WorldWideScience

Sample records for carbon isotope fractionation

  1. (Carbon isotope fractionation inplants)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Leary, M.H.

    1990-01-01

    The objectives of this research are: To develop a theoretical and experimental framework for understanding isotope fractionations in plants; and to develop methods for using this isotope fractionation for understanding the dynamics of CO{sub 2} fixation in plants. Progress is described.

  2. Carbon isotopic fractionation in heterotrophic microbial metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, N.; Leu, A.; Munoz, E.; Olsen, J.; Kwong, E.; Des Marais, D.

    1985-01-01

    Differences in the natural-abundance carbon stable isotopic compositions between products from aerobic cultures of Escherichia coli K-12 were measured. Respired CO2 was 3.4 percent depleted in C-13 relative to the glucose used as the carbon source, whereas the acetate was 12.3 percent enriched in C-13. The acetate C-13 enrichment was solely in the carboxyl group. Even though the total cellular carbon was only 0.6 percent depleted in C-13, intracellular components exhibited a significant isotopic heterogeneity. The protein and lipid fractions were -1.1 and -2.7 percent, respectively. Aspartic and glutamic acids were -1.6 and +2.7 percent, respectively, yet citrate was isotopically identical to the glucose. Probable sites of carbon isotopic fractionation include the enzyme, phosphotransacetylase, and the Krebs cycle.

  3. Oxygen isotope fractionation in divalent metal carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neil, J.R.; Clayton, R.N.; Mayeda, T.K.

    1969-01-01

    Equilibrium fractionation factors for the distribution of 18O between alkaline-earth carbonates and water have been measured over the temperature range 0-500??C. The fractionation factors ?? can be represented by the equations CaCO3-H2O, 1000 ln??=2.78(106 T-2)-3.39, SrCO3-H 2O, 1000 ln??=2.69(106 T-2)-3.74, BaCO3-H2O, 1000 ln??=2.57(106 T -2)-4.73. Measurements on MnCO3, CdCO3, and PbCO3 were made at isolated temperatures. A statistical-mechanical calculation of the isotopic partition function ratios gives reasonably good agreement with experiment. Both cationic size and mass are important in isotopic fractionation, the former predominantly in its effect on the internal vibrations of the anion, the latter in its effect on the lattice vibrations.

  4. [Carbon isotope fractionation inplants]. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Leary, M.H.

    1990-12-31

    The objectives of this research are: To develop a theoretical and experimental framework for understanding isotope fractionations in plants; and to develop methods for using this isotope fractionation for understanding the dynamics of CO{sub 2} fixation in plants. Progress is described.

  5. Carbon isotope fractionation in synthetic magnesian calcite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez-Lopez, Concepción; Romanek, Christopher S.; Caballero, Emilia

    2006-03-01

    Mg-calcite was precipitated at 25 °C in closed system, free-drift experiments, from solutions containing NaHCO 3, CaCl 2 and MgCl 2. The carbon stable isotope composition of bulk solid and solution were analyzed from subsamples collected during time course experiments of 24 h duration. Considering only the Mg-content and δ 13C values for the bulk solid, the carbon isotope fractionation factor for the Mg-calcite-HCO 3(aq)- system (as 103lnα) increased with average mol percentage of Mg (X Mg) in the solid at a rate of (0.024 ± 0.011) per mol% MgCO 3. Extrapolation of this relationship to the pure calcite end member yields a value of 0.82 ± 0.09, which is similar to published values for the calcite-HCO 3(aq)- system. Although 103lnα did not vary for precipitation rates that ranged from 10 3.21 to 10 4.60 μmol m -2 h -1, it was not possible to hold Mg-content of the solid constant, so kinetic effect on 10 3 ln α could not be evaluated from these experiments.

  6. Photosynthetic isotope fractionation: oxygen and carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isotopic carbon analyses of plant tissue and carbon dioxide from air samples and plant and soil respiration were made. Soil respiratory CO2 is about 150/00 lighter than atmospheric CO2. Plant isotopic ratios were found to be influenced by (1) plant photosynthetic efficiency, (2) source CO2, (3) airflow, and (4) CO2 concentrations. Etiolated bean plants have nearly the same delta13C value as seed carbon and seed dark respiratory CO2. Mature leaves from greenhouse grown beans, however, are some 5 0/00 lighter than seed carbon. This is a result of CO2 source, i.e., plant or soil respiratory CO2. Leaves which are generally lighter than other plant organs becomes still lighter during the growing season. As a consequence of increasingly light leaf carbon, photorespired CO2 also becomes lighter during the growing season. Oxygen isotopic values were measured for (1) photorespiratory CO2, which reflects equilibration with leaf water, and (2) photosynthetic O2, which is enriched in 18O, perhaps due to respiratory or photorespiratory 16O preference

  7. Carbon and oxygen isotope fractionation in dense interstellar clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, W. D.; Graedel, T. E.; Frerking, M. A.; Armentrout, P. B.

    1984-01-01

    It is pointed out that isotope fractionation as a result of chemical reactions is due to the small zero-point energy differences between reactants and products of isotopically distinct species. Only at temperatures near absolute zero does this energy difference become significant. Favorable conditions for isotope fractionation on the considered basis exist in space within dense interstellar clouds. Temperatures of approximately 10 K may occur in these clouds. Under such conditions, ion-molecule reactions have the potential to distribute isotopes of hydrogen, carbon, oxygen unequally among the interstellar molecules. The present investigation makes use of a detailed model of the time-dependent chemistry of dense interstellar clouds to study cosmological isotope fractionation. Attention is given to fractionation chemistry and the calculation of rate parameters, the isotope fractionation results, and a comparison of theoretical results with observational data.

  8. Chromium isotope fractionation during coprecipitation with calcium carbonate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodler, Alexandra; Sánchez-Pastor, Nuria; Fernández-Díaz, Lurdes;

    Archaean and Protoerozoic, needs careful assessment of the signal robustness and necessitates a thorough understanding of the Cr cycle in Earth system processes. We conducted experiments testing the incorporation and isotopic fractionation of chromate into the calcite lattice. Our experiments indicate...... no Cr isotope fractionation in the oceans. These experiments represent a first step toward understanding the Cr isotope signal of carbonates where fractionations will likely be ≤ 0.3 ‰ and as such, pave the way for future work to enable a reliable application of the Cr isotope proxy. References: [1...

  9. Short-term measurement of carbon isotope fractionation in plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combustion-based studies of the carbon-13 content of plants give only an integrated, long-term value for the isotope fractionation associated with photosynthesis. A method is described here which permits determination of this isotope fractionation in 2 to 3 hours. To accomplish this, the plant is enclosed in a glass chamber, and the quantity and isotopic content of the CO2 remaining in the atmosphere are monitored during photosynthesis. Isotope fractionation studies by this method give results consistent with what is expected from combustion studies of C3, C4, and Crassulacean acid metabolism plants. This method will make possible a variety of new studies of environmental and species effects in carbon isotope fractionation

  10. Organic chemistry of Murchison meteorite: Carbon isotopic fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, G. U.; Blair, N. E.; Desmarais, D. J.; Cronin, J. R.; Chang, S.

    1986-01-01

    The carbon isotopic composition of individual organic compounds of meteoritic origin remains unknown, as most reported carbon isotopic ratios are for bulk carbon or solvent extractable fractions. The researchers managed to determine the carbon isotopic ratios for individual hydrocarbons and monocarboxylic acids isolated from a Murchison sample by a freeze-thaw-ultrasonication technique. The abundances of monocarboxylic acids and saturated hydrocarbons decreased with increasing carbon number and the acids are more abundant than the hydrocarbon with the same carbon number. For both classes of compounds, the C-13 to C-12 ratios decreased with increasing carbon number in a roughly parallel manner, and each carboxylic acid exhibits a higher isotopic number than the hydrocarbon containing the same number of carbon atoms. These trends are consistent with a kinetically controlled synthesis of higher homologues for lower ones.

  11. Temperature dependence of carbon isotope fractionation in CAM plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deleens, E.; Treichel, I.; O' Leary, M.H.

    1985-09-01

    The carbon isotope fractionation associated with nocturnal malic acid synthesis in Kalanchoe daigremontiana and Bryophyllum tubiflorum was calculated from the isotopic composition of carbon-4 of malic acid, after appropriate corrections. In the lowest temperature treatment (17/sup 0/C nights, 23/sup 0/C days), the isotope fractionation for both plants is -4% per thousand (that is, malate is enriched in /sup 13/C relative to the atmosphere). For K. daigremontiana, the isotope fractionation decreases with increasing temperature, becoming approximately 0% per thousand at 27/sup 0/C/33/sup 0/C. Detailed analysis of temperature effects on the isotope fractionation indicates that stomatal aperture decreases with increasing temperature and carboxylation capacity increases. For B. tubiflorum, the temperature dependence of the isotope fractionation is smaller and is principally attributed to the normal temperature dependences of the rates of diffusion and carboxylation steps. The small change in the isotopic composition of remaining malic acid in both species which is observed during deacidification indicates that malate release, rather than decarboxylation, is rate limiting in the deacidification process. 28 references, 1 figure, 4 tables.

  12. [Carbon isotope fractionation in plants]: Annual technical progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plants fractionate carbon isotopes during photosynthesis in ways which reflect photosynthetic pathway and environment. The fractionation is product of contributions from diffusion, carboxylation and other factors which can be understood using models which have been developed in our work. The object of our work is to use this fractionation to learn about the factors which control the efficiency of photosynthesis. Unlike previous studies, we do not rely principally on combustion methods, but instead develop more specific methods with substantially higher resolving power. We have recently developed a new short-term method for studying carbon isotope fractionation which promises to provide a level of detail about temperature, species, and light intensity effects on photosynthesis which has not been available until now. We are studying the isotopic compositions of metabolites (particularly aspartic acid) in C3 plants in order to determine the role of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in C3 photosynthesis. We are studying the relative roles of diffusion and carboxylation in nocturnal CO2 fixation in CAM plants. We are studying the use of isotopic content as an index of water-use efficiency in C3 plants. We are developing new methods for studying carbon metabolism in plants. 3 refs

  13. Magnesium isotope fractionation in bacterial mediated carbonate precipitation experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, I. J.; Pearce, C. R.; Polacskek, T.; Cockell, C.; Hammond, S. J.

    2012-12-01

    Magnesium is an essential component of life, with pivotal roles in the generation of cellular energy as well as in plant chlorophyll [1]. The bio-geochemical cycling of Mg is associated with mass dependant fractionation (MDF) of the three stable Mg isotopes [1]. The largest MDF of Mg isotopes has been recorded in carbonates, with foraminiferal tests having δ26Mg compositions up to 5 ‰ lighter than modern seawater [2]. Magnesium isotopes may also be fractionated during bacterially mediated carbonate precipitation and such carbonates are known to have formed in both modern and ancient Earth surface environments [3, 4], with cyanobacteria having a dominant role in carbonate formation during the Archean. In this study, we aim to better constrain the extent to which Mg isotope fractionation occurs during cellular processes, and to identify when, and how, this signal is transferred to carbonates. To this end we have undertaken biologically-mediated carbonate precipitation experiments that were performed in artificial seawater, but with the molar Mg/Ca ratio set to 0.6 and with the solution spiked with 0.4% yeast extract. The bacterial strain used was marine isolate Halomonas sp. (gram-negative). Experiments were run in the dark at 21 degree C for two to three months and produced carbonate spheres of various sizes up to 300 μm in diameter, but with the majority have diameters of ~100 μm. Control experiments run in sterile controls (`empty` medium without bacteria) yielded no precipitates, indicating a bacterial control on the precipitation. The carbonate spheres are produced are amenable to SEM, EMP and Mg isotopic analysis by MC-ICP-MS. Our new data will shed light on tracing bacterial signals in carbonates from the geological record. [1] Young & Galy (2004). Rev. Min. Geochem. 55, p197-230. [2] Pogge von Strandmann (2008). Geochem. Geophys. Geosys. 9 DOI:10.1029/2008GC002209. [3] Castanier, et al. (1999). Sed. Geol. 126, 9-23. [4] Cacchio, et al. (2003

  14. Carbon isotope fractionation of methyl bromide during agricultural soil fumigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bill, M.; Miller, L.G.; Goldstein, Allen H.

    2002-01-01

    The isotopic composition of methyl bromide (CH3Br) has been suggested to be a potentially useful tracer for constraining the global CH3Br budget. In order to determine the carbon isotopic composition of CH3Br emitted from the most significant anthropogenic application (pre-plant fumigation) we directly measured the ??13C of CH3Br released during commercial fumigation. We also measured the isotopic fractionation associated with degradation in agricultural soil under typical field fumigation conditions. The isotopic composition of CH3Br collected in soil several hours after injection of the fumigant was -44.5??? and this value increased to -20.7??? over the following three days. The mean kinetic isotope effect (KIE) associated with degradation of CH3Br in agricultural soil (12???) was smaller than the reported value for methylotrophic bacterial strain IMB-1, isolated from previously fumigated agricultural soil, but was similar to methylotrophic bacterial strain CC495, isolated from a pristine forest litter zone. Using this fractionation associated with the degradation of CH3Br in agricultural soil and the mean ??13C of the industrially manufactured CH3Br (-54.4???), we calculate that the agricultural soil fumigation source has a carbon isotope signature that ranges from -52.8??? to -42.0???. Roughly 65% of industrially manufactured CH3Br is used for field fumigations. The remaining 35% is used for structural and post-harvest fumigations with a minor amount used during industrial chemical manufacturing. Assuming that the structural and post-harvest fumigation sources of CH3Br are emitted without substantial fractionation, we calculate that the ??13C of anthropogenically emitted CH3Br ranges from -53.2??? to -47.5???.

  15. Boron isotope fractionation in magma via crustal carbonate dissolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deegan, Frances M.; Troll, Valentin R.; Whitehouse, Martin J.; Jolis, Ester M.; Freda, Carmela

    2016-08-01

    Carbon dioxide released by arc volcanoes is widely considered to originate from the mantle and from subducted sediments. Fluids released from upper arc carbonates, however, have recently been proposed to help modulate arc CO2 fluxes. Here we use boron as a tracer, which substitutes for carbon in limestone, to further investigate crustal carbonate degassing in volcanic arcs. We performed laboratory experiments replicating limestone assimilation into magma at crustal pressure-temperature conditions and analysed boron isotope ratios in the resulting experimental glasses. Limestone dissolution and assimilation generates CaO-enriched glass near the reaction site and a CO2-dominated vapour phase. The CaO-rich glasses have extremely low δ11B values down to ‑41.5‰, reflecting preferential partitioning of 10B into the assimilating melt. Loss of 11B from the reaction site occurs via the CO2 vapour phase generated during carbonate dissolution, which transports 11B away from the reaction site as a boron-rich fluid phase. Our results demonstrate the efficacy of boron isotope fractionation during crustal carbonate assimilation and suggest that low δ11B melt values in arc magmas could flag shallow-level additions to the subduction cycle.

  16. Isotopic fractionation between organic carbon and carbonate carbon in Precambrian banded ironstone series from Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    37 delta13Csub(org) and 9 delta13Csub(carb) values furnished by argillaceous and carbonate sediments from the Rio das Velhas and Minas Series (Minas Gerais, Brazil) have yielded means of -24.3 +- 3.9 promille [PDB] and -0.9 +- 1.4 promille [PDB], respectively. These results, obtained from a major sedimentary banded ironstone province with an age between 2 and 3 x 109 yr, support previous assumptions that isotopic fractionation between inorganic and organic carbon in Precambrian sediments is about the same as in Phanerozoic rocks. This is consistent with a theoretically expected constancy of the kinetic fractionation factor governing biological carbon fixation and, likewise, with a photosynthetic pedigree of the reduced carbon fraction of Precambrian rocks. (orig.)

  17. Carbon monoxide isotope fractionation in the dust cloud Lynds 134

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prior observations of isotopically substituted CO in Lynds 134 are used to discuss the spatial behavior of the [CO]/[13CO] abundance ratio as a function of visual extinction in the cloud. [CO]/[13CO] is determined from both LTE and non-LTE evaluations of the double ratio [13CO]/: C18O] by subsequent application of an assumed constant, terrestrial oxygen isotope ratio. It is found that [CO]/[13CO] is roughly terrestrial toward the central regions of L134 where A/sub ν/> or approx. =7 mag, and decreases in the cloud periphery where A/sub ν/ is lower. These results are in qualitative agreement with theoretical expectation for a low-temperature, chemically fractionated dark cloud, in which preferential 13CO enhancement is driven in low-extinction regions by the charge exchange 13C++12CO→12C+13CO. The impact of this result on previous studies of the carbon isotope ratio [12C]/[13C] in the sense interstellar medium is discussed

  18. Paleogene plants fractionated carbon isotopes similar to modern plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diefendorf, Aaron F.; Freeman, Katherine H.; Wing, Scott L.; Currano, Ellen D.; Mueller, Kevin E.

    2015-11-01

    The carbon isotope composition (δ13 C) of terrestrial plant biomarkers, such as leaf waxes and terpenoids, provides insights into past carbon cycling. The δ13 C values of modern plant biomarkers are known to be sensitive to climate and vegetation type, both of which influence fractionation during lipid biosynthesis by altering plant carbon supply and its biochemical allocation. It is not known if fractionation observed in living plants can be used to interpret fossil lipids because plant biochemical characteristics may have evolved during the Cenozoic in response to changes in global climate and atmospheric CO2. The goal of this study was to determine if fractionation during photosynthesis (Δleaf) in the Paleogene was consistent with expectations based on living plants. To study plant fractionation during the Paleogene, we collected samples from eight stratigraphic beds in the Bighorn Basin (Wyoming, USA) that ranged in age from 63 to 53 Ma. For each sample, we measured the δ13 C of angiosperm biomarkers (triterpenoids and n-alkanes) and, abundance permitting, conifer biomarkers (diterpenoids). Leaf δ13 C values estimated from different angiosperms biomarkers were consistently 2‰ lower than leaf δ13 C values for conifers calculated from diterpenoids. This difference is consistent with observations of living conifers and angiosperms and the consistency among different biomarkers suggests ancient εlipid values were similar to those in living plants. From these biomarker-based δ13Cleaf values and independent records of atmospheric δ13 C values, we calculated Δleaf. These calculated Δleaf values were then compared to Δleaf values modeled by applying the effects that precipitation and major taxonomic group in living plants have on Δleaf values. Calculated and modeled Δleaf values were offset by less than a permil. This similarity suggests that carbon fractionation in Paleogene plants changed with water availability and major taxonomic group to about the

  19. Observations of Carbon Isotopic Fractionation in Interstellar Formaldehyde

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirstrom, E. S.; Charnley, S. B.; Geppert, W. D.; Persson, C. M.

    2012-01-01

    Primitive Solar System materials (e.g. chondrites. IDPs, the Stardust sample) show large variations in isotopic composition of the major volatiles (H, C, N, and O ) even within samples, witnessing to various degrees of processing in the protosolar nebula. For ex ample. the very pronounced D enhancements observed in IDPs [I] . are only generated in the cold. dense component of the interstellar medium (ISM), or protoplanetary disks, through ion-molecule reactions in the presence of interstellar dust. If this isotopic anomaly has an interstellar origin, this leaves open the possibility for preservation of other isotopic signatures throughout the form ation of the Solar System. The most common form of carbon in the ISM is CO molecules, and there are two potential sources of C-13 fractionation in this reservoir: low temperature chemistry and selective photodissociation. While gas-phase chemistry in cold interstellar clouds preferentially incorporates C-13 into CO [2], the effect of self-shielding in the presence of UV radiation instead leads to a relative enhancement of the more abundant isotopologue, 12CO. Solar System organic material exhibit rather small fluctuations in delta C-13 as compared to delta N-15 and delta D [3][1], the reason for which is still unclear. However, the fact that both C-13 depleted and enhanced material exists could indicate an interstellar origin where the two fractionation processes have both played a part. Formaldehyde (H2CO) is observed in the gas-phase in a wide range of interstellar environments, as well as in cometary comae. It is proposed as an important reactant in the formation of more complex organic molecules in the heated environments around young stars, and formaldehyde polymers have been suggested as the common origin of chondritic insoluable organic matter (IOM) and cometary refractory organic solids [4]. The relatively high gas-phase abundance of H2CO observed in molecular clouds (10(exp- 9) - 10(exp- 8) relative to H2) makes

  20. Photosynthetic Fractionation of the Stable Isotopes of Oxygen and Carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guy, R. D.; Fogel, M. L.; Berry, J. A.

    1993-01-01

    Isotope discrimination during photosynthetic exchange of O2 and CO2 was measured using enzyme, thylakoid, and whole cell preparations. Evolved oxygen from isolated spinach thylakoids was isotopically identical (within analytical error) to its source water. Similar results were obtained with Anacystis nidulans Richter and Phaeodactylum tricornutum Bohlin cultures purged with helium. For consumptive reactions, discrimination ([delta], where 1 + [delta]/1000 equals the isotope effect, k16/k18 or k12/k13) was determined by analysis of residual substrate (O2 or CO2). The [delta] for the Mehler reaction, mediated by ferredoxin or methylviologen, was 15.3[per mille (thousand) sign]. Oxygen isotope discrimination during oxygenation of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) catalyzed by RuBP carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) was 21.3[per mille (thousand) sign] and independent of enzyme source, unlike carbon isotope discrimination: 30.3[per mille (thousand) sign] for spinach enzyme and 19.6 to 23[per mille (thousand) sign] for Rhodospirillum rubrum and A. nidulans enzymes, depending on reaction conditions. The [delta] for O2 consumption catalyzed by glycolate oxidase was 22.7[per mille (thousand) sign]. The expected overall [delta] for photorespiration is about 21.7[per mille (thousand) sign]. Consistent with this, when Asparagus sprengeri Regel mesophyll cells approached the compensation point within a sealed vessel, the [delta]18O of dissolved O2 came to a steady-state value of about 21.5[per mille (thousand) sign] relative to the source water. The results provide improved estimates of discrimination factors in several reactions prominent in the global O cycle and indicate that photorespiration plays a significant part in determining the isotopic composition of atmospheric oxygen. PMID:12231663

  1. Stable carbon isotope fractionation by methanogens growing on different Mars regolith analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Navita; Kral, Timothy A.

    2015-07-01

    In order to characterize stable carbon (13C/12C) isotope fractionation of metabolically produced methane by methanogens in martian settings, Methanothermobacter wolfeii, Methanosarcina barkeri, and Methanobacterium formicicum were cultured on four different Mars regolith analogs - JSC Mars-1, Artificial Mars Simulant, montmorillonite, and Mojave Mars Simulant - and also in their growth supporting media. These chemoautotrophic methanogens utilize CO2 for their carbon source and H2 for their energy source. When compared to the carbon isotope signature of methane when grown on their respective growth media, M. wolfeii and M. barkeri demonstrated variability in carbon isotope fractionation values during methanogenesis on the Mars analogs, while M. formicicum showed subtle or negligible difference in carbon isotope fractionation values. Interestingly, M. wolfeii and M. barkeri have shown relatively consistent enriched values of 12C on montmorillonite, a kind of clay found on Mars, compared to other Mars regolith analogs. In general, M. barkeri showed large carbon isotope fractionation compared to M. wolfeii and M. formicicum during methanognesis on various kinds of analogs. Stable carbon isotope fractionation is one of the techniques used to infer different origins, environments, and pathways of methanogensis. The results obtained in this novel research can provide clues to determine ambiguous sources of methane on Mars.

  2. Carbon isotope fractionation of sapropelic organic matter during early diagenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiker, E. C.; Hatcher, P.G.

    1984-01-01

    Study of an algal, sapropelic sediment from Mangrove Lake, Bermuda shows that the mass balance of carbon and stable carbon isotopes in the major organic constituents is accounted for by a relatively straightforward model of selective preservation during diagenesis. The loss of 13C-enriched carbohydrates is the principal factor controlling the intermolecular mass balance of 13C in the sapropel. Results indicate that labile components are decomposed leaving as a residual concentrate in the sediment an insoluble humic substance that may be an original biochemical component of algae and associated bacteria. An overall decrease of up to about 4??? in the ?? 13C values of the organic matter is observed as a result of early diagenesis. ?? 1984.

  3. Intracellular Cadmium Isotope Fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horner, T. J.; Lee, R. B.; Henderson, G. M.; Rickaby, R. E.

    2011-12-01

    Recent stable isotope studies into the biological utilization of transition metals (e.g. Cu, Fe, Zn, Cd) suggest several stepwise cellular processes can fractionate isotopes in both culture and nature. However, the determination of fractionation factors is often unsatisfactory, as significant variability can exist - even between different organisms with the same cellular functions. Thus, it has not been possible to adequately understand the source and mechanisms of metal isotopic fractionation. In order to address this problem, we investigated the biological fractionation of Cd isotopes within genetically-modified bacteria (E. coli). There is currently only one known biological use or requirement of Cd, a Cd/Zn carbonic anhydrase (CdCA, from the marine diatom T. weissfloggii), which we introduce into the E. coli genome. We have also developed a cleaning procedure that allows for the treating of bacteria so as to study the isotopic composition of different cellular components. We find that whole cells always exhibit a preference for uptake of the lighter isotopes of Cd. Notably, whole cells appear to have a similar Cd isotopic composition regardless of the expression of CdCA within the E. coli. However, isotopic fractionation can occur within the genetically modified E. coli during Cd use, such that Cd bound in CdCA can display a distinct isotopic composition compared to the cell as a whole. Thus, the externally observed fractionation is independent of the internal uses of Cd, with the largest Cd isotope fractionation occurring during cross-membrane transport. A general implication of these experiments is that trace metal isotopic fractionation most likely reflects metal transport into biological cells (either actively or passively), rather than relating to expression of specific physiological function and genetic expression of different metalloenzymes.

  4. Effects of inorganic anions on carbon isotope fractionation during Fenton-like degradation of trichloroethene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yunde; Zhou, Aiguo; Gan, Yiqun; Li, Xiaoqian

    2016-05-01

    Understanding the magnitude and variability in isotope fractionation with respect to specific processes is crucial to the application of stable isotopic analysis as a tool to infer and quantify transformation processes. The variability of carbon isotope fractionation during Fenton-like degradation of trichloroethene (TCE) in the presence of different inorganic ions (nitrate, sulfate, and chloride), was investigated to evaluate the potential effects of inorganic anions on carbon isotope enrichment factor (ε value). A comparison of ε values obtained in deionized water, nitrate solution, and sulfate solution demonstrated that the ε values were identical and not affected by the presence of nitrate and sulfate. In the presence of chloride, however, the ε values (ranging from -6.3±0.8 to 10±1.3‰) were variable and depended on the chloride concentration, indicating that chloride could significantly affect carbon isotope fractionation during Fenton-like degradation of TCE. Thus, caution should be exercised in selecting appropriate ε values for the field application of stable isotope analysis, as various chloride concentrations may be present due to naturally present or introduced with pH adjustment and iron salts during Fenton-like remediation. Furthermore, the effects of chloride on carbon isotope fractionation may be able to provide new insights about reaction mechanisms of Fenton-like processes. PMID:26835895

  5. Carbon isotope fractionation reveals distinct process of CH4 emission from different compartments of paddy ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guangbin; Yu, Haiyang; Fan, Xianfang; Ma, Jing; Xu, Hua

    2016-06-01

    Carbon isotopic fractionations in the processes of CH4 emission from paddy field remain poorly understood. The δ13C-values of CH4 in association with production, oxidation and transport of CH4 in different pools of a paddy field were determined, and the stable carbon isotope fractionations were calibrated to assess relative contribution of acetate to CH4 production (fac) and fraction of CH4 oxidized (fox) by different pathways. The apparent isotope fractionation for CO2 conversion to CH4 (αapp) was 1.041–1.056 in the soil and 1.046–1.080 on the roots, indicating that fac was 10–60% and 0–50%, respectively. Isotope fractionation associated with CH4 oxidation (αox) was 1.021 ± 0.007 in the soil and 1.013 ± 0.005 on the roots, and the transport fractionation (εtransport) by rice plants was estimated to be ‑16.7‰ ~ ‑11.1‰. Rhizospheric fox was about 30–100%, and it was more important at the beginning but decreased fast towards the end of season. Large value of fox was also observed at the soil-water interface and soil and roots surfaces, respectively. The results demonstrate that carbon isotopic fractionations which might be different in different conditions were sensitive to the estimations of fac and fox in paddy field.

  6. Carbon isotope fractionation reveals distinct process of CH4 emission from different compartments of paddy ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guangbin; Yu, Haiyang; Fan, Xianfang; Ma, Jing; Xu, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Carbon isotopic fractionations in the processes of CH4 emission from paddy field remain poorly understood. The δ(13)C-values of CH4 in association with production, oxidation and transport of CH4 in different pools of a paddy field were determined, and the stable carbon isotope fractionations were calibrated to assess relative contribution of acetate to CH4 production (fac) and fraction of CH4 oxidized (fox) by different pathways. The apparent isotope fractionation for CO2 conversion to CH4 (αapp) was 1.041-1.056 in the soil and 1.046-1.080 on the roots, indicating that fac was 10-60% and 0-50%, respectively. Isotope fractionation associated with CH4 oxidation (αox) was 1.021 ± 0.007 in the soil and 1.013 ± 0.005 on the roots, and the transport fractionation (εtransport) by rice plants was estimated to be -16.7‰ ~ -11.1‰. Rhizospheric fox was about 30-100%, and it was more important at the beginning but decreased fast towards the end of season. Large value of fox was also observed at the soil-water interface and soil and roots surfaces, respectively. The results demonstrate that carbon isotopic fractionations which might be different in different conditions were sensitive to the estimations of fac and fox in paddy field. PMID:27251886

  7. Distribution and fractionation mechanism of stable carbon isotope of coalbed methane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIN; Shengfei; TANG; Xiuyi; SONG; Yan; WANG; Hongyan

    2006-01-01

    The stable carbon isotope values of coalbed methane range widely,and also are generally lighter than that of gases in normal coal-formed gas fields with similar coal rank.There exists strong carbon isotope fractionation in coalbed methane and it makes the carbon isotope value lighter.The correlation between the carbon isotope value and Ro in coalbed methane is less obvious.The coaly source rock maturity cannot be judged by coalbed methane carbon isotope value.The carbon isotopes of coalbed methane become lighter in much different degree due to the hydrodynamics.The stronger the hydrodynamics is,the lighter the CBM carbon isotopic value becomes.Many previous investigations indicated that the desorption-diffusion effects make the carbon isotope value of coalbed methane lighter.However,the explanation has encountered many problems.The authors of this article suggest that the flowing groundwater dissolution to free methane in coal seams and the free methane exchange with absorbed one is the carbon isotope fractionation mechanism in coalbed methane.The flowing groundwater in coal can easily take more 13CH4 away from free gas and comparatively leave more 12CH4.This will make 12CH4 density in free gas comparatively higher than that in absorbed gas.The remaining 12CH4 in free gas then exchanges with the adsorbed methane in coal matrix.Some absorbed 13CH4 can be replaced and become free gas.Some free 12CH4 can be absorbed again into coal matrix and become absorbed gas.Part of the newly replaced 13CH4 in free gas will also be taken away by water,leaving preferentially more 12CH4.The remaining 12CH4 in free gas will exchange again with adsorbed methane in the coal matrix.These processes occur all the time.Through accumulative effect,the 12CH4 will be greatly concentrated in coal.Thus,the stable carbon isotope of coalbed methane becomes dramatically lighter.Through simulation experiment on water-dissolved methane,it had been proved that the flowing water could fractionate the

  8. Carbon Isotopic Fractionation in Fischer-Tropsch Type Reactions and Relevance to Meteorite Organics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Natasha M; Elsila, Jamie E.; Kopstein, Mickey; Nuth, Joseph A., III

    2012-01-01

    Fischer-Tropsch-Type (FTT) reactions have been hypothesized to contribute to the formation of organic compounds in the early solar system, but it has been difficult to identify a signature of such reactions in meteoritic organics. The work reported here examined whether temperature-dependent carbon isotopic fractionation of FTT reactions might provide such a signature. Analyses of bulk organic deposits resulting from FTT experiments show a slight trend towards lighter carbon isotopic ratios with increasing temperature. It is unlikely, however, that these carbon isotopic signatures could provide definitive provenance for organic compounds in solar system materials produced through FTT reactions, because of the small scale of the observed fractionations and the possibility that signatures from many different temperatures may be present in any specific grain.

  9. Compound-specific carbon isotopic fractionation during transport of phthalate esters in sandy aquifer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui; Li, YanXi; He, Xi; Sissou, Zakari; Tong, Lei; Yarnes, Chris; Huang, Xianyu

    2016-02-01

    The present paper aims to evaluate the carbon isotopic fractionation of phthalate esters (PAEs) during transport in an sandy aquifer. Breakthrough curves of di-methyl phthalate (DMP), di-ethyl phthalate (DEP), and di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP) in mixed solution were determined by miscible displacement experiment, and simulated using HYDRUS-1D software. The stable carbon isotopes (δ(13)C) of 3 PAEs in effluent were analyzed at different times. Results showed that, in the transport process in sandy sediment, PAEs are mainly trapped into the pore space instead of being adsorbed on the surface of particles. At the initial stage of transport, PAEs with lighter carbon tend to run faster in the sandy sediment, and PAEs with heavier carbon run after. However, there is no priority for the transport of PAEs with different carbon isotopes at Stage Ⅱ with mainly time-limited sorption. So the transport-based isotope fractionation occurs in the front area of contaminant plume. This effect may be relevant for interpreting carbon isotope signatures in the real contaminant site. PMID:26539707

  10. Carbon Isotopic Fractionation Associated with Cyanobacterial Biomarkers: 2-Methylhopanoids and Methyl-Branched Alkanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahnke, L. L.; Summons, R. E.; Hope, J. M.; Cullings, K. W.

    2001-01-01

    This paper reports the carbon isotopic fractionations associated with the biosynthesis of biomarker lipids in a number of cyanobacteria obtained from culture collections and isolated from the coniform mats of Yellowstone National Park. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  11. Stable Carbon Isotope Fractionation by Methylotrophic Methanogenic Archaea

    OpenAIRE

    Penger, Jörn; Conrad, Ralf; Blaser, Martin

    2012-01-01

    In natural environments methane is usually produced by aceticlastic and hydrogenotrophic methanogenic archaea. However, some methanogens can use C1 compounds such as methanol as the substrate. To determine the contributions of individual substrates to methane production, the stable-isotope values of the substrates and the released methane are often used. Additional information can be obtained by using selective inhibitors (e.g., methyl fluoride, a selective inhibitor of acetoclastic methanoge...

  12. Fractionation behavior of chromium isotopes during coprecipitation with calcium carbonate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodler, Alexandra; Sánchez-Pastor, Nuria; Fernández-Díaz, Lurdes;

    2015-01-01

    paleoenvironmental changes, for example related to the rise of oxygen during the Archaean and Protoerozoic, needs careful assessment of the signal robustness and necessitates a thorough understanding of the Cr cycle in Earth system processes. We conducted experiments testing the incorporation of chromate...... into the calcite lattice to investigate isotopic changes facilitated by the coprecipitation process. Our experiments indicate enrichment in Cr concentration in the precipitates compared to the solutions, consistent with previous reports of Cr enrichment in chemical sediments compared to ambient seawater...

  13. Fractionation of carbon and hydrogen isotopes by methane-oxidizing bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, D.D.; Risatti, J.B.; Schoell, M.

    1981-01-01

    Carbon isotopic analysis of methane has become a popular technique in the exploration for oil and gas because it can be used to differentiate between thermogenic and microbial gas and can sometimes be used for gas-source rock correlations. Methane-oxidizing bacteria, however, can significantly change the carbon isotopic composition of methane; the origin of gas that has been partially oxidized by these bacteria could therefore be misinterpreted. We cultured methane-oxidizing bacteria at two different temperatures and monitored the carbon and hydrogen isotopic compositions of the residual methane. The residual methane was enriched in both 13C and D. For both isotopic species, the enrichment at equivalent levels of conversion was greater at 26??C than at 11.5??C. The change in ??D relative to the change in ??13C was independent of temperature within the range studied. One culture exhibited a change in the fractionation pattern for carbon (but not for hydrogen) midway through the experiment, suggesting that bacterial oxidation of methane may occur via more than one pathway. The change in the ??D value for the residual methane was from 8 to 14 times greater than the change in the ??13C value, indicating that combined carbon and hydrogen isotopic analysis may be an effective way of identifying methane which has been subjected to partial oxidation by bacteria. ?? 1981.

  14. Magnesium isotope fractionation during hydrous magnesium carbonate precipitation with and without cyanobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavromatis, Vasileios; Pearce, Christopher R.; Shirokova, Liudmila S.; Bundeleva, Irina A.; Pokrovsky, Oleg S.; Benezeth, Pascale; Oelkers, Eric H.

    2012-01-01

    The hydrous magnesium carbonates, nesquehonite (MgCO 3·3H 2O) and dypingite (Mg 5(CO 3) 4(OH) 2·5(H 2O)), were precipitated at 25 °C in batch reactors from aqueous solutions containing 0.05 M NaHCO 3 and 0.025 M MgCl 2 and in the presence and absence of live photosynthesizing Gloeocapsa sp. cyanobacteria. Experiments were performed under a variety of conditions; the reactive fluid/bacteria/mineral suspensions were continuously stirred, and/or air bubbled in most experiments, and exposed to various durations of light exposure. Bulk precipitation rates are not affected by the presence of bacteria although the solution pH and the degree of fluid supersaturation with respect to magnesium carbonates increase due to photosynthesis. Lighter Mg isotopes are preferentially incorporated into the precipitated solids in all experiments. Mg isotope fractionation between the mineral and fluid in the abiotic experiments is identical, within uncertainty, to that measured in cyanobacteria-bearing experiments; measured δ 26Mg ranges from -1.54‰ to -1.16‰ in all experiments. Mg isotope fractionation is also found to be independent of reactive solution pH and Mg, CO 32-, and biomass concentrations. Taken together, these observations suggest that Gloeocapsa sp. cyanobacterium does not appreciably affect magnesium isotope fractionation between aqueous fluid and hydrous magnesium carbonates.

  15. Oxygen isotope fractionation in the vacuum ultraviolet photodissociation of carbon monoxide: Wavelength, pressure and temperature dependency.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakraborty, Subrata; Davis, Ryan; Ahmed, Musahid; Jackson, Teresa L.; Thiemens, Mark H.

    2012-01-03

    Several absorption bands exist in the VUV region of Carbon monoxide (CO). Emission spectra indicate that these bands are all predissociative. An experimental investigation of CO photodissociation by vacuum ultraviolet photons (90 to 108 nm; ~13 to 11 eV) from the Advanced Light Source Synchrotron and direct measurement of the associated oxygen isotopic composition of the products are presented here. A wavelength dependency of the oxygen isotopic composition in the photodissociation product was observed. Slope values (δ'{sup 18}O/ δ'{sup 17}O) ranging from 0.76 to 1.32 were observed in oxygen three-isotope space (δ'{sup 18}O vs. δ'{sup 17}O) which correlated with increasing synchrotron photon energy, and indicate a dependency of the upper electronic state specific dissociation dynamics (e.g., perturbation and coupling associated with a particular state). An unprecedented magnitude in isotope separation was observed for photodissociation at the 105 and 107 nm synchrotron bands and are found to be associated with accidental predissociation of the vibrational states ({nu} = 0 and 1) of the upper electronic state E{sup 1}Π. For each synchrotron band, a large (few hundred per mil) extent of isotopic fractionation was observed and the range of fractionation is a combination of column density and exposure time. A significant temperature dependency in oxygen isotopic fractionation was observed, indicating a rotational level dependency in the predissociation process.

  16. Variable carbon isotope fractionation expressed by aerobic CH 4-oxidizing bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Templeton, Alexis S.; Chu, Kung-Hui; Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa; Conrad, Mark E.

    2006-04-01

    Carbon isotope fractionation factors reported for aerobic bacterial oxidation of CH 4(α) range from 1.003 to 1.039. In a series of experiments designed to monitor changes in the carbon isotopic fractionation of CH 4 by Type I and Type II methanotrophic bacteria, we found that the magnitude of fractionation was largely due to the first oxidation step catalyzed by methane monooxygenase (MMO). The most important factor that modulates the (α) is the fraction of the total CH 4 oxidized per unit time, which strongly correlates to the cell density of the growth cultures under constant flow conditions. At cell densities of less than 0.1 g/L, fractionation factors greater than 1.03 were observed, whereas at cell densities greater than 0.5 g/L the fractionation factors decreased to as low as 1.002. At low cell densities, low concentrations of MMO limit the amount of CH 4 oxidized, while at higher cell densities, the overall rates of CH 4 oxidation increase sufficiently that diffusion of CH 4 from the gaseous to dissolved state and into the cells is likely the rate-determining step. Thus, the residual CH 4 is more fractionated at low cell densities, when only a small fraction of the total CH 4 has been oxidized, than at high cell densities, when up to 40% of the influent CH 4 has been utilized. Therefore, since Rayleigh distillation behavior is not observed, δ 13C values of the residual CH 4 cannot be used to infer the amount oxidized in either laboratory or field-studies. The measured (α) was the same for both Type I and Type II methanotrophs expressing particulate or soluble MMO. However, large differences in the δ 13C values of biomass produced by the two types of methanotrophs were observed. Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b (Type II) produced biomass with δ 13C values about 15‰ higher than the dissimilated CO 2, whereas Methylomonas methanica (Type I) produced biomass with δ 13C values only about 6‰ higher than the CO 2. These effects were independent of the

  17. Carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionation by microbial methane oxidation: Improved determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isotope fractionation is a promising tool for quantifying methane oxidation in landfill cover soils. For good quantification an accurate determination of the isotope fractionation factor (α) of methane oxidation based on independent batch experiments with soil samples from the landfill cover is required. Most studies so far used data analysis methods based on approximations of the Rayleigh model to determine α. In this study, the two most common approximations were tested, the simplified Rayleigh approach and the Coleman method. To do this, the original model of Rayleigh was described in measurable variables, methane concentration and isotopic abundances, and fitted to batch oxidation data by means of a weighted non-linear errors-in-variables regression technique. The results of this technique were used as a benchmark to which the results of the two conventional approximations were compared. Three types of batch data were used: simulated data, data obtained from the literature, and data obtained from new batch experiments conducted in our laboratory. The Coleman approximation was shown to be acceptable but not recommended for carbon fractionation (error on α - 1 up to 5%) and unacceptable for hydrogen fractionation (error up to 20%). The difference between the simplified Rayleigh approach and the exact Rayleigh model is much smaller for both carbon and hydrogen fractionation (error on α - 1 13C, or D, were developed for the validity of the simplified Rayleigh approach when using labelled compounds

  18. Effect of Different Carbon Substrates on Nitrate Stable Isotope Fractionation During Microbial Denitrification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wunderlich, Anja; Meckenstock, Rainer; Einsiedl, Florian

    2012-01-01

    .1 ± 0.8‰; ε18O, −23.7 ± 1.8‰ to −19.9 ± 0.8‰). The observed isotope effects did not depend on the growth kinetics which were similar for the three types of electron donors. We suggest that different carbon sources change the observed isotope enrichment factors by changing the relative kinetics of......-labeled water and 18O-labeled nitrite were added to the microcosm experiments to study the effect of putative backward reactions of nitrite to nitrate on the stable isotope fractionation. We found no evidence for a reverse reaction. Significant variations of the stable isotope enrichment factor ε were observed...

  19. Stable carbon isotope fractionation during the biodegradation of lambda-cyhalothrin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, the microbial degradation of lambda-cyhalothrin in soil was investigated using compound-specific stable isotope analysis. The results revealed that lambda-cyhalothrin was biodegraded in soil under laboratory conditions. The half-lives of lambda-cyhalothrin were determined to be 49 and 161 days in non-sterile and sterile soils spiked with 2 mg/kg lambda-cyhalothrin and 84 and 154 days in non-sterile and sterile soils spiked with 10 mg/kg lambda-cyhalothrin, respectively. The biodegradation of lambda-cyhalothrin resulted in carbon isotope fractionation, which shifted from − 29.0‰ to − 26.5‰ in soil spiked with 2 mg/kg lambda-cyhalothrin, and to − 27.5‰ with 10 mg/kg lambda-cyhalothrin. A relationship was established between the stable carbon isotope fraction and the residual concentrations of lambda-cyhalothrin by the Rayleigh equation in which the carbon isotope enrichment factor ε of the microbial degradation of lambda-cyhalothrin in the soil was calculated as − 2.53‰. This study provides an approach to quantitatively evaluate the biodegradation of lambda-cyhalothrin in soil in field studies. - Highlights: • Abiotic and biotic degradation of lambda-cyhalothrin were observed in soil. • Biodegradation of lambda-cyhalothrin was evaluated by CSIA. • Biodegradation of lambda-cyhalothrin leads to carbon isotope fractionation. • An enrichment factor ε of lambda-cyhalothrin was determined as − 2.53‰

  20. Stable carbon isotope fractionation during the biodegradation of lambda-cyhalothrin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Xiaoli [MOE Key Laboratory of Environmental Remediation and Ecosystem Health, College of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Department of Environmental Engineering, Quzhou University, Quzhou 324000 (China); Xu, Zemin [MOE Key Laboratory of Environmental Remediation and Ecosystem Health, College of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Zhang, Xichang [Laboratory for Teaching in Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Yang, Fangxing, E-mail: fxyang@zju.edu.cn [MOE Key Laboratory of Environmental Remediation and Ecosystem Health, College of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Department of Effect-Directed Analysis, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research — UFZ, Leipzig 04318 (Germany)

    2015-11-01

    In this study, the microbial degradation of lambda-cyhalothrin in soil was investigated using compound-specific stable isotope analysis. The results revealed that lambda-cyhalothrin was biodegraded in soil under laboratory conditions. The half-lives of lambda-cyhalothrin were determined to be 49 and 161 days in non-sterile and sterile soils spiked with 2 mg/kg lambda-cyhalothrin and 84 and 154 days in non-sterile and sterile soils spiked with 10 mg/kg lambda-cyhalothrin, respectively. The biodegradation of lambda-cyhalothrin resulted in carbon isotope fractionation, which shifted from − 29.0‰ to − 26.5‰ in soil spiked with 2 mg/kg lambda-cyhalothrin, and to − 27.5‰ with 10 mg/kg lambda-cyhalothrin. A relationship was established between the stable carbon isotope fraction and the residual concentrations of lambda-cyhalothrin by the Rayleigh equation in which the carbon isotope enrichment factor ε of the microbial degradation of lambda-cyhalothrin in the soil was calculated as − 2.53‰. This study provides an approach to quantitatively evaluate the biodegradation of lambda-cyhalothrin in soil in field studies. - Highlights: • Abiotic and biotic degradation of lambda-cyhalothrin were observed in soil. • Biodegradation of lambda-cyhalothrin was evaluated by CSIA. • Biodegradation of lambda-cyhalothrin leads to carbon isotope fractionation. • An enrichment factor ε of lambda-cyhalothrin was determined as − 2.53‰.

  1. Stable carbon isotope fractionation during the biodegradation of lambda-cyhalothrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xiaoli; Xu, Zemin; Zhang, Xichang; Yang, Fangxing

    2015-11-01

    In this study, the microbial degradation of lambda-cyhalothrin in soil was investigated using compound-specific stable isotope analysis. The results revealed that lambda-cyhalothrin was biodegraded in soil under laboratory conditions. The half-lives of lambda-cyhalothrin were determined to be 49 and 161 days in non-sterile and sterile soils spiked with 2mg/kg lambda-cyhalothrin and 84 and 154 days in non-sterile and sterile soils spiked with 10mg/kg lambda-cyhalothrin, respectively. The biodegradation of lambda-cyhalothrin resulted in carbon isotope fractionation, which shifted from -29.0‰ to -26.5‰ in soil spiked with 2mg/kg lambda-cyhalothrin, and to -27.5‰ with 10mg/kg lambda-cyhalothrin. A relationship was established between the stable carbon isotope fraction and the residual concentrations of lambda-cyhalothrin by the Rayleigh equation in which the carbon isotope enrichment factor ε of the microbial degradation of lambda-cyhalothrin in the soil was calculated as -2.53‰. This study provides an approach to quantitatively evaluate the biodegradation of lambda-cyhalothrin in soil in field studies. PMID:26092290

  2. Improved quantification of microbial CH4 oxidation efficiency in arctic wetland soils using carbon isotope fractionation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Preuss

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Permafrost-affected tundra soils are significant sources of the climate-relevant trace gas methane (CH4. The observed accelerated warming of the arctic will cause deeper permafrost thawing, followed by increased carbon mineralization and CH4 formation in water-saturated tundra soils, thus creating a positive feedback to climate change. Aerobic CH4 oxidation is regarded as the key process reducing CH4 emissions from wetlands, but quantification of turnover rates has remained difficult so far. The application of carbon stable isotope fractionation enables the in situ quantification of CH4 oxidation efficiency in arctic wetland soils. The aim of the current study is to quantify CH4 oxidation efficiency in permafrost-affected tundra soils in Russia's Lena River delta based on stable isotope signatures of CH4. Therefore, depth profiles of CH4 concentrations and δ13CH4 signatures were measured and the fractionation factors for the processes of oxidation (αox and diffusion (αdiff were determined. Most previous studies employing stable isotope fractionation for the quantification of CH4 oxidation in soils of other habitats (such as landfill cover soils have assumed a gas transport dominated by advection (αtrans = 1. In tundra soils, however, diffusion is the main gas transport mechanism and diffusive stable isotope fractionation should be considered alongside oxidative fractionation. For the first time, the stable isotope fractionation of CH4 diffusion through water-saturated soils was determined with an αdiff = 1.001 ± 0.000 (n = 3. CH4 stable isotope fractionation during diffusion through air-filled pores of the investigated polygonal tundra soils was αdiff = 1.013 ± 0.003 (n = 18. Furthermore, it was found that αox differs widely between sites and horizons (mean αox = 1.017 ± 0.009 and needs to be determined on a case by case basis. The impact of both fractionation factors on the quantification of CH4 oxidation was analyzed by

  3. Improved quantification of microbial CH4 oxidation efficiency in Arctic wetland soils using carbon isotope fractionation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.-M. Pfeiffer

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Permafrost-affected tundra soils are significant sources of the climate-relevant trace gas methane (CH4. The observed accelerated warming of the Arctic will cause a deeper permafrost thawing followed by increased carbon mineralization and CH4 formation in water saturated tundra soils which might cause a positive feedback to climate change. Aerobic CH4 oxidation is regarded as the key process reducing CH4 emissions from wetlands, but quantification of turnover rates has remained difficult so far. The application of carbon stable isotope fractionation enables the in situ quantification of CH4 oxidation efficiency in arctic wetland soils. The aim of the current study is to quantify CH4 oxidation efficiency in permafrost-affected tundra soils in Russia's Lena River Delta based on stable isotope signatures of CH4. Therefore, depth profiles of CH4 concentrations and δ13CH4-signatures were measured and the fractionation factors for the processes of oxidation (αox and diffusion (αdiff were determined. Most previous studies employing stable isotope fractionation for the quantification of CH4 oxidation in soils of other habitats (e.g. landfill cover soils have assumed a gas transport dominated by advection (αtrans = 1. In tundra soils, however, diffusion is the main gas transport mechanism, aside from ebullition. Hence, diffusive stable isotope fractionation has to be considered. For the first time, the stable isotope fractionation of CH4 diffusion through water-saturated soils was determined with an αdiff = 1.001 ± 0.000 (n = 3. CH4 stable isotope fractionation during diffusion through air-filled pores of the investigated polygonal tundra soils was αdiff = 1.013 ± 0.003 (n = 18. Furthermore, it was found that αox differs widely between sites and horizons (mean αox, = 1.017 ± 0.009 and needs to be determined individually. The impact of both fractionation factors on the quantification of CH4 oxidation was analyzed by considering both the

  4. Compositional and stable carbon isotopic fractionation during non-autocatalytic thermochemical sulfate reduction by gaseous hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Xinyu; Ellis, Geoffrey S.; Ma, Qisheng; Tang, Yongchun

    2014-01-01

    The possibility of autocatalysis during thermochemical sulfate reduction (TSR) by gaseous hydrocarbons was investigated by examination of previously reported laboratory and field data. This reaction was found to be a kinetically controlled non-autocatalytic process, and the apparent lack of autocatalysis is thought to be due to the absence of the required intermediate species. Kinetic parameters for chemical and carbon isotopic fractionations of gaseous hydrocarbons affected by TSR were calculated and found to be consistent with experimentally derived values for TSR involving long-chain hydrocarbons. Model predictions based on these kinetic values indicate that TSR by gaseous hydrocarbon requires high-temperature conditions. The oxidation of C2–5 hydrocarbons by sulfate reduction is accompanied by carbon isotopic fractionation with the residual C2–5 hydrocarbons becoming more enriched in 13C. Kinetic parameters were calculated for the stable carbon isotopic fractionation of gaseous hydrocarbons that have experienced TSR. Model predictions based on these kinetics indicate that it may be difficult to distinguish the effects of TSR from those of thermal maturation at lower levels of hydrocarbon oxidation; however, unusually heavy δ13C2+ values (>−10‰) can be diagnostic of high levels of conversion (>50%). Stoichiometric and stable carbon isotopic data show that methane is stable under the investigated reaction conditions and is likely a product of TSR by other gaseous hydrocarbons rather than a significant reactant. These results indicate that the overall TSR reaction mechanism for oxidation of organic substrates containing long-chain hydrocarbons involves three distinct phases as follows: (1) an initial slow and non-autocatalytic stage characterized by the reduction of reactive sulfate by long-chain saturated hydrocarbons; (2) a second autocatalytic reaction phase dominated by reactions involving reduced sulfur species and partially oxidized hydrocarbons; (3

  5. Carbon Isotope Fractionations Associated with Methanotrophic Growth with the Soluble and Particulate Methane Monooxygenases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahnke, Linda L.; Summons, Roger E.; Chang, Sherwood (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Growth experiments with the RuMP-type methanotroph, Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath), have demonstrated that biomass and lipid biomarkers are significantly depleted in C-13 compared to the substrate methane and that the extent of fractionation is dependent on whether cells express the soluble (s) or particulate (p) methane monooxygenase (MMO). The presence or absence of the characteristic sMMO subunits was monitored using SDS-polyacrylamide gels. In M. capsulatus grown with no Cu supplementation, the characteristic sMMO subunits were observed in the soluble fraction throughout the entire growth period and biomass was depleted in C-13 by approximately 14,700 relative to substrate methane. In cells grown with 5uM Cu, no sMMO bands were observed and a greater fractionation of approximately 27,700 in resultant biomass was obtained. Methanol growth experiments with M. capsulatus and with a RuMP methylotroph, Methylophilus methylotrophus, in which biomass measurements yielded depletions in C-13 of 9 and 5%(sub o), respectively, suggest that oxidation of methane is the major fractionation step. Growth of M. capsulatus at a low level of oxygen, approximately 0.5%, had no significant effect on carbon isotope fractionation by either sMMO or pMMO. These observations are significant for identification of molecular biomarkers; and methanotrophic contributions to carbon isotope composition in natural environments.

  6. Carbon isotope fractionation of amino acids in fish muscle reflects biosynthesis and isotopic routing from dietary protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Kelton W; Fogel, Marilyn L; Elsdon, Travis S; Thorrold, Simon R

    2010-09-01

    1. Analysis of stable carbon isotopes is a valuable tool for studies of diet, habitat use and migration. However, significant variability in the degree of trophic fractionation (Delta(13)C(C-D)) between consumer (C) and diet (D) has highlighted our lack of understanding of the biochemical and physiological underpinnings of stable isotope ratios in tissues. 2. An opportunity now exists to increase the specificity of dietary studies by analyzing the delta(13)C values of amino acids (AAs). Common mummichogs (Fundulus heteroclitus, Linnaeus 1766) were reared on four isotopically distinct diets to examine individual AA Delta(13)C(C-D) variability in fish muscle. 3. Modest bulk tissue Delta(13)C(C-D) values reflected relatively large trophic fractionation for many non-essential AAs and little to no fractionation for all essential AAs. 4. Essential AA delta(13)C values were not significantly different between diet and consumer (Delta(13)C(C-D) = 0.0 +/- 0.4 per thousand), making them ideal tracers of carbon sources at the base of the food web. Stable isotope analysis of muscle essential AAs provides a promising tool for dietary reconstruction and identifying baseline delta(13)C values to track animal movement through isotopically distinct food webs. 5. Non-essential AA Delta(13)C(C-D) values showed evidence of both de novo biosynthesis and direct isotopic routing from dietary protein. We attributed patterns in Delta(13)C(C-D) to variability in protein content and AA composition of the diet as well as differential utilization of dietary constituents contributing to the bulk carbon pool. This variability illustrates the complicated nature of metabolism and suggests caution must be taken with the assumptions used to interpret bulk stable isotope data in dietary studies. 6. Our study is the first to investigate the expression of AA Delta(13)C(C-D) values for a marine vertebrate and should provide for significant refinements in studies of diet, habitat use and migration using

  7. Carbon Isotopic Fractionation During Formation of Macromolecular Organic Grain Coatings via FTT Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuth, J. A.; Johnson, N. M.; Elsila-Cook, J.; Kopstein, M.

    2011-01-01

    Observations of carbon isotopic fractionation of various organic compounds found in meteorites may provide useful diagnostic information concerning the environments and mechanisms that were responsible for their formation. Unfortunately, carbon has only two stable isotopes, making interpretation of such observations quite problematic. Chemical reactions can increase or decrease the C-13/C-12 ratio by various amounts, but the final ratio will depend on the total reaction pathway followed from the source carbon to the final product, a path not readily discernable after 4.5 billion years. In 1970 Libby showed that the C-13/C-12 ratios of terrestrial and meteoritic carbon were similar by comparing carbon from the Murchison meteorite to that of terrestrial sediments. More recent studies have shown that the C-13/C-12 ratio of the Earth and meteorites may be considerably enriched in C-13 compared to the ratio observed in the solar wind [2], possibly suggesting that carbon produced via ion-molecule reactions in cold dark clouds could be an important source of terrestrial and meteoritic carbon. However, meteoritic carbon has been subjected to parent body processing that could have resulted in significant changes to the C-13/C-12 ratio originally present while significant variation has been observed in the C-13/C-12 ratio of the same molecule extracted from different terrestrial sources. Again we must conclude that understanding the ratio found in meteorites may be difficult.

  8. Carbon isotope fractionation of 1,1,1-trichloroethane during base-catalyzed persulfate treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchesi, Massimo, E-mail: m2marche@uwaterloo.ca [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada N2L 3G1 (Canada); Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada N2L 3G1 (Canada); Thomson, Neil R. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada N2L 3G1 (Canada); Aravena, Ramon [Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada N2L 3G1 (Canada); Sra, Kanwartej S. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada N2L 3G1 (Canada); Golder Associates Inc, Toronto, Ontario, Canada L5N 5Z7 (Canada); Otero, Neus; Soler, Albert [Departament de Cristal.lographia, Mineralogia i Diposits Minerals, Facultat de Geologia, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain 08028 (Spain)

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: • Treatability and C fractionation of 1,1,1-TCA by base-catalyzed S{sub 2}O{sub 8}{sup 2−} was studied. • The rate of degradation of 1,1,1-TCA increased with a higher OH{sup −}:S{sub 2}O{sub 8}{sup 2−} ratio. •Base-catalyzed S{sub 2}O{sub 8}{sup 2−} can potentially treat recalcitrant compound like 1,1,1-TCA. • An enrichment factor of −7.0‰ independent of the OH{sup −}:S{sub 2}O{sub 8}{sup 2−} ratio was obtained. • Carbon isotope can potentially be used to estimate the ISCO treatment efficacy. -- Abstract: The extent of carbon isotope fractionation during degradation of 1,1,1-trichloroethane (1,1,1-TCA) by a base-catalyzed persulfate (S{sub 2}O{sub 8}{sup 2−}) treatment system was investigated. Significant destruction of 1,1,1-TCA was observed at a pH of ∼12. An increase in the NaOH:S{sub 2}O{sub 8}{sup 2−} molar ratio from 0.2:1 to 8:1 enhanced the reaction rate of 1,1,1-TCA by a factor of ∼5 to yield complete (>99.9%) destruction. An average carbon isotope enrichment fractionation factor which was independent of the NaOH:S{sub 2}O{sub 8}{sup 2−} molar ratio of −7.0 ± 0.2‰ was obtained. This significant carbon isotope fractionation and the lack of dependence on changes in the NaOH:S{sub 2}O{sub 8}{sup 2−} molar ratio demonstrates that carbon isotope analysis can potentially be used in situ as a performance assessment tool to estimate the degradation effectiveness of 1,1,1-TCA by a base-catalyzed persulfate system.

  9. Magnesium isotope fractionation in biogenic and abiogenic carbonates: implications for paleoenvironmental proxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saenger, Casey; Wang, Zhengrong

    2014-04-01

    Geochemical variations in marine biogenic carbonates that are preserved in the geological record serve as proxies of past environmental change. However, interpreting most proxies is complicated by biologically-mediated vital effects, highlighting the need to develop new tools for reconstructing paleoenvironmental change. Recently, magnesium (Mg) isotope variability in carbonates has been explored extensively to determine its utility as a paleoenvironmental proxy. We review the results of these works, which have yielded valuable information on the factors affecting Mg isotope fractionation between carbonates and solution (Δ26Mgcarb-sol) in biogenic and abiogenic carbonate minerals. Strong evidence exists for a mineralogical control on Δ26Mgcarb-sol, with the negative offset from 0‰ following the sequence aragonite ˜3 mol/mol) and saturation states (Ω >˜3) that are similar to seawater suggest that Δ26Mgcarb-sol has a temperature dependence of ˜0.01‰ °C-1 and is insensitive to precipitation rate. In contrast, a significant precipitation rate dependence is observed in calcites precipitated from solutions with relatively low Mg/Ca ratios (precursors, ion attachment/detachment kinetics, surface entrapment and Mg speciation. High-Mg calcite organisms, which likely precipitate from relatively unmodified seawater, also exhibit a temperature dependence of ˜0.01‰ °C-1, albeit sometimes with a systematic offset toward smaller fractionations. In contrast, strong vital effects in low-Mg calcite organisms, which exclude Mg from their calcifying fluids, lead to Δ26Mgcarb-sol values that exhibit no clear temperature dependence and are offset from abiogenic experiments. The majority of biogenic aragonites have Δ26Mgcarb-sol values that are slightly more positive than those in abiogenic experiments, but bivalves and one sclerosponge species can exhibit significantly larger fractionations. Although vital effects and analytical uncertainties will limit Δ26Mgcarb

  10. Carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionation during nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation by Methylomirabilis oxyfera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasigraf, Olivia; Vogt, Carsten; Richnow, Hans-Hermann; Jetten, Mike S. M.; Ettwig, Katharina F.

    2012-07-01

    Anaerobic oxidation of methane coupled to nitrite reduction is a recently discovered methane sink of as yet unknown global significance. The bacteria that have been identified to carry out this process, Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera, oxidize methane via the known aerobic pathway involving the monooxygenase reaction. In contrast to aerobic methanotrophs, oxygen is produced intracellularly and used for the activation of methane by a phylogenetically distinct particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO). Here we report the fractionation factors for carbon and hydrogen during methane oxidation by an enrichment culture of M. oxyfera bacteria. In two separate batch incubation experiments with different absolute biomass and methane contents, the specific methanotrophic activity was similar and the progressive isotope enrichment identical. Headspace methane was consumed up to 98% with rates showing typical first order reaction kinetics. The enrichment factors determined by Rayleigh equations were -29.2 ± 2.6‰ for δ13C (εC) and -227.6 ± 13.5‰ for δ2H (εH), respectively. These enrichment factors were in the upper range of values reported so far for aerobic methanotrophs. In addition, two-dimensional specific isotope analysis (Λ = ( α H - 1 - 1)/( α C - 1 - 1)) was performed and also the determined Λ value of 9.8 was within the range determined for other aerobic and anaerobic methanotrophs. The results showed that in contrast to abiotic processes biological methane oxidation exhibits a narrow range of fractionation factors for carbon and hydrogen irrespective of the underlying biochemical mechanisms. This work will therefore facilitate the correct interpretation of isotopic composition of atmospheric methane with implications for modeling of global carbon fluxes.

  11. Degradation of Perchloroethene by zero-valent iron evaluated by carbon isotope fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitner, Simon; Watzinger, Andrea; Reichenauer, Thomas G.

    2014-05-01

    Perchloroethene (PCE) is a widely spread groundwater contaminant in formally used industrial sites. Zero valent iron (ZVI) is used for in situ chemical reduction (ISCR) of PCE contaminants in the groundwater. A key factor in the application of in situ remediation technologies is a proper monitoring of contaminant reduction. The measurement of the stable isotope ratio is a promising method that is already used for quantifying microbial degradation of chlorinated contaminants. The carbon isotope ratio of PCE, measured by - isotope ratio mass spectrometry coupled to a gas chromatograph via a combustion interface (GC-C-IRMS), increases during degradation of PCE and can be directly related to the degree of degradation. It can be used to directly quantify chemical degradation and thus serves as a useful monitoring tool for groundwater remediation. An experiment to determine the carbon isotopic fractionation factor was performed as a lab experiment using Nanofer Star (NANOIRON). Two different PCE concentrations (c1: 220mgL-1, c2: 110mgL-1) mixed with 0.5 g of ZVI were sealed under deoxygenated conditions in 250 ml glas bottles locked with mininert caps. The bottles were incubated on a shaker for 865 h. Samples were taken weekly to measure the change in the carbon isotopic ratio of PCE as well as its concentration. Results showed a strong increase in the carbon isotope ratio (δ-value) of PCE (start: -27 o end: -4 ), which indicates a significant dechlorination process of PCE. Beside PCE also one degradation product (Trichloroethylene - TCE) was measured. TCE was further dechlorinated as indicated by the δ-value change of TCE from -26 o to -4 oȦn unexpected intermediate value of -45 o for TCE was observed in the experiment. This fluctuation could be induced by the time depending concentration due to degradation and conversation processes. Furthermore, it seems that the progress of the δ-value is affected by the starting concentration of PCE (δ-value of c1 < c2) as

  12. Carbon isotope fractionation of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) due to outgassing of carbon dioxide from a headwater stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doctor, D.H.; Kendall, C.; Sebestyen, S.D.; Shanley, J.B.; Ohte, N.; Boyer, E.W.

    2008-01-01

    The stable isotopic composition of dissolved inorganic carbon (??13C-DIC) was investigated as a potential tracer of streamflow generation processes at the Sleepers River Research Watershed, Vermont, USA. Downstream sampling showed ?? 13C-DIC increased between 3-5??? from the stream source to the outlet weir approximately 0??5 km downstream, concomitant with increasing pH and decreasing PCO2. An increase in ??13C-DIC of 2.4 ?? 0??1??? per log unit decrease of excess PCO2 (stream PCO2 normalized to atmospheric PCO2) was observed from downstream transect data collected during snowmelt. Isotopic fractionation of DIC due to CO2 outgassing rather than exchange with atmospheric CO2 may be the primary cause of increased ?? 13C-DIC values downstream when PCO2 of surface freshwater exceeds twice the atmospheric CO2 concentration. Although CO2 outgassing caused a general increase in stream ??13C-DIC values, points of localized groundwater seepage into the stream were identified by decreases in ??13C-DIC and increases in DIC concentration of the stream water superimposed upon the general downstream trend. In addition, comparison between snowmelt, early spring and summer seasons showed that DIC is flushed from shallow groundwater flowpaths during snowmelt and is replaced by a greater proportion of DIC derived from soil CO2 during the early spring growing season. Thus, in spite of effects from CO2 outgassing, ??13C of DIC can be a useful indicator of groundwater additions to headwater streams and a tracer of carbon dynamics in catchments. Copyright ?? 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Isotopic Fractionation of Mg2+(aq), Ca2+(aq), and Fe2+(aq) with Carbonate Minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rustad, James R.; Casey, William H.; Yin, Qing-Zhu; Bylaska, Eric J.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Bogatko, Stuart A.; Jackson, Virgil E.; Dixon, David A.

    2010-11-15

    Density functional electronic structure calculations are used to compute the equilibrium constant (the isotope fractionation factor) for 26Mg/24Mg and 44Ca/40Ca isotope exchange between carbonate minerals and uncomplexed divalent aquo ions. The most reliable calculations at the B3LYP/6-311++G(2d,2p) level predict equilibrium constants K, reported as 103ln(K) at 25 °C, of -5.3, -1.1, and +1.1 for 26Mg/24Mg exchange between calcite (CaCO3), magnesite (MgCO3), and dolomite (Ca0.5Mg0.5CO3), respectively, and Mg2+(aq), with positive values indicating enrichment in the mineral phase. For 44Ca/40Ca exchange between calcite and Ca2+(aq), the calculations predict values of +1.5 for Ca2+(aq) in six-fold coordination and +4.1 for Ca2+(aq) in seven-fold coordination. We find that the reduced partition function ratios can be reliably computed from systems as small as M(CO3)610- and M2+(H2O)6 embedded in a set of fixed atoms representing the 2nd shell (and greater) coordination environment. We find that the aqueous cluster representing the aquo ion is much more sensitive to improvements in the basis set than the calculations on the mineral systems, and that fractionation factors should be computed using 2 the best possible basis set for the aquo complex, even if the reduced partition function ratio calculated with the same basis set is not available for the mineral system. The new calculations show that the previous discrepancies between theory and experiment for Fe3+-hematite and Fe2+-siderite fractionations arise from an insufficiently accurate reduced partition function ratio for the Fe3+(aq) and Fe2+(aq) species.

  14. The effect of atmospheric CO2 concentration on carbon isotope fractionation in C3 land plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Brian A.; Jahren, A. Hope

    2012-11-01

    Because atmospheric carbon dioxide is the ultimate source of all land-plant carbon, workers have suggested that pCO2 level may exert control over the amount of 13C incorporated into plant tissues. However, experiments growing plants under elevated pCO2 in both chamber and field settings, as well as meta-analyses of ecological and agricultural data, have yielded a wide range of estimates for the effect of pCO2 on the net isotopic discrimination (Δδ13Cp) between plant tissue (δ13Cp) and atmospheric CO2 (δ13CCO2). Because plant stomata respond sensitively to plant water status and simultaneously alter the concentration of pCO2 inside the plant (ci) relative to outside the plant (ca), any experiment that lacks environmental control over water availability across treatments could result in additional isotopic variation sufficient to mask or cancel the direct influence of pCO2 on Δδ13Cp. We present new data from plant growth chambers featuring enhanced dynamic stabilization of moisture availability and relative humidity, in addition to providing constant light, nutrient, δ13CCO2, and pCO2 level for up to four weeks of plant growth. Within these chambers, we grew a total of 191 C3 plants (128 Raphanus sativus plants and 63 Arabidopsis thaliana) across fifteen levels of pCO2 ranging from 370 to 4200 ppm. Three types of plant tissue were harvested and analyzed for carbon isotope value: above-ground tissues, below-ground tissues, and leaf-extracted nC31-alkanes. We observed strong hyperbolic correlations (R ⩾ 0.94) between the pCO2 level and Δδ13Cp for each type of plant tissue analyzed; furthermore the linear relationships previously suggested by experiments across small (10-350 ppm) changes in pCO2 (e.g., 300-310 ppm or 350-700 ppm) closely agree with the amount of fractionation per ppm increase in pCO2 calculated from our hyperbolic relationship. In this way, our work is consistent with, and provides a unifying relationship for, previous work on carbon isotopes

  15. Isotopic Fractionation in Interstellar Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charnley, Steven

    2009-01-01

    Isotopically fractionated material is found in many solar system objects, including meteorites and comets. It is thought, in some cases, to trace interstellar material that was incorporated into the solar sys tem without undergoing significant processing. In this poster, we sho w the results of several models of the nitrogen, oxygen, and carbon f ractionation in proto-stellar cores.

  16. Fractionation behavior of chromium isotopes during coprecipitation with calcium carbonate: Implications for their use as paleoclimatic proxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodler, A.; Sánchez-Pastor, N.; Fernández-Díaz, L.; Frei, R.

