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Sample records for carbon nanotube composite

  1. Carbon nanotube composite materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Bryan, Gregory; Skinner, Jack L; Vance, Andrew; Yang, Elaine Lai; Zifer, Thomas

    2015-03-24

    A material consisting essentially of a vinyl thermoplastic polymer, un-functionalized carbon nanotubes and hydroxylated carbon nanotubes dissolved in a solvent. Un-functionalized carbon nanotube concentrations up to 30 wt % and hydroxylated carbon nanotube concentrations up to 40 wt % can be used with even small concentrations of each (less than 2 wt %) useful in producing enhanced conductivity properties of formed thin films.

  2. Carbon nanotube-polymer composite actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gennett, Thomas; Raffaelle, Ryne P.; Landi, Brian J.; Heben, Michael J.

    2008-04-22

    The present invention discloses a carbon nanotube (SWNT)-polymer composite actuator and method to make such actuator. A series of uniform composites was prepared by dispersing purified single wall nanotubes with varying weight percents into a polymer matrix, followed by solution casting. The resulting nanotube-polymer composite was then successfully used to form a nanotube polymer actuator.

  3. LDRD final report on carbon nanotube composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cahill, P.A.; Rand, P.B.

    1997-04-01

    Carbon nanotubes and their composites were examined using computational and experimental techniques in order to modify the mechanical and electrical properties of resins. Single walled nanotubes were the focus of the first year effort; however, sufficient quantities of high purity single walled nanotubes could not be obtained for mechanical property investigations. The unusually high electrical conductivity of composites loaded with <1% of multiwalled nanotubes is useful, and is the focus of continuing, externally funded, research.

  4. Carbon nanotube suspensions, dispersions, & composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Trevor John

    Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) are amazing structures that hold the potential to revolutionize many areas of scientific research. CNTs can be behave both as semiconductors and metals, can be grown in highly ordered arrays and patterns or in random orientation, and can be comprised of one graphene cylinder (single wall nanotube, SWNT) or several concentric graphene cylinders (multi-wall nanotube, MWNT). Although these structures are usually only a few nanometers wide, they can be grown up to centimeter lengths, and in massive quantities. CNTs can be produced in a variety of processes ranging from repeated combustion of organic material such as dried grass, arc-discharge with graphite electrodes, laser ablation of a graphitic target, to sophisticated chemical vapor deposition (CVD) techniques. CNTs are stronger than steel but lighter than aluminum, and can be more conductive than copper or semiconducting like silicon. This variety of properties has been matched by the wide variety of applications that have been developed for CNTs. Many of these applications have been limited by the inability of researchers to tame these structures, and incorporating CNTs into existing technologies can be exceedingly difficult and prohibitively expensive. It is therefore the aim of the current study to develop strategies for the solution processing and deposition of CNTs and CNT-composites, which will enable the use of CNTs in existing and emerging technologies. CNTs are not easily suspended in polar solvents and are extremely hydrophobic materials, which has limited much of the solution processing to organic solvents, which also cannot afford high quality dispersions of CNTs. The current study has developed a variety of aqueous CNT solutions that employ surfactants, water-soluble polymers, or both to create suspensions of CNTs. These CNT 'ink' solutions were deposited with a variety of techniques that have afforded many interesting structures, both randomly oriented as well as highly

  5. Carbon Nanotube Composites: Strongest Engineering Material Ever?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayeaux, Brian; Nikolaev, Pavel; Proft, William; Nicholson, Leonard S. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The primary goal of the carbon nanotube project at Johnson Space Center (JSC) is to fabricate structural materials with a much higher strength-to-weight ratio than any engineered material today, Single-wall nanotubes present extraordinary mechanical properties along with new challenges for materials processing. Our project includes nanotube production, characterization, purification, and incorporation into applications studies. Now is the time to move from studying individual nanotubes to applications work. Current research at JSC focuses on structural polymeric materials to attempt to lower the weight of spacecraft necessary for interplanetary missions. These nanoscale fibers present unique new challenges to composites engineers. Preliminary studies show good nanotube dispersion and wetting by the epoxy materials. Results of tensile strength tests will also be reported. Other applications of nanotubes are also of interest for energy storage, gas storage, nanoelectronics, field emission, and biomedical uses.

  6. Carbon Nanotubes Reinforced Composites for Biomedical Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Wei Wang; Yuhe Zhu; Susan Liao; Jiajia Li

    2014-01-01

    This review paper reported carbon nanotubes reinforced composites for biomedical applications. Several studies have found enhancement in the mechanical properties of CNTs-based reinforced composites by the addition of CNTs. CNTs reinforced composites have been intensively investigated for many aspects of life, especially being made for biomedical applications. The review introduced fabrication of CNTs reinforced composites (CNTs reinforced metal matrix composites, CNTs reinforced polymer matr...

  7. Pulsed laser deposition of carbon nanotube and polystyrene-carbon nanotube composite thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stramel, A. A.; Gupta, M. C.; Lee, H. R.; Yu, J.; Edwards, W. C.

    2010-12-01

    In this work, we report on the fabrication of carbon nanotube thin films via pulsed laser deposition using a pulsed, diode pumped, Tm:Ho:LuLF laser with 2 μm wavelength. The thin films were deposited on silicon substrates using pure carbon nanotube targets and polystyrene-carbon nanotube composite targets. Raman spectra, scanning electron micrographs, and transmission electron micrographs show that carbon nanotubes are present in the deposited thin films, and that the pulsed laser deposition process causes minimal degradation to the quality of the nanotubes when using pure carbon nanotube targets.

  8. Carbon nanotubes reinforced composites for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Zhu, Yuhe; Liao, Susan; Li, Jiajia

    2014-01-01

    This review paper reported carbon nanotubes reinforced composites for biomedical applications. Several studies have found enhancement in the mechanical properties of CNTs-based reinforced composites by the addition of CNTs. CNTs reinforced composites have been intensively investigated for many aspects of life, especially being made for biomedical applications. The review introduced fabrication of CNTs reinforced composites (CNTs reinforced metal matrix composites, CNTs reinforced polymer matrix composites, and CNTs reinforced ceramic matrix composites), their mechanical properties, cell experiments in vitro, and biocompatibility tests in vivo.

  9. Carbon Nanotubes Reinforced Composites for Biomedical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This review paper reported carbon nanotubes reinforced composites for biomedical applications. Several studies have found enhancement in the mechanical properties of CNTs-based reinforced composites by the addition of CNTs. CNTs reinforced composites have been intensively investigated for many aspects of life, especially being made for biomedical applications. The review introduced fabrication of CNTs reinforced composites (CNTs reinforced metal matrix composites, CNTs reinforced polymer matrix composites, and CNTs reinforced ceramic matrix composites, their mechanical properties, cell experiments in vitro, and biocompatibility tests in vivo.

  10. Synthesis of Carbon Nanotube (CNT Composite Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dusan Losic

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes are attractive approach for designing of new membranes for advanced molecular separation because of their unique transport properties and ability to mimic biological protein channels. In this work the synthetic approach for fabrication of carbon nanotubes (CNTs composite membranes is presented. The method is based on growth of multi walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT using chemical vapour deposition (CVD on the template of nanoporous alumina (PA membranes. The influence of experimental conditions including carbon precursor, temperature, deposition time, and PA template on CNT growth process and quality of fabricated membranes was investigated. The synthesis of CNT/PA composites with controllable nanotube dimensions such as diameters (30–150 nm, and thickness (5–100 µm, was demonstrated. The chemical composition and morphological characteristics of fabricated CNT/PA composite membranes were investigated by various characterisation techniques including scanning electron microscopy (SEM, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDXS, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM and x-ray diffraction (XRD. Transport properties of prepared membranes were explored by diffusion of dye (Rose Bengal used as model of hydrophilic transport molecule.

  11. Computational Nanomechanics of Carbon Nanotubes and Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Wei, Chenyu; Cho, Kyeongjae; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Nanomechanics of individual carbon and boron-nitride nanotubes and their application as reinforcing fibers in polymer composites has been reviewed with interplay of theoretical modeling, computer simulations and experimental observations. The emphasis in this work is on elucidating the multi-length scales of the problems involved, and of different simulation techniques that are needed to address specific characteristics of individual nanotubes and nanotube polymer-matrix interfaces. Classical molecular dynamics simulations are shown to be sufficient to describe the generic behavior such as strength and stiffness modulus but are inadequate to describe elastic limit and nature of plastic buckling at large strength. Quantum molecular dynamics simulations are shown to bring out explicit atomic nature dependent behavior of these nanoscale materials objects that are not accessible either via continuum mechanics based descriptions or through classical molecular dynamics based simulations. As examples, we discus local plastic collapse of carbon nanotubes under axial compression and anisotropic plastic buckling of boron-nitride nanotubes. Dependence of the yield strain on the strain rate is addressed through temperature dependent simulations, a transition-state-theory based model of the strain as a function of strain rate and simulation temperature is presented, and in all cases extensive comparisons are made with experimental observations. Mechanical properties of nanotube-polymer composite materials are simulated with diverse nanotube-polymer interface structures (with van der Waals interaction). The atomistic mechanisms of the interface toughening for optimal load transfer through recycling, high-thermal expansion and diffusion coefficient composite formation above glass transition temperature, and enhancement of Young's modulus on addition of nanotubes to polymer are discussed and compared with experimental observations.

  12. Hybrid Composite of Polyaniline Containing Carbon Nanotube

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Carbon nanotube-polyaniline hybrid material was synthesized by emulsion polymerization in-situ. The morphology of hybrid material was studied by TEM and X-ray diffraction. The conductivity of nanocomposite increases with the increasing of carbon nanotube content because of the new conductivity passageways formed by carbon nanotubes.

  13. Transport Properties of Carbon-Nanotube/Cement Composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Han, B.; Yang, Z.; Shi, X.; Yu, X.

    2012-01-01

    This paper preliminarily investigates the general transport properties (i.e., water sorptivity, water permeability, and gas permeability) of carbon-nanotube/cement composites. Carboxyl multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) are dispersed into cement mortar to fabricate the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) rei

  14. Carbon nanotube integrated multifunctional multiscale composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu Jingjing; Zhang, Chuck; Wang, Ben; Liang, Richard [High-Performance Materials Institute, Department of Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, Florida A and M University-Florida State University College of Engineering, 2525 Pottsdamer Street, Tallahassee, FL 32310-6046 (United States)

    2007-07-11

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) demonstrate extraordinary properties and show great promise in enhancing out-of-plane properties of traditional polymer composites and enabling functionality, but current manufacturing challenges hinder the realization of their potential. This paper presents a method to fabricate multifunctional multiscale composites through an effective infiltration-based vacuum-assisted resin transfer moulding (VARTM) process. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) were infused through and between glass-fibre tows along the through-thickness direction. Both pristine and functionalized MWNTs were used in fabricating multiscale glass-fibre-reinforced epoxy composites. It was demonstrated that the mechanical properties of multiscale composites were remarkably enhanced, especially in the functionalized MWNT multiscale composites. With only 1 wt% loading of functionalized MWNTs, tensile strength was increased by 14% and Young's modulus by 20%, in comparison with conventional fibre-reinforced composites. Moreover, the shear strength and short-beam modulus were increased by 5% and 8%, respectively, indicating the improved inter-laminar properties. The strain-stress tests also suggested noticeable enhancement in toughness. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) characterization confirmed an enhanced interfacial bonding when functionalized MWNTs were integrated into epoxy/glass-fibre composites. The coefficient thermal expansion (CTE) of functionalized nanocomposites indicated a reduction of 25.2% compared with epoxy/glass-fibre composites. The desired improvement of electrical conductivities was also achieved. The multiscale composites indicated a way to leverage the benefits of CNTs and opened up new opportunities for high-performance multifunctional multiscale composites.

  15. Carbon nanotube integrated multifunctional multiscale composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Jingjing; Zhang, Chuck; Wang, Ben; Liang, Richard

    2007-07-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) demonstrate extraordinary properties and show great promise in enhancing out-of-plane properties of traditional polymer composites and enabling functionality, but current manufacturing challenges hinder the realization of their potential. This paper presents a method to fabricate multifunctional multiscale composites through an effective infiltration-based vacuum-assisted resin transfer moulding (VARTM) process. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) were infused through and between glass-fibre tows along the through-thickness direction. Both pristine and functionalized MWNTs were used in fabricating multiscale glass-fibre-reinforced epoxy composites. It was demonstrated that the mechanical properties of multiscale composites were remarkably enhanced, especially in the functionalized MWNT multiscale composites. With only 1 wt% loading of functionalized MWNTs, tensile strength was increased by 14% and Young's modulus by 20%, in comparison with conventional fibre-reinforced composites. Moreover, the shear strength and short-beam modulus were increased by 5% and 8%, respectively, indicating the improved inter-laminar properties. The strain-stress tests also suggested noticeable enhancement in toughness. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) characterization confirmed an enhanced interfacial bonding when functionalized MWNTs were integrated into epoxy/glass-fibre composites. The coefficient thermal expansion (CTE) of functionalized nanocomposites indicated a reduction of 25.2% compared with epoxy/glass-fibre composites. The desired improvement of electrical conductivities was also achieved. The multiscale composites indicated a way to leverage the benefits of CNTs and opened up new opportunities for high-performance multifunctional multiscale composites.

  16. Multifunctional Carbon Nanotube Fiber Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    coagulant. The second process (patent pending) is novel in that it directly results polymer-free nanotube fibers without using a super acid spinning...chemical and electrochemical stability, hydrophobicity and viscosity . The generic structure, chemical name and abbreviations for the most common ions...modification procedure involved the electrochemical infiltration of small amounts of the polypyrrole/p-toluene sulphonate (PPy/PTS) conducting polymer

  17. Modification of carbon nanotubes and synthesis of polymeric composites involving the nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badamshina, E R; Gafurova, M P; Estrin, Yakov I [Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Chernogolovka, Moscow Region (Russian Federation)

    2010-12-29

    The results of studies, mainly published in recent years, on modification of carbon nanotubes and design of composites with these nanotubes for the manufacture of new-generation materials are generalized and analyzed. The methods of modification of the nanotubes by low- and high-molecular compounds and methods of polymer modification by carbon nanotubes are considered. Data on the properties of modified nanotubes are presented. The current and potential applications of materials based on the nanotubes are indicated.

  18. Fermentation based carbon nanotube multifunctional bionic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentini, Luca; Bon, Silvia Bittolo; Signetti, Stefano; Tripathi, Manoj; Iacob, Erica; Pugno, Nicola M.

    2016-06-01

    The exploitation of the processes used by microorganisms to digest nutrients for their growth can be a viable method for the formation of a wide range of so called biogenic materials that have unique properties that are not produced by abiotic processes. Here we produced living hybrid materials by giving to unicellular organisms the nutrient to grow. Based on bread fermentation, a bionic composite made of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and a single-cell fungi, the Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast extract, was prepared by fermentation of such microorganisms at room temperature. Scanning electron microscopy analysis suggests that the CNTs were internalized by the cell after fermentation bridging the cells. Tensile tests on dried composite films have been rationalized in terms of a CNT cell bridging mechanism where the strongly enhanced strength of the composite is governed by the adhesion energy between the bridging carbon nanotubes and the matrix. The addition of CNTs also significantly improved the electrical conductivity along with a higher photoconductive activity. The proposed process could lead to the development of more complex and interactive structures programmed to self-assemble into specific patterns, such as those on strain or light sensors that could sense damage or convert light stimulus in an electrical signal.

  19. Compositions and methods for cancer treatment using targeted carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, Jr., Roger G.; Resasco, Daniel E.; Neves, Luis Filipe Ferreira

    2016-11-29

    Compositions for detecting and/or destroying cancer tumors and/or cancer cells via photodynamic therapy are disclosed, as well as methods of use thereof. The compositions comprise a linking protein or peptide attached to or otherwise physically associated with a carbon nanotube to form a targeted protein-carbon nanotube complex.

  20. Thermal Conductivity of Carbon Nanotube Composite Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Quoc; Cruden, Brett A.; Cassell, Alan M.; Walker, Megan D.; Koehne, Jessica E.; Meyyappan, M.; Li, Jun; Yang, Cary Y.

    2004-01-01

    State-of-the-art ICs for microprocessors routinely dissipate power densities on the order of 50 W/sq cm. This large power is due to the localized heating of ICs operating at high frequencies, and must be managed for future high-frequency microelectronic applications. Our approach involves finding new and efficient thermally conductive materials. Exploiting carbon nanotube (CNT) films and composites for their superior axial thermal conductance properties has the potential for such an application requiring efficient heat transfer. In this work, we present thermal contact resistance measurement results for CNT and CNT-Cu composite films. It is shown that Cu-filled CNT arrays enhance thermal conductance when compared to as-grown CNT arrays. Furthermore, the CNT-Cu composite material provides a mechanically robust alternative to current IC packaging technology.

  1. Processing and Characterization of Carbon Nanotube Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Can, Roberto J.; Grimsley, Brian W.; Czabaj, Michael W.; Siochi, Emilie J.; Hull, Brandon

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in the synthesis of large-scale quantities of carbon nanotubes (CNT) have provided the opportunity to study the mechanical properties of polymer matrix composites using these novel materials as reinforcement. Nanocomp Technologies, Inc. currently supplies large sheets with dimensions up to 122 cm x 244 cm containing both single-wall and few-wall CNTs. The tubes are approximately 1 mm in length with diameters ranging from 8 to 12 nm. In the present study being conducted at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC), single and multiple layers of CNT sheets were infused or coated with various polymer solutions that included commercial toughened-epoxies and bismaleimides, as well as a LaRC developed polyimide. The resulting CNT composites were tested in tension using a modified version of ASTM D882-12 to determine their strength and modulus values. The effects of solvent treatment and mechanical elongation/alignment of the CNT sheets on the tensile performance of the composite were determined. Thin composites (around 50 wt% CNT) fabricated from acetone condensed and elongated CNT sheets with either a BMI or polyimide resin solution exhibited specific tensile moduli approaching that of toughened epoxy/ IM7 carbon fiber unidirectional composites.

  2. Carbon nanotube polymer composition and devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gao; Johnson, Stephen; Kerr, John B.; Minor, Andrew M.; Mao, Samuel S.

    2011-06-14

    A thin film device and compound having an anode, a cathode, and at least one light emitting layer between the anode and cathode, the at least one light emitting layer having at least one carbon nanotube and a conductive polymer.

  3. Fracture of Carbon Nanotube - Amorphous Carbon Composites: Molecular Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Benjamin D.; Wise, Kristopher E.; Odegard, Gregory M.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are promising candidates for use as reinforcements in next generation structural composite materials because of their extremely high specific stiffness and strength. They cannot, however, be viewed as simple replacements for carbon fibers because there are key differences between these materials in areas such as handling, processing, and matrix design. It is impossible to know for certain that CNT composites will represent a significant advance over carbon fiber composites before these various factors have been optimized, which is an extremely costly and time intensive process. This work attempts to place an upper bound on CNT composite mechanical properties by performing molecular dynamics simulations on idealized model systems with a reactive forcefield that permits modeling of both elastic deformations and fracture. Amorphous carbon (AC) was chosen for the matrix material in this work because of its structural simplicity and physical compatibility with the CNT fillers. It is also much stiffer and stronger than typical engineering polymer matrices. Three different arrangements of CNTs in the simulation cell have been investigated: a single-wall nanotube (SWNT) array, a multi-wall nanotube (MWNT) array, and a SWNT bundle system. The SWNT and MWNT array systems are clearly idealizations, but the SWNT bundle system is a step closer to real systems in which individual tubes aggregate into large assemblies. The effect of chemical crosslinking on composite properties is modeled by adding bonds between the CNTs and AC. The balance between weakening the CNTs and improving fiber-matrix load transfer is explored by systematically varying the extent of crosslinking. It is, of course, impossible to capture the full range of deformation and fracture processes that occur in real materials with even the largest atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. With this limitation in mind, the simulation results reported here provide a plausible upper limit on

  4. Carbon nanotube-polymer composites manufacture, properties, and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Grady, Brian P

    2011-01-01

    The accessible compendium of polymers in carbon nanotubes (CNTs) Carbon nanotubes (CNTs)-extremely thin tubes only a few nanometers in diameter but able to attain lengths thousands of times greater-are prime candidates for use in the development of polymer composite materials. Bringing together thousands of disparate research works, Carbon Nanotube-Polymer Composites: Manufacture, Properties, and Applications covers CNT-polymers from synthesis to potential applications, presenting the basic science and engineering of this dynamic and complex area in an accessible, readable way. Desi

  5. NARloy-Z-Carbon Nanotube Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Biliyar N.

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: (1) NARloy-Z (Cu-3%Ag-0.5%Zr) is the state of the art, high thermal conductivity structural alloy used for making liquid rocket engine main combustion chamber liner. It has a Thermal conductivity approx 80% of pure copper. (2) Improving the thermal conductivity of NARloy-Z will help to improve the heat transfer efficiency of combustion chamber. (3)Will also help to reduce the propulsion system mass and increase performance. It will also increases thrust to weight ratio. (4) Improving heat transfer helps to design and build better thermal management systems for nuclear propulsion and other applications. Can Carbon nanotubes (CNT) help to improve the thermal conductivity (TC)of NARloy-Z? (1)CNT's have TC of approx 20X that of copper (2) 5vol% CNT could potentially double the TC of NARloy-Z if properly aligned (3) Improvement will be less if CNT s are randomly distributed, provided there is a good thermal bond between CNT and matrix. Prior research has shown poor results (1) No TC improvement in the copper-CNT composite reported (2)Reported values are typically lower (3) Attributed to high contact thermal resistance between CNT and Cu matrix (4)Results suggest that a bonding material between CNT and copper matrix is required to lower the contact thermal resistance It is hypothesized that Zr in NARloy-Z could act as a bonding agent to lower the contact thermal resistance between CNT and matrix.

  6. Improved Composites Using Crosslinked, Surface-Modified Carbon Nanotube Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, James Stewart

    2014-01-01

    Individual carbon nanotubes (CNTs) exhibit exceptional tensile strength and stiffness; however, these properties have not translated well to the macroscopic scale. Premature failure of bulk CNT materials under tensile loading occurs due to the relatively weak frictional forces between adjacent CNTs, leading to poor load transfer through the material. When used in polymer matrix composites (PMCs), the weak nanotube-matrix interaction leads to the CNTs providing less than optimal reinforcement.Our group is examining the use of covalent crosslinking and surface modification as a means to improve the tensile properties of PMCs containing carbon nanotubes. Sheet material comprised of unaligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) was used as a drop-in replacement for carbon fiber in the composites. A variety of post-processing methods have been examined for covalently crosslinking the CNTs to overcome the weak inter-nanotube shear interactions, resulting in improved tensile strength and modulus for the bulk sheet material. Residual functional groups from the crosslinking chemistry may have the added benefit of improving the nanotube-matrix interaction. Composites prepared using these crosslinked, surface-modified nanotube sheet materials exhibit superior tensile properties to composites using the as received CNT sheet material.

  7. Carbon nanotube and conducting polymer composites for supercapacitors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chuang Peng; Shengwen Zhang; Daniel Jewell; George Z. Chen

    2008-01-01

    Composites of carbon nanotubes and conducting polymers can be prepared via chemical synthesis, electrochemical deposition on pre-formed carbon nanotube electrodes, or by electrochemical co-deposition. The composites combine the large pseudocapacitance of the conducting polymers with the fast charging/discharging double-layer capacitance and excellent mechanical properties of the carbon nanotubes. The electrochemically co-deposited composites are the most homogeneous and show an unusual interaction between thepolymer and nanotubes, giving rise to a strengthened electron delocalisation and conjugation along the polymer chains. As a result they exhibit excellent electrochemical charge storage properties and fast charge/discharge switching, making them promising electrode mate-rials for high power supercapacitors.

  8. Multifunctional Hybrid Carbon Nanotube/Carbon Fiber Polymer Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jin Ho; Cano, Roberto J.; Ratcliffe, James G.; Luong, Hoa; Grimsley, Brian W.; Siochi, Emilie J.

    2016-01-01

    For aircraft primary structures, carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites possess many advantages over conventional aluminum alloys due to their light weight, higher strengthand stiffness-to-weight ratio, and low life-cycle maintenance costs. However, the relatively low electrical and thermal conductivities of CFRP composites fail to provide structural safety in certain operational conditions such as lightning strikes. Despite several attempts to solve these issues with the addition of carbon nanotubes (CNT) into polymer matrices, and/or by interleaving CNT sheets between conventional carbon fiber (CF) composite layers, there are still interfacial problems that exist between CNTs (or CF) and the resin. In this study, hybrid CNT/CF polymer composites were fabricated by interleaving layers of CNT sheets with Hexcel® IM7/8852 prepreg. Resin concentrations from 1 wt% to 50 wt% were used to infuse the CNT sheets prior to composite fabrication. The interlaminar properties of the resulting hybrid composites were characterized by mode I and II fracture toughness testing (double cantilever beam and end-notched flexure test). Fractographical analysis was performed to study the effect of resin concentration. In addition, multi-directional physical properties like thermal conductivity of the orthotropic hybrid polymer composite were evaluated. Interleaving CNT sheets significantly improved the in-plane (axial and perpendicular direction of CF alignment) thermal conductivity of the hybrid composite laminates by 50 - 400%.

  9. Functionalized Carbon Nanotube-Polymer Composites and Interactions with Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera, Enrique V. (Inventor); Wilkins, Richard (Inventor); Shofner, Meisha (Inventor); Pulikkathara, Merlyn X. (Inventor); Vaidyanathan, Ranjii (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention involves the interaction of radiation with functionalized carbon nanotubes that have been incorporated into various host materials, particularly polymeric ones. The present invention is directed to chemistries, methods, and apparatuses which exploit this type of radiation interaction, and to the materials which result from such interactions. The present invention is also directed toward the time dependent behavior of functionalized carbon nanotubes in such composite systems.

  10. Multifunctional composites using reinforced laminae with carbon-nanotube forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veedu, Vinod P.; Cao, Anyuan; Li, Xuesong; Ma, Kougen; Soldano, Caterina; Kar, Swastik; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Ghasemi-Nejhad, Mehrdad N.

    2006-06-01

    Traditional fibre-reinforced composite materials with excellent in-plane properties fare poorly when out-of-plane through-thickness properties are important. Composite architectures with fibres designed orthogonal to the two-dimensional (2D) layout in traditional composites could alleviate this weakness in the transverse direction, but all of the efforts so far have only produced limited success. Here, we unveil an approach to the 3D composite challenge, without altering the 2D stack design, on the basis of the concept of interlaminar carbon-nanotube forests that would provide enhanced multifunctional properties along the thickness direction. The carbon-nanotube forests allow the fastening of adjacent plies in the 3D composite. We grow multiwalled carbon nanotubes on the surface of micro-fibre fabric cloth layouts, normal to the fibre lengths, resulting in a 3D effect between plies under loading. These nanotube-coated fabric cloths serve as building blocks for the multilayered 3D composites, with the nanotube forests providing much-needed interlaminar strength and toughness under various loading conditions. For the fabricated 3D composites with nanotube forests, we demonstrate remarkable improvements in the interlaminar fracture toughness, hardness, delamination resistance, in-plane mechanical properties, damping, thermoelastic behaviour, and thermal and electrical conductivities making these structures truly multifunctional.

  11. Multiscale carbon nanotube-carbon fiber reinforcement for advanced epoxy composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekyarova, E; Thostenson, E T; Yu, A; Kim, H; Gao, J; Tang, J; Hahn, H T; Chou, T-W; Itkis, M E; Haddon, R C

    2007-03-27

    We report an approach to the development of advanced structural composites based on engineered multiscale carbon nanotube-carbon fiber reinforcement. Electrophoresis was utilized for the selective deposition of multi- and single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on woven carbon fabric. The CNT-coated carbon fabric panels were subsequently infiltrated with epoxy resin using vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) to fabricate multiscale hybrid composites in which the nanotubes were completely integrated into the fiber bundles and reinforced the matrix-rich regions. The carbon nanotube/carbon fabric/epoxy composites showed approximately 30% enhancement of the interlaminar shear strength as compared to that of carbon fiber/epoxy composites without carbon nanotubes and demonstrate significantly improved out-of-plane electrical conductivity.

  12. Mechanically stiff, electrically conductive composites of polymers and carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worsley, Marcus A.; Kucheyev, Sergei O.; Baumann, Theodore F.; Kuntz, Joshua D.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.; Hamza, Alex V.

    2015-07-21

    Using SWNT-CA as scaffolds to fabricate stiff, highly conductive polymer (PDMS) composites. The SWNT-CA is immersing in a polymer resin to produce a SWNT-CA infiltrated with a polymer resin. The SWNT-CA infiltrated with a polymer resin is cured to produce the stiff and electrically conductive composite of carbon nanotube aerogel and polymer.

  13. Carbon Nanotube Composites for Electronic Packaging Applications: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavanya Aryasomayajula

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Composite engineering comprises of metal matrix composites. They have high strength-weight ratio, better stiffness, economical production, and ease of availability of raw materials. The discovery of carbon nanotubes has opened new possibilities to face challenges better. Carbon Nanotubes are known for their high mechanical strength, excellent thermal and electrical properties. Recent research has made progress in fabricating carbon nanotube metal matrix and polymer-based composites. The methods of fabrication of these composites, their properties and possible applications restricted to the field of electronic packaging have been discussed in this paper. Experimental and theoretical calculations have shown improved mechanical and physical properties like tensile stress, toughness, and improved electrical and thermal properties. They have also demonstrated the ease of production of the composites and their adaptability as one can tailor their properties as per the requirement. This paper reviews work reported on fabricating and characterizing carbon- nanotube-based metal matrix and polymer composites. The focus of this paper is mainly to review the importance of these composites in the field of electronics packaging.

  14. Gas Composition Sensing Using Carbon Nanotube Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Meyyappan, Meyya

    2012-01-01

    This innovation is a lightweight, small sensor for inert gases that consumes a relatively small amount of power and provides measurements that are as accurate as conventional approaches. The sensing approach is based on generating an electrical discharge and measuring the specific gas breakdown voltage associated with each gas present in a sample. An array of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in a substrate is connected to a variable-pulse voltage source. The CNT tips are spaced appropriately from the second electrode maintained at a constant voltage. A sequence of voltage pulses is applied and a pulse discharge breakdown threshold voltage is estimated for one or more gas components, from an analysis of the current-voltage characteristics. Each estimated pulse discharge breakdown threshold voltage is compared with known threshold voltages for candidate gas components to estimate whether at least one candidate gas component is present in the gas. The procedure can be repeated at higher pulse voltages to estimate a pulse discharge breakdown threshold voltage for a second component present in the gas. The CNTs in the gas sensor have a sharp (low radius of curvature) tip; they are preferably multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) or carbon nanofibers (CNFs), to generate high-strength electrical fields adjacent to the tips for breakdown of the gas components with lower voltage application and generation of high current. The sensor system can provide a high-sensitivity, low-power-consumption tool that is very specific for identification of one or more gas components. The sensor can be multiplexed to measure current from multiple CNT arrays for simultaneous detection of several gas components.

  15. High Volume Fraction Carbon Nanotube Composites for Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siochi, E. J.; Kim, J.-W.; Sauti, G.; Cano, R. J.; Wincheski, R. A.; Ratcliffe, J. G.; Czabaj, M.

    2016-01-01

    Reported mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) at the nanoscale suggest their potential to enable significantly lighter structures of interest for space applications. However, their utility depends on the retention of these properties in bulk material formats that permit practical fabrication of large structures. This presentation summarizes recent progress made to produce carbon nanotube composites with specific tensile properties that begin to rival those of carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites. CNT content in these nanocomposites was greater than 70% by weight. Tested nanocomposite specimens were fabricated from kilometers or tens of square meters of CNT, depending on the starting material format. Processing methods to yield these results, and characterization and testing to evaluate the performance of these composites will be discussed. The final objective is the demonstration of a CNT composite overwrapped pressure vessel to be flight tested in the Fall of 2016.

  16. Homogeneous Carbon Nanotube/Carbon Composites Prepared by Catalyzed Carbonization Approach at Low Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongjiang Li

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We synthesize carbon nanotube (CNT/carbon composite using catalyzed carbonization of CNT/Epoxy Resin composite at a fairly low temperature of about 400∘C. The microstructure of the composite is characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM, transmission electron microscope (TEM, and X-ray diffraction (XRD. The results indicate that CNTs and pyrolytic carbon blend well with each other. Pyrolytic carbon mainly stays in an amorphous state, with some of it forming crystalline structures. The catalyst has the effect of eliminating the interstices in the composites. Remarkable increases in thermal and electrical conductivity are also reported.

  17. Potential release scenarios for carbon nanotubes used in composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nowack, B.; David, R.M.; Fissan, H.; Morris, H.; Shatkin, J.A.; Stintz, M.; Zepp, R.; Brouwer, D.

    2013-01-01

    The expected widespread use of carbon nanotube (CNT)-composites in consumer products calls for an assessment of the possible release and exposure to workers, consumers and the environment. Release of CNTs may occur at all steps in the life cycle of products, but to date only limited information is a

  18. Structural and biological properties of carbon nanotube composite films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narayan, Roger J. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332-0245 (United States)]. E-mail: roger.narayan@mse.gatech.edu; Berry, C.J. [Environmental Biotechnology Section, Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Brigmon, R.L. [Environmental Biotechnology Section, Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

    2005-11-20

    Carbon nanotube composite films have been developed that exhibit unusual structural and biological properties. These novel materials have been created by pulsed laser ablation of graphite and bombardment of nitrogen ions at temperatures between 600 and 700 deg. C. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy and radial distribution function analysis demonstrate that this material consists of sp{sup 2}-bonded concentric ribbons that are wrapped approximately 15 deg. normal to the silicon substrate. The interlayer order in this material extends to approximately 15-30 A. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy data suggest that this material is predominantly trigonally coordinated. The carbon nanotube composite structure results from the use of energetic ions, which allow for non-equilibrium growth of graphitic planes. In vitro testing has revealed significant antimicrobial activity of carbon nanotube composite films against Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus warneri colonization. Carbon nanotube composite films may be useful for inhibiting microorganism attachment and biofilm formation in hemodialysis catheters and other medical devices.

  19. Potential release scenarios for carbon nanotubes used in composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    The expected widespread use of carbon nanotube (CNT)-composites in consumer products calls for an assessment of the possible release and exposure to workers, consumers and the environment. Release of CNTs may occur at all steps in the life cycle of products, but to date only limi...

  20. Progress in Research on Carbon Nanotubes Reinforced Cementitious Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinghua Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available As one-dimensional (1D nanofiber, carbon nanotubes (CNTs have been widely used to improve the performance of nanocomposites due to their high strength, small dimensions, and remarkable physical properties. Progress in the field of CNTs presents a potential opportunity to enhance cementitious composites at the nanoscale. In this review, current research activities and key advances on multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs reinforced cementitious composites are summarized, including the effect of MWCNTs on modulus of elasticity, porosity, fracture, and mechanical and microstructure properties of cement-based composites. The issues about the improvement mechanisms, MWCNTs dispersion methods, and the major factors affecting the mechanical properties of composites are discussed. In addition, large-scale production methods of MWCNTs and the effects of CNTs on environment and health are also summarized.

  1. Enhanced graphitization of carbon around carbon nanotubes during the formation of carbon nanotube/graphite composites by pyrolysis of carbon nanotube/polyaniline composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Dong Hoon; Cha, Seung Il; Jeong, Yong Jin; Hong, Soon Hyung

    2013-11-01

    The carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are actively applied to the reinforcements for composite materials during last decade. One of the attempts is development of CNT/Carbon composites. Although there are some reports on the enhancement of mechanical properties by addition of CNTs in carbon or carbon fiber, it is far below the expectation. Considering the microstructure of carbon materials such as carbon fiber, the properties of them can be modified and enhanced by control of graphitization and alignment of graphene planes. In this study, enhanced graphitization of carbon has been observed the vicinity of CNTs during the pyrolysis of CNT/Polyaniline composites. As a result, novel types of composite, consisting of treading CNTs and coated graphite, can be fabricated. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy revealed a specific orientation relationship between the graphene layers and the CNTs, with an angle of 110 degrees between the layers and the CNT axis. The possibility of graphene alignment control in the carbon by the addition of CNTs is demonstrated.

  2. Release characteristics of selected carbon nanotube polymer composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are commonly used in polymer formulations to improve strength, conductivity, and other attributes. A developing concern is the potential for carbon nanotube polymer nanocomposites to release nanoparticles into the environment as the polymer ...

  3. Production and Characterization of Carbon Nanotubes and Nanotube-Based Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaev, Pavel; Arepalli, Sivaram; Holmes, William; Gorelik, Olga; Files, Brad; Scott, Carl; Santos, Beatrice; Mayeaux, Brian; Victor, Joe

    1999-01-01

    The Nobel Prize winning discovery of the Buckuball (C60) in 1985 at Rice University by a group including Dr. Richard Smalley led to the whole new class of carbon allotropes including fullerenes and nanotubes. Especially interesting from many viewpoints are single-walled carbon nanotubes, which structurally are like a single graphitic sheet wrapped around a cylinder and capped at the ends. This cylinders have diameter as small as 0.5 - 2 nm (1/100,000th the diameter of a human hair) and are as long as 0.1 - 1 mm. Nanotubes are really individual molecules and believed to be defect-free, leading to high tensile strength despite their low density. Additionally, these fibers exhibit electrical conductivity as high as copper, thermal conductivity as high as diamond, strength 100 times higher than steel at one-sixth the weight, and high strain to failure. Thus it is believed that developments in the field of nanotechnology will lead to stronger and lighter composite materials for next generation spacecraft. Lack of a bulk method of production is the primary reason nanotubes are not used widely today. Toward this goal JSC nanotube team is exploring three distinct production techniques: laser ablation, arc discharge and chemical vapor deposition (CVD, in collaboration with Rice University). In laser ablation technique high-power laser impinges on the piece of carbon containing small amount of catalyst, and nanotubes self-assemble from the resulting carbon vapor. In arc generator similar vapor is created in arc discharge between carbon electrodes with catalyst. In CVD method nanotubes grow at much lower temperature on small catalyst particles from carbon-containing feedstock gas (methane or carbon monoxide). As of now, laser ablation produces cleanest material, but mass yield is rather small. Arc discharge produces grams of material, but purity is low. CVD technique is still in baby steps, but preliminary results look promising, as well as perspective of scaling the process

  4. Multilayer Electroactive Polymer Composite Material Comprising Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ounaies, Zoubeida (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor); Harrison, Joycelyn S. (Inventor); Holloway, Nancy M. (Inventor); Draughon, Gregory K. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    An electroactive material comprises multiple layers of electroactive composite with each layer having unique dielectric, electrical and mechanical properties that define an electromechanical operation thereof when affected by an external stimulus. For example, each layer can be (i) a 2-phase composite made from a polymer with polarizable moieties and an effective amount of carbon nanotubes incorporated in the polymer for a predetermined electromechanical operation, or (ii) a 3-phase composite having the elements of the 2-phase composite and further including a third component of micro-sized to nano-sized particles of an electroactive ceramic incorporated in the polymer matrix.

  5. Preparation of carbon nanotube composite material with metal matrix by electroplating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AN Bai-gang; LI Li-xiang; Li Hong-xi

    2005-01-01

    It is demonstrated that the nickel can be deposited directly on the surface of carbon nanotubes without pre-sensitization by Sn2+ and Pd2+ in a watt bath containing suspended nanotubes by electroplating. The nickel is deposited as spherical nanoparticle on the nanotubes. By increasing reaction time, the carbon nanotube is fully coated with nickel. A probable model, which represents the formation process of carbon nanotube-nickel composites by electroplating, is presented. The results show that this method is efficient and simple for preparing carbon nanotube-metal composite.

  6. Damage detection in composite interfaces through carbon nanotube reinforcement

    OpenAIRE

    Bily, Mollie A.; Kwon, Young W.; Pollak, Randall D.

    2010-01-01

    Use of carbon nanotubes along composite interfaces was studied to both improve fracture strength and monitor interfacial damage progression. Both carbon fiber and E-glass fiber composites were manufactured with vinyl ester resin using vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding. First, the effects of single-step curing (i.e., co-curing) versus two-step curing (i.e., curing a new section to a previously cured section) was studied using Mode II fracture testing. The results showed the two-step cured...

  7. Wrapping and dispersion of multiwalled carbon nanotubes improves electrical conductivity of protein-nanotube composite biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voge, Christopher M; Johns, Jeremy; Raghavan, Mekhala; Morris, Michael D; Stegemann, Jan P

    2013-01-01

    Composites of extracellular matrix proteins reinforced with carbon nanotubes have the potential to be used as conductive biopolymers in a variety of biomaterial applications. In this study, the effect of functionalization and polymer wrapping on the dispersion of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) in aqueous media was examined. Carboxylated MWCNT were wrapped in either Pluronic(®) F127 or gelatin. Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed that covalent functionalization of the pristine nanotubes disrupted the carbon lattice and added carboxyl groups. Polymer and gelatin wrapping resulted in increased surface adsorbed oxygen and nitrogen, respectively. Wrapping also markedly increased the stability of MWCNT suspensions in water as measured by settling time and zeta potential, with Pluronic(®)-wrapped nanotubes showing the greatest effect. Treated MWCNT were used to make 3D collagen-fibrin-MWCNT composite materials. Carboxylated MWCNT resulted in a decrease in construct impedance by an order of magnitude, and wrapping with Pluronic(®) resulted in a further order of magnitude decrease. Functionalization and wrapping also were associated with maintenance of fibroblast function within protein-MWCNT materials. These data show that increased dispersion of nanotubes in protein-MWCNT composites leads to higher conductivity and improved cytocompatibility. Understanding how nanotubes interact with biological systems is important in enabling the development of new biomedical technologies.

  8. Fabrication of high thermal conductivity arrays of carbon nanotubes and their composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geohegan, David B [Knoxville, TN; Ivanov, Ilya N [Knoxville, TN; Puretzky, Alexander A [Knoxville, TN

    2010-07-27

    Methods and apparatus are described for fabrication of high thermal conductivity arrays of carbon nanotubes and their composites. A composition includes a vertically aligned nanotube array including a plurality of nanotubes characterized by a property across substantially all of the vertically aligned nanotube array. A method includes depositing a vertically aligned nanotube array that includes a plurality of nanotubes; and controlling a deposition rate of the vertically aligned nanotubes array as a function of an in situ monitored property of the plurality of nanotubes.

  9. Electrical and thermal percolation in carbon nanotube- polymer composites

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Byung-Wook

    2014-01-01

    Electrical and thermal properties of carbon-nanotube (CNT) /polymer composites were investigated through percolating behavior of conducting fillers in insulating matrix. Synthesis methodology has been found using a blend of solution processing, which was adapted to facilitate uniformly distributed CNTs in polymer matrix and consequently to contribute to percolation. The onset of percolation thresholds depending on aspect ratio of fillers were theoretically estimated by the excluded volume met...

  10. Water-soluble carbon nanotube compositions for drug delivery and medicinal applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tour, James M.; Lucente-Schultz, Rebecca; Leonard, Ashley; Kosynkin, Dmitry V.; Price, Brandi Katherine; Hudson, Jared L.; Conyers, Jr., Jodie L.; Moore, Valerie C.; Casscells, S. Ward; Myers, Jeffrey N.; Milas, Zvonimir L.; Mason, Kathy A.; Milas, Luka

    2014-07-22

    Compositions comprising a plurality of functionalized carbon nanotubes and at least one type of payload molecule are provided herein. The compositions are soluble in water and PBS in some embodiments. In certain embodiments, the payload molecules are insoluble in water. Methods are described for making the compositions and administering the compositions. An extended release formulation for paclitaxel utilizing functionalized carbon nanotubes is also described.

  11. Electrical conductivity improvement of aeronautical carbon fiber reinforced polyepoxy composites by insertion of carbon nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Lonjon, Antoine; Demont, Philippe; Dantras, Eric; Lacabanne, Colette

    2012-01-01

    International audience; An increase and homogenization of electrical conductivity is essential in epoxy carbon fiber laminar aeronautical composites. Dynamic conductivity measurements have shown a very poor transversal conductivity. Double wall carbon nanotubes have been introduced into the epoxy matrix to increase the electrical conductivity. The conductivity and the degree of dispersion of carbon nanotubes in epoxy matrix were evaluated. The epoxy matrix was filled with 0.4 wt.% of CNTs to ...

  12. Electroless plating Ni-P matrix composite coating reinforced by carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓福铭; 陈小华; 陈卫祥; 李文铸

    2004-01-01

    Ni-P matrix composite coating reinforced by carbon nanotubes (CNTs) was deposited by electroless plating. The most important factors that influence the content of carbon nanotubes in deposits, such as agitation, surfactant and carbon nanotubes concentration in the plating bath were investigated. The surface morphology, structure and properties of the Ni-P-CNTs coating were examined. It is found that the maximum content of carbon nanotubes in the deposits is independent of carbon nanotubes concentration in the plating bath when it is up to 5 mg/L. The test results show that the carbon nanotubes co-deposited do not change the structure of the Ni-P matrix of the composite coating, but greatly increase the hardness and wear resistance and decrease the friction coefficient of the Ni-PCNTs composite coating with increasing content of carbon nanotubes in deposits.

  13. On the elastic properties of carbon nanotube-based composites: modelling and characterization

    CERN Document Server

    Thostenson, E T

    2003-01-01

    The exceptional mechanical and physical properties observed for carbon nanotubes has stimulated the development of nanotube-based composite materials, but critical challenges exist before we can exploit these extraordinary nanoscale properties in a macroscopic composite. At the nanoscale, the structure of the carbon nanotube strongly influences the overall properties of the composite. The focus of this research is to develop a fundamental understanding of the structure/size influence of carbon nanotubes on the elastic properties of nanotube-based composites. Towards this end, the nanoscale structure and elastic properties of a model composite system of aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes embedded in a polystyrene matrix were characterized, and a micromechanical approach for modelling of short fibre composites was modified to account for the structure of the nanotube reinforcement to predict the elastic modulus of the nanocomposite as a function of the constituent properties, reinforcement geometry and nanot...

  14. Preparation of silver-carbon nanotubes composites with plasma electrochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoefft, Oliver; Lohmann, Lara; Olschewski, Mark; Endres, Frank

    2016-09-01

    Plasma electrochemistry is a powerful tool to generate free nanoparticles in aqueous solutions and especially in ionic liquids (ILs). Due to their very low vapour pressure, ionic liquids can be employed under vacuum conditions as fluid substrates or solvents. Thus, ionic liquids are well suitable electrolytes for plasma electrochemical processes delivering stable and homogeneous plasmas. We have shown that free copper and germanium nanoparticles can be obtained in ILs by applying a plasma as a mechanically contact-free electrode. Here we present our results using an argon plasma for the electrochemical synthesis of silver on pure and pre-treated multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium dicyanamide. For the pre-treatment of the MWCNTS we have used a dielectric barrier discharge plasma (DBD) at atmospheric pressure. For the untreated MWCNTs we have found a formation of free silver nanoparticles between, on and in the vicinity of the carbon nanotubes. In case of the plasma treated MWCNTs a silver-carbon nanotubes composite is formed. Thus, the treatment of the MWCNTs obviously has a great influence on the deposit. Therefore we additionally have investigated the influence of the DBD on the chemical composition of the MWCNTs surface with X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy.

  15. Modeling of carbon nanotubes, graphene and their composites

    CERN Document Server

    Silvestre, Nuno

    2014-01-01

    This book contains ten chapters, authored by world experts in the field of simulation at nano-scale and aims to demonstrate the potentialities of computational techniques to model the mechanical behavior of nano-materials, such as carbon nanotubes, graphene and their composites. A large part of the research currently being conducted in the fields of materials science and engineering mechanics is devoted to carbon nanotubes, graphene and their applications. In this process, computational modeling is a very attractive research tool due to the difficulties in manufacturing and testing of nano-materials. Both atomistic modeling methods, such as molecular mechanics and molecular dynamics, and continuum modeling methods are being intensively used. Continuum modeling offers significant advantages over atomistic modeling such as the reduced computational effort, the capability of modeling complex structures and bridging different analysis scales, thus enabling modeling from the nano- to the macro-scale. On the oth...

  16. New generation fiber reinforced polymer composites incorporating carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliman, Eslam

    The last five decades observed an increasing use of fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composites as alternative construction materials for aerospace and infrastructure. The high specific strength of FRP attracted its use as non-corrosive reinforcement. However, FRP materials were characterized with a relatively low ductility and low shear strength compared with steel reinforcement. On the other hand, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been introduced in the last decade as a material with minimal defect that is capable of increasing the mechanical properties of polymer matrices. This dissertation reports experimental investigations on the use of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) to produce a new generation of FRP composites. The experiments showed significant improvements in the flexure properties of the nanocomposite when functionalized MWCNTs were used. In addition, MWCNTs were used to produce FRP composites in order to examine static, dynamic, and creep behavior. The MWCNTs improved the off-axis tension, off-axis flexure, FRP lap shear joint responses. In addition, they reduced the creep of FRP-concrete interface, enhanced the fracture toughness, and altered the impact resistance significantly. In general, the MWCNTs are found to affect the behaviour of the FRP composites when matrix failure dominates the behaviour. The improvement in the mechanical response with the addition of low contents of MWCNTs would benefit many industrial and military applications such as strengthening structures using FRP composites, composite pipelines, aircrafts, and armoured vehicles.

  17. Process for derivatizing carbon nanotubes with diazonium species and compositions thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tour, James M. (Inventor); Bahr, Jeffrey L. (Inventor); Yang, Jiping (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Methods for the chemical modification of carbon nanotubes involve the derivatization of multi- and single-wall carbon nanotubes, including small diameter (ca. 0.7 nm) single-wall carbon nanotubes, with diazonium species. The method allows the chemical attachment of a variety of organic compounds to the side and ends of carbon nanotubes. These chemically modified nanotubes have applications in polymer composite materials, molecular electronic applications, and sensor devices. The methods of derivatization include electrochemical induced reactions, thermally induced reactions, and photochemically induced reactions. Moreover, when modified with suitable chemical groups, the derivatized nanotubes are chemically compatible with a polymer matrix, allowing transfer of the properties of the nanotubes (such as, mechanical strength or electrical conductivity) to the properties of the composite material as a whole. Furthermore, when modified with suitable chemical groups, the groups can be polymerized to form a polymer that includes carbon nanotubes.

  18. Dispersion of Carbon Nanotubes: Mixing, Sonication, Stabilization, and Composite Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugene M. Terentjev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Advances in functionality and reliability of carbon nanotube (CNT composite materials require careful formulation of processing methods to ultimately realize the desired properties. To date, controlled dispersion of CNTs in a solution or a composite matrix remains a challenge, due to the strong van der Waals binding energies associated with the CNT aggregates. There is also insufficiently defined correlation between the microstructure and the physical properties of the composite. Here, we offer a review of the dispersion processes of pristine (non-covalently functionalized CNTs in a solvent or a polymer solution. We summarize and adapt relevant theoretical analysis to guide the dispersion design and selection, from the processes of mixing/sonication, to the application of surfactants for stabilization, to the final testing of composite properties. The same approaches are expected to be also applicable to the fabrication of other composite materials involving homogeneously dispersed nanoparticles.

  19. Fabrication of aluminum matrix composite reinforced with carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    1.0 wt.% carbon nanotube (CNT) reinforced 2024A1 matrix composite was fabricated by cold isostatic press and subsequent hot extrusion techniques. The mechanical properties of the composite were measured by a tensile test. Meanwhile, the fracture surfaces were examined using field emission scanning electron microscopy. The experimental results show that CNTs are dispersed homogeneously in the composite and that the interfaces of the Al matrix and the CNT bond well. Although the tensile strength and the Young's modulus of the composite are enhanced markedly, the elongation does not decrease when compared with the matrix material fabricated under the same process. The reasons for the increments may be the extraordinary mechanical properties of CNTs, and the bridging and pulling-out role of CNTs in the Al matrix composite.

  20. Thermal property of regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene)/nanotube composites using modified single-walled carbon nanotubes via ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adhikari, A R [College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, State University of New York, Albany, NY 12203 (United States); Huang, M [College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, State University of New York, Albany, NY 12203 (United States); Bakhru, H [College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, State University of New York, Albany, NY 12203 (United States); Chipara, M [Department of Physics and Geology, University of Texas Pan American, Edinburg, TX 78541-2999 (United States); Ryu, C Y [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY 12180 (United States); Ajayan, P M [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy and Rensselaer Nanotechnology Center, NY 12180 (United States)

    2006-12-28

    The effects of radiation-induced modifications on the thermal stability and phase transition behaviour of composites made of 1% pristine or ion irradiated single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) are reported. Thermogravimetry analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Raman spectroscopy and electron spin resonance (ESR) were used to investigate the radiation-induced functionalization of carbon nanotubes and to assess the effect of ionizing radiation on the adhesion between macromolecular polymer and carbon nanotubes. Irradiation was used to introduce defects in a controlled way solely within pristine nanotubes before composite synthesis. The addition of irradiated SWNTs to a polymer matrix was found to enhance thermo-oxidative stability and phase transition behaviour. Further, ESR studies demonstrate the electronic interaction through charge transfer between filler and matrix. These results could have immense applications in nanotube composite processing. Based on the experimental data, a model for the interaction between polymeric chains and carbon nanotubes is proposed.

  1. A Study of Surface Modifications of Carbon Nanotubes on the Properties of Polyamide 66/Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Qiu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of surface modification of carbon nanotube on the properties of polyamide 66/multiwalled carbon nanotube composites have been investigated. Polyamide 66 (PA66 and multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT composites were prepared by melt mixing. The surfaces of MWCNTs were modified with acid- and amine-groups. Field emission scanning electron microscopy analyses revealed that amine-MWCNTs (D-MWCNTs dispersed better in the PA66 matrix than pristine- and acid-MWCNTs. However, an introduction of D-MWCNTs into PA66 matrix induced heterogeneous nucleation and affected the crystal growth process during the crystallization of PA66/MWCNT composites. Both nanoindentation and friction analyses were carried out in a study of the effect of the introduction of modified MWCNTs on both mechanical and friction properties of the composites. With the introduction of D-MWCNTs, both nanohardness and elastic modulus of the composites were significantly improved, but it was observed that the maximum depth, nanohardness, and elastic modulus of the composites showed no distinct change before and after a friction test. It is evident that PA66/D-MWCNT composites have the least friction coefficient of the PA66/MWCNT composites of all the approaches of carbon nanotube surface modification.

  2. Composite yarns of multiwalled carbon nanotubes with metallic electrical conductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randeniya, Lakshman K; Bendavid, Avi; Martin, Philip J; Tran, Canh-Dung

    2010-08-16

    Unique macrostructures known as spun carbon-nanotube fibers (CNT yarns) can be manufactured from vertically aligned forests of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). These yarns behave as semiconductors with room-temperature conductivities of about 5 x 10(2) S cm(-1). Their potential use as, for example, microelectrodes in medical implants, wires in microelectronics, or lightweight conductors in the aviation industry has hitherto been hampered by their insufficient electrical conductivity. In this Full Paper, the synthesis of metal-CNT composite yarns, which combine the unique properties of CNT yarns and nanocrystalline metals to obtain a new class of materials with enhanced electrical conductivity, is presented. The synthesis is achieved using a new technique, self-fuelled electrodeposition (SFED), which combines a metal reducing agent and an external circuit for transfer of electrons to the CNT surface, where the deposition of metal nanoparticles takes place. In particular, the Cu-CNT and Au-CNT composite yarns prepared by this method have metal-like electrical conductivities (2-3 x 10(5) S cm(-1)) and are mechanically robust against stringent tape tests. However, the tensile strengths of the composite yarns are 30-50% smaller than that of the unmodified CNT yarn. The SFED technique described here can also be used as a convenient means for the deposition of metal nanoparticles on solid electrode supports, such as conducting glass or carbon black, for catalytic applications.

  3. High Volume Fraction Carbon Nanotube Composites for Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siochi, Emilie J.; Kim, Jae-Woo; Sauti, Godfrey; Cano, Roberto J.; Wincheski, Russell A.; Ratcliffe, James G.; Czabaj, Michael; Jensen, Benjamin D.; Wise, Kristopher E.

    2015-01-01

    Reported nanoscale mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) suggest that their use may enable the fabrication of significantly lighter structures for use in space applications. To be useful in the fabrication of large structures, however, their attractive nanoscale properties must be retained as they are scaled up to bulk materials and converted into practically useful forms. Advances in CNT production have significantly increased the quantities available for use in manufacturing processes, but challenges remain with the retention of nanoscale properties in larger assemblies of CNTs. This work summarizes recent progress in producing carbon nanotube composites with tensile properties approaching those of carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites. These advances were achieved in nanocomposites with CNT content of 70% by weight. The processing methods explored to yield these CNT composite properties will be discussed, as will the characterization and test methods that were developed to provide insight into the factors that contribute to the enhanced tensile properties. Technology maturation was guided by parallel advancements in computational modeling tools that aided in the interpretation of experimental data.

  4. Advanced Multifunctional Properties of Aligned Carbon Nanotube-Epoxy Composites from Carbon Nanotube Aerogel Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Thang; Liu, Peng; Fan, Zeng; Ngern, Nigel; Duong, Hai

    2015-03-01

    Unlike previous methods of making carbon nanotube (CNT) thin films, aligned CNT thin films in this work are synthesized directly from CNT aerogels in a CVD process. CH4/H2/He gases and ferrocene/thiophene catalysts are mixed and reacted in the reactor at 1200 °C to form CNT aerogel socks. By pulling out the socks with a metal rod, CNT thin films with 15-nm diameter MWNTs are aligned and produced continuously at a speed of a few meters per minute. The number of the aligned CNT thin film layers/ thickness can also be controlled well. The as-synthesized aligned CNT films are further condensed by acetone spray and post-treated by UV light. The aligned CNT films without any above post-treatment have a high electrical conductivity of 400S/cm. We also develop aligned CNT-epoxy composites by infiltrating epoxy into the above aligned CNT thin films using Vacuum Assisted Resin Transfer Molding (VARTM) method. Our cost-effective fabrication method of the aligned CNT films is more advanced for developing the composites having CNT orientation control. The mechanical, electrical and optical properties of the aligned CNT epoxy composites are measured. About 2% of the aligned CNTs can enhance significantly the electrical conductivity and hardness of aligned CNT-epoxy composite films. Effects of morphologies, volume fraction, and alignment of the CNTs on the advanced multifunctional properties of the aligned CNT-epoxy composites are also quantified.

  5. Evolution of Electronic Circuits using Carbon Nanotube Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, M. K.; Kotsialos, A.; Volpati, D.; Vissol-Gaudin, E.; Pearson, C.; Bowen, L.; Obara, B.; Zeze, D. A.; Groves, C.; Petty, M. C.

    2016-08-01

    Evolution-in-materio concerns the computer controlled manipulation of material systems using external stimuli to train or evolve the material to perform a useful function. In this paper we demonstrate the evolution of a disordered composite material, using voltages as the external stimuli, into a form where a simple computational problem can be solved. The material consists of single-walled carbon nanotubes suspended in liquid crystal; the nanotubes act as a conductive network, with the liquid crystal providing a host medium to allow the conductive network to reorganise when voltages are applied. We show that the application of electric fields under computer control results in a significant change in the material morphology, favouring the solution to a classification task.

  6. Evolution of Electronic Circuits using Carbon Nanotube Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, M K; Kotsialos, A; Volpati, D; Vissol-Gaudin, E; Pearson, C; Bowen, L; Obara, B; Zeze, D A; Groves, C; Petty, M C

    2016-08-25

    Evolution-in-materio concerns the computer controlled manipulation of material systems using external stimuli to train or evolve the material to perform a useful function. In this paper we demonstrate the evolution of a disordered composite material, using voltages as the external stimuli, into a form where a simple computational problem can be solved. The material consists of single-walled carbon nanotubes suspended in liquid crystal; the nanotubes act as a conductive network, with the liquid crystal providing a host medium to allow the conductive network to reorganise when voltages are applied. We show that the application of electric fields under computer control results in a significant change in the material morphology, favouring the solution to a classification task.

  7. Evolution of Electronic Circuits using Carbon Nanotube Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, M. K.; Kotsialos, A.; Volpati, D.; Vissol-Gaudin, E.; Pearson, C.; Bowen, L.; Obara, B.; Zeze, D. A.; Groves, C.; Petty, M. C.

    2016-01-01

    Evolution-in-materio concerns the computer controlled manipulation of material systems using external stimuli to train or evolve the material to perform a useful function. In this paper we demonstrate the evolution of a disordered composite material, using voltages as the external stimuli, into a form where a simple computational problem can be solved. The material consists of single-walled carbon nanotubes suspended in liquid crystal; the nanotubes act as a conductive network, with the liquid crystal providing a host medium to allow the conductive network to reorganise when voltages are applied. We show that the application of electric fields under computer control results in a significant change in the material morphology, favouring the solution to a classification task. PMID:27558444

  8. Carbon Nanotube-Conducting Polymer Composites Based Solar Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Prakash; R.Somani; M.Umeno

    2007-01-01

    1 Results Combination of carbon nanotubes (CN) with polymers is important for application towards value added composites,solar cells,fuel cells etc.Especially interesting is the combination of CN with π-conjugated polymers because of the potential interaction between the highly delocalized π-electrons of the CN and the π-electrons correlated with the lattice of polymer skeleton.Efficient exciton dissociation due to electron transfer from the photoexcited polymer to CN is of interest for photovoltaic app...

  9. Wear Behaviour of Carbon Nanotubes Reinforced Nanocrystalline AA 4032 Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senthil Saravanari, M. S.; Kumaresh Babu, S. P.; Sivaprasad, K.

    2016-09-01

    The present paper emphasizes the friction and wear properties of Carbon Nanotubes reinforced AA 4032 nanocomposites prepared by powder metallurgy technique. CNTs are multi-wall in nature and prepared by electric arc discharge method. Multi-walled CNTs are blended with AA 4032 elemental powders and compaction followed by sintering to get bulk nanocomposites. The strength of the composites has been evaluated by microhardness and the surface contact between the nanocomposites and EN 32 steel has been evaluated by Pin on disk tester. The results are proven that reinforcement of CNTs play a major role in the enhancement of hardness and wear.

  10. Diamond and Carbon Nanotube Composites for Supercapacitor Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, João Vitor Silva; May, Paul William; Corat, Evaldo José; Peterlevitz, Alfredo Carlos; Pinheiro, Romário Araújo; Zanin, Hudson

    2017-02-01

    We report on the synthesis and electrochemical properties of diamond grown onto vertically aligned carbon nanotubes with high surface areas as a template, resulting in a composite material exhibiting high double-layer capacitance as well as low electrochemical impedance electrodes suitable for applications as supercapacitor devices. We contrast results from devices fabricated with samples which differ in both their initial substrates (Si and Ti) and their final diamond coatings, such as boron-doped diamond and diamond-like carbon (DLC). We present for first time a conducting model for non-doped DLC thin-films. All samples were characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopy. Our results show specific capacitance as high as 8.25 F g-1 (˜1 F cm-2) and gravimetric specific energy and power as high as 0.7 W h kg-1 and 176.4 W kg-1, respectively, which suggest that these diamond/carbon nanotube composite electrodes are excellent candidates for supercapacitor fabrication.

  11. Diamond and Carbon Nanotube Composites for Supercapacitor Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, João Vitor Silva; May, Paul William; Corat, Evaldo José; Peterlevitz, Alfredo Carlos; Pinheiro, Romário Araújo; Zanin, Hudson

    2016-10-01

    We report on the synthesis and electrochemical properties of diamond grown onto vertically aligned carbon nanotubes with high surface areas as a template, resulting in a composite material exhibiting high double-layer capacitance as well as low electrochemical impedance electrodes suitable for applications as supercapacitor devices. We contrast results from devices fabricated with samples which differ in both their initial substrates (Si and Ti) and their final diamond coatings, such as boron-doped diamond and diamond-like carbon (DLC). We present for first time a conducting model for non-doped DLC thin-films. All samples were characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopy. Our results show specific capacitance as high as 8.25 F g-1 (˜1 F cm-2) and gravimetric specific energy and power as high as 0.7 W h kg-1 and 176.4 W kg-1, respectively, which suggest that these diamond/carbon nanotube composite electrodes are excellent candidates for supercapacitor fabrication.

  12. Nano-engineered composites: interlayer carbon nanotubes effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carley, Glaucio, E-mail: carleyone@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Geraldo, Viviany; Oliveira, Sergio de [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica; Avila, Antonio Ferreira [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica

    2013-11-01

    The concept of carbon nanotube interlayer was successfully introduced to carbon fiber/epoxy composites. This new hybrid laminated composites was characterized by Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and tensile tests. An increase on peak stress close to 85% was witnessed when CNTs interlayer with 206.30 mg was placed to carbon fiber/epoxy laminates. The failure mechanisms are associated to CNTs distribution between and around carbon fibers. These CNTs are also responsible for crack bridging formation and the increase on peak stress. Initial stiffness is strongly affected by the CNT interlayer, however, changes on stiffness is associated to changes on nano/micro-structure due to damage. Three different behaviors can be described, i.e. for interlayers with Almost-Equal-To 60 mg of CNT the failure mode is based on cracks between and around carbon fibers, while for interlayers with CNT contents between 136 mg and 185 mg cracks were spotted on fibers and inside the CNT/matrix mix. Finally, the third failure mechanism is based on carbon fiber breakage, as a strong interface between CNT/matrix mix and carbon fibers is observed. (author)

  13. Synergetic Effects of Mechanical Properties on Graphene Nanoplatelet and Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Hybrids Reinforced Epoxy/Carbon Fiber Composites

    OpenAIRE

    Pin-Ning Wang; Tsung-Han Hsieh; Chin-Lung Chiang; Ming-Yuan Shen

    2015-01-01

    Graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are novel nanofillers possessing attractive characteristics, including robust compatibility with most polymers, high absolute strength, and cost effectiveness. In this study, an outstanding synergetic effect on the grapheme nanoplatelets (GNPs) and multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) hybrids were used to reinforce epoxy composite and epoxy/carbon fiber composite laminates to enhance their mechanical properties. The mechanical propertie...

