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Sample records for carbon nanotube atomic

  1. Atomic transportation via carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Quan

    2009-01-01

    The transportation of helium atoms in a single-walled carbon nanotube is reported via molecular dynamics simulations. The efficiency of the atomic transportation is found to be dependent on the type of the applied loading and the loading rate as well as the temperature in the process. Simulations show the transportation is a result of the van der Waals force between the nanotube and the helium atoms through a kink propagation initiated in the nanotube.

  2. From carbon nanotubes to carbon atomic chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casillas García, Gilberto; Zhang, Weijia; José-Yacamán, Miguel

    2010-10-01

    Carbyne is a linear allotrope of carbon. It is formed by a linear arrangement of carbon atoms with sp-hybridization. We present a reliable and reproducible experiment to obtain these carbon atomic chains using few-layer-graphene (FLG) sheets and a HRTEM. First the FLG sheets were synthesized from worm-like exfoliated graphite and then drop-casted on a lacey-carbon copper grid. Once in the TEM, two holes are opened near each other in a FLG sheet by focusing the electron beam into a small spot. Due to the radiation, the carbon atoms rearrange themselves between the two holes and form carbon fibers. The beam is concentrated on the carbon fibers in order excite the atoms and induce a tension until multi wall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) is formed. As the radiation continues the MWCNT breaks down until there is only a single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT). Then, when the SWCNT breaks, an atomic carbon chain is formed, lasts for several seconds under the radiation and finally breaks. This demonstrates the stability of this carbon structure.

  3. Nanoscale atomic waveguides with suspended carbon nanotubes

    CERN Document Server

    Peano, V; Kasper, A; Egger, R

    2005-01-01

    We propose an experimentally viable setup for the realization of one-dimensional ultracold atom gases in a nanoscale magnetic waveguide formed by single doubly-clamped suspended carbon nanotubes. We show that all common decoherence and atom loss mechanisms are small guaranteeing a stable operation of the trap. Since the extremely large current densities in carbon nanotubes are spatially homogeneous, our proposed architecture allows to overcome the problem of fragmentation of the atom cloud. Adding a second nanowire allows to create a double-well potential with a moderate tunneling barrier which is desired for tunneling and interference experiments with the advantage of tunneling distances being in the nanometer regime.

  4. Near-field Electrodynamics of Atomically Doped Carbon Nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Bondarev, Igor V.; Lambin, Philippe

    2005-01-01

    We develop a quantum theory of near-field electrodynamical properties of carbon nanotubes and investigate spontaneous decay dynamics of excited states and van der Waals attraction of the ground state of an atomic system close to a single-wall nanotube surface. Atomic spontaneous decay exhibits vacuum-field Rabi oscillations -- a principal signature of strong atom-vacuum-field coupling. The strongly coupled atomic state is nothing but a 'quasi-1D cavity polariton'. Its stability is mainly dete...

  5. Atomic scale simulation of carbon nanotube nucleation from hydrocarbon precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalilov, Umedjon; Bogaerts, Annemie; Neyts, Erik C

    2015-12-22

    Atomic scale simulations of the nucleation and growth of carbon nanotubes is essential for understanding their growth mechanism. In spite of over twenty years of simulation efforts in this area, limited progress has so far been made on addressing the role of the hydrocarbon growth precursor. Here we report on atomic scale simulations of cap nucleation of single-walled carbon nanotubes from hydrocarbon precursors. The presented mechanism emphasizes the important role of hydrogen in the nucleation process, and is discussed in relation to previously presented mechanisms. In particular, the role of hydrogen in the appearance of unstable carbon structures during in situ experimental observations as well as the initial stage of multi-walled carbon nanotube growth is discussed. The results are in good agreement with available experimental and quantum-mechanical results, and provide a basic understanding of the incubation and nucleation stages of hydrocarbon-based CNT growth at the atomic level.

  6. Immersing carbon nano-tubes in cold atomic gases

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the sympathetic relaxation of a free-standing, vibrating carbon nano-tube that is mounted on an atom chip and is immersed in a cloud of ultra-cold atoms. Gas atoms colliding with the nano-tube excite phonons via a Casimir-Polder potential. We use Fermi's Golden Rule to estimate the relaxation rates for relevant experimental parameters and develop a fully dynamic theory of relaxation for the multi-mode phononic field embedded in a thermal atomic reservoir. Based on currently ava...

  7. Carbon nanotubes as tips for atomic force microscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    国立秋; 徐宗伟; 赵铁强; 赵清亮; 张飞虎; 董申

    2004-01-01

    Ordinary AFM probes' characters prevent the AFM' s application in various scopes. Carbon nanotubes represent ideal AFM probe materials for their higher aspect ratio, larger Young' s modulus, unique chemical structure, and well-defined electronic property. Carbon nanotube AFM probes are obtained by using a new method of attaching carbon nanotubes to the end of ordinary AFM probes, and are then used for doing AFM experiments. These experiments indicated that carbon nanotube probes have higher elastic deformation, higher resolution and higher durability. And it was also found that carbon nanotube probes can accurately reflect the morphology of deep narrow gaps, while ordinary probes can not reflect.

  8. Van der Waals and Casimir interactions between atoms and carbon nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Klimchitskaya, G. L.(Central Astronomical Observatory at Pulkovo of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 196140, St. Petersburg, Russia); Blagov, E. V.; Mostepanenko, V. M.

    2008-01-01

    The van der Waals and Casimir interactions of a hydrogen atom (molecule) with a single-walled and a multiwalled carbon nanotubes are compared. It is shown that the macroscopic concept of graphite dielectric permittivity is already applicable for nanotubes with only two or three walls. The absorption of hydrogen atoms by a nanotube at separations below one nanometer is considered. The lateral force due to exchange repulsion moves the atom to a position above the cell center, where it is absorb...

  9. Integrating Carbon Nanotubes For Atomic Force Microscopy Imaging Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Qi; Cassell, Alan M.; Liu, Hongbing; Han, Jie; Meyyappan, Meyya

    2004-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) related nanostructures possess remarkable electrical, mechanical, and thermal properties. To produce these nanostructures for real world applications, a large-scale controlled growth of carbon nanotubes is crucial for the integration and fabrication of nanodevices and nanosensors. We have taken the approach of integrating nanopatterning and nanomaterials synthesis with traditional silicon micro fabrication techniques. This integration requires a catalyst or nanomaterial protection scheme. In this paper, we report our recent work on fabricating wafer-scale carbon nanotube AFM cantilever probe tips. We will address the design and fabrication considerations in detail, and present the preliminary scanning probe test results. This work may serve as an example of rational design, fabrication, and integration of nanomaterials for advanced nanodevice and nanosensor applications.

  10. Carbon Nanotube Atomic Force Microscopy for Proteomics and Biological Forensics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noy, A; De Yoreo, J J; Malkin, A J

    2002-01-01

    , we have shown that AFM can already resolve some of the gross structural features of the virions themselves even in the absence of crystallization techniques (5). Our results show that the limitation on the applicability of this technique to structural studies of viruses and proteins is the size of the AFM tip which currently restricts the lateral resolution to about 10nm at best. The advent of carbon nanotube AFM probes made it possible to achieve unprecedented resolution in AFM imaging. Because single walled nanotubes have a radius of curvature of about 1nm, their use as AFM tips provides an order of magnitude improvement in lateral resolution. The purpose of this project was to use carbon nanotube tips to develop a new methodology for both determination of macromolecular structures and investigation of macromolecular crystallization. Our intent was to establish this methodology within the LLNL Directorates responsible for proteomics and biological forensics.

  11. Atomic Layer Deposition on Carbon Nanotubes and their Assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stano, Kelly Lynn

    Global issues related to energy and the environment have motivated development of advanced material solutions outside of traditional metals ceramics, and polymers. Taking inspiration from composites, where the combination of two or more materials often yields superior properties, the field of organic-inorganic hybrids has recently emerged. Carbon nanotube (CNT)-inorganic hybrids have drawn widespread and increasing interest in recent years due to their multifunctionality and potential impact across several technologically important application areas. Before the impacts of CNT-inorganic hybrids can be realized however, processing techniques must be developed for their scalable production. Optimization in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) methods for synthesis of CNTs and vertically aligned CNT arrays has created production routes both high throughput and economically feasible. Additionally, control of CVD parameters has allowed for growth of CNT arrays that are able to be drawn into aligned sheets and further processed to form a variety of aligned 1, 2, and 3-dimensional bulk assemblies including ribbons, yarns, and foams. To date, there have only been a few studies on utilizing these bulk assemblies for the production of CNT-inorganic hybrids. Wet chemical methods traditionally used for fabricating CNT-inorganic hybrids are largely incompatible with CNT assemblies, since wetting and drying the delicate structures with solvents can destroy their structure. It is therefore necessary to investigate alternative processing strategies in order to advance the field of CNT-inorganic hybrids. In this dissertation, atomic layer deposition (ALD) is evaluated as a synthetic route for the production of large-scale CNT-metal oxide hybrids as well as pure metal oxide architectures utilizing CNT arrays, ribbons, and ultralow density foams as deposition templates. Nucleation and growth behavior of alumina was evaluated as a function of CNT surface chemistry. While highly graphitic

  12. Weighing a single atom using a coupled plasmon–carbon nanotube system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Jin Li and Ka-Di Zhu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose an optical weighing technique with a sensitivity down to a single atom, using a surface plasmon and a doubly clamped carbon nanotube resonator. The mass of a single atom is determined via the vibrational frequency shift of the carbon nanotube while the atom attaches to the nanotube surface. Owing to the ultralight mass and high quality factor of the carbon nanotube, and the spectral enhancement by the use of surface plasmon, this method results in a narrow linewidth (kHz and high sensitivity (2.3×10−28 Hzcenterdot g−1, which is five orders of magnitude more sensitive than traditional electrical mass detection techniques.

  13. Carbon nanotube quantum dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sapmaz, S.

    2006-01-01

    Low temperature electron transport measurements on individual single wall carbon nanotubes are described in this thesis. Carbon nanotubes are small hollow cylinders made entirely out of carbon atoms. At low temperatures (below ~10 K) finite length nanotubes form quantum dots. Because of its small si

  14. van der Waals energy under strong atom-field coupling in doped carbon nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Bondarev, Igor; Lambin, Philippe

    2004-01-01

    Using a unified macroscopic QED formalism, we derive an integral equation for the van der Waals energy of a two-level atomic system near a carbon nanotube. The equation is valid for both strong and weak atom-vacuum-field coupling. By solving it numerically, we demonstrate the inapplicability of weak-coupling-based van der Waals interaction models in a close vicinity of the nanotube surface.

  15. van der Waals energy under strong atom field coupling in doped carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondarev, I. V.; Lambin, Ph.

    2004-10-01

    Using a unified macroscopic QED formalism, we derive an integral equation for the van der Waals energy of a two-level atomic system near a carbon nanotube. The equation is valid for both strong and weak atom-vacuum-field coupling. By solving it numerically, we demonstrate the inapplicability of weak-coupling-based van der Waals interaction models in a close vicinity of the nanotube surface.

  16. IMPROVED FABRICATION METHOD FOR CARBON NANOTUBE PROBE OF ATOMIC FORCE MICROSCOPY(AFM)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Zongwei; DONG Shen; GUO Liqiu; ZHAO Qingliang

    2006-01-01

    An improved arc discharge method is developed to fabricate carbon nanotube probe of atomic force microscopy (AFM) here. First, silicon probe and carbon nanotube are manipulated under an optical microscope by two high precision microtranslators. When silicon probe and carbon nanotube are very close, several tens voltage is applied between them. And carbon nanotube is divided and attached to the end of silicon probe, which mainly due to the arc welding function.Comparing with the arc discharge method before, the new method here needs no coat silicon probe with metal film in advance, which can greatly reduce the fabrication's difficulty. The fabricated carbon nanotube probe shows good property of higher aspect ratio and can more accurately reflect the true topography of silicon grating than silicon probe. Under the same image drive force, carbon nanotube probe had less indentation depth on soft triblock copolymer sample than silicon probe. This showed that carbon nanotube probe has lower spring constant and less damage to the scan sample than silicon probe.

  17. Prismatic modifications of single-walled carbon nanotubes and their electronic properties: Regular adsorption of fluorine atoms on graphene surfaces of nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomilin, O. B.; Stankevich, I. V.; Muryumin, E. E.; Lesin, S. A.; Syrkina, N. P.

    2011-01-01

    The regular adsorption of fluorine atoms on surfaces of single-walled carbon nanotubes along their axes can lead to a modification of cylindrical carbon cores of these single-walled carbon nanotubes to carbon cores that have a nearly prismatic shape (prismatic modification). In faces of these modified single-walled carbon nanotubes, there can arise quasi-one-dimensional isolated carbon conjugated subsystems (tracks) with different structures. It has been established that the main characteristics of the single-walled carbon nanotubes thus modified are rather close to the corresponding characteristics of the related isostructural polymer conjugated systems (such as cis-polyenes, polyphenylenes, poly(periacenes), or polyphenantrenes). Fragments of model nanotubes of the ( n, n) and ( n, 0) types that contain up to 360 carbon atoms and their derivatives doped with fluorine atoms have been calculated using the semiempirical parametric method 3.

  18. Quantification of tip-broadening in non-contact atomic force microscopy with carbon nanotube tips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meinander, Kristoffer; Jensen, Thomas N.; Simonsen, Soren B.;

    2012-01-01

    Carbon nanotube terminated atomic force microscopy (AFM) probes have been used for the imaging of 5 nm wide surface supported Pt nanoclusters by non-contact (dynamic mode) AFM in an ultra-high vacuum. The results are compared to AFM measurements done with conventional Si-tips, as well...... as with transmission electron microscopy images, which give accurate measures for cluster widths. Despite their ideal aspect ratio, tip-broadening is concluded to be a severe problem even when imaging with carbon nanotube tips, which overestimates the cluster width by several times the nominal width of the nanotube...... tip. This broadening is attributed to a bending of the carbon nanotubes, and not to pure geometrical factors, which coincidentally results in a significant improvement for relative height measurements of tightly spaced high aspect ratio structures, as compared to what can be achieved...

  19. Quantification of tip-broadening in non-contact atomic force microscopy with carbon nanotube tips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meinander, Kristoffer; Jensen, Thomas N.; Simonsen, Soren B.

    2012-01-01

    Carbon nanotube terminated atomic force microscopy (AFM) probes have been used for the imaging of 5 nm wide surface supported Pt nanoclusters by non-contact (dynamic mode) AFM in an ultra-high vacuum. The results are compared to AFM measurements done with conventional Si-tips, as well...

  20. Structural and chemical evolution of single-wall carbon nanotubes under atomic and molecular deuterium interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lisowski, W.; Keim, E.G.; Berg, van den A.H.J.; Smithers, M.A.

    2005-01-01

    The interaction of atomic (D) and molecular (D2) deuterium, as present in a (D + D2) gas mixture, with single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) has been studied by means of a combination of scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The SWNT samp

  1. Effects of Atomic-Scale Structure on the Fracture Properties of Amorphous Carbon - Carbon Nanotube Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Benjamin D.; Wise, Kristopher E.; Odegard, Gregory M.

    2015-01-01

    The fracture of carbon materials is a complex process, the understanding of which is critical to the development of next generation high performance materials. While quantum mechanical (QM) calculations are the most accurate way to model fracture, the fracture behavior of many carbon-based composite engineering materials, such as carbon nanotube (CNT) composites, is a multi-scale process that occurs on time and length scales beyond the practical limitations of QM methods. The Reax Force Field (ReaxFF) is capable of predicting mechanical properties involving strong deformation, bond breaking and bond formation in the classical molecular dynamics framework. This has been achieved by adding to the potential energy function a bond-order term that varies continuously with distance. The use of an empirical bond order potential, such as ReaxFF, enables the simulation of failure in molecular systems that are several orders of magnitude larger than would be possible in QM techniques. In this work, the fracture behavior of an amorphous carbon (AC) matrix reinforced with CNTs was modeled using molecular dynamics with the ReaxFF reactive forcefield. Care was taken to select the appropriate simulation parameters, which can be different from those required when using traditional fixed-bond force fields. The effect of CNT arrangement was investigated with three systems: a single-wall nanotube (SWNT) array, a multi-wall nanotube (MWNT) array, and a SWNT bundle system. For each arrangement, covalent bonds are added between the CNTs and AC, with crosslink fractions ranging from 0-25% of the interfacial CNT atoms. The SWNT and MWNT array systems represent ideal cases with evenly spaced CNTs; the SWNT bundle system represents a more realistic case because, in practice, van der Waals interactions lead to the agglomeration of CNTs into bundles. The simulation results will serve as guidance in setting experimental processing conditions to optimize the mechanical properties of CNT

  2. Adsorption of hydrogen atoms onto the exterior wall of carbon nanotubes and their thermodynamics properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, T.Y.; Ren, Y.X. [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Liew, K.M. [Department of Building and Construction, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon (China)

    2010-05-15

    In the present work, we present a systematic analysis of the chemisorption process pathway of hydrogen atoms onto the exterior wall of (5,5) carbon nanotubes using the ONIOM2 (B3LYP(6-31+G(d,p):UFF)) scheme, and we avoid the gross assumption of fixing any of the carbon atoms during the simulation. It is shown that the adsorption of hydrogen atoms onto the sidewall of CNTs are energetically favorable and the most stable state is to form two H-C {sigma}-bonds while the original {sigma}-bond between the carbon atoms is totally severed. In particular, we examined the molecular thermodynamics properties for the reaction at a range of temperatures from 77 K to 1000 K, and the results suggests that the reaction is possible at ambient temperature, but it is less favorable than that at lower temperatures. (author)

  3. Influence of Intertube Additional Atoms on Sliding Behaviors of Double-Walled Carbon Nanotube

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋海洋; 耿淑芳; 查新未; 孙建

    2012-01-01

    The effects of intertube additional atoms on (DWCNTs) are investigated using molecular dynamics (MD) the sliding behaviors of double-walled carbon nanotubes simulation method. The interaction between carbon atoms is modeled using the second-generation reactive empirical bond-order potential coupled with the Lennard-Jones potential. The simulations indicate that intertube additional atoms of DWCNT can significantly enhance the load transfer between neighboring tubes of DWCNT. The improvement in load transfer is guaranteed by the addition of intertube atoms which are covalently bonded to the inner and outer tubes of DWCNT. The results also show that the sliding behaviors of DWCNT are strongly dependent of additional atom numbers. The results presented here demonstrate that the superior mechanical properties of DWCNT can be realized by controlling intertube coupling. The general conclusions derived from this work may be of importance in devising high-performance CNT composites.

  4. Ab initio study of semiconductor atoms impurities in zigzag edge (10,0) carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muttaqien, Fahdzi; Suprijadi

    2015-04-01

    The substitutional impurities in zigzag edge (10,0) carbon nanotubes have been studied by using first principles calculations. Silicon (Si), gallium (Ga), and arsenic (As) atom have been chosen as semiconductor based-atom for replacing carbon atoms in CNT's surface. The silicon atom changes the energy gap of pristine zigzag (10,0) CNT, it is 0.19 eV more narrow than that of pristine CNT. Geometrically, the silicon atom creates sp3 bond with three adjacent carbon atoms, where the tetrahedral form of its sp3 bond is consisted of free unoccupied state. The silicon atom does not induce magnetism to zigzag CNT. Due to gallium (Ga) and arsenic (As) atom substitution, the zigzag CNT becomes metallic and has magnetic moment of 1 µB. The valance and conduction band are crossed each other, then the energy gap is vanished. The electronic properties of GaAs-doped CNT are dominantly affected by gallium atom and its magnetic properties are dominantly affected by arsenic atom. These results prove that the CNT with desired properties can be obtained with substitutional impurities without any giving structural defect.

  5. Noncontact atomic force microscopy in liquid environment with quartz tuning fork and carbon nanotube probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kageshima, M.; Jensenius, Henriette; Dienwiebel, M.

    2002-01-01

    A force sensor for noncontact atomic force microscopy in liquid environment was developed by combining a multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT) probe with a quartz tuning fork. Solvation shells of octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane surface were detected both in the frequency shift and dissipation. Due...... to the high aspect ratio of the CNT probe, the long-range background force was barely detectable in the solvation region. (C) 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved....

  6. Carbon nanotubes as solid-phase extraction sorbents prior to atomic spectrometric determination of metal species: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrero Latorre, C., E-mail: carlos.herrero@usc.es [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Dpto. Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, Facultad de Ciencias, Alfonso X el Sabio s/n, 27002 Lugo (Spain); Alvarez Mendez, J.; Barciela Garcia, J.; Garcia Martin, S.; Pena Crecente, R.M. [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Dpto. Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, Facultad de Ciencias, Alfonso X el Sabio s/n, 27002 Lugo (Spain)

    2012-10-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The use of CNTs as sorbent for metal species in solid phase extraction has been described. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Physical and chemical strategies for functionalization of carbon nanotubes have been discussed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Published analytical methods concerning solid phase extraction and atomic spectrometric determination have been reviewed. - Abstract: New materials have significant impact on the development of new methods and instrumentation for chemical analysis. From the discovery of carbon nanotubes in 1991, single and multi-walled carbon nanotubes - due to their high adsorption and desorption capacities - have been employed as sorption substrates in solid-phase extraction for the preconcentration of metal species from diverse matrices. Looking for successive improvements in sensitivity and selectivity, in the past few years, carbon nanotubes have been utilized as sorbents for solid phase extraction in three different ways: like as-grown, oxidized and functionalized nanotubes. In the present paper, an overview of the recent trends in the use of carbon nanotubes for solid phase extraction of metal species in environmental, biological and food samples is presented. The determination procedures involved the adsorption of metals on the nanotube surface, their quantitative desorption and subsequent measurement by means of atomic spectrometric techniques such as flame atomic absorption spectrometry, electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry or inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry/mass spectrometry, among others. Synthesis, purification and types of carbon nanotubes, as well as the diverse chemical and physical strategies for their functionalization are described. Based on 140 references, the performance and general properties of the applications of solid phase extraction based on carbon nanotubes for metal species atomic spectrometric determination are discussed.

  7. Carbon nanotube junctions and devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, H.W.Ch.

    2001-01-01

    In this thesis Postma presents transport experiments performed on individual single-wall carbon nanotubes. Carbon nanotubes are molecules entirely made of carbon atoms. The electronic properties are determined by the exact symmetry of the nanotube lattice, resulting in either metallic or semiconduct

  8. Bridged single-walled carbon nanotube-based atomic-scale mass sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali-Akbari, H. R.; Shaat, M.; Abdelkefi, A.

    2016-08-01

    The potentials of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as mechanical resonators for atomic-scale mass sensing are presented. To this aim, a nonlocal continuum-based model is proposed to study the dynamic behavior of bridged single-walled carbon nanotube-based mass nanosensors. The carbon nanotube (CNT) is considered as an elastic Euler-Bernoulli beam with von Kármán type geometric nonlinearity. Eringen's nonlocal elastic field theory is utilized to model the interatomic long-range interactions within the structure of the CNT. This developed model accounts for the arbitrary position of the deposited atomic-mass. The natural frequencies and associated mode shapes are determined based on an eigenvalue problem analysis. An atom of xenon (Xe) is first considered as a specific case where the results show that the natural frequencies and mode shapes of the CNT are strongly dependent on the location of the deposited Xe and the nonlocal parameter of the CNT. It is also indicated that the first vibrational mode is the most sensitive when the mass is deposited at the middle of a single-walled carbon nanotube. However, when deposited in other locations, it is demonstrated that the second or third vibrational modes may be more sensitive. To investigate the sensitivity of bridged single-walled CNTs as mass sensors, different noble gases are considered, namely Xe, argon (Ar), and helium (He). It is shown that the sensitivity of the single-walled CNT to the Ar and He gases is much lower than the Xe gas due to the significant decrease in their masses. The derived model and performed analysis are so needed for mass sensing applications and particularly when the detected mass is randomly deposited.

  9. Tunable Adsorption and Desorption of Hydrogen Atoms on Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵明文; 夏日源; 马玉臣; 英敏菊; 刘向东; 梅良模

    2002-01-01

    Chemical adsorption and desorption of hydrogen atoms on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are investi-gated by using molecular dynamics simulations. It is found that the adsorption and desorption energy of hydrogenatoms depend on the hydrogen coverage and the diameter of the SWNTs. Hydrogen-adsorption geometry at thecoverage of 1.0 is more energetically stable. The adsorption energy decreases with the increasing diameter ofthe armchair tubes. The adsorption and desorption energy of hydrogen atoms can be modified reversibly byexternally radial deformation. The averaged C-H bond energy on the high curvature sites of the deformed tubeincreases with increasing radial deformation, while that on the low curvature sites decreases.

  10. Numerical investigation on the influence of atomic defects on the tensile and torsional behavior of hetero-junction carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghavamian, Ali, E-mail: alighavamian@yahoo.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, 50603, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Andriyana, Andri, E-mail: andri.andriyana@um.edu.my [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, 50603, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Chin, Ang Bee, E-mail: amelynang@um.edu.my [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, 50603, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Öchsner, Andreas, E-mail: andreas.oechsner@gmail.com [Griffith School of Engineering, Griffith University, Gold Coast Campus, Southport, 4222 (Australia)

    2015-08-15

    The finite element method was employed for the numerical simulation of hetero-junction carbon nanotubes with all possible connection types and their corresponding fundamental homogeneous tubes. Then, atomically defective hetero-junction carbon nanotubes were modeled by introducing silicon impurities and vacant sites into their structures. Finally, the elastic and shear moduli of all the models were evaluated under tensile and torsional loads, based on the assumption of linear-elastic deformation of these nanomaterials. The results showed that armchair and zigzag carbon nanotubes have the highest Young's and shear moduli respectively, among homogeneous carbon nanotubes. The mechanical tests on the hetero-junction carbon nanotubes revealed that these nanotube types have lower moduli when compared to their fundamental tubes. It was clearly observed that armchair–armchair and zigzag–zigzag hetero-junction carbon nanotubes have the highest Young's modulus among the hetero-junction carbon nanotubes while the shear modulus peaks were seen in zigzag-zigzag models. On the other hand, the lowest values for the Young's and shear moduli of hetero-junction carbon nanotubes were obtained for the models with armchair-zigzag kinks. It was also discovered that the atomic defects in the structure of hetero-junction carbon nanotubes lead to a decrease in their Young's and shear moduli which seems to follow a linear trend and could be expressed by a mathematical relation in terms of the amount of the atomic defect in their structures which could be used for the prediction of the tensile and torsional strength of the atomically defective hetero-junction carbon nanotubes for their proper selection and applications in nanoindustry. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Hetero-junction and homogeneous carbon nanotubes are numerically simulated. • Two atomic defects i.e. Si-doping and carbon vacancy are introduced to the models. • Influence of

  11. Atomic Structure and Energy Distribution of Collapsed Carbon Nanotubes of Different Chiralities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia A. Baimova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available For carbon nanotubes of sufficiently large diameter at sufficiently low temperature, due to the action of the van der Waals forces, the ground state is a bilayer graphene with closed edges, the so-called collapsed configuration. Molecular dynamics simulation of collapsed carbon nanotubes is performed. The effect of length, diameter, and chirality of the nanotubes on their properties is investigated. It is shown that collapsed nanotubes after relaxation have rippled structure which is strongly dependent on the nanotube chirality. The structural properties are studied by calculating the radial distribution function and energy distribution along various regions in the collapsed carbon nanotubes.

  12. Trapping of metal Atoms on nanoprotrusions of carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shao, Lidong; Zhang, Wei; Kuhn, Luise Theil

    2013-01-01

    Nanoprotrusions on CNTs are engineered using conventional lab treatments at a low temperature. The experimental set-up of applying a mild acid treatment with sonication and base washing is based on the development of introduced defects and vacancies. Compared with previous reports realizing selec...... selective metal depositions on individual carbon nanostructures, our work achieve a selective deposition of Pd nanoparticles on nanoprotrusions of CNTs in a bulk-phase. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim....

  13. Building a multi-walled carbon nanotube-based mass sensor with the atomic force microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mateiu, Ramona Valentina; Kuhle, A.; Marie, Rodolphe Charly Willy;

    2005-01-01

    We report an approach for building a mass sensor based on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT). We propose a method with a great potential for the positioning of MWCNTs based on self-assembly onto patterned hydrophilic areas. For the experiments ultra flat mica substrates covered with gold...... are used. The gold substrate is first covered with hydrophobic thiol molecules: octadecanthiol. The octadecanthiol molecules are then selectively removed from small areas by nanoshaving the gold substrate with the tip of an atomic force microscope (AFM) operating in contact mode. Hydrophilic thiols (2...

  14. Doping of carbon nanotubes with aluminum atom to improve Pt adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganji, M.D., E-mail: ganji_md@yahoo.com [Department of Chemistry, Qaemshahr Branch, Islamic Azad University, Qaemshahr (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ahangari, M. Ghorbanzadeh [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Mazandaran University, Babolsar (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khosravi, A. [Department of Chemistry, Qaemshahr Branch, Islamic Azad University, Qaemshahr (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-01-30

    We implement the ab initio van der Waals (vdW) calculations at the density functional level of theory (vdW-DF) for the investigation of Pt adsorption ability of Al-doped carbon nanotubes (Al-CNTs). We present and discuss the energetically favorable sites for a single Pt atom adsorbed on the surface of Al-CNTs. Our results show significantly increment in the binding energy of Pt on the Al-CNT compared with pristine CNTs. We also find that Pt adsorption ability of Al-CNTs is more stronger than that of B- and N-doped CNTs. This is explained by the negative charges introduced in the neighboring C atoms by dopant atom. Our results verify that Al-doped CNTs seems to be more suitable materials for Pt adsorption than pure and also B- and N-doped CNTs.

  15. Doping of carbon nanotubes with aluminum atom to improve Pt adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganji, M. D.; Ahangari, M. Ghorbanzadeh; Khosravi, A.

    2014-01-01

    We implement the ab initio van der Waals (vdW) calculations at the density functional level of theory (vdW-DF) for the investigation of Pt adsorption ability of Al-doped carbon nanotubes (Al-CNTs). We present and discuss the energetically favorable sites for a single Pt atom adsorbed on the surface of Al-CNTs. Our results show significantly increment in the binding energy of Pt on the Al-CNT compared with pristine CNTs. We also find that Pt adsorption ability of Al-CNTs is more stronger than that of B- and N-doped CNTs. This is explained by the negative charges introduced in the neighboring C atoms by dopant atom. Our results verify that Al-doped CNTs seems to be more suitable materials for Pt adsorption than pure and also B- and N-doped CNTs.

  16. Atomic scale observation of oxygen delivery during silver-oxygen nanoparticle catalysed oxidation of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Yonghai; Yuchi, Datong; Guan, Pengfei; Xu, Jia; Guo, Lin; Liu, Jingyue

    2016-07-01

    To probe the nature of metal-catalysed processes and to design better metal-based catalysts, atomic scale understanding of catalytic processes is highly desirable. Here we use aberration-corrected environmental transmission electron microscopy to investigate the atomic scale processes of silver-based nanoparticles, which catalyse the oxidation of multi-wall carbon nanotubes. A direct semi-quantitative estimate of the oxidized carbon atoms by silver-based nanoparticles is achieved. A mechanism similar to the Mars-van Krevelen process is invoked to explain the catalytic oxidation process. Theoretical calculations, together with the experimental data, suggest that the oxygen molecules dissociate on the surface of silver nanoparticles and diffuse through the silver nanoparticles to reach the silver/carbon interfaces and subsequently oxidize the carbon. The lattice distortion caused by oxygen concentration gradient within the silver nanoparticles provides the direct evidence for oxygen diffusion. Such direct observation of atomic scale dynamics provides an important general methodology for investigations of catalytic processes.

  17. Influence of atomic vacancies on the dynamic characteristics of nanoresonators based on double walled carbon nanotube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Ajay M.; Joshi, Anand Y.

    2015-06-01

    The dynamic analysis of double walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) with different boundary conditions has been performed using atomistic finite element method. The double walled carbon nanotube is modeled considering it as a space frame structure similar to a three dimensional beam. The elastic properties of beam element are calculated by considering mechanical characteristics of covalent bonds between the carbon atoms in the hexagonal lattice. Spring elements are used to describe the interlayer interactions between the inner and outer tubes caused due to the van der Waals forces. The mass of each beam element is assumed as point mass at nodes coinciding with carbon atoms at inner and outer wall of DWCNT. It has been reported that atomic vacancies are formed during the manufacturing process in DWCNT which tend to migrate leading to a change in the mechanical characteristics of the same. Simulations have been carried out to visualize the behavior of such defective DWCNTs subjected to different boundary conditions and when used as mass sensing devices. The variation of such atomic vacancies in outer wall of Zigzag and Armchair DWCNT is performed along the length and the change in response is noted. Moreover, as CNTs have been used as mass sensors extensively, the present approach is focused to explore the use of zigzag and armchair DWCNT as sensing device with a mono-atomic vacancy in it. The results clearly state that the dynamic characteristics are greatly influenced by defects like vacancies in it. A higher frequency shift is observed when the vacancy is located away from the fixed end for both Armchair as well as zigzag type of CNTs. A higher frequency shift is reported for armchair CNT for a mass of 10-22 g which remains constant for 10-21 g and then decreases gradually. Comparison with the other experimental and theoretical studies exhibits good association which suggests that defective DWCNTs can further be explored for mass sensing. This investigation is helpful

  18. Carbon nanotubes randomly decorated with gold clusters: from nano{sup 2}hybrid atomic structures to gas sensing prototypes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charlier, J-C; Zanolli, Z [Unite de Physico-Chimie et de Physique des Materiaux (PCPM), European Theoretical Spectroscopy Facility (ETSF), Universite Catholique de Louvain, Place Croix du Sud 1, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Arnaud, L; Avilov, I V; Felten, A; Pireaux, J-J [Centre de Recherche en Physique de la Matiere et du Rayonnement (PMR-LISE), Facultes Universitaires Notre-Dame de la Paix, 61 Rue de Bruxelles, B-5000 Namur (Belgium); Delgado, M [Sensotran, s.l., Avenida Remolar 31, E-08820 El Prat de Llobregat, Barcelona (Spain); Demoisson, F; Reniers, F [Service de Chimie Analytique et Chimie des Interfaces (CHANI), Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Faculte des Sciences, CP255, Boulevard du Triomphe 2, B-1050 Bruxelles (Belgium); Espinosa, E H; Ionescu, R; Leghrib, R; Llobet, E [Department of Electronic Engineering, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Avenida Paisos Catalans 26, E-43007 Tarragona (Spain); Ewels, C P; Suarez-Martinez, I [Institut des Materiaux Jean Rouxel (IMN), Universite de Nantes, 2 rue de la Houssiniere-BP 32229, F-44322 Nantes Cedex 3 (France); Guillot, J; Mansour, A; Migeon, H-N [Departement Science et Analyse des Materiaux, Centre de Recherche Public-Gabriel Lippmann, rue du Brill 41, L-4422 Belvaux (Luxembourg); Watson, G E, E-mail: jean-jacques.pireaux@fundp.ac.b [Vega Science Trust, Unit 118, Science Park SQ, Brighton, BN1 9SB (United Kingdom)

    2009-09-16

    Carbon nanotube surfaces, activated and randomly decorated with metal nanoclusters, have been studied in uniquely combined theoretical and experimental approaches as prototypes for molecular recognition. The key concept is to shape metallic clusters that donate or accept a fractional charge upon adsorption of a target molecule, and modify the electron transport in the nanotube. The present work focuses on a simple system, carbon nanotubes with gold clusters. The nature of the gold-nanotube interaction is studied using first-principles techniques. The numerical simulations predict the binding and diffusion energies of gold atoms at the tube surface, including realistic atomic models for defects potentially present at the nanotube surface. The atomic structure of the gold nanoclusters and their effect on the intrinsic electronic quantum transport properties of the nanotube are also predicted. Experimentally, multi-wall CNTs are decorated with gold clusters using (1) vacuum evaporation, after activation with an RF oxygen plasma and (2) colloid solution injected into an RF atmospheric plasma; the hybrid systems are accurately characterized using XPS and TEM techniques. The response of gas sensors based on these nano{sup 2}hybrids is quantified for the detection of toxic species like NO{sub 2}, CO, C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH and C{sub 2}H{sub 4}.

  19. Characterization of carbon nanotube yarn after exposure to hyperthermal atomic oxygen and thermal fatigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misak, H. E.; Mall, S.

    2016-12-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT)-yarn was evaluated for the survivability under hazardous space environmental conditions which were thermal fatigue, atomic oxygen and additive effect of these two exposures. Its tensile strength, tenacity, stiffness, strain to failure and electrical conductivity were characterized at the two extreme space temperatures of -150 and 120 °C before and after exposure to these environmental conditions. Tensile strength, stiffness and electrical conductivity of unexposed CNT yarn increased at the cryogenic temperature relative to at the elevated temperature. There was no change in the tensile properties after exposure to the space environmental conditions when measured at the elevated and cryogenic temperatures. Electrical conductivity decreased after exposure to three hazardous environments involving thermal fatigue, but it had no or small decrease when exposed to atomic oxygen only. No additive effect of thermal fatigue followed by atomic oxygen or by atomic oxygen followed by thermal fatigue environments on the CNTs' tensile properties and electrical conductivity was observed. Considering the low density 0.59 g/cc and good resistant to the extreme hazardous space environment, CNT-yarns have potential for applications in spacecraft and satellites.

  20. Modeling and optimization of atomic layer deposition processes on vertically aligned carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuri Yazdani

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Many energy conversion and storage devices exploit structured ceramics with large interfacial surface areas. Vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VACNT arrays have emerged as possible scaffolds to support large surface area ceramic layers. However, obtaining conformal and uniform coatings of ceramics on structures with high aspect ratio morphologies is non-trivial, even with atomic layer deposition (ALD. Here we implement a diffusion model to investigate the effect of the ALD parameters on coating kinetics and use it to develop a guideline for achieving conformal and uniform thickness coatings throughout the depth of ultra-high aspect ratio structures. We validate the model predictions with experimental data from ALD coatings of VACNT arrays. However, the approach can be applied to predict film conformality as a function of depth for any porous topology, including nanopores and nanowire arrays.

  1. Single-walled carbon nanotubes coated with ZnO by atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Partha P.; Gilshteyn, Evgenia; Jiang, Hua; Timmermans, Marina; Kaskela, Antti; Tolochko, Oleg V.; Kurochkin, Alexey V.; Karppinen, Maarit; Nisula, Mikko; Kauppinen, Esko I.; Nasibulin, Albert G.

    2016-12-01

    The possibility of ZnO deposition on the surface of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with the help of an atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique was successfully demonstrated. The utilization of pristine SWCNTs as a support resulted in a non-uniform deposition of ZnO in the form of nanoparticles. To achieve uniform ZnO coating, the SWCNTs first needed to be functionalized by treating the samples in a controlled ozone atmosphere. The uniformly ZnO coated SWCNTs were used to fabricate UV sensing devices. An UV irradiation of the ZnO coated samples turned them from hydrophobic to hydrophilic behaviour. Furthermore, thin films of the ZnO coated SWCNTs allowed us switch p-type field effect transistors made of pristine SWCNTs to have ambipolar characteristics.

  2. Modeling and optimization of atomic layer deposition processes on vertically aligned carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdani, Nuri; Chawla, Vipin; Edwards, Eve; Wood, Vanessa; Park, Hyung Gyu; Utke, Ivo

    2014-01-01

    Many energy conversion and storage devices exploit structured ceramics with large interfacial surface areas. Vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VACNT) arrays have emerged as possible scaffolds to support large surface area ceramic layers. However, obtaining conformal and uniform coatings of ceramics on structures with high aspect ratio morphologies is non-trivial, even with atomic layer deposition (ALD). Here we implement a diffusion model to investigate the effect of the ALD parameters on coating kinetics and use it to develop a guideline for achieving conformal and uniform thickness coatings throughout the depth of ultra-high aspect ratio structures. We validate the model predictions with experimental data from ALD coatings of VACNT arrays. However, the approach can be applied to predict film conformality as a function of depth for any porous topology, including nanopores and nanowire arrays.

  3. Dispersion C3 coefficients for the alkali-metal atoms interacting with a graphene layer and with a carbon nanotube

    CERN Document Server

    Arora, Bindiya; Sahoo, B K

    2013-01-01

    We evaluate separation dependent van der Waal dispersion ($C_3$) coefficients for the interactions of the Li, Na, K and Rb alkali atoms with a graphene layer and with a single walled carbon nanotube (CNT) using the hydrodynamic and Dirac models. The results from both the models are evaluated using accurate values of the dynamic polarizabilities of the above atoms. Accountability of these accurate values of dynamical polarizabilities of the alkali atoms in determination of the above $C_3$ coefficients are accentuated by comparing them with the coefficients evaluated using the dynamic dipole polarizabilities estimated from the single oscillator approximation which are typically employed in the earlier calculations. For practical description of the atom-surface interaction potentials the radial dependent $C_3$ coefficients are given for a wide range of separation distances between the ground states of the considered atoms and the wall surfaces and also for different values of nanotube radii. The coefficients for...

  4. THEORETICAL ANALYSIS AND EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF CARBON NANOTUBE PROBE AND CONVENTIONAL ATOMIC FORCE MICROSCOPY PROBE ON SURFACE ROUGHNESS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jinghe; WANG Hongxiang; XU Zongwei; DONG Shen; WANG Shiqian; ZHANG Huali

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, three different tips are employed, i.e., the carbon nanotube tip, monocrystalline silicon tip and silicon nitride tip. Resorting to atomic force microscope (AFM), they are used for measuring the surface roughness of indium tin oxide (ITO) film and the immunoglobulin G (IgG) proteins within the scanning area of 10 μm×10 μm and 0.5 μm×0.5 μm, respectively. Subsequently, the scanned surface of the ITO film and IgG proteins are analyzed by using fractal dimension. The results show that the fractal dimension measured by carbon nanotube tip is biggest with the highest frequency components and the most microscopic information. Therefore, the carbon nanotube tip is the ideal measuring tool for measuring super-smooth surface, which will play a more and more important role in the high-resolution imaging field.

  5. Carbon nanotube composite materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Bryan, Gregory; Skinner, Jack L; Vance, Andrew; Yang, Elaine Lai; Zifer, Thomas

    2015-03-24

    A material consisting essentially of a vinyl thermoplastic polymer, un-functionalized carbon nanotubes and hydroxylated carbon nanotubes dissolved in a solvent. Un-functionalized carbon nanotube concentrations up to 30 wt % and hydroxylated carbon nanotube concentrations up to 40 wt % can be used with even small concentrations of each (less than 2 wt %) useful in producing enhanced conductivity properties of formed thin films.

  6. Conformal atomic layer deposition of alumina on millimeter tall, vertically-aligned carbon nanotube arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stano, Kelly L; Carroll, Murphy; Padbury, Richard; McCord, Marian; Jur, Jesse S; Bradford, Philip D

    2014-11-12

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) can be used to coat high aspect ratio and high surface area substrates with conformal and precisely controlled thin films. Vertically aligned arrays of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with lengths up to 1.5 mm were conformally coated with alumina from base to tip. The nucleation and growth behaviors of Al2O3 ALD precursors on the MWCNTs were studied as a function of CNT surface chemistry. CNT surfaces were modified through a series of post-treatments including pyrolytic carbon deposition, high temperature thermal annealing, and oxygen plasma functionalization. Conformal coatings were achieved where post-treatments resulted in increased defect density as well as the extent of functionalization, as characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Using thermogravimetric analysis, it was determined that MWCNTs treated with pyrolytic carbon and plasma functionalization prior to ALD coating were more stable to thermal oxidation than pristine ALD coated samples. Functionalized and ALD coated arrays had a compressive modulus more than two times higher than a pristine array coated for the same number of cycles. Cross-sectional energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy confirmed that Al2O3 could be uniformly deposited through the entire thickness of the vertically aligned MWCNT array by manipulating sample orientation and mounting techniques. Following the ALD coating, the MWCNT arrays demonstrated hydrophilic wetting behavior and also exhibited foam-like recovery following compressive strain.

  7. 3D scaffolds from vertically aligned carbon nanotubes/poly(methyl methacrylate) composites via atom transfer radical polymerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tebikachew, Behabtu; Magina, Sandra [CICECO, Department of Chemistry, University of Aveiro (Portugal); Mata, Diogo; Oliveira, Filipe J.; Silva, Rui F. [CICECO, Department of Materials and Ceramic Engineering, University of Aveiro (Portugal); Barros-Timmons, Ana, E-mail: anabarros@ua.pt [CICECO, Department of Chemistry, University of Aveiro (Portugal)

    2015-01-15

    Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) synthesized by Thermal Chemical Vapour Deposition (TCVD) were modified using an Ar:O{sub 2} (97:3) plasma to generate oxygen-containing functional groups on the surface for subsequent modification. X-ray photo-emission spectroscopy (XPS) and micro-Raman analyses confirmed the grafting of those functional groups onto the surface of the nanotubes as well as the removal of amorphous carbon produced and deposited on the VACNT forests during the CVD process. The plasma treated VACNT forests were further modified with 2-bromo-2-methylpropionyl bromide, an atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) initiator, to grow poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) chains from the forests via ATRP. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) of the ensuing VACNT/PMMA composites confirmed the coating of the nanotube forests with the PMMA polymer. 3D scaffolds of polymeric composites with honeycomb like structure were then obtained. Compressive tests have shown that the VACNT/PMMA composite has higher compressive strength than the pristine forest. - Highlights: • Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) were synthesized and plasma modified. • X-ray photo-emission and Raman spectroscopies confirmed the VACNTs modification. • Poly(methyl methacrylate) chains were grown via ATRP from the VACNTs. • STEM of the VACNT/PMMA composites confirmed that PMMA surrounds the nanotubes. • VACNT/PMMA composite has higher compressive strength compared to the pristine forest.

  8. Carbon Nanotubes for Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyyappan, Meyya

    2000-01-01

    The potential of nanotube technology for NASA missions is significant and is properly recognized by NASA management. Ames has done much pioneering research in the last five years on carbon nanotube growth, characterization, atomic force microscopy, sensor development and computational nanotechnology. NASA Johnson Space Center has focused on laser ablation production of nanotubes and composites development. These in-house efforts, along with strategic collaboration with academia and industry, are geared towards meeting the agency's mission requirements. This viewgraph presentation (including an explanation for each slide) outlines the research focus for Ames nanotechnology, including details on carbon nanotubes' properties, applications, and synthesis.

  9. Grafting of thermoresponsive polymer from the surface of functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes via atom transfer radical polymerization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU GuoYong; XIA Ru; WANG Hu; MENG XiangChun; ZHU QingRen

    2008-01-01

    Multiwalled carbon nanotubes were oxidized with concentrated HNOz and H2SO4 to introduce carboxylic groups onto carbon nanotubes surfaces. The oxidized carbon nanotubes were reacted subsequently with thionyl chloride and 2-Hydroxylethyl-2'-bromoisobutyrate, producing MWNT-based macroinitiators, MWNT-Br, for the atom transfer radical polymerization of (N-isopropylacrylamide). FTIR, XPS, 1H NMR, Raman and TGA were used to characterize the resulting products and to determine the content of the water-soluble poly (N-isopropylacrylamide) chains in the product. The MWNTs grafted with PNIPAM chains have good solubility in distilled water; THF and CHCl3. TEM images of the samples provide direct evidence for the formation of a nanostructure that MWNTs coated with polymer layer. The produced MWNT-g-PNIPAM has a PNIPAM shell, which is very sensitive to the change of temperature.This method would open a door for the fabrication of novel functional carbon nanotube-based nanomaterials or nanodevices with designable structure and tailor-made properties.

  10. First-principles study of palladium atom adsorption on the boron- or nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Guoxiang [College of Physics and Information Technology, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi' an 710062, Shaanxi (China); School of Science, Xi' an Shiyou University, Xi' an 710065, Shaanxi (China); Zhang Jianmin, E-mail: jianm_zhang@yahoo.co [College of Physics and Information Technology, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi' an 710062, Shaanxi (China); Wang Doudou [Institute of Telecommunication Engineering of the Air Force Engineering University (AFEU1), Xi' an 710077, Shaanxi (China); Xu Kewei [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049, Shaanxi (China)

    2009-11-15

    We have performed first-principles calculation to investigate the adsorption of a single palladium atom on the surface of the pristine and boron- or nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The results show that for the adsorption of a single palladium atom on the pristine CNT surface, the most stable site is Bridge1 site above the axial carbon-carbon bond. Either boron- or nitrogen-doped CNTs can assist palladium surface adsorption, but the detailed mechanisms are different. The enhanced palladium adsorption on boron-doped CNT is attributed to the palladium d orbital strongly hybridized with both boron p orbital and carbon p orbital. The enhancement in palladium adsorption on nitrogen-doped CNT results from activating the nitrogen-neighboring carbon atoms due to the large electron affinity of nitrogen. Furthermore, the axial bond is preferred over the zigzag bond for a palladium atom adsorbed on the surface of all three types of CNTs. The most energetically favorable site for a palladium atom adsorbed on three types of CNTs is above the axial boron-carbon bond in boron-doped CNT. The enhancement in palladium adsorption is more significant for the boron-doped CNT than it is for nitrogen-doped CNT with a similar configuration. So we conclude that accordingly, the preferred adsorption site is determined by the competition between the electron affinity of doped and adsorbed atoms and preferred degree of the axial bond over the zigzag bond.

  11. Sub-5 nm nanostructures fabricated by atomic layer deposition using a carbon nanotube template

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Ju Yeon; Han, Hyo; Kim, Ji Weon; Lee, Seung-Mo; Ha, Jeong Sook; Shim, Joon Hyung; Han, Chang-Soo

    2016-07-01

    The fabrication of nanostructures having diameters of sub-5 nm is very a important issue for bottom-up nanofabrication of nanoscale devices. In this work, we report a highly controllable method to create sub-5 nm nano-trenches and nanowires by combining area-selective atomic layer deposition (ALD) with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) as templates. Alumina nano-trenches having a depth of 2.6 ∼ 3.0 nm and SiO2 nano-trenches having a depth of 1.9 ∼ 2.2 nm fully guided by the SWNTs have been formed on SiO2/Si substrate. Through infilling ZnO material by ALD in alumina nano-trenches, well-defined ZnO nanowires having a thickness of 3.1 ∼ 3.3 nm have been fabricated. In order to improve the electrical properties of ZnO nanowires, as-fabricated ZnO nanowires by ALD were annealed at 350 °C in air for 60 min. As a result, we successfully demonstrated that as-synthesized ZnO nanowire using a specific template can be made for various high-density resistive components in the nanoelectronics industry.

  12. Atomically precise understanding of nanofluids: nanodiamonds and carbon nanotubes in ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaban, Vitaly V; Fileti, Eudes Eterno

    2016-09-29

    A nanofluid (NF) is composed of a base liquid and suspended nanoparticles (NPs). High-performance NFs exhibit significantly better heat conductivities, as compared to their base liquids. In the present work, we applied all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to characterize diffusive and ballistic energy transfer mechanisms within nanodiamonds (NDs), carbon nanotubes (CNTs), and N-butylpyridinium tetrafluoroborate ionic liquid (IL). We showed that heat transfer within both NDs and CNTs is orders of magnitude faster than that in the surrounding IL, whereas diffusion of all particles in the considered NF is similar. Intramolecular heat transfer in NPs is a key factor determining the difference of NFs from base liquids. Solvation free energy of NDs and CNTs in ILs was estimated from MD simulations. The geometric dimensions of NPs were shown to be a major source of entropic penalty. Temperature adjusts the entropic factor substantially by modifying a genuine local structure of the bulk base liquid. Our work contributes to engineering more stable and productive suspensions of NPs in ILs, which are necessary for essential progress in the field of NFs.

  13. Atomic Force Microscopy of DNA-wrapped Single-walled Carbon Nanotubes in Aqueous Solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashida, Takuya; Umemura, Kazuo

    2016-07-01

    We evaluated hybrids of DNA and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in aqueous solution and in air using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Although intensive AFM observations of these hybrids were previously carried out for samples in air, this is the first report on AFM observations of these hybrids in solution. As expected, diameters of DNA-SWNT hybrids dramatically increased in tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (TE) buffer solution. The data suggest that DNA molecules maintain their structures even on the SWNT surfaces. Furthermore, we simultaneously observed single DNA-SWNT hybrids using three different AFM modes in air and in the TE buffer solution. Height value of the hybrids was largest in the solution, and lowest for the mode that repulsive force is expected in air. For the bare SWNT molecules, height differences among the three AFM modes were much lower than those of the DNA-SWNT hybrids. DNA molecules adsorbed on SWNT surfaces flexibly changed their morphology as well as DNA molecules on flat surfaces such as mica. This is hopeful results for biological applications of DNA-SWNT hybrids. In addition, our results revealed the importance of the single-molecule approach to evaluate DNA structures on SWNT surfaces.

  14. Quantitative Conductive Atomic Force Microscopy on Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube-Based Polymer Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bârsan, Oana A; Hoffmann, Günter G; van der Ven, Leendert G J; de With, Gijsbertus

    2016-08-03

    Conductive atomic force microscopy (C-AFM) is a valuable technique for correlating the electrical properties of a material with its topographic features and for identifying and characterizing conductive pathways in polymer composites. However, aspects such as compatibility between tip material and sample, contact force and area between the tip and the sample, tip degradation and environmental conditions render quantifying the results quite challenging. This study aims at finding the suitable conditions for C-AFM to generate reliable, reproducible, and quantitative current maps that can be used to calculate the resistance in each point of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) network, nonimpregnated as well as impregnated with a polymer. The results obtained emphasize the technique's limitation at the macroscale as the resistance of these highly conductive samples cannot be distinguished from the tip-sample contact resistance. Quantitative C-AFM measurements on thin composite sections of 150-350 nm enable the separation of sample and tip-sample contact resistance, but also indicate that these sections are not representative for the overall SWCNT network. Nevertheless, the technique was successfully used to characterize the local electrical properties of the composite material, such as sample homogeneity and resistance range of individual SWCNT clusters, at the nano- and microscale.

  15. Multi-Directional Growth of Aligned Carbon Nanotubes Over Catalyst Film Prepared by Atomic Layer Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Kai

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The structure of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs severely depends on the properties of pre-prepared catalyst films. Aiming for the preparation of precisely controlled catalyst film, atomic layer deposition (ALD was employed to deposit uniform Fe2O3 film for the growth of CNT arrays on planar substrate surfaces as well as the curved ones. Iron acetylacetonate and ozone were introduced into the reactor alternately as precursors to realize the formation of catalyst films. By varying the deposition cycles, uniform and smooth Fe2O3 catalyst films with different thicknesses were obtained on Si/SiO2 substrate, which supported the growth of highly oriented few-walled CNT arrays. Utilizing the advantage of ALD process in coating non-planar surfaces, uniform catalyst films can also be successfully deposited onto quartz fibers. Aligned few-walled CNTs can be grafted on the quartz fibers, and they self-organized into a leaf-shaped structure due to the curved surface morphology. The growth of aligned CNTs on non-planar surfaces holds promise in constructing hierarchical CNT architectures in future.

  16. Carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhifeng; Lin, Yuehe; Yantasee, Wassana; Liu, Guodong; Lu, Fang; Tu, Yi

    2008-11-18

    The present invention relates to microelectode arrays (MEAs), and more particularly to carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays (CNT-NEAs) for chemical and biological sensing, and methods of use. A nanoelectrode array includes a carbon nanotube material comprising an array of substantially linear carbon nanotubes each having a proximal end and a distal end, the proximal end of the carbon nanotubes are attached to a catalyst substrate material so as to form the array with a pre-determined site density, wherein the carbon nanotubes are aligned with respect to one another within the array; an electrically insulating layer on the surface of the carbon nanotube material, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the electrically insulating layer; a second adhesive electrically insulating layer on the surface of the electrically insulating layer, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the second adhesive electrically insulating layer; and a metal wire attached to the catalyst substrate material.

