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Sample records for carbon nanostructures

  1. Magnetism in carbon nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Hagelberg, Frank

    2017-01-01

    Magnetism in carbon nanostructures is a rapidly expanding field of current materials science. Its progress is driven by the wide range of applications for magnetic carbon nanosystems, including transmission elements in spintronics, building blocks of cutting-edge nanobiotechnology, and qubits in quantum computing. These systems also provide novel paradigms for basic phenomena of quantum physics, and are thus of great interest for fundamental research. This comprehensive survey emphasizes both the fundamental nature of the field, and its groundbreaking nanotechnological applications, providing a one-stop reference for both the principles and the practice of this emerging area. With equal relevance to physics, chemistry, engineering and materials science, senior undergraduate and graduate students in any of these subjects, as well as all those interested in novel nanomaterials, will gain an in-depth understanding of the field from this concise and self-contained volume.

  2. Carbon Nanostructure-Based Sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Sarkar, Tapan

    2012-01-01

    One-dimensional (1-D) nanostructure-based sensors provide better sensitivity as compared to conventional thin film-based sensors due to their comparable dimensions with respect to Debye length. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are 1-D nanostructures having high electrical mobility, high mechanical strength and high specific surface area that facilitate building of low-power, ultrahigh density sensors within limited space. However, pristine SWNTs posses limited sensitivity and selectivit...

  3. Carbon nanostructures and graphite-coated metal nanostructures ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 30; Issue 1. Carbon nanostructures and graphite-coated metal nanostructures obtained by pyrolysis of ruthenocene and ruthenocene–ferrocene mixtures. L S Panchakarla A ... Keywords. Carbon nanotubes; nanoparticles; nanorods; pyrolysis; metallocene; FeRu alloy.

  4. Carbon Nanostructures Containing Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxanes (POSS)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Potsi, Georgia; Rossos, Andreas; Kouloumpis, Antonios; Antoniou, Myrsini K.; Spyrou, Konstantinos; Karakassides, Michael A.; Gournis, Dimitrios; Rudolf, Petra

    2015-01-01

    This mini review describes the synthesis and properties of carbon nanostructures containing organic-inorganic cage-like polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS). The physical and chemical functionalization of carbon nanomaterials such as graphene, graphene oxide, carbon nanotubes, and fullerenes

  5. Spectroelectrochemistry of carbon nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavan, Ladislav; Dunsch, Lothar

    2007-05-14

    This review is focused on charge-transfer reactions at carbon nanotubes and fullerenes. The spectroelectrochemistry of fullerenes deals with the spin states of fullerenes, the role of mono-anions and the reactivity of higher charged states in C60. The optical (Vis-NIR) spectroelectrochemistry of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) follows changes in the allowed optical transitions among the Van Hove singularities. The Raman spectroelectrochemistry of SWNT benefits from strong resonance enhancement of the Raman scattering. Here, both semiconducting and metallic SWNTs are analyzed using the radial breathing mode (RBM) and G-modes as well as the second order (D, G') and intermediate frequency modes. Raman spectroelectrochemistry of SWNT allows the addressing of index-identified tubes and even single isolated nanotubes. Optical and Raman spectroelectrochemistry of fullerene peapods, C60@SWNT and C70@SWNT indicates effective shielding of the intratubular fullerene (peas). The most striking effect in the spectroelectrochemistry of peapods is the so-called "anodic Raman enhancement" of intratubular C60. Double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWNTs) give a specific spectroscopic response in Vis-NIR spectroelectrochemistry for the inner and the outer tube. They are better distinguishable by Raman spectroelectrochemistry which allows a precise tracing of the specific doping response of outer/inner tubes.

  6. Reducibility of platinum supported on nanostructured carbons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plomp, A.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304837598; Schubert, T.; Storr, U.; de Jong, K.P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/06885580X; Bitter, J.H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/160581435

    2009-01-01

    The nanostructure of graphite like carbon, i.e. carbon nanofibers (CNF), carbon nanotubes (CNT) and carbon nanoplatelets (CNP), displayed a significant influence on the reducibility of platinum deposited on these carbons. The onset temperature for reduction increased from 461 K for Pt/CNF to 466 K

  7. Hydrogen adsorption in carbon nanostructures compared

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schimmel, H.G.; Nijkamp, M.G.; Kearley, G.J.; Rivera, A.; de Jong, K.P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/06885580X; Mulder, F.M.

    2004-01-01

    Recent reports continue to suggest high hydrogen storage capacities for some carbon nanostructures due to a stronger interaction between hydrogen and carbon. Here the interaction of hydrogen with activated charcoal, carbon nanofibers, single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT), and electron beam ‘opened’

  8. Field Emission from Nanostructure Carbon Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Sung Hoon; Kim, Hong Sik; Jang, Jin; Lee, Choong Hun

    We studied the field emission properties of carbon nanostructure, which comprised of high density carbon nanotips on Si. These carbon nanotips are grown on metal coated Si by a high density plasma chemical vapor deposition (HDPCVD) using an inductively coupled plasma. The emission current increases with increasing the growth temperature. They exhibited an emission current density of 1 mA/cm2 at a field of 1.95 V/μm when the growth temperature was 700°C. We developed high brightness field emission lamps using the carbon nanotips.

  9. Electrolytic formation of carbon nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, W. K.; Terrones, M.; Hare, J. P.; Terrones, H.; Kroto, H. W.; Walton, D. R. M.

    1996-11-01

    Carbon nanotubes (with and without encapsulated material) as well as nanoparticles and onion-like structures have been generated by electrolysis in molten alkali halide salts using carbon electrodes under an argon atmosphere. The nature of the products depends upon several factors including the electrolysis voltage and current, depth of electrode immersion in the electrolyte, the length of time the current is maintained and the electrolyte.

  10. Carbon nanostructures and networks produced by chemical vapor deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kowlgi, N.K.K.; Koper, G.J.M.; Van Raalten, R.A.D.

    2012-01-01

    The invention pertains to a method for manufacturing crystalline carbon nanostructures and/or a network of crystalline carbon nanostructures, comprising: (i) providing a bicontinuous micro-emulsion containing metal nanoparticles having an average particle size between 1and 100nm; (ii) bringing said

  11. Multifunctional Carbon Nanostructures for Advanced Energy Storage Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiran Wang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanostructures—including graphene, fullerenes, etc.—have found applications in a number of areas synergistically with a number of other materials. These multifunctional carbon nanostructures have recently attracted tremendous interest for energy storage applications due to their large aspect ratios, specific surface areas, and electrical conductivity. This succinct review aims to report on the recent advances in energy storage applications involving these multifunctional carbon nanostructures. The advanced design and testing of multifunctional carbon nanostructures for energy storage applications—specifically, electrochemical capacitors, lithium ion batteries, and fuel cells—are emphasized with comprehensive examples.

  12. A study of nanostructured gold modified glassy carbon electrode for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wintec

    A study of nanostructured gold modified glassy carbon electrode for the determination of trace Cr(VI). BENZHI ... The method was applied to determine levels of chromium(VI) in tap water and sewage water. Keywords. Nanostructured gold modified ... analytical reagent-grade and double distilled water was used throughout.

  13. Dynamics of Photoexcitation and Photocatalysis at Nanostructured Carbon Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-14

    SUBTITLE Dynamics of Photoexcitation and Photocatalysis at Nanostructured Carbon Interfaces 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER FA9550-12-1-0063...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT During this grant, we have made major contributions to the understanding and practice of photoexcitation and photocatalysis at...of Photoexcitation and Photocatalysis at Nanostructured Carbon Interfaces Michael S. Arnold, Robert J. Hamers, and Martin T. Zanni Department of

  14. Self-assembled MoS2–carbon nanostructures: influence of nanostructuring and carbon on lithium battery performance

    KAUST Repository

    Das, Shyamal K.

    2012-01-01

    Composites of MoS 2 and amorphous carbon are grown and self-assembled into hierarchical nanostructures via a hydrothermal method. Application of the composites as high-energy electrodes for rechargeable lithium-ion batteries is investigated. The critical roles of nanostructuring of MoS 2 and carbon composition on lithium-ion battery performance are highlighted. © 2012 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  15. Carbon nanostructures and graphite-coated metal nanostructures ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    as mixtures of ruthenocene and ethylene in hydrogen gives rise to spherical nanoparticles, which contain a high proportion of sp3 carbon. Under certain conditions, pyrolysis of ruthenocene gives rise to graphite coated ruthenium nanoparticles as well as worm-like carbon structures. Pyrolysis of mixtures of ruthenocene and.

  16. Process synthesis and optimization for the production of carbon nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iyuke, S E; Mamvura, T A; Liu, K; Sibanda, V [School of Chemical and Metallurgical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and the Built Environment, University of the Witwatersrand, Wits 2050, Johannesburg (South Africa); Meyyappan, M [Center for Nanotechnology, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Varadan, V K, E-mail: sunny.iyuke@wits.ac.z [HiDEC, Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Arkansas (United States)

    2009-09-16

    A swirled fluidized bed chemical vapour deposition (SFCVD) reactor has been manufactured and optimized to produce carbon nanostructures on a continuous basis using in situ formation of floating catalyst particles by thermal decomposition of organometallic ferrocene. During the process optimization, carbon nanoballs were produced in the absence of a catalyst at temperatures higher than 1000 {sup 0}C, while carbon nanofibres, single-walled carbon nanotubes, helical carbon nanotubes, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and carbon nanofibres (CNFs) were produced in the presence of a catalyst at lower temperatures of between 750 and 900 {sup 0}C. The optimum conditions for producing carbon nanostructures were a temperature of 850 {sup 0}C, acetylene flow rate of 100 ml min{sup -1}, and acetylene gas was used as the carbon source. All carbon nanostructures produced have morphologies and diameters ranging from 15 to 200 nm and wall thicknesses between 0.5 and 0.8 nm. In comparison to the quantity of MWCNTs produced with other methods described in the literature, the SFCVD technique was superior to floating catalytic CVD (horizontal fixed bed) and microwave CVD but inferior to rotary tube CVD.

  17. Recycled diesel carbon nanoparticles for nanostructured battery anodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuming; Liu, Chang; Sun, Xiaoxuan; Ye, Han; Cheung, Chunshun; Zhou, Limin

    2015-02-01

    Considerable attention has been devoted to using rational nanostructure design to address critical carbonaceous anode material issues for next-generation lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). However, the fabrication of nanostructured carbonaceous anode materials often involves complex processes and expensive starting materials. Diesel engine is an important source of nanostructured carbon particles with diameters ranging 20 nm-60 nm suspended in air, resulting in a serious scourge of global climate and a series of diseases such as lung cancer, asthma, and cardiovascular disease. Here, we show that diesel carbon nanoparticles collected from diesel engines can be chemically activated to create a porous structure. The resulting nanostructured carbon electrodes have a high specific capacity of 936 mAh g-1 after 40 cycles at 0.05 A/g, and excellent cycle stability while retaining a capacity of ∼210 mAh g-1 after 1200 cycles at 5 A/g. As recycled diesel carbon nanoparticles are readily available due to the several billion tons of diesel fuel consumed every year by diesel engines, their use represents an exciting source for nanostructured carbonaceous anode materials for high-performance LIBs and improves our environment and health.

  18. Methods of analyzing carbon nanostructures, methods of preparation of analytes from carbon nanostructures, and systems for analyzing carbon nanostructures

    KAUST Repository

    Da Costa, Pedro Miquel Ferreira Joaquim

    2016-09-09

    Provided herein is a method determining the concentration of impurities in a carbon material, comprising: mixing a flux and a carbon material to form a mixture, wherein the carbon material is selected from the group consisting of graphene, carbon nanotubes, fullerene, carbon onions, graphite, carbon fibers, and a combination thereof; heating the mixture using microwave energy to form fused materials; dissolution of the fused materials in an acid mixture; and measuring the concentration of one or more impurities.

  19. Review on the Antimicrobial Properties of Carbon Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Jumaili, Ahmed; Alancherry, Surjith; Bazaka, Kateryna

    2017-01-01

    Swift developments in nanotechnology have prominently encouraged innovative discoveries across many fields. Carbon-based nanomaterials have emerged as promising platforms for a broad range of applications due to their unique mechanical, electronic, and biological properties. Carbon nanostructures (CNSs) such as fullerene, carbon nanotubes (CNTs), graphene and diamond-like carbon (DLC) have been demonstrated to have potent broad-spectrum antibacterial activities toward pathogens. In order to ensure the safe and effective integration of these structures as antibacterial agents into biomaterials, the specific mechanisms that govern the antibacterial activity of CNSs need to be understood, yet it is challenging to decouple individual and synergistic contributions of physical, chemical and electrical effects of CNSs on cells. In this article, recent progress in this area is reviewed, with a focus on the interaction between different families of carbon nanostructures and microorganisms to evaluate their bactericidal performance. PMID:28892011

  20. A study of nanostructured gold modified glassy carbon electrode for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A nanostructured gold modified glassy carbon electrode (Aunano/GCE) was employed for the determination of trace chromium(VI). To prepare Aunano/GCE, the GCE was immersed into KAuCl4 solution and electrodeposition was conducted at the potential of -0.4 V (vs Ag/AgCl) for 600 s. Scanning electron microscopy ...

  1. Hybrid carbon nanostructure assemblage for high performance pseudo-capacitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Mishra

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Investigation of novel nanocomposites for pseudo-capacitors with high capacitance and energy density is the spotlight of current energy research. In the present work, hybrid carbon nanostructure assemblage of graphene and multiwalled carbon nanotubes has been used as carbon support to nanostructured RuO2 and polyaniline for high energy supercapacitors. Maximum specific capacitances of 110, 235 and 440 F g−1 at the voltage sweep rate of 10 mV s−1 and maximum energy densities of 7, 12.5 and 20.5 Wh kg−1 were observed for carbon assemblage and its RuO2 and polyanilne decorated nanocomposites, respectively, with 1M H2SO4 as electrolyte.

  2. Surface modification of microfibrous materials with nanostructured carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krasnikova, Irina V., E-mail: tokareva@catalysis.ru [Boreskov Institute of Catalysis SB RAS, pr. Ac. Lavrentieva, 5, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Lenin av., 30, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Mishakov, Ilya V.; Vedyagin, Aleksey A. [Boreskov Institute of Catalysis SB RAS, pr. Ac. Lavrentieva, 5, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Lenin av., 30, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Bauman, Yury I. [Boreskov Institute of Catalysis SB RAS, pr. Ac. Lavrentieva, 5, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Korneev, Denis V. [State Research Center of Virology and Biotechnology VECTOR, Koltsovo, Novosibirsk Region 630559 (Russian Federation)

    2017-01-15

    The surface of fiberglass cloth, carbon and basalt microfibers was modified with carbon nanostructured coating via catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD) of 1,2-dichloroethane. Incipient wetness impregnation and solution combustion synthesis (SCS) methods were used to deposit nickel catalyst on the surface of microfibrous support. Prepared NiO/support samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis and temperature-programmed reduction. The samples of resulted hybrid materials were studied by means of scanning and transmission electron microscopies as well as by low-temperature nitrogen adsorption. The nature of the support was found to have considerable effect on the CCVD process peculiarities. High yield of nanostructured carbon with largest average diameter of nanofibers within the studied series was observed when carbon microfibers were used as a support. This sample characterized with moderate surface area (about 80 m{sup 2}/g after 2 h of CCVD) shows the best anchorage effect. Among the mineral supports, fiberglass tissue was found to provide highest carbon yield (up to 3.07 g/g{sub FG}) and surface area (up to 344 m{sup 2}/g) due to applicability of SCS method for Ni deposition. - Highlights: • The microfibers of different nature were coated with nanostructured carbon layer. • Features of CNF growth and characteristics of hybrid materials were studied. • Appropriate anchorage of CNF layer on microfiber’s surface was demonstrated.

  3. The mathematical model for synthesis process management of the carbon nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chistyakova, T. B.; Petrov, D. N.

    2017-01-01

    In this article, key difficulties of management process for carbon nanostructure synthesis are described. Tasks of optimum control of the carbon nanostructure synthesis process and management in case of emergency situations are formulated. The mathematical model of carbon nanostructure synthesis is offered. The equations for calculation of quantitative, qualitative indexes, indicators of safety and operability of engineering procedure are provided. The necessity of mathematical model use for carbon nanostructure synthesis is caused by improvement of the quality, the quantity, a decrease in the cost value of carbon nanostructures and an increase in safety of the engineering procedure of their obtaining. Testing and approbation of the mathematical model for carbon nanostructure synthesis are executed on a fullerene industrial production line. Suitability of the mathematical model of carbon nanostructure synthesis for production control in the mode of optimum control and management in case of emergency situations is confirmed. The obtained solution is recommended for implementation on the enterprises of a similar purpose.

  4. Carbon Nanostructures for Tagging in Electrochemical Biosensing: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paloma Yáñez-Sedeño

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Growing demand for developing ultrasensitive electrochemical bioassays has led to the design of numerous signal amplification strategies. In this context, carbon-based nanomaterials have been demonstrated to be excellent tags for greatly amplifying the transduction of recognition events and simplifying the protocols used in electrochemical biosensing. This relevant role is due to the carbon-nanomaterials’ large surface area, excellent biological compatibility and ease functionalization and, in some cases, intrinsic electrochemistry. These carbon-based nanomaterials involve well-known carbon nanotubes (CNTs and graphene as well as the more recent use of other carbon nanoforms. This paper briefly discusses the advantages of using carbon nanostructures and their hybrid nanocomposites for amplification through tagging in electrochemical biosensing platforms and provides an updated overview of some selected examples making use of labels involving carbon nanomaterials, acting both as carriers for signal elements and as electrochemical tracers, applied to the electrochemical biosensing of relevant (biomarkers.

  5. Antibacterial Carbon Nanotubes by Impregnation with Copper Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palza, Humberto; Saldias, Natalia; Arriagada, Paulo; Palma, Patricia; Sanchez, Jorge

    2017-08-01

    The addition of metal-based nanoparticles on carbon nanotubes (CNT) is a relevant method producing multifunctional materials. In this context, CNT were dispersed in an ethanol/water solution containing copper acetate for their impregnation with different copper nanostructures by either a non-thermal or a thermal post-synthesis treatment. Our simple method is based on pure CNT in an air atmosphere without any other reagents. Particles without thermal treatment were present as a well-dispersed layered copper hydroxide acetate nanostructures on CNT, as confirmed by scanning and transmission (TEM) electron microscopies, and showing a characteristic x-ray diffraction peak at 6.6°. On the other hand, by thermal post-synthesis treatment at 300°C, these layered nanostructures became Cu2O nanoparticles of around 20 nm supported on CNT, as confirmed by TEM images and x-ray diffraction peaks. These copper nanostructures present on the CNT surface rendered antibacterial behavior to the resulting hybrid materials against both Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. These findings present for the first time a simple method for producing antibacterial CNT by direct impregnation of copper nanostructures.

  6. Applications of Nanostructured Carbon Materials in Constructions: The State of the Art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Nan Lu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The most recent studies on the applications of nanostructured carbon materials, including carbon nanotubes, carbon nanofibers, and graphene oxides, in constructions are presented. First, the preparation of nanostructured carbon/infrastructure material composites is summarized. This part is mainly focused on how the nanostructured carbon materials were mixed with cementitious or asphalt matrix to realize a good dispersion condition. Several methods, including high speed melting mixing, surface treatment, and aqueous solution with surfactants and sonication, were introduced. Second, the applications of the carbon nanostructured materials in constructions such as mechanical reinforcement, self-sensing detectors, self-heating element for deicing, and electromagnetic shielding component were systematically reviewed. This paper not only helps the readers understand the preparation process of the carbon nanostructured materials/infrastructure material composites but also sheds some light on the state-of-the-art applications of carbon nanostructured materials in constructions.

  7. Growth of Carbon Nanostructure Materials Using Laser Vaporization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shen; Su, Ching-Hua; Lehozeky, S.

    2000-01-01

    Since the potential applications of carbon nanotubes (CNT) was discovered in many fields, such as non-structure electronics, lightweight composite structure, and drug delivery, CNT has been grown by many techniques in which high yield single wall CNT has been produced by physical processes including arc vaporization and laser vaporization. In this presentation, the growth mechanism of the carbon nanostructure materials by laser vaporization is to be discussed. Carbon nanoparticles and nanotubes have been synthesized using pulsed laser vaporization on Si substrates in various temperatures and pressures. Two kinds of targets were used to grow the nanostructure materials. One was a pure graphite target and the other one contained Ni and Co catalysts. The growth temperatures were 600-1000 C and the pressures varied from several torr to 500 torr. Carbon nanoparticles were observed when a graphite target was used, although catalysts were deposited on substrates before growing carbon films. When the target contains catalysts, carbon nanotubes (CNT) are obtained. The CNT were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, optical absorption and transmission, and Raman spectroscopy. The temperature-and pressure-dependencies of carbon nanotubes' growth rate and size were investigated.

  8. Thin Polymer Films Containing Carbon Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paszkiewicz, S.; Piesowicz, E.; Irska, I.; Roslaniec, Z.; Szymczyk, A.; Pawelec, I.

    2016-05-01

    Within the framework of the presented paper, the research experiments were conducted on the preparation and characterization of polymer thin films containing carbon nanotubes, graphene derivatives and hybrid systems of both CNTs/graphene derivatives, in which condensation polymers constituted the matrix. The use of in situ synthesis allowed to obtain nanocomposites with a high degree of homogeneity, which is a key issue for further industrial applications, while the analysis of the physical properties of the obtained materials showed effect of the addition of carbon nanotubes and graphene derivatives on their structure, barrier properties and thermal and electrical conductivity.

  9. Formation and Characterization of Carbon and Ceramic Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huczko, Andrzej; Bystrzejewski, Michał; Lange, Hubert; Baranowski, Piotr

    Different carbon and ceramic nanostructures (nanotubes, nanowires, nanofibres, nanorods, and nanoencapsulates) have great potential for improving our understanding of the fundamental concepts of the roles of both dimensionality and size on physical properties, as well as for many potential applications. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were produced in carbon arc plasma using different starting carbons, as the anode material. Low-graphitized carbons (including carbon black) proved to be much more efficient comparing to the regular graphite material. The optical emission and absorption spectroscopy was used for spectral diagnostics of the carbon arc. Carbon arc was also used to produce carbon onions containing magnetic nanocrystallites (Fe and magnetic alloys) in the core. The process was optimized and the procedure to isolate encapsulates was elaborated. Carbon nanocapsules containing Fe were also obtained via combustion synthesis from mixtures NaN3-C6Cl6-Ferrocene. This technique also proved to be very efficient to produce silicon carbide nanowires from Teflon (PTFE) and different reductants (CaSi2, Si). The protocol to isolate and efficiently purify the final product (up to 98 wt%) was proposed.

  10. Hybrid Carbon-Based Nanostructured Platforms for the Advanced Bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levchenko, I; Mai-Prochnow, A; Yick, S; Bilek, M M M; Kondyurin, A; Han, Z J; Fang, J; Cvelbar, U; Mariotti, D; Ostrikov, K

    2015-12-01

    Mankind faces several global challenges such as chronic and acute hunger, global poverty, energy deficiency and environment conservation. Common biotechnologies based on batch, fluidbed and other similar processes are now extensively used for the production of a wide range of products such as antibiotics, biofuels, cultured and fermented food products. Unfortunately, these processes suffer from low efficiency, high energy demand, low controllability and rapid biocatalyst degradation by microbiological attack, and thus still are not capable of seriously addressing the global hunger and energy deficiency challenges. Moreover, sustainable future technologies require minimizing the environmental impact of toxic by-products by implementing the "life produces organic matter, organic matter sustains life" principle. Nanostructure-based biotechnology is one of the most promising approaches that can help to solve these challenges. In this work we briefly review the unique features of the carbon-based nanostructured platforms, with some attention paid to other nanomaterials. We discuss the main building blocks and processes to design and fabricate novel platforms, with a focus on dense arrays of the vertically-aligned nanostructures, mainly carbon nanotubes and graphene. Advantages and disadvantages of these systems are considered.

  11. Fabrication and characterization of carbon and boron carbide nanostructured materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynaud, Sara

    Carbon is present in nature in a variety of allotropes and chemical compounds. Due to reduced dimensionality, nanostructured carbon materials, i.e. single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), are characterized by unique physical and chemical properties. There is a potential for SWNTs use as biological probes and assists for tunable tissue growth in biomedical applications. However, the presumed cytotoxicity of SWNTs requires investigation of the risks of their incorporation into living systems. Boron is not found in nature in elementary form. Boron based materials are chemically complex and exist in various polymorphic forms, i.e. boron carbide (BC). Because BC is a lightweight material with exceptional mechanical and elastic properties, it is the ideal candidate for armor and ballistic applications. However, practical use of BC as armor material is limited because of its anomalous glass-like behaviour at high velocity impacts, which has been linked to stress-induced structural instability in one of BC polymorphs, B12(CCC). Theoretical calculations suggest that formation of B12(CCC) in BC could be suppressed by silicon doping. In the first part of this thesis, biocompatibility of SWNTs is investigated. It is shown that under normal cell implantation conditions, the electrical conductivity of the SWNTs decreases due to an increase in structural disorder. This research suggests that SWNTs can be functionalized by protein and biological cells reducing the risk of cytotoxicity. In the second part of this thesis, boron carbide nanostructured materials are synthesized and investigated. Radio frequency sputtering deposition technique is employed for fabrication of BC (Si free) and BC:Si thin films. Variation of plasma conditions and temperature are found to affect chemical composition, adhesion to the substrate and morphology of the films. It is shown that BC films are predominantly amorphous and a small addition of Si largely improves their mechanical properties. In addition

  12. Device Fabrication and Probing of Discrete Carbon Nanostructures

    KAUST Repository

    Batra, Nitin M

    2015-05-06

    Device fabrication on multi walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) using electrical beam lithography (EBL), electron beam induced deposition (EBID), ion beam induced deposition (IBID) methods was carried out, followed by device electrical characterization using a conventional probe station. A four-probe configuration was utilized to measure accurately the electrical resistivity of MWCNTs with similar results obtained from devices fabricated by different methods. In order to reduce the contact resistance of the beam deposited platinum electrodes, single step vacuum thermal annealing was performed. Microscopy and spectroscopy were carried out on the beam deposited electrodes to follow the structural and chemical changes occurring during the vacuum thermal annealing. For the first time, a core-shell type structure was identified on EBID Pt and IBID Pt annealed electrodes and analogous free standing nanorods previously exposed to high temperature. We believe this observation has important implications for transport properties studies of carbon materials. Apart from that, contamination of carbon nanostructure, originating from the device fabrication methods, was also studied. Finally, based on the observations of faster processing time together with higher yield and flexibility for device preparation, we investigated EBID to fabricate devices for other discrete carbon nanostructures.

  13. Structurally uniform and atomically precise carbon nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segawa, Yasutomo; Ito, Hideto; Itami, Kenichiro

    2016-01-01

    Nanometre-sized carbon materials consisting of benzene units oriented in unique geometric patterns, hereafter named nanocarbons, conduct electricity, absorb and emit light, and exhibit interesting magnetic properties. Spherical fullerene C60, cylindrical carbon nanotubes and sheet-like graphene are representative forms of nanocarbons, and theoretical simulations have predicted several exotic 3D nanocarbon structures. At present, synthetic routes to nanocarbons mainly lead to mixtures of molecules with a range of different structures and properties, which cannot be easily separated or refined into pure forms. Some researchers believe that it is impossible to synthesize these materials in a precise manner. Obtaining ‘pure’ nanocarbons is a great challenge in the field of nanocarbon science, and the construction of structurally uniform nanocarbons, ideally as single molecules, is crucial for the development of functional materials in nanotechnology, electronics, optics and biomedical applications. This Review highlights the organic chemistry approach — more specifically, bottom-up construction with atomic precision — that is currently the most promising strategy towards this end.

  14. Fabrication and characterization of branched carbon nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharali Malik

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs have atomically smooth surfaces and tend not to form covalent bonds with composite matrix materials. Thus, it is the magnitude of the CNT/fiber interfacial strength that limits the amount of nanomechanical interlocking when using conventional CNTs to improve the structural behavior of composite materials through reinforcement. This arises from two well-known, long standing problems in this research field: (a inhomogeneous dispersion of the filler, which can lead to aggregation and (b insufficient reinforcement arising from bonding interactions between the filler and the matrix. These dispersion and reinforcement issues could be addressed by using branched multiwalled carbon nanotubes (b-MWCNTs as it is known that branched fibers can greatly enhance interfacial bonding and dispersability. Therefore, the use of b-MWCNTs would lead to improved mechanical performance and, in the case of conductive composites, improved electrical performance if the CNT filler was better dispersed and connected. This will provide major benefits to the existing commercial application of CNT-reinforced composites in electrostatic discharge materials (ESD: There would be also potential usage for energy conversion, e.g., in supercapacitors, solar cells and Li-ion batteries. However, the limited availability of b-MWCNTs has, to date, restricted their use in such technological applications. Herein, we report an inexpensive and simple method to fabricate large amounts of branched-MWCNTs, which opens the door to a multitude of possible applications.

  15. Carbon nanotubes for stabilization of nanostructured lipid particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaunt, Nicholas P.; Patil-Sen, Yogita; Baker, Matthew J.; Kulkarni, Chandrashekhar V.

    2014-12-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are increasingly studied for innovative biotechnological applications particularly where they are combined with essential biological materials like lipids. Lipids have been used earlier for enhancing the dispersibility of CNTs in aqueous solutions. Here we report a novel application of CNTs for stabilization of internally self-assembled nanostructured lipid particles of 2-5 μm size. Single-walled (pristine) as well as -OH and -COOH functionalized multi-walled CNTs were employed to produce nanostructured emulsions which stayed stable for months and could be re-dispersed after complete dehydration. Concentrations of CNTs employed for stabilization were very low; moreover CNTs were well-decorated with lipid molecules. These features contribute towards reducing their toxicity and improving biocompatibility for biomedical and pharmaceutical applications. Our approach paves the way for future development of combination therapies employing both CNTs and nanostructured lipid self-assembly together as carriers of different drugs.Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are increasingly studied for innovative biotechnological applications particularly where they are combined with essential biological materials like lipids. Lipids have been used earlier for enhancing the dispersibility of CNTs in aqueous solutions. Here we report a novel application of CNTs for stabilization of internally self-assembled nanostructured lipid particles of 2-5 μm size. Single-walled (pristine) as well as -OH and -COOH functionalized multi-walled CNTs were employed to produce nanostructured emulsions which stayed stable for months and could be re-dispersed after complete dehydration. Concentrations of CNTs employed for stabilization were very low; moreover CNTs were well-decorated with lipid molecules. These features contribute towards reducing their toxicity and improving biocompatibility for biomedical and pharmaceutical applications. Our approach paves the way for future development

  16. Using metal nanostructures to form hydrocarbons from carbon dioxide, water and sunlight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cong Wang

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Based on experimental results, we propose a mechanism that allows the use of metal nanostructures to synthesize hydrocarbons and carbohydrates from carbon dioxide, water and sunlight. When sunlight impinges on cobalt nanostructures in a glass chamber, its intensity is greatly enhanced around the tips of the nanostructures through surface plasmon excitations focusing effect, and it then photodissociates the water and carbon dioxide molecules through enhanced photon absorptions of ions around the tips of the nanostructures. The photodissociated molecules in excited states remain on the cobalt nanostructure surfaces and various hydrocarbons and carbohydrates then will be formed around the surfaces at temperatures much lower than 100 oC.

  17. Functionalized carbon nanostructures for hydrogen catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Lung-Hao

    Sodium borohydride, NaBH4, is widely used as a source of pure hydrogen. Hydrogen is of interest because it is a source of clean energy. It can be converted directly into electrical energy by means of fuel cells. One of the objectives of this thesis was to develop a new catalytic process to (i) enhance the rate of hydrogen generation, and (ii) to achieve hydrogen generation equal to 100% of the theoretically expected value. The catalyst investigated in this research is constructed by starting from single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT). This material has a very high specific surface area and good conductivity. The SWNT were formed into a paper by a special filtration process. Polysilazane, a polymeric precursor (Ceraset(TM)-SN from KiON Corp., Wiesbaden, Germany) was diluted by acetone and then layered onto SWNT paper. The Ceraset coated SWNT was then pyrolyzed at 1100°C for three hours to form a silicon carbonitride (SiCN), polymer derived ceramic (PDC), layer on the surface of SWNT filtered paper. This functionalized SiCN carbon nanotube paper (SiCN/CNT) was used as the substrate for catalyst dispersions. The catalyst consisted of transition metals, Pt/Pd/Ru. Suspension solutions of Pt, Pd and Ru were impregnated onto the SiCN/CNT paper with the expectation of creating a monolayer of these transition metals on surface of the SiCN/CNT substrate. It is likely that an interaction could occur between the transition metals and the silicon atoms present in the SiCN layer on the surface of the carbon nanotubes. It is known that transition metals and silicon react to form silicides, suggesting the formation of a strong Si-transition metal bond. Therefore, it is possible that this bond could provide good wetting of metal atoms on SiCN functionalized carbon nanotube substrate. In the limit a monolayer of the transition metals may be achieved, which would correspond to a near zero dihedral angle between the substrate and the cluster of transition metals. In such a scenario a

  18. Microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition growth of carbon nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivan R. Singh

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The effect of various input parameters on the production of carbon nanostructures using a simple microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition technique has been investigated. The technique utilises a conventional microwave oven as the microwave energy source. The developed apparatus is inexpensive and easy to install and is suitable for use as a carbon nanostructure source for potential laboratory-based research of the bulk properties of carbon nanostructures. A result of this investigation is the reproducibility of specific nanostructures with the variation of input parameters, such as carbon-containing precursor and support gas flow rate. It was shown that the yield and quality of the carbon products is directly controlled by input parameters. Transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to analyse the carbon products; these were found to be amorphous, nanotubes and onion-like nanostructures.

  19. Study of physical chemical properties of nanostructured carbon sorbent for cleanup of biomolecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almagul Kerimkulova

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The technology of nanostructured carbon sorbent. Optimized the conditions of carbonization of plant material and studied the basic structural and physicochemical properties of the sorbent. Studied the molecular-sieve and adsorption characteristics of the sorbent.

  20. Engineering heterojunctions with carbon nanostructures: towards high-performance optoelectronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Judy Z.

    2015-08-01

    Low-dimensional carbon nanostructures such as nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene have excellent electronic, optoelectronic and mechanical properties, which provide fresh opportunities for designs of optoelectronic devices of extraordinary performance in addition to the benefits of low cost, large abundance, and light weight. This work investigates photodetectors made with CNTs and graphene with a particular focus on carbon-based nanohybrids aiming at a nanoscale control of photon absorption, exciton dissociation and charge transfer. Through several examples including graphene/GaSe-nanosheets, graphene/aligned ZnO nanorods, SWCNT/P3HT, and SWCNT/biomolecule, we show an atomic-scale control on the interfacial heterojunctions is the key to high responsivity and fast photoresponse in these nanohybrids optoelectronic devices.

  1. Dynamic polarization of carbon nano-structures by charged particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miskovic, Zoran L. [Department of Applied Mathematics and Waterloo Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada)

    2014-03-31

    A brief review is presented of several models used to describe dynamic polarization of carbon nanostructures by charged particles moving in a broad range of incident velocities. For low-energy excitations of graphene we use the polarization function for its π electron bands in the Dirac cone approximations within a dielectric response approach that includes the transverse optical phonons in a polar substrate. For high-energy excitations by fast electrons we use a two-dimensional hydrodynamic model for the π and σ electron systems in the sp{sup 2} bonded carbon with various geometrical shapes. In particular, we use second quantization of the hydrodynamic model to show that large numbers of plasmons may be excited by moderately fast electrons in a C{sub 60} molecule. Results of the theoretical modeling are compared with several experiments.

  2. Electrochemical Biosensors Based on Nanostructured Carbon Black: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago Almeida Silva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon black (CB is a nanostructured material widely used in several industrial processes. This nanomaterial features a set of remarkable properties including high surface area, high thermal and electrical conductivity, and very low cost. Several studies have explored the applicability of CB in electrochemical fields. Recent data showed that modified electrodes based on CB present fast charge transfer and high electroactive surface area, comparable to carbon nanotubes and graphene. These characteristics make CB a promising candidate for the design of electrochemical sensors and biosensors. In this review, we highlight recent advances in the use of CB as a template for biosensing. As will be seen, we discuss the main biosensing strategies adopted for enzymatic catalysis for several target analytes, such as glucose, hydrogen peroxide, and environmental contaminants. Recent applications of CB on DNA-based biosensors are also described. Finally, future challenges and trends of CB use in bioanalytical chemistry are discussed.

  3. Carbon-nanostructured materials for energy generation and storage applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Linkov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We have developed and refined a chemical vapour deposition method to synthesise nanotubes using liquid petroleum gasasthe carbonsource. The nanotubes were thoroughly characterised by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy
    X-ray diffraction and thermogravimetric analysis. The protocol to grow nanotubes was then adapted to deposit nanotubes on the surface of different substrates, which were chosen based upon how
    the substrates could be applied in various hydrogen energyconver-sion systems. Carbon nanotubes area nanostructured material with an extremely wide range of application sinvariousenergy applications. The methods outlined demonstrate the complete
    development of carbon nanotube composite materials with direct applications in hydrogen energy generation, storage and conversion.

  4. Transition of carbon nanostructures in heptane diffusion flames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Wei-Chieh [National Cheng Kung University, Department of Mechanical Engineering (China); Hou, Shuhn-Shyurng [Kun Shan University, Department of Mechanical Engineering (China); Lin, Ta-Hui, E-mail: thlin@mail.ncku.edu.tw [National Cheng Kung University, Department of Mechanical Engineering (China)

    2017-02-15

    The flame synthesis has high potential in industrial production of carbon nanostructure (CNS). Unfortunately, the complexity of combustion chemistry leads to less controlling of synthesized products. In order to improve the understanding of the relation between flames and CNSs synthesized within, experiments were conducted through heptane flames in a stagnation-point liquid-pool system. The operating parameters for the synthesis include oxygen supply, sampling position, and sampling time. Two kinds of nanostructures were observed, carbon nanotube (CNT) and carbon nano-onion (CNO). CNTs were synthesized in a weaker flame near extinction. CNOs were synthesized in a more sooty flame. The average diameter of CNTs formed at oxygen concentration of 15% was in the range of 20–30 nm. For oxygen concentration of 17%, the average diameter of CNTs ranged from 24 to 27 nm, while that of CNOs was around 28 nm. For oxygen concentration of 19%, the average diameter of CNOs produced at the sampling position 0.5 mm below the flame front was about 57 nm, while the average diameters of CNOs formed at the sampling positions 1–2.5 mm below the flame front were in the range of 20–25 nm. A transition from CNT to CNO was observed by variation of sampling position in a flame. We found that the morphology of CNS is directly affected by the presence of soot layer due to the carbonaceous environment and the growth mechanisms of CNT and CNO. The sampling time can alter the yield of CNSs depending on the temperature of sampling position, but the morphology of products is not affected.

  5. Nanostructures of Indium Gallium Nitride Crystals Grown on Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji-Yeon; Man Song, Keun; Min, Yo-Sep; Choi, Chel-Jong; Seok Kim, Yoon; Lee, Sung-Nam

    2015-11-16

    Nanostructure (NS) InGaN crystals were grown on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) using metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. The NS-InGaN crystals, grown on a ~5-μm-long CNT/Si template, were estimated to be ~100-270 nm in size. Transmission electron microscope examinations revealed that single-crystalline InGaN NSs were formed with different crystal facets. The observed green (~500 nm) cathodoluminescence (CL) emission was consistent with the surface image of the NS-InGaN crystallites, indicating excellent optical properties of the InGaN NSs on CNTs. Moreover, the CL spectrum of InGaN NSs showed a broad emission band from 490 to 600 nm. Based on these results, we believe that InGaN NSs grown on CNTs could aid in overcoming the green gap in LED technologies.

  6. Integration of inorganic nanostructures with polydopamine-derived carbon: tunable morphologies and versatile applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Junhua; Seyed Shahabadi, Seyed Ismail; Lu, Xuehong

    2016-01-01

    Polydopamine (PDA), a mussel adhesive-inspired biomimetic polymer, has attracted tremendous attention owing to its extremely versatile adhesion properties, facile aqueous coating process, capability of self-assembly to form nanostructures, and abundant surface functional groups for secondary modification. PDA is also a fantastic carbon source because it gives nitrogen (N)-doped graphite-like carbon in high yield, and the carbonized PDA (C-PDA) thin coatings have similar properties to those of N-doped multilayered graphene, i.e., they exhibit high electrical conductivity, and good electrochemical and mechanical properties. In comparison with other carbon sources, an outstanding feature of PDA lies in its ease of integration with inorganic nanostructures and capability for easy tailoring the structure and morphology of the resultant composite nanostructures. In this article, different routes for the preparation of C-PDA-based composite nanostructures, such as carbon/metal oxide and carbon/Si hollow, mesoporous, core-shell, yolk-shell nanostructures, are introduced with typical examples. The structures, morphologies and properties of the C-PDA-based composite nanostructures are also reviewed, and their potential applications in various engineering fields, such as energy storage, solar water splitting, flexible electronics, catalysis, sensing and environmental engineering, are highlighted. Finally a future outlook for this fascinating composite-nanostructure enabler is also presented.

  7. nanostructures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wintec

    Abstract. In the present study, we report the synthesis, characterization and application of nanostructured oxide materials. The oxide materials (Cu2O and ZnO) have been synthesized by electrolysis based oxidation and thermal oxidation methods. Cuprous oxide (Cu2O) nanostructures have been synthesized by anodic ...

  8. Glass-like carbon, pyrolytic graphite or nanostructured carbon for electrochemical sensing of bismuth ion?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jadranka Milikić

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Different carbon electrodes were explored for application in electroanalysis, namely for sensing of bismuth ion as model analyte. Carbon materials tested included glassy carbon, basal and edge plane pyrolytic graphite, as well as nanostructured carbonized polyaniline prepared in the presence of 3,5-dinitrosalicylic acid. Bismuth ion was chosen as model analyte as protocol for its detection and quantifications is still to be determined. Herein, anodic stripping voltammetry was used with study of effect of several parameters such as scan rate and deposition time. Electrode based on carbonized polyaniline showed the highest activity for bismuth ion sensing in terms of the highest current densities recorded both in a laboratory and in real sample, while basal plane pyrolytic graphite electrode gave the lowest limit of detection.

  9. Modification of nanostructured calcium carbonate for efficient gene delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Dong; Wang, Chao-Qun; Zhuo, Ren-Xi; Cheng, Si-Xue

    2014-06-01

    In this study, a facile method to modify nanostructured calcium carbonate (CaCO3) gene delivery systems by adding calcium phosphate (CaP) component was developed. CaCO3/CaP/DNA nanoparticles were prepared by the co-precipitation of Ca(2+) ions with plasmid DNA in the presence of carbonate and phosphate ions. For comparison, CaCO3/DNA nanoparticles and CaP/DNA co-precipitates were also prepared. The effects of carbonate ion/phosphate ion (CO3(2-)/PO4(3-)) ratio on the particle size and gene delivery efficiency were investigated. With an appropriate CO3(2-)/PO4(3-) ratio, the co-existence of carbonate and phosphate ions could control the size of co-precipitates effectively, and CaCO3/CaP/DNA nanoparticles with a decreased size and improved stability could be obtained. The in vitro gene transfections mediated by different nanoparticles in 293T cells and HeLa cells were carried out, using pGL3-Luc as a reporter plasmid. The gene transfection efficiency of CaCO3/CaP/DNA nanoparticles could be significantly improved as compared with CaCO3/DNA nanoparticles and CaP/DNA co-precipitates. The confocal microscopy study indicated that the cellular uptake and nuclear localization of CaCO3/CaP/DNA nanoparticles were significantly enhanced as compared with unmodified CaCO3/DNA nanoparticles. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Growth of hybrid carbon nanostructures on iron-decorated ZnO nanorods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbuyisa, Puleng N.; Rigoni, Federica; Sangaletti, Luigi; Ponzoni, Stefano; Pagliara, Stefania; Goldoni, Andrea; Ndwandwe, Muzi; Cepek, Cinzia

    2016-04-01

    A novel carbon-based nanostructured material, which includes carbon nanotubes (CNTs), porous carbon, nanostructured ZnO and Fe nanoparticles, has been synthetized using catalytic chemical vapour deposition (CVD) of acetylene on vertically aligned ZnO nanorods (NRs). The deposition of Fe before the CVD process induces the presence of dense CNTs in addition to the variety of nanostructures already observed on the process done on the bare NRs, which range from amorphous graphitic carbon up to nanostructured dendritic carbon films, where the NRs are partially or completely etched. The combination of scanning electron microscopy and in situ photoemission spectroscopy indicate that Fe enhances the ZnO etching, and that the CNT synthesis is favoured by the reduced Fe mobility due to the strong interaction between Fe and the NRs, and to the presence of many defects, formed during the CVD process. Our results demonstrate that the resulting new hybrid shows a higher sensitivity to ammonia gas at ambient conditions (∼60 ppb) than the carbon nanostructures obtained without the aid of Fe, the bare ZnO NRs, or other one-dimensional carbon nanostructures, making this system of potential interest for environmental ammonia monitoring. Finally, in view of the possible application in nanoscale optoelectronics, the photoexcited carrier behaviour in these hybrid systems has been characterized by time-resolved reflectivity measurements.

  11. Saturated versus unsaturated hydrocarbon interactions with carbon nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deivasigamani eUmadevi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The interactions of various acyclic and cyclic hydrocarbons in both saturated and unsaturated forms with the carbon nanostructures (CNSs have been explored by using density functional theory (DFT calculations. Model systems representing armchair and zigzag carbon nanotubes (CNTs and graphene have been considered to investigate the effect of chirality and curvature of the CNSs towards these interactions. Results of this study reveal contrasting binding nature of the acyclic and cyclic hydrocarbons towards CNSs. While the saturated molecules show stronger binding affinity in acyclic hydrocarbons; the unsaturated molecules exhibit higher binding affinity in cyclic hydrocarbons. In addition, acyclic hydrocarbons exhibit stronger binding affinity towards the CNSs when compared to their corresponding cyclic counterparts. The computed results excellently corroborate the experimental observations. The interaction of hydrocarbons with graphene is more favourable when compared with CNTs. Bader’s theory of atoms in molecules has been invoked to characterize the noncovalent interactions of saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons. Our results are expected to provide useful insights towards the development of rational strategies for designing complexes with desired noncovalent interaction involving CNSs.

  12. Electrodes synthesized from carbon nanostructures coated with a smooth and conformal metal adlayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adzic, Radoslav; Harris, Alexander

    2014-04-15

    High-surface-area carbon nanostructures coated with a smooth and conformal submonolayer-to-multilayer thin metal films and their method of manufacture are described. The preferred manufacturing process involves the initial oxidation of the carbon nanostructures followed by a surface preparation process involving immersion in a solution with the desired pH to create negative surface dipoles. The nanostructures are subsequently immersed in an alkaline solution containing a suitable quantity of non-noble metal ions which adsorb at surface reaction sites. The metal ions are then reduced via chemical or electrical means. The nanostructures are exposed to a solution containing a salt of one or more noble metals which replace adsorbed non-noble surface metal atoms by galvanic displacement. The process can be controlled and repeated to obtain a desired film coverage. The resulting coated nanostructures may be used, for example, as high-performance electrodes in supercapacitors, batteries, or other electric storage devices.

  13. Synthesis and chemical modification of carbon nanostructures for materials applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higginbotham, Amanda Lynn

    This dissertation explores the structure, chemical reactivities, electromagnetic response, and materials properties of various carbon nanostructures, including single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), graphite, and graphene nanoribbons (GNRs). Efficient production and modification of these unique structures, each with their own distinct properties, will make them more accessible for applications in electronics, materials, and biology. A method is reported for controlling the permittivity from 1--1000 MHz of SWCNT-polymer composites (0.5 wt%) for radio frequency applications including passive RF antenna structures and EMI shielding. The magnitude of the real permittivity varied between 20 and 3.3, decreasing as higher fractions of functionalized-SWCNTs were added. The microwave absorbing properties and subsequent heating of carbon nanotubes were used to rapidly cure ceramic composites. With less than 1 wt% carbon nanotube additives and 30--40 W of directed microwave power (2.45 GHz), bulk composite samples reached temperatures above 500°C within 1 min. Graphite oxide (GO) polymer nanocomposites were developed at 1, 5, and 10 wt% for the purpose of evaluating the flammability reduction and materials properties of the resulting systems. Microscale oxygen consumption calorimetry revealed that addition of GO reduced the total heat release in all systems, and GO-polycarbonate composites demonstrated very fast self-extinguishing times in vertical open flame tests. A simple solution-based oxidative process using potassium permanganate in sulfuric acid was developed for producing nearly 100% yield of graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) by lengthwise cutting and unraveling of MWCNT sidewalls. Subsequent chemical reduction of the GNRs resulted in restoration of electrical conductivity. The GNR synthetic conditions were investigated in further depth, and an improved method which utilized a two-acid reaction medium was found to produce GNRs with

  14. Non-covalently functionalized carbon nanostructures for synthesizing carbon-based hybrid nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haiqing; Song, Sing I; Song, Ga Young; Kim, Il

    2014-02-01

    Carbon nanostructures (CNSs) such as carbon nanotubes, graphene sheets, and nanodiamonds provide an important type of substrate for constructing a variety of hybrid nanomaterials. However, their intrinsic chemistry-inert surfaces make it indispensable to pre-functionalize them prior to immobilizing additional components onto their surfaces. Currently developed strategies for functionalizing CNSs include covalent and non-covalent approaches. Conventional covalent treatments often damage the structure integrity of carbon surfaces and adversely affect their physical properties. In contrast, the non-covalent approach offers a non-destructive way to modify CNSs with desired functional surfaces, while reserving their intrinsic properties. Thus far, a number of surface modifiers including aromatic compounds, small-molecular surfactants, amphiphilic polymers, and biomacromolecules have been developed to non-covalently functionalize CNS surfaces. Mediated by these surface modifiers, various functional components such as organic species and inorganic nanoparticles were further decorated onto their surfaces, resulting in versatile carbon-based hybrid nanomaterials with broad applications in chemical engineering and biomedical areas. In this review, the recent advances in the generation of such hybrid nanostructures based on non-covalently functionalized CNSs will be reviewed.

  15. Nanostructured membranes and electrodes with sulfonic acid functionalized carbon nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Tripathi, Bijay Prakash

    2011-02-01

    Herein we report the covalent functionalization of multiwall carbon nanotubes by grafting sulfanilic acid and their dispersion into sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone). The nanocomposites were explored as an option for tuning the proton and electron conductivity, swelling, water and alcohol permeability aiming at nanostructured membranes and electrodes for application in alcohol or hydrogen fuel cells and other electrochemical devices. The nanocomposites were extensively characterized, by studying their physicochemical and electrochemical properties. They were processed as self-supporting films with high mechanical stability, proton conductivity of 4.47 × 10 -2 S cm-1 at 30 °C and 16.8 × 10-2 S cm-1 at 80 °C and 100% humidity level, electron conductivity much higher than for the plain polymer. The methanol permeability could be reduced to 1/20, keeping water permeability at reasonable values. The ratio of bound water also increases with increasing content of sulfonated filler, helping in keeping water in the polymer in conditions of low external humidity level. © 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  16. Low pressure adsorption of hydrogen on carbon nanostructures; Adsorption d'hydrogene a basse pression sur des nanostructures de carbone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melancon, E.; Benard, P. [Universite du Quebec a Trois-Rivieres, Institut de recherche sur l' hydrogene, Trois-Rivieres, Quebec (Canada)

    2000-05-01

    Although hydrogen is one of the most efficient fuel per unit of mass, its low density per unit volume requires high pressure gaseous storage or cyrogenic storage in liquid form for practical applications. A promising technique to reduce the pressure requirements for gaseous storage is to use the adsorption properties of carbon materials. However, physisorption of hydrogen on activated carbon requires operating temperatures of the order of 77K and a proper densification of the carbon to exhibit appreciable gains over compression. Large absorbed densities of hydrogen have been reported on carbon nanostructures such as nanotubes and nanofibers, at or near room temperature. Adsorption storage of hydrogen using such carbon materials may therefore be possible at much higher temperatures than activated carbon. The precise mechanisms that could explain the large adsorbed densities is still not understood. Although physiosorption does not appear to be sufficient to explain by itself the large reported values of the adsorption density of nanotubes and nanofibers, it is interesting to study its contribution to the absorbed density and to compare it to other carbon structures such as activated carbon, particularly in view of the controversy surrounding the actual values of the absorbed density in carbon nanostructures. In this work, we will study the adsorption isotherms of hydrogen on caped and uncaped carbon nanotubes and nanotube ropes in the limit of Henry's Law by calculating the second virial coefficient for gas solid interaction and compare them to layered carbon structures.

  17. Nanostructured carbon-metal oxide composite electrodes for supercapacitors: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi, Mingjia; Xiang, Chengcheng; Li, Jiangtian; Li, Ming; Wu, Nianqiang

    2013-01-07

    This paper presents a review of the research progress in the carbon-metal oxide composites for supercapacitor electrodes. In the past decade, various carbon-metal oxide composite electrodes have been developed by integrating metal oxides into different carbon nanostructures including zero-dimensional carbon nanoparticles, one-dimensional nanostructures (carbon nanotubes and carbon nanofibers), two-dimensional nanosheets (graphene and reduced graphene oxides) as well as three-dimensional porous carbon nano-architectures. This paper has described the constituent, the structure and the properties of the carbon-metal oxide composites. An emphasis is placed on the synergistic effects of the composite on the performance of supercapacitors in terms of specific capacitance, energy density, power density, rate capability and cyclic stability. This paper has also discussed the physico-chemical processes such as charge transport, ion diffusion and redox reactions involved in supercapacitors.

  18. Calcium-decorated carbon nanostructures for the selective capture of carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Jahyun; Bae, Hyeonhu; Kang, Lei; Huang, Bing; Lee, Hoonkyung

    2016-10-26

    The development of advanced materials for CO 2 capture is of great importance for mitigating climate change. In this paper, we outline our discovery that calcium-decorated carbon nanostructures, i.e., zigzag graphene nanoribbons (ZGNRs), carbyne, and graphyne, have great potential for selective CO 2 capture, as demonstrated via first-principles calculations. Our findings show that Ca-decorated ZGNRs can bind up to three CO 2 molecules at each Ca atom site with an adsorption energy of ∼-0.8 eV per CO 2 , making them suitable for reversible CO 2 capture. They adsorb CO 2 molecules preferentially, compared with other gas molecules such as H 2 , N 2 , and CH 4 . Moreover, based on equilibrium thermodynamical simulations, we confirm that Ca-decorated ZGNRs can capture CO 2 selectively from a gas mixture with a capacity of ∼4.5 mmol g -1 under ambient conditions. Similar results have been found in other carbon nanomaterials, indicating the generality of carbon based nanostructures for selective CO 2 capture under ambient conditions.

  19. CVD fabrication of carbon nanotubes on electrodeposited flower-like Fe nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanganeh, Saeid, E-mail: SAZ@engr.uconn.ed [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Connecticut, 371 Fairfield Way, U-2157 Storrs, CT 06269-2157 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Center of Excellence for Production of Advanced Materials, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9466, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Torabi, Morteza [Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, P.O. Box 16845-161, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Center of Excellence for Production of Advanced Materials, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9466, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kajbafvala, Amir [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, 911 Partner' s Way, Raleigh, NC 27695-7907 (United States); Zanganeh, Navid [Chemical Engineering Department, Amirkabir University of Technology, P.O. Box 15875-4413, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bayati, M.R.; Molaei, Roya; Zargar, H.R. [Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, P.O. Box 16845-161, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sadrnezhaad, S.K. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Center of Excellence for Production of Advanced Materials, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9466, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-10-08

    Research highlights: {yields} The latest results obtained about production of flower-like nanostructured Fe catalysts deposited electrochemically on platinum electrodes (as a suitable catalyst for synthesis of carbon nanotubes) are presented in this paper. {yields} CVD is used as a convenient way of deposition of CNTs on the flower-like Fe catalyst substrate. - Abstract: Galvanostatic method was used to electrodeposit Fe nanostructures on platinum electrodes as catalysts. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed flower-like Fe deposits with high surface area. Carbon nanotubes were grown on flower-like Fe nanostructures by chemical vapor deposition. The structure of the synthesized carbon nanotubes was investigated by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. According to X-ray diffraction patterns, Fe was the only detected constituent of the deposited coating. The carbon nanotubes had small wall-thickness and wide hollow core.

  20. Nanostructured Diamond-Like Carbon Films Grown by Off-Axis Pulsed Laser Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong Shan Yap

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured diamond-like carbon (DLC films instead of the ultrasmooth film were obtained by pulsed laser ablation of pyrolytic graphite. Deposition was performed at room temperature in vacuum with substrates placed at off-axis position. The configuration utilized high density plasma plume arriving at low effective angle for the formation of nanostructured DLC. Nanostructures with maximum size of 50 nm were deposited as compared to the ultrasmooth DLC films obtained in a conventional deposition. The Raman spectra of the films confirmed that the films were diamond-like/amorphous in nature. Although grown at an angle, ion energy of >35 eV was obtained at the off-axis position. This was proposed to be responsible for subplantation growth of sp3 hybridized carbon. The condensation of energetic clusters and oblique angle deposition correspondingly gave rise to the formation of nanostructured DLC in this study.

  1. Effects of heating time on the growth and behavior of amorphous carbon nanostructures from ferrocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafiqul Islam, Md; Rashid, A. K. M. B.; Ferdous, Md; Shafiul Azam, Md

    2017-05-01

    Heating time is one of the crucial factors in various methods employed for the synthesis of carbon nanostructures (CNSs) from ferrocene. However, the effects of heating time on the growth and morphology of the nanostructured materials has not been well explored yet, particularly for amorphous carbon. Herein, we investigate how the variation of heating time impacts the growth of CNSs by carrying out the reaction between ferrocene and ammonium chloride in a solvent free condition at 250 °C. Several different forms of carbon nanostructures yielded from this reaction at 25 min (CNS-25), 30 min (CNS-30), 35 min (CNS-35) and 40 min (CNS-40) were analyzed by means of field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) coupled with energy-dispersive x-ray (EDX), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy. The final product CNS-40 was washed several times with concentrated hydrochloric acid solution to remove the impurities and then characterized by the means of similar techniques. FTIR spectra of all the nanostructures confirmed the presence of several functional groups such as C  =  C, C-O and -OH etc, which are common in carbonaceous nanostructures. However, the FESEM images obtained are significantly different and suggest a gradual growth of the carbon nanostructures ending up with long carbon nanotubes after 40 min. No absorption peak in the visible region of the UV-Vis spectra of the final product confirms the amorphous nature, which is also supported by XRD of the synthesized nanotube. Moreover, a noteworthy redshift in the UV-Vis peaks reflecting a huge increase in length and diameter of the nanostructures indicates the maximum longitudinal growth of the carbon nanotubes occurs during 35 min to 40 min.

  2. Carbon fiber CVD coating by carbon nanostructured for space materials protection against atomic oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastore, Roberto; Bueno Morles, Ramon; Micheli, Davide

    2016-07-01

    adhesion and durability in the environment. Though these coatings are efficient in protecting polymer composites, their application imposes severe constraints. Their thermal expansion coefficients may differ markedly from those of polymer composite substrates: as a result, cracks develop in the coatings on thermal cycling and AO can penetrate through them to the substrate. In addition to the technicalities of forming an effective barrier, such factors as cost, convenience of application and ease of repair are important considerations in the selection of a coating for a particular application. The latter issues drive the aerospace research toward the development of novel light composite materials, like the so called polymer nanocomposites, which are materials with a polymer matrix and a filler with at least one dimension less than 100 nanometers. Current interest in nanocomposites has been generated and maintained because nanoparticle-filled polymers exhibit unique combinations of properties not achievable with traditional composites. These combinations of properties can be achieved because of the small size of the fillers, the large surface area the fillers provide, and in many cases the unique properties of the fillers themselves. In particular, the carbon fiber-based polymeric composite materials are the basic point of interest: the aim of the present study is to find new solution to produce carbon fiber-based composites with even more upgraded performances. One intriguing strategy to tackle such an issue has been picked out in the coupling between the carbon fibers and the carbon nanostructures. That for two main reasons: first, carbon nanostructures have shown fancy potentialities for any kind of technological applications since their discovery, second, the chemical affinity between fiber and nanostructure (made of the same element) should be a likely route to approach the typical problems due to thermo-mechanical compatibility. This work is joined in such framework

  3. Synthesis of carbon nanostructures from high density polyethylene (HDPE) and polyethylene terephthalate (PET) waste by chemical vapour deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatta, M. N. M.; Hashim, M. S.; Hussin, R.; Aida, S.; Kamdi, Z.; Ainuddin, AR; Yunos, MZ

    2017-10-01

    In this study, carbon nanostructures were synthesized from High Density Polyethylene (HDPE) and Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) waste by single-stage chemical vapour deposition (CVD) method. In CVD, iron was used as catalyst and pyrolitic of carbon source was conducted at temperature 700, 800 and 900°C for 30 minutes. Argon gas was used as carrier gas with flow at 90 sccm. The synthesized carbon nanostructures were characterized by FESEM, EDS and calculation of carbon yield (%). FESEM micrograph shows that the carbon nanostructures were only grown as nanofilament when synthesized from PET waste. The synthesization of carbon nanostructure at 700°C was produced smooth and the smallest diameter nanofilament compared to others. The carbon yield of synthesized carbon nanostructures from PET was lower from HDPE. Furthermore, the carbon yield is recorded to increase with increasing of reaction temperature for all samples. Elemental study by EDS analysis were carried out and the formation of carbon nanostructures was confirmed after CVD process. Utilization of polymer waste to produce carbon nanostructures is beneficial to ensure that the carbon nanotechnology will be sustained in future.

  4. Functionalization of gold and carbon nanostructured materials using gamma-ray irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salah, Numan [Center of Nanotechnology, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia)], E-mail: alnumany@yahoo.com; Habib, Sami S.; Khan, Zishan H. [Center of Nanotechnology, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Al-Hamedi, Salim [Department of Biological Science, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Djouider, Fathi [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia)

    2009-11-15

    Gold nanoparticles were successfully attached to the surface sites of carbon nanotubes (CNT). Both nanostructured materials were functionalized by {lambda}-ray irradiation without chemical treatments for creating active sites. UV-visible absorption spectra of the un-irradiated and gamma ray-irradiated nanomaterials are also studied. The absorption spectrum of the irradiated CNT shows a new strong peak located at 700 nm, which might act as the active site on the surface of CNT, the result being an attachment of gold nanoparticles. This approach provides an efficient method to attach other nanostructures to carbon nanotubes for using them in different applications such as medicine and synthesis of catalytic materials.

  5. Parametric characterization of zinc oxide nanostructures forming three-dimensional hybrid nanoarchitectures on carbon nanotube constucts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ok, Jong G. [Dept. of Mechanical and Automotive Engineering, Seoul National University of Science and Technology (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    We study the structural and functional characteristics of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures that are grown on carbon nanotube (CNT) constructs via step-wise chemical vapor deposition (CVD). First, we optimize the CVD process to directly grow ZnO nanostructures on CNTs by controlling the growth temperature below 600 degree celsius, where CNTs can be sustained in a ZnO-growing oxidative atmosphere. We then investigate how the morphology and areal density of ZnO nanostructures evolve depending on process parameters, such as pressure, temperature, and gas feeding composition, while focusing on the effect of underlying CNT topology on ZnO nucleation and growth. Because various types of ZnO nanostructures, including nanowires, nanorods, nanoplates, and polycrystalline nanocrystals, can be conformally formed on highly conductive CNT platforms, this electrically addressable three-dimensional hybrid nanoarchitecture may better meet a wide range of nanoelectronic application-specific needs.

  6. Synthesis of carbon nanostructures by the pyrolysis of wood sawdust in a tubular reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria G. Sebag Bernd

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanostructures were produced by wood sawdust pyrolysis. The results obtained revealed that the thermodynamic simulations (FactSage were successful to predict the best reaction conditions for the synthesis of carbon, and potentially carbon fibers and nanotubes production. Graphite formation was indicated by XRD study, and by thermal analysis which presented the carbon oxidation range. The morphology of the samples (SEM/TEM analysis showed carbon nanotubes/nanofibers varying in size and thickness, with defects and flaws. The tubular reactor was considered to be an economic and environmental correct way to nanomaterials growing, with the simultaneous generation of hydrogen and lower pollutant gas emissions.

  7. Carbon Nanostructure-Based Field-Effect Transistors for Label-Free Chemical/Biological Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PingAn Hu

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decade, electrical detection of chemical and biological species using novel nanostructure-based devices has attracted significant attention for chemical, genomics, biomedical diagnostics, and drug discovery applications. The use of nanostructured devices in chemical/biological sensors in place of conventional sensing technologies has advantages of high sensitivity, low decreased energy consumption and potentially highly miniaturized integration. Owing to their particular structure, excellent electrical properties and high chemical stability, carbon nanotube and graphene based electrical devices have been widely developed for high performance label-free chemical/biological sensors. Here, we review the latest developments of carbon nanostructure-based transistor sensors in ultrasensitive detection of chemical/biological entities, such as poisonous gases, nucleic acids, proteins and cells.

  8. In situ mechanical property measurements of amorphous carbon-boron nitride nanotube nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Woo; Carpena Núñez, Jennifer; Siochi, Emilie J.; Wise, Kristopher E.; Lin, Yi; Connell, John W.; Smith, Michael W.

    2012-01-01

    To understand the mechanical properties of amorphous carbon (a-C)/boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) nanostructures, in situ mechanical tests are conducted inside a transmission electron microscope equipped with an integrated atomic force microscope system. The nanotube structure is modified with amorphous carbon deposited by controlled electron beam irradiation. We demonstrate multiple in situ tensile, compressive, and lap shear tests with a-C/BNNT hybrid nanostructures. The tensile strength of the a-C/BNNT hybrid nanostructure is 5.29 GPa with about 90 vol% of a-C. The tensile strength and strain of the end-to-end joint structure with a-C welding is 0.8 GPa and 5.2% whereas the lap shear strength of the side-by-side joint structure with a-C is 0.25 GPa.

  9. In Situ Mechanical Property Measurements of Amorphous Carbon-Boron Nitride Nanotube Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Woo; Lin, Yi; Nunez, Jennifer Carpena; Siochi, Emilie J.; Wise, Kristopher E.; Connell, John W.; Smith, Michael W.

    2011-01-01

    To understand the mechanical properties of amorphous carbon (a-C)/boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) nanostructures, in situ mechanical tests are conducted inside a transmission electron microscope equipped with an integrated atomic force microscope system. The nanotube structure is modified with amorphous carbon deposited by controlled electron beam irradiation. We demonstrate multiple in situ tensile, compressive, and lap shear tests with a-C/BNNT hybrid nanostructures. The tensile strength of the a-C/BNNT hybrid nanostructure is 5.29 GPa with about 90 vol% of a-C. The tensile strength and strain of the end-to-end joint structure with a-C welding is 0.8 GPa and 5.2% whereas the lap shear strength of the side-by-side joint structure with a-C is 0.25 GPa.