  14. Alignment and Load Transfer in Carbon Nanotube and Dicyclopentadiene Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severino, Joseph Vincent

    Individual carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are the strongest materials available but their macroscopic assemblies are weak. This work establishes a new thermosetting dicyclopentadiene (DCPD) and CNT composite that increases the strength of CNT assemblies. These high volume fraction and void free structures constitute advanced materials that could one day replace traditional composite systems. To further the understanding of physical interactions between polymer and CNTs, a novel "capstan" load transfer mechanism is also introduced. Self-supporting assemblies of interconnected carbon nanotubes were stretched, twisted and compressed to fashion composites by the infusion and polymerization of low viscosity DCPD based monomeric resins. The properties of the CNTs, polymer and composite were characterized with thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) and Raman spectroscopy. The microstructure was analyzed by wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Sheets were drawn at 15 m/min from a growth furnace to impart alignment then stretched to further modify alignment. The mechanical properties were determined in five orientations with respect to the growth direction. The strength was nearly three times higher along this growth direction than it was perpendicular, and modulus was nearly six times higher. Transverse stretching achieved 1.5 times the elongation but alignment was inferior due to CNT kinking that prevented alignment and consolidation. Composites yarns and sheets were investigated for the mechanical properties, microstructure and load transfer. The DCPD resin was found to wet the CNTs and lubricated deformation. This reduced loads during processing, and curing solidified the aligned and consolidated structure. The stretched and twisted composite yarns increased the failure stress 51%. In aligned composite sheet, the failure stress increased 200%. The increased stresses

  15. Copper-decorated carbon nanotubes-based composite electrodes for nonenzymatic detection of glucose

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pop, A.; Manea, F.; Orha, C.; Motoc, S.; Llinoiu, E.; Vaszilcsin, N.; Schoonman, J.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to prepare three types of multiwall carbon nanotubes (CNT)-based composite electrodes and to modify their surface by copper electrodeposition for nonenzymatic oxidation and determination of glucose from aqueous solution. Copper-decorated multiwall carbon nanotubes composite

  16. Anisotropic conductance of the multiwall carbon nanotube array/silicone elastomer composite film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao Yuan; Liu Changhong; Fan Shoushan [Tsinghua-Foxconn Nanotechnology Research Center and Department of Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2006-09-14

    Multiwall carbon nanotube array/silicone elastomer composite films have been fabricated with an in situ injection modelling method. The transverse conductivity of the composite films is larger than the lateral conductivity because the aligned carbon nanotube array is embedded into the polymer matrix. The nonlinear I-V curve has been analysed and the temperature-dependent transport behaviour has been investigated.

  17. Charge Transport in Carbon Nanotubes-Polymer Composite Photovoltaic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Davenas

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the dark and illuminated current density-voltage (J/V characteristics of poly(2-methoxy-5-(2’-ethylhexyloxy1-4-phenylenevinylene (MEH-PPV/single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs composite photovoltaic cells. Using an exponential band tail model, the conduction mechanism has been analysed for polymer only devices and composite devices, in terms of space charge limited current (SCLC conduction mechanism, where we determine the power parameters and the threshold voltages. Elaborated devices for MEH-PPV:SWNTs (1:1 composites showed a photoresponse with an open-circuit voltage Voc of 0.4 V, a short-circuit current density JSC of 1 µA/cm² and a fill factor FF of 43%. We have modelised the organic photovoltaic devices with an equivalent circuit, where we calculated the series and shunt resistances.

  18. Mechanical properties of Cu-based composites reinforced by carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    Cu-based composites reinforced by 0 % ~25 % (volume fraction) carbon nanotubes were prepared. The fracture behaviors and the rolling properties of the composites and the effects of the volume fraction of the carbon nanotubes were studied. The experimental results show that the fracture toughness of the composites is related to the pulling-out and bridging of the carbon nanotubes in the fracture process. With the volume fraction of the carbon nanotubes increasing, the Vicker' s hardness and the compactness of the composites increase first and then decrease. The peaks of the hardness and the compactness occur at 12 % ~15 % of volume fraction of carbon nanotubes. Some proper ratio of rolling reduction benefits to the comprehensive mechanical properties of the composites.

  19. Single walled carbon nanotube composites for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ashim; Woods, Mia D; Illingworth, Kenneth David; Niemeier, Ryan; Schafer, Isaac; Cady, Craig; Filip, Peter; El-Amin, Saadiq F

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) and poly lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLAGA) composites for orthopedic applications and to evaluate the interaction of human stem cells (hBMSCs) and osteoblasts (MC3T3-E1 cells) via cell growth, proliferation, gene expression, extracellular matrix production and mineralization. PLAGA and SWCNT/PLAGA composites were fabricated with various amounts of SWCNT (5, 10, 20, 40, and 100 mg), characterized and degradation studies were performed. Cells were seeded and cell adhesion/morphology, growth/survival, proliferation and gene expression analysis were performed to evaluate biocompatibility. Imaging studies demonstrated uniform incorporation of SWCNT into the PLAGA matrix and addition of SWCNT did not affect the degradation rate. Imaging studies revealed that MC3T3-E1 and hBMSCs cells exhibited normal, non-stressed morphology on the composites and all were biocompatible. Composites with 10 mg SWCNT resulted in highest rate of cell proliferation (p composites. Gene expression of alkaline phosphatase, collagen I, osteocalcin, osteopontin, Runx-2, and Bone Sialoprotein was observed on all composites. In conclusion, SWCNT/PLAGA composites imparted beneficial cellular growth capabilities and gene expression, and mineralization abilities were well established. These results demonstrate the potential of SWCNT/PLAGA composites for musculoskeletal regeneration and bone tissue engineering (BTE) and are promising for orthopedic applications.

  20. Charge-carrier transport mechanisms in composites containing carbon-nanotube inclusions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Usanov, D. A., E-mail: UsanovDA@info.sgu.ru; Skripal’, A. V.; Romanov, A. V. [Saratov State University (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    From the microwave-radiation transmittance and reflectance spectra, the temperature dependence of the complex permittivity of carbon nanotubes, subjected to high-temperature annealing, and composite materials produced on their basis is determined. The electron transport mechanisms in composites with inclusions of unannealed carbon nanotubes and nanotubes subjected to high-temperature annealing are determined. The influence of the annealing temperature on the parameters that are characteristic of these mechanisms and control the temperature dependence of the conductivity of multiwall carbon nanotubes is established.

  1. Fabrication of Carbon Nanotube - Chromium Carbide Composite Through Laser Sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ze; Gao, Yibo; Liang, Fei; Wu, Benxin; Gou, Jihua; Detrois, Martin; Tin, Sammy; Yin, Ming; Nash, Philip; Tang, Xiaoduan; Wang, Xinwei

    2016-03-01

    Ceramics often have high hardness and strength, and good wear and corrosion resistance, and hence have many important applications, which, however, are often limited by their poor fracture toughness. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) may enhance ceramic fracture toughness, but hot pressing (which is one typical approach of fabricating CNT-ceramic composites) is difficult to apply for applications that require localized heat input, such as fabricating composites as surface coatings. Laser beam may realize localized material sintering with little thermal effect on the surrounding regions. However, for the typical ceramics for hard coating applications (as listed in Ref.[1]), previous work on laser sintering of CNT-ceramic composites with mechanical property characterizations has been very limited. In this paper, research work has been reported on the fabrication and characterization of CNT-ceramic composites through laser sintering of mixtures of CNTs and chromium carbide powders. Under the studied conditions, it has been found that laser-sintered composites have a much higher hardness than that for plasma-sprayed composites reported in the literature. It has also been found that the composites obtained by laser sintering of CNTs and chromium carbide powder mixtures have a fracture toughness that is ~23 % higher than the material obtained by laser sintering of chromium carbide powders without CNTs.

  2. Thermal Expansion and Diffusion Coefficients of Carbon Nanotube-Polymer Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Chengyu; Srivastava, Deepak; Cho, Kyeongjae; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations employing Brenner potential for intra-nanotube interactions and van der Waals forces for polymer-nanotube interface have been used to investigate thermal expansion and diffusion characteristics of carbon nanotube-polyethylene composites. Addition of carbon nanotubes to polymer matrix is found to significantly increase the glass transition temperature Tg, and thermal expansion and diffusion coefficients in the composite above Tg. The increase has been attributed to the temperature dependent increase of the excluded volume for the polymer chains, and the findings could have implications in the composite processing, coating and painting applications.

  3. A flexible multifunctional sensor based on carbon nanotube/polyurethane composite

    OpenAIRE

    Slobodian, Petr; Říha, Pavel; Benlikaya, Ruhan; Svoboda, Petr; Petráš, David

    2013-01-01

    A sensor was made of a polymer composite composed of electrically-conductive carbon nanotubes embedded in elastic polyurethane. The composite was prepared by using a polyurethane filter membrane, enmeshing it and melding together with carbon nanotubes. Testing has shown that the composite can be elongated as much as 400 % during which the electrical resistance is increased 270 times. The composite is also sensitive to compression and to organic solvent vapors. These properties indicat...

  4. Carbon nanotube--poly(3-octylthiophene) composite photovoltaic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, David L; Czerw, Richard; Harrison, Benjamin

    2006-07-01

    The effects of varying nanotube loading/concentration in carbon nanotube-poly(3-octylthiophene) blends used as thin film photovoltaic cells, have been studied. The network of single walled nanotubes clearly aids in exciton separation and modifies carrier mobility within the active layer as suggested by a bulk heterojunction model. Further, modifications to the metal-polymer interface occur with the addition of nanotubes leading to variations in the observed VOC of the photovoltaic cells. Finally, the "nanocomposite" devices exhibit significant enhancements to external power conversion efficiencies, with the overall efficiency strongly dependent on device design parameters such as the addition of buffer layers.

  5. Carbon nanotube-cuprous oxide composite based pressure sensors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kh. S. Karimov; Muhammad Tariq Saeed Chani; Fazal Ahmad Khalid; Adam Khan; Rahim Khan

    2012-01-01

    In this paper,we present the design,the fabrication,and the experimental results of carbon nanotube (CNT) and Cu2O composite based pressure sensors.The pressed tablets of the CNT-Cu2O composite are fabricated at a pressure of 353 MPa.The diameters of the multiwalled nanotubes (MWNTs) are between 10 nm and 30 nm.The sizes of the Cu2O micro particles are in the range of 3-4 μrn.The average diameter and the average thickness of the pressed tablets are 10 mm and 4.0 mm,respectively.In order to make low resistance electric contacts,the two sides of the pressed tablet are covered by silver pastes.The direct current resistance of the pressure sensor decreases by 3.3 times as the pressure increases up to 37 kN/m2.The simulation result of the resistance-pressure relationship is in good agreement with the experimental result within a variation of ±2%.

  6. Increasing the Tensile Property of Unidirectional Carbon/Carbon Composites by Grafting Carbon Nanotubes onto Carbon Fibers by Electrophoretic Deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiang Song; Kezhi Li; Hejun Li; Qiangang Fu

    2013-01-01

    Although in-situ growing carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on carbon fibers could greatly increase the matrix-dominated mechanical properties of carbon/carbon composites (C/Cs),it always decreased the tensile strength of carbon fibers.In this work,CNTs were introduced into unidirectional carbon fiber (CF) preforms by electrophoretic deposition (EPD) and they were used to reinforce C/Cs.Effects of the content of CNTs introduced by EPD on tensile property of unidirectional C/Cs were investigated.Results demonstrated that EPD could be used as a simple and efficient method to fabricate carbon nanotube reinforced C/Cs (CNT-C/Cs) with excellent tensile strength,which pays a meaningful way to maximize the global performance of CNT-C/Cs.

  7. GROWTH OF CARBON NANOTUBES ON CARBON FIBRES AND THE TENSILE PROPERTIES OF RESULTING CARBON FIBRE REINFORCED POLYPROPYLENE COMPOSITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.R. SURAYA

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes were grown directly on carbon fibres using the chemical vapor deposition technique. The effects of reaction temperature (800-900oC and hydrogen gas flowrate (100-300 ml/min on the morphology of the carbon nanotube coating were investigated. Carbon nanotubes produced were characterized using scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope. The resulting fibres were compounded with polypropylene to produce carbon fibre reinforced polypropylene composites. The tensile properties of these composites were determined to investigate the effects of the carbon nanotubes on the overall performance of the composites. The optimum treatment condition that produced the thickest coating of carbon nanotubes was obtained at 800oC and 300 ml/min hydrogen gas flowrate. The composite sample obtained under these conditions demonstrated remarkable enhancement in tensile properties compared to composites made from as-received carbon fibres, whereby an increment of up to 52% and 133% was observed for the tensile strength and modulus respectively.

  8. Analytical and numerical techniques for predicting the interfacial stresses of wavy carbon nanotube/polymer composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yazdchi, K.; Salehi, M.; Shokrieh, M.M.

    2009-01-01

    By introducing a new simplified 3D representative volume element for wavy carbon nanotubes, an analytical model is developed to study the stress transfer in single-walled carbon nanotube-reinforced polymer composites. Based on the pull-out modeling technique, the effects of waviness, aspect ratio, a

  9. Controlled carbon nanotube synthesis for quantification of polymer-nanotube composite micromechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bult, Justin Bernard

    Conventional experimental approaches to the understanding of nanotube-polymer micro-mechanics have struggled to produce reproducible data due to the inherent difficulty in physically manipulating the nanotube in-situ. To avoid the problems scale represents in nanotube-polymer composites a novel approach of using Polarized Raman spectroscopy was developed. The Raman spectroscopic technique has the advantage of using non-invasive analysis to compute the composite micro mechanical properties of interfacial shear stress and critical length. Composites with nanotubes of defined length were needed in order to use the Raman technique. To satisfy this requirement a new thermal Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) tool capable of reproducibly growing aligned length uniformity with large mass yield was designed and built. The course of developing these furnace capabilities led to the investigation of nanotube growth mechanics. It is shown herein that a stable passivation barrier is required for nanotube growth. Using X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) depth profiling of metal substrate growth conclusively shows the presence of a stable catalyst layer on the outer surface of stable oxides of greater than 100 nm. By analyzing the diffusion profile represented in the XPS data it is shown that a critical thickness for the passivation oxide can be calculated as a function of time and temperature. For the growth parameters used in this study the critical thickness was found to be between 10 nm and 30 nm depending on the diffusivity value used for iron in chromia. This value agrees well with experimental observation. Uniformly grown carbon nanotubes with lengths of 4, 14, 17, 22, 43, 74, and 116 mum were incorporated into a polycarbonate matrix polymer via solvent-antisolvent processing. The nanotube composites of varied length were tested in tensile strain while Raman spectra were taken concurrently to deduce the load transfer to the nanotube due to composite strain. It is found

  10. Chitin and carbon nanotube composites as biocompatible scaffolds for neuron growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Nandita; Chen, Jinhu; Koziol, Krzysztof K.; Hallam, Keith R.; Janas, Dawid; Patil, Avinash J.; Strachan, Ally; G. Hanley, Jonathan; Rahatekar, Sameer S.

    2016-04-01

    The design of biocompatible implants for neuron repair/regeneration ideally requires high cell adhesion as well as good electrical conductivity. Here, we have shown that plasma-treated chitin carbon nanotube composite scaffolds show very good neuron adhesion as well as support of synaptic function of neurons. The addition of carbon nanotubes to a chitin biopolymer improved the electrical conductivity and the assisted oxygen plasma treatment introduced more oxygen species onto the chitin nanotube scaffold surface. Neuron viability experiments showed excellent neuron attachment onto plasma-treated chitin nanotube composite scaffolds. The support of synaptic function was evident on chitin/nanotube composites, as confirmed by PSD-95 staining. The biocompatible and electrically-conducting chitin nanotube composite scaffold prepared in this study can be used for in vitro tissue engineering of neurons and, potentially, as an implantable electrode for stimulation and repair of neurons.

  11. Polymeric composites containing carbon nanotubes for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahithi, Kolli; Swetha, Maddela; Ramasamy, Kumarasamy; Srinivasan, Narasimhan; Selvamurugan, Nagarajan

    2010-04-01

    Several natural and synthetic polymers are now available for bone tissue engineering applications but they may lack mechanical integrity. In recent years, there are reports emphasizing the importance of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in supporting bone growth. CNTs possess exceptional mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties, facilitating their use as reinforcements or additives in various materials to improve the properties of the materials. Biomaterials containing polymers often are placed adjacent to bone. The use of CNTs is anticipated in these biomaterials applied to bone mainly to improve their overall mechanical properties and expected to act as scaffolds to promote and guide bone tissue regeneration. This review paper provides a current state of knowledge available examining the use of the polymeric composites containing CNTs for promoting bone growth.

  12. Scalable fabrication of immunosensors based on carbon nanotube polymer composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendoza, Ernest; Gonzalez-Guerrero, Ana B [Institut Catala de Nanotecnologia, Campus Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Orozco, Jahir; Jimenez-Jorquera, Cecilia; Fernandez-Sanchez, Cesar [Instituto de Microelectronica de Barcelona, CNM-IMB (CSIC), Campus Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Calle, Ana; Lechuga, Laura M [Instituto de Microelectronica de Madrid, CNM-IMM (CSIC), Isaac Newton 8, 28760 Tres Cantos, Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: Ernest.Mendoza.icn@uab.es

    2008-02-20

    In this work we present the fabrication and characterization of immunosensors based on polystyrene (PS)-multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) composites. The electrochemical properties of the sensors have been investigated and show that the surface area is increased upon addition of the MWCNT-PS layer. Furthermore, a plasma activation process is used to partially remove the PS and expose the MWCNTs. This results in a huge increase in the electrochemical area and opens up the possibility of binding biomolecules to the MWCNT wall. The MWCNTs have been functionalized covalently with a model antibody (rabbit IgG). The biosensors have been tested using amperometric techniques and show detection limits comparable to standard techniques such as ELISA.

  13. Nanoengineered thermal materials based on carbon nanotube array composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun (Inventor); Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor); Dangelo, Carlos (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method for providing for thermal conduction using an array of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). An array of vertically oriented CNTs is grown on a substrate having high thermal conductivity, and interstitial regions between adjacent CNTs in the array are partly or wholly filled with a filler material having a high thermal conductivity so that at least one end of each CNT is exposed. The exposed end of each CNT is pressed against a surface of an object from which heat is to be removed. The CNT-filler composite adjacent to the substrate provides improved mechanical strength to anchor CNTs in place and also serves as a heat spreader to improve diffusion of heat flux from the smaller volume (CNTs) to a larger heat sink.

  14. Flexible strain sensor based on carbon nanotube rubber composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin-Ho; Kim, Young-Ju; Baek, Woon Kyung; Lim, Kwon Taek; Kang, Inpil

    2010-04-01

    Electrically conducting rubber composites (CRC) with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) filler have received much attention as potential materials for sensors. In this work, Ethylene propylene diene M-class rubber (EPDM)/CNT composites as a novel nano sensory material were prepared to develop flexible strain sensors that can measure large deformation of flexible structures. The EPDM/CNT composites were prepared by using a Brabender mixer with multi-walled CNTs and organo-clay. A strain sensor made of EPDM/CNT composite was attached to the surface of a flexible beam and change of resistance of the strain sensor was measured with respect to the beam deflection. Resistance of the sensor was change quite linearly under the bending and compressive large beam deflection. Upon external forces, CRC deformation takes place with the micro scale change of inter-electrical condition in rubber matrix due to the change of contact resistance, and CRC reveals macro scale piezoresistivity. It is anticipated that the CNT/EPDM fibrous strain sensor can be eligible to develop a biomimetic artificial neuron that can continuously sense deformation, pressure and shear force.

  15. Fabrication And Properties Of Silver Based Multiwall Carbon Nanotube Composite Prepared By Spark Plasma Sintering Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lis M.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of investigations of the obtained nanocomposite materials based on silver with addition of multiwall carbon nanotubes. The powder of carbon nanotubes content from 0.1 to 3 wt. % was produced by application of powder metallurgy methods, through mixing and high-energetic milling, and also chemical methods. Modification of carbon nanotubes included electroless deposition of silver particles on the carbon nanotube active surfaces and chemical reduction with strong reducing agent – sodium borohydride (NaBH4. The obtained powder mixtures were consolidated by SPS – Spark Plasma Sintering method. The formed composites were subjected to tests of relative density, electrical conductivity and electro-erosion properties. Detailed examinations of the structure with application of X-ray microanalysis, with consideration of carbon nanotubes distribution, were also carried out. The effect of manufacturing methods on properties of the obtained composites was observed.

  16. Carbon fiber/carbon nanotube reinforced hierarchical composites: Effect of CNT distribution on shearing strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, H. W.; Mishnaevsky, Leon; Yi, H. Y.;

    2016-01-01

    The strength and fracture behavior of carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites with carbon nanotube (CNT) secondary reinforcement are investigated experimentally and numerically. Short Beam Shearing tests have been carried out, with SEM observations of the damage evolution in the composites. 3D...... multiscale computational (FE) models of the carbon/polymer composite with varied CNT distributions have been developed and employed to study the effect of the secondary CNT reinforcement, its distribution and content on the strength and fracture behavior of the composites. It is shown that adding secondary...... CNT nanoreinforcement into the matrix and/or the sizing of carbon fiber/reinforced composites ensures strong increase of the composite strength. The effect of secondary CNTs reinforcement is strongest when some small addition of CNTs in the polymer matrix is complemented by the fiber sizing with high...

  17. Carbon Nanotube/Magnesium Composite as a Hydrogen Source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Min Kyu; Se, Kwon Oh; Kim, Min Joong; Hwang, Jae Won; Yoon, Byoung Young; Kwon, Hyuk Sang

    2015-11-01

    Hydrogen produced using the steam reforming process contains sulfur and carbon monoxide that are harmful to the Pt catalyst in proton-exchange-membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). However, CO-free hydrogen can be generated from the hydrolysis of either Al in strongly alkaline water or Mg in neutral water with chlorides such as sea water. The hydrogen generation rate from the hydrolysis of Mg is extremely slow and linearly proportional to the corrosion rate of Mg in chloride water. In this work, we fabricated a carbon nanotube (CNT)--reinforced Mg--matrix composite by Spark Plasma Sintering as a fast hydrogen generation source for a PEMFC. The CNTs distributed in the Mg matrix act as numerous local cathodes, and hence cause severe galvanic corrosion between the Mg-matrix anode and CNT-cathode in NaCl solution. It was found that the hydrogen generation rate from the hydrolysis of the 5 vol.% CNT/Mg composite is 3300 times faster than that of the Mg without CNTs due primarily to the galvanic corrosion effect.

  18. Carbon nanotubes/laser ablation gold nanoparticles composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lascialfari, Luisa [Department of Chemistry, Università di Firenze, Via della Lastruccia 3-13, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze 50019 (Italy); Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, via Madonna del Piano 10, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze 50019 (Italy); Consorzio Interuniversitario Nazionale per la Scienza e Tecnologia dei Materiali (INSTM), Via Giusti 9, Firenze 50123 (Italy); Marsili, Paolo [Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, via Madonna del Piano 10, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze 50019 (Italy); Caporali, Stefano [Department of Chemistry, Università di Firenze, Via della Lastruccia 3-13, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze 50019 (Italy); Consorzio Interuniversitario Nazionale per la Scienza e Tecnologia dei Materiali (INSTM), Via Giusti 9, Firenze 50123 (Italy); Muniz-Miranda, Maurizio [Department of Chemistry, Università di Firenze, Via della Lastruccia 3-13, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze 50019 (Italy); Margheri, Giancarlo [Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, via Madonna del Piano 10, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze 50019 (Italy); Serafini, Andrea; Brandi, Alberto [Department of Chemistry, Università di Firenze, Via della Lastruccia 3-13, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze 50019 (Italy); Giorgetti, Emilia, E-mail: emilia.giorgetti@fi.isc.cnr.it [Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, via Madonna del Piano 10, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze 50019 (Italy); Cicchi, Stefano, E-mail: stefano.cicchi@unifi.it [Department of Chemistry, Università di Firenze, Via della Lastruccia 3-13, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze 50019 (Italy); Consorzio Interuniversitario Nazionale per la Scienza e Tecnologia dei Materiali (INSTM), Via Giusti 9, Firenze 50123 (Italy)

    2014-10-31

    The production of nanohybrids formed by oxidized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and nanoparticles, produced by pulsed laser ablation in liquids process, is described. The use of linkers, obtained by transformation of pyrene-1-butanol, is mandatory to generate an efficient and stable interaction between the two components. Transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis showed the obtainment of the efficient coverage of the MWCNTs by nanoparticles composed by metal gold and, partially, by oxides. - Highlights: • Laser ablation is a used for the production of gold nanoparticle colloids • An efficient decoration of carbon nanotubes with nanoparticles is obtained through the use of a linker • This method allows an efficient and tunable preparation of carbon nanotube hybrids.

  19. Molecular-dynamic studies of carbon-water-carbon composite nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Jian; Ji, Baohua; Feng, Xi-Qiao; Gao, Huajian

    2006-11-01

    We recently reported the discovery via molecular-dynamic simulations that single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with different diameters, lengths, and chiralities can coaxially self-assemble into multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in water via the spontaneous insertion of smaller tubes into larger ones. Here, we extend that study to investigate the various water structures formed between two selected SWCNTs after such coaxial assembly. Depending on the tube geometry, typical water structures, besides the bulk phase, include a one-dimensional (1D) ordered water chain inside the smaller tube, a uniform or nonuniform water shell between the two tubes, and a "boundary layer" of water near the exterior wall of the larger tube. It was found that a concentric water shell consisting of up to three layers of water molecules can form between the two SWCNTs, which leads to a class of carbon-water-carbon composite nanotubes. Analysis of the potential energy of the SWCNT-water system indicated that the composite nanotubes are stabilized by both the tube-tube and tube-water van der Waals interactions. Geometrically confined between the two SWCNTs, water mono- and bilayers are found to be stable, highly condensed, and ordered, although the average number of hydrogen bonds per water molecule is reduced. In contrast, a water trilayer between the two CNTs can be easily disrupted by thermal fluctuations.

  20. Chemical functionalization of carbon nanotubes for the mechanical reinforcement of polystyrene composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byrne, Michele T; McNamee, William P; Gun' ko, Yurii K [School of Chemistry and CRANN Institute, Trinity College, University of Dublin, Dublin 2, Republic of Ireland (Ireland)], E-mail: igounko@tcd.ie

    2008-10-15

    An organometallic approach was used to functionalize multiwalled carbon nanotubes with n-butyllithium. This procedure was repeated two more times to achieve a higher degree of multiwalled carbon nanotube functionalization. The functionalized nanotubes have been characterized by Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopy, thermogravimetrical analysis, scanning electron microscopy and sedimentation studies. It was possible to form stable suspensions of the functionalized nanotubes in tetrahydrofuran and they were used to make nanotube polymer composites. The mechanical properties of these new nanotube polymer composites were tested and they were found to show an increase of up to 25% in their Young's moduli and up to 50% in their tensile strength over pure polystyrene.

  1. Improving Fatigue Performance of GFRP Composite Using Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moneeb Genedy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Glass fiber reinforced polymers (GFRP have become a preferable material for reinforcing or strengthening reinforced concrete structures due to their corrosion resistance, high strength to weight ratio, and relatively low cost compared with carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRP. However, the limited fatigue life of GFRP hinders their use in infrastructure applications. For instance, the low fatigue life of GFRP caused design codes to impose stringent stress limits on GFRP that rendered their use non-economic under significant cyclic loads in bridges. In this paper, we demonstrate that the fatigue life of GFRP can be significantly improved by an order of magnitude by incorporating Multi-Wall Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNTs during GFRP fabrication. GFRP coupons were fabricated and tested under static tension and cyclic tension with mean fatigue stress equal to 40% of the GFRP tensile strength. Microstructural investigations using scanning electron microscopy (SEM and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR spectroscopy were used for further investigation of the effect of MWCNTs on the GFRP composite. The experimental results show the 0.5 wt% and the 1.0 wt% MWCNTs were able to improve the fatigue life of GFRP by 1143% and 986%, respectively, compared with neat GFRP.

  2. Influence of Carbon Nanotubes on Thermal Stability of Water-Dispersible Nanofibrillar Polyaniline/Nanotube Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Bin Zhang

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Significant influence on the thermal stability of polyaniline (PANI in the presence of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs is reported. By means of in-situ rapid mixing approach, water-dispersible nanofibrillar PANI and composites, consisting of MWCNTs uniformly coated with PANI in the state of emeraldine salt, with a well-defined core-shell heterogeneous structure, were prepared. The de-protonation process in PANI occurs at a lower temperature under the presence of MWCNTs on the polyaniline composite upon thermal treatment. However, it is found that the presence of MWCNTs significantly enhances the thermal stability of PANI’s backbone upon exposure to laser irradiation, which can be ascribed to the core-shell heterogeneous structure of the composite of MWCNTs and PANI, and the high thermal conductivity of MWCNTs.

  3. Multifunctional Carbon Nanotube-Based Sensors for Damage Detection and Self Healing in Structural Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-29

    processing of thick-section composites, an alternative approach to the traditional calendering method of carbon nanotube dispersion has been...accomplished using a high shear stress field [2]. This method of dispersion incorporates a calendering approach through which large agglomerates of nanotubes...comparison of the different microstructural configurations resulting from the calendering approach vs. the sizing approach. The electrical conductivity of

  4. Process for attaching molecular wires and devices to carbon nanotubes and compositions thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tour, James M. (Inventor); Bahr, Jeffrey L. (Inventor); Yang, Jiping (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention is directed towards processes for covalently attaching molecular wires and molecular electronic devices to carbon nanotubes and compositions thereof. Such processes utilize diazonium chemistry to bring about this marriage of wire-like nanotubes with molecular wires and molecular electronic devices.

  5. Hybrid carbon fiber/carbon nanotube composites for structural damping applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tehrani, M; Safdari, M; Boroujeni, A Y; Razavi, Z; Case, S W; Dahmen, K; Garmestani, H; Al-Haik, M S

    2013-04-19

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were grown on the surface of carbon fibers utilizing a relatively low temperature synthesis technique; graphitic structures by design (GSD). To probe the effects of the synthesis protocols on the mechanical properties, other samples with surface grown CNTs were prepared using catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD). The woven graphite fabrics were thermally shielded with a thin film of SiO2 and CNTs were grown on top of this film. Raman spectroscopy and electron microscopy revealed the grown species to be multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). The damping performance of the hybrid CNT-carbon fiber-reinforced epoxy composite was examined using dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). Mechanical testing confirmed that the degradations in the strength and stiffness as a result of the GSD process are far less than those encountered through using the CCVD technique and yet are negligible compared to the reference samples. The DMA results indicated that, despite the minimal degradation in the storage modulus, the loss tangent (damping) for the hybrid composites utilizing GSD-grown MWCNTs improved by 56% compared to the reference samples (based on raw carbon fibers with no surface treatment or surface grown carbon nanotubes) over the frequency range 1-60 Hz. These results indicated that the energy dissipation in the GSD-grown MWCNTs composite can be primarily attributed to the frictional sliding at the nanotube/epoxy interface and to a lesser extent to the stiff thermal shielding SiO2 film on the fiber/matrix interface.

  6. Tensile Properties of Polyimide Composites Incorporating Carbon Nanotubes-Grafted and Polyimide-Coated Carbon Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naito, Kimiyoshi

    2014-09-01

    The tensile properties and fracture behavior of polyimide composite bundles incorporating carbon nanotubes-grafted (CNT-grafted) and polyimide-coated (PI-coated) high-tensile-strength polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based (T1000GB), and high-modulus pitch-based (K13D) carbon fibers were investigated. The CNT were grown on the surface of the carbon fibers by chemical vapor deposition. The pyromellitic dianhydride/4,4'-oxydianiline PI nanolayer coating was deposited on the surface of the carbon fiber by high-temperature vapor deposition polymerization. The results clearly demonstrate that CNT grafting and PI coating were effective for improving the Weibull modulus of T1000GB PAN-based and K13D pitch-based carbon fiber bundle composites. In addition, the average tensile strength of the PI-coated T1000GB carbon fiber bundle composites was also higher than that of the as-received carbon fiber bundle composites, while the average tensile strength of the CNT-grafted T1000GB, K13D, and the PI-coated K13D carbon fiber bundle composites was similar to that of the as-received carbon fiber bundle composites.

  7. Magnetic studies of polystyrene/iron-filled multi-wall carbon nanotube composite films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarova, T. L.; Zakharchuk, I.; Geydt, P.; Lahderanta, E.; Komlev, A. A.; Zyrianova, A. A.; Kanygin, M. A.; Sedelnikova, O. V.; Suslyaev, V. I.; Bulusheva, L. G.; Okotrub, A. V.

    2016-10-01

    Polystyrene/iron-filled multi-wall carbon nanotube composite films were prepared by solution processing, forge-rolling and stretching methods. Elongated iron carbide nanoparticles formed because of catalytic growth are situated inside the hollow cavity of the nanotubes. Magnetic susceptibility measurements as well as records of isothermal hysteresis loops performed in three perpendicular directions of magnetic field confirmed that the nanotubes have a preferential alignment in the matrix. Strong diamagnetic anisotropy in the composites emerges not only from the MWCNTs but also from the polystyrene matrix. The polymer sticks to the honeycomb lattice through the interaction of the π-orbitals of the phenyl ring and those of the carbon nanotube, contributing to anisotropic diamagnetic response. The contribution of iron nanoparticles to overall magnetic response strongly depends on nanotube concentration in the composite as well as on matrix-filler non-covalent stacking, which influences magnetic interparticle interactions.

  8. Polymer-Carbon Nanotube Composites, A Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-08-01

    les transducteurs, les capteurs ( chimiques et de pression) et les matériaux non linéaires (pour la guerre électro-optique). -Huber, T.A.. 2004...En plus des nombreuses applications des nanotubes de carbone pur (entreposage de gaz, capteurs , dispositifs électroniques, pointes de microscopes

  9. Fabrication of carbon nanotube-polyimide composite hollow microneedles for transdermal drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Bradley J; Aria, Adrianus I; Gharib, Morteza

    2014-12-01

    We introduce a novel method for fabricating hollow microneedles for transdermal drug delivery using a composite of vertically-aligned carbon nanotubes and polyimide. Patterned bundles of carbon nanotubes are used as a porous scaffold for defining the microneedle geometry. Polyimide resin is wicked through the carbon nanotube scaffold to reinforce the structure and provide the prerequisite strength for achieving skin penetration. The high aspect ratio and bottom-up assembly of carbon nanotubes allow the structure of the microneedles to be created in a single step of nanotube fabrication, providing a simple, scalable method for producing hollow microneedles. To demonstrate the utility of these microneedles, liquid delivery experiments are performed. Successful delivery of aqueous methylene blue dye into both hydrogel and swine skin in vitro is demonstrated. Electron microscopy images of the microneedles taken after delivery confirm that the microneedles do not sustain any structural damage during the delivery process.

  10. Computing with carbon nanotubes: Optimization of threshold logic gates using disordered nanotube/polymer composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, M. K.; Kotsialos, A.; Qaiser, F.; Zeze, D. A.; Pearson, C.; Volpati, D.; Bowen, L.; Petty, M. C.

    2015-04-01

    This paper explores the use of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT)/poly(butyl methacrylate) composites as a material for use in unconventional computing. The mechanical and electrical properties of the materials are investigated. The resulting data reveal a correlation between the SWCNT concentration/viscosity/conductivity and the computational capability of the composite. The viscosity increases significantly with the addition of SWCNTs to the polymer, mechanically reinforcing the host material and changing the electrical properties of the composite. The electrical conduction is found to depend strongly on the nanotube concentration; Poole-Frenkel conduction appears to dominate the conductivity at very low concentrations (0.11% by weight). The viscosity and conductivity both show a threshold point around 1% SWCNT concentration; this value is shown to be related to the computational performance of the material. A simple optimization of threshold logic gates shows that satisfactory computation is only achieved above a SWCNT concentration of 1%. In addition, there is some evidence that further above this threshold the computational efficiency begins to decrease.

  11. Nanoengineered Thermal Materials Based on Carbon Nanotube Array Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Meyyappan, Meyya; Dangelo, Carols

    2012-01-01

    State-of-the-art integrated circuits (ICs) for microprocessors routinely dissipate power densities on the order of 50 W/cm2. This large power is due to the localized heating of ICs operating at high frequencies and must be managed for future high-frequency microelectronic applications. As the size of components and devices for ICs and other appliances becomes smaller, it becomes more difficult to provide heat dissipation and transport for such components and devices. A thermal conductor for a macro-sized thermal conductor is generally inadequate for use with a microsized component or device, in part due to scaling problems. A method has been developed for providing for thermal conduction using an array of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). An array of vertically oriented CNTs is grown on a substrate having high thermal conductivity, and interstitial regions between adjacent CNTs in the array are partly or wholly filled with a filler material having a high thermal conductivity so that at least one end of each CNT is exposed. The exposed end of each CNT is pressed against a surface of an object from which heat is to be removed. The CNT-filler-composite adjacent to the substrate provides improved mechanical strength to anchor CNTs in place, and also serves as a heat spreader to improve diffusion of heat flux from the smaller volume (CNTs) to a larger heat sink.

  12. Composite microparticles of halloysite clay nanotubes bound by calcium carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yi; Yendluri, Raghuvara; Chen, Bin; Wang, Jingbo; Lvov, Yuri

    2016-03-15

    Natural halloysite clay nanotubes with 15 nm inner and 75 nm outer diameters have been used as vehicles for sustained release of drugs in composite hollow microparticles "glued" with CaCO3. We used a layer-by layer assembly accomplished alginate binding with Ca(2+) followed by CO2 bubbling to prepare the composite microspheres of CaCO3 and polyelectrolytes (PE) modified halloysite nanotubes (HNTs-PE2/CaCO3) with the diameter of about 5-10 μm. These microparticles have empty spherical structure and abundant pore distributions with maxima at 2.5, 3.9, 6.0 and 13.3 nm, and higher surface area of 82.3 m(2) g(-1) as characterized by SEM and BET test. We loaded drugs in these micro-nano carriers of tight piles of halloysite nanotube with end clogged with CaCO3. The sustained release of Nifedipine drug from HNTs-PE2/CaCO3 composite microspheres was slower than for pristine halloysite nanotubes.

  13. Preparation and characterization of grafted collagen-multiwalled carbon nanotubes composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Y; Zhou, Y M; Shan, Y; Ju, H X; Xue, X J

    2007-02-01

    This paper describes a new class of composite materials designed by combining multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and grafted collagen matrix. These materials show high mechanical capabilities by taking advantage of the favorable mechanical characteristics of MWCNTs. Furthermore, doping carbon nanotubes into grafted collagen matrix results in a substantial improvement of thermal stability and infrared emissivity. Thus these materials possess potential applications in some fields such as biomedicine and infrared camouflage.

  14. Method of Making an Electroactive Sensing/Actuating Material for Carbon Nanotube Polymer Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ounaies, Zoubeida (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor); Harrison, Joycelyn S. (Inventor); Holloway, Nancy M. (Inventor); Draughon, Gregory K. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    An electroactive sensing or actuating material comprises a composite made from a polymer with polarizable moieties and an effective amount of carbon nanotubes incorporated in the polymer for a predetermined electromechanical operation of the composite when such composite is affected by an external stimulus. In another embodiment, the composite comprises a, third component of micro -sized to nano-sized particles of an electroactive ceramic that is also incorporated in the polymer matrix. The method for making the three-phase composite comprises either incorporating the carbon nanotubes in the polymer matrix before incorporation of the particles of ceramic or mixing the carbon nanotubes and particles of ceramic together in a solution before incorporation in the polymer matrix.

  15. Sensing/actuating materials made from carbon nanotube polymer composites and methods for making same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ounaies, Zoubeida (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor); Harrison, Joycelyn S. (Inventor); Holloway, Nancy M. (Inventor); Draughon, Gregory K. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    An electroactive sensing or actuating material comprises a composite made from a polymer with polarizable moieties and an effective amount of carbon nanotubes incorporated in the polymer for a predetermined electromechanical operation of the composite when such composite is affected by an external stimulus. In another embodiment, the composite comprises a third component of micro-sized to nano-sized particles of an electroactive ceramic that is also incorporated in the polymer matrix. The method for making the three-phase composite comprises either incorporating the carbon nanotubes in the polymer matrix before incorporation of the particles of ceramic or mixing the carbon nanotubes and particles of ceramic together in a solution before incorporation in the polymer matrix.

  16. Preparation and properties of Cu matrix composite reinforced by carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xiao-hua; LI Wen-hua; CHEN Chuan-sheng; XU Long-shan; YANG Zhi; HU Jing

    2005-01-01

    Cu matrix composites reinforced by carbon nanotubes(CNTs) were prepared. The effect of carbon nanotubes on mechanical and tribological properties of the Cu matrix composites were investigated. The chemical method for coating CNTs was reported. The morphology of the fracture surfaces and worn surface were examined by SEM.The results show that Cu/coated-CNTs composites have higher hardness, much better wear resistance and antifriction properties than those of the reference Cu alloy (Cu-10Sn) and Cu/uncoated-CNTs composite sintered under the same conditions. The optimal mechanical properties of the composites occurred at 2. 25% (mass fraction) of CNTs. The excellent wear resistance and anti-friction properties are attributed to the fiber strengthening effect of CNTs and the effect of the spherical wear debris containing carbon nanotubes on the tribo-surface.

  17. Compositions and methods for cancer treatment using targeted carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Jr., Roger G; Resasco, Daniel E; Neves, Luis Filipe Ferreira

    2013-08-27

    The present invention is a method for detecting and destroying cancer tumors. The method is based on the concept of associating a linking protein or linking peptide such as, but not limited to, annexin V or other annexins to carbon nanotubes such as single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) to form a protein-CNT complex. Said linking protein or peptide can selectively bind to cancerous cells, especially tumor vasculature endothelial cells, rather than to healthy ones by binding to cancer-specific external receptors such as anionic phospholipids including phosphatidylserine expressed on the outer surfaces of cancer cells only. Irradiation of bound CNTs with one or more specific electromagnetic wavelengths is then used to detect and destroy those cells to which the CNTs are bound via the linking protein or peptide thereby destroying the tumor or cancer cells and preferably an immunostimulant is provided to the patient to enhance the immune response against antigens released from the tumor or cancer cells.

  18. Field Emission from Carbon Nanotube/Tin Composite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Bo; ZHANG Ya-fei

    2009-01-01

    Powder metallurgy was used to fabricate carbon nanotube (CNT) field emission cathodes. CNTs and tin (Sn) powder were blended, compacted and sintered. After polishing and etching, CNTs were exposed and protruded from the metal surface. CNTs were embedded into the Sn matrix, which acted as stable field emitters. The J-E curves show excellent field emission properties, such as low turn-on field of 2.8 V/μm, high emission current density and good current stability.

  19. Wear Behavior of the Lead-Free Tin Bronze Matrix Composite Reinforced by Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Jun; Fan, Huiqing; Wang, Yangli; Zhang, Siquan

    2011-12-01

    Copper-coated carbon nanotubes were prepared by the electroless plating route. The structure and component of copper/carbon tubes were characterized using a transmission electron microscope and energy dispersive spectrometer. The results show that the surface of the carbon tubes was covered by the copper particles. Copper/carbon tubes were used as the substitute of part of tin and all of lead in the tin bronze matrix, and the tribological properties of carbon nanotube-reinforced Cu-4 wt pct Sn-6 wt pct Zn composites were studied. The effects of the carbon nanotube volume fraction and sliding distance in unlubricated ball-on-disc wear test were investigated. The 3 vol pct carbon nanotube-reinforced Cu-4 wt pct Sn-6 wt pct Zn composite shows the Vickers hardness of 126.9, which is approximately 1.6 times higher than that of Cu-6 wt pct Sn-6 wt pct Zn-3 wt pct Pb tin bronze. The wear rate and average friction coefficients of 3 vol pct carbon nanotube-reinforced Cu-4 wt pct Sn-6 wt pct Zn composite were lower than those of the Cu-6 wt pct Sn-6 wt pct Zn-3 wt pct Pb tin bronze, respectively.

  20. Magnetic Property Measurements on Single Wall Carbon Nanotube-Polyimide Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Keun J.; Wincheski, Russell A.; Park, Cheol

    2008-01-01

    Temperature and magnetic field dependent magnetization measurements were performed on polyimide nanocomposite samples, synthesized with various weight percentages of single wall carbon nanotubes. It was found that the magnetization of the composite, normalized to the mass of nanotube material in the sample, decreased with increasing weight percentage of nanotubes. It is possible that the interfacial coupling between the carbon nanotube (CNT) fillers and the polyimide matrix promotes the diamagnetic response from CNTs and reduces the total magnetization of the composite. The coercivity of the samples, believed to originate from the residual magnetic catalyst particles, was enhanced and had a stronger temperature dependence as a result of the composite synthesis. These changes in magnetic properties can form the basis of a new approach to investigate the interfacial properties in the CNT nanocomposites through magnetic property measurements.

  1. Giant Surface Conductivity Enhancement in a Carbon Nanotube Composite by Ultraviolet Light Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Christian J; Orloff, Nathan D; Twedt, Kevin A; Lam, Thomas; Vargas-Lara, Fernando; Zhao, Minhua; Natarajan, Bharath; Scott, Keana C; Marksz, Eric; Nguyen, Tinh; Douglas, Jack F; McClelland, Jabez; Garboczi, Edward; Obrzut, Jan; Liddle, J Alexander

    2016-09-07

    Carbon nanotube composites are lightweight, multifunctional materials with readily adjustable mechanical and electrical properties-relevant to the aerospace, automotive, and sporting goods industries as high-performance structural materials. Here, we combine well-established and newly developed characterization techniques to demonstrate that ultraviolet (UV) light exposure provides a controllable means to enhance the electrical conductivity of the surface of a commercial carbon nanotube-epoxy composite by over 5 orders of magnitude. Our observations, combined with theory and simulations, reveal that the increase in conductivity is due to the formation of a concentrated layer of nanotubes on the composite surface. Our model implies that contacts between nanotube-rich microdomains dominate the conductivity of this layer at low UV dose, while tube-tube transport dominates at high UV dose. Further, we use this model to predictably pattern conductive traces with a UV laser, providing a facile approach for direct integration of lightweight conductors on nanocomposite surfaces.

  2. Effective permittivity of single-walled carbon nanotube composites: Two-fluid model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moradi, Afshin, E-mail: a.moradi@kut.ac.ir [Department of Engineering Physics, Kermanshah University of Technology, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Nano Sciences, Institute for Studies in Theoretical Physics and Mathematics (IPM), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zangeneh, Hamid Reza; Moghadam, Firoozeh Karimi [Department of Photonics, Faculty of Physics, University of Kashan, Kashan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    We develop an effective medium theory to obtain effective permittivity of a composite of two-dimensional (2D) aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes. Electronic excitations on each nanotube surface are modeled by an infinitesimally thin layer of a 2D electron gas represented by two interacting fluids, which takes into account different nature of the σ and π electrons. Calculations of both real and imaginary parts of the effective dielectric function of the system are presented, for different values of the filling factor and radius of carbon nanotubes.

  3. Effective permittivity of single-walled carbon nanotube composites: Two-fluid model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Afshin; Zangeneh, Hamid Reza; Moghadam, Firoozeh Karimi

    2015-12-01

    We develop an effective medium theory to obtain effective permittivity of a composite of two-dimensional (2D) aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes. Electronic excitations on each nanotube surface are modeled by an infinitesimally thin layer of a 2D electron gas represented by two interacting fluids, which takes into account different nature of the σ and π electrons. Calculations of both real and imaginary parts of the effective dielectric function of the system are presented, for different values of the filling factor and radius of carbon nanotubes.

  4. Sub percolation threshold carbon nanotube based polyvinylidene fluoride polymer-polymer composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Cedric Antony

    The study of piezoelectric materials has traditionally focused largely on homogeneous crystalline or semi-crystalline materials. This research focuses on the concept of piezoelectric composites using selective microstructural reinforcement in the piezoelectric material to improve the piezoelectric properties. This is done using a polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) and carbon nanotube composite as the model system. A multi-tiered engineering approach is taken to understand the material (experimental and computational analyses) and design a composite system which provides an effective platform for future research in piezoelectric improvement. A finite element analysis is used to evaluate the ability of carbon nanotubes to generate a heterogeneous electric field where local improvements in electric field produce an increase in the effective piezoelectric strength. The study finds that weight percent and aspect ratio of the carbon nanotubes are of key importance while formations of percolating networks are detrimental to performance. This motivates investigation into electrospinning into a method of producing sub percolation threshold composites with large carbon nanotube content. However, the electrospun fabrics have too low of a dielectric strength to sustain high strength electric fields. This is studied within the context of high voltage physics and a solution inspired by traditional composites manufacturing is proposed wherein the electrospun fiber mat is used as the fiber reinforcing component of a polymer-polymer composite. This composite is thoroughly analyzed to show that it allows for a high dielectric strength combined with high carbon nanotube content. It is also shown that the PVDF contains the proper crystal structure to allow for piezoelectric properties. Furthermore, the addition of carbon nanotubes greatly improves the strength and stiffness of the composite, as well as affecting the internal electric field response to an applied voltage. These qualities

  5. Hybrid Carbon Fibers/Carbon Nanotubes Structures for Next Generation Polymeric Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Al-Haik

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Pitch-based carbon fibers are commonly used to produce polymeric carbon fiber structural composites. Several investigations have reported different methods for dispersing and subsequently aligning carbon nanotubes (CNTs as a filler to reinforce polymer matrix. The significant difficulty in dispersing CNTs suggested the controlled-growth of CNTs on surfaces where they are needed. Here we compare between two techniques for depositing the catalyst iron used toward growing CNTs on pitch-based carbon fiber surfaces. Electrochemical deposition of iron using pulse voltametry is compared to DC magnetron iron sputtering. Carbon nanostructures growth was performed using a thermal CVD system. Characterization for comparison between both techniques was compared via SEM, TEM, and Raman spectroscopy analysis. It is shown that while both techniques were successful to grow CNTs on the carbon fiber surfaces, iron sputtering technique was capable of producing more uniform distribution of iron catalyst and thus multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs compared to MWCNTs grown using the electrochemical deposition of iron.

  6. Free vibration of functionally graded carbon-nanotube-reinforced composite plates with cutout

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Mirzaei

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available During the past five years, it has been shown that carbon nanotubes act as an exceptional reinforcement for composites. For this reason, a large number of investigations have been devoted to analysis of fundamental, structural behavior of solid structures made of carbon-nanotube-reinforced composites (CNTRC. The present research, as an extension of the available works on the vibration analysis of CNTRC structures, examines the free vibration characteristics of plates containing a cutout that are reinforced with uniform or nonuniform distribution of carbon nanotubes. The first-order shear deformation plate theory is used to estimate the kinematics of the plate. The solution method is based on the Ritz method with Chebyshev basis polynomials. Such a solution method is suitable for arbitrary in-plane and out-of-plane boundary conditions of the plate. It is shown that through a functionally graded distribution of carbon nanotubes across the thickness of the plate, the fundamental frequency of a rectangular plate with or without a cutout may be enhanced. Furthermore, the frequencies are highly dependent on the volume fraction of carbon nanotubes and may be increased upon using more carbon nanotubes as reinforcement.

  7. High-cycle Fatigue Life Extension of Glass Fiber/Polymer Composites with Carbon Nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christopher S Grimmer; C K H Dharan

    2009-01-01

    The present work shows that the addition of small volume fractions of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to the matrix results in a significant increase in the high-cycle fatigue life. It is proposed that carbon nanotubes tend to inhibit the formation of large cracks by nucleating nano-scale damage zones. In addition, the contribution to energy absorption from the fracture of nanotubes bridging across nano-scale cracks and from nanotube pull-out from the matrix are mechanisms that can improve the fatigue life. An energy-based model was proposed to estimate the additional strain energy absorbed in fatigue. The distributed nanotubes in the matrix appear to both distribute damage as well as inhibit damage propagation resulting in an overall improvement in the fatigue strength of glass fiber composites.

  8. Fabrication and characterization of poly(vinyl alcohol)/carbon nanotube melt-spinning composites fiber

    OpenAIRE

    Zhiqian Yang; Degen Xu; Jianzhong Liu; Jiaping Liu; Lin Li; Lihui Zhang; Jin Lv

    2015-01-01

    A composite fiber based on carbon nanotube (CNT) and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) was prepared by melt-spinning. Structural features and the mechanical performances of the PVA/CNT composite fiber were investigated as a function of draw condition. Initial moduli and tensile strengths of the drawn composite fibers are much higher than those of undrawn composite fiber. It is identified from XRD and 2D XRD that the composite fiber exhibits enhanced crystallinity and orientation degree with increasin...

  9. Effects of Atomic-Scale Structure on the Fracture Properties of Amorphous Carbon - Carbon Nanotube Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Benjamin D.; Wise, Kristopher E.; Odegard, Gregory M.

    2015-01-01

    The fracture of carbon materials is a complex process, the understanding of which is critical to the development of next generation high performance materials. While quantum mechanical (QM) calculations are the most accurate way to model fracture, the fracture behavior of many carbon-based composite engineering materials, such as carbon nanotube (CNT) composites, is a multi-scale process that occurs on time and length scales beyond the practical limitations of QM methods. The Reax Force Field (ReaxFF) is capable of predicting mechanical properties involving strong deformation, bond breaking and bond formation in the classical molecular dynamics framework. This has been achieved by adding to the potential energy function a bond-order term that varies continuously with distance. The use of an empirical bond order potential, such as ReaxFF, enables the simulation of failure in molecular systems that are several orders of magnitude larger than would be possible in QM techniques. In this work, the fracture behavior of an amorphous carbon (AC) matrix reinforced with CNTs was modeled using molecular dynamics with the ReaxFF reactive forcefield. Care was taken to select the appropriate simulation parameters, which can be different from those required when using traditional fixed-bond force fields. The effect of CNT arrangement was investigated with three systems: a single-wall nanotube (SWNT) array, a multi-wall nanotube (MWNT) array, and a SWNT bundle system. For each arrangement, covalent bonds are added between the CNTs and AC, with crosslink fractions ranging from 0-25% of the interfacial CNT atoms. The SWNT and MWNT array systems represent ideal cases with evenly spaced CNTs; the SWNT bundle system represents a more realistic case because, in practice, van der Waals interactions lead to the agglomeration of CNTs into bundles. The simulation results will serve as guidance in setting experimental processing conditions to optimize the mechanical properties of CNT

  10. Micromechanics Modeling of Functionally Graded Interphase Regions in Carbon Nanotube-Polymer Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, Gary D.; Lagoudas, Dimitris C.; Frankland, Sarah Jane V.; Gates, Thomas S.

    2006-01-01

    The effective elastic properties of a unidirectional carbon fiber/epoxy lamina in which the carbon fibers are coated with single-walled carbon nanotubes are modeled herein through the use of a multi-scale method involving the molecular dynamics/equivalent continuum and micromechanics methods. The specific lamina representative volume element studied consists of a carbon fiber surrounded by a region of epoxy containing a radially varying concentration of carbon nanotubes which is then embedded in the pure epoxy matrix. The variable concentration of carbon nanotubes surrounding the carbon fiber results in a functionally graded interphase region as the properties of the interphase region vary according to the carbon nanotube volume fraction. Molecular dynamics and equivalent continuum methods are used to assess the local effective properties of the carbon nanotube/epoxy comprising the interphase region. Micromechanics in the form of the Mori-Tanaka method are then applied to obtain the global effective properties of the graded interphase region wherein the carbon nanotubes are randomly oriented. Finally, the multi-layer composite cylinders micromechanics approach is used to obtain the effective lamina properties from the lamina representative volume element. It was found that even very small quantities of carbon nanotubes (0.36% of lamina by volume) coating the surface of the carbon fibers in the lamina can have a significant effect (8% increase) on the transverse properties of the lamina (E22, k23, G23 and G12) with almost no affect on the lamina properties in the fiber direction (E11 and v12).

  11. Visible light photocatalytic properties of novel molybdenum treated carbon nanotube/titania composites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Feng-Jun Zhang; Won-Chun Oh

    2011-06-01

    Two types of molybdenum–carbon nanotubes and molybdenum treated carbon nanotubes/titania composites were prepared using a sol–gel method. These composites were characterized comprehensively by the Brauer–Emett–Teller (BET) surface area, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and UV-vis absorption spectroscopy. It was found that the photocatalytic degradation of a methylene blue solution could be attributed to the combined effects caused by the photo-degradation of titania, the electron assistance of carbon nanotube network, and the enhancement of molybdenum. The proposed redox mechanism of the photodegradation of methylene blue on Mo-CNT/TiO2 composites is suggested.

  12. Polymer composites containing nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bley, Richard A. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention relates to polymer composite materials containing carbon nanotubes, particularly to those containing singled-walled nanotubes. The invention provides a polymer composite comprising one or more base polymers, one or more functionalized m-phenylenevinylene-2,5-disubstituted-p-phenylenevinylene polymers and carbon nanotubes. The invention also relates to functionalized m-phenylenevinylene-2,5-disubstituted-p-phenylenevinylene polymers, particularly to m-phenylenevinylene-2,5-disubstituted-p-phenylenevinylene polymers having side chain functionalization, and more particularly to m-phenylenevinylene-2,5-disubstituted-p-phenylenevinylene polymers having olefin side chains and alkyl epoxy side chains. The invention further relates to methods of making polymer composites comprising carbon nanotubes.

  13. Optimization of interfacial microstructure and mechanical properties of carbon fiber/epoxy composites via carbon nanotube sizing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Hongwei; Sui, Xianhang; Zhao, Zhongbo; Xu, Zhiwei; Chen, Lei, E-mail: chenlei@tjpu.edu.cn; Deng, Hui; Liu, Ya; Qian, Xiaoming, E-mail: qianxiaoming@tjpu.edu.cn

    2015-08-30

    Highlights: • Multiple sizing treatments were used to modify the surface of carbon fiber with carbon nanotubes. • The distribution state of carbon nanotubes in interface had a great effect on the performance of carbon fiber composites. • Interfacial microstructure changes brought by sizing treatment were detected by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and atomic force microscope. • Gradient interphase composed of carbon nanotubes and epoxy was favorable to improve the mechanical properties of carbon composites. - Abstract: Repetitious sizing treatment was used to modify the carbon fiber (CF) surface with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) for improving interfacial properties of CF/epoxy composites. Interlaminar shear and flexural results showed that mechanical properties of composites were significantly depended on the dispersion state and contents of CNTs in interfacial regions. Increases of 13.45% in interlaminar shear strength and 20.31% in flexural strength were achieved in quintuple sized-CF/epoxy composites, whereas excessive CNTs led to decrease of interfacial performance due to defects induced by agglomerated CNTs. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and force modulation atomic force microscope were used to detect the structure of interfacial phase and results indicated that gradient interfacial structure with various thicknesses was formed due to CNT incorporation. This means that such a simple and efficient method to improve interfacial performance of composites via regulating the fiber–matrix interphase structure was developed and showed great commercial application potential.

  14. Magnetic studies of polystyrene/iron-filled multi-wall carbon nanotube composite films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makarova, T.L., E-mail: Tatyana.makarova@lut.fi [Lappeenranta University of Technology, FI-53851 Lappeenranta (Finland); Ioffe Institute, St Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation); Zakharchuk, I.; Geydt, P.; Lahderanta, E. [Lappeenranta University of Technology, FI-53851 Lappeenranta (Finland); Komlev, A.A. [St Petersburg State Electrotechnical University, St Petersburg 197376 (Russian Federation); Zyrianova, A.A. [Ioffe Institute, St Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation); Kanygin, M.A. [Nikolaev Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, SB RAS, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Sedelnikova, O.V. [Nikolaev Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, SB RAS, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Suslyaev, V.I [Tomsk State University, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Bulusheva, L.G.; Okotrub, A.V. [Nikolaev Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, SB RAS, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation)

    2016-10-01

    Polystyrene/iron-filled multi-wall carbon nanotube composite films were prepared by solution processing, forge-rolling and stretching methods. Elongated iron carbide nanoparticles formed because of catalytic growth are situated inside the hollow cavity of the nanotubes. Magnetic susceptibility measurements as well as records of isothermal hysteresis loops performed in three perpendicular directions of magnetic field confirmed that the nanotubes have a preferential alignment in the matrix. Strong diamagnetic anisotropy in the composites emerges not only from the MWCNTs but also from the polystyrene matrix. The polymer sticks to the honeycomb lattice through the interaction of the π-orbitals of the phenyl ring and those of the carbon nanotube, contributing to anisotropic diamagnetic response. The contribution of iron nanoparticles to overall magnetic response strongly depends on nanotube concentration in the composite as well as on matrix-filler non-covalent stacking, which influences magnetic interparticle interactions. - Highlights: • . Nanotube/polystyrene composites were prepared by stretching and forge-rolling methods. • Anisotropic response of the composites mainly comes from the phenyl aromatic rings. • Magnetism of iron-based nanoparticles is governed by interactions with the matrix.

  15. Properties of Multifunctional Hybrid Carbon Nanotube/Carbon Fiber Polymer Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano, Roberto J.; Kang, Jin Ho; Grimsley, Brian W.; Ratcliffe, James G.; Siochi, Emilie J.

    2016-01-01

    For aircraft primary structures, carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites possess many advantages over conventional aluminum alloys due to their light weight, higher strength- and stiffness-to-weight ratios, and low life-cycle maintenance costs. However, the relatively low electrical and thermal conductivities of CFRP composites fail to provide structural safety in certain operational conditions such as lightning strikes. Carbon nanotubes (CNT) offer the potential to enhance the multi-functionality of composites with improved thermal and electrical conductivity. In this study, hybrid CNT/carbon fiber (CF) polymer composites were fabricated by interleaving layers of CNT sheets with Hexcel® IM7/8852 prepreg. Resin concentrations from 1 wt% to 50 wt% were used to infuse the CNT sheets prior to composite fabrication. The interlaminar properties of the resulting hybrid composites were characterized by mode I and II fracture toughness testing. Fractographical analysis was performed to study the effect of resin concentration. In addition, multi-directional physical properties like thermal conductivity of the orthotropic hybrid polymer composite were evaluated.

  16. Processing and Properties of Carbon Nanotube PVC Composites

    OpenAIRE

    Kristin Trommer; Carina Petzold; Bernd Morgenstern

    2014-01-01

    Commercially available multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) were incorporated in coating masses based on PVC by means of three roll mill. The best results could be obtained using the 5 µm gap. Thin PVC sheets were formed via knife coating having an electrical conductivity up to 1,500 S/m that are applicable as electric heating elements. For the use in the antistatic range, CNT contents ≤0.5% are sufficient. Rheological measurements indicate the quality of particle processing. AFM investigatio...

  17. Composite electrodes of activated carbon derived from cassava peel and carbon nanotubes for supercapacitor applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taer, E.; Iwantono, Yulita, M.; Taslim, R.; Subagio, A.; Salomo, Deraman, M.

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, a composite electrode was prepared from a mixture of activated carbon derived from precarbonization of cassava peel (CP) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The activated carbon was produced by pyrolysis process using ZnCl2 as an activation agent. A N2 adsorption-desorption analysis for the sample indicated that the BET surface area of the activated carbon was 1336 m2 g-1. Difference percentage of CNTs of 0, 5, 10, 15 and 20% with 5% of PVDF binder were added into CP based activated carbon in order to fabricate the composite electrodes. The morphology and structure of the composite electrodes were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. The SEM image observed that the distribution of CNTs was homogeneous between carbon particles and the XRD pattern shown the amorphous structure of the sample. The electrodes were fabricated for supercapacitor cells with 316L stainless steel as current collector and 1 M sulfuric acid as electrolyte. An electrochemical characterization was performed by using an electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) method using a Solatron 1286 instrument and the addition of CNTs revealed to improve the resistant and capacitive properties of supercapacitor cell.

  18. A nanofilter composed of carbon nanotube-silver composites for virus removal and antibacterial activity improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jun Pyo; Kim, Jae Ha; Kim, Jieun; Lee, Soo No; Park, Han-Oh

    2016-04-01

    We have developed a new nanofilter using a carbon nanotube-silver composite material that is capable of efficiently removing waterborne viruses and bacteria. The nanofilter was subjected to plasma surface treatment to enhance its flow rate, which was improved by approximately 62%. Nanoscale pores were obtained by fabricating a carbon nanotube network and using nanoparticle fixation technology for the removal of viruses. The pore size of the nanofilter was approximately 38 nm and the measured flow rate ranged from 21.0 to 97.2L/(min·m(2)) under a pressure of 1-6 kgf/cm(2) when the amount of loaded carbon nanotube-silver composite was 1.0 mg/cm(2). The nanofilter was tested against Polio-, Noro-, and Coxsackie viruses using a sensitive real-time polymerase chain reaction assay to detect the presence of viral particles within the outflow. No trace of viruses was found to flow through the nanofilter with carbon nanotube-silver composite loaded above 0.8 mg/cm(2). Moreover, the surface of the filter has antibacterial properties to prevent bacterial clogging due to the presence of 20-nm silver nanoparticles, which were synthesized on the carbon nanotube surface.

