WorldWideScience

Sample records for carbon isotope analysis

  1. Stable carbon isotope analysis of heavy oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fixari, B.; Le Perchec, P.; Bigois, M.; Casabianca, H.; Jame, P. [CNRS, Vernaison (France). Lab. des Materiaux Organiques

    1994-03-01

    Stable carbon isotope analysis of various heavy oils and some thermo-catalytically converted products was performed with a thermal analyser coupled with an isotopic ratio mass spectrometer. The temperature-programmed oxidative pyroanalysis technique subdivides the classical {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C ratio, affording new insights into the structural composition of heavy oils such as the contribution of naphthenoaromatics, and appears to be of interest for following their thermal refining. 24 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. STABLE CARBON ISOTOPE ANALYSIS OF SUBFOSSIL WOOD FROM AUSTRIAN ALPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    KŁUSEK, MARZENA; PAWEŁCZYK, SŁAWOMIRA

    2015-01-01

    The presented studies were carried out in order to check the usefulness of subfossil wood for stable isotope analysis. The aim of research was also to define the optimal method of subfossil samples preparation. Subfossil samples used during the presented studies are a part of the multi-century dendrochronological scale. This chronology originates in an area situated around a small mountain lake — Schwarzersee, in Austria. The obtained results of stable carbon isotope measurements confirmed that the method of α-cellulose extraction by the application of acidic sodium chlorite and sodium hydroxide solutions removes resins and other mobile compounds from wood. Therefore, in the case of the analysed samples, the additional chemical process of extractives removing was found to be unnecessary. Studied wood samples contained an adequate proportion of α-cellulose similar to the values characteristic for the contemporary trees. This proved an adequate wood preservation which is essential for the conduction of isotopic research. PMID:26346297

  3. On-site isotopic analysis of dissolved inorganic carbon using an isotope ratio infrared spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoltmann, Tim; Mandic, Magda; Stöbener, Nils; Wapelhorst, Eric; Aepfler, Rebecca; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Taubner, Heidi; Jost, Hj; Elvert, Marcus

    2016-04-01

    An Isotope Ratio Infrared Spectrometer (IRIS) has been adapted to perform measurements of δ13C of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in marine pore waters. The resulting prototype allowed highly automated analysis of δ13C isotopic ratios and CO2 concentration. We achieved a throughput of up to 70 samples per day with DIC contents as low as 1.7 μmol C. We achieved an internal precision of 0.066 ‰ and an external precision of 0.16 ‰, which is comparable to values given for Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometers (IRMS). The prototype instrument is field deployable, suitable for shipboard analysis of deep sea core pore waters. However, the validation of the prototype was centered around a field campaign in Eckernförde Bay, NW- Baltic Sea. As a proof of concept, a shallow site within an area of submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) and a site outside this area was investigated. We present profiles of δ13C of DIC over 50 cm exhibiting well understood methane turnover processes (anaerobic oxidation of methane). At the lowest point below the seafloor, microbial reduction of CO2 to CH4 dominates. 12CO2 is reduced preferentially over 13CO2, leading to more positive δ13C values in the remaining DIC pool; in layers closer to the surface, the oxidation of CH4 to CO2 becomes more prominent. Since the CH4 pool is enriched in 12C a shift to more negative δ13C can be observed in the DIC pool. In the upper 15 cm, the pore water DIC mixes with the sea water DIC, increasing δ13C again. Finally, we will present recent developments to further improve performance and future plans for deployments on research cruises.

  4. Sensitivity analysis and quantification of uncertainty for isotopic mixing relationships in carbon cycle research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zobitz, J. M.; Keener, J. P.; Bowling, D. R.

    2004-12-01

    Quantifying and understanding the uncertainty in isotopic mixing relationships is critical to isotopic applications in carbon cycle studies at all spatial and temporal scales. Studies associated with the North American Carbon Program will depend on stable isotope approaches and quantification of isotopic uncertainty. An important application of isotopic mixing relationships is determination of the isotopic content of large-scale respiration (δ 13CR) via an inverse relationship (a Keeling plot) between atmospheric CO2 concentrations ([CO2]) and carbon isotope ratios of CO2 (δ 13C). Alternatively, a linear relationship between [CO2] and the product of [CO2] and δ 13C (a Miller/Tans plot) can also be applied. We used an extensive dataset from the Niwot Ridge Ameriflux Site of [CO2] and δ 13C in forest air to examine contrasting approaches to determine δ 13CR and its uncertainty. These included Keeling plots, Miller/Tans plots, Model I, and Model II regressions Our analysis confirms previous observations that increasing the range of measurements ([CO2] range) reduces the uncertainty associated with δ 13CR. For carbon isotope studies, uncertainty in the isotopic measurements has a greater effect on the uncertainty of δ 13CR than the uncertainty in [CO2]. Reducing the uncertainty of isotopic measurements reduces the uncertainty of δ 13CR even when the [CO2] range of samples is small (13CR. We also find for carbon isotope studies no inherent advantage to using either a Keeling or a Miller/Tans approach to determine δ 13CR.

  5. Mass spectrometric analysis of stable carbon isotopes in abiogenic and biogenic natural compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the general methodology of sup/13/ carbon analysis on mass spectrometer and various preparation systems developed for conversion of samples into isotopically non-fractionated and purified carbon dioxide. Laboratory standards required for sup/13/ C analysis have been calibrated against international standards. The reproducibility/accuracy of sample preparation and analysis on mass spectrometer for sup/13/ C or sup/12/ C measurement is well within the internationally acceptable limits. (author)

  6. Analysis of carbon isotope in phytoliths from C3 and C4 plants and modern soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The analysis of carbon isotope in phytoliths from modern plants and surface soils in China shows that the values of carbon isotope are consistent with those from C3 and C4 plants,and the processes of photosynthesis of the original plants can be clearly identified by carbon isotope in phytoliths.The value of carbon isotope varied from -23.8‰ to -28‰,with the maximum distributed in the latitude zone from 34° N to 40° N in North China and East China areas,and the minimum in the Northeast China and South China regions.The values of carbon of phytoliths tend to increase from low to high and then reduce to low value again as the latitude increases.In the same latitude zone,the carbon isotope in phytoliths from grassland soil under the trees is obviously lower than that from grassland soil without any trees with the difference of 1‰-2‰.

  7. Analysis of the site-specific carbon isotope composition of propane by gas source isotope ratio mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piasecki, Alison; Sessions, Alex; Lawson, Michael; Ferreira, A. A.; Neto, E. V. Santos; Eiler, John M.

    2016-09-01

    Site-specific isotope ratio measurements potentially provide valuable information about the formation and degradation of complex molecules-information that is lost in conventional bulk isotopic measurements. Here we discuss the background and possible applications of such measurements, and present a technique for studying the site-specific carbon isotope composition of propane at natural abundance based on mass spectrometric analysis of the intact propane molecule and its fragment ions. We demonstrate the feasibility of this approach through measurements of mixtures of natural propane and propane synthesized with site-specific 13C enrichment, and we document the limits of precision of our technique. We show that mass balance calculations of the bulk δ13C of propane based on our site-specific measurements is generally consistent with independent constraints on bulk δ13C. We further demonstrate the accuracy of the technique, and illustrate one of its simpler applications by documenting the site-specific carbon isotope signature associated with gas phase diffusion of propane, confirming that our measurements conform to the predictions of the kinetic theory of gases. This method can be applied to propane samples of moderate size (tens of micromoles) isolated from natural gases. Thus, it provides a means of studying the site-specific stable isotope systematics of propane at natural isotope abundances on sample sizes that are readily recovered from many natural environments. This method may also serve as a model for future techniques that apply high-resolution mass spectrometry to study the site-specific isotopic distributions of larger organic molecules, with potential applications to biosynthesis, forensics and other geochemical subjects.

  8. Carbon Stable Isotope Analysis of Methylmercury Toxin in Biological Materials by Gas Chromatography Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masbou, Jeremy; Point, David; Guillou, Gaël; Sonke, Jeroen E; Lebreton, Benoit; Richard, Pierre

    2015-12-01

    A critical component of the biogeochemical cycle of mercury (Hg) is the transformation of inorganic Hg to neurotoxic monomethylmercury (CH3Hg). Humans are exposed to CH3Hg by consuming marine fish, yet the origin of CH3Hg in fish is a topic of debate. The carbon stable isotopic composition (δ(13)C) embedded in the methyl group of CH3Hg remains unexplored. This new isotopic information at the molecular level is thought to represent a new proxy to trace the carbon source at the origin of CH3Hg. Here, we present a compound-specific stable isotope analysis (CSIA) technique for the determination of the δ(13)C value of CH3Hg in biological samples by gas chromatography combustion isotope ratio mass spectrometry analysis (GC-C-IRMS). The method consists first of calibrating a CH3Hg standard solution for δ(13)C CSIA. This was achieved by comparing three independent approaches consisting of the derivatization and halogenation of the CH3Hg standard solution. The determination of δ(13)C(CH3Hg) values on natural biological samples was performed by combining a CH3Hg selective extraction, purification, and halogenation followed by GC-C-IRMS analysis. Reference δ(13)C values were established for a tuna fish certified material (ERM-CE464) originating from the Adriatic Sea (δ(13)C(CH3Hg) = -22.1 ± 1.5‰, ± 2 SD). This value is similar to the δ(13)C value of marine algal-derived particulate organic carbon (δ(13)CPOC = -21‰).

  9. Carbon isotopic analysis of atmospheric methane by isotope-ratio-monitoring gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merritt, Dawn A.; Hayes, J. M.; Des Marais, David J.

    1995-01-01

    Less than 15 min are required for the determination of delta C(sub PDB)-13 with a precision of 0.2 ppt(1 sigma, single measurement) in 5-mL samples of air containing CH4 at natural levels (1.7 ppm). An analytical system including a sample-introduction unit incorporating a preparative gas chromatograph (GC) column for separation of CH4 from N2, O2, and Ar is described. The 15-min procedure includes time for operation of that system, high-resolution chromatographic separation of the CH4, on-line combustion and purification of the products, and isotopic calibration. Analyses of standards demonstrate that systematic errors are absent and that there is no dependence of observed values of delta on sample size. For samples containing 100 ppm or more CH4, preconcentration is not required and the analysis time is less than 5 min. The system utilizes a commercially available, high-sensitivity isotope-ratio mass spectrometer. For optimal conditions of smaple handling and combustion, performance of the system is within a factor of 2 of the shot-noise limit. The potential exists therefore for analysis of samples as small as 15 pmol CH4 with a standard deviation of less than 1 ppt.

  10. On the interference of Kr during carbon isotope analysis of methane using continuous-flow combustion–isotope ratio mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmitt, J.; Seth, B.; Bock, M; van der Veen, C.; Möller, L.; Sapart, C.J.; Prokopiou, M.; Sowers, T.; Röckmann, T.; Fischer, H

    2013-01-01

    Stable carbon isotope analysis of methane ( 13C of CH4) on atmospheric samples is one key method to constrain the current and past atmospheric CH4 budget. A frequently applied measurement technique is gas chromatography (GC) isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) coupled to a combustion-preconcentra

  11. An analytical system for stable isotope analysis on carbon monoxide using continuous-flow isotope-ratio mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pathirana, S. L.; Van Der Veen, C.; Popa, M. E.; Röckmann, T.

    2015-01-01

    A fully automated system for the determination of δ13C and δ18O in atmospheric CO has been developed. CO is extracted from an air sample and converted into carbon dioxide (CO2) using the Schütze reagent. The isotopic composition is determined with an isotope-ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS) technique.

  12. Robust optical carbon dioxide isotope analyzer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Isotopic analysis of carbon dioxide is an important tool for characterization of the exchange and transformation of carbon between the biosphere and the atmosphere....

  13. In situ carbon isotope analysis of Archean organic matter with SIMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williford, K. H.; Ushikubo, T.; Lepot, K.; Hallmann, C.; Spicuzza, M. J.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Summons, R. E.; Valley, J. W.

    2011-12-01

    Spatiotemporal variability in the carbon isotope composition of sedimentary organic matter (OM) preserves information about the evolution of the biosphere and of the exogenic carbon cycle as a whole. Primary compositions, and imprints of the post-depositional processes that obscure them, exist at the scale of individual sedimentary grains (mm to μm). Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) (1) enables analysis at these scales and in petrographic context, (2) permits morphological and compositional characterization of the analyte and associated minerals prior to isotopic analysis, and (3) reveals patterns of variability homogenized by bulk techniques. Here we present new methods for in situ organic carbon isotope analysis with sub-permil precision and spatial resolution to 1 μm using SIMS, as well as new data acquired from a suite of Archean rocks. Three analytical protocols were developed for the CAMECA ims1280 at WiscSIMS to analyze domains of varying size and carbon concentration. Average reproducibility (at 2SD) using a 6 μm spot size with two Faraday cup detectors was 0.4%, and 0.8% for analyses using 1 μm and 3 μm spot sizes with a Faraday cup (for 12C) and an electron multiplier (for 13C). Eight coals, two ambers, a shungite, and a graphite were evaluated for μm-scale isotopic heterogeneity, and LCNN anthracite (δ13C = -23.56 ± 0.1%, 2SD) was chosen as the working standard. Correlation between instrumental bias and H/C was observed and calibrated for each analytical session using organic materials with H/C between 0.1 and 1.5 (atomic), allowing a correction based upon a 13CH/13C measurement included in every analysis and a 12CH measurement made immediately after every analysis. The total range of the H/C effect observed for the Archean samples analyzed was < 3%. Analyses of Archean OM domains for which 12C count rate varies with the proportions of organic carbon, carbonate carbon, and quartz suggest that instrumental bias is consistent for 12C count

  14. Simultaneous Analysis of Nitrogen, Carbon and Sulfur Stable Isotopes and Concentrations in Organics and Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mambelli, S.; Brooks, P. D.; Sutka, R.; Hughes, S.; Finstad, K. M.; Pakes, M. J.; Dawson, T. E.

    2014-12-01

    To date, analysis of diet, food web complexities, biogeochemical cycles, and ecosystem functioning have largely focused on using variation in carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) stable isotope ratios. This is because a great deal is understood about what leads to this variation and because the dual stable isotope analysis of these two elements using continuous flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) is now commonplace. However, the aforementioned studies may all greatly benefit from the additional information one can get from also having sulfur (S) stable isotopes ratio data. Until very recently the analysis of δ34S has traditionally required an additional and often more difficult analytical procedure. Here, we report on the development of a new method that simultaneously analyzes the elemental and isotopic composition of N, C and S in a single sample. The new commercially available instrument includes a modified NCS elemental analyzer in line with an IRMS outfitted with 100 volt AD converters for wide dynamic range. We tested, and modified, this instrument to achieve maximum accuracy and precision for the isotopic measurements of all three elements. We found that the original design needed improvements to achieve our goals by: a) including a component (originally designed for trapping water) as buffer to reduce S memory and obtain reliable δ34S analysis; b) adding an external furnace for complete reduction of nitrogen oxides to N2 gas for accurate δ15N; c) adding a magnesium perchlorate water trap immediately after the reduction tube to minimize any water condensation that could also influence S memory. We analyzed a selection of organic materials and soils with approximately a 1:2 standards versus unknowns ratio per run. Using this NCS set-up, the precision of the N and C isotopic measurements was comparable to the one usually attained in NC mode alone (standard deviation of ± 0.13 δ15N in the range 30 to 400 µg N, and of ± 0.12 δ13C in the range 0.20 to 4 mg

  15. Optimizing sample pretreatment for compound-specific stable carbon isotopic analysis of amino sugars in marine sediment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Zhu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Amino sugars are quantitatively significant constituents of soil and marine sediment, but their sources and turnover in environmental samples remain poorly understood. The stable carbon isotopic composition of amino sugars can provide information on the lifestyles of their source organisms and can be monitored during incubations with labeled substrates to estimate the turnover rates of microbial populations. However, until now, such investigation has been carried out only with soil samples, partly because of the much lower abundance of amino sugars in marine environments. We therefore optimized a procedure for compound-specific isotopic analysis of amino sugars in marine sediment employing gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry. The whole procedure consisted of hydrolysis, neutralization, enrichment, and derivatization of amino sugars. Except for the derivatization step, the protocol introduced negligible isotopic fractionation, and the minimum requirement of amino sugar for isotopic analysis was 20 ng, i.e. equivalent to ~ 8 ng of amino sugar carbon. Our results obtained from δ13C analysis of amino sugars in selected marine sediment samples showed that muramic acid had isotopic imprints from indigenous bacterial activities, whereas glucosamine and galactosamine were mainly derived from organic detritus. The analysis of stable carbon isotopic compositions of amino sugars opens a promising window for the investigation of microbial metabolisms in marine sediments and the deep marine biosphere.

  16. Open tube combustion method of organic samples for stable carbon isotope analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velivetskaya, Tatiana A; Ignatyev, Alexander V; Reize, Marina V; Kiyashko, Serguei I

    2007-01-01

    A simple and effective method for the conversion of organic carbon into carbon dioxide for analysis of stable carbon isotopes (delta(13)C) in samples of various organic substances, soils, sedimentary rocks, oils and volatile organic liquids is presented. The conversion of organic carbon of the samples is carried out in a quartz reactor connected to a vacuum line for CO(2) freezing and purification. A solid organic sample mixed with CuO is placed at the reactor bottom and the reactor is subsequently filled with granular CuO. One end of the CuO column is preheated to 850 degrees C while the other end of the column in contact with the sample is kept at ambient temperature. Heating of the sample (850 degrees C) and the remainder of the column is then performed. The preheated part of the column provides efficient conversion of carbon into CO(2). The reactor for the conversion of volatile liquid organic compounds is filled with granular CuO. The column of CuO is heated to 850 degrees C. Samples of volatile liquids are introduced into the reactor through a septum using a microsyringe. Complete conversion takes 10 min for solid samples and 3 min for volatile liquids. The precision of the delta(13)C analysis for solid and volatile liquid organic substances is +/-0.1 per thousand and +/-0.04 per thousand, respectively.

  17. Spatially Resolved, In Situ Carbon Isotope Analysis of Archean Organic Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williford, Kenneth H.; Ushikubo, Takayuki; Lepot, Kevin; Hallmann, Christian; Spicuzza, Michael J.; Eigenbrode, Jennifer L.; Summons, Roger E.; Valley, John W.

    2011-01-01

    Spatiotemporal variability in the carbon isotope composition of sedimentary organic matter (OM) preserves information about the evolution of the biosphere and of the exogenic carbon cycle as a whole. Primary compositions, and imprints of the post-depositional processes that obscure them, exist at the scale of individual sedimentary grains (mm to micron). Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) (1) enables analysis at these scales and in petrographic context, (2) permits morphological and compositional characterization of the analyte and associated minerals prior to isotopic analysis, and (3) reveals patterns of variability homogenized by bulk techniques. Here we present new methods for in situ organic carbon isotope analysis with sub-permil precision and spatial resolution to 1 micron using SIMS, as well as new data acquired from a suite of Archean rocks. Three analytical protocols were developed for the CAMECA ims1280 at WiscSIMS to analyze domains of varying size and carbon concentration. Average reproducibility (at 2SD) using a 6 micron spot size with two Faraday cup detectors was 0.4 %, and 0.8 % for analyses using 1 micron and 3 micron spot sizes with a Faraday cup (for C-12) and an electron multiplier (for C-13). Eight coals, two ambers, a shungite, and a graphite were evaluated for micron-scale isotopic heterogeneity, and LCNN anthracite (delta C-13 = -23.56 +/- 0.1 %, 2SD) was chosen as the working standard. Correlation between instrumental bias and H/C was observed and calibrated for each analytical session using organic materials with H/C between 0.1 and 1.5 (atomic), allowing a correction based upon a C-13H/C-13 measurement included in every analysis. Matrix effects of variable C/SiO2 were evaluated by measuring mm to sub-micron graphite domains in quartzite from Bogala mine, Sri Lanka. Apparent instrumental bias and C-12 count rate are correlated in this case, but this may be related to a crystal orientation effect in graphite. Analyses of amorphous

  18. An analytical system for stable isotope analysis on carbon monoxide using continuous-flow isotope-ratio mass spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    S. L. Pathirana; C. van der Veen; Popa, M. E.; T. Röckmann

    2015-01-01

    A fully automated system for the determination of δ13C and δ18O in atmospheric CO has been developed. CO is extracted from an air sample and converted into carbon dioxide (CO2) using the Schütze reagent. The isotopic composition is determined with an isotope-ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS) technique. The entire system is continuously flushed with high-purity helium (He), the carrier gas. The blank signal of the Schütze reagent is ~ 4 nmol mol−1, or 1–3 % of the typical sam...

  19. Stable isotope analysis of dissolved carbon species of Hot Lake, WA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, S.; Moran, J.; Cory, A. B.; Lindemann, S. R.; Fredrickson, J.

    2013-12-01

    Hot Lake is a hypersaline, meromictic lake in north-central Washington. The lake is epsomitic, with seasonably-variable salinity (.2 to 2 M magnesium sulfate) and produces carbonates and salt precipitates. The maximum depth of the lake is around 2.5 m, and below a thermocline there is intense solar heat retention in the monolimnion, often exceeding 50°C. Despite these extreme and variable conditions, a microbial mat of up to 1.5 cm thick thrives annually in Hot Lake. The mat is widespread throughout the lake at water depths (during our experiments) ranging from 60cm-140cm. It is comprised of a variety of cyanobacteria along with other autotrophic and heterotrophic bacteria. These populations are visibly stratified with four consistent laminae displaying differences in bacterial pigmentation. Many of the layers contain carbonate species, but the full relationship between the mat and the carbonate crystallization is not known. We are studying the microbial interactions and carbon cycling of the mat communities, using stable isotope analysis of the mat and the lake water, both in situ and ex situ. We are exploring the incorporation and movement of carbon in the mat, spatially and temporally, to understand the fixation mechanisms and metabolic processes at play in this environment. This was done primarily using stable isotope ratio mass spectrometry. The focus of this work is on the study and measurement of dissolved organic and inorganic carbon using a GasBench and IRMS setup, following methods adapted from Lang et al. (2012). To account for the unique chemistry of Hot Lake, trials on the effects of oxidation conditions and salinity were done on lab-synthesized samples to compare to Hot Lake results. The majority of lake water analyses were done in conjunction with a stable isotope probing (SIP) experiment, completed during two 24-hour periods at Hot Lake in June and July of 2013. The SIP experiments included ex situ incubations (in separate glass containers on the

  20. Dynamics of carbon in deep soils inferred from carbon stable isotopes signatures : a worldwide meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balesdent, Jérôme; Basile-Doelsch, Isabelle; Chadoeuf, Joël; Cornu, Sophie; Derrien, Delphine; Fekiacova, Zuzana; Hatté, Christine

    2014-05-01

    The contribution of soil carbon deeper than 30 cm to the atmospheric carbon balance is still poorly understood. A very straightforward quantification of the gross exchange of carbon between the atmosphere and soil organic matter can be obtained at places where the 13C/12C signature of vegetation has been changed for known durations, due to switch of the photosynthetic metabolism (C3 or C4) or to Free Air Carbon Enrichment experiments. We compiled C and 13C profile data of 113 sites of this type, either gahered from the literature or from our own measurements. Each site comprised two profiles : one where the 13C/12C of the vegetation had been changed, and a reference profile with unchanged vegetation 13C/12C. An isotope mixing equation was used, which takes into account the natural isotope enrichments with depth and decay. Three main variables were calculated at any depth from 0 to 100 cm and in a few sites down to 200 cm : the carbon content, the proportion of new carbon (aged less than the duration of change t) and the amount of new carbon. The database concerned 23 countries, various climates (58% intertropical and 42% between 23° to 56° latitude) and various soil types and textures. Landuses and vegetation consisted in 26% of forests and woodlands, 35% of grasslands and 38% of cropped systems. The duration of the natural labelling t ranged from 2 years to ca. 4000 years. Peatlands, boreal, and desert environments were absent from the database. Non-linear regressions with time across the dataset yielded kinetic parameters of the age distribution on one hand and of the flux of new carbon incorporation (kg C m-2 yr-1) on the other, each calculated by 10 cm depth increments. On the average, the median ages of carbon increase from ca. 15 years at 0 cm to more than 1000 years at 100 cm. Turnover is on the average 2 to 3 times slower for the subsoil (30-100 cm) than for the topsoil (0-30 cm). Based on the incorporation of new C in the first decades, the carbon input

  1. Lipid correction for carbon stable isotope analysis of deep-sea fishes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Joel C.; Sutton, Tracey T.

    2010-08-01

    Stable isotope analysis of fish tissue can aid studies of deep-sea food webs because sampling difficulties severely limit sample sizes of fish for traditional diet studies. The carbon stable isotope ratio (δ 13C) is widely used in food web studies, but it must be corrected to remove variability associated with varying lipid content in the tissue. A lipid correction has not been determined for any deep-sea fish. These fishes are ideal for studying lipid correction because lipid content varies widely among species. Our objective was to evaluate an application of a mass balance δ 13C correction to a taxonomically diverse group of deep-sea fishes by determining the effect of lipid extraction on the stable isotope ratios, examining the quality of the model parameters derived for the mass balance correction, and comparing the correction to published results. We measured the lipid extraction effect on the nitrogen stable isotope ratio (δ 15N) and δ 13C of muscle tissue from 30 North Atlantic species. Lipid extraction significantly increased tissue δ 15N (+0.66‰) and δ 13C values, but the treatment effect on δ 13C was dependent on C:N, a proxy for lipid content. We compared the lipid-extracted δ 13C to the δ 13C predicted by the mass balance correction using model variables estimated from either all individuals (pooled) or species-by-species or using published values from other species. The correction using the species-by-species approach performed best; however, all three approaches produced corrected values that were generally within 0.5‰ of the measured lipid-free δ 13C and that had a small over-all bias (deep-sea fishes, is similar to that developed for other fishes, and recommend caution when applying a generalized correction to fish with high lipid content (C:N >8).

  2. Carbon and oxygen isotope microanalysis of carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velivetskaya, Tatiana A; Ignatiev, Alexander V; Gorbarenko, Sergey A

    2009-08-30

    Technical modification of the conventional method for the delta(13)C and delta(18)O analysis of 10-30 microg carbonate samples is described. The CO(2) extraction is carried out in vacuum using 105% phosphoric acid at 95 degrees C, and the isotopic composition of CO(2) is measured in a helium flow by gas chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/IRMS). The feed-motion of samples to the reaction vessel provides sequential dropping of only the samples (without the sample holder) into the acid, preventing the contamination of acid and allowing us to use the same acid to carry out very large numbers of analyses. The high accuracy and high reproducibility of the delta(13)C and delta(18)O analyses were demonstrated by measurements of international standards and comparison of results obtained by our method and by the conventional method. Our method allows us to analyze 10 microg of the carbonate with a standard deviation of +/-0.05 per thousand for delta(13)C and delta(18)O. The method has been used successfully for the analyses of the oxygen and carbon isotopic composition of the planktonic and benthic foraminifera in detailed palaeotemperature reconstructions of the Okhotsk Sea. PMID:19603476

  3. Isotopic analysis of dissolved organic carbon in produced water brines by wet chemical oxidation and cavity ring-down spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Randal; Conaway, Christopher; Saad, Nabil; Kharaka, Yousif

    2013-04-01

    Identification of fluid migration and escape from intentionally altered subsurface geologic systems, such as in hydraulic fracturing, enhanced oil recovery, and carbon sequestration activities, is an important issue for environmental regulators based on the traction that the "fracking" process is gathering across the United States. Given diverse injected fluid compositions and the potential for toxic or regulated compounds to be released, one of the most important steps in the process is accurately identifying evidence of injected fluid escape during and after injection processes. An important tool in identifying differences between the natural groundwater and injected fluid is the isotopic composition of dissolved constituents including inorganic components such as Sr and carbon isotopes of the dissolved organic compounds. Since biological processes in the mesothermal subsurface can rapidly alter the organic composition of a fluid, stable carbon isotopes of the dissolved organic compounds (DOC) are an effective means to identify differences in the origin of two fluids, especially when coupled with inorganic compound analyses. The burgeoning field of cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) for isotopic analysis presents an opportunity to obtain rapid, reliable and cost-effective isotopic measurements of DOC in potentially affected groundwater for the identification of leakage or the improvement of hydrogeochemical pathway models. Here we adapt the use of the novel hyphenated TOC-CRDS carbon isotope analyzer for the analysis of DOC in produced water by wet oxidation and describe the methods to evaluate performance and obtain useful information at higher salinities. Our methods are applied to a specific field example in a CO2-enhanced EOR field in Cranfield, Mississippi (USA) as a means to demonstrate the ability to distinguish natural and injected DOC using the stable isotopic composition of the dissolved organic carbon when employing the novel TOC-CRDS instrumentation

  4. Variation in stable carbon isotopes in organic matter from the Gunflint Iron Formation. [Precambrian rock analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barghoorn, E. S.; Knoll, A. H.; Dembicki, H., Jr.; Meinschein, W. G.

    1977-01-01

    Results are presented for an isotopic analysis of the kerogen separated from 15 samples of the Gunflint Iron Formation, Ontario, and the conformably overlying Rove Formation. Reasons for which the Gunflint Iron Formation is suitable for such a study of a single Precambrian formation are identified. The general geology of the formation is outlined along with sample selection, description, and preparation. Major conclusions are that the basal Gunflint algal chert and shale facies are depleted in C-13 relative to the chert-carbonate and taconite facies, that differences in the delta C-13 values between Gunflint facies correlate with marked differences in their biological source materials as evidenced by their respective microbiotas, that the anthraxolites are anomalously depleted in C-13 relative to the kerogen of their encompassing cherts and shales, and that the effects of igneous intrusion and concomitant thermal alteration are shown by a marked loss of C-12 at the contact. The demonstration that not all kerogens are isotopically alike stresses the importance of facies data to the interpretation of C-13/C-12 ratios of ancient organic matter.

  5. A novel high-temperature combustion based system for stable isotope analysis of dissolved organic carbon in aqueous samples. : I development and validation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Federherr, E.; Cerli, C.; Kirkels, F. M. S. A.; Kalbitz, K.; Kupka, H. J.; Dunsbach, R.; Lange, L.; Schmidt, T. C.

    2014-01-01

    RATIONALE: Traditionally, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) stable isotope analysis (SIA) is performed using either offline sample preparation followed by elemental analyzer/isotope ratiomass spectrometry (EA/IRMS) or a wet chemical oxidation (WCO)-based device coupled to an isotope ratio mass spectrom

  6. Use of stable carbon isotope analysis to assess natural attenuation of organic contaminants in the unsaturated zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction Natural attenuation is an attractive remediation strategy when dealing with petroleum-hydrocarbon contaminated sites because of its cost efficiency. The unsaturated zone can play an important role in regulating the contaminant transfer between soil and groundwater. On one hand, contaminants from the soil zone may be degraded in the unsaturated zone thus preventing groundwater contamination. On the other hand, contaminants diffusing from the subsurface towards the atmosphere may be eliminated before reaching potential targets. Biodegradation is usually the main process leading to contaminant destruction and is usually considered to be the only process to influence 13C/12C ratio of organic contaminants in the saturated zone. Therefore, carbon and hydrogen isotope analysis has been used as a tool to demonstrate biodegradation (Griebler et al. 2004, Steinbach et al. 2004). Carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionation occurs during biodegradation as a consequence of the slightly faster cleavage of chemical bonds between light isotopes of an element compared to heavy isotopes. The difference in degradation rates leads to an enrichment of the heavy isotopes in the residual contaminant pool compared to the initial value. Most of the field studies focused on the saturated zone (Meckenstock et al. 2004) compare to only few studies on the unsaturated zone (Kirtland et al. 2005, Stehmeier et al. 1999). The aim of this study was to evaluate whether compound-specific stable isotope analysis can be used to demonstrate biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in the unsaturated zone. The study included a field experiment and mathematical simulations. At the field site, a defined mixture of hydrocarbons was buried in a sandy unsaturated zone and the evolution of concentration and isotope ratios of various hydrocarbons was followed using a dense network of sampling points. The study was complemented with two mathematical simulations performed to gain insight into the

  7. Carbon-Isotopic Analysis of Individual Pigments by HPLC-Moving Wire-IRMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sessions, A. L.; Keely, B. J.; Hayes, J. M.

    2003-12-01

    We have developed a method for directly analyzing the carbon isotope ratios of individual pigments, including chlorophyll (chl) and its derivatives, by coupling a high-performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC) to an isotope-ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS) via a novel `moving-wire' interface. Pigments were separated on a reversed-phase C18 column, using a binary gradient modified from Airs et al. (2001, J. Chrom. A 917, 167-177). The HPLC effluent was dried onto a continuously-spooling nickel wire, and the involatile sample residue was combusted to CO2 and transferred to the IRMS for isotopic analysis. Replicate analyses of a standard solution yield precision for delta13C of better than 0.2‰ for injections containing ~5 μ g of chl-a. A five-fold improvement in sensitivity should be attainable using capillary HPLC to further reduce solvent volumes. The biomarker potential of tetrapyrrole pigments, combined with the geochemical information recorded by isotopic compositions, makes this combination a potent tool for biogeochemical studies. As a demonstration, we analyzed chlorophyll degradation products in sediments from a lake and a salina. First, compounds derived from bacteriochlorophylls (bchl)-c and -d were extracted from sediment cores taken at Kirisjes Lake (Larsmann Hills, Antarctica). These pigments are products of green sulfur bacteria and indicate the presence of an anoxic photic zone. The δ 13C values of bchl-related compounds are near -25‰ . Using published fractionations for Chlorobium species to extrapolate, dissolved CO2 in Kirisjes Lake probably had a δ 13C value of -12 to -21‰ and was strongly influenced by the recycling of organic carbon, possibly including methane. Second, compounds derived from chl-a, bchl-c, and bchl-d were isolated from sediments taken below a living microbial mat in the hypersaline les Salines de la Trinital (South Catalonia, Spain). The sediments contain visible remnants of past microbial mats and pigment distributions

  8. Carbon isotope geochemistry and geobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmarais, D.

    1985-01-01

    Carbon isotope fractionation values were used to understand the history of the biosphere. For example, plankton analyses confirmed that marine extinctions at the end of the Cretaceous period were indeed severe (see Hsu's article in Sundquist and Broeker, 1984). Variations in the isotopic compositions of carbonates and evaporitic sulfates during the Paleozoic reflect the relative abundances of euxinic (anoxic) marine environments and organic deposits from terrestrial flora. The carbon isotopic composition of Precambrian sediments suggest that the enzyme ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase has existed for perhaps 3.5 billion years.

  9. Salinity of the Eocene Arctic Ocean from oxygen isotope analysis of fish bone carbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddell, Lindsey M.; Moore, Theodore C.

    2008-03-01

    Stable isotope analysis was performed on the structural carbonate of fish bone apatite from early and early middle Eocene samples (˜55 to ˜45 Ma) recently recovered from the Lomonosov Ridge by Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 302 (the Arctic Coring Expedition). The δ18O values of the Eocene samples ranged from -6.84‰ to -2.96‰ Vienna Peedee belemnite, with a mean value of -4.89‰, compared to 2.77‰ for a Miocene sample in the overlying section. An average salinity of 21 to 25‰ was calculated for the Eocene Arctic, compared to 35‰ for the Miocene, with lower salinities during the Paleocene Eocene thermal maximum, the Azolla event at ˜48.7 Ma, and a third previously unidentified event at ˜47.6 Ma. At the Azolla event, where the organic carbon content of the sediment reaches a maximum, a positive δ13C excursion was observed, indicating unusually high productivity in the surface waters.

  10. Congener-specific carbon isotopic analysis of technical PCB and PCN mixtures using two-dimensional gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horii, Yuichi; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Petrick, Gert; Gamo, Toshitaka; Falandysz, Jerzy; Yamashita, Nobuyoshi

    2005-06-01

    Analysis of stable carbon isotope fractionation is a useful method to study the sources and fate of anthropogenic organic contaminants such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in the environment. To evaluate the utility of carbon isotopes, determination of isotopic ratios of 13C/12C in source materials, for example, technical PCB preparations, is needed. In this study, we determined delta13C values of 31 chlorobiphenyl (CB) congeners in 18 technical PCB preparations and 15 chloronaphthalene (CN) congeners in 6 polychlorinated naphthalene preparations using two-dimensional gas chromatography-combustion furnace-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (2DGC-C-IRMS). Development of 2DGC-IRMS enabled improved resolution and sensitivity of compound-specific carbon isotope analysis (CSIA) of CB or CN congeners. Delta13C values of PCB congeners ranged from -34.4 (Delors) to -22.0/1000 (Sovol). Analogous PCB preparations with similar chlorine content, but different geographical origin, had different delta13C values. PCB preparations from Eastern European countries--Delors, Sovol, Trichlorodiphenyl, and Chlorofen--had distinct delta13C values. PCB mixtures showed increased 13C depletion with increasing chlorine content. Delta13C values for individual CB congeners varied depending on the degree of chlorination in technical mixtures. Delta13C values of CN congeners in Halowaxes ranged from -26.3 to -21.7/1000 and these values are within the ranges observed for PCBs. This study establishes the range of delta13C values in technical PCB and PCN preparations, which may prove to be useful in the determination of sources of these compounds in the environment. This is the first study to employ 2DGC-IRMS analysis of delta13C values in technical PCB and PCN preparations.

  11. Authenticity and Traceability of Vanilla Flavors by Analysis of Stable Isotopes of Carbon and Hydrogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anne-Mette Sølvbjerg; Fromberg, Arvid; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz

    2014-01-01

    . The authenticity of the flavor compound vanillin was evaluated on the basis of measurements of ratios of carbon stable isotopes (delta C-13). It was found that results of delta C-13 for vanillin extracted from Vanilla planifolia and Vanilla tahitensis were significantly different (t test) and that it was possible...... to differentiate these two groups of natural vanillin from vanillin produced otherwise. Vanilla flavors were also analyzed for ratios of hydrogen stable isotopes (delta H-2). A graphic representation of delta C-13 versus delta H-2 revealed that vanillin extracted from pods grown in adjacent geographic origins...

  12. Multi-decadal carbon and water relations of African tropical humid forests: a tree-ring stable isotope analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hufkens, Koen; Helle, Gerd; Beeckman, Hans; de Haulleville, Thales; Kearsley, Elizabeth; Boeckx, Pascal

    2013-04-01

    Little is known about the temporal dynamics of the carbon sequestering capacity and dynamics of African tropical humid forest ecosystems in response to various environmental drivers. This lack of knowledge is mainly due to the absence of ecosystem scale flux measurements of gas exchange. However, tree growth often displays itself as alternating pattern of visible rings due to the seasonally varying growth speed of the vascular cambium. Consequently, analysis of tree growth through tree-ring analysis provides us with insights into past responses of the carbon sequestering capacity of key species to abrupt ecosystem disturbances and, while slower, a changing climate. Not only does the width and density of growth rings reflect annual growth but their isotopic composition of 13C/12C and 18O/16O isotopes also reveal the environmental conditions in which the trees were growing. In particular, stable isotope ratios in tree-rings of carbon are influenced by fractionation through carboxylation during photosynthesis and changes in leaf stomatal conductance. Similarly, fractionation of oxygen isotopes of soil water occurs at the leaf level through evapo-transipiration. As a consequence, 18O/16O (δ18O) values in wood cores will reflect both the signal of the source water as well as that of for example summer humidity. Therefore, both C and O stable isotopes might not only be valuable as proxy data for past climatic conditions but they also serve as an important tool in understanding carbon and water relations within a tropical forest ecosystems. To this end we correlate long term climate records (1961 - present) with tree ring measurement of incremental growth and high resolution analysis of tree-core stable isotope composition(δ13C , δ18O) at a tropical humid forests in the DR Congo. The Yangambi Man And Biosphere (MAB) reserve is located in the north-eastern part of DR Congo, with a distinct tropical rainforest climate. In addition to the tree-core data records and

  13. An analytical system for stable isotope analysis on carbon monoxide using continuous-flow isotope-ratio mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathirana, S. L.; van der Veen, C.; Popa, M. E.; Röckmann, T.

    2015-12-01

    A fully automated system for the determination of δ13C and δ18O in atmospheric CO has been developed. CO is extracted from an air sample and converted into carbon dioxide (CO2) using the Schütze reagent. The isotopic composition is determined with an isotope-ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS) technique. The entire system is continuously flushed with high-purity helium (He), the carrier gas. The blank signal of the Schütze reagent is ~ 4 nmol mol-1, or 1-3 % of the typical sample size. The repeatability is 0.1 ‰ for δ13C and 0.2 ‰ for δ18O. The peak area allows for simultaneous determination of the mole fraction with an analytical repeatability of ~ 0.7 nmol mol-1 for 100 mL of ambient air (185.4 nmol mol-1 of CO). An automated single measurement is performed in only 18 min, and the achieved time efficiency (and small volume of sample air) allows for repetitive measurements practically.

  14. Carbon isotopes in mollusk shell carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnaughey, Ted A.; Gillikin, David Paul

    2008-10-01

    Mollusk shells contain many isotopic clues about calcification physiology and environmental conditions at the time of shell formation. In this review, we use both published and unpublished data to discuss carbon isotopes in both bivalve and gastropod shell carbonates. Land snails construct their shells mainly from respired CO2, and shell δ13C reflects the local mix of C3 and C4 plants consumed. Shell δ13C is typically >10‰ heavier than diet, probably because respiratory gas exchange discards CO2, and retains the isotopically heavier HCO3 -. Respired CO2 contributes less to the shells of aquatic mollusks, because CO2/O2 ratios are usually higher in water than in air, leading to more replacement of respired CO2 by environmental CO2. Fluid exchange with the environment also brings additional dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) into the calcification site. Shell δ13C is typically a few ‰ lower than ambient DIC, and often decreases with age. Shell δ13C retains clues about processes such as ecosystem metabolism and estuarine mixing. Ca2+ ATPase-based models of calcification physiology developed for corals and algae likely apply to mollusks, too, but lower pH and carbonic anhydrase at the calcification site probably suppress kinetic isotope effects. Carbon isotopes in biogenic carbonates are clearly complex, but cautious interpretation can provide a wealth of information, especially after vital effects are better understood.

  15. Carbon and Nitrogen Isotope Analysis of Atrazine and Desethylatrazine at Sub-μg/L Concentrations in Groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreglmann, Kathrin; Hoeche, Martina; Steinbeiss, Sibylle; Reinnicke, Sandra; Elsner, Martin

    2013-04-01

    Environmental degradation of organic micropollutants is difficult to monitor due to their diffuse and ubiquitous input. Current approaches - concentrations measurements over time, or daughter-to-parent compound ratios - may fall short, because they do not consider dilution, compound- specific sorption characteristics or alternative degradation pathways. Compound specific isotope analysis (CSIA) offers an alternative approach based on evidence from isotope values. Until now, however, the relatively high limits for precise isotope analysis by gas chromatography - isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-IRMS) have impeded CSIA of sub µg/L scale micropollutant concentrations in field samples. We present the first measurements of C and N isotope ratios of the herbicide atrazine and its metabolite desethylatrazine at concentrations of 100 to 1000 ng/L in natural groundwater samples. Solid phase extraction and preparative HPLC were tested and validated for preconcentration and cleanup of groundwater samples of up to 10 liters without bias by isotope effects. Matrix interferences after solid phase extraction could be greatly reduced by a preparative HPLC cleanup step prior to GC-IRMS analysis. Sensitivity was increased by a factor of 6 to 8 by changing the injection method from large-volume-injection to cold-on-column injection on the GC-IRMS system. Carbon and nitrogen isotope values of field samples showed no obvious correlation with concentrations or desethylatrazine-to-atrazine ratios. Contrary to expectations, however, δ13C values of desethylatrazine were consistently less negative than those of atrazine from the same sites. Potentially, this line of evidence may contain information about further desethylatrazine degradation. In such a case the common practice of using desethylatrazine-to-atrazine ratios would underestimate natural atrazine degradation.

  16. [Meta-analysis of stable carbon and nitrogen isotopic enrichment factors for aquatic animals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Liang; Sun, Cui-ping; Ren, Wei-zheng; Zhang, Jian; Tang, Jian-iun; Hu, Liana-liang; Chen, Xin

    2016-02-01

    Isotopic enrichment factor (Δ, the difference between the δ value of food and a consumer tissue) is an important parameter in using stable isotope analysis (SIA) to reconstruct diets, characterize trophic relationships, elucidate patterns of resource allocation, and construct food webs. Isotopic enrichment factor has been considered as a constancy value across a broad range of animals. However, recent studies showed that the isotopic enrichment factor differed among various types of animals although the magnitude of variation was not clear. Here, we conducted a meta-analysis to synthesize and compare Δ13C and Δ15N among four types of aquatic animals (teleosts, crustaceans, reptiles and molluscs). We searched for papers published before 2014 on Web of Science and CNKI using the key words "stable isotope or isotopic fractionation or fractionation factor or isotopic enrichment or trophic enrichment". Forty-two publications that contain 140 studies on Δ13C and 159 studies on Δ15N were obtained. We conducted three parallel meta-analyses by using three types of weights (the reciprocal of variance as weights, the sample size as weights, and equal weights). The results showed that no significant difference in Δ13C among different animal types (teleosts 1.0 per thousand, crustaceans 1.3 per thousand, reptiles 0.5 per thousand, and molluscs 1.5 per thousand), while Δ15N values were significantly different (teleosts 2.4 per thousand, crustaceans 3.6 per thousand, reptiles 1.0 per thousand and molluscs 2.5 per thousand). Our results suggested that the overall mean of Δ13C could be used as a general enrichment factor, but Δ15N should be chosen according to the type of aquatic animals in using SIA to analyze trophic relationships, patterns of resource allocation and food webs.

  17. Mechanistic insights into the formation of chloroform from natural organic matter using stable carbon isotope analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breider, Florian; Hunkeler, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Chloroform can be naturally formed in terrestrial environments (e.g. forest soils, peatland) by chlorination of natural organic matter (NOM). Recently, it was demonstrated that natural and anthropogenic chloroform have a distinctly different carbon isotope signature that makes it possible to identify its origin in soil and groundwater. In order to evaluate the contribution of different functional groups to chloroform production and factors controlling the isotopic composition of chloroform, carbon isotope trends during chlorination of model compounds, soil organic matter (SOM) and humic acids were evaluated, and apparent kinetic isotope effects (AKIEs) quantified. Phenol and propanone were selected as model compounds representing common functional groups in NOM. Chlorination was induced by hypochlorous acid to mimic natural chlorination. The pH ranged between 4 and 8 to cover typical soil conditions. For each model compound and pH, different AKIEs were observed. For phenol, the AKIE was normal at pH 4 (1.0156 ± 0.0012) and inverse at pH 8 (0.9900 ± 0.0007). For 2-propoanol, an opposite pH dependence was observed with an inverse AKIE at pH 4 (0.9935 ± 0.0007) and a normal AKIE at pH 8 (1.0189 ± 0.0016). The variations of the AKIE values suggest that the rate-limiting step of the reaction is either the re-hybridization of the carbon atom involved in chloroform formation or the hydrolysis of trichloroacetyl intermediates depending on the nature of functional group and pH. The chloroform formation from humic acid and SOM gives rise to small isotope variations. A comparison of the isotopic trends of chloroform formed from humic acid and SOM with those found for the model compounds suggest that opposed AKIE associated with the chlorination of phenolic and ketone moieties of NOM partly compensate each other during chlorination of NOM indicating that different types of functional groups contribute to chloroform formation.

  18. Field-based stable isotope analysis of carbon dioxide by mid-infrared laser spectroscopy for carbon capture and storage monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Geldern, Robert; Nowak, Martin E; Zimmer, Martin; Szizybalski, Alexandra; Myrttinen, Anssi; Barth, Johannes A C; Jost, Hans-Jürg

    2014-12-16

    A newly developed isotope ratio laser spectrometer for CO2 analyses has been tested during a tracer experiment at the Ketzin pilot site (northern Germany) for CO2 storage. For the experiment, 500 tons of CO2 from a natural CO2 reservoir was injected in supercritical state into the reservoir. The carbon stable isotope value (δ(13)C) of injected CO2 was significantly different from background values. In order to observe the breakthrough of the isotope tracer continuously, the new instruments were connected to a stainless steel riser tube that was installed in an observation well. The laser instrument is based on tunable laser direct absorption in the mid-infrared. The instrument recorded a continuous 10 day carbon stable isotope data set with 30 min resolution directly on-site in a field-based laboratory container during a tracer experiment. To test the instruments performance and accuracy the monitoring campaign was accompanied by daily CO2 sampling for laboratory analyses with isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). The carbon stable isotope ratios measured by conventional IRMS technique and by the new mid-infrared laser spectrometer agree remarkably well within analytical precision. This proves the capability of the new mid-infrared direct absorption technique to measure high precision and accurate real-time stable isotope data directly in the field. The laser spectroscopy data revealed for the first time a prior to this experiment unknown, intensive dynamic with fast changing δ(13)C values. The arrival pattern of the tracer suggest that the observed fluctuations were probably caused by migration along separate and distinct preferential flow paths between injection well and observation well. The short-term variances as observed in this study might have been missed during previous works that applied laboratory-based IRMS analysis. The new technique could contribute to a better tracing of the migration of the underground CO2 plume and help to ensure the long

  19. Analysis of tarnished plant bug movement using carbon and nitrogen isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarnished plant bug, Lygus lineolaris (Palisot de Beauvois), is the primary pest of cotton across the Midsouth of the United States. Movement into cotton fields occurs during the summer from other host plants, both cultivated and wild. Stable isotope analysis (SIA) has been used in other studies to ...

  20. Online Stable Isotope Analysis of Dissolved Organic Carbon Size Classes Using Size Exclusion Chromatography Coupled to an Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometer

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Malik, A.; Scheibe, A.; LokaBharathi, P.A.; Gleixner, G.

    been a technological leap in carbon stable isotope analysis of aqueous mixtures.21 This system allows efficient chromatographic separation of injected mixtures which then are sequentially oxidized under acidic conditions and the resulting CO2 after...,Thermo Fisher Scientific). 100 µL of analyte was injected into the mobile phase maintained at a constant flow rate of 500 µL/min using a Surveyor MS pump.Various eluents were tested for efficient separation of DOC; these included double distilled water, KH2PO...

  1. Carbon sources in the Beaufort Sea revealed by molecular lipid biomarkers and compound specific isotope analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Tolosa

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Molecular lipid biomarkers (hydrocarbons, alcohols, sterols and fatty acids and compound specific isotope analysis of suspended particulate organic matter (SPM and surface sediments of the Mackenzie Shelf and slope (Southeast Beaufort Sea, Arctic Ocean, were studied in summer 2009. The concentrations of the molecular lipid markers, characteristic of known organic matter sources, were grouped and used as proxies to evaluate the relative importance of fresh algal, detrital algal, fossil, C3 terrestrial plants, bacterial and zooplankton material in the sedimentary organic matter (OM.

    Fossil and detrital algal contributions were the major fractions of the freshwater SPM from the Mackenzie River with ~34% each of the total molecular biomarkers. Fresh algal, C3 terrestrial, bacterial and zooplanktonic components represented much lower percentages, 17, 10, 4 and < 1%, respectively. In marine SPM from the Mackenzie slope, the major contributions were fresh and detrital algal components (> 80% with a minor contribution of fossil and C3 terrestrial biomarkers. Characterization of the sediments revealed a major sink of refractory algal material mixed with some fresh algal material, fossil hydrocarbons and a small input of C3 terrestrial sources. In particular, the sediments from the shelf and at the mouth of the Amundsen Gulf presented the highest contribution of detrital algal material (60–75% whereas those from the slope contained the highest proportion of fossil (40% and C3 terrestrial plant material (10%. Overall, considering that the detrital algal material is marine derived, autochthonous sources contributed more than allochthonous sources to the OM lipid pool. Using the ratio of an allochthonous biomarker (normalized to total organic carbon, TOC found in the sediments to those measured at the river mouth water, we estimated that the fraction of terrestrial material preserved in the

  2. Authenticity and traceability of vanilla flavors by analysis of stable isotopes of carbon and hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Anne-Mette Sølvbjerg; Fromberg, Arvid; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz

    2014-10-22

    Authenticity and traceability of vanilla flavors were investigated using gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-IRMS). Vanilla flavors produced by chemical synthesis (n = 2), fermentation (n = 1), and extracted from two different species of the vanilla orchid (n = 79) were analyzed. The authenticity of the flavor compound vanillin was evaluated on the basis of measurements of ratios of carbon stable isotopes (δ(13)C). It was found that results of δ(13)C for vanillin extracted from Vanilla planifolia and Vanilla tahitensis were significantly different (t test) and that it was possible to differentiate these two groups of natural vanillin from vanillin produced otherwise. Vanilla flavors were also analyzed for ratios of hydrogen stable isotopes (δ(2)H). A graphic representation of δ(13)C versus δ(2)H revealed that vanillin extracted from pods grown in adjacent geographic origins grouped together. Accordingly, values of δ(13)C and δ(2)H can be used for studies of authenticity and traceability of vanilla flavors. PMID:25266169

  3. Authenticity and traceability of vanilla flavors by analysis of stable isotopes of carbon and hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Anne-Mette Sølvbjerg; Fromberg, Arvid; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz

    2014-10-22

    Authenticity and traceability of vanilla flavors were investigated using gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-IRMS). Vanilla flavors produced by chemical synthesis (n = 2), fermentation (n = 1), and extracted from two different species of the vanilla orchid (n = 79) were analyzed. The authenticity of the flavor compound vanillin was evaluated on the basis of measurements of ratios of carbon stable isotopes (δ(13)C). It was found that results of δ(13)C for vanillin extracted from Vanilla planifolia and Vanilla tahitensis were significantly different (t test) and that it was possible to differentiate these two groups of natural vanillin from vanillin produced otherwise. Vanilla flavors were also analyzed for ratios of hydrogen stable isotopes (δ(2)H). A graphic representation of δ(13)C versus δ(2)H revealed that vanillin extracted from pods grown in adjacent geographic origins grouped together. Accordingly, values of δ(13)C and δ(2)H can be used for studies of authenticity and traceability of vanilla flavors.

  4. Analysis of carbon isotope ratio variation in CO2 efflux from forest floor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To model carbon cycle in surface soil, variation of carbon-14 isotope ratio in soil-respired CO2 efflux from a larch forest floor was investigated by field measurements with an accumulation chamber, laboratory experiments on soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition and numerical simulations. The field measurements showed a characteristic variation in δ14C with large amplitude of diurnal variation in winter. From laboratory experiments, SOM decomposition was modeled as a function of soil temperature, CO2 concentration in ambient air and soil depth at a fixed soil moisture condition typical of the objective forest. An inversely proportional dependency on CO2 concentration was found. Less efficient SOM decomposition in deeper soil per unit content of SOM was also modeled. By using these results on SOM decomposition, numerical simulations were carried out to show that the diurnal and annual variation in δ14C found in the field measurements could be explained by change in depth profile of SOM decomposition. (author)

  5. Earth's early atmosphere as seen from carbon and nitrogen isotopic analysis of Archean sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, E. K., Jr.; Carr, L. P.; Gilmour, I.; Pillinger, C. T.

    1986-01-01

    The origin and evolution of the Earth's early atmosphere has long been a topic of great interest but determination of actual compositions over geologic time is a difficult problem. However, recent systematic studies of stromatolite deposits (Precambrian Paleobiology Research Group) has extended our knowledge of Archean ecosystems. It has been shown that many stromatolite deposits have undergone negligible alteration since their time of formation. The discovery of primary fluid inclusions within unaltered 3.5 b.y. old Archiean sediments and the observation that the 3.3 b.y. old Barberton cherts have remained closed to argon loss and have not been subjected to thermal metamorphism suggests that an opportunity exists for the direct measurement of the volatile constituents present at their time of formation. Of primary interest to this study was the possibility that the stromatolites and other Archean sediments might retain a vestige of the atmosphere and thus afford an indication of the variations in carbon dioxide and nitrogen isotopic compositions with time. A suite of essentially unaltered Archean stromatolites and the cherts of different ages and geologic sites have been analyzed for their trapped carbon dioxide and nitrogen compositions by the stepped combustion extraction tech nique utilizing static mass spectrometers for the isotope measurements.

  6. A versatile method for simultaneous stable carbon isotope analysis of DNA and RNA nucleotides by liquid chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moerdijk-Poortvliet, T.C.W.; Brasser, J.; de Ruiter, G.; Houtekamer, M.; Bolhuis, H.; Stal, L.J.; Boschker, H.T.S.

    2014-01-01

    RATIONALELiquid chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (LC/IRMS) is currently the most accurate and precise technique for the measurement of compound-specific stable carbon isotope ratios (C-13/C-12) in biological metabolites, at their natural abundance. However, until now this technique cou

  7. Carbon isotopic analysis of dissolved organic carbon in produced water brines by wet chemical oxidation and cavity ring-down spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, B.; Conaway, C.; Kharaka, Y. K.; Saad, N.

    2012-12-01

    We have adapted the Picarro iTOC CRDS isotope analyzer for analysis of produced water brines via wet chemical persulfate oxidation. In particular, we developed strategies and techniques for overcoming the limitation imposed by low oxidation efficiencies due to the chloride ion interference with persulfate oxidation. These techniques are important for understanding the origin of dissolved organic carbon in subsurface fluids from oilfields, as a tracer of fracking fluids in groundwater, and in interpreting changes in groundwater DOC as a result of microbial activity including oil biodegradation or microbially enhanced oil recovery. We describe the limitations of this new instrument for the analysis of DOC in brines including sample requirements, matrix effects, and the effect of DOC composition on reaction efficiency and isotopic measurements. We compare strategies including anion exchange cartridges, persulfate reactant concentrations, and reaction time. The CRDS analysis of DOC in brines is a useful tool for understanding the origin and fate of DOC and is a potentially powerful tool to identifiy evidence of contamination due to hydrofracturing chemicals that have a distinctive carbon isotopic signature relative to natural brine.

  8. Characterization, Quantification and Compound-specific Isotopic Analysis of Pyrogenic Carbon Using Benzene Polycarboxylic Acids (BPCA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedemeier, Daniel B.; Lang, Susan Q.; Gierga, Merle; Abiven, Samuel; Bernasconi, Stefano M.; Früh-Green, Gretchen L.; Hajdas, Irka; Hanke, Ulrich M.; Hilf, Michael D.; McIntyre, Cameron P.; Scheider, Maximilian P. W.; Smittenberg, Rienk H.; Wacker, Lukas; Wiesenberg, Guido L. B.; Schmidt, Michael W. I.

    2016-01-01

    Fire-derived, pyrogenic carbon (PyC), sometimes called black carbon (BC), is the carbonaceous solid residue of biomass and fossil fuel combustion, such as char and soot. PyC is ubiquitous in the environment due to its long persistence, and its abundance might even increase with the projected increase in global wildfire activity and the continued burning of fossil fuel. PyC is also increasingly produced from the industrial pyrolysis of organic wastes, which yields charred soil amendments (biochar). Moreover, the emergence of nanotechnology may also result in the release of PyC-like compounds to the environment. It is thus a high priority to reliably detect, characterize and quantify these charred materials in order to investigate their environmental properties and to understand their role in the carbon cycle. Here, we present the benzene polycarboxylic acid (BPCA) method, which allows the simultaneous assessment of PyC's characteristics, quantity and isotopic composition (13C and 14C) on a molecular level. The method is applicable to a very wide range of environmental sample materials and detects PyC over a broad range of the combustion continuum, i.e., it is sensitive to slightly charred biomass as well as high temperature chars and soot. The BPCA protocol presented here is simple to employ, highly reproducible, as well as easily extendable and modifiable to specific requirements. It thus provides a versatile tool for the investigation of PyC in various disciplines, ranging from archeology and environmental forensics to biochar and carbon cycling research. PMID:27214064

  9. Characterization, Quantification and Compound-specific Isotopic Analysis of Pyrogenic Carbon Using Benzene Polycarboxylic Acids (BPCA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedemeier, Daniel B; Lang, Susan Q; Gierga, Merle; Abiven, Samuel; Bernasconi, Stefano M; Früh-Green, Gretchen L; Hajdas, Irka; Hanke, Ulrich M; Hilf, Michael D; McIntyre, Cameron P; Scheider, Maximilian P W; Smittenberg, Rienk H; Wacker, Lukas; Wiesenberg, Guido L B; Schmidt, Michael W I

    2016-01-01

    Fire-derived, pyrogenic carbon (PyC), sometimes called black carbon (BC), is the carbonaceous solid residue of biomass and fossil fuel combustion, such as char and soot. PyC is ubiquitous in the environment due to its long persistence, and its abundance might even increase with the projected increase in global wildfire activity and the continued burning of fossil fuel. PyC is also increasingly produced from the industrial pyrolysis of organic wastes, which yields charred soil amendments (biochar). Moreover, the emergence of nanotechnology may also result in the release of PyC-like compounds to the environment. It is thus a high priority to reliably detect, characterize and quantify these charred materials in order to investigate their environmental properties and to understand their role in the carbon cycle. Here, we present the benzene polycarboxylic acid (BPCA) method, which allows the simultaneous assessment of PyC's characteristics, quantity and isotopic composition ((13)C and (14)C) on a molecular level. The method is applicable to a very wide range of environmental sample materials and detects PyC over a broad range of the combustion continuum, i.e., it is sensitive to slightly charred biomass as well as high temperature chars and soot. The BPCA protocol presented here is simple to employ, highly reproducible, as well as easily extendable and modifiable to specific requirements. It thus provides a versatile tool for the investigation of PyC in various disciplines, ranging from archeology and environmental forensics to biochar and carbon cycling research. PMID:27214064

  10. On the interference of 86Kr2+ during carbon isotope analysis of atmospheric methane using continuous flow combustion – isotope ratio mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Röckmann

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Stable carbon isotope analysis of methane (δ13C of CH4 on atmospheric samples is one key method to constrain the current and past atmospheric CH4 budget. A frequently applied measurement technique is gas chromatography isotope ratio mass spectrometry coupled to a combustion-preconcentration unit. This report shows that the atmospheric trace gas krypton can severely interfere during the mass spectrometric measurement leading to significant biases in δ13C of CH4 if krypton is not sufficiently separated during the analysis. The effect comes about by the lateral tailing of the peak of doubly charged 86Kr in the neighbouring m/z, 44, 45, and 46 Faraday cups. Accordingly, the introduced bias is dependent on the chromatographic separation, the Kr to CH4 mixing ratio in the sample, the mass spectrometer source tuning as well as the detector configuration and can amount to up to several permil in δ13C. Apart from technical solutions to avoid this interference we present correction routines to a posteriori remove the bias.

  11. Chromium isotope uptake in carbonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodler, Alexandra

    composition of contemporaneous seawater. Marine carbonates are ubiquitous throughout Earth’s rock record rendering them a particularly interesting archive for constraining past changes in ocean chemistry. This thesis includes an investigation of the fractionation behavior of Cr isotopesduring coprecipitation.......The redox changes of past surface environments can be explored using the Cr isotope composition of ancient marine carbonates, where a marginal offset compared to contemporaneous seawater δ53Cr is expected and the degree of contamination and later diagenetic alteration can be evaluated. Improved...