  10. Growth of Carbon Nanotubes on Clay: Unique Nanostructured Filler for High-Performance Polymer Nanocomposites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Wei-De; Phang, In Yee; Liu, Tianxi

    2006-01-01

    High-performance composites are produced using nanostructured clay-carbon nanotube (CNT) hybrids as a reinforcing filler. The intercalation of iron particles between the clay platelets serves as the catalyst for the growth of CNTs, while the platelets are exfoliated by the CNTs, forming the unique

  11. An investigation into carbon nanostructured materials as catalyst support in proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veltzé, Sune

    black support materials for low platinum containing electrocatalyst. This is partly due to their high electronic conductivity. Partly due to their high surface area needed for the dispersion of nanoparticulate metal-clusters. In addition carbon nano-structures (CNF, SWCNT, MWCNT etc.) are more durable...

  12. Advantages of the Biomimetic Nanostructured Films as an Immobilization Method vs. the Carbon Paste Classical Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Luz Rodríguez-Méndez

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Tyrosinase-based biosensors containing a phthalocyanine as electron mediator have been prepared by two different methods. In the first approach, the enzyme and the electron mediator have been immobilized in carbon paste electrodes. In the second method, they have been introduced in an arachidic acid Langmuir-Blodgett nanostructured film that provides a biomimetic environment. The sensing properties of non-nanostructured and nanostructured biosensors towards catechol, catechin and phenol have been analyzed and compared. The enzyme retains the biocatalytic properties in both matrixes. However, the nanostructured biomimetic films show higher values of maximum reaction rates and lowest apparent Michaelis-Menten constants. In both types of sensors, the sensitivity follows the decreasing order catechol > catechin > phenol. The detection limits observed are in the range of 1.8–5.4 μM for Langmuir-Blodgett biosensors and 8.19–8.57 μM for carbon paste biosensors. In summary, it has been demonstrated that the Langmuir-Blodgett films provide a biomimetic environment and nanostructured biosensors show better performances in terms of kinetic, detection limit and stability.

  13. Platinum-based electrocatalysts synthesized by depositing contiguous adlayers on carbon nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adzic, Radoslav R.; Harris, Alexander

    2015-10-06

    High-surface-area carbon nanostructures coated with a smooth and conformal submonolayer-to-multilayer thin metal films and their method of manufacture are described. The manufacturing process may involve initial oxidation of the carbon nanostructures followed by immersion in a solution with the desired pH to create negative surface dipoles. The nanostructures are subsequently immersed in an alkaline solution containing non-noble metal ions which adsorb at surface reaction sites. The metal ions are then reduced via chemical or electrical means and the nanostructures are exposed to a solution containing a salt of one or more noble metals which replace adsorbed non-noble surface metal atoms by galvanic displacement. Subsequent film growth may be performed via the initial quasi-underpotential deposition of a non-noble metal followed by immersion in a solution comprising a more noble metal. The resulting coated nanostructures may be used, for example, as high-performance electrodes in supercapacitors, batteries, or other electric storage devices.

  14. Nanostructured composites based on carbon nanotubes and epoxy resin for use as radar absorbing materials

    OpenAIRE

    Silva,Valdirene Aparecida; Folgueras,Luiza de Castro; Candido, Geraldo Mauricio; Paula, Adriano Luiz de; Rezende,Mirabel Cerqueira; Costa, Michelle Leali [UNESP

    2013-01-01

    Nanostructured polymer composites have opened up new perspectives for multifunctional materials. In particular, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) present potential applications in order to improve mechanical and electrical performance in composites with aerospace application. The combination of epoxy resin with multiwalled carbon nanotubes results in a new functional material with enhanced electromagnetic properties. The objective of this work was the processing of radar absorbing materials based on fo...

  15. A study on hydrogen storage through adsorption in nano-structured carbons; Etude du stockage d'hydrogene par adsorption dans des carbones nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langohr, D

    2004-10-15

    The aim of this work is to build and calibrate an experimental set-up for the testing of the materials, to produce some carbon materials in large amounts and characterise them, and finally, to test these materials in their ability to store hydrogen. This will help in establishing a link between the hydrogen storage capacities of the carbons and their nano-structure. The script is divided into four chapters. The first chapter will deal with the literature review on the thematic of hydrogen storage through adsorption in the carbon materials, while the second chapter will present the experimental set-up elaborated in the laboratory. The third chapter explains the processes used to produce the two families of carbon materials and finally, the last chapter presents the structural characterisation of the samples as well as the experimental results of hydrogen storage on the materials elaborated. (author)

  16. Liquid Phase – Pulsed Laser Ablation: A route to fabricate different carbon nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Hamaoy, Ahmed [Advanced Processing Technology Research Centre, Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Institute of Laser for Postgraduate Studies, University of Baghdad (Iraq); Mechanical Engineering Department, College of Engineering, University of Anbar (Iraq); Chikarakara, Evans [Advanced Processing Technology Research Centre, Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Jawad, Hussein [Institute of Laser for Postgraduate Studies, University of Baghdad (Iraq); Gupta, Kapil; Kumar, Dinesh; Rao, M.S. Ramachandra [Department of Physics, Nano Functional Materials Technology Centre and Materials Science Research Centre, Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India); Krishnamurthy, Satheesh [Materials Engineering, The Open University, Milton Keynes, MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Morshed, Muhammad [Advanced Processing Technology Research Centre, Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Fox, Eoin; Brougham, Dermot [School of Chemical Sciences, Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland); He, Xiaoyun; Vázquez, Mercedes [Advanced Processing Technology Research Centre, Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Irish Separation Science Cluster (ISSC) National Centre for Sensor Research, Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Brabazon, Dermot, E-mail: dermot.brabazon@dcu.ie [Advanced Processing Technology Research Centre, Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Irish Separation Science Cluster (ISSC) National Centre for Sensor Research, Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland)

    2014-05-01

    Carbon nanostructures in various forms and sizes, and with different speciation properties have been prepared from graphite by Liquid Phase – Pulsed Laser Ablation (LP-PLA) using a high frequency Nd:YAG laser. High energy densities and pulse repetition frequencies of up to 10 kHz were used in this ablation process to produce carbon nanomaterials with unique chemical structures. Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS), micro-Raman and High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) were used to confirm the size distribution, morphology, chemical bonding, and crystallinity of these nanostructures. This article demonstrates how the fabrication process affects measured characteristics of the produced carbon nanomaterials. The obtained particle properties have potential use for various applications including biochemical speciation applications.

  17. Electrodeposited manganese dioxide nanostructures on electro-etched carbon fibers: High performance materials for supercapacitor applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazemi, Sayed Habib, E-mail: habibkazemi@iasbs.ac.ir [Department of Chemistry, Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences (IASBS), Zanjan 45137-66731 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Center for Research in Climate Change and Global Warming (CRCC), Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences (IASBS), Zanjan 45137-66731 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Maghami, Mostafa Ghaem [Department of Chemistry, Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences (IASBS), Zanjan 45137-66731 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kiani, Mohammad Ali [Chemistry and Chemical Engineering Research Center of Iran, P.O. Box 14335-186, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • We report a facile method for fabrication of MnO{sub 2} nanostructures on electro-etched carbon fiber. • MnO{sub 2}-ECF electrode shows outstanding supercapacitive behavior even at high discharge rates. • Exceptional cycle stability was achieved for MnO{sub 2}-ECF electrode. • The coulombic efficiency of MnO{sub 2}-ECF electrode is nearly 100%. - Abstract: In this article we introduce a facile, low cost and additive/template free method to fabricate high-rate electrochemical capacitors. Manganese oxide nanostructures were electrodeposited on electro-etched carbon fiber substrate by applying a constant anodic current. Nanostructured MnO{sub 2} on electro-etched carbon fiber was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and energy dispersive X-ray analysis. The electrochemical behavior of MnO{sub 2} electro-etched carbon fiber electrode was investigated by electrochemical techniques including cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic charge/discharge, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. A maximum specific capacitance of 728.5 F g{sup −1} was achieved at a scan rate of 5 mV s{sup −1} for MnO{sub 2} electro-etched carbon fiber electrode. Also, this electrode showed exceptional cycle stability, suggesting that it can be considered as a good candidate for supercapacitor electrodes.

  18. Metal Nanoparticles and Carbon-Based Nanostructures as Advanced Materials for Cathode Application in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Calandra

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We review the most advanced methods for the fabrication of cathodes for dye-sensitized solar cells employing nanostructured materials. The attention is focused on metal nanoparticles and nanostructured carbon, among which nanotubes and graphene, whose good catalytic properties make them ideal for the development of counter electrode substrates, transparent conducting oxide, and advanced catalyst materials.

  19. Optical and structural properties of carbon dots/TiO2 nanostructures prepared via DC arc discharge in liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biazar, Nooshin; Poursalehi, Reza; Delavari, Hamid

    2018-01-01

    Synthesis and development of visible active catalysts is an important issue in photocatalytic applications of nanomaterials. TiO2 nanostructures coupled with carbon dots demonstrate a considerable photocatalytic activity in visible wavelengths. Extending optical absorption of a wide band gap semiconductor such as TiO2 with carbon dots is the origin of the visible activity of carbon dots modified semiconductor nanostructures. In addition, carbon dots exhibit high photostability, appropriate electron transport and chemical stability without considerable toxicity or environmental footprints. In this study, optical and structural properties of carbon dots/TiO2 nanostructures prepared via (direct current) DC arc discharge in liquid were investigated. Crystal structure, morphology and optical properties of the samples were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and UV-visible spectroscopy respectively. SEM images show formation of spherical nanoparticles with an average size of 27 nm. In comparison with pristine TiO2, optical transmission spectrum of carbon dots/TiO2 nanostructures demonstrates an absorption edge at longer wavelengths as well a high optical absorption in visible wavelengths which is significant for visible activity of nanostructures as a photocatalyst. Finally, these results can provide a flexible and versatile pathway for synthesis of carbon dots/oxide semiconductor nanostructures with an appropriate activity under visible light.

  20. CO2 Storage Properties of Nanostructured Carbons by a Microwave Plasma Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi Tian

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured carbon was successfully produced by methane cracking in a relatively low-energy cold plasma reactor designed in-house. A followed thermal treatment was carried out to further enhance its porosity. The modified plasma carbon was then employed for CO2 adsorption at 25°C. The as-synthesized plasma carbon and the modified carbon were characterized by BET surface area/pore size analyzer, Raman spectra, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The results show thermal modification pronouncedly improves BET surface area and porosity of PC due to opening up of accessible micro-/mesopores in the graphitic structure and by the removal of amorphous carbons around the graphite surface. The modified PC displays a higher adsorption capacity at 25°C than that of the commercial activated carbon reported. The low hydrogen storage capacity of the modified PC indicates that it can be considered for CO2 removal in syngas.

  1. Field Emission of Thermally Grown Carbon Nanostructures on Silicon Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-22

    acetylene (C2H2), ethylene (C2H4), or benzene (C6H6) for MWCNTs is flowed across the substrate reacting with the catalytic nanoparticles to synthesize... Vibration of Zigzag Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes using Nonlocal Timoshenko Beam Theory". Comput. Mater. Sci., (1), 2012. [14] S. Rai, "Carbon

  2. Three-Dimensional Carbon Nanostructures for Advanced Lithium-Ion Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiwon Kang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanostructural materials have gained the spotlight as promising anode materials for energy storage; they exhibit unique physico-chemical properties such as large surface area, short Li+ ion diffusion length, and high electrical conductivity, in addition to their long-term stability. However, carbon-nanostructured materials have issues with low areal and volumetric densities for the practical applications in electric vehicles, portable electronics, and power grid systems, which demand higher energy and power densities. One approach to overcoming these issues is to design and apply a three-dimensional (3D electrode accommodating a larger loading amount of active anode materials while facilitating Li+ ion diffusion. Furthermore, 3D nanocarbon frameworks can impart a conducting pathway and structural buffer to high-capacity non-carbon nanomaterials, which results in enhanced Li+ ion storage capacity. In this paper, we review our recent progress on the design and fabrication of 3D carbon nanostructures, their performance in Li-ion batteries (LIBs, and their implementation into large-scale, lightweight, and flexible LIBs.

  3. Synthesis and characterization of nanocomposites based on PANI and carbon nanostructures prepared by electropolymerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrovski, Aleksandar; Paunović, Perica [Faculty of Technology and Metallurgy, SS Cyril and Methodius University, Rudjer Bošković, 16, 1000, Skopje (Macedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic of); Avolio, Roberto; Errico, Maria E.; Cocca, Mariacristina; Gentile, Gennaro [Institute for Polymers, Composites and Biomaterials, National Research Council, Via Campi Flegrei 34, 80078, Pozzuoli, Napoli (Italy); Grozdanov, Anita, E-mail: anita.grozdanov@yahoo.com [Faculty of Technology and Metallurgy, SS Cyril and Methodius University, Rudjer Bošković, 16, 1000, Skopje (Macedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic of); Avella, Maurizio [Institute for Polymers, Composites and Biomaterials, National Research Council, Via Campi Flegrei 34, 80078, Pozzuoli, Napoli (Italy); Barton, John [Tyndall National Institute, University College Cork, Dyke Parade, T12 R5CP, Cork (Ireland); Dimitrov, Aleksandar [Faculty of Technology and Metallurgy, SS Cyril and Methodius University, Rudjer Bošković, 16, 1000, Skopje (Macedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic of)

    2017-01-01

    Nanocomposites based on polyaniline (PANI) and carbon nanostructures (CNSs) (graphene (G) and multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs)) were prepared by in situ electrochemical polymerization. CNSs were inserted into the PANI matrix by dispersing them into the electrolyte before the electropolymerization. Electrochemical characterization by means of cyclic voltammetry and steady state polarization were performed in order to determine conditions for electro-polymerization. Electro-polymerization of the PANI based nanocomposites was carried out at 0.75 V vs. saturated calomel electrode (SCE) for 40 and 60 min. The morphology and structural characteristics of the obtained nanocomposites were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Raman spectroscopy, while thermal stability was determined using thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). According to the morphological and structural study, fibrous and porous structure of PANI based nanocomposites was detected well embedding both G and MWCNTs. Also, strong interaction between quinoidal structure of PANI with carbon nanostructures via π–π stacking was detected by Raman spectroscopy. TGA showed the increased thermal stability of composites reinforced with CNSs, especially those reinforced with graphene. - Highlights: • Nanocomposites of PANI with carbon nanostructures were prepared for sensing application. • By cyclic voltammetry, conductive form of PANI (green colored emeraldine phase) is obtained 0.75 V • Using 4 Probe method, nanocomposite PANI/CNS tablet was tested for sensing application. • Micro-structural properties of nanocomposites were studied by SEM, TGA and Raman analysis.

  4. Equilibrium Limit of Boundary Scattering in Carbon Nanostructures: Molecular Dynamics Calculations of Thermal Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskins, Justin; Kinaci, Alper; Sevik, Cem; Cagin, Tahir

    2012-01-01

    It is widely known that graphene and many of its derivative nanostructures have exceedingly high reported thermal conductivities (up to 4000 W/mK at 300 K). Such attractive thermal properties beg the use of these structures in practical devices; however, to implement these materials while preserving transport quality, the influence of structure on thermal conductivity should be thoroughly understood. For graphene nanostructures, having average phonon mean free paths on the order of one micron, a primary concern is how size influences the potential for heat conduction. To investigate this, we employ a novel technique to evaluate the lattice thermal conductivity from the Green-Kubo relations and equilibrium molecular dynamics in systems where phonon-boundary scattering dominates heat flow. Specifically, the thermal conductivities of graphene nanoribbons and carbon nanotubes are calculated in sizes up to 3 microns, and the relative influence of boundary scattering on thermal transport is determined to be dominant at sizes less than 1 micron, after which the thermal transport largely depends on the quality of the nanostructure interface. The method is also extended to carbon nanostructures (fullerenes) where phonon confinement, as opposed to boundary scattering, dominates, and general trends related to the influence of curvature on thermal transport in these materials are discussed.

  5. Preparation of carbon-coated TiO{sub 2} nanostructures for lithium-ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sang-Jun [Materials Research Center for Energy and Green Technology, Andong National University, Andong, Gyungbuk 760-745 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hansu [Department of Energy Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young-Jun [Advanced Battery Research Center, Korea Electronics Technology Institute, Seongnam, Gyeonggi 463-816 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hyukjae, E-mail: hlee@andong.ac.kr [Materials Research Center for Energy and Green Technology, Andong National University, Andong, Gyungbuk 760-745 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-06-01

    Highlights: > We prepare carbon-coated TiO{sub 2} nanotubes/nanowires by one-pot hydrothermal method. > Carbon coating increases electronic conductivity at higher calcination temperatures. > Carbon coating suppresses the agglomeration of nanotubes at lower calcination temperatures. - Abstract: Carbon-coated TiO{sub 2} one-dimensional nanostructures are synthesized by hydrothermal reaction followed by post-calcination at various temperatures. Post-calcination induces crystallization of TiO{sub 2} and the complete crystallization of anatase phase is observed at 600 deg. C of the calcination temperature. Carbon-coated TiO{sub 2} nanostructures show relatively poor crystallinity as compared with the pristine counterparts, but their lithiation capacity and high rate capability are improved throughout all calcination temperatures. The coated carbon suppresses severe agglomeration of TiO{sub 2} nanotubes which allows easy access of Li-ions and electrons to the whole surface of primary nanotubes, leading to the better lithiation performance. Higher calcination temperatures cause excessive growth of nanotube walls, leading to the collapse of tubular morphology and deterioration of lithiation performance. At 700 deg. C of the calcination temperature, the enhanced electronic conductivity from the graphitization of the coated carbon seems to be the main reason for the improved capacity of TiO{sub 2} nanowires.

  6. A template-free, ultra-adsorbing, high surface area carbonate nanostructure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Forsgren

    Full Text Available We report the template-free, low-temperature synthesis of a stable, amorphous, and anhydrous magnesium carbonate nanostructure with pore sizes below 6 nm and a specific surface area of ∼ 800 m(2 g(-1, substantially surpassing the surface area of all previously described alkali earth metal carbonates. The moisture sorption of the novel nanostructure is featured by a unique set of properties including an adsorption capacity ∼50% larger than that of the hygroscopic zeolite-Y at low relative humidities and with the ability to retain more than 75% of the adsorbed water when the humidity is decreased from 95% to 5% at room temperature. These properties can be regenerated by heat treatment at temperatures below 100°C.The structure is foreseen to become useful in applications such as humidity control, as industrial adsorbents and filters, in drug delivery and catalysis.

  7. Electrochemical Biosensors Based on Nanostructured Carbon Black: A Review

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tiago Almeida Silva; Fernando Cruz Moraes; Bruno Campos Janegitz; Orlando Fatibello-Filho

    2017-01-01

    .... Several studies have explored the applicability of CB in electrochemical fields. Recent data showed that modified electrodes based on CB present fast charge transfer and high electroactive surface area, comparable to carbon nanotubes and graphene...

  8. Synthesis of carbon nanostructures in an RF induction plasmatron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalogin, G. N.; Krasil'nikov, A. V.; Rudin, N. F.; Popov, M. Yu.; Kul'nitskii, B. A.; Kirichenko, A. N.

    2015-05-01

    The method and results of synthesizing carbon nanotubes and onion-like structures by the sublimation of a mixture of a carbon powder with a catalyst (Y2(CO3)3) in the plasma flow of an inert gas (argon) generated in an rf plasmatron are described. Carbon vapors are condensed into fullerene-containing soot onto various materials (Al, Cu, Ti, stainless steel) placed in the working chamber of an experimental setup. The composition of the synthesized soot is analyzed by modern highly informative methods (Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction). Single-wall carbon nanotubes of a small diameter (1.2 nm) and onion-like structures 10-20 nm in size are formed in experiments. In a reference experiment on a mixture of argon and methane, a material, which consists of a mixture of amorphous carbon, nanosized graphite, and graphite with a crystallite size of several microns, is synthesized. The effect of the substrate material, the gas pressure, and the plasma flow velocity on the formation of carbon nanotubes is studied.

  9. Pt–Ru decorated self-assembled TiO2–carbon hybrid nanostructure ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Porous titanium oxide–carbon hybrid nanostructure (TiO2–C) with a specific surface area of 350 m2/g and an average pore-radius of 21.8 Å is synthesized via supramolecular self-assembly with an in situ crystallization process. Subsequently, TiO2–C supported Pt–Ru electro-catalyst (Pt–Ru/TiO2–C) is obtained and ...

  10. Fabrication of network films of conducting polymer-linked polyoxometallate-stabilized carbon nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulesza, Pawel J.; Skunik, Magdalena; Baranowska, Beata; Miecznikowski, Krzysztof; Chojak, Malgorzata; Karnicka, Katarzyna; Starobrzynska, Barbara; Ernst, Andrzej [Department of Chemistry, University of Warsaw, Pasteura 1, PL-02-093 Warsaw (Poland); Frackowiak, Elzbieta [ICTE, Poznan University of Technology, Piotrowo 3, PL-60-965 Poznan (Poland); Beguin, Francois [CRMD, CNRS-University, 1B, rue de la Ferollerie, F-45071 Orleans Cedex 02 (France); Kuhn, Alexander [Laboratoire d' Analyse Chimique par Reconnaissance Moleculaire Ecole Nationale Superieure de Chimie et de Physique de Bordeaux, 16 avenue Pey Berland, 33607 Pessac (France); Delville, Marie-Helene [Institut de Chimie de la Matiere Condensee de Bordeaux, 87 Avenue du Dr. Schweitzer, 33608 Pessac Cedex (France)

    2006-02-15

    The ability of a Keggin-type polyoxometallate, phosphododecamolybdate (PMo{sub 12}O{sub 40}{sup 3-}), to form stable anionic monolayers on carbon nanoparticles and multi-wall nanotubes is explored here to produce stable colloidal solutions of polyoxometallate covered carbon nanostructures and to disperse them within conducting polymer, poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene), i.e. PEDOT, or polyaniline multilayer films. By repeated alternate treatments in the colloidal suspension of PMo{sub 12}O{sub 40}{sup 3-}-protected carbon nanoparticles or nanotubes, and in the acid solution of a monomer (3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene or aniline), the amount of the material can be increased systematically (layer-by-layer) to form stable three-dimensional organized arrangements (networks) of interconnected organic and inorganic layers on electrode (e.g. glassy carbon) surfaces. In hybrid films, the negatively charged polyoxometallate-covered carbon nanostructures interact electrostatically with positively charged conducting polymer ultra-thin layers. Consequently, the attractive electrochemical charging properties of conducting polymers, reversible redox behavior of polyoxometallate, as well as the mechanical and electrical properties of carbon nanoparticles or nanotubes can be combined. The films are characterized by fast dynamics of charge transport, and they are of potential importance to electrocatalysis and charge storage in redox capacitors. (author)

  11. Carbonized Micro- and Nanostructures: Can Downsizing Really Help?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Naraghi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In this manuscript, we discuss relationships between morphology and mechanical strength of carbonized structures, obtained via pyrolysis of polymeric precursors, across multiple length scales, from carbon fibers (CFs with diameters of 5–10 µm to submicron thick carbon nanofibers (CNFs. Our research points to radial inhomogeneity, skin–core structure, as a size-dependent feature of polyacrylonitrile-based CFs. This inhomogeneity is a surface effect, caused by suppressed diffusion of oxygen and stabilization byproducts during stabilization through skin. Hence, reducing the precursor diameters from tens of microns to submicron appears as an effective strategy to develop homogeneous carbonized structures. Our research establishes the significance of this downsizing in developing lightweight structural materials by comparing intrinsic strength of radially inhomogeneous CFs with that of radially homogeneous CNF. While experimental studies on the strength of CNFs have targeted randomly oriented turbostratic domains, via continuum modeling, we have estimated that strength of CNFs can reach 14 GPa, when the basal planes of graphitic domains are parallel to nanofiber axis. The CNFs in our model are treated as composites of amorphous carbon (matrix, reinforced with turbostratic domains, and their strength is predicted using Tsai–Hill criterion. The model was calibrated with existing experimental data.

  12. Carbonized Micro- and Nanostructures: Can Downsizing Really Help?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naraghi, Mohammad; Chawla, Sneha

    2014-05-14

    In this manuscript, we discuss relationships between morphology and mechanical strength of carbonized structures, obtained via pyrolysis of polymeric precursors, across multiple length scales, from carbon fibers (CFs) with diameters of 5-10 µm to submicron thick carbon nanofibers (CNFs). Our research points to radial inhomogeneity, skin-core structure, as a size-dependent feature of polyacrylonitrile-based CFs. This inhomogeneity is a surface effect, caused by suppressed diffusion of oxygen and stabilization byproducts during stabilization through skin. Hence, reducing the precursor diameters from tens of microns to submicron appears as an effective strategy to develop homogeneous carbonized structures. Our research establishes the significance of this downsizing in developing lightweight structural materials by comparing intrinsic strength of radially inhomogeneous CFs with that of radially homogeneous CNF. While experimental studies on the strength of CNFs have targeted randomly oriented turbostratic domains, via continuum modeling, we have estimated that strength of CNFs can reach 14 GPa, when the basal planes of graphitic domains are parallel to nanofiber axis. The CNFs in our model are treated as composites of amorphous carbon (matrix), reinforced with turbostratic domains, and their strength is predicted using Tsai-Hill criterion. The model was calibrated with existing experimental data.

  13. Evaluation of carbon nanostructures as chiral selectors for direct enantiomeric separation of ephedrines by EKC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moliner-Martínez, Yolanda; Cárdenas, Soledad; Valcárcel, Miguel

    2007-08-01

    Single-walled nanotubes and multi-walled nanotubes (MWNTs) have been evaluated as chiral selectors for the enantiomeric separation of ephedrines by using EKC with surfactant-coated carbon nanotubes. The analysed compounds were (+/-)-ephedrine, (+/-)-norephedrine and (+/-)-N-methylephedrine. The potential of those carbon nanostructures as chiral selectors has been evaluated by changing different experimental variables such as pH, addition of organic modifiers, potential and injection time. The capability of MWNTs to resolve enantiomeric mixtures was demonstrated by using partial filling of the capillary with concentrated surfactant-coated MWNTs. Differences in the enantioselectivity were discussed.

  14. The effect of dimensionality of nanostructured carbon on the architecture of organic-inorganic hybrid materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, R D K; Depan, D; Shah, J

    2013-08-21

    The natural tendency of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to agglomerate is an underlying reason that prevents the realization of their full potential. On the other hand, covalent functionalization of CNTs to control dispersion leads to disruption of π-conjugation in CNTs and the non-covalent functionalization leads to a weak CNT-polymer interface. To overcome these challenges, we describe the characteristics of fostering of direct nucleation of polymers on nanostructured carbon (CNTs of diameters (~2-200 nm), carbon nanofibers (~200-300 nm), and graphene), which culminates in interfacial adhesion, resulting from electrostatic and van der Waals interaction in the hybrid nanostructured carbon-polymer architecture. Furthermore, the structure is tunable through a change in undercooling. High density polyethylene and polypropylene were selected as two model polymers and two sets of experiments were carried out. The first set of experiments was carried out using CNTs of diameter ~2-5 nm to explore the effect of undercooling and polymer concentration. The second set of experiments was focused on studying the effect of dimensionality on geometrical confinements. The periodic crystallization of polyethylene on small diameter CNTs is demonstrated to be a consequence of the geometrical confinement effect, rather than epitaxy, such that petal-like disks nucleate on large diameter CNTs, carbon nanofibers, and graphene. The application of the process is illustrated in terms of fabricating a system for cellular uptake and bioimaging.

  15. Enzymatic electrodes nanostructured with functionalized carbon nanotubes for biofuel cell applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazaruk, E; Sadowska, K; Biernat, J F; Rogalski, J; Ginalska, G; Bilewicz, R

    2010-10-01

    Nanostructured bioelectrodes were designed and assembled into a biofuel cell with no separating membrane. The glassy carbon electrodes were modified with mediator-functionalized carbon nanotubes. Ferrocene (Fc) and 2,2'-azino-bis (3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonate) diammonium salt (ABTS) bound chemically to the carbon nanotubes were found useful as mediators of the enzyme catalyzed electrode processes. Glucose oxidase from Aspergillus niger AM-11 and laccase from Cerrena unicolor C-139 were incorporated in a liquid-crystalline matrix-monoolein cubic phase. The carbon nanotubes-nanostructured electrode surface was covered with the cubic phase film containing the enzyme and acted as the catalytic surface for the oxidation of glucose and reduction of oxygen. Thanks to the mediating role of derivatized nanotubes the catalysis was almost ten times more efficient than on the GCE electrodes: catalytic current of glucose oxidation was 1 mA cm(-2) and oxygen reduction current exceeded 0.6 mA cm(-2). The open circuit voltage of the biofuel cell was 0.43 V. Application of carbon nanotubes increased the maximum power output of the constructed biofuel cell to 100 μW cm(-2) without stirring of the solution which was ca. 100 times more efficient than using the same bioelectrodes without nanotubes on the electrode surface.

  16. Nanostructured Carbon Materials as Supports in the Preparation of Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Electrocatalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Jesús Lázaro

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Different advanced nanostructured carbon materials, such as carbon nanocoils, carbon nanofibers, graphitized ordered mesoporous carbons and carbon xerogels, presenting interesting features such as high electrical conductivity and extensively developed porous structure were synthesized and used as supports in the preparation of electrocatalysts for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs. The main advantage of these supports is that their physical properties and surface chemistry can be tailored to adapt the carbonaceous material to the catalytic requirements. Moreover, all of them present a highly mesoporous structure, diminishing diffusion problems, and both graphitic character and surface area can be conveniently modified. In the present work, the influence of the particular features of each material on the catalytic activity and stability was analyzed. Results have been compared with those obtained for commercial catalysts supported on Vulcan XC-72R, Pt/C and PtRu/C (ETEK. Both a highly ordered graphitic and mesopore-enriched structure of these advanced nanostructured materials resulted in an improved electrochemical performance in comparison to the commercial catalysts assayed, both towards CO and alcohol oxidation.

  17. Nanostructured carbon materials decorated with organophosphorus moieties: synthesis and application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giacomo Biagiotti

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available A new synthetic approach for the production of carbon nanomaterials (CNM decorated with organophosphorus moieties is presented. Three different triphenylphosphine oxide (TPPO derivatives were used to decorate oxidized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (ox-MWCNTs and graphene platelets (GPs. The TPPOs chosen bear functional groups able to react with the CNMs by Tour reaction (an amino group, nitrene cycloaddition (an azido group or CuAAC reaction (one terminal C–C triple bond. All the adducts were characterized by FTIR, Raman spectroscopy, TEM, XPS, elemental analysis and ICP-AES. The cycloaddition of nitrene provided the higher loading on ox-MWCNTs and GPs as well, while the Tour approach gave best results with nanotubes (CNTs. Finally, we investigated the possibility to reduce the TPPO functionalized CNMs to the corresponding phosphine derivatives and applied one of the materials produced as heterogeneous organocatalyst in a Staudinger ligation reaction.

  18. Copper-based Composite Materials Reinforced with Carbon Nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Larionova

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The present work is devoted to development of high performance Cu-based material reinforced with carbon. For this purpose Cu-C composite powders were produced by one-step CVD process. The powders containing carbon nanofibers and graphene were subjected to compacting and analyzed. Mechanical properties of Cu-carbon nanofibers (CNFs and Cu-graphene composites were compared to traditional Cu-graphite and pure copper samples compacted under the same technology. Cu-CNFs material showed the best performance (1.7 times increase in the hardness compared to copper, that is primarily explained by the smallest matrix grain size, which growth is inhibited by the homogeneously dispersed CNFs. Friction coefficient of the Cu-(17-33vol.%CNF was found to be 9 times less than that of pure copper and coincides within the error with Cu-graphite, however the wear of Cu-33vol.%CNF reduced by more than 2 times over Cu-33vol.% graphite samples.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.21.3.7348

  19. New applications of carbon nanostructures in microbial fuel cells (MFC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaca, W.; Żarnowiec, P.; Keczkowska, Justyna; Suchańska, M.; Czerwosz, E.; Kozłowski, M.

    2014-11-01

    In the studies presented we proposed a new application for nanocomposite carbon films (C-Pd). These films were evaluated as an anode material for Microbial Fuel Cells (MFCs) used for electrical current generation. The results of characterization of C-Pd films composed of carbon and palladium nanograins were obtained using the Physical Vapor Deposition (PVD) method. The film obtained by this method exhibits a multiphase structure composed of fullerene nanograins, amorphous carbon and palladium nanocrystals. Raman Spectroscopy (RS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) are used to characterize the chemical composition, morphology and topography of these films. We observed, for MFC with C-Pd anode, the highest electrochemical activity and maximal voltage density - 458 mV (20,8 mV/cm2) for Proteus mirabilis, 426 mV (19,4 mV/cm2) for Pseudomonas aeruginosa and 652 mV (29,6 mV/cm2) for sewage bacteria as the microbial catalyst.

  20. Nanostructured membrane material designed for carbon dioxide separation

    KAUST Repository

    Yave, Wilfredo

    2010-03-15

    In this work carbon dioxide selective membrane materials from a commercially available poly(amide-b-ethylene oxide) (Pebax (R), Arkema) blended with polyethylene glycol ethers are presented. The preferred PEG-ether was PEG-dimethylether (PEG-DME). PEG-DME is well known as a physical solvent for acid gas absorption. It is used under the trade name Genosorb (R) in the Selexol (R) process (UOP) for acid gas removal from natural gas and synthesis gas. The combination of the liquid absorbent with the multiblock copolymer resulted in mechanically stable films with superior CO(2) separation properties. The addition of 50 wt.% PEG-DME to the copolymer resulted in a 8-fold increase of the carbon dioxide permeability; the CO(2)/H(2)-selectivity increased simultaneously from 9.1 to 14.9. It is shown that diffusivity as well as solubility of carbon dioxide is strongly increased by the blending of the copolymer with PEG-ethers. (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Graphitic carbon in a nanostructured titanium oxycarbide thin film to improve implant osseointegration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanoni, R., E-mail: robertino.zanoni@uniroma1.it [Dipartimento di Chimica, Università di Roma ‘La Sapienza’ p.le Aldo Moro 5, 00185 Rome (Italy); Ioannidu, C.A.; Mazzola, L.; Politi, L. [Dipartimento di Scienze Biochimiche, Università di Roma ‘La Sapienza’, p.le Aldo Moro 5, 00185 Rome (Italy); Misiano, C. [Romana Film Sottili, Anzio, Rome (Italy); Longo, G. [Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Viale Regina Elena 299, 00161 Rome (Italy); Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, SB IPSB LPMV, BSP 409 (Cubotron UNIL), R.te de la Sorge, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Falconieri, M. [ENEA, Unità Tecnica Applicazioni delle Radiazioni, via Anguillarese 301, 00123 Rome (Italy); Scandurra, R. [Dipartimento di Scienze Biochimiche, Università di Roma ‘La Sapienza’, p.le Aldo Moro 5, 00185 Rome (Italy)

    2015-01-01

    A nanostructured coating layer on titanium implants, able to improve their integration into bones and to protect against the harsh conditions of body fluids, was obtained by Ion Plating Plasma Assisted, a method suitable for industrial applications. A titanium carbide target was attached under vacuum to a magnetron sputtering source powered with a direct current in the 500–1100 W range, and a 100 W radio frequency was applied to the sample holder. The samples produced at 900 W gave the best biological response in terms of overexpression of some genes of proteins involved in bone turnover. We report the characterization of a reference and of an implant sample, both obtained at 900 W. Different micro/nanoscopic techniques evidenced the morphology of the substrates, and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy was used to disclose the surface composition. The layer is a 500 nm thick hard nanostructure, composed of 60% graphitic carbon clustered with 15% TiC and 25% Ti oxides. - Highlights: • Nanostructured TiC protective layers were produced on Ti samples for prostheses. • Ion Plating Plasma-Assisted Deposition from TiC targets was used on Ti samples. • A model of the surface layer has been drawn from XPS, Raman, AFM, FIB/SEM, TEM. • The layer is mainly composed of graphitic carbon in addition to TiC and Ti oxides.

  2. Capacitive energy storage in nanostructured carbon-electrolyte systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, P; Gogotsi, Y

    2013-05-21

    Securing our energy future is the most important problem that humanity faces in this century. Burning fossil fuels is not sustainable, and wide use of renewable energy sources will require a drastically increased ability to store electrical energy. In the move toward an electrical economy, chemical (batteries) and capacitive energy storage (electrochemical capacitors or supercapacitors) devices are expected to play an important role. This Account summarizes research in the field of electrochemical capacitors conducted over the past decade. Overall, the combination of the right electrode materials with a proper electrolyte can successfully increase both the energy stored by the device and its power, but no perfect active material exists and no electrolyte suits every material and every performance goal. However, today, many materials are available, including porous activated, carbide-derived, and templated carbons with high surface areas and porosities that range from subnanometer to just a few nanometers. If the pore size is matched with the electrolyte ion size, those materials can provide high energy density. Exohedral nanoparticles, such as carbon nanotubes and onion-like carbon, can provide high power due to fast ion sorption/desorption on their outer surfaces. Because of its higher charge-discharge rates compared with activated carbons, graphene has attracted increasing attention, but graphene had not yet shown a higher volumetric capacitance than porous carbons. Although aqueous electrolytes, such as sodium sulfate, are the safest and least expensive, they have a limited voltage window. Organic electrolytes, such as solutions of [N(C2H5)4]BF4 in acetonitrile or propylene carbonate, are the most common in commercial devices. Researchers are increasingly interested in nonflammable ionic liquids. These liquids have low vapor pressures, which allow them to be used safely over a temperature range from -50 °C to at least 100 °C and over a larger voltage window

  3. MoS2/MoOx-Nanostructure-Decorated Activated Carbon Cloth for Enhanced Supercapacitor Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, Fitri Nur Indah; Ting, Jyh-Ming

    2018-01-04

    MoS 2 /MoO x nanostructures were grown on activated carbon cloth through a facile one-step microwave-assisted hydrothermal method. The growth of MoS 2 /MoO x on activated carbon cloth creates a unique structure that favors ion intercalation. The conductive activated carbon cloth, MoO 3-x , and monoclinic MoO 2 provide fast electron transport, whereas the MoS 2 nanosheets/MoO 3-x nanoparticles structure improves the capacitance. As a result, MoS 2 /MoO x -nanostructure-decorated activated carbon cloth shows a high specific capacitance of 230 F g -1 at a scan rate of 5 mV s -1 with a low contact resistance of approximately 1.91 Ω. Moreover, the activated carbon cloth acts as a template for the growth of a perpendicular MoS 2 layer, which gives an excellent utilization rate of the active MoS 2 /MoO x material. We also demonstrate that the MoS 2 /MoO x /activated carbon cloth nanocomposite shows excellent electrochemical stability with retention up to 128 % after 1500 cycles. Finally, we show the use of a microwave-assisted hydrothermal method for the synthesis of the MoS 2 /MoO x /activated carbon cloth nanocomposite as an alternative and clean route to improve the kinetics of the intercalation redox reaction. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Enhanced performance in electrochemical energy storage and conversion via carbon-integrated nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, Margaret K.

    Electrochemical energy storage and conversion applications benefit from the integration of nanostructures into the devices, as they have many more active sites per gram which enables excellent mass utilization of the active species. By controlling the surface of fuel cell catalysts, higher activity and efficiency can be achieved as compared to the bulk counterpart, with multiple catalyst facets of varying activity and efficiency. Nanostructured electrochemical capacitors have enhanced electrolyte diffusion over the surface of the electrode, facilitating high rate capability. Nanostructured materials for energy storage and conversion devices, such as electrochemical capacitors and proton exchange membrane fuel cells, can perform even better with the incorporation of carbon. High surface area carbon can enhance the activity of electrochemical capacitors by improving the conductivity of the electrode and/or enhancing the double layer capacitance. Carbon supports for fuel cell catalysts enable proper dispersion of active material without sacrificing conductivity. The work reported in this thesis is aimed toward improving the performance of electrochemical energy storage and conversion devices through novel incorporation of carbon. Carbon was first used to enhance the performance of electrocatalysts. By wrapping fuel cell catalysts in a porous carbon shell, the activity was increased over its bare and CNT-supported counterparts. The carbon shell synthetic method reported here is a good route to the production of a conductive host for Pd electrocatalysts with good contact and in one step with the formation of the Pd nanoparticles. Carbon was also used to enhance the performance of pseudocapacitors, first by incorporating it into the precursor spray solution in the generation of mesoporous metal oxides and then as a metal-organic framework-derived carbon host with dispersed electrochemically active metal oxides. A carbon network was generated from the pyrolysis of pore

  5. Nanostructured composites based on carbon nanotubes and epoxy resin for use as radar absorbing materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Valdirene Aparecida [Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica (ITA), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Folgueras, Luiza de Castro; Candido, Geraldo Mauricio; Paula, Adriano Luiz de; Rezende, Mirabel Cerqueira, E-mail: mirabelmcr@iae.cta.br [Instituto de Aeronautica e Espaco (IAE), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Div. de Materiais; Costa, Michelle Leali [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (DMT/UNESP), Guaratingueta, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Materiais e Tecnologia

    2013-07-01

    Nanostructured polymer composites have opened up new perspectives for multifunctional materials. In particular, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) present potential applications in order to improve mechanical and electrical performance in composites with aerospace application. The combination of epoxy resin with multi walled carbon nanotubes results in a new functional material with enhanced electromagnetic properties. The objective of this work was the processing of radar absorbing materials based on formulations containing different quantities of carbon nanotubes in an epoxy resin matrix. To reach this objective the adequate concentration of CNTs in the resin matrix was determined. The processed structures were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, rheology, thermal and reflectivity in the frequency range of 8.2 to 12.4 GHz analyses. The microwave attenuation was up to 99.7%, using only 0.5% (w/w) of CNT, showing that these materials present advantages in performance associated with low additive concentrations (author)

  6. From small aromatic molecules to functional nanostructured carbon by pulsed laser-induced photochemical stitching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. R. Gokhale

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A novel route employing UV laser pulses (KrF Excimer, 248 nm to cleave small aromatic molecules and stitch the generated free radicals into functional nanostructured forms of carbon is introduced. The process differs distinctly from any strategies wherein the aromatic rings are broken in the primary process. It is demonstrated that this pulsed laser-induced photochemical stitching (PLPS process when applied to routine laboratory solvents (or toxic chemical wastes when discarded Chlorobenzene and o-Dichlorobenzene yields Carbon Nanospheres (CNSs comprising of graphene-like sheets assembled in onion-like configurations. This room temperature process implemented under normal laboratory conditions is versatile and clearly applicable to the whole family of haloaromatic compounds without and with additions of precursors or other nanomaterials. We further bring out its applicability for synthesis of metal-oxide based carbon nanocomposites.

  7. Diffraction by DNA, carbon nanotubes and other helical nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucas, Amand A; Lambin, Philippe [Physics Department, FUNDP, 61 Rue de Bruxelles, B5000 Namur (Belgium)

    2005-05-01

    This review discusses the diffraction patterns of x-rays or electrons scattered by fibres of helical biological molecules and by carbon nanotubes (CNTs) from the unified point of view of the Fourier-Bessel transform of an atomic helix. This paper is intended for scientists who are not professional crystallographers. X-ray fibre diffraction patterns of Pauling's protein {alpha}-helix and of Crick and Pauling's protein coiled-coil are revisited. This is followed by a non-technical comparison between the historic x-ray diffraction patterns of the A and B conformations of DNA, which were crucial for the discovery of the double helix. The qualitative analysis of the diffraction images is supported by novel optical simulation experiments designed to pinpoint the gross structural informational content of the patterns. The spectacular helical structure of the tobacco mosaic virus determined by Rosalind Franklin and co-workers will then be described as an early example of the great power of x-ray crystallography in determining the structure of a large biomolecular edifice. After these mostly historical and didactic case studies, this paper will consider electron diffraction and transmission electron microscopy of CNTs of great current interest, focusing particularly on recent data obtained for single-wall, double-wall and scrolled nanotubes. Several points of convergence between the interpretations of the diffraction patterns of biological helices and CNTs will be emphasized.

  8. Diffraction by DNA, carbon nanotubes and other helical nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Amand A.; Lambin, Philippe

    2005-05-01

    This review discusses the diffraction patterns of x-rays or electrons scattered by fibres of helical biological molecules and by carbon nanotubes (CNTs) from the unified point of view of the Fourier-Bessel transform of an atomic helix. This paper is intended for scientists who are not professional crystallographers. X-ray fibre diffraction patterns of Pauling's protein α-helix and of Crick and Pauling's protein coiled-coil are revisited. This is followed by a non-technical comparison between the historic x-ray diffraction patterns of the A and B conformations of DNA, which were crucial for the discovery of the double helix. The qualitative analysis of the diffraction images is supported by novel optical simulation experiments designed to pinpoint the gross structural informational content of the patterns. The spectacular helical structure of the tobacco mosaic virus determined by Rosalind Franklin and co-workers will then be described as an early example of the great power of x-ray crystallography in determining the structure of a large biomolecular edifice. After these mostly historical and didactic case studies, this paper will consider electron diffraction and transmission electron microscopy of CNTs of great current interest, focusing particularly on recent data obtained for single-wall, double-wall and scrolled nanotubes. Several points of convergence between the interpretations of the diffraction patterns of biological helices and CNTs will be emphasized.

  9. Promotion of Water-mediated Carbon Removal by Nanostructured Barium Oxide/nickel Interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L Yang; Y Choi; W Qin; H Chen; K Blinn; M Liu; P Liu; J Bai; T Tyson; M Liu

    2011-12-31

    The existing Ni-yttria-stabilized zirconia anodes in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) perform poorly in carbon-containing fuels because of coking and deactivation at desired operating temperatures. Here we report a new anode with nanostructured barium oxide/nickel (BaO/Ni) interfaces for low-cost SOFCs, demonstrating high power density and stability in C{sub 3}H{sub 8}, CO and gasified carbon fuels at 750 C. Synchrotron-based X-ray analyses and microscopy reveal that nanosized BaO islands grow on the Ni surface, creating numerous nanostructured BaO/Ni interfaces that readily adsorb water and facilitate water-mediated carbon removal reactions. Density functional theory calculations predict that the dissociated OH from H2O on BaO reacts with C on Ni near the BaO/Ni interface to produce CO and H species, which are then electrochemically oxidized at the triple-phase boundaries of the anode. This anode offers potential for ushering in a new generation of SOFCs for efficient, low-emission conversion of readily available fuels to electricity.

  10. Percolation dans des reseaux realistes de nanostructures de carbone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoneau, Louis-Philippe

    Carbon nanotubes have very interesting mechanical and electrical properties for various applications in electronics. They are highly resistant to deformation and can be excellent conductors or semiconductors. However, manipulating individual nanotubes to build structured devices remains very difficult. There is no method for controlling all of the electrical properties, the orientation and the spatial positioning of a large number of nanotubes. The fabrication of disordered networks of nanotubes is much easier, and these systems have a good electrical conductivity which makes them very interesting, especially as materials of transparent and flexible electrodes. There are three main methods of production used to make networks of nanotubes: the solution deposition, the direct growth on substrate and the embedding in a polymer matrix. The solution deposition method can form networks of various densities on a variety of substrates, the direct growth of nanotubes allows the creation of very clean networks on substrates such as SiO2, and the embedding in a polymer matrix can give composite volumes containing varying amounts of nanotubes. Many parameters such as the length of the tubes, their orientation or their tortuosity influence the properties of these networks and the presence of structural disorder complicates the understanding of their interactions. Predicting the properties of a network, such as conductivity, from a few characteristics such as size and density of the tubes can be difficult. This task becomes even more complex if one wants to identify the parameters that will optimize the performance of a device containing the material. We chose to address the carbon nanotube networks problem by developing a series of computer simulation tools that are mainly based on the Monte Carlo method. We take into account a large number of parameters to describe the characteristics of the networks, which allows for a more reliable representation of real networks as well as

  11. Novel carbon nanostructures as catalyst support for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Sadesh Kumar

    Polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) technology has advanced rapidly in recent years, with one of active area focused on improving the long-term performance of carbon supported catalysts, which has been recognized as one of the most important issues to be addressed for the commercialization of PEMFCs. The central part of a PEMFC is the membrane electrode assembly (MEA) which consists of two electrodes (anode and cathode) and a cation exchange membrane. These electrodes are commonly made of carbon black (most often, Vulcan XC-72) supported on carbon paper or carbon cloth backings. It is the primary objective of this thesis to prepare and investigate carbon nanostructures (CNS, licensed to Hydrogen Research Institute -- IRH, Quebec, Canada), the carbon material with more graphite component like carbon nanotubes (CNTs) for use as catalyst support in PEMFCs. High energy ball-milling of activated carbon along with transition metal catalysts under hydrogen atmosphere, followed by heat-treatment leads to nanocrystalline structures of carbon called CNS. However, CNS formed in the quartz tube after heat-treatment is inevitably accompanied by many impurities such as metal particles, amorphous carbon and other carbon nanoparticules. Such impurities are a serious impediment to detailed characterization of the properties of nanostructures. In addition, since the surface of CNS is itself rather inert, it is difficult to control the homogeneity and size distribution of Pt nanoparticules. In this thesis work, we demonstrated a novel mean to purify and functionalize CNS via acid-oxidation under reflux conditions. To investigate and quantify these nanostructures X-ray diffraction, electrical conductivity measurements, specific surface area measurements, thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy studies were used. Cyclic voltammetry studies were performed on different samples to derive estimates for the relationship

  12. Synthesis and characterization of polyaniline and polyaniline - Carbon nanotubes nanostructures for electrochemical supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bavio, Marcela A.; Acosta, Gerardo G.; Kessler, Teresita

    2014-01-01

    Nanostructures of polyaniline (PANI) and PANI with embedded carbon nanotubes (CNT) were synthesized through a chemical method of self-organization. An oxidative polymerization process was performed in the monomer acid solution with the presence of a surfactant and the addition of multi-walled CNT. The CNT were added with and without pretreatment, CNTf and CNTnf, respectively. Furthermore, ammonium persulfate and sodium dodecyl sulfate were incorporated to the reaction solution as dispersant and oxidizing agents, respectively. Different nanostructures such as nanoparticles or nanotubes were obtained depending on the CNT added, and characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, UV-vis spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy and electrochemical techniques. Spectroscopy results showed variations in the observed bands of the synthetized nanostructures attributed to changes in the molecular structures, to the state of doped PANI reached during polymerization and to the stabilization of these links by hydrogen bridge interactions. PANI and PANI-CNT composites were evaluated by electrochemical techniques to test their behavior in relation to supercapacitors properties. PANI-CNTf nanocomposites displayed improved capacitive properties in H2SO4 solutions, namely 1744 F g-1at 2 A g-1. Also, the specific capacitance was strongly influenced by the developed morphologies. These characteristics point to their feasible application as supercapacitors materials.

  13. 3D carbon/polyaniline nanostructures for energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Fan

    2011-07-01

    Among various types of electrical energy storage devices, supercapacitors (high power but low energy) and batteries (high energy but low power) are extensively studied. Present work aims to develop an electrode material that combines the advantages of both supercapacitors and batteries. This was realized by rational design of the microstructure of the composite material made of aligned carbon nanotubes (ACNTs) and a pseudocapacitive component which in this study is mainly polyaniline (PANI). Other affecting factors including electrolytes, configuration of the cell and so on are temporarily not included in this study. Initial study on the composite materials made of PANI and powder CNTs through chemical reactions has shown that the loading of PANI varied the p-p interaction between PANI and CNTs which could cause the change in the oxidation stability of the composite materials. Deposition of PANI on ACNTs via electrochemical polymerization shows better control over the morphology and microstructure of the composite materials than via chemical polymerization. ACNTs were successfully synthesized on Ti and Al substrates in present work. PANI was firstly electrochemically polymerized on the ACNTs/Ti templates by means of cyclic voltammetry (C V). A systematic study on the composite materials containing various loadings of PANI has shown: The specific capacitance based on PANI phase reached 1100 F/g when the PANI film is thinner than 11 nm, which is approaching the limited value that PANI can provide. After 2000 cycles of charge-discharge at 2.0 A/g, the reduction in the discharge capacitance of the composites containing 63.3% and 21.4% of PANI was 7.1% and 3.3%, A principle of designing the optimal microstructure of the composite materials towards high specific power and specific energy and good cycling stability was developed: high loading and thin layer of PANI should be obtained at the same time.This principle was realized by depositing a 9 nm of PANI on much smaller

  14. Development of nitrogen enriched nanostructured carbon adsorbents for CO2 capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Chitrakshi; Bhunia, Haripada; Bajpai, Pramod K

    2015-10-01

    Nanostructured carbon adsorbents containing high nitrogen content were developed by templating melamine-formaldehyde resin in the pores of mesoporous silica by nanocasting technique. A series of adsorbents were prepared by altering the carbonization temperature from 400 to 700 °C and characterized in terms of their textural and morphological properties. CO2 adsorption performance was investigated at various temperatures from 30 to 100 °C by using a thermogravimetric analyzer under varying CO2 concentrations. Multiple adsorption-desorption experiments were also carried out to investigate the adsorbent regenerability. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) confirmed the development of nanostructured materials. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and elemental analysis indicated the development of carbon adsorbents having high nitrogen content. The surface area and pore volume of the adsorbent carbonized at 700 °C were found to be 266 m(2) g(-1) and 0.25 cm(3) g(-1) respectively. CO2 uptake profile for the developed adsorbents showed that the maximum CO2 adsorption occurred within ca. 100 s. CO2 uptake of 0.792 mmol g(-1) at 30 °C was exhibited by carbon obtained at 700 °C with complete regenerability in three adsorption-desorption cycles. Furthermore, kinetics of CO2 adsorption on the developed adsorbents was studied by fitting the experimental data of CO2 uptake to three kinetic models with best fit being obtained by fractional order kinetic model with error% within range of 5%. Adsorbent surface was found to be energetically heterogeneous as suggested by Temkin isotherm model. Also the isosteric heat of adsorption for CO2 was observed to increase from ca. 30-44 kJ mol(-1) with increase in surface coverage. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Hydrogen storage in nanostructured carbons by spillover: bridge-building enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachawiec, Anthony J; Qi, Gongshin; Yang, Ralph T

    2005-11-22

    The hydrogen storage capacity in nanostructured carbon materials can be increased by atomic hydrogen spillover from a supported catalyst. A simple and effective technique was developed to build carbon bridges that serve to improve contact between a spillover source and a secondary receptor. In this work, a supported catalyst (Pd-C) served as the source of hydrogen atoms via dissociation and primary spillover and AX-21 or single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were secondary spillover receptors. By carbonizing a bridge-forming precursor in the presence of the components, the hydrogen adsorption amount was increased by a factor of 2.9 for the AX-21 receptor and 1.6 for the SWNT receptor at 298 K and 100 kPa. Similar results were obtained at 10 MPa, indicating that the enhancement factor is a weak function of pressure. The AX-21 receptor with carbon bridges had the highest absolute capacity of 1.8 wt % at 298 K and 10 MPa. Reversibility was demonstrated through desorption and readsorption at 298 K. The bridge-building process appears to be receptor specific, and optimization may yield even greater enhancement. Using this technique, enhancements in storage of up to 17-fold on other carbon-based materials have been observed and will be reported elsewhere shortly.

  16. Nanostructured carbon electrodes for laccase-catalyzed oxygen reduction without added mediators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stolarczyk, Krzysztof; Nazaruk, Ewa [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Warsaw, Pasteura 1, 02-093 Warsaw (Poland); Rogalski, Jerzy [Department of Biochemistry, Maria Curie Sklodowska University, Sklodowskiej Sq 3, Lublin 20-031 (Poland); Bilewicz, Renata [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Warsaw, Pasteura 1, 02-093 Warsaw (Poland)], E-mail: bilewicz@chem.uw.edu.pl

    2008-04-20

    Reduction of dioxygen catalyzed by laccase was studied at carbon electrodes without any added mediators. On bare glassy carbon electrode (GCE) the catalytic reduction did not take place. However, when the same substrate was decorated with carbon nanotubes or carbon microcrystals the dioxygen reduction started at 0.6 V versus Ag/AgCl, which is close to the formal potential of the laccase used. Four different matrices: lecithin, hydrophobin, Nafion and lipid liquid-crystalline cubic phase were employed for hosting fungal laccase from Cerrena unicolor. The carbon nanotubes and nanoparticles present on the electrode provided electrical connectivity between the electrode and the enzyme active sites. Direct electrochemistry of the enzyme itself was observed in deoxygenated solutions and its catalytic activity towards dioxygen reduction was demonstrated. The stabilities of the hosted enzymes, the reduction potentials and ratios of catalytic to background currents were compared. The boron-doped diamond (BDD) electrodes prepolarized to high anodic potentials exhibited behavior similar to that of nanotube covered GCE pointing to the formation of nanostructures during the anodic pretreatment. BDD is a promising substrate in terms of potential of dioxygen reduction, however the catalytic current densities are not large enough for practical applications, therefore as shown in this paper, it should be additionally decorated with carbon particles being in direct contact with the electrode surface.

  17. R & D on carbon nanostructures in Russia: scientometric analysis, 1990-2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terekhov, Alexander I.

    2015-02-01

    The analysis, based on scientific publications and patents, was conducted to form an understanding of the overall scientific and technology landscape in the field of carbon nanostructures and determine Russia's place on it. The scientific publications came from the Science Citation Index Expanded database (DB SCIE); the patent information was extracted from databases of the United States Patent and Trade Office (USPTO), the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO), and Russian Federal Service for Intellectual Property (Rospatent). We used also data about research projects, obtained via information systems of the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) and the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (RFBR). Bibliometric methods are used to rank countries, institutions, and scientists, contributing to the carbon nanostructures research. We analyze the current state and trends of the research in Russia as compared to other countries, and the contribution and impact of its institutions, especially research of the "highest quality." Considerable focus is on research collaboration and its relationship with citation impact. Patent datasets are used to determine the composition of participants of innovative processes and international patent activity of Russian inventors in the field, and to identify the most active representatives of small and medium business and some technological developments ripe for commercialization. The article contains a critical analysis of the findings, including a policy discussion of the country's scientific authorities.

  18. R & D on carbon nanostructures in Russia: scientometric analysis, 1990–2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terekhov, Alexander I., E-mail: a.i.terekhov@mail.ru [Central Economics and Mathematics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences (Russian Federation)

    2015-02-15

    The analysis, based on scientific publications and patents, was conducted to form an understanding of the overall scientific and technology landscape in the field of carbon nanostructures and determine Russia’s place on it. The scientific publications came from the Science Citation Index Expanded database (DB SCIE); the patent information was extracted from databases of the United States Patent and Trade Office (USPTO), the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO), and Russian Federal Service for Intellectual Property (Rospatent). We used also data about research projects, obtained via information systems of the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) and the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (RFBR). Bibliometric methods are used to rank countries, institutions, and scientists, contributing to the carbon nanostructures research. We analyze the current state and trends of the research in Russia as compared to other countries, and the contribution and impact of its institutions, especially research of the “highest quality.” Considerable focus is on research collaboration and its relationship with citation impact. Patent datasets are used to determine the composition of participants of innovative processes and international patent activity of Russian inventors in the field, and to identify the most active representatives of small and medium business and some technological developments ripe for commercialization. The article contains a critical analysis of the findings, including a policy discussion of the country’s scientific authorities.

  19. Synthetic hierarchical nanostructures: growth of carbon nanofibers on microfibers by chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan Huanan [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Worcester Polytechnic Institute, 100 Institute Rd., Worcester, MA 01609 (United States); Liang Jianyu, E-mail: jianyul@wpi.ed [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Worcester Polytechnic Institute, 100 Institute Rd., Worcester, MA 01609 (United States); Xia Zhenhai [Department of Mechanical Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Akron, Akron, OH 44325 (United States)

    2010-02-15

    In this paper the synthesis of three-dimensional hierarchical nanostructures by pyrolysis of acetylene to grow carbon nanofibers (CNFs) on carbon microfibers (CMFs) and glass microfibers (GMFs) is reported. The morphology and structure of the as-prepared CNFs were studied by scanning electron microscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. CNFs grown on both substrates typically exhibited two types of morphology: the coil-like CNFs with frequent change in orientation and the relatively straight and long CNFs with parallel graphene sheets. The ethanol pretreatment was effective at improving the yield and distribution of the as-grown CNFs on CMFs, but showed an adverse effect to the CNF growth on GMFs. The influence of different substrates and growth temperatures on CNF morphology and the possible growth mechanism for the observed microstructures was discussed.

  20. Electronic Detection of Lectins Using Carbohydrate Functionalized Nanostructures: Graphene versus Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanan; Vedala, Harindra; Kotchey, Gregg P.; Audfray, Aymeric; Cecioni, Samy; Imberty, Anne; Vidal, Sébastien; Star, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Here we investigated the interactions between lectins and carbohydrates using field-effect transistor (FET) devices comprised of chemically converted graphene (CCG) and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Pyrene- and porphyrin-based glycoconjugates were functionalized noncovalently on the surface of CCG-FET and SWNT-FET devices, which were then treated with 2 µM of nonspecific and specific lectins. In particular, three different lectins (PA-IL, PA-IIL and ConA) and three carbohydrate epitopes (galactose, fucose and mannose) were tested. The responses of 36 different devices were compared and rationalized using computer-aided models of carbon nanostructure/glycoconjugate interactions. Glycoconjugates surface coverage in addition to one-dimensional structures of SWNTs resulted in optimal lectin detection. Additionally, lectin titration data of SWNT- and CCG-based biosensors were used to calculate lectin dissociation constants (Kd) and compare them to the values obtained from the isothermal titration microcalorimetry (ITC) technique. PMID:22136380

  1. Plasmonic Properties of Nanostructured Diamond Like Carbon/Silver Nanocomposite Films with Nanohole Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šarūnas MEŠKINIS

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Plasmonic properties of the diamond like carbon nanocomposite films with embedded silver nanoparticles with patterned nanohole arrays were analyzed in this study. The films were deposited by unbalanced reactive magnetron sputtering of silver target. Nanopatterning of the films was performed by combining electron beam nanolithography and ion beam etching techniques. Modeling of plasmonic properties was done using the classical Maxwell-Garnett theory. Modeling data and experimental results were in good accordance. Formation of the nanohole pattern in diamond like carbon films doped with silver resulted in decreased intensity of the surface plasmon resonance absorbance peak. No new absorbance or transmittance peaks were observed after the nanopattering. It was explained by extraordinary transmission effect in nanostructured DLC : Ag film films due to plasmon polariton resonance inside of the nanoholes.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.22.4.13193

  2. Morphology, Microstructure, and Hydrogen Content of Carbon Nanostructures Obtained by PECVD at Various Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Acosta Gentoiu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanostructures were obtained by acetylene injection into an argon plasma jet in the presence of hydrogen. The samples were synthesized in similar conditions, except that the substrate deposition temperatures TD were varied, ranging from 473 to 973 K. A strong dependence of morphology, structure, and graphitization upon TD was found. We obtained vertical aligned carbon nanotubes (VA-CNTs at low temperatures as 473 K, amorphous carbon nanoparticles (CNPs at temperatures from about 573 to 673 K, and carbon nanowalls (CNWs at high temperatures from 773 to 973 K. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, elastic recoil detection analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy were used to substantiate the differences in these material types. It is known that hydrogen concentration modifies strongly the properties of the materials. Different concentrations of hydrogen-bonded carbon could be identified in amorphous CNP, VA-CNT, and CNW. Also, the H : C ratios along depth were determined for the obtained materials.

  3. Nanostructured Carbon/Antimony Composites as Anode Materials for Lithium-Ion Batteries with Long Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yong; Yi, Zheng; Wang, Chunli; Wang, Lidong; Wu, Yaoming; Wang, Limin

    2016-08-05

    A series of nanostructured carbon/antimony composites have been successfully synthesized by a simple sol-gel, high-temperature carbon thermal reduction process. In the carbon/antimony composites, antimony nanoparticles are homogeneously dispersed in the pyrolyzed nanoporous carbon matrix. As an anode material for lithium-ion batteries, the C/Sb10 composite displays a high initial discharge capacity of 1214.6 mAh g(-1) and a reversible charge capacity of 595.5 mAh g(-1) with a corresponding coulombic efficiency of 49 % in the first cycle. In addition, it exhibits a high reversible discharge capacity of 466.2 mAh g(-1) at a current density of 100 mA g(-1) after 200 cycles and a high rate discharge capacity of 354.4 mAh g(-1) at a current density of 1000 mA g(-1) . The excellent cycling stability and rate discharge performance of the C/Sb10 composite could be due to the uniform dispersion of antimony nanoparticles in the porous carbon matrix, which can buffer the volume expansion and maintain the integrity of the electrode during the charge-discharge cycles. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Mechanics of low-dimensional carbon nanostructures: Atomistic, continuum, and multi-scale approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdavi, Arash

    A new multiscale modeling technique called the Consistent Atomic-scale Finite Element (CAFE) method is introduced. Unlike traditional approaches for linking the atomic structure to its equivalent continuum, this method directly connects the atomic degrees of freedom to a reduced set of finite element degrees of freedom without passing through an intermediate homogenized continuum. As a result, there is no need to introduce stress and strain measures at the atomic level. The Tersoff-Brenner interatomic potential is used to calculate the consistent tangent stiffness matrix of the structure. In this finite element formulation, all local and non-local interactions between carbon atoms are taken into account using overlapping finite elements. In addition, a consistent hierarchical finite element modeling technique is developed for adaptively coarsening and refining the mesh over different parts of the model. This process is consistent with the underlying atomic structure and, by refining the mesh to the scale of atomic spacing, molecular dynamic results can be recovered. This method is valid across the scales and can be used to concurrently model atomistic and continuum phenomena so, in contrast with most other multi-scale methods, there is no need to introduce artificial boundaries for coupling atomistic and continuum regions. Effect of the length scale of the nanostructure is also included in the model by building the hierarchy of elements from bottom up using a finite size atom cluster as the building block. To be consistent with the bravais multi-lattice structure of sp2-bonded carbon, two independent displacement fields are used for reducing the order of the model. Sparse structure of the stiffness matrix of these nanostructures is exploited to reduce the memory requirement and to speed up the formation of the system matrices and solution of the equilibrium equations. Applicability of the method is shown with several examples of the nonlinear mechanics of carbon

  5. Plasma techniques for nanostructured carbon materials synthesis. A case study: carbon nanowall growth by low pressure expanding RF plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vizireanu, S.; Stoica, S. D.; Luculescu, C.; Nistor, L. C.; Mitu, B.; Dinescu, G.