  19. Enhancement in ballistic performance of composite hard armor through carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Gibson

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of carbon nanotubes in composite hard armor is discussed in this study. The processing techniques to make various armor composite panels consisting of Kevlar®29 woven fabric in an epoxy matrix and the subsequent V50 test results for both 44 caliber soft-point rounds and 30 caliber FSP (fragment simulated projectile threats are presented. A 6.5% improvement in the V50 test results was found for a combination of 1.65 wt% loading of carbon nanotubes and 1.65 wt% loading of milled fibers. The failure mechanism of carbon nanotubes during the ballistic event is discussed through scanning electron microscope images of the panels after the failure. Raman Spectroscopy was also utilized to evaluate the residual strain in the Kevlar®29 fibers post shoot. The Raman Spectroscopy shows a Raman shift of 25 cm−1 for the Kevlar®29 fiber utilized in the composite panel that had an enhancement in the V50 performance by using milled fiber and multi-walled carbon nanotubes. Evaluating both scenarios where an improvement was made and other panels without any improvement allows for understanding of how loading levels and synergistic effects between carbon nanotubes and milled fibers can further enhance ballistic performance.

  20. Synthesis of chemically bonded graphene/carbon nanotube composites and their application in large volumetric capacitance supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Naeyoung; Kwon, Soongeun; Lee, Dongwook; Yoon, Dong-Myung; Park, Young Min; Benayad, Anass; Choi, Jae-Young; Park, Jong Se

    2013-12-17

    Chemically bonded graphene/carbon nanotube composites as flexible supercapacitor electrode materials are synthesized by amide bonding. Carbon nanotubes attached along the edges and onto the surface of graphene act as spacers to increase the electrolyte-accessible surface area. Our lamellar structure electrodes demonstrate the largest volumetric capacitance (165 F cm(-3) ) ever shown by carbon-based electrodes.

  1. Enhancement of Carbon Nanotube Particle Distribution in PPS/PEEK/Carbon Nanotube Ternary Composites with Sausage-Like Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Cao

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanomaterial particles were selectively distributed in an incompatible and high-melting-temperature polymer blend interface, or in a particular phase, to obtain conductive composites. The composite products revealed poor morphology stability and mechanical performance due to processing several times. Poly(phenylene sulfide (PPS and poly(ether ether ketone (PEEK polymers with large differences of processing temperatures were selected as blend components to obtain a compatible blend. PPS/PEEK/multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT ternary nanocomposites were prepared using a controlled melt blending process. The composite samples with similar sausage-like structures of PEEK, as a dispersed phase, promote MWCNT to maximize concentration distribution in the PPS continuous phase. As a result, the theoretical percolation threshold of the composite reduced to 0.347 wt %. Moreover, the conductivity of the composite remained stable even after processing several times. CNTs revealed a particular effect when distributed selectively in this kind of system: it can enhance the dispersion of phases and also provide conductivity to the blend at small CNT contents, which can provide more useful ideas for the development of high-melting-temperature and antistatic or conductive plastic materials.

  2. Next Generation Structural Composite Using Surface Grown Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    Marwan  Al‐Haik (Virginia Tech, Mechanical Engineering)  3‐ Claudi Luhrs (Co‐PI, UNM, Mechanical Engineering)  4‐ Hamid Garmestani (Georgia Tech, Mechanical...Taha  Army  Office  of  Research  Award:  DURIP:  High  Velocity  Impact  Equipment, May 2010.  5. Dr  Marwan   Al‐Haik  and  Dr. Mahmoud  Reda  Taha...Chavez.   Honor Undergraduate Thesis, Growth of carbon nanotubes/nanofibers on the  surface  of  carbon  fibers.  Advisor  Marwan   Al‐Haik  May  2009

  3. Nanostructured composites based on carbon nanotubes and epoxy resin for use as radar absorbing materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Valdirene Aparecida [Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica (ITA), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Folgueras, Luiza de Castro; Candido, Geraldo Mauricio; Paula, Adriano Luiz de; Rezende, Mirabel Cerqueira, E-mail: mirabelmcr@iae.cta.br [Instituto de Aeronautica e Espaco (IAE), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Div. de Materiais; Costa, Michelle Leali [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (DMT/UNESP), Guaratingueta, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Materiais e Tecnologia

    2013-07-01

    Nanostructured polymer composites have opened up new perspectives for multifunctional materials. In particular, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) present potential applications in order to improve mechanical and electrical performance in composites with aerospace application. The combination of epoxy resin with multi walled carbon nanotubes results in a new functional material with enhanced electromagnetic properties. The objective of this work was the processing of radar absorbing materials based on formulations containing different quantities of carbon nanotubes in an epoxy resin matrix. To reach this objective the adequate concentration of CNTs in the resin matrix was determined. The processed structures were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, rheology, thermal and reflectivity in the frequency range of 8.2 to 12.4 GHz analyses. The microwave attenuation was up to 99.7%, using only 0.5% (w/w) of CNT, showing that these materials present advantages in performance associated with low additive concentrations (author)

  4. Deformation and Failure of a Multi-Wall Carbon Nanotube Yarn Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, Thomas S.; Jefferson, Gail D.; Frankland, Sarah-Jane V.

    2008-01-01

    Forests of multi-walled carbon nanotubes can be twisted and manipulated into continuous fibers or yarns that exhibit many of the characteristics of traditional textiles. Macro-scale analysis and test may provide strength and stiffness predictions for a composite composed of a polymer matrix and low-volume fraction yarns. However, due to the nano-scale of the carbon nanotubes, it is desirable to use atomistic calculations to consider tube-tube interactions and the influence of simulated twist on the effective friction coefficient. This paper reports laboratory test data on the mechanical response of a multi-walled, carbon nanotube yarn/polymer composite from both dynamic and quasi-static tensile tests. Macroscale and nano-scale analysis methods are explored and used to define some of the key structure-property relationships. The measured influence of hot-wet aging on the tensile properties is also reported.

  5. Three-Phase Carbon Fiber Amine Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes Epoxy Composite: Processing, Characterisation, and Multiscale Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper discusses the key issues of carbon nanotube (CNT dispersion and effect of functionalisation on the mechanical properties of multiscale carbon epoxy composites. In this study, CNTs were added in epoxy matrix and further reinforced with carbon fibres. Predetermined amounts of optimally amine functionalised CNTs were dispersed in epoxy matrix, and unidirectional carbon fiber laminates were produced. The effect of the presence of CNTs (1.0 wt% in the resin was reflected by pronounced increase in Young’s modulus, inter-laminar shear strength, and flexural modulus by 51.46%, 39.62%, and 38.04%, respectively. However, 1.5 wt% CNT loading in epoxy resin decreased the overall properties of the three-phase composites. A combination of Halpin-Tsai equations and micromechanics modeling approach was also used to evaluate the mechanical properties of multiscale composites and the differences between the predicted and experimental values are reported. These multiscale composites are likely to be used for potential missile and aerospace structural applications.

  6. Low temperature hall effect investigation of conducting polymer-carbon nanotubes composite network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrami, Afarin; Talib, Zainal Abidin; Yunus, Wan Mahmood Mat; Behzad, Kasra; M Abdi, Mahnaz; Din, Fasih Ud

    2012-11-14

    Polypyrrole (PPy) and polypyrrole-carboxylic functionalized multi wall carbon nanotube composites (PPy/f-MWCNT) were synthesized by in situ chemical oxidative polymerization of pyrrole on the carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The structure of the resulting complex nanotubes was characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The effects of f-MWCNT concentration on the electrical properties of the resulting composites were studied at temperatures between 100 K and 300 K. The Hall mobility and Hall coefficient of PPy and PPy/f-MWCNT composite samples with different concentrations of f-MWCNT were measured using the van der Pauw technique. The mobility decreased slightly with increasing temperature, while the conductivity was dominated by the gradually increasing carrier density.

  7. Crystallization and mechanical properties of functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes/polyvinylidene fluoride composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Jing; Iftekharul Haque, Rubaiyet; Larsen, Mikael

    2012-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes were purified and functionalized by nitric acid and octadecylamine. Raman and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were used to characterize the functionalization of the single-walled carbon nanotubes. Polyvinylidene flouride nanocomposites containing 1 wt......% purified or functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes were prepared by solution blending and injection molding. The dispersion of different carbon nanotubes in dimethylformamide and in polyvinylidene flouride has been investigated. Mechanical properties show that adding single-walled carbon nanotubes...

  8. Superconducting characteristics of 4-Å carbon nanotube-zeolite composite

    KAUST Repository

    Lortz, Rolf W.

    2009-04-15

    We have fabricated nanocomposites consisting of 4-A carbon nanotubes embedded in the 0.7-nm pores of aluminophosphate- five (AFI) zeolite that display a superconducting specific heat transition at 15 K. MicroRaman spectra of the samples show strong and spatially uniform radial breathing mode (RBM) signals at 510 cm-1 and 550 cm-1, characteristic of the (4,2) and (5,0) nanotubes, respectively. The specific heat transition is suppressed at >2T, with a temperature dependence characteristic of finite-size effects. Comparison with theory shows the behavior to be consistent with that of a type II BCS superconductor, characterized by a coherence length of 14 ± 2 nm and a magnetic penetration length of 1.5 ± 0.7 μm. Four probe and differential resistance measurements have also indicated a superconducting transition initiating at 15 K, but the magnetoresistance data indicate the superconducting network to be inhomogeneous, with a component being susceptible to magnetic fields below 3 T and other parts capable of withstanding a magnetic field of 5Tor beyond.

  9. Carbon Nanotube Coatings as Used in Strain Sensors for Composite Tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trigwell, Steve; Snyder, Sarah; Hatfield, Walt; Dervishi, Enkeleda; Biris, Alexandru S.

    2011-01-01

    The next generation of cryogenic fuel tanks, crew habitats and other components for future spacecraft will focus on the usc of lightweight carbon fiber composite materials. A critical issue in the design and optimization of such tanks and structures will bc in structural health monitoring, however, current strain sensors have limitations. In this study, a novel carbon nanotube thin film was applied to carbon fiber composites for structural monitoring. Applying a load using a 3-point bend test to simulate bowing of a tank wall, induced significant increases in the film's electrical resistance at small deflections. Upon release of the load, the resistance returned to its approximate start value and was reproducible over multiple tests. The results show that a carbon nanotube thin film has great potential for the health monitoring of composite structures.

  10. Enhanced Strain-Dependent Electrical Resistance of Polyurethane Composites with Embedded Oxidized Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Benlikaya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of different chemical oxidation of multiwalled carbon nanotubes with H2O2, HNO3, and KMnO4 on the change of electrical resistance of polyurethane composites with embedded oxidized nanotube networks subjected to elongation and bending has been studied. The testing has shown about twenty-fold increase in the electrical resistance for the composite prepared from KMnO4 oxidized nanotubes in comparison to the composites prepared from the pristine and other oxidized nanotubes. The evaluated sensitivity of KMnO4 treated composite in terms of the gauge factor increases with strain to nearly 175 at the strain 11%. This is a substantial increase, which ranks the composite prepared from KMnO4 oxidized nanotubes among materials as strain gauges with the highest electromechanical sensitivity. The observed differences in electromechanical properties of the composites are discussed on basis of their structure which is examined by the measurements of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscope. The possible practical use of the composites is demonstrated by monitoring of elbow joint flexion during two different physical exercises.

  11. Effect of carbon nanotubes upon emissions from cutting and sanding carbon fiber-epoxy composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heitbrink, William A. [LMK OSH Consulting LLC (United States); Lo, Li-Ming, E-mail: LLo@cdc.gov [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Division of Applied Research and Technology, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are being incorporated into structural composites to enhance material strength. During fabrication or repair activities, machining nanocomposites may release CNTs into the workplace air. An experimental study was conducted to evaluate the emissions generated by cutting and sanding on three types of epoxy-composite panels: Panel A containing graphite fibers, Panel B containing graphite fibers and carbon-based mat, and Panel C containing graphite fibers, carbon-based mat, and multi-walled CNTs. Aerosol sampling was conducted with direct-reading instruments, and filter samples were collected for measuring elemental carbon (EC) and fiber concentrations. Our study results showed that cutting Panel C with a band saw did not generate detectable emissions of fibers inspected by transmission electron microscopy but did increase the particle mass, number, and EC emission concentrations by 20–80 % compared to Panels A and B. Sanding operation performed on two Panel C resulted in fiber emission rates of 1.9 × 10{sup 8} and 2.8 × 10{sup 6} fibers per second (f/s), while no free aerosol fibers were detected from sanding Panels A and B containing no CNTs. These free CNT fibers may be a health concern. However, the analysis of particle and EC concentrations from these same samples cannot clearly indicate the presence of CNTs, because extraneous aerosol generation from machining the composite epoxy material increased the mass concentrations of the EC.

  12. Electrokinetics of scalable, electric-field-assisted fabrication of vertically aligned carbon-nanotube/polymer composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellano, Richard J.; Akin, Cevat; Giraldo, Gabriel; Kim, Sangil; Fornasiero, Francesco; Shan, Jerry W.

    2015-06-01

    Composite thin films incorporating vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) offer promise for a variety of applications where the vertical alignment of the CNTs is critical to meet performance requirements, e.g., highly permeable membranes, thermal interfaces, dry adhesives, and films with anisotropic electrical conductivity. However, current VACNT fabrication techniques are complex and difficult to scale up. Here, we describe a solution-based, electric-field-assisted approach as a cost-effective and scalable method to produce large-area VACNT composites. Multiwall-carbon nanotubes are dispersed in a polymeric matrix, aligned with an alternating-current (AC) electric field, and electrophoretically concentrated to one side of the thin film with a direct-current (DC) component to the electric field. This approach enables the fabrication of highly concentrated, individually aligned nanotube composites from suspensions of very dilute ( ϕ = 4 × 10 - 4 ) volume fraction. We experimentally investigate the basic electrokinetics of nanotube alignment under AC electric fields, and show that simple models can adequately predict the rate and degree of nanotube alignment using classical expressions for the induced dipole moment, hydrodynamic drag, and the effects of Brownian motion. The composite AC + DC field also introduces complex fluid motion associated with AC electro-osmosis and the electrochemistry of the fluid/electrode interface. We experimentally probe the electric-field parameters behind these electrokinetic phenomena, and demonstrate, with suitable choices of processing parameters, the ability to scalably produce large-area composites containing VACNTs at number densities up to 1010 nanotubes/cm2. This VACNT number density exceeds that of previous electric-field-fabricated composites by an order of magnitude, and the surface-area coverage of the 40 nm VACNTs is comparable to that of chemical-vapor-deposition-grown arrays of smaller-diameter nanotubes.

  13. Electrically conductive, optically transparent polymer/carbon nanotube composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Smith, Jr., Joseph G. (Inventor); Harrison, Joycelyn S. (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor); Watson, Kent A. (Inventor); Ounaies, Zoubeida (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    The present invention is directed to the effective dispersion of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) into polymer matrices. The nanocomposites are prepared using polymer matrices and exhibit a unique combination of properties, most notably, high retention of optical transparency in the visible range (i.e., 400-800 nm), electrical conductivity, and high thermal stability. By appropriate selection of the matrix resin, additional properties such as vacuum ultraviolet radiation resistance, atomic oxygen resistance, high glass transition (T.sub.g) temperatures, and excellent toughness can be attained. The resulting nanocomposites can be used to fabricate or formulate a variety of articles such as coatings on a variety of substrates, films, foams, fibers, threads, adhesives and fiber coated prepreg. The properties of the nanocomposites can be adjusted by selection of the polymer matrix and CNT to fabricate articles that possess high optical transparency and antistatic behavior.

  14. Processing and Properties of Carbon Nanotube PVC Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin Trommer

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Commercially available multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT were incorporated in coating masses based on PVC by means of three roll mill. The best results could be obtained using the 5 µm gap. Thin PVC sheets were formed via knife coating having an electrical conductivity up to 1,500 S/m that are applicable as electric heating elements. For the use in the antistatic range, CNT contents ≤0.5% are sufficient. Rheological measurements indicate the quality of particle processing. AFM investigations are suitable to investigate the alignment of the nanoparticles in the bulk polymer. Using this method, the decrease of agglomerates as well as the splitting of CNT bundles within further mass processing could be visualized.

  15. Preliminary study towards photoactivity enhancement using a biocompatible titanium dioxide/carbon nanotubes composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cendrowski, Krzysztof, E-mail: kcendrowski@zut.edu.pl [West Pomeranian University of Technology Szczecin, Centre of Knowledge Based Nanomaterials and Technologies, Institute of Chemical and Environment Engineering, Pulaskiego 10, Szczecin 70-322 (Poland); Jedrzejczak, Malgorzata [West Pomeranian University of Technology Szczecin, Faculty of Biotechnology and Animal Science, Laboratory of Molecular Cytogenetic, Dr Judyma 10, Szczecin 71-460 (Poland); Peruzynska, Magdalena [Department of Experimental and Clinical Pharmacology, Pomeranian Medical University, al. Powstancow Wielkopolskich 72, Szczecin 70-111 (Poland); Dybus, Andrzej [West Pomeranian University of Technology Szczecin, Faculty of Biotechnology and Animal Science, Laboratory of Molecular Cytogenetic, Dr Judyma 10, Szczecin 71-460 (Poland); Drozdzik, Marek [Department of Experimental and Clinical Pharmacology, Pomeranian Medical University, al. Powstancow Wielkopolskich 72, Szczecin 70-111 (Poland); Mijowska, Ewa [West Pomeranian University of Technology Szczecin, Centre of Knowledge Based Nanomaterials and Technologies, Institute of Chemical and Environment Engineering, Pulaskiego 10, Szczecin 70-322 (Poland)

    2014-08-25

    Graphical abstract: Scheme demonstrating the experimental steps toward the formation of titania/multiwalled carbon nanotubes (TiO{sub 2}-MWCNTs) from multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT). - Highlights: • Easy and efficient method of impregnation carbon nanotubes with titania. • High photoactivity. • Correlation between the interaction of carbon nanotubes with titania on the photocatalytic properties. • High biocompatibility of the nanotubes. - Abstract: Recent research is focused on the enhancement in photoactivity of titanium dioxide/carbon nanotubes through formation of novel nanocomposites that exhibit a high specific surface area, remarkable electron transfer and biocompatibility. Here, we explore a new synthesis route in the system composed of nanocrystalline titanium dioxide supported on external walls and inner space of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT). The advantages of this method are: its simplicity, direct fusion of titanium dioxide particles on the carbon material, and formation of chemical bond Ti–O–C between TiO{sub 2} and MWCNT. Photocatalytic performance of this system has been compared to a commercial catalyst (Degussa P25) in a model reaction of phenol decomposition in/under UV light. The efficiency of the process increased by the factor of 2.5 when the TiO{sub 2}–MWCNT photocatalyst was utilized. Further, the photoactive nanocomposite was analysed towards its biocompatibility in order to establish a safe dose of the catalyst. Its influence on the cells viability was studied on mouse fibroblasts and human liver tissue cells, in the range from 0 to 100 μg/mL. This has revealed that the composite in concentrations up to 25 μg/mL exerted low toxicity, which allowed for finding a compromise between the highest safe dose and acceptable photoactivity of the catalyst.

  16. Study on the Mechanical Properties of Carbon Nanotube/Polyacrylonitrile Composite Fibers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李建梅; 王彪; 张玉梅; 王华平; 杨崇倡

    2003-01-01

    The method of preparing the multi-walled carbon nanotubes(MWNTs)-polyacrylonitrile (PAN) composite fibers is described and the effects of draw ratio on the mechanical properties of CNT/PAN fibers have also been discussed.The results show that the degrees of MWNTs dispersion in the polymer matrix have much effect on the mechanical properties.

  17. Advanced Composite Armor: In Situ Sensing with Carbon Nanotube Networks for Improved Damage Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-19

    containing carbon nanotubes using VARTM before resin infusion. We found that both methods achieved electrical percolation however the fiber sizing agent...agent and epoxy resin were applied using VARTM methodology. In order to evaluate the response of thick-section composites (0.35 in/8.9 mm) under dynamic

  18. Study of Electromagnetic Wave Absorption Properties of Carbon Nanotubes-Based Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-29

    Publications: [1]. G. L. Zhao, Z. Ye, Z. Li, J. A. Roberts, "New carbon nanotube-epoxy composite for dampening microwave cavity resonance", IEEE Xplore ...Nanotechnology ( IEEE - NANO), 2012 12th IEEE Conference on 20-23 Aug. 2012. [2]. Z. Li, G. L. Zhao, P. Zhang, S. Guo, J. Tang, " Thermoelectric

  19. Crystallization and melting behavior of multi-walled carbon nanotube-reinforced nylon-6 composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Phang, In Yee; Ma, Jianhua; Shen, Lu; Liu, Tianxi; Zhang, Wei-De

    2006-01-01

    The crystallization and melting behavior of neat nylon-6 (PA6) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs)/PA6 composites prepared by simple melt-compounding was comparatively studied. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) results show two crystallization exotherms (TCC, 1 and TCC, 2) for PA6/MWNTs

  20. Analytic and computational micromechanics of clustering and interphase effects in carbon nanotube composites.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidel, Gary D.; Hammerand, Daniel Carl; Lagoudas, Dimitris C. (Texas A& M University, College Station, TX)

    2006-01-01

    Effective elastic properties for carbon nanotube reinforced composites are obtained through a variety of micromechanics techniques. Using the in-plane elastic properties of graphene, the effective properties of carbon nanotubes are calculated utilizing a composite cylinders micromechanics technique as a first step in a two-step process. These effective properties are then used in the self-consistent and Mori-Tanaka methods to obtain effective elastic properties of composites consisting of aligned single or multi-walled carbon nanotubes embedded in a polymer matrix. Effective composite properties from these averaging methods are compared to a direct composite cylinders approach extended from the work of Hashin and Rosen (1964) and Christensen and Lo (1979). Comparisons with finite element simulations are also performed. The effects of an interphase layer between the nanotubes and the polymer matrix as result of functionalization is also investigated using a multi-layer composite cylinders approach. Finally, the modeling of the clustering of nanotubes into bundles due to interatomic forces is accomplished herein using a tessellation method in conjunction with a multi-phase Mori-Tanaka technique. In addition to aligned nanotube composites, modeling of the effective elastic properties of randomly dispersed nanotubes into a matrix is performed using the Mori-Tanaka method, and comparisons with experimental data are made. Computational micromechanical analysis of high-stiffness hollow fiber nanocomposites is performed using the finite element method. The high-stiffness hollow fibers are modeled either directly as isotropic hollow tubes or equivalent transversely isotropic effective solid cylinders with properties computed using a micromechanics based composite cylinders method. Using a representative volume element for clustered high-stiffness hollow fibers embedded in a compliant matrix with the appropriate periodic boundary conditions, the effective elastic properties

  1. Synthesis and Characterization of Silver Nanoparticle-Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dunieskys G. Larrude

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs grown by spray pyrolysis have been decorated with silver nanoparticles prepared via the silver mirror reaction. Good dispersion of silver nanostructures was obtained on the surface of MWCNTs, resulting in an efficient and simple wet chemistry method for increasing the reactivity of the carbon nanotubes surfaces. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy showed the orientations of the crystallography planes of the anchored silver nanoparticles and revealed their size distribution. Raman spectroscopy results confirm that the composite material preserves the integrity of the MWCNTs. Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were also employed for sample characterization.

  2. Carbon Nanotube Enhanced Aerospace Composite Materials A New Generation of Multifunctional Hybrid Structural Composites

    CERN Document Server

    Kostopoulos, V

    2013-01-01

    The well documented increase in the use of high performance composites as structural materials in aerospace components is continuously raising the demands in terms of dynamic performance, structural integrity, reliable life monitoring systems and adaptive actuating abilities. Current technologies address the above issues separately; material property tailoring and custom design practices aim to the enhancement of dynamic and damage tolerance characteristics, whereas life monitoring and actuation is performed with embedded sensors that may be detrimental to the structural integrity of the component. This publication explores the unique properties of carbon nanotubes (CNT) as an additive in the matrix of Fibre Reinforced Plastics (FRP), for producing structural composites with improved mechanical performance as well as sensing/actuating capabilities. The successful combination of the CNT properties and existing sensing actuating technologies leads to the realization of a multifunctional FRP structure. The curre...

  3. Carbon nanotube-reinforced composites: frequency analysis theories based on the matrix stiffness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Sara Shayan; Dalir, Hamid; Farshidianfar, Anooshirvan

    2009-03-01

    Strong and versatile carbon nanotubes are finding new applications in improving conventional polymer-based fibers and films. This paper studies the influence of matrix stiffness and the intertube radial displacements on free vibration of an individual double-walled carbon nanotube (DWNT). For this, a double elastic beam model is presented for frequency analysis in a DWNT embedded in an elastic matrix. The analysis is based on both Euler-Bernoulli and Timoshenko beam theories which considers shear deformation and rotary inertia and for both concentric and non-concentric assumptions considering intertube radial displacements and the related internal degrees of freedom. New intertube resonant frequencies and the associated non-coaxial vibrational modes are calculated. Detailed results are demonstrated for the dependence of resonant frequencies and mode shapes on the matrix stiffness. The results indicate that internal radial displacement and surrounding matrix stiffness could substantially affect resonant frequencies especially for longer double-walled carbon nanotubes of larger innermost radius at higher resonant frequencies, and thus the latter does not keep the otherwise concentric structure at ultrahigh frequencies. Therefore, depending on the matrix stiffness, for carbon nanotubes reinforced composites, different analysis techniques should be used while the aspect ratio of carbon nanotubes has a little effect on the analysis theory which should be selected.

  4. Synthesis of Tin Oxide/Carbon Nanotube Composite by Homogeneous Precipitation and Characterizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jining; Varadan, Vijay K.

    2004-07-01

    Nanosized tin oxide particles have shown excellent performance when used as anode material in lithium ion batteries. To further improve their electrochemical properties, functionalized carbon nanotubes were introduced during the homogenous precipitation synthesis. Various material characterization techniques such as XRD, SEM, TEM, TGA and BET were performed to check their crystalline, micro- and nano-structure, thermal stability and surface area. Compared with blank tin oxide nanoparticles, much finer tin oxide nanoparticles with higher surface area were observed with the presence of functional carbon nanotubes. It is proposed that functional carbon nanotubes play an important role for nanoparticles' nucleation, growth, coagulation processes. The potential application of this composite in lithium ion batteries is discussed.

  5. Carbon nanotubes for supercapacitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Hui; Li, Jianyi; Feng, Yuanping

    2010-01-05

    As an electrical energy storage device, supercapacitor finds attractive applications in consumer electronic products and alternative power source due to its higher energy density, fast discharge/charge time, low level of heating, safety, long-term operation stability, and no disposable parts. This work reviews the recent development of supercapacitor based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and their composites. The purpose is to give a comprehensive understanding of the advantages and disadvantages of carbon nanotubes-related supercapacitor materials and to find ways for the improvement in the performance of supercapacitor. We first discussed the effects of physical and chemical properties of pure carbon nanotubes, including size, purity, defect, shape, functionalization, and annealing, on the supercapacitance. The composites, including CNTs/oxide and CNTs/polymer, were further discussed to enhance the supercapacitance and keep the stability of the supercapacitor by optimally engineering the composition, particle size, and coverage.

  6. Carbon Nanotubes for Supercapacitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Jianyi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract As an electrical energy storage device, supercapacitor finds attractive applications in consumer electronic products and alternative power source due to its higher energy density, fast discharge/charge time, low level of heating, safety, long-term operation stability, and no disposable parts. This work reviews the recent development of supercapacitor based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs and their composites. The purpose is to give a comprehensive understanding of the advantages and disadvantages of carbon nanotubes-related supercapacitor materials and to find ways for the improvement in the performance of supercapacitor. We first discussed the effects of physical and chemical properties of pure carbon nanotubes, including size, purity, defect, shape, functionalization, and annealing, on the supercapacitance. The composites, including CNTs/oxide and CNTs/polymer, were further discussed to enhance the supercapacitance and keep the stability of the supercapacitor by optimally engineering the composition, particle size, and coverage.

  7. Molecular dynamics simulation of diffusion of gases in a carbon-nanotube-polymer composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Seong Y.; Sahimi, Muhammad; Tsotsis, Theodore T.; Kim, Nayong

    2007-07-01

    Extensive molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were carried out to compute the solubilities and self-diffusivities of CO2 and CH4 in amorphous polyetherimide (PEI) and mixed-matrix PEI generated by inserting single-walled carbon nanotubes into the polymer. Atomistic models of PEI and its composites were generated using energy minimizations, MD simulations, and the polymer-consistent force field. Two types of polymer composite were generated by inserting (7,0) and (12,0) zigzag carbon nanotubes into the PEI structure. The morphologies of PEI and its composites were characterized by their densities, radial distribution functions, and the accessible free volumes, which were computed with probe molecules of different sizes. The distributions of the cavity volumes were computed using the Voronoi tessellation method. The computed self-diffusivities of the gases in the polymer composites are much larger than those in pure PEI. We find, however, that the increase is not due to diffusion of the gases through the nanotubes which have smooth energy surfaces and, therefore, provide fast transport paths. Instead, the MD simulations indicate a squeezing effect of the nanotubes on the polymer matrix that changes the composite polymers’ free-volume distributions and makes them more sharply peaked. The presence of nanotubes also creates several cavities with large volumes that give rise to larger diffusivities in the polymer composites. This effect is due to the repulsive interactions between the polymer and the nanotubes. The solubilities of the gases in the polymer composites are also larger than those in pure PEI, hence indicating larger gas permeabilities for mixed-matrix PEI than PEI itself.

  8. Crystalline and Amorphous Phosphorus – Carbon Nanotube Composites as Promising Anodes for Lithium-Ion Batteries

    KAUST Repository

    Smajic, Jasmin

    2016-05-04

    Battery research has been going full steam and with that the search for alternative anodes. Among many proposed electrode materials, little attention has been given to phosphorus. Phosphorus boasts the third highest gravimetric charge capacity and the highest volumetric charge capacity of all elements. Because of that, it would be an attractive battery anode material were it not for its poor cyclability with significant capacity loss immediately after the first cycle. This is known to be the consequence of considerable volume changes of phosphorus during charge/discharge cycles. In this work, we propose circumventing this issue by mixing amorphous red phosphorus with carbon nanotubes. By employing a non-destructive sublimation-deposition method, we have synthesized composites where the synergetic effect between phosphorus and carbon nanotubes allow for an improvement in the electrochemical performance of battery anodes. In fact, it has been shown that carbon nanotubes can act as an effective buffer to phosphorus volumetric expansions and contractions during charging and discharging of the half-cells [1]. By modifying the synthesis parameters, we have also been able to change the degree of crystallinity of the phosphorus matrix in the composites. In fact, the less common phase of red phosphorus, named fibrous phosphorus, was obtained, and that explains some of the varying electrochemical performances observed in the composites. Overall, it is found that a higher surface area of amorphous phosphorus allows for a better anode material when using single-walled carbon nanotubes as fillers.

  9. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes/polymer composites in absence and presence of acrylic elastomer (ACM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, S; Rath, T; Mahaling, R N; Mukherjee, M; Khatua, B B; Das, C K

    2009-05-01

    Polyetherimide/Multiwall carbon nanotube (MWNTs) nanocomposites containing as-received and modified (COOH-MWNT) carbon nanotubes were prepared through melt process in extruder and then compression molded. Thermal properties of the composites were characterized by thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA). Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) images showed that the MWNTs were well dispersed and formed an intimate contact with the polymer matrix without any agglomeration. However the incorporation of modified carbon nanotubes formed fascinating, highly crosslinked, and compact network structure throughout the polymer matrix. This showed the increased adhesion of PEI with modified MWNTs. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) also showed high degree of dispersion of modified MWNTs along with broken ends. Dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) results showed a marginal increase in storage modulus (E') and glass transition temperature (T(g)) with the addition of MWNTs. Increase in tensile strength and impact strength of composites confirmed the use the MWNTs as possible reinforcement agent. Both thermal and electrical conductivity of composites increased, but effect is more pronounced on modification due to formation of network of carbon nanotubes. Addition of acrylic elastomer to developed PEI/MWNTs (modified) nanocomposites resulted in the further increase in thermal and electrical properties due to the formation of additional bond between MWNTs and acrylic elastomers at the interface. All the results presented are well corroborated by SEM and FESEM studies.

  10. Carbon nanotube reinforced hybrid composites: Computational modeling of environmental fatigue and usability for wind blades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dai, Gaoming; Mishnaevsky, Leon

    2015-01-01

    The potential of advanced carbon/glass hybrid reinforced composites with secondary carbon nanotube reinforcement for wind energy applications is investigated here with the use of computational experiments. Fatigue behavior of hybrid as well as glass and carbon fiber reinforced composites...... with the secondary CNT reinforcements (especially, aligned tubes) present superior fatigue performances than those without reinforcements, also under combined environmental and cyclic mechanical loading. This effect is stronger for carbon composites, than for hybrid and glass composites....... automatically using the Python based code. 3D computational studies of environment and fatigue analyses of multiscale composites with secondary nano-scale reinforcement in different material phases and different CNTs arrangements are carried out systematically in this paper. It was demonstrated that composites...

  11. Nitrogen doping in carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewels, C P; Glerup, M

    2005-09-01

    Nitrogen doping of single and multi-walled carbon nanotubes is of great interest both fundamentally, to explore the effect of dopants on quasi-1D electrical conductors, and for applications such as field emission tips, lithium storage, composites and nanoelectronic devices. We present an extensive review of the current state of the art in nitrogen doping of carbon nanotubes, including synthesis techniques, and comparison with nitrogen doped carbon thin films and azofullerenes. Nitrogen doping significantly alters nanotube morphology, leading to compartmentalised 'bamboo' nanotube structures. We review spectroscopic studies of nitrogen dopants using techniques such as X-ray photoemission spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy and Raman studies, and associated theoretical models. We discuss the role of nanotube curvature and chirality (notably whether the nanotubes are metallic or semiconducting), and the effect of doping on nanotube surface chemistry. Finally we review the effect of nitrogen on the transport properties of carbon nanotubes, notably its ability to induce negative differential resistance in semiconducting tubes.

  12. Thermoelectric Properties of Carbon Nanotube and Nanofiber Based Ethylene-Octene Copolymer Composites for Thermoelectric Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Slobodian

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymer composites have been created from multiwalled carbon nanotubes or carbon nanofibers and ethylene-octene copolymer. The composites have thermoelectric properties and exhibit thermoelectric effect, that is, the conversion of temperature differences into electricity. The thermoelectric efficiency of created composites with nanotube or nanofiber concentration of 30 wt% evaluated by a thermoelectric power at room temperature is 13.3 μV/K and 14.2 μV/K, respectively. The flexible thermoelectric device (thermopile was constructed with three different composite legs to produce electric current and the output voltage was measured in the range of temperature difference from −15 to 25°C.

  13. Enhancement of X-ray detection by single-walled carbon nanotube enriched flexible polymer composite

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Heetak; Lee, Sanggeun; Seo, Jungmok; Mahata, Chandreswar; Cho, Sung Hwan; Han, A-Reum; Hong, Keun-Sung; Park, Joon-Ho; Soh, Myung-Jin; Park, Cheolmin; Lee, Taeyoon

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Although organic-based direct conversion X-ray detectors have been developed, their photocurrent generation efficiency has been limited by recombination of excitons due to the intrinsically poor electrical properties of organic materials. In this report, we fabricated a polymer-based flexible X-ray detector and enhanced the X-ray detection sensitivity using a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) enriched polymer composite. When this SWNT enriched polymer composite was used as the act...

  14. Liquid composite molding-processing and characterization of fiber-reinforced composites modified with carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeiler, R.; Khalid, U.; Kuttner, C.; Kothmann, M.; Dijkstra, D. J.; Fery, A.; Altstädt, V.

    2014-05-01

    The increasing demand in fiber-reinforced plastics (FRPs) necessitates economic processing of high quality, like the vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) process. FRPs exhibit excellent in-plane properties but weaknesses in off-plane direction. The addition of nanofillers into the resinous matrix phase embodies a promising approach due to benefits of the nano-scaled size of the filler, especially its high surface and interface areas. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are preferable candidates for resin modification in regard of their excellent mechanical properties and high aspect ratios. However, especially the high aspect ratios give rise to withholding or filtering by fibrous fabrics during the impregnation process, i.e. length dependent withholding of tubes (short tubes pass through the fabric, while long tubes are restrained) and a decrease in the local CNT content in the laminate along the flow path can occur. In this study, hybrid composites containing endless glass fiber reinforcement and surface functionalized CNTs dispersed in the matrix phase were produced by VARTM. New methodologies for the quantification of the filtering of CNTs were developed and applied to test laminates. As a first step, a method to analyze the CNT length distribution before and after injection was established for thermosetting composites to characterize length dependent withholding of nanotubes. The used glass fiber fabric showed no perceptible length dependent retaining of CNTs. Afterward, the resulting test laminates were examined by Raman spectroscopy and compared to reference samples of known CNT content. This Raman based technique was developed further to assess the quality of the impregnation process and to quantitatively follow the local CNT content along the injection flow in cured composites. A local decline in CNT content of approx. 20% was observed. These methodologies allow for the quality control of the filler content and size-distribution in CNT based hybrid

  15. Isotactic polypropylene carbon nanotube composites -- crystallization and ordering behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiev, Georgi; Judith, Robert; Gombos, Erin; McIntyre, Michael; Schoen, Scott; Cebe, Peggy; Mattera, Michael

    2010-03-01

    The field of Polymer Nanocomposites (PNCs) is growing steadily in recent years. We use carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to affect the crystallization behavior of the polymers. Isotactic Polypropylene (iPP) is very widely used and is a good model system to understand the physics of other similar polymers. iPP/CNT PNCs form α, β, and γ crystallographic phases under a variety of crystallization conditions: non-isothermal and isothermal melt crystallization, shear, stress, fiber extrusion, etc. The crystal growth is altered from spherulitic to α-fibrillar upon the nucleation effect of CNTs. We are studying the effect of different temperature treatment schemes and different isothermal crystallization conditions. We found also that the smectic ordering in iPP is improved by the introduction of CNTs. We use Differential Scanning Calorimetry, Wide Angle X-ray scattering, Microscopic Transmission Ellipsometry and Avrami analysis. Research supported by: Assumption College Faculty Development Grant, funding for students' stipends, instrumentation and supplies, the NSF Polymers Program of the DMR, grant (DMR-0602473) and NASA grant (NAG8-1167).

  16. The effect of molecular mobility on electronic transport in carbon nanotube-polymer composites and networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shenogin, Sergei, E-mail: sergei.shenogin.ctr.ru@us.af.mil [Air Force Research Laboratory, Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, 2941 Hobson Way, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio 45433 (United States); University of Dayton Research Institute, 300 College Park, Dayton, Ohio 45469 (United States); Lee, Jonghoon [Air Force Research Laboratory, Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, 2941 Hobson Way, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio 45433 (United States); UTC, Inc., 1270 N Fairfield Rd, Dayton, Ohio 45432 (United States); Voevodin, Andrey A.; Roy, Ajit K. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, 2941 Hobson Way, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio 45433 (United States)

    2014-12-21

    A multiscale modeling approach to the prediction of electrical conductivity in carbon nanotube (CNT)–polymer composite materials is developed, which takes into account thermally activated molecular mobility of the matrix and the CNTs. On molecular level, a tight-binding density functional theory and non-equilibrium Green's function method are used to calculate the static electron transmission function in the contact between two metallic carbon nanotubes that corresponds to electron transport at 0 K. For higher temperatures, the statistical distribution of effective contact resistances is considered that originates from thermal fluctuations of intermolecular distances caused by molecular mobility of carbon nanotube and the polymer matrix. Based on this distribution and using effective medium theory, the temperature dependence of macroscopic electrical resistivity for CNT-polymer composites and CNT mats is calculated. The predicted data indicate that the electrical conductivity of the CNT-polymer composites increases linearly with temperature above 50 K, which is in a quantitative agreement with the experiments. Our model predicts a slight nonlinearity in temperature dependence of electric conductivity at low temperatures for percolated composites with small CNT loading. The model also explains the effect of glass transition and other molecular relaxation processes in the polymer matrix on the composite electrical conductivity. The developed multiscale approach integrates the atomistic charge transport mechanisms in percolated CNT-polymer composites with the macroscopic response and thus enables direct comparison of the prediction with the measurements of macroscopic material properties.

  17. Influence of functionalization on mechanical and electrical properties of carbon nanotube-based silver composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Hemant; Sharma, Vimal; Sharma, Manjula

    2014-05-01

    In this study, we have extended the molecular-level mixing method to fabricate multiwall carbon nanotube (CNT)-reinforced silver nanocomposites. The multiwall nanotubes used in the synthesis process were dispersed by two ways viz. covalent and non-covalent functionalization techniques. To elucidate the comparative effects of functionalization, structural, mechanical and electrical properties of nanocomposites were evaluated before and after sintering. The structural characterization revealed that the nanotubes were embedded, anchored and homogenously dispersed within the silver matrix. Hardness and Young's modulus of nanotube-reinforced nanocomposite were increased by a factor of 1-1.6 times than that of pure silver, even before and after the sintering. Covalently functionalized nanotube-based composites have shown more enhanced mechanical properties. The CNT reinforcement also improved the electrical conductivity of low-conducting nanosilver matrix before sintering. Non-covalently functionalized nanotube-based nanosilver composites showed more increased electrical conductivity before sintering. But a negative reinforcement effect was observed in high-conducting bulk silver matrix after the sintering. Thus, covalent functionalization might be appropriate for mechanical improvement in low-strength materials. However, non-covalent functionalization is suitable for electrical enhancement in low-conducting nanomaterials.

  18. THERMAL DECOMPOSITION AND FLAMMABILITY OF ACRYLONITRILE-BUTADIENE-STYRENE/MULTI-WALLED CARBON NANOTUBES COMPOSITES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-fang Tong; Hai-yun Ma; Zheng-ping Fang

    2008-01-01

    Thermal and flammability properties of acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene copolymer (ABS) with the addition of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) were studied. ABS/MWNTs composites were prepared via melt blending with the MWNTs content varied from 0.2% to 4.0% by mass. Thermogravimetry results showed that the addition of MWNTs accelerated the degradation of ABS during the whole process under air atmosphere, and both onset and maximum degradation temperature were lower than those of pure ABS. The destabilization effect of MWNTs on the thermal stability of the composites became unobvious under nitrogen, and the addition of MWNTs could improve the maximum degradation temperature. The heat release rate and time of ignition (tign) for the composites reduced greatly with the addition of MWNTs especially when the concentration of nanotubes was higher than 1.0%. The accumulation of carbon nanotubes with a network structure was observed and the char layer became thicker with increasing nanotubes concentration. Results from Raman spectra showed a higher degree of graphitization for the residues of ABS/MWNTs composites.

  19. Electrochemical preparation and electrochemical behavior of polypyrrole/carbon nanotube composite films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue-tong ZHANG; Wen-hui SONG

    2009-01-01

    Polypyirole/multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT) composite fihns were electrochemically depos-ited in the presence of an ionic surfactant, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), acting as both supporting electrolyte and dispersant. The effects of the surfactant and the MWNT concentrations on the structure at the resulting composite films were investigated. The electrochemical behavior of the resulting polypyrrole/MWNT composite film was investigated aS well bv cyclic voltammogram. The effect of the additional alternating electric field applied during the constant direct potential electrochemical deposition on the morphology and electrochemical behavior of the resulting composite film was also investigated in this study.

  20. Carbon nanotube reinforced hybrid composites: Computational modeling of environmental fatigue and usability for wind blades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dai, Gaoming; Mishnaevsky, Leon

    2015-01-01

    The potential of advanced carbon/glass hybrid reinforced composites with secondary carbon nanotube reinforcement for wind energy applications is investigated here with the use of computational experiments. Fatigue behavior of hybrid as well as glass and carbon fiber reinforced composites...... with and without secondary CNT reinforcement is simulated using multiscale 3D unit cells. The materials behavior under both mechanical cyclic loading and combined mechanical and environmental loading (with phase properties degraded due to the moisture effects) is studied. The multiscale unit cells are generated...... with the secondary CNT reinforcements (especially, aligned tubes) present superior fatigue performances than those without reinforcements, also under combined environmental and cyclic mechanical loading. This effect is stronger for carbon composites, than for hybrid and glass composites....

  1. Electroadsorption Desalination with Carbon Nanotube/PAN-Based Carbon Fiber Felt Composites as Electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The chemical vapor deposition method is used to prepare CNT (carbon nanotube/PCF (PAN-based carbon fiber felt composite electrodes in this paper, with the surface morphology of CNT/PCF composites and electroadsorption desalination performance being studied. Results show such electrode materials with three-dimensional network nanostructures having a larger specific surface area and narrower micropore distribution, with a huge number of reactive groups covering the surface. Compared with PCF electrodes, CNT/PCF can allow for a higher adsorption and desorption rate but lower energy consumption; meanwhile, under the condition of the same voltage change, the CNT/PCF electrodes are provided with a better desalination effect. The study also found that the higher the original concentration of the solution, the greater the adsorption capacity and the lower the adsorption rate. At the same time, the higher the solution’s pH, the better the desalting; the smaller the ions’ radius, the greater the amount of adsorption.

  2. Carbon monoxide tolerant platinum electrocatalysts on niobium doped titania and carbon nanotube composite supports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigdon, William A.; Huang, Xinyu

    2014-12-01

    In the anode of electrochemical cells operating at low temperature, the hydrogen oxidation reaction is susceptible to poisoning from carbon monoxide (CO) which strongly adsorbs on platinum (Pt) catalysts and increases activation overpotential. Adsorbed CO is removed by oxidative processes such as electrochemical stripping, though cleaning can also cause corrosion. One approach to improve the tolerance of Pt is through alloying with less-noble metals, but the durability of alloyed electrocatalysts is a critical concern. Without sacrificing stability, tolerance can be improved by careful design of the support composition using metal oxides. The bifunctional mechanism is promoted at junctions of the catalyst and metal oxides used in the support. Stable metal oxides can also form strong interactions with catalysts, as is the case for platinum on titania (TiOx). In this study, niobium (Nb) serves as an electron donor dopant in titania. The transition metal oxides are joined to functionalized multi-wall carbon nanotube (CNT) supports in order to synthesize composite supports. Pt is then deposited to form electrocatalysts which are characterized before fabrication into anodes for tests as an electrochemical hydrogen pump. Comparisons are made between the control from Pt-CNT to Pt-TiOx-CNT and Pt-Ti0.9Nb0.1Ox-CNT in order to demonstrate advantages.

  3. Characterization of Electrosynthesized Conjugated Polymer-Carbon Nanotube Composite: Optical Nonlinearity and Electrical Property

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afarin Bahrami

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWNT concentration on the structural, optical and electrical properties of conjugated polymer-carbon nanotube composite are discussed. Multi-walled carbon nanotube-polypyrrole nanocomposites were synthesized by electrochemical polymerization of monomers in the presence of different amounts of MWNTs using sodium dodecylbenzensulfonate (SDBS as surfactant at room temperature and normal pressure. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM indicates that the polymer is wrapped around the nanotubes. Measurement of the nonlinear refractive indices (n2 and the nonlinear absorption (β of the samples with different MWNT concentrations measurements were performed by a single Z-scan method using continuous wave (CW laser beam excitation wavelength of λ = 532 nm. The results show that both nonlinear optical parameters increased with increasing the concentration of MWNTs. The third order nonlinear susceptibilities were also calculated and found to follow the same trend as n2 and β. In addition, the conductivity of the composite film was found to increase rapidly with the increase in the MWNT concentration.

  4. Characterization of electrosynthesized conjugated polymer-carbon nanotube composite: optical nonlinearity and electrical property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrami, Afarin; Talib, Zainal Abidin; Shahriari, Esmaeil; Yunus, Wan Mahmood Mat; Kasim, Anuar; Behzad, Kasra

    2012-01-01

    The effects of multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWNT) concentration on the structural, optical and electrical properties of conjugated polymer-carbon nanotube composite are discussed. Multi-walled carbon nanotube-polypyrrole nanocomposites were synthesized by electrochemical polymerization of monomers in the presence of different amounts of MWNTs using sodium dodecylbenzensulfonate (SDBS) as surfactant at room temperature and normal pressure. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) indicates that the polymer is wrapped around the nanotubes. Measurement of the nonlinear refractive indices (n(2)) and the nonlinear absorption (β) of the samples with different MWNT concentrations measurements were performed by a single Z-scan method using continuous wave (CW) laser beam excitation wavelength of λ = 532 nm. The results show that both nonlinear optical parameters increased with increasing the concentration of MWNTs. The third order nonlinear susceptibilities were also calculated and found to follow the same trend as n(2) and β. In addition, the conductivity of the composite film was found to increase rapidly with the increase in the MWNT concentration.

  5. Tuning polycaprolactone-carbon nanotube composites for bone tissue engineering scaffolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattioli-Belmonte, Monica [Department of Clinical and Molecular Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Marche Polytechnic University, Via Tronto 10/a, 60126 Ancona (Italy); Vozzi, Giovanni, E-mail: g.vozzi@ing.unipi.it [Department of Chemical Engineering, Industrial Chemistry and Materials Science, University of Pisa, Via Diotisalvi 2, 56126 Pisa (Italy); Interdepartmental Research ' E. Piaggio' , University of Pisa, Via Diotisalvi 2, 56126 Pisa (Italy); Whulanza, Yudan [Interdepartmental Research ' E. Piaggio' , University of Pisa, Via Diotisalvi 2, 56126 Pisa (Italy); Seggiani, Maurizia [Department of Chemical Engineering, Industrial Chemistry and Materials Science, University of Pisa, Via Diotisalvi 2, 56126 Pisa (Italy); Fantauzzi, Valentina [Interdepartmental Research ' E. Piaggio' , University of Pisa, Via Diotisalvi 2, 56126 Pisa (Italy); Orsini, Giovanna [Department of Clinic Specialised and Odontostomatological Sciences, Marche Polytechnic University, Via Tronto 10/A, 60020 Ancona (Italy); Ahluwalia, Arti [Interdepartmental Research ' E. Piaggio' , University of Pisa, Via Diotisalvi 2, 56126 Pisa (Italy)

    2012-02-01

    This report describes the mechanical, thermal and biological characterisation of a solid free form microfabricated carbon nanotube-polycaprolactone composite, in which both the quantity of nanotubes in the matrix as well as the scaffold design were varied in order to tune the mechanical properties of the material. The creep and stress relaxation behaviour of the composite material was analysed to identify an optimal composition for bone tissue engineering. Moreover, the morphology and viability of osteoblast-like cells (MG63) on composite scaffolds were analysed using scanning electron microscopy and MTT assays. Our data demonstrate that by changing the ratio of CNT to PCL, the elastic modulus of the nanocomposite can be varied between 10 and 75 MPa. In this range, the geometry of the scaffold can be used to finely tune its stiffness. However our PCL-CNT nanocomposites were able to sustain osteoblast proliferation and modulate cell morphology. Thus we show the potential of custom designed CNT nanocomposites for bone tissue engineering. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microfabricated carbon nanotube-polycaprolactone composite scaffold was realised. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mechanical, thermal and biological characterisation were performed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PCL-CNT nanocomposite scaffolds were able to sustain osteoblast proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Composite scaffolds were able to modulate cell morphology.

  6. Simulation of mechanical performance limits and failure of carbon nanotube composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Benjamin D.; Wise, Kristopher E.; Odegard, Gregory M.

    2016-02-01

    The mechanical properties of carbon nanotube (CNT) fiber composites are steadily approaching those of traditional carbon fiber composites. This work is focused on establishing a plausible upper bound on these properties by modeling the elastic deformations, yield, and fracture of idealized CNT composites using reactive molecular dynamics. Amorphous carbon (AC) was used for the matrix material because of its structural simplicity and physical compatibility with the CNT fillers. Three different arrangements of CNTs in the simulation cell were investigated: a single-wall nanotube (SWNT) array, a multi-wall nanotube (MWNT) array, and a SWNT bundle system. The SWNT and MWNT array systems are clearly idealizations, but the SWNT bundle system is a step closer to real systems in which individual tubes aggregate into large assemblies. Chemical crosslinking was modeled by adding bonds between the CNTs and AC to explore the balance between weakening the CNTs and improving fiber-matrix load transfer. The simulation results reported here clarify the impact of CNT dispersion, the extent of crosslinking, and CNT-templated matrix structuring on the mechanical properties of CNT composites.

  7. Graphene and carbon nanotube composite enabling a new prospective treatment for trichomoniasis disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanin, H., E-mail: hudsonzanin@gmail.com [National Institute for Space Research, Av. dos Astronautas 1758, Sao Jose dos Campos CEP: 12227-010, SP (Brazil); Margraf-Ferreira, A.; Silva, N.S. da [Laboratory of Cell Biology and Tissue, Institute of Research and Development, University of Vale do Paraiba, Av. Shishima Hifumi, 2911, CEP: 12244-000 Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Marciano, F.R. [Laboratory of Biomedical Nanotechnology, Institute of Research and Development, University of Vale do Paraiba, Av. Shishima Hifumi, 2911, CEP: 12244-000 Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Corat, E.J. [National Institute for Space Research, Av. dos Astronautas 1758, Sao Jose dos Campos CEP: 12227-010, SP (Brazil); Lobo, A.O. [Laboratory of Biomedical Nanotechnology, Institute of Research and Development, University of Vale do Paraiba, Av. Shishima Hifumi, 2911, CEP: 12244-000 Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

    2014-08-01

    We report the synthesis and application of novel graphene oxide and carbon nanotube oxide (GCN-O) composite. First, pristine multi-walled carbon nanotube was prepared by chemical vapour deposition furnace and then exfoliated and oxidised simultaneously by oxygen plasma etching. The superficial and volumetric compositions of GCN-O were measured by XPS spectroscopy and EDX spectroscopy, respectively. Both XPS and EDX analyses evidence that the GCN-O is composed of up to 20% of oxygen atoms. As a result, GCN-O forms a stable colloidal aqueous solution and shows to have strong interaction with the cell membrane of Tritrichomonas foetus protozoa, making easy its application as a drug carrier. Trichomoniasis infection of cattle is a devastating disease for cattle producers, causing some damages to females and fetus, and the abortion is the most serious result of this disease. There is no effective treatment for trichomoniasis infection yet. Therefore, new treatment, especially one with no collateral effects in animals, is required. With this goal in mind, our results suggest that water dispersible composite is a novel nanomaterial, promising for Trichomoniasis infection treatment and as therapeutic delivery agent as well. - Highlights: • Novel graphene oxide and carbon nanotube oxide (GCN-O{sub 2}) composite • MWCNTs are exfoliated and oxidised simultaneously by oxygen plasma etching. • Tritrichomonas foetus protozoan has a strong affinity with GCN-O{sub 2}.

  8. The influence of sintering on the dispersion of carbon nanotubes in ceramic matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapasztó, Orsolya; Lemmel, Hartmut; Markó, Márton; Balázsi, Katalin; Balázsi, Csaba; Tapasztó, Levente

    2014-10-01

    Optimizing the dispersion of carbon nanostructures in ceramic matrix composites is a fundamental technological challenge. So far most efforts have been focused on improving the dispersion of nanostructures during the powder phase processing, due to the limited information and control on their possible redistribution during the sintering. Here, we address this issue by comparing multi-walled carbon nanotubes reinforced Si3N4 composites prepared from the same starting powder dispersion but sintered using two different techniques. We employ ultra-small angle neutron scattering measurements to gain reliable information on the dispersion of nanostructures allowing a direct comparison of their redistribution during the sintering.

  9. Fabrication and Characterization of Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube (MWCNT) and Ni-Coated Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube (Ni-MWCNT) Repair Patches for Carbon Fiber Reinforced Composite Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Brienne; Caraccio, Anne; Tate, LaNetra; Jackson, Dionne

    2011-01-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)/epoxy and nickel-coated multi-walled carbon nanotube (Ni-MWCNT)/epoxy systems were fabricated into carbon fiber composite repair patches via vacuum resin infusion. Two 4 ply patches were manufactured with fiber orientations of [90/ 90/ 4590] and [0/90/ +45/ -45]. Prior to resin infusion, the MWCNT/Epoxy system and NiMWCNT/ epoxy systems were optimized for dispersion quality. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical microscopy (OM) were used to determine the presence ofcarbon nanotubes and assess dispersion quality. Decomposition temperatures were determined via thermogravametric analysis (TGA). SEM and TGA were also used to evaluate the composite repair patches.

  10. Preparation and properties of in-situ growth of carbon nanotubes reinforced hydroxyapatite coating for carbon/carbon composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shoujie; Li, Hejun; Su, Yangyang; Guo, Qian; Zhang, Leilei

    2017-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) possess excellent mechanical properties for their role playing in reinforcement as imparting strength to brittle hydroxyapatite (HA) bioceramic coating. However, there are few reports relating to the in-situ grown carbon nanotubes reinforced hydroxyapatite (CNTs-HA) coating. Here we demonstrate the potential application in reinforcing biomaterials by an attempt to use in-situ grown of CNTs strengthen HA coating, using a combined method composited of injection chemical vapor deposition (ICVD) and pulsed electrodeposition. The microstructure, phases and chemical compositions of CNTs-HA coatings were characterized by various advanced methods. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images indicated that CNTs-HA coatings avoided the inhomogeneous dispersion of CNTs inside HA coating. The result show that the interfacial shear strength between CNTs-HA coating and the C/C composite matrix reaches to 12.86±1.43MPa. Potenitodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) studies show that the content of CNTs affects the corrosion resistance of CNTs-HA coating. Cell culturing and simulated body fluid test elicit the biocompatibility with living cells and bioactivity of CNTs-HA coatings, respectively.

  11. Conditions for forming composite carbon nanotube-diamond like carbon material that retain the good properties of both materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Wei, E-mail: wei.ren@helsinki.fi; Avchaciov, Konstantin; Nordlund, Kai [Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 43, FIN-00014 Helsinki (Finland); Iyer, Ajai; Koskinen, Jari [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, School of Chemical Technology, Aalto University, P.O. Box 16200, 00076 Espoo (Finland); Kaskela, Antti; Kauppinen, Esko I. [NanoMaterials Group, Department of Applied Physics, Aalto University School of Science, P.O. Box 15100, 00076 Aalto (Finland)

    2015-11-21

    Carbon nanotubes are of wide interest due to their excellent properties such as tensile strength and electrical and thermal conductivity, but are not, when placed alone on a substrate, well resistant to mechanical wear. Diamond-like carbon (DLC), on the other hand, is widely used in applications due to its very good wear resistance. Combining the two materials could provide a very durable pure carbon nanomaterial enabling to benefit from the best properties of both carbon allotropes. However, the synthesis of high-quality diamond-like carbon uses energetic plasmas, which can damage the nanotubes. From previous works it is neither clear whether the quality of the tubes remains good after DLC deposition, nor whether the DLC above the tubes retains the high sp{sup 3} bonding fraction. In this work, we use experiments and classical molecular dynamics simulations to study the mechanisms of DLC formation on various carbon nanotube compositions. The results show that high-sp{sup 3}-content DLC can be formed provided the deposition conditions allow for sidewards pressure to form from a substrate close beneath the tubes. Under optimal DLC formation energies of around 40–70 eV, the top two nanotube atom layers are fully destroyed by the plasma deposition, but layers below this can retain their structural integrity.

  12. Conditions for forming composite carbon nanotube-diamond like carbon material that retain the good properties of both materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Wei; Iyer, Ajai; Koskinen, Jari; Kaskela, Antti; Kauppinen, Esko I.; Avchaciov, Konstantin; Nordlund, Kai

    2015-11-01

    Carbon nanotubes are of wide interest due to their excellent properties such as tensile strength and electrical and thermal conductivity, but are not, when placed alone on a substrate, well resistant to mechanical wear. Diamond-like carbon (DLC), on the other hand, is widely used in applications due to its very good wear resistance. Combining the two materials could provide a very durable pure carbon nanomaterial enabling to benefit from the best properties of both carbon allotropes. However, the synthesis of high-quality diamond-like carbon uses energetic plasmas, which can damage the nanotubes. From previous works it is neither clear whether the quality of the tubes remains good after DLC deposition, nor whether the DLC above the tubes retains the high sp3 bonding fraction. In this work, we use experiments and classical molecular dynamics simulations to study the mechanisms of DLC formation on various carbon nanotube compositions. The results show that high-sp3-content DLC can be formed provided the deposition conditions allow for sidewards pressure to form from a substrate close beneath the tubes. Under optimal DLC formation energies of around 40-70 eV, the top two nanotube atom layers are fully destroyed by the plasma deposition, but layers below this can retain their structural integrity.

  13. Carbon nanotubes filled polymer composites: A comprehensive study on improving dispersion, network formation and electrical conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarthi, Divya Kannan

    In this dissertation, we determine how the dispersion, network formation and alignment of carbon nanotubes in polymer nanocomposites affect the electrical properties of two different polymer composite systems: high temperature bismaleimide (BMI) and polyethylene. The knowledge gained from this study will facilitate optimization of the above mentioned parameters, which would further enhance the electrical properties of polymer nanocomposites. BMI carbon fiber composites filled with nickel-coated single walled carbon nanotubes (Ni-SWNTs) were processed using high temperature vacuum assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) to study the effect of lightning strike mitigation. Coating the SWNTs with nickel resulted in enhanced dispersions confirmed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS). An improved interface between the carbon fiber and Ni-SWNTs resulted in better surface coverage on the carbon plies. These hybrid composites were tested for Zone 2A lightning strike mitigation. The electrical resistivity of the composite system was reduced by ten orders of magnitude with the addition of 4 weight percent Ni-SWNTs (calculated with respect to the weight of a single carbon ply). The Ni-SWNTs - filled composites showed a reduced amount of damage to simulated lightning strike compared to their unfilled counterparts indicated by the minimal carbon fiber pull out. Methods to reduce the electrical resistivity of 10 weight percent SWNTs --- medium density polyethylene (MDPE) composites were studied. The composites processed by hot coagulation method were subjected to low DC electric fields (10 V) at polymer melt temperatures to study the effect of viscosity, nanotube welding, dispersion and, resultant changes in electrical resistivity. The electrical resistivity of the composites was reduced by two orders of magnitude compared to 10 wt% CNT-MDPE baseline. For effective alignment of SWNTs, a new process called Electric field Vacuum Spray was devised to

  14. Multiwalled carbon nanotube-reinforced ceramic matrix composites as a promising structural material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estili, Mehdi, E-mail: mehdiestili@gmail.co [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Department of Materials Processing, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Kwon, Hansang; Kawasaki, Akira; Cho, Seungchan; Takagi, Kenta; Kikuchi, Keiko [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Kawai, Masayoshi [Institute of Materials Structure Science, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan)

    2010-03-15

    In this paper, we introduce fully dense, multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)-reinforced ceramic matrix composites recently processed by a novel powder technology in our laboratory to be considered as a promising potential structural materials for employment in severe working conditions. A strategy is also offered to investigate the effect of working condition on the mechanical properties of MWCNTs embedded in the ceramic matrix for a reliable material selection for the working conditions needed.

  15. Carbon nanotube/polymer composite coated tapered fiber for four wave mixing based wavelength conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Bo; Omura, Mika; Takiguchi, Masato; Martinez, Amos; Ishigure, Takaaki; Yamashita, Shinji; Kuga, Takahiro

    2013-02-11

    In this paper, we demonstrate a nonlinear optical device based on a fiber taper coated with a carbon nanotube (CNT)/polymer composite. Using this device, four wave mixing (FWM) based wavelength conversion of 10 Gb/s Non-return-to-zero signal is achieved. In addition, we investigate wavelength tuning, two photon absorption and estimate the effective nonlinear coefficient of the CNTs embedded in the tapered fiber to be 1816.8 W(-1)km(-1).

  16. Decomposition kinetic study of nanostructured composites of poly (phenylene sulfide) reinforced with carbon nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Bruno Ribeiro; Edson C. Botelho; Michelle L. Costa

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work is to obtain nanostructured composites of poly (phenylene sulfide), PPS, reinforced with multiwalled carbon nanotubes, MWCNT, by melt mixing technique and further characterization of their morphological and thermal properties. Transmission Electron Microscopy analysis was carried out to evaluate the quality of MWCNT dispersion throughout the PPS matrix. Thermogravimetry shows an increase in the maximum degradation temperature by the addition of the nanofiller to the polym...

  17. Imaging latex-carbon nanotube composites by subsurface electrostatic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sajan; Petty, Clayton W.; Krafcik, Karen; Loyola, Bryan; O'Bryan, Greg; Friddle, Raymond W.

    2016-10-01

    Electrostatic modes of atomic force microscopy have shown to be non-destructive and relatively simple methods for imaging conductors embedded in insulating polymers. Here we use electrostatic force microscopy to image the dispersion of carbon nanotubes in a latex-based conductive composite, which brings forth features not observed in previously studied systems employing linear polymer films. A fixed-potential model of the probe-nanotube electrostatics is presented which in principle gives access to the conductive nanoparticle’s depth and radius, and the polymer film dielectric constant. Comparing this model to the data results in nanotube depths that appear to be slightly above the film-air interface. This result suggests that water-mediated charge build-up at the film-air interface may be the source of electrostatic phase contrast in ambient conditions.