  12. Tracing carbon flow in an arctic marine food web using fatty acid-stable isotope analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budge, S M; Wooller, M J; Springer, A M; Iverson, S J; McRoy, C P; Divoky, G J

    2008-08-01

    Global warming and the loss of sea ice threaten to alter patterns of productivity in arctic marine ecosystems because of a likely decline in primary productivity by sea ice algae. Estimates of the contribution of ice algae to total primary production range widely, from just 3 to >50%, and the importance of ice algae to higher trophic levels remains unknown. To help answer this question, we investigated a novel approach to food web studies by combining the two established methods of stable isotope analysis and fatty acid (FA) analysis--we determined the C isotopic composition of individual diatom FA and traced these biomarkers in consumers. Samples were collected near Barrow, Alaska and included ice algae, pelagic phytoplankton, zooplankton, fish, seabirds, pinnipeds and cetaceans. Ice algae and pelagic phytoplankton had distinctive overall FA signatures and clear differences in delta(13)C for two specific diatom FA biomarkers: 16:4n-1 (-24.0+/-2.4 and -30.7+/-0.8 per thousand, respectively) and 20:5n-3 (-18.3+/-2.0 and -26.9+/-0.7 per thousand, respectively). Nearly all delta(13)C values of these two FA in consumers fell between the two stable isotopic end members. A mass balance equation indicated that FA material derived from ice algae, compared to pelagic diatoms, averaged 71% (44-107%) in consumers based on delta(13)C values of 16:4n-1, but only 24% (0-61%) based on 20:5n-3. Our estimates derived from 16:4n-1, which is produced only by diatoms, probably best represented the contribution of ice algae relative to pelagic diatoms. However, many types of algae produce 20:5n-3, so the lower value derived from it likely represented a more realistic estimate of the proportion of ice algae material relative to all other types of phytoplankton. These preliminary results demonstrate the potential value of compound-specific isotope analysis of marine lipids to trace C flow through marine food webs and provide a foundation for future work. PMID:18481094

  13. COMPOUND-SPECIFIC CARBON AND HYDROGEN ISOTOPE ANALYSIS-FIELD EVIDENCE OF MTBE BIOREMEDIATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemical reactions (including bio- and abiotic degradation) tend to favor molecules with the lighter isotopic species (e.g., 12C, 1H), resulting in enrichment of the heavier isotopic species (13C, D) in the unreacted substrate, referred to as isotopic fractionation. On the other ...

  14. Compound-specific carbon and hydrogen isotope analysis of sub-parts per billion level waterborne petroleum hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.; Huang, Y.; Huckins, J.N.; Petty, J.D.

    2004-01-01

    Compound-specific carbon and hydrogen isotope analysis (CSCIA and CSHIA) has been increasingly used to study the source, transport, and bioremediation of organic contaminants such as petroleum hydrocarbons. In natural aquatic systems, dissolved contaminants represent the bioavailable fraction that generally is of the greatest toxicological significance. However, determining the isotopic ratios of waterborne hydrophobic contaminants in natural waters is very challenging because of their extremely low concentrations (often at sub-parts ber billion, or even lower). To acquire sufficient quantities of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons with 10 ng/L concentration for CSHIA, more than 1000 L of water must be extracted. Conventional liquid/liquid or solid-phase extraction is not suitable for such large volume extractions. We have developed a new approach that is capable of efficiently sampling sub-parts per billion level waterborne petroleum hydrocarbons for CSIA. We use semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) to accumulate hydrophobic contaminants from polluted waters and then recover the compounds in the laboratory for CSIA. In this study, we demonstrate, under a variety of experimental conditions (different concentrations, temperatures, and turbulence levels), that SPMD-associated processes do not induce C and H isotopic fractionations. The applicability of SPMD-CSIA technology to natural systems is further demonstrated by determining the ??13C and ??D values of petroleum hydrocarbons present in the Pawtuxet River, RI. Our results show that the combined SPMD-CSIA is an effective tool to investigate the source and fate of hydrophobic contaminants in the aquatic environments.

  15. Carbonate Ion Effects on Coccolith Carbon and Oxygen Isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziveri, P.; Probert, I.; Stoll, H. M.

    2006-12-01

    The stable oxygen and carbon isotopic composition of biogenic calcite constitutes one of the primary tools used in paleoceanographic reconstructions. The δ18O of shells of ocean floor microfossils and corals reflects the composition of the paleo-seawater as they use the oxygen to build up their calcite and aragonite shells. The δ13C is used to reconstruct variations in the carbon isotopic composition of dissolved inorganic carbon in the ocean, which is controlled by biological productivity through the removal of isotopically light carbon in organic matter. To be effective and sensitive tools for understanding photic zone processes it is first necessary to understand the various biological fractionations associated with carbonate precipitation. To date, isotopic fractionation models are mainly based on foraminifera and corals but not on coccoliths, tiny plates produced by coccolithophore algae, which are often the most dominant carbonate contributors to pelagic sediments. As photosynthetic organisms, their chemistry can provide a sensitive tool for understanding photic zone processes. Coccoliths may be the most important carbonate phase for geochemical analysis in sediments where foraminifera are less common and/or core material is limited, such as in subpolar regions and for Early Cenozoic and Mesozoic sediments. Here we report experimental results on a common living coccolithophore species showing that the 13C/12C and 18O/16O ratios decrease with the increase of HCO^{3-} (CO32-). The selected species are among the heaviest calcifying extant coccolithophores and are major contributors to present coccolith carbonate export production. Because coccolithophores are photosynthetic organisms that calcify intracellularly in specialized vesicles, the challenge lies in ascertaining how kinetic and thermodynamic processes of isotopic fractionation are linked to cellular carbon "transport" and carbonate precipitation. This is a daunting challenge since studies have not

  16. Carbon isotope ratio analysis of endogenous glucocorticoid urinary metabolites after cortisone acetate and adrenosterone administration for doping control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooker, Lance; Cawley, Adam; Kazlauskas, Ray; Goebel, Catrin; George, Adrian

    2012-12-01

    Glucocorticoids are listed on the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) Prohibited List of substances. The detection of the administration of hydrocortisone and cortisone is complicated by the fact that the human body also produces these steroids naturally. Gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry can be utilized to determine the use of endogenous glucocorticoids by measuring the carbon isotope ratio (CIR) of their resulting metabolites in human urine samples. A comprehensive sample preparation protocol for the analysis of endogenous glucocorticoid urinary metabolites was developed and validated, incorporating the use of high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) for purification and chemical oxidation for derivatisation. Target compounds were tetrahydrocortisol and tetrahydrocortisone, and 11β-hydroxyetiocholanolone, 11-oxoetiocholanolone and 11β-hydroxyandrosterone, while pregnanediol functioned as the endogenous reference compound. Urine samples from a population of 50 volunteers were analyzed to determine CIR reference limits. Excretion studies of the endogenous glucocorticoid preparation cortisone acetate (25 mg oral) and the dietary supplement adrenosterone (75 mg oral) were conducted with six male individuals. Variable changes in steroid metabolite isotopic composition were found across subjects after administration. The study also revealed that CIR analysis of the major glucocorticoid metabolites tetrahydrocortisol and tetrahydrocortisone is necessary to unambiguously distinguish administration of cortisone and adrenosterone, the former officially restricted to out-of-competition use by athletes, the latter not being restricted at the current time. Moreover, this study reaffirms that CIR methods for the doping control of endogenous steroids should not rely upon a single ERC, as the administration of an appropriate precursor to that ERC could cause complications during analysis. PMID:22987608

  17. An experimental set-up for carbon isotopic analysis of atmospheric CO2 and an example of ecosystem response during solar eclipse 2010

    OpenAIRE

    Guha, Tania; Ghosh, Prosenjit

    2013-01-01

    We present here, an experimental set-up developed for the first time in India for the determination of mixing ratio and carbon isotopic ratio of air-CO2. The set-up includes traps for collection and extraction of CO2 from air samples using cryogenic procedures, followed by the measurement of CO2 mixing ratio using an MKS Baratron gauge and analysis of isotopic ratios using the dual inlet peripheral of a high sensitivity isotope ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS) MAT 253. The internal reproducibil...

  18. Strontium Isotope Composition and Characteristic Analysis of Cambrian-Ordovician Carbonate in the Region of Tazhong, Tarim Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Wenhui; Yang Min; Yu Bingsong; Fan Tailiang; Chu Guangzhen; Wan Huan; Zhu Jingquan; Wang Xu; Wu Shiqiang

    2006-01-01

    The research on the trace elements of Ordovician carbonates plays an important part in the whole work on reservoir in Tazhong ( 塔中 ) area. This paper systematically studies the characteristics and sedimentary settings of Ordovician dolomites in Tazhong area, Tarim basin, and debates their enrichment of mechanisms and different element existing patterns. The study makes use of ICP-MS analysis technology to test the strontium and manganese content of 109 samples from four wells in the Tazhong area, Tarim basin and strontium isotope composition tests have also been done on 25 samples from wells Zhong-1 and Zhong-4 on VG354 solid isotope mass spectrograph. By means of analyzing contents of strontium andmanganese elements, doing research on the strontium isotope composition characteristics from wells Zhong-1 and Zhong-4 and comparing the results of strontium analysis to the global Ordovician marine carbonate and its evolution trend, in the combination of sedimentary facies characteristics of isolated wells in this area, we can come to the following cognitions: (1) The marine carbonate strontium isotope curve in the Tazhong area of Tarim basin is consistent to the global evolution trend which is overall descending with time, the direct reason of which is the evolution of paleogeographic environment.The Ordovician paleogeographic environment goes through restricted platform to open platform and then shallow marine shelf in Tazhong area, Tarim basin. Dolomitization is another subordinate reason and the inversion of fluid with high manganese can lead to heavy strontium; (2) The fact that the 87 Sr/86 Sr ratios of the Upper Ordovician in Tazhong area have an apparent mono-decline trend with the time going by,which is similar to the global strontium isotope ratio, is suggesting that the variation of the Upper Ordovician sea level is starting, the overall trend of which is the rising of the sea level; (3) Compared to the global seawater strontium ratios, the 87 Sr/86 Sr

  19. Isotopes Will Let the Cat Out of the Bag: A Carbon and Nitrogen Stable Isotopic Analysis of Dry Cat Food Brands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelanko, P. M.

    2011-12-01

    There are a plethora of healthy cat food brands that make a wide variety of claims about the nutrition of their product and the lack of nutrition of their competitors. The claims range from "No sugar or corn" to "Real meat is always the 1st ingredient". The two major disagreements in the cat food market are the nutritional value of corn and the realness of meat products. Here I present a carbon and nitrogen stable isotopic analysis of a wide range of dry cat food brands. The beginning assumption was brands with claims of no corn would be depleted in δ13C compared to brands with corn and brands with real meat as the 1st ingredient would be enriched in δ 15N compared to brands with meat as a lesser ingredient. Preliminary results show brands with no corn (δ13C ~ -22%) are depleted compared to brands with corn (δ13C ~ -17%), which is to be expected. However, brands that claim real meat is the 1st ingredient are slightly depleted (δ15N ~ 3.5%) compared to brands with proportionally less meat (δ15N ~ 5%); the opposite of what was anticipated. Also, the stable isotopes of three house cats, that were all fed the same dry diet (corn as major ingredient), were tracked over time as they were switched to a diet with no corn. Variation was present in the first round of analysis and persisted throughout the dietary change, suggesting individual cats may absorb nutrients from the identical diets differently.

  20. A synthetic standard for the analysis of carbon isotopes of carbon in silicates, and the observation of a significant water-associated matrix effect

    OpenAIRE

    House, Christopher H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Due to the biogeochemical fractionation of isotopes, organic material can be heterogeneous at the microscale. Because this heterogentiy preserves in the rock record, the microscale measurement of carbon isotopes is an important frontier of geobiology. Such analyses via secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) have been, however, held back by the lack of an appropriate homogeneous synthetic standard that can be shared between laboratories. Such a standard would need to yield a carbon ...

  1. Carbon isotope effects in carbonate systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deines, Peter

    2004-06-01

    Global carbon cycle models require a complete understanding of the δ 13C variability of the Earth's C reservoirs as well as the C isotope effects in the transfer of the element among them. An assessment of δ 13C changes during CO 2 loss from degassing magmas requires knowledge of the melt-CO 2 carbon isotope fractionation. In order to examine the potential size of this effect for silicate melts of varying composition, 13C reduced partition functions were computed in the temperature range 275 to 4000 K for carbonates of varying bond strengths (Mg, Fe, Mn, Sr, Ba, Pb, Zn, Cd, Li, and Na) and the polymorphs of calcite. For a given cation and a given pressure the 13C content increases with the density of the carbonate structure. For a given structure the tendency to concentrate 13C increases with pressure. The effect of pressure (‰/10 kbar) on the size of the reduced partition function of aragonite varies with temperature; in the pressure range 1 to 10 5 bars the change is given by: Δ 13C p average=-0.01796+0.06635∗ 10 3/T+0.006875∗ 10 6/T2 For calcite III the pressure effect is on average 1.4× larger than that for aragonite at all temperatures. The nature of the cation in a given structure type has a significant effect on the carbon isotope fractionation properties. The tendency to concentrate 13C declines in the series magnesite, aragonite, dolomite, strontianite, siderite, calcite, smithonite, witherite, rhodochrosite, otavite, cerrusite. For divalent cations a general expression for an estimation of the reduced partition function (β) from the reduced mass (μ = [M Cation × M Carbonate]/[M Cation + M Carbonate]) is: 1000 lnβ=(0.032367-0.072563∗ 10 3/T-0.01073∗ 10 6/T2)∗μ-14.003+29.953∗ 10 3/T+9.4610∗ 10 6/T2 For Mg-calcite the 13C content varies with the Mg concentration. The fractionation between Mg-calcite (X = mole fraction of MgCO 3) and calcite is given by: 1000 ln(α MgCalite- Calcite)=[0.013702-0.10957× 10 3/T+1.35940× 10 6/T2

  2. Recognition of n-alkyl and isoprenoid biopolymers in marine sediments by stable carbon isotopic analysis of pyrolysis products of kerogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Hold, I.M.; Schouten, S.; Kaam-Peters, H.M.E. van

    1998-01-01

    Analysis of the pyrolysis products of several marine kerogens revealed that the stable carbon isotopic composition of the n-alkanes (C10-C25) are quite similar to those of the n-alkenes. This suggests that they have a common origin such as algal biopolymers. The isoprenoid alkanes (C13-C20) also hav

  3. Multidimensional isotope analysis of carbon, hydrogen and oxygen as tool for identification of the origin of ibuprofen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilevska, Tetyana; Gehre, Matthias; Richnow, Hans Hermann

    2015-11-10

    Multidimensional isotope profiling is a useful tool for the characterization of the provenance of active pharmaceutical ingredients (API). To evaluate this approach, samples of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAIDs) ibuprofen were collected from 32 manufactures and 13 countries, and carbon, hydrogen and oxygen isotope ratios were analyzed by elemental analyzer, chromium-filled elemental analyzer and high temperature conversion elemental analyzer (EA, Cr-EA and TC/EA) coupled to an isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). The range of isotope values of ibuprofen (δ(13)C: -33.2±0.1‰ to -27.4±0.1‰; δ(2)H: -121.4±1.5‰ to -41.2±0.8‰; and δ(18)O: -12.6±0.3‰ to 19.0±0.6‰) allowed characterization and distinction of 5 groups, which reflect synthetic pathways and/or use of different raw materials, as well as possible isotope fractionation during the synthesis reactions. This study highlights that multi isotope fingerprinting has potential for identification of sources, and provides a database of isotope composition of ibuprofen (δ(2)H, δ(13)C, δ(18)O) that might improve the tracing of origin, transport pathways and environmental fate of ibuprofen.

  4. The origin of branched GDGTs in lake environments: Tracing allochthonous and autochthonous sources using compound-specific carbon isotope analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Yuki; De Jonge, Cindy; Hopmans, Ellen C.; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.; Gilli, Adrian; Lehmann, Moritz F.; Niemann, Helge

    2015-04-01

    Branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (brGDGTs) are bacterial membrane lipids that are ubiquitous in soils and peat, as well as in sediments and suspended particulate matter (SPM) of lakes, rivers and coastal marine environments. It has been found that the relative distribution of brGDGTs changes systematically with ambient temperature and pH, making them promising proxy indicators for paleoclimatic reconstructions in sedimentary archives. In lacustrine deposits, it was initially assumed that brGDGTs mainly originate from allochthonous soil organic matter, thus reflecting the integrated mean annual air temperature (MAAT) within the watershed. Most recent research, however, strongly suggest that the brGDGTs used for paleo-thermometry can also be produced in situ within the lake system, offsetting the temperature-brGDGT relationships commonly known from soils. Until now, disentangling the relative contribution of allochthonous versus autochthonous brGDGT sources in lacustrine sediments was impossible, complicating the use of brGDGTs for quantitative paleotemperature reconstructions. We recently discovered a novel brGDGT isomer with a strongly 13C-depleted carbon isotope composition of about 46.6 o in sediments of a small eutrophic Alpine lake (Lake Hinterburg, Switzerland), which was not present in soils collected from the catchment. Furthermore, all other major brGDGTs in the sediment uniformly displayed δ13C values of about 43 o strongly contrasting the C-isotopic composition of brGDGTs from catchment soils (ca. 27 ). These findings raise two prime questions: (1) Are lake-derived brGDGTs generally more depleted in 13C with respect to their allochthonous counterparts? (2) Does the δ13C of sedimentary brGDGTs serve as a reliable indicator for lacustrine in situ production of brGDGTs? To address these questions, we determined the 13C content of brGDGTs in surface sediments from various lakes across the Swiss Alps by CG-IRMS analysis of their alkyl chains

  5. A novel method of carbon dioxide clumped isotope analysis with tunable infra-red laser direct absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokhorov, Ivan; Kluge, Tobias; Janssen, Christof

    2016-04-01

    Precise clumped isotopes analysis of carbon dioxide opens up new horizons of atmospheric and biogeochemical research. Recent advances in laser and spectroscopic techniques provides us necessary instrumentation to access extremely low sub-permill variations of multiply-substituted isotopologues. We present an advanced analysis method of carbon dioxide clumped isotopes using direct absorption spectroscopy. Our assessments predict the ultimate precision of the new method on the sub-permill level comparable to state of the art mass spectrometry. Among the most auspicious intrinsic properties of this method we highlight genuine Δ16O13C18O and Δ16O13C18O measurements without isobaric interference, measurement cycle duration of several minutes versus hours for mass spectrometric analysis, reduced sample size of ˜ 10 μmol and high flexibility, allowing us to perform in-situ measurements. The pilot version of the instrument is being developed in an international collaboration framework between Heidelberg University, Germany and Pierre and Marie Curie University, Paris, France. It employs two continuous interband quantum cascade lasers tuned at 4.439 μm and 4.329 μm to measure doubly ( 16O13C18O, 16O13C17O) and singly ( 16O12C16O, 16O13C16O, 16O12C17O, 16O12C18O) substituted isotopologues, respectively. Two identical Herriot cells are filled with dry pure CO2 sample and reference gas at working pressure of 1 ‑ 10 mbar. Cells provide optical path lengths of ˜ 17 m for the laser tuned at doubly substituted isotopologues lines and use a single pass for the laser tuned at the stronger lines of singly substituted isotopologues. Light outside of the gas cells is coupled into optical fiber to avoid absorption by ambient air CO2. Simulations predict sub-permill precision at working pressure of 1 mbar and room temperature stabilised at the ±10 mK level. Our prime target is to apply the proposed method for continuous in-situ analysis of CO2. We are foreseeing potential

  6. A novel method of carbon dioxide clumped isotope analysis with tunable infra-red laser direct absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokhorov, Ivan; Kluge, Tobias; Janssen, Christof

    2016-04-01

    Precise clumped isotopes analysis of carbon dioxide opens up new horizons of atmospheric and biogeochemical research. Recent advances in laser and spectroscopic techniques provides us necessary instrumentation to access extremely low sub-permill variations of multiply-substituted isotopologues. We present an advanced analysis method of carbon dioxide clumped isotopes using direct absorption spectroscopy. Our assessments predict the ultimate precision of the new method on the sub-permill level comparable to state of the art mass spectrometry. Among the most auspicious intrinsic properties of this method we highlight genuine Δ16O13C18O and Δ16O13C18O measurements without isobaric interference, measurement cycle duration of several minutes versus hours for mass spectrometric analysis, reduced sample size of ˜ 10 μmol and high flexibility, allowing us to perform in-situ measurements. The pilot version of the instrument is being developed in an international collaboration framework between Heidelberg University, Germany and Pierre and Marie Curie University, Paris, France. It employs two continuous interband quantum cascade lasers tuned at 4.439 μm and 4.329 μm to measure doubly ( 16O13C18O, 16O13C17O) and singly ( 16O12C16O, 16O13C16O, 16O12C17O, 16O12C18O) substituted isotopologues, respectively. Two identical Herriot cells are filled with dry pure CO2 sample and reference gas at working pressure of 1 - 10 mbar. Cells provide optical path lengths of ˜ 17 m for the laser tuned at doubly substituted isotopologues lines and use a single pass for the laser tuned at the stronger lines of singly substituted isotopologues. Light outside of the gas cells is coupled into optical fiber to avoid absorption by ambient air CO2. Simulations predict sub-permill precision at working pressure of 1 mbar and room temperature stabilised at the ±10 mK level. Our prime target is to apply the proposed method for continuous in-situ analysis of CO2. We are foreseeing potential

  7. Clumped-isotope thermometry of magnesium carbonates in ultramafic rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    García del Real, Pablo; Maher, Kate; Kluge, Tobias; Bird, Dennis K.; Brown, Gordon E.; John, Cédric M.

    2016-11-01

    mineralization at shallow crustal depths in the presence of meteoric water. Hydrous magnesium carbonates from a 400-km latitudinal transect along the serpentinized-peridotite bodies of the California Coast Ranges record clumped-isotope temperatures between 14.2 and 22.7 ± 2.8 °C, in agreement with historical maximum temperatures during the rainy season for California. Talc-carbonate alteration of ultramafic rocks in Greenland (Isua Supracrustal Belt) and Vermont (Ludlow) yields clumped-isotope alteration temperatures of magnesite and dolomite between 326 and 490 °C, broadly consistent with paragenesis and thermodynamic analysis for CO2 metasomatism of ultramafic rocks. These metamorphic carbonates extend the applicability of clumped-isotope thermometry to high-temperature magnesium carbonate systems and indicate equilibrium blocking temperatures for magnesite of ∼490 °C. Our study demonstrates the applicability of the clumped isotope approach to provide information on the formation of magnesium carbonates as ore resources, surface records of climate, and metamorphic assemblages.

  8. Combined stable isotope, proteomic, metabolomics, and spatial specific analysis to track carbon flow through a hypersaline phototrophic microbial mat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, J.; Cory, A.; Riha, K. M.; Huang, E. L.; Gritsenko, M. A.; Kim, Y. M.; Metz, T. O.; Lipton, M. S.

    2014-12-01

    Tracking labeled substrates through microbial mat systems can help elucidate carbon dynamics, species interactions, and niche partitioning, but the inherent microbial complexity of these systems makes them difficult to probe with single analytical techniques. Here we use a combination of different tools to track three labeled substrates through a benthic phototrophic mat from Hot Lake. Hot Lake is a hypersaline, meromictic lake located in an endorheic basin in north-central Washington which, despite extreme salinity and seasonal water temperatures (> 55 ˚C), hosts dense, phototrophic benthic microbial mats. Cyanobacteria are the dominant CO2-fixing organisms in the system and we seek to understand the spatial and metabolic controls on how the carbon initially fixed by mat cyanobacteria is transferred to associated heterotrophic populations spread throughout the mat strata. We performed ex situ incubations over a complete diel cycle with 13C labeled bicarbonate, acetate, and glucose. Traditional elemental analysis IRMS provided an estimate of bulk label uptake to total biomass and showed that both bicarbonate and acetate were incorporated only during daylight while glucose uptake was nearly constant through the cycle. Spatially resolved isotope analysis using laser ablation IRMS showed distinctive patterns between the different substrates with bicarbonate having highest uptake in the top third of the mat, acetate uptake focused near the mat's center, and glucose showing similar uptake at all mat depths. Proteomic analysis showed a longer lag in substrate conversion to protein than to biomass and a distinct spike in the number of labeled peptides in the bicarbonate incubation near the end of the diel cycle. Proteomic analysis confirmed that photosynthetic organisms showed the highest rates of label conversion to protein but heterotrophic organisms also incorporated label into their peptides. Metabolomic analysis demonstrated the high conversion of organic substrates

  9. Deuterium, carbon and nitrogen isotopic analysis of natural and synthetic caffeines. Authentication of coffees and coffee extracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) was used to determine the δ(13C) and δ(15N) values of a series of caffeine samples extracted from coffee beans or obtained by synthesis, 2H NMR spectra were recorded in order to compute the site-specific isotope ratios of caffeine. The set of the five isotope ratios measured for the 26 different samples was studied by multi-variate analysis (principal component and discriminant analyse) and it is shown that the synthetic samples are clearly distinguishable from the natural caffeines which in turn can be classified with complete accuracy as of either American or African origin

  10. Extraction and isotopic analysis of medium molecular weight hydrocarbons from Murchison using supercritical carbon dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmour, Iain; Pillinger, Colin

    1993-03-01

    The large variety of organic compounds present in carbonaceous chondrites poses particular problems in their analysis not the least of which is terrestrial contamination. Conventional analytical approaches employ simple chromatographic techniques to fractionate the extractable compounds into broad classes of similar chemical structure. However, the use of organic solvents and their subsequent removal by evaporation results in the depletion or loss of semi-volatile compounds as well as requiring considerable preparative work to assure solvent purity. Supercritical fluids have been shown to provide a powerful alternative to conventional liquid organic solvents used for analytical extractions. A sample of Murchison from the Field Museum was analyzed. Two interior fragments were used; the first (2.85 g) was crushed in an agate pestel and mortar to a grain size of ca. 50-100 micron, the second (1.80 g) was broken into chips 3-8 mm in size. Each sample was loaded into a stainless steel bomb and placed in the extraction chamber of an Isco supercritical fluid extractor maintained at 35 C. High purity (99.9995 percent) carbon dioxide was used and was pressurized using an Isco syringe pump. The samples were extracted dynamically by flowing CO2 under pressure through the bomb and venting via a 50 micron fused filica capillary into 5 mls of hexane used as a collection solvent. The hexane was maintained at a temperature of 0.5 C. A series of extractions were done on each sample using CO2 of increasing density. The principal components extracted in each fraction are summarized.

  11. A method for the rapid radiochemical analysis of uranium and thorium isotopes in impure carbonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elyahyaoui, A; Zarki, R; Chiadli, A

    2003-01-01

    A simple method combining solvent extraction and electrodeposition procedures is described for the determination of the isotopic composition and content of uranium and thorium in travertine samples. The actinide elements are extracted with diethyl ether from a calcium nitrate solution. The isolation of the elements and the alpha source preparation are performed in two steps after the sample digestion. The acid leaching of samples is performed using both partial and total dissolution methods. High recoveries of both uranium and thorium and good alpha-spectra are obtained with both partial and total dissolution methods. PMID:12485673

  12. Stable-carbon isotope variability in tree foliage and wood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study documents variation of stable-carbon isotope ratios (13C/12C) in trees of genera Juniperus and Pinus under field conditions. Results are from cellulose analysis on leaves, twigs, and wood from a number of localities in the southwestern US. Substantial variability, typically 1-3%, exists among leaves, within wood (radially, vertically, circumferentially), and between individuals at a site. These results may help guide sampling in tracer-type studies with stable-carbon isotope ratios and aid in the interpretation of isotopic results from such studies

  13. Study and validity of {sup 13}C stable carbon isotopic ratio analysis by mass spectrometry and {sup 2}H site-specific natural isotopic fractionation by nuclear magnetic resonance isotopic measurements to characterize and control the authenticity of honey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cotte, J.F. [Cooperative France Miel, BP 5, 330 Mouchard (France); Casabianca, H. [Service Central d' Analyse, USR 059-CNRS, BP 22, 69390 Vernaison (France); Lheritier, J. [Cooperative France Miel, BP 5, 330 Mouchard (France); Perrucchietti, C. [Service Central d' Analyse, USR 059-CNRS, BP 22, 69390 Vernaison (France); Sanglar, C. [Service Central d' Analyse, USR 059-CNRS, BP 22, 69390 Vernaison (France); Waton, H. [Service Central d' Analyse, USR 059-CNRS, BP 22, 69390 Vernaison (France); Grenier-Loustalot, M.F. [Service Central d' Analyse, USR 059-CNRS, BP 22, 69390 Vernaison (France)]. E-mail: mf.grenier-loustalot@sca.cnrs.fr

    2007-01-16

    Honey samples were analyzed by stable carbon isotopic ratio analysis by mass spectrometry (SCIRA-MS) and site-specific natural isotopic fractionation measured by nuclear magnetic resonance (SNIF-NMR) to first determine their potentials for characterizing the substance and then to combat adulteration. Honey samples from several geographic and botanical origins were analyzed. The {delta} {sup 13}C parameter was not significant for characterizing an origin, while the (D/H){sub I} ratio could be used to differentiate certain single-flower varieties. Application of the official control method of adding a C{sub 4} syrup (AOAC official method 998.12) to our authentic samples revealed anomalies resulting from SCIRA indices that were more negative than -1 per mille (permil). A filtration step was added to the experimental procedure and provided results that were compliant with Natural origin of our honey samples. In addition, spiking with a C{sub 4} syrup could be detected starting at 9-10%. The use of SNIF-NMR is limited by the detection of a syrup spike starting only at 20%, which is far from satisfying.

  14. Study and validity of 13C stable carbon isotopic ratio analysis by mass spectrometry and 2H site-specific natural isotopic fractionation by nuclear magnetic resonance isotopic measurements to characterize and control the authenticity of honey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honey samples were analyzed by stable carbon isotopic ratio analysis by mass spectrometry (SCIRA-MS) and site-specific natural isotopic fractionation measured by nuclear magnetic resonance (SNIF-NMR) to first determine their potentials for characterizing the substance and then to combat adulteration. Honey samples from several geographic and botanical origins were analyzed. The δ 13C parameter was not significant for characterizing an origin, while the (D/H)I ratio could be used to differentiate certain single-flower varieties. Application of the official control method of adding a C4 syrup (AOAC official method 998.12) to our authentic samples revealed anomalies resulting from SCIRA indices that were more negative than -1 per mille (permil). A filtration step was added to the experimental procedure and provided results that were compliant with Natural origin of our honey samples. In addition, spiking with a C4 syrup could be detected starting at 9-10%. The use of SNIF-NMR is limited by the detection of a syrup spike starting only at 20%, which is far from satisfying

  15. Carbon isotopic fractionation in heterotrophic microbial metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, N.; Leu, A.; Munoz, E.; Olsen, J.; Kwong, E.; Des Marais, D.

    1985-01-01

    Differences in the natural-abundance carbon stable isotopic compositions between products from aerobic cultures of Escherichia coli K-12 were measured. Respired CO2 was 3.4 percent depleted in C-13 relative to the glucose used as the carbon source, whereas the acetate was 12.3 percent enriched in C-13. The acetate C-13 enrichment was solely in the carboxyl group. Even though the total cellular carbon was only 0.6 percent depleted in C-13, intracellular components exhibited a significant isotopic heterogeneity. The protein and lipid fractions were -1.1 and -2.7 percent, respectively. Aspartic and glutamic acids were -1.6 and +2.7 percent, respectively, yet citrate was isotopically identical to the glucose. Probable sites of carbon isotopic fractionation include the enzyme, phosphotransacetylase, and the Krebs cycle.

  16. Carbon isotope fractionation for cotton genotype selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovani Greigh de Brito

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the carbon isotope fractionation as a phenomic facility for cotton selection in contrasting environments and to assess its relationship with yield components. The experiments were carried out in a randomized block design, with four replicates, in the municipalities of Santa Helena de Goiás (SHGO and Montividiu (MONT, in the state of Goiás, Brazil. The analysis of carbon isotope discrimination (Δ was performed in 15 breeding lines and three cultivars. Subsequently, the root growth kinetic and root system architecture from the selected genotypes were determined. In both locations, Δ analyses were suitable to discriminate cotton genotypes. There was a positive correlation between Δ and seed-cotton yield in SHGO, where water deficit was more severe. In this site, the negative correlations found between Δ and fiber percentage indicate an integrative effect of gas exchange on Δ and its association with yield components. As for root robustness and growth kinetic, the GO 05 809 genotype performance contributes to sustain the highest values of Δ found in MONT, where edaphoclimatic conditions were more suitable for cotton. The use of Δ analysis as a phenomic facility can help to select cotton genotypes, in order to obtain plants with higher efficiency for gas exchange and water use.

  17. Primary carbon sources for juvenile penaeid shrimps in a mangrove-fringed Bay of Inhaca Island, Mozambique: a dual carbon and nitrogen isotope analysis.

    OpenAIRE

    Macia, A.

    2004-01-01

    A study to estimate the relative importance of mangrove primary carbon and nitrogen sources to five commercial penaeid shrimps species was done at Saco da Inhaca, a non-estuarine mangrove-fringed bay on Inhaca Island, southern Mozambique. Carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios were determined in a variety of primary producers (mangroves, epiphytes, phytoplankton and seagrasses), sediments and in five penaeid shrimp species (Penaeus (Fenneropenaeus) indicus, P. japonicus, P. semisulcatus, M...

  18. Nitrogen-isotope analysis of groundwater nitrate in carbonate aquifers: Natural sources versus human pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreitler, Charles W.; Browning, Lawrence A.

    1983-02-01

    Results of nitrogen-isotope analyses of nitrate in the waters of the Cretaceous Edwards aquifer in Texas, U.S.A., indicate that the source of the nitrate is naturally-occurring nitrogen compounds in the recharge streams. In contrast, nitrogen isotopes of nitrate in the fresh waters of the Pleistocene Ironshore Formation on Grand Cayman Island, West Indies, indicate that human wastes are the source of the nitrate. The Cretaceous Edwards Limestone is a prolific aquifer that produces principally from fracture porosity along the Balcones Fault Zone. Recharge is primarily by streams crossing the fault zone. Rainfall is ˜ 70 cm yr. -1, and the water table is generally deeper than 30 m below land surface. The δ15 N of 73 samples of nitrate from Edwards waters ranged from + 1.9 to + 10‰ with an average of + 6.2‰. This δ15 N range is within the range of nitrate in surface water in the recharge streams ( δ 15N range = + 1 to + 8.3‰ ) and within the range of nitrate in surface water from the Colorado River, Texas, ( δ 15N range = + 1 to + 11‰ ). No sample was found to be enriched in 15N, which would suggest the presence of nitrate from animal waste ( δ 15N range = + 10 to + 22‰ ). The Ironshore Formation contains a small freshwater lens that is recharged entirely by percolation through the soil. Average rainfall is 165 cm yr. -1, and the water table is within 3 m of land surface. The δ15 N of four nitrate samples from water samples of the Ironshore Formation ranged from + 18 to + 23.9‰, which indicates a cesspool/septictank source of the nitrate. Limestone aquifers in humid environments that are recharged by percolation through the soil appear to be more susceptible to contamination by septic tanks than are aquifers in subhumid environments that feature thick unsaturated sections and are recharged by streams.

  19. Physical and Human Controls on the Carbon Composition of Organic Matter in Tropical Rivers: An Integrated Analysis of Landscape Properties and River Isotopic Composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We applied an integrated analysis of landscape properties including soil properties, land cover and riverine isotopic composition. To evaluate physical and human controls on the carbon composition of organic matter in tropical rivers, we applied an integrated analysis of landscape properties including soil properties, land cover and riverine isotopic composition. Our main objective was to establish the relationship between basin attributes and forms, fluxes and composition of dissolved and particulate organic matter in river channels. A physical template was developed as a GIS-based comprehensive tool to support the understanding of the biogeochemistry of the surface waters of two tropical rivers: the Ji-Parana (Western Amazonia) and the Piracicaba (southeastern of Brazil). For each river we divided the basin into drainage units, organized according to river network morphology and degree of land use impact. Each sector corresponded to a sampling point where river isotopic composition was analysed. River sites and basin characteristics were calculated using datasets compiled as layers in ArcGis Geographical Information System and ERDAS-IMAGINE (Image Processing) software. Each delineated drainage area was individually characterized in terms of topography, soils, river network and land use. Carbon stable isotopic composition of dissolved organic matter (DOM) and particulate organic matter (POM) was determined at several sites along the main tributaries and small streams. The effects of land use on fluvial carbon composition were quantified by a linear regression analysis, relating basin cover and river isotopic composition. The results showed that relatively recent land cover changes have already had an impact on the composition of the riverine DOM and POM, indicating that, as in natural ecosystems, vegetation plays a key role in the composition of riverine organic matter in agricultural ecosystems. (author)

  20. Exotic structure of carbon isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ground state properties of C isotopes, deformation and electromagnetic moments, as well as electric dipole transition strength are investigated. We first study the ground state properties of C isotopes using a deformed Hartree-Fock (HF) + BCS model with Skyrme interactions. Isotope dependence of the deformation properties is investigated. Shallow deformation minima are found in several neutron-rich C isotopes. It is also shown that the deformation minima appear in both the oblate and the prolate sides in 17C and 19C having almost the same binding energies. Next, we carry out shell model calculations to study electromagnetic moments and electric dipole transitions of C isotopes. We point out the clear configuration dependence of the quadrupole and magnetic moments in the odd C isotopes, which will be useful to find out the deformation and spin-parties of the ground states of these nuclei. Electric dipole states of C isotopes are studied focusing on the interplay between low energy Pigmy strength and giant dipole resonances. Low peak energies, two-peak structure and large widths of the giant resonances show deformation effects. Calculated transition strength below dipole giant resonance in heavier C isotopes than 15C is found to exhaust 12∼15% of the Thomas-Reiche-Kuhn sum rule value and 50∼ 80% of the cluster sum rule value. (author)

  1. CARBON AND OXYGEN ISOTOPIC ANALYSIS: BUG, CHEROKEE, AND PATTERSON CANYON FIELDS, SAN JUAN COUNTY, UTAH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David E. Eby; Thomas C. Chidsey Jr; Kevin McClure; Craig D. Morgan; Stephen T. Nelson

    2003-12-01

    Over 400 million barrels (64 million m{sup 3}) of oil have been produced from the shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado. With the exception of the giant Greater Aneth field, the other 100 plus oil fields in the basin typically contain 2 to 10 million barrels (0.3-1.6 million m{sup 3}) of original oil in place. Most of these fields are characterized by high initial production rates followed by a very short productive life (primary), and hence premature abandonment. Only 15 to 25 percent of the original oil in place is recoverable during primary production from conventional vertical wells. An extensive and successful horizontal drilling program has been conducted in the giant Greater Aneth field. However, to date, only two horizontal wells have been drilled in small Ismay and Desert Creek fields. The results from these wells were disappointing due to poor understanding of the carbonate facies and diagenetic fabrics that create reservoir heterogeneity. These small fields, and similar fields in the basin, are at high risk of premature abandonment. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m{sup 3}) of oil will be left behind in these small fields because current development practices leave compartments of the heterogeneous reservoirs undrained. Through proper geological evaluation of the reservoirs, production may be increased by 20 to 50 percent through the drilling of low-cost single or multilateral horizontal legs from existing vertical development wells. In addition, horizontal drilling from existing wells minimizes surface disturbances and costs for field development, particularly in the environmentally sensitive areas of southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado.

  2. Carbon isotope geochemistry in the Yalujiang estuary

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴莹; 张经

    2001-01-01

    The distribution of particulate organic carbon (POC) along the lower reaches is similar between the dry season and the flood season in the Yalujiang Estuary, North China. However, the values of particulate organic carbon of the upperstream in the dry season are one magnitude lower than the concentrations in the flood season. Stable carbon isotope ratios have been used to study the sources of particulate organic carbon in the Yalujiang Estuary. The isotopic composition of POC shows a range from -23.1‰ to -29.4‰ with a little seasonal variation. The isotopic evidence indicates that the POC in the Yalujiang Estuary is predominantly of terrestrial origin rather than a result of in situ plankton. The study of the ratio of POC: Chla shows that the turbidity maximum plays an important role in POC cycle in the Yalujiang Estuary. Organic detritus and soil erosion are the main contributions to POC in the turbidity maximum, especially in the flood season.

  3. Method for the isolation of citric acid and malic acid in Japanese apricot liqueur for carbon stable isotope analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akamatsu, Fumikazu; Hashiguchi, Tomokazu; Hisatsune, Yuri; Oe, Takaaki; Kawao, Takafumi; Fujii, Tsutomu

    2017-02-15

    A method for detecting the undeclared addition of acidic ingredients is required to control the authenticity of Japanese apricot liqueur. We developed an analytical procedure that minimizes carbon isotope discrimination for measurement of the δ(13)C values of citric and malic acid isolated from Japanese apricot liqueur. Our results demonstrated that freeze-drying is preferable to nitrogen spray-drying, because it does not significantly affect the δ(13)C values of citric acid and results in smaller isotope discrimination for malic acid. Both 0.1% formic acid and 0.2% phosphoric acid are acceptable HPLC mobile phases for the isolation of citric and malic acid, although the δ(13)C values of malic acid exhibited relatively large variation compared with citric acid following isolation using either mobile phase. The developed procedure allows precise δ(13)C measurements of citric and malic acid isolated from Japanese apricot liqueur. PMID:27664615

  4. Salinity of the Early and Middle Eocene Arctic Ocean From Oxygen Isotope Analysis of Fish Bone Carbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddell, L. M.; Moore, T. C.

    2006-12-01

    Plate tectonic reconstructions indicate that the Arctic was largely isolated from the world ocean during the early and middle Eocene, with exchange limited to shallow, and possibly intermittent, connections to the North Atlantic and Tethys (via the Turgay Strait). Relative isolation, combined with an intensification of the hydrologic cycle under an Eocene greenhouse climate, is suspected to have led to the development of a low- salinity surface water layer in the Arctic that could have affected deep and intermediate convection in the North Atlantic. Sediment cores recently recovered from the Lomonosov Ridge by the IODP 302 Arctic Coring Expedition (ACEX) allow for the first assessment of the salinity of the Arctic Ocean during the early and middle Eocene. Stable isotope analysis performed on the structural carbonate of fish bone apatite from ~30 samples between the ages of ~55 and ~44 myr yielded δ18O values between -6.84‰ and -2.96‰ VPDB, with a mean value of -4.89‰. From the δ18O values we calculate that the Arctic Ocean was probably brackish during most of the early and middle Eocene, with an average salinity of 19 to 24‰. Negative excursions in the δ18O record (Azolla event at ~49 Ma, and a third previously unidentified event at ~46 Ma. During the PETM, low salinities developed under conditions of increased regional precipitation and runoff associated with extreme high latitude warmth and possible tectonic uplift in the North Atlantic. During the other two low-salinity events, sea level was lowered by ~20-30 m, implying a possible severing of Arctic connections to the world ocean. The most positive δ18O value (-2.96‰) occurs at ~45 Ma, the age of the youngest dropstone discovered in the ACEX sediments, and may therefore correspond to a climatic cooling rather than a high salinity event.

  5. 气相色谱-燃烧-同位素比值质谱法测定单体氨基酸的碳稳定同位素组成%Analysis of Stable Carbon Isotope Composition of Individual N-Trifluoroacetyl-Isopropyl Amino Acid Esters by Gas Chromatography-Combustion-Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡德陵; 刘金钟; 刘海珍

    2004-01-01

    A combined gas chromatography combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry method(GC-C IRMS) for stable carbon isotope analysis of amino acids is presented. Unlike hydrocarbons, amino acids require derivatization prior to GC-C-IRMS analysis. Replicate carbon isotope analyses of trifluoroacetyl isopropyl ester derivatives of 17 amino acids by IRMS revealed that the derivatization process is reproducible. Due to a reproducible isotopic fractionation an empirical correction factor for each individual amino acid is derived separately for derivatives and the original δ13C value of the underivatized amino acid is calculated.

  6. Carbon isotope anomalies in carbonates of the Karelian series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iudovich, Ia. E.; Makarikhin, V. V.; Medvedev, P. V.; Sukhanov, N. V.

    1990-07-01

    Results are presented on carbon isotope distributions in carbonates of the Karelian complex. A highly anomalous isotopic composition was found in carbonate rocks aged from 2.6 to 1.9 b.y. In the stromatolitic carbonates of the Onega water table, delta-(C-13) reaches a value of +18 percent, while the shungite layer of the Zaonega horizon is characterized by a wide dispersion (from +7.9 to -11.8 percent). These data are in good agreement with the known geochemical boundary (about 2.2 b.y. ago) in the history of the earth.

  7. Carbon isotope separation by absorptive distillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The feasibility of separating carbon isotopes by absorptive distillation has been studied for CO absorption by cryogenic solvents. Phase equilibrium, isotopic separation, and mass transfer data were taken between 77.4 and 114.3 K for the following solvents: propane, propylene, 1:1 propane-propylene, 1-butene, isobutane and nitrogen. Carbon monoxide solubility followed Henry's Law, with a maximum experimental solubility of 6.5 mole percent. Isotopic separation between CO in the gas and liquid phases using hydrocarbon solvents was several times that for pure CO vapor-liquid equilibrium. The maximum observed isotopic separation factor was 1.029 at 77.4 K with the propane-propylene solvent mixture. Mass transfer measurements yielded calculated HETP's of 2 to 5 cm for a possible separation system. An attempt has been made to correlate isotopic separation data using Hildebrand's theory of solutions. The differential absorption of isotopic CO species is expressed as a difference in solubility of the isotopic CO molecules. Data for propane, propylene, and 1-butene show approximately the same behavior at varying temperatures

  8. Carbon isotope separation by absorptive distillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The feasibility of separating carbon isotopes by absorptive distillation has been studied for CO absorption by cryogenic solvents. Phase equilibrium, isotopic separation, and mass transfer data were taken between 77.4 and 114.3 K for the following solvents: propane, propylene, 1:1 propane-propylene, 1-butene, isobutane and nitrogen. Carbon monoxide solubility followed Henry's Law, with a maximum experimental solubility of 6.5 mole per cent. Isotopic separation between CO in the gas and liquid phases using hydrocarbon solvents was several times that for pure CO vapor-liquid equilibrium. The maximum observed isotopic separation factor was 1.029 at 77.4 K with the propane-propylene solvent mixture. Mass transfer measurements yielded calculated HTU's of 2 to 5 cm for a possible separation system. An attempt has been made to correlate isotopic separation data using Hildebrand's theory of solutions. The differential absorption of isotopic CO species is expressed as a difference in solubility of the isotopic CO molecules. Data for propane, propylene, and 1-butene show approximately the same behavior at varying temperatures

  9. Compound specific isotope analysis of organophosphorus pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Langping; Yao, Jun; Trebse, Polonca; Zhang, Ning; Richnow, Hans H

    2014-09-01

    Compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) has been established as a tool to study the environmental fate of a wide range of contaminants. In this study, CSIA was developed to analyse the stable carbon isotope signatures of the widely used organophosphorus pesticides: dichlorvos, omethoate and dimethoate. The linearity of the GC-C-IRMS system was tested for target pesticides and led to an acceptable isotope composition within the uncertainty of the instrument. In order to assess the accuracy of the developed method, the effect of the evaporation procedure on measured carbon isotope composition (δ(13)C) values was studied and showed that concentration by evaporation of solvents had no significant isotope effect. The CSIA was then applied to investigate isotope fractionation of the hydrolysis and photolysis of selected pesticides. The carbon isotope fractionation of tested pesticides was quantified by the Rayleigh model, which revealed a bulk enrichment factor (ε) of -0.2±0.1‰ for hydrolysis of dichlorvos, -1.0±0.1‰ and -3.7±1.1‰ for hydrolysis and photolysis of dimethoate respectively. This study is a first step towards the application of CSIA to trace the transport and degradation of organophosphorus pesticides in the environment.

  10. Exotic Structure of Carbon Isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Suzuki, T; Hagino, K; Suzuki, Toshio; Sagawa, Hiroyuki; Hagino, Kouichi

    2002-01-01

    We studied firstly the ground state properties of C-isotopes using a deformed Hartree-Fock (HF)+ BCS model with Skyrme interactions. Shallow deformation minima are found in several neutron$-$rich C-isotopes. It is shown also that the deformation minima appear in both the oblate and the prolate sides in $^{17}$C and $^{19}$C having almost the same binding energies. Secondly, we carried out shell model calculations to study electromagnetic moments and electric dipole transitions of the C-isotopes. We point out the clear configuration dependence of the quadrupole and magnetic moments in the odd C-isotopes, which will be useful to find out the deformations and the spin-parities of the ground states of these nuclei. We studied electric dipole states of C-isotopes focusing on the interplay between low energy Pigmy strength and giant dipole resonances. Reasonable agreement is obtained with available experimental data for the photoreaction cross sections both in the low energy region below $\\hbar \\omega $=14 MeV and ...

  11. Carbon and Carbon Isotope Cycling in the Western Canadian Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mol, Jacoba; Thomas, Helmuth

    2016-04-01

    Increasing carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere are having drastic effects on the global oceans. The Arctic Ocean is particularly susceptible to change as warming, sea-ice loss and a weak buffering capacity all influence this complicated semi-enclosed sea. In order to investigate the inorganic carbon system in the Canadian Arctic, water samples were collected in the Beaufort Sea, on the Alaskan shelf, at the Mackenzie river delta, and in Amundsen Gulf during the summer of 2014 and were analyzed for dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), total alkalinity (TA), DI13C and 18O isotopes. Carbon isotopes are used to investigate the role of biological production on the uptake and transfer of inorganic carbon to depth. A preferential uptake of the lighter 12C relative to the heavier 13C isotope during biological production leads to a fractionation of the 13C/12C isotopes in both the organic matter and the water column. This results in an enrichment of DI13C in the high productivity surface waters and a depletion of DI13C at depth. Physical processes including freshwater input, brine rejection, and water mass mixing are investigated through the measurement of oxygen isotopes. Differences in the carbon system across the study area due to both biological and physical processes are assessed using depth profiles of DI13C and related carbon system parameters.

  12. Carbon stable isotope analysis as a tool for tracing temperature during the El Tremedal underground coal gasification at great depth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brasseur, A.; Antenucci, D.; Bouquegneau, J.-M.; Coeme, A.; Dauby, P.; Letolle, R.; Mostade, M.; Pirlot, P.; Pirard, J.-P. [Universite de Liege, Liege (Belgium). Laboratoire de Genie Chimique, Institut de Chimie

    2002-01-01

    The new opportunity given by the underground gasifier developed at Alcorisa in Spain (Province of Teruel) in the framework of an European experiment has promoted a better understanding of gasification in a natural reactor. The thermodynamical equilibria of gasification reactions and the repartition of the stable isotopes of carbon ({sup 13}C/{sup 12}C) in the produced gases have been used to monitor the process. An estimation of the temperatures inside the gasifier and at the exhaust gas been performed. As shown by the isotopic balances, the tar formation is negligible or null and the pyrolysis zone spreads continuously. The study has confirmed the reality of the {sup 13}C isotopic abundance measurements for the system CO/CO{sub 2} as an indicator of the temperature inside the gasifier. During the gasifier expansion, the temperature at the exhaust decreases whereas the temperature inside the gasifier is practically constant showing a slight increasing trend. As pointed out by the data, the oxygen enrichment of the gasifying agent plays an important role on the estimated temperatures. 19 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  13. An experimental set-up for carbon isotopic analysis of atmospheric CO2 and an example of ecosystem response during solar eclipse 2010

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tania Guha; Prosenjit Ghosh

    2013-06-01

    We present here, an experimental set-up developed for the first time in India for the determination of mixing ratio and carbon isotopic ratio of air-CO2. The set-up includes traps for collection and extraction of CO2 from air samples using cryogenic procedures, followed by the measurement of CO2 mixing ratio using an MKS Baratron gauge and analysis of isotopic ratios using the dual inlet peripheral of a high sensitivity isotope ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS) MAT 253. The internal reproducibility (precision) for the 13C measurement is established based on repeat analyses of CO2 ± 0.03‰. The set-up is calibrated with international carbonate and air-CO2 standards. An in-house air-CO2 mixture, `OASIS AIRMIX' is prepared mixing CO2 from a high purity cylinder with O2 and N2 and an aliquot of this mixture is routinely analyzed together with the air samples. The external reproducibility for the measurement of the CO2 mixing ratio and carbon isotopic ratios are ± 7 ( = 169) mol·mol−1 and ± 0.05 ( = 169)‰ based on the mean of the difference between two aliquots of reference air mixture analyzed during daily operation carried out during November 2009–December 2011. The correction due to the isobaric interference of N2O on air-CO2 samples is determined separately by analyzing mixture of CO2 (of known isotopic composition) and N2O in varying proportions. A +0.2‰ correction in the 13C value for a N2O concentration of 329 ppb is determined. As an application, we present results from an experiment conducted during solar eclipse of 2010. The isotopic ratio in CO2 and the carbon dioxide mixing ratio in the air samples collected during the event are different from neighbouring samples, suggesting the role of atmospheric inversion in trapping the emitted CO2 from the urban atmosphere during the eclipse.

  14. Source inference of exogenous gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) administered to humans by means of carbon isotopic ratio analysis: novel perspectives regarding forensic investigation and intelligence issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marclay, François; Saudan, Christophe; Vienne, Julie; Tafti, Mehdi; Saugy, Martial

    2011-05-01

    γ-Hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is an endogenous short-chain fatty acid popular as a recreational drug due to sedative and euphoric effects, but also often implicated in drug-facilitated sexual assaults owing to disinhibition and amnesic properties. Whilst discrimination between endogenous and exogenous GHB as required in intoxication cases may be achieved by the determination of the carbon isotope content, such information has not yet been exploited to answer source inference questions of forensic investigation and intelligence interests. However, potential isotopic fractionation effects occurring through the whole metabolism of GHB may be a major concern in this regard. Thus, urine specimens from six healthy male volunteers who ingested prescription GHB sodium salt, marketed as Xyrem(®), were analysed by means of gas chromatography/combustion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry to assess this particular topic. A very narrow range of δ(13)C values, spreading from -24.81‰ to -25.06‰, was observed, whilst mean δ(13)C value of Xyrem(®) corresponded to -24.99‰. Since urine samples and prescription drug could not be distinguished by means of statistical analysis, carbon isotopic effects and subsequent influence on δ(13)C values through GHB metabolism as a whole could be ruled out. Thus, a link between GHB as a raw matrix and found in a biological fluid may be established, bringing relevant information regarding source inference evaluation. Therefore, this study supports a diversified scope of exploitation for stable isotopes characterized in biological matrices from investigations on intoxication cases to drug intelligence programmes.

  15. Carbon isotope analysis of dissolved organic carbon in fresh and saline (NaCl) water via continuous flow cavity ring-down spectroscopy following wet chemical oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conaway, Christopher; Thomas, Randal B.; Saad, Nabil; Thordsen, James J.; Kharaka, Yousif K.

    2015-01-01

    This work examines the performance and limitations of a wet chemical oxidation carbon analyser interfaced with a cavity ring-down spectrometer (WCO-CRDS) in a continuous flow (CF) configuration for measuring δ13C of dissolved organic carbon (δ13C-DOC) in natural water samples. Low-chloride matrix (ratio, high-salinity samples with sufficient DOC (>22.5 µg C/aliquot) may be analysed. The WCO-CRDS approach requires more total carbon (µg C/aliquot) than conventional CF-isotope ratio mass spectrometer, but is nonetheless applicable to a wide range of DOC concentration and water types, including brackish water, produced water, and basinal brines.

  16. Clumped-isotope geochemistry of carbonates: A new tool for the reconstruction of temperature and oxygen isotope composition of seawater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernasconi, Stefano M., E-mail: Stefano.bernasconi@erdw.ethz.ch [Geological Institute, ETH Zuerich, Sonneggstrasse 5, 8092 Zuerich (Switzerland); Schmid, Thomas W.; Grauel, Anna-Lena [Geological Institute, ETH Zuerich, Sonneggstrasse 5, 8092 Zuerich (Switzerland); Mutterlose, Joerg [Institut fuer Geologie, Mineralogie und Geophysik, Ruhr Universitaet Bochum, Universitaetsstr. 150, 44801 Bochum (Germany)

    2011-06-15

    Highlights: > Clumped-isotope thermometry of carbonates is discussed. > Clumped isotopes of Belemnites show higher sea surface temperatures than commonly assumed for the lower Cretaceous. > The potential of clumped-isotope measurement on foraminifera is discussed. - Abstract: Clumped-isotope geochemistry deals with State of ordering of rare isotopes in molecules, in particular with their tendency to form bonds with other rare isotopes rather than with the most abundant ones. Among its possible applications, carbonate clumped-isotope thermometry is the one that has gained most attention because of the wide potential of applications in many disciplines of the earth sciences. In particular, it allows reconstructing the temperature of formation of carbonate minerals without knowledge of the isotopic composition of the water from which they were formed. In addition, the O isotope composition of the waters from which they were formed can be calculated using the {delta}{sup 18}O of the same carbonate sample. This feature offers new approaches in paleoclimatology for reconstructing past global geochemical cycles. In this contribution two applications of this method are presented. First the potential of a new analytical method of measurement of clumped isotopes on small samples of foraminifera, for high-resolution SST and seawater {delta}{sup 18}O reconstructions from marine sediments is shown. Furthermore the potential of clumped isotope analysis of belemnites, for reconstructing seawater {delta}{sup 18}O and temperatures in the Cretaceous is shown.

  17. Temperature dependence of carbon isotope fractionation in CAM plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deleens, E.; Treichel, I.; O' Leary, M.H.

    1985-09-01

    The carbon isotope fractionation associated with nocturnal malic acid synthesis in Kalanchoe daigremontiana and Bryophyllum tubiflorum was calculated from the isotopic composition of carbon-4 of malic acid, after appropriate corrections. In the lowest temperature treatment (17/sup 0/C nights, 23/sup 0/C days), the isotope fractionation for both plants is -4% per thousand (that is, malate is enriched in /sup 13/C relative to the atmosphere). For K. daigremontiana, the isotope fractionation decreases with increasing temperature, becoming approximately 0% per thousand at 27/sup 0/C/33/sup 0/C. Detailed analysis of temperature effects on the isotope fractionation indicates that stomatal aperture decreases with increasing temperature and carboxylation capacity increases. For B. tubiflorum, the temperature dependence of the isotope fractionation is smaller and is principally attributed to the normal temperature dependences of the rates of diffusion and carboxylation steps. The small change in the isotopic composition of remaining malic acid in both species which is observed during deacidification indicates that malate release, rather than decarboxylation, is rate limiting in the deacidification process. 28 references, 1 figure, 4 tables.

  18. The forensic analysis of office paper using carbon isotope ratio mass spectrometry--part 2: method development, validation and sample handling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Kylie; Benson, Sarah; Roux, Claude

    2013-09-10

    This paper describes the development and validation of a method for the analysis of office papers by measuring carbon isotopes using isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). The method development phase included testing protocols for storage, sample materials, set-up of the analytical run; and examining the effects of other paper examination procedures on IRMS results. A method validation was performed so that the Delta(plus) XP IRMS instrument (Thermo Finnigan, Bremen, Germany) with Flash EA™ 1112 could be used to measure document paper samples for forensic casework. A validation protocol that would meet international standards for laboratory accreditation (international standard ISO 17025) was structured so that the instruments performance characteristics could be observed. All performance characteristics measured were found to be within an acceptable range and an expanded measurement uncertainty for the measurement of carbon isotopes in paper was calculated at 0.26‰, with a coverage factor of 2. This method was utilized in a large-scale study, published as part one of this series, that showed that IRMS of document papers is useful as a chemical comparison technique for 80 gsm white office papers. PMID:23810570

  19. Carbon isotopes as indicators of peatland growth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alewell, Christine; Krüger, Jan Paul; von Sengbusch, Pascal; Szidat, Sönke; Leifeld, Jens

    2016-04-01

    As undisturbed and/or growing peatlands store considerable amounts of carbon and are unique in their biodiversity and species assemblage, the knowledge of the current status of peatlands (growing with carbon sequestration, stagnating or degrading with carbon emissions) is crucial for landscape management and nature conservation. However, monitoring of peatland status requires long term measurements and is only feasible with expert knowledge. The latter determination is increasingly impeded in a scientific world, where taxonomic expert knowledge and funding of long term monitoring is rare. Stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes depth profiles in peatland soils have been shown to be a useful tool to monitor the degradation of peatlands due to permafrost thawing in Northern Sweden (Alewell et al., 2011; Krüger et al., 2014), drainage in Southern Finland (Krüger et al., 2016) as well as land use intensification in Northern Germany (Krüger et al., 2015). Here, we tackle the questions if we are able to differentiate between growing and degrading peats with the use of a combination of carbon stable (δ13C) and radiogenic isotope data (14C) with peat stratification information (degree of humification and macroscopic plant remains). Results indicate that isotope data are a useful tool to approximate peatland status, but that expert taxonomic knowledge will be needed for the final conclusion on peatland growth. Thus, isotope tools might be used for landscape screening to pin point sites for detailed taxonomic monitoring. As the method remains qualitative future research at these sites will need to integrate quantitative approaches to determine carbon loss or gain (soil C balances by ash content or C accumulation methods by radiocarbon data; Krüger et al., 2016). Alewell, C., R. Giesler, J. Klaminder, J. Leifeld, and M. Rollog. 2011. Stable carbon isotopes as indicators for micro-geomorphic changes in palsa peats. Biogeosciences, 8, 1769-1778. Krüger, J. P., Leifeld, J

  20. Deciphering Carbon Isotope Excursions in Separated Biogenic and Diagenetic Carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermoso, M.; Minoletti, F.; Hesselbo, S.; Jenkyns, H.; Rickaby, R.; Diester-Haass, L.; Delsate, D.

    2008-12-01

    The long-term evolution of the carbon-isotope ratio in the sedimentary archive is classically linked with changes in primary productivity and organic matter burial. There have been sudden and pronounced shifts, so-called Carbon Isotope Excursions (CIEs) in the long-term trends as evidenced by synchronous shifts from various basins. These geochemical perturbations may have various explanations such as changes of the efficiency of the carbon sink; sudden infusion of isotopically-light carbon into the Ocean-Atmosphere system; or advection of 12C-rich source from bottom water in a stratified water column. Beside the record of primary changes in seawater chemistry, a possible diagenetic overprint may also mime such CIEs in the sedimentary record. The aim of this contribution is to illustrate through three critical intervals (the Early Toarcian, the K-P boundary and the Mid-Miocene Montery Event) how the various micron-sized sedimentary particles specifically record these CIEs, which are respectively associated with major paleoceanographical events. New techniques for getting monotaxic calcareous nannofossil assemblages from the sediment (Minoletti et al., accepted) enable the isotopic measurement at various depths within the surface water and from bottom water by analyzing early diagenetic precipitations (rhombs and micarbs). The integration of these high-resolution isotopic signals in terms of amplitudes affords to recognize diagenetic artifacts in some sections displaying coeval decrease in the carbonate content. For both Early Toarcian and K-P events, corroborative records of CIE records in both primary calcite and bottom water carbonate indicate a global C-isotope perturbation of the water column. For the Monterey event, the evolution of calcareous nannoplankton and the foraminifera isotopic records are in overall agreement, but in detail, the coccolith-discoaster and foraminifer ratio in the sediment, related to environmental changes, is likely to produce isotopic

  1. Laser ablation molecular isotopic spectrometry of carbon isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bol' shakov, Alexander A. [Applied Spectra, Inc., Fremont, CA (United States); Jain, Jinesh [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States); Russo, Richard E. [Applied Spectra, Inc., Fremont, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); McIntyre, Dustin [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States); Mao, Xianglei [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-08-28

    Quantitative determination of carbon isotopes using Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry (LAMIS) is described. Optical emission of diatomic molecules CN and C2 is used in these measurements. Two quantification approaches are presented:empirical calibration of spectra using a set of reference standards and numerical fitting of a simulated spectrum to the experimental one. Formation mechanisms of C2 and CN in laser ablation plasma are briefly reviewed to provide insights for implementation of LAMIS measurements. A simulated spectrum of the 12C2 Swan system was synthesized using four constituents within 473.5–476.5 nm. Simulation included three branches of 12C2 (1-0), branches R(0-0) and R(1-1), and branch P(9-8) of 12C2. Spectral positions of the tail lines in R(0-0) and R(1-1) were experimentally measured, since they were not accurately known before. The Swan band (1-0) of the isotopologue 13C12C was also simulated. Fitting to the experimental spectrumyielded the ratio 13C/12C = 1.08% in a good agreement with measurements by isotope ratio mass spectrometry. LAMIS promises to be useful in coal, oil and shale exploration, carbon sequestration monitoring, and agronomy studies

  2. Laser ablation molecular isotopic spectrometry of carbon isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bol‧shakov, Alexander A.; Mao, Xianglei; Jain, Jinesh; McIntyre, Dustin L.; Russo, Richard E.