  17. Synthesis of carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awasthi, Kalpana; Srivastava, Anchal; Srivastava, O N

    2005-10-01

    Carbon nanotubes play a fundamental role in the rapidly developing field of nanoscience and nanotechnology because of their unique properties and high potential for applications. In this article, the different synthesis methods of carbon nanotubes (both multi-walled and single-walled) are reviewed. From the industrial point of view, the chemical vapor deposition method has shown advantages over laser vaporization and electric arc discharge methods. This article also presents recent work in the controlled synthesis of carbon nanotubes with ordered architectures. Special carbon nanotube configurations, such as nanocoils, nanohorns, bamboo-shaped and carbon cylinder made up from carbon nanotubes are also discussed.

  18. Adsorption on the carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Yi; YANG Xiao-bao; NI Jun

    2006-01-01

    Adsorption on single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is a subject of growing experimental and theoretical interest.The possible adsorbed patterns of atoms and molecules on the single-walled carbon nanotubes vary with the diameters and chirality of the tubes due to the confinement.The curvature of the carbon nanotube surface enlarges the distance of the adsorbate atoms and thus enhances the stability of high coverage structures of adsorbate.There exist two novel high-coverage stable structures of potassium adsorbed on SWCNTs,which are not stable on graphite.The electronic properties of SWCNTs can be modified by adsorbate atoms and metal-semiconductor and semiconductor-semi-conductor transitions can be achieved by the doping of alkali atoms.

  19. Evaluation of carbon nanotube probes in critical dimension atomic force microscopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jinho; Park, Byong Chon; Ahn, Sang Jung; Kim, Dal-Hyun; Lyou, Joon; Dixson, Ronald G; Orji, Ndubuisi G; Fu, Joseph; Vorburger, Theodore V

    2016-07-01

    The decreasing size of semiconductor features and the increasing structural complexity of advanced devices have placed continuously greater demands on manufacturing metrology, arising both from the measurement challenges of smaller feature sizes and the growing requirement to characterize structures in more than just a single critical dimension. For scanning electron microscopy, this has resulted in increasing sophistication of imaging models. For critical dimension atomic force microscopes (CD-AFMs), this has resulted in the need for smaller and more complex tips. Carbon nanotube (CNT) tips have thus been the focus of much interest and effort by a number of researchers. However, there have been significant issues surrounding both the manufacture and use of CNT tips. Specifically, the growth or attachment of CNTs to AFM cantilevers has been a challenge to the fabrication of CNT tips, and the flexibility and resultant bending artifacts have presented challenges to using CNT tips. The Korea Research Institute for Standards and Science (KRISS) has invested considerable effort in the controlled fabrication of CNT tips and is collaborating with the National Institute of Standards and Technology on the application of CNT tips for CD-AFM. Progress by KRISS on the precise control of CNT orientation, length, and end modification, using manipulation and focused ion beam processes, has allowed us to implement ball-capped CNT tips and bent CNT tips for CD-AFM. Using two different generations of CD-AFM instruments, we have evaluated these tip types by imaging a line/space grating and a programmed line edge roughness specimen. We concluded that these CNTs are capable of scanning the profiles of these structures, including re-entrant sidewalls, but there remain important challenges to address. These challenges include tighter control of tip geometry and careful optimization of scan parameters and algorithms for using CNT tips.

  20. Diagnostics of Carbon Nanotube Formation in a Laser Produced Plume: An Investigation of the Metal Catalyst by Laser Ablation Atomic Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    deBoer, Gary; Scott, Carl

    2003-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes, elongated molecular tubes with diameters of nanometers and lengths in microns, hold great promise for material science. Hopes for super strong light-weight material to be used in spacecraft design is the driving force behind nanotube work at JSC. The molecular nature of these materials requires the appropriate tools for investigation of their structure, properties, and formation. The mechanism of nanotube formation is of particular interest because it may hold keys to controlling the formation of different types of nanotubes and allow them to be produced in much greater quantities at less cost than is currently available. This summer's work involved the interpretation of data taken last summer and analyzed over the academic year. The work involved diagnostic studies of carbon nanotube formation processes occurring in a laser-produced plume. Laser ablation of metal doped graphite to produce a plasma plume in which carbon nanotubes self assemble is one method of making carbon nanotube. The laser ablation method is amenable to applying the techniques of laser spectroscopy, a powerful tool for probing the energies and dynamics of atomic and molecular species. The experimental work performed last summer involved probing one of the metal catalysts, nickel, by laser induced fluorescence. The nickel atom was studied as a function of oven temperature, probe laser wavelength, time after ablation, and position in the laser produced plume. This data along with previously obtained data on carbon was analyzed over the academic year. Interpretations of the data were developed this summer along with discussions of future work. The temperature of the oven in which the target is ablated greatly influences the amount of material ablated and the propagation of the plume. The ablation conditions and the time scale of atomic and molecular lifetimes suggest that initial ablation of the metal doped carbon target results in atomic and small molecular species. The metal

  1. Hetero-atom doped carbon nanotubes for dye degradation and oxygen reduction reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nandan, Ravi, E-mail: aerawat27@gmail.com; Nanda, Karuna Kar [Materials Research Centre, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore-560012 (India)

    2015-06-24

    We report the synthesis of nitrogen doped vertically aligned multi-walled (MWNCNTs) carbon nanotubes by pyrolysis and its catalytic performance for degradation of methylene blue (MB) dye & oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). The degradation of MB was monitored spectrophotometrically with time. Kinetic studies show the degradation of MB follows a first order kinetic with rate constant k=0.0178 min{sup −1}. The present rate constant is better than that reported for various supported/non-supported semiconducting nanomaterials. Further ORR performance in alkaline media makes MWNCNTs a promising cost-effective, fuel crossover tolerance, metal-free, eco-friendly cathode catalyst for direct alcohol fuel cell.

  2. Van der Waals interaction between microparticle and uniaxial crystal with application to hydrogen atoms and multiwall carbon nanotubes

    CERN Document Server

    Blagov, E V; Mostepanenko, V M

    2005-01-01

    The Lifshitz theory of the van der Waals force is extended for the case of an atom (molecule) interacting with a plane surface of an uniaxial crystal or with a long solid cylinder or cylindrical shell made of isotropic material or uniaxial crystal. For a microparticle near a semispace or flat plate made of an uniaxial crystal the exact expressions for the free energy of the van der Waals and Casimir-Polder interaction are presented. An approximate expression for the free energy of microparticle- cylinder interaction is obtained which becomes precise for microparticle-cylinder separations much smaller than cylinder radius. The obtained expressions are used to investigate the van der Waals interaction between hydrogen atoms (molecules) and graphite plates or multiwall carbon nanotubes. To accomplish this the behavior of graphite dielectric permittivities along the imaginary frequency axis is found using the optical data for the complex refractive index of graphite for the ordinary and extraordinary rays. It is ...

  3. Static and dynamic wetting measurements of single carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Asa H; Cohen, Sidney R; Wagner, H Daniel

    2004-05-07

    Individual carbon nanotubes were immersed and removed from various organic liquids using atomic force microscopy. The carbon nanotube-liquid interactions could be monitored in situ, and accurate measurements of the contact angle between liquids and the nanotube surface were made. These wetting data were used to produce Owens and Wendt plots giving the dispersive and polar components of the nanotube surface.

  4. Bloch oscillations in carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jódar, Esther; Pérez-Garrido, Antonio; Rojas, Fernando

    2009-05-27

    Bloch oscillations arise when electrons are in a one-dimensional linear chain of atoms under a constant electric field. In this paper we show numerically that electrons in different types of carbon nanotubes show oscillations with a Bloch frequency proportional to the constant electric field applied along the nanotube axis. We show these oscillations, calculating the quadratic displacement as a function of the electric field. Because of the double periodicity of the nanotubes' geometry (the lattice constant and the lines of atoms) two frequencies appear, one twice the value of the other. These frequencies coincide perfectly with those predicted for a linear chain of atoms, taking into account the periodicity considered in each case.

  5. Bloch oscillations in carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jodar, Esther; Perez-Garrido, Antonio [Departamento Fisica Aplicada, Antiguo Hospital de Marina Campus Muralla del Mar, UPCT, Cartagena 30202 Murcia (Spain); Rojas, Fernando [Centro de Nanociencias y Nanotecnologia-UNAM, Apartado Postal 356, Ensenada, Baja California 22800 (Mexico)], E-mail: ejodar@upct.es

    2009-05-27

    Bloch oscillations arise when electrons are in a one-dimensional linear chain of atoms under a constant electric field. In this paper we show numerically that electrons in different types of carbon nanotubes show oscillations with a Bloch frequency proportional to the constant electric field applied along the nanotube axis. We show these oscillations, calculating the quadratic displacement as a function of the electric field. Because of the double periodicity of the nanotubes' geometry (the lattice constant and the lines of atoms) two frequencies appear, one twice the value of the other. These frequencies coincide perfectly with those predicted for a linear chain of atoms, taking into account the periodicity considered in each case. (fast track communication)

  6. Influence of Different Defects in Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotubes on TiO2 Nanoparticle Formation through Atomic Layer Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acauan, Luiz; Dias, Anna C; Pereira, Marcelo B; Horowitz, Flavio; Bergmann, Carlos P

    2016-06-29

    The chemical inertness of carbon nanotubes (CNT) requires some degree of "defect engineering" for controlled deposition of metal oxides through atomic layer deposition (ALD). The type, quantity, and distribution of such defects rules the deposition rate and defines the growth behavior. In this work, we employed ALD to grow titanium oxide (TiO2) on vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNT). The effects of nitrogen doping and oxygen plasma pretreatment of the CNT on the morphology and total amount of TiO2 were systematically studied using transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis. The induced chemical changes for each functionalization route were identified by X-ray photoelectron and Raman spectroscopies. The TiO2 mass fraction deposited with the same number of cycles for the pristine CNT, nitrogen-doped CNT, and plasma-treated CNT were 8, 47, and 80%, respectively. We demonstrate that TiO2 nucleation is dependent mainly on surface incorporation of heteroatoms and their distribution rather than structural defects that govern the growth behavior. Therefore, selecting the best way to functionalize CNT will allow us to tailor TiO2 distribution and hence fabricate complex heterostructures.

  7. Nanomechanics of carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kis, Andras; Zettl, Alex

    2008-05-13

    Some of the most important potential applications of carbon nanotubes are related to their mechanical properties. Stiff sp2 bonds result in a Young's modulus close to that of diamond, while the relatively weak van der Waals interaction between the graphitic shells acts as a form of lubrication. Previous characterization of the mechanical properties of nanotubes includes a rich variety of experiments involving mechanical deformation of nanotubes using scanning probe microscopes. These results have led to promising prototypes of nanoelectromechanical devices such as high-performance nanomotors, switches and oscillators based on carbon nanotubes.

  8. Carbon Nanotube Based Molecular Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Saini, Subhash; Menon, Madhu

    1998-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes and the nanotube heterojunctions have recently emerged as excellent candidates for nanoscale molecular electronic device components. Experimental measurements on the conductivity, rectifying behavior and conductivity-chirality correlation have also been made. While quasi-one dimensional simple heterojunctions between nanotubes with different electronic behavior can be generated by introduction of a pair of heptagon-pentagon defects in an otherwise all hexagon graphene sheet. Other complex 3- and 4-point junctions may require other mechanisms. Structural stability as well as local electronic density of states of various nanotube junctions are investigated using a generalized tight-binding molecular dynamics (GDBMD) scheme that incorporates non-orthogonality of the orbitals. The junctions investigated include straight and small angle heterojunctions of various chiralities and diameters; as well as more complex 'T' and 'Y' junctions which do not always obey the usual pentagon-heptagon pair rule. The study of local density of states (LDOS) reveal many interesting features, most prominent among them being the defect-induced states in the gap. The proposed three and four pointjunctions are one of the smallest possible tunnel junctions made entirely of carbon atoms. Furthermore the electronic behavior of the nanotube based device components can be taylored by doping with group III-V elements such as B and N, and BN nanotubes as a wide band gap semiconductor has also been realized in experiments. Structural properties of heteroatomic nanotubes comprising C, B and N will be discussed.

  9. Liquid surface model for carbon nanotube energetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solov'yov, Ilia; Mathew, Maneesh; Solov'yov, Andrey V.;

    2008-01-01

    an important insight in the energetics and stability of nanotubes of different chirality and might be important for the understanding of nanotube growth process. For the computations we use empirical Brenner and Tersoff potentials and discuss their applicability to the study of carbon nanotubes. From......In the present paper we developed a model for calculating the energy of single-wall carbon nanotubes of arbitrary chirality. This model, which we call as the liquid surface model, predicts the energy of a nanotube with relative error less than 1% once its chirality and the total number of atoms...... are known. The parameters of the liquid surface model and its potential applications are discussed. The model has been suggested for open end and capped nanotubes. The influence of the catalytic nanoparticle, atop which nanotubes grow, on the nanotube stability is also discussed. The suggested model gives...

  10. Catalytic Synthesis of Substrate-Free, Aligned and Tailored High Aspect Ratio Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes in an Ultrasonic Atomization Head CVD Reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Fahad Ali Rabbani; Zuhair Omar Malaibari; Muataz Ali Atieh; Ammar Jamie

    2016-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method has proven its benchmark, over other methods, for the production of different types of carbon nanotubes (CNT) on commercial and lab scale. In this study, an injection vertical CVD reactor fitted with an ultrasonic atomization head was used in a pilot-plant scale (height 274 cm, radius 25 cm) for semicontinuous production of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). p-Xylene was used as a hydrocarbon precursor in which ferrocene was dissolved and provided the ...

  11. Organic modification of carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The organic modification of carbon nanotubes is a novel research field being developed recently. In this article, the history and newest progress of organic modification of carbon nanotubes are reviewed from two aspects:organic covalent modification and organic noncovalent modification of carbon nanotubes. The preparation and properties of organic modified carbon nanotubes are discussed in detail. In addition, the prospective development of organic modification of carbon nanotubes is suggested.

  12. Fabrication of porous carbon nanotube network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jun-Wei; Fu, Shu-Juan; Gwo, Shangjr; Lin, Kuan-Jiuh; Lin, Kuna-Jiuh

    2008-11-21

    We used the spin-coating method combined with ultrasonic atomization as a continuous, one-step process to generate a two-dimensional honeycomb network that was constructed from pure multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

  13. Ordered phases of cesium in carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Jeong Won; Hwang, Ho Jung; Song, Ki Oh; Choi, Won Young; Byun, Ki Ryang [Chung-Ang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Oh Keun [Semyung University, Jecheon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jun Ha [Sangmyung University, Chonan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Won Woo [Juseong College, Cheongwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-10-15

    We investigate the structural phases of Cs in carbon nanotubes by using a structural optimization process applied to an atomistic simulation method. As the radius of the carbon nanotubes is increased, the structures are found in various phases from an atomic strand to multishell packs composed of coaxial cylindrical shells. Both helical structures and layered structures are found. The numbers of helical atom rows composed of coaxial tubes and the orthogonal vectors of the circular rolling of a triangular network can explain the structural phases of Cs in carbon nanotubes.

  14. Functionalization of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khare, Bishun N. (Inventor); Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Method and system for functionalizing a collection of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). A selected precursor gas (e.g., H2 or F2 or CnHm) is irradiated to provide a cold plasma of selected target species particles, such as atomic H or F, in a first chamber. The target species particles are d irected toward an array of CNTs located in a second chamber while suppressing transport of ultraviolet radiation to the second chamber. A CNT array is functionalized with the target species particles, at or below room temperature, to a point of saturation, in an exposure time interval no longer than about 30 sec. *Discrimination against non-target species is provided by (i) use of a target species having a lifetime that is much greater than a lifetime of a non-target species and/or (2) use of an applied magnetic field to discriminate between charged particle trajectories for target species and for non-target species.

  15. Carbon nanotube solar cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin Klinger

    Full Text Available We present proof-of-concept all-carbon solar cells. They are made of a photoactive side of predominantly semiconducting nanotubes for photoconversion and a counter electrode made of a natural mixture of carbon nanotubes or graphite, connected by a liquid electrolyte through a redox reaction. The cells do not require rare source materials such as In or Pt, nor high-grade semiconductor processing equipment, do not rely on dye for photoconversion and therefore do not bleach, and are easy to fabricate using a spray-paint technique. We observe that cells with a lower concentration of carbon nanotubes on the active semiconducting electrode perform better than cells with a higher concentration of nanotubes. This effect is contrary to the expectation that a larger number of nanotubes would lead to more photoconversion and therefore more power generation. We attribute this to the presence of metallic nanotubes that provide a short for photo-excited electrons, bypassing the load. We demonstrate optimization strategies that improve cell efficiency by orders of magnitude. Once it is possible to make semiconducting-only carbon nanotube films, that may provide the greatest efficiency improvement.

  16. Inkjet Printing of Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan P. Tortorich

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In an attempt to give a brief introduction to carbon nanotube inkjet printing, this review paper discusses the issues that come along with preparing and printing carbon nanotube ink. Carbon nanotube inkjet printing is relatively new, but it has great potential for broad applications in flexible and printable electronics, transparent electrodes, electronic sensors, and so on due to its low cost and the extraordinary properties of carbon nanotubes. In addition to the formulation of carbon nanotube ink and its printing technologies, recent progress and achievements of carbon nanotube inkjet printing are reviewed in detail with brief discussion on the future outlook of the technology.

  17. Epitaxial Approaches to Carbon Nanotube Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismach, Ariel

    Carbon nanotubes have unique electronic, mechanical, optical and thermal properties, which make them ideal candidates as building blocks in nano-electronic and electromechanical systems. However, their organization into well-defined geometries and arrays on surfaces remains a critical challenge for their integration into functional nanosystems. In my PhD, we developed a new approach for the organization of carbon nanotubes directed by crystal surfaces. The principle relies on the guided growth of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) by atomic features presented on anisotropic substrates. We identified three different modes of surface-directed growth (or 'nanotube epitaxy'), in which the growth of carbon nanotubes is directed by crystal substrates: We first observed the nanotube unidirectional growth along atomic steps ('ledge-directed epitaxy') and nanofacets ('graphoepitaxy') on the surface of miscut C-plane sapphire and quartz. The orientation along crystallographic directions ('lattice-directed epitaxy') was subsequently observed by other groups on different crystals. We have proposed a "wake growth" mechanism for the nanotube alignment along atomic steps and nanofacets. In this mechanism, the catalyst nanoparticle slides along the step or facet, leaving the nanotube behind as a wake. In addition, we showed that the combination of surface-directed growth with external forces, such as electric-field and gas flow, can lead to the simultaneous formation of complex nanotube structures, such as grids and serpentines. The "wake growth" model, which explained the growth of aligned nanotubes, could not explain the formation of nanotube serpentines. For the latter, we proposed a "falling spaghetti" mechanism, in which the nanotube first grows by a free-standing process, aligned in the direction of the gas flow, then followed by absorption on the stepped surface in an oscillatory manner, due to the competition between the drag force caused by the gas flow on the suspended

  18. Metals on graphene and carbon nanotube surfaces: From mobile atoms to atomtronics to bulk metals to clusters and catalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Sarkar, Santanu C.

    2014-01-14

    In this Perspective, we present an overview of recent fundamental studies on the nature of the interaction between individual metal atoms and metal clusters and the conjugated surfaces of graphene and carbon nanotube with a particular focus on the electronic structure and chemical bonding at the metal-graphene interface. We discuss the relevance of organometallic complexes of graphitic materials to the development of a fundamental understanding of these interactions and their application in atomtronics as atomic interconnects, high mobility organometallic transistor devices, high-frequency electronic devices, organometallic catalysis (hydrogen fuel generation by photocatalytic water splitting, fuel cells, hydrogenation), spintronics, memory devices, and the next generation energy devices. We touch on chemical vapor deposition (CVD) graphene grown on metals, the reactivity of its surface, and its use as a template for asymmetric graphene functionalization chemistry (ultrathin Janus discs). We highlight some of the latest advances in understanding the nature of interactions between metals and graphene surfaces from the standpoint of metal overlayers deposited on graphene and SWNT thin films. Finally, we comment on the major challenges facing the field and the opportunities for technological applications. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  19. ON THE CONTINUUM MODELING OF CARBON NANOTUBES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张鹏; 黄永刚; Philippe H.Geubelle; 黄克智

    2002-01-01

    We have recently proposed a nanoscale continuum theory for carbonnanotubes. The theory links continuum analysis with atomistic modeling by incor-porating interatomic potentials and atomic structures of carbon nanotubes directlyinto the constitutive law. Here we address two main issues involved in setting upthe nanoscale continuum theory for carbon nanotubes, namely the multi-body in-teratomic potentials and the lack of centrosymmetry in the nanotube structure. Weexplain the key ideas behind these issues in establishing a nanoscale continuum theoryin terms of interatomic potentials and atomic structures.

  20. Templated Growth of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siochik Emilie J. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A method of growing carbon nanotubes uses a synthesized mesoporous si lica template with approximately cylindrical pores being formed there in. The surfaces of the pores are coated with a carbon nanotube precu rsor, and the template with the surfaces of the pores so-coated is th en heated until the carbon nanotube precursor in each pore is convert ed to a carbon nanotube.

  1. Changes of the electronic structure of the atoms of nitrogen in nitrogen-doped multiwalled carbon nanotubes under the influence of pulsed ion radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korusenko, P.M., E-mail: korusenko@obisp.oscsbras.ru [Omsk Scientific Centre, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Karl Marx Avenue, 15, Omsk 644024 (Russian Federation); Bolotov, V.V.; Nesov, S.N.; Povoroznyuk, S.N. [Omsk Scientific Centre, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Karl Marx Avenue, 15, Omsk 644024 (Russian Federation); Khailov, I.P. [Tomsk Polytechnic University, Lenin Ave. 2a, Tomsk 634028 (Russian Federation)

    2015-09-01

    With the use of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) there have been investigated the changes of the chemical state of nitrogen atoms in the structure of nitrogen-doped multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CN{sub x}-MWCNTs) resulting from the impact of pulsed ion beam at various parameters of the beam (energy density, number of pulses). It has been established that irradiation with the pulsed ion beam leads to a reduction of the total amount of nitrogen in CN{sub x} nanotubes. It has been shown that a single pulse irradiation of ion beam at the energy densities of 0.5, 1, 1.5 J/cm{sup 2} leads to restructuring of the nitrogen from pyridinic and pyrrolic configuration to graphitic state. Complete removal of nitrogen (pyridinic, pyrrolic, graphitic) embedded in the structure of the walls of CN{sub x} nanotubes occurs at ten pulses and 1.5 J/cm{sup 2}.

  2. Carbon nanotubes for supercapacitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Hui; Li, Jianyi; Feng, Yuanping

    2010-01-05

    As an electrical energy storage device, supercapacitor finds attractive applications in consumer electronic products and alternative power source due to its higher energy density, fast discharge/charge time, low level of heating, safety, long-term operation stability, and no disposable parts. This work reviews the recent development of supercapacitor based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and their composites. The purpose is to give a comprehensive understanding of the advantages and disadvantages of carbon nanotubes-related supercapacitor materials and to find ways for the improvement in the performance of supercapacitor. We first discussed the effects of physical and chemical properties of pure carbon nanotubes, including size, purity, defect, shape, functionalization, and annealing, on the supercapacitance. The composites, including CNTs/oxide and CNTs/polymer, were further discussed to enhance the supercapacitance and keep the stability of the supercapacitor by optimally engineering the composition, particle size, and coverage.

  3. Carbon Nanotubes for Supercapacitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Jianyi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract As an electrical energy storage device, supercapacitor finds attractive applications in consumer electronic products and alternative power source due to its higher energy density, fast discharge/charge time, low level of heating, safety, long-term operation stability, and no disposable parts. This work reviews the recent development of supercapacitor based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs and their composites. The purpose is to give a comprehensive understanding of the advantages and disadvantages of carbon nanotubes-related supercapacitor materials and to find ways for the improvement in the performance of supercapacitor. We first discussed the effects of physical and chemical properties of pure carbon nanotubes, including size, purity, defect, shape, functionalization, and annealing, on the supercapacitance. The composites, including CNTs/oxide and CNTs/polymer, were further discussed to enhance the supercapacitance and keep the stability of the supercapacitor by optimally engineering the composition, particle size, and coverage.

  4. Direct formation of anatase TiO2 nanoparticles on carbon nanotubes by atomic layer deposition and their photocatalytic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Sheng-Hsin; Liao, Shih-Yun; Wang, Chih-Chieh; Kei, Chi-Chung; Gan, Jon-Yiew; Perng, Tsong-Pyng

    2016-10-01

    TiO2 with different morphology was deposited on acid-treated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by atomic layer deposition at 100 °C-300 °C to form a TiO2@CNT structure. The TiO2 fabricated at 100 °C was an amorphous film, but became crystalline anatase nanoparticles when fabricated at 200 °C and 300 °C. The saturation growth rates of TiO2 nanoparticles at 300 °C were about 1.5 and 0.4 Å/cycle for substrate-enhanced growth and linear growth processes, respectively. It was found that the rate constants for methylene blue degradation by the TiO2@CNT structure formed at 300 °C were more suitable to fit with second-order reaction. The size of 9 nm exhibited the best degradation efficiency, because of the high specific area and appropriate diffusion length for the electrons and holes.

  5. Fabrication and characterization of tunnel barriers in a multi-walled carbon nanotube formed by argon atom beam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomizawa, H. [Advanced Device Laboratory, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Department of Applied Physics, Tokyo University of Science, 6-3-1 Niijuku, Katsushika-ku, Tokyo 125-8585 (Japan); Yamaguchi, T., E-mail: tyamag@riken.jp [Advanced Device Laboratory, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Akita, S. [Department of Physics and Electronics, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-1 Gakuen-cho, Nakaku, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan); Ishibashi, K. [Advanced Device Laboratory, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Department of Applied Physics, Tokyo University of Science, 6-3-1 Niijuku, Katsushika-ku, Tokyo 125-8585 (Japan); RIKEN Center for Emergent Matter Science (CEMS), 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

    2015-07-28

    We have evaluated tunnel barriers formed in multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) by an Ar atom beam irradiation method and applied the technique to fabricate coupled double quantum dots. The two-terminal resistance of the individual MWNTs was increased owing to local damage caused by the Ar beam irradiation. The temperature dependence of the current through a single barrier suggested two different contributions to its Arrhenius plot, i.e., formed by direct tunneling through the barrier and by thermal activation over the barrier. The height of the formed barriers was estimated. The fabrication technique was used to produce coupled double quantum dots with serially formed triple barriers on a MWNT. The current measured at 1.5 K as a function of two side-gate voltages resulted in a honeycomb-like charge stability diagram, which confirmed the formation of the double dots. The characteristic parameters of the double quantum dots were calculated, and the feasibility of the technique is discussed.

  6. Synthesis of carbon nanotube-nickel nanocomposites using atomic layer deposition for high-performance non-enzymatic glucose sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Taejin; Kim, Soo Hyeon; Lee, Chang Wan; Kim, Hangil; Choi, Sang-Kyung; Kim, Soo-Hyun; Kim, Eunkyoung; Park, Jusang; Kim, Hyungjun

    2015-01-15

    A useful strategy has been developed to fabricate carbon-nanotube-nickel (CNT-Ni) nanocomposites through atomic layer deposition (ALD) of Ni and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of functionalized CNTs. Various techniques, including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), were used to characterize the morphology and the structure of as-prepared samples. It was confirmed that the products possess uniform Ni nanoparticles that are constructed by finely controlled deposition of Ni onto oxygen or bromine functionalized CNT surface. Electrochemical studies indicate that the CNT-Ni nanocomposites exhibit high electrocatalytic activity for glucose oxidation in alkaline solutions, which enables the products to be used in enzyme-free electrochemical sensors for glucose determination. It was demonstrated that the CNT-Ni nanocomposite-based glucose biosensor offers a variety of merits, such as a wide linear response window for glucose concentrations of 5 μM-2 mM, short response time (3 s), a low detection limit (2 μM), high sensitivity (1384.1 μA mM(-1) cm(-2)), and good selectivity and repeatability.

  7. Ballistic Fracturing of Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozden, Sehmus; Machado, Leonardo D; Tiwary, ChandraSekhar; Autreto, Pedro A S; Vajtai, Robert; Barrera, Enrique V; Galvao, Douglas S; Ajayan, Pulickel M

    2016-09-21

    Advanced materials with multifunctional capabilities and high resistance to hypervelocity impact are of great interest to the designers of aerospace structures. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with their lightweight and high strength properties are alternative to metals and/or metallic alloys conventionally used in aerospace applications. Here we report a detailed study on the ballistic fracturing of CNTs for different velocity ranges. Our results show that the highly energetic impacts cause bond breakage and carbon atom rehybridizations, and sometimes extensive structural reconstructions were also observed. Experimental observations show the formation of nanoribbons, nanodiamonds, and covalently interconnected nanostructures, depending on impact conditions. Fully atomistic reactive molecular dynamics simulations were also carried out in order to gain further insights into the mechanism behind the transformation of CNTs. The simulations show that the velocity and relative orientation of the multiple colliding nanotubes are critical to determine the impact outcome.

  8. Study of modification methods of probes for critical-dimension atomic-force microscopy by the deposition of carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ageev, O. A., E-mail: ageev@sfedu.ru [Southern Federal University, Institute for Nanotechnologies, Electronics, and Electronic Equipment Engineering (Russian Federation); Bykov, Al. V. [NT-MDT (Russian Federation); Kolomiitsev, A. S.; Konoplev, B. G.; Rubashkina, M. V.; Smirnov, V. A.; Tsukanova, O. G. [Southern Federal University, Institute for Nanotechnologies, Electronics, and Electronic Equipment Engineering (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    The results of an experimental study of the modification of probes for critical-dimension atomicforce microscopy (CD-AFM) by the deposition of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to improve the accuracy with which the surface roughness of vertical walls is determined in submicrometer structures are presented. Methods of the deposition of an individual CNT onto the tip of an AFM probe via mechanical and electrostatic interaction between the probe and an array of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) are studied. It is shown that, when the distance between the AFM tip and a VACNT array is 1 nm and the applied voltage is within the range 20–30 V, an individual carbon nanotube is deposited onto the tip. On the basis of the results obtained in the study, a probe with a carbon nanotube on its tip (CNT probe) with a radius of 7 nm and an aspect ratio of 1:15 is formed. Analysis of the CNT probe demonstrates that its use improves the resolution and accuracy of AFM measurements, compared with the commercial probe, and also makes it possible to determine the roughness of the vertical walls of high-aspect structures by CD-AFM. The results obtained can be used to develop technological processes for the fabrication and reconditioning of special AFM probes, including those for CD-AFM, and procedures for the interoperational express monitoring of technological process parameters in the manufacturing of elements for micro- and nanoelectronics and micro- and nanosystem engineering.

  9. Carbon nanotube filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, A.; Srivastava, O. N.; Talapatra, S.; Vajtai, R.; Ajayan, P. M.

    2004-09-01

    Over the past decade of nanotube research, a variety of organized nanotube architectures have been fabricated using chemical vapour deposition. The idea of using nanotube structures in separation technology has been proposed, but building macroscopic structures that have controlled geometric shapes, density and dimensions for specific applications still remains a challenge. Here we report the fabrication of freestanding monolithic uniform macroscopic hollow cylinders having radially aligned carbon nanotube walls, with diameters and lengths up to several centimetres. These cylindrical membranes are used as filters to demonstrate their utility in two important settings: the elimination of multiple components of heavy hydrocarbons from petroleum-a crucial step in post-distillation of crude oil-with a single-step filtering process, and the filtration of bacterial contaminants such as Escherichia coli or the nanometre-sized poliovirus (~25 nm) from water. These macro filters can be cleaned for repeated filtration through ultrasonication and autoclaving. The exceptional thermal and mechanical stability of nanotubes, and the high surface area, ease and cost-effective fabrication of the nanotube membranes may allow them to compete with ceramic- and polymer-based separation membranes used commercially.

  10. Carbon nanotubes for microelectronics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Andrew P; Duesberg, Georg S; Seidel, Robert V; Liebau, Maik; Unger, Eugen; Pamler, Werner; Kreupl, Franz; Hoenlein, Wolfgang

    2005-04-01

    Despite all prophecies of its end, silicon-based microelectronics still follows Moore's Law and continues to develop rapidly. However, the inherent physical limits will eventually be reached. Carbon nanotubes offer the potential for further miniaturization as long as it is possible to selectively deposit them with defined properties.

  11. Nitrogen doping in carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewels, C P; Glerup, M

    2005-09-01

    Nitrogen doping of single and multi-walled carbon nanotubes is of great interest both fundamentally, to explore the effect of dopants on quasi-1D electrical conductors, and for applications such as field emission tips, lithium storage, composites and nanoelectronic devices. We present an extensive review of the current state of the art in nitrogen doping of carbon nanotubes, including synthesis techniques, and comparison with nitrogen doped carbon thin films and azofullerenes. Nitrogen doping significantly alters nanotube morphology, leading to compartmentalised 'bamboo' nanotube structures. We review spectroscopic studies of nitrogen dopants using techniques such as X-ray photoemission spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy and Raman studies, and associated theoretical models. We discuss the role of nanotube curvature and chirality (notably whether the nanotubes are metallic or semiconducting), and the effect of doping on nanotube surface chemistry. Finally we review the effect of nitrogen on the transport properties of carbon nanotubes, notably its ability to induce negative differential resistance in semiconducting tubes.

  12. Defect-induced loading of Pt nanoparticles on carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Jin; Park, Yong Jin; Ra, Eun Ju; Kim, Ki Kang; An, Kay Hyeok; Lee, Young Hee; Choi, Jae Young; Park, Chan Ho; Doo, Seok Kwang; Park, Min Ho; Yang, Cheol Woong

    2007-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes-supported Pt nanoparticles were loaded using a microwave oven on the defective carbon nanotubes generated by an additional oxidant during acid treatment. The authors' Raman spectra and x-ray diffraction analysis demonstrated that defects created during oxidation and microwave treatment acted as nucleation seeds for Pt adsorption. The generated Pt nanoparticles had the size distributions of 2-3nm and were uniformly distributed on the defects of carbon nanotubes. The authors' density functional calculations showed that the adsorption of Pt atom on the vacancy of nanotube was significantly stronger by s-p hybridization with carbon atoms near the defect site.

  13. The transport properties of silicon and carbon nanotubes at the atomic scale: a first-principles study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Tengying; Wen, Shizheng; Yan, Likai; Wu, Caixia; Zhang, Chunmei; Zhang, Min; Su, Zhongmin

    2016-08-24

    Nanotubes are one of the most promising functional materials in nanotechnology. Silicon nanotubes (SiNTs) have been experimentally validated; they are unique puckered nanotubular structures unlike carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Although the electronic and optical properties of SiNTs have been previously studied, their structure-related capability for electron transport has not been investigated. Here we report a comparative study of the intrinsic electronic and transport properties of four pairs of SiNTs and CNTs (one armchair nanotubes (3,3) and three zigzag nanotubes (5,0), (6,0) and (7,0)) using density functional theory (DFT) combined with the nonequilibrium Green's function (NEGF) method. All our investigated systems of SiNTs and CNTs are conductors. Both the armchair SiNTs and CNTs possess superior electron transport performance to their zigzag counterparts. Compared with CNTs, SiNTs have more advantages in the high bias voltage region. Especially, Si(3,3) possesses around double the potential charge capacity of C(3,3) under the bias voltage of 2.0 V. In particular, the CNT(6,0) exhibits distinct negative differential resistance (NDR) behavior and the peak-valley ratio (PVR) for C(6,0) is about 1.2.

  14. The Toxicology of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, Ken; Poland, Craig; Duffin, Rodger; Bonner, James

    2012-06-01

    1. Carbon nanotube structure, synthesis and applications C. Singh and W. Song; 2. The aerodynamic behaviour and pulmonary deposition of carbon nanotubes A. Buckley, R. Smith and R Maynard; 3. Utilising the concept of the biologically effective dose to define the particle and fibre hazards of carbon nanotubes K. Donaldson, R. Duffin, F. Murphy and C. Poland; 4. CNT, biopersistence and the fibre paradigm D. Warheit and M. DeLorme; 5. Length-dependent retention of fibres in the pleural space C. Poland, F. Murphy and K. Donaldson; 6. Experimental carcinogenicity of carbon nanotubes in the context of other fibres K. Unfried; 7. Fate and effects of carbon nanotubes following inhalation J. Ryman-Rasmussen, M. Andersen and J. Bonner; 8. Responses to pulmonary exposure to carbon nanotubes V. Castranova and R. Mercer; 9. Genotoxicity of carbon nanotubes R. Schins, C. Albrecht, K. Gerloff and D. van Berlo; 10. Carbon nanotube-cellular interactions; macrophages, epithelial and mesothelial cells V. Stone, M. Boyles, A. Kermanizadeh, J. Varet and H. Johnston; 11. Systemic health effects of carbon nanotubes following inhalation J. McDonald; 12. Dosimetry and metrology of carbon nanotubes L. Tran, L. MacCalman and R. Aitken; Index.

  15. A Carbon Nanotube Cable for a Space Elevator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochnícek, Zdenek

    2013-01-01

    In this paper the mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes are discussed in connection with the possibility to use them for the construction of a space elevator. From the fundamental information about the structure of a carbon nanotube and the chemical bond between carbon atoms, Young's modulus and the ultimate tensile strength are…

  16. Computation of powder diffraction patterns for carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koloczek, J.; Burian, A

    2004-11-17

    An approach based on the Debye equations has been developed to compute the powder diffraction patterns of single-wall carbon nanotubes (CNs). A set of Cartesian coordinates of atoms which form nanotubes has been generated yielding interatomic distances. This leads to direct calculations of the kinematical diffraction profiles for nanotubes of arbitrary helicity and size.

  17. Carbon Nanotube Purification and Functionalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebron, Marisabel; Mintz, Eric; Smalley, Richard E.; Meador, Michael A.

    2003-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes have the potential to significantly enhance the mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties of polymers. However, dispersion of carbon nanotubes in a polymer matrix is hindered by the electrostatic forces that cause them to agglomerate. Chemical modification of the nanotubes is necessary to minimize these electrostatic forces and promote adhesion between the nanotubes and the polymer matrix. In a collaborative research program between Clark Atlanta University, Rice University, and NASA Glenn Research Center several approaches are being explored to chemically modify carbon nanotubes. The results of this research will be presented.

  18. Production of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journet, C.; Bernier, P.

    Carbon nanostructures such as single-walled and multi-walled nanotubes (SWNTs and MWNTs) or graphitic polyhedral nanoparticles can be produced using various methods. Most of them are based on the sublimation of carbon under an inert atmosphere, such as the electric arc discharge process, the laser ablation method, or the solar technique. But chemical methods can also be used to synthesize these kinds of carbon materials: the catalytic decomposition of hydrocarbons, the production by electrolysis, the heat treatment of a polymer, the low temperature solid pyrolysis, or the in situ catalysis.

  19. Manipulation and cutting of carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Nanomanipulation plays an important role in nanofabrication, it is also a technology necessary in exploring the secrets of nanoworld, and it thus beco mesa start point to research future nanomachine. In this study, manipulation and cutting of carbon nanotubes have been conducted in order to examine whether we can move a nanocomponent from one site to another by using the tip of atomic fo rce microscope (AFM). The technique may also be valuable for providing the const ructive materials of nanofabrication. While exploring the method for manipulatin g and cutting of nanotubes, some new phenomena have been observed during the process. Results show that carbon nanotubes present a feature of deformation combin ing bending and distortion when subjected to large mechanical forces exerted by the tip of AFM. In special cases, long carbon nanotubes can be cut into two part s, by which we can remove the part where crystal lattice is flawed, and therefor e a perfect nanocomponent can be obtained.

  20. Van der Waals interaction between two crossed carbon nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Zhbanov, Alexander I.; Pogorelov, Evgeny G.; Chang, Yia-Chung

    2008-01-01

    The analytical expressions for the van der Waals potential energy and force between two crossed carbon nanotubes are presented. The Lennard-Jones potential for two carbon atoms and the method of the smeared out approximation suggested by L.A. Girifalco were used. The exact formula is expressed in terms of rational and elliptical functions. The potential and force for carbon nanotubes were calculated. The uniform potential curves for single- and multi- wall nanotubes were plotted. The equilibr...

  1. Carbon nanotube network varactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Generalov, A. A.; Anoshkin, I. V.; Erdmanis, M.; Lioubtchenko, D. V.; Ovchinnikov, V.; Nasibulin, A. G.; Räisänen, A. V.

    2015-01-01

    Microelectromechanical system (MEMS) varactors based on a freestanding layer of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) films were designed, fabricated and tested. The freestanding SWCNT film was employed as a movable upper patch in the parallel plate capacitor of the MEMS. The measurements of the SWCNT varactors show very high tunability, nearly 100%, of the capacitance with a low actuation voltage of 10 V. The functionality of the varactor is improved by implementing a flexible nanocellulose aerogel filling.

  2. Carbon Nanotube Thermoelectric Coolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-06

    conductance. Inside thecentral section of the carbon nanotube, we obtained an impressive Peltier cooling 57 K down from the liquid nitrogentemperature. 15... trapped charges or dipoles) that occur either at the interface between the CNT and the gate dielectric (interface defects) or at some position within... liquid nitrogen temperature 77T  K up to hot 134 8T  K, or decreases from 77T  K down to about cold 20 6T  K, thus evidencing a strong

  3. Carbon nanotube biosensors

    OpenAIRE

    Tîlmaciu, Carmen-Mihaela; Morris, May C

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterials possess unique features which make them particularly attractive for biosensing applications. In particular, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can serve as scaffolds for immobilization of biomolecules at their surface, and combine several exceptional physical, chemical, electrical, and optical characteristics properties which make them one of the best suited materials for the transduction of signals associated with the recognition of analytes, metabolites, or disease biomarkers. Here we pr...

  4. From Carbon Nanotube Crystals to Carbon Nanotube Flowers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhengjun; ZHAO Ye; ZHOU Ya

    2005-01-01

    We have investigated the very initial deposition stages of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) with ferrocene (Fe(C5H5)2) and xylene (C8H10) for growing carbon nanotubes, and made clear that the mechanism for the self-organization behaviors of nanotubes at different growth stages by this approach. For instance, the organization of nanotubes into flower-like structures at prolonged deposition is developed from the crystal-like structures formed at early growth stages, both of which are closely related to and determined by the very initial deposition stages of this CVD approach. Based on this approach, ways have been established to build up different architectures of carbon nanotubes, by controlling the initial deposition stages of the CVD process, with which we have realized the selective growth of self-organized carbon nanotube structures. This study provides a new idea for growing carbon nanotube architectures by CVD.

  5. Carbon Nanotubes Based Quantum Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jian-Ping

    1999-01-01

    This document represents the final report for the NASA cooperative agreement which studied the application of carbon nanotubes. The accomplishments are reviewed: (1) Wrote a review article on carbon nanotubes and its potentials for applications in nanoscale quantum devices. (2) Extensive studies on the effects of structure deformation on nanotube electronic structure and energy band gaps. (3) Calculated the vibrational spectrum of nanotube rope and the effect of pressure. and (4) Investigate the properties of Li intercalated nanotube ropes and explore their potential for energy storage materials and battery applications. These studies have lead to four publications and seven abstracts in international conferences.

  6. DFT Studies on Electronic Structures of Boro-Nitride-Carbon Nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Ming; HUANG Chun-Hui

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, the configurations of Boro-Nitride-Carbon nanotubes with BNC2 composition were optimized by ROHF method. According to the density functional theory, the electronic structures of Boro-Nitride-Carbon nanotubes were calculated by DFT/ROB3LYP method. By analyzing the energy gap, density of electronic state and bonding maps of atoms, the conductive properties of Boro-Nitride-Carbon nanotubes were obtained, and compared with those of carbon nanotubes and other Boro-Nitride nanotubes.

  7. Conductance of AFM Deformed Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svizhenko, Alexei; Maiti, Amitesh; Anatram, M. P.; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on the electrical conductivity of carbon nanotubes upon deformation by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The density of states and conductance were computed using four orbital tight-binding method with various parameterizations. Different chiralities develop bandgap that varies with chirality.

  8. Spatially resolved spectroscopy on carbon nanotubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, J.W.

    2001-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are small cylindrical molecules with a typical diameter of 1 nm and lengths of up to micrometers. These intriguing molecules exhibit, depending on the exact atomic structure, either semiconducting or metallic behavior. This makes them ideal candidates for possible future molecular e

  9. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes as a sorbent material for the solid phase extraction of lead from urine and subsequent determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peña Crecente, Rosa M.; Lovera, Carlha Gutiérrez; García, Julia Barciela; Méndez, Jennifer Álvarez; Martín, Sagrario García; Latorre, Carlos Herrero, E-mail: carlos.herrero@usc.es

    2014-11-01

    The determination of lead in urine is a way of monitoring the chemical exposure to this metal. In the present paper, a new method for the Pb determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) in urine at low levels has been developed. Lead was separated from the undesirable urine matrix by means of a solid phase extraction (SPE) procedure. Oxidized multiwalled carbon nanotubes have been used as a sorbent material. Lead from urine was retained at pH 4.0 and was quantitatively eluted using a 0.7 M nitric acid solution and was subsequently measured by ETAAS. The effects of parameters that influence the adsorption–elution process (such as pH, eluent volume and concentration, sampling and elution flow rates) and the atomic spectrometry conditions have been studied by means of different factorial design strategies. Under the optimized conditions, the detection and quantification limits obtained were 0.08 and 0.26 μg Pb L{sup −1}, respectively. The results demonstrate the absence of a urine matrix effect and this is the consequence of the SPE process carried out. Therefore, the developed method is useful for the analysis of Pb at low levels in real samples without the influence of other urine components. The proposed method was applied to the determination of lead in urine samples of unexposed healthy people and satisfactory results were obtained (in the range 3.64–22.9 μg Pb L{sup −1}). - Highlights: • Lead determination in urine using a solid phase extraction procedure followed by ETAAS • Carbon nanotubes as SPE adsorbent for Pb in urine • Matrix elimination for the Pb determination in urine by using SPE based on carbon nanotubes • The detection limit was 0.08 μg Pb L{sup −1}.

  10. Lithium interaction with carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nalimova, V.A. [Moskovskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ., Moscow (Russian Federation). Khimicheskij Fakul`tet; Sklovsky, D.E. [Moskovskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ., Moscow (Russian Federation). Khimicheskij Fakul`tet; Bondarenko, G.N. [Topcheiv Institute of Petrochemical Synthesis, Leninsky Prospekt, 29, Moscow (Russian Federation); Alvergnat-Gaucher, H. [CRMD, CNRS, Universite d`Orleans, 1B rue de la Ferollerie, 45071, Orleans Cedex 02 (France); Bonnamy, S. [CRMD, CNRS, Universite d`Orleans, 1B rue de la Ferollerie, 45071, Orleans Cedex 02 (France); Beguin, F. [CRMD, CNRS, Universite d`Orleans, 1B rue de la Ferollerie, 45071, Orleans Cedex 02 (France)

    1997-05-01

    Lithium interaction with catalytic carbon nanotubes under high-pressure conditions was studied. A large amount of Li (2Li/C) reacted with the carbon nanotubes forming an intercalation compound (I{sub c}{proportional_to}4.1 A) which follows from X-ray diffraction and IR spectroscopy data. We cannot exclude also the possibility of insertion of a part of Li into the channel of the nanotubes. (orig.)

  11. Carbon nanotube Archimedes screws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oroszlány, László; Zólyomi, Viktor; Lambert, Colin J

    2010-12-28

    Recently, nanomechanical devices composed of a long stationary inner carbon nanotube and a shorter, slowly rotating outer tube have been fabricated. In this paper, we study the possibility of using such devices as nanoscale transducers of motion into electricity. When the outer tube is chiral, we show that such devices act like quantum Archimedes screws, which utilize mechanical energy to pump electrons between reservoirs. We calculate the pumped charge from one end of the inner tube to the other, driven by the rotation of a chiral outer nanotube. We show that the pumped charge can be greater than one electron per 360° rotation, and consequently, such a device operating with a rotational frequency of 10 MHz, for example, would deliver a current of ≈1 pAmp.

  12. CARBON NANOTUBES: PROPERTIES AND APPLICATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, John, E.

    2009-07-24

    Carbon nanotubes were discovered in 1991 as a minority byproduct of fullerene synthesis. Remarkable progress has been made in the ensuing years, including the discovery of two basic types of nanotubes (single-wall and multi-wall), great strides in synthesis and purification, elucidation of many fundamental physical properties, and important steps towards practical applications. Both the underlying science and technological potential of SWNT can profitably be studied at the scale of individual tubes and on macroscopic assemblies such as fibers. Experiments on single tubes directly reveal many of the predicted quantum confinement and mechanical properties. Semiconductor nanowires have many features in common with nanotubes, and many of the same fundamental and practical issues are in play – quantum confinement and its effect on properties; possible device structures and circuit architectures; thermal management; optimal synthesis, defect morphology and control, etc. In 2000 we began a small effort in this direction, conducted entirely by undergraduates with minimal consumables support from this grant. With DOE-BES approval, this grew into a project in parallel with the carbon nanotube work, in which we studied of inorganic semiconductor nanowire growth, characterization and novel strategies for electronic and electromechanical device fabrication. From the beginnings of research on carbon nanotubes, one of the major applications envisioned was hydrogen storage for fuel-cell powered cars and trucks. Subsequent theoretical models gave mixed results, the most pessimistic indicating that the fundamental H2-SWNT interaction was similar to flat graphite (physisorption) with only modest binding energies implying cryogenic operation at best. New material families with encouraging measured properties have emerged, and materials modeling has gained enormously in predictive power, sophistication, and the ability to treat a realistically representative number of atoms. One of

  13. Massive radius-dependent flow slippage in carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siria, Alessandro; Secchi, Eleonora; Marbach, Sophie; Niguès, Antoine; Stein, Derek; Bocquet, Lydéric

    2016-11-01

    Nanofluidics is the frontier where the continuum picture of fluid mechanics confronts the atomic nature of matter. Recent reports indicate that carbon nanotubes exhibit exceptional water transport properties due to nearly frictionless interfaces and this has stimulated interest in nanotube-based membranes for desalination, nano-filtration, and energy harvesting. However, the fundamental mechanisms of water transport inside nanotubes and at water-carbon interfaces remain controversial, as existing theories fail to provide a satisfying explanation for the limited experimental results. We report a study of water jets emerging from single nanotubes made of carbon and boron-nitride materials. Our experiments reveal extensive and radius-dependent surface slippage in carbon nanotubes (CNT). In stark contrast, boron-nitride nanotubes (BNNT), which are crystallographically similar to CNTs but electronically different, exhibit no slippage. This shows that slippage originates in subtle atomic-scale details of the solid-liquid interface. ERC StG - NanoSOFT.

  14. Catalytic Synthesis of Substrate-Free, Aligned and Tailored High Aspect Ratio Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes in an Ultrasonic Atomization Head CVD Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahad Ali Rabbani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemical vapor deposition (CVD method has proven its benchmark, over other methods, for the production of different types of carbon nanotubes (CNT on commercial and lab scale. In this study, an injection vertical CVD reactor fitted with an ultrasonic atomization head was used in a pilot-plant scale (height 274 cm, radius 25 cm for semicontinuous production of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs. p-Xylene was used as a hydrocarbon precursor in which ferrocene was dissolved and provided the cracking catalyst. Atomization of the feed solution resulted in full and even dispersion of the catalytic solution. This dispersion led to the production of high aspect ratio MWCNTs (ranging from 8,000 to 12,000 at 850°C. Different experimental parameters affecting the quality and quantity of the produced CNTs were investigated. These included temperature, reaction time, and flow rate of the reaction and carrier gases. Different properties of the produced CNTs were characterized using SEM and TEM, while TGA was used to evaluate their purity. Specific surface area of selected samples was calculated by BET.

  15. Carbon Nanotubes and Modern Nanoagriculture

    KAUST Repository

    Bayoumi, Maged Fouad

    2015-01-27

    Since their discovery, carbon nanotubes have been prominent members of the nanomaterial family. Owing to their extraordinary physical, chemical, and mechanical properties, carbon nanotubes have been proven to be a useful tool in the field of plant science. They were frequently perceived to bring about valuable biotechnological and agricultural applications that still remain beyond experimental realization. An increasing number of studies have demonstrated the ability of carbon nanotubes to traverse different plant cell barriers. These studies, also, assessed the toxicity and environmental impacts of these nanomaterials. The knowledge provided by these studies is of practical and fundamental importance for diverse applications including intracellular labeling and imaging, genetic transformation, and for enhancing our knowledge of plant cell biology. Although different types of nanoparticles have been found to activate physiological processes in plants, carbon nanotubes received particular interest. Following addition to germination medium, carbon nanotubes enhanced root growth and elongation of some plants such as onion, cucumber and rye-grass. They, also, modulated the expression of some genes that are essential for cell division and plant development. In addition, multi-walled carbon nanotubes were evidenced to penetrate thick seed coats, stimulate germination, and to enhance growth of young tomato seedlings. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes can penetrate deeply into the root system and further distribute into the leaves and the fruits. In recent studies, carbon nanotubes were reported to be chemically entrapped into the structure of plant tracheary elements. This should activate studies in the fields of plant defense and wood engineering. Although, all of these effects on plant physiology and plant developmental biology have not been fully understood, the valuable findings promises more research activity in the near future toward complete scientific understanding of

  16. Studies of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caneba, Gerard T.

    2005-01-01

    The fellowship experience for this summer for 2004 pertains to carbon nanotube coatings for various space-related applications. They involve the following projects: (a) EMI protection films from HiPco-polymers, and (b) Thermal protection nanosilica materials. EMI protection films are targeted to be eventually applied onto casings of laptop computers. These coatings are composites of electrically-conductive SWNTs and compatible polymers. The substrate polymer will be polycarbonate, since computer housings are typically made of carbon composites of this type of polymer. A new experimental copolymer was used last year to generate electrically-conductive and thermal films with HiPco at 50/50 wt/wt composition. This will be one of the possible formulations. Reference films will be base polycarbonate and neat HiPco onto polycarbonate films. Other coating materials that will be tried will be based on HiPco composites with commercial enamels (polyurethane, acrylic, polyester), which could be compatible with the polycarbonate substrate. Nanosilica fibers are planned for possible use as thermal protection tiles on the shuttle orbiter. Right now, microscale silica is used. Going to the nanoscale will increase the surface-volume-per-unit-area of radiative heat dissipation. Nanoscale carbon fibers/nanotubes can be used as templates for the generation of nanosilica. A sol-gel operation is employed for this purpose.

  17. Luminescence of carbon nanotube bulbs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI ChuanGang; WU DeHai; WANG KunLin; WEI JinQuan; WEI BingQing; ZHU HongWei; WANG ZhiCheng; LUO JianBin; LIU WenJin; ZHENG MingXin

    2007-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) bulbs made of decimeter-scale double-walled carbon nanotube (DWCNT) strands and films were fabricated and their luminescence properties, including the lighting efficiency, voltage-current relation and thermal stability were investigated. The results show that the DWCNT bulb has a comparable spectrum of visible light with tungsten bulb and its average efficiency is 40% higher than that of a tungsten filament at the same temperature (1400-2300 K). The nanotube filaments show both resistance and thermal stability over a large temperature region. No obvious damage was found for a nanotube bulb illuminating at 2300 K for more than 24 hours in vacuum.

  18. Atomic Layer Deposition of ZnO on Multi-walled Carbon Nanotubes and Its Use for Synthesis of CNT–ZnO Heterostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li C

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this article, direct coating of ZnO on PECVD-grown multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs is achieved using atomic layer deposition (ALD. Transmission electron microscopy investigation shows that the deposited ZnO shell is continuous and uniform, in contrast to the previously reported particle morphology. The ZnO layer has a good crystalline quality as indicated by Raman and photoluminescence (PL measurements. We also show that such ZnO layer can be used as seed layer for subsequent hydrothermal growth of ZnO nanorods, resulting in branched CNT–inorganic hybrid nanostructures. Potentially, this method can also apply to the fabrication of ZnO-based hybrid nanostructures on other carbon nanomaterials.