    2015-09-01

    Interest in chromium (Cr) isotope incorporation into carbonates arises from the observation that Cr isotopic composition of carbonates could be used as a paleoclimate proxy to elucidate past fluctuations of oxygen contents in atmosphere and hydrosphere. The use of Cr isotopes to track paleoenvironmental changes, for example related to the rise of oxygen during the Archaean and Protoerozoic, needs careful assessment of the signal robustness and necessitates a thorough understanding of the Cr cycle in Earth system processes. We conducted experiments testing the incorporation of chromate into the calcite lattice to investigate isotopic changes facilitated by the coprecipitation process. Our experiments indicate enrichment in Cr concentration in the precipitates compared to the solutions, consistent with previous reports of Cr enrichment in chemical sediments compared to ambient seawater. The fractionation of Cr isotopes during calcium carbonate coprecipitation was assumed to be small, based on previously published data of modern seawater and modern non-skeletal marine carbonates. However, results from this study for rapidly precipitated calcium carbonate in the presence of chromate show a tendency for preferential incorporation of heavy Cr isotopes in the precipitates resulting in increasing relative isotope difference between precipitate and initial solution (Δ53Cr[p-is]) from +0.06‰ to +0.18‰, with increasing initial Cr concentration of the solution. Sample precipitation in the presence of chromate also showed the presence of vaterite. Calcium carbonate crystals were also precipitated in a double diffusion silica hydrogel over a longer period of time resulting in samples consisting of micrometric-millimetric calcite crystals, which were again significantly enriched in heavy Cr isotopes compared to the initial solutions. They average, irrespective of the initial Cr concentration, a relative isotope difference (Δ53Cr[p-is]) of +0.29 ± 0.08‰ (2σ), whereas

  17. Carbon isotopic fractionation in the biosynthesis of bacterial fatty acids. Ozonolysis of unsaturated fatty acids as a means of determining the intramolecular distribution of carbon isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monson, K.D.; Hayes, J.M. (Indiana Univ., Bloomington (USA). Dept. of Chemistry; Indiana Univ., Bloomington (USA). Dept. of Geology)

    1982-02-01

    Methods for the determination of /sup 13/C abundances at individual olefinic carbon positions have been developed, tested, and shown to perform accurately. (1) The double bond is oxidized with ozone; (2) silver oxide is used to cleave the resulting ozonide quantitatively to carboxylic-acid fragments; (3) a modified Schmidt decarboxylation is used to produce CO/sub 2/ quantitatively from the carboxyl groups of the separated cleavage products; and (4) the CO/sub 2/ is utilized for mass spectrometric analysis. The results of intramolecular isotopic analyses are combined with molecular-average isotopic compositions determined by total combustion in order to show that fatty acids biosynthesized by Escherichia coli grown aerobically with glucose as the sole carbon source and harvested at late log phase are depleted by approximately 3 parts per thousand in /sup 13/C relative to the glucose. This fractionation arises in the formation of acetyl-coenzyme A by pyruvate dehydrogenase and is localized at the carboxyl position in the acetyl-CoA product. The isotopic order in that two-carbon subunit is carried through the biosynthesis of fatty acids so that alternate positions in the fatty-acid chains are depleted in /sup 13/C by an amount equal to twice the molecular-average depletion. The kinetic isotope effect at C-2 for pyruvate dehydrogenase in vivo is shown to be approximately 2.3%.

  18. Carbon isotopic fractionation in the biosynthesis of bacterial fatty acids. Ozonolysis of unsaturated fatty acids as a means of determining the intramolecular distribution of carbon isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methods for the determination of 13C abundances at individual olefinic carbon positions have been developed, tested, and shown to perform accurately. (1) The double bond is oxidized with ozone; (2) silver oxide is used to cleave the resulting ozonide quantitatively to carboxylic-acid fragments; (3) a modified Schmidt decarboxylation is used to produce CO2 quantitatively from the carboxyl groups of the separated cleavage products; and (4) the CO2 is utilized for mass spectrometric analysis. The results of intramolecular isotopic analyses are combined with molecular-average isotopic compositions determined by total combustion in order to show that fatty acids biosynthesized by Escherichia coli grown aerobically with glucose as the sole carbon source and harvested at late log phase are depleted by approximately 3 parts per thousand in 13C relative to the glucose. This fractionation arises in the formation of acetyl-coenzyme A by pyruvate dehydrogenase and is localized at the carboxyl position in the acetyl-CoA product. The isotopic order in that two-carbon subunit is carried through the biosynthesis of fatty acids so that alternate positions in the fatty-acid chains are depleted in 13C by an amount equal to twice the molecular-average depletion. The kinetic isotope effect at C-2 for pyruvate dehydrogenase in vivo is shown to be approximately 2.3%. (author)

  19. Biochemical hydrogen isotope fractionation during biosynthesis in higher plants reflects carbon metabolism of the plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormier, Marc-André; Kahmen, Ansgar

    2015-04-01

    Compound-specific isotope analyses of plant material are frequently applied to understand the response of plants to the environmental changes. As it is generally assume that the main factors controlling δ2H values in plants are the plant's source water and evaporative deuterium enrichment of leaf water, hydrogen isotope analyses of plant material are mainly applied regarding hydrological conditions at different time scales. However, only few studies have directly addressed the variability of the biochemical hydrogen isotope fractionation occurring during biosynthesis of organic compounds (ɛbio), accounting also for a large part in the δ2H values of plants but generally assumed to be constant. Here we present the results from a climate-controlled growth chambers experiment where tested the sensitivity of ɛbio to different light treatments. The different light treatments were applied to induce different metabolic status (autotrophic vs. heterotrophic) in 9 different plant species that we grew from large storage organs (e.g. tubers or roots). The results show a systematic ɛbio shift (up to 80 ) between the different light treatments for different compounds (i.e. long chain n-alkanes and cellulose). We suggest that this shift is due to the different NADPH pools used by the plants to build up the compounds from stored carbohydrates in heterotrophic or autotrophic conditions. Our results have important implications for the calibration and interpretation of sedimentary and tree rings records in geological studies. In addition, as the δ2H values reflect also strongly the carbon metabolism of the plant, our findings support the idea of δ2H values as an interesting proxy for plant physiological studies.

  20. Isotopic fractionation of Mg 2+(aq), Ca 2+(aq), and Fe 2+(aq) with carbonate minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustad, James R.; Casey, William H.; Yin, Qing-Zhu; Bylaska, Eric J.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Bogatko, Stuart A.; Jackson, Virgil E.; Dixon, David A.

    2010-11-01

    Density-functional electronic structure calculations are used to compute the equilibrium constants for 26Mg/ 24Mg and 44Ca/ 40Ca isotope exchange between carbonate minerals and uncomplexed divalent aquo ions. The most reliable calculations at the B3LYP/6-311++G(2d,2p) level predict equilibrium constants K, reported as 10 3ln ( K) at 25 °C, of -5.3, -1.1, and +1.2 for 26Mg/ 24Mg exchange between calcite (CaCO 3), magnesite (MgCO 3), and dolomite (Ca 0.5Mg 0.5CO 3), respectively, and Mg 2+(aq), with positive values indicating enrichment of the heavy isotope in the mineral phase. For 44Ca/ 40Ca exchange between calcite and Ca 2+(aq) at 25 °C, the calculations predict values of +1.5 for Ca 2+(aq) in 6-fold coordination and +4.1 for Ca 2+(aq) in 7-fold coordination. We find that the reduced partition function ratios can be reliably computed from systems as small as M(CO)610- and M(HO)62+ embedded in a set of fixed atoms representing the second-shell (and greater) coordination environment. We find that the aqueous cluster representing the aquo ion is much more sensitive to improvements in the basis set than the calculations on the mineral systems, and that fractionation factors should be computed using the best possible basis set for the aquo complex, even if the reduced partition function ratio calculated with the same basis set is not available for the mineral system. The new calculations show that the previous discrepancies between theory and experiment for Fe 3+-hematite and Fe 2+-siderite fractionations arise from an insufficiently accurate reduced partition function ratio for the Fe 3+(aq) and Fe 2+(aq) species.

  1. Radiocarbon and stable carbon isotope compositions of chemically fractionated soil organic matter in a temperate-zone forest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To better understand the role of soil organic matter in terrestrial carbon cycle, carbon isotope compositions in soil samples from a temperate-zone forest were measured for bulk, acid-insoluble and base-insoluble organic matter fractions separated by a chemical fractionation method. The measurements also made it possible to estimate indirectly radiocarbon (14C) abundances of acid- and base-soluble organic matter fractions, through a mass balance of carbon among the fractions. The depth profiles of 14C abundances showed that (1) bomb-derived 14C has penetrated the first 16 cm mineral soil at least; (2) Δ14C values of acid-soluble organic matter fraction are considerably higher than those of other fractions; and (3) a significant amount of the bomb-derived 14C has been preserved as the base-soluble organic matter around litter-mineral soil boundary. In contrast, no or little bomb-derived 14C was observed for the base-insoluble fraction in all sampling depths, indicating that this recalcitrant fraction, accounting for approximately 15% of total carbon in this temperate-zone forest soil, plays a role as a long-term sink in the carbon cycle. These results suggest that bulk soil organic matter cannot provide a representative indicator as a source or a sink of carbon in soil, particularly on annual to decadal timescales

  2. Can stable isotope fractionation in diatom and coccolith biominerals elucidate the significance of carbon concentrating mechanisms (CCMs) in the past?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoll, H.; Bolton, C.; Isensee, K.; Mendez-Vicente, A.; Rubio-Ramos, M.; Mejia-Ramirez, L. M.

    2012-04-01

    Carbon isotopic fractionation in fossil algal biomarkers is typically interpreted to reflect atmospheric CO2 changes assuming simple diffusive uptake of CO2 by cells, however modern algae employ a diverse array of additional strategies to concentrate DIC inside the cell (CCMs). We previously hypothesized that the size-correlated range of vital effects in carbonate liths produced by different coccolithophore species was due to variable significance of CCMs in their C acquisition, and that an absence of interspecific vital effects may reflect a reduced importance of CCMs (or more similar CCMs employed). Here, we present stable isotope data from size-separated deep-sea sediments dominated by small, intermediate and large coccoliths from time slices throughout the Cenozoic. We show that the range of coccolith vital effects is distinct during several major Cenozoic proxy-inferred climate-CO2 transitions, and where vital effects are significant their magnitude scales with cell size in the same sense as modern culture genera (increasing C and O isotope enrichment with decreasing coccolith size). Our new culture experiments with coccolithophorids reveal strong plasticity in the magnitude of stable carbon isotope vital effects in coccoliths of Calcidiscus leptoporus and Emiliania huxleyi with variable CO2. At high CO2 coccoliths of both species are more isotopically enriched, but the magnitude is greater in C. leptoporus leading to reduced interspecific offsets at high CO2. In the case of E. huxleyi, higher CO2 conditions resulted in significant reduction in the magnitude of DIC accumulation in the intracellular carbon pool, and more positive carbon isotopic values inside the particulate organic matter. A model of carbon acquisition incorporating both photosynthetic and carbonate production is used to explore mechanisms for these relationships. We also investigate fractionation in diatom organic matter and diatom biomineral-bound organic matter. While the carbon isotopic

  3. Carnivore specific bone bioapatite and collagen carbon isotope fractionations: Case studies of modern and fossil grey wolf populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox-Dobbs, K.; Wheatley, P. V.; Koch, P. L.

    2006-12-01

    Stable isotope analyses of modern and fossil biogenic tissues are routinely used to reconstruct present and past vertebrate foodwebs. Accurate isotopic dietary reconstructions require a consumer and tissue specific understanding of how isotopes are sorted, or fractionated, between trophic levels. In this project we address the need for carnivore specific isotope variables derived from populations that are ecologically well- characterized. Specifically, we investigate the trophic difference in carbon isotope values between mammalian carnivore (wolf) bone bioapatite and herbivore (prey) bone bioapatite. We also compare bone bioapatite and collagen carbon isotope values collected from the same individuals. We analyzed bone specimens from two modern North American grey wolf (Canis lupus) populations (Isle Royale National Park, Michigan and Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming), and the ungulate herbivores that are their primary prey (moose and elk, respectively). Because the diets of both wolf populations are essentially restricted to a single prey species, there were no confounding effects due to carnivore diet variability. We measured a trophic difference of approximately -1.3 permil between carnivore (lower value) and herbivore (higher value) bone bioapatite carbon isotope values, and an average inter-tissue difference of 5.1 permil between carnivore bone collagen (lower value) and bioapatite (higher value) carbon isotope values. Both of these isotopic differences differ from previous estimates derived from a suite of African carnivores; our carnivore-herbivore bone bioapatite carbon isotope spacing is smaller (-1.3 vs. -4.0 permil), and our carnivore collagen-bioapatite carbon difference is larger (5.1 vs. 3.0 permil). These discrepancies likely result from comparing values measured from a single hypercarnivore (wolf) to average values calculated from several carnivore species, some of which are insectivorous or partly omnivorous. The trophic and inter

  4. Canopy-scale kinetic fractionation of atmospheric carbon dioxide and water vapour isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    The isotopic fluxes of carbon dioxide (CO2) and water vapour (H2O) between the atmosphere and terrestrial plants provide powerful constraints on carbon sequestration on land 1-2, changes in vegetation cover 3 and the Earth’s Dole effect 4. Past studies, relying mainly on leaf-scale observations, hav...

  5. Simulation Experiments on the Reaction of CH4-CaSO4 and Its Carbon Kinetic Isotope Fractionation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YueChangtao; LiShuyuan; DingKangle; ZhongNingning

    2005-01-01

    Thermochemical sulfate reduction (TSR) in geological deposits can account for the accumulation of H,S in deep sour gas reservoirs. In this paper, thermal simulation experiments on the reaction of CH4-CaSO4 were carried out using an autoclave at high temperatures and high pressures. The products were characterized with analytical methods including carbon isotope analysis. It is found that the reaction can proceed to produce H2S, H2O and CaCO3 as the main products. Based on the experimental results, the carbon kinetic isotope fractionation was investigated, and the value of Ki(kinetic isotope effect) was calculated. The results obtained in this paper can provide useful information to explain the occurrence of H2S in deep carbonate gas reservoirs.

  6. Methane-producing bacteria - Natural fractionations of the stable carbon isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Games, L. M.; Hayes, J. M.; Gunsalus, R. P.

    1978-01-01

    Procedures for determining the C-13/C-12 fractionation factors for methane-producing bacteria are described, and the fractionation factors (CO2/CH4) for the reduction of CO2 to CH4 by pure cultures are 1.045 for Methanosarcina barkeri at 40 C, 1.061 for Methanobacterium strain M.o.H. at 40 C, and 1.025 for Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum at 65 C. The data are consistent with the field determinations if fractionation by acetate dissimilation approximates fractionations observed in natural environments. In other words, the acetic acid used by acetate dissimilating bacteria, if they play an important role in natural methane production, must have an intramolecular isotopic fractionation (CO2H/CH3) approximating the observed CO2/CH4 fractionation.

  7. Stable carbon isotope fractionation in pollen of Atlas cedar: first steps towards a new palaeoecological proxy for Northwest Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Benjamin; Fletcher, William; Ryan, Peter; Grant, Helen; Ilmen, Rachid

    2016-04-01

    Analysis of stable carbon isotopes can provide information on climate and the environmental conditions at different growth stages of the plant, both past and present. Carbon isotope discrimination in plant tissue is already well understood, and can be used as a drought stress indicator for semi-arid regions. Stable carbon isotope ratios measured directly on pollen provides the potential for the development of long-term environmental proxies (spanning thousands of years), as pollen is well preserved in the environment. Atlas Cedar (Cedrus atlantica Endl. Manetti ex Carrière), is an ideal test case to develop a pollen stable carbon isotope proxy. The tree grows across a wide altitudinal and climatic range and is extremely sensitive to moisture availability. The pollen is abundant, and easily identifiable to the species level in pollen analysis because different cedar species are geographically confined to different regions of the world. In 2015 we sampled 76 individual cedar trees across latitudinal, altitudinal and environmental gradients, highly focused on the Middle Atlas region of Morocco, with 25 additional samples from botanical gardens across Europe and the US to extend these gradients. Here, we report new stable carbon isotope data from pollen, leaf and stem wood from these samples with a view to assessing and quantifying species-specific fractionation effects associated with pollen production. The isotopic response of individual trees at local and wider geographical scales to altitude and climatic conditions is presented. This research forms part of an ongoing PhD project working to develop and calibrate a modern carbon isotope proxy in Atlas cedar pollen, which can ultimately be applied to fossil sequences and complement existing multi-proxy records (e.g. pollen analysis in lake sediments, tree-rings).

  8. Natural fractionation of uranium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The topic of this thesis was the investigation of U (n(238U) / n(235U)) isotope variations in nature with a focus on samples (1) that represent the continental crust and its weathering products (i.e. granites, shales and river water) (2) that represent products of hydrothermal alteration on mid-ocean ridges (i.e. altered basalts, carbonate veins and hydrothermal water) and (3) from restricted euxinic basins (i.e. from the water column and respective sediments). The overall goal was to explore the environmental conditions and unravel the mechanisms that fractionate the two most abundant U isotopes, n(238U) and n(235U), on Earth.

  9. Fractionation of carbon isotopes in biosynthesis of fatty acids by a piezophilic bacterium Moritella japonica strain DSK1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jiasong; Uhle, Maria; Billmark, Kaycie; Bartlett, Douglas H.; Kato, Chaki

    2006-04-01

    We examined stable carbon isotope fractionation in biosynthesis of fatty acids of a piezophilic bacterium Moritella japonica strain DSK1. The bacterium was grown to stationary phase at pressures of 0.1, 10, 20, and 50 MPa in media prepared using sterile-filtered natural seawater supplied with glucose as the sole carbon source. Strain DSK1 synthesized typical bacterial fatty acids (C 14-19 saturated, monounsaturated, and cyclopropane fatty acids) as well as long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) (20:6 ω3). Bacterial cell biomass and individual fatty acids exhibited consistent pressure-dependent carbon isotope fractionations relative to glucose. The observed Δδ FA-glucose (-1.0‰ to -11.9‰) at 0.1 MPa was comparable to or slightly higher than fractionations reported in surface bacteria. However, bulk biomass and fatty acids became more depleted in 13C with pressure. Average carbon isotope fractionation (Δδ FA-glucose) at high pressures was much higher than that for surface bacteria: -15.7‰, -15.3‰, and -18.3‰ at 10, 20, and 50 MPa, respectively. PUFA were more 13C depleted than saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids at all pressures. The observed isotope effects may be ascribed to the kinetics of enzymatic reactions that are affected by hydrostatic pressure and to biosynthetic pathways that are different for short-chain and long-chain fatty acids. A simple quantitative calculation suggests that in situ piezophilic bacterial contribution of polyunsaturated fatty acids to marine sediments is nearly two orders of magnitude higher than that of marine phytoplankton and that the carbon isotope imprint of piezophilic bacteria can override that of surface phytoplankton. Our results have important implications for marine biogeochemistry. Depleted fatty acids reported in marine sediments and the water column may be derived simply from piezophilic bacteria resynthesis of organic matter, not from bacterial utilization of a 13C-depleted carbon source (i

  10. Carbon isotopic fractionation in lipids from methanotrophic bacteria: relevance for interpretation of the geochemical record of biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summons, R. E.; Jahnke, L. L.; Roksandic, Z.

    1994-01-01

    Experiments with cultured aerobic methane oxidising bacteria confirm that their biomarker lipids will be significantly depleted in 13C compared to the substrate. The methanotrophic bacteria Methylococcus capsulatus and Methylomonas methanica, grown on methane and using the RuMP cycle for carbon assimilation, show maximum 13C fractionation of approximately 30% in the resultant biomass. In M. capsulatus, the maximum fractionation is observed in the earliest part of the exponential growth stage and decreases to approximately 16% as cells approach stationary phase. This change may be associated with a shift from the particulate form to the soluble form of the methane monooxygenase enzyme. Less than maximum fractionation is observed when cells are grown with reduced methane availability. Biomass of M. capsulatus grown on methanol was depleted by 9% compared to the substrate. Additional strong 13C fractionation takes place during polyisoprenoid biosynthesis in methanotrophs. The delta 13C values of individual hopanoid and steroid biomarkers produced by these organisms were as much as l0% more negative than total biomass. In individual cultures, squalene was 13C-enriched by as much as 14% compared to the triterpane skeleton of bacteriohopaneaminopentol. Much of the isotopic dispersion in lipid metabolites could be attributed to shifts in their relative abundances, combined with an overall reduction in fractionation during the growth cycle. In cells grown on methanol, where there was no apparent effect of growth stage on overall fractionation there were still significant isotopic differences between closely related lipids including a 5.3% difference between the hopane and 3 beta-methylhopane skeletons. Hopane and sterane polyisoprenoids were also 13C-depleted compared to fatty acids. These observations have significant implications for the interpretation of specific compound isotopic signatures now being measured for hydrocarbons and other lipids present in sediments and

  11. Carbon isotopic fractionation in lipids from methanotrophic bacteria: Relevance for interpretation of the geochemical record of biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summons, Roger E.; Jahnke, Linda L.; Roksandic, Zarko

    1994-07-01

    Experiments with cultured aerobic methane oxidising bacteria confirm that their biomarker lipids will be significantly depleted in 13C compared to the substrate. The methanotrophic bacteria Methylococcus capsulatus and Methylomonas methanica, grown on methane and using the RuMP cycle for carbon assimilation, show maximum 13C fractionation of approximately 30%. in the resultant biomass. In M. capsulatus, the maximum fractionation is observed in the earliest part of the exponential growth stage and decreases to approximately 16%. as cells approach stationary phase. This change may be associated with a shift from the particulate form to the soluble form of the methane monooxygenase enzyme. Less than maximum fractionation is observed when cells are grown with reduced methane availability. Biomass of M. capsulatus grown on methanol was depleted by 9%. compared to the substrate. Additional strong 13C fractionation takes place during polyisoprenoid biosynthesis in methanotrophs. The δ13C values of individual hopanoid and steroid biomarkers produced by these organisms were as much as 10%. more negative than total biomass. In individual cultures, squalene was 13C-enriched by as much as 14%. compared to the triterpane skeleton of bacteriohopaneaminopentol. Much of the isotopic dispersion in lipid metabolites could be attributed to shifts in their relative abundances, combined with an overall reduction in fractionation during the growth cycle. In cells grown on methanol, where there was no apparent effect of growth stage on overall fractionation there were still significant isotopic differences between closely related lipids including a 5.3%. difference between the hopane and 3 β-methylhopane skeletons. Hopane and sterane polyisoprenoids were also 13C-depleted compared to fatty acids. These observations have significant implications for the interpretation of specific compound isotopic signatures now being measured for hydrocarbons and other lipids present in sediments and

  12. Carbon isotopic fractionation in lipids from methanotrophic bacteria II: the effects of physiology and environmental parameters on the biosynthesis and isotopic signatures of biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahnke, Linda L.; Summons, Roger E.; Hope, Janet M.; Des Marais, David J.

    1999-01-01

    Controls on the carbon isotopic signatures of methanotroph biomarkers have been further explored using cultured organisms. Growth under conditions which select for the membrane-bound particulate form of the methane monooxygenase enzyme (pMMO) leads to a significantly higher isotopic fractionation than does growth based on the soluble isozyme in both RuMP and serine pathway methanotrophs; in an RuMP type the Δδ 13C biomass equaled -23.9‰ for pMMO and -12.6‰ for sMMO. The distribution of biomarker lipids does not appear to be significantly affected by the dominance of one or the other MMO type and their isotopic compositions generally track those of the parent biomass. The 13C fractionation behaviour of serine pathway methanotrophs is very complex, reflecting the assimilation of both methane and carbon dioxide and concomitant dissimilation of methane-derived carbon. A limitation in CH 4 availability leads to the production of biomass which is 13C-enriched with respect to both carbon substrates and this occurs irrespective of MMO type. This startling result indicates that there must be an additional fractionation step downstream from the MMO reaction which leads to incorporation of 13C-enriched carbon at the expense of dissimilation of 13C-depleted CO 2. In these organisms, polyisoprenoid lipids are 13C-enriched compared to polymethylenic lipid which is the reverse of that found in the RuMP types. Serine cycle hopanoids, for example, can vary anywhere from 12‰ depleted to 10‰ enriched with respect to the CH 4 substrate depending on its concentration. Decrease in growth temperature caused an overall increase in isotopic fractionation. In the total biomass, this effect tended to be masked by physiological factors associated with the type of organism and variation in the bulk composition. The effect was, however, clearly evident when monitoring the 13C signature of total lipid and individual biomarkers. Our results demonstrate that extreme carbon isotopic

  13. The evolution characteristics and fractionation mechanism of carbon isotopes in the process of "multi-stage hydrocarbon generation"

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Yongchang; LIU Wenhui; SHEN Ping; ZHANG Xiaobao; HUANG Difan; SONG Yitao

    2005-01-01

    The Jiyang Sag and the Liaohe Basin are the two important areas where immature oil resources are distributed in China. From these two areas immature-low mature to mature oil samples were collected for carbon isotopic analysis. The extracts of source rocks are dominant in the Jiyang Sag while crude oils are dominant in the Liaohe Basin. The maturity index, R., for source rocks varies from 0.25%(immature) to 0.65% (mature). Studies have shown that within this range of R. values the extracts of source rocks and crude oils, as well as their fraction components, have experienced observable carbon isotope fractionation. The carbon isotopic values tend to increase with burial depth, the oils become from immature-low mature to mature, and the rules of evolution of oils show a three-stage evolution pattern, i. e. ,light→heavy→light→heavy oils. Such variation trend seems to be related to the occurrence of two hydrocarbon-generating processes and the main hydrocarbon-forming materials being correspondingly non-hydrocarbons and possessing MAB characteristics, lower thermodynamic effects and other factors. In the process towards the mature stage, with increasing thermodynamic effects, the thermal degradation of kerogens into oil has become the leading factor, and correspondingly the bond-breaking ratio of 12 C-13C also increases,making the relatively 12C-rich materials at the low mature stage evolve again towards 13C enrichment.

  14. Stable carbon isotope fractionation of trans-1,2-dichloroethylene during co-metabolic degradation by methanotrophic bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brungard, K.L.; Munakata-Marr, J.; Johnson, C.A.; Mandernack, K.W.

    2003-01-01

    Changes in the carbon isotope ratio (??13C) of trans-1,2-dichloroethylene (t-DCE) were measured during its co-metabolic degradation by Methylomonas methanica, a type I methanotroph, and Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b, a type II methanotroph. In closed-vessel incubation experiments with each bacterium, the residual t-DCE became progressively enriched in 13C, indicating isotopic fractionation. From these experiments, the biological fractionation during t-DCE co-metabolism, expressed as ??, was measured to be -3.5??? for the type I culture and -6.7??? for the type II culture. This fractionation effect and subsequent enrichment in the ??13C of the residual t-DCE can thus be applied to determine the extent of biodegradation of DCE by these organisms. Based on these results, isotopic fractionation clearly warrants further study, as measured changes in the ??13C values of chlorinated solvents could ultimately be used to monitor the extent of biodegradation in laboratory or field settings where co-metabolism by methanotrophs occurs. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Stable isotope (C, O) and monovalent cation fractionation upon synthesis of carbonate-bearing hydroxyl apatite (CHAP) via calcite transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böttcher, Michael E.; Schmiedinger, Iris; Wacker, Ulrike; Conrad, Anika C.; Grathoff, Georg; Schmidt, Burkhard; Bahlo, Rainer; Gehlken, Peer-L.; Fiebig, Jens

    2016-04-01

    Carbonate-bearing hydroxyl-apatite (CHAP) is of fundamental and applied interest to the (bio)geochemical, paleontological, medical and material science communities, since it forms the basic mineral phase in human and animal teeth and bones. In addition, it is found in non-biogenic phosphate deposits. The stable isotope and foreign element composition of biogenic CHAP is widely used to estimate the formation conditions. This requires careful experimental calibration under well-defined boundary conditions. Within the DFG project EXCALIBOR, synthesis of carbonate-bearing hydroxyapatite was conducted via the transformation of synthetic calcite powder in aqueous solution as a function of time, pH, and temperature using batch-type experiments. The aqueous solution was analyzed for the carbon isotope composition of dissolved inorganic carbonate (gas irmMS), the oxygen isotope composition of water (LCRDS), and the cationic composition. The solid was characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, micro Raman and FTIR spectroscopy, SEM-EDX, elemental analysis (EA, ICP-OES) and gas irmMS. Temperature was found to significantly impact the transformation rate of calcite to CHAP. Upon complete transformation, CHAP was found to contain up to 5% dwt carbonate, depending on the solution composition (e.g., pH), both incorporated on the A and B type position of the crystal lattice. The oxygen isotope fractionation between water and CHAP decreased with increasing temperature with a tentative slope shallower than those reported in the literature for apatite, calcite or aragonite. In addition, the presence of dissolved NH4+, K+ or Na+ in aqueous solution led to partial incorporation into the CHAP lattice. How these distortions of the crystal lattice may impact stable isotope discrimination is subject of future investigations.

  16. Carbon and nitrogen isotope fractionation of amino acids in an avian marine predator, the gentoo penguin (Pygoscelis papua).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Kelton W; Polito, Michael J; Abel, Stephanie; McCarthy, Matthew D; Thorrold, Simon R

    2015-03-01

    Compound-specific stable isotope analysis (CSIA) of amino acids (AA) has rapidly become a powerful tool in studies of food web architecture, resource use, and biogeochemical cycling. However, applications to avian ecology have been limited because no controlled studies have examined the patterns in AA isotope fractionation in birds. We conducted a controlled CSIA feeding experiment on an avian species, the gentoo penguin (Pygoscelis papua), to examine patterns in individual AA carbon and nitrogen stable isotope fractionation between diet (D) and consumer (C) (Δ(13)CC-D and Δ(15)NC-D, respectively). We found that essential AA δ (13)C values and source AA δ (15)N values in feathers showed minimal trophic fractionation between diet and consumer, providing independent but complimentary archival proxies for primary producers and nitrogen sources respectively, at the base of food webs supporting penguins. Variations in nonessential AA Δ(13)CC-D values reflected differences in macromolecule sources used for biosynthesis (e.g., protein vs. lipids) and provided a metric to assess resource utilization. The avian-specific nitrogen trophic discrimination factor (TDFGlu-Phe = 3.5 ± 0.4‰) that we calculated from the difference in trophic fractionation (Δ(15)NC -D) of glutamic acid and phenylalanine was significantly lower than the conventional literature value of 7.6‰. Trophic positions of five species of wild penguins calculated using a multi-TDFG lu-Phe equation with the avian-specific TDFG lu-Phe value from our experiment provided estimates that were more ecologically realistic than estimates using a single TDFG lu-Phe of 7.6‰ from the previous literature. Our results provide a quantitative, mechanistic framework for the use of CSIA in nonlethal, archival feathers to study the movement and foraging ecology of avian consumers. PMID:25859333

  17. The influence of solution stoichiometry on surface-controlled Ca isotope fractionation during Ca carbonate precipitation from Mono Lake, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, L. C.; Depaolo, D. J.

    2010-12-01

    Precipitation of calcite and aragonite from aqueous solution causes kinetic stable Ca isotope fractionation under conditions where Ca2+ is greatly in excess of CO32-. Research on carbonate mineral growth from low Ca2+:CO32- activity ratio solutions is lacking. Mono Lake, California is a highly alkaline lake with a Ca2+:CO32- activity ratio of 9.6 x 10-4, over five orders of magnitude lower than typical terrestrial fresh and ocean water. Aragonitic tufa towers grow along the lakeshore due to the mixing of lake water and Ca-rich spring water, while fine aragonite particles precipitate directly from the lake water, accumulating on the lake bottom. Variations in the Ca2+:CO32- activity ratio affect calcite growth kinetics and could affect the partitioning of Ca isotopes during carbonate precipitation. However, the relationship between solution stoichiometry, microscopic mineral growth mechanisms and calcium isotope fractionation is poorly understood. We analyzed the Sr and Ca isotopic compositions of a suite of lake water, spring, tufa and lake bottom sediment samples from the Mono Basin. Using the Sr isotope signatures of endmember water sources (pure lake water and shoreline spring water), we determined the compositions of carbonate mineral growth solutions, associated isotope separations (Δ44/40Cas-f = δ44/40Casolid - δ44/40Cafluid) and precipitation rates. While lake bottom aragonite precipitates directly from lake water (Ca2+:CO32- ≈ 10-3), tufa grows from mixed solutions with Ca2+:CO32- activity ratios approaching 10, so carbonate precipitation in Mono Lake spans a four order of magnitude range in solution stoichiometry. At Mono Lake, Δ44/40Cas-f and calculated precipitation rates vary between -0.6±0.15‰ at 1.5×10-9 mol m-2 s-1 for aragonite precipitating from lake water and ~ -1.0±0.15‰ at up to 4×10-8 mol m-2 s-1 for tufa growing from mixed spring and lake water. These values are consistent with fractionation observed during CaCO3 precipitation at

  18. Variability in carbon isotope fractionation of trichloroethene during degradation by persulfate activated with zero-valent iron: Effects of inorganic anions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yunde; Zhou, Aiguo; Gan, Yiqun; Li, Xiaoqian

    2016-04-01

    Stable carbon isotope analysis has the potential to be used for assessing the performance of in situ remediation of organic contaminants. Successful application of this isotope technique requires understanding the magnitude and variability in carbon isotope fractionation associated with the reactions under consideration. This study investigated the influence of inorganic anions (sulfate, bicarbonate, and chloride) on carbon isotope fractionation of trichloroethene (TCE) during its degradation by persulfate activated with zero-valent iron. The results demonstrated that the significant carbon isotope fractionation (enrichment factors ε ranging from -3.4±0.3 to -4.3±0.3‰) was independent on the zero-iron dosage, sulfate concentration, and bicarbonate concentration. However, the ε values (ranging from -7.0±0.4 to -13.6±1.2‰) were dependent on the chloride concentration, indicating that chloride could significantly affect carbon isotope fractionation during TCE degradation by persulfate activated with zero-valent iron. The dependence of ε values on chloride concentration, indicated that TCE degradation mechanisms may be different from the degradation mechanism caused by sulfate radical (SO4(-)). Ignoring the effect of chloride on ε value may cause numerous uncertainties in quantitative assessment of the performance of the in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO). PMID:26784392

  19. Application of δ13C and δ15N isotopic signatures of organic matter fractions sequentially separated from adjacent arable and forest soils to identify carbon stabilization mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Kayler, Z.E.; Kaiser, M; Gessler, A.; Ellerbrock, R. H.; M. Sommer

    2011-01-01

    Identifying the chemical mechanisms behind soil carbon bound in organo-mineral complexes is necessary to determine the degree to which soil organic carbon is stabilized belowground. Analysis of δ13C and δ15N isotopic signatures of stabilized OM fractions along with soil mineral characteristics may yield important information about OM-mineral associations and their processing history. We anlayzed the δ13C and δ15N isotopic signatures from two organic matter (OM) fractio...

  20. On the isotope fractionation of stable carbon by the example of petroleum from the South-German molasse basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A theoretical model is used to try and explain the 13C/12C isotope fractionation between the hydrocarbon groups of petroleum to clarify its origin. Experimentally found isotope fractionations were compared with those assessed by a Galimov approximation method. The results enable one to group the South-German molasse basin petroleum into four regional groups. (HP)

  1. Distribution of lipid biomarkers and carbon isotope fractionation in contrasting trophic environments of the South East Pacific

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Tolosa

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The distribution of lipid biomarkers and their stable carbon isotope composition was investigated on suspended particles from different contrasting trophic environments at six sites in the South East Pacific. High algal biomass with diatom-related lipids (24-methylcholesta-5,24(28-dien-3β-ol, C25 HBI alkenes, C16:4 FA, C20:5 FA was characteristic in the upwelling zone, whereas haptophyte lipids (long-chain (C37-C39 unsaturated ketones were proportionally most abundant in the nutrient-poor settings of the centre of the South Pacific Gyre and on its easter edge. The dinoflagellate–sterol, 4α-23,24-trimethylcholest-22(E-en-3β-ol, was a minor contributor in all of the studied area and the cyanobacteria-hydrocarbon, C17n-alkane, was at maximum in the high nutrient low chlorophyll regime of the subequatorial waters near the Marquesas archipelago.

    The taxonomic and spatial variability of the relationships between carbon photosynthetic fractionation and environmental conditions for four specific algal taxa (diatoms, haptophytes, dinoflagellates and cyanobacteria was also investigated. The carbon isotope fractionation factor (εp of the 24-methylcholesta-5,24(28-dien-3β-ol diatom marker, varied over a range of 16% along the different trophic systems. In contrast, εp of dinoflagellate, cyanobacteria and alkenone markers varied only by 7–10‰. The low fractionation factors and small variations between the different phytoplankton markers measured in the upwelling area likely reveals uniformly high specific growth rates within the four phytoplankton taxa, and/or that transport of inorganic carbon into phytoplankton cells may not only occur by diffusion but also by other carbon concentrating mechanisms (CCM. In contrast, in the oligotrophic zone, i.e. gyre and eastgyre, relatively high εp values, especially for the diatom marker

  2. Different carbon isotope fractionation patterns during the development of phototrophic freshwater and marine biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Staal

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Natural phototrophic biofilms are influenced by a broad array of abiotic and biotic factors and vary over temporal and spatial scales. Different developmental stages can be distinguished and growth rates will vary due to the thickening of the biofilm, which is expected to lead to a limitation of light or mass transport. This study shows that variation in CO2(aq availability leads to a fractionation shift and thereby affects δ13C signatures during biofilm development. For phototrophic freshwater biofilms it was found that the δ13C value became less negative with the thickening of the biofilm, while the opposite trend was found in marine biofilms. Modeling and pH profiling indicated that the trend in the freshwater system was caused by an increase in CO2(aq limitation resulting in an increase of HCO3 as C-source. The opposite trend in the marine system could be explained by a higher heterotrophic biomass and activity causing a higher carbon recycling and thereby lower δ13C values. We conclude that δ13C was more related to the net areal photosynthesis rate and carbon recycling, rather than to the growth rate of the biofilms.

  3. Diet induced differences in carbon isotope fractionation between sirenians and terrestrial ungulates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clementz, M.T.; Koch, P.L.; Beck, C.A.

    2007-01-01

    Carbon isotope differences (??13C) between bioapatite and diet, collagen and diet, and bioapatite and collagen were calculated for four species of sirenians, Dugong dugon (Mu??ller), Trichechus manatus (Linnaeus), Trichechus inunguis (Natterer), and the extinct Hydrodamalis gigas (Zimmerman). Bone and tooth samples were taken from archived materials collected from populations during the mid eighteenth century (H. gigas), between 1978 and 1984 (T. manatus, T. inunguis), and between 1997 and 1999 (D. dugon). Mean ??13C values were compared with those for terrestrial ungulates, carnivores, and six species of carnivorous marine mammals (cetaceans = 1; pinnipeds = 4; mustelids = 1). Significant differences in mean ??13C values among species for all tissue types were detected that separated species or populations foraging on freshwater plants or attached marine macroalgae (??13C values -4???; ??13Cbioapatite-diet ???11???). Likewise, ??13Cbioapatite-collagen values for freshwater and algal-foraging species (???7???) were greater than those for seagrass-foraging species (???5???). Variation in ??13C values calculated between tissues and between tissues and diet among species may relate to the nutritional composition of a species' diet and the extent and type of microbial fermentation that occurs during digestion of different types of plants. These results highlight the complications that can arise when making dietary interpretations without having first determined species-specific ??13Ctissue-diet values. ?? 2007 Springer-Verlag.

  4. Dissolved inorganic carbon evolution and stable carbon isotope fractionation in acid mine drainage contaminated streams: Insights from a laboratory study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samples of groundwater, spring water and stream water contaminated by acid mine drainage (AMD), and uncontaminated stream water were collected and allowed to evolve in contact with air in the laboratory for 15-88 days. The objective of this study was to (1) document temporal changes in dissolved inorganic C (DIC) concentrations and stable isotopic composition (δ13CDIC) and (2) to determine the reaction mechanism and resulting isotopic fractionation (13C/12C) accompanying the chemical evolution of AMD. The contaminated spring and stream samples and one groundwater sample (with no HCO3-) showed temporal decreases in pH, Fe2+, alkalinity, and DIC, and enrichment in δ13CDIC. One contaminated groundwater sample (with HCO3- between 529 and 630 mg/L) showed a temporal increase in pH despite observed decreases in Fe2+, alkalinity and DIC, and enrichment in δ13CDIC. The uncontaminated stream samples showed a continuous temporal increase in pH, relatively constant alkalinity and DIC, and enrichment in δ13CDIC. The results suggest that proton production related to Fe2+ transformation is the driving force for DIC loss in AMD-contaminated samples, and that DIC loss can be described by first order kinetics. The C isotope enrichment rates associated with DIC loss in the contaminated samples varied between 1.0 per mille and 1.8 per mille for stream water, 2.1 per mille and 2.6 per mille for the spring, 1.0 per mille and 1.2 per mille for groundwater with no HCO3-, and 7.6 per mille and 9.3 per mille for groundwater with high HCO3-. Variations in 13C enrichment in the contaminated samples are attributed to differences in the initial Fe2+:HCO3- ratio. The effect of proton production on 13C enrichment in the AMD-contaminated samples was modeled as a Rayleigh-type distillation, whereby isotope fractionation was constant and occurred in an 'equilibrium closed system'. In the uncontaminated stream samples, C exchange between DIC and atmospheric CO2 resulted in an overall enrichment

  5. Temperature dependence of oxygen- and clumped isotope fractionation in carbonates: A study of travertines and tufas in the 6-95 °C temperature range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kele, Sándor; Breitenbach, Sebastian F. M.; Capezzuoli, Enrico; Meckler, A. Nele; Ziegler, Martin; Millan, Isabel M.; Kluge, Tobias; Deák, József; Hanselmann, Kurt; John, Cédric M.; Yan, Hao; Liu, Zaihua; Bernasconi, Stefano M.

    2015-11-01

    Conventional carbonate-water oxygen isotope thermometry and the more recently developed clumped isotope thermometer have been widely used for the reconstruction of paleotemperatures from a variety of carbonate materials. In spite of a large number of studies, however, there are still large uncertainties in both δ18O- and Δ47-based temperature calibrations. For this reason there is a need to better understand the controls on isotope fractionation especially on natural carbonates. In this study we analyzed oxygen, carbon and clumped isotopes of a unique set of modern calcitic and aragonitic travertines, tufa and cave deposits from natural springs and wells. Together these samples cover a temperature range from 6 to 95 °C. Travertine samples were collected close to the vents of the springs and from pools, and tufa samples were collected from karstic creeks and a cave. The majority of our vent and pool travertines and tufa samples show a carbonate-water oxygen isotope fractionation comparable to the one of Tremaine et al. (2011) with some samples showing higher fractionations. No significant difference between the calcite-water and aragonite-water oxygen isotope fractionation could be observed. The Δ47 data from the travertines show a strong relationship with temperature and define the regression Δ47 = (0.044 ± 0.005 × 106)/T2 + (0.205 ± 0.047). The pH of the parent solution, mineralogy and precipitation rate do not appear to significantly affect the Δ47-signature of carbonates, compared to the temperature effect and the analytical error. The tufa samples and three biogenic calcites show an excellent fit with the travertine calibration, indicating that this regression can be used for other carbonates as well. This work extends the calibration range of the clumped isotope thermometer to travertine and tufa deposits in the temperature range from 6 °C to 95 °C.

  6. Photo-induced isotopic fractionation

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Charles E.; Yung, Yuk L.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents a systematic method for the analysis of photo-induced isotopic fractionation. The physical basis for this fractionation mechanism centers on the fact that isotopic substitution alters the energy levels, molecular symmetries, spin statistical weights and other fundamental molecular properties, producing spectroscopic signatures distinguishable from that of the parent isotopomer. These mass-dependent physical properties are identical to those invoked by Urey to explain stabl...

  7. Organic fraction of the total carbon burial flux deduced from carbon isotopes across the Permo-Triassic boundary at Meishan,Zhejiang Province,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Junhua; LUO Genming; BAI Xiao; TANG Xinyan

    2007-01-01

    By combining the carbon cycle model with the records of carbonate and organic (kerogen) carbon isotope,this paper presents the calculation of the fraction of organic carbon burial (forg) of beds 23-40 at the global boundary stratotype section and point (GSSP) of the Permian-Triassic boundary at Meishan,Zhejiang Province.The resulting calculation produces two episodes of forg maxima observed to occur at beds 23-24 and 27-29,which respectively corresponds to the two episodic anoxic events indicated by the flourish of green sulfur bacteria.Two episodic forg minima occurred at beds 25-26 and 32-34,generally coincident with the flourish of cyanobacteria (bed 26 and upper part of beds 29 to 34) as shown by the high value of 2-melthyhopnoanes.It appears that the forg is related to the redox conditions,with greater forg values observed under the reductive condition.The relationship between forg and the total organic carbon (TOC) content was complex.The forg value was low at some beds with a high TOC content (such as bed 26),while high observed at some beds with a low TOC content (e.g.bed 27).This association infers the important contribution of primary productivity to the TOC content.The original organic burial could be thus calculated through the configuration of the function of the primary productivity and forg,which can be used to correct the residual TOC measured today.This investigation indicates that compiling the organic-inorganic carbon isotopes with the carbon cycle model favors to understand the fraction of organic carbon burial,providing information for the reconstruction of the coupling among biota,environments and organic burial.

  8. Fractional Absorption of Active Absorbable Algal Calcium (AAACa and Calcium Carbonate Measured by a Dual Stable-Isotope Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven A. Abrams

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available With the use of stable isotopes, this study aimed to compare the bioavailability of active absorbable algal calcium (AAACa, obtained from oyster shell powder heated to a high temperature, with an additional heated seaweed component (Heated Algal Ingredient, HAI, with that of calcium carbonate. In 10 postmenopausal women volunteers aged 59 to 77 years (mean ± S.D., 67 ± 5.3, the fractional calcium absorption of AAACa and CaCO3 was measured by a dual stable isotope method. 44Ca-enriched CaCO3 and AAACa were administered in all subjects one month apart. After a fixed-menu breakfast and pre-test urine collection (Urine 0, 42Ca-enriched CaCl2 was intravenously injected, followed by oral administration of 44Ca-enriched CaCO3 without carrier 15 minutes later, and complete urine collection for the next 24 hours (Urine 24. The fractional calcium absorption was calculated as the ratio of Augmentation of 44Ca from Urine 0 to Urine 24/ augmentation of 42Ca from Urine 0 to Urine 24. Differences and changes of 44Ca and 42Ca were corrected by comparing each with 43Ca. Fractional absorption of AAACa (mean ± S.D., 23.1 ± 6.4, was distinctly and significantly higher than that of CaCO3 (14.7 ± 6.4; p = 0.0060 by paired t-test. The mean fractional absorption was approximately 1.57-times higher for AAACa than for CaCO3. The serum 25(OH vitamin D level was low (mean ± S.D., 14.2 ± 4.95 ng/ml, as is common in this age group in Japan. Among the parameters of the bone and mineral metabolism measured, none displayed a significant correlation with the fractional absorption of CaCO3 and AAACa. Higher fractional absorption of AAACa compared with CaCO3 supports previous reports on the more beneficial effect of AAACa than CaCO3 for osteoporosis.

  9. Carbon isotopes in photosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The efficiency of photosynthesis continues to interest biochemists, biologists, and plant physiologists. Scientists interested in CO2 uptake are concerned about the extent to which the uptake rate is limited by such factors as stomatal diffusion and the chemistry of the CO2 absorption process. The fractionation of carbon isotopes that occurs during photosynthesis is one of the most useful techniques for investigating the efficiency of CO2 uptake

  10. Chromium isotope uptake in carbonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodler, Alexandra

    Chromium (Cr) is a redox sensitive element potentially capable of tracing fine-scale fluctuations of the oxygenation of Earth’s early surface environments and seawater. The Cr isotope composition of carbonates could perhaps be used as paleo-redox proxy to elucidate changes in the geological past....... Processes that potentially fractionate Cr isotopes, perhaps during deposition, burial and alteration need to be constrained.Previous studies have shown that Cr isotopes are fractionated during oxidative weathering on land, where heavy Cr isotopes are preferentially removed with Cr(VI) while residual soils...... retain an isotopically light Cr signature. Cr(VI) enriched in heavy Cr isotopes is then transported via river waters to the oceans and sequestered into marine sediments. Marine chemical sediments such asbanded iron formations and modern marine carbonates have proven useful in recording the Cr isotope...

  11. The Dynamics of Organic Matter in Soil Size and Density Fractions Traced by Stable Carbon Isotopes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘启明; 王世杰; 朴河春; 欧阳自远

    2003-01-01

    On the basis of different photosynthetic pathways, there is an obvious difference in δ 13C values between C3 plants and C4 plants. In terms of this characteristic, we analyzed the δ 13C values in different size and density fractions from two profile-soil samples either in farmland and forestlands near the Maolan Karst virgin forest, Southwest China, where there were developed C3 plants previously and now are C4 plants. Results showed that the δ13 C values of different size fractions in forestland soil are δ13 Ccoarse sand <δ 13 Cfine sand <δ 13 Coarse silt <δ 13 Celay <δ 13Cfine silt, and the δ 13C values of different size fractions in farmland soil are δ13Ccoarse sand >13 Cfine sand >δ 13Coarse silt >δ 13 Cclay >δ 13 Cfine silt, indicating that soil organic matter is fresh in coarse sand and oldest in fine silt. The δ 13C values of different density fractions in forestland soil are δ 13Clight <δ 13Cheavy, and the δ 13C values of different density fractions in farmland soil are δ13 Clight >δ 13 Cheavy, indicating that the soil organic matter is fresh in light fractions and old in heavy fractions .

  12. Quantifying uncertainty of past pCO2 determined from changes in C3 plant carbon isotope fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Ying; Schubert, Brian A.

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of the past concentrations of atmospheric CO2 level (pCO2) is critical to understanding climate sensitivity to changing pCO2. Towards this, a new proxy for pCO2 has been developed based on changes in carbon isotope fractionation (Δ13C) in C3 land plants. The accuracy of this approach has been validated against ice-core pCO2 records, suggesting the potential to apply this proxy to other geological periods; however, no thorough uncertainty assessment of the proxy has been conducted. Here, we first analyze the uncertainty in the model-curve fit through the experimental data using a bootstrap approach. Then, errors of the five input parameters for the proxy are evaluated using sensitivity analysis; these include the carbon isotope composition of atmospheric CO2 (δ13CCO2) and that of the plant material (δ13Corg) for two time periods, a reference time (t = 0) and the time period of interest (t), and the value of pCO2 at time t = 0. We then propagated the errors on the reconstructed pCO2 using a Monte Carlo random sampling approach that combined the uncertainties of the curve fitting and the five inputs for a scenario in which the reference time was the Holocene with a target period for the reconstructed pCO2 during the Cenozoic. We find that the error in the reconstructed pCO2(t) increases with increasing pCO2(t), yet remains stomata, liverwort, and paleosol proxies. The analysis presented here assumes that the paleoenvironment in which the plants grew is unknown and is determined to be the largest source of error in the reconstructed pCO2(t) levels; errors in pCO2(t) could be reduced provided independent determination of the paleoenvironmental conditions at the fossil site.

  13. ISOTOPE FRACTIONATION PROCESS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clewett, G.H.; Lee, DeW.A.

    1958-05-20

    A new method is described for isotopic enrichment of uranium. It has been found that when an aqueous acidic solution of ionic tetravalent uraniunn is contacted with chelate complexed tetravalent uranium, the U/sup 238/ preferentially concentrates in the complexed phase while U/sup 235/ concentrates in the ionic phase. The effect is enhanced when the chelate compound is water insoluble and is dissolved in a water-immiscible organic solvent. Cupferron is one of a number of sultable complexing agents, and chloroform is a suitable organic solvent.

  14. Boron-isotope fractionation in plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naturally-occurring variations in the abundance of stable isotopes of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and other elements in plants have been reported and are now used to understand various physiological processes in plants. Boron (B) isotopic variation in several plant species have been documented, but no determination as to whether plants fractionate the stable isotopes of boron, 11B and 10B, has been made. Here, we report that plants with differing B requirements (wheat, corn and broccoli) fractionated boron. The whole plant was enriched in 11B relative to the nutrient solution, and the leaves were enriched in 10B and the stem in 11B relative to the xylem sap. Although at present, a mechanistic role for boron in plants is uncertain, potential fractionating mechanisms are discussed. (author)

  15. Carbon Isotope Fractionation during Photorespiration and Carboxylation in Senecio1[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanigan, Gary J.; Betson, Nicholas; Griffiths, Howard; Seibt, Ulli

    2008-01-01

    The magnitude of fractionation during photorespiration and the effect on net photosynthetic 13C discrimination (Δ) were investigated for three Senecio species, S. squalidus, S. cineraria, and S. greyii. We determined the contributions of different processes during photosynthesis to Δ by comparing observations (Δobs) with discrimination predicted from gas-exchange measurements (Δpred). Photorespiration rates were manipulated by altering the O2 partial pressure (pO2) in the air surrounding the leaves. Contributions from 13C-depleted photorespiratory CO2 were largest at high pO2. The parameters for photorespiratory fractionation (f), net fractionation during carboxylation by Rubisco and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (b), and mesophyll conductance (gi) were determined simultaneously for all measurements. Instead of using Δobs data to obtain gi and f successively, which requires that b is known, we treated b, f, and gi as unknowns. We propose this as an alternative approach to analyze measurements under field conditions when b and gi are not known or cannot be determined in separate experiments. Good agreement between modeled and observed Δ was achieved with f = 11.6‰ ± 1.5‰, b = 26.0‰ ± 0.3‰, and gi of 0.27 ± 0.01, 0.25 ± 0.01, and 0.22 ± 0.01 mol m−2 s−1 for S. squalidus, S. cineraria, and S. greyii, respectively. We estimate that photorespiratory fractionation decreases Δ by about 1.2‰ on average under field conditions. In addition, diurnal changes in Δ are likely to reflect variations in photorespiration even at the canopy level. Our results emphasize that the effects of photorespiration must be taken into account when partitioning net CO2 exchange of ecosystems into gross fluxes of photosynthesis and respiration. PMID:18923019

  16. Carbon, hydrogen, and nitrogen isotope fractionation associated with oxidative transformation of substituted aromatic N-alkyl amines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skarpeli-Liati, Marita; Pati, Sarah G; Bolotin, Jakov; Eustis, Soren N; Hofstetter, Thomas B

    2012-07-01

    We investigated the mechanisms and isotope effects associated with the N-dealkylation and N-atom oxidation of substituted N-methyl- and N,N-dimethylanilines to identify isotope fractionation trends for the assessment of oxidations of aromatic N-alkyl moieties by compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA). In laboratory batch model systems, we determined the C, H, and N isotope enrichment factors for the oxidation by MnO(2) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP), derived apparent (13)C-, (2)H-, and (15)N-kinetic isotope effects (AKIEs), and characterized reaction products. The N-atom oxidation pathway leading to radical coupling products typically exhibited inverse (15)N-AKIEs (up to 0.991) and only minor (13)C- and (2)H-AKIEs. Oxidative N-dealkylation, in contrast, was subject to large normal (13)C- and (2)H-AKIEs (up to 1.019 and 3.1, respectively) and small (15)N-AKIEs. Subtle changes of the compound's electronic properties due to different types of aromatic and/or N-alkyl substituents resulted in changes of reaction mechanisms, rate-limiting step(s), and thus isotope fractionation trends. The complex sequence of electron and proton transfers during the oxidative transformation of substituted aromatic N-alkyl amines suggests highly compound- and mechanism-dependent isotope effects precluding extrapolations to other organic micropollutants reacting along the same degradation pathways. PMID:22681573

  17. Application of δ13C and δ15N isotopic signatures of organic matter fractions sequentially separated from adjacent arable and forest soils to identify carbon stabilization mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayler, Z. E.; Kaiser, M.; Gessler, A.; Ellerbrock, R. H.; Sommer, M.

    2011-03-01

    Identifying the chemical mechanisms behind soil carbon bound in organo-mineral complexes is necessary to determine the degree to which soil organic carbon is stabilized belowground. We used the δ13C and δ15N isotopic signatures from two organic matter (OM) fractions from soil to identify the likely binding mechanisms involved. We used OM fractions hypothesized to contain carbon stabilized through organo-mineral complexes: (1) OM separated chemically with sodium pyrophosphate (OM(PY)) and (2) OM stabilized in microstructures found in the chemical extraction residue (OM(ER)). Furthermore, because the OM fractions were separated from five different soils with paired forest and arable land use histories, we could address the impact of land use change on carbon binding and processing mechanisms within these soils. We used partial least squares regression to analyze patterns in the isotopic signature of OM with established proxies of different binding mechanisms. Parsing soil OM into different fractions is a systematic method of dissection, however, we are primarily interested in how OM is bound in soil as a whole, requiring a means of re-assembly. Thus, we implemented the recent zonal framework described by Kleber et al. (2007) to relate our findings to undisturbed soil. The δ15N signature of OM fractions served as a reliable indicator for microbial processed carbon in both arable and forest land use types. The δ13C signature of OM fractions in arable sites did not correlate well with proxies of soil mineral properties while a consistent pattern of enrichment was seen in the δ13C of OM fractions in the forest sites. We found a significant difference in δ13C of pooled OM fractions between the forest and arable land use type although it was relatively small (<1‰). We found different binding mechanisms predominate in each land use type. The isotopic signatures of OM fractions from arable soils were highly related to the clay and silt size particles amount while

  18. Application of δ13C and δ15N isotopic signatures of organic matter fractions sequentially separated from adjacent arable and forest soils to identify carbon stabilization mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sommer

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Identifying the chemical mechanisms behind soil carbon bound in organo-mineral complexes is necessary to determine the degree to which soil organic carbon is stabilized belowground. We used the δ13C and δ15N isotopic signatures from two organic matter (OM fractions from soil to identify the likely binding mechanisms involved. We used OM fractions hypothesized to contain carbon stabilized through organo-mineral complexes: (1 OM separated chemically with sodium pyrophosphate (OM(PY and (2 OM stabilized in microstructures found in the chemical extraction residue (OM(ER. Furthermore, because the OM fractions were separated from five different soils with paired forest and arable land use histories, we could address the impact of land use change on carbon binding and processing mechanisms within these soils. We used partial least squares regression to analyze patterns in the isotopic signature of OM with established proxies of different binding mechanisms. Parsing soil OM into different fractions is a systematic method of dissection, however, we are primarily interested in how OM is bound in soil as a whole, requiring a means of re-assembly. Thus, we implemented the recent zonal framework described by Kleber et al. (2007 to relate our findings to undisturbed soil. The δ15N signature of OM fractions served as a reliable indicator for microbial processed carbon in both arable and forest land use types. The δ13C signature of OM fractions in arable sites did not correlate well with proxies of soil mineral properties while a consistent pattern of enrichment was seen in the δ13C of OM fractions in the forest sites. We found a significant difference in δ13C of pooled OM fractions between the forest and arable land use type although it was relatively small (<1‰. We found different binding mechanisms predominate in each land use type. The isotopic signatures of OM fractions from arable soils were highly related to the clay and silt size particles

  19. Quantifying uncertainty of past pCO2 determined from changes in C3 plant carbon isotope fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Ying; Schubert, Brian A.

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of the past concentrations of atmospheric CO2 level (pCO2) is critical to understanding climate sensitivity to changing pCO2. Towards this, a new proxy for pCO2 has been developed based on changes in carbon isotope fractionation (Δ13C) in C3 land plants. The accuracy of this approach has been validated against ice-core pCO2 records, suggesting the potential to apply this proxy to other geological periods; however, no thorough uncertainty assessment of the proxy has been conducted. Here, we first analyze the uncertainty in the model-curve fit through the experimental data using a bootstrap approach. Then, errors of the five input parameters for the proxy are evaluated using sensitivity analysis; these include the carbon isotope composition of atmospheric CO2 (δ13CCO2) and that of the plant material (δ13Corg) for two time periods, a reference time (t = 0) and the time period of interest (t), and the value of pCO2 at time t = 0. We then propagated the errors on the reconstructed pCO2 using a Monte Carlo random sampling approach that combined the uncertainties of the curve fitting and the five inputs for a scenario in which the reference time was the Holocene with a target period for the reconstructed pCO2 during the Cenozoic. We find that the error in the reconstructed pCO2(t) increases with increasing pCO2(t), yet remains confidence for much of the Cenozoic and perhaps the majority of the last 400 million years, which is characterized by pCO2 levels generally less than 1000 ppmv. Towards this, an application of this uncertainty analysis is presented for the Paleogene (52-63 Ma) using published data. The resulting pCO2(t) levels calculated using this method average 470 +288/-147 ppmv (1σ, n = 75), and overlap with previous pCO2(t) estimates determined for this time period using stomata, liverwort, and paleosol proxies. The analysis presented here assumes that the paleoenvironment in which the plants grew is unknown and is determined to be the largest

  20. Trends in carbon isotope fractionation in atmospheric carbon dioxide constrain water use efficiency of northern ecosystems from the 1980s to 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welp, L. R.; Piper, S. C.; Graven, H. D.; Bollenbacher, A.; Meijer, H. A.; Keeling, R. F.

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric CO2 concentrations have increased by approximately 120 ppm since preindustrial times and have reached levels higher than any other time during the last three to five million years ago with uncertain consequences for the modern terrestrial biosphere. When plants take up CO2 for photosynthesis from the atmosphere through stomata openings in their leaves, water escapes due to the gradient in water vapor pressure from the leaf interior to the atmospheric boundary layer. The amount of carbon assimilated by photosynthesis per water lost determines the water use efficiency (WUE) of the plant. The extra CO2 in the atmosphere has been shown to increase WUE in growth chamber studies, allowing plants to take up the same or more CO2 with reduced stomatal conductance, thereby reducing water loss. Carbon isotope fractionation by plants is related to the CO2 concentration gradient from inside the leaf (Ci) to that in the atmosphere (Ca) (e.g. Farquhar model). Therefore intrinsic water use efficiency (iWUE) of the biosphere, defined as the amount of net photosynthesis divided by the stomatal conductance, leaves an imprint on the record of δ13C in atmospheric CO2. We will present estimates of the biological carbon isotope fractionation of atmospheric CO2 from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography flask network from the 1980s to 2010 and discuss the constraints it provides on trends in iWUE over this period. Using the seasonal co-variation of 13C and CO2, we calculate effective fractionation. This data can be used to test hypothetical trends in iWUE and Ci. The conventional wisdom in the field has been that the ratio of Ci/Ca would remain approximately constant as CO2 rises, which would result in no change in fractionation but a modest increase in iWUE. Keenan et al. (2013) recently published an analysis of FluxNet eddy covariance measurements suggesting that Ci has stayed nearly constant since the mid-1990s, translating to a large ~3% yr-1 increase in i

  1. Fractional absorption of active absorbable algal calcium (AAACa) and calcium carbonate measured by a dual stable-isotope method

    Science.gov (United States)

    With the use of stable isotopes, this study aimed to compare the bioavailability of active absorbable algal calcium (AAACa), obtained from oyster shell powder heated to a high temperature, with an additional heated seaweed component (Heated Algal Ingredient, HAI), with that of calcium carbonate. In ...

  2. Stable Carbon Isotope Fractionation during Bacterial Acetylene Fermentation: Potential for Life Detection in Hydrocarbon-Rich Volatiles of Icy Planet(oid)s

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Laurence G.; Baesman, Shaun M.; Oremland, Ronald S.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We report the first study of stable carbon isotope fractionation during microbial fermentation of acetylene (C2H2) in sediments, sediment enrichments, and bacterial cultures. Kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) averaged 3.7 ± 0.5‰ for slurries prepared with sediment collected at an intertidal mudflat in San Francisco Bay and 2.7 ± 0.2‰ for a pure culture of Pelobacter sp. isolated from these sediments. A similar KIE of 1.8 ± 0.7‰ was obtained for methanogenic enrichments derived from sedi...

  3. Interannual Variability in Carbon and Nitrogen Stable Isotopic Signatures of Size-Fractionated POM from the South Florida Coastal Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, S. L.; Anderson, W. T.; Jochem, F. J.; Fourqurean, J. W.

    2004-12-01

    Environmental conditions in South Florida coastal waters have been of local and national concern over the past 15 years. Attention has focused on the ecosystem impacts of salinity increases, seagrass die-off, increased algal bloom frequency, waste water influence, groundwater discharge, and exchange between Florida Bay, the Gulf of Mexico, and the Atlantic Ocean. Changes in water quality and productivity levels may be reflected in the isotopic signatures of coastal zone primary producers. Recent work with seagrasses in South Florida has demonstrated high seasonal and spatial variability in C and N isotopic signatures and decoupling between the two isotopic systems as they vary. To better understand the sources of seasonal and spatial fluctuation, size fractionated POM (particulate organic matter) samples have been collected on a quarterly basis since Sept. 2002. Fractions collected include >150μ m, 50-150μ m, and 0.1-50μ m using Nitex mesh sieves and a portable pump system deployed from a small boat at 10 sites around the Florida Keys and Florida Bay. It was hypothesized that planktonic groups respond more quickly to changes in water quality then seagrasses, and thus variations may be more clearly attributed to environmental parameters. Significant spatial and temporal variability is evident both within site between size fractions and between sites. Seasonal oscillations of up to 4‰ were observed in N isotopic values and 6‰ in C isotopic values of the 50-150μ m size fraction, which is dominated by diatoms and dinoflagellates. δ 13C values are depleted in the late winter/early spring sampling period possibly reflecting decreased productivity stress on available C pools. 13C depletion is generally coincident with δ 15N enrichment in the late winter/early spring, possibly demonstrating changes in DIN pools (NO3- and NH4+ concentrations) or changes in decomposition or denitrification rates. Broad groupings appear to separate Atlantic coral reef sites

  4. Observations of Molecular Isotope Fractionation in Prestellar Cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milam, Stefanie N.

    2010-01-01

    Anomalously fractionated isotopic material is found in many primitive Solar System objects, such as meteorites and comets. It has been suggested that these extreme isotope ratios, are tracers of interstellar chemistry. We will present observations of the nitrogen and carbon fractionation chemistry in dense molecular clouds, particularly in cores where sUbstantial freeze-out of molecules, namely CO, onto dust has occurred. Recent models have suggested that non-depleted species, carbon and nitrogen-rich, may undergo isotopic enhancements in these conditions. The fractionation ratios measured in different interstellar molecules will be discussed and compared to the ratios determined in molecular clouds, comets, and meteoritic material.

  5. Argon isotope fractionation induced by stepwise heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trieloff, Mario; Falter, Martina; Buikin, Alexei I.; Korochantseva, Ekaterina V.; Jessberger, Elmar K.; Altherr, Rainer

    2005-03-01

    Noble gas isotopes are widely used to elucidate the history of the rocks in which they have been trapped, either from distinct reservoirs or by accumulation following radioactive decay. To extract noble gases from their host rocks, stepwise heating is the most commonly used technique to deconvolve isotopically different components, e.g., atmospheric, in situ radiogenic, or excess radiogenic from mantle or crustal reservoirs. The accurate determination of the isotopic composition of these different components is of crucial importance, e.g., for ages obtained by 40Ar- 39Ar stepheating plateaus. However, diffusion theory-based model calculations predict that the stepwise thermal extraction process from mineral phases induces isotope fractionation and, hence, adulterates the original composition. Such effects are largely unconsidered, as they are small and a compelling experimental observation is lacking. We report the first unequivocal evidence for significant mass fractionation of argon isotopes during thermal extraction, observed on shungite, a carbon-rich Precambrian sedimentary rock. The degree of fractionation, as monitored by 38Ar/ 36Ar and 40Ar/ 36Ar ratios, very well agrees with theoretical predictions assuming an inverse square root dependence of diffusion coefficient and atomic mass, resulting in easier extraction of lighter isotopes. Hence, subatmospheric 40Ar/ 36Ar ratios obtained for argon extracted at low temperatures may not represent paleoatmospheric argon. Shungite argon resembles modern atmospheric composition, but constraints on the timing of trapping appear difficult to obtain, as shungites are multicomponent systems. In 40Ar- 39Ar stepwise heating, the isotope fractionation effect could cause systematic underestimations of plateau ages, between 0.15 and 0.4% depending on age, or considerably higher if samples contain appreciable atmospheric Ar. The magnitude of this effect is similar to the presently achieved uncertainties of this increasingly

  6. Isotope Fractionation in the Interstellar Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charnley, Steven

    2011-01-01

    Anomalously fractionated isotopic material is found in many primitive Solar System objects, such as meteorites and comets. It is thought, in some cases, to trace interstellar matter that was incorporated into the Solar Nebula without undergoing significant processing. We will present the results of models of the nitrogen, oxygen, and carbon fractionation chemistry in dense molecular clouds, particularly in cores where substantial freeze-out of molecules on to dust has occurred. The range of fractionation ratios expected in different interstellar molecules will be discussed and compared to the ratios measured in molecular clouds, comets and meteoritic material. These models make several predictions that can be tested in the near future by molecular line observations, particularly with ALMA.

  7. Models of Isotopic Fractionation in Prestellar Cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charnley, Steven B.

    2012-01-01

    Anomalously fractionated isotopic material is found in many primitive Solar System objects, such as meteorites and comets. It is thought, in some cases, to trace interstellar matter that was incorporated into the Solar Nebula without undergoing significant processing. We will present the results of models of the nitrogen, oxygen, and carbon fractionation chemistry in dense molecular clouds, particularly in cores where substantial freeze-out of molecules on to dust has occurred. The range of fractionation ratios expected in different interstellar molecules will be discussed and compared to the ratios measured in molecular clouds, comets and meteoritic material. These studies make several predictions that can be tested in the near future by high-resolution molecular line observations with ALMA.

  8. Zinc isotope fractionation during adsorption on calcite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, S.; Wasylenki, L. E.

    2013-12-01

    Zinc is an important element as a nutrient in the marine biosphere. However, our understanding of its biogeochemical cycling in the oceans is relatively limited. The Zn stable isotope system holds the promise of providing novel insights, since published Zn isotopic values for various natural samples reveal significant fractionations in the marine environment. Surface seawater, basalts, shales, deep-sea clay sediments, sediment trap material, bulk plankton and zooplankton samples, and eolian dust fall within a tight range (δ66/64Zn from -0.1 to 0.5‰), but modern ferromanganese crusts (δ66/64Zn from 0.5 to 1.2‰), as well as carbonates (δ66/64Zn from 0.3 to 1.4‰), are notably enriched in heavy Zn isotopes [1-4]. In this study we seek to constrain the mechanism by which carbonates are enriched in heavier isotopes. In particular, we have conducted experiments to quantify isotope fractionation during adsorption of Zn onto the surfaces of calcite crystals that are in equilibrium with solution. The adsorption experiments were carried out in a series of small-volume batch reactions in a clean laboratory environment, using high-purity reagents and calcite seed crystals. The calcite was equilibrated with the solution prior to addition of Zn at atmospheric CO2 pressure (i.e., in air) for 5 days until a stable pH of 8.3 was reached. Later, a small aliquot of dissolved ZnCl2 was added such that the solution remained undersaturated with respect to hydrozincite. Experimental duration varied among the replicates from 6 to 144 hours, and then all solids and solutions were separated by filtration, purified by ion exchange chromatography, and analyzed by MC-ICP-MS. Zn adsorbed on calcite is isotopically heavier than in the co-existing solutions, with Δ68/66Zncalcite-solution of approximately 0.3‰. The variation of Δ68/66Zncalcite-solution beyond 24 hours is insignificant, so we infer that isotopic equilibrium is reached by this time. Previous work strongly suggests that a

  9. Magnesium isotope fractionation during carbonatite magmatism at Oldoinyo Lengai, Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wang-Ye; Teng, Fang-Zhen; Halama, Ralf; Keller, Jörg; Klaudius, Jurgis

    2016-06-01

    To investigate the behaviour of Mg isotopes during carbonatite magmatism, we analyzed Mg isotopic compositions of natrocarbonatites and peralkaline silicate rocks from Oldoinyo Lengai, Tanzania. The olivine melilitites from the vicinity of Oldoinyo Lengai have homogeneous and mantle-like Mg isotopic compositions (δ26Mg of -0.30 to -0.26‰), indicating limited Mg isotope fractionation during mantle melting. The highly evolved peralkaline silicate rocks not related to silicate-carbonatite liquid immiscibility, including phonolites from the unit Lengai I, combeite-wollastonite nephelinites (CWNs) from the unit Lengai II A and carbonated combeite-wollastonite-melilite nephelinites (carbCWMNs), have δ26Mg values (from -0.25 to -0.10‰) clustered around the mantle value. By contrast, the CWNs from the unit Lengai II B, which evolved from the silicate melts that were presumably generated by silicate-carbonatite liquid immiscibility, have heavier Mg isotopes (δ26Mg of -0.06 to +0.09‰). Such a difference suggests Mg isotope fractionation during liquid immiscibility and implies, based on mass-balance calculations, that the original carbonatite melts at Lengai were isotopically light. The variable and positive δ26Mg values of natrocarbonatites (from +0.13 to +0.37‰) hence require a change of their Mg isotopic compositions subsequent to liquid immiscibility. The negative correlations between δ26Mg values and contents of alkali and alkaline earth metals of natrocarbonatites suggest Mg isotope fractionation during fractional crystallization of carbonatite melts, with heavy Mg isotopes enriched in the residual melts relative to fractionated carbonate minerals. Collectively, significant Mg isotope fractionation may occur during both silicate-carbonatite liquid immiscibility and fractional crystallization of carbonatite melts, making Mg isotopes a potentially useful tracer of these processes relevant to carbonatite petrogenesis.