  18. Growth of apatite on chitosan-multiwall carbon nanotube composite membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jun; Yao, Zhiwen; Tang, Changyu; Darvell, B. W.; Zhang, Hualin; Pan, Lingzhan; Liu, Jingsong; Chen, Zhiqing

    2009-07-01

    Bioactive membranes for guided tissue regeneration would be of value for periodontal therapy. Chitosan-multiwall carbon nanotube (CS-MWNT) composites were treated to deposit nanoscopic apatite for MWNT proportions of 0-4 mass%. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray analysis, and X-ray diffraction were used for characterization. Apatite was formed on the CS-MWNT composites at low MWNT concentrations, but the dispersion of the MWNT affects the crystallite size and the Ca/P molar ratio of the composite. The smallest crystallite size was 9 nm at 1 mass% MWNT.

  19. Growth of apatite on chitosan-multiwall carbon nanotube composite membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Jun; Yao Zhiwen [State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, West China College of Stomatology, Sichuan University, No 14, 3rd Section South People' s Road, Chengdu 610041 (China); Tang Changyu [Department of Polymer Science and Materials, Sichuan University (China); Darvell, B.W. [Dental Materials Science, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Zhang Hualin; Pan Lingzhan; Liu Jingsong [State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, West China College of Stomatology, Sichuan University, No 14, 3rd Section South People' s Road, Chengdu 610041 (China); Chen Zhiqing, E-mail: yangj0710@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, West China College of Stomatology, Sichuan University, No 14, 3rd Section South People' s Road, Chengdu 610041 (China)

    2009-07-30

    Bioactive membranes for guided tissue regeneration would be of value for periodontal therapy. Chitosan-multiwall carbon nanotube (CS-MWNT) composites were treated to deposit nanoscopic apatite for MWNT proportions of 0-4 mass%. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray analysis, and X-ray diffraction were used for characterization. Apatite was formed on the CS-MWNT composites at low MWNT concentrations, but the dispersion of the MWNT affects the crystallite size and the Ca/P molar ratio of the composite. The smallest crystallite size was 9 nm at 1 mass% MWNT.

  20. [Surface modification and microstructure of single-walled carbon nanotubes for dental composite resin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yang; Zhang, Feimin; Xu, Li'na; Gu, Ning

    2006-12-01

    In order to improve its dispersion condition in dental composite resin and enhance its interaction with the matrix, single-walled carbon nanotubes(SWNTs) were refluxed and oxidized, then treated by APTE. Their outer surface were coated by nano-SiO2 particles using sol-gel process, then further treated by organosilanes ATES. IR and TEM were used to analyze modification results. TEM pictures showed nano-particles were on the surface of SWNTs; IR showed characteristic adsorbing bands of SiO2. Composite resin specimen with modified SWNTs was prepared and examined by TEM. SWNTs were detected in composite resin matrix among other inorganic fillers.

  1. Evaluation for cell affinity of the composite material containing carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KANG Shizhao; WAN Yuqing; YAN Huijuan; BEI Jianzhong; WANG Chen; WANG Shenguo; WANG Chunru; WAN Lijun; BAI Chunli

    2004-01-01

    The composite material of poly-(L-lactide) (PLLA) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were prepared. Its surface morphologies and property were worked out by using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and contact angle measurement. Moreover, the prime cytocompatibility was used to investigate the biocompatibility of the composite material containing CNTs and the effects of CNTs on one aspect of cell function, cell affinity. The results obtained indicate that the composite material of PLLA and CNTs possesses good biocompatibility for both the 3T3 fibroblasts and Oct-1 osteoblast-like cells. The addition of CNTs will greatly affect cell affinity of the material, which may be disadvantage for the cell adhesion.

  2. Electrical conductivity and thermal properties of functionalized carbon nanotubes/polyurethane composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline M. F. Lima

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs functionalized with amine and carboxyl groups were used to prepare polyurethane/MWCNT nanocomposites in two distinct concentrations: a lower value of 1 mass% (spray coating and a higher one of ~50 mass% (buckypaper based. The MWCNT-NH2 sample contained only 0.5 mass% of amine groups, whereas MWCNT-COOH contained 5 mass% of carboxyl groups. The MWCNT functionalized with low amine group content showed improved thermal properties when compared to neat thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU and MWCNT-COOH based nanocomposites. The electrical conductivity of the polyurethane elastomer was greatly increased from 10-12 to ~10-5 S cm-1in the 1 mass% nanotube composite and to 7 S cm-1for the MWCNT-NH2 buckypaper-based nanocomposite. Furthermore, the relative high content of functional groups in the MWCNT-COOH sample, which disrupt the sp²structure in the nanotube walls, led to inferior properties; for instance the conductivity of the buckypaper based composite is one order of magnitude lower when using MWCNT-COOH in comparison with the MWCNT-NH2. These results show the range of property design possibilities available with the elastomeric polyurethane nanocomposite by tailoring the functional group content and the carbon nanotube load.

  3. Fabrication and mechanical properties of multiwalled carbon nanotube/nanonickel reinforced epoxy resin composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiwen; Zhao, Dongyu; Luan, Dongxue; Bi, Changlong

    2016-12-01

    Nanonickel is supported on the surface of the multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), forming the multiwalled carbon nanotubes/nanonickel composites (MWCNTs/Ni). By using the emulsifying machine dispersing MWCNTs/Ni evenly among epoxy resin, which is prepared into epoxy resin/multiwalled carbon nanotubes/nanonickel (EP/MWCNTs/Ni) composite materials. Additionally, the observed strong interfacial interaction between MWCNTs and the epoxy resin matrix is responsible for the enhanced mechanical properties based on the analysis from scanning electron microscope. Experimental results based on the analysis from dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) indicate a significant improvement in the glass transition temperature (Tg) by around 20 °C upon the addition of 1.5 wt% MWCNTs/Ni to the epoxy matrix. The tensile strength and the impact strength of the composites can improve around 64.8 and 176.7% compared with that of cured pure epoxy and improve with increasing MWCNTs/Ni content up to 1.3 wt%. Finally, the excellent mechanics capability of EP/MWCNTs/Ni nanocomposites will provide enormous opportunities for aerospace applications where conductive adhesive or high-performance polymer materials are necessary.

  4. Hysteresis Compensation of Piezoresistive Carbon Nanotube/Polydimethylsiloxane Composite-Based Force Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Sik Kim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a preliminary study on the hysteresis compensation of a piezoresistive silicon-based polymer composite, poly(dimethylsiloxane dispersed with carbon nanotubes (CNTs, to demonstrate its feasibility as a conductive composite (i.e., a force-sensitive resistor for force sensors. In this study, the potential use of the nanotube/polydimethylsiloxane (CNT/PDMS as a force sensor is evaluated for the first time. The experimental results show that the electrical resistance of the CNT/PDMS composite changes in response to sinusoidal loading and static compressive load. The compensated output based on the Duhem hysteresis model shows a linear relationship. This simple hysteresis model can compensate for the nonlinear frequency-dependent hysteresis phenomenon when a dynamic sinusoidal force input is applied.

  5. Hysteresis Compensation of Piezoresistive Carbon Nanotube/Polydimethylsiloxane Composite-Based Force Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji-Sik; Kim, Gi-Woo

    2017-01-24

    This paper provides a preliminary study on the hysteresis compensation of a piezoresistive silicon-based polymer composite, poly(dimethylsiloxane) dispersed with carbon nanotubes (CNTs), to demonstrate its feasibility as a conductive composite (i.e., a force-sensitive resistor) for force sensors. In this study, the potential use of the nanotube/polydimethylsiloxane (CNT/PDMS) as a force sensor is evaluated for the first time. The experimental results show that the electrical resistance of the CNT/PDMS composite changes in response to sinusoidal loading and static compressive load. The compensated output based on the Duhem hysteresis model shows a linear relationship. This simple hysteresis model can compensate for the nonlinear frequency-dependent hysteresis phenomenon when a dynamic sinusoidal force input is applied.

  6. Universal crossover of the charge carrier fluctuation mechanism in different polymer/carbon nanotubes composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barone, C., E-mail: cbarone@unisa.it; Mauro, C.; Pagano, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica “E.R. Caianiello” and CNR-SPIN Salerno, Università di Salerno, I-84084 Fisciano, Salerno (Italy); Landi, G.; Neitzert, H. C. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Industriale, Università di Salerno, I-84084 Fisciano, Salerno (Italy)

    2015-10-05

    Carbon nanotubes added to polymer and epoxy matrices are compounds of interest for applications in electronics and aerospace. The realization of high-performance devices based on these materials can profit from the investigation of their electric noise properties, as this gives a more detailed insight of the basic charge carriers transport mechanisms at work. The dc and electrical noise characteristics of different polymer/carbon nanotubes composites have been analyzed from 10 to 300 K. The results suggest that all these systems can be regarded as random resistive networks of tunnel junctions formed by adjacent carbon nanotubes. However, in the high-temperature regime, contributions deriving from other possible mechanisms cannot be separated using dc information alone. A transition from a fluctuation-induced tunneling process to a thermally activated regime is instead revealed by electric noise spectroscopy. In particular, a crossover is found from a two-level tunneling mechanism, operating at low temperatures, to resistance fluctuations of a percolative network, in the high-temperature region. The observed behavior of 1/f noise seems to be a general feature for highly conductive samples, independent on the type of polymer matrix and on the nanotube density.

  7. Plasma-activated multi-walled carbon nanotube-polystyrene composite substrates for biosensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez-Sanchez, Cesar; Orozco, Jahir; Jimenez-Jorquera, Cecilia [Instituto de Microelectronica de Barcelona, IMB-CNM (CSIC), Campus UAB, E-08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Pellicer, Eva; Lechuga, Laura M; Mendoza, Ernest, E-mail: cesar.fernandez@imb-cnm.csic.e [Nanobiosensors and Molecular Nanobiophysics Group, Research Center on Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (CIN2) CSIC-ICN, ETSE, Campus UAB-Edificio Q, E-08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain)

    2009-08-19

    Carbon nanotube-polymer composites have shown to be suitable materials for the fabrication of electrochemical transducers. The exposed surface of these materials is commonly passivated by a very thin layer of the polymer component that buries the conductive carbon particles. Working with multi-walled carbon nanotube-polystyrene (MWCNT-PS) composite structures, it was previously described how a simple low power oxygen plasma process produced an effective etching of the composite surface, thereby exposing the conductive surface of CNTs. This work shows how this plasma process not only gave rise to a suitable composite conductive surface for electrochemical sensing but simultaneously exposed and created a high density of oxygen-containing functional groups at both the CNT and the PS components, without affecting the material's mechanical stability. These chemical groups could be effectively modified for the stable immobilization of biological receptors. A detailed chemical characterization of the plasma-activated composite surface was possible using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The material reactivity towards the tethering of a protein was studied and protein-protein interactions were then evaluated on the modified composite transducers by scanning electron microscopy. Finally, an amperometric immunosensor approach for the detection of rabbit Immunoglobulin G target analyte was described and a minimum concentration of 3 ng ml{sup -1} was easily measured.

  8. An Electrically Conductive and Organic Solvent Vapors Detecting Composite Composed of an Entangled Network of Carbon Nanotubes Embedded in Polystyrene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Olejnik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A composite composed of electrically conductive entangled carbon nanotubes embedded in a polystyrene base has been prepared by the innovative procedure, when the nonwoven polystyrene filter membrane is enmeshed with carbon nanotubes. Both constituents are then interlocked by compression molding. The mechanical and electrical resistance testing show that the polymer increases nanotube network mechanical integrity, tensile strength, and the reversibility of electrical resistance in deformation cycles. Another obvious effect of the supporting polymer is the reduction of resistance temperature dependence of composite and the reproducibility of methanol vapor sensing.

  9. Carbon nanotube composites for glucose biosensor incorporated with reverse iontophoresis function for noninvasive glucose monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tai-Ping Sun

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Tai-Ping Sun1,2,5, Hsiu-Li Shieh2, Congo Tak-Shing Ching1,2,5, Yan-Dong Yao3, Su-Hua Huang4, Chia-Ming Liu1, Wei-Hao Liu1, Chung-Yuan Chen21Graduate Institute of Biomedicine and Biomedical Technology, 2Department of Electrical Engineering, National Chi Nan University, Nantou, Taiwan, ROC; 3Department of Applied Biology and Chemical Technology, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Hong Kong; 4Department of Biotechnology, Asia University, Taichung, Taiwan, ROC; 5These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: This study aims to develop an amperometric glucose biosensor, based on carbon nanotubes material for reverse iontophoresis, fabricated by immobilizing a mixture of glucose oxidase (GOD and multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT epoxy-composite, on a planar screen-printed carbon electrode. MWCNT was employed to ensure proper incorporation into the epoxy mixture and faster electron transfer between the GOD and the transducer. Results showed this biosensor possesses a low detection potential (+500 mV, good sensitivity (4 μA/mM and an excellent linear response range (r2 = 0.999; 0–4 mM of glucose detection at +500 mV (versus Ag/AgCl. The response time of the biosensor was about 25 s. In addition, the biosensor could be used in conjunction with reverse iontophoresis technique. In an actual evaluation model, an excellent linear relationship (r2 = 0.986 was found between the glucose concentration of the actual model and the biosensor’s current response. Thus, a glucose biosensor based on carbon nanotube composites and incorporated with reverse iontophoresis function was developed.Keywords: amperometric, carbon nanotubes, glucose monitoring, biosensors, reverse iontophoresis

  10. Investigation of Crack Resistance in Single Walled Carbon Nanotube Reinforced Polymer Composites Based on FEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosein Hemmatian

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotube (CNT is considered as a new generation of material possessing superior mechanical, thermal and electrical properties. The applications of CNT, especially in composite materials, i.e. carbon nanotube reinforced polymer have received great attention and interest in recent years. To characterize the influence of CNT on the stress intensity factor of nanocomposites, three fracture modes (opening, shearing and tearing are considered. The stress intensity factor of nanocomposites is evaluated using a representative volume element (RVE based on the continuum mechanics and finite element method (FEM. Inter-atomic interactions of CNT are simulated by beam elements in the finite element (FE model. Non-linear springbased line elements are employed to simulate the van der Waals (vdW bonds. In all fracture modes, the stress intensity factor was determined for pure matrix and matrix reinforced with single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT. Numerical results indicate that the load carrying capacities of the CNTs in a matrix are evident. Addition of CNTs in a matrix can increase the stiffness of the composite. Finally, the results showed that utilizing of SWCNT decreased the stress intensity factor and improved crack resistance.

  11. Effect of surface treatment of carbon nanotubes on mechanical properties of cement composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KONDAKOV Alexander Igorevich

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper is to explore the influence of the carbon nanotubes functionalized by oxygen groups on the physical and mechanical properties of cement composites. Advantages and disadvantages of the main methods for the homogeneous distribution of carbon nanotubes (CNTs in solution are discussed. A method for covalent functionalization of CNTs is described. An acid-base titration and dispersion analysis of solutions containing functionalized carbon nanotubes (f-CNTs was performed. The research data made it possible to propose new technology of preparation of modified concrete. The results of the work can be used for designing of the additives commonly used in the construction industry, as well as for further studies of the effects of CNTs on the physical and mechanical and structural properties of building materials. Efficient modification of cement composite with f-CNTs was achieved at the concentration of f-CNTs ranging from 0.0004% to 0.0008% by weight of the binder. The observed increase of the concrete mechanical properties is explained by the fact that the CNTs act as nucleation centers for the cement hydration products.

  12. Novel self-sensing carbon nanotube-based composites for rehabilitation of structural steel members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Shafique; Doshi, Sagar; Schumacher, Thomas; Thostenson, Erik T.; McConnell, Jennifer

    2016-02-01

    Fatigue and fracture are among the most critical forms of damage in metal structures. Fatigue damage can initiate from microscopic defects (e.g., surface scratches, voids in welds, and internal defects) and initiate a crack. Under cyclic loading, these cracks can grow and reach a critical level to trigger fracture of the member which leads to compromised structural integrity and, in some cases, catastrophic failure of the entire structure. In our research, we are investigating a solution using carbon nanotube-based sensing composites, which have the potential to simultaneously rehabilitate and monitor fatigue-cracked structural members. These composites consist of a fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) layer and a carbon nanotube-based sensing layer, which are integrated to form a novel structural self-sensing material. The sensing layer is composed of a non-woven aramid fabric that is coated with carbon nanotubes (CNT) to form an electrically conductive network that is extremely sensitive to detecting deformation as well as damage accumulation via changes in the resistance of the CNT network. In this paper, we introduce the sensing concept, describe the manufacturing of a model sensing prototype, and discuss a set of small-scale laboratory experiments to examine the load-carrying capacity and damage sensing response.

  13. Performance of a combined capacitor based on ultrafine nickel oxide/carbon nanotubes composite electrodes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaofeng Wang; Yanqiu Cao; Yiqiang Lu; Qiqian Sha; Ji Liang

    2004-01-01

    A new sol-gel process for the preparation of ultrafine nickel hydroxide electrode materials was developed. The composite electrodes consisting of carbon nanotubes and Ni(OH)2 were developed by mixing the hydroxide and carbon nanotubes together in different mass ratios. In order to enhance energy density, a combined type pseudocapacitor/electric double layer capacitor was considered and its electrochemical properties were characterized by cyclic voltammetry and dc charge/discharge test. The combined capacitor shows excellent capacitor behavior with an operating voltage up to 1.6 V in KOH aqueous electrolyte. Stable charge/discharge behaviors were observed with much higher specific capacitance values of 24 F/g compared with that of EDLC (12F/g) by introducing 60% Ni(OH)2 in the anode material. By using the modified anode of a Ni(OH)2/carbon nanotubes composite electrode, the specific capacitance of the cell was less sensitive to discharge current density compared with that of the capacitor employing pure nickel hydroxide as anode. The combined capacitor in this study exhibits high energy density and stable power characteristics.

  14. Electrical impedance properties of carbon nanotube composite electrodes for chemical and biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Dae-Sup; Kang, Inpil; Huh, Hoon; Lee, Haiwon

    2010-05-01

    Electrical impedance properties of different type of carbon nanotubes based bulk electrodes have been investigated to develop chemical and biosensors. The bulk composite electrodes were fabricated with single-wall and multi-wall carbon nanotubes involving ionic conducting host polymer, Nafion, by using traditional solution-casting techniques. Under the various amounts of buffer solution, resistance and capacitance of the electrodes were measured with LCR meter and their characteristics due to ionic conducting host polymer were investigated by means of electrokinetic analysis. The capacitance values showed drastic change while the resistances only changed within few percent ranges. Electrical impedance measurement provided rapid and simple sensing mechanism to develop chemical sensor and biosensors with bulk nano electrodes.

  15. Origin of mechanical modifications in poly (ether ether ketone)/carbon nanotube composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavlenko, Ekaterina; Puech, Pascal; Bacsa, Wolfgang, E-mail: wolfgang.bacsa@cemes.fr [CEMES-CNRS and University of Toulouse, 29 Jeanne Marvig, 31055 Toulouse (France); Boyer, François; Olivier, Philippe [Université de Toulouse, Institut Clément Ader, I.U.T. Université Paul Sabatier - 133C Avenue de Rangueil - B.P. 67701, 31077 Toulouse CEDEX 4 (France); Sapelkin, Andrei [School of Physics and Astronomy, Queen Mary, University of London, Mile End Road, E1 4NS London (United Kingdom); King, Stephen; Heenan, Richard [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, OX11 0QX Didcot (United Kingdom); Pons, François; Gauthier, Bénédicte; Cadaux, Pierre-Henri [AIRBUS FRANCE (B.E. M and P Toulouse), 316 Route de Bayonne, 31060 Toulouse (France)

    2014-06-21

    Variations in the hardness of a poly (ether ether ketone) beam electrically modified with multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT, 0.5%-3%) are investigated. It is shown that both rupture and hardness variations correlate with the changes in carbon nanotube concentration when using micro indentation and extended Raman imaging. Statistical analysis of the relative spectral intensities in the Raman image is used to estimate local tube concentration and polymer crystallinity. We show that the histogram of the Raman D band across the image provides information about the amount of MWCNTs and the dispersion of MWCNTs in the composite. We speculate that we have observed a local modification of the ordering between pure and modified polymer. This is partially supported by small angle neutron scattering measurements, which indicate that the agglomeration state of the MWCNTs is the same at the concentrations studied.

  16. Aligned Carbon Nanotube Reinforcement of Aerospace Carbon Fiber Composites: Substructural Strength Evaluation for Aerostructure Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Guzman de Villoria, Roberto; Ydrefors, L.; Hallander, P.; Ishiguro, Kyoko; Nordin, P.; Wardle, Brian L.

    2012-01-01

    Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) are placed between all plies in an aerospace carbon fiber reinforced plastic laminate (unidirectional plies, [(0/90/±45)2]s) to reinforce the interlaminar region in the z-direction. Significant improvement in Mode I and II interlaminar toughness have been observed previously. In this work, several substructural in-plane strength tests relevant to aerostructures were undertaken: bolt/tension-bearing, open hole compression, and L-shape laminate be...

  17. Broad Microwave Dielectric Property of Single-walled Carbon Nanotube Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Junhua WU

    2008-01-01

    Microwave dielectric measurements over the broad bandwith of 10 MHz to 20 GHz were conducted on composites comprising bundles of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) embedded in an epoxy matrix, in comparison to the nano-graphite and MWNT. It is found that both relative real and imaginary permittivity of the nanocomposites are strong functions of the SWNT concentration, showing large, wide dielectric and electrical response. Distinct resonance around 1.5 GHz is observed at high SWNT concentrations, accompanied by the downshift of the resonance frequency with increasing concentration. Largely, the SWNT-epoxy composites share the behavior of the MWNT owing to structural similarity, much more effective than the nano-graphite. The remarkable, broadband dielectric and electrical properties of the nanotubes acquired in the work originate from their unique seamless graphene architectures, modeled by two major contributions, dielectric relaxation/resonance and electronic conduction, which is substantiated by the agreement between theoretical analysis and experimental results. The carbon nanotube composites are prospective for microwave applications and offer experimental evidence for fundamental studies in low-dimensional systems.

  18. Carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhifeng; Lin, Yuehe; Yantasee, Wassana; Liu, Guodong; Lu, Fang; Tu, Yi

    2008-11-18

    The present invention relates to microelectode arrays (MEAs), and more particularly to carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays (CNT-NEAs) for chemical and biological sensing, and methods of use. A nanoelectrode array includes a carbon nanotube material comprising an array of substantially linear carbon nanotubes each having a proximal end and a distal end, the proximal end of the carbon nanotubes are attached to a catalyst substrate material so as to form the array with a pre-determined site density, wherein the carbon nanotubes are aligned with respect to one another within the array; an electrically insulating layer on the surface of the carbon nanotube material, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the electrically insulating layer; a second adhesive electrically insulating layer on the surface of the electrically insulating layer, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the second adhesive electrically insulating layer; and a metal wire attached to the catalyst substrate material.

  19. Synthesis and Properties of Magnetic Composites of Carbon Nanotubes/Fe Nanoparticle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Mei-Hua; QI Xiao-Si; ZHONG Wei; YE Xiao-Juan; DENG Yu; AU Chak-tong; JIN Chang-Qing; YANG Zai-Xing

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic composites of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are synthesized by the in situ catalytic decomposition of benzene at temperatures as low as 400℃ over Fe nanoparticles (mean grain size = 26 nm) produced by sol-gel fabrication and hydrogen reduction. The yield of CNT composite is up to about 3025% in a run of 6 h. FE-SEM and HRTEM investigations reveal that one-dimensional carbon species are produced in a large quantity. A relatively high value of magnetization is observed for the composite due to the encapsulation of ferromagnetic Fe3C and/or α-Fe. The method is suitable for the mass-production of CNT composites that contain magnetic nanoparticles.

  20. Synthesis and Characterization of Multi Wall Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNT) Reinforced Sintered Magnesium Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijaya Bhaskar, S.; Rajmohan, T.; Palanikumar, K.; Bharath Ganesh Kumar, B.

    2016-04-01

    Metal matrix composites (MMCs) reinforced with ceramic nano particles (less than 100 nm), termed as metal matrix nano composites (MMNCs), can overcome those disadvantages associated with the conventional MMCs. MMCs containing carbon nanotubes are being developed and projected for diverse applications in various fields of engineering like automotive, avionic, electronic and bio-medical sectors. The present investigation deals with the synthesis and characterization of hybrid magnesium matrix reinforced with various different wt% (0-0.45) of multi wall carbon nano tubes (MWCNT) and micro SiC particles prepared through powder metallurgy route. Microstructure and mechanical properties such as micro hardness and density of the composites were examined. Microstructure of MMNCs have been investigated by scanning electron microscope, X-ray diffraction and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) for better observation of dispersion of reinforcement. The results indicated that the increase in wt% of MWCNT improves the mechanical properties of the composite.

  1. Measurement of interfacial shear strength in single wall carbon nanotubes reinforced composite using Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Debdulal; Bhattacharyya, Sanjib; Rachamim, A.; Plati, A.; Saboungi, Marie-Louise

    2010-02-01

    A novel method of measuring interfacial shear strength using Raman peak shift is reported. Carbon nanotubes (CNT) functionalized with biomolecules have been used to form a composite with polyvinyl alcohol. Type I collagen has proven to improve the load transfer from the matrix to the tubes leading to improvement of interfacial shear strength. Collagen interacts with single wall CNTs and probably wraps around it. When a composite structure is formed with the collagen, load transfer takes place through the collagen molecule. The interfacial strength of the nanotubes-matrix interface was found to be larger than 160 MPa, which is significantly higher than that observed before. A similar shear strength is estimated using a simple analytical calculation.

  2. Towards large scale aligned carbon nanotube composites: an industrial safe-by-design and sustainable approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulanger, P.; Belkadi, L.; Descarpentries, J.; Porterat, D.; Hibert, E.; Brouzes, A.; Mille, M.; Patel, S.; Pinault, M.; Reynaud, C.; Mayne-L'Hermite, M.; Decamps, J. M.

    2013-04-01

    We present the main results demonstrating the feasibility of high surface (> A4 format size) semi-industrial fabrication of composites embedding VACNT in organic matrices. The process of growing VACNT exhibits several advantages regarding safety issues: integrating de facto a safe collecting procedure on the substrate, avoiding additional preparation steps and simplifying handling and protection by impregnation into a matrix. The following steps of the overall process: VACNT carpet functionalization, alignment control and impregnation, can be processed on-line in a closed and safe continuous process and lead to dramatically reduced direct nanotube exposure for workers and users. This project opens the route to a continuous, roll-to-roll, safer, cost-effective and green industrial process to manufacture composites with controlled and aligned greener "black" carbon nanotubes.

  3. Enhanced Carbon Nanotube Ultracapacitors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed innovation utilizes carbon nanotubes (CNTs) coated with pseudo-capacitive MnO2 material as nano-composite electrode and ionic electrolyte for the...

  4. Anti-fouling response of gold-carbon nanotubes composite for enhanced ethanol electrooxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sai Siddhardha, R. S.; Anupam Kumar, Manne; Lakshminarayanan, V.; Ramamurthy, Sai Sathish

    2014-12-01

    We report the synthesis of gold carbon nanotubes composite through a one-pot surfactant free approach and its utility for ethanol electrooxidation reaction (EOR). The method involves the application of laser ablation for nanoparticle synthesis and simultaneous assembly of these on carbon nanotubes. The catalyst has been characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX) and UV-vis spectroscopic techniques. A systematic study of gold carbon nanotubes modified carbon paste electrode for EOR has been pursued. The kinetic study revealed the excellent stability of the modified electrode even after 200 cycles of EOR and with an Arrhenius energy as low as ∼28 kJ mol-1. Tafel slopes that are the measure of electrode activity have been monitored as a function of temperature of the electrolyte. The results indicate that despite an increase in the reaction rate with temperature, the electrode surface has not been significantly passivated by carbonaceous species produced at high temperatures.

  5. Development of Carbon Nanotube-Based Sensor to Monitor Crack Growth in Cracked Aluminum Structures Underneath Composite Patching

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    carbon nanotube/epoxy composites,” Carbon, vol. 44, no. 14, pp. 3022–3029, Nov. 2006. [15] I. D. Rosca and S. V. Hoa , “Highly conductive...nanotube- based sensor- A review,” IEEE Sensors Journal, vol. 7, no. 1-2, pp. 266–284, Jan.–Feb., 2007. [23] M. Nofar, S. V. Hoa and M. D. Pugh

  6. Effeet of Strain on the Electrical Resistance of Carbon Nanotube/Silicone Rubber Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG You; LIU Huashi; CHEN Juan; GE Heyi

    2011-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) filled silicone rubber (SR) composites were synthesized by in situ polymerization.The effect of strain on the electrical resistance of the CNT/SR composites and the structure evolution of CNT networks during tensile deformation were investigated.The results showed that the CNT/SR composites had high sensitivity of resistance-strain response.In a wide strain range (0-125%),the change of resistivity could reach 107,which was closely associated with the evolution process of the conductive CNTnetwork structure.The volume expansion of the composites in the tensile process led to a gradual decrease in the volume fraction of CNTs with the strain increase.When CNT loading was lower than the percolation threshold,CNT network was in disconnected state with a rapid increase in electrical resistance of the composites.Furthermore,the CNT loading had remarkable effect on the sensitivity of resistance-strain response in the composites.

  7. Fracture Toughness of Carbon Nanotube-Reinforced Metal- and Ceramic-Matrix Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. L. Chen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hierarchical analysis of the fracture toughness enhancement of carbon nanotube- (CNT- reinforced hard matrix composites is carried out on the basis of shear-lag theory and facture mechanics. It is found that stronger CNT/matrix interfaces cannot definitely lead to the better fracture toughness of these composites, and the optimal interfacial chemical bond density is that making the failure mode just in the transition from CNT pull-out to CNT break. For hard matrix composites, the fracture toughness of composites with weak interfaces can be improved effectively by increasing the CNT length. However, for soft matrix composite, the fracture toughness improvement due to the reinforcing CNTs quickly becomes saturated with an increase in CNT length. The proposed theoretical model is also applicable to short fiber-reinforced composites.

  8. Electrodeposition behavior and characteristics of Ni-carbon nanotube composite coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sung-Kyu KIM; Tae-Sung OH

    2011-01-01

    Ni-CNT (carbon nanotube) composite coatings were processed by electrodeposition and their hardness and corrosion characteristics were investigated with variations of CNT concentration in an electrolyte solution and electrodeposition current density.With increasing the CNT concentration in the electrodeposition bath and the current density, more CNTs are incorporated into Ni matrix. Hardness values of the Ni-CNT coatings are irrelevant to the CNT concentration in the solution, the current density, and current mode. implying poor adhesion of CNTs to Ni matrix. With increasing the CNT content in the coating, the corrosion resistance of the Ni-CNT composite coating becomes inferior due to the porous microstructure.

  9. Glass Transition Temperature Depression at the Percolation Threshold in Carbon Nanotube-Epoxy Resin and Polypyrrole-Epoxy Resin Composites

    OpenAIRE

    Barrau, Sophie; Demont, Philippe; Maraval, Céline; Bernès, Alain; Lacabanne, Colette

    2005-01-01

    The glass transition temperatures of conducting composites, obtained by blending carbon nanotubes (CNTs) or polypyrrole (PPy) particles with epoxy resin, were investigated by using both differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and dynamical mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA). For both composites, dc and ac conductivity measurements revealed an electrical percolation threshold at which the glass transition temperature and mechanical modulus of the composites pass through a minimum.

  10. The concept of a novel hybrid smart composite reinforced with radially aligned zigzag carbon nanotubes on piezoelectric fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, M. C.

    2010-03-01

    A new hybrid piezoelectric composite (HPZC) reinforced with zigzag single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and piezoelectric fibers is proposed. The novel constructional feature of this composite is that the uniformly aligned CNTs are radially grown on the surface of piezoelectric fibers. A micromechanics model is derived to estimate the effective piezoelectric and elastic properties. It is found that the effective piezoelectric coefficient e31 of the proposed HPZC, which accounts for the in-plane actuation, is significantly higher than that of the existing 1-3 piezoelectric composite without reinforcement with carbon nanotubes and the previously reported hybrid piezoelectric composite (Ray and Batra 2009 ASME J. Appl. Mech. 76 034503).

  11. Carbon nanotube quantum dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sapmaz, S.

    2006-01-01

    Low temperature electron transport measurements on individual single wall carbon nanotubes are described in this thesis. Carbon nanotubes are small hollow cylinders made entirely out of carbon atoms. At low temperatures (below ~10 K) finite length nanotubes form quantum dots. Because of its small si

  12. Carbon Nanotubes for Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyyappan, Meyya

    2000-01-01

    The potential of nanotube technology for NASA missions is significant and is properly recognized by NASA management. Ames has done much pioneering research in the last five years on carbon nanotube growth, characterization, atomic force microscopy, sensor development and computational nanotechnology. NASA Johnson Space Center has focused on laser ablation production of nanotubes and composites development. These in-house efforts, along with strategic collaboration with academia and industry, are geared towards meeting the agency's mission requirements. This viewgraph presentation (including an explanation for each slide) outlines the research focus for Ames nanotechnology, including details on carbon nanotubes' properties, applications, and synthesis.

  13. Synthesis of carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awasthi, Kalpana; Srivastava, Anchal; Srivastava, O N

    2005-10-01

    Carbon nanotubes play a fundamental role in the rapidly developing field of nanoscience and nanotechnology because of their unique properties and high potential for applications. In this article, the different synthesis methods of carbon nanotubes (both multi-walled and single-walled) are reviewed. From the industrial point of view, the chemical vapor deposition method has shown advantages over laser vaporization and electric arc discharge methods. This article also presents recent work in the controlled synthesis of carbon nanotubes with ordered architectures. Special carbon nanotube configurations, such as nanocoils, nanohorns, bamboo-shaped and carbon cylinder made up from carbon nanotubes are also discussed.

  14. The effects of functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotube on mechanical properties of multi-walled carbon nanotube/epoxy composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Ardjmand

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical properties of the multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT/epoxy composites affected by carboxyl and amino functionalized MWCNT are investigated. Tensile tests of the specimens were carried out to obtain mechanical properties of MWCNT/epoxy composites for various weight-percents (wt % of MWCNTs. In order to properly predict the mechanical properties of MWCNT reinforced epoxy composites, the effect of MWCNTs de bonding is considered through applying a correction factor to a Halpin-Tsai equation. Applicability of the modified model was endorsed by the experimental results.

  15. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes-sulfur composites with enhanced electrochemical performance for lithium/sulfur batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Xin Zhou; Jin, Bo, E-mail: jinbo@jlu.edu.cn; Xin, Pei Ming; Wang, Huan Huan

    2014-07-01

    Multiwalled carbon nanotubes-sulfur (MWCNTs-S) composites were synthesized by chemical activation of MWCNTs and capillarity between sulfur and MWCNTs. The MWCNTs activated by potassium hydroxide (denoted as K-MWCNTs) were used as conductive additive. The as-prepared K-MWCNTs-S composites can display excellent cycle stability and rate capability with the initial discharge capacity of 741 mAh g⁻¹ and capacity retention of 80% after 50 cycles compared to pure S. The improvement in the electrochemical performance for K-MWCNTs-S composites is attributed to the interstitial structure of the MWCNTs resulted from the strong chemical etching, which can facilitate the insertion and extraction of Li ions and more better percolation of the electrolyte, and also ascribed to enhanced electronic conductivity of K-MWCNTs-S composites. It is indicated that the K-MWCNTs-S composites can be used as the cathode materials for lithium–sulfur batteries.

  16. Effect of carbon nanotubes on properties of cement-sand-based piezoelectric composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sunjung; Zhao, Ping; Enemuoh, Emmanuel

    2015-04-01

    Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) were dispersed in a cement-sand-based piezoelectric smart composite as conductive fillers to improve its poling efficiency, leading to a desirable piezoelectric effect. By introducing a small amount of CNTs, continuous electric networks between Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT) particles were created, thus making the composite poling easier. Specimens were prepared by mixing PZT powders, Portland cement and sand with CNTs, followed by pressing it with a load frame system. The effect of quantity of CNTs ranging from 0 to 1.0 volume percent on properties of the composite, including its piezoelectric coefficient, dielectric constant and loss, and sensing effects, were characterized. It was found that the addition of CNTs facilitated effective poling at room temperature and improved the piezoelectric and dielectric properties of the composite. The composite modified by CNTs achieved optimal properties when the CNTs content was 0.7 vol.%.

  17. Synthesis and Electrochemical Characterization of Polypyrrole/Multi-walled Carbon Nanotube Composite Electrodes for Supercapacitor Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, Santhosh; Lee, Yoon Sung; Choi, Ji Ae; Kang, Yun Chan; Kim, Dong Won [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-05-15

    The nanocomposites of polypyrrole (PPy) and multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) with different composition are synthesized by the chemical oxidative polymerization method. In these composites, the MWCNTs are uniformly coated by PPy with different thickness. The electrochemical properties of the composite electrodes are investigated by cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic charge-discharge cycling and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The full cells assembled with the PPy/MWCNT composite electrodes deliver initial specific capacitances ranging from 146.3 to 167.2 F/g at 0.5 mA/cm{sup 2} and exhibit stable cycling characteristics. The effect of content of MWCNT in the composite on cycling performance of the cells is also investigated.

  18. Optimization of the sintering atmosphere for high-density hydroxyapatite-carbon nanotube composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Ashley A; Kinloch, Ian A; Windle, Alan H; Best, Serena M

    2010-10-06

    Hydroxyapatite-carbon nanotube (HA-CNT) composites have the potential for improved mechanical properties over HA for use in bone graft applications. Finding an appropriate sintering atmosphere for this composite presents a dilemma, as HA requires water in the sintering atmosphere to remain phase pure and well hydroxylated, yet CNTs oxidize at the high temperatures required for sintering. The purpose of this study was to optimize the atmosphere for sintering these composites. While the reaction between carbon and water to form carbon monoxide and hydrogen at high temperatures (known as the 'water-gas reaction') would seem to present a problem for sintering these composites, Le Chatelier's principle suggests this reaction can be suppressed by increasing the concentration of carbon monoxide and hydrogen relative to the concentration of carbon and water, so as to retain the CNTs and keep the HA's structure intact. Eight sintering atmospheres were investigated, including standard atmospheres (such as air and wet Ar), as well as atmospheres based on the water-gas reaction. It was found that sintering in an atmosphere of carbon monoxide and hydrogen, with a small amount of water added, resulted in an optimal combination of phase purity, hydroxylation, CNT retention and density.

  19. Polyvinylchloride-Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Composites: Thermal and Spectroscopic Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mircea Chipara

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanocomposites of single-walled carbon nanotubes dispersed within polyvinylchloride have been obtained by using the solution path. High-power sonication was utilized to achieve a good dispersion of carbon nanotubes. Thermogravimetric analysis revealed that during the synthesis, processing, or thermal analysis of these nanocomposites the released chlorine is functionalizing the single-walled carbon nanotubes. The loading of polyvinylchloride by single-walled carbon nanotubes increases the glass transition temperature of the polymeric matrix, demonstrating the interactions between macromolecular chains and filler. Wide Angle X-Ray Scattering data suggested a drop of the crystallite size and of the degree of crystallinity as the concentration of single-walled carbon nanotubes is increased. The in situ chlorination and amorphization of nanotube during the synthesis (sonication step is confirmed by Raman spectroscopy.

  20. Structural CNT Composites. Part I; Developing a Carbon Nanotube Filament Winder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauti, Godfrey; Kim, Jae-Woo; Wincheski, Russell A.; Antczak, Andrew; Campero, Jamie C.; Luong, Hoa H.; Shanahan, Michelle H.; Stelter, Christopher J.; Siochi, Emilie J.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) based materials promise advances in the production of high strength and multifunctional components for aerospace and other applications. Specifically, in tension dominated applications, the latest CNT based filaments are yielding composite properties comparable to or exceeding composites from more established fibers such as Kevlar and carbon fiber. However, for the properties of these materials to be fully realized at the component level, suitable manufacturing processes have to be developed. These materials handle differently from conventional fibers, with different wetting characteristics and behavior under load. The limited availability of bulk forms also requires that the equipment be scaled down accordingly to tailor the process development approach to material availability. Here, the development of hardware and software for filament winding of carbon nanotube based tapes and yarns is described. This hardware features precision guidance of the CNT material and control of the winding tension over a wide range in an open architecture that allows for effective process control and troubleshooting during winding. Use of the filament winder to develop CNT based Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPVs) shall also be discussed.

  1. Dynamic behavior of a black phosphorus and carbon nanotube composite system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jiao; Cai, Haifang; Cai, Kun; Qin, Qing-Hua

    2017-01-01

    A double walled nanotube composite is constructed by placing a black-phosphorene-based nanotube (BPNT) in a carbon nanotube (CNT). When driving the CNT to rotate by stators in a thermal driven rotary nanomotor, the BPNT behaves differently from the CNT. For instance, the BPNT can be actuated to rotate by the CNT, but its rotational acceleration differs from that of the CNT. The BPNT oscillates along the tube axis when it is longer than the CNT. The results obtained indicate that the BPNT functions with high structural stability when acting as a rotor with rotational frequency of ~20 GHz at 250 K. If at a higher temperature than 250 K, say 300 K, the rotating BPNT shows weaker structural stability than its status at 250 K. When the two tubes in the rotor are of equal length, the rotational frequency of the BPNT drops rapidly after the BPNT is collapsed, owing to more broken P-P bonds. When the black-phosphorene nanotube is longer than the CNT, it rotates synchronously with the CNT even if it is collapsed. Hence, in the design of a nanomotor with a rotor from BPNT, the working rotational frequency should be lower than a certain threshold at a higher temperature.

  2. Analysis of DC Electrical Conductivity Models of Carbon Nanotube-Polymer Composites with Potential Application to Nanometric Electronic Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Vargas-Bernal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The design of nanometric electronic devices requires novel materials for improving their electrical performance from stages of design until their fabrication. Until now, several DC electrical conductivity models for composite materials have been proposed. However, these models must be valued to identify main design parameters that more efficiently control the electrical properties of the materials to be developed. In this paper, four different models used for modeling DC electrical conductivity of carbon nanotube-polymer composites are studied with the aim of obtaining a complete list of design parameters that allow guarantying to the designer an increase in electrical properties of the composite by means of carbon nanotubes.

  3. Collagen-carbon nanotube composite materials as scaffolds in tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Rebecca A; Laurenzi, Brendan F; Viswanathan, Gunaranjan; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Stegemann, Jan P

    2005-09-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) are attractive for use in fiber-reinforced composite materials due to their very high aspect ratio, combined with outstanding mechanical and electrical properties. Composite materials comprising a collagen matrix with embedded CNT were prepared by mixing solubilized Type I collagen with solutions of carboxylated single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) at concentrations of 0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.8, and 2.0 weight percent. Living smooth muscle cells were incorporated at the time of collagen gelation to produce cell-seeded collagen-CNT composite matrices. Constructs containing 2.0 wt % CNT exhibited delayed gel compaction, relative to lower concentrations that compacted at the same rate as pure collagen controls. Cell viability in all constructs was consistently above 85% at both Day 3 and Day 7, whereas cell number in CNT-containing constructs was lower than in control constructs at Day 3, though statistically unchanged by Day 7. Scanning electron microscopy showed physical interactions between CNT and collagen matrix. Raman spectroscopy confirmed the presence of CNT at the expected diameter (0.85-1.30 nm), but did not indicate strong molecular interactions between the collagen and CNT components. Such collagen-CNT composite matrices may have utility as scaffolds in tissue engineering, or as components of biosensors or other medical devices.

  4. Aligned Carbon Nanotube Reinforced Silicon Carbide Composites by Chemical Vapor Infiltration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, Zhan Jun [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Yang, Ying Chao [University of South Carolina, Columbia; Li, Kai Yuan [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Tao, Xin Yong [University of South Carolina, Columbia; Eres, Gyula [ORNL; Howe, Jane Y [ORNL; Zhang, Li Tong [Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an, China; Li, Xiao Dong [University of South Carolina, Columbia; Pan, Zhengwei [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Owing to their exceptional stiffness and strength1 4, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have long been considered to be an ideal reinforcement for light-weight, high-strength, and high-temperature-resistant ceramic matrix composites (CMCs)5 10. However, the research and development in CNT-reinforced CMCs have been greatly hindered due to the challenges related to manufacturing including poor dispersion, damages during dispersion, surface modification, densification and sintering, weak tube/matrix interfaces, and agglomeration of tubes at the matrix grain boundaries5,11. Here we report the fabrication of high-quality aligned CNT/SiC composites by chemical vapor infiltration (CVI), a technique that is being widely used to fabricate commercial continuous-filament CMCs12 15. Using the CVI technique most of the challenges previously encountered in the fabrication of CNT composites were readily overcome. Nanotube pullouts, an important toughening mechanism for CMCs, were consistently observed on all fractured CNT/SiC samples. Indeed, three-point bending tests conducted on individual CNT/SiC nanowires (diameters: 50 200 nm) using an atomic force microscope show that the CNT-reinforced SiC nanowires are about an order of magnitude tougher than the bulk SiC. The tube/matrix interface is so intimate and the SiC matrix is so dense that a ~50-nm-thick SiC coating can effectively protect the inside nanotubes from being oxidized at 1600 C in air. The CVI method may be extended to produce nanotube composites from a variety of matrix

  5. Effect of carbon nanotube addition on the wear behavior of basalt/epoxy woven composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, M T; Rhee, K Y; Lee, B H; Kim, C J

    2013-08-01

    The effect of acid-treated carbon nanotube (CNT) addition on the wear and dynamic mechanical thermal properties of basalt/epoxy woven composites was investigated in this study. Basalt/CNT/epoxy composites were fabricated by impregnating woven basalt fibers into epoxy resin mixed with 1 wt% CNTs which were acid-treated. Wear and DMA (dynamic mechanical analyzer) tests were performed on basalt/epoxy composites and basalt/CNT/epoxy composites. The results showed that the addition of the acid-treated CNTs improved the wear properties of basalt/epoxy woven composites. Specifically, the friction coefficient of the basalt/epoxy composite was stabilized in the range of 0.5-0.6 while it fell in the range of 0.3-0.4 for basalt/CNT/epoxy composites. The wear volume loss of the basalt/CNT/epoxy composites was approximately 68% lower than that of the basalt/epoxy composites. The results also showed that the glass transition temperature of basalt/CNT/epoxy composites was higher than that of basalt/epoxy composites. The improvement of wear properties of basalt/epoxy composites by the addition of acid-treated CNTs was caused by the homogeneous load transfer between basalt fibers and epoxy matrix due to the reinforcement of CNTs.

  6. Chitosan/silica coated carbon nanotubes composite proton exchange membranes for fuel cell applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hai; Gong, Chunli; Wang, Jie; Liu, Xiaoyan; Liu, Huanli; Cheng, Fan; Wang, Guangjin; Zheng, Genwen; Qin, Caiqin; Wen, Sheng

    2016-01-20

    Silica-coated carbon nanotubes (SCNTs), which were obtained by a simple sol-gel method, were utilized in preparation of chitosan/SCNTs (CS/SCNTs) composite membranes. The thermal and oxidative stability, morphology, mechanical properties, water uptake and proton conductivity of CS/SCNTs composite membranes were investigated. The insulated and hydrophilic silica layer coated on CNTs eliminates the risk of electronic short-circuiting and enhances the interaction between SCNTs and chitosan to ensure the homogenous dispersion of SCNTs, although the water uptake of CS/SCNTs membranes is reduced owing to the decrease of the effective number of the amino functional groups of chitosan. The CS/SCNTs composite membranes are superior to the pure CS membrane in thermal and oxidative stability, mechanical properties and proton conductivity. The results of this study suggest that CS/SCNTs composite membranes exhibit promising potential for practical application in proton exchange membranes.

  7. Rheological and mechanical study of regenerated cellulose/multi-walled carbon nanotube composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Wei; Wang, Shuxia; Liu, Hui; Wu, Jimin; Huang, Min; Ma, Wenjing; Huang, Chaobo

    2016-09-01

    Regenerated cellulose (RC)-based composites reinforced with multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were prepared by a facile casting method. The morphology and microstructure of the fabricated composites were characterized using transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopy. Thermogravimetry and derivative thermogravimetric analysis were conducted to investigate the effect of MWCNTs on the thermal behaviors of the RC. The results showed that the introduction of MWCNTs enhanced the thermal stability of the RC. Moreover, the effect of the dispersion state of MWCNTs in microcrystalline cellulose/ZnCl2 solutions with varying MWCNT loadings was studied by rheological tests. The mechanical properties of composite films were remarkably improved compared to those of pure RC film. Specifically, the composite film containing 3 wt% of MWCNTs exhibits a 123% enhancement in tensile strength and a 163% enhancement in the Young’s modulus compared with the pure RC film.

  8. Photoluminescence Properties of Silicon Nanowires and Carbon Nanotube-Silicon Nanowire Composite Arrays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李梦轲; 陆梅; 孔令斌; 王成伟; 郭新勇; 力虎林

    2002-01-01

    Composite arrays of multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) and silicon nanowires (SiNWs) are fabricated by means of the chemical vapour deposition method in porous anodic aluminium oxide (AAO) templates. The results of the scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy have shown that SiNWs are successful nested or filled in the hollow cavities of synthesized MWNT arrays in AAO templates to form MWNT-SiNW composite arrays. The photoluminescence (PL) intensity degradation and a blueshift of PL peak position, usually created from the chemical instability of the SiNW surfaces, are decreased and eliminated clearly in the composite arrays. The composite arrays of MWNTs-SiNWs exhibit more enhanced intensity and stability of PL performance than the SiNW arrays deposited in AAO templates.

  9. Deformation behavior of release agent coated glass fibre / epoxy composite using carbon nanotubes as strain sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paweena Sureeyatanapas

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The deformation behavior of model glass fiber in epoxy composites has been studied using Raman spectroscopyproperties. Single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs were introduced at the glass fiber/epoxy interface as strain sensors,which can be detected by Raman Spectroscopy, to sense the strain profile of the fiber under deformation. The release agentwas applied on the fiber surface before composite fabrication. It was found that at high strain level, the behavior of a singlefiber in a composite did not follow a classical shear-lag model as shown in the fragmentation study. This is due to the interfacial failure caused by the release agent. The strain mapping result can be compared to that without release agent coating.The finding confirmed the application of SWNTs as strain sensors at the fiber/composite interface.

  10. A Novel Method to Decrease Micro-residual Stresses of Fibrous Composites by Adding Carbon Nanotube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Shokrieh

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this research, a novel method to decrease micro-residual stresses of fibrous composites by adding carbon nanotubes (CNTs is proposed in detail. The negative coefficient of thermal expansion and the high young’s modulus of CNTs can be utilized to counterbalance the process induced residual stresses in composites. To this end, first, the effects of adding CNTs to the matrix of fibrous composites in reducing the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE and increasing of young’s modulus of matrix are studied theoretically. Then, a three phase micromechanical model (the energy method is used to model the effect of CNT in reducing the residual stresses of fibrous composites. The results show that by addition of CNTs, enhancements in properties of matrix are obtained and lead to decrease in micro-residual stresses of matrix and fiber up to 72%.

  11. Continuous Preparation of Copper/Carbon Nanotube Composite Films and Application in Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiao Gang; Le Wu, Min; Wang, Xiao Xia; Zhong, Xin Hua; Zhao, Ke; Wang, Jian Nong

    2016-02-08

    Realizing the continuous and large scale preparation of particle/carbon nanotube (CNT) composites with enhanced functionalities, and broad applications in energy conversion, harvesting, and storage systems, remains as a big challenge. Here, we report a scalable strategy to continuously prepare particle/CNT composite films in which particles are confined by CNT films. This is achieved by the continuous condensation and deposition of a cylindrical assembly of CNTs on a paper strip and the in situ incorporation of particles during the layer-by-layer deposition process. A Cu/CNT composite film is prepared as an example; such a film exhibits very high power conversion efficiency when it is used as a counter electrode in a solar cell, compared with previous materials under otherwise identical conditions. The proposed method can be extended to other CNT-based composite films with excellent functionalities for wide applications.

  12. Electrical conductivity and electromagnetic interference shielding characteristics of multiwalled carbon nanotube filled polyurethane composite films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son Hoang, Anh

    2011-06-01

    Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were homogeneously dispersed in a pure polyurethane resin by grinding in a planetary ball mill. The structure and surface morphology of the MWCNTs and MWCNT/polyurethane composites were studied by filed emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) methods. The electrical conductivity at room temperature and electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding effectiveness (SE) of the composite films with different MWCNT loadings were investigated and the measurement of EMI SE was carried out in a frequency range of 8-12 GHz (X-band). The experimental results show that with a low MWCNT concentration the composite films could achieve a high conductivity and their EMI SE has a strong dependence on MWCNT content. For the composite films with 22 wt% of MWCNTs, the EMI SE attained an average value of 20 dB, so that the shielding effect reduced the penetrating power to 1%.

  13. Optimization of interfacial microstructure and mechanical properties of carbon fiber/epoxy composites via carbon nanotube sizing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Hongwei; Sui, Xianhang; Zhao, Zhongbo; Xu, Zhiwei; Chen, Lei; Deng, Hui; Liu, Ya; Qian, Xiaoming

    2015-08-01

    Repetitious sizing treatment was used to modify the carbon fiber (CF) surface with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) for improving interfacial properties of CF/epoxy composites. Interlaminar shear and flexural results showed that mechanical properties of composites were significantly depended on the dispersion state and contents of CNTs in interfacial regions. Increases of 13.45% in interlaminar shear strength and 20.31% in flexural strength were achieved in quintuple sized-CF/epoxy composites, whereas excessive CNTs led to decrease of interfacial performance due to defects induced by agglomerated CNTs. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and force modulation atomic force microscope were used to detect the structure of interfacial phase and results indicated that gradient interfacial structure with various thicknesses was formed due to CNT incorporation. This means that such a simple and efficient method to improve interfacial performance of composites via regulating the fiber-matrix interphase structure was developed and showed great commercial application potential.

  14. Adsorption of Molecular Gases on Silver/Carbon Nanotube Composites at Low Temperatures and Low Pressures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Barberio

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present an experimental study adsorption of molecular gases (N2, H2, O2, CH4, C2H4, and C2H6 on multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs and MWCNT doped with Ag at low temperatures (35 K and pressures (10−6 Torr using the temperature programmed desorption technique. Our results show that the desorption kinetics is of the first order; furthermore comparative measurements indicate that Ag/MWCNTs have an adsorption capacity higher than that of a pure sample suggesting that these composites are good candidates as gas cryosorbers for applications in cryopumps or sensor of latest generation.

  15. Preparation and Crystallization of Carbon Nanotube/maleic Anhydride-grafted Polypropylene Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaohua CHEN; Jing HU; Lingping ZHOU; Wenhua LI; Zi YANG; Yanguo WANG

    2008-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT)/maleic acid anhydride (MAH)-grafted polypropylene (PP) composites were prepared by in situ grafting method. Infrared spectroscopy showed that the CNTs were linked to PP by MAH grafting. The microstructures and calorimetry analysis indicated that the crystallization behaviors of the filled and unfilled PP were quite different. The addition of CNTs dramatically reduced the spherulite size, increased crystallization rate and improved the thermal stability of PP. These results confirmed the expected nucleant effect of CNT on the crystallization of PP. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy showed that the CNTs were dispersed homogeneously, indicating that the original CNT bundles were separated into individual tubes by the grafting.

  16. Methods of Attaching or Grafting Carbon Nanotubes to Silicon Surfaces and Composite Structures Derived Therefrom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tour, James M. (Inventor); Chen, Bo (Inventor); Flatt, Austen K. (Inventor); Stewart, Michael P. (Inventor); Dyke, Christopher A. (Inventor); Maya, Francisco (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    The present invention is directed toward methods of attaching or grafting carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to silicon surfaces. In some embodiments, such attaching or grafting occurs via functional groups on either or both of the CNTs and silicon surface. In some embodiments, the methods of the present invention include: (1) reacting a silicon surface with a functionalizing agent (such as oligo(phenylene ethynylene)) to form a functionalized silicon surface; (2) dispersing a quantity of CNTs in a solvent to form dispersed CNTs; and (3) reacting the functionalized silicon surface with the dispersed CNTs. The present invention is also directed to the novel compositions produced by such methods.

  17. In situ preparation of composite from conjugated polyschiff bases and multiwalled carbon nanotube: Synthesis, electrochromic, acidochromic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma Lina; Cai Jiwei [Key Laboratory of Functional Inorganic Material Chemistry (Heilongjiang University), Ministry of Education, Department of Polymer Materials and Engineering, Harbin 150086 (China); Zhao Ping [Key Laboratory for Advanced Materials and Institute of Fine Chemicals, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Niu Haijun, E-mail: haijunniu@hotmail.com [Key Laboratory of Functional Inorganic Material Chemistry (Heilongjiang University), Ministry of Education, Department of Polymer Materials and Engineering, Harbin 150086 (China); Wang Cheng; Bai Xuduo [Key Laboratory of Functional Inorganic Material Chemistry (Heilongjiang University), Ministry of Education, Department of Polymer Materials and Engineering, Harbin 150086 (China); Wang Wen [School of Material Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150080 (China)

    2012-03-15

    Graphical abstract: The introduction of carbon nanotubes greatly improves the photochromic property of the composites. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MWNTs/PSB composite was prepared by in situ polymerization with a new type of PSB. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The introduction of carbon nanotubes greatly improves the photochromic property of the composites. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The composites exhibited excellent thermal stability and reversible electrochemical behavior. - Abstract: Polyschiff base (PSB) which has the structure of C=N double bond is well known as conducting material with high thermal resistance, chemical and electrical properties. Recently, it was used as hole transporting material in organic light emitting diode (OLED), chemical sensor and electrochromic materials. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with excellent properties such as unique electrical, mechanical, optical and chemical properties are promising reinforcing materials for polymer composites which improve the comprehensive properties of polymers. In this paper, conjugated PSB-grafted multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) composite was prepared by in situ polymerization. The resultant composites were characterized by thermogravimetric (TGA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), UV-vis absorption, photoluminescence (PL), cyclic voltammograms (CV), infrared spectroscopy (IR) and Raman spectroscopy. The composites exhibited high thermal stability and excellent reversibilities of electrochromic, photochromic, acidochromic characteristics, with the color change from the light yellow to blue.

  18. Electroless nickel plating of arc discharge synthesized carbon nanotubes for metal matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jagannatham, M.; Sankaran, S.; Prathap, Haridoss, E-mail: prathap@iitm.ac.in

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Electroless Ni coatings have been performed on CNTs for various deposition times. • The deposition of nickel increased with increase in deposition time. • A deposition time of 60 min has been optimum for uniform coating of Ni on CNTs. • The CNTs with uniform coating of Ni are potential for reinforcements in composites. • Electroless nickel coatings are determined to be super paramagnetic behavior. - Abstract: Electroless nickel (EN) plating was performed on arc discharge synthesized multiwalled carbon nanotubes for various deposition times. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and Raman spectroscopy characterization techniques are used to identify the presence of nickel deposition on the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and the degree of graphitization. The results indicate that impurities are less in the purified CNTs as compared to raw carbon soot. Increasing deposition time up to 60 min increases uniform deposition of nickel throughout the length of the CNTs. However, for deposition time longer than 60 min, nickel particles are seen separated from the surface of the CNTs. Uniformly coated nickel CNTs throughout their length are potential candidates for reinforcements in composite materials. Magnetic properties of the nickel coated CNTs, with deposition time of 30 and 60 min were also evaluated. The magnetic saturation of nickel coated CNTs with deposition time of 30 min is less compared to nickel coated CNTs with deposition time of 60 min.

  19. Strain sensitivity of carbon nanotube cement-based composites for structural health monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alessandro, Antonella; Ubertini, Filippo; Laflamme, Simon; Rallini, Marco; Materazzi, Annibale L.; Kenny, Josè M.

    2016-04-01

    Cement-based smart sensors appear particularly suitable for monitoring applications, due to their self-sensing abilities, their ease of use, and their numerous possible field applications. The addition of conductive carbon nanofillers into a cementitious matrix provides the material with piezoresistive characteristics and enhanced sensitivity to mechanical alterations. The strain-sensing ability is achieved by correlating the variation of external loads or deformations with the variation of specific electrical parameters, such as the electrical resistance. Among conductive nanofillers, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have shown promise for the fabrication of self-monitoring composites. However, some issues related to the filler dispersion and the mix design of cementitious nanoadded materials need to be further investigated. For instance, a small difference in the added quantity of a specific nanofiller in a cement-matrix composite can substantially change the quality of the dispersion and the strain sensitivity of the resulting material. The present research focuses on the strain sensitivity of concrete, mortar and cement paste sensors fabricated with different amounts of carbon nanotube inclusions. The aim of the work is to investigate the quality of dispersion of the CNTs in the aqueous solutions, the physical properties of the fresh mixtures, the electromechanical properties of the hardened materials, and the sensing properties of the obtained transducers. Results show that cement-based sensors with CNT inclusions, if properly implemented, can be favorably applied to structural health monitoring.

  20. Voltammetric determination of theophylline at a Nafion/multi-wall carbon nanotubes composite film-modified glassy carbon electrode

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Suling Yang; Ran Yang; Gang Li; Jianjun Li; Lingbo Qu

    2010-11-01

    A Nafion/multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) composite film-modified electrode was fabricated and applied to the sensitive and convenient determination of theophylline (TP). Multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) were easily dispersed homogeneously into 0.1% Nafion methanol solution by sonication. Appropriate amount of Nafion/MWNTs suspension was coated on a glassy carbon electrode. After evaporating methanol, a Nafion/MWNTs composite film-modified electrode was achieved. TP could effectively accumulate at Nafion/MWNTs composite film-modified electrode and cause a sensitive anodic peak at around 1180 mV (vs SCE) in 0.01 mol/L H2SO4 medium (pH 1.8). In contrast with the bare glassy carbon electrode, Nafion film-modified electrode, Nafion/MWNTs film-modified electrode could remarkably increase the anodic peak current and decreased the overpotential of TP oxidation. Under the optimized conditions, the anodic peak current was proportional to TP concentration in the range of 8.0 × 10-8-6.0 × 10-5 mol/L, with a detection limit of 2.0 × 10-8 mol/L. This newly developed method was used to determine TP in drug samples with good percentage of recoveries.

  1. Radar absorbing properties of carbon nanotubes/polymer composites in the V-band

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    E A ZAKHARYCHEV; E N RAZOV; YU D SEMCHIKOV; N S ZAKHARYCHEVA; M A KABINA; L I BAKINA; V L ZEFIROV

    2016-04-01

    This research is devoted to the study of radar absorbing properties of the composites, based on the epoxy binder and carbon nanotubes (CNT) in the frequency range of 52–73 GHz. Three species of unmodified multi-walledCNT differing in length and diameter were investigated as fillers. The reflection coefficients (Krefl) at the radar absorbing material (RAM)–air interface and the electro-magnetic radiation (EMR) absorption coefficients (Kabs) in the materials with the different content of nanotubes were measured (Krefl and Kabs were calculated using the highest (the worst) value of the voltage standing-wave ratio (VSWR) in the frequency range of 52–73 GHz). It was established that the increase in nanotubes aspect ratio (a ratio of CNT length to its diameter) leads to Kabs rising for polymer composites. Also, CNT diameter decrease leads to Krefl reduction. CNT of 8–15 nm in diameter and more than 2 $\\mu$m in length are the most effective from all investigated fillers. The reflection loss values were calculated and CNT optimal concentrations were obtained at different thickness of RAMs.

  2. Application of Conductive Carbon Nanotube Fibers and Composites: Gas Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    their review, Wang et al. provide a useful summary of specific data for interactions between SWNT and gases (13). These included adsorption energy...can be applied to offset the negative resulting from DMMP adsorption and speed up recovery of the device. Wang et al. also took a composite-style...Zhang HCN SWNT Boron modeling paper Gas -- -- (90) 2006 Wang HCOH SWNT Modeling paper -- -- (90) 2010 Khani Hg (II) MWNT BMIM.BF4 Liquid Voltage

  3. Thrombogenicity and blood coagulation of a microcatheter prepared from carbon nanotube-nylon-based composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Morinobu; Koyama, Shozo; Matsuda, Yoshikazu; Hayashi, Takuya; Kim, Yoong-Ahm

    2005-01-01

    Here we describe the fabrication of nanocomposite-based microcatheter through-melt extrusion utilizing high-purity carbon nanotubes as filler and nylon as matrix. Homogeneous dispersion of carbon nanotubes in nylon can provide novel microcatheters with enhanced mechanical properties (easier to handle) and extremely reduced thrombogenicity or antithrombotic property. The present microcatheter with high performance is highly promising for medical applications.