  19. (10, 10) Single walled carbon nanotube consisted of chemisorbed oxygen atoms as a promising supercapacitor electrode material: A first principles study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Targholi, Ehsan; Molaei, Masoumeh; Mousavi-Khoshdel, S. Morteza

    2016-11-01

    The effects of atomic oxygen chemisorption on the electronic structures and quantum capacitance of (10, 10) CNT have been studied in this article. The results indicated that the chemisorption on bonds aligned with nanotube axis is more favorable than other position. The most efficient configuration for enhancing quantum capacitance is the nanotube with oxygen atoms chemisorbed on axial bonds. Specifically, in water stability range, the quantum capacitance of (10, 10) CNT before and after chemisorption of six oxygen atoms (aligned with nanotube axis) were found to be 222.6 (anode) -117.6 (cathode) and 306.9 (anode) -217.2 (cathode) F/g, respectively.

  20. Carbon Nanotube Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen-Mihaela eTilmaciu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Nanomaterials possess unique features which make them particularly attractive for biosensing applications. In particular Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs can serve as scaffolds for immobilization of biomolecules at their surface, and combine several exceptional physical, chemical, electrical and optical characteristics properties which make them one of the best suited materials for the transduction of signals associated with the recognition of analytes, metabolites or disease biomarkers. Here we provide a comprehensive review on these carbon nanostructures, in which we will describe their structural and physical properties, discuss functionalization and cellular uptake, biocompatibility and toxicity issues. We further review historical developments in the field of biosensors, and describe the different types of biosensors which have been developed over time, with specific focus on CNT-conjugates engineered for biosensing applications, and in particular detection of cancer biomarkers.

  1. Carbon nanotube biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tîlmaciu, Carmen-Mihaela; Morris, May C.

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterials possess unique features which make them particularly attractive for biosensing applications. In particular, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can serve as scaffolds for immobilization of biomolecules at their surface, and combine several exceptional physical, chemical, electrical, and optical characteristics properties which make them one of the best suited materials for the transduction of signals associated with the recognition of analytes, metabolites, or disease biomarkers. Here we provide a comprehensive review on these carbon nanostructures, in which we describe their structural and physical properties, functionalization and cellular uptake, biocompatibility, and toxicity issues. We further review historical developments in the field of biosensors, and describe the different types of biosensors which have been developed over time, with specific focus on CNT-conjugates engineered for biosensing applications, and in particular detection of cancer biomarkers. PMID:26579509

  2. Method for synthesizing carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Hongyou

    2012-09-04

    A method for preparing a precursor solution for synthesis of carbon nanomaterials, where a polar solvent is added to at least one block copolymer and at least one carbohydrate compound, and the precursor solution is processed using a self-assembly process and subsequent heating to form nanoporous carbon films, porous carbon nanotubes, and porous carbon nanoparticles.

  3. Carbon nanotubes: engineering biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Gualdrón, Diego A; Burgos, Juan C; Yu, Jiamei; Balbuena, Perla B

    2011-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are cylinder-shaped allotropic forms of carbon, most widely produced under chemical vapor deposition. They possess astounding chemical, electronic, mechanical, and optical properties. Being among the most promising materials in nanotechnology, they are also likely to revolutionize medicine. Among other biomedical applications, after proper functionalization carbon nanotubes can be transformed into sophisticated biosensing and biocompatible drug-delivery systems, for specific targeting and elimination of tumor cells. This chapter provides an introduction to the chemical and electronic structure and properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes, followed by a description of the main synthesis and post-synthesis methods. These sections allow the reader to become familiar with the specific characteristics of these materials and the manner in which these properties may be dependent on the specific synthesis and post-synthesis processes. The chapter ends with a review of the current biomedical applications of carbon nanotubes, highlighting successes and challenges.

  4. Closely packed sodium and potassium nanowires in ultrathin carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Jeong Won; Hwang, Ho Jung [Chung-Ang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jun Ha; Lee, Hoong Ju [Sangmyung University, Chonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-15

    We have investigated the structural phases of sodium and potassium encapsulated in ultrathin carbon nanotubes by using a structural optimization process applied to an atomistic simulation method. As the radius of the carbon nanotubes is increased, structures are found in various phases from an atomic strand to multi-shell packs composed of coaxial cylindrical shells and in both helical and layered structures. The numbers of helical atom rows composed of coaxial tubes and the orthogonal vectors of a circular rolling of a triangular network can explain multi-shell phases of sodium and potassium in carbon nanotubes.

  5. Adsorption of Gases on Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbaye, Mamadou Thiao

    2014-01-01

    This research focus in studying the interaction between various classical and quantum gases with novel carbon nanostructures, mainly carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Since their discovery by the Japanese physicist Sumio Iijima [1] carbon nanotubes have, experimentally and theoretically, been subjected to many scientific investigation. Studies of adsorption on CNTs are particularly directed toward their better usage in gas storage, gas separation, catalyst, drug delivery, and water purification. We explore the adsorption of different gases entrapped in a single, double, or multi-bundles of CNTs using computer simulations. The first system we investigate consists of Ar and Kr films adsorbed on zigzag or armchair nanotubes. Our simulations revealed that Kr atoms on intermediate size zigzag NTs undergo two phase transitions: A liquid-vapor (L→V), and liquid-commensurate (L→CS) with a fractional coverage of one Kr atoms adsorbed for every four carbon atoms. For Ar on zigzag and armchair NTs, the only transition observed is a L→V. In the second problem, we explore the adsorption of CO2 molecules in a nanotube bundle and calculate the isosteric heat of adsorption of the entrapped molecules within the groove. We observed that the lower the temperature, the higher the isosteric of adsorption. Last, we investigate the adsorption of hydrogen, Helium, and Neon gases on the groove site of two parallel nanotubes. At low temperature, the transverse motion on the plane perpendicular to the tubes' axis is frozen out and as a consequence, the heat capacity is reduced to 1/2. At high temperature, the atoms gain more degree of freedom and as a consequence the heat capacity is 5/2.

  6. Carbon Nanotube Electron Gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Cattien V. (Inventor); Ribaya, Bryan P. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An electron gun, an electron source for an electron gun, an extractor for an electron gun, and a respective method for producing the electron gun, the electron source and the extractor are disclosed. Embodiments provide an electron source utilizing a carbon nanotube (CNT) bonded to a substrate for increased stability, reliability, and durability. An extractor with an aperture in a conductive material is used to extract electrons from the electron source, where the aperture may substantially align with the CNT of the electron source when the extractor and electron source are mated to form the electron gun. The electron source and extractor may have alignment features for aligning the electron source and the extractor, thereby bringing the aperture and CNT into substantial alignment when assembled. The alignment features may provide and maintain this alignment during operation to improve the field emission characteristics and overall system stability of the electron gun.

  7. Carbon nanotube biconvex microcavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butt, Haider; Yetisen, Ali K.; Ahmed, Rajib; Yun, Seok Hyun; Dai, Qing

    2015-03-01

    Developing highly efficient microcavities with predictive narrow-band resonance frequencies using the least amount of material will allow the applications in nonlinear photonic devices. We have developed a microcavity array that comprised multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) organized in a biconvex pattern. The finite element model allowed designing microcavity arrays with predictive transmission properties and assessing the effects of the microarray geometry. The microcavity array demonstrated negative index and produced high Q factors. 2-3 μm tall MWCNTs were patterned as biconvex microcavities, which were separated by 10 μm in an array. The microcavity was iridescent and had optical control over the diffracted elliptical patterns with a far-field pattern, whose properties were predicted by the model. It is anticipated that the MWCNT biconvex microcavities will have implications for the development of highly efficient lenses, metamaterial antennas, and photonic circuits.

  8. Massive radius-dependent flow slippage in carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secchi, Eleonora; Marbach, Sophie; Niguès, Antoine; Stein, Derek; Siria, Alessandro; Bocquet, Lydéric

    2016-09-01

    Measurements and simulations have found that water moves through carbon nanotubes at exceptionally high rates owing to nearly frictionless interfaces. These observations have stimulated interest in nanotube-based membranes for applications including desalination, nano-filtration and energy harvesting, yet the exact mechanisms of water transport inside the nanotubes and at the water-carbon interface continue to be debated because existing theories do not provide a satisfactory explanation for the limited number of experimental results available so far. This lack of experimental results arises because, even though controlled and systematic studies have explored transport through individual nanotubes, none has met the considerable technical challenge of unambiguously measuring the permeability of a single nanotube. Here we show that the pressure-driven flow rate through individual nanotubes can be determined with unprecedented sensitivity and without dyes from the hydrodynamics of water jets as they emerge from single nanotubes into a surrounding fluid. Our measurements reveal unexpectedly large and radius-dependent surface slippage in carbon nanotubes, and no slippage in boron nitride nanotubes that are crystallographically similar to carbon nanotubes, but electronically different. This pronounced contrast between the two systems must originate from subtle differences in the atomic-scale details of their solid-liquid interfaces, illustrating that nanofluidics is the frontier at which the continuum picture of fluid mechanics meets the atomic nature of matter.

  9. Massive radius-dependent flow slippage in carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secchi, Eleonora; Marbach, Sophie; Niguès, Antoine; Stein, Derek; Siria, Alessandro; Bocquet, Lydéric

    2016-09-08

    Measurements and simulations have found that water moves through carbon nanotubes at exceptionally high rates owing to nearly frictionless interfaces. These observations have stimulated interest in nanotube-based membranes for applications including desalination, nano-filtration and energy harvesting, yet the exact mechanisms of water transport inside the nanotubes and at the water-carbon interface continue to be debated because existing theories do not provide a satisfactory explanation for the limited number of experimental results available so far. This lack of experimental results arises because, even though controlled and systematic studies have explored transport through individual nanotubes, none has met the considerable technical challenge of unambiguously measuring the permeability of a single nanotube. Here we show that the pressure-driven flow rate through individual nanotubes can be determined with unprecedented sensitivity and without dyes from the hydrodynamics of water jets as they emerge from single nanotubes into a surrounding fluid. Our measurements reveal unexpectedly large and radius-dependent surface slippage in carbon nanotubes, and no slippage in boron nitride nanotubes that are crystallographically similar to carbon nanotubes, but electronically different. This pronounced contrast between the two systems must originate from subtle differences in the atomic-scale details of their solid-liquid interfaces, illustrating that nanofluidics is the frontier at which the continuum picture of fluid mechanics meets the atomic nature of matter.

  10. Enhanced Carbon Nanotube Ultracapacitors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed innovation utilizes carbon nanotubes (CNTs) coated with pseudo-capacitive MnO2 material as nano-composite electrode and ionic electrolyte for the...

  11. Carbon nanotubes for coherent spintronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuemmeth, Ferdinand; Churchill, H O H; Herring, P K;

    2010-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes bridge the molecular and crystalline quantum worlds, and their extraordinary electronic, mechanical and optical properties have attracted enormous attention from a broad scientific community. We review the basic principles of fabricating spin-electronic devices based on individua...

  12. Locally addressable tunnel barriers within a carbon nanotube

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biercuk, M.; Mason, N.; Chow, J.;

    2003-01-01

    We report the realization and characterization of independently controllable tunnel barriers within a carbon nanotube. The nanotubes are mechanically bent or kinked using an atomic force microscope, and top gates are subsequently placed near each kink. Transport measurements indicate that the kinks...

  13. Molybdenum Disulfide Sheathed Carbon Nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Chun SONG; Zhu De XU; Yi Fan ZHENG; Gui HAN; Bo LIU; Wei Xiang CHEN

    2004-01-01

    Single and double layered MoS2-coated multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNs) were successfully prepared by pyrolyzing (NH4)2MoS4-coated multiwalled carbon nanotubes in an H2 atmosphere at 900℃. MoS2-coated MWCNs would be expected to have different tribological and mechanical properties compared to MoS2, so it may have potential applications in many fields.

  14. Selective functionalization of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strano, Michael S. (Inventor); Usrey, Monica (Inventor); Barone, Paul (Inventor); Dyke, Christopher A. (Inventor); Tour, James M. (Inventor); Kittrell, W. Carter (Inventor); Hauge, Robert H. (Inventor); Smalley, Richard E. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention is directed toward methods of selectively functionalizing carbon nanotubes of a specific type or range of types, based on their electronic properties, using diazonium chemistry. The present invention is also directed toward methods of separating carbon nanotubes into populations of specific types or range(s) of types via selective functionalization and electrophoresis, and also to the novel compositions generated by such separations.

  15. Carbon nanotubes for coherent spintronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuemmeth, Ferdinand; Churchill, H O H; Herring, P K

    2010-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes bridge the molecular and crystalline quantum worlds, and their extraordinary electronic, mechanical and optical properties have attracted enormous attention from a broad scientific community. We review the basic principles of fabricating spin-electronic devices based on individual......, electrically-gated carbon nanotubes, and present experimental efforts to understand their electronic and nuclear spin degrees of freedom, which in the future may enable quantum applications....

  16. Carbon nanotube oscillator surface profiling device and method of use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, Adrian; Woods, Lilia M.; Bondarev, Igor V.

    2011-11-15

    The proposed device is based on a carbon nanotube oscillator consisting of a finite length outer stationary nanotube and a finite length inner oscillating nanotube. Its main function is to measure changes in the characteristics of the motion of the carbon nanotube oscillating near a sample surface, and profile the roughness of this surface. The device operates in a non-contact mode, thus it can be virtually non-wear and non-fatigued system. It is an alternative to the existing atomic force microscope (AFM) tips used to scan surfaces to determine their roughness.

  17. Computational Nanomechanics of Carbon Nanotubes and Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Wei, Chenyu; Cho, Kyeongjae; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Nanomechanics of individual carbon and boron-nitride nanotubes and their application as reinforcing fibers in polymer composites has been reviewed with interplay of theoretical modeling, computer simulations and experimental observations. The emphasis in this work is on elucidating the multi-length scales of the problems involved, and of different simulation techniques that are needed to address specific characteristics of individual nanotubes and nanotube polymer-matrix interfaces. Classical molecular dynamics simulations are shown to be sufficient to describe the generic behavior such as strength and stiffness modulus but are inadequate to describe elastic limit and nature of plastic buckling at large strength. Quantum molecular dynamics simulations are shown to bring out explicit atomic nature dependent behavior of these nanoscale materials objects that are not accessible either via continuum mechanics based descriptions or through classical molecular dynamics based simulations. As examples, we discus local plastic collapse of carbon nanotubes under axial compression and anisotropic plastic buckling of boron-nitride nanotubes. Dependence of the yield strain on the strain rate is addressed through temperature dependent simulations, a transition-state-theory based model of the strain as a function of strain rate and simulation temperature is presented, and in all cases extensive comparisons are made with experimental observations. Mechanical properties of nanotube-polymer composite materials are simulated with diverse nanotube-polymer interface structures (with van der Waals interaction). The atomistic mechanisms of the interface toughening for optimal load transfer through recycling, high-thermal expansion and diffusion coefficient composite formation above glass transition temperature, and enhancement of Young's modulus on addition of nanotubes to polymer are discussed and compared with experimental observations.

  18. Properties of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masood, Samina; Bullmore, Daniel; Duran, Michael; Jacobs, Michael

    2012-10-01

    Different synthesizing methods are used to create various nanostructures of carbon; we are mainly interested in single and multi-wall carbon nanotubes, (SWCNTs) and (MWCNTs) respectively. The properties of these tubes are related to their synthetic methods, chirality, and diameter. The extremely sturdy structure of CNTs, with their distinct thermal and electromagnetic properties, suggests a tremendous use of these tubes in electronics and medicines. Here, we analyze various physical properties of SWCNTs with a special emphasis on electromagnetic and chemical properties. By examining their electrical properties, we demonstrate the viability of discrete CNT based components. After considering the advantages of using CNTs over microstructures, we make a case for the advancement and development of nanostructures based electronics. As for current CNT applications, it's hard to overlook their use and functionality in the development of cancer treatment. Whether the tubes are involved in chemotherapeutic drug delivery, molecular imaging and targeting, or photodynamic therapy, we show that the remarkable properties of SWCNTs can be used in advantageous ways by many different industries.

  19. Carbon nanotube computer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulaker, Max M; Hills, Gage; Patil, Nishant; Wei, Hai; Chen, Hong-Yu; Wong, H-S Philip; Mitra, Subhasish

    2013-09-26

    The miniaturization of electronic devices has been the principal driving force behind the semiconductor industry, and has brought about major improvements in computational power and energy efficiency. Although advances with silicon-based electronics continue to be made, alternative technologies are being explored. Digital circuits based on transistors fabricated from carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have the potential to outperform silicon by improving the energy-delay product, a metric of energy efficiency, by more than an order of magnitude. Hence, CNTs are an exciting complement to existing semiconductor technologies. Owing to substantial fundamental imperfections inherent in CNTs, however, only very basic circuit blocks have been demonstrated. Here we show how these imperfections can be overcome, and demonstrate the first computer built entirely using CNT-based transistors. The CNT computer runs an operating system that is capable of multitasking: as a demonstration, we perform counting and integer-sorting simultaneously. In addition, we implement 20 different instructions from the commercial MIPS instruction set to demonstrate the generality of our CNT computer. This experimental demonstration is the most complex carbon-based electronic system yet realized. It is a considerable advance because CNTs are prominent among a variety of emerging technologies that are being considered for the next generation of highly energy-efficient electronic systems.

  20. Carbon Nanotube Purification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delzeit, Lance D. (Inventor); Delzeit, Clement J. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A method for cleaning or otherwise removing amorphous carbon and other residues that arise in growth of a carbon nanotube (CNT) array. The CNT array is exposed to a plurality of hydroxyls or hydrogen, produced from a selected vapor or liquid source such as H2O or H2O2. and the hydroxyls or hydrogen (neutral or electrically charged) react with the residues to produce partly or fully dissolved or hydrogenated or hydroxylizated products that can be removed or separated from the CNT array. The hydroxyls or hydrogen can be produced by heating the CNT array, residue and selected vapor or liquid source or by application of an electromagnetic excitation signal with a selected frequency or range of frequencies to dissociate the selected vapor or liquid. The excitation frequency can be chirped to cover a selected range of frequencies corresponding to dissociation of the selected vapor or liquid. Sonication may be uscd to supplement dissociation of the H2O and/or H2O2.

  1. Free energetics of carbon nanotube association in aqueous inorganic NaI salt solutions: Temperature effects using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Shu-Ching; Cui, Di; Wezowicz, Matthew; Taufer, Michela; Patel, Sandeep

    2015-06-15

    In this study, we examine the temperature dependence of free energetics of nanotube association using graphical processing unit-enabled all-atom molecular dynamics simulations (FEN ZI) with two (10,10) single-walled carbon nanotubes in 3 m NaI aqueous salt solution. Results suggest that the free energy, enthalpy and entropy changes for the association process are all reduced at the high temperature, in agreement with previous investigations using other hydrophobes. Via the decomposition of free energy into individual components, we found that solvent contribution (including water, anion, and cation contributions) is correlated with the spatial distribution of the corresponding species and is influenced distinctly by the temperature. We studied the spatial distribution and the structure of the solvent in different regions: intertube, intratube and the bulk solvent. By calculating the fluctuation of coarse-grained tube-solvent surfaces, we found that tube-water interfacial fluctuation exhibits the strongest temperature dependence. By taking ions to be a solvent-like medium in the absence of water, tube-anion interfacial fluctuation shows similar but weaker dependence on temperature, while tube-cation interfacial fluctuation shows no dependence in general. These characteristics are discussed via the malleability of their corresponding solvation shells relative to the nanotube surface. Hydrogen bonding profiles and tetrahedrality of water arrangement are also computed to compare the structure of solvent in the solvent bulk and intertube region. The hydrophobic confinement induces a relatively lower concentration environment in the intertube region, therefore causing different intertube solvent structures which depend on the tube separation. This study is relevant in the continuing discourse on hydrophobic interactions (as they impact generally a broad class of phenomena in biology, biochemistry, and materials science and soft condensed matter research), and

  2. Carbon Nanotubes by CVD and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassell, Alan; Delzeit, Lance; Nguyen, Cattien; Stevens, Ramsey; Han, Jie; Meyyappan, M.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) exhibits extraordinary mechanical and unique electronic properties and offers significant potential for structural, sensor, and nanoelectronics applications. An overview of CNT, growth methods, properties and applications is provided. Single-wall, and multi-wall CNTs have been grown by chemical vapor deposition. Catalyst development and optimization has been accomplished using combinatorial optimization methods. CNT has also been grown from the tips of silicon cantilevers for use in atomic force microscopy.

  3. Theoretical Investigation on Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes Doped with Nitrogen, Pyridine-Like Nitrogen Defects, and Transition Metal Atoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Mananghaya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study addresses the inherent difficulty in synthesizing single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs with uniform chirality and well-defined electronic properties through the introduction of dopants, topological defects, and intercalation of metals. Depending on the desired application, one can modify the electronic and magnetic properties of SWCNTs through an appropriate introduction of imperfections. This scheme broadens the application areas of SWCNTs. Under this motivation, we present our ongoing investigations of the following models: (i (10, 0 and (5, 5 SWCNT doped with nitrogen (CNxNT, (ii (10, 0 and (5, 5 SWCNT with pyridine-like defects (3NV-CNxNT, (iii (10, 0 SWCNT with porphyrine-like defects (4ND-CNxNT. Models (ii and (iii were chemically functionalized with 14 transition metals (TMs: Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Pd, Ag, Pt and Au. Using the spin-unrestricted density functional theory (DFT, stable configurations, deformations, formation and binding energies, the effects of the doping concentration of nitrogen, pyridine-like and porphyrine-like defects on the electronic properties were all examined. Results reveal that the electronic properties of SWCNTs show strong dependence on the concentration and configuration of nitrogen impurities, its defects, and the TMs adsorbed.

  4. Funcionalização de nanotubos de Carbono Functionalization of carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antônio Gomes de Souza Filho

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes are very stable systems having considerable chemical inertness due to the strong covalent bonds of the carbon atoms on the nanotube surface. Many applications of carbon nanotubes require their chemical modification in order to tune/control their physico-chemical properties. One way of achieving this control is carrying out functionalization processes where atoms and molecules interact (covalent or non-covalent with the nanotubes. We review some of the progress that has been made in chemical functionalization of carbon nanotubes. Emphasis is given to chemical strategies, the most used techniques, and applications.

  5. Mechanical properties of functionalized carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Z Q; Liu, B; Chen, Y L; Hwang, K C [FML, Department of Engineering Mechanics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Jiang, H [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Huang, Y [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States)], E-mail: liubin@tsinghua.edu.cn, E-mail: y-huang@northwestern.edu

    2008-10-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) used to reinforce polymer matrix composites are functionalized to form covalent bonds with the polymer in order to enhance the CNT/polymer interfaces. These bonds destroy the perfect atomic structures of a CNT and degrade its mechanical properties. We use atomistic simulations to study the effect of hydrogenization on the mechanical properties of single-wall carbon nanotubes. The elastic modulus of CNTs gradually decreases with the increasing functionalization (percentage of C-H bonds). However, both the strength and ductility drop sharply at a small percentage of functionalization, reflecting their sensitivity to C-H bonds. The cluster C-H bonds forming two rings leads to a significant reduction in the strength and ductility. The effect of carbonization has essentially the same effect as hydrogenization.

  6. Probing Photosensitization by Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) photosensitize the production of reactive oxygen species that can damage organisms by biomembrane oxidation or mediate CNTs' environmental transformations. The photosensitized nature of derivatized carbon nanotubes from various synthetic methods, and thus ...

  7. Contacting nanowires and nanotubes with atomic precision for electronic transport

    KAUST Repository

    Qin, Shengyong

    2012-01-01

    Making contacts to nanostructures with atomic precision is an important process in the bottom-up fabrication and characterization of electronic nanodevices. Existing contacting techniques use top-down lithography and chemical etching, but lack atomic precision and introduce the possibility of contamination. Here, we report that a field-induced emission process can be used to make local contacts onto individual nanowires and nanotubes with atomic spatial precision. The gold nano-islands are deposited onto nanostructures precisely by using a scanning tunneling microscope tip, which provides a clean and controllable method to ensure both electrically conductive and mechanically reliable contacts. To demonstrate the wide applicability of the technique, nano-contacts are fabricated on silicide atomic wires, carbon nanotubes, and copper nanowires. The electrical transport measurements are performed in situ by utilizing the nanocontacts to bridge the nanostructures to the transport probes. © 2012 American Institute of Physics.

  8. Morphology and crystallinity control of ultrathin TiO2 layers deposited on carbon nanotubes by temperature-step atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra-Nuñez, Carlos; Zhang, Yucheng; Li, Meng; Chawla, Vipin; Erni, Rolf; Michler, Johann; Park, Hyung Gyu; Utke, Ivo

    2015-06-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) coated with titanium oxide (TiO2) have generated considerable interest over the last decade and become a promising nanomaterial for a wide range of energy applications. The efficient use of the outstanding electrical properties of this nanostructure relies heavily on the quality of the interface and the thickness and morphology of the TiO2 layer. However, complete surface coverage of the chemically inert CNTs and appropriate control of the morphology of the TiO2 layer have not been achieved so far. Here, we report a new strategy to obtain ultrathin TiO2 coatings deposited by ``Temperature-step'' Atomic Layer Deposition (TS-ALD) with complete surface coverage of non-functionalized multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and controlled morphology and crystallinity of the TiO2 film. This strategy consists of adjusting the temperature during the ALD deposition to obtain the desired morphology. Complete coverage of long non-functionalized MWCNTs with conformal anatase layers was obtained by using a low temperature of 60 °C during the nucleation stage followed by an increase to 220 °C during the growth stage. This resulted in a continuous and amorphous TiO2 layer, covered with a conformal anatase coating. Starting with the deposition at 220 °C and reducing to 60 °C resulted in sporadic crystal grains at the CNT/TiO2 interface covered with an amorphous TiO2 layer. The results were accomplished through an extensive study of nucleation and growth of titanium oxide films on MWCNTs, of which a detailed characterization is presented in this work.Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) coated with titanium oxide (TiO2) have generated considerable interest over the last decade and become a promising nanomaterial for a wide range of energy applications. The efficient use of the outstanding electrical properties of this nanostructure relies heavily on the quality of the interface and the thickness and morphology of the TiO2 layer. However, complete surface coverage of the

  9. Cytotoxicity of carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Ying; LI WenXin

    2008-01-01

    With large-scale production and application at large scale, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) may cause ad-verse response to the environment and human health. Thus, study on bio-effects and safety of CNTs has attracted great attention from scientists and governments worldwide. This report briefly summa-rizes the main results from the in vitro toxicity study of CNTs. The emphasis is placed on the descrip-tion of a variety of factors affecting CNTs cytotoxicity, including species of CNTs, impurities contained,lengths of CNTs, aspect ratios, chemical modification, and assaying methods of cytotoxicity. However,experimental information obtained thus far on CNTs' cytotoxicity is lacking in comparability, and some-times there is controversy about it. In order to assess more accurately the potential risks of CNTs to human health, we suggest that care should be taken for issues such as chemical modification and quantitative characterization of CNTa in cytotoxicity assessment. More importantly, studies on physical and chemical mechanisms of CNTs' cytotoxicity should be strengthened; assaying methods and evaluating criteria characterized by nanotoxicology should be gradually established.

  10. Cytotoxicity of carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    With large-scale production and application at large scale, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) may cause ad-verse response to the environment and human health. Thus, study on bio-effects and safety of CNTs has attracted great attention from scientists and governments worldwide. This report briefly summa-rizes the main results from the in vitro toxicity study of CNTs. The emphasis is placed on the descrip-tion of a variety of factors affecting CNTs cytotoxicity, including species of CNTs, impurities contained, lengths of CNTs, aspect ratios, chemical modification, and assaying methods of cytotoxicity. However, experimental information obtained thus far on CNTs’ cytotoxicity is lacking in comparability, and some-times there is controversy about it. In order to assess more accurately the potential risks of CNTs to human health, we suggest that care should be taken for issues such as chemical modification and quantitative characterization of CNTs in cytotoxicity assessment. More importantly, studies on physical and chemical mechanisms of CNTs’ cytotoxicity should be strengthened; assaying methods and evaluating criteria characterized by nanotoxicology should be gradually established.

  11. Van der Waals interaction between two crossed carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhbanov, Alexander I; Pogorelov, Evgeny G; Chang, Yia-Chung

    2010-10-26

    The analytical expressions for the van der Waals potential energy and force between two crossed carbon nanotubes are presented. The Lennard-Jones potential between pairs of carbon atoms and the smeared-out approximation suggested by L. A. Girifalco (J. Phys. Chem. 1992, 96, 858) were used. The exact formula is expressed in terms of rational and elliptical functions. The potential and force for carbon nanotubes were calculated. The uniform potential curves for single- and multiwall nanotubes were plotted. The equilibrium distance, maximal attractive force, and potential energy have been evaluated.

  12. Hybrid Composite of Polyaniline Containing Carbon Nanotube

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Carbon nanotube-polyaniline hybrid material was synthesized by emulsion polymerization in-situ. The morphology of hybrid material was studied by TEM and X-ray diffraction. The conductivity of nanocomposite increases with the increasing of carbon nanotube content because of the new conductivity passageways formed by carbon nanotubes.

  13. Synthesis and Application of Carbon Nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qun Zeng; Zhenhua Li; Yuhong Zhou

    2006-01-01

    Owing to the unique structure, the superior physical and chemical properties, the super strong mechanical performances, and so on, carbon nanotubes have attracted the attention of researchers all over the world. In this article, the basic properties and the main production processes of carbon nanotubes are introduced in brief, and the progress of applied research for carbon nanotubes is reviewed.

  14. Determination of cadmium and lead in urine samples after dispersive solid–liquid extraction on multiwalled carbon nanotubes by slurry sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Álvarez Méndez, J.; Barciela García, J.; García Martín, S.; Peña Crecente, R.M.; Herrero Latorre, C., E-mail: carlos.herrero@usc.es

    2015-04-01

    A new method for the determination of Cd and Pb in urine samples has been developed. The method involves dispersive solid-phase extraction (DSPE), slurry sampling (SS), and subsequent electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). Oxidized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were used as the sorbent material. The isolated MWCNT/analyte aggregates were treated with nitric acid to form a slurry and both metals were determined directly by injecting the slurry into the ETAAS-atomizer. The parameters that influence the adsorption of the metals on MWCNTs in the DSPE process, the formation and extraction of the slurry, and the ETAAS conditions were studied by different factorial design strategies. The detection and quantification limits obtained for Cd under optimized conditions were 9.7 and 32.3 ng L{sup −1}, respectively, and for Pb these limits were 0.13 and 0.43 μg L{sup −1}. The preconcentration factors achieved were 3.9 and 5.4. The RSD values (n = 10) were less than 4.1% and 5.9% for Cd and Pb, respectively. The accuracy of the method was assessed in recovery studies, with values in the range 96–102% obtained for Cd and 97–101% for Pb. In addition, the analysis of certified reference materials gave consistent results. The DSPE–SS–ETAAS method is a novel and useful strategy for the determination of Pb and Cd at low levels in human urine samples. The method is sensitive, fast, and free of matrix interferences, and it avoids the tedious and time-consuming on-column adsorption and elution steps associated with commonly used SPE procedures. The proposed method was used to determine Cd and Pb in urine samples of unexposed healthy people and satisfactory results were obtained. - Highlights: • Cd and Pb determination based on the combination of DSP, SS and ETAAS • Urine matrix was eliminated using DSPE based on multiwalled carbon nanotubes. • Slurry sampling technique permitted the direct injection of sample into the ETAAS atomizer.

  15. Modeling of HiPco Process for Carbon Nanotube Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokcen, T.; Dateo, C. E.; Meyyappan, M.; Colbert, D. T.; Smith, D. T.; Smith, K.; Smalley, R. E.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    High-pressure carbon monoxide (HiPco) reactor, developed at Rice University, is used to produce single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) from gas-phase reactions of iron carbonyl and nickel carbonyl in carbon monoxide at high pressures (10 - 100 atm). Computational modeling is used to better understand the HiPco process. In the present model, decomposition of the precursor, metal cluster formation and growth, and carbon nanotube growth are addressed. Decomposition of precursor molecules is necessary to initiate metal cluster formation. The metal clusters serve as catalysts for carbon nanotube growth. Diameter of metal clusters and number of atoms in these clusters are some of the essential information for predicting carbon nanotube formation and growth, which is then modeled by Boudouard reaction (2CO ---> C(s) + CO2) with metal catalysts. The growth kinetic model is integrated with a two-dimensional axisymmetric reactor flow model to predict reactor performance.

  16. Doping Reaction of some Nanotubes with Aluminium Atom: A Thermodynamic PM6 and ONIOM Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasrin Zeighami

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The doping reaction of boron nitride and carbon nanotubes with aluminium atom was theoretically investigated. ONIOM method and PM6 method have been used to evaluate the thermochemistry of doping reactions of single walled boron nitride nanotubes and carbon nanotubes. The enthalpy changes, Gibbs free energy changes, of studied doping reactions were evaluated at different temperatures. All nanotubes were single-walled and finite length with hydrogen saturation in the terminal atoms. The thermodynamic calculations based on the ONIOM and PM6 levels results showed (8,0CNT is the best candidate for Al-doping reaction.result suggest the aluminum doped boron nitride nanotubes and carbon nanotubes may be considered the proper carries for the drug delivery.

  17. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes as a sorbent material for the solid phase extraction of lead from urine and subsequent determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña Crecente, Rosa M.; Lovera, Carlha Gutiérrez; García, Julia Barciela; Méndez, Jennifer Álvarez; Martín, Sagrario García; Latorre, Carlos Herrero

    2014-11-01

    The determination of lead in urine is a way of monitoring the chemical exposure to this metal. In the present paper, a new method for the Pb determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) in urine at low levels has been developed. Lead was separated from the undesirable urine matrix by means of a solid phase extraction (SPE) procedure. Oxidized multiwalled carbon nanotubes have been used as a sorbent material. Lead from urine was retained at pH 4.0 and was quantitatively eluted using a 0.7 M nitric acid solution and was subsequently measured by ETAAS. The effects of parameters that influence the adsorption-elution process (such as pH, eluent volume and concentration, sampling and elution flow rates) and the atomic spectrometry conditions have been studied by means of different factorial design strategies. Under the optimized conditions, the detection and quantification limits obtained were 0.08 and 0.26 μg Pb L- 1, respectively. The results demonstrate the absence of a urine matrix effect and this is the consequence of the SPE process carried out. Therefore, the developed method is useful for the analysis of Pb at low levels in real samples without the influence of other urine components. The proposed method was applied to the determination of lead in urine samples of unexposed healthy people and satisfactory results were obtained (in the range 3.64-22.9 μg Pb L- 1).

  18. Hydrodynamic properties of carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, J H; Werder, T; Jaffe, R L; Koumoutsakos, P

    2004-06-01

    We study water flowing past an array of single walled carbon nanotubes using nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. For carbon nanotubes mounted with a tube spacing of 16.4 x 16.4 nm and diameters of 1.25 and 2.50 nm, respectively, we find drag coefficients in reasonable agreement with the macroscopic, Stokes-Oseen solution. The slip length is -0.11 nm for the 1.25 nm carbon nanotube, and 0.49 for the 2.50 nm tube for a flow speed of 50 m/s, respectively, and 0.28 nm for the 2.50 nm tube at 200 m/s. A slanted flow configuration with a stream- and spanwise velocity component of 100 ms(-1) recovers the two-dimensional results, but exhibits a significant 88 nm slip along the axis of the tube. These results indicate that slip depends on the particular flow configuration.

  19. Locally addressable tunnel barriers within a carbon nanotube

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biercuk, M.; Mason, N.; Chow, J.;

    2003-01-01

    We report the realization and characterization of independently controllable tunnel barriers within a carbon nanotube. The nanotubes are mechanically bent or kinked using an atomic force microscope, and top gates are subsequently placed near each kink. Transport measurements indicate that the kinks...... form gate-controlled tunnel barriers, and that gates placed away from the kinks have little or no effect on conductance. The overall conductance of the nanotube can be controlled by tuning the transmissions of either the kinks or the metal-nanotube contacts....

  20. Carbon nanotube-polymer composite actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gennett, Thomas; Raffaelle, Ryne P.; Landi, Brian J.; Heben, Michael J.

    2008-04-22

    The present invention discloses a carbon nanotube (SWNT)-polymer composite actuator and method to make such actuator. A series of uniform composites was prepared by dispersing purified single wall nanotubes with varying weight percents into a polymer matrix, followed by solution casting. The resulting nanotube-polymer composite was then successfully used to form a nanotube polymer actuator.

  1. Enhancing conductivity of metallic carbon nanotube networks by transition metal adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketolainen, T.; Havu, V.; Puska, M. J.

    2015-02-01

    The conductivity of carbon nanotube thin films is mainly determined by carbon nanotube junctions, the resistance of which can be reduced by several different methods. We investigate electronic transport through carbon nanotube junctions in a four-terminal configuration, where two metallic single-wall carbon nanotubes are linked by a group 6 transition metal atom. The transport calculations are based on the Green's function method combined with the density-functional theory. The transition metal atom is found to enhance the transport through the junction near the Fermi level. However, the size of the nanotube affects the improvement in the conductivity. The enhancement is related to the hybridization of chromium and carbon atom orbitals, which is clearly reflected in the character of eigenstates near the Fermi level. The effects of chromium atoms and precursor molecules remaining adsorbed on the nanotubes outside the junctions are also examined.

  2. Enhancing conductivity of metallic carbon nanotube networks by transition metal adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ketolainen, T., E-mail: tomi.ketolainen@aalto.fi; Havu, V.; Puska, M. J. [COMP, Department of Applied Physics, Aalto University, P.O. Box 11100, FI-00076 Aalto (Finland)

    2015-02-07

    The conductivity of carbon nanotube thin films is mainly determined by carbon nanotube junctions, the resistance of which can be reduced by several different methods. We investigate electronic transport through carbon nanotube junctions in a four-terminal configuration, where two metallic single-wall carbon nanotubes are linked by a group 6 transition metal atom. The transport calculations are based on the Green’s function method combined with the density-functional theory. The transition metal atom is found to enhance the transport through the junction near the Fermi level. However, the size of the nanotube affects the improvement in the conductivity. The enhancement is related to the hybridization of chromium and carbon atom orbitals, which is clearly reflected in the character of eigenstates near the Fermi level. The effects of chromium atoms and precursor molecules remaining adsorbed on the nanotubes outside the junctions are also examined.

  3. Doping of carbon nanotubes with nitrogen improves protein coverage whilst retaining correct conformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burch, Hilary J.; Antoranz Contera, Sonia; de Planque, Maurits R. R.; Grobert, Nicole; Ryan, J. F.

    2008-09-01

    Relevant parameters for non-covalent protein functionalization of carbon nanotubes are explored. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes are carboxylated and functionalized with metalloproteins. Using atomic force microscopy (AFM) we quantitatively determine that coverage with nitrogen-doped multiwalled carbon nanotubes is superior compared to coverage with un-doped multiwalled carbon nanotubes, due to enhanced carboxylation. Conformational analysis using a combination of AFM, antibody binding assays, circular dichroism and UV-visible spectroscopy demonstrates that the metalloproteins retain their native structure when adsorbed to nitrogen-doped multiwalled carbon nanotubes irrespective of their size, charge or folding motif.

  4. Toward Distinct Element Method Simulations of Carbon Nanotube Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akatyeva, Evgeniya; Anderson, Tyler; Nikiforov, Ilia; Potyondy, David; Ballarini, Roberto; Dumitrica, Traian

    2011-03-01

    We propose distinct element method modeling of carbon nanotube systems. The atomic-level description of an individual nanotube is coarse-grained into a chain of spherical elements that interact by parallel bonds located at their contacts. The spherical elements can lump multiple translational unit cells of the carbon nanotube and have both translational and rotational degrees of freedom. The discrete long ranged interaction between nanotubes is included in a van der Waals contact of nonmechanical nature that acts simultaneously with the parallel bonds. The created mesoscopic model is put into service by simulating a realistic carbon nanotube ring. The ring morphology arises from the energy balance stored in both parallel and van der Waals bonds. We thank NSF CAREER under Grant No. CMMI-0747684, NSF under Grant No. CMMI 0800896.

  5. Modified carbon nanotubes and methods of forming carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heintz, Amy M.; Risser, Steven; Elhard, Joel D.; Moore, Bryon P.; Liu, Tao; Vijayendran, Bhima R.

    2016-06-14

    In this invention, processes which can be used to achieve stable doped carbon nanotubes are disclosed. Preferred CNT structures and morphologies for achieving maximum doping effects are also described. Dopant formulations and methods for achieving doping of a broad distribution of tube types are also described.

  6. Thermal Transport in Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christman, Jeremy; Moore, Andrew; Khatun, Mahfuza

    2011-10-01

    Recent advances in nanostructure technology have made it possible to create small devices at the nanoscale. Carbon nanotubes (CNT's) are among the most exciting building blocks of nanotechnology. Their versatility and extremely desirable properties for electronic and other devices have driven intense research and development efforts in recent years. A review of electrical and thermal conduction of the structures will be presented. The theoretical investigation is mainly based on molecular dynamics. Green Kubo relation is used for the study of thermal conductivity. Results include kinetic energy, potential energy, heat flux autocorrelation function, and heat conduction of various CNT structures. Most of the computation and simulation has been conducted on the Beowulf cluster at Ball State University. Various software packages and tools such as Visual Molecular Dynamics (VMD), Large-scale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator (LAMMPS), and NanoHUB, the open online resource at Purdue University have been used for the research. The work has been supported by the Indiana Academy of Science Research Fund, 2010-2011.

  7. Remote Joule heating by a carbon nanotube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baloch, Kamal H.; Voskanian, Norvik; Bronsgeest, Merijntje; Cumings, John

    2012-05-01

    Minimizing Joule heating remains an important goal in the design of electronic devices. The prevailing model of Joule heating relies on a simple semiclassical picture in which electrons collide with the atoms of a conductor, generating heat locally and only in regions of non-zero current density, and this model has been supported by most experiments. Recently, however, it has been predicted that electric currents in graphene and carbon nanotubes can couple to the vibrational modes of a neighbouring material, heating it remotely. Here, we use in situ electron thermal microscopy to detect the remote Joule heating of a silicon nitride substrate by a single multiwalled carbon nanotube. At least 84% of the electrical power supplied to the nanotube is dissipated directly into the substrate, rather than in the nanotube itself. Although it has different physical origins, this phenomenon is reminiscent of induction heating or microwave dielectric heating. Such an ability to dissipate waste energy remotely could lead to improved thermal management in electronic devices.

  8. Graphene nanoribbons production from flat carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melo, W. S.; Guerini, S.; Diniz, E. M., E-mail: eduardo.diniz@ufma.br [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Maranhão, São Luís - MA 65080-805 (Brazil)

    2015-11-14

    Graphene nanoribbons are of great interest for pure and applied sciences due to their unique properties which depend on the nanoribbon edges, as, for example, energy gap and antiferromagnetic coupling. Nevertheless, the synthesis of nanoribbons with well-defined edges remains a challenge. To collaborate with this subject, here we propose a new route for the production of graphene nanoribbons from flat carbon nanotubes filled with a one-dimensional chain of Fe atoms by first principles calculations based on density functional theory. Our results show that Fe-filled flat carbon nanotubes are energetically more stable than non flattened geometries. Also we find that by hydrogenation or oxygenation of the most curved region of the Fe-filled flat armchair carbon nanotube, it occurred a spontaneous production of zigzag graphene nanoribbons which have metallic or semiconducting behavior depending on the edge and size of the graphene nanoribbon. Such findings can be used to create a new method of synthesis of regular-edge carbon nanoribbons.

  9. Neutron activation study of gold-decorated singlewall carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goncalves, Rafael G.F.; Oliveira, Arno H. de [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Nuclear; Ladeira, Luiz O.; Lacerda, Rodrigo G.; Oliveira, Sergio de; Pinheiro, Mauricio V.B. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica; Ferreira, Andrea V. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2007-07-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) were synthesized by arc discharge technique of doped graphite electrodes and purified by burning the amorphous carbon and removing the metals with hydrochloric acid (HCl). The nanotubes were also functionalized with carboxyl groups (-COOH) by ultrasonification with nitric (HNO{sub 3}) and sulfuric (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) acids. The nanotubes were then decorated with gold by reducing chloroauric acid (HAuCl{sub 4}) with UV and hydrazine (N{sub 2}H{sub 4}). Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) images confirmed the decoration with the hydrazine route. The gold concentration in the samples was analyzed by neutron activation analysis. (author)

  10. Quantum transport in carbon nanotubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laird, E.A.; Kuemmeth, F.; Steele, G.A.; Grove-Rasmussen, K.; Nygard, J.; Flensberg, K.; Kouwenhoven, L.P.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are a versatile material in which many aspects of condensed matter physics come together. Recent discoveries have uncovered new phenomena that completely change our understanding of transport in these devices, especially the role of the spin and valley degrees of freedom. This revie

  11. Graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometric detection of vanadium in water and food samples after solid phase extraction on multiwalled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadhwa, Sham Kumar; Tuzen, Mustafa; Gul Kazi, Tasneem; Soylak, Mustafa

    2013-11-15

    Vanadium(V) ions as 8-hydroxyquinoline chelates were loaded on multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) in a mini chromatographic column. Vanadium was determined by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). Various analytical parameters including pH of the working solutions, amounts of 8-hydroxyquinoline, eluent type, sample volume, and flow rates were investigated. The effects of matrix ions and some transition metals were also studied. The column can be reused 250 times without any loss in its sorption properties. The preconcentration factor was found as 100. Detection limit (3 s) and limit of quantification (10 s) for the vanadium in the optimal conditions were observed to be 0.012 µg L(-1) and 0.040 μg L(-1), respectively. The capacity of adsorption was 9.6 mg g(-1). Relative standard deviation (RSD) was found to be 5%. The validation of the method was confirmed by using NIST SRM 1515 Apple leaves, NIST SRM 1570a Spinach leaves and GBW 07605 Tea certified reference materials. The procedure was applied to the determination of vanadium in tap water and bottled drinking water samples. The procedure was also successfully applied to microwave digested food samples including black tea, coffee, tomato, cabbage, zucchini, apple and chicken samples.

  12. Peel test of spinnable carbon nanotube webs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandoker, Noman; Hawkins, Stephen C.; Ibrahim, Raafat; Huynh, Chi P.

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents results of peel tests with spinnable carbon nanotube webs. Peel tests were performed to study the effect of orientation angles on interface energies between nanotubes. In absence of any binding agent the interface energy represents the Van Der Waals energies between the interacting nanotubes. Therefore, the effect of the orientations on Van Der Waals energies between carbon nanotubes is obtained through the peel test. It is shown that the energy for crossed nanotubes at 90° angle is lower than the energy for parallel nanotubes at 0° angle. This experimental observation was validated by hypothetical theoretical calculations.

  13. Attachment of Gold Nanoparticles to Carbon Nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xi Cheng MA; Ning LUN; Shu Lin WEN

    2005-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes were initially chemically modified with an H2SO4-HNO3 treatment,and subsequently activated with Pd-Sn catalytic nuclei via a one-step activation approach. These activated nanotubes were used as precursors for obtaining gold nanoparticles-attached nanotubes via simple electroless plating. This approach provides an efficient method for attachment of metal nanostructures to carbon nanotubes. Such novel hybrid nanostructures are attractive for many applications.

  14. On the elastic properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes/poly(ethylene oxide) nanocomposites using molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouhi, S; Alizadeh, Y; Ansari, R

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to study the physical and mechanical properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes/poly(ethylene oxide) nanocomposites. The effects of nanotube atomic structure, diameter, and volume fraction on the polymer density distribution, polymer atom distribution, stress-strain curves of nanocomposites and Young's, and shear moduli of single-walled carbon nanotubes/poly(ethylene oxide) nanocomposites are explored. It is shown that the density of polymer, surrounding the nanotube surface, has a peak near the nanotube surface. However, increasing distance leads to dropping it to the value near the density of pure polymer. It is seen that for armchair nanotubes, the average polymer atoms distances from the single-walled carbon nanotubes are larger than the polymer atom distance from zigzag nanotubes. It further is shown that zigzag nanotubes are better candidates to reinforce poly (ethylene oxide) than their armchair counterparts.

  15. Determination of cadmium and lead in urine samples after dispersive solid-liquid extraction on multiwalled carbon nanotubes by slurry sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez Méndez, J.; Barciela García, J.; García Martín, S.; Peña Crecente, R. M.; Herrero Latorre, C.

    2015-04-01

    A new method for the determination of Cd and Pb in urine samples has been developed. The method involves dispersive solid-phase extraction (DSPE), slurry sampling (SS), and subsequent electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). Oxidized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were used as the sorbent material. The isolated MWCNT/analyte aggregates were treated with nitric acid to form a slurry and both metals were determined directly by injecting the slurry into the ETAAS-atomizer. The parameters that influence the adsorption of the metals on MWCNTs in the DSPE process, the formation and extraction of the slurry, and the ETAAS conditions were studied by different factorial design strategies. The detection and quantification limits obtained for Cd under optimized conditions were 9.7 and 32.3 ng L- 1, respectively, and for Pb these limits were 0.13 and 0.43 μg L- 1. The preconcentration factors achieved were 3.9 and 5.4. The RSD values (n = 10) were less than 4.1% and 5.9% for Cd and Pb, respectively. The accuracy of the method was assessed in recovery studies, with values in the range 96-102% obtained for Cd and 97-101% for Pb. In addition, the analysis of certified reference materials gave consistent results. The DSPE-SS-ETAAS method is a novel and useful strategy for the determination of Pb and Cd at low levels in human urine samples. The method is sensitive, fast, and free of matrix interferences, and it avoids the tedious and time-consuming on-column adsorption and elution steps associated with commonly used SPE procedures. The proposed method was used to determine Cd and Pb in urine samples of unexposed healthy people and satisfactory results were obtained.

  16. Pulsed laser deposition of carbon nanotube and polystyrene-carbon nanotube composite thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stramel, A. A.; Gupta, M. C.; Lee, H. R.; Yu, J.; Edwards, W. C.

    2010-12-01

    In this work, we report on the fabrication of carbon nanotube thin films via pulsed laser deposition using a pulsed, diode pumped, Tm:Ho:LuLF laser with 2 μm wavelength. The thin films were deposited on silicon substrates using pure carbon nanotube targets and polystyrene-carbon nanotube composite targets. Raman spectra, scanning electron micrographs, and transmission electron micrographs show that carbon nanotubes are present in the deposited thin films, and that the pulsed laser deposition process causes minimal degradation to the quality of the nanotubes when using pure carbon nanotube targets.

  17. Carbon nanotubes: controlled growth and application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Notable progress has been made on the synthesis, properties and uses of carbon nanotubes (CNTs in the past two decades. However, the controlled growth of single-wall CNTs (SWCNTs with predefined and uniform structures remains a big challenge, and making full use of CNTs in applications still requires great effort. In this article, our strategies and recent progress on the controlled synthesis of SWCNTs by chemical vapor deposition are reviewed, and the applications of CNTs in lithium-ion batteries, transparent conductive films, and as connectors of metal atomic chains are discussed. Finally, future prospects for CNTs are considered.

  18. Structure, electronic properties, and aggregation behavior of hydroxylated carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    López-Oyama, A. B.; Silva-Molina, R. A.; Ruíz-García, J.; Guirado-López, R. A., E-mail: guirado@ifisica.uaslp.mx [Instituto de Física “Manuel Sandoval Vallarta,” Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí, Álvaro Obregón 64, 78000 San Luis Potosí, San Luis Potosí (Mexico); Gámez-Corrales, R. [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Sonora, Apartado Postal 5-088, 83190, Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico)

    2014-11-07

    We present a combined experimental and theoretical study to analyze the structure, electronic properties, and aggregation behavior of hydroxylated multiwalled carbon nanotubes (OH–MWCNT). Our MWCNTs have average diameters of ∼2 nm, lengths of approximately 100–300 nm, and a hydroxyl surface coverage θ∼0.1. When deposited on the air/water interface the OH–MWCNTs are partially soluble and the floating units interact and link with each other forming extended foam-like carbon networks. Surface pressure-area isotherms of the nanotube films are performed using the Langmuir balance method at different equilibration times. The films are transferred into a mica substrate and atomic force microscopy images show that the foam like structure is preserved and reveals fine details of their microstructure. Density functional theory calculations performed on model hydroxylated carbon nanotubes show that low energy atomic configurations are found when the OH groups form molecular islands on the nanotube's surface. This patchy behavior for the OH species is expected to produce nanotubes having reduced wettabilities, in line with experimental observations. OH doping yields nanotubes having small HOMO–LUMO energy gaps and generates a nanotube → OH direction for the charge transfer leading to the existence of more hole carriers in the structures. Our synthesized OH–MWCNTs might have promising applications.

  19. Van der Waals interaction between a microparticle and a single-wall carbon nanotube

    CERN Document Server

    Blagov, E V; Mostepanenko, V M

    2007-01-01

    The Lifshitz-type formulas describing the free energy and the force of the van der Waals interaction between an atom (molecule) and a single-wall carbon nanotube are obtained. The single-wall nanotube is considered as a cylindrical sheet carrying a two-dimensional free electron gas with appropriate boundary conditions on the electromagnetic field. The obtained formulas are used to calculate the van der Waals free energy and force between a hydrogen atom (molecule) and single-wall carbon nanotubes of different radia. Comparison studies of the van der Waals interaction of hydrogen atoms with single- and multi-wall carbon nanotubes show that depending on atom-nanotube separation distance the idealization of graphite dielectric permittivity is already applicable to nanotubes with only two or three walls.

  20. General hypothesis and shell model for the synthesis of semiconductor nanotubes, including carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, S. Noor

    2010-09-01

    Semiconductor nanotubes, including carbon nanotubes, have vast potential for new technology development. The fundamental physics and growth kinetics of these nanotubes are still obscured. Various models developed to elucidate the growth suffer from limited applicability. An in-depth investigation of the fundamentals of nanotube growth has, therefore, been carried out. For this investigation, various features of nanotube growth, and the role of the foreign element catalytic agent (FECA) in this growth, have been considered. Observed growth anomalies have been analyzed. Based on this analysis, a new shell model and a general hypothesis have been proposed for the growth. The essential element of the shell model is the seed generated from segregation during growth. The seed structure has been defined, and the formation of droplet from this seed has been described. A modified definition of the droplet exhibiting adhesive properties has also been presented. Various characteristics of the droplet, required for alignment and organization of atoms into tubular forms, have been discussed. Employing the shell model, plausible scenarios for the formation of carbon nanotubes, and the variation in the characteristics of these carbon nanotubes have been articulated. The experimental evidences, for example, for the formation of shell around a core, dipole characteristics of the seed, and the existence of nanopores in the seed, have been presented. They appear to justify the validity of the proposed model. The diversities of nanotube characteristics, fundamentals underlying the creation of bamboo-shaped carbon nanotubes, and the impurity generation on the surface of carbon nanotubes have been elucidated. The catalytic action of FECA on growth has been quantified. The applicability of the proposed model to the nanotube growth by a variety of mechanisms has been elaborated. These mechanisms include the vapor-liquid-solid mechanism, the oxide-assisted growth mechanism, the self

  1. Pressure-Induced Interlinking of Carbon Nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Yildirim, T.; Gulseren, O.; Kilic, C.; Ciraci, S.

    2000-01-01

    We predict new forms of carbon consisting of one and two dimensional networks of interlinked single wall carbon nanotubes, some of which are energetically more stable than van der Waals packing of the nanotubes on a hexagonal lattice. These interlinked nanotubes are further transformed with higher applied external pressures to more dense and complicated stable structures, in which curvature-induced carbon sp$^{3}$ re-hybridizations are formed. We also discuss the energetics of the bond format...

  2. Different Technical Applications of Carbon Nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Abdalla, S; Al-Marzouki, F.; Ahmed A. Al-Ghamdi; Abdel-Daiem, A.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes have been of great interest because of their simplicity and ease of synthesis. The novel properties of nanostructured carbon nanotubes such as high surface area, good stiffness, and resilience have been explored in many engineering applications. Research on carbon nanotubes have shown the application in the field of energy storage, hydrogen storage, electrochemical supercapacitor, field-emitting devices, transistors, nanoprobes and sensors, composite material, templates, etc....

  3. Faster and Smaller with Carbon Nanotubes?

    OpenAIRE

    Seidel, Robert V.; Graham, Andrew P.; Duesberg, Georg S.; Liebau, Maik; Unger, Eugen; Kreupl, Franz; Hoenlein, Wolfgang

    2004-01-01

    Carbon Nanotubes seem to be one of the most promising candidates for nanoelectronic devices beyond presumable scaling limits of silicon and compound semiconductors and independent from lithographic limitations. Discovered only about a decade ago, there has been a tremendous advance in the field of carbon nanotubes. Their exciting properties, especially with respect to electronic applications, and their fabrication methods will be discussed. A variety of Carbon Nanotube...

