WorldWideScience

Sample records for carbon nanoclusters formed

  1. Study on tunable resonator using a cantilevered carbon nanotube encapsulating a copper nanocluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jeong Won; Kim, Ki-Sub; Park, Jungchul; Hwang, Ho Jung

    2011-02-01

    We investigated an ultrahigh frequency carbon nanotube resonator encapsulating a nanocluster, as another tunable resonator, via classical molecular dynamics simulations and continuum models. The fundamental frequency of cantilevered carbon nanotube resonator encapsulating a copper nanocluster could be adjusted by controlling the position of the encapsulated copper nanocluster. Data obtained from the molecular dynamics simulations were analyzed with continuum theory, and we found that statistically the change in the effective mass factor was greatly correlated with the position change of the encapsulated nanocluster.

  2. Oxygen reduction catalyzed by gold nanoclusters supported on carbon nanosheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiannan; Wang, Likai; Tang, Zhenghua; Wang, Fucai; Yan, Wei; Yang, Hongyu; Zhou, Weijia; Li, Ligui; Kang, Xiongwu; Chen, Shaowei

    2016-03-01

    Nanocomposites based on p-mercaptobenzoic acid-functionalized gold nanoclusters, Au102(p-MBA)44, and porous carbon nanosheets have been fabricated and employed as highly efficient electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Au102(p-MBA)44 clusters were synthesized via a wet chemical approach, and loaded onto carbon nanosheets. Pyrolysis at elevated temperatures led to effective removal of the thiolate ligands and the formation of uniform nanoparticles supported on the carbon scaffolds. The nanocomposite structures were characterized by using a wide range of experimental techniques such as transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis and BET nitrogen adsorption/desorption. Electrochemical studies showed that the composites demonstrated apparent ORR activity in alkaline media, and the sample with a 30% Au mass loading was identified as the best catalyst among the series, with a performance comparable to that of commercial Pt/C, but superior to those of Au102 nanoclusters and carbon nanosheets alone, within the context of onset potential, kinetic current density, and durability. The results suggest an effective approach to the preparation of high-performance ORR catalysts based on gold nanoclusters supported on carbon nanosheets.Nanocomposites based on p-mercaptobenzoic acid-functionalized gold nanoclusters, Au102(p-MBA)44, and porous carbon nanosheets have been fabricated and employed as highly efficient electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Au102(p-MBA)44 clusters were synthesized via a wet chemical approach, and loaded onto carbon nanosheets. Pyrolysis at elevated temperatures led to effective removal of the thiolate ligands and the formation of uniform nanoparticles supported on the carbon scaffolds. The nanocomposite structures were characterized by using a wide range of experimental techniques such as

  3. Nano-clustered Pd catalysts formed on GaN surface for green chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirayama, Motoi; Ueta, Yukiko; Konishi, Tomoya; Tsukamoto, Shiro

    2011-05-01

    We have succeeded in observing Pd nano-clusters, catalytic prime elements, on a GaN(0 0 0 1) surface by a scanning tunneling microscope for the first time. After the sample was reused, we found that nano-clusters (width: 11 nm, height: 2.2 nm) existed on the surface which still kept the catalytic activity, resulting that the neutral Pd atoms formed the nano-cluster. Moreover, the S-termination contributed to the formation of the dense and flat structure consisting of the Pd nano-clusters.

  4. Microscopic Fuel Particles Produced by Self-Assembly of Actinide Nanoclusters on Carbon Nanomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Na, Chongzheng [Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States)

    2016-10-17

    Many consider further development of nuclear power to be essential for sustained development of society; however, the fuel forms currently used are expensive to recycle. In this project, we sought to create the knowledge and knowhow that are needed to produce nanocomposite materials by directly depositing uranium nanoclusters on networks of carbon-­ based nanomaterials. The objectives of the proposed work were to (1) determine the control of uranium nanocluster surface chemistry on nanocomposite formation, (2) determine the control of carbon nanomaterial surface chemistry on nanocomposite formation, and (3) develop protocols for synthesizing uranium-­carbon nanomaterials. After examining a wide variety of synthetic methods, we show that synthesizing graphene-­supported UO2 nanocrystals in polar ethylene glycol compounds by polyol reduction under boiling reflux can enable the use of an inexpensive graphene precursor graphene oxide in the production of uranium-carbon nanocomposites in a one-­pot process. We further show that triethylene glycol is the most suitable solvent for producing nanometer-­sized UO2 crystals compared to monoethylene glycol, diethylene glycol, and polyethylene glycol. Graphene-­supported UO2 nanocrystals synthesized with triethylene glycol show evidence of heteroepitaxy, which can be beneficial for facilitating heat transfer in nuclear fuel particles. Furthermore, we show that graphene-supported UO2 nanocrystals synthesized by polyol reduction can be readily stored in alcohols, preventing oxidation from the prevalent oxygen in air. Together, these methods provide a facile approach for preparing and storing graphene-supported UO nanocrystals for further investigation and development under ambient conditions.

  5. Enhanced electronic injection in organic light-emitting diodes by incorporating silver nanoclusters and cesium carbonate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Ying-Chung; Gao, Chia-Yuan [Department of Electrical Engineering, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Chen, Kan-Lin [Department of Electronic Engineering, Fortune Institute of Technology, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Sze, Po-Wen [Department of Electro-Optical Science and Engineering, Kao Yuan University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Huang, Chien-Jung, E-mail: chien@nuk.edu.tw [Department of Applied Physics, National University of Kaohsiung, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)

    2015-10-01

    Highlights: • The localized electric field around SNCs is enhanced. • When the cesium carbonate/silver nanoclusters/cesium carbonate electron-injection structure replaces the cesium carbonate electron-injection structure, higher electron-injection ability is obtained. • The structure for efficient electron injection is critical to characteristics of the device. - Abstract: The influence of the cesium carbonate/silver nanoclusters/cesium carbonate electron-injection structure (CSC-EIS) on the performance of organic light-emitting diodes is investigated in this study. The silver nanoclusters (SNCs) are introduced between the electron-injection layers by means of thermal evaporation. When the CSC-EIS replaces the cesium carbonate electron-injection structure, higher electron-injection ability is obtained because the electron-injection barrier between the cathode and the electron-transport layer is remarkably reduced from 1.2 to 0 eV. In addition, surface plasmon resonance effect will cause the enhanced localized electric field around the SNCs, resulting that electron-injection ability is further enhanced from the cathode to the emitting layer.

  6. Energy of the Isolated Metastable Iron-Nickel FCC Nanocluster with a Carbon Atom in the Tetragonal Interstice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondarenko, Natalya V; Nedolya, Anatoliy V

    2017-12-01

    The energy of the isolated iron-nickel nanocluster was calculated by molecular mechanics method using Lennard-Jones potential. The cluster included a carbon atom that drifted from an inside octahedral interstice to a tetrahedral interstice in [Formula: see text] direction and after that in direction to the surface. In addition, one of 14 iron atoms was replaced by a nickel atom, the position of which was changing during simulation.The energy of the nanocluster was estimated at the different interatomic distances. As a result of simulation, the optimal interatomic distances of Fe-Ni-C nanocluster was chosen for the simulation, in which height of the potential barrier was maximal and face-centered cubic (FCC) nanocluster was the most stable.It is shown that there were three main positions of a nickel atom that significantly affected nanocluster's energy.The calculation results indicated that position of the carbon atom in the octahedral interstice was more energetically favorable than tetrahedral interstice in the case of FCC nanocluster. On the other side, the potential barrier was smaller in the direction [Formula: see text] than in the direction .This indicates that there are two ways for carbon atom to drift to the surface of the nanocluster.

  7. Three-dimensional macroporous carbon/hierarchical Co3O4 nanoclusters for nonenzymatic electrochemical glucose sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Zhang, Yayun; Xie, Yingzhen; Yu, Jie; Yang, Han; Miao, Longfei; Song, Yonghai

    2017-04-01

    A novel supporting material named as three-dimensional kenaf stem-derived carbon (3D-KSCs) was used to load hierarchical Co3O4 nanoclusters for electrochemical sensing glucose. The 3D-KSCs/hierarchical Co3O4 nanoclusters were constructed by two steps. Los of acicular precursor nanoclusters firstly grew on the channels of 3D-KSCs densely by hydrothermal method and then the as-prepared 3D-KSCs/hierarchical Co3O4 nanoclusters was obtained by thermal pyrolysis of the 3D-KSCs/precursors nanocomposites at 400 °C. The 3D macroporous configuration of 3D-KSCs resulted in lots of hierarchical Co3O4 nanoclusters arrayed on the surface of 3D-KSCs owing to its large enough specific surface area, which effectively avoided their aggregations and improved the stability of nanocomposites. The obtained 3D-KSCs/hierarchical Co3O4 nanoclusters showed a large number of needle-shaped and layered Co3O4 nanoclusters uniformly grew on the macropore's walls of 3D-KSC. Due to its unique nanostructures, the 3D-KSCs/hierarchical Co3O4 nanoclusters integrated electrode showed superior performance for nonenzymatic electrochemical glucose sensing, showing wide linear range (0.088-7.0 mM) and low detection limit of 26 μM. It might be a new strategy to prepare nanostructures on 3D-KSC for future applications.

  8. Thermodynamics at the nanoscale: phase diagrams of nickel-carbon nanoclusters and equilibrium constants for phase transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelmann, Yannick; Bogaerts, Annemie; Neyts, Erik C

    2014-10-21

    Using reactive molecular dynamics simulations, the melting behavior of nickel-carbon nanoclusters is examined. The phase diagrams of icosahedral and Wulff polyhedron clusters are determined using both the Lindemann index and the potential energy. Formulae are derived for calculating the equilibrium constants and the solid and liquid fractions during a phase transition, allowing more rational determination of the melting temperature with respect to the arbitrary Lindemann value. These results give more insight into the properties of nickel-carbon nanoclusters in general and can specifically be very useful for a better understanding of the synthesis of carbon nanotubes using the catalytic chemical vapor deposition method.

  9. Functionalized Carbon Molecular Sieve membranes containing Ag-nanoclusters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barsema, J.N.; Balster, J.; Jordan, V.; Vegt, van der N.F.A.; Wessling, M.

    2003-01-01

    In Carbon Molecular Sieve (CMS) membranes, the separation of O2 and N2 is primarily based on the difference in size between the gas molecules. To enhance the separation properties of these CMS membranes it is necessary to functionalize the carbon matrix with materials that show a high affinity to on

  10. Network-Forming Nanoclusters in Binary As-S/Se Glasses: From Ab Initio Quantum Chemical Modeling to Experimental Evidences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyla, M.

    2017-01-01

    Network-forming As2(S/Se)m nanoclusters are employed to recognize expected variations in a vicinity of some remarkable compositions in binary As-Se/S glassy systems accepted as signatures of optimally constrained intermediate topological phases in earlier temperature-modulated differential scanning calorimetry experiments. The ab initio quantum chemical calculations performed using the cation-interlinking network cluster approach show similar oscillating character in tendency to local chemical decomposition but obvious step-like behavior in preference to global phase separation on boundary chemical compounds (pure chalcogen and stoichiometric arsenic chalcogenides). The onsets of stability are defined for chalcogen-rich glasses, these being connected with As2Se5 ( Z = 2.29) and As2S6 ( Z = 2.25) nanoclusters for As-Se and As-S glasses, respectively. The physical aging effects result preferentially from global phase separation in As-S glass system due to high localization of covalent bonding and local demixing on neighboring As2Sem+1 and As2Sem-1 nanoclusters in As-Se system. These nanoclusters well explain the lower limits of reversibility windows in temperature-modulated differential scanning calorimetry, but they cannot be accepted as signatures of topological phase transitions in respect to the rigidity theory.

  11. Effects of doping in 25-atom bimetallic nanocluster catalysts for carbon–carbon coupling reaction of iodoanisole and phenylacetylene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhimin Li

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available We here report the catalytic effects of foreign atoms (Cu, Ag, and Pt doped into well-defined 25-gold-atom nanoclusters. Using the carbon-carbon coupling reaction of p-iodoanisole and phenylacetylene as a model reaction, the gold-based bimetallic MxAu25−x(SR18 (–SR=–SCH2CH2Ph nanoclusters (supported on titania were found to exhibit distinct effects on the conversion of p-iodoanisole as well as the selectivity for the Sonogashira cross-coupling product, 1-methoxy-4-(2-phenylethynylbenzene. Compared to Au25(SR18, the centrally doped Pt1Au24(SR18 causes a drop in catalytic activity but with the selectivity retained, while the AgxAu25−x(SR18 nanoclusters gave an overall performance comparable to Au25(SR18. Interestingly, CuxAu25−x(SR18 nanoclusters prefer the Ullmann homo-coupling pathway and give rise to product 4,4′-dimethoxy-1,1′-biphenyl, which is in opposite to the other three nanocluster catalysts. Our overall conclusion is that the conversion of p-iodoanisole is largely affected by the electronic effect in the bimetallic nanoclusters’ 13-atom core (i.e., Pt1Au12, CuxAu13−x, and Au13, with the exception of Ag doping, and that the selectivity is primarily determined by the type of atoms on the MxAu12−x shell (M=Ag, Cu, and Au in the nanocluster catalysts.

  12. Electrochemically induced nanocluster migration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartl, Katrin [Lehrstuhl Physikalische Chemie, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Lichtenbergstr. 4, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Department of Chemistry, CS06, University of Copenhagen, Universitetsparken 5, DK-2100 Copenhagen O (Denmark); Nesselberger, Markus [Department of Chemistry, CS06, University of Copenhagen, Universitetsparken 5, DK-2100 Copenhagen O (Denmark); Mayrhofer, Karl J.J. [MPI fuer Eisenforschung, Abt. Grenzflaechenchemie und Oberflaechentechnik, Max-Planck-Strasse 1, D-40237 Duesseldorf (Germany); Kunz, Sebastian; Schweinberger, Florian F.; Kwon, GiHan [Lehrstuhl Physikalische Chemie, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Lichtenbergstr. 4, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Hanzlik, Marianne [Institut fuer Elektronenmikroskopie, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Lichtenbergstr. 4, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Heiz, Ueli [Lehrstuhl Physikalische Chemie, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Lichtenbergstr. 4, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Arenz, Matthias, E-mail: m.arenz@kemi.ku.d [Department of Chemistry, CS06, University of Copenhagen, Universitetsparken 5, DK-2100 Copenhagen O (Denmark)

    2010-12-30

    In the presented study the influence of electrochemical treatments on size-selected Pt nanoclusters (NCs) supported on amorphous carbon is investigated by means of transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Well-defined Pt NCs are prepared by an ultra-high vacuum (UHV) laser vaporization source and deposited with low kinetic energy ({<=}10 eV/cluster) onto TEM gold grids covered by a thin (2 nm) carbon film. After transfer out of UHV Pt NCs are verified to be uniform in size and randomly distributed on the support. Subsequently, the TEM grids are employed as working electrodes in a standard electrochemical three electrode setup and the Pt nanoclusters are subjected to different electrochemical treatments. It is found that the NC arrangement is not influenced by potential hold conditions (at 0.40 V vs. RHE) or by potential cycling in a limited potential window (V{sub max} = 0.55 V vs. RHE). Upon potential cycling to 1.05 V vs. RHE, however, the NCs migrate on the carbon support. Interestingly, migration in oxygen or argon saturated electrolyte leads to NC coalescence, a mechanism discussed for being responsible for performance degradation of low temperature fuel cells, whereas in carbon monoxide saturated electrolyte the Pt NC agglomerate, but remain separated from each other and thus form distinctive structures.

  13. One-step facile synthesis of Pd nanoclusters supported on carbon and their electrochemical property

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junjun Shi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Well-crystallized Pd nanoclusters supported on Ketjen Black (KB were successfully fabricated when Pd wires were served as an electrode pair by a solution plasma technique at atmospheric pressure. The synthesis of Pd nanoclusters was almost simultaneous with their dispersion on KB. Pd nanoclusters with the average diameter of about 2 nm were equably distributed on KB, and showed good electrochemical property corresponding to their obvious characteristic peaks. Multi-scan cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry clarified that as-prepared Pd nanoclusters have better electrochemical stability in alkaline solution than that of in acidic solution. Thus as-obtained Pd nanoclusters would become a promising electrocatalyst for fuel cells or Li-air batteries.

  14. Non-covalent attachment of silver nanoclusters onto single-walled carbon nanotubes with human serum albumin as linking molecule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodríguez-Galván, Andrés, E-mail: andres.rodriguez@nucleares.unam.mx [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito Exterior C.U., 04510 México D.F. (Mexico); Instituto de Física, Dpto. Física Experimental, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Coyoacán, México, DF 04510 (Mexico); Unidad de Investigación Biomédica en Cáncer INCan-UNAM, Instituto Nacional de Cancerología, México, DF 14080 (Mexico); Heredia, Alejandro [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito Exterior C.U., 04510 México D.F. (Mexico); Amelines-Sarria, Oscar; Rivera, Margarita [Instituto de Física, Dpto. Materia Condensada, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Coyoacán, 04510 México D.F. (Mexico); and others

    2015-03-15

    The attachment of silver nanoclusters (AgNCs) onto single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) for the formation of integrated fluorescence sites has attracted much attention due their potential applications as biological probes and nanovectors in theragnosis. Here, we report the preparation through assembly of fluorescent quasi 1-D nanomaterial based on SWNTs and silver nanoclusters (AgNCs) non-covalently attached to human serum albumin as biological linker. The fluorescent SWNT–AgNCs–HSA conjugates were characterized by atomic force microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), high angle annular dark field scanning TEM (HAADF-STEM), fluorescent and UV–vis spectroscopy. The above techniques confirmed that AgNCs were non-covalently attached onto the external surface of SWNTs. In addition, it was observed that the modification did not affect the optical properties of the synthesized AgNCs since the absorption spectra and fluorescence under UV irradiation (λ = 365 nm) remain the same. The effect of the functionalized systems was tested on mammal red blood cells (RBCs) and it was found that their structural integrity was compromised by the conjugates, limiting their biological and medical applications.

  15. Modulation of energy/electron transfer in gold nanoclusters by single walled carbon nanotubes and further consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Tarasankar; Maity, Arnab; Mondal, Somen; Purkayastha, Pradipta

    2015-04-01

    Semiconductor or metallic character in single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is developed because of their chirality and diameter. Depending upon the extent of these characters in a particular sample of SWCNT, various electronic and mechanical applications are formulated. In this work we used protein protected red emitting gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) to enhance the metallic character in SWCNTs through electron transfer induced by photonic excitation. The AuNCs have been synthesized following a known protocol that generates Au+ protected Au0 clusters. Normal and carboxylic acid functionalized SWCNTs were obtained commercially for usage in the experiments. The non-functionalized SWCNTs facilitate intersystem electron transfer while the functionalized ones defer the phenomenon, which, in turn, affects the metallic character in the nanotubes. Steady state and time resolved fluorescence spectroscopy prove the dynamics and electrochemistry supports the intersystem electron transfer process.

  16. Modulation of energy/electron transfer in gold nanoclusters by single walled carbon nanotubes and further consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Tarasankar; Maity, Arnab; Mondal, Somen; Purkayastha, Pradipta

    2015-04-15

    Semiconductor or metallic character in single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is developed because of their chirality and diameter. Depending upon the extent of these characters in a particular sample of SWCNT, various electronic and mechanical applications are formulated. In this work we used protein protected red emitting gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) to enhance the metallic character in SWCNTs through electron transfer induced by photonic excitation. The AuNCs have been synthesized following a known protocol that generates Au(+) protected Au(0) clusters. Normal and carboxylic acid functionalized SWCNTs were obtained commercially for usage in the experiments. The non-functionalized SWCNTs facilitate intersystem electron transfer while the functionalized ones defer the phenomenon, which, in turn, affects the metallic character in the nanotubes. Steady state and time resolved fluorescence spectroscopy prove the dynamics and electrochemistry supports the intersystem electron transfer process. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. A highly efficient nano-cluster artificial peroxidase and its direct electrochemistry on a nano complex modified glassy carbon electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jun; Wang, Wei; Huang, Kun; Yang, Wei-Yun; Zhao, Ying-Xue; Xiao, Bao-Lin; Gao, Yun-Fei; Moosavi-Movahedi, Zainab; Ghourchian, Hedayatollah; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali Akbar

    2012-01-01

    A nano-cluster with highly efficient peroxide activity was constructed based on nafion (NF) and cytochrome c (Cyt c). UV-Vis spectrometry and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) methods were utilized for characterization of the nano-structured enzyme or artificial peroxidase (AP). The nano-cluster was composed of a Chain-Ball structure, with an average ball size of about 40 nm. The Michaelis-Menten (K(m)) and catalytic rate (k(cat)) constants of the AP were determined to be 2.5 ± 0.4 µM and 0.069 ± 0.001 s(-1), respectively, in 50 mM PBS at pH 7.0. The catalytic efficiency of the AP was evaluated to be 0.028 ± 0.005 µM(-1) s(-1), which was 39 ± 5% as efficient as the native horseradish peroxidase (HRP). The AP was also immobilized on a functional multi-wall carbon nanotube (MWNCTs)-gold colloid nanoparticles (AuNPs) nano-complex modified glassy carbon (GC) electrode. The cyclic voltammetry of AP on the nano complex modified GC electrode showed a pair of well-defined redox peaks with a formal potential (E°') of -45 ± 2 mV (vs. Ag/AgCl) at a scan rate of 0.05 V/s. The heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant (k(s)) was evaluated to be 0.65 s(-1). The surface concentration of electroactive AP on GC electrode (Γ) was 7 × 10(-10) mol cm(-2). The apparent Michaelis-Menten constant (K(m)(app)) was 0.23 nM.

  18. Method of forming a nanocluster-comprising dielectric layer and device comprising such a layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kochupurackal, J.B.P.; Besling, W.F.A.; Klootwijk, J.H.; Wolters, A.M.; Roozeboom, F.

    2012-01-01

    A method of forming a dielectric layer on a further layer of a semiconductor device is disclosed. The method comprises depositing a dielectric precursor compound and a further precursor compound over the further layer, the dielectric precursor compound comprising a metal ion from the group consistin

  19. Mesoporous Li4Ti5O12 nanoclusters anchored on super-aligned carbon nanotubes as high performance electrodes for lithium ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Li; Kong, Weibang; Wu, Hengcai; Wu, Yang; Wang, Datao; Zhao, Fei; Jiang, Kaili; Li, Qunqing; Wang, Jiaping; Fan, Shoushan

    2015-12-01

    Mesoporous lithium titanate (LTO) nanoclusters are in situ synthesized in a network of super aligned carbon nanotubes (SACNTs) via a solution-based method followed by heat treatment in air. In the LTO-CNT composite, SACNTs not only serve as the skeleton to support a binder-free electrode, but also render the composite with high conductivity, flexibility, and mechanical strength. The homogeneously dispersed LTO nanoclusters among the SACNTs allow each LTO grain to effectively access the electrolyte and the conductive network, benefiting both ion and electron transport. By the incorporation of LTO into the CNT network, mechanical reinforcement is also achieved. When serving as a negative electrode for lithium ion batteries, such a robust composite-network architecture provides the electrodes with effective charge transport and structural integrity, leading to high-performance flexible electrodes with high capacity, high rate capability, and excellent cycling stability.Mesoporous lithium titanate (LTO) nanoclusters are in situ synthesized in a network of super aligned carbon nanotubes (SACNTs) via a solution-based method followed by heat treatment in air. In the LTO-CNT composite, SACNTs not only serve as the skeleton to support a binder-free electrode, but also render the composite with high conductivity, flexibility, and mechanical strength. The homogeneously dispersed LTO nanoclusters among the SACNTs allow each LTO grain to effectively access the electrolyte and the conductive network, benefiting both ion and electron transport. By the incorporation of LTO into the CNT network, mechanical reinforcement is also achieved. When serving as a negative electrode for lithium ion batteries, such a robust composite-network architecture provides the electrodes with effective charge transport and structural integrity, leading to high-performance flexible electrodes with high capacity, high rate capability, and excellent cycling stability. Electronic supplementary information

  20. Growth of Co Nanoclusters on Si3N4 Surface Formed on Si(111)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘熙; 贾金锋; 王俊忠; 薛其坤

    2003-01-01

    We have grown high density Co dusters with a narrow-sized distribution on the Si3N4(0001)-(8 × 8) surface. In the submonolayer regime, Co clusters tend to keep a certain size (~ 1.45 nm in diameter) irrespective of coverage.With increasing coverage above 0.92 ML, two new clusters with certain but larger sizes are formed. This novel growth behaviour can be explained by the quantum size effect [Phys. Rev. Lett. 90 (2003) 185506]. It is found that the Co cluster size distribution can be improved by post annealing. Even at high temperature (700℃ ), no reaction of Co with Si3N4 is observed, indicating that Si3N4(0001)-(8 × 8) is a promising substrate for growth of magnetic nanostructures.

  1. Ultra-sensitive determination of epinephrine based on TiO{sub 2}-Au nanoclusters supported on reduced graphene oxide and carbon nanotube hybrid nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jianbo, E-mail: chm_lijianbo@yeah.net; Wang, Xiaojiao; Duan, Huimin; Wang, Yanhui; Luo, Chuannan, E-mail: chm_lijianbo@yeah.net

    2016-07-01

    A highly efficient and sensitive electrochemical sensor for EP based on reduced graphene and multi-walled carbon nanotube hybrid nanocomposites loaded TiO{sub 2}-Au nano-clusters modified glassy carbon electrode was developed. The surface nature and morphology of the nanocomposite film and the electrochemical properties of the sensor were characterized by Raman spectra, X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectra (EDX), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and cyclic voltammetry (CV), respectively. Carbon nanomaterials were widely used in sensing due to its large electroactive surface area, fast electron transport and strong adsorption capacity. Meanwhile, TiO{sub 2}-Au nano-clusters could accelerate the electron transfer, increase reactive site and extend electrochemical response window. The nanocomposite film could greatly enhance the response sensitivity and decrease the overpotential. The resulting sensor showed an excellent electrocatalytic activity toward EP. Under the optimum conditions (i.e. pH 6.0, 0.1 M PBS, preconcentration for 110 s), Differential pulse voltammetry was employed to detect ultra-trace amounts of EP. The result of a wide linear range of 1.0–300 nM and limited of detection 0.34 nM (S/N = 3) were obtained. The constructed sensor exhibited excellent accuracy and precision, the relative standard deviation (RSD) was less than 5%. The nanocomposite film sensor was successfully used to accurately detect the content of EP in practical samples, and the recoveries for the standards added are 97%–105%. - Highlights: • The three dimensional composite materials rGO/CNTs were successful synthesized. • High conductivity and catalytic activity of TiO{sub 2}-Au nanoclusters were synthesized. • The sensor displays a wide linear range, low detection limit and good stability.

  2. Optical and Electron Spin Resonance Studies of Destruction of Porous Structures Formed by Nitrogen-Rare Gas Nanoclusters in Bulk Superfluid Helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    McColgan, Patrick T.; Meraki, Adil; Boltnev, Roman E.; Lee, David M.; Khmelenko, Vladimir V.

    2016-11-01

    We studied optical and electron spin resonance spectra during destruction of porous structures formed by nitrogen-rare gas (RG) nanoclusters in bulk superfluid helium containing high concentrations of stabilized nitrogen atoms. Samples were created by injecting products of a radio frequency discharge of nitrogen-rare gas-helium gas mixtures into bulk superfluid helium. These samples have a high energy density allowing the study of energy release in chemical processes inside of nanocluster aggregates. The rare gases used in the studies were neon, argon, and krypton. We also studied the effects of changing the relative concentrations between nitrogen and rare gas on thermoluminescence spectra during destruction of the samples. At the beginning of the destructions, α -group of nitrogen atoms, Vegard-Kaplan bands of N_2 molecules, and β -group of O atoms were observed. The final destruction of the samples were characterized by a series bright flashes. Spectra obtained during these flashes contain M- and β -bands of NO molecules, the intensities of which depend on the concentration of molecular nitrogen in the gas mixture as well as the type of rare gas present in the gas mixture.

  3. DNA-stabilized silver nanoclusters and carbon nanoparticles oxide: A sensitive platform for label-free fluorescence turn-on detection of HIV-DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Yu-Dan; Xia, Li; Xu, Dang-Dang; Xing, Xiao-Jing; Pang, Dai-Wen; Tang, Hong-Wu

    2016-11-15

    Based on the remarkable difference between the interactions of carbon nanoparticles (CNPs) oxide with single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) and double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), and the fact that fluorescence of DNA-stabilized silver nanoclusters (AgNCs) can be quenched by CNPs oxide, DNA-functionalized AgNCs were applied as label-free fluorescence probes and a novel fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) sensor was successfully constructed for the detection of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) DNA sequences. CNPs oxide were prepared with the oxidation of candle soot, hence it is simple, time-saving and low-cost. The strategy of dual AgNCs probes was applied to improve the detection sensitivity by using dual- probe capturing the same target DNA in a sandwich mode and as the fluorescence donor, and using CNPs oxide as the acceptor. In the presence of target DNA, a dsDNA hybrid forms, leading to the desorption of the ssDNA-AgNCs probes from CNPs oxide, and the recovering of fluorescence of the AgNCs in a HIV-DNA concentration-dependent manner. The results show that HIV-DNA can be detected in the range of 1-50nM with a detection limit of 0.40nM in aqueous buffer. The method is simple, rapid and sensitive with no need of labeled fluorescent probes, and moreover, the design of fluorescent dual-probe makes full use of the excellent fluorescence property of AgNCs and further improves the detection sensitivity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Forming foam structures with carbon foam substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landingham, Richard L.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.; Coronado, Paul R.; Baumann, Theodore F.

    2012-11-06

    The invention provides foams of desired cell sizes formed from metal or ceramic materials that coat the surfaces of carbon foams which are subsequently removed. For example, metal is located over a sol-gel foam monolith. The metal is melted to produce a metal/sol-gel composition. The sol-gel foam monolith is removed, leaving a metal foam.

  5. Graphene-multiwall carbon nanotube-gold nanocluster composites modified electrode for the simultaneous determination of ascorbic acid, dopamine, and uric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaofang; Wei, Shaping; Chen, Shihong; Yuan, Dehua; Zhang, Wen

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, graphene-multiwall carbon nanotube-gold nanocluster (GP-MWCNT-AuNC) composites were synthesized and used as modifier to fabricate a sensor for simultaneous detection of ascorbic acid (AA), dopamine (DA), and uric acid (UA). The electrochemical behavior of the sensor was investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), cyclic voltammetry (CV) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) techniques. The combination of GP, MWCNTs, and AuNCs endowed the electrode with a large surface area, good catalytic activity, and high selectivity and sensitivity. The linear response range for simultaneous detection of AA, DA, and UA at the sensor were 120-1,701, 2-213, and 0.7-88.3 μM, correspondingly, and the detection limits were 40, 0.67, and 0.23 μM (S/N=3), respectively. The proposed method offers a promise for simple, rapid, selective, and cost-effective analysis of small biomolecules.

  6. Light Harvesting and White-Light Generation in a Composite of Carbon Dots and Dye-Encapsulated BSA-Protein-Capped Gold Nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barman, Monoj Kumar; Paramanik, Bipattaran; Bain, Dipankar; Patra, Amitava

    2016-08-08

    Several strategies have been adopted to design an artificial light-harvesting system in which light energy is captured by peripheral chromophores and it is subsequently transferred to the core via energy transfer. A composite of carbon dots and dye-encapsulated BSA-protein-capped gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) has been developed for efficient light harvesting and white light generation. Carbon dots (C-dots) act as donor and AuNCs capped with BSA protein act as acceptor. Analysis reveals that energy transfer increases from 63 % to 83 % in presence of coumarin dye (C153), which enhances the cascade energy transfer from carbon dots to AuNCs. Bright white light emission with a quantum yield of 19 % under the 375 nm excitation wavelength is achieved by changing the ratio of components. Interesting findings reveal that the efficient energy transfer in carbon-dot-metal-cluster nanocomposites may open up new possibilities in designing artificial light harvesting systems for future applications.

  7. The 3D-tomography of the nano-clusters formed by Fe-coating and annealing of diamond films for enhancing their surface electron field emitters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang-Chin Chen

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The Fe-coating and H2-annealed processes markedly increased the conductivity and enhanced the surface electron field emission (s-EFE properties for the diamond films. The enhancement on the s-EFE properties for the diamond films is presumably owing to the formation of nano-graphite clusters on the surface of the films via the Fe-to-diamond interaction. However, the extent of enhancement varied with the granular structure of the diamond films. For the microcrystalline (MCD films, the s-EFE process can be turned on at (E0MCD = 1.9 V/μm, achieving a large s-EFE current density of (JeMCD = 315 μA/cm2 at an applied field of 8.8 V/μm. These s-EFE properties are markedly better than those for Fe-coated/annealed ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD films with (E0UNCD = 2.0 V/μm and (JeUNCD = 120 μA/cm2. The transmission electron microscopy showed that the nano-graphite clusters formed an interconnected network for MCD films that facilitated the electron transport more markedly, as compared with the isolated nano-graphitic clusters formed at the surface of the UNCD films. Therefore, the Fe-coating/annealing processes improved the s-EFE properties for the MCD films more markedly than that for the UNCD films. The understanding on the distribution of the nano-clusters is of critical importance in elucidating the authentic factor that influences the s-EFE properties of the diamond films. Such an understanding is possible only through the 3D-tomographic investigations.

  8. Poly(dopamine) coated gold nanocluster functionalized electrochemical immunosensor for brominated flame retardants using multienzyme-labeling carbon hollow nanochains as signal amplifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Mouhong; Liu, Yingju; Chen, Xiaofen; Fei, Shidong; Ni, Chunlin; Fang, Yueping; Liu, Chengbin; Cai, Qingyun

    2013-07-15

    An electrochemical, signal amplified immunosensor was developed to detect 3-bromobiphenyl (BBP) by using a bio-inspired polydopamine (PDOP)/gold nanocluster (AuNc) as the sensor platform and multienzyme-labeled carbon hollow nanochains as the signal amplifier. The self-polymerized dopamine membrane on the AuNc-modified indium tin oxide (ITO) electrode were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), contact angle and electrochemical measurements. Such PDOP/AuNc platform featured the mild cross-linking reaction with the dense immobilization of BBP-antigens (BBP-Ag). Moreover, by using multiple horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and secondary antibodies (Ab2) modified one-dimensional carbon hollow nanochains (CHNc) as the signal enhancer, it held promise for improving the sensitivity and detection limit of the immunoassay. Based on the competitive immunoassay protocol, this immunosensor showed a linear range from 1 pM to 2 nM for BBP with a detection limit of 0.5 pM. Also, it exhibited high sensitivity, wide linear range, acceptable stability and reproducibility on a promising immobilization platform using a novel signal amplifier, which may extend its application in other environmental monitoring. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Electrodeposition of gold nanoclusters on overoxidized polypyrrole film modified glassy carbon electrode and its application for the simultaneous determination of epinephrine and uric acid under coexistence of ascorbic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Jing [Department of Chemistry, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Lin Xiangqin [Department of Chemistry, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China)]. E-mail: xqlin@ustc.edu.cn

    2007-07-23

    A novel biosensor was fabricated by electrochemical deposition of gold nanoclusters on ultrathin overoxidized polypyrrole (PPyox) film, formed a nano-Au/PPyox composite on glassy carbon electrode (nano-Au/PPyox/GCE). The properties of the nanocomposite have been characterized by field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and electrochemical investigations. The nano-Au/PPyox/GCE had strongly catalytic activity toward the oxidation of epinephrine (EP), uric acid (UA) and ascorbic acid (AA), and resolved the overlapping voltammetric response of EP, UA and AA into three well-defined peaks with a large anodic peak difference. The catalytic peak currents obtained from differential pulse voltammetry increased linearly with increasing EP and UA concentrations in the range of 3.0 x 10{sup -7} to 2.1 x 10{sup -5} M and 5.0 x 10{sup -8} to 2.8 x 10{sup -5} M with a detection limit of 3.0 x 10{sup -8} and 1.2 x 10{sup -8} M (s/n = 3), respectively. The results showed that the modified electrode can selectively determine EP and UA in the coexistence of a large amount of AA. In addition, the sensor exhibited excellent sensitivity, selectivity and stability. The nano-Au/PPyox/GCE has been applied to determination of EP in epinephrine hydrochloride injection and UA in urine samples with satisfactory results.

  10. Amorphous calcium carbonate particles form coral skeletons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mass, Tali; Giuffre, Anthony J.; Sun, Chang-Yu; Stifler, Cayla A.; Frazier, Matthew J.; Neder, Maayan; Tamura, Nobumichi; Stan, Camelia V.; Marcus, Matthew A.; Gilbert, Pupa U. P. A.

    2017-09-01

    Do corals form their skeletons by precipitation from solution or by attachment of amorphous precursor particles as observed in other minerals and biominerals? The classical model assumes precipitation in contrast with observed “vital effects,” that is, deviations from elemental and isotopic compositions at thermodynamic equilibrium. Here, we show direct spectromicroscopy evidence in Stylophora pistillata corals that two amorphous precursors exist, one hydrated and one anhydrous amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC); that these are formed in the tissue as 400-nm particles; and that they attach to the surface of coral skeletons, remain amorphous for hours, and finally, crystallize into aragonite (CaCO3). We show in both coral and synthetic aragonite spherulites that crystal growth by attachment of ACC particles is more than 100 times faster than ion-by-ion growth from solution. Fast growth provides a distinct physiological advantage to corals in the rigors of the reef, a crowded and fiercely competitive ecosystem. Corals are affected by warming-induced bleaching and postmortem dissolution, but the finding here that ACC particles are formed inside tissue may make coral skeleton formation less susceptible to ocean acidification than previously assumed. If this is how other corals form their skeletons, perhaps this is how a few corals survived past CO2 increases, such as the Paleocene–Eocene Thermal Maximum that occurred 56 Mya.

  11. Ge nanoclusters in PECVD-deposited glass after heat treating and electron irradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ou, Haiyan; Rørdam, Troels Peter; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports the formation of Ge nanoclusters in silica glass thin films deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). We studied the samples by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Raman spectroscopy after annealing. TEM investigation shows that the Ge nanoclusters...... at two areaswere formed by different mechanisms. The Ge nanoclusters formed in a single row along the interface of a silicon substrate and the silica glass film by annealing during high-temperature heat treatment. Ge nanoclusters did not initially form in the bulk of the film but could be subsequently...

  12. Entanglement in Anderson Nanoclusters

    CERN Document Server

    Samuelsson, Peter

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the two-particle spin entanglement in magnetic nanoclusters described by the periodic Anderson model. An entanglement phase diagram is obtained, providing a novel perspective on a central property of magnetic nanoclusters, namely the temperature dependent competition between local Kondo screening and nonlocal Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yoshida spin ordering. We find that multiparticle entangled states are present for finite magnetic field as well as in the mixed valence regime and away from half filling. Our results emphasize the role of charge fluctuations.

  13. Modified carbon nanotubes and methods of forming carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heintz, Amy M.; Risser, Steven; Elhard, Joel D.; Moore, Bryon P.; Liu, Tao; Vijayendran, Bhima R.

    2016-06-14

    In this invention, processes which can be used to achieve stable doped carbon nanotubes are disclosed. Preferred CNT structures and morphologies for achieving maximum doping effects are also described. Dopant formulations and methods for achieving doping of a broad distribution of tube types are also described.

  14. Polymer-incarcerated gold-palladium nanoclusters with boron on carbon: a mild and efficient catalyst for the sequential aerobic oxidation-Michael addition of 1,3-dicarbonyl compounds to allylic alcohols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Woo-Jin; Miyamura, Hiroyuki; Kobayashi, Shuū

    2011-03-09

    We have developed a polymer-incarcerated bimetallic Au-Pd nanocluster and boron as a catalyst for the sequential oxidation-addition reaction of 1,3-dicarbonyl compounds with allylic alcohols. The desired tandem reaction products were obtained in good to excellent yields under mild conditions with broad substrate scope. In the course of our studies, we discovered that the excess reducing agent, sodium borohydride, reacts with the polymer backbone to generate an immobilized tetravalent boron catalyst for the Michael reaction. In addition, we found bimetallic Au-Pd nanoclusters to be particularly effective for the aerobic oxidation of allylic alcohols under base- and water-free conditions. The ability to conduct the reaction under relatively neutral and anhydrous conditions proved to be key in maintaining good catalyst activity during recovery and reuse of the catalyst. Structural characterization (STEM, EDS, SEM, and N(2) absorption/desorption isotherm) of the newly prepared PI/CB-Au/Pd/B was performed and compared to PI/CB-Au/Pd. We found that while boron was important for the Michael addition reaction, it was found to alter the structural profile of the polymer-carbon black composite material to negatively affect the allylic oxidation reaction.

  15. Phases formed during rapid quenching of liquid carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basharin, A. Yu.; Dozhdikov, V. S.; Dubinchuk, V. T.; Kirillin, A. V.; Lysenko, I. Yu.; Turchaninov, M. A.

    2009-05-01

    Pulsed laser action upon a sample of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) in a gasostat filled with helium at a pressure above that corresponding to the triple point of carbon, followed by rapid quenching of the liquid phase at a rate of about 106 K/s leads to the formation of a crater with a periodic spatial structure at the surface. The composition and structure of nongraphite carbon phases in the near-surface region of the crater have been studied using the Raman scattering spectroscopy, electron microdiffraction, and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis. It is established that rapidly quenched carbon possesses predominantly a hybrid structure of glassy carbon formed as a result of the high-temperature treatment, with inclusions of crystalline carbyne, chaoite, and a hybrid cubic phase of ultradense carbon (C8). The hybrid phases of glassy carbon and C8 had not been reported until now as possible products of solidification of liquid carbon.

  16. Dynamics and Thermodynamics of Nanoclusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karo Michaelian

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic and thermodynamic properties of nanoclusters are studied in two different environments: the canonical and microcanonical ensembles. A comparison is made to thermodynamic properties of the bulk. It is shown that consistent and reproducible results on nanoclusters can only be obtained in the canonical ensemble. Nanoclusters in the microcanonical ensemble are trapped systems, and inconsistencies will be found if thermodynamic formalism is applied. An analytical model is given for the energy dependence of the phase space volume of nanoclusters, which allows the prediction of both dynamical and thermodynamical properties.

  17. Carbon nanotubes and methods of forming same at low temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biris, Alexandru S.; Dervishi, Enkeleda

    2017-05-02

    In one aspect of the invention, a method for growth of carbon nanotubes includes providing a graphitic composite, decorating the graphitic composite with metal nanostructures to form graphene-contained powders, and heating the graphene-contained powders at a target temperature to form the carbon nanotubes in an argon/hydrogen environment that is devoid of a hydrocarbon source. In one embodiment, the target temperature can be as low as about 150.degree. C. (.+-.5.degree. C.).

  18. Tailoring the magnetic properties of cobalt-ferrite nanoclusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega, A. Estrada de la; Garza-Navarro, M. A., E-mail: marco.garzanr@uanl.edu.mx; Durán-Guerrero, J. G.; Moreno Cortez, I. E.; Lucio-Porto, R.; González-González, V. [Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Facultad de Ingeniería Mecánica y Eléctrica (Mexico)

    2016-01-15

    In this contribution, we report on the tuning of magnetic properties of cobalt-ferrite nanoclusters. The cobalt-ferrite nanoclusters were synthesized from a two-step approach that consists of the synthesis of cobalt-ferrite nanoparticles in organic media, followed by their dispersion into aqueous dissolution to form an oil-in-water emulsion. These emulsions were prepared at three different concentrations of the cationic surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), in order to control the size and clustering density of the nanoparticles in the nanoclusters. The synthesized samples were characterized by transmission electron microscopy and their related techniques, such as bright-field and Z-contrast imaging, electron diffraction and energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry; as well as static magnetic measures. The experimental evidence indicates that the size, morphology, and nanoparticles clustering density in the nanoclusters is highly dependent of the cobalt-ferrite:CTAB molar ratio that is used in their synthesis. In addition, due to the clustering of the nanoparticles into the nanoclusters, their magnetic moments are blocked to relax cooperatively. Hence, the magnetic response of the nanoclusters can be tailored by controlling the size and nanoparticles clustering density.

  19. Signal integration by lipid-mediated spatial cross talk between Ras nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yong; Liang, Hong; Rodkey, Travis; Ariotti, Nicholas; Parton, Robert G; Hancock, John F

    2014-03-01

    Lipid-anchored Ras GTPases form transient, spatially segregated nanoclusters on the plasma membrane that are essential for high-fidelity signal transmission. The lipid composition of Ras nanoclusters, however, has not previously been investigated. High-resolution spatial mapping shows that different Ras nanoclusters have distinct lipid compositions, indicating that Ras proteins engage in isoform-selective lipid sorting and accounting for different signal outputs from different Ras isoforms. Phosphatidylserine is a common constituent of all Ras nanoclusters but is only an obligate structural component of K-Ras nanoclusters. Segregation of K-Ras and H-Ras into spatially and compositionally distinct lipid assemblies is exquisitely sensitive to plasma membrane phosphatidylserine levels. Phosphatidylserine spatial organization is also modified by Ras nanocluster formation. In consequence, Ras nanoclusters engage in remote lipid-mediated communication, whereby activated H-Ras disrupts the assembly and operation of spatially segregated K-Ras nanoclusters. Computational modeling and experimentation reveal that complex effects of caveolin and cortical actin on Ras nanoclustering are similarly mediated through regulation of phosphatidylserine spatiotemporal dynamics. We conclude that phosphatidylserine maintains the lateral segregation of diverse lipid-based assemblies on the plasma membrane and that lateral connectivity between spatially remote lipid assemblies offers important previously unexplored opportunities for signal integration and signal processing.

  20. Surface Segregation in Supported Pd-Pt Nanoclusters and Alloys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Oetelaar, L.C.A.; Nooij, O.W.; Oerlemans, S.; Denier van der Gon, A.W.; Brongersma, H.H.; Lefferts, Leonardus; Roosenbrand, A.G.; van Veen, J.A.R.

    1998-01-01

    Surface segregation processes in Pd-Pt alloys and bimetallic Pd-Pt nanoclusters on alumina and carbon supports (technical catalysts) have been investigated by determining the metal surface composition of these systems by low-energy ion scattering (LEIS). Both Pd-rich (Pd80Pt20) and Pt-rich

  1. Synthesis and characterization of colloidal fluorescent silver nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Sherry; Pfeiffer, Christian; Hollmann, Jana; Friede, Sebastian; Chen, Justin Jin-Ching; Beyer, Andreas; Haas, Benedikt; Volz, Kerstin; Heimbrodt, Wolfram; Montenegro Martos, Jose Maria; Chang, Walter; Parak, Wolfgang J

    2012-06-19

    Ultrasmall water-soluble silver nanoclusters are synthesized, and their properties are investigated. The silver nanoclusters have high colloidal stability and show fluorescence in the red. This demonstrates that like gold nanoclusters also silver nanoclusters can be fluorescent.

  2. Superconducting state of metallic nanoclusters and Josephson tunneling networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kresin, Vladimir, E-mail: vzkresin@lbl.gov [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, University of California at Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Ovchinnikov, Yurii [L. Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics, RAN, Moscow 117334 (Russian Federation)

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • Specific nanoclusters form a new family of high T{sub c} superconductors. • For an isolated cluster the pairing affects its energy spectrum. • Nano-based Josephson tunneling network can transfer a macroscopic superconducting current at high temperatures. • A.c. tunneling network can be synchronized and radiates as a single junction. - Abstract: Metallic nanoclusters form a new family of high temperature superconductors. In principle, the value of T{sub c} can be raised up to room temperature. In addition, one can observe the Josephson tunneling between two clusters. One can build the nanocluster-based tunneling network capable to transfer a macroscopic supercurrent at high temperatures. Such a network can be synchronized and radiate as single junction.

  3. Relaxation path of metastable nanoclusters in oxide dispersion strengthened materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribis, J.; Thual, M. A.; Guilbert, T.; de Carlan, Y.; Legris, A.

    2017-02-01

    ODS steels are a promising class of structural materials for sodium cooled fast reactor application. The ultra-high density of the strengthening nanoclusters dispersed within the ferritic matrix is responsible of the excellent creep properties of the alloy. Fine characterization of the nanoclusters has been conducted on a Fe-14Cr-0.3Ti-0.3Y2O3 ODS material using High Resolution and Energy Filtered Transmission Electron Microscopy. The nanoclusters exhibit a cubic symmetry possibly identified as f.c.c and display a non-equilibrium YTiCrO chemical composition thought to be stabilized by a vacancy supersaturation. These nanoclusters undergo relaxation towards the Y2Ti2O7-like state as they grow. A Cr shell is observed around the relaxed nano-oxides, this size-dependent shell may form after the release of Cr by the particles. The relaxation energy barrier appears to be higher for the smaller particles probably owing to a volume/surface ratio effect in reason to the full coherency of the nanoclusters.

  4. Lewis-acid catalysis of carbon carbon bond forming reactions in water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engberts, JBFN; Feringa, BL; Keller, E; Otto, S

    1996-01-01

    In this article, we review the recent progress that has been made in the field of Lewis-acid catalysis of carbon carbon-bond-forming reactions in aqueous solution. Since water hampers the hard hard interactions between the catalyst and the reactant, it often complicates catalysis. However, once

  5. Creep Forming of Carbon-Reinforced Ceramic-Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn, Wallace L.; Scotti, Stephan J.; Ashe, Melissa P.; Connolly, Liz

    2007-01-01

    A set of lecture slides describes an investigation of creep forming as a means of imparting desired curvatures to initially flat stock plates of carbon-reinforced ceramic-matrix composite (C-CMC) materials. The investigation is apparently part of a continuing effort to develop improved means of applying small CCMC repair patches to reinforced carbon-carbon leading edges of aerospace vehicles (e.g., space shuttles) prior to re-entry into the atmosphere of the Earth. According to one of the slides, creep forming would be an intermediate step in a process that would yield a fully densified, finished C-CMC part having a desired size and shape (the other steps would include preliminary machining, finish machining, densification by chemical vapor infiltration, and final coating). The investigation included experiments in which C-CMC disks were creep-formed by heating them to unspecified high temperatures for time intervals of the order of 1 hour while they were clamped into single- and double-curvature graphite molds. The creep-formed disks were coated with an oxidation- protection material, then subjected to arc-jet tests, in which the disks exhibited no deterioration after exposure to high-temperature test conditions lasting 490 seconds.

  6. Nanocluster technologies for electronics design

    CERN Document Server

    Parker, A J

    2001-01-01

    based electronic systems. The work presented in this thesis covers an investigation into the use of metal nanoclusters in nanoelectronics design. Initial studies explored the interactions of the dodecanethiol passivated gold nanocluster, held in solution with toluene, and the native oxide covered silicon surface. Deposition of the clusters is achieved by pippetting mu-litre quantities of the solution onto the surface, and allowing the solvent to evaporate leaving the clusters as residue. Patterning of the surface with micron scale photoresist structures prior to cluster exposure, led to the selective aggregation of cluster deposits along the resist boundaries. An extension of this technique, examined the flow of the cluster solution along photoresist structures which extended beyond the solution droplet. Investigation into the electronic properties of nanocluster arrays generated non-linear current-voltage curves, which are explained in terms of two very simple models. These results cast doubt over the suitab...

  7. Nanocluster model of intermetallic compounds with giant unit cells: beta, beta'-Mg(2)Al(3) polymorphs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blatov, Vladislav A; Ilyushin, Gregory D; Proserpio, Davide M

    2010-02-15

    A novel method for the computational description of intermetallics as an assembly of nanoclusters was improved and applied to extremely complicated crystal structures of beta, beta'-Mg(2)Al(3) polymorphs. Using the TOPOS program package that implements the method, we separated two types of two-shell primary nanoclusters A, A1, A2, and B consisting of 57-63 atoms that completely compose the structures of the polymorphs. The nanocluster model interprets structural disordering in beta-Mg(2)Al(3): the disordered atoms form the inner shell of the nanocluster A, while the outer shells of all nanoclusters are preserved. The self-assembly of the beta, beta'-Mg(2)Al(3) crystal structures was considered within the hierarchical scheme: 0D primary polyhedral clusters (coordination polyhedra) --> 0D two-shell primary nanoclusters A, A1, A2, or B --> 0D supracluster-precursor AB(2) --> 1D primary chain --> 2D microlayer --> 3D microframework. The self-assembly scheme proves the similarity of beta, beta'-Mg(2)Al(3) to other extremely complicated Samson's phases, NaCd(2) and ZrZn(22); the spatial arrangement of the centers of nanoclusters in these structures as well as the topology of the corresponding network conform to the Laves phase MgCu(2). Using the TOPOS procedure of searching for finite fragments in infinite nets we found that nanocluster B is a typical fragment of intermetallic compounds: it exists in intermetallics belonging to 42 Pearson classes. The nanocluster A was found only in two Pearson classes: cF464 and hP238, while the nanoclusters A1 and A2 occur in beta'-Mg(2)Al(3) only. Thus, the nanoclusters A, A1, and A2 can be considered as "determinants" of the corresponding structures.

  8. Structure of the carbon nanofilaments formed by liquid phase carbonization in porous anodic alumina template

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habazaki, H. [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, N13-W8, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan)], E-mail: habazaki@eng.hokudai.ac.jp; Kiriu, M.; Hayashi, M.; Konno, H. [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, N13-W8, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan)

    2007-10-15

    Platelet structure carbon nanofilaments of {approx}30 nm in diameter have been prepared by heating a mixture of porous anodic alumina template and poly(vinyl)chloride (PVC) powders in an argon atmosphere, and the change in their structure and morphology with heat treatment temperature, ranging from 600 to 2800 deg. C, has been examined using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and nitrogen gas adsorption measurements. The diameter of the carbon nanofilaments formed does not change with heat treatment temperature, being in agreement with the pore diameter of the template, while their length is reduced with the temperature. The platelet-type orientation of graphene layers is evident even at 600 deg. C with the layer structure further developing with increasing heat treatment temperature. The carbon nanofilaments formed at lower temperatures have micropores, while those formed at higher temperatures do not have porosity. Highly graphitized carbon nanofilaments have been obtained after heat treatment at 2800 deg. C, with another characteristic structural feature being presence of loops at the edge of graphene layers formed at 2800 deg. C.

  9. Inter-cluster distance dependence of electrical conduction in nanocluster assembled films of silver: a new paradigm for design of nanostructures

    OpenAIRE

    Bansal, Chandrahas; Praveen, S. G.; Kumaran, J. T. T.; Chatterjee, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    The transport properties of films assembled from metal nanoclusters can be significantly different from the metals in their bulk or thin film forms due to quantum confinement effects and several competing energy and length scales. For a film composed of metal nanoclusters as its building blocks, the cluster size and the inter-cluster separation are parameters that can be varied experimentally. Here we show that the electrical conductivity of a film composed of silver nanoclusters can be chang...

  10. Pressurized polyol synthesis of Al-doped ZnO nanoclusters with high electrical conductivity and low near-infrared transmittance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ho-Nyun; Shin, Chi-Ho [Surface Technology R& BD Group, Korea Institute of Industrial Technology (KITECH), Incheon 406-840 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Duck Kun [Department of Corporate Diagnosis, Small and Medium Business Corporation, Seoul 150-718 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Haekyoung [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan 712-749 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Kyeongseok [Department of Chemical and Environmental Technology, Inha Technical College, Incheon 402-752 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyun-Jong, E-mail: hjkim23@kitech.re.kr [Surface Technology R& BD Group, Korea Institute of Industrial Technology (KITECH), Incheon 406-840 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-09-25

    Highlights: • Low-temperature pressurized polyol method synthesized Al-doped ZnO nanoclusters. • Reaction time affected the doping efficiency, resistivity, and NIR transmittance. • The near-IR blocking efficiency of Al-doped ZnO (AZO) nanoclusters reached 85%. • AZO nanocluster coatings could be used for heat reflectors or artificial glasses. - Abstract: In this study, a novel pressurized polyol method is proposed to synthesize aluminum-doped ZnO (AZO) nanoclusters without utilizing additional thermal treatment to avoid the merging of nanoclusters. The size of the AZO nanoclusters range from 100 to 150 nm with a resistivity of 204 Ω cm. The AZO nanoclusters primarily consist of approximately 10-nm nanocrystals that form a spherically clustered morphology. A two-stage growth model has been proposed based on the results of scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy images, nanocluster sizes, and X-ray diffraction patterns. The primary AZO nanocrystals first nucleate under pressurized conditions and then spontaneously aggregate into larger nanoclusters. Optically, the AZO nanoclusters exhibit a significant decrease in the near-infrared (NIR) transmittance compared to pure ZnO nanoparticles. The NIR blocking efficiency of AZO nanoclusters reached 85%. Moreover, the doping efficiency, resistivity, and NIR transmittance of AZO nanoclusters are influenced by the reaction time in the pressurized polyol solution. On the other hand, the reaction time has no effect on the particle size and crystallinity. An optically transparent coating for the AZO nanoclusters, which consisted of iso-propanol solvent and ultraviolet-curable acrylic binder, was also demonstrated.

  11. Synthesis of biocompatible AuAgS/Ag{sub 2}S nanoclusters and their applications in photocatalysis and mercury detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Qian; Chen, Shenna; Zhang, Lingyang; Huang, Haowen, E-mail: hhwn09@163.com; Liu, Fengping [Hunan University of Science and Technology, Key Laboratory of Theoretical Organic Chemistry and Function Molecule, Ministry of Education, Hunan Provincial University Key Laboratory of QSAR/QSPR, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering (China); Liu, Xuanyong, E-mail: xyliu@mail.sic.ac.cn [Chinese Academy of Sciences, State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructure, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics (China)

    2014-12-15

    In this paper, a facile approach for preparation of AuAgS/Ag{sub 2}S nanoclusters was developed. The unique AuAgS/Ag{sub 2}S nanoclusters capped with biomolecules exhibit interesting excellent optical and catalytic properties. The fluorescent AuAgS/Ag{sub 2}S nanoclusters show tunable luminescence depending on the nanocluster size. The apoptosis assay demonstrated that the AuAgS/Ag{sub 2}S nanoclusters showed low cytotoxicity and good biocompatibility. Therefore, the nanoclusters can be used not only as a probe for labeling cells but also for their photocatalytic activity for photodegradation of organic dye. Moreover, a highly selective and sensitive assay for detection of mercury including Hg{sup 2+} and undissociated mercury complexes was developed based on the quenching fluorescent AuAgS/Ag{sub 2}S nanoclusters, which provides a promising approach for determining various forms of Hg in the mercury-based compounds in environment. These unique nanoclusters may have potential applications in biological labeling, sensing mercury, and photodegradation of various organic pollutants in waste water.Graphical Abstract.

  12. Synthesis of biocompatible AuAgS/Ag2S nanoclusters and their applications in photocatalysis and mercury detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qian; Chen, Shenna; Zhang, Lingyang; Huang, Haowen; Liu, Fengping; Liu, Xuanyong

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, a facile approach for preparation of AuAgS/Ag2S nanoclusters was developed. The unique AuAgS/Ag2S nanoclusters capped with biomolecules exhibit interesting excellent optical and catalytic properties. The fluorescent AuAgS/Ag2S nanoclusters show tunable luminescence depending on the nanocluster size. The apoptosis assay demonstrated that the AuAgS/Ag2S nanoclusters showed low cytotoxicity and good biocompatibility. Therefore, the nanoclusters can be used not only as a probe for labeling cells but also for their photocatalytic activity for photodegradation of organic dye. Moreover, a highly selective and sensitive assay for detection of mercury including Hg2+ and undissociated mercury complexes was developed based on the quenching fluorescent AuAgS/Ag2S nanoclusters, which provides a promising approach for determining various forms of Hg in the mercury-based compounds in environment. These unique nanoclusters may have potential applications in biological labeling, sensing mercury, and photodegradation of various organic pollutants in waste water.

  13. Preparation and surface enhanced Raman scattering behavior of Ag-coated C{sub 60} nanoclusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Shi-Zhao; Yin, Die-er; Li, Xiangqing; Mu, Jin, E-mail: mujin@sit.edu.cn

    2013-12-01

    Ag-coated C{sub 60} nanoclusters were prepared and characterized with X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and nitrogen adsorption–desorption isotherm measurement. The Ag-coated C{sub 60} nanoclusters were assembled on the glass substrate to form a thin film using the layer-by-layer technique. Meanwhile, the surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) of musk xylene adsorbed on the film of Ag-coated C{sub 60} nanoclusters was explored. The results indicated that the film of Ag-coated C{sub 60} nanoclusters was a unique SERS-active substrate with a detection limit of 10{sup −9} mol L{sup −1} for musk xylene. Furthermore, the surface enhanced mechanisms were discussed preliminarily.

  14. Self-Assembled Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoclusters for Universal Cell Labeling and MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuzhen; Zhang, Jun; Jiang, Shengwei; Lin, Gan; Luo, Bing; Yao, Huan; Lin, Yuchun; He, Chengyong; Liu, Gang; Lin, Zhongning

    2016-05-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles have been widely used in a variety of biomedical applications, especially as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and cell labeling. In this study, SPIO nanoparticles were stabilized with amphiphilic low molecular weight polyethylenimine (PEI) in an aqueous phase to form monodispersed nanocomposites with a controlled clustering structure. The iron-based nanoclusters with a size of 115.3 ± 40.23 nm showed excellent performance on cellular uptake and cell labeling in different types of cells, moreover, which could be tracked by MRI with high sensitivity. The SPIO nanoclusters presented negligible cytotoxicity in various types of cells as detected using MTS, LDH, and flow cytometry assays. Significantly, we found that ferritin protein played an essential role in protecting stress from SPIO nanoclusters. Taken together, the self-assembly of SPIO nanoclusters with good magnetic properties provides a safe and efficient method for universal cell labeling with noninvasive MRI monitoring capability.

  15. Phosphorescent Nanocluster Light-Emitting Diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuttipillai, Padmanaban S; Zhao, Yimu; Traverse, Christopher J; Staples, Richard J; Levine, Benjamin G; Lunt, Richard R

    2016-01-13

    Devices utilizing an entirely new class of earth abundant, inexpensive phosphorescent emitters based on metal-halide nanoclusters are reported. Light-emitting diodes with tunable performance are demonstrated by varying cation substitution to these nanoclusters. Theoretical calculations provide insight about the nature of the phosphorescent emitting states, which involves a strong pseudo-Jahn-Teller distortion.

  16. Modulation of magnetic anisotropy through self-assembled surface nanoclusters: Evolution of morphology and magnetism in Co-Pd alloy films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chuan-Che; Chiu, Hsiang-Chih; Mudinepalli, Venkata Ramana; Chen, Yu-Chuan; Chang, Po-Chun; Wu, Chun-Te; Yen, Hung-Wei; Lin, Wen-Chin

    2017-09-01

    In this study, the self-assembly of surface nanoclusters on 10-20-nm-thick Co50Pd50 (Co-Pd) alloy thin films deposited on the Al2O3(0001) substrate was systematically investigated. The time-dependent evolution of the nanocluster size and magnetic properties was monitored using an atomic force microscope (AFM) and the magneto-optical Kerr effect. When the Co-Pd alloy films were stored in an ambient environment, small nanodots gradually gathered to form large nanoclusters. Approximately 30 days after growth, a nanocluster array formed with an average lateral size of 100 ± 20 nm and average height of 10 ± 3 nm. After 100 days, the average lateral size and average height had increased to 140 ± 20 and 25 ± 5 nm, respectively. The AFM phase image exhibited a structured contrast on the nanocluster surface, indicating the nonuniform stiffness distribution of the nanoclusters. A microscopic Auger spectroscopy measurement suggested that in contrast to the Pd-rich signal in the flat area, the nanoclusters were cobalt- and oxygen-rich areas. Cross-sectional investigation through transmission electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy showed that the nanoclusters were mostly composed of Co oxide. A uniform Pd-rich underlayer had been maintained underneath the self-assembled Co-oxide nanoclusters. With the formation of a Co-oxide nanocluster array and Pd-rich underlayer, the magnetic easy axis of the Co-Pd film gradually altered its direction from the pristine perpendicular to in-plane direction. Because of the change in the magnetic easy axis, the hydrogenation-induced spin-reorientation transition was suppressed with the evolution of the surface Co-oxide nanoclusters.

  17. The expanding universe of thiolated gold nanoclusters and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, De-en

    2013-08-21

    Thiolated gold nanoclusters form a universe of their own. Researchers in this field are constantly pushing the boundary of this universe by identifying new compositions and in a few "lucky" cases, solving their structures. Such solved structures, even if there are only few, provide important hints for predicting the many identified compositions that are yet to be crystallized or structure determined. Structure prediction is the most pressing issue for a computational chemist in this field. The success of the density functional theory method in gauging the energetic ordering of isomers for thiolated gold clusters has been truly remarkable, but to predict the most stable structure for a given composition remains a great challenge. In this feature article from a computational chemist's point of view, the author shows how one understands and predicts structures for thiolated gold nanoclusters based on his old and new results. To further entertain the reader, the author also offers several "imaginative" structures, claims, and challenges for this field.

  18. Optical properties of Si nanoclusters with passivated surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinh, L.N. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Applied Science]|[Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States). Chemistry and Materials Science Dept.; Chase, L.L.; Balooch, M.; Siekhaus, W.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States). Chemistry and Material Science Dept.; Wooten, F. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Applied Science

    1996-12-31

    Si nanoclusters with average size of a few nanometers have been synthesized by thermal vaporization of Si in an Ar buffer gas, and passivated with oxygen or atomic hydrogen. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) revealed that these nanoclusters were crystalline. All samples showed strong infrared and/or visible photoluminescence (PL) with varying decay times form nanoseconds to microseconds depending on synthesis conditions. Absorption mainly in the Si cores was observed by photoluminescence excitation (PLE) spectroscopy. The visible components of PL spectra were noted to blue shift and broaden as the size of the Si nanocrystals (nc-Si) was reduced, and there were differences in PL spectra for hydrogen and oxygen passivated nc-Si. This data can be explained best by a model involving absorption between quantum confined states in the Si cores and emission by surface/interface states.

  19. Atomistic study on mixed-mode fracture mechanisms of ferrite iron interacting with coherent copper and nickel nanoclusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Motasem, Ahmed Tamer; Mai, Nghia Trong; Choi, Seung Tae; Posselt, Matthias

    2016-04-01

    The effect of copper and/or nickel nanoclusters, generally formed by neutron irradiation, on fracture mechanisms of ferrite iron was investigated by using molecular statics simulation. The equilibrium configuration of nanoclusters was obtained by using a combination of an on-lattice annealing based on Metropolis Monte Carlo method and an off-lattice relaxation by molecular dynamics simulation. Residual stress distributions near the nanoclusters were also calculated, since compressive or tensile residual stresses may retard or accelerate, respectively, the propagation of a crack running into a nanocluster. One of the nanoclusters was located in front of a straight crack in ferrite iron with a body-centered cubic crystal structure. Two crystallographic directions, of which the crack plane and crack front direction are (010)[001] and (111) [ 1 bar 10 ] , were considered, representing cleavage and non-cleavage orientations in ferrite iron, respectively. Displacements corresponding to pure opening-mode and mixed-mode loadings were imposed on the boundary region and the energy minimization was performed. It was observed that the fracture mechanisms of ferrite iron under the pure opening-mode loading are strongly influenced by the presence of nanoclusters, while under the mixed-mode loading the nanoclusters have no significant effect on the crack propagation behavior of ferrite iron.

  20. Probing carbonate in bone forming minerals on the nanometre scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kłosowski, Michał M; Friederichs, Robert J; Nichol, Robert; Antolin, Nikolas; Carzaniga, Raffaella; Windl, Wolfgang; Best, Serena M; Shefelbine, Sandra J; McComb, David W; Porter, Alexandra E

    2015-07-01

    To devise new strategies to treat bone disease in an ageing society, a more detailed characterisation of the process by which bone mineralises is needed. In vitro studies have suggested that carbonated mineral might be a precursor for deposition of bone apatite. Increased carbonate content in bone may also have significant implications in altering the mechanical properties, for example in diseased bone. However, information about the chemistry and coordination environment of bone mineral, and their spatial distribution within healthy and diseased tissues, is lacking. Spatially resolved analytical transmission electron microscopy is the only method available to probe this information at the length scale of the collagen fibrils in bone. In this study, scanning transmission electron microscopy combined with electron energy-loss spectroscopy (STEM-EELS) was used to differentiate between calcium-containing biominerals (hydroxyapatite, carbonated hydroxyapatite, beta-tricalcium phosphate and calcite). A carbon K-edge peak at 290 eV is a direct marker of the presence of carbonate. We found that the oxygen K-edge structure changed most significantly between minerals allowing discrimination between calcium phosphates and calcium carbonates. The presence of carbonate in carbonated HA (CHA) was confirmed by the formation of peak at 533 eV in the oxygen K-edge. These observations were confirmed by simulations using density functional theory. Finally, we show that this method can be utilised to map carbonate from the crystallites in bone. We propose that our calibration library of EELS spectra could be extended to provide spatially resolved information about the coordination environment within bioceramic implants to stimulate the development of structural biomaterials. Copyright © 2015 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Electrical transport properties in Fe-Cr nanocluster-assembled granular films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiong-Zhi; Wang, Lai-Sen; Zhang, Qin-Fu; Liu, Xiang; Xie, Jia; Su, A.-Mei; Zheng, Hong-Fei; Peng, Dong-Liang

    2017-09-01

    The Fe100-xCrx nanocluster-assembled granular films with Cr atomic fraction (x) ranging from 0 to 100 were fabricated by using a plasma-gas-condensation cluster deposition system. The TEM characterization revealed that the uniform Fe clusters were coated with a Cr layer to form a Fe-Cr core-shell structure. Then, the as-prepared Fe100-xCrx nanoclusters were randomly assembled into a granular film in vacuum environments with increasing the deposition time. Because of the competition between interfacial resistance and shunting effect of Cr layer, the room temperature resistivity of the Fe100-xCrx nanocluster-assembled granular films first increased and then decreased with increasing the Cr atomic fraction (x), and revealed a maximum of 2 × 104 μΩ cm at x = 26 at.%. The temperature-dependent longitudinal resistivity (ρxx), magnetoresistance (MR) effect and anomalous Hall effect (AHE) of these Fe100-xCrx nanocluster-assembled granular films were also studied systematically. As the x increased from 0 to 100, the ρxx of all samples firstly decreased and then increased with increasing the measuring temperature. The dependence of ρxx on temperature could be well addressed by a mechanism incorporated for the fluctuation-induced-tunneling (FIT) conduction process and temperature-dependent scattering effect. It was found that the anomalous Hall effect (AHE) had no legible scaling relation in Fe100-xCrx nanocluster-assembled granular films. However, after deducting the contribution of tunneling effect, the scaling relation was unambiguous. Additionally, the Fe100-xCrx nanocluster-assembled granular films revealed a small negative magnetoresistance (MR), which decreased with the increase of x. The detailed physical mechanism of the electrical transport properties in these Fe100-xCrx nanocluster-assembled granular films was also studied.

  2. UV luminescence of dendrimer-encapsulated gold nanoclusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shim, Hyeong Seop; Kim, Jun Myung; Sohn, So Hyeong; Han, Noh Soo; Park, Seung Min [Dept. of Chemistry, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Size-dependent luminescence color is one of the interesting properties of metal nanocrystals, whose sizes are in the dimension of the Fermi wavelength of an electron. Despite the short Fermi wavelength of electrons in gold (-0.7 nm), luminescence of gold nanoclusters has been reported to range from the near-infrared to near-ultraviolet, depending on the number of atoms in the nanoclusters. The photoluminescence of G4-OH (Au) obtained by the excitation of 266 nm showed UV emission in addition to the well-known blue emission. The higher intensity and red-shifted emission of the gold nanoclusters was distinguished from the emission of dendrimers. The UV emission at 352 nm matched the emission energy of Au{sub 4} in the spherical jellium model, rather than the planar Au{sub 8}, which supported the emission of Au{sub 4} formed in G4-OH. Despite the change of [HAuCl{sub 4} ]/[G4-OH], the relative population between Au{sub 4} and Au{sub 8} was similar in G4-OH(Au), which indicated that the closed electronic and geometric structures stabilized the magic number of Au{sub 4}.