  4. Strain Sensing Characteristics of Rubbery Carbon Nanotube Composite for Flexible Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Gyong Rak; Park, Hyung-ki; Huh, Hoon; Kim, Young-Ju; Ham, Heon; Kim, Hyoun Woo; Lim, Kwon Taek; Kim, Sung Yong; Kang, Inpil

    2016-02-01

    In this study, the piezoresistive properties of CNT (Carbon Nanotube)/EPDM composite are characterized for the applications of a flexible sensor. The CNT/EPDM composites were prepared by using a Brabender mixer with MWCNT (Multi-walled Carbon Nanotube) and organoclay. The static and quasi-dynamic voltage output responses of the composite sensor were also experimentally studied and were compared with those of a conventional foil strain gage. The voltage output by using a signal processing system was fairly stable and it shows somehow linear responses at both of loading and unloading cases with hysteresis. The voltage output was distorted under a quasi-dynamic test due to its unsymmetrical piezoresistive characteristics. The CNT/EPDM sensor showed quite tardy response to its settling time test under static deflections and that would be a hurdle for its real time applications. Furthermore, since the CNT/EPDM sensor does not have directional voltage output to tension and compression, it only could be utilized as a mono-directional force sensor such as a compressive touch sensor.

  5. Electrical and dielectric properties of foam injection-molded polypropylene/multiwalled carbon nanotube composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameli, A.; Nofar, M.; Saniei, M.; Hossieny, N.; Park, C. B.; Pötschke, P.

    2015-05-01

    A combination of high dielectric permittivity (ɛ') and low dielectric loss (tan δ) is required for charge storage applications. In percolative systems such as conductive polymer composites, however, obtaining high ɛ' and low tan δ is very challenging due to the sharp insulation-conduction transition near the threshold region. Due to the particular arrangement of conductive fillers induced by both foaming and injection molding processes, they may address this issue. Therefore, this work evaluates the application of foam injection molding process in fabricating polymer nanocomposites for energy storage. Polypropylene-multiwalled carbon nanotubes (PP-MWCNT) composites were prepared by melt mixing and foamed in an injection molding process. Electrical conductivity (σ), ɛ' and tan δ were then characterized. Also, scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM) was used to investigate the carbon nanotube's arrangement as well as cellular morphology. The results showed that foam injection-molded composites exhibited highly superior dielectric properties to those of solid counterparts. For instance, foamed samples had ɛ'=68.3 and tan δ =0.05 (at 1.25 vol.% MWCNT), as opposed to ɛ'=17.8 and tan δ=0.04 in solid samples (at 2.56 vol.% MWCNT). The results of this work reveal that high performance dielectric nanocomposites can be developed using foam injection molding technologies for charge storage applications.

  6. Plasma-modified graphene nanoplatelets and multiwalled carbon nanotubes as fillers for advanced rubber composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicinski, M.; Gozdek, T.; Bielinski, D. M.; Szymanowski, H.; Kleczewska, J.; Piatkowska, A.

    2015-07-01

    In modern rubber industry, there still is a room for new fillers, which can improve the mechanical properties of the composites, or introduce a new function to the material. Modern fillers like carbon nanotubes or graphene nanoplatelets (GnP), are increasingly applied in advanced polymer composites technology. However, it might be hard to obtain a well dispersed system for such systems. The polymer matrix often exhibits higher surface free energy (SFE) level with the filler, which can cause problems with polymer-filler interphase adhesion. Filler particles are not wet properly by the polymer, and thus are easier to agglomerate. As a consequence, improvement in the mechanical properties is lower than expected. In this work, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) and GnP surface were modified with low-temperature plasma. Attempts were made to graft some functionalizing species on plasma-activated filler surface. The analysis of virgin and modified fillers’ SFE was carried out. MWCNT and GnP rubber composites were produced, and ultimately, their morphology and mechanical properties were studied.

  7. Fabrication and characterization of carbon nanotube reinforced magnesium matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mindivan, Harun; Efe, Arife; Kosatepe, A. Hadi; Kayali, E. Sabri

    2014-11-01

    In the present investigation, Mg chips are recycled to produce Mg-6 wt.% Al reinforced with 0.5, 1, 2 and 4 wt.% nanosized CNTs by mechanical ball milling, cold pressing and subsequently hot extrusion process without sintering step. The microstructure, mechanical properties and corrosion behavior of Mg/Al without CNT (base alloy) and composites were evaluated. The distribution of CNTs was analyzed using a Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) equipped with Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) analyzer and a Wavelength Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence spectrometer (WDXRF). Microstructural analysis revealed that the CNTs on the Mg chips were present throughout the extrusion direction and the uniform distribution of CNTs at the chip surface decreased with increase in the CNT content. The results of the mechanical and corrosion test showed that small addition of CNTs (0.5 wt.%) evidently improved the hardness and corrosion resistance of the composite by comparing with the base alloy, while increase in the CNT weight fraction in the initial mixture resulted in a significant decrease of hardness, compression strength, wear rate and corrosion resistance.

  8. Selective functionalization of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strano, Michael S. (Inventor); Usrey, Monica (Inventor); Barone, Paul (Inventor); Dyke, Christopher A. (Inventor); Tour, James M. (Inventor); Kittrell, W. Carter (Inventor); Hauge, Robert H. (Inventor); Smalley, Richard E. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention is directed toward methods of selectively functionalizing carbon nanotubes of a specific type or range of types, based on their electronic properties, using diazonium chemistry. The present invention is also directed toward methods of separating carbon nanotubes into populations of specific types or range(s) of types via selective functionalization and electrophoresis, and also to the novel compositions generated by such separations.

  9. A mediatorless microbial fuel cell using polypyrrole coated carbon nanotubes composite as anode material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, Yongjin; Xiang, Cuili; Yang, Lini [Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China); Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Sun, Li-Xian [Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China); School of Chemistry and Environmental Engineering, Changsha University of Science and Technology, Changsha 410076 (China); Xu, Fen [Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China); Cao, Zhong [School of Chemistry and Environmental Engineering, Changsha University of Science and Technology, Changsha 410076 (China)

    2008-09-15

    A microbial fuel cell (MFC) was constructed using polypyrrole (PPy) coated carbon nanotubes (CNTs) composite as an anode material and Escherichia coli as the biocatalyst. The composite PPy-CNTs were synthesized by the in situ chemical polymerization of pyrrole on the CNTs using ammonium persulfate as an oxidant. The electrocatalytic behaviors of the composite modified anode were investigated by means of cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and discharge experiments. The PPy-CNTs modified anode showed better electrochemical performance than that of plain carbon paper. The amount of the loading of the composite on the anode was also investigated. The power output of the MFC increased along with the increase of the composite loading. In the absence of exogenous electron mediators, the MFC with the composite modified anode contained 5 mg cm{sup -2} PPy-CNTs exhibited a maximum power density 228 mW m{sup -2}, which is much higher than those reported in the literature so far for E. coli using efficient electron mediators. These results show that the PPy-CNTs composite anode is promising for MFC application. (author)

  10. Preparation and characterization of poly[Ni(salen)(crown receptor)]/multi-walled carbon nanotube composite films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tedim, J.; Hillman, A.R. [Department of Chemistry, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7 RH (United Kingdom); Goncalves, F.; Pereira, M.F.R.; Figueiredo, J.L. [Laboratorio de Catalise e Materiais, Departamento de Engenharia Quimica, Faculdade de Engenharia, Universidade do Porto, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal); Moura, C. [CIQ, Departamento de Quimica, Faculdade de Ciencias, Universidade do Porto, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Freire, C. [REQUIMTE, Departamento de Quimica, Faculdade de Ciencias, Universidade do Porto, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal)

    2008-10-01

    Nanocomposite films comprising multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) embedded within poly[Ni(3-Mesalophen-b15-c5)] were deposited on Pt and ITO electrode surfaces by the potentiodynamic polymerisation of [Ni(3-Mesalophen-b15-c5)] from solutions containing dispersed MWCNTs. Composites incorporating carbon nanotubes subject to a range of oxidising pre-treatments were compared with those incorporating untreated carbon nanotubes and with the pure polymer. In both cases, the use of CH{sub 3}CN and CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} as fabrication and characterization media were explored. Films were characterized by voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The coating of the carbon nanotubes with polymer varied significantly with pre-treatment and solvent medium; this influenced the final composite morphology and electrical properties. Performance enhancement of the polymer component by the presence of the carbon nanotubes was manifested through the ability to store charge and the ease with which this could be accomplished; these were parameterized via increased redox capacitance and decreased charge-transfer resistance, respectively. Correlation of impedance parameters with SEM images provided a morphological rationale for composite electrical properties. (author)

  11. Multiwalled carbon nanotube/polydimethylsiloxane composite films as high performance flexible electric heating elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Jing; Jeong, Young Gyu, E-mail: ygjeong@cnu.ac.kr [Department of Advanced Organic Materials and Textile System Engineering, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-04

    High performance elastomeric electric heating elements were prepared by incorporating various contents of pristine multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) matrix by using an efficient solution-casting and curing technique. The pristine MWCNTs were identified to be uniformly dispersed in the PDMS matrix and the electrical percolation of MWCNTs was evaluated to be at ∼0.27 wt. %, where the electrical resistivity of the MWCNT/PDMS composite films dropped remarkably. Accordingly, the composite films with higher MWCNT contents above 0.3 wt. % exhibit excellent electric heating performance in terms of temperature response rapidity and electric energy efficiency at constant applied voltages. In addition, the composite films, which were thermally stable up to 250 °C, showed excellent heating-cooling cyclic performance, which was associated with operational stability in actual electric heating applications.

  12. A Spray-On Carbon Nanotube Artificial Neuron Strain Sensor for Composite Structural Health Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gyeongrak Choi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available We present a nanocomposite strain sensor (NCSS to develop a novel structural health monitoring (SHM sensor that can be easily installed in a composite structure. An NCSS made of a multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT/epoxy composite was installed on a target structure with facile processing. We attempted to evaluate the NCSS sensing characteristics and benchmark compared to those of a conventional foil strain gauge. The response of the NCSS was fairly good and the result was nearly identical to the strain gauge. A neuron, which is a biomimetic long continuous NCSS, was also developed, and its vibration response was investigated for structural damage detection of a composite cantilever. The vibration response for damage detection was measured by tracking the first natural frequency, which demonstrated good result that matched the finite element (FE analysis.

  13. Synthesis and Characterizations of Poly(3-hexylthiophene and Modified Carbon Nanotube Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Rezaul Karim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Poly(3-hexylthiophene and modified (functionalized and silanized multiwall carbon nanotube (MWNT nanocomposites have been prepared through in situ polymerization process in chloroform medium with FeCl3 oxidant at room temperature. The composites are characterized through Fourier transfer infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR, Raman, and X-ray diffraction (XRD measurements to probe the nature of interaction between the moieties. Optical properties of the composites are measured from ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis and photoluminescence (PL spectroscopy. Conductivity of the composites is followed by four probe techniques to understand the conduction mechanism. The change (if any in C=C symmetric and antisymmetric stretching frequencies in FT-IR, the shift in G band frequencies in Raman, any alterations in λmax of UV-Vis, and PL spectroscopic measurements are monitored with modified MWNT loading in the polymer matrix.

  14. A Spray-On Carbon Nanotube Artificial Neuron Strain Sensor for Composite Structural Health Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Gyeongrak; Lee, Jong Won; Cha, Ju Young; Kim, Young-Ju; Choi, Yeon-Sun; Schulz, Mark J.; Moon, Chang Kwon; Lim, Kwon Tack; Kim, Sung Yong; Kang, Inpil

    2016-01-01

    We present a nanocomposite strain sensor (NCSS) to develop a novel structural health monitoring (SHM) sensor that can be easily installed in a composite structure. An NCSS made of a multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT)/epoxy composite was installed on a target structure with facile processing. We attempted to evaluate the NCSS sensing characteristics and benchmark compared to those of a conventional foil strain gauge. The response of the NCSS was fairly good and the result was nearly identical to the strain gauge. A neuron, which is a biomimetic long continuous NCSS, was also developed, and its vibration response was investigated for structural damage detection of a composite cantilever. The vibration response for damage detection was measured by tracking the first natural frequency, which demonstrated good result that matched the finite element (FE) analysis. PMID:27472332

  15. A Spray-On Carbon Nanotube Artificial Neuron Strain Sensor for Composite Structural Health Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Gyeongrak; Lee, Jong Won; Cha, Ju Young; Kim, Young-Ju; Choi, Yeon-Sun; Schulz, Mark J; Moon, Chang Kwon; Lim, Kwon Tack; Kim, Sung Yong; Kang, Inpil

    2016-07-26

    We present a nanocomposite strain sensor (NCSS) to develop a novel structural health monitoring (SHM) sensor that can be easily installed in a composite structure. An NCSS made of a multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT)/epoxy composite was installed on a target structure with facile processing. We attempted to evaluate the NCSS sensing characteristics and benchmark compared to those of a conventional foil strain gauge. The response of the NCSS was fairly good and the result was nearly identical to the strain gauge. A neuron, which is a biomimetic long continuous NCSS, was also developed, and its vibration response was investigated for structural damage detection of a composite cantilever. The vibration response for damage detection was measured by tracking the first natural frequency, which demonstrated good result that matched the finite element (FE) analysis.

  16. INTERACTION MODELS FOR EFFECTIVE THERMAL AND ELECTRIC CONDUCTIVITIES OF CARBON NANOTUBE COMPOSITES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fei Deng; Quanshui Zheng

    2009-01-01

    The present article provides supplementary information of previous works of ana-lytic models for predicting conductivity enhancements of carbon nanotube composites. The mod-els, though fairly simple, are able to take account of the effects of conductivity anisotropy, non-straightness, and aspect ratio of the CNT additives on the conductivity enhancement of the com-posite and to give predictions agreeing well with existing experimental data. The omitted detailed derivation of this model is demonstrated in the present article with a more systematical analysis, which may help with further development in this direction. Furthermore, the effects of various orientation distributions of CNTs are reported here for the first time. The information may be useful in design or fabrication technology of CNT composites for better or specified conductivities.

  17. Graded Composites of Polyamide/Carbon Nanotubes Prepared by Laser Sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmoria, G. V.; Paggi, R. A.; Beal, V. E.

    2017-02-01

    In this study, the mechanical and electrical properties of graded composition material (GM) were investigated in order to evaluate the effects of the addition of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) to a polyamide 12 (PA12) matrix in different proportions. A graded component of PA12/MWCNTs was designed and manufactured by selective laser sintering (SLS) and variations in the morphology as well as in the mechanical and electrical properties were observed. The effect of different proportions of MWCNTs in the PA12 was investigated by microscopy, flexural test and resistivity measurements. The addition of 0.5 and 1.0 wt% of MWCNTs promoted an increase in the composite strength and flexural modulus. A significant reduction in the resistivity was verified with the addition of 3.0% of MWCNTs in the polyamide matrix. The mechanical and electrical behavior presented by the PA12/MWCNT composites suggests that the percolation concentration is around 3 wt%, when an effective inter-nanotube contact seems to be reached, improving the electrical conductivity but reducing the mechanical strength. A GM component with an MWCNT concentration gradient along the vertical axis was designed and manufactured by SLS. A gradual controlled variation in the composition of GM component leads to variations in the microstructure as well as in the mechanical and electrical properties.

  18. Micro/Nanostructure and Tribological Characteristics of Pressureless Sintered Carbon Nanotubes Reinforced Aluminium Matrix Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Manikandan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study reports the manufacture, microstructure, and tribological behaviour of carbon nanotube reinforced aluminium composites against pure aluminium. The specimens were fabricated using powder metallurgy method. The nanotubes in weight percentages of 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 were homogeneously dispersed and mechanically alloyed using a high energy ball milling. The milled powders were cold compacted and then isothermally sintered in air. The density of all samples was measured using Archimedes method and all had a relative density between 92.22% and 97.74%. Vickers hardness increased with increasing CNT fraction up to 1.5 wt% and then reduced. The microstructures and surfaces were investigated using high resolution scanning electron microscope (SEM. The tribological tests showed that the CNT reinforced composites displayed lower wear rate and friction coefficient compared to the pure aluminium under mild wear conditions. However, for severe wear conditions, the CNT reinforced composites exhibited higher friction coefficient and wear rate compared to the pure aluminium. It was also found that the friction and wear behaviour of CNT reinforced composites is significantly dependent on the applied load and there is a critical load beyond which CNTs could have adverse impact on the wear resistance of aluminium.

  19. 3D scaffolds from vertically aligned carbon nanotubes/poly(methyl methacrylate) composites via atom transfer radical polymerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tebikachew, Behabtu; Magina, Sandra [CICECO, Department of Chemistry, University of Aveiro (Portugal); Mata, Diogo; Oliveira, Filipe J.; Silva, Rui F. [CICECO, Department of Materials and Ceramic Engineering, University of Aveiro (Portugal); Barros-Timmons, Ana, E-mail: anabarros@ua.pt [CICECO, Department of Chemistry, University of Aveiro (Portugal)

    2015-01-15

    Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) synthesized by Thermal Chemical Vapour Deposition (TCVD) were modified using an Ar:O{sub 2} (97:3) plasma to generate oxygen-containing functional groups on the surface for subsequent modification. X-ray photo-emission spectroscopy (XPS) and micro-Raman analyses confirmed the grafting of those functional groups onto the surface of the nanotubes as well as the removal of amorphous carbon produced and deposited on the VACNT forests during the CVD process. The plasma treated VACNT forests were further modified with 2-bromo-2-methylpropionyl bromide, an atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) initiator, to grow poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) chains from the forests via ATRP. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) of the ensuing VACNT/PMMA composites confirmed the coating of the nanotube forests with the PMMA polymer. 3D scaffolds of polymeric composites with honeycomb like structure were then obtained. Compressive tests have shown that the VACNT/PMMA composite has higher compressive strength than the pristine forest. - Highlights: • Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) were synthesized and plasma modified. • X-ray photo-emission and Raman spectroscopies confirmed the VACNTs modification. • Poly(methyl methacrylate) chains were grown via ATRP from the VACNTs. • STEM of the VACNT/PMMA composites confirmed that PMMA surrounds the nanotubes. • VACNT/PMMA composite has higher compressive strength compared to the pristine forest.

  20. Spark plasma sintering of silicon carbide and multi-walled carbon nanotube reinforced zirconium diboride ceramic composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadhukulakrishnan, Govindaraajan B.; Rahman, Arif; Karumuri, Sriharsha [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078 (United States); Stackpoole, Margaret M. [ELORET Corporation, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Kalkan, A. Kaan; Singh, Raman P. [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078 (United States); Harimkar, Sandip P., E-mail: sandip.harimkar@okstate.edu [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078 (United States)

    2012-08-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dense SiC and carbon nanotube reinforced ZrB{sub 2} composites were spark plasma sintered. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SiC and carbon nanotube reinforcement favored the densification of ZrB{sub 2} composites. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SiC and carbon nanotube reinforcement resulted in toughening of ZrB{sub 2} composites. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbon nanotubes were retained in the spark plasma sintered ZrB{sub 2} composites. - Abstract: In this paper spark plasma sintering (SPS) of silicon carbide and multi-walled carbon nanotube reinforced zirconium diboride ultra-high temperature ceramic matrix composites is reported. Systematic investigations on the effect of reinforcement type (SiC and CNTs) and content (10-40 vol.% SiC and 2-6 vol.% CNTs) on densification behavior, microstructure development, and mechanical properties (microhardness, bi-axial flexural strength, and indentation fracture toughness) are presented. With the similar SPS processing parameters (1900 Degree-Sign C, 70 MPa pressure, and 15 min soaking time), near-full densification (>99% relative density) was achieved with 10-40% SiC (in ZrB{sub 2}-SiC) and 4-6% CNT (in ZrB{sub 2}-CNT) reinforced composites. The SiC and CNT reinforcement further improved the indentation fracture toughness of the composites through a range of toughening mechanisms, including particle shearing, crack deflection at the particle-matrix interface, and grain pull-outs for ZrB{sub 2}-SiC composites, and CNT pull-outs and crack deflection in ZrB{sub 2}-CNT composites.

  1. Simulation and experimental characterization of polymer/carbon nanotubes composites for strain sensor applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vivo, B.; Lamberti, P.; Spinelli, G.; Tucci, V.; Vertuccio, L.; Vittoria, V.

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, a numerical model is presented in order to analyze the electrical characteristics of polymer composites filled by carbon nanotubes (CNTs) subject to tensile stress and investigate the possible usage of such materials as innovative sensors for small values of strain. The simulated mechano-electrical response of the nanocomposite is obtained through a multi-step approach which, through different modeling stages, provides a simple and effective tool for material analysis and design. In particular, at first, the morphological structures of the composites are numerically simulated by adopting a previously presented model based on a Monte Carlo procedure in which uniform distributions of the CNTs, approximated as of solid cylinders and ensuring some physical constraints, are dispersed inside a cubic volume representing the polymer matrix. Second, a geometrical analysis allows to obtain the percolation paths detected in the simulated structures. Suitable electrical networks composed by resistors and capacitors associated to the complex charge transport and polarization mechanisms occurring in the percolation paths are then identified. Finally, the variations of these circuit parameters, which are differently affected by the mechanical stresses applied to the composites, are considered to analyze the electromechanical characteristics of the composites and hence their performances as stress sensors. The proposed approach is used to investigate the impact on the electro-mechanical response of some physical properties of the base materials, such as the type of carbon nanotube, the height of energy barrier of polymer resin, as well as characteristics of the composite, i.e., the volume fraction of the filler. The tunneling effect between neighboring nanotubes is found to play a dominant role in determining the composite sensitivity to mechanical stresses. The simulation results are also compared with the experimental data obtained by performing stress tests on

  2. Carbon nanotubes-porous ceramic composite by in situ CCVD growth of CNTs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazumder, Sangram; Sarkar, Naboneeta; Park, Jung Gyu [Institute of Processing and Application of Inorganic Materials (PAIM), Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Hanseo University, #360 Daegok-ri, Haemi-myeon, Seosan-si, Chungnam, 356-706 (Korea, Republic of); Han, In Sub [Korea Institute of Energy Research (KIER), #152 Gajeong-gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ik Jin, E-mail: ijkim@hanseo.ac.kr [Institute of Processing and Application of Inorganic Materials (PAIM), Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Hanseo University, #360 Daegok-ri, Haemi-myeon, Seosan-si, Chungnam, 356-706 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-01

    A novel approach towards the formation of Carbon nanotubes-porous alumina ceramic composite was attempted by the application of three different reaction techniques. Porous alumina ceramics having micrometer pore dimensions were developed using the direct foaming technique. NaA zeolites were simultaneously synthesized and coated within the porous ceramics by an in situ hydrothermal process and were subjected to a simple ion exchange reaction for preparing the suitable catalyst material for Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) synthesis. The catalytic chemical vapour deposition (CCVD) technique was used to grow CNTs within the porous ceramics and the effect of growth time on the synthesized CNTs were investigated. Phase compositions of the samples were analysed by X-ray diffractometer (XRD). Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) were used for morphology, surface quality and structural analysis. Crystallinity, defects and yield were studied by Raman spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). - Highlights: • Novel processing route of MWCNTs grown on Cobalt-zeolites-porous ceramics by CCVD. • CCVD time of 120 min produced MWCNTs with most prominent tube-like structure. • 120 min produced highest yield (19.46%) of CNTs with an I{sub D}/I{sub G} ratio of 0.88.

  3. Analytical applications of a carbon nanotubes composite modified with copper microparticles as detector in flow systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arribas, Alberto Sánchez; Bermejo, Esperanza; Chicharro, Manuel; Zapardiel, Antonio; Luque, Guillermina L; Ferreyra, Nancy F; Rivas, Gustavo A

    2006-09-08

    In this work we report on the successful use of a composite prepared by dispersion of multi-wall carbon nanotubes (1-5 microm length, 20-50 nm diameter) and copper microparticles within mineral oil as detector for amino acids quantification in flow injection analysis and capillary electrophoresis. The resulting electrode displays a highly sensitive amperometric detection of amino acids, based on the copper dissolution facilitated by the strong activity of amino acids as ligands of Cu(II). The sensor makes possible the detection of amino acids, electroactive or not, at very low potentials (0.000 V) and physiological pH. A correlation between the sensitivity for the amino acids and the amount of copper within the composite is observed, demonstrating the importance of the metal in the sensor response. The best analytical performance is obtained for the electrode containing 12.0% (w/w) copper. The excellent results obtained with the carbon nanotube paste electrodes containing copper (CNTPE-Cu) as detector in flow systems makes them an interesting alternative for further analytical applications involving different bioanalytes.

  4. Processing and Characterization of a Novel Distributed Strain Sensor Using Carbon Nanotube-Based Nonwoven Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongbo Dai

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the development of an innovative carbon nanotube-based non-woven composite sensor that can be tailored for strain sensing properties and potentially offers a reliable and cost-effective sensing option for structural health monitoring (SHM. This novel strain sensor is fabricated using a readily scalable process of coating Carbon nanotubes (CNT onto a nonwoven carrier fabric to form an electrically-isotropic conductive network. Epoxy is then infused into the CNT-modified fabric to form a free-standing nanocomposite strain sensor. By measuring the changes in the electrical properties of the sensing composite the deformation can be measured in real-time. The sensors are repeatable and linear up to 0.4% strain. Highest elastic strain gage factors of 1.9 and 4.0 have been achieved in the longitudinal and transverse direction, respectively. Although the longitudinal gage factor of the newly formed nanocomposite sensor is close to some metallic foil strain gages, the proposed sensing methodology offers spatial coverage, manufacturing customizability, distributed sensing capability as well as transverse sensitivity.

  5. Polyaniline/carbon nanotube/CdS quantum dot composites with enhanced optical and electrical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Mrinmoy; Ghosh, Ranajit; Maruyama, Takahiro; Meikap, Ajit Kumar

    2016-02-01

    A new kind of polyaniline/carbon nanotube/CdS quantum dot composites have been developed via in-situ polymerization of aniline monomer in the presence of dispersed CdS quantum dots (size: 2.7-4.8 nm) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNT), which exhibits enhanced optical and electrical properties. The existences of 1st order, 2nd order, and 3rd order longitudinal optical phonon modes, strongly indicate the high quality of synthesized CdS quantum dots. The occurrence of red shift of free exciton energy in photoluminescence is due to size dependent quantum confinement effect of CdS. The conductivity of the composites (for example PANI/CNT/CdS (2 wt.% CdS)) is increased by about 7 of magnitude compared to that of pure PANI indicating a charge transfer between CNT and polymer via CdS quantum dots. This advanced material has a great potential for high-performance of electro-optical applications.

  6. Studies of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caneba, Gerard T.

    2005-01-01

    The fellowship experience for this summer for 2004 pertains to carbon nanotube coatings for various space-related applications. They involve the following projects: (a) EMI protection films from HiPco-polymers, and (b) Thermal protection nanosilica materials. EMI protection films are targeted to be eventually applied onto casings of laptop computers. These coatings are composites of electrically-conductive SWNTs and compatible polymers. The substrate polymer will be polycarbonate, since computer housings are typically made of carbon composites of this type of polymer. A new experimental copolymer was used last year to generate electrically-conductive and thermal films with HiPco at 50/50 wt/wt composition. This will be one of the possible formulations. Reference films will be base polycarbonate and neat HiPco onto polycarbonate films. Other coating materials that will be tried will be based on HiPco composites with commercial enamels (polyurethane, acrylic, polyester), which could be compatible with the polycarbonate substrate. Nanosilica fibers are planned for possible use as thermal protection tiles on the shuttle orbiter. Right now, microscale silica is used. Going to the nanoscale will increase the surface-volume-per-unit-area of radiative heat dissipation. Nanoscale carbon fibers/nanotubes can be used as templates for the generation of nanosilica. A sol-gel operation is employed for this purpose.

  7. Transparent actuators and robots based on single-layer superaligned carbon nanotube sheet and polymer composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Luzhuo; Weng, Mingcen; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Zhiwei; Zhou, Yi; Xia, Dan; Li, Jiaxin; Huang, Zhigao; Liu, Changhong; Fan, Shoushan

    2016-03-01

    Transparent actuators have been attracting emerging interest recently, as they demonstrate potential applications in the fields of invisible robots, tactical displays, variable-focus lenses, and flexible cellular phones. However, previous technologies did not simultaneously realize macroscopic transparent actuators with advantages of large-shape deformation, low-voltage-driven actuation and fast fabrication. Here, we develop a fast approach to fabricate a high-performance transparent actuator based on single-layer superaligned carbon nanotube sheet and polymer composites. Various advantages of single-layer nanotube sheets including high transparency, considerable conductivity, and ultra-thin dimensions together with selected polymer materials completely realize all the above required advantages. Also, this is the first time that a single-layer nanotube sheet has been used to fabricate actuators with high transparency, avoiding the structural damage to the single-layer nanotube sheet. The transparent actuator shows a transmittance of 72% at the wavelength of 550 nm and bends remarkably with a curvature of 0.41 cm-1 under a DC voltage for 5 s, demonstrating a significant advance in technological performances compared to previous conventional actuators. To illustrate their great potential usage, a transparent wiper and a humanoid robot ``hand'' were elaborately designed and fabricated, which initiate a new direction in the development of high-performance invisible robotics and other intelligent applications with transparency.Transparent actuators have been attracting emerging interest recently, as they demonstrate potential applications in the fields of invisible robots, tactical displays, variable-focus lenses, and flexible cellular phones. However, previous technologies did not simultaneously realize macroscopic transparent actuators with advantages of large-shape deformation, low-voltage-driven actuation and fast fabrication. Here, we develop a fast approach to

  8. Hierarchical composite structures prepared by electrophoretic deposition of carbon nanotubes onto glass fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Qi; Rider, Andrew N; Thostenson, Erik T

    2013-03-01

    Carbon nanotube/glass fiber hierarchical composite structures have been produced using an electrophoretic deposition (EPD) approach for integrating the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) into unidirectional E-glass fabric, followed by infusion of an epoxy polymer matrix. The resulting composites show a hierarchical structure, where the structural glass fibers, which have diameters in micrometer range, are coated with CNTs having diameters around 10-20 nm. The stable aqueous dispersions of CNTs were produced using a novel ozonolysis and ultrasonication technique that results in dispersion and functionalization in a single step. Ozone-oxidized CNTs were then chemically reacted with a polyethyleneimine (PEI) dendrimer to enable cathodic EPD and promote adhesion between the CNTs and the glass-fiber substrate. Deposition onto the fabric was accomplished by placing the fabric in front of the cathode and applying a direct current (DC) field. Microscopic characterization shows the integration of CNTs throughout the thickness of the glass fabric, where individual fibers are coated with CNTs and a thin film of CNTs also forms on the fabric surfaces. Within the composite, networks of CNTs span between adjacent fibers, and the resulting composites exhibit good electrical conductivity and considerable increases in the interlaminar shear strength, relative to fiber composites without integrated CNTs. Mechanical, chemical and morphological characterization of the coated fiber surfaces reveal interface/interphase modification resulting from the coating is responsible for the improved mechanical and electrical properties. The CNT-coated glass-fiber laminates also exhibited clear changes in electrical resistance as a function of applied shear strain and enables self-sensing of the transition between elastic and plastic load regions.

  9. Microstructure and mechanical behavior of copper coated multiwall carbon nanotubes reinforced aluminum composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jagannatham, M.; Sankaran, S.; Haridoss, Prathap, E-mail: prathap@iitm.ac.in

    2015-06-25

    Electroless copper coatings were performed on purified carbon nanotubes (CNT), with varying deposition time and the optimum deposition time in terms of uniform deposition was determined to be 45 min. Different amounts of optimized Cu coated CNT (CNT (Cu)) and Al powders were ball milled. CNT (Cu) reinforced Al (Al-CNT (Cu)) composites were prepared by spark plasma sintering (SPS). Pure CNT reinforced Al (Al-CNT) composites were also prepared by SPS. The ball milled powders and composites were characterized using X-Ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Microhardness and compression properties of the composites were measured. TEM images of ball milled powders and composites revealed uniform distribution of CNT in matrix. Mechanical properties of Al-CNT (Cu) composites are superior to Al-CNT composites. The maximum enhancement in compressive strength of Al-CNT (Cu) composites is 154% for 2 wt% reinforcement; this enhancement is attributed to the copper coating on CNT surface.

  10. Electro- and photodriven phase change composites based on wax-infiltrated carbon nanotube sponges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liangjie; Zou, Ruqiang; Xia, Wei; Liu, Zhenpu; Shang, Yuanyuan; Zhu, Jinlong; Wang, Yingxia; Lin, Jianhua; Xia, Dingguo; Cao, Anyuan

    2012-12-21

    Organic phase change materials are usually insulating in nature, and they are unlikely to directly trigger latent heat storage through an electrical way. Here we report a multifunctional phase change composite in which the energy storage can be driven by small voltages (e.g., 1.5 V) or light illumination with high electro-to-heat or photo-to-thermal storage efficiencies (40% to 60%). The composite is composed of paraffin wax infiltrated into a porous, deformable carbon nanotube sponge; the latter not only acts as a flexible encapsulation scaffold for wax but also maintains a highly conductive network during the phase change process (for both solid and liquid states). Uniform interpenetration between the nanotube network and paraffin wax with high affinity results in enhanced phase change enthalpy and thermal conductivity compared to pure paraffin wax. Our phase change composite can store energy in practical ways such as by sunlight absorption or under voltages applied by conventional lithium-ion batteries.

  11. Multi-Functional Carbon Fibre Composites using Carbon Nanotubes as an Alternative to Polymer Sizing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozegic, T. R.; Anguita, J. V.; Hamerton, I.; Jayawardena, K. D. G. I.; Chen, J.-S.; Stolojan, V.; Ballocchi, P.; Walsh, R.; Silva, S. R. P.

    2016-11-01

    Carbon fibre reinforced polymers (CFRP) were introduced to the aerospace, automobile and civil engineering industries for their high strength and low weight. A key feature of CFRP is the polymer sizing - a coating applied to the surface of the carbon fibres to assist handling, improve the interfacial adhesion between fibre and polymer matrix and allow this matrix to wet-out the carbon fibres. In this paper, we introduce an alternative material to the polymer sizing, namely carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on the carbon fibres, which in addition imparts electrical and thermal functionality. High quality CNTs are grown at a high density as a result of a 35 nm aluminium interlayer which has previously been shown to minimise diffusion of the catalyst in the carbon fibre substrate. A CNT modified-CFRP show 300%, 450% and 230% improvements in the electrical conductivity on the ‘surface’, ‘through-thickness’ and ‘volume’ directions, respectively. Furthermore, through-thickness thermal conductivity calculations reveal a 107% increase. These improvements suggest the potential of a direct replacement for lightning strike solutions and to enhance the efficiency of current de-icing solutions employed in the aerospace industry.

  12. Sol-gel synthesis of tantalum oxide and phosphonic acid-modified carbon nanotubes composite coatings on titanium surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maho, Anthony; Detriche, Simon; Delhalle, Joseph; Mekhalif, Zineb

    2013-07-01

    Carbon nanotubes used as fillers in composite materials are more and more appreciated for the outstanding range of accessible properties and functionalities they generate in numerous domains of nanotechnologies. In the framework of biological and medical sciences, and particularly for orthopedic applications and devices (prostheses, implants, surgical instruments, …), titanium substrates covered by tantalum oxide/carbon nanotube composite coatings have proved to constitute interesting and successful platforms for the conception of solid and biocompatible biomaterials inducing the osseous regeneration processes (hydroxyapatite growth, osteoblasts attachment). This paper describes an original strategy for the conception of resistant and homogeneous tantalum oxide/carbon nanotubes layers on titanium through the introduction of carbon nanotubes functionalized by phosphonic acid moieties (-P(=O)(OH)2). Strong covalent C-P bonds are specifically inserted on their external sidewalls with a ratio of two phosphonic groups per anchoring point. Experimental results highlight the stronger "tantalum capture agent" effect of phosphonic-modified nanotubes during the sol-gel formation process of the deposits compared to nanotubes bearing oxidized functions (-OH, -C=O, -C(=O)OH). Particular attention is also paid to the relative impact of the rate of functionalization and the dispersion degree of the carbon nanotubes in the coatings, as well as their wrapping level by the tantalum oxide matrix material. The resulting effect on the in vitro growth of hydroxyapatite is also evaluated to confirm the primary osseous bioactivity of those materials. Chemical, structural and morphological features of the different composite deposits described herein are assessed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning (SEM) and transmission (TEM) electronic microscopies, energy dispersive X-rays analysis (EDX) and peeling tests.

  13. STRUCTURE AND PROPERTIES OF COMPOSITE MATERIAL BASED ON GYPSUM BINDER AND CARBON NANOTUBES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHUMAK Anastasia Gennadievna

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to carry out a number of studies in the area of nanomodi­fication of gypsum binder matrix and to investigate the influence of multilayer carbon nanotubes on the structure, physical and mechanical properties of obtained compos­ites. The study of the gypsum binders structure formation mechanisms with the use of nanoadditives makes it possible to control the production processes of gypsum materi­als and articles with the given set of properties. The main tasks of the binder nanomodification are: even distribution of carbon nanostructures over the whole volume of material and provision of stability for the nanodimensional modifier during production process of the construction composite.

  14. A Preliminary Study on the Effect of Macro Cavities Formation on Properties of Carbon Nanotube Bucky-Paper Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Gray

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we focus on processing and characterizing composite material structures made of carbon nanotubes (CNTs and reproducibly engineering macro-pores inside their structure. Highly porous bucky-papers were fabricated from pure carbon nanotubes by dispersing and stabilizing large 1 μm polystyrene beads within a carbon nanotube suspension. The polystyrene beads, homogeneously dispersed across the thickness of the bucky-papers, were then either dissolved or carbonized to generate macro cavities of different shape and properties. The impact of adding these macro cavities on the porosity, specific surface area and Young’s modulus was investigated and some benefits of the macro cavities will be demonstrated.

  15. Densification of in situ prepared mesocarbon microbead/carbon nanotube composites by hot-press sintering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Bin; GONG Qian-ming; WU Jian-jun; SONG Huai-he; LIANG Ji

    2009-01-01

    In situ prepared mesocarbon microbead/carbon nanotube(MCMB/CNT) composites are potential precursors of high density carbon materials for various applications. Integrated MCMB/CNT composites were successfully fabricated by hot-press sintering at 550 ℃ under 30 MPa. After further calcination at 900 ℃, the hot-press sintering fabricated MCMB block has an apparent density of 1.77 g/cm3 and the open porosity 5.1%. With the addition of 5%(mass fraction) CNTs, the density of the composite block is elevated to 1.84 g/cm3, and its open porosity is reduced to 3.5%. The flexural strength of composite block with 5% CNTs is elevated to 116 MPa. Through the hot-press sintering, pores of 10-50 nm in the calcinated bulks are remarkably eliminated. The interstice between microbeads in the composite blocks is filled up by CNTs together with β-resin and quinoline-insoluble spheres, which can further contribute to the densification.

  16. Bio-Inspired Aggregation Control of Carbon Nanotubes for Ultra-Strong Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yue; Zhang, Xiaohua; Yu, Xueping; Zhao, Jingna; Li, Shan; Liu, Feng; Gao, Peng; Zhang, Yongyi; Zhao, Tong; Li, Qingwen

    2015-01-01

    High performance nanocomposites require well dispersion and high alignment of the nanometer-sized components, at a high mass or volume fraction as well. However, the road towards such composite structure is severely hindered due to the easy aggregation of these nanometer-sized components. Here we demonstrate a big step to approach the ideal composite structure for carbon nanotube (CNT) where all the CNTs were highly packed, aligned, and unaggregated, with the impregnated polymers acting as interfacial adhesions and mortars to build up the composite structure. The strategy was based on a bio-inspired aggregation control to limit the CNT aggregation to be sub 20–50 nm, a dimension determined by the CNT growth. After being stretched with full structural relaxation in a multi-step way, the CNT/polymer (bismaleimide) composite yielded super-high tensile strengths up to 6.27–6.94 GPa, more than 100% higher than those of carbon fiber/epoxy composites, and toughnesses up to 117–192 MPa. We anticipate that the present study can be generalized for developing multifunctional and smart nanocomposites where all the surfaces of nanometer-sized components can take part in shear transfer of mechanical, thermal, and electrical signals. PMID:26098627

  17. Full factorial design analysis of carbon nanotube polymer-cement composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio de Paiva Cota

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The work described in this paper is related to the effect of adding carbon nanotubes (CNT on the mechanical properties of polymer-cement composites. A full factorial design has been performed on 160 samples to identify the contribution provided by the following factors: polymeric phase addition, CNT weight addition and water/cement ratio. The response parameters of the full factorial design were the bulk density, apparent porosity, compressive strength and elastic modulus of the polymer-cement-based nanocomposites. All the factors considered in this analysis affected significantly the bulk density and apparent porosity of the composites. The compressive strength and elastic modulus were affected primarily by the cross-interactions between polymeric phase and CNT additions, and the water/cement ratio with polymeric phase factors.

  18. A novel processing route for carbon nanotube reinforced glass-ceramic matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dassios, Konstantinos G.; Bonnefont, Guillaume; Fantozzi, Gilbert; Matikas, Theodore E.

    2015-03-01

    The current study reports the establishment of a novel feasible way for processing glass- and ceramic- matrix composites reinforced with carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The technique is based on high shear compaction of glass/ceramic and CNT blends in the presence of polymeric binders for the production of flexible green bodies which are subsequently sintered and densified by spark plasma sintering. The method was successfully applied on a borosilicate glass / multi-wall CNT composite with final density identical to that of the full-dense ceramic. Preliminary non-destructive evaluation of dynamic mechanical properties such as Young's and shear modulus and Poisson's ratio by ultrasonics show that property improvement maximizes up to a certain CNT loading; after this threshold is exceeded, properties degrade with further loading increase.

  19. Electrical stimuli to increase cell proliferation on carbon nanotubes/mesoporous silica composites for drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vila, M; Cicuéndez, M; Sánchez-Marcos, J; Fal-Miyar, V; Manzano, M; Prieto, C; Vallet-Regi, M

    2013-01-01

    The development of smart materials as bone implants is nowadays a challenging task to optimize their fast osteointegration. Nevertheless, no attempts have been done in joining the possibility of using electrical stimulation and drug delivery together in a material intended for bone tissue engineering. Moreover, the use of this synergy to induce bone healing is still limited until novel drug reservoirs material formulations allow an efficient applicability of the electrical stimuli. Herein, we present the biological response of osteoblasts cells, cultured over carbon nanotubes-mesoporous silica composites while exposed to external electrical stimulus. Moreover, its ability to function as drug delivery systems is also demonstrated. Bone cell metabolism was stimulated and mitochondrial activity was increased up to seven times in the presence of these composites under electrical stimulus, suggesting their potential application in bone regeneration processes.

  20. Enhanced electromagnetic interference shielding effectiveness of polyaniline functionalized carbon nanotubes filled polystyrene composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saini, Parveen, E-mail: pksaini@nplindia.org [CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, Polymeric and Soft Materials Section (India); Choudhary, Veena [Indian Institute of Technology, Centre for Polymer Science and Engineering (India)

    2013-01-15

    Multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs)/polystyrene composites were fabricated by solution processing route using non-covalently functionalized (polyaniline coated) MWCNTs. These composites exhibit an extremely low percolation threshold (0.12 vol.% MWCNT) along with micro porosity and are found to have potential applications in the areas of electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding and electrostatic dissipation (ESD) with an ESD time of 0.78 s and shielding effectiveness of -23.3 dB (>99 % attenuation). The EMI shielding was found to be dominated by absorption (-18.7 dB) with a nominal contribution from reflection (-4.6 dB) that can explained in terms of multiple internal reflection phenomenon driven by high conductivity and the porous structure.

  1. Polythiophene-carbon nanotubes composites as energy storage materials for supercapacitor application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, A. K.; Choudhary, R. B.; Sartale, S. D.; Desai, Mangesh

    2016-05-01

    Polythiophene incorporated carbon materials have sought huge attention due to various improved electrochemical properties including enhanced electrical conductivity. Our work includes the synthesis of polythiophene (PTP)-multi-wallcarbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) via in-situ polymerization method. The homogeneous distribution of MWCNT in PTP was confirmed by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM). Examination of the specimen using X-Ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transform-Infrared (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopy confirmed the composite formation. Other electrochemical characterizations like electrochemical impendence spectroscopy (EIS) and cyclic voltammetry (CV)of the PTP-MWCNT composite affirmed that incorporation of MWCNT improves the electrochemical properties of neat PTP including a significant increase in the capacitance. Hence making PTP-MWCNT isa better material for supercapacitor application than neat PTP.

  2. Carbon nanotube bundles/polystyrene composites as high-performance flexible thermoelectric materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suemori, Kouji; Watanabe, Yuichi; Hoshino, Satoshi

    2015-03-01

    Lightweight and flexible thermoelectric devices consisting of carbon nanotube (CNT)-based materials have the potential to be used for the various applications, such as energy harvesting from the low-temperature waste heat that exists ubiquitously in living areas. Because high-performance CNT-based materials are crucial for the broad-ranging employment of CNT-based thermoelectric devices, considerable efforts are being made to improve the power-generation capability of CNT-based thermoelectric materials. Here, we report high-performance thermoelectric composites consisting of CNT bundles and polystyrene fabricated by a planetary ball milling-based dispersion technique, which allows for the direct dispersion of the CNT bundles within the polystyrene matrix without causing the disaggregation of the bundled CNTs into individual ones. The CNT-bundles/polystyrene composites reported here exhibit a power factor of 413 μW/K2.m.

  3. Preparation and Characterization of Highly Aligned Carbon Nanotubes/Polyacrylonitrile Composite Nanofibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanhua Song

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the electrospinning process, a modified parallel electrode method (MPEM, conducted by placing a positively charged ring between the needle and the parallel electrode collector, was used to fabricate highly aligned carbon nanotubes/polyacrylonitrile (CNTs/PAN composite nanofibers. Characterizations of the samples—such as morphology, the degree of alignment, and mechanical and conductive properties—were investigated by a combination of scanning electron microscopy (SEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, universal testing machine, high-resistance meter, and other methods. The results showed the MPEM could improve the alignment and uniformity of electrospun CNTs/PAN composite nanofibers, and enhance their mechanical and conductive properties. This meant the successful preparation of highly aligned CNT-reinforced PAN nanofibers with enhanced physical properties, suggesting their potential application in appliances and communication areas.

  4. Low temperature magnetoresistance and magnetization studies of iron encapsulated multiwall carbon nanotube/polyvinyl chloride composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasanthkumar, M. S.; Sameera, I.; Bhatia, Ravi; Prasad, V.; Jayanna, H. S.

    2015-01-01

    We present the experimental results of temperature dependent magnetoresistance (MR) and the magnetization studies of iron encapsulated multiwall carbon nanotube (MWCNT)/polyvinyl chloride (PVC) composites with different wt% of MWCNTs. Transmission electron microscopy characterization shows that MWCNTs are encapsulated with rod-shaped iron nanoparticles of aspect ratio of ~3. The MR behavior of 1.9 wt% MWCNT/PVC sample shows dominance of forward scattering and wave function shrinkage whereas, weak localization and electron-electron interactions explain the MR data of higher wt% samples (9.1, 16.6 and 44.4 wt%). The composites of 4.7 and 9.1 wt% exhibit ferromagnetic behavior at all temperatures with room temperature coercivities of ~1036 and 628 Oe, respectively.

  5. Effectively Improved Field Emission Properties of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes/Graphenes Composite Field Emitter by Covering on the Si Pyramidal Structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Leifeng; Yu, Hua; Zhong, Jiasong;

    2015-01-01

    The composite nanostructure emitter of multiwalled carbon nanotubes and graphenes was deposited on pyramidal silicon substrate by the simple larger scale electrophoretic deposition process. The field emission (FE) properties of the composite/pyramidal Si device were greatly improved compared...

  6. Hydrogen peroxide sensor based on modified vitreous carbon with multiwall carbon nanotubes and composites of Pt nanoparticles-dopamine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guzman, C.; Orozco, G. [Electrochemistry Department, Centro de Investigacion y Desarrollo Tecnologico en Electroquimica S.C., P.O. Box 064, C.P. 76700, Pedro Escobedo, Queretaro (Mexico); Verde, Y. [Instituto Tecnologico de Cancun, Av. Kabah Km. 3, C.P. 77500, Cancun, Quintana Roo (Mexico); Jimenez, S. [Unidad Queretaro Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del I.P.N., Juriquilla, Santiago de Queretaro (Mexico); Godinez, Luis A. [Electrochemistry Department, Centro de Investigacion y Desarrollo Tecnologico en Electroquimica S.C., P.O. Box 064, C.P. 76700, Pedro Escobedo, Queretaro (Mexico); Juaristi, E. [Chemistry Department, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del I.P.N., P.O. Box 14-740, C.P. 07360 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Bustos, E. [Electrochemistry Department, Centro de Investigacion y Desarrollo Tecnologico en Electroquimica S.C., P.O. Box 064, C.P. 76700, Pedro Escobedo, Queretaro (Mexico); Chemistry Department, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del I.P.N., P.O. Box 14-740, C.P. 07360 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)], E-mail: ebustos@cideteq.mx

    2009-02-15

    Sensors using nanostructured materials have been under development in the last decade due to their selectivity for the detection and quantification of different compounds. The physical and chemical characteristics of carbon nanotubes provide significant advantages when used as electrodes for electronic devices, fuel cells and electrochemical sensors. This paper presents preliminary results on the modification of vitreous carbon electrodes with Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNTs) and composites of Pt nanoparticles-dopamine (DA) as electro-catalytic materials for the hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) reaction. Chemical pre-treatment and consequent functionalization of MWCNTs with carboxylic groups was necessary to increase the distribution of the composites. In addition, the presence of DA was important to protect the active sites and eliminate the pasivation of the surface after the electro-oxidation of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} takes place. The proposed H{sub 2}O{sub 2} sensor exhibited a linear response in the 0-5 mM range, with detection and quantification limits of 0.3441 mM and 1.1472 mM, respectively.

  7. Morphological and compositional engineering of Ni/carbon nanotube composite film via a novel cyclic voltammetric route

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yu Jun Yang

    2012-08-01

    Ni/multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) composite films were deposited on the glassy carbon electrode (GCE) by a Ni plating bath containing homogeneously dispersed MWCNTs using polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) as dispersion additive. Incorporation of MWCNTs into Ni matrix was greatly enhanced by the application of cyclic voltammetric (CV) deposition technique. The structure and nature of the Ni/MWCNT were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results show that the content of MWCNT and the morphology of the deposited Ni/MWCNT composite film can be controlled by selecting the appropriate electroplating conditions. Further study indicates that the obtained Ni/MWCNT showed excellent electro-catalytic activity for the oxidation of ethanol in alkaline solution.

  8. Synthesis of benzimidazole-grafted graphene oxide/multi-walled carbon nanotubes composite for supercapacitance application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, Rajesh Kr., E-mail: r05bhu@gmail.com [Division of Physics and Applied Physics, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 637371 Singapore (Singapore); Xingjue, Wang [Division of Physics and Applied Physics, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 637371 Singapore (Singapore); Kumar, Vinod [Department of Zoology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi (India); Srivastava, Anchal [Department of Physics, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi (India); Singh, Vidya Nand [CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi (India)

    2014-11-05

    Highlights: • We are reporting supercapacitance performance of BI-GO/MWCNTs composite. • The specific capacitance of BI-GO/MWCNTs is 275 and 460 F/g at 200 and 5 mV/s scan rate. • This composite has shown 224 F/g capacitance after 1300 cycles at 200 mV/s scan rate. - Abstract: We are reporting the fabrication, characterizations and supercapacitance performance of benzimidazole-grafted graphene oxide/multi-walled carbon nanotubes (BI-GO/MWCNTs) composite. The synthesis of BI-GO materials involves cyclization reaction of carboxylic groups on GO among the hydroxyl and amino groups on o-phenylenediamine. The BI-GO/MWCNTs composite has been fabricated via in situ reduction of BI-GO using hydrazine in presence of MWCNTs. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) have been used to characterize its surface and elemental composition. The uniform dispersion of MWCNTs with BI-GO helps to improve the charge transfer reaction during electrochemical process. The specific capacitance of BI-GO/MWCNTs composite is 275 and 460 F/g at 200 and 5 mV/s scan rate in 1 mol/L aqueous solution of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. This BI-GO/MWCNTs composite has shown 224 F/g capacitance after 1300 cycles at 200 mV/s scan rate, which represents its good electrochemical stability.

  9. Hardness and wear resistance of carbon nanotube reinforced aluminum-copper matrix composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Dong Hoon; Kim, Jae Hwang; Cha, Seung Il; Jung, Seung Il; Lee, Jong Kook; Park, Hoon Mo; Park, Hyun Dal; Hong, Hyung

    2014-12-01

    Recently, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been attracted to reinforcement of composite materials due to their extraordinary mechanical, thermal and electrical properties. Many researchers have attempted to develop CNT reinforced metal composites with various fabrication methods and have shown possibilities for structural and functional applications. Among them, CNT reinforced Al matrix composites have become very attractive due to their huge structural application in industry. In this study, CNT reinforced Al-Cu matrix composites with a microstructure of homogeneous dispersion of CNTs in the Al-Cu matrix are investigated. The CNT/Al-Cu composites are fabricated by mixing of CNT/Cu composite powders and Al powders by high energy ball mill process followed by hot extrusion process. The hardness and wear resistance of the CNT/Al-Cu composites are enhanced by 1.4 and 3 times, respectively, compared to those values for the Al-Cu matrix. This remarkable enhancement mainly originates from the homogeneous dispersion of CNTs in Al-Cu matrix and self-lubricant effect of CNTs.

  10. Preparation and characterization of rubbery epoxy/multiwall carbon nanotubes composites using amino acid salt assisted dispersion technique

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Epoxy/multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) composites were prepared using sodium salt of 6-aminohexanoic acid (SAHA) modified MWCNT and its effect properties of related composites were investigated. The composite prepared using a polar solvent, tetrahydrofuran exhibits better mechanical properties compared to those prepared using less polar solvent and without using solvent. The tensile properties and dynamic storage modulus was found to be increased as a result of modification of MWCNT with SA...

  11. Influence of carbon nanotubes coatings onto carbon fiber by oxidative treatments combined with electrophoretic deposition on interfacial properties of carbon fiber composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Chao; Jiang, Jianjun; Liu, Fa; Fang, Liangchao; Wang, Junbiao; Li, Dejia; Wu, Jianjun

    2015-12-01

    To improve the interfacial performance of carbon fiber (CF) and epoxy resin, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) coatings were utilized to achieve this purpose through coating onto CF by the treatment with hydrogen peroxide and concentrated nitric acid combined with electrophoretic deposition (EPD) process. The influence of electrophoretically deposited CNTs coatings on the surface properties of CFs were investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectrometer, atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and dynamic contact angle analysis. The results indicated that the deposition of carbon nanotubes introduced some polar groups to carbon fiber surfaces, enhanced surface roughness and changed surface morphologies of carbon fibers. Surface wettability of carbon fibers may be significantly improved by increasing surface free energy of the fibers due to the deposition of CNTs. The thickness and density of the coatings increases with the introduction of pretreatment of the CF during the EPD process. Short beam shear test was performed to examine the effect of carbon fiber functionalization on mechanical properties of the carbon fiber/epoxy resin composites. The interfacial adhesion of CNTs/CF reinforced epoxy composites showed obvious enhancement of interlaminar shear strength by 60.2% and scanning electron microscope photographs showed that the failure mode of composites was changed after the carbon fibers were coated with CNTs.

  12. Graphene and carbon nanotube composite electrodes for supercapacitors with ultra-high energy density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Qian; Tang, Jie; Ma, Jun; Zhang, Han; Shinya, Norio; Qin, Lu-Chang

    2011-10-21

    We describe a graphene and single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) composite film prepared by a blending process for use as electrodes in high energy density supercapacitors. Specific capacitances of 290.6 F g(-1) and 201.0 F g(-1) have been obtained for a single electrode in aqueous and organic electrolytes, respectively, using a more practical two-electrode testing system. In the organic electrolyte the energy density reached 62.8 Wh kg(-1) and the power density reached 58.5 kW kg(-1). The addition of single-walled carbon nanotubes raised the energy density by 23% and power density by 31% more than the graphene electrodes. The graphene/CNT electrodes exhibited an ultra-high energy density of 155.6 Wh kg(-1) in ionic liquid at room temperature. In addition, the specific capacitance increased by 29% after 1000 cycles in ionic liquid, indicating their excellent cyclicity. The SWCNTs acted as a conductive additive, spacer, and binder in the graphene/CNT supercapacitors. This work suggests that our graphene/CNT supercapacitors can be comparable to NiMH batteries in performance and are promising for applications in hybrid vehicles and electric vehicles.

  13. Electrochemical Determination of Pentachlorophenol in Water on a Multi-Wall Carbon Nanotubes-Epoxy Composite Electrode

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Remes, A.; Pop, A.; Manea, F.; Baciu, A.; Picken, S.J.; Schoonman, J.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was the preparation, characterization, and application of a multi-wall carbon nanotubes-epoxy composite electrode (MWCNT-EP) with 25%, wt. MWCNTs loading for the voltammetric/amperometric determination of pentachlorophenol (PCP) in aqueous solutions. The structural and morpholo

  14. Energy dissipation and high-strain rate dynamic response of E-glass fiber composites with anchored carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study explores the mechanical properties of an E-glass fabric composite reinforced with anchored multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The CNTs were grown on the E-glass fabric using a floating catalyst chemical vapor deposition procedure. The E-glass fabric with attached CNTs was then incorpor...

  15. Comment on “Carbon nanotube/graphene composite for enhanced capacitive deionization performance” by Y. Wimalasiri and L. Zou

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biesheuvel, P.M.; Porada, S.; Presser, V.

    2013-01-01

    In a recent study, Wimalasiri and Zou [1] have reported the use and performance of composite electrodes of carbon nanotubes (CNT) and graphene for application as porous electrodes in capacitive deionization (CDI). While CDI is emerging as an attractive technology for water desalination, and novel el

  16. Sub-surface imaging of carbon nanotube-polymer composites using dynamic AFM methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadena, Maria J; Misiego, Rocio; Smith, Kyle C; Avila, Alba; Pipes, Byron; Reifenberger, Ron; Raman, Arvind

    2013-04-05

    High-resolution sub-surface imaging of carbon nanotube (CNT) networks within polymer nanocomposites is demonstrated through electrical characterization techniques based on dynamic atomic force microscopy (AFM). We compare three techniques implemented in the single-pass configuration: DC-biased amplitude modulated AFM (AM-AFM), electrostatic force microscopy (EFM) and Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) in terms of the physics of sub-surface image formation and experimental robustness. The methods were applied to study the dispersion of sub-surface networks of single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs) in a polyimide (PI) matrix. We conclude that among these methods, the KPFM channel, which measures the capacitance gradient (∂C/∂d) at the second harmonic of electrical excitation, is the best channel to obtain high-contrast images of the CNT network embedded in the polymer matrix, without the influence of surface conditions. Additionally, we propose an analysis of the ∂C/∂d images as a tool to characterize the dispersion and connectivity of the CNTs. Through the analysis we demonstrate that these AFM-based sub-surface methods probe sufficiently deep within the SWNT composites, to resolve clustered networks that likely play a role in conductivity percolation. This opens up the possibility of dynamic AFM-based characterization of sub-surface dispersion and connectivity in nanostructured composites, two critical parameters for nanocomposite applications in sensors and energy storage devices.

  17. Bulk heterojunction organic photovoltaic based on polythiophene-polyelectrolyte carbon nanotube composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyes-Reyes, M. [Instituto de Investigacion en Comunicacion Optica, Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi, Alvaro Obregon 64, San Luis Potosi (Mexico); Lopez-Sandoval, R. [Advanced Materials Department, IPICYT, Camino a la Presa San Jose 2055, Col. Lomas 4a. Seccion, San Luis Potosi 78216 (Mexico); Liu, J.; Carroll, D.L. [Center for Nanotechnology and Molecular Materials, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC (United States)

    2007-09-22

    It is shown that carbon nanotubes can be used to enhance carrier mobility for efficient removal of the charges in thin film polymer-conjugated/fullerene photovoltaic devices. The fabricated photovoltaic devices consist of poly(3-octylthiophene) (P3OT) polymer blended with undoped multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) and carbon nanotubes doped with nitrogen (CNx-MWNTs). Nanophase formation and dispersion problems associated with the use of carbon nanotubes in polymer devices were addressed through the generation of functional groups and electrostatic attaching of the polyelectrolyte poly(dimethyldiallylamine) chloride (PDDA) in both MWNTs and CNx-MWNT systems. The resultant nanophase was highly dispersed allowing for excellent bulk heterojunction formation. Our results indicate that CNx-MWNTs enhance the efficiency of P3OT solar cells in comparison with MWNTs. (author)

  18. The Enhancement of Composite Scarf Joint Interface Strength Through Carbon Nanotube Reinforcement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-01

    13 Figure 6. Complete Sheet (Prior to Vacuum Curing ) ..........13 Figure 7. Complete Sheet (Following Vacuum Curing ) .........14 Figure 8...Figure 6. Complete Sheet (Prior to Vacuum Curing ) 14 Figure 7. Complete Sheet (Following Vacuum Curing ) B. CARBON NANOTUBE

  19. Platelet adhesion studies on nanostructured poly(lactic-co-glycolic-acid)-carbon nanotube composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Li Buay; Rodriguez, Isabel; Zhou, Jijie

    2008-08-01

    Design of blood-compatible surfaces is required to minimize platelet-surface interactions and increase the thromboresistance of foreign surfaces. Poly(lactic-co-glycolic-acid)-carbon nanotube (PLGA-CNT) composite is studied as a building material to fabricate artificial blood prostheses. This nanocomposite-based biomaterial is prepared by an electrostatic Layer-by-Layer (LbL) deposition technique, in which layers of CNTs are adsorbed onto a PLGA film. Before incubation in nonstimulated platelet-rich plasma (PRP) for platelet studies, fibrinogen is immobilized on PLGA-CNT composite. Interactions between the plasma proteins, e.g. fibrinogen and PRP, are investigated on the prepared PLGA-CNT composite. Contact angle measurements on the PLGA-CNT composite displayed a good resistance of platelets adhesion on a hydrophilic surface with an angle of 64.94 degrees as compared to pristine PLGA control with an angle of 93.43 degrees . A significant reduction of adhesion is observed on the PLGA-CNT composite, as well as the absence of platelet activation. On the contrary, both platelet adhesion and activation are observed on control samples. We inferred this suppression in secretion of granule contents in the platelet by the presence of the CNTs that resulted in the absence of platelet activation and its subsequent inhibition in the release of adhesive membrane receptors on the PLGA-CNT composite.

  20. Investigating Linear and Nonlinear Viscoelastic behaviour and microstructures of Gelatine-Multiwalled carbon nanotubes composites

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Zhi

    2015-12-01

    We have investigated the linear and nonlinear rheology of various gelatine-multiwalled carbon nanotube (gel-MWNT) composites, namely physically-crosslinked-gelatine gel-MWNT composites, chemically-crosslinked-gelatine gel-MWNT composites, and chemically-physically-crosslinked-gelatine gel-MWNT composites. Further, the internal structures of these gel-MWNT composites were characterized by ultra-small angle neutron scattering and scanning electron microscopy. The adsorption of gelatine onto the surface of MWNT is also investigated to understand gelatine-assisted dispersion of MWNT during ultrasonication. For all gelatine gels, addition of MWNT increases their complex modulus. The dependence of storage modulus with frequency for gelatine-MWNT composites is similar to that of the corresponding neat gelatine matrix. However, by incorporating MWNT, the dependence of the loss modulus on frequency is reduced. The linear viscoelastic region is decreased approximately linearly with the increase of MWNT concentration. The pre-stress results demonstrate that the addition of MWNT does not change the strain-hardening behaviour of physically-crosslinked gelatine gel. However, the addition of MWNT can increase the strain-hardening behaviour of chemically-crosslinked gelatine gel, and chemically-physically crosslinked gelatine gel. Results from light microscopy, cryo-SEM, and USANS demonstrate the hierarchical structures of MWNT, including that tens-of-micron scale MWNT agglomerates are present. Furthermore, the adsorption curve of gelatine onto the surface of MWNT follows two-stage pseudo-saturation behaviour.

  1. Thermal and mechanical interfacial properties of epoxy composites based on functionalized carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin Fanlong [School of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Jilin Institute of Chemical Technology, Jilin City 132022 (China); Ma Changjie [Applied Chemical Engineering Department, Jilin Vocational College of Industry and Technology, Jilin City 132013 (China); Park, Soo-Jin, E-mail: sjpark@inha.ac.kr [Department of Chemistry, Inha University, Nam-Gu, Incheon 402-751 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: {yields} CNTs were functionalized by acid and amine treatments. {yields} Epoxy resin/CNT composites were prepared. {yields} T{sub g} of the composites increased by about 10 deg. C compared to neat epoxy resins. {yields} Toughness of the composites was significantly improved by the addition of functionalized CNTs. - Abstract: Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were treated by a mixture of acid and functionalized subsequently by amine treatment to improve interfacial interactions and dispersion of CNTs in epoxy matrix. The thermal stabilities and mechanical interfacial properties of epoxy/CNT composites were investigated using several techniques. The dispersion state of CNTs in the epoxy matrix was observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). As a result, the glass transition temperature of epoxy/CNT composites increased by about 11 deg. C compared to neat epoxy resins. The mechanical interfacial property of the composites was significantly increased by the addition of amine treated CNTs. The SEM and TEM results showed that the separation and uniform dispersion of CNTs in the epoxy matrix.