  4. Mechanical Properties of Single-Walled (5,5) Carbon Nanotubes with Vacancy Defects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN Shi-Jun; KONG Yong; LI Fa-Shen

    2007-01-01

    First-principles simulation is used to investigate the structural and mechanical properties of vacancy defective single-walled (5,5) carbon nanotubes. The relations of the defect concentration, distribution and characteristic of defects to Young's modulus of nanotubes are quantitatively studied. It is found that each dangling-bond structure (per supercell) decreases Young's modulus of nanotube by 6.1% for symmetrical distribution cases. However the concentrative vacancy structure with saturated atoms has less influence on carbon nanotubes. It is suggested that the mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes depend strongly upon the structure and relative position of vacancies in a certain defect concentration.

  5. Carbon Nanotubes and Related Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kingsuk Mukhopadhyay

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes have attracted the fancy of many scientists world wide. The small dimensions,strength, and the remarkable physical properties of these structures make them a unique material with a whole range of promising applications. In this review, the structural aspects, the advantages and disadvantages of different for their procedures synthesis, the qualitative and quantitative estimation of carbon nanotubes by different analytical techniques, the present status on their applications as well as the current challenges faced in the application field, national, in particular DRDO, DMSRDE status, and interest in this field, have been discussed.Defence Science Journal, 2008, 58(4, pp.437-450, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.58.1666

  6. Carbon Nanotubes: Molecular Electronic Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Saini, Subhash; Menon, Madhu

    1997-01-01

    The carbon Nanotube junctions have recently emerged as excellent candidates for use as the building blocks in the formation of nanoscale molecular electronic networks. While the simple joint of two dissimilar tubes can be generated by the introduction of a pair of heptagon-pentagon defects in an otherwise perfect hexagonal graphene sheet, more complex joints require other mechanisms. In this work we explore structural characteristics of complex 3-point junctions of carbon nanotubes using a generalized tight-binding molecular-dynamics scheme. The study of pi-electron local densities of states (LDOS) of these junctions reveal many interesting features, most prominent among them being the defect-induced states in the gap.

  7. Torsional Carbon Nanotube Artificial Muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foroughi, Javad; Spinks, Geoffrey M.; Wallace, Gordon G.; Oh, Jiyoung; Kozlov, Mikhail E.; Fang, Shaoli; Mirfakhrai, Tissaphern; Madden, John D. W.; Shin, Min Kyoon; Kim, Seon Jeong; Baughman, Ray H.

    2011-10-01

    Rotary motors of conventional design can be rather complex and are therefore difficult to miniaturize; previous carbon nanotube artificial muscles provide contraction and bending, but not rotation. We show that an electrolyte-filled twist-spun carbon nanotube yarn, much thinner than a human hair, functions as a torsional artificial muscle in a simple three-electrode electrochemical system, providing a reversible 15,000° rotation and 590 revolutions per minute. A hydrostatic actuation mechanism, as seen in muscular hydrostats in nature, explains the simultaneous occurrence of lengthwise contraction and torsional rotation during the yarn volume increase caused by electrochemical double-layer charge injection. The use of a torsional yarn muscle as a mixer for a fluidic chip is demonstrated.

  8. Carbon nanotubes in tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosi, Susanna; Ballerini, Laura; Prato, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    As a result of their peculiar features, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are emerging in many areas of nanotechnology applications. CNT-based technology has been increasingly proposed for biomedical applications, to develop biomolecule nanocarriers, bionanosensors and smart material for tissue engineering purposes. In the following chapter this latter application will be explored, describing why CNTs can be considered an ideal material able to support and boost the growth and the proliferation of many kinds of tissues.

  9. A Thermal Model for Carbon Nanotube Interconnects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohsin, Kaji Muhammad; Srivastava, Ashok; Sharma, Ashwani K.; Mayberry, Clay

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we have studied Joule heating in carbon nanotube based very large scale integration (VLSI) interconnects and incorporated Joule heating influenced scattering in our previously developed current transport model. The theoretical model explains breakdown in carbon nanotube resistance which limits the current density. We have also studied scattering parameters of carbon nanotube (CNT) interconnects and compared with the earlier work. For 1 µm length single-wall carbon nanotube, 3 dB frequency in S12 parameter reduces to ~120 GHz from 1 THz considering Joule heating. It has been found that bias voltage has little effect on scattering parameters, while length has very strong effect on scattering parameters.

  10. Molecular dynamics analysis on buckling of defective carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulathunga, D D T K; Ang, K K [Department of Civil Engineering, National University of Singapore (Singapore); Reddy, J N, E-mail: cveangkk@nus.edu.s [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843-3123 (United States)

    2010-09-01

    Owing to their remarkable mechanical properties, carbon nanotubes have been employed in many diverse areas of applications. However, similar to any of the many man-made materials used today, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are also susceptible to various kinds of defects. Understanding the effect of defects on the mechanical properties and behavior of CNTs is essential in the design of nanotube-based devices and composites. It has been found in various past studies that these defects can considerably affect the tensile strength and fracture of CNTs. Comprehensive studies on the effect of defects on the buckling and vibration of nanotubes is however lacking in the literature. In this paper, the effects of various configurations of atomic vacancy defects, on axial buckling of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), in different thermal environments, is investigated using molecular dynamics simulations (MDS), based on a COMPASS force field. Our findings revealed that even a single missing atom can cause a significant reduction in the critical buckling strain and load of SWCNTs. In general, increasing the number of missing atoms, asymmetry of vacancy configurations and asymmetric distribution of vacancy clusters seemed to lead to higher deterioration in buckling properties. Further, SWCNTs with a single vacancy cluster, compared to SWCNTs with two or more vacancy clusters having the same number of missing atoms, appeared to cause higher deterioration of buckling properties. However, exceptions from the above mentioned trends could be expected due to chemical instabilities of defects. Temperature appeared to have less effect on defective CNTs compared to pristine CNTs.

  11. Optimization of Carbon Nanotubes for Nitrogen Gas Adsorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fereydoun Ashrafi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nano-tubes are one of the most significant achievements of nano-technology with important applications in the design of electronic nano-devices. The study of their properties is therefore important. Here the density functional theory (DFT of electron and the Hartree-Fock (HF method are utilized to study the adsorption of nitrogen molecules on the surface of (4, 4 and (5, 0 carbon nano-tubes. The electronic structure, single point and dipole moment of both nitrogen and carbon nuclei are thoroughly studied. The computational results, which includes, indicate that rich adsorption patterns may result from the interaction of nitrogen with the carbon nano tubes sometimes C-N bounds are formed via breaking C-C bounds and sometimes a carbon atom in the nano-tube is replaced with a nitrogen atom. Sometimes nitrogen atoms are attracted to a C-C bound. In summary, the optimized adsorption rates are calculated. Gaussian 98 software has been used to carry out quantum chemistry calculations. Keywords: Density functional theory, Hartree-Fock, carbon nano tube, Gaussian 98 software. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs are one of the most significant achievements of nano-technology because of his important applications in the design of electronic nano-devices. The study of their properties is therefore important. In this investigation the Density Functional Theory (DFT of electron and the Hartree-Fock (HF method are utilized to study the adsorption of nitrogen molecules on the surface of (4, 4 and (5, 0 carbon nanotubes. The electronic structure, single point and dipole moment of both nitrogen and carbon nuclei are thoroughly studied. The computational results, which includes, indicate that rich adsorption patterns m ay result from the interaction of nitrogen with the carbon nanotubes. Sometimes C-N bounds are formed via breaking C-C bounds and sometimes a carbon atom in the nanotube is replaced by a nitrogen atom. Sometimes nitrogen atoms are attracted to a C-C bound

  12. OPPORTUNITIES OF BIOMEDICAL USE OF CARBON NANOTUBES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Mitrofanova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanomaterials  –  materials,  whouse  structure  elements  has  proportions  doesn’t  exceed  100  nm.  In superdispersed state matter acquire new properties. In the last decade, carbon nanotubes become the most popular nanomaterials, that cause attention of representatives of various scientific field. The сarbon nanotubes offer new opportunities for biological and medical applications: imaging at the molecular, cellular and tissue levels, biosensors and electrodes based on carbon nanotubes, target delivery of various substances, radiation and photothermal therapy. The most promising of carbon nanotubes in the context of biomedical applications is their ability to penetrate the various tissues of the body and carry large doses of agents, providing diagnostic and therapeutic effects. Functionalized nanotubes are biodegradable. Other current direction of using carbon nanotubes in medicine and biology is to visualize objects on the molecular, cellular and tissue level. Associated with carbon nanotubes contrasting substances improve the visualization of cells and tissues, which can detected new patterns of development of the pathological process. Due to the vagueness of the question of biocompatibility and cytotoxicity of carbon nanotubes possibility of their practical application is hampered. Before the introduction of carbon nanotubes into practical health care is necessary to provide all the possible consequences of using nanotubes. High rates of properties and development of new nanostructures based on carbon nanotubes in the near future will lead to new advances related to the application and development of new parameters that will determine their properties and effects. In these review attention is paid to the structure, physico-chemical properties of nanotubes, their functionalization, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics and all aspects of using of carbon nanotubes.

  13. Effect of charge on the stability of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Ji; WU Jinlei

    2004-01-01

    By using density-functional-theory based DMol3 code, the structure optimizations are performed on a short charged single-walled carbon nanotube. Results show that the total energy of the nanotube exhibits a parabolic variation with respect to the amount of extra charge, and one negatively charged nanotube has the lowest total energy; thus the carbon nanotube has a positive electron affinity. When the charge is small, the variation of the atomic structure of the nanotube is also small, and neglecting the atomic structure variation leads to the qualitatively correct properties of the total energy and the energy of the highest occupied molecular orbital. When the extra charge is large, the end structure of the nanotube will be first affected and form into a trumpet shape. With the increasing of the extra charge, the nanotube end gradually becomes unstable, and this may lead to the ultimate destruction of the nanotube.

  14. LDRD final report on carbon nanotube composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cahill, P.A.; Rand, P.B.

    1997-04-01

    Carbon nanotubes and their composites were examined using computational and experimental techniques in order to modify the mechanical and electrical properties of resins. Single walled nanotubes were the focus of the first year effort; however, sufficient quantities of high purity single walled nanotubes could not be obtained for mechanical property investigations. The unusually high electrical conductivity of composites loaded with <1% of multiwalled nanotubes is useful, and is the focus of continuing, externally funded, research.

  15. Engineering carbon nanotubes and nanotube circuits using electrical breakdown.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, P G; Arnold, M S; Avouris, P

    2001-04-27

    Carbon nanotubes display either metallic or semiconducting properties. Both large, multiwalled nanotubes (MWNTs), with many concentric carbon shells, and bundles or "ropes" of aligned single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs), are complex composite conductors that incorporate many weakly coupled nanotubes that each have a different electronic structure. Here we demonstrate a simple and reliable method for selectively removing single carbon shells from MWNTs and SWNT ropes to tailor the properties of these composite nanotubes. We can remove shells of MWNTs stepwise and individually characterize the different shells. By choosing among the shells, we can convert a MWNT into either a metallic or a semiconducting conductor, as well as directly address the issue of multiple-shell transport. With SWNT ropes, similar selectivity allows us to generate entire arrays of nanoscale field-effect transistors based solely on the fraction of semiconducting SWNTs.

  16. Consideration of critical axial properties of pristine and defected carbon nanotubes under compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjbartoreh, A R; Su, D; Wang, G

    2012-06-01

    Carbon nanotubes are hexagonally configured carbon atoms in cylindrical structures. Exceptionally high mechanical strength, electrical conductivity, surface area, thermal stability and optical transparency of carbon nanotubes outperformed other known materials in numerous advanced applications. However, their mechanical behaviors under practical loading conditions remain to be demonstrated. This study investigates the critical axial properties of pristine and defected single- and multi-walled carbon nanotubes under axial compression. Molecular dynamics simulation method has been employed to consider the destructive effects of Stone-Wales and atom vacancy defects on mechanical properties of armchair and zigzag carbon nanotubes under compressive loading condition. Armchair carbon nanotube shows higher axial stability than zigzag type. Increase in wall number leads to less susceptibility of multi-walled carbon nanotubes to defects and higher stability of them under axial compression. Atom vacancy defect reveals higher destructive effect than Stone-Wales defect on mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes. Critical axial strain of single-walled carbon nanotube declines by 67% and 26% due to atom vacancy and Stone-Wales defects.

  17. Plasticity and Kinky Chemistry of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Dzegilenko, Fedor

    2000-01-01

    Since their discovery in 1991, carbon nanotubes have been the subject of intense research interest based on early predictions of their unique mechanical, electronic, and chemical properties. Materials with the predicted unique properties of carbon nanotubes are of great interest for use in future generations of aerospace vehicles. For their structural properties, carbon nanotubes could be used as reinforcing fibers in ultralight multifunctional composites. For their electronic properties, carbon nanotubes offer the potential of very high-speed, low-power computing elements, high-density data storage, and unique sensors. In a continuing effort to model and predict the properties of carbon nanotubes, Ames accomplished three significant results during FY99. First, accurate values of the nanomechanics and plasticity of carbon nanotubes based on quantum molecular dynamics simulations were computed. Second, the concept of mechanical deformation catalyzed-kinky-chemistry as a means to control local chemistry of nanotubes was discovered. Third, the ease of nano-indentation of silicon surfaces with carbon nanotubes was established. The elastic response and plastic failure mechanisms of single-wall nanotubes were investigated by means of quantum molecular dynamics simulations.

  18. Dielectrophoretic assembly of carbon nanotube devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dimaki, Maria

    The purpose of this project has been to assemble single-walled carbon nanotubes on electrodes at the tip of a biocompatible cantilever and use these for chemical species sensing in air and liquid, for example in order to measure the local activity from ion channels in the cell membrane....... The electrical resistance of carbon nanotubes has been shown to be extremely sensitive to gas molecules. Dielectrophoresis is a method capable of quickly attracting nanotubes on microelectrodes by using an electric field, thus enabling nanotube integration in microsystems. Dielectrophoresis offers also...... the potential of distinguishing between nanotubes of different electrical properties, which is very important for the optimisation of the properties of the carbon nanotube sensors. Various cantilever and planar structures were designed, fabricated and tested both with multi-walled and single-walled carbon...

  19. Sorting carbon nanotubes for electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martel, Richard

    2008-11-25

    Because of their unique structure and composition, single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are at the interface between molecules and crystalline solids. They also present properties that are ideal for making lightweight, inexpensive, and flexible electronics. The raw material is composed of a heterogeneous mixture of SWNTs that differ in helicity and diameter and, therefore, requires purification and separation. In a series of groundbreaking experiments, a robust process serving this purpose was developed based on SWNTs encapsulated in surfactants and water. Ultracentrifugation in a density gradient combined with surfactant mixtures provided buoyant density differences, enabling enrichment for both diameter and electronic properties. A new paper in this issue explores further the process through the hydrodynamic properties of SWNT-surfactant complexes. The study reveals that we have just begun to uncover the dynamics and properties of nanotube-surfactant interactions and highlights the potential that could be gained from a better understanding of their chemistry. The time scale of integration of carbon nanotubes into electronics applications remains unclear, but the recent developments in sorting out SWNTs paves the way for improving on the properties of network-based SWNTs.

  20. In situ, controlled and reproducible attachment of carbon nanotubes onto conductive AFM tips

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Jianxun [International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (MANA), National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Chinese Academy of Science Key Laboratory for Biomedical Effects of Nanomaterials and Nanosafty, National Center for Nanoscience and Technology of China, No. 11, Bei yi tiao, Zhong Guan Cun, Beijing 100190 (China); Shingaya, Yoshitaka [International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (MANA), National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Zhao, Yuliang [Chinese Academy of Science Key Laboratory for Biomedical Effects of Nanomaterials and Nanosafty, National Center for Nanoscience and Technology of China, No. 11, Bei yi tiao, Zhong Guan Cun, Beijing 100190 (China); Nakayama, Tomonobu, E-mail: NAKAYAMA.Tomonobu@nims.go.jp [International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (MANA), National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan)

    2015-04-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • An effective and controllable method was developed to fabricate CNT AFM probes in-situ. • Individual carbon nanotube was assembled. • The alignment angle and protruding length of as-produced CNT probes are excellent. - Abstract: Owing to the small diameter, wear resistance, high aspect ratio of their cylindrical structure and outstanding young's modulus, carbon nanotubes are regarded as excellent probes for atomic force microscope (AFM) imaging and various applications. To take the best out of carbon nanotubes’ potentials as AFM probes, we present a facile and reliable method to attach a single carbon nanotube onto an AFM probe covered with conductive Au layer. The method involves the following steps: positioning the AFM probe exactly onto a designated multiple-walled carbon nanotube growing vertically on a conductive substrate, establishing physical contact of the probe apex to the carbon nanotube with an appropriate force, and finally flowing a DC current of typically 100 μA from the AFM probe to the substrate through the carbon nanotube. The current flow results in the fracture and attachment of the carbon nanotube onto the AFM probe. Our method is similar to that reported in previous studies to cut and assemble carbon nanotubes by flowing current under SEM, but by our method we succeed to achieve superior control of protruding length and reproducible attachment angle of the carbon nanotube in one step. Moreover, it is now possible to reliably prepare carbon nanotube probes in-situ during AFM experiments.

  1. Study of Carbon Nanotube-Substrate Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaqueline S. Soares

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Environmental effects are very important in nanoscience and nanotechnology. This work reviews the importance of the substrate in single-wall carbon nanotube properties. Contact with a substrate can modify the nanotube properties, and such interactions have been broadly studied as either a negative aspect or a solution for developing carbon nanotube-based nanotechnologies. This paper discusses both theoretical and experimental studies where the interaction between the carbon nanotubes and the substrate affects the structural, electronic, and vibrational properties of the tubes.

  2. ANALYSIS OF MATERIAL MECHANICAL PROPERTIES FOR SINGLE-WALLED CARBON NANOTUBES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fu Yiming; Xu Xiaoxian

    2005-01-01

    Abstract The carbon-carbon bond between two nearest-neighboring atoms is modeled as a beam and the single-walled carbon nanotubes are treated as the space frame structures in order to analyze the mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes. Based on the theory of TersoffBrenner force field, the energy relationships between the carbon-carbon bond and the beam model are obtained, and the stiffness parameters of the beam are determined. By applying the present model, the Young's moduli of the single-walled carbon nanotubes with different tube diameters are determined. And the present results are compared with available data.

  3. Quantum transport in carbon nanotubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jarillo-Herrero, P.D.

    2005-01-01

    Electronic transport through nanostructures can be very different from trans- port in macroscopic conductors, especially at low temperatures. Carbon na- notubes are tiny cylinders made of carbon atoms. Their remarkable electronic and mechanical properties, together with their small size (a few nm in

  4. Amorphous Carbon-Boron Nitride Nanotube Hybrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae Woo (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Wise, Kristopher E. (Inventor); Lin, Yi (Inventor); Connell, John (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A method for joining or repairing boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs). In joining BNNTs, the nanotube structure is modified with amorphous carbon deposited by controlled electron beam irradiation to form well bonded hybrid a-C/BNNT structures. In repairing BNNTs, the damaged site of the nanotube structure is modified with amorphous carbon deposited by controlled electron beam irradiation to form well bonded hybrid a-C/BNNT structures at the damage site.

  5. A Tunable Carbon Nanotube Oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sazonova, Vera

    2005-03-01

    Nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) hold promise for a number of scientific and technological applications. Carbon nanotubes (NT) are perhaps the ultimate material for realizing a NEMS device as they are the stiffest material known, have low density, ultrasmall cross sections and can be defect-free. Equally important, a nanotube can act as a transistor and thus is able to sense its own motion. Here, we report the electrical actuation and detection of the guitar-string oscillation modes of doubly-clamped NT oscillators. We observed resonance frequencies in the 5MHz to 150MHz range with quality factors in the 50 to 100 range. We showed that the resonance frequencies can be widely tuned by a gate voltage. We also report on the temperature dependence of the quality factor and present a discussion of possible loss mechanisms.

  6. Mechanics of filled carbon nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Monteiro, A.O.

    2014-04-01

    The benefits of filling carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with assorted molecular and crystalline substances have been investigated for the past two decades. Amongst the study of new structural phases, defects, chemical reactions and varied types of host-guest interactions, there is one fundamental characterisation aspect of these systems that continues to be overlooked: the mechanical behaviour of filled CNTs. In contrast to their empty counterparts, the mechanics of filled CNTs is a subject where reports appear far and apart, this despite being key to the application of these materials in technological devices. In the following paragraphs, we review the work that has been carried out up to the present on the mechanics of filled CNTs. The studies discussed range from experimental resonant frequency essays performed within electron microscopes to modelling, via molecular dynamics, of three-point bending of nanotubes filled with gases. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Carbon nanotubes in drug delivery: focus on infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Yitzhak; Elman, Noel M

    2009-05-01

    Carbon nanotubes have the potential to address the challenges of combating infectious agents by both minimizing toxicity by dose reduction of standard therapeutics and allowing a multiple payload capacity to achieve both targeted activity and combating infectious strains, resistant strains in particular. One of their unique characteristics is the network of carbon atoms in the nanometer scale, allowing the creation of nano-channels via cellular membranes. This review focuses on the characterization, development, integration and application of carbon nanotubes as nanocarrier-based delivery systems and their appropriate design for achieving the desired drug delivery results in the different areas of infectious diseases. While a more extensive toxicological and pharmacological profile must be obtained, this review will focus on existing research and pre-clinical data concerning the potential use of carbon nanotubes.

  8. Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Joseph; Gilbert, Matthew; Naab, Fabian; Savage, Lauren; Holland, Wayne; Duggan, Jerome; McDaniel, Floyd

    2004-10-01

    Hydrogen as a fuel source is an attractive, relatively clean alternative to fossil fuels. However, a major limitation in its use for the application of automobiles has been the requirement for an efficient hydrogen storage medium. Current hydrogen storage systems are: physical storage in high pressure tanks, metal hydride, and gas-on-solid absorption. However, these methods do not fulfill the Department of Energy's targeted requirements for a usable hydrogen storage capacity of 6.5 wt.%, operation near ambient temperature and pressure, quick extraction and refueling, reliability and reusability.Reports showing high capacity hydrogen storage in single-walled carbon nanotubes originally prompted great excitement in the field, but further research has shown conflicting results. Results for carbon nanostructures have ranged from less than 1 wt.% to 70 wt.%. The wide range of adsorption found in previous experiments results from the difficulty in measuring hydrogen in objects just nanometers in size. Most previous experiments relied on weight analysis and residual gas analysis to determine the amount of hydrogen being adsorbed by the CNTs. These differing results encouraged us to perform our own analysis on single-walled (SWNTs), double-walled (DWNTs), and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs), as well as carbon fiber. We chose to utilize direct measurement of hydrogen in the materials using elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA). This work was supported by the National Science Foundation's Research Experience for Undergraduates and the University of North Texas.

  9. On the structural and mechanical properties of Fe-filled carbon nanotubes: a computer simulation approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldano, G; Mariscal, M M

    2009-04-22

    The structural and mechanical properties of single-and multi-walled carbon nanotubes filled with iron nanowires are studied using a recent parameterization of the modified embedded atom model. We have analyzed the effect of different crystal structures of iron (bcc and fcc) inside carbon nanotubes of different topographies. We have computed strain energy versus strain curves for pure systems: Fe nanowires, carbon and Fe-filled carbon nanotubes. A noticeable difference is found when these monatomic systems are joined to form iron-capped nanowires and where multi-layers of graphite are added to the nanotubes.

  10. Hydrogen bond and halogen bond inside the carbon nanotube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weizhou; Wang, Donglai; Zhang, Yu; Ji, Baoming; Tian, Anmin

    2011-02-01

    The hydrogen bond and halogen bond inside the open-ended single-walled carbon nanotubes have been investigated theoretically employing the newly developed density functional M06 with the suitable basis set and the natural bond orbital analysis. Comparing with the hydrogen or halogen bond in the gas phase, we find that the strength of the hydrogen or halogen bond inside the carbon nanotube will become weaker if there is a larger intramolecular electron-density transfer from the electron-rich region of the hydrogen or halogen atom donor to the antibonding orbital of the X-H or X-Hal bond involved in the formation of the hydrogen or halogen bond and will become stronger if there is a larger intermolecular electron-density transfer from the electron-rich region of the hydrogen or halogen atom acceptor to the antibonding orbital of the X-H or X-Hal bond. According to the analysis of the molecular electrostatic potential of the carbon nanotube, the driving force for the electron-density transfer is found to be the negative electric field formed in the carbon nanotube inner phase. Our results also show that the X-H bond involved in the formation of the hydrogen bond and the X-Hal bond involved in the formation of the halogen bond are all elongated when encapsulating the hydrogen bond and halogen bond within the carbon nanotube, so the carbon nanotube confinement may change the blue-shifting hydrogen bond and the blue-shifting halogen bond into the red-shifting hydrogen bond and the red-shifting halogen bond. The possibility to replace the all electron nanotube-confined calculation by the simple polarizable continuum model is also evaluated.

  11. Genotoxicity and carcinogenicity risk of carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyokuni, Shinya

    2013-12-01

    Novel materials are often commercialized without a complete assessment of the risks they pose to human health because such assessments are costly and time-consuming; additionally, sometimes the methodology needed for such an assessment does not exist. Carbon nanotubes have the potential for widespread application in engineering, materials science and medicine. However, due to the needle-like shape and high durability of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), concerns have been raised that they may induce asbestos-like pathogenicity when inhaled. Indeed, experiments in rodents supported this hypothesis. Notably, the genetic alterations in MWCNT-induced rat malignant mesothelioma were similar to those induced by asbestos. Single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs) cause mitotic disturbances in cultured cells, but thus far, there has been no report that SWCNTs are carcinogenic. This review summarizes the recent noteworthy publications on the genotoxicity and carcinogenicity of CNTs and explains the possible molecular mechanisms responsible for this carcinogenicity. The nanoscale size and needle-like rigid structure of CNTs appear to be associated with their pathogenicity in mammalian cells, where carbon atoms are major components in the backbone of many biomolecules. Publishing adverse events associated with novel materials is critically important for alerting people exposed to such materials. CNTs still have a bright future with superb economic and medical merits. However, appropriate regulation of the production, distribution and secondary manufacturing processes is required, at least to protect the workers.

  12. Glucose oxidase immobilization onto carbon nanotube networking

    CERN Document Server

    Karachevtsev, V A; Zarudnev, E S; Karachevtsev, M V; Leontiev, V S; Linnik, A S; Lytvyn, O S; Plokhotnichenko, A M; Stepanian, S G

    2012-01-01

    When elaborating the biosensor based on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), it is necessary to solve such an important problem as the immobilization of a target biomolecule on the nanotube surface. In this work, the enzyme (glucose oxidase (GOX)) was immobilized on the surface of a nanotube network, which was created by the deposition of nanotubes from their solution in 1,2-dichlorobenzene by the spray method. 1-Pyrenebutanoic acid succinimide ester (PSE) was used to form the molecular interface, the bifunctional molecule of which provides the covalent binding with the enzyme shell, and its other part (pyrene) is adsorbed onto the nanotube surface. First, the usage of such a molecular interface leaves out the direct adsorption of the enzyme (in this case, its activity decreases) onto the nanotube surface, and, second, it ensures the enzyme localization near the nanotube. The comparison of the resonance Raman (RR) spectrum of pristine nanotubes with their spectrum in the PSE environment evidences the creat...

  13. Polymer Self-assembly on Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giulianini, Michele; Motta, Nunzio

    This chapter analyses the poly(3-hexylthiophene) self-assembly on carbon nanotubes and the interaction between the two materials forming a new hybrid nanostructure. The chapter starts with a review of the several studies investigating polymers and biomolecules self-assembled on nanotubes. Then conducting polymers and polythiophenes are briefly introduced. Accordingly, carbon nanotube structure and properties are reported in Sect. 3. The experimental section starts with the bulk characterisation of polymer thin films with the inclusion of uniformly distributed carbon nanotubes. By using volume film analysis techniques (AFM, TEM, UV-Vis and Raman), we show how the polymer's higher degree of order is a direct consequence of interaction with carbon nanotubes. Nevertheless, it is through the use of nanoscale analysis and molecular dynamic simulations that the self-assembly of the polymer on the nanotube surface can be clearly evidenced and characterised. In Sect. 6, the effect of the carbon templating structure on the P3HT organisation on the surface is investigated, showing the chirality-driven polymer assembly on the carbon nanotube surface. The interaction between P3HT and CNTs brings also to charge transfer, with the modification of physical properties for both species. In particular, the alteration of the polymer electronic properties and the modification of the nanotube mechanical structure are a direct consequence of the P3HT π-π stacking on the nanotube surface. Finally, some considerations based on molecular dynamics studies are reported in order to confirm and support the experimental results discussed.

  14. Suspended carbon nanotubes coupled to superconducting circuits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schneider, B.H.

    2014-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are unique candidates to study quantum mechanical properties of a nanomechanical resonator. However to access this quantum regime, present detectors are not yet sensitive enough. In this thesis we couple a carbon nanotube CNT mechanical resonator to a superconducting circuit which i

  15. Carbon Nanotubes – Interactions with Biological Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Reis, Joana; Capela-Silva, Fernando; Potes, José; Fonseca, Alexandra; Oliveira, Mónica; Kanagaraj, Subramani; Marques, António Torres

    2011-01-01

    his book chapter discusses the prospective biomedical applications of carbon nanotubes based materials, the impact of carbon nanotubes properties in the interaction with biological systems. Protein adsorption, impact on cell viability and cytokine production are explored. Potential respiratory and dermal toxicity are reviewed, as the difficulties on studying the biological response. In face of recent studies, special attention is drawn upon promising orthopaedic use.

  16. Multiscale Simulations of Carbon Nanotubes and Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2005-11-01

    We present molecular dynamics and hybrid continuum/atomistic simulations of carbon nanotubes in liquid environments with an emphasis on aqueous solutions. We emphasize computational issues such as interaction potentials and coupling techniques and their influence on the simulated physics. We present results from simulations of water flows inside and outside doped and pure carbon nanotubes and discuss their implications for experimental studies.

  17. Non-destructive functionalisation for atomic layer deposition of metal oxides on carbon nanotubes: effect of linking agents and defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemnade, N.; Shearer, C. J.; Dieterle, D. J.; Cherevan, A. S.; Gebhardt, P.; Wilde, G.; Eder, D.

    2015-02-01

    The hybridisation of metal oxides and nanocarbons has created a promising new class of functional materials for environmental and sustainable energy applications. The performance of such hybrids can be further improved by rationally designing interfaces and morphologies. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is among the most powerful techniques for the controlled deposition of inorganic compounds, due to its ability to form conformal coatings on porous substrates at low temperatures with high surface sensitivity and atomic control of film thickness. The hydrophobic nature of the nanocarbon surface has so far limited the applicability of ALD on CNTs. Herein we investigate the role of structural defects in CNTs, both intrinsic and induced by acid treatment, on coverage, uniformity and crystallinity of ZnO coatings. Furthermore, we demonstrate the potential of small aromatic molecules, including benzyl alcohol (BA), naphthalene carboxylic acid (NA) and pyrene carboxylic acid (PCA), as active nucleation sites and linking agents. Importantly, only PCA exhibits sufficiently strong interactions with the pristine CNT surface to withstand desorption under reaction conditions. Thus, PCA enables a versatile and non-destructive alternative route for the deposition of highly uniform metal oxide coatings onto pristine CNTs via ALD over a wide temperature range and without the typical surface corrosion induced by covalent functionalisation. Importantly, preliminary tests demonstrated that the improved morphology obtained with PCA has indeed considerably increased the hybrid's photocatalytic activity towards hydrogen evolution via sacrificial water splitting. The concept demonstrated in this work is transferable to a wide range of other inorganic compounds including metal oxides, metal (oxy)nitrides and metal chalcogenides on a variety of nanocarbons.The hybridisation of metal oxides and nanocarbons has created a promising new class of functional materials for environmental and

  18. A piggyback ride for transition metals: encapsulation of exohedral metallofullerenes in carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, Thomas W; Champness, Neil R; Schröder, Martin; Khlobystov, Andrei N

    2011-01-10

    We have developed a method that enables the efficient insertion of transition-metal atoms and their small clusters into carbon nanotubes. As a model system, Os complexes attached to the exterior of fullerene C60 (exohedral metallofullerenes) were shown to be dragged into the nanotube spontaneously and irreversibly due to strong van der Waals interactions, specific to fullerenes and carbon nanotubes. The size of the metal-containing groups attached to C60 was shown to be critical for successful insertion, as functional groups too bulky to enter the nanotube were stripped off the fullerene during the encapsulation process. Once inside the nanotube, Os atoms catalyse polymerisation and decomposition of fullerene cages, which is related to a much higher catalytic activity of metal atoms situated on the surface of the fullerene cage, as compared to metal atoms in endohedral fullerenes, such as M@C82. Thus, exohedral metallofullerenes show promise for applications in catalysis in carbon “nano” test tubes.

  19. Air-stable conversion of separated carbon nanotube thin-film transistors from p-type to n-type using atomic layer deposition of high-κ oxide and its application in CMOS logic circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jialu; Wang, Chuan; Fu, Yue; Che, Yuchi; Zhou, Chongwu

    2011-04-26

    Due to extraordinary electrical properties, preseparated, high purity semiconducting carbon nanotubes hold great potential for thin-film transistors (TFTs) and integrated circuit applications. One of the main challenges it still faces is the fabrication of air-stable n-type nanotube TFTs with industry-compatible techniques. Here in this paper, we report a novel and highly reliable method of converting the as-made p-type TFTs using preseparated semiconducting nanotubes into air-stable n-type transistors by adding a high-κ oxide passivation layer using atomic layer deposition (ALD). The n-type devices exhibit symmetric electrical performance compared with the p-type devices in terms of on-current, on/off ratio, and device mobility. Various factors affecting the conversion process, including ALD temperature, metal contact material, and channel length, have also been systematically studied by a series of designed experiments. A complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) inverter with rail-to-rail output, symmetric input/output behavior, and large noise margin has been further demonstrated. The excellent performance gives us the feasibility of cascading multiple stages of logic blocks and larger scale integration. Our approach can serve as the critical foundation for future nanotube-based thin-film macroelectronics.

  20. Development of supercapacitors based on carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Block-type electrodes made of carbon nanotubes were fabricated by different processes. The volumetric specific capacitance based on such electrodes reached 107 F/cm3, which proves carbon nanotubes to be ideal candidate materials for supercapacitors. The composite electrodes consisting of carbon nanotubes and RuO2.xH2O were developed by the deposition of RuO2 on the surface of carbon nanotubes. Supercapacitors based on the composite electrodes show much higher specific capacitance than those based on pure carbon nanotube ones. A specific capacitance of 600 F/g can be achieved when the weight percent of RuO2.xH2O in the composite electrodes reaches 75%. In addition, supercapacitors based on the composite electrodes show both high energy density and high power density characteristics.

  1. Development of supercapacitors based on carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马仁志; 魏秉庆; 徐才录; 梁吉; 吴德海

    2000-01-01

    Block-type electrodes made of carbon nanotubes were fabricated by different processes. The volumetric specific capacitance based on such electrodes reached 107 F/cm3, which proves carbon nanotubes to be ideal candidate materials for supercapacitors. The composite electrodes consisting of carbon nanotubes and RuO2 ·xH2O were developed by the deposition of RuO2 on the surface of carbon nanotubes. Supercapacitors based on the composite electrodes show much higher specific capacitance than those based on pure carbon nanotube ones. A specific capacitance of 600 F/g can be achieved when the weight percent of RuO2· xH2O in the composite electrodes reaches 75% . In addition , supercapacitors based on the composite electrodes show both high energy density and high power density characteristics.

  2. Applications of Quantum Chemistry to the Study of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, Richard L.

    2005-01-01

    For several years, scientists at NASA Ames have been studying the properties of carbon nanotubes using various experimental and computational methods. In this talk, I will compare different strategies for using quantum chemistry calculations to describe the electronic structure, deformation and chemical functionalization of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) and the physisorption of small molecules on nanotube surfaces. The SWNT can be treated as an infinite (periodic) or finite length carbon cylinder or as a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecule with an imposed curvature maintained by external constraints (as if it were cut out of the SWNT surface). Calculations are carried out using DFT and MP2 methods and a variety of atomic orbital basis sets from minimal (STO-3G) to valence triple zeta. The optimal approach is based on the particular SWNT property of interest. Examples to be discussed include: nanotube fluorination and other functionalization reactions; coating of nanotubes by water vapor and low-molecular weight organic molecules; and the nature of the interface between SWNT and liquids such as water and amines. In many cases, the quantum chemistry calculations are used to parameterize or validate force fields for molecular dynamics simulations. The results of these calculations have helped explain experimental data and contributed to the design of novel materials and sensors based on carbon nanotubes. Some of this research is described in the following papers:

  3. Thermal Conductivity of Carbon Nanotubes Embedded in Solids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Bing-Yang; HOU Quan-Wen

    2008-01-01

    @@ A carbon-nanotube-atom fixed and activated scheme of non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations is put forward to extract the thermal conductivity of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) embedded in solid argon. Though a 6.5% volume fraction of CNTs increases the composite thermal conductivity to about twice as much as that of the pure basal material, the thermal conductivity of CNTs embedded in solids is found to be decreased by 1/8-1/5with reference to that of pure ones. The decrease of the intrinsic thermal conductivity of the solid-embedded CNTs and the thermal interface resistance are demonstrated to be responsible for the results.

  4. Growing carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshinori Ando

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of ‘fullerenes’ added a new dimension to the knowledge of carbon science1; and the subsequent discovery of ‘carbon nanotubes’ (CNTs, the elongated fullerene added a new dimension to the knowledge of technology2;. Today, ‘nanotechnology’ is a hot topic attracting scientists, industrialists, journalists, governments, and even the general public. Nanotechnology is the creation of functional materials, devices, and systems through control of matter on the nanometer scale and the exploitation of novel phenomena and properties of matter (physical, chemical, biological, electrical, etc. at that length scale. CNTs are supposed to be a key component of nanotechnology. Almost every week a new potential application of CNTs is identified, stimulating scientists to peep into this tiny tube with ever increasing curiosity.

  5. Improved synthesis of carbon nanotubes with junctions and of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    F L Deepak; A Govindaraj; C N R Rao

    2006-01-01

    Pyrolysis of thiophene over nickel nanoparticles dispersed on silica is shown to yield Yjunction carbon nanotubes with smaller diameters than those obtained by the pyrolysis of organometallicthiophene mixtures. In the presence of water vapour, the pyrolysis of organometallic-hydrocarbon mixtures yields single-walled nanotubes, as well as relatively narrow-diameter carbon nanotubes with Y-junctions. Pyrolysis of organometallic-hydrocarbon mixtures, in the absence of water vapour, only gives nanotubes with T- and Y-junctions.

  6. Coated carbon nanotube array electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhifeng; Wen, Jian; Chen, Jinghua; Huang, Zhongping; Wang, Dezhi

    2008-10-28

    The present invention provides conductive carbon nanotube (CNT) electrode materials comprising aligned CNT substrates coated with an electrically conducting polymer, and the fabrication of electrodes for use in high performance electrical energy storage devices. In particular, the present invention provides conductive CNTs electrode material whose electrical properties render them especially suitable for use in high efficiency rechargeable batteries. The present invention also provides methods for obtaining surface modified conductive CNT electrode materials comprising an array of individual linear, aligned CNTs having a uniform surface coating of an electrically conductive polymer such as polypyrrole, and their use in electrical energy storage devices.

  7. Carbon nanotube growth density control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delzeit, Lance D. (Inventor); Schipper, John F. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Method and system for combined coarse scale control and fine scale control of growth density of a carbon nanotube (CNT) array on a substrate, using a selected electrical field adjacent to a substrate surface for coarse scale density control (by one or more orders of magnitude) and a selected CNT growth temperature range for fine scale density control (by multiplicative factors of less than an order of magnitude) of CNT growth density. Two spaced apart regions on a substrate may have different CNT growth densities and/or may use different feed gases for CNT growth.

  8. Purification of carbon nanotube by wet oxidation; Shisshiki sanka ni yoru carbon nanotube no seisei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morishita, K.; Takarada, T. [Gunma University, Gunma (Japan)

    1997-07-10

    In order to efficiently recover carbon nanotubes, the purification method by wet oxidation with orthoperiodic acid and perchloric acid is investigated. The reactivity of the carbonaceous material toward the acids depends on the type of carbon. Carbon nanotubes are selectively recovered under the mild oxidation conditions. The degree of purification depends on the concentration of orthoperiodic acid. It is suggested that wet oxidation is an effective method for purification of carbon nanotubes. 17 refs., 6 figs.

  9. Thermoelectric transport properties through a single-walled zig–zag carbon nanotube side coupled to a correlated quantum dot: Atomic approach for the finite U-impurity Anderson model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos, Edwin, E-mail: eramosr@unal.edu.co [Departamento de Física, Universidad Nacional de Colombia (UNAL), A. A. 5997, Bogotá (Colombia); Franco, Roberto, E-mail: rfrancop@unal.edu.co [Departamento de Física, Universidad Nacional de Colombia (UNAL), A. A. 5997, Bogotá (Colombia); Instituto de Física de São Carlos-Universidade de São Paulo (IFSC-USP), 369 São Carlos, São Paulo (Brazil); Silva-Valencia, Jereson [Departamento de Física, Universidad Nacional de Colombia (UNAL), A. A. 5997, Bogotá (Colombia); Figueira, Marcos Sergio [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal Fluminense (IF-UFF), Avenida litorânea s/n, CEP 24210-346, Niterói, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2014-12-15

    We study the thermopower S, linear thermal conductance κ, linear electric conductance G and thermoelectric figure of merit Z properties of a single-walled zig–zag carbon nanotube side coupled to a correlated quantum dot (QD). We employ the recently developed U-finite atomic approach for the Single Impurity Anderson model (SIAM). The quantum dot is linked to the localized states in the model, considering a finite Coulombic repulsion U, and the conduction band in the model is associated with the single walled zig–zag metallic carbon nanotube (n=3), and is described by a tight-binding approximation in order to obtain Green's function of the nanotube. The thermoelectric transport coefficients were obtained using the Keldysh non-equilibrium Green's function technique with the Onsager relation in the linear regime automatically satisfied. Results indicate that this system can be employed in possible thermoelectric device applications at low temperatures when strong charge fluctuations are present in the QD.

  10. Carbon nanotubes: potential medical applications and safety concerns

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have unique atomic structure, as well as outstanding thermal, mechanical and electronic properties, making them extremely attractive materials for several different applications. Many research groups are focusing on biomedical applications of carbon-based nanomaterials, however the application of CNTs to the biomedical field is not developing as fast as in other areas. While CNTs-based products are already being used in textiles, polymer matrices to strengthen material...

  11. A cell nanoinjector based on carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xing; Kis, Andras; Zettl, Alex; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.

    2007-01-30

    Technologies for introducing molecules into living cells are vital for probing the physical properties and biochemical interactions that govern the cell's behavior. Here we report the development of a nanoscale cell injection system-termed the nanoinjector-that uses carbon nanotubes to deliver cargo into cells. A single multi-walled carbon nanotube attached to an atomic force microscope tip was functionalized with cargo via a disulfide-based linker. Penetration of cell membranes with this 'nanoneedle', followed by reductive cleavage of the disulfide bonds within the cell's interior, resulted in the release of cargo inside the cells. The capability of the nanoinjector was demonstrated by injection of protein-coated quantum dots into live human cells. Single-particle tracking was employed to characterize the diffusion dynamics of injected quantum dots in the cytosol. This new technique causes no discernible membrane or cell damage, and can deliver a discrete number of molecules to the cell's interior without the requirement of a carrier solvent.

  12. Preserving π-conjugation in covalently functionalized carbon nanotubes for optoelectronic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setaro, Antonio; Adeli, Mohsen; Glaeske, Mareen; Przyrembel, Daniel; Bisswanger, Timo; Gordeev, Georgy; Maschietto, Federica; Faghani, Abbas; Paulus, Beate; Weinelt, Martin; Arenal, Raul; Haag, Rainer; Reich, Stephanie

    2017-01-01

    Covalent functionalization tailors carbon nanotubes for a wide range of applications in varying environments. Its strength and stability of attachment come at the price of degrading the carbon nanotubes sp2 network and destroying the tubes electronic and optoelectronic features. Here we present a non-destructive, covalent, gram-scale functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes by a new [2+1] cycloaddition. The reaction rebuilds the extended π-network, thereby retaining the outstanding quantum optoelectronic properties of carbon nanotubes, including bright light emission at high degree of functionalization (1 group per 25 carbon atoms). The conjugation method described here opens the way for advanced tailoring nanotubes as demonstrated for light-triggered reversible doping through photochromic molecular switches and nanoplasmonic gold-nanotube hybrids with enhanced infrared light emission.

  13. Functionalized carbon nanotubes: biomedical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vardharajula S

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Sandhya Vardharajula,1 Sk Z Ali,2 Pooja M Tiwari,1 Erdal Eroğlu,1 Komal Vig,1 Vida A Dennis,1 Shree R Singh11Center for NanoBiotechnology and Life Sciences Research, Alabama State University, Montgomery, AL, USA; 2Department of Microbiology, Osmania University, Hyderabad, IndiaAbstract: Carbon nanotubes (CNTs are emerging as novel nanomaterials for various biomedical applications. CNTs can be used to deliver a variety of therapeutic agents, including biomolecules, to the target disease sites. In addition, their unparalleled optical and electrical properties make them excellent candidates for bioimaging and other biomedical applications. However, the high cytotoxicity of CNTs limits their use in humans and many biological systems. The biocompatibility and low cytotoxicity of CNTs are attributed to size, dose, duration, testing systems, and surface functionalization. The functionalization of CNTs improves their solubility and biocompatibility and alters their cellular interaction pathways, resulting in much-reduced cytotoxic effects. Functionalized CNTs are promising novel materials for a variety of biomedical applications. These potential applications are particularly enhanced by their ability to penetrate biological membranes with relatively low cytotoxicity. This review is directed towards the overview of CNTs and their functionalization for biomedical applications with minimal cytotoxicity.Keywords: carbon nanotubes, cytotoxicity, functionalization, biomedical applications

  14. Selective intercalation of polymers in carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazilevsky, Alexander V; Sun, Kexia; Yarin, Alexander L; Megaridis, Constantine M

    2007-07-03

    A room-temperature, open-air method is devised to selectively intercalate relatively low-molecular-weight polymers (approximately 10-100 kDa) from dilute, volatile solutions into open-end, as-grown, wettable carbon nanotubes with 50-100 nm diameters. The method relies on a novel self-sustained diffusion mechanism driving polymers from dilute volatile solutions into carbon nanotubes and concentrating them there. Relatively low-molecular-weight polymers, such as poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO, 600 kDa) and poly(caprolactone) (PCL, 80 kDa), were encapsulated in graphitic nanotubes as confirmed by transmission electron microscopy, which revealed morphologies characteristic of mixtures in nanoconfinements affected by intermolecular forces. Whereas relatively small, flexible polymer molecules can conform to enter these nanotubes, larger macromolecules (approximately 1000 kDa) remain outside. The selective nature of this process is useful for filling nanotubes with polymers and could also be valuable in capping nanotubes.

  15. SYNTHESIS OF CARBON NANOTUBES FOR ACETYLENE DETECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.Y. FAIZAH

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available A gas sensor, utilizing carbon nanotubes (CNTs in a pellet form for acetylene detection has been developed. This research was carried out to investigate the absorption effect of acetylene (C2H2 towards the change of resistance of carbon nanotubes pellet as sensor signal. Source Measurement Unit (SMU was used to study the gas sensing behaviour of resistance based sensors employing carbon nanotubes pellet as the active sensing element. Studies revealed that the absorption of acetylene into the carbon nanotubes pellet resulting in increase in pellet resistance. The changes are attributed to p-type conductivity in semiconducting carbon nanotubes. Carbon nanotubes used in this research was synthesized by means of Floating Catalyst Chemical Vapor Deposition (FC-CVD method. Benzene was used as a hydrocarbon source while ferrocene as a source of catalyst with Hydrogen and Argon as carrier and purge gas respectively. From the research, it was shown that carbon nanotubes show high sensitivity towards acetylene. The highest sensitivity recorded was 1.21, 1.16 and 17.86 for S1, S2 and S3 respectively. It is expected that many applications of CNT-based sensors will be explored in future as the interest of the nanotechnology research in this field increases.

  16. Is there a Difference in Van Der Waals Interactions between Rare Gas Atoms Adsorbed on Metallic and Semiconducting Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, De-Li [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering; Mandeltort, Lynn [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Saidi, Wissam A. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering; Yates, John T. [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Cole, Milton W. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept of Physics; Johnson, J. Karl [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering; National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Differences in polarizabilities of metallic (M) and semiconducting (S) single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) might give rise to differences in adsorption potentials. We show from experiments and van der Waals-corrected density functional theory (DFT) that binding energies of Xe adsorbed on M- and S-SWNTs are nearly identical. Temperature programmed desorption of Xe on purified M- and S-SWNTs give similar peak temperatures, indicating that desorption kinetics and binding energies are independent of the type of SWNT. Binding energies computed from vdW-corrected DFT are in good agreement with experiments.

  17. Is there a difference in van der Waals interactions between rare gas atoms adsorbed on metallic and semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, De-Li; Mandeltort, Lynn; Saidi, Wissam A; Yates, John T; Cole, Milton W; Johnson, J Karl

    2013-03-29

    The differences in the polarizabilities of metallic (M) and semiconducting (S) single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) might give rise to differences in adsorption potentials. We show from experiments and van der Waals--corrected density functional theory that the binding energies of Xe adsorbed on M- and S-SWNTs are nearly identical. Temperature programed desorption experiments of Xe on purified M- and S-SWNTs give similar peak temperatures, indicating that desorption kinetics and binding energies are independent of the type of SWNT. Binding energies computed from vdW-corrected density functional theory are in good agreement with experiments.

  18. A Tester for Carbon Nanotube Mode Lockers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yong-Won; Yamashita, Shinji

    2007-05-01

    We propose and demonstrate a tester for laser pulsating operation of carbon nanotubes employing a circulator with the extra degree of freedom of the second port to access diversified nanotube samples. The nanotubes are deposited onto the end facet of a dummy optical fiber by spray method that guarantees simple sample loading along with the minimized perturbation of optimized laser cavity condition. Resultant optical spectra, autocorrelation traces and pulse train of the laser outputs with qualified samples are presented.

  19. Enzymatic degradation of multiwalled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yong; Allen, Brett L; Star, Alexander

    2011-09-01

    Because of their unique properties, carbon nanotubes and, in particular, multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) have been used for the development of advanced composite and catalyst materials. Despite their growing commercial applications and increased production, the potential environmental and toxicological impacts of MWNTs are not fully understood; however, many reports suggest that they may be toxic. Therefore, a need exists to develop protocols for effective and safe degradation of MWNTs. In this article, we investigated the effect of chemical functionalization of MWNTs on their enzymatic degradation with horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)). We investigated HRP/H(2)O(2) degradation of purified, oxidized, and nitrogen-doped MWNTs and proposed a layer-by-layer degradation mechanism of nanotubes facilitated by side wall defects. These results provide a better understanding of the interaction between HRP and carbon nanotubes and suggest an eco-friendly way of mitigating the environmental impact of nanotubes.

  20. Carbon nanotube fiber spun from wetted ribbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yuntian T; Arendt, Paul; Zhang, Xiefei; Li, Qingwen; Fu, Lei; Zheng, Lianxi

    2014-04-29

    A fiber of carbon nanotubes was prepared by a wet-spinning method involving drawing carbon nanotubes away from a substantially aligned, supported array of carbon nanotubes to form a ribbon, wetting the ribbon with a liquid, and spinning a fiber from the wetted ribbon. The liquid can be a polymer solution and after forming the fiber, the polymer can be cured. The resulting fiber has a higher tensile strength and higher conductivity compared to dry-spun fibers and to wet-spun fibers prepared by other methods.

  1. Methods for producing reinforced carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhifen; Wen, Jian Guo; Lao, Jing Y.; Li, Wenzhi

    2008-10-28

    Methods for producing reinforced carbon nanotubes having a plurality of microparticulate carbide or oxide materials formed substantially on the surface of such reinforced carbon nanotubes composite materials are disclosed. In particular, the present invention provides reinforced carbon nanotubes (CNTs) having a plurality of boron carbide nanolumps formed substantially on a surface of the reinforced CNTs that provide a reinforcing effect on CNTs, enabling their use as effective reinforcing fillers for matrix materials to give high-strength composites. The present invention also provides methods for producing such carbide reinforced CNTs.

  2. Microcapsule carbon nanotube devices for therapeutic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulamarva, Arun; Raja, Pavan M. V.; Bhathena, Jasmine; Chen, Hongmei; Talapatra, Saikat; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Nalamasu, Omkaram; Prakash, Satya

    2009-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are a new class of nanomaterials that have immense potential in the field of biomedicine. Their ability to carry large quantities of therapeutic molecules makes them prime candidates for providing targeted delivery of therapeutics for use in various diseases. However, their utility is limited due to the problems faced during their delivery to target sites. This article for the first time describes the design of a novel microcapsule carbon nanotube targeted delivery device. This device has potential in the targeted delivery of carbon nanotubes in suitable membranes along with their cargo, safely and effectively to the target loci.

  3. Synthesis and characterization of well-aligned carbon nitrogen nanotubes by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Well-aligned carbon nitrogen nanotube films have been synthesized successfully on mesoporous silica substrates by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MWPCVD) method. Studies on their morphology, structure, and composition by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), respectively, indicate that these nanotubes consist of linearly polymerized carbon nitrogen nanobells, and the nitrogen atoms have been doped into carbon netweork to form a new structure C1-xNx (x=0.16±0.01). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results of the samples further demonstrate that carbon bonds covalently with nitrogen in all the carbon nitrogen nanotube films.

  4. Highly oriented carbon nanotube papers made of aligned carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Ding; Song Pengcheng; Liu Changhong; Wu Wei; Fan Shoushan [Tsinghua-Foxconn Nanotechnology Research Center and Department of Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)], E-mail: chliu@tsinghua.edu.cn

    2008-02-20

    Paper-like carbon nanotube (CNT) materials have many important applications such as in catalysts, in filtration, actuators, capacitor or battery electrodes, and so on. Up to now, the most popular way of preparing buckypapers has involved the procedures of dispersion and filtration of a suspension of CNTs. In this work, we present a simple and effective macroscopic manipulation of aligned CNT arrays called 'domino pushing' in the preparation of the aligned thick buckypapers with large areas. This simple method can efficiently ensure that most of the CNTs are well aligned tightly in the buckypaper. The initial measurements indicate that these buckypapers have better performance on thermal and electrical conductance. These buckypapers with controllable structure also have many potential applications, including supercapacitor electrodes.