    2010-06-01

    A short description of approaches for carbon nanostructures synthesis is made and the advantages of using plasma during the growth are presented. As a particular example of a plasma based technique we detail the process of downstream carbon nanowall (CNW) synthesis by a radiofrequency expanding plasma beam. The technique combines magnetron sputtering for catalyst deposition and plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (main gas: argon, active gas: hydrogen, precursor gas: acetylene) for carbon growth in a single reactor. The analysis focuses on the correlation between the material properties and the plasma characteristics measured at different points along the flow axis, aiming to reveal the importance of plasma species in the growth process. The material properties were investigated by scanning and transmission electron microscopy, whereas the plasma data were obtained by optical emission spectroscopy, Langmuir probes and mass spectrometry. CNWs with a large area and well isolated from each other are obtained at an optimum distance from the precursor injection point where the plasma presents an enhanced content of carbon nanoclusters. The possible processes responsible for the growth are discussed.

  6. Plasma techniques for nanostructured carbon materials synthesis. A case study: carbon nanowall growth by low pressure expanding RF plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vizireanu, S; Stoica, S D; Luculescu, C; Mitu, B; Dinescu, G [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics Magurele-Bucharest, PO Box MG-16, 077125 (Romania); Nistor, L C, E-mail: dinescug@infim.r [National Institute for Materials Physics Magurele-Bucharest, 077125 (Romania)

    2010-06-15

    A short description of approaches for carbon nanostructures synthesis is made and the advantages of using plasma during the growth are presented. As a particular example of a plasma based technique we detail the process of downstream carbon nanowall (CNW) synthesis by a radiofrequency expanding plasma beam. The technique combines magnetron sputtering for catalyst deposition and plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (main gas: argon, active gas: hydrogen, precursor gas: acetylene) for carbon growth in a single reactor. The analysis focuses on the correlation between the material properties and the plasma characteristics measured at different points along the flow axis, aiming to reveal the importance of plasma species in the growth process. The material properties were investigated by scanning and transmission electron microscopy, whereas the plasma data were obtained by optical emission spectroscopy, Langmuir probes and mass spectrometry. CNWs with a large area and well isolated from each other are obtained at an optimum distance from the precursor injection point where the plasma presents an enhanced content of carbon nanoclusters. The possible processes responsible for the growth are discussed.

  7. Electron field emission characteristics of different surface morphologies of ZnO nanostructures coated on carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kuan-Wei; Lian, Huan-Bin; Cai, Jhen-Hong; Wang, Yao-Te; Lee, Kuei-Yi

    2011-12-01

    The optimal carbon nanotube (CNT) bundles with a hexagonal arrangement were synthesized using thermal chemical vapor deposition (TCVD). To enhance the electron field emission characteristics of the pristine CNTs, the zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures coated on CNT bundles using another TCVD technique. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images showed that the ZnO nanostructures were grown onto the CNT surface uniformly, and the surface morphology of ZnO nanostructures varied with the distance between the CNT bundle and the zinc acetate. The results of field emissions showed that the ZnO nanostructures grown onto the CNTs could improve the electron field emission characteristics. The enhancement of field emission characteristics was attributed to the increase of emission sites formed by the nanostructures of ZnO grown onto the CNT surface, and each ZnO nanostructure could be regarded as an individual field emission site. In addition, ZnO-coated CNT bundles exhibited a good emission uniformity and stable current density. These results demonstrated that ZnO-coated CNTs is a promising field emitter material.

  8. Fullerenes, PAH, Carbon Nanostructures, and Soot in Low Pressure Diffusion Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieco, William J.; Lafleur, Arthur L.; Rainey, Lenore C.; Taghizadeh, Koli; VanderSande, John B.; Howard, Jack B.

    1997-01-01

    The formation of fullerenes C60 and C7O is known to occur in premixed laminar benzene/oxygen/argon flames operated at reduced pressures. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images of material collected from these flames has identified a variety of multishelled nanotubes and fullerene 'onions' as well as some trigonous structures. These fullerenes and nanostructures resemble the material that results from commercial fullerene production systems using graphite vaporization. As a result, combustion is an interesting method for fullerenes synthesis. If commercial scale operation is to be considered, the use of diffusion flames might be safer and less cumbersome than premixed flames. However, it is not known whether diffusion flames produce the types and yields of fullerenes obtained from premixed benzene/oxygen flames. Therefore, the formation of fullerenes and carbon nanostructures, as well as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and soot, in acetylene and benzene diffusion flames is being studied using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM).

  9. On the stability of conventional and nano-structured carbon-based catalysts in the oxidative dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene under industrially relevant conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zarubina, Valeriya; Talebi, Hesamoddin; Nederlof, Christian; Kapteijn, Freek; Makkee, Michiel; Melian-Cabrera, Ignacio

    2014-01-01

    Relevant carbon-based materials, home-made carbon-silica hybrids, commercial activated carbon, and nanostructured multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) were tested in the oxidative dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene (EB). Special attention was given to the reaction conditions, using a relatively

  10. Increased sensitivity of amorphous carbon based gas-sensors due to different Au nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, K. W.; Chen, B. Y.; Hsu, H. S.; Ju, S. P.; Sun, S. J.; Chou, H.; Spintronics lab Collaboration

    We reported that gold nanoparticles attached with the amorphous carbon (a-C) could promote sp2 bonds around the gold nanoparticles. This can change the hopping characteristics and can control the carrier transport which results in increased conductivity. These nanocomposites exhibit a superior sensitivity towards NH3 at room temperature, as well as good reproducibility and short response/recovery time. To increase the sensitivity of gas-sensors we need to increase the interface effect between gold nanostructures and a-C. To increase this interface effect we choose gold nanorods instead of nanoparticles. To grow the gold nanorods along z-direction perpendicular to the substrate surface we use low temperature deposition technique. Improvement in the interfacial effect will greatly improve the sensitivity of gas-sensors.

  11. Employing Carbon Nano-Tubes in New Nano-Structured Radiation Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosio, A.; Ambrosio, M.; Aramo, C.; Carillo, V.; Guarino, F.; Maddalena, P.; Grossi, V.; Passacantando, M.; Santucci, S.; Valentini, A.

    2010-04-01

    So far, electronics has growth up together with the possibility of designing electronic circuits based on the semi conductive properties of silicon. However, the last two decades has been characterized by the explosion of techniques allowing the observation and manipulation of materials at the nanometric length scale. For many applications, the role of silicon is thus turning towards that of a well known substrate whose surface is modified and decorated, at the nano-scale, with other materials. This configuration often represents a nano-structured material. Among all the materials involved in nano-science and nano-technology, Carbon Nano-Tubes (CNTs) have already been employed into a huge number of applications. Here we report the last results in designing a new radiation detector based on CNTs that appears promising for the aim of broadening the detection range of solid state radiation detectors.

  12. Correlation between macro- and nano-scopic measurements of carbon nanostructured paper elastic modulus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omar, Yamila M.; Al Ghaferi, Amal, E-mail: aalghaferi@masdar.ac.ae, E-mail: mchiesa@masdar.ac.ae; Chiesa, Matteo, E-mail: aalghaferi@masdar.ac.ae, E-mail: mchiesa@masdar.ac.ae [Laboratory for Energy and Nanosciences, Institute Center for Energy (iEnergy), Masdar Institute of Science and Technology, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates)

    2015-07-20

    Extensive work has been done in order to determine the bulk elastic modulus of isotropic samples from force curves acquired with atomic force microscopy. However, new challenges are encountered given the development of new materials constructed of one-dimensional anisotropic building blocks, such as carbon nanostructured paper. In the present work, we establish a reliable framework to correlate the elastic modulus values obtained by amplitude modulation atomic force microscope force curves, a nanoscopic technique, with that determined by traditional macroscopic tensile testing. In order to do so, several techniques involving image processing, statistical analysis, and simulations are used to find the appropriate path to understand how macroscopic properties arise from anisotropic nanoscale components, and ultimately, being able to calculate the value of bulk elastic modulus.

  13. Magnetic amphiphilic hybrid carbon nanotubes containing N-doped and undoped sections: powerful tensioactive nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purceno, Aluir D.; Machado, Bruno F.; Teixeira, Ana Paula C.; Medeiros, Tayline V.; Benyounes, Anas; Beausoleil, Julien; Menezes, Helvecio C.; Cardeal, Zenilda L.; Lago, Rochel M.; Serp, Philippe

    2014-11-01

    In this work, unique amphiphilic magnetic hybrid carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are synthesized and used as tensioactive nanostructures in different applications. These CNTs interact very well with aqueous media due to the hydrophilic N-doped section, whereas the undoped hydrophobic one has strong affinity for organic molecules. The amphiphilic character combined with the magnetic properties of these CNTs opens the door to completely new and exciting applications in adsorption science and catalysis. These amphiphilic N-doped CNTs can also be used as powerful tensioactive emulsification structures. They can emulsify water/organic mixtures and by a simple magnetic separation the emulsion can be easily broken. We demonstrate the application of these CNTs in the efficient adsorption of various molecules, in addition to promoting biphasic processes in three different reactions, i.e. transesterification of soybean oil, quinoline extractive oxidation with H2O2 and a metal-catalyzed aqueous oxidation of heptanol with molecular oxygen.In this work, unique amphiphilic magnetic hybrid carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are synthesized and used as tensioactive nanostructures in different applications. These CNTs interact very well with aqueous media due to the hydrophilic N-doped section, whereas the undoped hydrophobic one has strong affinity for organic molecules. The amphiphilic character combined with the magnetic properties of these CNTs opens the door to completely new and exciting applications in adsorption science and catalysis. These amphiphilic N-doped CNTs can also be used as powerful tensioactive emulsification structures. They can emulsify water/organic mixtures and by a simple magnetic separation the emulsion can be easily broken. We demonstrate the application of these CNTs in the efficient adsorption of various molecules, in addition to promoting biphasic processes in three different reactions, i.e. transesterification of soybean oil, quinoline extractive oxidation with H2O2 and

  14. Nano-structured silica coated mesoporous carbon micro-granules for potential application in water filtration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Avik; Sen, D.; Mazumder, S.; Ghosh, A. K.

    2017-05-01

    A novel nano-composite spherical micro-granule has been synthesized using a facile technique of solvent evaporation induced assembly of nanoparticles for potential application in water filtration. The spherical micro-granule is comprised of nano-structured shell of hydrophilic silica encapsulating a hydrophobic mesoporous carbon at the core. Hierarchical structure of such core-shell micro-granules has been rigorously characterized using small-angle neutron and X-ray scattering techniques and complemented with scanning electron microscopy. The hydrophilic silica envelope around the carbon core helps in incorporation of such granules into the hydrophilic polymeric ultra-filtration membrane. The interstitial micro-pores present in the silica shell can serve as water transport channels and the mesoporus carbon core enhances the separation performance due its well adsorption characteristics. It has been found that the incorporation of such granules inside the ultra-filtration membrane indeed enhances the water permeability as well as the separation performance in a significant way.

  15. Carbon/Clay nanostructured composite obtained by hydrothermal method; Compositos nanoestruturados carbono/argila obtidos por metodo hidotermico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barin, G.B.; Bispo, T.S.; Gimenez, I.F.; Barreto, L.S., E-mail: gabriela.borin@gmail.co [Universidade Federal de Sergipe (UFS), Aracaju, SE (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencia e Engenharia de Materiais; Souza Filho, A.G. [Universidade Federal do Ceara (UFC), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica

    2010-07-01

    The development of strategies for converting biomass into useful materials, more efficient energy carrier and / or hydrogen storage is shown a key issue for the present and future. Carbon nanostructure can be obtained by severe processing techniques such as arc discharge, chemical deposition and catalyzed pyrolysis of organic compounds. In this study we used hydrothermal methods for obtaining nanostructured composites of carbon / clay. To this end, we used coir dust and special clays. The samples were characterized by infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and Raman. The presence of the D band at 1350 cm{sup -1} in the Raman spectrum shows the formation of amorphous carbon with particle size of about 8.85 nm. (author)

  16. Phase control of Goos-Hänchen shifts in a fixed structure with carbon-nanotube quantum dot nanostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbari, M.

    2017-06-01

    In this article we proposed a new model based on carbon-nanotube quantum dot (CNT QD) nanostructure for controlling the Goos-Hänchen (GH) shifts in reflected and transmitted light beams. In our calculation we introduce the spin-orbit coupling parameter in the CNT QD nanostructure. Our results show that owing to the presence of spin-orbit coupling, Rabi frequency of magnetic field, coupling laser field and relative phase between applied fields, the enhanced GH shifts in reflected and transmitted light beams can be achieved. Moreover, we demonstrate that such enhanced GH shifts are simultaneously obtained for both reflected and transmitted light beams. At the end, we discuss the impact of intracavity thickness on the GH shift properties of reflected and transmitted light beams. We hope that our proposed model may be used for future developments based on CNT QD nanostructures.

  17. Modified glassy carbon electrodes based on carbon nanostructures for ultrasensitive electrochemical determination of furazolidone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shahrokhian, Saeed, E-mail: shahrokhian@sharif.edu [Department of Chemistry, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran 11155-9516 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Naderi, Leila [Department of Chemistry, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran 11155-9516 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghalkhani, Masoumeh [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Shahid Rajaee Teacher Training University, Lavizan, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute for advanced technology, Shahid Rajaee Teacher Training University, Lavizan, Tehran, 16788 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-04-01

    The electrochemical behavior of Furazolidone (Fu) was investigated on the surface of the glassy carbon electrode modified with different carbon nanomaterials, including carbon nanotubes (CNTs), carbon nanoparticles (CNPs), nanodiamond-graphite (NDG), graphene oxide (GO), reduced graphene oxide (RGO) and RGO-CNT hybrids (various ratios) using linear sweep voltammetry (LSV). The results of voltammetric studies exhibited a considerable increase in the cathodic peak current of Fu at the RGO modified GCE, compared to other modified electrodes and also bare GCE. The surface morphology and nature of the RGO film was thoroughly characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and cyclic voltammetry (CV) techniques. The modified electrode showed two linear dynamic ranges of 0.001–2.0 μM and 2.0–10.0 μM with a detection limit of 0.3 nM for the voltammetric determination of Fu. This sensor was used successfully for Fu determination in pharmaceutical and clinical preparations. - Highlights: • The electrochemical behavior of Furazolidone (Fu) was investigated on the surface of the modified electrode with different carbon nanomaterials by Linear sweep voltammetry. • Two linear dynamic ranges and a low detection limit were obtained. • The modified electrode was applied for the detection of Fu in pharmaceutical and clinical preparations.

  18. Precisely controlled resorcinol-formaldehyde resin coating for fabricating core-shell, hollow, and yolk-shell carbon nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xiaoliang; Liu, Shengjie; Zang, Jun; Xu, Chaofa; Zheng, Ming-Sen; Dong, Quan-Feng; Sun, Daohua; Zheng, Nanfeng

    2013-07-01

    This work provides a facile one-step sol-gel route to synthesize high-quality resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) resin coated nanocomposites that can be further used to fabricate desired carbon nanostructures. Colloidal particles with different morphologies and sizes can be coated with high-quality RF resin shells by the proposed cationic surfactant assisted RF resin coating strategy. The as-synthesized RF resin coated nanocomposites are ideal candidates for selective synthesis of core-shell, hollow, and yolk-shell carbon nanostructures. Based on the carboxylic functional RF resin coating, graphitic carbon nanostructures can also be synthesized by employing the graphitization catalyst. The as-synthesized carbon nanostructures show the advantageous performances in several applications. Hollow carbon spheres are potential electrode materials for lithium-sulfur batteries. Hollow graphitic spheres are promising catalyst supports for oxygen reduction reaction. And yolk-shell structured Au@HCS nanoreactors with ultrathin shells exhibit high catalytic activity and recyclability in confined catalysis.This work provides a facile one-step sol-gel route to synthesize high-quality resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) resin coated nanocomposites that can be further used to fabricate desired carbon nanostructures. Colloidal particles with different morphologies and sizes can be coated with high-quality RF resin shells by the proposed cationic surfactant assisted RF resin coating strategy. The as-synthesized RF resin coated nanocomposites are ideal candidates for selective synthesis of core-shell, hollow, and yolk-shell carbon nanostructures. Based on the carboxylic functional RF resin coating, graphitic carbon nanostructures can also be synthesized by employing the graphitization catalyst. The as-synthesized carbon nanostructures show the advantageous performances in several applications. Hollow carbon spheres are potential electrode materials for lithium-sulfur batteries. Hollow graphitic

  19. Ultimate Osmosis Engineered by the Pore Geometry and Functionalization of Carbon Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Zhigong; Xu, Zhiping

    2015-01-01

    Osmosis is the key process in establishing versatile functions of cellular systems and enabling clean-water harvesting technologies. Membranes with single-atom thickness not only hold great promises in approaching the ultimate limit of these functions, but also offer an ideal test-bed to explore the underlying physical mechanisms. In this work, we explore diffusive and osmotic transport of water and ions through carbon nanotube and porous graphene based membranes by performing molecular dynamics simulations. Our comparative study shows that the cylindrical confinement in carbon nanotubes offers much higher salt rejection at similar permeability in osmosis compared to porous graphene. Moreover, chemical functionalization of the pores modulates the membrane performance by its steric and electrostatic nature, especially at small-size pores due to the fact that the optimal transport is achieved by ordered water transport near pore edges. These findings lay the ground for the ultimate design of forward osmosis membranes with optimized performance trade-off, given the capability of nano-engineering nanostructures by their geometry and chemistry. PMID:26037602

  20. Processing, thermal and mechanical behaviour of PEI/MWCNT/carbon fiber nanostructured laminate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, L. F. P.; Ribeiro, B.; Hein, L. R. O.; Botelho, E. C.; Costa, M. L.

    2017-11-01

    In this work, nanostructured composites of polyetherimide (PEI) with addition of functionalized multiwall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) were processed via solution mixing. After processing, these nanocomposites were evaluated by thermogravimetry (TGA), dynamic-mechanical analysis (DMA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Subsequently, the nanocomposite was processed with carbon fibers by using hot compression molding. In order to evaluate interlaminar fracture strength, the processed laminates were mechanically evaluated by interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) and compression shear test (CST). Also, the Weibull distribution was employed to help in the statistical treatment of the data obtained from the mechanical tests. With regards to the fracture of the specimens, optical microscopy was used for the evaluation of the material. The addition of 1 wt% of MWCNT in the polymer matrix increased both thermal stability and viscoelastic behavior of the material. These improvements positively impacted the mechanical properties, generating a 16% and 58% increase in the short-beam strength and apparent interlaminar shear, respectively. In addition, it can be verified from morphological analysis of the fracture a change in the failure mode of the laminate by the incorporation of MWCNT. This behavior can be proven from CST test where there was no presence of the shear force by compression.

  1. Dissolution and storage stability of nanostructured calcium carbonates and phosphates for nutrition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Posavec, Lidija; Knijnenburg, Jesper T. N., E-mail: jesper.knijnenburg@alumni.ethz.ch; Hilty, Florentine M. [ETH Zurich, Human Nutrition Laboratory, Institute of Food, Nutrition and Health, Department of Health Sciences and Technology (Switzerland); Krumeich, Frank; Pratsinis, Sotiris E. [ETH Zurich, Particle Technology Laboratory, Institute of Process Engineering, Department of Mechanical and Process Engineering (Switzerland); Zimmermann, Michael B. [ETH Zurich, Human Nutrition Laboratory, Institute of Food, Nutrition and Health, Department of Health Sciences and Technology (Switzerland)

    2016-10-15

    Rapid calcium (Ca) dissolution from nanostructured Ca phosphate and carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) powders may allow them to be absorbed in much higher fraction in humans. Nanosized Ca phosphate and CaCO{sub 3} made by flame-assisted spray pyrolysis were characterized by nitrogen adsorption, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. As-prepared nanopowders contained both CaCO{sub 3} and CaO, but storing them under ambient conditions over 130 days resulted in a complete transformation into CaCO{sub 3}, with an increase in both crystal and particle sizes. The small particle size could be stabilized against such aging by cation (Mg, Zn, Sr) and anion (P) doping, with P and Mg being most effective. Calcium phosphate nanopowders made at Ca:P ≤ 1.5 were XRD amorphous and contained γ-Ca{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} with increasing hydroxyapatite content at higher Ca:P. Aging of powders with Ca:P = 1.0 and 1.5 for over 500 days gradually increased particle size (but less than for CaCO{sub 3}) without a change in phase composition or crystallinity. In 0.01 M H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} calcium phosphate nanopowders dissolved ≈4 times more Ca than micronsized compounds and about twice more Ca than CaCO{sub 3} nanopowders, confirming that nanosizing and/or amorphous structuring sharply increases Ca powder dissolution. Because higher Ca solubility in vitro generally leads to greater absorption in vivo, these novel FASP-made Ca nanostructured compounds may prove useful for nutrition applications, including supplementation and/or food fortification.

  2. Dissolution and storage stability of nanostructured calcium carbonates and phosphates for nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posavec, Lidija; Knijnenburg, Jesper T. N.; Hilty, Florentine M.; Krumeich, Frank; Pratsinis, Sotiris E.; Zimmermann, Michael B.

    2016-10-01

    Rapid calcium (Ca) dissolution from nanostructured Ca phosphate and carbonate (CaCO3) powders may allow them to be absorbed in much higher fraction in humans. Nanosized Ca phosphate and CaCO3 made by flame-assisted spray pyrolysis were characterized by nitrogen adsorption, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. As-prepared nanopowders contained both CaCO3 and CaO, but storing them under ambient conditions over 130 days resulted in a complete transformation into CaCO3, with an increase in both crystal and particle sizes. The small particle size could be stabilized against such aging by cation (Mg, Zn, Sr) and anion (P) doping, with P and Mg being most effective. Calcium phosphate nanopowders made at Ca:P ≤ 1.5 were XRD amorphous and contained γ-Ca2P2O7 with increasing hydroxyapatite content at higher Ca:P. Aging of powders with Ca:P = 1.0 and 1.5 for over 500 days gradually increased particle size (but less than for CaCO3) without a change in phase composition or crystallinity. In 0.01 M H3PO4 calcium phosphate nanopowders dissolved ≈4 times more Ca than micronsized compounds and about twice more Ca than CaCO3 nanopowders, confirming that nanosizing and/or amorphous structuring sharply increases Ca powder dissolution. Because higher Ca solubility in vitro generally leads to greater absorption in vivo, these novel FASP-made Ca nanostructured compounds may prove useful for nutrition applications, including supplementation and/or food fortification.

  3. Nanostructured Carbon Nitride Polymer-Reinforced Electrolyte To Enable Dendrite-Suppressed Lithium Metal Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jiulin; Tian, Jing; Li, Chilin

    2017-04-05

    Lithium metal batteries (LMBs) containing S, O2, and fluoride cathodes are attracting increasing attention owing to their much higher energy density than that of Li-ion batteries. However, current limitation for the progress of LMBs mainly comes from the uncontrolled formation and growth of Li dendrites at the anode side. In order to suppress dendrite growth, exploring novel nanostructured electrolyte of high modulus without degradation of Li-electrolyte interface appears to be a potential solution. Here we propose a lightweight polymer-reinforced electrolyte based on graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) mesoporous microspheres as electrolyte filler [bis(trifluoromethanesulfonimide) lithium salt/di(ethylene glycol) dimethyl ether mixed with g-C3N4, denoted as LiTFSI-DGM-C3N4] for the first time. This nanostructured electrolyte can effectively suppress lithium dendrite growth during cycling, benefiting from the high mechanical strength and nanosheet-built hierarchical structure of g-C3N4. The Li/Li symmetrical cell based on this slurrylike electrolyte enables long-term cycling of at least 120 cycles with a high capacity of 6 mA·h/cm2 and small plating/stripping overpotential of ∼100 mV at a high current density of 2 mA/cm2. g-C3N4 filling also enables a separator(Celgard)-free Li/FeS2 cell with at least 400 cycles. The 3D geometry of g-C3N4 shows advantages on interfacial resistance and Li plating/stripping stability compared to its 2D geometry.

  4. Modified glassy carbon electrodes based on carbon nanostructures for ultrasensitive electrochemical determination of furazolidone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahrokhian, Saeed; Naderi, Leila; Ghalkhani, Masoumeh

    2016-04-01

    The electrochemical behavior of Furazolidone (Fu) was investigated on the surface of the glassy carbon electrode modified with different carbon nanomaterials, including carbon nanotubes (CNTs), carbon nanoparticles (CNPs), nanodiamond-graphite (NDG), graphene oxide (GO), reduced graphene oxide (RGO) and RGO-CNT hybrids (various ratios) using linear sweep voltammetry (LSV). The results of voltammetric studies exhibited a considerable increase in the cathodic peak current of Fu at the RGO modified GCE, compared to other modified electrodes and also bare GCE. The surface morphology and nature of the RGO film was thoroughly characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and cyclic voltammetry (CV) techniques. The modified electrode showed two linear dynamic ranges of 0.001-2.0 μM and 2.0-10.0 μM with a detection limit of 0.3 nM for the voltammetric determination of Fu. This sensor was used successfully for Fu determination in pharmaceutical and clinical preparations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Sub-5 nm nanostructures fabricated by atomic layer deposition using a carbon nanotube template

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Ju Yeon; Han, Hyo; Kim, Ji Weon; Lee, Seung-Mo; Ha, Jeong Sook; Shim, Joon Hyung; Han, Chang-Soo

    2016-07-01

    The fabrication of nanostructures having diameters of sub-5 nm is very a important issue for bottom-up nanofabrication of nanoscale devices. In this work, we report a highly controllable method to create sub-5 nm nano-trenches and nanowires by combining area-selective atomic layer deposition (ALD) with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) as templates. Alumina nano-trenches having a depth of 2.6 ∼ 3.0 nm and SiO2 nano-trenches having a depth of 1.9 ∼ 2.2 nm fully guided by the SWNTs have been formed on SiO2/Si substrate. Through infilling ZnO material by ALD in alumina nano-trenches, well-defined ZnO nanowires having a thickness of 3.1 ∼ 3.3 nm have been fabricated. In order to improve the electrical properties of ZnO nanowires, as-fabricated ZnO nanowires by ALD were annealed at 350 °C in air for 60 min. As a result, we successfully demonstrated that as-synthesized ZnO nanowire using a specific template can be made for various high-density resistive components in the nanoelectronics industry.

  6. Comparison of nanostructured silver-modified silver and carbon ultramicroelectrodes for electrochemical detection of nitrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotfi Zadeh Zhad, Hamid R; Lai, Rebecca Y

    2015-09-10

    We report the use of silver (Ag)-modified carbon and Ag ultramicroelectrodes (UMEs) for electrochemical detection of nitrate. We investigated several methods for electrodeposition of Ag; our results show that the addition of a complexation agent (ammonium sulfate) in the Ag deposition solution is necessary for electrodeposition of nanostructured Ag that adheres well to the electrode. The electrodeposited Ag on both types of electrodes has branch-like structures that are well-suited for electrocatalytic reduction of nitrate. The use of UMEs is advantageous; the sigmoidal-shaped cyclic voltammogram allows for sensitive detection of nitrate by reducing the capacitive current, as well as enabling easy quantification of the nitrate reduction current. Both cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry were used to characterize the electrodes; and independent of the electrochemical interrogation technique, both UMEs were found to have a wide linear dynamic range (4-1000 μM) and a low limit of detection (3.2-5.1 μM). More importantly, they are reusable up to ∼100 interrogation cycles and are selective enough to be used for direct detection of nitrate in a synthetic aquifer sample without any sample pretreatment and/or pH adjustment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The hybrid nanostructure of MnCo2O4.5 nanoneedle/carbon aerogel for symmetric supercapacitors with high energy density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Pin; Zhao, Zhenhuan; Li, Liyi; Tuan, Chia-Chi; Li, Haidong; Sang, Yuanhua; Jiang, Huaidong; Wong, C P; Liu, Hong

    2015-09-14

    Current applications of carbon-based supercapacitors are limited by their low energy density. One promising strategy to enhance the energy density is to couple metal oxides with carbon materials. In this study, a porous MnCo2O4.5 nanoneedle/carbon aerogel hybrid nanostructure was synthesized by assembling MnCo2O4.5 nanoneedle arrays on the surface of channel walls of hierarchical porous carbon aerogels derived from chitosan for the supercapacitor application. The synthetic process of the hybrid nanostructure involves two steps, i.e. the growth of Mn-Co precursors on carbon aerogel by a hydrothermal process and the conversion of the precursor into MnCo2O4.5 nanoneedles by calcination. The carbon aerogel exhibits a high electrical conductivity, high specific surface area and porous structure, ensuring high electrochemical performance of the hybrid nanostructure when coupled with the porous MnCo2O4.5 nanoneedles. The symmetric supercapacitor using the MnCo2O4.5 nanoneedle/carbon aerogel hybrid nanostructure as the active electrode material exhibits a high energy density of about 84.3 Wh kg(-1) at a power density of 600 W kg(-1). The voltage window is as high as 1.5 V in neutral aqueous electrolytes. Due to the unique nanostructure of the electrodes, the capacitance retention reaches 86% over 5000 cycles.

  8. Using the carbon nanotube (CNT)/CNT interaction to obtain hybrid conductive nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, J.; Silva, A.; Bretas, R., E-mail: joaopaulofsbrasil@hotmail.com, E-mail: bretas@ufscar.br [Department of Materials Engineering, Federal University of São Carlos, Rod. Washington Luís, Km 235, PO Box 676, São Carlos, SP, 13565-905 (Brazil)

    2015-05-22

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) combine unique physical, electrical, chemical, thermal and mechanical properties with a huge surface area that qualify them to a broad range of applications. These potential applications, however, are often limited due to the strong inter-tubes van der Waals interactions, which results in poor dispersion in polymeric matrixes or solvents in general. Thus, the goal of this work was to use this limitation as an advantage, to produce novel conductive hybrid nanostructures, which consist of nonwoven Nylon 6 (PA6) mats of electrospun nanofibers with a large amount of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) strongly attached and adsorbed on the nanofibers´ surfaces. To produce such structures, the MWCNT were previously functionalized with carboxylic groups and subsequently incorporated in the nanofibers by two subsequent steps: i) preparation of nonwoven mats of PA6/MWCNT by electrospinning and ii) treatment of the mats in an aqueous dispersion of MWCNT/Triton X–100. Analyses of UV-visible light showed that carboxylic groups were actually inserted in the MWCNT. Thermogravimetric analyzes (TGA) showed that the amount of adsorbed MWCNT on the fibers´ surfaces at the end of the procedure was approximately 12 times higher than after the first step. Micrographs obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) confirmed this result and electrical conductivities measurements of the MWCNT/PA6, after the treatment in the aqueous solution, showed that these structures had conductivity of 10-2 S/m. It was concluded that the adhesion of CNTs at the surface of the nanofibers occurred due a combination of two types of bonding: hydrogen bonds between the carboxylic groups of the functionalized CNT and the PA6 and van der Waals interactions between the CNTs.

  9. Nanostructures of Boron, Carbon and Magnesium Diboride for High Temperature Superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfefferle, Lisa [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Fang, Fang [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Iyyamperumal, Eswarmoorthi [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Keskar, Gayatri [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States)

    2013-12-23

    Direct fabrication of MgxBy nanostructures is achieved by employing metal (Ni,Mg) incorporated MCM-41 in the Hybrid Physical-Chemical Vapor Deposition (HPCVD) reaction. Different reaction conditions are tested to optimize the fabrication process. TEM analysis shows the fabrication of MgxBy nanostructures starting at the reaction temperature of 600oC, with the yield of the nanostructures increasing with increasing reaction temperature. The as-synthesized MgxBy nanostructures have the diameters in the range of 3-5nm, which do not increase with the reaction temperature consistent with templated synthesis. EELS analysis of the template removed nanostructures confirms the existence of B and Mg with possible contamination of Si and O. NEXAFS and Raman spectroscopy analysis suggested a concentric layer-by-layer MgxBy nanowire/nanotube growth model for our as-synthesized nanostructures. Ni k-edge XAS indicates that the formation of MgNi alloy particles is important for the Vapor-Liquid-Solid (VLS) growth of MgxBy nanostructures with fine diameters, and the presence of Mg vapor not just Mg in the catalyst is crucial for the formation of Ni-Mg clusters. Physical templating by the MCM-41 pores was shown to confine the diameter of the nanostructures. DC magnetization measurements indicate possible superconductive behaviors in the as-synthesized samples.

  10. Effects of confinement in meso-porous silica and carbon nano-structures; Etude des effets de confinement dans la silice mesoporeuse et dans certaines nanostructures carbonees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leon, V

    2006-07-15

    Physico-chemical properties of materials can be strongly modified by confinement because of the quantum effects that appear at such small length scales and also because of the effects of the confinement itself. The aim of this thesis is to show that both the nature of the confining material and the size of the pores and cavities have a strong impact on the confined material. We first show the effect of the pore size of the host meso-porous silica on the temperature of the solid-solid phase transition of silver selenide, a semiconducting material with enhanced magnetoresistive properties under non-stoichiometric conditions. Narrowing the pores from 20 nm to 2 nm raises the phase transition temperature from 139 C to 146 C. This result can be explained by considering the interaction between the confining and confined materials as a driving force. The effects of confinement are also studied in the case of hydrogen and deuterium inside cavities of organized carbon nano-structures. The effects that appear in the adsorption/desorption cycles are much stronger with carbon nano-horns as the host material than with C60 pea-pods and single-walled carbon nano-tubes. (author)

  11. Notched Long-Period Fiber Grating with an Amine-Modified Surface Nanostructure for Carbon Dioxide Gas Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Janw-Wei; Chiang, Chia-Chin

    2015-07-21

    This paper presents the fabrication and application of a notched long-period fiber grating (NLPFG) with an amine-modified surface nanostructure for carbon dioxide (CO₂) gas sensing. The NLPFG with the modified surface nanostructure was fabricated by using inductively coupled plasma (ICP) etching with an Ag nanoparticle etching barrier. The experimental results show that the spectra were changed with the CO₂ gas flow within 12 min. Thereafter, the spectra of the NLPFG remained steady and unchanged. During the absorption process, the transmission loss was decreased by approximately 2.019 dB, and the decreased rate of transmission loss was 0.163 dB/min. The sensitivity was about -0.089 dB/%. These results demonstrate that the NLPFG CO₂ gas sensor has the advantages of steady performance, repeatability, and low cost. Therefore, the NLPFG can be utilized as a reliable CO₂ gas sensor.

  12. Nanostructured Electrodes For Organic Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells: Model Study Using Carbon Nanotube Dispersed Polythiophene-fullerene Blend Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, C.Y.; Wu, Q.; Su, D.; Chiu, C.-y; Tremblay, N.J.; Nuckolls, C,; Black, C.T.

    2011-09-19

    We test the feasibility of using nanostructured electrodes in organic bulk heterojunction solar cells to improve their photovoltaic performance by enhancing their charge collection efficiency and thereby increasing the optimal active blend layer thickness. As a model system, small concentrations of single wall carbon nanotubes are added to blends of poly(3-hexylthiophene): [6,6]-phenyl-C{sub 61}-butyric acid methyl ester in order to create networks of efficient hole conduction pathways in the device active layer without affecting the light absorption. The nanotube addition leads to a 22% increase in the optimal blend layer thickness from 90 nm to 110 nm, enhancing the short circuit current density and photovoltaic device efficiency by as much as {approx}10%. The associated incident-photon-to-current conversion efficiency for the given thickness also increases by {approx}10% uniformly across the device optical absorption spectrum, corroborating the enhanced charge carrier collection by nanostructured electrodes.

  13. Notched Long-Period Fiber Grating with an Amine-Modified Surface Nanostructure for Carbon Dioxide Gas Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janw-Wei Wu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the fabrication and application of a notched long-period fiber grating (NLPFG with an amine-modified surface nanostructure for carbon dioxide (CO2 gas sensing. The NLPFG with the modified surface nanostructure was fabricated by using inductively coupled plasma (ICP etching with an Ag nanoparticle etching barrier. The experimental results show that the spectra were changed with the CO2 gas flow within 12 min. Thereafter, the spectra of the NLPFG remained steady and unchanged. During the absorption process, the transmission loss was decreased by approximately 2.019 dB, and the decreased rate of transmission loss was 0.163 dB/min. The sensitivity was about −0.089 dB/%. These results demonstrate that the NLPFG CO2 gas sensor has the advantages of steady performance, repeatability, and low cost. Therefore, the NLPFG can be utilized as a reliable CO2 gas sensor.

  14. A high efficient nanostructured filter based on functionalized carbon nanotube to reduce the tobacco-specific nitrosamines, NNK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoosefian, Mehdi

    2018-03-01

    Filtration efficiency of Pd and Ni loaded single-walled carbon nanotubes via the applicability of the adsorption process for the removal NNK, the tobacco-specific nitrosamines, from tobacco smoke were investigated using first-principles calculations. The thermal and mechanical stability of designed nanostructured filter could allow them to compete with typical commercially used. It is expected that the removal efficiency of the proposed nanostructured filter could also provide a promising adsorbent candidate in removing the environmental pollutant. The suggested separation mechanism in this study was discussed with frontier molecular orbital theory, natural bond orbital (NBO) analyses and the density of states in the density functional theory framework. Finally, by the Bader theory of atoms in molecules (AIM), the topological properties of the electron density contributions for intermolecular and intramolecular interactions has been analyzed. Calculations show that the transition metal-loaded SWCNT exhibit strong affinity toward the NNK molecules.

  15. Cytocompatibility and biocompatibility of nanostructured carbonated hydroxyapatite spheres for bone repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    CALASANS-MAIA, Mônica Diuana; de MELO, Bruno Raposo; ALVES, Adriana Terezinha Neves Novellino; RESENDE, Rodrigo Figueiredo de Brito; LOURO, Rafael Seabra; SARTORETTO, Suelen Cristina; GRANJEIRO, José Mauro; ALVES, Gutemberg Gomes

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the in vitro and in vivo biological responses to nanostructured carbonated hydroxyapatite/calcium alginate (CHA) microspheres used for alveolar bone repair, compared to sintered hydroxyapatite (HA). Material and Methods The maxillary central incisors of 45 Wistar rats were extracted, and the dental sockets were filled with HA, CHA, and blood clot (control group) (n=5/period/group). After 7, 21 and 42 days, the samples of bone with the biomaterials were obtained for histological and histomorphometric analysis, and the plasma levels of RANKL and OPG were determined via immunoassay. Statistical analysis was performed by Two-Way ANOVA with post-hoc Tukey test at 95% level of significance. Results The CHA and HA microspheres were cytocompatible with both human and murine cells on an in vitro assay. Histological analysis showed the time-dependent increase of newly formed bone in control group characterized by an intense osteoblast activity. In HA and CHA groups, the presence of a slight granulation reaction around the spheres was observed after seven days, which was reduced by the 42nd day. A considerable amount of newly formed bone was observed surrounding the CHA spheres and the biomaterials particles at 42-day time point compared with HA. Histomorphometric analysis showed a significant increase of newly formed bone in CHA group compared with HA after 21 and 42 days from surgery, moreover, CHA showed almost 2-fold greater biosorption than HA at 42 days (two-way ANOVA, p<0.05) indicating greater biosorption. An increase in the RANKL/OPG ratio was observed in the CHA group on the 7th day. Conclusion CHA spheres were osteoconductive and presented earlier biosorption, inducing early increases in the levels of proteins involved in resorption. PMID:26814461

  16. Ion irradiation of electronic-type-separated single wall carbon nanotubes: A model for radiation effects in nanostructured carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossi, Jamie E. [NanoPower Research Laboratory, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Cress, Cory D.; Messenger, Scott R.; Weaver, Brad D. [Electronics Science and Technology Division, United States Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C. 20375 (United States); Helenic, Alysha R.; Landi, Brian J. [NanoPower Research Laboratory, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Department of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Schauerman, Chris M. [NanoPower Research Laboratory, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Golisano Institute of Sustainability, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); DiLeo, Roberta A.; Cox, Nathanael D. [NanoPower Research Laboratory, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Department of Microsystems Engineering, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Hubbard, Seth M. [NanoPower Research Laboratory, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Department of Microsystems Engineering, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Department of Physics, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2012-08-01

    The structural and electrical properties of electronic-type-separated (metallic and semiconducting) single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) thin-films have been investigated after irradiation with 150 keV {sup 11}B{sup +} and 150 keV {sup 31}P{sup +} with fluences ranging from 10{sup 12} to 10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2}. Raman spectroscopy results indicate that the ratio of the Raman D to G Prime band peak intensities (D/G Prime ) is a more sensitive indicator of SWCNT structural modification induced by ion irradiation by one order of magnitude compared to the ratio of the Raman D to G band peak intensities (D/G). The increase in sheet resistance (R{sub s}) of the thin-films follows a similar trend as the D/G Prime ratio, suggesting that the radiation induced variation in bulk electrical transport for both electronic-types is equal and related to localized defect generation. The characterization results for the various samples are compared based on the displacement damage dose (DDD) imparted to the sample, which is material and damage source independent. Therefore, it is possible to extend the analysis to include data from irradiation of transferred CVD-graphene films on SiO{sub 2}/Si substrates using 35 keV C{sup +} ions, and compare the observed changes at equivalent levels of ion irradiation-induced damage to that observed in the SWCNT thin-film samples. Ultimately, a model is developed for the prediction of the radiation response of nanostructured carbon materials based on the DDD for any incident ion with low-energy recoil spectra. The model is also related to the defect concentration, and subsequently the effective defect-to-defect length, and yields a maximum defect concentration (minimum defect-to-defect length) above which the bulk electrical transport properties in SWCNT thin-films and large graphene-based electronic devices rapidly degrade when exposed to harsh environments.

  17. Nanostructured materials for sensing Pb(II and Cd(II ions: Manganese oxohydroxide versus carbonized polyanilines?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šljukić Biljana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured materials including three different carbonized polyanilines and manganese oxyhydroxide were prepared and evaluated as electrode materials for sensing of lead and cadmium ions in aqueous media. Anodic stripping voltammetry results indicated that all prepared materials could be successfully used for determination of these two heavy metal ions. Carbonized polyaniline-based electrodes have higher signal and lower limits of detection (10-7 М compared to manganese oxyhydroxide-based electrode. Among the three studied carbonized polyanilines, the one that was derived from polyaniline precursor produced in the presence of 3,5-dinitrosalicyclic acid showed the highest electrocatalytic activity towards the lead and cadmium oxidation. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. OI172043 i br. III45014

  18. Interface study between nanostructured tantalum nitride films and carbon nanotubes grown by chemical vapour deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouchet-Fabre, B., E-mail: brigitte.bouchet-fabre@cea.fr [Nanosciences and Innovation, CEA/IRAMIS/NIMBE, CEA-Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France); Pinault, M.; Foy, E. [Nanosciences and Innovation, CEA/IRAMIS/NIMBE, CEA-Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France); Hugon, M.C.; Minéa, T. [Laboratoire de Physique des Gaz et des Plasmas (UMR 8578), Université Paris-Sud, Bat. 210, 91405 Orsay cedex (France); Mayne-L’Hermite, M. [Nanosciences and Innovation, CEA/IRAMIS/NIMBE, CEA-Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France)

    2014-10-01

    Highlights: • Our paper deals with the understanding of the carbon nanotubes growth parameters following the use of specific thin nitride buffer films. • For a large choice of buffer, we use ultra thin films elaborated by the very new method: high power pulsed magnetron sputtering; it allows a larger nitrogen incorporation in the films and lead to out of equilibrium phase formation. • Then by a multiscale investigation, developing a structural, a chemical and a morphology approach, we lead to some conclusion on the correlation between the phase transition for the buffer and morphology transition for the CNTs. • That is a new and deep approach. - Abstract: We present the role of nitrogen content in tantalum nitride ultra-thin buffers, on the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) growth by chemical vapour deposition at 850 °C, assisted by ferrocene as catalyst source. Tantalum nitride (TaN{sub x}) films with a very large range of concentration x = [0, 1.8] and various nanostructures, from amorphous Ta(N) to Ta{sub 3}N{sub 5}, were deposited by Highly Pulsed Plasma Magnetron Sputtering. The buffer films are characterized after heat treatment at 850 °C, and after the CNT growth, by wide angle X-ray scattering in grazing incidence and scanning electron microscopy. The CNT diameter explored by transition electron microscopy shows an all-out value for under stoichiometric thin films (Ta{sub 1}-N{sub 1−δ}, Ta{sub 3}-N{sub 5−δ}) and a minimum value just above the stoichiometric phases (Ta{sub 1}-N{sub 1+δ}, Ta{sub 3}-N{sub 5+δ}). Firstly one shows that the buffer films under the heat treatment present surface modification highly dependent on their initial state, which influences the catalyst particles diffusion. Secondly at the stoichiometric TaN phase we show that a specific ternary phase FeTa{sub 2}O{sub 6} is formed at the interface CNT/buffer, not present in the other cases, leading to a special CNT growth condition.

  19. Solid-phase synthesis of graphitic carbon nanostructures from iron and cobalt gluconates and their utilization as electrocatalyst supports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevilla, M; Salinas Martínez-de Lecea, C; Valdés-Solís, T; Morallón, E; Fuertes, A B

    2008-03-14

    We present a novel and facile synthesis methodology for obtaining graphitic carbon structures from Fe(II) and Co(II) gluconates. The formation of graphitic carbon can be carried out in only one step by means of heat treatment of these organic salts at a temperature of 900 degrees C or 1000 degrees C under inert atmosphere. This process consists of the following steps: (a) pyrolysis of the organic gluconate and its transformation to amorphous carbon, (b) conversion of Fe(2+) and Co(2+) ions to Fe(2)O(3) and CoO and their subsequent reduction to metallic nanoparticles by the carbon and (c) conversion of a fraction of formed amorphous carbon to graphitic structures by Fe and Co nanoparticles that act as catalysts in the graphitization process. The removal of the amorphous carbon and metallic nanoparticles by means of oxidative treatment (KMnO(4) in an acid solution) allows graphitic carbon nanostructures (GCNs) to be selectively recovered. The GCNs thus obtained (i.e. nanocapsules and nanopipes) have a high crystallinity as evidenced by TEM/SAED, XRD and Raman analysis. In addition, we used these GCNs as supports for platinum nanoparticles, which were well dispersed (mean Pt size approximately 2.5-3.2 nm). Most electrocatalysts prepared in this way have a high electrocatalytical surface area, up to 90 m(2) g(-1) Pt, and exhibit high catalytic activities toward methanol electrooxidation.

  20. Promotion of water-mediated carbon removal by nanostructured barium oxide/nickel interfaces in solid oxide fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lei; Choi, YongMan; Qin, Wentao; Chen, Haiyan; Blinn, Kevin; Liu, Mingfei; Liu, Ping; Bai, Jianming; Tyson, Trevor A.; Liu, Meilin

    2011-01-01

    The existing Ni-yttria-stabilized zirconia anodes in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) perform poorly in carbon-containing fuels because of coking and deactivation at desired operating temperatures. Here we report a new anode with nanostructured barium oxide/nickel (BaO/Ni) interfaces for low-cost SOFCs, demonstrating high power density and stability in C3H8, CO and gasified carbon fuels at 750°C. Synchrotron-based X-ray analyses and microscopy reveal that nanosized BaO islands grow on the Ni surface, creating numerous nanostructured BaO/Ni interfaces that readily adsorb water and facilitate water-mediated carbon removal reactions. Density functional theory calculations predict that the dissociated OH from H2O on BaO reacts with C on Ni near the BaO/Ni interface to produce CO and H species, which are then electrochemically oxidized at the triple-phase boundaries of the anode. This anode offers potential for ushering in a new generation of SOFCs for efficient, low-emission conversion of readily available fuels to electricity. PMID:21694705

  1. Promotion of water-mediated carbon removal by nanostructured barium oxide/nickel interfaces in solid oxide fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lei; Choi, YongMan; Qin, Wentao; Chen, Haiyan; Blinn, Kevin; Liu, Mingfei; Liu, Ping; Bai, Jianming; Tyson, Trevor A; Liu, Meilin

    2011-06-21

    The existing Ni-yttria-stabilized zirconia anodes in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) perform poorly in carbon-containing fuels because of coking and deactivation at desired operating temperatures. Here we report a new anode with nanostructured barium oxide/nickel (BaO/Ni) interfaces for low-cost SOFCs, demonstrating high power density and stability in C(3)H(8), CO and gasified carbon fuels at 750°C. Synchrotron-based X-ray analyses and microscopy reveal that nanosized BaO islands grow on the Ni surface, creating numerous nanostructured BaO/Ni interfaces that readily adsorb water and facilitate water-mediated carbon removal reactions. Density functional theory calculations predict that the dissociated OH from H(2)O on BaO reacts with C on Ni near the BaO/Ni interface to produce CO and H species, which are then electrochemically oxidized at the triple-phase boundaries of the anode. This anode offers potential for ushering in a new generation of SOFCs for efficient, low-emission conversion of readily available fuels to electricity.

  2. Theoretical Investigation of Light Transmission in a Slab Cavity via Kerr Nonlinearity of Carbon Nanotube Quantum Dot Nanostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solookinejad, Gh.; Jabbari, M.; Sangachin, E. Ahmadi; Asadpour, S. H.

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss the transmission properties of weak probe laser field propagate through slab cavity with defect layer of carbon-nanotube quantum dot (CNT-QD) nanostructure. We show that due to spin-orbit coupling, the double electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) windows appear and the giant Kerr nonlinearity of the intracavity medium can lead to manipulating of transmission coefficient of weak probe light. The thickness effect of defect layer medium has also been analyzed on transmission properties of probe laser field. Our proposed model may be useful for integrated photonics devices based on CNT-QD for applications in all-optical systems which require multiple EIT effect.

  3. Theoretical Investigation of Light Transmission in a Slab Cavity via Kerr Nonlinearity of Carbon Nanotube Quantum Dot Nanostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solookinejad, Gh.; Jabbari, M.; Sangachin, E. Ahmadi; Asadpour, S. H.

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, we discuss the transmission properties of weak probe laser field propagate through slab cavity with defect layer of carbon-nanotube quantum dot (CNT-QD) nanostructure. We show that due to spin-orbit coupling, the double electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) windows appear and the giant Kerr nonlinearity of the intracavity medium can lead to manipulating of transmission coefficient of weak probe light. The thickness effect of defect layer medium has also been analyzed on transmission properties of probe laser field. Our proposed model may be useful for integrated photonics devices based on CNT-QD for applications in all-optical systems which require multiple EIT effect.

  4. Fabrication of nanostructured metal oxide films with supercritical carbon dioxide: Processing and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Eunyoung

    Nanostructured metal oxide films have many applications in catalysis, microelectronics, microfluidics, photovoltaics and other fields. Since the performance of a device depends greatly on the structure of the material, the development of methodologies that enable prescriptive control of morphology are of great interest. The focus of this work is to control the structure and properties of the nanostructured metal oxide films using novel synthetic schemes in supercritical fluids and to use those films as key building components in alternative energy applications. A supercritical fluid is a substance at a temperature and pressure above its critical point. It typically exhibits gas-like transport properties and liquid-like densities. Supercritical fluid deposition (SFD) utilizes these properties of supercritical CO2 (scCO2) to deposit chemically pure metal, oxides and alloys of metal films. SFD is a chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-like process in the sense that it uses similar metal organic precursors and deposits films at elevated temperatures. Instead of vaporizing or subliming the precursors, they are dissolved in supercritical fluids. SFD has typically shown to exhibit higher precursor concentrations, lower deposition temperatures, conformal deposition of films on high aspect ratio features as compared to CVD. In2 O3, ZnO and SnO2 are attractive materials because they are used in transparent conductors. SFD of these materials were studied and In2 O3 deposition kinetics using tris(2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-3,5-heptanedionato) In (III) as precursor were determined. Growth rate dependence on the deposition temperature and the precursor concentrations were studied and the physicochemical and optical properties of In2 O3 films were characterized. Metal oxide nanochannels that can potentially be used for microfluidics have been fabricated by sequentially performing nanoimprint lithography (NIL) and SFD. NIL was used to pattern photoresist grating on substrates and SFD of TiO2

  5. Precise 3D printing of micro/nanostructures using highly conductive carbon nanotube-thiol-acrylate composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.; Xiong, W.; Jiang, L. J.; Zhou, Y. S.; Lu, Y. F.

    2016-04-01

    Two-photon polymerization (TPP) is of increasing interest due to its unique combination of truly three-dimensional (3D) fabrication capability and ultrahigh spatial resolution of ~40 nm. However, the stringent requirements of non-linear resins seriously limit the material functionality of 3D printing via TPP. Precise fabrication of 3D micro/nanostructures with multi-functionalities such as high electrical conductivity and mechanical strength is still a long-standing challenge. In this work, TPP fabrication of arbitrary 3D micro/nanostructures using multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWNT)-thiolacrylate (MTA) composite resins has been developed. Up to 0.2 wt% MWNTs have been incorporated into thiol-acrylate resins to form highly stable and uniform composite photoresists without obvious degradation for one week at room temperature. Various functional 3D micro/nanostructures including woodpiles, micro-coils, spiral-like photonic crystals, suspended micro-bridges, micro-gears and complex micro-cars have been successfully fabricated. The MTA composite resin offers significant enhancements in electrical conductivity and mechanical strength, and on the same time, preserving high optical transmittance and flexibility. Tightly controlled alignment of MWNTs and the strong anisotropy effect were confirmed. Microelectronic devices including capacitors and resistors made of the MTA composite polymer were demonstrated. The 3D micro/nanofabrication using the MTA composite resins enables the precise 3D printing of micro/nanostructures of high electrical conductivity and mechanical strength, which is expected to lead a wide range of device applications, including micro/nano-electromechanical systems (MEMS/NEMS), integrated photonics and 3D electronics.

  6. Combined sonochemical/CVD method for preparation of nanostructured carbon-doped TiO{sub 2} thin film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasoulnezhad, Hossein [Semiconductor Department, Materials and Energy Research Center (MERC), Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kavei, Ghassem, E-mail: kaveighassem@gmail.com [Semiconductor Department, Materials and Energy Research Center (MERC), Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ahmadi, Kamran [Semiconductor Department, Materials and Energy Research Center (MERC), Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rahimipour, Mohammad Reza [Ceramic Department, Materials and Energy Research Center (MERC), Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-06-30

    Highlights: • Combination of sonochemical and CVD methods for preparation of nanostructured carbon-doped TiO{sub 2} thin film on glass substrate, for the first time. • High transparency, monodispersity and homogeneity of the prepared thin films. • Preparation of the carbon-doped TiO{sub 2} thin films with nanorod and nanosphere morphologies. - Abstract: The present work reports the successful synthesis of the nanostructured carbon-doped TiO{sub 2} thin films on glass substrate by combination of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and ultrasonic methods, for the first time. In this method the ultrasound waves act as nebulizer for converting of sonochemically prepared TiO{sub 2} sol to the mist particles. These mist particles were thermally decomposed in subsequent CVD chamber at 320 °C to produce the carbon-doped TiO{sub 2} thin films. The obtained thin films were characterized by means of X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques. The results show that the prepared thin films have anatase crystal structure and nanorod morphology, which calcination of them at 800 °C results in the conversion of nanorods to nanoparticles. In addition, the prepared samples have high transparency, monodispersity and homogeneity. The presence of the carbon element in the structure of the thin films causes the narrowing of the band-gap energy of TiO{sub 2} to about 2.8 eV, which results in the improvement of visible light absorption capabilities of the thin film.

  7. LDRD final report on synthesis of shape-and size-controlled platinum and platinum alloy nanostructures on carbon with improved durability.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shelnutt, John Allen; Garcia, Robert M.; Song, Yujiang; Moreno, Andres M.; Stanis, Ronald J.

    2008-10-01

    This project is aimed to gain added durability by supporting ripening-resistant dendritic platinum and/or platinum-based alloy nanostructures on carbon. We have developed a new synthetic approach suitable for directly supporting dendritic nanostructures on VXC-72 carbon black (CB), single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). The key of the synthesis is to creating a unique supporting/confining reaction environment by incorporating carbon within lipid bilayer relying on a hydrophobic-hydrophobic interaction. In order to realize size uniformity control over the supported dendritic nanostructures, a fast photocatalytic seeding method based on tin(IV) porphyrins (SnP) developed at Sandia was applied to the synthesis by using SnP-containing liposomes under tungsten light irradiation. For concept approval, one created dendritic platinum nanostructure supported on CB was fabricated into membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) for durability examination via potential cycling. It appears that carbon supporting is essentially beneficial to an enhanced durability according to our preliminary results.

  8. A rational design approach to nanostructured catalysts for the oxidation of carbon monoxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karwacki, Christopher

    anatase (101) form of titania. Also, the support must provide a source of activated oxygen as a means to oxidize intermediate carbonates with CO 2 formation. The role of the support is to provide lattice oxygen in an activated state (O2-) for oxidation of adsorbed CO the Au NP:support interface. Furthermore, the primary interest is the energy associated Au NP in proximity to the support surface. Advancing the understanding of this region is believed to be crucial to the future design of active nanostructured materials that function under ambient conditions. The proposed model involves a structure consisting of properly sized and highly dispersed Au NP supported on a hydroxylated form of nanocrystalline zirconia. This type of zirconia is in a highly polymorphic form consisting of aggregates of small crystals less than 10 nm. The structure is highly porous, containing undercoordinated zirconium atoms, and provides an environment for rapid dissociation of molecular water. In this research and in collaboration with Mogilevsky et al., 37 I introduce a novel method for quantifying the surface concentration of two major forms of hydroxide that form on zirconia. Furthermore, in this research I show how both the porosity of the zirconia support and the size of the crystalline aggregates affect the type and surface concentration of hydroxyl groups. This relationship is thus directly related to the oxidation activity of the catalyst consisting of Au NP supported on hydroxylated ZrO 2. These phenomena are exemplified by a reduction in structural porosity and surface hydroxyl groups with increasing temperature treatments of the zirconia support. Gold NP and ZrO2 supports were extended to studies that included interactions with activated carbons. This work was done on the premise that graphitic carbons, based on their tunable porosities and surface chemistries, can enhance or stabilize the catalytic activity of neighboring Au NP. Gold dispersed on active carbon and hybrid structures

  9. Controlled Synthesis of Carbon-Encapsulated Copper Nanostructures by Using Smectite Clays as Nanotemplates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsoufis, Theodoros; Colomer, Jean-Francois; Maccallini, Enrico; Jankovic, Lubos; Rudolf, Petra; Gournis, Dimitrios; Jankovič, Lubos

    Rhomboidal and spherical metallic-copper nanostructures were encapsulated within well-formed graphitic shells by using a simple chemical method that involved the catalytic decomposition of acetylene over a copper catalyst that was supported on different smectite clays surfaces by ion-exchange. These

  10. Preparation of Copper Oxide Nanostructure Thin Film For Carbon Monoxide Gas Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Yuliarto

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This work reports the synthesis of nanostructure of CuO thin film using dip coating and chemical bath deposition method. Seed layer was deposited by dip coating method using zinc nitrate as a precursor. The CuO nanostructure has successfully grown on CBD process at 95oC for 6 hours. The X Ray Diffraction characterization result shows that the CuO has monoclinic crystallization and good crystallinity. Moreover, the Scanning Electron Microscope characterization results  shows that CuO has nanospike-like shape. The CuO thin film as a gas sensor shows relatively high response on CO gas at the temperature working above 200oC. The highest response is obtained at 350oC of working temperature toward 30 ppm CO gas at 186% of sensor response.

  11. Removal of Heavy Metals from Drinking Water by Magnetic Carbon Nanostructures Prepared from Biomass

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammad Muneeb Ur Rahman Khattak; Muhammad Zahoor; Bakhtiar Muhammad; Farhat Ali Khan; Riaz Ullah; AbdEI-Salam, Naser M.

    2017-01-01

    Heavy metals contamination of drinking water has significant adverse effects on human health due to their toxic nature. In this study a new adsorbent, magnetic graphitic nanostructures were prepared from watermelon waste. The adsorbent was characterized by different instrumental techniques (surface area analyzer, FTIR, XRD, EDX, SEM, and TG/DTA) and was used for the removal of heavy metals (As, Cr, Cu, Pb, and Zn) from water. The adsorption parameters were determined for heavy metals adsorpti...

  12. Comparison of photoluminescence of carbon nanotube/ZnO nanostructures synthesized by gas- and solution-phase transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Changhyun; Lee, Seawook; Kim, Chang-Wan; Park, Suyoung; Lee, Chongmu; Lee, Dongjin

    2015-02-01

    Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs)/ZnO heterostructures were synthesized by two different processes: (1) gas-phase transport (GPT) and nucleation of Zn powders and (2) solution-phase transport (SPT) chemical reaction of zinc nitrate solution on the MWCNTs. Transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis indicated that the ZnO nanostructures on the MWCNTs from the GPT and SPT processes were poly- and single-crystal hexagonal wurtzite structure, respectively. The major photoluminescence (PL) spectra of our MWCNT/ZnO hybrid, excited at 380 nm and 550 nm, were presented. The PL intensity of the MWCNT/ZnO coaxial nanostructures behaves differently depending on the ZnO synthesis methods on the MWCNTs. The MWCNT/ZnO heterostructures synthesized using the GPT process were more efficient than those synthesized by SPT process in enhancing the PL intensity around the near-band-edge emission region. However, the emission enhancement around defect region was mostly attributed to increase in the O vacancy concentration in the ZnO on the MWCNTs during the SPT process.

  13. Photoluminescence quenching, structures, and photovoltaic properties of ZnO nanostructures decorated plasma grown single walled carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aïssa, Brahim, E-mail: brahim.aissa@mpbc.ca [University of Quebec, Centre Énergie, Matériaux et Télécommunications, INRS-EMT (Canada); Nedil, Mourad [Telebec Wireless Underground Communication Laboratory, UQAT (Canada); Belaidi, Abdelhak; Isaifan, Rima J. [Hamad Bin Khalifa University, Qatar Foundation, Qatar Environment and Energy Research Institute (Qatar); Bentouaf, Ali [University Hassiba Ben Bouali, Physics Department, Faculty of Science (Algeria); Fauteux, Christian; Therriault, Daniel [École Polytechnique de Montréal, Laboratory for Multiscale Mechanics (LM2), Mechanical Engineering Department (Canada)

    2017-05-15

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures were successfully grown directly on single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) template through the CO{sub 2} laser-induced chemical liquid deposition (LCLD) process. Photoluminescence (PL) of the deposited ZnO/SWCNT hybrid composites exhibits, at room temperature, a narrow near UV band located at 390 nm with no emission bands in the visible region, indicating a high degree of crystalline quality of the ZnO nanostructures. Moreover, when the relative SWCNT loads are varied within the composites, the PL intensity and the diffused optical reflectance diminish in comparison with those of ZnO alone, owing to the transfer of photo-excited electrons from ZnO to the SWCNT, and the enhancement of the optical absorbance, respectively. Finally, these ZnO/SWCNT hybrid composites are integrated into a heterojunction photovoltaic-based device, using PEDOT:PSS on ITO/glass substrate. The devices show an evident p–n junction behavior in the dark, and a clear I–V curve shift downward when illuminated with an open-circuit voltage of 1.1 V, a short circuit current density of 14.05 μA cm{sup −2}, and a fill factor of ∼35%. These results indicate that these composites fabricated via LCLD process could be promising for optoelectronic and energy-harvesting devices.

  14. Selective responses of human gingival fibroblasts and bacteria on carbon fiber reinforced polyetheretherketone with multilevel nanostructured TiO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao; Lu, Tao; Wen, Jin; Xu, Lianyi; Zeng, Deliang; Wu, Qianju; Cao, Lingyan; Lin, Shuxian; Liu, Xuanyong; Jiang, Xinquan

    2016-03-01

    The long-term success of dental implants relies not only on stable osseointegration but also on the integration of implant surfaces with surrounding soft tissues. In our previous work, titanium plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) technique was applied to modify the carbon-fiber-reinforced polyetheretherketone (CFRPEEK) surface, constructing a unique multilevel TiO2 nanostructure thus enhancing certain osteogenic properties. However, the interactions between the modified surface and soft-tissue cells are still not clear. Here, we fully investigate the biological behaviors of human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) and oral pathogens on the structured surface, which determine the early peri-implant soft tissue integration. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) shows the formation of nanopores with TiO2 nanoparticles embedded on both the sidewall and bottom. In vitro studies including cell adhesion, viability assay, wound healing assay, real-time PCR, western blot and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) disclose improved adhesion, migration, proliferation, and collagen secretion ability of HGFs on the modified CFRPEEK. Moreover, the structured surface exhibits sustainable antibacterial properties towards Streptococcus mutans, Fusobacterium nucleatum and Porphyromonas gingivalis. Our results reveal that the multilevel TiO2 nanostructures can selectively enhance soft tissue integration and inhibit bacterial reproduction, which will further support and broaden the adoption of CFRPEEK materials in dental fields. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Application of gallium nitride nanostructures and nitrogen doped carbon spheres as supports for the hydrogenation of cinnamaldehyde.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kente, Thobeka; Dube, Sibongile M A; Coville, Neil J; Mhlanga, Sabelo D

    2013-07-01

    This paper reports on the synthesis and use of nanostructures of gallium nitride (GaN NSs) and nitrogen doped carbon spheres (NCSs) as support materials for the hydrogenation of cinnamaldehyde. This study provides the first investigation of GaN as a catalyst support in hydrogenation reactions. The GaN NSs were synthesized via chemical vapour deposition (CVD) in a double stage furnace (750 degrees C) while NCSs were made by CVD in a single stage furnace (950 degrees C) respectively. TEM analysis revealed that the GaN NSs were rod-like with average diameters of 200 nm, while the NCSs were solid with smoother surfaces, and with diameters of 450 nm. Pd nanoparticles (1 and 3% loadings) were uniformly dispersed on acid functionalized GaN NSs and NCS. The Pd nanoparticles had average diameters that were influenced by the type of support material used. The GaN NSs and NCSs were tested for the selective hydrogenation of cinnamaldehyde in isopropanol at 40 and 60 degrees C under atmospheric pressure. A comparative study of the activity of the nanostructured materials revealed that the order of catalyst activity was 3% Pd/GaN > 3% Pd/NCSs > 1% Pd/NCSs > 1% Pd/GaN. However, 100% selectivity to hydrocinnamaldehyde (HCALD) was obtained with 1% Pd/GaN at reasonable conversion rates.

  16. Mechanical Behavior of Nanostructured Hybrids Based on Poly(Vinyl Alcohol/Bioactive Glass Reinforced with Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. S. Mansur

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study reports the synthesis and characterization of novel tridimensional porous hybrids based on PVA combined with bioactive glass and reinforced by chemically functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNT for potential use in bone tissue engineering. The functionalization of CNT was performed by introducing carboxylic groups in multiwall nanotubes. This process aimed at enhancing the affinity of CNTs with the water-soluble PVA polymer derived by the hydrogen bonds formed among alcohol (PVA and carboxylic groups (CNT–COOH. In the sequence, the CNT–COOH (0.25 wt% were used as the nanostructure modifier for the hybrid system based on PVA associated with the bioactive glass (BaG. The mechanical properties of the nanostructured hybrids reinforced with CNT–COOH were evaluated by axial compression tests, and they were compared to reference hybrid. The averaged yield stresses of macroporous hybrids were (2.3 ± 0.9 and (4.4 ± 1.0 MPa for the reference and the CNT reinforced materials, respectively. Moreover, yield strain and Young's modulus were significantly enhanced by about 30% for the CNT–COOH hybrids. Hence, as far as the mechanical properties are concerned, the results have clearly showed the feasibility of utilizing these new hybrids reinforced with functionalized CNT in repairing cancellous bone tissues.