  10. In situ localization of NADP-malic enzyme in bundle sheath cells and leaf carbon isotope fractionation in two C4 grasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using an indirect immunofluorescence technique, we have provided further evidence on the subcellular localization of the NADP-dependent malic enzyme (EC 1.1.1.40) in the bundle sheath chloroplasts of some C4 grasses, including the two bluestem grasses Andropogon gerardi Vitman and Schizachyrium scoparium (Michx.) Nash, common C4 grasses of the prairies in the Great Plains. Leaf carbon isotope fractionation studies of the two bluestem species, grown in close proximity to each other, indicate that though both belong to the NADP-malic enzyme subtype of C4 plants, their δ13C values differ by 1.5‰. (author)

  11. Carbon isotope techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book is a hands-on introduction to using carbon isotope tracers in experimental biology and ecology. It is a bench-top reference with protocols for the study of plants, animals, and soils. The 11C, 12C, 13C, and 14C carbon isotopes are considered and standard techniques are described by established authors. The compilation includes the following features: specific, well-established, user-oriented techniques; carbon cycles in plants, animals, soils, air, and water; isotopes in ecological research; examples and sample calculations

  12. Diversity of sulfur isotope fractionations by sulfate-reducing prokaryotes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Detmers, Jan; Brüchert, Volker; Habicht, K S;

    2001-01-01

    Batch culture experiments were performed with 32 different sulfate-reducing prokaryotes to explore the diversity in sulfur isotope fractionation during dissimilatory sulfate reduction by pure cultures. The selected strains reflect the phylogenetic and physiologic diversity of presently known.......0 to 42.0 per thousand. Salinity, incubation temperature, pH, and phylogeny had no systematic effect on the sulfur isotope fractionation. There was no correlation between isotope fractionation and sulfate reduction rate. The type of dissimilatory bisulfite reductase also had no effect on fractionation....... Sulfate reducers that oxidized the carbon source completely to CO2 showed greater fractionations than sulfate reducers that released acetate as the final product of carbon oxidation. Different metabolic pathways and variable regulation of sulfate transport across the cell membrane all potentially affect...

  13. Stable Carbon Isotope Fractionation during Bacterial Acetylene Fermentation: Potential for Life Detection in Hydrocarbon-Rich Volatiles of Icy Planet(oid)s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baesman, Shaun M.; Oremland, Ronald S.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We report the first study of stable carbon isotope fractionation during microbial fermentation of acetylene (C2H2) in sediments, sediment enrichments, and bacterial cultures. Kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) averaged 3.7 ± 0.5‰ for slurries prepared with sediment collected at an intertidal mudflat in San Francisco Bay and 2.7 ± 0.2‰ for a pure culture of Pelobacter sp. isolated from these sediments. A similar KIE of 1.8 ± 0.7‰ was obtained for methanogenic enrichments derived from sediment collected at freshwater Searsville Lake, California. However, C2H2 uptake by a highly enriched mixed culture (strain SV7) obtained from Searsville Lake sediments resulted in a larger KIE of 9.0 ± 0.7‰. These are modest KIEs when compared with fractionation observed during oxidation of C1 compounds such as methane and methyl halides but are comparable to results obtained with other C2 compounds. These observations may be useful in distinguishing biologically active processes operating at distant locales in the Solar System where C2H2 is present. These locales include the surface of Saturn's largest moon Titan and the vaporous water- and hydrocarbon-rich jets emanating from Enceladus. Key Words: Acetylene—Fermentation—Isotope fractionation—Enceladus—Life detection. Astrobiology 15, 977–986. PMID:26539733

  14. Study and validity of 13C stable carbon isotopic ratio analysis by mass spectrometry and 2H site-specific natural isotopic fractionation by nuclear magnetic resonance isotopic measurements to characterize and control the authenticity of honey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honey samples were analyzed by stable carbon isotopic ratio analysis by mass spectrometry (SCIRA-MS) and site-specific natural isotopic fractionation measured by nuclear magnetic resonance (SNIF-NMR) to first determine their potentials for characterizing the substance and then to combat adulteration. Honey samples from several geographic and botanical origins were analyzed. The δ 13C parameter was not significant for characterizing an origin, while the (D/H)I ratio could be used to differentiate certain single-flower varieties. Application of the official control method of adding a C4 syrup (AOAC official method 998.12) to our authentic samples revealed anomalies resulting from SCIRA indices that were more negative than -1 per mille (permil). A filtration step was added to the experimental procedure and provided results that were compliant with Natural origin of our honey samples. In addition, spiking with a C4 syrup could be detected starting at 9-10%. The use of SNIF-NMR is limited by the detection of a syrup spike starting only at 20%, which is far from satisfying

  15. Study and validity of {sup 13}C stable carbon isotopic ratio analysis by mass spectrometry and {sup 2}H site-specific natural isotopic fractionation by nuclear magnetic resonance isotopic measurements to characterize and control the authenticity of honey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cotte, J.F. [Cooperative France Miel, BP 5, 330 Mouchard (France); Casabianca, H. [Service Central d' Analyse, USR 059-CNRS, BP 22, 69390 Vernaison (France); Lheritier, J. [Cooperative France Miel, BP 5, 330 Mouchard (France); Perrucchietti, C. [Service Central d' Analyse, USR 059-CNRS, BP 22, 69390 Vernaison (France); Sanglar, C. [Service Central d' Analyse, USR 059-CNRS, BP 22, 69390 Vernaison (France); Waton, H. [Service Central d' Analyse, USR 059-CNRS, BP 22, 69390 Vernaison (France); Grenier-Loustalot, M.F. [Service Central d' Analyse, USR 059-CNRS, BP 22, 69390 Vernaison (France)]. E-mail: mf.grenier-loustalot@sca.cnrs.fr

    2007-01-16

    Honey samples were analyzed by stable carbon isotopic ratio analysis by mass spectrometry (SCIRA-MS) and site-specific natural isotopic fractionation measured by nuclear magnetic resonance (SNIF-NMR) to first determine their potentials for characterizing the substance and then to combat adulteration. Honey samples from several geographic and botanical origins were analyzed. The {delta} {sup 13}C parameter was not significant for characterizing an origin, while the (D/H){sub I} ratio could be used to differentiate certain single-flower varieties. Application of the official control method of adding a C{sub 4} syrup (AOAC official method 998.12) to our authentic samples revealed anomalies resulting from SCIRA indices that were more negative than -1 per mille (permil). A filtration step was added to the experimental procedure and provided results that were compliant with Natural origin of our honey samples. In addition, spiking with a C{sub 4} syrup could be detected starting at 9-10%. The use of SNIF-NMR is limited by the detection of a syrup spike starting only at 20%, which is far from satisfying.

  16. Study and validity of 13C stable carbon isotopic ratio analysis by mass spectrometry and 2H site-specific natural isotopic fractionation by nuclear magnetic resonance isotopic measurements to characterize and control the authenticity of honey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotte, J F; Casabianca, H; Lhéritier, J; Perrucchietti, C; Sanglar, C; Waton, H; Grenier-Loustalot, M F

    2007-01-16

    Honey samples were analyzed by stable carbon isotopic ratio analysis by mass spectrometry (SCIRA-MS) and site-specific natural isotopic fractionation measured by nuclear magnetic resonance (SNIF-NMR) to first determine their potentials for characterizing the substance and then to combat adulteration. Honey samples from several geographic and botanical origins were analyzed. The delta(13)C parameter was not significant for characterizing an origin, while the (D/H)(I) ratio could be used to differentiate certain single-flower varieties. Application of the official control method of adding a C(4) syrup (AOAC official method 998.12) to our authentic samples revealed anomalies resulting from SCIRA indices that were more negative than -1 per thousand (permil). A filtration step was added to the experimental procedure and provided results that were compliant with the natural origin of our honey samples. In addition, spiking with a C(4) syrup could be detected starting at 9-10%. The use of SNIF-NMR is limited by the detection of a syrup spike starting only at 20%, which is far from satisfying. PMID:17386484

  17. Fractionation of Boron Isotopes in Icelandic Hydrothermal Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aggarwal, J.K.; Palmer, M.R.

    1995-01-01

    Boron isotope ratios have been determined in a variety of different geothermal waters from hydrothermal systems across Iceland. Isotope ratios from the high temperature meteoric water recharged systems reflect the isotope ratio of the host rocks without any apparent fractionation. Seawater recharged geothermal systems exhibit more positive {delta}{sup 11}B values than the meteoric water recharged geothermal systems. Water/rock ratios can be assessed from boron isotope ratios in the saline hydrothermal systems. Low temperature hydrothermal systems also exhibit more positive {delta}{sup 11}B than the high temperature systems, indicating fractionation of boron due to adsorption of the lighter isotope onto secondary minerals. Fractionation of boron in carbonate deposits may indicate the level of equilibrium attained within the systems.

  18. Experimentally-determined carbon isotope fractionation in and between methane-bearing melt and fluid to upper mantle temperatures and pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mysen, Bjorn

    2016-07-01

    The behavior of melts and fluids is at the core of understanding formation and evolution of the Earth. To advance our understanding of their role, high-pressure/-temperature experiments were employed to determine melt and fluid structure together with carbon isotope partitioning within and between (CH4 +H2O +H2)-saturated aluminosilicate melts and (CH4 +H2O +H2)-fluids. The samples were characterized with vibrational spectroscopy while at temperatures and pressures from 475° to 850 °C and 92 to 1158 MPa, respectively. The solution equilibrium is 2CH4 +Qn = 2 CH3- +H2O +Q n + 1 where the superscript, n, in the Qn-notation describes silicate species where n denotes the number of bridging oxygen. The solution equilibrium affects the carbon isotope fractionation factor between melt and fluid, αmelt/fluid. Moreover, it is significantly temperature-dependent. The αmelt/fluid < 1 with temperatures less than about 1050 °C, and is greater than 1 at higher temperature. Methane-bearing melts can exist in the upper mantle at fO2 ≤fO2 (MW) (Mysen et al., 2011). Reduced (Csbnd H)-species in present-day upper mantle magma, therefore, are likely. During melting and crystallization in this environment, the δ13C of melts increases with temperature at a rate of ∼ 0.6 ‰ /°C. From the simple-system data presented here, at T ≤ 1050°C, melt in equilibrium with a peridotite-(CH4 +H2O +H2)-bearing mantle source will be isotopically lighter than fluid. At higher temperatures, melts will be isotopically heavier. Degassing at T ≤ 1050°C will shift δ13C of degassed magma to more positive values, whereas degassing at T ≥ 1050°C, will reduce the δ13C of the degassed magma.

  19. Stable carbon isotope fractionation during bacterial acetylene fermentation: Potential for life detection in hydrocarbon-rich volatiles of icy planet(oid)s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Laurence; Baesman, Shaun; Oremland, Ron

    2015-01-01

    We report the first study of stable carbon isotope fractionation during microbial fermentation of acetylene (C2H2) in sediments, sediment enrichments, and bacterial cultures. Kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) averaged 3.7 ± 0.5‰ for slurries prepared with sediment collected at an intertidal mudflat in San Francisco Bay and 2.7 ± 0.2‰ for a pure culture of Pelobacter sp. isolated from these sediments. A similar KIE of 1.8 ± 0.7‰ was obtained for methanogenic enrichments derived from sediment collected at freshwater Searsville Lake, California. However, C2H2 uptake by a highly enriched mixed culture (strain SV7) obtained from Searsville Lake sediments resulted in a larger KIE of 9.0 ± 0.7‰. These are modest KIEs when compared with fractionation observed during oxidation of C1 compounds such as methane and methyl halides but are comparable to results obtained with other C2compounds. These observations may be useful in distinguishing biologically active processes operating at distant locales in the Solar System where C2H2 is present. These locales include the surface of Saturn's largest moon Titan and the vaporous water- and hydrocarbon-rich jets emanating from Enceladus.

  20. Chromium stable isotope fractionation in modern biogeochemical cycling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulukat, Cora Stefanie

    oxygen in the Earth’s atmosphere. Oxidative rock weathering on land induces oxidation of immobile Cr(III) to mobile Cr(VI). Isotopically relatively heavy Cr(VI) is released to runoff, and transported by rivers to the oceans, where it is incorporated into chemical sediments and carbonate shells. In the...... laterite soils from India, formed on ultramafic rocks, indicates extensive leaching of isotopically heavy Cr(VI). Transferring this knowledge to ancient weathering profiles, negatively fractionated Cr is clear evidence for the presence of free oxygen in the atmosphere. The second part demonstrates that the...... processes (biological productivity). In the third part the potential use of the Cr-isotope system in the marine environment is discussed. Incorporation into biogenic carbonates (bivalves, gastropods, corals) is accompanied by Cr-isotope fractionation, causing negative seawater-shell offsets. None of the...

  1. Carbon isotope fractionation in tree ring early and late wood in relation to intra-growing season water balance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We determined the stable carbon isotope composition (δ1.3C) of cellulose extracted from early and late wood in Douglas fir [Pseudotsuga menziexii (Mirb.) Franco] tree rings. Data were obtained for the period 1962 to 1981, at the start of which the trees were 20 years old. A water balance model was used to calculate daily stand transpiration and water deficit. The model incorporates site factors (soil water availability, slope and aspect) and environmental variables (solar radiation, air temperature and rainfall). There was far greater variability in late wood than in early wood δ1.3C. In wet years, late wood δ1.3C was significantly lighter (by as much as 2δ) than early wood δ1.3C but in dry years this difference was reversed. Differences between spring and summer cumulative transpiration accounted for almost 60δ of the variability in differences between early and late wood δ1.3C. We found excellent correspondence between summer cumulative transpiration and late wood δ1.3C, with estimates of transpiration accounting for up to 93% of the variability in δ1.3C. Correlations between early wood δ1.3C and spring transpiration were generally poor (r2<0.4), but we were able to identify those exceptional years in which there had been a very dry spring. Our results indicate that, while tree ring δ1.3C correlates reasonably well with basal area increment, it is a far better indicator of inter- and intra-annual variability in water availability than radial growth. (author)

  2. Multiple sulfur and carbon isotope composition of sediments from the Belingwe Greenstone Belt (Zimbabwe): A biogenic methane regulation on mass independent fractionation of sulfur during the Neoarchean?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomazo, Christophe; Nisbet, Euan G.; Grassineau, Nathalie V.; Peters, Marc; Strauss, Harald

    2013-11-01

    To explore the linkage between mass-independent sulfur isotope fractionation (MIF-S) and δ13Corg excursions during the Neoarchean, as well as the contemporary redox state and biogeochemical cycling of carbon and sulfur, we report the results of a detailed carbon and multiple sulfur (δ34S, δ33S, δ36S) isotopic study of the ∼2.7 Ga Manjeri and ∼2.65 Ga Cheshire formations of the Ngezi Group (Belingwe Greenstone Belt, Zimbabwe). Multiple sulfur isotope data show non-zero Δ33S and Δ36S values for sediments older than 2.4 Ga (i.e. prior to the Great Oxidation Event, GOE), indicating MIF-S thought to be associated with low atmospheric oxygen concentration. However, in several 2.7-2.5 Ga Neoarchean localities, small-scale variations in MIF-S signal (magnitude) seem to correlate with negative excursion in δ13Corg, possibly reflecting a global connection between the relative reaction rate of different MIF-S source reaction and sulfur exit channels and the biogenic flux of methane into the atmosphere during periods of localized, microbiologically mediated, shallow surface-water oxygenation. The Manjeri Formation black shales studied here display a wide range of δ13Corg between -35.4‰ and -16.2‰ (average of -30.3 ± 6.0‰, 1σ), while the Cheshire Formation shales have δ13Corg between -47.7‰ and -35.1‰ (average -41.3 ± 3‰, 1σ). The δ34S values of sedimentary sulfides from Manjeri Formation vary between -15.15‰ and +2.37‰ (average -1.71 ± 4.76‰, 1σ), showing very small and mostly negative Δ33S values varying from -0.58‰ to 0.87‰ (average 0.02 ± 0.43‰, 1σ). Cheshire Formation black shale sulfide samples measured in this study have δ34S values ranging from -2.11‰ to 2.39‰ (average 0.25 ± 1.08‰, 1σ) and near zero and solely positive Δ33S anomalies between 0.14‰ and 1.17‰ (average 0.56 ± 0.29‰, 1σ). Moreover, Δ36S/Δ33S in the two formations are comparable with a slope of -1.38 (Manjeri Formation) and -1.67 (Cheshire

  3. The use of alkaline hydrolysis as a novel strategy for chloroform remediation: the feasibility of using construction wastes and evaluation of carbon isotopic fractionation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrentó, Clara; Audí-Miró, Carme; Bordeleau, Geneviève; Marchesi, Massimo; Rosell, Mònica; Otero, Neus; Soler, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Laboratory and field-scale pilot experiments were performed to evaluate the feasibility of chloroform degradation by alkaline hydrolysis and the potential of δ(13)C values to assess this induced reaction process at contaminated sites. In batch experiments, alkaline conditions were induced by adding crushed concrete (pH 12.33 ± 0.07), a filtered concrete solution (pH 12.27 ± 0.04), a filtered cement solution (pH 12.66 ± 0.02) and a pH 12 buffer solution (pH 11.92 ± 0.11). The resulting chloroform degradation after 28 days was 94, 96, 99, and 72%, respectively. The experimental data were described using a pseudo-first-order kinetic model, resulting in pseudo-first-order rate constant values of 0.10, 0.12, 0.20, and 0.05 d(-1), respectively. Furthermore, the significant chloroform carbon isotopic fractionation associated with alkaline hydrolysis of chloroform (-53 ± 3‰) and its independence from pH in the admittedly limited tested pH range imply a great potential for the use of δ(13)C values for in situ monitoring of the efficacy of remediation approaches based on alkaline hydrolysis. The carbon isotopic fractionation obtained at the lab scale allowed the calculation of the percentage of chloroform degradation in field-scale pilot experiments where alkaline conditions were induced in two recharge water interception trenches filled with concrete-based construction wastes. A maximum of approximately 30-40% of chloroform degradation was achieved during the two studied recharge periods. Although further research is required, the treatment of chloroform in groundwater through the use of concrete-based construction wastes is proposed. This strategy would also imply the recycling of construction and demolition wastes for use in value-added applications to increase economic and environmental benefits. PMID:24410407

  4. Uranium isotope fractionation during coprecipitation with aragonite and calcite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xinming; Romaniello, Stephen J.; Herrmann, Achim D.; Wasylenki, Laura E.; Anbar, Ariel D.

    2016-09-01

    Natural variations in 238U/235U of marine calcium carbonates might provide a useful way of constraining redox conditions of ancient environments. In order to evaluate the reliability of this proxy, we conducted aragonite and calcite coprecipitation experiments at pH ∼7.5 and ∼8.5 to study possible U isotope fractionation during incorporation into these minerals. Small but significant U isotope fractionation was observed in aragonite experiments at pH ∼8.5, with heavier U isotopes preferentially enriched in the solid phase. 238U/235U of dissolved U in these experiments can be fit by Rayleigh fractionation curves with fractionation factors of 1.00007 + 0.00002/-0.00003, 1.00005 ± 0.00001, and 1.00003 ± 0.00001. In contrast, no resolvable U isotope fractionation was observed in an aragonite experiment at pH ∼7.5 or in calcite experiments at either pH. Equilibrium isotope fractionation among different aqueous U species is the most likely explanation for these findings. Certain charged U species are preferentially incorporated into calcium carbonate relative to the uncharged U species Ca2UO2(CO3)3(aq), which we hypothesize has a lighter equilibrium U isotope composition than most of the charged species. According to this hypothesis, the magnitude of U isotope fractionation should scale with the fraction of dissolved U that is present as Ca2UO2(CO3)3(aq). This expectation is confirmed by equilibrium speciation modeling of our experiments. Theoretical calculation of the U isotope fractionation factors between different U species could further test this hypothesis and our proposed fractionation mechanism. These findings suggest that U isotope variations in ancient carbonates could be controlled by changes in the aqueous speciation of seawater U, particularly changes in seawater pH, PCO2 , Ca2+, or Mg2+ concentrations. In general, these effects are likely to be small (<0.13‰), but are nevertheless potentially significant because of the small natural range of

  5. A kinetic analysis of leaf uptake of COS and its relation to transpiration, photosynthesis and carbon isotope fractionation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Seibt

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Carbonyl sulfide (COS is an atmospheric trace gas that holds great promise for studies of terrestrial carbon and water exchange. In leaves, COS follows the same pathway as CO2 during photosynthesis. Both gases are taken up in enzyme reactions, making COS and CO2 uptake closely coupled at the leaf scale. The biological background of leaf COS uptake is a hydrolysis reaction catalyzed by the enzyme carbonic anhydrase. Based on this, we derive and test a simple kinetic model of leaf COS uptake, and relate COS to CO2 and water fluxes at the leaf scale. The equation was found to predict realistic COS fluxes compared to observations from field and laboratory chambers. We confirm that COS uptake at the leaf level is directly linked to stomatal conductance. As a consequence, the ratio of deposition velocities (uptake rate divided by ambient mole fraction for leaf COS and CO2 fluxes can provide an estimate of Ci/Ca the ratio of intercellular to atmospheric CO2, an important plant gas exchange parameter that cannot be measured directly. The majority of published deposition velocity ratios for leaf studies on a variety of species fall in the range of 1.5 to 4, corresponding to Ci/Ca ratios of 0.5 to 0.8. In addition, we utilize the coupling of Ci/Ca and photosynthetic ˆ13C discrimination to derive an estimate of 2.8±0.3 for the global mean ratio of deposition velocities. This corresponds to a global vegetation sink of COS in the order of 900±100 Gg S yr−1. COS can now be implemented in the same model framework as CO2 and water vapour. Atmospheric COS measurements can then provide independent constraints on CO2 and water cycles at ecosystem, regional and global scales.

  6. Oxygen isotope fractionation in synthetic magnesian calcite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-López, Concepción; Romanek, Christopher S.; Huertas, F. Javier; Ohmoto, Hiroshi; Caballero, Emilia

    2004-08-01

    Mg-bearing calcite was precipitated at 25°C in closed system free-drift experiments from solutions containing NaHCO 3, CaCl 2 and MgCl 2. The chemical and isotope composition of the solution and precipitate were investigated during time course experiments of 24-h duration. Monohydrocalcite and calcite precipitated early in the experiments (95%) thereafter. Solid collected at the end of the experiments displayed compositional zoning from pure calcite in crystal cores to up to 23 mol% MgCO 3 in the rims. Smaller excursions in Mg were superimposed on this chemical record, which is characteristic of oscillatory zoning observed in synthetic and natural solid-solution carbonates of differing solubility. Magnesium also altered the predominant morphology of crystals over time from the {104} to {100} and {110} growth forms. The oxygen isotope fractionation factor for the magnesian-calcite-water system (as 10 3lnα Mg-cl-H 2O ) displayed a strong dependence on the mol% MgCO 3 in the solid phase, but quantification of the relationship was difficult due to the heterogeneous nature of the precipitate. Considering only the Mg-content and δ 18O values for the bulk solid, 10 3lnα Mg-cl-H 2O increased at a rate of 0.17 ± 0.02 per mol% MgCO 3; this value is a factor of three higher than the single previous estimate (Tarutani T., Clayton R.N., and Mayeda T. K. (1969) The effect of polymorphims and magnesium substitution on oxygen isotope fractionation between calcium carbonate and water. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 33, 987-996). Nevertheless, extrapolation of our relationship to the pure calcite end member yielded a value of 27.9 ± 0.02, which is similar in magnitude to published values for the calcite-water system. Although no kinetic effect was observed on 10 3lnα Mg-cl-H 2O for precipitation rates that ranged from 10 3.21 to 10 4.60 μmol · m -2 · h -1, it was impossible to disentangle the potential effect(s) of precipitation rate and Mg-content on 10 3lnα Mg-cl-H 2O due to

  7. Isotopic fractionation of water in plant leaves - A clue for the role of terrestrial vegetation in the global carbon cycle

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bulíčková, L.; Šantrůček, Jiří; Šetlík, J.; Květoň, Jiří

    Praha : Czech Geological Survey, 2005 - (Buzek, F.; Novák, M.). s. 31 [International Symposium on Applied Isotope Geochemistry /6./. 05.09.11-05.09.16, Praha] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA601410505 Keywords : plant physiology Subject RIV: ED - Physiology

  8. Carbon Isotope Fractionation in Reactions of 1,2-Dibromoethane with FeS and Hydrogen Sulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    EDB (1,2-dibromoethane) is frequently detected at sites impacted by leaded gasoline. In reducing environments, EDB is highly susceptible to abiotic degradation. A study was conducted to evaluate the potential of compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) in assessing abiotic degr...

  9. Carbon isotope effects in carbonate systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deines, Peter

    2004-06-01

    Global carbon cycle models require a complete understanding of the δ 13C variability of the Earth's C reservoirs as well as the C isotope effects in the transfer of the element among them. An assessment of δ 13C changes during CO 2 loss from degassing magmas requires knowledge of the melt-CO 2 carbon isotope fractionation. In order to examine the potential size of this effect for silicate melts of varying composition, 13C reduced partition functions were computed in the temperature range 275 to 4000 K for carbonates of varying bond strengths (Mg, Fe, Mn, Sr, Ba, Pb, Zn, Cd, Li, and Na) and the polymorphs of calcite. For a given cation and a given pressure the 13C content increases with the density of the carbonate structure. For a given structure the tendency to concentrate 13C increases with pressure. The effect of pressure (‰/10 kbar) on the size of the reduced partition function of aragonite varies with temperature; in the pressure range 1 to 10 5 bars the change is given by: Δ 13C p average=-0.01796+0.06635∗ 10 3/T+0.006875∗ 10 6/T2 For calcite III the pressure effect is on average 1.4× larger than that for aragonite at all temperatures. The nature of the cation in a given structure type has a significant effect on the carbon isotope fractionation properties. The tendency to concentrate 13C declines in the series magnesite, aragonite, dolomite, strontianite, siderite, calcite, smithonite, witherite, rhodochrosite, otavite, cerrusite. For divalent cations a general expression for an estimation of the reduced partition function (β) from the reduced mass (μ = [M Cation × M Carbonate]/[M Cation + M Carbonate]) is: 1000 lnβ=(0.032367-0.072563∗ 10 3/T-0.01073∗ 10 6/T2)∗μ-14.003+29.953∗ 10 3/T+9.4610∗ 10 6/T2 For Mg-calcite the 13C content varies with the Mg concentration. The fractionation between Mg-calcite (X = mole fraction of MgCO 3) and calcite is given by: 1000 ln(α MgCalite- Calcite)=[0.013702-0.10957× 10 3/T+1.35940× 10 6/T2

  10. Reactive transport modeling of Li isotope fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanner, C.; Sonnenthal, E. L.

    2013-12-01

    The fractionation of Li isotopes has been used as a proxy for interaction processes between silicate rocks and any kind of fluids. In particular, Li isotope measurements are powerful because Li is almost exclusively found in silicate minerals. Moreover, the two stable Li isotopes, 6Li and 7Li, differ by 17% in mass introducing a large mass dependent isotope fractionation even at high temperature. Typical applications include Li isotope measurements along soil profiles and of river waters to track silicate weathering patterns and Li isotope measurements of geothermal wells and springs to assess water-rock interaction processes in geothermal systems. For this contribution we present a novel reactive transport modeling approach for the simulation of Li isotope fractionation using the code TOUGHREACT [1]. It is based on a 6Li-7Li solid solution approach similar to the one recently described for simulating Cr isotope fractionation [2]. Model applications include the simulation of granite weathering along a 1D flow path as well as the simulation of a column experiment related to an enhanced geothermal system. Results show that measured δ7Li values are mainly controlled by (i) the degree of interaction between Li bearing primary silicate mineral phases (e.g., micas, feldspars) and the corresponding fluid, (ii) the Li isotope fractionation factor during precipitation of secondary mineral phases (e.g., clays), (iii) the Li concentration in primary and secondary Li bearing mineral phases and (iv) the proportion of dissolved Li that adsorbs to negatively charged surfaces (e.g., clays, Fe/Al-hydroxides). To date, most of these parameters are not very well constrained. Reactive transport modeling thus currently has to rely on many assumptions. Nevertheless, such models are powerful because they are the only viable option if individual contributions of all potential processes on the resulting (i.e., measured) Li isotopic ratio have to be quantitatively assessed. Accordingly, we

  11. Particle-size fractionation and stable carbon isotope distribution applied to the study of soil organic matter dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present Note concerns the dynamics of organic matter in soils under forest (C3-type vegetation) and 12 and 50 years old sugar-cane (C4-type vegetation) cultivation. The decomposition rate of ‘forest organic matter” and the accumulation rate of “sugar-cane organic matter” are estimated through 13C measurements of total soil and different organic fractions (particle-size, fractionation)

  12. Stable Vanadium Isotope Fractionation at High Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prytulak, J.; Parkinson, I. J.; Savage, P. S.; Nielsen, S. G.; Halliday, A. N.

    2011-12-01

    Vanadium is a redox sensitive transition metal existing in multiple valence states at terrestrial conditions. Stable vanadium isotopes (reported as δ51V in % relative to an Alfa Aesar standard [1]) are a potentially powerful tracer of oxidation-reduction processes. However, the determination of δ51V is analytically challenging, primarily due to the extreme abundance ratio between the only two stable isotopes (51V/50V ~ 400) and, also, significant isobaric interferences of 50Ti and 50Cr on the minor 50V isotope. We have developed the first method able to determine δ51V to a precision (2 s.d. ~ 0.15%, [1,2]) that enables application of this isotope system to geological processes. To usefully investigate high temperature processes using vanadium isotopes, knowledge of the isotope composition and range of values present in the ambient mantle is required. Here we discuss the first δ51V measured in igneous materials encompassing peridotites, MORB, and primitive mantle-derived melts such as picrites. This first dataset provides a preliminary reconnaissance of the magnitude of natural fractionation. We find little isotope fractionation in suites of peridotites and MORB (vanadium isotope fractionation that may be expected at high temperatures. The presence of significant isotope variation outside of analytical precision in these materials bodes well for the use of δ51V to address a variety of broad scale questions in high temperature planetary processes. [1] Nielsen, S.G., Prytulak, J., Halliday, A.N. 2011. Geost. Geoanal. Res., in press. [2] Prytulak, J., Nielsen, S.G., Halliday, A.N. 2011. Geost. Geoanal. Res., in press. [3] Parkinson and Pearce, 1998. Journal of Petrology, 39, 1577-1618. [4] Lee et al., 2005. Journal of Petrology, 46, 2313-2336. [5] Cottrell and Kelley, 2011. Earth and Planetary Sciences Letters, 305, 270-282.

  13. Magnesium stable isotope fractionation in marine biogenic calcite and aragonite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wombacher, F.; Eisenhauer, A.; Böhm, F.; Gussone, N.; Regenberg, M.; Dullo, W.-Chr.; Rüggeberg, A.

    2011-10-01

    This survey of magnesium stable isotope compositions in marine biogenic aragonite and calcite includes samples from corals, sclerosponges, benthic porcelaneous and planktonic perforate foraminifera, coccolith oozes, red algae, and an echinoid and brachiopod test. The analyses were carried out using MC-ICP-MS with an external repeatability of ±0.22‰ (2SD for δ 26Mg; n = 37), obtained from a coral reference sample (JCp-1). Magnesium isotope fractionation in calcitic corals and sclerosponges agrees with published data for calcitic speleothems with an average Δ 26Mg calcite-seawater = -2.6 ± 0.3‰ that appears to be weakly related to temperature. With one exception ( Vaceletia spp.), aragonitic corals and sclerosponges also display uniform Mg isotope fractionations relative to seawater with Δ 26Mg biogenic aragonite-seawater = -0.9 ± 0.2. Magnesium isotopes in high-Mg calcites from red algae, echinoids and perhaps some porcelaneous foraminifera as well as in all low-Mg calcites (perforate foraminifera, coccoliths and brachiopods) display significant biological influences. For planktonic foraminifera, the Mg isotope data is consistent with the fixation of Mg by organic material under equilibrium conditions, but appears to be inconsistent with Mg removal from vacuoles. Our preferred model, however, suggests that planktonic foraminifera synthesize biomolecules that increase the energetic barrier for Mg incorporation. In this model, the need to remove large quantities of Mg from vacuole solutions is avoided. For the high-Mg calcites from echinoids, the precipitation of amorphous calcium carbonate may be responsible for their weaker Mg isotope fractionation. Disregarding superimposed biological effects, it appears that cation light isotope enrichments in CaCO 3 principally result from a chemical kinetic isotope effect, related to the incorporation of cations at kink sites. In this model, the systematics of cation isotope fractionations in CaCO 3 relate to the

  14. Influence of organic carbon sources and isotope exchange processes between water and nitrate on the fractionation of the stable isotopes 15N/14N and 18O/16O in dissolved nitrate during microbial dentrification in groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stable isotopes of nitrate are commonly used to determine sources and degradation of nitrate. In this study, nitrite oxidizing bacteria were found to promote an oxygen isotope exchange between water and nitrate under anoxic conditions. Also, different carbon sources were found to influence the enrichment of stable isotopes in nitrate during microbial denitrification. Both results refine the stable isotope model of nitrate in respect to nitrate source determination and microbial nitrate reduction.

  15. Isotopic fractionation of zinc in tektites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moynier, Frederic; Beck, Pierre; Jourdan, Fred; Yin, Qing-Zhu; Reimold, Uwe; Koeberl, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Tektites are terrestrial natural glasses produced during a hypervelocity impact of an extraterrestrial projectile onto the Earth's surface. The similarity between the chemical and isotopic compositions of tektites and terrestrial upper continental crust implies that the tektites formed by fusion of such target rock. Tektites are among the driest rocks on Earth. Although volatilization at high temperature may have caused this extreme dryness, the exact mechanism of the water loss and the behavior of other volatile species during tektite formation are still debated. Volatilization can fractionate isotopes, therefore, comparing the isotope composition of volatile elements in tektites with that of their source rocks may help to understand the physical conditions during tektite formation. For this study, we have measured the Zn isotopic composition of 20 tektites from four different strewn fields. Almost all samples are enriched in heavy isotopes of Zn compared to the upper continental crust. On average, the different groups of tektites are isotopically distinct (listed from the isotopically lightest to the heaviest): Muong-Nong type indochinites ( δ66/64Zn = 0.61 ± 0.30‰); North American bediasites ( δ66/64Zn = 1.61 ± 0.49‰); Ivory Coast tektites ( δ66/64Zn = 1.66 ± 0.18‰); the Australasian tektites (others than the Muong Nong-type indochinites) ( δ66/64Zn = 1.84 ± 0.42‰); and Central European moldavites ( δ66/64Zn = 2.04 ± 0.19‰). These results are contrasted with a narrow range of δ66/64Zn = 0-0.7‰ for a diverse spectrum of upper continental crust materials. The elemental abundance of Zn is negatively correlated with δ66/64Zn, which may reflect that isotopic fractionation occurred by evaporation during the heating event upon tektite formation. Simple Rayleigh distillation predicts isotopic fractionations much larger than what is actually observed, therefore, such a model cannot account for the observed Zn isotope fractionation in tektites. We

  16. OXYGEN ISOTOPE FRACTION ATION IN URANIUM OXIDES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑永飞

    1995-01-01

    Thermodynamic oxygen isotope factors for uranium oxides have been calculated by means of the modified increment method.The sequence of 18O-enrichment in the uranium oxides with respect to the common rock-forming minerals is predicted as follows:spinelfractionation factors between the uranium oxides and water and between the uranium oxides and the other minerals have been obtained for 0-1200℃.The theoretical results are applicable to the isotopic geothermometry of uranium ores when pairing with other gangue minerals in hydrothermal uranium deposits.

  17. Carbon isotopic fractionation in macroalgae from Cádiz Bay (Southern Spain): Comparison with other bio-geographic regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercado, Jesús M.; de los Santos, Carmen B.; Lucas Pérez-Lloréns, J.; Vergara, Juan J.

    2009-11-01

    The 13C signature of forty-five macroalgal species from intertidal zones at Cádiz Bay was analysed in order to research the extension of diffusive vs. non-diffusive utilisation of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and to perform a comparison with data published for other bio-geographic regions. The ∂ 13C values ranged from -6.8‰ to -33‰, although the span of variation was different depending on the taxa. Thus, ∂ 13C for Chlorophyta varied from -7‰ ( Codium adhaerens) to -29.6‰ ( Flabellia petiolata), while all the Phaeophyceae (excepting Padina pavonica with ∂ 13C higher than -10‰) had values between -10‰, and -20‰. The widest variation range was recorded in Rhodophyta, from values above -10‰ ( Liagora viscida) to values lower than -30‰ obtained in three species belonging to the subclass Rhodymeniophycidae. Accordingly, the mean ∂ 13C value calculated for red algae (-20.2‰) was significantly lower than that for brown (-15.9‰) and green algae (-15.6‰). Most of the analysed red algae were species inhabiting crevices and the low intertidal fringe which explains that, on average, the shaded-habitat species had a ∂ 13C value lower than those growing fully exposed to sun (i.e. in rockpools or at the upper intertidal zone). The comparison between the capacity for non-diffusive use of DIC (i.e. active or facilitated transport of HCO 3- and/or CO 2) and the ∂ 13C values reveals that values more negative than -30‰ indicate that photosynthesis is dependent on CO 2 diffusive entry, whereas values above this threshold would not indicate necessary the operation of a non-diffusive DIC transport mechanism. Furthermore, external carbonic anhydrase activity ( extCA) and ∂ 13C values were negatively correlated indicating that the higher the dependence of the photosynthesis on the CO 2 supplied from HCO 3- via extCA, the lower the ∂ 13C in the algal material. The comparison between the ∂ 13C values obtained for the analysed species and those

  18. Copper isotope fractionation in acid mine drainage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimball, B.E.; Mathur, R.; Dohnalkova, A.C.; Wall, A.J.; Runkel, R.L.; Brantley, S.L.

    2009-01-01

    We measured the Cu isotopic composition of primary minerals and stream water affected by acid mine drainage in a mineralized watershed (Colorado, USA). The ??65Cu values (based on 65Cu/63Cu) of enargite (??65Cu = -0.01 ?? 0.10???; 2??) and chalcopyrite (??65Cu = 0.16 ?? 0.10???) are within the range of reported values for terrestrial primary Cu sulfides (-1??? fractionation (??aq-min = ??65Cuaq - ??65Cumin, where the latter is measured on mineral samples from the field system), equals 1.43 ?? 0.14??? and 1.60 ?? 0.14??? for chalcopyrite and enargite, respectively. To interpret this field survey, we leached chalcopyrite and enargite in batch experiments and found that, as in the field, the leachate is enriched in 65Cu relative to chalcopyrite (1.37 ?? 0.14???) and enargite (0.98 ?? 0.14???) when microorganisms are absent. Leaching of minerals in the presence of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans results in smaller average fractionation in the opposite direction for chalcopyrite (??aq-mino = - 0.57 ?? 0.14 ???, where mino refers to the starting mineral) and no apparent fractionation for enargite (??aq-mino = 0.14 ?? 0.14 ???). Abiotic fractionation is attributed to preferential oxidation of 65Cu+ at the interface of the isotopically homogeneous mineral and the surface oxidized layer, followed by solubilization. When microorganisms are present, the abiotic fractionation is most likely not seen due to preferential association of 65Cuaq with A. ferrooxidans cells and related precipitates. In the biotic experiments, Cu was observed under TEM to occur in precipitates around bacteria and in intracellular polyphosphate granules. Thus, the values of ??65Cu in the field and laboratory systems are presumably determined by the balance of Cu released abiotically and Cu that interacts with cells and related precipitates. Such isotopic signatures resulting from Cu sulfide dissolution should be useful for acid mine drainage remediation and ore prospecting purposes. ?? 2008 Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Changes to Lignin Phenol and Hydroxy Alkanoic Acid yStable Carbon Isotope Composition and Concentration in ySoil Fractions from a Grassland/Woodland Conversion in ya Subtropical Savannay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filley, T.; Gamblin, D.; Boutton, T.; Liao, J.; Jastrow, J.

    2005-12-01

    The response of soil organic carbon (SOC) pools to changes in land cover during woody yplant encroachment is an issue of great importance to soil carbon modeling as grassland ysoils represent a major Earth C stock. Bulk assessments of carbon turn over in soils can ybe obtained in systems where C4 plants are being replaced by C3 trees using stable yisotope modeling along a chronosequence. Few SOC studies, however, approach the yquestion of carbon storage and turn over at the compound specific level even though ybiopolymers turnover at vastly different rates and have selective affinities for long term ypreservation. Defining what compound classes represent relatively recalcitrant or labile ypools can be made in such systems where intrinsic differences in stable isotope ycomposition and molecular chemistry are very large. We quantified changes in lignin yphenol and hydroxyl alkanoic acid chemistry and stable carbon isotope composition of ysize and density fractionated soil from the Rio Grande Plains of Texas where C4 ygrasslands (δ13C = -14%) have undergone succession to subtropical thorn woodland ydominated by C3 trees/shrubs (δ13C = -27%) over an 80 year chronosequence. yComparison of the extant of conversion of the grassland SOM to C3 carbon by bulk SOC yisotope modeling to that obtained using compound specific isotope analysis of lignin yphenols in the microaggreagate (53-250 microns), macroaggregates (>250 microns), and ythe microaggregated particulate organic matter (phenol pools reflecting both ydifferences in input rate and ease by which the different pools can be degraded by ymicrobes. The relative extent of turn over between the physical fractions remained the ysame in the two analyses with macroaggrgates>microaggregated pom>microaggregates. yThis work adds to a growing body of the importance of compound specific isotope yanalyses to record ecosystem shifts in soils in compounds that have the potential for long yterm storage.y

  20. Carbon and Carbon Isotope Cycling in the Western Canadian Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mol, Jacoba; Thomas, Helmuth

    2016-04-01

    Increasing carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere are having drastic effects on the global oceans. The Arctic Ocean is particularly susceptible to change as warming, sea-ice loss and a weak buffering capacity all influence this complicated semi-enclosed sea. In order to investigate the inorganic carbon system in the Canadian Arctic, water samples were collected in the Beaufort Sea, on the Alaskan shelf, at the Mackenzie river delta, and in Amundsen Gulf during the summer of 2014 and were analyzed for dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), total alkalinity (TA), DI13C and 18O isotopes. Carbon isotopes are used to investigate the role of biological production on the uptake and transfer of inorganic carbon to depth. A preferential uptake of the lighter 12C relative to the heavier 13C isotope during biological production leads to a fractionation of the 13C/12C isotopes in both the organic matter and the water column. This results in an enrichment of DI13C in the high productivity surface waters and a depletion of DI13C at depth. Physical processes including freshwater input, brine rejection, and water mass mixing are investigated through the measurement of oxygen isotopes. Differences in the carbon system across the study area due to both biological and physical processes are assessed using depth profiles of DI13C and related carbon system parameters.

  1. The isotopic fractionation of organic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isotopic fractionation of organic compounds is the observation of their chromatographic separation caused solely by differing isotopic content. The phenomenon has been observed for over 35 years by investigators in various disciplines working with labeled compounds on GC, TLC, and HPLC. Over 100 reports of such separations for organic compounds labeled with 2H, 3H, 13C, and 14C are scattered throughout the literature, and it has been over twenty years since the topic was adequately reviewed. This paper will highlight the existing literature and examples from the author's own laboratory as well as emphasize the thoroughness and caution that one must exercise before invoking this explanation for anomalous chromatographic behavior of organic isotopomers

  2. Carbon isotopic thermometry calibrated by dolomite-calcite solvus temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The temperature dependence of carbon isotopic fractionations between calcite and graphite, and between dolomite and graphite are calibrated by the calcite-dolomite solvus geothermometry using marbles collected from the contact metamorphic aureole in the Kasuga area, central Japan. The carbon isotopic fractionations systematically decrease with increasing metamorphic temperature. The concordant relationships between the fractionations and solvus temperatures which are presented, are approximately linear with T-2 over the temperature range, 400 deg to 680 deg C. They suggest that carbon isotopic equilibria between carbonates and graphite were attained in many cases. The equation for the calcite-graphite system has a slope steeper than Bottinga's (1969) results. It is, however, in good agreement with that of Valley and O'Neil (1981) in the temperature range from 600 deg to 800 deg C. Because of the relatively high sensitivity to temperature, these isotopic geothermometers are useful for determining the temperatures in moderate- to high-grade metamorphosed carbonate rocks. (author)

  3. Biological Iron Isotopic Fractionations in Antarctic Endolithic Microbial Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, H.; Beard, B. L.; Johnson, C. M.; Nealson, K. H.

    2002-12-01

    In the McMurdo Dry Valleys, cryptoendolithic microorganisms under sandstone surfaces secrete oxalic acid to leach iron oxides from the rock. A translucent surface rock layer is necessary to trsansmit sufficient sunlight to support photosynthetic primary production and long-term survival. Part of the mobilized iron is re-deposited on the rock surface as a protective crust; the rest accumulates below the colonized zone. We report here that this weathering process results in redistribution of the iron isotopes, with the microbial zone being enriched in heavy isotopes relative to the rock crust and the accumulation zone. In a simulated laboratory experiment to understand the cause for this isotopic effect, hematite was incubated in 5 mM oxalic acid under light. Analysis of the initial dissolved iron showed that the dissolution in itself could not reproduce the isotopic shifts observed in the rock. Presumably, equilibrium isotopic fractionation between Fe(II) and Fe(III) species is the cause, as both are produced from oxalate-promoted dissolution of iron oxides. Subsequently, microorganisms would recycle oxalate for carbon nutrient and as a result destroy iron oxalate complexes. Without chelation, the ferric iron, which is isotopically heavier, would precipitate first and the ferrous iron later as they are transported downward through the circumneutral endolithic environment, effectively achieving a physical separation of the different isotopes. On Mars, if endolithic microorganisms had occurred and then became extinct as the planet dried and cooled, their iron isotopic biosignatures might be well preserved because subsequent reworking of iron would be unlikely without liquid water.

  4. Isotopic Fractionation in Comets: Quantifying the Contribution of Interstellar Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charnley, Steven

    2010-01-01

    Anomalously fractionated isotopic material is found in many primitive Solar System objects, such as meteorites and comets. It is thought, in some cases, to trace interstellar matter that was incorporated into the Solar Nebula without undergoing significant processing. We will present the results of models of the nitrogen, oxygen, and carbon fractionation chemistry in dense molecular clouds, particularly in cares where substantial freeze-taut of molecules on to dust has occurred. The range of fractionation ratios expected in different interstellar molecules will be discussed and compared to the ratios measured in molecular clouds, comets and meteoritic material. These models make several predictions that can be tested in the near future by molecular line observations, particularly with the GBT.

  5. Isotope-geochemical studies on fractions of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) for determining the origin and evolution of DOC for purposes of groundwater dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The laboratory work consisted in developing and testing methods of extraction and enrichment of individual high-purity DOC fractions (fulvic acids, humic acids, and low-molecular substances) with the aim of preparing large quantities of groundwaters (> 1000 l) with low DOC concentrations so as to obtain sufficient sampling material. Chemical characterisation of DOC consisted in an analysis of humic and fulvic acids with regard to element composition (C, H, N, O, S) and inorganic trace elements. Isotopic characterization of the DOC fractions consisted in determining 14C, 13C, and 2H levels. For the first time δ34S and δ15N relations in humic and fulvic acids dissolved in groundwater were determined. (orig./DG)

  6. Boron isotope fractionation during brucite deposition from artificial seawater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Xiao

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Experiments involving boron incorporation into brucite (Mg(OH2 from magnesium-free artificial seawater with pH values ranging from 9.5 to 13.0 were carried out to better understand the incorporation behavior of boron into brucite. The results show that both concentration of boron in deposited brucite ([B]d and its boron partition coefficient (Kd between deposited brucite and final seawater are controlled by pH of the solution. The incorporation capacity of boron into brucite is much stronger than that into oxides and clay minerals. The isotopic compositions of boron in deposited brucite (δ11Bd are higher than those in the associated artificial seawater (δ11Bisw with fractionation factors ranging between 1.0177 and 1.0569, resulting from the preferential incorporation of B(OH3 into brucite. Both boron adsorptions onto brucite and precipitation reaction of H3BO3 with brucite exist during deposition of brucite from artificial seawater. The simultaneous occurrence of both processes determines the boron concentration and isotopic fractionation of brucite. The isotopic fractionation behaviors and mechanisms of boron incorporated into brucite are different from those into carbonates. Furthermore, the isotopic compositions of boron in modern corals might be affected by the existence of brucite in madrepore and the preferential incorporation of B(OH3 into brucite. An exploratory study for the influence of brucite on the boron isotopic composition in modern corals is justifiable.

  7. Mg Isotope Fractionation Between E. coli and Growth Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basset, R.; Lemelle, L.; Albalat, E.; Telouk, P.; Albarède, F.

    2008-12-01

    Magnesium is a major element in both microbial cells and minerals, immune to redox conditions and atmospheric interactions. In organic cells, Mg can be associated with membranes, with cytoplasm (either as an isolated ion or bound to proteins). Its isotope composition can be used to constrain the contribution of organic material to carbonate fluxes and the overall cycle of this element in the exogenous environment [1, 2]. Cells of DH5α E. coli strain were grown in Luria Broth medium and the Mg isotope fractionation between the cells and their growth medium determined after calcination in Pt crucibles, chemical purification by cation exchange chemistry in HCl medium [3] and isotopic analysis on a Nu HR MC-ICPMS. The yield is better than 96%. The Mg contents of 2.19 ± 0.08 mg per g DW in cells and 0.117 ± 0.001 mg per g DW in Luria Broth medium are consistent with literature data [4]. About half of the Mg initially present in the LB medium is taken up by the growing cells. At high cellular concentrations (OD600 = 3.5), cells are enriched in 26Mg by 0.97 ± 0.14 ‰ with respect to the culture medium. Although E. coli may not be a good proxy for oceanic plankton, such a substantial fractionation of Mg isotopes suggests that incorporation of even a few percent organic matter into oceanic oozes depletes oceanic Mg in its heavy isotopes and therefore accounts for the isotopic difference between riverine and marine Mg. [1] Drever, The Sea 5 (1974) 337-357 [2] Tipper et al., EPSL 250 (2006) 241-253 [3] Chang et al., JAAS 18 (2003) 296-301 [4] Outten et al., Science 292 (2001), 2488-2492

  8. Carbon isotopes in mollusk shell carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnaughey, Ted A.; Gillikin, David Paul

    2008-10-01

    Mollusk shells contain many isotopic clues about calcification physiology and environmental conditions at the time of shell formation. In this review, we use both published and unpublished data to discuss carbon isotopes in both bivalve and gastropod shell carbonates. Land snails construct their shells mainly from respired CO2, and shell δ13C reflects the local mix of C3 and C4 plants consumed. Shell δ13C is typically >10‰ heavier than diet, probably because respiratory gas exchange discards CO2, and retains the isotopically heavier HCO3 -. Respired CO2 contributes less to the shells of aquatic mollusks, because CO2/O2 ratios are usually higher in water than in air, leading to more replacement of respired CO2 by environmental CO2. Fluid exchange with the environment also brings additional dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) into the calcification site. Shell δ13C is typically a few ‰ lower than ambient DIC, and often decreases with age. Shell δ13C retains clues about processes such as ecosystem metabolism and estuarine mixing. Ca2+ ATPase-based models of calcification physiology developed for corals and algae likely apply to mollusks, too, but lower pH and carbonic anhydrase at the calcification site probably suppress kinetic isotope effects. Carbon isotopes in biogenic carbonates are clearly complex, but cautious interpretation can provide a wealth of information, especially after vital effects are better understood.

  9. Carbonate Ion Effects on Coccolith Carbon and Oxygen Isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziveri, P.; Probert, I.; Stoll, H. M.

    2006-12-01

    The stable oxygen and carbon isotopic composition of biogenic calcite constitutes one of the primary tools used in paleoceanographic reconstructions. The δ18O of shells of ocean floor microfossils and corals reflects the composition of the paleo-seawater as they use the oxygen to build up their calcite and aragonite shells. The δ13C is used to reconstruct variations in the carbon isotopic composition of dissolved inorganic carbon in the ocean, which is controlled by biological productivity through the removal of isotopically light carbon in organic matter. To be effective and sensitive tools for understanding photic zone processes it is first necessary to understand the various biological fractionations associated with carbonate precipitation. To date, isotopic fractionation models are mainly based on foraminifera and corals but not on coccoliths, tiny plates produced by coccolithophore algae, which are often the most dominant carbonate contributors to pelagic sediments. As photosynthetic organisms, their chemistry can provide a sensitive tool for understanding photic zone processes. Coccoliths may be the most important carbonate phase for geochemical analysis in sediments where foraminifera are less common and/or core material is limited, such as in subpolar regions and for Early Cenozoic and Mesozoic sediments. Here we report experimental results on a common living coccolithophore species showing that the 13C/12C and 18O/16O ratios decrease with the increase of HCO^{3-} (CO32-). The selected species are among the heaviest calcifying extant coccolithophores and are major contributors to present coccolith carbonate export production. Because coccolithophores are photosynthetic organisms that calcify intracellularly in specialized vesicles, the challenge lies in ascertaining how kinetic and thermodynamic processes of isotopic fractionation are linked to cellular carbon "transport" and carbonate precipitation. This is a daunting challenge since studies have not

  10. Micronutrient Cadmium in the Oceans, Distribution and Stable Isotope Fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abouchami, W.; Galer, S. J.; Feldmann, H.; Andreae, M. O.; de Baar, H.; Middag, R.; Klunder, M.; Laan, P.

    2012-12-01

    Recent breakthroughs in ultra-clean seawater sampling, analytical instrumentation and chemical separation of trace metals have led to significant improvement in both sensitivity and accuracy of concentration measurements of some key bio-limiting metals such as Zn, Cd and Fe. Stable isotope fractionations of these transition metal elements have added a further new dimension to our understanding of the marine biogeochemical cycling of trace nutrients. Improving our understanding of the latter is essential for assessing the impact of climate changes on the global carbon cycle, given the control of oceanic nutrient inventories on the efficiency of the "biological pump" and hence, its strength in regulating the sequestration of atmospheric CO2. The first reliable vertical distribution profiles of trace metal element cadmium (Cd) in the oceans [1, 2] showed a correlation with the major nutrient phosphate. This apparent involvement of Cd in the ocean biological cycle was unexpected, as Cd was known to be toxic, notably at high Cd abundance where it interferes with the true biological function of zinc (Zn), due to their similar chemistry. The novel ability to measure accurately the stable isotope fractionation of Cd in seawater may now help unravel the apparent role of Cd in the ocean biological cycle, akin to the classical breakthroughs and numerous applications of the ratio 13C/12C for understanding the ocean carbon cycle. We have examined the distribution of Cd concentration and isotope ratios in depth profiles from the High Nutrients Low Chlorophyll (HNLC) Southern Ocean, collected within the framework of the international GEOTRACES program. The first surface water transect along the Greenwich Meridian in the Southern Ocean revealed a strong meridional isotope gradient and two major biogeochemical provinces with distinctive Cd isotope fractionation factors, apparently related to phytoplankton community compositions and cellular uptake mechanisms [3]. Here we focus on

  11. Fundamental studies on kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of hydrogen isotope fractionation in natural gas systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Y.; Ma, Q.; Ellis, G.S.; Dai, J.; Katz, B.; Zhang, S.; Tang, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Based on quantum chemistry calculations for normal octane homolytic cracking, a kinetic hydrogen isotope fractionation model for methane, ethane, and propane formation is proposed. The activation energy differences between D-substitute and non-substituted methane, ethane, and propane are 318.6, 281.7, and 280.2cal/mol, respectively. In order to determine the effect of the entropy contribution for hydrogen isotopic substitution, a transition state for ethane bond rupture was determined based on density function theory (DFT) calculations. The kinetic isotope effect (KIE) associated with bond rupture in D and H substituted ethane results in a frequency factor ratio of 1.07. Based on the proposed mathematical model of hydrogen isotope fractionation, one can potentially quantify natural gas thermal maturity from measured hydrogen isotope values. Calculated gas maturity values determined by the proposed mathematical model using ??D values in ethane from several basins in the world are in close agreement with similar predictions based on the ??13C composition of ethane. However, gas maturity values calculated from field data of methane and propane using both hydrogen and carbon kinetic isotopic models do not agree as closely. It is possible that ??D values in methane may be affected by microbial mixing and that propane values might be more susceptible to hydrogen exchange with water or to analytical errors. Although the model used in this study is quite preliminary, the results demonstrate that kinetic isotope fractionation effects in hydrogen may be useful in quantitative models of natural gas generation, and that ??D values in ethane might be more suitable for modeling than comparable values in methane and propane. ?? 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Hydrogen Isotope Fractionation As a Tool to Identify Aerobic and Anaerobic PAH Biodegradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kümmel, Steffen; Starke, Robert; Chen, Gao; Musat, Florin; Richnow, Hans H; Vogt, Carsten

    2016-03-15

    Aerobic and anaerobic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) biodegradation was characterized by compound specific stable isotope analysis (CSIA) of the carbon and hydrogen isotope effects of the enzymatic reactions initiating specific degradation pathways, using naphthalene and 2-methylnaphtalene as model compounds. Aerobic activation of naphthalene and 2-methylnaphthalene by Pseudomonas putida NCIB 9816 and Pseudomonas fluorescens ATCC 17483 containing naphthalene dioxygenases was associated with moderate carbon isotope fractionation (εC = -0.8 ± 0.1‰ to -1.6 ± 0.2‰). In contrast, anaerobic activation of naphthalene by a carboxylation-like mechanism by strain NaphS6 was linked to negligible carbon isotope fractionation (εC = -0.2 ± 0.2‰ to -0.4 ± 0.3‰). Notably, anaerobic activation of naphthalene by strain NaphS6 exhibited a normal hydrogen isotope fractionation (εH = -11 ± 2‰ to -47 ± 4‰), whereas an inverse hydrogen isotope fractionation was observed for the aerobic strains (εH = +15 ± 2‰ to +71 ± 6‰). Additionally, isotope fractionation of NaphS6 was determined in an overlaying hydrophobic carrier phase, resulting in more reliable enrichment factors compared to immobilizing the PAHs on the bottle walls without carrier phase. The observed differences especially in hydrogen fractionation might be used to differentiate between aerobic and anaerobic naphthalene and 2-methylnaphthalene biodegradation pathways at PAH-contaminated field sites. PMID:26855125

  13. Biomineralization and the carbon isotope record

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The advent of biomineralization at the turn of the Precambrian/Cambrian boundary has been a major event in the Earth's evolutionary history. With this there has been a major shift from abiotic to biotic formation of minerals such as phosphates and carbonates and, subsequently, silica. The dominant factor which effected this shift is a change in ocean's chemistry with respect to its Ca2+ and mineral nutrient contents. Mechanism controlling the biotic mineral formation is different from that controlling the abiotic one in that the former is enzymically controlled. It is suggested that this difference is also manifested in the stable carbon isotope fractionation between the two processes and has implication for the interpretation of stable carbon isotope record. (Author)

  14. Copper isotope fractionation in acid mine drainage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimball, Bryn E; Mathur, Ryan; Dohnalkova, Alice; Wall, A J; Runkel, R L; Brantley, Susan L

    2009-03-01

    We surveyed the Cu isotopic composition of primary minerals and stream water affected by acid mine drainage in a mineralized watershed located in southwestern Colorado, USA. The δ65Cu values (based on 65Cu/63Cu) of local enargite (δ65Cu = -0.01 ± 0.10‰; 2σ) and chalcopyrite (δ65Cu = 0.16 ± 0.10‰) are within the general range of previously reported values for terrestrial primary Cu sulfides (-1‰ < δ65Cu < 1). These mineral samples show lower δ65Cu values than stream waters (δ65Cu = 1.36 - 1.74 ± 0.10‰), with an average isotopic fractionation (quantified as Δaq-mino = δ65Cuaq – δ65Cu min, where Cuaq is leached Cu and Cu mino is the original mineral) of 1.60 ± 0.14‰ and 1.43 ± 0.14‰ for enargite and chalcopyrite, respectively.

  15. Economically important applications of carbon isotope data of natural gases and crude oil: a brief review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon isotope fractionations in hydrocarbons are briefly reviewed and examples of practical applications in the exploration of crude oil are given. Carbon isotope fractionations of natural gases are discussed. It is shown that the carbon isotope ratio of methane is predominantly determined by the environment (humic or sapropelic) and the maturity of its organic source material. In this way, isotope analyses of natural gases can be quantitatively used to characterize the maturity of their source rocks. (author)

  16. Experimental Study of Silicon Isotope Dynamic Fractionation and Its Application in Geology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李延河; 丁悌平; 等

    1995-01-01

    Silicon shows no vatiation in its chemical valence in nature and exists mainly in the form of silicon-oxygen tetrahedra,so very small silicon isotope thermodynamic frac-tionation occurs and the resultant silicon isotope variation is limited.Dynamic fraction-ation of Si isotopes during precipitation of SiO2 from a solution is a main factor leading to substantial variations in silicon isotopes in nature. In this experimental study,we determined the dynamic fractionation factor αfor silicon isotopes during precipitation of SiO2 from the solution.And in combination of α, a theoretical explanation is pre-sented of the considerably low &30Si values of black smokers on modern seafloor ,Archean banded magnetite-quartzite and clay minerals of weathering origin ,and of clearly high &30Si values of siliceous rocks in shallow -sea carbonate platforms.

  17. Tracing the biotransformation of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in common carp (Cryprinus carpio): Enantiomeric fraction and compound-specific stable carbon isotope analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Bin; Luo, Xiao-Jun; Zeng, Yan-Hong; Sun, Run-Xia; Chen, Hua-Shan; Li, Zong-Rui; Mai, Bi-Xian

    2016-09-01

    Metabolites of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in fish are difficult to detect in vivo due to the complexity of biometabolism. In the present study, atropisomeric fraction analysis of chiral PCB congeners and compound-specific isotopic analysis (CSIA) were applied to trace the biotransformation of PCBs in fish by exposure of common carp (Cryprinus carpio) to the commercial PCB mixture Aroclor 1242. Stereoselective elimination of the chiral PCB congeners 91, 95, and 136 was observed, indicating a stereoselective biotransformation process. The δ(13)C values of PCBs 5/8, 18, and 20/33 in fish were increased compared with those in the spiked food, while PCBs 47/48 and 49 showed significant heavy isotope depletion. These results suggested a significant biotransformation of the corresponding individual PCB congeners although the potential PCB metabolites, hydroxylated PCBs (OH-PCBs) and methylsulfone PCBs (MeSO2-PCBs), were not detected in the fish tissue samples throughout this experiment. The results of the present study demonstrated that a combination of chiral analysis and CSIA is a promising new approach for investigating the biotransformation of PCBs in biota. PMID:27341148

  18. Observations of Isotope Fractionation in Prestellar Cores: Interstellar Origin of Meteoritic Hot Spot?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milam, S. N.; Charnley, S. B.

    2011-01-01

    Isotopically fractionated material is found in many solar system objects, including meteorites and comets. It is thought, in some cases, to trace interstellar material that was incorporated into the solar system without undergoing significant processing. Here, we show the results of models and observations of the nitrogen and carbon fractionation in proto-stellar cores.

  19. Isotopic studies of Yucca Mountain soil fluids and carbonate pedogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Secondary carbonates occurring within the soils, faults, and subsurface fractures of Yucca Mountain contain some of the best available records of paleoclimate and palehydrology for the potential radioactive waste repository site. This article discusses conceptual and analytical advances being made with regard to the interpretation of stable isotope data from pedogenic carbonates, specifically related to the 13C content of soil CO2, CaCO3, precipitation mechanisms, and isotopic fractionations between parent fluids and precipitating carbonates. The 13C content of soil carbon dioxide from Yucca Mountain and vicinity shows most of the usual patterns expected in such contexts: Decreasing 13C content with depth decreasing 13C with altitude and reduced 13C during spring. These patterns exist within the domain of a noisy data set; soil and vegetational heterogeneities, weather, and other factors apparently contribute to isotopic variability in the system. Several soil calcification mechanisms appear to be important, involving characteristic physical and chemical environments and isotopic fractionations. When CO2 loss from thin soil solutions is an important driving factor, carbonates may contain excess heavy isotopes, compared to equilibrium precipitation with soil fluids. When root calcification serves as a proton generator for plant absorption of soil nutrients, heavy isotope deficiencies are likely. Successive cycles of dissolution and reprecipitation mix and redistribute pedogenic carbonates, and tend to isotopically homogenize and equilibrate pedogenic carbonates with soil fluids

  20. Progressive extraction method applied to isotopic exchange of carbon-14

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isotopic exchange in natural settings is essentially an irreversible process, so that it progresses continuously until there is complete isotopic equilibrium. In soils, this process involves interaction between isotopes in the liquid and solid phases, and complete isotopic equilibrium may take a very long time. Measurements after partial isotopic exchange have been used to characterize the labile fraction of elements in soils. We describe a method to characterize the extent of isotopic exchange, with application here to incorporation of inorganic carbon-14 (14C) into mineral carbonates and organic matter in soils. The procedure uses a continuous addition of extractant, acid, or H2O2in the examples presented here, coupled with sequential sampling. The method has been applied to demonstrate the degree of isotopic exchange in soil. The same strategy could be applied to many other elements, including plant nutrients. (author)

  1. Strontium isotope fractionation in soils and pedogenic processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stable isotope composition of strontium (the ratio 88Sr/86Sr expressed as δ88/86Sr) showed significant fractionation in mountain soils of the Judea Highland. In order to understand this phenomenon, we studied the elemental composition and the stable and radiogenic Sr isotopic composition in soil transects conducted from semi-arid (desert fringe) to wetter (Mediterranean) climate zones. These transects were selected because the degree of soil leaching depends on the amount of precipitation and the permeability of the underlying bedrock. These soils are the pedogenic products of leaching of the accumulated desert dust and the underlying carbonate bed-rocks resulting in, among others, enrichment of the residual soils in Al-clays. A clear negative correlation was found between the δ88/86Sr and Al2O3 (Al-clay content) values of the soils, the high δ88/86Sr-low Al2O3 being the dust end-member. This preliminary study demonstrates the feasibility of using stable 88Sr-86Sr isotopes as tracers of terrestrial weathering processes. (authors)

  2. Microbially Mediated Kinetic Sulfur Isotope Fractionation: Reactive Transport Modeling Benchmark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanner, C.; Druhan, J. L.; Cheng, Y.; Amos, R. T.; Steefel, C. I.; Ajo Franklin, J. B.

    2014-12-01

    Microbially mediated sulfate reduction is a ubiquitous process in many subsurface systems. Isotopic fractionation is characteristic of this anaerobic process, since sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) favor the reduction of the lighter sulfate isotopologue (S32O42-) over the heavier isotopologue (S34O42-). Detection of isotopic shifts have been utilized as a proxy for the onset of sulfate reduction in subsurface systems such as oil reservoirs and aquifers undergoing uranium bioremediation. Reactive transport modeling (RTM) of kinetic sulfur isotope fractionation has been applied to field and laboratory studies. These RTM approaches employ different mathematical formulations in the representation of kinetic sulfur isotope fractionation. In order to test the various formulations, we propose a benchmark problem set for the simulation of kinetic sulfur isotope fractionation during microbially mediated sulfate reduction. The benchmark problem set is comprised of four problem levels and is based on a recent laboratory column experimental study of sulfur isotope fractionation. Pertinent processes impacting sulfur isotopic composition such as microbial sulfate reduction and dispersion are included in the problem set. To date, participating RTM codes are: CRUNCHTOPE, TOUGHREACT, MIN3P and THE GEOCHEMIST'S WORKBENCH. Preliminary results from various codes show reasonable agreement for the problem levels simulating sulfur isotope fractionation in 1D.

  3. Nitrogen allocation and carbon isotope fractionation in relation to intercepted radiation and position in a young Pinus radiata D. Don tree

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The three dimensional distribution of intercepted radiation, intercellular CO2 concentration (Ci) and late summer needle nitrogen (N) concentration were determined at the tips of all 54 branches in a 6·2-m-tall Pinus radiata D. Don tree growing in a New Zealand plantation. Measurements included above- and below-canopy irradiance, leaf stable carbon isotopic composition (δ13C) and tree canopy architecture. The radiation absorption component of the model, MAESTRO, was tested on site and then used to determine the branch tip distribution of intercepted radiation. We hypothesized that in branch tip needles: (i) the allocation of nitrogen and other nutrients would be closely associated with the distribution of intercepted radiation, reflecting carbon gain optimization theory, and (ii) Ci would predominantly reflect changes in photosynthetic rate (A) rather than stomatal conductance (gs), indicating that the increase in A for a given increase in N concentration was larger than the corresponding increase in gs. Needle nitrogen concentration was poorly related to intercepted radiation, regardless of the period over which the latter was calculated. At a given height, there was a large azimuthal variation in intercepted radiation but N concentration was remarkably uniform around the tree canopy. There was, however, a linear and positive correspondence between N concentration and δ13C and needle height above ground (r2 = 0·73 and 0·68, respectively). The very strong linear correspondence between N concentration and Ci (r2 = 0·71) was interpreted, using gas exchange measurements, as supporting our second hypothesis. Recognizing the strong apical control in P. radiata and possible effects of leaf nitrogen storage in an evergreen species, we propose that the tree leader must have constituted a very strong carbon sink throughout the growing season, and that the proximity of branch tip needles to the leader affected their photosynthetic capacity and nutrient concentration

  4. Carbon and oxygen isotope microanalysis of carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velivetskaya, Tatiana A; Ignatiev, Alexander V; Gorbarenko, Sergey A

    2009-08-30

    Technical modification of the conventional method for the delta(13)C and delta(18)O analysis of 10-30 microg carbonate samples is described. The CO(2) extraction is carried out in vacuum using 105% phosphoric acid at 95 degrees C, and the isotopic composition of CO(2) is measured in a helium flow by gas chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/IRMS). The feed-motion of samples to the reaction vessel provides sequential dropping of only the samples (without the sample holder) into the acid, preventing the contamination of acid and allowing us to use the same acid to carry out very large numbers of analyses. The high accuracy and high reproducibility of the delta(13)C and delta(18)O analyses were demonstrated by measurements of international standards and comparison of results obtained by our method and by the conventional method. Our method allows us to analyze 10 microg of the carbonate with a standard deviation of +/-0.05 per thousand for delta(13)C and delta(18)O. The method has been used successfully for the analyses of the oxygen and carbon isotopic composition of the planktonic and benthic foraminifera in detailed palaeotemperature reconstructions of the Okhotsk Sea. PMID:19603476

  5. Mass-dependent sulfur isotope fractionation during reoxidative sulfur cycling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pellerin, André; Bui, Thi Hao; Rough, Mikaella;

    2015-01-01

    The multiple sulfur isotope composition of porewater sulfate from the anoxic marine sapropel of Mangrove Lake, Bermuda was measured in order to establish how multiple sulfur isotopes are fractionated during reoxidative sulfur cycling. The porewater-sulfate d34S and D33S dataset exhibits the...... distinct isotopic signatures of microbial sulfate reduction and sulfur reoxidation. We reproduced the measurements with a simple diagenetic model that yielded fractionation factors for net sulfate removal of between 29.2 0/00 and 32.5 0/00. A new approach to isotopic modeling of the sulfate profiles......, informed by the chemistry of sulfur intermediate compounds in Mangrove Lake, reveals that sulfate reduction produces a relatively small intrinsic fractionation and that an active reoxidative sulfur cycle increases the fractionation of the measured values. Based on the model results, the reoxidative cycle...