  3. Nanoclusters a bridge across disciplines

    CERN Document Server

    Jena, Purusottam

    2010-01-01

    This comprehensive book on Nanoclusters comprises sixteen authoritative chapters written by leading researchers in the field. It provides insight into topics that are currently at the cutting edge of cluster science, with the main focus on metal and metal compound systems that are of particular interest in materials science, and also on aspects related to biology and medicine. While there are numerous books on clusters, the focus on clusters as a bridge across disciplines sets this book apart from others. Delivers cutting edge coverage of cluster science Covers a broad range of topics in

  4. Three-dimensional PtxNi1-x nanoclusters supported on multiwalled carbon nanotubes in enzyme-free glucose biofuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yue; Fan, Louzhen; Zhang, Yang; Que, Qiming; Hong, Bo

    2015-11-01

    Enzyme-free glucose biofuel cells (GBFCs) have been a renewed interest because of excellent long-term stability and adequate power density. However, slow reaction kinetics and catalyst poisoning are critical obstacles to the realization of noble metal based GBFCs. In order to avoid these problems, three-dimensional (3D) flowerlike platinum (Pt)-nickel (Ni) alloy nanoparticle clusters are electrodeposited onto multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) by using a full-electrochemical protocol, which involves a key, second step of a potential pulse sequence. Polarization parameters, cell tests and degradation measurements prove that the 3D PtNi/MWCNTs catalysts have higher performance and stability for implantable GBFCs in comparison to the 3D Pt/MWCNTs and the uniform dispersive morphology PtNi/MWCNTs, and the highest catalytic activity was found for a Pt/Ni ratio of 3/7, which exhibits a high power density 3.12 ± 0.04 mW cm-2 and an open circuit potential 0.786 ± 0.005 V in physiological environment. This new procedure renders this kind of 3D PtNi/MWCNTs the possible candidate catalysts for construction of a new generation of GBFCs operating at mild conditions.

  5. Electron correlations and silicon nanocluster energetics

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    The first-principle prediction of nanocluster stable structure is often hampered by the existence of many isomer configurations with energies close to the ground state. This fact attaches additional importance to many-electron effects going beyond density functional theory (DFT), because their contributions may change a subtle energy order of competitive structures. To analyze this problem, we consider, as an example, the energetics of silicon nanoclusters passivated by hydrogen Si$_{10}$H$_{...

  6. An ultrafast look at Au nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yau, Sung Hei; Varnavski, Oleg; Goodson, Theodore

    2013-07-16

    In the past 20 years, researchers studying nanomaterials have uncovered many new and interesting properties not found in bulk materials. Extensive research has focused on metal nanoparticles (>3 nm) because of their potential applications, such as in molecular electronics, image markers, and catalysts. In particular, the discovery of metal nanoclusters (properties for nanomaterials are intriguing, because for metal nanosystems in this size regime both size and shape determine electronic properties. Remarkably, changes in the optical properties of nanomaterials have provided tremendous insight into the electronic structure of nanoclusters. The success of synthesizing monolayer protected clusters (MPCs) in the condensed phase has allowed scientists to probe the metal core directly. Au MPCs have become the "gold" standard in nanocluster science, thanks to the rigorous structural characterization already accomplished. The use of ultrafast laser spectroscopy on MPCs in solution provides the benefit of directly studying the chemical dynamics of metal nanoclusters (core), and their nonlinear optical properties. In this Account, we investigate the optical properties of MPCs in the visible region using ultrafast spectroscopy. Based on fluorescence up-conversion spectroscopy, we propose an emission mechanism for these nanoclusters. These clusters behave differently from nanoparticles in terms of emission lifetimes as well as two-photon cross sections. Through further investigation of the transient (excited state) absorption, we have found many unique phenomena of nanoclusters, such as quantum confinement effects and vibrational breathing modes. In summary, based on the differences in the optical properties, the distinction between nanoclusters and nanoparticles appears at a size near 2.2 nm. This is consistent with simulations from a free-electron model proposed for MPCs. The use of ultrafast techniques on these nanoclusters can answer many of the fundamental questions about

  7. Characterization of Carbon Deposits Formed During Plasma Pyrolysis of Xinjiang Candle Coal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Guilin; Meng, Yuedong; Shu, Xingsheng; Fang, Shidong

    2009-08-01

    Carbon deposits were formed on the reactor wall during plasma pyrolysis of the Xinjiang candle coal in our V-style plasma pyrolysis pilot-plant. The carbon deposits were studied using a scanning electronic microscope (SEM) and the X-ray diffraction (XRD) method. It was found that carbon deposits located at different parts in the reactor exhibited different microscopic patterns. The formation mechanism of the carbon deposits was deduced. The downward increase in the graphitization degree of the carbon deposits was found and interpreted.

  8. Characterization of carbon deposits formed during plasma pyrolysis of Xinjiang candle coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, G.L.; Meng, Y.D.; Shu, X.S.; Fang, S.D. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei (China). Inst. of Plasma Physics

    2009-08-15

    Carbon deposits were formed on the reactor wall during plasma pyrolysis of the Xinjiang candle coal in our V-style plasma pyrolysis pilot-plant. The carbon deposits were studied using a scanning electronic microscope (SEM) and the X-ray diffraction (XRD) method. It was found that carbon deposits located at different parts in the reactor exhibited different microscopic patterns. The formation mechanism of the carbon deposits was deduced. The down ward increase in the graphitization degree of the carbon deposits was found and interpreted

  9. Self-organized arrays of Cd nanocluster on Si (111)-7×7 surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Shao-Jie; Xiao, Hua-Fang; Ye, Juan; Sun, Kai; Tao, Min-Long; Tu, Yu-Bing; Wang, Ya-Li; Xie, Zheng-Bo; Wang, Jun-Zhong

    2017-02-01

    We studied the self-organization of Cd clusters on Si(111)-7×7 surface with an ultrahigh vacuum scanning tunneling microcopy (STM). Highly-ordered arrays of Cd nanoclusters have been fabricated by elevating the substrate temperature. The Cd clusters occupy equally the faulted and unfaulted half-unit cells of Si(111)-7×7 without obvious preference to either of them, forming Cd cluster pairs or hexamers. Furthermore, high-resolution STM images demonstrate that the charge transfer between Cd and Si atoms is responsible for cluster-cluster attractions, which in turn drive the self-organization of Cd nanoclusters into highly ordered arrays.

  10. A nanocluster beacon based on the template transformation of DNA-templated silver nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Ye; Jia, Xiaofang; Zhang, Shan; Zhu, Jinbo; Wang, Erkang

    2016-01-28

    In this work, we developed a novel light-up nanocluster beacon (NCB) based on shuttling dark silver nanoclusters (NCs) to a bright scaffold through hybridization. The fluorescence enhancement was as high as 70-fold when the two templates were on the opposite sides of the duplexes, enabling sensitive and selective detection of DNA.

  11. Nanoclusters of Cyanuric Acid

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M ELANGO; V SUBRAMANIAN; N SATHYAMURTHY

    2017-07-01

    In this article, the self-assembly of cyanuric acid (CA) molecules into nano-structures is examined. Equilibrium geometry of CA is planar and it belongs to the D3h point group. It is shown that CA clusters form three dimensional bowls and balls. Cyclic pentamer (5-bowl) is the basic motif responsible for these non-planar geometries. It is also shown that the cyclic hexamer based clusters can be non-planar if they contain a 5-bowl. A unified criterion for the formation of bowls and balls from basic molecular building blocks emerges from this study. The role of symmetry in supramolecular self-assembly is also clearly evident from the present study.

  12. Fractal Electronic Circuits Assembled From Nanoclusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairbanks, M. S.; McCarthy, D.; Taylor, R. P.; Brown, S. A.

    2009-07-01

    Many patterns in nature can be described using fractal geometry. The effect of this fractal character is an array of properties that can include high internal connectivity, high dispersivity, and enhanced surface area to volume ratios. These properties are often desirable in applications and, consequently, fractal geometry is increasingly employed in technologies ranging from antenna to storm barriers. In this paper, we explore the application of fractal geometry to electrical circuits, inspired by the pervasive fractal structure of neurons in the brain. We show that, under appropriate growth conditions, nanoclusters of Sb form into islands on atomically flat substrates via a process close to diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA), establishing fractal islands that will form the basis of our fractal circuits. We perform fractal analysis of the islands to determine the spatial scaling properties (characterized by the fractal dimension, D) of the proposed circuits and demonstrate how varying growth conditions can affect D. We discuss fabrication approaches for establishing electrical contact to the fractal islands. Finally, we present fractal circuit simulations, which show that the fractal character of the circuit translates into novel, non-linear conduction properties determined by the circuit's D value.

  13. Morphological forms of carbon and their utilizations at formation of iron casting surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Jelínek

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Model pyrolysis made possible to identify three solid products of carbonaceous additives. Lustrous carbon is the most important form of the pyrolysis carbon. With its structure and physical and chemical properties it comes near to graphite. Amorphous carbon with turbo-stratic lattice, higher oxireactivity, and lower protective function against liquid metal comes near to carbon black. Semicoke also plays a non-negligible role. All forms of carbon have an important representation in oolitized quartz grain also during forming the casting surface. While amorphous carbon is formed directly from the gaseous phase by homogeneous nucleation, lustrous carbon, with regard to similarity of lattices with quartz, is formed by heterogeneous nucleation on grains. High covering power and low oxireactivity give its highest protecting power of the mould face. New experimental equipment made possible to check a possibility of use of new composite bentonite binders containing „process carbon“(graphite, anthracite, amorphous carbon. The BTEX content in exhalations and in waste sands too was considerably decreased with high smoothness of castings.

  14. IMS-MS and IMS-IMS investigation of the structure and stability of dimethylamine-sulfuric acid nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Hui; He, Siqin; Larriba-Andaluz, Carlos; Hogan, Christopher J

    2015-03-12

    Recent studies of new particle formation events in the atmosphere suggest that nanoclusters (i.e, the species formed during the early stages of particle growth which are composed of 10(1)-10(3) molecules) may consist of amines and sulfuric acid. The physicochemical properties of sub-10 nm amine-sulfuric acid clusters are hence of interest. In this work, we measure the density, thermostability, and extent of water uptake of dimethylamine-sulfuric (DMAS) nanoclusters in the gas phase, produced via positive electrospray ionization. Specifically, we employ three systems to investigate DMAS properties: ion mobility spectrometry (IMS, with a parallel-plate differential mobility analyzer) is coupled with mass spectrometry to measure masses and collision cross sections for dimethylamine to sulfuric acid originally present in the electrospray solution. IMS-IMS thermostability studies reveal that partial pressures of DMAS nanoclusters are dependent upon the electrospray solution concentration ratio, R = [H2SO4]/[(CH3)2NH]. Extrapolating measurements, we estimate that dry DMAS nanoclusters have surface vapor pressures of order 10(-4) Pa near 300 K, with the surface vapor pressure increasing with increasing values of R through most of the probed concentration range. This suggests that nanocluster surface vapor pressures are substantially enhanced by capillarity effects (the Kelvin effect). Meanwhile, IMS-IMS water uptake measurements show clearly that DMAS nanoclusters uptake water at relative humidities beyond 10% near 300 K, and that larger clusters uptake water to a larger extent. In total, our results suggest that dry DMAS nanoclusters (in the 5-8.5 nm size range in diameter) would not be stable under ambient conditions; however, DMAS nanoclusters would likely be hydrated in the ambient (in some cases above 20% water by mass), which could serve to reduce surface vapor pressures and stabilize them from dissociation.

  15. Atomically Precise Metal Nanoclusters for Catalytic Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Rongchao [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2016-11-18

    The central goal of this project is to explore the catalytic application of atomically precise gold nanoclusters. By solving the total structures of ligand-protected nanoclusters, we aim to correlate the catalytic properties of metal nanoclusters with their atomic/electronic structures. Such correlation unravel some fundamental aspects of nanocatalysis, such as the nature of particle size effect, origin of catalytic selectivity, particle-support interactions, the identification of catalytically active centers, etc. The well-defined nanocluster catalysts mediate the knowledge gap between single crystal model catalysts and real-world conventional nanocatalysts. These nanoclusters also hold great promise in catalyzing certain types of reactions with extraordinarily high selectivity. These aims are in line with the overall goals of the catalytic science and technology of DOE and advance the BES mission “to support fundamental research to understand, predict, and ultimately control matter and energy at the level of electrons, atoms, and molecules”. Our group has successfully prepared different sized, robust gold nanoclusters protected by thiolates, such as Au25(SR)18, Au28(SR)20, Au38(SR)24, Au99(SR)42, Au144(SR)60, etc. Some of these nanoclusters have been crystallographically characterized through X-ray crystallography. These ultrasmall nanoclusters (< 2 nm diameter) exhibit discrete electronic structures due to quantum size effect, as opposed to quasicontinuous band structure of conventional metal nanoparticles or bulk metals. The available atomic structures (metal core plus surface ligands) of nanoclusters serve as the basis for structure-property correlations. We have investigated the unique catalytic properties of nanoclusters (i.e. not observed in conventional nanogold catalysts) and revealed the structure-selectivity relationships. Highlights of our

  16. Modular construction and hierarchical gelation of organooxotin nanoclusters derived from simple building blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Uwe; Hirst, Andrew R; Delgado, Juan Luis; Kaeser, Adrien; Delavaux-Nicot, Béatrice; Nierengarten, Jean-Francois; Smith, David K

    2007-12-14

    Mixtures of an appropriate carboxylic acid and n-butylstannoic acid constitute modular gelation systems, in which the formation of a well-defined 'tin-drum' nanocluster subsequently underpins the hierarchical assembly of nanostructured fibres, which form self-supporting gel-phase networks in organic solvents.

  17. Organization of copper nanoclusters in Langmuir–Blodgett films

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G Hemakanthi; Aruna Dhathathreyan; T Ramasami

    2002-02-01

    Stable nanoclusters of Cu were synthesized using Langmuir–Blodgett films of octadecylsuccinic acid (ODSA) as template. The Langmuir–Blodgett films of ODSA formed from subphase containing copper ions were first subjected to sulphidation (S) using sodium sulphide and then hydrogenated (H) using hydrogen gas. Diffuse reflectance UV-visible spectroscopy (DIR-UV-vis), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) used to characterize these films indicated the formation of Cu(0) metallic clusters ranging in size from 3 ∼ 10 nm.

  18. Acid-base bifunctional catalysis of silica-alumina-supported organic amines for carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motokura, Ken; Tomita, Mitsuru; Tada, Mizuki; Iwasawa, Yasuhiro

    2008-01-01

    Acid-base bifunctional heterogeneous catalysts were prepared by the reaction of an acidic silica-alumina (SA) surface with silane-coupling reagents possessing amino functional groups. The obtained SA-supported amines (SA-NR2) were characterized by solid-state 13C and 29Si NMR spectroscopy, FT-IR spectroscopy, and elemental analysis. The solid-state NMR spectra revealed that the amines were immobilized by acid-base interactions at the SA surface. The interactions between the surface acidic sites and the immobilized basic amines were weaker than the interactions between the SA and free amines. The catalytic performances of the SA-NR2 catalysts for various carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions, such as cyano-ethoxycarbonylation, the Michael reaction, and the nitro-aldol reaction, were investigated and compared with those of homogeneous and other heterogeneous catalysts. The SA-NR2 catalysts showed much higher catalytic activities for the carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions than heterogeneous amine catalysts using other supports, such as SiO2 and Al2O3. On the other hand, homogeneous amines hardly promoted these reactions under similar reaction conditions, and the catalytic behavior of SA-NR2 was also different from that of MgO, which was employed as a typical heterogeneous base. An acid-base dual-activation mechanism for the carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions is proposed.

  19. Surface-Induced Melting of Metal Nanoclusters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Quan-Wen; ZHU Ru-Zeng; WEI Jiu-An; WEN Yu-Hua

    2004-01-01

    @@ We investigate the size effect on melting of metal nanoclusters by molecular dynamics simulation and thermodynamic theory based on Kofman's melt model. By the minimization of the free energy of metal nanoclusters with respect to the thickness of the surface liquid layer, it has been found that the nanoclusters of the same metal have the same premelting temperature Tpre = T0 - T0(γsv -γlv -γst)/(ρLξ) (T0 is the melting point of bulk metal, γsv the solid-vapour interfacial free energy, γlv the liquid-vapour interfacial free energy, γsl the solid-liquid interfacial free energy, ρ the density of metal, L the latent heat of bulk metal, and ξ the characteristic length of surface-interface interaction) to be independent of the size of nanoclusters, so that the characteristic length ξ ofa metal can be obtained easily by Tpre, which can be obtained by experiments or molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The premelting temperature Tpre of Cu is obtained by MD simulations, then ξ is obtained.The melting point Tcm is further predicted by free energy analysis and is in good agreement with the result of our MD simulations. We also predict the maximum premelting-liquid width of Cu nanoclusters with various sizes and the critical size, below which there is no premelting.

  20. Conditions for forming composite carbon nanotube-diamond like carbon material that retain the good properties of both materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Wei, E-mail: wei.ren@helsinki.fi; Avchaciov, Konstantin; Nordlund, Kai [Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 43, FIN-00014 Helsinki (Finland); Iyer, Ajai; Koskinen, Jari [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, School of Chemical Technology, Aalto University, P.O. Box 16200, 00076 Espoo (Finland); Kaskela, Antti; Kauppinen, Esko I. [NanoMaterials Group, Department of Applied Physics, Aalto University School of Science, P.O. Box 15100, 00076 Aalto (Finland)

    2015-11-21

    Carbon nanotubes are of wide interest due to their excellent properties such as tensile strength and electrical and thermal conductivity, but are not, when placed alone on a substrate, well resistant to mechanical wear. Diamond-like carbon (DLC), on the other hand, is widely used in applications due to its very good wear resistance. Combining the two materials could provide a very durable pure carbon nanomaterial enabling to benefit from the best properties of both carbon allotropes. However, the synthesis of high-quality diamond-like carbon uses energetic plasmas, which can damage the nanotubes. From previous works it is neither clear whether the quality of the tubes remains good after DLC deposition, nor whether the DLC above the tubes retains the high sp{sup 3} bonding fraction. In this work, we use experiments and classical molecular dynamics simulations to study the mechanisms of DLC formation on various carbon nanotube compositions. The results show that high-sp{sup 3}-content DLC can be formed provided the deposition conditions allow for sidewards pressure to form from a substrate close beneath the tubes. Under optimal DLC formation energies of around 40–70 eV, the top two nanotube atom layers are fully destroyed by the plasma deposition, but layers below this can retain their structural integrity.

  1. Conditions for forming composite carbon nanotube-diamond like carbon material that retain the good properties of both materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Wei; Iyer, Ajai; Koskinen, Jari; Kaskela, Antti; Kauppinen, Esko I.; Avchaciov, Konstantin; Nordlund, Kai

    2015-11-01

    Carbon nanotubes are of wide interest due to their excellent properties such as tensile strength and electrical and thermal conductivity, but are not, when placed alone on a substrate, well resistant to mechanical wear. Diamond-like carbon (DLC), on the other hand, is widely used in applications due to its very good wear resistance. Combining the two materials could provide a very durable pure carbon nanomaterial enabling to benefit from the best properties of both carbon allotropes. However, the synthesis of high-quality diamond-like carbon uses energetic plasmas, which can damage the nanotubes. From previous works it is neither clear whether the quality of the tubes remains good after DLC deposition, nor whether the DLC above the tubes retains the high sp3 bonding fraction. In this work, we use experiments and classical molecular dynamics simulations to study the mechanisms of DLC formation on various carbon nanotube compositions. The results show that high-sp3-content DLC can be formed provided the deposition conditions allow for sidewards pressure to form from a substrate close beneath the tubes. Under optimal DLC formation energies of around 40-70 eV, the top two nanotube atom layers are fully destroyed by the plasma deposition, but layers below this can retain their structural integrity.

  2. Tunable growth of nanodendritic silver by galvanic-cell mechanism on formed activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fei; Lai, Yijian; Zhao, Binyuan; Hu, Xiaobin; Zhang, Di; Hu, Keao

    2010-06-07

    Well-defined silver dendritic nanostructures have been prepared in large quantities in an ambient environment using formed activated carbon (FAC) only. A reasonable mechanism (step 1: reduction by surface reductive groups; step 2: growing in the form of a galvanic cell) is suggested.

  3. Fragmentation of neutral carbon clusters formed by high velocity atomic collision; Fragmentation d'agregats de carbone neutres formes par collision atomique a haute vitesse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinet, G

    2004-05-01

    The aim of this work is to understand the fragmentation of small neutral carbon clusters formed by high velocity atomic collision on atomic gas. In this experiment, the main way of deexcitation of neutral clusters formed by electron capture with ionic species is the fragmentation. To measure the channels of fragmentation, a new detection tool based on shape analysis of current pulse delivered by semiconductor detectors has been developed. For the first time, all branching ratios of neutral carbon clusters are measured in an unambiguous way for clusters size up to 10 atoms. The measurements have been compared to a statistical model in microcanonical ensemble (Microcanonical Metropolis Monte Carlo). In this model, various structural properties of carbon clusters are required. These data have been calculated with Density Functional Theory (DFT-B3LYP) to find the geometries of the clusters and then with Coupled Clusters (CCSD(T)) formalism to obtain dissociation energies and other quantities needed to compute fragmentation calculations. The experimental branching ratios have been compared to the fragmentation model which has allowed to find an energy distribution deposited in the collision. Finally, specific cluster effect has been found namely a large population of excited states. This behaviour is completely different of the atomic carbon case for which the electron capture in the ground states predominates. (author)

  4. Nanostructures formed on carbon-based materials with different levels of crystallinity using oxygen plasma treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Tae-Jun [Institute for Multidisciplinary Convergence of Matter, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Jo, Wonjin; Lee, Heon Ju [Institute for Multidisciplinary Convergence of Matter, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Kyu Hwan [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Myoung-Woon, E-mail: mwmoon@kist.re.kr [Institute for Multidisciplinary Convergence of Matter, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-09-01

    Nanostructure formation was explored for various carbon-based materials, such as diamond, carbon fiber, polyethylene terephthalate and poly (methyl methacrylate), which have different levels of crystallinity, ranging from perfect crystal to polymeric amorphous. After treatment of oxygen plasma glow discharge, the nanostructures on these carbon-based materials were found to evolve via preferential etching due to the co-deposition of metal elements sputtered from the metal cathode plate. Local islands or clusters formed by the metal co-deposition have a low etching rate compared to pristine regions on each material, resulting in anisotropic patterns on the carbon-based materials. This pattern formation mechanism was confirmed by covering the cathode or preventing the co-deposition of metallic sources with a polymeric material. Regardless of the level of crystallinity of the carbon-based materials, no patterns were observed on the surfaces covered with the polymeric material, and the surfaces were uniformly etched. It was found that the materials with low crystallinity had a high etching rate due to low carbon atom density, which thus easily formed high-aspect-ratio nanostructures for the same plasma treatment duration. - Highlight: • Reactive ion etching & metal deposition were occurred in oxygen plasma treatment. • High-aspect-ratio nanostructures can be fabricated on carbon-based materials. • Materials with low crystallinity easily formed high-aspect-ratio nanostructure. • Amount of etching inhibitors affects the pattern formation and configuration.

  5. Plasmon transmutation: inducing new modes in nanoclusters by adding dielectric nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Fangfang; Ye, Jian; Liu, Na; Van Dorpe, Pol; Nordlander, Peter; Halas, Naomi J

    2012-09-12

    Planar clusters of coupled plasmonic nanoparticles support nanoscale electromagnetic "hot spots" and coherent effects, such as Fano resonances, with unique near and far field signatures, currently of prime interest for sensing applications. Here we show that plasmonic cluster properties can be substantially modified by the addition of individual, discrete dielectric nanoparticles at specific locations on the cluster, introducing new plasmon modes, or transmuting existing plasmon modes to new ones, in the resulting metallodielectric nanocomplex. Depositing a single carbon nanoparticle in the junction between a pair of adjacent nanodisks induces a metal-dielectric-metal quadrupolar plasmon mode. In a ten-membered cluster, placement of several carbon nanoparticles in junctions between multiple adjacent nanoparticles introduces a collective magnetic plasmon mode into the Fano dip, giving rise to an additional subradiant mode in the metallodielectric nanocluster response. These examples illustrate that adding dielectric nanoparticles to metallic nanoclusters expands the number and types of plasmon modes supported by these new mixed-media nanoscale assemblies.

  6. Plasmon tsunamis on metallic nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, A A; Sunjic, M

    2012-03-14

    A model is constructed to describe inelastic scattering events accompanying electron capture by a highly charged ion flying by a metallic nanosphere. The electronic energy liberated by an electron leaving the Fermi level of the metal and dropping into a deep Rydberg state of the ion is used to increase the ion kinetic energy and, simultaneously, to excite multiple surface plasmons around the positively charged hole left behind on the metal sphere. This tsunami-like phenomenon manifests itself as periodic oscillations in the kinetic energy gain spectrum of the ion. The theory developed here extends our previous treatment (Lucas et al 2011 New J. Phys. 13 013034) of the Ar(q+)/C(60) charge exchange system. We provide an analysis of how the individual multipolar surface plasmons of the metallic sphere contribute to the formation of the oscillatory gain spectrum. Gain spectra showing characteristic, tsunami-like oscillations are simulated for Ar(15+) ions capturing one electron in distant collisions with Al and Na nanoclusters.

  7. Fluorescent DNA Stabilized Silver Nanoclusters as Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso Latorre

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA stabilized fluorescent silver nanoclusters are promising materials, of which fluorescent properties can be exploited to develop sensors. Particularly, the presence of a DNA strand in the structure has promoted the development of gene sensors where one part of the sensor is able to recognize the target gene sequence. Moreover, since oligonucleotides can be designed to have binding properties (aptamers a variety of sensors for proteins and cells have been developed using silver nanoclusters. In this review the applications of this material as sensors of different biomolecules are summarized.

  8. Chirality in Bare and Passivated Gold Nanoclusters

    CERN Document Server

    Garzon, I L; Rodrigues-Hernandez, J I; Sigal, I; Beltran, M R; Michaelian, K

    2002-01-01

    Chiral structures have been found as the lowest-energy isomers of bare (Au$_{28}$ and Au$_{55}) and thiol-passivated (Au$_{28}(SCH$_{3})$_{16}$ and Au$_{38}$(SCH$_{3}$)$_{24}) gold nanoclusters. The degree of chirality existing in the chiral clusters was calculated using the Hausdorff chirality measure. We found that the index of chirality is higher in the passivated clusters and decreases with the cluster size. These results are consistent with the observed chiroptical activity recently reported for glutahione-passivated gold nanoclusters, and provide theoretical support for the existence of chirality in these novel compounds.

  9. Thin film solid-state reactions forming carbides as contact materials for carbon-containing semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroy, W. P.; Detavernier, C.; Van Meirhaeghe, R. L.; Lavoie, C.

    2007-03-01

    Metal carbides are good candidates to contact carbon-based semiconductors (SiC, diamond, and carbon nanotubes). Here, we report on an in situ study of carbide formation during the solid-state reaction between thin films. The solid-state reaction was examined between 11 transition metals (W, Mo, Fe, Cr, V, Nb, Mn, Ti, Ta, Zr, and Hf) and an amorphous carbon layer. Capping layers (C or TiN) of different thicknesses were applied to prevent oxidation. Carbide formation is evidenced for nine metals and the phases formed have been identified (for a temperature ranging from 100to1100°C). W first forms W2C and then WC; Mo forms Mo2C; Fe forms Fe3C; Cr first forms metastable phases Cr2C and Cr3C2-x, and finally forms Cr3C2; V forms VCx; Nb transforms into Nb2C followed by NbC; Ti forms TiC; Ta first forms Ta2C and then TaC; and Hf transforms into HfC. The activation energy for the formation of the various carbide phases has been obtained by in situ x-ray diffraction.

  10. Enantioselective silver nanoclusters: Preparation, characterization and photoluminescence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrag, Mostafa, E-mail: mostafafarrag@aun.edu.eg

    2016-09-01

    Herein, we report a new wet-synthesis method to separate some water-soluble chiral silver nanoclusters with high yield. The cluster material was obtained by the reduction of silver nitrate with NaBH{sub 4} in the presence of three ligands L-penicillamine (L-pen), D-penicillamine (D-pen) and racemic mixture of penicillamine (rac-pen), functioning as capping ligand. For characterizing all silver cluster samples, the particle size was assessed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and their average chemical formula was determined from thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and elemental analysis (EA). The particles sizes of all three clusters are 2.1 ± 0.2 nm. The optical properties of the samples were studied by four different methods: UV-vis spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL) and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. The spectra are dominated by the typical and intense plasmon peak at 486 nm accompanied by a small shoulder at 540 nm. Infrared spectroscopy was measured for the free ligand and protected silver nanoclusters, where the disappearance of the S-H vibrational band (2535–2570 cm{sup −1}) in the silver nanoclusters confirmed anchoring of ligand to the cluster surface through the sulfur atom. PL studies yielded the fluorescent properties of the samples. The main focus of this work, however, lies in the chirality of the particles. For all silver clusters CD spectra were recorded. While for clusters capped with one of the two enantiomers (D- or L-form) typical CD spectra were observed, no significant signals were detected for a racemic ligand mixture. Furthermore, silver clusters show quite large asymmetry factors (up to 3 × 10{sup −4}) in comparison to most other ligand protected clusters. These large factors and bands in the visible range of the spectrum suggest a strong chiral induction from the ligand to the metal core. Textural features of the

  11. Surface mediated assembly of small, metastable gold nanoclusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettibone, John M.; Osborn, William A.; Rykaczewski, Konrad; Talin, A. Alec; Bonevich, John E.; Hudgens, Jeffrey W.; Allendorf, Mark D.

    2013-06-01

    The unique properties of metallic nanoclusters are attractive for numerous commercial and industrial applications but are generally less stable than nanocrystals. Thus, developing methodologies for stabilizing nanoclusters and retaining their enhanced functionality is of great interest. We report the assembly of PPh3-protected Au9 clusters from a heterogeneous mixture into films consisting of sub 3 nm nanocluster assemblies. The depositing nanoclusters are metastable in solution, but the resulting nanocluster assemblies are stabilized indefinitely in air or fresh solvent. The films exhibit distinct structure from Au nanoparticles observed by X-ray diffraction, and film dissolution data support the preservation of small nanoclusters. UV-Vis spectroscopy, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and electron microscopy are used to elucidate information regarding the nanocluster formation and assembly mechanism. Preferential deposition of nanocluster assemblies can be achieved on multiple substrates, including polymer, Cr, Si, SiO2, SiNx, and metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). Unlike other vapor phase coating processes, nanocluster assembly on the MIL-68(In) MOF crystal is capable of preferentially coating the external surface and stabilizing the crystal structure in hydrothermal conditions, which should enhance their storage, separation and delivery capabilities.The unique properties of metallic nanoclusters are attractive for numerous commercial and industrial applications but are generally less stable than nanocrystals. Thus, developing methodologies for stabilizing nanoclusters and retaining their enhanced functionality is of great interest. We report the assembly of PPh3-protected Au9 clusters from a heterogeneous mixture into films consisting of sub 3 nm nanocluster assemblies. The depositing nanoclusters are metastable in solution, but the resulting nanocluster assemblies are stabilized indefinitely in air or fresh solvent. The

  12. Photophysical characterization of fluorescent metal nanoclusters sythesized using oligonucleotides, proteins and small reagent moleucles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeh, Hsin-chih [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jaswinder, Sharma K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martinez, Jennifer S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Werner, James H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Yoo, Hyojong [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    The size transition from bulk metals to insulating nanoparticles and eventually to single atoms passes through the relatively unexplored few-atom nanocluster region. With climensions close to the Fermi wavelength, these nanoclusters demonstrate molecule-like properties distinct from bulk metals or atoms, such as discrete and size-tunable electronic transitions which lead to photoluminescence. Current research aims to elucidate the fundamental photophysical properties of the existing metal nanoclusters made by different means and based on different encapsulation agents. Here, we report the study of the photophysical properties, including quantum yields, lifetimes, extinction coefficients, blinking dynamics and sizes, of silver and gold nanoclusters synthesized using oligonucleotides, a protein (bovine serum albumin) and a Good's buffer molecule (MES, 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid) as encapsulation agents. We also investigate the change of photoluminescence under varying conditions (time, temperature and salt). Furthermore, it is demonstrated here that fluorescent metal clusters can be used as a donor in forming resonance energy transfer pairs with a commercial organic quenching dye.

  13. Structure of the carbon nanofilaments formed by liquid phase carbonization in porous anodic alumina template

    OpenAIRE

    Habazaki, H.; Kiriu, M.; M. Hayashi; Konno, H.

    2007-01-01

    Platelet structure carbon nanofilaments of ~30 nm in diameter have been prepared by heating a mixture of porous anodic alumina template and poly(vinyl)chloride (PVC) powders in an argon atmosphere, and the change in their structure and morphology with heat treatment temperature, ranging from 600 to 2800 °C, has been examined using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and nitrogen gas adsorption measurements. The diameter of the ca...

  14. Silver nanoclusters emitting weak NIR fluorescence biomineralized by BSA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Baoshun; Li, Jianjun; Zhao, Junwu

    2015-01-01

    Noble metal (e.g., gold and silver) nanomaterials possess unique physical and chemical properties. In present work, silver nanoclusters (also known as silver quantum clusters or silver quantum dots) were synthesized by bovine serum albumin (BSA) biomineralization. The synthesized silver nanoclusters were characterized by UV-VIS absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, upconversion emission spectroscopy, TEM, HRTEM and FTIR spectroscopy. TEM results showed that the average size of the silver nanoclusters was 2.23 nm. Fluorescence results showed that these silver nanoclusters could emit weak near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence (the central emission wavelength being about 765 nm). And the central excitation wavelength was about 395 nm, in the UV spectral region. These silver nanoclusters showed an extraordinarily large gap (about 370 nm) between the central excitation wavelength and central emission wavelength. In addition, it was found that these silver nanoclusters possess upconversion emission property. Upconversion emission results showed that the upconversion emission spectrum of the silver nanoclusters agreed well with their normal fluorescence emission spectrum. The synthesized silver nanoclusters showed high stability in aqueous solution and it was considered that they might be confined in BSA molecules. It was found that silver nanoclusters might enhance and broaden the absorption of proteins, and the protein absorption peak showed an obvious red shift (being 7 nm) after the formation of silver nanoclusters.

  15. PHOTOOXIDATION OF ORGANIC WASTES USING SEMICONDUCTOR NANOCLUSTERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilcoxon, Jess P.

    2000-12-31

    It would be a major boon to have a visible light absorbing semiconductor catalytic material available, which is also photostable and non-toxic. Such a photocatalyst would make it possible to exploit sunlight as the sole energy source required for detoxification. To this end we have employed our expertise in nanocluster synthesis and processing to make and purify nanoparticles of MoS2. The band-gap and absorbance edges of these nanoparticles can be adjusted by particle size based upon the quantum confinement of the electron-hole pair. In a recent paper we demonstrated the use of these new photocatalysts to destroy phenol, and demonstrated a strong effect of size or band-gap on the rate of photo-oxidation.5 In this research we investigate the photooxidation kinetics and products formed for a standard material, Degussa P-25 TiO2, as compared to nanosize TiO2, SnO2, and MoS2. We examined the light intensity dependence for nanosize SnO2 compared to TiO2 (Degussa), and the effect o f size on photooxidation kinetics for both SnO2 and MoS2. We studied photooxidation in aqueous systems and, for the first time, a system consisting almost entirely of a polar organic, acetonitrile. Our primary objective was to develop an entirely new class of material: nanosize semiconductors with visible bandgaps and to engineer these material's properties to allow us to photooxidize toxic organic compounds in water on a reasonable time scale ({approx}8 hrs). A second objective was to study how certain material properties such as size, surface treatment, and material type affect the efficiency of the photocatalytic process as well as optimizing these features.

  16. The Nanocluster Trap endstation at BESSY II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Lau

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The Nanocluster Trap endstation at BESSY II combines a cryogenic linear radio-frequency ion trap with an applied magnetic field for x-ray magnetic circular dichroism studies of cold and size-selected trapped ions. Applications include atomic, molecular, and cluster ions as well as ionic complexes.

  17. Black carbon and other refractory forms in recent sediments from the Gulf of Cadiz, Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Vila, F. J.; de la Rosa, J. M.; González-Pérez, J. A.

    2009-01-01

    Black carbon (BC) produced by incomplete combustion of fossil fuels and vegetation is a ubiquitous form of refractory organic matter (ROM) widely distributed in the environment. The stable non-reactive, mainly aromatic, BC has received special interest in recent years as a possible carbon sink in soils and sediments. At present, several methods have been used, with applications for soil and sediments, although no single method has been accepted to detect BC forms, and therefore providing the analytical data required to estimate BC contribution to terrestrial and sedimentary carbon fluxes and the global carbon cycle. This study considers the potential of the combined use of analytical pyrolysis (Py-GC/MS) and solid state 13C NMR to determine the presence of BC and to characterize the refractory organic matter in a set of recent marine sediments from the Southwest Atlantic coast of Spain (Gulf of Cadiz). The content of BC-like material found in sediments (3.0 - 16.5 % of total organic carbon) was in the range previously reported for this kind of samples and decreases from coast to offshore. Solid state CP-MAS 13C NMR and Py-GC/MS analysis of the isolated ROM revealed a conspicuous aliphatic domain remained in the samples after chlorite oxidation. Our results suggests that, in recent sediments from fluvial and marine environments, not only BC and refractory carbon forms with aromatic nature may be sequestered in a stable form; it also seems probable that the ROM pool contains a significant amount of C immobilized in the form of alkylic compounds.

  18. Magnetic Ordering in Gold Nanoclusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agrachev, Mikhail; Antonello, Sabrina; Dainese, Tiziano; Ruzzi, Marco; Zoleo, Alfonso; Aprà, Edoardo; Govind, Niranjan; Fortunelli, Alessandro; Sementa, Luca; Maran, Flavio

    2017-06-12

    Several research groups have observed magnetism in monolayer-protected gold-cluster samples, but the results were often contradictory and thus a clear understanding of this phenomenon is still missing. We used Au25(SCH2CH2Ph)180, which is a paramagnetic cluster that can be prepared with atomic precision and whose structure is known precisely. Previous magnetometry studies only detected paramagnetism. We used samples representing a range of crystallographic orders and studied their magnetic behaviors by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). As a film, Au25(SCH2CH2Ph)180 displays paramagnetic behavior but, at low temperature, ferromagnetic interactions are detectable. One or few single crystals undergo physical reorientation with the applied field and display ferromagnetism, as detected through hysteresis experiments. A large collection of microcrystals is magnetic even at room temperature and shows distinct paramagnetic, superparamagnetic, and ferromagnetic behaviors. Simulation of the EPR spectra shows that both spin-orbit coupling and crystal distortion are important to determine the observed magnetic behaviors. DFT calculations carried out on single cluster and periodic models predict values of spin6orbit coupling and crystal6splitting effects in agreement with the EPR derived quantities. Magnetism in gold nanoclusters is thus demonstrated to be the outcome of a very delicate balance of factors. To obtain reproducible results, the samples must be (i) controlled for composition and thus be monodispersed with atomic precision, (ii) of known charge state, and (iii) well defined also in terms of crystallinity and experimental conditions. This study highlights the efficacy of EPR spectroscopy to provide a molecular understanding of these phenomena

  19. Membrane loop process for separating carbon dioxide for use in gaseous form from flue gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wijmans, Johannes G; Baker, Richard W; Merkel, Timothy C

    2016-09-06

    The invention is a process involving membrane-based gas separation for separating and recovering carbon dioxide emissions from combustion processes in partially concentrated form, and then transporting the carbon dioxide and using or storing it in a confined manner without concentrating it to high purity. The process of the invention involves building up the concentration of carbon dioxide in a gas flow loop between the combustion step and a membrane separation step. A portion of the carbon dioxide-enriched gas can then be withdrawn from this loop and transported, without the need to liquefy the gas or otherwise create a high-purity stream, to a destination where it is used or confined, preferably in an environmentally benign manner.

  20. Thermodynamic stability of ligand-protected metal nanoclusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Michael G.; Mpourmpakis, Giannis

    2017-01-01

    Despite the great advances in synthesis and structural determination of atomically precise, thiolate-protected metal nanoclusters, our understanding of the driving forces for their colloidal stabilization is very limited. Currently there is a lack of models able to describe the thermodynamic stability of these ‘magic-number’ colloidal nanoclusters as a function of their atomic-level structural characteristics. Herein, we introduce the thermodynamic stability theory, derived from first principles, which is able to address stability of thiolate-protected metal nanoclusters as a function of the number of metal core atoms and thiolates on the nanocluster shell. Surprisingly, we reveal a fine energy balance between the core cohesive energy and the shell-to-core binding energy that appears to drive nanocluster stabilization. Our theory applies to both charged and neutral systems and captures a large number of experimental observations. Importantly, it opens new avenues for accelerating the discovery of stable, atomically precise, colloidal metal nanoclusters. PMID:28685777

  1. Metal/Metal-Oxide Nanoclusters for Gas Sensor Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad I. Ayesh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of gas sensors that are based on metal/metal-oxide nanoclusters has attracted intensive research interest in the last years. Nanoclusters are suitable candidates for gas sensor applications because of their large surface-to-volume ratio that can be utilized for selective and rapid detection of various gaseous species with low-power consuming electronics. Herein, nanoclusters are used as building blocks for the construction of gas sensor where the electrical conductivity of the nanoclusters changes dramatically upon exposure to the target gas. In this review, recent progress in the fabrication of size-selected metallic nanoclusters and their utilization for gas sensor applications is presented. Special focus will be given to the enhancement of the sensing performance through the rational functionalization and utilization of different nanocluster materials.

  2. Thermodynamic stability of ligand-protected metal nanoclusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Michael G.; Mpourmpakis, Giannis

    2017-07-01

    Despite the great advances in synthesis and structural determination of atomically precise, thiolate-protected metal nanoclusters, our understanding of the driving forces for their colloidal stabilization is very limited. Currently there is a lack of models able to describe the thermodynamic stability of these `magic-number' colloidal nanoclusters as a function of their atomic-level structural characteristics. Herein, we introduce the thermodynamic stability theory, derived from first principles, which is able to address stability of thiolate-protected metal nanoclusters as a function of the number of metal core atoms and thiolates on the nanocluster shell. Surprisingly, we reveal a fine energy balance between the core cohesive energy and the shell-to-core binding energy that appears to drive nanocluster stabilization. Our theory applies to both charged and neutral systems and captures a large number of experimental observations. Importantly, it opens new avenues for accelerating the discovery of stable, atomically precise, colloidal metal nanoclusters.

  3. Enzymatic carbon-carbon bond-forming Michael-type additions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geertsema, Edzard; Poelarends, Gerrit; Faber, Kurt; Fessner, Wolf-Dieter; Turner, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    This chapter gives an overview of practical biocatalytic procedures for C-C bond-forming Michael(-type) additions suitable for organic synthesis purposes. Reported product yields, workup and isolation methods, stereoselectivity, and availability of the applied enzymes are assessed. All methodologies

  4. Metal/Metal-Oxide Nanoclusters for Gas Sensor Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Ayesh, Ahmad I.

    2016-01-01

    The development of gas sensors that are based on metal/metal-oxide nanoclusters has attracted intensive research interest in the last years. Nanoclusters are suitable candidates for gas sensor applications because of their large surface-to-volume ratio that can be utilized for selective and rapid detection of various gaseous species with low-power consuming electronics. Herein, nanoclusters are used as building blocks for the construction of gas sensor where the electrical conductivity of the...

  5. Remarkable effect of bimetallic nanocluster catalysts for aerobic oxidation of alcohols: combining metals changes the activities and the reaction pathways to aldehydes/carboxylic acids or esters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaizuka, Kosuke; Miyamura, Hiroyuki; Kobayashi, Shū

    2010-11-01

    Selective oxidation of alcohols catalyzed by novel carbon-stabilized polymer-incarcerated bimetallic nanocluster catalysts using molecular oxygen has been developed. The reactivity and the selectivity were strongly dependent on the combination of metals and solvent systems; aldehydes and ketones were obtained by the gold/platinum catalyst in benzotrifluoride, and esters were formed by the gold/palladium catalyst in methanol. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first example that the reaction pathway has been changed dramatically in gold catalysis by combining with a second metal. The differences in the activity and the selectivity are considered to be derived from the difference in the structure of the bimetallic clusters.

  6. One-dimensional nanoclustering of the Cu(100) surface under CO gas in the mbar pressure range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eren, Baran; Zherebetskyy, Danylo; Hao, Yibo; Patera, Laerte L.; Wang, Lin-Wang; Somorjai, Gabor A.; Salmeron, Miquel

    2016-09-01

    The bulk terminated Cu(100) surface becomes unstable in the presence of CO at room temperature when the pressure reaches the mbar range. Scanning tunneling microscopy images show that above 0.25 mbar the surface forms nanoclusters with CO attached to peripheral Cu atoms. At 20 mbar and above 3-atom wide one-dimensional nanoclusters parallel to directions cover the surface, with CO on every Cu atom, increasing in density up to 115 mbar. Density functional theory explains the findings as a result of the detachment of Cu atoms from step edges caused by the stronger binding of CO relative to that on flat terraces.

  7. DNA-Templated Silver Nanoclusters Formation at Gold Electrode Surface and Its Application to Hydrogen Peroxide Detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许媛媛; 陈阳阳; 杨娜娜; 孙丽洲; 李根喜

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we have prepared Ag nanoclusters (Ag NCs) at gold electrode surface by using thiol-modified oligodeoxynucleotide consisting of eighteen cytosine deoxyribonucleotides (polyC18) as template and NaBH4 as reducing agent. Experimental results show that Ag nanoclusters (Ag NCs) can be formed around the template polyC18, while the formation can be characterized with electrochemical method. Further studies reveal that the fab- ricated Ag NCs may display high catalytic activity for the reduction of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), which can be further used for the detection of H20〉

  8. Using metal nanostructures to form hydrocarbons from carbon dioxide, water and sunlight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cong; Shen, Mengyan; Huo, Haibin; Ren, Haizhou; Johnson, Michael

    2011-12-01

    Based on experimental results, we propose a mechanism that allows the use of metal nanostructures to synthesize hydrocarbons and carbohydrates from carbon dioxide, water and sunlight. When sunlight impinges on cobalt nanostructures in a glass chamber, its intensity is greatly enhanced around the tips of the nanostructures through surface plasmon excitations focusing effect, and it then photodissociates the water and carbon dioxide molecules through enhanced photon absorptions of ions around the tips of the nanostructures. The photodissociated molecules in excited states remain on the cobalt nanostructure surfaces and various hydrocarbons and carbohydrates then will be formed around the surfaces at temperatures much lower than 100 oC.

  9. Porous titania/carbon hybrid microspheres templated by in situ formed polystyrene colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ting; Zhang, Guoqiang; Xia, Yonggao; Sun, Zaicheng; Yang, Zhaohui; Liu, Rui; Xiao, Ying; Wang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Meimei; Ban, Jianzhen; Yang, Liangtao; Ji, Qing; Qiu, Bao; Chen, Guoxin; Chen, Huifeng; Lin, Yichao; Pei, Xiaoying; Wu, Qiang; Meng, Jian-Qiang; Liu, Zhaoping; Chen, Liang; Xiao, Tonghu; Sun, Ling-Dong; Yan, Chun-Hua; Butt, Hans Jürgen; Cheng, Ya-Jun

    2016-05-01

    A new strategy to synthesize hierarchical, porous titania/carbon (TiO2/C) hybrid microspheres via solvothermal reaction in N,N'-dimethyl formamide (DMF) has been developed. In situ formed polystyrene (PS) colloids have been used as templating agent and carbon source, through which TiO2/PS microspheres with a diameter of ca. 1 μm are built by packed TiO2 nanoparticles of tens of nanometers. The TiO2/PS microspheres are converted to TiO2/C microspheres with different amounts of carbon under controlled calcination condition. The mechanism investigation unveils that the introduction of concentrated HCl creates surface tension between PS and DMF, leading to the formation of PS colloids in solution. The solvothermal treatment further promotes the formation of PS colloids and integration of the titania nanoparticles within the PS colloids. The morphology, crystallinity, nature and content of carbon, UV-Vis absorption, carbon doping, pore size distribution, pore volume, and BET surface area of the TiO2 microspheres with different amounts of carbon have been measured. The applications of the TiO2/C hybrid microspheres as photo catalyst for water splitting and lithium-ion battery anode have been demonstrated. Superior photo catalytic activity for hydrogen conversion under both full spectrum and visible light illumination compared to commercial P25 has been observed for the TiO2/C microspheres with 2 wt% of carbon. Besides, the TiO2/C microspheres with 8 wt% of carbon as lithium-ion battery anode showed a much higher capacity than the bare TiO2 microsphere anode. The origin for the enhanced performance as photo catalyst and lithium-ion battery anode is discussed.

  10. Regulation of EGFR nanocluster formation by ionic protein-lipid interaction

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The abnormal activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is strongly associated with a variety of human cancers but the underlying molecular mechanism is not fully understood. By using direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM), we find that EGFR proteins form nanoclusters in the cell membrane of both normal lung epithelial cells and lung cancer cells, but the number and size of clusters significantly increase in lung cancer cells. The formation of EGFR clusters is...

  11. Influence of changing carbonate chemistry on morphology and weight of coccoliths formed by Emiliania huxleyi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. G. Schulz

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi is a marine phytoplankton species capable of forming small calcium carbonate scales (coccoliths which cover the organic part of the cell. Calcification rates of E. huxleyi are known to be sensitive to changes in seawater carbonate chemistry. It is, however, not yet understood how these changes are reflected in the morphology of coccoliths. Here, we compare data on coccolith size, weight, and malformation from a~set of five experiments with a large diversity of carbonate chemistry conditions. This diversity allows distinguishing the influence of individual carbonate chemistry parameters such as carbon dioxide (CO2, bicarbonate (HCO3−, carbonate (CO32−, and protons (H+ on the measured parameters. Measurements of fine-scale morphological structures reveal an increase of coccolith malformation with decreasing pH suggesting that H+ is the major factor causing malformations. Coccolith distal shield area varies from about 5 to 11 μm2. Changes in size seem to be mainly induced by varying [HCO3−] and [H+] although influence of [CO32−] cannot be entirely ruled out. Changes in coccolith weight were proportional to changes in size. Increasing CaCO3 production rates are reflected in an increase in coccolith weight and an increase of the number of coccoliths formed per unit time. The combined investigation of morphological features and coccolith production rates presented in this study may help to interpret data derived from sediment cores, where coccolith morphology is used to reconstruct calcification rates in the water column.

  12. Interaction of size-selected gold nanoclusters with dopamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montone, Georgia R.; Hermann, Eric; Kandalam, Anil K.

    2016-12-01

    We present density functional theory based results on the interaction of size-selected gold nanoclusters, Au10 and Au20, with dopamine molecule. The gold clusters interact strongly with the nitrogen site of dopamine, thereby forming stable gold-dopamine complexes. Our calculations further show that there is no site specificity on the planar Au10 cluster with all the edge gold atoms equally preferred. On the other hand, in the pyramidal Au20 cluster, the vertex metal atom is the most active site. As the size increased from Au10 to Au20, the interaction strength has shown a declining trend. The effect of aqueous environment on the interaction strengths were also studied by solvation model. It is found that the presence of solvent water stabilizes the interaction between the metal cluster and dopamine molecule, even though for Au10 cluster the energy ordering of the isomers changed from that of the gas-phase.

  13. A Multi-line Study of Atomic Carbon and Carbon Monoxide in the Galactic Star- forming Region W3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakob, H.; Kramer, C.; Mookerjea, B.; Jeyakumar, S.; Stutzki, J.

    We present results from simultaneous observations of the fine structure line emissions of neutral carbon (C I) at 492 and 809 GHz from selected Galactic star forming regions. These observations include the first results using the the newly installed SMART (SubmilliMeter Array Receiver at Two wavelengths) on KOSMA. The regions observed were selected in order to cover a range of strengths of the incident UV radiation from the exciting star/stars and also densities of the interstellar medium. Extended maps of C I emission from massive star forming regions including W3, S106 and Orion BN/KL have been observed. Simultaneous observation of the two C I lines ensures better relative calibration. The results from these observations will be combined with observed intensities of low-J and mid-J CO and C+ lines and analyzed using radiation transfer based models for Photon Dominated Regions (PDRs).

  14. Improving the Stability of Fluorescent Silver Nanoclusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Nicholas; Stanko, Danielle; Campbell, Ian; Wittmershaus, Bruce

    The quantum mechanical nature of noble metal nanoparticles results in them having optical properties much different from the bulk metal. Silver nanoclusters (AgNC), groups of 4 to 20 atoms, are characterized by strong optical transitions in the visible part of the spectrum giving them an appearance like fluorescent organic dyes. These nanoclusters can also have fluorescence quantum yields over 90%. Following the analysis of published results of DNA templated nanoclusters, we created a procedure for synthesizing AgNC. The AgNC have a high fluorescence quantum yield but degrade with a lifetime of only a few days when in solution at room temperature. Our goal in this study was to increase the stability of the AgNC towards improving their value as a fluorescent material in various applications, such as luminescent solar concentrators. To increase their stability, we've chosen to modify our procedure by removing oxygen from the solution after the sample has reacted. Oxygen removal caused a significant increase in the stability of the clusters over a given period of time. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant Number NSF-ECCS-1306157.

  15. Multifunctional nanocomposites of carbon nanotubes and nanoparticles formed via vacuum filtration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hersam, Mark C; Ostojic, Gordana; Liang, Yu Teng

    2013-10-22

    In one aspect, the present invention provides a method of forming a film of nanocomposites of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and platinum (Pt) nanoparticles. In one embodiment, the method includes the steps of (a) providing a first solution that contains a plurality of CNTs, (b) providing a second solution that contains a plurality of Pt nanoparticles, (c) combining the first solution and the second solution to form a third solution, and (d) filtering the third solution through a nanoporous membrane using vacuum filtration to obtain a film of nanocomposites of CNTs and Pt nanoparticles.

  16. Death in the "microwave oven": A form of execution by carbonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durão, Carlos; Machado, Marcos P; Daruge Júnior, Eduardo

    2015-08-01

    Death in the "microwave oven" has nothing to do with microwaves energy. It is the jargon name given to a criminal form of execution by carbonization that has been adopted by drug dealers in Rio de Janeiro (Brazil). The goal is to torture and intimidate victims, in an attempt of corpse occultation and to make identification harder or impossible. This paper brings to attention of the forensic international community an unusual and very cruel form of execution as a way to document these situations.

  17. Formation of solid Kr nanoclusters in MgO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Huis, MA; van Veen, A; Schut, H; Kooi, BJ; De Hosson, JTM

    2003-01-01

    The phenomenon of positron confinement enables us to investigate the electronic structure of nanoclusters embedded in host matrices. Solid Kr nanoclusters are a very interesting subject of investigation because of the very low predicted value of the positron affinity of bulk Kr. In this work,

  18. Synthesis and characterization of mixed ligand chiral nanoclusters

    KAUST Repository

    Guven, Zekiye P.

    2016-06-22

    Chiral mixed ligand silver nanoclusters were synthesized in the presence of a chiral and an achiral ligand. While the chiral ligand led mostly to the formation of nanoparticles, the presence of the achiral ligand drastically increased the yield of nanoclusters with enhanced chiral properties. © 2016 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  19. Molecular interactions in particular Van der Waals nanoclusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jungclas, Hartmut; Schmidt, Lothar [Marburg Univ. (Germany). Chemistry Dept.; Komarov, Viacheslav V.; Popova, Anna M. [Marburg Univ. (Germany). Chemistry Dept.; Lomonosov Moscow State Univ. (Russian Federation). Skobeltzin Inst. of Nuclear Physics

    2017-04-01

    A method is presented to analyse the interaction energies in a nanocluster, which is consisting of three neutral molecules bound by non-covalent long range Van der Waals forces. One of the molecules (M{sub 0}) in the nanocluster has a permanent dipole moment, whereas the two other molecules (M{sub 1} and M{sub 2}) are non-polar. Analytical expressions are obtained for the numerical calculation of the dispersion and induction energies of the molecules in the considered nanocluster. The repulsive forces at short intermolecular distances are taken into account by introduction of damping functions. Dispersion and induction energies are calculated for a nanocluster with a definite geometry, in which the polar molecule M{sub 0} is a linear hydrocarbon molecule C{sub 5}H{sub 10} and M{sub 1} and M{sub 2} are pyrene molecules. The calculations are done for fixed distances between the two pyrene molecules. The results show that the induction energies in the considered three-molecular nanocluster are comparable with the dispersion energies. Furthermore, the sum of induction energies in the substructure (M{sub 0}, M{sub 1}) of the considered nanocluster is much higher than the sum of induction energies in a two-molecular nanocluster with similar molecules (M{sub 0}, M{sub 1}) because of the absence of an electrostatic field in the latter case. This effect can be explained by the essential intermolecular induction in the three-molecular nanocluster.

  20. Passivation of cobalt nanocluster assembled thin films with hydrogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Romero, C.P.; Volodin, A.; Di Vece, M.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of hydrogen passivation on bare and Pd capped cobalt nanocluster assembled thin films was studied with Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and magnetic force microscopy (MFM) after exposure to ambient conditions. The nanoclusters are produced in a laser vaporization cluster...

  1. Differential effects of ocean acidification on carbon acquisition in two bloom-forming dinoflagellate species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberlein, Tim; Van de Waal, Dedmer B; Rost, Björn

    2014-08-01

    Dinoflagellates represent a cosmopolitan group of phytoplankton with the ability to form harmful algal blooms. Featuring a Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO) with very low CO2 affinities, photosynthesis of this group may be particularly prone to carbon limitation and thus benefit from rising atmospheric CO2 partial pressure (pCO2) under ocean acidification (OA). Here, we investigated the consequences of OA on two bloom-forming dinoflagellate species, the calcareous Scrippsiella trochoidea and the toxic Alexandrium tamarense. Using dilute batch incubations, we assessed growth characteristics over a range of pCO2 (i.e. 180-1200 µatm). To understand the underlying physiology, several aspects of inorganic carbon acquisition were investigated by membrane-inlet mass spectrometry. Our results show that both species kept growth rates constant over the tested pCO2 range, but we observed a number of species-specific responses. For instance, biomass production and cell size decreased in S. trochoidea, while A. tamarense was not responsive to OA in these measures. In terms of oxygen fluxes, rates of photosynthesis and respiration remained unaltered in S. trochoidea whereas respiration increased in A. tamarense under OA. Both species featured efficient carbon concentrating mechanisms (CCMs) with a CO2-dependent contribution of HCO3(-) uptake. In S. trochoidea, the CCM was further facilitated by exceptionally high and CO2-independent carbonic anhydrase activity. Comparing both species, a general trade-off between maximum rates of photosynthesis and respective affinities is indicated. In conclusion, our results demonstrate effective CCMs in both species, yet very different strategies to adjust their carbon acquisition. This regulation in CCMs enables both species to maintain growth over a wide range of ecologically relevant pCO2 .

  2. Method for producing bio-fuel that integrates heat from carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions to drive biomass gasification reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortright, Randy D.; Dumesic, James A.

    2011-01-18

    A low-temperature catalytic process for converting biomass (preferably glycerol recovered from the fabrication of bio-diesel) to synthesis gas (i.e., H.sub.2/CO gas mixture) in an endothermic gasification reaction is described. The synthesis gas is used in exothermic carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions, such as Fischer-Tropsch, methanol, or dimethylether syntheses. The heat from the exothermic carbon-carbon bond-forming reaction is integrated with the endothermic gasification reaction, thus providing an energy-efficient route for producing fuels and chemicals from renewable biomass resources.

  3. Method for producing bio-fuel that integrates heat from carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions to drive biomass gasification reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortright, Randy D [Madison, WI; Dumesic, James A [Verona, WI

    2012-04-10

    A low-temperature catalytic process for converting biomass (preferably glycerol recovered from the fabrication of bio-diesel) to synthesis gas (i.e., H.sub.2/CO gas mixture) in an endothermic gasification reaction is described. The synthesis gas is used in exothermic carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions, such as Fischer-Tropsch, methanol, or dimethylether syntheses. The heat from the exothermic carbon-carbon bond-forming reaction is integrated with the endothermic gasification reaction, thus providing an energy-efficient route for producing fuels and chemicals from renewable biomass resources.

  4. Argon Nanoclusters with Fivefold Symmetry in Supersonic Gas Jets and Superfluid Helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danylchenko, O. G.; Boltnev, R. E.; Khmelenko, V. V.; Kiryukhin, V.; Konotop, O. P.; Lee, D. M.; Krainyukova, N. V.

    2017-04-01

    In this study argon nanoclusters (800 to ˜ 6500 atoms) formed in supersonic gas jets are compared to the nanoclusters stabilized in superfluid helium. High-energy electron and X-ray diffraction methods are utilized. Both techniques allow investigation of isolated clusters. It is shown that the theoretical prediction of the so-called multiply twinned particles with fivefold symmetry, such as icosahedra (ico) and decahedra (dec) is valid in the investigated cluster size interval. Around the point of the expected ico-to-dec size-dependent transformation at a cluster size of ˜ 2000 atoms, hexagonal ico and the statistical distribution of structures with a tendency for dec to replace ico are observed. Kinetic reasons, as well as temperature-related effects, could be responsible for the latter observations.

  5. Observation of gold sub-nanocluster nucleation within a crystalline protein cage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, Basudev; Abe, Satoshi; Ueno, Takafumi

    2017-03-01

    Protein scaffolds provide unique metal coordination environments that promote biomineralization processes. It is expected that protein scaffolds can be developed to prepare inorganic nanomaterials with important biomedical and material applications. Despite many promising applications, it remains challenging to elucidate the detailed mechanisms of formation of metal nanoparticles in protein environments. In the present work, we describe a crystalline protein cage constructed by crosslinking treatment of a single crystal of apo-ferritin for structural characterization of the formation of sub-nanocluster with reduction reaction. The crystal structure analysis shows the gradual movement of the Au ions towards the centre of the three-fold symmetric channels of the protein cage to form a sub-nanocluster with accompanying significant conformational changes of the amino-acid residues bound to Au ions during the process. These results contribute to our understanding of metal core formation as well as interactions of the metal core with the protein environment.

  6. Formation of aligned CrN nanoclusters in Cr-delta-doped GaN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Y K; Kimura, S; Emura, S; Hasegawa, S; Asahi, H [Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research, Osaka University, 8-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan)], E-mail: zhou21@sanken.osaka-u.ac.jp

    2009-02-11

    Cr-delta-doped GaN layers were grown by radio-frequency plasma-assisted molecular-beam epitaxy on GaN template substrates. Cr flux was supplied without nitrogen flow during Cr-delta-doping. Cr incorporation into a narrow thin layer region was confirmed with the depth profile measured by secondary ion mass spectrometry. Structural properties and Cr atom alignments were studied with transmission electron microscopy. It was found that Cr-delta-doped GaN layers were coherently grown with Cr or CrGa nanoclusters in the delta-doped region for low temperature growth (350, 500 deg. C). It was also found that aligned CrN nanoclusters (approximately 5 nm vertical thickness) with NaCl-type structure were formed in the delta-doped region for the growth at 700 deg. C.

  7. Observation of gold sub-nanocluster nucleation within a crystalline protein cage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, Basudev; Abe, Satoshi; Ueno, Takafumi

    2017-01-01

    Protein scaffolds provide unique metal coordination environments that promote biomineralization processes. It is expected that protein scaffolds can be developed to prepare inorganic nanomaterials with important biomedical and material applications. Despite many promising applications, it remains challenging to elucidate the detailed mechanisms of formation of metal nanoparticles in protein environments. In the present work, we describe a crystalline protein cage constructed by crosslinking treatment of a single crystal of apo-ferritin for structural characterization of the formation of sub-nanocluster with reduction reaction. The crystal structure analysis shows the gradual movement of the Au ions towards the centre of the three-fold symmetric channels of the protein cage to form a sub-nanocluster with accompanying significant conformational changes of the amino-acid residues bound to Au ions during the process. These results contribute to our understanding of metal core formation as well as interactions of the metal core with the protein environment. PMID:28300064

  8. Calcium Carbonate Storage in Amorphous Form and Its Template-Induced Crystallization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, T Y; Aizenberg, J

    2007-08-31

    Calcium carbonate crystallization in organisms often occurs through the transformation from the amorphous precursor. It is believed that the amorphous phase could be temporarily stabilized and stored, until its templated transition to the crystalline form is induced. Here we develop a bio-inspired crystallization strategy that is based on the above mechanism. Amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) spherulitic particles are formed and stabilized on a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of hydroxy-terminated alkanethiols on Au surface. The ACC is stored as a reservoir for ions and is induced to crystallize on command by introducing a secondary surface that is functionalized with carboxylic acid-terminated SAM. This secondary surface acts as a template for oriented and patterned nucleation. Various oriented crystalline arrays and micropatterned films are formed. We also show that the ACC phase can be doped with foreign ions (e.g. Mg) and organic molecules (e.g. dyes) and that these dopants later function as growth modifiers of calcite crystals and become incorporated into the crystals during the transformation process of ACC to calcite. We believe that our strategy opens the way of using a stabilized amorphous phase as a versatile reservoir system that can be converted in a highly controlled fashion to a crystalline form upon contacting the nucleating template.

  9. Influence of the Tussock Growth Form on Arctic Ecosystem Carbon Stocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curasi, S.; Rocha, A. V.; Sonnentag, O.; Wullschleger, S. D.; Myers-Smith, I. H.; Fetcher, N.; Mack, M. C.; Natali, S.; Loranty, M. M.; Parker, T.

    2015-12-01

    The influence of plant growth forms on ecosystem carbon (C) cycling has been under appreciated. In arctic tundra, environmental factors and plant traits of the sedge Eriophorum vaginatum cause the formation of mounds that are dense amalgamations of belowground C called tussocks. Tussocks have important implications for arctic ecosystem biogeochemistry and C stocks, but the environmental and biological factors controlling their size and distribution across the landscape are poorly understood. In order to better understand how landscape variation in tussock size and density impact ecosystem C stocks, we formed the Carbon in Arctic Tussock Tundra (CATT) network and recruited an international team to sample locations across the arctic. The CATT network provided a latitudinal and longitudinal gradient along which to improve our understanding of tussocks' influence on ecosystem structure and function. CATT data revealed important insights into tussock formation across the arctic. Tussock density generally declined with latitude, and tussock size exhibited substantial variation across sites. The relationship between height and diameter was similar across CATT sites indicating that both biological and environmental factors control tussock formation. At some sites, C in tussocks comprised a substantial percentage of ecosystem C stocks that may be vulnerable to climate change. It is concluded that the loss of this growth form would offset C gains from projected plant functional shifts from graminoid to shrub tundra. This work highlights the role of plant growth forms on the magnitude and retention of ecosystem C stocks.

  10. Carbon enters silica forming a cristobalite-type CO2-SiO2 solid solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Mario; Gorelli, Federico A.; Bini, Roberto; Salamat, Ashkan; Garbarino, Gaston; Levelut, Claire; Cambon, Olivier; Haines, Julien

    2014-04-01

    Extreme conditions permit unique materials to be synthesized and can significantly update our view of the periodic table. In the case of group IV elements, carbon was always considered to be distinct with respect to its heavier homologues in forming oxides. Here we report the synthesis of a crystalline CO2-SiO2 solid solution by reacting carbon dioxide and silica in a laser-heated diamond anvil cell (P=16-22 GPa, T>4,000 K), showing that carbon enters silica. Remarkably, this material is recovered to ambient conditions. X-ray diffraction shows that the crystal adopts a densely packed α-cristobalite structure (P41212) with carbon and silicon in fourfold coordination to oxygen at pressures where silica normally adopts a sixfold coordinated rutile-type stishovite structure. An average formula of C0.6(1)Si0.4(1)O2 is consistent with X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy results. These findings may modify our view on oxide chemistry, which is of great interest for materials science, as well as Earth and planetary sciences.

  11. Selective Uptake of Alkaline Earth Metals by Cyanobacteria Forming Intracellular Carbonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cam, Nithavong; Benzerara, Karim; Georgelin, Thomas; Jaber, Maguy; Lambert, Jean-François; Poinsot, Mélanie; Skouri-Panet, Fériel; Cordier, Laure

    2016-11-01

    The uptakes of calcium (Ca), strontium (Sr), and barium (Ba) by two cyanobacterial strains, Cyanothece sp. PCC7425 and Gloeomargarita lithophora, both forming intracellular carbonates, were investigated in laboratory cultures. In the culture medium BG-11 amended with 250 μM Ca and 50 or 250 μM Sr and Ba, G. lithophora accumulated first Ba, then Sr, and finally Ca. Sr and Ba were completely accumulated by G. lithophora cells at rates between 0.02 and 0.10 fmol h(-1) cell(-1) and down to extracellular concentrations below the detection limits of inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy. Accumulation of Sr and Ba did not affect the growth rate of the strain. This sequential accumulation occurred mostly intracellularly within polyphosphate and carbonate granules and resulted in the formation of core-shell structures in carbonates. In contrast, Cyanothece sp. PCC7425 showed neither a preferential accumulation of heavier alkaline earth metals nor core-shell structures in the carbonates. This indicated that fractionation between alkaline earth metals was not inherent to intracellularly calcifying cyanobacteria but was likely a genetically based trait of G. lithophora. Overall, the capability of G. lithophora to sequester preferentially Sr and Ba at high rates may be of considerable interest for designing new remediation strategies and better understanding the geochemical cycles of these elements.

  12. Carbon enters silica forming a cristobalite-type CO2-SiO2 solid solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Mario; Gorelli, Federico A; Bini, Roberto; Salamat, Ashkan; Garbarino, Gaston; Levelut, Claire; Cambon, Olivier; Haines, Julien

    2014-04-30

    Extreme conditions permit unique materials to be synthesized and can significantly update our view of the periodic table. In the case of group IV elements, carbon was always considered to be distinct with respect to its heavier homologues in forming oxides. Here we report the synthesis of a crystalline CO2-SiO2 solid solution by reacting carbon dioxide and silica in a laser-heated diamond anvil cell (P = 16-22 GPa, T>4,000 K), showing that carbon enters silica. Remarkably, this material is recovered to ambient conditions. X-ray diffraction shows that the crystal adopts a densely packed α-cristobalite structure (P4(1)2(1)2) with carbon and silicon in fourfold coordination to oxygen at pressures where silica normally adopts a sixfold coordinated rutile-type stishovite structure. An average formula of C0.6(1)Si0.4(1)O2 is consistent with X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy results. These findings may modify our view on oxide chemistry, which is of great interest for materials science, as well as Earth and planetary sciences.

  13. Photocatalytic reduction of CO2 by CuxO nanocluster loaded SrTiO3 nanorod thin film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoji, Shusaku; Yin, Ge; Nishikawa, Masami; Atarashi, Daiki; Sakai, Etsuo; Miyauchi, Masahiro

    2016-08-01

    Photocatalytic carbon dioxide (CO2) conversion into carbon monoxide (CO) using H2O as an electron donor was achieved by the strontium titanate (SrTiO3: STO) nanorod thin films loaded with amorphous copper oxide (CuxO) nanoclusters. The loading of the CuxO-cocatalysts onto STO nanorods clearly improved the photocatalytic activity compared to bare STO nanorods. The CuxO-cocatalysts are composed of abundant and non-toxic elements, and can be loaded by using a simple and economical method. Our findings demonstrate that CuxO nanoclusters function as a general cocatalyst and can be used in combination with various semiconductors to construct low-cost and efficient photocatalytic CO2 reduction systems.