    2015-11-01

    Quantitative determination of carbon isotopes using Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry (LAMIS) is described. Optical emission of diatomic molecules CN and C2 is used in these measurements. Two quantification approaches are presented: empirical calibration of spectra using a set of reference standards and numerical fitting of a simulated spectrum to the experimental one. Formation mechanisms of C2 and CN in laser ablation plasma are briefly reviewed to provide insights for implementation of LAMIS measurements. A simulated spectrum of the 12C2 Swan system was synthesized using four constituents within 473.5-476.5 nm. Simulation included three branches of 12C2 (1-0), branches R(0-0) and R(1-1), and branch P(9-8) of 12C2. Spectral positions of the tail lines in R(0-0) and R(1-1) were experimentally measured, since they were not accurately known before. The Swan band (1-0) of the isotopologue 13C12C was also simulated. Fitting to the experimental spectrum yielded the ratio 13C/12C = 1.08% in a good agreement with measurements by isotope ratio mass spectrometry. LAMIS promises to be useful in coal, oil and shale exploration, carbon sequestration monitoring, and agronomy studies.

  3. Carbon isotopes in biological carbonates: Respiration and photosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnaughey, T.A.; Burdett, J.; Whelan, J.F.; Paull, C.K.

    1997-01-01

    Respired carbon dioxide is an important constituent in the carbonates of most air breathing animals but is much less important in the carbonates of most aquatic animals. This difference is illustrated using carbon isotope data from freshwater and terrestrial snails, ahermatypic corals, and chemoautotrophic and methanotrophic pelecypods. Literature data from fish otoliths and bird and mammal shell and bone carbonates are also considered. Environmental CO2/O2 ratios appear to be the major controlling variable. Atmospheric CO2/O2 ratios are about thirty times lower than in most natural waters, hence air breathing animals absorb less environmental CO2 in the course of obtaining O2. Tissue CO2 therefore, does not isotopically equilibrate with environmental CO2 as thoroughly in air breathers as in aquatic animals, and this is reflected in skeletal carbonates. Animals having efficient oxygen transport systems, such as vertebrates, also accumulate more respired CO2 in their tissues. Photosynthetic corals calcify mainly during the daytime when photosynthetic CO2 uptake is several times faster than respiratory CO2 release. Photosynthesis, therefore, affects skeletal ??13C more strongly than does respiration. Corals also illustrate how "metabolic" effects on skeletal isotopic composition can be estimated, despite the presence of much larger "kinetic" isotope effects. Copyright ?? 1997 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  4. Application of stable carbon isotopes in long term mesocosm studies for carbon cycle investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Mario

    2016-04-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) is an effective greenhouse gas. The Oceans absorb ca. 30% of the anthropogenic CO2 emissions and thereby partly attenuate deleterious climate effects. A consequence of the oceanic CO2 uptake is a decreased seawater pH and planktonic community shifts. The quantification of the anthropogenic perturbation was investigated through stable carbon isotope analysis in three "long term" mesocosm experiments (Sweden 2013, Gran Canaria 2014, Norway 2015) which reproduced near natural ecosystem conditions under both controlled and modified future CO2 level (up to 2000 ppm) scenarios. Parallel measurements of the stable isotope composition of dissolved inorganic carbon (δ13CDIC) dissolved organic carbon (δ13CDOC) and particulate carbon (δ13CTPC) both from the mesocosms water column and sediment traps showed similar trends in all the three experiments. A CO2 response was noticeable in the isotopic dataset, but increased CO2 levels had only a subtle effect on the concentrations of the dissolved and particulate organic carbon pool. Distinctive δ13C signatures of the particulate carbon pool both in the water column and the sediments were detectable for the different CO2 treatments and they were strongly correlated with the δ13CDIC signatures but not with the δ13CDOC pool. The validity of the isotopic data was verified by cross-analyses of multiple substances of known isotopic signatures on a GasBench, Elemental Analyser (EA) and on an in-house TOC-IRMS setup for the analysis of δ13CDIC, δ13CTPC and δ13CDOC, respectively. Results from these mesocosm experiments proved the stable carbon isotope approach to be an effective tool for quantifying the uptake and carbon transfer among the various compartments of the marine carbon system.

  5. Carbon and oxygen isotope separation by plasma chemical reactions in carbon monoxide glow discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The separation of carbon and oxygen isotopes in CO glow discharge has been studied. The isotope enrichment in the products was measured by quadru-pole mass spectrometer. The reaction yield and empirical formula of solid phase products were determined by the gas-volumetric analysis. The stable products obtained in our experiment are CO2 and solid polymers formed on the discharge wall. The polymer consists of both carbon and oxygen and the oxygen/carbon mole ratio in the polymer is 0.35±0.05. Thi isotope enrichment coefficients show a strong negative dependence on discharge current though the relative reaction yields have an opposite tendency. Consequently, the maximum isotope enrichment coefficients for 13C in wall deposit of 2.31 and for 18O in CO2 of 1.37 are obtained when the discharge current and the reaction yields are minimum in our experimental range. The experimental results of isotope enrichment have been compared with theoretical values estimated by an analytical model of literature. The dilution mechanism of the isotope enrichment of stable products is inferred from the isotopic distributions of 13C and 18O in products and theoretical predictions for isotope enrichment. (author)

  6. Preliminary attempt to distinguish the domesticated pigs from wild boars by the methods of carbon and nitrogen stable isotope analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU YaoWu; LUAN FengShi; WANG ShouGong; WANG ChangSui; Michael P. RICHARDS

    2009-01-01

    Despite great achievements in the origins of domestic pigs made by the methods of zooarchaeology and molecular biology, how to scientifically distinguish the domesticated pigs from wild boars during the early stage of pig domestication is still poorly understood. Compared to wild boar's diets which come from the natural environment, the diets of domestic pigs are more easily influenced by human feeding activities. Therefore, in principle, exploration of the dietary differences among pigs and under standing the impact on pig diets fed by humans can have great potential to differentiate between wild boars and domesticated pigs. To reveal dietary differences among pigs and distinguish the domesti cated pigs from wild boars based on comparison with the diets of humans and other animals, we ana lyzed the carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes of human bones from Xiaojingshan Site and animal bones from Yuezhuang Site, both of which belong to Houli Culture in Shandong Province and date to about 8500--7500 years ago. The mean б13C value ((-17.8 ± 0.3)%o) and б15N value ((9.0±0.6)%0) in human collagen indicate that although millet agriculture began it was not the main subsistence strategy as millets are typical of C4 plants and that humans made a living mainly by gathering, hunting or raisingsome domesticated animals. The б13C value (-16.1%.) and б15N value (6.9%.) in the bovine suggest that C3 plants were dominant in its diet with some C4 plants complemented. The fish has lower б13C value (-24.9%.) and higher б15N value (8.8%.) than the bovine, which is the characteristic of the isotopic val ues from Eurasian freshwater fish. Based on the differences in carbon and nitrogen isotope values, the pigs can be divided into three groups. A group, composed of two pigs, has low б13C values (-18.1%o,-20.0%o) and low б15N values (4.7%o, 6.0%.). B group, only one pig, has the highest б13C value (-10.6%o)and mediate б15N value (6.4%.). As for the C group, also only one pig

  7. Preliminary attempt to distinguish the domesticated pigs from wild boars by the methods of carbon and nitrogen stable isotope analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael; P.RICHARDS

    2009-01-01

    Despite great achievements in the origins of domestic pigs made by the methods of zooarchaeology and molecular biology,how to scientifically distinguish the domesticated pigs from wild boars during the early stage of pig domestication is still poorly understood.Compared to wild boar’s diets which come from the natural environment,the diets of domestic pigs are more easily influenced by human feeding activities.Therefore,in principle,exploration of the dietary differences among pigs and understanding the impact on pig diets fed by humans can have great potential to differentiate between wild boars and domesticated pigs.To reveal dietary differences among pigs and distinguish the domesticated pigs from wild boars based on comparison with the diets of humans and other animals,we analyzed the carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes of human bones from Xiaojingshan Site and animal bones from Yuezhuang Site,both of which belong to Houli Culture in Shandong Province and date to about 8500―7500 years ago.The mean δ 13C value((-17.8 ± 0.3)‰) and δ 15N value((9.0±0.6)‰) in human collagen indicate that although millet agriculture began it was not the main subsistence strategy as millets are typical of C4 plants and that humans made a living mainly by gathering,hunting or raising some domesticated animals.The δ 13C value(-16.1‰) and δ 15N value(6.9‰) in the bovine suggest that C3 plants were dominant in its diet with some C4 plants complemented.The fish has lower δ 13C value(-24.9‰) and higher δ 15N value(8.8‰) than the bovine,which is the characteristic of the isotopic values from Eurasian freshwater fish.Based on the differences in carbon and nitrogen isotope values,the pigs can be divided into three groups.A group,composed of two pigs,has low δ 13C values(-18.1‰,-20.0‰) and low δ 15N values(4.7‰,6.0‰).B group,only one pig,has the highest δ 13C value(-10.6‰) and mediate δ 15N value(6.4‰).As for the C group,also only one pig,low δ 13C

  8. Carbon isotopic composition of individual Precambrian microfossils

    Science.gov (United States)

    House, C. H.; Schopf, J. W.; McKeegan, K. D.; Coath, C. D.; Harrison, T. M.; Stetter, K. O.

    2000-01-01

    Ion microprobe measurements of carbon isotope ratios were made in 30 specimens representing six fossil genera of microorganisms petrified in stromatolitic chert from the approximately 850 Ma Bitter Springs Formation, Australia, and the approximately 2100 Ma Gunflint Formation, Canada. The delta 13C(PDB) values from individual microfossils of the Bitter Springs Formation ranged from -21.3 +/- 1.7% to -31.9 +/- 1.2% and the delta 13C(PDB) values from microfossils of the Gunflint Formation ranged from -32.4 +/- 0.7% to -45.4 +/- 1.2%. With the exception of two highly 13C-depleted Gunflint microfossils, the results generally yield values consistent with carbon fixation via either the Calvin cycle or the acetyl-CoA pathway. However, the isotopic results are not consistent with the degree of fractionation expected from either the 3-hydroxypropionate cycle or the reductive tricarboxylic acid cycle, suggesting that the microfossils studied did not use either of these pathways for carbon fixation. The morphologies of the microfossils suggest an affinity to the cyanobacteria, and our carbon isotopic data are consistent with this assignment.

  9. Carbon isotopic composition of individual Precambrian microfossils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    House, C H; Schopf, J W; McKeegan, K D; Coath, C D; Harrison, T M; Stetter, K O

    2000-08-01

    Ion microprobe measurements of carbon isotope ratios were made in 30 specimens representing six fossil genera of microorganisms petrified in stromatolitic chert from the approximately 850 Ma Bitter Springs Formation, Australia, and the approximately 2100 Ma Gunflint Formation, Canada. The delta 13C(PDB) values from individual microfossils of the Bitter Springs Formation ranged from -21.3 +/- 1.7% to -31.9 +/- 1.2% and the delta 13C(PDB) values from microfossils of the Gunflint Formation ranged from -32.4 +/- 0.7% to -45.4 +/- 1.2%. With the exception of two highly 13C-depleted Gunflint microfossils, the results generally yield values consistent with carbon fixation via either the Calvin cycle or the acetyl-CoA pathway. However, the isotopic results are not consistent with the degree of fractionation expected from either the 3-hydroxypropionate cycle or the reductive tricarboxylic acid cycle, suggesting that the microfossils studied did not use either of these pathways for carbon fixation. The morphologies of the microfossils suggest an affinity to the cyanobacteria, and our carbon isotopic data are consistent with this assignment.

  10. Carbon and Sulfur Isotopic Composition of Yellowknife Bay Sediments: Measurements by the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, H. B.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Stern, J. C.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Steele, A.; Ming, D. W.; McAdam, A. C.; Freissinet, C.; Glavin, D. P.; Archer, P. D.; Brunner, A. E.; Grotzinger,J. P.; Jones, J. H.; Leshin, L. A.; Miller, K.; Morris, R. V.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Niles, P. B.; Owen, T. C.; Summons, R. E.; Sutter, B.; Webster, C. R.

    2014-01-01

    Since landing at Gale Crater in Au-gust 2012, the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instru-ment suite on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) “Curiosity” rover has analyzed solid samples from the martian regolith in three locations, beginning with a scoop of aeolian deposits from the Rocknest (RN) sand shadow. Curiosity subsequently traveled to Yellowknife Bay, where SAM analyzed samples from two separate holes drilled into the Sheepbed Mudstone, designated John Klein (JK) and Cumberland (CB). Evolved gas analysis (EGA) of all samples revealed the presence of H2O as well as O-, C- and S-bearing phas-es, in most cases at abundances below the detection limit of the CheMin instrument. In the absence of definitive mineralogical identification by CheMin, SAM EGA data can help provide clues to the mineralogy of volatile-bearing phases through examination of tem-peratures at which gases are evolved from solid sam-ples. In addition, the isotopic composition of these gas-es may be used to identify possible formation scenarios and relationships between phases. Here we report C and S isotope ratios for CO2 and SO2 evolved from the JK and CB mudstone samples as measured with SAM’s quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) and draw com-parisons to RN.

  11. ASE extraction method for simultaneous carbon and nitrogen stable isotope analysis in soft tissues of aquatic organisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodin, Nathalie [ISM/LPTC, UMR 5255 CNRS, Universite de Bordeaux 1, 351 Cours de la Liberation, 33405 Talence (France); CRH, UMR 212 EME, Institut de Recherche et de Developpement, Av Jean Monnet BP171, 34203 Sete (France); Budzinski, Helene, E-mail: h.budzinski@ism.u-bordeaux1.fr [ISM/LPTC, UMR 5255 CNRS, Universite de Bordeaux 1, 351 Cours de la Liberation, 33405 Talence (France); Le Menach, Karyn; Tapie, Nathalie [ISM/LPTC, UMR 5255 CNRS, Universite de Bordeaux 1, 351 Cours de la Liberation, 33405 Talence (France)

    2009-06-08

    Since lipids are depleted in {sup 13}C relative to proteins and carbohydrates, variations in lipid composition among species and within individuals significantly influence {delta}{sup 13}C and may result in misleading ecological interpretations. Whereas lipid extraction before IRMS analysis constitutes a way of stable isotope result lipid-normalisation, such a procedure was given up because of the un-controlled effects of the methods used (i.e., 'Bligh and Dyer', Soxhlet, etc.) on {delta}{sup 15}N. The aim of this work was to develop a simple, rapid and efficient lipid extraction method allowing for simultaneous C and N stable isotope analysis in the biological soft tissues of aquatic organisms. The goal was to be free from the lipid influence on {delta}{sup 13}C values without interfering with {delta}{sup 15}N values. For that purpose, the modern automated pressurized liquid extraction technique ASE (accelerated solvent extraction) was selected. Eel muscles representative of a broad range of fat contents were extracted via ASE by using different semi-polar solvents (100% dichloromethane and 80% n-hexane/20% acetone) and by operating at different temperature (ambient temperature and 100 deg. C) and pressure (750 and 1900 psi) conditions. The results were discussed in terms of lipid extraction efficiency as well as {delta}{sup 13}C and {delta}{sup 15}N variability.

  12. Use of dual carbon-chlorine isotope analysis to assess the degradation pathways of 1,1,1-trichloroethane in groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palau, Jordi; Jamin, Pierre; Badin, Alice; Vanhecke, Nicolas; Haerens, Bruno; Brouyère, Serge; Hunkeler, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    Compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) is a powerful tool to track contaminant fate in groundwater. However, the application of CSIA to chlorinated ethanes has received little attention so far. These compounds are toxic and prevalent groundwater contaminants of environmental concern. The high susceptibility of chlorinated ethanes like 1,1,1-trichloroethane (1,1,1-TCA) to be transformed via different competing pathways (biotic and abiotic) complicates the assessment of their fate in the subsurface. In this study, the use of a dual C-Cl isotope approach to identify the active degradation pathways of 1,1,1-TCA is evaluated for the first time in an aerobic aquifer impacted by 1,1,1-TCA and trichloroethylene (TCE) with concentrations of up to 20 mg/L and 3.4 mg/L, respectively. The reaction-specific dual carbon-chlorine (C-Cl) isotope trends determined in a recent laboratory study illustrated the potential of a dual isotope approach to identify contaminant degradation pathways of 1,1,1-TCA. Compared to the dual isotope slopes (Δδ(13)C/Δδ(37)Cl) previously determined in the laboratory for dehydrohalogenation/hydrolysis (DH/HY, 0.33 ± 0.04) and oxidation by persulfate (∞), the slope determined from field samples (0.6 ± 0.2, r(2) = 0.75) is closer to the one observed for DH/HY, pointing to DH/HY as the predominant degradation pathway of 1,1,1-TCA in the aquifer. The observed deviation could be explained by a minor contribution of additional degradation processes. This result, along with the little degradation of TCE determined from isotope measurements, confirmed that 1,1,1-TCA is the main source of the 1,1-dichlorethylene (1,1-DCE) detected in the aquifer with concentrations of up to 10 mg/L. This study demonstrates that a dual C-Cl isotope approach can strongly improve the qualitative and quantitative assessment of 1,1,1-TCA degradation processes in the field. PMID:26874254

  13. Radioactive Carbon Isotope Monitoring System Based on Cavity Ring-down Laser Spectroscopy for Decommissioning Process of Nuclear Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomita, Hideki; Watanabe, Kenichi; Takiguchi, Yu; Kawarabayashi, Jun; Iguchi, Tetsuo

    In decommissioning process of nuclear facilities, large amount of radioactive isotopes are discharged as waste. Radioactive carbon isotope (14C) is one of the key nuclides to determine the upper limit of concentration in the waste disposal. In particular, 14C on the graphite reactor decommissioning should be separated from stable carbon isotopes (12C and 13C) and monitored for the public health and safety. We propose an isotope analysis system based on cavity ring-down laser spectroscopy (CRDS) to monitor the carbon isotopes (12C, 13C and 14C) in the isotope separation process for the graphite reactor decommissioning. This system is compact and suitable for a continuous monitoring, because the concentration of molecules including the carbon isotope is derived from its photo absorbance with ultra high sensitive laser absorption spectroscopy. Here are presented the necessary conditions of CRDS system for 14C isotope analysis through the preliminary experimental results of 13C isotope analysis with a prototype system.

  14. Fractionation behavior of chromium isotopes during coprecipitation with calcium carbonate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodler, Alexandra; Sánchez-Pastor, Nuria; Fernández-Díaz, Lurdes;

    2015-01-01

    Interest in chromium (Cr) isotope incorporation into carbonates arises from the observation that Cr isotopic composition of carbonates could be used as a paleoclimate proxy to elucidate past fluctuations of oxygen contents in atmosphere and hydrosphere. The use of Cr isotopes to track...

  15. Carbon Isotope Chemistry in Molecular Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Amy N.; Willacy, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Few details of carbon isotope chemistry are known, especially the chemical processes that occur in astronomical environments like molecular clouds. Observational evidence shows that the C-12/C-13 abundance ratios vary due to the location of the C-13 atom within the molecular structure. The different abundances are a result of the diverse formation pathways that can occur. Modeling can be used to explore the production pathways of carbon molecules in an effort to understand and explain the chemical evolution of molecular clouds.

  16. Carbon and oxygen isotope analysis of leaf biomass reveals contrasting photosynthetic responses to elevated CO2 near geologic vents in Yellowstone National Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sharma

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study we explore the use of natural CO2 emissions in Yellowstone National Park (YNP in Wyoming, USA to study responses of natural vegetation to elevated CO2 levels. Radiocarbon (14C analysis of leaf biomass from a conifer (Pinus contortus; lodgepole pine and an invasive, non-native herb (Linaria dalmatica; Dalmation toadflax was used to trace the inputs of vent CO2 and quantify assimilation-weighted CO2 concentrations experienced by individual plants near vents and in comparable locations with no geologic CO2 exposure. The carbon and oxygen isotopic composition and nitrogen percent of leaf biomass from the same plants was used to investigate photosynthetic responses of these plants to naturally elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations. The coupled shifts in carbon and oxygen isotope values suggest that dalmation toadflax responded to elevated CO2 exposure by increasing stomatal conductance with no change in photosynthetic capacity and lodgepole pine apparently responded by decreasing stomatal conductance and photosynthetic capacity. Lodgepole pine saplings exposed to elevated levels of CO2 likewise had reduced leaf nitrogen concentrations compared to plants with no enhanced CO2 exposure, further suggesting that this widespread and dominant conifer down-regulated photosynthetic capacity under elevated CO2 levels near geologic vents.

  17. Carbon and oxygen isotope analysis of leaf biomass reveals contrasting photosynthetic responses to elevated CO2 near geologic vents in Yellowstone National Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. G. Williams

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study we explore the use of natural CO2 emissions in Yellowstone National Park (YNP in Wyoming, USA to study responses of natural vegetation to elevated CO2 levels. Radiocarbon (14C analysis of leaf biomass from a conifer (Pinus contortus; lodgepole pine and an invasive, non-native herb (Linaria dalmatica; Dalmation toadflax was used to trace the inputs of vent CO2 and quantify assimilation-weighted CO2 concentrations experienced by individual plants near vents and in comparable locations with no geologic CO2 exposure. The carbon and oxygen isotopic composition and nitrogen percent of leaf biomass from the same plants was used to investigate photosynthetic responses of these plants to naturally elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations. The coupled shifts in carbon and oxygen isotope values suggest that dalmation toadflax responded to elevated CO2 exposure by increasing stomatal conductance with no change in photosynthetic capacity and lodgepole pine apparently responded by decreasing stomatal conductance and photosynthetic capacity. Lodgepole pine saplings exposed to elevated levels of CO2 likewise had reduced leaf nitrogen concentrations compared to plants with no enhanced CO2 exposure, further suggesting widespread and dominant conifer down-regulated photosynthetic capacity under elevated CO2 levels near geologic vents.

  18. Bulk Stable Isotope Analysis of Carbon from Solids and Liquids using an Elemental Analyzer Coupled to a Wavelength-Scanned Cavity Ring-Down Spectrophotometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, N.; Rella, C.; van Pelt, A.

    2009-04-01

    We report here on the novel employment of a small footprint Wavelength-Scanned Cavity Ring-Down Spectrometer (WS-CRDS) interfaced to an elemental analyzer for the measurement of the bulk isotopic carbon signature in plants and food products. The current system provides an inexpensive alternative with unparalleled ease-of-use as compared to standard methods using the more complex analytical instrumentation of isotope ratio mass spectrometry. A precision of carbon isotopic ratio measurements of less than 1 permil was achieved in minutes of measurement time. Such precision readily distinguishes the isotopic carbon signatures of a variety of environmental and agricultural products from different origins, providing information about food authenticity and climate changes effect on plant physiology.

  19. Stable carbon isotope analysis to distinguish biotic and abiotic degradation of 1,1,1-trichloroethane in groundwater sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broholm, Mette Martina; Hunkeler, Daniel; Tuxen, Nina;

    2014-01-01

    dechlorination. In all biotic microcosms 1,1,1-TCA was degraded with no apparent increase in the biotic degradation product 1,1-DCA. 1,1,1-TCA degradation was documented by a clear enrichment in 13C in all biotic microcosms, but not in the abiotic control, which suggests biotic or biotically mediated degradation...... not appear to be reductive dechlorination via 1,1-DCA. In the biotic microcosms, the degradation of 1,1,1-TCA occurred under iron and sulfate reducing conditions. Biotic reduction of iron and sulfate likely resulted in formation of FeS, which can abiotically degrade 1,1,1-TCA. Hence, abiotic degradation of 1......,1,1-TCA mediated by biotic FeS formation constitute an explanation for the observed 1,1,1-TCA degradation. This is supported by a high 1,1,1-TCA 13C enrichment factor consistent with abiotic degradation in biotic microcosms. 1,1-DCA carbon isotope field data suggest that this abiotic degradation of 1...

  20. Genetic Analysis of Carbon Isotope Discrimination and its Relation to Yield in a Wheat Doubled Haploid Population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xianshan Wu; Xiaoping Chang; Ruilian Jing

    2011-01-01

    Carbon isotope discrimination (△13C) is considered a useful indicator for indirect selection of grain yield (GY) in cereals.Therefore,it is important to evaluate the genetic variation in △13C and its relationship with GY.A doubled haploid (DH) population derived from a cross of two common wheat varieties,Hanxuan 10 (H10) and Lumai 14 (L14),was phenotyped for △13C in the flag leaf,GY and yield associated traits in two trials contrasted by water availability,specifically,rain-fed and irrigated.Quantitative trait loci (QTLs) were identified by single locus and two locus QTL analyses.QTLs for △13C were located on chromosomes 1A,2B,3B,5A,7A and 7B,and QTLs for other traits on all chromosomes except 1A,4D,5A,5B and 6D.The population selected for high △13C had an increased frequency of QTL for high △13C,GY and number of spikes per plant (NSP) when grown under rain-fed conditions and only for high △13C and NSP when grown under irrigated conditions,which was consistent with agronomic performance of the corresponding trait values in the high △13C progeny; that is,significantly greater than that in the low △13C.Therefore,selection for △13C was beneficial in increasing grain yield in rain-fed environments.

  1. Carbonate clumped isotope bond reordering and geospeedometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passey, Benjamin H.; Henkes, Gregory A.

    2012-10-01

    Carbonate clumped isotope thermometry is based on the preference of 13C and 18O to form bonds with each other. At elevated temperatures such bond ordering is susceptible to resetting by diffusion of C and O through the solid mineral lattice. This type of bond reordering has the potential to obscure primary paleoclimate information, but could also provide a basis for reconstructing shallow crustal temperatures and cooling rates. We determined Arrhenius parameters for solid-state reordering of C-O bonds in two different calcites through a series of laboratory heating experiments. We find that the calcites have different susceptibilities to solid-state reordering. Reaction progress follows a first order rate law in both calcites, but only after an initial period of non-first order reaction that we suggest relates to annealing of nonequilibrium defects when the calcites are first heated to experimental temperature. We show that the apparent equilibrium temperature equations (or "closure temperature" equations) for carbonate clumped isotope reordering are analogous Dodson's equations for first order loss of daughter isotopes. For each calcite, the sensitivity of apparent equilibrium temperature to cooling rate is sufficiently high for inference of cooling rates within a factor of ˜5 or better for cooling rates ranging from tens of degrees per day to a few degrees per million years. However, because the calcites have different susceptibilities to reordering, each calcite defines its own cooling rate-apparent equilibrium temperature relationship. The cooling rates of Carrara marble inferred from carbonate clumped isotope geospeedometry are 10-6-10-3 degrees per annum and are in broad agreement with rates inferred from thermochronometric methods. Cooling rates for 13C-depleted calcites from the late Neoproterozoic Doushantou cap carbonates in south China are on the order of 102-104 degrees per annum, consistent with rapid cooling following formation of these calcites by a

  2. Stable carbon isotope analysis ({delta}{sup 13}C values) of polybrominated diphenyl ethers and their UV-transformation products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenfelder, Natalie; Bendig, Paul [University of Hohenheim, Institute of Food Chemistry (170b), Garbenstr. 28, D-70599 Stuttgart (Germany); Vetter, Walter, E-mail: walter.vetter@uni-hohenheim.de [University of Hohenheim, Institute of Food Chemistry (170b), Garbenstr. 28, D-70599 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2011-10-15

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are frequently detected in food and environmental samples. We used compound specific isotope analysis to determine the {delta}{sup 13}C values of individual PBDEs in two technical mixtures. Within the same technical product (DE-71 or DE-79), BDE congeners were the more depleted in {sup 13}C the higher brominated they were. In contrast, the products of light-induced hydrodebromination of BDE 47 and technical DE-79 were more enriched in {sup 13}C because of more stable bonds between {sup 13}C and bromine. As a result, the {delta}{sup 13}C values of the irradiated solution progressed diametrically compared to those of the technical synthesis. The ratio of the {delta}{sup 13}C values of BDE 47 to BDE 99 and of BDE 99 to BDE 153 are thus suggested as indicators to distinguish native technical products from transformation products. Ratios <1 are typical for native congeners (e.g. in DE-71) while the reversed ratio (>1) is typical of transformation products. - Highlights: > {delta}{sup 13}C values of PBDEs were determined by means of compound specific isotope analysis. > PBDEs in technical mixtures were the more depleted in {sup 13}C the higher they were brominated. > Solutions of individual PBDEs and technical PBDE mixtures were irradiated by UV light. > {delta}{sup 13}C values of irradiated PBDEs and technical PBDEs progressed diametrically. > Ratios of the {delta}{sup 13}C values were used to distinguish native from transformed PBDEs. - Diametrically progressing {delta}{sup 13}C values in technical mixtures and UV-transformation products of DE-79 may be useful for source appointment of PBDEs in environmental samples

  3. Simultaneous tracing of carbon and nitrogen isotopes in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Roland; Jain, Mohit

    2016-05-24

    Stable isotope tracing is a powerful method for interrogating metabolic enzyme activities across the metabolic network of living cells. However, most studies of mammalian cells have used (13)C-labeled tracers only and focused on reactions in central carbon metabolism. Cellular metabolism, however, involves other biologically important elements, including nitrogen, hydrogen, oxygen, phosphate and sulfur. Tracing stable isotopes of such elements may help shed light on poorly understood metabolic pathways. Here, we demonstrate the use of high-resolution mass spectrometry to simultaneously trace carbon and nitrogen metabolism in human cells cultured with (13)C- and (15)N-labeled glucose and glutamine. To facilitate interpretation of the complex isotopomer data generated, we extend current methods for metabolic flux analysis to handle multivariate mass isotopomer distributions (MMIDs). We find that observed MMIDs are broadly consistent with known biochemical pathways. Whereas measured (13)C MIDs were informative for central carbon metabolism, (15)N isotopes provided evidence for nitrogen-carrying reactions in amino acid and nucleotide metabolism. This computational and experimental methodology expands the scope of metabolic flux analysis beyond carbon metabolism, and may prove important to understanding metabolic phenotypes in health and disease.

  4. Carbon isotope systematics of individual hydrocarbons in hydrothermal petroleum from Escanaba Trough, Northeastern Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoneit, B.R.T.; Schoell, M.; Kvenvolden, K.A.

    1997-01-01

    We submitted individual aliphatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in samples of hydrothermal petroleum from Escanaba trough to compound specific isotope analysis to trace their origins. The carbon isotope compositions of the alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (means -27.5 and -24.7%, respectively) reflect a primarily terrestrial organic matter source.We submitted individual aliphatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in samples of hydrothermal petroleum from Escanaba Trough to compound specific isotope analysis to trace their origins. The carbon isotope compositions of the alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (means -27.5 and -24.7 per mill, respectively) reflect a primarily terrestrial organic matter source.

  5. Oxygen isotope fractionation in divalent metal carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neil, J.R.; Clayton, R.N.; Mayeda, T.K.

    1969-01-01

    Equilibrium fractionation factors for the distribution of 18O between alkaline-earth carbonates and water have been measured over the temperature range 0-500??C. The fractionation factors ?? can be represented by the equations CaCO3-H2O, 1000 ln??=2.78(106 T-2)-3.39, SrCO3-H 2O, 1000 ln??=2.69(106 T-2)-3.74, BaCO3-H2O, 1000 ln??=2.57(106 T -2)-4.73. Measurements on MnCO3, CdCO3, and PbCO3 were made at isolated temperatures. A statistical-mechanical calculation of the isotopic partition function ratios gives reasonably good agreement with experiment. Both cationic size and mass are important in isotopic fractionation, the former predominantly in its effect on the internal vibrations of the anion, the latter in its effect on the lattice vibrations.

  6. Magnesium isotope fractionation in bacterial mediated carbonate precipitation experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, I. J.; Pearce, C. R.; Polacskek, T.; Cockell, C.; Hammond, S. J.

    2012-12-01

    Magnesium is an essential component of life, with pivotal roles in the generation of cellular energy as well as in plant chlorophyll [1]. The bio-geochemical cycling of Mg is associated with mass dependant fractionation (MDF) of the three stable Mg isotopes [1]. The largest MDF of Mg isotopes has been recorded in carbonates, with foraminiferal tests having δ26Mg compositions up to 5 ‰ lighter than modern seawater [2]. Magnesium isotopes may also be fractionated during bacterially mediated carbonate precipitation and such carbonates are known to have formed in both modern and ancient Earth surface environments [3, 4], with cyanobacteria having a dominant role in carbonate formation during the Archean. In this study, we aim to better constrain the extent to which Mg isotope fractionation occurs during cellular processes, and to identify when, and how, this signal is transferred to carbonates. To this end we have undertaken biologically-mediated carbonate precipitation experiments that were performed in artificial seawater, but with the molar Mg/Ca ratio set to 0.6 and with the solution spiked with 0.4% yeast extract. The bacterial strain used was marine isolate Halomonas sp. (gram-negative). Experiments were run in the dark at 21 degree C for two to three months and produced carbonate spheres of various sizes up to 300 μm in diameter, but with the majority have diameters of ~100 μm. Control experiments run in sterile controls (`empty` medium without bacteria) yielded no precipitates, indicating a bacterial control on the precipitation. The carbonate spheres are produced are amenable to SEM, EMP and Mg isotopic analysis by MC-ICP-MS. Our new data will shed light on tracing bacterial signals in carbonates from the geological record. [1] Young & Galy (2004). Rev. Min. Geochem. 55, p197-230. [2] Pogge von Strandmann (2008). Geochem. Geophys. Geosys. 9 DOI:10.1029/2008GC002209. [3] Castanier, et al. (1999). Sed. Geol. 126, 9-23. [4] Cacchio, et al. (2003

  7. The Precambrian marine carbonate isotope database: version 1.1.

    OpenAIRE

    G. A. Shields; Veizer, J.

    2002-01-01

    We present a compilation of strontium, carbon, and oxygen isotope compositions of roughly 10,000 marine carbonate rocks of Archean - Ordovician age (3800 Ma – 450 Ma). The Precambrian Marine Carbonate Isotope Database (PMCID) has been compiled from 152 published and 3 unpublished articles and books of the past 40 years. Also included are 30 categories of relevant “metadata” that allow detailed comparisons and quality assessments of the isotope data to be made. The PMCID will be updated period...

  8. Carbon and Oxygen isotopic composition in paleoenvironmental determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work reports that the carbon and oxygen isotopic composition separate the mollusks from marine environment of the mollusks from continental environment in two groups isotopically different, making the biological control outdone by environment control, in the isotopic fragmentation mechanisms. The patterns from the continental environment are more rich in O16 than the patterns from marine environments. The C12 is also more frequent in the mollusks from continental environments. The carbon isotopic composition in paterns from continental environments is situated betwen - 10.31 and - 4,05% and the oxygen isotopic composition is situated between - 6,95 and - 2,41%. To the marine environment patterns the carbon isotopic composition is between - 2,08 and + 2,65% and the oxigen isotopic composition is between - 2,08 and + 0,45%. Was also analysed fossil marine mollusks shells and their isotopic composition permit the formulation of hypothesis about the environment which they lived. (C.D.G.)

  9. Application of carbon and oxygen stable isotopes to the study of Brazilian precambrian

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samples of carbonated rocks of precambrian age are studied. The stable carbon and oxygen isotopes are applied to the study of terrestrial materials considering the variations of some element isotopic composition in function of the environment of sedimentation. The isotopic analysis was done using mass spectrometers. The analytical results and the description of region geology of the site of each sample are presented. The isotopic data are interpreted aiming to the environment of sedimentation. New techniques for better improvement of carbon and oxygen ratios, are proposed, such as: to use the analysis of surface trend and the isotopic logging in mapping of surface and subsurface. A new method for approximated determination of the ages of precambrian carbonated rocks, considering the limitations of their new technique, is also presented. (M.C.K.)

  10. Insights into Mechanistic Models for Evaporation of Organic Liquids in the Environment Obtained by Position-Specific Carbon Isotope Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julien, Maxime; Nun, Pierrick; Robins, Richard J; Remaud, Gérald S; Parinet, Julien; Höhener, Patrick

    2015-11-01

    Position-specific isotope effects (PSIEs) have been measured by isotope ratio monitoring (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry during the evaporation of 10 liquids of different polarities under 4 evaporation modes (passive evaporation, air-vented evaporation, low pressure evaporation, distillation). The observed effects are used to assess the validity of the Craig-Gordon isotope model for organic liquids. For seven liquids the overall isotope effect (IE) includes a vapor-liquid contribution that is strongly position-specific in polar compounds but less so in apolar compounds and a diffusive IE that is not position-specific, except in the alcohols, ethanol and propan-1-ol. The diffusive IE is diminished under forced evaporation. The position-specific isotope pattern created by liquid-vapor IEs is manifest in five liquids, which have an air-side limitation for volatilization. For the alcohols, undefined processes in the liquid phase create additional PSIEs. Three other liquids with limitations on the liquid side have a lower, highly position-specific, bulk diffusive IE. It is concluded that evaporation of organic pollutants creates unique position-specific isotope patterns that may be used to assess the progress of remediation or natural attenuation of pollution and that the Craig-Gordon isotope model is valid for the volatilization of nonpolar organic liquids with air-side limitation of the volatilization rate.

  11. Exploring the Potential of Laser Ablation Carbon Isotope Analysis for Examining Ecology during the Ontogeny of Middle Pleistocene Hominins from Sima de los Huesos (Northern Spain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuria Garcia

    Full Text Available Laser ablation of tooth enamel was used to analyze stable carbon isotope compositions of teeth of hominins, red deer, and bears from middle Pleistocene sites in the Sierra de Atapuerca in northern Spain, to investigate the possibility that this technique could be used as an additional tool to identify periods of physiological change that are not detectable as changes in tooth morphology. Most of the specimens were found to have minimal intra-tooth variation in carbon isotopes (< 2.3‰, suggesting isotopically uniform diets through time and revealing no obvious periods of physiological change. However, one of the two sampled hominin teeth displayed a temporal carbon isotope shift (3.2‰ that was significantly greater than observed for co-occurring specimens. The δ13C value of this individual averaged about -16‰ early in life, and -13‰ later in life. This isotopic change occurred on the canine crown about 4.2 mm from the root, which corresponds to an approximate age of two to four years old in modern humans. Our dataset is perforce small owing to the precious nature of hominid teeth, but it demonstrates the potential utility of the intra-tooth isotope profile method for extracting ontogenetic histories of human ancestors.

  12. Exploring the Potential of Laser Ablation Carbon Isotope Analysis for Examining Ecology during the Ontogeny of Middle Pleistocene Hominins from Sima de los Huesos (Northern Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Nuria; Feranec, Robert S; Passey, Benjamin H; Cerling, Thure E; Arsuaga, Juan Luis

    2015-01-01

    Laser ablation of tooth enamel was used to analyze stable carbon isotope compositions of teeth of hominins, red deer, and bears from middle Pleistocene sites in the Sierra de Atapuerca in northern Spain, to investigate the possibility that this technique could be used as an additional tool to identify periods of physiological change that are not detectable as changes in tooth morphology. Most of the specimens were found to have minimal intra-tooth variation in carbon isotopes (< 2.3‰), suggesting isotopically uniform diets through time and revealing no obvious periods of physiological change. However, one of the two sampled hominin teeth displayed a temporal carbon isotope shift (3.2‰) that was significantly greater than observed for co-occurring specimens. The δ13C value of this individual averaged about -16‰ early in life, and -13‰ later in life. This isotopic change occurred on the canine crown about 4.2 mm from the root, which corresponds to an approximate age of two to four years old in modern humans. Our dataset is perforce small owing to the precious nature of hominid teeth, but it demonstrates the potential utility of the intra-tooth isotope profile method for extracting ontogenetic histories of human ancestors. PMID:26673156

  13. Differential utilization of allochthonous and autochthonous carbon by aquatic insects of two shrub-steppe desert spring-streams: A stable carbon isotope analysis and critique of the method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mize, A.L. [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States)

    1993-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess whether the carbon supporting stream food webs comes principally from terrestrial sources or is produced within the stream. Lacking data to resolve the allochthonous/autochthonous issue with any finality, stream ecologists have alternately postulated that stream carbon was principally autochthonous or principally allochthonous. Others argued that autochthonous and allochthonous carbon resources cannot be separated and that the allochthonous/autochthonous dependence issue is unresolvable. Many investigators have seized upon stable carbon isotopes technology as the tool to resolve the controversy. Unfortunately most investigators have conceded that the results are rarely quantitative and that the qualitative relationships are ambiguous. This study points out the fallacies of trying to conjure single isotopic values for either allochthonous or autochthonous carbon. It suggests that stable carbon isotope technology is not reliable in establishing specific consumer/food source relations and that it is not suitable for assessing allochthonous/autochthonous carbon dependence in freshwater streams.

  14. A new approach to understand methylmercury (CH3Hg) sources and transformation pathways: Compound-specific carbon stable isotope analysis by GC-C-IRMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baya, P. A.; Point, D.; Amouroux, D. P.; Lebreton, B.; Guillou, G.

    2015-12-01

    Methylmercury (CH3Hg) is a potent neurotoxin which is readily assimilated by organisms and bio-accumulates in aquatic food webs. In humans, consumption of CH3Hg contaminated marine fish is the major route of mercury exposure. However, our understanding of CH3Hg transformation pathways is still incomplete. To close this knowledge gap, we propose to explore the stable carbon isotopic composition (δ13C) of the methyl group of CH3Hg for a better understanding of its sources and transformation mechanisms. The method developed for the determination of the δ13C value of CH3Hg in biological samples involves (i) CH3Hg selective extraction, (ii) derivatization, and (iii) separation by gas chromatography (GC) prior to analysis by combustion isotope ratio mass spectrometry (C-IRMS). We present the figures of merit of this novel method and the first δ13C signatures for certified materials (ERM-CE464, BCR414) and biological samples at different marine trophic levels (i.e., tuna fish, zooplankton). The implications of this new approach to trace the pathways associated with Hg methylation and the mechanisms involved will be discussed.

  15. Long-term field performance of a tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer for analysis of carbon isotopes of CO2 in forest air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. W. C. White

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Tunable diode laser absorption spectrometry (TDLAS is gaining in popularity for measuring the mole fraction [CO2] and stable isotopic composition (δ13C of carbon dioxide (CO2 in air in studies of biosphere-atmosphere gas exchange. Here we present a detailed examination of the performance of a commercially-available TDLAS located in a high-altitude subalpine coniferous forest (the Niwot Ridge AmeriFlux site, providing the first multi-year analysis of TDLAS instrument performance for measuring CO2 isotopes in the field. Air was sampled from five to nine vertical locations in and above the forest canopy every ten minutes for 2.4 years. A variety of methods were used to assess instrument performance. Measurement of two compressed air cylinders that were in place over the entire study establish the long-term field precision of 0.2 μmol mol−1 for [CO2] and 0.35‰ for δ13C, but after fixing several problems the isotope precision improved to 0.2‰ (over the last several months. The TDLAS provided detail on variability of δ13C of atmospheric CO2 that was not represented in weekly flask samples, as well as information regarding the influence of large-scale (regional seasonal cycle and local forest processes on [CO2] and δ13C of CO2. There were also clear growing season and winter differences in the relative contributions of photosynthesis and respiration on the [CO2] and δ13C of forest air.

  16. Long-term field performance of a tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer for analysis of carbon isotopes of CO2 in forest air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. R. Bowling

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Tunable diode laser absorption spectrometry (TDLAS is gaining in popularity for measuring the mole fraction [CO2] and stable isotopic composition (δ13C of carbon dioxide (CO2 in air in studies of biosphere-atmosphere gas exchange. Here we present a detailed examination of the performance of a commercially-available TDLAS located in a high-altitude subalpine coniferous forest (the Niwot Ridge AmeriFlux site, providing the first multi-year analysis of TDLAS instrument performance for measuring CO2 isotopes in the field. Air was sampled from five to nine vertical locations in and above the forest canopy every ten minutes for 2.4 years. A variety of methods were used to assess instrument performance. Measurement of two compressed air cylinders that were in place over the entire study establish the long-term field precision of 0.2 μmol mol−1 for [CO2] and 0.35‰ for δ13C, but after fixing several problems the isotope precision improved to 0.2permil (over the last several months. The TDLAS provided detail on variability of δ13C of atmospheric CO2 that was not represented in weekly flask samples, as well as information regarding the influence of large-scale (regional seasonal cycle and local forest processes on [CO2] and δ13C of CO2. There were also clear growing season and winter differences in the relative contributions of photosynthesis and respiration on the [CO2] and δ13C of forest air.

  17. Organic chemistry of Murchison meteorite: Carbon isotopic fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, G. U.; Blair, N. E.; Desmarais, D. J.; Cronin, J. R.; Chang, S.

    1986-01-01

    The carbon isotopic composition of individual organic compounds of meteoritic origin remains unknown, as most reported carbon isotopic ratios are for bulk carbon or solvent extractable fractions. The researchers managed to determine the carbon isotopic ratios for individual hydrocarbons and monocarboxylic acids isolated from a Murchison sample by a freeze-thaw-ultrasonication technique. The abundances of monocarboxylic acids and saturated hydrocarbons decreased with increasing carbon number and the acids are more abundant than the hydrocarbon with the same carbon number. For both classes of compounds, the C-13 to C-12 ratios decreased with increasing carbon number in a roughly parallel manner, and each carboxylic acid exhibits a higher isotopic number than the hydrocarbon containing the same number of carbon atoms. These trends are consistent with a kinetically controlled synthesis of higher homologues for lower ones.

  18. Carbon isotope fractionation in synthetic magnesian calcite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez-Lopez, Concepción; Romanek, Christopher S.; Caballero, Emilia

    2006-03-01

    Mg-calcite was precipitated at 25 °C in closed system, free-drift experiments, from solutions containing NaHCO 3, CaCl 2 and MgCl 2. The carbon stable isotope composition of bulk solid and solution were analyzed from subsamples collected during time course experiments of 24 h duration. Considering only the Mg-content and δ 13C values for the bulk solid, the carbon isotope fractionation factor for the Mg-calcite-HCO 3(aq)- system (as 103lnα) increased with average mol percentage of Mg (X Mg) in the solid at a rate of (0.024 ± 0.011) per mol% MgCO 3. Extrapolation of this relationship to the pure calcite end member yields a value of 0.82 ± 0.09, which is similar to published values for the calcite-HCO 3(aq)- system. Although 103lnα did not vary for precipitation rates that ranged from 10 3.21 to 10 4.60 μmol m -2 h -1, it was not possible to hold Mg-content of the solid constant, so kinetic effect on 10 3 ln α could not be evaluated from these experiments.

  19. The Oxidant Budget of Dissolved Organic Carbon Driven Isotope Excursions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristow, T. F.; Kennedy, M. J.

    2008-12-01

    Negative carbon isotope values, falling below the mantle average of about -5 per mil, in carbonate phases of Ediacaran age sedimentary rocks are widely regarded as reflecting negative excursions in the carbon isotopic composition of seawater lasting millions of years. These isotopic signals form the basis of chemostratigraphic correlations between Ediacaran aged sections in different parts of the world, and have been used to track the oxidation of the biosphere. However, these isotopic values are difficult to accommodate within limits prescribed by the current understanding of the carbon cycle, and a hypothetical Precambrian ocean dissolved organic carbon (DOC) pool 100 to 1000 times the size of the modern provides a potential source of depleted carbon not considered in Phanerozoic carbon cycle budgets. We present box model results that show the remineralization of such a DOC pool to drive an isotope excursion of the magnitude observed in the geological record exhausts global budgets of free oxygen and sulfate in 800 k.y. These results are incompatible with the estimated duration of late Ediacaran isotope excursions of more than 10 m.y., as well as geochemical and biological indicators that oceanic sulfate and oxygen levels were maintained or even increased at the same time. Therefore the carbon isotope record is probably not a useful tool for monitoring oxygen levels in the atmosphere and ocean. Covariation between the carbon and oxygen isotope records is often observed during negative excursions and is indicative of local processes or diagenetic overprinting.

  20. Degradation changes stable carbon isotope depth profiles in palsa peatlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. P. Krüger

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Palsa peatlands are a significant carbon pool in the global carbon cycle and are projected to change by global warming due to accelerated permafrost thaw. Our aim was to use stable carbon isotopes as indicators of palsa degradation. Depth profiles of stable carbon isotopes generally reflect organic matter dynamics in soils with an increase of δ13C values during aerobic decomposition and stable or decreasing δ13C values with depth during anaerobic decomposition. Stable carbon isotope depth profiles of undisturbed and degraded sites of hummocks as well as hollows at three palsa peatlands in northern Sweden were used to investigate the degradation processes. The depth patterns of stable isotopes clearly differ between intact and degraded hummocks at all sites. Erosion and cryoturbation at the degraded sites significantly changes the stable carbon isotope depth profiles. At the intact hummocks the uplifting of peat material by permafrost is indicated by a turning in the δ13C depth trend and this assessment is supported by a change in the C / N ratios. For hollows isotope patterns were less clear, but some hollows and degraded hollows in the palsa peatlands show differences in their stable carbon isotope depth profiles indicating enhanced degradation rates. We conclude that the degradation of palsa peatlands by accelerated permafrost thawing could be identified with stable carbon isotope depth profiles. At intact hummocks δ13C depth patterns display the uplifting of peat material by a change in peat decomposition processes.

  1. Phanerozoic and Neoproterozoic Negative Carbon Isotope Excursions, Diagenesis and Terrestrialization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, K.; Kennedy, M. J.

    2008-12-01

    Comprehensive data sets of Phanerozoic and late Precambrian carbon isotope data derived from carbonate rocks show a similar positive relation when cross-plotted with oxygen isotope values. The range and slope between the time periods is identical and the processes responsible for the relation have been well documented in Quaternary sediments. These processes include the stabilization of isotope values to ambient meteoric water values during shallow burial and flushing of carbonate sediments. Both data sets show strongly depleted carbon (-9 per mil PDB) and oxygen isotope values that retain seemingly systematic stratigraphic patterns with the Quaternary and Phanerozoic examples that demonstrably record meteroric water values. Similar values and patterns in the Precambrian are interpreted as primary marine in origin with significant implications for an ocean carbon mass balance not possible in the Phanerozoic carbon cycle. A similar compilation of carbonates older than one billion years do not show a relation between carbon and oxygen isotopes, lacking the negative carbon values evident in the younger record. We hypothesize that this difference records the onset of significant organic carbon on the land surface and the alteration of meteoric waters toward Phanerozoic values. We demonstrate the meteoric affinities of Neoproterozoic carbonates containing prominent negative isotope excursions recorded in the Shuram and Wonoka Formations of Oman and South Australia commonly attributed to whole ocean isotope variation. The conspicuous absence of negative carbon isotope values with normal marine oxygenisotope values in the Phanerozoic and Neoproterozic identifies a consistent relation between these time intervals and suggests that, as well accepted in the Phanerozoic, negative carbon isotope excursions less than -3 per mil are not a record of marine processes, but rather the later terrestrial biotic influence on meteoric water values.

  2. Geochemical identification of coal-sourced oils and interbedded shale-sourced oils as revealed by compound specific carbon isotopic analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    To date, questions remain as to how to differen tiate between coal- and interbedded shale-sourced oils in coal measures. Based on the hypothesis that δ13C value of sedimentary organic matter is controlled by the depositional environment and productivities of biota grown in such depositional setting, this note examines compound specific carbon isotopic profiles from coal and interbedded shale extracts using the gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry technique (GC/IRMS). The results show that compound specific carbon isotope values from coal extracts are enriched in 13C relative to that of interbedded shale extracts, and provide useful information in characterizing coal- and interbedded shale-sourced oils in coal measures. An example for its successful application from the Turpan Basin, Northwestern China is presented.

  3. Carbon isotope ratio analysis of organic moieties from fossil mummified wood: establishing optimum conditions for off-line pyrolysis extraction using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poole, I.J.; Bergen, P.F. van

    2002-01-01

    Mummified fossil wood was studied using off-line pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry to reveal detailed insights into the pyrolysis conditions that are needed to obtain simultaneously sufficient amounts of both cellulose and lignin markers for stable carbon isotope analyses. The off-line

  4. Carbon isotope systematics of individual hydrocarbons in hydrothermal petroleum from Escanaba Trough, northeastern Pacific Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoneit, B R; Schoell, M; Kvenvolden, K A

    1997-01-01

    We submitted individual aliphatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in samples of hydrothermal petroleum from Escanaba Trough to compound specific isotope analysis to trace their origins. The carbon isotope compositions of the alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (means -27.5 and -24.7%, respectively) reflect a primarily terrestrial organic matter source. PMID:11541391

  5. Carbonate isotopic records of paleoclimate changes in Chinese loess

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩家懋; 姜文英; 刘东生; 吕厚远; 郭正堂; 吴乃琴

    1996-01-01

    Oxygen and carbon isotopes of carbonate in concretion and bulk samples collected from Xifeng. Luochuan and Weinan loess sections, China, have been analyzed. It has been found that carbon and oxygen isotopic ratios of concretion in paleosol, as useful paleodimatic indicators, recorded temperature and humidity variation during their formation. Comparison of isotopic data from different locations may offer a spatial picture of past environmental changes. Isotopic data from carbonate of bulk sample also include useful environmental information. Carbon and oxygen isotopic curves of past 150ka in Weinan completely reflect the fluctuations of the paleodimate with different stratigraphical units. The curves can correlate well with those of other dimatic proxies and of the deep sea sediments.

  6. Boron Isotope Intercomparison Project (BIIP): Development of a new carbonate standard for stable isotopic analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutjahr, Marcus; Bordier, Louise; Douville, Eric; Farmer, Jesse; Foster, Gavin L.; Hathorne, Ed; Hönisch, Bärbel; Lemarchand, Damien; Louvat, Pascale; McCulloch, Malcolm; Noireaux, Johanna; Pallavicini, Nicola; Rodushkin, Ilia; Roux, Philippe; Stewart, Joseph; Thil, François; You, Chen-Feng

    2014-05-01

    .20 ‰ for JCp-1 and 0.15 ‰ for JCt-1, hence within uncertainty of the reported values. With the exception of one MC-ICPMS lab that provided significantly lower JCp-1 δ11B data for unoxidised material (1.7 ‰ below median), the remaining JCp-1 results reproduced within ± 0.54 ‰ for unoxidised (n=21) and ± 0.37 ‰ for oxidised standards (n=21). The JCt-1 standards did not reproduce as well, resulting in a 2 s.d. of 1.0 ‰ for both unoxidised and oxidised powders (n=21) and in places the effect of oxidation appeared to be laboratory dependent. Exclusion of one MC-ICPMS lab resulted in an improved reproducibility of 0.52 ‰ (n=18) for oxidised JCt-1 material. The mean difference for the two standard materials in the respective labs (i.e., Δδ11B = mean δ11B(JCp-1) - mean δ11B(JCt-1)) was 7.9 ± 0.9 ‰ for unoxidised (n=7) and 8.1 ± 0.7 ‰ for oxidised standards (n=7). In this presentation emphasis will also be placed on distinguishing factors leading to increased/decreased interlaboratory consistency during the preparation and analysis of biogenic carbonates for other isotopic systems. References [1] Foster, G.L. et al. (2013) Chemical Geology 358: p. 1-14. [2] Okai, T. et al. (2002) Geostandards Newsletter 26: p. 95-99. [3] Inoue, M. et al. (2004) Geostandards and Geoanalytical Research 28: p. 411-416.

  7. [Effects of lipid extraction on stable carbon and nitrogen isotope analyses of Ommastrephes bartramii muscle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yi; Chen, Xin-Jun; Gao, Chun-Xia; Li, Yun-Kai

    2014-11-01

    Stable isotope analysis (SIA) has become an important tool to investigate diet shift, habitat use and trophic structure of animal population. Muscle is considered to be the most common tissue for SIA, however, lipid content in muscle causes a considerable bias to the interpretation of isotopic ratios of animals. Neon flying squid (Ommastrephes bartramii) is an important economic cephalopod of Chinese distant water fishery, and plays a major role in marine ecosystems. In this study, the effects of lipid extraction on stable isotope ratios of the muscles of 53 neon flying squids were investigated and the interference mechanism of lipid in SIA was clarified with the aim of contrasting the suitability of different lipid correction models of stable carbon isotope. Results showed that the stable carbon and nitrogen isotopic values of non-lipid extracted samples significantly increased after lipid extractions by 0.71 per thousand and 0.47 per thousand, respectively, which suggested that lipid extraction in cephalopod isotope study is needed prior to stable carbon isotope analysis but not recommended for stable nitrogen isotope analysis. The results could help remove the effects of lipid contents and standardize SIA muscle samples, thereby getting better understanding of the isotopic change of neon flying squids in the future. PMID:25898636

  8. Carbon isotope fractionation in protoplanetary disks

    CERN Document Server

    Woods, Paul M

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the gas-phase and grain-surface chemistry in the inner 30 AU of a typical protoplanetary disk using a new model which calculates the gas temperature by solving the gas heating and cooling balance and which has an improved treatment of the UV radiation field. We discuss inner-disk chemistry in general, obtaining excellent agreement with recent observations which have probed the material in the inner regions of protoplanetary disks. We also apply our model to study the isotopic fractionation of carbon. Results show that the fractionation ratio, 12C/13C, of the system varies with radius and height in the disk. Different behaviour is seen in the fractionation of different species. We compare our results with 12C/13C ratios in the Solar System comets, and find a stark contrast, indicative of reprocessing.

  9. Progressive extraction method applied to isotopic exchange of carbon-14

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isotopic exchange in natural settings is essentially an irreversible process, so that it progresses continuously until there is complete isotopic equilibrium. In soils, this process involves interaction between isotopes in the liquid and solid phases, and complete isotopic equilibrium may take a very long time. Measurements after partial isotopic exchange have been used to characterize the labile fraction of elements in soils. We describe a method to characterize the extent of isotopic exchange, with application here to incorporation of inorganic carbon-14 (14C) into mineral carbonates and organic matter in soils. The procedure uses a continuous addition of extractant, acid, or H2O2in the examples presented here, coupled with sequential sampling. The method has been applied to demonstrate the degree of isotopic exchange in soil. The same strategy could be applied to many other elements, including plant nutrients. (author)

  10. Photosynthetic fractionation of the stable isotopes of oxygen and carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guy, R.D. (Carnegie Institution of Washington, Stanford, CA (United States)); Fogel, M.L.; Berry, J.A. (Carnegie Inst. of Washington, Washington, DC (United States))

    1993-01-01

    Isotope discrimination during photosynthetic exchange of O[sub 2] and CO[sub 2] was measured using enzyme, thylakoid, and whole cell preparations. Evolved oxygen from isolated spinach thylakoids was isotopically identical (within analytical error) to its source water. Similar results were obtained with Anacystis nidulans Richter and Phaeodactylum tricornutum Bohlin cultures purged with helium. For consumptive reactions, discrimination ([triangle], where 1 + [triangle]/1000 equals the isotope effect, k[sup 16]/k[sup 18] or k[sup 12]/k[sup 13]) was determined by analysis of residual substrate (O[sub 2] or CO[sub 2]). The [triangle] for the Mehler reaction, mediated by ferredoxin or methylviologen, was 15.3[per thousand]. Oxygen isotope discrimination during oxygenation of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) catalyzed by RuBP carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) was 21.3[per thousand] and independent of enzyme source, unlike carbon isotope dicrimination: 30.3[per thousand] for spinach enzyme and 19.6 to 23[per thousand] for Rhodospirillum rubrum and A. nidulans enzymes, depending on reaction conditions. The [triangle] for O[sub 2] consumption catalyzed by glycolate oxidase was 22.7[per thousand]. Consistent with this, when Asparagus sprengeri Regel mesopyll cells approached the compensation point within a sealed vessel, the [delta][sup 18]O of dissolved O[sub 2] came to a steady-state value of about 21.5[per thousand] relative to the source water. The results provide improved estimates of discrimination factors in several reactions prominent in the global oxygen cycle and indicate that photorespiration plays a significant part in determining the isotopic composition of atmospheric oxygen. 47 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Photosynthetic Fractionation of the Stable Isotopes of Oxygen and Carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guy, R. D.; Fogel, M. L.; Berry, J. A.

    1993-01-01

    Isotope discrimination during photosynthetic exchange of O2 and CO2 was measured using enzyme, thylakoid, and whole cell preparations. Evolved oxygen from isolated spinach thylakoids was isotopically identical (within analytical error) to its source water. Similar results were obtained with Anacystis nidulans Richter and Phaeodactylum tricornutum Bohlin cultures purged with helium. For consumptive reactions, discrimination ([delta], where 1 + [delta]/1000 equals the isotope effect, k16/k18 or k12/k13) was determined by analysis of residual substrate (O2 or CO2). The [delta] for the Mehler reaction, mediated by ferredoxin or methylviologen, was 15.3[per mille (thousand) sign]. Oxygen isotope discrimination during oxygenation of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) catalyzed by RuBP carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) was 21.3[per mille (thousand) sign] and independent of enzyme source, unlike carbon isotope discrimination: 30.3[per mille (thousand) sign] for spinach enzyme and 19.6 to 23[per mille (thousand) sign] for Rhodospirillum rubrum and A. nidulans enzymes, depending on reaction conditions. The [delta] for O2 consumption catalyzed by glycolate oxidase was 22.7[per mille (thousand) sign]. The expected overall [delta] for photorespiration is about 21.7[per mille (thousand) sign]. Consistent with this, when Asparagus sprengeri Regel mesophyll cells approached the compensation point within a sealed vessel, the [delta]18O of dissolved O2 came to a steady-state value of about 21.5[per mille (thousand) sign] relative to the source water. The results provide improved estimates of discrimination factors in several reactions prominent in the global O cycle and indicate that photorespiration plays a significant part in determining the isotopic composition of atmospheric oxygen. PMID:12231663

  12. The clumped isotope geothermometer in soil and paleosol carbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quade, J.; Eiler, J.; Daëron, M.; Achyuthan, H.