  17. Photoluminescence quenching, structures, and photovoltaic properties of ZnO nanostructures decorated plasma grown single walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aïssa, Brahim; Nedil, Mourad; Belaidi, Abdelhak; Isaifan, Rima J.; Bentouaf, Ali; Fauteux, Christian; Therriault, Daniel

    2017-05-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures were successfully grown directly on single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) template through the CO2 laser-induced chemical liquid deposition (LCLD) process. Photoluminescence (PL) of the deposited ZnO/SWCNT hybrid composites exhibits, at room temperature, a narrow near UV band located at 390 nm with no emission bands in the visible region, indicating a high degree of crystalline quality of the ZnO nanostructures. Moreover, when the relative SWCNT loads are varied within the composites, the PL intensity and the diffused optical reflectance diminish in comparison with those of ZnO alone, owing to the transfer of photo-excited electrons from ZnO to the SWCNT, and the enhancement of the optical absorbance, respectively. Finally, these ZnO/SWCNT hybrid composites are integrated into a heterojunction photovoltaic-based device, using PEDOT:PSS on ITO/glass substrate. The devices show an evident p-n junction behavior in the dark, and a clear I- V curve shift downward when illuminated with an open-circuit voltage of 1.1 V, a short circuit current density of 14.05 μA cm-2, and a fill factor of ˜35%. These results indicate that these composites fabricated via LCLD process could be promising for optoelectronic and energy-harvesting devices.

  18. Biofunctionalization of carbon nanotubes/chitosan hybrids on Ti implants by atom layer deposited ZnO nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yizhou; Liu, Xiangmei; Yeung, Kelvin W. K.; Chu, Paul K.; Wu, Shuilin

    2017-04-01

    One-dimensional (1D) nanostructures of ZnO using atomic layer deposition (ALD) on chitosan (CS) modified carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were first introduced onto the surfaces of biomedical implants. When the content of ZnO is not sufficient, CNTs can strengthen the antibacterial activity against E. coli and S. aureus by 8% and 39%, respectively. CS can improve the cytocompatibility of CNTs and ZnO. The amount of Zn content can be controlled by changing the cycling numbers of ALD processes. This hybrid coating can not only endow medical implants with high self-antibacterial efficacy against Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) of over 73% and 98%, respectively, but also regulate the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of osteoblasts by controlling the amount of ZnO.

  19. Electronic detection of Drechslera sp. fungi in charentais melon ( Cucumis melo Naudin) using carbon-nanostructure-based sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenshields, Márcia W C C; Mamo, Messai A; Coville, Neil J; Spina, Andréa P; Rosso, Diogo Filipe; Latocheski, Elaine C; Destro, João Guilherme; Pimentel, Ida C; Hümmelgen, Ivo A

    2012-10-24

    The development of chemical sensor technology in recent years has stimulated an interest regarding the use of characteristic volatiles and odors as a rapid and early indication of deterioration in fruit quality. The fungal infestation by Drechslera sp. in melons is a severe problem, and we demonstrate that electronic sensors based on carbon nanostructures are able to detect the presence of these fungi in melon. The responses of sensor conductance G and capacitance C at 27 kHz were measured and used to calculate their ΔG and ΔC variation over the full melon ripening process under shelf conditions with proliferation of Drechslera sp. fungi. The sensor response showed that these fungi can be electronically identified in charentais melon, constituting an effective and cheap test procedure to differentiate between infected and uninfected melon.

  20. Assessing manganese nanostructures based carbon nanotubes composite for the highly sensitive determination of vitamin C in pharmaceutical formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hameed, Sadaf; Munawar, Anam; Khan, Waheed S; Mujahid, Adnan; Ihsan, Ayesha; Rehman, Asma; Ahmed, Ishaq; Bajwa, Sadia Z

    2017-03-15

    This work is the first report describing the development of a novel three dimensional manganese nanostructures based carbon nanotubes (CNTs-Mn NPs) composite, for the determination of ascorbic acid (vitamin C) in pharmaceutical formulation. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were used as a conductive skeleton to anchor highly electrolytic manganese nanoparticles (Mn NPs), which were prepared by a hydrothermal method. Scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy revealed the presence of Mn Nps of 20-25nm, anchored along the whole length of CNTs, in the form of patches having a diameter of 50-500nm. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy confirmed the surface modification of CNTs by amine groups, whereas dynamic light scattering established the presence of positive charge on the prepared nanocomposite. The binding events were studied by monitoring cyclic voltammetry signals and the developed nanosensor exhibited highly sensitive response, demonstrating improved electrochemical activity towards ascorbic acid. Linear dependence of the peak current on the square root of scan rates (R 2 =0.9785), demonstrated that the oxidation of ascorbic acid by the designed nanostructures is a diffusion control mechanism. Furthermore, linear range was found to be 0.06-4.0×10 -3 M, and nanosensor displayed an excellent detection limit of 0.1µM (S/N=3). This developed nanosensor was successfully applied for the determination of vitamin C in pharmaceutical formulation. Besides, the results of the present study indicate that such a sensing platform may offer a different pathway to utilize manganese nanoparticles based CNTs composite for the determination of other bio-molecules as well. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Confirming the key role of Ar+ ion bombardment in the growth feature of nanostructured carbon materials by PECVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yulin; Lin, Jinghuang; Jia, Henan; Chen, Shulin; Qi, Junlei; Qu, Chaoqun; Cao, Jian; Feng, Jicai; Fei, Weidong

    2017-11-01

    In order to confirm the key role of Ar+ ion bombardment in the growth feature of nanostructured carbon materials (NCMs), here we report a novel strategy to create different Ar+ ion states in situ in plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) by separating catalyst film from the substrate. Different bombardment environments on either side of the catalyst film were created simultaneously to achieve multi-layered structural NCMs. Results showed that Ar+ ion bombardment is crucial and complex for the growth of NCMs. Firstly, Ar+ ion bombardment has both positive and negative effects on carbon nanotubes (CNTs). On one hand, Ar+ ions can break up the graphic structure of CNTs and suppress thin CNT nucleation and growth. On the other hand, Ar+ ion bombardment can remove redundant carbon layers on the surface of large catalyst particles which is essential for thick CNTs. As a result, the diameter of the CNTs depends on the Ar+ ion state. As for vertically oriented few-layer graphene (VFG), Ar+ ions are essential and can even convert the CNTs into VFG. Therefore, by combining with the catalyst separation method, specific or multi-layered structural NCMs can be obtained by PECVD only by changing the intensity of Ar+ ion bombardment, and these special NCMs are promising in many fields.

  2. Combined sonochemical/CVD method for preparation of nanostructured carbon-doped TiO2 thin film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasoulnezhad, Hossein; Kavei, Ghassem; Ahmadi, Kamran; Rahimipour, Mohammad Reza

    2017-06-01

    The present work reports the successful synthesis of the nanostructured carbon-doped TiO2 thin films on glass substrate by combination of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and ultrasonic methods, for the first time. In this method the ultrasound waves act as nebulizer for converting of sonochemically prepared TiO2 sol to the mist particles. These mist particles were thermally decomposed in subsequent CVD chamber at 320 °C to produce the carbon-doped TiO2 thin films. The obtained thin films were characterized by means of X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques. The results show that the prepared thin films have anatase crystal structure and nanorod morphology, which calcination of them at 800 °C results in the conversion of nanorods to nanoparticles. In addition, the prepared samples have high transparency, monodispersity and homogeneity. The presence of the carbon element in the structure of the thin films causes the narrowing of the band-gap energy of TiO2 to about 2.8 eV, which results in the improvement of visible light absorption capabilities of the thin film.

  3. Carbon-coated Si nanoparticles/reduced graphene oxide multilayer anchored to nanostructured current collector as lithium-ion battery anode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zhengjiao; Guo, Pengqian; Liu, Boli; Xie, Wenhe; Liu, Dequan; He, Deyan, E-mail: hedy@lzu.edu.cn

    2017-02-28

    Silicon is the most promising anode material for the next-generation lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). However, the large volume change during lithiation/delithiation and low intrinsic conductivity hamper its electrochemical performance. Here we report a well-designed LIB anode in which carbon-coated Si nanoparticles/reduced graphene oxide (Si/rGO) multilayer was anchored to nanostructured current collector with stable mechanical support and rapid electron conduction. Furthermore, we improved the integral stability of the electrode through introducing amorphous carbon. The designed anode exhibits superior cyclability, its specific capacity remains above 800 mAh g{sup −1} after 350 cycles at a current density of 2.0 A g{sup −1}. The excellent electrochemical performance can be attributed to the fact that the Si/rGO multilayer is reinforced by the nanostructured current collector and the formed amorphous carbon, which can maintain the structural and electrical integrities of the electrode.

  4. One-Pot Synthesis of Carbon-Coated Nanostructured Iron Oxide on Few-Layer Graphene for Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhenyu; Madej, Edyta; Wiktor, Christian; Sinev, Ilya; Fischer, Roland A; van Tendeloo, Gustaaf; Muhler, Martin; Schuhmann, Wolfgang; Ventosa, Edgar

    2015-11-02

    Nanostructure engineering has been demonstrated to improve the electrochemical performance of iron oxide based electrodes in Li-ion batteries (LIBs). However, the synthesis of advanced functional materials often requires multiple steps. Herein, we present a facile one-pot synthesis of carbon-coated nanostructured iron oxide on few-layer graphene through high-pressure pyrolysis of ferrocene in the presence of pristine graphene. The ferrocene precursor supplies both iron and carbon to form the carbon-coated iron oxide, while the graphene acts as a high-surface-area anchor to achieve small metal oxide nanoparticles. When evaluated as a negative-electrode material for LIBs, our composite showed improved electrochemical performance compared to commercial iron oxide nanopowders, especially at fast charge/discharge rates. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Synthesis of nanostructured and microstructured ZnO and Zn(OH)2 on activated carbon cloth by hydrothermal and microwave-assisted chemical bath deposition methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosayebi, Elham; Azizian, Saeid; Hajian, Ali

    2015-05-01

    Nanostructured and microstructured ZnO and Zn(OH)2 loaded on activated carbon cloth were synthesized by microwave-assisted chemical bath deposition and hydrothermal methods. By hydrothermal method the deposited sample on carbon fiber is pure ZnO with dandelion-like nanostructures. By microwave-assisted chemical bath method the structure and composition of deposited sample depends on solution pH. At pH = 9.8 the deposited sample on carbon fiber is pure ZnO with flower-like microstructure; but at pH = 10.8 the sample is a mixture of ZnO and Zn(OH)2 with flower-like and rhombic microstructures, respectively. The mechanism of crystal grow by microwave-assisted chemical bath method was investigated by SEM method at both pH.

  6. Synergetic effect between adsorption and photodegradation on nanostructured TiO{sub 2}/activated carbon fiber felt porous composites for toluene removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Min; Lu, Bin; Ke, Qin-Fei; Guo, Ya-Jun; Guo, Ya-Ping, E-mail: ypguo@shnu.edu.cn

    2017-07-05

    Highlights: • Nanostructured TiO{sub 2}/activated carbon fiber felt porous composites are prepared. • Nanostructures TiO{sub 2} particles on fibers are constructed by nanocrystals. • They have synergetic adsorption-photocatalytic activities for toluene removal. • The adsorption efficiency reaches 98% at toluene concentrations <1150 ppm. • Carbon fibers can hinder the recombination of electron-hole pairs on TiO{sub 2}. - Abstract: The low quantum efficiency and limited adsorption efficiency of TiO{sub 2} makes it only fit for the removal of VOCs with low concentrations. Herein, we for the first time fabricated nanostructured TiO{sub 2}/activated carbon fiber felt (TiO{sub 2}/ACFF) porous composites by the in situ deposition of TiO{sub 2} microspheres on the carbon fibers in ACFF. Interestingly, the TiO{sub 2} microspheres exhibit hierarchical nanostructures constructed by nanocrystals as building blocks. The TiO{sub 2}/ACFF porous composites possess excellent adsorption and photodegradation properties for toluene because of the synergetic effects between the nanostructured TiO{sub 2} and ACFF. The adsorption efficiencies of the TiO{sub 2}/ACFF porous composites reach approximately 98% at the toluene concentration (<1150 ppm) and approximately 77% even at the high concentration of 6900 ppm. Moreover, the ACFF in the TiO{sub 2}/ACFF porous composites significantly enhances photocatalytic property for toluene by hindering the recombination of electron-hole pairs, reducing the TiO{sub 2} band gap energy (E{sub g}) to 2.95 eV and accelerating toluene adsorption. At the toluene concentrations of 230 ppm and 460 ppm, the photocatalytic oxidation efficiency of toluene into CO{sub 2} arrives at 100% and 81.5%, respectively. Therefore, the TiO{sub 2}/ACFF porous composites with synergetic adsorption and photocatalytic activities have great potentials for toluene removal.

  7. Investigation of the properties of carbon-base nanostructures doped YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7−δ} high temperature superconductor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dadras, Sedigheh, E-mail: dadras@alzahra.ac.ir; Ghavamipour, Mahshid

    2016-03-01

    In this research, we have investigated the effects of three samples of carbon-base nanostructures (carbon nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes and silicon carbide nanoparticles) doping on the properties of Y{sub 1}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7−δ} (YBCO) high temperature superconductor. The pure and doped YBCO samples were synthesized by sol–gel method and characterized by resistivity versus temperature (ρ–T), current versus voltage (I–V), through X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis. The results confirmed that for all the samples, the orthorhombic phase of YBCO compound is formed. We found that the pinning energy and critical current density of samples increase by adding carbon nanostructures to YBCO compound. Also critical temperature is improved by adding carbon nanotubes to YBCO compound, while it does not change much for carbon and silicon carbide nanoparticles doped compounds. Furthermore, the samples were characterized by UV–vis spectroscopy in 300 K and the band gap of the samples was determined. We found that the carbon nanotubes doping decreases YBCO band gap in normal state from 1.90 eV to 1.68 eV, while carbon and SiC nanoparticles doping increases it to 2.20 and 3.37 eV respectively.

  8. Nanostructured nitrogen-doped mesoporous carbon derived from polyacrylonitrile for advanced lithium sulfur batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ying; Zhao, Xiaohui; Chauhan, Ghanshyam S. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Research Institute for Green Energy Convergence Technology, Gyeongsang National University, 501 Jinju-daero, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Jou-Hyeon, E-mail: jhahn@gnu.ac.kr [Department of Chemical Engineering and Research Institute for Green Energy Convergence Technology, Gyeongsang National University, 501 Jinju-daero, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Materials Engineering and Convergence Technology and RIGET, Gyeongsang National University, 501 Jinju-daero, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-01

    Graphical abstract: Well-ordered nitrogen-doped mesoporous carbon materials were prepared by in-situ polymerization of polyacrylonitrile in SBA-15 template. The composite of sulfur and nitrogen-doped carbon was successfully used as a cathode material for lithium sulfur battery. - Highlights: • N-doped mesoporous carbons were prepared with PAN as carbon source. • Highly ordered pore system facilitates sulfur loading. • Ladder-type carbon matrix provides good structural stability for confining sulfur. • N-doping ensures an improved absorbability of soluble polysulfides. - Abstract: Nitrogen doping in carbon matrix can effectively improve the wettability of electrolyte and increase electric conductivity of carbon by ensuring fast transfer of ions. We synthesized a series of nitrogen-doped mesoporous carbons (CPANs) via in situ polymerization of polyacrylonitrile (PAN) in SBA-15 template followed by carbonization at different temperatures. Carbonization results in the formation of ladder structure which enhances the stability of the matrix. In this study, CPAN-800, carbon matrix synthesized by the carbonization at 800 °C, was found to possess many desirable properties such as high specific surface area and pore volume, moderate nitrogen content, and highly ordered mesoporous structure. Therefore, it was used to prepare S/CPAN-800 composite as cathode material in lithium sulfur (Li-S) batteries. The S/CPAN-800 composite was proved to be an excellent material for Li-S cells which delivered a high initial discharge capacity of 1585 mAh g{sup −1} and enhanced capacity retention of 862 mAh g{sup −1} at 0.1 C after 100 cycles.

  9. Optimization of modified carbon paste electrode with multiwalled carbon nanotube/ionic liquid/cauliflower-like gold nanostructures for simultaneous determination of ascorbic acid, dopamine and uric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afraz, Ahmadreza [Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Bu-Ali Sina University, P.O. Box 65174, Hamedan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rafati, Amir Abbas, E-mail: aa_rafati@basu.ac.ir [Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Bu-Ali Sina University, P.O. Box 65174, Hamedan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Najafi, Mojgan [Department of Materials Engineering, Hamedan University of Technology (HUT), 65169 Hamedan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-11-01

    We describe the modification of a carbon paste electrode (CPE) with multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and an ionic liquid (IL). Electrochemical studies by using a D-optimal mixture design in Design-Expert software revealed an optimized composition of 60% graphite, 14.2% paraffin, 10.8% MWCNT and 15% IL. The optimal modified CPE shows good electrochemical properties that are well matched with model prediction parameters. In the next step, the optimized CPE was modified with gold nanostructures by applying a double-pulse electrochemical technique. The resulting electrode was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. It gives three sharp and well-separated oxidation peaks for ascorbic acid (AA), dopamine (DA), and uric acid (UA). The sensor enables simultaneous determination of AA, DA and UA with linear responses from 0.3 to 285, 0.08 to 200, and 0.1 to 450 μM, respectively, and with 120, 30 and 30 nM detection limits (at an S/N of 3). The method was successfully applied to the determination of AA, DA, and UA in spiked samples of human serum and urine. - Highlights: • New method for simultaneous determination of AA, DA and UA was developed. • MWCNT/ionic liquid/cauliflower-like Au nanostructure was used for CPE modification. • Optimization of electrode composition was done by Design-Expert software. • The pH effect, peak separation mechanism and real samples was thoroughly studied.

  10. FIB and CVD Fabrication of Carbon Nanostructures on Diamond and Quartz Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-29

    Quang Trung Tran, Sung Hong Hahn, Jin Suk Chung, Eun Woo Shin, Eui Jung Kim, Optoelectronic properties of graphene thin films prepared by thermal...91. [50] Boudou JP, Paredes JI , Cuesta A, Martine-Alonso A, Tascon JMD. Oxygen plasma modification of pitch-based isotropic carbon fibres. Carbon

  11. Controllable and Large-Scale Synthesis of Carbon Nanostructures: A Review on Bamboo-Like Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zirui Jia

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Bamboo-like carbon nanotubes are members of the carbon nanotubes (CNTs family, whose structure is made up of separated hollow compartments and bamboo knots. Due to the peculiar structure of the CNTs species, the growth mechanism and related features have been widely investigated. Bamboo-like carbon nanotubes are widely applied in several fields, such as sensors, adsorbents, catalysts, and lithium-ion battery electrodes materials. Different methods have been applied for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes, among them, catalytic chemical vapor deposition has been singled out as the most used procedure due to low cost with a high quality product. The present review is devoted to increasing the literature dealing with the design, synthesis, and characterization of bamboo-like carbon nanotubes grown over different catalysts. Results on the methane dry reforming reaction, hydrocarbon thermal decomposition, special chemical vapor deposition as well as other methods applied to the preparation of bamboo-like carbon nanotubes are discussed. The differences in the carbon deposits between the dry reforming reaction and other reaction methods are compared and possible formation mechanisms of bamboo-like carbon nanotubes are discussed.

  12. The presence of carbon nanostructures in bakery products induces metabolic stress in human mesenchymal stem cells through CYP1A and p53 gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hadi, Ahmed M; Periasamy, Vaiyapuri Subbarayan; Athinarayanan, Jegan; Alshatwi, Ali A

    2016-01-01

    Ingredients commonly present in processed foods are excellent substrates for chemical reactions during modern thermal cooking or processing, which could possibly result in deteriorative carbonization changes mediated by a variety of thermal reactions. Spontaneous self-assembling complexation or polymerization of partially combusted lipids, proteins, and other food macromolecules with synthetic food additives during high temperature food processing or baking (200-250 °C) would result in the formation of carbon nanostructures (CNs). These unknown nanostructures may produce adverse physiological effects or potential health risks. The present work aimed to identify and characterize the nanostructures from the crusts of bread. Furthermore, a toxicological risk assessment of these nanostructures was conducted using human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) as a model for cellular uptake and metabolic oxidative stress, with special reference to induced adipogenesis. CNs isolated from bread crusts were characterized using transmission electron microscopy. The in vitro risk assessment of the CNs was carried out in hMSCs using an MTT assay, cell morphological assessment, a reactive oxygen species assay, a mitochondrial trans-membrane potential assay, cell cycle progression assessment and gene expression analysis. Our results revealed that bread crusts contain CNs, which may form during the bread-making process. The in vitro results indicate that carbon nanostructures have moderately toxic effects in the hMSCs at a high dose (400 μg/mL). The mitochondrial trans-membrane potentials and intracellular ROS levels of the hMSCs were altered at this dose. The levels of the mRNA transcripts of metabolic stress-responsive genes such as CAT, GSR, GSTA4, CYP1A and p53 were significantly altered in response to CNs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Biofunctionalization of carbon nanotubes/chitosan hybrids on Ti implants by atom layer deposited ZnO nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Yizhou; Liu, Xiangmei [Hubei Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Organic Chemical Materials, Ministry-of-Education Key Laboratory for the Green Preparation and Application of Functional Materials, Hubei Key Laboratory of Polymer Materials, School of Materials Science & Engineering, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China); Yeung, Kelvin W.K. [Division of Spine Surgery, Department of Orthopaedics & Traumatology, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong (China); Chu, Paul K. [Department of Physics & Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Wu, Shuilin, E-mail: shuilin.wu@gmail.com [Hubei Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Organic Chemical Materials, Ministry-of-Education Key Laboratory for the Green Preparation and Application of Functional Materials, Hubei Key Laboratory of Polymer Materials, School of Materials Science & Engineering, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China)

    2017-04-01

    Highlights: • Carbon naonotubes/chitosan/ZnO coating was first constructed on Ti implants. • This system endowed Ti implants with excellent self-antibacterial activity. • The amount of Zn could be precisely controlled by atom layer deposition. • This system could regulate cell behaviors on metallic implants. - Abstract: One-dimensional (1D) nanostructures of ZnO using atomic layer deposition (ALD) on chitosan (CS) modified carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were first introduced onto the surfaces of biomedical implants. When the content of ZnO is not sufficient, CNTs can strengthen the antibacterial activity against E. coli and S. aureus by 8% and 39%, respectively. CS can improve the cytocompatibility of CNTs and ZnO. The amount of Zn content can be controlled by changing the cycling numbers of ALD processes. This hybrid coating can not only endow medical implants with high self-antibacterial efficacy against Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) of over 73% and 98%, respectively, but also regulate the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of osteoblasts by controlling the amount of ZnO.

  14. Spontaneous Synthesis and Electrochemical Characterization of Nanostructured MnO2 on Nitrogen-Incorporated Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Chu Chen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigated the layered manganese dioxide with hydrate (MnO2⋅xH2O deposits onto nitrogen-containing carbon nanotube (CNxNTs as a hierarchical electrode for an energy-storage device. The dense and entangled CNxNTs were directly grown by microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MPECVD on a carbon cloth (CC, and subsequently used as a current collector. By controlling the pH value of KMnO4 precursor solution, and incorporating nitrogen into CNTs as a reducing agent, the MnO2 thin layer was uniformly fabricated on the CNxNTs at room temperature by using a spontaneous reduction method. The role of incorporation nitrogen is not only capable of creating active sites on the CNT surface, but can also donate electrons to reduce MnO4- to MnO2 spontaneously. From the measurements of cyclic voltammograms and galvanostatic charge/discharge, MnO2/CNxNTs/CC composite electrodes illustrated excellent specific capacitance of 589.1 Fg-1. The key factor for high performance could be attributed to the thin-layered MnO2 nanostructure, which resulted in the full utilization of MnO2 deposits. Hence, the hierarchically porous MnO2/CNxNTs/CC electrodes exhibited excellent capacitive behavior for electrochemical capacitor application.

  15. Electrochemical deposition of nanostructured manganese oxide on hierarchically porous graphene-carbon nanotube structure for ultrahigh-performance electrochemical capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shin-Ming; Wang, Yu-Sheng; Yang, Shin-Yi; Liu, Chia-Hong; Chang, Kuo-Hsin; Tien, Hsi-Wen; Wen, Niann-Tsyr; Ma, Chen-Chi M.; Hu, Chi-Chang

    2013-03-01

    A 3D graphene sheet-carbon nanotube (GS-CNT) structure with a good wetting property, high porosity, and large surface area is homogeneously deposited with active amorphous manganese oxide (a-MnOx) by potentiodynamic deposition. The flowery a-MnOx nanostructure with ultra-slender petals (ca. 5-8 nm) on the framework of hierarchically porous GS-CNT matrix not only enables nearly full utilization of a-MnOx but also retains sufficient conductivity and porosity for the high-rate charge-discharge application. The use of a-MnOx on the 3D GS-CNT material produces a specific capacitance of MnOx of 1200 F g-1 which is much-higher than that of a pure a-MnOx electrode (CS,Mn = 233 F g-1). The specific energy and specific power of a-MnOx/GS-CNT are respectively as high as 46.2 Wh kg-1 and 33.2 kW kg-1, revealing that our work conceptually provides a way to produce porous structures composed of graphene, carbon nanotubes, and various electroactive materials for high-performance energy storage devices.

  16. Hydrogenated amorphous carbon films on steel balls and Si substrates: Nanostructural evolutions and their trigging tribological behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongfu; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Xingkai; Shi, Jing; Gao, Kaixiong; Zhang, Bin; Zhang, Junyan

    2017-10-01

    In this study, we prepared hydrogenated amorphous carbon films on steel balls and Si substrates (steel ball- and Si substrate-films) with different deposition time, and discussed their carbon nanostructural evolutions and tribological behaviors. The steel ball-film structure started to be graphite-like structure and then gradually transformed into fullerene-like (FL) structure. The Si substrate-film structure began in FL structure and kept it through the thickness. The difference may be result from the competition between high starting substrate temperature after additional nitriding applied on the steel balls (its supply power is higher than that in the film deposition), and relaxation of compressive stress from energized ion bombardment in film deposition process. The FL structural film friction couples could achieve ultra-low friction in open air. In particular, the Si substrate-film with 3 h, against the steel ball-film with 2 h and 3 h, exhibited super-low friction (∼0.009) and superlong wear life (∼5.5 × 105 cycles). Our result could widen the superlubricity scope from previously high load and velocity, to middle load and velocity.

  17. Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study of the HIV-1 Protease Inhibit ion Using Fullerene and New Fullerene Derivatives of Carbon Nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzegar, Abolfazl; Naghizadeh, Esmail; Zakariazadeh, Mostafa; Azamat, Jafar

    2017-01-01

    The water insolubility of fullerene C60 nanostructure greatly hampers its biological applications as an effective HIV-1 protease inhibitor, which suggests to synthesis new C60 derivatives with different functional polar groups. The new carbon nanostructures of fulleropyrrolidines with one and two polar acetoxyhydroxyl (AcH) groups (C60-A and C60-B, respectively) were constructed to evaluate their interactions and binding affinity into HIV-1 protease active site via theoretical molecular docking and molecular dynamic simulations. Data obviously indicated the higher affinity of fulleropyrrolidines derivatives C60-A and C60-B compared to fullerene C60 in interacting with HIV-1 protease active site cavity. The functional groups in C60 caused better residing of C60 derivatives in the center of active site by changing the spherical shape of C60, constructing different stable H-bonds with supporting the main π interactions between C60 and aromatic Phe53/Arg8 in protease active site. Our finding showed that the functionalization of C60 is essential for both increasing solubility and improving different π interactions of C60 with protease. Also, H-bond forming with AcH functional groups and enzyme active site residues is more important to support the van der Waals interactions between C60 fragment of fulleropyrrolidines and enzyme cavity. Since enzyme possesses aspartic acid residues in active site, C60-B with two AcH groups interacted with the active site more efficiently via additional H-bond relative to C60-A. Finally, the results indicate a possible use of the investigated fulleropyrrolidines derivatives as new HIV-1 protease inhibitors. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  18. Nanostructured TiO2/carbon nanosheet hybrid electrode for high-rate thin-film lithium-ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moitzheim, S; Nimisha, C S; Deng, Shaoren; Cott, Daire J; Detavernier, C; Vereecken, P M

    2014-12-19

    Heterogeneous nanostructured electrodes using carbon nanosheets (CNS) and TiO2 exhibit high electronic and ionic conductivity. In order to realize the chip level power sources, it is necessary to employ microelectronic compatible techniques for the fabrication and characterization of TiO2-CNS thin-film electrodes. To achieve this, vertically standing CNS grown through a catalytic free approach on a TiN/SiO2/Si substrate by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) was used. The substrate-attached CNS is responsible for the sufficient electronic conduction and increased surface-to-volume ratio due to its unique morphology. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) of nanostructured amorphous TiO2 on CNS provides enhanced Li storage capacity, high rate performance and stable cycling. The amount of deposited TiO2 masks the underlying CNS, thereby controlling the accessibility of CNS, which gets reflected in the total electrochemical performance, as revealed by the cyclic voltammetry and charge/discharge measurements. TiO2 thin-films deposited with 300, 400 and 500 ALD cycles on CNS have been studied to understand the kinetics of Li insertion/extraction. A large potential window of operation (3-0.01 V); the excellent cyclic stability, with a capacity retention of 98% of the initial value; and the remarkable rate capability (up to 100 C) are the highlights of TiO2/CNS thin-film anode structures. CNS with an optimum amount of TiO2 coating is proposed as a promising approach for the fabrication of electrodes for chip compatible thin-film Li-ion batteries.

  19. FORMATION OF CARBON NANOSTRUCTURES USING ACETYLENE, ARGON-ACETYLENE AND ARGON-HYDROGEN-ACETYLENE PLASMAS

    OpenAIRE

    Marcinauskas, Liutauras; Grigonis, Alfonsas; Valincius, Vitas

    2013-01-01

    The amorphous carbon films were deposited on silicon-metal substrates by plasma jet chemical vapor deposition (PJCVD) and plasma enchanted CVD (PECVD). PJCVD carbon films have been prepared at atmospheric pressure in argon-acetylene and argon-hydrogen-acetylene plasma mixtures. The films deposited in Ar-C2H2 plasma are attributed to graphite-like carbon films. The formation of the nanocrystalline graphite was obtained in Ar-H2-C2H2 plasma. Addition of the hydrogen gas lead to the ...

  20. Vertical Alignment of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes on Nanostructure Fabricated by Atomic Force Microscope

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lee, Haiwon

    2007-01-01

    This project focused on the behavior of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in the electrophoresis cells and aligned growth of SWCNTs by thermal chemical vapor deposition on selectively deposited metallic nanoparticle...

  1. Self-organized formation of metal-carbon nanostructures by hyperthermal ion deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hannstein, I.K.

    2006-04-26

    The quasi-simultaneous deposition of mass-selected hyperthermal carbon and metal ions results in a variety of interesting film morphologies, depending on the metal used and the deposition conditions. The observed features are of the order of a few nanometres and are therefore interesting for future potential applications in the various fields of nanotechnology. The present study focuses on the structural analysis of amorphous carbon films containing either copper, silver, gold, or iron using amongst others Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy, High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy, and Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy. The film morphologies found are as follows: copper-containing films consist of copper nanoclusters with sizes ranging from about 3 to 9 nm uniformly distributed throughout the amorphous carbon matrix. The cluster size hereby rises with the copper content of the films. The silver containing films decompose into a pure amorphous carbon film with silver agglomerates at the surface. Both, the gold- and the iron-containing films show a multilayer structure of metal-rich layers with higher cluster density separated by metal-depleted amorphous carbon layers. The layer distances are of the order of up to 15 nm in the case of gold-carbon films and 7 nm in the case of iron-carbon films. The formation of theses different structures cannot be treated in the context of conventional self-organization mechanisms basing upon thermal diffusion and equilibrium thermodynamics. Instead, an ion-induced atomic transport, sputtering effects, and the stability of small metal clusters were taken into account in order to model the structure formation processes. A similar multilayer morphology was recently also reported in the literature for metal-carbon films grown by magnetron sputtering techniques. In order to investigate, whether the mechanisms are the same as in the case of the ion beam deposited films described above, first experiments were conducted

  2. Light-Weight Low-Loss Dielectric Polymer Composites Containing Carbon Nanostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-17

    temperature, polyurethane (clear-coat Dupli-Color™ auto paint , O ʹReilly Auto Parts) was spray-coated over the HD-GNRs to provide a robust film. Since the...Wei, M.-H. Electrical, Morphological, and Electromagnetic Interference Shielding Properties of Silver Nanowires and Nanoparticles Conductive...using Ta2O5 nanotubes as a framework to support carbon onion-coated Fe2O3 nanoparticles along the surface of the nanotubes. Carbon onion layers function

  3. Doped carbon nanostructures as metal-free catalysts for oxidative dehydrogenation of light alkanes

    OpenAIRE

    Jenssen, Kaia Andersson

    2014-01-01

    Catalytic reactions are often carried out on various supported metals, these usually being noble metals or metal oxides. Even though metal based catalysts plays a major role in today s industrial processes, they still have several disadvantages, including high cost, proneness to gas poisoning, as well as disadvantageous effect on the environment. Recently, certain carbon nanomaterials have been in the spotlight of several research groups, as carbon has the advantages of wide availability, env...

  4. Nanostructured synthetic carbons obtained by pyrolysis of spherical acrylonitrile/divinylbenzene copolymers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danish J Malik

    Full Text Available Novel carbon materials have been prepared by the carbonization of acrylonitrile (AN/divinylbenzene (DVB suspension porous copolymers having nominal crosslinking degrees in the range of 30-70% and obtained in the presence of various amounts of porogens. The carbons were obtained by pre-oxidation of AN/DVB copolymers at 250-350°C in air followed by pyrolysis at 850°C in an N(2 atmosphere. Both processes were carried out in one furnace and the resulting material needed no further activation. Resulting materials were characterized by XPS and low temperature nitrogen adsorption/desorption. It was found that maximum pyrolysis yield was ca. 50% depending on the oxidation conditions but almost independent of the crosslinking degree of the polymers. Porous structure of the carbons was characterized for the presence of micropores and macropores, when obtained from highly crosslinked polymers or polymers oxidized at 350°C and meso- and macropores in all other cases. The latter pores are prevailing in the structure of carbons obtained from less porous AN/DVB resins. Specific surface area (BET of polymer derived carbons can vary between 440 m(2/g and 250 m(2/g depending on the amount of porogen used in the synthesis of the AN/DVB polymeric precursors.

  5. Nanostructured synthetic carbons obtained by pyrolysis of spherical acrylonitrile/divinylbenzene copolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Danish J; Trochimczuk, Andrzej W; Ronka, Sylwia

    2012-01-01

    Novel carbon materials have been prepared by the carbonization of acrylonitrile (AN)/divinylbenzene (DVB) suspension porous copolymers having nominal crosslinking degrees in the range of 30-70% and obtained in the presence of various amounts of porogens. The carbons were obtained by pre-oxidation of AN/DVB copolymers at 250-350°C in air followed by pyrolysis at 850°C in an N(2) atmosphere. Both processes were carried out in one furnace and the resulting material needed no further activation. Resulting materials were characterized by XPS and low temperature nitrogen adsorption/desorption. It was found that maximum pyrolysis yield was ca. 50% depending on the oxidation conditions but almost independent of the crosslinking degree of the polymers. Porous structure of the carbons was characterized for the presence of micropores and macropores, when obtained from highly crosslinked polymers or polymers oxidized at 350°C and meso- and macropores in all other cases. The latter pores are prevailing in the structure of carbons obtained from less porous AN/DVB resins. Specific surface area (BET) of polymer derived carbons can vary between 440 m(2)/g and 250 m(2)/g depending on the amount of porogen used in the synthesis of the AN/DVB polymeric precursors.

  6. Dechlorination of Environmental Contaminants Using a Hybrid Nanocatalyst: Palladium Nanoparticles Supported on Hierarchical Carbon Nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hema Vijwani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper demonstrates the effectiveness of a new type of hybrid nanocatalyst material that combines the high surface area of nanoparticles and nanotubes with the structural robustness and ease of handling larger supports. The hybrid material is made by fabricating palladium nanoparticles on two types of carbon supports: as-received microcellular foam (Foam and foam with carbon nanotubes anchored on the pore walls (CNT/Foam. Catalytic reductive dechlorination of carbon tetrachloride with these materials has been investigated using gas chromatography. It is seen that while both palladium-functionalized carbon supports are highly effective in the degradation of carbon tetrachloride, the rate of degradation is significantly increased with palladium on CNT/Foam. However, there is scope to increase this rate further if the wettability of these structures can be enhanced in the future. Microstructural and spectroscopic analyses of the fresh and used catalysts have been compared which indicates that there is no change in density or surface chemical states of the catalyst after prolonged use in dechlorination test. This implies that these materials can be used repeatedly and hence provide a simple, powerful, and cost-effective approach for dechlorination of water.

  7. Removal of Heavy Metals from Drinking Water by Magnetic Carbon Nanostructures Prepared from Biomass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Muneeb Ur Rahman Khattak

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Heavy metals contamination of drinking water has significant adverse effects on human health due to their toxic nature. In this study a new adsorbent, magnetic graphitic nanostructures were prepared from watermelon waste. The adsorbent was characterized by different instrumental techniques (surface area analyzer, FTIR, XRD, EDX, SEM, and TG/DTA and was used for the removal of heavy metals (As, Cr, Cu, Pb, and Zn from water. The adsorption parameters were determined for heavy metals adsorption using Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms. The adsorption kinetics and effect of time, pH, and temperature on heavy metal ions were also determined. The best fits were obtained for Freundlich isotherm. The percent adsorption showed a decline at high pH. Best fit was obtained with second-order kinetics model for the kinetics experiments. The values of ΔH° and ΔG° were negative while that of ΔS° was positive. The prepared adsorbent has high adsorption capacities and can be efficiently used for the removal of heavy metals from water.

  8. Self-assembled zinc/copper hydroxide carbonates with tunable hierarchical nanostructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Min; Hu, Ye; Ferrari, Mauro; Xie, Zhaohui

    2011-08-01

    Here, we report a synthetic, polymer-mediated method for the self-assembly of zinc/copper hydroxide carbonate superstructures including 3D hierarchical sunflower-like, urchin-like, alga-like, and rotiform-like zinc hydroxide carbonate (ZHC) microstructures, and hierarchical copper hydroxide carbonate (CHC) microspheres with radiating nanoplates and nanorods. As a capping agent, poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) was found to play an important role in directing the growth and self-assembly of such unique structures. The crystal structure of the products and the resulting hierarchical superstructure morphology, as controlled by the molecular weight and concentration of PVP, were systematically investigated. A possible growth mechanism for the formation of hierarchical superstructures with different morphologies is also proposed.

  9. Boosting electrical conductivity in a gel-derived material by nanostructuring with trace carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canevet, David; Pérez Del Pino, Angel; Amabilino, David B.; Sallé, Marc

    2011-07-01

    An organogelator with two distinct π-functional units is able to incorporate carbon nanotubes into its mesh of fibres in the gel state. The morphology of the material derived from this nanocomposite after evaporation of the solvent is a complex mesh of fibres which is clearly different from the pure gelator. This feature indicates a role of the nanotubes in assisting the formation of a fibre structure in the gel thanks to their interaction with the pyrene units in the organogelator. The nanocomposite conducts electricity once the p-type gelator is doped with iodine vapour. The change in morphology caused by the carbon material increases the conductivity of the material compared with the purely organic conducting system. It is remarkable that this improvement in the physical property is caused by an extremely small proportion of the carbon material (only present at a ratio of 0.1% w/w). The practically unique properties of TTF unit allow measurements with both doped and undoped materials with conducting atomic force microscopy which have demonstrated that the carbon nanotubes are not directly responsible for the increased conductivity.An organogelator with two distinct π-functional units is able to incorporate carbon nanotubes into its mesh of fibres in the gel state. The morphology of the material derived from this nanocomposite after evaporation of the solvent is a complex mesh of fibres which is clearly different from the pure gelator. This feature indicates a role of the nanotubes in assisting the formation of a fibre structure in the gel thanks to their interaction with the pyrene units in the organogelator. The nanocomposite conducts electricity once the p-type gelator is doped with iodine vapour. The change in morphology caused by the carbon material increases the conductivity of the material compared with the purely organic conducting system. It is remarkable that this improvement in the physical property is caused by an extremely small proportion of the

  10. Pt–Ru decorated self-assembled TiO2–carbon hybrid nanostructure ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    DMFC with carbon-supported Pt–Ru anode catalyst operating under similar conditions. Keywords. DMFC; anode catalyst; methanol oxidation; Pt–Ru; accelerated durability test. 1. Introduction. Direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) are attractive for portable power applications owing to the easy transportation, storage and ...

  11. Theoretical studies of carbon-based nanostructured materials with applications in hydrogen storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuc, Agnieszka

    2008-07-01

    The main goal of this work is to search for new stable porous carbon-based materials, which have the ability to accommodate and store hydrogen gas. Theoretical and experimental studies suggest a close relation between the nano-scale structure of the material and its storage capacity. In order to design materials with a high storage capacity, a compromise between the size and the shape of the nanopores must be considered. Therefore, a number of different carbon-based materials have been investigated: carbon foams, dislocated graphite, graphite intercalated by C60 molecules, and metal-organic frameworks. The structures of interest include experimentally well-known as well as hypothetical systems. The studies were focused on the determination of important properties and special features, which may result in high storage capacities. Although the variety of possible pure carbon structures and metal-organic frameworks is almost infinite, the materials described in this work possess the main structural characteristics, which are important for gas storage. (orig.)

  12. Water-Dispersible Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes and Novel Hybrid Nanostructures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pham, Tuan Anh; Son, Se Mo; Jeong, Yeon Tae

    2010-01-01

    Water-dispersible multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) were successfully prepared by the chemical grafting of acylated MWNTs with adenosine. The MWNTs were first purified and oxidized in order to obtain carboxylic acid funcionalized MWNTs, which was further acylated with thionyl chloride to give

  13. Carbon nanostructures modified LiFePO4 cathodes for lithium ion battery applications: optimized porosity and composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Lama; Singh Lalia, Boor; Hashaikeh, Raed

    2016-12-01

    Lithium iron phosphate (LiFePO4) battery cathode was fabricated without using any metallic current collector and polymeric binder. Carbon nanostructures (CNS) were used as microbinders for LiFePO4 particles and at the same time as a 3D current collector. A facile and cost effective method of fabricating composite cathodes of CNS and LiFePO4 was developed. Thick electrodes with high loading of active material (20-25 mg cm-2) were obtained that are almost 2-3 folds higher than commercial electrodes. SEM images confirm that the 3D CNS conductive network encapsulated the LiFePO4 particles homogenously facilitating the charge transfer at the electrode-CNS interface. The composition, scan rate and porosity of the paper-like cathode were sequentially varied and their influence was systematically monitored by means of linear sweep cyclic voltammetry and AC electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Addition of CNS improved the electrode’s bulk electronic conductivity, mechanical integrity, surface area and double layer capacitance, yet compromised the charge transfer resistance at the electrode-electrolyte interface. Based on a range of the tested binder-free electrodes, this study proposes that electrodes with 20 wt% CNS having 49 ± 2.5% porosity had realized best improvements of two folds and four folds in the electronic conductivity and diffusion coefficient, respectively.

  14. Symmetrical MnO2-carbon nanotube-textile nanostructures for wearable pseudocapacitors with high mass loading

    KAUST Repository

    Hu, Liangbing

    2011-11-22

    While MnO2 is a promising material for pseudocapacitor applications due to its high specific capacity and low cost, MnO2 electrodes suffer from their low electrical and ionic conductivities. In this article, we report a structure where MnO2 nanoflowers were conformally electrodeposited onto carbon nanotube (CNT)-enabled conductive textile fibers. Such nanostructures effectively decrease the ion diffusion and charge transport resistance in the electrode. For a given areal mass loading, the thickness of MnO2 on conductive textile fibers is much smaller than that on a flat metal substrate. Such a porous structure also allows a large mass loading, up to 8.3 mg/cm2, which leads to a high areal capacitance of 2.8 F/cm2 at a scan rate of 0.05 mV/s. Full cells were demonstrated, where the MnO2-CNT-textile was used as a positive electrode, reduced MnO2-CNT-textile as a negative electrode, and 0.5 M Na2SO4 in water as the electrolyte. The resulting pseudocapacitor shows promising results as a low-cost energy storage solution and an attractive wearable power. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  15. Nanostructured Black Phosphorus/Ketjenblack–Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes Composite as High Performance Anode Material for Sodium-Ion Batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Gui-Liang; Chen, Zonghai; Zhong, Gui-Ming [Collaborative; Liu, Yuzi; Yang, Yong [Collaborative; Ma, Tianyuan [Materials; Ren, Yang; Zuo, Xiaobing; Wu, Xue-Hang [Collaborative; Zhang, Xiaoyi; Amine, Khalil

    2016-05-04

    Sodium-ion batteries are promising alternatives to lithium-ion batteries for large-scale applications. However, the low capacity and poor rate capability of existing anodes for sodium-ion batteries are bottlenecks for future developments. Here, we report a high performance nanostructured anode material for sodium-ion batteries that is fabricated by high energy ball milling to form black phosphorus/Ketjenblack–multiwalled carbon nanotubes (BPC) composite. With this strategy, the BPC composite with a high phosphorus content (70 wt %) could deliver a very high initial Coulombic efficiency (>90%) and high specific capacity with excellent cyclability at high rate of charge/discharge (~1700 mAh g–1 after 100 cycles at 1.3 A g–1 based on the mass of P). In situ electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, synchrotron high energy X-ray diffraction, ex situ small/wide-angle X-ray scattering, high resolution transmission electronic microscopy, and nuclear magnetic resonance were further used to unravel its superior sodium storage performance. The scientific findings gained in this work are expected to serve as a guide for future design on high performance anode material for sodium-ion batteries.

  16. Nano-structural characteristics of carbon nanotube-polymer composite films for high-amplitude optoacoustic generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baac, Hyoung Won; Ok, Jong G; Lee, Taehwa; Guo, L Jay

    2015-09-14

    We demonstrate nano-structural characteristics of carbon nanotube (CNT)-polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) composite films that can be used as highly efficient and robust ultrasound transmitters for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. An inherent architecture of the nano-composite provides unique thermal, optical, and mechanical properties that are accommodated not just for efficient energy conversion but also for extraordinary robustness against pulsed laser ablation. First, we explain a thermoacoustic transfer mechanism within the nano-composite. CNT morphologies are examined to determine a suitable arrangement for heat transfer to the surrounding PDMS. Next, we introduce an approach to enhance optical extinction of the composite films, which uses shadowed deposition of a thin Au layer through an as-grown CNT network. Finally, the transmitter robustness is quantified in terms of laser-induced damage threshold. This reveals that the CNT-PDMS films can withstand an order-of-magnitude higher optical fluence (and extinction) than a Cr film used as a reference. Such robustness is crucial to increase the maximum-available optical energy for optoacoustic excitation and pressure generation. All of these structure-originated characteristics manifest the CNT-PDMS composite films as excellent optoacoustic transmitters for high-amplitude and high-frequency ultrasound generation.

  17. Optimizing the Binding Energy of Hydrogen on Nanostructured Carbon Materials through Structure Control and Chemical Doping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jie Liu

    2011-02-01

    The DOE Hydrogen Sorption Center of Excellence (HSCoE) was formed in 2005 to develop materials for hydrogen storage systems to be used in light-duty vehicles. The HSCoE and two related centers of excellence were created as follow-on activities to the DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy’s (EERE’s) Hydrogen Storage Grand Challenge Solicitation issued in FY 2003. The Hydrogen Sorption Center of Excellence (HSCoE) focuses on developing high-capacity sorbents with the goal to operate at temperatures and pressures approaching ambient and be efficiently and quickly charged in the tank with minimal energy requirements and penalties to the hydrogen fuel infrastructure. The work was directed at overcoming barriers to achieving DOE system goals and identifying pathways to meet the hydrogen storage system targets. To ensure that the development activities were performed as efficiently as possible, the HSCoE formed complementary, focused development clusters based on the following four sorption-based hydrogen storage mechanisms: 1. Physisorption on high specific surface area and nominally single element materials 2. Enhanced H2 binding in Substituted/heterogeneous materials 3. Strong and/or multiple H2 binding from coordinated but electronically unsatruated metal centers 4. Weak Chemisorption/Spillover. As a member of the team, our group at Duke studied the synthesis of various carbon-based materials, including carbon nanotubes and microporous carbon materials with controlled porosity. We worked closely with other team members to study the effect of pore size on the binding energy of hydrogen to the carbon –based materials. Our initial project focus was on the synthesis and purification of small diameter, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with well-controlled diameters for the study of their hydrogen storage properties as a function of diameters. We developed a chemical vapor deposition method that synthesized gram quantities of carbon nanotubes with

  18. Improvement in color properties of copper mesh electrodes via electrophoretic coating with nano-structured carbon materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Young-Jin; Kim, Bu-Jong; Park, Jin-Seok

    2017-03-01

    In this study, the effects of coating with nano-structured carbon materials, such as carbon nanotube (CNT) and graphene, on the characteristics of transparent conductive electrodes based on copper (Cu) meshes, particularly on the visibility related to their color properties, were examined. The electrical sheet resistance of the Cu meshes remained almost unchanged regardless of the coating with CNT and graphene. Through the electrophoretic deposition method, the CNT and graphene layers were selectively used to coat only the regions where Cu mesh patterns had been formed, which helped minimize the transmittance loss caused by the coating with CNT and graphene. The reflectance of the Cu mesh was substantially reduced by the coating with CNT and graphene, meaning that the CNT or graphene coating layer played the role of suppressing the visible light reflected from the Cu mesh. In addition, the reflectance reduction effect was greater when the Cu mesh was coated with CNT rather than with graphene, which was attributed to the difference in particle size between the CNT suspension and the graphene suspension. Furthermore, the chromatic parameters (e.g., redness, yellowness) of the Cu meshes approached almost zero as the thickness of the CNT or graphene coating layer increased, meaning that the Cu meshes became nearly colorless, while the primitive Cu mesh was tinged with a red-orange color. The experiment results presented in this study verified that the combined technology with CNT and graphene coating contributed to the amelioration of the poor visibility caused by the high reflectance and color-tinted nature of the conventional Cu mesh.

  19. An evaluation of microwave-assisted fusion and microwave-assisted acid digestion methods for determining elemental impurities in carbon nanostructures using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry

    KAUST Repository

    Patole, Shashikant P.

    2015-10-21

    It is common for as-prepared carbon nanotube (CNT) and graphene samples to contain remnants of the transition metals used to catalyze their growth; contamination may also leave other trace elemental impurities in the samples. Although a full quantification of impurities in as-prepared samples of carbon nanostructures is difficult, particularly when trace elements are intercalated or encapsulated within a protective layer of graphitic carbon, reliable information is essential for reasons such as quantifying the adulteration of physico-chemical properties of the materials and for evaluating environmental issues. Here, we introduce a microwave-based fusion method to degrade single- and double-walled CNTs and graphene nanoplatelets into a fusion flux thereby thoroughly leaching all metallic impurities. Subsequent dissolution of the fusion product in diluted hydrochloric and nitric acid allowed us to identify their trace elemental impurities using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. Comparisons of the results from the proposed microwave-assisted fusion method against those of a more classical microwave-assisted acid digestion approach suggest complementarity between the two that ultimately could lead to a more reliable and less costly determination of trace elemental impurities in carbon nanostructured materials. Graphical abstract A method for the complete digestion of carbon nanostructures has been demonstrated. Photographs (on the left side) show zirconium crucibles containing SWCNTs with flux of Na2CO3 and K2CO3, before and after microwave fusion; (on the right side) the appearance of the final solutions containing dissolved samples, from microwave-assisted fusion and microwave-assisted acid digestion. These solutions were used for determining the trace elemental impurities by ICP‒OES.

  20. Transformation of graphene flakes into carbon nanostructures by γ-irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiagulskyi, S. I.; Vasin, A. V.; Rusavsky, A. V.; Lytvyn, P. M.; Nikolenko, A. S.; Strelchuk, V. V.; Stubrov, Yu Yu; Gomeniuk, Yu Yu; Slobodian, O. M.; Lysenko, V. S.; Poroshin, V. N.; Povarchuk, V. Yu; Nazarov, A. N.

    2017-04-01

    In this paper the gamma irradiation effect on graphene layers is investigated. A simple method of synthesis from a solid-source bilayer (SiC/Ni) precursor has been used for the production of graphene flakes, both single-layer and multilayer. Samples with graphene flakes on the Ni surface were subjected to gamma irradiation in vacuum and in air under ambient atmospheric conditions. After a dose of 36 kGy, a variety of new carbon structures were observed on the surface of multilayer graphene flakes. This paper summarizes our thorough studies of the special features of these new carbon formations, including our study of the initial film morphology using optical and electron scanning microscopy, micro-Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy and Kelvin probe force microscopy.

  1. Platinum nanoparticles decorated dendrite-like gold nanostructure on glassy carbon electrodes for enhancing electrocatalysis performance to glucose oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia, Hongmei [Hubei Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Organic Chemical Materials, Ministry-of-Education Key Laboratory for the Green Preparation and Application of Functional Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hubei University, No. 368 Youyi Avenue, Wuchang, Wuhan 430062 (China); Chang, Gang, E-mail: changgang@hubu.edu.cn [Hubei Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Organic Chemical Materials, Ministry-of-Education Key Laboratory for the Green Preparation and Application of Functional Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hubei University, No. 368 Youyi Avenue, Wuchang, Wuhan 430062 (China); Lei, Ming [State Key Laboratory of Information Photonics and Optical Communications, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Beijing 100876 (China); He, Hanping [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineer, Hubei University, Youyi Road 368, Wuchang, Wuhan, Hubei 430062 (China); Liu, Xiong; Shu, Honghui; Xia, Tiantian; Su, Jie [Hubei Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Organic Chemical Materials, Ministry-of-Education Key Laboratory for the Green Preparation and Application of Functional Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hubei University, No. 368 Youyi Avenue, Wuchang, Wuhan 430062 (China); He, Yunbin, E-mail: ybhe@hubu.edu.cn [Hubei Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Organic Chemical Materials, Ministry-of-Education Key Laboratory for the Green Preparation and Application of Functional Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hubei University, No. 368 Youyi Avenue, Wuchang, Wuhan 430062 (China)

    2016-10-30

    Highlights: • Pt/DGNs/GC composites were obtained via a clean and facile method without any templates, surfactants, or stabilizers. • Controlling chemical reduction deposition time, the amount of platinum nanoparticles on Au surface could be regulated, which further tuned electrocatalytic properties toward glucose oxidation. • The obtained Pt/DGNs/GC composites with high electrochemical active surface area (ECSA) show superior electrocatalytic activity to glucose. • The sensor based on Pt/DGNs/GC exhibited excellent sensitivity, selectivity and stability for nonenzymatic glucose detection. - Abstract: Platinum nanoparticles decorated dendrite-like gold nanostructure, bimetal composite materials on glassy carbon electrode (Pt/DGNs/GC) for enhancing electrocatalysis to glucose oxidation was designed and successfully fabricated by a facile two-step deposition method without any templates, surfactants, or stabilizers. Dendrite-like gold nanostructure was firstly deposited on the GC electrode via the potentiostatic method, and then platinum nanoparticles were decorated on the surface of gold substrate through chemical reduction deposition. X-ray diffraction (XRD), field-emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) were applied to characterize the evolution of morphology and structure of the as-prepared Pt/DGNs/GC. Based on electrochemical measurements such as cyclic voltammetry, linear voltammetry and chronoamperometry, Pt/DGNs/GC exhibited significantly enhanced electrocatalytic performance to glucose oxidation compared those of pure dendrite-like Au nanoparticles in our previous report. Controlling chemical reduction deposition time, the amount of platinum nanoparticles on Au surface could be regulated, which further tuned electrocatalytic properties toward glucose oxidation. The dendrite-like gold surface partially covered by platinum nanoparticles dramatically enhanced the electrocatalytic performance for the

  2. Theoretical Studies of Gas Phase Elementary and Carbon Nanostructure Growth Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-19

    photodissociation reactions of ketene, methylamine, formic acid , methyl ethyl ketone, acetone and NO3. For instance, for NO3, a totally unknown...to photodissociation reactions of ketene, methylamine, formic acid , methyl ethyl ketone, acetone and NO3. For instance, for NO3, a totally unknown...K. R. S. Chandrakumar, A. J. Page, S. Irle and K. Morokuma, Carbon Coating Precedes SWCNT Nucleation on Silicon Nanoparticles : Insights from QM/MD

  3. Elucidating How Surface Functionalization of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Affects Nanostructured MWCNT/Titania Hybrid Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Fu Yang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The new class of multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT/titania nanocomposites was prepared using a sol-gel technique. The addition of titania to MWCNTs has the potential to provide new capability for the development of electrical devices by taking advantage of the favorable electric characteristics of MWCNTs. MWCNTs were first functionalized with carboxyl, acyl chloride, amine, and hydroxyl groups and were then dispersed in a tetraisopropyl titanate (TIPT solution via ultrasonic processing. After gelation, well-dispersed titania in the MWCNT/titania nanocomposites was obtained. Functionalized MWCNTs with varied functional groups were proved by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR. For the nanocomposites, the degree of the sol-gel process were proved by Raman spectroscopy and wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD. Furthermore, the morphology of the MWCNT/titania nanocomposites was observed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM. In the sol-gel process, the functionalized MWCNTs with carboxyl, acyl chloride, amine, and hydroxyl groups have resulted in the carbon nanotube-graft-titania nanocomposites with a network structure of titania between the carbon nanotubes.

  4. Dual Functional Core-Shell Fluorescent Ag2S@Carbon Nanostructure for Selective Assay of E. coli O157:H7 and Bactericidal Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ning; Wei, Xing; Zheng, An-Qi; Yang, Ting; Chen, Ming-Li; Wang, Jian-Hua

    2017-03-24

    A dual functional fluorescent core-shell Ag 2 S@Carbon nanostructure is prepared by a hydrothermally assisted multi-amino synthesis approach with folic acid (FA), polyethylenimine (PEI), and mannoses (Mans) as carbon and nitrogen sources (FA-PEI-Mans-Ag 2 S nanocomposite shortly as Ag 2 S@C). The nanostructure exhibits strong fluorescent emission at λ ex /λ em = 340/450 nm with a quantum yield of 12.57 ± 0.52%. Ag 2 S@C is bound to E. coli O157:H7 via strong interaction with the Mans moiety in Ag 2 S@C with FimH proteins on the fimbriae tip in E. coli O157:H7. Fluorescence emission from Ag 2 S@C/E. coli conjugate is closely related to the content of E. coli O157:H7. Thus, a novel procedure for fluorescence assay of E. coli O157:H7 is developed, offering a detection limit of 330 cfu mL -1 . Meanwhile, the Ag 2 S@C nanostructure exhibits excellent antibacterial performance against E. coli O157:H7. A 99.9% sterilization rate can be readily achieved for E. coli O157:H7 at a concentration of 10 6 -10 7 cfu mL -1 with 3.3 or 10 μg mL -1 of Ag 2 S@C with an interaction time of 5 or 0.5 min, respectively.

  5. Vertical Alignment of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes on Nanostructure Fabricated by Atomic Force Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-16

    Technology, and Entrepreneurship , NST-4.3, San Diego, CA, August 2008. [10] J. E. Seo, T. J. Lee, K. W. Oh, M. M. Sung, J. W. Lee, W. Yi, H. Lee...T. Chen and J.-I, Chyi, Appl . Phys. Lett. 84, 2919 (2004). [30] J. L. Sauvajol, E. Anglaret, S. Rols and L. Alvarez, Car- bon 40, 1697 (2002). [31...Elastic strain of freely suspended single-wall carbon nanotube ropes. Appl Phys Lett. 1999;74(25):3803-5. [2] Tombler TW, Zhou C, Alexseyev L, Kong

  6. Recent progress on the synthesis and applications of carbon based nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajavel, K; Minitha, C R; Ranjith, K S; Rajendra Kumar, R T

    2012-06-01

    This article reviews the latest developments in the synthesis of Graphene, Carbon nanotubes and graphene/CNT based devices based on patents, patent applications and articles published in the last two years. A brief introduction about CNT and Graphene is presented, followed by the latest techniques and advanced processing for the large scale synthesis of Graphene and CNTs. Furthermore, a brief account of emerging devices based on applications of CNTs and graphene not limited to sensors, high speed electronics, energy harvesting and storage applications are presented.

  7. Optical multistability in 1D photonic crystal doped with carbon-nanotube quantum dot nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solookinejad, Gh; Payravi, M.; Jabbari, M.; Nafar, M.; Ahmadi Sangachin, E.

    2017-12-01

    The optical bistability (OB) and multistability (OM) in one-dimensional photonic crystals doped with carbon-nanotube quantum dots (CNT QDs) is theoretically investigated. Our investigations show that due to spin–orbit coupling in CNT QDs the threshold of optical bistability can be adjusted. Also, the switching from OB to OM, or vice versa, can be achieved by controlling the transverse magnetic field. Our proposed model can be used as a suitable structure based on CNT QDs for realizing all-optical switching devices. Moreover, we realize that the controlling of OB and OM can be done without changing the thickness of the layers.

  8. Ionic liquid for in situ Vis/NIR and Raman spectroelectrochemistry: Doping of carbon nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavan, Ladislav; Dunsch, Lothar

    2003-09-15

    1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate (an ionic liquid) is an advantageous electrolyte for the study of charge-transfer reactions at single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and fullerene peapods (C60@SWCNT). Compared to traditional electrolyte solutions, this medium offers a broader window of electrochemical potentials to be applied, and favorable optical properties for in situ Vis/NIR and Raman spectroelectrochemistry of nano-carbon species. The electrochemistry of both nanotubes and peapods is dominated by their capacitive double-layer charging. Vis/NIR spectroelectrochemistry confirms the charging-induced bleaching of transitions between Van Hove singularities. At high positive potentials, new optical transitions were activated in partly filled valence band. The bleaching of optical transitions is mirrored by the quenching of resonance Raman scattering in the region of tube-related modes. The Raman frequency of the tangential displacement mode of SWCNT shifts to blue upon both anodic and cathodic charging in the ionic liquid. The Raman modes of intratubular C60 exhibit a considerable intensity increase upon anodic doping of peapods.

  9. Peculiarities of obtaining a catalyst for the synthesis of nanostructured carbon materials via thermal decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyachkova, Tatyana; Besperstova, Galina; Burakova, Elena; Rukhov, Artem; Tugolukov, Evgeny

    2017-11-01

    The paper presents the peculiarities of catalysts preparation through thermal decomposition and calcination. We propose methods for the evaluation of reagents solubility and decomposition degree that allow eliminating and adapting (NH4)6Mo7O24.4H2O, which does not meet the reagent solubility requirements contain (NH4)2MoO4, to obtain catalyst used to synthesize carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with a diameter of 5-30 nm via chemical vapor deposition. The density (1510…1515 kg/m3) and electrical conductivity (1.54….1.72 µS/cm) experimentally found for the initial solution make it possible to control the pre-catalyst quality prior to the thermal decomposition stage. With the help of obtained Co-Mo/Al2O3-MgO catalyst CNTs yield was achieved as 10.3… 11.9 and 20.3…23.0 [gram of CNTs / gram of catalysts] when using ethylene and propane-butane mixture as a carbon-containing gas, respectively.

  10. Micro glow plasma for localized nanostructural modification of carbon nanotube forest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarwar, Mirza Saquib us; Xiao, Zhiming; Saleh, Tanveer; Nojeh, Alireza; Takahata, Kenichi [University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z4 (Canada)

    2016-08-22

    This paper reports the localized selective treatment of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes, or CNT forests, for radial size modification of the nanotubes through a micro-scale glow plasma established on the material. An atmospheric-pressure DC glow plasma is shown to be stably sustained on the surface of the CNT forest in argon using micromachined tungsten electrodes with diameters down to 100 μm. Experiments reveal thinning or thickening of the nanotubes under the micro glow depending on the process conditions including discharge current and process time. These thinning and thickening effects in the treated nanotubes are measured to be up to ∼30% and ∼300% in their diameter, respectively, under the tested conditions. The elemental and Raman analyses suggest that the treated region of the CNT forest is pure carbon and maintains a degree of crystallinity. The local plasma treatment process investigated may allow modification of material characteristics in different domains for targeted regions or patterns, potentially aiding custom design of micro-electro-mechanical systems and other emerging devices enabled by the CNT forest.

  11. Methotrexate intercalated calcium carbonate nanostructures: Synthesis, phase transformation and bioassay study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Chao-Fan; Wang, Wei-Yuan; Wang, Lin; Zhou, Lei; Li, Shu-Ping; Li, Xiao-Dong

    2016-12-01

    The formation and stabilization of amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) is an active area of research owing to the presence of stable ACC in various biogenic minerals. In this paper, the synthesis of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) under the participation of methotrexate (MTX) via a facile gas diffusion route was reported. The results indicated that the addition of MTX can result in the phase transformation of CaCO3, and then two kinds of hybrids, i.e., MTX-vaterite and stable MTX-ACC came into being. Interestingly, the functional agent MTX served as both the target anticancer drug loaded and effective complexation agents to modify and control the morphology of final samples. The examination of MTX-ACC biodegradation process revealed that the collapse of MTX-ACC nanoparticles was due to the synergistic effect of drug release and the phase transformation. Finally, our study also proved that MTX-ACC exhibited the most excellent suppressing function on the viability of cancer cells, especially after long-time duration. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Boron carbon nitride nanostructures from salt melts: tunable water-soluble phosphors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Weiwei; Portehault, David; Dimova, Rumiana; Antonietti, Markus

    2011-05-11

    A simple, high yield, chemical process is developed to fabricate layered h-BN nanosheets and BCNO nanoparticles with a diameter of ca. 5 nm at 700 °C. The use of the eutectic LiCl/KCl salt melt medium enhances the kinetics of the reaction between sodium borohydride and urea or guanidine as well as the dispersion of the nanoparticles in water. The carbon content can be tuned from 0 to 50 mol % by adjusting the reactant ratio, thus providing precise control of the light emission of the particles in the range 440-528 nm while reaching a quantum yield of 26%. Because of their green synthesis, low toxicity, small size, and stability against aggregation in water, the as-obtained photoluminescent BCNO nanoparticles show promise for diagnostics and optoelectronics. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  13. Effect of bias voltages on the synthesis of nanostructured carbon nitride films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, P. X.; Yang, P.; Shi, Y. C.