  14. Influence of carbonization conditions on micro-pore structure of foundry formed coke produced with char

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jun Qiao; Jianjun Wu; Jingru Zu; Zhiyuan Gao; Guoli Zhou

    2009-07-01

    There are few studies on coke's micro-pore structure in recent years, however, micro-pore structure of foundry coke determines its macroscopically quality index and reactivity in cupola furnace. Effect of such factors on micro-pore structure were investigated under different carbonization conditions with certain ratio of raw materials and material forming process in this article as charging temperature (A); braised furnace time (B); heating rate of the first stage (C)and the second stage (D) and holding time of ultimate temperature (E). Research showed that charging temperature was the most influential factor on the coke porosity, pore volume, pore size and specific surface area. It is suggested that formation of plastic mass and releasing rate of volatile during carbonization period are two main factors on microstructure of foundry coke while charging temperature contributes most to the above factors. 6 refs., 4 figs., 9 tabs.

  15. Dispersion and film-forming properties of poly(acrylic acid)-stabilized carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saint-Aubin, Karell; Poulin, Philippe; Saadaoui, Hassan; Maugey, Maryse; Zakri, Cécile

    2009-11-17

    We present a detailed study of the influence of pH on the dispersion and film-forming properties of poly(acrylic acid)-stabilized carbon nanotubes. Poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) is a weak polyelectrolyte, with a pH-responsive behavior in aqueous solution. We obtain quantitative UV-visible measurements to show that the amount of polyelectrolyte in optimal pH conditions is weak, showing a good efficiency of the polymer as a carbon nanotube dispersing agent. The best dispersion conditions are achieved at pH 5, a value close to the pK(a) of PAA. Apart from this tenuous pH value, the PAA is not efficient at stabilizing nanotubes and atomic force microscopy allows us to explain the delicate balance between the PAA adsorption and the suspension stability. This study finally permits optimal conditions for making homogeneous and conductive composite films to be determined.

  16. From atoms to minerals: how calcium carbonates form and why we should care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diego Rodriguez-Blanco, Juan

    2017-04-01

    Calcium carbonate minerals are ubiquitous on Earth where they play a key role in many marine and terrestrial biomineralization processes, controlling the evolution of past and future ocean chemistry and a large part of the global carbon cycle. However, the mechanisms by which biominerals form and transform are not well understood because these processes frequently involve the formation of poorly-ordered and crystalline metastable phases (e.g., amorphous calcium carbonate, vaterite, monohydrocalcite). Furthermore, the degree of ordering, hydration and particle size of these phases and their crystallisation pathways are largely controlled by their origin and conditions of formation. These include a number of factors like temperature, pH, and concentration of foreign ions in solution (e.g., Mg2+, Sr2+, SO42-, organics, etc.). Over the last few years, new experimental and characterization approaches have been developed, combining classical characterization techniques with synchrotron-based methods that allow in situ and real-time monitoring of the reactions (e.g., time-resolved synchrotron-based scattering and diffraction, pair distribution function). These techniques have provided very useful data to attain the mechanisms and quantify the kinetics of crystallization in abiotic systems. I will present a series of results obtained from synchrotron- and lab-based experiments that shed light on the mechanisms of formation of a number of biominerals (e.g., vaterite, calcite, aragonite, monohydrocalcite, dolomite). These results provide a detailed understanding of how calcium carbonate phases form during biomineralization processes, the effects of seawater ions and organics during the formation and transformation of biominerals, and the implications for past and future ocean chemistry, CO2 capture and storage and industrial mineral synthesis.

  17. In situ formed lithium sulfide/microporous carbon cathodes for lithium-ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Shiyou; Chen, Yvonne; Xu, Yunhua; Yi, Feng; Zhu, Yujie; Liu, Yihang; Yang, Junhe; Wang, Chunsheng

    2013-12-23

    Highly stable sulfur/microporous carbon (S/MC) composites are prepared by vacuum infusion of sulfur vapor into microporous carbon at 600 °C, and lithium sulfide/microporous carbon (Li2S/MC) cathodes are fabricated via a novel and facile in situ lithiation strategy, i.e., spraying commercial stabilized lithium metal powder (SLMP) onto a prepared S/MC film cathode prior to the routine compressing process in cell assembly. The in situ formed Li2S/MC film cathode shows high Coulombic efficiency and long cycling stability in a conventional commercial Li-ion battery electrolyte (1.0 M LiPF6 + EC/DEC (1:1 v/v)). The reversible capacities of Li2S/MC cathodes remain about 650 mAh/g even after 900 charge/discharge cycles, and the Coulombic efficiency is close to 100% at a current density of 0.1C, which demonstrates the best electrochemical performance of Li2S/MC cathodes reported to date. Furthermore, this Li2S/MC film cathode fabricated via our in situ lithiation strategy can be coupled with a Li-free anode, such as graphite, carbon/tin alloys, or Si nanowires to form a rechargeable Li-ion cell. As the Li2S/MC cathode is paired with a commercial graphite anode, the full cell of Li2S/MC-graphite (Li2S-G) shows a stable capacity of around 600 mAh/g in 150 cycles. The Li2S/MC cathodes prepared by high-temperate sulfur infusion and SLMP prelithiation before cell assembly are ready to fit into current Li-ion batteries manufacturing processes and will pave the way to commercialize low-cost Li2S-G Li-ion batteries.

  18. Organic Carbon Stabilization of Soils Formed on Acidic and Calcareous Bedrocks in Neotropical Alpine Grassland, Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Songyu; Cammeraat, Erik; Jansen, Boris; Cerli, Chiara; Kalbitz, Karsten

    2016-04-01

    Increasing evidence shows that Neotropical alpine ecosystems are vulnerable to global change. Since soils in the alpine grasslands of the Peruvian Andean region have large soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks, profound understanding of soil organic matter (OM) stabilization mechanisms will improve the prediction of the feedback between SOC stocks and global change. It is well documented that poor-crystalline minerals and organo-metallic complexes significantly contribute to the OM stabilization in volcanic ash soils, including those in the Andean region. However, limited research has focused on non-ash soils that also express significant SOC accumulation. A pilot study of Peruvian Andean grassland soils suggests that lithology is a prominent factor for such carbon accumulation. As a consequence of contrasting mineral composition and pedogenic processes in soils formed on different non-volcanic parent materials, differences in OM stabilization mechanisms may be profound and consequently may respond differently to global change. Therefore, our study aims at a further understanding of carbon stocks and OM stabilization mechanisms in soils formed on contrasting bedrocks in the Peruvian Andes. The main objective is to identify and compare the roles that organo-mineral associations and aggregations play in OM stabilization, by a combination of selective extraction methods and fractionations based on density, particle size and aggregates size. Soil samples were collected from igneous acidic and calcareous sedimentary bedrocks in alpine grassland near Cajamarca, Peru (7.17°S, 78.63°W), at around 3700m altitude. Samples were taken from 3 plots per bedrock type by sampling distinguishable horizons until the C horizons were reached. Outcomes confirmed that both types of soil accumulate large amounts of carbon: 405.3±41.7 t/ha of calcareous bedrock soil and 226.0±5.6 t/ha of acidic bedrock soil respectively. In addition, extremely high carbon contents exceeding 90g carbon per

  19. Effects of Nitrogen Forms on Carbon and Nitrogen Accumulation in Tomato Seedling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GE Ti-da; SONG Shi-wei; CHI Ming-han; HUANG Dan-feng; K Iwasaki

    2008-01-01

    Utilization of organic nitrogen (N) is an important aspect of plant N assimilation and has potential application in sustainable agriculture. The aim of this study was to investigate the plant growth, C and N accumulation in leaves and roots of tomato seedlings in response to inorganic (NH4+-N, NO3--N) and organic nitrogen (Gly-N). Different forms of nitrogen (NH4+-N, NO3--N, Gly-N) were supplied to two tomato cultivars (Shenfen 918 and Huying 932) using a hydroponics system. The plant dry biomass, chlorophyll content, root activity, total carbon and nitrogen content in roots and leaves, and total N absorption, etc. were assayed during the cultivation. Our results showed that no significant differences in plant height, dry biomass, and total N content were found within the first 16 d among three treatments; however, significant differences in treatments on 24 d and 32 d were observed, and the order was NO3--N > GIy-N > NH4+-N. Significant differences were also observed between the two tomato cultivars. Chlorophyll contents in the two cultivars were significantly increased by the GIy-N treatment, and root activity showed a significant decrease in NH4+-N treatment. Tomato leaf total carbon content was slightly affected by different N forms; however, total carbon in root and total nitrogen in root and leaf were promoted significantly by inorganic and organic N. Among the applied N forms, the increasing effects of the NH4+-N treatment were larger than that of the Gly-N. In a word, different N resources resulted in different physiological effects in tomatoes. Organic nitrogen (e.g., Gly-N) can be a proper resource of plant N nutrition. Tomatoes of different genotypes had different responses under organic nitrogen (e.g., Gly-N) supplies.

  20. Stable colloidal Co-Pd nanocatalysts for carbon nanotube growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berenguer, A.; Golovko, V.B.; Johnson, B.F.G.; Robertson, John [Department of Chemistry, University of Cambridge (United Kingdom); Cantoro, M.; Hofmann, S.; Wirth, C.T. [Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2009-12-15

    The standard preparation method for catalysts for surface-bound growth of carbon nanotubes (CNT) is to sputter or evaporate the metal catalyst (Fe, Co, and Ni) onto the surface. A lower cost method for large areas is to use liquid delivery. Colloids have the advantage of containing the catalyst in nanocluster form. Our previously developed colloidal catalysts were successful for growth but had limited shelf-life due to oxidation and coagulation. Here, we develop an air-stable colloidal catalyst with long shelf-life of many months to years. (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  1. In Vivo Renal Clearance, Biodistribution, Toxicity of Gold nanoclusters

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Xiao-Dong; Shen, Xiu; Liu, Pei-Xun; Fan, Fei-Yue; Fan, Sai-Jun; 10.1016/j.biomaterials.2012.03.020

    2012-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles have shown great prospective in cancer diagnosis and therapy, but they can not be metabolized and prefer to accumulate in liver and spleen due to their large size. The gold nanoclusters with small size can penetrate kidney tissue and have promise to decrease in vivo toxicity by renal clearance. In this work, we explore the in vivo renal clearance, biodistribution, and toxicity responses of the BSA- and GSH-protected gold nanoclusters for 24 hours and 28 days. The BSA-protected gold nanoclusters have low-efficient renal clearance and only 1% of gold can be cleared, but the GSH-protected gold nanoclusters have high-efficient renal clearance and 36 % of gold can be cleared after 24 hours. The biodistribution further reveals that 94% of gold can be metabolized for the GSH-protected nanoclusters, but only less than 5% of gold can be metabolized for the BSA-protected nanoclusters after 28 days. Both of the GSH- and BSA-protected gold nanoclusters cause acute infection, inflammation, and kidney fu...

  2. Spontaneous assembly of perfectly ordered identical-size nanocluster arrays: The theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, S. B.; Xue, Qi-Kun

    2002-03-01

    Ordered nanocluster array is a new form of condensed matter that provides unprecedented opportunities for exploring the law of physics that nature rarely provides. It has important immediate applications such as in microelectronics, ultra-high-density recording, and nanocatalysis. Despite many years of intensive studies, however, epitaxial growth of uniform size perfectly ordered nanocluster arrays is prohibited difficult. Recently, Li et al. [1] reported a discovery where Si (111)-7x7 surface can be used to induce size selection and two-dimension ordering. This opens up a new road towards high-quality nanocluster crystals. Interestingly, indium clusters appear to be loosely packed, occupy only half of the 7x7 cell, and the STM images have unusually strong bias voltage dependence. First-principles calculations elucidate the cluster structure, the ordering and size selectivity mechanism, and provide solid foundation for the experiment. This work was supported by the U. S. DOE-SC-BES under contract No. DE-AC36-99GO10337. [1] Li, et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. (in press).

  3. LOW TEMPERATURE OPTICAL PROPERTIES OF AMORPHOUS OXIDE NANOCLUSTERS IN POLYMETHYL METHACRYLATE MATRIX

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    V. V. VOLKOV; WANG ZHONG-LIN; Zou BING-SUO; XIE SI-SHEN

    2000-01-01

    We studied the temperature-dependent steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence properties of very small (1-2 nm) ZnO, CdO, and PbO amorphous nanoclusters prepared in AOT reverse micelles and imbedded in polymethyl methacrylate(PMMA) films. X-ray diffraction and electron diffraction and imaging indicate that these structures are amorphous. These amorphous oxide nanoclusters demonstrate similar structural, electronic, and optical properties. Properties of steady-state fluorescence spectra indicate the unique localization of electronic states due to the amorphous structure. ZnO and CdO show double-band fluorescence structure, which is due to the spin-orbital splitting, similar to Cu2O. Time-resolved fluorescence studies of the nanoclusters in the polymer reveal two lifetime components, as found in solution. The slow component reflects relaxation processes from band-tail states while the fast component may be related to high-lying extended states. The temperature dependence of fast fluorescence component reveals the presence of exciton hopping between anharmonic wells at temperatures higher than 200K. We correlate the barrier height between two wells formed around local atoms with the inter-atomic distance and bond ionicity.

  4. Kinetic growth mechanisms of sputter-deposited Au films on mica: from nanoclusters to nanostructured microclusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruffino, F.; Grimaldi, M.G. [Universita di Catania, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Catania (Italy); CNR-IMM MATIS, Catania (Italy); Torrisi, V.; Marletta, G. [University of Catania and CSGI, Laboratory for Molecular Surface and Nanotechnology (LAMSUN), Department of Chemical Sciences, Catania (Italy)

    2010-07-15

    Au nanostructured film was deposited on mica by room temperature RF sputtering. The growth mechanism of the film was studied analyzing the evolution of the film morphology as a function of its thickness by the atomic force microscopy. In the early stages of a growth the film evolution proceeds by the nucleation and growth of nanoclusters. After a critical thickness the growth of microclusters formed by the joining of nanoclusters in preferential nucleation sites, onto a quasicontinuous film, is observed. We quantified the evolution of the mean nanoclusters height and surface density and of the film roughness. This data were analyzed by the dynamic scaling theory of growing interfaces obtaining the scaling and roughness exponents z and {beta} whose values suggest a conservative growth process. We also quantified the growth of the microclusters showing that it is consistent with a coalescence/impingement dynamic. About the formation of the microclusters, furthermore, we speculate that their origin is strongly correlated to the features of the sputtering technique in connection with the deposition on a high-diffusivity substrate. (orig.)

  5. Restructuring of hex-Pt(100) under CO gas environments: formation of 2-D nanoclusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao, Feng; Dag, Sefa; Wang, Lin-Wang; Liu, Zhi; Butcher, Derek; Salmeron, Miquel; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2009-04-24

    The atomic-scale restructuring of hex-Pt(100) induced by carbon monoxide with a wide pressure range was studied with a newly designed chamber-in-chamber high-pressure STM and theoretical calculations. Both experimental and DFT calculation results show that CO molecules are bound to Pt nanoclusters through a tilted on-top configuration with a separation of {approx}3.7-4.1 {angstrom}. The phenomenon of restructuring of metal catalyst surfaces induced by adsorption, and in particular the formation of small metallic clusters suggests the importance of studying structures of catalyst surfaces under high pressure conditions for understanding catalytic mechanisms.

  6. Reactivity of Mg-Al hydrotalcites in solid and delaminated forms in ammonium carbonate solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoica, Georgiana; Santiago, Marta; Abelló, Sònia; Pérez-Ramírez, Javier

    2010-10-01

    Treatment of Mg-Al hydrotalcites (LDHs, layered double hydroxides) in aqueous (NH 4) 2CO 3 at 298 K leads to composites of dawsonite, hydrotalcite, and magnesium ammonium carbonate. The mechanism and kinetics of this transformation, ultimately determining the relative amounts of these components in the composite, depend on the treatment time (from 1 h to 9 days), the Mg/Al ratio in the hydrotalcite (2-4), and on the starting layered double hydroxide (solid or delaminated form). The materials at various stages of the treatment were characterized by inductive coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetry, and nitrogen adsorption at 77 K. The progressive transformation of hydrotalcite towards crystalline dawsonite and magnesium ammonium carbonate phases follows a dissolution-precipitation mechanism. A gradual decrease of the Mg/Al ratio in the resulting solids was observed in time due to magnesium leaching in the reacting medium. Dawsonite-hydrotalcite composite formation is favored at high aluminum contents in the starting hydrotalcite, while the formation of magnesium ammonium carbonate is favored at high Mg/Al ratios. The synthetic strategy comprising hydrotalcite delamination in formamide prior to aqueous (NH 4) 2CO 3 treatment is more reactive towards composite formation than starting from the bulk solid hydrotalcite.

  7. Nanoclusters and Microparticles in Gases and Vapors

    CERN Document Server

    Smirnov, Boris M

    2012-01-01

    Research of processes involving Nanoclusters and Microparticleshas been developing fastin many fields of rescent research, in particular in materials science. To stay at the cutting edge of this development, a sound understanding of the processes is needed. In this work, several processes involving small particles are described, such as transport processes in gases, charging of small particles in gases, chemical processes, atom attachment and quenching of excited atomic particles on surfaces, nucleation, coagulation, coalescence and growth processes for particles and aggregates. This work pres

  8. Peptide-stabilized, fluorescent silver nanoclusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Simon; Vosch, Tom André Jos; Jensen, Knud Jørgen

    2016-01-01

    . Herein, we demonstrate how solid-phase methods can increase throughput dramatically in peptide ligand screening and in initial evaluation of fluorescence intensity and chemical stability of peptide-stabilized AgNCs (P-AgNCs). 9-Fluorenylmethyloxycarbonyl (Fmoc) solid-phase peptide synthesis......Few-atom silver nanoclusters (AgNCs) can exhibit strong fluorescence; however, they require ligands to prevent aggregation into larger nanoparticles. Fluorescent AgNCs in biopolymer scaffolds have so far mainly been synthesized in solution, and peptides have only found limited use compared to DNA...

  9. On the fluctuation mechanism of melting of supported gold nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pushkin, M A; Troyan, V I; Borisyuk, P V; Borman, V D; Tronin, V N

    2012-11-01

    The size dependence of the melting temperature of Au nanoclusters deposited on SiO2 and HOPG substrates, measured by the elastic-peak electron spectroscopy (EPES) is discussed. The observed behavior of the melting temperature with decrease in clusters' size is qualitatively explained in the framework of the fluctuation mechanism for surface melting. The interaction of nanoclusters with substrate is taken into account by means of the effective surface tension for spherical-segment shaped particles, corresponding to the contact angle of supported nanocluster.

  10. Nonlinear analysis of nano-cluster doped fiber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Gang; ZHANG Ru

    2007-01-01

    There are prominent nonlinear characteristics that we hope for the semiconductor nano-clusters doped fiber. Refractive index of fiber core can be effectively changed by adulteration. This technology can provide a new method for developing photons components. Because the semiconductor nano-cluster has quantum characteristics,Based on first-order perturbation theory and classical theory of fiber,we deduced refractive index expressions of fiber core,which was semiconductor nano-cluster doped fiber. Finally,third-order nonlinear coefficient equation was gained. Using this equation,we calculated SMF-28 fiber nonlinear coefficient. The equation shows that new third-order coefficient was greater.

  11. Efficiency of genomic DNA extraction dependent on the size of magnetic nanoclusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hyun Ah; Hyun Min, Ji; Hua Wu, Jun; Woo Jang, Jin; Lim, Chae-Seung; Keun Kim, Young

    2014-05-01

    We report the efficiency of genomic DNA extraction as a function of particle size and quantity. For DNA extraction, we synthesized magnetic nanoclusters of various sizes and coated the surface of these magnetic nanoclusters with meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid. We showed that the nanoclusters had a tight particle size distribution and high crystallinity. Furthermore, we observed that the three types of magnetic nanoclusters studied exhibited ferrimagnetic behavior and that larger nanoclusters showed larger saturation magnetization values. The resultant efficiency of DNA extraction is inversely proportional to particle size in the range of nanoclusters tested, due to the fact that the surface-to-volume ratio decreases as particle size increases.

  12. Synthesis of gold nano-wire and nano-dumbbell shaped colloids and AuC60 nano-clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landon, Preston B.; Jarvis, Brandon C.; Gilleland, Cody L.; Renfro, Tim; Gutierrez, Jose; Synowczynski, Jennifer; Hirsch, Samuel G.; Glosser, Robert

    2005-08-01

    A technique for the fabrication of colloidal gold nano-wire and nano-dumbbell shaped particles using carbon nanotubes and rod shaped viruses as templates is described. The gold (Au) encapsulation process was accomplished by the precipitation of gold chloride from aqueous solutions. When this process was conducted in the presence of hydroxylated C60, small pieces of phase-separated composites of AuC60 appeared to have formed. These nano-clusters may turn out to be large noble metal analogs of the alkali metal fullerides with the smallest geometrically possible Au aggregate consisting of 55 gold atoms. The existence of noble metal fullerene composites has been previously theorized. The alkali metal fullerides are examples of phase separated solids and have exhibited superconductivity with temperatures as high 33K. The mechanism required for the binding energy between C60 and gold has been observed to exist between C60 and many of the mirror metals (Al, Ag, Au, Cu, Ni). This binding energy is a charge transfer from the metal Fermi level into the C60 LUMO. If this bonding energy, is greater than the metals coagulation energy an Au/C60 size terminated mechanism during the formation of the gold aggregates by the adhesion of C60 to the surface is energetically favorable.

  13. Rigid rod spaced fullerene as building block for nanoclusters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pallikara K Sudeep; James P Varkey; K George Thomas; Manappurathu V George; Prashant V Kamat

    2003-10-01

    By using phenylacetylene based rigid-rod linkers (PhA), we have successfully synthesized two fullerene derivatives, C60-PhA and C60-PhA-C60. The absorption spectral features of C60, as well as that of the phenylacetylene moiety are retained in the monomeric forms of these fullerene derivatives, ruling out the possibility of any strong interaction between the two chromophores in the ground state. Both the fullerene derivatives form optically transparent clusters, absorbing in the UV-Vis region; this clustering leads to a significant increase in their molar extinction coefficients. TEM characterization of the C60-PhA showed large spherical clusters, with sizes ranging from 150-350 nm, while an elongated wire-type structure was observed for the bisfullerene derivative (C60-PhA-C60). AFM section analysis studies of isolated nanoclusters of C60-PhA-C60, deposited on mica, indicate that smaller clusters associate to form larger nanostructures.

  14. A thermochromic silver nanocluster exhibiting dual emission character

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qing-Qing; Dong, Xi-Yan; Huang, Ren-Wu; Li, Bo; Zang, Shuang-Quan; Mak, Thomas C. W.

    2015-01-01

    A Ag12(SCH2C10H7)6(CF3CO2)6(CH3CN)6 (1) nanocluster modified using naphthalen-2-yl-methanethiol was synthesized and structurally characterized by single crystal X-ray analysis. The targeted luminescent nanocluster displays dual emission with the property of reversible thermochromism spanning from red to bright yellow.A Ag12(SCH2C10H7)6(CF3CO2)6(CH3CN)6 (1) nanocluster modified using naphthalen-2-yl-methanethiol was synthesized and structurally characterized by single crystal X-ray analysis. The targeted luminescent nanocluster displays dual emission with the property of reversible thermochromism spanning from red to bright yellow. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental section and supporting Fig. S1-S6. CCDC 1004246. For ESI and crystallographic data in CIF or other electronic format see DOI: 10.1039/c4nr05122j

  15. Carbon dioxide level and form of soil nitrogen regulate assimilation of atmospheric ammonia in young trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Lucas C R; Salamanca-Jimenez, Alveiro; Doane, Timothy A; Horwath, William R

    2015-08-21

    The influence of carbon dioxide (CO2) and soil fertility on the physiological performance of plants has been extensively studied, but their combined effect is notoriously difficult to predict. Using Coffea arabica as a model tree species, we observed an additive effect on growth, by which aboveground productivity was highest under elevated CO2 and ammonium fertilization, while nitrate fertilization favored greater belowground biomass allocation regardless of CO2 concentration. A pulse of labelled gases ((13)CO2 and (15)NH3) was administered to these trees as a means to determine the legacy effect of CO2 level and soil nitrogen form on foliar gas uptake and translocation. Surprisingly, trees with the largest aboveground biomass assimilated significantly less NH3 than the smaller trees. This was partly explained by declines in stomatal conductance in plants grown under elevated CO2. However, unlike the (13)CO2 pulse, assimilation and transport of the (15)NH3 pulse to shoots and roots varied as a function of interactions between stomatal conductance and direct plant response to the form of soil nitrogen, observed as differences in tissue nitrogen content and biomass allocation. Nitrogen form is therefore an intrinsic component of physiological responses to atmospheric change, including assimilation of gaseous nitrogen as influenced by plant growth history.

  16. Cyclic voltammetry investigation of diffusion of ferrocene within propylene carbonate organogel formed by gelator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng Guilong; Xiong Yun; Wang Hong [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Luoyu Road 1037, Wuhan 430074 (China); Yang Yajiang [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Luoyu Road 1037, Wuhan 430074 (China)], E-mail: yjyang@mail.hust.edu.cn

    2008-11-30

    Propylene carbonate organogel containing LiClO{sub 4} was formed in the presence of gelator bis-(4-stearoylaminophenyl) methane (BSAPM). The electrochemical behavior and diffusion of ferrocene (Fc) and ferricenium (Fc{sup +}) entrapped within the organogel was investigated by cyclic voltammetry. The Fc molecules still show redox activity within the organogels in comparison with corresponding solutions of propylene carbonate containing LiClO{sub 4}. The shape of the cyclic voltammograms of the Fc electrooxidation in organogel was similar to that in corresponding solutions. The results indicated that redox reactions of Fc/Fc{sup +} were a quasi-reversible process of diffusion-controlled single electron transfer in organogels. The diffusion coefficients of Fc and Fc{sup +} in organogels decreased with an increase of the concentration of gelator BSAPM, but increased with an increase of temperature. The temperature dependence of the diffusion coefficient in organogels followed classical Arrhenius equation. The activation energy in organogels was found of no difference from that in corresponding solutions.

  17. The bacterial carbon-fixing organelle is formed by shell envelopment of preassembled cargo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna H Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cyanobacteria play a significant role in the global carbon cycle. In Synechococcuselongatus, the carbon-fixing enzyme ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO is concentrated into polyhedral, proteinaceous compartments called carboxysomes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using live cell fluorescence microscopy, we show that carboxysomes are first detected as small seeds of RuBisCO that colocalize with existing carboxysomes. These seeds contain little or no shell protein, but increase in RuBisCO content over several hours, during which time they are exposed to the solvent. The maturing seed is then enclosed by shell proteins, a rapid process that seals RuBisCO from the cytosol to establish a distinct, solvent-protected microenvironment that is oxidizing relative to the cytosol. These closure events can be spatially and temporally coincident with the appearance of a nascent daughter RuBisCO seed. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Carboxysomes assemble in a stepwise fashion, inside-to-outside, revealing that cargo is the principle organizer of this compartment's biogenesis. Our observations of the spatial relationship of seeds to previously formed carboxysomes lead us to propose a model for carboxysome replication via sequential fission, polymerization, and encapsulation of their internal cargo.

  18. Influence of various carbon nano-forms as supports for Pt catalyst on proton exchange membrane fuel cell performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharti, Abha; Cheruvally, Gouri

    2017-08-01

    In this study, we discuss the influence of various carbon supports for Pt on proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell performance. Here, Pt supported on various carbon nano-forms [Pt/carbon black (Pt/CB), Pt/single-walled carbon nanotubes (Pt/SWCNT), Pt/multi-walled carbon nanotubes (Pt/MWCNT) and Pt/graphene (Pt/G)] are synthesized by a facile, single step, microwave-assisted, modified chemical reduction route. Their physical, chemical and electrochemical characteristics pertaining to oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalytic activity and stability in PEM fuel cell are studied in detail by various techniques and compared. The study shows that the different carbon supports does not significantly affect the Pt particle size during synthesis, but leads to different amount of defective sites in the carbon framework which influence both the availability of active metal nano-catalysts and metal-support interaction. In-situ electrochemical investigations reveal that the different carbon supports influence both ORR catalytic activity and stability of the catalyst. This is further corroborated by the demonstration of varying polarization characteristics on PEM fuel cell performance by different carbon supported Pt catalysts. This study reveals MWCNT as the most suitable carbon support for Pt catalyst, exhibiting high activity and stability for ORR in PEM fuel cell.

  19. Carbon dioxide reduction to methane and coupling with acetylene to form propylene catalyzed by remodeled nitrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhi-Yong; Moure, Vivian R; Dean, Dennis R; Seefeldt, Lance C

    2012-11-27

    A doubly substituted form of the nitrogenase MoFe protein (α-70(Val)(→Ala), α-195(His→Gln)) has the capacity to catalyze the reduction of carbon dioxide (CO(2)) to yield methane (CH(4)). Under optimized conditions, 1 nmol of the substituted MoFe protein catalyzes the formation of 21 nmol of CH(4) within 20 min. The catalytic rate depends on the partial pressure of CO(2) (or concentration of HCO(3)(-)) and the electron flux through nitrogenase. The doubly substituted MoFe protein also has the capacity to catalyze the unprecedented formation of propylene (H(2)C = CH-CH(3)) through the reductive coupling of CO(2) and acetylene (HC≡CH). In light of these observations, we suggest that an emerging understanding of the mechanistic features of nitrogenase could be relevant to the design of synthetic catalysts for CO(2) sequestration and formation of olefins.

  20. Molten metal reactor and method of forming hydrogen, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide using the molten alkaline metal reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingham, Dennis N.; Klingler, Kerry M.; Turner, Terry D.; Wilding, Bruce M.

    2012-11-13

    A molten metal reactor for converting a carbon material and steam into a gas comprising hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide is disclosed. The reactor includes an interior crucible having a portion contained within an exterior crucible. The interior crucible includes an inlet and an outlet; the outlet leads to the exterior crucible and may comprise a diffuser. The exterior crucible may contain a molten alkaline metal compound. Contained between the exterior crucible and the interior crucible is at least one baffle.

  1. Controlled nanoclustering of magnetic nanoparticles using telechelic polysiloxane and disiloxane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thong-On, Bandit; Rutnakornpituk, Boonjira; Wichai, Uthai; Rutnakornpituk, Metha, E-mail: methar@nu.ac.th [Naresuan University, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science (Thailand)

    2015-06-15

    Diacrylate-terminated polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and disiloxane were synthesized and used for controlling degree of nanoclustering of magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs). PDMS was synthesized via a ring-opening polymerization of octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D{sub 4}), followed by end functionalization with diacrylate groups. Diacrylate-terminated disiloxane was separately synthesized in a similar fashion without the use of D{sub 4} in the reaction. They were then reacted with amino-coated MNPs to obtain MNP-embedded siloxane nanoclusters. Transmission electron microscopy showed the formation of MNP-siloxane nanoclusters with the size of 70–200 nm. Degree of MNP nanoclustering can be adjusted by varying the MNP-to-siloxane ratio to obtain hydrodynamic size ranging from 200 to 2400 nm. Using the same ratio of MNPs to the siloxanes, PDMS resulted in the nanoclusters with smaller D{sub h} and more stable in toluene than those coated with disiloxane. These novel nanoclusters with controllable size might be ideal candidates for biomedical and other advanced applications after suitable surface modification.

  2. Surface modification of adamantane-terminated gold nanoclusters using cyclodextrins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Chunyang; Liu, Chao; Abroshan, Hadi; Li, Zhimin; Qiu, Renhua; Li, Gao

    2016-08-17

    The surface functionality of Au38S2(SAdm)20 nanoclusters (-SAdm = adamantanethiolate) in the presence of α-, β-, and γ-cyclodextrins (CDs) is studied. The supramolecular chemistry and host-guest interactions of CDs and the protecting ligands of nanoclusters are investigated using UV-vis and NMR spectroscopies, MALDI mass spectrometry, and molecular dynamics simulations. In contrast to α- and γ-CDs, the results show that β-CDs are capable of efficiently chemisorbing onto the Au38S2(SAdm)20 nanoclusters to yield Au38S2(SAdm)20-(β-CD)2 conjugates. MD simulations revealed that two -SAdm ligands of the nanoparticle with the least steric hindrance are capable to selectively be accommodated into hydrophobic cavity of β-CDs, as furthermore confirmed by NMR spectroscopy. The conjugates largely improve the stability of the nanoclusters in the presence of strong oxidants (e.g., TBHP). Further, the electrochemical properties of Au38S2(SAdm)20 nanoclusters and Au38S2(SAdm)20-(β-CD)2 conjugates are compared. The charge transfer to the redox probe molecules (e.g., K3Fe(CN)6) in solution was monitored by cyclic voltammetry. It is found that β-CDs act as an umbrella to cover the fragile metal cores of the nanoclusters, thereby blocking direct interaction with destabilizing agents and hence quenching the charge transfer process.

  3. Oxidative addition of the C-I bond on aluminum nanoclusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Turbasu; Das, Susanta; Pal, Sourav

    2015-07-01

    Energetics and the in-depth reaction mechanism of the oxidative addition step of the cross-coupling reaction are studied in the framework of density functional theory (DFT) on aluminum nanoclusters. Aluminum metal in its bulk state is totally inactive towards carbon-halogen bond dissociation but selected Al nanoclusters (size ranging from 3 to 20 atoms) have shown a significantly lower activation barrier towards the oxidative addition reaction. The calculated energy barriers are lower than the gold clusters and within a comparable range with the conventional and most versatile Pd catalyst. Further investigations reveal that the activation energies and other reaction parameters are highly sensitive to the geometrical shapes and electronic structures of the clusters rather than their size, imposing the fact that comprehensive studies on aluminum clusters can be beneficial for nanoscience and nanotechnology. To understand the possible reaction mechanism in detail, the reaction pathway is investigated with the ab initio Born Oppenheimer Molecular Dynamics (BOMD) simulation and the Natural Bond Orbital (NBO) analysis. In short, our theoretical study highlights the thermodynamic and kinetic details of C-I bond dissociation on aluminum clusters for future endeavors in cluster chemistry.Energetics and the in-depth reaction mechanism of the oxidative addition step of the cross-coupling reaction are studied in the framework of density functional theory (DFT) on aluminum nanoclusters. Aluminum metal in its bulk state is totally inactive towards carbon-halogen bond dissociation but selected Al nanoclusters (size ranging from 3 to 20 atoms) have shown a significantly lower activation barrier towards the oxidative addition reaction. The calculated energy barriers are lower than the gold clusters and within a comparable range with the conventional and most versatile Pd catalyst. Further investigations reveal that the activation energies and other reaction parameters are highly

  4. Study of the effect of magnesium concentration on the deposit of allotropic forms of calcium carbonate and related carbon steel interface behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben Amor, Y., E-mail: yasser_ben@yahoo.f [Institut Superieur des Sciences et Technologies de l' Environnement de Borj-Cedria, B.P 1003, Hammam-Lif 2050 (Tunisia); Bousselmi, L. [Laboratoire Traitement et Recyclage des Eaux, B.P 273, Hammam-Lif, Technopole de Borj-Cedria, 8020 Soliman (Tunisia); Tribollet, B. [UPR 15 CNRS - Physique des liquides et Electrochimie, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie - Tour 22, 4 place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Triki, E. [Unite de recherche Corrosion et Protection des metalliques, Ecole Nationale d' Ingenieurs de Tunis, P.B. 37, 1002 Tunis, Belvedere (Tunisia)

    2010-06-30

    Different allotropic forms of calcium carbonate scales were electrochemically deposited on a carbon steel surface in artificial underground Tunisian water at -0.95 V{sub SCE} and various Mg{sup 2+} concentrations. Because of the importance of the diffusion process, the rotating disk electrode was used. The deposition kinetics were analyzed by chronoamperometry measurements and the calcareous layers were characterized by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The physical model proposed by Gabrielli was used to analyze the EIS measurements. Independent of the deposited allotropic form of calcium carbonate, the measurements showed that the oxygen reduction occurs in the pores formed between the CaCO{sub 3} crystals and the metallic surface.

  5. Size dependence of thermoelectric power of Au, Pd, Pt nanoclusters deposited onto HOPG surface

    OpenAIRE

    Borisyuk, P. V.; V. I. Troyan; Lebedinskii, Yu Yu; Vasilyev, O S

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents the study of tunnel current-voltage characteristics of Au, Pd and Pt nanoclusters deposited onto the highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surface by pulsed laser deposition. The analysis of tunnel current-voltage characteristics obtained by scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) allowed to recover the thermoelectric power value of nanoclusters. It was found that the value of thermoelectric power of pulsed laser deposited nanoclusters depends on nanocluster material and ...

  6. Modelling nano-clusters and nucleation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catlow, C Richard A; Bromley, Stefan T; Hamad, Said; Mora-Fonz, Miguel; Sokol, Alexey A; Woodley, Scott M

    2010-01-28

    We review the growing role of computational techniques in modelling the structures and properties of nano-particulate oxides and sulphides. We describe the main methods employed, including those based on both electronic structure and interatomic potential approaches. Particular attention is paid to the techniques used in searching for global minima in the energy landscape defined by the nano-particle cluster. We summarise applications to the widely studied ZnO and ZnS systems, to silica nanochemistry and to group IV oxides including TiO(2). We also consider the special case of silica cluster chemistry in solution and its importance in understanding the hydrothermal synthesis of microporous materials. The work summarised, together with related experimental studies, demonstrates a rich and varied nano-cluster chemistry for these materials.

  7. On the Effect of Carbon Content to the Mechanical Properties and Microstructure of Green Compacts Formed at above Ambient Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Mujibur Rahman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Friction force is generated during the generation of green compacts from metal powder, which obviously gives adverse effect to the mechanical properties and microstructure of the green compacts. In this study, fine carbon powder is used to minimize the interparticle as well as die wall frictions and as alloying element hence high density yet defect-free near-net shape or net shape mechanical components can be produced. Powder forming at elevated temperature is a relatively new technology hence the effect of carbon content is not fully explored yet. Therefore, a lab scale warm compaction rig is designed and fabricated which enabled the generation of green compacts at different forming load and temperature. The powder mass was prepared by mechanically mixing iron ASC 100.29 powder with different weight percent of fine carbon powder for different duration of time. The prepared powder mass was formed at different compaction temperature to generate green compacts for the purpose of mechanical testing and microstructure evaluation. The results revealed that the mechanical properties and microstructures of green compacts are affected by the carbon content, mixing time, as well as forming temperature. From this study, the suitable carbon content, mixing time, and forming temperature are identified for the production of high quality mechanical components.

  8. Silver Nanocluster Reparative Effect in Hernioplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay M. Anichkov

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The acceleration of re-epithelialization and fibroblast differentiation were noted during the experiments with silver nanoclusters (SNs by interrupting the negative development of inflammation at the level of cytokines and promoting a positive course of reparative processes. The aim of this work was to elaborate the experimental model of prosthesis hernioplasty in subcutaneous and intraperitoneal locations of hernioprostheses with SNs, which allowed us to study the course of reparative reactions in all layers of the anterior abdominal wall. Material and Methods: We used a modified hernioprosthesis made from polyester fibers coated with a metal-polymer composition, including the stabilized SN in a concentration of 6.8 and 11.3 mg per 1 g of the hernioprosthesis mesh. During this research we used guinea pigs to study the in vivo tissue reactions. The clinical part of the study included the group of 212 patients who underwent removal of an inguinal hernia. We have identified various factors associated with infectious and toxic effects on the body by determining the level of the serum glutamate-pyruvate-transaminase (SGPT. Results: In implantation of the hernioprostheses, including the high concentration of SN in the laparotomy wound, the exudative component of the inflammation was weakly expressed. It was mostly the proliferative changes that took place. We did not find either CD8-positive type T lymphocytes or PAX5-positive type B activated cells in the exudate. Conclusion: Our research has shown that the use of hernioprostheses that include silver nanoclusters leads to the reduction of inflammation in the exudative phase and to a more favorable course of reparative processes.

  9. Magnetic properties of novel superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoclusters and their peculiarity under annealing treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadic, Marin; Kralj, Slavko; Jagodic, Marko; Hanzel, Darko; Makovec, Darko

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this work is to present the magnetic properties of novel superparamagnetic iNANOvative™|silica nanoparticle clusters. A TEM analysis showed that these nanoparticle clusters, approximately 80 nm in size, contained an assembly of maghemite nanoparticles in the core and an amorphous silica shell. The maghemite nanoparticles in the core were approximately 10 nm in size, whereas the uniform silica shell was approximately 15-nm thick. The number of magnetic nanoparticles that were densely packed in the core of the single nanocluster was estimated to be approximately 67, resulting in a high magnetic moment for the single nanocluster of mnc ∼ 1.2 × 106μB. This magnetic property of the nanoparticle cluster is advantageous for its easy manipulation using an external magnetic field, for example, in biomedical applications, such as drug delivery, or for magnetic separation in biotechnology. The magnetic properties of the iNANOvative™|silica nanoparticle clusters were systematically studied, with a special focus on the influence of the magnetic interactions between the nanoparticles in the core. For comparison, the nanoparticle clusters were annealed for 3 h at 300 °C in air. The annealing had no influence on the nanoparticles' size and phase; however, it had a unique effect on the magnetic properties, i.e., a decrease of the blocking temperature and a weakening of the inter-particle interactions. We believe that this surprising observation is related to the thermal decomposition of the organic surfactant on the surfaces of the nanoparticles' at the high annealing temperatures, which resulted in the formation of amorphous carbon inside the nanocluster.

  10. Growth of bridging carbon nanofibers in cracks formed by heat-treating iron oxide thin sheets in acetylene gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Hikata

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available We produced novel carbon nanofibers (CNFs by oxidizing high-purity iron foil and then carburizing it in acetylene gas flow. This formed cracks in the heat-treated iron foil with CNFs bridging the two walls of each crack. The CNFs were drawn out from the walls as the crack opened during heat treatment. This will be a new method to grow and arrange carbon nanotubes and nanosheets without using metal nanoparticles or template substrates.

  11. Growth of bridging carbon nanofibers in cracks formed by heat-treating iron oxide thin sheets in acetylene gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hikata, Takeshi; Okubo, Soichiro; Higashi, Yugo; Matsuba, Teruaki; Utsunomiya, Risa; Tsurekawa, Sadahiro; Murakami, Katsuhisa; Fujita, Jun-ichi

    2013-04-01

    We produced novel carbon nanofibers (CNFs) by oxidizing high-purity iron foil and then carburizing it in acetylene gas flow. This formed cracks in the heat-treated iron foil with CNFs bridging the two walls of each crack. The CNFs were drawn out from the walls as the crack opened during heat treatment. This will be a new method to grow and arrange carbon nanotubes and nanosheets without using metal nanoparticles or template substrates.

  12. Synthesis of crystalline Ge nanoclusters in PE-CVD-deposited SiO2 films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leervad Pedersen, T.P.; Skov Jensen, J.; Chevallier, J.

    2005-01-01

    The synthesis of evenly distributed Ge nanoclusters in plasma-enhanced chemical-vapour-deposited (PE-CVD) SiO2 thin films containing 8 at. % Ge is reported. This is of importance for the application of nanoclusters in semiconductor technology. The average diameter of the Ge nanoclusters can...

  13. Fullerene-containing phases obtained from aqueous dispersions of carbon nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozhkov, S. P.; Kovalevskii, V. V.; Rozhkova, N. N.

    2007-06-01

    The hydration of fullerenes and shungite carbon nanoclusters in aqueous dispersions at various carbon concentrations is studied on frozen samples by EPR with spin probes. It is found that, for stable dispersions of both substances (at carbon concentrations of 0.1 mg/ml), the probe rotation frequency versus 1/T dependences exhibit a plateau in the range 243 257 K, which is probably associated with the peculiarities of freezing of water localized near hydrophobic structures of carbon nanoclusters. Solid phases isolated from supersaturated aqueous dispersions of fullerenes and shungites by slow evaporation of water at temperatures higher than 0°C are examines by electron diffraction and electron microscopy. It is established that obtained films of fullerenes contain at least two phases: fullerite with a face-centered cubic lattice and a phase similar in interplanar spacing and radically different in distribution of intensities of diffraction peaks. It is concluded that this phase is formed by the interaction of fullerenes and water (an analogous phase is found in shungite carbon films). It is found that the morphology of the new crystal phase is characterized by globules of size 20 to 70 nm, for fullerenes, and 10 to 400 nm for shungites. It is established that processes of crystallization of fullerites and fullerene-containing phases are very sensitive to temperature: a decrease in the temperature (within the range from 40 to 1°C) is accompanied by an increase in the new phase content.

  14. Target-controlled formation of silver nanoclusters in abasic site-incorporated duplex DNA for label-free fluorescence detection of theophylline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ki Soo; Oh, Seung Soo; Soh, H. Tom; Park, Hyun Gyu

    2014-08-01

    A novel, label-free, fluorescence based sensor for theophylline has been developed. In the new sensor system, an abasic site-incorporated duplex DNA probe serves as both a pocket for recognition of theophylline and a template for the preparation of fluorescent silver nanoclusters. The strategy relies on theophylline-controlled formation of fluorescent silver nanoclusters from abasic site-incorporated duplex DNA. When theophylline is not present, silver ions interact with the cytosine groups opposite to the abasic site in duplex DNA. This interaction leads to efficient formation of intensely red fluorescent silver nanoclusters. In contrast, when theophylline is bound at the abasic site through pseudo base-pairing with appropriately positioned cytosines, silver ion binding to the cytosine nucleobase is prevented. Consequently, fluorescent silver nanoclusters are not formed causing a significant reduction of the fluorescence signal. By employing this new sensor, theophylline can be highly selectively detected at a concentration as low as 1.8 μM. Finally, the diagnostic capability and practical application of this sensor were demonstrated by its use in detecting theophylline in human blood serum.A novel, label-free, fluorescence based sensor for theophylline has been developed. In the new sensor system, an abasic site-incorporated duplex DNA probe serves as both a pocket for recognition of theophylline and a template for the preparation of fluorescent silver nanoclusters. The strategy relies on theophylline-controlled formation of fluorescent silver nanoclusters from abasic site-incorporated duplex DNA. When theophylline is not present, silver ions interact with the cytosine groups opposite to the abasic site in duplex DNA. This interaction leads to efficient formation of intensely red fluorescent silver nanoclusters. In contrast, when theophylline is bound at the abasic site through pseudo base-pairing with appropriately positioned cytosines, silver ion binding to

  15. Quenched Assembly of NIR-Active Gold Nanoclusters Capped with Strongly Bound Ligands by Tuning Particle Charge via pH and Salinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stover, Robert J; Murthy, Avinash K; Nie, Golay D; Gourisankar, Sai; Dear, Barton J; Truskett, Thomas M; Sokolov, Konstantin V; Johnston, Keith P

    2014-07-03

    Gold nanospheres coated with a binary monolayer of bound citrate and cysteine ligands were assembled into nanoclusters, in which the size and near-infrared (NIR) extinction were tuned by varying the pH and concentration of added NaCl. During full evaporation of an aqueous dispersion of 4.5 ± 1.8 nm Au primary particles, the nanoclusters were formed and quenched by the triblock copolymer polylactic acid (PLA)(1K)-b-poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)(10K)-b-PLA(1K), which also provided steric stabilization. The short-ranged depletion and van der Waals attractive forces were balanced against longer ranged electrostatic repulsion to tune the nanocluster diameter and NIR extinction. Upon lowering the pH from 7 to 5 at a given salinity, the magnitude of the charge on the primary particles decreased, such that the weaker electrostatic repulsion increased the hydrodynamic diameter and, consequently, NIR extinction of the clusters. At a given pH, as the concentration of NaCl was increased, the NIR extinction decreased monotonically. Furthermore, the greater screening of the charges on the nanoclusters weakened the interactions with PLA(1K)-b-PEG(10K)-b-PLA(1K) and thus lowered the amount of adsorbed polymer on the nanocluster surface. The generalization of the concept of self-assembly of small NIR-active nanoclusters to include a strongly bound thiol and the manipulation of the morphologies and NIR extinction by variation of pH and salinity not only is of fundamental interest but also is important for optical biomedical imaging and therapy.

  16. Absorption spectra of alkali-C₆₀ nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabilloud, Franck

    2014-10-28

    We investigate the absorption spectra of alkali-doped C60 nanoclusters, namely C60Nan, C60Kn, and C60Lin, with n = 1, 2, 6, 12, in the framework of the time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT). We study the dependence of the absorption spectra on the nature of the alkali. We show that in few cases the absorption spectra depend on the arrangement of the alkali atoms over the fullerene, though sometimes the absorption spectra do not allow us to distinguish between different configurations. When only one or two alkali atoms are adsorbed on the fullerene, the optical response of alkali-doped C60 is similar to that of the anion C60(-) with a strong response in the UV domain. In contrast, for higher concentration of alkali, a strong optical response is predicted in the visible range, particularly when metal-metal bonds are formed. The weak optical response of the I(h)-symmetry C60Li12 is proposed to be used as a signature of its structure.

  17. Synthesis and characterization of human transferrin-stabilized gold nanoclusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Guevel, Xavier; Schneider, Marc [Pharmaceutical Nanotechnology, Saarland University, Saarbruecken (Germany); Daum, Nicole, E-mail: Marc.Schneider@mx.uni-saarland.de [Drug Delivery, Helmholtz Institute for Pharmaceutical Research Saarland (HIPS), Saarbruecken (Germany)

    2011-07-08

    Human transferrin has been biolabelled with gold nanoclusters (Au NCs) using a simple, fast and non-toxic method. These nanocrystals (<2 nm) are stabilized in the protein via sulfur groups and have a high fluorescence emission in the near infrared region (QY = 4.3%; {lambda}{sub em} = 695 nm). Structural investigation and photophysical measurements show a high population of clusters formed of 22-33 gold atoms covalently bound to the transferrin. In solutions with pH ranging from 5 to 10 and in buffer solutions (PBS, HEPES), those biolabelled proteins exhibit a good stability. No significant quenching effect of the fluorescent transferrin has been detected after iron loading of iron-free transferrin (apoTf) and in the presence of a specific polyclonal antibody. Additionally, antibody-induced agglomeration demonstrates no alteration in the protein activity and the receptor target ability. MTT and Vialight Plus tests show no cytotoxicity of these labelled proteins in cells (1 {mu}g ml{sup -1}-1 mg ml{sup -1}). Cell line experiments (A549) indicate also an uptake of the iron loaded fluorescent proteins inside cells. These remarkable data highlight the potential of a new type of non-toxic fluorescent transferrin for imaging and targeting.

  18. Photoluminescent carbon quantum dots as a directly film-forming phosphor towards white LEDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Feng; Feng, Xiaoting; Zhang, Yi; Yan, Lingpeng; Yang, Yongzhen; Liu, Xuguang

    2016-04-01

    Photoluminescent organosilane-functionalized carbon quantum dots (CQDs), 3.0-3.5 nm in diameter, were synthesized via a facile hydrothermal method using citric acid monohydrate as a precursor and N-(3-(trimethoxysilyl) propyl) ethylenediamine as a coordinating and passivation agent. The optical properties of the as-obtained CQDs were investigated in detail. The CQD aqueous solution emits bright blue-white light under ultraviolet (UV) illumination with a quantum yield of 57.3% and high red-green-blue (RGB) spectral composition of 60.1%, and in particular the CQDs exhibit excitation-independent photoluminescence. The CQDs have a narrow size distribution around 3.1 nm and good film-forming ability through simple heat-treatment. By virtue of these excellent optical characteristics and good film-forming ability, a white light-emitting device (LED) was fabricated by combining a UV-LED chip with a single CQD phosphor film, which exhibited cool white light with a CIE coordinate of (0.31, 0.36), a color rendering index of 84 and a correlated color temperature of 6282 K. In addition, the white LED exhibits good optical stability under various working currents and for different working time intervals. Moreover, the interaction between the carbogenic core and surface groups was discussed using the DMol3 program based on density functional theory. This research suggests the great potential of CQDs for solid-state lighting systems and reveals the effect of the surface state on the photoluminescent mechanism of CQDs.

  19. Photoluminescent carbon quantum dots as a directly film-forming phosphor towards white LEDs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Feng; Feng, Xiaoting; Zhang, Yi; Yan, Lingpeng; Yang, Yongzhen; Liu, Xuguang

    2016-04-28

    Photoluminescent organosilane-functionalized carbon quantum dots (CQDs), 3.0-3.5 nm in diameter, were synthesized via a facile hydrothermal method using citric acid monohydrate as a precursor and N-(3-(trimethoxysilyl) propyl) ethylenediamine as a coordinating and passivation agent. The optical properties of the as-obtained CQDs were investigated in detail. The CQD aqueous solution emits bright blue-white light under ultraviolet (UV) illumination with a quantum yield of 57.3% and high red-green-blue (RGB) spectral composition of 60.1%, and in particular the CQDs exhibit excitation-independent photoluminescence. The CQDs have a narrow size distribution around 3.1 nm and good film-forming ability through simple heat-treatment. By virtue of these excellent optical characteristics and good film-forming ability, a white light-emitting device (LED) was fabricated by combining a UV-LED chip with a single CQD phosphor film, which exhibited cool white light with a CIE coordinate of (0.31, 0.36), a color rendering index of 84 and a correlated color temperature of 6282 K. In addition, the white LED exhibits good optical stability under various working currents and for different working time intervals. Moreover, the interaction between the carbogenic core and surface groups was discussed using the DMol(3) program based on density functional theory. This research suggests the great potential of CQDs for solid-state lighting systems and reveals the effect of the surface state on the photoluminescent mechanism of CQDs.

  20. ALMA observations of atomic carbon in z ∼ 4 dusty star-forming galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bothwell, M. S.; Aguirre, J. E.; Aravena, M.; Bethermin, M.; Bisbas, T. G.; Chapman, S. C.; De Breuck, C.; Gonzalez, A. H.; Greve, T. R.; Hezaveh, Y.; Ma, J.; Malkan, M.; Marrone, D. P.; Murphy, E. J.; Spilker, J. S.; Strandet, M.; Vieira, J. D.; Weiß, A.

    2017-04-01

    We present Atacama Large Millimeter Array [C I](1 - 0) (rest frequency 492 GHz) observations for a sample of 13 strongly lensed dusty star-forming galaxies (DSFGs) originally discovered at 1.4 mm in a blank-field survey by the South Pole Telescope (SPT). We compare these new data with available [C I] observations from the literature, allowing a study of the interstellar medium (ISM) properties of ∼30 extreme DSFGs spanning a redshift range 2 modern photodissociation region code (3D-PDR) to assess the physical conditions (including the density, UV radiation field strength and gas temperature) within the ISM of the DSFGs in our sample. We find that the ISM within our DSFGs is characterized by dense gas permeated by strong UV fields. We note that previous efforts to characterize photodissociation region regions in DSFGs may have significantly under-estimated the density of the ISM. Combined, our analysis suggests that the ISM of extreme dusty starbursts at high redshift consists of dense, carbon-rich gas not directly comparable to the ISM of starbursts in the local Universe.

  1. Magnetic properties of novel superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoclusters and their peculiarity under annealing treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tadic, Marin, E-mail: marint@vinca.rs [Condensed Matter Physics Laboratory, Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, University of Belgrade, POB 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia); Kralj, Slavko [Department for Materials Synthesis, Jožef Stefan Institute, Ljubljana SI-1000 (Slovenia); Nanos Scientificae d.o.o. (Nanos Sci.), Teslova 30, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Jagodic, Marko [Institute of Mathematics, Physics and Mechanics, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Hanzel, Darko [Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Makovec, Darko [Department for Materials Synthesis, Jožef Stefan Institute, Ljubljana SI-1000 (Slovenia)

    2014-12-15

    nanoparticles’ at the high annealing temperatures, which resulted in the formation of amorphous carbon inside the nanocluster.

  2. NanoClusters Enhance Drug Delivery in Mechanical Ventilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pornputtapitak, Warangkana

    The overall goal of this thesis was to develop a dry powder delivery system for patients on mechanical ventilation. The studies were divided into two parts: the formulation development and the device design. The pulmonary system is an attractive route for drug delivery since the lungs have a large accessible surface area for treatment or drug absorption. For ventilated patients, inhaled drugs have to successfully navigate ventilator tubing and an endotracheal tube. Agglomerates of drug nanoparticles (also known as 'NanoClusters') are fine dry powder aerosols that were hypothesized to enable drug delivery through ventilator circuits. This Thesis systematically investigated formulations of NanoClusters and their aerosol performance in a conventional inhaler and a device designed for use during mechanical ventilation. These engineered powders of budesonide (NC-Bud) were delivered via a MonodoseRTM inhaler or a novel device through commercial endotracheal tubes, and analyzed by cascade impaction. NC-Bud had a higher efficiency of aerosol delivery compared to micronized stock budesonide. The delivery efficiency was independent of ventilator parameters such as inspiration patterns, inspiration volumes, and inspiration flow rates. A novel device designed to fit directly to the ventilator and endotracheal tubing connections and the MonodoseRTM inhaler showed the same efficiency of drug delivery. The new device combined with NanoCluster formulation technology, therefore, allowed convenient and efficient drug delivery through endotracheal tubes. Furthermore, itraconazole (ITZ), a triazole antifungal agent, was formulated as a NanoCluster powder via milling (top-down process) or precipitation (bottom-up process) without using any excipients. ITZ NanoClusters prepared by wet milling showed better aerosol performance compared to micronized stock ITZ and ITZ NanoClusters prepared by precipitation. ITZ NanoClusters prepared by precipitation methods also showed an amorphous state

  3. Synthesis, Growing Processes and Physical Properties of CdS Nanoclusters in Y-Zeolite Studied by Positron Annihilation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Direct synthesis of CdS nanoclusters within the pore structure of Y zeolite was made. The location of CdS nanoclusters inside Y zeolite hosts was confirmed by the blue-shifted reflection absorption spectra with respected to that of bulk CdS materials. In this paper, we conducted Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectrum (PALS) measurements on a series of CdS/Y zeolite samples and concluded that CdS clusters were not located in supercages but in smaller sodalite cages; as the CdS loading concentration increases to 5 wt%, the discrete CdS cubes begin to form bigger superclusters through interaction. The stability of CdS clusters inside the so- dalite units is due to the coordination of Cd atoms with the framework oxygen atoms of the double six-ring windows. Moreover, PALS reveals some important information of surface states existing on the interfacial layers between CdS clusters and Y zeolite.

  4. Supercharging with m-nitrobenzyl alcohol and propylene carbonate: forming highly charged ions with extended, near-linear conformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Going, Catherine C; Williams, Evan R

    2015-04-07

    The effectiveness of the supercharging reagents m-nitrobenzyl alcohol (m-NBA) and propylene carbonate at producing highly charged protein ions in electrospray ionization is compared. Addition of 5% m-NBA or 15% propylene carbonate increases the average charge of three proteins by ∼21% or ∼23%, respectively, when these ions are formed from denaturing solutions (water/methanol/acetic acid). These results indicate that both reagents are nearly equally effective at supercharging when used at their optimum concentrations. A narrowing of the charge state distribution occurs with both reagents, although this effect is greater for propylene carbonate. Focusing the ion signal into fewer charge states has the advantage of improving sensitivity. The maximum charge state of ubiquitin formed with propylene carbonate is 21+, four charges higher than previously reported. Up to nearly 30% of all residues in a protein can be charged, and the collisional cross sections of the most highly charged ions of both ubiquitin and cytochrome c formed with these supercharging reagents were measured for the first time and found to be similar to those calculated for theoretical highly extended, linear or near-linear conformations. Under native supercharging conditions, m-NBA is significantly more effective at producing high charge states than propylene carbonate.

  5. Plasmon Resonance in A-С : Н Films Modified with Platinum Nanoclusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Prikhodko

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Optical density spectra of amorphous diamond-like films of hydrogenated carbon modified with platinum impurity (a-C : HPt have been investigated. a-C : HPt films were prepared by the method of ion plasma magnetron co-sputtering of graphite and platinum in argon-hydrogen atmosphere. Platinum content in the films was varied from 0 to 9 at. %. In the optical spectra of a-C : HPt films with different Pt content the peaks of resonance absorption in the range from 496 to 501 nm were found, whilst in the spectrum of a-C : H films the absorption peak is absent. The appearance of these absorption peaks in a-C : HPt films is explained by resonance plasmon vibrations of free electrons in platinum nanoclusters. The average diameter of the Pt nanoclusters was estimated using electromagnetic theory of Mie, and it is ~ 5 nm.

  6. The use of renewable energy in the form of methane via electrolytic hydrogen generation using carbon dioxide as the feedstock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Koji; Kumagai, Naokazu; Izumiya, Koichi; Takano, Hiroyuki; Shinomiya, Hiroyuki; Sasaki, Yusuke; Yoshida, Tetsuya; Kato, Zenta

    2016-12-01

    The history reveals the continuous increase in world energy consumption and carbon emissions. For prevention of intolerable global warming and complete exhaustion of fossil fuels we need complete conversion from fossil fuel consumption to renewable energy. We have been performing the research and development of global carbon dioxide recycling for more than 25 years to supply renewable energy to the world in the form of methane produced by the reaction of carbon dioxide captured from chimney with hydrogen generated electrolytically using electricity generated by renewable energy. We created the cathode and anode for electrolytic hydrogen generation and the catalyst for carbon dioxide methanation by the reaction with hydrogen. The methane formation from renewable energy will be the most convenient and efficient key technology for the use of renewable energy by storage of intermittent and fluctuating electricity generated from renewable energy and by regeneration of stable electricity. Domestic and international cooperation of companies for industrialization is in progress.

  7. Straightforward and robust synthesis of monodisperse surface-functionalized gold nanoclusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Varela-Aramburu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Gold nanoclusters are small (1–3 nm nanoparticles with a high surface area that are useful for biomedical studies and drug delivery. The synthesis of small, surface-functionalized gold nanoclusters is greatly dependent on the reaction conditions. Here, we describe a straightforward, efficient and robust room temperature one-pot synthesis of 2 nm gold nanoclusters using thioglucose as a reducing and stabilizing agent, which was discovered by serendipity. The resultant monodisperse gold nanoclusters are more stable than those generated using some other common methods. The carboxylic acid contained in the stabilizing agent on the cluster surface serves as anchor for nanocluster functionalization. Alternatively, the addition of thiols serves to functionalize the nanoclusters. The resulting non-cytotoxic nanoclusters are taken up by cells and constitute a tuneable platform for biomedical applications including drug delivery.

  8. Straightforward and robust synthesis of monodisperse surface-functionalized gold nanoclusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela-Aramburu, Silvia; Wirth, Richard; Lai, Chian-Hui; Orts-Gil, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    Summary Gold nanoclusters are small (1–3 nm) nanoparticles with a high surface area that are useful for biomedical studies and drug delivery. The synthesis of small, surface-functionalized gold nanoclusters is greatly dependent on the reaction conditions. Here, we describe a straightforward, efficient and robust room temperature one-pot synthesis of 2 nm gold nanoclusters using thioglucose as a reducing and stabilizing agent, which was discovered by serendipity. The resultant monodisperse gold nanoclusters are more stable than those generated using some other common methods. The carboxylic acid contained in the stabilizing agent on the cluster surface serves as anchor for nanocluster functionalization. Alternatively, the addition of thiols serves to functionalize the nanoclusters. The resulting non-cytotoxic nanoclusters are taken up by cells and constitute a tuneable platform for biomedical applications including drug delivery. PMID:27826501

  9. Ligand-Induced Stability of Gold Nanoclusters: Thiolate versus Selenolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurashige, Wataru; Yamaguchi, Masaki; Nobusada, Katsuyuki; Negishi, Yuichi

    2012-09-20

    Thiolate-protected gold nanoclusters have attracted considerable attention as building blocks for new functional materials and have been extensively researched. Some studies have reported that changing the ligand of these gold nanoclusters from thiolate to selenolate increases cluster stability. To confirm this, in this study, we compare the stabilities of precisely synthesized [Au25(SC8H17)18](-) and [Au25(SeC8H17)18](-) against degradation in solution, thermal dissolution, and laser fragmentation. The results demonstrate that changing the ligand from thiolate to selenolate increases cluster stability in reactions involving dissociation of the gold-ligand bond but reduces cluster stability in reactions involving intramolecular dissociation of the ligand. These results reveal that using selenolate ligands makes it possible to produce gold clusters that are more stable against degradation in solution than thiolate-protected gold nanoclusters.

  10. Control on Crystal Forms of Ultrafine Barium Carbonate Particles and Study on its Mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Barium carbonate particles were prepared by using homogeneous precipitation method and co-precipitation method respectively. Through adding different crystalline controlling modifiers, Barium carbonate particles in five different shapes including linear, needle-like, pillarlike, sphere-like and dumbbell-like were synthesized. These particles were characterized by SEM and XRD, and their synthetic mechanism was discussed in this paper.

  11. Carbon Metabolism, Uptake Kinetics, and Export: how Watershed Form Influences Carbon Mobilization and In-Stream Transformations in Headwater Catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seybold, E. C.; McGlynn, B. L.

    2014-12-01

    Previous research has demonstrated the highly dynamic nature of hydrologic connectivity, and the vertical and spatial expansion of the active watershed area during wet periods. While activation of variable DOM and solute sources during expansion and contraction periods has been well documented in a number of systems, changes in nutrient loading to streams have rarely been linked explicitly to in-stream function. To this end, we investigated the linkages between terrestrial mobilization of DOC and DIC, in-stream biogeochemical cycling, and downstream transport across scales in two geomorphically contrasting watersheds located in Tenderfoot Creek Experimental Forest, Montana. We deployed a network of in-situ high frequency sensors with a focus on CO2, dissolved oxygen, fluorescent DOM, nitrate, and a suite of supporting chemical constituents every 30 minutes beginning with the onset of snowmelt and through summer baseflow recession. Our results suggest that DOM and DIC fluxes, as well as ecosystem processes such as metabolism, were coupled to watershed scale carbon accumulation and mobilization. In both watersheds, metabolism tracked the temporal trends of DOM loading from the terrestrial landscape, indicating that the streams are actively transforming allochthonous organic materials during transport. Headwater stream reaches in the watershed with more hydrologically connected riparian source areas exhibited elevated metabolism, carbon uptake, and carbon export as compared to streams in the watershed with less riparian connectivity, suggesting that the degree of riparian connectivity may explain spatial variation in metabolism and in-stream carbon cycling within and across stream networks. Ultimately, this study highlights the tight coupling between terrestrial uplands and in-stream ecosystem processes in headwater catchments, and identifies spatio-temporal variation in hydrologic connectivity as a key driver of in-stream metabolic variation. We posit that the

  12. Magnetic properties of colloidal cobalt nanoclusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torchio, R; Meneghini, C; Mobilio, S; Capellini, G [Dipartimento di Fisica ' E. Amaldi' , Universita di Roma Tre, via della Vasca Navale 84, I-00146 Roma (Italy); Prieto, A Garcia; Alonso, J; Fdez-Gubieda, M L [Departamento de Electricidad y Electronica y Fisica Aplicada I, Universidad del PaIs Vasco (Spain); Liveri, V Turco; Ruggirello, A M [Dipartimento di Chimica Fisica ' F. Accascina' , Universita di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, Parco d' Orleans II, Edificio 17, 90128 Palermo (Italy); Longo, A [ISMN, Istituto per lo Studio dei Materiali Nanostrutturati, CNR, Via U. La Malfa 153, 90146 Palermo (Italy); Neisius, T, E-mail: torchio@fis.uniroma3.i [Universite Paul CEZANNE, Faculte des Sciences et Techniques, Marseille (France)

    2010-01-01

    Co nanoclusters were synthesized by an inverse-micelle chemical route. The magnetic and microstructural properties of the nanoparticles have been analyzed as a function of the surfactant (AOT and DEHP) and the drying method. Microstructural analysis has been performed by TEM and XANES; magnetic properties have been studied by hysteresis loops and zero-field cooling - field cooling (ZFC-FC) curves. TEM images show 2 to 4 nm sized particles spherical in shape. XANES measurements point out a significant presence of Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}with metallic Co and some Co{sup 2+} bound to the surfactant. The presence of antiferromagnetic Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} explains the magnetic transition observed at low T in both ZFC-FC measurements and hysteresis loops. Finally, the presence of magnetic interactions explains the bigger effective cluster size obtained from hysteresis loops fits (6-10 nm) compared to the sizes observed by TEM (2-4 nm).

  13. Quantum confinement in GaP nanoclusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurich, B.K.; Smith, D.C.; Healy, M.D.

    1994-06-01

    We have prepared GaP and GaAs nanoclusters from organometallic condensation reactions of E[Si(ChH{sub 3})3]3 (E = P, As) and GaCl{sub 3}. The size of the as synthesized clusters is 10 {Angstrom} to 15 {Angstrom}. Larger clusters of 20 {Angstrom} to 30 {Angstrom} size were obtained by thermal annealing of the as grown material. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy confirm the high crystalline quality. A lattice contraction of 6.7% could be seen for 10 {Angstrom} sized GaAs clusters. The clusters are nearly spherical in shape. Optical absorption spectra show a distinct line which can be assigned to the fundamental transition of the quantum confined electronic state. The measured blue shift, with respect to the GaP bulk absorption edge is 0.53 eV. As the cluster is smaller than the exciton radius, we can calculate the cluster size from this blue shift and obtain 20.2 {Angstrom}, consistent with the results from X-ray diffraction of 19.5 {Angstrom} for the same sample.

  14. Catalytic photooxidation of pentachlorophenol using semiconductor nanoclusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WILCOXON,JESS P.

    2000-04-17

    Pentachlorophenol (PCP) is a toxic chlorinated aromatic molecule widely used as fungicide, a bactericide and a wood preservation, and thus ubiquitous in the environment. The authors report photo-oxidation of PCP using a variety of nanosize semiconductor metal oxides and sulfides in both aqueous and polar organic solvents and compare the photo-oxidation kinetics of these nanoclusters to widely studied bulk powders like Degussa P-25 TiO{sub 2} and CdS. They study both the light intensity dependence of PCP photooxidation for nanosize SnO{sub 2} and the size dependence of PCP photooxidation for both nanosize SnO{sub 2} and MoS{sub 2}. They find an extremely strong size dependence for the latter which they attribute to its size-dependent band gap and the associated change in redox potentials due to quantum confinement of the hole-electron pair. The authors show that nanosize MoS{sub 2} with a diameter of d=3.0 nm and an absorbance edge of {approximately}450 nm is a very effective photooxidation catalyst for complete PCP mineralization, even when using only visible light irradiation.

  15. Correlation effects in Auger spectra of Ni and Cu nanoclusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Troyan, V.I.; Borisyuk, P.V.; Kashurnikov, V.A. [National Research Nuclear University (MEPhI), 31 Kashirskoye shosse, 115409, Moscow (Russian Federation); Krasavin, A.V., E-mail: avkrasavin@gmail.com [National Research Nuclear University (MEPhI), 31 Kashirskoye shosse, 115409, Moscow (Russian Federation); Borman, V.D.; Tronin, V.I. [National Research Nuclear University (MEPhI), 31 Kashirskoye shosse, 115409, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2013-01-17

    Results of experimental research of exciton-like two-hole states in nanoclusters of narrow-band metals (Ni, Cu) on surface of high-oriented pyrolitic graphite by X-ray photoelectron and Auger electron spectroscopy are presented. It was found that the evolution of the electronic structure in Ni nanoclusters with the decreasing of their sizes can lead to appearance of long-living two-hole states in the valence band. One-particle and two-particle density of states are analyzed, and the Auger-electron spectra confirming the presence of the bound and localized states are obtained.

  16. Magnetic and optoelectronic properties of gold nanocluster-thiophene assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Wei; Lohrman, Jessica; Ren, Shenqiang

    2014-07-07

    Nanohybrids consisting of Au nanocluster and polythiophene nanowire assemblies exhibit unique thermal-responsive optical behaviors and charge-transfer controlled magnetic and optoelectronic properties. The ultrasmall Au nanocluster enhanced photoabsorption and conductivity effectively improves the photocurrent of nanohybrid based photovoltaics, leading to an increase of power conversion efficiency by 14 % under AM 1.5 illumination. In addition, nanohybrids exhibit electric field controlled spin resonance and magnetic field sensing behaviors, which open up the potential of charge-transfer complex system where the magnetism and optoelectronics interact.