  2. Electrochemical capacitor improvement fabricated by carbon microfiber composite with admicellar-modified carbon nanotube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pongprayoon, Thirawudh; Ayutthaya, Montira Seneewong-Na; Poochai, Chatwarin

    2017-02-01

    Conventional electrochemical capacitors are usually made from activated carbon microfiber electrode, which has relatively low electrochemical capacitance. To improve performance of electrochemical capacitor, carbon nanotube (CNT) was used to incorporate in carbon microfiber. Firstly, CNT was coated with ultra-thin polyacrylonitrile (PAN) film coating using the admicellar polymerization technique to improve its dispersion in PAN matrix. Secondly, the mix solution of admicellar-modified CNT (Ad-CNT) and PAN in N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) was prepared to produce microfiber by electrospinning. Lastly, microfiber was collected as a sheet, which was then stabilized and carbonized to be used as an electrode. The fabricated electrode using Ad-CNT/PAN was analyzed by SEM and TEM. SEM images show that the microfiber was uniform with approximately 2 μm average diameter. TEM images display well alignment and good dispersion of Ad-CNT in the matrix. The electrode made from Ad-CNT/PAN exhibited a high specific capacitance of 125 F g-1 at a scan rate of 3 mV s-1 (based on cyclic voltammetry) and 82 F g-1 at a specific current of 1 A g-1 (based on galvanostatic charge/discharge). The percentage of relative specific capacitance retention of the prepared electrode was 70% after 1000 cycles. The results clearly show that the Ad-CNT played an effective role in improving dispersion in electrode leading to increase in electrical conductivity as well as electrical capacitance of the capacitor.

  3. Effect of carbon nanotube on physical and mechanical properties of natural fiber/glass fiber/cement composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hamed Younesi Kordkheili; Shokouh Etedali Shehni; Ghorban Niyatzade

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to introduce a cement-based composite of higher quality. For this purpose new hybrid nanocomposite from bagasse fiber, glass fiber and multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were manufactured. The physical and mechanical proper-ties of the manufactured composites were measured according to standard methods. The properties of the manufactured hybrid nanocomposites were dramatically better than traditional composites. Also all the reinforced composites with carbon nanotube, glass fiber or bagasse fiber exhibited better properties rather than neat cement. The results indicated that bagasse fiber proved suitable for substitution of glass fiber as a reinforcing agent in the cement composites. The hybrid nanocomposite containing 10%glass fiber, 10%bagasse fiber and 1.5%MWCNTs was selected as the best compound.

  4. Photocatalytic activity of porous multiwalled carbon nanotube-TiO2 composite layers for pollutant degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zouzelka, Radek; Kusumawati, Yuly; Remzova, Monika; Rathousky, Jiri; Pauporté, Thierry

    2016-11-05

    TiO2 nanoparticles are suitable building blocks nanostructures for the synthesis of porous functional thin films. Here we report the preparation of films using brookite, P25 titania and anatase pristine nanoparticles and of nanocomposite layers combining anatase nanoparticles and multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) at various concentrations. The structure and phase composition of the layers were characterized by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. Their morphology and texture properties were determined by scanning electron microscopy and krypton adsorption experiments, respectively. Additionally to a strong absorption in the UV range, the composites exhibited light absorption in the visible range as well. The photocatalytic performance of the layers was tested in the degradation of aqueous solutions of 4-chlorophenol serving as a model of an eco-persistent pollutant. Besides the determination of the decrease in the concentration of 4-chlorophenol, also the formation of intermediate degradation products, namely hydroquinone and benzoquinone, was followed. The presence of MWCNTs had a beneficial effect on the photocatalytic performance, a marked increase in the photocatalytic degradation rate constant being observed even at very low concentrations of MWCNTs. Compared to a P25 reference layer, the first order rate reaction constant increased by about 100% for the composite films containing MWCNTs at concentrations above 0.6 wt%. The key parameters for the enhancement of the photocatalytic performance are discussed. The presence of carbon nanotubes influences beneficially the degradation of 4-chlorophenol by an attack of the primarily photoproduced hydroxyl radicals onto the 4-chlorophenol molecules. The degradation due to the direct charge transfer is practically not influenced at all.

  5. Wet spinning of PVA composite fibers with a large fraction of multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dengpan Lai

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available PVA composites fibers with a large fraction of multi-walled carbon nanotubes modified by both covalent and non-covalent functionalization were produced by a wet-spinning process. Model XQ-1 tensile tester, thermogravimetric analysis, scanning electron microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and wide-angle X-ray diffraction were used to characterize the properties of PVA/MWNT composite fibers. The TGA results suggested that MWNTs content in composite fibers were ranged from 5.3 wt% to 27.6 wt%. The mechanical properties of PVA/MWNT composite fibers were obviously superior to pure PVA fiber. The Young׳s modulus of composite fibers enhanced with increasing the content of MWNTs, and it rised gradually from 6.7 GPa for the pure PVA fiber to 12.8 GPa for the composite fibers with 27.6 wt% MWNTs. Meanwhile, the tensile strength increased gradually from 0.39 GPa for the pure PVA fiber to 0.74 GPa for the composite fibers with 14.4 wt% MWNTs. Nevertheless, the tensile strength of the composite fibers decreased as the MWNTs content up to 27.6 wt%. SEM results indicated that the MWNTs homogeneously dispersed in the composite fibers, however some agglomerates also existed when the content of MWNTs reached 27.6 wt%. DSC results proved strong interfacial interaction between MWNTs and PVA chain, which benefited composite fibers in the efficient stress-transfer. WXAD characterization showed that the orientation of PVA molecules declined from 94.1% to 90.9% with the increasing of MWNTs content. The good dispersibility of MWNTs throughout PVA matrix and efficient stress-transfer between MWNTs and PVA matrix may contributed to significant enhancement in the mechanical properties.

  6. A Numerical Study on Electrical Percolation of Polymer-Matrix Composites with Hybrid Fillers of Carbon Nanotubes and Carbon Black

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuli Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The electrical percolation of polymer-matrix composites (PMCs containing hybrid fillers of carbon nanotubes (CNTs and carbon black (CB is estimated by studying the connection possibility of the fillers using Monte Carlo simulation. The 3D simulation model of CB-CNT hybrid filler is established, in which CNTs are modeled by slender capped cylinders and CB groups are modeled by hypothetical spheres with interspaces because CB particles are always agglomerated. The observation on the effects of CB and CNT volume fractions and dimensions on the electrical percolation threshold of hybrid filled composites is then carried out. It is found that the composite electrical percolation threshold can be reduced by increasing CNT aspect ratio, as well as increasing the diameter ratio of CB groups to CNTs. And adding CB into CNT composites can decrease the CNT volume needed to convert the composite conductivity, especially when the CNT volume fraction is close to the threshold of PMCs with only CNT filler. Different from previous linear assumption, the nonlinear relation between CB and CNT volume fractions at composite percolation threshold is revealed, which is consistent with the synergistic effect observed in experiments. Based on the nonlinear relation, the estimating equation for the electrical percolation threshold of the PMCs containing CB-CNT hybrid fillers is established.

  7. Carbon Nanotube/Cu Nanowires/Epoxy Composite Mats with Improved Thermal and Electrical Conductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Yajuan; Cao, Wei; Li, Wei; Chen, Hongyuan; Wang, Miao; Wei, Hanxing; Hu, Dongmei; Chen, Minghai; Li, Qingwen

    2015-04-01

    Polymer composites with carbon nanofillers have been regarded as a promising candidate for electronic package materials. The challenge for such materials is to increase the electrical and thermal conductivity of the composites. Herein, we reported an epoxy composite film with high thermal and electrical conductivity that were prepared by loading high volume fraction of well-dispersed multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs, around 50 nm in diameter, 1-10 µm in length) and copper nanowires (Cu NWs, 60-70 nm in diameter, 1-5 µm in length) in epoxy matrix. The MWCNT-Cu NW hybrid mats were prepared by a vacuum filtration method with an optimum Cu NW content of 50 wt%. The hybrid mats was then impregnated by epoxy solution to prepare epoxy composite films. The epoxy was modified by the toughening agent to make the composite films tough and flexible. The loading fraction of MWCNTs and Cu NWs was tuned by controlling the viscosity of epoxy solution. A remarkable synergetic effect between the MWCNTs and Cu NWs in improving the electrical and thermal conductivity of epoxy composites was demonstrated. The results showed that the electrical conductivity of nanocomposites with 42.5 wt% epoxy was 1500 S/m, and the thermal conductivity was 2.83 W/m K, which was 10.1 times of the neat epoxy. Its thermal resistance was as low as 1% of the pure epoxy. And the mechanical properties of composites were also investigated. These robust and flexible nanocomposites showed prospective applications as thermal interface materials (TIMs) in the electronic industry.

  8. Development of scalable methods for the utilization of multi-walled carbon nanotubes in polymer and metal matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vennerberg, Danny Curtis

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) have received considerable attention as reinforcement for composites due to their high tensile strength, stiffness, electrical conductivity and thermal conductivity as well as their low coefficient of thermal expansion. However, despite the availability of huge quantities of low-cost, commercially synthesized nanotubes, the utilization of MWCNTs in engineering composites is extremely limited due to difficulties in achieving uniform dispersion and strong interfacial bonding with the matrix. A proven method of enhancing the nanotube-polymer interface and degree of MWCNT dispersion involves functionalizing the MWCNTs through oxidation with strong acids. While effective at laboratory scales, this technique is not well-suited for large-scale operations due to long processing times, poor yield, safety hazards, and environmental concerns. This work aims to find scalable solutions to several of the challenges associated with the fabrication of MWCNT-reinforced composites. For polymer matrix composite applications, a rapid, dry, and cost-effective method of oxidizing MWCNTs with O3 in a fluidized bed was developed as an alternative to acid oxidation. Oxidized MWCNTs were further functionalized with silane coupling agents using water and supercritical carbon dioxide as solvents in order to endow the MWCNTs with matrix-specific functionalities. The effect of silanization on the cure kinetics, rheological behavior, and thermo-mechanical properties of model epoxy nanocomposites were investigated. Small additions of functionalized MWCNTs were found to increase the glass transition temperature, strength, and toughness of the epoxy. In order to achieve composite properties approaching those of individual nanotubes, new approaches are needed to allow for high loadings of MWCNTs. One strategy involves making macroscopic mats of nanotubes called buckypaper (BP) and subsequently infiltrating the mats with resin in processes familiar to

  9. Vanadium oxide-carbon nanotube composite films characterized by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qiong; Xu, Xiangdong; Gu, Yu; Wang, Meng; Yao, Jie; Jiang, Yadong; Sun, Minghui; Ao, Tianhong; Lian, Yuxiang; Wang, Fu; Li, Xinrong

    2016-10-01

    Spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) is utilized to characterize the vanadium oxide (VO x )-single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) composite films prepared by sol-gel. Five Tauc-Lorentz oscillators model is employed to describe the dispersions in the optical responses of VO x and VO x -SWCNT thin films. Results reveal that if the SWCNT concentration in the composite film is increased, the refractive index is decreased, while the extinction coefficient is increased. Moreover, higher SWCNT content leads to lower optical band gap (E g) but larger localized state (E e). Interestingly, both E g and E e values reach saturated at a SWCNT content of ~8 wt%. Particularly, the peak transition energies of the 5 Tauc-Lorentz oscillators have been assigned to the specific transitions according to the band structures of VO x . This work reveals the feasibility of investigating the optical properties and microstructures of VO x -SWCNT composite films by SE. These experimental results will be helpful for better understanding the VO x -SWCNT composite films, and promoting future characterizations of other SWCNT-based composites by SE.

  10. Effect of Water Vapor Adsorption on Electrical Properties of Carbon Nanotube/Nanocrystalline Cellulose Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safari, Salman; van de Ven, Theo G M

    2016-04-13

    It has been long known that the electrical properties of cellulose are greatly influenced by adsorption of water vapor. Incorporating conductive nanofillers in a cellulose matrix is an example of an approach to tailor their characteristics for use in electronics and sensing devices. In this work, we introduce two new nanocomposites comprising carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and conventional or electrosterically stabilized nanocrystalline celluloses matrices. While conventional nanocrystalline cellulose (NCC) consists of a rigid crystalline backbone, electrosterically stabilized cellulose (ENCC) is composed of a rigid crystalline backbone with carboxylated polymers protruding from both ends. By tuning CNT loading, we can tailor a CNT/NCC composite with minimal electrical sensitivity to the ambient relative humidity, despite the fact that the composite has a high moisture uptake. The expected decrease in CNT conductivity upon water vapor adsorption, due to electron donation, is counterbalanced by an increase in the conductivity of NCC due to proton hopping at an optimum CNT loading (1-2%). Contrary to the CNT/NCC composite, a CNT/ENCC composite at 1% CNT loading shows insulating behavior for relative humidities up to 75%, after which the composite becomes conductive. This interesting behavior can be ascribed to the low moisture uptake of ENCC at low and moderate relative humidities due to the limited number of hydroxyl groups and hydrogen bond formation between carboxyl groups on ENCC, which endow ENCC with limited water molecule adsorption sites.

  11. Wear Behavior of Mechanically Alloyed Ti-Based Bulk Metallic Glass Composites Containing Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung-Sheng Lin

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The present paper reports the preparation and wear behavior of mechanically alloyed Ti-based bulk metallic glass composites containing carbon nanotube (CNT particles. The differential scanning calorimeter results show that the thermal stability of the amorphous matrix is affected by the presence of CNT particles. Changes in glass transition temperature (Tg and crystallization temperature (Tx suggest that deviations in the chemical composition of the amorphous matrix occurred because of a partial dissolution of the CNT species into the amorphous phase. Although the hardness of CNT/Ti50Cu28Ni15Sn7 bulk metallic glass composites is increased with the addition of CNT particles, the wear resistance of such composites is not directly proportional to their hardness, and does not follow the standard wear law. A worn surface under a high applied load shows that the 12 vol. % CNT/Ti50Cu28Ni15Sn7 bulk metallic glass composite suffers severe wear compared with monolithic Ti50Cu28Ni15Sn7 bulk metallic glass.

  12. Photoreactive TiO2/carbon nanotube composites: synthesis and reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yuan; Li, Gonghu; Ciston, Shannon; Lueptow, Richard M; Gray, Kimberly A

    2008-07-01

    Electron-hole recombination limits the efficiency of TiO2 photocatalysis. We have investigated the efficacy with which anatase/carbon nanotube (CNT) composite materials reduce charge recombination and enhance reactivity. We synthesized nanostructured assemblies composed of different proportions of anatase (5 or 100 nm) and either single-or multi-walled CNTs. The composites were prepared using a simple low temperature process in which CNTs and anatase nanoparticles were dispersed in water, dehydrated at 80 degrees C, and dried at 104 degrees C. The structures of the various TiO2/CNT composites were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and their function was tested by phenol oxidation. Charge recombination was compared by measuring the photoluminescence spectra of select composites. We found that a nanostructured composite assembled from the 100 nm anatase and single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs) exhibited enhanced and selective photocatalytic oxidation of phenol in comparison to both pure anatase and Degussa P25. A mechanism for the enhanced reactivity is proposed in which electrons are shuttled from TiO2 particles to the SWCNTs as a result of an optimal TiO2/ CNT arrangement that stabilizes charge separation and reduces charge recombination. In addition, the SWCNT assembly provides better catalyst-support (dispersal and connection) than multi-walled CNTs.

  13. Nitrite Oxidation with Copper-Cobalt Nanoparticles on Carbon Nanotubes Doped Conducting Polymer PEDOT Composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junjie; Xu, Guiyun; Wang, Wei; Xu, Shenghao; Luo, Xiliang

    2015-09-01

    Copper-cobalt bimetal nanoparticles (Cu-Co) have been electrochemically prepared on glassy carbon electrodes (GCEs), which were electrodeposited with conducting polymer nanocomposites of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) doped with carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Owing to their good conductivity, high mechanical strength, and large surface area, the PEDOT/CNTs composites offered excellent substrates for the electrochemical deposition of Cu-Co nanoparticles. As a result of their nanostructure and the synergic effect between Cu and Co, the Cu-Co/PEDOT/CNTs composites exhibited significantly enhanced catalytic activity towards the electrochemical oxidation of nitrite. Under optimized conditions, the nanocomposite-modified electrodes had a fast response time within 2 s and a linear range from 0.5 to 430 μm for the detection of nitrite, with a detection limit of 60 nm. Moreover, the Cu-Co/PEDOT/CNTs composites were highly stable, and the prepared nitrite sensors could retain more than 96 % of their initial response after 30 days.

  14. Electrical and dielectric properties of foam injection-molded polypropylene/multiwalled carbon nanotube composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ameli, A.; Nofar, M.; Saniei, M.; Hossieny, N.; Park, C. B. [Microcellular Plastics Manufacturing Laboratory, Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Toronto, 5 King’s College Road, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5S 3G8 (Canada); Pötschke, P. [Leibniz-Institut für Polymerforschung Dresden e.V. (IPF), Hohe Strasse 6, D-01069 Dresden (Germany)

    2015-05-22

    A combination of high dielectric permittivity (ε′) and low dielectric loss (tan δ) is required for charge storage applications. In percolative systems such as conductive polymer composites, however, obtaining high ε′ and low tan δ is very challenging due to the sharp insulation-conduction transition near the threshold region. Due to the particular arrangement of conductive fillers induced by both foaming and injection molding processes, they may address this issue. Therefore, this work evaluates the application of foam injection molding process in fabricating polymer nanocomposites for energy storage. Polypropylene-multiwalled carbon nanotubes (PP-MWCNT) composites were prepared by melt mixing and foamed in an injection molding process. Electrical conductivity (σ), ε′ and tan δ were then characterized. Also, scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM) was used to investigate the carbon nanotube’s arrangement as well as cellular morphology. The results showed that foam injection-molded composites exhibited highly superior dielectric properties to those of solid counterparts. For instance, foamed samples had ε′=68.3 and tan δ =0.05 (at 1.25 vol.% MWCNT), as opposed to ε′=17.8 and tan δ=0.04 in solid samples (at 2.56 vol.% MWCNT). The results of this work reveal that high performance dielectric nanocomposites can be developed using foam injection molding technologies for charge storage applications.

  15. N-type thermoelectric performance of functionalized carbon nanotube-filled polymer composites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dallas D Freeman

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs were functionalized with polyethyleneimine (PEI and made into composites with polyvinyl acetate (PVAc. CNTs were dispersed with different amounts of sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate (SDBS prior to the PEI functionalization. The resulting samples exhibit air-stable n-type characteristics with electrical conductivities as great as 1500 S/m and thermopowers as large as -100 µV/K. Electrical conductivity and thermopower were strongly affected by CNT dispersion, improving the properties with better dispersion with high concentrations of SDBS. This improvement is believed to be due to the increase in the number of tubes that are evenly coated with PEI in a better-dispersed sample. Increasing the amount of PEI relative to the other constituents positively affects thermopower but not conductivity. Air exposure reduces both thermopower and conductivity presumably due to oxygen doping (which makes CNTs p-type, but stable values were reached within seven days following sample fabrication.

  16. N-type thermoelectric performance of functionalized carbon nanotube-filled polymer composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Dallas D; Choi, Kyungwho; Yu, Choongho

    2012-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were functionalized with polyethyleneimine (PEI) and made into composites with polyvinyl acetate (PVAc). CNTs were dispersed with different amounts of sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate (SDBS) prior to the PEI functionalization. The resulting samples exhibit air-stable n-type characteristics with electrical conductivities as great as 1500 S/m and thermopowers as large as -100 µV/K. Electrical conductivity and thermopower were strongly affected by CNT dispersion, improving the properties with better dispersion with high concentrations of SDBS. This improvement is believed to be due to the increase in the number of tubes that are evenly coated with PEI in a better-dispersed sample. Increasing the amount of PEI relative to the other constituents positively affects thermopower but not conductivity. Air exposure reduces both thermopower and conductivity presumably due to oxygen doping (which makes CNTs p-type), but stable values were reached within seven days following sample fabrication.

  17. Comparison of quasistatic to impact mechanical properties of multiwall carbon nanotube/polycarbonate composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brühwiler, Paul A.; Barbezat, Michel; Necola, Adly; Kohls, Doug J.; Bunk, Oliver; Schaefer, Dale W.; Pötschke, Petra (PSI); (EMMPA); (UCIN); (Leibniz)

    2010-10-22

    We report the quasistatic tensile and impact penetration properties (falling dart test) of injection-molded polycarbonate samples, as a function of multiwall carbon nanotube (MWNT) concentration (0.0-2.5%). The MWNT were incorporated by dilution of a commercial MWNT/polycarbonate masterbatch. The stiffness and quasistatic yield strength of the composites increased approximately linearly with MWNT concentration in all measurements. The energy absorbed in fracture was, however, a negative function of the MWNT concentration, and exhibited different dependencies in quasistatic and impact tests. Small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) showed that the dispersion of the MWNT was similar at all concentrations. The negative effects on energy absorption are attributed to agglomerates remaining in the samples, which were observed in optical microscopy and SAXS. Overall, there was a good correspondence between static and dynamic energy absorption.

  18. Preparation and characterization of aligned carbon nanotubes/polylactic acid composite fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong Yuxia; Yuan Jie [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 201804 (China); Qiu Jun, E-mail: qiujun@tongji.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 201804 (China); Key Laboratory of Advanced Civil Engineering Materials of Education of Ministry, Shanghai 201804 (China)

    2012-07-01

    Aligned functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes/polylactic acid (MWNTs-PCL/PLA) composite fibers were successfully prepared by electrospinning processing. The MWNTs bonded with the polycaprolactone chains exhibited excellent uniform dispersion in PLA solution by comparing with the acid-functionalized MWNTs and amino-functionalized MWNTs. Optical microscopy was used to study the aligned degree of the fibers and to investigate the influences of the electrodes distance on the alignment and structure of the fibers, and results showed that the best quality of aligned fibers with dense structure and high aligned degree were obtained at an electrodes distance of 3 cm. Moreover, the MWNTs embedded inside the MWNTs-PCL/PLA fibers displayed well orientation along the axes of the fibers, which was demonstrated by field emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy.

  19. A study of conductive hydrogel composites of pH-responsive microgels and carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Zhengxing; Zhou, Mi; Greensmith, Paula J; Wang, Wenkai; Hoyland, Judith A; Kinloch, Ian A; Freemont, Tony; Saunders, Brian R

    2016-05-14

    Conductive gel composites are attracting considerable attention because of their interesting electrical and mechanical properties. Here, we report conductive gel composites constructed using only colloidal particles as building blocks. The composites were prepared from mixed dispersions of vinyl-functionalised pH-responsive microgel particles (MGs) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs). MGs are crosslinked pH-responsive polymer colloid particles that swell when the pH approaches the pKa of the particles. Two MG systems were used which contained ethyl acrylate (EA) or methyl acrylate (MA) and around 30 mol% of methacrylic acid (MAA). The MA-based MG is a new pH-responsive system. The mixed MG/CNT dispersions formed thixotropic physical gels. Those gels were transformed into covalent interlinked electrically conducting doubly crosslinked microgel/CNT composites (DX MG/CNT) by free-radical reaction. The MGs provided the dual roles of dispersant for the CNTs and macro-crosslinker for the composite. TEM data showed evidence for strong attraction between the MG and the CNTs which facilitated CNT dispersion. An SEM study confirmed CNT dispersion throughout the composites. The mechanical properties of the composites were studied using dynamic rheology and uniaxial compression measurements. Surprisingly, both the ductility and the modulus of the gel composites increased with increasing CNT concentration used for their preparation. Human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AD-MSCs) exposed to DX MG/CNT maintained over 99% viability with metabolic activity retained over 7 days, which indicated non-cytotoxicity. The results of this study suggest that our approach could be used to prepare other DX MG/CNT gel composites and that these materials may lead to future injectable gels for advanced soft-tissue repair.

  20. Rheological and electrical percolation in melt-processed poly(ether ether ketone)/multi-wall carbon nanotube composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangarusampath, D. S.; Ruckdäschel, Holger; Altstädt, Volker; Sandler, Jan K. W.; Garray, Didier; Shaffer, Milo S. P.

    2009-11-01

    Multi-wall carbon nanotubes were dispersed homogeneously throughout a poly(ether ether ketone) matrix by melt processing. The influence of nanotube content on both rheological and electrical properties was analysed. The dynamic storage modulus, G', shows a characteristic solid-like behavior above 1 wt% nanotubes. A sharp transition from an electrically insulating to a conductive composite was observed between 1 and 1.5 wt%. By applying a power-law relation, the rheological and electrical percolation thresholds were found to be 0.9 wt%, and 1.3 wt%, respectively. Considering this data, Guth's filler reinforcement theory provides a valuable estimation of the aspect ratio of the nanotubes after processing and indicates substantial length degradation during the dispersion process.

  1. Electrochemical detection and degradation of ibuprofen from water on multi-walled carbon nanotubes-epoxy composite electrode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sorina Motoc; Adriana Remes; Aniela Pop; Florica Manea; Joop Schoonman

    2013-01-01

    This work describes the electrochemical behaviour of ibuprofen on two types of multi-walled carbon nanotubes based composite electrodes,i.e.,multi-walled carbon nanotubes-epoxy (MWCNT) and silver-modified zeolite-multi-walled carbon nanotubes-epoxy (AgZMWCNT) composites electrodes.The composite electrodes were obtained using two-roll mill procedure.SEM images of surfaces of the composites revealed a homogeneous distribution of the composite components within the epoxy matrix.AgZMWCNT composite electrode exhibited the better electrical conductivity and larger electroactive surface area.The electrochemical determination of ibuprofen (IBP) was achieved using AgZMWCNT by cyclic voltammetry,differential-pulsed voltammetry,square-wave voltammetry and chronoamperometry.The IBP degradation occurred on both composite electrodes under controlled electrolysis at 1.2 and 1.75 V vs.Ag/AgCl,and IBP concentration was determined comparatively by differential-pulsed voltammetry,under optimized conditions using AgZMWCNT electrode and UV-Vis spectrophotometry methods to determine the IBP degradation performance for each electrode.AgZMWCNT electrode exhibited a dual character allowing a double application in IBP degradation process and its control.

  2. Different Technical Applications of Carbon Nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Abdalla, S; Al-Marzouki, F.; Ahmed A. Al-Ghamdi; Abdel-Daiem, A.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes have been of great interest because of their simplicity and ease of synthesis. The novel properties of nanostructured carbon nanotubes such as high surface area, good stiffness, and resilience have been explored in many engineering applications. Research on carbon nanotubes have shown the application in the field of energy storage, hydrogen storage, electrochemical supercapacitor, field-emitting devices, transistors, nanoprobes and sensors, composite material, templates, etc....

  3. Novel multifunctional composites based on carbon nanotube sheets and yarns: Synthesis, fabrication, properties and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepro Chavez, Xavier N.

    Multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT) aligned sheets directly drawn from forests and derived yarns have recently attracted wide attention because of their exhibited mechanical, electronic, photonic and optical properties. Unfortunately, the supply of drawable forests is currently limited since the set of experimental conditions required to obtain adequate forest morphology is rather narrow, thus restricting the advance towards large scale applications. This work starts by addressing this issue by showing that the correct preparation of alternative substrates, such as thin metallic sheets, can produce the forest morphology required for solid-state drawability and increase the attainable surface for forest harvesting without further enlargement of the currently used chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reactor chamber. Also, it explores suitable ways to quantify the alignment of MWNTs in forests and by comparing them with spinnable ones, provides a range of alignment distribution where forest drawability can be reasonably expected. Next, this work presents procedures that can add functionality to the MWNT free-standing sheets without strongly affecting their mechanical integrity, nanotube alignment or individual morphology. Proved examples, such as free-standing sheets of catalytic-active, highly capacity (39 F/g), aligned nitrogen-doped MWNTs and silicon-based ceramic conformationally coated MWNTs that can be easily twisted into yarns, are examined in different chapters. Moreover, we show that MWNT sheets can be used for templating materials other than carbon into nanostructured arrays by preparing sheets of aligned silicon oxide nanotubes. Similar to MWNT sheets, these nanotube based materials can be used as host to confine functional unspinnable materials (up to 95 wt.%) by twisting them together into biscrolled yarns, suitable for applications as superconductors, lithium-ion batteries, fuel cells catalysts and photocatalysis. Such biscrolled yarns have a twist

  4. Electromagnetic Interference Behavior of Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes and Carbon Nanofibers Composites Under Fatigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    This led to the use of composite structures made of Kevlar /epoxy and graphite/epoxy. The U.S. military today are researching and testing...Laboratory. The first discovery of a carbon nano scaled molecule was in 1985 with fullerenes by Kroto, Smalley, and Curl at Rice University. A fullerene

  5. Nanomechanics of carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kis, Andras; Zettl, Alex

    2008-05-13

    Some of the most important potential applications of carbon nanotubes are related to their mechanical properties. Stiff sp2 bonds result in a Young's modulus close to that of diamond, while the relatively weak van der Waals interaction between the graphitic shells acts as a form of lubrication. Previous characterization of the mechanical properties of nanotubes includes a rich variety of experiments involving mechanical deformation of nanotubes using scanning probe microscopes. These results have led to promising prototypes of nanoelectromechanical devices such as high-performance nanomotors, switches and oscillators based on carbon nanotubes.

  6. Production and mechanical properties of aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes-M140 composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the production of M140, aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes (A-MWNTs) reinforced M140 composites (A-MWNTs-M140) and their mechanical properties including their compressive and bending properties as well as their microstructure characteristic of bend fracture surface. M140 was first produced by speed change mixing technics with commercial materials, water-bath curing at normal temperature. In addition, two different A-MWNTs dispersions including carbonyl disper- sions of A-MWNTs (C-A-MWNTs) and aqueous dispersions of A-MWNTs (A-A-MWNTs) with the addition of 0.01wt% A-MWNTs were utilized to obtain enhanced mechanical properties with respect to plain M140. The results indicated that the use of A-MWNTs dispersions allows increasing compressive strength and flexural strength by 8.4% and 5.4%, respectively for the C-A-MWNTs-M140, and by 15.9% and 20.7% for the A-A-MWNTs-M140, respectively. The SEM and EPMA examinations of fracture surface also showed that the bond interface between the nanotubes and matrix is moderate and the main reinforcing mechanisms are microfilling effect, CNTs pull-out and debond. The aqueous dispersion of A-MWNTs is an appropriate method and is more compatible with the M140.

  7. Production and mechanical properties of aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes-M140 composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU ShiLang; GAO LiangLi; JIN WeiJun

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the production of M140, aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes (A-MWNTs)reinforced M140 composites (A-MWNTs-M140) and their mechanical properties including their compressive and bending properties as well as their microstructure characteristic of bend fracture surface.M140 was first produced by speed change mixing technics with commercial materials, water-bath curing at normal temperature. In addition, two different A-MWNTs dispersions including carbonyl dispersions of A-MWNTs (C-A-MWNTs) and aqueous dispersions of A-MWNTs (A-A-MWNTs) with the addition of 0.01wt% A-MWNTs were utilized to obtain enhanced mechanical properties with respect to plain M140. The results indicated that the use of A-MWNTs dispersions allows increasing compressive strength and flexural strength by 8.4% and 5.4%, respectively for the C-A-MWNTs-M140, and by 15.9% and 20.7% for the A-A-MWNTs-M140, respectively. The SEM and EPMA examinations of fracture surface also showed that the bond interface between the nanotubes and matrix is moderate and the main reinforcing mechanisms are microfilling effect, CNTs pull-out and debond. The aqueous dispersion of A-MWNTs is an appropriate method and is more compatible with the M140.

  8. p-toluene sulfonic acid doped polyaniline carbon nanotube composites: synthesis via different routes and modified properties

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Ashok K.; YASHPAL SHARMA

    2013-01-01

    Composites of polyaniline and carbon nanotube (CNT) were prepared by in-situ chemical polymerization method using various aniline concentrations in the initial polymerization solution with p-toluene sulfonic acid (PTS) as secondary dopant and mechanical mixing of the PANI and CNT using different weight ratios of PANI and CNTs. The structural characterizations of the composites were done by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and Ultra violet visible spectroscopy (UV-Visible). Scanning electron ...

  9. Effect of the carbon nanotube surface characteristics on the conductivity and dielectric constant of carbon nanotube/poly(vinylidene fluoride composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pereira João

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Commercial multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNT were functionalized by oxidation with HNO3, to introduce oxygen-containing surface groups, and by thermal treatments at different temperatures for their selective removal. The obtained samples were characterized by adsorption of N2 at -196°C, temperature-programmed desorption and determination of pH at the point of zero charge. CNT/poly(vinylidene fluoride composites were prepared using the above CNT samples, with different filler fractions up to 1 wt%. It was found that oxidation reduced composite conductivity for a given concentration, shifted the percolation threshold to higher concentrations, and had no significant effect in the dielectric response.

  10. Development of supercapacitors based on carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Block-type electrodes made of carbon nanotubes were fabricated by different processes. The volumetric specific capacitance based on such electrodes reached 107 F/cm3, which proves carbon nanotubes to be ideal candidate materials for supercapacitors. The composite electrodes consisting of carbon nanotubes and RuO2.xH2O were developed by the deposition of RuO2 on the surface of carbon nanotubes. Supercapacitors based on the composite electrodes show much higher specific capacitance than those based on pure carbon nanotube ones. A specific capacitance of 600 F/g can be achieved when the weight percent of RuO2.xH2O in the composite electrodes reaches 75%. In addition, supercapacitors based on the composite electrodes show both high energy density and high power density characteristics.

  11. Development of supercapacitors based on carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马仁志; 魏秉庆; 徐才录; 梁吉; 吴德海

    2000-01-01

    Block-type electrodes made of carbon nanotubes were fabricated by different processes. The volumetric specific capacitance based on such electrodes reached 107 F/cm3, which proves carbon nanotubes to be ideal candidate materials for supercapacitors. The composite electrodes consisting of carbon nanotubes and RuO2 ·xH2O were developed by the deposition of RuO2 on the surface of carbon nanotubes. Supercapacitors based on the composite electrodes show much higher specific capacitance than those based on pure carbon nanotube ones. A specific capacitance of 600 F/g can be achieved when the weight percent of RuO2· xH2O in the composite electrodes reaches 75% . In addition , supercapacitors based on the composite electrodes show both high energy density and high power density characteristics.

  12. Molecular Dynamics Modeling of Carbon Nanotube Composite Fracture Using ReaxFF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Benjamin D.; Wise, Kristopher E.; Odegard, Gregory M.

    2016-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) fiber reinforced composites with specific tensile strengths and moduli approaching those of aerospace grade carbon fiber composites have recently been reported. This achievement was enabled by the emerging availability of high N/tex yarns in kilometer-scale quantities. While the production of this yarn is an impressive advance, its strength is still much lower than that of the individual CNTs comprising the yarn. Closing this gap requires understanding load transfer between CNTs at the nanometer dimensional scale. This work uses reactive molecular dynamics simulations to gain an understanding at the nanometer scale of the key factors that determine CNT nanocomposite mechanical performance, and to place more realistic upper bounds on the target properties. While molecular dynamics simulations using conventional force fields can predict elastic properties, the ReaxFF reactive forcefield can also model fracture behavior because of its ability to accurately describe bond breaking and formation during a simulation. The upper and lower bounds of CNT composite properties are investigated by comparing systems composed of CNTs continuously connected across the periodic boundary with systems composed of finite length CNTs. These lengths, effectively infinite for the continuous tubes and an aspect ratio of 13 for the finite length case, result from practical limitations on the number of atoms that can be included in a simulation. Experimentally measured aspect ratios are typically on the order of 100,000, so the calculated results should represent upper and lower limits on experimental mechanical properties. Finally, the effect of various degrees of covalent crosslinking between the CNTs and amorphous carbon matrix is considered to identify the amount of CNT-matrix covalent bonding that maximizes overall composite properties.

  13. Metal coated functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes for composite applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Qiang

    This study is considered as a method for producing multifunctional composite materials by using metals coated Single-walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWCNTs). In this research, various metals (Ni, Cu, Ag) were successfully deposited onto the surface of SWCNTs. It has been found that homogenous dispersion and dense nucleation sites are the necessary conditions to form uniform coatings on SWCNTs. Functionalization has been applied to achieve considerable improvement in the dispersion of purified SWCNTs and creates more nucleation sites for subsequent metal deposition. A three-step electroless plating approach was used and the coating mechanism is described in the paper. The samples were characterized by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), Raman spectroscopy, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Bulk copper/aluminum-SWNT composites were processed by powder metallurgy with wet mixing techniques. Coated SWCNTs were well dispersed in the metal matrix. Cold pressing followed by sintering was applied to control porosity. The relationships between hardness and SWCNTs addition were discussed. Ni-SWCNTs composite coatings were prepared by electro-composite deposition. SWCNTs were suspended in a Ni deposition electrolyte and deposited together with nickel during electrodeposition. SWCNTs concentrations in the coatings were found to be related to the SWCNTs concentration in the solution, current density and agitation rate. The microstructure of the coatings has been examined by electron microscopy. Ni coated SWCNTs were also incorporated into the high temperature Bismaleimide (BMI)/graphite composite to improve Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) shielding and surface conductivity. The vacuum assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) was used to process these composites. Surface and volume resistivity and EMI shielding effectiveness of the composites

  14. 3D Printed Polycaprolactone Carbon Nanotube Composite Scaffolds for Cardiac Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Chee Meng Benjamin; Mishra, Abhinay; Lin, Pearlyn Teo Pei; Ng, Sum Huan; Yeong, Wai Yee; Kim, Young-Jin; Yoon, Yong-Jin

    2016-11-28

    Fabrication of tissue engineering scaffolds with the use of novel 3D printing has gained lot of attention, however systematic investigation of biomaterials for 3D printing have not been widely explored. In this report, well-defined structures of polycaprolactone (PCL) and PCL- carbon nanotube (PCL-CNT) composite scaffolds have been designed and fabricated using a 3D printer. Conditions for 3D printing has been optimized while the effects of varying CNT percentages with PCL matrix on the thermal, mechanical and biological properties of the printed scaffolds are studied. Raman spectroscopy is used to characterise the functionalized CNTs and its interactions with PCL matrix. Mechanical properties of the composites are characterised using nanoindentation. Maximum peak load, elastic modulus and hardness increases with increasing CNT content. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) studies reveal the thermal and crystalline behaviour of PCL and its CNT composites. Biodegradation studies are performed in Pseudomonas Lipase enzymatic media, showing its specificity and effect on degradation rate. Cell imaging and viability studies of H9c2 cells from rat origin on the scaffolds are performed using fluorescence imaging and MTT assay, respectively. PCL and its CNT composites are able to show cell proliferation and have the potential to be used in cardiac tissue engineering.

  15. Enhanced dielectric performance in polymer composite films with carbon nanotube-reduced graphene oxide hybrid filler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin-Young; Kim, TaeYoung; Suk, Ji Won; Chou, Harry; Jang, Ji-Hoon; Lee, Jong Ho; Kholmanov, Iskandar N; Akinwande, Deji; Ruoff, Rodney S

    2014-08-27

    The electrical conductivity and the specific surface area of conductive fillers in conductor-insulator composite films can drastically improve the dielectric performance of those films through changing their polarization density by interfacial polarization. We have made a polymer composite film with a hybrid conductive filler material made of carbon nanotubes grown onto reduced graphene oxide platelets (rG-O/CNT). We report the effect of the rG-O/CNT hybrid filler on the dielectric performance of the composite film. The composite film had a dielectric constant of 32 with a dielectric loss of 0.051 at 0.062 wt% rG-O/CNT filler and 100 Hz, while the neat polymer film gave a dielectric constant of 15 with a dielectric loss of 0.036. This is attributed to the increased electrical conductivity and specific surface area of the rG-O/CNT hybrid filler, which results in an increase in interfacial polarization density between the hybrid filler and the polymer.

  16. Scratch-resistant, highly conductive, and high-strength carbon nanotube-based composite yarns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kai; Sun, Yinghui; Lin, Xiaoyang; Zhou, Ruifeng; Wang, Jiaping; Fan, Shoushan; Jiang, Kaili

    2010-10-26

    High-strength and conductive carbon nanotube (CNT) yarns are very attractive in many potential applications. However, there is a difficulty when simultaneously enhancing the strength and conductivity of CNT yarns. Adding some polymers into CNT yarns to enhance their strength will decrease their conductivity, while treating them in acid or coating them with metal nanoparticles to enhance their conductivity will reduce their strength. To overcome this difficulty, here we report a method to make high-strength and highly conductive CNT-based composite yarns by using a continuous superaligned CNT (SACNT) yarn as a conductive framework and then inserting polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) into the intertube spaces of the framework through PVA/dimethyl sulphoxide solution to enhance the strength of yarns. The as-produced CNT/PVA composite yarns possess very high tensile strengths up to 2.0 GPa and Young's moduli more than 120 GPa, much higher than those of the CNT/PVA yarns reported. The electric conductivity of as-produced composite yarns is as high as 9.2 × 10(4) S/m, comparable to HNO(3)-treated or Au nanoparticle-coated CNT yarns. These composite yarns are flexible, lightweight, scratch-resistant, very stable in the lab environment, and resistant to extremely humid ambient and as a result can be woven into high-strength and heatable fabrics, showing potential applications in flexible heaters, bullet-proof vests, radiation protection suits, and spacesuits.

  17. Electrospun single-walled carbon nanotube/polyvinyl alcohol composite nanofibers: structure property relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naebe, Minoo; Lin, Tong; Staiger, Mark P.; Dai, Liming; Wang, Xungai

    2008-07-01

    Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) nanofibers and single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT)/PVA composite nanofibers have been produced by electrospinning. An apparent increase in the PVA crystallinity with a concomitant change in its main crystalline phase and a reduction in the crystalline domain size were observed in the SWNT/PVA composite nanofibers, indicating the occurrence of a SWNT-induced nucleation crystallization of the PVA phase. Both the pure PVA and SWNT/PVA composite nanofibers were subjected to the following post-electrospinning treatments: (i) soaking in methanol to increase the PVA crystallinity, and (ii) cross-linking with glutaric dialdehyde to control the PVA morphology. Effects of the PVA morphology on the tensile properties of the resultant electrospun nanofibers were examined. Dynamic mechanical thermal analyses of both pure PVA and SWNT/PVA composite electrospun nanofibers indicated that SWNT-polymer interaction facilitated the formation of crystalline domains, which can be further enhanced by soaking the nanofiber in methanol and/or cross-linking the polymer with glutaric dialdehyde.

  18. Electrospun single-walled carbon nanotube/polyvinyl alcohol composite nanofibers: structure-property relationships

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naebe, Minoo; Lin Tong; Wang Xungai [Centre for Material and Fibre Innovation, Deakin University, Geelong, VIC 3217 (Australia); Staiger, Mark P [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Canterbury, Christchurch (New Zealand); Dai Liming [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Dayton, Dayton, OH 45469 (United States)], E-mail: tong.lin@deakin.edu.au

    2008-07-30

    Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) nanofibers and single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT)/PVA composite nanofibers have been produced by electrospinning. An apparent increase in the PVA crystallinity with a concomitant change in its main crystalline phase and a reduction in the crystalline domain size were observed in the SWNT/PVA composite nanofibers, indicating the occurrence of a SWNT-induced nucleation crystallization of the PVA phase. Both the pure PVA and SWNT/PVA composite nanofibers were subjected to the following post-electrospinning treatments: (i) soaking in methanol to increase the PVA crystallinity, and (ii) cross-linking with glutaric dialdehyde to control the PVA morphology. Effects of the PVA morphology on the tensile properties of the resultant electrospun nanofibers were examined. Dynamic mechanical thermal analyses of both pure PVA and SWNT/PVA composite electrospun nanofibers indicated that SWNT-polymer interaction facilitated the formation of crystalline domains, which can be further enhanced by soaking the nanofiber in methanol and/or cross-linking the polymer with glutaric dialdehyde.

  19. Pressureless sintering and mechanical properties of hydroxyapatite/functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotube composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abden, M J; Afroze, J D; Alam, M S; Bahadur, N M

    2016-10-01

    This work aims to study the optimum sintering conditions of hydroxyapatite/functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotube (HA/f-MWCNT) composite with improved mechanical properties for bone implant applications using a pressureless sintering technique. The carboxyl functional group (COOH) introduced by the acid treatment on the MWCNT surface by which HA molecules are grafted onto the surface of functionalized MWCNT with strong interfacial bonding. The composite exhibits a lower hemolytic rate of 1.27%. The flexible nature of f-MWCNT makes them bend and attached to the HA grains, indicates that f-MWCNT bear significant stress by sharing a portion of the load and it leads to improve their mechanical properties. The maximum Vickers hardness of 3.6GPa is obtained for the HA/f-MWCNT composite sintered at 1100°C, whereas the highest compressive strength of 481.7MPa and fracture toughness of 2.38MPa.m(1/2) achieved after sintering at 1150°C. This study demonstrated that HA/f-MWCNT composite create suitable structures by vacuum pressureless sintering technique to satisfy the mechanical requirements for bone tissues.

  20. Kinetics and thermodynamics of adsorption of methylene blue by a magnetic graphene-carbon nanotube composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Peifang; Cao, Muhan; Wang, Chao; Ao, Yanhui, E-mail: andyao@hhu.edu.cn; Hou, Jun; Qian, Jin

    2014-01-30

    A solvothermal method was employed to prepare a novel magnetic composite adsorbent composed of graphene, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles. The prepared adsorbents were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray fluorescence spectrometry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and the particle size distribution of the samples before and after adsorption was also carried out. The performance of as-prepared composites was investigated by the adsorption of dye methylene blue. Results showed that the maximum adsorption capacity of the samples was up to 65.79 mg g{sup −1}, which was almost equal to the sum of magnetic graphene and magnetic MWCNTs. The effect of pH and temperature on the adsorption performance of methylene blue onto the magnetic adsorbents was investigated. The kinetic was well-described by pseudo-second-order and intraparticle diffusion model, while the isotherm obeyed the Langmuir isotherm. Furthermore, the as-prepared composites were found to be regenerative and reusable. The application in the treatment of an artificial dye wastewater and its cost estimation were also discussed. Therefore, the as-prepared magnetic composites can be severed as a potential adsorbent for removal of dye pollutant, owing to its high adsorption performance, magnetic separability and efficient recyclable property.

  1. Kinetics and thermodynamics of adsorption of methylene blue by a magnetic graphene-carbon nanotube composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peifang; Cao, Muhan; Wang, Chao; Ao, Yanhui; Hou, Jun; Qian, Jin

    2014-01-01

    A solvothermal method was employed to prepare a novel magnetic composite adsorbent composed of graphene, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and Fe3O4 nanoparticles. The prepared adsorbents were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray fluorescence spectrometry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and the particle size distribution of the samples before and after adsorption was also carried out. The performance of as-prepared composites was investigated by the adsorption of dye methylene blue. Results showed that the maximum adsorption capacity of the samples was up to 65.79 mg g-1, which was almost equal to the sum of magnetic graphene and magnetic MWCNTs. The effect of pH and temperature on the adsorption performance of methylene blue onto the magnetic adsorbents was investigated. The kinetic was well-described by pseudo-second-order and intraparticle diffusion model, while the isotherm obeyed the Langmuir isotherm. Furthermore, the as-prepared composites were found to be regenerative and reusable. The application in the treatment of an artificial dye wastewater and its cost estimation were also discussed. Therefore, the as-prepared magnetic composites can be severed as a potential adsorbent for removal of dye pollutant, owing to its high adsorption performance, magnetic separability and efficient recyclable property.

  2. Electrical Conductance Tuning and Bistable Switching in Poly(N-vinylcarbazole)-Carbon Nanotube Composite Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gang; Ling, Qi-Dan; Teo, Eric Yeow Hwee; Zhu, Chun-Xiang; Chan, D Siu-Hung; Neoh, Koon-Gee; Kang, En-Tang

    2009-07-28

    By varying the carbon nanotube (CNT) content in poly(N-vinylcarbazole) (PVK) composite thin films, the electrical conductance behavior of an indium-tin oxide/PVK-CNT/aluminum (ITO/PVK-CNT/Al) sandwich structure can be tuned in a controlled manner. Distinctly different electrical conductance behaviors, such as (i) insulator behavior, (ii) bistable electrical conductance switching effects (write-once read-many-times (WORM) memory effect and rewritable memory effect), and (iii) conductor behavior, are discernible from the current density-voltage characteristics of the composite films. The turn-on voltage of the two bistable conductance switching devices decreases and the ON/OFF state current ratio of the WORM device increases with the increase in CNT content of the composite film. Both the WORM and rewritable devices are stable under a constant voltage stress or a continuous pulse voltage stress, with an ON/OFF state current ratio in excess of 10(3). The conductance switching effects of the composite films have been attributed to electron trapping in the CNTs of the electron-donating/hole-transporting PVK matrix.

  3. Scalable fabrication of multifunctional freestanding carbon nanotube/polymer composite thin films for energy conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaokai; Gittleson, Forrest; Carmo, Marcelo; Sekol, Ryan C; Taylor, André D

    2012-02-28

    Translating the unique properties of individual single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) to the macroscale while simultaneously incorporating additional functionalities into composites has been stymied by inadequate assembly methods. Here we describe a technique for developing multifunctional SWNT/polymer composite thin films that provides a fundamental engineering basis to bridge the gap between their nano- and macroscale properties. Selected polymers are infiltrated into a Mayer rod coated conductive SWNT network to fabricate solar cell transparent conductive electrodes (TCEs), fuel cell membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs), and lithium ion battery electrodes. Our TCEs have an outstanding optoelectronic figure of merit σ(dc)/σ(ac) of 19.4 and roughness of 3.8 nm yet are also mechanically robust enough to withstand delamination, a step toward scratch resistance necessary for flexible electronics. Our MEAs show platinum utilization as high as 1550 mW/mg(Pt), demonstrating our technique's ability to integrate ionic conductivity of the polymer with electrical conductivity of the SWNTs at the Pt surface. Our battery anodes, which show reversible capacity of ∼850 mAh/g after 15 cycles, demonstrate the integration of electrode and separator to simplify device architecture and decrease overall weight. Each of these applications demonstrates our technique's ability to maintain the conductivity of SWNT networks and their dispersion within a polymer matrix while concurrently optimizing key complementary properties of the composite. Here, we lay the foundation for the assembly of nanotubes and nanostructured components (rods, wires, particles, etc.) into macroscopic multifunctional materials using a low-cost and scalable solution-based processing technique.

  4. Influence of Ultrasonic Treatment on Electromagnetic Characteristicsof Composites Based on Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes at Wide Range of Frequencies (100 Hz – 258 GHz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kachusova

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, we investigated microwave properties of polymer composites based on multiwall carbon nanotubes. The multiwall carbon nanotubes used in the composite were about 9.4 nm and 18.4 nm in diameter. The results show that the ultrasonic treatment modifies the dielectric properties of the composite. The dependence of the real and imaginary parts of the permittivity of sonication time is non linear. The results showed that composite material based on nanotubes with a diameter of 9.4 nm has a dispersive region of dielectric permittivity at the range about 10 GHz.

  5. Exposure to nanoscale particles and fibers during machining of hybrid advanced composites containing carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello, Dhimiter; Wardle, Brian L.; Yamamoto, Namiko; Guzman deVilloria, Roberto; Garcia, Enrique J.; Hart, Anastasios J.; Ahn, Kwangseog; Ellenbecker, Michael J.; Hallock, Marilyn

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated airborne exposures to nanoscale particles and fibers generated during dry and wet abrasive machining of two three-phase advanced composite systems containing carbon nanotubes (CNTs), micron-diameter continuous fibers (carbon or alumina), and thermoset polymer matrices. Exposures were evaluated with a suite of complementary instruments, including real-time particle number concentration and size distribution (0.005-20 μm), electron microscopy, and integrated sampling for fibers and respirable particulate at the source and breathing zone of the operator. Wet cutting, the usual procedure for such composites, did not produce exposures significantly different than background whereas dry cutting, without any emissions controls, provided a worst-case exposure and this article focuses here. Overall particle release levels, peaks in the size distribution of the particles, and surface area of released particles (including size distribution) were not significantly different for composites with and without CNTs. The majority of released particle surface area originated from the respirable (1-10 μm) fraction, whereas the nano fraction contributed 10% of the surface area. CNTs, either individual or in bundles, were not observed in extensive electron microscopy of collected samples. The mean number concentration of peaks for dry cutting was composite dependent and varied over an order of magnitude with highest values for thicker laminates at the source being >1 × 106 particles cm-3. Concentration of respirable fibers for dry cutting at the source ranged from 2 to 4 fibers cm-3 depending on the composite type. Further investigation is required and underway to determine the effects of various exposure determinants, such as specimen and tool geometry, on particle release and effectiveness of controls.

  6. Organic modification of carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The organic modification of carbon nanotubes is a novel research field being developed recently. In this article, the history and newest progress of organic modification of carbon nanotubes are reviewed from two aspects:organic covalent modification and organic noncovalent modification of carbon nanotubes. The preparation and properties of organic modified carbon nanotubes are discussed in detail. In addition, the prospective development of organic modification of carbon nanotubes is suggested.

  7. Computational modeling of elastic properties of carbon nanotube/polymer composites with interphase regions. Part II: Mechanical modeling

    KAUST Repository

    Han, Fei

    2014-01-01

    We present two modeling approaches for predicting the macroscopic elastic properties of carbon nanotubes/polymer composites with thick interphase regions at the nanotube/matrix frontier. The first model is based on local continuum mechanics; the second one is based on hybrid local/non-local continuum mechanics. The key computational issues, including the peculiar homogenization technique and treatment of periodical boundary conditions in the non-local continuum model, are clarified. Both models are implemented through a three-dimensional geometric representation of the carbon nanotubes network, which has been detailed in Part I. Numerical results are shown and compared for both models in order to test convergence and sensitivity toward input parameters. It is found that both approaches provide similar results in terms of homogenized quantities but locally can lead to very different microscopic fields. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Evaluating the thermal damage resistance of graphene/carbon nanotube hybrid composite coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, L.; Feldman, A.; Mansfield, E.; Lehman, J.; Singh, G.

    2014-03-01

    We study laser irradiation behavior of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) and chemically modified graphene (rGO)-composite spray coatings for use as a thermal absorber material for high-power laser calorimeters. Spray coatings on aluminum test coupon were exposed to increasing laser irradiance for extended exposure times to quantify their damage threshold and optical absorbance. The coatings, prepared at varying mass % of MWCNTs in rGO, demonstrated significantly higher damage threshold values at 2.5 kW laser power at 10.6 μm wavelength than carbon paint or MWCNTs alone. Electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy of irradiated specimens show that the coating prepared at 50% CNT loading endure at least 2 kW.cm-2 for 10 seconds without significant damage. The improved damage resistance is attributed to the unique structure of the composite in which the MWCNTs act as an efficient absorber of laser light while the much larger rGO sheets surrounding them, dissipate the heat over a wider area.

  9. Self-Consistent Physical Properties of Carbon Nanotubes in Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pipes, R. B.; Frankland, S. J. V.; Hubert, P.; Saether, E.

    2002-12-01

    A set of relationships is developed for selected physical properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCN) and their hexagonal arrays as a function of nanotube size in terms of the chiral vector integer pair, (n,m). Properties include density, principal Young's modulus, and specific Young's modulus. Relationships between weight fraction and volume fraction of SWCN and their arrays are developed for polymeric mixtures.

  10. Flame Retardancy Effects of Graphene Nanoplatelet/Carbon Nanotube Hybrid Membranes on Carbon Fiber Reinforced Epoxy Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongxian Zhuo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotube/graphene nanoplatelet (MWCNT/GNP hybrid membranes with lower liquid permeability and better barrier effect compared to MWCNT membranes were successfully synthesized by vacuum filtering. Their morphologies, water permeability, and pore structures were characterized by a scanning electron microscope (SEM and nitrogen adsorption isotherms. Furthermore, MWCNT/GNP membranes were used to improve the flame retardancy of carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP composites, and the influence of weight percentage of GNPs on the permeability and flame retardancy of MWCNT/GNP membranes was systematically investigated. Results show that incorporation of MWCNT/GNP membranes on CFRP composite plates can remarkably improve the flame retardancy of CFRP composites. Specifically, the incorporation of hierarchical MWCNT/GNP membrane with 7.5 wt% of GNP displays a 35% reduction in the peak heat release rate (PHRR for a CFRP composite plate with the epoxy as matrix and a 11% reduction in PHRR compared with the incorporation of MWCNT membrane only. A synergistic flame retarding mechanism is suggested to be attributed to these results, which includes controlling the pore size and penetrative network structure.

  11. Synergistic toughening of composite fibres by self-alignment of reduced graphene oxide and carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Min Kyoon; Lee, Bommy; Kim, Shi Hyeong; Lee, Jae Ah; Spinks, Geoffrey M.; Gambhir, Sanjeev; Wallace, Gordon G.; Kozlov, Mikhail E.; Baughman, Ray H.; Kim, Seon Jeong

    2012-01-01

    The extraordinary properties of graphene and carbon nanotubes motivate the development of methods for their use in producing continuous, strong, tough fibres. Previous work has shown that the toughness of the carbon nanotube-reinforced polymer fibres exceeds that of previously known materials. Here we show that further increased toughness results from combining carbon nanotubes and reduced graphene oxide flakes in solution-spun polymer fibres. The gravimetric toughness approaches 1,000 J g-1, far exceeding spider dragline silk (165 J g-1) and Kevlar (78 J g-1). This toughness enhancement is consistent with the observed formation of an interconnected network of partially aligned reduced graphene oxide flakes and carbon nanotubes during solution spinning, which act to deflect cracks and allow energy-consuming polymer deformation. Toughness is sensitive to the volume ratio of the reduced graphene oxide flakes to the carbon nanotubes in the spinning solution and the degree of graphene oxidation. The hybrid fibres were sewable and weavable, and could be shaped into high-modulus helical springs.

  12. Polymer-derived ceramic composite fibers with aligned pristine multiwalled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Sourangsu; Zou, Jianhua; Liu, Jianhua; Xu, Chengying; An, Linan; Zhai, Lei

    2010-04-01

    Polymer-derived ceramic fibers with aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are fabricated through the electrospinning of polyaluminasilazane solutions with well-dispersed MWCNTs followed by pyrolysis. Poly(3-hexylthiophene)-b-poly (poly (ethylene glycol) methyl ether acrylate) (P3HT-b-PPEGA), a conjugated block copolymer compatible with polyaluminasilazane, is used to functionalize MWCNT surfaces with PPEGA, providing a noninvasive approach to disperse carbon nanotubes in polyaluminasilazane chloroform solutions. The electrospinning of the MWCNT/polyaluminasilazane solutions generates polymer fibers with aligned MWCNTs where MWCNTs are oriented along the electrospun jet by a sink flow. The subsequent pyrolysis of the obtained composite fibers produces ceramic fibers with aligned MWCNTs. The study of the effect of polymer and CNT concentration on the fiber structures shows that the fiber size increases with the increment of polymer concentration, whereas higher CNT content in the polymer solutions leads to thinner fibers attributable to the increased conductivity. Both the SEM and TEM characterization of the polymer and ceramic fibers demonstrates the uniform orientation of CNTs along the fibers, suggesting excellent dispersion of CNTs and efficient CNT alignment via the electrospinning. The electrical conductivity of a ceramic fibers with 1.2% aligned MWCNTs is measured to be 1.58 x 10(-6) S/cm, which is more than 500 times higher than that of bulk ceramic (3.43 x 10(-9) S/cm). Such an approach provides a versatile method to disperse CNTs in preceramic polymer solutions and offers a new approach to integrate aligned CNTs in ceramics.

  13. A comparative investigation on strain induced crystallization for graphene and carbon nanotubes filled natural rubber composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. H. Fu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Natural rubber containing graphene and carbon nanotubes (CNTs composites were prepared by ultrasonicallyassisted latex mixing. Natural rubber filled by both graphene and CNTs show significant enhanced tensile strength, while graphene exhibits a better reinforcing effect than CNTs. Strain-induced crystallization in natural rubber composites during stretching was determined by synchrotron wide-angle X-ray diffraction. With the addition of CNTs or graphene, the crystallization for natural rubber occurs at a lower strain compared to unfilled natural rubber, and the strain amplification effects were observed. The incorporation of graphene results in a faster strain-induced crystallization rate and a higher crystallinity compared to CNTs. The entanglement-bound rubber tube model was used to analyze the chain network structure and determine the network parameters of composites. The results show that the addition of graphene or CNTs has an influence on the molecular network structure and improves the contribution of entanglement to the conformational constraint, while graphene has a more marked effect than CNTs.

  14. Ballistic impact behavior of carbon nanotube and nanosilica dispersed resin and composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, K. S.; Akella, K.; Joshi, M.; Naik, N. K.

    2012-12-01

    Experimental studies are presented on the ballistic impact behavior of nanoparticle dispersed materials viz. symmetric balanced cross-ply laminates made using unidirectional E-glass fabric with epoxy resin and neat epoxy resin. The nanoparticles used are nanosilica and multi-walled carbon nanotube for polymer matrix composites and nanosilica for epoxy resin. For comparison, studies are carried out on symmetric balanced cross-ply E-glass/epoxy and neat epoxy resin without nanoparticles. Effect of nanoparticle dispersion on ballistic limit velocity, V50 and energy absorbed has been studied. It is observed that V50 can be enhanced up to 6.3% for polymer matrix composites and up to 7.3% for neat resin on addition of nanoparticles. Also, energy absorbed can be increased up to 13.0% for polymer matrix composites and up to 15.2% for neat resin on addition of nanoparticles. Damage and energy absorbing mechanisms for different types of materials studied is also presented. Further, it is observed that the damage size on the target around the point of impact decreases on addition of nanoparticles. Quantitative data are given for high velocity impact behavior of the five types of specimens studied.

  15. Real time sensing of structural glass fiber reinforced composites by using embedded PVA - carbon nanotube fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marioli-Riga Z.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Polyvinyl alcohol - carbon nanotube (PVA-CNT fibers had been embedded to glass fiber reinforced polymers (GFRP for the structural health monitoring of the composite material. The addition of the conductive PVA-CNT fiber to the nonconductive GFRP material aimed to enhance its sensing ability by means of the electrical resistance measurement method. The test specimen’s response to mechanical load and the in situ PVA-CNT fiber’s electrical resistance measurements were correlated for sensing and damage monitoring purposes. The embedded PVA-CNT fiber worked as a sensor in GFRP coupons in tensile loadings. Sensing ability of the PVA-CNT fibers was also demonstrated on an integral composite structure. PVA-CNT fiber near the fracture area of the structure recorded very high values when essential damage occurred to the structure. A finite element model of the same structure was developed to predict axial strains at locations of the integral composite structure where the fibers were embedded. The predicted FEA strains were correlated with the experimental measurements from the PVA-CNT fibers. Calculated and experimental values were in good agreement, thus enabling PVA-CNT fibers to be used as strain sensors.

  16. Kinetics of phase transformation of carbon nanotubes containing Se85Te10Ag5 glassy composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, A. N.; Singh, Kedar

    2016-12-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) containing glassy composites [(Se85Te10Ag5)100-X(CNT)X] (X = 0, 3 and 5) have been prepared by the melt-quenching technique. The differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) technique was used to study changes in the kinetics of phase transformations of [(Se85Te10Ag5)100-X(CNT)X] (X = 0, 3 and 5) after the incorporation of CNTs under non-isothermal conditions at different heating rates (5, 10, 15 and 20 K min-1). The calculated values of the activation energy of crystallization (E c) and the Avrami index (n) decrease whereas the activation energy of the glass transition (E g) increases for CNTs containing glass composites; such effects are explained on the basis of effective CNTs mediating through a cross-link with the pure-Se85Te10Ag5 glassy matrix. The superiority of the CNT-Se85Te10Ag5 glassy composite over the pure glassy alloy have also been briefly mentioned in regard to electrical, thermal and mechanical properties at room temperature.

  17. New insights into subsurface imaging of carbon nanotubes in polymer composites via scanning electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Minhua; Ming, Bin; Kim, Jae-Woo; Gibbons, Luke J.; Gu, Xiaohong; Nguyen, Tinh; Park, Cheol; Lillehei, Peter T.; Villarrubia, J. S.; Vladár, András E.; Liddle, J. Alexander

    2015-02-01

    Despite many studies of subsurface imaging of carbon nanotube (CNT)-polymer composites via scanning electron microscopy (SEM), significant controversy exists concerning the imaging depth and contrast mechanisms. We studied CNT-polyimide composites and, by three-dimensional reconstructions of captured stereo-pair images, determined that the maximum SEM imaging depth was typically hundreds of nanometers. The contrast mechanisms were investigated over a broad range of beam accelerating voltages from 0.3 to 30 kV, and ascribed to modulation by embedded CNTs of the effective secondary electron (SE) emission yield at the polymer surface. This modulation of the SE yield is due to non-uniform surface potential distribution resulting from current flows due to leakage and electron beam induced current. The importance of an external electric field on SEM subsurface imaging was also demonstrated. The insights gained from this study can be generally applied to SEM nondestructive subsurface imaging of conducting nanostructures embedded in dielectric matrices such as graphene-polymer composites, silicon-based single electron transistors, high resolution SEM overlay metrology or e-beam lithography, and have significant implications in nanotechnology.