    2006-05-01

    XPS, Raman scattering and SEM were used to study effect of DC bias voltages (0-400 V) on the synthesis of high nitrogen content of carbon nitride (CN x) films. Maximal N/C ratio up to 0.81 was first obtained at the bias voltage of 250 V, and the maximal fraction of sp 3 CN bond inside the film was up to 40%. Either too high or too low bias voltages would result in decrease of nitrogen content inside the CN x films. Typical G and D bands were identified. Intensities of G and D bands showed periodic development following an increase of bias voltages. Several groups of nanoscale particles were observed at the pulsed bias voltage of 5 kV. Each group of particles appeared sunflower type of distribution where the biggest (85 nm) particle at the center was surrounded by many small sizes (35 nm) of CN particles.

  14. Plasmon-Organic Fiber Interactions in Diamond-Like Carbon Coated Nanostructured Gold Films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cielecki, Pawel Piotr; Sobolewska, Elżbieta Karolina; Kostiučenko, Oksana

    2017-01-01

    Gold is the most commonly used plasmonic material, however soft and prone to mechanical deformations. It has been shown that the durability of gold plasmonic substrates can be improved by applying a protective diamond-like carbon (DLC) coating. In this work, we investigate the influence...... of such protective layers on plasmonic interactions in organic–plasmonic hybrid systems. We consider systems, consisting of 1-Cyano-quaterphenylene nanofibers on top of gold nano-square plasmonic arrays, coated with protective layers of varying thickness. We numerically investigate the spectral position of surface...... plasmon polariton resonances and electric field intensity, as a function of protective layer thickness, using the finite-difference time-domain method. To confirm the numerically indicated field enhancement preservation on top of protective layers, we experimentally map the second harmonic response...

  15. Thermal Behavior and Spectroscopy Analysis of Carbonized Nanostructures Derived from Polypyrrole Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fracari, Tiago; Einloft, Sandra; Lavayen, Vladimir

    Carbonaceous nanotubes with a calculated specific heat of 710J K-1 Kg-1, and an outer diameter of 58nm, made by a micro-thermal reaction, using polypyrrole nanotubes precursor is presented here. Three degradation stages from the thermal curves are identified. We observe a decomposition temperature at 371∘C that relates to the presence of amorphous carbon on samples for the first time in this material. Also, it is identified that gradual decomposition of the fragments provides a different kind of residue percentage in the range 48-32% that is related to stirring speed used in each synthesis. It is worthy to note that electron transmission microscope images of carbonaceous nanotubes present defects as well, wherein we identify chloride and nitrogen as doped agents. Finally, results of nanotubes using Infrared, Raman spectrometry analysis, scanning electron microscopy and electron diffraction are presented here.

  16. Facile general route toward tunable Magnéli nanostructures and their use as thermoelectric metal oxide/carbon nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portehault, David; Maneeratana, Vasana; Candolfi, Christophe; Oeschler, Niels; Veremchuk, Igor; Grin, Yuri; Sanchez, Clément; Antonietti, Markus

    2011-11-22

    Engineering nanoscale interfaces is a requisite for harnessing electrical and thermal transports within nanostructured materials, especially those destined for thermoelectric applications requiring an unusual combination of low thermal conductivity and electrical resistivity. Nanocomposites open up possibilities in this area, but are still bound to a very narrow range of materials. Here, we report a new approach combining the sol-gel process toward hybrid materials with spark plasma sintering (SPS) to yield functional nanocomposites based on substoichiometric titanium oxides Ti(n)O(2n-1), so-called Magnéli phases. The potential of this new approach is demonstrated by three results. First, multiple Ti(n)O(2n-1) compounds (n = 3, 4, 5, 6, 8) are obtained for the first time as sole nano-Magnéli crystalline phases with controlled specific surface areas from 55 to 300 m(2)·g(-1), classified as potential thermoelectric n-type metal oxides and paving the way toward advanced systems for energy-harvesting devices and optoelectronics. Second, this work combines the use of sol-gel and SPS processes to yield percolated nanocomposites based on metal oxide nanoparticles embedded in a carbon matrix with low electrical resistivity (2 × 10(-4) Ω·m for a Ti(4)O(7) compound) and reduced thermal conductivity (1 W·m(-1)·K(-1)) with respect to bulk phases. Finally, the discovered materials are reliable with thermoelectric figures of merit (ZT = 0.08) relatively high for n-type Ti-O-based systems and metal oxides. Thereby this study represents a proof of concept for the development of promising, cheaper, and more efficient thermoelectric conversion devices. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  17. The enhanced hydrogen storage of micro-nanostructured hybrids of Mg(BH4)2-carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Mo; Zhao, Qing; Zhu, Zhiqiang; Hu, Yuxiang; Tao, Zhanliang; Chen, Jun

    2015-11-21

    We report the facile preparation of micro-nanostructured hybrids of Mg(BH4)2-carbon nanotubes (denoted as MBH-CNTs) and their enhanced hydrogen desorption/absorption performance. The hybrids with Mg(BH4)2 loadings of 25 wt%, 50 wt% and 75 wt% are synthesized through a one-step solvent method by adjusting the ratios of Mg(BH4)2 and CNTs. The optimized MBH-CNTs with 50 wt% Mg(BH4)2 exhibit a nanosized layer coating of Mg(BH4)2 with the thickness of 2-6 nm on the surface of CNTs. The MBH-CNTs with 50 wt% Mg(BH4)2 start to release hydrogen at 76 °C, which shows a significant decrease of about 200 °C compared with that of pure Mg(BH4)2 (about 292 °C). Furthermore, 3.79 wt% of H2 can be desorbed from this sample within 10 min at the peak release temperature of 117 °C. Meanwhile, the dehydrogenated MBH-CNTs could take up 2.5 wt% of H2 at 350 °C under the hydrogen pressure of 10 MPa. The high chemical activity of nanosized Mg(BH4)2 and the catalytic effect of CNTs synergistically promote reversible hydrogen storage. The simple synthesis process and enhanced hydrogen desorption/absorption of MBH-CNT hybrids shed light on the utilization of Mg(BH4)2 on CNTs as efficient hydrogen storage materials.

  18. Nanostructured carbon electrode modified with N-doped graphene quantum dots-chitosan nanocomposite: a sensitive electrochemical dopamine sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Aoun, Sami

    2017-11-01

    A highly selective and sensitive dopamine electrochemical sensor based on nitrogen-doped graphene quantum dots-chitosan nanocomposite-modified nanostructured screen printed carbon electrode is presented, for the first time. Graphene quantum dots were prepared via microwave-assisted hydrothermal reaction of glucose, and nitrogen doping was realized by introducing ammonia in the reaction mixture. Chitosan incorporation played a significant role towards the selectivity of the prepared sensor by hindering the ascorbic acid interference and enlarging the peak potential separation between dopamine and uric acid. The proposed sensor's performance was shown to be superior to several recently reported investigations. The as-prepared CS/N,GQDs@SPCE exhibited a high sensitivity (i.e. ca. 418 µA mM cm-2), a wide linear range i.e. (1-100 µM) and (100-200 µM) with excellent correlations (i.e. R2 = 0.999 and R2 = 1.000, respectively) and very low limit of detection (LOD = 0.145 µM) and limit of quantification (LOQ = 0.482 µM) based on S/N = 3 and 10, respectively. The applicability of the prepared sensor for real sample analysis was tested by the determination of dopamine in human urine in pH 7.0 PBS showing an approximately 100% recovery with RSD < 2% inferring both the practicability and reliability of CS/N,GQDs@SPCE. The proposed sensor is endowed with high reproducibility (i.e. RSD = ca. 3.61%), excellent repeatability (i.e. ca. 0.91% current change) and a long-term stability (i.e. ca. 94.5% retained activity).

  19. A Study of Iron-Nitrogen-Carbon Fuel Cell Catalysts: Chemistry - Nanostructure - Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workman, Michael J., Jr.

    focused ion beam tomography is modified and optimized for platinum-group metal free catalyst layers, facilitating direct observation of catalyst integration into catalyst layers. I present evidence supporting the hypothesis that atomically dispersed iron coordinated with nitrogen are the dominant active sites in these catalysts. Further, that the concentration of surface oxides in the carbon structure, which can be directly influenced by synthesis parameters, correlates with both the concentration of active sites in the material and with fuel cell performance. Catalyst performance is hindered by the addition of carbon nanotubes and by the presence of metallic iron. Evidence consistent with the catalytic active sites residing in the graphitic plane is also presented.

  20. Method of fabrication of anchored nanostructure materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seals, Roland D; Menchhofer, Paul A; Howe, Jane Y; Wang, Wei

    2013-11-26

    Methods for fabricating anchored nanostructure materials are described. The methods include heating a nano-catalyst under a protective atmosphere to a temperature ranging from about 450.degree. C. to about 1500.degree. C. and contacting the heated nano-catalysts with an organic vapor to affix carbon nanostructures to the nano-catalysts and form the anchored nanostructure material.

  1. Electron emission from nano-structured carbon films fabricated by hot-filament chemical-vapor deposition and microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    CERN Document Server

    Park, K H; Lee, K M; Oh, S G; Lee, S I; Koh, K H

    2000-01-01

    The electron-emission characteristics of nano-structured carbon films fabricated by using the HFCVD (hot- filament chemical-vapor deposition) and the MPECVD (microwave plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition) methods with a metal catalyst are presented. According to our observation, neither the formation nor the alignment of nano tubes is absolutely necessary to realize carbon-based electron emitters. However, utilization of chrome as an interlayer between Si substrates and metal catalyst particles results in a great improvement in the emission characteristics and the mechanical stability. Also, fabrication of good electron-emitting carbon films on glass substrates, with sputter-deposited chrome electrodes,at a nominal temperature approx 615 .deg. C was demonstrated.

  2. Plasmon-organic fiber interactions in diamond-like carbon coated nanostructured gold films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cielecki, Paweł Piotr; Sobolewska, Elżbieta Karolina; Kostiuočenko, Oksana; Leißner, Till; Tamulevičius, Tomas; Tamulevičius, Sigitas; Rubahn, Horst-Günter; Adam, Jost; Fiutowski, Jacek

    2017-11-01

    Gold is the most commonly used plasmonic material, however soft and prone to mechanical deformations. It has been shown that the durability of gold plasmonic substrates can be improved by applying a protective diamond-like carbon (DLC) coating. In this work, we investigate the influence of such protective layers on plasmonic interactions in organic-plasmonic hybrid systems. We consider systems, consisting of 1-Cyano-quaterphenylene nanofibers on top of gold nano-square plasmonic arrays, coated with protective layers of varying thickness. We numerically investigate the spectral position of surface plasmon polariton resonances and electric field intensity, as a function of protective layer thickness, using the finite-difference time-domain method. To confirm the numerically indicated field enhancement preservation on top of protective layers, we experimentally map the second harmonic response of organic nanofibers. Subsequently, we characterize the plasmonic coupling between organic nanofibers and underlying substrates, considered as one of the main loss channels for photoluminescence from nanofibers, by time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy. Our findings reveal that, for the investigated system, plasmonic interactions are preserved for DLC coatings up to 55 nm. This is relevant for the fabrication of new passive and active plasmonic components with increased durability and hence prolonged lifetime.

  3. Cluster solvation models of carbon nanostructures: extension to fullerenes, tubes, and buds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrens, Francisco; Castellano, Gloria

    2014-06-01

    Carbon nanobud (CNB), a hybrid material consisting of single-wall C-nanotubes (CNTs) (SWNTs) with covalently attached fullerenes, in cluster form is discussed in organic solvents. Theories are developed based on bundlet and droplet models describing size-distribution functions. Phenomena present a unified explanation in bundlet model in which free energy of CNBs involved in cluster is combined from two parts: a volume one proportional to the number of molecules n in aggregate and a surface one, to n(1/2). Bundlet model enables describing distribution function of CNB clusters by size. From purely geometrical considerations bundlet (SWNT/CNB) and droplet (fullerene) models predict dissimilar behaviors. Interaction-energy parameters of CNBs are taken from C60. A C60/SWNT in-between behavior is expected; however, properties of CNBs result closer to SWNTs. Smaller CNB clusters result less stable but greater ones are more stable than SWNT bundles. The solubility decays with temperature result smaller for SWNT/CNB than C60 in agreement with lower number of units in aggregates. Discrepancy between the experimental data of heat of solution of fullerenes and CNT/CNBs is ascribed to sharp concentration dependence of heat of solution. Diffusion coefficient decays with temperature and results greater for CNB than SWNT or C60. Clusters (C60)13 and SWNT/CNB7 are representative of droplet and bundlet models.

  4. Synthesis and Characterization of Pt-loaded carbon nanostructures derived from polyaniline nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Gong Da; Kim, Pil; Lee, Youn Sik [Div. of Chemical Engineering, Nanomaterials Processing Research Center, Chonbuk NationalUniversity, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    Proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) are one of the most advanced fuel cells for future energy, owing to their high conversion efficiency, quick start-up, rapid response to variable loading, and relatively low operating temperature, compared with of her conventional energy conversion devices. PANTs were synthesized to have various aspect ratios and inner diameters. As the aniline concentration increased, the PANTs’ inner diameter greatly decreased, but their outer diameters only slightly increased, leading to a decrease in their aspect ratios. Carbonization of PANTs resulted in the formation of corresponding CNSs. Pt nanoparticles were successfully formed on the CNSs under N{sub 2} or N{sub 2}/NH{sub 3} flow. The Pt nanoparticles of the Pt- CNS-N{sub 2} /NH{sub 3} catalysts were smaller in size, less aggregated, and more uniformly dispersed than those of the Pt- CNS-N{sub 2} catalysts. The ECSA values of Pt-CNS-N{sub 2} /NH{sub 3} were larger than those of Pt-CNS-N{sub 2} and Pt/C. The half wave potentials of the Pt-CNS-N{sub 2} catalysts were lower than those of the Pt-CNS-N{sub 2} /NH{sub 3} , and close to those of the Pt/C. The Pt-CNS-N{sub 2} /NH{sub 3} catalysts exhibited better kinetic performance than the Pt-CNS -N{sub 2} catalysts and Pt/C.

  5. Nano-structured variable capacitor based on P(VDF-TrFE) copolymer and carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakbita, I.; El-Hami, K.

    2018-02-01

    A newly organic capacitor was conceived with a variable capacitance using the inverse piezoelectric effect. The device consists of two parallel plates of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), known for their large surface area, high sensitivity and high electric conductivity, separated by a thin film of a dielectric layer of Polyinylidene fluoride and trifluoroehtylene (P(VDF-TrFE)) promising material for piezoelectric and ferroelectric properties. The obtained architecture is the CNT/PVDF-TrFE/CNT capacitor device. In this study, an ultra-thin film of P(VDF-TrFE) (54/46) with thickness of 20 nm was elaborated on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) by spin-coating. The morphology of the ultra-thin film and the mechanical behavior of CNT/P(VDF-TrFE)/CNT system were studied using the atomic force microscopy (AFM) combined with a lock-in amplifier in contact mode. All changes in applied voltage induce a change in thin film thickness according to the inverse piezoelectric effect that affect, consequently the capacitance. The results showed that the ratio of capacitance change ΔC to initial capacitance C0 is ΔC/C0=5%. This value is sufficient to use P(VDF-TrFE) as variable organic capacitor.

  6. Multilevel surface engineering of nanostructured TiO2 on carbon-fiber-reinforced polyetheretherketone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Tao; Liu, Xuanyong; Qian, Shi; Cao, Huiliang; Qiao, Yuqin; Mei, Yongfeng; Chu, Paul K; Ding, Chuanxian

    2014-07-01

    As an implantable material, carbon-fiber-reinforced polyetheretherketone (CFRPEEK) possesses an adjustable elastic modulus similar to that of cortical bone and is a prime candidate to replace metallic surgical implants. However, the bioinertness and poor osteogenic properties of CFRPEEK limit its clinical application as orthopedic implants. In this work, titanium ions are introduced energetically into CFRPEEK by plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) reveal the formation of nanopores with the side wall and bottom embedded with ∼20 nm TiO2 nanoparticles on the CFRPEEK surface. Nanoindentation measurements confirm the stability and improved elastic resistance of the structured surfaces. In vitro cell adhesion, viability assay, and real-time PCR analyses disclose enhanced adhesion, proliferation, and osteo-differentiation of rat bone mesenchymal stem cells (bMSCs). The multilevel structures on CFRPEEK also exhibit partial antibacterial activity to Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. Our results indicate that a surface with multifunctional biological properties can be produced by multilevel surface engineering and application of CFRPEEK to orthopedic and dental implants can be broadened and expedited based on this scheme. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Micro/Nanostructure and Tribological Characteristics of Pressureless Sintered Carbon Nanotubes Reinforced Aluminium Matrix Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Manikandan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study reports the manufacture, microstructure, and tribological behaviour of carbon nanotube reinforced aluminium composites against pure aluminium. The specimens were fabricated using powder metallurgy method. The nanotubes in weight percentages of 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 were homogeneously dispersed and mechanically alloyed using a high energy ball milling. The milled powders were cold compacted and then isothermally sintered in air. The density of all samples was measured using Archimedes method and all had a relative density between 92.22% and 97.74%. Vickers hardness increased with increasing CNT fraction up to 1.5 wt% and then reduced. The microstructures and surfaces were investigated using high resolution scanning electron microscope (SEM. The tribological tests showed that the CNT reinforced composites displayed lower wear rate and friction coefficient compared to the pure aluminium under mild wear conditions. However, for severe wear conditions, the CNT reinforced composites exhibited higher friction coefficient and wear rate compared to the pure aluminium. It was also found that the friction and wear behaviour of CNT reinforced composites is significantly dependent on the applied load and there is a critical load beyond which CNTs could have adverse impact on the wear resistance of aluminium.

  8. Using nanostructured conductive carbon tape modified with bismuth as the disposable working electrode for stripping analysis in paper-based analytical devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Qiu-Mei; Zhang, Qing; Shi, Chuan-Guo; Xu, Jing-Juan; Bao, Ning; Gu, Hai-Ying

    2013-10-15

    Low cost disposable working electrodes are specifically desired for practical applications of electrochemical detection considering maturity of electrochemical stations and data collection protocols. In this paper double-sided conductive adhesive carbon tape with nanostructure was applied to fabricate disposable working electrodes. Being supported by indium tin oxide glass, the prepared carbon tape electrodes were coated with bismuth film for stripping analysis of heavy metal ions. By integrating the bismuth modified electrodes with paper-based analytical devices, we were able to differentiate Zn, Cd and Pb ions with the sample volume of around 15 μL. After the optimization of parameters, including modification of bismuth film and the area of the electrodes, etc., Pb ions could be measured in the linear range from 10 to 500 μg/L with the detection limit of 2 μg/L. Our experimental results revealed that the disposable modified electrodes could be used to quantify migrated lead from toys with the results agreed well with that using atomic absorption spectrometry. Although bismuth modification and stripping analysis could be influenced by the low conductivity of the carbon tape, the low cost disposable carbon tape electrodes take the advantages of large-scaled produced double-sided carbon tape, including its reproducible nanostructure and scaled-up fabrication process. In addition, the preparation of disposable electrodes avoids time-consuming pretreatment and experienced operation. This study implied that the carbon tape might be an alternative candidate for practical applications of electrochemical detection. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. 1D Ni-Co oxide and sulfide nanoarray/carbon aerogel hybrid nanostructures for asymmetric supercapacitors with high energy density and excellent cycling stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Pin; Tian, Jian; Sang, Yuanhua; Tuan, Chia-Chi; Cui, Guanwei; Shi, Xifeng; Wong, C P; Tang, Bo; Liu, Hong

    2016-09-15

    The fabrication of supercapacitor electrodes with high energy density and excellent cycling stability is still a great challenge. A carbon aerogel, possessing a hierarchical porous structure, high specific surface area and electrical conductivity, is an ideal backbone to support transition metal oxides and bring hope to prepare electrodes with high energy density and excellent cycling stability. Therefore, NiCo2S4 nanotube array/carbon aerogel and NiCo2O4 nanoneedle array/carbon aerogel hybrid supercapacitor electrode materials were synthesized by assembling Ni-Co precursor needle arrays on the surface of the channel walls of hierarchical porous carbon aerogels derived from chitosan in this study. The 1D nanostructures grow on the channel surface of the carbon aerogel vertically and tightly, contributing to the enhanced electrochemical performance with ultrahigh energy density. The energy density of NiCo2S4 nanotube array/carbon aerogel and NiCo2O4 nanoneedle array/carbon aerogel hybrid asymmetric supercapacitors can reach up to 55.3 Wh kg(-1) and 47.5 Wh kg(-1) at a power density of 400 W kg(-1), respectively. These asymmetric devices also displayed excellent cycling stability with a capacitance retention of about 96.6% and 92% over 5000 cycles.

  10. Ultrafast photocurrents and terahertz radiation in gallium arsenide and carbon based nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prechtel, Hans Leonhard

    2011-08-15

    In this thesis we developed a measurement technique based on a common pump-probe scheme and coplanar stripline circuits that enables time-resolved photocurrent measurements of contacted nanosystems with a micrometer spatial and a picosecond time resolution. The measurement technique was applied to lowtemperature grown gallium arsenide (LT-GaAs), carbon nanotubes (CNTs), graphene, and p-doped gallium arsenide (GaAs) nanowires. The various mechanisms responsible for the generation of current pulses by pulsed laser excitation were reviewed. Furthermore the propagation of the resulting electromagnetic radiation along a coplanar stripline circuit was theoretically and numerically treated. The ultrafast photocurrent response of low-temperature grown GaAs was investigated. We found two photocurrent pulses in the time-resolved response. We showed that the first pulse is consistent with a displacement current pulse. We interpreted the second pulse to result from a transport current process. We further determined the velocity of the photo-generated charge carriers to exceed the drift, thermal and quantum velocities of single charge carriers. Hereby, we interpreted the transport current pulse to stem from an electron-hole plasma excitation. We demonstrated that the photocurrent response of CNTs comprises an ultrafast displacement current and a transport current. The data suggested that the photocurrent is finally terminated by the recombination lifetime of the charge carriers. To the best of our knowledge, we presented in this thesis the first recombination lifetime measurements of contacted, suspended, CVD grown CNT networks. In addition, we studied the ultrafast photocurrent dynamics of freely suspended graphene contacted by metal electrodes. At the graphene-metal interface, we demonstrated that built-in electric fields give rise to a photocurrent with a full-width-half-maximum of a few picoseconds and that a photo-thermoelectric effect generates a current with a decay time

  11. Sulfur-Doped Porphyrinic Carbon Nanostructures Synthesized with Amorphous MoS2 for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction in an Acidic Medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyun-Suk; Han, Sang-Beom; Kwak, Da-Hee; Lee, Gyu-Ho; Choi, In-Ae; Kim, Do-Hyoung; Ma, Kyeng-Bae; Kim, Min-Cheol; Kwon, Hye-Jin; Park, Kyung-Won

    2017-05-22

    To develop doped carbon nanostructures as non-precious metal cathode catalysts, nanocomposites were synthesized by using SBA-15 and 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-methoxyphenyl)porphyrin-iron(III) chloride with different ratios of amorphous MoS2 precursor. From various analyses, it was found that, during pyrolysis at 900 °C under an N2 atmosphere, the amorphous MoS2 precursor decomposed into Mo and S, facilitating the formation of graphene sheet-like carbon with MoC and doping of sulfur in the carbon. In the nanocomposite formed from 10 wt % MoS2 precursor (denoted as Mo/S/PC-10), most of the MoS2 was decomposed, thus forming S-doped carbon, which was grown on the MoC phase without crystalline MoS2 . Furthermore, Mo/S/PC-10 exhibited better performance in the oxygen reduction reaction (specific activity of 1.23 mA cm(-2) at 0.9 V and half-wave potential of 0.864 V) than a commercial Pt catalyst, owing to a heteroatom-doped carbon nanostructure with a fairly high specific surface area. In the polarization curve of the unit-cell performance measured at 80 °C under ambient pressure, Mo/S/PC-10 as a cathode catalyst exhibited an optimal power density of 314 mW cm(-2) and a current density of 280 mA cm(-2) at 0.6 V. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Sugar Blowing-Induced Porous Cobalt Phosphide/Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Nanostructures with Enhanced Electrochemical Oxidation Performance toward Water and Other Small Molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Chengzhou [School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman WA 99164 USA; Fu, Shaofang [School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman WA 99164 USA; Xu, Bo Z. [School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman WA 99164 USA; Song, Junhua [School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman WA 99164 USA; Shi, Qiurong [School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman WA 99164 USA; Engelhard, Mark H. [Environmental Molecular Science Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Li, Xiaolin [Energy and Environmental Directory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Beckman, Scott P. [School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman WA 99164 USA; Sun, Junming [The Gene and Linda Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering, Washington State University, Pullman WA 99164 USA; Du, Dan [School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman WA 99164 USA; Lin, Yuehe [School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman WA 99164 USA

    2017-06-28

    Finely controlled synthesis of high active and robust nonprecious metal catalysts with excellent catalytic efficiency in oxygen evolution reaction (OER) is extremely vital for making the water splitting process more energy-efficient and economical. Among these noble metal-free catalysts, transition-metal-based nanomaterials are considered as one of the most promising OER catalysts due to their relatively low-cost intrinsic activities, high abundance and diversity in terms of structure and morphology. In this work, we reported a facile sugar-blowing technique and low-temperature phosphorization to generate 3D self-supported metal involved carbon nanostructures, which termed as Co2P@Co/nitrogen-doped carbon (Co2P@Co/N-C). By capitalizing on the 3D porous nanostructures with high surface area, generously dispersed active sites, the intimate interaction between active sites and 3D N-doped carbon, the resultant Co2P@Co/N-C exhibited satisfying OER performance superior to CoO@Co/N-C, delivering 10 mA cm-2 at overpotential of 0.32 V. It is noting that in contrast to the substantial current density loss of RuO2, Co2P@Co/N-C showed much enhanced catalytic activity during the stability test and the 1.8-fold increase in current density was observed after stability test. Furthermore, the obtained Co2P@Co/N-C can also be served as an excellent nonprecious metal catalyst for methanol and glucose electrooxidation in alkaline media, further extending their potential applications.

  13. Ionic-liquid-assisted synthesis of nanostructured and carbon-coated Li3V2(PO4)3 for high-power electrochemical storage devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaofei; Böckenfeld, Nils; Berkemeier, Frank; Balducci, Andrea

    2014-06-01

    Carbon-coated Li3V2(PO4)3 (LVP) displaying nanostructured morphology can be easily prepared by using ionic-liquid-assisted sol-gel synthesis. The selection of highly viscous and thermally stable ionic liquids might promote the formation of nanostructures during the sol-gel synthesis. The presence of these structures shortens the diffusion paths and enlarges the contact area between the active material and the electrolyte; this leads to a significant improvement in lithium-ion diffusion. At the same time, the use of ionic liquids has a positive influence on the coating of the LVP particles, which improves the electronic conductivity of this material; this leads to enhanced charge-transfer properties. At a high current density of 40 C, the LVP/N-butyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide material delivered a reversible capacity of approximately 100 mA h g(-1), and approximately 99 % of the initial capacity value was retained even after 100 cycles at 50 C. The excellent high rate and cycling stability performance make Li3V2(PO4)3 prepared by ionic-liquid-assisted sol-gel synthesis a very promising cathode material for high-power electrochemical storage devices. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Voltammetric Sensor Based on Fe-doped ZnO and TiO2 Nanostructures-modified Carbon-paste Electrode for Determination of Levodopa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaraki Firooz, Azam; Hosseini Nia, Bahram; Beheshtian, Javad; Ghalkhani, Masoumeh

    2017-10-01

    In this study, undoped and 1 wt.% Fe-doped with ZnO, and TiO2 nanostructures were synthesized by a simple hydrothermal method without using templates. The influence of the Fe dopant on structural, optical and electrochemical response was studied by x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, UV-Vis spectra, photoluminescence spectra and electrochemical characterization system. The electrochemical response of the carbon paste electrode modified with synthesized nanostructures (undoped ZnO and TiO2 as well as doped with Fe ions) toward levodopa (L-Dopa) was studied. Cyclic voltammetry using provided modified electrodes showed electro-catalytic properties for electro-oxidation of L-Dopa and a significant reduction was observed in the anodic overvoltage compared to the bare electrode. The results indicated the presence of the sufficient dopants. The best response was obtained in terms of the current enhancement, overvoltage reduction, and reversibility improvement of the L-Dopa oxidation reaction under experimental conditions by the modified electrode with TiO2 nanoparticles doped with Fe ions.

  15. Nanostructured superconductors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moshchalkov, V. V; Fritzsche, Joachim

    2011-01-01

    ... through nanostructuring and for developing a variety of novel fluxonics devices based on vortex manipulation. Nanostructuring can, in fact, create such conditions for the flux pinning by arrays of nanofabricated antidots or magnetic dots, which could maximize the second important superconducting critical parameter (critical current) up to its theoretical limit ...

  16. Label-free and reagentless electrochemical detection of microRNAs using a conducting polymer nanostructured by carbon nanotubes: application to prostate cancer biomarker miR-141.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, H V; Piro, B; Reisberg, S; Tran, L D; Duc, H T; Pham, M C

    2013-11-15

    In this paper, a label-free and reagentless microRNA sensor based on an interpenetrated network of carbon nanotubes and electroactive polymer is described. The nanostructured polymer film presents very well-defined electroactivity in neutral aqueous medium in the cathodic potential domain from the quinone group embedded in the polymer backbone. Addition of microRNA miR-141 target (prostate cancer biomarker) gives a "signal-on" response, i.e. a current increase due to enhancement of the polymer electroactivity. On the contrary, non-complementary miRNAs such as miR-103 and miR-29b-1 do not lead to any significant current change. A very low detection limit of ca. 8 fM is achieved with this sensor. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of strontium-containing nanostructured carbonated hydroxyapatite/sodium alginate for sinus lift in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiense, Helder; Barreto, Mauricio; Resende, Rodrigo F; Alves, Adriana T; Rossi, Alexandre M; Mavropoulos, Elena; Granjeiro, José M; Calasans-Maia, Mônica D

    2016-02-01

    Various synthetic bone substitutes have been developed to reconstruct bone defects. One of the most prevalent ceramics in bone treatment is hydroxyapatite (HA) that is a useful material as bone substitute, however, with a low rate of biodegradation. Its structure allows isomorphic cationic and anionic substitutions to be easily introduced, which can alter the crystallinity, morphology, biocompatibility, and osteoconductivity. The objective of this study was to investigate the in vitro and in vivo biological responses to strontium-containing nanostructured carbonated HA/sodium alginate (SrCHA) spheres (425<ϕ <600 μm) that were used for sinus lifts in rabbits using nanostructured carbonated HA/sodium alginate (CHA) as a reference. Cytocompatibility was determined using a multiparametric assay after exposing murine preosteoblasts to the extracts of these materials. Twelve male and female rabbits underwent bilateral sinus lift procedures and were divided into two groups (CHA or SrCHA) and in two experimental periods (4 and 12 weeks), for microscopic and histomorphometric analyses. The in vitro test revealed the overall viability of the cells exposed to the CHA and SrCHA extracts; thus, these extracts were considered cytocompatible, which was confirmed by three different parameters in the in vitro tests. The histological analysis showed chronic inflammation with a prevalence of macrophages around the CHA spheres after 4 weeks, and this inflammation decreased after 12 weeks. Bone formation was observed in both groups, and smaller quantities of SrCHA spheres were observed after 12 weeks, indicating greater bioresorption of SrCHA than CHA. SrCHA spheres are biocompatible and osteoconductive and undergo bioresorption earlier than CHA spheres. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. PdCo porous nanostructures decorated on polypyrrole @ MWCNTs conductive nanocomposite-Modified glassy carbon electrode as a powerful catalyst for ethanol electrooxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fard, Leyla Abolghasemi; Ojani, Reza; Raoof, Jahan Bakhsh; Zare, Ehsan Nazarzadeh; Lakouraj, Moslem Mansour

    2017-04-01

    In the current study, well-defined PdCo porous nanostructure (PdCo PNS) is prepared by a simple one-pot wet-chemical method and polypyrrole@multi-walled carbon nanotubes (PPy@MWCNTs) nanocomposite is used as a catalyst support. The morphology and the structural properties of the prepared catalyst were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The electrocatalytic performance of PdCo PNS/PPy@MWCNTs on glassy carbon electrode has been evaluated by cyclic voltammetry (CV), chronoamperometry (CA) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) techniques. The specific activity of PdCo PNS/PPy@MWCNTs for ethanol electrooxidation (1.65 mA cm-2) is higher than those of other compared electrocatalysts. Also, PdCo PNS/PPy@MWCNTs catalyst represented higher electrocatalytic activity, better long-term stability and high level of poisoning tolerance to the carbonaceous oxidative intermediates for ethanol electrooxidation reaction in alkaline media. Furthermore, the presence of PPY@MWCNTs on the surface of GCE produce a high activity to electrocatalyst, which might be due to the easier charge transfer at polymer/carbon nanotubes interfaces, higher electrochemically accessible surface areas and electronic conductivity. The superior catalytic activity of PdCo PNS/PPy@MWCNTs suggests it to be as a promising electrocatalyst for future direct ethanol fuel cells.

  19. Impact delivery of organic matter on the acapulcoite-lodranite parent-body deduced from C, N isotopes and nanostructures of carbon phases in Acapulco and Lodran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charon, E.; Aléon, J.; Rouzaud, J.-N.

    2014-10-01

    The structure and nanostructures of carbon phases from the Acapulco and Lodran meteorites and their carbon and nitrogen isotopic composition were investigated at the nanometer and micrometer scale using a systematic combination of Raman microspectrometry, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry to determine their origin and thermal evolution. Several morphological types were recognized belonging to roughly two isotopic and structural families: coarse carbon grains and rosettes, only found in Acapulco, and vein-like carbon occurrences present in both Acapulco and Lodran. Carbon phases in Acapulco are highly graphitized, and show a genetic relationship with metal indicative of metal-assisted graphitization. By contrast, carbon phases in Lodran are exclusively disordered mesoporous turbostratic carbons, in spite of their inclusion in metal and the higher peak temperature experienced by the Lodran parent body. δ13C values range between -59‰ and +37‰ in Acapulco and between -38‰ and -1‰ in Lodran and show in both cases a peak in their distribution at the value of chondritic insoluble organic matter (IOM, -10‰ to -15‰). N concentrations together with δ15N values indicate a mixing between a component akin to chondritic IOM in Lodran with a δ15N value around +10‰ to +20‰ and a component akin to that in the most N-poor Acapulco graphites. The latter are systematically depleted in 15N with a δ15N value constant at ∼-140‰ for N concentrations below ∼1.4 wt%. These observations can be explained if carbon phases in Acapulco and Lodran result from the late impact introduction of CI-CM like IOM, after significant cooling of the parent-body, and subsequent carbonization and graphitization of IOM by interaction with FeNi metal by the heat wave induced by the impact. Temperatures probably reached 900 °C in Acapulco, enough to achieve metal-assisted graphitization but were not significantly higher than 650 °C in

  20. Gel nanostructure in alkali-activated binders based on slag and fly ash, and effects of accelerated carbonation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernal, Susan A., E-mail: s.bernal@sheffield.ac.uk [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Provis, John L., E-mail: j.provis@sheffield.ac.uk [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Walkley, Brant; San Nicolas, Rackel [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Gehman, John D. [School of Chemistry and Bio21 Institute, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Brice, David G.; Kilcullen, Adam R. [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Zeobond Pty Ltd, P.O. Box 23450, Docklands, Victoria 8012 (Australia); Duxson, Peter [Zeobond Pty Ltd, P.O. Box 23450, Docklands, Victoria 8012 (Australia); Deventer, Jannie S.J. van [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Zeobond Pty Ltd, P.O. Box 23450, Docklands, Victoria 8012 (Australia)

    2013-11-15

    Binders formed through alkali-activation of slags and fly ashes, including ‘fly ash geopolymers’, provide appealing properties as binders for low-emissions concrete production. However, the changes in pH and pore solution chemistry induced during accelerated carbonation testing provide unrealistically low predictions of in-service carbonation resistance. The aluminosilicate gel remaining in an alkali-activated slag system after accelerated carbonation is highly polymerised, consistent with a decalcification mechanism, while fly ash-based binders mainly carbonate through precipitation of alkali salts (bicarbonates at elevated CO{sub 2} concentrations, or carbonates under natural exposure) from the pore solution, with little change in the binder gel identifiable by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. In activated fly ash/slag blends, two distinct gels (C–A–S–H and N–A–S–H) are formed; under accelerated carbonation, the N–A–S–H gel behaves comparably to fly ash-based systems, while the C–A–S–H gel is decalcified similarly to alkali-activated slag. This provides new scope for durability optimisation, and for developing appropriate testing methodologies. -- Highlights: •C-A-S-H gel in alkali-activated slag decalcifies during accelerated carbonation. •Alkali-activated fly ash gel changes much less under CO{sub 2} exposure. •Blended slag-fly ash binder contains two coexisting gel types. •These two gels respond differently to carbonation. •Understanding of carbonation mechanisms is essential in developing test methods.

  1. Early History of Acapulco and Lodran Constrained by the Nanostructure and C, N Isotopic Composition of Their Carbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charon, E.; Aléon, J.; Rouzaud, J. N.

    2012-03-01

    New results of structure and C, N isotopes of carbons on A-L meteorites allows us to defend an original history of A-L parent body benefiting of previous interpretations implying shock after the peak temperature and seeding by an exogenous carbons.

  2. Effect of carbonation temperature on CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity of CaO derived from micro/nanostructured aragonite CaCO{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hlaing, Nwe Ni, E-mail: nwenihlaing76@gmail.com [School of Materials and Mineral Resources Engineering, Engineering Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Penang (Malaysia); Department of International Development Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Department of Physics, University of Yangon, 11041 Kamayut, Yangon (Myanmar); Sreekantan, Srimala, E-mail: srimala@usm.my [School of Materials and Mineral Resources Engineering, Engineering Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Penang (Malaysia); Hinode, Hirofumi, E-mail: hinode@ide.titech.ac.jp; Kurniawan, Winarto, E-mail: Kurniawan.w.ab@m.titech.ac.jp [Department of International Development Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Thant, Aye Aye, E-mail: a2thant@gmail.com [Department of Physics, University of Yangon, 11041 Kamayut, Yangon (Myanmar); Othman, Radzali, E-mail: radzali@utem.edu.my [Faculty of Manufacturing Engineering, Universiti Teknikal Malaysia Melaka, Hang Tuah Jaya, 76100 Durian Tunggal, Malacca (Malaysia); Mohamed, Abdul Rahman, E-mail: chrahman@eng.usm.my [Low Carbon Economy (LCE) Research Group, School of Chemical Engineering, Engineering Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Penang (Malaysia); Salime, Chris, E-mail: chris.salim@surya.ac.id [Environmental Engineering, Surya University, Tangerang, 15810 Banten (Indonesia)

    2016-07-06

    Recent years, CaO-based synthetic materials have been attracted attention as potential adsorbents for CO{sub 2} capture mainly due to their high CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity. In this study, micro/nanostructured aragonite CaCO{sub 3} was synthesized by a simple hydrothermal method with using polyacrylamide (PAM). The structural, morphological and thermal properties of the synthesized sample were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and thermogravimetry analysis (TG-DTA). The XRD and FESEM results showed that the obtained sample was aragonite CaCO{sub 3} with aggregated nanorods and microspheres composed of nanorods. A TG-DTA apparatus with Thermoplus 2 software was used to investigate the effect of carbonation temperature on the CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity of CaO derived from aragonite CaCO{sub 3} sample. At 300 °C, the sample reached the CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity of 0.098 g-CO{sub 2}/g-adsorbent, whereas the sample achieved the highest capacity of 0.682 g-CO{sub 2}/g-adsorbent at 700 °C. The results showed that the carbonation temperature significantly influenced on the CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity of the CaO derived from aragonite CaCO{sub 3}.

  3. An electrochemical immunosensor for brain natriuretic peptide prepared with screen-printed carbon electrodes nanostructured with gold nanoparticles grafted through aryl diazonium salt chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafín, V; Torrente-Rodríguez, R M; González-Cortés, A; García de Frutos, P; Sabaté, M; Campuzano, S; Yáñez-Sedeño, P; Pingarrón, J M

    2018-03-01

    A sensitive amperometric immunosensor has been prepared by immobilization of capture antibodies onto gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) grafted on a screen-printed carbon electrode (SPCE) through aryl diazonium salt chemistry using 4-aminothiophenol (AuNPs-S-Phe-SPCE). The immunosensor was designed for the accurate determination of clinically relevant levels of B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) in human serum samples. The nanostructured electrochemical platform resulted in an ordered layer of AuNPs onto SPCEs which combined the advantages of high conductivity and improved stability of immobilized biomolecules. The resulting disposable immunosensor used a sandwich type immunoassay involving a peroxidase-labeled detector antibody. The amperometric transduction was carried out at -0.20V (vs the Ag pseudo-reference electrode) upon the addition of hydroquinone (HQ) as electron transfer mediator and H2O2 as the enzyme substrate. The nanostructured immunosensors show a storage stability of at least 25 days, a linear range between 0.014 and 15ngmL-1, and a LOD of 4pgmL-1, which is 100 times lower than the established cut-off value for heart failure (HF) diagnosis. The performance of the immunosensor is advantageously compared with that provided with immunosensors prepared by grafting SPCE with p-phenylendiamine (H2N-Phe-SPCE) and attaching AuNPs by immersion into an AuNPs suspension or by electrochemical deposition, as well as with immunosensors constructed using commercial AuNPs-modified SPCEs. The developed immunosensor was applied to the successful analysis of human serum from heart failure (HF) patients upon just a 10-times dilution as sample treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Osseointegration is improved by coating titanium implants with a nanostructured thin film with titanium carbide and titanium oxides clustered around graphitic carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veronesi, Francesca; Giavaresi, Gianluca; Fini, Milena; Longo, Giovanni; Ioannidu, Caterina Alexandra; Scotto d'Abusco, Anna; Superti, Fabiana; Panzini, Gianluca; Misiano, Carlo; Palattella, Alberto; Selleri, Paolo; Di Girolamo, Nicola; Garbarino, Viola; Politi, Laura; Scandurra, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    Titanium implants coated with a 500nm nanostructured layer, deposited by the Ion Plating Plasma Assisted (IPPA) technology, composed of 60% graphitic carbon, 25% titanium oxides and 15% titanium carbide were implanted into rabbit femurs whilst into the controlateral femurs uncoated titanium implants were inserted as control. At four time points the animals were injected with calcein green, xylenol orange, oxytetracycline and alizarin. After 2, 4 and 8weeks femurs were removed and processed for histology and static and dynamic histomorphometry for undecalcified bone processing into methylmethacrylate, sectioned, thinned, polished and stained with Toluidine blue and Fast green. The overall bone-implant contacts rate (percentage of bone-implant contacts/weeks) of the TiC coated implant was 1.6 fold than that of the uncoated titanium implant. The histomorphometric analyses confirmed the histological evaluations. More precisely, higher Mineral Apposition Rate (MAR, μm/day) (p<0.005) and Bone Formation Rate (BFR, μm 2 /μm/day) (p<0.0005) as well as Bone Implant Contact (Bic) and Bone Ingrowth values (p<0.0005) were observed for the TiC coated implants compared to uncoated implants. In conclusion the hard nanostructured TiC layer protects the bulk titanium implant against the harsh conditions of biological tissues and in the same time, stimulating adhesion, proliferation and activity of osteoblasts, induces a better bone-implant contacts of the implant compared to the uncoated titanium implant. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Morphology-Controllable Synthesis of Zn-Co-Mixed Sulfide Nanostructures on Carbon Fiber Paper Toward Efficient Rechargeable Zinc-Air Batteries and Water Electrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaoyu; Han, Xiaopeng; Ma, Xiaoya; Zhang, Wei; Deng, Yida; Zhong, Cheng; Hu, Wenbin

    2017-04-12

    It remains an ongoing challenge to develop cheap, highly active, and stable electrocatalysts to promote the sluggish electrocatalytic oxygen evolution, oxygen reduction, and hydrogen evolution reactions for rechargeable metal-air batteries and water-splitting systems. In this work, we report the morphology-controllable synthesis of zinc cobalt mixed sulfide (Zn-Co-S) nanoarchitectures, including nanosheets, nanoplates, and nanoneedles, grown on conductive carbon fiber paper (CFP) and the micronanostructure dependent electrochemical efficacy for catalyzing hydrogen and oxygen in zinc-air batteries and water electrolysis. The formation of different Zn-Co-S morphologies was attributed to the synergistic effect of decomposed urea products and the corrosion of NH 4 F. Among synthesized Zn-Co-S nanostructures, the nanoneedle arrays supported on CFP exhibit superior trifunctional activity for oxygen reduction, oxygen evolution, and hydrogen evolution reactions than its nanosheet and nanoplate counterparts through half reaction testing. It also exhibited better catalytic durability than Pt/C and RuO 2 . Furthermore, the Zn-Co-S nanoneedle/CFP electrode enables rechargeable Zn-air batteries with low overpotential (0.85 V), high efficiency (58.1%), and long cycling lifetimes (200 cycles) at 10 mA cm -2 as well as considerable performance for water splitting. The superior performance is contributed to the integrated nanoneedle/CFP nanostructure, which not only provides enhanced electrochemical active area, but also facilitates ion and gas transfer between the catalyst surface and electrolyte, thus maintaining an effective solid-liquid-gas interface necessary for electrocatalysis. These results indicate that the Zn-Co-S nanoneedle/CFP system is a low cost, highly active, and durable electrode for highly efficient rechargeable zinc-air batteries and water electrolysis in alkaline solution.

  6. The regularities of the formation of carbon nanostructures from hydrocarbons based on the composition of the reaction mixture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilya V. Mishakov

    2016-06-01

    The decisive factor in the decomposition of hydrocarbons yielding carbon materials is the degree of deviation of the methanation reaction from equilibrium which can be influenced in two ways. The addition of hydrogen to the reaction gas promotes the driving force of the carbon hydrogenation reaction, resulting in defective high-surface carbon fibres. Increasing the concentration of methane in the reaction gas composition, in contrast, reduces the driving force of methanation until the process is suppressed, which promotes a more structured form of the CNF, without defects.

  7. Metal-Organic Framework Derived Hierarchically Porous Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Nanostructures as Novel Electrocatalyst for Oxygen Reduction Reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Shaofang; Zhu, Chengzhou; Zhou, Yazhou; Yang, Guohai; Jeon, Ju Won; Lemmon, John P.; Du, Dan; Nune, Satish K.; Lin, Yuehe

    2015-10-01

    The hierarchically porous nitrogen-doped carbon materials, derived from nitrogen-containing isoreticular metal-organic framework-3 (IRMOF-3) through direct carbonization, exhibited excellent electrocatalytic activity in alkaline solution for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). This high activity is attributed to the 10 presence of high percentage of quaternary and pyridinic nitrogen, the high surface area as well as good conductivity. When IRMOF-3 was carbonized at 950 °C (CIRMOF-3-950), it showed four-electron reduction pathway for ORR and exhibited better stability (about 78.5% current density was maintained) than platinum/carbon (Pt/C) in the current durability test. In addition, CIRMOF-3-950 presented high selectivity to cathode reactions compared to commercial Pt/C.

  8. PdCo porous nanostructures decorated on polypyrrole @ MWCNTs conductive nanocomposite—Modified glassy carbon electrode as a powerful catalyst for ethanol electrooxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fard, Leyla Abolghasemi [Electroanalytical Chemistry Research Laboratory, Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Mazandaran, 3rd Kilometer of Air Force Road, 47416-95447, Babolsar (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ojani, Reza, E-mail: fer-o@umz.ac.ir [Electroanalytical Chemistry Research Laboratory, Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Mazandaran, 3rd Kilometer of Air Force Road, 47416-95447, Babolsar (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Raoof, Jahan Bakhsh [Electroanalytical Chemistry Research Laboratory, Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Mazandaran, 3rd Kilometer of Air Force Road, 47416-95447, Babolsar (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zare, Ehsan Nazarzadeh; Lakouraj, Moslem Mansour [Polymer Research Laboratory Department of Organic-Polymer Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Mazandaran, 3rd Kilometer of Air Force Road, 47416-95447, Babolsar (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • The PdCo PNS/PPy@MWCNT electrocatalyst was easily prepared. • The electrocatalyst exhibits high electrocatalytic activity and stability toward the EOR. • The specific activity of PdCo PNS/PPy@MWCNTs for ethanol electrooxidation (1.65 mA cm{sup −2}) is higher than those of other compared electrocatalysts. • The high electrocatalytic performance is attributed to concerted effects of Porous nature, Co and PPy@MWCNT. • The PdCo PNS/PPy@MWCNT electrocatalyst has never been reported. - Abstract: In the current study, well-defined PdCo porous nanostructure (PdCo PNS) is prepared by a simple one-pot wet-chemical method and polypyrrole@multi-walled carbon nanotubes (PPy@MWCNTs) nanocomposite is used as a catalyst support. The morphology and the structural properties of the prepared catalyst were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The electrocatalytic performance of PdCo PNS/PPy@MWCNTs on glassy carbon electrode has been evaluated by cyclic voltammetry (CV), chronoamperometry (CA) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) techniques. The specific activity of PdCo PNS/PPy@MWCNTs for ethanol electrooxidation (1.65 mA cm{sup −2}) is higher than those of other compared electrocatalysts. Also, PdCo PNS/PPy@MWCNTs catalyst represented higher electrocatalytic activity, better long-term stability and high level of poisoning tolerance to the carbonaceous oxidative intermediates for ethanol electrooxidation reaction in alkaline media. Furthermore, the presence of PPY@MWCNTs on the surface of GCE produce a high activity to electrocatalyst, which might be due to the easier charge transfer at polymer/carbon nanotubes interfaces, higher electrochemically accessible surface areas and electronic conductivity. The superior catalytic activity of PdCo PNS/PPy@MWCNTs suggests it to be as a promising electrocatalyst for future direct ethanol fuel cells.

  9. Effect of polymers on the nanostructure and on the carbonation of calcium silicate hydrates: a scanning transmission X-ray microscopy study

    KAUST Repository

    Ha, J.

    2011-09-07

    This study investigated the effects of organic polymers (polyethylene glycol and hexadecyltrimethylammonium) on structures of calcium silicate hydrates (C-S-H) which is the major product of Portland cement hydration. Increased surface areas and expansion of layers were observed for all organic polymer modified C-S-H. The results from attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopic measurements also suggest lowered water contents in the layered structures for the C-S-H samples that are modified by organic polymers. Scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) results further supports this observation. We also observed difference in the extent of C-S-H carbonation due to the presence of organic polymers. No calcite formed in the presence of HDTMA whereas formation of calcite was observed with C-S-H sample modified with PEG. We suggest that the difference in the carbonation reaction is possibly due to the ease of penetration and diffusion of the CO 2. This observation suggests that CO 2 reaction strongly depends on the presence of organic polymers and the types of organic polymers incorporated within the C-S-H structure. This is the first comprehensive study using STXM to quantitatively characterize the level of heterogeneity in cementitious materials at high spatial and spectral resolutions. The results from BET, XRD, ATR-FTIR, and STXM measurements are consistent and suggest that C-S-H layer structures are significantly modified due to the presence of organic polymers, and that the chemical composition and structural differences among the organic polymers determine the extent of the changes in the C-S-H nanostructures as well as the extent of carbonation reaction. © 2011 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  10. Carbon wrapped and doped TiO{sub 2} mesoporous nanostructure with efficient visible-light photocatalysis for NO removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Di; Li, Yongli, E-mail: lyl@bjut.edu.cn; Wang, Inshu, E-mail: wangjsh@bjut.edu.cn; Wu, Junshu; Yang, Yilong; An, Qier

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Carbon wrapped and doped mesoporous titanium dioxide nanocrystals were fabricated. • Meso/micropores are generated on TiO{sub 2} surface caused by eliminating of carbon precursor. • Absorption edge is extended to visible region owing to the carbon-doping. • About 71% of NO is removed under visible light irradiation even in absence of moisture. - Abstract: Carbon wrapped and doped mesoporous anatase TiO{sub 2} nanocrystals were prepared by a hydrothermal approach in acetic acid aqueous containing chitosan. A designed post-thermal treatment was employed to enhance the incorporation between carbon and TiO{sub 2}. After hydrothermal process, mesoporous anatase TiO{sub 2} formed with wrapped by a few layers of carbon shell. Here chitosan was used as not only the template for the formation of mesopores, but also the carbon source toward the carbon layers coating. Furthermore, chitosan provided doping element into TiO{sub 2} lattice and induced to form Ti−C bond which caused Ti(III) with oxygen vacancies. The Ti(III)-oxygen vacancy are partly responsible for visible-light response and high photocatalytic activity, which can accelerate electron transfer thus inhibit photogenerated charge recombination. The photocatalytic activity was evaluated using photo-oxidation of gaseous NO under visible light irradiation as the probe reaction. In the optimum result, 71% of NO with starting concentration at ppb level was photo-degraded. Our results also showed that the photogenerated electrons played a key role in photodegradation of NO, as a result, the environmental humidity level had a negligible effect on the photocatalysis.

  11. Anchored nanostructure materials and method of fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seals, Roland D; Menchhofer, Paul A; Howe, Jane Y; Wang, Wei

    2012-11-27

    Anchored nanostructure materials and methods for their fabrication are described. The anchored nanostructure materials may utilize nano-catalysts that include powder-based or solid-based support materials. The support material may comprise metal, such as NiAl, ceramic, a cermet, or silicon or other metalloid. Typically, nanoparticles are disposed adjacent a surface of the support material. Nanostructures may be formed as anchored to nanoparticles that are adjacent the surface of the support material by heating the nano-catalysts and then exposing the nano-catalysts to an organic vapor. The nanostructures are typically single wall or multi-wall carbon nanotubes.

  12. Nanostructured composite TiO{sub 2}/carbon catalysts of high activity for dehydration of n-butanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cyganiuk, Aleksandra [Faculty of Chemistry, Nicolaus Copernicus University, 87-100 Torun (Poland); Klimkiewicz, Roman [Institute of Low Temperature and Structure Research PAN, 50-422 Wroclaw (Poland); Bumajdad, Ali [Faculty of Science, Kuwait University, PO Box 5969 Safat, Kuwait 13060 (Kuwait); Ilnicka, Anna [Faculty of Chemistry, Nicolaus Copernicus University, 87-100 Torun (Poland); Lukaszewicz, Jerzy P., E-mail: jerzy_lukaszewicz@o2.pl [Faculty of Chemistry, Nicolaus Copernicus University, 87-100 Torun (Poland)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • New biotechnological method for fabrication of composite catalysts. • In situ synthesis of nanosized TiO{sub 2} clusters in the carbon matrix. • High dispersion of TiO{sub 2} in carbon matrix. • High catalytic activity achieved for very low active phase content. • Efficient dehydration of n-butanol to butane-1. - Abstract: A novel method of wood impregnation with titanium ions is presented. Titanium(IV) ions were complexed to peroxo/hydroxo complexes which were obtained by treating a TiCl{sub 4} water solution with H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. The solution of chelated titanium ions was used for the impregnation of living stems of Salix viminalis wood. Saturated stems were carbonized at 600–800 °C, yielding a microporous carbon matrix, in which nanoparticles of TiO{sub 2} were uniformly distributed. A series of composite TiO{sub 2}–carbon catalysts was manufactured and tested in the process of n-butanol conversion to butane-1. The composite catalysts exhibited very high selectivity (ca. 80%) and yield (ca. 30%) despite a low content of titanium (ca. 0.5% atomic). The research proved that the proposed functionalization led to high dispersion of the catalytic phase (TiO{sub 2}), which played a crucial role in the catalyst performance. High dispersion of TiO{sub 2} was achieved due to a natural transport of complexed titanium ions in living plant stems.

  13. Composite materials formed with anchored nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seals, Roland D; Menchhofer, Paul A; Howe, Jane Y; Wang, Wei

    2015-03-10

    A method of forming nano-structure composite materials that have a binder material and a nanostructure fiber material is described. A precursor material may be formed using a mixture of at least one metal powder and anchored nanostructure materials. The metal powder mixture may be (a) Ni powder and (b) NiAl powder. The anchored nanostructure materials may comprise (i) NiAl powder as a support material and (ii) carbon nanotubes attached to nanoparticles adjacent to a surface of the support material. The process of forming nano-structure composite materials typically involves sintering the mixture under vacuum in a die. When Ni and NiAl are used in the metal powder mixture Ni.sub.3Al may form as the binder material after sintering. The mixture is sintered until it consolidates to form the nano-structure composite material.

  14. Analytic device including nanostructures

    KAUST Repository

    Di Fabrizio, Enzo M.

    2015-07-02

    A device for detecting an analyte in a sample comprising: an array including a plurality of pixels, each pixel including a nanochain comprising: a first nanostructure, a second nanostructure, and a third nanostructure, wherein size of the first nanostructure is larger than that of the second nanostructure, and size of the second nanostructure is larger than that of the third nanostructure, and wherein the first nanostructure, the second nanostructure, and the third nanostructure are positioned on a substrate such that when the nanochain is excited by an energy, an optical field between the second nanostructure and the third nanostructure is stronger than an optical field between the first nanostructure and the second nanostructure, wherein the array is configured to receive a sample; and a detector arranged to collect spectral data from a plurality of pixels of the array.

  15. Interfacing nanostructures to biological cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xing; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2012-09-04

    Disclosed herein are methods and materials by which nanostructures such as carbon nanotubes, nanorods, etc. are bound to lectins and/or polysaccharides and prepared for administration to cells. Also disclosed are complexes comprising glycosylated nanostructures, which bind selectively to cells expressing glycosylated surface molecules recognized by the lectin. Exemplified is a complex comprising a carbon nanotube functionalized with a lipid-like alkane, linked to a polymer bearing repeated .alpha.-N-acetylgalactosamine sugar groups. This complex is shown to selectively adhere to the surface of living cells, without toxicity. In the exemplified embodiment, adherence is mediated by a multivalent lectin, which binds both to the cells and the .alpha.-N-acetylgalactosamine groups on the nanostructure.

  16. Activated Carbon Fibers with Hierarchical Nanostructure Derived from Waste Cotton Gloves as High-Performance Electrodes for Supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Chao; Yu, Jianlin; Yang, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Guoqing

    2017-06-01

    One of the most challenging issues that restrict the biomass/waste-based nanocarbons in supercapacitor application is the poor structural inheritability during the activating process. Herein, we prepare a class of activated carbon fibers by carefully selecting waste cotton glove (CG) as the precursor, which mainly consists of cellulose fibers that can be transformed to carbon along with good inheritability of their fiber morphology upon activation. As prepared, the CG-based activated carbon fiber (CGACF) demonstrates a surface area of 1435 m2 g-1 contributed by micropores of 1.3 nm and small mesopores of 2.7 nm, while the fiber morphology can be well inherited from the CG with 3D interconnected frameworks created on the fiber surface. This hierarchically porous structure and well-retained fiber-like skeleton can simultaneously minimize the diffusion/transfer resistance of the electrolyte and electron, respectively, and maximize the surface area utilization for charge accumulation. Consequently, CGACF presents a higher specific capacitance of 218 F g-1 and an excellent high-rate performance as compared to commercial activated carbon.

  17. In situ TEM investigation of congruent phase transition and structural evolution of nanostructured silicon/carbon anode for lithium ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chong-Min; Li, Xiaolin; Wang, Zhiguo; Xu, Wu; Liu, Jun; Gao, Fei; Kovarik, Libor; Zhang, Ji-Guang; Howe, Jane; Burton, David J; Liu, Zhongyi; Xiao, Xingcheng; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Baer, Donald R

    2012-03-14

    It is well-known that upon lithiation, both crystalline and amorphous Si transform to an armorphous Li(x)Si phase, which subsequently crystallizes to a (Li, Si) crystalline compound, either Li(15)Si(4) or Li(22)Si(5). Presently, the detailed atomistic mechanism of this phase transformation and the degradation process in nanostructured Si are not fully understood. Here, we report the phase transformation characteristic and microstructural evolution of a specially designed amorphous silicon (a-Si) coated carbon nanofiber (CNF) composite during the charge/discharge process using in situ transmission electron microscopy and density function theory molecular dynamic calculation. We found the crystallization of Li(15)Si(4) from amorphous Li(x)Si is a spontaneous, congruent phase transition process without phase separation or large-scale atomic motion, which is drastically different from what is expected from a classic nucleation and growth process. The a-Si layer is strongly bonded to the CNF and no spallation or cracking is observed during the early stages of cyclic charge/discharge. Reversible volume expansion/contraction upon charge/discharge is fully accommodated along the radial direction. However, with progressive cycling, damage in the form of surface roughness was gradually accumulated on the coating layer, which is believed to be the mechanism for the eventual capacity fade of the composite anode during long-term charge/discharge cycling. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  18. Influence of calcination temperature on the morphology and energy storage properties of cobalt oxide nanostructures directly grown over carbon cloth substrates

    KAUST Repository

    Baby, Rakhi Raghavan

    2013-09-23

    Nanostructured and mesoporous cobalt oxide (Co3O4) nanowire in flower-like arrangements have been directly grown over flexible carbon cloth collectors using solvothermal synthesis for supercapacitor applications. Changes in the morphology and porosity of the nanowire assemblies have been induced by manipulating the calcination temperature (200–300 °C) of the one-dimensional (1-D) structures, resulting in significant impact on their surface area and pseudocapacitive properties. As the calcination temperature increases from 200 to 250 °C, the flower morphology gradually modifies to the point where the electrolyte could access almost all the nanowires over the entire sample volume, resulting in an increase in specific capacitance from 334 to 605 Fg−1, depending on the nanowire electrode morphology. The 300 °C calcination results in the breakdown of the mesoporous morphology and decreases the efficiency of electrolyte diffusion, resulting in a drop in pseudocapacitance after 300 °C. A peak energy density of 44 Wh kg−1 has been obtained at a power density of 20 kW kg−1 for the 250 °C calcined sample.

  19. Nanostructured manganese oxide/carbon nanotubes, graphene and graphene oxide as water-oxidizing composites in artificial photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafpour, Mohammad Mahdi; Rahimi, Fahime; Fathollahzadeh, Maryam; Haghighi, Behzad; Hołyńska, Małgorzata; Tomo, Tatsuya; Allakhverdiev, Suleyman I

    2014-07-28

    Herein, we report on nano-sized Mn oxide/carbon nanotubes, graphene and graphene oxide as water-oxidizing compounds in artificial photosynthesis. The composites are synthesized by different and simple procedures and characterized by a number of methods. The water-oxidizing activities of these composites are also considered in the presence of cerium(IV) ammonium nitrate. Some composites are efficient Mn-based catalysts with TOF (mmol O2 per mol Mn per second) ~ 2.6.

  20. Dual Tuning of Biomass-Derived Hierarchical Carbon Nanostructures for Supercapacitors: the Role of Balanced Meso/Microporosity and Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhengju; Jiang, Hao; Guo, Shaojun; Cheng, Qilin; Hu, Yanjie; Li, Chunzhong

    2015-01-01

    Rational design of advanced carbon nanomaterials with a balanced mesoporosity to microporosity is highly desirable for achieving high energy/power density for supercapacitors because the mesopore can allow better transport pathways for the solvated ions of larger than 1 nm. Inspired by the inherent meso/macroporous architecture and huge absorption ability to aqueous solution of auricularia biomass, we demonstrate a new biomass-derived synthesis process for the three-dimensional (3D) few-layered graphene nanosheets incorporated hierarchical porous carbon (GHPC) nanohybrids. The as-prepared GHPC nanohybrids possess a balanced mesoporosity to microporosity with much improved conductivity, which is highly desirable for achieving high energy/power density for supercapacitors. As we predicted, they delivered a high specific capacitance of 256 F g−1 at 1 A g−1 with excellent rate capability (120 F g−1 at 50 A g−1) and long cycle life (92% capacity retention after 10000 cycles) for symmetric supercapacitors in 1 M H2SO4. Based on the as-obtained carbon materials, a flexible and all-solid-state supercapacitor was also assembled, which can be fully recharged within 10 s and able to light an LED even under bended state. Such excellent performance is at least comparable to the best reports in the literature for two-electrode configuration under aqueous systems. PMID:26515442

  1. Application of Black Pearl carbon-supported WO 3 nanostructures as hybrid carriers for electrocatalytic RuSe x nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miecznikowski, Krzysztof; Kulesza, Pawel J.; Fiechter, Sebastian

    2011-07-01

    RuSe x electrocatalytic nanoparticles were deposited onto hybrid carriers composed of Black Pearl carbon-supported tungsten oxide; and the resulting system's electrochemical activity was investigated during oxygen reduction reaction. The tungsten oxide-utilizing and RuSe x nanoparticle-containing materials were characterized using transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and electrochemical diagnostic techniques such as cyclic voltammetry and rotating ring-disk voltammetry. Application of Black Pearl carbon carriers modified with ultra-thin films of WO 3 as matrices (supports) for RuSe x catalytic centers results during electroreduction of oxygen in 0.5 mol dm -3 H 2SO 4 (under rotating disk voltammetric conditions) in the potential shift of ca. 70 mV towards more positive values relative to the behavior of the analogous WO 3-free system. Also the percent formation (at ring in the rotating ring-disk voltammetry) of the undesirable hydrogen peroxide has been decreased approximately twice by utilizing WO 3-modified carbon carriers. The results are consistent with the bifunctional mechanism in which oxygen reduction is initiated at RuSe x centers and the hydrogen peroxide intermediate is reductively decomposed at reactive WO 3-modified Black Pearl supports. The electrocatalytic activity of the system utilizing WO 3-modified Black Pearl supports has been basically unchanged upon addition of acetic acid, formic acid or methyl formate to the sulfuric acid supporting electrolyte.

  2. Comparative study on nanostructured MnO2/carbon composites synthesized by spontaneous reduction for supercapacitor application

    KAUST Repository

    Lin, Yen-Po

    2011-10-01

    MnO2 has been deposited onto two types of carbon (C) substrates, including a non-porous multi-wall carbon nano-tube (CNT) and a porous carbon black (CB) powder, by a solution reduction process where MnO4 - was reduced at 80 °C by the C substrate so as to give nano-crystalline MnO2 directly at the C surface. The nature of the C substrate has profound effects on polymorphicity, microstructure and electrochemical properties, in terms of supercapacitor application, of the resulting oxide. Deposition on CNT produces meso/macro-porous layer containing predominantly spinel MnO2 strongly bonded to the CNTs and having a larger surface area, while that on CB results in birnessite granules with a lower surface area. In addition to having a higher specific capacitance (309 F g-1), the MnO2/CNT electrode exhibits superior power performance (221 F g-1 at 500 mV s-1 or ca. 20 Wh kg -1at 88 kW kg-1) to MnO2/CB due to reduced electronic and ion-diffusion resistances. Furthermore, the MnO2/CNT electrode also exhibits slower self-discharging rate and greater cycling stability. The results indicate that the MnO2 spinel/CNT holds promise for supercapacitor applications. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Hydrogen storage in nanotubes & nanostructures

    OpenAIRE

    Froudakis, George E.

    2011-01-01

    Over the last several years, a significant share of the scientific community has focused its attention on the hydrogen storage problem. Since 1997, when carbon nanotubes appeared to be a promising storage material, many theoretical and experimental groups have investigated the hydrogen storage capacity of these carbon nanostructures. These efforts were not always successful and consequently, the results obtained were often controversial. In the current review we attempt to summarize some the ...