  17. Electrochemical Behaviors of Graphite in an Ethylene Carbonate-Based Electrolyte Containing Two Different Types of Film- Forming Additive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sa Rang Yoon and Soon-Ki Jeong

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Electrochemical reactions occurring at a graphite electrode were investigated to gain insight into the effects of film-forming additives such as vinylene carbonate, fluoroethlyene carbonate (FEC and lithium bis(oxalato borate (LiBOB on surface film formation on the electrode. The surface film generated in the presence of a mixture of FEC and LiBOB was found to have the certain characteristics that are important in the initial charging and discharging process. The mixture produced a highly resistive film on the graphite electrode, resulting in an improvement in Coulombic efficiency.

  18. Polyelectrolyte-assisted preparation of gold nanocluster-doped silica particles with high incorporation efficiency and improved stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haonan; Huang, Zhenzhen; Guo, Zilong; Yang, Wensheng

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, we reported an approach for efficient incorporation of glutathione-capped gold nanoclusters (GSH-Au NCs) into silica particles with the assistance of a polyelectrolyte, poly-diallyldimethyl-ammoniumchloride (PDDA). In this approach, the negatively charged GSH-Au NCs were firstly mixed with the positively charged PDDA to form PDDA-Au NC complexes. Then, the complexes were added into a pre-hydrolyzed Stöber system to get the Au NCs-doped silica particles. With increased ratio of PDDA in the complexes, the negative charges on surface of the Au NCs were neutralized gradually and finally reversed to positive in presence of excess PDDA, which facilitated the incorporation of the Au NCs into the negatively charged silica matrix. Under the optimal amount of PDDA in the complexes, the incorporation efficiency of Au NCs could be as high as 88%. After being incorporated into the silica matrix, the Au NCs become much robust against pH and heavy metal ions attributed to the protection effect of silica and PDDA. This approach was also extendable to highly efficient incorporation of other negatively charged metal nanoclusters, such as bovine serum albumin-capped Cu nanoclusters, into silica matrix.

  19. Photo-induced nonlinear absorption in carbon nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zatrudina, Rimma Sh.; Gribkov, Vladislav Yu.

    2017-05-01

    Photoinduced nonlinear absorption of new carbon nanoparticles - astralenes and two types of carbon nanoclusters was investigated. The nonlinear absorption of aqueous suspensions of astralenes and solutions of carbon nanoclusters was studied by the method of z-scanning with Nd3+ -glass laser (wavelength λ = 1064 nm) in Q-switching regimes. A numerical model of the propagation of the laser pulse in a medium with reverse saturable absorption was created. Relaxation time of the first exited state and the ratio of absorption cross-sections of the first exited and ground states for the researched types of carbon nanoparticles were determined by the numerical simulation.

  20. Biologically formed calcium carbonate, a durable plugging agent for enhanced oil recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemati, M. [University of Saskatchewan, Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Voordouw, G. [University of Calgary, Dept. of Biological Sciences, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2004-02-01

    The use of bacterially precipitated inorganic compounds such as calcium carbonate and silica have been suggested as an effective method for selective plugging of reservoirs as a means to improve microscopic and volumetric sweep efficiencies within a given geological formation. In this paper controlled enzymatic and bacterial formation of calcium carbonate were studied using a purified urease enzyme and a bacterium isolated from a Canadian oil field. Results showed that the quantity of produced calcium carbonate in the presence of bacteria was dependent on urea concentration. The highest amount achieved was 15 g/L urea. Enzymatically, the maximum concentration of calcium carbonate was 2.6 times higher than that achieved in the presence of bacteria (57.6 g/L vs 21.5 g/L). The production of calcium carbonate appeared to be less sensitive to temperature in the presence of bacteria, whereas production rates were enhanced with the urease enzyme as the temperature was increased from 20 degrees C to 50 degrees C. Plugging studies in unconsolidated porous media and in a core-flooding system with Beria sandstone indicated that in situ formation of calcium carbonate could effectively decrease the permeability of the porous media. Nevertheless, it should be noted that plugging by biomass is not permanent, and permeabilities will increase as degradation of bacterial cells progresses. 5 refs., 4 tabs., 1 fig.

  1. Recyclable magnetic nanocluster crosslinked with poly(ethylene oxide)-block-poly(2-vinyl-4,4-dimethylazlactone) copolymer for adsorption with antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prai-In, Yingrak; Boonthip, Chatchai; Rutnakornpituk, Boonjira; Wichai, Uthai; Montembault, Véronique; Pascual, Sagrario; Fontaine, Laurent; Rutnakornpituk, Metha

    2016-10-01

    Surface modification of magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) with poly(ethylene oxide)-block-poly(2-vinyl-4,4-dimethylazlactone) (PEO-b-PVDM) diblock copolymers and its application as recyclable magnetic nano-support for adsorption with antibody were reported herein. PEO-b-PVDM copolymers were first synthesized via a reversible addition-fragmentation chain-transfer (RAFT) polymerization using poly(ethylene oxide) chain-transfer agent as a macromolecular chain transfer agent to mediate the RAFT polymerization of VDM. They were then grafted on amino-functionalized MNP by coupling with some azlactone rings of the PVDM block to form magnetic nanoclusters with tunable cluster size. The nanocluster size could be tuned by adjusting the chain length of the PVDM block. The nanoclusters were successfully used as efficient and recyclable nano-supports for adsorption with anti-rabbit IgG antibody. They retained higher than 95% adsorption of the antibody during eight adsorption-separation-desorption cycles, indicating the potential feasibility in using this novel hybrid nanocluster as recyclable support in cell separation applications.

  2. Inter-cluster distance dependence of electrical conduction in nanocluster assembled films of silver: a new paradigm for design of nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Chandrahas; Praveen, S G; Kumaran, J T T; Chatterjee, Ashok

    2015-01-08

    The transport properties of films assembled from metal nanoclusters can be significantly different from the metals in their bulk or thin film forms due to quantum confinement effects and several competing energy and length scales. For a film composed of metal nanoclusters as its building blocks, the cluster size and the inter-cluster separation are parameters that can be varied experimentally. Here we show that the electrical conductivity of a film composed of silver nanoclusters can be changed by 9 orders of magnitude as a function of the average inter-cluster separation while keeping the average cluster size same. For inter-cluster separations of 9 nanometres or more the conductivity is insulating type whereas for lesser inter-cluster separations the conductivity behaviour is metallic type with a positive temperature coefficient of resistance. In the intermediate range between the two regions, a very interesting temperature-independent conductivity is seen. Our work provides a new paradigm for design of artificial solid structures composed of nanoclusters. The properties of these nanostructures could be tuned by varying the inter-cluster distances to get the desired properties in the same material.

  3. Stable Carbon Isotope Ratios of Phenolic Compounds in Secondary Particulate Organic Matter Formed by Photooxidation of Toluene

    CERN Document Server

    Irei, Satoshi; Huang, Lin; Auld, Janeen; Collin, Fabrice; Hastie, Donald

    2014-01-01

    Compound-specific stable carbon isotope ratios for phenolic compounds in secondary particulate organic matter (POM) formed by photooxidation of toluene were studied. Secondary POM generated by photooxidation of toluene using a continuous-flow reactor and an 8 cubic meter indoor smog chamber was collected, and then extracted with acetonitrile. Eight phenolic compounds were identified in the extracts by a gas chromatograph coupled with a mass spectrometer, and their compound-specific stable carbon isotope ratios were determined by a gas chromatograph coupled with a combustion furnace followed by an isotope ratio mass spectrometer. The majority of the products, including methylnitrophenols and methylnitrocatechols, were isotopically depleted by 5 to 6 permil compared to the initial isotope ratio for toluene, whereas the isotope ratio for 4_nitrophenol remained the same as the initial isotope ratio for toluene. Based on the reaction mechanisms postulated in literature, stable carbon isotope ratios of these produc...

  4. The new carbon forms in the scientific instrumentation; Las nuevas formas del carbono en la instrumentacion cientifica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saniger B, J.M. [Area de Materiales y Sensores, Centro de Instrumentos, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 70-186, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1999-11-01

    Applications in the development of scientific instrumentation of some of the new forms of carbon are discussed in this work. A short revision is presented of the remaining technical problems of the applications of diamond thin films as active semiconductor elements; heat sinks; X-ray, UV and particle detectors; surface acoustic wave devices, etc. Some advances in the improvement of the surface quality and textural design of diamond films are also presented. On the other hand, the possible implications of carbon nano tubes in scientific instrumentation are also discussed mainly for the development of electronic nano devices. Finally, other promising applications of carbon nano tubes as nano tips for atomic force and scanning tunneling microscopes, as well as nano-host structures for the synthesis of metallic carbide and nitride nano wires are also presented. (Author)

  5. Thermodynamics and kinetics of NaAlH4 nanocluster decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhakta, Raghunandan K; Maharrey, Sean; Stavila, Vitalie; Highley, Aaron; Alam, Todd; Majzoub, Eric; Allendorf, Mark

    2012-06-14

    Reactive nanoparticles are of great interest for applications ranging from catalysis to energy storage. However, efforts to relate cluster size to thermodynamic stability and chemical reactivity are hampered by broad pore size distributions and poorly characterized chemical environments in many microporous templates. Metal hydrides are an important example of this problem. Theoretical calculations suggest that reducing their critical dimension to the nanoscale can in some cases considerably destabilize these materials and there is clear experimental evidence for accelerated kinetics, making hydrogen storage applications more attractive in some cases. However, quantitative measurements establishing the influence of size on thermodynamics are lacking, primarily because carbon aerogels often used as supports provide inadequate control over size and pore chemistry. Here, we employ the nanoporous metal-organic framework (MOF) Cu-BTC (also known as HKUST-1) as a template to synthesize and confine the complex hydride NaAlH(4). The well-defined crystalline structure and monodisperse pore dimensions of this MOF allow detailed, quantitative probing of the thermodynamics and kinetics of H(2) desorption from 1-nm NaAlH(4) clusters (NaAlH(4)@Cu-BTC) without the ambiguity associated with amorphous templates. Hydrogen evolution rates were measured as a function of time and temperature using the Simultaneous Thermogravimetric Modulated Beam Mass Spectrometry method, in which sample mass changes are correlated with a complete analysis of evolved gases. NaAlH(4)@Cu-BTC undergoes a single-step dehydrogenation reaction in which the Na(3)AlH(6) intermediate formed during decomposition of the bulk hydride is not observed. Comparison of the thermodynamically controlled quasi-equilibrium reaction pathways in the bulk and nanoscale materials shows that the nanoclusters are slightly stabilized by confinement, having an H(2) desorption enthalpy that is 7 kJ (mol H(2))(-1) higher than the

  6. Characterization of submonolayer film composed of soft-landed copper nanoclusters on HOPG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mondal, Shyamal, E-mail: shyamal.mondal@saha.ac.in; Das, Pabitra; Chowdhury, Debasree; Bhattacharyya, S. R. [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata-700 064 (India)

    2015-06-24

    Preformed Copper nanoclusters are deposited on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) at very low energy. For the study of chemical composition X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) is performed for a wide range of binding energy without exposing the sample in the ambient. Morphological aspects of the supported clusters are characterized employing high resolution scanning electron microscope (SEM). Different types of morphology are observed depending on the nature of the substrate surface. Big fractal islands are formed on terraces while at the step edges small islands are found to form. Ex-situ cathodoluminescence (CL) measurement shows peak at 558 nm wavelength which corresponds to the band gap of 2.22 eV which is due to Cu{sub 2}O nanocrystals formed due to oxidation of the deposited film in ambient.

  7. Amine Reactivity with Nanoclusters of Sulfuric Acid and Ammonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, M. V.; Bzdek, B. R.; DePalma, J.

    2011-12-01

    Alkyl amines have emerged as key species in new particle formation and growth. This interest is reinforced by ambient measurements of amines (e.g. Smith et al., 2010) and enhanced levels of nitrogen (e.g. Bzdek et al., 2011) during growth of newly formed particles. An important mechanism of amine uptake is aminium salt formation, either by substituting for ammonium ions that already exist in the particle or by opening new channels for salt formation that are not favorable with ammonia. This presentation will focus on recent experimental and computational work in our group to study amine uptake into charged nanoclusters of sulfuric acid and ammonia. In the experimental work, clusters are produced by electrospray of an ammonium sulfate solution and then drawn into a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer where a specific cluster is isolated and exposed to amine vapor. We find that amine reactivity is dependent on the size, composition and charge of the isolated cluster. For small clusters of either polarity, all ammonium ions reside on the surface and amine substitution occurs with near unit reaction probability. As the cluster size increases, an ammonium ion can be encapsulated in the center of the cluster, which provides a steric hindrance to amine substitution. Negatively charged clusters are more likely to be acidic than positively charged clusters. For acidic clusters, incoming amine molecules first substitute for preexisting ammonium ions and then add to the cluster until a "neutralized" aminium bisulfate composition is reached. Computational studies of these clusters provide fundamental insight into the thermodynamics and kinetics of amine uptake.

  8. Distinct metal-exchange pathways of doped Ag25 nanoclusters

    KAUST Repository

    Bootharaju, Megalamane Siddaramappa

    2016-09-09

    Atomically precise metal nanoclusters (NCs) containing more than one type of metal atom (i.e., doped or alloyed), due to synergistic effects, open new avenues for engineering the catalytic and optical properties of NCs in a manner that homometal NCs cannot. Unfortunately, it is still a major challenge to controllably introduce multimetallic dopants in NCs, understanding the dopants\\' positions, mechanism, and synergistic effects. To overcome these challenges, we designed a metal-exchange approach involving NCs as molecular templates and metal ions as the source of the incoming dopant. In particular, two structurally similar monodoped silver-rich NCs, [MAg24(SR)(18)](2-) (M = Pd/Pt and SR: thiolate), were synthesized as templates to study their mechanistic transformation in response to the introduction of gold atoms. The controllable incorporation of Au atoms into the MAg24 framework facilitated the elucidation of distinct doping pathways through high-resolution mass spectrometry, optical spectroscopy and elemental analysis. Interestingly, gold replaced the central Pd atom of [PdAg24(SR)(18)](2-) clusters to produce predominantly bimetallic [AuAg24(SR)(18)](-) clusters along with a minor product of an [Au2Ag23(SR)(18)](-) cluster. In contrast, the central Pt atom remained intact in [PtAg24(SR)(18)](2-) clusters, and gold replaced the noncentral Ag atoms to form trimetallic [AuxPtAg24-x(SR)(18)](2-) NCs, where x = 1-2, with a portion of the starting [PtAg24(SR)(18)](2-) NCs remaining. This study reveals some of the unusual metal-exchange pathways of doped NCs and the important role played by the initial metal dopant in directing the position of a second dopant in the final product.

  9. A complementary palette of NanoCluster Beacons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obliosca, Judy M; Babin, Mark C; Liu, Cong; Liu, Yen-Liang; Chen, Yu-An; Batson, Robert A; Ganguly, Mainak; Petty, Jeffrey T; Yeh, Hsin-Chih

    2014-10-28

    NanoCluster Beacons (NCBs), which use few-atom DNA-templated silver clusters as reporters, are a type of activatable molecular probes that are low-cost and easy to prepare. While NCBs provide a high fluorescence enhancement ratio upon activation, their activation colors are currently limited. Here we report a simple method to design NCBs with complementary emission colors, creating a set of multicolor probes for homogeneous, separation-free detection. By systematically altering the position and the number of cytosines in the cluster-nucleation sequence, we have tuned the activation colors of NCBs to green (C8-8, 460 nm/555 nm); yellow (C5-5, 525 nm/585 nm); red (C3-4, 580 nm/635 nm); and near-infrared (C3-3, 645 nm/695 nm). At the same NCB concentration, the activated yellow NCB (C5-5) was found to be 1.3 times brighter than the traditional red NCB (C3-4). Three of the four colors (green, yellow, and red) were relatively spectrally pure. We also found that subtle changes in the linker sequence (down to the single-nucleotide level) could significantly alter the emission spectrum pattern of an NCB. When the length of linker sequences was increased, the emission peaks were found to migrate in a periodic fashion, suggesting short-range interactions between silver clusters and nucleobases. Size exclusion chromatography results indicated that the activated NCBs are more compact than their native duplex forms. Our findings demonstrate the unique photophysical properties and environmental sensitivities of few-atom DNA-templated silver clusters, which are not seen before in common organic dyes or luminescent crystals.

  10. Switching a Nanocluster Core from Hollow to Non-hollow

    KAUST Repository

    Bootharaju, Megalamane Siddaramappa

    2016-03-24

    Modulating the structure-property relationship in atomically precise nanoclusters (NCs) is vital for developing novel NC materials and advancing their applications. While promising biphasic ligand-exchange (LE) strategies have been developed primarily to attain novel NCs, understanding the mechanistic aspects involved in tuning the core and the ligand-shell of NCs in such biphasic processes is challenging. Here, we design a single phase LE process that enabled us to elucidate the mechanism of how a hollow NC (e.g., [Ag44(SR)30]4-, -SR: thiolate) converts into a non-hollow NC (e.g., [Ag25(SR)18]-), and vice versa. Our study reveals that the complete LE of the hollow [Ag44(SPhF)30]4- NCs (–SPhF: 4-fluorobenzenethiolate) with incoming 2,4-dimethylbenzenethiol (HSPhMe2) induced distortions in the Ag44 structure forming the non-hollow [Ag25(SPhMe2)18]- by a disproportionation mechanism. While the reverse reaction of [Ag25(SPhMe2)18]- with HSPhF prompted an unusual dimerization of Ag25, followed by a rearrangement step that reproduces the original [Ag44(SPhF)30]4-. Remarkably, both the forward and the backward reactions proceed through similar size intermediates that seem to be governed by the boundary conditions set by the thermodynamic and electronic stability of the hollow and non-hollow metal cores. Furthermore, the resizing of NCs highlights the surprisingly long-range effect of the ligands which are felt by atoms far deep in the metal core, thus opening a new path for controlling the structural evolution of nanoparticles.

  11. On the formation of copper nanoparticles in nanocluster aggregation source

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dutka, Mikhail V.; Turkin, Anatoliy A.; Vainchtein, David I.; De Hosson, Jeff Th. M.

    2015-01-01

    The influence of pressure and type of inert gas (Ar and Kr) on the morphology and size distribution of nanoparticles produced in a nanocluster source is studied experimentally. The experimental data are used to validate the model of cluster formation from a supersaturated atomic vapor in an inert bu

  12. On the formation of copper nanoparticles in nanocluster aggregation source

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dutka, Mikhail V.; Turkin, Anatoliy A.; Vainchtein, David I.; De Hosson, Jeff Th. M.

    The influence of pressure and type of inert gas (Ar and Kr) on the morphology and size distribution of nanoparticles produced in a nanocluster source is studied experimentally. The experimental data are used to validate the model of cluster formation from a supersaturated atomic vapor in an inert

  13. Enhanced fluorescence of silver nanoclusters stabilized with branched oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latorre, Alfonso; Lorca, Romina; Zamora, Félix; Somoza, Álvaro

    2013-05-28

    DNA stabilized silver nanoclusters (AgNCs) are promising optical materials, whose fluorescence properties can be tuned by the selection of the DNA sequence employed. In this work we have used modified oligonucleotides in the preparation of AgNCs. The fluorescent intensity obtained was 60 times higher than that achieved with standard oligonucleotides.

  14. Nanoclustering as a dominant feature of plasma membrane organization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia-Parajo, M.F.; Cambi, A.; Torreno-Pina, J.A.; Thompson, N.; Jacobson, K.

    2014-01-01

    Early studies have revealed that some mammalian plasma membrane proteins exist in small nanoclusters. The advent of super-resolution microscopy has corroborated and extended this picture, and led to the suggestion that many, if not most, membrane proteins are clustered at the plasma membrane at

  15. Ultrafast coherence transfer in DNA-templated silver nanoclusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyrhaug, Erling; Bogh, Sidsel Ammitzbøll; Carro, Miguel

    2017-01-01

    DNA-templated silver nanoclusters of a few tens of atoms or less have come into prominence over the last several years due to very strong absorption and efficient emission. Applications in microscopy and sensing have already been realized, however little is known about the excited-state structure...

  16. On the formation of copper nanoparticles in nanocluster aggregation source

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dutka, Mikhail V.; Turkin, Anatoliy A.; Vainchtein, David I.; De Hosson, Jeff Th. M.

    2015-01-01

    The influence of pressure and type of inert gas (Ar and Kr) on the morphology and size distribution of nanoparticles produced in a nanocluster source is studied experimentally. The experimental data are used to validate the model of cluster formation from a supersaturated atomic vapor in an inert bu

  17. ELASTO-PLASTIC DEFORMATION OF COMPOSITE POWDERS WITH LAYERED CARBON AND CARBIDE-FORMING ELEMENT COATING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Kovalevsky

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Coating structure formation under magnetron spraying of titanium and carbon cathodes and combined cathodes, namely cobalt (EP 131 – nickel, tungsten – carbon have been investigated under conditions of carbide separate synthesis within the temperature range of 650–1200 °C. Usage of cobalt and nickel particles as matrix material leads to their rapid thermal expansion under heating during sintering process in the dilatometer. Subsequent plastic deformation of sintered samples provides obtaining a composite powder material that is a composite with framing structure of cobalt, titanium and tungsten carbides in the coatings.

  18. On the Effect of Carbon Content to the Mechanical Properties and Microstructure of Green Compacts Formed at above Ambient Temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Md. Mujibur Rahman; Sany Shahriman Md Nor; Hendri Yani Rahman

    2011-01-01

    Friction force is generated during the generation of green compacts from metal powder, which obviously gives adverse effect to the mechanical properties and microstructure of the green compacts. In this study, fine carbon powder is used to minimize the interparticle as well as die wall frictions and as alloying element hence high density yet defect-free near-net shape or net shape mechanical components can be produced. Powder forming at elevated temperature is a relatively new technology henc...

  19. Polarization properties of fluorescent BSA protected Au25 nanoclusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raut, Sangram; Chib, Rahul; Rich, Ryan; Shumilov, Dmytro; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Gryczynski, Ignacy

    2013-03-01

    BSA protected gold nanoclusters (Au25) are attracting a great deal of attention due to their unique spectroscopic properties and possible use in biophysical applications. Although there are reports on synthetic strategies, spectroscopy and applications, little is known about their polarization behavior. In this study, we synthesized the BSA protected Au25 nanoclusters and studied their steady state and time resolved fluorescence properties including polarization behavior in different solvents: glycerol, propylene glycol and water. We demonstrated that the nanocluster absorption spectrum can be separated from the extinction spectrum by subtraction of Rayleigh scattering. The nanocluster absorption spectrum is well approximated by three Gaussian components. By a comparison of the emissions from BSA Au25 clusters and rhodamine B in water, we estimated the quantum yield of nanoclusters to be higher than 0.06. The fluorescence lifetime of BSA Au25 clusters is long and heterogeneous with an average value of 1.84 μs. In glycerol at -20 °C the anisotropy is high, reaching a value of 0.35. However, the excitation anisotropy strongly depends on the excitation wavelengths indicating a significant overlap of the different transition moments. The anisotropy decay in water reveals a correlation time below 0.2 μs. In propylene glycol the measured correlation time is longer and the initial anisotropy depends on the excitation wavelength. BSA Au25 clusters, due to long lifetime and high polarization, can potentially be used in studying large macromolecules such as protein complexes with large molecular weight.BSA protected gold nanoclusters (Au25) are attracting a great deal of attention due to their unique spectroscopic properties and possible use in biophysical applications. Although there are reports on synthetic strategies, spectroscopy and applications, little is known about their polarization behavior. In this study, we synthesized the BSA protected Au25 nanoclusters and

  20. Analysis of the Interphase on Carbon Black Formed in High Voltage Batteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Younesi, Reza; Christiansen, Ane Sælland; Scipioni, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Carbon black (CB) additives commonly used to increase the electrical conductivity of electrodes in Li-ion batteries are generally believed to be electrochemically inert additives in cathodes. Decomposition of electrolyte in the surface region of CB in Li-ion cells at high voltages up to 4.9 V...

  1. Stable carbon isotope fractionation of organic cyst-forming dinoflagellates: Evaluating the potential for a CO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoins, M.; Van de Waal, D.B.; Eberlein, T.; Reichart, G.-J.; Rost, B.; Sluijs, A.

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decades, significant progress has been made regarding the quantification and mechanistic understanding of stable carbon isotope fractionation (13C fractionation) in photosynthetic unicellular organisms in response to changes in the partial pressure of atmospheric CO2 (pCO2). However, h

  2. Fumaric acid: an overlooked form of fixed carbon in Arabidopsis and other plant species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chia, D.W.; Yoder, T.J.; Reiter, W.D.; Gibson, S.I.

    2000-10-01

    Photoassimilates are used by plants for production of energy, as carbon skeletons and in transport of fixed carbon between different plant organs. Many studies have been devoted to characterizing the factors that. regulate photoassimilate concentrations in different plant species. Most studies examining photoassimilate concentrations in C{sub 3} plants have focused on analyzing starch and soluble sugars. However, work presented here demonstrates that a number of C{sub 3} plants, including the popular model organism Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh., and agriculturally important plants, such as soybean [Glycine ma (L.) Merr.], contain significant quantities of furnaric acid. In fact, furnaric acid can accumulate to levels of several mg per g fresh weight in A-abidopsis leaves, often exceeding starch and soluble sugar levels. Furnaric acid is a component of the tricarboxylic acid cycle and, like starch and soluble sugars, can be metabolized to yield energy and carbon skeletons for production of other compounds. Fumaric acid concentrations increase with plant age and light intensity in Arabidopsis leaves. Arabidopsis phloem exudates contain significant quantities of fumaric acid, raising the possibility that fumaric acid may function in carbon transport.

  3. Dimethylammonium hexanoate stabilized rhodium(0) nanoclusters identified as true heterogeneous catalysts with the highest observed activity in the dehydrogenation of dimethylamine-borane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahmakiran, Mehmet; Ozkar, Saim

    2009-09-21

    Herein we report the discovery of a superior dimethylamine-borane dehydrogenation catalyst, more active than the prior best heterogeneous catalyst (Jaska, C. A.; Manners, I. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2004, 126, 9776) reported to date for the dehydrogenation of dimethylamine-borane. The new catalyst system consists of rhodium(0) nanoclusters stabilized by C(5)H(11)COO(-) anions and Me(2)H(2)N(+) cations and can reproducibly be formed from the reduction of rhodium(II) hexanoate during dehydrogenation of dimethylamine-borane at room temperature. Rhodium(0) nanoclusters in an average particle size of 1.9 +/- 0.6 nm Rh(0)(approximately 190) nanoclusters) provide 1040 turnovers over 26 h with a record initial turnover frequency (TOF) of 60 h(-1) (the average TOF value is 40 h(-1)) in the dehydrogenation of dimethylamine-borane, yielding 100% of the cyclic product (Me(2)NBH(2))(2) at room temperature. The work reported here also includes the full experimental details of the following major components: (i) Characterization of dimethylammonium hexanoate stabilized rhodium(0) nanoclusters by using TEM, STEM, EDX, XRD, UV-vis, XPS, FTIR, (1)H, (13)C, and (11)B NMR spectroscopy, and elemental analysis. (ii) Collection of a wealth of previously unavailable kinetic data to determine the rate law and activation parameters for catalytic dehydrogenation of dimethylamine-borane. (iii) Monitoring of the formation kinetics of the rhodium(0) nanoclusters by a fast dimethylamine-borane dehydrogenation catalytic reporter reaction (Watzky, M. A.; Finke, R. G. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1997, 119, 10382) at various [Me(2)NH.BH(3)]/[Rh] ratios and temperatures. Significantly, sigmoidal kinetics of catalyst formation was found to be well fit to the two-step, slow nucleation and then autocatalytic surface growth mechanism, A --> B (rate constant k(1)) and A + B --> 2B (rate constant k(2)), in which A is [Rh(C(5)H(11)CO(2))(2)](2) and B is the growing, catalytically active rhodium(0) nanoclusters. (iv) Mercury

  4. Ion-tuned DNA/Ag fluorescent nanoclusters as versatile logic device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tao; Zhang, Libing; Ai, Jun; Dong, Shaojun; Wang, Erkang

    2011-08-23

    A novel kind of versatile logic device has been constructed utilizing ion-tuned DNA/Ag fluorescent nanoclusters, with K(+) and H(+) as two inputs. A well-chosen hairpin DNA with a poly-C loop serves as the template for synthesizing two species of Ag nanoclusters. Several G-tracts and C-tracts on its two terminals enable the hairpin DNA to convert into the G-quadruplex and/or i-motif structures upon input of K(+) and H(+). Such a structural change remarkably influences the spectral behaviors of Ag nanoclusters. In particular, different species of Ag nanoclusters have distinct fluorescence responses to the input of K(+) and H(+). These unique features of DNA/Ag nanoclusters enable multiple logic operations via multichannel fluorescence output, indicating the versatility as a molecular logic device. By altering the specific sequence of the hairpin DNA, more logic gates can be constructed utilizing Ag nanoclusters. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  5. Aqueous-Medium Carbon-Carbon Bond-Forming Radical Reactions Catalyzed by Excited Rhodamine B as a Metal-Free Organic Dye under Visible Light Irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshioka, Eito; Kohtani, Shigeru; Jichu, Takahisa; Fukazawa, Takuya; Nagai, Toyokazu; Kawashima, Akira; Takemoto, Yoshiji; Miyabe, Hideto

    2016-08-19

    The utility of rhodamine B as a water-soluble organic photocatalyst was studied in the cascade radical addition-cyclization-trapping reactions under visible light irradiation. In the presence of (i-Pr)2NEt, the electron transfer from the excited rhodamine B to perfluoroalkyl iodides proceeded smoothly to promote the carbon-carbon bond-forming radical reactions in aqueous media. When i-C3F7I was employed as a radical precursor, the aqueous-medium radical reactions proceeded even in the absence of (i-Pr)2NEt. In these reactions, the direct electron transfer from the excited singlet state of rhodamine B would take place. Furthermore, the cleavage of the C-I bond in less reactive i-PrI could be achieved by the reductive electron transfer from the excited rhodamine B, which was confirmed by the fluorescence quenching of rhodamine B with the addition of i-PrI.

  6. Hydrophilic magnetic nanoclusters with thermo-responsive properties and their drug controlled release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meerod, Siraprapa [Department of Chemistry and Center of Excellence for Innovation in Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Naresuan University, Phitsanulok 65000 (Thailand); Rutnakornpituk, Boonjira; Wichai, Uthai [Department of Chemistry and Center of Excellence for Innovation in Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Naresuan University, Phitsanulok 65000 (Thailand); Center of Excellence in Biomaterials, Faculty of Science, Naresuan University, Phitsanulok 65000 Thailand (Thailand); Rutnakornpituk, Metha, E-mail: methar@nu.ac.th [Department of Chemistry and Center of Excellence for Innovation in Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Naresuan University, Phitsanulok 65000 (Thailand); Center of Excellence in Biomaterials, Faculty of Science, Naresuan University, Phitsanulok 65000 Thailand (Thailand)

    2015-10-15

    Synthesis and drug controlled release properties of thermo-responsive magnetic nanoclusters grafted with poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (poly(NIPAAm)) and poly(NIPAAm-co-poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate) (PEGMA) copolymers were described. These magnetic nanoclusters were synthesized via an in situ radical polymerization in the presence of acrylamide-grafted magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). Poly(NIPAAm) provided thermo-responsive properties, while PEGMA played a role in good water dispersibility to the nanoclusters. The ratios of PEGMA to NIPAAm in the (co)polymerization in the presence of the MNPs were fine-tuned such that the nanoclusters with good water dispersibility, good magnetic sensitivity and thermo responsiveness were obtained. The size of the nanoclusters was in the range of 50–100 nm in diameter with about 100–200 particles/cluster. The nanoclusters were well dispersible in water at room temperature and can be suddenly agglomerated when temperature was increased beyond the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) (32 °C). The release behavior of an indomethacin model drug from the nanoclusters was also investigated. These novel magnetic nanoclusters with good dispersibility in water and reversible thermo-responsive properties might be good candidates for the targeting drug controlled release applications. - Highlights: • Nanoclusters with good water dispersibility and magnetic response were prepared. • They were grafted with thermo-responsive poly(NIPAAm) and/or poly(PEGMA). • Poly(NIPAAm) provided thermo-responsive properties to the nanoclusters. • Poly(PEGMA) provided good water dispersibilityto the nanoclusters. • Accelerated and controllable releases of a drug from the nanoclusters were shown.

  7. All-carbon nanotube diode and solar cell statistically formed from macroscopic network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Albert G. Nasibulin[1,2,3; Adinath M. Funde[3,4; Ilya V. Anoshkin[3; Igor A. Levitskyt[5,6

    2015-01-01

    Schottky diodes and solar cells are statistically created in the contact area between two macroscopic films of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) at the junction of semiconducting and quasi-metallic bundles consisting of several high quality tubes. The n-doping of one of the films allows for photovoltaic action, owing to an increase in the built-in potential at the bundle-to-bundle interface. Statistical analysis demonstrates that the Schottky barrier device contributes significantly to the I-V characteristics, compared to the p-n diode. The upper limit of photovoltaic conversion efficiency has been estimated at N20%, demonstrating that the light energy conversion is very efficient for such a unique solar cell. While there have been multiple studies on rectifying SWNT diodes in the nanoscale environment, this is the first report of a macroscopic all-carbon nanotube diode and solar cell.

  8. A larger pool of ozone-forming carbon compounds in urban atmospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, A.C.; Carslaw, N.; Marriott, P.J.; Kinghorn, R.M.; Morrison, P.; Lee, A.L.; Bartle, K.D.; Pilling, M.J.

    2000-06-15

    Volatile organic compounds play a central role in the processes that generate both urban photochemical smog and tropospheric ozone. For successful and accurate prediction of these pollution episodes, identification of the dominant reactive species within the volatile organic carbon pool is needed. At present, lack of resolution inherent in single-column chromatographic analysis limits such a detailed chemical characterization of the complex urban atmosphere. Here we present an improved method of peak deconvolution from double-column (orthogonal) gas chromatography. This has enabled us to isolate and classify more than 500 chemical species of volatile organic compounds in urban air, including over 100 multi-substituted monoaromatic and volatile oxygenated hydrocarbons. We suggest that previous assessments of reactive carbon species may therefore have underestimated the contribution made by volatile organic compounds to urban pollution, particularly for compounds with more that six carbon atoms. Incorporating these species in predictive models should greatly improve our understanding of photochemical ozone yields and the formation of harmful secondary organic aerosols. (author)

  9. Endohedral confinement of a DNA dodecamer onto pristine carbon nanotubes and the stability of the canonical B form

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Fernando J. A. L.; de Pablo, Juan J.; Mota, José P. B.

    2014-06-01

    Although carbon nanotubes are potential candidates for DNA encapsulation and subsequent delivery of biological payloads to living cells, the thermodynamical spontaneity of DNA encapsulation under physiological conditions is still a matter of debate. Using enhanced sampling techniques, we show for the first time that, given a sufficiently large carbon nanotube, the confinement of a double-stranded DNA segment, 5'-D(*CP*GP*CP*GP*AP*AP*TP*TP*CP*GP*CP*G)-3', is thermodynamically favourable under physiological environments (134 mM, 310 K, 1 bar), leading to DNA-nanotube hybrids with lower free energy than the unconfined biomolecule. A diameter threshold of 3 nm is established below which encapsulation is inhibited. The confined DNA segment maintains its translational mobility and exhibits the main geometrical features of the canonical B form. To accommodate itself within the nanopore, the DNA's end-to-end length increases from 3.85 nm up to approximately 4.1 nm, due to a ˜0.3 nm elastic expansion of the strand termini. The canonical Watson-Crick H-bond network is essentially conserved throughout encapsulation, showing that the contact between the DNA segment and the hydrophobic carbon walls results in minor rearrangements of the nucleotides H-bonding. The results obtained here are paramount to the usage of carbon nanotubes as encapsulation media for next generation drug delivery technologies.

  10. Enhanced electrochemical performance of porous activated carbon by forming composite with graphene as high-performance supercapacitor electrode material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhi-Hang; Yang, Jia-Ying; Wu, Xiong-Wei; Chen, Xiao-Qing; Yu, Jin-Gang; Wu, Yu-Ping

    2017-02-01

    In this work, a novel activated carbon containing graphene composite was developed using a fast, simple, and green ultrasonic-assisted method. Graphene is more likely a framework which provides support for activated carbon (AC) particles to form hierarchical microstructure of carbon composite. Scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area measurement, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), Raman spectra analysis, XRD, and XPS were used to analyze the morphology and surface structure of the composite. The electrochemical properties of the supercapacitor electrode based on the as-prepared carbon composite were investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), charge/discharge, and cycling performance measurements. It exhibited better electrochemical performance including higher specific capacitance (284 F g-1 at a current density of 0.5 A g-1), better rate behavior (70.7% retention), and more stable cycling performance (no capacitance fading even after 2000 cycles). It is easier for us to find that the composite produced by our method was superior to pristine AC in terms of electrochemical performance due to the unique conductive network between graphene and AC.

  11. On the possibility of controlling the hydrophilic/hydrophobic characteristics of toroid Mo138 nanocluster polyoxometalates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzhegorzhevskii, K. V.; Adamova, L. V.; Eremina, E. V.; Ostroushko, A. A.

    2017-03-01

    The possibility of changing the hydrophilic (polar) surfaces of toroid nanocluster polyoxomolibdates to hydrophobic (nonpolar) surfaces via the modification of Mo138 nanoclusters by surfactant molecules (dodecylpyridinium chloride) as a result of the interaction between these compounds in solutions is demonstrated. Benzene and methanol are used as molecular probes (indicators of the condition of nanocluster surfaces). Comparative characteristics of the equilibrium sorption of benzene and methanol vapors on the initial and modified surfaces of the solid polyoxometalate, and data on the sorption of organic molecules on the surfaces of Rhodamine B-modified nanoclusters of the toroid (Mo138) and keplerate (Mo132) types are obtained.

  12. Carbon Fluxes in Dissolved and Gaseous Forms for a Restored Peatland in British Columbia, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Acunha, B.; Johnson, M. S.; Lee, S. C.; Christen, A.

    2016-12-01

    Peatlands are wetlands where gross primary production exceeds organic matter decomposition causing an accumulation of partially decomposed matter, also called peat. These ecosystems can accumulate more carbon than tropical rainforests. However, dissolved and gaseous fluxes of carbon (as dissolved organic carbon (DOC), CO2 and methane (CH4)) must also be considered to determine if these ecosystems are net sinks or sources of greenhouse gases (GHGs) to the atmosphere, which depends in part on the environmental conditions and the state of the ecosystem. We conducted research in Burns Bog, Delta, BC, Canada, a raised domed peat bog located in the Fraser River Delta and one of the largest raised peat bogs on the west coast of the Americas, but which has been heavily impacted by a range of human activities. Currently, ecological restoration efforts are underway by a large-scale ditch blocking program, with the aim to re-establish a high water table. This is approached in partnership with research on the ecosystem services that the bog provides, including its role in a regional GHG inventory. Here we present data on ecosystem-scale fluxes of CO2 and CH4 determined by eddy covariance (EC) on a floating tower platform, and complementary data on (i) evasion fluxes of CO2, CH4 and nitrous oxide (N2O) from the water surface to the atmosphere, and (ii) the flux and composition of dissolved organic carbon in water draining Burns Bog. Concentrations of dissolved CO2, CH4 and N2O were determined by headspace equilibration, and evasion rates from the water surface were quantified and are used to estimate the role of the hydrosphere in the ecosystem-scale measurements. Water samples collected from five saturated areas in the flux tower footprint were analyzed for DOC concentrations and composition. Results indicated that, even though the whole system is a net C sink, the water surface behaved as a source of CO2 and CH4, and a sink for N2O throughout the study period. Drainage waters

  13. Investigation of scale inhibition mechanisms based on the effect of scale inhibitor on calcium carbonate crystal forms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG GuiCai; GE JiJiang; SUN MingQin; PAN BinLin; MAO Tao; SONG ZhaoZheng

    2007-01-01

    To probe the scale inhibition mechanisms, calcium carbonate scale occurring before and after the addition of scale inhibitors was collected. The results from scale SEM confirm that, without scale inhibitor, calcium carbonate scale shows rhombohedron and hexagon, which are the characteristic feathers of calcite. After addition of inhibitors, morphology of scale is changed, and the more efficient the scale inhibitor is, the more greatly the morphology is modified. To elucidate the scale constitute, they were further analyzed by FT-IR, XRD. Besides calcite, vaterite and aragonite occur in calcium carbonate scale after addition of inhibitors, and the higher scale inhibition efficiency is, the more vaterite presents in scale. It can be concluded that the alteration of morphology is ascribed to the change of crystal form. There are three stages in the crystallizing process including occurrence and disappearing of unstable phase, occurrence and disappearing of metastable phase, development of stable phase. Without scale inhibitors, metastable phases usually transform into stable phase, thus the main constitute of formed scale is calcite. When scale inhibitors are added, both formation and transformation of metastable phases are inhibited, which results in the occurrence of aragonite and vaterite. From the fact that more vaterite presents in scale with a more efficient scale inhibitor added, we can see that the function of scale inhibitor is realized mainly by controlling the crystallizing process at the second stage.

  14. Investigation of scale inhibition mechanisms based on the effect of scale inhibitor on calcium carbonate crystal forms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    To probe the scale inhibition mechanisms,calcium carbonate scale occurring before and after the ad- dition of scale inhibitors was collected.The results from scale SEM confirm that,without scale inhibitor, calcium carbonate scale shows rhombohedron and hexagon,which are the characteristic feathers of calcite.After addition of inhibitors,morphology of scale is changed,and the more efficient the scale inhibitor is,the more greatly the morphology is modified.To elucidate the scale constitute,they were further analyzed by FT-IR,XRD.Besides calcite,vaterite and aragonite occur in calcium carbonate scale after addition of inhibitors,and the higher scale inhibition efficiency is,the more vaterite presents in scale.It can be concluded that the alteration of morphology is ascribed to the change of crystal form. There are three stages in the crystallizing process including occurrence and disappearing of unstable phase,occurrence and disappearing of metastable phase,development of stable phase.Without scale inhibitors,metastable phases usually transform into stable phase,thus the main constitute of formed scale is calcite.When scale inhibitors are added,both formation and transformation of metastable phases are inhibited,which results in the occurrence of aragonite and vaterite.From the fact that more vaterite presents in scale with a more efficient scale inhibitor added,we can see that the function of scale inhibitor is realized mainly by controlling the crystallizing process at the second stage.

  15. Extraction of oxidized and reduced forms of uranium from contaminated soils: effects of carbonate concentration and pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ping; Gu, Baohua

    2005-06-15

    Uranium may present in soil as precipitated, sorbed, complexed, and reduced forms, which impact its mobility and fate in the subsurface soil environment. In this study, a uranium-contaminated soil was extracted with carbonate/ bicarbonate at varying concentrations (0-1 M), pHs, and redox conditions in an attempt to evaluate their effects on the extraction efficiency and selectivity for various forms of uranium in the soil. Results indicate that at least three differentforms of uranium existed in the contaminated soil: uranium(VI) phosphate minerals, reduced U(IV) phases, and U(VI) complexed with soil organic matter. A small fraction of U(VI) could be sorbed onto soil minerals. The mechanism involved in the leaching of U(VI) by carbonates appears to involve three processes which may act concurrently or independently: the dissolution of uranium(VI) phosphate and other mineral phases, the oxidation-complexation of U(IV) under oxic conditions, and the desorption of U(VI)-organic matter complexes at elevated pH conditions. This study suggests that, depending on site-specific geochemical conditions, the presence of small quantities of carbonate/bicarbonate could result in a rapid and greatly increased leaching and the mobilization of U(VI) from the contaminated soil. Even the reduced U(IV) phases (only sparingly soluble in water) are subjected to rapid oxidation and therefore potential leaching into the environment.

  16. Surface-Limited Synthesis of Pt Nanocluster Decorated Pd Hierarchical Structures with Enhanced Electrocatalytic Activity toward Oxygen Reduction Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tao; Cao, Guojian; Huang, Qingli; Ma, Yanxia; Wan, Sheng; Zhao, Hong; Li, Na; Sun, Xia; Yin, Fujun

    2015-08-12

    Exploring superior catalysts with high catalytic activity and durability is of significant for the development of an electrochemical device involving the oxygen reduction reaction. This work describes the synthesis of Pt-on-Pd bimetallic heterogeneous nanostructures, and their high electrocatalytic activity toward the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Pt nanoclusters with a size of 1-2 nm were generated on Pd nanorods (NRs) through a modified Cu underpotential deposition (UPD) process free of potential control and a subsequent surface-limited redox reaction. The Pt nanocluster decorated Pd nanostructure with a ultralow Pt content of 1.5 wt % exhibited a mass activity of 105.3 mA mg(-1) (Pt-Pd) toward ORR, comparable to that of the commercial Pt/C catalyst but 4 times higher than that of carbon supported Pd NRs. More importantly, the carbon supported Pt-on-Pd catalyst displays relatively small losses of 16% in electrochemical surface area (ECSA) and 32% in mass activity after 10 000 potential sweeps, in contrast to respective losses of 46 and 64% for the commercial Pt/C catalyst counterpart. The results demonstrated that Pt decoration might be an efficient way to improve the electrocatalytic activity of Pd and in turn allow Pd to be a promising substitution for commercial Pt catalyst.

  17. Mechanistic information on the reductive elimination from cationic trimethylplatinum(IV) complexes to form carbon-carbon bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procelewska, Joanna; Zahl, Achim; Liehr, Günter; van Eldik, Rudi; Smythe, Nicole A; Williams, B Scott; Goldberg, Karen I

    2005-10-31

    Cationic complexes of the type fac-[(L(2))Pt(IV)Me(3)(pyr-X)][OTf] (pyr-X = 4-substituted pyridines; L(2) = diphosphine, viz., dppe = bis(diphenylphosphino)ethane and dppbz = o-bis(diphenylphosphino)benzene; OTf = trifluoromethanesulfonate) undergo C-C reductive elimination reactions to form [L(2)Pt(II)Me(pyr-X)][OTf] and ethane. Detailed studies indicate that these reactions proceed by a two-step pathway, viz., initial reversible dissociation of the pyridine ligand from the cationic complex to generate a five-coordinate Pt(IV) intermediate, followed by irreversible concerted C-C bond formation. The reaction is inhibited by pyridine. The highly positive values for DeltaS()(obs) = +180 +/- 30 J K(-1) mol(-1), DeltaH(obs) = 160 +/- 10 kJ mol(-1), and DeltaV()(obs) = +16 +/- 1 cm(3) mol(-1) can be accounted for in terms of significant bond cleavage and/or partial reduction from Pt(IV) to Pt(II) in going from the ground to the transition state. These cationic complexes have provided the first opportunity to carry out detailed studies of C-C reductive elimination from cationic Pt(IV) complexes in a variety of solvents. The absence of a significant solvent effect for this reaction provides strong evidence that the C-C reductive coupling occurs from an unsaturated five-coordinate Pt(IV) intermediate rather than from a six-coordinate Pt(IV) solvento species.

  18. Forming of carbon fiber reinforced thermoplastic composite tubes - Experimental and numerical approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maron, Bernhard; Garthaus, Christian; Lenz, Florian; Hornig, Andreas; Hübner, Michael; Gude, Maik

    2016-10-01

    Continuous-reinforced thermoplastic composites are of growing importance for series production of lightweight components in manifold industrial areas. Novel manufacturing technologies allow the production of hollow semi-finished products that are post formed to enhance functionality. To maximize efficiency in the development process of such components it is necessary to map the forming processes numerically using Finite Elements(FE)-methods. The aim is to perform feasibility studies at an early stage, reduce development time by virtual process optimization and to generate a detailed understanding of the post formed fiber architecture for further structural-mechanical analysis.

  19. Simulation of the transport of low-energy electrons in various forms of carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terrissol, M.; Combes, M.A.; Patau, J.P. (Centre de Physique Atomique, Toulouse (France))

    1981-10-01

    This work describes a Monte Carlo transport simulation of electrons with energies ranging from 10 eV to 30 keV in homogeneous and porous graphites and amorphous carbon. We have used results of Lindhard theory adapted by Ritchie for the free electron model and by Ashley who takes electron bond into account. In the case of porous graphite we have considered the pore crossing as an interaction with the possibility of surface plasmon creation at interfaces. We compare our results with Jacobi experiments and Ashley calculations.

  20. Stable carbon isotope fractionation of organic cyst-forming dinoflagellates: Evaluating the potential for a CO2 proxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoins, Mirja; Van de Waal, Dedmer B.; Eberlein, Tim; Reichart, Gert-Jan; Rost, Björn; Sluijs, Appy

    2015-07-01

    Over the past decades, significant progress has been made regarding the quantification and mechanistic understanding of stable carbon isotope fractionation (13C fractionation) in photosynthetic unicellular organisms in response to changes in the partial pressure of atmospheric CO2 (pCO2). However, hardly any data is available for organic cyst-forming dinoflagellates while this is an ecologically important group with a unique fossil record. We performed dilute batch experiments with four harmful dinoflagellate species known for their ability to form organic cysts: Alexandrium tamarense, Scrippsiella trochoidea, Gonyaulax spinifera and Protoceratium reticulatum. Cells were grown at a range of dissolved CO2 concentrations characterizing past, modern and projected future values (∼5-50 μmol L-1), representing atmospheric pCO2 of 180, 380, 800 and 1200 μatm. In all tested species, 13C fractionation depends on CO2 with a slope of up to 0.17‰ (μmol L)-1. Even more consistent correlations were found between 13C fractionation and the combined effects of particulate organic carbon quota (POC quota; pg C cell-1) and CO2. Carbon isotope fractionation as well as its response to CO2 is species-specific. These results may be interpreted as a first step towards a proxy for past pCO2 based on carbon isotope ratios of fossil organic dinoflagellate cysts. However, additional culture experiments focusing on environmental variables other than pCO2, physiological underpinning of the recorded response, testing for possible offsets in 13C values between cells and cysts, as well as field calibration studies are required to establish a reliable proxy.

  1. Electrodeposition of tantalum on carbon black in non-aqueous solution and its electrocatalytic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, Ara; Lee, Youngmi, E-mail: youngmilee@ewha.ac.kr; Lee, Chongmok, E-mail: cmlee@ewha.ac.kr

    2016-08-24

    In this work, we synthesized tantalum (Ta) nanoclusters on carbon black (Ta/CB) via simple electrodeposition in non-aqueous solvent, acetonitrile (ACN) at ambient temperature. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images showed that the electrodeposited Ta nanoclusters consisted of tiny Ta nanoparticles. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) result represented that the outermost Ta formed the native oxide on Ta/CB due to its ambient exposure to air. Electrochemical catalytic properties of prepared Ta/CB on glassy carbon electrode (Ta/CB/GC) were investigated toward reductions of oxygen and hydrogen peroxide, and oxidations of ascorbic acid and dopamine. For oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in acid, Ta/CB/GC represented a decent electrocatalytic performance which was better or comparable to bare Pt. The operational stability in acidic condition was maintained up to 500 repetitive potential cycles presumably due to the protective native Ta oxide layer. Ta/CB/GC also showed high amperometric sensitivity (4.5 (±0.1{sub 6}) mA mM{sup −1} cm{sup −2}, n = 5) for reduction of hydrogen peroxide in 0.1 M phosphate buffer solution (PBS, pH 7.4). In addition, Ta/CB/GC was demonstrated for the possibility of simultaneous detection of ascorbic acid and dopamine using differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). - Highlights: • We electrodeposited Ta nanoclusters (Ta/CB/GC) in acetonitrile at room temperature. • The Ta/CB/GC showed better or comparable performance to bare Pt for ORR. • The Ta/CB/GC showed high sensitivity for reduction of hydrogen peroxide at pH 7.4. • The Ta/CB/GC showed possible simultaneous detection of ascorbic acid and dopamine. • We extended the applicability of Ta electrode material for various electrocatalytic reactions.

  2. Is extensive terrestrial carbon dioxide removal a 'green' form of geoengineering? A global modelling study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heck, Vera; Gerten, Dieter; Lucht, Wolfgang; Boysen, Lena R.

    2016-02-01

    Biological carbon sequestration through implementation of biomass plantations is currently being discussed as an option for climate engineering (CE) should mitigation efforts fail to substantially reduce greenhouse gas emissions. As it is a plant-based CE option that extracts CO2 from the atmosphere, it might be considered a 'green' CE method that moves the biosphere closer to its natural, i.e. pre-Neolithic, state. Here, we test this hypothesis by comparing the biogeochemical (water- and carbon-related) changes induced by biomass plantations compared to those induced by historical human land cover and land use change. Results indicate that large-scale biomass plantations would produce a biogeochemical shift in the terrestrial biosphere which is, in absolute terms, even larger than that already produced by historical land use change. However, the nature of change would differ between a world dominated by biomass plantations and the current world inheriting the effects of historical land use, highlighting that large-scale tCDR would represent an additional distinct and massive human intervention into the biosphere. Contrasting the limited possibilities of tCDR to reduce the pressure on the planetary boundary for climate change with the potential negative implications on the status of other planetary boundaries highlights that tCDR via biomass plantations should not be considered a 'green' CE method but a full scale engineering intervention.

  3. Nitrogen forms and decomposition of organic carbon in the southern Bohai Sea core sediments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋金明; 马红波; 吕晓霞

    2002-01-01

    Study on form characteristics of nitrogen in marine sediments is the primary method to research its biogeochemical cycling and nitrogen form characteristics in core sediments can reflect the process and results of early diagenesis in a certain degree. In this paper, Sequential extraction process in natural grain size was used for studying the existent forms of nitrogen in five core sediments of the southern Bohai Sea for the first time. Nitrogen was divided into two parts - transferable and fixed based on whether it could be extracted by the reagent. Distributions and early diagenesis of transferable nitrogen forms in the southern Bohai Sea were researched integratedly. Results indicate that IEF- N and OSFN are predominant forms in transferable part in the studied core sediments. Contents of different nitrogen forms vary differently with depth, and have different diagenesis process. Decomposition constant of organic nitrogen (ON) and OC are about 15.51 × 10-3a-1and 4.79 × 10-3a-1 respectively, and the decomposition content of biogenic elements C, N, P, Si has the sequence N>P>C>Si. OC/TN (simplified as C/N in the following) ratio is much lower than OC/ON, which indicates that sediment preserves plenty of inorganic nitrogen (IN) and/or fixed nitrogen, and the decrease of OC/ON ratio with depth is due to ON reservation in sediments. Generally, transferable nitrogen accounts for more proportion of TN in the surface layer than in the deep layer of core sediments, whereas, some stable forms of nitrogen can activate and become transferable under appropriate environment, which induces the proportion of transferable nitrogen in TN in the deep layer to be almost the same as that in the surface layer.

  4. A study of many-body phenomena in metal nanoclusters (Au, Cu) close to their transition to the nonmetallic state

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borman, VD; Borisyuk, PV; Lebid'ko, VV; Pushkin, AA; Tronin, VN; Troyan, [No Value; Antonov, DA; Filatov, DO

    2006-01-01

    The results of a study of many-body phenomena in gold and copper nanoclusters are presented. The measured conductivity as a function of nanocluster height h was found to have a minimum at h approximate to 0.6 nm. Conductivity was local in character at nanocluster sizes l infinity) to nonmetallic (ep

  5. Size Dependence of Atomically Precise Gold Nanoclusters in Chemoselective Hydrogenation and Active Site Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Gao [Carnegie Mellon University (CMU); Jiang, Deen [ORNL; Kumar, Santosh [Carnegie Mellon University (CMU); Chen, Yuxiang [Carnegie Mellon University (CMU); Jin, Rongchao [Carnegie Mellon University (CMU)

    2014-01-01

    We here investigate the catalytic properties of water-soluble Aun(SG)m nanocluster catalysts (H-SG = glutathione) of different sizes, including Au15(SG)13, Au18(SG)14, Au25(SG)18, Au38(SG)24, and captopril-capped Au25(Capt)18 nanoclusters. These Aun(SR)m nanoclusters (-SR represents thiolate generally) are used as homogeneous catalysts (i.e., without supports) in the chemoselective hydrogenation of 4-nitrobenzaldehyde (4-NO2PhCHO) to 4-nitrobenzyl alcohol (4-NO2PhCH2OH) in water with H2 gas (20 bar) as the hydrogen source. These nanocluster catalysts, except Au18(SG)14, remain intact after the catalytic reaction, evidenced by UV-vis spectra which are characteristic of each sized nanoclusters and thus serve as spectroscopic fingerprints . We observe a drastic size-dependence and steric effect of protecting ligands on the gold nanocluster catalysts in the hydrogenation reaction. Density functional theory (DFT) modeling of the 4-nitrobenzaldehyde adsorption shows that both the CHO and NO2 groups are in close interact with the S-Au-S staples on the gold nanocluster surface; the adsorption of the 4-nitrobenzaldehyde molecule on the four different sized Aun(SR)m nanoclusters are moderately strong and similar in strength. The DFT results suggest that the catalytic activity of the Aun(SR)m nanoclusters is primarily determined by the surface area of the Au nanocluster, consistent with the observed trend of the conversion of 4-nitrobenzaldehyde versus the cluster size. Overall, this work offers the molecular insight into the hydrogenation of 4-nitrobenzaldehyde and the catalytically active site structure on gold nanocluster catalysts.

  6. Investigating Molecular Inheritance of Carbon in Star-forming Regions along a Galactic Gradient

    KAUST Repository

    Smith, Rachel L.

    2015-04-01

    Observations of CO isotopologues taken at high spectral resolution toward young stellar objects (YSOs) are valuable tools for investigating protoplanetary chemical reservoirs, and enable robust comparisons between YSOs and solar system material (meteorites and the Sun). Investigating a range of YSO environments also helps parameterize variations in the distribution and evolution of carbon-based molecules, furthering an understanding of prebiotic chemistry. We have begun a wide survey of massive YSOs using Keck-NIRSPEC at high spectral resolution (R=25,000). Fundamental and first-overtone near-IR CO rovibrational absorption spectra have thus far been obtained toward 14 massive, luminous YSOs at Galactocentric radii (RGC) ranging from ~4.5 to 9.7 kpc. From these data we can obtain precise [12CO]/[13CO] gas-phase abundance ratios along a Galactic gradient, and [12CO]/[13CO]Gas can be further evaluated against published [12CO2]/[13CO2]Ice and [12CO]/[13CO]Ice because all observations are in absorption, a robust study of molecular inheritance is possible by virtue of comparing 12C/13C along the same lines-of-sight. Initial results for cold CO gas at RGC ~ 6.1 kpc and 9.4 kpc reveal [12C16O]/[13C16O] of 59+/‑8 and 74+/‑3, respectively, roughly following an expected 12C/13C Galactic gradient. Thus far, we find [12CO]/[13CO] in the cold CO gas to be lower than [12CO2]/[13CO2]Ice, suggesting that CO2 may not originate from CO reservoirs as often assumed. While very high-resolution observations of CO gas toward low-mass YSOs observed with VLT-CRIRES show significant heterogeneity in [12CO]/[13CO] at RGC ~ 8 kpc, this dispersion is not found for the massive YSOs. Both the low-mass and massive YSOs have higher [12CO]/[13CO] in warm vs. cold gas, and both show signatures suggesting possible interplay between CO ice and gas reservoirs. Overall, our results indicate that carbon isotopic evolution in massive YSO environments may follow different paths compared to low-mass YSOs

  7. In situ synthesis of lead sulfide nanoclusters on eggshell membrane fibers by an ambient bio-inspired technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Huilan; Han, Jie; Wang, Na; Dong, Qun; Zhang, Di; Zhang, Chunfu

    2008-02-01

    An ambient aqueous soakage technique is successfully developed to prepare PbS nanoclusters on eggshell membrane (ESM) fibers containing some active functional groups (hydroxyl, amine, imine, etc). Based on the biomaterial ESM serving as the reactive substrate and some ESM biomacromolecules acting as the surfactant, PbS nanocrystallites are in situ formed and further assembled into well-distributed nanoparticle aggregations. This moderate bio-inspired strategy would be of great value in preparing novel functional nanomaterials. The as-prepared hybrid PbS/ESM nanocomposites could have great potential for applications in semiconductor industries, optoelectronic fields, and nanostructured devices.

  8. Template free synthesis of natural carbohydrates functionalised fluorescent silver nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahiminezhad, Alireza; Berenjian, Aydin; Ghasemi, Younes

    2016-06-01

    Template-assisted synthesis is one of the most recognised techniques for fabrication of silver nanoclusters (AgNCs). However, this process is time consuming, toxic and expensive. In this study, the authors report a completely novel approach for the green and facile synthesis of AgNCs using Matricaria chamomilla, without any additional template. Fluorescent and colloidally stable AgNCs with average particle size of 2.4 nm were successfully produced. They found that carbohydrates from Matricaria chamomilla act as an ideal template to generate fluorescent AgNCs. Moreover, oxygen-bearing functional groups were validated to be the active groups for anchoring and reducing of Ag(+) ions. The novel carbohydrate coating method makes the prepared nanoclusters completely hydrophilic and stable in aqueous matrices.

  9. Shape and scale dependent diffusivity of colloidal nanoclusters and aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcanzare, M. M. T.; Ollila, S. T. T.; Thakore, V.; Laganapan, A. M.; Videcoq, A.; Cerbelaud, M.; Ferrando, R.; Ala-Nissila, T.

    2016-07-01

    The diffusion of colloidal nanoparticles and nanomolecular aggregates, which plays an important role in various biophysical and physicochemical phenomena, is currently under intense study. Here, we examine the shape and size dependent diffusion of colloidal nano- particles, fused nanoclusters and nanoaggregates using a hybrid fluctuating lattice Boltzmann-Molecular Dynamics method. We use physically realistic parameters characteristic of an aqueous solution, with explicitly implemented microscopic no-slip and full-slip boundary conditions. Results from nanocolloids below 10 nm in radii demonstrate how the volume fraction of the hydrodynamic boundary layer influences diffusivities. Full-slip colloids are found to diffuse faster than no-slip particles. We also characterize the shape dependent anisotropy of the diffusion coefficients of nanoclusters through the Green-Kubo relation. Finally, we study the size dependence of the diffusion of nanoaggregates comprising N ≤ 108 monomers and demonstrate that the diffusion coefficient approaches the continuum scaling limit of N-1/3.

  10. Catalytically highly active top gold atom on palladium nanocluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haijun; Watanabe, Tatsuya; Okumura, Mitsutaka; Haruta, Masatake; Toshima, Naoki

    2011-10-23

    Catalysis using gold is emerging as an important field of research in connection with 'green' chemistry. Several hypotheses have been presented to explain the markedly high activities of Au catalysts. So far, the origin of the catalytic activities of supported Au catalysts can be assigned to the perimeter interfaces between Au nanoclusters and the support. However, the genesis of the catalytic activities of colloidal Au-based bimetallic nanoclusters is unclear. Moreover, it is still a challenge to synthesize Au-based colloidal catalysts with high activity. Here we now present the 'crown-jewel' concept (Supplementary Fig. S1) for preparation of catalytically highly Au-based colloidal catalysts. Au-Pd colloidal catalysts containing an abundance of top (vertex or corner) Au atoms were synthesized according to the strategy on a large scale. Our results indicate that the genesis of the high activity of the catalysts could be ascribed to the presence of negatively charged top Au atoms.

  11. Study of the corrosion products formed on carbon steels in the tropical atmosphere of Panama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaen, J. A.; Villalaz, M. S. de; Araque, L. de; Hernandez, C.; Bosquez, A. de

    2003-07-01

    Moessbauer spectroscopy and X-ray powder diffraction (in selected samples) have been used to characterize corrosion products on carbon steels after atmospheric exposure to the tropical Panamanian locations of Panama and Colon, classified according to ISO 9233 as C3 and C5, respectively. Goethite ({alpha}-FeOOH) of intermediate particle size (20-100 nm), lepidocrocite ({gamma}-FeOOH), a spinel phase consisting of non-stoichiometric magnetite (Fe{sub 3}-xO{sub 4}) and/or maghemita ({gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and nano-sized particles were identified in the corrosion products. The spinel phase is related to short term atmospheric exposure transforms in time to other corrosion products. The corrosion resistance increased with fraction of goethite following a saturation-type behavior. (Author) 13 refs.

  12. Biologically formed calcium carbonate : a durable plugging agent for enhanced oil recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemati, M.; Voordouw, G. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada)

    2002-06-01

    Waterflooding is a common enhanced oil recovery method in which water is injected into an oil reservoir. The flow is diverted into high permeability zones from which oil has already been recovered during primary production. The increased permeability variation decreases volumetric sweep efficiency of injected water. Cross flow complicates this problem by allowing flow between contrasting layers. This results in a ratio of produced water to oil that is much too high. The use of calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) and silica may be an effective method for selective plugging of reservoirs. The controlled biological formation of CaCO{sub 3} depends on the decomposition of urea to carbonate and ammonium ions by the catalytic action of urease enzyme. This study shows that biological formation of CaCO{sub 3} could be induced successfully using a bacterium with urease producing activity or urease enzyme. It is shown that the yield of enzymatically produced CaCO{sub 3} is substantially higher than when bacterially produced because the tolerable level of urea for bacteria is lower than the concentration of urea that participates in the enzymatic reaction. Plugging studies in unconsolidated porous media have shown that in situ formation of CaCO{sub 3} may decrease the permeability of porous media. The extent of plugging depends on the enzyme and reactant concentration. The extent of enzymatically produced CaCO{sub 3} increases with higher enzyme concentrations as well as with higher temperature. In situ formation of CaCO{sub 3} could result in a major decrease in permeability. 4 refs., 1 tab., 1 fig.

  13. Structural, electronic, and magnetic properties of single MnAs nanoclusters in GaAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smakman, E. P., E-mail: e.p.smakman@tue.nl; Mauger, S.; Koenraad, P. M. [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, Den Dolech 2, 5612 AZ Eindhoven (Netherlands); Rench, D. W.; Samarth, N. [Department of Physics and Materials Research Institute, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States)

    2014-12-08

    MnAs nanoclusters in GaAs were investigated with cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy. The topographic images reveal that the small clusters have the same zinc-blende crystal structure as the host material, while the larger clusters grow in a hexagonal crystal phase. The initial Mn concentration during molecular beam epitaxy growth has a strong influence on the size of the clusters that form during the annealing step. The local band structure of a single MnAs cluster is probed with scanning tunneling spectroscopy, revealing a Coulomb blockade effect that correlates with the size of the cluster. With a spin-sensitive tip, for the smaller clusters, superparamagnetic switching between two distinct states is observed at T = 77 K. The larger clusters do not change their magnetic state at this temperature, i.e., they are superferromagnetic, confirming that they are responsible for the ferromagnetic behavior of this material at room-temperature.

  14. Doping of magic nanoclusters in the submonolayer In/Si(100) system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotlyar, V G; Zotov, A V; Saranin, A A; Chukurov, E N; Kasyanova, T V; Cherevik, M A; Pisarenko, I V; Okado, H; Katayama, M; Oura, K; Lifshits, V G

    2003-07-11

    Si(100)4 x 3-In reconstruction is essentially a superlattice of magic (identical-size) Si7In6 nanoclusters. Using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) observations, we have found that under appropriate growth conditions up to 35% of these clusters can be modified; namely, two Si atoms in the cluster can be replaced by two In atoms, thus forming a Si5In8 cluster. This modification can be considered as a doping of the magic cluster, as it changes the electronic properties of the cluster from semiconducting towards metallic. The doped cluster is less rigid than the ordinary one and swings in the electrical field of the STM tip. The atomic structure and stability of the doped magic cluster have been examined using first-principles total-energy calculations.

  15. Intrinsically patterned two-dimensional materials for selective adsorption of molecules and nanoclusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, X.; Lu, J. C.; Shao, Y.; Zhang, Y. Y.; Wu, X.; Pan, J. B.; Gao, L.; Zhu, S. Y.; Qian, K.; Zhang, Y. F.; Bao, D. L.; Li, L. F.; Wang, Y. Q.; Liu, Z. L.; Sun, J. T.; Lei, T.; Liu, C.; Wang, J. O.; Ibrahim, K.; Leonard, D. N.; Zhou, W.; Guo, H. M.; Wang, Y. L.; Du, S. X.; Pantelides, S. T.; Gao, H.-J.

    2017-07-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials have been studied extensively as monolayers, vertical or lateral heterostructures. To achieve functionalization, monolayers are often patterned using soft lithography and selectively decorated with molecules. Here we demonstrate the growth of a family of 2D materials that are intrinsically patterned. We demonstrate that a monolayer of PtSe2 can be grown on a Pt substrate in the form of a triangular pattern of alternating 1T and 1H phases. Moreover, we show that, in a monolayer of CuSe grown on a Cu substrate, strain relaxation leads to periodic patterns of triangular nanopores with uniform size. Adsorption of different species at preferred pattern sites is also achieved, demonstrating that these materials can serve as templates for selective self-assembly of molecules or nanoclusters, as well as for the functionalization of the same substrate with two different species.

  16. Optimal control of electromagnetic field using metallic nanoclusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigorenko, Ilya; Haas, Stephan; Balatsky, Alexander; Levi, A. F. J.

    2008-04-01

    The dielectric properties of metallic nanoclusters in the presence of an applied electromagnetic field are investigated using the non-local linear response theory. In the quantum limit we find a nontrivial dependence of the induced field and charge distributions on the spatial separation between the clusters and on the frequency of the driving field. Using a genetic algorithm, these quantum functionalities are exploited to custom-design sub-wavelength lenses with a frequency-controlled switching capability.

  17. Mossbauer Characterization of Iron Oxide Nanoclusters Grown within Aluminosilicate Matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    2Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas , Universidad Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Peru. 3Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas , Rio de Janeiro, Brasil. ABSTRACT...nanoclusters. Zeolitic and sol-gel derived molecular sieves and a variety of cross-linked and block co-polymers have been used to this purpose [1-41. The...Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas and the NSF: DMR 0074537 for support. Figures 1 and 2 ame reprinted with permission from reference [I]. Copyright 2001

  18. Preparation of nanocomposites containing nanoclusters of transition metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milne, S.B.; Lukehart, C.M., Wittig, J.E. [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States)] [and others

    1996-10-01

    New nanocomposites containing nanoclusters of transition metals have been prepared and characterized by TEM, XRD, and energy dispersive spectroscopy. Organometallic or other coordination compounds functionalized with trialkoxysilyl groups have been synthesized and covalently incorporated into silica xerogels using standard sol-gel techniques. Thermal oxidative treatment of these xerogels in air followed by reduction in hydrogen yielded the desired nanocomposite phases. Using these methods, Mo, Re, Fe, Ru, Os, Pd, Pt, Cu. and Ag nanocomposites have been prepared.

  19. DNase 1 Retains Endodeoxyribonuclease Activity Following Gold Nanocluster Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-04

    Gatan). Microscopy samples were prepared for analysis through the following steps: (i) bulk material was ground up using a mortar and pestle , (ii...employed as efficient and fast sensors to augment the current time-consuming DNA contamination analysis techniques. Noble metal nanoclusters (NCs...to metal nanoparticles (NPs), which do not exhibit fluorescence but show plasmonic transitions involving surface electrons. By definition , NCs are

  20. Theory of Nanocluster Size Distributions from Ion Beam Synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, C.W.; Yi, D.O.; Sharp, I.D.; Shin, S.J.; Liao, C.Y.; Guzman, J.; Ager III, J.W.; Haller, E.E.; Chrzan, D.C.