    2013-03-01

    We studied both modern soils and buried paleosols in order to understand the relationship of temperature (T°C(47)) estimated from clumped isotope compositions (Δ47) of soil carbonates to actual surface and burial temperatures. Carbonates from modern soils with differing rainfall seasonality were sampled from Arizona, Nevada, Tibet, Pakistan, and India. T°C(47) obtained from these soils shows that soil carbonate forms in the warmest months of the year, in the late morning to afternoon, and probably in response to intense soil dewatering. T°C(47) obtained from modern soil carbonate ranges from 10.8 to 39.5 °C. On average, T°C(47) exceeds mean annual temperature by 10-15 °C due to summertime bias in soil carbonate formation, and to summertime ground heating by incident solar radiation. Secondary controls on T°C(47) are soil depth and shading. Site mean annual air temperature (MAAT) across a broad range (0-30 °C) of site temperatures is highly correlated with T°C(47) from soils, following the equation: MAAT(°C)=1.20(T°C(47)0)-21.72(r2=0.92) where T°C(47)0 is the effective air temperature at the site estimated from T°C(47). The effective air temperature represents the air temperature required to account for the T°C(47) at each site, after consideration of variations in T°C(47) with soil depth and ground heating. The highly correlated relationship in this equation should now permit mean annual temperature in the past to be reconstructed from T°C(47) in paleosol carbonate, assuming one is studying paleosols that formed in environments generally similar in seasonality and ground cover to our calibration sites. T°C(47)0 decreases systematically with elevation gain in the Himalaya, following the equation: elevation(m)=-229(T°C(47)0)+9300(r2=0.95) Assuming that temperature varied similarly with elevation in the past, this equation can be used to reconstruct paleoelevation from clumped isotope analysis of ancient soil carbonates. We also measured T°C(47

  13. Land-use and Erosion Source Discrimination of Soil and Carbon Sources to the Logan and Albert Rivers in Australia using Compound Specific Isotope Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The compound specific isotope analysis (CSIA) technique has been used to identify the sources of soil erosion contributing sediment to the Logan-Albert catchment. Soil samples were collected in January 2010 and used to assess the ability of the CSIA technique to discriminate probable sources of soil erosion. Fatty acid and bulk carbon isotope signature (δ13C) were measured. This study has built on a previous sediment tracing study undertaken in 2008 using fallout radionuclides and major/minor element geochemistry. It was found that surface soils from forest, pasture and cultivated land uses are well discriminated using CSIA. Furthermore, sub-surface soil sources associated with channel bank erosion and exposed subsoils (gullies and hillslope scalds) occurring specifically in the mid-western Logan catchment could also be discriminated. The CSIA and bulk carbon δ13C data were used in the IsoSource mixing model to estimate the erosion sources of sediment collected during the January 2008 flood. The results of this analysis were compared with results obtained using other sediment tracers. For the lower Logan River, the CSIA tracing results are consistent with fallout and element geochemistry tracing, with channel bank erosion being confirmed as the major sediment source. However, the significant contribution to Logan River sediment of exposed subsoils originating on hillslopes and drainage lines from the mid-western region of the Logan catchment has also been confirmed by CSIA. This erosion source was not quantified by catchment modelling. In the Albert River catchment about 50% of soil comes from forest land use, although more than half of this soil comes from sub-surface sources. These results have demonstrated that the CSIA technique has the potential to significantly enhance the ability of CSIRO Land and Water sediment tracing studies to determine the extent that different land uses are contributing eroded soil to rivers, thus providing a check on

  14. Application of stable carbon isotope analysis to the detection of 17beta-estradiol administration to cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buisson, C; Hebestreit, M; Weigert, A Preiss; Heinrich, K; Fry, H; Flenker, U; Banneke, S; Prevost, S; Andre, F; Schaenzer, W; Houghton, E; Le Bizec, B

    2005-11-01

    The use of anabolic agents in food producing animals is prohibited within the EU since 1988 (96/22/EC directive). The control of the illegal use of natural steroid hormones in cattle is still an exciting analytical challenge as far as no definitive method and non-ambiguous analytical criteria are available. The ability of gas chromatography/combustion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/C/IRMS) to demonstrate the administration of 17beta-estradiol to bovine has been investigated in this paper. By comparison of 13C/12C isotopic ratio of main urinary estradiol metabolite, i.e. 17alpha-estradiol, with two endogenous reference compounds (ERCs), i.e. dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and 5-androstene-3beta,17alpha-diol, the differentiation of estradiol metabolite origin, either endogenous or exogenous, has been proved to be achievable. After treatment, the delta(13)C(VPDB)-values of 17alpha-estradiol reached -27 per thousand to -29 per thousand, whereas delta13CVPDB-values of DHEA remained between -13 per thousand and -20 per thousand depending on the diet, maize and grass, respectively. A significant difference of delta13CVPDB between ERCs and 17alpha-estradiol was measurable over a period of 2 weeks after estradiol ester administration to the animal. PMID:16233872

  15. Carbon isotope analysis in apple nectar beverages Análise isotópica do carbono em néctar de maçã

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Figueira

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study were to use the isotope analysis method to quantify the carbon of C3 photosynthetic cycle in commercial apple nectars and to determine the legal limit to identify the beverages that do not conform to the safety standards established by the Brazilian Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock and Food Supply. These beverages (apple nectars were produced in the laboratory according to the Brazilian legislation. Adulterated nectars were also produced with an amount of pulp juice below the permitted threshold limit value. The δ13C values of the apple nectars and their fractions (pulp and purified sugar were measured to quantify the C3 source percentage. In order to demonstrate the existence of adulteration, the values found were compared to the limit values established by the Brazilian Law. All commercial apple nectars analyzed were within the legal limits, which enabled to identify the nectars that were in conformity with the Brazilian Law. The isotopic methodology developed proved efficient to quantify the carbon of C3 origin in commercial apple nectars.Os objetivos deste trabalho foram utilizar o método de análise isotópica para quantificar o carbono do ciclo fotossintético C3 em néctares de maçã comerciais e mensurar o limite de legalidade para identificar as bebidas em inconformidade com o Ministério da Agricultura, Pecuária e Abastecimento. Essa bebida foi produzida em laboratório, conforme a legislação brasileira. Também foram produzidos néctares adulterados com quantidade de suco polposo abaixo do permitido. Os δ13C dos néctares de maçã e de suas frações (polpa e açúcar purificado foram mensurados para quantificar a porcentagem de fonte C3. Para determinar a existência de adulteração, foi calculado o limite de legalidade de acordo com a legislação brasileira. Todos os néctares comerciais de maçã analisados foram classificados como legais. O limite de legalidade possibilitou identificar as bebidas

  16. Carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios analysis of food sources for Chironomus acerbiphilus larvae (Diptera Chironomidae) in strongly acidic lake Katanuma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The food sources for Chironomus acerbiphilus larvae (Diptera Chironomidae) were analyzed using carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios in Lake Katanuma. Lake Katanuma is a volcanic and strongly acidic lake (average pH 2.2). In Lake Katanuma, potential sources of diets for the chironomid larvae are limited including a benthic diatom (Pinnularia braunii), a phytoplankton (Chlamydomonas acidophila), sulfate oxidizing bacteria, and vascular plants supplied from vegetation surrounding the lake. Based on the average carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios among these potential sources and sediment, benthic diatoms were considered to be most probable food source of the chironomid larvae. δ13C values of the chironomid were significantly different among seasons and habitat depths, suggesting that diet of C. acerbiphilus changed seasonally and with habitat depth. (author)

  17. Chromium isotope fractionation during coprecipitation with calcium carbonate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodler, Alexandra; Sánchez-Pastor, Nuria; Fernández-Díaz, Lurdes;

    The chromium (Cr) isotopic composition of carbonates can potentially be used as a paleoclimate proxy to elucidate past fluctuations of oxygen contents in atmosphere and hydrosphere. The use of Cr isotopes to track paleoenvironmental changes, for example related to the rise of oxygen during...

  18. Probing the Isotopic Composition of Surface Waters Across Isotopic Extremes of Cryogenian Carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosak, T.; Matys, E. D.; Bird, L. R.; Macdonald, F. A.; Freeman, K. H.

    2012-12-01

    Neoproterozoic carbonate strata record unusually large and positive carbon isotope values (δ13Ccarb from 4 to 10 per mil), and stratigraphically extensive large negative carbon isotope excursions (δ13Ccarb isotopically extreme carbonates in Neoproterozoic successions remain poorly understood. Little is also known about organisms and metabolisms that cycled carbon in these carbonate strata, because they rarely contain well-preserved organic-rich fossils. To better understand the cycling of carbon during the deposition of the 715-635 Ma Tayshir member of the Tsagaan Oloom Formation, Mongolia, we analyzed δ13Cfossil of two types of organic fossils that occur in 13C- enriched carbonates (+ 5 to 9.9 per mil) and within 13C-depleted carbonates of the Tayshir anomaly (-3 to -6 per mil). Because these organic microfossils are remarkably similar to the tests of modern planktonic, herbivorous tintinnid ciliates and benthic macroscopic red algae, respectively, they can be used as tracers of organic matter production in surface waters. Fossil tests were extracted by acid maceration, cleaned and analyzed morphologically and microscopically. Their carbon isotopic composition was measured using a nano-scaled elemental analyzer inlet (nano-EA-IRMS), with ±1 per mil analytical precision. To date, we analyzed 12 samples of 100-150 organic tests, representing 3 different fossiliferous parts of the Tayshir anomaly (δ13Ccarb +5 per mil), respectively. More samples, including those of fossil algae and tests from the carbonate strata overlying the Tayshir anomaly, are currently being analyzed. Initial data reveal a rather constant isotopic composition of organic carbon in fossil tests (δ13Cfossil), with values of -23 ±1 per mil both within 13C-enriched and 13C-depleted carbonates. The isotopic difference between δ13Cfossil and 13C-enriched carbonates is 28 to 30 per mil, suggesting maximal isotopic fractionation by primary producers, and little environmental (or diagenetic

  19. Mechanisms of trichloramine removal with activated carbon: stoichiometric analysis with isotopically labeled trichloramine and theoretical analysis with a diffusion-reaction model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuma, Miki; Matsushita, Taku; Matsui, Yoshihiko; Aki, Tomoko; Isaka, Masahito; Shirasaki, Nobutaka

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the mechanism by which activated carbon removes trichloramine, a byproduct of water treatment that has a strongly offensive chlorinous odor. A stoichiometrical mass balance for ¹⁵N before and after activated carbon treatment of laboratory-prepared ¹⁵N-labeled trichloramine solutions clearly revealed that the mechanism of trichloramine removal with activated carbon was not adsorption but rather reductive decomposition to nitrogen gas. There was a weak positive correlation between the surface decomposition rate constant of trichloramine and the concentration of basic functional groups on the surface of the carbon particles, the suggestion being that the trichloramine may have been reduced by sulfhydryl groups (-SH) on the activated carbon surface. Efficient decomposition of trichloramine was achieved with super powdered activated carbon (SPAC), which was prepared by pulverization of commercially available PAC into very fine particles less than 1 μm in diameter. SPAC could decompose trichloramine selectively, even when trichloramine and free chlorine were present simultaneously in water, the indication being that the strong disinfection capability of residual free chlorine could be retained even after trichloramine was effectively decomposed. The residual ratio of trichloramine after carbon contact increased somewhat at low water temperatures of 1-5 °C. At these low temperatures, biological treatment, the traditional method for control of a major trichloramine precursor (ammonium nitrogen), is inefficient. Even at these low temperatures, SPAC could reduce the trichloramine concentration to an acceptable level. A theoretical analysis with a diffusion-reaction model developed in the present study revealed that the increase in the trichloramine residual with decreasing water temperature was attributable to the temperature dependence of the rate of the reductive reaction rather than to the temperature dependence of the diffusive mass

  20. Effects of inorganic anions on carbon isotope fractionation during Fenton-like degradation of trichloroethene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yunde; Zhou, Aiguo; Gan, Yiqun; Li, Xiaoqian

    2016-05-01

    Understanding the magnitude and variability in isotope fractionation with respect to specific processes is crucial to the application of stable isotopic analysis as a tool to infer and quantify transformation processes. The variability of carbon isotope fractionation during Fenton-like degradation of trichloroethene (TCE) in the presence of different inorganic ions (nitrate, sulfate, and chloride), was investigated to evaluate the potential effects of inorganic anions on carbon isotope enrichment factor (ε value). A comparison of ε values obtained in deionized water, nitrate solution, and sulfate solution demonstrated that the ε values were identical and not affected by the presence of nitrate and sulfate. In the presence of chloride, however, the ε values (ranging from -6.3±0.8 to 10±1.3‰) were variable and depended on the chloride concentration, indicating that chloride could significantly affect carbon isotope fractionation during Fenton-like degradation of TCE. Thus, caution should be exercised in selecting appropriate ε values for the field application of stable isotope analysis, as various chloride concentrations may be present due to naturally present or introduced with pH adjustment and iron salts during Fenton-like remediation. Furthermore, the effects of chloride on carbon isotope fractionation may be able to provide new insights about reaction mechanisms of Fenton-like processes. PMID:26835895

  1. Study of neutron rich carbon isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallon, Paul

    2012-03-01

    Electric quadrupole (E2) matrix elements are important quantities in nuclear structure. In particular they are sensitive to nuclear deformation, the decoupling of proton and neutron degrees of freedom, and are often affected by small components of the nuclear wave function. Neutron-rich carbon isotopes have attracted a great deal of attention recently, both experimentally and theoretically, with regards to the question of spatially extended (halo-like) and decoupled valence neutrons. For example, 19C and the drip-line nucleus 22C are proposed to have ground-state neutron halo structures. Electric quadrupole transition rates in 16C 18C and 20C are among the lowest found throughout the nuclear chart and this fact has been cited by some as evidence for a reduced coupling between the valence neutrons and the core nucleons. In this talk I will present the results from our experiments to measure the transition rates in 16,18,20C and discuss the evidence for a ``decoupling'' of valence neutrons from the core that goes beyond the usual shell model approach. Data will be compared to shell model and no-core (ab-initio) shell model calculations with NN and NN+NNN interactions.

  2. Analysis of biomagnification of persistent organic pollutants in the aquatic food web of the Mekong Delta, South Vietnam using stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikemoto, Tokutaka; Tu, Nguyen Phuc Cam; Watanabe, Michio X; Okuda, Noboru; Omori, Koji; Tanabe, Shinsuke; Tuyen, Bui Cach; Takeuchi, Ichiro

    2008-05-01

    The present study elucidated the biomagnification profiles of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) through a tropical aquatic food web of Vietnam based on trophic characterization using stable nitrogen analysis. Various biological samples collected from the main stream of the Mekong Delta were provided for the analysis for both POPs, and stable nitrogen and carbon isotope ratios. Of the POPs analyzed, dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane and its metabolites (DDTs) were the predominant contaminants with concentrations ranging from 0.058 to 12 ng/g wet weight, followed by polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) at 0.017-8.9 ng/g, chlordane compounds (CHLs) at 0.0043-0.76 ng/g, tris-4-chlorophenyl methane (TCPMe) at N.D.-0.26 ng/g, hexachlorocyclohexane isomers (HCHs) at N.D.-0.20 ng/g and hexachlorobenzene (HCB) at 0.0021-0.096 ng/g. Significant positive increases of concentrations in DDTs, CHLs, and TCPMe against the stable nitrogen ratio (delta(15)N) were detected, while, concentrations of HCHs and HCB showed no significant increase. The slopes of the regression equations between the log-transformed concentrations of these POPs and delta(15)N were used as indices of biomagnification. The slopes of the POPs for which positive biomagnification was detected ranged from 0.149 to 0.177 on a wet weight basis. The slopes of DDTs and CHLs were less than those reported for a marine food web of the Arctic Ocean, indicating that less biomagnification had occurred in the tropical food web. Of the isomers of CHLs, unlike the studies of the Arctic Ocean, oxychlordane did not undergo significant biomagnification through the food web of the Mekong Delta. This difference is considered to be due to a lack of marine mammals, which might metabolize cis- and trans-chlordane to oxychlordane, in the Mekong Delta ecosystem. The biomagnification profile of TCPMe is reported for the first time in the present study. PMID:18313720

  3. Combined oxygen- and carbon-isotope records through the Early Jurassic: multiple global events and two modes of carbon-cycle/temperature coupling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hesselbo, Stephen P.; Korte, Christoph

    2010-01-01

    , to the extent that meaningful comparisons between these events can begin to be made. Here we present new carbon and oxygen isotope data from mollusks (bivalves and belemnites) and brachiopods collected through the marine Early Jurassic succession of NE England, including the Sinemurian-Plienbachian boundary...... GSSP. All materials have been screened by chemical analysis and scanning electron microscopy to check for diagenetic alteration. Analysis of carbon isotopes from marine calcite is supplemented by analysis of carbon-isotope values from fossil wood collected through the same section. It is demonstrated...... that both long-term and short-term carbon-isotope shifts from the UK Early Jurassic represent global changes in carbon cycle balances. The Sinemurian-Pliensbachian boundary event is an event of global significance and shows several similarities to the Toarcian OAE (relative sea-level change, carbon...

  4. Modeling the carbon isotope composition of bivalve shells (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanek, C.

    2010-12-01

    The stable carbon isotope composition of bivalve shells is a valuable archive of paleobiological and paleoenvironmental information. Previous work has shown that the carbon isotope composition of the shell is related to the carbon isotope composition of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in the ambient water in which a bivalve lives, as well as metabolic carbon derived from bivalve respiration. The contribution of metabolic carbon varies among organisms, but it is generally thought to be relatively low (e.g., organism and high (>90%) in the shells from terrestrial organisms. Because metabolic carbon contains significantly more C-12 than DIC, negative excursions from the expected environmental (DIC) signal are interpreted to reflect an increased contribution of metabolic carbon in the shell. This observation contrasts sharply with modeled carbon isotope compositions for shell layers deposited from the inner extrapallial fluid (EPF). Previous studies have shown that growth lines within the inner shell layer of bivalves are produced during periods of anaerobiosis when acidic metabolic byproducts (e.g., succinic acid) are neutralized (or buffered) by shell dissolution. This requires the pH of EPF to decrease below ambient levels (~7.5) until a state of undersaturation is achieved that promotes shell dissolution. This condition may occur when aquatic bivalves are subjected to external stressors originating from ecological (predation) or environmental (exposure to atm; low dissolved oxygen; contaminant release) pressures; normal physiological processes will restore the pH of EPF when the pressure is removed. As a consequence of this process, a temporal window should also exist in EPF at relatively low pH where shell carbonate is deposited at a reduced saturation state and precipitation rate. For example, EPF chemistry should remain slightly supersaturated with respect to aragonite given a drop of one pH unit (6.5), but under closed conditions, equilibrium carbon isotope

  5. Partitioning Net Ecosystem Carbon Exchange Into net Assimilation and Respiration With Canopy-scale Isotopic Measurements: an Error Propagation Analysis With Both 13C and 18O Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peylin, P.; Ogee, J.; Cuntz, M.; Bariac, T.; Ciais, P.; Brunet, Y.

    2003-12-01

    Stable CO2 isotope measurements are increasingly used to partition the net CO2 exchange between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere in terms of non-foliar respiration (FR) and gross photosynthesis (FA). However the accuracy of the partitioning strongly depends on the isotopic disequilibrium between these two gross fluxes and a rigorous estimation of the errors on FA and FR is needed. In this study we account and propagate uncertainties on all terms in the mass balance equations for total and "labeled" CO2 in order to get precise estimates of the errors on FA and FR. We applied our method to a maritime pine forest in the Southwest of France. Using the δ 13C-CO2 and CO2 measurements, we show that the resulting uncertainty associated to the gross fluxes can be as large as 4 æmol m-2 s-1. In addition, even if we could get more precise estimates of the isoflux and the isotopic signature of FA we show that this error would not be significantly reduced. This is because the isotopic disequilibrium between FA and FR is around 2-3‰ , i.e. the order of magnitude of the uncertainty on the isotopic signature of FR (δ R). With δ 18O-CO2 and CO2 measurements, the uncertainty associated to the gross fluxes lies also around 4 æmol m-2 s-1. On the other hand, it could be dramatically reduced if we were able to get more precise estimates of the CO18O isoflux and the associated discrimination during photosynthesis. This is because the isotopic disequilibrium between FA and FR is large, of the order of 10-15‰ , i.e. much larger than the uncertainty on δ R. The isotopic disequilibrium between FA and FR or the uncertainty on δ R vary among ecosystems and over the year. Our approach may help to choose the best strategy to study the carbon budget of a given ecosystem using stable isotopes.

  6. A kinetic analysis of leaf uptake of COS and its relation to transpiration, photosynthesis and carbon isotope fractionation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Seibt

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Carbonyl sulfide (COS is an atmospheric trace gas that holds great promise for studies of terrestrial carbon and water exchange. In leaves, COS follows the same pathway as CO2 during photosynthesis. Both gases are taken up in enzyme reactions, making COS and CO2 uptake closely coupled at the leaf scale. The biological background of leaf COS uptake is a hydrolysis reaction catalyzed by the enzyme carbonic anhydrase. Based on this, we derive and test a simple kinetic model of leaf COS uptake, and relate COS to CO2 and water fluxes at the leaf scale. The equation was found to predict realistic COS fluxes compared to observations from field and laboratory chambers. We confirm that COS uptake at the leaf level is directly linked to stomatal conductance. As a consequence, the ratio of deposition velocities (uptake rate divided by ambient mole fraction for leaf COS and CO2 fluxes can provide an estimate of Ci/Ca the ratio of intercellular to atmospheric CO2, an important plant gas exchange parameter that cannot be measured directly. The majority of published deposition velocity ratios for leaf studies on a variety of species fall in the range of 1.5 to 4, corresponding to Ci/Ca ratios of 0.5 to 0.8. In addition, we utilize the coupling of Ci/Ca and photosynthetic ˆ13C discrimination to derive an estimate of 2.8±0.3 for the global mean ratio of deposition velocities. This corresponds to a global vegetation sink of COS in the order of 900±100 Gg S yr−1. COS can now be implemented in the same model framework as CO2 and water vapour. Atmospheric COS measurements can then provide independent constraints on CO2 and water cycles at ecosystem, regional and global scales.

  7. Carbon isotope excursions in paleosol carbonate marking five early Eocene hyperthermals in the Bighorn Basin, Wyoming

    OpenAIRE

    H. A. Abels; Lauretano, V.; A. van Yperen; T. Hopman; Zachos, J.C.; L. J. Lourens; Gingerich, P. D.; G. J. Bowen

    2015-01-01

    Transient greenhouse warming events in the Paleocene and Eocene were associated with the addition of isotopically-light carbon to the exogenic atmosphere–ocean carbon pool, leading to substantial environmental and biotic change. The magnitude of an accompanying carbon isotope excursion (CIE) can be used to constrain both the sources and amounts of carbon released during an event, as well as to correlate marine and terrestrial records with high precision. The ...

  8. Development of a non-destructive micro-analytical method for stable carbon isotope analysis of transmission electron microscope (TEM) samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hode, Tomas; Kristiansson, Per; Elfman, Mikael; Hugo, Richard C.; Cady, Sherry L.

    2009-10-01

    The biogenicity of ancient morphological microfossil-like objects can be established by linking morphological (e.g. cell remnants and extracellular polymeric matrix) and chemical (e.g. isotopes, biomarkers and biominerals) evidence indicative of microorganisms or microbial activity. We have developed a non-destructive micro-analytical ion beam system capable of measuring with high spatial resolution the stable carbon isotope ratios of thin samples used for transmission electron microscopy. The technique is based on elastic scattering of alpha particles with an energy of 2.751 MeV. At this energy the 13C cross section is enhanced relative to the pure Rutherford cross section for 13C, whereas the 12C cross section is reduced relative to its pure Rutherford cross section. Here we report the initial results of this experimental approach used to characterize ultramicrotomed sections of sulfur-embedded graphite and microbial cells.

  9. Stable isotope analysis in the ivory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishibashi, H.; Koike, H. [Graduate School of Social and Cultural Studies, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Takeuchi, Takayuki [Kyoto Univ., Kumatori, Osaka (Japan). Research Reactor Inst

    2001-01-01

    Stable isotope ratio in an ivory collagen reflects the isotope ratio of the plants they are eaten by the elephant. From the stable isotope ratios of carbon ({delta} {sup 13}C) and nitrogen ({delta} {sup 15}N) in a ivory collagen the habitat of the elephant can be estimated. The 118 pieces of the ivory were analyzed for detecting the isotope ratios, which are kept in the Kruger National Park, South Africa. The result shows the grouping of the ivory related to the area in which elephant were captured. (H. Katsuta)

  10. Carbon isotopes in oil and gas exploration. Examples of applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of carbon isotopes in hydrocarbon exploration is reviewed. Examples of the application of stable carbon isotopes are discussed in the fields of: (1) gas exploration, where source rocks of gas deposits or gas shows can be identified by 13C/12C analyses of methane and the exploration efforts redirected; (2) wildcat drilling, in which the carbon isotope composition of methane from the head space of canned cuttings characterizes autochthonous methane and gives information on the maturity of organic matter in relation to depth; (3) oil/oil and source-rock/oil correlation, where the 'isotopic type curve technique', a recently developed sensitive oil/oil and source-rock/oil correlation method, is discussed and applied to correlation problems in the British North Sea region. (author)

  11. Variations in carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes of cryoconite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, N.

    2012-12-01

    Cryoconite is biogenic surface dust on snow and ice, and is commoly observed on glaciers worldwide. Because of their dark coloration, cryoconite substantially reduce surface albedo and accelerate melting of glaciers. Therefore, it is important to understand formation process of cryoconite to evaluate its effect on glacier melting. Although cryoconite consists of mineral particles and organic matter, organic fraction is more important in terms of albedo effect because it is usually darker color and accounts for major part of cryoconite in volume. The organic matter is derived from photosynthetic microbes such as cyanobacteria, and/or from windblown organic matter from ground soil around glaciers. Carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) stable isotopes of the organic matter could be useful to know their sources and to understand their cycles on glaciers. In this study, I analyzed carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes of cryoconite collected from 6 sites of different elevation from May to September on an Alaska glacier (Gulkana Glacier) to know their spatial and seasonal variations. I also analyze those collected from glaciers in Asia and Arctic to compare them among different geographical locations. Results on the Alaska glacier show that C and N stable isotopes of cryoconite organic mater significantly varied among elevations and seasons. C isotope was generally higher in lower elevation, probably due to higher photosynthetic activity in the lower elevation. In contrast, N isotope was constant on the ice area, but was lower in the snow area where the red snow algae were blooming. N isotope may be reflective of nitrogen availavility on the glacier surface. Geograpical comparison shows large variations in C and N isotopes among regions: higher C and N isotopes on Asian glaciers, lower C and N isotopes in Alaska, and lower C and higher N isotopes on Arctic glaciers. The isotope values suggest that algal production is a major carbon source on most of glaciers, but their productivity

  12. Biogeochemistry of the stable carbon isotopes in carboxylic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The carbon isotopic compositions of the carboxyl carbons of fatty acids were determined by measuring the isotopic composition of the carbon dioxide quantitatively released from the acid. A modified version of the Schmidt decarboxylation developed and tested in this work was employed. A study of the evolution of CO2 at 5 +- 20C from the Schmidt decarboxylation of octanoic acid during the developmental program revealed two kinetic phases, each characterized by different rate constants and carbon isotope effects. The first, slower reaction phase displayed overall first-order kinetics, its rate being independent of HN3 concentration. Both pre-equilibration of the HN3-CHCl3 decarboxylation reagent with H2SO4 and saturation of the catalytic H2SO4 phase with KHSO4 drastically altered the rate of evolution and isotopic composition of the product CO2. The mechanistic implications of these results were discussed. A review of the metabolism of saturated fatty acids was made in which the impact of potential isotope fractionations in the various chemical reactions comprising the biosynthetic pathways on the intramolecular carbon isotope distribution within fatty acids was discussed

  13. Carbon and oxygen isotope fractionation in dense interstellar clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, W. D.; Graedel, T. E.; Frerking, M. A.; Armentrout, P. B.

    1984-01-01

    It is pointed out that isotope fractionation as a result of chemical reactions is due to the small zero-point energy differences between reactants and products of isotopically distinct species. Only at temperatures near absolute zero does this energy difference become significant. Favorable conditions for isotope fractionation on the considered basis exist in space within dense interstellar clouds. Temperatures of approximately 10 K may occur in these clouds. Under such conditions, ion-molecule reactions have the potential to distribute isotopes of hydrogen, carbon, oxygen unequally among the interstellar molecules. The present investigation makes use of a detailed model of the time-dependent chemistry of dense interstellar clouds to study cosmological isotope fractionation. Attention is given to fractionation chemistry and the calculation of rate parameters, the isotope fractionation results, and a comparison of theoretical results with observational data.

  14. The Stable and Radio- Carbon Isotopic Content of Labile and Refractory Carbon in Atmospheric Particulate Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNichol, A. P.; Rosenheim, B. E.; Gerlach, D. S.; Hayes, J. M.

    2006-12-01

    Studies of the isotopic content of atmospheric particulate matter are hampered by difficulties in chemically defining the pools of carbon and analytically isolating the different pools. We are conducting studies on reference materials and atmospheric aerosol samples to develop a method to measure stable and radio- carbon isotopes on the labile and refractory carbon. We are using a flow-through combustion system that allows us to combust, collect and measure the isotopic content of the gases produced at all stages of heating/oxidizing. We compare our results to those measured using a chemothermal oxidation method (CTO) (Gustafsson et al., 2001). In this method, refractory carbon is defined as the material remaining after pre- combusting a sample at 375°C in the presence of oxygen for 24 hours. The reference materials are diesel soot, apple leaves and a hybrid of the two (DiesApple), all from NIST. These provide carbon with two well-defined fractions -- the soot provides refractory carbon that is radiocarbon dead and the apple leaves provide organic carbon that is radiocarbon modern. Radiocarbon results from DiesApple indicate that the "refractory" carbon defined by the CTO method is actually a mixture of old and modern carbon that contains over 25% modern carbon. This suggests that charred material formed from the apples leaves during the pre-combustion step is contributing to the fraction we identify as refractory carbon. We are studying this by analyzing the individual materials and the mixture using our flow-through system. First results with this system indicate that the refractory fraction trapped from the DiesApple contains much less modern carbon than the CTO method, less than 7%. We will present detailed concentration and isotopic results of the generation of carbon dioxide during programmed combustion of each of the reference materials. We studied the radiocarbon content of both the total carbon (TC) and refractory carbon in the fine particulate matter (PM

  15. Compound specific stable isotope analysis vs. bulk stable isotope analysis of agricultural food products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psomiadis, David; Horváth, Balázs; Nehlich, Olaf; Bodiselitsch, Bernd

    2015-04-01

    The bulk analysis of stable isotopes (carbon, nitrogen, sulphur, oxygen and hydrogen) from food staples is a common tool for inferring origin and/or fraud of food products. Many studies have shown that bulk isotope analyses of agricultural products are able to separate large geographical areas of food origin. However, in micro-localities (regions, districts, and small ranges) these general applications fail in precision and discriminative power. The application of compound specific analysis of specific components of food products helps to increase the precision of established models. Compound groups like fatty acids (FAMEs), vitamins or amino acids can help to add further detailed information on physiological pathways and local conditions (micro-climate, soil, water availability) and therefore might add further information for the separation of micro-localities. In this study we are aiming to demonstrate the power and surplus of information of compound specific isotope analysis in comparison to bulk analysis of agricultural products (e.g. olive oil, cereal crops or similar products) and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of such (labor intense) analysis methods. Here we want to identify tools for further detailed analysis of specific compounds with high powers of region separation for better prediction models.

  16. Application of carbon isotope analyses in food technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The vast economic size of the food market offers great temptations for the production and sale of fraudulent products, adulterated products and synthetic products that are labeled as natural ones. Conventional techniques of chemical analyses have served the food industry well for many years but are limited in their ability to detect certain types of fraudulent or mislabelled products. The aversion to added sugar and the demand for 'all natural' food products among consumers has led to a great deal of mislabelling on the part of food processors in order to achieve greater economic gain. The nature of deceptions detectable by carbon Stable Isotope Ratio Analysis (SIRA) in food technology falls into three broad categories. The most common is the adulteration of an expensive natural product, such as apple juice, with a much cheaper natural product such as cane sugar or high fructose corn syrup (HFCS). The second is outright falsification of a food. An example is maple syrup produced by simple addition of maple flavoring to a sugar syrup or HFCS. The third general category is the sale of synthetic materials as natural ones or the addition of synthetic materials to natural ones in order to increase the volume of the product. The procedure for using carbon SIRA in monitoring food products involves two stages. It must first be established that the product to be analyzed, or some specific component of it, has a particular isotopic composition that can be distinguished from that of the materials that might be used to adulterate it. Potential adulterating components are then analyzed to establish their isotopic identity. The carbon SIRA method cannot, in general, be used to establish purity unequivocally but it can be used to establish impurity or adulteration with a high degree of success. The overall process of carbon SIRA consists of three stages: selection of the sample or the isolation of the particular compound to be analyzed, conversion of this compound into CO2 gas

  17. Stable carbon isotope biogeochemistry of lakes along a trophic gradient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Kluijver, A.; Schoon, P.L.; Downing, J.A.; Schouten, S.; Middelburg, J.J.

    2014-01-01

    The stable carbon (C) isotope variability of dissolved inorganic and organic C (DIC and DOC), particulate organic carbon (POC), glucose and polar-lipid derived fatty acids (PLFAs) was studied in a survey of 22 North American oligotrophic to eutrophic lakes. The d13C of different PLFAs were used as p

  18. Carbon sources in suspended particles and surface sediments from the Beaufort Sea revealed by molecular lipid biomarkers and compound-specific isotope analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Tolosa

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Molecular lipid biomarkers (hydrocarbons, alcohols, sterols and fatty acids and compound-specific isotope analysis of suspended particulate organic matter (SPM and surface sediments of the Mackenzie Shelf and slope (southeast Beaufort Sea, Arctic Ocean were studied in summer 2009. The concentrations of the molecular lipid markers, characteristic of known organic matter sources, were grouped and used as proxies to evaluate the relative importance of fresh algal, detrital algal, fossil, C3 terrestrial plants, bacterial and zooplankton material in the organic matter (OM of this area. Fossil and detrital algal contributions were the major fractions of the freshwater SPM from the Mackenzie River with ~34% each of the total molecular biomarkers. Fresh algal, C3 terrestrial, bacterial and zooplanktonic components represented much lower percentages, 17, 10, 4 and 80%, with a minor contribution of fossil and C3 terrestrial biomarkers. Characterization of the sediments revealed a major sink of refractory algal material mixed with some fresh algal material, fossil hydrocarbons and a small input of C3 terrestrial sources. In particular, the sediments from the shelf and at the mouth of the Amundsen Gulf presented the highest contribution of detrital algal material (60–75%, whereas those from the slope contained the highest proportion of fossil (40% and C3 terrestrial plant material (10%. Overall, considering that the detrital algal material is marine derived, autochthonous sources contributed more than allochthonous sources to the OM lipid pool. Using the ratio of an allochthonous biomarker (normalized to total organic carbon, TOC found in the sediments to those measured at the river mouth water, we estimated that the fraction of terrestrial material preserved in the sediments accounted for 30–40% of the total carbon in the inner shelf sediments, 17% in the outer shelf and Amundsen Gulf and up to 25% in the slope sediments. These estimates are low

  19. Carbon isotopic studies of organic matter in Precambrian rocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehler, D. Z.; Schopf, J. W.; Kvenvolden, K. A.

    1972-01-01

    A survey has been undertaken of the carbon composition of the total organic fraction of a suite of Precambrian sediments to detect isotopic trends possibly correlative with early evolutionary events. Early Precambrian cherts of the Fig Tree and upper and middle Onverwacht groups of South Africa were examined for this purpose. Reduced carbon in these cherts was found to be isotopically similar to photosynthetically produced organic matter of younger geological age. Reduced carbon in lower Onverwacht cherts was found to be anomalously heavy; it is suggested that this discontinuity may reflect a major event in biological evolution.

  20. Carbon isotopic study of individual alcohol compounds in modern sediments from Nansha Islands sea area, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    段毅; 文启彬; 郑国东; 罗斌杰

    1997-01-01

    Carbon isotopic compositions of individual n-alkanols and sterols in modern sediments from the Nan-sha Islands sea area are measured after derivatization to trimethylsilyl ethers by the new isotopic analytical technique of GC/C/IRMS. The effects of the three added silyl carbon atoms in every alcohol molecule on these compound isotopic compositions and the characteristics of their carbon isotopic compositions are studied. Then their biological sources are discussed using their carbon isotopic compositions.

  1. Calcium isotope analysis by mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulyga, Sergei F

    2010-01-01

    The variations in the isotopic composition of calcium caused by fractionation in heterogeneous systems and by nuclear reactions can provide insight into numerous biological, geological, and cosmic processes, and therefore isotopic analysis finds a wide spectrum of applications in cosmo- and geochemistry, paleoclimatic, nutritional, and biomedical studies. The measurement of calcium isotopic abundances in natural samples has challenged the analysts for more than three decades. Practically all Ca isotopes suffer from significant isobaric interferences, whereas low-abundant isotopes can be particularly affected by neighboring major isotopes. The extent of natural variations of stable isotopes appears to be relatively limited, and highly precise techniques are required to resolve isotopic effects. Isotope fractionation during sample preparation and measurements and instrumental mass bias can significantly exceed small isotope abundance variations in samples, which have to be investigated. Not surprisingly, a TIMS procedure developed by Russell et al. (Russell et al., 1978. Geochim Cosmochim Acta 42: 1075-1090) for Ca isotope measurements was considered as revolutionary for isotopic measurements in general, and that approach is used nowadays (with small modifications) for practically all isotopic systems and with different mass spectrometric techniques. Nevertheless, despite several decades of calcium research and corresponding development of mass spectrometers, the available precision and accuracy is still not always sufficient to achieve the challenging goals. The present article discusses figures of merits of presently used analytical methods and instrumentation, and attempts to critically assess their limitations. In Sections 2 and 3, mass spectrometric methods applied to precise stable isotope analysis and to the determination of (41)Ca are described. Section 4 contains a short summary of selected applications, and includes tracer experiments and the potential use

  2. Carbon and nitrogen isotopes analysis and sources of organic matter in surface sediments from the Sanggou Bay and its adjacent areas, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIA Bin; CUI Yi; CHEN Bijuan; CUI Zhengguo; QU Keming; MA Feifei

    2014-01-01

    Naturally existing stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes are important in the study of sedimentary organic matter sources. To identify the sources of sedimentary organic matter in Sanggou Bay and its adjacent areas, which is characterized by high-density shellfish and seaweed aquaculture, the grain size, organic carbon (OC), total nitrogen (TN), carbon and nitrogen isotopic composition (δ13C andδ15N) of organic matter in the surface sediment were determined. The results showed that, in August, sedimentary OC and TN ranged from 0.17% to 0.76% and 0.04% to 0.14%, respectively. In November, OC and TN ranged from 0.23% to 0.87% and 0.05% to 0.14%, respectively. There was a significant positive correlation between OC and TN (R=0.98, P<0.0001), indicating that OC and TN were homologous. In August, theδ13C andδ15N of organic matter varied from −23.06‰ to −21.59‰ and 5.10‰ to 6.31‰, respectively. In November,δ13C andδ15N ranged from −22.87‰ to −21.34‰ and 5.13‰ to 7.31‰, respectively. This study found that the major sources of sedimentary organic matter were marine shellfish biodeposition, seaweed farming, and soil organic matter. Using a three-end-member mixed model, we estimated that the dominant source of sedimentary organic matter was shellfish biodeposition, with an average contribution rate of 65.53% in August and 43.00% in November. Thus, shellfish farming had a significant influence on the coastal carbon cycle.

  3. Fractionation of carbon and hydrogen isotopes by methane-oxidizing bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, D.D.; Risatti, J.B.; Schoell, M.

    1981-01-01

    Carbon isotopic analysis of methane has become a popular technique in the exploration for oil and gas because it can be used to differentiate between thermogenic and microbial gas and can sometimes be used for gas-source rock correlations. Methane-oxidizing bacteria, however, can significantly change the carbon isotopic composition of methane; the origin of gas that has been partially oxidized by these bacteria could therefore be misinterpreted. We cultured methane-oxidizing bacteria at two different temperatures and monitored the carbon and hydrogen isotopic compositions of the residual methane. The residual methane was enriched in both 13C and D. For both isotopic species, the enrichment at equivalent levels of conversion was greater at 26??C than at 11.5??C. The change in ??D relative to the change in ??13C was independent of temperature within the range studied. One culture exhibited a change in the fractionation pattern for carbon (but not for hydrogen) midway through the experiment, suggesting that bacterial oxidation of methane may occur via more than one pathway. The change in the ??D value for the residual methane was from 8 to 14 times greater than the change in the ??13C value, indicating that combined carbon and hydrogen isotopic analysis may be an effective way of identifying methane which has been subjected to partial oxidation by bacteria. ?? 1981.

  4. Carbon and oxygen isotope compositions of the carbonate facies in the Vindhyan Supergroup, central India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Banerjee; S K Bhattacharya; S Sarkar

    2006-02-01

    The Vindhyan sedimentary succession in central India spans a wide time bracket from the Paleopro- terozoic to the Neoproterozoic period.Chronostratigraphic significance of stable carbon and oxygen isotope ratios of the carbonate phase in Vindhyan sediments has been discussed in some recent studies.However,the subtle controls of facies variation,depositional setting and post-depositional diagenesis on stable isotope compositions are not yet clearly understood.The Vindhyan Super- group hosts four carbonate units,exhibiting a wide variability in depositional processes and paleogeography.A detailed facies-specific carbon and oxygen isotope study of the carbonate units was undertaken by us to investigate the effect of these processes and to identify the least altered isotope values.It is seen that both carbon and oxygen isotope compositions have been affected by early meteoric water diagenesis.The effect of diagenetic alteration is,however,more pronounced in case of oxygen isotopes than carbon isotopes.Stable isotope compositions remained insensitive to facies only when sediments accumulated in a shallow shelf setting without being exposed.Major alteration of original isotope ratios was observed in case of shallow marine carbonates,which became exposed to meteoric fluids during early diagenetic stage.Duration of exposure possibly determined the magnitude of alteration and shift from the original values.Moreover,dolomitization is found to be accompanied by appreciable alteration of isotope compositions in some of the carbonates.The present study suggests that variations in sediment depositional settings,in particular the possibility of subaerial exposure,need to be considered while extracting chronostratigraphic signi ficance from 13C data.

  5. Trophic ecology of small yellow croaker (Larimichthys polyactis Bleeker): stable carbon and nitrogen isotope evidence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JI Weiwei; CHEN Xuezhong; JIANG Yazhou; LI Shengfa

    2011-01-01

    The trophic ecology of the small yellow croaker (Larimichthys polyactis) was studied using stable isotope analyses.Samples were collected from July to September 2009 and 34 individuals from eight sites were examined for stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes.Stable carbon isotope ratios (δ13C)ranged from -20.67 to -15.43,while stable nitrogen isotope ratios (δ15N) ranged 9.18-12.23.The relationship between δ13C and δ15N suggested high resource partitioning in the sampling area.Significant differences in stable isotope values among the eight sampling sites may be linked to environmental diversities involving various physical processes (such as ocean current,wind and tide) and different carbon sources.Furthermore,the stable isotope ratios may also explain the ontogenetic variability in diet and feeding,because δ13C and δ15N varied significantly with increasing body size.The findings are consistent with other studies on diet analyses in small yellow croaker.It was also demonstrated that stable isotope analysis could be used to estimate the trophic characters of small yellow croaker in feeding patterns and migrating habits.

  6. Stable carbon isotope ratios of ambient aromatic volatile organic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornilova, Anna; Huang, Lin; Saccon, Marina; Rudolph, Jochen

    2016-09-01

    Measurements of mixing ratios and stable carbon isotope ratios of aromatic volatile organic compounds (VOC) in the atmosphere were made in Toronto (Canada) in 2009 and 2010. Consistent with the kinetic isotope effect for reactions of aromatic VOC with the OH radical the observed stable carbon isotope ratios are on average significantly heavier than the isotope ratios of their emissions. The change of carbon isotope ratio between emission and observation is used to determine the extent of photochemical processing (photochemical age, ∫ [OH]dt) of the different VOC. It is found that ∫ [OH]dt of different VOC depends strongly on the VOC reactivity. This demonstrates that for this set of observations the assumption of a uniform ∫ [OH]dt for VOC with different reactivity is not justified and that the observed values for ∫ [OH]dt are the result of mixing of VOC from air masses with different values for ∫ [OH]dt. Based on comparison between carbon isotope ratios and VOC concentration ratios it is also found that the varying influence of sources with different VOC emission ratios has a larger impact on VOC concentration ratios than photochemical processing. It is concluded that for this data set the use of VOC concentration ratios to determine ∫ [OH]dt would result in values for ∫ [OH]dt inconsistent with carbon isotope ratios and that the concept of a uniform ∫ [OH]dt for an air mass has to be replaced by the concept of individual values of an average ∫ [OH]dt for VOC with different reactivity.

  7. Chromium Isotopes in Marine Carbonates - an Indicator for Climatic Change?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frei, R.; Gaucher, C.

    2010-12-01

    Chromium (Cr) stable isotopes experience an increased interest as a tracer of Cr (VI) reduction in groundwater and thus showed their potential as a monitor of remediation of anthropogenic and natural contamination in water (Berna et al., 2009; Izbicki et al., 2008). Chromium stable isotopes in Fe-rich chemical sediments (BIFs and Fe-cherts) have recently also been used as a tracer for Earth's atmospheric oxygenation through time (Frei et al., 2009). We have applied the Cr isotope system to organic-rich carbonates from a late Ediacaran succession in Uruguay (Polanco Formation), from which we have previously analyzed BIFs with extremely fractionated (δ53Cr up to 5.0 ‰) Cr isotope signatures that are part of an underlying deep water clastic sediment (shale-dominated) sequence (Yerbal Formation) deposited in a glacio-marine environment (Gaucher et al.,2004). δ53Cr values of organic rich carbonates correlate with positive and negative carbon isotope excursions (δ13C PDB between -3 and +3 ‰) and with systematic changes in strontium isotope compositions, commonly interpreted as to reflect fluctuations in organic (photosynthetic algae) production related to fluctuations in atmospheric oxygen and weathering intensities, respectively. Slightly positively fractioned δ53Cr values (up to +0.25‰), paralleling positive (δ13C PDB and 87Sr/86Sr ratio excursions would thereby trace elevated atmospheric oxygen levels/pulses possibly related to glacier retreat/melting stages that caused bioproductivity to increase. While the causal link between these multiple isotopic tracers and the mechanisms of Cr stripping into carbonates has to be further investigated in detail, the first indications from this study point to a potentially promising use of stable Cr isotopes in organic-rich carbonates to monitor fluctuations of atmospheric oxygen, particularly over the Neoproterozoic and Phanerozoic ice age periods. E.C. Berna et al. (2010) Cr stable isotopes as indicators of Cr

  8. Significance of Carbon Isotopes in Carbonate Sequence Stratigraphy—As Exemplified by the Permian System in Southwest China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    覃建雄; 杨作升; 等

    1999-01-01

    Based on the research on sequence stratigraphy of the Permian in Southwest China,in conjunction with the carbon isotope data from the typical sections at Ganluo,Sichuan and Tianlin and Masan,Guangxi,the authors suggest that the genetic framework and internal architicture of different sequences possess quite different carbon isotopic characteristics.Therefore ,the following problems can be solved in terms of carbon isotopic values,evolutionary curve patterns and structures of carbonate sequences:(1) to determe the nature of sequence boundary surface and related geological events;(2) to recognize various kinds of sedimentary system tracts;(3) to discuss the internal architicture and genetic framework of the sequences and their evolution;(4) to subdivide and correlate sedimentary sequences on a regional or global scale; and (5)to enhance the resolution of sequence stratigraphic analysis.Stable carbon isotopes have proved themselves to be valid in sequence stratigraphic studies of carbonate rocks,as demonstrated by our results presented in this paper.

  9. Vegetational ecotype of the Gyirong Basin in Tibet, China and its response in stable carbon isotopes of mammaltooth enamel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG Tao; LI Yumei

    2005-01-01

    Carbon isotope analysis of modern herbaceous plants in the Gyirong Basin (Tibet, China) indicates that although C3 plants are dominant, C4 plants rarely comprise of the vegetation in the area at 4000 m above sea level. The C4 plants discovered in the Gyirong Basin are Salsola nepalensis of Chenopodiaceae and Pennisetum flaccidum of Gramineae, affirming that C4 plants affected by high solar gain can be distributed at high altitude, which supports the opinion that some C4 plants can exist in areas of high elevation. Carbon isotope analysis of herbivore tooth enamel from the Gyirong Basin indicates that carbon isotopes of structural carbonate in biogenic apatite at high altitude still keep a stable enrichment relationship with those of plants in their diet. Carbon isotopes in tooth enamel are therefore an accurate proxy for vegetation ecotypes and should reflect climatic and environmental features.

  10. Quantitative analysis of intraspecific variations in the carbon and oxygen isotope compositions of the modern cool-temperate brachiopod Terebratulina crossei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayanagi, Hideko; Asami, Ryuji; Otake, Tsuguo; Abe, Osamu; Miyajima, Toshihiro; Kitagawa, Hiroyuki; Iryu, Yasufumi

    2015-12-01

    This study unravels intraspecific variations in the carbon isotope (δ13C) and oxygen isotope (δ18O) compositions of shells of the modern cool-temperate brachiopod Terebratulina crossei collected at a water depth of 70 m in Otsuchi Bay, northeastern Honshu, Japan. Brachiopod shells have been used as proxies of the δ13C values of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) (δ13CDIC) and seawater temperature/δ18O (δ18OSW) values to reconstruct the evolution of Phanerozoic oceans. To identify more reliable shell portions as the proxies, we conducted a rigorous time-series comparison of δ13C and δ18O values between the brachiopod shells and calcite precipitated in isotopic equilibrium with ambient seawater (equilibrium calcite) (δ13CEC and δ18OEC values, respectively). Samples were collected from the outer and inner surfaces of the secondary shell layer along the maximum growth axis (ontogenetic-series and inner-series samples, respectively). The ontogenetic-series δ13C values, which showed regular annual and irregular non-annual cycles, partly fell in but were mostly less than the range of the δ13CEC values. The δ13C cycles were often associated with one or two minor negative peaks. The peaks were likely resulted from an increased incorporation of respiration-derived 12C due to elevated metabolic activity during spawning. The ontogenetic-series δ18O values showed distinct seasonal variations and were mostly within the range of δ18OEC values. The amplitude of the δ18O profiles was relatively large during the younger fast-growth stage, and decreased during the senescent slow-growth stage. The inner-series δ13C and δ18O values of individual shells varied within narrow ranges. The inner-series δ13C values were close to the minimum δ13CEC values. The inner-series δ18O values were in the upper range of the δ18OEC values. Kinetic isotope fractionation effects were evident, but its degree varied among different shells. We identified the shell portions reliably

  11. Aptian Carbon Isotope Stratigraphy in Sierra del Rosario, Northeastern Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barragan-Manzo, R.; Moreno-Bedmar, J.; Nuñez, F.; Company, M.

    2013-05-01

    In most recent years Aptian carbon isotope stratigraphy has been widely studied in Europe where isotopic stages have been developed to correlate global events. Two negative excursions have been recorded in the Lower Aptian, the older is OAE 1a in the middle part, and a younger negative excursion labeled "Aparein level", which occurs in the uppermost part of the Lower Aptian. In Mexico previous works reported a carbon isotope negative excursion in the lowermost part of the La Peña Formation that was assigned to the onset of Oceanic Anoxic Event 1a (=OAE 1a). In this work we study the isotopic record of the δ13Ccarb of 32 bulk rock samples of limestone from the uppermost part of the Cupido Formation and the lower part of the La Peña Formation at the Francisco Zarco Dam Section (=FZD), Durango State, northeastern Mexico. The isotopic data are calibrated using the latest ammonite biostratigraphic biozonation of the Aptian. This age calibration allows us to make a precise correlation between the carbon isotopic record of Mexico and several European sections (e.g. Spain and France). In the studied Francisco Zarco Dam section we recognize a negative carbon isotopic excursion in the Dufrenoyia justinae ammonite Zone that corresponds to the "Aparein level", which we correlate using the ammonite zonation of others European sections (Figure 1). This correlation allows us to see how the negative excursion that characterizes the "Aparein level" is consistent with the C7 segment. Thus, our recent stratigraphic study allows us to conclude that the ammonite record in the lowermost part of the La Peña Formation is regionally isochronous, and correlates with the Dufrenoyia justinae Zone and Lower Aptian isotope interval C7. In agreement to these biostratigraphic data, the supposed record of the OAE 1a in the lowermost part of the La Peña Formation is not correct, and the carbon isotope negative excursion must be assigned to the younger event "Aparein level". Taking this into

  12. Isotope analysis of incremental human dentine : towards higher temporal resolution.

    OpenAIRE

    Beaumont, J.; Gledhill, A.; Montgomery, J.

    2014-01-01

    Here we present a novel method which allows the measurement of the stable isotope ratios of carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) from much smaller samples of dentine than previously possible without affecting the quality parameters. The reconstruction of the diet of past populations using isotopic analysis of bone collagen is a well-established tool. However, because of remodelling of bone throughout life, this gives a blurred picture of the diet. The analysis of δ13C and δ15N from tiny incremen...

  13. The magnesium isotope record of cave carbonate archives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Riechelmann

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Here we explore the potential of magnesium (δ26Mg isotope time-series data as continental climate proxies in speleothem calcite archives. For this purpose, a total of six Pleistocene and Holocene stalagmites from caves in Germany, Morocco and Peru and two flowstones from a cave in Austria were investigated. These caves represent the semi-arid to arid (Morocco, the warm-temperate (Germany, the equatorial-humid (Peru and the cold-humid (Austria climate zones. Changes in the calcite magnesium isotope signature with time are compared against carbon and oxygen isotope records from these speleothems. Similar to other proxies, the non-trivial interaction of a number of environmental, equilibrium and disequilibrium processes governs the δ26Mg fractionation in continental settings. These include the different sources of magnesium isotopes such as rainwater or snow as well as soil and host rock, soil zone biogenic activity, shifts in silicate versus carbonate weathering ratios and residence time of water in the soil and karst zone. Pleistocene stalagmites from Morocco show the lowest mean δ26Mg values (GDA: −4.26 ± 0.07‰ and HK3: −4.17 ± 0.15‰, and the data are well explained in terms of changes in aridity over time. The Pleistocene to Holocene stalagmites from Peru show the highest mean value of all stalagmites (NC-A and NC-B δ26Mg: −3.96 ± 0.04‰ but only minor variations in Mg-isotope composition, which is consistent with the rather stable equatorial climate at this site. Holocene stalagmites from Germany (AH-1 mean δ26Mg: −4.01 ± 0.07‰; BU 4 mean δ26Mg: −4.20 ± 0.10‰ suggest changes in outside air temperature was the principal driver rather than rainfall amount. The alpine Pleistocene flowstones from Austria (SPA 52: −3.00 ± 0.73‰; SPA 59: −3.70 ± 0.43‰ are affected by glacial versus interglacial climate change with outside air temperature

  14. The magnesium isotope record of cave carbonate archives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Riechelmann

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Here we explore the potential of time-series magnesium (δ26Mg isotope data as continental climate proxies in speleothem calcite archives. For this purpose, a total of six Pleistocene and Holocene stalagmites from caves in Germany, Morocco and Peru and two flowstones from a cave in Austria were investigated. These caves represent the semi-arid to arid (Morocco, the warm-temperate (Germany, the equatorial-humid (Peru and the cold-humid (Austria climate zones. Changes in the calcite magnesium isotope signature with time are placed against carbon and oxygen isotope records from these speleothems. Similar to other proxies, the non-trivial interaction of a number of environmental, equilibrium and non-equilibrium processes governs the δ26Mg fractionation in continental settings. These include the different sources of magnesium isotopes such as rain water or snow as well as soil and hostrock, soil zone biogenic activity, shifts in silicate versus carbonate weathering ratios and residence time of water in the soil and karst zone. Pleistocene stalagmites from Morocco show the lowest mean δ26Mg values (GDA: −4.26 ± 0.07 ‰ and HK3: −4.17 ± 0.15 ‰ and the data are well explained in terms of changes in aridity over time. The Pleistocene to Holocene stalagmites from Peru show the highest mean value (NC-A and NC-B δ26Mg: −3.96 ± 0.04 ‰ but only minor variations in Mg-isotope composition, which is in concert with the rather stable equatorial climate at this site. Holocene stalagmites from Germany (AH-1 mean δ26Mg: −4.01 ± 0.07 ‰; BU 4 mean δ26Mg: −4.20 ± 0.10 ‰ record changes in outside air temperature as driving factor rather than rainfall amount. The alpine Pleistocene flowstones from Austria (SPA 52: −3.00 ± 0.73 ‰; SPA 59: −3.70 ± 0.43 ‰ are affected by glacial versus interglacial climate change with outside air temperature affecting soil zone activity

  15. Benthic trophic network in the Bay of Banyuls-sur-Mer (northwest Mediterranean, France): An assessment based on stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlier, Antoine; Riera, Pascal; Amouroux, Jean-Michel; Bodiou, Jean-Yves; Grémare, Antoine

    2007-03-01

    The benthic trophic network in the Bay of Banyuls-sur-Mer was studied through the carbon and nitrogen isotopic characterization of a large set of soft-bottom macrobenthic invertebrates, fishes and potential food sources. Continental inputs as well as seagrass meadows did not contribute significantly to this benthic trophic network as indicated by: (1) the difference between their δ 13C signatures (respectively -28.4‰ and -9.5‰) and those of sampled animals (between -21.0‰ and -14.6‰); and (2) their low inputs to the bay. Benthic primary consumers fed mostly on surface sediment organic matter (SSOM), which tightly interacts with suspended particulate organic matter (SPOM) and sedimenting organic matter (STOM) due to sediment resuspension. Our results also suggest the occurrence of a transfer between marine SPOM and some invertebrates (e.g. Veretillum cynomorium) and fishes (e.g. Boops boops and Spicara melanurus) through zooplankton. Moreover, the different types of primary consumers (i.e., suspension-feeders, interface-feeders, surface deposit-feeders and subsurface deposit-feeders) preferentially used distinct fractions of the heterogeneous SPOM-STOM-SSOM pool. These differences were mostly related with feeding depth and resulted in distinct isotopic signatures. Differences in the stable isotopic ratios of suspension and interface-feeders could also partly reflect the use of microphytobenthos by the later. Assuming a 15N-enrichment factor of 3.4‰ between the lower and upper ranges of two successive trophic levels, we estimated that the benthic food web of the Bay of Banyuls-sur-Mer was composed of 4 trophic levels. The comparison with our δ 13C values suggests that the whole trophic food chain is affected by continental inputs at the immediate vicinity of the Rhône River mouth even though these effects are maximal for deposit-feeding and carnivorous polychaetes.

  16. Carbon isotope fractionation of chlorinated ethenes during oxidation by Fe{sup 2+} activated persulfate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchesi, Massimo, E-mail: m2marche@uwaterloo.ca [Departament de Cristallografia, Mineralogia i Diposits Minerals, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalunya 08028 (Spain); Earth and Environmental Department, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada N2L 3G1 (Canada); Aravena, Ramon [Earth and Environmental Department, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada N2L 3G1 (Canada); Sra, Kanwartej S. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada N2L 3G1 (Canada); Golder Associates Inc, Toronto, Ontario, Canada L5N 5Z7 (Canada); Thomson, Neil R. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada N2L 3G1 (Canada); Otero, Neus; Soler, Albert [Departament de Cristallografia, Mineralogia i Diposits Minerals, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalunya 08028 (Spain); Mancini, Silvia [Golder Associates Inc, Toronto, Ontario, Canada L5N 5Z7 (Canada)

    2012-09-01

    The increased use of persulfate (S{sub 2}O{sub 8}{sup 2-}) for in situ chemical oxidation to treat groundwater and soils contaminated by chlorinated hydrocarbon compounds (CHCs) requires unbiased methods to assess treatment performance. Stable carbon isotope analysis offers a potential tool for assessing the in situ treatment performance of persulfate at sites contaminated with CHCs. This study investigated the extent of C isotope fractionation during oxidation of tetrachloroethene (PCE), trichloroethene (TCE) and cis-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) by persulfate activated by ferrous ion (Fe{sup 2+}). An average carbon isotope enrichment factor {epsilon}{sub bulk} of - 4.9 Per-Mille-Sign for PCE, - 3.6 Per-Mille-Sign for TCE and - 7.6 Per-Mille-Sign for cis-DCE were obtained in batch experiments. Variations in the initial S{sub 2}O{sub 8}{sup 2-}/Fe{sup 2+}/CHC molar ratios did not result in any significant differences in carbon isotope fractionation. The occurrence of carbon isotope fractionation during oxidation and the lack of dependence of enrichment factors upon the S{sub 2}O{sub 8}{sup 2-}/Fe{sup 2+}/CHC molar ratio demonstrate that carbon isotope analysis can potentially be used at contaminated sites as an additional technique to estimate treatment efficacy during oxidation of CHCs by Fe{sup 2+} activated persulfate. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The performance of in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) is still difficult to assess. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigated the potential of carbon isotope analysis as a new assessing tool. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer C isotope of PCE, TCE and DCE oxidized by persulfate activated by Fe{sup 2+} was measured. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Enrichment factors of - 4.9 Per-Mille-Sign for PCE, - 3.6 Per-Mille-Sign for TCE and - 7.6 Per-Mille-Sign for cisDCE were obtained. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbon isotope can potentially be used to estimate the ISCO treatment efficacy.

  17. The clumped isotopic record of Neoproterozoic carbonates, Sultanate of Oman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, K. D.; Eiler, J. M.; Fischer, W. W.; Osburn, M. R.; Grotzinger, J. P.

    2011-12-01

    The Huqf Supergroup of the Sultanate of Oman records several important events in latest Precambrian time, including two glaciations in the Abu Mahara Group (ca. 725 - isotope excursion in the Nafun Group (ca. Precambrian-Cambrian boundary in the Ara Group (ca. 547-540 Ma). This interval contains several extreme isotopic excursions, hypothesized to record perturbations of the surficial Earth carbon cycle or post-depositional diagenetic processes. Rigorous interpretation of these records requires a more thorough assessment of diagenetic processes. To better understand the significance and cause of these large amplitude isotopic excursions, we employed carbonate clumped isotope thermometry. This method allows us to estimate the absolute temperature of carbonate precipitation, including recrystallization, based on the temperature dependent abundance of carbonate ions containing both 13C and 18O. These estimates are accompanied by a measurement of carbonate δ18O, which in conjunction with temperature, can be used to calculate the oxygen isotopic composition of the fluid from which the carbonate precipitated. We analyzed stratigraphically constrained samples from a range of paleoenvironments with differing burial histories (1 - >10km maximum burial depth) to constrain the temperature and fluid composition of recrystallization. Clumped isotope temperatures from Huqf Supergroup samples range from 35-175°C. The isotopic composition of the fluid these rocks equilibrated with ranges from -3.7 to 15.7% VSMOW. This large range in temperature and fluid composition separates into distinct populations that differ systematically with independent constraints on petrography, stratigraphy and burial history. The data indicate the Abu Mahara, Nafun and Ara groups have unique diagenetic histories. In central Oman, the post-glacial Abu Mahara cap dolostone shows high temperature, rock buffered diagenesis (Tavg = 176°C; δ18Ofluid = 15% VSMOW), the Nafun Group generally experienced

  18. Compound specific stable isotope analysis: Research frontiers in isotope hydrology and water resources management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compound Specific Isotope Analysis (CSIA) - the characterization of stable isotope compositions of individual contaminant compounds dissolved in groundwater, sparked a revolution in the interface between isotope geochemistry and contaminant hydrogeology. Stable isotope fingerprints can provide diagnostic tools to identify and differentiate sources of contamination. Furthermore CSIA rapidly proved a novel method for investigation of both abiotic and biotic remediation potential at contaminated sites. Several novel developments in CSIA are directly relevant to moving applications of this fi eld from point source contamination to larger regional watershed and ground water resource management applications. The limits of sensitivity and detection limit are being pushed back to facilitate the application of CSIA to low concentrations of contaminants in more diffuse sources. Multi-isotope approaches such as incorporation of both carbon and hydrogen isotope signatures, which to date have been used primarily for non-chlorinated hydrocarbons, are now being extended to investigation of chlorinated hydrocarbon compounds. Improved detection limits and chromatography are facilitating applications of CSIA to new classes of compounds including pesticides, and chlorinated aromatics, where the presence of many isomers presents both an analytical challenge and a challenge for identifying promising lines of evidence for biodegradation. (author)

  19. Behaviour of Structural Carbonate Stable Carbon and Oxygen Isotope Compositions in Bioapatite During Burning of Bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munro, L. E.; Longstaffe, F. J.; White, C. D.