  18. Quantitative Conductive Atomic Force Microscopy on Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube-Based Polymer Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bârsan, Oana A; Hoffmann, Günter G; van der Ven, Leendert G J; de With, Gijsbertus

    2016-08-03

    Conductive atomic force microscopy (C-AFM) is a valuable technique for correlating the electrical properties of a material with its topographic features and for identifying and characterizing conductive pathways in polymer composites. However, aspects such as compatibility between tip material and sample, contact force and area between the tip and the sample, tip degradation and environmental conditions render quantifying the results quite challenging. This study aims at finding the suitable conditions for C-AFM to generate reliable, reproducible, and quantitative current maps that can be used to calculate the resistance in each point of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) network, nonimpregnated as well as impregnated with a polymer. The results obtained emphasize the technique's limitation at the macroscale as the resistance of these highly conductive samples cannot be distinguished from the tip-sample contact resistance. Quantitative C-AFM measurements on thin composite sections of 150-350 nm enable the separation of sample and tip-sample contact resistance, but also indicate that these sections are not representative for the overall SWCNT network. Nevertheless, the technique was successfully used to characterize the local electrical properties of the composite material, such as sample homogeneity and resistance range of individual SWCNT clusters, at the nano- and microscale.

  19. Mapping local microstructure and mechanical performance around carbon nanotube grafted silica fibres: Methodologies for hierarchical composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Hui; Kalinka, Gerhard; Chan, K. L. Andrew; Kazarian, Sergei G.; Greenhalgh, Emile S.; Bismarck, Alexander; Shaffer, Milo S. P.

    2011-11-01

    The introduction of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) modifies bulk polymer properties, depending on intrinsic quality, dispersion, alignment, interfacial chemistry and mechanical properties of the nanofiller. These effects can be exploited to enhance the matrices of conventional microscale fibre-reinforced polymer composites, by using primary reinforcing fibres grafted with CNTs. This paper presents a methodology that combines atomic force microscopy, polarised Raman spectroscopy, and nanoindentation techniques, to study the distribution, alignment and orientation of CNTs in the vicinity of epoxy-embedded micrometre-scale silica fibres, as well as, the resulting local mechanical properties of the matrix. Raman maps of key features in the CNT spectra clearly show the CNT distribution and orientation, including a `parted' morphology associated with long grafted CNTs. The hardness and indentation modulus of the epoxy matrix were improved locally by 28% and 24%, respectively, due to the reinforcing effects of CNTs. Moreover, a slower stress relaxation was observed in the epoxy region containing CNTs, which may be due to restricted molecular mobility of the matrix. The proposed methodology is likely to be relevant to further studies of nanocomposites and hierarchical composites.The introduction of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) modifies bulk polymer properties, depending on intrinsic quality, dispersion, alignment, interfacial chemistry and mechanical properties of the nanofiller. These effects can be exploited to enhance the matrices of conventional microscale fibre-reinforced polymer composites, by using primary reinforcing fibres grafted with CNTs. This paper presents a methodology that combines atomic force microscopy, polarised Raman spectroscopy, and nanoindentation techniques, to study the distribution, alignment and orientation of CNTs in the vicinity of epoxy-embedded micrometre-scale silica fibres, as well as, the resulting local mechanical properties of the matrix. Raman

  20. New practical method of homogeneous dispersion of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) into Mg matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Teng; Du, Shuangming; Sun, Wanchang; Zhang, Jumei; Niu, Libin; Hua, Xiaohu

    2017-03-01

    It is difficult to disperse multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) into Mg matrix composites homogeneously due to the high specific surface energy between MWCNTs. This would affect the mechanical properties of magnesium matrix composites reinforced by MWCNTs tremendously. The key is to overcome MWCNTs aggregate together, and gain the homogeneous dispersion of MWCNTs. Moreover, the density difference of Mg matrix and MWCNTs is another problem which prevents MWCNTs from dispersing homogeneously into Mg matrix composites. In order to solve these problems, a new practical method of homogeneous dispersion of carbon nanotubes into Mg matrix composites was presented basing on combination the tow step ball milling and ultrasonication dispersion methods. First, a certain amount of MWCNTs was ball-milled in ethanol solution contain 5 wt.% sodium stearate at various rotation speeds (100 rpm-300 rpm) and ball-milled times (0.5 H-2 H) to break MWCNTs hard aggregation. Second, MWCNTs which were subjected to the ball-milling were dispersed further in ethanol solution containing (SDS, DBS) using ultrasonication method. Third, the Mg powers were mixed with good dispersion of carbon nanotubes solution and ball-milled for 1 H to make MWCNTs coated uniformly on the surface of the magnesium substrate. The results were mainly examined by field emission scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It was found that MWCNTs were dispersed well and some of these MWCNTs had directional arrangement. Furthermore, MWCNTs were homogeneously dispersed into Mg matrix composites. These results suggest that this method has good application for magnesium matrix composites reinforced by carbon nanotubes.

  1. Nano-Reinforcement of Interfaces in Prepreg-Based Composites Using a Carbon Nanotubes Spraying Method

    KAUST Repository

    Almuhammadi, Khaled

    2012-11-01

    Multi-scale reinforcement of composite materials is a topic a great interest owing to the several advantages provided, e.g. increased stiffness, improved aging resistance, and fracture toughness. It is well known, that the fracture toughness of epoxy resins used as matrix materials for CFRP composites can be increased by the addition of nano-sized fillers such as Carbon nanotubes (CNTs). CNTs are particularly well suited for this purpose because of their nano-scale diameter and high aspect ratio which allow enhancing the contact area and adhesion to the epoxy matrix. On the other hand, CNTs can also be used to improve the interlaminar strength of composite, which is the resistance offered to delamination. Several fabrication techniques have been devised to this purpose, such as powder dispersion [51-53], spraying [54], roll coating [2] and electrospinning [55, 56]. The aim of this work is to extend the knowledge in this field. In particular, MWCNTs were dispersed throughout the interface of a carbon fiber composite laminate ([0o]16) through spraying and the resulting fracture toughness was investigated in detail. To this purpose, Double Cantilever Beam (DCB) specimens were fabricated by placing 0.5 wt.% CNTs at the interface of mid-plane plies and the fracture toughness was determined using the ASTM standard procedures. For comparison, baseline samples were prepared using neat prepregs. In order to corroborate the variation of fracture toughness to the modifications of interfacial damage mechanisms, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) of the failed surfaces was also undertaken. The results of this work have shown that functionalized MWCNTs can enhance the interlaminar fracture toughness; indeed, compared to the neat case, an average increase around 17% was observed. The SEM analysis revealed that the improved fracture toughness was related to the ability of the Nano-reinforcement to spread the damage through crack bridging, i.e. CNTs pull-out and peeling.

  2. Shear Pressed Aligned Carbon Nanotubes and their use as Composite and Adhesive Interlayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, James Joseph, III

    The following studies utilize shearing force to consolidate and re-orient multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) into a shear pressed sheet (SPS) preform. Carbon nanotube (CNT) array growth and shear pressing angle are studied to improve the quality of SPSs. Heat assisted vacuum infusion is used to form a nano-composite from the SPS preform, and mechanical properties are characterized and compared between non-functionalized and functionalized nano-composite tensile specimens. A novel functionalization technique is applied which rinses SPSs with an acidic wet chemical oxidation treatment of H2SO4 and KMnO4 in order to add sidewall carboxyl groups to the CNTs. This is shown to impart hydrophilicity to the SPS and improves composite modulus by 62%, strain-to-failure 42% and failure stress 113%. Composite laminates and joints are vulnerable to shearing forces which cause delamination in the former and failure in the latter. Damage is initiated and propagated at defects and free edges often due to high peel stress, which is much higher than the shear stress and functions as a tensile opening of the joint just as in Mode I delamination failure of laminate composites. In order to resist failure it is necessary to improve the strain-to-failure of the interphase where a crack propagates without sacrificing strength or modulus of the material, thus toughening the material without impacting the rigidity of the composite. Due to the similarity between peel stress/strain and Mode I delamination, the initiation fracture toughness of a double cantilever beam (DCB) test should provide a good indication of peel toughness at a joint free edge. Many studies have explored the possibility of improving Mode I fracture toughness (G IC) of a composite through locally incorporating a tough material into the interlaminar interphase; this material is termed an interleaf. Common interleaf categories are toughened adhesive, disperse particle, disperse fiber, short fiber nonwoven, and continuous

  3. Influence of adding carbon nanotubes and graphite to Ag-MoS_2 composites on the electrical sliding wear properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Silver matrix composite brushes were fabricated by means of powder metallurgy,which included pressing at 300 MPa and then sintering for 1 h in pure H2 protective atmosphere at 700℃ and repressing at 500 MPa.Four kinds composites with different compositions were produced,and the mechanical properties and electrical wear performance were investigated.The results showed that the composite added with carbon nanotubes had a higher hardness and strength,a lower contact voltage drop and an excellent anti-wear prop...

  4. Self-response multi-functional composite material base on carbon nanotube paper using deicing, flame retardancy, thermal insulation, and lightning-strike protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Hetao; Zhang, Zhichun; Liu, Yanju; Leng, Jinsong

    2015-04-01

    Carbon nanotube paper (CNP) based multi-functional composite material is an attractive candidate for deicing, flame retardancy, thermal insulation and lighting strike protection due to the excellent conductivity, light weight and thin dimensions. In this article, multi-functional carbon nanotube paper was fabricated successfully by using commercial carbon nanotube. As a deicing composite material, carbon nanotube was used directly without pretreatment in fabricating carbon nanotube paper. The conductivities of the carbon nanotube paper and deicing composite were 77.8S/cm and 64.9S/ respectively. Electrical heating and deicing performance were test by infrared camera with deicing time less than 220s and 450s to melt a certain amount of ice under different ambient condition. CNT was grafted by zirconium (IV) butoxide solution and dimethyl dichlorosilicane to form co-oligomers on the tube surface while oligomers decompose under a certain temperature to develop an inorganic layer of silicon zirconium oxide. The oxidizing temperature of carbon nanotube increases more than 20°C and the weight loss rate decreases 20% than the untreated carbon nanotube. Lightning protection material required high electro conductivity, due to the utmost high current in a short time. Therefore, silver nanoparticles were deposited on the surface of carbon nanotube with the diameter around 100nm. The conductivity increased sharply from 84s/cm to1756s/cm with the mount of 5.9wt% Ag of the modified carbon nanotube paper because the silver nanoparticles deposited on the surface. In addition, the silver modified also can be used as thermal insulation material decreasing the infrared radiation.

  5. Enhanced dielectric performance of three phase percolative composites based on thermoplastic-ceramic composites and surface modified carbon nanotube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Sun, Haoliang; Zhu, Benpeng; Wang, Ziyu; Wei, Jianhong; Xiong, Rui; Shi, Jing; Liu, Zhengyou; Lei, Qingquan

    2015-01-01

    Three-phase composites were prepared by embedding CaCu3Ti4O12(CCTO) nanoparticles and Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube (MWNT) into polyimide (PI) matrix via in-situ polymerization. The dependences of electric and dielectric properties of the resultant composites on volume fractions of filler and frequency were investigated. The dielectric permittivity of PI/CCTO-surface modified MWNT (MWNT-S) composite reached as high as 252 at 100 Hz at 0.1 vol. % filler (MWNT-S), which is about 63 times higher than that of pure PI. Also the dielectric loss is only 0.02 at 100 Hz. The results are in good agreement with the percolation theory. It is shown that embedding high aspect ratio MWNT-S in PI/CCTO composites is an effective means to enhance the dielectric permittivity and reduce the percolation threshold. The dielectric properties of the composites will meet the practical requirements for the application in high dielectric constant capacitors and high energy density materials.

  6. Preparation and properties of a composite SiC with addition of multi-walled carbon nanotubes synthesized in the plasma jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shavelkina, M. B.; Amirov, R. Kh; Kelina, I. Yu; Golubeva, N. A.

    2016-11-01

    Ceramic composite reinforced with plaits of carbon nanotubes have been fabricated by the reaction bonded silicon carbide method. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are produced using a 35 kW dc plasma torch and C2H2 as carbon precursor. Effective methods of CNTs adding and dispersing in the preform volume have been found. The optimal content and operational technological parameters have been determined for ceramic matrix. Physico-mechanical properties of the reinforcing ceramic matrices with nanomaterials have been investigated.

  7. Engineering carbon nanotubes and nanotube circuits using electrical breakdown.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, P G; Arnold, M S; Avouris, P

    2001-04-27

    Carbon nanotubes display either metallic or semiconducting properties. Both large, multiwalled nanotubes (MWNTs), with many concentric carbon shells, and bundles or "ropes" of aligned single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs), are complex composite conductors that incorporate many weakly coupled nanotubes that each have a different electronic structure. Here we demonstrate a simple and reliable method for selectively removing single carbon shells from MWNTs and SWNT ropes to tailor the properties of these composite nanotubes. We can remove shells of MWNTs stepwise and individually characterize the different shells. By choosing among the shells, we can convert a MWNT into either a metallic or a semiconducting conductor, as well as directly address the issue of multiple-shell transport. With SWNT ropes, similar selectivity allows us to generate entire arrays of nanoscale field-effect transistors based solely on the fraction of semiconducting SWNTs.

  8. Compositing polyetherimide with polyfluorene wrapped carbon nanotubes for enhanced interfacial interaction and conductivity

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Ye

    2014-06-25

    A novel approach to chemically functionalize multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) for making superior polyetherimide (PEI) nanocomposites with polyfluorene polymer is presented. In this approach, MWCNTs are non-covalently functionalized with poly(9,9-dioctyfluorenyl-2,7-diyl) (PFO) through π-π stacking as confirmed by UV-vis, fluorescence, and Raman spectra. Atomic force microscopy as well as scanning and transmission electron microscopy shows the PFO coated MWCNTs, which provides excellent dispersion of the latter in both solvent and PEI matrix. The strong interaction of PFO with PEI chains, as evidenced from fluorescence spectra, supports the good adhesion of dispersed MWCNTs to PEI leading to stronger interfacial interactions. As a result, the addition of as little as 0.25 wt % of modified MWCNTs to PEI matrix can strongly improve the mechanical properties of the composite (increase of 46% in storage modulus). Increasing the amount of MWCNTs to 2.0 wt % (0.5 wt % PFO loading) affords a great increase of 119% in storage modulus. Furthermore, a sharp decrease of 12 orders of magnitude in volume resistivity of PEI composite is obtained with only 0.5 wt % of PFO modified MWCNT. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  9. Mapping local microstructure and mechanical performance around carbon nanotube grafted silica fibres: methodologies for hierarchical composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Hui; Kalinka, Gerhard; Chan, K L Andrew; Kazarian, Sergei G; Greenhalgh, Emile S; Bismarck, Alexander; Shaffer, Milo S P

    2011-11-01

    The introduction of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) modifies bulk polymer properties, depending on intrinsic quality, dispersion, alignment, interfacial chemistry and mechanical properties of the nanofiller. These effects can be exploited to enhance the matrices of conventional microscale fibre-reinforced polymer composites, by using primary reinforcing fibres grafted with CNTs. This paper presents a methodology that combines atomic force microscopy, polarised Raman spectroscopy, and nanoindentation techniques, to study the distribution, alignment and orientation of CNTs in the vicinity of epoxy-embedded micrometre-scale silica fibres, as well as, the resulting local mechanical properties of the matrix. Raman maps of key features in the CNT spectra clearly show the CNT distribution and orientation, including a 'parted' morphology associated with long grafted CNTs. The hardness and indentation modulus of the epoxy matrix were improved locally by 28% and 24%, respectively, due to the reinforcing effects of CNTs. Moreover, a slower stress relaxation was observed in the epoxy region containing CNTs, which may be due to restricted molecular mobility of the matrix. The proposed methodology is likely to be relevant to further studies of nanocomposites and hierarchical composites.

  10. A novel method of fabricating carbon nanotubes-polydimethylsiloxane composite electrodes for electrocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Benyan; Chen, Yingmin; Luo, Zhangyuan; Zhang, Wenzan; Tu, Quan; Jin, Xun

    2015-01-01

    Polymer-based flexible electrodes are receiving much attention in medical applications due to their good wearing comfort. The current fabrication methods of such electrodes are not widely applied. In this study, polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and conductive additives of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were employed to fabricate composite electrodes for electrocardiography (ECG). A three-step dispersion process consisting of ultrasonication, stirring, and in situ polymerization was developed to yield homogenous CNTs-PDMS mixtures. The CNTs-PDMS mixtures were used to fabricate CNTs-PDMS composite electrodes by replica technology. The influence of ultrasonication time and CNT concentration on polymer electrode performance was evaluated by impedance and ECG measurements. The signal amplitude of the electrodes prepared using an ultrasonication time of 12 h and CNT content of 5 wt% was comparable to that of commercial Ag/AgCl electrodes. The polymer electrodes were easily fabricated by conventional manufacturing techniques, indicating a potential advantage of reduced cost for mass production.

  11. Polydiphenylamine/carbon nanotube composites for applications in rechargeable lithium batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baibarac, Mihaela, E-mail: barac@infim.ro [National Institute of Materials Physics, Lab. of Optical Process in Nanostructured Materials, P.O. Box MG-7, R-77125 Bucharest (Romania); Baltog, Ioan [National Institute of Materials Physics, Lab. of Optical Process in Nanostructured Materials, P.O. Box MG-7, R-77125 Bucharest (Romania); Lefrant, Serge [Institut des Materiaux ' Jean Rouxel' , 2 rue de la Houssiniere, B.P. 32229, F-44322 Nantes (France); Gomez-Romero, Pedro [Centre d' Investigacio en Nanociencia i Nanotecnologia, CIN2 (CSIC-ICN), Campus de la UAB, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain)

    2011-02-15

    Polydiphenylamine/single walled carbon nanotube (PDPA/SWNT) composites were synthesized electrochemically aiming at their application as active electrode materials for rechargeable lithium batteries. The electrochemical polymerization of diphenylamine (DPA) on a SWNT film immersed in a 1 M HCl solution was studied by cyclic voltammetry. Comparing cyclic voltammograms recorded on a blank Pt electrode with those obtained for a SWNT film deposited on Pt electrode one observes in the latter case a decrease of the DPA reduction potential. To elucidate electrochemical polymerization mechanism, photoluminescence studies on DPA/SWNT and PDPA/SWNT systems were carried out. Additional information concerning the functionalization process of SWNT with PDPA was obtained by Raman and IR spectroscopy. Using the PDPA/SWNT composite as active material for the positive electrode of a rechargeable lithium cell (LiPF{sub 6} electrolyte), the charge-discharge tests show a specific discharge capacity of ca. 245 mA h g{sup -1}, much higher than the 35 mA h g{sup -1} for pure PDPA.

  12. Temperature-compensated force/pressure sensor based on multi-walled carbon nanotube epoxy composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinh, Nghia Trong; Kanoun, Olfa

    2015-05-12

    In this study, we propose a multi-walled carbon nanotube epoxy composite sensor for force and pressure sensing in the range of 50 N-2 kN. A manufacturing procedure, including material preparation and deposition techniques, is proposed. The electrode dimensions and the layer thickness were optimized by the finite element method. Temperature compensation is realized by four nanocomposites elements, where only two elements are exposed to the measurand. In order to investigate the influence of the filler contents, samples with different compositions were prepared and investigated. Additionally, the specimens are characterized by cyclical and stepped force/pressure loads or at defined temperatures. The results show that the choice of the filler content should meet a compromise between sensitivity, temperature influence and noise behavior. At constant temperature, a force of at least 50N can be resolved. The measurement error due to the temperature influence is 150N in a temperature range of -20°C-50°C.

  13. Piezoresistive properties of cement composites reinforced by functionalized carbon nanotubes using photo-assisted Fenton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jianlin, Luo; Kwok L, Chung; Qiuyi, Li; Shunjian, Chen; Lu, Li; Dongshuai, Hou; Chunwei, Zhang

    2017-03-01

    A combined chemical technique for surface functionalization of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is presented in this paper. The functionalized CNTs (f-CNTs) were employed to reinforce both the mechanical and electromechanical properties of cementitious composites for the purpose of developing intrinsic self-sensing sensors. With moderate functionalization, the f-CNTs were found to easily disperse in an aqueous system while just aiding with low fraction of dispersants: (a) polyethylene oxide (MPEG), (b) Trition X-100 (Tx-100). Both the FTIR and DSC results show that the oxidation effect of this combined technique were not as strong as those when using conventional strong oxidation methods. As a result, the integrity of electronic structure inside the f-CNT reinforced cement matrixes can be effectively maintained. This paper is aimed at exploring the electrical resistivity and piezoresistive properties of the f-CNT reinforced cement composites (f-CNT-RCCs). Both the monoaxial and cyclic compression tests were undertaken on the specimens with different f-CNT doping levels of 0.1%, 0.2% and 0.3%. Experimental results indicated that excellent piezoresistive properties were achieved at the doping level of 0.3%, wherein high strain sensitivity were recorded as 254.9 and 286.6 for the cases of adding small amounts of surfactants, MPEG and combination of MPEG and Tx100, respectively.

  14. Structure and Properties of Self-assembled Narural Rubber/Multi-walled Carbon Nanotube Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Zheng; FENG Chunfang; LUO Yongyue; YI Zhifeng; KONG Lingxue

    2011-01-01

    Natural rubber (NR)/multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNTs) composites were prepared by combining self-assembly and latex compounding techniques.The acid-treated MWCNTs (H2SO4∶HNO3=3∶1,volume ratio) were self-assembled with poly (diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA) through electrostatic adhesion.In the second assembling,NR/MWCNTs composites were developed by mixing MWCNTs/PDDA solution with NR latex.The results show that MWCNTs are homogenously distributed throughout the NR matrix as single tube and present a great interfacial adhesion with NR phase when MWCNTs contents are less than 3 wt%.Moreover,the addition of the MWCNTs brings about the remarkable enhancement in tensile strength and crosslink density compared with the NR host,and the data peak at 2 wt% MWCNTs loadings.When more MWCNTs are loaded,aggregations of MWCNTs are gradually generated,and the tensile strength and crosslink both decrease to a certain extent.

  15. Carbon nanotube solar cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin Klinger

    Full Text Available We present proof-of-concept all-carbon solar cells. They are made of a photoactive side of predominantly semiconducting nanotubes for photoconversion and a counter electrode made of a natural mixture of carbon nanotubes or graphite, connected by a liquid electrolyte through a redox reaction. The cells do not require rare source materials such as In or Pt, nor high-grade semiconductor processing equipment, do not rely on dye for photoconversion and therefore do not bleach, and are easy to fabricate using a spray-paint technique. We observe that cells with a lower concentration of carbon nanotubes on the active semiconducting electrode perform better than cells with a higher concentration of nanotubes. This effect is contrary to the expectation that a larger number of nanotubes would lead to more photoconversion and therefore more power generation. We attribute this to the presence of metallic nanotubes that provide a short for photo-excited electrons, bypassing the load. We demonstrate optimization strategies that improve cell efficiency by orders of magnitude. Once it is possible to make semiconducting-only carbon nanotube films, that may provide the greatest efficiency improvement.

  16. Development of new techniques for functionalizing single-wall carbon nanotubes for composite and biological systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Jared Lee

    Building from established methods of using diazonium salts to derivatize single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), new methodologies for achieving functionalized individual nanotubes that are compatible with a wide variety of materials have been developed. The use of aryl triazenes as diazonium precursors to functionalize surfactant stabilized suspensions of individual SWNTs has resulted in the ability to synthesize more complex molecules bearing a diazonium salt precursor. Prior to this work, such functionality was difficult to install in complex molecules due to the required linearity of diazonium salt synthesis. A protocol to access individualized SWNTs without the use of scale-limiting techniques such as high powered sonication and centrifugation was achieved by the use of oleum as a solvent for underivatized SWNTs. This disentangled suspension of SWNTs was then treated with a modification of an established in-situ diazonium functionalization protocol to yield alcohol and water-soluble, exfoliated, nonroping SWNTs. Functionalized SWNTs were used as polymerization initiators for both anionic and atom transfer radical polymerization. They were used to reinforce poly(dimethylsiloxane) and poly(propylene fumarate) based composites. The functionalized SWNTs were also used as a support for neuronal interface systems and to reinforce the collagen network in rat cervical tissue. Through continued functionalization and PEGylation (poly(ethylene glycol) attachment) of cut SWNTs, the development of a SWNT-based, viable nanovector core has been achieved. Continued functionalization provides one with the ability to further derivatize aqueous suspensions of previously functionalized SWNTs, while the PEGylation of cut SWNTs offers solubility in water, irrigation saline, and phosphate buffered saline. Using the developed SWNT-based nanovector core, molecules that are relevant for attachment to a nanovector were targeted. This includes a fluorescein-5-isothiocyanate (FITC

  17. Inkjet Printing of Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan P. Tortorich

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In an attempt to give a brief introduction to carbon nanotube inkjet printing, this review paper discusses the issues that come along with preparing and printing carbon nanotube ink. Carbon nanotube inkjet printing is relatively new, but it has great potential for broad applications in flexible and printable electronics, transparent electrodes, electronic sensors, and so on due to its low cost and the extraordinary properties of carbon nanotubes. In addition to the formulation of carbon nanotube ink and its printing technologies, recent progress and achievements of carbon nanotube inkjet printing are reviewed in detail with brief discussion on the future outlook of the technology.

  18. HIGHLY DISPERSED MULTI-WALLED CARBON NANOTUBES IN WATER/ETHANOL AND ITS APPLICATION FOR PVA COMPOSITE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Y. Li; X.B. Zhang; X.Y. Tao; J.M. Xu; F. Liu; G.L. Xu

    2005-01-01

    Two carboxylation processes were carried out to modify multi-walled carbon nanotube bundles (m-MWNTs). The results showed that both of the m-MWNTs could be highly dispersed in water with the concentration up to 25 and 15mg/mL in ethanol without obvious deposition or conglomeration over 6 months. FTIR, Raman, TGA and TEM characterizations of the mMWNTs showed that hydroxyl and carboxyl groups have been attached with MWNTs, and that the nanotube structure was only damaged a little after modification treatments in mixed acids over 24h. Above prepared nanotube suspensions in water were successfully used as a filler of thermoplastic PVA composite to enhance its electrical conductivity. The results showed that the addition of m-MWNTs greatly improved the conductivity and the threshold of mass fraction was about 5wt%. The results also proved that purification process was not needed because of high purity of the raw MWNTs prepared in our group.

  19. Nano-engineered Multiwall Carbon Nanotube-copper Composite Thermal Interface Material for Efficient Heat Conduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Quoc; Cruden, Brett A.; Cassell, Alan M.; Sims, Gerard; Li, Jun; Meyyappa, M.; Yang, Cary Y.

    2005-01-01

    Efforts in integrated circuit (IC) packaging technologies have recently been focused on management of increasing heat density associated with high frequency and high density circuit designs. While current flip-chip package designs can accommodate relatively high amounts of heat density, new materials need to be developed to manage thermal effects of next-generation integrated circuits. Multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWNT) have been shown to significantly enhance thermal conduction in the axial direction and thus can be considered to be a candidate for future thermal interface materials by facilitating efficient thermal transport. This work focuses on fabrication and characterization of a robust MWNT-copper composite material as an element in IC package designs. We show that using vertically aligned MWNT arrays reduces interfacial thermal resistance by increasing conduction surface area, and furthermore, the embedded copper acts as a lateral heat spreader to efficiently disperse heat, a necessary function for packaging materials. In addition, we demonstrate reusability of the material, and the absence of residue on the contacting material, both novel features of the MWNT-copper composite that are not found in most state-of-the-art thermal interface materials. Electrochemical methods such as metal deposition and etch are discussed for the creation of the MWNT-Cu composite, detailing issues and observations with using such methods. We show that precise engineering of the composite surface affects the ability of this material to act as an efficient thermal interface material. A thermal contact resistance measurement has been designed to obtain a value of thermal contact resistance for a variety of different thermal contact materials.

  20. Improved critical current density of MgB2--carbon nanotubes composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekhar, Chandra; Giri, Rajiv; Malik, S K; Srivastav, O N

    2007-06-01

    In the present study, we report a systematic study of doping/admixing of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in different concentrations in MgB2. The composite material corresponding to MgB2-x at.% CNTs (35 at.% > or = x > or = 0 at.%) have been prepared by solid-state reaction at ambient pressure. All the samples in the present investigation have been subjected to structural/microstructural characterization employing XRD, Scanning electron microscopic (SEM), and Transmission electron microscopic (TEM) techniques. The magnetization measurements were performed by Physical property measurement system (PPMS) and electrical transport measurements have been done by the four-probe technique. The microstructural investigations reveal the formation of MgB2-carbon nanotube composites. A CNT connecting the MgB2 grains may enhance critical current density due to its size (approximately 5-20 nm diameter) compatible with coherence length of MgB2 (approximately 5-6 nm) and ballistic transport current carrying capability along the tube axis. The transport critical current density (Jct) of MgB2 samples with varying CNTs concentration have been found to vary significantly e.g., Jct of the MgB2 sample with 10 at.% CNT addition is approximately 2.3 x 10(3) A/cm2 and its value for MgB2 sample without CNT addition is approximately 7.2 x 102 A/cm2 at 20 K. In order to study the flux pinning effect of CNTs doping/ admixing in MgB2, the evaluation of intragrain critical current density (JJ) has been carried out through magnetic measurements on the fine powdered version of the as synthesized samples. The optimum result on Jc is obtained for 10 at.% CNTs admixed MgB2 sample at 5 K, the Jc reaches approximately 5.2 x 10(6) A/cm2 in self field, -1.6 x 10(6) A/cm2 at 1 T, approximately 2.9 x 10(5) A/cm2 at 2.6 T, and approximately 3.9 x 10(4) A/cm2 at 4 T. The high value of intragrain Jc in 10 at.% CNTs admixed MgB2 superconductor has been attributed to the incorporation of CNTs into the crystal matrix of

  1. Effect of amino acid-functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes on the properties of dopamine-based poly(amide–imide) composites: An experimental study

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shadpour Mallakpour; Amin Zadehnazari

    2014-08-01

    In a single-step, rapid microwave-assisted process, multi-walled carbon nanotubes were functionalized by -valine amino acid. Formation of amino acid on nanotube surface was confirmed by Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning and transmission electron microscopy techniques. The surface-modified nanotubes showed better chemical stability in common solvents such as ,-dimethylacetamide. The effects of amino acid functionalization of multiwalled carbon nanotubes on the properties of nanotube/poly(amide–imide) nanocomposites were investigated. The functionalized carbon nanotubes (5–15 wt%) were dispersed homogeneously in the poly(amide–imide) matrix, while the structure of the polymer and the nanotubes structure were stable in the preparation process as revealed by microscopic observations. The properties of nanocomposites were characterized extensively using the aforementioned techniques. The composite films have been prepared by casting a solution of precursor polymer containing -valine-functionalized carbon nanotubes into a thin film and its tensile properties were examined. The Young’s modulus (elastic modulus) and tensile strength of the composite films were greatly improved by the incorporation of modified nanotubes.

  2. How carbon nanotubes affect the cure kinetics and glass transition temperature of their epoxy composites? – A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Motivated by the widespread and contradictory results regarding the glass transition temperature of carbon nanotube (CNT/epoxy composites, we reviewed and analyzed the literature results dealing with the effect of unmodified multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWNT on the cure behaviour of an epoxy resin (as a possible source of this discrepancy. The aim of this work was to clarify the effective role of unmodified multiwall carbon nanotubes on the cure kinetics and glass transition temperature (Tg of their epoxy composites. It was found that various authors reported an acceleration effect of CNT. The cure reaction was promoted in its early stage which may be due to the catalyst particles present in the CNT raw material. While SWNT may lead to a decrease of Tg due to their bundling tendency, results reported for MWNT suggested an increased or unchanged Tg of the composites. The present status of the literature does not allow to isolate the effect of MWNT on the Tg due to the lack of a study providing essential information such as CNT purity, glass transition temperature along with the corresponding cure degree.

  3. Isotactic polypropylene/carbon nanotube composites prepared by latex technology: electrical conductivity study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grossiord, N.; Wouters, M.E.L.; Miltner, H.E.; Lu, K.; Loos, J.; Mele, B.V.; Koning, C.E.

    2010-01-01

    Several series of nanocomposites were prepared using a latex-based process, the main step of which consisted of mixing an aqueous suspension of exfoliated carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and a polymer latex. In the present work, a systematic study on the electrical properties of fully amorphous (polystyrene

  4. Plastic membrane, carbon paste and multiwalled carbon nanotube composite coated copper wire sensors for determination of oxeladin citrate using batch and flow injection techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Zayed,Sayed I. M.; Yousry M Issa

    2013-01-01

    The fabrication and performance characteristics of three novel potentiometric sensors for the determination of oxeladin citrate are described. The proposed sensors include a PVC plastic membrane sensor, a carbon paste sensor and a multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) composite coated copper wire sensor. The sensors are based on the oxeladin-phosphotungstate ion associate as electroactive material and dibutyl phthalate as solvent mediator. The developed sensors exhibited near nernstian slopes o...

  5. Shear Flow Induced Alignment of Carbon Nanotubes in Natural Rubber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan He

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A new procedure for the fabrication of natural rubber composite with aligned carbon nanotubes is provided in this study. The two-step approach is based on (i the preparation of mixture latex of natural rubber, multiwalled carbon nanotubes, and other components and (ii the orientation of carbon nanotubes by a flow field. Rubber composite sheets filled with variable volume fraction of aligned carbon nanotubes were fabricated and then confirmed by transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy studies. An obvious increase in thermal conductivity has been obtained after the alignment of carbon nanotubes. The dynamic mechanical analysis was carried out in a tear mode for the composite.

  6. Effects of carbon nanotubes in a chitosan/collagen-based composite on mouse fibroblast cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wen; Yu, Wenwen; Zheng, Jiawei; Wang, Ying; Zhang, Zhiyuan; Zhang, Dongsheng

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the in vitro cytocompatibility of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in a chitosan/collagen-based composite. Mouse fibroblasts were cultured on the surface of a novel material consisting of CNTs in a chitosan/collagen-based composite (chitosan/collagen+CNTs group). Chitosan/collagen composites without CNTs served as the control material (chitosan/collagen group) and cells cultured normally in tissue culture plates served as blank controls (blank control group). Cell adhesion and proliferation were observed, and cell apoptosis was measured. The doubling time (DT1) of cells was significantly shorter in the chitosan/collagen+CNTs group than in the chitosan/collagen group, and that in the chitosan/collagen group was shorter than in the blank control group. The CNTs in the chitosan/collagen-based composites promoted mouse fibroblast adhesion, producing a distinct cytoskeletal structure. At 24 h after culture, the cytoskeleton of the cells in the chitosan/collagen+CNTs group displayed typical fibroblastic morphology, with clear microfilaments. Cells in the chitosan/collagen group were typically round, with an unclear cytoskeleton. The blank control group even had a few unattached cells. At 4 days after incubation, no early apoptosis of cells was detected in the blank control group, whereas early apoptosis of cells was observed in the chitosan/collagen+CNTs and chitosan/collagen groups. No significant difference in the proportion of living cells was detected among the three groups. After entering the plateau stage, the average cell number in the chitosan/collagen+CNTs group was similar to that in the chitosan/collagen group and significantly smaller than that in the blank control group. Early apoptosis of cells in the blank control group was not detectable. There were significant differences in early apoptosis among the three groups. These results suggest that CNTs in a chitosan/collagen-based composite did not cause significant cytotoxic effects on mouse

  7. Effect of Continuous Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes on Thermal and Mechanical Properties of Flexible Composite Film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Eun Cha

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the effect of continuous multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs on the thermal and mechanical properties of composites, we propose a fabrication method for a buckypaper-filled flexible composite film prepared by a two-step process involving buckypaper fabrication using vacuum filtration of MWCNTs, and composite film fabrication using the dipping method. The thermal conductivity and tensile strength of the composite film filled with the buckypaper exhibited improved results, respectively 76% and 275% greater than those of the individual MWCNT-filled composite film. It was confirmed that forming continuous MWCNT fillers is an important factor which determines the physical characteristics of the composite film. In light of the study findings, composite films using buckypaper as a filler and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS as a flexible matrix have sufficient potential to be applied as a heat-dissipating material, and as a flexible film with high thermal conductivity and excellent mechanical properties.

  8. Co-TPP functionalized carbon nanotube composites for detection of nitrobenzene and chlorobenzene vapours

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Swasti Saxena; G S S SAINI; A L Verma

    2015-04-01

    We report preparation of nanocomposites by non-covalent functionalization of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with metal-tetraphenylporphyrins (M-TPP). Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results suggest formation of nanosized clusters of Co-TPP around the CNTs surface. X-ray diffraction studies indicate electronic charge re-distribution and strong interactions among CNTs and Co-TPP on functionalization. The films of the hybrid CNT–M-TPP nanocomposite exhibit change in conductivity on exposure to some chemical vapours. In the present work, the films prepared from the cobalt-TPP functionalized CNTs hybrid composites have been investigated for the detection of chlorobenzene (CB) and nitrobenzene (NB) vapours at room temperature. The films show response time of few seconds on exposure to both the NB and CB vapours while the recovery time for NB is significantly different compared to CB. A distinct and highly reproducible response pattern in the relative changes in resistance, recovery and response times on exposure to the vapours of NB, CB and few other chemicals at room temperature has been exploited to differentiate CB and NB vapours from one another.

  9. Morphology of PEDOT:PSS/SWCNT Composites: Insight into Carbon Nanotube Based Organic Thermoelectric Matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etampawala, Thusitha; Tehrani, Mehran; Dadmun, Mark

    2015-03-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) loaded poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) nanocomposites are promising materials as the active layer in organic thermoelectric devices. Improvements in the thermoelectric performance of these nanocomposites have been hampered by the lack of an understanding of the correlation between thermo-electrical performance and morphology. In this study, the morphology of highly conducting single walled CNT/PEDOT:PSS nanocomposites were probed by small and ultra-small angle neutron scattering (SANS and USANS respectively) as a function of CNT loading (10wt%, 30wt% and 50wt%,), sonication duration to control the CNT dispersion, and presence and absence of ethylene glycol (EG) in the deposition solution of PEDOT:PSS. The morphology of these composites is currently being correlated to their thermo-electric performance. The SANS and USANS profiles were analyzed with the hierarchical Beaucage model. Further, the USANS data were fit to a two ellipsoidal form factor, which is consistent with the analysis of the USANS data by the Beaucage model and SEM results. These results reveal that the sonication duration and presence of EG effectively de-bundle the CNTs and disperse them in the PEDOT:PSS matrix.

  10. Unusual thermal conduction characteristics of phase change composites with single-walled carbon nanotube inclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harish, Sivasankaran; Ishikawa, Kei; Chiashi, Shohei; Shiomi, Junichiro; Maruyama, Shigeo

    2013-03-01

    Thermal energy storage using phase transition materials is often employed in many engineering applications. However, the low thermal conductivity of such materials inhibits its use for large scale applications. Recently, Zheng et al. [Nature Comm. 2011] demonstrated an efficient technique using graphite suspensions to tune the thermal and electrical conductivity using temperature regulation. In this work, we report large contrasts in thermal conductivity enhancement of nano composites with single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) inclusions using first order phase transition process. SWCNTs synthesized by alcohol CVD were dispersed in n-octadecane by tip-sonication with sodium deoxycholate as the surfactant. Thermal conductivity measurements were carried out with transient hot-wire system [Mater. Express 2012]. Thermal conductivity enhancement in the liquid state was found to be nominal and is consistent with the predictions of Maxwell- Garnett type effective medium theory. However, in the frozen state nearly a 2.5 fold increase in thermal conductivity was observed. Similar temperature dependent thermal conductivity contrast was observed when exfoliated graphite nanoplatelets were used as the inclusions. Financial support from Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (22226006 and 19054003), Monbukagakusho Scholarship, Global Center of Excellence for Mechanical Systems Innovation

  11. Potentiometric urea biosensor based on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs)/silica composite material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahuja, Tarushee [National Physical Laboratory (Council of Scientific and Industrial Research), Dr. K.S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi-110012 (India); Department of Applied Chemistry, Delhi College of Engineering, University of Delhi, Bawana Road, Delhi-110042 (India); Kumar, D. [Department of Applied Chemistry, Delhi College of Engineering, University of Delhi, Bawana Road, Delhi-110042 (India); Singh, Nahar; Biradar, A.M. [National Physical Laboratory (Council of Scientific and Industrial Research), Dr. K.S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi-110012 (India); Rajesh, E-mail: rajesh_csir@yahoo.com [National Physical Laboratory (Council of Scientific and Industrial Research), Dr. K.S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi-110012 (India)

    2011-03-12

    A novel potentiometric urea biosensor has been fabricated with urease (Urs) immobilized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) embedded in silica matrix deposited on the surface of indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glass plate. The enzyme Urs was covalently linked with the exposed free -COOH groups of functionalized MWCNTs (F-MWCNTs), which are subsequently incorporated within the silica matrix by sol-gel method. The Urs/MWCNTs/SiO{sub 2}/ITO composite modified electrode was characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and UV-visible spectroscopy. The morphologies and electrochemical performance of the modified Urs/MWCNTs/SiO{sub 2}/ITO electrode have been investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and potentiometric method, respectively. The synergistic effect of silica matrix, F-MWCNTs and biocompatibility of Urs/MWCNTs/SiO{sub 2} made the biosensor to have the excellent electro catalytic activity and high stability. The resulting biosensor exhibits a good response performance to urea detection with a wide linear range from 2.18 x 10{sup -5} to 1.07 x 10{sup -3} M urea. The biosensor shows a short response time of 10-25 s and a high sensitivity of 23 mV/decade/cm{sup 2}.

  12. Synergistic interactions between silver decorated graphene and carbon nanotubes yield flexible composites to attenuate electromagnetic radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patangrao Pawar, Shital; Kumar, Sachin; Jain, Shubham; Gandi, Mounika; Chatterjee, Kaushik; Bose, Suryasarathi

    2017-01-01

    The need of today’s highly integrated electronic devices, especially working in the GHz frequencies, is to protect them from unwanted interference from neighbouring devices. Hence, lightweight, flexible, easy to process microwave absorbers were designed here by dispersing conductive multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) and silver nanoparticles decorated onto two-dimensional graphene sheets (rGO@Ag) in poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL). In this study, we have shown how dielectric losses can be tuned in the nanocomposites by rGO@Ag nano-hybrid; an essential criterion for energy dissipation within a material resulting in effective shielding of the incoming electromagnetic (EM) radiation. Herein, the conducting pathway for nomadic charge transfer in the PCL matrix was established by MWNTs and the attenuation was tuned by multiple scattering due to the large specific surface area of rGO@Ag. The latter was possible because of the fine dispersion state of the Ag nanoparticles which otherwise often agglomerate if mixed separately. The effect of individual nanoparticles on microwave attenuation was systematically assessed here. It was observed that this strategy resulted in strikingly enhanced microwave attenuation in PCL nanocomposites in contrast to addition of individual particles. For instance, PCL nanocomposites containing both MWNTs and rGO@Ag manifested in a SET of -37 dB and, interestingly, at arelatively smaller fraction. The SE shown by this particular composite makes it a potential candidate for many commercial applications as reflected by its exceptional absorption capability (91.3%).

  13. Inkjet printing of multi-walled carbon nanotube/polymer composite thin film for interconnection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lok, Boon Keng; Ng, You Min; Liang, Yen Nan; Hu, Xiao

    2010-07-01

    In this paper, multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) ink was selectively patterned by inkjet printing on substrates to form conductive traces and electrodes for interconnection application. MWCNT was firstly functionalized using concentrated acid and dispersed in deionized water to form a colloidal solution. Various concentrations of MWCNT were formulated to test the stability of the solution. The printability of the MWCNT ink was examined against printing temperature, ink concentration and ink droplet pitch. Rheological properties of the ink were determined by rheometer and sessile drop method. The electrical conductivity of the MWCNT pattern was measured against multiple printing of MWCNT on the same pattern (up to 10 layers). While single layer printing pattern exhibited highest resistance, the CNT entangled together and formed a random network with more printed layers has higher conductivity. The electrical properties of the printed film was compared to a composite ink of CNT and conducting polymer (CNT ink was mixed with conductive polymer solution, Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-Poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS)). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to observe the surface structure and atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to study the morphology of the printed film under different conditions.

  14. Carbon nanotube composite coated platinum electrode for detection of Ga(III).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbaspour, A; Khoshfetrat, Seyyed Mehdi; Sharghi, H; Khalifeh, R

    2011-01-15

    This study demonstrates the application of composite multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) polyvinylchloride (MWNT-PVC) based on 7-(2-hydroxy-5-methoxybenzyl)-5,6,7,8,9,10-hexahydro-2H benzo [b][1,4,7,10,13] dioxa triaza cyclopentadecine-3,11(4H,12H)-dione ionophore for gallium sensor. The sensor shows a good Nernstian slope of 19.68 ± 0.40 mV/decade in a wide linear range concentration of 7.9 × 10(-7) to 3.2 × 10(-2)M of Ga(NO(3))(3). The detection limit of this electrode is 5.2 × 10(-7)M of Ga(NO(3))(3). This proposed sensor is applicable in a pH range of 2.7-5.0. It has a short response time of about 10s and has a good selectivity over nineteen various metal ions. The practical analytical utility of this electrode is demonstrated by measurement of Ga(III) in river water.

  15. Melt-mixed thermoplastic composites containing carbon nanotubes for thermoelectric applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beate Krause

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Flexible thermoelectric materials are prepared by melt mixing technique, which can be easily scaled up to industrial level. Hybrid filler systems of carbon nanotubes (CNTs and copper oxide (CuO, which are environmental friendly materials and contain abundant earth elements, are melt mixed into a thermoplastic matrix, namely polypropylene (PP. With the CNT addition, an electrical network could be built up inside the insulating PP for effective charge transport. The effect of CuO addition is determined by the corresponding CNT concentration. At high CNT concentration, largely above the percolation threshold (φc, ca. 0.1 wt%, the change in the TE properties is small. In contrast, at CNT concentration close to φc, the co-addition of CuO could simultaneously increase the electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficient. With 5 wt% CuO and 0.8 wt% CNTs where a loose percolated network is formed, the Seebeck coefficient was increased from 34.1 µV/K to 45 µV/K while the electrical conductivity was from 1.6 × 10−3 S/cm to 3.8 × 10−3 S/cm, leading to a power factor of 9.6 × 10−4 µW/mK2 (cf. 1.8 × 10−4 µW/mK2 for the composite with only 0.8 wt% CNTs.

  16. In situ electron microscopy of Braille microsystems: photo-actuation of ethylene vinyl acetate/carbon nanotube composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czaniková, Klaudia; Krupa, Igor; Račko, Dušan; Šmatko, Vasilij; Campo, Eva M.; Pavlova, Ewa; Omastová, Mária

    2015-02-01

    The development of new types of tactile displays based on the actuation of composite materials can aid the visually impaired. Micro/nano systems based on ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) polymeric matrices enriched with multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) can produce ensembles capable of light-induced actuation. In this report, we investigate two types of commercial EVA copolymers matrices containing 28 and 50 wt% vinyl-acetate (VA). Non-covalent modification of carbon nanotubes was achieved through a compatibilization technique that appends the pyrenenyl and cholesteryl groups on the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) surface. EVA/MWCNT nanocomposites were prepared by casting from a solution. These composites were shaped into Braille elements using molds. The deformation of the Braille element (BE) under light-emitting diode (LED) illumination was observed for the first time by in situ scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The superior actuation performance promoted by the EVA/MWCNT nanocomposites indicates that these materials will be useful in the future as light-driven micro/nano system actuators.

  17. Methods for producing reinforced carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhifen; Wen, Jian Guo; Lao, Jing Y.; Li, Wenzhi

    2008-10-28

    Methods for producing reinforced carbon nanotubes having a plurality of microparticulate carbide or oxide materials formed substantially on the surface of such reinforced carbon nanotubes composite materials are disclosed. In particular, the present invention provides reinforced carbon nanotubes (CNTs) having a plurality of boron carbide nanolumps formed substantially on a surface of the reinforced CNTs that provide a reinforcing effect on CNTs, enabling their use as effective reinforcing fillers for matrix materials to give high-strength composites. The present invention also provides methods for producing such carbide reinforced CNTs.

  18. Simple fabrication of carbon/TiO2 composite nanotubes showing dual functions with adsorption and photocatalytic decomposition of Rhodamine B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Ji Hyuk; Yang, Seung Jae; Yun, Chang Hun; Park, Chong Rae

    2012-01-01

    Carbon/TiO2 composite nanotubes were fabricated via a very simple electrospinning process and their dual functionalities of adsorptivity and photocatalytic activity were evaluated using Rhodamine B (RhB) as a model organic pollutant. A poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) aqueous solution was directly electrospun into a coagulation bath containing titanium (IV) tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) solution so that PVA-core/TiO2-shell composite nanofibers were formed through the in situ sol-gel reaction of TTIP. The carbon/TiO2 composite nanotubes were then fabricated by heat treatment of composite nanofibers under nitrogen atmosphere. By using several characterization methods, we confirmed that the resultant nanotubes consisted of anatase TiO2 nanocrystallites embedded in a carbonaceous matrix. The prepared nanotubes exhibited fast adsorption of RhB with high capacity compared with a commercial porous carbon, and they also showed the photocatalytic decomposition activity for the dye molecules under UV irradiation comparable to the degradation by P-25 and ST-01 (commercial TiO2). Finally, the carbon/TiO2 composite nanotubes exhibited several cycle performances of adsorption-photodegradation for RhB. This indicates that the composite nanotubes can adsorb and photodecompose organic pollutants repeatedly without additional activating processes.

  19. Cellular uptake of single-walled carbon nanotubes in 3D extracellular matrix-mimetic composite collagen hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Hongli; Kawazoe, Naoki; Chen, Guoping

    2014-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) exhibit intrinsic unique physical and chemical properties that make them attractive candidates for biological and biomedicine applications. An efficient cellular uptake of CNTs is vital for many of these applications. However, most of the cellular uptake studies have been performed with a two-dimensional cell culture system. In this study, cellular uptake of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) was investigated by using a three-dimensional cell culture system. Bovine articular chondrocytes cultured in SWCNTs/collagen composite hydrogels maintained their proliferation capacity when compared to the culture in collagen hydrogels. Ultraviolet-visible-near-infrared spectroscopy analysis revealed a high amount of SWCNTs were internalized by cells. Confocal Raman imaging showed that most of the internalized SWCNTs were distributed in the perinuclear region. The results indicated that SWCNTs could be internalized by chondrocytes when SWCNTs were incorporated in the three-dimensional biomimetic collagen hydrogels.

  20. Templated Growth of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siochik Emilie J. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A method of growing carbon nanotubes uses a synthesized mesoporous si lica template with approximately cylindrical pores being formed there in. The surfaces of the pores are coated with a carbon nanotube precu rsor, and the template with the surfaces of the pores so-coated is th en heated until the carbon nanotube precursor in each pore is convert ed to a carbon nanotube.

  1. Plasticity and Kinky Chemistry of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Dzegilenko, Fedor

    2000-01-01

    Since their discovery in 1991, carbon nanotubes have been the subject of intense research interest based on early predictions of their unique mechanical, electronic, and chemical properties. Materials with the predicted unique properties of carbon nanotubes are of great interest for use in future generations of aerospace vehicles. For their structural properties, carbon nanotubes could be used as reinforcing fibers in ultralight multifunctional composites. For their electronic properties, carbon nanotubes offer the potential of very high-speed, low-power computing elements, high-density data storage, and unique sensors. In a continuing effort to model and predict the properties of carbon nanotubes, Ames accomplished three significant results during FY99. First, accurate values of the nanomechanics and plasticity of carbon nanotubes based on quantum molecular dynamics simulations were computed. Second, the concept of mechanical deformation catalyzed-kinky-chemistry as a means to control local chemistry of nanotubes was discovered. Third, the ease of nano-indentation of silicon surfaces with carbon nanotubes was established. The elastic response and plastic failure mechanisms of single-wall nanotubes were investigated by means of quantum molecular dynamics simulations.

  2. Computational modeling of elastic properties of carbon nanotube/polymer composites with interphase regions. Part I: Micro-structural characterization and geometric modeling

    KAUST Repository

    Han, Fei

    2014-01-01

    A computational strategy to predict the elastic properties of carbon nanotube-reinforced polymer composites is proposed in this two-part paper. In Part I, the micro-structural characteristics of these nano-composites are discerned. These characteristics include networks/agglomerations of carbon nanotubes and thick polymer interphase regions between the nanotubes and the surrounding matrix. An algorithm is presented to construct three-dimensional geometric models with large amounts of randomly dispersed and aggregated nanotubes. The effects of the distribution of the nanotubes and the thickness of the interphase regions on the concentration of the interphase regions are demonstrated with numerical results. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Hybrid magnetic amphiphilic composites based on carbon nanotube/nanofibers and layered silicates fragments as efficient adsorbent for ethynilestradiol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purceno, Aluir D; Teixeira, Ana Paula C; de Souza, Nubia Janaína; Fernandez-Outon, Luis E; Ardisson, José D; Lago, Rochel M

    2012-08-01

    In this work, hybrid magnetic amphiphilic composites were prepared by the catalytic growth of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and nanofibers CNF on layered silicates fragments. SEM, TEM, Raman, XRD, Mössbauer, TG/DTA showed that CVD with CH(4) at 800°C produced CNF and magnetic Fe cores fixed on the surface of microfragments of silicates layers. Due to the amphiphilic character, the composites can be easily dispersed in water and efficiently adsorb hydrophobic contaminant molecules. For example, the composites showed remarkable adsorption capacities for the hormone ethinylestradiol, e.g. 2-4 mg m(-2), compared to ca. 0.1 mg m(-2) obtained for high surface area activated carbon and multiwall CNT. These results are discussed in terms of a high hydrophobic exposed surface area of the CNT and CNF fixed on the layered silicates fragments surface. Moreover, the composites can be easily removed from water by a simple magnetic separation process.

  4. The bactericidal effect of carbon nanotube/agar composites irradiated with near-infrared light on Streptococcus mutans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akasaka, Tsukasa, E-mail: akasaka@den.hokudai.ac.jp [Graduate School of Dental Medicine, Hokkaido University, Kita13 Nishi7, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8586 (Japan); Matsuoka, Makoto [Graduate School of Dental Medicine, Hokkaido University, Kita13 Nishi7, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8586 (Japan); Hashimoto, Takeshi [Meijo Nano Carbon Co. Ltd., Otsubashi bldg. 4F, 3-4-10 Marunouchi, Naka-ku, Nagoya 460-0002 (Japan); Abe, Shigeaki; Uo, Motohiro; Watari, Fumio [Graduate School of Dental Medicine, Hokkaido University, Kita13 Nishi7, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8586 (Japan)

    2010-10-15

    Dental caries are mainly associated with oral pathogens, and Streptococcus mutans is a primary cariogenic organism. Many methods have been established to eliminate S. mutans from the oral cavity. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of carbon nanotube (CNT)/agar composites irradiated with near-infrared (NIR) light on S. mutans, as a potential photothermal antimicrobial nanotherapy. A colony-forming unit assay clearly showed that CNT/agar composites attain bactericidal activity after NIR light irradiation; this bactericidal activity is higher than that of graphite (GP)/agar and activated carbon (AC)/agar composites. Furthermore, it was observed that longer irradiation times immobilized S. mutans in the CNT/agar composite.

  5. Composite of TiN nanoparticles and few-walled carbon nanotubes and its application to the electrocatalytic oxygen reduction reaction

    KAUST Repository

    Isogai, Shunsuke

    2011-11-30

    Nanoparticles meet nanotubes! Direct synthesis of TiN nanoparticles in a three-dimensional network of few-walled carbon nanotubes (FWCNTs) was achieved by using mesoporous graphitic carbon nitride (C 3N 4) as both a hard template and a nitrogen source. The TiN/FWCNT composite showed high performance for the oxygen reduction reaction in acidic media. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Simultaneous detection of ascorbic acid, dopamine, uric acid and tryptophan with Azure A-interlinked multi-walled carbon nanotube/gold nanoparticles composite modified electrode

    OpenAIRE

    Hayati Filik; Asiye Aslıhan Avan; Sevda Aydar

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, multi-walled carbon nanotube/Azure A/gold nanoparticle composites (Nafion/AuNPs/AzA/MWCNTs) were prepared by binding gold nanoparticles to the surfaces of Azure A-coated carbon nanotubes. Nafion/AuNPs/AzA/MWCNTs based electrochemical sensor was fabricated for the simultaneous determination of ascorbic acid, dopamine, uric acid, and tryptophan. Cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were used to characterize the electrochemical properties of the modified e...

  7. Carbon nanotube junctions and devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, H.W.Ch.

    2001-01-01

    In this thesis Postma presents transport experiments performed on individual single-wall carbon nanotubes. Carbon nanotubes are molecules entirely made of carbon atoms. The electronic properties are determined by the exact symmetry of the nanotube lattice, resulting in either metallic or semiconduct

  8. In vitro evaluation of three-dimensional single-walled carbon nanotube composites for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ashim; Main, Benjamin J; Taylor, Brittany L; Gupta, Manu; Whitworth, Craig A; Cady, Craig; Freeman, Joseph W; El-Amin, Saadiq F

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop three-dimensional single-walled carbon nanotube composites (SWCNT/PLAGA) using 10-mg single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) for bone regeneration and to determine the mechanical strength of the composites, and to evaluate the interaction of MC3T3-E1 cells via cell adhesion, growth, survival, proliferation, and gene expression. PLAGA (polylactic-co-glycolic acid) and SWCNT/PLAGA microspheres and composites were fabricated, characterized, and mechanical testing was performed. MC3T3-E1 cells were seeded and cell adhesion/morphology, growth/survival, proliferation, and gene expression analysis were performed to evaluate biocompatibility. Imaging studies demonstrated microspheres with uniform shape and smooth surfaces, and uniform incorporation of SWCNT into PLAGA matrix. The microspheres bonded in a random packing manner while maintaining spacing, thus resembling trabeculae of cancellous bone. Addition of SWCNT led to greater compressive modulus and ultimate compressive strength. Imaging studies revealed that MC3T3-E1 cells adhered, grew/survived, and exhibited normal, nonstressed morphology on the composites. SWCNT/PLAGA composites exhibited higher cell proliferation rate and gene expression compared with PLAGA. These results demonstrate the potential of SWCNT/PLAGA composites for musculoskeletal regeneration, for bone tissue engineering, and are promising for orthopedic applications as they possess the combined effect of increased mechanical strength, cell proliferation, and gene expression.

  9. Measuring Nanomaterial Release from Carbon Nanotube Composites: Review of the State of the Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Stacey; Wohlleben, Wendel; Doa, Maria; Nowack, Bernd; Clancy, Shaun; Canady, Richard; Maynard, Andrew

    2015-05-01

    Hazard studies of “as-produced” nanomaterials are increasingly available, yet a critical gap exists in exposure science that may impede safe development of nanomaterials. The gap is that we do not understand what is actually released because nanomaterials can change when released in ways that are not understood. We also generally do not have methods capable of quantitatively measuring what is released to support dose assessment. This review presents a case study of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) for the measurement challenge to bridge this gap. As the use and value of MWCNTs increases, methods to measure what is released in ways relevant to risk evaluation are critically needed if products containing these materials are to be economically, environmentally, and socially sustainable. This review draws on the input of over 50 experts engaged in a program of workshops and technical report writing to address the release of MWCNTs from nanocomposite materials across their life cycle. The expert analyses reveals that new and sophisticated methods are required to measure and assess MWCNT exposures for realistic exposure scenarios. Furthermore, method requirements vary with the materials and conditions of release across life cycle stages of products. While review shows that the likelihood of significant release of MWCNTs appears to be low for many stages of composite life cycle, measurement methods are needed so that exposures from MWCNT-composites are understood and managed. In addition, there is an immediate need to refocus attention from study of “as-produced” nanomaterials to coordinated research on actual release scenarios.

  10. Engineering Crack Formation in Carbon Nanotube-Silver Nanoparticle Composite Films for Sensitive and Durable Piezoresistive Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran Hoang, Phong; Salazar, Nicolas; Porkka, Thomas Nolan; Joshi, Kunal; Liu, Tao; Dickens, Tarik J.; Yu, Zhibin

    2016-09-01

    We report highly sensitive and reliable strain sensors based on silver nanoparticle (AgNP) and carbon nanotube (CNT) composite thin films. The CNT/AgNP was prepared by a screen printing process using a mixture of a CNT paste and an AgNP ink. It is discovered that the sensitivity of such sensors are highly dependent on the crack formation in the composites. By altering the substrate use and the relative ratios of AgNPs and CNTs, the formation and propagation of cracks can be properly engineered, leading to piezoresistive strain sensors with enhanced sensitivity and robustness.

  11. Engineering Crack Formation in Carbon Nanotube-Silver Nanoparticle Composite Films for Sensitive and Durable Piezoresistive Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran Hoang, Phong; Salazar, Nicolas; Porkka, Thomas Nolan; Joshi, Kunal; Liu, Tao; Dickens, Tarik J; Yu, Zhibin

    2016-12-01

    We report highly sensitive and reliable strain sensors based on silver nanoparticle (AgNP) and carbon nanotube (CNT) composite thin films. The CNT/AgNP was prepared by a screen printing process using a mixture of a CNT paste and an AgNP ink. It is discovered that the sensitivity of such sensors are highly dependent on the crack formation in the composites. By altering the substrate use and the relative ratios of AgNPs and CNTs, the formation and propagation of cracks can be properly engineered, leading to piezoresistive strain sensors with enhanced sensitivity and robustness.

  12. Carbon Nanomaterials as Reinforcements for Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shen; Su, Ching-Hua; Lehoczky, S. L.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Carbon nanomaterials including fellerenes, nanotubes (CNT) and nanofibers have been proposed for many applications. One of applications is to use the carbon nanomaterials as reinforcements for composites, especially for polymer matrices. Carbon nanotubes is a good reinforcement for lightweight composite applications due to its low mass density and high Young's modulus. Two obscures need to overcome for carbon nanotubes as reinforcements in composites, which are large quantity production and functioning the nanotubes. This presentation will discuss the carbon nanotube growth by chemical vapor deposition. In order to reduce the cost of producing carbon nanotubes as well as preventing the sliding problems, carbon nanotubes were also synthesized on carbon fibers. The synthesis process and characterization results of nanotubes and nanotubes/fibers will be discussed in the presentation.

  13. Gamma-rays initiated cationic polymerization of epoxy resins and their carbon nanotubes composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przybytniak, Grażyna; Nowicki, Andrzej; Mirkowski, Krzysztof; Stobiński, Leszek

    2016-04-01

    Epoxy resins based on diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) in the presence cationic initiator in the form of iodonium salt were exposed to gamma-rays in order to initiate curing process. The influence of the initiator concentration, dose rate, chemical structure of monomers and the presence of carbon nanotubes were determined on the basis of the recorded on-line thermal effects. The induction time of radiation curing increased with lowering concentration of the initiator and oxirane groups as well as with decreasing dose rates. As was confirmed by SEM images, carbon nanotubes were uniformly distributed over the matrix and closely surrounded by the macromolecules. Such a structure resulted from adsorption of the initiator on the filler surface what allowed to begin polymerization around nanoparticles and facilitated their incorporation into the matrix. As a consequence, the mechanical properties of the nanocomposites were improved.

  14. Solution casting method for PVC nano-composites with functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes1

    OpenAIRE

    Vlasova, T. V.; Kryshtob, V. I.; Mironov, V. F.; Apresyan, L. A.; Bokova, S. N.; Obraztsova, E. D.; Vlasov, D. V.

    2011-01-01

    Annotation A carbon nanotubes (CNT) filled polymer nanocomposites with their unique physical, mechanical and electro-optical properties has repeatedly discussed in the literature. The main part of this problem is to obtain high quality dispersion of CNTs. If for water-soluble polymers this problem can be considered as solved, it is not so for hydrophobic polymers, and PVC is an important example of this kind. This paper describes the methods of dispersion of SWNTs bundles in PVC, both by the ...

  15. Acid yellow 9 as a dispersing agent for carbon nanotubes: preparation of redox polymer-carbon nanotube composite film and its sensing application towards ascorbic acid and dopamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, S Ashok; Wang, Sea-Fue; Yang, Thomas C-K; Yeh, Chun-Ting

    2010-08-15

    In this study, we show that acid yellow 9 (4-amino-1-1'-azobenzene-3,4'-disulfonicacid, AY) is a good stabilizing agent for multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). MWCNTs dispersed in AY solution was remained stable about three months and even remained stable after centrifugation at 10,000 rpm for 30 min. Using MWCNTs/AY dispersion, thin-films were prepared on indium tin oxide coated glass electrode and glassy carbon electrodes. Further, dried films of MWCNTs/AY were subjected to electropolymerization in 0.1M H(2)SO(4) solution. Adsorbed AY molecules on MWCNTs get polymerized and they yield a polymer-MWCNTs nanocomposite film on electrode surface which is found to be electrochemically active in wide pH range (1-11). Characterization studies were performed using cyclic voltammetry and SEM. These studies are supported that hybrid material PAY/MWCNTs was obtained. Moreover, newly synthesized PAY-MWCNTs composite film showed excellent electrocatalytic activity towards oxidation of dopamine (DA) and ascorbic acid (AA) with high sensitivity in physiological pH. Linear sweep voltammetry was employed to the determination of DA in the presence of AA in the range of 2x10(-7) to 1.4x10(-6) M. Amperometry was employed to determination of AA at 0.0 V in the range from 1x10(-6) to 5.6x10(-5) M, and DA, uric acid are not interfered on the steady-state current of AA. In addition, real samples such as dopamine injection and AA spiked into human urine were analyzed using PAY/MWCNTs composite modified electrode and satisfactory results were obtained.