    2008-06-13

    Ion beam synthesis of nanoclusters is studied via both kinetic Monte Carlo simulations and the self-consistent mean-field solution to a set of coupled rate equations. Both approaches predict the existence of a steady state shape for the cluster size distribution that depends only on a characteristic length determined by the ratio of the effective diffusion coefficient to the ion flux. The average cluster size in the steady state regime is determined by the implanted species/matrix interface energy.

  1. Live Cell Surface Labeling with Fluorescent Ag Nanocluster Conjugates†

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Junhua; Choi, Sungmoon; Richards, Chris I.; Antoku, Yasuko; Dickson, Robert M

    2008-01-01

    DNA-encapsulated silver clusters are readily conjugated to proteins and serve as alternatives to organic dyes and semiconductor quantum dots. Stable and bright on the bulk and single molecule levels, Ag nanocluster fluorescence is readily observed when staining live cell surfaces. Being significantly brighter and more photostable than organics and much smaller than quantum dots with a single point of attachment, these nanomaterials offer promising new approaches for bulk and single molecule b...

  2. Hyperspherical and related views of the dynamics of nanoclusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lombardi, A; Palazzetti, F; Grossi, G; Aquilanti, V [Dipartimento di Chimica, Universita di Perugia, Via Elce di Sotto 8, 06123 Perugia (Italy); Castro Palacio, J C [Departamento de FI sica, Universidad de Pinar del Rio, MartI 270, Esq. 27 de Noviembre, Pinar del Rio (Cuba); Rubayo Soneira, J [Departamento de Fisica General y Matema ticas, Instituto Superior de Ciencias y Tecnologia Nucleares, Quinta de los Molinos, Avenne Carlos III y Luaces, Plaza C. Habana (Cuba)], E-mail: abulafia@dyn.unipg.it

    2009-10-15

    In this paper, we give an account of recent progress in understanding properties of nanoaggregates, following their dynamical behavior by classical mechanics simulations and utilizing tools based on extensions of hyperspherical and related techniques, originally developed for the quantum mechanical treatment of few-body atomic and molecular systems. After an outline of the underlying theory, recent applications exemplifying statistical and thermodynamic aspects of nanoclusters are discussed.

  3. In-vitro Synthesis of Gold Nanoclusters in Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Pradeep T. Protein-protected luminescent noble metal quantum clusters : an emerging trend in atomic cluster nanoscience. Nano Rev. 2012;3:14767−14783. 2...5 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. 1 1. Introduction Noble metal nanoclusters (NCs) composed of...toxic to the cells based on the results from the 100-mM solutions discussed previously. Potentially, other cell lines might yield brighter clusters

  4. a Search for Interstellar Carbon-Chain Alcohol HC4OH in the Star Forming Region L1527

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Mitsunori; Takano, Shuro; Koshikawa, Hiromichi Yamabe Naohiro; Tsukiyama, Koichi; Nakane, Aya; Okabatyashi, Toshiaki; Kunimatsu, Arisa; Kuze, Nobuhiko

    2011-06-01

    We have made a sensitive search for the rotational transitions of carbon-chain alcohol HC_4OH with the frequency ragne from 21.2 to 46.7 GHz in the star forming region L1527 in Taurus with rich carbon-chain chemistry. The incentive of this observation was a laboratory detection of HC_4OH by the microwave spectroscopy. Despite achieving an rms of several mK in antenna temperature by the 45m telescope at Nobeyama Radio Observatory, the searche for HC_4OH was negative, leading to a 5 sigma upper limit corresponding to the column density of 4 × 1012 Cm-2 based on the excitation temperature of 12.3 K. The upper limit indicates that the [HC_4-OH]/[HC_4-CN] ratio is less than 1.0. The ratio suggests that the cyanide species with carbon-chain structure is dominant in comparison with the hydroxyl one in L1527, which can be the opposite case of saturated compounds, e.g. CH_3OH and CH_3CN, in hot cores and dark clouds.

  5. Near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy for mapping nano-scale distribution of organic carbon forms in soil: Application to black carbon particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Johannes; Liang, Biqing; Solomon, Dawit; Lerotic, Mirna; LuizãO, Flavio; Kinyangi, James; SchäFer, Thorsten; Wirick, Sue; Jacobsen, Chris

    2005-03-01

    Small-scale heterogeneity of organic carbon (C) forms in soils is poorly quantified since appropriate analytical techniques were not available up to now. Specifically, tools for the identification of functional groups on the surface of micrometer-sized black C particles were not available up to now. Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy (STXM) using synchrotron radiation was used in conjunction with Near-Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy to investigate nano-scale distribution (50-nm resolution) of C forms in black C particles and compared to synchrotron-based FTIR spectroscopy. A new embedding technique was developed that did not build on a C-based embedding medium and did not pose the risk of heat damage to the sample. Elemental sulfur (S) was melted to 220°C until it polymerized and quenched with liquid N2 to obtain a very viscous plastic S in which the black C could be embedded until it hardened to a noncrystalline state and was ultrasectioned. Principal component and cluster analysis followed by singular value decomposition was able to resolve distinct areas in a black carbon particle. The core of the studied biomass-derived black C particles was highly aromatic even after thousands of years of exposure in soil and resembled the spectral characteristics of fresh charcoal. Surrounding this core and on the surface of the black C particle, however, much larger proportions of carboxylic and phenolic C forms were identified that were spatially and structurally distinct from the core of the particle. Cluster analysis provided evidence for both oxidation of the black C particle itself as well as adsorption of non-black C. NEXAFS spectroscopy has great potential to allow new insight into black C properties with important implications for biogeochemical cycles such as mineralization of black C in soils and sediments, and adsorption of C, nutrients, and pollutants as well as transport in the geosphere, hydrosphere, and atmosphere.

  6. Observation of Body-Centered Cubic Gold Nanocluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chao; Li, Tao; Li, Gao; Nobusada, Katsuyuki; Zeng, Chenjie; Pang, Guangsheng; Rosi, Nathaniel L; Jin, Rongchao

    2015-08-17

    The structure of nanoparticles plays a critical role in dictating their material properties. Gold is well known to adopt face-centered cubic (fcc) structure. Herein we report the first observation of a body-centered cubic (bcc) gold nanocluster composed of 38 gold atoms protected by 20 adamantanethiolate ligands and two sulfido atoms ([Au38S2(SR)20], where R=C10H15) as revealed by single-crystal X-ray crystallography. This bcc structure is in striking contrast with the fcc structure of bulk gold and conventional Au nanoparticles, as well as the bi-icosahedral structure of [Au38(SCH2CH2Ph)24]. The bcc nanocluster has a distinct HOMO-LUMO gap of ca. 1.5 eV, much larger than the gap (0.9 eV) of the bi-icosahedral [Au38(SCH2CH2Ph)24]. The unique structure of the bcc gold nanocluster may be promising in catalytic applications.

  7. Ab Initio Calculations for the Surface Energy of Silver Nanoclusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medasani, Bharat; Vasiliev, Igor; Park, Young Ho

    2007-03-01

    We apply first principles computational methods to study the surface energy and the surface stress of silver nanoparticles. The structures, energies and lattice contractions of spherical Ag nanoclusters are calculated in the framework of density functional theory combined with the generalized gradient approximation. Our calculations predict the surface energies of Ag nanoclusters to be in the range of 1-2 J/m^2. These values are close to the bulk surface energy of silver, but are significantly lower than the recently reported value of 7.2 J/m^2 derived from the Kelvin equation for free Ag nanoparticles. From the lattice contraction and the nearest neighbor interatomic distance, we estimate the surface stress of the silver nanoclusters to be in the the range of 1-1.45 N/m. This result suggests that a liquid droplet model can be employed to evaluate the surface energy and the surface stress of Ag nanoparticles. K. K. Nanda et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 106102 (2003).

  8. Polyethyleneimine Capped Silver Nanoclusters as Efficient Antibacterial Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dong; Wang, Qingyun; Yang, Tao; Cao, Jianzhong; Lin, Qinlu; Yuan, Zhiqin; Li, Le

    2016-03-18

    Development of efficient antibacterial agents is critical for human health. In the present study, we investigated the antibacterial activity of polyethyleneimine (PEI)-capped silver nanoclusters (PEI-AgNCs), based on the fact that nanoclusters normally have higher surface-to-volume ratios than traditional nanomaterials and PEI itself has a strong antimicrobial capacity. We synthesized stable silver nanoclusters by altering PEI molecular weight from 0.6 kDa to 25 kDa and characterized them by UV-Vis absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. The sizes of AgNCs were around 2 nm in diameter and were little influenced by the molecular weight of PEIs. The antibacterial abilities of the four PEI-AgNCs were explored on agar plate and in liquid systems. Our results revealed that the antibacterial activity of PEI-AgNCs is excellent and the reduction of PEI molecular weight could result in the increased antibacterial capacity of PEI-AgNCs. Such proposed new materials might be useful as efficient antibacterial agents in practical clinical applications.

  9. Magnetic endohedral transition-metal-doped semiconducting-nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matxain, Jon M; Formoso, Elena; Mercero, Jose M; Piris, Mario; Lopez, Xabier; Ugalde, Jesus M

    2008-01-01

    Endohedral first-row transition-metal-doped TM@Zn(i)S(i) nanoclusters, in which TM stands for the first-row transition-metals from Sc to Zn, and i=12, 16, have been characterized. In these structures the dopant metals are trapped inside spheroidal hollow semiconducting nanoclusters. It is observed that some of the transition metals are trapped in the center of mass of the cluster, whereas others are found to be displaced from that center, leading to structures in which the transition metals display a complex dynamical behavior upon encapsulation. This fact was confirmed by quantum molecular dynamics calculations, which further confirmed the thermal stability of endohedral compounds. In the endohedrally-doped nanoclusters in which the transition-metal atom sits on the center of mass, the host hollow cluster structure remains undistorted after dopant encapsulation. Conversely, if the encapsulated transition-metal atom is displaced from the center of mass, the host hollow cluster structure suffers a very tiny distortion. Additionally, it is found that there is negligible charge transfer between the dopant transition-metal atom and its hollow cluster host and, after encapsulation, the spin densities remain localized on the transition-metal atom. This allows for the atomic-like behavior of the trapped transition-metal atom, which gives rise to their atomic-like magnetic properties. The encapsulation free energies are negative, suggesting that these compounds are thermodynamically stable.

  10. Theoretical structural study on the adsorption properties of aliphatic aldehydes on ZnO nanoclusters and graphene-like nanosheets systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayebee, R.; Zamand, N.; Hosseini-nasr, A.; Kargar Razi, M.

    2014-05-01

    The structure optimizations for some aliphatic aldehydes adsorbed on ZnO nanoclusters, and graphene-like nanosheets were carried out using the B3LYP/LanL2DZ calculations and the adsorption energies were calculated. It was considered that adsorption of the examined aldehydes on the ZnO nanoclusters and graphene-like nanosheets occurred through carbonyl oxygens of aldehyde molecules with the surface Zn2+ ions of the central ring. Aldehydes with the general formula of R-COH (R denotes a branched or linear aliphatic chain with maximum of three carbon atoms) were considered. Also, Effects of chain length were investigated on the orientation of the aldehyde molecules with respect to the nanosheet and nanocluster surfaces. Findings revealed that the adsorption energy was decreased with enhancing chain length. However, the most negative adsorption energy was obtained for iso-butyraldehyde, as a branched aldehyde. Interaction of the aldehyde molecules with the surfaces of nanosheets were analyzed by means of DOS analysis and Bader's method. We hope the obtained results be helpful in identifying the mechanism of cyclotrimerization of aliphatic aldehydes on the surface of zinc oxide nanoparticles.

  11. Sedimentary structures formed by upper-regime flows on a Pleistocene carbonate ramp (Favignana Calcarenite, Sicily, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slootman, Arnoud; Moscariello, Andrea; Cartigny, Matthieu; de Boer, Poppe

    2015-04-01

    Antidune, chute-and-pool and cyclic step deposits are found in the outcrops of the Pleistocene calcarenite wedge of Favignana Island. These deposits were formed on a prograding carbonate ramp. Three zones are identified: inner-mid ramp (shoreface), ramp slope, and outer ramp (offshore). The ramp slope dips 3° to 10° and drops 30-40 m over 400-600 m. The ramp slope and outer ramp show a succession of bioturbated dune cross beds with up to 10 m-thick, intercalated event beds containing supercritical-flow structures. Grain sizes range from coarse sand to granules, with large rhodoliths (algal balls) and shells as gravel-sized clasts. It is our aim to provide insight into the processes that create upper-regime flow structures and the hydraulic parameters of their generating flows. During normal storms, wind-driven currents generated submarine dunes that migrated across the sea floor. During exceptional high-energy events (megastorms, tsunamis), large amounts of skeletal debris from the carbonate factory were transported towards the top of the ramp slope, where under the effect of gravity sustained supercritical sediment gravity flows were generated. In a case study of bedform evolution, we present the formation of a large downstream-asymmetric bedform with two antidunes superimposed on its upstream flank. A stepwise flow reconstruction reveals the progressive steepening of the antidunes until critical steepness is reached, and the first and, shortly after, the second antidune wave breaks. The two hydraulic jumps thus formed, developed a temporary cyclic step morphology (i.e. hydraulic jump, accelerating subcritical flow, supercritical chute, hydraulic jump etc.). The bedform geometries are used to reconstruct the nature of the catastrophic events that were active on the ramp slope. The wave length of the antidunes is measured from outcrop, which, through hydraulic equations, allows for estimation of mean flow velocity as a function of sediment concentration in the

  12. Role of carbon and climate in forming the Páramo, an Andean evolutionary hotspot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    of the highest altitude Andean regions reduces the available area for grassland biomes, the effect is significantly smaller than the impact of Plio-Pleistocene climate change. By individually introducing the Pliocene changes (atmospheric carbon dioxide levels, mean temperature, minimum temperatures, precipitation and direct sunlight) to the BIOME4 simulations, it is shown that the primary driver of these changes is atmospheric carbon dioxide levels. The higher Pliocene levels favour the expansion of the forest biomes, increasing the altitude of the treeline and replacing grassland biomes. This suggests that in such areas prediction of future changes and plans to preserve these important ecosystems must consider the impact of both climate change and CO2 fertilization.

  13. Copper(I)-catalyzed aryl bromides to form intermolecular and intramolecular carbon-oxygen bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Jiajia; Guo, Pengran; Kang, Juntao; Li, Zhigang; Xu, Jingwei; Hu, Shaojing

    2009-07-17

    A highly efficient Cu-catalyzed C-O bond-forming reaction of alcohol and aryl bromides has been developed. This transformation was realized through the use of copper(I) iodide as a catalyst, 8-hydroxyquinoline as a ligand, and K(3)PO(4) as a base. A variety of functionalized substrates were found to react under these reaction conditions to provide products in good to excellent yields.

  14. Endohedral confinement of a DNA dodecamer onto pristine carbon nanotubes and the stability of the canonical B form

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz, Fernando J. A. L., E-mail: fj.cruz@fct.unl.pt [Requimte/CQFB, Departamento de Química, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Caparica 2829-516 (Portugal); Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Pablo, Juan J. de [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Institute of Molecular Engineering, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Mota, José P. B. [Requimte/CQFB, Departamento de Química, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Caparica 2829-516 (Portugal)

    2014-06-14

    Although carbon nanotubes are potential candidates for DNA encapsulation and subsequent delivery of biological payloads to living cells, the thermodynamical spontaneity of DNA encapsulation under physiological conditions is still a matter of debate. Using enhanced sampling techniques, we show for the first time that, given a sufficiently large carbon nanotube, the confinement of a double-stranded DNA segment, 5′-D({sup *}CP{sup *}GP{sup *}CP{sup *}GP{sup *}AP{sup *}AP{sup *}TP{sup *}TP{sup *}CP{sup *}GP{sup *}CP{sup *}G)-3′, is thermodynamically favourable under physiological environments (134 mM, 310 K, 1 bar), leading to DNA-nanotube hybrids with lower free energy than the unconfined biomolecule. A diameter threshold of 3 nm is established below which encapsulation is inhibited. The confined DNA segment maintains its translational mobility and exhibits the main geometrical features of the canonical B form. To accommodate itself within the nanopore, the DNA's end-to-end length increases from 3.85 nm up to approximately 4.1 nm, due to a ∼0.3 nm elastic expansion of the strand termini. The canonical Watson-Crick H-bond network is essentially conserved throughout encapsulation, showing that the contact between the DNA segment and the hydrophobic carbon walls results in minor rearrangements of the nucleotides H-bonding. The results obtained here are paramount to the usage of carbon nanotubes as encapsulation media for next generation drug delivery technologies.

  15. Platinum Iron Intermetallic Nanoparticles Supported on Carbon Formed In Situ by High-Pressure Pyrolysis for Efficient Oxygen Reduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Yang; Jensen, Jens Oluf; Zhang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Carbon-supported PtFe alloy catalysts are synthesized by the one-step, high-temperature pyrolysis of Pt, Fe, and C precursors. As a result of the high temperature, the formed PtFe nanoparticles possess highly ordered, face-centered tetragonal, intermetallic structures with a mean size of ≈11.8 nm....... At 0.9 V versus the reversible hydrogen electrode, the PtFe nanoparticles show a 6.8 times higher specific activity than the reference Pt/C catalyst towards the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) as well as excellent stability, most likely because of the durable intermetallic structure and the preleaching...... treatment of the catalyst. During these preliminary syntheses, we found that a portion of the PtFe nanoparticles is buried in the in situ formed carbon phase, which limits Pt utilization in the catalyst and results in a mass-specific activity equivalent to the commercial Pt/C catalyst. Moreover...

  16. Synthesis of bimetallic gold-silver alloy nanoclusters by simple mortar grinding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murugadoss, Arumugam; Kai, Noriko; Sakurai, Hidehiro

    2012-02-21

    A macroscale quantity of bimetallic Au-Ag alloy nanoclusters was achieved through sequential reduction by simple mortar grinding. The chitosan biopolymer was used as both a stabilizing and reducing agent. These nanoclusters exhibit excellent catalytic activity toward the reduction of 4-nitrophenol.

  17. Organic Inorganic Hybrid Solar Cell Efficiency Improvement By Employing Au Nanocluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-14

    Specialists Conference Conference Date: June 14, 2015 Organic - Inorganic Hybrid Solar Cell Efficiency Improvement by Employing Au Nanocluster Manisha...tunable conductivity, organic polymer, heterojunction, nanocluster I. INTRODUCTION Recently, organic / inorganic hybrid heterojunction solar cells have...conventional Si p−n junction. These heterojunction devices are intended to exploit the advantageous properties of both organic and inorganic materials

  18. Controlling embedment and surface chemistry of nanoclusters in metal-organic frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coupry, D E; Butson, J; Petkov, P S; Saunders, M; O'Donnell, K; Kim, H; Buckley, C; Addicoat, M; Heine, T; Szilágyi, P Á

    2016-04-14

    A combined theoretical and experimental approach demonstrates that nanocluster embedment into the pores of metal-organic frameworks (MOF) may be influenced by the chemical functionalisation of the MOF. Furthermore, this results in the surface functionalisation of the embedded nanoclusters, highlighting the potential of MOF scaffolds for the design and synthesis of novel functional materials.

  19. Carbon-sulfur bond-forming reaction catalysed by the radical SAM enzyme HydE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohac, Roman; Amara, Patricia; Benjdia, Alhosna; Martin, Lydie; Ruffié, Pauline; Favier, Adrien; Berteau, Olivier; Mouesca, Jean-Marie; Fontecilla-Camps, Juan C.; Nicolet, Yvain

    2016-05-01

    Carbon-sulfur bond formation at aliphatic positions is a challenging reaction that is performed efficiently by radical S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) enzymes. Here we report that 1,3-thiazolidines can act as ligands and substrates for the radical SAM enzyme HydE, which is involved in the assembly of the active site of [FeFe]-hydrogenase. Using X-ray crystallography, in vitro assays and NMR spectroscopy we identified a radical-based reaction mechanism that is best described as the formation of a C-centred radical that concomitantly attacks the sulfur atom of a thioether. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first example of a radical SAM enzyme that reacts directly on a sulfur atom instead of abstracting a hydrogen atom. Using theoretical calculations based on our high-resolution structures we followed the evolution of the electronic structure from SAM through to the formation of S-adenosyl-L-cysteine. Our results suggest that, at least in this case, the widely proposed and highly reactive 5‧-deoxyadenosyl radical species that triggers the reaction in radical SAM enzymes is not an isolable intermediate.

  20. Enhancement of cemented waste forms by supercritical CO{sub 2} carbonation of standard portland cements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubin, J.B.; Carey, J.; Taylor, C.M.V.

    1997-08-01

    We are conducting experiments on an innovative transformation concept, using a traditional immobilization technique, that may significantly reduce the volume of hazardous or radioactive waste requiring transport and long-term storage. The standard practice for the stabilization of radioactive salts and residues is to mix them with cements, which may include additives to enhance immobilization. Many of these wastes do not qualify for underground disposition, however, because they do not meet disposal requirements for free liquids, decay heat, head-space gas analysis, and/or leachability. The treatment method alters the bulk properties of a cemented waste form by greatly accelerating the natural cement-aging reactions, producing a chemically stable form having reduced free liquids, as well as reduced porosity, permeability and pH. These structural and chemical changes should allow for greater actinide loading, as well as the reduced mobility of the anions, cations, and radionuclides in aboveground and underground repositories. Simultaneously, the treatment process removes a majority of the hydrogenous material from the cement. The treatment method allows for on-line process monitoring of leachates and can be transported into the field. We will describe the general features of supercritical fluids, as well as the application of these fluids to the treatment of solid and semi-solid waste forms. some of the issues concerning the economic feasibility of industrial scale-up will be addressed, with particular attention to the engineering requirements for the establishment of on-site processing facilities. Finally, the initial results of physical property measurements made on portland cements before and after supercritical fluid processing will be presented.

  1. Fabrication and characterization of tunnel barriers in a multi-walled carbon nanotube formed by argon atom beam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomizawa, H. [Advanced Device Laboratory, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Department of Applied Physics, Tokyo University of Science, 6-3-1 Niijuku, Katsushika-ku, Tokyo 125-8585 (Japan); Yamaguchi, T., E-mail: tyamag@riken.jp [Advanced Device Laboratory, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Akita, S. [Department of Physics and Electronics, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-1 Gakuen-cho, Nakaku, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan); Ishibashi, K. [Advanced Device Laboratory, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Department of Applied Physics, Tokyo University of Science, 6-3-1 Niijuku, Katsushika-ku, Tokyo 125-8585 (Japan); RIKEN Center for Emergent Matter Science (CEMS), 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

    2015-07-28

    We have evaluated tunnel barriers formed in multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) by an Ar atom beam irradiation method and applied the technique to fabricate coupled double quantum dots. The two-terminal resistance of the individual MWNTs was increased owing to local damage caused by the Ar beam irradiation. The temperature dependence of the current through a single barrier suggested two different contributions to its Arrhenius plot, i.e., formed by direct tunneling through the barrier and by thermal activation over the barrier. The height of the formed barriers was estimated. The fabrication technique was used to produce coupled double quantum dots with serially formed triple barriers on a MWNT. The current measured at 1.5 K as a function of two side-gate voltages resulted in a honeycomb-like charge stability diagram, which confirmed the formation of the double dots. The characteristic parameters of the double quantum dots were calculated, and the feasibility of the technique is discussed.

  2. Clustomesogens: Liquid Crystalline Hybrid Nanomaterials Containing Functional Metal Nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molard, Yann

    2016-08-16

    Inorganic phosphorescent octahedral metal nanoclusters fill the gap between metal complexes and nanoparticles. They are finite groups of metal atoms linked by metal-metal bonds, with an exact composition and structure at the nanometer scale. As their phosphorescence internal quantum efficiency can approach 100%, they represent a very attractive class of molecular building blocks to design hybrid nanomaterials dedicated to light energy conversion, optoelectronic, display, lighting, or theragnostic applications. They are obtained as AnM6X(i)8X(a)6 ternary salt powders (A = alkali cation, M = Mo, Re, W, X(i): halogen inner ligand, X(a) = halogen apical ligand) by high temperature solid state synthesis (750-1200 °C). However, their ceramic-like behavior has largely restricted their use as functional components in the past. Since these last two decades, several groups, including ours, started to tackle the challenge of integrating them in easy-to-process materials. Within this context, we have extensively explored the nanocluster ternary salt specificities to develop a new class of self-organized hybrid organic-inorganic nanomaterials known as clustomesogens. These materials, combine the specific properties of nanoclusters (magnetic, electronic, luminescence) with the anisotropy-related properties of liquid crystals (LCs). This Account covers the research and development of clustomesogens starting from the design concepts and synthesis to their introduction in functional devices. We developed three strategies to build such hybrid super- or supramolecules. In the covalent approach, we capitalized on the apical ligand-metal bond iono-covalent character to graft tailor-made organic LC promoters on the {M6X(i)8}(n+) nanocluster cores. The supramolecular approach relies on the host-guest complexation of the ternary cluster salt alkali cations with functional crown ether macrocycles. We showed that the hybrid LC behavior depends on the macrocycles structural features

  3. Synthesis and Doping of Ligand-Protected Atomically-Precise Metal Nanoclusters

    KAUST Repository

    Aljuhani, Maha A.

    2016-05-01

    Rapidly expanding research in nanotechnology has led to exciting progress in a versatile array of applications from medical diagnostics to catalysis. This success resulted from the manipulation of the desired properties of nanomaterials by controlling their size, shape, and composition. Among the most thriving areas of research about nanoparticle is the synthesis and doping of the ligand-protected atomically-precise metal nanoclusters. In this thesis, we developed three different novel metal nanoclusters, such as doped Ag29 with five gold (Au) atoms leading to enhance its quantum yield with remarkable stability. We also developed half-doped (alloyed) cluster of Ni6 nanocluster with molybdenum (Mo). This enabled enhanced stability and better catalytic activity. The third metal nanocluster that we synthesized was Au28 nanocluster by using di-thiolate as the ligand stabilizer instead of mono-thiolate. The new metal clusters obtained have been characterized by spectroscopic, electrochemical and crystallographic methods.

  4. Quantum-sized gold nanoclusters: bridging the gap between organometallics and nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Rongchao; Zhu, Yan; Qian, Huifeng

    2011-06-06

    This Concept article provides an elementary discussion of a special class of large-sized gold compounds, so-called Au nanoclusters, which lies in between traditional organogold compounds (e.g., few-atom complexes, 2 nm). The discussion is focused on the relationship between them, including the evolution from the Au⋅⋅⋅Au aurophilic interaction in Au(I) complexes to the direct Au-Au bond in clusters, and the structural transformation from the fcc structure in nanocrystals to non-fcc structures in nanoclusters. Thiolate-protected Au(n)(SR)(m) nanoclusters are used as a paradigm system. Research on such nanoclusters has achieved considerable advances in recent years and is expected to flourish in the near future, which will bring about exciting progress in both fundamental scientific research and technological applications of nanoclusters of gold and other metals.

  5. Multiple sources of carbonic anhydrase activity in pea thylakoids: soluble and membrane-bound forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudenko, Natalia N; Ignatova, Lyudmila K; Ivanov, Boris N

    2007-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) activity of pea thylakoids, thylakoid membranes enriched with photosystem I (PSI-membranes), or photosystem II (PSII-membranes) as well as both supernatant and pellet after precipitation of thylakoids treated with detergent Triton X-100 were studied. CA activity of thylakoids in the presence of varying concentrations of Triton X-100 had two maxima, at Triton/chlorophyll (triton/Chl) ratios of 0.3 and 1.0. CA activities of PSI-membranes and PSII-membranes had only one maximum each, at Triton/Chl ratio 0.3 or 1.0, respectively. Two CAs with characteristics of the membrane-bound proteins and one CA with characteristics of the soluble proteins were found in the medium after thylakoids were incubated with Triton. One of the first two CAs had mobility in PAAG after native electrophoresis the same as that of CA residing in PSI-membranes, and the other CA had mobility the same as the mobility of CA residing in PSII-membranes, but the latter was different from CA situated in PSII core-complex (Ignatova et al. 2006 Biochemistry (Moscow) 71:525-532). The properties of the "soluble" CA removed from thylakoids were different from the properties of the known soluble CAs of plant cell: apparent molecular mass was about 262 kD and it was three orders more sensitive to the specific CA inhibitor, ethoxyzolamide, than soluble stromal CA. The data are discussed as indicating the presence of, at least, four CAs in pea thylakoids.

  6. Expansion of cardiac ischemia/reperfusion injury after instillation of three forms of multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urankar Rakhee N

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The exceptional physical-chemical properties of carbon nanotubes have lead to their use in diverse commercial and biomedical applications. However, their utilization has raised concerns about human exposure that may predispose individuals to adverse health risks. The present study investigated the susceptibility to cardiac ischemic injury following a single exposure to various forms of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs. It was hypothesized that oropharyngeal aspiration of MWCNTs exacerbates myocardial ischemia and reperfusion injury (I/R injury. Methods Oropharyngeal aspiration was performed on male C57BL/6J mice with a single amount of MWCNT (0.01 - 100 μg suspended in 100 μL of a surfactant saline (SS solution. Three forms of MWCNTs were used in this study: unmodified, commercial grade (C-grade, and functionalized forms that were modified either by acid treatment (carboxylated, COOH or nitrogenation (N-doped and a SS vehicle. The pulmonary inflammation, serum cytokine profile and cardiac ischemic/reperfusion (I/R injury were assessed at 1, 7 and 28 days post-aspiration. Results Pulmonary response to MWCNT oropharyngeal aspiration assessed by bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF revealed modest increases in protein and inflammatory cell recruitment. Lung histology showed modest tissue inflammation as compared to the SS group. Serum levels of eotaxin were significantly elevated in the carboxylated MWCNT aspirated mice 1 day post exposure. Oropharyngeal aspiration of all three forms of MWCNTs resulted in a time and/or dose-dependent exacerbation of myocardial infarction. The severity of myocardial injury varied with the form of MWCNTs used. The N-doped MWCNT produced the greatest expansion of the infarct at any time point and required a log concentration lower to establish a no effect level. The expansion of the I/R injury remained significantly elevated at 28 days following aspiration of the COOH and N-doped forms, but

  7. Study of the corrosion products formed on carbon steels in the tropical atmosphere of Panama

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaén, J. A.

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Mössbauer spectroscopy and X-ray powder diffraction (in selected samples have been used to characterize corrosion products on carbon steels after atmospheric exposure to the tropical Panamanian locations of Panama and Colon, classified according to ISO 9223 as C3 and C5, respectively. Goethite (α-FeOOH of intermediate particle size (20-100 nm, lepidocrocite (γ-FeOOH, a spinel phase consisting of non-stoichiometric magnetite (Fe3-xO4 and/or maghemite (γ-Fe2O3 and nano-sized particles were identified in the corrosion products. The spinel phase is related to short term atmospheric exposure transforms in time to other corrosion products. The corrosion resistance increased with fraction of goethite following a saturation-type behavior.

    Se caracterizaron los productos de corrosión de aceros al carbono expuestos a las atmósferas tropicales panameñas localizadas en Panamá y Colón, mediante el uso de la espectroscopia Mössbauer y difracción de rayos-X (en muestras seleccionadas. Las atmósferas se clasifican como C3 y C5, respectivamente, de acuerdo a la norma ISO 9223. Se lograron identificar los compuestos goethita (α-FeOOH de tamaño de partícula intermedio (20-100 nm, lepidocrocita (γ-FeOOH, una fase de espinela consistente en magnetita no estequiométrica (Fe3-xO4 y/o maghemita (γ-Fe2O3, y nanopartículas. La fase de espinela se puede correlacionar con exposiciones cortas a la atmósfera, transformándose en el tiempo en otros productos de corrosión. La resistencia a la corrosión se incrementa con la cantidad de goethita siguiendo una conducta de saturación.

  8. Charge transport and rectification in molecular junctions formed with carbon-based electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Taekyeong; Liu, Zhen-Fei; Lee, Chulho; Neaton, Jeffrey B; Venkataraman, Latha

    2014-07-29

    Molecular junctions formed using the scanning-tunneling-microscope-based break-junction technique (STM-BJ) have provided unique insight into charge transport at the nanoscale. In most prior work, the same metal, typically Au, Pt, or Ag, is used for both tip and substrate. For such noble metal electrodes, the density of electronic states is approximately constant within a narrow energy window relevant to charge transport. Here, we form molecular junctions using the STM-BJ technique, with an Au metal tip and a microfabricated graphite substrate, and measure the conductance of a series of graphite/amine-terminated oligophenyl/Au molecular junctions. The remarkable mechanical strength of graphite and the single-crystal properties of our substrates allow measurements over few thousand junctions without any change in the surface properties. We show that conductance decays exponentially with molecular backbone length with a decay constant that is essentially the same as that for measurements with two Au electrodes. More importantly, despite the inherent symmetry of the oligophenylamines, we observe rectification in these junctions. State-of-art ab initio conductance calculations are in good agreement with experiment, and explain the rectification. We show that the highly energy-dependent graphite density of states contributes variations in transmission that, when coupled with an asymmetric voltage drop across the junction, leads to the observed rectification. Together, our measurements and calculations show how functionality may emerge from hybrid molecular-scale devices purposefully designed with different electrodes beyond the so-called "wide band limit," opening up the possibility of assembling molecular junctions with dissimilar electrodes using layered 2D materials.

  9. Glucose oxidase-functionalized fluorescent gold nanoclusters as probes for glucose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Xiaodong [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University of Science and Technology, Xiangtan 411201 (China); Long, Yunfei, E-mail: l_yunfei927@163.com [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University of Science and Technology, Xiangtan 411201 (China); Wang, Jianxiu, E-mail: jxiuwang@csu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China)

    2013-04-15

    Highlights: ► A glucose oxidase/gold nanocluster conjugates formed by etching chemistry. ► Integration of the bioactivities and fluorescence properties within a single unit. ► These conjugates serve as novel fluorescent probe for glucose. -- Abstract: Creation and application of noble metal nanoclusters have received continuous attention. By integrating enzyme activity and fluorescence for potential applications, enzyme-capped metal clusters are more desirable. This work demonstrated a glucose oxidase (an enzyme for glucose)-functionalized gold cluster as probe for glucose. Under physiological conditions, such bioconjugate was successfully prepared by an etching reaction, where tetrakis (hydroxylmethyl) phosphonium-protected gold nanoparticle and thioctic acid-modified glucose oxidase were used as precursor and etchant, respectively. These bioconjugates showed unique fluorescence spectra (λ{sub em} {sub max} = 650 nm, λ{sub ex} {sub max} = 507 nm) with an acceptable quantum yield (ca. 7%). Moreover, the conjugated glucose oxidase remained active and catalyzed reaction of glucose and dissolved O{sub 2} to produce H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, which quenched quantitatively the fluorescence of gold clusters and laid a foundation of glucose detection. A linear range of 2.0 × 10{sup −6}–140 × 10{sup −6} M and a detection limit of 0.7 × 10{sup −6} M (S/N = 3) were obtained. Also, another horseradish peroxidase/gold cluster bioconjugate was produced by such general synthesis method. Such enzyme/metal cluster bioconjugates represented a promising class of biosensors for biologically important targets in organelles or cells.

  10. One-Step Synthesis of Zeolite Membranes Containing Catalytic Metal Nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seok-Jhin; Tan, Shuai; Taborga Claure, Micaela; Briones Gil, Laura; More, Karren L; Liu, Yujun; Moore, Jason S; Dixit, Ravindra S; Pendergast, John G; Sholl, David S; Jones, Christopher W; Nair, Sankar

    2016-09-21

    Metal-loaded zeolitic membranes are promising candidates as catalytic membrane reactors. We report a one-step synthesis method to synthesize zeolite membranes containing metal nanoclusters, that has advantages in comparison to multistep methods such as impregnation and ion exchange. Pure-silica MFI zeolite-Pt hybrid membranes were prepared by hydrothermal synthesis with addition of 3-mercaptopropyl-trimethoxysilane (MPS) and a platinum precursor. Composition analysis and mapping by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) reveal that Pt ions/clusters are uniformly distributed along the membrane cross-section. High-magnification scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) analysis shows that Pt metal clusters in the hybrid zeolite membrane have a diameter distribution in the range of 0.5-2.0 nm. In contrast, a pure-silica MFI membrane synthesized from an MPS-free solution shows negligible incorporation of Pt metal clusters. To characterize the properties of the hybrid (zeolite/metal) membrane, it was used as a catalytic membrane reactor (CMR) for high-temperature propane dehydrogenation (PDH) at 600 °C and 1 atm. The results indicate that Pt metal clusters formed within the MFI zeolite membrane can serve as effective catalysts for high-temperature PDH reaction along with H2 removal via membrane permeation, thereby increasing both conversion and selectivity in relation to a conventional membrane reactor containing an equivalent amount of packed Pt catalyst in contact with an MFI membrane. The hybrid zeolite-Pt CMR also showed stable conversion and selectivity upon extended high-temperature operation (12 h), indicating that encapsulation in the zeolite allowed thermal stabilization of the Pt nanoclusters and reduced catalyst deactivation.

  11. Carbon gas in SMC low-metallicity star-forming regions

    CERN Document Server

    Requena-Torres, M A; Okada, Y; Guesten, R; Stutzki, J; Risacher, C; Simon, R; Zinnecker, H

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents [CII], [CI] and CO emission line maps of the star-forming regions N66, N25+N26, and N88 in the metal-poor Local Group dwarf galaxy SMC. The spatial and velocity structure of the large HII region N66 reveals an expanding ring of shocked molecular gas centered on the exciting star cluster NGC346, whereas a more distant dense molecular cloud is being eroded by UV radiation from the same cluster. In the N25+N26 and N88 maps, diffuse [CII] emission at a relatively low surface brightness extends well beyond the compact boundaries of the bright emission associated with the [CII] regions. In all regions, the distribution of this bright [CII] emission and the less prominent [CI] emission closely follows the outline of the CO complexes, but the intensity of the [CII] and [CI] emission is generally anticorrelated, which can be understood by the action of photodissociation and photoionization processes. Notwithstanding the overall similarity of CO and [CII] maps, the intensity ratio of these lines var...

  12. Carbon dioxide enhances the development of the ethylene forming enzyme in tobacco leaf discs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philosoph-Hadas, S.; Aharoni, N.; Yang, S.F.

    1986-01-01

    Since CO/sub 2/ is known to stimulate ethylene production by promoting the conversion of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) to ethylene, the effect of CO/sub 2/ on the activity and the development of the ethylene forming enzyme (EFE) was studied in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv Havana 425 and Xanthi) leaf discs. In addition to previous observations that EFE activity is dependent on CO/sub 2/ concentration and is saturable with 2% CO/sub 2/, present data show two saturation curves at 2% and 10% CO/sub 2/. Promotion of EFE development was dependent also on CO/sub 2/ concentration (saturated at 2% CO/sub 2/) and duration (maximum at 24 in the dark), and was abolished by 20 micromolar cycloheximide. Application of exogenous ethylene (20 microliters per liter) or light treatment further increased the CO/sub 2/-enhanced development of EFE, implying that these two factors can also affect EFE development via interaction with CO/sub 2/. The results suggest that CO/sub 2/ exerts its stimulatory effect on the conversion of ACC to ethylene by enhancing not only the activity but also the synthesis of EFE in leaf discs.

  13. Physical properties of carbon films obtained by methane pyrolysis in an electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brantov, S. K.; Tereshchenko, A. N.; Shteinman, E. A.; Yakimov, E. B.

    2016-03-01

    A method of synthesizing carbon films on single-crystal silicon substrates by methane pyrolysis in an electrical field is suggested. The pressure and temperature arising in a working chamber when the substrate is exposed to C-4 ions during pyrolysis are measured. Ion bombardment generates nuclei in the form of fibers about 2 μm in diameter providing the growth of a polycrystalline film. The resulting material is examined using electron microscopy and photo- and cathodoluminescence. Synthesized films are a composite material the matrix of which contains nanoclusters of a dissimilar crystalline nature. The effect of considerable two-stage decrease in the resistivity of the film material with increasing temperature from 300 to 1750 K is discovered. This points to the semiconducting properties of thick carbon films.

  14. Endohedral confinement of a DNA dodecamer onto pristine carbon nanotubes and the stability of the canonical B form

    CERN Document Server

    Cruz, Fernando J A L; Mota, José P B

    2016-01-01

    Although carbon nanotubes are potential candidates for DNA encapsulation and subsequent delivery of biological payloads to living cells, the thermodynamical spontaneity of DNA encapsulation under physiological conditions is still a matter of debate. Using enhanced sampling techniques, we show for the first time that, given a sufficiently large carbon nanotube, the confinement of a double-stranded DNA segment, 5'-D(*CP*GP*CP*GP*AP*AP*TP*TP*CP*GP*CP*G)-3', is thermodynamically favourable under physiological environments (134 mM, 310 K, 1 bar), leading to DNA-nanotube hybrids with lower free energy than the unconfined biomolecule. A diameter threshold of 3 nm is established below which encapsulation is inhibited. The confined DNA segment maintains its translational mobility and exhibits the main geometrical features of the canonical B form. To accommodate itself within the nanopore, the DNA end-to-end length increases from 3.85 nm up to approximately 4.1 nm, due to a 0.3 nm elastic expansion of the strand termin...

  15. The Effect of Different Nitrogen Form on Key Enzyme Activity of Sugarbeet (Vulgaris L.) Carbon and Nitrogen Metabolism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    This article analyses the effect of the proportion of the different nitrogen forms on key enzyme activity of carbon and nitrogen metabolism under the condition of nutritional water while Tian Yan-7 was used as experimental material. The result showed that nitrate reductase(NR) activity in the leaves gradually enhanced with the increase of NO-3. No matter in root or leaves ,glutamina synthetase (GS) activity first enhanced with increasing NH4+ when NH4+ was lower than that of NO-3 ,and GS activity was the highest when NH4+and NO3-was equal ,then GS activity declined with NH4+ increasing further. In the anaphase of growth ,synthetic activity in root of sucrose synthetase(SS) in the mixed NH4+ and NO3- was obviously highr than or NO3- alone. Both of the root and sugar yields were the highest when the proportion of NH4+ and NO3- was 1: 1.

  16. Modeling of metal nanocluster growth on patterned substrates and surface pattern formation under ion bombardment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Numazawa, Satoshi

    2012-11-01

    This work addresses the metal nanocluster growth process on prepatterned substrates, the development of atomistic simulation method with respect to an acceleration of the atomistic transition states, and the continuum model of the ion-beam inducing semiconductor surface pattern formation mechanism. Experimentally, highly ordered Ag nanocluster structures have been grown on pre-patterned amorphous SiO{sub 2} surfaces by oblique angle physical vapor deposition at room temperature. Despite the small undulation of the rippled surface, the stripe-like Ag nanoclusters are very pronounced, reproducible and well-separated. The first topic is the investigation of this growth process with a continuum theoretical approach to the surface gas condensation as well as an atomistic cluster growth model. The atomistic simulation model is a lattice-based kinetic Monte-Carlo (KMC) method using a combination of a simplified inter-atomic potential and experimental transition barriers taken from the literature. An effective transition event classification method is introduced which allows a boost factor of several thousand compared to a traditional KMC approach, thus allowing experimental time scales to be modeled. The simulation predicts a low sticking probability for the arriving atoms, millisecond order lifetimes for single Ag monomers and {approx}1 nm square surface migration ranges of Ag monomers. The simulations give excellent reproduction of the experimentally observed nanocluster growth patterns. The second topic specifies the acceleration scheme utilized in the metallic cluster growth model. Concerning the atomistic movements, a classical harmonic transition state theory is considered and applied in discrete lattice cells with hierarchical transition levels. The model results in an effective reduction of KMC simulation steps by utilizing a classification scheme of transition levels for thermally activated atomistic diffusion processes. Thermally activated atomistic movements

  17. Polymer stabilized Ni-Ag and Ni-Fe alloy nanoclusters: Structural and magnetic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabir, L.; Mandal, A.R. [Department of Physics, Visva-Bharati, Santiniketan-731 235 (India); Mandal, S.K., E-mail: sk_mandal@hotmail.co [Department of Physics, Visva-Bharati, Santiniketan-731 235 (India)

    2010-04-15

    We report here the structural and magnetic behaviors of nickel-silver (Ni-Ag) and nickel-iron (Ni-Fe) nanoclusters stabilized with polymer (polypyrrole). High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) indicates Ni-Ag nanoclusters to stabilize in core-shell configuration while that of Ni-Fe nanoclusters in a mixed type of geometry. Structural characterizations by X-ray diffraction (XRD) reveal the possibility of alloying in such bimetallic nanoclusters to some extent even at temperatures much lower than that of bulk alloying. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra clearly reveal two different absorption behaviors: one is ascribed to non-isolated Ni{sup 2+} clusters surrounded by either silver or iron giving rise to a broad signal, other (very narrow signal) being due to the isolated superparamagnetic Ni{sup 2+} clusters or bimetallic alloy nanoclusters. Results obtained for Ni-Ag and Ni-Fe nanoclusters have been further compared with the behavior exhibited by pure Ni nanoclusters in polypyrrole host. Temperature dependent studies (at 300 and 77 K) of EPR parameters, e.g. linewidth, g-value, line shape and signal intensity indicating the significant influence of surrounding paramagnetic silver or ferromagnetic iron within polymer host on the EPR spectra have been presented.

  18. Importance of configurational contributions to the free energy of nanoclusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Posselt

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available An effective simulation method based on the Wang-Landau Monte Carlo algorithm is used in order to demonstrate the significance of the configurational contributions to the free energy of embedded nanoclusters. Starting from the most stable cluster configuration the simulation provides all geometrically different, but simply connected and sufficiently compact configurations of a nanocluster of a given size and the respective formation energies. The knowledge of these data allows the calculation of the free formation and free binding energy of the cluster at T ≠ 0. The method is applied to coherent Cu clusters in bcc-Fe. It is shown that even at moderate temperatures the configurational contributions to the free formation and binding energy must not be neglected. The dependence of the monomer free binding energy on clusters size is found to change significantly with increasing temperature which has a considerable effect on the pathway of cluster evolution. Therefore, present investigations provide an essential contribution to the improvement of the input parameters for object kinetic Monte Carlo simulations and rate theory used in multi-scale simulations of the nanostructure evolution. The calculation scheme developed in this work is rather general and applicable to many types of embedded nanoclusters. Compared to the method of overlapping distributions hitherto used in some cases to determine the configurational part of the free energy the new method has major advantages. Various tests are performed in order verify the presented approach and to compare with the results of the other calculation procedure. A roadmap is proposed to include the vibrational contributions to the free energy of the clusters within the framework of the method employed in this work.

  19. Fabrication of metal nanoclusters on graphene grown on Ru(0001)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hui; FU Qiang; CUI Yi; TAN DaLi; BAO XinHe

    2009-01-01

    Monolayer graphene was epitaxially grown on Ru(0001) through exposure of the Ru(0001) to ethylene at room temperature followed by annealing in ultrahigh vacuum at elevated temperatures. The resulting graphene structures were studied by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), X-ray photoelectron spec-troscopy (XPS), and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS). The graphene/Ru(0001) surface was used as a periodic template for growth of metal nanoclusters. Highly dispersed Pt clusters with well controlled size and spatial distribution were fabricated on the surface.

  20. Dynamic study on the transformation process of gold nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaoqian; Wen, Xiaoming; Toh, Yon-Rui; Huang, Kuo-Yen; Tang, Jau; Yu, Pyng

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, the transformation process from Au8 to Au25 nanoclusters (NCs) is investigated with steady state fluorescence spectroscopy and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy at various reaction temperatures and solvent diffusivities. Results demonstrate that Au8 NCs, protected by bovine serum albumin, transform into Au25 NCs under controlled pH values through an endothermic reaction with the activation energy of 74 kJ mol(-1). Meanwhile, the characteristic s-shaped curves describing the formation of Au25 NCs suggest this process involves a diffusion controlled growth mechanism.

  1. Synthesis and characterization of human transferrin-stabilized gold nanoclusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Guével, Xavier; Daum, Nicole; Schneider, Marc

    2011-07-01

    Human transferrin has been biolabelled with gold nanoclusters (Au NCs) using a simple, fast and non-toxic method. These nanocrystals (polyclonal antibody. Additionally, antibody-induced agglomeration demonstrates no alteration in the protein activity and the receptor target ability. MTT and Vialight® Plus tests show no cytotoxicity of these labelled proteins in cells (1 µg ml - 1-1 mg ml - 1). Cell line experiments (A549) indicate also an uptake of the iron loaded fluorescent proteins inside cells. These remarkable data highlight the potential of a new type of non-toxic fluorescent transferrin for imaging and targeting.

  2. Rust Layer Formed on Low Carbon Weathering Steels with Different Mn, Ni Contents in Environment Containing Chloride Ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gui-qin FU

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The rusting evolution of low carbon weathering steels with different Mn, Ni contents under a simulated environment containing chloride ions has been investigated to clarify the correlation between Mn, Ni and the rust formed on steels. The results show that Mn contents have little impact on corrosion kinetics of experimental steels. Content increase of Ni both enhances the anti-corrosion performance of steel substrate and the rust. Increasing Ni content is beneficial to forming compact rust. Semi-quantitative XRD phase analysis shows that the quantity ratio of α/γ*(α-FeOOH/(γ-FeOOH+Fe3O4 decreases as Mn content increases but it increases as Ni content increases. Ni enhances rust layer stability but Mn content exceeding 1.06 wt.% is disadvantageous for rust layer stability. The content increase of Mn does not significantly alter the parameters of the polarization curve. However, as Ni contents increases, Ecorr has shifted to the positive along with decreased icorr values indicating smaller corrosion rate especially as Ni content increases from 0.42 wt.% to 1.50 wt.%.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.22.4.12844

  3. Selective-area growth and magnetic characterization of MnAs/AlGaAs nanoclusters on insulating Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layers crystallized on Si(111) substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakita, Shinya; Hara, Shinjiro, E-mail: hara@rciqe.hokudai.ac.jp [Research Center for Integrated Quantum Electronics, Hokkaido University, North 13 West 8, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Elm, Matthias T. [Institute of Experimental Physics I, Justus-Liebig-University Giessen, Heinrich-Buff-Ring 16, 35392 Giessen (Germany); Institute of Physical Chemistry, Justus-Liebig-University Giessen, Heinrich-Buff-Ring 17, 35392 Giessen (Germany); Klar, Peter J. [Institute of Experimental Physics I, Justus-Liebig-University Giessen, Heinrich-Buff-Ring 16, 35392 Giessen (Germany)

    2016-01-25

    We report on selective-area metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy and magnetic characterization of coupled MnAs/AlGaAs nanoclusters formed on thin Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} insulating layers crystallized on Si(111) substrates. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy reveals that poly-crystalline γ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} grains are formed after an annealing treatment of the amorphous Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layers deposited by atomic layer deposition on Si(111) substrates. The 〈111〉 direction of the γ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} grains tends to be oriented approximately parallel to the 〈111〉 direction of the Si substrate. We observe that hexagonal MnAs nanoclusters on AlGaAs buffer layers grown by selective-area metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy on partially SiO{sub 2}-masked Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} insulator crystallized on Si(111) substrates are oriented with the c-axis along the 〈111〉 direction of the substrates, but exhibit a random in-plane orientation. A likely reason is the random orientation of the poly-crystalline γ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} grains in the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer plane. Magnetic force microscopy studies at room temperature reveal that arrangements of coupled MnAs nanoclusters exhibit a complex magnetic domain structure. Such arrangements of coupled MnAs nanoclusters may also show magnetic random telegraph noise, i.e., jumps between two discrete resistance levels, in a certain temperature range, which can be explained by thermally activated changes of the complex magnetic structure of the nanocluster arrangements.

  4. Reversible modulation of gold nanoclusters photoluminescence based on electrochromic poly(methylene blue).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Zhai, Yanling; Dong, Shaojun

    2014-11-01

    Reversible photoluminescence (PL) switches based on a complex of gold nanoclusters and electrochromic poly(methylene blue) (PMB) were realized. The gold nanoclusters PL of hybrid device can be modulated reversibly under electrochemical stimulation. Such an electrochromic device presents several advantages, such as large fluorescence contrast under reduction and oxidation potentials, good reversibility and excellent long-time stability. This simple protocol is anticipated to offer important hints for other nanoclusters and electrochromic materials in the field of photoelectric devices. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Protein mediated synthesis of fluorescent Au-nanoclusters for metal sensory coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogel, Manja; Raff, Johannes [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Biogeochemistry

    2017-06-01

    Fluorescent Au-nanocluster were successfully synthesized and used for the selective detection of Cu{sup 2} {sup +}. The synthesized Au-BSA-nanoclusters remain functional also after immobilization and show high thermal stability. Additionally, the transfer of the protein mediated Au-nanocluster synthesis route to S-layer proteins was achieved. (The presented work is part of the project BIONEWS dealing with long-term stable cells for the set-up and regeneration of sensor and actor materials for strategic relevant metals, in particular rare earth elements).

  6. Size-dependent mobility of gold nano-clusters during growth on chemically modified graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, Gavin R., E-mail: gavin.bell@warwick.ac.uk; Dawson, Peter M.; Pandey, Priyanka A.; Wilson, Neil R. [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Mulheran, Paul A. [Department of Chemical and Process Engineering, University of Strathclyde, James Weir Building, 75 Montrose St., Glasgow G1 1XJ (United Kingdom)

    2014-01-01

    Gold nano-clusters were grown on chemically modified graphene by direct sputter deposition. Transmission electron microscopy of the nano-clusters on these electron-transparent substrates reveals an unusual bimodal island size distribution (ISD). A kinetic Monte Carlo model of growth incorporating a size-dependent cluster mobility rule uniquely reproduces the bimodal ISD, providing strong evidence for the mobility of large clusters during surface growth. The cluster mobility exponent of −5/3 is consistent with cluster motion via one-dimensional diffusion of gold atoms around the edges of the nano-clusters.

  7. Size-dependent mobility of gold nano-clusters during growth on chemically modified graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavin R. Bell

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gold nano-clusters were grown on chemically modified graphene by direct sputter deposition. Transmission electron microscopy of the nano-clusters on these electron-transparent substrates reveals an unusual bimodal island size distribution (ISD. A kinetic Monte Carlo model of growth incorporating a size-dependent cluster mobility rule uniquely reproduces the bimodal ISD, providing strong evidence for the mobility of large clusters during surface growth. The cluster mobility exponent of −5/3 is consistent with cluster motion via one-dimensional diffusion of gold atoms around the edges of the nano-clusters.

  8. Kinetically controlled synthesis of Au102(SPh)44 nanoclusters and catalytic application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yongdong; Wang, Jin; Liu, Chao; Li, Zhimin; Li, Gao

    2016-05-01

    We here explore a kinetically controlled synthetic protocol for preparing solvent-solvable Au102(SPh)44 nanoclusters which are isolated from polydispersed gold nanoclusters by solvent extraction and size exclusion chromatography (SEC). The as-obtained Au102(SPh)44 nanoclusters are determined by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) and electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry, in conjunction with UV-vis spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). However, Au99(SPh)42, instead of Au102(SPh)44, is yielded when the polydispersed gold nanoclusters are etched in the presence of excess thiophenol under thermal conditions (e.g., 80 °C). Interestingly, the Au102(SPh)44 nanoclusters also can convert to Au99(SPh)42 with equivalent thiophenol ligands, evidenced by the analyses of UV-vis and MALDI mass spectrometry. Finally, the TiO2-supported Au102(SPh)44 nanocluster catalyst is investigated in the selective oxidation of sulfides into sulfoxides by the PhIO oxidant and gives rise to high catalytic activity (e.g., 80-99% conversion of R-S-R' sulfides with 96-99% selectivity for R-S(&z.dbd;O)-R' sulfoxides). The Au102(SPh)44/TiO2 catalyst also shows excellent recyclability in the sulfoxidation process.We here explore a kinetically controlled synthetic protocol for preparing solvent-solvable Au102(SPh)44 nanoclusters which are isolated from polydispersed gold nanoclusters by solvent extraction and size exclusion chromatography (SEC). The as-obtained Au102(SPh)44 nanoclusters are determined by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) and electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry, in conjunction with UV-vis spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). However, Au99(SPh)42, instead of Au102(SPh)44, is yielded when the polydispersed gold nanoclusters are etched in the presence of excess thiophenol under thermal conditions (e.g., 80 °C). Interestingly, the Au102(SPh)44 nanoclusters also can convert to Au99(SPh)42 with equivalent

  9. Quest for Inexpensive Hydrogen Isotopic Fractionation: Do We Need 2D Quantum Confining in Porous Materials or Are Rough Surfaces Enough? The Case of Ammonia Nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mella, Massimo; Curotto, E

    2016-10-05

    We study the adsorption energetics and quantum properties of the molecular hydrogen isotopes H2, D2, and T2 onto the surface of rigid ammonia nanoclusters with quantum simulations and accurate model potential energy surfaces (PES). A highly efficient diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC) algorithm for rigid rotors allowed us to accurately define zero-point adsorption energies for the three isotopes, as well as the degree of translational and rotational delocalization that each affords on the surface. From the data emerges that the quantum adsorption energy (Eads) of T2 can be up to twice the one of H2 at 0 K, suggesting the possibility of exploiting some form of solid ammonia to selectivity separate hydrogen isotopes at low temperatures (≃20 K). This is discussed by focusing on the structural motif that may be more effective for the task. The analysis of the contributions to Eads, however, surprisingly indicates that the average kinetic energy (E(kin)) and rotation energy (Erot(kin)) of T2 can also be, respectively, 2 times and 20 times higher than those of H2; this finding markedly deviates from what is predicted for hydrogen molecules inside carbon nanotubes (CNT) or metallic-organic frameworks (MOF), where E(kin) and Erot(kin) is higher for H2 due to the unavoidable effects of confinement and hindrance to its rotational motion. The rationale for these differences is provided by the geometrical distributions for the rigid rotors, which reveal an increasingly stronger coupling between rotational and translational degrees of freedom upon increasing the isotopic mass. This effect has never been observed before on adsorbing surfaces (e.g., graphite) and is induced by a strongly anisotropic and anharmonic bowl-like potential experienced by the rotors.

  10. Highly selective detection of microRNA based on distance-dependent electrochemiluminescence resonance energy transfer between CdTe nanocrystals and Au nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yan; Lei, Jianping; Chen, Yunlong; Ju, Huangxian

    2014-01-15

    A distance-dependent electrochemiluminescence resonance energy transfer (ERET) system based on CdTe nanocrystals and Au nanoclusters (Au NCs) was designed with the aid of ligase for highly selective detection of microRNA (miRNA). First, Au NCs functionalized hairpin DNA was synthesized via Au-S chemistry, and characterized with transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. The resulting hairpin DNA-Au NCs composite can be bound to the carboxylated CdTe nanocrystals via amide reaction on glass carbon electrode. The strong interaction between CdTe nanocrystals and AuNCs led to the electrochemiluminescence (ECL) quenching of CdTe nanocrystals. In the presence of assistant DNA and miRNA, the ligase can selectively ligate both of them on the strand of the hairpin DNA to form long DNA-RNA heteroduplexes. Thus the ECL signal was recovered due to the blocking of the ERET. As a comparison, when directly opening the hairpin DNA by the target, the ECL emission signal is weak owing to the presence of ERET effect at the short distance. Based on the distance-dependent ERET, a 'signal on' ECL system was utilized for the detection of miRNA with the advantages of 6 orders magnitude linear range and excellent sequence specificity. The total detection processing time of the biosensor was approximately 70 min. By substituting the hairpin DNA with different sequences, this strategy as a new signal transduction approach could be conveniently extended for detection of other short miRNA and DNA.

  11. Fluorescence enhancement of DNA-silver nanoclusters from guanine proximity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeh, Hsin-chih [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sharma, Jaswinder [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Yoo, Hyojong [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martinez, Jennifer S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Oligonucleotide-templated, silver nanoclusters (DNA/Ag NCs) are a versatile set of fluorophores and have already been used for live cell imaging, detection of specific metal ions, and single-nucleotide variation identification. Compared to commonly used organic dyes, these fluorescent nanoclusters have much better photostability and are often a few times brighter. Owing to their small size, simple preparation, and biocompatibility (i.e. made of nontoxic metals), DNA/Ag NCs should find more applications in biological imaging and chemical detection in the years to come. While clearly promising as new fluorophores, DNA/Ag NCs possess a unique and poorly understood dynamic process not shared by organic dyes or photoluminescent nanocrystals - the conversion among different NC species due to silver oxidation/reduction or NC regrouping. While this environmental sensitivity can be viewed as a drawback, in the appropriate context, it can be used as a sensor or reporter. Often reversible, conversions among different NC species have been found to depend upon a number of factors, including time, temperature, oxygen and salt content. In this communication, we report significant fluorescence enhancement of DNA/Ag NCs via interactions with guanine-rich DNA sequences. Moreover, we demonstrated this property can be used for sensitive detection of specific target DNA from a human oncogene (i.e. Braf gene).

  12. PE-CVD fabrication of germanium nanoclusters for memory applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duerkop, T. [Institut fuer Materialien und Bauelemente der Elektronik, Leibniz Universitaet Hannover, Appelstrasse 11a, 30167 Hannover (Germany)], E-mail: duerkop@mbe.uni-hannover.de; Bugiel, E. [Institut fuer Materialien und Bauelemente der Elektronik, Leibniz Universitaet Hannover, Appelstrasse 11a, 30167 Hannover (Germany); Costina, I. [IHP GmbH, Im Technologiepark 25, 15236 Frankfurt (Oder) (Germany); Ott, A.; Peibst, R.; Hofmann, K.R. [Institut fuer Materialien und Bauelemente der Elektronik, Leibniz Universitaet Hannover, Appelstrasse 11a, 30167 Hannover (Germany)

    2008-02-15

    We have investigated Ge nanoclusters (Ge-NC) embedded in silicon dioxide, whose fundamental properties promise improved characteristics in NC flash memory devices as compared to Si nanoclusters. We present a simple new method, based on plasma-enhanced CVD (PE-CVD) deposition of amorphous Ge (a-Ge) onto SiO{sub 2}, to create gate stacks with embedded Ge-NC at vertically well-controlled positions suitable for use in flash memory devices. This process minimizes the exposure of Ge to environmental influences by depositing a-Ge as well as a SiO{sub 2} cap layer in situ within the same deposition chamber. Subsequent high-temperature anneals compatible with the temperature budget of CMOS processing are used for the actual cluster formation. Variation of annealing temperature and duration of this step as well as the thickness of the initial Ge layer controls the average cluster radius and density, as determined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Measurements of electrical properties show the capability of samples with NC to store charge.

  13. Melting Properties of Medium-Sized Silicon Nanoclusters: A Molecular Dynamics Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haipeng; Xu, Runfeng; Bi, Zetong; Shen, Xiaopeng; Han, Kui

    2017-07-01

    The structures and melting properties of the medium-sized silicon nanoclusters have been comparatively studied using the molecular dynamics method. Structural and thermodynamic parameters are used to characterize the melting properties of the clusters. The size dependence of the melting temperature of silicon nanoclusters is determined using the computation results. Different from the homogeneous melting of bulk silicon, melting of silicon nanoparticles proceeds over a finite temperature range due to surface effects, which shows the heterogeneous melting of nanoclusters. We found that the melting starts at the cluster surface and progressively shifts into the core region. This study provides a fundamental perspective on the melting behaviors of semiconductor silicon nanoclusters at the atomistic level.

  14. The role of oxygen and water on molybdenum nanoclusters for electro catalytic ammonia production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Howalt, Jakob Geelmuyden; Vegge, Tejs

    2014-01-01

    . In this study, we present theoretical investigations of the influence of oxygen adsorption and reduction on pure and nitrogen covered molybdenum nanocluster electro catalysts for electrochemical reduction of N2 to NH3 with the purpose of understanding oxygen and water poisoning of the catalyst. Density...... functional theory calculations are used in combination with the computational hydrogen electrode approach to calculate the free energy profile for electrochemical protonation of O and N2 species on cuboctahedral Mo13 nanoclusters. The calculations show that the molybdenum nanocluster will preferentially bind...... are -0.72 V or lower for all oxygen coverages studied, and it is thus possible to (re)activate (partially) oxidized nanoclusters for electrochemical ammonia production, e.g., using a dry proton conductor or an aqueous electrolyte. At lower oxygen coverages, nitrogen molecules can adsorb to the surface...

  15. Nanocluster metal films as thermoelectric material for radioisotope mini battery unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisyuk, P. V.; Krasavin, A. V.; Tkalya, E. V.; Lebedinskii, Yu. Yu.; Vasiliev, O. S.; Yakovlev, V. P.; Kozlova, T. I.; Fetisov, V. V.

    2016-10-01

    The paper is devoted to studying the thermoelectric and structural properties of films based on metal nanoclusters (Au, Pd, Pt). The experimental results of the study of single nanoclusters' tunneling conductance obtained with scanning tunneling spectroscopy are presented. The obtained data allowed us to evaluate the thermoelectric power of thin film consisting of densely packed individual nanoclusters. It is shown that such thin films can operate as highly efficient thermoelectric materials. A scheme of miniature thermoelectric radioisotope power source based on the thorium-228 isotope is proposed. The efficiency of the radioisotope battery using thermoelectric converters based on nanocluster metal films is shown to reach values up to 1.3%. The estimated characteristics of the device are comparable with the parameters of up-to-date radioisotope batteries based on nickel-63.

  16. A colloidal assembly approach to synthesize magnetic porous composite nanoclusters for efficient protein adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qi; Lan, Fang; Yi, Qiangying; Wu, Yao; Gu, Zhongwei

    2015-10-01

    A combination strategy of the inverse emulsion crosslinking approach and the colloidal assembly technique is first proposed to synthesize Fe3O4/histidine composite nanoclusters as new-type magnetic porous nanomaterials. The nanoclusters possess uniform morphology, high magnetic content and excellent protein adsorption capacity, exhibiting their great potential for bio-separation.A combination strategy of the inverse emulsion crosslinking approach and the colloidal assembly technique is first proposed to synthesize Fe3O4/histidine composite nanoclusters as new-type magnetic porous nanomaterials. The nanoclusters possess uniform morphology, high magnetic content and excellent protein adsorption capacity, exhibiting their great potential for bio-separation. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr05800g

  17. The Influence of Ultrasound on Formation of Self-organized Uniform Nanoclusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.M. Peleshchak

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The non-linear diffusion-deformation theory of self-organization of nanoclusters of dot defects in semiconductor exposed to ultrasound treatment that considers the interaction of defects among themselves and with atoms of a matrix via the elastic field created by dot defects and an acoustic wave is developed. Within this theory the influence of ultrasound on the conditions of formation of spherical nanoclusters and their radius is investigated. The nanocluster size depending on average concentration of defects and amplitude of an acoustic wave is determined. It is established that ultrasonic treatment of the semiconductor in the process of formation of an ensemble of nanoclusters leads to reduction of dispersion of their sizes.

  18. Automated electrodeposition of bimetallic noble-metal nanoclusters via redox-replacement reactions for electrocatalysis

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mkwizu, TS

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanoclusters of bimetallic composition involving platinum with gold or ruthenium were sequentially deposited via redoxreplacement of electrodeposited sacrificial Cu adlayers for controlling the deposition of the noble metals. These steps were...

  19. Probing the Absorption and Emission Transition Dipole Moment of DNA Stabilized Silver Nanoclusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hooley, Emma Nicole; Carro Temboury, Miguel R.; Vosch, Tom André Jos

    2017-01-01

    Using single molecule polarization measurements, we investigate the excitation and emission polarization characteristics of DNA stabilized silver nanoclusters (C24-AgNCs). Although small changes in the polarization generally accompany changes to the emission spectrum, the emission and excitation ...

  20. Sub-micron scale patterning of fluorescent silver nanoclusters using low-power laser

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kunwar, Puskal; Hassinen, Jukka; Bautista, Godofredo; Ras, Robin H A; Toivonen, Juha

    2016-01-01

    .... A cost-effective fabrication of photostable micron-sized fluorescent silver nanocluster barcode is demonstrated in silver-impregnated polymer films using a low-power continuous-wave laser diode...

  1. Developing a Millifluidic Platform for the Synthesis of Ultrasmall Nanoclusters: Ultrasmall Copper Nanoclusters as a Case Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biswas, Sanchita; Miller, Jeffrey T; Li, Yuehao; Nandakumar, Krishnaswamy; Kumar, Challa S.S.R.

    2012-02-02

    The future of lab-on-a-chip devices for the synthesis of nanomaterials hinges on the successful development of high-throughput methods with better control over their size. While significant effort in this direction mainly focuses on developing “difficult to fabricate” complex microfluidic reactors, scant attention has been paid to the “easy to fabricate” and simple millifluidic systems that could provide the required control as well as high throughput. By utilizing numerical simulation of fluids within the millifluidic space at different flow rates, the results presented here show velocity profiles and residence time distributions similar to the case of microfluidics. By significantly reducing the residence time and residence time distribution, a continuous flow synthesis of ultrasmall copper nanoclusters (UCNCs) with exceptional colloidal stability is achieved. In-situ synchrotron-radiation-based X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) reveal that the as-prepared clusters are about 1 nm, which is further supported by transmission electron microscopy and UV–vis spectroscopy studies. The clusters reported here are the smallest ever produced using a lab-on-a-chip platform. When supported on silica, they are found to efficiently catalyze C–H oxidation reactions, hitherto unknown to be catalyzed by Cu. This work suggests that a millifluidic platform can be an inexpensive, versatile, easy-to-use, and powerful tool for nanoparticle synthesis in general, and more specifically for ultrasmall nanoclusters (UNCs).

  2. Laser-assisted atom probe tomography investigation of magnetic FePt nanoclusters: First experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Folcke, E.; Larde, R. [Groupe de Physique des Materiaux, UMR CNRS 6634, Universite de Rouen, 76801 Saint Etienne du Rouvray (France); Le Breton, J.M., E-mail: jean-marie.lebreton@univ-rouen.fr [Groupe de Physique des Materiaux, UMR CNRS 6634, Universite de Rouen, 76801 Saint Etienne du Rouvray (France); Gruber, M.; Vurpillot, F. [Groupe de Physique des Materiaux, UMR CNRS 6634, Universite de Rouen, 76801 Saint Etienne du Rouvray (France); Shield, J.E.; Rui, X. [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Nebraska Center for Materials and Nanoscience, University of Nebraska, N104 WSEC, Lincoln, NE 68588 (United States); Patterson, M.M. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Stout, Menomonie, WI 54751 (United States)

    2012-03-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FePt nanoclusters dispersed in a Cr matrix were studied by atom probe tomography. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Simulated experiments were conducted to study the artefacts of the analysis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In FePt nanoclusters, Fe and Pt are present in equiatomic proportions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FePt nanoclusters are homogeneous, no core-shell structure is observed. - Abstract: FePt nanoclusters dispersed in a Cr matrix have been investigated by laser-assisted atom probe tomography. The results were analysed according to simulated evaporation experiments. Three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions reveal the presence of nanoclusters roughly spherical in shape, with a size in good agreement with previous transmission electron microscopy observations. Some clusters appear to be broken up after the evaporation process due to the fact that the Cr matrix has a lower evaporation field than Fe and Pt. It is thus shown that the observed FePt nanoclusters are chemically homogeneous. They contain Fe and Pt in equiatomic proportions, with no core-shell structure observed.

  3. Enhancement of the Hydrogen Evolution Reaction from Ni-MoS2 Hybrid Nanoclusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    This report focuses on a novel strategy for the preparation of transition metal–MoS2 hybrid nanoclusters based on a one-step, dual-target magnetron sputtering, and gas condensation process demonstrated for Ni-MoS2. Aberration-corrected STEM images coupled with EDX analysis confirms the presence of Ni and MoS2 in the hybrid nanoclusters (average diameter = 5.0 nm, Mo:S ratio = 1:1.8 ± 0.1). The Ni-MoS2 nanoclusters display a 100 mV shift in the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) onset potential and an almost 3-fold increase in exchange current density compared with the undoped MoS2 nanoclusters, the latter effect in agreement with reported DFT calculations. This activity is only reached after air exposure of the Ni-MoS2 hybrid nanoclusters, suggested by XPS measurements to originate from a Ni dopant atoms oxidation state conversion from metallic to 2+ characteristic of the NiO species active to the HER. Anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV) experiments on the Ni-MoS2 hybrid nanoclusters confirm the presence of Ni-doped edge sites and reveal distinctive electrochemical features associated with both doped Mo-edge and doped S-edge sites which correlate with both their thermodynamic stability and relative abundance.