  4. High Power Electric Double-Layer Capacitors based on Room-Temperature Ionic Liquids and Nanostructured Carbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Carlos R.

    The efficient storage of electrical energy constitutes both a fundamental challenge for 21st century science and an urgent requirement for the sustainability of our technological civilization. The push for cleaner renewable forms of energy production, such as solar and wind power, strongly depends on a concomitant development of suitable storage methods to pair with these intermittent sources, as well as for mobile applications, such as vehicles and personal electronics. In this regard, Electrochemical Double-Layer Capacitors (supercapacitors) represent a vibrant area of research due to their environmental friendliness, long lifetimes, high power capability, and relative underdevelopment when compared to electrochemical batteries. Currently supercapacitors have gravimetric energies one order of magnitude lower than similarly advanced batteries, while conversly enjoying a similar advantage over them in terms of power. The challenge is to increase the gravimentric energies and conserve the high power. On the material side, research focuses on highly porous supports and electrolytes, the critical components of supercapacitors. Through the use of electrolyte systems with a wider electrochemical stability window, as well as properly tailored carbon nanomaterials as electrodes, significant improvements in performance are possible. Room Temperature Ionic Liquids and Carbide-Derived Carbons are promising electrolytes and electrodes, respectively. RTILs have been shown to be stable at up to twice the voltage of organic solvent-salt systems currently employed in supercapacitors, and CDCs are tunable in pore structure, show good electrical conductivity, and superior demonstrated capability as electrode material. This work aims to better understand the interplay of electrode and electrolyte parameters, such as pore structure and ion size, in the ultimate performance of RTIL-based supercapacitors in terms of power, energy, and temperature of operation. For this purpose, carbon

  5. A novel high energy hybrid Li-ion capacitor with a three-dimensional hierarchical ternary nanostructure of hydrogen-treated TiO2 nanoparticles/conductive polymer/carbon nanotubes anode and an activated carbon cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Gang; Cao, Liujun; Xiao, Peng; Zhang, Yunhuai; Liu, Hao

    2017-07-01

    Lithium ion capacitors (LICs) are considered to be high-performance energy storage devices that have stimulated intense attention to bridge the gap between lithium ion battery and supercapacitor. Currently, the major challenge for LICs has been to improve the energy density without sacrificing the high rate of power output performance. Herein, we designed a three-dimensional (3D) hierarchical porous nanostructure of hydrogen-treated TiO2 nanoparticles wrapped conducting polymer polypyrrole (PPy) framework with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) hybrid (denoted as, H-TiO2/PPy/SWCNTs) anode material for LICs through a conventional and green approach. Such a unique network can offer continuous electron transport and reduce the diffusion length of lithium ions. A greatly lithium storage specific capacity is achieved with reversible discharge capacity ∼213 mA h g-1 (based on the mass of TiO2) over 50 cycles (@ 0.1 A g-1), which is almostly three times compared with raw TiO2 (a commercial TiO2 nanoparticles powder). In addition, coupled with commercial activated carbon (AC) cathode, the fully assembled H-TiO2/PPy/SWCNTs//AC LICs delivers a maximum energy and power densities of 31.3 Wh kg-1 and 4 kW kg-1, a reasonably good cycling stability (∼77.8% retention after 3000 cycles) within the voltage range of 1.0-3.0 V.

  6. The Unexpected Reactivity of the Carbon Sites on the Nanostructured Carbon Catalysts towards the C-H Bond Activation from the Analysis of the Aromaticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, XiaoYing; Li, Bo; Su, DangSheng

    2016-06-06

    It is believed that the oxygen groups on the carbon catalysts are responsible for the observed reactivity for C-H bond activations. On the other hand, the oxygen groups also reduce the aromaticity of the host. The loss of the aromaticity increases reactivities of the carbon atoms and they become the active sites for the C-H bond activation. The newly identified C-C site exhibits the comparable catalytic performance in the oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) of propane compared with the conventional oxygen groups like quinone and ketone. A series of calculations indicate that the aromaticity might be a useful descriptor for the carbon catalysts. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. One-dimensional fossil-like γ-Fe2O3@carbon nanostructure: preparation, structural characterization and application as adsorbent for fast and selective recovery of gold ions from aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunawan, Poernomo; Xiao, Wen; Hao Chua, Marcus Wen; Poh-Choo Tan, Cheryl; Ding, Jun; Zhong, Ziyi

    2016-10-01

    One-dimensional (1D) magnetic nanostructures with high thermal stability have important industrial applications, but their fabrication remains a big challenge. Herein we demonstrate a scalable approach for the preparation of stable 1D γ-Fe2O3@carbon, which is also applicable for other metal oxide-core and carbon-shell nanostructures, such as 1D TiO2@carbon. One-dimensional ferric oxyhydroxide (α-FeO(OH)) was initially prepared by a hydrothermal method, followed by carbon coating through hydrothermal treatment of the resulting metal oxide in glucose solution. After calcination in N2 gas at 500 °C and subsequent exposure to air, the initial carbon-coated 1D α-Fe2O3 was converted to 1D γ-Fe2O3@carbon, which was very stable without any observed changes even after 1.5 years of storage under ambient conditions. The materials were then used as adsorbents and found to be highly selective towards Au (III) adsorption, of which the maximum adsorption capacity is about 600 mg Au/g sorbent (1132 mg Au/g carbon). The spent sorbent containing Au after adsorption can be readily collected by applying a magnetic field due to the presence of the magnetic core, and the adsorbed Au particles are subsequently recovered after the combustion and dissolution of the sorbent. This work demonstrates not only a facile approach to the fabrication of robust 1D magnetic materials with a stable carbon shell, but also a possible cyanide-free process for the fast and selective recovery of gold from electronic waste and industrial water.

  8. Enhanced Absorption Performance of Carbon Nanostructure Based Metamaterials and Tuning Impedance Matching Behavior by an External AC Electric Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholipur, Reza; Khorshidi, Zahra; Bahari, Ali

    2017-04-12

    Metamaterials have surprisingly broadened the range of available practical applications in new devices such as shielding, microwave absorbing, and novel antennas. More research has been conducted related to tuning DNG frequency bands of ordered or disordered metamaterials, and far less research has focused on the importance of impedance matching behavior, with little effort and attention given to adjusting the magnitude of negative permittivity values. This is particularly important if devices deal with low-amplitude signals such as radio or TV antennas. The carbon/hafnium nickel oxide (C/Hf0.9Ni0.1Oy) nanocomposites with simultaneously negative permittivity and negative permeability, excellent metamaterial performance, and good impedance matching could become an efficient alternative for the ordered metamaterials in wave-transparent, microwave absorbing, and solar energy harvesting fields. In this study, we prepared C/Hf0.9Ni0.1Oy nanocomposites by the solvothermal method, and we clarified how the impedance matching and double-negative (DNG) behaviors of C/Hf0.9Ni0.1Oy can be tuned by an external AC electric field created by an electric quadrupole system. An external electric field allows for the alignment of the well-dispersed nanoparticles of carbon with long-range orientations order. We believe that this finding broadens our understanding of moderate conductive material-based random metamaterials (MCMRMs) and provides a novel strategy for replacing high-loss ordered or disordered metamaterials with MCMRMs.

  9. Ultrasensitive photoelectrochemical determination of chromium(VI) in water samples by ion-imprinted/formate anion-incorporated graphitic carbon nitride nanostructured hybrid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Tian; Yang, Xiaomin; Zhang, Lizhi; Gong, Jingming, E-mail: jmgong@mail.ccnu.edu.cn

    2016-07-15

    Highlights: • IIP functionalized F-g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} first applied to Cr(VI) detection. • The first smart integration of F-g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} with IIP yielding a novel PEC sensing probe. • The system also explored for the speciation determination of chromium species. • The resulting sensor exhibiting fine applicability in real water samples. - Abstract: A rapid and highly sensitive photoelectrochemical (PEC) method has been proposed for the determination of trace amounts of chromium in water samples under visible-light irradiation. Here, a unique nanostructured hybrid of formate anion incorporated graphitic carbon nitride (F-g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}) is smartly integrated with a Cr(VI) ion-imprinted polymer (IIP) as a photoactive electrode (denoted as IIP@F-g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}). The nanohybrid of F-g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} exhibits an enhanced charge separation with substantially improved PEC responses versus g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}. The newly designed IIP@F-g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} PEC sensor exhibits high sensitivity and selectivity for the determination of Cr(VI) because it offers efficient photogenerated electron reduction toward Cr(VI). The PEC analysis is highly linear over Cr(VI) concentrations ranging from 0.01 to 100.00 ppb with a detection limit of 0.006 ppb (S/N = 3). Our approach can be used to detect Cr(VI), Cr(III) and the total chromium level in aqueous solution through oxidation of Cr(III) to Cr(VI) and the determination of the total chromium as Cr(VI). In practical applications, this low-cost and sensitive assay has been successfully applied for speciation determination of chromium in environmental water samples.

  10. Metal-Free and Noble Metal-Free Heteroatom-Doped Nanostructured Carbons as Prospective Sustainable Electrocatalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asefa, Tewodros

    2016-09-20

    The large-scale deployment of many types of fuel cells and electrolyzers is currently constrained by the lack of sustainable and efficient catalysts that can replace the less earth-abundant, noble metal-based catalysts, which are commonly used in these renewable energy systems. This burgeoning issue has led to explosive research efforts worldwide to find alternative, metal-free and noble metal-free catalysts that are composed of inexpensive and earth-abundant elements. Hence, the recent discoveries that doping carbon nanomaterials with heteroatoms (such as N, S, B, etc.) can give sustainable materials with good electrocatalytic activity for reactions carried out in fuel cells and electrolyzers have been not only quite exciting but also very promising to address these challenging issues. Interestingly, even though they contain no metals or involve only the inexpensive, more earth-abundant ones, the catalytic activity of some of these materials fares well with those of the commercially used noble metal-based electrocatalysts, such as Pt/C. However, research efforts to improve the catalytic activity, selectivity, and stability of some of these materials for various reactions are still necessary and thus continuing. While some of these efforts have focused on finding synthetic methods that can tune the structures and compositions of already known materials and thereby improve their catalytic properties (activity, selectivity, stability, etc.), others have focused on developing entirely new materials that can exhibit better or superior catalytic properties. In these efforts, additional considerations are also being paid to find facile synthetic routes or renewable and inexpensive precursors that can lead to such types of catalysts in order to make the entire process highly sustainable and widely applicable. In this Account, notable heteroatom-doped carbon catalysts that have been developed for reactions in fuel cells and water electrolyzers, the various synthetic

  11. Highly conductive and flexible nano-structured carbon-based polymer nanocomposites with improved electromagnetic-interference-shielding performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Subhadip; Ghosh, Sabyasachi; Ganguly, Sayan; Das, Poushali; Ravindren, Revathy; Sit, Subhashis; Chakraborty, Goutam; Das, Narayan Ch

    2017-10-01

    Widespread usage and development of electrical/electronic devices can create severe problems for various other devices and in our everyday lives due to harmful exposure to electromagnetic (EM) radiation. Herein, we report on the electromagnetic interference (EMI)-shielding performance of highly flexible and conductive chlorinated polyethylene (CPE)/carbon nanofiber (CNF) nanocomposites fabricated by a probe-sonication-assisted simple solution-mixing process. The dispersion of CNF nanofillers inside the CPE matrix has been studied by electron micrographs. This dispersion is reflected in the formation of continuous conductive networks at a low percolation-threshold value of 2.87 wt% and promising EMI-shielding performance of 41.5 dB for 25 wt% CNF in the X-band frequency (8.2–12.4 GHz). Such an intriguing performance mainly depends on the unique filler–filler or filler–polymer networks in CPE nanocomposites. In addition, the composite material displays a superior EMI efficiency of 47.5 dB for 2.0 mm thickness at 8.2 GHz. However, we have been encouraged by the promotion of highly flexible and lightweight CPE/CNF nanocomposite as a superior EMI shield, which can protect electronic devices against harm caused by EM radiation and offers an adaptable solution in advanced EMI-shield applications.

  12. Silver and zinc oxide nanostructures loaded on activated carbon as new adsorbents for removal of methylene green: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaedi, M; Karimi, H; Yousefi, F

    2014-09-01

    In this study, the removal of methylene green (MG) from aqueous solution based on two new adsorbents including silver nanoparticles and zinc oxide nanorods loaded on activated carbon (Ag-NP-AC and ZnO-NR-AC, respectively) has been carried out. The dependency of removal process to variables such as contact time, pH, amount of adsorbents, and initial MG concentration were examined and optimized. It was found that the maximum MG removal percentage was achieved at pH = 7.0 following stirring at 400 r min(-1) for 7 and 6 min for Ag-NP-AC and ZnO-NR-AC, respectively. Equilibrium data were well fitted with the Langmuir model having maximum adsorption capacity of 166.7 and 200 mg g(-1) for Ag-NP-AC and ZnO-NR-AC, respectively. Thermodynamic parameters of MG adsorption on Ag-NP-AC such as enthalpy and entropy changes, activation energy, sticking probability, and Gibbs free energy changes show the spontaneous and endothermic nature of the removal process. Among different conventional kinetic models, the pseudo second-order kinetics in addition to particle diffusion mechanism is the best and efficient model for the prediction and explanation of experimental data of MG adsorption onto both adsorbents. © The Author(s) 2014.

  13. A cross-functional nanostructured platform based on carbon nanotube-Si hybrid junctions: where photon harvesting meets gas sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigoni, F.; Pintossi, C.; Drera, G.; Pagliara, S.; Lanti, G.; Castrucci, P.; de Crescenzi, M.; Sangaletti, L.

    2017-03-01

    A combination of the functionalities of carbon nanotube (CNT)-Si hybrid heterojunctions is presented as a novel method to steer the efficiency of the photovoltaic (PV) cell based on these junctions, and to increase the selectivity and sensitivity of the chemiresistor gas sensor operated with the p-doped CNT layer. The electrical characteristics of the junctions have been tracked by exposing the devices to oxidizing (NO2) and reducing (NH3) molecules. It is shown that when used as PV cells, the cell efficiency can be reversibly steered by gas adsorption, providing a tool to selectively dope the p-type layer through molecular adsorption. Tracking of the current-voltage curve upon gas exposure also allowed to use these cells as gas sensors with an enhanced sensitivity as compared to that provided by a readout of the electrical signal from the CNT layer alone. In turn, the chemiresistive response was improved, both in terms of selectivity and sensitivity, by operating the system under illumination, as the photo-induced charges at the junction increase the p-doping of CNTs making them more sensitive to NH3 and less to NO2.

  14. Metallic Tungsten Nanostructures and Highly Nanostructured Thin Films by Deposition of Tungsten Oxide and Subsequent Reduction in a Single Hot-Wire CVD Process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harks, P.P.R.M.L.; Houweling, Z.S.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/251874486; de Jong, M.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/325844208; Kuang, Y; Geus, J.W.; Schropp, R.E.I.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/072502584

    2012-01-01

    The synthesis of metallic tungsten nanostructures and highly nanostructured thin films is presented. Crystalline tungsten oxide nanostructures are deposited on glassy carbon substrates kept at 700 100 8C by oxidizing resistively heated tungsten filaments in an air flow under subatmospheric

  15. Many-particle theory of optical properties in low-dimensional nanostructures. Dynamics in single-walled carbon nanotubes and semiconductor quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malic, Ermin

    2008-09-02

    This work focuses on the theoretical investigation of optical properties of low-dimensional nanostructures, specifically single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and self-assembled InAs/GaAs quantum dots (QDs). The density-matrix formalism is applied to explain recent experimental results and to give insight into the underlying physics. A microscopic calculation of the absorption coefficient and the Rayleigh scattering cross section is performed by a novel approach combining the density-matrix formalism with the tight-binding wave functions. The calculated spectra of metallic nanotubes show a double-peaked structure resulting from the trigonal warping effect. The intensity ratios of the four lowest-lying transitions in both absorption and Rayleigh spectra can be explained by the different behavior of the optical matrix elements along the high-symmetry lines K-{gamma} and K-M. The Rayleigh line shape is predicted to be asymmetric, with an enhanced cross section for lower photon energies arising from non-resonant contributions of the optical susceptibility. Furthermore, the Coulomb interaction is shown to be maximal when the momentum transfer is low. For intersubband processes with a perpendicular momentum transfer, the coupling strength is reduced to less than 5%. The chirality and diameter dependence of the excitonic binding energy and the transition frequency are presented in Kataura plots. Furthermore, the influence of the surrounding environment on the optical properties of CNTs is investigated. Extending the confinement to all three spatial dimensions, semiconductor Bloch equation are derived to describe the dynamics in QD semiconductor lasers and amplifiers. A detailed microscopic analysis of the nonlinear turn-on dynamics of electrically pumped InAs/GaAs QD lasers is performed, showing the generation of relaxation oscillations on a nanosecond time scale in both the photon and charge carrier density. The theory predicts a strong damping of relaxation oscillations

  16. Van Der Waals heterogeneous layer-layer carbon nanostructures involving π···H-C-C-H···π···H-C-C-H stacking based on graphene and graphane sheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Kun; Zhao, Rui-Sheng; Zheng, Jia-Jia; Zheng, Hong; Nagase, Shigeru; Zhao, Sheng-Dun; Liu, Yan-Zhi; Zhao, Xiang

    2017-04-15

    Noncovalent interactions involving aromatic rings, such as π···π stacking, CH···π are very essential for supramolecular carbon nanostructures. Graphite is a typical homogenous carbon matter based on π···π stacking of graphene sheets. Even in systems not involving aromatic groups, the stability of diamondoid dimer and layer-layer graphane dimer originates from C - H···H - C noncovalent interaction. In this article, the structures and properties of novel heterogeneous layer-layer carbon-nanostructures involving π···H-C-C-H···π···H-C-C-H stacking based on [n]-graphane and [n]-graphene and their derivatives are theoretically investigated for n = 16-54 using dispersion corrected density functional theory B3LYP-D3 method. Energy decomposition analysis shows that dispersion interaction is the most important for the stabilization of both double- and multi-layer-layer [n]-graphane@graphene. Binding energy between graphane and graphene sheets shows that there is a distinct additive nature of CH···π interaction. For comparison and simplicity, the concept of H-H bond energy equivalent number of carbon atoms (noted as NHEQ), is used to describe the strength of these noncovalent interactions. The NHEQ of the graphene dimers, graphane dimers, and double-layered graphane@graphene are 103, 143, and 110, indicating that the strength of C-H···π interaction is close to that of π···π and much stronger than that of C-H···H-C in large size systems. Additionally, frontier molecular orbital, electron density difference and visualized noncovalent interaction regions are discussed for deeply understanding the nature of the C-H···π stacking interaction in construction of heterogeneous layer-layer graphane@graphene structures. We hope that the present study would be helpful for creations of new functional supramolecular materials based on graphane and graphene carbon nano-structures. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley

  17. Electrostatic interactions for directed assembly of high performance nanostructured energetic materials of Al/Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Tianfu; Ma, Zhuang; Li, Guoping; Wang, Zhen; Zhao, Benbo; Luo, Yunjun, E-mail: yjluo@bit.edu.cn

    2016-05-15

    Electrostatic self-assembly in organic solvent without intensively oxidative or corrosive environments, was adopted to prepare Al/Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/MWCNT nanostructured energetic materials as an energy generating material. The negatively charged MWCNT was used as a glue-like agent to direct the self-assembly of the well dispersed positively charged Al (fuel) and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} (oxide) nanoparticles. This spontaneous assembly method without any surfactant chemistry or other chemical and biological moieties decreased the aggregation of the same nanoparticles largely, moreover, the poor interfacial contact between the Al (fuel) and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} (oxide) nanoparticles was improved significantly, which was the key characteristic of high performance nanostructured energetic materials. In addition, the assembly process was confirmed as Diffusion-Limited Aggregation. The assembled Al/Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/MWCNT nanostructured energetic materials showed excellent performance with heat release of 2400 J/g, peak pressure of 0.42 MPa and pressurization rate of 105.71 MPa/s, superior to that in the control group Al/Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanostructured energetic materials prepared by sonication with heat release of 1326 J/g, peak pressure of 0.19 MPa and pressurization rate of 33.33 MPa/s. Therefore, the approach, which is facile, opens a promising route to the high performance nanostructured energetic materials. - Graphical abstract: The negatively charged MWCNT was used as a glue-like agent to direct the self-assembly of the well dispersed positively charged Al (fuel) and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} (oxide) nanoparticles. - Highlights: • A facile spontaneous electrostatic assembly strategy without surfactant was adopted. • The fuels and oxidizers assembled into densely packed nanostructured composites. • The assembled nanostructured energetic materials have excellent performance. • This high performance energetic material can be scaled up for practical application. • This

  18. Investigations on the Role of N2:(N2 + CH4) Ratio on the Growth of Hydrophobic Nanostructured Hydrogenated Carbon Nitride Thin Films by Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition at Low Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanis, Noor Hamizah; Ritikos, Richard; Ahmad Kamal, Shafarina Azlinda; Abdul Rahman, Saadah

    2017-01-01

    Nanostructured hydrogenated carbon nitride (CNx:H) thin films were synthesized on a crystal silicon substrate at low deposition temperature by radio-frequency plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). Methane and nitrogen were the precursor gases used in this deposition process. The effects of N2 to the total gas flow rate ratio on the formation of CNx:H nanostructures were investigated. Field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), Raman scattering, and Fourier transform of infrared spectroscopies (FTIR) were used to characterize the films. The atomic nitrogen to carbon ratio and sp2 bonds in the film structure showed a strong influence on its growth rate, and its overall structure is strongly influenced by even small changes in the N2:(N2 + CH4) ratio. The formation of fibrous CNx:H nanorod structures occurs at ratios of 0.7 and 0.75, which also shows improved surface hydrophobic characteristic. Analysis showed that significant presence of isonitrile bonds in a more ordered film structure were important criteria contributing to the formation of vertically-aligned nanorods. The hydrophobicity of the CNx:H surface improved with the enhancement in the vertical alignment and uniformity in the distribution of the fibrous nanorod structures. PMID:28772460

  19. Synthesis and coatings production of carbonaceous nanostructures

    OpenAIRE

    Stankevičienė, Inga

    2012-01-01

    Films and coatings of carbonaceous nanostructures are employed in nanoelectronics, biotechnology and other fields. The aim of the research was to synthesize multi-walled carbon nanotubes and graphite oxide and fabricate coatings thereof. Consequently, multi-walled carbon nanotubes and their coatings were synthesized by the catalytic chemical vapour deposition method. As-grown carbon nanotubes inevitably contain remains of metal catalyst particles. A method developed in the laboratory usin...

  20. Covalent crosslinking of carbon nanostructures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    dinary synergy in mechanical properties resulted from incorporating two nanocarbons into polymer matri- ces.11 In this case the binary combination was achieved ..... support and encouragement. References. 1. D'Evelyn M P 1998 Surface Properties of diamond. In. Handbook of industrial diamonds and diamond films. (eds.) ...

  1. Carbon nanostructures under high pressure

    CERN Document Server

    Sundqvist, B

    2002-01-01

    Results from recent high-pressure experiments in the field of fullerenes are briefly reviewed. In particular, new results on one-, two- and three-dimensional polymerized C sub 6 sub 0 and C sub 7 sub 0 are discussed. Results discussed include the first synthesis of a well defined, one-dimensional polymer based on C sub 7 sub 0 , transformations from two-dimensional (2D) to three-dimensional phases in C sub 6 sub 0 , and doping of 2D C sub 6 sub 0 polymers.

  2. Covalent crosslinking of carbon nanostructures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1H NMR (400 MHz, CDCl3): ppm 5.58 (br, NH, 1H), 3.35-3.32 (t, 2H), 3.00-2.97 (t, 2H), 1.93 (NH, 2H), 1.41(s, 9H); 13C NMR (400 MHz, CDCl3): ppm 156.6, 79.7, 40.6, 40.0, 28.5. GCMS: 161.0 [M + H]+, calcd. 160.2 for C7H16N2O2. Figure S3. 1H NMR of mono Boc-1,2-ethelynediamine. Figure S4. GC-MS spectra of ...

  3. Hierarchical nanostructured noble metal/metal oxide/graphene-coated carbon fiber: in situ electrochemical synthesis and use as microelectrode for real-time molecular detection of cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdurhman, Abduraouf Alamer Mohamed; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Guoan; Wang, Shuai

    2015-10-01

    We report the design and fabrication of a new type of nanohybrid microelectrode based on a hierarchical nanostructured Au/MnO2/graphene-modified carbon fiber (CF) via in situ electrochemical synthesis, which leads to better structural integration of different building blocks into the CF microelectrode. Our finding demonstrates that wrapping CF with graphene nanosheets has dramatically increased the surface area and electrical conductivity of the CF microelectrode. The subsequent template-free electrodeposition of MnO2 on graphene-wrapped CF gives rise to a porous nanonest architecture built up from twisted and intersectant MnO2 nanowires, which serves as an ideal substrate for the direct growth of Au nanoparticles. Owing to the structural merit and synergy effect between different components, the hierarchical nanostructured noble metal/metal oxide/graphene-coated CF demonstrates dramatically enhanced electrocatalytic activity. When used for nonenzymatic H2O2 sensing, the resultant modified microelectrode exhibits acceptable sensitivity, reproducibility, stability, and selectivity, which enable it to be used for real-time tracking H2O2 secretion in human cervical cancer cells. Graphical abstract A schematic illustration of preparation of hierarchical Au/MnO2/ERGO/CF nanohybrid electrode for real-time molecular detection of cancer cells.

  4. Nanostructured materials for water desalination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humplik, T.; Lee, J.; O'Hern, S. C.; Fellman, B. A.; Baig, M. A.; Hassan, S. F.; Atieh, M. A.; Rahman, F.; Laoui, T.; Karnik, R.; Wang, E. N.

    2011-07-01

    Desalination of seawater and brackish water is becoming an increasingly important means to address the scarcity of fresh water resources in the world. Decreasing the energy requirements and infrastructure costs of existing desalination technologies remains a challenge. By enabling the manipulation of matter and control of transport at nanometer length scales, the emergence of nanotechnology offers new opportunities to advance water desalination technologies. This review focuses on nanostructured materials that are directly involved in the separation of water from salt as opposed to mitigating issues such as fouling. We discuss separation mechanisms and novel transport phenomena in materials including zeolites, carbon nanotubes, and graphene with potential applications to reverse osmosis, capacitive deionization, and multi-stage flash, among others. Such nanostructured materials can potentially enable the development of next-generation desalination systems with increased efficiency and capacity.

  5. Imaging edges of nanostructured graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kling, Jens; Cagliani, Alberto; Booth, T. J.

    Graphene, as the forefather of 2D-materials, attracts much attention due to its extraordinary properties like transparency, flexibility and outstanding high conductivity, together with a thickness of only one atom. However, graphene also possesses no band gap, which makes it unsuitable for many...... electronic applications like transistors. It has been shown theoretically that by nanostructuring pristine graphene, e.g. with regular holes, the electronic properties can be tuned and a band gap introduced. The size, distance and edge termination of these “defects” influence the adaptability....... Such nanostructuring can be done experimentally, but especially characterization at atomic level is a huge challenge. High-resolution TEM (HRTEM) is used to characterize the atomic structure of graphene. We optimized the imaging conditions used for the FEI Titan ETEM. To reduce the knock-on damage of the carbon atoms...

  6. Transport and dynamics of nanostructured graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunst, Tue

    This thesis is concerned with the heating and electronic properties of nanoscale devices based on nanostructured graphene. As electronic devices scale down to nanometer dimensions, the operation depends on the detailed atomic structure. Emerging carbon nano-materials such as graphene, carbon...... nanotubes and graphene nanoribbons, exhibit promising electronic and heat transport properties. Much research addresses the electron mobility of pristine graphene devices. However, the thermal transport properties, as well as the effects of e-ph interaction, in nanoscale devices, based on nanostructured...... graphene, have received much less attention. This thesis contributes to the understanding of the thermal properties of nanostructured graphene. The computational analysis is based on DFT/TB-NEGF. We show how a regular nanoperforation of a graphene layer - a graphene antidot lattice (GAL) - may...

  7. Bulk Nanostructured Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, C. C.; Langdon, T. G.; Lavernia, E. J.

    2017-11-01

    This paper will address three topics of importance to bulk nanostructured materials. Bulk nanostructured materials are defined as bulk solids with nanoscale or partly nanoscale microstructures. This category of nanostructured materials has historical roots going back many decades but has relatively recent focus due to new discoveries of unique properties of some nanoscale materials. Bulk nanostructured materials are prepared by a variety of severe plastic deformation methods, and these will be reviewed. Powder processing to prepare bulk nanostructured materials requires that the powders be consolidated by typical combinations of pressure and temperature, the latter leading to coarsening of the microstructure. The thermal stability of nanostructured materials will also be discussed. An example of bringing nanostructured materials to applications as structural materials will be described in terms of the cryomilling of powders and their consolidation.

  8. Nanostructured composite reinforced material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seals, Roland D [Oak Ridge, TN; Ripley, Edward B [Knoxville, TN; Ludtka, Gerard M [Oak Ridge, TN

    2012-07-31

    A family of materials wherein nanostructures and/or nanotubes are incorporated into a multi-component material arrangement, such as a metallic or ceramic alloy or composite/aggregate, producing a new material or metallic/ceramic alloy. The new material has significantly increased strength, up to several thousands of times normal and perhaps substantially more, as well as significantly decreased weight. The new materials may be manufactured into a component where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the bulk and/or matrix material, or as a coating where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the coating or surface of a "normal" substrate material. The nanostructures are incorporated into the material structure either randomly or aligned, within grains, or along or across grain boundaries.

  9. Advanced Magnetic Nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Sellmyer, David

    2006-01-01

    Advanced Magnetic Nanostructures is devoted to the fabrication, characterization, experimental investigation, theoretical understanding, and utilization of advanced magnetic nanostructures. Focus is on various types of 'bottom-up' and 'top-down' artificial nanostructures, as contrasted to naturally occurring magnetic nanostructures, such as iron-oxide inclusions in magnetic rocks, and to structures such as perfect thin films. Chapter 1 is an introduction into some basic concepts, such as the definitions of basic magnetic quantities. Chapters 2-4 are devoted to the theory of magnetic nanostructures, Chapter 5 deals with the characterization of the structures, and Chapters 6-10 are devoted to specific systems. Applications of advanced magnetic nanostructures are discussed in Chapters11-15 and, finally, the appendix lists and briefly discusses magnetic properties of typical starting materials. Industrial and academic researchers in magnetism and related areas such as nanotechnology, materials science, and theore...

  10. Nanostructured Materials for Magnetoelectronics

    CERN Document Server

    Mikailzade, Faik

    2013-01-01

    This book provides an up-to-date review of nanometer-scale magnetism and focuses on the investigation of the basic properties of magnetic nanostructures. It describes a wide range of physical aspects together with theoretical and experimental methods. A broad overview of the latest developments in this emerging and fascinating field of nanostructured materials is given with emphasis on the practical understanding and operation of submicron devices based on nanostructured magnetic materials.

  11. Injection moulding antireflective nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Alexander Bruun; Clausen, Jeppe Sandvik; Mortensen, N. Asger

    We present a method for injection moulding antireflective nanostructures on large areas, for high volume production. Nanostructured black silicon masters were fabricated by mask-less reactive ion etching, and electroplated with nickel. The nickel shim was antistiction coated and used in an inject......We present a method for injection moulding antireflective nanostructures on large areas, for high volume production. Nanostructured black silicon masters were fabricated by mask-less reactive ion etching, and electroplated with nickel. The nickel shim was antistiction coated and used...

  12. Injection moulding antireflective nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Alexander Bruun; Clausen, Jeppe Sandvik; Mortensen, N. Asger

    2014-01-01

    We present a method for injection moulding antireflective nanostructures on large areas, for high volume production. Nanostructured black silicon masters were fabricated by mask-less reactive ion etching, and electroplated with nickel. The nickel shim was antistiction coated and used in an inject......We present a method for injection moulding antireflective nanostructures on large areas, for high volume production. Nanostructured black silicon masters were fabricated by mask-less reactive ion etching, and electroplated with nickel. The nickel shim was antistiction coated and used...

  13. Nanostructured layers of thermoelectric materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urban, Jeffrey J.; Lynch, Jared; Coates, Nelson; Forster, Jason; Sahu, Ayaskanta; Chabinyc, Michael; Russ, Boris

    2018-01-30

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to thermoelectric materials. In one aspect, a method includes providing a plurality of nanostructures. The plurality of nanostructures comprise a thermoelectric material, with each nanostructure of the plurality of nanostructures having first ligands disposed on a surface of the nanostructure. The plurality of nanostructures is mixed with a solution containing second ligands and a ligand exchange process occurs in which the first ligands disposed on the plurality of nanostructures are replaced with the second ligands. The plurality of nanostructures is deposited on a substrate to form a layer. The layer is thermally annealed.

  14. Electronic properties of complex nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhen

    Nanostructured materials have brought an unprecedented opportunity for advancement in many fields of human endeavor and in applications. Nanostructures are a new research field which may revolutionize people's everyday life. In the Thesis, I have used theoretical methods including density functional theory (DFT), molecular dynamic simulations (MD) and tight-binding methods to explore the structural, mechanical and electronic properties of various nanomaterials. In all this, I also paid attention to potential applications of these findings. First, I will briefly introduce the scientific background of this Thesis, including the motivation for the study of a boron enriched aluminum surface, novel carbon foam structures and my research interest in 2D electronics. Then I will review the computational techniques I used in the study, mostly DFT methods. In Chapter 3, I introduce an effective way to enhance surface hardness of aluminum by boron nanoparticle implantation. Using boron dimers to represent the nanoparticles, the process of boron implantation is modeled in a molecular dynamics simulation of bombarding the aluminum surface by energetic B 2 molecules. Possible metastable structures of boron-coated aluminum surface are identified. Within these structures, I find that boron atoms prefer to stay in the subsurface region of aluminum. By modeling the Rockwell indentation process, boron enriched aluminum surface is found to be harder than the pristine aluminum surface by at least 15%. In Chapter 4, I discuss novel carbon structures, including 3D carbon foam and related 2D slab structures. Carbon foam contains both sp 2 and sp3 hybridized carbon atoms. It forms a 3D honeycomb lattice with a comparable stability to fullerenes, suggesting possible existence of such carbon foam structures. Although the bulk 3D foam structure is semiconducting, an sp2 terminated carbon surface could maintain a conducting channel even when passivated by hydrogen. To promote the experimental

  15. Matrix-assisted energy conversion in nanostructured piezoelectric arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirbuly, Donald J.; Wang, Xianying; Wang, Yinmin

    2013-01-01

    A nanoconverter is capable of directly generating electricity through a nanostructure embedded in a polymer layer experiencing differential thermal expansion in a stress transfer zone. High surface-to-volume ratio semiconductor nanowires or nanotubes (such as ZnO, silicon, carbon, etc.) are grown either aligned or substantially vertically aligned on a substrate. The resulting nanoforest is then embedded with the polymer layer, which transfers stress to the nanostructures in the stress transfer zone, thereby creating a nanostructure voltage output due to the piezoelectric effect acting on the nanostructure. Electrodes attached at both ends of the nanostructures generate output power at densities of .about.20 nW/cm.sup.2 with heating temperatures of .about.65.degree. C. Nanoconverters arrayed in a series parallel arrangement may be constructed in planar, stacked, or rolled arrays to supply power to nano- and micro-devices without use of external batteries.

  16. Attribution of white-light emitting centers with carbonized surface in nano-structured SiO{sub 2}:C layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasin, A.V., E-mail: av966@yahoo.co [Lashkaryov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Kiev, 03028 (Ukraine); Muto, Sh. [Department of Materials, Physics and Energy Engineering, Nagoya University, 464-8603 (Japan); Ishikawa, Yu. [Japan Fine Ceramics Center, Nagoya, 456-8587 (Japan); Salonen, J. [Department of Physics, University of Turku, FI-20014 Turku (Finland); Nazarov, A.N.; Lysenko, V.S. [Lashkaryov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Kiev, 03028 (Ukraine)

    2011-04-01

    Carbon incorporated silicon oxide layers were fabricated by carbonization of porous silicon layer in acetylene atmosphere followed by oxidation in wet argon. The resulting porous SiO{sub 2}:C material exhibited a strong white photoluminescence. Subsequent thermal treatment in oxygen at 600 {sup o}C significantly decreased the green-yellow part of photoluminescence band while blue shoulder remained unchanged. Annealing at the same temperature in pure argon did not change light-emission properties indicating that the green-yellow light-emission sites originate from the surface. This study focuses on the interface of silicon oxide matrix and carbon inclusions by high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) combined with electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). It is confirmed by EELS and STEM that the green-yellow emission band is associated with the carbonized interface in the porous layer.

  17. Electron emission from nanostructured materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safir, Abdelilah

    In this dissertation, standardized methods for measuring electron emission (EE) from nanostructured materials are established. Design of an emitter array platform, synthesis and nanomanipulation of different types of are successfully conducted. Preexisting as well as novel nanostructures are examined for possible use as electron point sources. Three main categories of emitters are under evaluation: oxide nanowires, metallic nanowires and carbon based nanomaterials (CBNs). Tungsten oxides nanowires have low work function, then metallic nanowires have high electrical conductivity and abundant number of free electrons at and below their Fermi level and lastly, CBNs have superior electrical, mechanical, chemical and thermal properties. This evaluation is designed to compare and choose among the nanoemitters that are suitable for EE. Simulation through theoretical modeling is provided to optimize the parameters directly or indirectly affecting EE properties. The models are to enhance the emitter's performance through increase the packing density, reduce the field screening effect, lower the turn-on and the threshold electric fields and increase the emission current densities. The current estimations and the modeling of the validity regions where EE types theoretically exist, help to select and fabricate optimum emitters. An assembly consisting of sample substrate, electrical feedthroughs, electrodes, nano/micro-manipulator and insulators are mounted within a vacuum chamber. An ion vacuum pump and a turbo pump are used to reach a vacuum pressure of 10-7 Torr. Two systems are used for EE characterization of nanostructures: bulk and In-situ configurations. The bulk investigation is realized by designing a vacuum chamber and different sample holders that can resist harsh environment as well as high temperature for both FE and TE experiments. In-situ experiments are conducted in the chamber of the scanning electron microscope (SEM), it consists of designing special sample

  18. Géochimie et nanostructures des carbones des achondrites primitives : recherche de signatures pré-accrétionnelles par SIMS, Raman et METHR

    OpenAIRE

    Charon, Emeline

    2012-01-01

    This thesis is focused on the contribution of the coupling of multi-scale organization and C, N isotopic composition of carbons in differentiated meteorites (acapulcoites – lodranites (A-L)), in order to better understand the history of their parent body. We systematically combined observations of carbons from these meteorites with experimental analogues. We developed an original methodology associating the study of the organization at the micrometre to nanometre scales (by Transmission Elect...

  19. Nanostructured inorganic solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musselman, Kevin P. [Cambridge Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics; Schmidt-Mende, Lukas [Ludwig-Maximilians Univ. Muenchen (DE). Dept. of Physics and Center for NanoScience (CeNS)

    2011-07-01

    Recent progress in the development of nanostructured inorganic solar cells is reviewed. Nanostructuring of inorganic solar cells offers the possibility of reducing the cost of photovoltaics by allowing smaller amounts of lower-grade photovoltaic semiconductors to be used. Various fabrication methods used to nanostructure traditional photovoltaic semiconductors are detailed and the performance of resulting devices is discussed. The synthesis of solar cells by solution-based methods using less traditional, abundant materials is identified as a promising route to widescale photovoltaic electricity generation, and nanostructured solar cell geometries are highlighted as essential in this approach. Templating and self-assembling methods used to produce appropriate low-cost nanostructures from solutions are detailed, and the performance of preliminary ultra-low-cost cells made with these structures is reviewed. (orig.)

  20. Filling of carbon nanotubes and nanofibres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reece D. Gately

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The reliable production of carbon nanotubes and nanofibres is a relatively new development, and due to their unique structure, there has been much interest in filling their hollow interiors. In this review, we provide an overview of the most common approaches for filling these carbon nanostructures. We highlight that filled carbon nanostructures are an emerging material for biomedical applications.

  1. Toward binder-free electrochemical capacitor electrodes of vanadium oxide-nanostructured carbon by supercritical fluid deposition: Precursor adsorption and conversion, and electrode performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Quyet H.; Smithyman, Jesse; Zeng, Changchun; Zhang, Chuck; Liang, Richard; Zheng, Jim P.

    2014-02-01

    Electrochemical capacitor electrodes were fabricated by depositing an ultra-thin layer of vanadium oxide on a high conducting, large specific surface area (SSA) materials (substrates) using a supercritical fluid adsorption-calcination method. The high SSA materials included binder free single walled carbon nanotube-activated carbon (SWCNT-AC) composites and the traditional electrode of activated carbon-carbon black-polymer binder (AC-CB-binder). The uptake of the organometallic precursor for the oxide (vanadium (III) acetylacetonate) on the substrates were investigated and related to their SSA. Precursor uptakes up to 54.7 wt% of the initial carbon substrate was achieved. Calcination conditions for converting the precursor to oxide and electrochemical properties of the electrodes were thoroughly investigated. The V2O5, which showed extremely high specific pseudo-capacitance (>1000 F g-1 at 100 mV s-1), greatly enhanced the overall electrode performances. Conversely, the V2O5 pseudo-capacitance was better utilized in the SWCNT-AC substrate, particularly at high working speeds, because of the significantly higher electrical conductivity. For example, the SWCNT-AC-V2O5 composite (weight ratio 40:60) had its volumetric capacitance doubled, comparing to the ∼50% increase in the AC-CB-binder sample at 100 mV s-1.

  2. DNA-based Artificial Nanostructures: Fabrication, Properties, and Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Young; Kiang, Ching-Hwa

    2005-01-01

    Table of Content 1. Introduction 2. DNA fundamentals 3. Attachment of DNA to surface 4. Fabrication of nanostructures using DNA 4.1 Nanostructures of pure DNA 4.2 DNA-based assembly of metal nanoparticles 4.3 Construction of semiconductor particle arrays using DNA 4.4 DNA-directed nanowires 4.5 DNA-functionalized carbon nanotubes 4.6 Field-transistor based on DNA 4.7 Nanofabrication using artificial DNA 5. DNA-based nanostructures as biosensors 6. Properties of DNA-linked gold nanoparticles 6...

  3. Self-assembly of graphene nanostructures on nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Niladri; Song, Yuanbo; Král, Petr

    2011-03-22

    We demonstrate by molecular dynamics simulations that carbon nanotubes can activate and guide on their surfaces and in their interiors the self-assembly of planar graphene nanostructures of various sizes and shapes. Nanotubes can induce bending, folding, sliding, and rolling of the nanostructures in vacuum and in the presence of solvent, leading to stable graphene rings, helices, and knots. We investigate the self-assembly conditions and analyze the stability of the formed nanosystems, with numerous possible applications.

  4. Flexible and Foldable Fully-Printed Carbon Black Conductive Nanostructures on Paper for High-Performance Electronic, Electrochemical, and Wearable Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santhiago, Murilo; Corrêa, Cátia C; Bernardes, Juliana S; Pereira, Mariane P; Oliveira, Letícia J M; Strauss, Mathias; Bufon, Carlos C B

    2017-07-19

    In this work, we demonstrate the first example of fully printed carbon nanomaterials on paper with unique features, aiming the fabrication of functional electronic and electrochemical devices. Bare and modified inks were prepared by combining carbon black and cellulose acetate to achieve high-performance conductive tracks with low sheet resistance. The carbon black tracks withstand extremely high folding cycles (>20 000 cycles), a new record-high with a response loss of less than 10%. The conductive tracks can also be used as 3D paper-based electrochemical cells with high heterogeneous rate constants, a feature that opens a myriad of electrochemical applications. As a relevant demonstrator, the conductive ink modified with Prussian-blue was electrochemically characterized proving to be very promising toward the detection of hydrogen peroxide at very low potentials. Moreover, carbon black circuits can be fully crumpled with negligible change in their electrical response. Fully printed motion and wearable sensors are additional examples where bioinspired microcracks are created on the conductive track. The wearable devices are capable of efficiently monitoring extremely low bending angles including human motions, fingers, and forearm. Here, to the best of our knowledge, the mechanical, electronic, and electrochemical performance of the proposed devices surpasses the most recent advances in paper-based devices.

  5. Simultaneous determination of nitroaromatic compounds in water using capillary electrophoresis with amperometric detection on an electrode modified with a mesoporous nano-structured carbon material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Dongxia; Li, Ping; Zhang, Dan; Zhou, Tianshu; Liang, Ying; Shi, Guoyue

    2010-09-01

    In this article, a carbon disk electrode modified with mesoporous carbon material (CMK-3) was used in CE with amperometric detection system for the simultaneous determination of four types of important nitroaromatic compounds, including 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), 1,3,5-trinitrobenzene (TNB), 2,4-dinitrotoluene (DNT) and 1,3-dinitrobenzene (DNB). Compared with the bare carbon electrode, the CMK-3 modified electrode greatly improved the sensitivity at a relatively positive detection potential due to its excellent electrocatalytic activities, high conductivity and large effective surface area. The four analytes could be well separated and detected within 480 s. A good linear response was obtained for TNB, DNB, TNT and DNT from 8.4 to 5.0 x 10(3) μg/L, with correlation coefficients higher than 0.9992. And the detection limits were established between 3.0 and 4.7 μg/L for the four investigated nitroaromatic compounds (S/N=3). The CMK-3-modified electrode was successfully employed to analyze coking wastewater, tap water and river samples with recoveries in the range of 94.8-109.0%, and RSDs less than 5.0%. The presented results demonstrated that the CMK-3-modified carbon electrode used in CE with amperometric detection was of convenient preparation, high sensitivity and good repeatability, which could be employed in the rapid determination of practical samples.

  6. Modeling Carbon Nanostructures with the Self-Consistent Charge Density-Functional Tight-Binding Method: Vibrational Spectra and Electronic Structure of C₂₈, C₆₀, and C₇₀

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witek, Henryk A.; Irle, Stephen; Zheng, Guishan; De Jong, Wibe A.; Morokuma, Keiji

    2006-12-07

    The self-consistent charge density-functional tight-binding (SCC-DFTB) method is employed for studying various molecular properties of small fullerenes: C₂₈, C₆₀, and C₇₀. The computed optimized bond distances, vibrational infrared and Raman spectra, vibrational densities of states, and electronic densities of states are compared with experiment (where available) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations using various basis sets. The presented DFT benchmark calculations using the correlation-consistent polarized valence triple zeta (cc-pVTZ) basis set of Dunning are at present the most extensive calculations on harmonic frequencies of these species. Possible limitations of the SCC-DFTB method for the prediction of molecular vibrational and optical properties are discussed. The presented results suggest that SCC-DFTB is a computationally feasible and reliable method for predicting vibrational and electronic properties of such carbon nanostructures comparable in accuracy with small to medium size basis set DFT calculations at the computational cost of standard semiempirical methods.

  7. Modeling energy transport in nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattamatta, Arvind

    Heat transfer in nanostructures differ significantly from that in the bulk materials since the characteristic length scales associated with heat carriers, i.e., the mean free path and the wavelength, are comparable to the characteristic length of the nanostructures. Nanostructure materials hold the promise of novel phenomena, properties, and functions in the areas of thermal management and energy conversion. Example of thermal management in micro/nano electronic devices is the use of efficient nanostructured materials to alleviate 'hot spots' in integrated circuits. Examples in the manipulation of heat flow and energy conversion include nanostructures for thermoelectric energy conversion, thermophotovoltaic power generation, and data storage. One of the major challenges in Metal-Oxide Field Effect Transistor (MOSFET) devices is to study the 'hot spot' generation by accurately modeling the carrier-optical phonon-acoustic phonon interactions. Prediction of hotspot temperature and position in MOSFET devices is necessary for improving thermal design and reliability of micro/nano electronic devices. Thermoelectric properties are among the properties that may drastically change at nanoscale. The efficiency of thermoelectric energy conversion in a material is measured by a non-dimensional figure of merit (ZT) defined as, ZT = sigmaS2T/k where sigma is the electrical conductivity, S is the Seebeck coefficient, T is the temperature, and k is the thermal conductivity. During the last decade, advances have been made in increasing ZT using nanostructures. Three important topics are studied with respect to energy transport in nanostructure materials for micro/nano electronic and thermoelectric applications; (1) the role of nanocomposites in improving the thermal efficiency of thermoelectric devices, (2) the interfacial thermal resistance for the semiconductor/metal contacts in thermoelectric devices and for metallic interconnects in micro/nano electronic devices, (3) the

  8. Simultaneous determination of levodopa, carbidopa and tryptophan using nanostructured electrochemical sensor based on novel hydroquinone and carbon nanotubes: Application to the analysis of some real samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazloum-Ardakani, Mohammad, E-mail: mazloum@yazduni.ac.ir [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Yazd University, Yazd 89195-741 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ganjipour, Bahram [Institute of Nanotechnology, University of Kashan, Kashan 87317 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Beitollahi, Hadi [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Yazd University, Yazd 89195-741 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Environmet Department, Research Institute of Environmental Sciences, International Center for Science, High Technology and Environmental Sciences, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Amini, Mohammad Kazem [Department of Chemistry, University of Isfahan, Isfahan 81744-73441 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mirkhalaf, Fakhradin [Sonochemistry Center, Coventry University, Coventry CV1 5FB (United Kingdom); Naeimi, Hossein; Nejati-Barzoki, Maryam [Department of Organic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Kashan, Kashan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-10-30

    Highlights: > A novel hydroquinone-carbon nanotube paste electrode have been fabricated. > This electrode reduced the oxidation potential of levodopa by about 460 mV. > Some kinetic parameters for oxidation of levodopa has been determined. > This electrode resolved the voltammetric waves of levodopa, carbidopa and tryptophan. > This electrode used for determination of levodopa in some real samples. - Abstract: In the present paper, the use of a novel carbon paste electrode modified by 2, 2'-[1,2-ethanediylbis (nitriloethylidyne)]-bis-hydroquinone (EBNBH) and carbon nanotubes prepared by a simple and rapid method for the determination of levodopa (LD), carbidopa (CD) and tryptophan (Trp) was described. In the first part of the work, cyclic voltammetry was used to investigate the redox properties of this modified electrode at various scan rates. The apparent charge-transfer rate constant, k{sub s}, and transfer coefficient, {alpha}, for electron transfer between EBNBH and carbon nanotube paste electrode were calculated. In the second part of the work, the mediated oxidation of LD at the modified electrode was described. It has been found that under optimum condition (pH 7.0) in cyclic voltammetry, the oxidation of LD occurs at a potential about 460 mV less positive than that of an unmodified carbon paste electrode. The values of electron transfer coefficient ({alpha}), catalytic rate constant (k{sub h}') and diffusion coefficient (D) were calculated for LD, using electrochemical approaches. Differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) exhibited two linear dynamic ranges and a detection limit (3{sigma}) of 0.094 {mu}M for LD. In the third part of the work, simultaneous determination of LD, CD and Trp at the modified electrode was described. Finally, this method was used for the determination of LD in some real samples, using standard addition method.

  9. Biomolecule-based nanomaterials and nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willner, Itamar; Willner, Bilha

    2010-10-13

    Biomolecule-nanoparticle (or carbon nanotube) hybrid systems provide new materials that combine the unique optical, electronic, or catalytic properties of the nanoelements with the recognition or biocatalytic functions of biomolecules. This article summarizes recent applications of biomolecule-nanoparticle (or carbon nanotubes) hybrid systems for sensing, synthesis of nanostructures, and for the fabrication of nanoscale devices. The use of metallic nanoparticles for the electrical contacting of redox enzymes with electrodes, and as catalytic labels for the development of electrochemical biosensors is discussed. Similarly, biomolecule-quantum dot hybrid systems are implemented for optical biosensing, and for monitoring intracellular metabolic processes. Also, the self-assembly of biomolecule-metal nanoparticle hybrids into nanostructures and functional nanodevices is presented. The future perspectives of the field are addressed by discussing future challenges and highlighting different potential applications.

  10. New synthesis of poly ortho-methoxyaniline nanostructures and its application to construct modified multi-wall carbon nanotube/graphite paste electrode for simultaneous determination of uric acid and folic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajabi, Hossein; Noroozifar, Meissam

    2017-06-01

    Uric acid (UA) and folic acid (FA) are compounds of biomedical interest. In humans, about 70% of daily uric acid disposal occurs via the kidneys, and in 5-25% of humans, impaired renal (kidney) excretion leads to hyperuricemia. Folate is another form folic acid of which is known as, is one of the B vitamins. It is used as a supplement by women to prevent neural tube defects developing during pregnancy. Polyortho-methoxyaniline nanostructures (POMANS) was synthesized with a new two phase (organic-water) synthesis method. The POMANS was characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Fourier transform IR (FTIR). This polymer was used to construct a modified multi-wall carbon nanotube, graphite paste electrode (POMANS-MWCNT/GPE). Linear sweep voltammograms (LSV), cyclic voltammetry (CV) and chronoamperometry were used to investigate the suitability of polyortho-methoxyaniline with multi-wall carbon nanotubes paste electrode as a modifier for the electrocatalytic oxidation of UA and FA in aqueous solutions with various pHs. The results showed that POMANS-MWCNT/GPE had high anodic peak currents for the electrooxidation of UA and FA in pH6.0.Under the optimized conditions, The catalytic peak currents obtained, was linearly dependent on the UA and FA concentrations in the range of 0.6-52 and 0.5-68μM with two segments and the detection limits 0.157 and 0.113μM for UA and FA were, respectively. Finally, the proposed method was also examined as a sensitive, simple and inexpensive electrochemical sensor for the simultaneous determination of UA and FA in real samples such as urine and serum. Copyright © 2017 +98-54-3344-6565. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Biophysical and electrochemical properties of Self-assembled noncovalent SWNT/DNA hybrid and electroactive nanostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzapoor, Aboulfazl; Ranjbar, Bijan

    2017-09-01

    DNA self-assembled hybrid nanostructures are widely used in recent research in nanobiotechnology. Combination of DNA with carbon based nanoparticles such as single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT), multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWNT) and carbon quantum dot were applied in important biological applications. Many examples of biosensors, nanowires and nanoelectronic devices, nanomachine and drug delivery systems are fabricated by these hybrid nanostructures. In this study, a new hybrid nanostructure has been fabricated by noncovalent interactions between single or double stranded DNA and SWNT nanoparticles and biophysical properties of these structures were studied comparatively. Biophysical properties of hybrid nanostructures studied by circular dichroism, UV-vis and fluorescence spectroscopy techniques. Also, electrochemical properties studied by cyclic voltammetry, linear sweep voltammetry, square wave voltammetry, choronoamperometry and impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Results revealed that the biophysical and electrochemical properties of SWNT/DNA hybrid nanostructures were different compare to ss-DNA, ds-DNA and SWNT singly. Circular dichroism results showed that ss-DNA wrapped around the nanotubes through π-π stacking interactions. The results indicated that after adding SWNT to ss-DNA and ds-DNA intensity of CD and UV-vis spectrum peaks were decreased. Electrochemical experiments indicated that the modification of single-walled carbon nanotubes by ss-DNA improves the electron transfer rate of hybrid nanostructures. It was demonstrated SWNT/DNA hybrid nanostructures should be a good electroactive nanostructure that can be used for electrochemical detection or sensing.

  12. Injection moulding antireflective nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Alexander Bruun; Clausen, Jeppe Sandvik; Mortensen, N. Asger

    We present a method for injection moulding antireflective nanostructures on large areas, for high volume production. Nanostructured black silicon masters were fabricated by mask-less reactive ion etching, and electroplated with nickel. The nickel shim was antistiction coated and used in an inject......We present a method for injection moulding antireflective nanostructures on large areas, for high volume production. Nanostructured black silicon masters were fabricated by mask-less reactive ion etching, and electroplated with nickel. The nickel shim was antistiction coated and used...... in an injection moulding process, to fabricate the antireflective surfaces. The cycle-time was 35 s. The injection moulded structures had a height of 125 nm, and the visible spectrum reflectance of injection moulded black polypropylene surfaces was reduced from 4.5±0.5% to 2.5±0.5%. The gradient of the refractive...

  13. Self-assembled nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Jin Z; Liu, Jun; Chen, Shaowei; Liu, Gang-yu

    2003-01-01

    Nanostructures refer to materials that have relevant dimensions on the nanometer length scales and reside in the mesoscopic regime between isolated atoms and molecules in bulk matter. These materials have unique physical properties that are distinctly different from bulk materials. Self-Assembled Nanostructures provides systematic coverage of basic nanomaterials science including materials assembly and synthesis, characterization, and application. Suitable for both beginners and experts, it balances the chemistry aspects of nanomaterials with physical principles. It also highlights nanomaterial-based architectures including assembled or self-assembled systems. Filled with in-depth discussion of important applications of nano-architectures as well as potential applications ranging from physical to chemical and biological systems, Self-Assembled Nanostructures is the essential reference or text for scientists involved with nanostructures.

  14. A low-potential, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-assisted electrodeposition of cobalt oxide/hydroxide nanostructures onto vertically-aligned multi-walled carbon nanotube arrays for glucose sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Jiang [Food and Bioprocess Engineering laboratory, Department of Biological Systems Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 460 Henry Mall, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Zhang Weide [Nanoscience Research Center, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510630 (China); Gunasekaran, Sundaram, E-mail: guna@wisc.edu [Food and Bioprocess Engineering laboratory, Department of Biological Systems Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 460 Henry Mall, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2011-06-30

    Highlights: > We successfully synthesized CoOx.nH{sub 2}O-MWCNTs nanocomposites using a cathodic electrochemical reduction of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} to deposit cobalt oxide/hydroxide nanostructures onto vertically well-aligned MWCNTs arrays. > This is an enzyme-free sensor. > Under optimal detection conditions, the sensor showed a good-enough sensitivity of 162.8 {mu}A mM{sup -1} cm{sup -2}, a low detection limit of 2.0 {mu}M (S/N = 3) and a fast response of less than 4 s within the linear range of up to 4.5 mM. > Other advantages of the sensor for Glc measurements include high insensitivity to common interferences, long-term stability, reproducibility and resistance to chloride poisoning without additional outer membrance like Nafion. Therefor it is useful for routine Glc analysis. > The novel nanocomposite material with good mechanical strength and high conductivity can be planted into microchannels to conduct sophisticated lab-on-a-chip Glc detection. - Abstract: A novel nanocomposite was synthesized using a cathodic, low-potential, electrochemical reduction of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} to homogeneously deposit cobalt oxide/hydroxide (denoted as CoOx.nH{sub 2}O) nanostructures onto vertically well-aligned multi-walled carbon nanotube arrays (MWCNTs), while the MWCNTs were prepared by catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on a tantalum (Ta) substrate. The CoOx.nH{sub 2}O-MWCNTs nanocomposite exhibits much higher electrocatalytic activity towards glucose (Glc) after modification with CoOx.nH{sub 2}O than before. This non-enzymatic Glc sensor has a high sensitivity (162.8 {mu}A mM{sup -1} cm{sup -2}), fast response time (<4 s) and low detection limit (2.0 {mu}M at signal/noise ratio = 3), and a linear dynamic range up to 4.5 mM. The sensor output is stable over 30 days and unaffected by common interferents that co-exist with Glc in analytical samples; it is also resistant to chloride poisoning. These features make the CoOx.nH{sub 2}O-MWCNTs nanocomposite a promising electrode

  15. Process Development for Nanostructured Photovoltaics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elam, Jeffrey W.

    2015-01-01

    Photovoltaic manufacturing is an emerging industry that promises a carbon-free, nearly limitless source of energy for our nation. However, the high-temperature manufacturing processes used for conventional silicon-based photovoltaics are extremely energy-intensive and expensive. This high cost imposes a critical barrier to the widespread implementation of photovoltaic technology. Argonne National Laboratory and its partners recently invented new methods for manufacturing nanostructured photovoltaic devices that allow dramatic savings in materials, process energy, and cost. These methods are based on atomic layer deposition, a thin film synthesis technique that has been commercialized for the mass production of semiconductor microelectronics. The goal of this project was to develop these low-cost fabrication methods for the high efficiency production of nanostructured photovoltaics, and to demonstrate these methods in solar cell manufacturing. We achieved this goal in two ways: 1) we demonstrated the benefits of these coatings in the laboratory by scaling-up the fabrication of low-cost dye sensitized solar cells; 2) we used our coating technology to reduce the manufacturing cost of solar cells under development by our industrial partners.

  16. Core-shell nanostructured catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiao; Lee, Ilkeun; Joo, Ji Bong; Zaera, Francisco; Yin, Yadong

    2013-08-20

    excellent catalytic activity for the oxidation of organic compounds under UV, visible, and direct sunlight. The enhanced photocatalytic efficiency of this nanostructure resulted from an added interfacial nonmetal doping, which improved visible light absorption, and from plasmonic metal decoration that enhanced light harvesting and charge separation. In addition to our synthetic efforts, we have developed ways to evaluate the accessibility of reactants to the metal cores and to characterize the catalytic properties of the core-shell samples we have synthesized. We have adapted infrared absorption spectroscopy and titration experiments using carbon monoxide and other molecules as probes to study adsorption on the surface of metal cores in metal oxide-shell structures in situ in both gas and liquid phases. In particular, the experiments in solution have provided insights into the ease of diffusion of molecules of different sizes in and out of the shells in these catalysts.

  17. The formation of nanostructured carbon material on a ferrocene-containing polymer surface induced by a high-power ion beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovivchak, V. S.; Kryazhev, Yu. G.; Zapevalova, E. S.

    2016-02-01

    The surface morphology and the composition of polymer layers based on chlorinated polyvinylchloride with addition of ferrocene (up to 10% of the polymer mass) subject to the action of a nanosecond high-power ion beam are studied. It is demonstrated that carbon material in the form of nanofibers with an average diameter of 80 nm and a length of up to 10 μm is formed on a surface singly irradiated by such beam with a current density of ˜100 A/cm2. A possible mechanism of the observed phenomenon is discussed.

  18. 1.5 V battery driven reduced graphene oxide-silver nanostructure coated carbon foam (rGO-Ag-CF) for the purification of drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Surender; Ghosh, Somnath; Munichandraiah, N; Vasan, H N

    2013-06-14

    A porous carbon foam (CF) electrode modified with a reduced graphene oxide-Ag (rGO-Ag) nanocomposite has been fabricated to purify water. It can perform as an antibacterial device by killing pathogenic microbes with the aid of a 1.5 V battery, with very little power consumption. The device is recycled ten times with good performance for long term usage. It is shown that the device may be implemented as a fast water purifier to deactivate the pathogens in drinking water.

  19. Construction of hierarchical FeCo2O4@MnO2 core-shell nanostructures on carbon fibers for high-performance asymmetric supercapacitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Fangfang; Liu, Yu; Yan, Ming; Shi, Weidong

    2018-02-15

    In this work, the novel hierarchical FeCo2O4@MnO2 core-shell nanosheet arrays have been synthesized by a facile hydrothermal method, which are grown directly on a flexible carbon fiber (CF) as an integrated electrode for supercapacitors. Scanning electron microscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy measurements illustrate that MnO2 nanoflakes uniformly wrap around the surface of two-dimensional FeCo2O4 nanosheets. The electrode exhibits high areal capacitance of 4.8Fcm-2 at a current density of 1mAcm-2. Moreover, an asymmetric FeCo2O4@MnO2//active carbon (AC) cell is successfully fabricated. The asymmetric supercapacitor (ASC) displays high energy density/power density (22.68Whkg-1 at 406.01Wkg-1 and 7.06Whkg-1 at 1802.5Wkg-1), as well as excellent cycling stability with 90.1% of the initial capacitance after 5000 continuous cycles. Moreover, two ASCs connected in series can light a LED. These performances demonstrate great potential of the designed ASC in the field of energy storage due to their remarkable electrochemical properties. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Effect of the pulsed laser deposition conditions on the tribological properties of thin-film nanostructured coatings based on molybdenum diselenide and carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fominskii, V. Yu.; Grigor'ev, S. N.; Romanov, R. I.; Nevolin, V. N.

    2012-04-01

    The structural state and tribological properties of gradient and composite antifriction coatings produced by pulsed laser codeposition from MoSe2(Ni) and graphite targets are studied. The coatings are deposited onto steel substrates in vacuum and an inert gas, and an antidrop shield is used to prevent the deposition of micron-size particles from a laser jet onto the coating. The deposition of a laser jet from the graphite target and the application of a negative potential to the substrate ensure additional high-energy atom bombardment of growing coatings. Comparative tribological tests performed at a relative air humidity of ˜50% demonstrate that the "drop-free" deposition of a laser-induced atomic flux in the shield shadow significantly improves the antifriction properties of MoSe x coatings, decreasing the friction coefficient from 0.07 to 0.04. The best tribological properties, which combine a low friction coefficient and high wear resistance, are detected in drop-free MoSe x coatings additionally alloyed with carbon (up to ˜55 at %) and subjected to effective bombardment by high-energy atoms during growth. Under these conditions, a dense nanocomposite structure containing the self-lubricating MoSe2 phase and an amorphous carbon phase with a rather high concentration of diamond bonds forms.

  1. Direct evidence of chemically inhomogeneous, nanostructured, Si-O buried interfaces and their effect on the efficiency of carbon nanotube/Si photovoltaic heterojunctions

    KAUST Repository

    Pintossi, Chiara

    2013-09-12

    An angle resolved X-ray photoemission study of carbon nanotube/silicon hybrid photovoltaic (PV) cells is reported, providing a direct probe of a chemically inhomogeneous, Si-O buried interface between the carbon nanotube (CNT) networked layer and the n-type Si substrate. By changing the photoelectron takeoff angle of the analyzer, a nondestructive in-depth profiling of a CNT/SiOx/SiO2/Si complex interface is achieved. Data are interpreted on the basis of an extensive modeling of the photoemission process from layered structures, which fully accounts for the depth distribution function of the photoemitted electrons. As X-ray photoemission spectroscopy provides direct access to the buried interface, the aging and the effects of chemical etching on the buried interface have been highlighted. This allowed us to show how the thickness and the composition of the buried interface can be related to the efficiency of the PV cell. The results clearly indicate that while SiO2 is related to an increase of the efficiency, acting as a buffer layer, SiOx is detrimental to cell performances, though it can be selectively removed by etching in HF vapors. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  2. Micro-‘‘factory’’ for self-assembled peptide nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castillo, Jaime; Rodriguez-Trujíllo, Romén; Gauthier, Sébastian

    2011-01-01

    nanostructures due to the mild conditions of their synthesis process. This biological material can form nanostructures in a rapid way and the synthesis method is less expensive as compared to that of carbon nanotubes or silicon nanowires. The present article thus reports on the on-chip fabrication of self...

  3. Nanostructures having high performance thermoelectric properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Peidong; Majumdar, Arunava; Hochbaum, Allon I; Chen, Renkun; Delgado, Raul Diaz

    2014-05-20

    The invention provides for a nanostructure, or an array of such nanostructures, each comprising a rough surface, and a doped or undoped semiconductor. The nanostructure is an one-dimensional (1-D) nanostructure, such a nanowire, or a two-dimensional (2-D) nanostructure. The nanostructure can be placed between two electrodes and used for thermoelectric power generation or thermoelectric cooling.