  5. Carbon Nanotube Microarrays Grown on Nanoflake Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Howard K.; Hauge, Robert H.; Pint, Cary; Pheasant, Sean

    2013-01-01

    This innovation consists of a new composition of matter where single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are grown in aligned arrays from nanostructured flakes that are coated in Fe catalyst. This method of growth of aligned SWNTs, which can yield well over 400 percent SWNT mass per unit substrate mass, exceeds current yields for entangled SWNT growth. In addition, processing can be performed with minimal wet etching treatments, leaving aligned SWNTs with superior properties over those that exist in entangled mats. The alignment of the nanotubes is similar to that achieved in vertically aligned nanotubes, which are called "carpets. " Because these flakes are grown in a state where they are airborne in a reactor, these flakes, after growing SWNTs, are termed "flying carpets. " These flakes are created in a roll-to-roll evaporator system, where three subsequent evaporations are performed on a 100-ft (approx. =30-m) roll of Mylar. The first layer is composed of a water-soluble "release layer, " which can be a material such as NaCl. After depositing NaCl, the second layer involves 40 nm of supporting layer material . either Al2O3 or MgO. The thickness of the layer can be tuned to synthesize flakes that are larger or smaller than those obtained with a 40-nm deposition. Finally, the third layer consists of a thin Fe catalyst layer with a thickness of 0.5 nm. The thickness of this layer ultimately determines the diameter of SWNT growth, and a layer that is too thick will result in the growth of multiwalled carbon nanotubes instead of single-wall nanotubes. However, between a thickness of 0.5 nm to 1 nm, single-walled carbon nanotubes are known to be the primary constituent. After this three-layer deposition process, the Mylar is rolled through a bath of water, which allows catalyst-coated flakes to detach from the Mylar. The flakes are then collected and dried. The method described here for making such flakes is analogous to that which is used to make birefringent ink that is

  6. Electronic conduction in polymers, carbon nanotubes and graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Alan B; Skákalová, Viera

    2011-07-01

    In the years since the discovery of organic polymers that exhibited electrical conductivities comparable to some metals, other novel carbon-based conductors have been developed, including carbon nanotubes and graphene (monolayers of carbon atoms). In this critical review, we discuss the common features and the differences in the conduction mechanisms observed in these carbon-based materials, which range from near ballistic and conventional metallic conduction to fluctuation-assisted tunnelling, variable-range hopping and more exotic mechanisms. For each category of material, we discuss the dependence of conduction on the morphology of the sample. The presence of heterogeneous disorder is often particularly important in determining the overall behaviour, and can lead to surprisingly similar conduction behaviour in polymers, carbon nanotube networks and chemically-derived graphene (122 references).

  7. Carbon nanotube-based coatings on titanium

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elzbieta Dlugon; Wojciech Simka; Aneta Fraczek-Szczypta; Wiktor Niemiec; Jaroslaw Markowski; Marzena Szymanska; Marta Blazewicz

    2015-09-01

    This paper reports results of the modification of titanium surface with multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The Ti samples were covered with CNTs via electrophoretic deposition (EPD) process. Prior to EPD process, CNTs were functionalized by chemical treatment. Mechanical, electrochemical and biological properties of CNT-covered Ti samples were studied and compared to those obtained for unmodified titanium surface. Atomic force microscopy was used to investigate the surface topography. To determine micromechanical characteristics of CNT-covered metallic samples indentation tests were conducted. Throughout electrochemical studies were performed in order to characterize the impact of the coating on the corrosion of titanium substrate. In vitro experiments were conducted using the human osteoblast NHOst cell line. CNT layers shielded titanium from corrosion gave the surface-enhanced biointegrative properties. Cells proliferated better on the modified surface in comparison to unmodified titanium. The deposited layer enhanced cell adhesion and spreading as compared to titanium sample.

  8. The electrical conduction variation in stained carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shih-Jye; Wei Fan, Jun; Lin, Chung-Yi

    2012-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes become stained from coupling with foreign molecules, especially from adsorbing gas molecules. The charge exchange, which is due to the orbital hybridization, occurred in the stained carbon nanotube induces electrical dipoles that consequently vary the electrical conduction of the nanotube. We propose a microscopic model to evaluate the electrical current variation produced by the induced electrical dipoles in a stained zigzag carbon nanotube. It is found that stronger orbital hybridization strengths and larger orbital energy differences between the carbon nanotube and the gas molecules help increasing the induced electrical dipole moment. Compared with the stain-free carbon nanotube, the induced electrical dipoles suppress the current in the nanotube. In the carbon nanotubes with induced dipoles the current increases as a result of increasing orbital energy dispersion via stronger hybridization couplings. In particular, at a fixed hybridization coupling, the current increases with the bond length for the donor-carbon nanotube but reversely for the acceptor-carbon nanotube.

  9. Methods for preparation of carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rakov, Eduard G [D.I. Mendeleev Russian University of Chemical Technology, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2000-01-31

    The most important methods of synthesis and purification of carbon nanotubes, a new form of material, are described. The prospects for increasing the scale of preparation processes and for more extensive application of nanotubes are evaluated. The bibliography includes 282 references.

  10. Carbon nanotubes for RF and microwaves

    OpenAIRE

    Burke, P. J.; Yu, Z; Rutherglen, C.

    2005-01-01

    In this invited overview paper we provide a brief up-to-date summary of the potential applications of carbon nanotubes for RF and microwave devices and systems. We focus in particular on the use of nanotubes as ultra-high speed interconnects in integrated circuits.

  11. Carbon nanotubes as heat dissipaters in microelectronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pérez Paz, Alejandro; García-Lastra, Juan María; Markussen, Troels

    2013-01-01

    We review our recent modelling work of carbon nanotubes as potential candidates for heat dissipation in microelectronics cooling. In the first part, we analyze the impact of nanotube defects on their thermal transport properties. In the second part, we investigate the loss of thermal properties...

  12. Carbon Nanotubes for Human Space Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Carl D.; Files, Brad; Yowell, Leonard

    2003-01-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes offer the promise of a new class of revolutionary materials for space applications. The Carbon Nanotube Project at NASA Johnson Space Center has been actively researching this new technology by investigating nanotube production methods (arc, laser, and HiPCO) and gaining a comprehensive understanding of raw and purified material using a wide range of characterization techniques. After production and purification, single wall carbon nanotubes are processed into composites for the enhancement of mechanical, electrical, and thermal properties. This "cradle-to-grave" approach to nanotube composites has given our team unique insights into the impact of post-production processing and dispersion on the resulting material properties. We are applying our experience and lessons-learned to developing new approaches toward nanotube material characterization, structural composite fabrication, and are also making advances in developing thermal management materials and electrically conductive materials in various polymer-nanotube systems. Some initial work has also been conducted with the goal of using carbon nanotubes in the creation of new ceramic materials for high temperature applications in thermal protection systems. Human space flight applications such as advanced life support and fuel cell technologies are also being investigated. This discussion will focus on the variety of applications under investigation.

  13. The solvation study of carbon, silicon and their mixed nanotubes in water solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi Haeri, Haleh; Ketabi, Sepideh; Hashemianzadeh, Seyed Majid

    2012-07-01

    Nanotubes are believed to open the road toward different modern fields, either technological or biological. However, the applications of nanotubes have been badly impeded for the poor solubility in water which is especially essential for studies in the presence of living cells. Therefore, water soluble samples are in demand. Herein, the outcomes of Monte Carlo simulations of different sets of multiwall nanotubes immersed in water are reported. A number of multi wall nanotube samples, comprised of pure carbon, pure silicon and several mixtures of carbon and silicon are the subjects of study. The simulations are carried out in an (N,V,T) ensemble. The purpose of this report is to look at the effects of nanotube size (diameter) and nanotube type (pure carbon, pure silicon or a mixture of carbon and silicon) variation on solubility of multiwall nanotubes in terms of number of water molecules in shell volume. It is found that the solubility of the multi wall carbon nanotube samples is size independent, whereas multi wall silicon nanotube samples solubility varies with diameter of the inner tube. The higher solubility of samples containing silicon can be attributed to the larger atomic size of silicon atom which provides more direct contact with the water molecules. The other affecting factor is the bigger inter space (the space between inner and outer tube) in the case of silicon samples. Carbon type multi wall nanotubes appeared as better candidates for transporting water molecules through a multi wall nanotube structure, while in the case of water adsorption problems it is better to use multi wall silicon nanotubes or a mixture of multi wall carbon/ silicon nanotubes.

  14. Coulomb drag in multiwall armchair carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lunde, A.M.; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2004-01-01

    We calculate the transresistivity rho(21) between two concentric armchair nanotubes in a diffusive multiwall carbon nanotube as a function of temperature T and Fermi level epsilon(F). We approximate the tight-binding band structure by two crossing bands with a linear dispersion near the Fermi...... surface. The cylindrical geometry of the nanotubes and the different parities of the Bloch states are accounted for in the evaluation of the effective Coulomb interaction between charges in the concentric nanotubes. We find a broad peak in rho(21) as a function of temperature at roughly T similar to 0.4T...

  15. Microfabricated electroactive carbon nanotube actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahluwalia, Arti; Baughman, Ray H.; De Rossi, Danilo; Mazzoldi, Alberto; Tesconi, Mario; Tognetti, Alessandro; Vozzi, Giovanni

    2001-07-01

    A variety of microfabrication techniques have been developed at the University of Pisa. They are based either on pressure or piston actuated microsyringes or modified ink-jet printers. This work present the results of a study aimed at fabricating carbon nanotube (NT) actuators using micro-syringes. In order to prevent the nanotubes from aggregating into clumps, they were enclosed in a partially cross-linked polyvinylalcohol - polyallylamine matrix. After sonication the solution remained homogenously dispersed for about 40 minutes, which was sufficient time for deposition. Small strips of NT, about 5 mm across and 15 mm long were deposited. Following deposition, the films were baked at 80 degree(s)C and their thickness, impedance and mechanical resistance measured. The results indicate that 50 minutes of baking time is sufficient to give a constant resistivity of 1.12 x 10-2 (Omega) m per layer similar to a typical semiconductor, and each layer has a thickness of about 6 micrometers .

  16. Flightweight Carbon Nanotube Magnet Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, J. N.; Schmidt, H. J.; Ruoff, R. S.; Chandrasekhar, V.; Dikin, D. A.; Litchford, R. J.

    2003-01-01

    Virtually all plasma-based systems for advanced airborne/spaceborne propulsion and power depend upon the future availability of flightweight magnet technology. Unfortunately, current technology for resistive and superconducting magnets yields system weights that tend to counteract the performance advantages normally associated with advanced plasma-based concepts. The ongoing nanotechnology revolution and the continuing development of carbon nanotubes (CNT), however, may ultimately relieve this limitation in the near future. Projections based on recent research indicate that CNTs may achieve current densities at least three orders of magnitude larger than known superconductors and mechanical strength two orders of magnitude larger than steel. In fact, some published work suggests that CNTs are superconductors. Such attributes imply a dramatic increase in magnet performance-to-weight ratio and offer real hope for the construction of true flightweight magnets. This Technical Publication reviews the technology status of CNTs with respect to potential magnet applications and discusses potential techniques for using CNT wires and ropes as a winding material and as an integral component of the containment structure. The technology shortfalls are identified and a research and technology strategy is described that addresses the following major issues: (1) Investigation and verification of mechanical and electrical properties, (2) development of tools for manipulation and fabrication on the nanoscale, (3) continuum/molecular dynamics analysis of nanotube behavior when exposed to practical bending and twisting loads, and (4) exploration of innovative magnet fabrication techniques that exploit the natural attributes of CNTs.

  17. Nanorobotic Manipulation Setup for Pick-and-Place Handling and non-destructive Characterization of Carbon Nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eicchorn, V.; Carlson, Kenneth; Andersen, Karin Nordström

    2007-01-01

    . The pick-and-place task is carried out by using an electrothermal actuated microgripper, designed for controlled manipulation of nanotubes. The nanotube is picked up from an array of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and transferred to the tip of an atomic force microscope (AFM) probe in order...

  18. Thermal Characterization of Carbon Nanotubes by Photothermal Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leahu, G.; Li Voti, R.; Larciprete, M. C.; Sibilia, C.; Bertolotti, M.; Nefedov, I.; Anoshkin, I. V.

    2015-06-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are multifunctional materials commonly used in a large number of applications in electronics, sensors, nanocomposites, thermal management, actuators, energy storage and conversion, and drug delivery. Despite recent important advances in the development of CNT purity assessment tools and atomic resolution imaging of individual nanotubes by scanning tunnelling microscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, the macroscale assessment of the overall surface qualities of commercial CNT materials remains a great challenge. The lack of quantitative measurement technology to characterize and compare the surface qualities of bulk manufactured and engineered CNT materials has negative impacts on the reliable and consistent nanomanufacturing of CNT products. In this paper it is shown how photoacoustic spectroscopy and photothermal radiometry represent useful non-destructive tools to study the optothermal properties of carbon nanotube thin films.

  19. Phonon Scattering Dynamics of Thermophoretic Motion in Carbon Nanotube Oscillators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Matukumilli V D; Bhattacharya, Baidurya

    2016-04-13

    Using phonon wave packet molecular dynamics simulations, we find that anomalous longitudinal acoustic (LA) mode phonon scattering in low to moderate energy ranges is responsible for initiating thermophoretic motion in carbon nanotube oscillators. The repeated scattering of a single mode LA phonon wave packet near the ends of the inner nanotube provides a net unbalanced force that, if large enough, initiates thermophoresis. By applying a coherent phonon pulse on the outer tube, which generalizes the single mode phonon wave packet, we are able to achieve thermophoresis in a carbon nanotube oscillator. We also find the nature of the unbalanced force on end-atoms to be qualitatively similar to that under an imposed thermal gradient. The thermodiffusion coefficient obtained for a range of thermal gradients and core lengths suggest that LA phonon scattering is the dominant mechanism for thermophoresis in longer cores, whereas for shorter cores, it is the highly diffusive mechanism that provides the effective force.

  20. Modification of carbon nanotubes and synthesis of polymeric composites involving the nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badamshina, E R; Gafurova, M P; Estrin, Yakov I [Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Chernogolovka, Moscow Region (Russian Federation)

    2010-12-29

    The results of studies, mainly published in recent years, on modification of carbon nanotubes and design of composites with these nanotubes for the manufacture of new-generation materials are generalized and analyzed. The methods of modification of the nanotubes by low- and high-molecular compounds and methods of polymer modification by carbon nanotubes are considered. Data on the properties of modified nanotubes are presented. The current and potential applications of materials based on the nanotubes are indicated.

  1. Very-high-strength (60-GPa) carbon nanotube fiber design based on molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornwell, Charles F.; Welch, Charles R.

    2011-05-01

    The mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes such as low density, high stiffness, and exceptional strength make them ideal candidates for reinforcement material in a wide range of high-performance composites. Molecular dynamics simulations are used to predict the tensile response of fibers composed of aligned carbon nanotubes with intermolecular bonds of interstitial carbon atoms. The effects of bond density and carbon nanotube length distribution on fiber strength and stiffness are investigated. The interstitial carbon bonds significantly increase load transfer between the carbon nanotubes over that obtained with van der Waals forces. The simulation results indicate that fibers with tensile strengths to 60 GPa could be produced by employing interstitial cross-link atoms. The elastic modulus of the fibers is also increased by the bonds.

  2. Purification of Carbon Nanotubes: Alternative Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Files, Bradley; Scott, Carl; Gorelik, Olga; Nikolaev, Pasha; Hulse, Lou; Arepalli, Sivaram

    2000-01-01

    Traditional carbon nanotube purification process involves nitric acid refluxing and cross flow filtration using surfactant TritonX. This is believed to result in damage to nanotubes and surfactant residue on nanotube surface. Alternative purification procedures involving solvent extraction, thermal zone refining and nitric acid refiuxing are used in the current study. The effect of duration and type of solvent to dissolve impurities including fullerenes and P ACs (polyaromatic compounds) are monitored by nuclear magnetic reasonance, high performance liquid chromatography, and thermogravimetric analysis. Thermal zone refining yielded sample areas rich in nanotubes as seen by scanning electric microscopy. Refluxing in boiling nitric acid seem to improve the nanotube content. Different procedural steps are needed to purify samples produced by laser process compared to arc process. These alternative methods of nanotube purification will be presented along with results from supporting analytical techniques.

  3. Deconvoluting hepatic processing of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alidori, Simone; Bowman, Robert L.; Yarilin, Dmitry; Romin, Yevgeniy; Barlas, Afsar; Mulvey, J. Justin; Fujisawa, Sho; Xu, Ke; Ruggiero, Alessandro; Riabov, Vladimir; Thorek, Daniel L. J.; Ulmert, Hans David S.; Brea, Elliott J.; Behling, Katja; Kzhyshkowska, Julia; Manova-Todorova, Katia; Scheinberg, David A.; McDevitt, Michael R.

    2016-07-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes present unique opportunities for drug delivery, but have not advanced into the clinic. Differential nanotube accretion and clearance from critical organs have been observed, but the mechanism not fully elucidated. The liver has a complex cellular composition that regulates a range of metabolic functions and coincidently accumulates most particulate drugs. Here we provide the unexpected details of hepatic processing of covalently functionalized nanotubes including receptor-mediated endocytosis, cellular trafficking and biliary elimination. Ammonium-functionalized fibrillar nanocarbon is found to preferentially localize in the fenestrated sinusoidal endothelium of the liver but not resident macrophages. Stabilin receptors mediate the endocytic clearance of nanotubes. Biocompatibility is evidenced by the absence of cell death and no immune cell infiltration. Towards clinical application of this platform, nanotubes were evaluated for the first time in non-human primates. The pharmacologic profile in cynomolgus monkeys is equivalent to what was reported in mice and suggests that nanotubes should behave similarly in humans.

  4. Carbon Nanotube Composites: Strongest Engineering Material Ever?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayeaux, Brian; Nikolaev, Pavel; Proft, William; Nicholson, Leonard S. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The primary goal of the carbon nanotube project at Johnson Space Center (JSC) is to fabricate structural materials with a much higher strength-to-weight ratio than any engineered material today, Single-wall nanotubes present extraordinary mechanical properties along with new challenges for materials processing. Our project includes nanotube production, characterization, purification, and incorporation into applications studies. Now is the time to move from studying individual nanotubes to applications work. Current research at JSC focuses on structural polymeric materials to attempt to lower the weight of spacecraft necessary for interplanetary missions. These nanoscale fibers present unique new challenges to composites engineers. Preliminary studies show good nanotube dispersion and wetting by the epoxy materials. Results of tensile strength tests will also be reported. Other applications of nanotubes are also of interest for energy storage, gas storage, nanoelectronics, field emission, and biomedical uses.

  5. Functionalized carbon nanotubes: biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardharajula, Sandhya; Ali, Sk Z; Tiwari, Pooja M; Eroğlu, Erdal; Vig, Komal; Dennis, Vida A; Singh, Shree R

    2012-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are emerging as novel nanomaterials for various biomedical applications. CNTs can be used to deliver a variety of therapeutic agents, including biomolecules, to the target disease sites. In addition, their unparalleled optical and electrical properties make them excellent candidates for bioimaging and other biomedical applications. However, the high cytotoxicity of CNTs limits their use in humans and many biological systems. The biocompatibility and low cytotoxicity of CNTs are attributed to size, dose, duration, testing systems, and surface functionalization. The functionalization of CNTs improves their solubility and biocompatibility and alters their cellular interaction pathways, resulting in much-reduced cytotoxic effects. Functionalized CNTs are promising novel materials for a variety of biomedical applications. These potential applications are particularly enhanced by their ability to penetrate biological membranes with relatively low cytotoxicity. This review is directed towards the overview of CNTs and their functionalization for biomedical applications with minimal cytotoxicity.

  6. Carbon Nanotube Tape Vibrating Gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Dennis Stephen (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A vibrating gyroscope includes a piezoelectric strip having length and width dimensions. The piezoelectric strip includes a piezoelectric material and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) substantially aligned and polled along the strip's length dimension. A spindle having an axis of rotation is coupled to the piezoelectric strip. The axis of rotation is parallel to the strip's width dimension. A first capacitance sensor is mechanically coupled to the spindle for rotation therewith. The first capacitance sensor is positioned at one of the strip's opposing ends and is spaced apart from one of the strip's opposing faces. A second capacitance sensor is mechanically coupled to the spindle for rotation therewith. The second capacitance sensor is positioned at another of the strip's opposing ends and is spaced apart from another of the strip's opposing faces. A voltage source applies an AC voltage to the piezoelectric strip.

  7. Aligned carbon nanotubes for nanoelectronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Won Bong; Bae, Eunju; Kang, Donghun; Chae, Soodoo; Cheong, Byung-ho; Ko, Ju-hye; Lee, Eungmin; Park, Wanjun

    2004-10-01

    We discuss the central issues to be addressed for realizing carbon nanotube (CNT) nanoelectronics. We focus on selective growth, electron energy bandgap engineering and device integration. We have introduced a nanotemplate to control the selective growth, length and diameter of CNTs. Vertically aligned CNTs are synthesized for developing a vertical CNT-field effect transistor (FET). The ohmic contact of the CNT/metal interface is formed by rapid thermal annealing. Diameter control, synthesis of Y-shaped CNTs and surface modification of CNTs open up the possibility for energy bandgap modulation. The concepts of an ultra-high density transistor based on the vertical-CNT array and a nonvolatile memory based on the top gate structure with an oxide-nitride-oxide charge trap are also presented. We suggest that the deposited memory film can be used for the quantum dot storage due to the localized electric field created by a nano scale CNT-electron channel.

  8. Carbon nanotubes – becoming clean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Grobert

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs are now well into their teenage years. Early on, theoretical predictions and experimental data showed that CNTs possess chemical and mechanical properties that exceed those of many other materials. This has triggered intense research into CNTs. A variety of production methods for CNTs have been developed; chemical modification, functionalization, filling, and doping have been achieved; and manipulation, separation, and characterization of individual CNTs is now possible. Today, products containing CNTs range from tennis rackets and golf clubs to vehicle fenders, X-ray tubes, and Li ion batteries. Breakthroughs for CNT-based technologies are anticipated in the areas of nanoelectronics, biotechnology, and materials science. In this article, I review the current situation in CNT production and highlight the importance of clean CNT material for the success of future applications.

  9. Carbon nanotube polymer composition and devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gao; Johnson, Stephen; Kerr, John B.; Minor, Andrew M.; Mao, Samuel S.

    2011-06-14

    A thin film device and compound having an anode, a cathode, and at least one light emitting layer between the anode and cathode, the at least one light emitting layer having at least one carbon nanotube and a conductive polymer.

  10. Carbon nanotube heat-exchange systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, Terry Joseph; Heben, Michael J.

    2008-11-11

    A carbon nanotube heat-exchange system (10) and method for producing the same. One embodiment of the carbon nanotube heat-exchange system (10) comprises a microchannel structure (24) having an inlet end (30) and an outlet end (32), the inlet end (30) providing a cooling fluid into the microchannel structure (24) and the outlet end (32) discharging the cooling fluid from the microchannel structure (24). At least one flow path (28) is defined in the microchannel structure (24), fluidically connecting the inlet end (30) to the outlet end (32) of the microchannel structure (24). A carbon nanotube structure (26) is provided in thermal contact with the microchannel structure (24), the carbon nanotube structure (26) receiving heat from the cooling fluid in the microchannel structure (24) and dissipating the heat into an external medium (19).

  11. A Thermal Model for Carbon Nanotube Interconnects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clay Mayberry

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we have studied Joule heating in carbon nanotube based very large scale integration (VLSI interconnects and incorporated Joule heating influenced scattering in our previously developed current transport model. The theoretical model explains breakdown in carbon nanotube resistance which limits the current density. We have also studied scattering parameters of carbon nanotube (CNT interconnects and compared with the earlier work. For 1 µm length single-wall carbon nanotube, 3 dB frequency in S12 parameter reduces to ~120 GHz from 1 THz considering Joule heating. It has been found that bias voltage has little effect on scattering parameters, while length has very strong effect on scattering parameters.

  12. Self Assembled Carbon Nanotube Enhanced Ultracapacitors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of this NASA STTR program is to develop single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) based ultracapacitors for energy storage devices (ESD) application, using...

  13. Piezoresistive Sensors Based on Carbon Nanotube Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L(U) Jian-wei; WANG Wan-lu; LIAO Ke-jun; WANG Yong-tian; LIU CHang-lin; Zeng Qing-gao

    2005-01-01

    Piezoresistive effect of carbon nanotube films was investigated by a three-point bending test.Carbon nanotubes were synthesized by hot filament chemical vapor deposition.The experimental results showed that the carbon nanotubes have a striking piezoresistive effect.The relative resistance was changed from 0 to 10.5×10-2 and 3.25×10-2 for doped and undoped films respectively at room temperature when the microstrain under stress from 0 to 500. The gauge factors for doped and undoped carbon nanotube films under 500 microstrain were about 220 and 67 at room temperature, respectively, exceeding that of polycrystalline silicon (30) at 35℃.The origin of the resistance changes in the films may be attributed to a strain-induced change in the band gap for the doped tubes and the defects for the undoped tubes.

  14. Controlled Deposition and Alignment of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smits, Jan M. (Inventor); Wincheski, Russell A. (Inventor); Patry, JoAnne L. (Inventor); Watkins, Anthony Neal (Inventor); Jordan, Jeffrey D. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A carbon nanotube (CNT) attraction material is deposited on a substrate in the gap region between two electrodes on the substrate. An electric potential is applied to the two electrodes. The CNT attraction material is wetted with a solution defined by a carrier liquid having carbon nanotubes (CNTs) suspended therein. A portion of the CNTs align with the electric field and adhere to the CNT attraction material. The carrier liquid and any CNTs not adhered to the CNT attraction material are then removed.

  15. Carbon nanotube temperature and pressure sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, Ilia N.; Geohegan, David B.

    2016-12-13

    The present invention, in one embodiment, provides a method of measuring pressure or temperature using a sensor including a sensor element composed of a plurality of carbon nanotubes. In one example, the resistance of the plurality of carbon nanotubes is measured in response to the application of temperature or pressure. The changes in resistance are then recorded and correlated to temperature or pressure. In one embodiment, the present invention provides for independent measurement of pressure or temperature using the sensors disclosed herein.

  16. Carbon nanotube temperature and pressure sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, Ilia N.; Geohegan, David B.

    2016-11-15

    The present invention, in one embodiment, provides a method of measuring pressure or temperature using a sensor including a sensor element composed of a plurality of carbon nanotubes. In one example, the resistance of the plurality of carbon nanotubes is measured in response to the application of temperature or pressure. The changes in resistance are then recorded and correlated to temperature or pressure. In one embodiment, the present invention provides for independent measurement of pressure or temperature using the sensors disclosed herein.

  17. Carbon nanotube temperature and pressure sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, Ilia N.; Geohegan, David B.

    2016-10-25

    The present invention, in one embodiment, provides a method of measuring pressure or temperature using a sensor including a sensor element composed of a plurality of carbon nanotubes. In one example, the resistance of the plurality of carbon nanotubes is measured in response to the application of temperature or pressure. The changes in resistance are then recorded and correlated to temperature or pressure. In one embodiment, the present invention provides for independent measurement of pressure or temperature using the sensors disclosed herein.

  18. [Hygienic evaluation of multilayer carbon nanotubes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haliullin, T O; Zalyalov, R R; Shvedova, A A; Tkachov, A G

    2015-01-01

    The authors demonstrate that traditional methods evaluating work conditions on contemporary innovative enterprises producing nanomaterials assess these conditions as harmless and safe. At the same time, special investigation methods enable to reveal new hazards for workers' health: the study results prove that workers engaged into multilayer carbon nanotubes production are exposed to multilayer carbon nanotubes aerosols in concentrations exceeding internationally acceptable levels of 1 μg/ml (NIOSH)--that can harm the workers' health.

  19. Carbon nanotube temperature and pressure sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Ilia N; Geohegan, David Bruce

    2013-10-29

    The present invention, in one embodiment, provides a method of measuring pressure or temperature using a sensor including a sensor element composed of a plurality of carbon nanotubes. In one example, the resistance of the plurality of carbon nanotubes is measured in response to the application of temperature or pressure. The changes in resistance are then recorded and correlated to temperature or pressure. In one embodiment, the present invention provides for independent measurement of pressure or temperature using the sensors disclosed herein.

  20. Carbon nanotubes field effect transistors biosensors

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez, M.T.; Tseng, Y. C.; Ormategui, N.; Loinaz, I.; Eritja Casadellà, Ramón; Salvador, Juan Pablo; Marco, María Pilar; Bokor, J.

    2012-01-01

    [EN] Carbon nanotube transistor arrays (CNTFETs) were used as biosensors to detect NA hybridization and to recognize two anabolic steroids, stanozolol (Stz) and methylboldenone (MB). Single strand DNA and antibodies specific for STz and MB were immobilized on the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in situ in the device using two different approaches: direct noncovalent bonding of antibodies to the devices and covalently trough a polymer previously attached to the CNTFETs. A new approach to ensure specif...

  1. Carbon nanotubes as electromechanical resonators: Single-electron tunneling, nonlinearity, and high-bandwidth readout

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meerwaldt, H.B.

    2013-01-01

    A carbon nanotube (CNT) is a remarkable material and can be thought of as a single-atom thick cylinder of carbon atoms capped of with a semisphere. This is called a single-walled CNT and, depending on how the cylinder is rolled up, CNTs are either semiconducting or metallic. A CNT is made into a mec

  2. Carbon nanotubes as nanodelivery systems an insight through molecular dynamics simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Lim, Melvin Choon Giap

    2013-01-01

    This book showcases the application of carbon nanotubes as nanodelivery systems for copper atoms, using molecular dynamics simulations as a means of investigation. The nanodelivery system of the carbon nanotube presents the possible usage of the carbon structure in many areas in the future. This book is comprehensive and informative, and serves as a guide for any reader who wishes to perform a molecular dynamics simulation of his own and to conduct an analytical study of a molecular system.

  3. Filling of carbon nanotubes and nanofibres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reece D. Gately

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The reliable production of carbon nanotubes and nanofibres is a relatively new development, and due to their unique structure, there has been much interest in filling their hollow interiors. In this review, we provide an overview of the most common approaches for filling these carbon nanostructures. We highlight that filled carbon nanostructures are an emerging material for biomedical applications.

  4. Bonding titanium on multi-walled carbon nanotubes for hydrogen storage: An electrochemical approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brieno-Enriquez, K.M.; Ledesma-Garcia, J. [Centro de Investigacion y Desarrollo Tecnologico en Electroquimica, S.C., Parque Tecnologico Queretaro-Sanfandila, Pedro Escobedo, Qro, C.P. 76703 (Mexico); Perez-Bueno, J.J., E-mail: jperez@cideteq.mx [Centro de Investigacion y Desarrollo Tecnologico en Electroquimica, S.C., Parque Tecnologico Queretaro-Sanfandila, Pedro Escobedo, Qro, C.P. 76703 (Mexico); Godinez, Luis A. [Centro de Investigacion y Desarrollo Tecnologico en Electroquimica, S.C., Parque Tecnologico Queretaro-Sanfandila, Pedro Escobedo, Qro, C.P. 76703 (Mexico); Terrones, H. [Instituto Potosino de Investigacion Cientifica y Tecnologica, Division de Materiales Avanzados, Camino a la Presa San Jose 2055, Col. Lomas 4o Seccion C.P. 78216, San Luis Potosi (Mexico); Angeles-Chavez, C. [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Programa de Ingenieria Molecular, Eje Central Lazaro Cardenas 152, A.P. 14-805, 07730 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2009-06-15

    This work explores the use of some procedures, involving electrochemistry, in order to bond atomic Ti on the outer surface of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs). It is assumed that each titanium atom has the potential of host up to four hydrogen molecules and relinquish them by heated. As a way to spread and stick nanotubes on an electrode, a tested route was drying a solution with nanotubes on a glassy carbon flat electrode. The MWNTs were treated by anodic polarization in organic media. Dichloromethane was selected as the medium and titanium tetrachloride as the precursor for attaching atomic Ti onto the nanotubes. The hydrogen adsorption, estimated from voltamperometry was five times higher on Ti-MWNTs that on bare nanotubes. The use of anodic polarization during the preparation of Ti-MWNTs may represent great significance in procedure, which was manifest during the voltamperometric evaluation of samples.

  5. Method for nano-pumping using carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insepov, Zeke; Hassanein, Ahmed

    2009-12-15

    The present invention relates generally to the field of nanotechnology, carbon nanotubes and, more specifically, to a method and system for nano-pumping media through carbon nanotubes. One preferred embodiment of the invention generally comprises: method for nano-pumping, comprising the following steps: providing one or more media; providing one or more carbon nanotubes, the one or more nanotubes having a first end and a second end, wherein said first end of one or more nanotubes is in contact with the media; and creating surface waves on the carbon nanotubes, wherein at least a portion of the media is pumped through the nanotube.

  6. Fast readout of carbon nanotube mechanical resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meerwaldt, Harold; Singh, Vibhor; Schneider, Ben; Schouten, Raymond; van der Zant, Herre; Steele, Gary

    2013-03-01

    We perform fast readout measurements of carbon nanotube mechanical resonators. Using an electronic mixing scheme, we can detect the amplitude of the mechanical motion with an intermediate frequency (IF) of 46 MHz and a timeconstant of 1 us, up to 5 orders of magnitude faster than before. Previous measurements suffered from a low bandwidth due to the combination of the high resistance of the carbon nanotube and a large stray capacitance. We have increased the bandwidth significantly by using a high-impedance, close-proximity HEMT amplifier. The increased bandwidth should allow us to observe the nanotube's thermal motion and its transient response, approaching the regime of real-time detection of the carbon nanotube's mechanical motion.

  7. A highly viscous imidazolium ionic liquid inside carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohba, Tomonori; Chaban, Vitaly V

    2014-06-12

    We report a combined experimental (X-ray diffraction) and theoretical (molecular dynamics, hybrid density functional theory) study of 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride, [C2C1MIM][Cl], inside carbon nanotubes (CNTs). We show that despite its huge viscosity [C2C1MIM][Cl] readily penetrates into 1-3 nm wide CNTs at slightly elevated temperatures (323-363 K). Molecular simulations were used to assign atom-atom peaks. Experimental and simulated structures of RTIL inside CNT and in bulk phase are in good agreement. We emphasize a special role of the CNT-chloride interactions in the successful adsorption of [C2C1MIM][Cl] on the inner sidewalls of 1-3 nm carbon nanotubes.

  8. A Highly Viscous Imidazolium Ionic Liquid inside Carbon Nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ohba, T.; Chaban, Vitaly V.

    2014-01-01

    We report a combined experimental (X-ray diffraction) and theoretical (molecular dynamics, hybrid density functional theory) study of 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride, [C2C1MIM][Cl], inside carbon nanotubes (CNTs). We show that despite its huge viscosity [C2C1MIM][Cl] readily penetrates into 1......-3 nm wide CNTs at slightly elevated temperatures (323-363 K). Molecular simulations were used to assign atom-atom peaks. Experimental and simulated structures of RTIL inside CNT and in bulk phase are in good agreement. We emphasize a special role of the CNT-chloride interactions in the successful...... adsorption of [C2C1MIM][Cl] on the inner sidewalls of 1-3 nm carbon nanotubes....

  9. Polymerization initated at sidewalls of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tour, James M. (Inventor); Hudson, Jared L. (Inventor); Krishnamoorti, Ramanan (Inventor); Yurekli, Koray (Inventor); Mitchell, Cynthia A. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    The present invention is directed to aryl halide (such as aryl bromide) functionalized carbon nanotubes that can be utilized in anionic polymerization processes to form polymer-carbon nanotube materials with improved dispersion ability in polymer matrices. In this process the aryl halide is reacted with an alkyllithium species or is reacted with a metal to replace the aryl-bromine bond with an aryl-lithium or aryl-metal bond, respectively. It has further been discovered that other functionalized carbon nanotubes, after deprotonation with a deprotonation agent, can similarly be utilized in anionic polymerization processes to form polymer-carbon nanotube materials. Additionally or alternatively, a ring opening polymerization process can be performed. The resultant materials can be used by themselves due to their enhanced strength and reinforcement ability when compared to their unbound polymer analogs. Additionally, these materials can also be blended with pre-formed polymers to establish compatibility and enhanced dispersion of nanotubes in otherwise hard to disperse matrices resulting in significantly improved material properties. The resultant polymer-carbon nanotube materials can also be used in drug delivery processes due to their improved dispersion ability and biodegradability, and can also be used for scaffolding to promote cellular growth of tissue.

  10. Effects of phosphorus-doping upon the electronic structures of single wall carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN AQing; SHAO QingYi; LIN ZhiCheng

    2009-01-01

    The phosphorus-doped single wall carbon nanotube (PSWCNT) is studied by using First-Principle methods based on Density Function Theory (DFT). The formation energy, total energy, band structure, geometry structure and density of states are calculated. It is found that the formation energy of the P-doped single carbon nanotubes increases with diameters; the total energy of carbon nanotubes with the same diameter decreases as the doping rate increases. The effects of impurity position on the im-purity level are discussed. It illustrates that the position of the impurity level may depend on the C-P-C bond angle. According to the above results, it is feasible to substitute a carbon atom with a phosphorus atom in SWCNT. It is also found that P-doped carbon nanotubes are N type semiconductor.

  11. Effects of phosphorus-doping upon the electronic structures of single wall carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The phosphorus-doped single wall carbon nanotube(PSWCNT) is studied by using First-Principle methods based on Density Function Theory(DFT).The formation energy,total energy,band structure,geometry structure and density of states are calculated.It is found that the formation energy of the P-doped single carbon nanotubes increases with diameters;the total energy of carbon nanotubes with the same diameter decreases as the doping rate increases.The effects of impurity position on the impurity level are discussed.It illustrates that the position of the impurity level may depend on the C-P-C bond angle.According to the above results,it is feasible to substitute a carbon atom with a phosphorus atom in SWCNT.It is also found that P-doped carbon nanotubes are N type semiconductor.

  12. Identification of nitrogen dopants in single-walled carbon nanotubes by scanning tunneling microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tison, Yann; Lin, Hong; Lagoute, Jérôme; Repain, Vincent; Chacon, Cyril; Girard, Yann; Rousset, Sylvie; Henrard, Luc; Zheng, Bing; Susi, Toma; Kauppinen, Esko I; Ducastelle, François; Loiseau, Annick

    2013-08-27

    Using scanning tunnelling microscopy and spectroscopy, we investigated the atomic and electronic structure of nitrogen-doped single walled carbon nanotubes synthesized by chemical vapor deposition. The insertion of nitrogen in the carbon lattice induces several types of point defects involving different atomic configurations. Spectroscopic measurements on semiconducting nanotubes reveal that these local structures can induce either extended shallow levels or more localized deep levels. In a metallic tube, a single doping site associated with a donor state was observed in the gap at an energy close to that of the first van Hove singularity. Density functional theory calculations reveal that this feature corresponds to a substitutional nitrogen atom in the carbon network.

  13. Dispersion of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in Organic Solvents

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Qiaohuan

    2010-01-01

    This thesis contains a systematic study of the dispersion of pristine HiPco Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWNTs) in a series of organic solvents. A double beamed UV-Vis-NIR absorption spectrometer coupled with an integrating sphere was employed to demonstrate the dispersibility of SWNTs in different solvents. Raman Spectroscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) were used to confirm the debundling and exfoliation of SWNTs aggregates. An investigation of the solubility of SWNTs in four chlori...

  14. Universal Features of Quantized Thermal Conductance of Carbon Nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Yamamoto, Takahiro; Watanabe, Satoshi; Watanabe, Kazuyuki

    2003-01-01

    The universal features of quantized thermal conductance of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are revealed through theoretical analysis based on the Landauer theory of heat transport. The phonon-derived thermal conductance of semiconducting CNTs exhibits a universal quantization in the low temperature limit, independent of the radius or atomic geometry. The temperature dependence follows a single curve given in terms of temperature scaled by the phonon energy gap. The thermal conductance of metallic CNT...

  15. Nonlinear dynamics of bi-layered graphene sheet, double-walled carbon nanotube and nanotube bundle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajbhiye, Sachin O.; Singh, S. P.

    2016-05-01

    Due to strong van der Waals (vdW) interactions, the graphene sheets and nanotubes stick to each other and form clusters of these corresponding nanostructures, viz. bi-layered graphene sheet (BLGS), double-walled carbon nanotube (DWCNT) and nanotube bundle (NB) or ropes. This research work is concerned with the study of nonlinear dynamics of BLGS, DWCNT and NB due to nonlinear interlayer vdW forces using multiscale atomistic finite element method. The energy between two adjacent carbon atoms is represented by the multibody interatomic Tersoff-Brenner potential, whereas the nonlinear interlayer vdW forces are represented by Lennard-Jones 6-12 potential function. The equivalent nonlinear material model of carbon-carbon bond is used to model it based on its force-deflection relation. Newmark's algorithm is used to solve the nonlinear matrix equation governing the motion of the BLGS, DWCNT and NB. An impulse and harmonic excitations are used to excite these nanostructures under cantilevered, bridged and clamped boundary conditions. The frequency responses of these nanostructures are computed, and the dominant resonant frequencies are identified. Along with the forced vibration of these structures, the eigenvalue extraction problem of armchair and zigzag NB is also considered. The natural frequencies and corresponding mode shapes are extracted for the different length and boundary conditions of the nanotube bundle.

  16. Oscillatory characteristics of carbon nanotubes inside carbon nanotube bundles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, R.; Alipour, A.; Sadeghi, F.

    2012-12-01

    This article presents a comprehensive study on the mechanics of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) oscillating in CNT bundles. Using the continuum approximation along with Lennard-Jones (LJ) potential function, new semi-analytical expressions in terms of double integrals are presented to evaluate van der Waals (vdW) potential energy and interaction force upon which the equation of motion is directly solved. The obtained potential expression enables one to arrive at a new semi-analytical formula for the exact evaluation of oscillation frequency. Also, an algebraic frequency formula is extracted on the basis of the simplifying assumption of constant vdW force. Based on the present expressions, a thorough study on various aspects of operating frequencies under different system parameters is given, which permits fresh insight into the problem. The strong dependence of oscillation frequency on system parameters, such as the extrusion distance and initial velocity of the core as initial conditions for the motion is indicated. Interestingly, a specific initial velocity is found at which the oscillation frequency is independent of the core length. In addition, a relation between this specific initial velocity and the escape velocity is disclosed.

  17. 75 FR 56880 - Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes and Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes; Significant New Use Rules

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-17

    ... structural characteristics entitled ``Material Characterization of Carbon Nanotubes for Molecular Identity... AGENCY 40 CFR Parts 9 and 721 RIN 2070-AB27 Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes and Single-Walled Carbon...). The two chemical substances are identified generically as multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) (PMN...

  18. Carbon nanotube ecotoxicity in amphibians: assessment of multiwalled carbon nanotubes and comparison with double-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouchet, Florence; Landois, Perine; Puech, Pascal; Pinelli, Eric; Flahaut, Emmanuel; Gauthier, Laury

    2010-08-01

    The potential impact of industrial multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) was investigated under normalized laboratory conditions according to the International Standard micronucleus assay ISO 21427-1 for 12 days of half-static exposure to 0.1, 1, 10 and 50 mg/l of MWNTs in water. Three different end points were carried out for 12 days of exposure: mortality, growth inhibition and micronuclei induction in erythrocytes of the circulating blood of larvae. Raman spectroscopy analysis was used to study the presence of carbon nanotubes in the biological samples. Considering the high diversity of carbon nanotubes according to their different characteristics, MWNTs were analyzed in Xenopus larvae, comparatively to double-walled carbon nanotubes used in a previous study in similar conditions. Growth inhibition in larvae exposed to 50 mg/l of MWNTs was evidenced; however, no genetoxicity (micronucleus assay) was noticed, at any concentration. Carbon nanotube localization in the larvae leads to different possible hypothesis of mechanisms explaining toxicity in Xenopus.

  19. Large spin-orbit coupling in carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, G. A.; Pei, F.; Laird, E. A.; Jol, J. M.; Meerwaldt, H. B.; Kouwenhoven, L. P.

    2013-03-01

    It has recently been recognised that the strong spin-orbit interaction present in solids can lead to new phenomena, such as materials with non-trivial topological order. Although the atomic spin-orbit coupling in carbon is weak, the spin-orbit coupling in carbon nanotubes can be significant due to their curved surface. Previous works have reported spin-orbit couplings in reasonable agreement with theory, and this coupling strength has formed the basis of a large number of theoretical proposals. Here we report a spin-orbit coupling in three carbon nanotube devices that is an order of magnitude larger than previously measured. We find a zero-field spin splitting of up to 3.4 meV, corresponding to a built-in effective magnetic field of 29 T aligned along the nanotube axis. Although the origin of the large spin-orbit coupling is not explained by existing theories, its strength is promising for applications of the spin-orbit interaction in carbon nanotubes devices.

  20. Large spin-orbit coupling in carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, G A; Pei, F; Laird, E A; Jol, J M; Meerwaldt, H B; Kouwenhoven, L P

    2013-01-01

    It has recently been recognised that the strong spin-orbit interaction present in solids can lead to new phenomena, such as materials with non-trivial topological order. Although the atomic spin-orbit coupling in carbon is weak, the spin-orbit coupling in carbon nanotubes can be significant due to their curved surface. Previous works have reported spin-orbit couplings in reasonable agreement with theory, and this coupling strength has formed the basis of a large number of theoretical proposals. Here we report a spin-orbit coupling in three carbon nanotube devices that is an order of magnitude larger than previously measured. We find a zero-field spin splitting of up to 3.4 meV, corresponding to a built-in effective magnetic field of 29 T aligned along the nanotube axis. Although the origin of the large spin-orbit coupling is not explained by existing theories, its strength is promising for applications of the spin-orbit interaction in carbon nanotubes devices.

  1. Carbon Nanotube-Based Synthetic Gecko Tapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhinojwala, Ali

    2008-03-01

    Wall-climbing geckos have unique ability to attach to different surfaces without the use of any viscoelastic glues. On coming in contact with any surface, the micron-size gecko foot-hairs deform, enabling molecular contact over large areas, thus translating weak van der Waals (vdW) interactions into enormous shear forces. We will present our recent results on the development of synthetic gecko tape using aligned carbon nanotubes to mimic the keratin hairs found on gecko feet. The patterned carbon nanotube-based gecko tape can support a shear stress (36 N/cm^2) nearly four times higher than the gecko foot and sticks to a variety of surfaces, including Teflon. Both the micron-size setae (replicated by nanotube bundles) and nanometer-size spatulas (individual nanotubes) are necessary to achieve macroscopic shear adhesion and to translate the weak vdW interactions into high shear forces. The carbon nanotube based tape offers an excellent synthetic option as a dry conductive reversible adhesive in microelectronics, robotics and space applications. The mechanism behind these large shear forces and self-cleaning properties of these carbon nanotube based synthetic gecko tapes will be discussed. This work was performed in collaboration with graduate students Liehui Ge, and Sunny Sethi, and collaborators from RPI; Lijie Ci and Professor Pulickel Ajayan.

  2. Growth of chiral single-walled carbon nanotube caps in the presence of a cobalt cluster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez-Gualdron, Diego A; Balbuena, Perla B [Department of Chemical Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States)], E-mail: balbuena@tamu.edu

    2009-05-27

    Density functional theory is used to simulate nanotube growth by addition of a pair of carbon atoms to a composite chiral nanotube cap/cobalt cluster system, with caps corresponding to near-armchair (6, 5), (7, 5) and near-zigzag (9, 1) nanotubes. Two different carbon addition processes are evaluated: in the first, the new carbon atoms are located in the vicinity of the armchair site of the cap rim, and thus this process provides insight into the root-growth mechanism; in the second the carbon atoms are initially located under the cobalt cluster, and thus this process helps one to evaluate the dissolution of carbon inside the metal cluster. The geometric evolution and energetics of the system are used to explain features of the mechanism of nanotube growth. The root-growth reaction is shown to occur by displacement of a cobalt atom initially interacting with the armchair site while the added carbon atoms bond to each other forming a new hexagonal ring, whereas the carbon dissolution process shows formation of dimers inside the cluster only for the (6, 5) system. The energetics for both steps reveals that the dissolution stage is probably controlling the overall nanotube growth rate.

  3. Growth of chiral single-walled carbon nanotube caps in the presence of a cobalt cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Gualdrón, Diego A; Balbuena, Perla B

    2009-05-27

    Density functional theory is used to simulate nanotube growth by addition of a pair of carbon atoms to a composite chiral nanotube cap/cobalt cluster system, with caps corresponding to near-armchair (6, 5), (7, 5) and near-zigzag (9, 1) nanotubes. Two different carbon addition processes are evaluated: in the first, the new carbon atoms are located in the vicinity of the armchair site of the cap rim, and thus this process provides insight into the root-growth mechanism; in the second the carbon atoms are initially located under the cobalt cluster, and thus this process helps one to evaluate the dissolution of carbon inside the metal cluster. The geometric evolution and energetics of the system are used to explain features of the mechanism of nanotube growth. The root-growth reaction is shown to occur by displacement of a cobalt atom initially interacting with the armchair site while the added carbon atoms bond to each other forming a new hexagonal ring, whereas the carbon dissolution process shows formation of dimers inside the cluster only for the (6, 5) system. The energetics for both steps reveals that the dissolution stage is probably controlling the overall nanotube growth rate.

  4. A carbon nanotube wall membrane for water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byeongho; Baek, Youngbin; Lee, Minwoo; Jeong, Dae Hong; Lee, Hong H; Yoon, Jeyong; Kim, Yong Hyup

    2015-05-14

    Various forms of carbon nanotubes have been utilized in water treatment applications. The unique characteristics of carbon nanotubes, however, have not been fully exploited for such applications. Here we exploit the characteristics and corresponding attributes of carbon nanotubes to develop a millimetre-thick ultrafiltration membrane that can provide a water permeability that approaches 30,000 l m(-2) h(-1) bar(-1), compared with the best water permeability of 2,400 l m(-2) h(-1) bar(-1) reported for carbon nanotube membranes. The developed membrane consists only of vertically aligned carbon nanotube walls that provide 6-nm-wide inner pores and 7-nm-wide outer pores that form between the walls of the carbon nanotubes when the carbon nanotube forest is densified. The experimental results reveal that the permeance increases as the pore size decreases. The carbon nanotube walls of the membrane are observed to impede bacterial adhesion and resist biofilm formation.

  5. A Review: Carbon Nanotube-Based Piezoresistive Strain Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waris Obitayo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of carbon nanotubes for piezoresistive strain sensors has acquired significant attention due to its unique electromechanical properties. In this comprehensive review paper, we discussed some important aspects of carbon nanotubes for strain sensing at both the nanoscale and macroscale. Carbon nanotubes undergo changes in their band structures when subjected to mechanical deformations. This phenomenon makes them applicable for strain sensing applications. This paper signifies the type of carbon nanotubes best suitable for piezoresistive strain sensors. The electrical resistivities of carbon nanotube thin film increase linearly with strain, making it an ideal material for a piezoresistive strain sensor. Carbon nanotube composite films, which are usually fabricated by mixing small amounts of single-walled or multiwalled carbon nanotubes with selected polymers, have shown promising characteristics of piezoresistive strain sensors. Studies also show that carbon nanotubes display a stable and predictable voltage response as a function of temperature.

  6. Methods for Gas Sensing with Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaul, Anupama B. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Methods for gas sensing with single-walled carbon nanotubes are described. The methods comprise biasing at least one carbon nanotube and exposing to a gas environment to detect variation in temperature as an electrical response.

  7. Release characteristics of selected carbon nanotube polymer composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are commonly used in polymer formulations to improve strength, conductivity, and other attributes. A developing concern is the potential for carbon nanotube polymer nanocomposites to release nanoparticles into the environment as the polymer ...

  8. Carbon Nanotube Reinforced Polymers for Radiation Shielding Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibeault, S. (Technical Monitor); Vaidyanathan, Ranji

    2004-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on the use of Extrusion Freeform Fabrication (EEF) for the fabrication of carbon nanotubes. The presentation addresses TGA analysis, Raman spectroscopy, radiation tests, and mechanical properties of the carbon nanotubes.

  9. Physical Removal of Metallic Carbon Nanotubes from Nanotube Network Devices Using a Thermal and Fluidic Process

    OpenAIRE

    Ford, Alexandra C.; Shaughnessy, Michael; Wong, Bryan M.; Kane, Alexander A.; Kuznetsov, Oleksandr V.; Krafcik, Karen L.; Billups, W. E.; Hauge, Robert H.; Léonard, François

    2013-01-01

    Electronic and optoelectronic devices based on thin films of carbon nanotubes are currently limited by the presence of metallic nanotubes. Here we present a novel approach based on nanotube alkyl functionalization to physically remove the metallic nanotubes from such network devices. The process relies on preferential thermal desorption of the alkyls from the semiconducting nanotubes and the subsequent dissolution and selective removal of the metallic nanotubes in chloroform. The approach is ...

  10. Carbon Nanotube Tower-Based Supercapacitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A supercapacitor system, including (i) first and second, spaced apart planar collectors, (ii) first and second arrays of multi-wall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) towers or single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) towers, serving as electrodes, that extend between the first and second collectors where the nanotube towers are grown directly on the collector surfaces without deposition of a catalyst and without deposition of a binder material on the collector surfaces, and (iii) a porous separator module having a transverse area that is substantially the same as the transverse area of at least one electrode, where (iv) at least one nanotube tower is functionalized to permit or encourage the tower to behave as a hydrophilic structure, with increased surface wettability.

  11. Carbon Nanotube-Based Permeable Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holt, J K; Park, H G; Bakajin, O; Noy, A; Huser, T; Eaglesham, D

    2004-04-06

    A membrane of multiwalled carbon nanotubes embedded in a silicon nitride matrix was fabricated for use in studying fluid mechanics on the nanometer scale. Characterization by fluorescent tracer diffusion and scanning electron microscopy suggests that the membrane is void-free near the silicon substrate on which it rests, implying that the hollow core of the nanotube is the only conduction path for molecular transport. Assuming Knudsen diffusion through this nanotube membrane, a maximum helium transport rate (for a pressure drop of 1 atm) of 0.25 cc/sec is predicted. Helium flow measurements of a nanoporous silicon nitride membrane, fabricated by sacrificial removal of carbon, give a flow rate greater than 1x10{sup -6} cc/sec. For viscous, laminar flow conditions, water is estimated to flow across the nanotube membrane (under a 1 atm pressure drop) at up to 2.8x10{sup -5} cc/sec (1.7 {micro}L/min).

  12. Functionalized carbon nanotubes for potential medicinal applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Bai, Yuhong; Yan, Bing

    2010-06-01

    Functionalized carbon nanotubes display unique properties that enable a variety of medicinal applications, including the diagnosis and treatment of cancer, infectious diseases and central nervous system disorders, and applications in tissue engineering. These potential applications are particularly encouraged by their ability to penetrate biological membranes and relatively low toxicity. High aspect ratio, unique optical property and the likeness as small molecule make carbon nanotubes an unusual allotrope of element carbon. After functionalization, carbon nanotubes display potentials for a variety of medicinal applications, including the diagnosis and treatment of cancer, infectious diseases and central nervous system disorders, and applications in tissue engineering. These potential applications are particularly encouraged by their ability to penetrate biological membranes and relatively low toxicity.

  13. Carbon Nanotubes and Chronic Granulomatous Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara P. Barna

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Use of nanomaterials in manufactured consumer products is a rapidly expanding industry and potential toxicities are just beginning to be explored. Combustion-generated multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT or nanoparticles are ubiquitous in non-manufacturing environments and detectable in vapors from diesel fuel, methane, propane, and natural gas. In experimental animal models, carbon nanotubes have been shown to induce granulomas or other inflammatory changes. Evidence suggesting potential involvement of carbon nanomaterials in human granulomatous disease, has been gathered from analyses of dusts generated in the World Trade Center disaster combined with epidemiological data showing a subsequent increase in granulomatous disease of first responders. In this review we will discuss evidence for similarities in the pathophysiology of carbon nanotube-induced pulmonary disease in experimental animals with that of the human granulomatous disease, sarcoidosis.

  14. Change in the electrical characteristics of single-walled carbon nanotube networks under photoresist treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Mi-Suk; Kim, Ju-Jin; Choi, Won Jin; Lee, Jeong-O.

    2016-08-01

    The electrical properties of a single-walled carbon nanotube network were investigated after photoresist treatment with the pristine device. Atomic force microscopy found that the diameters of the single-walled carbon nanotubes were increased after photoresist treatment and that the photoresist could not be completely removed from nanotube surfaces by using a simple cleaning process with an organic solvent. Although the presence of a residual photoresist had no noticeable effects on the Raman spectrum of single-walled carbon nanotubes in our devices, the charge carrier mobilities and the on/off ratios of the single-walled carbon nanotube devices were lowered due to the photoresist treatment, and the gate-hysteresis behavior in the devices that had undergone photoresist treatment was found to be different from that of pristine devices.