  6. Copper isotope fractionation during equilibration with natural and synthetic ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Brooke M; Kirby, Jason K; Degryse, Fien; Scheiderich, Kathleen; McLaughlin, Mike J

    2014-01-01

    As copper (Cu) stable isotopes emerge as a tool for tracing Cu biogeochemical cycling, an understanding of how Cu isotopes fractionate during complexation with soluble organic ligands in natural waters and soil solutions is required. A Donnan dialysis technique was employed to assess the isotopic fractionation of Cu during complexation with the soluble synthetic ligands ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), iminodiacetic acid (IDA) and desferrioxamine B (DFOB), as well as with Suwannee River fulvic acid (SRFA). The results indicated enrichment of the heavy isotope ((65)Cu) in the complexes, with Δ(65)Cu complex-free values ranging from +0.14 to +0.84‰. A strong linear correlation was found between the logarithms of the stability constants of the Cu complexes and the magnitudes of isotopic fractionation. These results show that complexation of Cu by organic ligands can affect the isotopic signature of the free Cu ion. This free Cu is considered the most bioavailable species, and hence, our results highlight the importance of understanding fractionation processes in the uptake medium when using Cu isotopes to study the uptake mechanisms of organisms. These data contribute a vital piece to the emerging picture of Cu isotope cycling in the natural environment, as organic complexation plays a key role in the Cu cycle. PMID:24992660

  7. Ca isotope fractionation in a high-alkalinity lake system: Mono Lake, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Laura C.; DePaolo, Donald J.

    2013-10-01

    Precipitation of calcium carbonate minerals from aqueous solutions causes surface-controlled kinetic stable Ca isotope fractionation. The magnitude of fractionation depends on the relative rates of ion attachment to and detachment from the mineral surface, which in turn is predicted to depend on both the saturation state and the solution stoichiometry or the Ca:CO32- activity ratio. Experimental studies have not directly investigated the effects of varying solution stoichiometry on calcium isotope partitioning during calcite or aragonite growth, but natural alkaline lake systems such as Mono Lake, California provide a test bed for the hypothesized stoichiometry dependence. Mono Lake has a Ca:CO32- activity ratio of about 0.0001, seven orders of magnitude lower than ocean water and typical terrestrial freshwater. We present chemical and isotopic measurements of streams, springs, lake water, and precipitated carbonates from the Mono Basin that yield evidence of stoichiometry-dependent Ca isotope fractionation during calcite, aragonite and Mg-calcite precipitation from the alkaline lake water. To estimate the Ca isotope fractionation factors, it is necessary to characterize the lake Ca balance and constrain the variability of lake water chemistry both spatially and temporally. Streams and springs supply Ca to the lake, and a substantial fraction of this supply is precipitated along the lake shore to form tufa towers. Lake water is significantly supersaturated with respect to carbonate minerals, so CaCO3 also precipitates directly from the water column to form carbonate-rich bottom sediments. Growth rate inhibition by orthophosphate likely preserves the high degree of supersaturation in the lake. Strontium isotope ratios are used to estimate the proportions of fresh and alkaline lake water from which each solid carbonate sample precipitated. Carbonate minerals that precipitate directly from lake water (low Ca:CO32-) experience relatively large Ca isotope fractionation

  8. Li isotope fractionation in peridotites and mafic melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffcoate, A. B.; Elliott, T.; Kasemann, S. A.; Ionov, D.; Cooper, K.; Brooker, R.

    2007-01-01

    We have measured the Li isotope ratios of a range of co-existing phases from peridotites and mafic magmas to investigate high-temperature fractionations of 7Li/ 6Li. The Li isotopic compositions of seven mantle peridotites, reconstructed from analyses of mineral separates, show little variation (δ 7Li 3.2-4.9‰) despite a wide range in fertility and radiogenic isotopic compositions. The most fertile samples yield a best estimate of δ 7Li ˜ 3.5‰ for the upper mantle. Bulk analyses of olivine separates from the xenoliths are typically ˜1.5‰ isotopically lighter than co-existing orthopyroxenes, suggestive of a small, high-temperature equilibrium isotope fractionation. On the other hand, bulk analyses of olivine phenocrysts and their host melts are isotopically indistinguishable. Given these observations, equilibrium mantle melting should generate melts with δ 7Li little different from their sources (style of zoning is also observed in the phenocrysts of holocrystalline Hawaiian lavas. More dramatically, a single orthopyroxene crystal from a San Carlos xenolith shows a W-shaped Li isotope profile with a 40‰ range in δ 7Li, close to the isotope variability seen in all terrestrial whole rock analyses. We attribute Li isotope zonation in mineral phases to diffusive fractionation of Li isotopes, within mineral phases and along melt pathways that pervade xenoliths. Given the high diffusivity of Li, the Li isotope profiles we observe can persist, at most, only a few years at magmatic temperatures. Our results thus highlight the potential of Li isotopes as a high-resolution geospeedometer of the final phases of magmatic activity and cooling.

  9. Fractionation of metal stable isotopes by higher plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Blanckenburg, F.; Von Wiren, N.; Guelke, M.; Weiss, D.J.; Bullen, T.D.

    2009-01-01

    Higher plants induce chemical reactions in the rhizosphere, facilitating metal uptake by roots. Fractionation of the isotopes in nutrients such as calcium, iron, magnesium, and zinc produces a stable isotope composition in the plants that generally differs from that of the growth medium. Isotope fractionation also occurs during transport of the metals within most plants, but its extent depends on plant species and on the metal, in particular, on the metal's redox state and what ligand it is bound to. The metal stable isotope variations observed in plants create an isotope signature of life at the Earth's surface, contributing substantially to our understanding of metal cycling processes in the environment and in individual organisms.

  10. Carbon isotopic studies of organic matter in Precambrian rocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehler, D. Z.; Schopf, J. W.; Kvenvolden, K. A.

    1972-01-01

    A survey has been undertaken of the carbon composition of the total organic fraction of a suite of Precambrian sediments to detect isotopic trends possibly correlative with early evolutionary events. Early Precambrian cherts of the Fig Tree and upper and middle Onverwacht groups of South Africa were examined for this purpose. Reduced carbon in these cherts was found to be isotopically similar to photosynthetically produced organic matter of younger geological age. Reduced carbon in lower Onverwacht cherts was found to be anomalously heavy; it is suggested that this discontinuity may reflect a major event in biological evolution.

  11. Iron isotope fractionation in marine invertebrates in near shore environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmanuel, S.; Schuessler, J. A.; Vinther, J.; Matthews, A.; von Blanckenburg, F.

    2014-04-01

    Chitons (Mollusca) are marine invertebrates that produce radula (teeth or rasping tongue) containing high concentrations of biomineralized magnetite and other iron bearing minerals. As Fe isotope signatures are influenced by redox processes and biological fractionation, Fe isotopes in chiton radula might be expected to provide an effective tracer of ambient oceanic conditions and biogeochemical cycling. Here, in a pilot study to measure Fe isotopes in marine invertebrates, we examine Fe isotopes in modern marine chiton radula collected from different locations in the Atlantic and Pacific oceans to assess the range of isotopic values, and to test whether or not the isotopic signatures reflect seawater values. Furthermore, by comparing two species that have very different feeding habits but collected from the same location, we infer a possible link between diet and Fe isotopic signatures. Values of δ56Fe (relative to IRMM-014) in chiton teeth range from -1.90 to 0.00‰ (±0.05‰ (2σ) uncertainty in δ56Fe), probably reflecting a combination of geographical control and biological fractionation processes. Comparison with published local surface seawater Fe isotope data shows a consistent negative offset of chiton teeth Fe isotope compositions relative to seawater. Strikingly, two different species from the same locality in the North Pacific (Puget Sound, Washington, USA) have distinct isotopic signatures. Tonicella lineata, which feeds on red algae, has a mean δ56Fe of -0.65 ± 0.26‰ (2σ, 3 specimens), while Mopalia muscosa, which feeds primarily on green algae, shows lighter isotopic values with a mean δ56Fe of -1.47 ± 0.98‰ (2σ, 5 specimens). Although chitons are not simple recorders of the ambient seawater Fe isotopic signature, these preliminary results suggest that Fe isotopes provide information concerning Fe biogeochemical cycling in near shore environments, and might be used to probe sources of Fe in the diets of different organisms.

  12. Linking observable stable isotope fractionation to transformation pathways of organic pollutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Measuring stable isotope fractionation of carbon, hydrogen and other elements by compound specific isotope analysis (CSIA) is a new, innovative approach to assess organic pollutant degradation in the environment. Central to this concept is the Rayleigh equation which relates degradation-induced decreases in concentrations directly to concomitant changes in bulk (= average over the whole compound) isotope ratios. The extent of in situ transformation may therefore be inferred from measured isotope ratios in field samples, provided that an appropriate enrichment factor (εbulk) is known. This εbulk value, however, is usually only valid for a specific compound and for specific degradation conditions. We therefore developed an evaluation procedure that takes into account (a) non reacting positions within a compound as well as (b) effects of intramolecular isotopic competition so that enrichment factors εbulk can now be converted into estimates of apparent kinetic isotope effects. Reevaluation of existing bulk literature values result in consistent ranges of AKIE values that generally are in good agreement with previously published data in the (bio)chemical literature and are typical of certain degradation reactions. Hence, the evaluation scheme bridges a gap between basic and environmental (bio)chemistry. It provides insight into factors that control the magnitude of bulk isotope fractionation factors and serves as a basis to even identify degradation pathways using only the observable bulk isotope fractionation in an organic substrate. (author)

  13. Probing the Isotopic Composition of Surface Waters Across Isotopic Extremes of Cryogenian Carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosak, T.; Matys, E. D.; Bird, L. R.; Macdonald, F. A.; Freeman, K. H.

    2012-12-01

    Neoproterozoic carbonate strata record unusually large and positive carbon isotope values (δ13Ccarb from 4 to 10 per mil), and stratigraphically extensive large negative carbon isotope excursions (δ13Ccarb red algae, respectively, they can be used as tracers of organic matter production in surface waters. Fossil tests were extracted by acid maceration, cleaned and analyzed morphologically and microscopically. Their carbon isotopic composition was measured using a nano-scaled elemental analyzer inlet (nano-EA-IRMS), with ±1 per mil analytical precision. To date, we analyzed 12 samples of 100-150 organic tests, representing 3 different fossiliferous parts of the Tayshir anomaly (δ13Ccarb +5 per mil), respectively. More samples, including those of fossil algae and tests from the carbonate strata overlying the Tayshir anomaly, are currently being analyzed. Initial data reveal a rather constant isotopic composition of organic carbon in fossil tests (δ13Cfossil), with values of -23 ±1 per mil both within 13C-enriched and 13C-depleted carbonates. The isotopic difference between δ13Cfossil and 13C-enriched carbonates is 28 to 30 per mil, suggesting maximal isotopic fractionation by primary producers, and little environmental (or diagenetic) processing of primary photosynthetic carbon. The carbonates of the Tayshir anomaly preserve two organic materials: matrix or bulk carbon characterized by a δ13Corg that covaries with δ13Ccarb, and a small, but morphologically diagnostic component whose δ13Cfossil values do not covary with δ13Ccarb. The stratigraphic thickness (~ 50 m) and isotopic heterogeneity of the organic matter within the Tayshir anomaly (~ 50 m) suggest a prolonged and large contribution of organic carbon remineralization.

  14. Biological, chemical, electrochemical, and photochemical fractionation of Fe isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, S.; King, A.; Hutchins, D.; Adkins, J. F.; Fu, F.; Wasson, A.; Hodierne, C.

    2012-12-01

    Iron is an important nutrient for life in the ocean, where low Fe concentrations often limit the growth of marine phytoplankton. Fe stable isotope ratios (δ56Fe) are a potentially valuable new tool for studying the marine biological cycling of Fe. In order to effectively use Fe isotopes as a biological tracer, however, it is important to parameterize the isotope effect for biological uptake. We have therefore measured the biological fractionation of Fe isotopes by the marine diatoms Thalassiosira pseudonana, T. oceanica, and Phaeodactylum tricornutum in culture. During biological Fe acquisition, Fe(III) is often first reduced from Fe(III) to Fe(II), either in seawater or at the cell surface. Therefore, we have also measured the isotope effect for Fe(III) reduction by chemical, electrochemical, and photochemical processes. Diatoms were cultured in EDTA or NTA buffered media under varying Fe concentrations from Fe-sufficiency to Fe-limitation. Biological fractionation of Fe isotopes was determined by comparing δ56Fe of phytoplankton to the media. The use of a cell wash allows us to distinguish between isotopic fractionation during extracellular adsorption and intracellular uptake. The biological fractionation of Fe isotopes is highly dependent on culture conditions with Δδ56Fe ranging from +0.6 ‰ to -0.5 ‰ depending on ligand composition, species, and Fe-limitation status. Isotope effects for chemical, electrochemical, and photochemical reduction of Fe(III) to Fe(II) span an even larger range. For example, chemical reduction of Fe(III)-EDTA with hydroxylamine hydrochloride has an isotope effect of Δδ56Fe = -2.8 ‰. By contrast, photochemical reduction of Fe(III)-EDTA has an isotope effect of Δδ56Fe = +0.9 ‰. Isotope effects for electrochemical reduction of Fe(III) using a rotating disc electrode allow for greater control of experimental conditions, such as differentiating between the effects of electric potential (voltage) and mass transport (diffusion

  15. Robust optical carbon dioxide isotope analyzer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Isotopic analysis of carbon dioxide is an important tool for characterization of the exchange and transformation of carbon between the biosphere and the atmosphere....

  16. Modeling the carbon isotope composition of bivalve shells (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanek, C.

    2010-12-01

    The stable carbon isotope composition of bivalve shells is a valuable archive of paleobiological and paleoenvironmental information. Previous work has shown that the carbon isotope composition of the shell is related to the carbon isotope composition of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in the ambient water in which a bivalve lives, as well as metabolic carbon derived from bivalve respiration. The contribution of metabolic carbon varies among organisms, but it is generally thought to be relatively low (e.g., 90%) in the shells from terrestrial organisms. Because metabolic carbon contains significantly more C-12 than DIC, negative excursions from the expected environmental (DIC) signal are interpreted to reflect an increased contribution of metabolic carbon in the shell. This observation contrasts sharply with modeled carbon isotope compositions for shell layers deposited from the inner extrapallial fluid (EPF). Previous studies have shown that growth lines within the inner shell layer of bivalves are produced during periods of anaerobiosis when acidic metabolic byproducts (e.g., succinic acid) are neutralized (or buffered) by shell dissolution. This requires the pH of EPF to decrease below ambient levels (~7.5) until a state of undersaturation is achieved that promotes shell dissolution. This condition may occur when aquatic bivalves are subjected to external stressors originating from ecological (predation) or environmental (exposure to atm; low dissolved oxygen; contaminant release) pressures; normal physiological processes will restore the pH of EPF when the pressure is removed. As a consequence of this process, a temporal window should also exist in EPF at relatively low pH where shell carbonate is deposited at a reduced saturation state and precipitation rate. For example, EPF chemistry should remain slightly supersaturated with respect to aragonite given a drop of one pH unit (6.5), but under closed conditions, equilibrium carbon isotope fractionation

  17. Controls on stable sulfur isotope fractionation during bacterial sulfate reduction in Arctic sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruchert, V.; Knoblauch, C.; Jørgensen, BB

    2001-01-01

    -specific sulfate reduction rates, these greater isotopic differences cannot be accounted for by significantly lower in situ bacterial sulfate reduction rates. Therefore, the remaining isotopic difference between sulfate and sulfide must derive from additional isotope effects that exist in the oxidative part of the...... fractionations varied by less than 5.8 parts per thousand with respect to temperature and sulfate reduction rate, whereas the difference in sulfur isotopic fractionation between bacteria with different carbon oxidation pathways was as large as 17.4 parts per thousand. Incubation of sediment slurries from two...... parts per thousand and 8 parts per thousand above 25 degreesC, respectively. In absence of significant differences in sulfate reduction rates in the high and low temperature range, respectively, we infer that different genera of sulfate-reducing bacteria dominate the sulfate-reducing bacterial community...

  18. In-situ biodegradation of tetrachloroethene and trichloroethene in contaminated aquifers monitored by stable isotope fractionation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieth, A; Müller, J; Strauch, G; Kästner, M; Gehre, M; Meckenstock, R U; Richnow, H H

    2003-06-01

    Stable carbon isotope analysis of tetrachloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethene (TCE) was applied to evaluatenatural attenuation processes in the upper Quaternary and lower Tertiary aquifer in the area of a former dry-cleaning plant located in Leipzig, Germany. Groundwater samples were taken during one monitoring campaign in 2001. The 13C enrichment in contaminants along the water flow path suggested that both, PCE and TCE were degraded in the Quaternary aquifer. The enrichment of 13C in the residual PCE fraction and an isotope fractionation factor from laboratory experiments were used to calculate the extent of biodegradation in the Quatemary aquifer. These calculations indicated that a major portion of PCE was biodegraded in the course of the plume. In the Tertiary aquifer the carbon isotope ratios of PCE and TCE indicated that the decreasing concentrations of these contaminants were probably not caused by microbial processes. PMID:12872803

  19. Isotopic studies of Yucca Mountain soil fluids and carbonate pedogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Secondary carbonates occurring within the soils, faults, and subsurface fractures of Yucca Mountain contain some of the best available records of paleoclimate and paleohydrology for the potential radioactive waste repository site. This article discusses conceptual and analytical advances being made with regard to the interpretation of stable isotope data from pedogenic carbonates, specifically related to the 13C content of soil CO2, CaCO3 precipitation mechanisms, and isotopic fractionations between parent fluids and precipitating carbonates. The 13C content of soil carbon dioxide from Yucca Mountain and vicinity shows most of the usual patterns expected in such contexts: decreasing 13C content with depth (due mainly to increased importance of respired CO2), decreasing 13C with altitude (partially due to relatively more C-3 vegetation), and reduced 13C during spring (due again to higher rates of respiration, and reduced gas permeability of wet soils). These patterns exist within the domain of a noisy data set; soil and vegetational heterogeneities, weather, and other factors apparently contribute to isotopic variability in the system. Several soil calcification mechanisms appear to be important, involving characteristic physical and chemical environments and isotopic fractionations. When CO2 loss from thin soil solutions is an important driving factor, carbonates may contain excess heavy isotopes, compared to equilibrium precipitation with soil fluids. When root calcification serves as a proton generator for plant absorption of soil nutrients, heavy isotope deficiencies are likely. Successive cycles of dissolution and reprecipitation mix and redistribute pedogenic carbonates, and tend to isotopically homogenize and equilibrate pedogenic carbonates with soil fluids

  20. Unraveling quantum mechanical effects in water using isotopic fractionation

    CERN Document Server

    Markland, Thomas E

    2013-01-01

    When two phases of water are at equilibrium, the ratio of hydrogen isotopes in each is slightly altered due to their different phase affinities. This isotopic fractionation process can be utilized to analyze water's movement in the world's climate. Here we show that equilibrium fractionation ratios, an entirely quantum mechanical property, also provide a sensitive probe to assess the magnitude of nuclear quantum fluctuations in water. By comparing the predictions of a series of water models, we show that those describing the OH chemical bond as rigid or harmonic greatly over-predict the magnitude of isotope fractionation. Models that account for anharmonicity in this coordinate are shown to provide much more accurate results due to their ability to give partial cancellation between inter and intra-molecular quantum effects. These results give evidence of the existence of competing quantum effects in water and allow us to identify how this cancellation varies across a wide range of temperatures. In addition, t...

  1. From application of isotope enriched mercury in environmental studies to fractionation of mercury isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: This overview on using isotope enriched Hg in environmental studies summarizes results from a whole ecosystem experiment to illustrate aspects of sample preparation and instrumental requirements. Building on our experience in working with isotope-enriched material, our group recently progressed to using multicollector ICPMS for ultra precise isotope ratio determinations, revealing variations in natural Hg isotope ratios. Fractionation is triggered by mass dependent (e.g. reduction and volatilization) and mass independent processes (e.g. photochemical reactions). The presentation will give examples of both mechanisms and discuss Hg isotope fingerprinting as a tool for tracking sources of Hg in the environment. (author)

  2. Carbon isotope analysis in apple nectar beverages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Figueira

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study were to use the isotope analysis method to quantify the carbon of C3 photosynthetic cycle in commercial apple nectars and to determine the legal limit to identify the beverages that do not conform to the safety standards established by the Brazilian Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock and Food Supply. These beverages (apple nectars were produced in the laboratory according to the Brazilian legislation. Adulterated nectars were also produced with an amount of pulp juice below the permitted threshold limit value. The δ13C values of the apple nectars and their fractions (pulp and purified sugar were measured to quantify the C3 source percentage. In order to demonstrate the existence of adulteration, the values found were compared to the limit values established by the Brazilian Law. All commercial apple nectars analyzed were within the legal limits, which enabled to identify the nectars that were in conformity with the Brazilian Law. The isotopic methodology developed proved efficient to quantify the carbon of C3 origin in commercial apple nectars.

  3. Stable carbon and nitrogen isotopic fractionation between diet and swine tissues Fracionamento isotópico de carbono e nitrogênio entre a dieta e tecidos de porcos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Bielefeld Nardoto

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Naturally occurring stable isotope ratios can be a powerful tool in studies of animal nutrition, provided that the assumptions required for dietary reconstruction are validated by studies such as the one presented here. The objective of this study was to document the magnitude of isotopic fractionation between swine diet and their different tissues. For this, the isotopic ratios of carbon and nitrogen of the diet and selected tissues (hair, nail, liver, muscle, fat and cartilage were determined. The delta13C and delta15N of the diet were -15.9‰ and 1.3‰, respectively, and all delta15N of swine tissues were 2.2 to 3.0‰ enriched in 15N in relation to the diet. Little variation in delta15N occurred among tissues, with exception to liver that was less enriched in 15N than the nail. Nail and hair presented no 13C enrichment relative to diet. Cartilage was ~1.0‰ enriched in 13C as compared to diet. Liver and muscle were on average 2.1‰ more depleted in 13C in relation to diet as well as fat tissues. Some of the C and N isotope ratios of swine tissues differed in organs, but the isotopic fractionation trends among tissues appears to be similar to other mammals. Therefore our data provide a good baseline to interpret stable isotope patterns in domestic mammals (such as swine in controlled or semi-controlled experiments.O uso da abundância natural de isótopos estáveis pode ser uma ferramenta útil em estudos de nutrição animal, de forma que a base necessária para a reconstrução da dieta alimentar pode ser validada a partir de estudos como o apresentado aqui. O objetivo deste estudo foi documentar a magnitude do fracionamento isotópico entre a dieta e os tecidos de porcos domésticos. Para tanto, foram determinadas as razões isotópicas de carbono e nitrogênio de alguns tecidos selecionados (pêlo, unha, fígado, músculo, gordura e cartilagem. Os valores de delta13C e delta15N da ração fornecida foram -15,9‰ e 1,3

  4. Mass Fractionation Laws, Mass-Independent Effects, and Isotopic Anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauphas, Nicolas; Schauble, Edwin A.

    2016-06-01

    Isotopic variations usually follow mass-dependent fractionation, meaning that the relative variations in isotopic ratios scale with the difference in mass of the isotopes involved (e.g., δ17O ≈ 0.5×δ18O). In detail, however, the mass dependence of isotopic variations is not always the same, and different natural processes can define distinct slopes in three-isotope diagrams. These variations are subtle, but improvements in analytical capabilities now allow precise measurement of these effects and make it possible to draw inferences about the natural processes that caused them (e.g., reaction kinetics versus equilibrium isotope exchange). Some elements, in some sample types, do not conform to the regularities of mass-dependent fractionation. Oxygen and sulfur display a rich phenomenology of mass-independent fractionation, documented in the laboratory, in the rock record, and in the modern atmosphere. Oxygen in meteorites shows isotopic variations that follow a slope-one line (δ17O ≈ δ18O) whose origin may be associated with CO photodissociation. Sulfur mass-independent fractionation in ancient sediments provides the tightest constraint on the oxygen partial pressure in the Archean and the timing of Earth's surface oxygenation. Heavier elements also show departures from mass fractionation that can be ascribed to exotic effects associated with chemical reactions such as magnetic effects (e.g., Hg) or the nuclear field shift effect (e.g., U or Tl). Some isotopic variations in meteorites and their constituents cannot be related to the terrestrial composition by any known process, including radiogenic, nucleogenic, and cosmogenic effects. Those variations have a nucleosynthetic origin, reflecting the fact that the products of stellar nucleosynthesis were not fully homogenized when the Solar System formed. Those anomalies are found at all scales, from nanometer-sized presolar grains to bulk terrestrial planets. They can be used to learn about stellar

  5. Silicon Isotopic Fractionation of CAI-like Vacuum Evaporation Residues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knight, K; Kita, N; Mendybaev, R; Richter, F; Davis, A; Valley, J

    2009-06-18

    Calcium-, aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) are often enriched in the heavy isotopes of magnesium and silicon relative to bulk solar system materials. It is likely that these isotopic enrichments resulted from evaporative mass loss of magnesium and silicon from early solar system condensates while they were molten during one or more high-temperature reheating events. Quantitative interpretation of these enrichments requires laboratory determinations of the evaporation kinetics and associated isotopic fractionation effects for these elements. The experimental data for the kinetics of evaporation of magnesium and silicon and the evaporative isotopic fractionation of magnesium is reasonably complete for Type B CAI liquids (Richter et al., 2002, 2007a). However, the isotopic fractionation factor for silicon evaporating from such liquids has not been as extensively studied. Here we report new ion microprobe silicon isotopic measurements of residual glass from partial evaporation of Type B CAI liquids into vacuum. The silicon isotopic fractionation is reported as a kinetic fractionation factor, {alpha}{sub Si}, corresponding to the ratio of the silicon isotopic composition of the evaporation flux to that of the residual silicate liquid. For CAI-like melts, we find that {alpha}{sub Si} = 0.98985 {+-} 0.00044 (2{sigma}) for {sup 29}Si/{sup 28}Si with no resolvable variation with temperature over the temperature range of the experiments, 1600-1900 C. This value is different from what has been reported for evaporation of liquid Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} (Davis et al., 1990) and of a melt with CI chondritic proportions of the major elements (Wang et al., 2001). There appears to be some compositional control on {alpha}{sub Si}, whereas no compositional effects have been reported for {alpha}{sub Mg}. We use the values of {alpha}Si and {alpha}Mg, to calculate the chemical compositions of the unevaporated precursors of a number of isotopically fractionated CAIs from CV chondrites whose

  6. Experimental chlorine stable isotope fractionation of perchlorate respiring bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ader, M.; Coleman, M.; Coates, J.; Chaudhuri, S.

    2006-12-01

    Perchlorate natural occurrences on earth are very limited and seem restricted to extremely arid environments such as nitrate deposits of the Atacama Desert of northern Chile, where perchlorate contents can reach 0.1 to 1%. Anthropogenically sourced perchlorate however is extensively used as a major component of explosives and rocket fuels. Careless disposal of these highly soluble and very stable perchlorates locally led to the contamination of drinking water, now recognised as posing a significant health threat. Recent studies have demonstrated that some microorganisms are able to completely reduce perchlorate to innocuous chloride, and offer a great potential for the bioremediation of contaminated waters. Provided that the isotopic fractionation associated with this reduction is significant, the measurement of the chloride isotopic composition of contaminated water is a powerful tool for monitoring the progress of in-situ remediation. We report here, the characterisation of the isotopic fractionation associated with perchlorate reduction performed by Dechlorosoma suillum strain PS during 3 culture experiments performed in a batch fermentor (anoxic, 37°°C, pH =7). The basal medium contained acetate as the electron donor and perchlorate as the electron acceptor. When possible, chloride salts were replaced by sulphate salts so as to lower the initial chloride content. The paired chlorine isotopic compositions of chloride and perchlorate in solutions sampled throughout the experiment were measured using the method described in Ader et al. 2001. The fractionation between chloride and perchlorate was calculated independently for each sample, using on the one hand the chloride content and isotopic composition and on the other hand the perchlorate content and isotopic composition. The results show that the fractionation is constant within error throughout the experiment for the 3 experiments with a weighted mean of -14.94±0.14‰. This value is much lower than the

  7. UTEX modeling of radioxenon isotopic fractionation resulting from subsurface transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The underground transport of environmental xenon (UTEX) model is a finite-difference code that was developed at the University of Texas at Austin to simulate the transport of radioxenon from an underground nuclear detonation to the surface. UTEX handles a time dependent source term and includes the effects of radioactive decay to determine isotopic signatures of the various radioxenon species as a function of release time. The model shows that significant perturbations in the isotopic signatures are possible under some geologic conditions. Transport of radioxenon gas in UTEX is driven in large part by atmospheric pumping. A study was undertaken to characterize the dependence of resulting isotopic signatures on the various geologic and physical parameters that define the system model. Additionally, the model was used to roughly simulate isotopic measurements at various depths and position; the potential dependence of isotopic radioxenon fractionation on sampling depth and lateral position between fractures was examined. (author)

  8. Carbon isotope effects associated with aceticlastic methanogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelwicks, J. T.; Risatti, J. B.; Hayes, J. M.

    1994-01-01

    The carbon isotope effects associated with synthesis of methane from acetate have been determined for Methanosarcina barkeri 227 and for methanogenic archaea in sediments of Wintergreen Lake, Michigan. At 37 degrees C, the 13C isotope effect for the reaction acetate (methyl carbon) --> methane, as measured in replicate experiments with M. barkeri, was - 21.3% +/- 0.3%. The isotope effect at the carboxyl portion of acetate was essentially equal, indicating participation of both positions in the rate-determining step, as expected for reactions catalyzed by carbon monoxide dehydrogenase. A similar isotope effect, - 19.2% +/- 0.3% was found for this reaction in the natural community (temperature = 20 degrees C). Given these observations, it has been possible to model the flow of carbon to methane within lake sediment communities and to account for carbon isotope compositions of evolving methane. Extension of the model allows interpretation of seasonal fluctuations in 13C contents of methane in other systems.

  9. Biogeochemistry of the stable carbon isotopes in carboxylic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The carbon isotopic compositions of the carboxyl carbons of fatty acids were determined by measuring the isotopic composition of the carbon dioxide quantitatively released from the acid. A modified version of the Schmidt decarboxylation developed and tested in this work was employed. A study of the evolution of CO2 at 5 +- 20C from the Schmidt decarboxylation of octanoic acid during the developmental program revealed two kinetic phases, each characterized by different rate constants and carbon isotope effects. The first, slower reaction phase displayed overall first-order kinetics, its rate being independent of HN3 concentration. Both pre-equilibration of the HN3-CHCl3 decarboxylation reagent with H2SO4 and saturation of the catalytic H2SO4 phase with KHSO4 drastically altered the rate of evolution and isotopic composition of the product CO2. The mechanistic implications of these results were discussed. A review of the metabolism of saturated fatty acids was made in which the impact of potential isotope fractionations in the various chemical reactions comprising the biosynthetic pathways on the intramolecular carbon isotope distribution within fatty acids was discussed

  10. 14C in fractions of dissolved organic carbon in ground water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Here we report carbon isotope ratios of fractions of natural organic compounds in ground waters isolated from the Stripa mine (Sweden) and the Milk River aquifer (Alberta, Canada). High-molecular-weight and low-molecular-weight fractions of the organic carbon were characterized and these, along with dissolved inorganic carbon, were analysed for δ13C and 14C. The 14C results suggest that the dissolved organic carbon originates from a combination of soil organic matter and kerogen in the aquifer matrix. The high-molecular-weight fractions show a predominant soil origin, whereas the low-molecular-weight fractions are often strongly influenced by kerogen. (author)

  11. Oxygen and hydrogen isotope fractionation during cellulose metabolism in Lemna gibba L

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemna gibba L. B3 was grown under heterotrophic, photoheterotrophic, and autotrophic conditions in water having a variety of hydrogen and oxygen isotopic compositions. The slopes of the linear regression lines between the isotopic composition of water and leaf cellulose indicated that under the three growth conditions about 40, 70, and 100% of oxygens and carbon-bound hydrogens of cellulose exchanged with those of water prior to cellulose formation. Using the equations of the linear relationships, we estimated the overall fractionation factors between water and the exchanged oxygen and carbon bound-hydrogen of cellulose. At least two very different isotope effects must determine the hydrogen isotopic composition of Lemna cellulose. One reflects the photosynthetic reduction of NADP, while the second reflects exchange reactions that occur subsequent to NADP reduction. Oxygen isotopic composition of cellulose apparently is determined by a single type of exchange reaction with water. Under different growth conditions, variations in metabolic fluxes affect the hydrogen isotopic composition of cellulose by influencing the extent to which the two isotope effects mentioned above are recorded. The oxygen isotopic composition of cellulose is not affected by such changes in growth conditions

  12. Quantification of Calcium Isotope Fractionation in Ectomycorrhizal Trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoff, C. J.; Bryce, J. G.; Hobbie, E. A.; Colpaert, J. V.; Bullen, T. D.

    2005-12-01

    Calcium plays a significant role in many forest ecosystem processes and is required for plant growth. Within plants, calcium is a critical component of cell walls and membranes, signaling processes, and charge balances (1). Current efforts to quantify Ca cycling in ecosystems rely on large-scale ecosystem manipulations (e.g., 2) or mass balances (e.g., 3) and indirect chemical proxies, Ca/Sr or Sr isotopic systems (e.g., 4). The measurement of Ca isotopes may provide more direct information about the calcium sources and fluxes within and between the geological (mineral and soil) and biological (fungi and plants) components of terrestrial ecosystems. To examine calcium isotopic variability systematically, we measured the fractionation between roots and needles in cultured Scots pine ( Pinus sylvestris) seedlings. Our samples include roots and needles from trees grown at low or high nutrient supply rates (3% or 5% per day). Because mycorrhizal fungi are intimately involved in plant nutrient supply, we also tested whether mycorrhizal colonization by Suillus bovinus affected calcium isotopic fractionation. Initial results demonstrate that at a low nutrient supply rate there is a small but measurable fractionation (averaging 0.58 ‰) between the roots and needles of individual trees; the needles are enriched in 40Ca compared to the roots. The root-needle fractionation is unaffected by mycorrhizal colonization. Ongoing analyses will address both the consistency of the root-needle fractionation and the impacts of nutrient supply rate on fractionation. Preliminary results suggest that higher nutrient supply rates lead to decreased root-needle fractionation. Analyses underway will also address whether different fungal species ( Thelephora terrestris) affect the documented root-needle fractionation. Isotope signatures of calcium source materials will complete our sample suite and will be used to assess fractionation during uptake. Ultimately, the results of this study will

  13. Isotopic fractionation of argon during stepwise release from shungite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In previous attempts to determine the 40Ar/36Ar ratio in the ancient atmosphere, the only direct measurement yielding a value below the atmospheric value of today is for argon released at low temperatures from a pre-Cambrian shungite, an amorphous carbon mineral The present work confirms a low value for 40Ar/36Ar in gas released from a type I shungite at low temperatures. But quantitative scrutiny of the accompanying 38AR/36Ar ratios and the enhanced ratio of 40Ar/36Ar for the fractions released at high temperatures shows convincingly that the effect seen here is an artifact of the stepwise heating and the argon diffusion mobilized thereby. The low 40Ar/36Ar previously obtained is very likely from the same cause rather than reflecting the isotopic composition of the pre-Cambrian atmosphere. The vitreous character of and the sharp, conchoidal fractures seen in the specimens of type I shungite suggest that the substance may exhibit simple volume diffusion over macroscopic dimensions as glasses do. If so, the diffusion parameters (D infinitely = 3 x 10-4 cm2/s and E = 11 kcal/mole) obtained from the data imply rapid exchange with the atmosphere for any argon initially trapped in centimenter-thick veins of the material. (orig.)

  14. Simulation Experiments on the Reaction of CH4-CaSO4 and Its Carbon Kinetic Isotope Fractionation%甲烷和硫酸钙反应体系热模拟实验及碳同位素分馏研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    岳长涛; 李术元; 丁康乐; 钟宁宁

    2005-01-01

    Thermochemical sulfate reduction (TSR) in geological deposits can account for the accumulation of H2S in deep sour gas reservoirs. In this paper, thermal simulation experiments on the reaction of CH4-CaSO4 were carried out using an autoclave at high temperatures and high pressures. The products were characterized with analytical methods including carbon isotope analysis. It is found that the reaction can proceed to produce H2S, H2O and CaCO3 as the main products. Based on the experimental results, the carbon kinetic isotope fractionation was investigated, and the value of Ki (kinetic isotope effect) was calculated. The results obtained in this paper can provide useful information to explain the occurrence of H2S in deep carbonate gas reservoirs.

  15. Variations in carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes of cryoconite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, N.

    2012-12-01

    Cryoconite is biogenic surface dust on snow and ice, and is commoly observed on glaciers worldwide. Because of their dark coloration, cryoconite substantially reduce surface albedo and accelerate melting of glaciers. Therefore, it is important to understand formation process of cryoconite to evaluate its effect on glacier melting. Although cryoconite consists of mineral particles and organic matter, organic fraction is more important in terms of albedo effect because it is usually darker color and accounts for major part of cryoconite in volume. The organic matter is derived from photosynthetic microbes such as cyanobacteria, and/or from windblown organic matter from ground soil around glaciers. Carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) stable isotopes of the organic matter could be useful to know their sources and to understand their cycles on glaciers. In this study, I analyzed carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes of cryoconite collected from 6 sites of different elevation from May to September on an Alaska glacier (Gulkana Glacier) to know their spatial and seasonal variations. I also analyze those collected from glaciers in Asia and Arctic to compare them among different geographical locations. Results on the Alaska glacier show that C and N stable isotopes of cryoconite organic mater significantly varied among elevations and seasons. C isotope was generally higher in lower elevation, probably due to higher photosynthetic activity in the lower elevation. In contrast, N isotope was constant on the ice area, but was lower in the snow area where the red snow algae were blooming. N isotope may be reflective of nitrogen availavility on the glacier surface. Geograpical comparison shows large variations in C and N isotopes among regions: higher C and N isotopes on Asian glaciers, lower C and N isotopes in Alaska, and lower C and higher N isotopes on Arctic glaciers. The isotope values suggest that algal production is a major carbon source on most of glaciers, but their productivity

  16. Diet-consumer nitrogen isotope fractionation for prolonged fasting arthropods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizota, Chitoshi; Yamanaka, Toshiro

    2011-12-01

    Nitrogen acquisition for cellular metabolism during diapause is a primary concern for herbivorous arthropods. Analyses of naturally occurring stable isotopes of nitrogen help elucidate the mechanism. Relevant articles have cited (58 times up to mid-June 2011) anomalously elevated δ(15)N (per mil deviation of (15)N/(14)N, relative to atmospheric nitrogen=0 ‰) values (diet-consumer nitrogen isotope fractionation; up to 12 ‰) for a prolonged fasting raspberry beetle (Byturus tomentosus Degeer (Coleoptera: Byturidae)), which feeds on red raspberries (Rubus idaeus: δ(15)N= ~ +2 ‰). Biologists have hypothesised that extensive recycling of amino acid nitrogen is responsible for the prolonged fasting. Since this hypothesis was proposed in 1995, scientists have integrated biochemical and molecular knowledge to support the mechanism of prolonged diapausing of animals. To test the validity of the recycling hypothesis, we analysed tissue nitrogen isotope ratios for four Japanese arthropods: the shield bug Parastrachia japonensis Scott (Hemiptera: Cydnidae), the burrower bug Canthophorus niveimarginatus Scott (Hemiptera: Cydnidae), leaf beetle Gastrophysa atrocyanea Motschulsky (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) and the Japanese oak silkworm Antheraea yamamai (Lepidoptera: Saturniidae), all of which fast for more than 6 months as part of their life-history strategy. Resulting diet-consumer nitrogen isotope discrimination during fasting ranged from 0 to 7‰, as in many commonly known terrestrial arthropods. We conclude that prolonged fasting of arthropods does not always result in anomalous diet-consumer nitrogen isotope fractionation, since the recycling process is closed or nearly closed with respect to nitrogen isotopes. PMID:22166153

  17. Theoretical Calculation of Oxygen Isotopic Fractionation of Tenorite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    方涛

    1997-01-01

    Tenorite is an oxide of cupper which has been well documented on its structure,force constants and spectrum.Based on the isotopic shifts of its spectrum calculated from the force constants of tenorite,its reduced partition function ratios were calculated,from which an oxygen isotopic fractionation curve between tenorite and water was obtained:103lnα=2.51X2-14.87X+6.31(X=103/T)Oxygen isotopic fractionation of tenorite was also calculated with the modified increment method of Zheng(1991),and another equation was obtained:103lnα=2.89X2-13.10X+3.92(X=103/T) Calculated results of the two different models were fitted and possible deviation involved in the calcuation was also discussed.

  18. Site-specific and multielement approach to the determination of liquid-vapor isotope fractionation parameters. The case of alcohols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isotope fractionation phenomena occurring at the natural abundance level in the course of liquid-vapor transformation have been investigated by using the SNIF-NMR method (site-specific natural isotope fractionation studied by NMR) which has a unique capability of providing simultaneous access to fractionation parameters associated with different molecular isotopomers. This new approach has been combined with the determination of overall carbon and hydrogen fractionation effects by isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). The results of distillation and evaporation experiments of alcohols performed in technical conditions of practical interest have been analyzed according to the Rayleigh-type model. In order to check the performance of the column, unit fractionation factors were measured beforehand for water and for the hydroxylic sites of methanol and ethanol for which liquid-vapor equilibrium constants were already known. Inverse isotope effects are determined in distillation experiments for the overall carbon isotope ratio and for the site-specific hydrogen isotope ratios associated with the methyl and methylene sites of methanol and ethanol. In contrast, normal isotope effects are produced by distillation for the hydroxylic sites and by evaporation for all the isotopic ratios

  19. Site-specific and multielement approach to the determination of liquid-vapor isotope fractionation parameters. The case of alcohols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moussa, I.; Naulet, N.; Martin, M.L.; Martin, G.J. (Universite de Nantes (France))

    1990-10-18

    Isotope fractionation phenomena occurring at the natural abundance level in the course of liquid-vapor transformation have been investigated by using the SNIF-NMR method (site-specific natural isotope fractionation studied by NMR) which has a unique capability of providing simultaneous access to fractionation parameters associated with different molecular isotopomers. This new approach has been combined with the determination of overall carbon and hydrogen fractionation effects by isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). The results of distillation and evaporation experiments of alcohols performed in technical conditions of practical interest have been analyzed according to the Rayleigh-type model. In order to check the performance of the column, unit fractionation factors were measured beforehand for water and for the hydroxylic sites of methanol and ethanol for which liquid-vapor equilibrium constants were already known. Inverse isotope effects are determined in distillation experiments for the overall carbon isotope ratio and for the site-specific hydrogen isotope ratios associated with the methyl and methylene sites of methanol and ethanol. In contrast, normal isotope effects are produced by distillation for the hydroxylic sites and by evaporation for all the isotopic ratios.

  20. Cadmium isotope fractionation during adsorption to Mn-oxyhydroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasylenki, L. E.; Swihart, J. W.

    2013-12-01

    The heavy metal cadmium is of interest both as a toxic contaminant in groundwater and as a critical nutrient for some marine diatoms [1], yet little is known about the biogeochemistry of this element. Horner et al. [2] suggested that Cd stable isotopes could potentially enable reconstruction of biological use of Cd in the marine realm: since cultured diatoms fractionate Cd isotopes [3], and ferromanganese crusts appear to incorporate a faithful record of deepwater Cd isotopes [2], depth profiles in such crusts may yield information about the extent of Cd assimilation of isotopically light Cd by diatoms over time. Although no work has yet been published regarding the use of stable isotopes to track reactive transport of Cd in contaminated aquifers, others have recently demonstrated the potential of isotopes to track reactions affecting the mobility of other toxic metals (e.g., [4]). With both of these potential applications in mind, we conducted two sets of experiments, at low and high ionic strength, in which Cd partially adsorbed to potassium birnessite. Our goals are to quantify the fractionations and to constrain the mechanisms governing Cd isotope behavior during adsorption to an environmentally abundant scavenger of Cd. Suspensions of synthetic birnessite were doped with various amounts of dissolved Cd2+ at pH ~8.3. Following reaction, the dissolved and adsorbed pools of Cd were separated by filtration, purified by anion exchange chromatography, and analyzed by multicollector ICP-MS using a double-spike routine. In all cases, lighter isotopes preferentially adsorbed to the birnessite particles. At low ionic strength (ILacan et al. (2006) Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta. 70, 5104. [4] Berna et al. (2010) Env. Sci. & Tech. 44, 1043.

  1. Soil Carbon Fractionation under Perennial Forage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crop management practices can improve soil quality. Forage type and N-sources might also affect soil organic matter, especially soil carbon fractionation. The objective of this study is to evaluate the impact of legume inter-planting and compost application on soil C pools under a perennial grass mi...

  2. Stable carbon isotope biogeochemistry of lakes along a trophic gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kluijver, A.; Schoon, P. L.; Downing, J. A.; Schouten, S.; Middelburg, J. J.

    2014-11-01

    The stable carbon (C) isotope variability of dissolved inorganic and organic C (DIC and DOC), particulate organic carbon (POC), glucose and polar-lipid derived fatty acids (PLFAs) was studied in a survey of 22 North American oligotrophic to eutrophic lakes. The δ13C of different PLFAs were used as proxy for phytoplankton producers and bacterial consumers. Lake pCO2 was primarily determined by autochthonous production (phytoplankton biomass), especially in eutrophic lakes, and governed the δ13C of DIC. All organic-carbon pools showed overall higher isotopic variability in eutrophic lakes (n = 11) compared to oligo-mesotrophic lakes (n = 11) because of the high variability in δ13C at the base of the food web (both autochthonous and allochthonous carbon). Phytoplankton δ13C was negatively related to lake pCO2 over all lakes and positively related to phytoplankton biomass in eutrophic lakes, which was also reflected in a large range in photosynthetic isotope fractionation (ϵCO2-phyto, 8-25‰). The carbon isotope ratio of allochthonous carbon in oligo-mesotrophic lakes was rather constant, while it varied in eutrophic lakes because of maize cultivation in the watershed.

  3. Cadmium Isotope Fractionation in Seawater - A Signature of Nutrient Utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichtlhuber, S.; Rehkaemper, M.; Halliday, A. N.

    2005-12-01

    Cadmium displays a nutrient-like distribution akin to phosphorous in the oceans. This has been attributed to the assimilation of Cd by phytoplankton in surface waters and re-mineralization at depth. If biological uptake is associated with kinetic isotopic fractionation, as recently suggested by Lacan et al. (2005), then the Cd-depleted surface waters of the oceans (with Cd contents of Lacan et al., 2005). In this study, we have extended the search for Cd isotope variations in the oceans with analyses of two depth profiles and various additional seawater samples from the North Pacific, the Arctic, and the Southern Ocean. The Cd isotope measurements utilized a double spike technique in conjunction with multiple-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICPMS), to achieve a precision and accuracy of about ± 0.8 to 1.5 ɛ114/110Cd. This precision is about a factor of 3 to 4 better than that of previous studies, which did not utilize a double spike. The data collected for the samples display a clear co-variation of Cd isotope compositions with Cd concentrations. The most Cd-rich water samples (with ~1 nmol/kg Cd) display the "lightest" Cd isotope compositions with ɛ114/110Cd ~ +3, akin to results previously obtained for crustal and mantle rocks (Wombacher et. al, 2003). In contrast, samples from the upper water column of the North Pacific (with Lacan et al. (2005), because inorganic geological processes (other than evaporation/condensation) do not appear to generate isotope effects as large as those observed in the present study (Wombacher et. al, 2003). These preliminary results suggest that Cd isotopes have the potential to become a useful proxy of nutrient utilization, which could supplement the Cd/Ca and δ13C records of previous studies, if suitable sedimentary archives can be identified that preserve the Cd isotope signatures of past seawater. References: Lacan F., Francois R., Ji Y. and Sherrell R., 2005. Does oceanic productivity production

  4. Cd Isotope Fractionation During Adsorption Varies with Salinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasylenki, L. E.; Montanez, G.; Anbar, A. D.

    2009-12-01

    Because its marine concentration profile is very similar to that of phosphate [1], Cd is considered to have potential as a paleophosphate or paleonutrient proxy in the geologic record. Previous work [2,3] has established that lighter isotopes of Cd are preferentially assimilated by phytoplankton, leaving surface waters isotopically heavy. Another recent study [4] suggests that analysis of Cd isotope variations in transects of ferromanganese crusts could reveal past variations in the extent to which Cd, and thus phosphate, has been depleted over time. This idea presumes that the extent of consumption of Cd by phytoplankton is reflected in the isotopic composition of seawater and that the Cd isotopic composition of seawater is in turn faithfully recorded in ferromanganese crusts. To test the latter assumption, Rehkämper et al. [4] measured the Cd isotopic composition of 15 Fe-Mn crusts from various ocean basins and found that 13 of those samples were within analytical error of the Cd isotopic composition of deep seawater from [3], indicating that Cd often does not fractionate appreciably during incorporation into ferromanganese crusts. Other studies [5,6] have likewise revealed little or no variation in Cd isotopic compositions among various terrestrial rocks and carbonaceous chondrites, suggesting that few earth processes significantly fractionate Cd isotopes. To test this conclusion experimentally, we performed adsorption experiments in which aqueous Cd was allowed to adsorb to synthetic birnessite (Mn oxyhydroxide). Stock solutions of dissolved Cd and birnessite suspension were mixed and agitated from 1 to 48 hours at room temperature. Some experiments had 0.1m KNO3 as background electrolyte, while others had 0.3m NaCl + 0.1m KNO3. After filtration, both the fluid with remaining dissolved Cd and solids with adsorbed Cd were purified with anion exchange chemistry. Column yields and proportions of dissolved and adsorbed Cd were determined by ICP-MS, and isotope

  5. Calcium isotopic fractionation in microbially mediated gypsum precipitates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harouaka, Khadouja; Mansor, Muammar; Macalady, Jennifer L.; Fantle, Matthew S.

    2016-07-01

    Gypsum (CaSO4·2H2O) precipitation experiments were carried out at low pH in the presence of the sulfur oxidizing bacterium Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans. The observed Ca isotopic fractionation (expressed as Δ44/40Cas-f = δ44/40Casolid-δ44/40Cafluid) at the end of each experimental time period (∼50 to 60 days) was -1.41‰ to -1.09‰ in the biotic experiments, -1.09‰ in the killed control, and -1.01‰ to -0.88‰ in the abiotic controls. As there were no strong differences in the solution chemistry and the rate at which gypsum precipitated in the biotic and abiotic controls, we deduce a biological Ca isotope effect on the order of -0.3‰. The isotope effect correlates with a difference in crystal aspect ratios between the biotic experiments (8.05 ± 3.99) and abiotic controls (31.9 ± 8.40). We hypothesize that soluble and/or insoluble organic compounds selectively inhibit crystal growth at specific crystal faces, and that the growth inhibition affects the fractionation factor associated with gypsum precipitation. The experimental results help explain Ca isotopic variability in gypsum sampled from a sulfidic cave system, in which gypsum crystals exhibiting a diversity of morphologies (microcrystalline to cm-scale needles) have a broad range of δ44/40Ca values (∼1.2-0.4‰) relative to the limestone wall (δ44/40Ca = 1.3‰). In light of the laboratory experiments, the variation in Ca isotope values in the caves can be interpreted as a consequence of gypsum precipitation in the presence of microbial organic matter and subsequent isotopic re-equilibration with the Ca source.

  6. Isotopic Fractionation of Water-Ice from Sublimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, E.; Boyer, C.; Park, M.; Gormally, J.; Benitez, E.; Dominguez, G.

    2015-12-01

    Elizabeth Christensen, Charisa Boyer, Manesseh Park, Ezra Benitez, Gerardo Dominguez Understanding the multi-isotopic fractionation of water-ice that results from its sublimation may be important for understanding the isotopic composition of cometary ices. Here we describe an experimental setup whose purpose is to understand the effects of various astrophysical processes on the δD and δ18O and δ17O composition of water-ices. Our setup consists of an ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) chamber with oil free pumping, a closed cycle He cryostat to achieve low temperatures (capable of reaching 6K), and a vacuum line connected to the chamber via a UHV feed-through. Water isotopologues H216O, H218O, H217O, and HD16O samples can be measured after sublimation of water-ice with a cavity ring-down spectrometer (Picarro L2120-i) that is connected to the vacuum line. To perform these experiments, ambient water vapor was introduced into, frozen, and purified inside the UHV chamber (Tfractions of the original reservoir. We will present the first results on the oxygen and deuterium isotopic fractionation of water-ice sublimation and discuss their implications for interpreting the isotopic compositions of cometary ices.

  7. Isotopic Hg in an Allende carbon-rich residue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, G. W., Jr.; Jovanovic, S.

    1990-01-01

    A carbon-rich residue from Allende subjected to stepwise heating yielded two isotopically resolvable types of Hg: one with an (Hg-196)/(Hg-202) concentration ratio the same as terrestrial (monitor) Hg; the other enriched in Hg-196 relative to Hg-202 by about 60 percent. Hg with the 202 isotope enriched relative to 196, as is found in bulk Allende, was not observed. Whether the result of mass fractionation or nucleosynthesis, the distinct types of Hg entered different carrier phases and were not thermally mobilized since the accretion of the Allende parent body.

  8. Hydrogen isotope fractionation in the photolysis of formaldehyde

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. S. Rhee

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Experiments investigating the isotopic fractionation in the formation of H2 by the photolysis of CH2O under tropospheric conditions are reported and discussed. The deuterium (D depletion in H2 produced is 500(±20‰ with respect to the parent CH2O. We also observed that complete photolysis of CH2O under atmospheric conditions produces H2 that has virtually the same isotopic ratio as that of the parent CH2O. These findings imply that there must be a very strong concomitant isotopic enrichment in the radical channel (CH2O + → CHO + H as compared to the molecular channel (CH2O + → H2 + CO of the photolysis of CH2O in order to balance the relatively small isotopic fractionation in the competing reaction of CH2O with OH. Using a 1-box photochemistry model we calculated the isotopic fractionation factor for the radical channel to be 0.22(±0.08, which is equivalent to a 780(±80‰ enrichment in D of the remaining CH2O. When CH2O is in photochemical steady state, the isotopic ratio of the H2 produced is determined not only by the isotopic fractionation occurring during the photolytical production of H2m but also by overall fractionation for the removal processes of CH2O (αf, and is represented by the ratio of αmf. Applying the isotopic fractionation factors relevant to CH2O photolysis obtained in the present study to the troposphere, the ratio of αmf varies from ~0.8 to ~1.2 depending on the fraction of CH2O that reacts with OH and that produces H2. This range of αmf can render the H2 produced from the photochemical oxidation of CH4 to be enriched in D (with respect to the original CH

  9. Zinc isotope fractionation during magmatic differentiation and the isotopic composition of the bulk Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Heng; Savage, Paul S.; Teng, Fang-Zehn; Helz, Rosalind T.; Moynier, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    he zinc stable isotope system has been successfully applied to many and varied fields in geochemistry, but to date it is still not completely clear how this isotope system is affected by igneous processes. In order to evaluate the potential application of Zn isotopes as a proxy for planetary differentiation and volatile history, it is important to constrain the magnitude of Zn isotopic fractionation induced by magmatic differentiation. In this study we present high-precision Zn isotope analyses of two sets of chemically diverse, cogenetic samples from Kilauea Iki lava lake, Hawaii, and Hekla volcano, Iceland, which both show clear evidence of having undergone variable and significant degrees of magmatic differentiation. The Kilauea Iki samples display small but resolvable variations in Zn isotope composition (0.26‰66Zn66Zn defined as the per mille deviation of a sample's 66Zn/64Zn compositional ratio from the JMC-Lyon standard), with the most differentiated lithologies exhibiting more positive δ66Zn values. This fractionation is likely a result of the crystallization of olivine and/or Fe–Ti oxides, which can both host Zn in their crystal structures. Samples from Hekla have a similar range of isotopic variation (0.22‰66Zn66Zn=0.28±0.05‰ (2s.d.).

  10. Exotic structure of carbon isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ground state properties of C isotopes, deformation and electromagnetic moments, as well as electric dipole transition strength are investigated. We first study the ground state properties of C isotopes using a deformed Hartree-Fock (HF) + BCS model with Skyrme interactions. Isotope dependence of the deformation properties is investigated. Shallow deformation minima are found in several neutron-rich C isotopes. It is also shown that the deformation minima appear in both the oblate and the prolate sides in 17C and 19C having almost the same binding energies. Next, we carry out shell model calculations to study electromagnetic moments and electric dipole transitions of C isotopes. We point out the clear configuration dependence of the quadrupole and magnetic moments in the odd C isotopes, which will be useful to find out the deformation and spin-parties of the ground states of these nuclei. Electric dipole states of C isotopes are studied focusing on the interplay between low energy Pigmy strength and giant dipole resonances. Low peak energies, two-peak structure and large widths of the giant resonances show deformation effects. Calculated transition strength below dipole giant resonance in heavier C isotopes than 15C is found to exhaust 12∼15% of the Thomas-Reiche-Kuhn sum rule value and 50∼ 80% of the cluster sum rule value. (author)

  11. Silicon Isotopic Fractionation in a Tropical Soil-Plant System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opfergelt, S.; Delstanche, S.; Cardinal, D.; Andre, L.; Delvaux, B.

    2006-12-01

    Silica fluxes to soil solutions and water streams are controlled by both abiotic and biotic processes occurring in a Si soil-plant cycle that can be significant in comparison with Si weathering input and hydrological output. The quantification of Si-isotopic fractionation by these processes is highly promising to study the Si soil-plant cycle. Therein, the fate of aqueous monosilicic acid H4SiO4, as produced by silicate weathering, may take four paths: (1) uptake by plants and recycling through falling litter, (2) formation of clay minerals, (3) specific adsorption onto Al and Fe oxides, (4) leaching in drainage waters and export from watersheds. Here we report on detailed Si-isotopic compositions of various Si pools in a tropical soil-plant system involving old stands of banana (Musa acuminata Colla, cv Grande Naine) cropped on a weathering sequence of soils derived from andesitic volcanic ash and pumice deposits in Cameroon, West Africa. Si-isotopic compositions were measured by MC-ICP-MS in dry plasma mode with external Mg doping with a reproducibility of 0.08 permil (2stdev). Results were expressed as delta29Si vs NBS28. The compositions were determined in plant parts, bulk soils, clay fractions (less than 2um) and stream waters used for crop irrigation. Of the weathering sequence, we selected young (Y) and old (O) volcanic soils (vs). Yvs are rich in weatherable minerals, and contain large amounts of pumice gravels; their clay fraction (10-35 percent) contains allophane, halloysite and ferrihydrite. Oppositely, Ovs are strongly weathered and fine clayey soils (75-96 percent clay) rich in halloysite, kaolinite, gibbsite and goethite. Intra-plant fractionation between roots and shoots and within shoots confirmed our previous data measured on banana plants grown in hydroponics. The bulk plant isotopic composition was heavier at Ovs than at Yvs giving a fractionation factor per atomic mass unit between plants and their irrigation water Si source (+0.61 permil) of

  12. Carbon isotope analysis of fossil bone apatite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The feasibility of using bone apatite for stable carbon isotope analysis of ancient bone for palaeodietary studies has been the subject of much controversy, and attempts to determine whether isotopic signatures are stable over time have produced contradictory results. We have tested this stability by measuring the δ13C values of chemically treated bone or tooth mineral of herbivores of known diet (browsers), in a temporal series. The results indicate that diagenesis of biogenic carbonates in the mineral over time is unexpectedly limited, and that chemical pretreatment further reduces diagenetic alteration of the biogenic signal. Enough biogenic carbonate remains to distinguish clearly between browsers and grazers, even after 3 million years

  13. Source and migration of light hydrocarbons indicated by carbon isotopic ratios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon isotopic ratios can distinguish among different sources of methane and can be used to correlate maturity of sediments with the methane. This technique has been applied to several wells and the isotopic values have been used to suggest the sources of the methane and whether the methane migrated into the area. Comparison of the isotopic ratio changes in ethane, propane, and butanes indicated that isotopic fractionation of methane by migration is not a major factor. The significant changes in methane isotopic ratio and the small changes in the isotopic ratios of these heavier hydrocarbons suggest that, although diffusion is not the sole process in migration, the time for migration is moderate

  14. Microbial mass-dependent fractionation of chromium isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikora, E.R.; Johnson, T.M.; Bullen, T.D.

    2008-01-01

    Mass-dependent fractionation of Cr isotopes occurs during dissimilatory Cr(VI) reduction by Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1. Cells suspended in a simple buffer solution, with various concentrations of lactate or formate added as electron donor, reduced 5 or 10 ??M Cr(VI) to Cr(III) over days to weeks. In all nine batch experiments, 53Cr/52Cr ratios of the unreacted Cr(VI) increased as reduction proceeded. In eight experiments covering a range of added donor concentrations up to 100 ??M, isotopic fractionation factors were nearly invariant, ranging from 1.0040 to 1.0045, with a mean value somewhat larger than that previously reported for abiotic Cr(VI) reduction (1.0034). One experiment containing much greater donor concentration (10 mM lactate) reduced Cr(VI) much faster and exhibited a lesser fractionation factor (1.0018). These results indicate that 53Cr/52Cr measurements should be effective as indicators of Cr(VI) reduction, either bacterial or abiotic. However, variability in the fractionation factor is poorly constrained and should be studied for a variety of microbial and abiotic reduction pathways. ?? 2008 Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Pressure-dependent boron isotopic fractionation observed by column chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musashi, M.; Oi, T.; Matsuo, M.; Nomura, M.

    2007-12-01

    Boron isotopic fractionation factor ( S ) between boron taken up in strongly basic anion exchange resin and boron in aqueous solution was determined by breakthrough column chromatography at 5 and 17 MPa at 25°C, using 0.1 mmol/L boric acid solution as feed solution. The S values obtained were 1.018 and 1.012, respectively, which were smaller than the value reported by using the same chromatographic method at atmospheric pressure at 25°C with the boron concentration of 10 mmol/L, but were larger than the values at the same condition with much higher concentration of 100 and 501 mmol/L, indicating that borate-polymerization reducing the isotopic fractionation was negligible. However, calculations based on the theory of isotope distribution between two phases estimated that 21% (5MPa) and 47% (17MPa) of boron taken up in the resin phase was in the three-coordinated B(OH)3-form, instead of in the four-coordinated B(OH)4--form, at high pressures even with the very diluted solution. We discussed this discrepancy by introducing (1) hydration or (2) a partial molar volume difference between isotopic molecules. It was inferred that borate ions were partially dehydrated upon transfer from the solution phase to the resin phase at high pressures, which resulted in smaller S values compared with those at the atmospheric pressure. Alternatively, it was likely that the S value decreased with increasing pressure, because the difference of the partial isotopic molar volumes between 10B(OH)3 and 11B(OH)3 was larger than that between 10B(OH)4- and 11B(OH)4-. If either will be the case, the influence of a pressure upon the isotope effect may not be negligible for boron isotopic exchange equilibrium. This knowledge is crucial for the principle of the boron isotopic pH-metry reconstructing a chemical variation at the paleo-deep oceanic environment where the early life may have been evolved.

  16. Carbon isotope geochemistry in the Yalujiang estuary

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴莹; 张经

    2001-01-01

    The distribution of particulate organic carbon (POC) along the lower reaches is similar between the dry season and the flood season in the Yalujiang Estuary, North China. However, the values of particulate organic carbon of the upperstream in the dry season are one magnitude lower than the concentrations in the flood season. Stable carbon isotope ratios have been used to study the sources of particulate organic carbon in the Yalujiang Estuary. The isotopic composition of POC shows a range from -23.1‰ to -29.4‰ with a little seasonal variation. The isotopic evidence indicates that the POC in the Yalujiang Estuary is predominantly of terrestrial origin rather than a result of in situ plankton. The study of the ratio of POC: Chla shows that the turbidity maximum plays an important role in POC cycle in the Yalujiang Estuary. Organic detritus and soil erosion are the main contributions to POC in the turbidity maximum, especially in the flood season.

  17. Diet control on carbon isotopic composition of land snail shell carbonate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU ZongXiu; GU ZhaoYan; WU NaiQin; XU Bing

    2007-01-01

    Carbon isotope compositions for both the carbonate shells and soft bodies (organic tissue) of living land snails collected mostly from the Loess Plateau, China have been measured. The result shows that δ13C values range from -13.1‰ to -4.3‰ for the aragonite shell samples and from -26.8‰ to -18.0‰ for the soft body samples. Although the shells are enriched in 13C relative to the bodies averagely by 14.2(±0.8)‰, the shell δ13Ca values are closely correlated to the body δ13Corg values, expressed as δ13Ca = 1.021 δ13Corg + 14.38 (R = 0.965; N = 31). This relationship indicates that δ13Ca is primarily a function of the isotopic composition of the snail diets since previous studies have proved that the snail body is the same as their food in carbon isotope composition. In other words, carbon isotope compo-sition of the carbonate shell can be used as a proxy to estimate the dietary 13C abundance of the land snails. The data also support that the 13C enrichment of the carbonate shells results mainly from the equilibrium fractionations between the metabolic CO2, HCO3- in the hemolymph and shell aragonite, and partially from kinetic fractionations when snail shells form during their activity.

  18. Carbonate clumped isotope thermometry in continental tectonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntington, Katharine W.; Lechler, Alex R.

    2015-04-01

    Reconstructing the thermal history of minerals and fluids in continental environments is a cornerstone of tectonics research. Paleotemperature constraints from carbonate clumped isotope thermometry have provided important tests of geodynamic, structural, topographic and basin evolution models. The thermometer is based on the 13C-18O bond ordering in carbonates (mass-47 anomaly, Δ47) and provides estimates of the carbonate formation temperature independent of the δ18O value of the water from which the carbonate grew; Δ47 is measured simultaneously with conventional measurements of carbonate δ13C and δ18O values, which together constrain the isotopic composition of the parent water. Depending on the geologic setting of carbonate growth, this information can help constrain paleoenvironmental conditions or basin temperatures and fluid sources. This review examines how clumped isotope thermometry can shed new light on problems in continental tectonics, focusing on paleoaltimetry, basin evolution and structural diagenesis applications. Paleoaltimetry is inherently difficult, and the precision in carbonate growth temperature estimates is at the limit of what is useful for quantitative paleoelevation reconstruction. Nevertheless, clumped isotope analyses have enabled workers to address previously intractable problems and in many settings offer the best chance of understanding topographic change from the geologic record. The portion of the shallow crust residing at temperatures up to ca. 200 °C is important as host to economic resources and records of tectonics and climate, and clumped isotope thermometry is one of the few proxies that can access this critical range with sensitivity to temperature alone. Only a handful of studies to date have used clumped isotopes to investigate diagenesis and other sub-surface processes using carbonate crystallization temperatures or the sensitivity of Δ47 values to a sample's thermal history. However, the thermometer is

  19. Carbon isotope anomalies in carbonates of the Karelian series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iudovich, Ia. E.; Makarikhin, V. V.; Medvedev, P. V.; Sukhanov, N. V.

    1990-07-01

    Results are presented on carbon isotope distributions in carbonates of the Karelian complex. A highly anomalous isotopic composition was found in carbonate rocks aged from 2.6 to 1.9 b.y. In the stromatolitic carbonates of the Onega water table, delta-(C-13) reaches a value of +18 percent, while the shungite layer of the Zaonega horizon is characterized by a wide dispersion (from +7.9 to -11.8 percent). These data are in good agreement with the known geochemical boundary (about 2.2 b.y. ago) in the history of the earth.

  20. Isotope-based Fluvial Organic Carbon (ISOFLOC) Model: Model formulation, sensitivity, and evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, William I.; Fox, James F.

    2015-06-01

    Watershed-scale carbon budgets remain poorly understood, in part due to inadequate simulation tools to assess in-stream carbon fate and transport. A new numerical model termed ISOtope-based FLuvial Organic Carbon (ISOFLOC) is formulated to simulate the fluvial organic carbon budget in watersheds where hydrologic, sediment transport, and biogeochemical processes are coupled to control benthic and transported carbon composition and flux. One ISOFLOC innovation is the formulation of new stable carbon isotope model subroutines that include isotope fractionation processes in order to estimate carbon isotope source, fate, and transport. A second innovation is the coupling of transfers between carbon pools, including algal particulate organic carbon, fine particulate and dissolved organic carbon, and particulate and dissolved inorganic carbon, to simulate the carbon cycle in a comprehensive manner beyond that of existing watershed water quality models. ISOFLOC was tested and verified in a low-gradient, agriculturally impacted stream. Results of a global sensitivity analysis suggested the isotope response variable had unique sensitivity to the coupled interaction between fluvial shear resistance of algal biomass and the concentration of dissolved inorganic carbon. Model calibration and validation suggested good agreement at event, seasonal, and annual timescales. Multiobjective uncertainty analysis suggested inclusion of the carbon stable isotope routine reduced uncertainty by 80% for algal particulate organic carbon flux estimates.

  1. Chromium isotopic fractionation during Cr(VI) reduction by Bacillus sp. under aerobic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Fen; Ma, Teng; Zhou, Lian; Hu, Zhifang; Shi, Liu

    2015-07-01

    This study investigated the fractionation of chromium isotopes during chromium reduction by Bacillus sp. under aerobic condition, variable carbon source (glucose) concentration (0, 0.1, 1, 2.5 and 10mM), and incubation temperatures (4, 15, 25 and 37°C). The results revealed that the δ(53)Cr values in the residual Cr(VI) increased with the degree of Cr reduction, and followed a Rayleigh fractionation model. The addition of glucose only slightly affected cell-specific Cr(VI) reduction rates (cSRR). However, the value of ε (2.00±0.21‰) in the experiments with different concentrations of glucose (0.1, 1, 2.5 and 10mM) was smaller than that from the experiment without glucose (3.74±0.16‰). The results indicated that the cell-specific reduction rate is not the sole control on the degree of isotopic fractionation, and different metabolic pathways would result in differing degrees of Cr isotopic fractionation. The cSRR decreased with decreasing temperature, showing that the values of ε were 7.62±0.36‰, 4.59±0.28‰, 3.09±0.16‰ and 1.99±0.23‰ at temperatures of 4, 15, 25 and 37°C, respectively. It shown that increasing cSRR linked to decreasing fractionations has been associated with increasing temperatures. Overall, our results revealed that temperature is a primary factor affecting Cr isotopic fractionation under microbial actions. PMID:25777078

  2. Stable carbon isotope analysis of heavy oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fixari, B.; Le Perchec, P.; Bigois, M.; Casabianca, H.; Jame, P. [CNRS, Vernaison (France). Lab. des Materiaux Organiques

    1994-03-01

    Stable carbon isotope analysis of various heavy oils and some thermo-catalytically converted products was performed with a thermal analyser coupled with an isotopic ratio mass spectrometer. The temperature-programmed oxidative pyroanalysis technique subdivides the classical {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C ratio, affording new insights into the structural composition of heavy oils such as the contribution of naphthenoaromatics, and appears to be of interest for following their thermal refining. 24 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Isotope Fractionation Studies in Prestellar Cores: The Case of Nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milam, Stefanie N.; Charnley, Steven B.

    2011-01-01

    Isotopically fractionated material is found in many solar system objects, including meteorites and comets. It is considered, in some cases, to trace interstellar material that was incorporated into the solar system without undergoing significant processing, thus preserving the fractionation. In interstellar molecular clouds, ion-molecule chemistry continually cycles nitrogen between the two main reservoirs - N and N2 - leading to only minor N-15 enrichments. Charnley and Rodgers showed that depletion of CO removes oxygen from the gas and weakens this cycle such that significant N-15 fractionation can occur for N2 and other N-bearing species in such cores. Observations are being conducted at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths employing various facilities in order to both spatially and spectrally, resolve emission from these cores. A preliminary study to obtain the N-14/N-15 ratio in nitriles (HCN and HNC) was conducted at the Arizona Radio Observatory's 12m telescope on Kitt Peak, AZ. Spectra were obtained at high resolution (0.08 km/s) in order to resolve dynamic properties of each source as well as to resolve hyperfine structure present in certain isotopologues. This study included four dark cloud cores, observed to have varying levels of molecular depletion: L1521E, L1498, L1544, and L1521F. Previous studies of the N-14/N-15 ratio towards LI544 were obtained with N2H+ and NIH3, yielding ratios of 446 and >700, respectively. The discrepancy observed in these two measurements suggests a strong chemical dependence on the fractionation of nitrogen. Ratios (C,N, and D) obtained from isotopologues for a particular molecule are likely tracing the same chemical heritage and are directly comparable within a given source. Results and comparisons between the protostellar evolutionary state and isomer isotope fractionation as well as between other N-bearing species will be presented.