  4. Analytical, numerical, and experimental investigations on effective mechanical properties and performances of carbon nanotubes and nanotube based nanocomposites with novel three dimensional nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askari, Davood

    The theoretical objectives and accomplishment of this work are the analytical and numerical investigation of material properties and mechanical behavior of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and nanotube nanocomposites when they are subjected to various loading conditions. First, the finite element method is employed to investigate numerically the effective Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio of a single-walled CNT. Next, the effects of chirality on the effective Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio are investigated and then variations of their effective coefficient of thermal expansions and effective thermal conductivities are studied for CNTs with different structural configurations. To study the influence of small vacancy defects on mechanical properties of CNTs, finite element analyses are performed and the behavior of CNTs with various structural configurations having different types of vacancy defects is studied. It is frequently reported that nano-materials are excellent candidates as reinforcements in nanocomposites to change or enhance material properties of polymers and their nanocomposites. Second, the inclusion of nano-materials can considerably improve electrical, thermal, and mechanical properties of the bonding agent, i.e., resin. Note that, materials atomic and molecular level do not usually show isotropic behaviour, rather they have orthotropic properties. Therefore, two-phase and three-phase cylindrically orthotropic composite models consisting of different constituents with orthotropic properties are developed and introduced in this work to analytically predict the effective mechanical properties and mechanical behavior of such structures when they are subjected to various external loading conditions. To verify the analytically obtained exact solutions, finite element analyses of identical cylindrical structures are also performed and then results are compared with those obtained analytically, and excellent agreement is achieved. The third part of this

  5. Self-replication: Nanostructure evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmel, Friedrich C.

    2017-10-01

    DNA origami nanostructures were utilized to replicate a seed pattern that resulted in the growth of populations of nanostructures. Exponential growth could be controlled by environmental conditions depending on the preferential requirements of each population.

  6. Selective Functionalization of Tailored Nanostructures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slingenbergh, Winand; Boer, Sanne K. de; Cordes, Thorben; Browne, Wesley R.; Feringa, Ben L.; Hoogenboom, Jacob P.; Hosson, Jeff Th.M. De; Dorp, Willem F. van

    2012-01-01

    The controlled positioning of nanostructures with active molecular components is of importance throughout nanoscience and nanotechnology. We present a novel three-step method to produce nanostructures that are selectively decorated with functional molecules. We use fluorophores and nanoparticles to

  7. Nanostructured materials in potentiometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Düzgün, Ali; Zelada-Guillén, Gustavo A; Crespo, Gastón A; Macho, Santiago; Riu, Jordi; Rius, F Xavier

    2011-01-01

    Potentiometry is a very simple electrochemical technique with extraordinary analytical capabilities. It is also well known that nanostructured materials display properties which they do not show in the bulk phase. The combination of the two fields of potentiometry and nanomaterials is therefore a promising area of research and development. In this report, we explain the fundamentals of potentiometric devices that incorporate nanostructured materials and we highlight the advantages and drawbacks of combining nanomaterials and potentiometry. The paper provides an overview of the role of nanostructured materials in the two commonest potentiometric sensors: field-effect transistors and ion-selective electrodes. Additionally, we provide a few recent examples of new potentiometric sensors that are based on receptors immobilized directly onto the nanostructured material surface. Moreover, we summarize the use of potentiometry to analyze processes involving nanostructured materials and the prospects that the use of nanopores offer to potentiometry. Finally, we discuss several difficulties that currently hinder developments in the field and some future trends that will extend potentiometry into new analytical areas such as biology and medicine.

  8. Nanostructured electronic and magnetic materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Research and development in nanostructured materials is one of the most intensely studied areas in science. As a result of concerted R & D efforts, nanostructured electronic and magnetic materials have achieved commercial success. Specific examples of novel industrially important nanostructured electronic and magnetic ...

  9. Synthesis of porphyrin nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Hongyou; Bai, Feng

    2014-10-28

    The present disclosure generally relates to self-assembly methods for generating porphyrin nanostructures. For example, in one embodiment a method is provided that includes preparing a porphyrin solution and a surfactant solution. The porphyrin solution is then mixed with the surfactant solution at a concentration sufficient for confinement of the porphyrin molecules by the surfactant molecules. In some embodiments, the concentration of the surfactant is at or above its critical micelle concentration (CMC), which allows the surfactant to template the growth of the nanostructure over time. The size and morphology of the nanostructures may be affected by the type of porphyrin molecules used, the type of surfactant used, the concentration of the porphyrin and surfactant the pH of the mixture of the solutions, and the order of adding the reagents to the mixture, to name a few variables.

  10. Physiological responses induced in tomato plants by a two-component nanostructural system composed of carbon nanotubes conjugated with quantum dots and its in vivo multimodal detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimohammadi, Mohammad; Xu, Yang; Wang, Daoyuan; Biris, Alexandru S.; Khodakovskaya, Mariya V.

    2011-07-01

    Plant seedlings were exposed to single-walled carbon nanotube-quantum dot conjugates (SWCNT-QD) mixed in the growth medium in order to understand the interactions between these multicomponent nanosystems and plants. A combination of fluorescent and Raman-scattering 2D mapping analysis was used to clearly monitor the presence of the SWCNT-QD conjugates in various parts of the tomato seedlings. We found that the addition of QDs to SWCNTs dramatically changed the biological viability of the tomato plants by significantly accelerating leaf senescence and inhibiting root formation. Although the exposure of SWCNTs only to the plants induced positive effects, the chlorophyll content decreased by 1.5-fold in leaves, and the total weight of the root system decreased four times for the tomato plants exposed to SWCNT-QDs (50 µg ml - 1) compared to plants grown on regular medium as controls. Our results clearly indicate that the exposure of plants to multicomponent nanomaterials is highly influenced by the presence and bioactivity of each component, individually. Such studies could be the foundation for understanding how complex nanosized systems affect the activity of various biological systems with a major impact on ecotoxicology.

  11. Chiral Inorganic Nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Wei; Xu, Liguang; de Moura, André F; Wu, Xiaoling; Kuang, Hua; Xu, Chuanlai; Kotov, Nicholas A

    2017-06-28

    The field of chiral inorganic nanostructures is rapidly expanding. It started from the observation of strong circular dichroism during the synthesis of individual nanoparticles (NPs) and their assemblies and expanded to sophisticated synthetic protocols involving nanostructures from metals, semiconductors, ceramics, and nanocarbons. Besides the well-established chirality transfer from bioorganic molecules, other methods to impart handedness to nanoscale matter specific to inorganic materials were discovered, including three-dimentional lithography, multiphoton chirality transfer, polarization effects in nanoscale assemblies, and others. Multiple chiral geometries were observed with characteristic scales from ångströms to microns. Uniquely high values of chiral anisotropy factors that spurred the development of the field and differentiate it from chiral structures studied before, are now well understood; they originate from strong resonances of incident electromagnetic waves with plasmonic and excitonic states typical for metals and semiconductors. At the same time, distinct similarities with chiral supramolecular and biological systems also emerged. They can be seen in the synthesis and separation methods, chemical properties of individual NPs, geometries of the nanoparticle assemblies, and interactions with biological membranes. Their analysis can help us understand in greater depth the role of chiral asymmetry in nature inclusive of both earth and space. Consideration of both differences and similarities between chiral inorganic, organic, and biological nanostructures will also accelerate the development of technologies based on chiroplasmonic and chiroexcitonic effects. This review will cover both experiment and theory of chiral nanostructures starting with the origin and multiple components of mirror asymmetry of individual NPs and their assemblies. We shall consider four different types of chirality in nanostructures and related physical, chemical, and

  12. Nanostructured piezoelectric energy harvesters

    CERN Document Server

    Briscoe, Joe

    2014-01-01

    This book covers a range of devices that use piezoelectricity to convert mechanical deformation into electrical energy and relates their output capabilities to a range of potential applications. Starting with a description of the fundamental principles and properties of piezo- and ferroelectric materials, where applications of bulk materials are well established, the book shows how nanostructures of these materials are being developed for energy harvesting applications. The authors show how a nanostructured device can be produced, and put in context some of the approaches that are being invest

  13. Nanostructured Lead Compounds in Electrode Materials of a Lead-Acid Battery

    OpenAIRE

    A.P. Kuzmenko; E.A. Grechushnikov; V.A. Kharseev; M.B. Dobromyslov; P.A. Rusanov

    2016-01-01

    The nanostructure and phase composition of the electrode material of lead-acid batteries, formed by chemical transformations with involvement of sulfuric acid solutions of various concentrations, water and carbon dioxide have been studied.

  14. Nanostructure Sensing and Transmission of Gas Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A system for receiving, analyzing and communicating results of sensing chemical and/or physical parameter values, using wireless transmission of the data. Presence or absence of one or more of a group of selected chemicals in a gas or vapor is determined, using suitably functionalized carbon nanostructures that are exposed to the gas. One or more physical parameter values, such as temperature, vapor pressure, relative humidity and distance from a reference location, are also sensed for the gas, using nanostructures and/or microstructures. All parameter values are transmitted wirelessly to a data processing site or to a control site, using an interleaving pattern for data received from different sensor groups, using I.E.E.E. 802.11 or 802.15 protocol, for example. Methods for estimating chemical concentration are discussed.

  15. Nanostructured thin films and coatings mechanical properties

    CERN Document Server

    2010-01-01

    The first volume in "The Handbook of Nanostructured Thin Films and Coatings" set, this book concentrates on the mechanical properties, such as hardness, toughness, and adhesion, of thin films and coatings. It discusses processing, properties, and performance and provides a detailed analysis of theories and size effects. The book presents the fundamentals of hard and superhard nanocomposites and heterostructures, assesses fracture toughness and interfacial adhesion strength of thin films and hard nanocomposite coatings, and covers the processing and mechanical properties of hybrid sol-gel-derived nanocomposite coatings. It also uses nanomechanics to optimize coatings for cutting tools and explores various other coatings, such as diamond, metal-containing amorphous carbon nanostructured, and transition metal nitride-based nanolayered multilayer coatings.

  16. Epitaxial growth of hybrid nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chaoliang; Chen, Junze; Wu, Xue-Jun; Zhang, Hua

    2018-02-01

    Hybrid nanostructures are a class of materials that are typically composed of two or more different components, in which each component has at least one dimension on the nanoscale. The rational design and controlled synthesis of hybrid nanostructures are of great importance in enabling the fine tuning of their properties and functions. Epitaxial growth is a promising approach to the controlled synthesis of hybrid nanostructures with desired structures, crystal phases, exposed facets and/or interfaces. This Review provides a critical summary of the state of the art in the field of epitaxial growth of hybrid nanostructures. We discuss the historical development, architectures and compositions, epitaxy methods, characterization techniques and advantages of epitaxial hybrid nanostructures. Finally, we provide insight into future research directions in this area, which include the epitaxial growth of hybrid nanostructures from a wider range of materials, the study of the underlying mechanism and determining the role of epitaxial growth in influencing the properties and application performance of hybrid nanostructures.

  17. Nanostructures-History

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Graphics. Nanostructures-History. Inspiration to Nanotechnology-. The Japanese scientist Norio Taniguchi of the Tokyo University of Science was used the term "nano-technology" in a 1974 conference, to describe semiconductor processes such as thin film His definition was, ...

  18. Defects in semiconductor nanostructures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    11] A detailed review article of defects in semiconductor nanostructures is currently under preparation. [12] V Ranjan and Vijay A Singh, J. Appl. Phys. 89, 6415 (2001). [13] V Ranjan, R K Pandey, Manoj K Harbola and Vijay A Singh, Phys. Rev.

  19. Nanostructured catalyst supports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yimin; Goldman, Jay L.; Qian, Baixin; Stefan, Ionel C.

    2012-10-02

    The present invention relates to SiC nanostructures, including SiC nanopowder, SiC nanowires, and composites of SiC nanopowder and nanowires, which can be used as catalyst supports in membrane electrode assemblies and in fuel cells. The present invention also relates to composite catalyst supports comprising nanopowder and one or more inorganic nanowires for a membrane electrode assembly.

  20. Bionanomaterials and Bioinspired Nanostructures for Selective Vapor Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-03

    Shvartsman, B. Dkhil, and A.L. Kholkin 423 Nanowire Heterostructures ...inorganic nanowires , semiconducting conjugated polymer nanotubes, and metal nanoparticles. Vapor sensing with bioinspired nanostructures also brings...Sorption of vapors in insulating regions, electron tunneling between metal cores, charge hopping along the atoms of ligand shell 22, 23 Carbon nanotubes

  1. Einstein relation in compound semiconductors and their nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Bhattacharya, Sitangshu

    2008-01-01

    Deals with the Einstein relation in compound semiconductors and their nanostructures. This book considers materials such as nonlinear optical, III-V, ternary, quaternary, II-VI, IV-VI, Bismuth, stressed compounds, quantum wells, quantum wires, nipi structures, carbon nanotubes, heavily doped semiconductors, and inversion layers.

  2. Developing very hard nanostructured bainitic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amel-Farzad, H., E-mail: hh_amel@yahoo.com [Department of Materials Engineering and Metallurgy, Faculty of Engineering, Bu-Ali Sina University, Hamedan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Materials Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Faridi, H.R., E-mail: faridihr@yahoo.com [Department of Materials Engineering and Metallurgy, Hamedan University of Technology, Hamedan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rajabpour, F.; Abolhasani, A.; Kazemi, Sh.; Khaledzadeh, Y. [Department of Materials Engineering and Metallurgy, Faculty of Engineering, Bu-Ali Sina University, Hamedan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-01-01

    Novel nanostructured high carbon high silicon, carbide-free bainitic steels with very high strength and good ductility have been developed in the recent decade. In this work, an alloy with a high carbon content and no manganese was designed and cast. The prepared samples were heat treated through an austempering process in the range 200-350 Degree-Sign C. Optical and scanning electron microscopes and XRD were used to analyze the microstructures precisely. Bainitic ferrite plates of just a few tens of nanometer thickness were obtained with the hardness of 697{+-}6 HV. It is reasonable to say that the unprecedented hardness values obtained in this work are mostly caused by the extraordinary carbon content of the alloy.

  3. A Design Tool for Nanostructures with Tunable Thermal Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-15

    inorganic materials (mainly nanostructures: Si nanowire and thin film, single-walled carbon naotube (SWCNT) and single layer graphene) and bulk...distributions need to be simulated to accurate capture the dispersion characteristics of the individual material phases. In this project, a simpler and...amide-linked with carbon nanotubes: a first-principle study,” Phys. Rev. B 78, 235436 (2008) 20 T. Yamamoto and K. Watanabe, “Nonequilibrium Green’s

  4. Synthesis of ferroelectric nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roervik, Per Martin

    2008-12-15

    The increasing miniaturization of electric and mechanical components makes the synthesis and assembly of nanoscale structures an important step in modern technology. Functional materials, such as the ferroelectric perovskites, are vital to the integration and utility value of nanotechnology in the future. In the present work, chemical methods to synthesize one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures of ferroelectric perovskites have been studied. To successfully and controllably make 1D nanostructures by chemical methods it is very important to understand the growth mechanism of these nanostructures, in order to design the structures for use in various applications. For the integration of 1D nanostructures into devices it is also very important to be able to make arrays and large-area designed structures from the building blocks that single nanostructures constitute. As functional materials, it is of course also vital to study the properties of the nanostructures. The characterization of properties of single nanostructures is challenging, but essential to the use of such structures. The aim of this work has been to synthesize high quality single-crystalline 1D nanostructures of ferroelectric perovskites with emphasis on PbTiO3 , to make arrays or hierarchical nanostructures of 1D nanostructures on substrates, to understand the growth mechanisms of the 1D nanostructures, and to investigate the ferroelectric and piezoelectric properties of the 1D nanostructures. In Paper I, a molten salt synthesis route, previously reported to yield BaTiO3 , PbTiO3 and Na2Ti6O13 nanorods, was re-examined in order to elucidate the role of volatile chlorides. A precursor mixture containing barium (or lead) and titanium was annealed in the presence of NaCl at 760 degrees Celsius or 820 degrees Celsius. The main products were respectively isometric nanocrystalline BaTiO3 and PbTiO3. Nanorods were also detected, but electron diffraction revealed that the composition of the nanorods was

  5. Polylactide based nanostructured biomaterials and their applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Surya; Ray, Suprakas Sinha

    2007-08-01

    Polylactide (PLA) is one of the most innovative materials being actively investigated for a wide range of industrial applications. The polymer is a linear aliphatic thermoplastic polyester which is biodegradable as well as biocompatible, which makes it highly versatile and attractive to various commodities and medical applications. A large variety of nanoparticles of different nature and size can be blended with PLA, therefore, generating a new class of nanostructured biomaterials or nanocomposites with interesting physical properties and applications. PLA based nanostructured biomaterials are the focus of this review article, throwing light on their preparation techniques, physical properties, and industrial applications. Structural characteristics and morphological features of PLA based nanocomposites have been explained on the basis of X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Depending upon the nature and characteristics of the nanoparticles, the ultimate properties of the resulting nanocomposite materials can be tailored. Biocompatible materials such as carbon nanotubes, cellulose nanowhiskers, hydroxyapitite, etc. could be incorporated into the PLA matrix, which increase the potential of PLA for biomedical applications. Applications of PLA based nanostructured materials in different areas have been summarized.

  6. Raman Spectroscopy and its Application in Nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Shu-Lin

    2012-01-01

    Raman Spectroscopy and its Application in Nanostructures is an original and timely contribution to a very active area of physics and materials science research. This book presents the theoretical and experimental phenomena of Raman spectroscopy, with specialized discussions on the physical fundamentals, new developments and main features in low-dimensional systems of Raman spectroscopy. In recent years physicists, materials scientists and chemists have devoted increasing attention to low-dimensional systems and as Raman spectroscopy can be used to study and analyse such materials as carbon nan

  7. One-dimensional nanostructures principles and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Zhai, Tianyou

    2012-01-01

    Reviews the latest research breakthroughs and applications Since the discovery of carbon nanotubes in 1991, one-dimensional nanostructures have been at the forefront of nanotechnology research, promising to provide the building blocks for a new generation of nanoscale electronic and optoelectronic devices. With contributions from 68 leading international experts, this book reviews both the underlying principles as well as the latest discoveries and applications in the field, presenting the state of the technology. Readers will find expert coverage of all major classes of one-di

  8. Nanostructured polymer- and metal surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Alexander Bruun

    This Ph.D. thesis explores the optical properties of nanostructured dielectric and metallic surfaces. Focusing on scalable fabrication methods for antireflective nanostructures, this experimental study has resulted in the proof of concept of inexpensive, large area antireflective nanostructures...... in a structural colour filter for specularly transmitted light. By reducing the height and lateral size, the structures enter a regime where scattering of visible light becomes insignificant. In this regime, the BSi structures were shown to be antireflective. An empirical relation between the characteristic...... length scale of the nanostructured surface, and the wavelength at which scattering becomes significant, was shown. The result is thus a design criterion for the use of random nanostructures for non-scattering antireflective surfaces. Antireflective BSi nanostructures were fabricated using injection...

  9. Hybrid phonons in nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Ridley, Brian K

    2017-01-01

    Crystalline semiconductor nanostructures have special properties associated with electrons and lattice vibrations and their interaction, and this is the topic of the book. The result of spatial confinement of electrons is indicated in the nomenclature of nonostructures: quantum wells, quantum wires, and quantum dots. Confinement also has a profound effect on lattice vibrations and an account of this is the prime focus. The documentation of the confinement of acoustic modes goes back to Lord Rayleigh’s work in the late nineteenth century, but no such documentation exists for optical modes. Indeed, it is only comparatively recently that any theory of the elastic properties of optical modes exists, and the account given in the book is comprehensive. A model of the lattice dynamics of the diamond lattice is given that reveals the quantitative distinction between acoustic and optical modes and the difference of connection rules that must apply at an interface. The presence of interfaces in nanostructures forces ...

  10. Ductility of Nanostructured Bainite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Morales-Rivas

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured bainite is a novel ultra-high-strength steel-concept under intensive current research, in which the optimization of its mechanical properties can only come from a clear understanding of the parameters that control its ductility. This work reviews first the nature of this composite-like material as a product of heat treatment conditions. Subsequently, the premises of ductility behavior are presented, taking as a reference related microstructures: conventional bainitic steels, and TRIP-aided steels. The ductility of nanostructured bainite is then discussed in terms of work-hardening and fracture mechanisms, leading to an analysis of the three-fold correlation between ductility, mechanically-induced martensitic transformation, and mechanical partitioning between the phases. Results suggest that a highly stable/hard retained austenite, with mechanical properties close to the matrix of bainitic ferrite, is advantageous in order to enhance ductility.

  11. Nanostructured sulfur cathodes

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Rechargeable Li/S batteries have attracted significant attention lately due to their high specific energy and low cost. They are promising candidates for applications, including portable electronics, electric vehicles and grid-level energy storage. However, poor cycle life and low power capability are major technical obstacles. Various nanostructured sulfur cathodes have been developed to address these issues, as they provide greater resistance to pulverization, faster reaction kinetics and better trapping of soluble polysulfides. In this review, recent developments on nanostructured sulfur cathodes and mechanisms behind their operation are presented and discussed. Moreover, progress on novel characterization of sulfur cathodes is also summarized, as it has deepened the understanding of sulfur cathodes and will guide further rational design of sulfur electrodes. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  12. Nanostructured sulfur cathodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuan; Zheng, Guangyuan; Cui, Yi

    2013-04-07

    Rechargeable Li/S batteries have attracted significant attention lately due to their high specific energy and low cost. They are promising candidates for applications, including portable electronics, electric vehicles and grid-level energy storage. However, poor cycle life and low power capability are major technical obstacles. Various nanostructured sulfur cathodes have been developed to address these issues, as they provide greater resistance to pulverization, faster reaction kinetics and better trapping of soluble polysulfides. In this review, recent developments on nanostructured sulfur cathodes and mechanisms behind their operation are presented and discussed. Moreover, progress on novel characterization of sulfur cathodes is also summarized, as it has deepened the understanding of sulfur cathodes and will guide further rational design of sulfur electrodes.

  13. Vortices and nanostructured superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book provides expert coverage of modern and novel aspects of the study of vortex matter, dynamics, and pinning in nanostructured and multi-component superconductors. Vortex matter in superconducting materials is a field of enormous beauty and intellectual challenge, which began with the theoretical prediction of vortices by A. Abrikosov (Nobel Laureate). Vortices, vortex dynamics, and pinning are key features in many of today’s human endeavors: from the huge superconducting accelerating magnets and detectors at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, which opened new windows of knowledge on the universe, to the tiny superconducting transceivers using Rapid Single Flux Quanta, which have opened a revolutionary means of communication. In recent years, two new features have added to the intrinsic beauty and complexity of the subject: nanostructured/nanoengineered superconductors, and the discovery of a range of new materials showing multi-component (multi-gap) superconductivity. In this book, leading researche...

  14. Nanostructured thin film coatings with different strengthening effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panfilov Yury

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A number of articles on strengthening thin film coatings were analyzed and a lot of unusual strengthening effects, such as super high hardness and plasticity simultaneously, ultra low friction coefficient, high wear-resistance, curve rigidity increasing of drills with small diameter, associated with process formation of nanostructured coatings by the different thin film deposition methods were detected. Vacuum coater with RF magnetron sputtering system and ion-beam source and arc evaporator for nanostructured thin film coating manufacture are represented. Diamond Like Carbon and MoS2 thin film coatings, Ti, Al, Nb, Cr, nitride, carbide, and carbo-nitride thin film materials are described as strengthening coatings.

  15. Carbon nanostructure composite for electromagnetic interference ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Blocking the electromagnetic radiation using barriers made up of conductive or mag- netic materials is called EMI shielding. The shielding material helps in absorbing or reflecting the EM radiation thereby acting as a shield by blocking the radiation from pen- etration into the shielded device. Earlier the most common way of ...

  16. Carbon nanostructured surfaces for enhanced heat transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taha, T.J.

    2015-01-01

    The advancement of high performance thermal systems has stimulated interest in methods to improve heat transfer rates. Considerable efforts have been made to increase heat transfer rates by implementing passive convective heat transfer enhancement methods that require no direct consumption of

  17. Carbon nanostructure composite for electromagnetic interference ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-05-30

    based composite materials for electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding. With more and more electronic gadgets being used at different frequencies, there is a need for shielding them from one another to avoid interference.

  18. Lipid Self-Assemblies and Nanostructured Emulsions for Cosmetic Formulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrashekhar V. Kulkarni

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A majority of cosmetic products that we encounter on daily basis contain lipid constituents in solubilized or insolubilized forms. Due to their amphiphilic nature, the lipid molecules spontaneously self-assemble into a remarkable range of nanostructures when mixed with water. This review illustrates the formation and finely tunable properties of self-assembled lipid nanostructures and their hierarchically organized derivatives, as well as their relevance to the development of cosmetic formulations. These lipid systems can be modulated into various physical forms suitable for topical administration including fluids, gels, creams, pastes and dehydrated films. Moreover, they are capable of encapsulating hydrophilic, hydrophobic as well as amphiphilic active ingredients owing to their special morphological characters. Nano-hybrid materials with more elegant properties can be designed by combining nanostructured lipid systems with other nanomaterials including a hydrogelator, silica nanoparticles, clays and carbon nanomaterials. The smart materials reviewed here may well be the future of innovative cosmetic applications.

  19. Wave propagation in nanostructures nonlocal continuum mechanics formulations

    CERN Document Server

    Gopalakrishnan, Srinivasan

    2013-01-01

    Wave Propagation in Nanostructures describes the fundamental and advanced concepts of waves propagating in structures that have dimensions of the order of nanometers. The book is fundamentally based on non-local elasticity theory, which includes scale effects in the continuum model. The book predominantly addresses wave behavior in carbon nanotubes and graphene structures, although the methods of analysis provided in this text are equally applicable to other nanostructures. The book takes the reader from the fundamentals of wave propagation in nanotubes to more advanced topics such as rotating nanotubes, coupled nanotubes, and nanotubes with magnetic field and surface effects. The first few chapters cover the basics of wave propagation, different modeling schemes for nanostructures and introduce non-local elasticity theories, which form the building blocks for understanding the material provided in later chapters. A number of interesting examples are provided to illustrate the important features of wave behav...

  20. Scaling laws for van der Waals interactions in nanostructured materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobre, Vivekanand V; Tkatchenko, Alexandre

    2013-01-01

    Van der Waals interactions have a fundamental role in biology, physics and chemistry, in particular in the self-assembly and the ensuing function of nanostructured materials. Here we utilize an efficient microscopic method to demonstrate that van der Waals interactions in nanomaterials act at distances greater than typically assumed, and can be characterized by different scaling laws depending on the dimensionality and size of the system. Specifically, we study the behaviour of van der Waals interactions in single-layer and multilayer graphene, fullerenes of varying size, single-wall carbon nanotubes and graphene nanoribbons. As a function of nanostructure size, the van der Waals coefficients follow unusual trends for all of the considered systems, and deviate significantly from the conventionally employed pairwise-additive picture. We propose that the peculiar van der Waals interactions in nanostructured materials could be exploited to control their self-assembly.

  1. Enhanced photocatalytic activity of C@ZnO core-shell nanostructures and its photoluminescence property

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Tao; Yu, Shanwen; Fang, Xiaoxin; Huang, Honghong; Li, Lun [School of Materials and Chemical Engineering, Hubei University of Technology, Wuhan (China); Wang, Xiuyuan [College of Plant Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan (China); Wang, Huihu, E-mail: wanghuihu@mail.hbut.edu.cn [School of Materials and Chemical Engineering, Hubei University of Technology, Wuhan (China); Hubei Provincial Key Laboratory of Green Materials for Light Industry, Hubei University of Technology, Wuhan (China)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • C@ZnO nanostructures were synthesized by a facile hydrothermal carbonization method. • Glucose content has a great influence on the microstructure of C@ZnO nanostructures. • An ultrathin amorphous carbon layer enhances the adsorption capacity of C@ZnO. • C@ZnO nanostructures exhibit the improved photocatalytic activity and stability. - Abstract: An ultrathin layer of amorphous carbon coated C@ZnO core-shell nanostructures were synthesized via a facile hydrothermal carbonization process using glucose as precursor in this work. X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and diffuse reflectance UV–vis spectroscopy (DRS) were used for the characterization of as-prepared samples. Photoluminescence (PL) properties of C@ZnO samples were investigated using PL spectroscopy. The microstructure analysis results show that the glucose content has a great influence on the size, morphology, crystallinity and surface chemical states of C@ZnO nanostructures. Moreover, the as-prepared C@ZnO core-shell nanostructures exhibit the enhanced photocatalytic activity and good photostability for methyl orange dye degradation due to its high adsorption ability and its improved optical characteristics.

  2. Recent Developments of Nanostructured Electrodes for Bioelectrocatalysis of Dioxygen Reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Opallo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The recent development of nanostructured electrodes for bioelectrocatalytic dioxygen reduction catalysed by two copper oxidoreductases, laccase and bilirubin oxidase, is reviewed. Carbon-based nanomaterials as carbon nanotubes or carbon nanoparticles are frequently used for electrode modification, whereas there are only few examples of biocathodes modified with metal or metal oxide nanoparticles. These nanomaterials are adsorbed on the electrode surface or embedded in multicomponent film. The nano-objects deposited act as electron shuttles between the enzyme and the electrode substrate providing favourable conditions for mediatorless bioelectrocatalysis.

  3. Semiconductors and semimetals nanostructured systems

    CERN Document Server

    Willardson, Robert K; Beer, Albert C; Reed, Mark A

    1992-01-01

    This is the first available volume to consolidate prominent topics in the emerging field of nanostructured systems. Recent technological advancements have led to a new era of nanostructure physics, allowing for the fabrication of nanostructures whose behavior is dominated by quantum interference effects. This new capability has enthused the experimentalist and theorist alike. Innumerable possibilities have now opened up for physical exploration and device technology on the nanoscale. This book, with contributions from five pioneering researchers, will allow the expert and novice alike to explore a fascinating new field.Provides a state-of-the-art review of quantum-scale artificially nanostructured electronic systemsIncludes contributions by world-known experts in the fieldOpens the field to the non-expert with a concise introductionFeatures discussions of:Low-dimensional condensed matter physicsProperties of nanostructured, ultrasmall electronic systemsMesoscopic physics and quantum transportPhysics of 2D ele...

  4. Nanostructured cobalt(II) tetracarboxyphthalocyanine complex supported within the MWCNT frameworks: electron transport and charge storage capabilities

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Pillay, S

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The electrochemical redox properties of a surface-confined thin solid film of nanostructured cobalt(II) tetracarboxyphthalocyanine integrated with multiwalled carbon nanotube (nanoCoTCPc/MWCNT) have been investigated. This novel nano...

  5. Co-TPP functionalized carbon nanotube composites for detection of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Electrical properties; nanostructure materials; porphyrin functionalized carbon nanotubes; sensor for chlorobenzene and nitrobenzene vapour. Abstract. We report preparation of nanocomposites by non-covalent functionalization of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with metal-tetraphenylporphyrins (M-TPP). Fourier ...

  6. Preparation of porous flower-like ZnO nanostructures and their gas-sensing property

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu Cuiping [College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Anhui Key Laboratory of Functional Molecular Solids, Anhui Normal University, Wuhu 241000 (China); Huang Jiarui, E-mail: jrhuang@mail.anhu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Anhui Key Laboratory of Functional Molecular Solids, Anhui Normal University, Wuhu 241000 (China); Key Lab Biomimet Sensing and Adv Robot Technol, Institute of Intelligent Machines, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Wu Youjie; Zhai Muheng [College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Anhui Key Laboratory of Functional Molecular Solids, Anhui Normal University, Wuhu 241000 (China); Sun Yufeng [Mechanical Engineering Department, Anhui University of Technology and Science, Wuhu 241000 (China); Liu Jinhuai [Key Lab Biomimet Sensing and Adv Robot Technol, Institute of Intelligent Machines, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2011-03-31

    Research highlights: > Flower-like basic zinc carbonate was prepared by template-free hydrothermal method. > Porous flower-like ZnO nanostructures were obtained by annealing the precursors. > The porous flower-like ZnO nanostructures exhibit excellent sensing performances. > High porosity and 3D morphology structures promote its sensing performances. - Abstract: Porous flower-like ZnO nanostructures have been synthesized by a template-free, economical hydrothermal method combined with subsequent calcination. Calcination of the precursors produced flower-like ZnO nanostructures, composed of interconnected porous ZnO nanosheets with high porosity resulting from the thermal decomposition of the as-prepared precursors, i.e., flower-like basic zinc carbonate (BZC). Moreover, the nanostructures have been characterized through X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric-differential thermalgravimetric analysis, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption analyses. Compared with ZnO nanorods, the as-prepared porous flower-like ZnO nanostructures exhibit a good response and reversibility to some organic gas, such as ethanol and acetone. The sensor responses to 100 ppm ethanol and acetone are 21.8 and 16.8, respectively, at a working temperature of 320 {sup o}C. In addition, the sensors also exhibited a good response to 2-propanol and methanol, which indicate that these porous flower-like ZnO nanostructures are highly promising for applications of gas sensors.

  7. EDITORIAL: Nanostructured solar cells Nanostructured solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenham, Neil C.; Grätzel, Michael

    2008-10-01

    Conversion into electrical power of even a small fraction of the solar radiation incident on the Earth's surface has the potential to satisfy the world's energy demands without generating CO2 emissions. Current photovoltaic technology is not yet fulfilling this promise, largely due to the high cost of the electricity produced. Although the challenges of storage and distribution should not be underestimated, a major bottleneck lies in the photovoltaic devices themselves. Improving efficiency is part of the solution, but diminishing returns in that area mean that reducing the manufacturing cost is absolutely vital, whilst still retaining good efficiencies and device lifetimes. Solution-processible materials, e.g. organic molecules, conjugated polymers and semiconductor nanoparticles, offer new routes to the low-cost production of solar cells. The challenge here is that absorbing light in an organic material produces a coulombically bound exciton that requires dissociation at a donor-acceptor heterojunction. A thickness of at least 100 nm is required to absorb the incident light, but excitons only diffuse a few nanometres before decaying. The problem is therefore intrinsically at the nano-scale: we need composite devices with a large area of internal donor-acceptor interface, but where each carrier has a pathway to the respective electrode. Dye-sensitized and bulk heterojunction cells have nanostructures which approach this challenge in different ways, and leading research in this area is described in many of the articles in this special issue. This issue is not restricted to organic or dye-sensitized photovoltaics, since nanotechnology can also play an important role in devices based on more conventional inorganic materials. In these materials, the electronic properties can be controlled, tuned and in some cases completely changed by nanoscale confinement. Also, the techniques of nanoscience are the natural ones for investigating the localized states, particularly at

  8. CFN lectures on functional nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Vojta, Matthias; Schön, Gerd

    2011-01-01

    This series of books contains selected and edited lectures from summer schools organized by the Center for Functional nanostructures (C.F.N.) at the University of Karlsruhe. The mission of the C.F.N. is to carry out research in the following areas: nanophotonics, nanoelectronics, molecular nanostructures and nanostructured materials. The aim of the summer schools is mainly to exchange new ideas and illustrate emerging research methodologies through a series of topical, introductory lectures. This is reflected by both the selection of topics addressed in the present volume, nanoelectronics, as well as the tutorial aspect of the contributions.

  9. Fabrication of nanowires and nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mátéfi-Tempfli, Stefan; Mátéfi-Tempfli, M.; Piraux, L.

    2009-01-01

    We report on different approaches that we have adopted and developed for the fabrication of nanowires and nanostructures. Methods based on template synthesis and on self organization seem to be the most promising for the fabrication of nanomaterials and nanostructures due to their easiness and low...... cost. The development of a supported nanoporous alumina template and the possibility of using this template to combine electrochemical synthesis with lithographic methods open new ways for the fabrication of complex nanostructures. The numerous advantages of the supported template and its compatibility...... with microelectronic processes make it an ideal candidate for further integration into large-scale fabrication of various nanowire-based devices....

  10. 2009 Clusters, Nanocrystals & Nanostructures GRC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lai-Sheng [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States)

    2009-07-19

    For over thirty years, this Gordon Conference has been the premiere meeting for the field of cluster science, which studies the phenomena that arise when matter becomes small. During its history, participants have witnessed the discovery and development of many novel materials, including C60, carbon nanotubes, semiconductor and metal nanocrystals, and nanowires. In addition to addressing fundamental scientific questions related to these materials, the meeting has always included a discussion of their potential applications. Consequently, this conference has played a critical role in the birth and growth of nanoscience and engineering. The goal of the 2009 Gordon Conference is to continue the forward-looking tradition of this meeting and discuss the most recent advances in the field of clusters, nanocrystals, and nanostructures. As in past meetings, this will include new topics that broaden the field. In particular, a special emphasis will be placed on nanomaterials related to the efficient use, generation, or conversion of energy. For example, we anticipate presentations related to batteries, catalysts, photovoltaics, and thermoelectrics. In addition, we expect to address the controversy surrounding carrier multiplication with a session in which recent results addressing this phenomenon will be discussed and debated. The atmosphere of the conference, which emphasizes the presentation of unpublished results and lengthy discussion periods, ensures that attendees will enjoy a valuable and stimulating experience. Because only a limited number of participants are allowed to attend this conference, and oversubscription is anticipated, we encourage all interested researchers from academia, industry, and government institutions to apply as early as possible. An invitation is not required. We also encourage all attendees to submit their latest results for presentation at the poster sessions. We anticipate that several posters will be selected for 'hot topic' oral

  11. Defects in semiconductor nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vijay A.; Harbola, Manoj K.; Pathak, Praveen

    2008-02-01

    Impurities play a pivotal role in semiconductors. One part in a million of phosphorous in silicon alters the conductivity of the latter by several orders of magnitude. Indeed, the information age is possible only because of the unique role of shallow impurities in semiconductors. Although work in semiconductor nanostructures (SN) has been in progress for the past two decades, the role of impurities in them has been only sketchily studied. We outline theoretical approaches to the electronic structure of shallow impurities in SN and discuss their limitations. We find that shallow levels undergo a SHADES (SHAllow-DEep-Shallow) transition as the SN size is decreased. This occurs because of the combined effect of quantum confinement and reduced dielectric constant in SN. Level splitting is pronounced and this can perhaps be probed by ESR and ENDOR techniques. Finally, we suggest that a perusal of literature on (semiconductor) cluster calculations carried out 30 years ago would be useful.

  12. Quantum transport in carbon nanotubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jarillo-Herrero, P.D.

    2005-01-01

    Electronic transport through nanostructures can be very different from trans- port in macroscopic conductors, especially at low temperatures. Carbon na- notubes are tiny cylinders made of carbon atoms. Their remarkable electronic and mechanical properties, together with their small size (a few nm in

  13. Hydrogen storage in carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirscher, M; Becher, M

    2003-01-01

    The article gives a comprehensive overview of hydrogen storage in carbon nanostructures, including experimental results and theoretical calculations. Soon after the discovery of carbon nanotubes in 1991, different research groups succeeded in filling carbon nanotubes with some elements, and, therefore, the question arose of filling carbon nanotubes with hydrogen by possibly using new effects such as nano-capillarity. Subsequently, very promising experiments claiming high hydrogen storage capacities in different carbon nanostructures initiated enormous research activity. Hydrogen storage capacities have been reported that exceed the benchmark for automotive application of 6.5 wt% set by the U.S. Department of Energy. However, the experimental data obtained with different methods for various carbon nanostructures show an extreme scatter. Classical calculations based on physisorption of hydrogen molecules could not explain the high storage capacities measured at ambient temperature, and, assuming chemisorption of hydrogen atoms, hydrogen release requires temperatures too high for technical applications. Up to now, only a few calculations and experiments indicate the possibility of an intermediate binding energy. Recently, serious doubt has arisen in relation to several key experiments, causing considerable controversy. Furthermore, high hydrogen storage capacities measured for carbon nanofibers did not survive cross-checking in different laboratories. Therefore, in light of today's knowledge, it is becoming less likely that at moderate pressures around room temperature carbon nanostructures can store the amount of hydrogen required for automotive applications.

  14. METAL MELTS – NANOSTRUCTURED SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Yu. Stetsenko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of thermodynamic analysis it is shown that metal melts are the nanostructured systems which consist of phases and atoms nanocrystals. Nanocrystalsmake 97% ofthemeltvolume.

  15. Quantum optics with semiconductor nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Jahnke, Frank

    2012-01-01

    A guide to the theory, application and potential of semiconductor nanostructures in the exploration of quantum optics. It offers an overview of resonance fluorescence emission.$bAn understanding of the interaction between light and matter on a quantum level is of fundamental interest and has many applications in optical technologies. The quantum nature of the interaction has recently attracted great attention for applications of semiconductor nanostructures in quantum information processing. Quantum optics with semiconductor nanostructures is a key guide to the theory, experimental realisation, and future potential of semiconductor nanostructures in the exploration of quantum optics. Part one provides a comprehensive overview of single quantum dot systems, beginning with a look at resonance fluorescence emission. Quantum optics with single quantum dots in photonic crystal and micro cavities are explored in detail, before part two goes on to review nanolasers with quantum dot emitters. Light-matter interaction...

  16. Synthesis of vertically aligned metal oxide nanostructures

    KAUST Repository

    Roqan, Iman S.

    2016-03-03

    Metal oxide nanostructure and methods of making metal oxide nanostructures are provided. The metal oxide nanostructures can be 1 -dimensional nanostructures such as nanowires, nanofibers, or nanotubes. The metal oxide nanostructures can be doped or undoped metal oxides. The metal oxide nanostructures can be deposited onto a variety of substrates. The deposition can be performed without high pressures and without the need for seed catalysts on the substrate. The deposition can be performed by laser ablation of a target including a metal oxide and, optionally, a dopant. In some embodiments zinc oxide nanostructures are deposited onto a substrate by pulsed laser deposition of a zinc oxide target using an excimer laser emitting UV radiation. The zinc oxide nanostructure can be doped with a rare earth metal such as gadolinium. The metal oxide nanostructures can be used in many devices including light-emitting diodes and solar cells.

  17. Functionalized carbon nanomaterials derived from carbohydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagadeesan, Dinesh; Eswaramoorthy, Muthusamy

    2010-02-01

    A tremendous growth in the field of carbon nanomaterials has led to the emergence of carbon nanotubes, fullerenes, mesoporous carbon and more recently graphene. Some of these materials have found applications in electronics, sensors, catalysis, drug delivery, composites, and so forth. The high temperatures and hydrocarbon precursors involved in their synthesis usually yield highly inert graphitic surfaces. As some of the applications require functionalization of their inert graphitic surface with groups like -COOH, -OH, and -NH(2), treatment of these materials in oxidizing agents and concentrated acids become inevitable. More recent works have involved using precursors like carbohydrates to produce carbon nanostructures rich in functional groups in a single-step under hydrothermal conditions. These carbon nanostructures have already found many applications in composites, drug delivery, materials synthesis, and Li ion batteries. The review aims to highlight some of the recent developments in the application of carbohydrate derived carbon nanostructures and also provide an outlook of their future prospects.

  18. Nanostructured Electrode Materials for Electrochemical Capacitor Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hojin Choi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The advent of novel organic and inorganic nanomaterials in recent years, particularly nanostructured carbons, conducting polymers, and metal oxides, has enabled the fabrication of various energy devices with enhanced performance. In this paper, we review in detail different nanomaterials used in the fabrication of electrochemical capacitor electrodes and also give a brief overview of electric double-layer capacitors, pseudocapacitors, and hybrid capacitors. From a materials point of view, the latest trends in electrochemical capacitor research are also discussed through extensive analysis of the literature and by highlighting notable research examples (published mostly since 2013. Finally, a perspective on next-generation capacitor technology is also given, including the challenges that lie ahead.

  19. Hybrid nanostructured materials for high-performance electrochemical capacitors

    KAUST Repository

    Yu, Guihua

    2013-03-01

    The exciting development of advanced nanostructured materials has driven the rapid growth of research in the field of electrochemical energy storage (EES) systems which are critical to a variety of applications ranging from portable consumer electronics, hybrid electric vehicles, to large industrial scale power and energy management. Owing to their capability to deliver high power performance and extremely long cycle life, electrochemical capacitors (ECs), one of the key EES systems, have attracted increasing attention in the recent years since they can complement or even replace batteries in the energy storage field, especially when high power delivery or uptake is needed. This review article describes the most recent progress in the development of nanostructured electrode materials for EC technology, with a particular focus on hybrid nanostructured materials that combine carbon based materials with pseudocapacitive metal oxides or conducting polymers for achieving high-performance ECs. This review starts with an overview of EES technologies and the comparison between various EES systems, followed by a brief description of energy storage mechanisms for different types of EC materials. This review emphasizes the exciting development of both hybrid nanomaterials and novel support structures for effective electrochemical utilization and high mass loading of active electrode materials, both of which have brought the energy density of ECs closer to that of batteries while still maintaining their characteristic high power density. Last, future research directions and the remaining challenges toward the rational design and synthesis of hybrid nanostructured electrode materials for next-generation ECs are discussed. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Osteogenic response of human MSCs and osteoblasts to hydrophilic and hydrophobic nanostructured titanium implant surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotz, Ethan M; Olivares-Navarrete, Rene; Berner, Simon; Boyan, Barbara D; Schwartz, Zvi

    2016-12-01

    Microstructured implant surfaces created by grit blasting and acid etching titanium (Ti) support osseointegration. This effect is further enhanced by storing in aqueous solution to retain hydrophilicity, but this also leads to surface nanostructure formation. The purpose of this study was to assess the contributions of nanostructures on the improved osteogenic response of osteoblast lineage cells to hydrophilic microstructured Ti. Human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and normal human osteoblasts (NHOsts) were cultured separately on non-nanostructured/hydrophobic (SLA), nanostructured/hydrophilic (modSLA), or nanostructured/hydrophobic (SLAnano) Ti surfaces. XPS showed elevated carbon levels on SLA and SLAnano compared to modSLA. Contact angle measurements indicated only modSLA was hydrophilic. Confocal laser microscopy revealed minor differences in mean surface roughness. SEM showed the presence of nanostructures on modSLA and SLAnano. MSCs and NHOst cells exhibited similar morphology on the substrates and osteoblastic differentiation and maturation were greatest on modSLA. These results suggest that when the appropriate microstructure is present, hydrophilicity may play a greater role in stimulating MSC and NHOst osteoblastic differentiation and maturation than the presence of nanostructures generated during storage in an aqueous environment. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 3137-3148, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Towards new functional nanostructures for medical imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuura, Naomi; Rowlands, J. A. [Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada)

    2008-10-15

    Nanostructures represent a promising new type of contrast agent for clinical medical imaging modalities, including magnetic resonance imaging, x-ray computed tomography, ultrasound, and nuclear imaging. Currently, most nanostructures are simple, single-purpose imaging agents based on spherical constructs (e.g., liposomes, micelles, nanoemulsions, macromolecules, dendrimers, and solid nanoparticle structures). In the next decade, new clinical imaging nanostructures will be designed as multi-functional constructs, to both amplify imaging signals at disease sites and deliver localized therapy. Proposals for nanostructures to fulfill these new functions will be outlined. New functional nanostructures are expected to develop in five main directions: Modular nanostructures with additive functionality; cooperative nanostructures with synergistic functionality; nanostructures activated by their in vivo environment; nanostructures activated by sources outside the patient; and novel, nonspherical nanostructures and components. The development and clinical translation of next-generation nanostructures will be facilitated by a combination of improved clarity of the in vivo imaging and biological challenges and the requirements to successfully overcome them; development of standardized characterization and validation systems tailored for the preclinical assessment of nanostructure agents; and development of streamlined commercialization strategies and pipelines tailored for nanostructure-based agents for their efficient translation to the clinic.

  2. Photoresponsive nanostructured membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Madhavan, Poornima

    2016-07-26

    The perspective of adding stimuli-response to isoporous membranes stimulates the development of separation devices with pores, which would open or close under control of environment chemical composition, temperature or exposure to light. Changes in pH and temperature have been previously investigated. In this work, we demonstrate for the first time the preparation of photoresponsive isoporous membranes, applying self-assembly non-solvent induced phase separation to a new light responsive block copolymer. First, we optimized the membrane formation by using poly(styrene-b-anthracene methyl methacrylate-b-methylmethacrylate) (PS-b-PAnMMA-b-PMMA) copolymer, identifying the most suitable solvent, copolymer block length, and other parameters. The obtained final triblock copolymer membrane morphologies were characterized using atomic force and electron microscopy. The microscopic analysis reveals that the PS-b-PAnMMA-b-PMMA copolymer can form both lamellar and ordered hexagonal nanoporous structures on the membrane top layer in appropriate solvent compositions. The nanostructured membrane emits fluorescence due to the presence of the anthracene mid-block. On irradiation of light the PS-b-PAnMMA-b-PMMA copolymer membranes has an additional stimuli response. The anthracene group undergoes conformational changes by forming [4 + 4] cycloadducts and this alters the membrane\\'s water flux and solute retention. © 2016 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  3. Magnetic anisotropy in nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Eisenbach, M

    2001-01-01

    method for solving the LDA Kohn-Sham equation. This extended code allows us to perform fully relativistic calculations to enable us to investigate the spin orbit coupling effects leading to anisotropies and potentially non collinear ordering of magnetic moments in these systems of magnetic inclusions in copper. With this approach we find that depending on the orientation of the atoms along the 100 or 110 direction in copper the ground state orientation of the magnetic moments in the chain is either perpendicular or parallel to the chain direction, when the magnetic dipolar interaction energy is added to the final ab initio result. In this thesis we investigate the effect of magnetic anisotropies in nanostructured materials. The main emphasis in our work presented here is on systems that have an underlying one dimensional structure, like nanowires or atomic chains. In a simple classical one dimensional model we show the rich ground state structure of magnetic orientations one might expect to find in such syste...

  4. Phonon engineering for nanostructures.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubry, Sylvie (Stanford University); Friedmann, Thomas Aquinas; Sullivan, John Patrick; Peebles, Diane Elaine; Hurley, David H. (Idaho National Laboratory); Shinde, Subhash L.; Piekos, Edward Stanley; Emerson, John Allen

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the physics of phonon transport at small length scales is increasingly important for basic research in nanoelectronics, optoelectronics, nanomechanics, and thermoelectrics. We conducted several studies to develop an understanding of phonon behavior in very small structures. This report describes the modeling, experimental, and fabrication activities used to explore phonon transport across and along material interfaces and through nanopatterned structures. Toward the understanding of phonon transport across interfaces, we computed the Kapitza conductance for {Sigma}29(001) and {Sigma}3(111) interfaces in silicon, fabricated the interfaces in single-crystal silicon substrates, and used picosecond laser pulses to image the thermal waves crossing the interfaces. Toward the understanding of phonon transport along interfaces, we designed and fabricated a unique differential test structure that can measure the proportion of specular to diffuse thermal phonon scattering from silicon surfaces. Phonon-scale simulation of the test ligaments, as well as continuum scale modeling of the complete experiment, confirmed its sensitivity to surface scattering. To further our understanding of phonon transport through nanostructures, we fabricated microscale-patterned structures in diamond thin films.

  5. Direct laser planting of hybrid Au-Ag/C nanostructures - nanoparticles, flakes and flowers

    CERN Document Server

    Manshina, Alina; Bashouti, Muhammad; Povolotskiy, Alexey; Petrov, Yuriy; Koshevoy, Igor; Christiansen, Silke; Tunik, Sergey; Leuchs, Gerd

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a new approach for forming hybrid metal/carbonaceous nanostructures in a controlled direct laser planting process. Au-Ag nanoclusters in amorphous or crystalline carbonaceous matrices are formed with different morphology: nanoparticles, nanoflakes, and nanoflowers. In contrast to other generation techniques our approach is simple, involving only a single laser-induced process transforming supramolecular complexes dissolved in solvent such as acetone, acetophenone, or dichloroethane into hybrid nanostructures in the laser-affected area of the substrate. The morphology of the hybrid nanostructures can be steered by controlling the deposition parameters, the composition of the liquid phase and the type of substrate, amorphous or crystalline. The carbonaceous phase of the hybrid nanostructures consists of hydrogenated amorphous carbon in the case of nanoparticles and of crystalline orthorhombic graphite of nanoscale thickness in the case of flakes and flowers. To the best of our knowledge this is t...

  6. Nanostructure sensitization of transition metal oxides for visible-light photocatalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongjun

    2014-01-01

    Summary To better utilize the sunlight for efficient solar energy conversion, the research on visible-light active photocatalysts has recently attracted a lot of interest. The photosensitization of transition metal oxides is a promising approach for achieving effective visible-light photocatalysis. This review article primarily discusses the recent progress in the realm of a variety of nanostructured photosensitizers such as quantum dots, plasmonic metal nanostructures, and carbon nanostructures for coupling with wide-bandgap transition metal oxides to design better visible-light active photocatalysts. The underlying mechanisms of the composite photocatalysts, e.g., the light-induced charge separation and the subsequent visible-light photocatalytic reaction processes in environmental remediation and solar fuel generation fields, are also introduced. A brief outlook on the nanostructure photosensitization is also given. PMID:24991507

  7. Nanostructure sensitization of transition metal oxides for visible-light photocatalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongjun Chen

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available To better utilize the sunlight for efficient solar energy conversion, the research on visible-light active photocatalysts has recently attracted a lot of interest. The photosensitization of transition metal oxides is a promising approach for achieving effective visible-light photocatalysis. This review article primarily discusses the recent progress in the realm of a variety of nanostructured photosensitizers such as quantum dots, plasmonic metal nanostructures, and carbon nanostructures for coupling with wide-bandgap transition metal oxides to design better visible-light active photocatalysts. The underlying mechanisms of the composite photocatalysts, e.g., the light-induced charge separation and the subsequent visible-light photocatalytic reaction processes in environmental remediation and solar fuel generation fields, are also introduced. A brief outlook on the nanostructure photosensitization is also given.

  8. Photonic effects in natural nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey GonzáLez, Rafael Ramón; Barrera Patiã+/-O, Claudia Patricia

    Nature exhibits a great variety of structures and nanostructures. In particular the interaction light-matter has a strong dependence with the shape of the nanostructures. In some cases, in the so called structural color, ordered arrays of nanostructures play a very critical role. One of the most interesting color effects is the iridescence, the angular dependence of the observed color in some species of butterflies, insects, plants, beetles, fishes, birds and even in minerals. In the last years, iridescence has been related with photonic properties. In the present work, we present a theoretical study of the photonic properties for different patterns that exist in natural nanostructures present in wings of butterflies that exhibit iridescence. The nanostructures observed in these cases present spatial variations of the dielectric constant that are possible to model them as 1D and 2D photonic crystal. Partial photonic gaps are found as function of lattice constant, dielectric contrast and geometrical configuration. Also, disordered effects are considered. Authors would like to thank the División de Investigación Sede Bogotá for their financial support at Universidad Nacional de Colombia.

  9. Key Physical Mechanisms in Nanostructured Solar Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr Stephan Bremner

    2010-07-21

    The objective of the project was to study both theoretically and experimentally the excitation, recombination and transport properties required for nanostructured solar cells to deliver energy conversion efficiencies well in excess of conventional limits. These objectives were met by concentrating on three key areas, namely, investigation of physical mechanisms present in nanostructured solar cells, characterization of loss mechanisms in nanostructured solar cells and determining the properties required of nanostructured solar cells in order to achieve high efficiency and the design implications.

  10. Fifty years in studying carbon-based materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dresselhaus, Mildred S.

    2012-01-01

    A review is presented based on our 50 year involvement in studying carbon materials physics and carbon-based nanostructures. The review topics include an early history of studies of graphene and graphite, graphite intercalation compounds, forerunners of nano-carbons, fullerenes, carbon nanotubes and, finally, graphene and graphene nanoribbons.

  11. Enhanced Ethanol Gas Sensing Properties of SnO2-Core/ZnO-Shell Nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Tharsika

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available An inexpensive single-step carbon-assisted thermal evaporation method for the growth of SnO2-core/ZnO-shell nanostructures is described, and the ethanol sensing properties are presented. The structure and phases of the grown nanostructures are investigated by field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM and X-ray diffraction (XRD techniques. XRD analysis indicates that the core-shell nanostructures have good crystallinity. At a lower growth duration of 15 min, only SnO2 nanowires with a rectangular cross-section are observed, while the ZnO shell is observed when the growth time is increased to 30 min. Core-shell hierarchical nanostructures are present for a growth time exceeding 60 min. The growth mechanism for SnO2-core/ZnO-shell nanowires and hierarchical nanostructures are also discussed. The sensitivity of the synthesized SnO2-core/ZnO-shell nanostructures towards ethanol sensing is investigated. Results show that the SnO2-core/ZnO-shell nanostructures deposited at 90 min exhibit enhanced sensitivity to ethanol. The sensitivity of SnO2-core/ZnO-shell nanostructures towards 20 ppm ethanol gas at 400 °C is about ~5-times that of SnO2 nanowires. This improvement in ethanol gas response is attributed to high active sensing sites and the synergistic effect of the encapsulation of SnO2 by ZnO nanostructures.

  12. Enhanced Ethanol Gas Sensing Properties of SnO2-Core/ZnO-Shell Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tharsika, T.; Haseeb, A. S. M. A.; Akbar, Sheikh A.; Sabri, Mohd Faizul Mohd; Hoong, Wong Yew

    2014-01-01

    An inexpensive single-step carbon-assisted thermal evaporation method for the growth of SnO2-core/ZnO-shell nanostructures is described, and the ethanol sensing properties are presented. The structure and phases of the grown nanostructures are investigated by field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. XRD analysis indicates that the core-shell nanostructures have good crystallinity. At a lower growth duration of 15 min, only SnO2 nanowires with a rectangular cross-section are observed, while the ZnO shell is observed when the growth time is increased to 30 min. Core-shell hierarchical nanostructures are present for a growth time exceeding 60 min. The growth mechanism for SnO2-core/ZnO-shell nanowires and hierarchical nanostructures are also discussed. The sensitivity of the synthesized SnO2-core/ZnO-shell nanostructures towards ethanol sensing is investigated. Results show that the SnO2-core/ZnO-shell nanostructures deposited at 90 min exhibit enhanced sensitivity to ethanol. The sensitivity of SnO2-core/ZnO-shell nanostructures towards 20 ppm ethanol gas at 400 °C is about ∼5-times that of SnO2 nanowires. This improvement in ethanol gas response is attributed to high active sensing sites and the synergistic effect of the encapsulation of SnO2 by ZnO nanostructures. PMID:25116903

  13. Electron Microscopy of Nanostructures in Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Købler, Carsten

    in brain-machine interfaces, for drug delivery and for interfacing with cells. The potential health risks associated with nanostructures are also becoming a more pressing issue with the increased production and use of nanostructures. Developing and testing tools for visualising nanostructures interacting...

  14. Quantum Nanostructures by Droplet Epitaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somsak Panyakeow

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Droplet epitaxy is an alternative growth technique for several quantum nanostructures. Indium droplets are distributed randomly on GaAs substrates at low temperatures (120-350'C. Under background pressure of group V elements, Arsenic and Phosphorous, InAs and InP nanostructures are created. Quantum rings with isotropic shape are obtained at low temperature range. When the growth thickness is increased, quantum rings are transformed to quantum dot rings. At high temperature range, anisotropic strain gives rise to quantum rings with square holes and non-uniform ring stripe. Regrowth of quantum dots on these anisotropic quantum rings, Quadra-Quantum Dots (QQDs could be realized. Potential applications of these quantum nanostructures are also discussed.

  15. Zinc stannate nanostructures: hydrothermal synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunandan Baruah and Joydeep Dutta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured binary semiconducting metal oxides have received much attention in the last decade owing to their unique properties rendering them suitable for a wide range of applications. In the quest to further improve the physical and chemical properties, an interest in ternary complex oxides has become noticeable in recent times. Zinc stannate or zinc tin oxide (ZTO is a class of ternary oxides that are known for their stable properties under extreme conditions, higher electron mobility compared to its binary counterparts and other interesting optical properties. The material is thus ideal for applications from solar cells and sensors to photocatalysts. Among the different methods of synthesizing ZTO nanostructures, the hydrothermal method is an attractive green process that is carried out at low temperatures. In this review, we summarize the conditions leading to the growth of different ZTO nanostructures using the hydrothermal method and delve into a few of its applications reported in the literature.

  16. PREFACE: Self-organized nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousset, Sylvie; Ortega, Enrique

    2006-04-01

    In order to fabricate ordered arrays of nanostructures, two different strategies might be considered. The `top-down' approach consists of pushing the limit of lithography techniques down to the nanometre scale. However, beyond 10 nm lithography techniques will inevitably face major intrinsic limitations. An alternative method for elaborating ultimate-size nanostructures is based on the reverse `bottom-up' approach, i.e. building up nanostructures (and eventually assemble them to form functional circuits) from individual atoms or molecules. Scanning probe microscopies, including scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) invented in 1982, have made it possible to create (and visualize) individual structures atom by atom. However, such individual atomic manipulation is not suitable for industrial applications. Self-assembly or self-organization of nanostructures on solid surfaces is a bottom-up approach that allows one to fabricate and assemble nanostructure arrays in a one-step process. For applications, such as high density magnetic storage, self-assembly appears to be the simplest alternative to lithography for massive, parallel fabrication of nanostructure arrays with regular sizes and spacings. These are also necessary for investigating the physical properties of individual nanostructures by means of averaging techniques, i.e. all those using light or particle beams. The state-of-the-art and the current developments in the field of self-organization and physical properties of assembled nanostructures are reviewed in this issue of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter. The papers have been selected from among the invited and oral presentations of the recent summer workshop held in Cargese (Corsica, France, 17-23 July 2005). All authors are world-renowned in the field. The workshop has been funded by the Marie Curie Actions: Marie Curie Conferences and Training Courses series named `NanosciencesTech' supported by the VI Framework Programme of the European Community, by

  17. Indirect involvement of armorphous carbon layer on convective heat transfer enhancement using carbon nanofibers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taha, T.J.; Lefferts, Leonardus; van der Meer, Theodorus H.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, an experimental heat transfer investigation was carried out to investigate the combined influence of both amorphous carbon (a-C) layer thickness and carbon nanofibers (CNFs) on the convective heat transfer behavior. Synthesis of these carbon nanostructures was achieved using catalytic

  18. Vortex ice in nanostructured superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichhardt, Charles [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reichhardt, Cynthia J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Libal, Andras J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate using numerical simulations of nanostructured superconductors that it is possible to realize vortex ice states that are analogous to square and kagome ice. The system can be brought into a state that obeys either global or local ice rules by applying an external current according to an annealing protocol. We explore the breakdown of the ice rules due to disorder in the nanostructure array and show that in square ice, topological defects appear along grain boundaries, while in kagome ice, individual defects appear. We argue that the vortex system offers significant advantages over other artificial ice systems.

  19. Nanostructures for Organic Solar Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goszczak, Arkadiusz Jarosław

    2016-01-01

    The experimental work in this thesis is focused on the fabrication of nanostructures that can be implemented in organic solar cell (OSC) architecture for enhancement of the device performance. Solar devices made from organic material are gaining increased attention, compared to their inorganic...... technique. Resist imprinted Al dimples drag the main focus showing increase in absorption and efficiency enhancement in poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT) and Phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl (PCBM) BHJ devices. Not limited to this, nanostructures by imprinting the organic layer of P3HT:PCBM and imprinted...... for organic solar cell applications, opening new patterning possibilities....

  20. Cast Nanostructured Films of Poly(methyl methacrylate-b-butyl acrylate)/Carbon Nanotubes: Influence of Poly(butyl acrylate) Content on Film Evaporation Rate, Morphology, and Electrical Resistance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Soriano-Corral, F; Ramos-de Valle, L. F; Enríquez-Medrano, F. J; De León-Martínez, P. A; López-Quintanilla, M. L; Cabrera-Álvarez, E. N

    2012-01-01

      Nanocomposites of poly(methyl methacrylate-b-butyl acrylate)/multiwalled carbon nanotubes were prepared from different copolymers synthesized by RITP technique using iodine functionalized poly(methyl methacrylate...

  1. Laser-Based Growth of Nanostructured Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patsalas, P.

    The development of powerful, pulsed lasers with immense power has drastically changed our perception of light-matter interactions and opened new ways of implementing laser sources for the growth and processing of nanostructured materials, making Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) as one of the most important techniques in the nanotechnology era. In this work, we describe the main parts of a PLD system and the basic physical processes involved, as well as some laser processes for microstructural control of the grown materials. In order to establish firm understanding of the PLD processes, three case studies are presented as examples: (a) External Control of Ablated Species and Application to Tetrahedral Amorphous Carbon (ta-C) Films, (b) Self-assembled nanoparticles (NPs) into dielectric-matrix films and superlattices, (c) Controlling of the atomic structure and nanostructure of intermetallic and glassy films.

  2. Solid gold nanostructures fabricated by electron beam deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølhave, Kristian; Madsen, Dorte Nørgaard; Rasmussen, A.M.

    2003-01-01

    and bridges. Transmission electron microscopy was used to study how the composition of these structures was affected when the background gas in the ESEM chamber and the electron beam parameters were varied. The nanostructures were layered composites of up to three different materials each characterized......Direct writing with gold by electron beam deposition is a method for rapid fabrication of electrically conducting nanostructures. An environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) equipped with a source of the precursor gas dimethylacetylacetonate gold(Ill) was used to fabricate nanoscale tips...... by a certain range of gold/carbon ratios. Above a certain threshold of ESEM chamber water vapor pressure and a certain threshold of electron beam current, the deposited tips contained a solid polycrystalline gold core. The deposition technique was used to fabricate free-standing nanowires and to solder free...

  3. Equivalent-Continuum Modeling of Nano-Structured Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odegard, Gregory M.; Gates, Thomas S.; Nicholson, Lee M.; Wise, Kristopher E.

    2001-01-01

    A method has been developed for modeling structure-property relationships of nano-structured materials. This method serves as a link between computational chemistry and solid mechanics by substituting discrete molecular structures with an equivalent-continuum model. It has been shown that this substitution may be accomplished by equating the vibrational potential energy of a nano-structured material with the strain energy of representative truss and continuum models. As an important example with direct application to the development and characterization of single-walled carbon nanotubes, the model has been applied to determine the effective continuum geometry of a graphene sheet. A representative volume element of the equivalent-continuum model has been developed with an effective thickness. This effective thickness has been shown to be similar to, but slightly smaller than, the interatomic spacing of graphite.