    2003-12-01

    Bioapatite, the principal inorganic phase comprising bone, commonly contains a small fraction of carbonate, which has been substituted into the phosphate structure during bone formation. The isotopic compositions of both the phosphate oxygen and the structural carbonate oxygen are now commonly used in palaeoclimatological and bioarchaeological investigations. The potential for post-mortem alteration of these isotopic compositions, therefore, is of interest, with the behaviour of structural carbonate being of most concern. In bioarchaeological studies, alteration of bone isotopic compositions has the potential to occur not only during low-temperature processes associated with burial but also during food preparation involving heating (burning, boiling). Here, we examine the stable isotopic behaviour of structural carbonate oxygen and carbon, and coexisting phosphate oxygen during the burning of bone. Freshly deceased (6determined using powder X-ray diffraction (pXRD), and Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR). Combined differential thermal and thermogravimetric analyses (DTA/TG) were used to evaluate weight loss and associated reactions during heating. Stable carbon isotope compositions of the bioapatite remain relatively constant (+/-1‰ ) during heating to 650° C. A 4‰ increase in stable carbon isotopic composition then occurs between 650-750° C, accompanied by an increase in CI, followed by a 10‰ decline at temperatures above 800° C, as carbonate carbon is lost. Carbonate and phosphate oxygen isotopic compositions are correlated over the entire heating range, with carbonate being enriched relative to phosphate by about 8-10‰ below 500° C, 5-6‰ between 500-700° C, and 8-10‰ above 700° C. CI and oxygen isotopic compositions of carbonate and phosphate are not well correlated. Only modest CI changes are recorded from 25-675° C, compared with much larger changes in oxygen isotopic composition, especially above 300° C. On average, original

  20. Carbon isotope fractionation of amino acids in fish muscle reflects biosynthesis and isotopic routing from dietary protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Kelton W; Fogel, Marilyn L; Elsdon, Travis S; Thorrold, Simon R

    2010-09-01

    1. Analysis of stable carbon isotopes is a valuable tool for studies of diet, habitat use and migration. However, significant variability in the degree of trophic fractionation (Delta(13)C(C-D)) between consumer (C) and diet (D) has highlighted our lack of understanding of the biochemical and physiological underpinnings of stable isotope ratios in tissues. 2. An opportunity now exists to increase the specificity of dietary studies by analyzing the delta(13)C values of amino acids (AAs). Common mummichogs (Fundulus heteroclitus, Linnaeus 1766) were reared on four isotopically distinct diets to examine individual AA Delta(13)C(C-D) variability in fish muscle. 3. Modest bulk tissue Delta(13)C(C-D) values reflected relatively large trophic fractionation for many non-essential AAs and little to no fractionation for all essential AAs. 4. Essential AA delta(13)C values were not significantly different between diet and consumer (Delta(13)C(C-D) = 0.0 +/- 0.4 per thousand), making them ideal tracers of carbon sources at the base of the food web. Stable isotope analysis of muscle essential AAs provides a promising tool for dietary reconstruction and identifying baseline delta(13)C values to track animal movement through isotopically distinct food webs. 5. Non-essential AA Delta(13)C(C-D) values showed evidence of both de novo biosynthesis and direct isotopic routing from dietary protein. We attributed patterns in Delta(13)C(C-D) to variability in protein content and AA composition of the diet as well as differential utilization of dietary constituents contributing to the bulk carbon pool. This variability illustrates the complicated nature of metabolism and suggests caution must be taken with the assumptions used to interpret bulk stable isotope data in dietary studies. 6. Our study is the first to investigate the expression of AA Delta(13)C(C-D) values for a marine vertebrate and should provide for significant refinements in studies of diet, habitat use and migration using

  1. Stable Carbon Isotope Record in a Palau Sclerosponge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grottoli, A. G.

    2002-12-01

    The ratio of stable carbon isotopes (δ13C) deposited in the calcium carbonate skeleton of marine sclerosponges appears to record the carbon isotopic composition of seawater mixed-layer dissolved inorganic carbon (δ13CDIC). Thus the δ13C signature chronicled in sclerosponge skeletons offers a promising multi-century proxy record of seawater mixed-layer δ13CDIC throughout the tropics. Here, a high-resolution (0.1 mm) δ13C record for a 7.7 cm Acanthocheatetes wellsi sclerosponge from Palau (7N, 134W) is presented. At a published growth rate of 0.45 mm per year, this record spans ~s170 years beginning in July 2001 and going back to 1831. The δ13C values for a definitive 10-year A. wellsi record spanning 1989-1998 were similar to δ13C values here for the first 4.7 mm of the record providing supporting evidence for the growth rate. The sclerosponge δ13C shows a distinct Seuss Effect. At the time this abstract was submitted, the analysis of the first 16 mm of the sclerosponge revealed a significant decrease in δ13C with time [δ13C = 0.02 (distance) + 2.64, r2 = 0.73, p < 0.0001, where time is marked by distance in millimeters from the growing edge] corresponding to a decrease in δ13C of 0.076‰ per decade. For comparison, published low-frequency measurements in Australian, New Caledonian and Jamaican sclerosponges have yielded decreases in δ13C of ~s0.05 to 0.08 ‰ per decade over the past 40 years. Preliminary interpretation of the data indicates that the amount of atmospheric CO2 contributing to the seawater δ13CDIC at Palau is intermediate to Australia and Jamaica. In addition, visual examination of the δ13C record reveals regular fluctuation in δ13C that may correspond to annual variability in δ13CDIC. This research presents the first century or longer sclerosponge δ13C record from the northwester equatorial Pacific.

  2. Mechanisms of trichloramine removal with activated carbon: Stoichiometric analysis with isotopically labeled trichloramine and theoretical analysis with a diffusion-reaction model

    OpenAIRE

    Sakuma, Miki; Matsushita, Taku; Matsui, Yoshihiko; Aki, Tomoko; Isaka, Masahito; Shirasaki, Nobutaka

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the mechanism by which activated carbon removes trichloramine, a byproduct of water treatment that has a strongly offensive chlorinous odor. A stoichiometrical mass balance for 15N before and after activated carbon treatment of laboratory-prepared N-15-labeled trichloramine solutions clearly revealed that the mechanism of trichloramine removal with activated carbon was not adsorption but rather reductive decomposition to nitrogen gas. There was a weak positive correlat...

  3. Organic Carbon Isotopic Evolution during the Ediacaran-Cambrian Transition Interval in Eastern Guizhou, South China: Paleoenvironmental and Stratigraphic Implications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Xinglian; ZHU Maoyan; GUO Qingjun; ZHAO Yuanlong

    2007-01-01

    Secular variations of carbon isotopic composition of organic carbon can be used in the study of global environmental variation, the carbon cycle, stratigraphic delimitation, and biological evolution, etc. Organic carbon isotopic analysis of the Nangao and Zhalagou sections in eastern Guizhou reveals a negative excursion near the Precambrian-Cambrian boundary that correlates with a distinct carbonate carbon isotopic negative excursion at this boundary globally. Our results also demonstrate that several alternating positive and negative shifts occur in the Meishucunian, and an obvious negative anomaly appears at the boundary between the Meishucunian and Qiongzhusian. The isotope values are stable in the middle and lower parts but became more positive in the upper part of the Qiongzhusian. Evolution of organic carbon isotopes from the two sections in the deepwater facies can be well correlated with that of the carbonate carbon isotopes from the section in the shallow water facies. Integrated with other stratigraphic tools, we can precisely establish a lower Cambrian stratigraphic framework from shallow shelf to deep basin of the Yangtze Platform.

  4. High Resolution Carbon and Oxygen Isotope Measurements of Laminations in Pedogenic Carbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breecker, D.; Sharp, Z.

    2005-12-01

    Stable carbon and oxygen isotope ratios in pedogenic carbonate from buried soils provide a proxy for low-resolution Quaternary climate and environmental conditions. Samples of carbonate are taken from clast rinds, nodules or filaments in calcic soils. Most clast rinds exhibit micro-laminations that may preserve isotopic ratios of formation. The techniques typically utilized to sample pedogenic carbonate, however, are too coarse to sample individual laminations and likely result in time averages and therefore limit temporal resolution. We investigated the heterogeneity of both carbon and oxygen isotopes ratios in clast rinds at a 100 μm scale using a rapid CO2 laser extraction technique (Sharp and Cerling, 1996). A single 20 msec burst at low power releases CO2 from polished carbonate slabs and the CO2 is then analyzed using continuous flow GC-IRMS. Analyses take less than 5 minutes with a reproducibility of better than ±0.3‰ (δ13C) and ±0.4‰ (δ18O). We have made a two dimensional map of a thick carbonate rind on a limestone clast from a stage V soil to explore the potential for preservation of isotopic ratios in well developed soils and plan to analyze additional rinds from less well developed calcic horizons for comparison. The isotopic map reveals heterogeneities in δ13C of up to 4‰ at a sub-millimeter scale, possibly corresponding to 30% changes in the fraction of C4 plants. Also imaged are abrupt changes in δ13C of approximately 2‰ across sub-100 μm scale boundaries. One well-defined carbon isotope boundary is sub parallel to, but crosses, the lamination boundaries. Oxygen isotope compositions do not change systematically across the same boundary and generally appear more random. These observations are most easily explained by alteration of initial isotopic compositions. Alteration may preferentially affect oxygen isotope ratios leaving carbon isotope distributions relatively intact. It is also possible that both carbon and oxygen isotopes

  5. Molecular, radioactive and stable carbon isotope characterization of estuarine particulate organic matter

    OpenAIRE

    Megens, L.; van der Plicht, J.; De Leeuw, JW; Leeuw, Jan W. de; Mook, W.G.

    1998-01-01

    Organic matter in sediments and suspended matter is a complex mixture of constituents with different histories, sources and stabilities. To study these components in a suspended matter sample from the Ems-Dollard Estuary, we used combined molecular analysis with pyrolysis/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and stable and radioactive carbon isotope analyses of the bulk and separated chemical fractions. Carbohydrates and proteins, ca. 50% of the total organic carbon (TOC), are much younger th...

  6. Comparing Carbon and Strontium Isotope Chemostratigraphy against U-Pb Detrital Zircon Analysis in Dating Marbles of the Uppermost Allochthon in North Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verellen, Devon; Yaw Agyei-Dwarko, Nana; Steltenpohl, Mark; Andresen, Arild

    2015-04-01

    The basal parts of the Uppermost Allochthon between latitudes N67oN (Fauske) and N68.45oN (Ofoten) comprise a thick sequence of platformal marbles that overlie a fragmented ophiolite complex. This basement-cover package can be traced discontinuously from Ofoten more than 150 kilometers northward to connect with the Lyngen ophiolite, the largest ophiolite complex in Scandinavia. U-Pb zircon geochronology documents an Early Ordovician age (469 ±5 Ma) for magmatic crystallization of the Lyngen ophiolite and for the Ofoten mafic complex (474 ±0.7 Ma). A regional unconformity separates the Lyngen ophiolite from overlying rocks of the Balsfjord Group. Halysitid corals from the Balsfjord Group constrain an Upper Llandoverian age for the unconformity. In Ofoten, metasedimentary rocks of the Evenes Group nonconformably overlie the mafic complex and are lithologically correlated to parts of the Balsfjord Group. The basal unit of the Evenes Group, the Elvenes Conglomerate, contains clasts of plutonic igneous rocks clearly derived from the underlying mafic complex (Lillevik dike complex). Suites of multiple phases of felsic intrusions occur within overlying (Bogen/Niingen nappes) and underlying (Narvik nappe) allochthons but are absent in the Evenes Group. Carbon and strontium isotopes reported on these amphibolite-facies marbles have been interpreted to place chemostratigraphic ages that range from Neoproterozoic to Silurian, requiring the placement of hypothetical thrusts and normal faults to explain their vertical stacking although no faults are yet recognized based on field and structural studies. We present LA-ICPMS U-Pb isotope data on detrital zircons from a siliciclastic layer within one of the carbonate units of the Evenes Group that had previously been assigned a Neoproterozoic chemostratigraphic apparent age. Twenty-seven percent of the ages are younger than 600 Ma and define a prominent 470 Ma age population with the 5 youngest ones giving a concordia age of 460

  7. Terrestrial carbon isotope excursions and biotic change during Palaeogene hyperthermals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abels, H.A.; Clyde, W.C.; Gingerich, P.D.; Hilgen, F.J.; Fricke, H.C.; Bowen, G.J.; Lourens, L.J.

    2012-01-01

    Pronounced transient global warming events between 60 and 50 million years ago have been linked to rapid injection of isotopically-light carbon to the ocean–atmosphere system1,2. It is, however, unclear whether the largest of the hyperthermals, the Palaeocene–Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM; ref. 3), h

  8. Carbon isotopic fractionation in the biosynthesis of bacterial fatty acids. Ozonolysis of unsaturated fatty acids as a means of determining the intramolecular distribution of carbon isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monson, K.D.; Hayes, J.M. (Indiana Univ., Bloomington (USA). Dept. of Chemistry; Indiana Univ., Bloomington (USA). Dept. of Geology)

    1982-02-01

    Methods for the determination of /sup 13/C abundances at individual olefinic carbon positions have been developed, tested, and shown to perform accurately. (1) The double bond is oxidized with ozone; (2) silver oxide is used to cleave the resulting ozonide quantitatively to carboxylic-acid fragments; (3) a modified Schmidt decarboxylation is used to produce CO/sub 2/ quantitatively from the carboxyl groups of the separated cleavage products; and (4) the CO/sub 2/ is utilized for mass spectrometric analysis. The results of intramolecular isotopic analyses are combined with molecular-average isotopic compositions determined by total combustion in order to show that fatty acids biosynthesized by Escherichia coli grown aerobically with glucose as the sole carbon source and harvested at late log phase are depleted by approximately 3 parts per thousand in /sup 13/C relative to the glucose. This fractionation arises in the formation of acetyl-coenzyme A by pyruvate dehydrogenase and is localized at the carboxyl position in the acetyl-CoA product. The isotopic order in that two-carbon subunit is carried through the biosynthesis of fatty acids so that alternate positions in the fatty-acid chains are depleted in /sup 13/C by an amount equal to twice the molecular-average depletion. The kinetic isotope effect at C-2 for pyruvate dehydrogenase in vivo is shown to be approximately 2.3%.

  9. Carbon isotopic fractionation in the biosynthesis of bacterial fatty acids. Ozonolysis of unsaturated fatty acids as a means of determining the intramolecular distribution of carbon isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methods for the determination of 13C abundances at individual olefinic carbon positions have been developed, tested, and shown to perform accurately. (1) The double bond is oxidized with ozone; (2) silver oxide is used to cleave the resulting ozonide quantitatively to carboxylic-acid fragments; (3) a modified Schmidt decarboxylation is used to produce CO2 quantitatively from the carboxyl groups of the separated cleavage products; and (4) the CO2 is utilized for mass spectrometric analysis. The results of intramolecular isotopic analyses are combined with molecular-average isotopic compositions determined by total combustion in order to show that fatty acids biosynthesized by Escherichia coli grown aerobically with glucose as the sole carbon source and harvested at late log phase are depleted by approximately 3 parts per thousand in 13C relative to the glucose. This fractionation arises in the formation of acetyl-coenzyme A by pyruvate dehydrogenase and is localized at the carboxyl position in the acetyl-CoA product. The isotopic order in that two-carbon subunit is carried through the biosynthesis of fatty acids so that alternate positions in the fatty-acid chains are depleted in 13C by an amount equal to twice the molecular-average depletion. The kinetic isotope effect at C-2 for pyruvate dehydrogenase in vivo is shown to be approximately 2.3%. (author)

  10. Carbon dioxide gasification of carbon black: isotope study of carbonate catalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Temperature-programmed reaction was used with labeled isotopes (13C and 18O) to study interactions between carbon black and potassium carbonate in pure He and 10% CO2/90% He atmospheres. Catalytic gasification precursor complexes were observed. Carbon and oxygen-bearing carbon surface groups interacted with the carbonate above 500 K to form surface complexes. Between 500 and 950 K, and in the presence of gaseous CO2, the complexes participated in C and O exchange with the gas phase while oxygen atoms within the complexes also exchanged with those on the carbon surface. As the temperature rose, the complexes decomposed, with CO2 the initial product. Decomposition started around 500 K in pure He, and around 950 K in CO2/He. Catalytic gasification began only after decomposition of significant portions of the complexes. Elemental potassium formed, and the active catalyst appears to alternate between being potassium metal and a potassium-oxygen-carbon complex. Potassium carbonate is not part of the catalytic cycle. 20 references, 10 figures

  11. Isotopic composition of carbon-13 and oxygen-18 from authigenic carbonates, Black Sea region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logvina, E.; Mazurenko, L.; Prasolov, E.

    2004-05-01

    Several types of authigenic carbonates related to the fluid discharge zones were sampled during the international expeditions onboard R/V "Professor Vodyanitskiy" (56th cruise) and R/V "Professor Logachev" (11th cruise of UNESCO-TTR) in the northwest part of the Black sea. These carbonates are represented as mounds, build-ups and chimney-like structures, cemented sediments, crusts and concretions. The isotope analyses of carbonates were conducted using mass-spectrometer MS-20 in the Laboratory of Isotope Geology (St.Petersburg State University). The obtained values of oxygen-18 varied from +0,6 to -1,9 per mille (up to C0.8 per mille on average). This value is corresponding to normal seawater oxygen-18 value (about 0 per mille); we suspect, that the source of oxygen for carbonate formation is the seawater. The carbonates are characterized by low carbon-13 (from -35,4 to -42,6 per mille) in comparison with normal marine carbonates (about 0 per mille). We have reason to suppose that carbonates associated with fluid venting were formed by light isotopic composition of carbon dioxide (carbon-13 -45 to -52 per mille), which forming under methane microbiologic oxidation with such isotopic composition. This is because of crossing fluid process of carbon dioxide to carbonate with 8~10 degrees temperature carbon became heaver to 10- 11 per mille. The isotopic composition study of carbonate build-ups is of interest because its association with the gas hydrate accumulations is quite often in the gas seeps. This work is financially supported by Russian Foundation for Basic Research, grant 02-05-64346.

  12. Modeling stable isotope and organic carbon in hillslope stormflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusek, Jaromir; Vogel, Tomas; Dohnal, Michal; Marx, Anne; Jankovec, Jakub; Sanda, Martin; Votrubova, Jana; Barth, Johannes A. C.; Cislerova, Milena

    2016-04-01

    Reliable prediction of water movement and fluxes of dissolved substances (such as stable isotopes and organic carbon) at both the hillslope and the catchment scales remains a challenge due to complex boundary conditions and soil spatial heterogeneity. In addition, microbially mediated transformations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) are known to affect balance of DOC in soils, hence the transformations need to be included in a conceptual model of a DOC transport. So far, only few studies utilized stable isotope information in modeling and even fewer linked dissolved carbon fluxes to mixing and/or transport models. In this study, stormflow dynamics of oxygen-18 isotope and dissolved organic carbon was analyzed using a physically based modeling approach. One-dimensional dual-continuum vertical flow and transport model, based on Richards and advection-dispersion equations, was used to simulate the subsurface transport processes in a forest soil during several observed rainfall-runoff episodes. The transport of heat in the soil profile was described by conduction-advection equation. Water flow and transport of solutes and heat were assumed to take place in two mutually communicating porous domains, the soil matrix and the network of preferential pathways. The rate of microbial transformations of DOC was assumed to depend on soil water content and soil temperature. Oxygen-18 and dissolved organic carbon concentrations were observed in soil pore water, hillslope stormflow (collected in the experimental hillslope trench), and stream discharge (at the catchment outlet). The modeling was used to analyze the transformation of input solute signals into output hillslope signals observed in the trench stormflow. Signatures of oxygen-18 isotope in hillslope stormflow as well as isotope concentration in soil pore water were predicted reasonably well. Due to complex nature of microbial transformations, prediction of DOC rate and transport was associated with a high uncertainty.

  13. Combination of carbon isotope ratio with hydrogen isotope ratio determinations in sports drug testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, Thomas; Emery, Caroline; Thomas, Andreas; Saugy, Martial; Thevis, Mario

    2013-06-01

    Carbon isotope ratio (CIR) analysis has been routinely and successfully applied to doping control analysis for many years to uncover the misuse of endogenous steroids such as testosterone. Over the years, several challenges and limitations of this approach became apparent, e.g., the influence of inadequate chromatographic separation on CIR values or the emergence of steroid preparations comprising identical CIRs as endogenous steroids. While the latter has been addressed recently by the implementation of hydrogen isotope ratios (HIR), an improved sample preparation for CIR avoiding co-eluting compounds is presented herein together with newly established reference values of those endogenous steroids being relevant for doping controls. From the fraction of glucuronidated steroids 5β-pregnane-3α,20α-diol, 5α-androst-16-en-3α-ol, 3α-Hydroxy-5β-androstane-11,17-dione, 3α-hydroxy-5α-androstan-17-one (ANDRO), 3α-hydroxy-5β-androstan-17-one (ETIO), 3β-hydroxy-androst-5-en-17-one (DHEA), 5α- and 5β-androstane-3α,17β-diol (5aDIOL and 5bDIOL), 17β-hydroxy-androst-4-en-3-one and 17α-hydroxy-androst-4-en-3-one were included. In addition, sulfate conjugates of ANDRO, ETIO, DHEA, 3β-hydroxy-5α-androstan-17-one plus 17α- and androst-5-ene-3β,17β-diol were considered and analyzed after acidic solvolysis. The results obtained for the reference population encompassing n = 67 males and females confirmed earlier findings regarding factors influencing endogenous CIR. Variations in sample preparation influenced CIR measurements especially for 5aDIOL and 5bDIOL, the most valuable steroidal analytes for the detection of testosterone misuse. Earlier investigations on the HIR of the same reference population enabled the evaluation of combined measurements of CIR and HIR and its usefulness regarding both steroid metabolism studies and doping control analysis. The combination of both stable isotopes would allow for lower reference limits providing the same statistical

  14. An Approach to Analysis of Stable Isotopes in Microsamples

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩友科; 安娜

    1991-01-01

    A new aproach to isotopic analysis of carbon,oxygen,sulfur and nitrogen in microsamples has been established.Samples were conventionally prepared by mixing microsamples to be analyzed with reference samples with known δ values in a proper proportion,and then analyzed for their stable isotopes as those at ordinary levels.According to the equilibrium relationships before and after mixing,the δvalues of unknown microsamples were calculated.The δ15N of the atmosphere was estimated at zero by this approach,which is concordant with the internationally recommended value.

  15. Forensic utility of the carbon isotope ratio of PVC tape backings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, L. A.; Thompson, A. H.; Mehltretter, A. H.; McLaskey, V.; Parish, A.; Aranda, R.

    2008-12-01

    Forensic interest in adhesive tapes with PVC-backings (polyvinyl chloride, electrical tapes) derives from their use in construction of improvised explosive devices, drug packaging and in a variety of other illicit activities. Due to the range of physical characteristics and chemical compositions of such tapes, traditional microscopic and chemical analysis of the tape backings and adhesives offer a high degree of discrimination between tapes from different manufacturers and products. To evaluate whether carbon isotope ratios may be able to increase discrimination of electrical tapes, particularly with regards to different tapes of the same product, we assessed the PVC-backings of 87 rolls of black electrical tape for their δ13C values. The adhesive on these tapes was physically removed with hexane, and plasticizers within the PVC tape backings were removed by three-20 minute extractions with chloroform. The δ13C values of the PVC tape backings ranged between -23.8 and -41.5 (‰ V-PDB). The carbon isotopic variation within a product (identical brand and product identification) is significant, based on five products with at least 3 rolls (ranges of 7.4‰ (n=3), 10.0‰ (n=6), 4.2‰ (n=16), 3.8‰ (n=6), and 11.5‰ (n=8), respectively). There was no measurable carbon isotope variation in regards to the following: a) along the length of a roll (4 samples from 1 roll); b) between the center and edge of a strip of tape (1 pair); c) between rolls assumed to be from the same lot of tape (2 pairs); d) between different rolls from the same batch of tape (same product purchased at the same time and place; 5 pairs); and e) between samples of a tape at room temperature, heated to 50° C and 80° C for 1 week. For each sample within the population of 87 tapes, carbon isotopes alone exclude 80 to 100% of the tapes as a potential match, with an average exclusion power of 92.5%, using a window of ± 0.4‰. Carbon isotope variations originate from variations in starting

  16. Carbon and Sulfur Isotopic Composition of Rocknest Soil as Determined with the Sample Analysis at Mars(SAM) Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, H. B.; McAdam, C.; Stern, J. C.; Archer, P. D., Jr.; Sutter, B.; Grotzinger, J. P.; Jones, J. H.; Leshin, L. A.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Niles, P. B.; Owen, T. C.; Raaen, E.; Steele, A.; Webster, C. R.

    2013-01-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Curiosity rover got its first taste of solid Mars in the form of loose, unconsolidated materials (soil) acquired from an aeolian bedform designated Rocknest. Evolved gas analysis (EGA) revealed the presence of H2O as well as O-, C- and S-bearing phases in these samples. CheMin did not detect crystalline phases containing these gaseous species but did detect the presence of X-ray amorphous materials. In the absence of definitive mineralogical identification by CheMin, SAM EGA data can provide clues to the nature and/or mineralogy of volatile-bearing phases through examination of temperatures at which gases are evolved from solid samples. In addition, the isotopic composition of these gases, particularly when multiple sources contribute to a given EGA curve, may be used to identify possible formation scenarios and relationships between phases. Here we report C and S isotope ratios for CO2 and SO2 evolved from Rocknest soil samples as measured with SAM's quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS).

  17. Carbon isotope fluctuations in Precambrian carbonate sequences of several localities in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SIAL ALCIDES N.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon isotope fluctuations in Precambrian sedimentary carbonates between 2.8 Ga and 0.60 Ga in Brazil are examined in this study. The carbonate facies of the BIF of the 2.8 Ga-old Carajás Formation, state of Pará in northern Brazil, has rather homogeneous delta13C (-5 o/ooPDB, compatible with carbonatization of a silicate protolith by a CO2-rich fluid from mantle degassing. The Paleoproterozoic Gandarela Formation, state of Minas Gerais, displays a narrow delta13C variation (-1.5 to +0.5 o/oo compatible with carbon isotope signatures of carbonates deposited around 2.4 Ga worldwide. The Fecho do Funil Formation has probably recorded the Lomagundi delta13C positive anomaly (+6.4 to +7.1 o/ooPDB. The magnesite-bearing carbonates of the Orós mobile belt, state of Ceará, exhibit carbon isotope fluctuation within the range for carbonates deposited at 1.8 Ga. The C-isotope record of the Frecheirinha Formation, northwestern state of Ceará, shows negative delta13C values in its lower portion (-2 o/oo and positive values up section (+1 to +3 o/oo, which suggests this sequence is a cap carbonate deposited after a glacial event around 0.95 Ga. The Jacoca and Acauã sedimentary carbonate Formations, state of Sergipe, NE Brazil, show carbon isotope fluctuations very similar to each other (average around -5 o/oo, compatible with a deposition around 0.76 Ga. The younger Olho D'Água carbonate Formation, however, also in the state of Sergipe, displays negative delta13C values at the lower portion of the Formation, changing dramatically up section to positive values as high as +10 o/oo, a characteristic compatible with a Sturtian cap carbonate deposited around 0.69 Ga. On the light of the C isotope data discussed in this study, it seems that delta13C fluctuations in Paleoproterozoic carbonates in Brazil are within the range found globally for metasedimentary carbonates of this age. Carbon isotope data proved to be very useful in establishing relative

  18. Carbon abundances and isotope ratios in 70 bright M giants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Approximate carbon abundances and 12C/13C isotope ratios are obtained for 70 M giant stars from intermediate-resolution spectrophotometry of the CO bands near 2.3 μm. A low mean carbon abundance ([C/H]=-0.64±0.29) is obtained, suggesting that standard mixing is insufficient to explain atmospheric abundances in M giants. HR 8795 appears to be exceptionally carbon deficient, and is worthy of further study as a possible weak G-band star descendant. (author)

  19. Carbon abundances and isotope ratios in 70 bright M giants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazaro, C. (Inst. de Astrofisica de Canarias, Tenerife (Spain)); Lynas-Gray, A.E. (University Coll., London (UK). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy); Clegg, R.E.S. (Royal Greenwich Observatory, Cambridge (UK)); Mountain, C.M.; Zadrozny, A. (Imperial Coll. of Science and Technology, London (UK))

    1991-03-01

    Approximate carbon abundances and {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C isotope ratios are obtained for 70 M giant stars from intermediate-resolution spectrophotometry of the CO bands near 2.3 {mu}m. A low mean carbon abundance ((C/H)=-0.64+-0.29) is obtained, suggesting that standard mixing is insufficient to explain atmospheric abundances in M giants. HR 8795 appears to be exceptionally carbon deficient, and is worthy of further study as a possible weak G-band star descendant. (author).

  20. ­­A Clumped Isotope Calibration for Terrestrial Microbial Carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petryshyn, V. A.; Mering, J. A.; Mitsunaga, B. A.; Eagle, R.; Dunbar, R. B.; Bhattacharya, A.; Tripati, A.

    2014-12-01

    Accurate terrestrial paleotemperature records are key pieces of information in the paleoenvironmental reconstruction of Earth history. These records aid in building reliable climate models and help scientists understand the links between continental and oceanic climate data. Many different types of analyses are used to estimate terrestrial climate shifts, including leaf margin analysis, palynology, glacial deposits, elemental ratios, organic geochemistry, and stable isotopes of lacustrine deposits. Here we report a carbonate clumped isotope calibration for microbial carbonates. Application of the clumped isotope paleothermometer can potentially provide a direct temperature measurement of the water at the time of carbonate formation. Although different calibrations of the paleothermometer have been published for both inorganic and biotic carbonate minerals, the effects of clumping in microbialites (structures built under the influence of microbial activity) have not yet been quantified. Lacustrine microbialites present a potentially large, untapped archive of terrestrial climate data, however they are not strictly biotic or abiotic, but bio-induced carbonate, meaning that organisms (such as photosynthetic bacteria) influence but do not directly control precipitation. We have measured modern microbialites from multiple lacustrine sites and will report a comparison of these results to known water temperatures. Additionally we will compare lacustrine samples to marine microbialites (e.g., samples from Shark Bay) to assess potential differences between lacustrine and marine intertidal environments on clumped isotope compositions.

  1. Determination of the origin of dissolved inorganic carbon in groundwater around a reclaimed landfill in Otwock using stable carbon isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porowska, Dorota, E-mail: dorotap@uw.edu.pl

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Research showed the origin of DIC in the groundwater around a reclaimed landfill. • Carbon isotope was used to evaluate the contributions of carbon from different sources. • The leachate-contaminated water was isotopically distinct from the natural groundwater. • DIC in the natural groundwater comes from organic matter and dissolution of carbonates. • In the contaminated water, DIC comes from organic matter in the aquifer and landfill. - Abstract: Chemical and isotopic analyses of groundwater from piezometers located around a reclaimed landfill in Otwock (Poland) were performed in order to trace the origin of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in the groundwater. Due to differences in the isotopic composition of carbon from different sources, an analysis of stable carbon isotopes in the groundwater, together with the Keeling plot approach and a two-component mixing model allow us to evaluate the relative contributions of carbon from these sources in the groundwater. In the natural (background) groundwater, DIC concentrations and the isotopic composition of DIC (δ{sup 13}C{sub DIC}) comes from two sources: decomposition of organic matter and carbonate dissolution within the aquifer sediments, whereas in the leachate-contaminated groundwater, DIC concentrations and δ{sup 13}C{sub DIC} values depend on the degradation of organic matter within the aquifer sediments and biodegradation of organic matter stored in the landfill. From the mixing model, about 4–54% of the DIC pool is derived from organic matter degradation and 96–46% from carbonate dissolution in natural conditions. In the leachate-contaminated groundwater, about 20–53% of the DIC is derived from organic matter degradation of natural origin and 80–47% from biodegradation of organic matter stored in the landfill. Partial pressure of CO{sub 2} (P CO{sub 2}) was generally above the atmospheric, hence atmospheric CO{sub 2} as a source of carbon in DIC pool was negligible in the

  2. Characteristics of carbon and hydrogen isotopic compositions of light hydrocarbons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈平

    1995-01-01

    Light hydrocarbons named in the present paper refer to the natural gas-associated light oil and condensate 46 light oil and condensate samples from 11 oil-bearing basins of China were collected and their carbon and hydrogen isotopic compositions were analysed in terms of their total hydrocarbons, saturated hydrocarbons and a part of aromatic fractions, and gas-source materials and their sedimentary environments were discussed based on the above-mentioned data and the geological background of each area. From the view of carbon and hydrogen isotopic composition of total hydrocarbons and saturated hydrocarbons, it is revealed that the condensate related to coal-bearing strata is enriched in 13C and D while that related to the source material of type I-II is enriched in 12C. In general, the isotopic composition of carbon is mainly attributed to the inheriting effect of their source materials, whereas that of hydrogen principally reflects the correlationship between hydrogen isotopes and the sedimentary envi

  3. Isotopic Hg in an Allende carbon-rich residue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, G. W., Jr.; Jovanovic, S.

    1990-01-01

    A carbon-rich residue from Allende subjected to stepwise heating yielded two isotopically resolvable types of Hg: one with an (Hg-196)/(Hg-202) concentration ratio the same as terrestrial (monitor) Hg; the other enriched in Hg-196 relative to Hg-202 by about 60 percent. Hg with the 202 isotope enriched relative to 196, as is found in bulk Allende, was not observed. Whether the result of mass fractionation or nucleosynthesis, the distinct types of Hg entered different carrier phases and were not thermally mobilized since the accretion of the Allende parent body.

  4. Austrian meat: Authenticity control by stable isotope analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The EU has declared that all foodstuff must be able to be traced back from 'fork to farm' to increase the safety of food and the confidence of the consumers in food quality and safety. Additionally, several incidents of 'food diseases and scandals' related with meat (e.g.: BSE, foot and mouth disease, antibiotics abuse, avian flu, etc.) have demonstrated the necessity to trace back the origin of meat, to be able to locate sources of infection/mismanagement. Besides the conventional method of the control of documentation there is the possibility of control of origin by analysing the isotopic composition of meat and herewith controlling the questioned good itself. Stable isotope ratios of the elements HCNOS are varying geographically due to different environmental conditions (e.g.: climate, geology, soil, altitude, geography, etc.) thus every region possesses an individual pattern. The isotopic pattern is imprinted on plants and animals growing in a certain region, and therefore analysis of the stable isotope pattern can allow the identification of agricultural goods from different regions. For the control of origin of Austrian meat about 500 beef and 500 pork samples have been collected from slaughterhouses and were analysed for the isotopic composition of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and sulphur and compared with the isotopic composition of meat samples from neighbouring countries. As Austria, despite being a small country, is very heterogeneous in its environmental conditions, thus there are significant differences in the isotopic patterns of individual Austrian provinces. The isotopic signature of meat samples from neighbouring countries can overlap with the 'Austrian isotope pattern' due to similar environmental conditions. However, a correct statistical classification has been achieved for 80% and 84% of the analysed beef and pork samples, respectively. If the declared origin of meat can be pinned down to an Austrian province, the discrimination power of

  5. Isotopes of carbon monoxide in the free troposphere and their implications to atmospheric chemistry. Doctoral thesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mak, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    The thesis project was designed to provide information for the following questions: what is the oxidative capacity of the troposphere, and how are the source strengths of carbon monoxide partitioned. Because of its active role in tropospheric chemistry, carbon monoxide is important in determining the fate of a number of species, including hydroxyl radicals. (14)CO serves as a natural tracer for its destruction, as the source function can be well contrained. By determining the tropospheric inventory of (14)CO and calculating its source strength, one may realize the rate of destruction. Similarly, because certain sources have unique stable isotope signatures, an analysis of the stable isotopes provides information on the relative source strengths. A sampling system was built which allowed for the collection of large, whole air samples from an aircraft platform. CO was extracted and the isotopes were determined, and from these data an OH abundance was calculated using a 2-D transport model.

  6. Triassic-Jurassic organic carbon isotope stratigraphy of key sections in the western Tethys realm (Austria)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhl, Micha; Kürschner, Wolfram M.; Krystyn, Leopold

    2009-05-01

    The late Triassic period is recognized as one of the five major mass extinctions in the fossil record. All these important intervals in earth history are associated with excursions in C-isotope records thought to have been caused by perturbations in the global carbon cycle. The nature and causes of C-isotopic events across the Triassic-Jurassic (T-J) transition however, are poorly understood. We present several new high resolution organic C-isotope records from the Eiberg Basin, Austria, including the proposed Global boundary Stratotype Section and Point (GSSP) for the base of the Jurassic. The Triassic-Jurassic boundary interval in these records is characterized by the initial and main negative organic carbon isotope excursions (CIE) of up to 8‰. The initial and main CIEs are biostratigraphically constrained by first and last occurrences of boundary defining macro- and microfossils (e.g. ammonites). High resolution C-isotope records appear to be an excellent correlation proxy for this period in the Eiberg Basin. Pyrolysis analysis demonstrates increased Hydrogen Index (HI) values for organic matter coinciding with the initial CIE. Terrestrial organic matter influx and mass occurrences of green algae remains may have influenced the C-isotope composition of the sedimentary organic matter. This may have contributed to the extreme amplitude of the initial CIE in the Eiberg Basin.

  7. Impact of flood events on lacustrine carbonate isotope records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kämpf, Lucas; Plessen, Birgit; Lauterbach, Stefan; Nantke, Carla; Meyer, Hanno; Chapligin, Bernhard; Höllerer, Hannes; Brauer, Achim

    2016-04-01

    Stable oxygen (δ 18O) and carbon (δ 13C) isotope compositions of lacustrine carbonates are among the most frequently used proxies in palaeolimnological / -environmental studies. Stable isotope analyses are often carried out on bulk carbonate samples, which are prone to contamination with detrital carbonates, transported into the lake by runoff processes and carrying the isotopic signal of catchment rocks, thus hampering the interpretation of the data in terms of past climatic and/or environmental changes. Despite the awareness of a likely detrital bias, the degree of contamination in most cases remains unknown and discrete contaminated samples undetected due to a lack of methods to disentangle endogenic and detrital carbonates in sediment records. To address this issue and provide more comprehensive insights into effects of flood-related detrital input on the bulk carbonate isotopic composition, we conducted stable isotope measurements on sediments trapped on a 3-12 day basis over a three-year period (January 2011 to November 2013) at two locations in pre-Alpine Lake Mondsee, close to the inflow of the main tributary and in the deepest part of the lake basin. Lake Mondsee was chosen for the monitoring since the pelagic sediments are annually laminated consisting of couplets of light calcite layers and dark layers made up by a mixture of detrital clastic and organic matter. Maximum calcite flux rates >1.5 g m2 d-1 were trapped between May and September, indicating the seasonal endogenic precipitation of calcite crystals. The comparison of the δ 18O composition of trapped carbonates, rain and epilimnion lake water revealed equilibrium calcite precipitation, allowing us to infer purely endogenic δ 18O (-9 to -11.3‰ VPDB) and δ 13C values (-6 to -9‰ VPDB) throughout the summer season. The endogenic calcite precipitation was interrupted by 14 peaks in carbonate flux (4 to 175 g m2 d-1) triggered by runoff events of different magnitudes (10-110 m3 s-1 peak

  8. A Novel Airborne Carbon Isotope Analyzer for Methane and Carbon Dioxide Source Fingerprinting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, E. S.; Huang, Y. W.; Owano, T. G.; Leifer, I.

    2014-12-01

    Recent field studies on major sources of the important greenhouse gas methane (CH4) indicate significant underestimation of methane release from fossil fuel industrial (FFI) and animal husbandry sources, among others. In addition, uncertainties still exist with respect to carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements, especially source fingerprinting. CO2 isotopic analysis provides a valuable in situ measurement approach to fingerprint CH4 and CO2as associated with combustion sources, leakage from geologic reservoirs, or biogenic sources. As a result, these measurements can characterize strong combustion source plumes, such as power plant emissions, and discriminate these emissions from other sources. As part of the COMEX (CO2 and MEthane eXperiment) campaign, a novel CO2 isotopic analyzer was installed and collected data aboard the CIRPAS Twin Otter aircraft. Developing methods to derive CH4 and CO2 budgets from remote sensing data is the goal of the summer 2014 COMEX campaign, which combines hyperspectral imaging (HSI) and non-imaging spectroscopy (NIS) with in situ airborne and surface data. COMEX leverages the synergy between high spatial resolution HSI and moderate spatial resolution NIS. The carbon dioxide isotope analyzer developed by Los Gatos Research (LGR) uses LGR's patented Off-Axis ICOS (Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy) technology and incorporates proprietary internal thermal control for high sensitivity and optimal instrument stability. This analyzer measures CO2 concentration as well as δ13C, δ18O, and δ17O from CO2 at natural abundance (100-3000 ppm). The laboratory accuracy is ±1.2 ppm (1σ) in CO2 from 370-1000 ppm, with a long-term (1000 s) precision of ±0.012 ppm. The long-term precision for both δ13C and δ18O is 0.04 ‰, and for δ17O is 0.06 ‰. The analyzer was field-tested as part of the COWGAS campaign, a pre-cursor campaign to COMEX in March 2014, where it successfully discriminated plumes related to combustion processes associated with

  9. Investigating the Formation of Pedogenic Carbonate Using Stable Isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breecker, D. O.; Sharp, Z. D.; McFadden, L.

    2006-12-01

    The stable isotope composition of pedogenic carbonate has been used as a paleoenvironmental proxy because it is thought to form in isotopic equilibrium with soil CO2 and soil water, which are influenced by vegetation type and atmospheric circulation patterns, respectively. However, the isotopic composition of soil CO2 and soil water change seasonally and it is not known what portion of this variability is recorded by the isotopic composition of pedogenic carbonate. It is generally believed that carbonate precipitation in soils is driven by evaporative concentration of Ca ions and/or decreasing soil pCO2. We seek to improve the proxy by determining the seasonality of pedogenic carbonate formation, in particular whether pedogenic carbonate forms during the wet season after individual rainstorms or during seasonal drying following the wet season. This was done by comparing the variations in carbon and oxygen isotope composition of soil CO2 with the isotopic composition of proximally located, newly-formed carbonates. Soil CO2 and incipient pedogenic carbonate coatings were collected in a very young (soil developing in an inset terrace on the piedmont of the Sandia Mountains, central New Mexico. We also measure soil temperatures at the same site. In May 2006, at the end of the driest 6-month period on record in central New Mexico, soil CO2 profiles displayed a 2‰ decrease in δ13C values with depth from 9 to 100 cm. In August 2006, the shapes of the profiles were similar, but the δ13C values were 3-4‰ lower at each depth than in May. These results can be explained by an increase in respiration rate during the latter half of the summer (the wettest on record) when monsoon rainfall maintained high moisture contents in soils across New Mexico. Calculated δ13C values of calcite in equilibrium with May (but not August) soil CO2 agree with measured carbonate δ13C values below 20 cm depth. Very shallow carbonate has anomalously high δ13C values. Measurements of the

  10. Economically important applications of carbon isotope data of natural gases and crude oil: a brief review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon isotope fractionations in hydrocarbons are briefly reviewed and examples of practical applications in the exploration of crude oil are given. Carbon isotope fractionations of natural gases are discussed. It is shown that the carbon isotope ratio of methane is predominantly determined by the environment (humic or sapropelic) and the maturity of its organic source material. In this way, isotope analyses of natural gases can be quantitatively used to characterize the maturity of their source rocks. (author)

  11. Carbon Isotope and Isotopomer Fractionation in Cold Dense Cloud Cores

    CERN Document Server

    Furuya, Kenji; Sakai, Nami; Yamamoto, Satoshi

    2011-01-01

    We construct the gas-grain chemical network model which includes carbon isotopes (12C and 13C) with an emphasis on isotopomer-exchange reactions. Temporal variations of molecular abundances, the carbon isotope ratios (12CX/13CX) and the isotopomer ratios (12C13CX/13C12CX) of CCH and CCS in cold dense cloud cores are investigated by numerical calculations. We confirm that the isotope ratios of molecules, both in the gas phase and grain surfaces, are significantly different depending on whether the molecule is formed from the carbon atom (ion) or the CO molecule. Molecules formed from carbon atoms have the CX/13CX ratios greater than the elemental abundance ratio of [12C/13C]. On the other hand, molecules formed from CO molecules have the CX/13CX ratios smaller than the [12C/13C] ratio. We reproduce the observed C13CH/13CCH ratio in TMC-1, if the isotopomer exchange reaction, 13CCH + H C13CH + H + 8.1 K, proceeds with the forward rate coefficient kf > 10^-11 cm3 s-1. However, the C13CS/13CCS ratio is lower tha...

  12. Triple oxygen isotopes in biogenic and sedimentary carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passey, Benjamin H.; Hu, Huanting; Ji, Haoyuan; Montanari, Shaena; Li, Shuning; Henkes, Gregory A.; Levin, Naomi E.

    2014-09-01

    The 17O anomaly (Δ17O) of natural waters has been shown to be sensitive to evaporation in a way analogous to deuterium excess, with evaporated bodies of water (e.g., leaf waters, lake waters, animal body waters) tending to have lower Δ17O than primary meteoric waters. In animal body water, Δ17O relates to the intake of evaporated waters, evaporative effluxes of water, and the Δ17O value of atmospheric O2, which itself carries signatures of global carbon cycling and photochemical reactions in the stratosphere. Carbonates have the potential to record the triple oxygen isotope compositions of parent waters, allowing reconstruction of past water compositions, but such investigations have awaited development of methods for high-precision measurement of Δ17O of carbonate. We describe optimized methods based on a sequential acid digestion/reduction/fluorination approach that yield Δ17O data with the high precision (∼0.010‰, 1σ) needed to resolve subtle environmental signals. We report the first high-precision Δ17O dataset for terrestrial carbonates, focusing on vertebrate biogenic carbonates and soil carbonates, but also including marine invertebrates and high-temperature carbonates. We determine apparent three-isotope fractionation factors between the O2 analyte derived from carbonate and the parent waters of the carbonate. These in combination with appropriate temperature estimates (from clumped isotope thermometry, or known or estimated body temperatures) are used to calculate the δ18O and Δ17O of parent waters. The clearest pattern to emerge is the strong 17O-depletion in avian, dinosaurian, and mammalian body water (from analyses of eggshell and tooth enamel) relative to meteoric waters, following expected influences of evaporated water (e.g., leaf water) and atmospheric O2 on vertebrate body water. Parent waters of the soil carbonates studied here have Δ17O values that are similar to or slightly lower than global precipitation. Our results suggest

  13. Carbon and Oxygen Isotope Stratigraphy of the Oxfordian Carbonate Rocks in Amu Darya Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rongcai Zheng; Yanghui Pan; Can Zhao; Lei Wu; Renjin Chen; Rui Yang

    2013-01-01

    Based on the detailed research on petrologic and geochemical characteristics of deposition and diagenesis of Oxfordian carbonate rocks in Amu Darya Basin,Turkmenistan,carbon and oxygen isotopes were analyzed.The results show that the paleoenvironmental evolution reflected by the samples with well-preserved original carbon isotopes coincides with the carbon-isotope stratigraphic carve and is almost consistent with the global sea-level curve,the Mid-Oxfordian wide transgression,and the positive carbon-isotope excursion event.The Mid-Oxfordian continuing transgression not only laid the foundation for the development of the Oxfordian reef and shoal reservoirs in Amu Darya Basin but also provided an example for the Oxfordian global transgression and the resulting development of reefs and banks and high-speed organic carbon burial events.The response of oxygen isotopes in diagenetic environment showed that micrite limestones and granular limestones underwent weak diagenetic alteration,and the samples largely retained the original seawater features.Dolomitization and the precipitation of hydrothermal calcites tilling solution vugs and fractures before hydrocarbon accumulation occurred in a closed diagenetic environment where the main controlling factor is the temperature,and the diagenetic fluids were from the deep hot brine.The chalkification of the limestones after hydrocarbon accumulation occurred in the oiltield water systems.

  14. Shear heating and clumped isotope reordering in carbonate faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siman-Tov, Shalev; Affek, Hagit P.; Matthews, Alan; Aharonov, Einat; Reches, Ze'ev

    2016-07-01

    Natural faults are expected to heat rapidly during seismic slip and to cool quite quickly after the slip event. Here we examine clumped isotope thermometry for its ability to identify such short duration elevated temperature events along frictionally heated carbonate faults. Our approach is based on measured Δ47 values that reflect the distribution of oxygen and carbon isotopes in the calcite lattice, measuring the abundance of 13Csbnd 18O bonds, which is affected by temperature. We examine three types of calcite rock samples: (1) crushed limestone grains that were rapidly heated and then cooled in static laboratory experiments, simulating the temperature cycle experienced by fault rock during an earthquake slip; (2) limestone samples that were experimentally sheared to simulate earthquake slip events; and (3) samples from Fault Mirrors (FMs) collected from principle slip surfaces of three natural carbonate faults. Extensive FM surfaces are believed to form during earthquake slip. Our experimental results show that Δ47 values decrease rapidly (in the course of seconds) with increasing temperature and shear velocity. On the other hand, carbonate shear zones from natural faults do not show such Δ47 decrease. We suggest that the Δ47 response may be controlled by nano-size grains, the high abundance of defects, and highly stressed/strained grain boundaries within the carbonate fault zone that can reduce the activation energy for diffusion, and thus lead to an increased rate of isotopic disordering during shear experiments. In our laboratory experiments the high stress and strain on grain contacts and the presence of nanograins thus allows for rapid disordering so that a change in Δ47 occurs in a very short and relatively low intensity heating events. In natural faults it may also lead to isotopic ordering after the cessation of frictional heating thus erasing the high temperature signature of Δ47.

  15. Enantioselective stable isotope analysis (ESIA) of polar Herbicides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Michael; Qiu, Shiran; Elsner, Martin

    2013-04-01

    The complexity of aquatic systems makes it challenging to assess the environmental fate of chiral micropolutants. As an example, chiral herbicides are frequently detected in the environment (Buser and Muller, 1998); however, hydrological data is needed to determine their degradability from concentration measurements. Otherwise declining concentrations cannot unequivocally be attributed to degradation, but could also be caused by dilution effects. In contrast, isotope ratios or enantiomeric ratios are elegant alternatives that are independent of dilution and can even deliver insights into reaction mechanisms. To combine the advantages of both approaches we developed an enatioselective stable isotope analysis (ESIA) method to investigate the fate of the chiral herbicides 4-CPP ((RS)-2-(4-chlorophenoxy)-propionic acid), mecoprop (2-(4-Chloro-2-methylphenoxy)-propionic acid) and dichlorprop (2-(2,4-Dichlorophenoxy)-propionic acid). After testing the applicable concentration range of the method, enantioselective isotope fractionation was investigated by microbial degradation using dichlorprop as a model compound. The method uses enantioselective gas-chromatography (GC) to separate enantiomers. Subsequently samples are combusted online to CO2 and carbon isotope ratios are determined for each enantiomer by isotope-ratio-mass-spectrometry (IRMS). Because the analytes contain a polar carboxyl-group, samples were derivatised prior to GC-IRMS analysis with methanolic BF3 solution. Precise carbon isotope analysis (2σ ≤0.5‰) was achieved with a high sensitivity of ≥ 7 ng C that is needed on column for one analysis. Microbial degradation of the model compound dichlorprop was conducted with Delftia acidovorans MC1 and pronounced enantiomer fractionation, but no isotope fractionation was detected. The absence of isotope fractionation can be explained by two scenarios: either the degrading enzyme has no isotopic preference, or another step in the reaction without an isotopic

  16. Using a laser-based CO2 carbon isotope analyser to investigate gas transfer in geological media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CO2 stable carbon isotopes are very attractive in environmental research to investigate both natural and anthropogenic carbon sources. Laser-based CO2 carbon isotope analysis provides continuous measurement at high temporal resolution and is a promising alternative to isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). We performed a thorough assessment of a commercially available CO2 Carbon Isotope Analyser (CCIA DLT-100, Los Gatos Research) that allows in situ measurement of C-13 in CO2. Using a set of reference gases of known CO2 concentration and carbon isotopic composition, we evaluated the precision, long-term stability, temperature sensitivity and concentration dependence of the analyser. Despite good precision calculated from Allan variance (5.0 ppm for CO2 concentration, and 0.05 per thousand for δC-13 at 60 s averaging), real performances are altered by two main sources of error: temperature sensitivity and dependence of C-13 on CO2 concentration. Data processing is required to correct for these errors. Following application of these corrections, we achieve an accuracy of 8.7 ppm for CO2 concentration and 1.3 per thousand for δC-13, which is worse compared to mass spectrometry performance, but still allowing field applications. With this portable analyser we measured CO2 flux degassed from rock in an underground tunnel. The obtained carbon isotopic composition agrees with IRMS measurement, and can be used to identify the carbon source. (authors)

  17. Using a laser-based CO2 carbon isotope analyser to investigate gas transfer in geological media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillon, S.; Pili, E.; Agrinier, P.

    2012-05-01

    CO2 stable carbon isotopes are very attractive in environmental research to investigate both natural and anthropogenic carbon sources. Laser-based CO2 carbon isotope analysis provides continuous measurement at high temporal resolution and is a promising alternative to isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). We performed a thorough assessment of a commercially available CO2 Carbon Isotope Analyser (CCIA DLT-100, Los Gatos Research) that allows in situ measurement of δ 13C in CO2. Using a set of reference gases of known CO2 concentration and carbon isotopic composition, we evaluated the precision, long-term stability, temperature sensitivity and concentration dependence of the analyser. Despite good precision calculated from Allan variance (5.0 ppm for CO2 concentration, and 0.05 ‰ for δ 13C at 60 s averaging), real performances are altered by two main sources of error: temperature sensitivity and dependence of δ 13C on CO2 concentration. Data processing is required to correct for these errors. Following application of these corrections, we achieve an accuracy of 8.7 ppm for CO2 concentration and 1.3 ‰ for δ 13C, which is worse compared to mass spectrometry performance, but still allowing field applications. With this portable analyser we measured CO2 flux degassed from rock in an underground tunnel. The obtained carbon isotopic composition agrees with IRMS measurement, and can be used to identify the carbon source.

  18. Stable-Isotopic Analysis of Porcine, Bovine, and Ovine Heparins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasper, John P.; Zhang, Fuming; Poe, Russell B.; Linhardt, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    The assessment of provenance of heparin is becoming a major concern for the pharmaceutical industry and its regulatory bodies. Batch-specific [carbon (δ13C), nitrogen (δ15N), oxygen (δ18O), sulfur (δ34S), and hydrogen (δD)] stable-isotopic compositions of five different animal-derived heparins were performed. Measurements readily allowed their differentiation into groups and/or subgroups based on their isotopic provenance. Principle component analysis showed that a bivariate plot of δ13C and δ18O is the best single, bivariate plot that results in the maximum discrimination ability when only two stable isotopes are used to describe the variation in the data set. Stable-isotopic analyses revealed that (i) stable-isotope measurements on these highly-sulfated polysaccharide (MW ~15 kDa) natural products (“biologics”) were feasible; (ii) in bivariate plots, the δ13C versus δ18O plot reveals a well-defined relationship for source differentiation of hogs raised in the US from hogs raised in Europe and China; (iii) the δD versus δ18O plot revealed the most well-defined relationship for source differentiation based on the hydrologic-environmental isotopes of water (D/H and 18O/16O), and (iv) the δ15N versus δ18O and δ34S versus δ18O relationships are both very similar, possibly reflecting the food sources used by the different heparin producers. PMID:25186630

  19. Respiration and assimilation processes reflected in the carbon isotopic composition of atmospheric carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents diurnal variations of concentration and carbon isotopic composition of atmospheric carbon dioxide caused by respiration and assimilation processes. Air samples were collected during early and late summer in 1998 in unpolluted area (village Guciow located near Roztocze National Park, SE Poland) in three different environments: uncultivated field on a hill, a meadow in the Wieprz river valley and a forest. The effect is very strong during intensive vegetation growth on a sunny day and clear night. The largest diurnal variations in atmospheric CO2 concentration and its carbon isotopic composition in June above the meadow were about 480 ppm and 10 pro mille, respectively. (author)

  20. A comparison of dried shiitake mushroom in log cultivation and mycelial cultivation from different geographical origins using stable carbon and nitrogen isotope analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We determined carbon and nitrogen isotopic compositions (δ13C and δ15N) of dried shiitake mushroom (Lentinula edodes) samples from Japan, China, South Korea and Brazil in order to discriminate their geographical origins. In log cultivation, the δ13C values of Japanese dried shiitake samples were lower than those of Chinese samples, depending on the δ13C values of log and their growth conditions. In mycelial cultivation, the δ13C and δ15N values of Japanese dried shiitake samples were higher than those of Chinese samples. By using the δ13C and δ15N values, 87.4% of Japanese dried shiitake samples (n = 95) and 87.9% of Chinese dried shiitake samples (n = 66) in log cultivation, 90.0% of the Japanese dried shiitake samples (n = 50) and 93.9% of Chinese dried shiitake samples (n = 114) in mycelial cultivation, were correctly classified according to the production site. These results suggested that the δ13C and δ15N values will be potentially useful for tracing their geographical origin of dried shiitake samples. (author)

  1. Boron isotope fractionation in magma via crustal carbonate dissolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deegan, Frances M; Troll, Valentin R; Whitehouse, Martin J; Jolis, Ester M; Freda, Carmela

    2016-01-01

    Carbon dioxide released by arc volcanoes is widely considered to originate from the mantle and from subducted sediments. Fluids released from upper arc carbonates, however, have recently been proposed to help modulate arc CO2 fluxes. Here we use boron as a tracer, which substitutes for carbon in limestone, to further investigate crustal carbonate degassing in volcanic arcs. We performed laboratory experiments replicating limestone assimilation into magma at crustal pressure-temperature conditions and analysed boron isotope ratios in the resulting experimental glasses. Limestone dissolution and assimilation generates CaO-enriched glass near the reaction site and a CO2-dominated vapour phase. The CaO-rich glasses have extremely low δ(11)B values down to -41.5‰, reflecting preferential partitioning of (10)B into the assimilating melt. Loss of (11)B from the reaction site occurs via the CO2 vapour phase generated during carbonate dissolution, which transports (11)B away from the reaction site as a boron-rich fluid phase. Our results demonstrate the efficacy of boron isotope fractionation during crustal carbonate assimilation and suggest that low δ(11)B melt values in arc magmas could flag shallow-level additions to the subduction cycle. PMID:27488228

  2. Boron isotope fractionation in magma via crustal carbonate dissolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deegan, Frances M.; Troll, Valentin R.; Whitehouse, Martin J.; Jolis, Ester M.; Freda, Carmela

    2016-08-01

    Carbon dioxide released by arc volcanoes is widely considered to originate from the mantle and from subducted sediments. Fluids released from upper arc carbonates, however, have recently been proposed to help modulate arc CO2 fluxes. Here we use boron as a tracer, which substitutes for carbon in limestone, to further investigate crustal carbonate degassing in volcanic arcs. We performed laboratory experiments replicating limestone assimilation into magma at crustal pressure-temperature conditions and analysed boron isotope ratios in the resulting experimental glasses. Limestone dissolution and assimilation generates CaO-enriched glass near the reaction site and a CO2-dominated vapour phase. The CaO-rich glasses have extremely low δ11B values down to ‑41.5‰, reflecting preferential partitioning of 10B into the assimilating melt. Loss of 11B from the reaction site occurs via the CO2 vapour phase generated during carbonate dissolution, which transports 11B away from the reaction site as a boron-rich fluid phase. Our results demonstrate the efficacy of boron isotope fractionation during crustal carbonate assimilation and suggest that low δ11B melt values in arc magmas could flag shallow-level additions to the subduction cycle.

  3. Isotope ratio analysis by a combination of element analyzer and mass spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of stable isotope ratios of carbon, nitrogen and sulfur as analytical tool in many fields of research is of growing interest. A method has therefore been developed, consisting in essential of coupling an Elemental Analyzer with an Isotope Mass Spectrometer, which enables the gas preparation of carbon dioxide, nitrogen and sulfur dioxide from any solid or liquid sample in a fast and easy way. Results of carbon isotope measurements in food analysis are presented, whereat it is possible to check origin and treatment of sugar, oils, fats, mineral waters, spirituous liquors etc. and to detect adulterations as well. Also applications in the field of environmental research are given. (Author)

  4. Hirnantian Isotope Carbon Excursion in Gorny Altai, southwestern Siberia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay V. Sennikov

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The Hirnantian Isotope Carbon Excursion (HICE, a glaciation-induced positive δ13C shift in the end-Ordovician successions, has been widely used in chemostratigraphic correlation of the Ordovician–Silurian boundary beds in many areas of the world. However, large regions with Ordovician sediments in Siberia are almost unstudied for stable isotope chemostratigraphy. The Burovlyanka section in the Altai area is one of the rare Hirnantian–Rhuddanian sections with both carbonates and graptolitiferous shales occurring in the succession. Here we report the discovery of the HICE in the uppermost beds of the Tekhten¢ Formation, the Dalmanitina Beds in the Burovlyanka section. The Dalmanitina limestone Member between the graptolitiferous shales may correspond to the mid-Hirnantian glacial episode, which led to a global sea level drop and major extinction of marine fauna.

  5. Descriptions of carbon isotopes within the energy density functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ismail, Atef [Fundamental and Applied Sciences Department, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Bandar Seri Iskandar, 31750 Tronoh, Perak, Malaysia and Department of Physics, Al-Azhar University, 71524 Assiut (Egypt); Cheong, Lee Yen; Yahya, Noorhana [Fundamental and Applied Sciences Department, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Bandar Seri Iskandar, 31750 Tronoh, Perak (Malaysia); Tammam, M. [Department of Physics, Al-Azhar University, 71524 Assiut (Egypt)

    2014-10-24

    Within the energy density functional (EDF) theory, the structure properties of Carbon isotopes are systematically studied. The shell model calculations are done for both even-A and odd-A nuclei, to study the structure of rich-neutron Carbon isotopes. The EDF theory indicates the single-neutron halo structures in {sup 15}C, {sup 17}C and {sup 19}C, and the two-neutron halo structures in {sup 16}C and {sup 22}C nuclei. It is also found that close to the neutron drip-line, there exist amazing increase in the neutron radii and decrease on the binding energies BE, which are tightly related with the blocking effect and correspondingly the blocking effect plays a significant role in the shell model configurations.

  6. The use of carbon stable isotope ratios in drugs characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isotopic Ratio Mass Spectrometry (IRMS) is an effective toll to be used for drug product authentication. The isotopic composition could be used to assist in the differentiation between batches of drugs and assist in the identification of counterfeit materials on the market. Only two factors affect the isotopic ratios in pharmaceutical components: the isotopic composition of the raw materials and the synthetic processes performed upon them. Counterfeiting of pharmaceutical drugs threatens consumer confidence in drug products companies' economical well-being. In this preliminary study, the analyzed samples consist in two types of commercially available analgesics, which were purchases from Romanian pharmacies. Differences in δ13C between batches from −29.7 to −31.6% were observed, demonstrating that this method can be used to differentiate among individual drug batches and subsequently identify counterfeits on the market. On the other hand, carbon isotopic ratios differences among producers were recorded, the variations being between −31.3 to −34.9% for the same type of analgesic, but from different manufactures

  7. The use of carbon stable isotope ratios in drugs characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magdas, D. A., E-mail: gabriela.cristea@itim-cj.ro; Cristea, G., E-mail: gabriela.cristea@itim-cj.ro; Bot, A., E-mail: gabriela.cristea@itim-cj.ro; Mirel, V., E-mail: gabriela.cristea@itim-cj.ro [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 65-103 Donath Str., 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2013-11-13

    Isotopic Ratio Mass Spectrometry (IRMS) is an effective toll to be used for drug product authentication. The isotopic composition could be used to assist in the differentiation between batches of drugs and assist in the identification of counterfeit materials on the market. Only two factors affect the isotopic ratios in pharmaceutical components: the isotopic composition of the raw materials and the synthetic processes performed upon them. Counterfeiting of pharmaceutical drugs threatens consumer confidence in drug products companies' economical well-being. In this preliminary study, the analyzed samples consist in two types of commercially available analgesics, which were purchases from Romanian pharmacies. Differences in δ{sup 13}C between batches from −29.7 to −31.6% were observed, demonstrating that this method can be used to differentiate among individual drug batches and subsequently identify counterfeits on the market. On the other hand, carbon isotopic ratios differences among producers were recorded, the variations being between −31.3 to −34.9% for the same type of analgesic, but from different manufactures.

  8. Low stable carbon isotope fractionation by coccolithophore RubisCO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boller, Amanda J.; Thomas, Phaedra J.; Cavanaugh, Colleen M.; Scott, Kathleen M.

    2011-11-01

    The 13C/ 12C ratio of carbon compounds is used to identify sources and sinks in the global carbon cycle. However, the relatively enriched 13C content observed for marine organic carbon remains enigmatic. The majority of oceanic carbon is fixed by algae and cyanobacteria via the Calvin-Benson-Bassham cycle, yet isotopic discrimination by the CO 2 fixation enzyme, RubisCO (ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase), has only been measured for a single marine cyanobacterium. Different forms of RubisCO occur in different phytoplankton species (overall amino acid identity varying by as much as ˜75%) and thus may vary in the degree to which they fractionate carbon. Here we measured isotope discrimination by RubisCO from the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi, a cosmopolitan species used as a marine algal model .E. huxleyi RubisCO discriminated substantially less ( ɛ = 11.1‰) against 13CO 2 than other RubisCO enzymes (18-29‰), despite having Michaelis-Menten kinetic parameters ( K = 72 μM; Vmax = 0.66 μmol min -1 mg -1 protein) similar to those measured for RubisCO enzymes from different organisms. If widespread, decreased isotope discrimination of 13C by phytoplankton RubisCO may be a major factor influencing the enriched 13C content of marine organic carbon. This finding emphasizes the necessity of (a) determining ɛ values for RubisCOs of other marine phytoplankton and (b) re-evaluation of δ13C values from physiological, environmental, and geological studies.