  4. Observations of Nitrogen Isotope Fractionation in Prestellar Cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milam, Stefanie N.; Charnley, Steven B.

    2011-01-01

    Isotopically fractionated material is found in many solar system objects, including meteorites and comets [1]. It is considered, in some cases, to trace interstellar material that was incorporated into the solar system without undergoing significant processing, thus preserving the fractionation. In interstellar molecular clouds, ion-molecule chemistry continually cycles nitrogen between the two main reservoirs - Nand N2 - leading to only minor N-15 enrichments [2]. Charnley and Rodgers [3,4] showed that depletion of CO removes oxygen from the gas and weakens this cycle such that significant N-15 fractionation can occur for N2 and other N-bearing species in such cores. Observations are being conducted at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths employing various facilities in order to both spatially and spectrally, resolve emission from these cores. A preliminary study to obtain the N-14/N-15 ratio in nitriles was conducted at the Arizona Radio Observatory's 12m telescope on Kitt Peak, AZ. Spectra were obtained at high resolution (0.08 km/s) in order to resolve dynamic properties of each source as well as to resolve hyperfine structure present in certain isotopologues. This study included four dark cloud cores, observed to have varying levels of molecular depletion: Ll521E, Ll498, Ll544, and Ll521F. Previous studies of the N-14/N-15 ratio towards Ll544 were obtained with N2H(+) and NH3 yielding ratios of 446 and greater than 700, respectively [5,6]. The discrepancy observed in these two measurements suggests a strong chemical dependence on the fractionation of nitrogen. Ratios (C,N, and D) obtained from isotopologues for a particular molecule are likely tracing the same chemical heritage and are directly comparable within a given source. Results and comparisons between the protostellar evolutionary state and isomer isotope fractionation as well as between other N-bearing species will be presented.

  5. Fractionation of Stable Isotopes in Atmospheric Aerosol Reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meusinger, Carl

    Aerosols - particles suspended in air - are the single largest uncertainty in our current understanding of Earth's climate. They also affect human health, infrastructure and ecosystems. Aerosols are emitted either directly into the atmosphere or are formed there for instance in response to chemical...... reactions and undergo complex chemical and physical changes during their lifetimes. In order to assess processes that form and alter aerosols, information provided by stable isotopes can be used to help constrain estimates on the strength of aerosol sources and sinks. This thesis studies (mass......-independent) fractionation processes of stable isotopes of C, N, O and S in order to investigate three different systems related to aerosols: 1. Post-depositional processes of nitrate in snow that obscure nitrate ice core records 2. Formation and aging of secondary organic aerosol generated by ozonolysis of X...

  6. Exotic Structure of Carbon Isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Suzuki, T; Hagino, K; Suzuki, Toshio; Sagawa, Hiroyuki; Hagino, Kouichi

    2002-01-01

    We studied firstly the ground state properties of C-isotopes using a deformed Hartree-Fock (HF)+ BCS model with Skyrme interactions. Shallow deformation minima are found in several neutron$-$rich C-isotopes. It is shown also that the deformation minima appear in both the oblate and the prolate sides in $^{17}$C and $^{19}$C having almost the same binding energies. Secondly, we carried out shell model calculations to study electromagnetic moments and electric dipole transitions of the C-isotopes. We point out the clear configuration dependence of the quadrupole and magnetic moments in the odd C-isotopes, which will be useful to find out the deformations and the spin-parities of the ground states of these nuclei. We studied electric dipole states of C-isotopes focusing on the interplay between low energy Pigmy strength and giant dipole resonances. Reasonable agreement is obtained with available experimental data for the photoreaction cross sections both in the low energy region below $\\hbar \\omega $=14 MeV and ...

  7. Carbon isotope separation by absorptive distillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The feasibility of separating carbon isotopes by absorptive distillation has been studied for CO absorption by cryogenic solvents. Phase equilibrium, isotopic separation, and mass transfer data were taken between 77.4 and 114.3 K for the following solvents: propane, propylene, 1:1 propane-propylene, 1-butene, isobutane and nitrogen. Carbon monoxide solubility followed Henry's Law, with a maximum experimental solubility of 6.5 mole percent. Isotopic separation between CO in the gas and liquid phases using hydrocarbon solvents was several times that for pure CO vapor-liquid equilibrium. The maximum observed isotopic separation factor was 1.029 at 77.4 K with the propane-propylene solvent mixture. Mass transfer measurements yielded calculated HETP's of 2 to 5 cm for a possible separation system. An attempt has been made to correlate isotopic separation data using Hildebrand's theory of solutions. The differential absorption of isotopic CO species is expressed as a difference in solubility of the isotopic CO molecules. Data for propane, propylene, and 1-butene show approximately the same behavior at varying temperatures

  8. Carbon isotope separation by absorptive distillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The feasibility of separating carbon isotopes by absorptive distillation has been studied for CO absorption by cryogenic solvents. Phase equilibrium, isotopic separation, and mass transfer data were taken between 77.4 and 114.3 K for the following solvents: propane, propylene, 1:1 propane-propylene, 1-butene, isobutane and nitrogen. Carbon monoxide solubility followed Henry's Law, with a maximum experimental solubility of 6.5 mole per cent. Isotopic separation between CO in the gas and liquid phases using hydrocarbon solvents was several times that for pure CO vapor-liquid equilibrium. The maximum observed isotopic separation factor was 1.029 at 77.4 K with the propane-propylene solvent mixture. Mass transfer measurements yielded calculated HTU's of 2 to 5 cm for a possible separation system. An attempt has been made to correlate isotopic separation data using Hildebrand's theory of solutions. The differential absorption of isotopic CO species is expressed as a difference in solubility of the isotopic CO molecules. Data for propane, propylene, and 1-butene show approximately the same behavior at varying temperatures

  9. Compound-Specific Stable Isotope Fractionation of Pesticides and Pharmaceuticals in a Mesoscale Aquifer Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schürner, Heide K V; Maier, Michael P; Eckert, Dominik; Brejcha, Ramona; Neumann, Claudia-Constanze; Stumpp, Christine; Cirpka, Olaf A; Elsner, Martin

    2016-06-01

    Compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) receives increasing interest for its ability to detect natural degradation of pesticides and pharmaceuticals. Despite recent laboratory studies, CSIA investigations of such micropollutants in the environment are still rare. To explore the certainty of information obtainable by CSIA in a near-environmental setting, a pulse of the pesticide bentazone, the pesticide metabolite 2,6-dichlorobenzamide (BAM), and the pharmaceuticals diclofenac and ibuprofen was released into a mesoscale aquifer with quasi-two-dimensional flow. Concentration breakthrough curves (BTC) of BAM and ibuprofen demonstrated neither degradation nor sorption. Bentazone was transformed but did not sorb significantly, whereas diclofenac showed both degradation and sorption. Carbon and nitrogen CSIA could be accomplished in similar concentrations as for "traditional" priority pollutants (low μg/L range), however, at the cost of uncertainties (0.4-0.5‰ (carbon), 1‰ (nitrogen)). Nonetheless, invariant carbon and nitrogen isotope values confirmed that BAM was neither degraded nor sorbed, while significant enrichment of (13)C and in particular (15)N corroborated transformation of diclofenac and bentazone. Retardation of diclofenac was reflected in additional (15)N sorption isotope effects, whereas isotope fractionation of transverse dispersion could not be identified. These results provide a benchmark on the performance of CSIA to monitor the reactivity of micropollutants in aquifers and may guide future efforts to accomplish CSIA at even lower concentrations (ng/L range). PMID:27100740

  10. Biochemical Hydrogen Isotope Fractionation during Lipid Biosynthesis in Higher Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahmen, A.; Gamarra, B.; Cormier, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Although hydrogen isotopes (δ2H) of leaf wax lipids are increasingly being applied as (paleo-) hydrological proxies, we still do not understand some of the basic processes that shape the δ2H values of these compounds. In general, it is believed that three variables shape the δ2H values of leaf wax lipids: source water δ2H values, evaporative deuterium (2H) enrichment of leaf water and the biosynthetic fractionation (ɛbio) during the synthesis of organic compounds. While the influences of source water δ2H values and leaf water evaporative 2H enrichment have been well documented, very little is known how ɛbio shapes the δ2H values of plant-derived lipids. I will present the results from recent experiments, where we show that the magnitude of ɛbio, and thus the δ2H value of plant-derived lipids, strongly depends on the carbon (C) metabolism of a plant. Specifically, I will show that plants that rely for their tissue formation on recently assimilated C have δ2H values in their n-alkanes that are up to 60‰ more negative than plants that depend for their tissue formation on stored carbohydrates. Our findings can be explained by the fact that NADPH is the primary source of hydrogen in plant lipids and that the δ2H value of NADPH differs whether NADPH was generated directly in the light reaction of photosynthesis or whether it was generated by processing stored carbohydrates. As such, the δ2H values of plant-derived lipids will directly depend on whether the tissue containing these lipids was synthesized using recent assimilates, e.g. in a C autonomous state or, if it was synthesized from stored or otherwise aquired C sources, e.g. in a not C autonomous state. Given the magnidude of this effect, our results have important implications for interpretation of plant-derived lipid δ2H values when used as (paleo-) hydrological proxies. In addition, our results suggest, that δ2H values of plant-derived lipids could be employed as a new tools to assess the C

  11. Cr isotope fractionation in metal-mineral-microbe interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiong; Porcelli, Don; Thompson, Ian; Amor, Ken; Galer, Stephen

    2016-04-01

    Microbes interact with metals and minerals in the environments, altering their physical and chemical state whilst in turn the metals and minerals affect microbial growth, activity and survival. The interactions between Cr, Fe minerals and bacteria were investigated in this study. Cr(VI) reduction experiments by two iron-reducing bacteria, Pseudomonas fluorescens LB 300 and Shewanella oneidensis MR 1, in the presence of two iron oxide minerals, goethite and hematite, were conducted. Both minerals were found to inhibit the Cr(VI) reduction rate by Pseudomonas fluorescens LB 300 but accelerated Shewanella oneidensis MR 1. The Cr isotopic fractionation factor generated by both bacteria was mostly independent of the presence of the minerals, except for hematite with Pseudomonas fluorescens LB 300, where the ɛ was much higher. Aqueous Fe(III) in the solution did not have any detectable impact on either bacterial Cr reduction rates or the isotopic fractionation factors, indicating that the reduction of Cr(VI) occurred prior to that of Fe(III). The presence of aqueous Fe(II) induced a very fast abiotic reduction of Cr, but had little impact on the bacterial Cr reduction rates or its isotope fractionations. The evidence suggests that the different impact that Fe minerals had on the bacteria were related to the way they attached to the minerals and the difference in the reduction mechanism. SEM images confirmed that the attachment of Pseudomonas fluorescens LB 300 on the mineral surfaces were much more tightly packed than that of Shewanella oneidensis MR 1, so reducing mineral-metal interactions.

  12. Carbon isotopes in the ocean model of the Community Earth System Model (CESM1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Jahn

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Carbon isotopes in the ocean are frequently used as paleoclimate proxies and as present-day geochemical ocean tracers. In order to allow a more direct comparison of climate model results with this large and currently underutilized data set, we added a carbon isotope module to the ocean model of the Community Earth System Model (CESM, containing the cycling of the stable isotope 13C and the radioactive isotope 14C. We implemented the 14C tracer in two ways: in the "abiotic" case, the 14C tracer is only subject to air–sea gas exchange, physical transport, and radioactive decay, while in the "biotic" version, the 14C additionally follows the 13C tracer through all biogeochemical and ecological processes. Thus, the abiotic 14C tracer can be run without the ecosystem module, requiring significantly fewer computational resources. The carbon isotope module calculates the carbon isotopic fractionation during gas exchange, photosynthesis, and calcium carbonate formation, while any subsequent biological process such as remineralization as well as any external inputs are assumed to occur without fractionation. Given the uncertainty associated with the biological fractionation during photosynthesis, we implemented and tested three parameterizations of different complexity. Compared to present-day observations, the model is able to simulate the oceanic 14C bomb uptake and the 13C Suess effect reasonably well compared to observations and other model studies. At the same time, the carbon isotopes reveal biases in the physical model, for example, too sluggish ventilation of the deep Pacific Ocean.

  13. Carbon isotopes in the ocean model of the Community Earth System Model (CESM1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahn, A.; Lindsay, K.; Giraud, X.; Gruber, N.; Otto-Bliesner, B. L.; Liu, Z.; Brady, E. C.

    2015-08-01

    Carbon isotopes in the ocean are frequently used as paleoclimate proxies and as present-day geochemical ocean tracers. In order to allow a more direct comparison of climate model results with this large and currently underutilized data set, we added a carbon isotope module to the ocean model of the Community Earth System Model (CESM), containing the cycling of the stable isotope 13C and the radioactive isotope 14C. We implemented the 14C tracer in two ways: in the "abiotic" case, the 14C tracer is only subject to air-sea gas exchange, physical transport, and radioactive decay, while in the "biotic" version, the 14C additionally follows the 13C tracer through all biogeochemical and ecological processes. Thus, the abiotic 14C tracer can be run without the ecosystem module, requiring significantly fewer computational resources. The carbon isotope module calculates the carbon isotopic fractionation during gas exchange, photosynthesis, and calcium carbonate formation, while any subsequent biological process such as remineralization as well as any external inputs are assumed to occur without fractionation. Given the uncertainty associated with the biological fractionation during photosynthesis, we implemented and tested three parameterizations of different complexity. Compared to present-day observations, the model is able to simulate the oceanic 14C bomb uptake and the 13C Suess effect reasonably well compared to observations and other model studies. At the same time, the carbon isotopes reveal biases in the physical model, for example, too sluggish ventilation of the deep Pacific Ocean.

  14. Carbon isotopes in the ocean model of the Community Earth System Model (CESM1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Jahn

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Carbon isotopes in the ocean are frequently used as paleo climate proxies and as present-day geochemical ocean tracers. In order to allow a more direct comparison of climate model results with this large and currently underutilized dataset, we added a carbon isotope module to the ocean model of the Community Earth System Model (CESM, containing the cycling of the stable isotope 13C and the radioactive isotope 14C. We implemented the 14C tracer in two ways: in the "abiotic" case, the 14C tracer is only subject to air–sea gas exchange, physical transport, and radioactive decay, while in the "biotic" version, the 14C additionally follows the 13C tracer through all biogeochemical and ecological processes. Thus, the abiotic 14C tracer can be run without the ecosystem module, requiring significantly less computational resources. The carbon isotope module calculates the carbon isotopic fractionation during gas exchange, photosynthesis, and calcium carbonate formation, while any subsequent biological process such as remineralization as well as any external inputs are assumed to occur without fractionation. Given the uncertainty associated with the biological fractionation during photosynthesis, we implemented and tested three parameterizations of different complexity. Compared to present-day observations, the model is able to simulate the oceanic 14C bomb uptake and the 13C Suess effect reasonably well compared to observations and other model studies. At the same time, the carbon isotopes reveal biases in the physical model, for example a too sluggish ventilation of the deep Pacific Ocean.

  15. Stable carbon isotope ratios as proxies for CO2 migration: An experimental approach with analogue fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myrttinen, A.; Becker, V.; Mayer, B.; Barth, J. A.

    2012-12-01

    Stable carbon isotope ratios have proven to be highly sensitive tracers of CO2 migration in the subsurface, provided that the δ13C value of injected CO2 is distinct from that of baseline carbon in the reservoir and in shallow aquifers. This is of great importance for tracing the movement and the fate of injected CO2 in storage reservoirs where fluid and gas samples for chemical and isotope analyses can be obtained. One fundamental aspect that needs to be considered is carbon isotope fractionation between the various dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) species and sub- or super-critical CO2. Such isotope fractionation may occur at various stages of CO2 migration including, the initial stages of injection during CO2 dissolution; during possible CO2 desiccation in pores; during CO2 migration within the reservoir or even during potential leakage into the near-surface environment. The magnitude and direction of carbon isotope fractionation (1000lnαDIC-CO2) between the DIC species and the injected CO2 depends highly on temperature and pH. At shallow depths, where temperatures are moderate and pH values are typically close to neutral, HCO3- is the dominant form of DIC. Carbon isotope fractionation between CO2 and DIC is therefore expected to reach ~ +10 ‰, resulting in a more positive δ13C value of DIC compared to that of the injected CO2. On the other hand, during injection, elevated temperatures and pH values of below 6 are usually observed. Here, H2CO3 is the dominant form of DIC and carbon isotope fractionation of close to -1 ‰ is expected. However, literature data on isotope fractionation values between H2CO3 and CO2 at temperatures above ˜ 60 °C are limited. In order to investigate the effects of pH and temperature on carbon isotope fractionation at various subsurface conditions, including elevated temperatures and pressures typical for CO2 reservoirs, laboratory experiments with analogue fluids were conducted within the framework of the CO2ISO-LABEL project

  16. Isotope fractionation of selenium during fungal biomethylation by Alternaria alternata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, Kathrin; Johnson, Thomas M; Wilcke, Wolfgang

    2011-04-01

    The natural abundance of stable Se isotopes may reflect sources and formation conditions of methylated Se. We aimed at (1) quantifying the degree of methylation of selenate [Se(VI)] and (hydro)selenite [Se(IV)] by the fungus Alternaria alternata at pH 4 and 7 and (2) determining the effects of these different Se sources and pH values on 82Se/76Se ratios (δ82/76Se) in methylselenides. Alternaria alternata was incubated with Se(VI) and Se(IV) in closed microcosms for 11-15 days and additionally with Se(IV) for 3-5 days at 30 °C. We determined Se concentrations and δ82/76Se values in source Se(VI) and Se(IV), media, fungi, and trapped methylselenides. In Se(VI) incubations, methylselenide volatilization ended before the 11th day, and the amounts of trapped methylselenide were not significantly different among the 11-15 day incubations. In 11-15 days, 2.9-11% of Se(VI) and 21-29% of Se(IV) were methylated, and in 3-5 days, 3-5% of Se(IV) was methylated. The initial δ82/76Se values of Se(VI) and Se(IV) were -0.69±SD 0.07‰, and -0.20±0.05‰, respectively. The δ82/76Se values of methylselenides differed significantly between Se(VI) (-3.97‰ to -3.25‰) and Se(IV) (-1.44‰ to -0.16‰) as sources after 11-15 days of incubation; pH had little influence on δ82/76Se values. Thus, the δ82/76Se values of methylselenide indicate the source species of methylselenides used in this study. The strong isotope fractionation of Se(VI) is probably attributable to the different reduction steps of Se(VI) to Se(-II) which were rate-limiting explaining the low methylation yields, but not to the methylation itself. The shorter incubation of Se(IV) for 3-5 days showed a large Se isotope fractionation of at least -6‰ before the biomethylation reaction reached its end. This initial Se isotope fractionation during methylation of Se(IV) is much larger than previously published. PMID:21366259

  17. Isotopic Fractionation in Primitive Material: Quantifying the Contribution of Interstellar Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charnley, Steven

    2010-01-01

    Anomalously fractionated isotopic material is found in many primitive Solar System objects, such as meteorites and comets. It is thought, in some cases, to trace interstellar matter that was incorporated into the Solar Nebula without undergoing significant processing. We will present the results of models of the nitrogen, oxygen, and carbon fractionation chemistry in dense molecular clouds, particularly in cores where substantial freeze-out of molecules on to dust has occurred. The range of fractionation ratios expected in different interstellar molecules will be discussed and compared to the ratios measured in molecular clouds, comets and meteoritic material. These models make several predictions that can be tested in the near future by molecular line observations, particularly with ALMA.

  18. Carbon isotopes as indicators of peatland growth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alewell, Christine; Krüger, Jan Paul; von Sengbusch, Pascal; Szidat, Sönke; Leifeld, Jens

    2016-04-01

    As undisturbed and/or growing peatlands store considerable amounts of carbon and are unique in their biodiversity and species assemblage, the knowledge of the current status of peatlands (growing with carbon sequestration, stagnating or degrading with carbon emissions) is crucial for landscape management and nature conservation. However, monitoring of peatland status requires long term measurements and is only feasible with expert knowledge. The latter determination is increasingly impeded in a scientific world, where taxonomic expert knowledge and funding of long term monitoring is rare. Stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes depth profiles in peatland soils have been shown to be a useful tool to monitor the degradation of peatlands due to permafrost thawing in Northern Sweden (Alewell et al., 2011; Krüger et al., 2014), drainage in Southern Finland (Krüger et al., 2016) as well as land use intensification in Northern Germany (Krüger et al., 2015). Here, we tackle the questions if we are able to differentiate between growing and degrading peats with the use of a combination of carbon stable (δ13C) and radiogenic isotope data (14C) with peat stratification information (degree of humification and macroscopic plant remains). Results indicate that isotope data are a useful tool to approximate peatland status, but that expert taxonomic knowledge will be needed for the final conclusion on peatland growth. Thus, isotope tools might be used for landscape screening to pin point sites for detailed taxonomic monitoring. As the method remains qualitative future research at these sites will need to integrate quantitative approaches to determine carbon loss or gain (soil C balances by ash content or C accumulation methods by radiocarbon data; Krüger et al., 2016). Alewell, C., R. Giesler, J. Klaminder, J. Leifeld, and M. Rollog. 2011. Stable carbon isotopes as indicators for micro-geomorphic changes in palsa peats. Biogeosciences, 8, 1769-1778. Krüger, J. P., Leifeld, J

  19. Influence of carbon source on the stable carbon isotopic composition of the seagrass Thalassia testudinum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of isotopically distinct organic carbon sources in sediments and CO2 enrichment on the stable carbon isotope composition of Thalassia testudinum (turtle grass) seedlings were investigated. Seedling leaves became increasingly 13C depleted in all treatments with time. In the CO2 enriched treatment, δ13C values for seedlings declined from -9.1 to -57.1 per mille over the nine month culture period; the latter value is the lightest stable carbon isotope composition ever reported for a higher plant. In all non-CO2-enriched treatments, δ13C values declined from -9.1 per mille at T=0 to between -18.3 and -22.2 per mille after nine months. The lack of treatment effect in the non-CO2-enriched cultures was probably due to the release and exchange of isotopically light CO2 from the CO2 enriched treatment within the relatively closed environment of the culture room. This exchange was reflected in media dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) δ13C values that indicated increasing 13C depletion relative to the initial compositions of the synthetic seawater salts. Depletion of 13C in leaf tissue of seedlings in the non-CO2-enriched treatments occurred faster than did media DIC 13C depletion, suggesting an increase in isotopic fractionation as seedlings grew. The reasons for this increasing fractionation are unclear, but they may reflect a decreasing contribution of isotopically heavy seed research and/or increasing availability of exogenous carbon. 18 refs, 1 fig., 2 tabs

  20. The Li isotope composition of modern biogenic carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellinger, M.; West, A. J.; Adkins, J. F.; Paris, G.; Eagle, R.; Freitas, P. S.; Bagard, M. L.; Ries, J. B.; Corsetti, F. A.; Pogge von Strandmann, P.; Ullmann, C. V.

    2015-12-01

    The lithium stable isotope composition (δ7Li) of sedimentary carbonates has great potential to unravel weathering rates and intensity in the past, with implications for understanding the carbon cycle over geologic time. However, so far very little is known about the potential influence of fractionation of the stable Li isotope composition of biogenic carbonates. Here, we investigate the δ7Li of various organisms (particularly mollusks, echinoderms and brachiopods) abundant in the Phanerozoic record, in order to understand which geologic archives might provide the best targets for reconstructing past seawater composition. The range of measured samples includes (i) modern calcite and aragonite shells from variable natural environments, (ii) shells from organisms grown under controlled conditions (temperature, salinity, pCO2), and (iii) fossil shells from a range of species collected from Miocene deposits. When possible, both the inner and outer layers of bivalves were micro-sampled to assess the intra-shell heterogeneity. For calcitic shells, the measured δ7Li of bivalve species range from +32 to +41‰ and is systematically enriched in the heavy isotope relative to seawater (31 ‰) and to inorganic calcite, which is characterized by Δ7Licalcite-seawater = -2 to -5‰ [1]. The Li isotope composition of aragonitic bivalves, ranging from +16 to +22‰, is slightly fractionated to both high and low δ7Li relative to inorganic aragonite. The largest intra-shell Li isotope variability is observed for mixed calcite-aragonite shells (more than 20‰) whereas in single mineralogy shells, intra-shell δ7Li variability is generally less than 3‰. Overall, these results suggest a strong influence of vital effects on Li isotopes during bio-calcification of bivalve shells. On the contrary, measured brachiopods systematically exhibit fractionation that is very similar to inorganic calcite, with a mean δ7Li of 27.0±1.5‰, suggesting that brachiopods may provide good

  1. Carbon isotopes in biological carbonates: Respiration and photosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnaughey, T.A.; Burdett, J.; Whelan, J.F.; Paull, C.K.

    1997-01-01

    Respired carbon dioxide is an important constituent in the carbonates of most air breathing animals but is much less important in the carbonates of most aquatic animals. This difference is illustrated using carbon isotope data from freshwater and terrestrial snails, ahermatypic corals, and chemoautotrophic and methanotrophic pelecypods. Literature data from fish otoliths and bird and mammal shell and bone carbonates are also considered. Environmental CO2/O2 ratios appear to be the major controlling variable. Atmospheric CO2/O2 ratios are about thirty times lower than in most natural waters, hence air breathing animals absorb less environmental CO2 in the course of obtaining O2. Tissue CO2 therefore, does not isotopically equilibrate with environmental CO2 as thoroughly in air breathers as in aquatic animals, and this is reflected in skeletal carbonates. Animals having efficient oxygen transport systems, such as vertebrates, also accumulate more respired CO2 in their tissues. Photosynthetic corals calcify mainly during the daytime when photosynthetic CO2 uptake is several times faster than respiratory CO2 release. Photosynthesis, therefore, affects skeletal ??13C more strongly than does respiration. Corals also illustrate how "metabolic" effects on skeletal isotopic composition can be estimated, despite the presence of much larger "kinetic" isotope effects. Copyright ?? 1997 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  2. Laser ablation molecular isotopic spectrometry of carbon isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bol' shakov, Alexander A. [Applied Spectra, Inc., Fremont, CA (United States); Jain, Jinesh [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States); Russo, Richard E. [Applied Spectra, Inc., Fremont, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); McIntyre, Dustin [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States); Mao, Xianglei [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-08-28

    Quantitative determination of carbon isotopes using Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry (LAMIS) is described. Optical emission of diatomic molecules CN and C2 is used in these measurements. Two quantification approaches are presented:empirical calibration of spectra using a set of reference standards and numerical fitting of a simulated spectrum to the experimental one. Formation mechanisms of C2 and CN in laser ablation plasma are briefly reviewed to provide insights for implementation of LAMIS measurements. A simulated spectrum of the 12C2 Swan system was synthesized using four constituents within 473.5–476.5 nm. Simulation included three branches of 12C2 (1-0), branches R(0-0) and R(1-1), and branch P(9-8) of 12C2. Spectral positions of the tail lines in R(0-0) and R(1-1) were experimentally measured, since they were not accurately known before. The Swan band (1-0) of the isotopologue 13C12C was also simulated. Fitting to the experimental spectrumyielded the ratio 13C/12C = 1.08% in a good agreement with measurements by isotope ratio mass spectrometry. LAMIS promises to be useful in coal, oil and shale exploration, carbon sequestration monitoring, and agronomy studies

  3. Laser ablation molecular isotopic spectrometry of carbon isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bol‧shakov, Alexander A.; Mao, Xianglei; Jain, Jinesh; McIntyre, Dustin L.; Russo, Richard E.

    2015-11-01

    Quantitative determination of carbon isotopes using Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry (LAMIS) is described. Optical emission of diatomic molecules CN and C2 is used in these measurements. Two quantification approaches are presented: empirical calibration of spectra using a set of reference standards and numerical fitting of a simulated spectrum to the experimental one. Formation mechanisms of C2 and CN in laser ablation plasma are briefly reviewed to provide insights for implementation of LAMIS measurements. A simulated spectrum of the 12C2 Swan system was synthesized using four constituents within 473.5-476.5 nm. Simulation included three branches of 12C2 (1-0), branches R(0-0) and R(1-1), and branch P(9-8) of 12C2. Spectral positions of the tail lines in R(0-0) and R(1-1) were experimentally measured, since they were not accurately known before. The Swan band (1-0) of the isotopologue 13C12C was also simulated. Fitting to the experimental spectrum yielded the ratio 13C/12C = 1.08% in a good agreement with measurements by isotope ratio mass spectrometry. LAMIS promises to be useful in coal, oil and shale exploration, carbon sequestration monitoring, and agronomy studies.

  4. ISOTOPIC MASS FRACTIONATION OF SOLAR WIND: EVIDENCE FROM FAST AND SLOW SOLAR WIND COLLECTED BY THE GENESIS MISSION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NASA's Genesis space mission returned samples of solar wind collected over ∼2.3 years. We present elemental and isotopic compositions of He, Ne, and Ar analyzed in diamond-like carbon targets from the slow and fast solar wind collectors to investigate isotopic fractionation processes during solar wind formation. The solar wind provides information on the isotopic composition for most volatile elements for the solar atmosphere, the bulk Sun and hence, on the solar nebula from which it formed 4.6 Ga ago. Our data reveal a heavy isotope depletion in the slow solar wind compared to the fast wind composition by 63.1 ± 2.1 per mille for He, 4.2 ± 0.5 per mille amu–1 for Ne and 2.6 ± 0.5 per mille amu–1 for Ar. The three Ne isotopes suggest that isotopic fractionation processes between fast and slow solar wind are mass dependent. The He/H ratios of the collected slow and fast solar wind samples are 0.0344 and 0.0406, respectively. The inefficient Coulomb drag model reproduces the measured isotopic fractionation between fast and slow wind. Therefore, we apply this model to infer the photospheric isotopic composition of He, Ne, and Ar from our solar wind data. We also compare the isotopic composition of oxygen and nitrogen measured in the solar wind with values of early solar system condensates, probably representing solar nebula composition. We interpret the differences between these samples as being due to isotopic fractionation during solar wind formation. For both elements, the magnitude and sign of the observed differences are in good agreement with the values predicted by the inefficient Coulomb drag model.

  5. ISOTOPIC MASS FRACTIONATION OF SOLAR WIND: EVIDENCE FROM FAST AND SLOW SOLAR WIND COLLECTED BY THE GENESIS MISSION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heber, Veronika S.; Baur, Heinrich; Wieler, Rainer [Institute for Geochemistry and Petrology, ETH Zurich, Clausiusstrasse 25, CH-8092 Zurich (Switzerland); Bochsler, Peter [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Bern, Sidlerstasse 5, CH-3012 Bern (Switzerland); McKeegan, Kevin D. [Department of Earth and Space Sciences, University of California Los Angeles, 595 Charles Young Drive East, Box 951567, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1567 (United States); Neugebauer, Marcia [Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721-0092 (United States); Reisenfeld, Daniel B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Montana, Missoula, MT 59812 (United States); Wiens, Roger C., E-mail: heber@ess.ucla.edu [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2012-11-10

    NASA's Genesis space mission returned samples of solar wind collected over {approx}2.3 years. We present elemental and isotopic compositions of He, Ne, and Ar analyzed in diamond-like carbon targets from the slow and fast solar wind collectors to investigate isotopic fractionation processes during solar wind formation. The solar wind provides information on the isotopic composition for most volatile elements for the solar atmosphere, the bulk Sun and hence, on the solar nebula from which it formed 4.6 Ga ago. Our data reveal a heavy isotope depletion in the slow solar wind compared to the fast wind composition by 63.1 {+-} 2.1 per mille for He, 4.2 {+-} 0.5 per mille amu{sup -1} for Ne and 2.6 {+-} 0.5 per mille amu{sup -1} for Ar. The three Ne isotopes suggest that isotopic fractionation processes between fast and slow solar wind are mass dependent. The He/H ratios of the collected slow and fast solar wind samples are 0.0344 and 0.0406, respectively. The inefficient Coulomb drag model reproduces the measured isotopic fractionation between fast and slow wind. Therefore, we apply this model to infer the photospheric isotopic composition of He, Ne, and Ar from our solar wind data. We also compare the isotopic composition of oxygen and nitrogen measured in the solar wind with values of early solar system condensates, probably representing solar nebula composition. We interpret the differences between these samples as being due to isotopic fractionation during solar wind formation. For both elements, the magnitude and sign of the observed differences are in good agreement with the values predicted by the inefficient Coulomb drag model.

  6. Experimental study on stable isotopic fractionation of evaporating water under varying temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-ying HU; Wei-min BAO; Tao WANG; Si-min QU

    2009-01-01

    The variation of stable isotope ratios in natural waters provides valuable information that can be used to trace water movement. Evaporation plays a crucial role in determining the variation of stable isotopes. In this paper, several evaporation experiments were conducted in order to study the stable isotopic fractionation mechanism of water and analyze the influence of different temperatures on evaporation fractionation. Three group experiments of water evaporation under different temperatures and initial isotopic values were carried out. The results show that fractionation factors of hydrogen and oxygen may increase with temperature, and the average enrichment degree of hydrogen isotope D is 3.432 times that of oxygen isotope 18O. The results also show that the isotopic composition of the initial water has little influence on water evaporation fractionation, which is mainly affected by the state variables in the evaporation process, such as temperature. This research provides experimental data for further understanding the evaporation fractionation mechanism.

  7. Boron isotope fractionation during brucite deposition from artificial seawater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Xiao

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Experiments involving boron incorporation into brucite (Mg(OH2 from magnesium-free artificial seawater with pH values ranging from 9.5 to 13.0 were carried out to better understand the incorporation behavior of boron into brucite and the influence of it on Mg/Ca-SST proxy and δ11B-pH proxy. The results show that both the concentration of boron in deposited brucite ([B]d and its boron partition coefficient (Kd between deposited brucite and final seawater are controlled by the pH of the solution. The incorporation capacity of boron into brucite is almost the same as that into corals, but much stronger than that into oxides and clay minerals. The isotopic compositions of boron in deposited brucite (δ11Bd are higher than those in the associated artificial seawater (δ11Bisw with fractionation factors ranging between 1.0177 and 1.0569, resulting from the preferential incorporation of B(OH3 into brucite. Both boron adsorptions onto brucite and the precipitation reaction of H3BO3 with brucite exist during deposition of brucite from artificial seawater. The simultaneous occurrence of both processes determines the boron concentration and isotopic fractionation of brucite. The isotopic fractionation behaviors and mechanisms of boron incorporated into brucite are different from those into corals. The existence of brucite in corals can affect the δ11B and Mg/Ca in corals and influences the Mg/Ca-SST proxy and δ11B-pH proxy negatively. The relationship between δ11B and Mg/Ca in corals can be used to judge the existence of brucite in corals, which should provide a reliable method for better use of δ11B and Mg/Ca in corals to reconstruct paleo-marine environment.

  8. 14C in fractions of dissolved organic carbon in ground water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Here we report carbon isotope ratios of fractions of natural organic compounds in ground waters isolated from the Stripa mine (Sweden) and the Milk River aquifer (Alberta, Canada). High-molecular-weight and low-molecular-weight fractions of the organic carbon were characterized and these, along with dissolved inorganic carbon, were analysed for δ13C and 14C. The 14C results suggest that the dissolved organic carbon originates from a combination of soil organic matter and kerogen in the aquifer matrix. The high-molecular-weight fractions show a predominant soil origin, whereas the low-molecular-weight fractions are often strongly influenced by kerogen. (author). 23 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  9. Nitrogen isotopic fractionation during abiotic synthesis of organic solid particles

    CERN Document Server

    Kuga, Maïa; Marty, Bernard; Marrocchi, Yves; Bernard, Sylvain; Rigaudier, Thomas; Fleury, Benjamin; Tissandier, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    The formation of organic compounds is generally assumed to result from abiotic processes in the Solar System, with the exception of biogenic organics on Earth. Nitrogen-bearing organics are of particular interest, notably for prebiotic perspectives but also for overall comprehension of organic formation in the young solar system and in planetary atmospheres. We have investigated abiotic synthesis of organics upon plasma discharge, with special attention to N isotope fractionation. Organic aerosols were synthesized from N2-CH4 and N2-CO gaseous mixtures using low-pressure plasma discharge experiments, aimed at simulating chemistry occurring in Titan s atmosphere and in the protosolar nebula, respectively. Nitrogen is efficiently incorporated into the synthesized solids, independently of the oxidation degree, of the N2 content of the starting gas mixture, and of the nitrogen speciation in the aerosols. The aerosols are depleted in 15N by 15-25 permil relative to the initial N2 gas, whatever the experimental set...

  10. Microbial Enzyme Activity and Carbon Cycling in Grassland Soil Fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, S. D.; Jastrow, J. D.

    2004-12-01

    Extracellular enzymes are necessary to degrade complex organic compounds present in soils. Using physical fractionation procedures, we tested whether old soil carbon is spatially isolated from degradative enzymes across a prairie restoration chronosequence in Illinois, USA. We found that carbon-degrading enzymes were abundant in all soil fractions, including macroaggregates, microaggregates, and the clay fraction, which contains carbon with a mean residence time of ~200 years. The activities of two cellulose-degrading enzymes and a chitin-degrading enzyme were 2-10 times greater in organic matter fractions than in bulk soil, consistent with the rapid turnover of these fractions. Polyphenol oxidase activity was 3 times greater in the clay fraction than in the bulk soil, despite very slow carbon turnover in this fraction. Changes in enzyme activity across the restoration chronosequence were small once adjusted for increases in soil carbon concentration, although polyphenol oxidase activity per unit carbon declined by 50% in native prairie versus cultivated soil. These results are consistent with a `two-pool' model of enzyme and carbon turnover in grassland soils. In light organic matter fractions, enzyme production and carbon turnover both occur rapidly. However, in mineral-dominated fractions, both enzymes and their carbon substrates are immobilized on mineral surfaces, leading to slow turnover. Soil carbon accumulation in the clay fraction and across the prairie restoration chronosequence probably reflects increasing physical isolation of enzymes and substrates on the molecular scale, rather than the micron to millimeter scale.

  11. Yucca Mountain Area Saturated Zone Dissolved Organic Carbon Isotopic Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, James; Decker, David; Patterson, Gary; Peterman, Zell; Mihevc, Todd; Larsen, Jessica; Hershey, Ronald

    2007-06-25

    groundwater ages. The DIC calculated groundwater ages were compared with DOC calculated groundwater ages and both of these ages were compared to travel times developed in ground-water flow and transport models. If nuclear waste is stored in Yucca Mountain, the saturated zone is the final barrier against the release of radionuclides to the environment. The most recent rendition of the TSPA takes little credit for the presence of the saturated zone and is a testament to the inadequate understanding of this important barrier. If radionuclides reach the saturated zone beneath Yucca Mountain, then there is a travel time before they would leave the Yucca Mountain area and flow down gradient to the Amargosa Valley area. Knowing how long it takes groundwater in the saturated zone to flow from beneath Yucca Mountain to down gradient areas is critical information for potential radionuclide transport. Radionuclide transport in groundwater may be the quickest pathway for radionuclides in the proposed Yucca Mountain repository to reach land surface by way of groundwater pumped in Amargosa Valley. An alternative approach to ground-water flow and transport models to determine the travel time of radionuclides from beneath Yucca Mountain to down gradient areas in the saturated zone is by carbon-14 dating of both inorganic and organic carbon dissolved in the groundwater. A standard method of determining ground-water ages is to measure the carbon-13 and carbon-14 of DIC in the groundwater and then correct the measured carbon-14 along a flow path for geochemical reactions that involve carbon containing phases. These geochemical reactions are constrained by carbon-13 and isotopic fractionations. Without correcting for geochemical reactions, the ground-water ages calculated from only the differences in carbon-14 measured along a flow path (assuming the decrease in carbon-14 is due strictly to radioactive decay) could be tens of thousands of years too old. The computer program NETPATH, developed by

  12. Carbon-13 kinetic isotope effects in the decarbonylation of lactic acid of natural isotopic composition in phosphoric acid medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 13C kinetic isotope effect fractionation in the decarbonylation of lactic acid (LA) of natural isotopic composition by concentrated phosphoric acids (PA) and by 85% H3PO4 has been studied in the temperature interval of 60-150 deg C. The values of the 13C(1) isotope effects in the decarbonylation of lactic acid in 100% H3PO4, in pyrophosphoric acid and in more concentrated phosphoric acids are intermediate between the values calculated assuming that the C(1)-OH bond is broken in the rate-controlling step of dehydration and those calculated for rupture of the carbon-carbon bond in the transition state. In the temperature interval of 90-130 deg C the experimental 13C fractionation factors determined in concentrated PA approach quite closely the 13C fractionation corresponding to C(2)-C(1) bond scission. The 13C(1) kinetic isotope effects in the decarbonylation of LA in 85% orthophosphoric acid in the temperature range of 110-150 deg C coincide with the 13C isotope effects calculated assuming that the frequency corresponding to the C(1)-OH vibration is lost in the transition state of decarbonylation. A change of the mechanism of decarbonylation of LA in going from concentrated PA medium to 85% H3PO4 has been suggested. A possible secondary 18O and a primary18O kinetic isotope effect in decarbonylation of lactic acid in phosphoric acids media have been discussed, too. (author) 21 refs.; 3 tabs

  13. Lithium and magnesium isotopes fractionation by zone melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akimov, D. V.; Egorov, N. B.; Dyachenko, A. N.; Pustovalova, M. P.; Podoinikov, I. R.

    2016-06-01

    The process of changing isotopic composition of the lithium and magnesium salts was studied by using the process of zone melting. It was founded in the paper that the process of separation of the lithium isotopes is more effective than for magnesium isotopes when the conditions of process were the same. The coefficients of isotopes separation were calculated and have the next value: α = 1.006 for 26Mg isotope and α = 1.0022 for 6Li isotope.

  14. Triple oxygen isotopes in biogenic and sedimentary carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passey, Benjamin H.; Hu, Huanting; Ji, Haoyuan; Montanari, Shaena; Li, Shuning; Henkes, Gregory A.; Levin, Naomi E.

    2014-09-01

    The 17O anomaly (Δ17O) of natural waters has been shown to be sensitive to evaporation in a way analogous to deuterium excess, with evaporated bodies of water (e.g., leaf waters, lake waters, animal body waters) tending to have lower Δ17O than primary meteoric waters. In animal body water, Δ17O relates to the intake of evaporated waters, evaporative effluxes of water, and the Δ17O value of atmospheric O2, which itself carries signatures of global carbon cycling and photochemical reactions in the stratosphere. Carbonates have the potential to record the triple oxygen isotope compositions of parent waters, allowing reconstruction of past water compositions, but such investigations have awaited development of methods for high-precision measurement of Δ17O of carbonate. We describe optimized methods based on a sequential acid digestion/reduction/fluorination approach that yield Δ17O data with the high precision (∼0.010‰, 1σ) needed to resolve subtle environmental signals. We report the first high-precision Δ17O dataset for terrestrial carbonates, focusing on vertebrate biogenic carbonates and soil carbonates, but also including marine invertebrates and high-temperature carbonates. We determine apparent three-isotope fractionation factors between the O2 analyte derived from carbonate and the parent waters of the carbonate. These in combination with appropriate temperature estimates (from clumped isotope thermometry, or known or estimated body temperatures) are used to calculate the δ18O and Δ17O of parent waters. The clearest pattern to emerge is the strong 17O-depletion in avian, dinosaurian, and mammalian body water (from analyses of eggshell and tooth enamel) relative to meteoric waters, following expected influences of evaporated water (e.g., leaf water) and atmospheric O2 on vertebrate body water. Parent waters of the soil carbonates studied here have Δ17O values that are similar to or slightly lower than global precipitation. Our results suggest

  15. Calcium isotope fractionation in coccoliths of cultured Calcidiscus leptoporus, Helicosphaera carteri, Syracosphaera pulchra and Umbilicosphaera foliosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gussone, Nikolaus; Langer, Gerald; Geisen, Markus; Steel, Blair A.; Riebesell, Ulf

    2007-08-01

    Four species of marine calcifying algae, the coccolithophores Calcidiscus leptoporus, Helicosphaera carteri, Syracosphaera pulchra and Umbilicosphaera foliosa were grown in laboratory cultures under temperatures varying between 14 and 23 °C, and one species, C. leptoporus, under varying [CO 32-], ranging from 105 to 219 μmol/kg. Calcium isotope compositions of the coccoliths resemble in both absolute fractionation and temperature sensitivity previous calibrations of marine calcifying species e.g. Emiliania huxleyi (coccolithophores) and Orbulina universa (planktonic foraminifera) as well as inorganically precipitated CaCO 3, but also reveal small species specific differences. In contrast to inorganically precipitated calcite, but similar to E. huxleyi and O. universa, the carbonate ion concentration of the medium has no statistically significant influence on the Ca isotope fractionation of C. leptoporus coccoliths; however, combined data of E. huxleyi and C. leptoporus indicate that the observed trends might be related to changes of the calcite saturation state of the medium. Since coccoliths constitute a significant portion of the global oceanic CaCO 3 export production, the Ca isotope fractionation in these biogenic structures is important for defining the isotopic composition of the Ca sink of the ocean, one of the key parameters for modelling changes to the marine Ca budget over time. For the present ocean our results are in general agreement with the previously postulated and applied mean value of the oceanic Ca sink (Δ sed) of about - 1.3‰, but the observed inter- and intra-species differences point to possible changes in Δ sed through earth history, due to changing physico-chemical conditions of the ocean and shifts in floral and faunal assemblages.

  16. Chemical and carbon isotopic composition of dissolved organic carbon in a regional confined methanogenic aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aravena, R.; Wassenaar, L.I.; Spiker, E. C.

    2004-01-01

    This study demonstrates the advantage of a combined use of chemical and isotopic tools to understand the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) cycle in a regional confined methanogenic aquifer. DOC concentration and carbon isotopic data demonstrate that the soil zone is a primary carbon source of groundwater DOC in areas close to recharge zones. An in-situ DOC source linked to organic rich sediments present in the aquifer matrix is controlling the DOC pool in the central part of the groundwater flow system. DOC fractions, 13C-NMR on fulvic acids and 14C data on DOC and CH4 support the hypothesis that the in-situ DOC source is a terrestrial organic matter and discard the Ordovician bedrock as a source of DOC. ?? 2004 Taylor and Francis Ltd.

  17. Observations of nitrogen isotope fractionation in deeply embedded protostars

    CERN Document Server

    Wampfler, S F; Bizzarro, M; Bisschop, S E

    2014-01-01

    (Abridged) The terrestrial planets, comets, and meteorites are significantly enriched in 15N compared to the Sun and Jupiter. While the solar and jovian nitrogen isotope ratio is believed to represent the composition of the protosolar nebula, a still unidentified process has caused 15N-enrichment in the solids. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain the variations, including chemical fractionation. However, observational results that constrain the fractionation models are scarce. While there is evidence of 15N-enrichment in prestellar cores, it is unclear how the signature evolves into the protostellar phases. Our aim is to measure the 14N/15N ratio around three nearby, embedded low-to-intermediate-mass protostars. Isotopologues of HCN and HNC were used to probe the 14N/15N ratio. A selection of H13CN, HC15N, HN13C, and H15NC transitions was observed with the APEX telescope. The 14N/15N ratios were derived from the integrated intensities assuming a standard 12C/13C ratio. The assumption of optically...

  18. Carbon isotope excursions in paleosol carbonate marking five early Eocene hyperthermals in the Bighorn Basin, Wyoming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. A. Abels

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Transient greenhouse warming events in the Paleocene and Eocene were associated with the addition of isotopically-light carbon to the exogenic atmosphere–ocean carbon pool, leading to substantial environmental and biotic change. The magnitude of an accompanying carbon isotope excursion (CIE can be used to constrain both the sources and amounts of carbon released during an event, as well as to correlate marine and terrestrial records with high precision. The Paleocene Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM is well documented, but CIE records for the subsequent warming events are still rare especially from the terrestrial realm. Here, we provide new CIE records for two of the smaller hyperthermal events, I1 and I2, in paleosol carbonate, as well as two additional records of ETM2 and H2 in the Bighorn Basin. Stratigraphic comparison of this expanded, high-resolution terrestrial carbon isotope record to the deep-sea benthic foraminifera records from ODP Sites 1262 and 1263, Walvis Ridge, in the southern Atlantic Ocean corroborates that the Bighorn Basin fluvial sediments record global atmospheric change. The stratigraphic thicknesses of the eccentricity-driven hyperthermals in these archives are in line with precession-forcing of the 7 m thick fluvial overbank-avulsion sedimentary cycles. Using the CALMAG bulk oxide mean annual precipitation proxy, we reconstruct similar or slightly wetter than background soil moisture contents during the four younger hyperthermals, in contrast to drying observed during the PETM. Soil carbonate CIEs vary in magnitude proportionally with the marine CIEs for the four smaller early Eocene hyperthermals. This relationship breaks down for the PETM, with the soil carbonate CIE ~ 2–4‰ less than expected if all five linearly relate to marine CIEs. If the PETM CO2 forcing was similar but scaled to the younger hyperthermals, photosynthetic isotope fractionation or soil environmental factors are needed to explain this anomaly. We

  19. Carbon Isotope Chemistry in Molecular Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Amy N.; Willacy, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Few details of carbon isotope chemistry are known, especially the chemical processes that occur in astronomical environments like molecular clouds. Observational evidence shows that the C-12/C-13 abundance ratios vary due to the location of the C-13 atom within the molecular structure. The different abundances are a result of the diverse formation pathways that can occur. Modeling can be used to explore the production pathways of carbon molecules in an effort to understand and explain the chemical evolution of molecular clouds.

  20. Isotope Fractionation During N Mineralization and the N Isotope Composition of Terrestrial Ecosystem N Pools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkstra, P.; Schwartz, E.; Hungate, B. A.; Hart, S. C.

    2008-12-01

    It has been an open question for several decades whether N mineralization is a fractionating process. This question is important for N cycling in terrestrial ecosystems because even a small fractionation during N mineralization could potentially have a large influence on the N isotope composition of other ecosystem N pools. Fractionation during N mineralization should result in a difference between the N isotope composition of the soil microorganisms, that of its substrates, and products. We analyzed the N isotope composition of the soil microbial biomass in a variety of ecosystems, and found that it was 15N enriched compared to that of other soil N pools, such as soil soluble, organic and inorganic N (Dijkstra et al. 2006a,b). We observed a negative correlation between the 15N enrichment of the microorganisms and the relative C and N availability for soil from ecosystems in Hawaii and Arizona, across a broad range of climates, grasslands and forests, and more than four million years of ecosystem development. This suggests that during N dissimilation (and associated transaminations) and N export, the lighter 14N N isotope is preferentially removed in a manner similar to that proposed for animals and ectomycorrhizae. This was further confirmed by the positive correlation between microbial 15N enrichment and net N mineralization rate (Dijkstra et al. 2008, Ecology Letters 11: 389-397) and by culture experiments with Escherichia coli (Collins et al. 2008). Since mineralization is the largest flux of N in ecosystems, fractionation during N mineralization has the potential to influence the N isotope composition of other N pools, such as inorganic N, plant N and soil organic matter N. We demonstrate that the N isotope compositions of these ecosystem N pools exhibit differences that are consistent with fractionation during N mineralization. Our results show that the N isotope composition can be used as a measure to trace N mineralization and decomposition in ecosystems

  1. Two-Dimensional Stable Isotope Fractionation During Aerobic and Anaerobic Alkane Biodegradation and Implications for the Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Morris, Brandon; Suflita, Joseph M.; Richnow, Hans-Hermann

    2010-05-01

    Quantitatively, n-alkanes comprise a major portion of most crude oils. In petroliferous formations, it may be possible to relate the loss of these compounds to the levels of biodegradation occurring in situ [1]. Moreover, it is important to develop indicators of alkane degradation that may be used to monitor bioremediation of hydrocarbon-impacted environments. Desulfoglaeba alkanexedens and Pseudomonas putida GPo1 were used to determine if carbon and hydrogen stable isotope fractionation could differentiate between n-alkane degradation under anaerobic and aerobic conditions, respectively in the context of the Rayleigh equation model [2]. Bacterial cultures were sacrificed by acidification and headspace samples were analyzed for stable isotope composition using gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Carbon enrichment factors (bulk) for anaerobic and aerobic biodegradation of hexane were -5.52 ± 0.2‰ and -4.34 ± 0.3‰, respectively. Hydrogen enrichment during hexane degradation was -43.14 ± 6.32‰ under sulfate-reducing conditions, and was too low for quantification during aerobiosis. Collectively, this indicates that the correlation between carbon and hydrogen stable isotope fractionation (may be used to help elucidate in situ microbial processes in oil reservoirs, and during intrinsic as well as engineered remediation efforts. References 1. Asif, M.; Grice, K.; Fazeelat, T., Assessment of petroleum biodegradation using stable hydrogen isotopes of individual saturated hydrocarbon and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon distributions in oils from the Upper Indus Basin, Pakistan. Organic Geochemistry 2009, 40, (3), 301-311. 2. Fischer, A.; Herklotz, I.; Herrmann, S.; Thullner, M.; Weelink, S. A. B.; Stams, A., J. M.; Schloemann, M.; Richnow, H.-H.; Vogt, C., Combined carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionation investigations for elucidating benzene biodegradation pathways. Environ. Sci. Technol. 2008, 42, 4356-4363.

  2. Investigation of magnesium isotope fractionation during granite differentiation: Implication for Mg isotopic composition of the continental crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sheng-Ao; Teng, Fang-Zhen; He, Yongsheng; Ke, Shan; Li, Shuguang

    2010-09-01

    High-precision Mg isotopic analysis was performed on a suite of well-characterized I-type granitoids and associated hornblende and biotite minerals from the Dabie Orogen in central China, to address the behavior of Mg isotopes during granite differentiation. Although these granitoids formed through different degrees of partial melting and fractional crystallization, with large variations in elemental and mineral compositions, their δ26Mg values vary from -0.26 to -0.14 and are indistinguishable within our analytical precision (± 0.07‰; 2 SD). Coexisting hornblendes and biotites in these granitoids display similar Mg isotopic composition, with δ26Mg ranging from -0.31 to -0.14 in hornblendes and -0.23 to -0.12 in biotites. The inter-mineral fractionation factors (Δ 26Mg Hbl-Bt = δ26Mg Hbl - δ26Mg Bt) vary from -0.10 to -0.02, with an average = -0.06 ± 0.08 (2 SD). The limited inter-mineral fractionation agrees with the theoretic prediction that Mg cations in both hornblende and biotite are octahedrally coordinated with oxygen, which restricts the magnitude of equilibrium isotope fractionation. Overall, data from both bulk granitoids and associated mineral separates suggest that Mg isotope fractionation during I-type granite differentiation is limited. Collectively, granitoids studied here have Mg isotopic composition similar to that of terrestrial basalts and peridotites ( δ26Mg = -0.21 ± 0.07 vs. -0.25 ± 0.07; 2 SD), confirming that magmatic processes do not significantly fractionate Mg isotopes. The continental crust in the Dabie Orogen, as sampled by these I-type granitoids, has a mantle-like Mg isotopic composition. Given that significant Mg isotope fractionation occurs during chemical weathering processes, Mg isotopes may potentially be used for tracing granite genesis, in particular, if sedimentary materials are involved in granite sources.

  3. Lithium distribution and isotopic fractionation during chemical weathering and soil formation in a loess profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Pei-Hsuan; You, Chen-Feng; Huang, Kuo-Fang; Chung, Chuan-Hisung; Sun, You-Bin

    2014-06-01

    Lithium (Li) is a fluid-mobile element and δ7Li in secondary deposits represents an excellent proxy for silicate weathering and authigenic mineral formation. The soil samples from 1205 to 1295 cm in the Weinan profile, one of the best developed loess-paleosol sequences covering the last glacial-interglacial climatic cycle, were collected and chemically separated into detritus and carbonate fractions for subsequent analyses of Li, δ7Li, major and trace elements. Other desert specimens (i.e., Qaidam Desert, Tengger Desert, Badain Juran Desert and Taklimakan Desert) near the Chinese Loess Plateau (CLP) and various standard clays were analyzed for assisting provenance determination. The Li and δ7Li distributions in the detritus are rather homogeneous, 1.4-2.0 μg/g and +2.5‰ to +4.7‰, respectively, compared with the carbonate fraction. The detrital δ7Li varies systematically with magnetic susceptibility and grain size changes, reflecting significant Li isotopic variation associated with sources and mineralogy of detrital material. On the other hand, Li and δ7Li in carbonates show large changes, 781-963 ng/g and -4.1‰ to +10.2‰, respectively. These carbonate δ7Li correlated well with the estimated index of chemical weathering, as a result of Li mobilization and soil formation during chemical weathering.

  4. Carbonate clumped isotope bond reordering and geospeedometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passey, Benjamin H.; Henkes, Gregory A.

    2012-10-01

    Carbonate clumped isotope thermometry is based on the preference of 13C and 18O to form bonds with each other. At elevated temperatures such bond ordering is susceptible to resetting by diffusion of C and O through the solid mineral lattice. This type of bond reordering has the potential to obscure primary paleoclimate information, but could also provide a basis for reconstructing shallow crustal temperatures and cooling rates. We determined Arrhenius parameters for solid-state reordering of C-O bonds in two different calcites through a series of laboratory heating experiments. We find that the calcites have different susceptibilities to solid-state reordering. Reaction progress follows a first order rate law in both calcites, but only after an initial period of non-first order reaction that we suggest relates to annealing of nonequilibrium defects when the calcites are first heated to experimental temperature. We show that the apparent equilibrium temperature equations (or "closure temperature" equations) for carbonate clumped isotope reordering are analogous Dodson's equations for first order loss of daughter isotopes. For each calcite, the sensitivity of apparent equilibrium temperature to cooling rate is sufficiently high for inference of cooling rates within a factor of ˜5 or better for cooling rates ranging from tens of degrees per day to a few degrees per million years. However, because the calcites have different susceptibilities to reordering, each calcite defines its own cooling rate-apparent equilibrium temperature relationship. The cooling rates of Carrara marble inferred from carbonate clumped isotope geospeedometry are 10-6-10-3 degrees per annum and are in broad agreement with rates inferred from thermochronometric methods. Cooling rates for 13C-depleted calcites from the late Neoproterozoic Doushantou cap carbonates in south China are on the order of 102-104 degrees per annum, consistent with rapid cooling following formation of these calcites by a

  5. Comment on "Abiotic pyrite formation produces a large Fe isotope fractionation".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czaja, Andrew D; Johnson, Clark M; Yamaguchi, Kosei E; Beard, Brian L

    2012-02-01

    Guilbaud et al. (Reports, 24 June 2011, p. 1548) suggest that the geologic record of Fe isotope fractionation can be explained by abiological precipitation of pyrite. We argue that a detailed understanding of the depositional setting, mineralogy, and geologic history of Precambrian sedimentary rocks indicates that the Fe isotope record dominantly reflects biological fractionations and Fe redox processes. PMID:22301304

  6. Silicon Isotope Fractionation During Acid Water-Igneous Rock Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Boorn, S. H.; van Bergen, M. J.; Vroon, P. Z.

    2007-12-01

    Silica enrichment by metasomatic/hydrothermal alteration is a widespread phenomenon in crustal environments where acid fluids interact with silicate rocks. High-sulfidation epithermal ore deposits and acid-leached residues at hot-spring settings are among the best known examples. Acid alteration acting on basalts has also been invoked to explain the relatively high silica contents of the surface of Mars. We have analyzed basaltic-andesitic lavas from the Kawah Ijen volcanic complex (East Java, Indonesia) that were altered by interaction with highly acid (pH~1) sulfate-chloride water of its crater lake and seepage stream. Quantitative removal of major elements during this interaction has led to relative increase in SiO2 contents. Our silicon isotope data, obtained by HR-MC-ICPMS and reported relative to the NIST RM8546 (=NBS28) standard, show a systematic increase in &δ&&30Si from -0.2‰ (±0.3, 2sd) for unaltered andesites and basalts to +1.5‰ (±0.3, 2sd) for the most altered/silicified rocks. These results demonstrate that silicification induced by pervasive acid alteration is accompanied by significant Si isotope fractionation, so that alterered products become isotopically heavier than the precursor rocks. Despite the observed enrichment in SiO2, the rocks have experienced an overall net loss of silicon upon alteration, if Nb is considered as perfectly immobile. The observed &δ&&30Si values of the alteration products appeared to correlate well with the inferred amounts of silicon loss. These findings would suggest that &28Si is preferentially leached during water-rock interaction, implying that dissolved silica in the ambient lake and stream water is isotopically light. However, layered opaline lake sediments, that are believed to represent precipitates from the silica-saturated water show a conspicuous &30Si-enrichment (+1.2 ± 0.2‰). Because anorganic precipitation is known to discriminate against the heavy isotope (e.g. Basile- Doelsch et al., 2006

  7. Chromium isotope fractionation during oxidative weathering of a modern basaltic weathering profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Arcy, Joan Mary; Døssing, Lasse Nørbye; Frei, Robert

    fractionate under both reducing and oxidizing conditions [1, 2]. Recent studies on d53Cr isotopes in laterite soils show that oxidative weathering of Cr-bearing rocks is accompanied by an isotopic fractionation, where by the lighter isotopes are retained in the residual soil and the heavier isotope is...... enriched in local runoff [1]. This study aims to quantify the stable Cr isotope composition of two modern basaltic weathering profiles, to help better understand the processes that oxidize inert Cr (III) to toxic Cr (VI). We sampled basaltic weathering profiles and associated river waters from areas of two...

  8. Arctic herbivore diet can be inferred from stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes in C3 plants, faeces and wool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Ditte; Kristensen, Erik; Forchhammer, Mads C.; Michelsen, Anders; Schmidt, Niels Martin

    2011-01-01

    The use of stable isotopes in diet analysis usually relies on the different photosynthetic pathways of C3 and C4 plants, and the resulting difference in carbon isotope signature. In the Arctic, however, plant species are exclusively C3, and carbon isotopes alone are therefore not suitable for...... studying arctic herbivore diets. In this study, we examined the potential of both stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes to reconstruct the diet of an arctic herbivore, here the muskox (Ovibos moschatus (Zimmermann, 1780)), in northeast Greenland. The isotope composition of plant communities and functional...... distinct. As a result, our examination mainly relied on stable nitrogen isotopes. The interpretation of stable isotopes from faeces was difficult because of the large uncertainty in diet–faeces fractionation, whereas isotope signatures from wool suggested that the muskox summer diet consists of around 80...

  9. The molecular mechanism of Mo isotope fractionation during adsorption to birnessite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasylenki, L.E.; Weeks, C.L.; Bargar, J.R.; Spiro, T.G.; Hein, J.R.; Anbar, A.D.

    2011-01-01

    Fractionation of Mo isotopes during adsorption to manganese oxides is a primary control on the global ocean Mo isotope budget. Previous attempts to explain what drives the surprisingly large isotope effect ??97/95Modissolved-??97/95Moadsorbed=1.8??? have not successfully resolved the fractionation mechanism. New evidence from extended X-ray absorption fine structure analysis and density functional theory suggests that Mo forms a polymolybdate complex on the surfaces of experimental and natural samples. Mo in this polynuclear structure is in distorted octahedral coordination, while Mo remaining in solution is predominantly in tetrahedral coordination as MoO42- Our results indicate that the difference in coordination environment between dissolved Mo and adsorbed Mo is the cause of isotope fractionation. The molecular mechanism of metal isotope fractionation in this system should enable us to explain and possibly predict metal isotope effects in other systems where transition metals adsorb to mineral surfaces. ?? 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Iron Cycling in Marine Sediments - New Insights from Isotope Analysis on Sequentially Extracted Fe Fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henkel, S.; Kasten, S.; Poulton, S.; Hartmann, J.; Staubwasser, M.

    2014-12-01

    Reactive Fe (oxyhydr)oxides preferentially undergo early diagenetic cycling and may cause a diffusive flux of dissolved Fe2+ from sediments towards the sediment-water interface. The partitioning of Fe in sediments has traditionally been studied by applying sequential extractions based on reductive dissolution of Fe minerals. We complemented the sequential leaching method by Poulton and Canfield [1] in order to be able to gain δ56Fe data for specific Fe fractions, as such data are potentially useful to study Fe cycling in marine environments. The specific mineral fractions are Fe-carbonates, ferrihydrite + lepidocrocite, goethite + hematite, and magnetite. Leaching was performed with acetic acid, hydroxylamine-HCl, Na-dithionite and oxalic acid. The processing of leachates for δ56Fe analysis involved boiling the samples in HCl/HNO3/H2O2, Fe precipitation and anion exchange column chromatography. The new method was applied to short sediment cores from the North Sea and a bay of King George Island (South Shetland Islands, Antarctica). Downcore mineral-specific variations in δ56Fe revealed differing contributions of Fe (oxyhydr)oxides to redox cycling. A slight decrease in easily reducible Fe oxides correlating with a slight increase in δ56Fe for this fraction with depth, which is in line with progessive dissimilatory iron reduction [2,3], is visible in the top 10 cm of the North Sea core, but not in the antarctic sediments. Less reactive (dithionite and oxalate leachable) fractions did not reveal isotopic trends. The acetic acid-soluble fraction displayed pronounced δ56Fe trends at both sites that cannot be explained by acid volatile sulfides that are also extracted by acetic acid [1]. We suggest that low δ56Fe values in this fraction relative to the pool of easily reducible Fe oxides result from adsorbed Fe(II) that was open to isotopic exchange with oxide surfaces, affirming the experimental results of Crosby el al. [2]. Hence, δ56Fe analyses on marine

  11. Carbon and hydrogen isotopic effects of stomatal density in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyejung; Feakins, Sarah J.; Sternberg, Leonel da S. L.

    2016-04-01

    Stomata are key gateways mediating carbon uptake and water loss from plants. Varied stomatal densities in fossil leaves raise the possibility that isotope effects associated with the openness of exchange may have mediated plant wax biomarker isotopic proxies for paleovegetation and paleoclimate in the geological record. Here we use Arabidopsis thaliana, a widely used model organism, to provide the first controlled tests of stomatal density on carbon and hydrogen isotopic compositions of cuticular waxes. Laboratory grown wildtype and mutants with suppressed and overexpressed stomatal densities allow us to directly test the isotope effects of stomatal densities independent of most other environmental or biological variables. Hydrogen isotope (D/H) measurements of both plant waters and plant wax n-alkanes allow us to directly constrain the isotopic effects of leaf water isotopic enrichment via transpiration and biosynthetic fractionations, which together determine the net fractionation between irrigation water and n-alkane hydrogen isotopic composition. We also measure carbon isotopic fractionations of n-alkanes and bulk leaf tissue associated with different stomatal densities. We find offsets of +15‰ for δD and -3‰ for δ13C for the overexpressed mutant compared to the suppressed mutant. Since the range of stomatal densities expressed is comparable to that found in extant plants and the Cenozoic fossil record, the results allow us to consider the magnitude of isotope effects that may be incurred by these plant adaptive responses. This study highlights the potential of genetic mutants to isolate individual isotope effects and add to our fundamental understanding of how genetics and physiology influence plant biochemicals including plant wax biomarkers.

  12. Silicon isotopic fractionation during adsorption of aqueous monosilicic acid onto iron oxide

    OpenAIRE

    Delstanche, Séverine; Opfergelt, Sophie; Cardinal, Damien; Elsass, Francoise; André, Luc; Delvaux, Bruno

    2009-01-01

    The quantification of silicon isotopic fractionation by biotic and abiotic processes contributes to the understanding of the Si continental cycle. In soils, light Si isotopes are selectively taken up by plants, and concentrate in secondary clay-sized minerals. Si an readily be retrieved from soil solution through the specific adsorption of monosilicic acid () by iron oxides. Here, we report on the Si-isotopic fractionation during adsorption on synthesized ferrihydrite and goethite in batch ex...

  13. Stable isotope composition of atmospheric carbon monoxide. A modelling study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study aims at an improved understanding of the stable carbon and oxygen isotope composition of the carbon monoxide (CO) in the global atmosphere by means of numerical simulations. At first, a new kinetic chemistry tagging technique for the most complete parameterisation of isotope effects has been introduced into the Modular Earth Submodel System (MESSy) framework. Incorporated into the ECHAM/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry (EMAC) general circulation model, an explicit treatment of the isotope effects on the global scale is now possible. The expanded model system has been applied to simulate the chemical system containing up to five isotopologues of all carbon- and oxygen-bearing species, which ultimately determine the δ13C, δ18O and Δ17O isotopic signatures of atmospheric CO. As model input, a new stable isotope-inclusive emission inventory for the relevant trace gases has been compiled. The uncertainties of the emission estimates and of the resulting simulated mixing and isotope ratios have been analysed. The simulated CO mixing and stable isotope ratios have been compared to in-situ measurements from ground-based observatories and from the civil-aircraft-mounted CARIBIC-1 measurement platform. The systematically underestimated 13CO/12CO ratios of earlier, simplified modelling studies can now be partly explained. The EMAC simulations do not support the inferences of those studies, which suggest for CO a reduced input of the highly depleted in 13C methane oxidation source. In particular, a high average yield of 0.94 CO per reacted methane (CH4) molecule is simulated in the troposphere, to a large extent due to the competition between the deposition and convective transport processes affecting the CH4 to CO reaction chain intermediates. None of the other factors, assumed or disregarded in previous studies, however hypothesised to have the potential in enriching tropospheric CO in 13C, were found significant when explicitly simulated. The inaccurate surface

  14. Trace element and isotopic effects of combined wallrock assimilation and fractional crystallization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Equations describing trace element and isotopic evolution in a magma chamber affected simultaneously by fractional crystallization and wallrock assimilation are presented for a model where the mass assimilation rate (Msub(a)) is an arbitrary fraction (r) of the fractional crystallization rate (Msub(c)). The equations also apply to recharge of a crystallizing magma. Relatively simple analytical expressions are obtained for both radiogenic isotope variations (Nd, Sr, Pb) and stable isotopes (O, H) including the effects of mass-dependent fractionation. (orig./ME)

  15. Lightning and Mass Independent Oxygen Isotopic Fractionation in Nebular Silicates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuth, Joseph A.

    2009-01-01

    Lightning has long been postulated as the agent of Chondru|e formation in the solar nebula, but it may have an additional role to play as well. Lightning bolts of almost any scale will both vaporize dust and liberate oxygen atoms that will then interact with both nebular gases as well as the refractory silicate vapor as it re-condenses. Such processes should result in the addition of the heavy oxygen isotopes to the growing silicate grains while the light oxygen-16 becomes part of the gas phase water. This process will proceed to some extent throughout the history of any turbulent nebula and will result in the gradual increase of O-16 in the gas phase and in a much larger relative increase in the O-17 and O-18 content of the nebular dust. Laboratory experiments have demonstrated the production of such "heavy oxygen enriched", non-mass-dependently-fractionated dust grains in a high voltage discharge in a hydrogen rich gas containing small quantities of silane, pentacarbonyl iron and oxygen.

  16. Evaluation of bioremediation systems utilizing stable carbon isotope analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon, whether in an organic or inorganic form, is composed primarily of two stable isotopes, carbon-12 and carbon-13. The ratio of carbon-12 to carbon-13 is approximately 99:1. The stable carbon isotope ratios of most natural carbon materials of biological interest range from approximately 0 to -110 per mil (per-thousand) versus the PDB standard. Utilizing stable carbon isotope analysis, it is often possible to determine the source(s) of the liberated carbon dioxide, thereby confirming successful mineralization of the targeted carbon compound(s) and, if the carbon dioxide results from multiple carbon compounds, in what ratio the carbon compounds are mineralized. Basic stable isotope 'theory' recommended sampling procedures and analysis protocols are reviewed. A case study involving fuel oil presented on the application of stable carbon isotope analysis for the monitoring and evaluation of in situ bioremediation. At the site, where a field bioventing study was being conducted, multiple potential sources of carbon dioxide production existed. Additional potential applications of stable carbon isotope analysis for bioremediation evaluation and monitoring are discussed

  17. Carbon isotopes in terrestrial ecosystem pools and CO2 fluxes.

    OpenAIRE

    Bowling, DR; Pataki, DE; Randerson, JT

    2008-01-01

    Stable carbon isotopes are used extensively to examine physiological, ecological, and biogeochemical processes related to ecosystem, regional, and global carbon cycles and provide information at a variety of temporal and spatial scales. Much is known about the processes that regulate the carbon isotopic composition (delta(13)C) of leaf, plant, and ecosystem carbon pools and of photosynthetic and respiratory carbon dioxide (CO(2)) fluxes. In this review, systematic patterns and mechanisms unde...