  4. Photoluminescent Gold Nanoclusters in Cancer Cells: Cellular Uptake, Toxicity, and Generation of Reactive Oxygen Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matulionyte, Marija; Dapkute, Dominyka; Budenaite, Laima; Jarockyte, Greta; Rotomskis, Ricardas

    2017-02-10

    In recent years, photoluminescent gold nanoclusters have attracted considerable interest in both fundamental biomedical research and practical applications. Due to their ultrasmall size, unique molecule-like optical properties, and facile synthesis gold nanoclusters have been considered very promising photoluminescent agents for biosensing, bioimaging, and targeted therapy. Yet, interaction of such ultra-small nanoclusters with cells and other biological objects remains poorly understood. Therefore, the assessment of the biocompatibility and potential toxicity of gold nanoclusters is of major importance before their clinical application. In this study, the cellular uptake, cytotoxicity, and intracellular generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) of bovine serum albumin-encapsulated (BSA-Au NCs) and 2-(N-morpholino) ethanesulfonic acid (MES)capped photoluminescent gold nanoclusters (Au-MES NCs) were investigated. The results showed that BSA-Au NCs accumulate in cells in a similar manner as BSA alone, indicating an endocytotic uptake mechanism while ultrasmall Au-MES NCs were distributed homogeneously throughout the whole cell volume including cell nucleus. The cytotoxicity of BSA-Au NCs was negligible, demonstrating good biocompatibility of such BSA-protected Au NCs. In contrast, possibly due to ultrasmall size and thin coating layer, Au-MES NCs exhibited exposure time-dependent high cytotoxicity and higher reactivity which led to highly increased generation of reactive oxygen species. The results demonstrate the importance of the coating layer to biocompatibility and toxicity of ultrasmall photoluminescent gold nanoclusters.

  5. Ligand-exchange synthesis of selenophenolate-capped Au25 nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xiangming; Xu, Qian; Wang, Shuxin; Zhu, Manzhou

    2012-07-21

    We report the synthesis and characterization of selenophenolate-capped 25-gold-atom nanoclusters via a ligand-exchange approach. In this method, phenylethanethiolate (PhCH(2)CH(2)S) capped Au(25) nanoclusters are utilized as the starting material, which is subject to ligand-exchange with selenophenol (PhSeH). The as-obtained cluster product is confirmed to be selenophenolate-protected Au(25) nanoclusters through characterization by electrospray ionization (ESI) and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), elemental analysis (EA), UV-Vis and (1)H/(13)C NMR spectroscopies. The ligand-exchange synthesis of [Au(25)(SePh)(18)](-)[(C(8)H(17))(4)N](+) nanoclusters demonstrates that the core size of gold nanoclusters is retained in the thiolate-to-selenolate exchange process and that the 18 surface thiolate ligands can be completely exchanged by selenophenolate, rather than giving rise to a mixed ligand shell on the cluster. The two types of Au(25)L(18) (L = thiolate or selenolate) nanoclusters also show some differences in stability and optical properties.

  6. Synthesis of selenolate-protected Au18(SeC6H5)14 nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qian; Wang, Shuxin; Liu, Zhao; Xu, Guoyong; Meng, Xiangming; Zhu, Manzhou

    2013-02-07

    This work reports the first synthesis of selenophenolate-protected Au(18)(SePh)(14) nanoclusters. This cluster exhibits distinct differences from its thiolate analogue in terms of optical absorption properties. The Au(18)(SePh)(14) nanoclusters were obtained via a controlled reaction of Au(25)(SCH(2)CH(2)Ph)(18) with selenophenol. Electrospray ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ESI-TOF-MS) revealed the crude product to contain predominantly Au(18)(SePh)(14) nanoclusters, and side products include Au(15)(SePh)(13), Au(19)(SePh)(15) and Au(20)(SePh)(16). High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was employed to isolate Au(18)(SePh)(14) nanoclusters. The results of thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), elemental analysis (EA), and (1)H/(13)C NMR spectroscopy confirmed the cluster composition. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of selenolate-protected Au(18) nanoclusters. Future theoretical and X-ray crystallographic work will reveal the geometric structure and the nature of selenolate-gold bonding in the nanocluster.

  7. Design of an ultrasmall Au nanocluster-CeO2 mesoporous nanocomposite catalyst for nitrobenzene reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Hanbao; Li, Peng; Xiang, Ji; Fu, Fangyu; Zhang, Dandan; Ran, Xiaorong; Zhu, Manzhou

    2013-08-21

    In this work we are inspired to explore gold nanoclusters supported on mesoporous CeO2 nanospheres as nanocatalysts for the reduction of nitrobenzene. Ultrasmall Au nanoclusters (NCs) and mesoporous CeO2 nanospheres were readily synthesized and well characterized. Due to their ultrasmall size, the as-prepared Au clusters can be easily absorbed into the mesopores of the mesoporous CeO2 nanospheres. Owing to the unique mesoporous structure of the CeO2 support, Au nanoclusters in the Au@CeO2 may effectively prevent the aggregation which usually results in a rapid decay of the catalytic activity. It is notable that the ultrasmall gold nanoclusters possess uniform size distribution and good dispersibility on the mesoporous CeO2 supports. Compared to other catalyst systems with different oxide supports, the as-prepared Au nanocluster-CeO2 nanocomposite nanocatalysts showed efficient catalytic performance in transforming nitrobenzene into azoxybenzene. In addition, a plausible mechanism was deeply investigated to explain the transforming process. Au@CeO2 exhibited efficient catalytic activity for reduction of nitrobenzene. This strategy may be easily extended to fabricate many other heterogeneous catalysts including ultrasmall metal nanoclusters and mesoporous oxides.

  8. Photoluminescent Gold Nanoclusters in Cancer Cells: Cellular Uptake, Toxicity, and Generation of Reactive Oxygen Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matulionyte, Marija; Dapkute, Dominyka; Budenaite, Laima; Jarockyte, Greta; Rotomskis, Ricardas

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, photoluminescent gold nanoclusters have attracted considerable interest in both fundamental biomedical research and practical applications. Due to their ultrasmall size, unique molecule-like optical properties, and facile synthesis gold nanoclusters have been considered very promising photoluminescent agents for biosensing, bioimaging, and targeted therapy. Yet, interaction of such ultra-small nanoclusters with cells and other biological objects remains poorly understood. Therefore, the assessment of the biocompatibility and potential toxicity of gold nanoclusters is of major importance before their clinical application. In this study, the cellular uptake, cytotoxicity, and intracellular generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) of bovine serum albumin-encapsulated (BSA-Au NCs) and 2-(N-morpholino) ethanesulfonic acid (MES)-capped photoluminescent gold nanoclusters (Au-MES NCs) were investigated. The results showed that BSA-Au NCs accumulate in cells in a similar manner as BSA alone, indicating an endocytotic uptake mechanism while ultrasmall Au-MES NCs were distributed homogeneously throughout the whole cell volume including cell nucleus. The cytotoxicity of BSA-Au NCs was negligible, demonstrating good biocompatibility of such BSA-protected Au NCs. In contrast, possibly due to ultrasmall size and thin coating layer, Au-MES NCs exhibited exposure time-dependent high cytotoxicity and higher reactivity which led to highly increased generation of reactive oxygen species. The results demonstrate the importance of the coating layer to biocompatibility and toxicity of ultrasmall photoluminescent gold nanoclusters. PMID:28208642

  9. Reaction of carbon tetrachloride with methane in a non-equilibrium plasma at atmospheric pressure, and characterisation of the polymer thus formed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaikwad, Vaibhav; Kennedy, Eric; Mackie, John; Holdsworth, Clovia; Molloy, Scott; Kundu, Sazal; Stockenhuber, Michael; Dlugogorski, Bogdan

    2014-09-15

    In this paper we focus on the development of a methodology for treatment of carbon tetrachloride utilising a non-equilibrium plasma operating at atmospheric pressure, which is not singularly aimed at destroying carbon tetrachloride but rather at converting it to a non-hazardous, potentially valuable commodity. This method encompasses the reaction of carbon tetrachloride and methane, with argon as a carrier gas, in a quartz dielectric barrier discharge reactor. The reaction is performed under non-oxidative conditions. Possible pathways for formation of major products based on experimental results and supported by quantum chemical calculations are outlined in the paper. We elucidate important parameters such as carbon tetrachloride conversion, product distribution, mass balance and characterise the chlorinated polymer formed in the process.

  10. Carbonates in the Martian meteorite Allan Hills 84001 formed at 18 +/- 4 degrees C in a near-surface aqueous environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halevy, Itay; Fischer, Woodward W; Eiler, John M

    2011-10-11

    Despite evidence for liquid water at the surface of Mars during the Noachian epoch, the temperature of early aqueous environments has been impossible to establish, raising questions of whether the surface of Mars was ever warmer than today. We address this problem by determining the precipitation temperature of secondary carbonate minerals preserved in the oldest known sample of Mars' crust--the approximately 4.1 billion-year-old meteorite Allan Hills 84001 (ALH84001). The formation environment of these carbonates, which are constrained to be slightly younger than the crystallization age of the rock (i.e., 3.9 to 4.0 billion years), has been poorly understood, hindering insight into the hydrologic and carbon cycles of earliest Mars. Using "clumped" isotope thermometry we find that the carbonates in ALH84001 precipitated at a temperature of approximately 18 °C, with water and carbon dioxide derived from the ancient Martian atmosphere. Furthermore, covarying carbonate carbon and oxygen isotope ratios are constrained to have formed at constant, low temperatures, pointing to deposition from a gradually evaporating, subsurface water body--likely a shallow aquifer (meters to tens of meters below the surface). Despite the mild temperatures, the apparently ephemeral nature of water in this environment leaves open the question of its habitability.

  11. Phosphinothiolates as ligands for polyhydrido copper nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huertos, Miguel A; Cano, Israel; Bandeira, Nuno A G; Benet-Buchholz, Jordi; Bo, Carles; van Leeuwen, Piet W N M

    2014-12-01

    The reaction of [CuI(HSC6 H4 PPh2 )]2 with NaBH4 in CH2 Cl2 /EtOH led to air- and moisture-stable copper hydride nanoparticles (CuNPs) containing phosphinothiolates as new ligands, one of which was isolated by crystallization. The X-ray crystal structure of [Cu18 H7 L10 I] (L=(-) S(C6 H4 )PPh2 ) shows unprecedented features in its 28-atom framework (18 Cu and 10 S atoms). Seven hydrogen atoms, in hydride form, are needed for charge balance and were located by density functional theory methods. H2 was released from the copper hydride nanoparticles by thermolysis and visible light irradiation.

  12. First characterization of the surface compounds formed during the reduction of a carbonaceous electrode in LiClO{sub 4}-ethylene carbonate electrolyte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naji, A. [Universite Henri Poincare, 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France). Lab. de Chimie du Solide Mineral; Ghanbaja, J. [Universite Henri Poincare, 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France). Lab. de Chimie du Solide Mineral; Willmann, P. [CNES, 31 - Toulouse (France); Humbert, B. [CNRS-UHP, 54 - Villers-les-Nancy (France); Billaud, D. [Universite Henri Poincare, 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France). Lab. de Chimie du Solide Mineral

    1996-09-01

    Reduction of a carbonaceous electrode in LiClO{sub 4}-ethylene carbonate electrolyte results in the development of a surface layer formed of Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and different lithium alkylcarbonates identified both by electron energy loss and FT-IR spectroscopies. (orig.)

  13. 活性炭及工艺参数对所制固体活性炭性能的影响%PREPARATION OF ACTIVATED CARBON FORM II. ROLES OF ACTIVATED CARBONS ON THE STRENGTH OF ACTIVATED CARBON FORM USING A THERMOPLASTIC POLYMER AS BINDER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    乔文明; 光来要三; 持田力; 堀雄一; 前田岳志

    2001-01-01

    以煤焦油基活性炭(TAC)和椰子壳活性炭(CAC)为原料,以聚乙烯醇缩丁醛(PVB)为粘接剂,以邻苯二甲酸二丁酯(DBP)为增塑剂,通过混合、成型、硬化及炭化处理,最终制得固体活性炭。详细地考查了工艺条件(如强度、收率、收缩率、比表面积等)的影响。研究结果表明:对于椰子壳活性炭来说,制备高强度(>5000kPa)的固体活性炭是困难的,其主要原因在于椰子壳活性炭比煤焦油基活性炭含有更少的表面官能团(-COOH,-OH等),而这些官能团可能增强PVB在活性炭表面的粘接,并且参与粘接剂的氧化硬化,硬化的粘接剂在炭化过程中在活性炭颗粒间形成炭桥或者枝状结构而粘接这些颗粒。因此,为了制备高强度的固体活性炭,椰子壳活性炭的表面改性是必要的。%Activated carbon/polymer derived carbon form for capacitor electrode was prepared from coconut shell activated carbon (CAC) through mixing, moulding, curing and carbonizing using polyvinylbutyral resin (PVB) as the binder, dibutylphthalate (DBP) as a plastisizing agent. The strength of CAC form was found always poor and difficult to be above 5000kPa which was easily obtained with tar based activated carbon (TAC) in a previous paper. Severer curing conditions and cross-linking agent failed to improve the strength. Higher pressure of moulding was effective to increase the strength, and 500MPa or more pressure is required to achieve 5000kPa. IR and TPD demonstrated that CAC carried much less oxygen functional groups, especially CO2 evolving and low temperature CO evolving groups than TAC. Such surface oxygen functional groups on the activated carbon may adhere to PVB on the carbon surface and may participate in the oxidative curing of the polymer to bind the grains through the carbon bridges after the carbonization. Surface modification of activated carbon is suggested to obtain high strength of its carbonized form

  14. Advanced fire-resistant forms of activated carbon and methods of adsorbing and separating gases using same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiong, Yongliang; Wang, Yifeng

    2016-04-19

    A method of removing a target gas from a gas stream is disclosed. The method uses advanced, fire-resistant activated carbon compositions having vastly improved fire resistance. Methods for synthesizing the compositions are also provided. The advanced compositions have high gas adsorption capacities and rapid adsorption kinetics (comparable to commercially-available activated carbon), without having any intrinsic fire hazard.

  15. Photodissociation of Cerium Oxide Nanocluster Cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akin, S T; Ard, S G; Dye, B E; Schaefer, H F; Duncan, M A

    2016-04-21

    Cerium oxide cluster cations, CexOy(+), are produced via laser vaporization in a pulsed nozzle source and detected with time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The mass spectrum displays a strongly preferred oxide stoichiometry for each cluster with a specific number of metal atoms x, with x ≤ y. Specifically, the most prominent clusters correspond to the formula CeO(CeO2)n(+). The cluster cations are mass selected and photodissociated with a Nd:YAG laser at either 532 or 355 nm. The prominent clusters dissociate to produce smaller species also having a similar CeO(CeO2)n(+) formula, always with apparent leaving groups of (CeO2). The production of CeO(CeO2)n(+) from the dissociation of many cluster sizes establishes the relative stability of these clusters. Furthermore, the consistent loss of neutral CeO2 shows that the smallest neutral clusters adopt the same oxidation state (IV) as the most common form of bulk cerium oxide. Clusters with higher oxygen content than the CeO(CeO2)n(+) masses are present with much lower abundance. These species dissociate by the loss of O2, leaving surviving clusters with the CeO(CeO2)n(+) formula. Density functional theory calculations on these clusters suggest structures composed of stable CeO(CeO2)n(+) cores with excess oxygen bound to the surface as a superoxide unit (O2(-)).

  16. Enhanced thermal conductivity of form-stable phase change composite with single-walled carbon nanotubes for thermal energy storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Tingting; Li, Jinhong; Feng, Wuwei; Nian, Hong'en

    2017-03-16

    A striking contrast in the thermal conductivities of polyethylene glycol (PEG)/diatomite form-stable phase change composite (fs-PCC) with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNs) as nano-additive has been reported in our present study. Compared to the pure PEG, the thermal conductivity of the prepared fs-PCC has increased from 0.24 W/mK to 0.87 W/Mk with a small SWCNs loading of 2 wt%. SWCNs are decorated on the inner surface of diatomite pores whilst retaining its porous structure. Compared to PEG/diatomite fs-PCC, the melting and solidification time of the PEG/diatomite/SWCNs fs-PCC are respectively decreased by 54.7% and 51.1%, and its thermal conductivity is 2.8 times higher. The composite can contain PEG as high as 60 wt% and maintain its original shape perfectly without any PEG leakage after subjected to 200 melt-freeze cycles. DSC results indicates that the melting point of the PEG/diatomite/SWCNs fs-PCC shifts to a lower temperature while the solidification point shifts to a higher temperature due to the presence of SWCNs. Importantly, the use of SWCNs is found to have clear beneficial effects for enhancing the thermal conductivity and thermal storage/release rates, without affecting thermal properties, chemical compatibility and thermal stability. The prepared PEG/diatomite/SWCNs fs-PCC exhibits excellent chemical and thermal durability and has potential application in solar thermal energy storage and solar heating.

  17. Enhanced thermal conductivity of form-stable phase change composite with single-walled carbon nanotubes for thermal energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Tingting; Li, Jinhong; Feng, Wuwei; Nian, Hong'En

    2017-03-01

    A striking contrast in the thermal conductivities of polyethylene glycol (PEG)/diatomite form-stable phase change composite (fs-PCC) with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNs) as nano-additive has been reported in our present study. Compared to the pure PEG, the thermal conductivity of the prepared fs-PCC has increased from 0.24 W/mK to 0.87 W/Mk with a small SWCNs loading of 2 wt%. SWCNs are decorated on the inner surface of diatomite pores whilst retaining its porous structure. Compared to PEG/diatomite fs-PCC, the melting and solidification time of the PEG/diatomite/SWCNs fs-PCC are respectively decreased by 54.7% and 51.1%, and its thermal conductivity is 2.8 times higher. The composite can contain PEG as high as 60 wt% and maintain its original shape perfectly without any PEG leakage after subjected to 200 melt-freeze cycles. DSC results indicates that the melting point of the PEG/diatomite/SWCNs fs-PCC shifts to a lower temperature while the solidification point shifts to a higher temperature due to the presence of SWCNs. Importantly, the use of SWCNs is found to have clear beneficial effects for enhancing the thermal conductivity and thermal storage/release rates, without affecting thermal properties, chemical compatibility and thermal stability. The prepared PEG/diatomite/SWCNs fs-PCC exhibits excellent chemical and thermal durability and has potential application in solar thermal energy storage and solar heating.

  18. Simultaneous expression and transportation of insulin by supramolecular polysaccharide nanocluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu-Hui; Zhang, Ying-Ming; Zhao, Qi-Hui; Liu, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Drug/gene transportation systems with stimuli-responsive release behaviors are becoming research hotspots in biochemical and biomedical fields. In this work, a glucose-responsive supramolecular nanocluster was successfully constructed by the intermolecular complexation of phenylboronic acid modified β-cyclodextrin with adamantane modified polyethylenimine, which could be used as a biocompatible carrier for insulin and pCMV3-C-GFPSpark-Ins DNA which could express insulin co-delivery. Benefiting from the response capability of phenylboronic acid moiety toward glucose, the encapsulated insulin could be specifically released and the corresponding targeted DNA could efficiently express insulin in HepG2 cell, accompanied by the high-level insulin release in vitro. Our results demonstrate that the simultaneous insulin drug delivery and insulin gene transfection in a controlled mode may have great potential in the clinical diabetes treatments. PMID:26948978

  19. Cytotoxicity of nucleus-targeting fluorescent gold nanoclusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing-Ya; Cui, Ran; Zhang, Zhi-Ling; Zhang, Mingxi; Xie, Zhi-Xiong; Pang, Dai-Wen

    2014-10-01

    Gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) with ultra small sizes and unique fluorescence properties have shown promising potential for imaging the nuclei of living cells. However, little is known regarding the potential cytotoxicity of AuNCs after they enter the cell nucleus. The aim of this study is to investigate whether and how nucleus-targeting AuNCs affect the normal functioning of cells. Highly stable, water-soluble and bright fluorescent Au25NCs (the core of each nanocluster is composed of 25 gold atoms) were synthesized. Specific targeting of Au25NCs to the cell nucleus was achieved by conjugating the TAT peptide to the Au25NCs. Cell viability, cell morphology, cell apoptosis/necrosis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) level and mitochondrial membrane potential examinations were performed on different cell lines exposed to the nucleus-targeting Au25NCs. We found that the nucleus-targeting Au25NCs caused cell apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. A possible mechanism for the cytotoxicity of the nucleus-targeting Au25NCs was proposed as follows: the nucleus-targeting Au25NCs induce the production of ROS, resulting in the oxidative degradation of mitochondrial components, in turn leading to apoptosis via a mitochondrial damage pathway. This work facilitates a better understanding of the toxicity of AuNCs, especially nucleus-targeting AuNCs.Gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) with ultra small sizes and unique fluorescence properties have shown promising potential for imaging the nuclei of living cells. However, little is known regarding the potential cytotoxicity of AuNCs after they enter the cell nucleus. The aim of this study is to investigate whether and how nucleus-targeting AuNCs affect the normal functioning of cells. Highly stable, water-soluble and bright fluorescent Au25NCs (the core of each nanocluster is composed of 25 gold atoms) were synthesized. Specific targeting of Au25NCs to the cell nucleus was achieved by conjugating the TAT peptide to the Au25NCs. Cell viability, cell

  20. Thumb Imprint Based Detection of Hyperbilirubinemia Using Luminescent Gold Nanoclusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Srestha; Sahoo, Amaresh Kumar; Paul, Anumita; Chattopadhyay, Arun

    2016-12-01

    Early and easy detection of diseases, using point-of-care and inexpensive devices, not only provides option for early treatment but also reduces the risk of propagation. Herein we report the fabrication of a robust film based luminescence indicator of bilirubin, which can indicate hyperbilirubinemia through the thumb imprint of the patient. The UV-light induced luminescence intensity of the film, made out of chitosan stabilised gold (Au) nanoclusters, which was effectively quenched in the presence of Cu2+ ions, recovered in the presence of bilirubin from skin or blood serum. Moreover, the sensitivity of detection of bilirubin was tuneable with the amount of Cu2+ added, thereby facilitating the detection of the desired concentration range of bilirubin.

  1. Simultaneous expression and transportation of insulin by supramolecular polysaccharide nanocluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu-Hui; Zhang, Ying-Ming; Zhao, Qi-Hui; Liu, Yu

    2016-03-01

    Drug/gene transportation systems with stimuli-responsive release behaviors are becoming research hotspots in biochemical and biomedical fields. In this work, a glucose-responsive supramolecular nanocluster was successfully constructed by the intermolecular complexation of phenylboronic acid modified β-cyclodextrin with adamantane modified polyethylenimine, which could be used as a biocompatible carrier for insulin and pCMV3-C-GFPSpark-Ins DNA which could express insulin co-delivery. Benefiting from the response capability of phenylboronic acid moiety toward glucose, the encapsulated insulin could be specifically released and the corresponding targeted DNA could efficiently express insulin in HepG2 cell, accompanied by the high-level insulin release in vitro. Our results demonstrate that the simultaneous insulin drug delivery and insulin gene transfection in a controlled mode may have great potential in the clinical diabetes treatments.

  2. A comparison of interatomic potentials for modeling tungsten nanocluster structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Jiannan; Shu, Xiaolin; Jin, Shuo; Zhang, Xuesong; Zhang, Ying; Lu, Guang-Hong

    2017-02-01

    Molecular dynamic simulation is utilized to study the nanocluster and the fuzz structure on the PFM surface of tungsten. The polyhedral and linear cluster structures based on the icosahedron, cuboctahedron and rhombic dodecahedron are built up. Three interatomic potentials are used in calculating the relationship between the cluster energy and the number of atoms. The results are compared with first-principles calculation to show each potential's best application scale. Furthermore, the transition between the icosahedral and the cuboctahedral clusters is observed in molecular dynamic simulation at different temperatures, which follows a critical curve for different numbers of atoms. The linear structures are proved to be stable at experimental temperatures by thermodynamics. The work presents a selection of interatomic potentials in simulating tungsten cluster systems and helps researchers understand the growth and evolution laws of clusters and the fuzz-like structure formation process in fusion devices.

  3. Efficient Radioisotope Energy Transfer by Gold Nanoclusters for Molecular Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volotskova, Olga; Sun, Conroy; Stafford, Jason H; Koh, Ai Leen; Ma, Xiaowei; Cheng, Zhen; Cui, Bianxiao; Pratx, Guillem; Xing, Lei

    2015-08-26

    Beta-emitting isotopes Fluorine-18 and Yttrium-90 are tested for their potential to stimulate gold nanoclusters conjugated with blood serum proteins (AuNCs). AuNCs excited by either medical radioisotope are found to be highly effective ionizing radiation energy transfer mediators, suitable for in vivo optical imaging. AuNCs synthesized with protein templates convert beta-decaying radioisotope energy into tissue-penetrating optical signals between 620 and 800 nm. Optical signals are not detected from AuNCs incubated with Technetium-99m, a pure gamma emitter that is used as a control. Optical emission from AuNCs is not proportional to Cerenkov radiation, indicating that the energy transfer between the radionuclide and AuNC is only partially mediated by Cerenkov photons. A direct Coulombic interaction is proposed as a novel and significant mechanism of energy transfer between decaying radionuclides and AuNCs.

  4. Jump electroconductivity in the laser deposited nanoclustered structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antipov, A.; Shagurina, A.; Osipov, A.; Istratov, A.; Skryabin, I.; Arakelian, S.

    2017-01-01

    The quantum states verification in cluster semiconductor/metallic structures by jump/tunneling electroconductivity and possible mechanisms for their implementation are considered in experiment and theory. By our laser ablation technique we have nanostructurized the films for which the ability to control the change in their electrical properties does exist by variation of the topology for the system. The granular conductivity specificity has been under study. The current-voltage characteristics behavior has been measured for a nanocluster bimetallic film (Au+Ag), and the experiments for multilayer bimetal thin films of the different composition have been carried out. Two associated mechanisms for electroconductivity occur in the case, i.e. tunnel transition for electrons and electron activation in the frames of the shell model for a cluster system, in dependence on the nanostructure topology.

  5. Information processing schemes based on monolayer protected metallic nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervera, Javier; Mafé, Salvador

    2011-09-01

    Nanostructures are potentially useful as building blocks to complement future electronics because of their high versatility and packing densities. The fabrication and characterization of particular nanostructures and the use of new theoretical tools to describe their properties are receiving much attention. However, the integration of these individual systems into general schemes that could perform simple tasks is also necessary because modern electronics operation relies on the concerted action of many basic units. We review here new conceptual schemes that can allow information processing with ligand or monolayer protected metallic nanoclusters (MPCs) on the basis of the experimentally demonstrated and theoretically described electrical characteristics of these nanostructures. In particular, we make use of the tunnelling current through a metallic nanocluster attached to the electrodes by ligands. The nanostructure is described as a single electron transistor (SET) that can be gated by an external potential. This fact permits exploiting information processing schemes in approximately defined arrays of MPCs. These schemes include: (i) binary, multivalued, and reversible logic gates; (ii) an associative memory and a synchronization circuit; and (iii) two signal processing nanodevices based on parallel arrays of MPCs and nanoswitches. In each case, the practical operation of the nanodevice is based on the SET properties of MPCs reported experimentally. We examine also some of the practical problems that should be addressed in future experimental realizations: the stochastic nature of the electron tunnelling, the relatively low operation temperatures, and the limited reliability caused by the weak signals involved and the nanostructure variability. The perspectives to solve these problems are based on the potentially high degree of scalability of the nanostructures.

  6. Inclusion of Cu nano-cluster 1D arrays inside a C3-symmetric artificial oligopeptide via co-assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Ruiying; Li, Fei; Yang, Chunpeng; Wan, Xiaobo

    2015-12-01

    A peptide sequence N3-GVGV-OMe (G: glycine; V: valine) was attached to a benzene 1,3,5-tricarboxamide (BTA) derivative via ``click chemistry'' to afford a C3-symmetric artificial oligopeptide. The key feature of this oligopeptide is that the binding sites (triazole groups formed by click reaction) are located at the center, while the three oligopeptide arms with a strong tendency to assemble are located around it, which provides inner space to accommodate nanoparticles via self-assembly. The inclusion of Cu nanoclusters and the formation of one-dimensional (1D) arrays inside the nanofibers of the C3-symmetric artificial oligopeptide assembly were observed, which is quite different from the commonly observed nanoparticle growth on the surface of the pre-assembled oligopeptide nanofibers via the coordination sites located outside. Our finding provides an instructive concept for the design of other stable organic-inorganic hybrid 1D arrays with the inorganic nanoparticles inside.A peptide sequence N3-GVGV-OMe (G: glycine; V: valine) was attached to a benzene 1,3,5-tricarboxamide (BTA) derivative via ``click chemistry'' to afford a C3-symmetric artificial oligopeptide. The key feature of this oligopeptide is that the binding sites (triazole groups formed by click reaction) are located at the center, while the three oligopeptide arms with a strong tendency to assemble are located around it, which provides inner space to accommodate nanoparticles via self-assembly. The inclusion of Cu nanoclusters and the formation of one-dimensional (1D) arrays inside the nanofibers of the C3-symmetric artificial oligopeptide assembly were observed, which is quite different from the commonly observed nanoparticle growth on the surface of the pre-assembled oligopeptide nanofibers via the coordination sites located outside. Our finding provides an instructive concept for the design of other stable organic-inorganic hybrid 1D arrays with the inorganic nanoparticles inside. Electronic

  7. Influence of form IA RubisCO and environmental dissolved inorganic carbon on the delta13C of the clam-chemoautotroph symbiosis Solemya velum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Kathleen M; Schwedock, Julie; Schrag, Daniel P; Cavanaugh, Colleen M

    2004-12-01

    Many nutritive symbioses between chemoautotrophic bacteria and invertebrates, such as Solemya velum, have delta(13)C values of approximately -30 to -35%, considerably more depleted than phytoplankton. Most of the chemoautotrophic symbionts fix carbon with a form IA ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (RubisCO). We hypothesized that this form of RubisCO discriminates against (13)CO(2) to a greater extent than other forms. Solemya velum symbiont RubisCO was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli, purified and characterized. Enzyme from this recombinant system fixed carbon most rapidly at pH 7.5 and 20-25 degrees C. Surprisingly, this RubisCO had an epsilon-value (proportional to the degree to which the enzyme discriminates against (13)CO(2)) of 24.4 per thousand, similar to form IB RubisCOs, and higher than form II RubisCOs. Samples of interstitial water from S. velum's habitat were collected to determine whether the dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) could contribute to the negative delta(13)C values. Solemya velum habitat DIC was present at high concentrations (up to approximately 5 mM) and isotopically depleted, with delta(13)C values as low as approximately -6%. Thus environmental DIC, coupled with a high degree of isotopic fractionation by symbiont RubisCO likely contribute to the isotopically depleted delta(13)C values of S. velum biomass, highlighting the necessity of considering factors at all levels (from environmental to enzymatic) in interpreting stable isotope ratios.

  8. Ion beam synthesis of Te and Bi nanoclusters in silicon: The effect of post-implantation high frequency electromagnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalitzova, M. [Institute of Solid State Physics - BAS, Boulevard Tzarigradsko Chaussee 72, BG-1784 Sofia (Bulgaria)]. E-mail: markaliz@issp.bas.bg; Peeva, A. [Institute of Solid State Physics - BAS, Boulevard Tzarigradsko Chaussee 72, BG-1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); Ignatova, V. [SCK.CEN, Reactor Materials Research, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Lebedev, O.I. [EMAT, RUCA, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Zollo, G. [Dipartimento di Enerdetica, Univ. La Sapienza, Via A. Scarpa 14, 00161 Rome (Italy); Vitali, G. [Dipartimento di Enerdetica, Univ. La Sapienza, Via A. Scarpa 14, 00161 Rome (Italy)

    2006-01-15

    The post-implantation effect of high frequency electromagnetic field (HFEMF) on the microstructure and electrical properties of high dose Te{sup +} and Bi{sup +} implanted (1 0 0) Si was investigated by cross-sectional high resolution transmission electron microscopy and four-point probe electrical measurements. Te and Bi nanoclusters (NCs) embedded in amorphized Si have been formed by ion implantation. Post-implantation treatment with HFEMF reorganizes the cluster shape and distribution by stimulation of spinodal decomposition and ordering of Te NCs to a percolation system. The effect of HFEMF on Bi NCs is assumed to be connected with the formation of electrical microcurrents causing local heating of their interfaces with the a-Si matrix. The results of electrical measurements show that the HFEMF application reduces the sheet resistance by a factor of about 6 for Te{sup +} and about 3 for Bi{sup +} irradiation.

  9. Characterization and Application of DNA-templated Silver Nanoclusters and Polarized Spectroscopy of Self-Assembled Nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carro-Temboury, Miguel R.

    other applications are possible such as detection of analytes, pH detection or their use as active layer of Organic Light Emitting Diodes (OLEDs). The fluorophores studied here, DNAAgNCs, are few nanometer sized and formed by a few to ca. 20 silver atoms templated by one or two single stranded DNA (ss......In this thesis two different systems are investigated envisioning their potential applications: DNA-templated silver nanoclusters (DNA-AgNCs) and ionic self-assembled (ISA) nanostructures based on azo-dyes. Mainly Visible-NIR spectroscopy was used to probe electronic transitions with absorbance......DNA) scaffolds. By choosing different DNA sequences their emission can be tuned in the visible-NIR range. Their small size, brightness, photostability and good biocompatibility makes them a promising alternative to other commercially available fluorophores such as organic dyes or quantum dots. Upon synthesis...

  10. A scalable synthesis of highly stable and water dispersible Ag 44(SR)30 nanoclusters

    KAUST Repository

    AbdulHalim, Lina G.

    2013-01-01

    We report the synthesis of atomically monodisperse thiol-protected silver nanoclusters [Ag44(SR)30] m, (SR = 5-mercapto-2-nitrobenzoic acid) in which the product nanocluster is highly stable in contrast to previous preparation methods. The method is one-pot, scalable, and produces nanoclusters that are stable in aqueous solution for at least 9 months at room temperature under ambient conditions, with very little degradation to their unique UV-Vis optical absorption spectrum. The composition, size, and monodispersity were determined by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and analytical ultracentrifugation. The produced nanoclusters are likely to be in a superatom charge-state of m = 4-, due to the fact that their optical absorption spectrum shares most of the unique features of the intense and broadly absorbing nanoparticles identified as [Ag44(SR) 30]4- by Harkness et al. (Nanoscale, 2012, 4, 4269). A protocol to transfer the nanoclusters to organic solvents is also described. Using the disperse nanoclusters in organic media, we fabricated solid-state films of [Ag44(SR)30]m that retained all the distinct features of the optical absorption spectrum of the nanoclusters in solution. The films were studied by X-ray diffraction and photoelectron spectroscopy in order to investigate their crystallinity, atomic composition and valence band structure. The stability, scalability, and the film fabrication method demonstrated in this work pave the way towards the crystallization of [Ag44(SR)30]m and its full structural determination by single crystal X-ray diffraction. Moreover, due to their unique and attractive optical properties with multiple optical transitions, we anticipate these clusters to find practical applications in light-harvesting, such as photovoltaics and photocatalysis, which have been hindered so far by the instability of previous generations of the cluster. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  11. Characterization of complex (B + C) diffusion layers formed on chromium and nickel-based low-carbon steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pertek, A.; Kulka, M

    2002-12-30

    Combined surface hardening with boron and carbon was used for low-carbon chromium and nickel-based steels. The microstructure, boron contents, carbon profiles and chosen properties of borided layers produced on the carburized steels have been examined. These complex (B+C) layers are termed borburized layers. The microhardness profiles and wear resistance of these layers have been studied. In the microstructure of the borocarburized layer two zones have been observed: iron borides (FeB+Fe{sub 2}B) and a carburized layer. The depth (70-125 {mu}m) and microhardness (1500-1800 HV) of iron borides zone have been found. The carbon content (1.2-1.94 wt.%) and microhardness (700-950 HV) beneath iron borides zone have been determined. The microhardness gradient in borocarburized layer has been reduced in comparison with the only borided layer. An increase of distance from the surface is accompanied by a decrease of carbon content and microhardness in the carburized zone. The carbon and microhardness profiles of borided, carburized and borocarburized layers have been presented. A positive influence of complex layers (B+C) on the wear resistance was determined. The wear resistance of the borocarburized layer was determined to be greater in comparison with that for only borided or only carburized layers.

  12. Synthesis and optical properties of ZnO nanocluster porous films deposited by modified SILAR method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, X. D.; Li, X. M.; Yu, W. D.

    2004-05-01

    Ultrasonic rinsing procedure was introduced to successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method. ZnO nanocluster porous films were successfully deposited on glass substrate using zinc-ammonia complexed precursor. The crystallinity, microstructure, optical properties and photoluminescence were measured and analyzed for both as-deposited and annealed films. Effects of experimental parameters and heat treatment on the structural and optical properties were discussed. Results show that as-deposited ZnO film exhibits excellent crystallinity with the preferential orientation of (0 0 2) plane. A porous feature with interconnected particles of 200-400 nm in ZnO films was observed, with each ZnO particle formed by the aggregation of many crystallites in size of 30-50 nm. The low transmittance due to scattering losses over the porous ZnO layer down to 16% was detected. The annealing at 400 °C can promote the preferential orientation along (1 0 0) plane, the interfusion of adjacent particles and the reduction of scattering loss. Intense and sharp ultraviolet emission peaks at 392 nm dominates the PL spectra for both as-deposited and annealed samples, indicating the good optical quality of ZnO layer.

  13. Bio-NCs - the marriage of ultrasmall metal nanoclusters with biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Nirmal; Zheng, Kaiyuan; Xie, Jianping

    2014-10-01

    Ultrasmall metal nanoclusters (NCs) have attracted increasing attention due to their fascinating physicochemical properties. Today, functional metal NCs are finding growing acceptance in biomedical applications. To achieve a better performance in biomedical applications, metal NCs can be interfaced with biomolecules, such as proteins, peptides, and DNA, to form a new class of biomolecule-NC composites (or bio-NCs in short), which typically show synergistic or novel physicochemical and physiological properties. This feature article focuses on the recent studies emerging at the interface of metal NCs and biomolecules, where the interactions could impart unique physicochemical properties to the metal NCs, as well as mutually regulate biological functions of the bio-NCs. In this article, we first provide a broad overview of key concepts and developments in the novel biomolecule-directed synthesis of metal NCs. A special focus is placed on the key roles of biomolecules in metal NC synthesis. In the second part, we describe how the encapsulated metal NCs affect the structure and function of biomolecules. Followed by that, we discuss several unique synergistic effects observed in the bio-NCs, and illustrate them with examples highlighting their potential biomedical applications. Continued interdisciplinary efforts are required to build up in-depth knowledge about the interfacial chemistry and biology of bio-NCs, which could further pave their ways toward biomedical applications.

  14. DNA abasic site-directed formation of fluorescent silver nanoclusters for selective nucleobase recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Kun; Cui, Qinghua; Liu, Guiying; Wu, Fei; Xu, Shujuan; Shao, Yong

    2011-07-01

    DNA single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) detection has attracted much attention due to mutation related diseases. Various methods for SNP detection have been proposed and many are already in use. Here, we find that the abasic site (AP site) in the DNA duplex can be developed as a capping scaffold for the generation of fluorescent silver nanoclusters (Ag NCs). As a proof of concept, the DNA sequences from fragments near codon 177 of cancer supression gene p53 were used as a model for SNP detection by in situ formed Ag NCs. The formation of fluorescent Ag NCs in the AP site-containing DNA duplex is highly selective for cytosine facing the AP site and guanines flanking the site and can be employed in situ as readout for SNP detection. The fluorescent signal-on sensing for SNP based on this inorganic fluorophore is substantially advantageous over the previously reported signal-off responses using low-molecular-weight organic ligands. The strong dependence of fluorescent Ag NC formation on the sequences surrounding the AP site was successfully used to identify mutations in codon 177 of cancer supression gene p53. We anticipate that this approach will be employed to develop a practical SNP detection method by locating an AP site toward the midway cytosine in a target strand containing more than three consecutive cytosines.

  15. One-step synthesis of boronic acid functionalized gold nanoclusters for photoluminescence sensing of dopamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huide; Liu, Chunxiu; Xia, Yunsheng

    2017-03-01

    This study is the first to report one-step synthesis of boronic acid functionalized gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) using mixed ligands of 4-mercaptophenylboronic acid (MPBA) and glutathione. Furthermore, the emission color of the products can be fancily tuned from green to near-infrared by simply changing the proportion of the two stabilizers. In basic media, dopamine (DA) molecules themselves polymerize each other and form polydopamine with large amounts of cis-diol groups, which then react with boronic acid groups on the AuNC’s surface based on the formation of boronate esters. As a result, the photoluminescence of the AuNCs is well quenched by the electron transfer effect. Accordingly, DA molecules are assayed from 0.5 to 9 μM, and the detection limit is as low as 0.1 μM. The as-prepared AuNCs exhibit high selectivity; the existing biomolecules including various amino acids, ascorbic acid, uric acid, glucose, etc, do not interfere with the assay. The proposed method is successfully applied to the assay of DA in human serum, indicating its practical potential.

  16. A new approach to studying the luminescence spectra of free icosahedral and crystalline argon nanoclusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doronin, Yu. S.; Vakula, V. L.; Kamarchuk, G. V.; Tkachenko, A. A.; Samovarov, V. N.

    2016-02-01

    We propose a new approach to analyzing the cathodoluminescence spectra of free argon nanoclusters, forming in a supersonic jet flowing into vacuum. Based on this approach, we conduct an analysis of the intensities of the luminescence bands of neutral and charged excimer complexes (Ar2)* and (Ar+4)*, measured for clusters with an average size ranging from 500 to 8900 atoms per cluster, and a diameter of 32-87 Å. It is shown that the concentration of the substance condensed into clusters, which determines the integrated intensity of the bands, is proportional to the logarithm of the average size of the clusters in the jet. An analysis of the normalized intensities of the (Ar2)* and (Ar+4)* bands for crystalline clusters with an fcc structure allowed us to establish that the luminescence of neutral (Ar2)* molecules comes from within the volume of the cluster, while the charged complexes (Ar+4)* emit from the subsurface layer. We highlighted an area of cluster dimensions at which the jet is dominated by quasi-crystalline clusters with an icosahedral structure, and it is shown that the transition from icosahedral clusters to fcc structures occurs when the average size of the cluster in the jet is N ¯ = (1000-1800) atoms/cluster.

  17. Bio-NCs--the marriage of ultrasmall metal nanoclusters with biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Nirmal; Zheng, Kaiyuan; Xie, Jianping

    2014-11-21

    Ultrasmall metal nanoclusters (NCs) have attracted increasing attention due to their fascinating physicochemical properties. Today, functional metal NCs are finding growing acceptance in biomedical applications. To achieve a better performance in biomedical applications, metal NCs can be interfaced with biomolecules, such as proteins, peptides, and DNA, to form a new class of biomolecule-NC composites (or bio-NCs in short), which typically show synergistic or novel physicochemical and physiological properties. This feature article focuses on the recent studies emerging at the interface of metal NCs and biomolecules, where the interactions could impart unique physicochemical properties to the metal NCs, as well as mutually regulate biological functions of the bio-NCs. In this article, we first provide a broad overview of key concepts and developments in the novel biomolecule-directed synthesis of metal NCs. A special focus is placed on the key roles of biomolecules in metal NC synthesis. In the second part, we describe how the encapsulated metal NCs affect the structure and function of biomolecules. Followed by that, we discuss several unique synergistic effects observed in the bio-NCs, and illustrate them with examples highlighting their potential biomedical applications. Continued interdisciplinary efforts are required to build up in-depth knowledge about the interfacial chemistry and biology of bio-NCs, which could further pave their ways toward biomedical applications.

  18. Storage of Gold Nanoclusters in Muscle Leads to their Biphasic in Vivo Clearance

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Xiao-Dong; Chen, Jie; Wang, Hao; Song, Sha Sha; Shen, Xiu; Long, Wei; Sun, Yuan-Ming; Fan, Saijun; Zheng, Kaiyuan; Leong, David Tai; Xie, Jianping

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasmall gold nanoclusters show great potential in biomedical applications. Long term biodistribution, retention, toxicity, and pharmacokinetics profiles are prerequisites in their potential clinical applications. Here we systematically investigated the biodistribution, clearance, and toxicity of one widely used Au NC species glutathione protected Au NCs or GSH Au NCs, over a relatively long period of 90 days in mice. We observed that most of the Au NCs were cleared at 30 days post injection with a major accumulation in liver and kidney. However, it is surprising that an abnormal increase of Au amount in the heart, liver, spleen, lung, and testis was observed at 60 and 90 days, indicating that the injected Au NCs formed a V shaped time dependent distribution profile in various organs. Further investigations revealed that Au NCs were steadily accumulating in the muscle in the first 30 days p.i., and the as stored Au NCs gradually released into blood in 30 to 90 days, which induced a redistribution and reaccu...

  19. Morphology and atomic-scale structure of single-layer WS2 nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Füchtbauer, Henrik G; Tuxen, Anders K; Moses, Poul G; Topsøe, Henrik; Besenbacher, Flemming; Lauritsen, Jeppe V

    2013-10-14

    Two-dimensional sheets of transition metal (Mo and W) sulfides are attracting strong attention due to the unique electronic and optical properties associated with the material in its single-layer form. The single-layer MoS2 and WS2 are already in widespread commercial use in catalytic applications as both hydrotreating and hydrocracking catalysts. Consequently, characterization of the morphology and atomic structure of such particles is of utmost importance for the understanding of the catalytic active phase. However, in comparison with the related MoS2 system only little is known about the fundamental properties of single-layer WS2 (tungstenite). Here, we use an interplay of atom-resolved Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) studies of Au(111)-supported WS2 nanoparticles and calculated edge structures using Density Functional Theory (DFT) to reveal the equilibrium morphology and prevalent edge structures of single-layer WS2. The STM results reveal that the single layer S-W-S sheets adopt a triangular equilibrium shape under the sulfiding conditions of the synthesis, with fully sulfided edges. The predominant edge structures are determined to be the (101[combining macron]0) W-edge, but for the smallest nanoclusters also the (1[combining macron]010) S-edges become important. DFT calculations are used to construct phase diagrams of the WS2 edges, and describe their sulfur and hydrogen coordination under different conditions, and in this way shed light on the catalytic role of WS2 edges.

  20. DNA abasic site-directed formation of fluorescent silver nanoclusters for selective nucleobase recognition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma Kun; Cui Qinghua; Liu Guiying; Wu Fei; Xu Shujuan; Shao Yong, E-mail: yshao@zjnu.cn [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Zhejiang Normal University, Jinhua 321004, Zhejiang (China)

    2011-07-29

    DNA single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) detection has attracted much attention due to mutation related diseases. Various methods for SNP detection have been proposed and many are already in use. Here, we find that the abasic site (AP site) in the DNA duplex can be developed as a capping scaffold for the generation of fluorescent silver nanoclusters (Ag NCs). As a proof of concept, the DNA sequences from fragments near codon 177 of cancer supression gene p53 were used as a model for SNP detection by in situ formed Ag NCs. The formation of fluorescent Ag NCs in the AP site-containing DNA duplex is highly selective for cytosine facing the AP site and guanines flanking the site and can be employed in situ as readout for SNP detection. The fluorescent signal-on sensing for SNP based on this inorganic fluorophore is substantially advantageous over the previously reported signal-off responses using low-molecular-weight organic ligands. The strong dependence of fluorescent Ag NC formation on the sequences surrounding the AP site was successfully used to identify mutations in codon 177 of cancer supression gene p53. We anticipate that this approach will be employed to develop a practical SNP detection method by locating an AP site toward the midway cytosine in a target strand containing more than three consecutive cytosines.

  1. Electrodeposition of Pd based binary catalysts on Carbon paper via surface limited redox-replacement reaction for oxygen reduction reaction

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Modibedi, RM

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available -replacement reaction (SLR3) with Cu as a sacrificial metal. Co-deposition of the two metals on carbon paper was also performed. ECALD is the appropriate fabrication methodology because the resultant catalysts showed good dispersion of the nanoclusters on the carbon...

  2. Controllable synthesis of hexagonal ZnO–carbon core–shell microrods and the removal of ZnO to form hexagonal carbon microtubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Yong, E-mail: xy91007@163.com [Department of Applied Chemistry, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou 510642 (China); He, Wenqi; Gao, Chuang [Department of Chemistry and Institute of Nanochemistry, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Zheng, Mingtao; Lie, Bingfu; Liu, Xiaotang [Department of Applied Chemistry, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou 510642 (China); Liu, Yingliang, E-mail: tliuyl@163.com [Department of Applied Chemistry, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou 510642 (China)

    2013-06-15

    A simple and efficient approach was developed to produce regular and uniform shaped hexagonal ZnO–C core–shell micro-rods and carbon micro-tubes. A single-source raw material, zinc acetate dihydrate, has been used for the in situ generation of the hexagonal ZnO–C micro-rods in a sealed autoclave system at 500 °C for 12 h without a catalyst. The resulting products were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray analysis and room-temperature photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL). The partial or complete carbon coating on the ZnO surfaces plays an important role in modifying the PL properties. Impacting factors including thermolysis temperature, time and dose of the reactant on the evolution of the hexagonal shape were investigated. A possible formation diagram for the materials has been proposed and discussed based on the features of the reaction system. - Highlights: • Hexagonal ZnO–C core–shell microrods were synthesized by the lower temperature decomposition of zinc acetate. • The novel hexagonal carbon microtubes can gain by simply handling with dilute acid. • The partial or complete carbon coating on the ZnO surfaces plays an important role in modifying the PL properties. • A possible formation diagram for the materials has been proposed.

  3. Green synthesis of peptide-templated gold nanoclusters as novel fluorescence probes for detecting protein kinase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wei; Liang, Ru-Ping; Wang, Ying; Zhang, Li; Qiu, Jian-Ding

    2015-06-21

    A green method was employed for synthesizing peptide-templated nanoclusters without requiring strong reducing agents. Using synthetic peptide-gold nanoclusters as fluorescence probes, a novel assay for detecting protein kinase is developed based on phosphorylation against carboxypeptidase Y digestion.

  4. Continuous and rapid synthesis of nanoclusters and nanocrystals using scalable microstructured reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hyung Dae

    Recent advances in nanocrystalline materials production are expected to impact the development of next generation low-cost and/or high efficiency solar cells. For example, semiconductor nanocrystal inks are used to lower the fabrication cost of the absorber layers of the solar cells. In addition, some quantum confined nanocrystals display electron-hole pair generation phenomena with greater than 100% quantum yield, called multiple exciton generation (MEG). These quantum dots could potentially be used to fabricate solar cells that exceed the Schockley-Queisser limit. At present, continuous syntheses of nanoparticles using microreactors have been reported by several groups. Microreactors have several advantages over conventional batch synthesis. One advantage is their efficient heat transfer and mass transport. Another advantage is the drastic reduction in the reaction time, in many cases, down to minutes from hours. Shorter reaction time not only provides higher throughput but also provide better particle size control by avoiding aggregation and by reducing probability of oxidizing precursors. In this work, room temperature synthesis of Au11 nanoclusters and high temperature synthesis of chalcogenide nanocrystals were demonstrated using continuous flow microreactors with high throughputs. A high rate production of phosphine-stabilized Au11 nanoclusters was achieved using a layer-up strategy which involves the use of microlamination architectures; the patterning and bonding of thin layers of material (laminae) to create a multilayered micromixer in the range of 25-250 mum thick was used to step up the production of phosphine-stabilized Au11 nanoclusters. Continuous production of highly monodispersed phosphine-stabilized Au 11 nanoclusters at a rate of about 11.8 [mg/s] was achieved using a microreactor with a size of 1.687cm3. This result is about 30,000 times over conventional batch synthesis according to production rate/per reactor volume. We have elucidated the

  5. Advanced fire-resistant forms of activated carbon and methods of adsorbing and separating gases using same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Yongliang; Wang, Yifeng

    2015-02-03

    Advanced, fire-resistant activated carbon compositions useful in adsorbing gases; and having vastly improved fire resistance are provided, and methods for synthesizing the compositions are also provided. The advanced compositions have high gas adsorption capacities and rapid adsorption kinetics (comparable to commercially-available activated carbon), without having any intrinsic fire hazard. They also have superior performance to Mordenites in both adsorption capacities and kinetics. In addition, the advanced compositions do not pose the fibrous inhalation hazard that exists with use of Mordenites. The fire-resistant compositions combine activated carbon mixed with one or more hydrated and/or carbonate-containing minerals that release H.sub.2O and/or CO.sub.2 when heated. This effect raises the spontaneous ignition temperature to over 500.degree. C. in most examples, and over 800.degree. C. in some examples. Also provided are methods for removing and/or separating target gases, such as Krypton or Argon, from a gas stream by using such advanced activated carbons.

  6. Use of Activated Carbon in Packaging to Attenuate Formaldehyde-Induced and Formic Acid-Induced Degradation and Reduce Gelatin Cross-Linking in Solid Dosage Forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colgan, Stephen T; Zelesky, Todd C; Chen, Raymond; Likar, Michael D; MacDonald, Bruce C; Hawkins, Joel M; Carroll, Sophia C; Johnson, Gail M; Space, J Sean; Jensen, James F; DeMatteo, Vincent A

    2016-07-01

    Formaldehyde and formic acid are reactive impurities found in commonly used excipients and can be responsible for limiting drug product shelf-life. Described here is the use of activated carbon in drug product packaging to attenuate formaldehyde-induced and formic acid-induced drug degradation in tablets and cross-linking in hard gelatin capsules. Several pharmaceutical products with known or potential vulnerabilities to formaldehyde-induced or formic acid-induced degradation or gelatin cross-linking were subjected to accelerated stability challenges in the presence and absence of activated carbon. The effects of time and storage conditions were determined. For all of the products studied, activated carbon attenuated drug degradation or gelatin cross-linking. This novel use of activated carbon in pharmaceutical packaging may be useful for enhancing the chemical stability of drug products or the dissolution stability of gelatin-containing dosage forms and may allow for the 1) extension of a drug product's shelf-life when the limiting attribute is a degradation product induced by a reactive impurity, 2) marketing of a drug product in hotter and more humid climatic zones than currently supported without the use of activated carbon, and 3) enhanced dissolution stability of products that are vulnerable to gelatin cross-linking.

  7. A Search for Interstellar Carbon-chain Alcohol HC4OH in Star-forming Region l1527 and Dark Cloud TMC-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Mitsunori; Takano, Shuro; Yamabe, Hiromichi; Koshikawa, Naohiro; Tsukiyama, Koichi; Nakane, Aya; Okabayashi, Toshiaki; Kunimatsu, Arisa; Kuze, Nobuhiko

    2012-01-01

    We report a sensitive search for the rotational transitions of the carbon-chain alcohol HC4OH in the frequency range 21.2-46.7 GHz in the star-forming region L1527 and the dark cloud TMC-1. The motivation was laboratory detection of HC4OH by microwave spectroscopy. Despite achieving rms noise levels of several millikelvin in the antenna temperature using the 45 m telescope at Nobeyama Radio Observatory, the detection was not successful, leading to 3σ upper limits corresponding to the column densities of 2.0 × 1012 and 5.6 × 1012 cm-2 in L1527 and TMC-1, respectively. These upper limits indicate that [HC4OH]/[HC5N] ratios are less than 0.3 and 0.1 in L1527 and TMC-1, respectively, where HC5N is an HC4-chain cyanide and HC4OH is a hydroxide. These ratios suggest that the cyano carbon-chain molecule dominates the hydroxyl carbon-chain molecule in L1527 and TMC-1. This is contrary to the case of saturated compounds in hot cores, e.g., CH3OH and CH3CN, and can be a chemical feature of carbon-chain molecules in L1527 and TMC-1. In addition, the column densities of the "unsubstituted" carbon-chain molecule C4H and the sulfur-bearing molecules SO and HCS+ were determined from detected lines in L1527.

  8. Au Nanocluster assisted PCE improvement in PEDOT: PSS - Si Hybrid Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Manisha; Pudasaini, Pushpa Raj; Ayon, Arturo A.

    2015-03-01

    Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS), a P-type organic polymer is frequently employed in the fabrication of heterojunction p-n solar cell devices due to its proper HOMO-LUMO band gap as well as its tunable conductivity. In this report we describe the incorporation of gold (Au) nanoclusters in the PEDOT:PSS blend and its influence on the power-conversion-efficiency (PCE) on planar silicon (Si) hybrid heterojunction solar cell devices. Specifically, the reference samples without the aforementioned nanoclusters, were measured to exhibit a 6.10% PCE, value that increased to 7.55% upon the addition of the Au nanoclusters. The observed increase in the PCE is attributed to the enhanced electrical conductivity of the PEDOT:PSS films due to the incorporation of the nanoclusters, which is directly reflected in their improved fill factor. It is further theorized that the presence of Au nanoclusters in the insulating PSS layer in the PEDOT:PSS blend have a positive influence in the charge collection effectiveness of the devices produced. Considering that the Au nanoparticles involved in this research exercise had an average size of only 4 nm, it is considered that plasmonic effects did not play a relevant role in the observed PCE improvement.

  9. Highly fluorescent gold nanoclusters based sensor for the detection of quercetin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Zhanguang, E-mail: kqlu@stu.edu.cn; Qian Sihua [Shantou University, Department of Chemistry (China); Chen Junhui, E-mail: chenjupush@126.com [Peking University Shenzhen Hospital, Interventional Oncology and Minimally Invasive Therapies Department (China); Chen Xi [Guangdong Pharmaceutical University (China)

    2012-12-15

    In this contribution, novel luminescent gold nanoclusters were synthesized by utilizing bovine serum albumin as templates with a simple, rapid, and one-pot procedure. The as-prepared gold nanoclusters were highly dispersed in aqueous solution and emitted an intense red fluorescence under UV light (365 nm). They exhibited strong fluorescence and the maximum excitation and emission wavelengths were 480 and 613.5 nm. In addition, the bovine serum albumin-stabilized gold nanoclusters were successfully utilized as novel fluorescent probes for the detection of quercetin for the first time. It was found that the addition of quercetin induced the strong fluorescence intensity of the gold nanoclusters to decrease. The decrease in fluorescence intensity of the gold nanoclusters caused by quercetin allowed the sensitive detection of quercetin in the range of 8.9 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8}-1.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} mol L{sup -1}. The detection limit for quercetin is 1.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8} mol L{sup -1} at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3. The present sensor for quercetin detection possessed a low detection limit and wide linear range. In addition, the real samples were analyzed with satisfactory results.

  10. Highly fluorescent gold nanoclusters based sensor for the detection of quercetin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhanguang; Qian, Sihua; Chen, Junhui; Chen, Xi

    2012-12-01

    In this contribution, novel luminescent gold nanoclusters were synthesized by utilizing bovine serum albumin as templates with a simple, rapid, and one-pot procedure. The as-prepared gold nanoclusters were highly dispersed in aqueous solution and emitted an intense red fluorescence under UV light (365 nm). They exhibited strong fluorescence and the maximum excitation and emission wavelengths were 480 and 613.5 nm. In addition, the bovine serum albumin-stabilized gold nanoclusters were successfully utilized as novel fluorescent probes for the detection of quercetin for the first time. It was found that the addition of quercetin induced the strong fluorescence intensity of the gold nanoclusters to decrease. The decrease in fluorescence intensity of the gold nanoclusters caused by quercetin allowed the sensitive detection of quercetin in the range of 8.9 × 10-8-1.8 × 10-4 mol L-1. The detection limit for quercetin is 1.8 × 10-8 mol L-1 at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3. The present sensor for quercetin detection possessed a low detection limit and wide linear range. In addition, the real samples were analyzed with satisfactory results.

  11. Synthesis and Optical Properties of Au-Ag Alloy Nanoclusters with Controlled Composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. F. Sánchez-Ramírez

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Colloidal solid-solution-like Au-Ag alloy nanoclusters of different compositions were synthesized through citrate reduction of mixed metal ions of low concentrations, without using any other protective or capping agents. Optical absorption of the alloy nanoclusters was studied both theoretically and experimentally. The position of the surface plasmon resonance (SPR absorption band of the nanoclusters could be tuned from 419 nm to 521 nm through the variation of their composition. Considering effective dielectric constant of the alloy, optical absorption spectra for the nanoclusters were calculated using Mie theory, and compared with the experimentally obtained spectra. Theoretically obtained optical spectra well resembled the experimental spectra when the true size distribution of the nanoparticles was considered. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HREM, high-angle annular dark field (HAADF imaging, and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS revealed the true alloy nature of the nanoparticles with nominal composition being preserved. The synthesis technique can be extended to other bimetallic alloy nanoclusters containing Ag.

  12. Nanocrystals and Nanoclusters as Cocatalysts for Photocatalytic Water Splitting

    KAUST Repository

    Sinatra, Lutfan

    2016-12-04

    studied for the photocatalytic H2 production in order to explore the synergistic effect of the plasmonic resonance from the Au nanoparticles and pn-junction between Cu2O and TiO2. Additionally, the plasmonic effect of the Au films was also studied and utilized in order to improve the PWS. Secondly, the nanoscaling of cocatalysts was studied in order to improve the efficiency thereof and to reduce the cost of the cocatalyst materials. Moreover, it is sought to explore the quantum size effect on the properties of the cocatalyst and their effect on the photocatalytic reaction. Atomically precise Au and Ni nanoclusters were employed in these studies. Au nanoclusters were studied in relation to the cocatalysts in the photocatalytic water splitting, and Ni nanoclusters were studied in relation to the cocatalysts in the electrocatalytic water oxidation. The results of these studies will provide new insights in relation to the strategy used in order to develop efficient cocatalysts for the purpose of photocatalytic water splitting.

  13. Formation of functionalized nanoclusters by solvent evaporation and their effect on the physicochemical properties of dental composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Henry A; Giraldo, Luis F; Casanova, Herley

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this work was to study the effect of silica nanoclusters (SiNC), obtained by a solvent evaporation method and functionalized by 3-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane (MPS) and MPS+octyltrimethoxysilane (OTMS) (50/50wt/wt), on the rheological, mechanical and sorption properties of urethane dimethylacrylate (UDMA)/triethylenglycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) (80/20wt/wt) resins blend. Silica nanoparticles (SiNP) were silanized with MPS or MPS+OTMS (50/50wt/wt) and incorporated in an UDMA-isopropanol mix to produce functionalized silica nanoclusters after evaporating the isopropanol. The effect of functionalized SiNC on resins rheological properties was determined by large and small deformation tests. Mechanical, thermal, sorption and solubility properties were evaluated for composite materials. The UDMA/TEGDMA (80/20wt/wt) resins blend with added SiNC (ca. 350nm) and functionalized with MPS showed a Newtonian flow behavior associated to their spheroidal shape, whereas the resins blend with nanoclusters silanized with MPS+OTMS (50/50wt/wt) (ca. 400nm) showed a shear-thinning behavior due to nanoclusters irregular shape. Composite materials prepared with bare silica nanoclusters showed lower compressive strength than functionalized silica nanoclusters. MPS functionalized nanoclusters showed better mechanical properties but higher water sorption than functionalized nanoclusters with both silane coupling agents, MPS and OTMS. The solvent evaporation method applied to functionalized nanoparticles showed to be an alternative way to the sinterization method for producing nanoclusters, which improved some dental composite mechanical properties and reduced water sorption. The shape of functionalized silica nanoclusters showed to have influence on the rheological properties of SiNC resin suspensions and the mechanical and sorption properties of light cured composites. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Stable carbon isotope fractionation of organic cyst-forming dinoflagellates : Evaluating the potential for a CO2 proxy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoins, Mirja; Van de Waal, Dedmer B.; Eberlein, Tim; Reichart, Gert Jan; Rost, Björn; Sluijs, Appy

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decades, significant progress has been made regarding the quantification and mechanistic understanding of stable carbon isotope fractionation (13C fractionation) in photosynthetic unicellular organisms in response to changes in the partial pressure of atmospheric CO2 (pCO2). However, h

  15. Stable carbon isotope fractionation of organic cyst-forming dinoflagellates: evaluating the potential for a CO2 proxy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoins, Mirja; Van de Waal, Dedmer B.; Eberlein, Tim; Reichart, Gert-Jan; Rost, Björn; Sluijs, Appy

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decades, significant progress has been made regarding the quantification and mechanistic understanding of stable carbon isotope fractionation (13C fractionation) in photosynthetic unicellular organisms in response to changes in the partial pressure of atmospheric CO2 (pCO2). However, h

  16. Charge Carrier Dynamics at Silver Nanocluster-Molecular Acceptor Interfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Almansaf, Abdulkhaleq

    2017-07-01

    A fundamental understanding of interfacial charge transfer at donor-acceptor interfaces is very crucial as it is considered among the most important dynamical processes for optimizing performance in many light harvesting systems, including photovoltaics and photo-catalysis. In general, the photo-generated singlet excitons in photoactive materials exhibit very short lifetimes because of their dipole-allowed spin radiative decay and short diffusion lengths. In contrast, the radiative decay of triplet excitons is dipole forbidden; therefore, their lifetimes are considerably longer. The discussion in this thesis primarily focuses on the relevant parameters that are involved in charge separation (CS), charge transfer (CT), intersystem crossing (ISC) rate, triplet state lifetime, and carrier recombination (CR) at silver nanocluster (NCs) molecular-acceptors interfaces. A combination of steady-state and femto- and nanosecond broadband transient absorption spectroscopies were used to investigate the charge carrier dynamics in various donor-acceptor systems. Additionally, this thesis was prolonged to investigate some important factors that influence the charge carrier dynamics in Ag29 silver NCs donor-acceptor systems, such as the metal doping and chemical structure of the nanocluster and molecular acceptors. Interestingly, clear correlations between the steady-state measurements and timeresolved spectroscopy results are found. In the first study, we have investigated the interfacial charge transfer dynamics in positively charged meso units of 5, 10, 15, 20-tetra (1- methyl-4-pyridino)-porphyrin tetra (p-toluene sulfonate) (TMPyP) and neutral charged 5, 10, 15, 20-tetra (4-pyridyl)-porphyrin (TPyP), with negatively charged undoped and gold (Au)- doped silver Ag29 NCs. Moreover, this study showed the impact of Au doping on the charge carrier dynamics of the system. In the second study, we have investigated the interfacial charge transfer dynamics in [Pt2 Ag23 Cl7 (PPh3

  17. Magnetic-responsive hybrids of Fe3O4 nanoparticles with β-lactoglobulin amyloid fibrils and nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolisetty, Sreenath; Vallooran, Jijo J; Adamcik, Jozef; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2013-07-23

    We report on the synthesis and magnetic-responsive behavior of hybrids formed by dispersing negatively charged iron oxide (Fe3O4) magnetic nanoparticles in positively charged β-lactoglobulin protein solutions at acidic pH, followed by heating at high temperatures. Depending on the pH used, different hybrid aggregates can be obtained, such as nanoparticle-modified amyloid fibrils (pH 3) and spherical nanoclusters (pH 4.5). We investigate the effect of magnetic fields of varying strengths (0-5 T) on the alignment of these Fe3O4-modified amyloid fibrils and spherical nanoclusters using a combination of scattering, birefringence and microscopic techniques and we find a strong alignment of the hybrids upon increasing the intensity of the magnetic field, which we quantify via 2D and 3D order parameters. We also demonstrate the possibility of controlling magnetically the sol-gel behavior of these hybrids: addition of salt (NaCl, 150 mM) to a solution containing nanoparticles modified with β-lactoglobulin amyloid fibrils (2 wt % fibrils modified with 0.6 wt % Fe3O4 nanoparticles) induces first the formation of a reversible gel, which can then be converted back to solution upon application of a moderate magnetic field of 1.1 T. These hybrids offer a new appealing functional colloidal system in which the aggregation, orientational order and rheological behavior can be efficiently controlled in a purely noninvasive way by external magnetic fields of weak intensity.

  18. Effect of time dependent nanoclusters morphology on the thermal conductivity and heat transport mechanism of TiO2 based nanofluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundan, Lal; Mallick, Soumya Suddha; Pal, Bonamali

    2016-11-01

    The effect of time dependent nanoclusters morphology on heat conduction mechanism of a nanofluid has been presented over here. The time dependent growth of nanoclusters of TiO2 nanoparticles (size 25-30 nm, volume fraction of 0.05%) along with surfactant (SDBS) in water (DI), has been investigated. A detailed report on the size distribution of nanoparticles while in suspension for an actual volume fraction of the nanoparticles at a particular instant of time is presented. The different pH values (2.92-11.62) along with surfactant (SDBS, 1:1 by wt.) have been used to investigate the suspension stabilities of different smaples of the nanofluid. The suspension stabilities have been evaluated by measuring the zeta potential and stability ratios of TiO2-H2O nanofluid. A quantitative analysis on the role of nanoparticles presented in the form of dead-ends and backbone chains, has been carried out. The effect of liquid layering of the water present inside the characteristic dimension of a nanocluster is taken into account to determine the effective thermal conductivity of a nanofluid. The so, obtained experimental and theoretical results of thermal conductivities have been correlated and found to be predicted well with a new developed model and with an accuracy level of +2.82 to -1.5%. Whereas, the predictions from other fundamental models and empirical correlations are found to be vary with an error from +3 to +8.1% on one side and from -4.87 to -12.62% on other side, in the volume fraction from 0.01 to 0.12%, when analysed.

  19. Effect of thermal treatments on sputtered silver nanocluster/silica composite coatings on soda-lime glasses: ionic exchange and antibacterial activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferraris, M.; Ferraris, S., E-mail: sara.ferraris@polito.it; Miola, M.; Perero, S.; Balagna, C.; Verne, E. [Politecnico di Torino, Department of Applied Science and Technology, Institute of Materials Physics and Engineering (Italy); Gautier, G. [IMAMOTER Institute for Agricultural and Earthmoving Machines (Italy); Manfredotti, Ch.; Battiato, A.; Vittone, E. [University of Torino, Physics Department, NIS Excellence Centre and CNISM (Italy); Speranza, G. [Fondazione Bruno Kessler FBK (Italy); Bogdanovic, I. [Ruder Boskovic Institute, Experimental Physics Department (Croatia)

    2012-12-15

    Silver nanocluster/silica composite coatings were deposited on both soda-lime and silica glasses by radio frequency (RF) co-sputtering. The effect of thermal treatments on the microstructure in the range of 150-450 Degree-Sign C were examined by UV-visible spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Time of Flight-Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis. Sodium/silver ionic exchange was evidenced for coatings sputtered on soda-lime substrates after heating at 450 Degree-Sign C; presence of silver ions and/or silver nanoclusters, nanocluster size and their position inside the sputtered layers will be discussed for as-deposited and heated coatings on both substrates. The antibacterial activity of all coatings was determined against Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans by disk diffusion method and colonies forming units count; in agreement with microstructural results, the antibacterial activity present on all coatings was slightly reduced after heating at 450 Degree-Sign C. All coatings have been submitted to humidity plus UV ageing and sterilization by autoclave, gamma ray and ethylene oxide gas. Tape resistance (ASTM D3359-97) tests have been done on each coating before and after ageing and sterilizations, revealing a good adhesion on soda-lime substrates, except for those aged in humidity plus UV and sterilized by autoclave. Scratch tests and nanoindentation tests have been done on each coating, as-deposited and after heating at 450 Degree-Sign C. The coating hardness was improved by heating only when coatings were deposited on silica. The heating of coatings deposited on soda-lime substrates gave opposite effect on their hardness.