  9. Constraining the global bromomethane budget from carbon stable isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahlmann, Enno; Wittmer, Julian; Greule, Markus; Zetzsch, Cornelius; Seifert, Richard; Keppler, Frank

    2016-04-01

    Despite intense research in the last two decades, the global bromomethane (CH3Br) budget remains unbalanced with the known sinks exceeding the known sources by about 25%. The reaction with OH is the largest sink for CH3Br. We have determined the kinetic isotope effects for the reactions of CH3Br with the OH and Cl radical in order to better constrain the global CH3Br budget from an isotopic perspective. The isotope fractionation experiments were performed at 20±1°C in a 3500 L Teflon smog-chamber with initial CH3Br mixing ratios of about 2 and 10 ppm and perflourohexane (25 ppb) as internal standard. Atomic chlorine (Cl) was generated via photolysis of molecular chlorine (Cl2) using a solar simulator with an actinic flux comparable to that of the sun in mid-summer in Germany. OH radicals were generated via the photolysis of ozone (O3) at 253.7 nm in the presence of water vapor (RH = 70%).The mixing ratios of CH3Br, and perflourohexane were monitored by GC-MS with a time resolution of 15 minutes throughout the experiments. From each experiment 10 to 15 sub samples were taken in regular time intervals for subsequent carbon isotope ratio determinations by GC-IRMS performed at two independent laboratories in parallel. We found a kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of 17.6±3.3‰ for the reaction of CH3Br with OH and a KIE of 9.8±1.4 ‰ for the reaction with Cl*. We used these fractionation factors along with new data on the isotopic composition of CH3Br in the troposphere (-34±7‰) and the surface ocean (-26±7‰) along with reported source signatures, to constrain the unknown source from an isotopic perspective. The largest uncertainty in estimating the isotopic composition of the unknown source arises from the soil sink. Microbial degradation in soils is the second largest sink and assigned with a large fractionation factors of about 50‰. However, field experiments revealed substantially smaller apparent fractionation factors ranging from 11 to 22‰. In addition

  10. Late Carboniferous to Late Permian carbon isotope stratigraphy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buggisch, Werner; Krainer, Karl; Schaffhauser, Maria;

    2015-01-01

    . Negative δ13C excursions are related to low-stand deposits and caused by diagenetic processes during subaerial exposure. The comparison with δ13C records from other parts of the world demonstrate that δ13C values are high in most unaltered samples, an overall negative trend during the Permian, as recently...... published, is not obvious and negative excursions related to changes in the carbon isotope composition of the global oceanic carbon pool cannot be confirmed, except for the Permian–Triassic boundary interval....

  11. Preliminary Study: Application of Off-Axis ICOS to Determine Stable Carbon Isotope in Dissolved Inorganic Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y. T.; Lee, J. M.; Hwang, J. H.; Piao, J.; Woo, N. C.

    2015-12-01

    CO2 is one of the major causes for global climate change. Because stable carbon isotope ratio is used to trace carbon source, several analytical techniques likes IRMS (Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry) and LAS (Laser Absorption Spectrometry) were extensively used. Off-axis ICOS, a kind of LAS, has merits on long-term stability and field application, therefore it is widely being used in CCS (Carbon Capture and Storage) field. The aim of this study is to extend the application scope of OA-ICOS to determine dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). Because OA-ICOS showed dependence of δ13C on CO2 concentration, data processing is required. We tested CO2 Carbon Isotope Analyzer (CCIA-36-EP, Los Gatos Research) with both reference gas (δ13C= -28.28‰) and aqueous solutions prepared by dissolving sodium bicarbonate standards (δ13C= -12.26‰ and +3.96‰). The differences of δ13C between reference and measurement values are plotted by CO2 concentrations, then compared. At first, we checked the similarity between our curve pattern for reference gas and Guillon's research (δ13C= -43.99‰) by other Analyzer. To analyze aqueous samples, more errors can be caused than gas analysis. The carbon isotope fractionation occurs during dissolving standard reagents and extracting DIC as CO2 gas form. This effect is mixed with CO2 concentration dependence effect, therefore the curve patterns are different with that for reference gas. Our experiments are done for various δ13C values. It could be an important point to use OA-ICOS to analyze DIC, too.

  12. Environmental impact and magnitude of paleosol carbonate carbon isotope excursions marking five early Eocene hyperthermals in the Bighorn Basin, Wyoming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abels, H.A.; Lauretano, V.; van Yperen, Anna E.; Hopman, Tarek; Zachos, J.C.; Lourens, L.J.; Gingerich, P.D.; Bowen, G.J.

    2016-01-01

    Transient greenhouse warming events in the Paleocene and Eocene were associated with the addition of isotopically light carbon to the exogenic atmosphere–ocean carbon system, leading to substantial environmental and biotic change. The magnitude of an accompanying carbon isotope excursion (CIE) can b

  13. The Li isotope composition of modern biogenic carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellinger, M.; West, A. J.; Adkins, J. F.; Paris, G.; Eagle, R.; Freitas, P. S.; Bagard, M. L.; Ries, J. B.; Corsetti, F. A.; Pogge von Strandmann, P.; Ullmann, C. V.

    2015-12-01

    The lithium stable isotope composition (δ7Li) of sedimentary carbonates has great potential to unravel weathering rates and intensity in the past, with implications for understanding the carbon cycle over geologic time. However, so far very little is known about the potential influence of fractionation of the stable Li isotope composition of biogenic carbonates. Here, we investigate the δ7Li of various organisms (particularly mollusks, echinoderms and brachiopods) abundant in the Phanerozoic record, in order to understand which geologic archives might provide the best targets for reconstructing past seawater composition. The range of measured samples includes (i) modern calcite and aragonite shells from variable natural environments, (ii) shells from organisms grown under controlled conditions (temperature, salinity, pCO2), and (iii) fossil shells from a range of species collected from Miocene deposits. When possible, both the inner and outer layers of bivalves were micro-sampled to assess the intra-shell heterogeneity. For calcitic shells, the measured δ7Li of bivalve species range from +32 to +41‰ and is systematically enriched in the heavy isotope relative to seawater (31 ‰) and to inorganic calcite, which is characterized by Δ7Licalcite-seawater = -2 to -5‰ [1]. The Li isotope composition of aragonitic bivalves, ranging from +16 to +22‰, is slightly fractionated to both high and low δ7Li relative to inorganic aragonite. The largest intra-shell Li isotope variability is observed for mixed calcite-aragonite shells (more than 20‰) whereas in single mineralogy shells, intra-shell δ7Li variability is generally less than 3‰. Overall, these results suggest a strong influence of vital effects on Li isotopes during bio-calcification of bivalve shells. On the contrary, measured brachiopods systematically exhibit fractionation that is very similar to inorganic calcite, with a mean δ7Li of 27.0±1.5‰, suggesting that brachiopods may provide good

  14. Stable isotope dilution assays in mycotoxin analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rychlik, Michael; Asam, Stefan [Universitaet Muenchen, Lehrstuhl fuer Lebensmittelchemie der Technischen, Garching (Germany)

    2008-01-15

    The principle and applications of stable isotope dilution assays (SIDAs) in mycotoxin analysis are critically reviewed. The general section includes historical aspects of SIDAs, the prerequisites and limitations of the use of stable isotopically labelled internal standards, and possible calibration procedures. In the application section actual SIDAs for the analysis of trichothecenes, zearalenone, fumonisins, patulin, and ochratoxin A are presented. The syntheses and availability of labelled mycotoxins for use as internal standards is reviewed and specific advances in food analysis and toxicology are demonstrated. The review indicates that LC-MS applications, in particular, require the use of stable isotopically labelled standards to compensate for losses during clean-up and for discrimination due to ion suppression. As the commercial availability of these compounds continues to increase, SIDAs can be expected to find expanding use in mycotoxin analysis. (orig.)

  15. Isotopic investigations of carbonate growth on concrete structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnamurthy, R.V.; Schmitt, D.; Atekwana, E.A.; Baskaran, M

    2003-03-01

    Stable C and O isotope ratios were measured in carbonate minerals, growing under concrete structures from two locations in the United States. These locations were under a bridge in Michigan and under an overpass in New York. The {delta}{sup 13}C of the carbonate samples ranged from -21.6 to -31.4 per mille (with respect to V-PDB) and clearly indicated precipitation under non-equilibrium conditions. Indeed, the values in some cases were more negative than could be accounted for by existing models that invoke 4 stages of kinetic fractionation. There have been suggestions that microbial activity involving C from gasoline and other fossil fuel sources might be responsible for the relatively low C isotope ratios measured in these carbonates. To explore this possibility, {sup 14}C measurements were made in some of the samples. All samples measured for {sup 14}C contained bomb C. The range of {sup 14}C concentrations suggested a non-uniform growth rate, although possible fossil fuel-derived carbon in the system needs future investigation. The {delta}{sup 18}O values of the carbonates analyzed from Michigan range from 12.5 to 15.7 per mille (with respect to V-SMOW), with a mean value of 13.7 per mille. The {delta}{sup 18}O values of the NY samples range from 11.8 to 15.2 per mille, with a mean value of 13.1 per mille. The nearly identical mean values at both locations favors incorporation of O from atmospheric CO{sub 2} in carbonate precipitation. Additionally, the {sup 210}Pb radiometric technique was also attempted to explore the applicability of this technique in dating concrete derived carbonates as well as recent carbonates forming in a wide variety of environments. The results gave ages between 64 and 3.8 a and are consistent when compared with the date the bridge was constructed.

  16. Oxygen and carbon isotopic growth record in a reef coral from the florida keys and a deep-sea coral from blake plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emiliani, C.; Harold, Hudson J.; Shinn, E.A.; George, R.Y.

    1978-01-01

    Carbon and oxygen isotope analysis through a 30-year (1944 to 1974) growth of Montastrea annularis from Hen and Chickens Reef (Florida Keys) shows a strong yearly variation in the abundances of both carbon-13 and oxygen-18 and a broad inverse relationship between the two isotopes. Normal annual dense bands are formed during the summer and are characterized by heavy carbon and light oxygen. "Stress bands" are formed during particularly severe winters and are characterized by heavy carbon and heavy oxygen. The isotopic effect of Zooxanthellae metabolism dominates the temperature effect on the oxygen-18/oxygen-16 ratio. The isotopic results on the deep-sea solitary coral Bathypsammia tintinnabulum, where Zooxanthellae are nonexistent, indicates that the abundance of the heavy isotopes carbon-13 and oxygen-18 is inversely related to the growth rate, with both carbon and oxygen approaching equilibrium values with increasing skeletal age.

  17. New methodologies in stable isotope analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the 1970s, soil scientists stressed the need for a fast, easy to use 15N analyser to replace the isotope ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS) and Kjeldahl sample preparation. By 1984, three groups had succeeded in interfacing an elemental analyser to an IRMS. 'Continuous flow' Dumas combustion converted N in plant tissue or soil to a pulse of N2 gas, taken to the mass spectrometer by a helium carrier. Throughput increased from 20 to 100 analyses per day and only 5 μg N were required compared with 50 μg N for Kjeldahl-Rittenberg preparation and IRMS analysis. Since 1987, a software controlled automated nitrogen and carbon analyser-mass spectrometer (ANCA-MS) has been developed with which 15N and 13C can be measured to 0.0003 and 0.0002 at.% RSD respectively. Reducing hardware has made it portable, enabling it to be used in the field. Measurement of submicrogram quantities of nitrogen is possible using software control to move the oxygen pulse, with its N2 'blank', out of phase with the sample. Software also allows operation at twice normal speed, enabling plant breeders to screen genotypes for N fixing ability within the flowering period. 35 refs, 6 figs, 7 tabs

  18. Isotopic analysis of cometary organic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerridge, John F.

    1991-01-01

    Carbon isotope ratios have been measured for CN in the coma of Comet Halley and for several CHON particles emitted by Halley. Of these, only the CHON-particle data may be reasonably related to organic matter in the cometary nucleus, but the true range of (C-13)/(C-12) values in those particles is quite uncertain. The D/H ratio in H2O in the Halley coma resembles that in Titan/Uranus.

  19. Carbon isotopic composition of fossil leaves from the Early Cretaceous sediments of western India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Chakraborty; B N Jana; S K Bhattacharya; I Robertson

    2011-08-01

    Stable carbon isotope analysis of fossil leaves from the Bhuj Formation, western India was carried out to infer the prevailing environmental conditions. Compression fossil leaves such as Pachypteris indica, Otozamite kachchhensis, Brachyphyllum royii and Dictyozamites sp. were recovered from three sedimentary successions of the Bhuj Formation, Early Cretaceous in age. A chronology was established based on faunal assemblage and palyno-stratigraphy and further constrained by carbon isotope stratigraphy. The three sampling sites were the Karawadi river bank near Dharesi; the Chawad river bank near Mathal; and the Pur river section near Trambau village in Gujarat. The Dharesi sample was also analyzed to investigate intra-leaf 13C variability. The mean 13C of the leaf was −24.6 ± 0.4‰ which implied negligible systematic change along the leaf axis. The Mathal sample was fragmented in nature and showed considerable variation in carbon isotopic composition. The Trambau sample considered to be the oldest, dating to the middle of Aptian (ca. 116 Ma), shows the most depleted value in 13C among all of them. The overall 13C trend ranging from mid Aptian (ca. 116 Ma) to early Albian (ca. 110 Ma) shows a progressive increase in 13C from −26.8 to −20.5‰. Based on these measurements the carbon isotopic composition of atmospheric carbon dioxide of the Aptian–Albian period is estimated to be between −7.4 and −1.7‰. The ratio of the partial pressure of carbon dioxide in leaf to that of the ambient atmosphere calculated based on a model is estimated to be similar to that of the modern plants. This indicates that the Early-Cretaceous plants adapted to the prevailing high carbon dioxide regime by increasing their photosynthetic uptake.

  20. Diet control on carbon isotopic composition of land snail shell carbonate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU ZongXiu; GU ZhaoYan; WU NaiQin; XU Bing

    2007-01-01

    Carbon isotope compositions for both the carbonate shells and soft bodies (organic tissue) of living land snails collected mostly from the Loess Plateau, China have been measured. The result shows that δ13C values range from -13.1‰ to -4.3‰ for the aragonite shell samples and from -26.8‰ to -18.0‰ for the soft body samples. Although the shells are enriched in 13C relative to the bodies averagely by 14.2(±0.8)‰, the shell δ13Ca values are closely correlated to the body δ13Corg values, expressed as δ13Ca = 1.021 δ13Corg + 14.38 (R = 0.965; N = 31). This relationship indicates that δ13Ca is primarily a function of the isotopic composition of the snail diets since previous studies have proved that the snail body is the same as their food in carbon isotope composition. In other words, carbon isotope compo-sition of the carbonate shell can be used as a proxy to estimate the dietary 13C abundance of the land snails. The data also support that the 13C enrichment of the carbonate shells results mainly from the equilibrium fractionations between the metabolic CO2, HCO3- in the hemolymph and shell aragonite, and partially from kinetic fractionations when snail shells form during their activity.

  1. Sulfur and carbon isotope biogeochemistry of a rewetted brackish fen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koebsch, Franziska; Gehre, Matthias; Winkel, Matthias; Koehler, Stefan; Koch, Marian; Jurasinski, Gerald; Spitzy, Alejandro; Liebner, Susanne; Sachs, Torsten; Schmiedinger, Iris; Kretzschmann, Lisett; Saborowski, Anke; Böttcher, Michael E.

    2015-04-01

    Coastal wetlands are at the interface between terrestrial freshwater and marine and exhibit very specific biogeochemical conditions. Intermittent sea water intrusion affects metabolic pathways, i. e. anaerobic carbon metabolism is progressively dominated by sulfate reduction with lower contribution of methanogenesis whilst methane production is increasingly shifted from acetoclastic to hydrogenotrophic. Due to expanding anthropogenic impact a large proportion of coastal ecosystems is degraded with severe implications for the biogeochemical processes. We use concentration patterns and stable isotope signatures of water, sulfate, dissolved carbonate, and methane (δ2H, δ13C, δ18O, δ34S) to investigate the S and C metabolic cycle in a rewetted fen close to the southern Baltic Sea border. Such studies are crucial to better predict dynamic ecosystem feedback to global change like organic matter (OM) decomposition or greenhouse gas emissions. Yet, little is known about the metabolic pathways in such environments. The study site is part of the TERENO Observatory "Northeastern German Lowlands' and measurements of methane emissions have run since 2009. High methane fluxes up to 800 mg m-2 hr-1 indicate that methanogenesis is the dominant C metabolism pathway despite of high sulfate concentrations (up to 37 mM). The presented data are part of a comprehensive biogeochemical investigation that we conducted in autumn 2014 and that comprises 4 pore water profiles and sediment samples within a transect of 300-1500 m distance to the Baltic Sea. Depth of organic layers ranged from 25 to 140 cm with high OM contents (up to 90 dwt.%). Sulfate/chloride ratios in the pore waters were lower than in the Baltic Sea for most sites and sediment depths indicated a substantial net sulfate loss. Sulfide concentrations were negligible at the top and increased parallel to the sulfate concentrations with depth to values of up to 0.3 mM. One pore water profiles situated 1150 m from the Baltic

  2. Method for determination of stable carbon isotope ratio of methylnitrophenols in atmospheric PM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Moukhtar

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available A technique for the measurement of the stable isotope ratio of methylnitrophenols in atmospheric particulate matter (PM is presented. It has been found in numerous laboratory studies that these compounds are photooxidation products of toluene in PM. Atmospheric samples from rural and suburban areas were collected for evaluation of the procedure. PM was collected on quartz fibre filters using dichotomous high volume air samplers for PM 2.5. Methylnitrophenols were extracted from the filters using acetonitrile. The sample was then purified using a combination of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC and solid phase extraction (SPE. The final solution was then divided into two aliquots. To one aliquot, a derivatising agent, Bis(trimethylsilyltrifluoroacetamide (BSTFA, was added to the solution for Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectroscopy (GC/MS analysis. The second half of the sample was stored at low temperature. When GC/MS analysis showed high enough concentrations the remaining sample was derivatized with BSTFA and analysed for stable isotope ratio using a Gas Chromatography/Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (GC-IRMS.

    In all atmospheric PM samples analysed, 2-methyl-4-nitrophenol was found to be the most abundant methylnitrophenol. Nevertheless, due to low pollution levels occurring in the rural area, no samples had concentrations high enough to perform stable carbon isotope composition measurements of the methylnitrophenols. Samples collected in the suburban area could be analysed for carbon stable isotope ratio using GC-IRMS.

    The procedure described in this paper provides a very sensitive and selective method for the analysis of methylnitrophenols in atmospheric PM at concentrations as low as 1 pg m−3. For accurate (within ±0.5‰ stable isotope ratio analysis significantly higher concentrations in the range of 100 pg m−3 or more are required.

  3. Isotopic composition of carbon in vinegars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krueger, D.A.; Krueger, H.W.

    1985-05-01

    Measurements of delta TC and UC-activity were performed on vinegars from various known sources. Natural vinegar can be distinguished from petrochemical acetic acid by UC-analysis: Natural vinegar currently gives values of greater than 112% of modern activity; petrochemical acetic acid yields values of 0% of modern activity. Apple cider vinegar can be distinguished from corn-derived vinegar by delta TC-analysis: Cider vinegar gives delta TC-values near -26%; corn-derived vinegars yield delta TC-values near -10%. These techniques are applied to a series of retail vinegars.

  4. Isotopic composition of carbon in vinegars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements of delta 13C and 14C-activity were performed on vinegars from various known sources. Natural vinegar can be distinguished from petrochemical acetic acid by 14C-analysis: Natural vinegar currently gives values of greater than 112% of modern activity; petrochemical acetic acid yields values of 0% of modern activity. Apple cider vinegar can be distinguished from corn-derived vinegar by delta 13C-analysis: Cider vinegar gives delta 13C-values near -26%; corn-derived vinegars yield delta 13C-values near -10%. These techniques are applied to a series of retail vinegars

  5. Allochthonous carbon hypothesis for bulk OM and n-alkane PETM carbon isotope discrepancies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baczynski, A. A.; McInerney, F. A.; Wing, S. L.; Kraus, M. J.; Fricke, H. C.

    2011-12-01

    The Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM), a period of abrupt, transient, and large-scale global warming fueled by a large release of isotopically light carbon, is a relevant analogue for episodes of rapid global warming and recovery. The PETM is recorded in pedogenic carbonate, bulk organic matter, and n-alkanes as a prominent negative carbon isotope excursion (CIE) in paleosols exposed in the Bighorn Basin, WY. Here we present a composite stable carbon isotope record from n-alkanes and dispersed soil organic δ13C records from five individual sections that span the PETM in the southeastern Bighorn Basin. Four sections are from a 10km transect in the Cabin Fork area and one section was collected at Sand Creek Divide. These five new dispersed organic carbon (DOC) isotope records are compared to the previously published Polecat Bench (Magioncalda et al. 2004) and Honeycombs (Yans et al. 2006) isotope records. The high-resolution n-alkane curve shows an abrupt, negative shift in δ13C values, an extended CIE body, and a rapid recovery to more positive δ13C values. Although the five DOC records show similarly abrupt negative shifts in δ13C values, the DOC CIEs are compressed, smaller in magnitude, and return to more positive δ13C values more gradually relative to the n-alkane record. Moreover, the stratigraphic thickness of the body of the excursion and the pattern of the recovery phase are not consistent among the five DOC records. We modeled predicted DOC δ13C values from the n-alkane record by applying enrichment factors based on modern plants to the n-alkane δ13C values. The anomaly, difference between the expected and observed DOC δ13C values, was calculated for the PETM records and compared to weight percent carbon and grain size. There is no correlation between pre- and post-PETM anomaly values and grain size or weight percent carbon. PETM anomaly values, however, do trend with both grain size and weight percent carbon. The largest PETM anomaly values

  6. Organic carbon isotopes of the Sinian and Early Cambrian black shales on Yangtze Platform, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李任伟; 卢家烂; 张淑坤; 雷加锦

    1999-01-01

    Organic matter of the Sinian and early Cambrian black shales on the Yangtze Platform belongs to the light carbon group of isotopes with the δ13C values from - 27 % to -35 % , which are lower than those of the contemporaneously deposited carbonates and phosphorites. A carbon isotope-stratified paleooceanographic model caused by upwelling is proposed, which can be used not only to interpret the characteristics of organic carbon isotopic compositions of the black shales, but also to interpret the paleogeographic difference in the organic carbon isotope compositions of various types of sedimentary rocks.

  7. Isotope analysis (δ13C of pulpy whole apple juice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Figueira

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to develop the method of isotope analysis to quantify the carbon of C3 photosynthetic cycle in pulpy whole apple juice and to measure the legal limits based on Brazilian legislation in order to identify the beverages that do not conform to the Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock and Food Supply (MAPA. This beverage was produced in a laboratory according to the Brazilian law. Pulpy juices adulterated by the addition of sugarcane were also produced. The isotope analyses measured the relative isotope enrichment of the juices, their pulpy fractions (internal standard and purified sugar. From those results, the quantity of C3 source was estimated by means of the isotope dilution equation. To determine the existence of adulteration in commercial juices, it was necessary to create a legal limit according to the Brazilian law. Three brands of commercial juices were analyzed. One was classified as adulterated. The legal limit enabled to clearly identify the juice that was not in conformity with the Brazilian law. The methodology developed proved efficient for quantifying the carbon of C3 origin in commercial pulpy apple juices.

  8. 碳同位素技术在碳质气溶胶源解析中应用的研究进展%The Use of Carbon Isotope Analysis in Source Apportionment of Carbonaceous Aerosols: A Review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张世春; 王毅勇; 童全松

    2013-01-01

    概述了国内外14C和13C技术在大气碳质气溶胶源解析中应用的研究进展,指出14C在碳质气溶胶源解析研究中具有不可替代的独特优势,联合采用14C和13C技术有利于解决多种排放源的区分问题;随着碳质气溶胶组分分离技术的进步,对有机碳(0C)和黑碳(BC)等组分中14C的研究获得重要进展;除需深入研究13C的分馏机制外,建立各种排放源在不同区域的δ13C值域“特征谱”的重要性也日益突出;结合14C和13C以外的其他示踪剂、模型和分析方法将提供更多关于气溶胶来源的信息,并减小来源贡献率估算的不确定性.%The observation and source apportionment of carbonaceous aerosols is one of the focus of studies in the current scientific community. Radioactive (14C) and stable (13C) carbon isotopes have become useful tools in the source apportionment studies for carbonaceous aerosols. In this paper, we review the recent development of carbon isotope techniques, and explore its potential to be used for source apportionment for carbonaceous aerosols. It was pointed out that 14C has unique advantages in the quantitative distinguishment between fossil fuel and contemporary biomass combustion sources of atmospheric Organic Carbon (0C) and Black Carbon ( BC) , and that the combined C- C analysis can better constrain the sources of carbonaceous aerosols. Recent progress towards isolating OC and BC from other components of the particles has made it appicable to perform C measurements for OC and BC seperately. As for 13C, it was proposed that while it is very important to investigate the isotopic fraetionation mechanism of δ13C values of the carbonaceous aerosols, a regional δ13C signature map for the carbonacoues aerosols should be biult up aiming to facilitate explaining the δ13C variations and hence constraining the emisson sources. Future research that uses these carbon isotope techniques, in conjunction with other means such as

  9. Carbon isotopes in the ocean model of the Community Earth System Model (CESM1)

    OpenAIRE

    A. Jahn; Lindsay, K; Giraud, X.; Gruber, N.; Otto-Bliesner, B. L.; Liu, Z.; E. C. Brady

    2014-01-01

    Carbon isotopes in the ocean are frequently used as paleo climate proxies and as present-day geochemical ocean tracers. In order to allow a more direct comparison of climate model results with this large and currently underutilized dataset, we added a carbon isotope module to the ocean model of the Community Earth System Model (CESM), containing the cycling of the stable isotope 13C and the radioactive isotope 14C. We implemented the 14C tracer in two ways: in the "ab...

  10. Carbon isotopes in the ocean model of the Community Earth System Model (CESM1)

    OpenAIRE

    A. Jahn; Lindsay, K; Giraud, X.; Gruber, N.; Otto-Bliesner, B. L.; Liu, Z.; E. C. Brady

    2015-01-01

    Carbon isotopes in the ocean are frequently used as paleoclimate proxies and as present-day geochemical ocean tracers. In order to allow a more direct comparison of climate model results with this large and currently underutilized data set, we added a carbon isotope module to the ocean model of the Community Earth System Model (CESM), containing the cycling of the stable isotope 13C and the radioactive isotope 14C. We implemented the 14C tracer in two ways: in the "ab...

  11. Control strategies for laser separation of carbon isotopes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V Parthasarathy; A K Nayak; S K Sarkar

    2002-12-01

    Laser isotope separation (LIS) by infrared laser chemistry of polyatomic molecules has come a long way since its discovery. The last decade has seen considerable efforts in scaling up of the process for light elements like carbon, oxygen and silicon. These efforts aim at ways to improve both the enrichment factor and the throughput. The achievement is quite significant especially for carbon isotope separation wherein macroscopic operating scales have been realized. We report our studies on the IR laser chemistry of two promising systems, viz. neat CF2HCl and CF3Br/Cl2. We have investigated conditions for optimizing the dissociation yield and selectivity using natural samples containing 1.1 % C-13. We also highlight our current efforts for scaling up the process. These include the design aspects of a photochemical reactor with multipass refocusing Herriott optics for efficient photon utilization, development of a cryogenic distillation set up and a preparative gas chromatograph for large scale separation/collection of the isotopically enriched photoproduct in the post-irradiation stage.

  12. Carbon and oxygen isotopes in apatite CO2 and co-existing calcite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon and oxygen isotopes were analyzed in carbonate apatite CO2 and in co-existing calcite. Both C and O in apatite CO2 are enriched in the respective light isotopes relative to calcite. These results confirm the proposition that carbonate is part of the apatite structure

  13. Stable isotope composition of atmospheric carbon monoxide. A modelling study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study aims at an improved understanding of the stable carbon and oxygen isotope composition of the carbon monoxide (CO) in the global atmosphere by means of numerical simulations. At first, a new kinetic chemistry tagging technique for the most complete parameterisation of isotope effects has been introduced into the Modular Earth Submodel System (MESSy) framework. Incorporated into the ECHAM/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry (EMAC) general circulation model, an explicit treatment of the isotope effects on the global scale is now possible. The expanded model system has been applied to simulate the chemical system containing up to five isotopologues of all carbon- and oxygen-bearing species, which ultimately determine the δ13C, δ18O and Δ17O isotopic signatures of atmospheric CO. As model input, a new stable isotope-inclusive emission inventory for the relevant trace gases has been compiled. The uncertainties of the emission estimates and of the resulting simulated mixing and isotope ratios have been analysed. The simulated CO mixing and stable isotope ratios have been compared to in-situ measurements from ground-based observatories and from the civil-aircraft-mounted CARIBIC-1 measurement platform. The systematically underestimated 13CO/12CO ratios of earlier, simplified modelling studies can now be partly explained. The EMAC simulations do not support the inferences of those studies, which suggest for CO a reduced input of the highly depleted in 13C methane oxidation source. In particular, a high average yield of 0.94 CO per reacted methane (CH4) molecule is simulated in the troposphere, to a large extent due to the competition between the deposition and convective transport processes affecting the CH4 to CO reaction chain intermediates. None of the other factors, assumed or disregarded in previous studies, however hypothesised to have the potential in enriching tropospheric CO in 13C, were found significant when explicitly simulated. The inaccurate surface

  14. Stable carbon isotope fractionation during the biodegradation of lambda-cyhalothrin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Xiaoli [MOE Key Laboratory of Environmental Remediation and Ecosystem Health, College of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Department of Environmental Engineering, Quzhou University, Quzhou 324000 (China); Xu, Zemin [MOE Key Laboratory of Environmental Remediation and Ecosystem Health, College of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Zhang, Xichang [Laboratory for Teaching in Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Yang, Fangxing, E-mail: fxyang@zju.edu.cn [MOE Key Laboratory of Environmental Remediation and Ecosystem Health, College of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Department of Effect-Directed Analysis, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research — UFZ, Leipzig 04318 (Germany)

    2015-11-01

    In this study, the microbial degradation of lambda-cyhalothrin in soil was investigated using compound-specific stable isotope analysis. The results revealed that lambda-cyhalothrin was biodegraded in soil under laboratory conditions. The half-lives of lambda-cyhalothrin were determined to be 49 and 161 days in non-sterile and sterile soils spiked with 2 mg/kg lambda-cyhalothrin and 84 and 154 days in non-sterile and sterile soils spiked with 10 mg/kg lambda-cyhalothrin, respectively. The biodegradation of lambda-cyhalothrin resulted in carbon isotope fractionation, which shifted from − 29.0‰ to − 26.5‰ in soil spiked with 2 mg/kg lambda-cyhalothrin, and to − 27.5‰ with 10 mg/kg lambda-cyhalothrin. A relationship was established between the stable carbon isotope fraction and the residual concentrations of lambda-cyhalothrin by the Rayleigh equation in which the carbon isotope enrichment factor ε of the microbial degradation of lambda-cyhalothrin in the soil was calculated as − 2.53‰. This study provides an approach to quantitatively evaluate the biodegradation of lambda-cyhalothrin in soil in field studies. - Highlights: • Abiotic and biotic degradation of lambda-cyhalothrin were observed in soil. • Biodegradation of lambda-cyhalothrin was evaluated by CSIA. • Biodegradation of lambda-cyhalothrin leads to carbon isotope fractionation. • An enrichment factor ε of lambda-cyhalothrin was determined as − 2.53‰.

  15. Carbon and Oxygen Isotope Measurements of Ordinary Chondrite (OC) Meteorites from Antarctica Indicate Distinct Terrestrial Carbonate Species using a Stepped Acid Extraction Procedure Impacting Mars Carbonate Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, M. E.; Niles, P. B.; Locke, D.

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to characterize the stable isotope values of terrestrial, secondary carbonate minerals from five OC meteorites collected in Antarctica. These samples were selected for analysis based upon their size and collection proximity to known Martian meteorites. They were also selected based on petrologic type (3+) such that they were likely to be carbonate-free before falling to Earth. This study has two main tasks: 1) characterize the isotopic composition of terrestrial, secondary carbonate minerals formed on meteorites in Antarctica, and 2) study the mechanisms of carbonate formation in cold and arid environments with Antarctica as an analog for Mars. Two samples from each meteorite, each ~0.5g, was crushed and dissolved in pure phosphoric acid for 3 sequential reactions: a) Rx0 for 1 hour at 30°C, b) Rx1 for 18 hours at 30°C, and c) Rx2 for 3 hours at 150°C. CO2 was distilled by freezing with liquid nitrogen from each sample tube, then separated from organics and sulfides with a TRACE GC using a Restek HayeSep Q 80/100 6' 2mm stainless column, and then analyzed on a Thermo MAT 253 IRMS in Dual Inlet mode. This system was built at NASA/JSC over the past 3 years and proof tested with known carbonate standards to develop procedures, assess yield, and quantify expected uncertainties. Two distinct species of carbonates are found based on the stepped extraction technique: 1) Ca-rich carbonate released at low temperatures, and 2) Mg, or Fe-rich carbonate released at high temperatures. Preliminary results indicate that most of the carbonates present in the ordinary chondrites analyzed have δ13C=+5‰, which is consistent with formation from atmospheric CO2 δ13C=-7‰ at -20°C. The oxygen isotopic compositions of the carbonates vary between +4‰ and +34‰ with the Mg-rich and/or Fe-rich carbonates possessing the lowest δ18O values. This suggests that the carbonates formed under a wide range of temperatures. However, the carbonate oxygen

  16. Stable carbon isotope fractionation in pollen of Atlas cedar: first steps towards a new palaeoecological proxy for Northwest Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Benjamin; Fletcher, William; Ryan, Peter; Grant, Helen; Ilmen, Rachid

    2016-04-01

    Analysis of stable carbon isotopes can provide information on climate and the environmental conditions at different growth stages of the plant, both past and present. Carbon isotope discrimination in plant tissue is already well understood, and can be used as a drought stress indicator for semi-arid regions. Stable carbon isotope ratios measured directly on pollen provides the potential for the development of long-term environmental proxies (spanning thousands of years), as pollen is well preserved in the environment. Atlas Cedar (Cedrus atlantica Endl. Manetti ex Carrière), is an ideal test case to develop a pollen stable carbon isotope proxy. The tree grows across a wide altitudinal and climatic range and is extremely sensitive to moisture availability. The pollen is abundant, and easily identifiable to the species level in pollen analysis because different cedar species are geographically confined to different regions of the world. In 2015 we sampled 76 individual cedar trees across latitudinal, altitudinal and environmental gradients, highly focused on the Middle Atlas region of Morocco, with 25 additional samples from botanical gardens across Europe and the US to extend these gradients. Here, we report new stable carbon isotope data from pollen, leaf and stem wood from these samples with a view to assessing and quantifying species-specific fractionation effects associated with pollen production. The isotopic response of individual trees at local and wider geographical scales to altitude and climatic conditions is presented. This research forms part of an ongoing PhD project working to develop and calibrate a modern carbon isotope proxy in Atlas cedar pollen, which can ultimately be applied to fossil sequences and complement existing multi-proxy records (e.g. pollen analysis in lake sediments, tree-rings).

  17. Principles of isotopic analysis by mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of magnetic sector field mass spectrometers in isotopic analysis, especially for nitrogen gas, is outlined. Two measuring methods are pointed out: the scanning mode for significantly enriched samples and the double collector method for samples near the natural abundance of 15N. The calculation formulas are derived and advice is given for corrections. (author)

  18. Isotopic neutron sources for neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This User's Manual is an attempt to provide for teaching and training purposes, a series of well thought out demonstrative experiments in neutron activation analysis based on the utilization of an isotopic neutron source. In some cases, these ideas can be applied to solve practical analytical problems. 19 refs, figs and tabs

  19. Environmental impact and magnitude of paleosol carbonate carbon isotope excursions marking five early Eocene hyperthermals in the Bighorn Basin, Wyoming

    OpenAIRE

    Abels, Hemmo A.; Lauretano, Vittoria; van Yperen, Anna E.; Hopman, Tarek; Zachos, James C.; Lourens, Lucas J.; Gingerich, Philip D.; Gabriel J Bowen

    2016-01-01

    Transient greenhouse warming events in the Paleocene and Eocene were associated with the addition of isotopically light carbon to the exogenic atmosphere–ocean carbon system, leading to substantial environmental and biotic change. The magnitude of an accompanying carbon isotope excursion (CIE) can be used to constrain both the sources and amounts of carbon released during an event and also to correlate marine and terrestrial records with high precision. The Paleocene–Eocene ...

  20. A global deglacial negative carbon isotope excursion in speleothem calcite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breecker, D.

    2015-12-01

    δ13C values of speleothem calcite decreased globally during the last deglaciation defining a carbon isotope excursion (CIE) despite relatively constant δ13C values of carbon in the ocean-atmosphere system. The magnitude of the CIE varied with latitude, increasing poleward from ~2‰ in the tropics to as much as 7‰ at high latitudes. This recent CIE provides an interesting comparison with CIEs observed in deep time. A substantial portion of this CIE can be explained by the increase in atmospheric pCO2 that accompanied deglaciation. The dependence of C3 plant δ13C values on atmospheric pCO2 predicts a 2‰ δ13C decrease driven by the deglacial pCO2 increase. I propose that this signal was transferred to caves and thus explains nearly 100% of the CIE magnitude observed in the tropics and no less than 30% at the highest latitudes in the compilation. An atmospheric pCO2 control on speleothem δ13C values, if real, will need to be corrected for using ice core data before δ13C records can be interpreted in a paleoclimate context. The decrease in the magnitude of the equilibrium calcite-CO2 carbon isotope fractionation factor explains a maximum of 1‰ of the CIE at the highest northern latitude in the compilation, which experienced the largest deglacial warming. Much of the residual extratropical CIE was likely driven by increasing belowground respiration rates, which were presumably pronounced at high latitudes as glacial retreat exposed fresh surfaces and/or vegetation density increased. The largest increases in belowground respiration would have therefore occurred at the highest latitudes, explaining the meridional trend. This work supports the notion that increases in atmospheric pCO2 and belowground respiration rates can result in large CIEs recorded in terrestrial carbonates, which, as previously suggested, may explain the magnitude of the PETM CIE as recorded by paleosol carbonates.

  1. Applications of isotopic tracer in analysis of residual sulfonylurea herbicide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The analysis technique of the agrochemical residue by isotopic tracer is significantly increased, and obtained substantial development. The progress of the isotopic analysis in four kinds of sulfonylurea herbicide residues was reviewed in this paper. (authors)

  2. Carbon isotope excursions in paleosol carbonate marking five early Eocene hyperthermals in the Bighorn Basin, Wyoming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. A. Abels

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Transient greenhouse warming events in the Paleocene and Eocene were associated with the addition of isotopically-light carbon to the exogenic atmosphere–ocean carbon pool, leading to substantial environmental and biotic change. The magnitude of an accompanying carbon isotope excursion (CIE can be used to constrain both the sources and amounts of carbon released during an event, as well as to correlate marine and terrestrial records with high precision. The Paleocene Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM is well documented, but CIE records for the subsequent warming events are still rare especially from the terrestrial realm. Here, we provide new CIE records for two of the smaller hyperthermal events, I1 and I2, in paleosol carbonate, as well as two additional records of ETM2 and H2 in the Bighorn Basin. Stratigraphic comparison of this expanded, high-resolution terrestrial carbon isotope record to the deep-sea benthic foraminifera records from ODP Sites 1262 and 1263, Walvis Ridge, in the southern Atlantic Ocean corroborates that the Bighorn Basin fluvial sediments record global atmospheric change. The stratigraphic thicknesses of the eccentricity-driven hyperthermals in these archives are in line with precession-forcing of the 7 m thick fluvial overbank-avulsion sedimentary cycles. Using the CALMAG bulk oxide mean annual precipitation proxy, we reconstruct similar or slightly wetter than background soil moisture contents during the four younger hyperthermals, in contrast to drying observed during the PETM. Soil carbonate CIEs vary in magnitude proportionally with the marine CIEs for the four smaller early Eocene hyperthermals. This relationship breaks down for the PETM, with the soil carbonate CIE ~ 2–4‰ less than expected if all five linearly relate to marine CIEs. If the PETM CO2 forcing was similar but scaled to the younger hyperthermals, photosynthetic isotope fractionation or soil environmental factors are needed to explain this anomaly. We

  3. A molecular organic carbon isotope record of Miocene climate changes

    OpenAIRE

    Schoell, M.; Schouten, S.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; J. W. de Leeuw; Summons, R. E.

    1994-01-01

    The difference in carbon-13 (13C) contents of hopane and sterane biomarkers in the Monterey formation (Naples Beach, California) parallels the Miocene inorganic record of the change in 18O (δ18O), reflecting the Miocene evolution from a well-mixed to a highly stratified photic zone (upper 100 meters) in the Pacific. Steranes (δ13C = 25.4 ± 0.7 per mil versus the Pee Dee belemnite standard) from shallow photic-zone organisms do not change isotopically throughout the Miocene. In contrast, sulfu...

  4. Isotopic evidence of magmatism and a sedimentary carbon source at the Endeavour hydrothermal system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, T A; Proskurowski, G; Lilley, M D

    2004-01-07

    Stable and radiocarbon isotope measurements made on CO{sub 2} from high temperature hydrothermal vents on the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge indicate both magmatic and sedimentary sources of carbon to the hydrothermal system. The Endeavour segment is devoid of overlying sediments and has shown no observable signs of surficial magmatic activity during the {approx}20 years of ongoing studies. The appearance of isotopically heavy, radiocarbon dead CO{sub 2} after a 1999 earthquake swarm requires that this earthquake event was magmatic in origin. Evidence for a sedimentary organic carbon source suggests the presence of buried sediments at the ridge axis. These findings, which represent the first temporally coherent set of radiocarbon measurements from hydrothermal vent fluids, demonstrate the utility of radiocarbon analysis in hydrothermal studies. The existence of a sediment source at Endeavour and the occurrence of magmatic episodes illustrate the extremely complex and evolving nature of the Endeavour hydrothermal system.

  5. Compound-specific isotope analysis as a tool to characterize biodegradation of ethylbenzene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorer, C.; Vogt, C.; Kleinsteuber, S.; Stams, A.J.M.; Richnow, H.H.

    2014-01-01

    This study applied one- and two-dimensional compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) for the elements carbon and hydrogen to assess different means of microbial ethylbenzene activation. Cultures incubated under nitrate-reducing conditions showed significant carbon and highly pronounced hydrogen iso

  6. Carbon isotope excursions across the Permian-Triassic boundary in the Meishan section, Zhejiang Province, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Both gradual and sharp decrease in organic and carbonate carbon isotope values were detected across the Permian-Triassic boundary in the Meishan section, Changxing, Zhejiang Province, China. The gradual decrease in organic carbon isotope values started at the bottom of Bed 23, coinciding with the strong oscillations of total organic carbon (TOC) contents, indicates increasing fluxes from carbonate to organic carbon reservoir during this interval. A 2.3‰ sharp drop of inorganic carbon isotope values occurred at the uppermost part of Bed 24e. A 3.7‰ sharp drop of organic carbon isotope values occurred in Bed 26. The dramatic drop of inorganic carbon isotope value of 8‰ reported previously is not confirmed from the unweathered carbonate samples in Bed 27. The large-scale fluctuation of organic carbon isotope values in the Yinkeng Formation reflects different extent of mixing of marine and terrestrial organic matters. The gradual depletion and subsequent sharp drop of carbon isotopes near the Permian-Triassic boundary might indicate complex causes of the end-Permian mass extinction.

  7. Constraints on Phanerozoic paleotemperature and seawater oxygen isotope evolution from the carbonate clumped isotope compositions of Late Paleozoic marine fossils (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henkes, G. A.; Passey, B. H.; Grossman, E. L.; Pérez-Huerta, A.; Shenton, B.; Yancey, T. E.

    2013-12-01

    A long-standing geoscience controversy has been the interpretation of the observed several per mil increase in the oxygen isotope compositions of marine calcites over the Phanerozoic Eon. Explanations for this trend have included decreasing seawater paleotemperatures, increasing seawater oxygen isotope values, and post-depositional calcite alteration. Carbonate clumped isotope paleothermometry is a useful geochemical tool to test these hypotheses because of its lack of dependence on the bulk isotopic composition of the water from which carbonate precipitated. This technique is increasingly applied to ancient marine invertebrate shells, which can be screened for diagenesis using chemical and microstructural approaches. After several years of clumped isotope analysis of these marine carbonates in a handful of laboratories, a long-term temperature and isotopic trend is emerging, with the results pointing to relatively invariant seawater δ18O and generally decreasing seawater temperatures through the Phanerozoic. Uncertainties remain, however, including the effects of reordering of primary clumped isotope compositions via solid-state diffusion of C and O through the mineral lattice at elevated burial temperatures over hundred million year timescales. To develop a quantitative understanding of such reordering, we present data from laboratory heating experiments of late Paleozoic brachiopod calcite. When combined with kinetic models of the reordering reaction, the results of these experiments suggest that burial temperatures less than ~120 °C allow for preservation of primary brachiopod clumped isotope compositions over geological timescales. Analyses of well-preserved Carboniferous and Permian brachiopods reinforce these results by showing that shells with apparent clumped isotope temperatures of ~150 °C are associated with deep sedimentary burial (>5 km), whereas those with putatively primary paleotemperatures in the 10-30 °C range experienced no more than ~1.5 km

  8. Beyond temperature: Clumped isotope signatures in dissolved inorganic carbon species and the influence of solution chemistry on carbonate mineral composition

    OpenAIRE

    Tripati, Aradhna K.; Hill, Pamela S.; Eagle, Robert A.; Mosenfelder, Jed L.; Tang, Jianwu; Schauble, Edwin A.; Eiler, John M.; Zeebe, Richard E.; Uchikawa, Joji; Coplen, Tyler B.; Ries, Justin B; Henry, Drew

    2015-01-01

    “Clumped-isotope” thermometry is an emerging tool to probe the temperature history of surface and subsurface environments based on measurements of the proportion of ^(13)C and ^(18)O isotopes bound to each other within carbonate minerals in ^(13)C^(18)O^(16)O_2^(2−) groups (heavy isotope “clumps”). Although most clumped isotope geothermometry implicitly presumes carbonate crystals have attained lattice equilibrium (i.e., thermodynamic equilibrium for a mineral, which is independent of solutio...

  9. Carbon isotope fractionation of sapropelic organic matter during early diagenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiker, E. C.; Hatcher, P.G.

    1984-01-01

    Study of an algal, sapropelic sediment from Mangrove Lake, Bermuda shows that the mass balance of carbon and stable carbon isotopes in the major organic constituents is accounted for by a relatively straightforward model of selective preservation during diagenesis. The loss of 13C-enriched carbohydrates is the principal factor controlling the intermolecular mass balance of 13C in the sapropel. Results indicate that labile components are decomposed leaving as a residual concentrate in the sediment an insoluble humic substance that may be an original biochemical component of algae and associated bacteria. An overall decrease of up to about 4??? in the ?? 13C values of the organic matter is observed as a result of early diagenesis. ?? 1984.

  10. Carbon isotopes and water use efficiency in C4 plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellsworth, Patrick Z; Cousins, Asaph B

    2016-06-01

    Drought is a major agricultural problem worldwide. Therefore, selection for increased water use efficiency (WUE) in food and biofuel crop species will be an important trait in plant breeding programs. The leaf carbon isotopic composition (δ(13)Cleaf) has been suggested to serve as a rapid and effective high throughput phenotyping method for WUE in both C3 and C4 species. This is because WUE, leaf carbon discrimination (Δ(13)Cleaf), and δ(13)Cleaf are correlated through their relationships with intercellular to ambient CO2 partial pressures (Ci/Ca). However, in C4 plants, changing environmental conditions may influence photosynthetic efficiency (bundle-sheath leakiness) and post-photosynthetic fractionation that will potentially alter the relationship between δ(13)Cleaf and Ci/Ca. Here we discuss how these factors influence the relationship between δ(13)Cleaf and WUE, and the potential of using δ(13)Cleaf as a meaningful proxy for WUE.

  11. Mantle Degassing and Diamond Genesis:A Carbon Isotope Perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑永飞

    1994-01-01

    The effect of Co2 and CH4 degassing from the mantle on the carbon isotopic composition of diamond has been quantitatively modeled in terms of the principles of Rayleigh distillation.Assuming the δ13 C value of -5‰ for the mantle,the outgassing of CO2 can result in the large negative δ13 C values of diamond,whereas the outgassing of CH4 can drive the δ13C values of diamond in the positive direction.The theoretical expectations can be used to explain the full range of δ13 C values from-34.4‰5 to+5‰ observed for natural diamonds.It is possible that diamond formation was triggered by the degassing of Co2 and/or CH4 from the mantle and the associated fractional crystallization of carbonate-bearing melt.

  12. A molecular organic carbon isotope record of miocene climate changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoell, M; Schouten, S; Damsté, J S; de Leeuw, J W; Summons, R E

    1994-02-25

    The difference in carbon-13 ((13)C) contents of hopane and sterane biomarkers in the Monterey formation (Naples Beach, California) parallels the Miocene inorganic record of the change in (18)O (delta(18)O), reflecting the Miocene evolution from a well-mixed to a highly stratified photic zone (upper 100 meters) in the Pacific. Steranes (delta(13)C = 25.4 +/- 0.7 per mil versus the Pee Dee belemnite standard) from shallow photic-zone organisms do not change isotopically throughout the Miocene. In contrast, sulfur-bound C(35) hopanes (likely derived from bacterial plankton living at the base of the photic zone) have systematically decreasing (13)C concentrations in Middle and Late Miocene samples (delta(13)C = -29.5 to -31.5 per mil), consistent with the Middle Miocene formation of a carbon dioxide-rich cold water mass at the base of the photic zone. PMID:17831625

  13. Isotope effects for carbon and hydrogen with bacterial oxidation of oils and certain petroleum hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mekhtiyeva, V.L.; Guriyeva, S.M.; Kondrat' yeva, G.F.

    1983-01-01

    Results are presented of experiments on bacterial oxidation of oils, decane and hexadecane. Oxidation of oils was done by natural biocenosis isolated from bed waters, hydrocarbons by pure culture of bacteria from the river Pseudomonas. As a result of bacterial transformation, the methane oils were enriched with the isotope C/sup 12/, the methane-naphthene by isotope C/sup 13/. The carbon dioxide formed during oxidation of oils was fairly close in deltaC/sup 13/ values to the original oils. The oils exposed to biodegradation in aerobic conditions were enriched with deuterium, in anaerobic--they were slightly depleted. With oxidation of individual hydrocarbons, the isotope effects for carbon were extremely small, and for hydrogen were missing altogether. As a result of analysis of the presented data, as well as the previously published materials, conclusions were drawn about the nature of the isotope effects with bacterial oxidation of the oils and scales were defined with different degree of oxidation of the oils.

  14. Carbon isotope fractionation by thermophilic phototrophic sulfur bacteria: evidence for autotrophic growth in natural populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madigan, M. T.; Takigiku, R.; Lee, R. G.; Gest, H.; Hayes, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    Purple phototrophic bacteria of the genus Chromatium can grow as either photoautotrophs or photoheterotrophs. To determine the growth mode of the thermophilic Chromatium species, Chromatium tepidum, under in situ conditions, we have examined the carbon isotope fractionation patterns in laboratory cultures of this organism and in mats of C. tepidum which develop in sulfide thermal springs in Yellowstone National Park. Isotopic analysis (13C/12C) of total carbon, carotenoid pigments, and bacteriochlorophyll from photoautotrophically grown cultures of C. tepidum yielded 13C fractionation factors near -20%. Cells of C. tepidum grown on excess acetate, wherein synthesis of the Calvin cycle enzyme ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase) was greatly repressed, were isotopically heavier, fractionation factors of ca. -7% being observed. Fractionation factors determined by isotopic analyses of cells and pigment fractions of natural populations of C. tepidum growing in three different sulfide thermal springs in Yellowstone National Park were approximately -20%, indicating that this purple sulfur bacterium grows as a photoautotroph in nature.

  15. Carbon isotope fluctuations in Precambrian carbonate sequences of several localities in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    SIAL ALCIDES N.; FERREIRA VALDEREZ P.; DEALMEIDA AFONSO R.; ROMANO ANTONIO W.; PARENTE CLOVIS V.; DACOSTA MARCONDES L.; SANTOS VICTOR H.

    2000-01-01

    Carbon isotope fluctuations in Precambrian sedimentary carbonates between 2.8 Ga and 0.60 Ga in Brazil are examined in this study. The carbonate facies of the BIF of the 2.8 Ga-old Carajás Formation, state of Pará in northern Brazil, has rather homogeneous delta13C (-5 o/ooPDB), compatible with carbonatization of a silicate protolith by a CO2-rich fluid from mantle degassing. The Paleoproterozoic Gandarela Formation, state of Minas Gerais, displays a narrow delta13C variation (-1.5 to +0.5 o/...

  16. Abundances in red giant stars - Carbon and oxygen isotopes in carbon-rich molecular envelopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wannier, P. G.; Sahai, R.

    1987-01-01

    Millimeter-wave observations have been made of isotopically substituted CO toward the envelopes of 11 carbon-rich stars. In every case, C-13O was detected and model calculations were used to estimate the C-12/C-13 abundance ratio. C-17O was detected toward three, and possibly four, envelopes, with sensitive upper limits for two others. The CO-18 variant was detected in two envelopes. New results include determinations of oxygen isotopic ratios in the two carbon-rich protoplanetary nebulae CRL 26688 and CRL 618. As with other classes of red giant stars, the carbon-rich giants seem to be significantly, though variably, enriched in O-17. These results, in combination with observations in interstellar molecular clouds, indicate that current knowledge of stellar production of the CNO nuclides is far from satisfactory.

  17. Chemical and carbon isotopic composition of dissolved organic carbon in a regional confined methanogenic aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aravena, R.; Wassenaar, L.I.; Spiker, E. C.

    2004-01-01

    This study demonstrates the advantage of a combined use of chemical and isotopic tools to understand the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) cycle in a regional confined methanogenic aquifer. DOC concentration and carbon isotopic data demonstrate that the soil zone is a primary carbon source of groundwater DOC in areas close to recharge zones. An in-situ DOC source linked to organic rich sediments present in the aquifer matrix is controlling the DOC pool in the central part of the groundwater flow system. DOC fractions, 13C-NMR on fulvic acids and 14C data on DOC and CH4 support the hypothesis that the in-situ DOC source is a terrestrial organic matter and discard the Ordovician bedrock as a source of DOC. ?? 2004 Taylor and Francis Ltd.

  18. Multi-isotope (carbon and chlorine) analysis for fingerprinting and site characterization at a fractured bedrock aquifer contaminated by chlorinated ethenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palau, Jordi; Marchesi, Massimo; Chambon, Julie Claire Claudia;

    2014-01-01

    The use of compound specific multi-isotope approach (C and Cl) in the characterization of a chlorinated ethenes contaminated fractured aquifer allows the identification of several sources and contaminant plumes, as well as the occurrence of biodegradation and mixing processes. The study site......, showed a wide range in δ13C values from − 15.6 to − 40.5‰ for TCE and from − 18.5 to − 32.4‰ for PCE, allowing the use of isotope fingerprinting for tracing of the origin and migration of these contaminants in the aquifer. In contrast, there is no difference between the δ37Cl values for TCE...... in the contaminant sources, ranging from + 0.53 to + 0.66‰. Variations of δ37Cl and δ13C in the different contaminant plumes were used to investigate the role of biodegradation in groundwater. Moreover, the isotopic data were incorporated into a reactive transport model for determination of whether the isotope...

  19. The thermal history of char as disclosed by carbon isotope ratios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egsgaard, Helge; Ambus, Per; Ahrenfeldt, Jesper;

    pyrolysis and isotope ratio mass spectrometry. The results demonstrate that the temperature history of the char is reflected in the fine variation of carbon isotopes. The compound classes responsible for the variation were identified. Key words: Isotope ratio, flash pyrolysis, hot gas cleaning...

  20. Stable carbon isotope depth profiles and soil organic carbon dynamics in the lower Mississippi Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynn, J.G.; Harden, J.W.; Fries, T.L.

    2006-01-01

    Analysis of depth trends of 13C abundance in soil organic matter and of 13C abundance from soil-respired CO2 provides useful indications of the dynamics of the terrestrial carbon cycle and of paleoecological change. We measured depth trends of 13C abundance from cropland and control pairs of soils in the lower Mississippi Basin, as well as the 13C abundance of soil-respired CO2 produced during approximately 1-year soil incubation, to determine the role of several candidate processes on the 13C depth profile of soil organic matter. Depth profiles of 13C from uncultivated control soils show a strong relationship between the natural logarithm of soil organic carbon concentration and its isotopic composition, consistent with a model Rayleigh distillation of 13C in decomposing soil due to kinetic fractionation during decomposition. Laboratory incubations showed that initially respired CO 2 had a relatively constant 13C content, despite large differences in the 13C content of bulk soil organic matter. Initially respired CO2 was consistently 13C-depleted with respect to bulk soil and became increasingly 13C-depleted during 1-year, consistent with the hypothesis of accumulation of 13C in the products of microbial decomposition, but showing increasing decomposition of 13C-depleted stable organic components during decomposition without input of fresh biomass. We use the difference between 13C / 12C ratios (calculated as ??-values) between respired CO 2 and bulk soil organic carbon as an index of the degree of decomposition of soil, showing trends which are consistent with trends of 14C activity, and with results of a two-pooled kinetic decomposition rate model describing CO2 production data recorded during 1 year of incubation. We also observed inconsistencies with the Rayleigh distillation model in paired cropland soils and reasons for these inconsistencies are discussed. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Variation in dietary histories among the immigrants of Machu Picchu: Carbon and nitrogen isotope evidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study estimates dietary composition during infancy and childhood among 71 adults interred at the site of Machu Picchu, a royal Inca estate in the southern highlands of Peru. Recent research suggests that the majority of individuals were members of the cosmopolitan yana and aclla servant classes, and immigrated to the site from different regions; individual dietary histories may have been similarly varied. Diet was estimated at multiple points in early life through characterization of carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios in tooth enamel and dentin, which preserve isotopic values from the first years of life. These data were compared to isotopic data from modern food samples, and analyzed using recently-published statistical models. A subset of individuals also has existing bone collagen isotopic data, which reflects diet from the last decade of life and thus permits comparison over the life course. Results indicate significant variation in enamel δ13C (approximately 12%o), dentin δ13C (approximately 9%o) and δ15N (approximately 8%o) between individuals across the study population. These findings suggest substantial variability in diet during infancy and childhood, and support interpretations that this population was primarily yanacona or mixed yanaconalacllacona. This study also highlights the utility of multi-tissue isotopic analysis in more nuanced reconstruction of diet in the ancient Andes

  2. The effects of atmospheric [CO2] on carbon isotope fractionation and magnesium incorporation into biogenic marine calcite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Veronica

    1997-01-01

    The influences of atmospheric carbon dioxide on the fractionation of carbon isotopes and the magnesium incorporation into biogenic marine calcite were investigated using samples of the calcareous alga Amphiroa and benthic foraminifer Sorites grown in the Biosphere 2 Ocean system under variable atmospheric CO2 concentrations (approximately 500 to 1200 ppm). Carbon isotope fractionation was studied in both the organic matter and the skeletal carbonate. Magnesium analysis was to be performed on the carbonate removed during decalcification. These data have not been collected due to technical problems. Carbon isotope data from Amphiroa yields a linear relation between [CO2] and Delta(sup 13)C(sub Corg)values suggesting that the fractionation of carbon isotopes during photosynthesis is positively correlated with atmospheric [CO2]. [CO2] and Delta(sup 13)C(sub Corg) values for Sorites produce a relation that is best described by a hyperbolic function where Delta(sup 13)C(sub Corg) values increase between 300 and 700 ppm and decrease from 700 to 1200 ppm. Further investigation of this relation and Sorites physiology is needed.

  3. Ion microprobe Sr isotope analysis of carbonates with about 5 {mu}m spatial resolution: An example from an ayu otolith

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sano, Yuji [Center for Advanced Marine Research, Ocean Research Institute, University of Tokyo, Nakano-ku, Tokyo 164-8639 (Japan)], E-mail: ysano@ori.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Shirai, Kotaro [International Coastal Research Center, Ocean Research Institute, University of Tokyo, Otsuchi, Iwate 028-1102 (Japan); Takahata, Naoto; Amakawa, Hiroshi [Center for Advanced Marine Research, Ocean Research Institute, University of Tokyo, Nakano-ku, Tokyo 164-8639 (Japan); Otake, Tsuguo [International Coastal Research Center, Ocean Research Institute, University of Tokyo, Otsuchi, Iwate 028-1102 (Japan)

    2008-08-15

    A high lateral resolution secondary ion mass spectrometer (NanoSIMS NS50 ion microprobe) has been used to measure {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratios in natural CaCO{sub 3} samples. A {approx}2 nA O{sup -} primary beam was used to sputter a 5-7-{mu}m diameter crater on the sample surface and secondary positive ions were extracted for mass analysis using an accelerating voltage of 8 kV and a Mattauch-Herzog geometry. The multi-collector system was adjusted to detect {sup 43}Ca{sup +} (by a detector EM2), {sup 80}Ca{sub 2}{sup +} (EM3), {sup 86}Sr{sup +} (EM4), and {sup 87}Sr{sup +} (EM4b) ions at the same time. Then the magnetic field was scanned for the EM4 to detect {sup 85}Rb{sup +}, {sup 86}Sr{sup +} and {sup 87}Sr{sup +}, while the EM4b can measure {sup 86}Sr{sup +}, {sup 87}Sr{sup +} and {sup 88}Sr{sup +}, respectively. A mass resolution of 3600 at 10% peak height was attained with a flat peak top, while the sensitivity of Sr was about 10 cps/nA/ppm. An aragonite sample (coral skeleton standard; JCp-1) was used as a reference for Sr isotope ratio calibration. Repeated analyses of the JCp-1 show that the {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratio agrees well with the seawater signature within a precision of 0.3 per mille at 2{sigma}, after the series of corrections such as the Ca dimer, {sup 87}Rb, and a mass bias estimated by the {sup 88}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratio. The method was applied to an otolith (ear-stone) from ayu (Plecoglossus altivelis altivelis) collected from the Yodo river, Japan. Although experimental errors are relatively large, up to 3 per mille at 2{sigma}, the ratios of the core region are higher than the seawater signature while more distal values agree well with seawater. The very outermost part again shows the relatively higher {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratios. The spatial variation of {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratios was consistent with amphidromous migration of the fish, namely, born in the lake and grown in the coastal sea and finally collected in a river.

  4. Carbon Isotope Composition of Mysids at a Terrestrial-Marine Ecotone, Clayoquot Sound, British Columbia, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulkins, L. M.; Jelinski, D. E.; Karagatzides, J. D.; Carr, A.

    2002-04-01

    The relative contribution of summertime terrestrial versus marine carbon to an estuary on coastal British Columbia, Canada was explored using stable carbon isotopic (δ 13C values) analysis of mysid crustaceans (Malacostraca: Peracarida: Mysidacea). We hypothesized that landscape linkages between the forested upland and adjacent inshore marine waters, via river, groundwater and overland flows, may influence carbon content and metabolism in the coastal zone. We sampled 14 stations spatially distributed in a grid and found δ 13C compositions of mysids ranged from -15·2 to -18·4‰. There was, however, no obvious spatial distribution of δ 13C values relative to the estuarine gradient in Cow Bay. Heavy tidal mixing is suggested to disperse marine and terrestrial carbon throughout the entire bay. From a temporal perspective however, mysid δ 13C signatures became enriched over the sampling period (mid-July to mid-August), which is representative of a stronger marine influence. This may arise because mysids are exposed to greater marine-derived carbon sources later in the summer, a decrease in freshwater input (and hence terrestrial carbon), changes in phytoplankton or macrophyte community structure, or that mysids preferentially feed on marine food sources. Overall, the recorded isotopic values are characteristic of marine organic carbon signatures suggesting that in summer, despite the proximity to shore, little or no terrestrial carbon penetrates the food web at the trophic level of mysids. This notwithstanding we believe there is a strong need for additional study of carbon flows at the marine-terrestrial interface, especially for disturbed watersheds.