  18. Molybdenum isotopic composition of modern and Carboniferous carbonates

    OpenAIRE

    Voegelin, Andrea R.; Nägler, Thomas F.; Samankassou, Elias; Villa, Igor M.

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the redox-sensitive isotope system of molybdenum (Mo) in marine carbonates to evaluate their potential as archive of the Mo isotopic composition of coeval seawater. We present Mo isotope data (δ98/95Mo) of modern skeletal and non-skeletal carbonates as well as a variety of precipitates from the mid and late Carboniferous. The external reproducibility is determined by repeated analyses of two commercially available carbonate standards. The resulting uncertainty of the low concen...

  19. Fractionation of Fe isotopes during Fe(II) oxidation by a marine photoferrotroph is controlled by the formation of organic Fe-complexes and colloidal Fe fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanner, Elizabeth D.; Wu, Wenfang; Schoenberg, Ronny; Byrne, James; Michel, F. Marc; Pan, Yongxin; Kappler, Andreas

    2015-09-01

    Much interest exists in finding mineralogical, organic, morphological, or isotopic biosignatures for Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) that are retained in Fe-rich sediments, which could indicate the activity of these organisms in Fe-rich seawater, more common in the Precambrian Era. To date, the effort to establish a clear Fe isotopic signature in Fe minerals produced by Fe(II)-oxidizing metabolisms has been thwarted by the large kinetic fractionation incurred as freshly oxidized aqueous Fe(III) rapidly precipitates as Fe(III) (oxyhydr)oxide minerals at near neutral pH. The Fe(III) (oxyhydr)oxide minerals resulting from abiotic Fe(II) oxidation are isotopically heavy compared to the Fe(II) precursor and are not clearly distinguishable from minerals formed by FeOB isotopically. However, in marine hydrothermal systems and Fe(II)-rich springs the minerals formed are often isotopically lighter than expected considering the fraction of Fe(II) that has been oxidized and experimentally-determined fractionation factors. We measured the Fe isotopic composition of aqueous Fe (Feaq) and the final Fe mineral (Feppt) produced in batch experiment using the marine Fe(II)-oxidizing phototroph Rhodovulum iodosum. The δ56Feaq data are best described by a kinetic fractionation model, while the evolution of δ56Feppt appears to be controlled by a separate fractionation process. We propose that soluble Fe(III), and Fe(II) and Fe(III) extracted from the Feppt may act as intermediates between Fe(II) oxidation and Fe(III) precipitation. Based on 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy, extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy, and X-ray total scattering, we suggests these Fe phases, collectively Fe(II/III)interm, may consist of organic-ligand bound, sorbed, and/or colloidal Fe(II) and Fe(III) mineral phases that are isotopically lighter than the final Fe(III) mineral product. Similar intermediate phases, formed in response to organic carbon produced by FeOB and inorganic

  20. Evaluating reaction pathways of hydrothermal abiotic organic synthesis at elevated temperatures and pressures using carbon isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qi; Socki, Richard A.; Niles, Paul B.

    2015-04-01

    Experiments were performed to better understand the role of environmental factors on reaction pathways and corresponding carbon isotope fractionations during abiotic hydrothermal synthesis of organic compounds using piston cylinder apparatus at 750 °C and 5.5 kbars. Chemical compositions of experimental products and corresponding carbon isotopic values were obtained by a Pyrolysis-GC-MS-IRMS system. Alkanes (methane and ethane), straight-chain saturated alcohols (ethanol and n-butanol) and monocarboxylic acids (formic and acetic acids) were generated with ethanol being the only organic compound with higher δ13C than CO2. CO was not detected in experimental products owing to the favorable water-gas shift reaction under high water pressure conditions. The pattern of δ13C values of CO2, carboxylic acids and alkanes are consistent with their equilibrium isotope relationships: CO2 > carboxylic acids > alkanes, but the magnitude of the fractionation among them is higher than predicted isotope equilibrium values. In particular, the isotopic fractionation between CO2 and CH4 remained constant at ∼31‰, indicating a kinetic effect during CO2 reduction processes. No "isotope reversal" of δ13C values for alkanes or carboxylic acids was observed, which indicates a different reaction pathway than what is typically observed during Fischer-Tropsch synthesis under gas phase conditions. Under constraints imposed in experiments, the anomalous 13C isotope enrichment in ethanol suggests that hydroxymethylene is the organic intermediate, and that the generation of other organic compounds enriched in 12C were facilitated by subsequent Rayleigh fractionation of hydroxymethylene reacting with H2 and/or H2O. Carbon isotope fractionation data obtained in this study are instrumental in assessing the controlling factors on abiotic formation of organic compounds in hydrothermal systems. Knowledge on how environmental conditions affect reaction pathways of abiotic synthesis of organic

  1. Carbon isotope stratigraphy of an ancient (Ordovician) Bahamian-type carbonate platform: Implications for preservation of global seawater trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltzman, M.; Leslie, S. A.; Edwards, C. T.; Diamond, C. W.; Trigg, C. R.; Sedlacek, A. R.

    2013-12-01

    Carbon isotope stratigraphy has a unique role in the interpretation of Earth history as one of the few geochemical proxies that have been widely applied throughout the geologic time scale, from the Precambrian to the Recent, as both a global correlation tool and proxy for the carbon cycle. However, in addition to consideration of the role of diagenesis, numerous studies have raised awareness of the fact that C-isotope trends derived from ancient carbonate platforms may not be representative of dissolved inorganic carbon from a well-mixed global ocean reservoir. Furthermore, the larger carbon isotopic fractionation in the formation of aragonite versus calcite from seawater must be taken into account. All three of these variables (diagenesis, water mass residence time, % aragonite) may change in response to sea level, producing trends in C-isotopes on ancient carbonate platforms that are unrelated to the global carbon cycle. Global carbon cycle fluxes may also have a cause-effect relationship with sea level changes, further complicating interpretations of stratigraphic trends in carbon isotopes from ancient platform environments. Studies of C-isotopes in modern carbonate platform settings such as the Great Bahama Bank (GBB) provide important analogues in addressing whether or not ancient platforms are likely to preserve a record of carbon cycling in the global ocean. Swart et al. (2009) found that waters of the GBB had generally the same or elevated values (ranging from +0.5‰ to +2.5‰) compared to the global oceans, interpreted as reflecting differential photosynthetic fractionation and precipitation of calcium carbonate (which lowers pH and converts bicarbonate into 12-C enriched carbon dioxide, leaving residual bicarbonate heavier). Carbonate sediments of the GBB have elevated C-isotopes, not only because of the high C-isotope composition of the overlying waters, but also due to the greater fractionation associated with precipitation of aragonite versus calcite

  2. Carbon and Oxygen isotopic composition in paleoenvironmental determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work reports that the carbon and oxygen isotopic composition separate the mollusks from marine environment of the mollusks from continental environment in two groups isotopically different, making the biological control outdone by environment control, in the isotopic fragmentation mechanisms. The patterns from the continental environment are more rich in O16 than the patterns from marine environments. The C12 is also more frequent in the mollusks from continental environments. The carbon isotopic composition in paterns from continental environments is situated betwen - 10.31 and - 4,05% and the oxygen isotopic composition is situated between - 6,95 and - 2,41%. To the marine environment patterns the carbon isotopic composition is between - 2,08 and + 2,65% and the oxigen isotopic composition is between - 2,08 and + 0,45%. Was also analysed fossil marine mollusks shells and their isotopic composition permit the formulation of hypothesis about the environment which they lived. (C.D.G.)

  3. Empirical equations for the temperature dependence of calcite-water oxygen isotope fractionation from 10 to 70°C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demény, Attila; Kele, Sándor; Siklósy, Zoltán

    2010-12-30

    Although the temperature dependence of calcite-water oxygen isotope fractionation seems to have been well established by numerous empirical, experimental and theoretical studies, it is still being discussed, especially due to the demand for increased accuracy of paleotemperature calculations. Experimentally determined equations are available and have been verified by theoretical calculations (considered as representative of isotopic equilibrium); however, many natural formations do not seem to follow these relationships implying either that existing fractionation equations should be revised, or that carbonate deposits are seriously affected by kinetic and solution chemistry effects, or late-stage alterations. In order to test if existing fractionation-temperature relationships can be used for natural deposits, we have studied calcite formations precipitated in various environments by means of stable isotope mass spectrometry: travertines (freshwater limestones) precipitating from hot and warm waters in open-air or quasi-closed environments, as well as cave deposits formed in closed systems. Physical and chemical parameters as well as oxygen isotope composition of water were monitored for all the investigated sites. Measuring precipitation temperatures along with oxygen isotope compositions of waters and calcites yielded empirical environment-specific fractionation-temperature equations: [1] 1000 · lnα = 17599/T - 29.64 [for travertines with a temperature range of 30 to 70°C] and [2] 1000 · lnα = 17500/T - 29.89 [for cave deposits for the range 10 to 25°C]. Finally, based on the comparison of literature data and our results, the use of distinct calcite-water oxygen isotopic fractionation relationships and application strategies to obtain the most reliable paleoclimate information are evaluated. PMID:21080503

  4. Copper and iron isotope fractionation during weathering and pedogenesis: Insights from saprolite profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sheng-Ao; Teng, Fang-Zhen; Li, Shuguang; Wei, Gang-Jian; Ma, Jing-Long; Li, Dandan

    2014-12-01

    Iron and copper isotopes are useful tools to track redox transformation and biogeochemical cycling in natural environment. To study the relationships of stable Fe and Cu isotopic variations with redox regime and biological processes during weathering and pedogenesis, we carried out Fe and Cu isotope analyses for two sets of basalt weathering profiles (South Carolina, USA and Hainan Island, China), which formed under different climatic conditions (subtropical vs. tropical). Unaltered parent rocks from both profiles have uniform δ56Fe and δ65Cu values close to the average of global basalts. In the South Carolina profile, δ56Fe values of saprolites vary from -0.01‰ to 0.92‰ in the lower (reduced) part and positively correlate with Fe3+/ΣFe (R2 = 0.90), whereas δ65Cu values are almost constant. By contrast, δ56Fe values are less variable and negatively correlate with Fe3+/ΣFe (R2 = 0.88) in the upper (oxidized) part, where large (4.85‰) δ65Cu variation is observed with most samples enriched in heavy isotopes. In the Hainan profile formed by extreme weathering under oxidized condition, δ56Fe values vary little (0.05-0.14‰), whereas δ65Cu values successively decrease from 0.32‰ to -0.12‰ with depth below 3 m and increase from -0.17‰ to 0.02‰ with depth above 3 m. Throughout the whole profile, δ65Cu positively correlate with Cu concentration and negatively correlate with the content of total organic carbon (TOC). Overall, the contrasting Fe isotopic patterns under different redox conditions suggest redox states play the key controls on Fe mobility and isotope fractionation. The negative correlation between δ56Fe and Fe3+/ΣFe in the oxidized part of the South Carolina profile may reflect addition of isotopically light Fe. This is demonstrated by leaching experiments, which show that Fe mineral pools extracted by 0.5 N HCl, representing poorly-crystalline Fe (hydr)-oxides, are enriched in light Fe isotopes. The systematic Cu isotopic variation

  5. Changes of stable isotopes carbon-13 and nitrogen-15 in different tissues of cattle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stable isotope analysis is a potential tool for tracing food origin. The stable carbon and nitrogen isotope composition in different tissues of two varieties of cattle under the same culture condition were investigated. δ 13C and δ15N values of different defatted muscle and crude fat, cattle tail hair, blood, liver and feed were determined by isotope ratio mass spectrometry, and statistical analysis was carried out. The results showed that stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen composition was not affected by cattle variety; the δ 13C values between different defatted muscle, blood, liver and cattle hair were not significantly different, but δ 15N value in the liver was much higher than other muscle and the δ 13C values didn't show difference among all the crude fat samples. So these results indicated that isotope fractionation in the various tissue was discrepant. (authors)

  6. Isotope fractionation of 238U and 235U during biologically-mediated uranium reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stirling, Claudine H.; Andersen, Morten B.; Warthmann, Rolf; Halliday, Alex N.

    2015-08-01

    A series of laboratory-controlled microbial experiments using gram-negative sulphate-reducing bacteria (Desulfovibrio brasiliensis) inoculated with natural uranium were performed to investigate 238U/235U fractionation during bacterially-mediated U reduction. Control experiments, without bacteria to drive U reduction, were conducted in parallel. Paired measurements of 238U/235U and U concentration for both the residual growth medium solution and the accumulated biologically-mediated precipitate were obtained using multiple-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICPMS). The control experiments show that only minor (<0.1‰), if any 238U/235U fractionation occurs during co-precipitation with calcite. This implies that carbonate sediments are capable of faithfully recording the signature of the global ocean during Earth's major climatic events, including oxygenation and de-oxygenation transitions in the marine environment. The results for the microbial experiments demonstrate that the 238U/235U composition of the unreacted growth medium containing U(VI) is isotopically lighter than the composition of the U(IV)-bearing precipitate as U(VI) is consumed, in agreement with field-based observations of microbially-mediated U reduction. Uranium isotopic shifts of up to 0.8‰ were observed between the liquid and solid phases. These observations can be modelled using a Rayleigh distillation approach describing kinetic uptake in a closed system, which yields a fractionation factor α of 0.99923 ± 0.00004 (ε = -0.77 ± 04‰) for U(VI)-U(IV) reduction mediated by the D. brasiliensis microbe. This fractionation behaviour is consistent with that observed in field-based redox environments, which give rise to similar α values. Competing processes such as U co-precipitation (e.g. adsorption) may act to lower the apparent value for α and possibly play a secondary role both in the microbial experiments of this study and in natural U reduction settings where

  7. Biomarker and molecular isotope approaches to deconvolve the terrestrial carbon isotope record: modern and Eocene calibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diefendorf, A. F.; Freeman, K. H.; Wing, S.; Currano, E. D.

    2010-12-01

    Climate, biome, and plant community are important predictors of carbon isotope patterns recorded in leaves and leaf waxes. However, signatures recorded by terrestrial organic carbon and lipids that have mixed floral sources (e.g., n-alkanes) potentially reflect both plant community changes and climate. More taxonomically specific proxies for plants (i.e., di- and tri-terpenoids for conifers and angiosperms, respectively), can help to resolve the relative influences of changing community and climate, provided differences in biomarker production and lipid biosynthetic fractionation among plants can be better constrained. We present biomarker abundance and carbon isotope values for lipids from leaves, branches and bark of 44 tree species, representing 21 families including deciduous and evergreen conifers and angiosperms. n-alkane production differs greatly between conifer and angiosperm leaves. Both deciduous and evergreen angiosperms make significantly more n-alkanes than conifers, with n-alkanes not detected in over half of the conifers in our study. Terpenoid abundances scale strongly with leaf habit: evergreen species have significantly higher abundances. We combine these relative differences in lipid production with published estimates of fluxes for leaf litter from conifer and angiosperm trees to develop a new proxy approach for estimating paleo plant community inputs to ancient soils and sediments. To test our modern calibration results, we have evaluated n-alkanes and terpenoids from laterally extensive (~18 km) carbonaceous shales and mudstones in Eocene sediments (52.6 Ma) at Fifteenmile Creek in the Bighorn Basin (WY, USA). Our terpenoid-based proxy predicts on average a 40% conifer community, which is remarkably close in agreement with a fossil-based estimate of 36%. n-alkane carbon isotope fractionation (leaf-lipid) differs among plant types, with conifer n-alkanes about 2-3‰ 13C enriched relative to those in angiosperms. Since conifer leaves are

  8. Isotope analysis of carbon monoxide in atmospheric samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A technique was established that allows the analysis of carbon and oxygen isotope composition of CO in small air samples (250ml). The method is based on the oxidation of CO to CO2 with iodine pentoxide and the subsequent isotope analysis of CO2. Potential applications include the use of CO and its isotopes as a tracer to distinguish different pollution sources. (author)

  9. Iron, copper and zinc isotopic fractionation up mammal trophic chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaouen, Klervia; Pons, Marie-Laure; Balter, Vincent

    2013-07-01

    There is a growing body of evidence that some non-traditional elements exhibit stable isotope compositions that are distinct in botanical and animal products, providing potential new tracers for diet reconstructions. Here, we present data for iron (Fe), copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn) stable isotope compositions in plants and bones of herbivores and carnivores. The samples come from trophic chains located in the Western Cape area and in the Kruger National Park in South Africa. The Fe, Cu and Zn isotope systematics are similar in both parks. However, local Cu, and possibly Zn, isotopic values of soils influence that of plants and of higher trophic levels. Between plants and bones of herbivores, the Zn isotope compositions are 66Zn-enriched by about 0.8‰ whereas no significant trophic enrichment is observed for Fe and Cu. Between bones of herbivores and bones of carnivores, the Fe isotope compositions are 56Fe-depleted by about 0.6‰, the Cu isotope compositions are 65Cu-enriched by about 1.0‰, and the Zn isotope compositions are slightly 66Zn-depleted by about 0.2‰. The isotopic distributions of the metals in the body partly explain the observed trophic isotopic systematics. However, it is also necessary to invoke differential intestinal metal absorption between herbivores and carnivores to account for the observed results. Further studies are necessary to fully understand how the Fe, Cu and Zn isotope values are regulated within the ecosystem's trophic levels, but the data already suggests significant potential as new paleodietary and paleoecological proxies.

  10. Modelling carbon isotope composition of dissolved inorganic carbon and methane in marine porewaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meister, Patrick; Liu, Bo; Khalili, Arzhang; Barker Jørgensen, Bo

    2014-05-01

    Carbon isotope compositions of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and methane (CH4) in marine sedimentary porewaters at near surface temperatures show extremely large variation in apparent fractionation covering a range from -100 ‰ to +30 ‰. This fractionation is essentially the result of microbial activity, but the mechanisms and factors controlling this fractionation are still incompletely understood. This study provides a reaction transport model approach to evaluate the effects of the most important processes and factors on carbon isotope distribution with the goal to better understand carbon isotope distribution in modern sediment porewaters and in the geological record. Our model results show that kinetic fractionation during methanogenesis, both through the acetoclastic and autotrophic pathways, results in a nearly symmetrical distribution of δ13C values in DIC and CH4 with respect to the isotope value of buried organic matter. An increased fractionation factor during methanogenesis leads to a larger difference between δ13CDIC and δ13CCH4. Near the sulphate methane transition zone, DIC is more depleted in 13C due to diffusive mixing with DIC produced by anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) and organoclastic sulphate reduction. The model also shows that an upward decrease in δ13CCH4 near the SMT can only be caused by equilibrium fractionation during AOM including a backward "leakage" of carbon from DIC to CH4 through the enzymatic pathway. However, this effect of reversibility has no influence on the DIC pool as long as methane is completely consumed at the SMT. Only a release of methane at the sediment-water interface, due to a fraction of the methane escaping re-oxidation, results in a small shift towards more positive δ13CDIC values. Methane escape at the SMT is possible if either the methane flux is too high to be entirely oxidized by AOM, or if bubbles of methane gas by-pass the sulphate reduction zone and escape episodically into the water column

  11. Experimental determination of barium isotope fractionation during diffusion and adsorption processes at low temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zuilen, Kirsten; Müller, Thomas; Nägler, Thomas F.; Dietzel, Martin; Küsters, Tim

    2016-08-01

    Variations in barium (Ba) stable isotope abundances measured in low and high temperature environments have recently received increasing attention. The actual processes controlling Ba isotope fractionation, however, remain mostly elusive. In this study, we present the first experimental approach to quantify the contribution of diffusion and adsorption on mass-dependent Ba isotope fractionation during transport of aqueous Ba2+ ions through a porous medium. Experiments have been carried out in which a BaCl2 solution of known isotopic composition diffused through u-shaped glass tubes filled with silica hydrogel at 10 °C and 25 °C for up to 201 days. The diffused Ba was highly fractionated by up to -2.15‰ in δ137/134Ba, despite the low relative difference in atomic mass. The time-dependent isotope fractionation can be successfully reproduced by a diffusive transport model accounting for mass-dependent differences in the effective diffusivities of the Ba isotope species (D137Ba /D134Ba =(m134 /m137) β). Values of β extracted from the transport model were in the range of 0.010-0.011. Independently conducted batch experiments revealed that adsorption of Ba onto the surface of silica hydrogel favoured the heavier Ba isotopes (α = 1.00015 ± 0.00008). The contribution of adsorption on the overall isotope fractionation in the diffusion experiments, however, was found to be small. Our results contribute to the understanding of Ba isotope fractionation processes, which is crucial for interpreting natural isotope variations and the assessment of Ba isotope ratios as geochemical proxies.

  12. The evolution of Carbon isotopes in calcite in the presence of cyanobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Christian; Mavromatis, Vasileios; Pokrovsky, Oleg S.; Oelkers, Eric H.

    2016-04-01

    Stable isotopic compositions in carbonates are widely used as indicators of environmental conditions prevailing during mineral formation. This reconstruction is substantially based on the assumption that there is no change in the mineral composition over geological time. However, recent experimental studies have shown that carbon and magnesium isotopes in hydrous Mg-carbonates undergo continuous re-equilibration with the ambient solution even after mineral precipitation stopped ([1] and [2], respectively). To verify whether this holds true for anhydrous Ca-bearing carbonates which readily form at earth's surface environments, a series of batch system calcite precipitation experiments were performed in the presence of actively growing cyanobacteria Synechococcus sp. The bacteria were grown at ambient temperature in a BG11 culture medium (SIGMA C3061) and continuous stirring, air-bubbling and illumination. Calcite precipitation was initiated by the addition of 8.5mM CaCl2 and 0-50 mM NaHCO3 or NaHCO3-Na2CO3 mixtures. The presence of cyanobacteria is on one hand promoting CaCO3 formation due to increasing pH resulting from photosynthesis. On the other hand, actively growing cyanobacteria drastically change carbon isotope signature of the aqueous fluid phase by preferably incorporating the lighter 12C isotope into biomass [1]. This study explores the effect of continuously changing carbon isotope compositions in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) on precipitated calcite which is in chemical equilibrium with the ambient fluid phase. [1] Mavromatis et al. (2015). The continuous re-equilibration of carbon isotope compositions of hydrous Mg-carbonates in the presence of cyanobacteria. Chem. Geol. 404, 41-51 [2] Mavromatis et al. (2012). Magnesium isotope fractionation during hydrous magnesium carbonate precipitation with and without cyanobacteria. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 76, 161-174

  13. The mechanism of oxygen isotope fractionation during N2O production by denitrification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewicka-Szczebak, D.; Dyckmans, J.; Kaiser, J.; Marca, A.; Augustin, J.; Well, R.

    2015-10-01

    The isotopic composition of soil-derived N2O can help differentiate between N2O production pathways and estimate the fraction of N2O reduced to N2. Until now, δ18O of N2O has been rarely used in the interpretation of N2O isotopic signatures because of the rather complex oxygen isotope fractionations during N2O production by denitrification. The latter process involves nitrate reduction mediated through the following three enzymes: nitrate reductase (NAR), nitrite reductase (NIR) and nitric oxide reductase (NOR). Each step removes one oxygen atom as water (H2O), which gives rise to a branching isotope effect. Moreover, denitrification intermediates may partially or fully exchange oxygen isotopes with ambient water, which is associated with an exchange isotope effect. The main objective of this study was to decipher the mechanism of oxygen isotope fractionation during N2O production by denitrification and, in particular, to investigate the relationship between the extent of oxygen isotope exchange with soil water and the δ18O values of the produced N2O. We performed several soil incubation experiments. For the first time, Δ17O isotope tracing was applied to simultaneously determine the extent of oxygen isotope exchange and any associated oxygen isotope effect. We found bacterial denitrification to be typically associated with almost complete oxygen isotope exchange and a stable difference in δ18O between soil water and the produced N2O of δ18O(N2O / H2O) = (17.5 ± 1.2) ‰. However, some experimental setups yielded oxygen isotope exchange as low as 56 % and a higher δ18O(N2O / H2O) of up to 37 ‰. The extent of isotope exchange and δ18O(N2O / H2O) showed a very significant correlation (R2 = 0.70, p denitrification. An oxygen isotope fractionation model was used to test various scenarios with different magnitudes of branching isotope effects at different steps in the reduction process. The results suggest that during denitrification the isotope exchange

  14. Conformational effect of dicyclo-hexano-18-crown-6 on isotopic fractionation of zinc: DFT approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Generalized gradient approximated BP86 density functional employing triple zeta valence plus polarization (TZVP) basis set has been used to compute the reduced partition function ratio and isotopic separation factor for zinc isotopes. The isotopic separation factor was found to be in good agreement with the experimental results. The isotopic separation factor was found to depend on the conformation of the crown ether ligand. The trans-trans conformation shows the highest fractionation compared to cis-cis conformer. The present theoretical results can thus be used to plan the isotope separation experiments

  15. Mars atmospheric escape and isotopic fractionation: Synthesis of data and models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakosky, Bruce M.; Luhmann, Janet G.; Jones, John H.

    1994-01-01

    The present Mars atmosphere is relatively thin and cold. It is not at all like that which is presumed to have been responsible for the formation of valley networks and the heavy erosion of craters during the earliest epochs of martian history. An important goal of Mars exploration is to try to understand the properties of the early atmosphere, the initial inventory of volatiles at the planet's surface, the processes by which the atmosphere and climate have evolved over time, and the current location of volatiles presumed to have been in the atmosphere in the earlier times. The current status of understanding of the escape of volatiles to space over geologic time and the resulting fractionation of isotopes of stable atoms remaining in the atmosphere are described, and a scenario for volatile abundance and evolution that is consistent with the available information on the escape and fractionation of each species is constructed. In particular, the evolution of hydrogen, carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen, as contained in atmospheric (and non-atmospheric) water, carbon dioxide, and molecular nitrogen, is examined.

  16. Site-specific isotope fractionation in the characterization of biochemical mechanisms: the glycolytic pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For a given biochemical transformation, such as the fermentation reaction, the redistribution coefficients, which relate the natural site-specific isotope contents in end products to those of their precursors, are a source of mechanistic information. These coefficients characterize the traceability of specific hydrogens in the products (ethanol and water) to their parent hydrogens in the starting materials (glucose and water). In conditions of complete transformation, they also enable intermolecular exchanges with the water medium to be estimated. Thus it is directly confirmed that hydrogens 1, 2, 6, and 6' of glucose are strongly connected to the methyl site I of ethanol obtained by fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, whereas hydrogens 6 and 6' are transferred to a great extent, transfer is only partial for hydrogen 2, and it is even less for hydrogen 1. Because the two moieties of glucose corresponding to carbons 1-2-3 and 4-5-6 are scrambled by the aldolase and triosephosphate isomerase reactions, additional exchange of hydrogens at positions 1 and 2 must have occurred before these steps. The value of the coefficient that relates site 2 of glucose to site I of ethanol in particular can be used to quantify the contribution of intermolecular exchange occurring in the course of the transfer from site 2 of glucose 6-phosphate to site 1 of fructose 6-phosphate mediated by phosphoglucoisomerase. The average hydrogen isotope effects associated with the transfer of hydrogen from the water pool to the methyl or methylene site of ethanol are estimated. In contrast to conventional experiments carried out in strongly deuterium-enriched media where metabolic switching may occur, the NMR investigation of site-specific natural isotope fractionation, which operates at tracer isotopic abundance, faithfully describes the unperturbed metabolic pathways

  17. Degradation changes stable carbon isotope depth profiles in palsa peatlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. P. Krüger

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Palsa peatlands are a significant carbon pool in the global carbon cycle and are projected to change by global warming due to accelerated permafrost thaw. Our aim was to use stable carbon isotopes as indicators of palsa degradation. Depth profiles of stable carbon isotopes generally reflect organic matter dynamics in soils with an increase of δ13C values during aerobic decomposition and stable or decreasing δ13C values with depth during anaerobic decomposition. Stable carbon isotope depth profiles of undisturbed and degraded sites of hummocks as well as hollows at three palsa peatlands in northern Sweden were used to investigate the degradation processes. The depth patterns of stable isotopes clearly differ between intact and degraded hummocks at all sites. Erosion and cryoturbation at the degraded sites significantly changes the stable carbon isotope depth profiles. At the intact hummocks the uplifting of peat material by permafrost is indicated by a turning in the δ13C depth trend and this assessment is supported by a change in the C / N ratios. For hollows isotope patterns were less clear, but some hollows and degraded hollows in the palsa peatlands show differences in their stable carbon isotope depth profiles indicating enhanced degradation rates. We conclude that the degradation of palsa peatlands by accelerated permafrost thawing could be identified with stable carbon isotope depth profiles. At intact hummocks δ13C depth patterns display the uplifting of peat material by a change in peat decomposition processes.

  18. Systematic AMD+GCM Study of Structure of Carbon Isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The structure of low-lying states of the carbon isotopes is investigated using the extended version of the Antisymmetrized Molecular Dynamics (AMD) Multi-Slater Determinant model. We can reproduce reasonably well many experimental data for carbon isotopes 12C-22C. A special approach is adopted for 15C to better describe the tail of the wave function

  19. Oxygen isotope fractionation during N2O production by soil denitrification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewicka-Szczebak, Dominika; Dyckmans, Jens; Kaiser, Jan; Marca, Alina; Augustin, Jürgen; Well, Reinhard

    2016-02-01

    The isotopic composition of soil-derived N2O can help differentiate between N2O production pathways and estimate the fraction of N2O reduced to N2. Until now, δ18O of N2O has been rarely used in the interpretation of N2O isotopic signatures because of the rather complex oxygen isotope fractionations during N2O production by denitrification. The latter process involves nitrate reduction mediated through the following three enzymes: nitrate reductase (NAR), nitrite reductase (NIR) and nitric oxide reductase (NOR). Each step removes one oxygen atom as water (H2O), which gives rise to a branching isotope effect. Moreover, denitrification intermediates may partially or fully exchange oxygen isotopes with ambient water, which is associated with an exchange isotope effect. The main objective of this study was to decipher the mechanism of oxygen isotope fractionation during N2O production by soil denitrification and, in particular, to investigate the relationship between the extent of oxygen isotope exchange with soil water and the δ18O values of the produced N2O. In our soil incubation experiments Δ17O isotope tracing was applied for the first time to simultaneously determine the extent of oxygen isotope exchange and any associated oxygen isotope effect. We found that N2O formation in static anoxic incubation experiments was typically associated with oxygen isotope exchange close to 100 % and a stable difference between the 18O / 16O ratio of soil water and the N2O product of δ18O(N2O / H2O) = (17.5 ± 1.2) ‰. However, flow-through experiments gave lower oxygen isotope exchange down to 56 % and a higher δ18O(N2O / H2O) of up to 37 ‰. The extent of isotope exchange and δ18O(N2O / H2O) showed a significant correlation (R2 = 0.70, p fractionation model was used to test various scenarios with different magnitudes of branching isotope effects at different steps in the reduction process. The results suggest that during denitrification, isotope exchange occurs prior to

  20. Sulfur isotope fractionation by Proteus vulgaris and Salmonella heidelberg during the reduction of thiosulfate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proteus vulgris metabolized thiosulfate to H2S. The amount evolved and its sulfur isotope composition identifed it solely with sulfane sulfur. In contrast, Salmonella heidelberg sequentially reduced the sulfane sulfur of S2O32- with slight enrichment of the evolved sulfide in 32S and then reduced the sulfonate sulfur of S2O32- with large isotopic selectivities and an inverse isotopic fractional pattern. The inverse isotope fractionation then reduced the sulfonate sulfur of S2O32- with large isotopic selectivities and an inverse isotopic pattern for the H2S derived from the sulfonate sulfur was almost identical to that observed during the reduction of high concentrations of sulfite by S. heidelberg. (auth)

  1. Mass spectrometric analysis of stable carbon isotopes in abiogenic and biogenic natural compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the general methodology of sup/13/ carbon analysis on mass spectrometer and various preparation systems developed for conversion of samples into isotopically non-fractionated and purified carbon dioxide. Laboratory standards required for sup/13/ C analysis have been calibrated against international standards. The reproducibility/accuracy of sample preparation and analysis on mass spectrometer for sup/13/ C or sup/12/ C measurement is well within the internationally acceptable limits. (author)

  2. Molecular, radioactive and stable carbon isotope characterization of estuarine particulate organic matter

    OpenAIRE

    Megens, L.; van der Plicht, J.; De Leeuw, JW; Leeuw, Jan W. de; Mook, W.G.

    1998-01-01

    Organic matter in sediments and suspended matter is a complex mixture of constituents with different histories, sources and stabilities. To study these components in a suspended matter sample from the Ems-Dollard Estuary, we used combined molecular analysis with pyrolysis/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and stable and radioactive carbon isotope analyses of the bulk and separated chemical fractions. Carbohydrates and proteins, ca. 50% of the total organic carbon (TOC), are much younger th...

  3. Fractionation of Stable Cadmium Isotopes in the Cadmium Tolerant Ricinus communis and Hyperaccumulator Solanum nigrum

    OpenAIRE

    Rongfei Wei; Qingjun Guo; Hanjie Wen; Congqiang Liu; Junxing Yang; Marc Peters; Jian Hu; Guangxu Zhu; Hanzhi Zhang; Liyan Tian; Xiaokun Han; Jie Ma; Chuanwei Zhu; Yingxin Wan

    2016-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) isotopes provide new insights into Cd uptake, transport and storage mechanisms in plants. Therefore, the present study adopted the Cd-tolerant Ricinus communis and Cd-hyperaccumulator Solanum nigrum, which were cultured under controlled conditions in a nutrient solution with variable Cd supply, to test the isotopic fractionation of Cd during plant uptake. The Cd isotope compositions of nutrient solutions and organs of the plants were measured by multiple collector inductively cou...

  4. Iron-Isotopic Fractionation Studies Using Multiple Collector Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anbar, A. D.; Zhang, C.; Barling, J.; Roe, J. E.; Nealson, K. H.

    1999-01-01

    The importance of Fe biogeochemistry has stimulated interest in Fe isotope fractionation. Recent studies using thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) and a "double spike" demonstrate the existence of biogenic Fe isotope effects. Here, we assess the utility of multiple-collector inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry(MC-ICP-MS) with a desolvating sample introduction system for Fe isotope studies, and present data on Fe biominerals produced by a thermophilic bacterium. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  5. Weathering and vegetation controls on nickel isotope fractionation in surface ultramafic environments (Albania)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrade, Nicolas; Cloquet, Christophe; Echevarria, Guillaume; Sterckeman, Thibault; Deng, Tenghaobo; Tang, YeTao; Morel, Jean-Louis

    2015-08-01

    The dissolved nickel (Ni) isotopic composition of rivers and oceans presents an apparent paradox. Even though rivers represent a major source of Ni in the oceans, seawater is more enriched in the heavier isotopes than river-water. Additional sources or processes must therefore be invoked to account for the isotopic budget of dissolved Ni in seawater. Weathering of continental rocks is thought to play a major role in determining the magnitude and sign of isotopic fractionation of metals between a rock and the dissolved product. We present a study of Ni isotopes in the rock-soil-plant systems of several ultramafic environments. The results reveal key insights into the magnitude and the control of isotopic fractionation during the weathering of continental ultramafic rocks. This study introduces new constraints on the influence of vegetation during the weathering process, which should be taken into account in interpretations of the variability of Ni isotopes in rivers. The study area is located in a temperate climate zone within the ophiolitic belt area of Albania. The serpentinized peridotites sampled present a narrow range of heavy Ni isotopic compositions (δ60Ni = 0.25 ± 0.16 ‰, 2SD n = 2). At two locations, horizons within two soil profiles affected by different degrees of weathering all presented light isotopic compositions compared to the parent rock (Δ60Nisoil-rock up to - 0.63 ‰). This suggests that the soil pool takes up the light isotopes, while the heavier isotopes remain in the dissolved phase. By combining elemental and mineralogical analyses with the isotope compositions determined for the soils, the extent of fractionation was found to be controlled by the secondary minerals formed in the soil. The types of vegetation growing on ultramafic-derived soils are highly adapted and include both Ni-hyperaccumulating species, which can accumulate several percent per weight of Ni, and non-accumulating species. Whole-plant isotopic compositions were found

  6. Fractionation of Stable Cadmium Isotopes in the Cadmium Tolerant Ricinus communis and Hyperaccumulator Solanum nigrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Rongfei; Guo, Qingjun; Wen, Hanjie; Liu, Congqiang; Yang, Junxing; Peters, Marc; Hu, Jian; Zhu, Guangxu; Zhang, Hanzhi; Tian, Liyan; Han, Xiaokun; Ma, Jie; Zhu, Chuanwei; Wan, Yingxin

    2016-04-01

    Cadmium (Cd) isotopes provide new insights into Cd uptake, transport and storage mechanisms in plants. Therefore, the present study adopted the Cd-tolerant Ricinus communis and Cd-hyperaccumulator Solanum nigrum, which were cultured under controlled conditions in a nutrient solution with variable Cd supply, to test the isotopic fractionation of Cd during plant uptake. The Cd isotope compositions of nutrient solutions and organs of the plants were measured by multiple collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICPMS). The mass balance of Cd isotope yields isotope fractionations between plant and Cd source (δ114/110Cdorgans-solution) of ‑0.70‰ to ‑0.22‰ in Ricinus communis and ‑0.51‰ to ‑0.33‰ in Solanum nigrum. Moreover, Cd isotope fractionation during Cd transport from stem to leaf differs between the Cd-tolerant and -hyperaccumulator species. Based on these results, the processes (diffusion, adsorption, uptake or complexation), which may induce Cd isotope fractionation in plants, have been discussed. Overall, the present study indicates potential applications of Cd isotopes for investigating plant physiology.

  7. The study of the deuterium isotopic fractionation through the cell membrane of the plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to prove that there is a water deuterium isotope fractionation when the water passes through the cell membrane. The carrots (Daucus carota) were grown in vitro in a Murashige and Skoog mineral-salt medium and have been exposed to a water solution with a uniform isotopic content. After seven days the cell culture was filtered and the cell water was vacuum extracted. The water from aqueous solution and the cell water were analyzed for hydrogen by isotope ratio mass spectrometry. The procedure was repeated for 14 and 21 day old cell cultures. The measurements have revealed a water deuterium isotopic fractionation between extra-cellular water and cellular water. The deuterium content was found to be higher within the cells by 10o/oo for non-embryonic cells and 13 o/oo for the embryonic cells. This fractionation is a non-evaporative fractionation between intracellular and extra-cellular water and it represents a new step in the overall fractionation of deuterium water in the plants. The existence of such isotopic fractionation through the cell membrane implies that the relationship between the deuterium content of cellulose nitrate in plant and meteoric water should be revised. Also, this finding is of interest for understanding the balance and dynamics of the hydrogen isotopes in the environment. (authors)

  8. Nitrogen isotope dynamics and fractionation during sedimentary denitrification in Boknis Eck, Baltic Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Dähnke

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The global marine nitrogen cycle is constrained by nitrogen fixation as a source of reactive nitrogen, and denitrification or anammox on the sink side. These processes with their respective isotope effects set the marine nitrate 15N-isotope value (δ15N to a relatively constant average of 5‰. This value can be used to better assess the magnitude of these sources and sink terms, but the underlying assumption is that sedimentary denitrification and anammox, processes responsible for approximately one-third of global nitrogen removal, have little to no isotope effect on nitrate in the water column. We investigated the isotope fractionation in sediment incubations, measuring net denitrification and nitrogen and oxygen stable isotope fractionation in surface sediments from the coastal Baltic Sea (Boknis Eck, northern Germany, a site with seasonal hypoxia and dynamic nitrogen turnover. Sediment denitrification was fast, and regardless of current paradigms assuming little fractionation during sediment denitrification, we measured fractionation factors of 18.9‰ for nitrogen and 15.8‰ for oxygen in nitrate. While the input of nitrate to the water column remains speculative, these results challenge the current view of fractionation during sedimentary denitrification and imply that nitrogen budget calculations may need to consider this variability, as both preferential uptake of light nitrate and release of the remaining heavy fraction can significantly alter water column nitrate isotope values at the sediment–water interface.

  9. Nitrogen isotope dynamics and fractionation during sedimentary denitrification in Boknis Eck, Baltic Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Dähnke

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The global marine nitrogen cycle is constrained by nitrogen fixation as a source of reactive nitrogen, and denitrification or anammox on the sink side. These processes with their respective isotope effects set the marine nitrate 15N-isotope value (δ15N to a relatively constant average of 5‰. This value can be used to better assess the magnitude of these sources and sink terms, but the underlying assumption is that sedimentary denitrification and anammox, processes responsible for approximately one third of global nitrogen removal, have little to no isotope effect on nitrate in the water column.

    We investigated the isotope fractionation in sediment incubations, measuring net denitrification and nitrogen and oxygen stable isotope fractionation in surface sediments from the coastal Baltic Sea (Boknis Eck, Northern Germany, a site with seasonal hypoxia and dynamic nitrogen turnover.

    We found tremendously high denitrification rates, and regardless of current paradigms assuming little fractionation during sediment denitrification, we measured fractionation factors of 18.9‰ for nitrogen and 15.8‰ for oxygen in nitrate. While the input of nitrate to the water column remains speculative, these results challenge the current view of fractionation during sedimentary denitrification and imply that nitrogen budget calculations may need to consider this variability, as both preferential uptake of light nitrate and release of the remaining heavy fraction can significantly alter water column nitrate isotope vales at the sediment-water interface.

  10. Stable carbon isotope analysis of bone apatite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of stable carbon isotope analysis to bone apatite is investigated. Bone apatite was prepared from 28 samples of 5 species of modern browsing herbivores, and their 13C/12C ratios measured. The δ13C values for bone apatite of the modern specimens shows a mean enrichment of +12 o/oo relative to the C3 dietary mean of -26.5o/oo. The values for T. strepsiceros (kudu) suggest that it is not a consistent browzer, as was formerly believed. Seven fossil bone apatite browzer samples gave δ13C values which fell within the range for the modern samples. It is concluded that the 13C/12C ratio in modern bone apatite accurately reflects diet, but data for fossil samples was insufficient to allow a firm conclusion about the reliability of bone apatite dietary tracing in archaeological contexts

  11. Adsorptive fractionation of dissolved organic matter (DOM) by carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) and carbon nanotubes are introduced into aquatic environments. Thus, it is important to elucidate whether their interaction affects DOM amount and composition. In this study, the composition of DOM, before and after interactions with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), was measured and the adsorption affinity of the individual structural fractions of DOM to SWCNTs was investigated. Adsorption of DOM to SWCNTs was dominated by the hydrophobic acid fraction, resulting in relative enhancement of the hydrophilic character of non-adsorbed DOM. The preferential adsorption of the HoA fraction was concentration-dependent, increasing with increasing concentration. Adsorption affinities of bulk DOM calculated as the normalized sum of affinities of the individual structural fractions were similar to the measured affinities, suggesting that the structural fractions of DOM act as independent adsorbates. The altered DOM composition may affect the nature and reactivity of DOM in aquatic environments polluted with carbon nanotubes. - Highlights: • Interaction with carbon nanotubes alters DOM amount and composition. • Hydrophobic acid fraction governs DOM adsorption to carbon nanotubes. • Adsorbed DOM composition is concentration-dependent. • Adsorption affinity and capacity are dependent on hydrophobicity of DOM. - Dissolved organic matter (DOM)–single walled carbon nanotubes interactions result in the relative enrichment of the hydrophilic character of the DOM

  12. Does density fractionation of SOC represent chemically different carbon pools?

    OpenAIRE

    Mulvaney, Michael J.; Graham, M.; Xia, K.; Barrera, Victor H.; Botello, Rubén; Saavedra, Ana Karina; Mamani, P.

    2012-01-01

    Organic matter stabilization is thought to be a process of physical protection and chemical recalcitrance. The determination of recalcitrant soil organic carbon (SOC) often relies on operational definitions provided by various fractionation techniques, usually particle size or density fractionation. However, it is unknown if these operational definitions represent true chemical recalcitrance.

  13. Neon Isotope Fractionation in Ice Cores at Close-Off Depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, C.; Severinghaus, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    Analyzing trapped air bubbles in glacial ice is a well-established and useful method to reconstruct past atmospheric gas concentrations. However, trapped gas composition can be affected by fractionation during the closure of the air bubbles, complicating the reconstruction. Gases such as dioxygen (O2) and dihydrogen (H2) are known to leak out of the bubbles by permeation through the ice lattice at the close-off depth,where firn turns into ice. This process also can cause isotope fractionation, which obscures the past atmospheric isotope ratios in air bubbles in glacial ice. In order to establish the most accurate measurements of past atmospheric content, we need very detailed understanding of the permeation leakage mechanism in order to establish possible corrections. In this study, we propose the use of neon stable isotopes (neon-22 and neon-20) to place constraints on the mechanism of permeation leakage. Neon isotopes are an ideal system to explore because neon has a constant atmospheric isotope ratio, and thus only is affected by close-off fractionation. Neon permeation occurs via velocity-dependent hopping between sites within the ice lattice, because the neon atom is smaller than the critical size (3.6 Å) of the opening in the lattice. Theory predicts that neon isotope fractionation will occur due to the lower velocity of the heavier isotope, but this has never been experimentally verified and the theory is unable to quantitatively predict the magnitude of the fractionation. We will present the first results of high-precision neon isotope (22Ne/20Ne) measurements made in air pumped from the firm-to-ice transition in the Greenland Ice Sheet, where actively closing air bubbles drive permeation leakage. By measuring this natural neon isotope fractionation, we hope to learn about the mass dependence of the leakage mechanism and develop a more quantitative theory that is generalizable to biogeochemically- and climatically-active gases.

  14. Zinc isotope evidence for a large-scale carbonated mantle beneath eastern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sheng-Ao; Wang, Ze-Zhou; Li, Shu-Guang; Huang, Jian; Yang, Wei

    2016-06-01

    A large set of zinc (Zn) stable isotope data for continental basalts from eastern China were reported to investigate the application of Zn isotopes as a new tracer of deep carbonate cycling. All of the basalts with ages of 120 Ma basalts from eastern China (0.27 ± 0.06‰; 2sd). Given that Zn isotope fractionation during magmatic differentiation is limited (≤0.1‰), the elevated δ66Zn values reflect the involvement of isotopically heavy crustal materials (e.g., carbonates with an average δ66Zn of ∼0.91‰) in the mantle sources. SiO2 contents of the cycling in the Earth's mantle.

  15. Normalization of stable isotope data for carbonate minerals: Implementation of IUPAC guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang-Tae; Coplen, Tyler B.; Horita, Juske

    2015-06-01

    Carbonate minerals provide a rich source of geochemical information because their δ13C and δ18O values provide information about surface and subsurface Earth processes. However, a significant problem is that the same δ18O value is not reported for the identical carbonate sample when analyzed in different isotope laboratories in spite of the fact that the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) has provided reporting guidelines for two decades. This issue arises because (1) the δ18O measurements are performed on CO2 evolved by reaction of carbonates with phosphoric acid, (2) the acid-liberated CO2 is isotopically fractionated (enriched in 18O) because it contains only two-thirds of the oxygen from the solid carbonate, (3) this oxygen isotopic fractionation factor is a function of mineralogy, temperature, concentration of the phosphoric acid, and δ18O value of water in the phosphoric acid, (4) researchers may use any one of an assortment of oxygen isotopic fractionation factors that have been published for various minerals at various reaction temperatures, and (5) it sometimes is not clear how one should calculate δ18OVPDB values on a scale normalized such that the δ18O value of SLAP reference water is -55.5 ‰ relative to VSMOW reference water. To enable researchers worldwide to publish the same δ18O value (within experimental uncertainty) for the same carbonate sample, we have re-evaluated reported acid fractionation factors for calcite at 25, 50, and 75 °C and propose a revised relation for the temperature dependence of oxygen isotopic acid fractionation factor, αCO2(ACID)-calcite , of where T is temperature in kelvin. At 25 °C, αCO2(ACID)-calcite = 1.01025 , the most commonly accepted value for this quantity. We propose a normalization protocol in which (1) the internationally distributed carbonate isotopic reference materials NBS 18 and NBS 19 are interspersed among carbonate samples analyzed by treatment with phosphoric acid, (2

  16. Mercury (Hg) in meteorites: Variations in abundance, thermal release profile, mass-dependent and mass-independent isotopic fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Matthias M. M.; Cloquet, Christophe; Marty, Bernard

    2016-06-01

    We have measured the concentration, isotopic composition and thermal release profiles of Mercury (Hg) in a suite of meteorites, including both chondrites and achondrites. We find large variations in Hg concentration between different meteorites (ca. 10 ppb to 14,000 ppb), with the highest concentration orders of magnitude above the expected bulk solar system silicates value. From the presence of several different Hg carrier phases in thermal release profiles (150-650 °C), we argue that these variations are unlikely to be mainly due to terrestrial contamination. The Hg abundance of meteorites shows no correlation with petrographic type, or mass-dependent fractionation of Hg isotopes. Most carbonaceous chondrites show mass-independent enrichments in the odd-numbered isotopes 199Hg and 201Hg. We show that the enrichments are not nucleosynthetic, as we do not find corresponding nucleosynthetic deficits of 196Hg. Instead, they can partially be explained by Hg evaporation and redeposition during heating of asteroids from primordial radionuclides and late-stage impact heating. Non-carbonaceous chondrites, most achondrites and the Earth do not show these enrichments in vapor-phase Hg. All meteorites studied here have however isotopically light Hg (δ202Hg = ∼-7 to -1) relative to the Earth's average crustal values, which could suggest that the Earth has lost a significant fraction of its primordial Hg. However, the late accretion of carbonaceous chondritic material on the order of ∼2%, which has been suggested to account for the water, carbon, nitrogen and noble gas inventories of the Earth, can also contribute most or all of the Earth's current Hg budget. In this case, the isotopically heavy Hg of the Earth's crust would have to be the result of isotopic fractionation between surface and deep-Earth reservoirs.

  17. Biological fractionation of lead isotopes in Sprague-Dawley rats lead poisoned via the respiratory tract.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Wu

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: It was considered that lead isotope ratios did not change during physical, chemical, or biological processes. Thus, lead isotope ratios have been used as fingerprints to identify possible lead sources. However, recent evidence has shown that the lead isotope ratios among different biological samples in human are not always identical from its lead origins in vitro. An animal experiment was conducted to explore the biological fractionation of lead isotopes in biological systems. METHODS: 24 male Sprague-Dawley (SD rats were divided into groups that received acute lead exposure (0, 0.02, 0.2, or 2 mg/kg body weight of lead acetate via the respiratory route every day for 5 days. Biological samples (i.e., blood, urine, and feces were collected for comparison with the lead acetate (test substance and the low-lead animal feed (diet administered to the rats. The lead isotope ratios were determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS. RESULTS: There are significant differences (p<0.05 in lead isotope ratios between blood, urine, and feces. Moreover, a nonlinear relationship between the blood lead concentration and the blood lead isotope ratios was observed. There is also a threshold effect to the fractionation function. Only the blood isotope ratio of (204Pb/(206Pb matches the test substance well. As for feces, when (204Pb/(206Pb ratio is considered, there is no significant difference between feces-test substance pairs in medium and high dose group. CONCLUSIONS: The biological fractionation of lead isotopes in SD rats was observed. Moreover, there might be a threshold for the biological fractionation of lead isotopes which is depending on whole blood lead level. It is considered to be more reliable that we compared the isotope ratios of potential lead hazards with both blood and feces lead fingerprints especially for (204Pb/(206Pb ratio under high-dose exposure.

  18. Mouse skin damages caused by fractionated irradiation with carbon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have investigated carbon-dose responses of early and late skin damages after daily fractionations to the mouse leg. Depilated legs were irradiated with 7 different positions within 290 MeV/u carbon beams. Fractionation schedules were 1, 2, 4 and 8 daily fractions. Skin reaction was scored every other day for 32 days. Five highest scores in individual mice were averaged, and used as averaged peak reaction. The isoeffect doses to produce an averaged peak skin reaction of 3.0 (moist desquamation) on dose-response curves were calculated with 95% confidence limit. The isoeffect dose for control gamma rays constantly increased with an increase in the number of fraction. The isoeffect doses in low LET carbon ions of 14- and 20 keV/μm also increased up to 4 fractions, but did not increase when 4 fractions increased to 8 fractions. The saturation of isoeffect dose was more prominently observed for 40 keV/μm in such that the isoeffect doses did not change among 2, 4 and 8 fractions. The isoeffect doses for LET higher than 50 keV/μm were smaller than those for lower LET. However, the isoeffect doses for 50-, 60-, 80- and 100 keV/μ steadily increased with an increase in the number of fraction and did not show any saturation up to 8 fractions. Relation between LET and RBE was linear for all fractionation schedules. The slope of regression line in 4 fractions was steepest, and significantly (P<0.05) different from that in 1 fraction. (orig.)

  19. Mouse skin damages caused by fractionated irradiation with carbon ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ando, K.; Chen, Y.J.; Ohira, C.; Nojima, K.; Ando, S.; Kobayashi, N.; Ohbuchi, T.; Shimizu, W. [Space and Particle Radiation Science Research Group, Chiba (Japan); Koike, S.; Kanai, T. [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan). Div. of Accelerator Physics

    1997-09-01

    We have investigated carbon-dose responses of early and late skin damages after daily fractionations to the mouse leg. Depilated legs were irradiated with 7 different positions within 290 MeV/u carbon beams. Fractionation schedules were 1, 2, 4 and 8 daily fractions. Skin reaction was scored every other day for 32 days. Five highest scores in individual mice were averaged, and used as averaged peak reaction. The isoeffect doses to produce an averaged peak skin reaction of 3.0 (moist desquamation) on dose-response curves were calculated with 95% confidence limit. The isoeffect dose for control gamma rays constantly increased with an increase in the number of fraction. The isoeffect doses in low LET carbon ions of 14- and 20 keV/{mu}m also increased up to 4 fractions, but did not increase when 4 fractions increased to 8 fractions. The saturation of isoeffect dose was more prominently observed for 40 keV/{mu}m in such that the isoeffect doses did not change among 2, 4 and 8 fractions. The isoeffect doses for LET higher than 50 keV/{mu}m were smaller than those for lower LET. However, the isoeffect doses for 50-, 60-, 80- and 100 keV/{mu} steadily increased with an increase in the number of fraction and did not show any saturation up to 8 fractions. Relation between LET and RBE was linear for all fractionation schedules. The slope of regression line in 4 fractions was steepest, and significantly (P<0.05) different from that in 1 fraction. (orig.)

  20. Europium, Samarium, and Neodymium Isotopic Fractions in Metal-Poor Stars

    OpenAIRE

    Roederer, Ian U.; Lawler, James E.; Sneden, Christopher; Cowan, John J.; Sobeck, Jennifer S.; Pilachowski, Catherine A.

    2007-01-01

    We have derived isotopic fractions of europium, samarium, and neodymium in two metal-poor giants with differing neutron-capture nucleosynthetic histories. These isotopic fractions were measured from new high resolution (R ~ 120,000), high signal-to-noise (S/N ~ 160-1000) spectra obtained with the 2dCoude spectrograph of McDonald Observatory's 2.7m Smith telescope. Synthetic spectra were generated using recent high-precision laboratory measurements of hyperfine and isotopic subcomponents of se...

  1. Molecular and carbon isotopic compositions of gas inclusions of deep carbonate rocks in the Tarim Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Shixin; WANG Xianbin; MENG Zifang; LI Yuan; Paul Farrimond; LI Liwu; DUAN Yi

    2004-01-01

    Gaseous components of gas inclusions in deep carbonate rocks (>5700 m) from the Tacan 1 well were analyzed by online mass spectrometry by means of either the stepwise heating technique or vacuum electromagnetism crushing. The carbon isotopic compositions of gases released by vacuum electromagnetism crushing were also measured. Although the molecular compositions of gas inclusions show differences between the two methods, the overall characteristics are that gas inclusions mainly contain CO2, whilst hydrocarbon gases, such as CH4, C2H6 and C3H8, are less abundant. The content of CO is higher in the stepwise heating experiment than that in the method of vacuum electromagnetism crushing, and there are only minor amounts of N2, H2 and O2 in gas inclusions. Methane δ13C values of gas inclusions in Lower Ordovician and Upper Cambrian rocks (from 5713.7 to 6422 m; -52‰-63‰) are similar to those of bacterial methane, but their chemical compositions do not exhibit the dry character in comparison with biogenic gases. These characteristics of deep gas inclusions may be related to the migration fractionation. Some deep natural gases with light carbon isotopic characteristics in the Tazhong Uplift may have a similar origin. The δ13C1 values of gas inclusions in Lower Cambrian rocks (7117-7124 m) are heavier (-39‰), consistent with highly mature natural gases. Carbon isotopic compositions of CO2 in the gas inclusions of deep carbonate rocks are similar (from -4‰ to -13‰) to those of deep natural gases, indicating predominantly an inorganic origin.

  2. Carbon Stable Isotopes as Indicators of Coastal Eutrophication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coastal ecologists and managers have frequently used nitrogen stable isotopes (δ15N) to trace and monitor anthropogenic nitrogen (N) in coastal ecosystems. However, the interpretation of δ15N data can often be challenging, if not confounding, as the isotope values fractionate su...

  3. Carbon-isotopic analysis of dissolved acetate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heating of dried, acetate-containing solids together with oxalic acid dihydrate conveniently releases acetic acid for purification by gas chromatography. For determination of the carbon-isotopic composition of total acetate, the acetate-containing zone of the chromatographic effluent can be routed directly to a combustion furnace coupled to a vacuum system allowing recovery, purification, and packaging of CO2 for mass-spectrometric analysis. For analysis of methyl carbon, acetic acid can be cryogenically trapped from the chromatographic effluent, then transferred to a tube containing excess NaOH. The tube is evacuated, sealed, and heated to 500 degree C to produce methane by pyrolysis of sodium acetate. Subsequent combustion of the methane allows determination of the 13C content at the methyl position in the parent acetate. With typical blanks, the standard deviation of single analyses is less than 0.4 per-thousand for acetate samples larger than 5 μmol. A full treatment of uncertainties is outlined

  4. Observations of nitrogen isotope fractionation in deeply embedded protostars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wampfler, Susanne Franziska; Jørgensen, Jes Kristian; Bizzarro, Martin;

    2014-01-01

    (Abridged) The terrestrial planets, comets, and meteorites are significantly enriched in 15N compared to the Sun and Jupiter. While the solar and jovian nitrogen isotope ratio is believed to represent the composition of the protosolar nebula, a still unidentified process has caused 15N-enrichment......(Abridged) The terrestrial planets, comets, and meteorites are significantly enriched in 15N compared to the Sun and Jupiter. While the solar and jovian nitrogen isotope ratio is believed to represent the composition of the protosolar nebula, a still unidentified process has caused 15N...

  5. Isotope Fractionation Associated with the Indirect Photolysis of Substituted Anilines in Aqueous Solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratti, Marco; Canonica, Silvio; McNeill, Kristopher; Bolotin, Jakov; Hofstetter, Thomas B

    2015-11-01

    Organic micropollutants containing aniline substructures are susceptible to different light-induced transformation processes in aquatic environments and water treatment operations. Here, we investigated the magnitude and variability of C and N isotope fractionation during the indirect phototransformation of four para-substituted anilines in aerated aqueous solutions. The model photosensitizers, namely 9,10-anthraquinone-1,5-disulfonate and methylene blue, were used as surrogates for dissolved organic matter chromophores generating excited triplet states in sunlit surface waters. The transformation of aniline, 4-CH3-, 4-OCH3-, and 4-Cl-aniline by excited triplet states of the photosensitizers was associated with inverse and normal N isotope fractionation, whereas C isotope fractionation was negligible. The apparent 15N kinetic isotope effects (AKIE) were almost identical for both photosensitizers, increased from 0.9958±0.0013 for 4-OCH3-aniline to 1.0035±0.0006 for 4-Cl-aniline, and correlated well with the electron donating properties of the substituent. N isotope fractionation is pH-dependent in that H+ exchange reactions dominate below and N atom oxidation processes above the pKa value of the substituted aniline's conjugate acid. Correlations of C and N isotope fractionation for indirect phototransformation were different from those determined previously for the direct photolysis of chloroanilines and offer new opportunities to distinguish between abiotic degradation pathways. PMID:26418612

  6. Experimental Evaluation of Stable Isotope Fractionation in Fish Muscle and Otoliths

    Science.gov (United States)

    We investigated an unresolved question in the use of stable isotopes to determine diet and trophic position of fish using both muscle and otoliths. We determined: i) the degree of fractionation of δ13C and δ15N between diet and muscle, and assessed if fractionation was consistent...

  7. Iron isotope fractionation during magmatic differentiation in Kilauea Iki lava lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, F.-Z.; Dauphas, N.; Helz, R.T.

    2008-01-01

    Magmatic differentiation helps produce the chemical and petrographic diversity of terrestrial rocks. The extent to which magmatic differentiation fractionates nonradiogenic isotopes is uncertain for some elements. We report analyses of iron isotopes in basalts from Kilauea Iki lava lake, Hawaii. The iron isotopic compositions (56Fe/54Fe) of late-stage melt veins are 0.2 per mil (???) greater than values for olivine cumulates. Olivine phenocrysts are up to 1.2??? lighter than those of whole rocks. These results demonstrate that iron isotopes fractionate during magmatic differentiation at both whole-rock and crystal scales. This characteristic of iron relative to the characteristics of magnesium and lithium, for which no fractionation has been found, may be related to its complex redox chemistry in magmatic systems and makes iron a potential tool for studying planetary differentiation.

  8. First data supporting crystallization model of lithium isotopes fractionation in pegmatite process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reason of Li isotopes fractionation in the network of evolution of complete pegmatite-forming systems (PS) is ascertained. Lithium minerals of two contrasting PS of rare earth formation pertaining to the Kolmozero-Voron'ya pegmatite-bearing band (Kola peninsula) work as an object of the research. Measurement procedure of the Li isotope ratio is realized at MC-ICP-MS. Data on measurements δ7Li are presented. Existence of isotope shift 7Li/6Li in the analyzed PS is demonstrated. Prospects for use of the given isotope parameter is discussed

  9. Analytical modelling of stable isotope fractionation of volatile organic compounds in the unsaturated zone

    CERN Document Server

    Bouchard, D; Höhener, P; Hunkeler, D; 10.1016/j.jconhyd.2010.09.006

    2011-01-01

    Analytical models were developed that simulate stable isotope ratios of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) near a point source contamination in the unsaturated zone. The models describe diffusive transport of VOCs, biodegradation and source ageing. The mass transport is governed by Fick's law for diffusion, and the equation for reactive transport of VOCs in the soil gas phase was solved for different source geometries and for different boundary conditions. Model results were compared to experimental data from a one-dimensional laboratory column and a radial-symmetric field experiment, and the comparison yielded a satisfying agreement. The model results clearly illustrate the significant isotope fractionation by gas-phase diffusion under transient state conditions. This leads to an initial depletion of heavy isotopes with increasing distance from the source. The isotope evolution of the source is governed by the combined effects of isotope fractionation due to vaporization, diffusion and biodegradation. The net...

  10. Modeling Environmental Controls on the Carbon Isotope Composition of Ecosystem Respired Carbon Dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, T.; Flanagan, L. B.

    2006-12-01

    Our main objective was to test whether the carbon isotope composition of ecosystem respired CO2 varied in response to environmental conditions in a manner consistent with well-known leaf-level studies of photosynthetic 13C discrimination. We developed an ecosystem-scale model that calculated leaf CO2 assimilation, stomatal conductance and chloroplast CO2 concentration separately for sunlit and shaded leaves within multiple canopy layers. The stomatal conductance model was linked to differences in water potential and resistances in the hydraulic pathway between the soil and the tree foliage. This part of the ecosystem model was validated by comparison to leaf-level gas exchange measurements and estimates of ecosystem-scale photosynthesis (GEP). The estimates of GEP were based on eddy covariance measurements of net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) and the Fluxnet-Canada Research Network standard protocol for partitioning NEE into GEP and total ecosystem respiration (TER). The carbon isotope composition of carbohydrate formed during photosynthesis was calculated based on the Farquhar model of isotope effects. Total ecosystem respiration was modeled, based on measured temperature and soil moisture, as the sum of four components (1) above-ground plant, (2) root, (3) litter, and (4) mineral soil. We applied a variety of techniques to allocate the contribution of these different components so that modeled TER was consistent with TER calculated from NEE measurements. The carbon isotope composition of CO2 released during above-ground plant and root respiration was calculated based on an assimilated-weighted average of carbohydrate fixed during a variable number of days previous to the day of respiration. The isotope composition of CO2 released by litter and mineral soil respiration was based on measurements of the δ13C values of these components (we assumed no isotope fractionation during respiration) and held constant in all calculations. The model was compared to

  11. Cr isotope fractionation factors for Cr(VI) reduction by a metabolically diverse group of bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Anirban; Johnson, Thomas M.; Sanford, Robert A.

    2014-10-01

    Reduction of Cr(VI) is an important process that determines the geochemical behavior, mobility and bioavailability of Cr in both terrestrial and marine environments. Many metabolically diverse microorganisms possess Cr(VI) reduction capacity. Cr(VI) reduction fractionates Cr isotopes and thus 53Cr/52Cr ratios can be used to monitor Cr(VI) reduction and redox conditions. The magnitude of isotopic fractionation (ε) for a variety of microbial reduction mechanisms must be known for accurate interpretation of observed shifts in 53Cr/52Cr ratios. We determined isotopic fractionation factors for Cr(VI) reduction by metal reducers Geobacter sulfurreducens and Shewanella sp. strain NR, a denitrifying soil bacterium Pseudomonas stutzeri DCP-Ps1, and a sulfate reducer Desulfovibrio vulgaris. All bacteria investigated in this study produced significant Cr isotope fractionation. The fractionation (ε) for G. sulfurreducens, Shewanella sp. (NR), P. stutzeri DCP-Ps1, and D. vulgaris were -3.03‰ ± 0.12‰, -2.17‰ ± 0.22‰, -3.14‰ ± 0.13‰, and -3.01‰ ± 0.11‰, respectively. Despite differences in microbial strains in this study, the ε did not vary significantly except for Shewanella sp. (NR). Our results suggest that strong isotopic fractionation is induced during Cr(VI) reduction under electron donor poor (∼300 μM) conditions.

  12. Biogeochemial modeling of biodegradation and stable isotope fractionation of DCE in a small-scale wetland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Zaldívar, Pablo; Imfeld, Gwenaël; Maier, Uli; Centler, Florian; Thullner, Martin

    2013-04-01

    In recent years, the use of (constructed) wetlands has gained significant attention for the in situ remediation of groundwater contaminated with (chlorinated) organic hydrocarbons. Although many sophisticated experimental methods exist for the assessment of contaminant removal in such wetlands the understanding how changes in wetland hydrochemistry affect the removal processes is still limited. This knowledge gap might be reduced by the use of biogeochemical reactive transport models. This study presents the reactive transport simulation of a small-scale constructed wetland treated with groundwater containing cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cDCE). Simulated processes consider different cDCE biodegradation pathways and the associated carbon isotope fractionation, a set of further (bio)geochemical processes as well as the activity of the plant roots. Spatio-temporal hydrochemical and isotope data from a long-term constructed wetland experiment [1] are used to constrain the model. Simulation results for the initial oxic phase of the wetland experiment indicate carbon isotope enrichment factors typical for cometabolic DCE oxidation, which suggests that aerobic treatment of cDCE is not an optimal remediation strategy. For the later anoxic phase of the experiment model derived enrichment factors indicate reductive dechlorination pathways. This degradation is promoted at all wetland depths by a sufficient availability of electron donor and carbon sources from root exudates, which makes the anoxic treatment of groundwater in such wetlands an effective remediation strategy. In combination with the previous experimental data results from this study suggest that constructed wetlands are viable remediation means for the treatment of cDCE contaminated groundwater. Reactive transport models can improve the understanding of the factors controlling chlorinated ethenes removal, and the used model approach would also allow for an optimization of the wetland operation needed for a complete

  13. Estimation of the contribution of soil carbon to paddy rice and soil to rice carbon transfer factor using natural abundances of stable carbon isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To obtain the soil-to-rice transfer factor (TF) of carbon-14 (14C), TF of stable carbon was estimated by measuring stable carbon isotope ratios (13C/12C) and total C concentrations in rice grain and associated soil samples collected throughout Japan. Carbon isotope ratios were reported in terms of a δ13C value. By comparing δ13C values for brown rice, white rice and bran, we concluded that white rice was the most suitable part to be used for this estimation because it reflects products from photosynthesis. The δ13C values for white rice and soil showed a weak correlation which may indicate a potential carbon supply from soil to rice. Thus we took a statistical approach to estimate the percent of soil-origin carbon in rice plants. We found that a maximum 1.6% of total carbon in rice plants was from soil under the reasonable assumptions that the carbon fractionation by paddy rice was -19 per mille and δ13C of atmospheric CO2 was -8 per mille. Maximum TF value ranged from 0.05 to 0.5 for stable carbon and the value would also be applicable for 14C because the carbon fractionation effect for 14C would be negligible in carbon transfer. (author)

  14. Carbon mass-balance modeling and carbon isotope exchange processes in the Curonian Lagoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barisevičiūtė, Rūta; Žilius, Mindaugas; Ertürk, Ali; Petkuvienė, Jolita

    2016-04-01

    The Curonian lagoon one of the largest coastal lagoons in Europe is located in the southeastern part of the Baltic Sea and lies along the Baltic coast of Lithuania and the Kaliningrad region of Russia. It is influenced by a discharge of the Nemunas and other smaller rivers and saline water of the Baltic Sea. The narrow (width 0.4 km, deep 8-14 m) Klaipėda Strait is the only way for fresh water run-off and brackish water intrusions. This research is focused on carbon isotope fractionations related with air - water exchange, primary production and organic carbon sedimentation, mineralization and uptake from both marine and terrestrial sources.