  20. Layered Double Hydroxide Nanoclusters: Aqueous, Concentrated, Stable, and Catalytically Active Colloids toward Green Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokudome, Yasuaki; Morimoto, Tsuyoshi; Tarutani, Naoki; Vaz, Pedro D; Nunes, Carla D; Prevot, Vanessa; Stenning, Gavin B G; Takahashi, Masahide

    2016-05-24

    Increasing attention has been dedicated to the development of nanomaterials rendering green and sustainable processes, which occur in benign aqueous reaction media. Herein, we demonstrate the synthesis of another family of green nanomaterials, layered double hydroxide (LDH) nanoclusters, which are concentrated (98.7 g/L in aqueous solvent), stably dispersed (transparent sol for >2 weeks), and catalytically active colloids of nano LDHs (isotropic shape with the size of 7.8 nm as determined by small-angle X-ray scattering). LDH nanoclusters are available as colloidal building blocks to give access to meso- and macroporous LDH materials. Proof-of-concept applications revealed that the LDH nanocluster works as a solid basic catalyst and is separable from solvents of catalytic reactions, confirming the nature of nanocatalysts. The present work closely investigates the unique physical and chemical features of this colloid, the formation mechanism, and the ability to act as basic nanocatalysts in benign aqueous reaction systems.

  1. XAFS studies of monodisperse Au nanoclusters formation in the etching process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lina; Huang, Ting; Liu, Wei; Bao, Jie; Huang, Yuanyuan; Cao, Yuanjie; Yao, Tao; Sun, Zhihu; Wei, Shiqiang

    2016-05-01

    Understanding the formation mechanism of gold nanoclusters is essential to the development of their synthetic chemistry. Here, by using x-ray absorption fine-structure (XAFS) spectroscopy, UV-Vis and MS spectra, the formation process of monodisperse Au13 nanoclusters is investigated. We find that a critical step involving the formation of smaller Au8-Au11 metastable intermediate clusters induced by the HCl + HSR etching of the polydisperse Aun precursor clusters occurs firstly. Then these intermediate species undergo a size-growth to Au13 cores, followed by a slow structure rearrangement to reach the final stable structure. This work enriches the understanding of cluster formation chemistry and may guide the way towards the design and the controllable synthesis of nanoclusters.

  2. Crystal structure of selenolate-protected Au24(SeR)20 nanocluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yongbo; Wang, Shuxin; Zhang, Jun; Kang, Xi; Chen, Shuang; Li, Peng; Sheng, Hongting; Zhu, Manzhou

    2014-02-26

    We report the X-ray structure of a selenolate-capped Au24(SeR)20 nanocluster (R = C6H5). It exhibits a prolate Au8 kernel, which can be viewed as two tetrahedral Au4 units cross-joined together without sharing any Au atoms. The kernel is protected by two trimeric Au3(SeR)4 staple-like motifs as well as two pentameric Au5(SeR)6 staple motifs. Compared to the reported gold-thiolate nanocluster structures, the features of the Au8 kernel and pentameric Au5(SeR)6 staple motif are unprecedented and provide a structural basis for understanding the gold-selenolate nanoclusters.

  3. Coherent Fano resonances in a plasmonic nanocluster enhance optical four-wave mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Wen, Fangfang; Zhen, Yu-Rong; Nordlander, Peter; Halas, Naomi J.

    2013-01-01

    Plasmonic nanoclusters, an ordered assembly of coupled metallic nanoparticles, support unique spectral features known as Fano resonances due to the coupling between their subradiant and superradiant plasmon modes. Within the Fano resonance, absorption is significantly enhanced, giving rise to highly localized, intense near fields with the potential to enhance nonlinear optical processes. Here, we report a structure supporting the coherent oscillation of two distinct Fano resonances within an individual plasmonic nanocluster. We show how this coherence enhances the optical four-wave mixing process in comparison with other double-resonant plasmonic clusters that lack this property. A model that explains the observed four-wave mixing features is proposed, which is generally applicable to any third-order process in plasmonic nanostructures. With a larger effective susceptibility χ(3) relative to existing nonlinear optical materials, this coherent double-resonant nanocluster offers a strategy for designing high-performance third-order nonlinear optical media. PMID:23690571

  4. Analysis of the applicability of Ni, Cu, Au, Pt, and Pd nanoclusters for data recording

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redel', L. V.; Gafner, S. L.; Gafner, Yu. Ya.; Zamulin, I. S.; Goloven'ko, Zh. V.

    2017-02-01

    The applicability of individual Ni, Cu, Au, Pt, and Pd nanoclusters as data bits in next generation memory devices constructed on the phase-change carrier principle is studied. To this end, based on the modified tight-binding potential (TB-SMA), structure formation from the melt of nanoparticles of these metals to 10 nm in diameter was simulated by the molecular dynamics method. The effect of various crystallization conditions on the formation of the internal structures of Ni, Cu, Au, Pt, and Pd nanoclusters is studied. The stability boundaries of various crystalline isomers are analyzed. The obtained systematic features are compared for nanoparticles of copper, nickel, gold, platinum, and palladium of identical sizes. It is concluded that platinum nanoclusters of diameter D > 8 nm are the best materials among studied metals for producing memory elements based on phase transitions.

  5. XAFS study on thiol etching of diphosphine-stabilized gold nanoclusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Jie; Yang, Lina; Huang, Ting; Sun, Zhihu; Yao, Tao; Jiang, Yong; Wei, Shiqiang

    2017-08-01

    Thiol-etching triphenylphosphine (PPh3)-protected Au nanoclusters has been widely used to synthesize thiolated Au nanoclusters, while few studies have been reported on the thiol-etching reaction starting from diphosphine-protected Au clusters. Here the thiol-etching reaction in chloroform (CHCl3) for 1,5-Bis(diphenylphosphino) pentane (L5) protected Au11 nanoclusters is presented, and synchrotron radiation X-ray absorption fine structure, UV-vis absorption and mass spectra are combined to identify the reaction products. It is revealed that a gold(I)-thiolate complex Au2L5(RS) is produced, contrary to the case of thiol-etching PPh3-protected Au clusters where formation of thermodynamically stable Au25 or Au11 clusters is achieved.

  6. Composition and source identification of deposits forming in landfill gas (LFG) engines and effect of activated carbon treatment on deposit composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevimoğlu, Orhan; Tansel, Berrin

    2013-10-15

    Compositions of deposits forming on engines parts operated with landfill gas (LFG) were analyzed. The deposit compositions were compared before and after the installation of activated carbon system for treatment of LFG. Deposits forming on the spark plugs had significantly higher levels of calcium, chromium, and nickel in comparison to those forming on the engine heads. The LFG contained about 9.5 ± 0.4 mg/m(3) total siloxanes, majority of which were octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4) (5.0 ± 0.2 mg/m(3)), decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5) (2.9 ± 0.1 mg/m(3)) and hexamethyldisiloxane (L2) (1.6 ± 0.1 mg/m(3)). The samples collected from the engine heads before the activated carbon treatment of LFG had significantly high levels of silicon (149,400 ± 89,900 mg/kg) as well as calcium (70,840 ± 17,750 mg/kg), sulfur (42,500 ± 11,500 mg/kg), and zinc (22,300 ± 7200 mg/kg). After the activated carbon treatment, silicon levels decreased significantly; however, deposits had higher sulfur content (104,560 ± 68,100 mg/kg) indicating that the activated carbon released some sulfur during treatment. The analyses indicate that zinc and calcium originated from the additives in the lube oil while lead, aluminum, copper, nickel, iron, chromium were due to the engine wear.

  7. Crystal structure and electronic properties of a thiolate-protected Au24 nanocluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Anindita; Li, Tao; Li, Gao; Nobusada, Katsuyuki; Zeng, Chenjie; Rosi, Nathaniel L.; Jin, Rongchao

    2014-05-01

    Solving the total structures of gold nanoclusters is of critical importance for understanding their electronic, optical and catalytic properties. Herein, we report the X-ray structure of a charge-neutral Au24(SCH2Ph-tBu)20 nanocluster. This structure features a bi-tetrahedral Au8 kernel protected by four tetrameric staple-like motifs. Electronic structure analysis is further carried out and the optical absorption spectrum is interpreted. The Au24(SCH2Ph-tBu)20, Au23(S-c-C6H11)16 and Au25(SCH2CH2Ph)18 nanoclusters constitute the first crystallographically characterized ``trio''.Solving the total structures of gold nanoclusters is of critical importance for understanding their electronic, optical and catalytic properties. Herein, we report the X-ray structure of a charge-neutral Au24(SCH2Ph-tBu)20 nanocluster. This structure features a bi-tetrahedral Au8 kernel protected by four tetrameric staple-like motifs. Electronic structure analysis is further carried out and the optical absorption spectrum is interpreted. The Au24(SCH2Ph-tBu)20, Au23(S-c-C6H11)16 and Au25(SCH2CH2Ph)18 nanoclusters constitute the first crystallographically characterized ``trio''. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental and supporting Fig. S1-S3. CCDC NUMBER(1000102). For ESI and crystallographic data in CIF or other electronic format see DOI: 10.1039/c4nr01350f

  8. Phenotypic Screening Identifies Protein Synthesis Inhibitors as H-Ras-Nanocluster-Increasing Tumor Growth Inducers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najumudeen, Arafath K; Posada, Itziar M D; Lectez, Benoit; Zhou, Yong; Landor, Sebastian K-J; Fallarero, Adyary; Vuorela, Pia; Hancock, John; Abankwa, Daniel

    2015-12-15

    Ras isoforms H-, N-, and K-ras are each mutated in specific cancer types at varying frequencies and have different activities in cell fate control. On the plasma membrane, Ras proteins are laterally segregated into isoform-specific nanoscale signaling hubs, termed nanoclusters. As Ras nanoclusters are required for Ras signaling, chemical modulators of nanoclusters represent ideal candidates for the specific modulation of Ras activity in cancer drug development. We therefore conducted a chemical screen with commercial and in-house natural product libraries using a cell-based H-ras-nanoclustering FRET assay. Next to established Ras inhibitors, such as a statin and farnesyl-transferase inhibitor, we surprisingly identified five protein synthesis inhibitors as positive regulators. Using commonly employed cycloheximide as a representative compound, we show that protein synthesis inhibition increased nanoclustering and effector recruitment specifically of active H-ras but not of K-ras. Consistent with these data, cycloheximide treatment activated both Erk and Akt kinases and specifically promoted H-rasG12V-induced, but not K-rasG12V-induced, PC12 cell differentiation. Intriguingly, cycloheximide increased the number of mammospheres, which are enriched for cancer stem cells. Depletion of H-ras in combination with cycloheximide significantly reduced mammosphere formation, suggesting an exquisite synthetic lethality. The potential of cycloheximide to promote tumor cell growth was also reflected in its ability to increase breast cancer cell tumors grown in ovo. These results illustrate the possibility of identifying Ras-isoform-specific modulators using nanocluster-directed screening. They also suggest an unexpected feedback from protein synthesis inhibition to Ras signaling, which might present a vulnerability in certain tumor cell types.

  9. Characterization of surface carbon formed during the conversion of methane to benzene over Mo/H-ZSM-5 catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weckhuysen, B.M.; Rosynek, Michael P.; Lunsford, Jack H.

    2001-01-01

    During the conversion of methane to benzene in the absence of oxygen over a 2 wt% Mo/H-ZSM-5 catalyst at 700 °C, three different types of surface carbon have been observed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy: adventitious or graphitic-like C (284.6 eV), carbidic-like C (282.7 eV), and hydrogen-poor

  10. Effects of Carbon Allotropic Forms on Microstructure and Thermal Properties of Cu-C Composites Produced by SPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrzak, K.; Sobczak, N.; Chmielewski, M.; Homa, M.; Gazda, A.; Zybała, R.; Strojny-Nędza, A.

    2016-08-01

    Combination of extreme service conditions and complex thermomechanical loadings, e.g., in electronics or power industry, requires using advanced materials with unique properties. Dissipation of heat generated during the operation of high-power electronic elements is crucial from the point of view of their efficiency. Good cooling conditions can be guaranteed, for instance, with materials of very high thermal conductivity and low thermal expansion coefficient, and by designing the heat dissipation system in an accurate manner. Conventional materials such as silver, copper, or their alloys, often fail to meet such severe requirements. This paper discusses the results of investigations connected with Cu-C (multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs), graphene nanopowder (GNP), or thermally reduced graphene oxide (RGO)) composites, produced using the spark plasma sintering technique. The obtained composites are characterized by uniform distribution of a carbon phase and high relative density. Compared with pure copper, developed materials are characterized by similar thermal conductivity and much lower values of thermal expansion coefficient. The most promising materials to use as heat dissipation elements seems to be copper-based composites reinforced by carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and GNP.

  11. Magnetism of FePt Nanoclusters in Polyimide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mircea Chipara

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available FePt nanoclusters have been implanted onto polyimide films and subjected to thermal annealing in order to obtain a special magnetic phase (L10 dispersed within the polymer. SQUID measurements quantified the magnetic features of the as-prepared and annealed hybrid films. As-implanted FePt nanoparticles in polyimide films exhibited a blocking temperature of 70 ± 5 K. Thermal annealing in zero and 10 kOe applied magnetic field increased the magnetic anisotropy and coercivity of the samples. Wide Angle X-Ray Scattering confirmed the presence of FePt and L10 phase. All samples (as deposited and annealed exhibited electron spin resonance spectra consisting of two overlapping lines. The broad line was a ferromagnetic resonance originating from FePt nanoparticles. Its angular dependence indicated the magnetic anisotropy of FePt nanoparticles. SEM micrographs suggest a negligible coalescence of FePt nanoparticles, supporting that the enhancement of the magnetic properties is a consequence of the improvement of the L10 structure. The narrow ESR line was assigned to nonmagnetic (paramagnetic impurities within the samples consistent with graphite-like structures generated by the local degradation of the polymer during implantation and annealing. Raman spectroscopy confirmed the formation of graphitic structures in annealed KHN and in KHN-FePt.

  12. Photoluminescent gold nanoclusters as sensing probes for uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po-Han Chan

    Full Text Available Glycan-bound nanoprobes have been demonstrated as suitable sensing probes for bacteria containing glycan binding sites. In this study, we demonstrated a facile approach for generating glycan-bound gold nanoclusters (AuNCs. The generated AuNCs were used as sensing probes for corresponding target bacteria. Mannose-capped AuNCs (AuNCs@Mann were generated and used as the model sensors for target bacteria. A one-step synthesis approach was employed to generate AuNCs@Mann. In this approach, an aqueous solution of tetrachloroauric acid and mannoside that functionized with a thiol group (Mann-SH was stirred at room temperature for 48 h. The mannoside functions as reducing and capping agent. The size of the generated AuNCs@Mann is 1.95±0.27 nm, whereas the AuNCs with red photoluminescence have a maximum emission wavelength of ~630 nm (λexcitation = 375 nm. The synthesis of the AuNCs@Mann was accelerated by microwave heating, which enabled the synthesis of the AuNCs@Mann to complete within 1 h. The generated AuNCs@Mann are capable of selectively binding to the urinary tract infection isolate Escherichia coli J96 containing the mannose binding protein FimH expressed on the type 1 pili. On the basis of the naked eye observation, the limit of detection of the sensing approach is as low as ~2×10(6 cells/mL.

  13. Photoluminescent gold nanoclusters as sensing probes for uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Po-Han; Ghosh, Bhaswati; Lai, Hong-Zheng; Peng, Hwei-Ling; Mong, Kwok Kong Tony; Chen, Yu-Chie

    2013-01-01

    Glycan-bound nanoprobes have been demonstrated as suitable sensing probes for bacteria containing glycan binding sites. In this study, we demonstrated a facile approach for generating glycan-bound gold nanoclusters (AuNCs). The generated AuNCs were used as sensing probes for corresponding target bacteria. Mannose-capped AuNCs (AuNCs@Mann) were generated and used as the model sensors for target bacteria. A one-step synthesis approach was employed to generate AuNCs@Mann. In this approach, an aqueous solution of tetrachloroauric acid and mannoside that functionized with a thiol group (Mann-SH) was stirred at room temperature for 48 h. The mannoside functions as reducing and capping agent. The size of the generated AuNCs@Mann is 1.95±0.27 nm, whereas the AuNCs with red photoluminescence have a maximum emission wavelength of ~630 nm (λexcitation = 375 nm). The synthesis of the AuNCs@Mann was accelerated by microwave heating, which enabled the synthesis of the AuNCs@Mann to complete within 1 h. The generated AuNCs@Mann are capable of selectively binding to the urinary tract infection isolate Escherichia coli J96 containing the mannose binding protein FimH expressed on the type 1 pili. On the basis of the naked eye observation, the limit of detection of the sensing approach is as low as ~2×10(6) cells/mL.

  14. Silver Nanoclusters: From Design Principles to Practical Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Abdulhalim, Lina G.

    2015-12-08

    A strategy based on reticulating metal ions and organic ligands into atomically precise gold and silver nanoclusters (NCs) with high monodispersity has been advanced to a point that allows the design of NCs with strict stoichiometries, functionalities and valence. Of the Ag NCs discovered, Ag44 is the most studied, not only due to its high absorption that transcends the visible spectrum suitable for photovoltaics but also because of its long excited state lifetime, as revealed by nanosecond transient absorption spectroscopy. A major principle discovered in this dissertation is the ability to produce Ag44 in scalable amounts and with high stability in addition to modulation of the functional groups of the organic ligands via a fast and complete ligand exchange process. This new discovery has led to the development of synthetic designs in which new sizes were obtained by varying the reaction parameters (e.g., ligands functionality, reaction temperature and time), namely, Ag29 using dithiols and phosphines. The synthesized NCs possess tetravalent functionalities that facilitate their crystallization and characterization. Furthermore, Ag29 glows red and is therefore a possible candidate for sensing and imaging applications.

  15. Growth and characterization of barium oxide nanoclusters on YSZ(111)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nachimuthu, Ponnusamy; Kim, Yong Joo; Kuchibhatla, Satyanarayana V N T; Yu, Zhongqing; Jiang, Weilin; Engelhard, Mark H.; Shutthanandan, V.; Szanyi, Janos; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai

    2009-08-13

    Barium oxide (BaO) was grown on YSZ(111) substrate by oxygen-plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (OPA-MBE). In-situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction, ex-situ x-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy have confirmed that the BaO grows as clusters on YSZ(111). During and following the growth under UHV conditions, BaO remains in single phase. When exposed to ambient conditions, the clusters transformed to BaCO3 and/or Ba(OH)2 H2O. However, in a few attempts of BaO growth, XRD results show a fairly single phase cubic BaO with a lattice constant of 0.5418(1) nm. XPS results show that exposing BaO clusters to ambient conditions results in the formation BaCO3 on the surface and partly Ba(OH)2 throughout in the bulk. Based on the observations, it is concluded that the BaO nanoclusters grown on YSZ(111) are highly reactive in ambient conditions. The variation in the reactivity of BaO between different attempts of the growth is attributed to the cluster size.

  16. Ag29(BDT)12(TPP)4: A Tetravalent Nanocluster

    KAUST Repository

    AbdulHalim, Lina G.

    2015-06-24

    The bottom-up assembly of nanoparticles into diverse ordered solids is a challenge because it requires nanoparticles, which are often quasi-spherical, to have interaction anisotropy akin to atoms and molecules. Typically, anisotropy has been introduced by changing the shape of the inorganic nanoparticle core. Here, we present the design, self-assembly, optical properties and total structural determination of Ag29(BDT)12(TPP)4, an atomically precise tetravalent nanocluster (NC) (BDT: 1,3-benzenedithiols; TPP: triphenylphosphine). It features four unique tetrahedrally symmetrical binding surface sites facilitated by the supramolecular assembly of 12 BDT—wide footprint bidentate thiols—in the ligand shell. When each of these sites was selectively functionalized by a single phosphine ligand, particle stability, synthetic yield and the propensity to self-assemble into macroscopic crystals increased. The solid crystallized NCs have a substantially narrowed optical bandgap compared to that of the solution state, suggesting strong inter-particle electronic coupling occurs in the solid state.

  17. Formation of fivefold axes in the FCC-metal nanoclusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myasnichenko, Vladimir S., E-mail: virtson@gmail.com [Altai State Technical University, 46 Lenina av., Barnaul 656038 (Russian Federation); Starostenkov, Mikhail D. [Altai State Technical University, 46 Lenina av., Barnaul 656038 (Russian Federation)

    2012-11-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Formation of fcc-metal nanoclusters having the fivefold symmetry. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Formation of the cores of icosahedral symmetry in the gold, silver and copper nanoparticles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Construction of bimetallic clusters with icosahedral symmetry and increased fractal dimensionality. - Abstract: Formation of atomistic structures of metallic Cu, Au, Ag clusters and bimetallic Cu-Au clusters was studied with the help of molecular dynamics using the many-body tight-binding interatomic potential. The simulation of the crystallization process of clusters with the number of atoms ranging from 300 to 1092 was carried out. The most stable configurations of atoms in the system, corresponding to the minimum of potential energy, was found during super-fast cooling from 1000 K. Atoms corresponding to fcc, hcp, and Ih phases were identified by the method of common neighbor analysis. Incomplete icosahedral core can be discovered at the intersection of one of the Ih axes with the surface of monometallic cluster. The decahedron-shaped structure of bimetallic Cu-Au cluster with seven completed icosahedral cores was obtained. The principles of the construction of small bimetallic clusters with icosahedral symmetry and increased fractal dimensionality were offered.

  18. Collective electric and magnetic plasmonic resonances in spherical nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallecchi, Andrea; Albani, Matteo; Capolino, Filippo

    2011-01-31

    We report an investigation on the optical properties of three-dimensional nanoclusters (NCs) made by spherical constellations of metallic nanospheres arranged around a central dielectric sphere, which can be realized and assembled by current state-of-the-art nanochemistry techniques. This type of NCs supports collective plasmon modes among which the most relevant are those associated with the induced electric and magnetic resonances. Combining a single dipole approximation for each nanoparticle and the multipole spherical-wave expansion of the scattered field, we achieve an effective characterization of the optical response of individual NCs in terms of their scattering, absorption, and extinction efficiencies. By this approximate model we analyze a few sample NCs identifying the electric and magnetic resonance frequencies and their dependence on the size and number of the constituent nanoparticles. Furthermore, we discuss the effective electric and magnetic polarizabilities of the NCs, and their isotropic properties. A homogenization method based on an extension of the Maxwell Garnett model to account for interaction effects due to higher order multipoles in dense packed arrays is applied to a distribution of NCs showing the possibility of obtaining metamaterials with very large, small, and negative values of permittivity and permeability, and even negative index.

  19. First-Principles Investigation of Ag-Doped Gold Nanoclusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei-Yue Fan

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Gold nanoclusters have the tunable optical absorption property, and are promising for cancer cell imaging, photothermal therapy and radiotherapy. First-principle is a very powerful tool for design of novel materials. In the present work, structural properties, band gap engineering and tunable optical properties of Ag-doped gold clusters have been calculated using density functional theory. The electronic structure of a stable Au20 cluster can be modulated by incorporating Ag, and the HOMO–LUMO gap of Au20−nAgn clusters is modulated due to the incorporation of Ag electronic states in the HOMO and LUMO. Furthermore, the results of the imaginary part of the dielectric function indicate that the optical transition of gold clusters is concentration-dependent and the optical transition between HOMO and LUMO shifts to the low energy range as the Ag atom increases. These calculated results are helpful for the design of gold cluster-based biomaterials, and will be of interest in the fields of radiation medicine, biophysics and nanoscience.

  20. Nanocluster formation in Co/Fe implanted ZnO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bharuth-Ram, K., E-mail: kbr@tlabs.ac.za [Durban University of Technology, Physics Department (South Africa); Masenda, H. [University of the Witwatersrand, School of Physics (South Africa); Doyle, T. B. [iThemba LABS (South Africa); Geburt, S.; Ronning, C. [University of Jena, Institute of Solid State Physics (Germany)

    2015-04-15

    Conversion electron Mössbauer Spectroscopy (CEMS) measurements were made on a ZnO single crystal sample implanted at room temperature (RT) with of 145 and 345 keV {sup 59}Co ions with respective fluences of 1.15×10{sup 16} ions/cm {sup 2} and 4.17×10{sup 16} ions/cm {sup 2}, followed by implantation of 60 keV {sup 57}Fe to a fluence of 0.50×10{sup 16}/cm {sup 2} to yield a ‘box-shaped’ implantation profile with a Co + Fe concentration of about 3.2 at. %. CEM spectra were collected after annealing the sample up to 973 K. The spectra after annealing up to 973 K are similar to spectra observed in other CEMS studies on Fe implanted ZnO, but show a dramatic change after the 973 K annealing step; it is dominated by a doublet component with fit parameters typical of Fe {sup 3+}. Magnetization curves of the sample after the 973 K anneal show hysteresis, with a small residual magnetization at RT that increases at 4 K. The saturation magnetization at 4 K was approximately 0.33 μ{sub B}/CoFe ion, in good agreement with observations for 5–8 nm sized Co nanoclusters in ZnO.

  1. A strategy to find minimal energy nanocluster structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogan, José; Varas, Alejandro; Valdivia, Juan Alejandro; Kiwi, Miguel

    2013-11-05

    An unbiased strategy to search for the global and local minimal energy structures of free standing nanoclusters is presented. Our objectives are twofold: to find a diverse set of low lying local minima, as well as the global minimum. To do so, we use massively the fast inertial relaxation engine algorithm as an efficient local minimizer. This procedure turns out to be quite efficient to reach the global minimum, and also most of the local minima. We test the method with the Lennard-Jones (LJ) potential, for which an abundant literature does exist, and obtain novel results, which include a new local minimum for LJ13 , 10 new local minima for LJ14 , and thousands of new local minima for 15≤N≤65. Insights on how to choose the initial configurations, analyzing the effectiveness of the method in reaching low-energy structures, including the global minimum, are developed as a function of the number of atoms of the cluster. Also, a novel characterization of the potential energy surface, analyzing properties of the local minima basins, is provided. The procedure constitutes a promising tool to generate a diverse set of cluster conformations, both two- and three-dimensional, that can be used as an input for refinement by means of ab initio methods. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Exotic high activity surface patterns in PtAu nanoclusters

    KAUST Repository

    Mokkath, Junais Habeeb

    2013-05-09

    The structure and chemical ordering of PtAu nanoclusters of 79, 135, and 201 atoms are studied via a combination of a basin hopping atom-exchange technique (to locate the lowest energy homotops at fixed composition), a symmetry orbit technique (to find the high symmetry isomers), and density functional theory local reoptimization (for determining the most stable homotop). The interatomic interactions between Pt and Au are derived from the empirical Gupta potential. The lowest energy structures show a marked tendency toward PtcoreAushell chemical ordering by enrichment of the more cohesive Pt in the core region and of Au in the shell region. We observe a preferential segregation of Pt atoms to (111) facets and Au atoms to (100) facets of the truncated octahedron cluster motif. Exotic surface patterns are obtained particularly for Pt-rich compositions, where Pt atoms are being surrounded by Au atoms. These surface arrangements boost the catalytic activity by creating a large number of active sites. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  3. "light-on" sensing of antioxidants using gold nanoclusters

    KAUST Repository

    Hu, Lianzhe

    2014-05-20

    Depletion of intracellular antioxidants is linked to major cytotoxic events and cellular disorders, such as oxidative stress and multiple sclerosis. In addition to medical diagnosis, determining the concentration of antioxidants in foodstuffs, food preservatives, and cosmetics has proved to be very vital. Gold nanoclusters (Au-NCs) have a core size below 2 nm and contain several metal atoms. They have interesting photophysical properties, are readily functionalized, and are safe to use in various biomedical applications. Herein, a simple and quantitative spectroscopic method based on Au-NCs is developed to detect and image antioxidants such as ascorbic acid. The sensing mechanism is based on the fact that antioxidants can protect the fluorescence of Au-NCs against quenching by highly reactive oxygen species. Our method shows great accuracy when employed to detect the total antioxidant capacity in commercial fruit juice. Moreover, confocal fluorescence microscopy images of HeLa cells show that this approach can be successfully used to image antioxidant levels in living cells. Finally, the potential application of this "light-on" detection method in multiple logic gate fabrication was discussed using the fluorescence intensity of Au-NCs as output. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  4. Atomic-scale structure of single-layer MoS2 nanoclusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helveg, S.; Lauritsen, J. V.; Lægsgaard, E.

    2000-01-01

    We have studied using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) the atomic-scale realm of molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) nanoclusters, which are of interest as a model system in hydrodesulfurization catalysis. The STM gives the first real space images of the shape and edge structure of single-layer MoS2 n...... nanoparticles synthesized on Au(lll), and establishes a new picture of the active edge sires of the nanoclusters. The results demonstrate a way to get detailed atomic-scale information on catalysts in general....

  5. Fabrication, Study of Optical Properties and Structure of Most Stable (CdP2)n Nanoclusters

    OpenAIRE

    Yeshchenko, O. A.; Dmitruk, I. M.; Koryakov, S. V.; Galak, M. P.

    2005-01-01

    CdP2 nanoclusters were fabricated by incorporation into pores of zeolite Na-X and by laser ablation. Absorption and photoluminescence (PL) spectra of CdP2 nanoclusters in zeolite were measured at the temperatures of 4.2, 77 and 293 K. Both absorption and PL spectra consist of two bands blue shifted with respect to bulk crystal. We performed the calculations aimed to find the most stable clusters in the size region up to size of the zeolite Na-X supercage. The most stable clusters are (CdP2)6 ...

  6. Tetrahedral 1B4Sb nanoclusters in GaP:(B, Sb)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elyukhin, V A, E-mail: elyukhin@cinvestav.m [Departamento de Ingenieria Electrica-SEES, CINVESTAV-IPN, Avenida IPN 2508, Col. San Pedro Zacatenco, C. P. 07360, Mexico, D. F. (Mexico)

    2009-05-01

    Self-assembling conditions of 1B4Sb tetrahedral nanoclusters in GaP doped with boron and Sb isoelectronic impurities are represented in the ultradilute and dilute limits of the boron and Sb contents, respectively. The fulfilled estimates demonstrated the preferential complete or almost complete allocation of boron atoms in 1B4Sb nanoclusters at temperatures of 500 {sup 0}C and 900 {sup 0}C, respectively. The significant decrease of the sum of the free energies of the constituent compounds is the main origin of self-assembling. The reduction of the strain energy is the additional cause of this phenomenon.

  7. Reaction of carbon tetrachloride with methane in a non-equilibrium plasma at atmospheric pressure, and characterisation of the polymer thus formed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaikwad, Vaibhav [Process Safety and Environment Protection Research Group, School of Engineering, The University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308 (Australia); Kennedy, Eric, E-mail: Eric.Kennedy@newcastle.edu.au [Process Safety and Environment Protection Research Group, School of Engineering, The University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308 (Australia); Mackie, John [Process Safety and Environment Protection Research Group, School of Engineering, The University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308 (Australia); Holdsworth, Clovia [Centre for Organic Electronics, Chemistry Building, School of Environmental and Life Sciences, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308 (Australia); Molloy, Scott; Kundu, Sazal; Stockenhuber, Michael [Process Safety and Environment Protection Research Group, School of Engineering, The University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308 (Australia); Dlugogorski, Bogdan [School of Engineering and Information Technology, Murdoch University, Murdoch, WA 6150 (Australia)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • CCl{sub 4} remediation using non-equilibrium plasma and non-oxidative conditions is proposed. • The reaction mechanism relies on experimental data and quantum chemical analysis. • Comprehensive mass balance for the reaction is provided. • CCl{sub 4} is converted to an environmentally benign and potentially useful polymer. • Characterisation of the polymer structure based on NMR and FTIR analyses is presented. - Abstract: In this paper we focus on the development of a methodology for treatment of carbon tetrachloride utilising a non-equilibrium plasma operating at atmospheric pressure, which is not singularly aimed at destroying carbon tetrachloride but rather at converting it to a non-hazardous, potentially valuable commodity. This method encompasses the reaction of carbon tetrachloride and methane, with argon as a carrier gas, in a quartz dielectric barrier discharge reactor. The reaction is performed under non-oxidative conditions. Possible pathways for formation of major products based on experimental results and supported by quantum chemical calculations are outlined in the paper. We elucidate important parameters such as carbon tetrachloride conversion, product distribution, mass balance and characterise the chlorinated polymer formed in the process.

  8. A Search for Interstellar Carbon Chain Alcohol HC4OH in Star-Forming Region L1527 and Dark Cloud TMC-1

    CERN Document Server

    Araki, Mitsunori; Yamabe, Hiromichi; Koshikawa, Naohiro; Tsukiyama, Koichi; Nakane, Aya; Okabayashi, Toshiaki; Kunimatsu, Arisa; Kuze, Nobuhiko

    2011-01-01

    We report a sensitive search for the rotational transitions of the carbon chain alcohol HC4OH in the frequency range of 21.2-46.7 GHz in the star-forming region L1527 and the dark cloud TMC-1. The motivation was laboratory detection of HC4OH by microwave spectroscopy. Despite achieving rms noise levels of several millikelvin in the antenna temperature using the 45 m telescope at Nobeyama Radio Observatory, the detection was not successful, leading to 3 sigma upper limits corresponding to the column densities of 2.0 \\times 1012 and 5.6 \\times 1012 cm-2 in L1527 and TMC-1, respectively. These upper limits indicate that [HC4OH]/[HC5N] ratios are less than 0.3 and 0.1 in L1527 and TMC-1, respectively, where HC5N is an HC4-chain cyanide and HC4OH is a hydroxide. These ratios suggest that the cyano carbon chain molecule dominates the hydroxyl carbon chain molecule in L1527 and TMC-1. This is contrary to the case of saturated compounds in hot cores, e.g., CH3OH and CH3CN, and can be a chemical feature of carbon chai...

  9. Study on Preparation of Formed Activated Carbon from Bagasse%甘蔗渣制备板状成型活性炭的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张承龙; 白建峰; 孙可伟

    2011-01-01

    Formed activated carbon block was prepared using powdered activated carbon prepared from bagasse with phosphoric acid activation.The influence of various preparation parameters such as the type binders and the amount of the binders was investigated.The test results showed that the iodine value of quantity adsorption and volume adsorption of formed activated carbon block decreased as ratio of binder increased,the penetration rate of formed activated carbon block decreased with increasing ratio of binder when using carboxymethylcellulose as binder,and the penetration rate first decreased a little,then increased with increasing ratio of binder when using polyvinyl alcohol as binder.The adsorption behavior of formed activated carbon block binded by carboxymethylcellulose was better;the iodine value of quantity adsorption and volume adsorption was 418.8211 mg/cm^3 on 10% of carboxymethylcellulose.%以磷酸活化法所制得的甘蔗渣粉状活性炭为原料,研究不同粘接剂种类、粘接剂添加量对板状成型活性炭性能的影响。结果表明:板状成型活性炭的体积吸附量及质量吸附量随着粘结剂添加量的增加而减小;渗透速率随着羧甲基纤维素添加量的增加而减小,随着聚乙烯醇素添加量的增加先是呈略微下降而后增加;以羧甲基纤维素为粘接剂制得的板状成型活性炭的性能较好,当羧甲基纤维素的添加量为10%时,其体积碘吸附量为418.82 mg/cm^3。

  10. One-pot one-cluster synthesis of fluorescent and bio-compatible Ag14 nanoclusters for cancer cell imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jie; Xia, Nan; Wang, Xinan; Liu, Xianhu; Xu, An; Wu, Zhikun; Luo, Zhixun

    2015-11-01

    Small-molecule-protected silver nanoclusters have smaller hydrodynamic diameter, and thus may hold greater potential in biomedicine application compared with the same core-sized, macromolecule (i.e. DNA)-protected silver nanoclusters. However, the live cell imaging labeled by small-molecule-protected silver nanoclusters has not been reported until now, and the synthesis and atom-precise characterization of silver nanoclusters have been challenging for a long time. We develop a one-pot one-cluster synthesis method to prepare silver nanoclusters capped with GSH which is bio-compatible. The as-prepared silver nanoclusters are identified to be Ag14(SG)11 (abbreviated as Ag14, SG: glutathione) by isotope-resolvable ESI-MS. The structure is probed by 1D NMR spectroscopy together with 2D COSY and HSQC. This cluster species is fluorescent and the fluorescence quantum yield is solvent-dependent. Very importantly, Ag14 was successfully applied to label lung cancer cells (A549) for imaging, and this work represents the first attempt to image live cells with small-molecule-protected silver nanoclusters. Furthermore, it is revealed that the Ag14 nanoclusters exhibit lower cytotoxicity compared with some other silver species (including silver salt, silver complex and large silver nanoparticles), and the explanation is also provided. The comparison of silver nanoclusters to state-of-the-art labeling materials in terms of cytotoxicity and photobleaching lifetime is also conducted.Small-molecule-protected silver nanoclusters have smaller hydrodynamic diameter, and thus may hold greater potential in biomedicine application compared with the same core-sized, macromolecule (i.e. DNA)-protected silver nanoclusters. However, the live cell imaging labeled by small-molecule-protected silver nanoclusters has not been reported until now, and the synthesis and atom-precise characterization of silver nanoclusters have been challenging for a long time. We develop a one-pot one

  11. Mechanisms for catalytic carbon nanofiber growth studied by ab initio density functional theory calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abild-Pedersen, Frank; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet; Rostrup-Nielsen, Jens;

    2006-01-01

    Mechanisms and energetics of graphene growth catalyzed by nickel nanoclusters were studied using ab initio density functional theory calculations. It is demonstrated that nickel step-edge sites act as the preferential growth centers for graphene layers on the nickel surface. Carbon is transported...

  12. Quantification of tip-broadening in non-contact atomic force microscopy with carbon nanotube tips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meinander, Kristoffer; Jensen, Thomas N.; Simonsen, Soren B.

    2012-01-01

    Carbon nanotube terminated atomic force microscopy (AFM) probes have been used for the imaging of 5 nm wide surface supported Pt nanoclusters by non-contact (dynamic mode) AFM in an ultra-high vacuum. The results are compared to AFM measurements done with conventional Si-tips, as well...

  13. Synthesis and magnetic properties of multiwalled carbon nanotubes decorated with magnetite nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pistone, A., E-mail: pistone@unime.it [Department of Electronic Engineering, Chemistry and Industrial Engineering, University of Messina, Messina I-98166 (Italy); Iannazzo, D.; Fazio, M. [Department of Electronic Engineering, Chemistry and Industrial Engineering, University of Messina, Messina I-98166 (Italy); Celegato, F.; Barrera, G.; Tiberto, P. [INRIM Electromagnetism Division, Torino (Italy); Giordano, A.; Azzerboni, B.; Galvagno, S. [Department of Electronic Engineering, Chemistry and Industrial Engineering, University of Messina, Messina I-98166 (Italy)

    2014-02-15

    Magnetite particles with nanoscale sizes were deposited along multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) through a simple, effective and reproducible chemical route. The structure, morphology and magnetic properties of the hybrid materials were characterized by XRD, SEM, TEM, EDX, VSM. The characterization results show that the surface of nanotubes was loaded with iron oxides nanoclusters and each nanocluster is composed by several nanocrystals with a mean diameter of 10 nm. The experimental magnetic hysteretic behavior has been also studied by means of the Preisach model and a good agreement between experimental data and numerical computations was found.

  14. Stratigraphic and micropetrographic occurrences of pyrite in sediments at the confluence of carbonate and peat-forming depositional systems, southern Florida, USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, K.E.; Cohen, A.D. (University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1995-01-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate peat/carbonate relationships in a modern coal-forming setting, with initial research on pyrite and sulfur contents relative to stratigraphic and petrographic conditions. Over 40 closely spaced cores were taken from transects from Florida Bay inland through mangrove swamps and freshwater Everglades. Core stratigraphy confirms an overall transgressive sequence, but new evidence supports a small regression within the overall transgression. On average, both total S and pyrite are lowest at inland sites, highest near the coastline, and intermediate in Florida Bay sediments. Total S is higher in marine than freshwater peats, but freshwater peats overlain by marine peats are enriched in S. In cores that start with peat at the top, pyrite is generally absent or very low in the top 20 cm. Higher percentages of pyrite occur in carbonate rather than peat facies. Pyrite exists in three forms, framboidal aggregates, minute crystals, and large solitary crystals. Most of the pyrite occurs as minute crystals ([lt]2[mu]m) and framboidal aggregates. The occurrence of large crystals ([gt]2[mu]m) is less common and generally restricted to the cavities of larger cells or cavities within other organics (e.g. foraminifer, pollen grains, fungal sclerotia). A general relationship seems to exist in certain cases between the occurrence of spherical organic cell fillings and the occurrence of the framboidal form of pyrite. 37 refs., 20 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Ultrahigh surface area meso/microporous carbon formed with self-template for high-voltage aqueous supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jie; Hu, Jiangtao; Zhu, Min; Zhao, Yan; Chen, Haibiao; Pan, Feng

    2017-10-01

    A new hierarchically porous carbon has been synthesized with self-template of silica phase from a commercial silicone resin by pyrolysis and subsequent NaOH activation. The obtained carbon materials achieve an ultrahigh specific surface area (2896 m2 g-1) with abundant mesopores. The C800 sample demonstrates excellent performance in supercapacitors, with a high capacitance of 322 F g-1 at 0.5 A g-1 and outstanding rate capability (182 F g-1 at 100 A g-1) in a three-electrode system using 6.0 mol L-1 KOH electrolyte. The energy density is improved by widening the voltage window using 1.0 mol L-1 alkali metal nitrate solutions (LiNO3, NaNO3, KNO3) in which the strong solvation of alkali metal cations and nitrate anions effectively reduce the activity of water. In a symmetric supercapacitor, the maximum operating voltage is essentially restricted by the potential of positive electrode and the total capacitance is dominated by the capacitance of the anion at the positive electrode. The symmetric supercapacitors based on C800 deliver a high energy density of 22.4 Wh kg-1 at a power density of 0.23 kW kg-1 in 1.0 mol L-1 LiNO3 with a voltage of 1.8 V and long-term stability with a retention of 89.87% after 10000 cycles.

  16. The morphology of Al-Ti-O complex oxide inclusions formed in an ultra low-carbon steel melt during the RH process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doo, Won-Chul; Kim, Dong-Yong; Kang, Soo-Chang; Yi, Kyung-Woo

    2007-06-01

    Internal morphologies of bulk shape oxides in a melt of Ti bearing low-carbon steel were analyzed. The outer shapes of nearly spherical inclusions containing Ti were quite different from the shape of alumina inclusions that typically have a cluster form. A cross-section investigation using a polishing method and the FIB method revealed that the TiOx-Al2O3 complex oxide covers alumina clusters and that the interfaces of the alumina and complex oxide are modified as time passes.

  17. ORR viability of alumina-supported platinum nanocluster: exploring oxidation behaviour by DFT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigam, Sandeep; Majumder, Chiranjib

    2017-07-26

    While alumina-supported platinum particles are versatile for several oxidation reactions, their viability as ORR catalysts has not been explored to date. Therefore, to assess the prospects of alumina-supported platinum nanoclusters in ORRs, a systematic DFT study has been carried out to explore the oxidation behavior of a Ptn@Al2O3 (n = 1-7, 10) cluster. The results are compared with the oxidation behavior of the corresponding gas phase platinum cluster and that of an extended Pt(111) slab. Both supported and unsupported clusters activate adsorbed oxygen molecules and energetically favor dissociative chemisorption of oxygen, leading to stable oxide formation with Pt-O-Pt linkages. However, the influence of the alumina substrate downshifts the d-band centre of the platinum cluster, which not only reduces the reaction enthalpy of oxidation by 8-10%, but also elongates the Pt-O bond of the oxide product by 3-8%. These observations indicate that removal of oxide will be relatively easier for supported clusters than for unsupported clusters. Cluster binding is found to sustain during oxidation, as oxidation of the platinum host cluster results in reduction of the distance between the cluster and support surface. While the gas phase Pt10 cluster does not show any similarity to the oxidation behavior shown by THE Pt(111) slab, the Pt10@Al2O3 cluster reveals close resemblance. Both the Pt(111) slab and Pt10@Al2O3 cluster form similar oxide products, having tri-coordinated oxygen with comparable Pt-O bond distances. The observed resemblance has been attributed to the similarity in the electronic structure and d-band centre position of the platinum surface and alumina-supported Pt10 cluster. Whilst this similar oxidation behaviour of the Pt10@Al2O3 cluster endorses its viability as an ORR catalyst, further modulation of this catalyst is desirable to improve its potential.

  18. Structural factors impacting carrier transport and electroluminescence from Si nanocluster-sensitized Er ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cueff, Sébastien; Labbé, Christophe; Jambois, Olivier; Berencén, Yonder; Kenyon, Anthony J; Garrido, Blas; Rizk, Richard

    2012-09-24

    We present an analysis of factors influencing carrier transport and electroluminescence (EL) at 1.5 µm from erbium-doped silicon-rich silica (SiOx) layers. The effects of both the active layer thickness and the Si-excess content on the electrical excitation of erbium are studied. We demonstrate that when the thickness is decreased from a few hundred to tens of nanometers the conductivity is greatly enhanced. Carrier transport is well described in all cases by a Poole-Frenkel mechanism, while the thickness-dependent current density suggests an evolution of both density and distribution of trapping states induced by Si nanoinclusions. We ascribe this observation to stress-induced effects prevailing in thin films, which inhibit the agglomeration of Si atoms, resulting in a high density of sub-nm Si inclusions that induce traps much shallower than those generated by Si nanoclusters (Si-ncs) formed in thicker films. There is no direct correlation between high conductivity and optimized EL intensity at 1.5 µm. Our results suggest that the main excitation mechanism governing the EL signal is impact excitation, which gradually becomes more efficient as film thickness increases, thanks to the increased segregation of Si-ncs, which in turn allows more efficient injection of hot electrons into the oxide matrix. Optimization of the EL signal is thus found to be a compromise between conductivity and both number and degree of segregation of Si-ncs, all of which are governed by a combination of excess Si content and sample thickness. This material study has strong implications for many electrically-driven devices using Si-ncs or Si-excess mediated EL.

  19. Transformation from gold nanoclusters to plasmonic nanoparticles: A general strategy towards selective detection of organophosphorothioate pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qian; Zhou, Tingyao; Wang, Yaping; Gong, Lingshan; Liu, Jinbin

    2018-01-15

    Luminescent gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) synthesized using non-thiolate DNA ligands were reported to show both optical and structure responses toward diethyposphorthioate (DEP) derived from the hydrolysis of chlorpyrifos (CP). After incubation of AuNCs with DEP, the non-thiolate DNA ligands were immediately replaced and the tiny AuNCs with ultrasmall size transformed gradually to plasmonic nanoparticles, which resulted in significant luminescence quenching of the AuNCs, offering a new possibility to selectively detect organophosphorothioate pesticides that could be easily hydrolyzed to form the special structures such as DEP containing two binding sites (e.g. S and O atoms). Therefore, selecting CP as a model analyte, we here developed a general strategy for the construction of a novel chemosensor for the determination of CP using the non-thiolate DNA coated AuNCs as an optical probe. Based on aggregation-induced luminescence quenching, this strategy exhibited highly sensitive and selective responses towards CP with a limit of detection (LOD) of 0.50μM, and was applied successfully to the analysis of CP in real sample. More interestingly, this facile strategy could easily distinguish CP from other thiol reagents through solution color change in spite of the existence of the coordination between Au and S atom for both of them, and the response mechanisms for them were studied in detail. In additional, it could be extended to detect the other organophosphorothioate pesticides with the similar structure as CP, which exploits a new platform for the construction of chemosensor and application. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. New polyimide-polyoxometalate nanocomposite materials with nanoporous structure and ultra-low dielectric constant, formed in supercritical carbon dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshtov, Mukhamed; Said-Galiev, Ernest; Kochurov, Vitaliy; Khokhlov, Alexei

    2012-07-01

    Vinyltrimethoxysilane interaction with K8(SiW11O39) obtained polyoxometalate (Bu4N)4[SiW11O39{(CH2 = CH-Si)2O}](SiW11-CH = CH2). Synthesized two new fluorinated aromatic polyimide in two stages with a dielectric constant (k) in the range 2.70-2.75. On the basis of poly(amic acids) and a mixture of thermal imidization polyoxometalate obtained polyimide/polyoxometalate composite film. It was found that with increasing polyoxometalate in a mixture of 0 to 20 wt% the dielectric constant decreases from 2,75 to 1,70. Nanoporous materials with ultra-low dielectric constant in the range 1.31-1.64 in combination with high thermal (T10% = 536-570°C in N2) and mechanical characteristics using supercritical carbon dioxide have been developed on the basis of the obtained polyimide/polyoxometalate composite films.

  1. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes formed by condensed-phase conversions of Fe-C-based nanopowder in vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, B.; Pizúrová, N.; Schneeweiss, O.; Bezdička, P.; Klementová, M.; Filip, J.; Alexandrescu, R.; Dumitrache, F.; Fleaca, C. T.; Voicu, I.; Morjan, I.

    2006-12-01

    We describe the formation of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) which have grown during annealing at 800 °C of Fe-C-based nanopowder in vacuum. The Fe-C-based nanopowder was produced by a laser pyrolysis of gas-phase reactants. The as-synthesized and annealed samples were characterised by TEM, XRD, Mössbauer spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and magnetic measurements. Under the TEM, MWCNTs were observed in the annealed sample. In addition, larger particles with the graphitic shells and various graphitic structures were found. XRD and Mössbauer analysis confirmed that only two iron phases were present in the annealed sample: α-Fe and Fe3C. Phase transformations taking place during the thermal treatment of the sample are discussed.

  2. Stabilizing subnanometer Ag(0) nanoclusters by thiolate and diphosphine ligands and their crystal structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huayan; Wang, Yu; Zheng, Nanfeng

    2013-03-01

    The combined use of thiolate and diphosphine as surface ligands helps to stabilize subnanometer Ag(0) nanoclusters, resulting in the successful crystallization of two Ag(0)-containing nanoclusters (Ag16 and Ag32) for X-ray single crystal analysis. Both clusters have core-shell structures with Ag86+ and Ag2212+ as their cores, which are not simply either fragments of face-centered cubic metals or their five-fold twinned counterparts. The clusters display UV-Vis absorption spectra consisting of molecule-like optical transitions.The combined use of thiolate and diphosphine as surface ligands helps to stabilize subnanometer Ag(0) nanoclusters, resulting in the successful crystallization of two Ag(0)-containing nanoclusters (Ag16 and Ag32) for X-ray single crystal analysis. Both clusters have core-shell structures with Ag86+ and Ag2212+ as their cores, which are not simply either fragments of face-centered cubic metals or their five-fold twinned counterparts. The clusters display UV-Vis absorption spectra consisting of molecule-like optical transitions. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details, more pictures of the structure and XPS spectra of the clusters. CCDC 916463 and 916464. For ESI and crystallographic data in CIF or other electronic format see DOI: 10.1039/c3nr34328f

  3. Stabilizing Protein Effects on the Pressure Sensitivity of Fluorescent Gold Nanoclusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-13

    and β-sheet structure present in the stabilizing protein. These data support the hypothesis that the pressure -induced fluorescence enhancement...ARL-TR-7572 ● JAN 2016 US Army Research Laboratory Stabilizing Protein Effects on the Pressure Sensitivity of Fluorescent Gold...JAN 2016 US Army Research Laboratory Stabilizing Protein Effects on the Pressure Sensitivity of Fluorescent Gold Nanoclusters by Abby

  4. {Fe6O2}-Based Assembly of a Tetradecanuclear Iron Nanocluster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana G. Baca

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The tetradecanuclear FeIII pivalate nanocluster [Fe14O10(OH4(Piv18], comprising a new type of metal oxide framework, has been solvothermally synthesized from a hexanuclear iron pivalate precursor in dichlormethane/acetonitrile solution. Magnetic measurements indicate the presence of very strong antiferromagnetic interactions in the cluster core.

  5. High Selective Hydrogenation of Acetophenone Catalyzed by Alumina Supported Platinum Nanoclusters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    A new preparation and reduction method of γ-Al2O3 supported and PVP stabilized platinum nanoclusters was studied.The catalyst exhibited very high activity and selectivity for acetophenone hydrogenation in isopropanol-KOH solution at 25~60°C and P H2=1~5 MPa.

  6. Wavelength-switchable photocurrent in a hybrid TiO2-Ag nanocluster photoelectrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongjun; Wang, Qiong; Lyu, Miaoqiang; Zhang, Zhi; Wang, Lianzhou

    2015-08-04

    A hybrid TiO2-Ag nanocluster (NC) photoelectrode demonstrates unique wavelength-switchable photocurrent. By simply tuning the light wavelength from ultraviolet (UV) to visible light, the photocurrent generated on a single electrode can be switched from anodic to cathodic current, in which the Ag NCs behave like a new type of visible light active photocatalyst.

  7. Ge nanoclusters in PECVD-deposited glass caused only by heat treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ou, Haiyan; Rørdam, Troels Peter; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports the formation of Ge nanoclusters in a multi-layer structure consisting of alternating thin films of Ge-doped silica glass and SiGe, deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) and post annealed at 1100 °C in N2 atmosphere. We studied the annealed samples by t...

  8. Logic gates scheme based on Coulomb blockade in metallic nanoclusters with organic ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cervera, Javier [Facultat de Fisica, Universitat de Valencia, E-46100 Burjassot (Spain); Ramirez, Patricio [Depto. de Fisica Aplicada, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, E-46022 Valencia (Spain); Mafe, Salvador, E-mail: smafe@uv.e [Facultat de Fisica, Universitat de Valencia, E-46100 Burjassot (Spain)

    2010-01-11

    We propose a logic gates scheme based on the electron transfer through metallic nanoclusters linked to organic ligands and discuss theoretically the characteristics needed for practical implementation. As a proof-of-the-concept, we demonstrate the OR, AND and NOT gates and study the performance in terms of temperature, applied voltage, and noise.

  9. Self consistent tight binding molecular dynamics study of Ti02 nanoclusters in water.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erdin, S.; Lin, Y.; Halley, J. W.; Zapol, P.; Redfern, P.; Curtiss, L.; Northern Illinois Univ.; Univ. of Minnesota

    2007-09-01

    Self-consistent tight binding molecular dynamics studies of TiO{sub 2}2 anatase and rutile nanoclusters in dissociable water are reported. It is found that the structure of the particle expands as a result of interaction between the particle's surface and water. Water molecules dissociate at the nanoparticle surface during simulation.

  10. Mechanistic insights from atomically precise gold nanocluster-catalyzed reduction of 4-nitrophenol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuo Zhao

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A trio of thiolate-protected atomically precise gold nanoclusters, [Au23(S-c-C6H1116]–, Au24(SCH2pHtBu20 and [Au25(SCH2CH2pH18]–, are utilized as catalysts for 4-nitrophenol (4-NP reduction to 4-aminophenol (4-AP. Despite nearly identical sizes (~1 nm, the three nanoclusters possess distinctly different atomic packing structures and surface ligand binding modes, which contribute to different catalytic performance. The [Au23(S-c-C6H1116]– nanocluster shows the highest activity with a kinetic rate constant of 0.0370 s−1, which is higher than those of Au24(SCH2pHtBu20 (0.0090 s−1 and [Au25(SCH2CH2pH18]– (0.0242 s−1. Such a trio of gold nanoclusters indicate that the atomic packing mode and electronic structure play a crucial role in determining their catalytic performance.

  11. The variable polarization undulator beamline UE52 PGM nanocluster trap at BESSY II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruslan Ovsyannikov

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available UE52 PGM nanocluster trap is a soft x-ray beamline at BESSY II that delivers an unfocussed low-divergence beam of variable polarization. Its characteristics are ideally suited for ion trap studies of magnetic properties.

  12. Biophysical mechanism for ras-nanocluster formation and signaling in plasma membrane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Gurry

    Full Text Available Ras GTPases are lipid-anchored G proteins, which play a fundamental role in cell signaling processes. Electron micrographs of immunogold-labeled Ras have shown that membrane-bound Ras molecules segregate into nanocluster domains. Several models have been developed in attempts to obtain quantitative descriptions of nanocluster formation, but all have relied on assumptions such as a constant, expression-level independent ratio of Ras in clusters to Ras monomers (cluster/monomer ratio. However, this assumption is inconsistent with the law of mass action. Here, we present a biophysical model of Ras clustering based on short-range attraction and long-range repulsion between Ras molecules in the membrane. To test this model, we performed Monte Carlo simulations and compared statistical clustering properties with experimental data. We find that we can recover the experimentally-observed clustering across a range of Ras expression levels, without assuming a constant cluster/monomer ratio or the existence of lipid rafts. In addition, our model makes predictions about the signaling properties of Ras nanoclusters in support of the idea that Ras nanoclusters act as an analog-digital-analog converter for high fidelity signaling.

  13. Probing DNA-stabilized fluorescent silver nanocluster spectral heterogeneity by time-correlated single photon counting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carro, Miguel; Paolucci, Valentina; Hooley, Emma Nicole

    2016-01-01

    DNA-stabilized silver nanoclusters (DNA-AgNCs) are promising fluorophores whose photophysical properties and synthesis procedures have received increased attention in the literature. However, depending on the preparation conditions and the DNA sequence, the DNA-AgNC samples can host a range of di...

  14. Concentrated dispersions of equilibrium protein nanoclusters that reversibly dissociate into active monomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truskett, Thomas M.; Johnston, Keith; Maynard, Jennifer; Borwankar, Ameya; Miller, Maria; Wilson, Brian; Dinin, Aileen; Khan, Tarik; Kaczorowski, Kevin

    2012-02-01

    Stabilizing concentrated protein solutions is of wide interest in drug delivery. However, a major challenge is how to reliably formulate concentrated, low viscosity (i.e., syringeable) solutions of biologically active proteins. Unfortunately, proteins typically undergo irreversible aggregation at intermediate concentrations of 100-200 mg/ml. In this talk, I describe how they can effectively avoid these intermediate concentrations by reversibly assembling into nanoclusters. Nanocluster assembly is achieved by balancing short-ranged, cosolute-induced attractions with weak, longer-ranger electrostatic repulsions near the isoelectric point. Theory predicts that native proteins are stabilized by a self-crowding mechanism within the concentrated environment of the nanoclusters, while weak cluster-cluster interactions can result in colloidally-stable dispersions with moderate viscosities. I present experimental results where this strategy is used to create concentrated antibody dispersions (up to 260 mg/ml) comprising nanoclusters of proteins [monoclonal antibody 1B7, polyclonal sheep Immunoglobin G and bovine serum albumin], which upon dilution in vitro or administration in vivo, are conformationally stable and retain activity.

  15. Reversible Size Control of Silver Nanoclusters via Ligand-exchange

    KAUST Repository

    Bootharaju, Megalamane Siddaramappa

    2015-05-21

    The properties of atomically monodisperse noble metal nanoclusters (NCs) are intricately intertwined with their precise molecular formula. The vast majority of size-specific NC syntheses start from the reduction of the metal salt and thiol ligand mixture. Only in gold was it recently shown that ligand-exchange could induce the growth of NCs from one atomically precise species to another; a process of yet unknown reversibility. Here, we present a process for the ligand-exchange-induced growth of atomically precise silver NCs, in a biphasic liquid-liquid system, which is particularly of interest because of its complete reversibility and ability to occur at room temperature. We explore this phenomenon in-depth using Ag35(SG)18 [SG= glutathionate] and Ag44(4-FTP)30 [4-FTP= 4-fluorothiophenol] as model systems. We show that the ligand-exchange conversion of Ag35(SG)18 into Ag44(4-FTP)30 is rapid (< 5 min) and direct, while the reverse process proceeds slowly through intermediate cluster sizes. We adapt a recently developed theory of reverse Ostwald ripening to model the NCs’ interconvertibility. The model’s predictions are in good agreement with the experimental observations, and they highlight the importance of small changes in the ligand-metal binding energy in determining the final equilibrium NC size. Based on the insight provided by this model, we demonstrated experimentally that by varying the choice of ligands, ligand-exchange can be used to obtain different sized NCs. The findings in this work establish ligand-exchange as a versatile tool for tuning cluster sizes.

  16. Optical properties of II-VI semiconductor nanoclusters for use as phosphors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcoxon, Jess P.; Newcomer, Paula

    2002-11-01

    The optical properties of both II-VI (direct gap) and type IV (indirect gap) nanosize semiconductors are significantly affected not only by their size, but by the nature of the chemical interface of the cluster with the embedding medium. This affects the light conversion efficiency and can alter the shape and position (i.e. the color) of the photoluminescence (PL). As the goal of our work is to embed nanoclusters into either organic or inorganic matrices for use as near UV, LED-excited phosphor thin films, understanding and controlling this interface is very important for preserving the high Q.E. of nanoclusters known for dilute solution conditions. We describe a room temperature synthesis of semiconductor nanoclusters which employs inexpensive, less toxic ionic precursors (metal salts), and simple coordinating solvents (e.g. tetrahydrofuran). This allows us to add passivating agents, ions, metal or semiconductor coatings to identical, highly dispersed bare clusters, post-synthesis. We can also increase the cluster size by heterogeneous growth on the seed nanoclusters. One of the most interesting observations for our II-VI nanomaterials is that both the absorbance excitonic features and the photoluminescence (PL) energy and intensity depend on the nature of the surface as well as the average size. In CdS, for example, the presence of electron traps (i.e Cd(II) sites) decreases the exciton absorbance peak amplitude but increases the PL nearly two-fold. Hole traps (i.e. S(II)) have the opposite effect. In the coordinating solvents used for the synthesis, the PL yield for d~2 nm, blue emitting CdSe clusters increases dramatically with sample age as the multiple absorbance features sharpen. Liquid chromatographic (LC) separation of the nanoclusters from other chemicals and different sized clusters is used to investigate the intrinsic optical properties of the purified clusters and identify which clusters are contributing most strongly to the PL. Both LC and dynamic

  17. Laboratory studies of carbon kinetic isotope effects on the production mechanism of particulate phenolic compounds formed by toluene photooxidation: a tool to constrain reaction pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irei, Satoshi; Rudolph, Jochen; Huang, Lin; Auld, Janeen; Collin, Fabrice; Hastie, Donald

    2015-01-08

    In this study, we examined compound-specific stable carbon isotope ratios for phenolic compounds in secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formed by photooxidation of isotope-label-free toluene. SOA generated by photooxidation of toluene using a continuous-flow reactor and an 8 m(3) indoor smog chamber was collected on filters, which were extracted with acetonitrile for compound-specific analysis. Eight phenolic compounds were identified in the extracts using a gas chromatograph coupled with a mass spectrometer, and their compound-specific stable carbon isotope ratios were determined using a gas chromatograph coupled with a combustion furnace followed by an isotope ratio mass spectrometer. The majority of products, including methylnitrophenols and methylnitrocatechols, were isotopically depleted by 5-6‰ compared to the initial isotope ratio of toluene, whereas the isotope ratio for 4-nitrophenol remained identical to that of toluene. On the basis of the reaction mechanisms proposed in previous reports, stable carbon isotope ratios of these products were calculated. By comparing the observed isotope ratios with the predicted isotope ratios, we explored possible production pathways for the particulate phenolic compounds.

  18. Use of density functional theory method to calculate structures of neutral carbon clusters Cn (3 ≤ n ≤ 24) and study their variability of structural forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, T W; Lai, S K

    2015-02-28

    In this work, we present modifications to the well-known basin hopping (BH) optimization algorithm [D. J. Wales and J. P. Doye, J. Phys. Chem. A 101, 5111 (1997)] by incorporating in it the unique and specific nature of interactions among valence electrons and ions in carbon atoms through calculating the cluster's total energy by the density functional tight-binding (DFTB) theory, using it to find the lowest energy structures of carbon clusters and, from these optimized atomic and electronic structures, studying their varied forms of topological transitions, which include a linear chain, a monocyclic to a polycyclic ring, and a fullerene/cage-like geometry. In this modified BH (MBH) algorithm, we define a spatial volume within which the cluster's lowest energy structure is to be searched, and introduce in addition a cut-and-splice genetic operator to increase the searching performance of the energy minimum than the original BH technique. The present MBH/DFTB algorithm is, therefore, characteristically distinguishable from the original BH technique commonly applied to nonmetallic and metallic clusters, technically more thorough and natural in describing the intricate couplings between valence electrons and ions in a carbon cluster, and thus theoretically sound in putting these two charged components on an equal footing. The proposed modified minimization algorithm should be more appropriate, accurate, and precise in the description of a carbon cluster. We evaluate the present algorithm, its energy-minimum searching in particular, by its optimization robustness. Specifically, we first check the MBH/DFTB technique for two representative carbon clusters of larger size, i.e., C60 and C72 against the popular cut-and-splice approach [D. M. Deaven and K. M. Ho, Phys. Rev. Lett. 75, 288 (1995)] that normally is combined with the genetic algorithm method for finding the cluster's energy minimum, before employing it to investigate carbon clusters in the size range C3-C24

  19. Visualization of BRI1 and SERK3/BAK1 Nanoclusters in Arabidopsis Roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Esse, Wilma; Nolles, Antsje; Bücherl, Christoph A.; de Vries, Sacco C.; Hohlbein, Johannes; Borst, Jan Willem

    2017-01-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) are plant hormones that are perceived at the plasma membrane (PM) by the ligand binding receptor BRASSINOSTEROID-INSENSITIVE1 (BRI1) and the co-receptor SOMATIC EMBRYOGENESIS RECEPTOR LIKE KINASE 3/BRI1 ASSOCIATED KINASE 1 (SERK3/BAK1). To visualize BRI1-GFP and SERK3/BAK1-mCherry in the plane of the PM, variable-angle epifluorescence microscopy (VAEM) was employed, which allows selective illumination of a thin surface layer. VAEM revealed an inhomogeneous distribution of BRI1-GFP and SERK3/BAK1-mCherry at the PM, which we attribute to the presence of distinct nanoclusters. Neither the BRI1 nor the SERK3/BAK1 nanocluster density is affected by depletion of endogenous ligands or application of exogenous ligands. To reveal interacting populations of receptor complexes, we utilized selective-surface observation—fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (SSO-FLIM) for the detection of Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). Using this approach, we observed hetero-oligomerisation of BRI1 and SERK3 in the nanoclusters, which did not change upon depletion of endogenous ligand or signal activation. Upon ligand application, however, the number of BRI1-SERK3 /BAK1 hetero-oligomers was reduced, possibly due to endocytosis of active signalling units of BRI1-SERK3/BAK1 residing in the PM. We propose that formation of nanoclusters in the plant PM is subjected to biophysical restraints, while the stoichiometry of receptors inside these nanoclusters is variable and important for signal transduction. PMID:28114413

  20. Homogeneously embedded Pt nanoclusters on amorphous titania matrix as highly efficient visible light active photocatalyst material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Vipul; Kumar, Suneel; Krishnan, Venkata, E-mail: vkn@iitmandi.ac.in

    2016-08-15

    A novel and facile technique, based on colloidal synthesis route, has been utilized for the preparation of homogeneously embedded Pt nanoclusters on amorphous titania matrix. The material has been thoroughly characterized using high resolution transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray analysis, powder x-ray diffraction, optical and Raman spectroscopic techniques to understand the morphology, structure and other physical characteristics. The photocatalytic activity of the material under visible light irradiation was demonstrated by investigations on the degradation of two organic dyes (methylene blue and rhodamine B). In comparison to other Pt−TiO{sub 2} based nanomaterials (core-shell, doped nanostructures, modified nanotubes, decorated nanospheres and binary nanocomposites), the embedded Pt nanoclusters on titania was found to be highly efficient for visible light active photocatalytic applications. The enhanced catalytic performance could be attributed to the efficient charge separation and decreased recombination of the photo generated electrons and holes at the Pt-titania interface and the availability of multiple metal-metal oxide interfaces due to homogeneous embedment of Pt nanoclusters on amorphous titania. In essence, this work illustrates that homogeneous embedment of noble metal nanoparticles/nanoclusters on semiconductor metal oxide matrices can lead to tuning of the photophysical properties of the final material and eventually enhance its photocatalytic activity. - Highlights: • Homogeneously embedded Pt nanoclusters on amorphous titania matrix has been prepared. • Facile low temperature colloidal synthesis technique has been used. • Enhanced catalytic performance could be observed. • Work can pave way for tuning photocatalytic activity of composite materials.

  1. The Precise Radio Observation of the 13C Isotopic Fractionation for Carbon Chain Molecule HC3N in the Low-Mass Star Forming Region L1527

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Mitsunori; Takano, Shuro; Sakai, Nami; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Oyama, Takahiro; Kuze, Nobuhiko; Tsukiyama, Koichi

    2016-06-01

    We observed the three 13C isotopic species of HC3N with the high signal-to-noise ratios in L1527 using Green Bank 100 m telescope and Nobeyama 45 m telescope to explore the production scheme of HC3N, where L1527 is the low-mass star forming region in the phase of a warm carbon chain chemistry region. The spectral lines of the J = 5--4, 9--8, 10--9, and 12--11 transitions in the 44-109 GHz region were used to measure isotopic ratios. The abundance of HCCCN was determined from the line intensities of the two weak hyperfine components of the J = 5-4 transition. The isotopic ratios were precisely determined to be 1.00 : 1.01 : 1.35 : 86.4 for [H13CCCN] : [HC13CCN] : [HCC13CN] : [HCCCN]. It was found that the abundance of H13CCCN is equal to that of HC13CCN, and it was implied that HC3N is mainly formed by the reaction schemes via C2H2 and C2H2+ in L1527. This would suggest a universality of dicarbide chemistry producing HC3N irrespective of evolutional phases from a starless dark cloud to a warm carbon chain chemistry region. Sakai, N., Sakai, T., Hirota, T., & Yamamoto, S. 2008, ApJ, 672, 371 Takano, S., Masuda, A., Hirahara, Y., et al. 1998, A&A, 329, 1156

  2. Preparation of three-dimensional composite of poly(N-acetylaniline) nanorods/platinum nanoclusters and electrocatalytic oxidation of methanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Chunming; Lin, Xiangqin [Department of Chemistry, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China)

    2007-01-10

    Preparation of nanocomposites of precious metal/conducting polymer is interested in studies of nanoscience and technology and in the fields of fuel cells applications. In this work, a 3D matrix of the novel nanocomposite on a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) was presented, which is consisted of nanorods of poly(N-acetylaniline) (nr-PAANI) and embedded platinum nanoclusters (nc-Pt). The nc-Pt/nr-PAANI nanocomposite was electrochemically in situ deposited in two steps: first, the nr-PAANI matrix was deposited on GCE by potential cycling between -0.2 and 1.0V versus SCE; then, the nc-Pt was deposited on the nr-PAANI modified electrode by potential cycling between -0.2 and 0.8V. The unique 3D structure of the nr-PAANI, nc-Pt and nc-Pt/nr-PAANI was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis) and cyclic voltammetry techniques. The nanocomposite acted as a high efficient catalyst with enhanced anti-poisoning ability for the electrochemical oxidation of methanol in 0.5M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. Based on our observations, a mechanism for the synergic effect of the poly(N-acetylaniline) (PAANI) in the nanocomposite was proposed. (author)

  3. Preparation of three-dimensional composite of poly(N-acetylaniline) nanorods/platinum nanoclusters and electrocatalytic oxidation of methanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chunming; Lin, Xiangqin

    Preparation of nanocomposites of precious metal/conducting polymer is interested in studies of nanoscience and technology and in the fields of fuel cells applications. In this work, a 3D matrix of the novel nanocomposite on a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) was presented, which is consisted of nanorods of poly(N-acetylaniline) (nr-PAANI) and embedded platinum nanoclusters (nc-Pt). The nc-Pt/nr-PAANI nanocomposite was electrochemically in situ deposited in two steps: first, the nr-PAANI matrix was deposited on GCE by potential cycling between -0.2 and 1.0 V versus SCE; then, the nc-Pt was deposited on the nr-PAANI modified electrode by potential cycling between -0.2 and 0.8 V. The unique 3D structure of the nr-PAANI, nc-Pt and nc-Pt/nr-PAANI was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis) and cyclic voltammetry techniques. The nanocomposite acted as a high efficient catalyst with enhanced anti-poisoning ability for the electrochemical oxidation of methanol in 0.5 M H 2SO 4. Based on our observations, a mechanism for the synergic effect of the poly(N-acetylaniline) (PAANI) in the nanocomposite was proposed.