  15. Elastomer Reinforced with Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Jared L.; Krishnamoorti, Ramanan

    2009-01-01

    Elastomers are reinforced with functionalized, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) giving them high-breaking strain levels and low densities. Cross-linked elastomers are prepared using amine-terminated, poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), with an average molecular weight of 5,000 daltons, and a functionalized SWNT. Cross-link densities, estimated on the basis of swelling data in toluene (a dispersing solvent) indicated that the polymer underwent cross-linking at the ends of the chains. This thermally initiated cross-linking was found to occur only in the presence of the aryl alcohol functionalized SWNTs. The cross-link could have been via a hydrogen-bonding mechanism between the amine and the free hydroxyl group, or via attack of the amine on the ester linage to form an amide. Tensile properties examined at room temperature indicate a three-fold increase in the tensile modulus of the elastomer, with rupture and failure of the elastomer occurring at a strain of 6.5.

  16. Localized Excitons in Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamska, Lyudmyla; Doorn, Stephen K.; Tretiak, Sergei

    2015-03-01

    It has been historically known that unintentional defects in carbon nanotubes (CNTs) may fully quench the fluorescence. However, some dopants may enhance the fluorescence by one order of magnitude thus turning the CNTs, which are excellent light absorbers, in good emitters. We have correlated the experimentally observed photoluminescence spectra to the electronic structure simulations. Our experiment reveals multiple sharp asymmetric emission peaks at energies 50-300 meV red-shifted from that of the lowest bright exciton peak. Our simulations suggest an association of these peaks with deep trap states tied to different specific chemical adducts. While the wave functions of excitons in undoped CNTs are delocalized, those of the deep-trap states are strongly localized and pinned to the dopants. These findings are consistent with the experimental observation of asymmetric broadening of the deep trap emission peaks, which can result from scattering of acoustic phonons on localized excitons. Our work lays the foundation to utilize doping as a generalized route for wave function engineering and direct control of carrier dynamics in SWCNTs toward enhanced light emission properties for photonic applications.

  17. Modification of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) for hydrogen storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rashidi, A.M.; Nouralishahi, A.; Karimi, A.; Kashefi, K. [Nanotechnology Research Center, Research Institute of petroleum industry (RIPI), Tehran (Iran); Khodadadi, A.A.; Mortazavi, Y. [Chemical engineering Department, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran)

    2010-09-15

    Due to unique structural, mechanical and electrical properties of single wall carbon nanotubes, SWNTs, they have been proposed as promising hydrogen storage materials especially in automotive industries. This research deals with investing of CNT's and some activated carbons hydrogen storage capacity. The CNT's were prepared through natural gas decomposition at a temperature of 900 C over cobalt-molybdenum nanoparticles supported by nanoporous magnesium oxide (Co-Mo/MgO) during a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. The effects of purity of CNT (80-95%wt.) on hydrogen storage were investigated here. The results showed an improvement in the hydrogen adsorption capacity with increasing the purity of CNT's. Maximum adsorption capacity was 0.8%wt. in case of CNT's with 95% purity and it may be raised up with some purification to 1%wt. which was far less than the target specified by DOE (6.5%wt.). Also some activated carbons were manufactured and the results compared to CNTs. There were no considerable H{sub 2}-storage for carbon nanotubes and activated carbons at room-temperature due to insufficient binding between H{sub 2} molecules carbon nanostructures. Therefore, hydrogen must be adsorbed via interaction of atomic hydrogen with the storage environment in order to achieve DOE target, because the H atoms have a very stronger interaction with carbon nanostructures. (author)

  18. Different Technical Applications of Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalla, S; Al-Marzouki, F; Al-Ghamdi, Ahmed A; Abdel-Daiem, A

    2015-12-01

    Carbon nanotubes have been of great interest because of their simplicity and ease of synthesis. The novel properties of nanostructured carbon nanotubes such as high surface area, good stiffness, and resilience have been explored in many engineering applications. Research on carbon nanotubes have shown the application in the field of energy storage, hydrogen storage, electrochemical supercapacitor, field-emitting devices, transistors, nanoprobes and sensors, composite material, templates, etc. For commercial applications, large quantities and high purity of carbon nanotubes are needed. Different types of carbon nanotubes can be synthesized in various ways. The most common techniques currently practiced are arc discharge, laser ablation, and chemical vapor deposition and flame synthesis. The purification of CNTs is carried out using various techniques mainly oxidation, acid treatment, annealing, sonication, filtering chemical functionalization, etc. However, high-purity purification techniques still have to be developed. Real applications are still under development. This paper addresses the current research on the challenges that are associated with synthesis methods, purification methods, and dispersion and toxicity of CNTs within the scope of different engineering applications, energy, and environmental impact.

  19. Chemical reactions confined within carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miners, Scott A; Rance, Graham A; Khlobystov, Andrei N

    2016-08-22

    In this critical review, we survey the wide range of chemical reactions that have been confined within carbon nanotubes, particularly emphasising how the pairwise interactions between the catalysts, reactants, transition states and products of a particular molecular transformation with the host nanotube can be used to control the yields and distributions of products of chemical reactions. We demonstrate that nanoscale confinement within carbon nanotubes enables the control of catalyst activity, morphology and stability, influences the local concentration of reactants and products thus affecting equilibria, rates and selectivity, pre-arranges the reactants for desired reactions and alters the relative stability of isomeric products. We critically evaluate the relative advantages and disadvantages of the confinement of chemical reactions inside carbon nanotubes from a chemical perspective and describe how further developments in the controlled synthesis of carbon nanotubes and the incorporation of multifunctionality are essential for the development of this ever-expanding field, ultimately leading to the effective control of the pathways of chemical reactions through the rational design of multi-functional carbon nanoreactors.

  20. Different Technical Applications of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalla, S.; Al-Marzouki, F.; Al-Ghamdi, Ahmed A.; Abdel-Daiem, A.

    2015-09-01

    Carbon nanotubes have been of great interest because of their simplicity and ease of synthesis. The novel properties of nanostructured carbon nanotubes such as high surface area, good stiffness, and resilience have been explored in many engineering applications. Research on carbon nanotubes have shown the application in the field of energy storage, hydrogen storage, electrochemical supercapacitor, field-emitting devices, transistors, nanoprobes and sensors, composite material, templates, etc. For commercial applications, large quantities and high purity of carbon nanotubes are needed. Different types of carbon nanotubes can be synthesized in various ways. The most common techniques currently practiced are arc discharge, laser ablation, and chemical vapor deposition and flame synthesis. The purification of CNTs is carried out using various techniques mainly oxidation, acid treatment, annealing, sonication, filtering chemical functionalization, etc. However, high-purity purification techniques still have to be developed. Real applications are still under development. This paper addresses the current research on the challenges that are associated with synthesis methods, purification methods, and dispersion and toxicity of CNTs within the scope of different engineering applications, energy, and environmental impact.

  1. Edge effects in finite elongated carbon nanotubes

    CERN Document Server

    Hod, O; Scuseria, G E; Hod, Oded; Peralta, Juan E.; Scuseria, Gustavo E.

    2006-01-01

    The importance of finite-size effects for the electronic structure of long zigzag and armchair carbon nanotubes is studied. We analyze the electronic structure of capped (6,6), (8,0), and (9,0) single walled carbon nanotubes as a function of their length up to 60 nm, using a divide and conquer density functional theory approach. For the metallic nanotubes studied, most of the physical features appearing in the density of states of an infinite carbon nanotube are recovered at a length of 40 nm. The (8,0) semi-conducting nanotube studied exhibits pronounced edge effects within the energy gap that scale as the inverse of the length of the nanotube. As a result, the energy gap reduces from the value of ~1 eV calculated for the periodic system to a value of ~0.25 eV calculated for a capped 62 nm long CNT. These edge effects are expected to become negligible only at tube lengths exceeding 6 micrometers. Our results indicate that careful tailoring of the nature of the system and its capping units should be applied w...

  2. Controlled growth and assembly of single-walled carbon nanotubes for nanoelectronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omrane, Badr

    Carbon nanotubes are promising candidates for enhancing electronic devices in the future at the nanoscale level. Their integration into today's electronics has however been challenging due to the difficulties in controlling their orientation, location, chirality and diameter during formation. This thesis investigates and develops new techniques for the controlled growth and assembly of carbon nanotubes as a way to address some of these challenges. Colloidal lithography using nanospheres of 450 nm in diameter, acting as a shadow mask during metal evaporation, has been used to pattern thin films of single-walled carbon nanotube multilayer catalysts on Si and Si/SiO2 substrates. Large areas of periodic hexagonal catalyst islands were formed and chemical vapor deposition resulted in aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes on Si substrates within the hexagonal array of catalyst islands. On silicon dioxide, single-walled carbon nanotubes connecting the hexagonal catalyst islands were observed. To help explain these observations, a growth model based on experimental data has been used. Electrostatic interaction, van der Waals interaction and gas flow appear to be the main forces contributing to single-walled carbon nanotube alignment on Si/SiO2. Although the alignment of single-walled carbon nanotubes on Si substrates is still not fully understood, it may be due to a combination of the above factors, in addition to silicide-nanotube interaction. Atomic force microscopy and Raman spectroscopy of the post-growth samples show single-walled carbon nanotubes of 1-2 nm in diameter. Based on the atomic force microscopy data and Raman spectra, a mixture of individual and bundles of metallic and semiconducting nanotubes were inferred to be present. A novel technique based on direct nanowriting of carbon nanotube catalysts in liquid form has also been developed. The reliability of this method to produce nanoscale catalyst geometries in a highly controlled manner, as required for

  3. Bulk Cutting of Carbon Nanotubes Using Electron Beam Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Kirk J. (Inventor); Rauwald, Urs (Inventor); Hauge, Robert H. (Inventor); Schmidt, Howard K. (Inventor); Smalley, Richard E. (Inventor); Kittrell, W. Carter (Inventor); Gu, Zhenning (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    According to some embodiments, the present invention provides a method for attaining short carbon nanotubes utilizing electron beam irradiation, for example, of a carbon nanotube sample. The sample may be pretreated, for example by oxonation. The pretreatment may introduce defects to the sidewalls of the nanotubes. The method is shown to produces nanotubes with a distribution of lengths, with the majority of lengths shorter than 100 tun. Further, the median length of the nanotubes is between about 20 nm and about 100 nm.

  4. Chitosan-mediated synthesis of carbon nanotube-gold nanohybrids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GRAVEL; Edmond; FOILLARD; Stéphanie; DORIS; Eric

    2010-01-01

    Metal-nanotube nanohybrids were produced by in situ synthesis and stabilization of gold nanoparticles on chitosan-functionalized carbon nanotubes.The formation of gold nanoparticles from tetrachloroauric acid was observed after only a few minutes of contact with the functionalized nanotubes,at room temperature.These results suggest that adsorption of chitosan at the surface of carbon nanotubes permits smooth reduction of the metallic salt and efficient anchoring of gold nanoparticles to the nanotubes.

  5. Effects of single-walled carbon nanotubes on lysozyme gelation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tardani, Franco; La Mesa, Camillo

    2014-09-01

    The possibility to disperse carbon nanotubes in biocompatible matrices has got substantial interest from the scientific community. Along this research line, the inclusion of single walled carbon nanotubes in lysozyme-based hydrogels was investigated. Experiments were performed at different nanotube/lysozyme weight ratios. Carbon nanotubes were dispersed in protein solutions, in conditions suitable for thermal gelation. The state of the dispersions was determined before and after thermal treatment. Rheology, dynamic light scattering and different microscopies investigated the effect that carbon nanotubes exert on gelation. The gelation kinetics and changes in gelation temperature were determined. The effect of carbon and lysozyme content on the gel properties was, therefore, determined. At fixed lysozyme content, moderate amounts of carbon nanotubes do not disturb the properties of hydrogel composites. At moderately high volume fractions in carbon nanotubes, the gels become continuous in both lysozyme and nanotubes. This is because percolating networks are presumably formed. Support to the above statements comes by rheology.

  6. Deposition of the platinum crystals on the carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A new technique and the affecting factors for depositing platinum on the carbon nanotubes were investigated. The results show that the deposited platinum crystals in the atmosphere of hydrogen or nitrogen have a small size and a homogeneous distribution on the surface of the carbon nanotubes. The pretreatment would decrease the platinum particles on the carbon nanotubes significantly.

  7. Transport Properties of Carbon-Nanotube/Cement Composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Han, B.; Yang, Z.; Shi, X.; Yu, X.

    2012-01-01

    This paper preliminarily investigates the general transport properties (i.e., water sorptivity, water permeability, and gas permeability) of carbon-nanotube/cement composites. Carboxyl multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) are dispersed into cement mortar to fabricate the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) rei

  8. Microscopic and Spectroscopic Investigation of Poly(3-hexylthiophene Interaction with Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio De Crescenzi

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The inclusion of carbon nanotubes in polymer matrix has been proposed to enhance the polymer’s physical and electrical properties. In this study, microscopic and spectroscopic techniques are used to investigate the interaction between poly(3-hexylthiophene (P3HT and nanotubes and the reciprocal modification of physical properties. The presence of P3HT-covered nanotubes dispersed in the polymer matrix has been observed by atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Then, the modification of P3HT optical properties due to nanotube inclusion has been evidenced with spectroscopic techniques like absorption and Raman spectroscopy. The study is completed with detailed nanoscale analysis by scanning probe techniques. The ordered self assembly of polymer adhering on the nanotube is unveiled by showing an example of helical wrapping of P3HT. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy study provides information on the electronic structure of nanotube-polymer assembly, revealing the charge transfer from P3HT to the nanotube.

  9. Interaction of pristine and functionalized carbon nanotubes with lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baoukina, Svetlana; Monticelli, Luca; Tieleman, D Peter

    2013-10-10

    Carbon nanotubes are widely used in a growing number of applications. Their interactions with biological materials, cell membranes in particular, is of interest in applications including drug delivery and for understanding the toxicity of carbon nanotubes. We use extensive molecular dynamics simulations with the MARTINI model to study the interactions of model nanotubes of different thickness, length, and patterns of chemical modification with model membranes. In addition, we characterize the interactions of small bundles of carbon nanotubes with membrane models. Short pristine carbon nanotubes readily insert into membranes and adopt an orientation parallel to the plane of the membrane in the center of the membrane. Larger aggregates and functionalized nanotubes exhibit a range of possible interactions. The distribution and orientation of carbon nanotubes can be controlled by functionalizing the nanotubes. Free energy calculations provide thermodynamic insight into the preferred orientations of different nanotubes and quantify structural defects in the lipid matrix.

  10. Graphene-carbon nanotube hybrid materials and use as electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tour, James M.; Zhu, Yu; Li, Lei; Yan, Zheng; Lin, Jian

    2016-09-27

    Provided are methods of making graphene-carbon nanotube hybrid materials. Such methods generally include: (1) associating a graphene film with a substrate; (2) applying a catalyst and a carbon source to the graphene film; and (3) growing carbon nanotubes on the graphene film. The grown carbon nanotubes become covalently linked to the graphene film through carbon-carbon bonds that are located at one or more junctions between the carbon nanotubes and the graphene film. In addition, the grown carbon nanotubes are in ohmic contact with the graphene film through the carbon-carbon bonds at the one or more junctions. The one or more junctions may include seven-membered carbon rings. Also provided are the formed graphene-carbon nanotube hybrid materials.

  11. Propriétés Electro-mécaniques des Nanotubes de Carbone

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    With aims of modeling mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes in electric fields, we begin with molecular dynamics simulations using the AIREBO potential to investigate non-linear elastic behaviors and deformation of torsion of nanotubes. By the comparison between our results and those in the literature, we demonstrate the precision and the efficiency of this potential in large-scale atomic simulations.In a second step, we calculate the distribution of electric charges and dipoles in carbon...

  12. Analysis of radial nonlocal effect on the structural response of carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pradhan, S.C., E-mail: scp@aero.iitkgp.ernet.in; Mandal, U.

    2013-11-01

    In this Letter, finite element model is developed to study the effect of nonlocal parameter in the radial structural response of carbon nanotubes. Timoshenko beam model is employed. The influence of nonlocal parameter in the radial direction due to interaction of atoms is defined as the radial nonlocal effect. It is found that there is significant influence of radial nonlocal effect on the structural response of the carbon nanotubes.

  13. Modeling electrostatically induced collapse transitions in carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shklyaev, Oleg E; Mockensturm, Eric; Crespi, Vincent H

    2011-04-15

    Molecular dynamics simulations demonstrate how a mechanically bistable single-walled carbon nanotube can act as a variable-shaped capacitor. If the voltage is tuned so that collapsed and inflated states are degenerate, the tube's susceptibility to diverse external stimuli--temperature, voltage, trapped atoms--diverges following a universal curve, yielding an exceptionally sensitive sensor or actuator. The boundary between collapsed and inflated states can shift hundreds of angstroms in response to a single gas atom inside the tube. Several potential nanoelectromechanical devices could be based on this electrically tuned crossover between near-degenerate collapsed and inflated configurations.

  14. Carbon nanotube suspensions, dispersions, & composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Trevor John

    Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) are amazing structures that hold the potential to revolutionize many areas of scientific research. CNTs can be behave both as semiconductors and metals, can be grown in highly ordered arrays and patterns or in random orientation, and can be comprised of one graphene cylinder (single wall nanotube, SWNT) or several concentric graphene cylinders (multi-wall nanotube, MWNT). Although these structures are usually only a few nanometers wide, they can be grown up to centimeter lengths, and in massive quantities. CNTs can be produced in a variety of processes ranging from repeated combustion of organic material such as dried grass, arc-discharge with graphite electrodes, laser ablation of a graphitic target, to sophisticated chemical vapor deposition (CVD) techniques. CNTs are stronger than steel but lighter than aluminum, and can be more conductive than copper or semiconducting like silicon. This variety of properties has been matched by the wide variety of applications that have been developed for CNTs. Many of these applications have been limited by the inability of researchers to tame these structures, and incorporating CNTs into existing technologies can be exceedingly difficult and prohibitively expensive. It is therefore the aim of the current study to develop strategies for the solution processing and deposition of CNTs and CNT-composites, which will enable the use of CNTs in existing and emerging technologies. CNTs are not easily suspended in polar solvents and are extremely hydrophobic materials, which has limited much of the solution processing to organic solvents, which also cannot afford high quality dispersions of CNTs. The current study has developed a variety of aqueous CNT solutions that employ surfactants, water-soluble polymers, or both to create suspensions of CNTs. These CNT 'ink' solutions were deposited with a variety of techniques that have afforded many interesting structures, both randomly oriented as well as highly

  15. High frequency conductivity in carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Abukari

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We report on theoretical analysis of high frequency conductivity in carbon nanotubes. Using the kinetic equation with constant relaxation time, an analytical expression for the complex conductivity is obtained. The real part of the complex conductivity is initially negative at zero frequency and become more negative with increasing frequency, until it reaches a resonance minimum at ω ∼ ωB for metallic zigzag CNs and ω < ωB for armchair CNs. This resonance enhancement is indicative for terahertz gain without the formation of current instabilities induced by negative dc conductivity. We noted that due to the high density of states of conduction electrons in metallic zigzag carbon nanotubes and the specific dispersion law inherent in hexagonal crystalline structure result in a uniquely high frequency conductivity than the corresponding values for metallic armchair carbon nanotubes. We suggest that this phenomenon can be used to suppress current instabilities that are normally associated with a negative dc differential conductivity.

  16. Carbon nanotubes in neuroregeneration and repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabbro, Alessandra; Prato, Maurizio; Ballerini, Laura

    2013-12-01

    In the last decade, we have experienced an increasing interest and an improved understanding of the application of nanotechnology to the nervous system. The aim of such studies is that of developing future strategies for tissue repair to promote functional recovery after brain damage. In this framework, carbon nanotube based technologies are emerging as particularly innovative tools due to the outstanding physical properties of these nanomaterials together with their recently documented ability to interface neuronal circuits, synapses and membranes. This review will discuss the state of the art in carbon nanotube technology applied to the development of devices able to drive nerve tissue repair; we will highlight the most exciting findings addressing the impact of carbon nanotubes in nerve tissue engineering, focusing in particular on neuronal differentiation, growth and network reconstruction.

  17. Boron-Filled Hybrid Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Rajen B.; Chou, Tsengming; Kanwal, Alokik; Apigo, David J.; Lefebvre, Joseph; Owens, Frank; Iqbal, Zafar

    2016-07-01

    A unique nanoheterostructure, a boron-filled hybrid carbon nanotube (BHCNT), has been synthesized using a one-step chemical vapor deposition process. The BHCNTs can be considered to be a novel form of boron carbide consisting of boron doped, distorted multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) encapsulating boron nanowires. These MWCNTs were found to be insulating in spite of their graphitic layered outer structures. While conventional MWCNTs have great axial strength, they have weak radial compressive strength, and do not bond well to one another or to other materials. In contrast, BHCNTs are shown to be up to 31% stiffer and 233% stronger than conventional MWCNTs in radial compression and have excellent mechanical properties at elevated temperatures. The corrugated surface of BHCNTs enables them to bond easily to themselves and other materials, in contrast to carbon nanotubes (CNTs). BHCNTs can, therefore, be used to make nanocomposites, nanopaper sheets, and bundles that are stronger than those made with CNTs.

  18. A review on protein functionalized carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaraju, Kathyayini; Reddy, Roopa; Reddy, Narendra

    2015-12-18

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been widely recognized and used for controlled drug delivery and in various other fields due to their unique properties and distinct advantages. Both single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and multiwalled (MWCNTs) carbon nanotubes are used and/or studied for potential applications in medical, energy, textile, composite, and other areas. Since CNTs are chemically inert and are insoluble in water or other organic solvents, they are functionalized or modified to carry payloads or interact with biological molecules. CNTs have been preferably functionalized with proteins because CNTs are predominantly used for medical applications such as delivery of drugs, DNA and genes, and also for biosensing. Extensive studies have been conducted to understand the interactions, cytotoxicity, and potential applications of protein functionalized CNTs but contradicting results have been published on the cytotoxicity of the functionalized CNTs. This paper provides a brief review of CNTs functionalized with proteins, methods used to functionalize the CNTs, and their potential applications.

  19. Boron-Filled Hybrid Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Rajen B.; Chou, Tsengming; Kanwal, Alokik; Apigo, David J.; Lefebvre, Joseph; Owens, Frank; Iqbal, Zafar

    2016-01-01

    A unique nanoheterostructure, a boron-filled hybrid carbon nanotube (BHCNT), has been synthesized using a one-step chemical vapor deposition process. The BHCNTs can be considered to be a novel form of boron carbide consisting of boron doped, distorted multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) encapsulating boron nanowires. These MWCNTs were found to be insulating in spite of their graphitic layered outer structures. While conventional MWCNTs have great axial strength, they have weak radial compressive strength, and do not bond well to one another or to other materials. In contrast, BHCNTs are shown to be up to 31% stiffer and 233% stronger than conventional MWCNTs in radial compression and have excellent mechanical properties at elevated temperatures. The corrugated surface of BHCNTs enables them to bond easily to themselves and other materials, in contrast to carbon nanotubes (CNTs). BHCNTs can, therefore, be used to make nanocomposites, nanopaper sheets, and bundles that are stronger than those made with CNTs. PMID:27460526

  20. Carbon Nanotube Bolometer for Absolute FTIR Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Solomon; Neira, Jorge; Tomlin, Nathan; Lehman, John

    We have developed and calibrated planar electrical-substitution bolometers which employ absorbers made from vertically-aligned carbon nanotube arrays. The nearly complete absorption of light by the carbon nanotubes from the visible range to the far-infrared can be exploited to enable a device with read-out in native units equivalent to optical power. Operated at cryogenic temperatures near 4 K, these infrared detectors are designed to have time constant near 10 ms and a noise floor of about 10 pW. Built upon a micro-machined silicon platform, each device has an integrated heater and thermometer, either a carbon nanotube thermistor or superconducting transition edge sensor, for temperature control. We are optimizing temperature-controlled measurement techniques to enable high resolution spectral calibrations using these devices with a Fourier-transform spectrometer.

  1. Carbon Nanotubes Synthesis Through Gamma Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirado, Pablo; Garcia, Rafael; Montes, Jorge; Melendrez, Rodrigo; Barboza, Marcelino; Contreras, Oscar

    2015-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes show a great potential of applications since there discovery by Iijima in 1991[1] due to their numerous physical-chemical properties such as their high weight to strength relationship, which make them ideal to use in high resistance compound materials, and in many other applications[2] In this work, a novel method for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes is presented, starting from an ultra-thin sheet of graphite synthesized by the chemical vapor decomposition technique (CVD), using ultra high purity methane and hydrogen at 1200°C in a horizontal quartz reactor. For the synthesis of carbon nanotubes, the graphite sheets were exposed to different doses of radiation, with the objective of breaking the graphite bonds and form carbon nanotubes; a Gammacell equipment model 220 Excel was used for the purpose, which counts with a radiation source of cobalt 60, and a current radiation rate of 0.9 Gy/seconds. The time of exposure to radiation was varied in each sample, according to the desired dose of radiation in each case, afterwards the samples were characterized using the Raman spectroscopy and TEM microscopy techniques with the objective of observing the kind of nanotubes formed, their morphology and their number of defects. Results will be shown during the poster session.

  2. Effect of Catalytic Layer Thickness on Diameter of Vertically Aligned Individual Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Kyung Jung

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of catalytic thin film thickness on the diameter control of individual carbon nanotubes grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition was investigated. Individual carbon nanotubes were grown on catalytic nanodot arrays, which were fabricated by e-beam lithography and e-beam evaporation. During e-beam evaporation of the nanodot pattern, more catalytic metal was deposited at the edge of the nanodots than the desired catalyst thickness. Because of this phenomenon, carbon atoms diffused faster near the center of the dots than at the edge of the dots. The carbon atoms, which were gathered at the interface between the catalytic nanodot and the diffusion barrier, accumulated near the center of the dot and lifted the catalyst off. From the experiments, an individual carbon nanotube with the same diameter as that of the catalytic nanodot was obtained from a 5 nm thick catalytic nanodot; however, an individual carbon nanotube with a smaller diameter (~40% reduction was obtained from a 50 nm thick nanodot. We found that the thicker the catalytic layer, the greater the reduction in diameter of the carbon nanotubes. The diameter-controlled carbon nanotubes could have applications in bio- and nanomaterial scanning and as a contrast medium for magnetic resonance imaging.

  3. Carbon nanotubes buckypaper radiation studies for medical physics applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alanazi, Abdulaziz; Alkhorayef, Mohammed; Alzimami, Khalid; Jurewicz, Izabela; Abuhadi, Nouf; Dalton, Alan; Bradley, D A

    2016-11-01

    Graphite ion chambers and semiconductor diode detectors have been used to make measurements in phantoms but these active devices represent a clear disadvantage when considered for in vivo dosimetry. In such circumstance, dosimeters with atomic number similar to human tissue are needed. Carbon nanotubes have properties that potentially meet the demand, requiring low voltage in active devices and an atomic number similar to adipose tissue. In this study, single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) buckypaper has been used to measure the beta particle dose deposited from a strontium-90 source, the medium displaying thermoluminescence at potentially useful sensitivity. As an example, the samples show a clear response for a dose of 2Gy. This finding suggests that carbon nanotubes can be used as a passive dosimeter specifically for the high levels of radiation exposures used in radiation therapy. Furthermore, the finding points towards further potential applications such as for space radiation measurements, not least because the medium satisfies a demand for light but strong materials of minimal capacitance.

  4. A carbon nanotube optical rectenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Asha; Singh, Virendra; Bougher, Thomas L.; Cola, Baratunde A.

    2015-12-01

    An optical rectenna—a device that directly converts free-propagating electromagnetic waves at optical frequencies to direct current—was first proposed over 40 years ago, yet this concept has not been demonstrated experimentally due to fabrication challenges at the nanoscale. Realizing an optical rectenna requires that an antenna be coupled to a diode that operates on the order of 1 PHz (switching speed on the order of 1 fs). Diodes operating at these frequencies are feasible if their capacitance is on the order of a few attofarads, but they remain extremely difficult to fabricate and to reliably couple to a nanoscale antenna. Here we demonstrate an optical rectenna by engineering metal-insulator-metal tunnel diodes, with a junction capacitance of ˜2 aF, at the tip of vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes (˜10 nm in diameter), which act as the antenna. Upon irradiation with visible and infrared light, we measure a d.c. open-circuit voltage and a short-circuit current that appear to be due to a rectification process (we account for a very small but quantifiable contribution from thermal effects). In contrast to recent reports of photodetection based on hot electron decay in a plasmonic nanoscale antenna, a coherent optical antenna field appears to be rectified directly in our devices, consistent with rectenna theory. Finally, power rectification is observed under simulated solar illumination, and there is no detectable change in diode performance after numerous current-voltage scans between 5 and 77 °C, indicating a potential for robust operation.

  5. Micromechanics of carbon nanotube turfs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torabi, Hamid

    Complex structures consisting of intertwined, nominally vertical carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are called turfs. Unique electrical, thermal, optical, and permeability properties of these turfs have attracted growing attention during the past decade, and have rendered them as appropriate candidates for applications such as contact thermal switches. These properties are controlled by the details of the turf microstructures. Due to the application of the turfs in different fields, they are subjected to different loading conditions. Deformation changes the microstructure of a CNT turf, which results in change of effective properties. Many researchers have recently studied the collective mechanical behavior of CNT turfs to compression loading, as this behavior determines their performance. However, their complex and intertwined structure must be investigated in more details to find the relation between their deformation and their underlying morphology. Under uniform compression experiments, CNT turfs exhibit irreversible collective buckling of a layer preceded by reorientation of CNT segments. Experimentally observed independence of the buckling stress and the buckling wavelength on the turf width suggests the existence of an intrinsic material length. To investigate the relationship the macroscopic material properties and the statistical parameters describing the nano-scale geometry of the turf (tortuosity, density and connectivity) we develop a nano-scale computational model, based on the representation of CNT segments as elastica finite elements with van der Waals interactions. The virtual turfs are generated by means of a constrained random walk algorithm and subsequent relaxation. The resulting computational model is robust and is capable of modeling the collective behavior of CNTs. We first establish the dependence of statistical parameters on the computational parameters used for turf generation, then establish relationships between post-buckling stress, initial

  6. Laser ablative synthesis of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michael W.; Jordan, Kevin; Park, Cheol

    2010-03-02

    An improved method for the production of single walled carbon nanotubes that utilizes an RF-induction heated side-pumped synthesis chamber for the production of such. Such a method, while capable of producing large volumes of carbon nanotubes, concurrently permits the use of a simplified apparatus that allows for greatly reduced heat up and cool down times and flexible flowpaths that can be readily modified for production efficiency optimization. The method of the present invention utilizes a free electron laser operating at high average and peak fluence to illuminate a rotating and translating graphite/catalyst target to obtain high yields of SWNTs without the use of a vacuum chamber.

  7. Carbon nanotubes for in vivo cancer nanotechnology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The latest progress of using carbon nanotubes(CNTs) for in vivo cancer nanotechnology is reviewed.CNTs can be functionalized by either covalent or non-covalent chemistry to produce functional bioconjugates for many in vivo applications.In vivo behaviors and toxicology studies of CNTs are summarized,suggesting no significant toxicity of well functionalized CNTs to the treated mice.Owing to their unique chemical and physical properties,CNTs,especially single-walled carbon nanotubes(SWNTs),have been widely used for various modalities of in vivo cancer treatment and imaging.Future development of CNT-based nanomedicine may bring novel opportunities to cancer diagnosis and therapy.

  8. Piezoresistive effect in carbon nanotube films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The piezoresistive effect of the pristine carbon nanotube (CNT) films has been studied. Carbon nanotubes were synthesized by hot filament chemical vapor deposition. The piezoresistive effect in the pristine CNT films was studied by a three-point bending test. The gauge factor for the pristine CNT films under 500 microstrains was found to be at least 65 at room temperature, and increased with temperature, exceeding that of polycrystalline silicon (30) at 35℃. The origin of the piezoresistivity in CNT films may be ascribed to a pressure-induced change in the band gap and the defects.

  9. Carbon nanotube based transparent conductive thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, X; Rajamani, R; Stelson, K A; Cui, T

    2006-07-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) based optically transparent and electrically conductive thin films are fabricated on plastic substrates in this study. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are chemically treated with a mixture of concentrated sulfuric acid and nitric acid before being dispersed in aqueous surfactant-contained solutions. SWNT thin films are prepared from the stable SWNT solutions using wet coating techniques. The 100 nm thick SWNT thin film exhibits a surface resistivity of 6 kohms/square nanometer with an average transmittance of 88% on the visible light range, which is three times better than the films prepared from the high purity as-received SWNTs.

  10. Quantum transport in carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laird, Edward A.; Kuemmeth, Ferdinand; Steele, Gary A.;

    2015-01-01

    by recent advances in theory. As well as the well-understood overall picture, we also state clearly open questions for the field. These advances position nanotubes as a leading system for the study of spin and valley physics in one dimension where electronic disorder and hyperfine interaction can both...... and valley degrees of freedom. This review describes the modern understanding of transport through nanotube devices. Unlike conventional semiconductors, electrons in nanotubes have two angular momentum quantum numbers, arising from spin and from valley freedom. We focus on the interplay between the two....... In single quantum dots defined in short lengths of nanotube, the energy levels associated with each degree of freedom, and the spin-orbit coupling between them, are revealed by Coulomb blockade spectroscopy. In double quantum dots, the combination of quantum numbers modifies the selection rules of Pauli...

  11. A tunable carbon nanotube electromechanical oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sazonova, Vera; Yaish, Yuval; Üstünel, Hande; Roundy, David; Arias, Tomás A.; McEuen, Paul L.

    2004-09-01

    Nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) hold promise for a number of scientific and technological applications. In particular, NEMS oscillators have been proposed for use in ultrasensitive mass detection, radio-frequency signal processing, and as a model system for exploring quantum phenomena in macroscopic systems. Perhaps the ultimate material for these applications is a carbon nanotube. They are the stiffest material known, have low density, ultrasmall cross-sections and can be defect-free. Equally important, a nanotube can act as a transistor and thus may be able to sense its own motion. In spite of this great promise, a room-temperature, self-detecting nanotube oscillator has not been realized, although some progress has been made. Here we report the electrical actuation and detection of the guitar-string-like oscillation modes of doubly clamped nanotube oscillators. We show that the resonance frequency can be widely tuned and that the devices can be used to transduce very small forces.

  12. Single wall carbon nanotubes and their electrical properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛增泉; 刘惟敏; 侯士敏; 施祖进; 顾镇南; 刘虹雯; 赵兴钰; 张兆祥; 吴绵雷; 彭练矛; 吴全德

    2000-01-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were synthesized and purified. A water colloid of SWCNTs was prepared and used to assemble SWCNTs onto a gold film surface. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) images showed that short SWCNTs stood on gold film surfaces. Using STM tips made of SWCNTs, a crystal grain image of a gold thin film and an atomic resolution image of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite were successfully obtained. The electrical properties of short SWCNTs, which stood on the surface of gold film, were measured using STM. That SWCNTs stand on gold thin films is a promising technique for studying structures and properties of carbon nanotubes, as well as assembling and fabricating high-intensity coherent electron sources, field emission flat panel display, tips for scanning probe microscopes, new nanoelectronic devices, etc.

  13. Shear Flow Induced Alignment of Carbon Nanotubes in Natural Rubber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan He

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A new procedure for the fabrication of natural rubber composite with aligned carbon nanotubes is provided in this study. The two-step approach is based on (i the preparation of mixture latex of natural rubber, multiwalled carbon nanotubes, and other components and (ii the orientation of carbon nanotubes by a flow field. Rubber composite sheets filled with variable volume fraction of aligned carbon nanotubes were fabricated and then confirmed by transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy studies. An obvious increase in thermal conductivity has been obtained after the alignment of carbon nanotubes. The dynamic mechanical analysis was carried out in a tear mode for the composite.

  14. The elastic buckling of super-graphene and super-square carbon nanotube networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Ying; Qiu Xinming [AML, Department of Engineering Mechanics, School of Aerospace, Tsinghua University, 100084 Beijing (China); Yin Yajun, E-mail: yinyj@tsinghua.edu.c [AML, Department of Engineering Mechanics, School of Aerospace, Tsinghua University, 100084 Beijing (China)] [Division of Mechanics, Nanjing University of Technology, 210009 Nanjing (China); Yang Fan [AML, Department of Engineering Mechanics, School of Aerospace, Tsinghua University, 100084 Beijing (China); Fan Qinshan [Division of Mechanics, Nanjing University of Technology, 210009 Nanjing (China)

    2010-04-05

    The super-graphene (SG) and super-square (SS) carbon nanotube network are built by the straight single-walled carbon nanotubes and corresponding junctions. The elastic buckling behaviors of these carbon nanotube networks under different boundary conditions are explored through the molecular structural mechanics method. The following results are obtained: (a) The critical buckling forces of the SG and SS networks decrease as the side lengths or aspect ratios of the networks increase. The continuum plate theory could give good predictions to the buckling of the SS network but not the SG network with non-uniform buckling modes. (b) The carbon nanotube networks are more stable structures than the graphene structures with less carbon atoms.

  15. Nickel oxide nanotube synthesis using multiwalled carbon nanotubes as sacrificial templates for supercapacitor application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalla, Ahmed M.; Sahu, Rakesh P.; Wallar, Cameron J.; Chen, Ri; Zhitomirsky, Igor; Puri, Ishwar K.

    2017-02-01

    A novel approach for the fabrication of nickel oxide nanotubes based on multiwalled carbon nanotubes as a sacrificial template is described. Electroless deposition is employed to deposit nickel onto carbon nanotubes. The subsequent annealing of the product in the presence of air oxidizes nickel to nickel oxide, and carbon is released as gaseous carbon dioxide, leaving behind nickel oxide nanotubes. Electron microscopy and elemental mapping confirm the formation of nickel oxide nanotubes. New chelating polyelectrolytes are used as dispersing agents to achieve high colloidal stability for both the nickel-coated carbon nanotubes and the nickel oxide nanotubes. A gravimetric specific capacitance of 245.3 F g-1 and an areal capacitance of 3.28 F cm-2 at a scan rate of 2 mV s-1 is achieved, with an electrode fabricated using nickel oxide nanotubes as the active element with a mass loading of 24.1 mg cm-2.

  16. Flexible microdevices based on carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Ashante'; Cannon, Andrew; Lee, Jungchul; King, William P.; Graham, Samuel

    2006-12-01

    This work reports the fabrication and testing of flexible carbon nanotube microdevices made using hot embossing material transfer. Both micro-plasma and photodetector devices were made using as-grown unpurified multi-wall carbon nanotubes printed on PMMA substrates. Optical detectors were fabricated by attaching metal wires and monitoring the resistance as a function of light exposure. The electrical resistance of the nanotubes showed a strong sensitivity to light exposure which was also enhanced by heating the devices. While such processes in MWCNTs are not fully understood, the addition of thermal energy is believed to generate additional free charge carriers in the nanotubes. The plasma-generating microdevices consisted of a thin layer of thermoplastic polymer having the CNT electrode on one side and a metal electrode on the reverse side. The devices were electrically tested under atmospheric conditions with 0.01-1 kV ac and at 2.5 kHz, with the plasma igniting near 0.7 kV. The fabrication of these flexible organic devices demonstrates the ability to pattern useful carbon nanotube microdevices in low-cost thermoplastic polymers.

  17. Carbon nanotubes as optical biomedical sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruss, Sebastian; Hilmer, Andrew J; Zhang, Jingqing; Reuel, Nigel F; Mu, Bin; Strano, Michael S

    2013-12-01

    Biosensors are important tools in biomedical research. Moreover, they are becoming an essential part of modern healthcare. In the future, biosensor development will become even more crucial due to the demand for personalized-medicine, point-of care devices and cheaper diagnostic tools. Substantial advances in sensor technology are often fueled by the advent of new materials. Therefore, nanomaterials have motivated a large body of research and such materials have been implemented into biosensor devices. Among these new materials carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are especially promising building blocks for biosensors due to their unique electronic and optical properties. Carbon nanotubes are rolled-up cylinders of carbon monolayers (graphene). They can be chemically modified in such a way that biologically relevant molecules can be detected with high sensitivity and selectivity. In this review article we will discuss how carbon nanotubes can be used to create biosensors. We review the latest advancements of optical carbon nanotube based biosensors with a special focus on near-infrared (NIR)-fluorescence, Raman-scattering and fluorescence quenching.

  18. Improved Method of Purifying Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delzeit, Lance D.

    2004-01-01

    An improved method of removing the residues of fabrication from carbon nanotubes has been invented. These residues comprise amorphous carbon and metal particles that are produced during the growth process. Prior methods of removing the residues include a variety of processes that involved the use of halogens, oxygen, or air in both thermal and plasma processes. Each of the prior methods entails one or more disadvantages, including non-selectivity (removal or damage of nanotubes in addition to removal of the residues), the need to dispose of toxic wastes, and/or processing times as long as 24 hours or more. In contrast, the process described here does not include the use of toxic chemicals, the generation of toxic wastes, causes little or no damage to the carbon nanotubes, and involves processing times of less than 1 hour. In the improved method, purification is accomplished by flowing water vapor through the reaction chamber at elevated temperatures and ambient pressures. The impurities are converted to gaseous waste products by the selective hydrogenation and hydroxylation by the water in a reaction chamber. This process could be performed either immediately after growth or in a post-growth purification process. The water used needs to be substantially free of oxygen and can be obtained by a repeated freeze-pump-thaw process. The presence of oxygen will non-selectively attach the carbon nanotubes in addition to the amorphous carbon.

  19. Carbon Nanotube Membranes: Carbon Nanotube Membranes for Energy-Efficient Carbon Sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2010-03-01

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Porifera is developing carbon nanotube membranes that allow more efficient removal of CO2 from coal plant exhaust. Most of today’s carbon capture methods use chemical solvents, but capture methods that use membranes to draw CO2 out of exhaust gas are potentially more efficient and cost effective. Traditionally, membranes are limited by the rate at which they allow gas to flow through them and the amount of CO2 they can attract from the gas. Smooth support pores and the unique structure of Porifera’s carbon nanotube membranes allows them to be more permeable than other polymeric membranes, yet still selective enough for CO2 removal. This approach could overcome the barriers facing membrane-based approaches for capturing CO2 from coal plant exhausts.

  20. Theoretical Investigation on the Solubilization in Water of Functionalized Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Mananghaya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An important technique to increase the solubility and reactivity of carbon nanotube is through functionalization. In this study, the effects of functionalization of some single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs were investigated with the aid of density functional theory. The SWCNT model used in the study consists of a finite, (5, 0 zigzag nanotube segment containing 60 C atoms with hydrogen atoms added to the dangling bonds of the perimeter carbons. There are three water-dispersible SWCNTs used in this study that were functionalized with (a formic acid, as a model of carboxylic acid, (b isophthalic acid, as a model aromatic dicarboxylic acid, and (c benzenesulfonic acid, as a model aromatic sulfonic acid. Binding energies of the organic radicals to the nanotubes are calculated, as well as the HOMO-LUMO gaps and dipole moments of both nanotubes and functionalized nanotubes. Binding was found out to be thermodynamically favorable. The functionalization increases the electrical dipole moments and results in an enhancement in the solubility of the nanotubes in water manifested through favorable changes in the free energies of solvation. This should lower the toxicity of nanotubes and improve their biocompatibility.

  1. Structure Stability of Ⅰ-Type Carbon Nanotube Junctions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏丹; 袁喆; 李家明

    2002-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes with junctions may play an important role in future ‘nanoelectronics' and future ‘nano devices'.In particular, junctions constructed with metal and semiconducting nanotubes have potential applications. Basedon the orthogonal tight-binding molecular dynamics method, we present our study of the structure stability ofI-type carbon nanotube junctions.

  2. Bioaccumulation and ecotoxicity of carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jackson, Petra; Jacobsen, Nicklas Raun; Baun, Anders;

    2013-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) have numerous industrial applications and may be released to the environment. In the aquatic environment, pristine or functionalized CNT have different dispersion behavior, potentially leading to different risks of exposure along the water column. Data included in this review...

  3. Effective models for excitons in carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornean, Horia; Duclos, Pierre; Ricaud, Benjamin

    2007-01-01

    We analyse the low lying spectrum of a model of excitons in carbon nanotubes. Consider two particles with opposite charges and a Coulomb self-interaction, placed on an infinitely long cylinder. If the cylinder radius becomes small, the low lying spectrum of their relative motion is well described...

  4. Effective models for excitons in carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornean, Horia; Duclos, Pierre; Ricaud, Benjamin

    We analyse the low lying spectrum of a model of excitons in carbon nanotubes. Consider two particles with a Coulomb self-interaction, placed on an infinitely long cylinder. If the cylinder radius becomes small, the low lying spectrum is well described by a one-dimensional effective Hamiltonian...

  5. In-line manufacture of carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brambilla, Nicol Michele; Signorelli, Riccardo; Martini, Fabrizio; Corripio Luna, Oscar Enrique

    2015-04-28

    Mass production of carbon nanotubes (CNT) are facilitated by methods and apparatus disclosed herein. Advantageously, the methods and apparatus make use of a single production unit, and therefore provide for uninterrupted progress in a fabrication process. Embodiments of control systems for a variety of CNT production apparatus are included.

  6. Biodistribution of Carbon Nanotubes in Animal Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Nicklas Raun; Møller, Peter; Clausen, Per Axel

    2016-01-01

    The many physical and chemical properties of carbon nanotubes (CNT) make it one of the most commercially attractive materials in the era of nanotechnology. Here, we review the recent publications on in vivo biodistribution of pristine and functionalized forms of single-walled and multi-walled CNT...

  7. Multiwall carbon nanotubes reinforced epoxy nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei

    The emergence of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) has led to myriad possibilities for structural polymer composites with superior specific modulus, strength, and toughness. While the research activities in carbon nanotube reinforced polymer composites (NRPs) have made enormous progress towards fabricating next-generation advanced structural materials with added thermal, optical, and electrical advantages, questions concerning the filler dispersion, interface, and CNT alignment in these composites remain partially addressed. In this dissertation, the key technical challenges related to the synthesis, processing, and reinforcing mechanics governing the effective mechanical properties of NRPs were introduced and reviewed in the first two chapters. Subsequently, issues on the dispersion, interface control, hierarchical structure, and multi-functionality of NRPs were addressed based on functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotube reinforced DGEBA epoxy systems (NREs). In chapter 3, NREs with enhanced flexural properties were discussed in the context of improved dispersion and in-situ formation of covalent bonds at the interface. In chapter 4, NREs with controlled interface and tailored thermomechanical properties were demonstrated through the judicious choice of surface functionality and resin chemistry. In chapter 5, processing-condition-induced CNT organization in hierarchical epoxy nanocomposites was analyzed. In Chapter 6, possibilities were explored for multi-functional NREs for underwater acoustic structural applications. Finally, the findings of this dissertation were concluded and future research was proposed for ordered carbon nanotube array reinforced nanocomposites in the last chapter. Four journal publications resulted from this work are listed in Appendix.

  8. Chemistry of Carbon Nanotubes for Everyone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu-Dutt, Sharmistha; Minus, Marilyn L.; Jain, Rahul; Nepal, Dhriti; Kumar, Satish

    2012-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have the extraordinary potential to change our lives by improving existing products and enabling new ones. Current and future research and industrial workforce professionals are very likely to encounter some aspects of nanotechnology including CNT science and technology in their education or profession. The simple structure…

  9. Single electron-ics with carbon nanotubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Götz, G.T.J.

    2010-01-01

    We experimentally investigate Quantum Dots, formed in Carbon Nanotubes. The first part of this thesis deals with charge sensing on such quantum dots. The charge sensor is a metallic Single-electron-transistor, sensitive to the charge of a single electron on the quantum dot. We use this technique for

  10. Photothermal effects of immunologically modified carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griswold, Ryan T.; Henderson, Brock; Goddard, Jessica; Tan, Yongqiang; Hode, Tomas; Liu, Hong; Nordquist, Robert E.; Chen, Wei R.

    2013-02-01

    Carbon nanotubes have a great potential in the biomedical applications. To use carbon nanotubes in the treatment of cancer, we synthesized an immunologically modified single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) using a novel immunomodifier, glycated chitosan (GC), as an effective surfactant for SWNT. This new composition SWNT-GC was stable due to the strong non-covalent binding between SWNT and GC. The structure of SWNT-GC is presented in this report. The photothermal effect of SWNT-GC was investigated under irradiation of a near-infrared laser. SWNT-GC retained the optical properties of SWNT and the immunological properties of GC. Specifically, the SWNT-GC could selectively absorb a 980-nm light and induce desirable thermal effects in tissue culture and in animals. It could also induce tumor cell destruction, controlled by the laser settings and the doses of SWNT and GC. Laser+SWNT-GC treatment could also induce strong expression of heat shock proteins on the surface of tumor cells. This immunologically modified carbon nanotube could be used for selective photothermal interactions in noninvasive tumor treatment.

  11. Synthesis of Carbon Nanotube (CNT Composite Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dusan Losic

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes are attractive approach for designing of new membranes for advanced molecular separation because of their unique transport properties and ability to mimic biological protein channels. In this work the synthetic approach for fabrication of carbon nanotubes (CNTs composite membranes is presented. The method is based on growth of multi walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT using chemical vapour deposition (CVD on the template of nanoporous alumina (PA membranes. The influence of experimental conditions including carbon precursor, temperature, deposition time, and PA template on CNT growth process and quality of fabricated membranes was investigated. The synthesis of CNT/PA composites with controllable nanotube dimensions such as diameters (30–150 nm, and thickness (5–100 µm, was demonstrated. The chemical composition and morphological characteristics of fabricated CNT/PA composite membranes were investigated by various characterisation techniques including scanning electron microscopy (SEM, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDXS, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM and x-ray diffraction (XRD. Transport properties of prepared membranes were explored by diffusion of dye (Rose Bengal used as model of hydrophilic transport molecule.

  12. A New Resistance Formulation for Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Huan He

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A new resistance formulation for carbon nanotubes is suggested using fractal approach. The new formulation is also valid for other nonmetal conductors including nerve fibers, conductive polymers, and molecular wires. Our theoretical prediction agrees well with experimental observation.

  13. A new mechanism for carbon nanotube evolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ Key discoveries on the growth mechanism of carbon nanotubes(CNTs) have recently been achieved by CAS researcher ZHU Zhenping and his research group at the State Key Laboratory of Coal Conversion,the Institute of Coal Chemistry of CAS, funded by the National Natural Science Foundation of China and the CAS Bairen Program.

  14. Quantum transport in carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laird, Edward A.; Kuemmeth, Ferdinand; Steele, Gary A.

    2015-01-01

    modifies their transport behaviour. Interaction between electrons inside and outside a quantum dot is manifested in SU(4) Kondo behavior and level renormalization. Interaction within a dot leads to Wigner molecules and more complex correlated states. This review takes an experimental perspective informed...... and valley degrees of freedom. This review describes the modern understanding of transport through nanotube devices. Unlike conventional semiconductors, electrons in nanotubes have two angular momentum quantum numbers, arising from spin and from valley freedom. We focus on the interplay between the two....... In single quantum dots defined in short lengths of nanotube, the energy levels associated with each degree of freedom, and the spin-orbit coupling between them, are revealed by Coulomb blockade spectroscopy. In double quantum dots, the combination of quantum numbers modifies the selection rules of Pauli...

  15. Ionic liquid-assisted multiwalled carbon nanotube-dispersive micro-solid phase extraction for sensitive determination of inorganic As species in garlic samples by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grijalba, Alexander Castro; Escudero, Leticia B.; Wuilloud, Rodolfo G.

    2015-08-01

    A highly sensitive dispersive micro-solid phase extraction (D-μ-SPE) method combining an ionic liquid (IL) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) for inorganic As species (As(III) and As(V)) species separation and determination in garlic samples by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) was developed. Trihexyl(tetradecil)phosphonium chloride IL was used to form an ion pair with the arsenomolybdate complex obtained by reaction of As(V) with molybdate ion. Afterwards, 1.0 mg of MWCNTs was dispersed for As(V) extraction and the supernatant was separated by centrifugation. MWCNTs were re-dispersed with tetradecyltrimethylammonium bromide surfactant and ultrasound followed by direct injection into the graphite furnace of ETAAS for As determination. Pyrolysis and atomization conditions were carefully studied for complete decomposition of MWCNTs and IL matrices. Under optimum conditions, an extraction efficiency of 100% and a preconcentration factor of 70 were obtained with 5 mL of garlic extract. The detection limit was 7.1 ng L- 1 and the relative standard deviations (RSDs) for six replicate measurements at 5 μg L- 1 of As were 5.4% and 4.8% for As(III) and As(V), respectively. The proposed D-μ-SPE method allowed the efficient separation and determination of inorganic As species in a complex matrix such as garlic extract.

  16. Making junctions between carbon nanotubes using an ion beam

    CERN Document Server

    Krasheninnikov, A V; Keinonen, J; Banhart, F

    2003-01-01

    Making use of empirical potential molecular dynamics, we study ion bombardment of crossed single-walled carbon nanotubes as a tool to join the nanotubes. We demonstrate that ion irradiation should result in welding of crossed nanotubes, both suspended and deposited on substrates. We further predict optimum ion doses and energies for ion-mediated nanotube welding which may potentially be used for developing complicated networks of joined nanotubes.

  17. Carbon nanotubes for stem cell control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A. Stout

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In the past decade, two major advancements have transformed the world of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine—stem cells and carbon nano-dimensional materials. In the past, stem cell therapy seemed like it may present a cure for all medical ailments, but problems arose (i.e., immune system clearance, control of differentiation in the body, etc. that have hindered progress. But, with the synergy of carbon nano-dimensional materials, researchers have been able to overcome these tissue engineering and regenerative medicine obstacles and have begun developing treatments for strokes, bone failure, cardiovascular disease, and many other conditions. Here, we briefly review research involving carbon nanotubes which are relevant to the tissue engineering and regenerative medicine field with a special emphasis on carbon nanotube applications for stem cell delivery, drug delivery applications, and their use as improved medical devices.

  18. Growth Mechanism of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes on Iron–Copper Catalyst and Chirality Studies by Electron Diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, Maoshuai; Liu, Bilu; Chernov, Alexander I.

    2012-01-01

    Chiralities of single-walled carbon nanotubes grown on an atomic layer deposition prepared bimetallic FeCu/MgO catalyst were evaluated quantitatively using nanobeam electron diffraction. The results reveal that the growth yields nearly 90% semiconducting tubes, 45% of which are of the (6,5) type...... by impregnation, showing similar catalytic performance as the atomic layer deposition-prepared catalyst, yielding single-walled carbon nanotubes with a similar narrow chirality distribution....

  19. Pure carbon nanoscale devices: Nanotube heterojunctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chico, L.; Crespi, V.H.; Benedict, L.X.; Louie, S.G.; Cohen, M.L. [Department of Physics, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)]|[Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    1996-02-01

    Introduction of pentagon-heptagon pair defects into the hexagonal network of a single carbon nanotube can change the helicity of the tube and alter its electronic structure. Using a tight-binding method to calculate the electronic structure of such systems we show that they behave as nanoscale metal/semiconductor or semiconductor/semiconductor junctions. These junctions could be the building blocks of nanoscale electronic devices made entirely of carbon. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  20. Exploring the Immunotoxicity of Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Yanmei

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Mass production of carbon nanotubes (CNTs and their applications in nanomedicine lead to the increased exposure risk of nanomaterials to human beings. Although reports on toxicity of nanomaterials are rapidly growing, there is still a lack of knowledge on the potential toxicity of such materials to immune systems. This article reviews some existing studies assessing carbon nanotubes’ toxicity to immune system and provides the potential mechanistic explanation.

  1. Preparation of double-walled carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Bin; WEI Jinquan; CI Lijie; WU Dehai

    2004-01-01

    Double-walled carbon nanotubes were prepared using the floating chemical vapor deposition with methane as carbon source and adding small amount of sulfur into the ferrocene catalyst. The optimized technological parameters are: the reaction temperature is 1200℃; the catalyst vapor temperature is 80℃; the flow rate of argon is 2000 SCCM; the flow rate of methane is 5 SCCM. The purified DWNTs under these optimized technological parameters have high purity above 90 wt%.