  15. Zinc isotope fractionation on benzo-15-crown-5 resin by liquid chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chromatographic fractionation of zinc isotopes was performed on the synthesized benzo-15-crown-5 resin as a column packing material at 323 K in the breakthrough manner for both a frontal and a rear bands. Zinc adsorption capacity was affected by anion chloride concentration and solvent dielectric constant. The heavier zinc isotopes were found enriched to the solution phase and the lighter zinc isotope was concentrated on the resin phase. The frontal maximum enrichment ratio for isotopic pair of 68Zn/64Zn was 1.0081. The isotope separation coefficients for isotopic pair of 68Zn/64Zn for frontal and rear band, were 5.3x10-4, 4.5x10-4, respectively. (author)

  16. Carbon isotope effects in plants related to photosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plants contain less 13C than the atmosphere due to both enzymatic and physical processes that discriminate against the heavier isotope in favour of the lighter one. These differences have allowed us to use isotopic signature to identify photosynthetic pathways of many plant species. The purpose of this study is to present a method for measuring the carbon isotope discrimination in the leaf of the plant. We carried out conversion of organic sample from two species (Prunus amygdalus and Rosa) to CO2 by dry combustion in an excess of oxygen. The stable carbon isotope ratio (13C/12C) was measured with high precision by a mass spectrometer. This isotopic discrimination was used to assess the ratio of intercellular to atmospheric CO2 concentration, ci/ca. We plan to use the isotopic discrimination to estimate plant water-use efficiency, a relevant parameter for conferring tolerance of the plant to environmental stress. (authors)

  17. Source identification of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in fine atmospheric particulates using stable carbon isotopic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, a method is established to quantitatively partition fractional contributions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in fine atmospheric particulate matters by using stable carbon isotopic analysis. Dichloromethane extraction, TLC purification, and gas chromatography-combustion system and isotope mass spectrometry (GC/C/IRMS), are used to measure the stable carbon isotope compositions (δ13C). The fractional contributions of coal combustion, vehicle exhaust and biomass burning to the PAHs in the fine particulate matters (PM2.5) collected in Jiading district, a suburb of Shanghai, are estimated. The results show that the δ13C values increase with decreasing molecular weight. The coal combustion and biomass burning play bigger role than vehicle exhaust in the PAHs, compared to the δ13C values of PAHs in all kinds of potential pollution sources. The estimated contributions from coal combustion,vehicle exhaust and biomass burning to PAHs of PM2.5 range from 3%- 21%, 29%- 33% and 46%- 67%, respectively, which agree well with the surrounding condition of the sampling site, indicating that it is feasible to estimate the fractional contributions of PAHs quantitatively by using stable carbon isotopic analysis. (authors)

  18. Evidence for stable Sr isotope fractionation by silicate weathering in a small sedimentary watershed in southwestern Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Hung-Chun; You, Chen-Feng; Liu, Hou-Chun; Chung, Chuan-Hsiung

    2015-09-01

    Radiogenic Sr isotopes (87Sr/86Sr) are robust for provenance identification in hydrology, affected mainly by the age of background lithologies and the degree of chemical weathering. However, there is limited knowledge concerning the fractionation mechanism of stable Sr isotopes (88Sr/86Sr) in rivers. In this study, river water was collected on a weekly to monthly basis throughout dry and wet seasons. Furthermore, to study the variations of radiogenic and stable Sr isotopes during intense weathering, a major flooding event (2000 mm precipitation in three days, Typhoon Morakot), water was captured within a small drainage catchment system (161 km2) along the Hou-ku River in southwestern Taiwan. For a better constraint on the end member compositions, bedload sediments, suspended particles, and several host rocks were sampled for a systematic investigation. The carbonate and silicate phases of these solids were chemically separated. Dissolved major elements indicate that the watersheds were predominated by silicate weathering. Stable Sr isotopes show no significant variation (δ88Sr = 0.24-0.31‰) temporally and spatially with an average of 0.28‰. Additionally, all solids showed lower δ88Sr values than the river water while the host rocks had higher δ88Sr values (δ88Sr = 0.20-0.26‰) than the residual weathering products (δ88Sr = 0.08-0.22‰), indicating preferential leaching of heavy Sr into the hydrosphere and leaving light Sr in the residual solids. Results of laboratory acid leaching experiments reveal that dissolution of high δ88Sr value minerals occurred at an early stage of weathering. The variation of weathering intensity does not alter stable Sr isotopes in silicate weathering dominated river water, which contains higher stable Sr isotopes than the associated sediments. The silicatic sedimentary rocks preferentially released higher stable Sr isotopes into the hydrosphere during chemical weathering, thus leaving lower stable Sr isotopes in the residual

  19. Diffusive fractionation complicates isotopic partitioning of autotrophic and heterotrophic sources of soil respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyes, Andrew B; Gaines, Sarah J; Siegwolf, Rolf T W; Bowling, David R

    2010-11-01

    Carbon isotope ratios (δ¹³C) of heterotrophic and rhizospheric sources of soil respiration under deciduous trees were evaluated over two growing seasons. Fluxes and δ¹³C of soil respiratory CO₂ on trenched and untrenched plots were calculated from closed chambers, profiles of soil CO₂ mole fraction and δ¹³C and continuous open chambers. δ¹³C of respired CO₂ and bulk carbon were measured from excised leaves and roots and sieved soil cores. Large diel variations (>5‰) in δ¹³C of soil respiration were observed when diel flux variability was large relative to average daily fluxes, independent of trenching. Soil gas transport modelling supported the conclusion that diel surface flux δ¹³C variation was driven by non-steady state gas transport effects. Active roots were associated with high summertime soil respiration rates and around 1‰ enrichment in the daily average δ¹³C of the soil surface CO₂ flux. Seasonal δ¹³C variability of about 4‰ (most enriched in summer) was observed on all plots and attributed to the heterotrophic CO₂ source. PMID:20545887

  20. Towards a better understanding of magnesium-isotope ratios from marine skeletal carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hippler, Dorothee; Buhl, Dieter; Witbaard, Rob; Richter, Detlev K.; Immenhauser, Adrian

    2009-10-01

    This study presents magnesium stable-isotope compositions of various biogenic carbonates of several marine calcifying organisms and an algae species, seawater samples collected from the western Dutch Wadden Sea, and reference materials. The aim of this study is to explore the influence of mineralogy, taxonomy and environmental factors (e.g., seawater isotopic composition, temperature, salinity) on magnesium-isotopic (δ 26Mg) ratios of skeletal carbonates. Using high-precision multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, we observed that the magnesium-isotopic composition of seawater from the semi-enclosed Dutch Wadden Sea is identical to that of open marine seawater. We further found that a considerable component of the observed variability in δ 26Mg values of marine skeletal carbonates can be attributed to differences in mineralogy. Furthermore, magnesium-isotope fractionation is species-dependent, with all skeletal carbonates being isotopically lighter than seawater. While δ 26Mg values of skeletal aragonite and high-magnesium calcite of coralline red algae indicate the absence or negligibility of metabolic influences, the δ 26Mg values of echinoids, brachiopods and bivalves likely result from a taxon-specific level of control on Mg-isotope incorporation during biocalcification. Moreover, no resolvable salinity and temperature effect were observed for coralline red algae and echinoids. In contrast, Mg-isotope data of bivalves yield ambiguous results, which require further validation. The data presented here, point to a limited use of Mg isotopes as temperature proxy, but highlight the method's potential as tracer of seawater chemistry through Earth's history.

  1. Europium, Samarium, and Neodymium Isotopic Fractions in Metal-Poor Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roederer, Ian U.; Lawler, James E.; Sneden, Christopher; Cowan, John J.; Sobeck, Jennifer S.; Pilachowski, Catherine A.

    2008-03-01

    We have derived isotopic fractions of europium (Eu), samarium (Sm), and neodymium (Nd) in two metal-poor giants with differing neutron-capture nucleosynthetic histories. These isotopic fractions were measured from new very high resolution (R~120,000), high signal-to-noise (S/N~160-1000) spectra obtained with the 2dCoudé spectrograph of McDonald Observatory's 2.7 m Smith telescope. Synthetic spectra were generated using recent high-precision laboratory measurements of hyperfine and isotopic subcomponents of several transitions of these elements and matched quantitatively to the observed spectra. We interpret our isotopic fractions by the nucleosynthesis predictions of the stellar model, which models s-process nucleosynthesis in the physical conditions expected in a low-mass, thermally-pulsing star on the AGB, and the classical method, which assumes that s-process nucleosynthesis can be approximated by a steady neutron flux impinging upon Fe-peak seed nuclei. These two approaches predict the relative contributions to the Solar System n-capture abundances from the s- and r-processes and, by extension, the relative contributions of these two process to material in metal-poor stars. Our Eu isotopic fraction in HD 175305 is consistent with an r-process origin by the classical method and is consistent with both an r-process and s-process origin by the stellar model. Our Sm isotopic fraction in HD 175305 is consistent with a predominantly r-process origin by both methods, and our Sm isotopic fraction in HD 196944 is consistent with a pure s-process origin by both methods as well. Our Nd isotopic fractions in both stars are consistent with either r-process and s-process origins by both methods. The Eu and Sm isotopic fraction estimates argue for an r-process origin for the rare-earth elements in HD 175305 and an s-process origin for them in HD 196944, in excellent agreement with previous studies of the elemental abundance distributions in these stars. This study for the

  2. Isotopic fractionation during soil uptake of atmospheric hydrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Rice

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Soil uptake of atmospheric hydrogen (H2 and the associated hydrogen isotope effect were studied using soil chambers in a Western Washington second-growth coniferous forest. Chamber studies were conducted during both winter and summer seasons to account for large natural variability in soil moisture content (4–50% and temperature (6–22 °C. H2 deposition velocities were found to range from 0.01–0.06 cm s−1 with an average of 0.033 ± 0.008 cm s−1 (95% confidence interval. Consistent with prior studies, deposition velocities were correlated with soil moisture below 20% soil moisture content during the summer season. During winter, there was considerable variability observed in deposition velocity that was not closely related to soil moisture. The hydrogen kinetic isotope effect with H2 uptake was found to range from −24‰ to −109‰. Aggregate analysis of experimental data results in an average KIE of −57 ± 5‰ (95% CI. Some of the variability in KIE can be explained by larger isotope effects at lower (<10% and higher (>30% soil moisture contents. The measured KIE was also found to be correlated with deposition velocity, with smaller isotope effects occurring at higher deposition velocities. If correct, these findings will have an impact on the interpretation of atmospheric measurements and modeling of δD of H2.

  3. Isotopic fractionation during soil uptake of atmospheric hydrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Rice

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Soil uptake of atmospheric hydrogen (H2 and the associated hydrogen isotope effect were studied using soil chambers in a Western Washington second-growth coniferous forest. Chamber studies were conducted during both winter and summer seasons to account for large natural variability in soil moisture content (4–50% and temperature (6–22 °C. H2 deposition velocities were found to range from 0.01–0.06 cm s−1 with an average of 0.033 ± 0.008 cm s−1 (95% confidence interval. Consistent with prior studies, deposition velocities were correlated with soil moisture below 20% soil moisture content during the summer season. Considerable variability in deposition velocity observed during winter was not found to be closely related to soil moisture. The hydrogen kinetic isotope effect with H2 uptake was found to range from –24‰ to –109‰. Aggregate analysis of experimental data results in an average KIE of −57 ± 5‰ (95% CI. Some of the variability in KIE can be explained by larger isotope effects at lower (<10% and higher (>30% soil moisture contents. The measured KIE was also found to be correlated with deposition velocity, with smaller isotope effects occurring at higher deposition velocities. If correct, these findings will have an impact on the interpretation of atmospheric measurements and modeling of δD of H2.

  4. Modelling of stable isotope fractionation by methane oxidation and diffusion in landfill cover soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A technique to measure biological methane oxidation in landfill cover soils that is gaining increased interest is the measurement of stable isotope fractionation in the methane. Usually to quantify methane oxidation, only fractionation by oxidation is taken into account. Recently it was shown that neglecting the isotope fractionation by diffusion results in underestimation of the methane oxidation. In this study a simulation model was developed that describes gas transport and methane oxidation in landfill cover soils. The model distinguishes between 12CH4, 13CH4, and 12CH3D explicitly, and includes isotope fractionation by diffusion and oxidation. To evaluate the model, the simulations were compared with column experiments from previous studies. The predicted concentration profiles and isotopic profiles match the measured ones very well, with a root mean square deviation (RMSD) of 1.7 vol% in the concentration and a RMSD of 0.8 per mille in the δ13C value, with δ13C the relative 13C abundance as compared to an international standard. Overall, the comparison shows that a model-based isotope approach for the determination of methane oxidation efficiencies is feasible and superior to existing isotope methods

  5. Simulations of an isotopic fractionation by freezing in an open system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yoshinori Iizuka

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a model of isotopic fractionation by freezing under near-equilibrium conditions in an open system and uses the model to predict the fractionation curve and slope gradient of δ18O versus δD.The simulation results show that 1) the fractionation curve and slope gradient are determined by the ratio of freezing rate to input rate, 2) the isotopic value in the initial stage of freezing is determined by the isotopic value of initial water; 3) in the latter half of freezing in an open system, the isotopic value converges to a certain value determined by that of input water.These results suggest that the shape of the fractionation curve is the method to distinguish whether freezing occurred in a closed or open system.This analysis is applied to an isotopic curve observed in basal ice of Hamna Glacier, Sya drainage, East Antarctica.The isotopic curve indicates formation by regelation in an open system with a ratio of freezing/input rates of about 10/4.

  6. Influence of the enzyme dissimilatory sulfite reductase on stable isotope fractionation during sulfate reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangalo, Muna; Einsiedl, Florian; Meckenstock, Rainer U.; Stichler, Willibald

    2008-03-01

    The stable isotopes of sulfate are often used as a tool to assess bacterial sulfate reduction on the macro scale. However, the mechanisms of stable isotope fractionation of sulfur and oxygen at the enzymatic level are not yet fully understood. In batch experiments with water enriched in 18O we investigated the effect of different nitrite concentrations on sulfur isotope fractionation by Desulfovibrio desulfuricans. With increasing nitrite concentrations, we found sulfur isotope enrichment factors ranging from -11.2 ± 1.8‰ to -22.5 ± 3.2‰. Furthermore, the δ18O values in the remaining sulfate increased from approximately 50-120‰ when 18O-enriched water was supplied. Since 18O-exchange with ambient water does not take place in sulfate, but rather in intermediates of the sulfate reduction pathway (e.g. SO32-), we suggest that nitrite affects the steady-state concentration and the extent of reoxidation of the metabolic intermediate sulfite to sulfate during sulfate reduction. Given that nitrite is known to inhibit the production of the enzyme dissimilatory sulfite reductase, our results suggest that the activity of the dissimilatory sulfite reductase regulates the kinetic isotope fractionation of sulfur and oxygen during bacterial sulfate reduction. Our novel results also imply that isotope fractionation during bacterial sulfate reduction strongly depends on the cell internal enzymatic regulation rather than on the physico-chemical features of the individual enzymes.

  7. Mercury isotope fractionation during ore retorting in the Almadén mining district, Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, John E.; Pribil, Michael J.; Higueras, Pablo L.

    2013-01-01

    Almadén, Spain, is the world's largest mercury (Hg) mining district, which has produced over 250,000 metric tons of Hg representing about 30% of the historical Hg produced worldwide. The objective of this study was to measure Hg isotopic compositions of cinnabar ore, mine waste calcine (retorted ore), elemental Hg (Hg0(L)), and elemental Hg gas (Hg0(g)), to evaluate potential Hg isotopic fractionation. Almadén cinnabar ore δ202Hg varied from − 0.92 to 0.15‰ (mean of − 0.56‰, σ = 0.35‰, n = 7), whereas calcine was isotopically heavier and δ202Hg ranged from − 0.03‰ to 1.01‰ (mean of 0.43‰, σ = 0.44‰, n = 8). The average δ202Hg enrichment of 0.99‰ between cinnabar ore and calcines generated during ore retorting indicated Hg isotopic mass dependent fractionation (MDF). Mass independent fractionation (MIF) was not observed in any of the samples in this study. Laboratory retorting experiments of cinnabar also were carried out to evaluate Hg isotopic fractionation of products generated during retorting such as calcine, Hg0(L), and Hg0(g). Calcine and Hg0(L) generated during these retorting experiments showed an enrichment in δ202Hg of as much as 1.90‰ and 0.67‰, respectively, compared to the original cinnabar ore. The δ202Hg for Hg0(g) generated during the retorting experiments was as much as 1.16‰ isotopically lighter compared to cinnabar, thus, when cinnabar ore was roasted, the resultant calcines formed were isotopically heavier, whereas the Hg0(g) generated was isotopically lighter in Hg isotopes.

  8. Nuclear volume effects in equilibrium stable isotope fractionations of mercury, thallium and lead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sha; Liu, Yun

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear volume effects (NVEs) of Hg, Tl and Pb isotope systems are investigated with careful evaluation on quantum relativistic effects via the Dirac's formalism of full-electron wave function. Equilibrium (202)Hg/(198)Hg, (205)Tl/(203)Tl, (207)Pb/(206)Pb and (208)Pb/(206)Pb isotope fractionations are found can be up to 3.61‰, 2.54‰, 1.48‰ and 3.72‰ at room temperature, respectively, larger than fractionations predicted by classical mass-dependent isotope fractionations theory. Moreover, the NVE can cause mass-independent fractionations (MIF) for odd-mass isotopes and even-mass isotopes. The plot of [formula in text] for Hg-bearing species falls into a straight line with the slope of 1.66, which is close to previous experimental results. For the first time, Pb(4+)-bearing species are found can enrich heavier Pb isotopes than Pb(2+)-bearing species to a surprising extent, e.g., the enrichment can be up to 4.34‰ in terms of (208)Pb/(206)Pb at room temperature, due to their NVEs are in opposite directions. In contrast, fractionations among Pb(2+)-bearing species are trivial. Therefore, the large Pb fractionation changes provide a potential new tracer for redox conditions in young and closed geologic systems. The magnitudes of NVE-driven even-mass MIFs of Pb isotopes (i.e., [formula in text]) and odd-mass MIFs (i.e., [formula in text) are almost the same but with opposite signs. PMID:26224248

  9. The growth environments of sloan diamonds: inferences based on their carbon isotope composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon isotope compositions have been determined from the Sloan diatremes of the Colorado-Wyoming State Line kimberlite district (North America). The diamonds were previously broken for a study of their mineral inclusions. Based on mineral inclusion composition, the Sloan diamonds are divided into the broad peridotitic and eclogitic categories found for diamonds worldwide. Group I is comprised entirely of peridotitic diamonds whereas most of the diamonds in Group II and Group III are of eclogitic affinity. Differences in diamond morphology and mass are found between the three groups. Significant variation in δ13C was documented within single diamonds. Carbon isotope modelling of the Sloan diamond data suggests that the ranges in δ13C found for Group I and Group II diamonds at Sloan could have been produced from relatively homogeneous carbon reservoirs undergoing Rayleigh fractionation. The Group III diamonds were probably not produced from a single, isotopically homogeneous carbon reservoir. It is possible that the wide range of δ13C values for Group III diamonds was formed from an initially inhomogeneous (primordial or recycled) carbon source. Alternatively, the Group III diamonds may have crystallized from a less inhomogeneous, 13C-depleted fraction remaining after crystallization of Group I and Group II diamonds. The latter posibility suggests that the full range of δ13C values found for Sloan diamonds could have been produced in stages from an initially homogeneous carbon source. 2 figs., 3 refs

  10. Late Carboniferous to Late Permian carbon isotope stratigraphy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buggisch, Werner; Krainer, Karl; Schaffhauser, Maria;

    2015-01-01

    An integrated study of the litho-, bio-, and isotope stratigraphy of carbonates in the Southern Alps was undertaken in order to better constrain δ13C variations during the Late Carboniferous to Late Permian. The presented high resolution isotope curves are based on 1299 δ13Ccarb and 396 δ13Corg...

  11. Carbon Monoxide Isotopes: On the Trail of Galactic Chemical Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, W.

    1995-01-01

    From the early days of the discovery of radio emission from carbon monoxide it was realized that it offered unusual potential for under- standing the chemical evolution of the Galaxy and external galaxies through measurements of molecular isotopes. These results bear on stellar nucleosynthesis, star formation, and gases in the interstellar medium. Progress in isotopic radio measurements will be reviewed.

  12. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of water isotope fractionation during ice crystal growth in clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Guoping; DePaolo, Donald J.

    2016-05-01

    We describe a lattice Boltzmann (LB) method for simulating water isotope fractionation during diffusion-limited ice crystal growth by vapor deposition from water-oversaturated air. These conditions apply to the growth of snow crystals in clouds where the vapor composition is controlled by the presence of both ice crystals and water droplets. Modeling of water condensation with the LB method has the advantage of allowing concentration fields to evolve based on local conditions so that the controls on grain shapes of the condensed phase can be studied simultaneously with the controls on isotopic composition and growth rate. Water isotope fractionation during snow crystal growth involves kinetic effects due to diffusion of water vapor in air, which requires careful consideration of the boundary conditions at the ice-vapor interface. The boundary condition is relatively simple for water isotopes because the molecular exchange rate for water at the interface is large compared to the crystal growth rate. Our results for the bulk crystal isotopic composition are consistent with simpler models using analytical solutions for radial geometry. However, the model results are sufficiently different for oxygen isotopes that they could affect the interpretation of D-excess values of snow and ice. The extent of vapor oversaturation plays a major role in determining the water isotope fractionation as well as the degree of dendritic growth. Departures from isotopic equilibrium increase at colder temperatures as diffusivity decreases. Dendritic crystals are isotopically heterogeneous. Isotopic variations within individual snow crystals could yield information on the microphysics of ice condensation as well as on the accommodation or sticking coefficient of water associated with vapor deposition. Our results are ultimately a first step in implementing LB models for kinetically controlled condensation or precipitation reactions, but needs to be extended also to cases where the

  13. Chemical Nature and Turnover of Carbon Associated with Diagnostic Aggregate Fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Six, J.

    2004-12-01

    Recently, many studies have shown the importance of aggregation in controlling soil organic C dynamics and storage. Nevertheless, very few studies have characterized the chemical nature of aggregated associated C fractions to elucidate the origin and degree of microbial alteration of these C fractions. Here, I summarize several studies employing biomarker analyses for plant-derived lignin, bacterial-derived muramic acid, and fungal-derived glucosamine to aggregate associated C fractions. A comparison of different particulate organic matter (POM) fractions indicated that fine POM occluded within microaggregates-within-macroaggregates (mM) had the greatest amino sugar content, greatest ratio of glucosamine over muramic acid, and lowest phenolic CuO oxidation products. The latter result suggest that the fine POM is the most degraded POM fraction, which was confirmed by C isotope analyses. However, side chain oxidation of lignin compounds of fine POM was intermediate, suggesting an average microbial alteration of lignin. These results suggest a significant microbial contribution, especially fungal, to this relative older C fraction protected within the mM. Carbon and isotopic analyses of the mM confirmed that this structural unit within the soil protects C from fast decomposition and facilitates the long-term stabilization of C in undisturbed soil. Furthermore, amino sugar analyses indicated that microbial-derived C is stabilized in the mM, due primarily to a greater fungal-mediated improvement of soil structural stability and concurrent deposition of fungal-derived C. In conclusion, the characterizing the chemical nature and turnover of aggregate associated C fractions elucidated that the mM fraction plays an important role in the long term stabilization of C and seems to be an ideal indicator or diagnostic fraction for C sequestration potential in soils.

  14. Ab initio prediction of equilibrium boron isotope fractionation between minerals and aqueous fluids at high P and T

    CERN Document Server

    Kowalski, Piotr M; Jahn, Sandro

    2012-01-01

    Over the last decade experimental studies have shown a large B isotope fractionation between materials carrying boron incorporated in trigonally and tetrahedrally coordinated sites, but the mechanisms responsible for producing the observed isotopic signatures are poorly known. In order to understand the boron isotope fractionation processes and to obtain a better interpretation of the experimental data and isotopic signatures observed in natural samples, we use first principles calculations based on density functional theory in conjunction with ab initio molecular dynamics and a new pseudofrequency analysis method to investigate the B isotope fractionation between B-bearing minerals (such as tourmaline and micas) and aqueous fluids containing H_3BO_3 and H_4BO_4- species. We confirm the experimental finding that the isotope fractionation is mainly driven by the coordination of the fractionating boron atoms and have found in addition that the strength of the produced isotopic signature is strongly correlated w...

  15. Fractionation of stable isotopes in perchlorate and nitrate during in situ biodegradation in a sandy aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatzinger, P.B.; Böhlke, J.K.; Sturchio, N.C.; Gu, B.; Heraty, L.J.; Borden, R.C.

    2009-01-01

    Environmental context. Perchlorate (ClO4-) and nitrate (NO3-) are common co-contaminants in groundwater, with both natural and anthropogenic sources. Each of these compounds is biodegradable, so in situ enhanced bioremediation is one alternative for treating them in groundwater. Because bacteria typically fractionate isotopes during biodegradation, stable isotope analysis is increasingly used to distinguish this process from transport or mixing-related decreases in contaminant concentrations. However, for this technique to be useful in the field to monitor bioremediation progress, isotope fractionation must be quantified under relevant environmental conditions. In the present study, we quantify the apparent in situ fractionation effects for stable isotopes in ClO4- (Cl and O) and NO3- (N and O) resulting from biodegradation in an aquifer. Abstract. An in situ experiment was performed in a shallow alluvial aquifer in Maryland to quantify the fractionation of stable isotopes in perchlorate (Cl and O) and nitrate (N and O) during biodegradation. An emulsified soybean oil substrate that was previously injected into this aquifer provided the electron donor necessary for biological perchlorate reduction and denitrification. During the field experiment, groundwater extracted from an upgradient well was pumped into an injection well located within the in situ oil barrier, and then groundwater samples were withdrawn for the next 30 h. After correction for dilution (using Br- as a conservative tracer of the injectate), perchlorate concentrations decreased by 78% and nitrate concentrations decreased by 82% during the initial 8.6 h after the injection. The observed ratio of fractionation effects of O and Cl isotopes in perchlorate (18O/37Cl) was 2.6, which is similar to that observed in the laboratory using pure cultures (2.5). Denitrification by indigenous bacteria fractionated O and N isotopes in nitrate at a ratio of ???0.8 (18O/15N), which is within the range of values

  16. A revised isotope fractionation model for dissimilatory sulfate reduction in sulfate reducing bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Benjamin; Bernasconi, Stefano M.

    2005-10-01

    Sulfur isotope fractionation during dissimilatory sulfate reduction has been conceptually described by the widely accepted Rees model as related to the stepwise reduction of sulfate to sulfide within the cells of bacteria. The magnitude of isotope fractionation is determined by the interplay between different reduction steps in a chain of reactions. Here we present a revision of Rees' model for bacterial sulfate reduction that includes revised fractionation factors for the sulfite-sulfide step and incorporates new forward and reverse steps in the reduction of sulfite to sulfide, as well as exchange of sulfide between the cell and ambient water. With this model we show that in contrast to the Rees model, isotope fractionations well in excess of -46‰ are possible. Therefore, some of the large sulfur isotope fractionations observed in nature can be explained without the need of alternate pathways involving the oxidative sulfur cycle. We use this model to predict that large fractionations should occur under hypersulfidic conditions and where electron acceptor concentrations are limiting.

  17. Electron-bifurcating transhydrogenase is central to hydrogen isotope fractionation during lipid biosynthesis in sulfate reducing bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leavitt, W.; Flynn, T. M.; Suess, M.; Bradley, A. S.

    2015-12-01

    A significant range in microbial lipid 2H/1H ratios is observed in modern marine sediments [Li et al. 2009. GCA]. The magnitude of hydrogen isotope fractionation between microbial lipids and growth water (2ɛlipid-H2O) is hypothesized to relate to the central carbon and energy metabolism [Zhang et al. 2009. PNAS]. These observations have raised the intriguing possibility for culture independent identification of the dominant metabolic pathways operating in environments critical to the geological record. One such metabolism we would like to track for its global significance in sedimentary carbon cycling is bacterial sulfate reduction [Jørgensen. 1982. Nature]. To-date, heterotrophic sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) have been observed to produce lipids that are depleted in fatty acid H-isotope composition, relative to growth water (2ɛlipid-H2O ~ -125 to -175 ‰), with experiments on different substrates yielding little variability [Campbell et al. 2009. GCA; Osburn. 2013; Dawson et al. 2015. Geobiology]. In stark contrast, aerobic heterotrophs show a wide range in fractionations (2ɛlipid-H2O ~ +300 to -125‰) which seems to scale with the route cellular carbon metabolism [Zhang et al. 2009. PNAS; Heinzelmann et al. 2015. Front Microbio]. Recent work in aerobic methylotrophs [Bradley et al. 2014. AGU] implicates transhydrogenase (TH) activity as a critical control on 2ɛlipid-H2O. This work suggests a specific driving mechanism for this range in fractionation is the ratio of intracellular NADPH/NADH, and more fundamentally, the intracellular redox state. In SRB a key component of energy metabolism is the activity of electron-bifurcating TH [Price et al. 2014. Front Microbio], for which a recent transposon mutant library has generated a number of knockouts in the target gene [Kuehl et al. 2014. mBio] in the model organism Desulfovibrio alaskensis strain G20. In this study we compare growth rates, fatty acid concentrations and 2ɛlipid-H2O from wild type and TH

  18. A study on zinc isotope fractionation in a benzo crown resin/acetone system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinc isotope fractionation has been studied in different cavities of crown ether resins that were synthesized in porous silica beads. Displacement chromatography was performed, as a breakthrough manner, in glass columns by feeding in a zinc chloride solution. From the mass analysis of effluents, the heavier isotopes of zinc were enriched at the beginning of the zinc adsorption band. The front maximum enrichment (1.0168), separation coefficient (8.1 x 10-4), and smaller HETP (0.205 cm) for the isotopic pair 68Zn/64Zn were obtained with the use of the benzo-15-crown-5 resin. Zinc isotope fractionation was obviously affected by the cavity size of the crown ethers. (author)

  19. Evidence from carbon isotope measurements for biological origins of individual longchain n-alkanes in sediments from the Nansha Sea, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Carbon isotopes are measured for individual long-chain n-alkanes in sediments from the Nansha Sea. The features of carbon isotopic compositions of individual n-alkanes and their origins are studied. The results show that the long-chain n-aikanes have a light carbon isotopic composition and a genetic feature of mixing sources, and low-latitude higher plants and microbes are considered to be their main end member sources. Based on the abundances and carbon isotopic compositions of individual n-alkanes, the fractional contributions of the two end member sources to individual n-aikanes are quantitatively calculated by using a mixing model. The obtained data indicate that the fractional contributions of the two biological sources are different in the three samples. A trend is that the contribution of microbes increases with the depth. These results provide the theory basis and quantitatively studied method for carbon isotopic applied research of individual n-alkanes.

  20. Calcium and calcium isotope changes during carbon cycle perturbations at the end-Permian

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komar, N.; Zeebe, R. E.

    2016-01-01

    Negative carbon and calcium isotope excursions, as well as climate shifts, took place during the most severe mass extinction event in Earth's history, the end-Permian (˜252 Ma). Investigating the connection between carbon and calcium cycles during transient carbon cycle perturbation events, such as the end-Permian, may help resolve the intricacies between the coupled calcium-carbon cycles, as well as provide a tool for constraining the causes of mass extinction. Here we identify the deficiencies of a simplified calcium model employed in several previous studies, and we demonstrate the importance of a fully coupled carbon cycle model when investigating the dynamics of carbon and calcium cycling. Simulations with a modified version of the Long-term Ocean-atmosphere-Sediment CArbon cycle Reservoir model, which includes a fully coupled carbon-calcium cycle, indicate that increased weathering rates and ocean acidification (potentially caused by Siberian Trap volcanism) are not capable of producing trends observed in the record, as previously claimed. Our model results suggest that combined effects of carbon input via Siberian Trap volcanism (12,000 Pg C), the cessation of biological carbon export, and variable calcium isotope fractionation (due to a change in the seawater carbonate ion concentration) represents a more plausible scenario. This scenario successfully reconciles δ13C and δ44Ca trends observed in the sediment record, as well as the proposed warming of >6°C.

  1. Empirical High-Temperature Calibration for the Carbonate Clumped Isotopes Paleothermometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluge, T.; John, C. M.; Jourdan, A.; Davis, S.; Crawshaw, J.

    2013-12-01

    The clumped isotope paleothermometer is being used in a wide range of applications related to carbonate mineral formation, focusing on temperature and fluid δ18O reconstruction. Whereas the range of typical Earth surface temperatures has been the focus of several studies based on laboratory experiments and biogenic carbonates of known growth temperatures, the clumped isotope-temperature relationship above 70 °C has not been assessed by direct precipitation of carbonates. We investigated the clumped isotope-temperature relationship by precipitating carbonates between 20 and 200°C in the laboratory. The setup consists of a pressurized vessel in which carbonate minerals are precipitated from the mixture of two solutions (CaCl2, NaHCO3). Both solutions are thermally and isotopically equilibrated before injection in the pressure vessel. Minerals precipitated in this setup generally consist of calcite. Samples were reacted with 105% orthophosphoric acid for 10 min at 90°C. The evolved CO2 was continuously collected and subsequently purified with a Porapak trap held at -35°C. Measurements were performed on a MAT 253 using the protocol of Huntington et al. (2009) and Dennis et al. (2011). Clumped isotope values from 20-90°C are consistent with carbonates that were precipitated from a CaCO3 super-saturated solution using the method of McCrea (1950). This demonstrates that the experimental setup does not induce any kinetic fractionation, and can be used for high-temperature carbonate precipitation. The new clumped isotope calibration at high temperature follows the theoretical calculations of Schauble et al. (2006) adjusted for phosphoric acid digestion at 90°C. We gratefully acknowledge funding from Qatar Petroleum, Shell and the Qatar Science and Technology Park.

  2. An Experimental Study of Oxygen Isotope Fractionation in the Quartz—Wolframite—Water System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张理刚; 刘敬秀; 等

    1993-01-01

    Oxygen isotope fractionation was experimentally studied in the quartz-wolframite-water systemf rom 200 to 420℃.The starting wolframite was synthexized in aqueous solutions of Na2WOR·2H2O+FeCl2·4H2O or MnCl2·4H2O.The starting solutions range in salinity from 0 to 10 equivalent wt.% NaCl.Experiments were conducted in a gold-lined stainless steel autoclave,with filling degrees of about 50%.The results showed no significant difference in dquilibrium isotope fractionation between water and wolframite,ferberite and huebnerite at the same temperature(310℃).The equilibrium oxygen isotope fractionation factors of wolframite and water tend to be equal with increasing temperature above 370℃.but to increase significantly with decreasing temperature below 370℃.

  3. Isotope analysis of carbon by C2 molecule spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was made on inert gas mixture (He, Ne, Ar) with carbon-containing components (CO, CO2, CH4) under conditions of variation of mixture pressure in discharge tube, of carbon-containing components contents and the rate of gas flow through the discharge tube. The use of C2 molecule spectrum enabled to develope the spectroscopic techniques for determination of carbon isotope ratio. The method is universal with respect to molecular form of carbon-containing substance

  4. Calculating isotopic fractionation from atmospheric measurements at various scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we describe some new approaches for calculating isotopic discrimination from atmospheric measurements of CO2 and 13C. We introduce a framework that is more flexible than the traditional 'Keeling plot' two end-member mixing model, because it allows for the explicit specification of the background values of both CO2 and 13C. This approach is necessary for evaluating time series for which one can be certain that the Keeling plot requirement of stable background is violated. We also discuss a robust method for curve fitting and for estimating uncertainty of the fitting parameters. In addition to accounting for the uncertainty associated with measurements, we also account for the uncertainty associated with the appropriateness of the analytical model to the data. Our analysis suggests that uncertainty in calculated source signatures is more strongly related to the appropriateness of the model to the data than to the analytical precision of CO2 and 13C measurements. Relative to our approach, other approaches tend to underestimate the uncertainty in the fitted parameters. There can be substantial uncertainty in slopes and intercepts (two per mil or more) even if R2 is greater than 0.98. In addition, we note that fitting methods not accounting for uncertainty in both x and y result in systematic biases in the fitted parameters. Finally, we discuss the interpretation of the apparent isotopic source signature when this is a composite of several sources

  5. Equilibrium isotopic fractionation in the kaolinite, quartz, water system : Prediction from first-principles density-functional theory

    OpenAIRE

    Meheut, M.; Lazzeri, M.; Balan, Etienne; Mauri, F.

    2007-01-01

    Isotopic fractionation factors for oxygen, hydrogen and silicon have been calculated using first-principles methods for the kaolinite, quartz, water (ice and gas water) system. Good agreement between theory and experiment is obtained for mineral-water oxygen isotope fractionation. This approach gives reliable results on isotopic fractionation factors as a function of temperature, within a relative precision of typically 5%. These calculations provide independent quantitative constraints on th...

  6. Stable-carbon isotope variability in tree foliage and wood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study documents variation of stable-carbon isotope ratios (13C/12C) in trees of genera Juniperus and Pinus under field conditions. Results are from cellulose analysis on leaves, twigs, and wood from a number of localities in the southwestern US. Substantial variability, typically 1-3%, exists among leaves, within wood (radially, vertically, circumferentially), and between individuals at a site. These results may help guide sampling in tracer-type studies with stable-carbon isotope ratios and aid in the interpretation of isotopic results from such studies

  7. Carbon isotope effects associated with Fenton-like degradation of toluene: Potential for differentiation of abiotic and biotic degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-mediated oxygenation to enhance subsurface aerobic biodegradation is a frequently employed remediation technique. However, it may be unclear whether observed organic contaminant mass loss is caused by biodegradation or chemical oxidation via hydroxyl radicals generated during catalyzed Fenton-like reactions. Compound-specific carbon isotope analysis has the potential to discriminate between these processes. Here we report laboratory experiments demonstrating no significant carbon isotope fractionation during Fenton-like hydroxyl radical oxidation of toluene. This implies that observation of significant isotopic fractionation of toluene at a site undergoing H2O2-mediated remediation would provide direct evidence of biodegradation. We applied this approach at a field site that had undergone 27 months of H2O2-mediated subsurface oxygenation. Despite substantial decreases (> 68%) in groundwater toluene concentrations carbon isotope signatures of toluene (δ13Ctol) showed no significant variation (mean = - 27.5 ±0.3 per mille, n = 13) over a range of concentrations from 11.1 to 669.0 mg L-1. Given that aerobic degradation by ring attack has also been shown to result in no significant isotopic fractionation during degradation, at this site we were unable to discern the mechanism of degradation. However, such differentiation is possible at sites where aerobic degradation by methyl group attack results in significant isotopic fractionation

  8. Molybdenum isotope variations in molybdenite: Vapor transport and Rayleigh fractionation of Mo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannah, J. L.; Stein, H. J.; Wieser, M. E.; de Laeter, J. R.; Varner, M. D.

    2007-08-01

    Molybdenum isotopes in 20 molybdenite samples, dated by the Re-Os method and representing a range of geologic settings, show mass-dependent fractionation spanning 0.63‰ per atomic mass unit (amu). Previous Mo isotope data for molybdenite reveal variations in fractionation of <0.5‰/amu. Interpretation of these data is hampered, however, by limited sample numbers in each study, lack of a common standard for interlaboratory comparison, and limited range of geologic settings. Here we show that Mo isotope compositions of molybdenites do not correlate with crystallization temperature, age, geographic distribution, or geologic conditions. Rather, Rayleigh distillation may explain variations of as much as 0.34‰/amu in a single molybdenite occurrence, exceeding the proposed variability in average continental crust. Vapor transport and rapid precipitation of Mo in propagating fractures may account for isotope fractionation of Mo (and perhaps other metals) at very small scales. If so, the average isotopic composition of Mo at each molybdenite occurrence may be representative of bulk crust. Our results suggest that the isotopic composition of Mo delivered to the oceans is uniform geographically and through geologic time.

  9. The effect of redox conditions and bioirrigation on nitrogen isotope fractionation in marine sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooze, J.; Meile, C.

    2016-07-01

    Nitrogen isotopic signatures of sources and sinks of fixed nitrogen (N) can be used to constrain marine nitrogen budgets. However, the reported fractionation during benthic N2 production varies substantially. To assess the range and mechanisms responsible for such observations, we conducted a model study to evaluate the extent to which nitrification, denitrification, and anaerobic ammonium oxidation contribute to the isotopic composition of in situ N2 production. Different hydrodynamic regimes were taken into account, ranging from bioirrigation to diffusion-dominated transport. The benthic redox conditions were found to control the N isotope effect, which under reducing conditions is driven by fractionation during nitrification and anaerobic ammonium oxidation and under oxidizing conditions by fractionation during denitrification. Environmental parameters, such as the mineralization rate, the bioirrigation intensity, and chemical composition of the overlying water affect the benthic redox zonation and therefore also the benthic N isotope effect. The N isotope effect of benthic N2 production was computed for a wide range of bioirrigation intensities and mineralization rates, and found to be approximately -3‰ for commonly encountered conditions. This value is similar to previous estimates of the global N isotope effect of benthic N2 production, and further constrains the relative importance of water column vs. benthic N2 production.

  10. Isotope Fractionation of chlorine in Aqueous System: One Study on Anion-Exchange Chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musashi, M.; Oi, T.; Eggenkamp, H.; Van Cappellen, P.

    2001-05-01

    Stable chlorine isotopes such as 37Cl and 35Cl have been paid attention as useful tool identifying the source, and monitoring the transport process and natural fate of chlorinated organic pollutants in air and groundwater. However, it is not established yet whether any isotope effects accompany biodegradation or reductive dehalogenation of the pollutants (Clark and Fritz, 1997). Here we first present an experimental determination of isotope fractionation factor of chlorine in aqueous system by using anion-exchange chromatographic technique. Into the Cl-free anion exchange resin (Muromac, OH- form) packed in a 30 cm long pyrex glass column and controlled temperature at 25 oC, hydrochloric solution was fed with controlling the flow rate constant. Effluent from the column was recovered by an automatic fraction collector and prepared for Cl isotope analysis. The Cl isotope ratio (δ 37Cl vs. SMOC) was measured by IR-MS at the Utrecht University with precision of 0.06 per-mil. Magnitude of the factor obtained was 1.00035 at 25 oC. The result indicates that the lighter isotope (35Cl) was preferably fractionated into the resin phase, while the heavier one (37Cl) was enriched into the aqueous phase. This trend suggests that molecular structure of hydrolysis with Cl in aqueous phase may be more stable than that of Cl ionically bonding with the resin. This result may offer physico-chemical insights into behavior and fate of the pollutants.

  11. Extreme magnesium isotope fractionation during bauxite formation on the Columbia River Basalts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X.; Teng, F.; Rudnick, R. L.; McDonough, W. F.; Cummings, M. L.

    2012-12-01

    The behavior of magnesium isotopes during intense weathering of continental basalt is investigated by analyses of two ~10 m deep drill cores through bauxite developed on Columbia River Basalts (CRBs) in western Oregon and Washington, United States. XRD analyses reveal that these cores consist of gibbsite, hematite, +/- halloysite, kaolinite, goethite and maghemite; quartz, which is not present in fresh basalt, occurs only at the top of the cores and its abundance decreases progressively with depth; no quartz is observed below 5 m depth in either core. Both profiles display strong Mg depletion (up to 99%) relative to fresh basalt and one profile shows re-enrichment of Mg near the surface. δ26Mg values in bauxites are extremely high (up to +1.7) relative to the fresh basalts, which have mantle-like δ26Mg of -0.24 ± 0.07. The Mg isotopic fractionation in these bauxites is unlikely to be caused by kinetic fractionation via chemical diffusion (as suggested for lithium isotopes for a different weathering profile by Teng et al. (1)) because Richter et al. (2) found no measureable Mg isotopic fractionation associated with Mg diffusion in water. Moreover, due to the intense weathering, Mg isotopic fractionation in these drill cores should not be influenced by dissolution of basalts. Therefore, it is likely that the observed extreme Mg isotopic fractionation is associated with secondary mineral formation. However, δ26Mg tends to lower values towards the surface in both cores, opposite the trend that is expected to be produced by progressive leaching of the basalt accompanied by secondary mineral formation. Both the presence of quartz and less radiogenic Nd isotopic compositions at the tops of the profiles suggest that eolian material has been added to the top few meters of these weathering profiles, causing the Mg isotopic composition to be lighter at the surface. Moreover, both Mg concentration and δ26Mg in bauxites influenced by eolian addition show correlations with

  12. Europium, Samarium, and Neodymium Isotopic Fractions in Metal-Poor Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Roederer, Ian U; Sneden, Christopher; Cowan, John J; Sobeck, Jennifer S; Pilachowski, Catherine A

    2007-01-01

    We have derived isotopic fractions of europium, samarium, and neodymium in two metal-poor giants with differing neutron-capture nucleosynthetic histories. These isotopic fractions were measured from new high resolution (R ~ 120,000), high signal-to-noise (S/N ~ 160-1000) spectra obtained with the 2dCoude spectrograph of McDonald Observatory's 2.7m Smith telescope. Synthetic spectra were generated using recent high-precision laboratory measurements of hyperfine and isotopic subcomponents of several transitions of these elements and matched quantitatively to the observed spectra. We interpret our isotopic fractions by the nucleosynthesis predictions of the stellar model, which reproduces s-process nucleosynthesis from the physical conditions expected in low-mass, thermally-pulsing stars on the AGB, and the classical method, which approximates s-process nucleosynthesis by a steady neutron flux impinging upon Fe-peak seed nuclei. Our Eu isotopic fraction in HD 175305 is consistent with an r-process origin by the ...

  13. Soil organic carbon assessments in cropping systems using isotopic techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín De Dios Herrero, Juan; Cruz Colazo, Juan; Guzman, María Laura; Saenz, Claudio; Sager, Ricardo; Sakadevan, Karuppan

    2016-04-01

    Introduction of improved farming practices are important to address the challenges of agricultural production, food security, climate change and resource use efficiency. The integration of livestock with crops provides many benefits including: (1) resource conservation, (2) ecosystem services, (3) soil quality improvements, and (4) risk reduction through diversification of enterprises. Integrated crop livestock systems (ICLS) with the combination of no-tillage and pastures are useful practices to enhance soil organic carbon (SOC) compared with continuous cropping systems (CCS). In this study, the SOC and its fractions in two cropping systems namely (1) ICLS, and (2) CCS were evaluated in Southern Santa Fe Province in Argentina, and the use of delta carbon-13 technique and soil physical fractionation were evaluated to identify sources of SOC in these systems. Two farms inside the same soil cartographic unit and landscape position in the region were compared. The ICLS farm produces lucerne (Medicago sativa Merrill) and oat (Avena sativa L.) grazed by cattle alternatively with grain summer crops sequence of soybean (Glicine max L.) and corn (Zea mays L.), and the farm under continuous cropping system (CCS) produces soybean and corn in a continuous sequence. The soil in the area is predominantly a Typic Hapludoll. Soil samples from 0-5 and 0-20 cm depths (n=4) after the harvest of grain crops were collected in each system and analyzed for total organic carbon (SOC, 0-2000 μm), particulate organic carbon (POC, 50-100 μm) and mineral organic carbon (MOC, <50 μm). Delta carbon-13 was determined by isotopic ratio mass spectrometry. In addition, a site with natural vegetation (reference site, REF) was also sampled for delta carbon-13 determination. ANOVA and Tukey statistical analysis were carried out for all data. The SOC was higher in ICLS than in CCS at both depths (20.8 vs 17.7 g kg-1 for 0-5 cm and 16.1 vs 12.7 g kg-1 at 0-20 cm, respectively, P<0.05). MOC was

  14. The mechanism of oxygen isotope fractionation during N2O production by denitrification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Lewicka-Szczebak

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The isotopic composition of soil-derived N2O can help differentiate between N2O production pathways and estimate the fraction of N2O reduced to N2. Until now, δ18O of N2O has been rarely used in the interpretation of N2O isotopic signatures because of the rather complex oxygen isotope fractionations during N2O production by denitrification. The latter process involves nitrate reduction mediated through the following three enzymes: nitrate reductase (NAR, nitrite reductase (NIR and nitric oxide reductase (NOR. Each step removes one oxygen atom as water (H2O, which gives rise to a branching isotope effect. Moreover, denitrification intermediates may partially or fully exchange oxygen isotopes with ambient water, which is associated with an exchange isotope effect. The main objective of this study was to decipher the mechanism of oxygen isotope fractionation during N2O production by denitrification and, in particular, to investigate the relationship between the extent of oxygen isotope exchange with soil water and the δ18O values of the produced N2O. We performed several soil incubation experiments. For the first time, Δ17O isotope tracing was applied to simultaneously determine the extent of oxygen isotope exchange and any associated oxygen isotope effect. We found bacterial denitrification to be typically associated with almost complete oxygen isotope exchange and a stable difference in δ18O between soil water and the produced N2O of δ18O(N2O / H2O = (17.5 ± 1.2 ‰. However, some experimental setups yielded oxygen isotope exchange as low as 56 % and a higher δ18O(N2O / H2O of up to 37 ‰. The extent of isotope exchange and δ18O(N2O / H2O showed a very significant correlation (R2 = 0.70, p 2O from another production process, most probably fungal denitrification. An oxygen isotope fractionation model was used to test various scenarios with different magnitudes of branching isotope effects at different steps in the reduction process. The

  15. Carbon isotope excursions in paleosol carbonate marking five early Eocene hyperthermals in the Bighorn Basin, Wyoming

    OpenAIRE

    H. A. Abels; Lauretano, V.; A. van Yperen; T. Hopman; Zachos, J.C.; L. J. Lourens; Gingerich, P. D.; G. J. Bowen

    2015-01-01

    Transient greenhouse warming events in the Paleocene and Eocene were associated with the addition of isotopically-light carbon to the exogenic atmosphere–ocean carbon pool, leading to substantial environmental and biotic change. The magnitude of an accompanying carbon isotope excursion (CIE) can be used to constrain both the sources and amounts of carbon released during an event, as well as to correlate marine and terrestrial records with high precision. The ...

  16. Stable carbon isotope analyses in sediments and its implications for reconstructing climatic and environmental changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relative significance of the 20th-century climatic and environmental changes must be assessed form the long-term global-scale perspective available from a spectrum of proxy histories. In many cases geochemical proxies in sediments are needed to supplement the established use of the stable isotope analyses for paleotemperature and paleo-hydrological modeling so as to understand the past environment conditions and evaluate predictive models of climate. The stable carbon isotope fractionation during photosynthesis and the system CO2 (gas)-CO2-(aqueous)-HCO3- (aqueous) are reviewed; and application of the stable carbon isotope to reconstruction of palaeo-climatic and palaeo-environmental changes, especially CO2 levels during the late Quaternary are discussed

  17. The carbon isotope biogeochemistry of methane production in anoxic sediments. 1: Field observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Neal E.; Boehme, Susan E.; Carter, W. Dale, Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The natural abundance C-13/C-12 ratio of methane from anoxic marine and freshwater sediments in temperate climates varies seasonally. Carbon isotopic measurements of the methanogenic precursors, acetate and dissolved inorganic carbon, from the marine sediments of Cape Lookout Bight, North Carolina were used to determine the sources of the seasonal variations at that site. Movement of the methanogenic zone over an isotopic gradient within the dissolved CO2 pool appears to be the dominant control of the methane C-13/C-12 ratio from February to June. The onset of acetoclastic methane-production is a second important controlling process during mid-summer. An apparent temperature dependence on the fractionation factor for CO2-reduction may have a significant influence on the isotopic composition of methane throughout the year.

  18. Stable carbon isotope ratios of ambient secondary organic aerosols in Toronto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saccon, M.; Kornilova, A.; Huang, L.; Moukhtar, S.; Rudolph, J.

    2015-09-01

    A method to quantify concentrations and stable carbon isotope ratios of secondary organic aerosols has been applied to study atmospheric nitrophenols in Toronto, Canada. The sampling of five nitrophenols, all with substantial secondary formation from the photooxidation of aromatic volatile organic compounds (VOCs), was conducted in the gas phase and particulate matter (PM) together and in PM alone. Their concentrations in the atmosphere are in the low ng m-3 range and, consequently, a large volume of air (> 1000 m3) is needed to analyze samples for stable carbon isotope ratios, resulting in sampling periods of typically 24 h. While this extended sampling period increases the representativeness of average values, it at the same time reduces possibilities to identify meteorological conditions or atmospheric pollution levels determining nitrophenol concentrations and isotope ratios. Average measured carbon isotope ratios of the different nitrophenols are between -34 and -33 ‰, which is well within the range predicted by mass balance. However, the observed carbon isotope ratios cover a range of nearly 9 ‰ and approximately 20 % of the isotope ratios of the products have isotope ratios lower than predicted from the kinetic isotope effect of the first step of the reaction mechanism and the isotope ratio of the precursor. This can be explained by isotope fractionation during reaction steps following the initial reaction of the precursor VOCs with the OH radical. Limited evidence for local production of nitrophenols is observed since sampling was done in the Toronto area, an urban center with significant anthropogenic emission sources. Strong evidence for significant local formation of nitrophenols is only found for samples collected in summer. On average, the difference in carbon isotope ratios between nitrophenols in the particle phase and in the gas phase is insignificant, but for a limited number of observations in summer, a substantial difference is observed. This

  19. Extreme lithium isotopic fractionation in three zircon standards (Plešovice, Qinghu and Temora)

    OpenAIRE

    Yu-Ya Gao; Xian-Hua Li; Griffin, William L.; Yan-Jie Tang; Norman J. Pearson; Yu Liu; Mei-Fei Chu; Qiu-Li Li; Guo-Qiang Tang; O’Reilly, Suzanne Y.

    2015-01-01

    To understand the behavior of Li in zircon, we have analyzed the abundance and isotopic composition of Li in three zircon standards (Plešovice, Qinghu and Temora) widely used for microbeam analysis of U-Pb ages and O-Hf isotopes. We have mapped Li concentration ([Li]) on large grains, using a Cameca 1280HR Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometer (SIMS). All zircons have a rim 5–20 μm wide in which [Li] is 5 to 20 times higher than in the core. Up to ~20‰ isotopic fractionation is observed on a small ...

  20. Zinc isotopic fractionation in Phragmites australis in response to toxic levels of zinc

    OpenAIRE

    Caldelas, Cristina; Dong, Shuofei; Araus, José Luis; Jakob Weiss, Dominik

    2010-01-01

    Stable isotope signatures of Zn have shown great promise in elucidating changes in uptake and translocation mechanisms of this metal in plants during environmental changes. Here this potential was tested by investigating the effect of high Zn concentrations on the isotopic fractionation patterns of Phragmites australis (Cav.) Trin. ex Steud. Plants were grown for 40 d in a nutritive solution containing 3.2 μM (sufficient) or 2 mM (toxic) Zn. The Zn isotopic composition of roots, rhizomes, sho...

  1. Carbon isotopes in oil and gas exploration. Examples of applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of carbon isotopes in hydrocarbon exploration is reviewed. Examples of the application of stable carbon isotopes are discussed in the fields of: (1) gas exploration, where source rocks of gas deposits or gas shows can be identified by 13C/12C analyses of methane and the exploration efforts redirected; (2) wildcat drilling, in which the carbon isotope composition of methane from the head space of canned cuttings characterizes autochthonous methane and gives information on the maturity of organic matter in relation to depth; (3) oil/oil and source-rock/oil correlation, where the 'isotopic type curve technique', a recently developed sensitive oil/oil and source-rock/oil correlation method, is discussed and applied to correlation problems in the British North Sea region. (author)

  2. Soil Carbon:An Overview on Soil Carbon Function and its Fractionation

    OpenAIRE

    Kumari Priyanka; Anshumali

    2016-01-01

    The atmospheric carbon reservoir is significantly affected by change in lithogenic carbon reservoir. Carbon reservoir of soil is strongly influenced by the interaction between different biogeochemical cycles and environmental processes. At the local scale land use and soil management have also a significant impact on the soil carbon pool. Soil carbon is the major determinant of soil quality and agronomic viability because of its influence on other soil features. Different fractionation proced...

  3. Lithium isotope fractionation in the Ganges-Brahmaputra floodplain and implications for groundwater impact on seawater isotopic composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagard, Marie-Laure; West, A. Joshua; Newman, Karla; Basu, Asish R.

    2015-12-01

    Lithium isotopes are a promising proxy for reconstructing past weathering processes, but unraveling the seawater record requires a comprehensive understanding of the magnitude and isotopic composition of Li fluxes to the oceans, and of how these change over time. Little information is available on the role of floodplain sediments and groundwater systems in setting the Li isotope signature of the dissolved flux delivered from the continents to the oceans. Here we investigate the Li dissolved fluxes of river waters and groundwaters in the Ganges-Brahmaputra floodplain. The data suggest that a maximum of 3.1 ×108 and 1.5 ×108 moles Li/yr are carried to the Bay of Bengal by Ganges-Brahmaputra rivers and groundwaters, respectively. The riverine flux has a significantly heavier Li isotope composition (average δ7Li: 26‰) than the groundwater flux (average δ7Li: 16‰) and increases downstream across the floodplain. δ7Li in both river waters and shallow groundwater can be explained by Li scavenging by Quaternary floodplain sediments following a Rayleigh fractionation process, with preferential removal of 6Li. On the other hand, deep groundwaters (>40 m) contributing to submarine groundwater discharge to the Bay of Bengal are enriched in 6Li at depth, likely due to the dissolution of floodplain sediments releasing Li with a light isotope composition. Similarly low δ7Li has been reported in other large sedimentary aquifers. The deep groundwater values are close to the average isotope composition of the global Li inputs to the ocean (∼15‰), so groundwater submarine discharge has only a minor influence on the assessment of the modern Li isotope budget of the ocean. Our analysis further suggests that groundwater discharge of Li has probably played at most a small and secondary role in past changes in the isotope composition of the total continental flux of Li to the ocean.

  4. Isotope fractionations and radiocarbon ages of beach rock samples collected from the Nansei Islands, southwest of Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beach rocks are observed frequently on the tropical and subtropical sandy beaches where they express thin beds dipping seaward at less than 15 degrees. They consist of beach sediments including fossil shells, fragments of corals, diatoms and other biocarbonates, and are well cemented within the inter-tidal zone with calcium carbonate originated in sea water. Therefore, they are not only good indicators which show the past sea level, but also provide good sample material for radiocarbon dating. The locations of beach rocks give us an optimum condition studying a carbon cycle between land and marine environment by analyzing their isotope fractionations. In order to estimate the origin of calcium carbonate which worked as an adhesive when beach rocks were formed and to estimate the formative ages of beach rocks, a total of 330 fossil corals, fossil shells and calcarenite or calcirdite samples were collected from 128 sites of 16 islands consisting of the Nansei Islands, southwest of Japan. The Nansei Islands are chains of islands located between Kyushu Island and Taiwan Island for 1,500 km in length. They are divided into three major islands groups, namely from north to south, Amami Islands, Okinawa Islands and Sakishima Islands, respectively. Isotope corrections and reservoir corrections are indispensable for marine organisms to correct their radiocarbon ages in years BP. Isotope fractionations and radiocarbon ages of beach rock samples collected from the Nansei Islands were determined at the Radiocarbon Laboratory of the Nihon University and the radiocarbon dates were corrected. According to Geyh and Schleicher isotope fractionations for marine organisms were in the range within 0±2 per mille. Isotope fractionation (δ13C) of all beach rock samples collected from the Nansei Islands ranged between 9.4 per mille and -6.0 per mille, with an average of 2.1 per mille. Although the average values of isotope fractionations over the 16 islands indicated nearly the same

  5. Fractionated Mercury Isotopes in Fish: The Effects of Nuclear Mass, Spin, and Volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, R.; Odom, A. L.

    2007-12-01

    Mercury is long known as a common environmental contaminant. In methylated form it is even more toxic and the methylation process is facilitated by microbial activities. Methyl mercury easily crosses cell membrane and accumulates in soft tissues of fishes and finally biomagnifies with increasing trophic levels. Natural variations in the isotopic composition of mercury have been reported and such variations have emphasized mass dependent fractionations, while theory and laboratory experiments indicate that mass-independent isotopic fractionation (MIF) effects are likely to be found as well. This study focuses on the MIF of mercury isotopes in the soft tissues of fishes. Samples include both fresh water and marine fish, from different continents and oceans. Approximately 1 gm of fish soft tissue was dissolved in 5 ml of conc. aqua regia for 24 hrs and filtered through a ¬¬¬100 μm filter paper and diluted with DI water. Hg is measured as a gaseous phase generated by reduction of the sample with SnCl2 in a continuous- flow cold-vapor generator connected to a Thermo-Finnigan Neptune MC-ICPMS. To minimize instrumental fractionation isotope ratios were measured by sample standard bracketing and reported as δ‰ relative to NIST SRM 3133 Hg standard where δAHg = [(A Hg/202Hg)sample/(A Hg/202Hg)NIST313] -1 ×1000‰. In this study we have measured the isotope ratios 198Hg/202Hg, 199Hg/202Hg, 200Hg/202Hg, 201Hg/202Hg and 204Hg/202Hg. In all the fish samples δ198Hg, δ200Hg, δ202Hg, δ204Hg define a mass- dependent fractionation sequence, where as the δ199Hg and δ201Hg depart from the mass- dependent fractionation line and indicate an excess of the odd-N isotopes. The magnitude of the deviation (ΔAHg where A=199 or 201) as obtained by difference between the measured δ199Hg and δ201Hg of the samples and the value obtained by linear scaling defined by the even-N isotopes ranges from approximately 0.2 ‰ to 3‰. The ratios of Δ199Hg /Δ201Hg range from 0.8 to 1

  6. Calcium and calcium isotope changes during carbon cycle perturbations at the end-Permian

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komar, Nemanja; Zeebe, Richard

    2016-04-01

    Negative carbon and calcium isotope excursions, as well as climate shifts, took place during the most severe mass extinction event in Earth's history, the end-Permian (˜252 Ma). Investigating the connection between carbon and calcium cycles during transient carbon cycle perturbation events, such as the end-Permian, may help resolve the intricacies between the coupled calcium-carbon cycles, as well as provide a tool for constraining the causes of mass extinction. Here, we identify the deficiencies of a simplified calcium model employed in several previous studies and we demonstrate the importance of a fully coupled carbon-cycle model when investigating the dynamics of carbon and calcium cycling. Simulations with a modified version of the LOSCAR model, which includes a fully coupled carbon-calcium cycle, indicate that increased weathering rates and ocean acidification (potentially caused by Siberian Trap volcanism) are not capable of producing trends observed in the record, as previously claimed. Our model results suggest that combined effects of carbon input via Siberian Trap volcanism (12,000 Pg C), the cessation of biological carbon export, and variable calcium isotope fractionation (due to a change in the seawater carbonate ion concentration) represents a more plausible scenario. This scenario successfully reconciles δ13C and δ44Ca trends observed in the sediment record, as well as the proposed warming of >6oC.

  7. The magnesium isotope record of cave carbonate archives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Riechelmann

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Here we explore the potential of magnesium (δ26Mg isotope time-series data as continental climate proxies in speleothem calcite archives. For this purpose, a total of six Pleistocene and Holocene stalagmites from caves in Germany, Morocco and Peru and two flowstones from a cave in Austria were investigated. These caves represent the semi-arid to arid (Morocco, the warm-temperate (Germany, the equatorial-humid (Peru and the cold-humid (Austria climate zones. Changes in the calcite magnesium isotope signature with time are compared against carbon and oxygen isotope records from these speleothems. Similar to other proxies, the non-trivial interaction of a number of environmental, equilibrium and disequilibrium processes governs the δ26Mg fractionation in continental settings. These include the different sources of magnesium isotopes such as rainwater or snow as well as soil and host rock, soil zone biogenic activity, shifts in silicate versus carbonate weathering ratios and residence time of water in the soil and karst zone. Pleistocene stalagmites from Morocco show the lowest mean δ26Mg values (GDA: −4.26 ± 0.07‰ and HK3: −4.17 ± 0.15‰, and the data are well explained in terms of changes in aridity over time. The Pleistocene to Holocene stalagmites from Peru show the highest mean value of all stalagmites (NC-A and NC-B δ26Mg: −3.96 ± 0.04‰ but only minor variations in Mg-isotope composition, which is consistent with the rather stable equatorial climate at this site. Holocene stalagmites from Germany (AH-1 mean δ26Mg: −4.01 ± 0.07‰; BU 4 mean δ26Mg: −4.20 ± 0.10‰ suggest changes in outside air temperature was the principal driver rather than rainfall amount. The alpine Pleistocene flowstones from Austria (SPA 52: −3.00 ± 0.73‰; SPA 59: −3.70 ± 0.43‰ are affected by glacial versus interglacial climate change with outside air temperature

  8. The magnesium isotope record of cave carbonate archives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Riechelmann

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Here we explore the potential of time-series magnesium (δ26Mg isotope data as continental climate proxies in speleothem calcite archives. For this purpose, a total of six Pleistocene and Holocene stalagmites from caves in Germany, Morocco and Peru and two flowstones from a cave in Austria were investigated. These caves represent the semi-arid to arid (Morocco, the warm-temperate (Germany, the equatorial-humid (Peru and the cold-humid (Austria climate zones. Changes in the calcite magnesium isotope signature with time are placed against carbon and oxygen isotope records from these speleothems. Similar to other proxies, the non-trivial interaction of a number of environmental, equilibrium and non-equilibrium processes governs the δ26Mg fractionation in continental settings. These include the different sources of magnesium isotopes such as rain water or snow as well as soil and hostrock, soil zone biogenic activity, shifts in silicate versus carbonate weathering ratios and residence time of water in the soil and karst zone. Pleistocene stalagmites from Morocco show the lowest mean δ26Mg values (GDA: −4.26 ± 0.07 ‰ and HK3: −4.17 ± 0.15 ‰ and the data are well explained in terms of changes in aridity over time. The Pleistocene to Holocene stalagmites from Peru show the highest mean value (NC-A and NC-B δ26Mg: −3.96 ± 0.04 ‰ but only minor variations in Mg-isotope composition, which is in concert with the rather stable equatorial climate at this site. Holocene stalagmites from Germany (AH-1 mean δ26Mg: −4.01 ± 0.07 ‰; BU 4 mean δ26Mg: −4.20 ± 0.10 ‰ record changes in outside air temperature as driving factor rather than rainfall amount. The alpine Pleistocene flowstones from Austria (SPA 52: −3.00 ± 0.73 ‰; SPA 59: −3.70 ± 0.43 ‰ are affected by glacial versus interglacial climate change with outside air temperature affecting soil zone activity

  9. Sulfur isotope fractionation during bacterial sulfate reduction in organic-rich sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Habicht, K S; Canfield, D E

    1997-01-01

    Isotope fractionation during sulfate reduction by natural populations of sulfate-reducing bacteria was investigated in the cyanobacterial microbial mats of Solar Lake, Sinai and the sediments of Logten Lagoon sulfuretum, Denmark. Fractionation was measured at different sediment depths, sulfate...... natural populations of sulfate reducers and previous measurements from pure cultures. This was somewhat surprising given the extremely high rates of sulfate reduction in the experiments. Our results are explained if we conclude that the fractionation was mainly controlled by the specific rate of sulfate...... reduction (mass cell-1 time-1) and not by the absolute rate (mass volume-1 time-1). Sedimentary sulfides (mainly FeS2) were on average 40% depleted in 34S compared to seawater sulfate. This amount of depletion was more than could be explained by the isotopic fractionations that we measured during bacterial...

  10. Calcium isotope fractionation in liquid chromatography with benzo-18-crown-6 resin in aqueous hydrobromic acid medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liquid chromatography operated in a breakthrough mode was employed to study calcium isotope fractionation in the aqueous hydrobromic acid medium. Highly porous silica beads, the inner pores of which were embedded with a benzo-18-crown-6 ether resin, were used as column packing material. Enrichment of heavier isotopes of calcium was observed in the frontal part of respective calcium chromatograms. The values of the isotope fractionation coefficient were on the order of 10-3. The observed isotope fractionation coefficient was dependent on the concentration of hydrobromic acid in the calcium feed solution; a higher HBr concentration resulted in a smaller fractionation coefficient value. The present calcium isotope effects were most probably mass-dependent, indicating that they mostly came from isotope effects based on molecular vibration. Molecular orbital calculations supported the present experimental results in a qualitative fashion. Chromatography operated in aqueous HBr media is a better system of Ca isotope separation than that operated in aqueous HCl media. (author)

  11. Uranium isotope fractionation resulting from UF6 vapor distillation from containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This empirical study for possible isotopic fractionation due to UF6 vapor distillation from valved containers was performed to determine the effects of repeated vapor sampling. Four different experiments were performed, each of which varied by the method of measuring the isotopic contents and/or by the difference in temperature gradients as follows: The ratio of the parent UF6 to the desublimed UF6 collected at liquid nitrogen temperature and homogenized was measured by sampling the containers. The ratio of the parent UF6 to the desublimed UF6 collected at liquid nitrogen temperature and homogenized was measured by direct comparison to each other without subsampling. The ratio of the parent UF6 to the desublimed UF6 collected at liquid nitrogen and ice-water temperatures and homogenized was measured by indirect comparison to a common UF6 reference material without subsampling. The ratio of the parent UF6 to the desublimed UF6 collected at liquid nitrogen temperature without homogenizing was measured by indirect comparison to a common UF6 reference. Gas-phase, relative mass spectrometry was used for all isotopic measurements. Results of the study indicate that fractionation does occur. The U-235 isotope becomes more enriched in the parent container as the UF6 is vaporized from it and desublimed into the receiving cylinder; i.e., the vaporized fraction is enriched in the U-238 isotope. The degree of fractionation indicates that the separation is due to the U-238 isotope of UF6 having a higher vapor pressure than the U-235 isotope of UF6. 3 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs

  12. Stable isotope fractionation analysis as a tool to monitor biodegradation in contaminated acquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meckenstock, Rainer U.; Morasch, Barbara; Griebler, Christian; Richnow, Hans H.

    2004-12-01

    The assessment of biodegradation in contaminated aquifers has become an issue of increasing importance in the recent years. To some extent, this can be related to the acceptance of intrinsic bioremediation or monitored natural attenuation as a means to manage contaminated sites. Among the few existing methods to detect biodegradation in the subsurface, stable isotope fractionation analysis (SIFA) is one of the most promising approaches which is pronounced by the drastically increasing number of applications. This review covers the recent laboratory and field studies assessing biodegradation of contaminants via stable isotope analysis. Stable isotope enrichment factors have been found that vary from no fractionation for dioxygenase reactions converting aromatic hydrocarbons over moderate fractionation by monooxygenase reactions ( ɛ=-3‰) and some anaerobic studies on microbial degradation of aromatic hydrocarbons ( ɛ=-1.7‰) to larger fractionations by anaerobic dehalogenation reactions of chlorinated solvents ( ɛ=between -5‰ and -30‰). The different isotope enrichment factors can be related to the respective biochemical reactions. Based on that knowledge, we discuss under what circumstances SIFA can be used for a qualitative or even a quantitative assessment of biodegradation in the environment. In a steadily increasing number of cases, it was possible to explain biodegradation processes in the field based on isotope enrichment factors obtained from laboratory experiments with pure cultures and measured isotope values from the field. The review will focus on the aerobic and anaerobic degradation of aromatic hydrocarbons and chlorinated solvents as the major contaminants of groundwater. Advances in the instrumental development for stable isotope analysis are only mentioned if it is important for the understanding of the application.

  13. Mass-independent fractionation of mercury isotopes in compact fluorescent light bulbs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mead, C.; Anbar, A. D.; Lyons, J. R.; Johnson, T. M.

    2010-12-01

    Compact fluorescent lightbulbs (CFLs) are a growing source of Hg pollution. The high-energy environment of the CFLs combined with the known partitioning of Hg into the bulb walls could provide an environment for unusual isotope fractionation that could be used to trace pollution from improper bulb disposal. To investigate this possibility, we analyzed the isotope composition of Hg in CFL glass, phosphor powder, and whole bulbs from CFLs of known ages. We observed large, mass-independent fractionation of Hg isotopes between Hg embedded in the bulb wall and Hg in the liquid and vapor phases, which are the initial reservoir of Hg in the bulb. This fractionation results in the bulb wall showing enrichment of 198Hg, 199Hg, 200Hg, 201Hg, and 204Hg relative to 202Hg, the most abundant isotope. Both the amount of Hg embedded in the glass and the magnitude of the isotope enrichment were found to increase with the number of hours of light bulb use. For a CFL used for 3600 hours (with a rated lifetime of 10,000 hours), the isotopic composition of the Hg in the glass was enriched by 34.5‰, 4.1‰, 6.3‰, 21.1‰, and 12.1‰ for 198Hg/202Hg, 199Hg/202Hg, 200Hg/202Hg, 201Hg/202Hg, and 204Hg/202Hg, respectively, compared to NIST SRM-3133. This pattern of isotope enrichments is not correlated with mass differences for any of the isotope ratios. In contrast, the other mass-independent effects that have recently been observed in Hg isotopes (i.e., the nuclear volume and magnetic isotope effects) resemble mass-dependent fractionation for the even mass isotopes and are anomalous only for the odd mass isotopes, 199Hg and 201Hg. First order theoretical calculations using Hg absorption and emission data for each of the hyperfine components of the 253.7 nm line have shown that similar fractionation can be produced through an optical self-shielding effect. This effect occurs because each Hg isotope has a different degree of optical saturation at their respective absorption wavelength

  14. Mixing effects on apparent reaction rates and isotope fractionation during denitrification in a heterogeneous aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, C.T.; Böhlke, J.K.; Bekins, B.A.; Phillips, S.P.

    2010-01-01

    Gradients in contaminant concentrations and isotopic compositions commonly are used to derive reaction parameters for natural attenuation in aquifers. Differences between field-scale (apparent) estimated reaction rates and isotopic fractionations and local-scale (intrinsic) effects are poorly understood for complex natural systems. For a heterogeneous alluvial fan aquifer, numerical models and field observations were used to study the effects of physical heterogeneity on reaction parameter estimates. Field measurements included major ions, age tracers, stable isotopes, and dissolved gases. Parameters were estimated for the O2 reduction rate, denitrification rate, O 2 threshold for denitrification, and stable N isotope fractionation during denitrification. For multiple geostatistical realizations of the aquifer, inverse modeling was used to establish reactive transport simulations that were consistent with field observations and served as a basis for numerical experiments to compare sample-based estimates of "apparent" parameters with "true" (intrinsic) values. For this aquifer, non-Gaussian dispersion reduced the magnitudes of apparent reaction rates and isotope fractionations to a greater extent than Gaussian mixing alone. Apparent and true rate constants and fractionation parameters can differ by an order of magnitude or more, especially for samples subject to slow transport, long travel times, or rapid reactions. The effect of mixing on apparent N isotope fractionation potentially explains differences between previous laboratory and field estimates. Similarly, predicted effects on apparent O2 threshold values for denitrification are consistent with previous reports of higher values in aquifers than in the laboratory. These results show that hydrogeological complexity substantially influences the interpretation and prediction of reactive transport. ?? 2010 by the American Geophysical Union.