  16. Highly sensitive piezo-resistive graphite nanoplatelet-carbon nanotube hybrids/polydimethylsilicone composites with improved conductive network construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hang; Bai, Jinbo

    2015-05-13

    The constructions of internal conductive network are dependent on microstructures of conductive fillers, determining various electrical performances of composites. Here, we present the advanced graphite nanoplatelet-carbon nanotube hybrids/polydimethylsilicone (GCHs/PDMS) composites with high piezo-resistive performance. GCH particles were synthesized by the catalyst chemical vapor deposition approach. The synthesized GCHs can be well dispersed in the matrix through the mechanical blending process. Due to the exfoliated GNP and aligned CNTs coupling structure, the flexible composite shows an ultralow percolation threshold (0.64 vol %) and high piezo-resistive sensitivity (gauge factor ∼ 10(3) and pressure sensitivity ∼ 0.6 kPa(-1)). Slight motions of finger can be detected and distinguished accurately using the composite film as a typical wearable sensor. These results indicate that designing the internal conductive network could be a reasonable strategy to improve the piezo-resistive performance of composites.

  17. Modified Sol-Gel Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes Supported Titania Composites with Enhanced Visible Light Induced Photocatalytic Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quanjie Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT enhanced MWCNT/TiO2 nanocomposites were synthesized by surface coating of carbon nanotube with mixed phase of anatase and rutile TiO2 through a modified sol-gel approach using tetrabutyl titanate as raw material. The morphological structures and physicochemical properties of the nanocomposites were characterized by FT-IR, XRD, DTA-TG, TEM, and UV-Vis spectra. The results show that TiO2 nanoparticles with size of around 15 nm are closely attached on the sidewall of MWCNT. The nanocomposites possess good absorption properties not only in the ultraviolet but also in the visible light region. Under irradiation of ultraviolet lamp, the prepared composites have the highest photodegradation efficiency of 83% within 4 hours towards the degradation of Methyl Orange (MO aqueous solution. The results indicate that the carbon nanotubes supported TiO2 nanocomposites exhibit high photocatalytic activity and stability, showing great potentials in the treatment of wastewater.

  18. Cyclophosphazene based conductive polymer-carbon nanotube composite as novel supporting material for methanol fuel cell applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasanna, Dakshinamoorthy; Selvaraj, Vaithilingam

    2016-06-15

    This present study reports the development of novel catalyst support of amine terminated cyclophosphazene/cyclophosphazene/hexafluoroisopropylidenedianiline-carbon nanotube (ATCP/CP/HFPA-CNT) composite. The ATCP/CP/HFPA-CNT composite has been used as a catalyst support for platinum (Pt) and platinum-gold (Pt-Au) nanoparticles towards electrooxidation of methanol in alkaline medium. The obtained anode materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscope and energy dispersive X-ray analysis. Electrocatalytic performances of Pt/ATCP/CP/HFPA-CNT and Pt-Au/ATCP/CP/HFPA-CNT catalysts were investigated by cyclic voltammetry, CO stripping and chronoamperometric techniques. The electrooxidation of methanol and CO stripping results conclude that the metal nanocatalyst embedded with ATCP/CP/HFPA-CNT composite shows significantly higher anodic oxidation current, more CO tolerance and lower onset potential when compared to that of the Pt/CNT and Pt/C (Vulcan carbon) catalysts.

  19. Carbon Nanotubes for Human Space Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Carl D.; Files, Brad; Yowell, Leonard

    2003-01-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes offer the promise of a new class of revolutionary materials for space applications. The Carbon Nanotube Project at NASA Johnson Space Center has been actively researching this new technology by investigating nanotube production methods (arc, laser, and HiPCO) and gaining a comprehensive understanding of raw and purified material using a wide range of characterization techniques. After production and purification, single wall carbon nanotubes are processed into composites for the enhancement of mechanical, electrical, and thermal properties. This "cradle-to-grave" approach to nanotube composites has given our team unique insights into the impact of post-production processing and dispersion on the resulting material properties. We are applying our experience and lessons-learned to developing new approaches toward nanotube material characterization, structural composite fabrication, and are also making advances in developing thermal management materials and electrically conductive materials in various polymer-nanotube systems. Some initial work has also been conducted with the goal of using carbon nanotubes in the creation of new ceramic materials for high temperature applications in thermal protection systems. Human space flight applications such as advanced life support and fuel cell technologies are also being investigated. This discussion will focus on the variety of applications under investigation.

  20. A Review: Carbon Nanotube-Based Piezoresistive Strain Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waris Obitayo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of carbon nanotubes for piezoresistive strain sensors has acquired significant attention due to its unique electromechanical properties. In this comprehensive review paper, we discussed some important aspects of carbon nanotubes for strain sensing at both the nanoscale and macroscale. Carbon nanotubes undergo changes in their band structures when subjected to mechanical deformations. This phenomenon makes them applicable for strain sensing applications. This paper signifies the type of carbon nanotubes best suitable for piezoresistive strain sensors. The electrical resistivities of carbon nanotube thin film increase linearly with strain, making it an ideal material for a piezoresistive strain sensor. Carbon nanotube composite films, which are usually fabricated by mixing small amounts of single-walled or multiwalled carbon nanotubes with selected polymers, have shown promising characteristics of piezoresistive strain sensors. Studies also show that carbon nanotubes display a stable and predictable voltage response as a function of temperature.

  1. Polyetheretherketone Hybrid Composites with Bioactive Nanohydroxyapatite and Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Fillers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Liu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Polyetheretherketone (PEEK hybrid composites reinforced with inorganic nanohydroxyapatite (nHA and multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT were prepared by melt-compounding and injection molding processes. The additions of nHA and MWNT to PEEK were aimed to increase its elastic modulus, tensile strength, and biocompatibility, rendering the hybrids suitable for load-bearing implant applications. The structural behavior, mechanical property, wettability, osteoblastic cell adhesion, proliferation, differentiation, and mineralization of the PEEK/nHA-MWNT hybrids were studied. X-ray diffraction and SEM observation showed that both nHA and MWNT fillers are incorporated into the polymer matrix of PEEK-based hybrids. Tensile tests indicated that the elastic modulus of PEEK can be increased from 3.87 to 7.13 GPa by adding 15 vol % nHA and 1.88 vol % MWNT fillers. The tensile strength and elongation at break of the PEEK/(15% nHA-(1.88% MWNT hybrid were 64.48 MPa and 1.74%, respectively. Thus the tensile properties of this hybrid were superior to those of human cortical bones. Water contact angle measurements revealed that the PEEK/(15% nHA-(1.88% MWNT hybrid is hydrophilic due to the presence of nHA. Accordingly, hydrophilic PEEK/(15% nHA-(1.88% MWNT hybrid promoted the adhesion, proliferation, differentiation, and mineralization of murine MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts on its surface effectively on the basis of cell culture, fluorescence microscopy, MTT assay, WST-1 assay, alkaline phosphatase activity, and Alizarin red staining tests. Thus the PEEK/(15% nHA-(1.88% MWNT hybrid has the potential to be used for fabricating load-bearing bone implants.

  2. Electrocatalytic Activity of Tungsten Trioxide Micro-spheres, Tungsten Carbide Microspheres and Multi-walled Carbon Nanotube-tungsten Carbide Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Hongzhi; YAN Taining

    2009-01-01

    Tungsten trioxide micropheres were prepared by spray pyrolysis, and tungsten carbidemicrospheres were produced by spray pyrolysis-low temperature reduction and carbonization technology.Multi-walled carbon nanotube-tungsten carbide composites were prepared by the continuous reductionand carbonization process using multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and WO_3 precursor by mo-lecular level mixing and calcination. The morphology and structure of the samples were characterized byscanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope. Furthermore, the crystal phase was identified by X-ray diffraction. The electrocatalytic activity of the sample was analyzed by means of me-thanol oxidation. Tungsten carbide microspheres were catalytic active for methanol oxidation reaction.Nevertheless tungsten trioxide microspheres and multi-walled carbon nanotube-tungsten carbide compos-ites were not catalytic active for methanol oxidation reaction. These results indicate that tungsten carbide micropheres are promising catalyst for methanol oxidation.

  3. Recent advances in understanding the reinforcing ability and mechanism of carbon nanotubes in ceramic matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estili, Mehdi; Sakka, Yoshio

    2014-12-01

    Since the discovery of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), commonly referred to as ultimate reinforcement, the main purpose for fabricating CNT-ceramic matrix composites has been mainly to improve the fracture toughness and strength of the ceramic matrix materials. However, there have been many studies reporting marginal improvements or even the degradation of mechanical properties. On the other hand, those studies claiming noticeable toughening measured using indentation, which is an indirect/unreliable characterization method, have not demonstrated the responsible mechanisms applicable to the nanoscale, flexible CNTs; instead, those studies proposed those classical methods applicable to microscale fiber/whisker reinforced ceramics without showing any convincing evidence of load transfer to the CNTs. Therefore, the ability of CNTs to directly improve the macroscopic mechanical properties of structural ceramics has been strongly questioned and debated in the last ten years. In order to properly discuss the reinforcing ability (and possible mechanisms) of CNTs in a ceramic host material, there are three fundamental questions to our knowledge at both the nanoscale and macroscale levels that need to be addressed: (1) does the intrinsic load-bearing ability of CNTs change when embedded in a ceramic host matrix?; (2) when there is an intimate atomic-level interface without any chemical reaction with the matrix, could one expect any load transfer to the CNTs along with effective load bearing by them during crack propagation?; and (3) considering their nanometer-scale dimensions, flexibility and radial softness, are the CNTs able to improve the mechanical properties of the host ceramic matrix at the macroscale when individually, intimately and uniformly dispersed? If so, how? Also, what is the effect of CNT concentration in such a defect-free composite system? Here, we briefly review the recent studies addressing the above fundamental questions. In particular, we discuss the new

  4. Copper-Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes and Copper-Diamond Composites for Advanced Rocket Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Biliyar N.; Ellis, Dave L.; Smelyanskiy, Vadim; Foygel, Michael; Rape, Aaron; Singh, Jogender; Vohra, Yogesh K.; Thomas, Vinoy; Otte, Kyle G.; Li, Deyu

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on the research effort to improve the thermal conductivity of the copper-based alloy NARloy-Z (Cu-3 wt.%Ag-0.5 wt.% Zr), the state-of-the-art alloy used to make combustion chamber liners in regeneratively-cooled liquid rocket engines, using nanotechnology. The approach was to embed high thermal conductivity multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and diamond (D) particles in the NARloy-Z matrix using powder metallurgy techniques. The thermal conductivity of MWCNTs and D have been reported to be 5 to 10 times that of NARloy-Z. Hence, 10 to 20 vol. % MWCNT finely dispersed in NARloy-Z matrix could nearly double the thermal conductivity, provided there is a good thermal bond between MWCNTs and copper matrix. Quantum mechanics-based modeling showed that zirconium (Zr) in NARloy-Z should form ZrC at the MWCNT-Cu interface and provide a good thermal bond. In this study, NARloy-Z powder was blended with MWCNTs in a ball mill, and the resulting mixture was consolidated under high pressure and temperature using Field Assisted Sintering Technology (FAST). Microstructural analysis showed that the MWCNTs, which were provided as tangles of MWCNTs by the manufacturer, did not detangle well during blending and formed clumps at the prior particle boundaries. The composites made form these powders showed lower thermal conductivity than the base NARloy-Z. To eliminate the observed physical agglomeration, tangled multiwall MWCNTs were separated by acid treatment and electroless plated with a thin layer of chromium to keep them separated during further processing. Separately, the thermal conductivities of MWCNTs used in this work were measured, and the results showed very low values, a major factor in the low thermal conductivity of the composite. On the other hand, D particles embedded in NARloy-Z matrix showed much improved thermal conductivity. Elemental analysis showed migration of Zr to the NARloy-Z-D interface to form ZrC, which appeared to provide a low contact

  5. Copper Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes and Copper-Diamond Composites for Advanced Rocket Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Biliyar N.; Ellis, Dave L.; Smelyanskiy, Vadim; Foygel, Michael; Singh, Jogender; Rape, Aaron; Vohra, Yogesh; Thomas, Vinoy; Li, Deyu; Otte, Kyle

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on the research effort to improve the thermal conductivity of the copper-based alloy NARloy-Z (Cu-3 wt.%Ag-0.5 wt.% Zr), the state-of-the-art alloy used to make combustion chamber liners in regeneratively-cooled liquid rocket engines, using nanotechnology. The approach was to embed high thermal conductivity multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and diamond (D) particles in the NARloy-Z matrix using powder metallurgy techniques. The thermal conductivity of MWCNTs and D have been reported to be 5 to 10 times that of NARloy-Z. Hence, 10 to 20 vol. % MWCNT finely dispersed in NARloy-Z matrix could nearly double the thermal conductivity, provided there is a good thermal bond between MWCNTs and copper matrix. Quantum mechanics-based modeling showed that zirconium (Zr) in NARloy-Z should form ZrC at the MWCNT-Cu interface and provide a good thermal bond. In this study, NARloy-Z powder was blended with MWCNTs in a ball mill, and the resulting mixture was consolidated under high pressure and temperature using Field Assisted Sintering Technology (FAST). Microstructural analysis showed that the MWCNTs, which were provided as tangles of MWCNTs by the manufacturer, did not detangle well during blending and formed clumps at the prior particle boundaries. The composites made form these powders showed lower thermal conductivity than the base NARloy-Z. To eliminate the observed physical agglomeration, tangled multiwall MWCNTs were separated by acid treatment and electroless plated with a thin layer of chromium to keep them separated during further processing. Separately, the thermal conductivities of MWCNTs used in this work were measured, and the results showed very low values, a major factor in the low thermal conductivity of the composite. On the other hand, D particles embedded in NARloy-Z matrix showed much improved thermal conductivity. Elemental analysis showed migration of Zr to the NARloy-Z-D interface to form ZrC, which appeared to provide a low contact

  6. Surface Modification of Carbon Nanotubes with Conjugated Polyelectrolytes: Fundamental Interactions and Applications in Composite Materials, Nanofibers, Electronics, and Photovoltaics

    KAUST Repository

    Ezzeddine, Alaa

    2015-10-01

    Ever since their discovery, Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been renowned to be potential candidates for a variety of applications. Nevertheless, the difficulties accompanied with their dispersion and poor solubility in various solvents have hindered CNTs potential applications. As a result, studies have been developed to address the dispersion problem. The solution is in modifying the surfaces of the nanotubes covalently or non-covalently with a desired dispersant. Various materials have been employed for this purpose out of which polymers are the most common. Non-covalent functionalization of CNTs via polymer wrapping represents an attractive method to obtain a stable and homogenous CNTs dispersion. This method is able to change the surface properties of the nanotubes without destroying their intrinsic structure and preserving their properties. This thesis explores and studies the surface modification and solublization of pristine single and multiwalled carbon nanotubes via a simple solution mixing technique through non-covalent interactions of CNTs with various anionic and cationic conjugated polyelectrolytes (CPEs). The work includes studying the interaction of various poly(phenylene ethynylene) electrolytes with MWCNTs and an imidazolium functionalized poly(3-hexylthiophene) with SWCNTs. Our work here focuses on the noncovalent modifications of carbon nanotubes using novel CPEs in order to use these resulting CPE/CNT complexes in various applications. Upon modifying the CNTs with the CPEs, the resulting CPE/CNT complex has been proven to be easily dispersed in various organic and aqueous solution with excellent homogeneity and stability for several months. This complex was then used as a nanofiller and was dispersed in another polymer matrix (poly(methyl methacrylate), PMMA). The PMMA/CPE/CNT composite materials were cast or electrospun depending on their desired application. The presence of the CPE modified CNTs in the polymer matrix has been proven to enhance

  7. Carbon/Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) Composites from Green Pellets Contain CNTs and Self-adhesive Carbon Grains from Fibres of Oil Palm Empty Fruit Bunch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deraman, Mohamad; Saad, Siti Khatijah Md.; Ishak, Maria M.; Awitdrus, Taer, Erman; Talib, Ibrahim; Omar, Ramli; Jumali, Mohammad Hafizuddin Hj.

    2010-10-01

    Nano composites green pellets (GPs) were prepared from the mixtures of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) at varying percentage (0, 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10%) and self-adhesive carbon grains (SACG) from fibres of oil palm empty fruit bunch. These GPs were carbonized and CO2 activated to produce activated carbon/CNTs composites in the form of pellets (ACPs). It was found that the density (ρ) and electrical conductivity (σ) of the ACPs varied nonlinearly with CNTs content; as for the CNTs content of 3-5%, we observed the peak values of ρ and σ at 1.3781 gcm-3 and 3.4146 (Ωcm)-1 respectively. The presence of the agglomerated and individual particles of CNTs in the pores of the ACPs was clearly shown by the micrograph of the Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM). The nitrogen adsorption isotherm data showed the decrease in surface area, volume and diameter of pores due to the effect of CNTs. The effect of CNTs on the electrochemical behavior of the ACPs were investigated from the supercapacitor cells fabricated using the ACPs as composite electrodes. It was found that the specific capacitance, energy density and power density of the supercapacitor with electrodes containing 10% CNTs were lower than that with electrodes without CNTs. This result is consistent with the change of pores characteristic due to the presence of CNTs in the ACPs, suggesting the need to optimize the pore characteristic for improving the supercapacitor performance.

  8. Carbon Nanotubes Hybrid Hydrogels in Drug Delivery: A Perspective Review

    OpenAIRE

    Giuseppe Cirillo; Silke Hampel; Umile Gianfranco Spizzirri; Ortensia Ilaria Parisi; Nevio Picci; Francesca Iemma

    2014-01-01

    The use of biologics, polymers, silicon materials, carbon materials, and metals has been proposed for the preparation of innovative drug delivery devices. One of the most promising materials in this field are the carbon-nanotubes composites and hybrid materials coupling the advantages of polymers (biocompatibility and biodegradability) with those of carbon nanotubes (cellular uptake, stability, electromagnatic, and magnetic behavior). The applicability of polymer-carbon nanotubes composites i...

  9. Influence of carbon nanotubes on the properties of epoxy based composites reinforced with a semicrystalline thermoplastic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díez-Pascual, A.; Shuttleworth, P.; Gónzalez-Castillo, E.; Marco, C.; Gómez-Fatou, M.; Ellis, G.

    2014-08-01

    Novel ternary nanocomposites based on a thermoset (TS) system composed of triglycidyl p-aminophenol (TGAP) epoxy resin and 4,4'-diaminodiphenylsulfone (DDS) curing agent incorporating 5 wt% of a semicrystalline thermoplastic (TP), an ethylene/1-octene copolymer, and 0.5 or 1.0 wt% multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) have been prepared via physical blending and curing. The influence of the TP and the MWCNTs on the curing process, morphology, thermal and mechanical properties of the hybrid nanocomposites has been analyzed. Different morphologies evolved depending on the CNT content: the material with 0.5 wt% MWCNTs showed a matrix-dispersed droplet-like morphology with well-dispersed nanofiller that selectively located at the TS/TP interphase, while that with 1.0 wt% MWCNTs exhibited coarse dendritic TP areas containing agglomerated MWCNTs. Although the cure reaction was accelerated in its early stage by the nanofillers, curing occurred at a lower rate since these obstructed chain crosslinking. The nanocomposite with lower nanotube content displayed two crystallization peaks at lower temperature than that of pure TP, while a single peak appearing at similar temperature to that of TP was observed for the blend with higher nanotube loading. The highest thermal stability was found for TS/TP (5.0 wt%)/MWCNTs (0.5 wt%), due to a synergistic barrier effect of both TP and the nanofiller. Moreover, this nanocomposite displayed the best mechanical properties, with an optimal combination of stiffness, strength and toughness. However, poorer performance was found for TS/TP (5.0 wt%)/MWCNTs (1.0 wt%) due to the less effective reinforcement of the agglomerated nanotubes and the coalescence of the TP particles into large areas. Therefore, finely tuned morphologies and properties can be obtained by adjusting the nanotube content in the TS/TP blends, leading to high-performance hybrid nanocomposites suitable for structural and high-temperature applications.

  10. Carbon nanotube filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, A.; Srivastava, O. N.; Talapatra, S.; Vajtai, R.; Ajayan, P. M.

    2004-09-01

    Over the past decade of nanotube research, a variety of organized nanotube architectures have been fabricated using chemical vapour deposition. The idea of using nanotube structures in separation technology has been proposed, but building macroscopic structures that have controlled geometric shapes, density and dimensions for specific applications still remains a challenge. Here we report the fabrication of freestanding monolithic uniform macroscopic hollow cylinders having radially aligned carbon nanotube walls, with diameters and lengths up to several centimetres. These cylindrical membranes are used as filters to demonstrate their utility in two important settings: the elimination of multiple components of heavy hydrocarbons from petroleum-a crucial step in post-distillation of crude oil-with a single-step filtering process, and the filtration of bacterial contaminants such as Escherichia coli or the nanometre-sized poliovirus (~25 nm) from water. These macro filters can be cleaned for repeated filtration through ultrasonication and autoclaving. The exceptional thermal and mechanical stability of nanotubes, and the high surface area, ease and cost-effective fabrication of the nanotube membranes may allow them to compete with ceramic- and polymer-based separation membranes used commercially.

  11. Carbon nanotubes for microelectronics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Andrew P; Duesberg, Georg S; Seidel, Robert V; Liebau, Maik; Unger, Eugen; Pamler, Werner; Kreupl, Franz; Hoenlein, Wolfgang

    2005-04-01

    Despite all prophecies of its end, silicon-based microelectronics still follows Moore's Law and continues to develop rapidly. However, the inherent physical limits will eventually be reached. Carbon nanotubes offer the potential for further miniaturization as long as it is possible to selectively deposit them with defined properties.

  12. Conductivity analysis of epoxy/carbon nanotubes composites by dipole relaxation and hopping models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Airton; Pezzin, Sergio H.; Farias, Heric Denis; Becker, Daniela; Bello, Roger H.; Coelho, Luiz A. F.

    2016-10-01

    In this study it was used a numerical technique of successive approximations to estimate parameters of a conductivity model that includes the hopping process and the dipole relaxation for the purpose of describing the behavior of the conductivity measured on nanocomposites with carbon nanotubes in epoxy resin in the range of frequency of 100 Hz to 40 MHz. Two relaxation bands were detected, one with a response below 10 kHz and one above 10 MHz. For the first band, it was observed that the nanocomposites become more conductive, and its conductivity less temperature dependent, as the nanotube content increases. The second band is characterized by a large spread in relaxation time. The results show that the percolation threshold is below 0.15 vol% and that 'ac' hopping is the main transport process above 100 kHz, becoming dominant with respect to percolation at higher temperatures (>340 K).

  13. Electrochemical determination of sulphide at multi-walled carbon nanotubes-dihexadecyl hydrogen phosphate composite film modified electrodes based on in situ synthesis of methylene blue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    An Min Xiang; Li Zhou; Cheng Guo Hu; Sheng Shui Hu

    2008-01-01

    A novel electrochemical method for the determination of sulphide at a multi-walled carbon nanotube-dihexadecyl hydrogenphosphate composite film coated glassy carbon electrode (MWNTs-DHP/GCE) based on in situ synthesis of methylene blue (MB)was established.

  14. A Review on Nanomaterial Dispersion, Microstructure, and Mechanical Properties of Carbon Nanotube and Nanofiber Reinforced Cementitious Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shama Parveen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Excellent mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs and nanofibers (CNFs have motivated the development of advanced nanocomposites with outstanding and multifunctional properties. After achieving a considerable success in utilizing these unique materials in various polymeric matrices, recently tremendous interest is also being noticed on developing CNT and CNF reinforced cement-based composites. However, the problems related to nanomaterial dispersion also exist in case of cementitious composites, impairing successful transfer of nanomaterials' properties into the composites. Performance of cementitious composites also depends on their microstructure which is again strongly influenced by the presence of nanomaterials. In this context, the present paper reports a critical review of recent literature on the various strategies for dispersing CNTs and CNFs within cementitious matrices and the microstructure and mechanical properties of resulting nanocomposites.

  15. Crack-free and scalable transfer of carbon nanotube arrays into flexible and highly thermal conductive composite film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Miao; Chen, Hongyuan; Lin, Wei; Li, Zhuo; Li, Qiang; Chen, Minghai; Meng, Fancheng; Xing, Yajuan; Yao, Yagang; Wong, Ching-ping; Li, Qingwen

    2014-01-08

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays show great promise in developing anisotropic thermal conductive composites for efficiently dissipating heat from high-power devices along thickness direction. However, CNT arrays are always grown on some substrates and liable to be deformed and broken into pieces during transfer and solution treatment. In the present study, we intentionally synthesized well-crystallized and large-diameter (~80 nm) multiwalled CNT (MWCNT) arrays by floating catalyst chemical vapor deposition (FCCVD) method. Such arrays provided high packing density and robust structure from collapse and crack formation during post solution treatment and therefore favored to maintain original thermal and electrical conductive paths. Under optimized condition, the CNT arrays can be transferred into flexible composite films. Furthermore, the composite film also exhibited excellent thermal conductivity at 8.2 W/(m·K) along thickness direction. Such robust, flexible, and highly thermal conductive composite film may enable some prospective applications in advanced thermal management.

  16. Flaky FeSiAl alloy-carbon nanotube composite with tunable electromagnetic properties for microwave absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lina; Liu, Xiaofang; Chuai, Dan; Chen, Yaxin; Yu, Ronghai

    2016-01-01

    Flaky FeSiAl alloy/multi-wall carbon nanotube (FeSiAl/MWCNT) composite was fabricated by facile and scalable ball milling method. The morphology and electromagnetic properties of the FeSiAl alloy can be well tuned by controlling the milling time. It is found that the magnetic loss of the FeSiAl alloy is improved by optimizing the milling time due to the increased anisotropy field. Meanwhile the addition of MWCNTs enhances the dielectric loss of the composite by increasing the interfacial polarizations, dipolar polarizations and conductive paths. Relative to conventional FeSiAl absorbers, the FeSiAl/MWCNT composite exhibits greatly improved microwave absorption performance with advantages of strong absorption and small thickness. The minimum reflection loss of the composite reaches −42.8 dB at 12.3 GHz at a very thin thickness of 1.9 mm. PMID:27762327

  17. Carbon nanotubes-Nafion composites as Pt-Ru catalyst support for methanol electro-oxidation in acid media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shengzhou Chen; Fei Ye; Weiming Lin

    2009-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes-Nafion (CNTs-Nafion) composites were prepared by impregnated CNTs with Nafion in ethanol solution and characterized by FT-IR. Pt-Ru catalysts supported on CNTs-Nafion composites were synthesized by microwave-assisted polyol process. The physical and electrochemical properties of the catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM), CO stripping voltammetry, cyclic voltammetry (CV) and chronoamperometry (CA). The results showed that the Nafion incorporation in CNTs-Nafion composites did not significantly alter the oxygen-containing groups on the CNTs surface. The Pt-Ru catalyst supported on CNTs-Nafion composites with 2 wt% Nafion showed good dispersion and the best CO oxidation and methanol electro-oxidation activities.

  18. Effects of single-walled carbon nanotubes on lysozyme gelation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tardani, Franco; La Mesa, Camillo

    2014-09-01

    The possibility to disperse carbon nanotubes in biocompatible matrices has got substantial interest from the scientific community. Along this research line, the inclusion of single walled carbon nanotubes in lysozyme-based hydrogels was investigated. Experiments were performed at different nanotube/lysozyme weight ratios. Carbon nanotubes were dispersed in protein solutions, in conditions suitable for thermal gelation. The state of the dispersions was determined before and after thermal treatment. Rheology, dynamic light scattering and different microscopies investigated the effect that carbon nanotubes exert on gelation. The gelation kinetics and changes in gelation temperature were determined. The effect of carbon and lysozyme content on the gel properties was, therefore, determined. At fixed lysozyme content, moderate amounts of carbon nanotubes do not disturb the properties of hydrogel composites. At moderately high volume fractions in carbon nanotubes, the gels become continuous in both lysozyme and nanotubes. This is because percolating networks are presumably formed. Support to the above statements comes by rheology.

  19. Mechanically durable and highly conductive elastomeric composites from long single-walled carbon nanotubes mimicking the chain structure of polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ata, Seisuke; Kobashi, Kazufumi; Yumura, Motoo; Hata, Kenji

    2012-06-13

    By using long single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) as a filler possessing the highest aspect ratio and small diameter, we mimicked the chain structure of polymers in the matrix and realized a highly conductive elastomeric composite (30 S/cm) with an excellent mechanical durability (4500 strain cycles until failure), far superior to any other reported conductive elastomers. This exceptional mechanical durability was explained by the ability of long and traversing SWNTs to deform in concert with the elastomer with minimum stress concentration at their interfaces. The conductivity was sufficient to operate many active electronics components, and thus this material would be useful for practical stretchable electronic devices.

  20. Radiation Shielding System Using a Composite of Carbon Nanotubes Loaded with Electropolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Chris; Chen, Bin

    2012-01-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) coated with a hydrogen-rich, electrically conducting polymer such as polyethylene, receive and dissipate a portion of incoming radiation pulse energy to electrical signals that are transmitted along the CNT axes, and are received at energy-dissipating terminals. In this innovation, an array of highly aligned nanowires is grown using a strong electric field or another suitable orientation procedure. Polyethylene (PE), polymethymlethacrylate (PMMA), or other electrically conducting polymer is spin-coated onto the SWCNTs with an average thickness of a few hundred nanometers to a few tenths of micrometers to form a PE/SWCNT composite. Alternatively, the polymer is spin-coated onto the nanowire array or an anodized alumina membrane (AAM) to form a PE/metal core shell structure, or PE can be electropolymerized using the SWCNTs or the metal nanowires as an electrode to form a PE/SWCNT core shell structure. The core shell structures can be extruded as anisotropic fibers. A monomer can be polymerized in the presence of SWCNTs to form highly cross-linked PE/SWCNT films. Alternatively, Pb colloid solution can be impregnated into a three-dimensional PE/SWCNT nanostructure to form a PW/SWCNT/Pb composite structure. A face-centered cubic (FCC) arrangement provides up to 12 interconnection channels connected to each core, with transverse channel dimensions up to 20 nm, with adequate mechanical compressive strength, and with an associated electrical conductivity of around 3 Seimens/cm for currents ranging from 0.01 to 10 mA. This threedimensional nanostructure is used as a host material to house appropriate radiation shielding material such as hydrogen- rich polymer/CNT structures, metal nanoparticles, and nanowires. Thicknesses of this material required to attenuate 10 percent, 50 percent, and 90 percent of an incident beam (gamma, X-ray, ultraviolet, neutron, proton, and electron) at energies in the range of 0 440 MeV are being determined

  1. ELECTRICAL RESISTIVITY, CRYSTALLIZATION AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF POLYPROPYLENE/MULTI-WALLED CARBON NANOTUBE/CALCIUM CARBONATE COMPOSITES PREPARED BY MELT MIXING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ha-da Bao; Zhao-xia Guo; Jian Yu

    2009-01-01

    Polypropylene (PP)/multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)/calcium carbonate (CaCO3) composites are prepared by melt mixing using two types of CaCO3 of different sizes. The electrical resistivities of the composites with the two types of CaCO3 are all lower than those of the corresponding PP/MWCNT composites at various MWCNT loadings (1 wt%-5 wt%). The morphology of the composites is investigated by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). The crystallization behavior of PP in the composites is characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The storage modulus, as measured by dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA), increases significantly by the presence of CaCO3.

  2. Influence of Cu nanoparticle size on the photo-electrochemical response from Cu-multiwall carbon nanotube composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scarselli, M; Castrucci, P; Camilli, L; Del Gobbo, S; De Crescenzi, M [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Roma Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); Casciardi, S; Tombolini, F [Istituto Superiore per la Prevenzione e la Sicurezza del Lavoro, ISPESL, 00040 Monte Porzio Catone (Italy); Gatto, E; Venanzi, M, E-mail: manuela.scarselli@roma2.infn.it [Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Chimiche, Universita di Roma Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma (Italy)

    2011-01-21

    We show that Cu metal nanoparticle-multiwall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) assemblies can act as a new hybrid photoactive layer in photo-electrochemical devices. The carbon nanotube (CNT) composites were formed by a controlled thermal deposition of copper which produced crystalline metal nanoparticles localized on the carbon tube outer walls. The photoresponse evaluated in terms of IPCE (incident photon-to-charge carrier generation efficiency) varied for different sized-Cu-MWCNT samples across all the visible and near ultraviolet photon energy range with respect to the response of bare MWCNTs. In the case of 0.2 nm Cu nominal thickness, the IPCE increased, reaching 15%, a value 2.5 times higher than that measured for bare MWCNTs. As the Cu nominal coverage thickened, the IPCE started to decrease and become totally ineffective after 1 nm deposited Cu. The IPCE increase found was interpreted as being the result of a remarkable charge transfer between the Cu metal nanoparticles and the CNTs due to the formation of a strong ionic bond at their interface. The results obtained prove that the metal nanoparticle-CNT composites have optical, electrical and structural properties that can be applied in a variety of nanoscale architectures for novel photo-electrochemical devices.

  3. Electrical stimulation of neural stem cells mediated by humanized carbon nanotube composite made with extracellular matrix protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kam, Nadine Wong Shi; Jan, Edward; Kotov, Nicholas A

    2009-01-01

    One of the key challenges to engineering neural interfaces is to minimize their immune response toward implanted electrodes. One potential approach is to manufacture materials that bear greater structural resemblance to living tissues and by utilizing neural stem cells. The unique electrical and mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes make them excellent candidates for neural interfaces, but their adoption hinges on finding approaches for "humanizing" their composites. Here we demonstrated the fabrication of layer-by-layer assembled composites from single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and laminin, which is an essential part of human extracellular matrix. Laminin-SWNT thin films were found to be conducive to neural stem cells (NSC) differentiation and suitable for their successful excitation. We observed extensive formation of functional neural network as indicated by the presence of synaptic connections. Calcium imaging of the NSCs revealed generation of action potentials upon the application of a lateral current through the SWNT substrate. These results indicate that the protein-SWNT composite can serve as materials foundation of neural electrodes with chemical structure better adapted with long-term integration with the neural tissue.

  4. The Toxicology of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, Ken; Poland, Craig; Duffin, Rodger; Bonner, James

    2012-06-01

    1. Carbon nanotube structure, synthesis and applications C. Singh and W. Song; 2. The aerodynamic behaviour and pulmonary deposition of carbon nanotubes A. Buckley, R. Smith and R Maynard; 3. Utilising the concept of the biologically effective dose to define the particle and fibre hazards of carbon nanotubes K. Donaldson, R. Duffin, F. Murphy and C. Poland; 4. CNT, biopersistence and the fibre paradigm D. Warheit and M. DeLorme; 5. Length-dependent retention of fibres in the pleural space C. Poland, F. Murphy and K. Donaldson; 6. Experimental carcinogenicity of carbon nanotubes in the context of other fibres K. Unfried; 7. Fate and effects of carbon nanotubes following inhalation J. Ryman-Rasmussen, M. Andersen and J. Bonner; 8. Responses to pulmonary exposure to carbon nanotubes V. Castranova and R. Mercer; 9. Genotoxicity of carbon nanotubes R. Schins, C. Albrecht, K. Gerloff and D. van Berlo; 10. Carbon nanotube-cellular interactions; macrophages, epithelial and mesothelial cells V. Stone, M. Boyles, A. Kermanizadeh, J. Varet and H. Johnston; 11. Systemic health effects of carbon nanotubes following inhalation J. McDonald; 12. Dosimetry and metrology of carbon nanotubes L. Tran, L. MacCalman and R. Aitken; Index.

  5. Enzymatic degradation of multiwalled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yong; Allen, Brett L; Star, Alexander

    2011-09-01

    Because of their unique properties, carbon nanotubes and, in particular, multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) have been used for the development of advanced composite and catalyst materials. Despite their growing commercial applications and increased production, the potential environmental and toxicological impacts of MWNTs are not fully understood; however, many reports suggest that they may be toxic. Therefore, a need exists to develop protocols for effective and safe degradation of MWNTs. In this article, we investigated the effect of chemical functionalization of MWNTs on their enzymatic degradation with horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)). We investigated HRP/H(2)O(2) degradation of purified, oxidized, and nitrogen-doped MWNTs and proposed a layer-by-layer degradation mechanism of nanotubes facilitated by side wall defects. These results provide a better understanding of the interaction between HRP and carbon nanotubes and suggest an eco-friendly way of mitigating the environmental impact of nanotubes.

  6. Hybrid Carbon Fibers/Carbon Nanotubes Structures for Next Generation Polymeric Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    carbon fiber surfaces. Electrochemical deposition of iron using pulse voltametry is compared to DC magnetron iron sputtering. Carbon nanostructures...04 5E − 04 6E − 04 Figure 2: Cyclic Voltammogramm 0f 0.05 M FeCl3. 6H2O/KOH (pH = 3), with scan rate 50 mV/s. 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 Time (s) C u...deposition the electrolyte-electrode interface was studies to set suitable parameters for the deposition experiment. Cyclic voltammetry was utilized to set

  7. Optical Limiting Properties of Two Soluble Polymer/Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIU Xue-Qiong; Wu Hui-Xia; TONG Rui; QIAN Shi-Xiong; LIN Yang-Hui; CAI Rui-Fang

    2008-01-01

    Two soluble polymer grafted multi-walled carbon nanotubes(MWNTs),including poly(N-vinylcarbazole)-MwNTs and poly(methyl methacrylate)-MWNTs,are synthesized.Their nonlinear optical properties and optical limiting(OL)performances are investigated by z-scan method with 527nm nanosecond laser pulses.These grafted MWNTs dissolved in chlorform show much better optical limiting performance than those of MWNTs and C60 in toluene solution.Nonlinear absorption and nonlinear scattering mechanism are taken into consideration for explaining the observed results.The comparison of the experimental results shows that nonlinear absorption is the dominant mechanism for OL performance of these new samples.

  8. Sheet resistances of composite films prepared from chemically-reduced graphite oxides and multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Weontae; Kim, Daehan; Jeong, Euh Duck; Bae, Jong-Seong

    2013-12-01

    Graphite oxides (GOs) were spray-coated on a glass substrate to prepare the GO film, and the film was soaked in a HI aqueous solution to make a chemically-reduced GO (rGO) film. The rGOs were successfully prepared by using a chemical reduction of as-made GOs, but their surfaces were seriously damaged during the chemical treatments. The Sheet resistances of rGO and rGO/multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT) films were characterized as functions of the film's thickness and the number of MWNTs added to the rGO films.

  9. Carbon Nanotube Purification and Functionalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebron, Marisabel; Mintz, Eric; Smalley, Richard E.; Meador, Michael A.

    2003-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes have the potential to significantly enhance the mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties of polymers. However, dispersion of carbon nanotubes in a polymer matrix is hindered by the electrostatic forces that cause them to agglomerate. Chemical modification of the nanotubes is necessary to minimize these electrostatic forces and promote adhesion between the nanotubes and the polymer matrix. In a collaborative research program between Clark Atlanta University, Rice University, and NASA Glenn Research Center several approaches are being explored to chemically modify carbon nanotubes. The results of this research will be presented.

  10. Polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes/carbon nanotube/carbon fiber multiscale composite: Influence of a novel hierarchical reinforcement on the interfacial properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, R. L.; Wang, C. G.; Liu, L.; Cui, H. Z.; Gao, B.

    2015-10-01

    A novel hierarchical reinforcing carbon fiber through co-grafting carbon nanotube (CNTs) and polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POSS) was prepared in this paper. The structure and surface characteristics of the grafted carbon fiber were investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), thermogravimetry (TG) and scanning electron microscope (SEM), respectively. The surface energy and the functional groups of the carbon fiber surface were increased obviously after modification. The ILSS results showed that there was a remarkable improvement in the interfacial properties of the new hybrid CF-CNTs-POSS composites. The investigation can prove an effective way to increase the interfacial adhesion and improve the mechanical performance of the fiber/resin composites on the desired application.

  11. Mechanical properties of PET composites using multi-walled carbon nanotubes functionalized by inorganic and itaconic acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. May-Pat

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs were oxidized by two different acid treatments and further functionalized with itaconic acid (IA. The functionalized MWCNTs were used to fabricate Poly(ethylene terephthalate (PET composites by melt mixing. The presence of functional groups on the surface of the treated MWCNTs was confirmed by infrared spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis. The MWCNTs oxidized with a concentrated mixture of HNO3 and H2SO4 exhibited more oxygen containing functional groups (OH, COOH but also suffer larger structural degradation than those oxidized by a mild treatment based on diluted HNO3 followed by H2O2. PET composites were fabricated using the oxidized-only and oxidized followed by functionalization with IA MWCNTs. PET composites fabricated with MWCNT oxidized by mild conditions showed improved tensile strength and failure strain, while harsh MWCNT oxidation render them overly brittle.

  12. The effect of an electrically conductive carbon nanotube/collagen composite on neurite outgrowth of PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Youngnam; Borgens, Richard Ben

    2010-11-01

    We report the preparation of an electrically conductive composite composed of collagen and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and its use as a substrate for the in vitro growth of PC12 cells. Morphological observation by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) indicated the homogenous dispersion of CNTs in the collagen matrix. Four-point probe and cyclic voltammogram studies demonstrated the enhanced electroactivity and a lowered electrical resistivity of the resulting composites even at low loadings (collagen matrix. SEM and immunofluorescent images have indicated that the morphological features of PC12 cells were dominantly influenced by electrical potential. Greater neurite extension was preferentially induced on the exposure of electrical stimulation by facilitating the differentiation of PC12 cells into neurons indicated by more significant filopodium extension. These electrically conductive, biocompatible CNT/collagen composites could be of benefit for the development of novel neural electrodes, enhancing the growth, differentiation, and branching of neurons in an electrically driven way.

  13. Ion-modulated nonlinear electronic transport in carbon nanotube bundle/RbAg4I5 thin film composite nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jia-Lin; Zhang, Wei; Wei, Jinquan; Gu, Bingfu

    2014-01-01

    We have explored the ion-modulated electronic transport properties of mixed ionic-electronic conductor (MIEC) composite nanostructures made of superionic conductor RbAg4I5 films and carbon nanotube (CNT) bundle spiderwebs. Our experimental and theoretical studies indicate that the formation of ion-electron bound states (IEBSs) leads to strong ion-electron interference effect and interesting electronic transport of CNT, such as nonlinear current-voltage (I-V) characteristics and novel temperature dependence of the current. With increasing temperature, the hybrid nanostructures show rich phases with different dependence of current on temperature, which is related to the structural phase transition of RbAg4I5 and the transition of dissociation of IEBSs. The ion-modulation of the electric conductivity in such MIEC composite nanostructures with great tunability has been used to design new ionic-electronic composite nano-devices with function like field effect transistor.

  14. Preparation and properties of multi-wall carbon nanotube/SiC composites by aqueous tape casting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L(U) ZhiHui; JIANG DongLiang; ZHANG JingXian; LIN QingLing

    2009-01-01

    MWCNTS/SiC composites were fabricated by aqueous tape casting. High solid content (50 vol%) SiC slurries with sintering additives and multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) as reinforcements were prepared using Tetramethylammonium hydroxide as the dispersant. The stability of MWCNTs/SiC slur-ries was studied and characterized in terms of zeta potential and rheology measurements. The relative density of the composite was about 98% after hot-pressing at 1850℃ (at 25 MPa in Ar for 30 min). The hardness of the composites decreased with the increase in MWCNTs content, The flexural strength and was 0,25 wt%. Further increase in MWCNTs content to 0.50 wt% did not lead to the increase in me-chanical properties. Most of MWCNTs were found to be located at SiC grain boundaries and the pull out of the MWCNTs was observed.

  15. Compression Molded Ultra High Molecular Weight Polyethylene-Hydroxyapatite-Aluminum Oxide-Carbon Nanotube Hybrid Composites for Hard Tissue Replacement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ankur Gupta; Garima Tripathi; Debrupa Lahiri; Kantesh Balani

    2013-01-01

    Ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) is widely used for articulating surfaces in total hip and knee replacements.In the present work,UHMWPE based polymer composites were synthesized by synergistic reinforcing of bioactive hydroxyapatite (HA),bioinert aluminum oxide (Al2O3),and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) using compression molding.Phase and microstructural analysis suggests retention of UHMWPE and reinforcing phases in the compression molded composites.Microstructural analysis elicited variation in densification due to the size effect of the reinforcing particles.The hybrid composites exhibited hardness,elastic modulus and toughness comparable to that of UHMWPE.The interfacial effect of reinforcement phases has evinced the effectiveness of Al2O3 over HA and CNT reinforcements,depicting synergistic enhancement in hardness and elastic modulus.Weak interfacial bonding of polymer matrix with HA and CNT requires utilization of coupling agents to achieve enhanced mechanical properties without deteriorating cytocompatible properties.

  16. Production of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journet, C.; Bernier, P.

    Carbon nanostructures such as single-walled and multi-walled nanotubes (SWNTs and MWNTs) or graphitic polyhedral nanoparticles can be produced using various methods. Most of them are based on the sublimation of carbon under an inert atmosphere, such as the electric arc discharge process, the laser ablation method, or the solar technique. But chemical methods can also be used to synthesize these kinds of carbon materials: the catalytic decomposition of hydrocarbons, the production by electrolysis, the heat treatment of a polymer, the low temperature solid pyrolysis, or the in situ catalysis.

  17. p-toluene sulfonic acid doped polyaniline carbon nanotube composites: synthesis via different routes and modified properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ASHOK K. SHARMA

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Composites of polyaniline and carbon nanotube (CNT were prepared by in-situ chemical polymerization method using various aniline concentrations in the initial polymerization solution with p-toluene sulfonic acid (PTS as secondary dopant and mechanical mixing of the PANI and CNT using different weight ratios of PANI and CNTs. The structural characterizations of the composites were done by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR and Ultra violet visible spectroscopy (UV-Visible. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM was used to characterize the surface morphology of the composites. It was found that the composites prepared by in-situ chemical polymerization had smoother surface morphology in comparison to the composites obtained by mechanical mixing. The capacitive studies reveal that the in-situ composite has synergistic effect and the specific capacitance of the composite calculated from cyclic voltammogram (CV was 385.1 F/g. Thermal studies indicate that the composites are stable as compared to PANI alone showing that the CNT contributes towards thermal stability in the PANI-CNT composites.

  18. Electrical properties of multiphase composites based on carbon nanotubes and an optimized clay content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egiziano, Luigi; Lamberti, Patrizia; Spinelli, Giovanni; Tucci, Vincenzo; Guadagno, Liberata; Vertuccio, Luigi

    2016-05-01

    The experimental results concerning the characterization of a multiphase nanocomposite systems based on epoxy matrix, loaded with different amount of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and an optimized Hydrotalcite (HT) clay content (i.e. 0.6 wt%), duly identified by an our previous theoretical study based on Design of Experiment (DoE), are presented. Dynamic-mechanical analysis (DMA) reveal that even the introduction of higher HT loading (up to 1%wt) don't affect significantly the mechanical properties of the nanocomposites while morphological investigations show an effective synergy between clay and carbon nanotubes that leads to peculiar micro/nanostructures that favor the creation of the electrical conductive network inside the insulating resin. An electrical characterization is carried out in terms of DC electrical conductivity, percolation threshold (EPT) and frequency response in the range 10Hz-1MHz. In particular, the measurements of the DC conductivity allow to obtain the typical "percolation" curve also found for classical CNT-polymer mixtures and a value of about 2 S/m for the electrical conductivity is achieved at the highest considered CNTs concentration (i.e. 1 wt%). The results suggest that multiphase nanocomposites obtained incorporating dispersive nanofillers, in addition to the conductive one, may be a valid alternative to the polymer blends, to improve the properties of the polymeric materials thus able to meet high demands, particularly concerning their mechanical and thermal stability and electrical features required in the aircraft engineering.

  19. The effect of protein corona composition on the interaction of carbon nanotubes with human blood platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Paoli, Silvia H; Diduch, Lukas L; Tegegn, Tseday Z; Orecna, Martina; Strader, Michael B; Karnaukhova, Elena; Bonevich, John E; Holada, Karel; Simak, Jan

    2014-08-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) are one of the most promising nanomaterials for use in medicine. The blood biocompatibility of CNT is a critical safety issue. In the bloodstream, proteins bind to CNT through non-covalent interactions to form a protein corona, thereby largely defining the biological properties of the CNT. Here, we characterize the interactions of carboxylated-multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTCOOH) with common human proteins and investigate the effect of the different protein coronas on the interaction of CNTCOOH with human blood platelets (PLT). Molecular modeling and different photophysical techniques were employed to characterize the binding of albumin (HSA), fibrinogen (FBG), γ-globulins (IgG) and histone H1 (H1) on CNTCOOH. We found that the identity of protein forming the corona greatly affects the outcome of CNTCOOH's interaction with blood PLT. Bare CNTCOOH-induced PLT aggregation and the release of platelet membrane microparticles (PMP). HSA corona attenuated the PLT aggregating activity of CNTCOOH, while FBG caused the agglomeration of CNTCOOH nanomaterial, thereby diminishing the effect of CNTCOOH on PLT. In contrast, the IgG corona caused PLT fragmentation, and the H1 corona induced a strong PLT aggregation, thus potentiating the release of PMP.

  20. Electromagnetic characterization and shielding effectiveness of concrete composite reinforced with carbon nanotubes in the mobile phones frequency band

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Micheli, D., E-mail: davide.micheli@uniroma1.it [“Sapienza” University of Rome, Department of Astronautic, Electric and Energy Engineering (DIAEE), Via Salaria 851, 00184 Rome (Italy); Pastore, R.; Vricella, A.; Morles, R.B.; Marchetti, M.; Delfini, A. [“Sapienza” University of Rome, Department of Astronautic, Electric and Energy Engineering (DIAEE), Via Salaria 851, 00184 Rome (Italy); Moglie, F.; Primiani, V. Mariani [Università Politecnica delle Marche, Department of Information Engineering (DII), Via Brecce Bianche 12, Ancona (Italy)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • The frequency band 0.75–1.12 GHz is exploited in mobile phone radio access network. • A lot of nanomaterial is needed for the measurement and no literature is available. • The manufacturing procedure is usually used for preparation of concrete composite. • High EM absorbing walls could be used to mitigate the human exposure to EM fields. • A shielding effectiveness of 50 dB is obtained for a 15 cm thick wall–3 wt% of CNT. - Abstract: The electromagnetic properties of carbon nanotube powder reinforced concretes are numerically and experimentally characterized. This typology of composite material is built by following the simple procedure usually adopted for the on-site concrete production. The dielectric parameters are investigated by means of waveguide measurements in the frequency band 0.75–1.12 GHz that is currently exploited in mobile phone radio access networks. The obtained results are used to compute the electromagnetic shielding effectiveness of large wall-shaped concrete structures. A shielding effectiveness up to 50 dB is obtained for a 15 cm thick wall when the carbon nanotube inclusion is raised up to 3 wt%.

  1. Enhancement of nanofibrous scaffold of multiwalled carbon nanotubes/polyurethane composite to the fibroblasts growth and biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Jie; Kong, Hua; Han, Zhaozhao; Wang, Chaoying; Zhu, Guangjin; Xie, Sishen; Xu, Haiyan

    2009-01-01

    In this work, the effect of nanofibrous structure and multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) incorporation in the polyurethane (PU) on the fibroblasts growth behavior was studied. The nanofibrous scaffold of multiwalled carbon nanotubes and polyurethane composite (MWNT/PU) with an average fiber diameter of 300-500 nm was fabricated by electrospinning technique. The nanofibrous scaffold of PU, smooth film of PU, and MWNT/PU were also prepared as controls. Cell viability assay, laser confocal microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy were applied to evaluate cell adhesion, proliferation, and cytoskeletal development on the scaffolds, respectively. Cell-released protein was analyzed by Bradford protein assay, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), mass spectrometry, and transwell assay, respectively. Experimental results demonstrated that the scaffold with nanofibrous structure and MWNTs incorporation exhibited highest enhancement not only to the cell adhesion and proliferation but also to the cell migration and aggregation. Besides, cells cultured on the nanofibrous scaffold of MWNT/PU released the largest amount of proteins including collagen in comparison with those on the other substrates. Hence, the nanofibrous architecture and MWNTs incorporation provided favorite interactions to the cells, which implied the application potentials of the nanofibrous composite for tissue repair and regeneration.

  2. Deconvoluting hepatic processing of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alidori, Simone; Bowman, Robert L.; Yarilin, Dmitry; Romin, Yevgeniy; Barlas, Afsar; Mulvey, J. Justin; Fujisawa, Sho; Xu, Ke; Ruggiero, Alessandro; Riabov, Vladimir; Thorek, Daniel L. J.; Ulmert, Hans David S.; Brea, Elliott J.; Behling, Katja; Kzhyshkowska, Julia; Manova-Todorova, Katia; Scheinberg, David A.; McDevitt, Michael R.

    2016-07-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes present unique opportunities for drug delivery, but have not advanced into the clinic. Differential nanotube accretion and clearance from critical organs have been observed, but the mechanism not fully elucidated. The liver has a complex cellular composition that regulates a range of metabolic functions and coincidently accumulates most particulate drugs. Here we provide the unexpected details of hepatic processing of covalently functionalized nanotubes including receptor-mediated endocytosis, cellular trafficking and biliary elimination. Ammonium-functionalized fibrillar nanocarbon is found to preferentially localize in the fenestrated sinusoidal endothelium of the liver but not resident macrophages. Stabilin receptors mediate the endocytic clearance of nanotubes. Biocompatibility is evidenced by the absence of cell death and no immune cell infiltration. Towards clinical application of this platform, nanotubes were evaluated for the first time in non-human primates. The pharmacologic profile in cynomolgus monkeys is equivalent to what was reported in mice and suggests that nanotubes should behave similarly in humans.

  3. The structure and optical properties of regio-regular poly(3-hexylthiophene) and carboxylic multi-walled carbon nanotubes composite films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Han-Dong; Zheng, Fei; Xu, Wei-Long; Yuan, Wei-Hao; Zhu, Meng-Qi; Hao, Xiao-Tao

    2014-12-01

    The introduction of small amounts of carboxylic multi-walled carbon nanotubes into regio-regular poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) can vary the structure and optical properties of the polymer. The microstructure of the composite film was analysed by various techniques including x-ray diffraction, ultraviolet-visible optical absorption, Raman spectroscopy, and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. It is shown that the presence of carbon nanotubes can improve the crystallinity and increase the conjugation length of P3HT in the films. Furthermore, an obvious photoluminescence quenching is observed in the P3HT/CNTs composite films, suggesting the possibility of photoinduced electron transfer between P3HT and carbon nanotubes due to the π-π interaction of these two components. These results are important for applications in bulk heterojunction solar cells and organic photo-detectors.

  4. Carbon nanotube network varactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Generalov, A. A.; Anoshkin, I. V.; Erdmanis, M.; Lioubtchenko, D. V.; Ovchinnikov, V.; Nasibulin, A. G.; Räisänen, A. V.

    2015-01-01

    Microelectromechanical system (MEMS) varactors based on a freestanding layer of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) films were designed, fabricated and tested. The freestanding SWCNT film was employed as a movable upper patch in the parallel plate capacitor of the MEMS. The measurements of the SWCNT varactors show very high tunability, nearly 100%, of the capacitance with a low actuation voltage of 10 V. The functionality of the varactor is improved by implementing a flexible nanocellulose aerogel filling.

  5. Carbon Nanotube Thermoelectric Coolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-06

    conductance. Inside thecentral section of the carbon nanotube, we obtained an impressive Peltier cooling 57 K down from the liquid nitrogentemperature. 15... trapped charges or dipoles) that occur either at the interface between the CNT and the gate dielectric (interface defects) or at some position within... liquid nitrogen temperature 77T  K up to hot 134 8T  K, or decreases from 77T  K down to about cold 20 6T  K, thus evidencing a strong

  6. Carbon nanotube biosensors

    OpenAIRE

    Tîlmaciu, Carmen-Mihaela; Morris, May C

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterials possess unique features which make them particularly attractive for biosensing applications. In particular, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can serve as scaffolds for immobilization of biomolecules at their surface, and combine several exceptional physical, chemical, electrical, and optical characteristics properties which make them one of the best suited materials for the transduction of signals associated with the recognition of analytes, metabolites, or disease biomarkers. Here we pr...

  7. Electrical Resistivity, Tribological Behaviour of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes and Nanoboron Carbide Particles Reinforced Copper Hybrid Composites for Pantograph Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Selvakumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This work focuses on the influence and contribution of multiwalled carbon-nanotube (MWCNT–boron carbide (B4C to the mechanical and tribological properties of copper matrix composites. Different weight fractions of nano- B4C-containing fixed-weight fractions of MWCNT-reinforced copper composites were prepared using the entrenched cold-press sintering method of powder metallurgy. The wear losses of sintered Cu–MWCNT–B4C composites were investigated by conducting sliding tests in a pin-on-disc apparatus. The addition of reinforcements showed enhancements in the hardness and wear properties of the composites due to the uniform dispersion of the secondary reinforcement in the copper matrix and the self-lubricating effect of the MWCNTs. The effects of the nanoparticle distribution in the matrix, the worn surface morphology, and the elemental composition of the composites were characterized using high-resolution scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. The electrical resistivity of the fabricated copper hybrid composite preforms was evaluated using a four-point probe tester. Our results highlight the use of experiential reinforcing limits of B4C on the wear and electrical and mechanical behaviour of copper composites.

  8. Macroscopic Crosslinked Neat Carbon Nanotube Materials and CNT/Carbon Fiber Hybrid Composites: Supermolecular Structure and New Failure Mode Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    bubbles in carbon fiber layers were not able to be expelled, resulting in a high void content. In contrast to the CF layers, SEM examination indicated... Reinforcement on the Processing and the Mechanical Behaviour of Carbon Fiber/epoxy Composites. Carbon 2009, 47 (12), 2914–2923. (135) Kharisov, B. I...50  4.4 Permeability  Results

  9. From Carbon Nanotube Crystals to Carbon Nanotube Flowers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhengjun; ZHAO Ye; ZHOU Ya

    2005-01-01

    We have investigated the very initial deposition stages of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) with ferrocene (Fe(C5H5)2) and xylene (C8H10) for growing carbon nanotubes, and made clear that the mechanism for the self-organization behaviors of nanotubes at different growth stages by this approach. For instance, the organization of nanotubes into flower-like structures at prolonged deposition is developed from the crystal-like structures formed at early growth stages, both of which are closely related to and determined by the very initial deposition stages of this CVD approach. Based on this approach, ways have been established to build up different architectures of carbon nanotubes, by controlling the initial deposition stages of the CVD process, with which we have realized the selective growth of self-organized carbon nanotube structures. This study provides a new idea for growing carbon nanotube architectures by CVD.

  10. Carbon Nanotubes Based Quantum Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jian-Ping

    1999-01-01

    This document represents the final report for the NASA cooperative agreement which studied the application of carbon nanotubes. The accomplishments are reviewed: (1) Wrote a review article on carbon nanotubes and its potentials for applications in nanoscale quantum devices. (2) Extensive studies on the effects of structure deformation on nanotube electronic structure and energy band gaps. (3) Calculated the vibrational spectrum of nanotube rope and the effect of pressure. and (4) Investigate the properties of Li intercalated nanotube ropes and explore their potential for energy storage materials and battery applications. These studies have lead to four publications and seven abstracts in international conferences.

  11. Study of Silicon Nitrate and Tin Dioxide carbon nanotube composite as lithium-ion battery anode, gas sensor and the self-assembly of carbon nanotubes on copper substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Lugo, Dionne M.

    Carbon nanotubes since their discovery have been used for many applications. They are predicted to reinforce novel composite materials because of their structural perfection, excellent mechanical properties and low density. CNT can be made into nanowires of different materials or as part of a composite making them beneficial for the incorporation into electrochemical devices. Carbon nanotubes in this study were gown directly on a copper substrate employing hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD). Bamboo-like carbon nanotubes were made into electrodes reducing the use of inactive materials on the development of working electrodes for electrochemical application. This BCNT were tested as lithium-ion battery anodes assembled together with high capacity materials such as Silicon and Tin Oxide (4200mAh/g and 782 mAh/g). On this study BCNT served as a conductive matrix as well as buffer matrix for the volume expansion brought by cycling silicon and tin oxide. The composite structural properties enhance the surface-to-volume ratio of the electrode demonstrating a desirable electrochemical performance for a lithium-ion battery anode. As a gas sensor electrode CNT was assembled with tin-oxide directly on a copper substrate for the detection of ethanol, methanol, ammonia and H2S. CNT gave a higher surface area and a conductive matrix aiding to the sensing capabilities of the SnO2 increasing the effectiveness of the matrix material for gas detection. Copper is known to produce CNT with a disturb structure. To develop an electrode on copper with well-ordered CNT other techniques need to be used. One way to do this is by chemical modification of the copper substrate with a molecule able to react with the carbon nanotube. For the attachment of well-ordered carbon nanotubes such as SWCNT a self-assembly monolayer technique is chosen. On this study 4-aminothiophenol served as the linker between the copper substrate and the carbon nanotubes. This study let to chemically

  12. Analysis of interlaminar fracture toughness and damage mechanisms in composite laminates reinforced with sprayed multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Almuhammadi, Khaled

    2014-01-01

    The present work is focused on the nanoreinforcement of prepreg based carbon fiber composite laminates to improve delamination resistance. Functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were dispersed over the interface between prepreg layers through solvent spraying and the resulting mode I interlaminar fracture toughness was determined. For comparison, baseline samples with neat prepregs were also prepared. Results indicate that the introduction of functionalized MWCNTs can favorably affect the interlaminar fracture toughness, and the associated mechanisms of failure have been investigated. The manufacturing procedures and the interfacial reinforcing mechanism were explored by analyzing (i) the wettability between CNTs-solvent solution and prepreg surface, (ii) CNTs dispersion and (iii) the fractured surfaces through high resolution scanning electron microscopy and Raman mapping. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Nickel Sulfide/Graphene/Carbon Nanotube Composites as Electrode Material for the Supercapacitor Application in the Sea Flashing Signal System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hailong Chen; Ji Li; Conglai Long; Tong Wei; Guoqing Ning; Jun Yan; Zhuangjun Fan

    2014-01-01

    This work presents NiS/graphene/carbon nanotube (NiS/GNS/CNT) composites as electrode material for the supercapacitor application in sea flashing signal systems. NiS nanosheets were closely anchored on the conductive GNS-CNT networks. As a result, the NiS/GNS/CNT electrode showed a high specific capacitance of 2 377 F·g-1 at 2 mV·s-1 and good cycling stability compared with the pure NiS (1 599 F·g-1 ). The enhanced electrochemical performances are attributed to the synergetic effect between the conductive carbon and the pseudo-capacitive NiS. The high performance supercapacitor may provide application in the sea flashing signal system.

  14. Electrochemical sensing of DNA immobilization and hybridization based on carbon nanotubes/nano zinc oxide/chitosan composite film

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Zhang; Tao Yang; Da Ming Huang; Kui Jiao

    2008-01-01

    A novel electrochemical DNA biosensor based on zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs)for DNA immobilization and enhanced hybridization detection is presented. The MWNTs/nano ZnO/chitosan composite filmmodified glassy carbon electrode (MWNTs/ZnO/CHIT/GCE) was fabricated and DNA probes were immobilized on the electrodesurface. The hybridization events were monitored by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) using methylene blue (MB) as anindicator. The sensor can effectively discriminate different DNA sequences related to PAT gene in the.transgenic corn, with adetection limit of 2.8×10-12 mol/L of target sequence.2008 Kui Jiao. Published by Elsevier B.V. on behalf of Chinese Chemical Society. All rights reserved.

  15. Synergistic effect of carbon nanofiber/nanotube composite catalyst on carbon felt electrode for high-performance all-vanadium redox flow battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Minjoon; Jung, Yang-jae; Kim, Jungyun; Lee, Ho il; Cho, Jeaphil

    2013-10-01

    Carbon nanofiber/nanotube (CNF/CNT) composite catalysts grown on carbon felt (CF), prepared from a simple way involving the thermal decomposition of acetylene gas over Ni catalysts, are studied as electrode materials in a vanadium redox flow battery. The electrode with the composite catalyst prepared at 700 °C (denoted as CNF/CNT-700) demonstrates the best electrocatalytic properties toward the V(2+)/V(3+) and VO(2+)/VO2(+) redox couples among the samples prepared at 500, 600, 700, and 800 °C. Moreover, this composite electrode in the full cell exhibits substantially improved discharge capacity and energy efficiency by ~64% and by ~25% at 40 mA·cm(-2) and 100 mA·cm(-2), respectively, compared to untreated CF electrode. This outstanding performance is due to the enhanced surface defect sites of exposed edge plane in CNF and a fast electron transfer rate of in-plane side wall of the CNT.

  16. Ultra fast UV-photo detector based on single-walled carbon nanotube/PEDOT-PSS composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najeeb, Choolakadavil Khalid; Lee, Jae-Hyoek; Chang, Jingbo; Kang, Won-Seok; Kim, Jae-Ho

    2009-12-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT)/Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-poly(styrenesulfonate) (P