  2. Synthesis, characterisation and applications of coiled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanus, Monica J; Harris, Andrew T

    2010-04-01

    Coiled carbon nanotubes are helical carbon structures formed when heptagonal and pentagonal rings are inserted into the hexagonal backbone of a 'straight' nanotube. Coiled carbon nanotubes have been reported with both regular and irregular helical structures. In this work the structure, growth mechanism(s), synthesis, properties and potential applications of coiled carbon nanotubes are reviewed. Published data suggests that coiled carbon nanotube synthesis occurs due to nonuniform extrusion of carbon from a catalyst surface. To date, coiled carbon nanotubes have been synthesised using catalyst modification techniques including: (i) the addition of S or P containing compounds during synthesis; (ii) the use of binary or ternary metal catalysts; (iii) the use of microwaves to create a local temperature gradient around individual catalyst particles and; (iv) the use of pH control during catalyst preparation. In most instances coiled carbon nanotubes are produced as a by-product; high yield and/or large-scale synthesis of coiled carbon nanotubes remains problematic. The qualitative analysis of coiled carbon nanotubes is currently hindered by the absence of specific characterisation data in the literature, e.g., oxidation profiles measured by thermogravimetric analysis and Raman spectra of pure coiled carbon nanotube samples.

  3. In-situ observations of catalyst dynamics during surface-bound carbon nanotube nucleation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofmann, S; Sharma, R; Du, G;

    2007-01-01

    We present atomic-scale, video-rate environmental transmission electron microscopy and in situ time-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of surface-bound catalytic chemical vapor deposition of single-walled carbon nanotubes and nanofibers. We observe that transition metal catalyst...... nanoparticles on SiOx support show crystalline lattice fringe contrast and high deformability before and during nanotube formation. A single-walled carbon nanotube nucleates by lift-off of a carbon cap. Cap stabilization and nanotube growth involve the dynamic reshaping of the catalyst nanocrystal itself....... For a carbon nanofiber, the graphene layer stacking is determined by the successive elongation and contraction of the catalyst nanoparticle at its tip....

  4. Quantitative Analysis of Isolated Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes with Their Molar Absorbance Coefficients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shota Kuwahara

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The molar absorbance coefficients of metallic, semiconducting, and (6,5 chirality enriched single-wall carbon nanotubes were evaluated by a spray technique combined with atomic force microscopy. Single-wall carbon nanotubes with isolated and a single predominant electronic type were obtained by using the density-gradient ultracentrifugation technique. In the visible region, all coefficients had similar values around 2–5 × 109/mL mol−1 cm−1, independent of their diameter distribution and the electronic types of single-wall carbon nanotubes, and the εS22/εM11  and εS11/εM11 were estimated to be 1.0 and 4.0, respectively. The coefficient strongly depends on the length of single-wall carbon nanotubes, independent of their electronic types and chirality.

  5. Carbon nanotube oscillators for applications as nanothermometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmat, Fainida; Thamwattana, Ngamta; Hill, James M.

    2010-10-01

    Nanostructures such as carbon nanotubes have a broad range of potential applications such as nanomotors, nano-oscillators and electromechanical nanothermometers, and a proper understanding of the molecular interaction between nanostructures is fundamentally important for these applications. In this paper, we determine the molecular interaction potential of interacting carbon nanotubes for two configurations. The first is a shuttle configuration involving a short outer tube sliding on a fixed inner tube, and the second involves a telescopic configuration for which an inner tube moves both in the region between two outer tubes and through the tubes themselves. For the first configuration we examine two cases of semi-infinite and finite inner carbon nanotubes. We employ the continuum approximation and the 6-12 Lennard-Jones potential for non-bonded molecules to determine the molecular interaction potential and the resulting van der Waals force, and we evaluate the resulting surface integrals numerically. We also investigate the acceptance condition and suction energy for the first configuration. Our results show that for the shuttle configuration with a semi-infinite inner tube, the suction energy is maximum when the difference between the outer and inner tubes radii is approximately 3.4 Å, which is the ideal inter-wall spacing between graphene sheets. For the finite inner tube, the potential energy is dependent on both the inner and outer tube lengths as well as on the inter-wall spacing. In terms of the oscillating frequency, the critical issue is the length of the moving outer tube, and the shorter the length, the higher the frequency. Further, for the telescopic configuration with two semi-infinite outer nanotubes of different radii, we find that the interaction energy also depends on the difference of the tube radii. For two outer nanotubes of equal radii we observe that the shorter the distance between the two outer nanotubes, the higher the magnitude of the

  6. Commensurate Phases of Kr Adsorbed on Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbaye, Mamadou T.; Maiga, Sidi M.; Gatica, Silvina M.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we show that Krypton atoms form a commensurate solid (CS) phase with a fractional coverage of one krypton atom per every four carbons on zigzag carbon nanotubes. This is a unique phase, different from the √{3} × √{3}R30° CS monolayer formed on graphite, which has a lower coverage of one krypton atom per every six carbons. Our prediction disagrees with experiments that observe in nanotubes the same solid structure found on graphite. In order to address this discrepancy, we simulated adsorption of Kr on zigzag and armchair single-walled carbon nanotubes with radii ranging from 4.7 to 28.83 Å. Our simulations confirm that the CS of coverage 1/4 forms on medium-sized zigzag nanotubes. We also found the 1/6-coverage solid on graphene, which represents the infinite-radius limit of a nanotube. Our findings are key to experiments of adsorption on nanotubes where the interpretation and justification of the results are based on the monolayer coverage, such as mass or conductance isotherms measurements.

  7. Field-effect transistors assembled from functionalized carbon nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Klinke, Christian; Hannon, James B.; Afzali, Ali; Avouris, Phaedon

    2006-01-01

    We have fabricated field effect transistors from carbon nanotubes using a novel selective placement scheme. We use carbon nanotubes that are covalently bound to molecules containing hydroxamic acid functionality. The functionalized nanotubes bind strongly to basic metal oxide surfaces, but not to silicon dioxide. Upon annealing, the functionalization is removed, restoring the electronic properties of the nanotubes. The devices we have fabricated show excellent electrical characteristics.

  8. Porous carbon nanotubes: Molecular absorption, transport, and separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yzeiri, Irena; Patra, Niladri; Král, Petr

    2014-03-01

    We use classical molecular dynamics simulations to study nanofluidic properties of porous carbon nanotubes. We show that saturated water vapor condenses on the porous nanotubes, can be absorbed by them and transported in their interior. When these nanotubes are charged and placed in ionic solutions, they can selectively absorb ions in their interior and transport them. Porous carbon nanotubes can also be used as selective molecular sieves, as illustrated on a room temperature separation of benzene and ethanol.

  9. Carbon nanotubes on a spider silk scaffold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steven, Eden; Saleh, Wasan R.; Lebedev, Victor; Acquah, Steve F. A.; Laukhin, Vladimir; Alamo, Rufina G.; Brooks, James S.

    2013-09-01

    Understanding the compatibility between spider silk and conducting materials is essential to advance the use of spider silk in electronic applications. Spider silk is tough, but becomes soft when exposed to water. Here we report a strong affinity of amine-functionalised multi-walled carbon nanotubes for spider silk, with coating assisted by a water and mechanical shear method. The nanotubes adhere uniformly and bond to the silk fibre surface to produce tough, custom-shaped, flexible and electrically conducting fibres after drying and contraction. The conductivity of coated silk fibres is reversibly sensitive to strain and humidity, leading to proof-of-concept sensor and actuator demonstrations.

  10. Localization in single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuhrer, M.S.; Cohen, M.L.; Zettl, A.; Crespi, V.H.

    1998-08-15

    We demonstrate that in low temperature semiconductor-like regions the electrical resistance of single-walled carbon nanotube mats is highly nonlinear with a temperature-dependent threshold field for the onset of nonohmic conduction. The modest applied electric field completely suppresses the upturn in resistance and recovers metallic behavior over the entire temperature range 2.2K < T < 300K. The transport data indicate low-temperature localization of charge carriers arise from disorder on the nanotube bundles themselves and not from granularity caused by weak interbundle connections. The temperature-independent localization radius a is determined to be approximately 330 nm.

  11. A new method of preparing single-walled carbon nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Vivekchang, SRC; Govindaraj, A.

    2003-01-01

    A novel method of purification for single-walled carbon nanotubes, prepared by an arc-discharge method, is described. The method involves a combination of acid washing followed by high temperature hydrogen treatment to remove the metal nanoparticles and amorphous carbon present in the as-synthesized single-walled carbon nanotubes. The purified single-walled carbon nanotubes have been characterised by low-angle X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, thermo-gravimetric analysis and Raman spect...

  12. Carbon Nanotubes Hybrid Hydrogels in Drug Delivery: A Perspective Review

    OpenAIRE

    Giuseppe Cirillo; Silke Hampel; Umile Gianfranco Spizzirri; Ortensia Ilaria Parisi; Nevio Picci; Francesca Iemma

    2014-01-01

    The use of biologics, polymers, silicon materials, carbon materials, and metals has been proposed for the preparation of innovative drug delivery devices. One of the most promising materials in this field are the carbon-nanotubes composites and hybrid materials coupling the advantages of polymers (biocompatibility and biodegradability) with those of carbon nanotubes (cellular uptake, stability, electromagnatic, and magnetic behavior). The applicability of polymer-carbon nanotubes composites i...

  13. A new method of preparing single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S R C Vivekchand; A Govindaraj

    2003-10-01

    A novel method of purification for single-walled carbon nanotubes, prepared by an arc-discharge method, is described. The method involves a combination of acid washing followed by high temperature hydrogen treatment to remove the metal nanoparticles and amorphous carbon present in the as-synthesized singlewalled carbon nanotubes. The purified single-walled carbon nanotubes have been characterised by low-angle X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, thermo-gravimetric analysis and Raman spectroscopy.

  14. Thin Coatings of Polymeric Carbon and Carbon Nanotubes for Corrosion Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-01

    Carbon Nanotube Functionalization /Doping Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) A) p-Doping C) Polymer Wrapping Model B) n-Doping Polyethyleneimine ( PEI ) SWCNT Paint...fluorine-containing) groups functions as the barrier layer Multilayer Smart Carbon Nanotube Coating Insoluble polymer layer top coating -PMMA Substrate...Thin Coatings of Polymeric Carbon and Carbon Nanotubes for Corrosion Protection Zafar Iqbal Department of Chemistry and Environmental Science New

  15. Functionalization of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eloise Van Hooijdonk

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This review focuses and summarizes recent studies on the functionalization of carbon nanotubes oriented perpendicularly to their substrate, so-called vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VA-CNTs. The intrinsic properties of individual nanotubes make the VA-CNTs ideal candidates for integration in a wide range of devices, and many potential applications have been envisaged. These applications can benefit from the unidirectional alignment of the nanotubes, the large surface area, the high carbon purity, the outstanding electrical conductivity, and the uniformly long length. However, practical uses of VA-CNTs are limited by their surface characteristics, which must be often modified in order to meet the specificity of each particular application. The proposed approaches are based on the chemical modifications of the surface by functionalization (grafting of functional chemical groups, decoration with metal particles or wrapping of polymers to bring new properties or to improve the interactions between the VA-CNTs and their environment while maintaining the alignment of CNTs.

  16. Modeling of the HiPco process for carbon nanotube production. II. Reactor-scale analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokcen, Tahir; Dateo, Christopher E.; Meyyappan, M.

    2002-01-01

    The high-pressure carbon monoxide (HiPco) process, developed at Rice University, has been reported to produce single-walled carbon nanotubes from gas-phase reactions of iron carbonyl in carbon monoxide at high pressures (10-100 atm). Computational modeling is used here to develop an understanding of the HiPco process. A detailed kinetic model of the HiPco process that includes of the precursor, decomposition metal cluster formation and growth, and carbon nanotube growth was developed in the previous article (Part I). Decomposition of precursor molecules is necessary to initiate metal cluster formation. The metal clusters serve as catalysts for carbon nanotube growth. The diameter of metal clusters and number of atoms in these clusters are some of the essential information for predicting carbon nanotube formation and growth, which is then modeled by the Boudouard reaction with metal catalysts. Based on the detailed model simulations, a reduced kinetic model was also developed in Part I for use in reactor-scale flowfield calculations. Here this reduced kinetic model is integrated with a two-dimensional axisymmetric reactor flow model to predict reactor performance. Carbon nanotube growth is examined with respect to several process variables (peripheral jet temperature, reactor pressure, and Fe(CO)5 concentration) with the use of the axisymmetric model, and the computed results are compared with existing experimental data. The model yields most of the qualitative trends observed in the experiments and helps to understanding the fundamental processes in HiPco carbon nanotube production.

  17. G-quartet type self-assembly of guanine functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Prabhpreet; Venkatesh, V.; Nagapradeep, N.; Verma, Sandeep; Bianco, Alberto

    2012-03-01

    The simple strategy of linking guanine to single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) through covalent functionalization permitted generation of the alignment of the nanotubes into lozenges reminiscent of guanine quartets (G-quartets) in the presence of potassium ions as observed by atomic force microscopy.The simple strategy of linking guanine to single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) through covalent functionalization permitted generation of the alignment of the nanotubes into lozenges reminiscent of guanine quartets (G-quartets) in the presence of potassium ions as observed by atomic force microscopy. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental procedures for the synthesis and characterization of the precursors and MWCNT conjugates. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr11849a

  18. Carbon nanotubes degraded by neutrophil myeloperoxidase induce less pulmonary inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagan, Valerian E.; Konduru, Nagarjun V.; Feng, Weihong; Allen, Brett L.; Conroy, Jennifer; Volkov, Yuri; Vlasova, Irina I.; Belikova, Natalia A.; Yanamala, Naveena; Kapralov, Alexander; Tyurina, Yulia Y.; Shi, Jingwen; Kisin, Elena R.; Murray, Ashley R.; Franks, Jonathan; Stolz, Donna; Gou, Pingping; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith; Fadeel, Bengt; Star, Alexander; Shvedova, Anna A.

    2010-05-01

    We have shown previously that single-walled carbon nanotubes can be catalytically biodegraded over several weeks by the plant-derived enzyme, horseradish peroxidase. However, whether peroxidase intermediates generated inside human cells or biofluids are involved in the biodegradation of carbon nanotubes has not been explored. Here, we show that hypochlorite and reactive radical intermediates of the human neutrophil enzyme myeloperoxidase catalyse the biodegradation of single-walled carbon nanotubes in vitro, in neutrophils and to a lesser degree in macrophages. Molecular modelling suggests that interactions of basic amino acids of the enzyme with the carboxyls on the carbon nanotubes position the nanotubes near the catalytic site. Importantly, the biodegraded nanotubes do not generate an inflammatory response when aspirated into the lungs of mice. Our findings suggest that the extent to which carbon nanotubes are biodegraded may be a major determinant of the scale and severity of the associated inflammatory responses in exposed individuals.

  19. Computational studies of small carbon and iron-carbon systems relevant to carbon nanotube growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Haiming; Rosén, Arne; Harutyunyan, Avetik; Curtarolo, Stefano; Bolton, Kim

    2008-11-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations show that dimers and longer carbon strings are more stable than individual atoms on Fe(111) surfaces. It is therefore necessary to consider the formation of these species on the metal surfaces and their effect on the mechanism of single-walled nanotube (SWNT) growth. The good agreement between the trends (energies and structures) obtained using DFT and those based on the Brenner and AIREBO models indicate that these analytic models provide adequate descriptions of the supported carbon systems needed for valid molecular dynamics simulations of SWNT growth. In contrast, the AIREBO model provides a better description of the relative energies for isolated carbon species, and this model is preferred over the Brenner potential when simulating SWNT growth in the absence of metal particles. However, the PM3 semiempirical model appears to provide an even better description for these systems and, given sufficient computer resources, direct dynamics methods based on this model may be preferred.

  20. Purification of Carbon Nanotubes by Proton Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Euikwoun; Lee, Jeonggil; Lee, Younman; Jeon, Jaekyun; Kim, Jae-Yong; Kim, Jeongha; Shin, Kwanwoo; Youn, Sang-Pil; Kim, Kyeryung

    2007-10-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) exhibit variety of superior physical properties including well-defined nanodimensional structure, high electrical and thermal conductivity, and good mechanical stability against external irradiations. Further, a large specific surface area per unit weight suggests that carbon nanotubes could be excellent candidates for gas storage, purification, and separation. However, the practical application of CNTs is limited mainly due to the metallic impurities that were used as a catalyst during the fabrication process. Here, we irradiated CNTs by using high energy proton beams (35.7 MeV at the Bragg Peak). Interestingly, metallic impurities such as Fe, Ni, Co and chunk of amorphous carbon that were attached on the surface of CNTs were completely removed after the irradiation. The mechanism of such the purification process is not understood. The possible speculation will be demonstrated combined with the changes of physical properties including the appearance of the magnetism after the irradiation.

  1. On the Nanoindentation of the Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petre P. Teodorescu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A new inverse approach is proposed in this paper, which combines elements of nonlocal theory and molecular mechanics, based on the experimental results available in the nanoindentation literature. The effect of the inlayer van der Waals atomistic interactions for carbon nanotubes with multiple walls (MWCNT is included by means of the Brenner-Tersoff potential and experimental results. The neighboring walls of MWCNT are coupled through van der Waals interactions, and the shell buckling would initiate in the outermost shell, when nanotubes are short. The nanoindentation technique is simulated for the axially compressed of individual nanotubes, in order to evaluate the load-unloaded-displacement, the curve critical buckling and the appropriate values for local Lamé constants.

  2. Comparison of adsorption behavior of PCDD/Fs on carbon nanotubes and activated carbons in a bench-scale dioxin generating system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xujian; Li, Xiaodong; Xu, Shuaixi; Zhao, Xiyuan; Ni, Mingjiang; Cen, Kefa

    2015-07-01

    Porous carbon-based materials are commonly used to remove various organic and inorganic pollutants from gaseous and liquid effluents and products. In this study, the adsorption of dioxins on both activated carbons and multi-walled carbon nanotube was internally compared, via series of bench scale experiments. A laboratory-scale dioxin generator was applied to generate PCDD/Fs with constant concentration (8.3 ng I-TEQ/Nm(3)). The results confirm that high-chlorinated congeners are more easily adsorbed on both activated carbons and carbon nanotubes than low-chlorinated congeners. Carbon nanotubes also achieved higher adsorption efficiency than activated carbons even though they have smaller BET-surface. Carbon nanotubes reached the total removal efficiency over 86.8 % to be compared with removal efficiencies of only 70.0 and 54.2 % for the two other activated carbons tested. In addition, because of different adsorption mechanisms, the removal efficiencies of carbon nanotubes dropped more slowly with time than was the case for activated carbons. It could be attributed to the abundant mesopores distributed in the surface of carbon nanotubes. They enhanced the pore filled process of dioxin molecules during adsorption. In addition, strong interactions between the two benzene rings of dioxin molecules and the hexagonal arrays of carbon atoms in the surface make carbon nanotubes have bigger adsorption capacity.

  3. Carbon nanotube materials from hydrogen storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dillon, A.C.; Bekkedahl, T.A.; Cahill, A.F. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The lack of convenient and cost-effective hydrogen storage is a major impediment to wide scale use of hydrogen in the United States energy economy. Improvements in the energy densities of hydrogen storage systems, reductions in cost, and increased compatibility with available and forecasted systems are required before viable hydrogen energy use pathways can be established. Carbon-based hydrogen adsorption materials hold particular promise for meeting and exceeding the U.S. Department of Energy hydrogen storage energy density targets for transportation if concurrent increases in hydrogen storage capacity and carbon density can be achieved. These two goals are normally in conflict for conventional porous materials, but may be reconciled by the design and synthesis of new adsorbent materials with tailored pore size distributions and minimal macroporosity. Carbon nanotubes offer the possibility to explore new designs for adsorbents because they can be fabricated with small size distributions, and naturally tend to self-assemble by van der Waals forces. This year we report heats of adsorption for hydrogen on nanotube materials that are 2 and 3 times greater than for hydrogen on activated carbon. The hydrogen which is most strongly bound to these materials remains on the carbon surface to temperatures greater than 285 K. These results suggest that nanocapillary forces are active in stabilizing hydrogen on the surfaces of carbon nanotubes, and that optimization of the adsorbent will lead to effective storage at higher temperatures. In this paper we will also report on our activities which are targeted at understanding and optimizing the nucleation and growth of single wall nanotubes. These experiments were made possible by the development of a unique feedback control circuit which stabilized the plasma-arc during a synthesis run.

  4. Carbon Nanotubes for Space Photovoltaic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efstathiadis, Harry; Haldar, Pradeep; Landi, Brian J.; Denno, Patrick L.; DiLeo, Roberta A.; VanDerveer, William; Raffaelle, Ryne P.

    2007-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can be envisioned as an individual graphene sheet rolled into a seamless cylinder (single-walled, SWNT), or concentric sheets as in the case of a multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWNT) (1). The role-up vector will determine the hexagonal arrangement and "chirality" of the graphene sheet, which will establish the nanotube to be metallic or semiconducting. The optoelectronic properties will depend directly on this chiral angle and the diameter of the SWNT, with semiconductor types exhibiting a band gap energy (2). Characteristic of MWNTs are the concentric graphene layers spaced 0.34 nm apart, with diameters from 10-200 nm and lengths up to hundreds of microns (2). In the case of SWNTs, the diameters range from 0.4 - 2 nm and lengths have been reported up to 1.5 cm (3). SWNTs have the distinguishable property of "bundling" together due to van der Waal's attractions to form "ropes." A comparison of these different structural types is shown in Figure 1. The use of SWNTS in space photovoltaic (PV) applications is attractive for a variety of reasons. Carbon nanotubes as a class of materials exhibit unprecedented optical, electrical, mechanical properties, with the added benefit of being nanoscale in size which fosters ideal interaction in nanomaterial-based devices like polymeric solar cells. The optical bandgap of semiconducting SWNTs can be varied from approx. 0.4 - 1.5 eV, with this property being inversely proportional to the nanotube diameter. Recent work at GE Global Research has shown where a single nanotube device can behave as an "ideal" pn diode (5). The SWNT was bridged over a SiO2 channel between Mo contacts and exhibited an ideality factor of 1, based on a fit of the current-voltage data using the diode equation. The measured PV efficiency under a 0.8 eV monochromatic illumination showed a power conversion efficiency of 0.2 %. However, the projected efficiency of these junctions is estimated to be > 5 %, especially when one considers the

  5. Carbon Micronymphaea: Graphene on Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Won Choi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the morphology of carbon nanomaterials such as carbon nanotube (CNT, graphene, and their hybrid structure under various operating conditions during a one-step synthesis via plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD. We focus on the synthetic aspects of carbon hybrid material composed of heteroepitaxially grown graphene on top of a vertical array of carbon nanotubes, called carbon micronymphaea. We characterize the structural features of this unique nanocomposite by uses of electron microscopy and micro-Raman spectroscopy. We observe carbon nanofibers, poorly aligned and well-aligned vertical arrays of CNT sequentially as the growth temperature increases, while we always discover the carbon hybrids, called carbon micronymphaea, at specific cooling rate of 15°C/s, which is optimal for the carbon precipitation from the Ni nanoparticles in this study. We expect one-pot synthesized graphene-on-nanotube hybrid structure poses great potential for applications that demand ultrahigh surface-to-volume ratios with intact graphitic nature and directional electronic and thermal transports.

  6. Occupational nanosafety considerations for carbon nanotubes and carbon nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castranova, Vincent; Schulte, Paul A; Zumwalde, Ralph D

    2013-03-19

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are carbon atoms arranged in a crystalline graphene lattice with a tubular morphology. CNTs exhibit high tensile strength, possess unique electrical properties, are durable, and can be functionalized. These properties allow applications as structural materials, in electronics, as heating elements, in batteries, in the production of stain-resistant fabric, for bone grafting and dental implants, and for targeted drug delivery. Carbon nanofibers (CNFs) are strong, flexible fibers that are currently used to produce composite materials. Agitation can lead to aerosolized CNTs and CNFs, and peak airborne particulate concentrations are associated with workplace activities such as weighing, transferring, mixing, blending, or sonication. Most airborne CNTs or CNFs found in workplaces are loose agglomerates of micrometer diameter. However, due to their low density, they linger in workplace air for a considerable time, and a large fraction of these structures are respirable. In rat and mouse models, pulmonary exposure to single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), or CNFs causes the following pulmonary reactions: acute pulmonary inflammation and injury, rapid and persistent formation of granulomatous lesions at deposition sites of large CNT agglomerates, and rapid and progressive alveolar interstitial fibrosis at deposition sites of more dispersed CNT or CNF structures. Pulmonary exposure to SWCNTs can induce oxidant stress in aortic tissue and increases plaque formation in an atherosclerotic mouse model. Pulmonary exposure to MWCNTs depresses the ability of coronary arterioles to respond to dilators. These cardiovascular effects may result from neurogenic signals from sensory irritant receptors in the lung. Pulmonary exposure to MWCNTs also upregulates mRNA for inflammatory mediators in selected brain regions, and pulmonary exposure to SWCNTs upregulates the baroreceptor reflex. In addition, pulmonary exposure to

  7. Multifunctional Carbon Nanotube Fiber Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    coagulant. The second process (patent pending) is novel in that it directly results polymer-free nanotube fibers without using a super acid spinning...chemical and electrochemical stability, hydrophobicity and viscosity . The generic structure, chemical name and abbreviations for the most common ions...modification procedure involved the electrochemical infiltration of small amounts of the polypyrrole/p-toluene sulphonate (PPy/PTS) conducting polymer

  8. Phonon and thermal properties of achiral single wall carbon nanotubes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prapti Saxena; Sankar P Sanyal

    2006-08-01

    A detailed theoretical study of the phonon and thermal properties of achiral single wall carbon nanotubes has been carried out using force constant model considering up to third nearest-neighbor interactions. We have calculated the phonon dispersions, density of states, radial breathing modes (RBM) and the specific heats for various zigzag and armchair nanotubes, with radii ranging from 2.8 Å to 11.0 Å. A comparative study of phonon spectrum with measured Raman data reveals that the number of Raman active modes for a tube does not depend on the number of atoms present in the unit cell but on its chirality. Calculated phonon modes at the zone center more or less accurately predicted the Raman active modes. The radial breathing mode is of particular interest as for a specific radius of a nanotube it is found to be independent of its chirality. We have also calculated the variation of RBM and G-band modes for tubes of different radii. RBM shows an inverse dependence on the radius of the tube. Finally, the values of specific heat are calculated for various nanotubes at room temperature and it was found that the specific heat shows an exponential dependence on the diameter of the tube.

  9. Strong adsorption of Al-doped carbon nanotubes toward cisplatin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Li, Guo-Qing; Lu, Xiao-Min; Ma, Juan-Juan; Zeng, Peng-Yu; He, Qin-Yu; Wang, Yin-Zhen

    2016-08-01

    The adsorption of cisplatin molecule on Al-doped CNTs is investigated using density functional theory. The obtained results indicate that Al-doped carbon nanotubes can strongly absorb cisplatin. After absorbing cisplatin, the symmetry of CNTs has some changes. We innovatively defined a parameter of symmetry variation which relates to the adsorption. By analyzing the electronic structure, it can be concluded that under the circumstance that cisplatin was absorbed by Al-doped CNTs through aluminum atom of Al-doped CNTs. In conclusion, Al-doped CNTs is a kind of potential delivery carrier with high quality for anticancer drug cisplatin.

  10. Probe Microscopic Studies of DNA Molecules on Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuo Umemura

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Hybrids of DNA and carbon nanotubes (CNTs are promising nanobioconjugates for nanobiosensors, carriers for drug delivery, and other biological applications. In this review, nanoscopic characterization of DNA-CNT hybrids, in particular, characterization by scanning probe microscopy (SPM, is summarized. In many studies, topographical imaging by atomic force microscopy has been performed. However, some researchers have demonstrated advanced SPM operations in order to maximize its unique and valuable functions. Such sophisticated approaches are attractive and will have a significant impact on future studies of DNA-CNT hybrids.

  11. Electronic, transport, and magnetic properties of punctured carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Jeová Calisto; de Vasconcelos, Fabrício Morais; de Aguiar, Acrísio Lins; Alves, Tayroni Francisco de Alencar; Meunier, Vincent; Girão, Eduardo Costa

    2016-12-01

    We use a spin-polarized tight-binding model Hamiltonian and the Landauer transport formalism to investigate the electronic transport properties of carbon nanotubes where different types of holes have been drilled through their sidewalls. We focus on zigzag edged defects with different atomic configurations since these systems enable the emergence of magnetic properties. We show that a number of hole geometries, magnetic states, and electronic spins yield attractive transport properties, such as ON/OFF switching for the electronic current, and nontrivial dependence of transmission with hole size.

  12. Use of Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes for Covalent Attachment of Nanotubes to Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tour, James M.; Dyke, Christopher A.; Maya, Francisco; Stewart, Michael P.; Chen, Bo; Flatt, Austen K.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the invention is to covalently attach functionalized carbon nanotubes to silicon. This step allows for the introduction of carbon nanotubes onto all manner of silicon surfaces, and thereby introduction of carbon nano - tubes covalently into silicon-based devices, onto silicon particles, and onto silicon surfaces. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) dispersed as individuals in surfactant were functionalized. The nano - tube was first treated with 4-t-butylbenzenediazonium tetrafluoroborate to give increased solubility to the carbon nanotube; the second group attached to the sidewall of the nanotube has a silyl-protected terminal alkyne that is de-protected in situ. This gives a soluble carbon nanotube that has functional groups appended to the sidewall that can be attached covalently to silicon. This reaction was monitored by UV/vis/NJR to assure direct covalent functionalization.

  13. Metal-enhanced fluorescence of carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Guosong; Tabakman, Scott M; Welsher, Kevin; Wang, Hailiang; Wang, Xinran; Dai, Hongjie

    2010-11-17

    The photoluminescence (PL) quantum yield of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) is relatively low, with various quenching effects by metallic species reported in the literature. Here, we report the first case of metal enhanced fluorescence (MEF) of surfactant-coated carbon nanotubes on nanostructured gold substrates. The photoluminescence quantum yield of SWNTs is observed to be enhanced more than 10-fold. The dependence of fluorescence enhancement on metal-nanotube distance and on the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of the gold substrate for various SWNT chiralities is measured to reveal the mechanism of enhancement. Surfactant-coated SWNTs in direct contact with metal exhibit strong MEF without quenching, suggesting a small quenching distance for SWNTs on the order of the van der Waals distance, beyond which the intrinsically fast nonradiative decay rate in nanotubes is little enhanced by metal. The metal enhanced fluorescence of SWNTs is attributed to radiative lifetime shortening through resonance coupling of SWNT emission to the reradiating dipolar plasmonic modes in the metal.

  14. Spectroscopy of Optical Excitations in Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yingzhong

    2006-03-01

    Understanding the optical spectra and electronic excited state dynamics of carbon naotubes is important both for fundamental research and a wide variety of potential applications. In this presentation, we will report the results of a systematic study on semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) obtained by utilizing complementary femtosecond spectroscopic techniques, including fluorescence up-conversion, frequency-resolved transient absorption, and three-pulse photon echo peakshift (3PEPS) spectroscopy. Our efforts have focused on optically selective detection of the spectra and dynamics associated with structurally distinct semiconducting SWNT species. Using individual nanotube enriched micelle-dispersed SWNT preparations, in combination with resonant excitation and detection, has enabled us to independently access selected species, such as the (8,3), (6,5), (7,5), (11,0), (7,6) and (9,5) nanotubes. We will discuss the following topics: (1) the excitonic nature of the elementary excitation and its unambiguous identification from direct determination of the exciton binding energy for a selected semiconducting nanotube, the (8,3) tube; (2) the spectroscopic and dynamical signatures of exciton-exciton annihilation and its predominant role in governing ultrafast excited state relaxation; (3) the annihilation-concomitant exciton dissociation and the spectroscopic and dynamic features of the resulting electron-hole continuum; (4) timescales characterizing the ultrafast thermalization processes. In addition, we will demonstrate the power of 3PEPS spectroscopy to elucidate the spectral properties and dynamics of SWNTs. This work was supported by the NSF.

  15. Developing Carbon Nanotube Standards at NASA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaev, Pasha; Arepalli, Sivaram; Sosa, Edward; Gorelik, Olga; Yowell, Leonard

    2007-01-01

    Single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are currently being produced and processed by several methods. Many researchers are continuously modifying existing methods and developing new methods to incorporate carbon nanotubes into other materials and utilize the phenomenal properties of SWCNTs. These applications require availability of SWCNTs with known properties and there is a need to characterize these materials in a consistent manner. In order to monitor such progress, it is critical to establish a means by which to define the quality of SWCNT material and develop characterization standards to evaluate of nanotube quality across the board. Such characterization standards should be applicable to as-produced materials as well as processed SWCNT materials. In order to address this issue, NASA Johnson Space Center has developed a protocol for purity and dispersion characterization of SWCNTs. The NASA JSC group is currently working with NIST, ANSI and ISO to establish purity and dispersion standards for SWCNT material. A practice guide for nanotube characterization is being developed in cooperation with NIST. Furthermore, work is in progress to incorporate additional characterization methods for electrical, mechanical, thermal, optical and other properties of SWCNTs.

  16. Carbon nanotube catalysts: recent advances in synthesis, characterization and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yibo; Miao, Jianwei; Yang, Zhihong; Xiao, Fang-Xing; Yang, Hong Bin; Liu, Bin; Yang, Yanhui

    2015-05-21

    Carbon nanotubes are promising materials for various applications. In recent years, progress in manufacturing and functionalizing carbon nanotubes has been made to achieve the control of bulk and surface properties including the wettability, acid-base properties, adsorption, electric conductivity and capacitance. In order to gain the optimal benefit of carbon nanotubes, comprehensive understanding on manufacturing and functionalizing carbon nanotubes ought to be systematically developed. This review summarizes methodologies of manufacturing carbon nanotubes via arc discharge, laser ablation and chemical vapor deposition and functionalizing carbon nanotubes through surface oxidation and activation, doping of heteroatoms, halogenation, sulfonation, grafting, polymer coating, noncovalent functionalization and nanoparticle attachment. The characterization techniques detecting the bulk nature and surface properties as well as the effects of various functionalization approaches on modifying the surface properties for specific applications in catalysis including heterogeneous catalysis, photocatalysis, photoelectrocatalysis and electrocatalysis are highlighted.

  17. CARBON NANOTUBES: AN APPROACH TO NOVEL DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. Alai et al.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes are cylindrical carbon molecules have novel properties, making them potentially useful in many applications in nanotechnology, electronics, optics, and other fields of material science as well as potential uses in architectural fields. They have unique electronic, mechanical, optical and chemical properties that make them good candidates for a wide variety of applications, including drug transporters, new therapeutics, delivery systems and diagnostics. Their unique surface area, stiffness, strength and resilience have led to much excitement in the field of pharmacy. Nanotubes are categorized as single-walled nanotubes, multiple walled nanotubes. Various techniques have been developed to produce nanotubes in sizeable quantities, including arc discharge, laser ablation, chemical vapor deposition. They can pass through membranes, carrying therapeutic drugs, vaccines and nucleic acids deep into the cell to targets previously unreachable. Purification of the tubes can be divided into a couple of main techniques: oxidation, acid treatment, annealing, sonication, filtering and functionalization techniques. The main problem of insolubility in aqueous media has been solved by developing a synthetic protocol that allows highly water-soluble carbon NTs to be obtained. The modifications are done to improve efficiency of carbon nanotubes by formulating luminescent carbon nanotubes, ultrathin carbon nanoneedles, magnetically guided nanotubes. The application of carbon nanotube in tissue engineering, drug carrier release system, wound healing, in cancer treatment and as biosensor. Researchers have recently developed a new approach to Boron Neutron Capture Therapy in the treatment of cancer using substituted Carborane-Appended Water-Soluble single-wall carbon nanotubes.

  18. Molecular dynamics simulations of carbon nanotube-based gears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jie; Globus, Al; Jaffe, Richard; Deardorff, Glenn

    1997-09-01

    We use a molecular dynamics simulation to investigate the properties and design space of molecular gears fashioned from carbon nanotubes with teeth added via a benzyne reaction known to occur with 0957-4484/8/3/001/img1. Brenner's reactive hydrocarbon potential is used to model interatomic forces within each molecular gear. A Lennard - Jones 6 - 12 potential or the Buckingham 0957-4484/8/3/001/img2 potential plus electrostatic interaction terms are used for intermolecular interactions between gears. A number of gear and gear/shaft configurations are simulated on parallel computers. One gear is powered by forcing the atoms near the end of the nanotube to rotate, and a second gear is allowed to rotate by keeping the atoms near the end of its nanotube constrained to a cylinder. The meshing aromatic gear teeth transfer angular momentum from the powered gear to the driven gear. Results suggest that these gears can operate at up to 50 - 100 GHz in a vacuum at room temperature. The failure mode involves tooth slip, not bond breaking, so failed gears can be returned to operation by lowering the temperature and/or rotation rate.

  19. Filled and empty states of carbon nanotubes in water: Dependence on nanotube diameter, wall thickness and dispersion interactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Malay Rana; Amalendu Chandra

    2007-09-01

    We have carried out a series of molecular dynamics simulations of water containing a narrow carbon nanotube as a solute to investigate the filling and emptying of the nanotube and also the modifications of the density and hydrogen bond distributions of water inside and also in the vicinity of the outer surfaces of the nanotube. Our primary goal is to look at the effects of varying nanotube diameter, wall thickness and also solute-solvent interactions on the solvent structure in the confined region also near the outer surfaces of the solute. The thickness of the walls is varied by considering single and multi-walled nanotubes and the interaction potential is varied by tuning the attractive strength of the 12-6 pair interaction potential between a carbon atom of the nanotubes and a water molecule. The calculations are done for many different values of the tuning parameter ranging from fully Lennard-Jones to pure repulsive pair interactions. It is found that both the solvation characteristics and hydrogen bond distributions can depend rather strongly on the strength of the attractive part of the solute-water interaction potential. The thickness of the nanotube wall, however, is found to have only minor effects on the density profiles, hydrogen bond network and the wetting characteristics. This indicates that the long range electrostatic interactions between water molecules inside and on the outer side of the nanotube do not make any significant contribution to the overall solvation structure of these hydrophobic solutes. The solvation characteristics are primarily determined by the balance between the loss of energy due to hydrogen bond network disruption, cavity repulsion potential and offset of the same by attractive component of the solute-water interactions. Our studies with different system sizes show that the essential features of wetting and dewetting characteristics of narrow nanotubes for different diameter and interaction potentials are also present in

  20. Raman spectroscopy on carbon nanotubes at high pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Loa, I.

    2003-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy has been the most extensively employed method to study carbon nanotubes at high pressures. This review covers reversible pressure-induced changes of the lattice dynamics and structure of single- and multi-wall carbon nanotubes as well as irreversible transformations induced by high pressures. The interplay of covalent and van-der-Waals bonding in single-wall nanotube bundles and a structural distortion near 2 GPa are discussed in detail. Attempts of transforming carbon nano...

  1. Varied morphology carbon nanotubes and method for their manufacture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenzhi; Wen, Jian Guo; Ren, Zhi Feng

    2007-01-02

    The present invention describes the preparation of carbon nanotubes of varied morphology, catalyst materials for their synthesis. The present invention also describes reactor apparatus and methods of optimizing and controlling process parameters for the manufacture carbon nanotubes with pre-determined morphologies in relatively high purity and in high yields. In particular, the present invention provides methods for the preparation of non-aligned carbon nanotubes with controllable morphologies, catalyst materials and methods for their manufacture.

  2. Thermogravimetric Analysis of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arepalli, Sivram; Nikolaev, Pavel; Gorelik, Olga

    2010-01-01

    An improved protocol for thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) of samples of single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) material has been developed to increase the degree of consistency among results so that meaningful comparisons can be made among different samples. This improved TGA protocol is suitable for incorporation into the protocol for characterization of carbon nanotube material. In most cases, TGA of carbon nanotube materials is performed in gas mixtures that contain oxygen at various concentrations. The improved protocol is summarized.

  3. A statistical mechanics model of carbon nanotube macro-films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Carbon nanotube macro-films are two-dimensional films with micrometer thickness and centimeter by centimeter in-plane dimension.These carbon nanotube macroscopic assemblies have attracted significant attention from the material and mechanics communities recently because they can be easily handled and tailored to meet specific engineering needs.This paper reports the experimental methods on the preparation and characterization of single-walled carbon nanotube macro-films,and a statistical mechanics model on ...

  4. Simulations of Electrophoretic RNA Transport Through Transmembrane Carbon Nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Zimmerli, Urs; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2008-01-01

    The study of interactions between carbon nanotubes and cellular components, such as membranes and biomolecules, is fundamental for the rational design of nanodevices interfacing with biological systems. In this work, we use molecular dynamics simulations to study the electrophoretic transport of RNA through carbon nanotubes embedded in membranes. Decorated and naked carbon nanotubes are inserted into a dodecane membrane and a dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine lipid bilayer, and the system is sub...

  5. Continuous Growth of Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotubes Forests

    OpenAIRE

    Guzman de Villoria, Roberto; Wardle, Brian L.

    2011-01-01

    Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes are one of the most promising materials due their numerous applications in flexible electronic devices, biosensors and multifunctional aircraft materials, among others. However, the costly production of aligned carbon nanotubes, generally in a batch process, prevents their commercial use. For the first time, a controlled process to grow aligned carbon nanotubes in a continuous manner is presented. Uniform growth is achieved using 2D and 3D substrates. A sig...

  6. Nanoscale Continuum Modelling of Carbon Nanotubes by Polyhedral Finite Elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Logah Perumal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As the geometry of a cell of carbon nanotube is hexagonal, a new approach is presented in modelling of single-walled carbon nanotubes using polyhedral finite elements. Effect of varying length, diameter, and thickness of carbon nanotubes on Young’s modulus is studied. Both armchair and zigzag configurations are modelled and simulated in Mathematica. Results from current approach found good agreement with the other published data.

  7. Carbon nanotube based stationary phases for microchip chromatography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Klaus Bo; Kutter, Jörg Peter

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this article is to provide an overview and critical evaluation of the use of carbon nanotubes and related carbon-based nanomaterials for microchip chromatography. The unique properties of carbon nanotubes, such as a very high surface area and intriguing adsorptive behaviour, have...

  8. Electrostatic sensing and electrochemistry with single carbon nanotubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heller, I.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis describes the experimental study of devices based on single carbon nanotubes in the context of (bio)sensing in aqueous solutions. Carbon nanotubes are cylindrical molecules of sp2- carbon, about one nanometer in diameter and typically several micrometers long, which have semiconducting o

  9. Carbon Nanotube Flexible and Stretchable Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Le; Wang, Chuan

    2015-08-01

    The low-cost and large-area manufacturing of flexible and stretchable electronics using printing processes could radically change people's perspectives on electronics and substantially expand the spectrum of potential applications. Examples range from personalized wearable electronics to large-area smart wallpapers and from interactive bio-inspired robots to implantable health/medical apparatus. Owing to its one-dimensional structure and superior electrical property, carbon nanotube is one of the most promising material platforms for flexible and stretchable electronics. Here in this paper, we review the recent progress in this field. Applications of single-wall carbon nanotube networks as channel semiconductor in flexible thin-film transistors and integrated circuits, as stretchable conductors in various sensors, and as channel material in stretchable transistors will be discussed. Lastly, state-of-the-art advancement on printing process, which is ideal for large-scale fabrication of flexible and stretchable electronics, will also be reviewed in detail.

  10. Carbon Nanotube Flexible and Stretchable Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Le; Wang, Chuan

    2015-12-01

    The low-cost and large-area manufacturing of flexible and stretchable electronics using printing processes could radically change people's perspectives on electronics and substantially expand the spectrum of potential applications. Examples range from personalized wearable electronics to large-area smart wallpapers and from interactive bio-inspired robots to implantable health/medical apparatus. Owing to its one-dimensional structure and superior electrical property, carbon nanotube is one of the most promising material platforms for flexible and stretchable electronics. Here in this paper, we review the recent progress in this field. Applications of single-wall carbon nanotube networks as channel semiconductor in flexible thin-film transistors and integrated circuits, as stretchable conductors in various sensors, and as channel material in stretchable transistors will be discussed. Lastly, state-of-the-art advancement on printing process, which is ideal for large-scale fabrication of flexible and stretchable electronics, will also be reviewed in detail.

  11. Printed Carbon Nanotube Electronics and Sensor Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kevin; Gao, Wei; Emaminejad, Sam; Kiriya, Daisuke; Ota, Hiroki; Nyein, Hnin Yin Yin; Takei, Kuniharu; Javey, Ali

    2016-06-01

    Printing technologies offer large-area, high-throughput production capabilities for electronics and sensors on mechanically flexible substrates that can conformally cover different surfaces. These capabilities enable a wide range of new applications such as low-cost disposable electronics for health monitoring and wearables, extremely large format electronic displays, interactive wallpapers, and sensing arrays. Solution-processed carbon nanotubes have been shown to be a promising candidate for such printing processes, offering stable devices with high performance. Here, recent progress made in printed carbon nanotube electronics is discussed in terms of materials, processing, devices, and applications. Research challenges and opportunities moving forward from processing and system-level integration points of view are also discussed for enabling practical applications.

  12. Aerosol printed carbon nanotube strain sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Bradley; Yoon, Hwan-Sik

    2012-04-01

    In recent years, printed electronics have received attention as a method to produce low-cost macro electronics on flexible substrates. In this regard, inkjet and aerosol printing have been the primary printing methods for producing passive electrical components, transistors, and a number of sensors. In this research, a custom aerosol printer was utilized to create a strain sensor capable of measuring static and dynamic strain. The proposed sensor was created by aerosol printing a multiwall carbon nanotube solution onto an aluminum beam covered with an insulating layer. After printing the carbon nanotube-based sensor, the sensor was tested under quasi-static and vibration strain conditions, and the results are presented. The results show that the printed sensor could potentially serve as an effective method for measuring dynamic strain of structural components.

  13. Advanced technology for functionalization of carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lingjie Meng; Chuanlong Fu; Qinghua Lu

    2009-01-01

    Functionalization of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) has attracted considerable interest in the fields of physics, chemistry, material science and biology. The functionalized CNTs exhibit improved properties enabling facile fabrication of novel nanomaterials and nanodevices. Most of the functionalization approaches developed at present could be categorized into the covalent attachment of functional groups and the non-covalent adsorption of various functional molecules onto the surface of CNTs. This review highlights recent development and our work in functionalization of carbon nanotubes, leading to bio-compatible CNTs, fluorescent CNTs and transition metal func-tionalizcd CNTs. These novel methods possess advantages such as simplified technical procedures and reduced cost of novel nanoma-terials and nanodcvices fabrication.

  14. Density controlled carbon nanotube array electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhifeng F.; Tu, Yi

    2008-12-16

    CNT materials comprising aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with pre-determined site densities, catalyst substrate materials for obtaining them and methods for forming aligned CNTs with controllable densities on such catalyst substrate materials are described. The fabrication of films comprising site-density controlled vertically aligned CNT arrays of the invention with variable field emission characteristics, whereby the field emission properties of the films are controlled by independently varying the length of CNTs in the aligned array within the film or by independently varying inter-tubule spacing of the CNTs within the array (site density) are disclosed. The fabrication of microelectrode arrays (MEAs) formed utilizing the carbon nanotube material of the invention is also described.

  15. Non-uniform binding of single-stranded DNA binding proteins to hybrids of single-stranded DNA and single-walled carbon nanotubes observed by atomic force microscopy in air and in liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umemura, Kazuo; Ishizaka, Kei; Nii, Daisuke; Izumi, Katsuki

    2016-12-01

    Using atomic force spectroscopy (AFM), we observed hybrids of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with or without protein molecules in air and in an aqueous solution. This is the first report of ssDNA-SWNT hybrids with proteins in solution analyzed by AFM. In the absence of protein, the height of the ssDNA-SWNT hybrids was 1.1 ± 0.3 nm and 2.4 ± 0.6 nm in air and liquid, respectively, suggesting that the ssDNA molecules adopted a flexible structure on the SWNT surface. In the presence of single-stranded DNA binding (SSB) proteins, the heights of the hybrids in air and liquid increased to 6.4 ± 3.1 nm and 10.0 ± 4.5 nm, respectively. The AFM images clearly showed binding of the SSB proteins to the ssDNA-SWNT hybrids. The morphology of the SSB-ssDNA-SWNT hybrids was non-uniform, particularly in aqueous solution. The variance of hybrid height was quantitatively estimated by cross-section analysis along the long-axis of each hybrid. The SSB-ssDNA-SWNT hybrids showed much larger variance than the ssDNA-SWNT hybrids.

  16. Ultrasensitive quartz crystal microbalance integrated with carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Abhijat

    energy loss channel and hence causing an increase in the Q-factor. Measurement of out-of-plane vibrations of the quartz crystals using a laser based optical vibrometer revealed that the out-of-plane vibrations of QCM increase from 13 pm to 26 pm when carbon nanotubes are removed from the surface of the resonator---directly confirming the suppression of the out-of-plane motion on the resonator surface by carbon nanotubes. Additionally, the QCMs were used to study the gas adsorption and desorption behavior of nominally "open-ended" isolated and nominally "close-ended" bundled SWNTs. Using the ultrasensitive QCM, we were able to probe gas storage properties of carbon nanotubes. It was found that carbon nanotubes can adsorb large amount of gas molecules not only in the cylindrical pore that they enclose, but also on their external surface. Four different gases were tested, namely Helium, Nitrogen, Argon, and SF6. It was found that the change in resonance frequency and quality factor for the "fill in" and "evacuation" of gases from carbon nanotubes exhibited a characteristic ˜ MW relationship, where MW is the atomic/molecular weight of gas species adsorbed. Such a behavior was consistently observed both for change in resonance frequency and Q-factor during the events of "fill in" and "evacuation" in the case of bare quartz with gold electrode, gold electrode covered with nominally isolated "open-ended" SWNTs, and gold electrode with nominally bundled "close-ended" SWNTs. In the case of bare quartz with gold electrode, the observed change in resonance frequency and Q-factor and their characteristic ˜ MW relationship can be explained on the basis of the viscous dissipation arising due to gas ambient through the Gordon-Kanazawa equation. In the case of QCM with carbon nanotubes, the change in Q-factor and its characteristic ˜ MW relationship could be explained on the basis of enhanced viscous dissipation arising due to surface roughness or modified Gordon Kanazawa equation

  17. Excited State Dynamics in Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Yoshiyuki

    2004-03-01

    Carbon nanotube, one of the most promising materials for nano-technology, still suffers from its imperfection in crystalline structure that will make performance of nanotube behind theoretical limit. From the first-principles simulations, I propose efficient methods to overcome the imperfection. I show that photo-induced ion dynamics can (1) identify defects in nanotubes, (2) stabilize defected nanotubes, and (3) purify contaminated nanotubes. All of these methods can be alternative to conventional heat treatments and will be important techniques for realizing nanotube-devices. Ion dynamics under electronic excitation has been simulated with use of the computer code FPSEID (First-Principles Simulation tool for Electron Ion Dynamics) [1], which combines the time-dependent density functional method [2] to classical molecular dynamics. This very challenging approach is time-consuming but can automatically treat the level alternation of differently occupied states, and can observe initiation of non-adiabatic decay of excitation. The time-dependent Kohn-Sham equation has been solved by using the Suzuki-Trotter split operator method [3], which is a numerically stable method being suitable for plane wave basis, non-local pseudopotentials, and parallel computing. This work has been done in collaboration with Prof. Angel Rubio, Prof. David Tomanek, Dr. Savas Berber and Mina Yoon. Most of present calculations have been done by using the SX5 Vector-Parallel system in the NEC Fuchu-plant, and the Earth Simulator in Yokohama Japan. [1] O. Sugino and Y. Miyamoto, Phys. Rev. B59, 2579 (1999); ibid, B66 089901(E) (2001) [2] E. Runge and E. K. U. Gross, Phys. Rev. Lett. 52, 997 (1984). [3] M. Suzuki, J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 61, L3015 (1992).

  18. Aqueous solution dispersement of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Woo (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor); Choi, Sang H. (Inventor); Lillehei, Peter T. (Inventor); Harrison, Joycelyn S. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are dispersed in an aqueous buffer solution consisting of at least 50 weight percent water and a remainder weight percent that includes a buffer material. The buffer material has a molecular structure defined by a first end, a second end, and a middle disposed between the first and second ends. The first end is a cyclic ring with nitrogen and oxygen heteroatomes, the middle is a hydrophobic alkyl chain, and the second end is a charged group.

  19. Torsional electromechanical systems based on carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, A R; Paulson, S; Cui, T; Lu, J P; Qin, L-C; Washburn, S

    2012-11-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are among the most highly studied nanomaterials due to their unique (and intertwined) mechanical and electrical properties. Recent advances in fabrication have allowed devices to be fabricated that are capable of applying a twisting force to individual CNTs while measuring mechanical and electrical response. Here, we review major results from this emerging field of study, revealing new properties of the material itself and opening possibilities for advances in future devices.

  20. Carbon Nanotubes Reinforced Composites for Biomedical Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Wei Wang; Yuhe Zhu; Susan Liao; Jiajia Li

    2014-01-01

    This review paper reported carbon nanotubes reinforced composites for biomedical applications. Several studies have found enhancement in the mechanical properties of CNTs-based reinforced composites by the addition of CNTs. CNTs reinforced composites have been intensively investigated for many aspects of life, especially being made for biomedical applications. The review introduced fabrication of CNTs reinforced composites (CNTs reinforced metal matrix composites, CNTs reinforced polymer matr...

  1. Octagonal Defects at Carbon Nanotube Junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaskólski, W.; Pelc, M.; Chico, Leonor; Ayuela, A.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate knee-shaped junctions of semiconductor zigzag carbon nanotubes. Two dissimilar octagons appear at such junctions; one of them can reconstruct into a pair of pentagons. The junction with two octagons presents two degenerate localized states at Fermi energy (EF). The reconstructed junction has only one state near EF, indicating that these localized states are related to the octagonal defects. The inclusion of Coulomb interaction splits the localized states in the junction with two octagons, yielding an antiferromagnetic system. PMID:24089604

  2. Air Brush Fabricated Carbon Nanotube Supercapacitor Electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    dispersant is not contributing to the capacitance. The electrochemical, cyclic voltametry , measurements were made using a Keithley 4200 Semiconductor...reference electrode. The cyclic voltamogram (CV) was performed in potential ranges of anywhere between –0.9–0.5 V at scan rates ranging from 1–100 mV...Symbols, Acronyms, and Abbreviations AL aluminum CNT carbon nanotube Cu copper CV cyclic voltamogram ESEM environmental scanning electron microscope

  3. Nanoparticle Decoration of Carbon Nanotubes by Sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    on metal morphology, as does diffusion activation energy. Comparison of the metal– graphene interfa- cial energy to the surface energy of the metal...Nanotechnology 2009;20:375501–11. [17] O. Yaglioglu, Thesis . Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineering; 2007. [18] Venables...25] Osswald S, Flahaut E, Ye H, Gogotsi Y. Elimination of D-band in Raman spectra of double-wall carbon nanotubes by oxidation . Chem Phys Lett

  4. Thermophoresis of water droplets inside carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zambrano, Harvey; Walther, Jens Honore; Oyarzua, Elton

    2016-01-01

    Carbon Nanotubes(CNTs) offer unique possibilities as fluid conduits with applications ranging from lab on a chip devices to encapsulation media for drug delivery. CNTs feature high mechanical strength, chemical and thermalstability and biocompatibility therefore they are promising candidates...... for nanodevice fabrication. Thermal gradients have been proposed as mechanism to drive particles, fullerenes and droplets inside CNTs. Here, by conducting Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations, we study thermophoresis of water droplets inside CNTs. We systematically change the size of the droplets, the axial...

  5. Role of carbon nanotubes in electroanalytical chemistry: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agüí, Lourdes; Yáñez-Sedeño, Paloma; Pingarrón, José M

    2008-08-01

    This review covers recent advances in the development of new designs of electrochemical sensors and biosensors that make use of electrode surfaces modification with carbon nanotubes. Applications based on carbon nanotubes-driven electrocatalytic effects, and the construction and analytical usefulness of new hybrid materials with polymers or other nanomaterials will be treated. Moreover, electrochemical detection using carbon nanotubes-modified electrodes as detecting systems in separation techniques such as high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) or capillary electrophoresis (CE) will be also considered. Finally, the preparation of electrochemical biosensors, including enzyme electrodes, immunosensors and DNA biosensors, in which carbon nanotubes play a significant role in their sensing performance will be separately considered.