  4. Ultra-fast efficient synthesis of one-dimensional nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dabrowska, Agnieszka; Huczko, Andrzej; Soszynski, Michal [Department of Chemistry, Warsaw University, 1 Pasteur str., 02-093 Warsaw (Poland); Bendjemil, Badis [Department of Physics, University of Badji-Mokhtar, LEREC, BP. 12, 23000 Annaba (Algeria); Micciulla, Federico; Sacco, Immacolata; Coderoni, Laura; Bellucci, Stefano [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Via E. Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati, Roma (Italy)

    2011-11-15

    Self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS) can be regarded as an efficient method to obtain new nanomaterials. Different starting mixtures of magnesium powder with various carbonates (Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, CaCO{sub 3}, FeCO{sub 3}, (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}CO{sub 3}) were tried and the auto-thermal reactions were carried out under both reactive (air) and neutral atmosphere (argon) with an initial pressure of 1 or 10 atm to yield novel nanomaterials. Both SiC nanofibres and novel branched SiC nanostructures were also obtained from Si/polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) mixtures and their synthesis and purification have been optimized. The application of those one-dimensional (1-D) SiC nanostructures as a composite filler is presented. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  5. Could Nano-Structured Materials Enable the Improved Pressure Vessels for Deep Atmospheric Probes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, D.; Fuentes, A.; Bienstock, B.; Arnold, J. O.

    2005-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on the use of Nano-Structured Materials to enable pressure vessel structures for deep atmospheric probes is shown. The topics include: 1) High Temperature/Pressure in Key X-Environments; 2) The Case for Use of Nano-Structured Materials Pressure Vessel Design; 3) Carbon based Nanomaterials; 4) Nanotube production & purification; 5) Nanomechanics of Carbon Nanotubes; 6) CNT-composites: Example (Polymer); 7) Effect of Loading sequence on Composite with 8% by volume; 8) Models for Particulate Reinforced Composites; 9) Fullerene/Ti Composite for High Strength-Insulating Layer; 10) Fullerene/Epoxy Composite for High Strength-Insulating Layer; 11) Models for Continuous Fiber Reinforced Composites; 12) Tensile Strength for Discontinuous Fiber Composite; 13) Ti + SWNT Composites: Thermal/Mechanical; 14) Ti + SWNT Composites: Tensile Strength; and 15) Nano-structured Shell for Pressure Vessels.

  6. Synthesis of ZnO nanostructures with different morphologies by a direct melt oxidation of Al-Zn mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Geun-Hyoung

    2012-02-01

    ZnO nanostructures with different morphologies were synthesized through a direct melt oxidation of source materials mixed with Al and Zn in air at atmospheric pressure. When Al-Zn mixture was used as a source material, tetrapod-shaped ZnO nanostructures were formed. ZnO nanostructures with bottle and tubular shape were fabricated when Al-Zn source material contained Au. The morphology depended on the Au content in Al-Zn source material. In addition, when carbon was contained in Al-Zn source material, ZnO nanostructures with comb shape were observed after the oxidation of the source material. All the ZnO nanostructures showed a hexagonal wurtzite crystallographic structure and were grown along the [0001] direction. On the other hand, the green emission centered at 510 nm was detected for all the ZnO nanostructures. This suggests that the ZnO nanostructures had high density of oxygen vacancies, which is supposed to be ascribed from high density of surface and subsurface oxygen vacancies in the nanostructures.

  7. Computer Code for Nanostructure Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filikhin, Igor; Vlahovic, Branislav

    2009-01-01

    Due to their small size, nanostructures can have stress and thermal gradients that are larger than any macroscopic analogue. These gradients can lead to specific regions that are susceptible to failure via processes such as plastic deformation by dislocation emission, chemical debonding, and interfacial alloying. A program has been developed that rigorously simulates and predicts optoelectronic properties of nanostructures of virtually any geometrical complexity and material composition. It can be used in simulations of energy level structure, wave functions, density of states of spatially configured phonon-coupled electrons, excitons in quantum dots, quantum rings, quantum ring complexes, and more. The code can be used to calculate stress distributions and thermal transport properties for a variety of nanostructures and interfaces, transport and scattering at nanoscale interfaces and surfaces under various stress states, and alloy compositional gradients. The code allows users to perform modeling of charge transport processes through quantum-dot (QD) arrays as functions of inter-dot distance, array order versus disorder, QD orientation, shape, size, and chemical composition for applications in photovoltaics and physical properties of QD-based biochemical sensors. The code can be used to study the hot exciton formation/relation dynamics in arrays of QDs of different shapes and sizes at different temperatures. It also can be used to understand the relation among the deposition parameters and inherent stresses, strain deformation, heat flow, and failure of nanostructures.

  8. Elastic theory of low-dimensional continua and its applications in bio- and nano-structures

    CERN Document Server

    Tu, Z C

    2007-01-01

    This review presents the elastic theory of low-dimensional (one- and two-dimensional) continua and its applications in bio- and nano-structures including short DNA rings, lipid membranes, cell membranes, graphene and carbon nanotubes. [The full abstract is in the pdf file.

  9. Fabrication of zein nanostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luecha, Jarupat

    resins. The soft lithography technique was mainly used to fabricate micro and nanostructures on zein films. Zein material well-replicated small structures with the smallest size at sub micrometer scale that resulted in interesting photonic properties. The bonding method was also developed for assembling portable zein microfluidic devices with small shape distortion. Zein-zein and zein-glass microfluidic devices demonstrated sufficient strength to facilitate fluid flow in a complex microfluidic design with no leakage. Aside from the fabrication technique development, several potential applications of this environmentally friendly microfluidic device were investigated. The concentration gradient manipulation of Rhodamine B solution in zein-glass microfluidic devices was demonstrated. The diffusion of small molecules such as fluorescent dye into the wall of the zein microfluidic channels was observed. However, with this formulation, zein microfluidic devices were not suitable for cell culture applications. This pioneer study covered a wide spectrum of the implementation of the two nanotechnology approaches to advance zein biomaterial which provided proof of fundamental concepts as well as presenting some limitations. The findings in this study can lead to several innovative research opportunities of advanced zein biomaterials with broad applications. The information from the study of zein nanocomposite structure allows the packaging industry to develop the low cost biodegradable materials with physical property improvement. The information from the study of the zein microfluidic devices allows agro-industry to develop the nanotechnology-enabled microfluidic sensors fabricated entirely from biodegradable polymer for on-site disease or contaminant detection in the fields of food and agriculture.

  10. Quantitative 3D electromagnetic field determination of 1D nanostructures from single projection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phatak, C., E-mail: cd@anl.gov [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Knoop, L. de; Houdellier, F.; Gatel, C. [CEMES-CNRS, 29 rue Jeanne Marvig, F-31055 Toulouse (France); Université Paul Sabatier, F-31000 Toulouse (France); Hÿtch, M.J.; Masseboeuf, A. [CEMES-CNRS, 29 rue Jeanne Marvig, F-31055 Toulouse (France)

    2016-05-15

    One-dimensional (1D) nanostructures have been regarded as the most promising building blocks for nanoelectronics and nanocomposite material systems as well as for alternative energy applications. Although they result in confinement of a material, their properties and interactions with other nanostructures are still very much three-dimensional (3D) in nature. In this work, we present a novel method for quantitative determination of the 3D electromagnetic fields in and around 1D nanostructures using a single electron wave phase image, thereby eliminating the cumbersome acquisition of tomographic data. Using symmetry arguments, we have reconstructed the 3D magnetic field of a nickel nanowire as well as the 3D electric field around a carbon nanotube field emitter, from one single projection. The accuracy of quantitative values determined here is shown to be a better fit to the physics at play than the value obtained by conventional analysis. Moreover the 3D reconstructions can then directly be visualized and used in the design of functional 3D architectures built using 1D nanostructures. - Highlights: • Novel method for tomography of 3D electromagnetic fields from a single image is presented. • The method relies upon using cylindrical symmetry and is applied to 1D nanostructures. • The 3D magnetic field of a Nickel nanowire is reconstructed. • The 3D electric field from a biased carbon cone nanotip is reconstructed. • Our method improves the quantitative measurement of the 3D electromagnetic fields.

  11. Synthesis and applications of MOF-derived porous nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Hui Yap

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Metal organic frameworks (MOFs represent a class of porous material which is formed by strong bonds between metal ions and organic linkers. By careful selection of constituents, MOFs can exhibit very high surface area, large pore volume, and excellent chemical stability. Research on synthesis, structures and properties of various MOFs has shown that they are promising materials for many applications, such as energy storage, gas storage, heterogeneous catalysis and sensing. Apart from direct use, MOFs have also been used as support substrates for nanomaterials or as sacrificial templates/precursors for preparation of various functional nanostructures. In this review, we aim to present the most recent development of MOFs as precursors for the preparation of various nanostructures and their potential applications in energy-related devices and processes. Specifically, this present survey intends to push the boundaries and covers the literatures from the year 2013 to early 2017, on supercapacitors, lithium ion batteries, electrocatalysts, photocatalyst, gas sensing, water treatment, solar cells, and carbon dioxide capture. Finally, an outlook in terms of future challenges and potential prospects towards industrial applications are also discussed. Keywords: Metal organic frameworks, Porous nanostructures, Supercapacitors, Lithium ion batteries, Heterogeneous catalyst

  12. Laser-driven proton acceleration with nanostructured targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallières, Simon; Morabito, Antonia; Veltri, Simona; Scisciò, Massimiliano; Barberio, Marianna; Antici, Patrizio

    2017-05-01

    Laser-driven particle acceleration has become a growing field of research, in particular for its numerous interesting applications. One of the most common proton acceleration mechanism that is obtained on typically available multi-hundred TW laser systems is based on the irradiation of thin solid metal foils by the intense laser, generating the proton acceleration on its rear target surface. The efficiency of this acceleration scheme strongly depends on the type of target used. Improving the acceleration mechanism, i.e. enhancing parameters such as maximum proton energy, laminarity, efficiency, monocromaticy, and number of accelerated particles, is heavily depending on the laser-to-target absorption, where obviously cheap and easy to implement targets are best candidates. In this work, we present nanostructured targets that are able to increase the absorption of light compared to what can be achieved with a classical solid (non-nanostructured) target and are produced with a method that is much simpler and cheaper than conventional lithographic processes. Several layers of gold nanoparticles were deposited on solid targets (aluminum, Mylar and multiwalled carbon nanotube buckypaper) and allow for an increased photon absorption. This ultimately permits to increase the laser-to-particle energy transfer, and thus to enhance the yield in proton production. Experimental characterization results on the nanostructured films are presented (UV-Vis spectroscopy and AFM), along with preliminary experimental proton spectra obtained at the JLF-TITAN laser facility at LLNL.

  13. Simulation of nanostructured electrodes for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Sanjeev M.; Xing, Yangchuan

    Aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with Pt uniformly deposited on them are being considered in fabricating the catalyst layer of polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell electrodes. When coated with a proton conducting polymer (e.g., Nafion) on the Pt/CNTs, each Pt/CNT acts as a nanoelectrode and a collection of such nanoelectrodes constitutes the proposed nanostructured electrodes. Computer modeling was performed for the cathode side, in which both multicomponent and Knudsen diffusion were taken into account. The effect of the nanoelectrode lengths was also studied with catalyst layer thicknesses of 2, 4, 6, and 10 μm. It was observed that shorter lengths produce better electrode performance due to lower diffusion barriers and better catalyst utilization. The effect of spacing between the nanoelectrodes was studied. Simulation results showed the need to have sufficiently large gas pores, i.e., large spacing, for good oxygen transport. However, this is at the cost of obtaining large electrode currents due to reduction of the number of nanoelectrodes per unit geometrical area of the nanostructured electrode. An optimization of the nanostructured electrodes was obtained when the spacing was at about 400 nm that produced the best limiting current density.

  14. Nanoparticle modifications of photodefined nanostructures for energy applications.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polsky, Ronen; Xiao, Xiaoyin; Burckel, David Bruce; Brozik, Susan Marie; Washburn, Cody M.; Wheeler, David Roger

    2011-10-01

    The advancement of materials technology towards the development of novel 3D nanostructures for energy applications has been a long-standing challenge. The purpose of this project was to explore photolithographically defineable pyrolyzed photoresist carbon films for possible energy applications. The key attributes that we explored were as follows: (1) Photo-interferometric fabrication methods to produce highly porous (meso, micro, and nano) 3-D electrode structures, and (2) conducting polymer and nanoparticle-modification strategies on these structures to provide enhanced catalytic capabilities and increase conductivity. The resulting electrodes were then explored for specific applications towards possible use in battery and energy platforms.

  15. Stability of DNA nanostructures by junction penalty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong Bum; Kim, Hyuncheol

    2013-04-01

    DNA nanostructures have been attracting much attention because of their well-controlled nanoarchitectural features. However, regulating the stability of DNA nanostructures is less well understood because of complexity. In this paper, the stability of DNA nanostructure was studied first in the form of simple building blocks. Since these DNA nanostructures have junctions on the center of the structures, the junctions were mainly investigated as a factor in the instability. In addition, regulation of the stability of complicated nanostructures based on these building blocks was achieved. Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) methods were employed to monitor the conformation change with nano-scale sensitivity. The junction effect on DNA nanostructures was monitored with labeling FRET pairs at various conditions. DNA tile structures was also thoroughly studied by FRET.

  16. Synthesis of hierarchical and bridging carbon-coated LiMn0.9Fe0.1PO4 nanostructure as cathode material with improved performance for lithium ion battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Feng; Zhang, Xiaoyu; He, Ping; Zhang, Xueping; Wang, Peng; Zhou, Haoshen

    2017-08-01

    A pyrolyzed carbon and reduced graphene oxide co-doped LiMn0.9Fe0.1PO4 (LMFP/C/rGO) is synthesized by a novel and facile amine-assisted coating strategy. The well designed co-doped LiMn0.9Fe0.1PO4 nanoplate (LMFP/C/rGO, 150 nm in length and 20 nm in thickness) is proved to be olivine phase with good crystallinity which is further compared with the sole pyrolyzed carbon coated LiMn0.9Fe0.1PO4 (LMFP/C) from structural and electrochemical points of views. The LMFP/C/rGO exhibits superior electrochemical performances with the specific capacity of 158.0 mAh g-1 at 0.1C and 124.6 mAh g-1 at 20C, which is, to the best of our knowledge, the highest rate capability. Moreover, after 140 cycles at 0.2C rate, around 95% of the initial capacity is still retained. Further analyses disclosed the outstanding electrochemical performances can be ascribed to the collaboration of the uniformly coated pyrolyzed carbon and closely connected rGO with an extraordinary electronic conductivity. Our research shows this effective synthesis strategy is imperative for the improvement of Li-ion battery performance and can be widely used for advanced energy storage.

  17. Nanostructuring of Solar Cell Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Rasmus Schmidt; Schmidt, Michael Stenbæk

    Solar energy is by far the most abundant renewable energy source available, but the levelized cost of solar energy is still not competitive with that of fossil fuels. Therefore there is a need to improve the power conversion effciency of solar cells without adding to the production cost. The main...... objective of this PhD thesis is to develop nanostructured silicon (Si) solar cells with higher power conversion efficiency using only scalable and cost-efficient production methods. The nanostructures, known as 'black silicon', are fabricated by single-step, maskless reactive ion etching and used as front....... This result indicates the potential of improved cell performance and higher output power at diffuse light conditions and during daily and yearly operation. A second batch of RIEtextured solar cells with laser-doped selective emitters (LDSE) was fabricated. A power conversion eciency of 18.1% and a ll factor...

  18. Chiroplasmonic DNA-based nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecconello, Alessandro; Besteiro, Lucas V.; Govorov, Alexander O.; Willner, Itamar

    2017-09-01

    Chiroplasmonic properties of nanoparticles, organized using DNA-based nanostructures, have attracted both theoretical and experimental interest. Theory suggests that the circular dichroism spectra accompanying chiroplasmonic nanoparticle assemblies are controlled by the sizes, shapes, geometries and interparticle distances of the nanoparticles. In this Review, we present different methods to assemble chiroplasmonic nanoparticle or nanorod systems using DNA scaffolds, and we discuss the operations of dynamically reconfigurable chiroplasmonic nanostructures. The chiroplasmonic properties of the different systems are characterized by circular dichroism and further supported by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy or cryo-transmission electron microscopy imaging and theoretical modelling. We also outline the applications of chiroplasmonic assemblies, including their use as DNA-sensing platforms and as functional systems for information processing and storage. Finally, future perspectives in applying chiroplasmonic nanoparticles as waveguides for selective information transfer and their use as ensembles for chiroselective synthesis are discussed. Specifically, we highlight the upscaling of the systems to device-like configurations.

  19. Nanostructured Biomaterials and Their Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsten Parratt

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Some of the most important advances in the life sciences have come from transitioning to thinking of materials and their properties on the nanoscale rather than the macro or even microscale. Improvements in imaging technology have allowed us to see nanofeatures that directly impact chemical and mechanical properties of natural and man-made materials. Now that these can be imaged and quantified, substantial advances have been made in the fields of biomimetics, tissue engineering, and drug delivery. For the first time, scientists can determine the importance of nanograins and nanoasperities in nacre, direct the nucleation of apatite and the growth of cells on nanostructured scaffolds, and pass drugs tethered to nanoparticles through the blood-brain barrier. This review examines some of the most interesting materials whose nanostructure and hierarchical organization have been shown to correlate directly with favorable properties and their resulting applications.

  20. Ballistic transport in graphene nanostructures

    OpenAIRE

    Terrés, Bernat

    2017-01-01

    This work aims to contribute to the progress and understanding of the sources of disorder in nano-structured graphene devices. The first part of the thesis starts with the introduction of disordered two-terminal graphene nanoribbons of different aspect ratio, in order to unveil and characterize the amount of potential fluctuations on silicon dioxide ($SiO_2$) substrates. The experimental results reveal the diffusive nature of the transport behavior and a Coulomb blockade dominated transport r...

  1. Stress Controlled Catalysis via Engineered Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-02

    fields on catalysis : “Stress Controlled Catalysis via Engineered Nanostructures.” For this effort a workshop was organized and held at Brown... Catalysis via Engineered Nanostructures" The views, opinions and/or findings contained in this report are those of the author(s) and should not contrued...Support for current award "Stress Controlled Catalysis via Engineered Nanostructures" Report Title This is the final report of the ARO project of

  2. Metal chalcogenide nanostructures for renewable energy applications

    CERN Document Server

    Qurashi, Ahsanulhaq

    2014-01-01

    This first ever reference book that focuses on metal chalcogenide semiconductor nanostructures for renewable energy applications encapsulates the state-of-the-art in multidisciplinary research on the metal chalcogenide semiconductor nanostructures (nanocrystals, nanoparticles, nanorods, nanowires,  nanobelts, nanoflowers, nanoribbons and more).  The properties and synthesis of a class of nanomaterials is essential to renewable energy manufacturing and this book focuses on the synthesis of metal chalcogendie nanostructures, their growth mechanism, optical, electrical, and other important prop

  3. Nanostructured Metal Oxides Based Enzymatic Electrochemical Biosensors

    OpenAIRE

    Ansari, Anees A.; Alhoshan, M.; Alsalhi, M.S.; Aldwayyan, A.S.

    2010-01-01

    The unique electrocatalytic properties of the metal oxides and the ease of metal oxide nanostructured fabrication make them extremely interesting materials for electrochemical enzymatic biosensor applications. The application of nanostructured metal oxides in such sensing devices has taken off rapidly and will surely continue to expand. This article provides a review on current research status of electrochemical enzymatic biosensors based on various new types of nanostructured metal oxides su...

  4. Sintering and ripening resistant noble metal nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Swol, Frank B; Song, Yujiang; Shelnutt, John A; Miller, James E; Challa, Sivakumar R

    2013-09-24

    Durable porous metal nanostructures comprising thin metal nanosheets that are metastable under some conditions that commonly produce rapid reduction in surface area due to sintering and/or Ostwald ripening. The invention further comprises the method for making such durable porous metal nanostructures. Durable, high-surface area nanostructures result from the formation of persistent durable holes or pores in metal nanosheets formed from dendritic nanosheets.

  5. Direct writing of gold nanostructures with an electron beam: On the way to pure nanostructures by combining optimized deposition with oxygen-plasma treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domagoj Belić

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a highly effective approach for the chemical purification of directly written 2D and 3D gold nanostructures suitable for plasmonics, biomolecule immobilisation, and nanoelectronics. Gold nano- and microstructures can be fabricated by one-step direct-write lithography process using focused electron beam induced deposition (FEBID. Typically, as-deposited gold nanostructures suffer from a low Au content and unacceptably high carbon contamination. We show that the undesirable carbon contamination can be diminished using a two-step process – a combination of optimized deposition followed by appropriate postdeposition cleaning. Starting from the common metal-organic precursor Me2-Au-tfac, it is demonstrated that the Au content in pristine FEBID nanostructures can be increased from 30 atom % to as much as 72 atom %, depending on the sustained electron beam dose. As a second step, oxygen-plasma treatment is established to further enhance the Au content in the structures, while preserving their morphology to a high degree. This two-step process represents a simple, feasible and high-throughput method for direct writing of purer gold nanostructures that can enable their future use for demanding applications.

  6. Direct writing of gold nanostructures with an electron beam: On the way to pure nanostructures by combining optimized deposition with oxygen-plasma treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belić, Domagoj; Shawrav, Mostafa M; Bertagnolli, Emmerich; Wanzenboeck, Heinz D

    2017-01-01

    This work presents a highly effective approach for the chemical purification of directly written 2D and 3D gold nanostructures suitable for plasmonics, biomolecule immobilisation, and nanoelectronics. Gold nano- and microstructures can be fabricated by one-step direct-write lithography process using focused electron beam induced deposition (FEBID). Typically, as-deposited gold nanostructures suffer from a low Au content and unacceptably high carbon contamination. We show that the undesirable carbon contamination can be diminished using a two-step process - a combination of optimized deposition followed by appropriate postdeposition cleaning. Starting from the common metal-organic precursor Me2-Au-tfac, it is demonstrated that the Au content in pristine FEBID nanostructures can be increased from 30 atom % to as much as 72 atom %, depending on the sustained electron beam dose. As a second step, oxygen-plasma treatment is established to further enhance the Au content in the structures, while preserving their morphology to a high degree. This two-step process represents a simple, feasible and high-throughput method for direct writing of purer gold nanostructures that can enable their future use for demanding applications.

  7. Reactor and method for production of nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sunkara, Mahendra Kumar; Kim, Jeong H.; Kumar, Vivekanand

    2017-04-25

    A reactor and method for production of nanostructures, including metal oxide nanowires or nanoparticles, are provided. The reactor includes a regulated metal powder delivery system in communication with a dielectric tube; a plasma-forming gas inlet, whereby a plasma-forming gas is delivered substantially longitudinally into the dielectric tube; a sheath gas inlet, whereby a sheath gas is delivered into the dielectric tube; and a microwave energy generator coupled to the dielectric tube, whereby microwave energy is delivered into a plasma-forming gas. The method for producing nanostructures includes providing a reactor to form nanostructures and collecting the formed nanostructures, optionally from a filter located downstream of the dielectric tube.

  8. Is there a shift to "active nanostructures"?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Vrishali; Youtie, Jan; Porter, Alan L.; Shapira, Philip

    2010-01-01

    It has been suggested that an important transition in the long-run trajectory of nanotechnology development is a shift from passive to active nanostructures. Such a shift could present different or increased societal impacts and require new approaches for risk assessment. An active nanostructure "changes or evolves its state during its operation," according to the National Science Foundation's (2006) Active Nanostructures and Nanosystems grant solicitation. Active nanostructure examples include nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS), nanomachines, self-healing materials, targeted drugs and chemicals, energy storage devices, and sensors. This article considers two questions: (a) Is there a "shift" to active nanostructures? (b) How can we characterize the prototypical areas into which active nanostructures may emerge? We build upon the NSF definition of active nanostructures to develop a research publication search strategy, with a particular intent to distinguish between passive and active nanotechnologies. We perform bibliometric analyses and describe the main publication trends from 1995 to 2008. We then describe the prototypes of research that emerge based on reading the abstracts and review papers encountered in our search. Preliminary results suggest that there is a sharp rise in active nanostructures publications in 2006, and this rise is maintained in 2007 and through to early 2008. We present a typology that can be used to describe the kind of active nanostructures that may be commercialized and regulated in the future.

  9. Nanostructures for Electronic and Sensing Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed project will develop sensors and electronic components from metal oxide based nanotubes and nanowires. These nanostructured materials will be grown...

  10. Nanostructured Catalytic Reactors for Air Purification Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase I project proposes the development of lightweight compact nanostructured catalytic reactors for air purification from toxic gaseous organic...

  11. Nanostructured Catalytic Reactors for Air Purification Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase II project proposes the development of lightweight compact nanostructured catalytic reactors for air purification from toxic gaseous organic...

  12. Particle Lithography Enables Fabrication of Multicomponent Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wei-feng; Swartz, Logan A.; Li, Jie-Ren; Liu, Yang; Liu, Gang-yu

    2014-01-01

    Multicomponent nanostructures with individual geometries have attracted much attention because of their potential to carry out multiple functions synergistically. The current work reports a simple method using particle lithography to fabricate multicomponent nanostructures of metals, proteins, and organosiloxane molecules, each with its own geometry. Particle lithography is well-known for its capability to produce arrays of triangular-shaped nanostructures with novel optical properties. This paper extends the capability of particle lithography by combining a particle template in conjunction with surface chemistry to produce multicomponent nanostructures. The advantages and limitations of this approach will also be addressed. PMID:24707328

  13. When carbon meets light: synergistic effect between carbon nanomaterials and metal oxide semiconductors for photocatalytic applications

    OpenAIRE

    Claudia G Silva; Pastrana-Martínez, L.M.; Sergio Morales Torres

    2016-01-01

    Activated carbon based materials and more recently, nanostructured carbon materials namely, fullerenes, nanotubes, nanodiamonds and graphene, have been the focus of intensive research for application in nanotechnology. In the field of photocatalysis, carbon materials have been combined with conventional semiconductors as carbon/inorganic composites seeking for synergies resulting from the coupling of both phases. This overview paper aims at exploring some important aspects that influence the ...

  14. Less-Common Nanostructures: Nanobuds: A Micro-Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharisov, Boris I; Kharissova, Oxana V; Méndez, Yolanda P

    2017-01-01

    Synthesis, properties, structural peculiarities, and applications of nanobuds and related nanostructures are discussed. In addition, few relevant patents to the topic have been reviewed and cited. According to observed properties and those predicted by DFT calculations, the nanobuds are semiconducting and stable in normal conditions, can accept adatoms and molecules. They contain a relatively chemically inert carbon nanotubes and more active fullerene species and can be compatible with a variety of other materials, in particular polymers. In addition to nanobuds for SWCNTs, the nanobuds with graphene, small fullerenes or metal nanobud-like structures are also known. We have undertaken an extensive search of bibliographic databases for peer-reviewed research literature using a focused review question and inclusion/exclusion criteria. The characteristics of screened papers were described and critically compared. Thirty-six papers were included in the review, mainly from high-impact international journals. The published articles correspond to the range 2006-2016; the term "nanobuds" appeared in 2006 after their discovery. The reports included approaches of the synthesis of carbon nanobuds, their formation mechanism, in situ engineering, different modes of attachment of fullerene on carbon nanotubes, DFT and MD calculations, nanobuds containing small fullerenes and graphene nanobuds, information about related noble metal nanobuds, and applications of carbon nanobuds. The findings of this review confirm the importance of novel less-common nanostructures on the basis of carbon for fundamental science, their unusual properties and current and possible applications. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  15. Applications and Nanotoxicity of Carbon Nanotubes and Graphene in Biomedicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caitlin Fisher

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Owing to their unique mechanical, electrical, optical, and thermal properties, carbon nanostructures including carbon nanotubes and graphenes show great promise for advancing the fields of biology and medicine. Many reports have demonstrated the promise of these carbon nanostructures and their hybrid structures (composites with polymers, ceramics, and metal nanoparticles, etc. for a variety of biomedical areas ranging from biosensing, drug delivery, and diagnostics, to cancer treatment, tissue engineering, and bioterrorism prevention. However, the issue of the safety and toxicity of these carbon nanostructures, which is vital to their use as diagnostic and therapeutic tools in biomedical fields, has not been completely resolved. This paper aims to provide a summary of the features of carbon nanotube and graphene-based materials and current research progress in biomedical applications. We also highlight the current opinions within the scientific community on the toxicity and safety of these carbon structures.

  16. Nanostructured Networks for Energy Storage: Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotubes (VACNT as Current Collectors for High-Power Li4Ti5O12(LTO//LiMn2O4(LMO Lithium-Ion Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian Pawlitzek

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available As a concept for electrode architecture in high power lithium ion batteries, self-supported nanoarrays enable ultra-high power densities as a result of their open pore geometry, which results in short and direct Li+-ion and electron pathways. Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNT on metallic current collectors with low interface resistance are used as current collectors for the chemical solution infiltration of electroactive oxides to produce vertically aligned carbon nanotubes decorated with in situ grown LiMn2O4 (LMO and Li4Ti5O12 (LTO nanoparticles. The production processes steps (catalyst coating, VACNT chemical vapor deposition (CVD, infiltration, and thermal transformation are all scalable, continuous, and suitable for niche market production to achieve high oxide loadings up to 70 wt %. Due to their unique transport structure, as-prepared nanoarrays achieve remarkably high power densities up to 2.58 kW kg−1, which is based on the total electrode mass at 80 C for LiMn2O4//Li4Ti5O12 full cells. The tailoring of LTO and LMO nanoparticle size (~20–100 nm and VACNT length (array height: 60–200 µm gives insights into the rate-limiting steps at high current for these kinds of nanoarray electrodes at very high C-rates of up to 200 C. The results reveal the critical structural parameters for achieving high power densities in VACNT nanoarray full cells.

  17. Splendid one-dimensional nanostructures of zinc oxide: a new nanomaterial family for nanotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhong Lin

    2008-10-28

    Zinc oxide is a unique material that exhibits exceptional semiconducting, piezoelectric, and pyroelectric properties. Nanostructures of ZnO are equally as important as carbon nanotubes and silicon nanowires for nanotechnology and have great potential applications in nanoelectronics, optoelectronics, sensors, field emission, light-emitting diodes, photocatalysis, nanogenerators, and nanopiezotronics. Fundamental understanding about the growth of ZnO nanowires is of critical importance for controlling their size, composition, structure, and corresponding physical and chemical properties. The papers by She et al. and Ito et al. in this issue describe the controlled growth and field-emission properties of individual nanostructures, respectively. These studies provide new approaches and insight into the controlled growth and electrical properties of ZnO nanostructures.

  18. Effect of tip geometry on photo-electron-emission from nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teki, Ranganath; Lu, Toh-Ming; Koratkar, Nikhil

    2009-03-01

    We show in this paper the strong effect of tip geometry on the photo-electron-emission behavior of nanostructured surfaces. To study the effect of tip geometry we compared the photo-emissivity of Ru and Pt nanorods with pyramidal shaped tips to that of carbon nanorods that display flat top (planar) tips. Flat top architectures gave no significant increase in the emission current, while nanostructures with pyramidal shaped tips showed 3-4 fold increase in photo-emission compared to a thin film of the same material. Pyramidal tip geometries increase the effective surface area that is exposed to the incident photon-flux thereby enhancing the photon-collection probability of the system. Such nano-structured surfaces show promise in a variety of device applications such as photo-detectors, photon counters and photo-multiplier tubes.

  19. Mechanical Properties of Nanostructured Materials Determined Through Molecular Modeling Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancy, Thomas C.; Gates, Thomas S.

    2005-01-01

    The potential for gains in material properties over conventional materials has motivated an effort to develop novel nanostructured materials for aerospace applications. These novel materials typically consist of a polymer matrix reinforced with particles on the nanometer length scale. In this study, molecular modeling is used to construct fully atomistic models of a carbon nanotube embedded in an epoxy polymer matrix. Functionalization of the nanotube which consists of the introduction of direct chemical bonding between the polymer matrix and the nanotube, hence providing a load transfer mechanism, is systematically varied. The relative effectiveness of functionalization in a nanostructured material may depend on a variety of factors related to the details of the chemical bonding and the polymer structure at the nanotube-polymer interface. The objective of this modeling is to determine what influence the details of functionalization of the carbon nanotube with the polymer matrix has on the resulting mechanical properties. By considering a range of degree of functionalization, the structure-property relationships of these materials is examined and mechanical properties of these models are calculated using standard techniques.

  20. Nanostructures for Enhanced Light Absorption in Solar Energy Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustav Edman Jonsson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The fascinating optical properties of nanostructured materials find important applications in a number of solar energy utilization schemes and devices. Nanotechnology provides methods for fabrication and use of structures and systems with size corresponding to the wavelength of visible light. This opens a wealth of possibilities to explore the new, often of resonance character, phenomena observed when the object size and the electromagnetic field periodicity (light wavelength λ match. Here we briefly review the effects and concepts of enhanced light absorption in nanostructures and illustrate them with specific examples from recent literature and from our studies. These include enhanced optical absorption of composite photocatalytically active TiO2/graphitic carbon films, systems with enhanced surface plasmon resonance, field-enhanced absorption in nanofabricated carbon structures with geometrical optical resonances and excitation of waveguiding modes in supported nanoparticle assembles. The case of Ag particles plasmon-mediated chemistry of NO on graphite surface is highlighted to illustrate the principle of plasmon-electron coupling in adsorbate systems.

  1. Quantum Pumping and Adiabatic Transport in Nanostructures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wakker, G.M.M.

    2011-01-01

    This thesis consists of a theoretical exploration of quantum transport phenomena and quantum dynamics in nanostructures. Specifically, we investigate adiabatic quantum pumping of charge in several novel types of nanostructures involving open quantum dots or graphene. For a bilayer of graphene we

  2. Multi-periodic nanostructures for photon control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kluge, Christian; Adam, Jost; Barié, Nicole

    2014-01-01

    We propose multi-periodic nanostructures yielded by superposition of multiple binary gratings for wide control over photon emission in thin-film devices. We present wavelength- and angle-resolved photoluminescence measurements of multi-periodically nanostructured organic light-emitting layers...

  3. Processing of Nanostructured Devices Using Microfabrication Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Gary W (Inventor); Xu, Jennifer C (Inventor); Evans, Laura J (Inventor); Kulis, Michael H (Inventor); Berger, Gordon M (Inventor); Vander Wal, Randall L (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Systems and methods that incorporate nanostructures into microdevices are discussed herein. These systems and methods can allow for standard microfabrication techniques to be extended to the field of nanotechnology. Sensors incorporating nanostructures can be fabricated as described herein, and can be used to reliably detect a range of gases with high response.

  4. Nanostructuring steel for injection molding tools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-Azawi, A.; Smistrup, Kristian; Kristensen, Anders

    2014-01-01

    The production of nanostructured plastic items by injection molding with ridges down to 400 nm in width, which is the smallest line width replicated from nanostructured steel shims, is presented. Here we detail a micro-fabrication method where electron beam lithography, nano-imprint lithography...... and ion beam etching are combined to nanostructure the planar surface of a steel wafer. Injection molded plastic parts with enhanced surface properties, like anti-reflective, superhydrophobic and structural colors can be achieved by micro-and nanostructuring the surface of the steel molds. We investigate...... has been produced by injection molding with good structure transfer fidelity. Thus we have demonstrated that by utilizing well-established fabrication techniques, nanostructured steel shims that are used in injection molding, a technique that allows low cost mass fabrication of plastic items...

  5. Nanostructures, systems, and methods for photocatalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reece, Steven Y.; Jarvi, Thomas D.

    2015-12-08

    The present invention generally relates to nanostructures and compositions comprising nanostructures, methods of making and using the nanostructures, and related systems. In some embodiments, a nanostructure comprises a first region and a second region, wherein a first photocatalytic reaction (e.g., an oxidation reaction) can be carried out at the first region and a second photocatalytic reaction (e.g., a reduction reaction) can be carried out at the second region. In some cases, the first photocatalytic reaction is the formation of oxygen gas from water and the second photocatalytic reaction is the formation of hydrogen gas from water. In some embodiments, a nanostructure comprises at least one semiconductor material, and, in some cases, at least one catalytic material and/or at least one photosensitizing agent.

  6. Optoelectronic properties of semiconductor nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Kristin Nicole

    Semiconductor nanostructures have unique optical and electronic properties that have inspired research into their technological applications and basic science. This thesis presents approaches to the fabrication and characterization of optoelectronic devices incorporating individual semiconductor nanostructures. Nanowires of the II-VI semiconductors CdSe and CdS were synthesized using nanoparticle-catalysed solution-liquid-solid growth. Single-component nanowires and heterostructure nanowires with axial compositional modulation were generated using this method. Individual nanowires and nanocrystals were then incorporated into devices with a three-terminal field-effect transistor geometry. An experimental platform was developed which allows for simultaneous electrical characterization of devices and measurement of their optical properties. This setup enables the measurement of spatially and spectrally resolved electroluminescence (EL) and photoluminescence (PL) from individual nanostructures and nanostructure devices. It also allows the measurement of photon coincidence histograms for emitted light and the acquisition of photocurrent images via laser scanning microscopy. Electroluminescence was observed from individual CdSe nanocrystals contacted by gold electrodes. Concomitant transport measurements at low temperature showed clear evidence of Coulomb blockade at low bias voltage, with light only emitted from devices exhibiting asymmetric tunnel couplings between the nanocrystal and electrodes. Combined analyses of the data indicate that the resistances of the tunnel barriers are bias voltage dependent and that light emission results from the inelastic scattering of tunneling electrons. Three-terminal devices incorporating individual CdSe nanoNvires exhibited EL localized near the positively-biased electrode. Characterization of these devices by scanning photocurrent microscopy (SPCM) and Kelvin probe microscopy (KPM) indicates that while there are n-type Schottky

  7. MAGNETIC PROPERTIES OF HEMATITE NANOSTRUCTURES

    OpenAIRE

    Munayco S., J.; Centro Brasilero de Pesquisas Físicas.; 5aavedra V., I.; Departamento Académico Física del Sólido- Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos Lima, Perú; Munayco S., P.; Centro Brasilero de Pesquisas Físicas; Ale B., N.; Departamento Académico de Química Analítica, FQIQ - Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos Lima, Perú

    2014-01-01

    Nanostructured a-Fe203 (hematite) was produced usíng high-energy ball milling and analized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), 57Fe Mi.issbauer spectrometry and magnetization measurements. The results showed that after 2 h milling, a-Fe203 nanosize particles were obtained about 15 nm. The 57 Fe Mossbauer spectrometry correlated with magnetometry showed also that Morin transition was notobserved after 0,75 h milling. Son estudiados los procedimientos de producción nanopartículas de hematita, evaluá...

  8. Transport Properties of Nanostructured Graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2017-01-01

    Despite of its many wonderful properties, pristine graphene has one major drawback: it does not have a band gap, which complicates its applications in electronic devices. Many routes have been suggested to overcome this difficulty, such as cutting graphene into nanoribbons, using chemical methods...... device operation. In this talk I elaborate these ideas and review the state-of-the-art both from the theoretical and the experimental points of view. I also introduce two new ideas: (1) triangular antidots, and (2) nanobubbles formed in graphene. Both of these nanostructuring methods are predicted...

  9. Theory of electronic and optical properties of nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewageegana, Prabath S.

    "There is plenty of room at the bottom." This bold and prophetic statement from Nobel laureate Richard Feynman back in 1950s at Cal Tech launched the Nano Age and predicted, quite accurately, the explosion in nanoscience and nanotechnology. Now this is a fast developing area in both science and technology. Many think this would bring the greatest technological revolution in the history of mankind. To understand electronic and optical properties of nanostructures, the following problems have been studied. In particular, intensity of mid-infrared light transmitted through a metallic diffraction grating has been theoretically studied. It has been shown that for s-polarized light the enhancement of the transmitted light is much stronger than for p-polarized light. By tuning the parameters of the diffraction grating enhancement can be increased by a few orders of magnitude. The spatial distribution of the transmitted light is highly nonuniform with very sharp peaks, which have the spatial widths about 10 nm. Furthermore, under the ultra fast response in nanostructures, the following two related goals have been proved: (a) the two-photon coherent control allows one to dynamically control electron emission from randomly rough surfaces, which is localized within a few nanometers. (b) the photoelectron emission from metal nanostructures in the strong-field (quasistationary) regime allows coherent control with extremely high contrast, suitable for nanoelectronics applications. To investigate the electron transport properties of two dimensional carbon called graphene, a localization of an electron in a graphene quantum dot with a sharp boundary has been considered. It has been found that if the parameters of the confinement potential satisfy a special condition then the electron can be strongly localized in such quantum dot. Also the energy spectra of an electron in a graphene quantum ring has been analyzed. Furthermore, it has been shown that in a double dot system some

  10. Facile One-pot Transformation of Iron Oxides from Fe2O3 Nanoparticles to Nanostructured Fe3O4@C Core-Shell Composites via Combustion Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jungho; Lee, Kang Yeol; Yeo, Taehan; Choi, Wonjoon

    2016-01-01

    The development of a low-cost, fast, and large-scale process for the synthesis and manipulation of nanostructured metal oxides is essential for incorporating materials with diverse practical applications. Herein, we present a facile one-pot synthesis method using combustion waves that simultaneously achieves fast reduction and direct formation of carbon coating layers on metal oxide nanostructures. Hybrid composites of Fe2O3 nanoparticles and nitrocellulose on the cm scale were fabricated by a wet impregnation process. We demonstrated that self-propagating combustion waves along interfacial boundaries between the surface of the metal oxide and the chemical fuels enabled the release of oxygen from Fe2O3. This accelerated reaction directly transformed Fe2O3 into Fe3O4 nanostructures. The distinctive color change from reddish-brown Fe2O3 to dark-gray Fe3O4 confirmed the transition of oxidation states and the change in the fundamental properties of the material. Furthermore, it simultaneously formed carbon layers of 5–20 nm thickness coating the surfaces of the resulting Fe3O4 nanoparticles, which may aid in maintaining the nanostructures and improving the conductivity of the composites. This newly developed use of combustion waves in hybridized nanostructures may permit the precise manipulation of the chemical compositions of other metal oxide nanostructures, as well as the formation of organic/inorganic hybrid nanostructures. PMID:26902260

  11. Lifetime of Nano-Structured Black Silicon for Photovoltaic Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plakhotnyuk, Maksym; Davidsen, Rasmus Schmidt; Schmidt, Michael Stenbæk

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we present recent results of lifetime optimization for nano-structured black silicon and its photovoltaic applications. Black silicon nano-structures provide significant reduction of silicon surface reflection due to highly corrugated nanostructures with excellent light trapping......, respectively. This is promising for use of black silicon RIE nano-structuring in a solar cell process flow...

  12. Inorganic nanostructure-organic polymer heterostructures useful for thermoelectric devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    See, Kevin C.; Urban, Jeffrey J.; Segalman, Rachel A.; Coates, Nelson E.; Yee, Shannon K.

    2017-11-28

    The present invention provides for an inorganic nanostructure-organic polymer heterostructure, useful as a thermoelectric composite material, comprising (a) an inorganic nanostructure, and (b) an electrically conductive organic polymer disposed on the inorganic nanostructure. Both the inorganic nanostructure and the electrically conductive organic polymer are solution-processable.

  13. Interface controlled growth of nanostructures in discontinuous Ag ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Interfacial nanostructuring of thin films is demonstrated to be a viable technique to realize a variety of nanostructures. The use of interfacial nanostructuring for plasmonic applications is demonstrated. It is shown that the surface Plasmon resonance of the metal nanostructures can be tuned over a wide range of wavelengths ...

  14. Quantitative Characterization of Nanostructured Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Frank (Bud) Bridges, University of California-Santa Cruz

    2010-08-05

    The two-and-a-half day symposium on the "Quantitative Characterization of Nanostructured Materials" will be the first comprehensive meeting on this topic held under the auspices of a major U.S. professional society. Spring MRS Meetings provide a natural venue for this symposium as they attract a broad audience of researchers that represents a cross-section of the state-of-the-art regarding synthesis, structure-property relations, and applications of nanostructured materials. Close interactions among the experts in local structure measurements and materials researchers will help both to identify measurement needs pertinent to real-world materials problems and to familiarize the materials research community with the state-of-the-art local structure measurement techniques. We have chosen invited speakers that reflect the multidisciplinary and international nature of this topic and the need to continually nurture productive interfaces among university, government and industrial laboratories. The intent of the symposium is to provide an interdisciplinary forum for discussion and exchange of ideas on the recent progress in quantitative characterization of structural order in nanomaterials using different experimental techniques and theory. The symposium is expected to facilitate discussions on optimal approaches for determining atomic structure at the nanoscale using combined inputs from multiple measurement techniques.

  15. Aluminum nanostructures for ultraviolet plasmonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jérôme; Khlopin, Dmitry; Zhang, Feifei; Schuermans, Silvère; Proust, Julien; Maurer, Thomas; Gérard, Davy; Plain, Jérôme

    2017-08-01

    An electromagnetic field is able to produce a collective oscillation of free electrons at a metal surface. This allows light to be concentrated in volumes smaller than its wavelength. The resulting waves, called surface plasmons can be applied in various technological applications such as ultra-sensitive sensing, Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy, or metal-enhanced fluorescence, to name a few. For several decades plasmonics has been almost exclusively studied in the visible region by using nanoparticles made of gold or silver as these noble metals support plasmonic resonances in the visible and near-infrared range. Nevertheless, emerging applications will require the extension of nano-plasmonics toward higher energies, in the ultraviolet range. Aluminum is one of the most appealing metal for pushing plasmonics up to ultraviolet energies. The subsequent applications in the field of nano-optics are various. This metal is therefore a highly promising material for commercial applications in the field of ultraviolet nano-optics. As a consequence, aluminum (or ultraviolet, UV) plasmonics has emerged quite recently. Aluminium plasmonics has been demonstrated efficient for numerous potential applications including non-linear optics, enhanced fluorescence, UV-Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy, optoelectronics, plasmonic assisted solid-state lasing, photocatalysis, structural colors and data storage. In this article, different preparation methods developed in the laboratory to obtain aluminum nanostructures with different geometries are presented. Their optical and morphological characterizations of the nanostructures are given and some proof of principle applications such as fluorescence enhancement are discussed.

  16. Biocompatibility of plasma nanostructured biopolymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slepičková Kasálková, N. [Department of Solid State Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic); Slepička, P., E-mail: petr.slepicka@vscht.cz [Department of Solid State Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic); Bačáková, L. [Institute of Physiology, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic 142 20 Prague (Czech Republic); Sajdl, P. [Department of Power Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic); Švorčík, V. [Department of Solid State Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2013-07-15

    Many areas of medicine such as tissue engineering requires not only mastery of modification techniques but also thorough knowledge of the interaction of cells with solid state substrates. Plasma treatment can be used to effective modification, nanostructuring and therefore can significantly change properties of materials. In this work the biocompatibility of the plasma nanostructured biopolymers substrates was studied. Changes in surface chemical structure were studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The morphology pristine and modified samples were determined using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The surface wettability was determined by goniometry from contact angle. Biocompatibility was determined by in vitro tests, the rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) were cultivated on the pristine and plasma modified biopolymer substrates. Their adhesion, proliferation, spreading and homogeneous distribution on polymers was monitored. It was found that the plasma treatment leads to rapid decrease of contact angle for all samples. Contact angle decreased with increasing time of modification. XPS measurements showed that plasma treatment leads to changes in ratio of polar and non-polar groups. Plasma modification was accompanied by a change of surface morphology. Biological tests found that plasma treatment have positive effect on cells adhesion and proliferation cells and affects the size of cell’s adhesion area. Changes in plasma power or in exposure time influences the number of adhered and proliferated cells and their distribution on biopolymer surface.

  17. Shape-controlled continuous synthesis of metal nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastian, Victor; Smith, Christopher D.; Jensen, Klavs F.

    2016-03-01

    A segmented flow-based microreactor is used for the continuous production of faceted nanocrystals. Flow segmentation is proposed as a versatile tool to manipulate the reduction kinetics and control the growth of faceted nanostructures; tuning the size and shape. Switching the gas from oxygen to carbon monoxide permits the adjustment in nanostructure growth from 1D (nanorods) to 2D (nanosheets). CO is a key factor in the formation of Pd nanosheets and Pt nanocubes; operating as a second phase, a reductant, and a capping agent. This combination confines the growth to specific structures. In addition, the segmented flow microfluidic reactor inherently has the ability to operate in a reproducible manner at elevated temperatures and pressures whilst confining potentially toxic reactants, such as CO, in nanoliter slugs. This continuous system successfully synthesised Pd nanorods with an aspect ratio of 6; thin palladium nanosheets with a thickness of 1.5 nm; and Pt nanocubes with a 5.6 nm edge length, all in a synthesis time as low as 150 s.A segmented flow-based microreactor is used for the continuous production of faceted nanocrystals. Flow segmentation is proposed as a versatile tool to manipulate the reduction kinetics and control the growth of faceted nanostructures; tuning the size and shape. Switching the gas from oxygen to carbon monoxide permits the adjustment in nanostructure growth from 1D (nanorods) to 2D (nanosheets). CO is a key factor in the formation of Pd nanosheets and Pt nanocubes; operating as a second phase, a reductant, and a capping agent. This combination confines the growth to specific structures. In addition, the segmented flow microfluidic reactor inherently has the ability to operate in a reproducible manner at elevated temperatures and pressures whilst confining potentially toxic reactants, such as CO, in nanoliter slugs. This continuous system successfully synthesised Pd nanorods with an aspect ratio of 6; thin palladium nanosheets with a

  18. Silicon-embedded copper nanostructure network for high energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Tianyue

    2018-01-23

    Provided herein are nanostructure networks having high energy storage, electrochemically active electrode materials including nanostructure networks having high energy storage, as well as electrodes and batteries including the nanostructure networks having high energy storage. According to various implementations, the nanostructure networks have high energy density as well as long cycle life. In some implementations, the nanostructure networks include a conductive network embedded with electrochemically active material. In some implementations, silicon is used as the electrochemically active material. The conductive network may be a metal network such as a copper nanostructure network. Methods of manufacturing the nanostructure networks and electrodes are provided. In some implementations, metal nanostructures can be synthesized in a solution that contains silicon powder to make a composite network structure that contains both. The metal nanostructure growth can nucleate in solution and on silicon nanostructure surfaces.

  19. Silicon-embedded copper nanostructure network for high energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tianyue

    2016-03-15

    Provided herein are nanostructure networks having high energy storage, electrochemically active electrode materials including nanostructure networks having high energy storage, as well as electrodes and batteries including the nanostructure networks having high energy storage. According to various implementations, the nanostructure networks have high energy density as well as long cycle life. In some implementations, the nanostructure networks include a conductive network embedded with electrochemically active material. In some implementations, silicon is used as the electrochemically active material. The conductive network may be a metal network such as a copper nanostructure network. Methods of manufacturing the nanostructure networks and electrodes are provided. In some implementations, metal nanostructures can be synthesized in a solution that contains silicon powder to make a composite network structure that contains both. The metal nanostructure growth can nucleate in solution and on silicon nanostructure surfaces.

  20. Nanostructure and molecular interface for biosensing devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiep, Ha M.; Endo, Tatsuro; Kim, Do-Kyun; Tamiya, Eiichi

    2007-09-01

    Nanostructure and molecular interface have currently received the great attractions for highly efficient, simultaneously analysis of a number of important biomolecules from proteomics to genomics. Outstanding optical property of noble metal nanostructures, localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR), is a powerful phenomenon used in many chemical and biological sensing experiments. This report described two types of gold-capped nanostructures: nanoparticle and nanopore which reveal the strong excitation of LSPR spectra in the UV-visible region. The optical absorbance properties of these nanostructures governing its sensitivity to local environment were studied. The flexibility in design of the goldcapped nanostructures was evidently displayed on the wide-range capacity to develop in many types, from single to multiple to microfluidic formats. Moreover, chemical modifications on the nanostructure surface were thoroughly exploited to archive a highly sensitive protein and gene sensors such as using Protein A linker for orientation antibody or using specific binding of streptavidin and biotinylated PNA or DNA probes... Lastly, we introduced a new form of optical sensor, involving the coupling between interferometry and LSPR properties on the surface of gold-capped nanopore structure. Our optical biosensing devices connecting with the gold-capped nanostructures including both nanoparticle and nanopore are applicable to highly sensitive monitoring the interactions of other biomolecules, such as proteins, whole cells, or receptors with a massively parallel detection capability in a highly miniaturized package.

  1. Increased graphitization in electrospun single suspended carbon nanowires integrated with carbon-MEMS and carbon-NEMS platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Swati; Sharma, Ashutosh; Cho, Yoon-Kyoung; Madou, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Single suspended carbon nanowires (CNWs) integrated on carbon-MEMS (CMEMS) structures are fabricated by electrospinning of SU-8 photoresist followed by pyrolysis. These monolithic CNW-CMEMS structures enable fabrication of very high aspect ratio CNWs of predefined length. The CNWs thus fabricated display core-shell structures having a graphitic shell with a glassy carbon core. The electrical conductivity of these CNWs is increased by about 100% compared to glassy carbon as a result of enhanced graphitization. We suggest some tunable fabrication and pyrolysis parameters that may improve graphitization in the resulting CNWs, making them a good replacement for several carbon nanostructure-based devices. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  2. Synthesis of nanostructured bismuth titanate microspheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Hongchu; Wohlrab, Sebastian; Kaskel, Stefan

    2006-07-01

    A hydrothermal method was developed for the synthesis of bismuth titanate nanostructured microspheres. The precursor powder was prepared using a diethylene glycol mediated coprecipitation method. The as-synthesized nanostructured microspheres consisting of granular nanoparticles and nano-platelets were obtained through a hydrothermal treatment of the precursor powder in aqueous sodium hydroxide solution. Tailoring of the morphology was achieved by changing the precursor quantity, sodium hydroxide concentration, and reaction time. The formation mechanism of the nanostructured microspheres probably involves aggregation, followed by dissolution and recrystallization. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy were used to characterize the phase purities, morphologies, and composition of the products.

  3. Solar Cells Having a Nanostructured Antireflection Layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    An solar cell having a surface in a first material is provided, the optical device having a non-periodic nanostructure formed in the surface, the nanostructure comprising a plurality of cone -haped structures wherein the cones are distributed non-periodically on the surface and have a random height...... distribution, at least a part of the cone-shaped structures having a height of at least 100 nm. The first material may be SiC or GaN. A method of manufacturing a non-periodic nanostructured surface on a solar cell, is furthermore provided, the method comprising the steps of providing a surface comprising Si...

  4. Nanostructured thin films and coatings functional properties

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Sam

    2010-01-01

    The second volume in ""The Handbook of Nanostructured Thin Films and Coatings"" set, this book focuses on functional properties, including optical, electronic, and electrical properties, as well as related devices and applications. It explores the large-scale fabrication of functional thin films with nanoarchitecture via chemical routes, the fabrication and characterization of SiC nanostructured/nanocomposite films, and low-dimensional nanocomposite fabrication and applications. The book also presents the properties of sol-gel-derived nanostructured thin films as well as silicon nanocrystals e

  5. Ultrafast spectroscopy of semiconductors and semiconductor nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Shah, Jagdeep

    1996-01-01

    Ultrafast Spectroscopy of Semiconductors and Semiconductor Nanostructures Ultrafast spectroscopy of semiconductors is currently one of the most exciting areas of research in condensed-matter physics Remarkable recent progress in the generation of tunable femtosecond pulses has allowed direct investigation of the most fundamental dynamical processes in semiconductors This monograph presents some of the most striking recent advances in the field of ultrafast spectroscopy of semiconductors and their nanostructures After a brief overview of the basic concepts and of the recent advances in the techniques of ultrashort pulse generation and ultrafast spectroscopy, it discusses the physics of relaxation, tunneling and transport dynamics in semiconductors and semiconductor nanostructures following excitation by femtosecond laser pulses

  6. Terahertz Photoconductivity of Graphene Nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Søren A.; Ulbricht, Ronald; Narita, Akimitsu

    2013-01-01

    The photoconductive properties of graphene nanoribbons and carbon nanotubes were studied using optical pump-THz probe spectroscopy. A reduction in conductivity of GNRs compared to CNTs was observed.......The photoconductive properties of graphene nanoribbons and carbon nanotubes were studied using optical pump-THz probe spectroscopy. A reduction in conductivity of GNRs compared to CNTs was observed....

  7. MnO2 Based Nanostructures for Supercapacitor Energy Storage Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Wei

    2013-11-01

    Nanostructured materials provide new and exciting approaches to the development of supercapacitor electrodes for high-performance electrochemical energy storage applications. One of the biggest challenges in materials science and engineering, however, is to prepare the nanomaterials with desirable characteristics and to engineer the structures in proper ways. This dissertation presents the successful preparation and application of very promising materials in the area of supercapacitor energy storage, including manganese dioxide and its composites, polyaniline and activated carbons. Attention has been paid to understanding their growth process and performance in supercapacitor devices. The morphological and electrochemical cycling effects, which contribute to the understanding of the energy storage mechanism of MnO2 based supercapacitors is thoroughly investigated. In addition, MnO2 based binary (MnO2-carbon nanocoils, MnO2-graphene) and ternary (MnO2-carbon nanotube-graphene) nanocomposites, as well as two novel electrodes (MnO2-carbon nanotube-textile and MnO2-carbon nanotube-sponge) have been studied as supercapacitor electrode materials, showing much improved electrochemical storage performance with good energy and power densities. Furthermore, a general chemical route was introduced to synthesize different conducting polymers and activated carbons by taking the MnO2 nanostructures as reactive templates. The electrochemical behaviors of the polyaniline and activated nanocarbon supercapacitors demonstrate the morphology-dependent enhancement of capacitance. Excellent energy and power densities were obtained from the template-derived polyaniline and activated carbon based supercapacitors, indicating the success of our proposed chemical route toward the preparation of high performance supercapacitor materials. The work discussed in this dissertation conclusively showed the significance of the preparation of desirable nanomaterials and the design of effective

  8. Jumplike microdeformation of nanostructured metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peschanskaya, N. N.; Smirnov, B. I.; Shpeĭzman, V. V.

    2008-05-01

    The parameters of microdeformation jumps for copper, aluminum, titanium, and Armco iron with the initial (annealed) structure and after equal-channel angular pressing are investigated in a creep mode under low compressive stresses. The strain rate is measured with a laser interferometer in 0.15-μm linear displacements. It is demonstrated that the values of the microstrain rate and the mean sizes of jumps for the annealed metals are larger than those for the metals subjected to severe deformation. It is revealed that there is a correlation between the jumps of microplastic deformation and the size of nanometal grains. The inference is made that, for nanostructured metals, as for other materials, the structural heterogeneity is one of the factors responsible for the jumplike deformation.

  9. Nanostructured systems with GMR behaviour

    CERN Document Server

    Bergenti, I; Savini, L; Bonetti, E; Bosco, E; Baricco, M

    2002-01-01

    Fe/Fe-oxide core-shell systems obtained by inert-gas condensation and Au sub 8 sub 0 Fe sub 2 sub 0 nanostructured alloys prepared by fast-quenching techniques followed by thermal treatment have been studied by polarised small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). The particle-size distribution was derived from the fit of the scattering curves. In the core-shell samples, the results support the model of a magnetic iron core surrounded by a surface layer (oxide shell) with a reduced magnetisation. The SANS measurements on the Au sub 8 sub 0 Fe sub 2 sub 0 alloys do not show any appreciable magnetic signal, indicating that the iron precipitates have a superparamagnetic behaviour. Thermal treatment induces the formation of small precipitates of atomic size. (orig.)

  10. Homoepitaxial Nanostructures of Zinc Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana V. Plakhova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The homoepitaxial ZnO nanostructures (HENS were obtained on different substrates using various techniques. The first type of homoepitaxial ZnO nanorod arrays was grown on Si or ITO substrates by using two alternative sequences: (a seeding → growth from solution → growth from vapor and contrariwise (b seeding → growth from vapor → growth from solution. As follows from transport and cathode luminescence measurements homoepitaxial growth allows enhancing electrical or luminescence properties. The second type of HENS was prepared by growth of vertically or horizontally oriented ZnO nanorod arrays depending on monocrystalline ZnO wafers with [0001] and [10-10] orientation. In all cases the growth occurs along the c-axis of fast growth.

  11. Nanorice Particles: Hybrid Plasmonic Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui (Inventor); Brandl, Daniel (Inventor); Le, Fei (Inventor); Nordlander, Peter (Inventor); Halas, Nancy J. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A new hybrid nanoparticle, i.e., a nanorice particle, which combines the intense local fields of nanorods with the highly tunable plasmon resonances of nanoshells, is described herein. This geometry possesses far greater structural tunability than previous nanoparticle geometries, along with much larger local field enhancements and far greater sensitivity as a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) nanosensor than presently known dielectric-conductive material nanostructures. In an embodiment, a nanoparticle comprises a prolate spheroid-shaped core having a first aspect ratio. The nanoparticle also comprises at least one conductive shell surrounding said prolate spheroid-shaped core. The nanoparticle has a surface plasmon resonance sensitivity of at least 600 nm RIU(sup.-1). Methods of making the disclosed nanorice particles are also described herein.

  12. Hemocompatibility of Polymeric Nanostructured Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leszczak, Victoria; Smith, Barbara S.; Popat, Ketul C.

    2013-01-01

    Tissue integration is an important property when inducing transplant tolerance, however, the hemocompatibility of the biomaterial surface also plays an important role in the ultimate success of the implant. Therefore, in order to induce transplant tolerance, it is critical to understand the interaction of blood components with the material surfaces. In this study, we have investigated the adsorption of key blood serum proteins, in vitro adhesion and activation of platelets and clotting kinetics of whole blood on flat polycaprolactone (PCL) surfaces, nanowire (NW) surfaces and nanofiber (NF) surfaces. Previous studies have shown that polymeric nanostructured surfaces improve cell adhesion, proliferation and viability; however it is unclear how these polymeric nanostructured surfaces interact with the blood and its components. Protein adsorption results indicate that while there were no significant differences in total albumin adsorption on PCL, NW and NF surfaces, NW surfaces had higher total fibrinogen and immunoglobulin-G adsorption compared to NF and PCL surfaces. In contrast, NF surfaces had higher surface FIB and IgG adsorption compared to PCL and NW surfaces. Platelet adhesion and viability studies show more adhesion and clustering of platelets on the NF surfaces as compared to PCL and NW surfaces. Platelet activation studies reveal that NW surfaces have the highest percentage of unactivated platelets, whereas NF surfaces have the highest percentage of fully activated platelets. Whole blood clotting results indicate that NW surfaces maintain an increased amount of free hemoglobin during the clotting process compared to PCL and NF surface, indicating less clotting and slower rate of clotting on their surfaces. PMID:23848447

  13. Porphyrin-Based Nanostructures for Photocatalytic Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingzhi Chen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Well-defined organic nanostructures with controllable size and morphology are increasingly exploited in optoelectronic devices. As promising building blocks, porphyrins have demonstrated great potentials in visible-light photocatalytic applications, because of their electrical, optical and catalytic properties. From this perspective, we have summarized the recent significant advances on the design and photocatalytic applications of porphyrin-based nanostructures. The rational strategies, such as texture or crystal modification and interfacial heterostructuring, are described. The applications of the porphyrin-based nanostructures in photocatalytic pollutant degradation and hydrogen evolution are presented. Finally, the ongoing challenges and opportunities for the future development of porphyrin nanostructures in high-quality nanodevices are also proposed.

  14. Characterization of optical active nanostructures on silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumgaertel, Thomas; Graaf, Harald; Borczyskowski, Christian von [Center of Nanostructured Materials and Analytics, TU Chemnitz (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    It has been recently demonstrated, that nanostructures can be functionalized in a neat way through selective binding of dye molecules and nanoparticles. Anchoring optically active molecules on nanostructured surfaces is a promising step towards building complex structures with variable properties and functions. In our contribution we report on the characterization of nanostructures on silicon, that have been optically functionalized by binding of cationic dyes. The structures have been generated by local anodic oxidation of alkyl-terminated silicon via AFM. Due to the oxidation process, these silicon oxide structures are partially negatively charged. The cationic dyes rhodamine 6G and cresyl violet have been attached to the structures via electrostatic interactions and were studied using wide-field and confocal microscopy. A change in luminescence spectra of the dyes on the nanostructures, compared to the dyes in solution has been found. Furthermore, the bleaching behaviour of the dyes bound to the structure has been investigated.

  15. Optical Biosensors Based on Semiconductor Nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl J. Martín-Palma

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The increasing availability of semiconductor-based nanostructures with novel and unique properties has sparked widespread interest in their use in the field of biosensing. The precise control over the size, shape and composition of these nanostructures leads to the accurate control of their physico-chemical properties and overall behavior. Furthermore, modifications can be made to the nanostructures to better suit their integration with biological systems, leading to such interesting properties as enhanced aqueous solubility, biocompatibility or bio-recognition. In the present work, the most significant applications of semiconductor nanostructures in the field of optical biosensing will be reviewed. In particular, the use of quantum dots as fluorescent bioprobes, which is the most widely used application, will be discussed. In addition, the use of some other nanometric structures in the field of biosensing, including porous semiconductors and photonic crystals, will be presented.

  16. Metallic nanostructures for efficient LED lighting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lozano, G.; Rodriguez, S. R. K.; Verschuuren, M. A.; J. Gomez Rivas,

    2016-01-01

    Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are driving a shift toward energy-efficient illumination. Nonetheless, modifying the emission intensities, colors and directionalities of LEDs in specific ways remains a challenge often tackled by incorporating secondary optical components. Metallic nanostructures

  17. Nanostructure Science and Technology. A Worldwide Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Siegel, Richard

    1999-01-01

    ... and other leading industrialized countries. Topics covered include particle synthesis and assembly, dispersions and coatings of nanoparticles, high surface area materials, functional nanoscale devices, bulk behavior of nanostructured materials...

  18. Packaging glass with hierarchically nanostructured surface

    KAUST Repository

    He, Jr-Hau

    2017-08-03

    An optical device includes an active region and packaging glass located on top of the active region. A top surface of the packaging glass includes hierarchical nanostructures comprised of honeycombed nanowalls (HNWs) and nanorod (NR) structures extending from the HNWs.

  19. Unique mechanical properties of nanostructured metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Nobuhiro

    2007-11-01

    Recently, it becomes possible to fabricate bulk metals having ultrafine grained or nanocrystalline structures of which grain size is in nano-meter dimensions. One of the promising ways to realize bulk nanostructured metals is severe plastic deformation (SPD) above logarithmic equivalent strain of 4. We have developed an original SPD process, named Accumulative Roll Bonding (ARB) using rolling deformation in principle, and have succeeded in fabricating bulk nanostructured sheets of various kinds of metals and alloys. The ARB process and the nanostructured metals fabricated by the ARB are introduced in this paper. The nanostructured metals sometimes perform quite unique mechanical properties, that is rather surprising compared with conventionally coarse grained materials. The unique properties seem to be attributed to the characteristic structures of the nano-metals full of grain boundaries.

  20. Noise and dissipation in magnetoelectronic nanostructures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foros, J.; Brataas, A.; Bauer, G.E.W.; Tserkovnyak, Y.

    2009-01-01

    The interplay between current and magnetization fluctuations and dissipation in layered-ferromagnetic-normal-metal nanostructures is investigated. We use scattering theory and magnetoelectronic circuit theory to calculate charge and spin-current fluctuations. Via the spin-transfer torque,