  4. Comparison of the quantitative determination of soil organic carbon in coastal wetlands containing reduced forms of Fe and S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passos, Tassia R. G.; Artur, Adriana G.; Nóbrega, Gabriel N.; Otero, Xosé L.; Ferreira, Tiago O.

    2016-06-01

    The performance of the Walkley-Black wet oxidation chemical method for soil organic carbon (SOC) determination in coastal wetland soils (mangroves, coastal lagoons, and hypersaline tidal flats) was evaluated in the state of Ceará along the semiarid coast of Brazil, assessing pyrite oxidation and its effects on soil C stock (SCS) quantification. SOC determined by the chemical oxidation method (CWB) was compared to that assessed by means of a standard elemental analyzer (CEA) for surficial samples (oxidation method, evaluating the effects of pyrite oxidation. Regardless of the method used, and consistent with site-specific physicochemical conditions, higher pyrite and SOC contents were recorded in the mangroves, whereas lower values were found in the other settings. CWB values were higher than CEA values. Significant differences in SCS calculations based on CWB and CEA were recorded for the coastal lagoons and hypersaline tidal flats. Nevertheless, the CWB and CEA values were strongly correlated, indicating that the wet oxidation chemical method can be used in such settings. In contrast, the absence of correlation for the mangroves provides evidence of the inadequacy of this method for these soils. Air drying and oxidation decrease the pyrite content, with larger effects rooted in oxidation. Thus, the wet oxidation chemical method is not recommended for mangrove soils, but seems appropriate for SOC/SCS quantification in hypersaline tidal flat and coastal lagoon soils characterized by lower pyrite contents.

  5. Heterostructure of Au nanocluster tipping on a ZnS quantum rod: controlled synthesis and novel luminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yang; Wang, Ligang; Yu, Shanshan; Zhou, Weiwei

    2015-08-01

    Heterostructures of metal nanoparticles and semiconductors are widely studied for their unique properties. However, few reports are available on the heterostructure of metal nanoclusters and semiconductors. In the present study, a heterostructure, in which gold nanoclusters selectively locate at ZnS quantum rod (QR) tips, was fabricated using a two-step solvothermal route. The composition, intrinsic crystallography, and junction of the prepared heterostructure were thoroughly investigated, and it was observed to exhibit novel luminescent behaviours. By comparison with the individual components of ZnS QRs and gold clusters, the resultant heterostructure shows an enhanced exciton emission and complete depression of defect emission for the ZnS component, and a pronounced red emission for the gold nanocluster component. The mechanism of these properties and the charge transfer between gold nanoclusters and ZnS QRs were also explored. The size and location of gold in the heterostructure were also controlled during synthesis to study their effects on the luminescence.

  6. Immobilized organoruthenium(II) complexes onto polyethyleneimine-wrapped carbon nanotubes/in situ formed gold nanoparticles as a novel electrochemical sensing platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azadbakht, Azadeh, E-mail: Azadbakht.a@gmail.com; Abbasi, Amir Reza; Derikvand, Zohreh; Amraei, Shiba

    2015-03-01

    The polyethyleneimine (PEI) wrapped multi-walled carbon nanotubes functionalized with a carboxylic acid group (CNTs–COOH) gold nanoparticle (AuNP)-modified gold (Au) electrode has been utilized as a platform to immobilize organoruthenium(II) complexes (ORC). The surface structure and composition of the sensor were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Electrocatalytic reduction of iodate and nitrite on the surface of modified electrode was investigated with cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and hydrodynamic voltammetry methods. The cyclic voltammetric results indicated the ability of AuNPs/PEI/CNT–COOH/ORC modified Au electrode to catalyze the reduction of this compound. AuNPs/PEI/CNTs–COOH nanocomposite combined the advantages of PEI-well dispersed CNTs–COOH and in situ formed AuNPs. - Highlights: • We prepared composite containing polyethyleneimine (PEI), CNTs and AuNPs. • AuNPs were in situ formed on the surface of CNTs–PEI. • When the AuNPs were in situ formed the stability would be improved. • Nanocomposite combined the advantages of PEI–CNTs and in situ formed AuNPs. • Modified nanocomposite Au electrode catalyzes the reduction of iodate and nitrite.

  7. Chiral ligand-protected gold nanoclusters: Considering the optical activity from a viewpoint of ligand dissymmetric field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Yao

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Chirality is a geometric property of a physical, chemical, or biological object, which is not superimposable on its mirror image. Its significant presence has led to a strong demand in the development of chiral drugs, sensors, catalysts, and photofunctional materials. In recent years, chirality of nanoscale organic/inorganic hybrids has received tremendous attention owing to potential applications in chiral nanotechnology. In particular, with the recent progress in the syntheses and characterizations of atomically precise gold nanoclusters protected by achiral thiolates, atomic level origins of their chirality have been unveiled. On the other hand, chirality or optical activity in metal nanoclusters can also be introduced via the surface chiral ligands, which should be universal for the nanosystems. This tutorial review presents some optically-active metal (gold nanoclusters protected by chiral thiolates or phosphines, and their chiroptical (or circular dichroism; CD properties are discussed mostly from a viewpoint of the ligand dissymmetric field scheme. The examples are the gold nanoclusters protected by (R-/(S-2-phenylpropane-1-thiol, (R-/(S-mercaptosuccinic acid, phenylboronate-D/L-fructose complexes, phosphine sulfonate-ephedrinium ion pairs, or glutathione. Some methodologies for versatile asymmetric transformation and chiroptical controls of the nanocluster compounds are also described. In the dissymmetric field model as the origin of optical activity, the chiroptical responses of the gold nanoclusters are strongly associated with coupled oscillator and/or CD stealing mechanisms based on the concept of induced CD (ICD derived from a perturbation theory, so on this basis, some characteristic features of the observed CD responses of chiral ligand-protected gold nanoclusters are presented in detail. We believe that various kinds of origins of chirality found in ligand-protected gold nanoclusters may provide models for understanding those of

  8. Chiral ligand-protected gold nanoclusters:Considering the optical activity from a viewpoint of ligand dissymmetric field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hiroshi Yao

    2016-01-01

    Chirality is a geometric property of a physical, chemical, or biological object, which is not superimposable on its mirror image. Its significant presence has led to a strong demand in the development of chiral drugs, sensors, catalysts, and photofunctional materials. In recent years, chirality of nanoscale organic/inorganic hybrids has received tremendous attention owing to potential applications in chiral nanotechnology. In particular, with the recent progress in the syntheses and characterizations of atomically precise gold nanoclusters protected by achiral thiolates, atomic level origins of their chirality have been unveiled. On the other hand, chirality or optical activity in metal nanoclusters can also be introduced via the surface chiral ligands, which should be universal for the nanosystems. This tutorial review presents some optically-active metal (gold) nanoclusters protected by chiral thiolates or phosphines, and their chiroptical (or circular dichroism; CD) properties are discussed mostly from a viewpoint of the ligand dissymmetric field scheme. The examples are the gold nanoclusters protected by (R)-/(S)-2-phenylpropane-1-thiol, (R)-/(S)-mercaptosuccinic acid, phenylboronate-D/L-fructose complexes, phosphine sulfonate-ephedrinium ion pairs, or glutathione. Some methodologies for versatile asymmetric transformation and chiroptical controls of the nanocluster compounds are also described. In the dissymmetric field model as the origin of optical activity, the chiroptical responses of the gold nanoclusters are strongly associated with coupled oscillator and/or CD stealing mechanisms based on the concept of induced CD (ICD) derived from a perturbation theory, so on this basis, some characteristic features of the observed CD responses of chiral ligand-protected gold nanoclusters are presented in detail. We believe that various kinds of origins of chirality found in ligand-protected gold nanoclusters may provide models for understanding those of many related

  9. Carbon and oxygen isotope composition of Pb-, Cu- and Bi-carbonates of the Schwarzwald mining district: Carbon sources, first data on bismutite and the discovery of an oxidation zone formed by ascending thermal water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haßler, Kathrin; Taubald, Heinrich; Markl, Gregor

    2014-05-01

    The carbon and oxygen isotope composition of cerussite, bismutite, malachite and azurite samples from the Schwarzwald mining district, SW Germany, was analyzed in order to evaluate carbon sources and conditions of formation. We deliberately chose samples showing various textures and coming from deposits at various altitudes and geological settings. δ13C values vary from +1.0‰ to -21.0‰ VPDB, cerussite, bismutite, malachite and azurite δ18O values show a variation from +11.2‰ to +17.9‰, +16.8‰ to +21.0‰, +23.0‰ to +28.1‰ and +26.3‰ to +30.2‰ VSMOW2, respectively. In accordance with earlier studies, the δ13C values indicate carbon partially derived from biogenic (vegetation-respired or from heterotrophic degradation of organic matter) soil CO2 combined with carbon from an isotopically heavier reservoir (e.g. atmospheric CO2, carbonate rocks, hydrothermal calcite from the ore vein) in varying proportions.

  10. Carbon and oxygen abundances from recombination lines in low-metallicity star-forming galaxies. Implications for chemical evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Esteban, C; Carigi, L; Peimbert, M; Bresolin, F; López-Sánchez, A R; Mesa-Delgado, A

    2014-01-01

    We present deep echelle spectrophotometry of the brightest emission-line knots of the star-forming galaxies He 2-10, Mkn 1271, NGC 3125, NGC 5408, POX 4, SDSS J1253-0312, Tol 1457-262, Tol 1924-416 and the HII region Hubble V in the Local Group dwarf irregular galaxy NGC 6822. The data have been taken with the Very Large Telescope Ultraviolet-Visual Echelle Spectrograph in the 3100-10420 $\\AA$ range. We determine electron densities and temperatures of the ionized gas from several emission-line intensity ratios for all the objects. We derive the ionic abundances of C$^{2+}$ and/or O$^{2+}$ from faint pure recombination lines (RLs) in several of the objects, permitting to derive their C/H and C/O ratios. We have explored the chemical evolution at low metallicities analysing the C/O vs. O/H, C/O vs. N/O and C/N vs. O/H relations for Galactic and extragalactic HII regions and comparing with results for halo stars and DLAs. We find that HII regions in star-forming dwarf galaxies occupy a different locus in the C/O...

  11. Carbon and nitrogen stocks and forms of N in a red dysthropic argisol grown or not with peanut forage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valdinei Tadeu Paulino

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The low availability of nitrogen (N is considered one of the most limiting factors for the productivity of pastures, often responsible for their degradation. Overall, due to the high cost of nitrogen fertilizers, it is not applied in sufficient quantities. In this context, the cultivation of legumes is an option for adding nitrogen in the soil and simultaneously is into high-protein food. Forage legume may reduce the emission of greenhouse gases, changing nutrient cycling (C and N and can improve productivity and sustainability of agricultural systems. Most of the N in the soil is in the organic form compounds, that is converted into inorganic fraction, the predominant mineral forms of nitrogen (NH4+ and NO3-, available to plants by mineralization process. The C:N ratios from soil and plant residues affect the decomposition rate and the balance between N mineralization and N immobilization by microbes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the improvements in soil quality by comparing the forage legume Arachis pintoi cv. Belmonte, cultivated for eight years and a bare soil - an adjacent area (AA in a soil Ultissol (Red Dysthrophic argisol. We evaluated the levels and stocks of C, total N and C:N, NH4+ and NO3- in soil from a depth of 0-20 cm. The experimental design was a randomized complete block with ten replications. Variance analysis (ANOVA was used to detect significant differences between the study areas, averages were compared using test for multiple comparisons Student Newman-Keuls - SNK test (p < 0.05. Analyses were performed using SAS (2010. The availability of mineral N in uncultivated area was low, with mean values below 10 mg kg-1 for both nitrate and ammonium, possibly due to the low organic matter content (17.8 g kg-1. However, under the cultivation of the peanut forage there were increases (p < 0.05 of the contents and stocks of C and N, and the levels of ammonium and nitrate. Increases in total N and inorganic N forms are the

  12. Structure prediction of nanoclusters; a direct or a pre-screened search on the DFT energy landscape?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrow, M R; Chow, Y; Woodley, S M

    2014-10-21

    The atomic structure of inorganic nanoclusters obtained via a search for low lying minima on energy landscapes, or hypersurfaces, is reported for inorganic binary compounds: zinc oxide (ZnO)n, magnesium oxide (MgO)n, cadmium selenide (CdSe)n, and potassium fluoride (KF)n, where n = 1-12 formula units. The computational cost of each search is dominated by the effort to evaluate each sample point on the energy landscape and the number of required sample points. The effect of changing the balance between these two factors on the success of the search is investigated. The choice of sample points will also affect the number of required data points and therefore the efficiency of the search. Monte Carlo based global optimisation routines (evolutionary and stochastic quenching algorithms) within a new software package, viz. Knowledge Led Master Code (KLMC), are employed to search both directly and after pre-screening on the DFT energy landscape. Pre-screening includes structural relaxation to minimise a cheaper energy function - based on interatomic potentials - and is found to improve significantly the search efficiency, and typically reduces the number of DFT calculations required to locate the local minima by more than an order of magnitude. Although the choice of functional form is important, the approach is robust to small changes to the interatomic potential parameters. The computational cost of initial DFT calculations of each structure is reduced by employing Gaussian smearing to the electronic energy levels. Larger (KF)n nanoclusters are predicted to form cuboid cuts from the rock-salt phase, but also share many structural motifs with (MgO)n for smaller clusters. The transition from 2D rings to 3D (bubble, or fullerene-like) structures occur at a larger cluster size for (ZnO)n and (CdSe)n. Differences between the HOMO and LUMO energies, for all the compounds apart from KF, are in the visible region of the optical spectrum (2-3 eV); KF lies deep in the UV region

  13. Analysis of the Effects of Introduction of an Additional Carbon Tax on the Slovenian Economy Considering Different Forms of Recycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matjaž Koman

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper outlines some of the environmental and economic implications of an additional CO2 tax of EUR 15/tCO2 in Slovenia in the period 2012-2030 in order to determine whether it yield a double dividend. Authors analyze (using E3ME model different forms of revenue recycling by reducing the social security contributions of either the employers or the employees or by reducing the public deficit, in order to identify the optimal fiscal instrument for improving the environmental and economic welfare (double dividend. In this policy orientated paper authors argue that a reduction of employee social security contributions has more favourable effect than a reduction in employers' social security contributions.

  14. Improving Performance of InGaN/GaN Light-Emitting Diodes and GaAs Solar Cells Using Luminescent Gold Nanoclusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. D. Yang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We studied the optoelectronic properties of the InGaN/GaN multiple-quantum-well light emitting diodes (LEDs and single-junction GaAs solar cells by introducing the luminescent Au nanoclusters. The electroluminescence intensity for InGaN/GaN LEDs increases after incorporation of the luminescent Au nanoclusters. An increase of 15.4% in energy conversion efficiency is obtained for the GaAs solar cells in which the luminescent Au nanoclusters have been incorporated. We suggest that the increased light coupling due to radiative scattering from nanoclusters is responsible for improving the performance of the LEDs and solar cells.

  15. Antibacterial silver nanocluster/silica composite coatings on stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraris, M.; Perero, S.; Ferraris, S.; Miola, M.; Vernè, E.; Skoglund, S.; Blomberg, E.; Odnevall Wallinder, I.

    2017-02-01

    A coating made of silver nanocluster/silica composites has been deposited, via a radio frequency (RF) co-sputtering technique, for the first time onto stainless steel (AISI 304L) with the aim to improve its antibacterial properties. Different thermal treatments after coating deposition have been applied in order to optimize the coating adhesion, cohesion and its antibacterial properties. Its applicability has been investigated at realistic conditions in a cheese production plant. The physico-chemical characteristics of the coatings have been analyzed by means of different bulk and surface analytical techniques. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), contact angle measurements and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were employed to assess coating morphology, composition, surface roughness, wetting properties, size and local distribution of the nanoparticles within the coating. Tape tests were used to determine the adhesion/cohesion properties of the coating. The amount and time-dependence of released silver in solutions of acetic acid, artificial water, artificial tap water and artificial milk were determined by means of Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS). The antibacterial effect of the coating was evaluated at different experimental conditions using a standard bacterial strain of Staphylococcus aureus in compliance with National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS) and AATCC 147 standards. The Ahearn test was performed to measure the adhesion of bacteria to the coated stainless steel surface compared with a control surface. The antibacterial coating retained its antibacterial activity after thermal treatment up to 450 °C and after soaking in common cleaning products for stainless steel surfaces used for e.g. food applications. The antibacterial capacity of the coating remained at high levels for 1-5 days, and showed a good capacity to reduce the adhesion of bacteria up to 30 days. Only a few

  16. Fabrication of carbon nanofiber-reinforced aluminum matrix composites assisted by aluminum coating formed on nanofiber surface by in situ chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Fumio; Masuda, Chitoshi

    2015-01-01

    The van der Waals agglomeration of carbon nanofibers (CNFs) and the weight difference and poor wettability between CNFs and aluminum hinder the fabrication of dense CNF-reinforced aluminum matrix composites with superior properties. In this study, to improve this situation, CNFs were coated with aluminum by a simple and low-cost in situ chemical vapor deposition (in situ CVD). Iodine was used to accelerate the transport of aluminum atoms. The coating layer formed by the in situ CVD was characterized using scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results confirmed that the CNFs were successfully coated with aluminum. The composites were fabricated to investigate the effect of the aluminum coating formed on the CNFs. The dispersion of CNFs, density, Vickers micro-hardness and thermal conductivity of the composites fabricated by powder metallurgy were improved. Pressure-less infiltration experiments were conducted to fabricate composites by casting. The results demonstrated that the wettability and infiltration were dramatically improved by the aluminum coating layer on CNFs. The aluminum coating formed by the in situ CVD technique was proved to be effective for the fabrication of CNF-reinforced aluminum matrix composites.

  17. High-resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry analysis of carbon dynamics in mycorrhizas formed by an obligately myco-heterotrophic orchid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bougoure, Jeremy; Ludwig, Martha; Brundrett, Mark; Cliff, John; Clode, Peta; Kilburn, Matt; Grierson, Pauline

    2014-05-01

    Mycorrhiza formation represents a significant carbon (C) acquisition alternative for orchid species, particularly those that remain achlorophyllous through all life stages. As it is known that orchid mycorrhizas facilitate nutrient transfer (most notably of C), it has not been resolved if C transfer occurs only after lysis of mycorrhizal structures (fungal pelotons) or also across the mycorrhizal interface of pre-lysed pelotons. We used high-resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry (nanoSIMS) and labelling with enriched (13) CO2 to trace C transfers, at subcellular scale, across mycorrhizal interfaces formed by Rhizanthella gardneri, an achlorphyllous orchid. Carbon was successfully traced in to the fungal portion of orchid mycorrhizas. However, we did not detect C movement across intact mycorrhizal interfaces up to 216 h post (13) CO2 labelling. Our findings provide support for the hypothesis that C transfer from the mycorrhizal fungus to orchid, at least for R. gardneri, likely occurs after lysis of the fungal peloton. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Modeling the conformational preference of the carbon-bonded covalent adduct formed upon exposure of 2'-deoxyguanosine to ochratoxin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Purshotam; Manderville, Richard A; Wetmore, Stacey D

    2013-05-20

    The conformational flexibility of the C8-linked guanine adduct formed from attachment of ochratoxin A (OTA) was analyzed using a systematic computational approach and models ranging from the nucleobase to the adducted DNA helix. A focus was placed on the influence of the C8-modification of 2'-deoxyguanosine (dG) on the preferred relative arrangement of the nucleobase and the C8-substituent and, more importantly, the anti/syn conformational preference with respect to the glycosidic bond. Although OTA is twisted with respect to the base in the nucleobase model, addition of the deoxyribose sugar induces a further twist and restricts rotation about the C-C linkage due to close contacts between OTA and the sugar. The nucleoside model preferentially adpots a syn orientation (by 10-20 kJ mol(-1) depending on the OTA conformation) due to the presence of an O5'-H···N3 interaction. However, when this hydrogen bond is eliminated, which better mimics the DNA environment, a small (simulations and free energy analysis predict that both syn- and anti-conformations of OTB-dG are equally stable in helices when paired opposite cytosine. These results indicate that the adduct will likely adopt a syn conformation in an isolated nucleoside and nucleotide, while a mixture of syn and anti conformations will be observed in DNA duplexes. Since the syn conformation could stabilize base mismatches upon DNA replication or Z-DNA structures with varied biological outcomes, future computational and experimental work should elucidate the consequences of the conformational preference of this potentially harmful DNA lesion.

  19. In situ X-ray Diffraction Study of Graphitic Carbon Formed During Heating and Cooling of Amorphous-C/Ni bilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saenger, K.; Tsang, J; Bol, A; Chu, J; Grill, A; Lavoie, C

    2010-01-01

    We examine graphitization of amorphous carbon (a-C) in a-C/Ni bilayer samples having the structure Si/SiO{sub 2}/a-C(3-30 nm)/Ni(100 nm). In situ x-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements during heating in He at 3 C/s to 1000 C showed graphitic C formation beginning at temperatures T of 640-730 C, suggesting graphitization by direct metal-induced crystallization, rather than by a dissolution/precipitation mechanism in which C is dissolved during heating and expelled from solution upon cooling. We also find that graphitic C, once formed, can be reversibly dissolved by heating to T > 950 C, and that nongraphitic C can be volatilized by annealing in H{sub 2}-containing ambients.

  20. Magnetic-field-dependent assembly of silica-coated magnetite nanoclusters probed by Ultra-Small-Angle X-ray Scattering (USAXS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malik, Vikash [Physics Department, University of Wisconsin Milwaukee, 1900 E. Kenwood Blvd., Milwaukee, WI 53211 (United States); Suthar, Kamleshkumar J. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave., Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Mancini, Derrick C. [Physical Sciences and Engineering, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave., Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Ilavsky, Jan, E-mail: ilavsky@aps.anl.gov [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave., Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Colloidal suspension of the silica coated magnetic nanoclusters (MNCs) was used to study the magnetic field mediated assembly of magnetic nanoparticles. The spatial arrangement of these MNCs in colloidal suspension was studied using the ultra-small-angle X-ray scattering (USAXS) technique with magnetic field applied in directions orthogonal and parallel to the scattering vector. In situ magnetic field analysis of the USAXS scattering measurement showed anisotropic behavior that can be attributed to the formation of colloidal crystals. During magnetization, the clustered magnetic core induces a large dipole moment, and the thickness of the silica shell helps keep distance between the neighboring particles. The assembly of these hybrid nanostructured particles was found to be dependent on the strength and orientation of this external magnetic field. The dipolar chains formed of MNCs arranged themselves into colloidal crystals formed by two-dimensional magnetic sheets. The structure factor calculations suggested that the lattice parameters of these colloidal crystals can be tuned by changing the strength of the external magnetic field. These experiments shed light on the stimuli-responsive assembly of magnetic colloidal nanoparticles that leads to the creation of tunable photonic crystals. - Highlights: • In situ analysis of Magnetically tunable colloidal nanocluster using Ultra Small Angle X-ray Scattering (USAXS) under uniform magnetic field. • The colloidal super-lattice structure was analyzed in magnetic field along the direction parallel and perpendicular to scattering vector. • Structure factors were extracted by subtracting form factor from the USAXS data using Irena software tool. • The observed super-lattice structural spacing can be tuned by extent of the strength of external magnetic field. • The structure factor calculations showed that the colloidal crystal has the hexagonal packing.

  1. Purine-stabilized green fluorescent gold nanoclusters for cell nuclei imaging applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesh, V; Shukla, Akansha; Sivakumar, Sri; Verma, Sandeep

    2014-02-12

    We report facile one-pot synthesis of water-soluble green fluorescent gold nanoclusters (AuNCs), capped with 8-mercapto-9-propyladenine. The synthesized AuNCs were characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), (1)H NMR, and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry. These nanoclusters show high photostability and biocompatibility. We observed that AuNCs stain cell nuclei with high specificity, where the mechanism of AuNC uptake was established through pathway-specific uptake inhibitors. These studies revealed that cell internalization of AuNCs occurs via a macropinocytosis pathway.

  2. Mechanism of the formation of metal nanoclusters during pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pushkin, M.A. [Moscow Engineering Physics Institute, 31 Kashirskoe chausse, 115409 Moscow (Russian Federation); Lebid' ko, V.V. [Moscow Engineering Physics Institute, 31 Kashirskoe chausse, 115409 Moscow (Russian Federation); Borman, V.D. [Moscow Engineering Physics Institute, 31 Kashirskoe chausse, 115409 Moscow (Russian Federation); Tronin, V.N. [Moscow Engineering Physics Institute, 31 Kashirskoe chausse, 115409 Moscow (Russian Federation); Troyan, V.I. [Moscow Engineering Physics Institute, 31 Kashirskoe chausse, 115409 Moscow (Russian Federation); Smurov, I. [Ecole Nationale d' Ingenieurs de Saint Etienne, 58 rue Jean Parot, 42023 St-Etienne (France)]. E-mail: smurov@enise.fr

    2006-04-30

    The geometrical structure of Au, Ni, Co and Cr nanoclusters self-assembled on NaCl and HOPG surfaces under pulsed laser deposition (PLD) has been experimentally investigated. The PLD technique is characterized by an extremely high instantaneous deposition rate. Unlike for the thermal evaporation (TE) process, formation of fractal nanoclusters under PLD conditions has been observed with scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The driving mechanism for this phenomenon occurring at high deposition rate is thought to be the evolution of the initial interacting-adatom states in a system far from thermodynamic equilibrium. The obtained results can be explained by proposing a new mechanism of condensed phase formation under the conditions of strong deviation from thermodynamic equilibrium.

  3. Magnetic properties of transition-metal nanoclusters on a biological substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrmannsdoeerfer, T. [Institut Hochfeld-Magnetlabor Dresden (HLD), Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, P.O. Box 510119, D-01314 Dresden (Germany)]. E-mail: T.Herrmannsdoerfer@fz-rossendorf.de; Bianchi, A.D. [Institut Hochfeld-Magnetlabor Dresden (HLD), Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, P.O. Box 510119, D-01314 Dresden (Germany); Papageorgiou, T.P. [Institut Hochfeld-Magnetlabor Dresden (HLD), Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, P.O. Box 510119, D-01314 Dresden (Germany); Pobell, F. [Institut Hochfeld-Magnetlabor Dresden (HLD), Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, P.O. Box 510119, D-01314 Dresden (Germany); Wosnitza, J. [Institut Hochfeld-Magnetlabor Dresden (HLD), Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, P.O. Box 510119, D-01314 Dresden (Germany); Pollmann, K. [Institut fuer Radiochemie, Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, P.O. Box 510119, D-01314 Dresden (Germany); Merroun, M. [Institut fuer Radiochemie, Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, P.O. Box 510119, D-01314 Dresden (Germany); Raff, J. [Institut fuer Radiochemie, Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, P.O. Box 510119, D-01314 Dresden (Germany); Selenska-Pobell, S. [Institut fuer Radiochemie, Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, P.O. Box 510119, D-01314 Dresden (Germany)

    2007-03-15

    We have investigated the magnetic properties of transition-metal clusters with a single grain size of about 1 nm. These metallic nanoclusters have been deposed on a biological substrate. This substrate is a purified self-assembling paracrystalline surface layer (S-layer) of the Bacillus sphaericus strain JG-A12, which exhibits square symmetry and is composed of identical protein monomers. First data of the magnetic susceptibility, taken in a SQUID magnetometer at 0nanoclusters is dramatically reduced compared to the one of the corresponding bulk transition metals. The weakened magnetism of the 5d electrons is considered to play a crucial role for the occurrence of superconductivity in microgranular Pt by adjusting the balance between electron-phonon interactions and competing magnetic interactions.

  4. Silver nanocluster/silica composite coatings obtained by sputtering for antibacterial applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraris, M.; Balagna, C.; Perero, S.; Miola, M.; Ferraris, S.; Baino, F.; Battiato, A.; Manfredotti, C.; Vittone, E.; Vernè, E.

    2012-09-01

    Silver nanocluster silica composite coatings were deposited by radio frequency co-sputtering technique on several substrates. This versatile method allows tailoring of silver content and antibacterial behaviour of coatings deposited on glasses, ceramics, metals and polymers for several applications. Coating morphology and composition as well as nanocluster size were analyzed by means of UV-Visible absorption, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM), electron dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). The antibacterial effect was verified through the inhibition halo test against standard bacterial strain, Staphylococcus aureus, before and after sterilization process. Tape test demonstrated a good adhesion of the coatings to the substrates.

  5. Preparation and characterization of Ni/Co bimetallic nano-clusters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinzhang Gao; Fei Guan; Yongjun Ma; Jingwan Kang

    2003-01-01

    Ni/Co bimetallic nano-cluters have been prepared from the aqueous solution by reducing their corresponding metal salts under suitable conditions. The experimental conditions including the type and concentration of protective agent, feeding order and the pH of the solution that influence the average particle size have been studied in detail. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM)indicates that the shape of those bimetallic nano-cluster particles is spheroid. The alloy structure has been shown by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD). The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) data have confirmed that the nickel and cobalt in the bimetallic nano-clusters are in the zero-valence state.

  6. Absorption Spectra of CuGaSe 2 and CuInSe 2 Semiconducting Nanoclusters

    KAUST Repository

    Mokkath, Junais Habeeb

    2015-10-01

    The structural and optical properties of the chalcopyrite CunGanSe2n and CunInnSe2n nanoclusters (n = 2, 4, 6, and 8) are investigated as a function of the size using a combination of basin-hopping global optimization and time-dependent density functional theory. Although the lowest energy structures are found to show almost random geometries, the band gaps and absorption spectra still are subject to systematic blue shifts for decreasing cluster size in the case of CunGanSe2n, indicating strong electron confinement. The applicability of the nanoclusters in photovoltaics is discussed. © 2015 American Chemical Society.

  7. Surface induced magnetization reversal of MnP nanoclusters embedded in GaP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacroix, Christian; Lambert-Milot, Samuel; Desjardins, Patrick; Masut, Remo A.; Ménard, David

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the quasi-static magnetic behavior of ensembles of ferromagnetic nanoparticles consisting of MnP nanoclusters embedded in GaP(001) epilayers grown at 600, 650, and 700 °C. We use a phenomenological model, in which surface effects are included, to reproduce the experimental hysteresis curves measured as a function of temperature (120-260 K) and direction of the applied field. The slope of the hysteresis curve during magnetization reversal is determined by the MnP nanoclusters size distribution, which is a function of the growth temperature. Our results show that the coercive field is very sensitive to the strength of the surface anisotropy, which reduces the energy barrier between the two states of opposite magnetization. Notably, this reduction in the energy barrier increases by a factor of 3 as the sample temperature is lowered from 260 to 120 K.

  8. Poly thymine stabilized copper nanoclusters as a fluorescence probe for melamine sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hong-Wei; Dai, Wen-Xia; Yu, Xiao-Dong; Xu, Jing-Juan; Chen, Hong-Yuan

    2015-11-01

    In this work, poly-thymine stabilized copper nanoclusters have been used as a fluorescence probe for melamine sensing for the first time. Melamine can bind to thymine through hydrogen bond, which could dramatically enhance the fluorescence intensity of poly-thymine stabilized copper nanoclusters. The enhancement factors (I-I0)/I0 increase linearly with the lgCmelamine over the melamine concentration range of 0.1 µM to 6 µM. The detection limit of melamine is 95 nM, which is 200 times lower than the US Food and Drug Administration estimate melamine safety limit 20 µM. Melamine in milk was detected with good recovery, which suggested that this novel fluorescence probe has great potential in practical application.

  9. Papain-directed synthesis of luminescent gold nanoclusters and the sensitive detection of Cu2+.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yang; Wang, Yan; Wang, Chuanxi; Li, Wenying; Zhou, Huipeng; Jiao, Huping; Lin, Quan; Yu, Cong

    2013-04-15

    Highly fluorescent papain stabilized gold nanoclusters (NCs) have been synthesized through a simple wet chemical route. Papain was used for the first time as an effective capping and reducing agent for these clusters. The optimal conditions for the synthesis of the gold nanoclusters, including the concentrations of papain and NaOH, reaction time and temperature, were investigated. The as-prepared Au clusters show intense red emission at ∼660nm (QY ∼4.3%) and are uniform in size. The clusters are quite stable and the intense red emission remained unchanged at a buffer pH range of 6-12. The fluorescent Au NCs were then used as a label-free probe for the sensitive detection of Cu(2+). A limit of detection of 3nM was obtained. The sensing strategy is also highly selective against the various potential interference ions.

  10. Synthesis, characterization, and growth simulations of Cu–Pt bimetallic nanoclusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subarna Khanal

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Highly monodispersed Cu–Pt bimetallic nanoclusters were synthesized by a facile synthesis approach. Analysis of transmission electron microscopy (TEM and spherical aberration (Cs-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM images shows that the average diameter of the Cu–Pt nanoclusters is 3.0 ± 1.0 nm. The high angle annular dark field (HAADF-STEM images, intensity profiles, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX line scans, allowed us to study the distribution of Cu and Pt with atomistic resolution, finding that Pt is embedded randomly in the Cu lattice. A novel simulation method is applied to study the growth mechanism, which shows the formation of alloy structures in good agreement with the experimental evidence. The findings give insight into the formation mechanism of the nanosized Cu–Pt bimetallic catalysts.

  11. On the Evolution from Non-Plasmonic Metal Nanoclusters to Plasmonic Nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-24

    OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON a. REPORT b. ABSTRACT c. THIS PAGE 19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER (include area code ) Standard...structures as well as for thiol binding on extended gold surfaces in self-assembled-monolayer (SAM) systems. Figure 1. Total structure of Au36( SPh ...thiolate ligands (Fig. 2). Remarkably, the Au133(SR)52 nanocluster (where, R = SPh -p-But) exhibits aesthetic orderings in structure from the gold kernel

  12. Light-Emitting Diodes: Phosphorescent Nanocluster Light-Emitting Diodes (Adv. Mater. 2/2016).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuttipillai, Padmanaban S; Zhao, Yimu; Traverse, Christopher J; Staples, Richard J; Levine, Benjamin G; Lunt, Richard R

    2016-01-13

    On page 320, R. R. Lunt and co-workers demonstrate electroluminescence from earth-abundant phosphorescent metal halide nanoclusters. These inorganic emitters, which exhibit rich photophysics combined with a high phosphorescence quantum yield, are employed in red and near-infrared light-emitting diodes, providing a new platform of phosphorescent emitters for low-cost and high-performance light-emission applications.

  13. Molecular dynamics simulation study of the melting of Pd-Pt nanoclusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaranarayanan, Subramanian K. R. S.; Bhethanabotla, Venkat R.; Joseph, Babu

    2005-05-01

    Bimetallic nanoclusters are of interest because of their utility in catalysis and sensors. The thermal characteristics of bimetallic Pt-Pd nanoclusters of different sizes and compositions were investigated through molecular dynamics simulations using quantum Sutton-Chen (QSC) many-body potentials. Monte Carlo simulations employing the bond order simulation model were used to generate minimum energy configurations, which were utilized as the starting point for molecular dynamics simulations. The calculated initial configurations of the Pt-Pd system consisted of surface segregated Pd atoms and a Pt-rich core. Melting characteristics were studied by following the changes in potential energy and heat capacity as functions of temperature. Structural changes accompanying the thermal evolution were studied by the bond order parameter method. The Pt-Pd clusters exhibited a two-stage melting: surface melting of the external Pd atoms followed by homogeneous melting of the Pt core. These transitions were found to depend on the composition and size of the nanocluster. Melting temperatures of the nanoclusters were found to be much lower than those of bulk Pt and Pd. Bulk melting temperatures of Pd and Pt simulated using periodic boundary conditions compare well with experimental values, thus providing justification for the use of QSC potentials in these simulations. Deformation parameters were calculated to characterize the structural evolution resulting from diffusion of Pd and Pt atoms. The results indicate that in Pd-Pt clusters, Pd atoms prefer to remain at the surface even after melting. In addition, Pt also tends to diffuse to the surface after melting due to reduction of its surface energy with temperature. This mixing pattern is different from those reported in some of the earlier studies on melting of bimetallics.

  14. Physical characteristics and optical properties of PbS nanoclusters: DFT simulation and experimental study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yanhua; Wen, Jianxiang; Sun, Xiaolan; Shang, Yana; Wang, Tingyun

    2015-08-01

    The physical characteristics and optical properties of PbS nanoclusters are investigated by using density functional theory (DFT) of first-principles. Microstructure models of (PbS)n (n=1-9) nanoclusters and bulk materials are built on Materials Studio platform, and its energy band structures, highest occupied molecular orbital-lowest unoccupied molecular orbital gap (HOMO-LUMO gap), density of state (DOS), and optical properties are calculated, respectively. Compared to PbS bulk materials, PbS nanoclusters show a discrete energy gap as well as the DOS, because of the quantum confinement effect. It is interesting that the HOMO-LUMO gap of (PbS)n (n=1-9) shows oscillates with the increasing of the n number. However, when its size is large enough, the HOMO-LUMO gap is gradually decrease with the increasing of size (>27 atoms). And, the HOMO-LUMO gap of PbS nanoclusters of different sizes is range from 2.575 to 0.58 eV, which covers the low loss communication band of optical communication. In addition, PbS nanomaterials (NMs) with small size are synthesized by using oleylamine as ligands. Sizes of PbS NMs can be accurately controlled through control of the reaction time as well as the growth temperature. The photoluminescence (PL) spectra show strong size dependence, which is large red shift with increasing size of the NMs. This trend is basically in agreement with the theoretical calculation above. Moreover, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) further reveals the morphology of PbS NMs. PbS NMs can be used in optical fiber amplifiers and fiber lasers because of its unique optical properties in optical communication bands.

  15. Simulation of Structure and Energies of NinAlm Nanoclusters (n + m = 13) by Molecular Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Rojas T., Justo; Departamento de Física, Instituto Peruano de Energía Nuclear. Lima, Perú Facultad de Ciencias Físicas, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos. Lima, Perú; Rojas A., Chachi; Facultad de Ciencias Físicas, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos. Lima, Perú; Arroyo C., Juan; Facultad de Química e Ingeniería Química, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos. Lima, Perú

    2014-01-01

    By simulation with the Molecular Dynamics method and the thermal temper technique, the more stablegeometric structures and their respective energy were determined in the Nin Alm (n + m = 13)nanoclusters. The atomic interaction in the cluster was modelized with the Embeded Atom Method (EAM)(the Voter & Chen version). The most stable geometric structures of the cluster and their minimal energywere obtained from 200 generating spatial coordinates along the high energy path. The initial inter...

  16. Green synthesis of peptide-templated fluorescent copper nanoclusters for temperature sensing and cellular imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hong; Li, Hua; Wang, Ai-Jun; Zhong, Shu-Xian; Fang, Ke-Ming; Feng, Jiu-Ju

    2014-12-21

    A simple and green approach was developed for the preparation of fluorescent Cu nanoclusters (NCs) using the artificial peptide CLEDNN as a template. The as-synthesized Cu NCs exhibited a high fluorescence quantum yield (7.3%) and good stability, along with excitation and temperature dependent fluorescent properties, which could be employed for temperature sensing. Further investigations demonstrated low toxicity of Cu NCs for cellular imaging.

  17. Structural Evolution of Core-Shell Gold Nanoclusters: Aun(-) (n = 42-50).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pande, Seema; Huang, Wei; Shao, Nan; Wang, Lei-Ming; Khetrapal, Navneet; Mei, Wai-Ning; Jian, Tian; Wang, Lai-Sheng; Zeng, Xiao Cheng

    2016-11-22

    Gold nanoclusters have attracted great attention in the past decade due to their remarkable size-dependent electronic, optical, and catalytic properties. However, the structures of large gold clusters are still not well-known because of the challenges in global structural searches. Here we report a joint photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) and theoretical study of the structural evolution of negatively charged core-shell gold nanoclusters (Aun(-)) for n = 42-50. Photoelectron spectra of size-selected Aun(-) clusters are well resolved with distinct spectral features, suggesting a dominating structural type. The combined PES data and density functional calculations allow us to systematically identify the global minimum or candidates of the global minima of these relatively large gold nanoclusters, which are found to possess low-symmetry structures with gradually increasing core sizes. Remarkably, the four-atom tetrahedral core, observed first in Au33(-), continues to be highly robust and is even present in clusters as large as Au42(-). Starting from Au43(-), a five-atom trigonal bipyramidal core appears and persists until Au47(-). Au48(-) possesses a six-atom core, while Au49(-) and Au50(-) feature seven- and eight-atom cores, respectively. Notably, both Au46(-) and Au47(-) contain a pyramidal Au20 motif, which is stacked with another truncated pyramid by sharing a common 10-atom triangular face. The present study sheds light on our understanding of the structural evolution of the medium-sized gold nanoclusters, the shells and core as well as how the core-shell structures may start to embrace the golden pyramid (bulk-like) fragment.

  18. Templated Atom-Precise Galvanic Synthesis and Structure Elucidation of a [Ag 24 Au(SR) 18 ] − Nanocluster

    KAUST Repository

    Bootharaju, Megalamane Siddaramappa

    2015-11-27

    Synthesis of atom-precise alloy nanoclusters with uniform composition is challenging when the alloying atoms are similar in size (for example, Ag and Au). A galvanic exchange strategy has been devised to produce a compositionally uniform [Ag24Au(SR)18]- cluster (SR: thiolate) using a pure [Ag25(SR)18]- cluster as a template. Conversely, the direct synthesis of Ag24Au cluster leads to a mixture of [Ag25-xAux(SR)18]-, x=1-8. Mass spectrometry and crystallography of [Ag24Au(SR)18]- reveal the presence of the Au heteroatom at the Ag25 center, forming Ag24Au. The successful exchange of the central Ag of Ag25 with Au causes perturbations in the Ag25 crystal structure, which are reflected in the absorption, luminescence, and ambient stability of the particle. These properties are compared with those of Ag25 and Ag24Pd clusters with same ligand and structural framework, providing new insights into the modulation of cluster properties with dopants at the single-atom level.

  19. Optical and structural properties of InAs nanoclusters in crystalline Si obtained through sequential ion implantation and RTA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sortica, Mauricio A.; Canut, Bruno; Chauvin, Nicolas [Institut des Nanotechnologies de Lyon INL-UMR5270, INSA - Lyon, CNRS, 7 av. Jean Capelle, 69621, Villeurbanne (France); Hatori, Masahiro; Dias, Johnny F. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul IF-UFRGS, av. Bento Goncalves 9500, 91501-970, Porto Alegre - RS (Brazil); Marty, Olivier [Institut des Nanotechnologies de Lyon INL-UMR5270, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 8 rue Andre-Marie Ampere, 69622, Villeurbanne (France)

    2015-12-15

    Si (100) wafers were implanted at 500 C with 250 keV As ions and 350 keV In ions in this order. The implantations were carried out with three different fluences, namely 1 x 10{sup 16}, 2 x 10{sup 16}, and 5 x 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2}. The samples were annealed with rapid thermal annealing (RTA) for 30 s at temperatures ranging from 800 up to 1000 C. Different techniques like photoluminescence (PL) and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) were employed to characterize the samples. Finally, scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM, respectively) provided further structural information of the InAs nanoclusters. The results indicate that InAs nanoprecipitates are formed after RTA treatment. Moreover, a broad photoluminescence peak was observed in all samples submitted to RTA. RBS results reveal that losses of implanted ions due to diffusion processes can be minimized through the use of RTA, depending of the fluence of ion implantation. Finally, the present results suggest that the photoluminescence yield depends on the degree of the radiation damage induced in the Si matrix during the implantation process. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  20. Usefulness of TAO model to predict and manage the transformation in soil of carbon and nitrogen forms from West-Africa urban solid wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaboré, W T; Pansu, M; Hien, E; Houot, S; Zombré, N P; Masse, D

    2011-01-01

    The TAO model of Transformation of Added Organic materials (AOM) calibrated on AOMs and substrates of temperate areas was used to assess the transformations in soil of carbon and nitrogen forms of AOMs: raw materials, selected mixtures and composts from Ouagadougou urban wastes. AOMs were studied in terms of chemical and biochemical contents and for their C and N mineralization during incubations in a typical Ferric Lixisol of the sub-urban agriculture of Ouagadougou. The TAO model was used to predict the transformations of C (very labile, resistant and stable organic C) and N (very labile, resistant and stable organic N, produced and immobilized inorganic N) forms driven by AOM biochemical data. Without any change in calibration formulae, TAO predicted accurately the C transformations and inorganic N production of most of the tested AOMs, with a tendency to slightly overestimate C mineralization of previously well-composted materials and re-mineralization of immobilized N. Complementary adjustments using more complete data from laboratory experiments are suggested, but the model agrees with other data collected in the field and appears as a promising tool to optimise the management of urban wastes in the tropical area as well as for agro industrial organic fertilizers of the temperate zone. This application suggests ways to improve the management of urban wastes aiming to optimize agricultural yields, system sustainability and C sequestration in soil. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Characterisation of passive films formed on low carbon steel in borate buffer solution (pH 9.2) by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamadou, L. [Laboratoire de Materiaux, Electrochimie et Corrosion, Universite Mouloud MAMMERI de, Tizi-Ouzou, B.P. 17 (15000) (Algeria)]. E-mail: lamhama@yahoo.fr; Kadri, A. [Laboratoire de Materiaux, Electrochimie et Corrosion, Universite Mouloud MAMMERI de, Tizi-Ouzou, B.P. 17 (15000) (Algeria); Benbrahim, N. [Laboratoire de Materiaux, Electrochimie et Corrosion, Universite Mouloud MAMMERI de, Tizi-Ouzou, B.P. 17 (15000) (Algeria)

    2005-12-15

    The comprehension of passivity and its protective character against corrosion is closely connected with the electronic properties of passive films. Passive films formed anodically on carbon steel in borate/boric acid solution, pH 9.2, have been characterised by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Mott-Schottky plots and impedance measurements were made on films formed at different potentials and times. The investigation allowed the determination of the semiconductive properties of the films. The results of the capacitance response indicate that the passive films behave like highly doped n-type semiconductors, showing that the passive film properties are dominated by iron. The value of donors density (N {sub D}) for the passive film is of the order of 10{sup 21} cm{sup -3} and decreases with increasing formation time and potential, indicating that defects decrease with increasing film thickness. Based on the information about the physical phenomena, an equivalent circuit is proposed to fit the experimental data, leading to determination of anodic film capacitance and film resistance.

  2. A new strategy for specific imaging of neural cells based on peptide-conjugated gold nanoclusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang E

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Enqi Zhang, Ailing Fu School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Southwest University, Chongqing, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Despite the significant progress in molecular imaging technologies that has been made in recent years, the specific detection of neural cells still remains challenging. Here, we suggest the use of gold nanoclusters (AuNCs modified with a brain-targeting peptide as a potential imaging candidate for detecting neural cells in vitro and in mice. AuNCs of less than 10 nm (dynamic light scattering analysis were first prepared using the “green” synthetic approach, and then a targeting peptide, rabies virus glycoprotein derived peptide (RDP, was conjugated to the AuNCs for improving the efficiency and specificity of neural cell penetration. The conjugate’s mechanism of cellular attachment and entry into neural cells was suggested to be receptor-mediated endocytosis through clathrin-coated pits. Also, noninvasive imaging analysis and animal studies indicated that the RDP-modified nanoclusters could concentrate in the brain and locate in neural cells. This study suggests the feasibility of using targeting peptide-modified nanoclusters for noninvasive imaging brain cells in vivo. Keywords: RDP, targeted delivery, bioimaging, brain 

  3. Size-selective synthesis of immobilized copper oxide nanoclusters on silica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lomnicki, Slawo M., E-mail: slomni1@lsu.edu [Louisiana State University, Department of Chemistry, 232 Choppin Hall, Baton Rouge, LA 70803-1804 (United States); Wu, Hongyi; Osborne, Scott N.; Pruett, Jeff M.; McCarley, Robin L.; Poliakoff, Erwin; Dellinger, Barry [Louisiana State University, Department of Chemistry, 232 Choppin Hall, Baton Rouge, LA 70803-1804 (United States)

    2010-11-25

    We report a straightforward route for preparing bulk quantities of size-controlled and low size dispersity copper oxide nanoclusters on amorphous silica. Adsorption of the copper-dendrimer complex on the silica surface minimizes aggregation, which results in previously unachieved low size dispersity of the nanoclusters. Copper oxide nanoclusters with mean diameters of 1-5 nm with size dispersities of only 8-15% were prepared by calcination of silica impregnated with Cu(II)-poly(propylene imine) dendrimer complexes of varying stoichiometry. The size and size distribution of the copper oxide nanoparticles are tunably controlled by the ratio of the Cu(II) to the terminal primary amines in the copper-dendrimer complex, DAB-Am{sub n}-Cu(II){sub x}, the surface coverage of the DAB-Am{sub n}-Cu(II){sub x}, and the impregnation procedure. This method is anticipated to be useful in the preparation of other metal oxide nanoparticles, e.g., Ni and Fe, and with other oxide substrates.

  4. Size-selective synthesis of immobilized copper oxide nanoclusters on silica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomnicki, Slawo M; Wu, Hongyi; Osborne, Scott N; Pruett, Jeff M; McCarley, Robin L; Poliakoff, Erwin; Dellinger, Barry

    2010-11-25

    We report a straightforward route for preparing bulk quantities of size-controlled and low size dispersity copper oxide nanoclusters on amorphous silica. Adsorption of the copper-dendrimer complex on the silica surface minimizes aggregation, which results in previously unachieved low size dispersity of the nanoclusters. Copper oxide nanoclusters with mean diameters of 1-5 nm with size dispersities of only 8-15% were prepared by calcination of silica impregnated with Cu(II)-poly(propylene imine) dendrimer complexes of varying stoichiometry. The size and size distribution of the copper oxide nanoparticles are tunably controlled by the ratio of the Cu(II) to the terminal primary amines in the copper-dendrimer complex, DAB-Am n -Cu(II) x , the surface coverage of the DAB-Am n -Cu(II) x , and the impregnation procedure. This method is anticipated to be useful in the preparation of other metal oxide nanoparticles, e.g., Ni and Fe, and with other oxide substrates.

  5. In-situ Study of Nanostructure and Electrical Resistance of Nanocluster Films Irradiated with Ion Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Weilin; Sundararajan, Jennifer A.; Varga, Tamas; Bowden, Mark E.; Qiang, You; McCloy, John S.; Henager, Charles H.; Montgomery, Robert O.

    2014-08-11

    An in-situ study is reported on the structural evolution in nanocluster films under He+ ion irradiation using an advanced helium ion microscope. The films consist of loosely interconnected nanoclusters of magnetite or iron-magnetite (Fe-Fe3O4) core-shells. The nanostructure is observed to undergo dramatic changes under ion-beam irradiation, featuring grain growth, phase transition, particle aggregation, and formation of nanowire-like network and nano-pores. Studies based on ion irradiation, thermal annealing and election irradiation have indicated that the major structural evolution is activated by elastic nuclear collisions, while both electronic and thermal processes can play a significant role once the evolution starts. The electrical resistance of the Fe-Fe3O4 films measured in situ exhibits a super-exponential decay with dose. The behavior suggests that the nanocluster films possess an intrinsic merit for development of an advanced online monitor for neutron radiation with both high detection sensitivity and long-term applicability, which can enhance safety measures in many nuclear operations.

  6. Size and property bimodality in magnetic nanoparticle dispersions: single domain particles vs. strongly coupled nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetterskog, E; Castro, A; Zeng, L; Petronis, S; Heinke, D; Olsson, E; Nilsson, L; Gehrke, N; Svedlindh, P

    2017-03-23

    The widespread use of magnetic nanoparticles in the biotechnical sector puts new demands on fast and quantitative characterization techniques for nanoparticle dispersions. In this work, we report the use of asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) and ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) to study the properties of a commercial magnetic nanoparticle dispersion. We demonstrate the effectiveness of both techniques when subjected to a dispersion with a bimodal size/magnetic property distribution: i.e., a small superparamagnetic fraction, and a larger blocked fraction of strongly coupled colloidal nanoclusters. We show that the oriented attachment of primary nanocrystals into colloidal nanoclusters drastically alters their static, dynamic, and magnetic resonance properties. Finally, we show how the FMR spectra are influenced by dynamical effects; agglomeration of the superparamagnetic fraction leads to reversible line-broadening; rotational alignment of the suspended nanoclusters results in shape-dependent resonance shifts. The AF4 and FMR measurements described herein are fast and simple, and therefore suitable for quality control procedures in commercial production of magnetic nanoparticles.

  7. The fourth crystallographic closest packing unveiled in the gold nanocluster crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Zibao; Chen, Jishi; Wang, Juan; Wang, Chengming; Li, Man-Bo; Yao, Chuanhao; Zhuang, Shengli; Xu, An; Li, Lingling; Wu, Zhikun

    2017-03-01

    Metal nanoclusters have recently attracted extensive interest not only for fundamental scientific research, but also for practical applications. For fundamental scientific research, it is of major importance to explore the internal structure and crystallographic arrangement. Herein, we synthesize a gold nanocluster whose composition is determined to be Au60S6(SCH2Ph)36 by using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and single crystal X-ray crystallography (SCXC). SCXC also reveals that Au60S6(SCH2Ph)36 consists of a fcc-like Au20 kernel protected by a pair of giant Au20S3(SCH2Ph)18 staple motifs, which contain 6 tetrahedral-coordinate μ4-S atoms not previously reported in the Au-S interface. Importantly, the fourth crystallographic closest-packed pattern, termed 6H left-handed helical (6HLH) arrangement, which results in the distinct loss of solid photoluminescence of amorphous Au60S6(SCH2Ph)36, is found in the crystals of Au60S6(SCH2Ph)36. The solvent-polarity-dependent solution photoluminescence is also demonstrated. Overall, this work provides important insights about the structure, Au-S bonding and solid photoluminescence of gold nanoclusters.

  8. Trends in the adsorption and reactivity of hydrogen on magnesium silicate nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oueslati, Ichraf; Kerkeni, Boutheïna; Bromley, Stefan T

    2015-04-14

    We study nanoclusters of Mg-rich olivine and pyroxene (having (MgO)6(SiO2)3 and (MgO)4(SiO2)4 compositions) with respect to their reactivity towards hydrogen atoms, using density functional calculations. Ultrasmall silicate particles are fundamental intermediates in cosmic dust grain formation and processing, and are thought to make up a significant mass fraction of the grain population. Due to their nanoscale dimensions and high surface area to bulk ratios, they are likely to also have a disproportionately large influence on surface chemistry in the interstellar medium. This work investigates the potential role of silicate nanoclusters in vital interstellar hydrogen-based chemistry by studying atomic H adsorption and H2 formation. Our extensive set of calculations confirm the generality of a Brønsted-Evans-Polanyi (BEP) relation between the H2 reaction barrier and the 2Hchem binding energy, suggesting it to be independent of silicate dust grain shape, size, crystallinity and composition. Our results also suggest that amorphous/porous grains with forsteritic composition would tend to dissociate H2, but relatively Mg-poor silicate grains (e.g. enstatite composition) and/or more crystalline/compact silicate grains would tend to catalyse H2 formation. The high structural thermostability of silicate nanoclusters with respect to the heat released during exothermic H2 formation reactions is also verified.

  9. First-principles calculated decomposition pathways for LiBH4 nanoclusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhi-Quan; Chen, Wei-Chih; Chuang, Feng-Chuan; Majzoub, Eric H.; Ozoliņš, Vidvuds

    2016-05-01

    We analyze thermodynamic stability and decomposition pathways of LiBH4 nanoclusters using grand-canonical free-energy minimization based on total energies and vibrational frequencies obtained from density-functional theory (DFT) calculations. We consider (LiBH4)n nanoclusters with n = 2 to 12 as reactants, while the possible products include (Li)n, (B)n, (LiB)n, (LiH)n, and Li2BnHn; off-stoichiometric LinBnHm (m ≤ 4n) clusters were considered for n = 2, 3, and 6. Cluster ground-state configurations have been predicted using prototype electrostatic ground-state (PEGS) and genetic algorithm (GA) based structural optimizations. Free-energy calculations show hydrogen release pathways markedly differ from those in bulk LiBH4. While experiments have found that the bulk material decomposes into LiH and B, with Li2B12H12 as a kinetically inhibited intermediate phase, (LiBH4)n nanoclusters with n ≤ 12 are predicted to decompose into mixed LinBn clusters via a series of intermediate clusters of LinBnHm (m ≤ 4n). The calculated pressure-composition isotherms and temperature-pressure isobars exhibit sloping plateaus due to finite size effects on reaction thermodynamics. Generally, decomposition temperatures of free-standing clusters are found to increase with decreasing cluster size due to thermodynamic destabilization of reaction products.

  10. Structural and optical properties of the naked and passivated Al5Au5 bimetallic nanoclusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grande-Aztatzi, Rafael; Formoso, Elena; Mercero, Jose M.; Matxain, Jon M.; Grabowski, Slawomir J.; Ugalde, Jesus M.

    2016-03-01

    The structural and optical properties of both the naked and passivated bimetallic Al5Au5 nanoclusters have been analyzed based on data obtained from ab initio density functional theory and quantum molecular dynamics simulations. It has been found that the Al5Au5 nanocluster possesses a hollow shaped minimum energy structure with segregated Al and Au layered domains, the former representing the electrophilic domain and the latter the nucleophilic domain. In particular, it has been shown that alkali metal cations attach in the nucleophilic domain and hop from one Au site to the next one in the picoseconds time scale, while anions are bound tightly to the Al atoms of the electrophilic domain. Simulating annealing studies are very suggestive of the proneness of the nanocluster towards coalescence into large cluster units, when the cluster is left unprotected by appropriate ligands. Further passivation studies with NaF salt suggest, nonetheless, the possibility of the isolation of the Al5Au5 cluster in molten salts or ionic liquids.

  11. Nanoclusters as a new family of high temperature superconductors (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halder, Avik; Kresin, Vitaly V.

    2017-03-01

    Electrons in metal clusters organize into quantum shells, akin to atomic shells in the periodic table. Such nanoparticles are referred to as "superatoms". The electronic shell levels are highly degenerate giving rise to sharp peaks in the density of states, which can enable exceptionally strong electron pairing in certain clusters containing tens to hundreds of atoms. A spectroscopic investigation of size - resolved aluminum nanoclusters has revealed a sharp rise in the density of states near the Fermi level as the temperature decreases towards 100 K. The effect is especially prominent in the closed-shell "magic" cluster Al66 [1, 2]. The characteristics of this behavior are fully consistent with a pairing transition, implying a high temperature superconducting state with Tc metal nanocluster particles are promising building blocks for high-Tc materials, devices, and networks. ---------- 1. Halder, A., Liang, A., Kresin, V. V. A novel feature in aluminum cluster photoionization spectra and possibility of electron pairing at T 100K. Nano Lett 15, 1410 - 1413 (2015) 2. Halder, A., Kresin, V. V. A transition in the density of states of metal "superatom" nanoclusters and evidence for superconducting pairing at T 100K. Phys. Rev. B 92, 214506 (2015).

  12. Teaching Form as Form

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiding, Tina Bering

    2012-01-01

    understanding of form per se, or, to use an expression from this text, of form as form. This challenge can be reduced to one question: how can design teaching support students in achieving not only the ability to recognize and describe different form-related concepts in existing design (i.e. analytical...... means that form serves both as the connective value and as the concept for reflection. In other words, form is observed as form, not anything else. The didactical challenge of teaching form as form is accentuated by students’ everyday-based pre-orientation towards function at the expense of form....... In general, students enter design education as far more skilled observers with regards to function than form. They are, in other words, predisposed to observe objects asking ‘what is?’, rather than ‘how is?’. This habit has not only cognitive implications. It is closely intertwined with a rudimentary...

  13. Teaching Form as Form

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiding, Tina Bering

    2012-01-01

    understanding of form per se, or, to use an expression from this text, of form as form. This challenge can be reduced to one question: how can design teaching support students in achieving not only the ability to recognize and describe different form-related concepts in existing design (i.e. analytical...... means that form serves both as the connective value and as the concept for reflection. In other words, form is observed as form, not anything else. The didactical challenge of teaching form as form is accentuated by students’ everyday-based pre-orientation towards function at the expense of form...... vocabulary of form. Even in cases in which teaching uses terms and phrases from everyday life (for instance, ‘intersection’), the meaning of the word cannot necessarily be transmitted directly from an ordinary vocabulary into a design context. And it is clearly a common issue for the contributions...

  14. DFT study of selective hydrogenation of acetylene to ethylene on Pd doping Ag nanoclusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, D., E-mail: liud@ysu.edu.cn

    2016-11-15

    Graphical abstract: The co-adsorption of H{sub 2} and C{sub 2}H{sub 4} on a single Pd doping atom of Ag clusters is impossible. Display Omitted - Highlights: • H{sub 2} and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} can simultaneously bind with a single Pd doping atom on Ag clusters. • The co-adsorption of H{sub 2} and C{sub 2}H{sub 4} on a single Pd doping atom is impossible. • C{sub 2}H{sub 4} can be hydrogenated to form C{sub 2}H{sub 6} on two neighboring Pd doping atoms. - Abstract: Recently, it has been reported that the reaction selectivity of catalytic hydrogenation of acetylene to ethylene can be significantly enhanced via the approach of Pd mono-atomic catalysis [Pei et al. ACS Catal. 5 (2015) 3717–3725]. To explain the catalytic mechanism of this binary alloy catalyst, C{sub 2}H{sub 2} hydrogenation reactions on Pd doping Ag nanoclusters are studied using density functional theory simulations. The simulation results indicate that H{sub 2} and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} can simultaneously bind with a single Pd doping atom no matter it is on vertex and edge sites of Ag clusters. The following H{sub 2} dissociation and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} hydrogenation are not difficult since the corresponding reaction barrier values are no more than 0.58 eV. The generated C{sub 2}H{sub 4} molecule can not be further hydrogenated since it locates on the top of Pd doping atom, which is the only adsorption site for H{sub 2}. On two Pd doping atoms at contiguous sites of Ag clusters, C{sub 2}H{sub 4} hydrogenation reactions can be carried out since there are enough sites for co-adsorption of H{sub 2} and C{sub 2}H{sub 4}.

  15. Dolomitization of carbonated reservoirs of platforms. From geologic data to modeling. Example of the great Bahama bank; La dolomitisation des reservoirs carbonates de plate-forme. Des donnees geologiques a la modelisation. Exemple du Grand Banc des Bahamas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caspard, E.

    2002-09-01

    Dolomitization has long been one of the most studied geological processes because of its economic interest (dolomitic rocks form a significant share of hydrocarbon reservoirs) as well as its academic interest, based on the fact that dolomite scarcely forms in current and recent marine environments whereas seawater is highly over-saturated; and that it is still not possible to synthesize it in laboratory under the same conditions. We used data collected by the University of Miami (Bahamas Drilling Project, ODP Leg 166) to understand the geological context of complete dolomitization of a Messinian 60 m thick reef unit. Classical methods of petrographic analysis of thin sections (optical microscopy, cathodoluminescence, scanning electron microscopy, in situ isotopic analyze using ionic microprobe) showed that the intensity of dolomitization is not controlled by the initial texture of the sediment, that the key parameter for dolomitization is the conservation of the initial mineralogy of magnesian bio-clasts, and that redox conditions, salinity and/or temperature of the precipitation fluid varied significantly during the process. Hydrodynamic modelling showed that during periods of high sea-level, Kohout thermal convection is a viable mechanism for driving marine fluids through the sediments. The key parameter for fluid circulations is the permeability anisotropy on the platform scale. Geochemical modelling showed that seawater is able to induce a complete dolomitization over durations of around one million years. Sensitivity tests showed that the critical parameter (as well as one of the less well-known) to describe diagenetic processes in carbonates is the water/rock reactions kinetics and in particular the precipitation kinetics of carbonate minerals. We finally propose that the dolomitization of the reef unit of the Unda well took place during the high sea-level period which extended over 1,1 My in the early Pliocene, according to the Kohout thermal convection

  16. Adsorption of sulfur dioxide by active carbon treated by nitric acid: I. Effect of the treatment on adsorption of SO{sub 2} and extractability of the acid formed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lisovskii, A.; Semiat, R.; Aharoni, C. [Technion-Israle Institute of Technology, Haifa (Israel). Chemical Engineering Dept.

    1997-12-31

    Activated carbon is used as an adsorbent in flue gas cleaning. The process of adsorptive-catalytic cleaning of gas from sulfur dioxide using active carbon, treated by concentrated nitric acid, was studied. After oxidative treatment the acidity of the carbon increases and the basicity decreases. This results in an increase of the SO{sub 2} adsorption and its oxidation to SO{sub 3}, and in weaker retention of the sulfuric acid formed. This facilitates the removal of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} by washing of the carbon and allows to obtain a more concentrated acid. The efficiency of the treated carbon is also higher in the process of SO{sub 2} removal from a gas similar in composition to stack gases. 13 refs., 1 fig., 7 tabs.

  17. The efficacy of Raf kinase recruitment to the GTPase H-ras depends on H-ras membrane conformer-specific nanoclustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán, Camilo; Šolman, Maja; Ligabue, Alessio; Blaževitš, Olga; Andrade, Débora M; Reymond, Luc; Eggeling, Christian; Abankwa, Daniel

    2014-04-01

    Solution structures and biochemical data have provided a wealth of mechanistic insight into Ras GTPases. However, information on how much the membrane organization of these lipid-modified proteins impacts on their signaling is still scarce. Ras proteins are organized into membrane nanoclusters, which are necessary for Ras-MAPK signaling. Using quantitative conventional and super-resolution fluorescence methods, as well as mathematical modeling, we investigated nanoclustering of H-ras helix α4 and hypervariable region mutants that have different bona fide conformations on the membrane. By following the emergence of conformer-specific nanoclusters in the plasma membrane of mammalian cells, we found that conformers impart distinct nanoclustering responses depending on the cytoplasmic levels of the nanocluster scaffold galectin-1. Computational modeling revealed that complexes containing H-ras conformers and galectin-1 affect both the number and lifetime of nanoclusters and thus determine the specific Raf effector recruitment. Our results show that mutations in Ras can affect its nanoclustering response and thus allosterically effector recruitment and downstream signaling. We postulate that cancer- and developmental disease-linked mutations that are associated with the Ras membrane conformation may exhibit so far unrecognized Ras nanoclustering and therefore signaling alterations.

  18. Seeking sunlight: rapid phototactic motility of filamentous mat-forming cyanobacteria optimize photosynthesis and enhance carbon burial in Lake Huron's submerged sinkholes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biddanda, Bopaiah A; McMillan, Adam C; Long, Stephen A; Snider, Michael J; Weinke, Anthony D

    2015-01-01

    We studied the motility of filamentous mat-forming cyanobacteria consisting primarily of Oscillatoria-like cells growing under low-light, low-oxygen, and high-sulfur conditions in Lake Huron's submerged sinkholes using in situ observations, in vitro measurements and time-lapse microscopy. Gliding movement of the cyanobacterial trichomes (100-10,000 μm long filaments, composed of cells ∼10 μm wide and ∼3 μm tall) revealed individual as well as group-coordinated motility. When placed in a petri dish and dispersed in ground water from the sinkhole, filaments re-aggregated into defined colonies within minutes, then dispersed again. Speed of individual filaments increased with temperature from ∼50 μm min(-1) or ∼15 body lengths min(-1) at 10°C to ∼215 μm min(-1) or ∼70 body lengths min(-1) at 35°C - rates that are rapid relative to non-flagellated/ciliated microbes. Filaments exhibited precise and coordinated positive phototaxis toward pinpoints of light and congregated under the light of foil cutouts. Such light-responsive clusters showed an increase in photosynthetic yield - suggesting phototactic motility aids in light acquisition as well as photosynthesis. Once light source was removed, filaments slowly spread out evenly and re-aggregated, demonstrating coordinated movement through inter-filament communication regardless of light. Pebbles and pieces of broken shells placed upon intact mat were quickly covered by vertically motile filaments within hours and became fully buried in the anoxic sediments over 3-4 diurnal cycles - likely facilitating the preservation of falling debris. Coordinated horizontal and vertical filament motility optimize mat cohesion and dynamics, photosynthetic efficiency and sedimentary carbon burial in modern-day sinkhole habitats that resemble the shallow seas in Earth's early history. Analogous cyanobacterial motility may have played a key role in the oxygenation of the planet by optimizing photosynthesis while favoring

  19. Seeking sunlight: rapid phototactic motility of filamentous mat-forming cyanobacteria optimize photosynthesis and enhance carbon burial in Lake Huron’s submerged sinkholes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bopaiah A Biddanda

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We studied the motility of filamentous mat-forming cyanobacteria consisting primarily of Oscillatoria-like cells growing under low-light, low-oxygen and high-sulfur conditions in Lake Huron’s submerged sinkholes using in situ observations, in vitro measurements and time-lapse microscopy. Gliding movement of the cyanobacterial trichomes (100-10,000 µm long filaments, composed of cells ~10 µm wide and ~3 µm tall revealed individual as well as group-coordinated motility. When placed in a petri dish and dispersed in ground water from the sinkhole, filaments re-aggregated into defined colonies within minutes, then dispersed again. Speed of individual filaments increased with temperature from ~50 µm minute-1 or ~15 body lengths minute-1 at 10°C to ~215 µm minute-1 or ~70 body lengths minute-1 at 35°C – rates that are rapid relative to non-flagellated/ciliated microbes. Filaments exhibited precise and coordinated positive phototaxis towards pinpoints of light and congregated under the light of foil cutouts. Such light-responsive clusters showed an increase in photosynthetic yield – suggesting phototactic motility aids in light acquisition as well as photosynthesis. Once light source was removed, filaments slowly spread out evenly and re-aggregated, demonstrating coordinated movement through inter-filament communication regardless of light. Pebbles and pieces of broken shells placed upon intact mat were quickly covered by vertically motile filaments within hours and became fully buried in the anoxic sediments over 3-4 diurnal cycles – likely facilitating the preservation of falling debris. Coordinated horizontal and vertical filament motility optimize mat cohesion and dynamics, photosynthetic efficiency and sedimentary carbon burial in modern-day sinkhole habitats that resemble the shallow seas in Earth’s early history. Analogous cyanobacterial motility may have played a key role in the oxygenation of the planet by optimizing

  20. Quantitative modelling of the surface plasmon resonances of metal nanoclusters sandwiched between dielectric layers: the influence of nanocluster size, shape and organization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toudert, J; Babonneau, D; Simonot, L; Camelio, S; Girardeau, T [PHYMAT, UMR CNRS 6630, Batiment SP2MI, Boulevard Marie et Pierre Curie, 86962 Futuroscope Chasseneuil (France)], E-mail: johann.toudert@gmail.com

    2008-03-26

    The effects of size, shape and organization on the surface plasmon resonances of Ag nanoclusters sandwiched between Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} layers are studied by transmission electron microscopy and anisotropic spectroscopic ellipsometry. We present an easy-to-handle model that quantitatively links the nanostructure and optical response of the films, which are considered as dielectric/metal:dielectric/dielectric trilayers, with the central nanocomposite layer being an effective medium whose optical properties are described by an anisotropic dielectric tensor. The components of this tensor are calculated using a generalization of the Yamaguchi theory taking into account the real organization, size and shape distributions of ellipsoidal nanoclusters, whose electronic properties are assumed to reflect shape-dependent finite size effects. Using this model, it is shown that the optical response of the films in the visible range is dominated by the excitation of the surface plasmon resonance of the clusters along their in-plane long axis, while no surface plasmon resonance resulting from an excitation along their in-plane short axis can be observed due to damping effects. Moreover, the spectral position of this resonance appears to be mainly affected by the average shape of the clusters, and weakly by their size, their shape distribution and the electromagnetic interaction between them.