  6. Carbon nanotubes from synthesis to in vivo biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajid, Muhammad Imran; Jamshaid, Usama; Jamshaid, Talha; Zafar, Nadiah; Fessi, H; Elaissari, Abdelhamid

    2016-03-30

    Owing to their unique and interesting properties, extensive research round the globe has been carried out on carbon nanotubes and carbon nanotubes based systems to investigate their practical usefulness in biomedical applications. The results from these studies demonstrate a great promise in their use in targeted drug delivery systems, diagnostic techniques and in bio-analytical applications. Although, carbon nanotubes possess quite interesting properties, which make them potential candidates in the biomedical science, but they also have some inherent properties which arise great concern regarding their biosafety. In this comprehensive review, we have discussed different aspects of carbon nanotubes and carbon nanotube based systems related to biomedical applications. In the beginning, a short historical account of these tiny yet powerful particles is given followed by discussion regarding their types, properties, methods of synthesis, large scale production method, purification techniques and characterization aspects of carbon nanotubes. In the second part of the review, the functionalization of carbon nanotubes is reviewed in detail, which is not only important to make them biocompatible and stable in biological systems but also render them a great property of loading various biomolecules, diagnostic and therapeutic moieties resulting in diversified applications. In the final part of the review, emphasis is given on the pharmacokinetic aspects of carbon nanotubes including administration routes, absorption mechanisms, distribution and elimination of carbon nanotubes based systems. Lastly, a comprehensive account about the potential biomedical applications has been given followed by insights into the future.

  7. Conformational changes of fibrinogen in dispersed carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park SJ

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Sung Jean Park,1 Dongwoo Khang21College of Pharmacy, Gachon University, Yeonsu-gu, Incheon, South Korea; 2School of Nano and Advanced Materials Science Engineering and Center for PRC and RIGET, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju, South KoreaAbstract: The conformational changes of plasma protein structures in response to carbon nanotubes are critical for determining the nanotoxicity and blood coagulation effects of carbon nanotubes. In this study, we identified that the functional intensity of carboxyl groups on carbon nanotubes, which correspond to the water dispersity or hydrophilicity of carbon nanotubes, can induce conformational changes in the fibrinogen domains. Also, elevation of carbon nanotube density can alter the secondary structures (ie, helices and beta sheets of fibrinogen. Furthermore, fibrinogen that had been in contact with the nanoparticle material demonstrated a different pattern of heat denaturation compared with free fibrinogen as a result of a variation in hydrophilicity and concentration of carbon nanotubes. Considering the importance of interactions between carbon nanotubes and plasma proteins in the drug delivery system, this study elucidated the correlation between nanoscale physiochemical material properties of carbon nanotubes and associated structural changes in fibrinogen.Keywords: carbon nanotubes, fibrinogen, nanotoxicity, conformational change, denaturation

  8. Development of matrix photoreceivers based on carbon nanotubes array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blagov, E. V.; Gerasimenko, A. Y.; Dudin, A. A.; Ichkitidze, L. P.; Kitsyuk, E. P.; Orlov, A. P.; Pavlov, A. A.; Polokhin, A. A.; Shaman, Yu. P.

    2016-04-01

    The technology of production of matrix photoreceivers based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) consisting of 16 sensitive elements was developed. Working wavelength range, performance and sensitivity were studied.

  9. Optimization of interfacial microstructure and mechanical properties of carbon fiber/epoxy composites via carbon nanotube sizing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Hongwei; Sui, Xianhang; Zhao, Zhongbo; Xu, Zhiwei; Chen, Lei, E-mail: chenlei@tjpu.edu.cn; Deng, Hui; Liu, Ya; Qian, Xiaoming, E-mail: qianxiaoming@tjpu.edu.cn

    2015-08-30

    Highlights: • Multiple sizing treatments were used to modify the surface of carbon fiber with carbon nanotubes. • The distribution state of carbon nanotubes in interface had a great effect on the performance of carbon fiber composites. • Interfacial microstructure changes brought by sizing treatment were detected by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and atomic force microscope. • Gradient interphase composed of carbon nanotubes and epoxy was favorable to improve the mechanical properties of carbon composites. - Abstract: Repetitious sizing treatment was used to modify the carbon fiber (CF) surface with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) for improving interfacial properties of CF/epoxy composites. Interlaminar shear and flexural results showed that mechanical properties of composites were significantly depended on the dispersion state and contents of CNTs in interfacial regions. Increases of 13.45% in interlaminar shear strength and 20.31% in flexural strength were achieved in quintuple sized-CF/epoxy composites, whereas excessive CNTs led to decrease of interfacial performance due to defects induced by agglomerated CNTs. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and force modulation atomic force microscope were used to detect the structure of interfacial phase and results indicated that gradient interfacial structure with various thicknesses was formed due to CNT incorporation. This means that such a simple and efficient method to improve interfacial performance of composites via regulating the fiber–matrix interphase structure was developed and showed great commercial application potential.

  10. Synthesis and characterization of well-aligned carbon nitrogen nanotubes by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马旭村; 徐贵昌; 王恩哥

    2000-01-01

    Well-aligned carbon nitrogen nanotube films have been synthesized successfully on meso-porous silica substrates by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MWPCVD) method. Studies on their morphology, structure, and composition by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), respectively, indicate that these nanotubes consist of linearly polymerized carbon nitrogen nanobells, and the nitrogen atoms have been doped into carbon netweork to form a new structure C1-xNx( x = 0.16±0.01). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results of the samples further demonstrate that carbon bonds cova-lently with nitrogen in all the carbon nitrogen nanotube films.

  11. Carbon nanotube materials for hydrogen storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dillon, A.C.; Parilla, P.A.; Jones, K.M.; Riker, G.; Heben, M.J. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1998-08-01

    Carbon single-wall nanotubes (SWNTs) are essentially elongated pores of molecular dimensions and are capable of adsorbing hydrogen at relatively high temperatures and low pressures. This behavior is unique to these materials and indicates that SWNTs are the ideal building block for constructing safe, efficient, and high energy density adsorbents for hydrogen storage applications. In past work the authors developed methods for preparing and opening SWNTs, discovered the unique adsorption properties of these new materials, confirmed that hydrogen is stabilized by physical rather than chemical interactions, measured the strength of interaction to be {approximately} 5 times higher than for adsorption on planar graphite, and performed infrared absorption spectroscopy to determine the chemical nature of the surface terminations before, during, and after oxidation. This year the authors have made significant advances in synthesis and characterization of SWNT materials so that they can now prepare gram quantities of high-purity SWNT samples and measure and control the diameter distribution of the tubes by varying key parameters during synthesis. They have also developed methods which purify nanotubes and cut nanotubes into shorter segments. These capabilities provide a means for opening the tubes which were unreactive to the oxidation methods that successfully opened tubes, and offer a path towards organizing nanotube segments to enable high volumetric hydrogen storage densities. They also performed temperature programmed desorption spectroscopy on high purity carbon nanotube material obtained from collaborator Prof. Patrick Bernier and finished construction of a high precision Seivert`s apparatus which will allow the hydrogen pressure-temperature-composition phase diagrams to be evaluated for SWNT materials.

  12. Fast Electromechanical Switches Based on Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaul, Anupama; Wong, Eric; Epp, Larry

    2008-01-01

    Electrostatically actuated nanoelectromechanical switches based on carbon nanotubes have been fabricated and tested in a continuing effort to develop high-speed switches for a variety of stationary and portable electronic equipment. As explained below, these devices offer advantages over electrostatically actuated microelectromechanical switches, which, heretofore, have represented the state of the art of rapid, highly miniaturized electromechanical switches. Potential applications for these devices include computer memories, cellular telephones, communication networks, scientific instrumentation, and general radiation-hard electronic equipment. A representative device of the present type includes a single-wall carbon nanotube suspended over a trench about 130 nm wide and 20 nm deep in an electrically insulating material. The ends of the carbon nanotube are connected to metal electrodes, denoted the source and drain electrodes. At bottom of the trench is another metal electrode, denoted the pull electrode (see figure). In the off or open switch state, no voltage is applied, and the nanotube remains out of contact with the pull electrode. When a sufficiently large electric potential (switching potential) is applied between the pull electrode and either or both of the source and drain electrodes, the resulting electrostatic attraction bends and stretches the nanotube into contact with the pull electrode, thereby putting the switch into the "on" or "closed" state, in which substantial current (typically as much as hundreds of nanoamperes) is conducted. Devices of this type for use in initial experiments were fabricated on a thermally oxidized Si wafer, onto which Nb was sputter-deposited for use as the pull-electrode layer. Nb was chosen because its refractory nature would enable it to withstand the chemical and thermal conditions to be subsequently imposed for growing carbon nanotubes. A 200- nm-thick layer of SiO2 was formed on top of the Nb layer by plasma

  13. Effects of carbon doping on the electronic properties of boron nitride nanotubes: Tight binding calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chegel, Raad

    2016-10-01

    The electronic properties of pure and carbon doped zigzag and armchair Boron Nitride Nanotubes (BNNTs) have been investigated based on tight binding formalism. It was found that the band gap is reduced due to substitution of Boron or Nitrogen atoms by carbon atoms and the doping effects of B- and N-substituted BNNTs are different. The applied electric field converts the carbon doped BNNTs from semiconductor to metal. The gap energy reduction shows an identical dependence to electric field and doping for both armchair and zigzag carbon doped BNNTs. Our results indicate that the band gap of carbon doped BNNTs is a function of the Impurity concentration, electric field strength and the direction between the electric field and dopant location. The band gap for C-doped BNNTs with four carbon atoms decreases linearly but for two carbon atoms, it is constant at first then decreases linearly.

  14. Carbon Nanotube Paper-Based Electroanalytical Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngmi Koo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Here, we report on carbon nanotube paper-based electroanalytical devices. A highly aligned-carbon nanotube (HA-CNT array, grown using chemical vapor deposition (CVD, was processed to form bi-layered paper with an integrated cellulose-based Origami-chip as the electroanalytical device. We used an inverse-ordered fabrication method from a thick carbon nanotube (CNT sheet to a thin CNT sheet. A 200-layered HA-CNT sheet and a 100-layered HA-CNT sheet are explored as a working electrode. The device was fabricated using the following methods: (1 cellulose-based paper was patterned using a wax printer, (2 electrical connection was made using a silver ink-based circuit printer, and (3 three electrodes were stacked on a 2D Origami cell. Electrochemical behavior was evaluated using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS and cyclic voltammetry (CV. We believe that this platform could attract a great deal of interest for use in various chemical and biomedical applications.

  15. On the vibration of double-walled carbon nanotubes using molecular structural and cylindrical shell models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, R.; Rouhi, S.; Aryayi, M.

    2016-01-01

    The vibrational behavior of double-walled carbon nanotubes is studied by the use of the molecular structural and cylindrical shell models. The spring elements are employed to model the van der Waals interaction. The effects of different parameters such as geometry, chirality, atomic structure and end constraint on the vibration of nanotubes are investigated. Besides, the results of two aforementioned approaches are compared. It is indicated that by increasing the nanotube side length and radius, the computationally efficient cylindrical shell model gives rational results.

  16. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes for drug delivery: Efficiency related to length and incubation time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciortino, Niccolò; Fedeli, Stefano; Paoli, Paolo; Brandi, Alberto; Chiarugi, Paola; Severi, Mirko; Cicchi, Stefano

    2017-02-13

    Batches of oxidized multiwalled carbon nanotubes differing in length were adopted to prepare two drug delivery systems (DDS) loaded with doxorubicin. The different internalization of the two batches, verified by atomic emission spectroscopy onto cell lysates, was also confirmed by the different toxicity of the same DDS loaded with doxorubicin. In vitro experiments evidenced, after 48h of incubation, the superior efficacy of the shortest nanotubes. However, upon prolonging the incubation time up to 72h the difference in efficiency was minimized due to the spontaneous release of doxorubicin by the non-internalized long nanotubes.

  17. Effect of curvature on structures and vibrations of zigzag carbon nanotubes: A first-principles study

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mousumi Upadhyay Kahaly; Umesh V Waghmare

    2008-06-01

    First-principles pseudopotential-based density functional theory calculations of atomic and electronic structures, full phonon dispersions and thermal properties of zigzag single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are presented. By determining the correlation between vibrational modes of a graphene sheet and of the nanotube, we understand how rolling of the sheet results in mixing between modes and changes in vibrational spectrum of graphene. We find that the radial breathing mode softens with decreasing curvature. We estimate thermal expansion coefficient of nanotubes within a quasiharmonic approximation and identify the modes that dominate thermal expansion of some of these SWCNTs both at low and high temperatures.

  18. The donut and dynamic polarization effects in proton channeling through carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borka, D.; Mowbray, Duncan; Miskovic, Z.L.;

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the angular and spatial distributions of protons with an energy of 0.223 MeV after channeling them through an (11, 9) single-wall carbon nanotube of 0.2 mu m length. The proton incident angle is varied between 0 and 10 mrad, being close to the critical angle for channeling. We show...... demonstrate that an increase of the proton incident angle can lead to a significant rearrangement of the propagating protons within the nanotube. This effect may be used to locate atomic impurities in nanotubes as well as for creating nanosized proton beams to be used in materials science, biology...

  19. Synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotube networks using monodisperse metallic nanocatalysts encapsulated in reverse micelles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gayduchenko Igor A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on a method of synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotubes percolated networks on silicon dioxide substrates using monodisperse Co and Ni catalyst. The catalytic nanoparticles were obtained by modified method of reverse micelles of bis-(2-ethylhexyl sulfosuccinate sodium in isooctane solution that provides the nanoparticle size control in range of 1 to 5 nm. The metallic nanoparticles of Ni and Co were characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM and atomic-force microscopy (AFM. Carbon nanotubes were synthesized by chemical vapor deposition of CH4/H2 composition at temperature 1000 °С on catalysts pre-deposited on silicon dioxide substrate. Before temperature treatment during the carbon nanotube synthesis most of the catalyst material agglomerates due to magnetic forces while during the nanotube growth disintegrates into the separate nanoparticles with narrow diameter distribution. The formed nanotube networks were characterized using AFM, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and Raman spectroscopy. We find that the nanotubes are mainly single-walled carbon nanotubes with high structural perfection up to 200 μm long with diameters from 1.3 to 1.7 nm consistent with catalyst nanoparticles diameter distribution and independent of its material.

  20. Fluoride and lead adsorption on carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Shuguang; LI Yanhui

    2004-01-01

    The properties and applications of CNT have been studied extensively since Iijima discovered them in 1991[1,2]. They have exceptional mechanical properties and unique electrical property, highly chemical stability and large specific surface area. Thus far, they have widely potential applications in many fields. They can be used as reinforcing materials in composites[3], field emissions[4], hydrogen storage[5], nanoelectronic components[6], catalyst supports[7], adsorption material and so on. However, the study on the potential application of CNT, environmental protection field in particular, was hardly begun.Long[8] et al. reported that CNT had a significantly higher dioxin removal efficiency than that of activated carbon. The Langmuir adsorption constant is 2.7 × 1052, 1.3 × 1018 respectively. The results indicated that CNT is potential candidate for the removal of micro-organic pollutants. However, the reports on the CNT used as fluoride and heavy metal adsorbent are seldom.In this paper, A novel material, alumina supported on carbon nanotubes (Al2O3/CNT), was prepared from carbon nanotubes and Al(NO3)3. X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectra demonstrate that alumina is amorphous, and scanning electron microscope (SEM) images show that CNT and alumina are homogeneously mixed. Furthermore, the fluoride adsorption behavior on the surface of Al2O3/CNT has been investigated and compared with other adsorbents. The results indicate that Al2O3/CNT has a high adsorption capacity, with a saturation adsorption capacity of 39.4 mg/g. It is also found that the adsorption capacity of Al2O3/CNT is 3.0~4.5 times that of γ-Al2O3while almost equal to that of IRA-410 polymeric resin at 25 ℃. The adsorption isotherms of fluoride on Al2O3/CNT is fit the Freundlich equation well, optimal pH ranging from 5.0 to 9.0.Also in this paper, a novel material, modified carbon nanotubes (CNT), was prepared from carbon nanotubes and HNO3 under boiling condition. Infrared spectroscopy (IR

  1. Field—ion microscopy observation of single—walled carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张兆祥; 顾镇南; 等

    2002-01-01

    Field-ion microscopy(FIM),a tool for surface analysis with atomic resolution,has been employed to observe the end structure of single-walled carbon nanotubes(SWCNTs).FIM images revealed the existence of open SWCNT ends,Amorphous carbon atoms were also observed to occur around SWCNTs and traditional field evaporation failed to remove them.Heat treatment was found to be efficacious in altering the end structures of SWCNT bundles.Carbon and oxygen atoms released from heated tungsten filament are believed to be responsible for the decoration imposed on the SWCNT ends.

  2. Determination of the chiral indices (n,m) of carbon nanotubes by electron diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Lu-Chang

    2007-01-07

    The atomic structure of a carbon nanotube can be defined by the chiral indices, (n,m), that specify its perimeter vector (chiral vector), with which the diameter and helicity are also determined. The fine electron beam available in a modern Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) offers a unique and powerful probe to reveal the atomic structure of individual nanotubes. This article covers two aspects related to the use of the electron probe in the TEM for the study of carbon nanotubes: (i) to express the electron diffraction intensity distribution in the electron diffraction patterns of carbon nanotubes and (ii) to obtain the chiral indices (n,m) of carbon nanotubes from their electron diffraction patterns. For a nanotube of given chiral indices (n,m), the electron scattering amplitude from the carbon nanotube can be expressed analytically in closed form using the helical diffraction theory, from which its electron diffraction pattern can be calculated and understood. The reverse problem, i.e., assignment of the chiral indices (n,m) of a carbon nanotube from its electron diffraction pattern, is approached from the relationship between the electron diffraction intensity distribution and the chiral indices (n,m). The first method is to obtain indiscriminately the chiral indices (n,m) by reading directly the intensity distribution on the three principal layer lines, l(1), l(2), and l(3), which have intensities proportional to the square of the Bessel functions of orders m, n, and n + m: I(l1) proportional, variant |J(m) (pidR)|(2), I(l2) proportional, variant |J(n) (pidR)|(2), and I(l3) proportional, variant |J(n+m) (pidR)|(2). The second method is to obtain and use the ratio of the indices n/m = (2D(1)-D(2))/(2D(2)-D(1)) in which D(1) and D(2) are the spacings of principal layer lines l(1) and l(2), respectively. Examples of using these methods are also illustrated in the determination of chiral indices of isolated individual single-walled carbon nanotubes, a bundle

  3. Ionic liquid-assisted multiwalled carbon nanotube-dispersive micro-solid phase extraction for sensitive determination of inorganic As species in garlic samples by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grijalba, Alexander Castro; Escudero, Leticia B.; Wuilloud, Rodolfo G., E-mail: rwuilloud@mendoza-conicet.gob.ar

    2015-08-01

    A highly sensitive dispersive micro-solid phase extraction (D-μ-SPE) method combining an ionic liquid (IL) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) for inorganic As species (As(III) and As(V)) species separation and determination in garlic samples by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) was developed. Trihexyl(tetradecil)phosphonium chloride IL was used to form an ion pair with the arsenomolybdate complex obtained by reaction of As(V) with molybdate ion. Afterwards, 1.0 mg of MWCNTs was dispersed for As(V) extraction and the supernatant was separated by centrifugation. MWCNTs were re-dispersed with tetradecyltrimethylammonium bromide surfactant and ultrasound followed by direct injection into the graphite furnace of ETAAS for As determination. Pyrolysis and atomization conditions were carefully studied for complete decomposition of MWCNTs and IL matrices. Under optimum conditions, an extraction efficiency of 100% and a preconcentration factor of 70 were obtained with 5 mL of garlic extract. The detection limit was 7.1 ng L{sup −1} and the relative standard deviations (RSDs) for six replicate measurements at 5 μg L{sup −1} of As were 5.4% and 4.8% for As(III) and As(V), respectively. The proposed D-μ-SPE method allowed the efficient separation and determination of inorganic As species in a complex matrix such as garlic extract. - Highlights: • Efficient retention and preconcentration of As by combining an IL with MWCNTs • Determination of As by ETAAS with direct injection of MWCNTs • Thermal degradation of MWCNTs in the graphite furnace of ETAAS • Highly sensitive speciation and determination of As in garlic.

  4. Fabrication of 3D core-shell multiwalled carbon nanotube@RuO2 lithium-ion battery electrodes through a RuO2 atomic layer deposition process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregorczyk, Keith E; Kozen, Alexander C; Chen, Xinyi; Schroeder, Marshall A; Noked, Malachi; Cao, Anyuan; Hu, Liangbing; Rubloff, Gary W

    2015-01-27

    Pushing lithium-ion battery (LIB) technology forward to its fundamental scaling limits requires the ability to create designer heterostructured materials and architectures. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) has recently been applied to advanced nanostructured energy storage devices due to the wide range of available materials, angstrom thickness control, and extreme conformality over high aspect ratio nanostructures. A class of materials referred to as conversion electrodes has recently been proposed as high capacity electrodes. RuO2 is considered an ideal conversion material due to its high combined electronic and ionic conductivity and high gravimetric capacity, and as such is an excellent material to explore the behavior of conversion electrodes at nanoscale thicknesses. We report here a fully characterized atomic layer deposition process for RuO2, electrochemical cycling data for ALD RuO2, and the application of the RuO2 to a composite carbon nanotube electrode scaffold with nucleation-controlled RuO2 growth. A growth rate of 0.4 Å/cycle is found between ∼ 210-240 °C. In a planar configuration, the resulting RuO2 films show high first cycle electrochemical capacities of ∼ 1400 mAh/g, but the capacity rapidly degrades with charge/discharge cycling. We also fabricated core/shell MWCNT/RuO2 heterostructured 3D electrodes, which show a 50× increase in the areal capacity over their planar counterparts, with an areal lithium capacity of 1.6 mAh/cm(2).

  5. Carbon Nanotubes:from Nanoscale Building Blocks to Macrostructures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    1 Results Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have fascinating properties.In order to use these novel one-dimensional structures for applications such as in nano-electronic,nano-mechanical and electrochemical energy storage device and as structural elements in various composites,the structure of nanotubes needs to be tailored and various architectures and macroscale assembles have to be configured using nanotube building blocks.Nanotube macrostructures are macroscopically organized groups of CNTs,which are expecte...

  6. Electronic transport properties of metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹觉先; 颜晓红; 肖杨; 丁建文

    2003-01-01

    We have calculated the differential conductance of metallic carbon nanotubes by the scatter matrix method. It is found that the differential conductance of metallic nanotube-based devices oscillates as a function of the bias voltage between the two leads and the gate voltage. Oscillation period T is directly proportional to the reciprocal of nanotube length. In addition, we found that electronic transport properties are sensitive to variation of the length of the nanotube.

  7. Carbon nanotubes linked with pitavastatin: synthesis and characterisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowiak-Palen, E; Skupin, P; Kruszynska, M; Sobotta, L; Mielcarek, J

    2011-04-01

    The paper presents a study on functionalisation of multi-walled carbon nanotubes in the area of lattice defects and an attempt to bind the nanotubes with pitavastatin. Carbon nanotubes were synthesised by alcohol-chemical vapour deposition in the presence of the catalyst Fe-Co/MgO. The nanotubes were purified and the product was subjected to chemical functionalisation. Functional groups were introduced in the reaction of the purified nanotubes with thionyl chloride to obtain acidic chlorides linked to pitavastatin. The properties and structure of the nanotubes were analysed by FT-IR and Raman spectroscopies, transmission electron microscopy and liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. Photochemical stability of pitavastatin linked with carbon nanotubes has been found to be increased.

  8. Fluid flow in carbon nanotubes and nanopipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitby, M.; Quirke, N.

    2007-02-01

    Nanoscale carbon tubes and pipes can be readily fabricated using self-assembly techniques and they have useful electrical, optical and mechanical properties. The transport of liquids along their central pores is now of considerable interest both for testing classical theories of fluid flow at the nanoscale and for potential nanofluidic device applications. In this review we consider evidence for novel fluid flow in carbon nanotubes and pipes that approaches frictionless transport. Methods for controlling such flow and for creating functional device architectures are described and possible applications are discussed.

  9. Terahertz Response of Carbon Nanotubes and Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawano, Yukio

    2015-12-01

    The terahertz (THz) research field is expected to serve as a new platform for studying low-energy excitation in solids and higher-order structures in large molecules, and for realizing applications in medicine, agriculture, security, and high-capacity communications. The THz frequency region, however, is located between the electronic and photonic bands, hampering the development of basic components like detectors and sources. This article presents an overview of basic background information about THz waves and THz detector applications and describes the THz response of carbon-based low-dimensional systems, such as single carbon nanotubes (CNT), CNT-array films, and graphene.

  10. First-principles calculations on the structure and electronic properties of boron doping zigzag single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEN QingBo; YU ShanSheng; ZHENG WeiTao

    2009-01-01

    Calculations have been made for single-walled zigzag (n, 0) carbon nanotubes containing substitutional boron impurity atoms using ab initio density functional theory. It is found that the formation energies of these nanotubes depend on the tube diameter, as do the electronic properties, and show periodic fea-ture that results from their different π bonding structures compared to those of perfect zigzag carbon nanotubes. When more boron atoms are incorporated into a single-walled zigzag carbon nanotube, the substitutional boron atoms tend to come together to form structure of BC3 nanodomains, and B-doped tubes have striking acceptor states above the top of the valence bands. For the structure of BC3, there are two kinds of configurations with different electronic structures.

  11. First-principles calculations on the structure and electronic properties of boron doping zigzag single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Calculations have been made for single-walled zigzag(n,0) carbon nanotubes containing substitutional boron impurity atoms using ab initio density functional theory.It is found that the formation energies of these nanotubes depend on the tube diameter,as do the electronic properties,and show periodic fea-ture that results from their different π bonding structures compared to those of perfect zigzag carbon nanotubes.When more boron atoms are incorporated into a single-walled zigzag carbon nanotube,the substitutional boron atoms tend to come together to form structure of BC3 nanodomains,and B-doped tubes have striking acceptor states above the top of the valence bands.For the structure of BC3,there are two kinds of configurations with different electronic structures.

  12. Self-assembly of single-walled carbon nanotubes into multiwalled carbon nanotubes in water: molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Jian; Ji, Baohua; Feng, Xi-Qiao; Gao, Huajian

    2006-03-01

    We report discoveries from a series of molecular dynamics simulations that single-walled carbon nanotubes, with different diameters, lengths, and chiralities, can coaxially self-assemble into multiwalled carbon nanotubes in water via spontaneous insertion of smaller tubes into larger ones. The assembly process is tube-size-dependent, and the driving force is primarily the intertube van der Waals interactions. The simulations also suggest that a multiwalled carbon nanotube may be separated into single-walled carbon nanotubes under appropriate solvent conditions. This study suggests possible bottom-up self-assembly routes for the fabrication of novel nanodevices and systems.

  13. Growth of single-walled gold nanotubes confined in carbon nanotubes, studied by molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yang; Hu, Ting; Dong, Jinming

    2013-01-01

    Growth of the single-walled gold nanotube (SWGNT), confined in the single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) has been studied by using the classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, in which two different empirical potentials (the glue and EAM potentials) are used for the interaction between gold atoms. It is found that under the glue potential, three new SWGNTs, (3, 2), (4, 2) and (6, 3) gold tubes can be formed, in addition to the previously found (3, 3), (4, 3) and (5, 3) ones, among which two achiral ones, (4, 2) and (6, 3) gold tubes are particularly interesting because they were thought to be not the tube-like structures, or to have large enough diameter, permitting an extra gold atom chain in it. However, when the EAM potential is used, only four SWGNTs, i.e., (3, 2), (4, 2), (4, 3) and (5, 3) gold tubes could be formed in our MD simulations. After comparing all the MD simulation results with those of the first principles calculations, it is found that the EAM potential is better to describe the interaction between gold atoms than the glue potential for the MD simulation on the growth of gold tubular structure in confined CNT.

  14. Synthesis and characterization of novel fullerenes and carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piskoti, Charles Richard

    Since the discovery of Buckminsterfullerene, the soccerball shaped carbon-caged molecule consisting of 60 carbon atoms, there has been much speculation about the stability of other "fullerenes" with less than 60 carbon atoms. Although several fullerenes with greater than 60 carbon atoms have since been isolated in bulk, the only evidence of lower fullerenes has come from minute-quantity gas phase experiments. This thesis presents work on the first ever bulk synthesis, extraction and characterization of a lower fullerene: C36. By exploring the parameter space of the Kratschmer-Huffman graphite arc-discharge method, C36 was produced in milligram quantities. This new material which was extracted with pyridine was found by electron diffraction to form a covalently bonded solid with a d-spacing of 6.68 A. This material is electrically insulating in its pure form but it becomes conducting upon intercalation with alkali metals. The resistance vs temperature behavior of the alkali intercalated samples is consistent with variable range hopping. From microwave-loss measurements and current vs. voltage data, there are preliminary results that may indicate the presence of a very small superconducting fraction in these alkali doped samples. This result would be consistent with predictions by Grossman, Cote, Cohen and Louie that a certain isomer of C 36 with D6h symmetry has an exceptionally strong electron-phonon coupling constant. Other developments described in this thesis include a method of synthesizing multi-walled carbon nanotubes in high yield at an accelerated rate using a low pressure mixture of nitrogen and helium as the buffer gas. Also, a simple technique has been developed for synthesizing magnetic nickel-iron clusters that are coated with both electrical insulators and electrical conductors. These clusters may have a variety of applications in the fields of magnetic recording and biochemistry where magnetic manipulation of cells is important. Finally, a

  15. Carbon nanotube materials for hydrogen storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dillon, A.C.; Jones, K.M.; Heben, M.J. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Hydrogen burns pollution-free and may be produced from renewable energy resources. It is therefore an ideal candidate to replace fossil fuels as an energy carrier. However, the lack of a convenient and cost-effective hydrogen storage system greatly impedes the wide-scale use of hydrogen in both domestic and international markets. Although several hydrogen storage options exist, no approach satisfies all of the efficiency, size, weight, cost and safety requirements for transportation or utility use. A material consisting exclusively of micropores with molecular dimensions could simultaneously meet all of the requirements for transportation use if the interaction energy for hydrogen was sufficiently strong to cause hydrogen adsorption at ambient temperatures. Small diameter ({approx}1 mm) carbon single-wall nanotubes (SWNTs) are elongated micropores of molecular dimensions, and materials composed predominantly of SWNTs may prove to be the ideal adsorbent for ambient temperature storage of hydrogen. Last year the authors reported that hydrogen could be adsorbed on arc-generated soots containing 12{Angstrom} diameter nanotubes at temperatures in excess of 285K. In this past year they have learned that such adsorption does not occur on activated carbon materials, and that the cobalt nanoparticles present in their arc-generated soots are not responsible for the hydrogen which is stable at 285 K. These results indicate that enhanced adsorption forces within the internal cavities of the SWNTs are active in stabilizing hydrogen at elevated temperatures. This enhanced stability could lead to effective hydrogen storage under ambient temperature conditions. In the past year the authors have also demonstrated that single-wall carbon nanotubes in arc-generated soots may be selectively opened by oxidation in H{sub 2}O resulting in improved hydrogen adsorption, and they have estimated experimentally that the amount of hydrogen stored is {approximately}10% of the nanotube weight.

  16. Nanotube substituted source/drain regions for carbon nanotube transistors for VLSI circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Shibesh; Shankar, Balakrishnan

    2011-12-01

    Aggressive scaling of silicon technology over the years has pushed CMOS devices to their fundamental limits. Pioneering works on carbon nanotube during the last decade possessing exceptional electrical properties have provided an intriguing solution for high performance integrated circuits. So far, at best, carbon nanotubes have been considered only for the channel, with metal electrodes being used for source/drain. Here, alternative schemes of 'All-Nanotube' transistor are presented where even the transistor components are derived from carbon nanotubes which hold the promise for smaller, faster, denser and more power efficient electronics.

  17. Carbon nanotube-based functional materials for optical limiting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu; Lin, Ying; Liu, Ying; Doyle, James; He, Nan; Zhuang, Xiaodong; Bai, Jinrui; Blau, Werner J

    2007-01-01

    Optical limiting is an important application of nonlinear optics, useful for the protection of human eyes, optical elements, and optical sensors from intense laser pulses. An optical limiter is such a device that strongly attenuates high intensity light and potentially damaging light such as focused laser beams, whilst allowing for the high transmission of ambient light. Optical limiting properties of carbon nanotube suspensions, solubilized carbon nanotubes, small molecules doped carbon nanotubes and polymer/carbon nanotube composites have been reviewed. The optical limiting responses of carbon nanotube suspensions are shown to be dominated by nonlinear scattering as a result of thermally induced solvent-bubble formation and sublimation of the nanotubes, while the solubilized carbon nanotubes optically limit through nonlinear absorption mechanism and exhibit significant solution-concentration-dependent optical limiting responses. In the former case the optical limiting results are independent of nanotube concentrations at the same linear transmittance as that of the solubilized systems. Many efforts have been invested into the research of polymer/carbon nanotube composites in an attempt to allow for the fabrication of films required for the use of nanotubes in a real optical limiting application. The higher carbon nanotube content samples block the incident light more effectively at higher incident energy densities or intensities. The optical limiting mechanism of these composite materials is quite complicated. Besides nonlinear scattering contribution to the optical limiting, there may also be other contributions e.g., nonlinear absorption, nonlinear refraction, electronic absorption and others to the optical limiting. Further improvements in the optical limiting efficiency of the composites and in the dispersion and alignment properties of carbon nanotubes in the polymer matrix could be realized by variation of both nanostructured guest and polymer host, and by

  18. Oscillation of carbon molecules inside carbon nanotube bundles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thamwattana, Ngamta; Cox, Barry J.; Hill, James M.

    2009-04-01

    In this paper, we investigate the mechanics of a nanoscaled gigahertz oscillator comprising a carbon molecule oscillating within the centre of a uniform concentric ring or bundle of carbon nanotubes. Two kinds of oscillating molecules are considered, which are a carbon nanotube and a C60 fullerene. Using the Lennard-Jones potential and the continuum approach, we obtain a relation between the bundle radius and the radii of the nanotubes forming the bundle, as well as the optimum bundle size which gives rise to the maximum oscillatory frequency for both the nanotube-bundle and the C60-bundle oscillators. While previous studies in this area have been undertaken through molecular dynamics simulations, this paper emphasizes the use of applied mathematical modelling techniques, which provides considerable insight into the underlying mechanisms of the nanoscaled oscillators. The paper presents a synopsis of the major results derived in detail by the present authors (Cox et al 2007 Proc. R. Soc. A 464 691-710 and Cox et al 2007 J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 40 13197-208).

  19. Chaotic region of elastically restrained single-walled carbon nanotube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Weipeng; Song, Mingzhe; Deng, Zichen; Zou, Hailin; Wei, Bingqing

    2017-02-01

    The occurrence of chaos in the transverse oscillation of the carbon nanotube in all of the precise micro-nano mechanical systems has a strong impact on the stability and the precision of the micro-nano systems, the conditions of which are related with the boundary restraints of the carbon nanotube. To generalize some transverse oscillation problems of the carbon nanotube studied in current references, the elastic restraints at both ends of the single-walled carbon nanotube are considered by means of rotational and translational springs to investigate the effects of the boundary restraints on the chaotic properties of the carbon nanotube in this paper. Based on the generalized multi-symplectic theory, both the generalized multi-symplectic formulations for the governing equation describing the transverse oscillation of the single-walled carbon nanotube subjected to the transverse load and the constraint equations resulting from the elastic restraints are presented firstly. Then, the structure-preserving scheme with discrete constraint equations is constructed to simulate the transverse oscillation process of the carbon nanotube. Finally, the chaotic region of the carbon nanotube is captured, and the oscillations of the two extreme cases (including simply supported and cantilever) are investigated in the numerical investigations. From the numerical results, it can be concluded that the relative bending stiffness coefficient and the absolute bending stiffness coefficients at both ends of the carbon nanotube are two important factors that affect the chaotic region of the carbon nanotube, which provides guidance on the design and manufacture of precise micro-nano mechanical systems. In addition, the different routes to the chaos of the carbon nanotube in two extreme cases are revealed.

  20. Mechanical and Electrical Properties of Organogels with Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moniruzzaman, Mohammad; Winey, Karen

    2008-03-01

    Organogels are fascinating thermally reversible viscoelastic materials that are comprised of an organic liquid and low concentrations (typically organogel/carbon nanotube composites using 12-hydroxystearic acid (HSA) as the gelator molecule and pristine and carboxylated multi-wall carbon nanotubes as the nanofillers and 1,2-dichlorobenzene as the organic solvent. We have achieved significant improvements in the mechanical and electrical properties of organogels by incorporating these carbon nanotubes. For example, the linear viscoelastic regime of the HSA organogel, an indicator of the strength of the gel, extends by a factor of 4 with the incorporation of 0.2 wt% of the carboxylated nanotubes. Also, the carbon nanotubes (specially the pristine tubes) improve the electrical conductivity of the organogels, e.g. six orders of magnitude enhancement in electrical conductivity with 0.2 wt% of pristine tubes. Differential scanning calorimetry experiments indicate that the nanotubes do not affect the thermoreversibility of the organogels.

  1. Preparation of array of long carbon nanotubes and fibers therefrom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arendt, Paul N.; DePaula, Ramond F.; Zhu, Yuntian T.; Usov, Igor O.

    2015-11-19

    An array of carbon nanotubes is prepared by exposing a catalyst structure to a carbon nanotube precursor. Embodiment catalyst structures include one or more trenches, channels, or a combination of trenches and channels. A system for preparing the array includes a heated surface for heating the catalyst structure and a cooling portion that cools gas above the catalyst structure. The system heats the catalyst structure so that the interaction between the precursor and the catalyst structure results in the formation of an array of carbon nanotubes on the catalyst structure, and cools the gas near the catalyst structure and also cools any carbon nanotubes that form on the catalyst structure to prevent or at least minimize the formation of amorphous carbon. Arrays thus formed may be used for spinning fibers of carbon nanotubes.

  2. Controlling growth of aligned carbon nanotubes from porous silicon templates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Fabricating well-aligned carbon nanotubes, especially, on a silicon substrate is very important for their applications. In this paper, an aligned carbon nanotube array has been prepared by pyrolysis of hydrocarbons catalyzed by nickel nanoparticles embedded in porous silicon (PS) templates. High-magnification transmission electron microscopy images confirm that the nanotubes are well graphitized. The PS substrates with pore sizes between 10 and 100 nm play a control role on the growth of carbon nanotubes and the diameters of the tubes increase with the enlargement of the pores of the substrates. However, such a control role cannot be found in the macro-PS substrates.

  3. The effect of carbon nanotubes on chiral chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rance, Graham A.; Miners, Scott A.; Chamberlain, Thomas W.; Khlobystov, Andrei N.

    2013-02-01

    The intrinsic helicity of carbon nanotubes influences the formation of chiral molecules in chemical reactions. A racemic mixture of P and M enantiomers of nanotubes affects the enantiomeric excess of the products of the autocatalytic Soai reaction proportional to the amount of nanotubes added in the reaction mixture. An intermediate complex formed between the nanotube and the organometallic reagent is essential and explains the observed correlation between the enantiomeric distribution of products and the curvature of the carbon nanostructure. This Letter establishes a key mechanism for harnessing the helicity of nanoscale carbon surfaces for preparative organic reactions.

  4. Thermal desorption of deuterium from modified carbon nanotubes and its correlation to the microstructure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lisowski, W.; Keim, E.G.; Berg, van den A.H.J.; Smithers, M.A.

    2006-01-01

    The process of deuterium desorption from single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) modified by atomic (D) and molecular (D2) deuterium treatment was investigated in an ultrahigh vacuum environment using thermal desorption mass spectroscopy (TDMS). Microstructural and chemical analyses of SWNT material, m

  5. A vapor-liquid-solid model for chemical vapor deposition growth of carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Kaili; Feng, Chen; Liu, Kai; Fan, Shoushan

    2007-01-01

    Although carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with a variety of morphologies have been successfully synthesized, there is no clear physical picture of the growth process. Correspondingly, the growth mechanism is still not clear up to now. Here we suggest a VLS model for the growth process of CNTs, which involves a liquid or liquid-like state catalyst. The basic idea is that, due to the high thermal conductivity and nanometer size of the catalyst and the fast diffusion of carbon atoms in it, both the temperature and the carbon atom distribution across it are uniform. The supersaturation level can be expressed as a function of the carbon concentration and temperature, which determines the nucleation dynamics and growth kinetics. Based on this model, the growth rate equation was obtained to describe the growth kinetics of carbon nanotubes, which shows good accordance with the experimental results.

  6. Investigation of Hydrogen Adsorption on Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Sang-Hun; Jeong, Seong Hun; Lee, Soon-Bo; Boo, Jin-Hyo

    We have investigated adsorption and desorption condition of atomic hydrogen on single-walled nanotubes (SWCNTs) using ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) and thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). The SWCNTs were made by the high pressure carbon monoxide (HiPCO) method. In our results, we observe from UPS data absorptive states reduce with increasing hydrogen doses and a new peak is developed near 8.6 eV and other points. But this peak is gradually diminished with pumping time. The TDS data show two characteristic peaks at 640 and 790K. By comparing with density functional calculations, we propose these peaks to be related to the presence of atomic hydrogen. Therefore, we can know that there are two adsorption sites on SWCNTs. Also we observed physisorption and chemisorption site by pumping time. We note that the UPS data are fully recoverable after hydrogen desorption at 1200K.

  7. Functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes regulates their effect on hemostasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sokolov, A V; Aseychev, A V; Kostevich, V A; Gusev, A A; Gusev, S A; Vlasova, I I, E-mail: irina.vlasova@yahoo.com [Research Institute for Physico-Chemical Medicine, FMBA, M. Pirogovskaya Str. 1a, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2011-04-01

    Applications of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in medical field imply the use of drug-coupled carbon nanotubes as well as carbon nanotubes functionalized with different chemical groups that change nanotube surface properties and interactions between nanotubes and cells. Covalent attachment of polyethylene glycol (PEG) to carboxylated single-walled carbon nanotubes (c-SWNT) is known to prevent the nanotubes from interaction with macrophages. Here we characterized nanotube's ability to stimulate coagulation processes in platelet-poor plasma (PPP), and evaluated the effect of SWNTs on platelet aggregation in platelet-rich plasma (PRP). Our study showed that PEG-SWNT did not affect the rate of clotting in PPP, while c-SWNT shortened the clot formation time five times compared to the control PPP. Since c-SWNT failed to accelerate coagulation in plasma lacking coagulation factor XI, it may be suggested that c-SWNT affects the contact activation pathway. In PRP, platelets responded to both SWNT types with irreversible aggregation, as evidenced by changes in the aggregate mean radius. However, the rate of aggregation induced by c-SWNT was two times higher than it was with PEG-SWNT. Cytological analysis also showed that c-SWNT was two times more efficient when compared to PEG-SWNT in aggregating platelets in PRP. Taken together, our results show that functionalization of nanoparticles can diminish their negative influence on blood cells. As seen from our data, modification of c-SWNT with PEG, when only a one percent of carbon atoms is bound to polymer (70 wt %), decreased the nanotube-induced coagulation in PRP and repelled the accelerating effect on the coagulation in PPP. Thus, when functionalized SWNTs are used for administration into bloodstream of laboratory animals, their possible pro-coagulant and pro-aggregating properties must be taken into account.

  8. Functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes regulates their effect on hemostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolov, A. V.; Aseychev, A. V.; Kostevich, V. A.; Gusev, A. A.; Gusev, S. A.; Vlasova, I. I.

    2011-04-01

    Applications of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in medical field imply the use of drug-coupled carbon nanotubes as well as carbon nanotubes functionalized with different chemical groups that change nanotube surface properties and interactions between nanotubes and cells. Covalent attachment of polyethylene glycol (PEG) to carboxylated single-walled carbon nanotubes (c-SWNT) is known to prevent the nanotubes from interaction with macrophages. Here we characterized nanotube's ability to stimulate coagulation processes in platelet-poor plasma (PPP), and evaluated the effect of SWNTs on platelet aggregation in platelet-rich plasma (PRP). Our study showed that PEG-SWNT did not affect the rate of clotting in PPP, while c-SWNT shortened the clot formation time five times compared to the control PPP. Since c-SWNT failed to accelerate coagulation in plasma lacking coagulation factor XI, it may be suggested that c-SWNT affects the contact activation pathway. In PRP, platelets responded to both SWNT types with irreversible aggregation, as evidenced by changes in the aggregate mean radius. However, the rate of aggregation induced by c-SWNT was two times higher than it was with PEG-SWNT. Cytological analysis also showed that c-SWNT was two times more efficient when compared to PEG-SWNT in aggregating platelets in PRP. Taken together, our results show that functionalization of nanoparticles can diminish their negative influence on blood cells. As seen from our data, modification of c-SWNT with PEG, when only a one percent of carbon atoms is bound to polymer (70 wt %), decreased the nanotube-induced coagulation in PRP and repelled the accelerating effect on the coagulation in PPP. Thus, when functionalized SWNTs are used for administration into bloodstream of laboratory animals, their possible pro-coagulant and pro-aggregating properties must be taken into account.

  9. Structural, elastic and electronic Properties of isotropic cubic crystals of carbon and silicon nanotubes : Density functional based tight binding calculations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander L. Ivanovskii

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Atomic models of cubic crystals (CC of carbon and graphene-like Si nanotubes are offered and their structural, cohesive, elastic and electronic properties are predicted by means of the DFTB method. Our main findings are that the isotropic crystals of carbon nanotubes adopt a very high elastic modulus B and low compressibility β, namely B = 650 GPa, β = 0.0015 1/GPa. In addition, these crystals preserve the initial conductivity type of their “building blocks”, i.e. isolated carbon and Si nanotubes. This feature may be important for design of materials with the selected conductivity type.

  10. Detecting Lyme Disease Using Antibody-Functionalized Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Transistors

    CERN Document Server

    Lerner, Mitchell B; Goldsmith, Brett R; Brisson, Dustin; Johnson, A T Charlie

    2013-01-01

    We examined the potential of antibody-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) field-effect transistors (FETs) for use as a fast and accurate sensor for a Lyme disease antigen. Biosensors were fabricated on oxidized silicon wafers using chemical vapor deposition grown carbon nanotubes that were functionalized using diazonium salts. Attachment of Borrelia burgdorferi (Lyme) flagellar antibodies to the nanotubes was verified by Atomic Force Microscopy and electronic measurements. A reproducible shift in the turn-off voltage of the semiconducting SWNT FETs was seen upon incubation with Borrelia burgdorferi flagellar antigen, indicative of the nanotube FET being locally gated by the residues of flagellar protein bound to the antibody. This sensor effectively detected antigen in buffer at concentrations as low as 1 ng/ml, and the response varied strongly over a concentration range coinciding with levels of clinical interest. Generalizable binding chemistry gives this biosensing platform the potential to...

  11. Electric Characteristics of the Carbon Nanotube Network Transistor with Directly Grown ZnO Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Un Jeong; Bae, Gi Yoon; Suh, Dong Ik; Park, Wanjun

    2016-03-01

    We report on the electrical characteristics of field effect transistors fabricated with random networks of single-walled carbon nanotubes with surfaces modified by ZnO nanoparticles. ZnO nanoparticles are directly grown on single-walled carbon nanotubes by atomic layer deposition using diethylzinc (DEZ) and water. Electrical observations show that ZnO nanoparticles act as charge transfer sources that provide electrons to the nanotube channel. The valley position in ambipolar transport of nanotube transistors is negatively shifted for 3V due to the electronic n-typed property of ZnO nanoparticles. However, the Raman resonance remains invariant despite the charge transfer effect produced by ZnO nanoparticles.

  12. Fast and reliable method of conductive carbon nanotube-probe fabrication for scanning probe microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dremov, Vyacheslav, E-mail: dremov@issp.ac.ru; Fedorov, Pavel; Grebenko, Artem [Institute of Solid State Physics, RAS, 142432 Chernogolovka (Russian Federation); Interdisciplinary Center for Basic Research, Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, 141700 Dolgoprudniy (Russian Federation); Fedoseev, Vitaly [Institute of Solid State Physics, RAS, 142432 Chernogolovka (Russian Federation)

    2015-05-15

    We demonstrate the procedure of scanning probe microscopy (SPM) conductive probe fabrication with a single multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWNT) on a silicon cantilever pyramid. The nanotube bundle reliably attached to the metal-covered pyramid is formed using dielectrophoresis technique from the MWNT suspension. It is shown that the dimpled aluminum sample can be used both for shortening/modification of the nanotube bundle by applying pulse voltage between the probe and the sample and for controlling the probe shape via atomic force microscopy imaging the sample. Carbon nanotube attached to cantilever covered with noble metal is suitable for SPM imaging in such modulation regimes as capacitance contrast microscopy, Kelvin probe microscopy, and scanning gate microscopy. The majority of such probes are conductive with conductivity not degrading within hours of SPM imaging.

  13. Carbon Nanotubes Synthesis via Arc Discharge with a Yttria Catalyst

    OpenAIRE

    M. I. Mohammad; Ahmed A. Moosa; J.H. Potgieter; Mustafa K. Ismael

    2013-01-01

    A facile method is proposed to use a computer controlled Arc discharge gap between graphite electrodes together with an yttria-nickel catalyst to synthesize carbon nanotubes under an Ar-H2 gases mixture atmosphere by applying different DC currents and pressure. This produces carbon nanotubes with decreased diameters and increased length. XRD evidence indicated a shift toward higher crystallinity nanotubes. Yields of the CNTs after purification were also enhanced.

  14. Site-selective radiation damage of collapsed carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crespi, V.H. [Department of Physics, 104 Davey Lab, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802-6300 (United States); Chopra, N.G.; Cohen, M.L.; Zettl, A. [Department of Physics, University of California at Berkeley and Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Radmilovic, V. [Department of Physical Metallurgy, University of Belgrade Karnegijeva 4, P.O. Box 494, Belgrade, 11001 (Yugoslavia)

    1998-10-01

    Carbon nanotubes can flatten into collapsed tubes with bulbs along either edge. The strong anisotropy in the graphitic radiation damage threshold both explains the rapid destruction of face-on flattened nanotubes and can be exploited to selectively modify the structure of edge-on flattened nanotubes, thereby creating one-dimensional sp{sup 2} carbon with noncontinuous transverse boundary conditions. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. Storage of hydrogen in floating catalytic carbon nanotubes after graphitizing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱宏伟; 李雪松; 慈立杰; 徐才录; 毛宗强; 梁吉; 吴德海

    2002-01-01

    Hydrogen storage under moderate pressure (~10 Mpa) and ambient temperature (~25℃) in multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) prepared by the floating catalyst method is investigated. The capacity of hydrogen adsorption is evaluated based on both the nanotubes diameter and morphology. Indirect evidence indicates that hydrogen adsorption not only occurs on tube surface and interiors, but also in tube interlayers. The results show that the floating catalytic carbon nanotubes might be a candidate hydrogen storage material for fuel cell electric vehicles.

  16. Carbon nanotube growth by PECVD: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyyappan, M; Delzeit, Lance; Cassell, Alan; Hash, David [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States)

    2003-05-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs), due to their unique electronic and extraordinary mechanical properties, have been receiving much attention for a wide variety of applications. Recently, plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) has emerged as a key growth technique to produce vertically-aligned nanotubes. This paper reviews various plasma sources currently used in CNT growth, catalyst preparation and growth results. Since the technology is in its early stages, there is a general lack of understanding of growth mechanisms, the role of the plasma itself, and the identity of key species responsible for growth. This review is aimed at the low temperature plasma research community that has successfully addressed such issues, through plasma and surface diagnostics and modelling, in semiconductor processing and diamond thin film growth.

  17. Solution-phase synthesis of chromium-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Kalinina, Irina V.

    2015-03-01

    The solution phase reactions of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with Cr(CO)6 and benzene-Cr(CO)3 can lead to the formation of small chromium clusters. The cluster size can be varied from less than 1 nm to about 4 nm by increasing the reaction time. TEM images suggest that the clusters are deposited predominantly on the exterior walls of the nanotubes. TGA analysis was used to obtain the Cr content and carbon to chromium ratio in the Cr-complexed SWNTs. It is suggested that the carbon nanotube benzenoid structure templates the condensation of chromium atoms and facilitates the loss of carbon monoxide leading to well defined metal clusters.

  18. Catalytic growth of carbon nanotubes with large inner diameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WEI REN ZHONG

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (2.4 g/g catalyst, with large inner diameters were successfully synthesized through pyrolysis of methane on a Ni–Cu–Al catalyst by adding sodium carbonate into the carbon nanotubes growth system. The inner diameter of the carbon nanotubes prepared by this method is about 20–60 nm, while their outer diameter is about 40–80 nm. Transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction were employed to investigate the morphology and microstructures of the carbon nanotubes. The analyses showed that these carbon nanotubes have large inner diameters and good graphitization. The addition of sodium carbonate into the reaction system brings about a slight decrease in the methane conversion and the yield of carbon. The experimental results showed that sodium carbonate is a mildly toxic material which influenced the catalytic activity of the Ni–Cu–Al catalyst and resulted in the formation of carbon nanotubes with large inner diameters. The growth mechanism of the carbon nanotubes with large inner diameters is discussed in this paper.

  19. Theoretical Studies of the Interaction of Excitons with Charged Impurities in Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayo, Benjamin O.

    A fundamental theory of the electronic and optical properties of semiconductors shows the importance of impurities, which are often unavoidable and can alter intrinsic properties of semiconductor materials substantially. While the subject of impurity doping is well understood in bulk semiconductors, the role and impact of doping in low dimensional materials like carbon nanotubes is still under investigation and there exists significant debate on the exact nature of electronic impurity levels in single-walled carbon nanotubes associated with adatoms. In this work, we address the role of impurities in single-walled carbon nanotubes. A simple model is developed for studying the interaction of bright (singlet) excitons in semiconducting single-wall nanotubes with charged impurities. The model reveals a red shift in the energy of excitonic states in the presence of an impurity, thus indicating binding of excitons in the impurity potential well. Signatures of several bound states were found in the absorption spectrum below the onset of excitonic optical transitions in the bare nanotube. The dependence of the binding energy on the model parameters, such as impurity charge and position, was determined and analytical fits were derived for a number of tubes of different diameter. The nanotube family splitting is seen in the diameter dependence, gradually decreasing with the diameter. By calculating the partial absorption coefficient for a small segment of nanotube the local nature of the wave function of the bound states was derived. Our studies provide useful insights into the role of the physical environment (here, a charged impurity atom) in the manipulation of the excited states of carbon nanotubes. We performed very detailed calculations of the electronic and optical properties of carbon nanotubes in the presence of an immobile impurity atom, thus going beyond previous many-body perturbation theory (MBPT) studies in which the carbon nanotubes were considered in vacuum

  20. Catalysts for Efficient Production of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ted X.; Dong, Yi

    2009-01-01

    Several metal alloys have shown promise as improved catalysts for catalytic thermal decomposition of hydrocarbon gases to produce carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Heretofore almost every experiment on the production of carbon nanotubes by this method has involved the use of iron, nickel, or cobalt as the catalyst. However, the catalytic-conversion efficiencies of these metals have been observed to be limited. The identification of better catalysts is part of a continuing program to develop means of mass production of high-quality carbon nanotubes at costs lower than those achieved thus far (as much as $100/g for purified multi-wall CNTs or $1,000/g for single-wall CNTs in year 2002). The main effort thus far in this program has been the design and implementation of a process tailored specifically for high-throughput screening of alloys for catalyzing the growth of CNTs. The process includes an integral combination of (1) formulation of libraries of catalysts, (2) synthesis of CNTs from decomposition of ethylene on powders of the alloys in a pyrolytic chemical-vapor-decomposition reactor, and (3) scanning- electron-microscope screening of the CNTs thus synthesized to evaluate the catalytic efficiencies of the alloys. Information gained in this process is put into a database and analyzed to identify promising alloy compositions, which are to be subjected to further evaluation in a subsequent round of testing. Some of these alloys have been found to catalyze the formation of carbon nano tubes from ethylene at temperatures as low as 350 to 400 C. In contrast, the temperatures typically required for prior catalysts range from 550 to 750 C.