  5. Carbon allocation and carbon isotope fluxes in the plant-soil-atmosphere continuum: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brüggemann, N.; Gessler, A.; Kayler, Z.; Keel, S. G.; Badeck, F.; Barthel, M.; Boeckx, P.; Buchmann, N.; Brugnoli, E.; Esperschütz, J.; Gavrichkova, O.; Ghashghaie, J.; Gomez-Casanovas, N.; Keitel, C.; Knohl, A.; Kuptz, D.; Palacio, S.; Salmon, Y.; Uchida, Y.; Bahn, M.

    2011-11-01

    The terrestrial carbon (C) cycle has received increasing interest over the past few decades, however, there is still a lack of understanding of the fate of newly assimilated C allocated within plants and to the soil, stored within ecosystems and lost to the atmosphere. Stable carbon isotope studies can give novel insights into these issues. In this review we provide an overview of an emerging picture of plant-soil-atmosphere C fluxes, as based on C isotope studies, and identify processes determining related C isotope signatures. The first part of the review focuses on isotopic fractionation processes within plants during and after photosynthesis. The second major part elaborates on plant-internal and plant-rhizosphere C allocation patterns at different time scales (diel, seasonal, interannual), including the speed of C transfer and time lags in the coupling of assimilation and respiration, as well as the magnitude and controls of plant-soil C allocation and respiratory fluxes. Plant responses to changing environmental conditions, the functional relationship between the physiological and phenological status of plants and C transfer, and interactions between C, water and nutrient dynamics are discussed. The role of the C counterflow from the rhizosphere to the aboveground parts of the plants, e.g. via CO2 dissolved in the xylem water or as xylem-transported sugars, is highlighted. The third part is centered around belowground C turnover, focusing especially on above- and belowground litter inputs, soil organic matter formation and turnover, production and loss of dissolved organic C, soil respiration and CO2 fixation by soil microbes. Furthermore, plant controls on microbial communities and activity via exudates and litter production as well as microbial community effects on C mineralization are reviewed. A further part of the paper is dedicated to physical interactions between soil CO2 and the soil matrix, such as CO2 diffusion and dissolution processes within the

  6. Carbon and oxygen isotopic ratios of carbon dioxide of a stratospheric profile over Japan

    OpenAIRE

    GAMO, Toshitaka; Tsutsumi, Makoto; SAKAI, Hitoshi; NAKAZAWA, Takakiyo; Tanaka, Masayuki; Honda, Hideyuki; Kubo, Haruya; ITOH, Tomizo

    2011-01-01

    Four stratospheric air samples from 19 to 25 km altitudes over Japan were collected by using a balloon-borne cryogenic sampling system to measure the vertical profiles of carbon and oxygen stable isotopic ratios of the lower stratospheric CO2. The δ13C value of the stratospheric CO2 increased with increasing altitude, while the CO2 mixing ratios decreased, in accordance with anthropogenic input of the isotopically light, fuel CO2 into the atmosphere. However, the relationship between δ13C an...

  7. Carbonate Chemistry and Isotope Characteristics of Groundwater of Ljubljansko Polje and Ljubljansko Barje Aquifers in Slovenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Ljubljansko polje and Ljubljansko Barje aquifers are the main groundwater resources for the needs of Ljubljana, the capital of Slovenia. Carbonate chemistry and isotope analysis of the groundwater were performed to acquire new hydrogeological data, which should serve as a base for improvement of hydrogeological conceptual models of both aquifers. A total of 138 groundwater samples were collected at 69 sampling locations from both aquifers. Major carbonate ions and the stable isotope of oxygen were used to identify differences in the recharging areas of aquifers. Four groups of groundwater were identified: (1) Ljubljansko polje aquifer, with higher Ca2+values, as limestone predominates in its recharge area, (2) northern part of Ljubljansko Barje aquifer, with prevailing dolomite in its recharge area, (3) central part of Ljubljansko Barje aquifer, which lies below surface cover of impermeable clay and is poor in carbonate, and (4) Brest and Iški vršaj aquifer in the southern part of Ljubljansko Barje with higher Mg2+ in groundwater and dolomite prevailing in its recharge area. The radioactive isotope tritium was also used to estimate the age of groundwater. Sampled groundwater is recent with tritium activity between 4 and 8 TU and residence time of up to 10 years. PMID:24453928

  8. Carbonate Chemistry and Isotope Characteristics of Groundwater of Ljubljansko Polje and Ljubljansko Barje Aquifers in Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja Cerar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ljubljansko polje and Ljubljansko Barje aquifers are the main groundwater resources for the needs of Ljubljana, the capital of Slovenia. Carbonate chemistry and isotope analysis of the groundwater were performed to acquire new hydrogeological data, which should serve as a base for improvement of hydrogeological conceptual models of both aquifers. A total of 138 groundwater samples were collected at 69 sampling locations from both aquifers. Major carbonate ions and the stable isotope of oxygen were used to identify differences in the recharging areas of aquifers. Four groups of groundwater were identified: (1 Ljubljansko polje aquifer, with higher Ca2+ values, as limestone predominates in its recharge area, (2 northern part of Ljubljansko Barje aquifer, with prevailing dolomite in its recharge area, (3 central part of Ljubljansko Barje aquifer, which lies below surface cover of impermeable clay and is poor in carbonate, and (4 Brest and Iški vršaj aquifer in the southern part of Ljubljansko Barje with higher Mg2+ in groundwater and dolomite prevailing in its recharge area. The radioactive isotope tritium was also used to estimate the age of groundwater. Sampled groundwater is recent with tritium activity between 4 and 8 TU and residence time of up to 10 years.

  9. Oxygen isotopes in nitrite: Analysis, calibration, and equilibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casciotti, K.L.; Böhlke, J.K.; McIlvin, M.R.; Mroczkowski, S.J.; Hannon, J.E.

    2007-01-01

    Nitrite is a central intermediate in the nitrogen cycle and can persist in significant concentrations in ocean waters, sediment pore waters, and terrestrial groundwaters. To fully interpret the effect of microbial processes on nitrate (NO3-), nitrite (NO2-), and nitrous oxide (N2O) cycling in these systems, the nitrite pool must be accessible to isotopic analysis. Furthermore, because nitrite interferes with most methods of nitrate isotopic analysis, accurate isotopic analysis of nitrite is essential for correct measurement of nitrate isotopes in a sample that contains nitrite. In this study, nitrite salts with varying oxygen isotopic compositions were prepared and calibrated and then used to test the denitrifier method for nitrite oxygen isotopic analysis. The oxygen isotopic fractionation during nitrite reduction to N2O by Pseudomonas aureofaciens was lower than for nitrate conversion to N2O, while oxygen isotopic exchange between nitrite and water during the reaction was similar. These results enable the extension of the denitrifier method to oxygen isotopic analysis of nitrite (in the absence of nitrate) and correction of nitrate isotopes for the presence of nitrite in "mixed" samples. We tested storage conditions for seawater and freshwater samples that contain nitrite and provide recommendations for accurate oxygen isotopic analysis of nitrite by any method. Finally, we report preliminary results on the equilibrium isotope effect between nitrite and water, which can play an important role in determining the oxygen isotopic value of nitrite where equilibration with water is significant. ?? 2007 American Chemical Society.

  10. A novel high-temperature combustion based system for stable isotope analysis of dissolved organic carbon in aqueous samples. : II optimization and assessment of analytical performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirkels, F. M. S. A.; Cerli, C.; Federherr, E.; Gao, J.; Kalbitz, K.

    2014-01-01

    RATIONALE: Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) plays an important role in carbon cycling, making precise and routine measurement of delta C-13 values and DOC concentration highly desirable. A new promising system has been developed for this purpose. However, broad-scale application of this new technique

  11. Simulation Experiments on the Reaction of CH4-CaSO4 and Its Carbon Kinetic Isotope Fractionation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YueChangtao; LiShuyuan; DingKangle; ZhongNingning

    2005-01-01

    Thermochemical sulfate reduction (TSR) in geological deposits can account for the accumulation of H,S in deep sour gas reservoirs. In this paper, thermal simulation experiments on the reaction of CH4-CaSO4 were carried out using an autoclave at high temperatures and high pressures. The products were characterized with analytical methods including carbon isotope analysis. It is found that the reaction can proceed to produce H2S, H2O and CaCO3 as the main products. Based on the experimental results, the carbon kinetic isotope fractionation was investigated, and the value of Ki(kinetic isotope effect) was calculated. The results obtained in this paper can provide useful information to explain the occurrence of H2S in deep carbonate gas reservoirs.

  12. Tracing organic matter sources of estuarine tidal flat nematodes with stable carbon isotopes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moens, T.; Luyten, C.; Middelburg, J.J.; Herman, P.M.J.; Vincx, M.

    2002-01-01

    The present study explores the use of stable carbon isotopes to trace organic matter sources of intertidal nematodes in the Schelde estuary (SW Netherlands). Stable carbon isotope signatures of nematodes from a saltmarsh and 4 tidal flat stations were determined in spring and winter situations, and

  13. Microbial degradation of alpha-cypermethrin in soil by compound-specific stable isotope analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Zemin [MOE Key Laboratory of Environmental Remediation and Ecosystem Health, College of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Shen, Xiaoli [MOE Key Laboratory of Environmental Remediation and Ecosystem Health, College of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Department of Environmental Engineering, Quzhou University, Quzhou 324000 (China); Zhang, Xi-Chang [Laboratory for Teaching in Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Liu, Weiping [MOE Key Laboratory of Environmental Remediation and Ecosystem Health, College of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Yang, Fangxing, E-mail: fxyang@zju.edu.cn [MOE Key Laboratory of Environmental Remediation and Ecosystem Health, College of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Department of Effect-Directed Analysis, Helmholtz Center for Environmental Research – UFZ, Leipzig 04318 (Germany)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Alpha-cypermethrin (α-CP) can be degraded by microorganisms in soil. • Biodegradation of α-CP resulted in carbon isotope fractionation. • A relationship was found between carbon isotope ratios and concentrations of α-CP. • An enrichment factor ϵ of α-CP was determined as −1.87‰. • CSIA is applicable to assess biodegradation of α-CP. - Abstract: To assess microbial degradation of alpha-cypermethrin in soil, attenuation of alpha-cypermethrin was investigated by compound-specific stable isotope analysis. The variations of the residual concentrations and stable carbon isotope ratios of alpha-cypermethrin were detected in unsterilized and sterilized soils spiked with alpha-cypermethrin. After an 80 days’ incubation, the concentrations of alpha-cypermethrin decreased to 0.47 and 3.41 mg/kg in the unsterilized soils spiked with 2 and 10 mg/kg, while those decreased to 1.43 and 6.61 mg/kg in the sterilized soils. Meanwhile, the carbon isotope ratios shifted to −29.14 ± 0.22‰ and −29.86 ± 0.33‰ in the unsterilized soils spiked with 2 and 10 mg/kg, respectively. The results revealed that microbial degradation contributed to the attenuation of alpha-cypermethrin and induced the carbon isotope fractionation. In order to quantitatively assess microbial degradation, a relationship between carbon isotope ratios and residual concentrations of alpha-cypermethrin was established according to Rayleigh equation. An enrichment factor, ϵ = −1.87‰ was obtained, which can be employed to assess microbial degradation of alpha-cypermethrin. The significant carbon isotope fractionation during microbial degradation suggests that CSIA is a proper approach to qualitatively detect and quantitatively assess the biodegradation during attenuation process of alpha-cypermethrin in the field.

  14. Long-range transport of continentally-derived particulate carbon in the marine atmosphere: evidence from stable carbon isotope studies

    OpenAIRE

    Cachier, Héléne; BUAT-MÉNARD, PATRICK; Fontugne, Michel; Chesselet, Roger

    2011-01-01

    Since 1979, we have investigated marine and non-marine sources of particulate carbon in the marine atmosphere from measurements of carbon concentration and isotopic composition 13C/12C). Aerosol samples were collected, mostly during the Sea/Air Exchange (SEAREX) Program experiments, in the northern and southern hemispheres (Sargasso Sea, Enewetak Atoll, Peru upwelling, American Samoa, New Zealand, Amsterdam Island). The concentration and the isotopic composition of particulate carbon of marin...

  15. Using Carbon Isotopes in Cenozoic Soil Carbonates to Quantify Primary Productivity from Mid-Latitude Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caves, J. K.; Kramer, S. H.; Ibarra, D. E.; Chamberlain, C. P.

    2015-12-01

    The carbon isotope composition of pedogenic carbonates (δ13Ccarb) from paleosols has been extensively used as a proxy to estimate atmospheric pCO2 over the Phanerozoic. However, a number of other factors - including the concentration of plant-respired CO2 and the isotopic composition of both atmospheric and plant-respired carbon - influence the δ13C of pedogenic carbonates. For example, δ13Ccarb records from the mid-latitudes in central Asia and western North America show increasing trends in δ13Ccarb despite decreasing pCO2 during the late Cenozoic, which suggests that other factors play an important role in determining the isotopic composition of pedogenic carbonates. Instead, we suggest that these records are primarily recording changes in primary productivity rather than changes in atmospheric pCO2 and therefore propose a novel use of paleosol carbonate records to understand paleo-ecosystem dynamics. Here, we compile existing paleosol carbonate records, and present three new records from Wyoming, to estimate soil respiration and primary productivity in western North America during the Paleogene and early Neogene. We observe both an overall increase in δ13Ccarb after the early Eocene, and spatially heterogeneous δ13Ccarb values across western US basins. We combine this δ13Ccarb data with compilations of atmospheric pCO2 to estimate soil respiration and plant productivity. The long-term increase in δ13Ccarb indicates a decrease in plant productivity as conditions became more arid across much of the western US, congruent with both records of regional uplift and of global cooling. Furthermore, significant spatial heterogeneity in δ13Ccarb indicates that regional factors, such as the presence of paleolakes and/or local paleotopography may have provided a second-order control on local and regional productivity. Thus, our results provide a first-order estimate linking changes in primary productivity with regional tectonics and global climatic change.

  16. Carbon isotope composition of latex does not reflect temporal variations of photosynthetic carbon isotope discrimination in rubber trees (Hevea brasiliensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanpanon, Nicha; Kasemsap, Poonpipope; Thaler, Philippe; Kositsup, Boonthida; Gay, Frédéric; Lacote, Régis; Epron, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    Latex, the cytoplasm of laticiferous cells localized in the inner bark of rubber trees (Hevea brasiliensis Müll. Arg.), is collected by tapping the bark. Following tapping, latex flows out of the trunk and is regenerated, whereas in untapped trees, there is no natural exudation. It is still unknown whether the carbohydrates used for latex regeneration in tapped trees is coming from recent photosynthates or from stored carbohydrates, and in the former case, it is expected that latex carbon isotope composition of tapped trees will vary seasonally, whereas latex isotope composition of untapped trees will be more stable. Temporal variations of carbon isotope composition of trunk latex (δ(13)C-L), leaf soluble compounds (δ(13)C-S) and bulk leaf material (δ(13)C-B) collected from tapped and untapped 20-year-old trees were compared. A marked difference in δ(13)C-L was observed between tapped and untapped trees whatever the season. Trunk latex from tapped trees was more depleted (1.6‰ on average) with more variable δ(13)C values than those of untapped trees. δ(13)C-L was higher and more stable across seasons than δ(13)C-S and δ(13)C-B, with a maximum seasonal difference of 0.7‰ for tapped trees and 0.3‰ for untapped trees. δ(13)C-B was lower in tapped than in untapped trees, increasing from August (middle of the rainy season) to April (end of the dry season). Differences in δ(13)C-L and δ(13)C-B between tapped and untapped trees indicated that tapping affects the metabolism of both laticiferous cells and leaves. The lack of correlation between δ(13)C-L and δ(13)C-S suggests that recent photosynthates are mixed in the large pool of stored carbohydrates that are involved in latex regeneration after tapping. PMID:26358051

  17. Multi-isotope (carbon and chlorine) analysis for fingerprinting and site characterization at a fractured bedrock aquifer contaminated by chlorinated ethenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palau, Jordi, E-mail: jordi.palau@unine.ch [Departament de Cristal.lografia, Mineralogia i Dipòsits Minerals, Facultat de Geologia, Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès, s/n 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Marchesi, Massimo [Departament de Cristal.lografia, Mineralogia i Dipòsits Minerals, Facultat de Geologia, Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès, s/n 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada); Chambon, Julie C.C. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, 2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Aravena, Ramon [Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada); Canals, Àngels [Departament de Cristal.lografia, Mineralogia i Dipòsits Minerals, Facultat de Geologia, Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès, s/n 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Binning, Philip J.; Bjerg, Poul L. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, 2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Otero, Neus; Soler, Albert [Departament de Cristal.lografia, Mineralogia i Dipòsits Minerals, Facultat de Geologia, Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès, s/n 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2014-03-01

    The use of compound specific multi-isotope approach (C and Cl) in the characterization of a chlorinated ethenes contaminated fractured aquifer allows the identification of several sources and contaminant plumes, as well as the occurrence of biodegradation and mixing processes. The study site is located in Spain with contamination resulting in groundwater concentrations of up to 50 mg/L of trichloroethene (TCE), the most abundant chlorinated ethene, and 7 mg/L of tetrachloroethene (PCE). The potential sources of contamination including abandoned barrels, an underground tank, and a disposal lagoon, showed a wide range in δ{sup 13}C values from − 15.6 to − 40.5‰ for TCE and from − 18.5 to − 32.4‰ for PCE, allowing the use of isotope fingerprinting for tracing of the origin and migration of these contaminants in the aquifer. In contrast, there is no difference between the δ{sup 37}Cl values for TCE in the contaminant sources, ranging from + 0.53 to + 0.66‰. Variations of δ{sup 37}Cl and δ{sup 13}C in the different contaminant plumes were used to investigate the role of biodegradation in groundwater. Moreover, the isotopic data were incorporated into a reactive transport model for determination of whether the isotope pattern observed downstream from the tank's source could be explained by the simultaneous effect of mixing and biodegradation. The results demonstrate that a multi-isotope approach is a valuable tool for characterization of complex sites such as fractured bedrock aquifer contaminated by multiple sources, providing important information which can be used by consultants and site managers to prioritize and design more successful remediation strategies. - Highlights: • Origin and fate of CAHs in groundwater by means of multi CSIA ({sup 13}C,{sup 35}Cl) survey • Innovative/new approach tested in a fractured bedrock site • Differentiation of distinct CAH sources • Biodegradation and source mixing recognition in the aquifer.

  18. Regional prediction of carbon isotopes in soil carbonates for Asian dust source tracer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bing; Cui, Xinjuan; Wang, Yaqiang

    2016-10-01

    Dust particles emitted from deserts and semi-arid lands in northern China cause particulate pollution that increases the burden of disease particularly for urban population in East Asia. The stable carbon isotopes (δ13C) of carbonates in soils and dust aerosols in northern China were investigated. We found that the δ13C of carbonates in surface soils in northern China showed clearly the negative correlation (R2 = 0.73) with Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI). Using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite-derived NDVI, we predicted the regional distribution of δ13C of soil carbonates in deserts, sandy lands, and steppe areas. The predictions show the mean δ13C of -0.4 ± 0.7‰ in soil carbonates in Taklimakan Desert and Gobi Deserts, and the isotope values decrease to -3.3 ± 1.1‰ in sandy lands. The increase in vegetation coverage depletes 13C in soil carbonates, thus the steppe areas are predicted by the lowest δ13C levels (-8.1 ± 1.7‰). The measurements of atmospheric dust samples at eight sites showed that the Asian dust sources were well assigned by the 13C mapping in surface soils. Predicting 13C in large geographical areas with fine resolution offers a cost-effective tracer to monitor dust emissions from sandy lands and steppe areas which show an increasing role in Asian dust loading driven by climate change and human activities.

  19. Stable Carbon and Oxygen Isotopes of Pedogenic Carbonates in Ustic Vertisols: Implications for Paleoenvironmental Change

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Cheng-Min; WANG Cheng-Shan; TANG Ya

    2005-01-01

    Pedogenic carbonates, found extensively in arid and semiarid regions, are important in revealing regional climatic and environmental changes as well as the carbon cycle. In addition, stable carbon and oxygen isotopic compositions of pedogenic carbonates have been used to rebuild paleoecology (biomass and vegetation) and to estimate paleotemperature and paleoprecipitation during past geological time. By utilizing the stable carbon and oxygen isotopic compositions (δ13C and δ18O) of secondary nodules in Ustic Vertisols, this study looked into the climatic and environmental changes in the dry valleys of the Yuanmou Basin, Yunnan Province, in southwestern China. The results showed that during the early Holocene, a warm-humid or hot-humid climate existed in the Yuanmou Basin, but since then fluctuations in climate have occurred, with a dry climate prevailing. A highly significant correlation (r = 0.92, n= 9) between δ13C and δ18O values of carbonates illustrated that there had been a continual shifting between cold-humid and warm-dry climates in southwestern China including the Yuanmou Basin since the early Holocene.

  20. Temperature and Oxygen Isotope Composition of The Ediacaran Ocean: Constraints From Clumped Isotope Carbonate Thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonifacie, M.; Eiler, J. M.; Fike, D. A.

    2008-12-01

    The temperature and chemical variations of the early oceans on Earth are highly debated, particularly for periods associated with significant evolutionary change and/or extinction. The temperature of past oceans has been estimated based on conventional carbonate-water and/or silicate-water stable oxygen isotope thermometry. Precambrian carbonates and silicates both exhibit a long-term secular trend of increasing δ18O values with decreasing age. This trend has been used to support two opposite - though related - interpretations: the Earth's oceans gradually cooled over the course of the Proterozoic eon, from a maximum of ~ 60-90°C at ~ 2.5Ga (and were, on average, relatively warm during much of the Paleozoic era) [1]. This interpretation has been supported by Si-isotope proxies and the thermal tolerances of proteins in various classes of microbial organisms [2-3]. Alternatively, the δ18O value of the oceans has gradually increased through time [4-5], and mean Earth surface temperatures varied over a narrow range similar to modern conditions. In other terms, one either assumes an ocean of constant δ18O and infers that climate varied dramatically, or vise versa. Finally, it is possible that post- depositional processes (e.g., diagenesis, burial metamorphism, weathering) has modified the δ18O values of all or most Precambrian sedimentary carbonates and silicates, overprinting any paleoclimatic variations. Carbonate 'clumped isotope' thermometry provides a new way to independently test these hypotheses because it allows one to determine the apparent growth temperatures of carbonate minerals based on their abundances of 13C-18O bonds, as reflected by the 'Δ47' value of CO2 extracted by phosphoric acid digestion [6]. This method is thermodynamically based and independent of the δ18O of water from which the carbonate grew. We will report the initial results of measurements of 'Δ47 for a suite of carbonates from the Sultanate of Oman. This Ediacaran age (~ 635 to

  1. 水中氯代烃单体碳同位素分析中预富集方法进展%Review on Pre-enrichment Methods in Compound Specific Carbon Isotope Analysis of Chlorinated Hydrocarbon in Water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    凌媛; 黄毅; 尚文郁; 谢曼曼; 刘舒波; 孙青

    2011-01-01

    Highly accurate determination of Compound Specific Carbon Isotope Analysis ( CSIA ) of chlorinated hydrocarbons is of great significance in tracing the source and revealing the biodegradating progress of pollutants. The isotopic composition of organic contaminations may be stable or varied in the process of environmental transformation. We can trace the source of contaminations if the composition is stable and can evaluate the probability and degree of degradation of contaminations. This paper summarizes solid-phase microextraction, static headspace analysis, purge and trap method and compound specific isotope analyses of chlorinated hydrocarbon in water, using combinations of these pretreatment methods, Gas Chromatography-Combustion-Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry ( GC-C-IRMS ), and comparesthe three methods. Compared with liquid-liquid extraction, solid-phase micro extraction, static headspace analysis, purge and trap method are all solvent-free enrichment techniques, producing no secondary pollution, less interference, and the resolution and accuracy of the analysis of GC-C-IRMS is improved. No, or little, isotopic mass fractionation occurred during the isotope analysis of chlorinated hydrocarbon in water by combining these solvent-free enrichment techniques with GC-C-IRMS, of which the precision of the analysis is less than l%e. The detection limit decreased along with the methods of static headspace analysis, solid-phase micro extraction, purge and trap method. Purge and trap is the most popular method because of its good reproducibility and low detection limit for the compound specific isotope analysis of chlorinated hydrocarbon in Water. The combinations of in-needle microextraction, in-tube microextraction, stir bar sorptive extraction or headspace sorptive extraction with GC-C-IRMS have a bright future.%高精度准确测定氯代烃单体碳同位素对示踪污染物来源,了解污染物的生物降解过程具有重要意义.在环境转化过程中,

  2. Multispectral dual isotope and NMR image analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dual isotope scintigraphy and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging produce image data that is intrinsically multispectral. That is multiple images of the same anatomic region are generated with different gray scale distribution and morphologic content that is largely redundant. Image processing technology, originally developed by NASA for satellite imaging, is available for multispectral analysis. These methods have been applied to provide tissue characterization. Tissue specific information encoded in the grapy scale data from dual isotope and NMR studies may be extracted using multispectral pattern recognition methods. The authors used table lookup minimum distance, maximum likelihood and cluster analysis techniques with data sets from Ga-67 / Tc-99m, 1-131 labeled antibodies / Tc-99m, Tc-99m perfusion / Xe-133 ventilation, and NMR studies. The results show; tissue characteristic signatures exist in dual isotope and NMR imaging, and these spectral signatures are identifiable using multispectral image analysis and provide tissue classification maps with scatter diagrams that facilitate interpretation and assist in elucidating subtle changes

  3. Microbial degradation of alpha-cypermethrin in soil by compound-specific stable isotope analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zemin; Shen, Xiaoli; Zhang, Xi-Chang; Liu, Weiping; Yang, Fangxing

    2015-09-15

    To assess microbial degradation of alpha-cypermethrin in soil, attenuation of alpha-cypermethrin was investigated by compound-specific stable isotope analysis. The variations of the residual concentrations and stable carbon isotope ratios of alpha-cypermethrin were detected in unsterilized and sterilized soils spiked with alpha-cypermethrin. After an 80 days' incubation, the concentrations of alpha-cypermethrin decreased to 0.47 and 3.41 mg/kg in the unsterilized soils spiked with 2 and 10 mg/kg, while those decreased to 1.43 and 6.61 mg/kg in the sterilized soils. Meanwhile, the carbon isotope ratios shifted to -29.14 ± 0.22‰ and -29.86 ± 0.33‰ in the unsterilized soils spiked with 2 and 10 mg/kg, respectively. The results revealed that microbial degradation contributed to the attenuation of alpha-cypermethrin and induced the carbon isotope fractionation. In order to quantitatively assess microbial degradation, a relationship between carbon isotope ratios and residual concentrations of alpha-cypermethrin was established according to Rayleigh equation. An enrichment factor, ϵ = -1.87‰ was obtained, which can be employed to assess microbial degradation of alpha-cypermethrin. The significant carbon isotope fractionation during microbial degradation suggests that CSIA is a proper approach to qualitatively detect and quantitatively assess the biodegradation during attenuation process of alpha-cypermethrin in the field.

  4. Comparative assessment of air quality in two health resorts using carbon isotopes and palynological analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorka, M.; Jedrysek, M.O.; Maj, J.; Worobiec, A.; Buczynska, A.; Stefaniak, E.; Krata, A.; Van Grieken, R.; Zwozdziak, A.; Sowka, I.; Zwozdziak, J.; Lewicka-Szczebak, D. [University of Wroclaw, Wroclaw (Poland). Inst. of Geological Science

    2009-01-15

    This paper describes results of applying the palynological and carbon isotopic analysis of the organic fraction of Total Suspended Particles (TSP) to discriminate distinct pollution sources and assess the anthropogenic impact for the investigated areas. The samples of atmospheric particles were collected in Czerniawa and Cieplice (two health resorts in Lower Silesia, SW Poland) twice a year in summer and winter season (from July 2006 to February 2008). The palynological spectra represent in the vast majority local plant communities without a noticeable contribution of long-transported plant particles. Palynological analysis revealed also differences in the specificity of the two sampling areas, i.e. the higher contribution of identified organic material in Czerniawa stands for more natural character of this site, but is also responsible for the higher allergic pressure when compared to Cieplice. The carbon isotopic composition of TSP varied seasonally ({delta}{sup 13}C value from -27.09 parts per thousand in summer to -25.47 parts per thousand in winter). The increased {delta} {sup 13}C value in winter (heating period) is most probably caused by uncontrolled contribution of coal soot. On the basis of isotopic mass balance the calculated contribution of anthropogenic organic particles in the atmosphere reached in winter season 72% in Czerniawa and 79% in Cieplice.

  5. Carbon and Oxygen Isotopic Composition of Surface-Sediment Carbonate in Bosten Lake (Xinjiang, China) and its Controlling Factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Chengjun; Steffen MISCHKE; ZHENG Mianping; Alexander PROKOPENKO; GUO Fangqin; FENG Zhaodong

    2009-01-01

    Bosten Lake is a mid-latitude lake with water mainly supplied by melting ice and snow in the Tianshan Mountains. The depositional environment of the lake is spatially not uniform due to the proximity of the major inlet and the single outlet in the western part of the lake. The analytical results show that the carbon and oxygen isotopic composition of recent lake sediments is related to this specific lacustrine depositional environment and to the resulting carbonate mineralogy. In the southwestern lake region between the Kaidu River inlet and the Kongqi River outlet, carbon isotope composition (δ13C) values of the carbonate sediment (-1‰ to -2‰) have no relation to the oxygen isotope composition of the carbonate (δ18O) values (-7‰ to -8‰), with both isotopes showing a low variability. The carbonate content is low (<20%). Carbonate minerals analyzed by X-ray diffraction are mainly composed of calcite, while aragonite was not recorded. The salinity of the lake water is low in the estuary region as a result of the Kaidu River inflow. In comparison, the carbon and oxygen isotope values are higher in the middle and eastern parts of the lake, with δ13C values between approximately +0.5‰ and +3‰, and δ18O values between -1‰ and -5‰. There is a moderate correlation between the stable oxygen and carbon isotopes, with a coefficient of correlation r of approximately 0.63. This implies that the lake water has a relatively short residence time. Carbonate minerals constitute calcite and aragonite in the middle and eastern region of the lake. Aragonite and Mg-calcite are formed at higher lake water salinity and temperatures, and larger evaporation effects. More saline lake water in the middle and eastern region of the lake and the enhanced isotopic equilibrium between water and atmospheric CO2 cause the correlating carbon and oxygen isotope values determined for aragonite and Mg-calcite. Evaporation and biological processes are the main reasons for the salinity

  6. Biochemical and physiological bases for the use of carbon and nitrogen isotopes in environmental and ecological studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkouchi, Naohiko; Ogawa, Nanako O.; Chikaraishi, Yoshito; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Wada, Eitaro

    2015-12-01

    We review the biochemical and physiological bases of the use of carbon and nitrogen isotopic compositions as an approach for environmental and ecological studies. Biochemical processes commonly observed in the biosphere, including the decarboxylation and deamination of amino acids, are the key factors in this isotopic approach. The principles drawn from the isotopic distributions disentangle the complex dynamics of the biosphere and allow the interactions between the geosphere and biosphere to be analyzed in detail. We also summarize two recently examined topics with new datasets: the isotopic compositions of individual biosynthetic products (chlorophylls and amino acids) and those of animal organs for further pursuing the basis of the methodology. As a tool for investigating complex systems, compound-specific isotopic analysis compensates the intrinsic disadvantages of bulk isotopic signatures. Chlorophylls provide information about the particular processes of various photoautotrophs, whereas amino acids provide a precise measure of the trophic positions of heterotrophs. The isotopic distributions of carbon and nitrogen in a single organism as well as in the whole biosphere are strongly regulated, so that their major components such as amino acids are coordinated appropriately rather than controlled separately.

  7. Reconstruction of central carbon metabolism in Sulfolobus solfataricus using a two-dimensional gel electrophoresis map, stable isotope labelling and DNA microarray analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijders, B.P.L.; Walther, J.; Peter, S.; Kinnman, I.; Vos, de M.J.G.; Werken, van de H.J.G.; Brouns, S.J.J.; Oost, van der J.; Wright, P.C.

    2006-01-01

    In the last decade, an increasing number of sequenced archaeal genomes have become available, opening up the possibility for functional genomic analyses. Here, we reconstructed the central carbon metabolism in the hyperthermophilic crenarchaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus (glycolysis, gluconeogenesis an

  8. Authentication of vegetable oils by bulk and molecular carbon isotope analyses with emphasis on olive oil and pumpkin seed oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spangenberg, J E; Ogrinc, N

    2001-03-01

    The authenticity of vegetable oils consumed in Slovenia and Croatia was investigated by carbon isotope analysis of the individual fatty acids by the use of gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/C/IRMS), and through carbon isotope analysis of the bulk oil. The fatty acids from samples of olive, pumpkin, sunflower, maize, rape, soybean, and sesame oils were separated by alkaline hydrolysis and derivatized to methyl esters for chemical characterization by capillary gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) prior to isotopic analysis. Enrichment in heavy carbon isotope ((13)C) of the bulk oil and of the individual fatty acids are related to (1) a thermally induced degradation during processing (deodorization, steam washing, or bleaching), (2) hydrolytic rancidity (lipolysis) and oxidative rancidity of the vegetable oils during storage, and (3) the potential blend with refined oil or other vegetable oils. The impurity or admixture of different oils may be assessed from the delta(13)C(16:0) vs. delta(13)C(18:1) covariations. The fatty acid compositions of Slovenian and Croatian olive oils are compared with those from the most important Mediterranean producer countries (Spain, Italy, Greece, and France). PMID:11312892

  9. Applications of stable isotope analysis in foodstuffs surveillance and environmental research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The instrumental coupling of Elemental Analysis and Mass Spectrometry, constituting a convenient tool for isotope ratio measurements of the bioelements in solid or liquid samples is now well established. Advantages of this technique compared with the so far usual wet chemistry sample preparation are: speed of analysis, easy operation and minor sample consumption. The performance of the system is described and some applications are given. Detection of foodstuffs adulterations is mainly based on the natural carbon isotope differences between C3- and C4-plants. In the field of environmental research the existing small isotopic variations of carbon, nitrogen and sulfur in nature, which depend on substance origin and history, are used as intrinsic signature of the considered sample. Examples of source appointment or exclusion by help of this natural isotopic tracer method are dealt with. (authors)

  10. Biomarker and molecular isotope approaches to deconvolve the terrestrial carbon isotope record: modern and Eocene calibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diefendorf, A. F.; Freeman, K. H.; Wing, S.; Currano, E. D.

    2010-12-01

    Climate, biome, and plant community are important predictors of carbon isotope patterns recorded in leaves and leaf waxes. However, signatures recorded by terrestrial organic carbon and lipids that have mixed floral sources (e.g., n-alkanes) potentially reflect both plant community changes and climate. More taxonomically specific proxies for plants (i.e., di- and tri-terpenoids for conifers and angiosperms, respectively), can help to resolve the relative influences of changing community and climate, provided differences in biomarker production and lipid biosynthetic fractionation among plants can be better constrained. We present biomarker abundance and carbon isotope values for lipids from leaves, branches and bark of 44 tree species, representing 21 families including deciduous and evergreen conifers and angiosperms. n-alkane production differs greatly between conifer and angiosperm leaves. Both deciduous and evergreen angiosperms make significantly more n-alkanes than conifers, with n-alkanes not detected in over half of the conifers in our study. Terpenoid abundances scale strongly with leaf habit: evergreen species have significantly higher abundances. We combine these relative differences in lipid production with published estimates of fluxes for leaf litter from conifer and angiosperm trees to develop a new proxy approach for estimating paleo plant community inputs to ancient soils and sediments. To test our modern calibration results, we have evaluated n-alkanes and terpenoids from laterally extensive (~18 km) carbonaceous shales and mudstones in Eocene sediments (52.6 Ma) at Fifteenmile Creek in the Bighorn Basin (WY, USA). Our terpenoid-based proxy predicts on average a 40% conifer community, which is remarkably close in agreement with a fossil-based estimate of 36%. n-alkane carbon isotope fractionation (leaf-lipid) differs among plant types, with conifer n-alkanes about 2-3‰ 13C enriched relative to those in angiosperms. Since conifer leaves are

  11. Seasonal variation in stable carbon and nitrogen isotope values of bats reflect environmental baselines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana G Popa-Lisseanu

    Full Text Available The stable carbon and nitrogen isotope composition of animal tissues is commonly used to trace wildlife diets and analyze food chains. Changes in an animal's isotopic values over time are generally assumed to indicate diet shifts or, less frequently, physiological changes. Although plant isotopic values are known to correlate with climatic seasonality, only a few studies restricted to aquatic environments have investigated whether temporal isotopic variation in consumers may also reflect environmental baselines through trophic propagation. We modeled the monthly variation in carbon and nitrogen isotope values in whole blood of four insectivorous bat species occupying different foraging niches in southern Spain. We found a common pattern of isotopic variation independent of feeding habits, with an overall change as large as or larger than one trophic step. Physiological changes related to reproduction or to fat deposition prior to hibernation had no effect on isotopic variation, but juvenile bats had higher δ13C and δ15N values than adults. Aridity was the factor that best explained isotopic variation: bat blood became enriched in both 13C and 15N after hotter and/or drier periods. Our study is the first to show that consumers in terrestrial ecosystems reflect seasonal environmental dynamics in their isotope values. We highlight the danger of misinterpreting stable isotope data when not accounting for seasonal isotopic baselines in food web studies. Understanding how environmental seasonality is integrated in animals' isotope values will be crucial for developing reliable methods to use stable isotopes as dietary tracers.

  12. Seasonal variation in stable carbon and nitrogen isotope values of bats reflect environmental baselines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popa-Lisseanu, Ana G; Kramer-Schadt, Stephanie; Quetglas, Juan; Delgado-Huertas, Antonio; Kelm, Detlev H; Ibáñez, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    The stable carbon and nitrogen isotope composition of animal tissues is commonly used to trace wildlife diets and analyze food chains. Changes in an animal's isotopic values over time are generally assumed to indicate diet shifts or, less frequently, physiological changes. Although plant isotopic values are known to correlate with climatic seasonality, only a few studies restricted to aquatic environments have investigated whether temporal isotopic variation in consumers may also reflect environmental baselines through trophic propagation. We modeled the monthly variation in carbon and nitrogen isotope values in whole blood of four insectivorous bat species occupying different foraging niches in southern Spain. We found a common pattern of isotopic variation independent of feeding habits, with an overall change as large as or larger than one trophic step. Physiological changes related to reproduction or to fat deposition prior to hibernation had no effect on isotopic variation, but juvenile bats had higher δ13C and δ15N values than adults. Aridity was the factor that best explained isotopic variation: bat blood became enriched in both 13C and 15N after hotter and/or drier periods. Our study is the first to show that consumers in terrestrial ecosystems reflect seasonal environmental dynamics in their isotope values. We highlight the danger of misinterpreting stable isotope data when not accounting for seasonal isotopic baselines in food web studies. Understanding how environmental seasonality is integrated in animals' isotope values will be crucial for developing reliable methods to use stable isotopes as dietary tracers. PMID:25700080

  13. Stable Isotope Studies of Crop Carbon and Water Relations: A Review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Cong-zhi; ZHANG Jia-bao; ZHAO Bing-zi; ZHANG Hui; HUANG Ping

    2009-01-01

    Crop carbon and water relations research is important in the studies of water saving agriculture,breeding program,and energy and material cycles in soil plant atmosphere continuum (SPAC).The purpose of this paper is to review the current state of knowledge on stable isotopes of carbon,oxygen,and hydrogen in the research of crop carbon and water relations,such as carbon isotope discrimination (△13C) during carbon fixation process by photosynthesis,application of △13C in crop water use efficiency (WUE) and breeding programs,oxygen isotope enrichment during leaf water transpiration,CO2 fixation by photosynthesis and release by respiration,application of hydrogen isotope composition (δD) and oxygen isotope composition (δ18O) for determination of water source used by a crop,stable isotope coupling Keeling plot for investigating the carbon and water flux in ecosystem,energy and material cycle in SPAC and correlative integrative models on stable isotope.These aspects contain most of the stable isotope researches on crop carbon and water relations which have been widely explored internationally while less referred in China.Based on the reviewed literatures,some needs for future research are suggested.

  14. Stable Isotope Ratios and Forensic Analysis of Microorganisms▿

    OpenAIRE

    Kreuzer-Martin, Helen W.; Jarman, Kristin H.

    2007-01-01

    In the aftermath of the anthrax letters of 2001, researchers have been exploring various analytical signatures for the purpose of characterizing the production environment of microorganisms. One such signature is stable isotope ratios, which in heterotrophs, are a function of nutrient and water sources. Here we discuss the use of stable isotope ratios in microbial forensics, using as a database the carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and hydrogen stable isotope ratios of 247 separate cultures of Bacill...

  15. Ultra-rapid targeted analysis of 40 drugs of abuse in oral fluid by LC-MS/MS using carbon-13 isotopes of methamphetamine and MDMA to reduce detector saturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Rago, Matthew; Chu, Mark; Rodda, Luke N; Jenkins, Elizabeth; Kotsos, Alex; Gerostamoulos, Dimitri

    2016-05-01

    The number of oral fluid samples collected by the road policing authority in Victoria, Australia, requiring confirmatory laboratory analysis for drugs proscribed under Victorian legislation (methamphetamine, MDMA and Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol) has greatly increased in recent years, driving the need for improved analysis techniques to enable expedient results. The aim of this study was to develop an LC-MS/MS-based targeted oral fluid screening technique that covers a broad range of basic and neutral drugs of abuse that can satisfy increased caseload while monitoring other compounds of interest for epidemiological purposes. By combining small sample volume, simple extraction procedure, rapid LC-MS/MS analysis and automated data processing, 40 drugs of abuse including amphetamines, benzodiazepines, cocaine and major metabolites, opioids, cannabinoids and some designer stimulants were separated over 5 min (with an additional 0.5 min re-equilibration time). The analytes were detected using a Sciex® API 4500 Q-Trap LC-MS/MS system with positive ESI in MRM mode monitoring three transitions per analyte. The method was fully validated in accordance with international guidelines and also monitored carbon-13 isotopes of MDMA and MA to reduce detector saturation effects, allowing for confirmation of large concentrations of these compounds without the need for dilution or re-analysis. The described assay has been successfully used for analysis of oral fluid collected as part of law enforcement procedures at the roadside in Victoria, providing forensic results as well as epidemiological prevalence in the population tested. The fast and reliable detection of a broad range of drugs and subsequent automated data processing gives the opportunity for high throughput and fast turnaround times for forensic toxicology.

  16. Ultra-rapid targeted analysis of 40 drugs of abuse in oral fluid by LC-MS/MS using carbon-13 isotopes of methamphetamine and MDMA to reduce detector saturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Rago, Matthew; Chu, Mark; Rodda, Luke N; Jenkins, Elizabeth; Kotsos, Alex; Gerostamoulos, Dimitri

    2016-05-01

    The number of oral fluid samples collected by the road policing authority in Victoria, Australia, requiring confirmatory laboratory analysis for drugs proscribed under Victorian legislation (methamphetamine, MDMA and Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol) has greatly increased in recent years, driving the need for improved analysis techniques to enable expedient results. The aim of this study was to develop an LC-MS/MS-based targeted oral fluid screening technique that covers a broad range of basic and neutral drugs of abuse that can satisfy increased caseload while monitoring other compounds of interest for epidemiological purposes. By combining small sample volume, simple extraction procedure, rapid LC-MS/MS analysis and automated data processing, 40 drugs of abuse including amphetamines, benzodiazepines, cocaine and major metabolites, opioids, cannabinoids and some designer stimulants were separated over 5 min (with an additional 0.5 min re-equilibration time). The analytes were detected using a Sciex® API 4500 Q-Trap LC-MS/MS system with positive ESI in MRM mode monitoring three transitions per analyte. The method was fully validated in accordance with international guidelines and also monitored carbon-13 isotopes of MDMA and MA to reduce detector saturation effects, allowing for confirmation of large concentrations of these compounds without the need for dilution or re-analysis. The described assay has been successfully used for analysis of oral fluid collected as part of law enforcement procedures at the roadside in Victoria, providing forensic results as well as epidemiological prevalence in the population tested. The fast and reliable detection of a broad range of drugs and subsequent automated data processing gives the opportunity for high throughput and fast turnaround times for forensic toxicology. PMID:26993306

  17. The Strontium Isotope Record of Zavkhan Terrane Carbonates: Strontium Isotope Stability Through the Ediacaran-Cambrian Transition

    OpenAIRE

    Petach, Tanya N.

    2015-01-01

    First order trends in the strontium isotopic (87Sr/86Sr) composition of seawater are controlled by radiogenic inputs from the continent and non-radiogenic inputs from exchange at mid-ocean ridges. Carbonates precipitated in seawater preserve trace amounts of strontium that record this isotope ratio and therefore record the relative importance of mid-ocean ridge and weathering chemical inputs to sea water composition. It has been proposed that environmental changes during the Ediacaran-Cambria...

  18. [Effect of processes in the earth's crust on evolution of photosynthesis (as indicated by data on carbon isotopic composition)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivlev, A A

    2010-01-01

    model, data on isotope composition of carbon of carbonate and organic substance in rocks are used and its ability to explain several known natural regularities and empirical correlations. The model is used for analysis of some key stages of evolution of photosynthesis. PMID:20583589

  19. Observation of Large Enhancement of Charge Exchange Cross Sections with Neutron-Rich Carbon Isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Tanihata, I; Kanungo, R; Ameil, F; Atkinson, J; Ayyad, Y; Cortina-Gil, D; Dillmann, I; Estradé, A; Evdokimov, A; Farinon, F; Geissel, H; Guastalla, G; Janik, R; Knoebel, R; Kurcewicz, J; Litvinov, Yu A; Marta, M; Mostazo, M; Mukha, I; Nociforo, C; Ong, H J; Pietri, S; Prochazka, A; Scheidenberger, C; Sitar, B; Strmen, P; Takechi, M; Tanaka, J; Toki, H; Vargas, J; Winfield, J S; Weick, H

    2015-01-01

    Production cross sections of nitrogen isotopes from high-energy carbon isotopes on hydrogen and carbon targets have been measured for the first time for a wide range of isotopes. The fragment separator FRS at GSI was used to deliver C isotope beams. The cross sections of the production of N isotopes were determined by charge measurements of forward going fragments. The cross sections show a rapid increase with the number of neutrons in the projectile. Since the production of nitrogen is mostly due to charge exchange reactions below the proton separation energies, the present data suggests a concentration of Gamow-Teller and Fermi transition strength at low excitation energies for neutron-rich isotopes. It was also observed that the cross sections were enhanced much more strongly for neutron rich isotopes in the C-target data.

  20. Isotopic disequilibrium in Globigerina bulloides and carbon isotope response to productivity increase in Southern Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasanna, K.; Ghosh, Prosenjit; Bhattacharya, S. K.; Mohan, K.; Anilkumar, N.

    2016-02-01

    Oxygen and carbon isotope ratios in planktonic foraminifera Globigerina bulloides collected from tow samples along a transect from the equatorial Indian ocean to the Southern Ocean (45°E and 80°E and 10°N to 53°S) were analysed and compared with the equilibrium δ18O and δ13C values of calcite calculated using the temperature and isotopic composition of the water column. The results agree within ~0.25‰ for the region between 10°N and 40°S and 75-200 m water depth which is considered to be the habitat of Globigerina bulloides. Further south (from 40°S to 55°S), however, the measured δ18O and δ13C values are higher than the expected values by ~2‰ and ~1‰ respectively. These enrichments can be attributed to either a ‘vital effect’ or a higher calcification rate. An interesting pattern of increase in the δ13C(DIC) value of the surface water with latitude is observed between 35°S and~ 60°S, with a peak at~ 42°S. This can be caused by increased organic matter production and associated removal. A simple model accounting for the increase in the δ13C(DIC) values is proposed which fits well with the observed chlorophyll abundance as a function of latitude.

  1. Diet of spotted bats (Euderma maculatum) in Arizona as indicated by fecal analysis and stable isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    We assessed diet of spotted bats (Euderma maculatum (J.A. Allen, 1891)) by visual analysis of bat feces and stable carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) isotope analysis of bat feces, wing, hair, and insect prey. We collected 33 fecal samples from spotted bats and trapped 3755 insect...

  2. Carbon isotope fractionation of 1,1,1-trichloroethane during base-catalyzed persulfate treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchesi, Massimo, E-mail: m2marche@uwaterloo.ca [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada N2L 3G1 (Canada); Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada N2L 3G1 (Canada); Thomson, Neil R. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada N2L 3G1 (Canada); Aravena, Ramon [Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada N2L 3G1 (Canada); Sra, Kanwartej S. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada N2L 3G1 (Canada); Golder Associates Inc, Toronto, Ontario, Canada L5N 5Z7 (Canada); Otero, Neus; Soler, Albert [Departament de Cristal.lographia, Mineralogia i Diposits Minerals, Facultat de Geologia, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain 08028 (Spain)

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: • Treatability and C fractionation of 1,1,1-TCA by base-catalyzed S{sub 2}O{sub 8}{sup 2−} was studied. • The rate of degradation of 1,1,1-TCA increased with a higher OH{sup −}:S{sub 2}O{sub 8}{sup 2−} ratio. •Base-catalyzed S{sub 2}O{sub 8}{sup 2−} can potentially treat recalcitrant compound like 1,1,1-TCA. • An enrichment factor of −7.0‰ independent of the OH{sup −}:S{sub 2}O{sub 8}{sup 2−} ratio was obtained. • Carbon isotope can potentially be used to estimate the ISCO treatment efficacy. -- Abstract: The extent of carbon isotope fractionation during degradation of 1,1,1-trichloroethane (1,1,1-TCA) by a base-catalyzed persulfate (S{sub 2}O{sub 8}{sup 2−}) treatment system was investigated. Significant destruction of 1,1,1-TCA was observed at a pH of ∼12. An increase in the NaOH:S{sub 2}O{sub 8}{sup 2−} molar ratio from 0.2:1 to 8:1 enhanced the reaction rate of 1,1,1-TCA by a factor of ∼5 to yield complete (>99.9%) destruction. An average carbon isotope enrichment fractionation factor which was independent of the NaOH:S{sub 2}O{sub 8}{sup 2−} molar ratio of −7.0 ± 0.2‰ was obtained. This significant carbon isotope fractionation and the lack of dependence on changes in the NaOH:S{sub 2}O{sub 8}{sup 2−} molar ratio demonstrates that carbon isotope analysis can potentially be used in situ as a performance assessment tool to estimate the degradation effectiveness of 1,1,1-TCA by a base-catalyzed persulfate system.

  3. An analytical system for studying the stable isotopes of carbon monoxide using continuous flow-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (CF-IRMS)

    OpenAIRE

    S. L. Pathirana; C. van der Veen; Popa, M. E.; T. Röckmann

    2015-01-01

    In the atmosphere, carbon monoxide (CO) is the major sink for the hydroxyl radical (OH •), has multiple anthropogenic and natural sources and considerable spatial and seasonal variability. Measurements of CO isotopic composition are useful in constraining the strengths of its individual source and sink processes and thus its global cycle. A fully automated system for δ13C and δ18O analysis has been developed to extract CO from an air sample, convert ...

  4. Biology and air–sea gas exchange controls on the distribution of carbon isotope ratios (δ13C) in the ocean

    OpenAIRE

    A. Schmittner; Gruber, N.; Mix, A. C.; Key, R.M.; Tagliabue, A.; Westberry, T. K.

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of observations and sensitivity experiments with a new three-dimensional global model of stable carbon isotope cycling elucidate processes that control the distribution of δ13C of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in the contemporary and preindustrial ocean. Biological fractionation and the sinking of isotopically light δ13C organic matter from the surface into the interior ocean leads to low δ13CDIC values at depths and in high latitude surface waters and high...

  5. Biology and air–sea gas exchange controls on the distribution of carbon isotope ratios (δ13C) in the ocean

    OpenAIRE

    A. Schmittner; Gruber, N.; Mix, A. C.; Key, R.M.; Tagliabue, A.; Westberry, T. K.

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of observations and sensitivity experiments with a new three-dimensional global model of stable carbon isotope cycling elucidate the processes that control the distribution of δ13C in the contemporary and preindustrial ocean. Biological fractionation dominates the distribution of δ13CDIC of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) due to the sinking of isotopically light δ13C organic matter from the surface into the interior ocean. This process leads to low δ13CDI...

  6. Application of δ13C and δ15N isotopic signatures of organic matter fractions sequentially separated from adjacent arable and forest soils to identify carbon stabilization mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Kayler, Z.E.; Kaiser, M; Gessler, A.; Ellerbrock, R. H.; M. Sommer

    2011-01-01

    Identifying the chemical mechanisms behind soil carbon bound in organo-mineral complexes is necessary to determine the degree to which soil organic carbon is stabilized belowground. Analysis of δ13C and δ15N isotopic signatures of stabilized OM fractions along with soil mineral characteristics may yield important information about OM-mineral associations and their processing history. We anlayzed the δ13C and δ15N isotopic signatures from two organic matter (OM) fractio...

  7. Carbonate concretions as a significant component of ancient marine carbon cycles: Insights from paired organic and inorganic carbon isotope analyses of a Cretaceous shale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loyd, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    Carbonate concretions often occur within fine-grained, organic-rich sedimentary rocks. This association reflects the common production of diagenetic minerals through biologic cycling of organic matter. Chemical analysis of carbonate concretions provides the rare opportunity to explore ancient shallow diagenetic environments, which are inherently transient due to progressive burial but are an integral component of the marine carbon cycle. The late Cretaceous Holz Shale (~80 Ma) contains abundant calcite concretions that exhibit textural and geochemical characteristics indicative of relatively shallow formation (i.e., near the sediment-water interface). Sampled concretions contain between 5.4 and 9.8 wt.% total inorganic carbon (TIC), or ~45 and 82 wt.% CaCO3, compared to host shale values which average ~1.5 wt.% TIC. Organic carbon isotope compositions (δ13Corg) are relatively constant in host and concretion samples ranging from ­-26.3 to -24.0‰ (VPDB). Carbonate carbon isotope compositions (δ13Ccarb) range from -22.5 to -3.4‰, indicating a significant but not entirely organic source of carbon. Concretions of the lower Holz Shale exhibit considerably elevated δ13Ccarb values averaging -4.8‰, whereas upper Holz Shale concretions express an average δ13Ccarb value of -17.0‰. If the remaining carbonate for lower Holz Shale concretions is sourced from marine fluids and/or dissolved marine carbonate minerals (e.g., shells), a simple mass balance indicates that ~28% of concretion carbon was sourced from organic matter and ~72% from late Cretaceous marine inorganic carbon (with δ13C ~ +2.5‰). Upper Holz Shale calculations indicate a ~73% contribution from organic matter and a ~27% contribution from inorganic carbon. When normalized for carbonate, organic contents within the concretions are ~2-13 wt.% enriched compared to host contents. This potentially reflects the protective nature of cementation that acts to limit permeability and chemical destruction of

  8. Molecular and carbon isotopic compositions of gas inclusions of deep carbonate rocks in the Tarim Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Shixin; WANG Xianbin; MENG Zifang; LI Yuan; Paul Farrimond; LI Liwu; DUAN Yi

    2004-01-01

    Gaseous components of gas inclusions in deep carbonate rocks (>5700 m) from the Tacan 1 well were analyzed by online mass spectrometry by means of either the stepwise heating technique or vacuum electromagnetism crushing. The carbon isotopic compositions of gases released by vacuum electromagnetism crushing were also measured. Although the molecular compositions of gas inclusions show differences between the two methods, the overall characteristics are that gas inclusions mainly contain CO2, whilst hydrocarbon gases, such as CH4, C2H6 and C3H8, are less abundant. The content of CO is higher in the stepwise heating experiment than that in the method of vacuum electromagnetism crushing, and there are only minor amounts of N2, H2 and O2 in gas inclusions. Methane δ13C values of gas inclusions in Lower Ordovician and Upper Cambrian rocks (from 5713.7 to 6422 m; -52‰-63‰) are similar to those of bacterial methane, but their chemical compositions do not exhibit the dry character in comparison with biogenic gases. These characteristics of deep gas inclusions may be related to the migration fractionation. Some deep natural gases with light carbon isotopic characteristics in the Tazhong Uplift may have a similar origin. The δ13C1 values of gas inclusions in Lower Cambrian rocks (7117-7124 m) are heavier (-39‰), consistent with highly mature natural gases. Carbon isotopic compositions of CO2 in the gas inclusions of deep carbonate rocks are similar (from -4‰ to -13‰) to those of deep natural gases, indicating predominantly an inorganic origin.

  9. Partitioning net ecosystem carbon exchange into net assimilation and respiration with canopy-scale isotopic measurements: An error propagation analysis with 13CO2 and CO18O data

    Science.gov (United States)

    OgéE, J.; Peylin, P.; Cuntz, M.; Bariac, T.; Brunet, Y.; Berbigier, P.; Richard, P.; Ciais, P.

    2004-06-01

    Stable CO2 isotope measurements are increasingly used to partition the net CO2 exchange between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere in terms of nonfoliar respiration (FR) and net photosynthesis (FA) in order to better understand the variations of this exchange. However, the accuracy of the partitioning strongly depends on the isotopic disequilibrium between these two gross fluxes, and a rigorous estimation of the errors on FA and FR is needed. In this study, we account for and propagate uncertainties on all terms in the mass balance and isotopic mass balance equations for CO2 in order to get accurate estimates of the errors on FA and FR. We apply our method to a maritime pine forest in the southwest of France. Nighttime Keeling plots are used to estimate the 13C and 18O isotopic signature of FR (δR), and for both isotopes the a priori uncertainty associated with this term is estimated to be around 2‰ at our site. Using δ13C-CO2 and [CO2] measurements, we then show that the uncertainty on instantaneous values of FA and FR can be as large as 4 μmol m-2 s-1. Even if we could get more accurate estimates of the net CO2 flux, the isoflux, and the isotopic signatures of FA and FR, this uncertainty would not be significantly reduced because the isotopic disequilibrium between FA and FR is too small, around 2-3‰. With δ18O-CO2 and [CO2] measurements the uncertainty associated with the gross fluxes lies also around 4 μmol m-2 s-1 but could be dramatically reduced if we were able to get more accurate estimates of the CO18O isoflux and the associated discrimination during photosynthesis. This is because the isotopic disequilibrium between FA and FR is large, of the order of 12-17‰. The isotopic disequilibrium between FA and FR and the uncertainty on δR vary among ecosystems and over the year. Our approach should help to choose the best strategy to study the carbon budget of a given ecosystem using stable isotopes.

  10. Carbon isotopic studies of individual lipids in organisms from the Nansha sea area, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUAN Yi; SONG Jinming; ZHANG Hui

    2004-01-01

    Carbon isotopes of individual lipids in typical organisms from the Nansha sea area were measured by the GC-IRMS analytical technique. δ13C values of saturated fatty acids in different organisms examined are from -25.6‰ to -29.7‰ with the average values ranging from -26.4‰ to -28.2‰ and the variance range of 1.8‰ between different organisms is also observed.Unsaturated fatty acids have heavy carbon isotopic compositions and the mean differences of 2.9‰-6.8‰ compared to the same carbon number saturated fatty acids. δ13C values of n-alkanes range from -27.5‰ to -29.7‰ and their mean values, ranging from -28.6‰ to -28.9‰, are very close in different organisms. The mean difference in δ13C between the saturated fatty acids and n-alkanes is only 1.5‰, indicating that they have similar biosynthetic pathways. The carbon isotopic variations between the different carbon-number lipids are mostly within ±2.0‰, reflecting that they experienced a biosynthetic process of the carbon chain elongation. At the same time, the carbon isotopic genetic relationships between the biological and sedimentary lipids are established by comparative studies of carbon isotopic compositions of individual lipids in organisms and sediments from the Nansha sea area, which provides scientific basis for carbon isotopic applied research of individual lipids.

  11. Sedimentary Organic Carbon Dynamics in Mangrove Soil in Shenzhen Bay Based on Carbon Isotopic Analysis%深圳湾红树林土壤碳同位素研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡毅; 景艳波; 钟志诚; 陈瑞平; 邹飞; 王银英

    2013-01-01

      陆地生态系统土壤有机质(SOM)的碳动态研究已引起科学界的广泛关注,对海陆交错带的相关研究则较少。本研究选取位于广东深圳湾的三个红树林群落土壤剖面,测定了土壤有机碳(SOC)含量和SOM的稳定碳同位素比率(13C)等含量。结果表明,地表100 cm土壤碳库分别为:桐花树(Aegiceras corniculatum)群落碳库量较大,达673.2 Mg/ha,而木榄(Bruguiera gymnorrhiza)+秋茄(Kandelia obovata)群落为371.9 Mg/ha,白骨壤(Avicennia marina)群落为325.2 Mg/ha。这三个剖面SOM的13C介于-29.4译至-24.1译之间,指示其来源主要为C3植被。不同于传统的SOM的13C随深度增加而增加的趋势,桐花树和白骨壤剖面底层的SOM的13C随深度增加而呈现亏损,而木榄+秋茄SOM的13C在整个剖面则基本稳定。红树林SOM的13C的垂直格局可能反映了大气CO2的13C的历史变化、有机质分解过程中的同位素分馏作用、植物根系分泌物和凋落物13C的差异,和土壤对植物组织的选择性保存等因素的综合作用。此外,诸如潮汐作用、群落演替阶段以及生物干扰等,也会对红树林土壤的碳动态产生一定的影响。结果还表明,在红树林有机质沉积过程中,土壤含水量通过作用于土壤分解过程在某种程度上控制SOC含量,同时间接作用于土壤同位素分馏过程而影响SOM的13C。%Mangrove ecosystems are highly productive and play an important role in tropical and global coastal carbon (C) budgets. However, soil organic carbon (SOC) storage and turnover in mangrove forests are still poorly understood. Based on C isotopic measurements of soil cores of three mangrove stands in Shenzhen bay, Southern China. SOC density was 673.2 Mg/ha in Aegiceras corniculatumstand stand, 371.9 673.2 Mg/ha in Bruguiera gymnorrhiza + Kandelia candel-dominated stand) and 325.2 Mg/ha in Avicennia marina stand. SOC 13C values at the three mangrove

  12. Is it really organic? – Multi-isotopic analysis as a tool to discriminate between organic and conventional plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, K.H.; Mihailova, A.; Kelly, S.D.;

    2013-01-01

    Novel procedures for analytical authentication of organic plant products are urgently needed. Here we present the first study encompassing stable isotopes of hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, magnesium and sulphur as well as compound-specific nitrogen and oxygen isotope analysis of nitrate...

  13. Isotopic analysis for degradation diagnosis of calcite matrix in mortar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotsika, E; Psomiadis, D; Poutoukis, D; Raco, B; Gamaletsos, P

    2009-12-01

    Mortar that was used in building as well as in conservation and restoration works of wall paintings have been analysed isotopically (delta(13)C and delta(18)O) in order to evaluate the setting environments and secondary processes, to distinguish the structural components used and to determine the exact causes that incurred the degradation phenomena. The material undergoes weathering and decay on a large proportion of its surface and in depth, due to the infiltration of water through the structural blocks. Mineralogical analysis indicated signs of sulphation and dissolution/recrystallisation processes taking place on the material, whereas stable isotopes provided information relative to the origin of the CO(2) and water during calcite formation and degradation processes. Isotopic change of the initial delta(13)C and delta(18)O in carbonate matrix was caused by alteration of the primary source of CO(2) and H(2)O in mortar over time, particularly by recrystallisation of calcite with porewater, evaporated or re-condensed water, and CO(2) from various sources of atmospheric and biogenic origin. Human influence (surface treatment) and biological growth (e.g. fungus) are major exogenic processes which may alter delta(18)O and delta(13)C in lime mortar.