  15. Stable carbon isotope biogeochemistry of lakes along a trophic gradient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Kluijver, A.; Schoon, P.L.; Downing, J.A.; Schouten, S.; Middelburg, J.J.

    2014-01-01

    The stable carbon (C) isotope variability of dissolved inorganic and organic C (DIC and DOC), particulate organic carbon (POC), glucose and polar-lipid derived fatty acids (PLFAs) was studied in a survey of 22 North American oligotrophic to eutrophic lakes. The d13C of different PLFAs were used as p

  16. Carbon and hydrogen isotope effects in the open-system Fischer-Tropsch type reactions. Implications for abiogenic hydrocarbons in the Earth Crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taran, Y.

    2009-05-01

    This study aims to clarify the isotope effects in the open-system Fischer-Tropsh type (FTT) synthesis with application to the problem of 'abiogenic' hydrocarbons. Carbon and hydrogen isotopic compositions were measured for products of catalytic hydrogenation of CO2 on cobalt and iron catalysts at 245° C and 350° C and 10 MPa in a flow-through reactor. No carbon isotope fractionation between methane and longer hydrocarbons was observed, independently on the CO2 conversion. The hydrogen isotope fractionation appeared to be similar to that found in natural ('thermogenic' and 'biogenic') gases with the enrichment in deuterium of longer hydrocarbon chains and the higher effects for the Co-catalyst. It can be suggested that other than FTT reactions or a simple mixing are responsible for the occurrence of 'inverse' isotopic trends in both carbon and hydrogen isotopic composition found in light hydrocarbons in some specific terrestrial environments and meteorites.

  17. Stability of Soil Carbon Fractions - Aggregation Versus Mineral Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, C. W.; Koegel-Knabner, I.

    2007-12-01

    of CO2-C (70%) in the recombined fraction is the clay fraction. Nevertheless the recalcitrance of mineral bound C is restricting the positive effects of aggregate disruption on the C turnover. The small fast decomposing C pool of the sand fraction is of minor importance to the total soil respiration balance. CO2-13C signatures showed higher values of the silt and clay fractions in contrast to the sand fraction, indicating a lower bioavailability of 13C-depleted carbon sources in the small fractions. The analyses of CO2-14C showed a shift to the utilization of older C sources with time.

  18. Oxygen isotope fractionation between human phosphate and water revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daux, Valérie; Lécuyer, Christophe; Héran, Marie-Anne;

    2008-01-01

    investigate the impact of solid food consumption on the oxygen isotope composition of the total ingested water (drinking water+solid food water). The results, along with those from three, smaller published data sets, can be considered as random estimates of a unique delta18OW/delta18OP linear relationship...... collected at 12 sites located at latitudes ranging from 4 degrees N to 70 degrees N together with the corresponding oxygen composition of tap waters (delta18OW) from these areas. In addition, the delta18O of some raw and boiled foods were determined and simple mass balance calculations were performed to......: delta18OW=1.54(+/-0.09)xdelta18OP-33.72(+/-1.51)(R2=0.87: p [H0:R2=0]=2x10(-19)). The delta18O of cooked food is higher than that of the drinking water. As a consequence, in a modern diet the delta18O of ingested water is +1.05 to 1.2 per thousand higher than that of drinking water in the area. In meat...

  19. Experimental identification of mechanisms controlling calcium isotopic fractionations by the vegetation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobert, Florian; Schimtt, Anne-Désirée.; Bourgeade, Pascale; Stille, Peter; Chabaux, François; Badot, Pierre-Marie; Jaegler, Thomas

    2010-05-01

    This study aims to better understand the role of vegetation on the Ca cycle at the level of the critical zone of the Earth, in order to specify the mechanisms controlling the Ca absorption by plants at the rock/plant interface. To do this, we performed experiments using hydroponic plant cultures in a way that we could control the co-occuring geochemical and physiological process and determine the impact of the nutritive solution on the Ca cycle within plants. A dicotyledon and calcicole plant with rapid growth, the French bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), has been chosen to have access to one complete growth cycle. Several experiments have been conducted with two Ca concentrations, 6 (L) and 60 (H) ppm and two pH values (4 and 6) in the nutritive solution, for which the Ca concentration was maintained constant, so its Ca content is considered as infinite. A second experiment (non infinite L6) allowed Ca depletion in the solution through time; therefore, response effects on the Ca isotopic signatures in the plant organs and in the nutritive solution were observed. We determined Ca concentrations and isotopic ratios in the nutritive solution and in different organs (main roots, secondary roots, old and young stems, old and young leaves and fruits) at two different growth stages (10 days and 6 weeks). Preliminary results show that: (1) the roots (main and secondary) were enriched in the light isotope (40Ca) compared to the nutritive solution, and leaves were enriched in the heavy isotope (44Ca) compared to stems. These results are in accord with previously published field studies (Wigand et al., 2005; Page et al., 2008; Cenki-Tok et al., 2009; Holmden and Bélanger, 2010). Leaves and secondary roots were however enriched in the heavy isotope (44Ca) compared to bean pods, stems and main roots. These results could be related to kinetic fractionation processes occurring either during the Ca root uptake, or during the Ca transport within the plant, or physiological mechanisms

  20. Carbon allocation and carbon isotope fluxes in the plant-soil-atmosphere continuum: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Brüggemann

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The terrestrial carbon (C cycle has received increasing interest over the past few decades, however, there is still a lack of understanding of the fate of newly assimilated C allocated within plants and to the soil, stored within ecosystems and lost to the atmosphere. Stable carbon isotope studies can give novel insights into these issues. In this review we provide an overview of an emerging picture of plant-soil-atmosphere C fluxes, as based on C isotope studies, and identify processes determining related C isotope signatures. The first part of the review focuses on isotopic fractionation processes within plants during and after photosynthesis. The second major part elaborates on plant-internal and plant-rhizosphere C allocation patterns at different time scales (diel, seasonal, interannual, including the speed of C transfer and time lags in the coupling of assimilation and respiration, as well as the magnitude and controls of plant-soil C allocation and respiratory fluxes. Plant responses to changing environmental conditions, the functional relationship between the physiological and phenological status of plants and C transfer, and interactions between C, water and nutrient dynamics are discussed. The role of the C counterflow from the rhizosphere to the aboveground parts of the plants, e.g. via CO2 dissolved in the xylem water or as xylem-transported sugars, is highlighted. The third part is centered around belowground C turnover, focusing especially on above- and belowground litter inputs, soil organic matter formation and turnover, production and loss of dissolved organic C, soil respiration and CO2 fixation by soil microbes. Furthermore, plant controls on microbial communities and activity via exudates and litter production as well as microbial community effects on C mineralization are reviewed. A further part of the paper is dedicated to physical interactions between soil CO2 and the soil matrix, such as

  1. Tracing low-temperature aqueous metal migration in mineralized watersheds with Cu isotope fractionation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Cu isotope fractionation of ores and waters identifies copper sulfide weathering. • Redox reactions cause isotopic shift measured in areas of sulfide weathering. • Consistent isotope signature in different deposit, climate, or concentration. - Abstract: Copper isotope signatures in waters emanating from mineralized watersheds provide evidence for the source aqueous copper in solution. Low-temperature aqueous oxidation of Cu sulfide minerals produces significant copper isotopic fractionation between solutions and residues. Abiotic experimental data of fractionation (defined as Δliquid–solid ‰ = δ65Culiquid − δ65Cusolid) are on the order of 1–3‰ and are unique for copper rich-sulfide minerals. Data presented here from ores and waters within defined boundaries of porphyry copper, massive sulfide, skarn, and epithermal ore deposits mimic abiotic experiments. Thus, the oxidation of sulfide minerals appears to cause the signatures in the waters although significant biological, temperature, and pH variations exist in the fluids. Regardless of the deposit type, water type, concentration of Cu in solution, or location, the data provide a means to trace sources of metals in solutions. This relationship allows for tracking sources and degree of metal migration in low temperature aqueous systems and has direct application to exploration geology and environmental geochemistry

  2. Absence of fractionation of mercury isotopes during trophic transfer of methylmercury to freshwater fish in captivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Sae Yun; Blum, Joel D.; Carvan, Michael J.; Basu, Niladri; Head, Jessica A.; Madenjian, Charles P.; David, Solomon R.

    2012-01-01

    We performed two controlled experiments to determine the amount of mass-dependent and mass-independent fractionation (MDF and MIF) of methylmercury (MeHg) during trophic transfer into fish. In experiment 1, juvenile yellow perch (Perca flavescens) were raised in captivity on commercial food pellets and then their diet was either maintained on unamended food pellets (0.1 μg/g MeHg) or was switched to food pellets with 1.0 μg/g or 4.0 μg/g of added MeHg, for a period of 2 months. The difference in δ202Hg (MDF) and Δ199Hg (MIF) between fish tissues and food pellets with added MeHg was within the analytical uncertainty (δ202Hg, 0.07 ‰; Δ199Hg, 0.06 ‰), indicating no isotope fractionation. In experiment 2, lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) were raised in captivity on food pellets and then shifted to a diet of bloater (Coregonus hoyi) for 6 months. The δ202Hg and Δ199Hg of the lake trout equaled the isotopic composition of the bloater after 6 months, reflecting reequilibration of the Hg isotopic composition of the fish to new food sources and a lack of isotope fractionation during trophic transfer. We suggest that the stable Hg isotope ratios in fish can be used to trace environmental sources of Hg in aquatic ecosystems.

  3. A study on the isotope effects in the reduction of carbon dioxide by zinc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have determined the isotope effects which occur in the reduction of carbon dioxide by zinc. It has been shown that in the case of irreversible surface reactions, Bernstein's equation which permits the calculation of the fractionation factor is still valid. These experimental factors are in good agreement with those obtained by calculating the partition functions of the adsorbed activated complexes. In the reaction mechanism used, the model of the activated complex corresponds to the dissociation of one of the carbon oxygen bonds CO2 → CO + O. Perturbations arising from the slight reversibility of the reaction Zn + CO2 ↔ ZnO + CO on the isotope effects on the carbon and oxygen atoms have also been calculated. (author)

  4. Laboratory controls of precursor and temperature on the kinetics and isotopic fractionations of microbial methane for deep subsurface environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Y.; Lin, L.; Wang, P.; Sun, C.

    2009-12-01

    , methanogenic rates were rapid at all temperatures. Maximum methane production rates occurred at 40~50OC for incubations with methanol, 40~60OC for incubation with acetate, and 50OC for those with methylamine. The patterns of carbon isotopic compositions on methane were either consistent with the prediction of the Rayleigh fractionation in a closed system, trending toward more depleted through time or invariant through time, suggesting variable physiological responses and microbial assemblages to precursor additions. The obtained ɛ values were 0~-12‰ for incubations with acetate, -16~-45‰ for incubations with hydrogen, -50~-80‰ for incubations with methanol, and -87~-115‰ for incubations with methylamine. Acetoclastic methanogenesis appears to fractionate carbon isotopes at the smallest magnitude. This when combined with the results from positive controls and the field observation suggests that acetoclastic methanogenesis produced methane with isotopic signatures comparable with those with thermogenic in origin and contributed significantly to the total methane inventory in the Kuan-Tzu-Ling hotspring area.

  5. Ice-vapor equilibrium fractionation factor of hydrogen and oxygen isotopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellehøj, Mads Dam; Steen-Larsen, Hans Christian; Johnsen, Sigfus Johann;

    2013-01-01

    RATIONALE: The equilibrium fractionation factors govern the relative change in the isotopic composition during phase transitions of water. The commonly used results, which were published more than 40 years ago, are limited to a minimum temperature of -33 degrees C. This limits the reliability in...

  6. Isotopic fractionation of boron in growing corals and its palaeoenvironmental implication

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Xiao, Y.K.; Shirodkar, P.V.; Zhang, C.G.; Wei, H.Z.; Liu, W.G.; Zhou, W.J.

    to be incorporated into corals. Based on the measured δ11B values of growing corals and coexisting sea water as well as the pH of co-existing sea water, a new isotopic fractionation factor α43 between two boron species, B(OH)4 – and B(OH)3, has been measured to be 0...

  7. THE GENESIS SOLAR WIND CONCENTRATOR TARGET: MASS FRACTIONATION CHARACTERISED BY NE ISOTOPES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WIENS, ROGER C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; OLINGER, C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; HEBER, V.S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; REISENFELD, D.B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; BURNETT, D.S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; ALLTON, J.H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; BAUR, H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; WIECHERT, U. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; WIELER, R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2007-01-02

    The concentrator on Genesis provides samples of increased fluences of solar wind ions for precise determination of the oxygen isotopic composition of the solar wind. The concentration process caused mass fractionation as function of the radial target position. They measured the fractionation using Ne released by UV laser ablation along two arms of the gold cross from the concentrator target to compare measured Ne with modeled Ne. The latter is based on simulations using actual conditions of the solar wind during Genesis operation. Measured Ne abundances and isotopic composition of both arms agree within uncertainties indicating a radial symmetric concentration process. Ne data reveal a maximum concentration factor of {approx} 30% at the target center and a target-wide fractionation of Ne isotopes of 3.8%/amu with monotonously decreasing {sup 20}Ne/{sup 22}Ne ratios towards the center. The experimentally determined data, in particular the isotopic fractionation, differ from the modeled data. They discuss potential reasons and propose future attempts to overcome these disagreements.

  8. Copper and iron isotope fractionation in mine tailings at the Laver and Kristineberg mines, northern Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Describes Cu and Fe isotope fractionation in subarctic mine tailings. ► Covellite precipitated from pyrrhotite oxidation is depleted in 65Cu. ► Adsorption of 65Cu in organic layers in natural samples. ► Pyrite oxidation is linked to a enrichment in 56Fe in oxidising tailings. - Abstract: Previous research has shown that Cu and Fe isotopes are fractionated by dissolution and precipitation reactions driven by changing redox conditions. In this study, Cu isotope composition (65Cu/63Cu ratios) was studied in profiles through sulphide-bearing tailings at the former Cu mine at Laver and in a pilot-scale test cell at the Kristineberg mine, both in northern Sweden. The profile at Kristineberg was also analysed for Fe isotope composition (56Fe/54Fe ratios). At both sites sulphide oxidation resulted in an enrichment of the lighter Cu isotope in the oxidised zone of the tailings compared to the original isotope ratio, probably due to preferential losses of the heavier Cu isotope into the liquid phase during oxidation of sulphides. In a zone with secondary enrichment of Cu, located just below the oxidation front at Laver, δ65Cu (compared to ERM-AE633) was as low as −4.35 ± 0.02‰, which can be compared to the original value of 1.31 ± 0.03‰ in the unoxidised tailings. Precipitation of covellite in the secondary Cu enrichment zone explains this fractionation. The Fe isotopic composition in the Kristineberg profile is similar in the oxidised zone and in the unoxidised zone, with average δ56Fe values (relative to the IRMM-014) of −0.58 ± 0.06‰ and −0.49 ± 0.05‰, respectively. At the well-defined oxidation front, δ56Fe was less negative, −0.24 ± 0.01‰. Processes such as Fe(II)–Fe(III) equilibrium and precipitation of Fe-(oxy)hydroxides at the oxidation front are assumed to cause this Fe isotope fractionation. This field study provides additional support for the importance of redox processes for the isotopic composition of Cu and Fe

  9. Fractionation of Hydrogen Isotopes by Sulfate- and Nitrate-Reducing Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osburn, Magdalena R.; Dawson, Katherine S.; Fogel, Marilyn L.; Sessions, Alex L.

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen atoms from water and food are incorporated into biomass during cellular metabolism and biosynthesis, fractionating the isotopes of hydrogen—protium and deuterium—that are recorded in biomolecules. While these fractionations are often relatively constant in plants, large variations in the magnitude of fractionation are observed for many heterotrophic microbes utilizing different central metabolic pathways. The correlation between metabolism and lipid δ2H provides a potential basis for reconstructing environmental and ecological parameters, but the calibration dataset has thus far been limited mainly to aerobes. Here we report on the hydrogen isotopic fractionations of lipids produced by nitrate-respiring and sulfate-reducing bacteria. We observe only small differences in fractionation between oxygen- and nitrate-respiring growth conditions, with a typical pattern of variation between substrates that is broadly consistent with previously described trends. In contrast, fractionation by sulfate-reducing bacteria does not vary significantly between different substrates, even when autotrophic and heterotrophic growth conditions are compared. This result is in marked contrast to previously published observations and has significant implications for the interpretation of environmental hydrogen isotope data. We evaluate these trends in light of metabolic gene content of each strain, growth rate, and potential flux and reservoir-size effects of cellular hydrogen, but find no single variable that can account for the differences between nitrate- and sulfate-respiring bacteria. The emerging picture of bacterial hydrogen isotope fractionation is therefore more complex than the simple correspondence between δ2H and metabolic pathway previously understood from aerobes. Despite the complexity, the large signals and rich variability of observed lipid δ2H suggest much potential as an environmental recorder of metabolism. PMID:27531993

  10. Experimentally determined sulfur isotope fractionation between metal and silicate and implications for planetary differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labidi, J.; Shahar, A.; Le Losq, C.; Hillgren, V. J.; Mysen, B. O.; Farquhar, J.

    2016-02-01

    The Earth's mantle displays a subchondritic 34S/32S ratio. Sulfur is a moderately siderophile element (i.e. iron-loving), and its partitioning into the Earth's core may have left such a distinctive isotope composition on the terrestrial mantle. In order to constrain the sulfur isotope fractionation occurring during core-mantle differentiation, high-pressure and temperature experiments were conducted with synthetic mixtures of metal and silicate melts. With the purpose to identify the mechanism(s) responsible for the S isotope fractionations, we performed our experiments in different capsules - namely, graphite and boron nitride capsules - and thus at different fO2, with varying major element chemistry of the silicate and metal fractions. The S isotope fractionations Δ34Smetal-silicate of equilibrated metal alloys versus silicate melts is +0.2 ± 0.1‰ in a boron-free and aluminum-poor system quenched at 1-1.5 GPa and 1650 °C. The isotope fractionation increases linearly with increasing boron and aluminum content, up to +1.4 ± 0.2‰, and is observed to be independent of the silicon abundance as well as of the fO2 over ∼3.5 log units of variations explored here. The isotope fractionations are also independent of the graphite or nitride saturation of the metal. Only the melt structural changes associated with aluminum and boron concentration in silicate melts have been observed to affect the strength of sulfur bonding. These results establish that the structure of silicate melts has a direct influence on the S2- average bonding strengths. These results can be interpreted in the context of planetary differentiation. Indeed, the structural environments of silicate evolve strongly with pressure. For example, the aluminum, iron or silicon coordination numbers increase under the effect of pressure. Consequently, based on our observations, the sulfur-bonding environment is likely to be affected. In this scheme, we tentatively hypothesize that S isotope fractionations

  11. Carbon and oxygen isotope compositions of the carbonate facies in the Vindhyan Supergroup, central India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Banerjee; S K Bhattacharya; S Sarkar

    2006-02-01

    The Vindhyan sedimentary succession in central India spans a wide time bracket from the Paleopro- terozoic to the Neoproterozoic period.Chronostratigraphic significance of stable carbon and oxygen isotope ratios of the carbonate phase in Vindhyan sediments has been discussed in some recent studies.However,the subtle controls of facies variation,depositional setting and post-depositional diagenesis on stable isotope compositions are not yet clearly understood.The Vindhyan Super- group hosts four carbonate units,exhibiting a wide variability in depositional processes and paleogeography.A detailed facies-specific carbon and oxygen isotope study of the carbonate units was undertaken by us to investigate the effect of these processes and to identify the least altered isotope values.It is seen that both carbon and oxygen isotope compositions have been affected by early meteoric water diagenesis.The effect of diagenetic alteration is,however,more pronounced in case of oxygen isotopes than carbon isotopes.Stable isotope compositions remained insensitive to facies only when sediments accumulated in a shallow shelf setting without being exposed.Major alteration of original isotope ratios was observed in case of shallow marine carbonates,which became exposed to meteoric fluids during early diagenetic stage.Duration of exposure possibly determined the magnitude of alteration and shift from the original values.Moreover,dolomitization is found to be accompanied by appreciable alteration of isotope compositions in some of the carbonates.The present study suggests that variations in sediment depositional settings,in particular the possibility of subaerial exposure,need to be considered while extracting chronostratigraphic signi ficance from 13C data.

  12. Isotopic fractionation of argon during stepwise release from shungite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rison, W.

    1980-05-01

    It is noted that in previous attempts to determine the Ar-40/Ar-36 ratio in the ancient atmosphere, the only direct measurement yielding a value below the atmospheric value of today is for argon released at low temperatures from a pre-Cambrian shungite. In the present work, a low value for Ar-40/Ar-36 in gas released from a type I shungite at low temperatures is confirmed. Attention is given to a study of the accompanying Ar-38/Ar-36 ratios and the enhanced ratio of Ar-40/Ar-36 for the fractions released at high temperatures which shows that the effect observed is a result of the stepwise heating and the argon diffusion mobilized thereby. It is suggested that the low Ar-40/Ar-36 obtained in the past is from the same source rather than reflecting the isotropic composition of the pre-Cambrian atmosphere, and that the type I shungite may exhibit simple volume diffusion over macroscopic dimensions as glasses do. It is concluded that if this is so, the diffusion parameters obtained from the data would imply rapid exchange with the atmosphere for any argon initially trapped in the veins of the material.

  13. Sulfur Isotopic Characteristics of Coal in China and Sulfur Isotopic Fractionation during Coal—burning Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    洪业汤; 张鸿斌; 等

    1993-01-01

    The determined results of the sulfur contents and isotopic composition of coal samples from major coal mines in 15 provinces and regions of China show that the coal mined in the north of China is characterized by higher 34S and lower sulfur content, but that in the south of China has lower 34S and higher sulfur content.During the coal-burning process in both indrstrial and daily use of coal as fuel the released sulfur dioxide is always enriched in lighter sulfur isotope relative to the corresponding coal;the particles are always enriched in heavier sulfur isotope.The discussion on the environmental geochemical significance of the above-mentioned results also has been made.

  14. Diffusion-driven magnesium and iron isotope fractionation in Hawaiian olivine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, F.-Z.; Dauphas, N.; Helz, R.T.; Gao, S.; Huang, S.

    2011-01-01

    Diffusion plays an important role in Earth sciences to estimate the timescales of geological processes such as erosion, sediment burial, and magma cooling. In igneous systems, these diffusive processes are recorded in the form of crystal zoning. However, meaningful interpretation of these signatures is often hampered by the fact that they cannot be unambiguously ascribed to a single process (e.g., magmatic fractionation, diffusion limited transport in the crystal or in the liquid). Here we show that Mg and Fe isotope fractionations in olivine crystals can be used to trace diffusive processes in magmatic systems. Over sixty olivine fragments from Hawaiian basalts show isotopically fractionated Mg and Fe relative to basalts worldwide, with up to 0.4??? variation in 26Mg/24Mg ratios and 1.6??? variation in 56Fe/54Fe ratios. The linearly and negatively correlated Mg and Fe isotopic compositions [i.e., ??56Fe=(??3.3??0.3)????26Mg], co-variations of Mg and Fe isotopic compositions with Fe/Mg ratios of olivine fragments, and modeling results based on Mg and Fe elemental profiles demonstrate the coupled Mg and Fe isotope fractionation to be a manifestation of Mg-Fe inter-diffusion in zoned olivines during magmatic differentiation. This characteristic can be used to constrain the nature of mineral zoning in igneous and metamorphic rocks, and hence determine the residence times of crystals in magmas, the composition of primary melts, and the duration of metamorphic events. With improvements in methodology, in situ isotope mapping will become an essential tool of petrology to identify diffusion in crystals. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  15. Iron and zinc isotope fractionation during uptake and translocation in rice (Oryza sativa) grown in oxic and anoxic soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Tim; Markovic, Tamara; Kirk, Guy J. D.; Schönbächler, Maria; Rehkämper, Mark; Zhao, Fangjie J.; Weiss, Dominik J.

    2015-11-01

    Stable isotope fractionation is emerging quickly as a powerful novel technique to study metal uptake and translocation in plants. Fundamental to this development is a thorough understanding of the processes that lead to isotope fractionation under differing environmental conditions. In this study, we investigated Zn and Fe isotope fractionation in rice grown to maturity in anaerobic and aerobic soils under greenhouse conditions. The overall Zn isotope fractionation between the soil and above ground plant material was negligible in aerobic soil but significant in anaerobic soil with isotopically lighter Zn in the rice plant. The observed range of fractionation is in line with previously determined fractionations of Zn in rice grown in hydroponic solutions and submerged soils and emphasizes the effect of taking up different chemical forms of Zn, most likely free and organically complexed Zn. The Zn in the grain was isotopically lighter than in the rest of the above ground plant in rice grown in aerobic and anaerobic soils alike. This suggests that in the course of the grain loading and during the translocation within the plant important biochemical and/or biophysical processes occur. The isotope fractionation observed in the grains would be consistent with an unidirectional controlled transport from shoot to grain with a fractionation factor of α ≈ 0.9994. Iron isotopes showed an isotopic lighter signature in shoot and grain compared to the bulk soil or the leachate in aerobic and anaerobic soils alike. The negative direction of isotopic fractionation is consistent with possible changes in the redox state of Fe occurring during the uptake and translocation processes. The isotope fractionation pattern between shoots and grain material are different for Zn and Fe which finally suggests that different mechanisms operate during translocation and grain-loading in rice for these two key micronutrients.

  16. Tracking transformation processes of organic micropollutants in aquatic environments using multi-element isotope fractionation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofstetter, Thomas B., E-mail: thomas.hofstetter@eawag.ch [Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, CH-8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland)] [Institute of Biogeochemistry and Pollutant Dynamics (IBP), ETH Zurich, CH-8092 Zurich (Switzerland); Bolotin, Jakov [Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, CH-8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland); Skarpeli-Liati, Marita; Wijker, Reto [Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, CH-8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland)] [Institute of Biogeochemistry and Pollutant Dynamics (IBP), ETH Zurich, CH-8092 Zurich (Switzerland); Kurt, Zohre; Nishino, Shirley F.; Spain, Jim C. [School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States)

    2011-06-15

    The quantitative description of enzymatic or abiotic transformations of man-made organic micropollutants in rivers, lakes, and groundwaters is one of the major challenges associated with the risk assessment of water resource contamination. Compound-specific isotope analysis enables one to identify (bio)degradation pathways based on changes in the contaminants' stable isotope ratios even if multiple reactive and non-reactive processes cause concentrations to decrease. Here, we investigated how the magnitude and variability of isotope fractionation in some priority pollutants is determined by the kinetics and mechanisms of important enzymatic and abiotic redox reactions. For nitroaromatic compounds and substituted anilines, we illustrate that competing transformation pathways can be assessed via trends of N and C isotope signatures.

  17. Iron isotope fractionation between aqueous Fe(II) and goethite revisited: New insights based on a multi-direction approach to equilibrium and isotopic exchange rate modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frierdich, Andrew J.; Beard, Brian L.; Reddy, Thiruchelvi R.; Scherer, Michelle M.; Johnson, Clark M.

    2014-08-01

    The Fe isotope compositions of naturally occurring Fe oxide minerals provide insights into biogeochemical processes that occur in modern and ancient environments. Key to understanding isotopic variations in such minerals is knowledge of the equilibrium Fe isotope fractionation factors between common minerals and aqueous Fe species. Because experimental measurements of isotopic fractionation may reflect a combination of kinetic and equilibrium fractionations during rapid dissolution and precipitation, even in experiments that employ the three-isotope method, assessment of the attainment of equilibrium is often difficult. Here, we re-examine Fe isotope exchange, via a 57Fe tracer, and natural mass-dependent fractionation, through changes in initial 56Fe/54Fe ratios, between aqueous Fe(II) (Fe(II)aq) and goethite. This approach uses the three-isotope method, but is distinct in its evaluation of kinetic isotope fractionation and the attainment of equilibrium by: (i) employing a multi-direction approach to equilibrium at 22 °C via reaction of three Fe(II)aq solutions that had different initial 56Fe/54Fe ratios, (ii) conducting isotopic exchange experiments at elevated temperature (50 °C), and (iii) modifying the rate of isotopic exchange through a combination of trace-element substitutions and particle coarsening to evaluate corresponding temporal changes in fractionation trajectories that may reflect changing instantaneous fractionation factors. We find that rapid isotopic exchange produces kinetic isotope effects between Fe(II)aq and goethite, which shifts the 56Fe/54Fe ratios of Fe(II)aq early in reactions toward that of goethite, indicating that the instantaneous Fe(II)aq-goethite fractionation factor under kinetic conditions is small. Importantly, however, this kinetic fractionation is “erased” with continued reaction, and this is evident by the congruence for multiple-exchange trajectories of distinct initial Fe(II)aq solutions toward the same final value

  18. Method for the determination of concentration and stable carbon isotope ratios of atmospheric phenols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Saccon

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available A method for the determination of the stable carbon isotopic composition of atmospheric nitrophenols in the gas and particulate phases is presented. It has been proposed to use the combination of concentration and isotope ratio measurements of precursor and product to test the applicability of results of laboratory studies to the atmosphere. Nitrophenols are suspected to be secondary products formed specifically from the photooxidation of volatile organic compounds. XAD-4™ resin was used as an adsorbent on quartz filters to sample ambient phenols using conventional high-volume air samplers at York University in Toronto, Canada. Filters were extracted in acetonitrile, with a HPLC clean-up step and a solid phase extraction step prior to derivatization with BSTFA. Concentration measurements were done with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry was used for isotope ratio analysis. The technique presented allows for atmospheric compound-specific isotopic composition measurements for five semi-volatile phenols with an estimated accuracy of 0.3‰ to 0.5‰ at atmospheric concentrations exceeding 0.1 ng m−3 while the detection limits for concentration measurements are in the pg m−3 range. Isotopic fractionation throughout the entire extraction procedure and analysis was proven to be below the precision of the isotope ratio measurements. The method was tested by conducting ambient measurements from September to December 2011.

  19. Stable oxygen and hydrogen isotope fractionation factors for the Goethite (hematite-water system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khawar Sultan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports experimental results on the low-temperature (<100 ºC δ18O and δ 2H fractionation of goethite (hematite-water in a closed system. Both goethite (α-FeOOH and hematite (α-Fe2O3 exhibited closer fractionation factor values but the αHematite-Water value is slightly higher (~0.9932 than the αGoethite-Water (~0.9924 for the 18O isotope. The average fractionation factor (1000 ln2α; at 70 ºC value for 2H in the goethite-water is determined to be -115.78 which is more negative than the 1000ln18α values for 18O. The isotopic change from initial waters to the final waters in which these minerals were synthesized, was observed to be larger for the δ2H (average~2.02‰ than the δ18O (average~0.55‰. Variations in the fractionation factors of goethite and hematite reported in various studies is probably related to the procedures such as drying, washing, type of reactants, pH, and extraction and measurement of 18O and 2H isotopes and, therefore, invite further research for the understanding of α-T relation. Formation temperatures of goethite (~70 ºC and hematite (~90 ºC seem to have less impact in altering mineral-water fractionation as compared to the formation water.

  20. Nitrogen isotope fractionations in the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis and in the Miller-Urey reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, C.-C.; Clayton, R. N.; Hayatsu, R.; Studier, M. H.

    1979-01-01

    Nitrogen isotope fractionations have been measured in Fischer-Tropsch and Miller-Urey reactions in order to determine whether these processes can account for the large N-15/N-14 ratios found in organic matter in carbonaceous chondrites. Polymeric material formed in the Fischer-Tropsch reaction was enriched in N-15 by only 3 per mil relative to the starting material (NH3). The N-15 enrichment in polymers from the Miller-Urey reaction was 10-12 per mil. Both of these fractionations are small compared to the 80-90 per mil differences observed between enstatite chondrites and carbonaceous chondrites. These large differences are apparently due to temporal or spatial variations in the isotopic composition of nitrogen in the solar nebula, rather than to fractionation during the production of organic compounds.

  1. Nitrogen isotope fractionations in the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis and in the Miller-Urey reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitrogen isotope fractionations have been measured in Fischer-Tropsch and Miller-Urey reactions in order to determine whether these processes can account for the large 15N/14N ratios found in organic matter in carbonaceous chondrites. Polymeric material formed in the Fischer-Tropsch reaction was enriched in 15N by only 3 promille relative to the starting material (NH3). The 15N enrichment in polymers from the Miller-Urey reaction was 10-12 promille. Both of these fractionations are small compared to the 80-90 promille differences observed between enstatite chondrites and carbonaceous chondrites. These large differences are apparently due to temporal or spatial variations in the isotopic composition of nitrogen in the solar nebula, rather than to fractionation during the production of organic compounds. (orig.)

  2. Oxygen Isotope Fractionation in TiO2 Polymorphs and Application to Geothermometry of Eclogites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑永飞

    1995-01-01

    Oxygen isotope fractionation in TiO2 polymorphs has been calculated by the modi-fied increment method .The results that rutile is enriched in 18O relative to brookite but depleted in 18O relative to anatase.Due to the same crystal structure ,oxygen isotope partitioning in the TiO2 polymorphs is determined by the cation-oxygen inter-atomic distances.The theoretical calibrations involving rutile are in fair agreement with known experimental measurements and empirical estimates.Application of the theoretic-cal quartz-rutile calibration to geothermometry of natural eclogite assemblages indicates the preservation of isotopic equilibrium at high temperatures.The isotopic temperatures calculated are only slightly lower than the non-isotopic temperatures,indicating the slow rates of exchange for oxygen diffusion in rutile.The kinetics of exchange for oxygen diffu-sion in rutile is accordingly estimated by reconciling the differences between the isotopic and the non-isotopic temperatures.The rates of exchange for oxygen diffusion in rutile should be smaller than those for hornblende,but may be equal to or greater than those for diopside.

  3. Distribution and Fractionation of Uranium Isotopes in Water from San Marcos Dam, Chihuahua, Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this work was to assess the fractionation and distribution of isotopic uranium contained in both, suspended matter and water. Uranium was measured in three points along the San Marcos dam: water input, midpoint, and near to dam wall. Every water sample was separated in suspended particulate matter fraction and in dissolved fraction. Likewise, suspended particulate matter was divided and analyzed in three particle size fractions: coarse, medium, and fine. The results show that most uranium was in the suspended particulate matter. The distribution coefficient kd ranged between 1.6 ·101 to 1·103 L/g. In dissolved fraction, high concentrations of 234U were found, where the activity ratio (AR, 238U/234U) ranged from 2.1 to 3.5. In average, uranium contents tend to be concentrated in coarse fraction, with AR near to unit. Medium and fine fractions showed 238U concentration higher than 234U. The highest uranium concentration was at water input point. The highest 238U concentrations were found: in the coarse fraction at the input point, in the medium fraction at the midpoint of the dam, and in the fine fraction by the nearest point of the dam wall. (author)

  4. Evaluation of zinc, cadmium and lead isotope fractionation during smelting and refining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate metallurgical processing as a source of Zn and Cd isotopic fractionation and to potentially trace their distribution in the environment, high-precision MC-ICP-MS Zn, Cd and Pb isotope ratio measurements were made for samples from the integrated Zn-Pb smelting and refining complex in Trail, B.C., Canada. Significant fractionation of Zn and Cd isotopes during processing of ZnS and PbS ore concentrates is demonstrated by the total variation in δ66/64Zn and δ114/110Cd values of 0.42 per mille and 1.04 per mille , respectively, among all smelter samples. No significant difference is observed between the isotopic compositions of the Zn ore concentrates (δ66/64Zn = 0.09 to 0.17 per mille ; δ114/110Cd = - 0.13 to 0.18 per mille ) and the roasting product, calcine (δ66/64Zn = 0.17 per mille ; δ114/110Cd = 0.05 per mille ), due to ∼ 100% recovery from roasting. The overall Zn recovery from metallurgical processing is ∼ 98%, thus the refined Zn metal (δ66/64Zn = 0.22 per mille ) is not significantly fractionated relative to the starting materials despite significantly fractionated fume (δ66/64Zn = 0.43 per mille ) and effluent (δ66/64Zn = 0.41 to 0.51 per mille ). Calculated Cd recovery from metallurgical processing is 72-92%, with the majority of the unrecovered Cd lost during Pb operations (δ114/110Cd = - 0.38 per mille ). The refined Cd metal is heavy (δ114/110Cd = 0.39 to 0.52 per mille ) relative to the starting materials. In addition, significant fractionation of Cd isotopes is evidenced by the relatively light and heavy isotopic compositions of the fume (δ114/110Cd = - 0.52 per mille ) and effluent (δ114/110Cd = 0.31 to 0.46 per mille ). In contrast to Zn and Cd, Pb isotopes are homogenized by mixing during processing. The total variation observed in the Pb isotopic compositions of smelter samples is attributed to mixing of ore sources with different radiogenic signatures.

  5. Fractionation in position-specific isotope composition during vaporization of environmental pollutants measured with isotope ratio monitoring by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isotopic fractionation of pollutants in terrestrial or aqueous environments is a well-recognized means by which to track different processes during remediation. As a complement to the common practice of measuring the change in isotope ratio for the whole molecule using isotope ratio monitoring by mass spectrometry (irm-MS), position-specific isotope analysis (PSIA) can provide further information that can be exploited to investigate source and remediation of soil and water pollutants. Position-specific fractionation originates from either degradative or partitioning processes. We show that isotope ratio monitoring by 13C NMR (irm-13C NMR) spectrometry can be effectively applied to methyl tert-butylether, toluene, ethanol and trichloroethene to obtain this position-specific data for partitioning. It is found that each compound exhibits characteristic position-specific isotope fractionation patterns, and that these are modulated by the type of evaporative process occurring. Such data should help refine models of how remediation is taking place, hence back-tracking to identify pollutant sources. - Highlights: • Position-Specific Isotope Analysis (PSIA) by 13C NMR spectrometry. • PSIA on isotope fractionation during several vaporization processes. • PSIA for isotope profiling in environment pollutants. • Intramolecular 13C reveal normal and inverse effects, bulk values being unchanged. - PSIA in pollutants during evaporation processes shows more detailed information for discerning the nature of the process involved than does bulk isotope measurements

  6. Detailed Carbon Isotopic Characterization of Aerosol-Derived Organic Carbon Deposited to two Temperate Watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wozniak, A. S.; Bauer, J. E.; Keesee, E. E.; McNichol, A. P.; Xu, L.; Dickhut, R. M.

    2008-12-01

    Atmospheric deposition of carbonaceous aerosols can be a quantitatively significant flux in the carbon budgets of temperate watersheds. Characterizing the sources and fates of this material is therefore critical for assessing its role in carbon and organic matter cycling in these systems. Aerosol samples were collected in the Hudson and York River watersheds throughout 2006-2007 and analyzed for quantities and isotopic signatures (δ13C, Δ14C) of total and water-soluble organic carbon (TOC, WSOC, respectively). On average ~2.4 and 2.1 mg m-2 d-1 of aerosol TOC were deposited to the Hudson and York River watersheds, respectively, and nearly half of this material was water-soluble. δ13C analyses indicated that both the TOC and the WSOC were primarily terrestrial in nature. TOC Δ14C signatures covered a broad range for both watersheds, with calculated contributions from fossil sources (e.g., anthropogenic combustion of petroleum, coal, etc.) ranging from 0% for samples collected during the summer of 2007 to approximately 50% for samples collected in the winter of 2007. Aerosol-derived WSOC Δ14C values were less variable and were nearly always enriched in 14C with respect to the corresponding TOC, indicating that contemporary aerosol material tends to partition into the aqueous phase, while fossil-derived aerosol OC is more likely to remain insoluble. However, WSOC still often showed considerable contributions from fossil OC (up to 20%). Thus, some portion of the anthropogenic fossil-derived aerosol OC is relatively soluble and may be transported hydrologically through watersheds and aquatic systems. A subset of aerosol samples from each watershed was selected for more thorough isotopic analysis of operationally-defined components of the carbonaceous material. Isotopic signatures were obtained for TOC, WSOC, total solvent-extract, and the aliphatic, aromatic, and polar components. Isotopic information on these fractions allows us to determine which components

  7. Use of stable carbon isotope analysis to assess natural attenuation of organic contaminants in the unsaturated zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction Natural attenuation is an attractive remediation strategy when dealing with petroleum-hydrocarbon contaminated sites because of its cost efficiency. The unsaturated zone can play an important role in regulating the contaminant transfer between soil and groundwater. On one hand, contaminants from the soil zone may be degraded in the unsaturated zone thus preventing groundwater contamination. On the other hand, contaminants diffusing from the subsurface towards the atmosphere may be eliminated before reaching potential targets. Biodegradation is usually the main process leading to contaminant destruction and is usually considered to be the only process to influence 13C/12C ratio of organic contaminants in the saturated zone. Therefore, carbon and hydrogen isotope analysis has been used as a tool to demonstrate biodegradation (Griebler et al. 2004, Steinbach et al. 2004). Carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionation occurs during biodegradation as a consequence of the slightly faster cleavage of chemical bonds between light isotopes of an element compared to heavy isotopes. The difference in degradation rates leads to an enrichment of the heavy isotopes in the residual contaminant pool compared to the initial value. Most of the field studies focused on the saturated zone (Meckenstock et al. 2004) compare to only few studies on the unsaturated zone (Kirtland et al. 2005, Stehmeier et al. 1999). The aim of this study was to evaluate whether compound-specific stable isotope analysis can be used to demonstrate biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in the unsaturated zone. The study included a field experiment and mathematical simulations. At the field site, a defined mixture of hydrocarbons was buried in a sandy unsaturated zone and the evolution of concentration and isotope ratios of various hydrocarbons was followed using a dense network of sampling points. The study was complemented with two mathematical simulations performed to gain insight into the

  8. Stable and radioactive carbon in forest soils of Chhattisgarh, Central India: Implications for tropical soil carbon dynamics and stable carbon isotope evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laskar, A. H.; Yadava, M. G.; Ramesh, R.

    2016-06-01

    Soils from two sites viz. Kotumsar and Tirathgarh, located ∼5 km apart in a tropical reserve forest (18°52‧N, 81°56‧E) in central India, have been explored for soil organic carbon (SOC) content, its mean residence time (MRT) and the evolution of stable carbon isotopic composition (δ13C). SOC stocks in the upper 30 cm of soil layers are ∼5.3 kg/m2 and ∼3.0 kg/m2; in the upper 110 m are ∼10.7 kg/m2 and ∼7.8 kg/m2 at Kotumsar and Tirathgarh, respectively. SOC decreases with increasing depth. Bomb carbon signature is observed in the upper ∼10 cm. Organic matters in the top soil layers (0-10 cm) have MRTs of the order of a century which increases gradually with depths, reaching 3500-5000 yrs at ∼100 cm. δ13C values of SOC increase with depth, the carbon isotopic fractionation is obtained to be -1.2‰ and -3‰ for soils at Kotumsar and Tirathgarh, respectively, confirmed using Rayleigh isotopic fractionation model. The evolution of δ13C in soils was also studied using a modified Rayleigh fractionation model incorporating a continuous input into the reservoir: the depth profiles of δ13C for SOC show that the input organic matter from surface into the deeper soil layers is either insignificant or highly labile and decomposes quite fast in the top layers, thus making little contribution to the residual biomasses of the deeper layers. This is an attempt to understand the distillation processes that take place in SOC, assess the extent of decomposition by microbes and effect of percolation of fresh organic matter into dipper soil layers which are important for stable isotope based paleoclimate and paleovegetation reconstruction and understanding the dynamics of organic carbon in soils.

  9. Land use change to Miscanthus: measured and modelled changes in soil carbon fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Andy; Davies, Christian; Smith, Pete; McNamara, Niall

    2014-05-01

    Miscanthus is a lignocellulosic crop that uses the Hatch-Slack (C4) photosynthetic pathway as opposed to most C3 vegetation native to the UK. Miscanthus can be grown for a number of practical end-uses but recently interest has increased in its viability as a bioenergy crop; both providing a renewable source of energy and helping to limit climate change by improving the carbon (C) budgets associated with energy generation. Miscanthus distribution is very limited at present and therefore in most cases propagation will require land use change. Limited case studies have shown that changing land use to Miscanthus may increase stocks of soil organic carbon (SOC). However, the accuracy of simulating SOC dynamics under Miscanthus for scaling purposes is limited by empirical validation data regarding the longevity of newly sequestered SOC1. Consequently, in our work the size and turnover times of different SOC fractions have been quantified through physiochemical fractionation2 under a Miscanthus plantation and an adjacent paired reference site. Twenty-five 2 m2 plots were set up in a three-year old 11 hectare commercial Miscanthus plantation in Lincolnshire, UK. From each plot monthly measurements of CO2 emissions were taken at the soil surface between March 2009 and March 2013, and soil C from the top 30 cm was monitored in all plots over the same period. Miscanthus-derived SOC and CO2 emissions resulting from Miscanthus plant matter were determined using the isotopic discrimination between C4 plant matter and C3 soil. Stable isotope techniques were also used in conjunction with soil fractionation performed annually to establish the rate of change to different soil fractions. Soil C and fractionation was also performed on five soils from an adjacent site with continued cropping of the prior land use. There is a notable increase in SOC stocks under Miscanthus when compared with the adjacent reference site (2.05 tC ha-1 yr-1) despite fractionation indicating the Miscanthus

  10. Linking mercury, carbon, and nitrogen stable isotopes in Tibetan biota: Implications for using mercury stable isotopes as source tracers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Qianggong; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2016-01-01

    Tibetan Plateau is located at a mountain region isolated from direct anthropogenic sources. Mercury concentrations and stable isotopes of carbon, nitrogen, and mercury were analyzed in sediment and biota for Nam Co and Yamdrok Lake. Biotic mercury concentrations and high food web magnification factors suggested that Tibetan Plateau is no longer a pristine site. The primary source of methylmercury was microbial production in local sediment despite the lack of direct methylmercury input. Strong ultraviolet intensity led to extensive photochemical reactions and up to 65% of methylmercury in water was photo-demethylated before entering the food webs. Biota displayed very high Δ(199)Hg signatures, with some highest value (8.6%) ever in living organisms. The δ(202)Hg and Δ(199)Hg in sediment and biotic samples increased with trophic positions (δ(15)N) and %methylmercury. Fish total length closely correlated to δ(13)C and Δ(199)Hg values due to dissimilar carbon sources and methylmercury pools in different living waters. This is the first mercury isotope study on high altitude lake ecosystems that demonstrated specific isotope fractionations of mercury under extreme environmental conditions. PMID:27151563

  11. Linking mercury, carbon, and nitrogen stable isotopes in Tibetan biota: Implications for using mercury stable isotopes as source tracers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Qianggong; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2016-05-01

    Tibetan Plateau is located at a mountain region isolated from direct anthropogenic sources. Mercury concentrations and stable isotopes of carbon, nitrogen, and mercury were analyzed in sediment and biota for Nam Co and Yamdrok Lake. Biotic mercury concentrations and high food web magnification factors suggested that Tibetan Plateau is no longer a pristine site. The primary source of methylmercury was microbial production in local sediment despite the lack of direct methylmercury input. Strong ultraviolet intensity led to extensive photochemical reactions and up to 65% of methylmercury in water was photo-demethylated before entering the food webs. Biota displayed very high Δ199Hg signatures, with some highest value (8.6%) ever in living organisms. The δ202Hg and Δ199Hg in sediment and biotic samples increased with trophic positions (δ15N) and %methylmercury. Fish total length closely correlated to δ13C and Δ199Hg values due to dissimilar carbon sources and methylmercury pools in different living waters. This is the first mercury isotope study on high altitude lake ecosystems that demonstrated specific isotope fractionations of mercury under extreme environmental conditions.

  12. Linking mercury, carbon, and nitrogen stable isotopes in Tibetan biota: Implications for using mercury stable isotopes as source tracers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Qianggong; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2016-01-01

    Tibetan Plateau is located at a mountain region isolated from direct anthropogenic sources. Mercury concentrations and stable isotopes of carbon, nitrogen, and mercury were analyzed in sediment and biota for Nam Co and Yamdrok Lake. Biotic mercury concentrations and high food web magnification factors suggested that Tibetan Plateau is no longer a pristine site. The primary source of methylmercury was microbial production in local sediment despite the lack of direct methylmercury input. Strong ultraviolet intensity led to extensive photochemical reactions and up to 65% of methylmercury in water was photo-demethylated before entering the food webs. Biota displayed very high Δ199Hg signatures, with some highest value (8.6%) ever in living organisms. The δ202Hg and Δ199Hg in sediment and biotic samples increased with trophic positions (δ15N) and %methylmercury. Fish total length closely correlated to δ13C and Δ199Hg values due to dissimilar carbon sources and methylmercury pools in different living waters. This is the first mercury isotope study on high altitude lake ecosystems that demonstrated specific isotope fractionations of mercury under extreme environmental conditions. PMID:27151563

  13. Carbon and hydrogen isotopic compositions of New Zealand geothermal gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon and hydrogen isotopic compositions are reported for methane, hydrogen and carbon dioxide from four New Zealand geothermal areas; Ngawha, Wairakei, Broadlands and Tikitere. Carbon-13 contents are between -24.4 and -29.5 per mille (PDB) for methane, and between -3.2 and -9.1 per mille for carbon dioxide. Deuterium contents are between -142 and -197 per mille (SMOW) for methane and between -310 and -600 per mille for hydrogen. The different areas have different isotopic compositions with some general relationships to reservoir temperature. The isotopic exchange of hydrogen with water indicates acceptable reservoir temperatures of 180 to 260 deg C from most spring samples but often higher than measured temperatures in well samples. Indicated temperatures assuming 13C equilibria between CH4 and CO2 are 100 to 200 deg C higher than measured maxima. This difference may be due to partial isotopic equilibration or may reflect the origin of the methane. Present evidence cannot identify whether the methane is primordial, or from decomposing sediments or from reduction of magmatic CO2. The isotopic equilibria between CH4, CO2, H2 and H2O are reviewed and a new semiempirical temperature scale proposed for deuterium exchange between methane and water. (author)

  14. Stable carbon isotope ratios of intact GDGTs indicate heterogeneous sources to marine sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Ann; Hurley, Sarah J.; Walter, Sunita R. Shah; Kusch, Stephanie; Lichtin, Samantha; Zhang, Yi Ge

    2016-05-01

    Thaumarchaeota, the major sources of marine glycerol dibiphytanyl glycerol tetraether lipids (GDGTs), are believed to fix the majority of their carbon directly from dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). The δ13C values of GDGTs (δ13CGDGT) may be powerful tools for reconstructing variations in the ocean carbon cycle, including paleoproductivity and water mass circulation, if they can be related to values of δ13CDIC. To date, isotope measurements primarily are made on the C40 biphytane skeletons of GDGTs, rather than on complete tetraether structures. This approach erases information revealed by the isotopic heterogeneity of GDGTs within a sample and may impart an isotopic fractionation associated with the ether cleavage. To circumvent these issues, we present δ13C values for GDGTs from twelve recent sediments representing ten continental margin locations. Samples are purified by orthogonal dimensions of HPLC, followed by measurement of δ13C values by Spooling Wire Microcombustion (SWiM)-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) with 1σ precision and accuracy of ±0.25‰. Using this approach, we confirm that GDGTs, generally around -19‰, are isotopically "heavy" compared to other marine lipids. However, measured δ13CGDGT values are inconsistent with predicted values based on the 13C content of DIC in the overlying water column and the previously-published biosynthetic isotope fractionation for a pure culture of an autotrophic marine thaumarchaeon. In some sediments, the isotopic composition of individual GDGTs differs, indicating multiple source inputs. The data appear to confirm that crenarchaeol primarily is a biomarker for Thaumarchaeota, but its δ13C values still cannot be explained solely by autotrophic carbon fixation. Overall the complexity of the results suggests that both organic carbon assimilation (ca. 25% of total carbon) and multiple source(s) of exogenous GDGTs (contributing generally <30% of input to sediments) are necessary to explain the observed

  15. Laboratory chalcopyrite oxidation by Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans: Oxygen and sulfur isotope fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurston, R.S.; Mandernack, K.W.; Shanks, Wayne C., III

    2010-01-01

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to simulate chalcopyrite oxidation under anaerobic and aerobic conditions in the absence or presence of the bacterium Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. Experiments were carried out with 3 different oxygen isotope values of water (??18OH2O) so that approach to equilibrium or steady-state isotope fractionation for different starting conditions could be evaluated. The contribution of dissolved O2 and water-derived oxygen to dissolved sulfate formed by chalcopyrite oxidation was unambiguously resolved during the aerobic experiments. Aerobic oxidation of chalcopyrite showed 93 ?? 1% incorporation of water oxygen into the resulting sulfate during the biological experiments. Anaerobic experiments showed similar percentages of water oxygen incorporation into sulfate, but were more variable. The experiments also allowed determination of sulfate-water oxygen isotope fractionation, ??18OSO4-H2O, of ~ 3.8??? for the anaerobic experiments. Aerobic oxidation produced apparent ??SO4-H2O values (6.4???) higher than the anaerobic experiments, possibly due to additional incorporation of dissolved O2 into sulfate. ??34SSO4 values are ~ 4??? lower than the parent sulfide mineral during anaerobic oxidation of chalcopyrite, with no significant difference between abiotic and biological processes. For the aerobic experiments, a small depletion in ??34SSO4 of ~- 1.5 ?? 0.2??? was observed for the biological experiments. Fewer solids precipitated during oxidation under aerobic conditions than under anaerobic conditions, which may account for the observed differences in sulfur isotope fractionation under these contrasting conditions. ?? 2009 Elsevier B.V.

  16. Fractionation of Mercury Stable Isotopes during Microbial Methylmercury Production by Iron- and Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Sarah E; Schaefer, Jeffra K; Barkay, Tamar; Reinfelder, John R

    2016-08-01

    The biological production of monomethylmercury (MeHg) in soils and sediments is an important factor controlling mercury (Hg) accumulation in aquatic and terrestrial food webs. In this study we examined the fractionation of Hg stable isotopes during Hg methylation in nongrowing cultures of the anaerobic bacteria Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA and Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132. Both organisms showed mass-dependent, but no mass-independent fractionation of Hg stable isotopes during Hg methylation. Despite differences in methylation rates, the two bacteria had similar Hg fractionation factors (αr/p = 1.0009 and 1.0011, respectively). Unexpectedly, δ(202)Hg values of MeHg for both organisms were 0.4‰ higher than the value of initial inorganic Hg after about 35% of inorganic Hg had been methylated. These results indicate that a (202)Hg-enriched pool of inorganic Hg was preferentially utilized as a substrate for methylation by these organisms, but that multiple intra- and/or extracellular pools supplied inorganic Hg for biological methylation. Understanding the controls of the Hg stable isotopic composition of microbially produced MeHg is important to identifying bioavailable Hg in natural systems and the interpretation of Hg stable isotopes in aquatic food webs. PMID:27392249

  17. Spinel-olivine-pryoxene equilibrium iron isotopic fractionation and applications to natural peridotites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roskosz, Mathieu; Sio, Corliss K. I.; Dauphas, Nicolas; Bi, Wenli; Tissot, Francois L. H.; Hu, Michael Y.; Zhao, Jiyong; Alp, Esen E.

    2015-11-15

    Eight spinel-group minerals were synthesized by a flux-growth method producing spinels with varying composition and Fe3+/Fe-tot ratios. The mean force constants of iron bonds in these minerals were determined by synchrotron nuclear resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (NRIXS) in order to determine the reduced isotopic partition function ratios (beta-factors) of these spinels. The mean force constants are strongly dependent on the Fe3+/Fe-tot of the spinel but are independent, or weakly dependent on other structural and compositional parameters. From our spectroscopic data, it is found that a single redox-dependent calibration line accounts for the effects of Fe3+/Fe-tot on the beta-factors of spinels. This calibration successfully describes the equilibrium Fe isotopes fractionation factors between spinels and silicates (olivine and pyroxenes). Our predictions are in excellent agreement with independent determinations for the equilibrium Fe isotopic fractionations for the magnetite- fayalite and the magnetite-hedenbergite couples. Our calibration applies to the entire range of Fe3+/Fe-tot ratios found in natural spinels and provides a basis for interpreting iron isotopic variations documented in mantle peridotites. Except for a few exceptions, most of the samples measured so far are in isotopic disequilibrium, reflecting metasomatism and partial melting processes.

  18. Tracking Movement of Plant Carbon Through Soil to Water by Lignin Phenol Stable Carbon Isotope Composition in a Small Agricultural Watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crooker, K.; Filley, T.; Six, J.; Frey, J.

    2005-12-01

    Few studies integrate land cover, soil physical structure, and aquatic physical fractions when investigating the fate of agricultural carbon in watersheds. In crop systems that involve rotations of soy (a C3 plant) and corn (a C4 plant) the large intrinsic differences in stable carbon isotope values and lignin plus cutin chemistry enable tracking of plant carbon movement from soil fractions to DOM and overland flow during precipitation events. In a small (~3Km2) agricultural basin in central Indiana, we studied plant carbon dynamics in a soy/corn agricultural rotation (2004-2005) to determine the relative inputs of these two plants to soil fractions and the resultant contributions to dissolved, colloidal, and particulate organic matter when mobilized. Using bulk isotope values the fraction of carbon derived from corn in macroaggregates (>250 micron), microaggregates (53-250 mm), and silts plus clays (compound specific isotope analysis of lignin in the soil fractions revealed a wide range of relative inputs among the monomers with cinnamyl phenols being almost exclusively (~ 93%) derived from corn. Syringyl phenols ranged from 75-56% corn and vanillyl phenols ranged from 37-40% corn carbon. The relative input among the fractions mirrors closely the comparative plant chemistry abundances between soy and corn. During export of DOM from the land to the stream the relative abundance of plant source varied with discharge (0.05-1.8 m3/sec) as increases in flow increased the relative export of corn-derived C from the fields. Over the full range of flows lignin phenols varied from 0.05 to 82% corn-derived with the greatest relative corn input for cinnamyl and syringyl carbon. The trend with stream discharge indicates a progressive movement of particulate corn residues with overland flow. Ongoing studies look to resolve contributions of algae, bacteria and terrestrial plants to soil fractions and their mobilized components.

  19. Stable isotope fractionation of chlorine during the precipitation of single chloride minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Solutions of NaCl, KCl, and MgCl2⋅6H2O were evaporated at 28 ± 2 °C. • The δ37Cl values of samples decreased during precipitation. • Cl isotope has fractionation features different from predecessor research. • New Cl isotopic evolution curve of seawater precipitation were calculated. • The δ37Cl values can be used as an better indicator of brine evolution. - Abstract: In order to better understand chlorine isotopic variations during brine evolution, experiments were designed to determine the changes in the chlorine isotope composition (δ37Cl value) during evaporations of solutions containing NaCl, KCl and MgCl2⋅6H2O at 28 ± 2 °C. Three evaporation experiments were conducted in a clean environment. The precipitate and brine samples were collected during the evaporation, and the chlorine isotopic ratios of the samples were determined using an improved thermal ionisation mass spectrometry procedure based on Cs2Cl+ ion measurement. The results are as follows: the mean fractionation factors of the three solutions are αNa = 1.00055, αK = 1.00025, and αMg = 1.00012, respectively, where αNa, αK and αMg are the fractionation factors between salts (NaCl, KCl and MgCl2⋅6H2O) and saturated solutions. The results showed that the δ37Cl values of precipitate and coexisting brine samples decrease during the precipitation of single chloride minerals. The residual brine was a 35Cl reservoir for different single chloride solutions. New chlorine isotopic evolution curve during seawater evaporation were also calculated. The results indicated that during the primary precipitation stage of halite, δ37Cl decreased continuously, and the most important thing is that this trend continues during the final stages when Mg–salts begin to precipitate

  20. Isotopic fractionation in a large herbivorous insect, the Auckland tree weta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehi, Priscilla M; Hicks, Brendan J

    2010-12-01

    Determining diet and trophic position of species with stable isotopes requires appropriate trophic enrichment estimates between an animal and its potential foods. These estimates are particularly important for cryptic foragers where there is little comparative dietary information. Nonetheless, many trophic enrichment estimates are based on related taxa, without confirmation of accuracy using laboratory trials. We used stable isotope analysis to investigate diet and to resolve trophic relationships in a large endemic insect, the Auckland tree weta (Hemideina thoracica White). Comparisons of isotopes in plant foods fed to captive wetas with isotope ratios in their frass provided variable results, so frass isotope values had limited usefulness as a proxy indicator of trophic level. Isotopic values varied between different tissues, with trophic depletion of (15)N highest in body fat and testes. Tissue fractionation was consistent in captive and wild caught wetas, and isotopic values were not significantly different between the two groups, suggesting that this weta species is primarily herbivorous. Whole-body values in captive wetas demonstrated trophic depletion (Δδ) for δ(15)N of about -0.77 ‰ and trophic enrichment of 4.28 ‰ for δ(13)C. These values differ from commonly estimated trophic enrichments for both insects and herbivores and indicate the importance of laboratory trials to determine trophic enrichment. Isotopic values for femur muscles from a number of local wild weta populations did not vary consistently with body weight or size, suggesting that juveniles eat the same foods as adults. Considerable variation among individuals within and between populations suggests that isotopic values are strongly influenced by food availability and individual foraging traits. PMID:20709068

  1. Can Mg isotopes be used to trace cyanobacteria-mediated magnesium carbonate precipitation in alkaline lakes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirokova, L. S.; Mavromatis, V.; Bundeleva, I.; Pokrovsky, O. S.; Bénézeth, P.; Pearce, C.; Gérard, E.; Balor, S.; Oelkers, E. H.

    2011-07-01

    The fractionation of Mg isotopes was determined during the cyanobacterial mediated precipitation of hydrous magnesium carbonate precipitation in both natural environments and in the laboratory. Natural samples were obtained from Lake Salda (SE Turkey), one of the few modern environments on the Earth's surface where hydrous Mg-carbonates are the dominant precipitating minerals. This precipitation was associated with cyanobacterial stromatolites which were abundant in this aquatic ecosystem. Mg isotope analyses were performed on samples of incoming streams, groundwaters, lake waters, stromatolites, and hydromagnesite-rich sediments. Laboratory Mg carbonate precipitation experiments were conducted in the presence of purified Synechococcus sp cyanobacteria that were isolated from the lake water and stromatolites. The hydrous magnesium carbonates nesquehonite (MgCO3·3H2O) and dypingite (Mg5(CO3)4(OH)25(H2O)) were precipitated in these batch reactor experiments from aqueous solutions containing either synthetic NaHCO3/MgCl2 mixtures or natural Lake Salda water, in the presence and absence of live photosynthesizing Synechococcus sp. Bulk precipitation rates were not to affected by the presence of bacteria when air was bubbled through the system. In the stirred non-bubbled reactors, conditions similar to natural settings, bacterial photosynthesis provoked nesquehonite precipitation, whilst no precipitation occurred in bacteria-free systems in the absence of air bubbling, despite the fluids achieving a similar or higher degree of supersaturation. The extent of Mg isotope fractionation (Δ26Mgsolid-solution) between the mineral and solution in the abiotic experiments was found to be identical, within uncertainty, to that measured in cyanobacteria-bearing experiments, and ranges from -1.4 to -0.7 ‰. This similarity refutes the use of Mg isotopes to validate microbial mediated precipitation of hydrous Mg carbonates.

  2. Aptian Carbon Isotope Stratigraphy in Sierra del Rosario, Northeastern Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barragan-Manzo, R.; Moreno-Bedmar, J.; Nuñez, F.; Company, M.

    2013-05-01

    In most recent years Aptian carbon isotope stratigraphy has been widely studied in Europe where isotopic stages have been developed to correlate global events. Two negative excursions have been recorded in the Lower Aptian, the older is OAE 1a in the middle part, and a younger negative excursion labeled "Aparein level", which occurs in the uppermost part of the Lower Aptian. In Mexico previous works reported a carbon isotope negative excursion in the lowermost part of the La Peña Formation that was assigned to the onset of Oceanic Anoxic Event 1a (=OAE 1a). In this work we study the isotopic record of the δ13Ccarb of 32 bulk rock samples of limestone from the uppermost part of the Cupido Formation and the lower part of the La Peña Formation at the Francisco Zarco Dam Section (=FZD), Durango State, northeastern Mexico. The isotopic data are calibrated using the latest ammonite biostratigraphic biozonation of the Aptian. This age calibration allows us to make a precise correlation between the carbon isotopic record of Mexico and several European sections (e.g. Spain and France). In the studied Francisco Zarco Dam section we recognize a negative carbon isotopic excursion in the Dufrenoyia justinae ammonite Zone that corresponds to the "Aparein level", which we correlate using the ammonite zonation of others European sections (Figure 1). This correlation allows us to see how the negative excursion that characterizes the "Aparein level" is consistent with the C7 segment. Thus, our recent stratigraphic study allows us to conclude that the ammonite record in the lowermost part of the La Peña Formation is regionally isochronous, and correlates with the Dufrenoyia justinae Zone and Lower Aptian isotope interval C7. In agreement to these biostratigraphic data, the supposed record of the OAE 1a in the lowermost part of the La Peña Formation is not correct, and the carbon isotope negative excursion must be assigned to the younger event "Aparein level". Taking this into

  3. Development of U isotope fractionation as an indictor or U(VI) reduction in uranium plumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundstrom, Craig [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Johnson, Thomas [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States)

    2016-02-16

    This is the final report for a university research project that advanced development of a new technology for identifying chemical reduction of uranium contamination in groundwater at the Rifle Field Challenge site. Reduction changes mobile hexavalent uranium into immobile U(IV). The stable isotope ratio (238U/235U) measurements of U using multicollector ICP-mass spectrometry were performed to understand the chemical reduction and sorption processes during various field experiments. In addition laboratory experiments were performed to better understand the isotopic fractionations. The main objectives of this project were completed during the project period and two peer-reviewed articles were published to disseminate the information gained.

  4. Oxygen isotope fractionation factors between anhydrite and water from 100 to 5500C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oxygen isotope exchange between anhydrite and water was studied from 100 to 5500C, using the partial equilibrium method. The exchange rate was extremely low in NaCl solution. In the lower-temperature range, acid solutions were used to produce sufficient reaction to determine the oxygen isotope fractionation factors. The fractionation factors obtained in the present study are definitely different from those given by Lloyd. They are similar to those for the HSO-4-water system studied by Mizutani and Rafter, and are consistently 2 promille higher than those of the barite-water system by Kusakabe and Robinson. The temperature dependence of the oxygen isotope fractionation factors was calculated by the least squares method in which the weight was taken to be inversely proportional to the experimental error. The fractionation is given by: 103 1n α(anhydrite-water) = 3.21 x (103/T)2-4.72. Available delta18O values of natural anhydrite were used to test the validity of this expression. It is shown that this newly revised geothermometer can be successfully applied to natural hydrothermal anhydrite. (orig.)

  5. Isotopic fractionation associated with [NiFe]- and [FeFe]-hydrogenases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Hui; Gandhi, Hasand; Cornish, Adam J.; Moran, James J.; Kreuzer, Helen W.; Ostrom, Nathaniel; Hegg, Eric L.

    2016-01-30

    Hydrogenases catalyze the reversible formation of H2 from electrons and protons with high efficiency. Understanding the relationships between H2 production, H2 uptake, and H2-H2O exchange can provide insight into the metabolism of microbial communities in which H2 is an essential component in energy cycling. In this manuscript, we used stable H isotopes (1H and 2H) to probe the isotope effects associated with three [FeFe]-hydrogenases and three [NiFe]-hydrogenases. All six hydrogenases displayed fractionation factors for H2 formation that were significantly less than 1, producing H2 that was severely depleted in 2H relative to the substrate, water. Consistent with differences in their active site structure, the fractionation factors for each class appear to cluster, with the three [NiFe]-hydrogenases (α = 0.27-0.40) generally having smaller values than the three [FeFe]-hydrogenases (α = 0.41-0.55). We also obtained isotopic fractionation factors associated with H2 uptake and H2-H2O exchange under conditions similar to those utilized for H2 production, providing us with a more complete picture of the three reactions catalyzed by hydrogenases. The fractionation factors determined in our studies can be used as signatures for different hydrogenases to probe their activity under different growth conditions and to ascertain which hydrogenases are most responsible for H2 production and/or uptake in complex microbial communities.

  6. Carbon and hydrogen isotope variations in methane from natural gas and from thermal cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The isotope ratio of methane from natural gas of the Thuringia Basin follows the relation delta D = 5.7 delta 13C + 23. The delta D values of the methane component of the gas vary from -238 to -80 0/00, referred to SMOW, whereas the corresponding delta 13C values vary from -46.9 to -23.9 0/00, referred to PDB. In order to elucidate carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionations in thermal cracking, model experiments have been carried out. For this purpose methane was produced by cracking hexadecane at 400 0C. The following relation was found: delta D = 7.1 delta 13C - 28. The hitherto existing conceptions of the causes of the extraordinarily great isotope variations observed in natural gases of the Thuringia Basin are discussed on the basis of the new experimental data

  7. Carbon, cesium and iodine isotopes in Japanese cedar leaves from Iwaki, Fukushima

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Sheng; Cook, Gordon T.; Cresswell, Alan J.;

    2016-01-01

    Japanese cedar leaves from Iwaki, Fukushima were analyzed for carbon, cesium and iodine isotopic compositions before and after the 2011 nuclear accident. The Δ14C values reflect ambient atmospheric 14C concentrations during the year the leaves were sampled/defoliated, and also previous year(s). The...... elevated 129I and 134,137Cs concentrations are attributed to direct exposure to the radioactive fallout for the pre-fallout-expended leaves and to internal translocation from older parts of the tree for post-fallout-expended leaves. 134Cs/137Cs and 129I/137Cs activity ratios suggest insignificant isotopic...... and elemental fractionation during translocation. However, fractionation between radioiodine and radiocesium is significant during transportation from the source....

  8. Isotopic composition of carbon monoxide in St. Louis, Missouri area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concentration and isotropic composition of carbon monoxide were determined for air samples taken in the vicinity of St. Louis, Missouri, to provide information as to the movement of the pollutant plume from the city. Urban air was detected as far as 48 miles downwind of St. Louis; however, movement of the pollutant plume was not detected. The effect of engine carbon monoxide produced along a highway in a rural area was found to be minimal three miles downwind of the highway. Diurnal studies demonstrated an inverse relationship between carbon monoxide concentration and oxygen and carbon isotopic ratios during the night. A parallel relation prevailed during the day

  9. Copper in soil fractions and runoff in a vineyard catchment: Insights from copper stable isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babcsányi, Izabella; Chabaux, François; Granet, Mathieu; Meite, Fatima; Payraudeau, Sylvain; Duplay, Joëlle; Imfeld, Gwenaël

    2016-07-01

    Understanding the fate of copper (Cu) fungicides in vineyard soils and catchments is a prerequisite to limit the off-site impact of Cu. Using Cu stable isotopes, Cu retention in soils and runoff transport was investigated in relation to the use of Cu fungicides and the hydrological conditions in a vineyard catchment (Rouffach, Haut-Rhin, France; mean slope: 15%). The δ(65)Cu values of the bulk vineyard soil varied moderately through the depth of the soil profiles (-0.12 to 0.24‰±0.08‰). The values were in the range of those of the fungicides (-0.21 to 0.11‰) and included the geogenic δ(65)Cu value of the untreated soil (0.08‰). However, δ(65)Cu values significantly differed between particle-size soil fractions (-0.37±0.10‰ in fine clays and 0.23±0.07‰ in silt). Together with the soil mineralogy, the results suggested Cu isotope fractionation primarily associated with the clay and fine clay fractions that include both SOM and mineral phases. The vegetation did not affect the Cu isotope patterns in the vineyard soils. Cu export by runoff from the catchment accounted for 1% of the applied Cu mass from 11th May to 20(th) July 2011, covering most of the Cu use period. 84% of the exported Cu mass was Cu bound to suspended partic