  14. Recent developments in high productivity stable isotope analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The roots of today's high productivity stable isotope analyzers go back to the early 1980s. Development has since led to several 'continuous flow' methods. By 1984, three groups had interfaced an automated nitrogen analyzer (ANA) to an isotope ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS) for bulk analysis of 15N in solid and liquid samples. Continuous flow combustion converted sample N to a pulse of N2 gas, taken to the mass spectrometer by an He carrier. Carbon-13 analysis followed and the technique became automated nitrogen and carbon analysis-mass spectrometry (ANCA-MS). Also in 1984, a gas chromatograph (GC) was first used on-line with an IRMS for 13C analysis in individual compounds separated from a mixture (GC-IRMS). In 1987, a software controlled ANCA-MS was developed. Software control reduced running costs, allowed measurement of submicrogram quantities of N and also a 'turbo' mode to double 15N throughput. In 1990, a 'dual isotope' mode was added to analyse 13C and 15N in the same sample. Changes in research directions raised new analytical requirements: different gases and smaller samples. In 1992, a novel 120 deg. C mass analyzer was designed to meet these needs. Its precision of 13C and 15N for >50 μg N allows ANCA-MS to be used for 'natural abundance' applications. In 1989, a packed column GC-IRMS method was developed for 13CO2 in human breath. By 1993, it could analyze isotopes in other gases: 13CO2, 15N2, 15N2O and 13CH4 in 12 mL air samples; 18O from water equilibrated with CO2; and 15NO from NO-3 in KC1 extracts. A thermal desorption module allows GC-IRMS to measure denitrification rates down to 40 μg·ha-1·h-1, i.e. 1000 fold lower than conventional methods. Sulphur-34 analysis is actively being developed and there is the potential to measure D (or 2H) from water using H2 equilibration if the mass spectrometric interference between HD+ and the tail from 3He+ can be resolved. A capillary GC-IRMS approach has potential for measuring organic compounds for

  15. Automated determination of the stable carbon isotopic composition (δ13C) of total dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and total nonpurgeable dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in aqueous samples: RSIL lab codes 1851 and 1852

    Science.gov (United States)

    Révész, Kinga M.; Doctor, Daniel H.

    2014-01-01

    The purposes of the Reston Stable Isotope Laboratory (RSIL) lab codes 1851 and 1852 are to determine the total carbon mass and the ratio of the stable isotopes of carbon (δ13C) for total dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC, lab code 1851) and total nonpurgeable dissolved organic carbon (DOC, lab code 1852) in aqueous samples. The analysis procedure is automated according to a method that utilizes a total carbon analyzer as a peripheral sample preparation device for analysis of carbon dioxide (CO2) gas by a continuous-flow isotope ratio mass spectrometer (CF-IRMS). The carbon analyzer produces CO2 and determines the carbon mass in parts per million (ppm) of DIC and DOC in each sample separately, and the CF-IRMS determines the carbon isotope ratio of the produced CO2. This configuration provides a fully automated analysis of total carbon mass and δ13C with no operator intervention, additional sample preparation, or other manual analysis. To determine the DIC, the carbon analyzer transfers a specified sample volume to a heated (70 °C) reaction vessel with a preprogrammed volume of 10% phosphoric acid (H3PO4), which allows the carbonate and bicarbonate species in the sample to dissociate to CO2. The CO2 from the reacted sample is subsequently purged with a flow of helium gas that sweeps the CO2 through an infrared CO2 detector and quantifies the CO2. The CO2 is then carried through a high-temperature (650 °C) scrubber reactor, a series of water traps, and ultimately to the inlet of the mass spectrometer. For the analysis of total dissolved organic carbon, the carbon analyzer performs a second step on the sample in the heated reaction vessel during which a preprogrammed volume of sodium persulfate (Na2S2O8) is added, and the hydroxyl radicals oxidize the organics to CO2. Samples containing 2 ppm to 30,000 ppm of carbon are analyzed. The precision of the carbon isotope analysis is within 0.3 per mill for DIC, and within 0.5 per mill for DOC.

  16. Maturation of Green River Shale Kerogen with Hydrous Pyrolysis: Characterization of Geochemical Biomarkers and Carbon Isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Q.; Darnell, M.; Bissada, K. K.

    2014-12-01

    To fully understand controlling factors of organic compound generation during oil shale maturation, and systematically assess associated carbon isotope values, a series of hydrous pyrolysis experiments are performed. Kerogen was isolated from Green River shale by a set of acid treatment. Experiments are conducted at 350 °C and 300 bars of total pressure with running time of 24, 48 and 72 hours, respectively. In each experiment, the reactor contains 1.5 grams of kerogen and 30 grams of deionized water. After experiments, gaseous products are removed under cryogenic conditions for chemical and carbon isotope analyses (GC-IRMS). The bitumen product is retrieved and separated into saturated hydrocarbons, aromatics, resins, and asphaltenes (SARA) by HPLC before subsequent analyses (GC, GC-MS, and IRMS). The gaseous compounds from experiments consisted of CO2 and C1 to C4 hydrocarbons. Semiquantitative analysis indicates the yield of n-alkanes decreases with carbon number, with CO2 being more abundant than all alkanes. The δ13C value of alkanes increases with molecular weight, with CO2 having the highest value. Methane and ethane become enriched in 13C with time. In bitumen products, gravimetric analysis has shown that the abundance of aromatics increases with time, while that of asphaltenes decreases. After 72 hours, the weight percentages of saturated hydrocarbons, aromatics, resins and asphaltenes are 2.6, 42.3, 40.1, and 15.0, respectively. High resolution GC-MS results indicate low kerogen maturation after 72 hours using saturated biomarker compounds as thermal maturity indicator, such as 22S/(22S + 22R) of C31 to C35 homohopanes, tricyclics/17(H)-hopanes, and Ts/(Ts + Tm). Bulk carbon isotope value of bitumen decreases with time, with 2.5‰ lighter than original kerogen after 72 hours. In terms of different groups, saturated hydrocarbons and resins become depleted in 13C with longer reaction time, while aromatics and asphaltenes become enriched in 13C

  17. Evidence from carbon isotope measurements for diverse origins of sedimentary hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, K. H.; Hayes, J. M.; Trendel, J. M.; Albrecht, P.

    1990-01-01

    The organic matter found in sedimentary rocks must derive from many sources; not only from ancient primary producers but also from consumers and secondary producers. In all of these organisms, isotope effects can affect the abundance and distribution of 13C in metabolites. Here, by using an improved form of a previously described technique in which the effluent of a gas chromatograph is continuously analysed isotopically, we report evidence of the diverse origins of sedimentary organic matter. The record of 13C abundances in sedimentary carbonate and total organic carbon can be interpreted in terms of variations in the global carbon cycle. Our results demonstrate, however, that isotope variations within sedimentary organic mixtures substantially exceed those observed between samples of total organic carbon. Resolution of isotope variations at the molecular level offers a new and convenient means of refining views both of localized palaeoenvironments and of control mechanisms within the global carbon cycle.

  18. Mesozoic black shales, source mixing and carbon isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suan, Guillaume

    2016-04-01

    Over the last decades, considerable attention has been devoted to the paleoenvironmental and biogeochemical significance of Mesozoic black shales. Black shale-bearing successions indeed often display marked changes in the organic carbon isotope composition (δ13Corg), which have been commonly interpreted as evidence for dramatic perturbations of global carbon budgets and CO2 levels. Arguably the majority of these studies have discarded some more "local" explanations when interpreting δ13Corg profiles, most often because comparable profiles occur on geographically large and distant areas. Based on newly acquired data and selected examples from the literature, I will show that the changing contribution of organic components with distinct δ13C signatures exerts a major but overlooked influence of Mesozoic δ13Corg profiles. Such a bias occurs across a wide spectrum of sedimentological settings and ages, as shown by the good correlation between δ13Corg values and proxies of kerogen proportions (such as rock-eval, biomarker, palynofacies and palynological data) recorded in Mesozoic marginal to deep marine successions of Triassic, Jurassic and Cretaceous age. In most of these successions, labile, 12C-enriched amorphous organic matter of marine origin dominates strata deposited under anoxic conditions, while oxidation-resistant, 13C-rich terrestrial particles dominate strata deposited under well-oxygenated conditions. This influence is further illustrated by weathering profiles of Toarcian (Lower Jurassic) black shales from France, where weathered areas dominated by refractory organic matter show dramatic 13C-enrichment (and decreased total organic carbon and pyrite contents) compared to non-weathered portions of the same horizon. The implications of these results for chemostratigraphic correlations and pCO2 reconstructions of Mesozoic will be discussed, as well as strategies to overcome this major bias.

  19. Carbon and sulfur isotopic signatures of ancient life and environment at the microbial scale: Neoarchean shales and carbonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williford, K H; Ushikubo, T; Lepot, K; Kitajima, K; Hallmann, C; Spicuzza, M J; Kozdon, R; Eigenbrode, J L; Summons, R E; Valley, J W

    2016-03-01

    An approach to coordinated, spatially resolved, in situ carbon isotope analysis of organic matter and carbonate minerals, and sulfur three- and four-isotope analysis of pyrite with an unprecedented combination of spatial resolution, precision, and accuracy is described. Organic matter and pyrite from eleven rock samples of Neoarchean drill core express nearly the entire range of δ(13) C, δ(34) S, Δ(33) S, and Δ(36) S known from the geologic record, commonly in correlation with morphology, mineralogy, and elemental composition. A new analytical approach (including a set of organic calibration standards) to account for a strong correlation between H/C and instrumental bias in SIMS δ(13) C measurement of organic matter is identified. Small (2-3 μm) organic domains in carbonate matrices are analyzed with sub-permil accuracy and precision. Separate 20- to 50-μm domains of kerogen in a single ~0.5 cm(3) sample of the ~2.7 Ga Tumbiana Formation have δ(13) C = -52.3 ± 0.1‰ and -34.4 ± 0.1‰, likely preserving distinct signatures of methanotrophy and photoautotrophy. Pyrobitumen in the ~2.6 Ga Jeerinah Formation and the ~2.5 Ga Mount McRae Shale is systematically (13) C-enriched relative to co-occurring kerogen, and associations with uraniferous mineral grains suggest radiolytic alteration. A large range in sulfur isotopic compositions (including higher Δ(33) S and more extreme spatial gradients in Δ(33) S and Δ(36) S than any previously reported) are observed in correlation with morphology and associated mineralogy. Changing systematics of δ(34) S, Δ(33) S, and Δ(36) S, previously investigated at the millimeter to centimeter scale using bulk analysis, are shown to occur at the micrometer scale of individual pyrite grains. These results support the emerging view that the dampened signature of mass-independent sulfur isotope fractionation (S-MIF) associated with the Mesoarchean continued into the early Neoarchean, and that the connections

  20. Carbon and sulfur isotopic signatures of ancient life and environment at the microbial scale: Neoarchean shales and carbonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williford, K H; Ushikubo, T; Lepot, K; Kitajima, K; Hallmann, C; Spicuzza, M J; Kozdon, R; Eigenbrode, J L; Summons, R E; Valley, J W

    2016-03-01

    An approach to coordinated, spatially resolved, in situ carbon isotope analysis of organic matter and carbonate minerals, and sulfur three- and four-isotope analysis of pyrite with an unprecedented combination of spatial resolution, precision, and accuracy is described. Organic matter and pyrite from eleven rock samples of Neoarchean drill core express nearly the entire range of δ(13) C, δ(34) S, Δ(33) S, and Δ(36) S known from the geologic record, commonly in correlation with morphology, mineralogy, and elemental composition. A new analytical approach (including a set of organic calibration standards) to account for a strong correlation between H/C and instrumental bias in SIMS δ(13) C measurement of organic matter is identified. Small (2-3 μm) organic domains in carbonate matrices are analyzed with sub-permil accuracy and precision. Separate 20- to 50-μm domains of kerogen in a single ~0.5 cm(3) sample of the ~2.7 Ga Tumbiana Formation have δ(13) C = -52.3 ± 0.1‰ and -34.4 ± 0.1‰, likely preserving distinct signatures of methanotrophy and photoautotrophy. Pyrobitumen in the ~2.6 Ga Jeerinah Formation and the ~2.5 Ga Mount McRae Shale is systematically (13) C-enriched relative to co-occurring kerogen, and associations with uraniferous mineral grains suggest radiolytic alteration. A large range in sulfur isotopic compositions (including higher Δ(33) S and more extreme spatial gradients in Δ(33) S and Δ(36) S than any previously reported) are observed in correlation with morphology and associated mineralogy. Changing systematics of δ(34) S, Δ(33) S, and Δ(36) S, previously investigated at the millimeter to centimeter scale using bulk analysis, are shown to occur at the micrometer scale of individual pyrite grains. These results support the emerging view that the dampened signature of mass-independent sulfur isotope fractionation (S-MIF) associated with the Mesoarchean continued into the early Neoarchean, and that the connections

  1. Distribution and fractionation mechanism of stable carbon isotope of coalbed methane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIN; Shengfei; TANG; Xiuyi; SONG; Yan; WANG; Hongyan

    2006-01-01

    The stable carbon isotope values of coalbed methane range widely,and also are generally lighter than that of gases in normal coal-formed gas fields with similar coal rank.There exists strong carbon isotope fractionation in coalbed methane and it makes the carbon isotope value lighter.The correlation between the carbon isotope value and Ro in coalbed methane is less obvious.The coaly source rock maturity cannot be judged by coalbed methane carbon isotope value.The carbon isotopes of coalbed methane become lighter in much different degree due to the hydrodynamics.The stronger the hydrodynamics is,the lighter the CBM carbon isotopic value becomes.Many previous investigations indicated that the desorption-diffusion effects make the carbon isotope value of coalbed methane lighter.However,the explanation has encountered many problems.The authors of this article suggest that the flowing groundwater dissolution to free methane in coal seams and the free methane exchange with absorbed one is the carbon isotope fractionation mechanism in coalbed methane.The flowing groundwater in coal can easily take more 13CH4 away from free gas and comparatively leave more 12CH4.This will make 12CH4 density in free gas comparatively higher than that in absorbed gas.The remaining 12CH4 in free gas then exchanges with the adsorbed methane in coal matrix.Some absorbed 13CH4 can be replaced and become free gas.Some free 12CH4 can be absorbed again into coal matrix and become absorbed gas.Part of the newly replaced 13CH4 in free gas will also be taken away by water,leaving preferentially more 12CH4.The remaining 12CH4 in free gas will exchange again with adsorbed methane in the coal matrix.These processes occur all the time.Through accumulative effect,the 12CH4 will be greatly concentrated in coal.Thus,the stable carbon isotope of coalbed methane becomes dramatically lighter.Through simulation experiment on water-dissolved methane,it had been proved that the flowing water could fractionate the

  2. Applications of stable isotope analysis in mammalian ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, W David; Kurle, Carolyn M; Hopkins, John B

    2014-01-01

    In this editorial, we provide a brief introduction and summarize the 10 research articles included in this Special Issue on Applications of stable isotope analysis in mammalian ecology. The first three articles report correction and discrimination factors that can be used to more accurately estimate the diets of extinct and extant mammals using stable isotope analysis. The remaining seven applied research articles use stable isotope analysis to address a variety of wildlife conservation and management questions from the oceans to the mountains.

  3. Environmental forcing of terrestrial carbon isotope excursion amplification across five Eocene hyperthermals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, G. J.; Abels, H.

    2015-12-01

    Abrupt changes in the isotope composition of exogenic carbon pools accompany many major episodes of global change in the geologic record. The global expression of this change in substrates that reflect multiple carbon pools provides important evidence that many events reflect persistent, global redistribution of carbon between reduced and oxidized stocks. As the diversity of records documenting any event grows, however, discrepancies in the expression of carbon isotope change among substrates are almost always revealed. These differences in magnitude, pace, and pattern of change can complicate interpretations of global carbon redistribution, but under ideal circumstances can also provide additional information on changes in specific environmental and biogeochemical systems that accompanied the global events. Here we evaluate possible environmental influences on new terrestrial records of the negative carbon isotope excursions (CIEs) associated with multiple hyperthermals of the Early Eocene, which show a common pattern of amplified carbon isotope change in terrestrial paleosol carbonate records relative to that recorded in marine substrates. Scaling relationships between climate and carbon-cycle proxies suggest that that the climatic (temperature) impact of each event scaled proportionally with the magnitude of its marine CIE, likely implying that all events involved release of reduced carbon with a similar isotopic composition. Amplification of the terrestrial CIEs, however, does not scale with event magnitude, being proportionally less for the first, largest event (the PETM). We conduct a sensitivity test of a coupled plant-soil carbon isotope model to identify conditions that could account for the observed CIE scaling. At least two possibilities consistent with independent lines of evidence emerge: first, varying effects of pCO2 change on photosynthetic carbon isotope discrimination under changing background pCO2, and second, contrasting changes in regional

  4. Paleogene plants fractionated carbon isotopes similar to modern plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diefendorf, Aaron F.; Freeman, Katherine H.; Wing, Scott L.; Currano, Ellen D.; Mueller, Kevin E.

    2015-11-01

    The carbon isotope composition (δ13 C) of terrestrial plant biomarkers, such as leaf waxes and terpenoids, provides insights into past carbon cycling. The δ13 C values of modern plant biomarkers are known to be sensitive to climate and vegetation type, both of which influence fractionation during lipid biosynthesis by altering plant carbon supply and its biochemical allocation. It is not known if fractionation observed in living plants can be used to interpret fossil lipids because plant biochemical characteristics may have evolved during the Cenozoic in response to changes in global climate and atmospheric CO2. The goal of this study was to determine if fractionation during photosynthesis (Δleaf) in the Paleogene was consistent with expectations based on living plants. To study plant fractionation during the Paleogene, we collected samples from eight stratigraphic beds in the Bighorn Basin (Wyoming, USA) that ranged in age from 63 to 53 Ma. For each sample, we measured the δ13 C of angiosperm biomarkers (triterpenoids and n-alkanes) and, abundance permitting, conifer biomarkers (diterpenoids). Leaf δ13 C values estimated from different angiosperms biomarkers were consistently 2‰ lower than leaf δ13 C values for conifers calculated from diterpenoids. This difference is consistent with observations of living conifers and angiosperms and the consistency among different biomarkers suggests ancient εlipid values were similar to those in living plants. From these biomarker-based δ13Cleaf values and independent records of atmospheric δ13 C values, we calculated Δleaf. These calculated Δleaf values were then compared to Δleaf values modeled by applying the effects that precipitation and major taxonomic group in living plants have on Δleaf values. Calculated and modeled Δleaf values were offset by less than a permil. This similarity suggests that carbon fractionation in Paleogene plants changed with water availability and major taxonomic group to about the

  5. Transfer of carbon isotope in human and animal bodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For realistic estimation of internal dose due to 14C released from nuclear facilities, the one compartment model for 14C metabolism in the human body which ICRP recommends may be too simple to be applied, and precise information on metabolism of radioactive nuclides in the human body is essential. In this study, the exhalation rate of carbon from human and livestock animal bodies was investigated using stable carbon isotope 13C. A 13C amount of 200 mg was administered as 13C-labeled rice to 5 human subjects, and 13C ratios in expiration of the subjects were measured during 2 weeks after the administration. From 2 days prior to the administration to the end of the experiment, meals with a slightly controlled 13C ratio of carbon were offered to the subjects to reduce the fluctuation of background 13C ratio in their breath air. The averaged background 13C ratio in expiration among the subjects was -24.7±0.7 per mille before the ingestion of 13C enriched rice. The highest 13C ratio of 73.0±6.6 per mille was observed 350 min after the ingestion. In the temporal changes in 13C ratio in breath air, three components were observed to have decreasing half times of 3.8, 14.4 and 52.8 h, which may indicate the existence of three compartments in carbon metabolism in the human body. In addition, in order to investigate the transfer of 14C from plants to animal milk, which is one of the important pathways for the assessment of radiation dose due to radionuclides, an experiment to measure the excretion rate of carbon from goats which were given 13C labeled feed (1.174 13C atom%), as representative livestock ruminant, was carried out. The 13C ratio of milk was 1.191% when it reached a plateau, whereas the 13C ratio of serum continued to increase during the feeding period. (author)

  6. 特定化合物碳同位素分析系统中的氧化反应装置的研制%Combustion Reactor for Compound Specific of Carbon Isotope Ratio Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李中平; 李立武; 陶明信; 杜丽; 曹春辉; 王广; 徐义

    2012-01-01

    A combustion reactor, the intermediate junction part between the gas chromatography(GC) and the isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS), was developed by self-designing the major parts (including heating systems, temperature-control unit, the reaction systems and the connector). Between 600℃ and 950℃ , several working temperature was adopted to test the oxidizing efficiency of the newly-developed oxidation reactor by using the most representative chemically-stable hydrocarbon compounds (CH4, C2H6 and C3H8)) the results showed that the oxidation working temperature can be controlled with a high accuracy (± 1℃) and the carbon isotope ratio of hydrocarbons (δ13 C1, δ13 C2 and δ13 C3 ) gradually became stable with the reaction temperature increased, which conforms to the regular pattern of δ13Calkane analysis. Through the δ13Calkane analysis of hydrocarbon samples of different carbon number (l≤n ≤31), including the standard multi-components gaseous hydrocarbons, liquid hydrocarbon compounds (international reference standard) and the geological oil and gas samples, the δ13 Calkane accuracy is better than ± (0.2 - 0.5)%o> which can fully meet the related research needs. For the low-cost design and construction, this newly-developed oxidation reactor device can effectively reduce the analysis cost and it had made a good application in the δ13Calkane analysis.%通过对比实验,研制了特定化合物碳同位素在线分析系统中连接气相色谱与同位素比质谱的核心部分——氧化反应装置,包括加热系统、氧化反应系统及接口系统,并以特定化合物的碳同位素分析为例,选用天然气工作标准样品,在600~950℃之间选择8个温度点进行了氧化反应实验,表明其碳同位素测定值(δ13C1,δ13C2,δ13C3)随反应温度升高而逐渐趋于稳定,符合氧化反应过程的一般规律.通过对不同碳数(1≤n≤31)烃类样品(工作标准、国际参考标准、天然气及原油样品)

  7. Carbon isotopes in the ocean model of the Community Earth System Model (CESM1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Jahn

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Carbon isotopes in the ocean are frequently used as paleoclimate proxies and as present-day geochemical ocean tracers. In order to allow a more direct comparison of climate model results with this large and currently underutilized data set, we added a carbon isotope module to the ocean model of the Community Earth System Model (CESM, containing the cycling of the stable isotope 13C and the radioactive isotope 14C. We implemented the 14C tracer in two ways: in the "abiotic" case, the 14C tracer is only subject to air–sea gas exchange, physical transport, and radioactive decay, while in the "biotic" version, the 14C additionally follows the 13C tracer through all biogeochemical and ecological processes. Thus, the abiotic 14C tracer can be run without the ecosystem module, requiring significantly fewer computational resources. The carbon isotope module calculates the carbon isotopic fractionation during gas exchange, photosynthesis, and calcium carbonate formation, while any subsequent biological process such as remineralization as well as any external inputs are assumed to occur without fractionation. Given the uncertainty associated with the biological fractionation during photosynthesis, we implemented and tested three parameterizations of different complexity. Compared to present-day observations, the model is able to simulate the oceanic 14C bomb uptake and the 13C Suess effect reasonably well compared to observations and other model studies. At the same time, the carbon isotopes reveal biases in the physical model, for example, too sluggish ventilation of the deep Pacific Ocean.

  8. Carbon isotopes in the ocean model of the Community Earth System Model (CESM1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahn, A.; Lindsay, K.; Giraud, X.; Gruber, N.; Otto-Bliesner, B. L.; Liu, Z.; Brady, E. C.

    2015-08-01

    Carbon isotopes in the ocean are frequently used as paleoclimate proxies and as present-day geochemical ocean tracers. In order to allow a more direct comparison of climate model results with this large and currently underutilized data set, we added a carbon isotope module to the ocean model of the Community Earth System Model (CESM), containing the cycling of the stable isotope 13C and the radioactive isotope 14C. We implemented the 14C tracer in two ways: in the "abiotic" case, the 14C tracer is only subject to air-sea gas exchange, physical transport, and radioactive decay, while in the "biotic" version, the 14C additionally follows the 13C tracer through all biogeochemical and ecological processes. Thus, the abiotic 14C tracer can be run without the ecosystem module, requiring significantly fewer computational resources. The carbon isotope module calculates the carbon isotopic fractionation during gas exchange, photosynthesis, and calcium carbonate formation, while any subsequent biological process such as remineralization as well as any external inputs are assumed to occur without fractionation. Given the uncertainty associated with the biological fractionation during photosynthesis, we implemented and tested three parameterizations of different complexity. Compared to present-day observations, the model is able to simulate the oceanic 14C bomb uptake and the 13C Suess effect reasonably well compared to observations and other model studies. At the same time, the carbon isotopes reveal biases in the physical model, for example, too sluggish ventilation of the deep Pacific Ocean.

  9. Carbon isotopes in the ocean model of the Community Earth System Model (CESM1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Jahn

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Carbon isotopes in the ocean are frequently used as paleo climate proxies and as present-day geochemical ocean tracers. In order to allow a more direct comparison of climate model results with this large and currently underutilized dataset, we added a carbon isotope module to the ocean model of the Community Earth System Model (CESM, containing the cycling of the stable isotope 13C and the radioactive isotope 14C. We implemented the 14C tracer in two ways: in the "abiotic" case, the 14C tracer is only subject to air–sea gas exchange, physical transport, and radioactive decay, while in the "biotic" version, the 14C additionally follows the 13C tracer through all biogeochemical and ecological processes. Thus, the abiotic 14C tracer can be run without the ecosystem module, requiring significantly less computational resources. The carbon isotope module calculates the carbon isotopic fractionation during gas exchange, photosynthesis, and calcium carbonate formation, while any subsequent biological process such as remineralization as well as any external inputs are assumed to occur without fractionation. Given the uncertainty associated with the biological fractionation during photosynthesis, we implemented and tested three parameterizations of different complexity. Compared to present-day observations, the model is able to simulate the oceanic 14C bomb uptake and the 13C Suess effect reasonably well compared to observations and other model studies. At the same time, the carbon isotopes reveal biases in the physical model, for example a too sluggish ventilation of the deep Pacific Ocean.

  10. Observations of Carbon Isotopic Fractionation in Interstellar Formaldehyde

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirstrom, E. S.; Charnley, S. B.; Geppert, W. D.; Persson, C. M.

    2012-01-01

    Primitive Solar System materials (e.g. chondrites. IDPs, the Stardust sample) show large variations in isotopic composition of the major volatiles (H, C, N, and O ) even within samples, witnessing to various degrees of processing in the protosolar nebula. For ex ample. the very pronounced D enhancements observed in IDPs [I] . are only generated in the cold. dense component of the interstellar medium (ISM), or protoplanetary disks, through ion-molecule reactions in the presence of interstellar dust. If this isotopic anomaly has an interstellar origin, this leaves open the possibility for preservation of other isotopic signatures throughout the form ation of the Solar System. The most common form of carbon in the ISM is CO molecules, and there are two potential sources of C-13 fractionation in this reservoir: low temperature chemistry and selective photodissociation. While gas-phase chemistry in cold interstellar clouds preferentially incorporates C-13 into CO [2], the effect of self-shielding in the presence of UV radiation instead leads to a relative enhancement of the more abundant isotopologue, 12CO. Solar System organic material exhibit rather small fluctuations in delta C-13 as compared to delta N-15 and delta D [3][1], the reason for which is still unclear. However, the fact that both C-13 depleted and enhanced material exists could indicate an interstellar origin where the two fractionation processes have both played a part. Formaldehyde (H2CO) is observed in the gas-phase in a wide range of interstellar environments, as well as in cometary comae. It is proposed as an important reactant in the formation of more complex organic molecules in the heated environments around young stars, and formaldehyde polymers have been suggested as the common origin of chondritic insoluable organic matter (IOM) and cometary refractory organic solids [4]. The relatively high gas-phase abundance of H2CO observed in molecular clouds (10(exp- 9) - 10(exp- 8) relative to H2) makes

  11. Carbon allocation and carbon isotope fluxes in the plant-soil-atmosphere continuum: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Brüggemann

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The terrestrial carbon (C cycle has received increasing interest over the past few decades, however, there is still a lack of understanding of the fate of newly assimilated C allocated within plants and to the soil, stored within ecosystems and lost to the atmosphere. Stable carbon isotope studies can give novel insights into these issues. In this review we provide an overview of an emerging picture of plant-soil-atmosphere C fluxes, as based on C isotope studies, and identify processes determining related C isotope signatures. The first part of the review focuses on isotopic fractionation processes within plants during and after photosynthesis. The second major part elaborates on plant-internal and plant-rhizosphere C allocation patterns at different time scales (diel, seasonal, interannual, including the speed of C transfer and time lags in the coupling of assimilation and respiration, as well as the magnitude and controls of plant-soil C allocation and respiratory fluxes. Plant responses to changing environmental conditions, the functional relationship between the physiological and phenological status of plants and C transfer, and interactions between C, water and nutrient dynamics are discussed. The role of the C counterflow from the rhizosphere to the aboveground parts of the plants, e.g. via CO2 dissolved in the xylem water or as xylem-transported sugars, is highlighted. The third part is centered around belowground C turnover, focusing especially on above- and belowground litter inputs, soil organic matter formation and turnover, production and loss of dissolved organic C, soil respiration and CO2 fixation by soil microbes. Furthermore, plant controls on microbial communities and activity via exudates and litter production as well as microbial community effects on C mineralization are reviewed. A further part of the paper is dedicated to physical interactions between soil CO2 and the soil matrix, such as

  12. Intra-annual variability of carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes in suspended organic matter in waters of the western continental shelf of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Maya, M.V.; Karapurkar, S.G.; Naik, H.; Roy, R.; Shenoy, D.M.; Naqvi, S.W.A.

    and later air dried in a clean laminar flow to remove all traces of acid fumes. Elemental and isotopic measure- ments were made on single filters. Two to three aliquots of 12 mm diameter were sub-sectioned from the filter paper and packed tightly in tin cups... for analysis of isotopic ratios. Stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios were measured us- ing a Thermo Finnigan DELTA V plus isotope ratio mass spectrometer in continuous-flow mode after high tempera- ture flash combustion at 1050 ◦C in a EURO3000 Eurovector...

  13. On the isotope ratio of hydrogen, oxygen, carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur in man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental investigations of the isotope ratio of hydrogen, oxygen, carbon, nitrogen and sulfur in urine of persons living at different locations show considerable variations. A distinct relation to the isotope ratio of the local drinking water has only been observed in the case of hydrogen. The variations are far from being within the experimental limits of error. Therefore, they are decisive in selecting the relative abundance of the labelling isotope in tracer experiments on human metabolism. (author)

  14. The relationship between needle sugar carbon isotope ratios and tree rings of larch in Siberia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinne, K T; Saurer, M; Kirdyanov, A V; Loader, N J; Bryukhanova, M V; Werner, R A; Siegwolf, R T W

    2015-11-01

    Significant gaps still exist in our knowledge about post-photosynthetic leaf level and downstream metabolic processes and isotopic fractionations. This includes their impact on the isotopic climate signal stored in the carbon isotope composition (δ(13)C) of leaf assimilates and tree rings. For the first time, we compared the seasonal δ(13)C variability of leaf sucrose with intra-annual, high-resolution δ(13)C signature of tree rings from larch (Larix gmelinii Rupr.). The trees were growing at two sites in the continuous permafrost zone of Siberia with different growth conditions. Our results indicate very similar low-frequency intra-seasonal trends of the sucrose and tree ring δ(13)C records with little or no indication for the use of 'old' photosynthates formed during the previous year(s). The comparison of leaf sucrose δ(13)C values with that in other leaf sugars and in tree rings elucidates the cause for the reported (13)C-enrichment of sink organs compared with leaves. We observed that while the average δ(13)C of all needle sugars was 1.2‰ more negative than δ(13)C value of wood, the δ(13)C value of the transport sugar sucrose was on an average 1.0‰ more positive than that of wood. Our study shows a high potential of the combined use of compound-specific isotope analysis of sugars (leaf and phloem) with intra-annual tree ring δ(13)C measurements for deepening our understanding about the mechanisms controlling the isotope variability in tree rings under different environmental conditions.

  15. Evaluation of online carbon isotope dilution mass spectrometry for the purity assessment of synthetic peptide standards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Díaz, Sergio Cueto; Ruiz Encinar, Jorge, E-mail: ruizjorge@uniovi.es; García Alonso, J. Ignacio, E-mail: jiga@uniovi.es

    2014-09-24

    Highlights: • Purity assessment of peptide standards applicable to any water soluble peptide. • Online {sup 13}C isotope dilution mass spectrometry. • Mass flow chromatogram from measured 44/45 isotope ratios. • Validation by the analysis of NIST 8327. - Abstract: We present a novel method for the purity assessment of peptide standards which is applicable to any water soluble peptide. The method is based on the online {sup 13}C isotope dilution approach in which the peptide is separated from its related impurities by liquid chromatography (LC) and the eluent is mixed post-column with a continuous flow of {sup 13}C-enriched sodium bicarbonate. An online oxidation step using sodium persulfate in acidic media at 99 °C provides quantitative oxidation to {sup 12}CO{sub 2} and {sup 13}CO{sub 2} respectively which is extracted to a gaseous phase with the help of a gas permeable membrane. The measurement of the isotope ratio 44/45 in the mass spectrometer allows the construction of the mass flow chromatogram. As the only species that is finally measured in the mass spectrometer is CO{sub 2}, the peptide content in the standard can be quantified, on the base of its carbon content, using a generic primary standard such as potassium hydrogen phthalate. The approach was validated by the analysis of a reference material (NIST 8327), and applied to the quantification of two commercial synthetic peptide standards. In that case, the results obtained were compared with those obtained using alternative methods, such as amino acid analysis and ICP-MS. The results obtained proved the value of the method for the fast, accurate and precise mass purity assignment of synthetic peptide standards.

  16. Evaluation of online carbon isotope dilution mass spectrometry for the purity assessment of synthetic peptide standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Purity assessment of peptide standards applicable to any water soluble peptide. • Online 13C isotope dilution mass spectrometry. • Mass flow chromatogram from measured 44/45 isotope ratios. • Validation by the analysis of NIST 8327. - Abstract: We present a novel method for the purity assessment of peptide standards which is applicable to any water soluble peptide. The method is based on the online 13C isotope dilution approach in which the peptide is separated from its related impurities by liquid chromatography (LC) and the eluent is mixed post-column with a continuous flow of 13C-enriched sodium bicarbonate. An online oxidation step using sodium persulfate in acidic media at 99 °C provides quantitative oxidation to 12CO2 and 13CO2 respectively which is extracted to a gaseous phase with the help of a gas permeable membrane. The measurement of the isotope ratio 44/45 in the mass spectrometer allows the construction of the mass flow chromatogram. As the only species that is finally measured in the mass spectrometer is CO2, the peptide content in the standard can be quantified, on the base of its carbon content, using a generic primary standard such as potassium hydrogen phthalate. The approach was validated by the analysis of a reference material (NIST 8327), and applied to the quantification of two commercial synthetic peptide standards. In that case, the results obtained were compared with those obtained using alternative methods, such as amino acid analysis and ICP-MS. The results obtained proved the value of the method for the fast, accurate and precise mass purity assignment of synthetic peptide standards

  17. Non-destructive measurement of carbonic anhydrase activity and the oxygen isotope composition of soil water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Sam; Sauze, Joana; Ogée, Jérôme; Wohl, Steven; Bosc, Alexandre; Wingate, Lisa

    2016-04-01

    Carbonic anhydrases are a group of metalloenzymes that catalyse the hydration of aqueous carbon dioxide (CO2). The expression of carbonic anhydrase by bacteria, archaea and eukarya has been linked to a variety of important biological processes including pH regulation, substrate supply and biomineralisation. As oxygen isotopes are exchanged between CO2 and water during hydration, the presence of carbonic anhydrase in plants and soil organisms also influences the oxygen isotope budget of atmospheric CO2. Leaf and soil water pools have distinct oxygen isotope compositions, owing to differences in pool sizes and evaporation rates, which are imparted on CO2during hydration. These differences in the isotopic signature of CO2 interacting with leaves and soil can be used to partition the contribution of photosynthesis and soil respiration to net terrestrial CO2 exchange. However, this relies on our knowledge of soil carbonic anhydrase activity and currently, the prevalence and function of these enzymes in soils is poorly understood. Isotopic approaches used to estimate soil carbonic anhydrase activity typically involve the inversion of models describing the oxygen isotope composition of CO2 fluxes to solve for the apparent, potentially catalysed, rate of oxygen exchange during hydration. This requires information about the composition of CO2 in isotopic equilibrium with soil water obtained from destructive, depth-resolved soil water sampling. This can represent a significant challenge in data collection given the considerable potential for spatial and temporal variability in the isotopic composition of soil water and limited a priori information with respect to the appropriate sampling resolution and depth. We investigated whether we could circumvent this requirement by constraining carbonic anhydrase activity and the composition of soil water in isotopic equilibrium with CO2 by solving simultaneously the mass balance for two soil CO2 steady states differing only in the

  18. Interannual variability in seagrass carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes from the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary, a preliminary study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fourqurean, J. W.; Fourqurean, J. W.; Anderson, W. T.; Anderson, W. T.

    2001-12-01

    The shallow marine waters surrounding the southern tip of Florida provide an ideal environment for seagrasses, which are the most common benthic community in the region. Yet, these communities are susceptible to a variety of anthropogenic disturbances, especially changes in water quality caused by an increase the nutrient flux to the near shore environment. In order to better understand the carbon and nitrogen isotopic ratio in marine plants, an extensive times series analysis was constructed from quarterly sampling of Thalassia testudinum (the dominate species in the study area) from 1996 through 1998. Sites for study where selected from permanent stations within the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary (FKNMS), from both sides of the Florida Keys - two stations on the bay side and two stations on the reef side. These data will also help to constrain elements of the carbon and nitrogen cycles affecting this region. The data analyzed over the three year study period show unique cyclic trends associated with seasonal changes in primary productivity and potentially changes in the nitrogen and carbon pools. Additionally, the analysis of our time series indicates that isotope food web studies need to take into account spatial and temporal changes when evaluating trophic levels. The mean carbon and nitrogen isotope values of T. testudinum from all 4 stations vary respectively from -7.2 per mil to -10.41 and 1.1 per mil to 2.2 per mil (n = 48). However, certain stations displayed anonymously depleted nitrogen isotope values, values as low as -1.2 per mil. These values potentially indicated that biogeochmical processes like N fixation, ammonification and denitrification cause regional pattern in the isotopic composition of the source DIN. Both carbon and nitrogen isotopes displayed seasonal enrichment-depletion trends, with maximum enrichment occurring during the summer. The overall seasonal variation for carbon 13 from the different stations ranged from 1 per mil to

  19. Do stable carbon isotopes of brown coal woods record changes in Lower Miocene palaeoecology?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poole, I.J.; Dolezych, M.; Kool, J.; Burgh, J. van der; Bergen, P.F. van

    2006-01-01

    Stable carbon isotope ratios of fossil wood from the Miocene brown coal deposits in former East Germany are compared with palaeobotanical and sedimentological data to test the use of stable isotopes in determining palaeoenvironment. Significant differences in the chemical composition of samples from

  20. Spatial and Temporal Trends in Stable Carbon and Oxygen Isotope Ratios of Juvenile Winter Flounder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isotopic ratios of fish otoliths have been used in numerous studies as natural tags or markers to aid the study of connectivity among fish populations. We investigated the use of spatial and temporal changes in the stable carbon and oxygen isotope ratios of otoliths to different...

  1. Soil drying effects on the carbon isotope composition of soil respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stable isotopes are used widely as a tool for determining sources of carbon (C) fluxes in ecosystem C studies. Environmental factors that change over time, such as moisture, can create dynamic changes in the isotopic composition of C assimilated by plants, and offers a unique opp...

  2. Is my C isotope excursion global, local, or both? Insights from the Mg and Ca isotopic composition of primary, diagenetic, and authigenic carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, J. A.; Blättler, C. L.; Husson, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    The C isotopic composition of ancient limestones and dolomites is a widely used proxy for the global geochemical cycles of carbon and oxygen in the ocean-atmosphere system and a critical tool for chemostratigraphy in Precambrian rocks. Although relatively robust to diagenesis, the C isotopic composition of bulk carbonates can be reset when conditions favor high water-to-rock ratios or fluids with high C concentrations and distinct isotopic compositions. Authigenic carbonates and different pools of primary carbonate (e.g. calcite vs. aragonite) may also bias the C isotopic composition of bulk carbonates if they are both abundant and isotopically distinct. New approaches to quantifying contributions from diagenesis, authigenesis, and mixing of primary carbonates to the C isotopic composition of bulk sedimentary carbonates are needed. Here we present preliminary Mg and Ca isotope data sets of primary, diagenetic, and authigenic carbonates, both modern and ancient. We show that recrystallization, dolomitization, and authigenesis produce Mg and Ca isotope fingerprints that may be used to identify and characterize these processes in ancient carbonate sediments.

  3. Application of isotope techniques to carbonate rock aquifers: Some Indian examples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isotope hydrological investigations were carried out to study the origin of ground water and surface water-ground water interactions in two carbonate rock terrains - Jhamarkotra rock phosphate mine, Rajasthan and Amner river basin, Madhya Pradesh - situated in different settings

  4. Stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen in suspended matter and sediments from the Godavari estuary

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sarma, V.V.S.S.; Arya, J.; Subbaiah, Ch.V.; Naidu, S.A.; Gawade, L.; PraveenKumar, P.; Reddy, N.P.C.

    Spatial distribution of the carbon and nitrogen content and their isotopic enrichment in suspended matter and sediments were measured in the Godavari estuary to identify the sources and transformation mechanism of organic matter. Significant...

  5. The evolution of Carbon isotopes in calcite in the presence of cyanobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Christian; Mavromatis, Vasileios; Pokrovsky, Oleg S.; Oelkers, Eric H.

    2016-04-01

    Stable isotopic compositions in carbonates are widely used as indicators of environmental conditions prevailing during mineral formation. This reconstruction is substantially based on the assumption that there is no change in the mineral composition over geological time. However, recent experimental studies have shown that carbon and magnesium isotopes in hydrous Mg-carbonates undergo continuous re-equilibration with the ambient solution even after mineral precipitation stopped ([1] and [2], respectively). To verify whether this holds true for anhydrous Ca-bearing carbonates which readily form at earth's surface environments, a series of batch system calcite precipitation experiments were performed in the presence of actively growing cyanobacteria Synechococcus sp. The bacteria were grown at ambient temperature in a BG11 culture medium (SIGMA C3061) and continuous stirring, air-bubbling and illumination. Calcite precipitation was initiated by the addition of 8.5mM CaCl2 and 0-50 mM NaHCO3 or NaHCO3-Na2CO3 mixtures. The presence of cyanobacteria is on one hand promoting CaCO3 formation due to increasing pH resulting from photosynthesis. On the other hand, actively growing cyanobacteria drastically change carbon isotope signature of the aqueous fluid phase by preferably incorporating the lighter 12C isotope into biomass [1]. This study explores the effect of continuously changing carbon isotope compositions in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) on precipitated calcite which is in chemical equilibrium with the ambient fluid phase. [1] Mavromatis et al. (2015). The continuous re-equilibration of carbon isotope compositions of hydrous Mg-carbonates in the presence of cyanobacteria. Chem. Geol. 404, 41-51 [2] Mavromatis et al. (2012). Magnesium isotope fractionation during hydrous magnesium carbonate precipitation with and without cyanobacteria. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 76, 161-174

  6. Carbon isotopic record from Upper Devonian carbonates at Dongcun in Guilin, southern China, supporting the world-wide pattern of carbon isotope excursions during Frasnian-Famennian transition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Two positive δ13C excursions are presented in records from the Frasnian-Famennian (F-F) marine carbonate sediments in Europe, America, Africa, and Australia, having been considered as a worldwide pattern, and attributed to enhanced organic carbon burial during the F-F biological mass extinction. However, this worldwide pattern has not been revealed from the well-deposited Late Devonian sequences in southern China. In this paper, a detailed investigation has been made on the Late Devonian section at Dongcun, Guilin, southern China to constrain perturbations in δ13C of carbonates in the F-F deposited sequence. The result from this section also indicates two positive δ13C excursions during the F-F transition. The first excursion with an amplitude of 1.5‰ occurred at the bottom of linguiformis Zone, later than the early excursion existing in the Late rhenana Zone of the Late Devonian profiles in other continents, especially, in central Europe. This difference has been expected to be a result as conodont Palmatolepis linguiformis occurred earlier in southern China than other sites. The second excursion with an amplitude of 2.1‰ is located at the F-F boundary, same as the records from other continents. This result strongly supports the view that two carbon isotope positive excursions during the F-F transition are common in carbonate sediments, resulting from worldwide increases of organic carbon burial intensity.

  7. Stable carbon isotope discrimination in the smut fungus Ustilago violacea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haploid strains 15.10, I.C429, and I.C2y and diploid strain JK2 of Ustilago Piolacea were grown on one or more of the following carbon sources: glucose, sucrose, maltose, inulin, starch, inositol, glycerol, casein, and yeast extract. The media, both before and after fungal growth, and the fungal cells were analyzed for 13C/12C content (δ13 values) using an isotope ratio mass spectrometer after combustion to CO2. In all cases, the used and unused media had identical δ13C values. Strain 15.10 had significantly less 13C than the media when grown on glucose, sucrose, maltose, and inositol; significantly more 13C when grown on inulin, starch, and glycerol; and no significant difference in δ13C values when grown on casein and yeast extract media. Other haploid strains responded similarly to 15.10. Diploid strain JK2 was also depleted in 13C when grown on glucose and enriched in 13C when grown on glycerol; however, JK2 was slightly depleted in 13C when grown on casein, whereas all the tested haploid strains were enriched in 13C

  8. Decoupling of carbon isotope records between organic matter and carbonate prior to the Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Event (Early Jurassic)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodin, Stephane; Kothe, Tim; Krencker, Francois-Nicolas; Suan, Guillaume; Heimhofer, Ulrich; Immenhauser, Adrian

    2014-05-01

    Across the Pliensbachian-Toarcian boundary (P-To, Early Jurassic), ca. 1 Myr before the Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Event (T-OAE), an initial negative carbon isotope excursion has been documented in western Tethys sedimentary rocks. In carbonate, its amplitude (2-3 permil) is similar to the subsequent excursion recorded at the onset of the T-OAE. Being also associated with a rapid warming event, the significance of this first carbon isotope shift, in terms of paleoenvironmental interpretation and triggering mechanism, remains however elusive. Taking advantage of expanded and rather continuous sections in the High Atlas of Morocco, several high-resolution, paired organic-inorganic carbon isotope records have been obtained across the Upper Pliensbachian - Lower Toarcian interval. At the onset of the T-OAE, an abrupt 1-2 permil negative shift is recorded in both organic and inorganic phases, succeeded by a relatively longer term 1-2 permil negative trend and a final slow return to pre-excursion conditions. In accordance with previous interpretations, this pattern indicates a perturbation of the entire exogenic carbon isotope reservoir at the onset of the T-OAE by the sudden release of isotopically light carbon into the atmosphere. By contrast, there is no negative shift in carbon isotopes for the P-To event recorded in bulk organic matter of Morocco. Given the strong dominance of terrestrial particles in the bulk organic matter fraction, this absence indicates that massive input of 12C-rich carbon into the atmosphere is not likely to have happened during the P-To event. A pronounced (2 permil) and abrupt negative shift in carbon isotope is however recorded in the bulk carbonate phase. We suggest that this decoupling between organic and inorganic phase is due to changes in the nature of the bulk carbonate phase. Indeed, the negative shift occurs at the lithological transition between Pliensbachian-lowermost Toarcian limestone-marl alternations and the Lower Toarcian marl

  9. Modelling carbon isotope composition of dissolved inorganic carbon and methane in marine porewaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meister, Patrick; Liu, Bo; Khalili, Arzhang; Barker Jørgensen, Bo

    2014-05-01

    Carbon isotope compositions of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and methane (CH4) in marine sedimentary porewaters at near surface temperatures show extremely large variation in apparent fractionation covering a range from -100 ‰ to +30 ‰. This fractionation is essentially the result of microbial activity, but the mechanisms and factors controlling this fractionation are still incompletely understood. This study provides a reaction transport model approach to evaluate the effects of the most important processes and factors on carbon isotope distribution with the goal to better understand carbon isotope distribution in modern sediment porewaters and in the geological record. Our model results show that kinetic fractionation during methanogenesis, both through the acetoclastic and autotrophic pathways, results in a nearly symmetrical distribution of δ13C values in DIC and CH4 with respect to the isotope value of buried organic matter. An increased fractionation factor during methanogenesis leads to a larger difference between δ13CDIC and δ13CCH4. Near the sulphate methane transition zone, DIC is more depleted in 13C due to diffusive mixing with DIC produced by anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) and organoclastic sulphate reduction. The model also shows that an upward decrease in δ13CCH4 near the SMT can only be caused by equilibrium fractionation during AOM including a backward "leakage" of carbon from DIC to CH4 through the enzymatic pathway. However, this effect of reversibility has no influence on the DIC pool as long as methane is completely consumed at the SMT. Only a release of methane at the sediment-water interface, due to a fraction of the methane escaping re-oxidation, results in a small shift towards more positive δ13CDIC values. Methane escape at the SMT is possible if either the methane flux is too high to be entirely oxidized by AOM, or if bubbles of methane gas by-pass the sulphate reduction zone and escape episodically into the water column

  10. Complementary constraints from carbon (13C) and nitrogen (15N) isotopes on the glacial ocean's soft-tissue biological pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmittner, A.; Somes, C. J.

    2016-06-01

    during the LGM. Both circulation and biological nutrient utilization could contribute. However, these conclusions are preliminary given our idealized experiments, which do not consider changes in benthic denitrification and spatially inhomogenous changes in aeolian iron fluxes. The analysis illustrates interactions between the carbon and nitrogen cycles as well as the complementary constraints provided by their isotopes. Whereas carbon isotopes are sensitive to circulation changes and indicate well the three-dimensional Corg distribution, nitrogen isotopes are more sensitive to biological nutrient utilization.

  11. Historic Carbon Isotopic Shifts in Pinyon Pines and Woodland Junipers are Unprecedented During the Quaternary History of These Taxa

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Water, P. K.; Leavitt, S. W.; Betancourt, J. L.

    2003-12-01

    Packrat (Neotoma) midden macrofossil records from arid and semiarid western North America provide evidence that pinyon pines and woodland junipers have grown together for at least the past 50,000 radiocarbon years. The midden records show that this association was sustained despite large-scale changes in climate and atmospheric CO2 concentrations over the past 50 millenia. Reconstruction of physiological parameters, using 13C analysis of a select sample of pinyon pine and juniper macrofossils from radiocarbon-dated ancient packrat middens, shows distinct physical responses to these changes despite a offset between the carbon isotopic values of the two genera, with pinyon pines having consistently lower 13C values than junipers. Remarkably, analysis of historic (from herbarium sheets) and present-day (from field collections) materials from northern Arizona and the Four-Corners region indicates that the long-term offset between the carbon isotopic values of pinyon pines and woodland junipers has inverted; with the junipers now providing isotopically lighter values than the pinyon pines. This reversal began in the late 1800's to early 1900's and has widened over the past century. The inverted isotopic offsets in the historic period may be due to the unprecedented levels of carbon dioxide and other trace gases in the atmosphere.

  12. Detection of adulterated honey produced by honeybee (Apis mellifera L.) colonies fed with different levels of commercial industrial sugar (C₃ and C₄ plants) syrups by the carbon isotope ratio analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guler, Ahmet; Kocaokutgen, Hasan; Garipoglu, Ali V; Onder, Hasan; Ekinci, Deniz; Biyik, Selim

    2014-07-15

    In the present study, one hundred pure and adulterated honey samples obtained from feeding honeybee colonies with different levels (5, 20 and 100 L/colony) of various commercial sugar syrups including High Fructose Corn Syrup 85 (HFCS-85), High Fructose Corn Syrup 55 (HFCS-55), Bee Feeding Syrup (BFS), Glucose Monohydrate Sugar (GMS) and Sucrose Sugar (SS) were evaluated in terms of the δ(13)C value of honey and its protein, difference between the δ(13)C value of protein and honey (Δδ(13)C), and C4% sugar ratio. Sugar type, sugar level and the sugar type*sugar level interaction were found to be significant (Psyrup level of all sugar types when the δ(13)C value of honey, Δδ(13)C (protein-honey), and C4% sugar ratio were used as criteria according to the AOAC standards. However, it was possible to detect the adulteration by using the same criteria in the honeys taken from the 20 and 100 L/colony of HFCS-85 and the 100L/colony of HFCS-55. Adulteration at low syrup level (20 L/colony) was more easily detected when the fructose content of HFCS syrup increased. As a result, the official methods (AOAC, 978.17, 1995; AOAC, 991.41, 1995; AOAC 998.12, 2005) and Internal Standard Carbon Isotope Ratio Analysis could not efficiently detect the indirect adulteration of honey obtained by feeding the bee colonies with the syrups produced from C3 plants such as sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) and wheat (Triticium vulgare). For this reason, it is strongly needed to develop novel methods and standards that can detect the presence and the level of indirect adulterations. PMID:24594168

  13. Detection of adulterated honey produced by honeybee (Apis mellifera L.) colonies fed with different levels of commercial industrial sugar (C₃ and C₄ plants) syrups by the carbon isotope ratio analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guler, Ahmet; Kocaokutgen, Hasan; Garipoglu, Ali V; Onder, Hasan; Ekinci, Deniz; Biyik, Selim

    2014-07-15

    In the present study, one hundred pure and adulterated honey samples obtained from feeding honeybee colonies with different levels (5, 20 and 100 L/colony) of various commercial sugar syrups including High Fructose Corn Syrup 85 (HFCS-85), High Fructose Corn Syrup 55 (HFCS-55), Bee Feeding Syrup (BFS), Glucose Monohydrate Sugar (GMS) and Sucrose Sugar (SS) were evaluated in terms of the δ(13)C value of honey and its protein, difference between the δ(13)C value of protein and honey (Δδ(13)C), and C4% sugar ratio. Sugar type, sugar level and the sugar type*sugar level interaction were found to be significant (Phoney, Δδ(13)C (protein-honey), and C4% sugar ratio were used as criteria according to the AOAC standards. However, it was possible to detect the adulteration by using the same criteria in the honeys taken from the 20 and 100 L/colony of HFCS-85 and the 100L/colony of HFCS-55. Adulteration at low syrup level (20 L/colony) was more easily detected when the fructose content of HFCS syrup increased. As a result, the official methods (AOAC, 978.17, 1995; AOAC, 991.41, 1995; AOAC 998.12, 2005) and Internal Standard Carbon Isotope Ratio Analysis could not efficiently detect the indirect adulteration of honey obtained by feeding the bee colonies with the syrups produced from C3 plants such as sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) and wheat (Triticium vulgare). For this reason, it is strongly needed to develop novel methods and standards that can detect the presence and the level of indirect adulterations.

  14. Carbon allocation belowground in Pinus pinaster using stable carbon isotope pulse labeling technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dannoura, M.; Bosc, A.; Chipeaux, C.; Sartore, M.; Lambrot, C.; Trichet, P.; Bakker, M.; Loustau, D.; Epron, D.

    2010-12-01

    Carbon allocation belowground competes with aboveground growth and biomass production. In the other hand, it contributes to resource acquisition such as nutrient, water and carbon sequestration in soil. Thus, a better characterization of carbon flow from plant to soil and its residence time within each compartment is an important issue for understanding and modeling forest ecosystem carbon budget. 13C pulse labeling of whole crown was conducted at 4 seasons to study the fate of assimilated carbon by photosynthesis into the root on 12 year old Pinus pinaster planted in the INRA domain of Pierroton. Maritime pine is the most widely planted species in South-West Europe. Stem, root and soil CO2 effluxes and their isotope composition were measured continuously by tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy with a trace gas analyzer (TGA 100A; Campbell Scientific) coupled to flow-through chambers. 13CO2 recovery and peak were observed in respiration of each compartment after labeling. It appeared sequentially from top of stem to bottom, and to coarse root. The maximum velocity of carbon transfer was calculated as the difference in time lag of recovery between two positions on the trunk or on the root. It ranged between 0.08-0.2 m h-1 in stem and between 0.04-0.12 m h-1 in coarse root. This velocity was higher in warmer season, and the difference between time lag of recovery and peak increased after first frost. Photosynthates arrived underground 1.5 to 5 days after labeling, at similar time in soil CO2 effluxes and coarse root respiration. 0.08-1.4 g of carbon was respired per tree during first 20 days following labeling. It presented 0.6 -10% of 13C used for labeling and it is strongly related to seasons. The isotope signal was detected in fine root organs and microbial biomass by periodical core sampling. The peak was observed 6 days after labeling in early summer while it was delayed more than 10 days in autumn and winter with less amount of carbon allocated

  15. The modeling of carbon isotope kinetics and its application to the evaluation of natural gas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xianqing LI; Xianming XIAO; Yongchun TANG; Hui TIAN; Qiang ZHOU; Yunfeng YANG; Peng DONG; Yan WANG; Zhihong SONG

    2008-01-01

    The modeling of carbon isotope kinetics of natural gas is an issue driving pioneering research in the oil and gas geochemistry in China and internationally.Combined with the sedimentary burial history and basin geothermal history,the modeling of carbon isotope kinetics provides a new and effective means for the determination of the origin and accumulation history of natural gas pools.In this paper,we introduce the modeling of carbon isotope kinetics of natural gas formation and its applications to the assessment of natural gas maturity,the determination of the gas source,the history of gas accumulation,and the oil-gas ratio.It is shown that this approach is of great value for these applications.The carbon isotopic characteristics of natural gas are not only affected by the gas source and maturity of the source rock,but also are related to the accumulation condition and geothermal gradient in a basin.There are obvious differences in the characteristics of carbon isotope ratios between instantaneous gas and cumulative gas.Different basins have different kinetic models of carbon isotope fractionation,which depends on the gas source condition,the accumulation history and the sedimentary-tectonic history.Since the origin of natural gas in the superimposed basin in China is very complicated,and the natural gas pool is characterized by multiphase and variable gas-sources,this paper may provide a new perspective on the study and evaluation of natural gas.

  16. USE OF STABLE CARBON ISOTOPE RATIOS OF FATTY ACIDS TO EVALUATE MICROBIAL CARBON SOURCES IN TERRESTRIAL ENVIRONMENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    We use measurements of the concentration and stable carbon isotopic ratio (D 13C) of individual microbial phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) in soils as indicators of live microbial biomass levels and microbial carbon source. We found that intensive sugar cane cultivation leads to ...

  17. Carbon isotopic evidence for microbial control of carbon supply to Orca Basin at the brine-seawater interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. R. Shah

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Orca Basin, an intraslope basin on the Texas–Louisiana continental slope, hosts a hypersaline, anoxic brine in its lowermost 200 m. This brine contains a large reservoir of reduced and aged carbon, and appears to be stable at decadal time scales: concentrations and the isotopic composition of dissolved inorganic (DIC and organic carbon (DOC are similar to previous reports. Both DIC and DOC are more "aged" within the brine pool than in overlying water, and the isotopic contrast between brine carbon and seawater carbon is much greater for DIC than DOC. While the stable carbon isotopic composition of brine DIC points towards a combination of methane and organic carbon re-mineralization as its source, radiocarbon and box model results point to the brine interface as the major source region for DIC with oxidation of methane diffusing upwards from sediments supplying only limited DIC to the brine. This conclusion is consistent with previous studies reporting microbial activity focused at the seawater-brine interface. Isotopic similarities between DIC and DOC suggest a different relationship between these two carbon reservoirs than is typically observed in deep ocean basins. Radiocarbon values implicate the seawater-brine interface region as the likely source region for DOC as well as DIC. Further investigations of the seawater-brine interface are needed to advance our understanding of the specific microbial processes contributing to dissolved carbon storage in the Orca Basin brine.

  18. Carbon mass-balance modeling and carbon isotope exchange processes in the Curonian Lagoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barisevičiūtė, Rūta; Žilius, Mindaugas; Ertürk, Ali; Petkuvienė, Jolita

    2016-04-01

    The Curonian lagoon one of the largest coastal lagoons in Europe is located in the southeastern part of the Baltic Sea and lies along the Baltic coast of Lithuania and the Kaliningrad region of Russia. It is influenced by a discharge of the Nemunas and other smaller rivers and saline water of the Baltic Sea. The narrow (width 0.4 km, deep 8-14 m) Klaipėda Strait is the only way for fresh water run-off and brackish water intrusions. This research is focused on carbon isotope fractionations related with air - water exchange, primary production and organic carbon sedimentation, mineralization and uptake from both marine and terrestrial sources.

  19. Method for determination of stable carbon isotope ratio of methylnitrophenols in atmospheric particulate matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Moukhtar

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available A technique for the measurement of the stable isotope ratio of methylnitrophenols in atmospheric particulate matter is presented. Atmospheric samples from rural and suburban areas were collected for evaluation of the procedure. Particulate matter was collected on quartz fibre filters using dichotomous high volume air samplers. Methylnitrophenols were extracted from the filters using acetonitrile. The sample was then purified using a combination of high-performance liquid chromatography and solid phase extraction. The final solution was then divided into two aliquots. To one aliquot, a derivatising agent, Bis(trimethylsilyltrifluoroacetamide, was added for Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry analysis. The second half of the sample was stored in a refrigerator. For samples with concentrations exceeding 1 ng μl−1, the second half of the sample was used for measurement of stable carbon isotope ratios by Gas Chromatography-Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry.

    The procedure described in this paper provides a method for the analysis of methylnitrophenols in atmospheric particulate matter at concentrations as low as 0.3 pg m−3 and for stable isotope ratios with an accuracy of better than ±0.5‰ for concentrations exceeding 100 pg m−3.

    In all atmospheric particulate matter samples analysed, 2-methyl-4-nitrophenol was found to be the most abundant methylnitrophenol, with concentrations ranging from the low pg m−3 range in rural areas to more than 200 pg m−3 in some samples from a suburban location.

  20. Atomic Beam Laser Spectrometer for In-field Isotopic Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, Alonso [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Actinide Analytical Chemistry Group

    2016-06-22

    This is a powerpoint presentation for the DTRA quarterly program review that goes into detail about the atomic beam laser spectrometer for in-field isotopic analysis. The project goals are the following: analysis of post-detonation debris, determination of U and Pu isotopic composition, and fieldable prototype: < 2ft3, < 1000W.

  1. Nitrogen and carbon isotopes in soil with special reference to the diagnosis of organic matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Distributions of nitrogen and carbon isotopes in terrestrial ecosystems are described based on available data and our recent findings for soil organic matters. Major processes regulating N-isotope and C-isotope ratios in biogenic substances are discussed. The biological di-nitrogen fixation and the precipitation are major sources which lower the delta15N value for forested soil organic matters. Denitrification enhances delta15N value for soil in cultivated fields. An addition of chemical fertilizer lowers 15N content in soils. The permiation of soil water is an important factor controlling vertical profiles of delta15N in soil systems. Among soil organic matters, non-hydrolizable fraction seems to give unique low delta15N value, suggesting the utility of delta15N analysis in studying the nature of the fractions. delta13C of soil organic matter is significantly lower than that for marine sediments. delta13C for soil humus varies with respect to chemical forms as well as an age of soil organic matters. The variation is large in paddy fields. It is, thus, probable that delta13C is an useful parameter in studying the early epidiagenesis of soil organic matters. Based on the known delta15N-delta13C relationships, a two-source mixing model has been applied to assess sources of organic matters in coastal sediment. (author)

  2. Isotopic composition of carbon and nitrogen in ureilitic fragments of the Almahata Sitta meteorite

    OpenAIRE

    Downes, Hilary; Abernethy, F.A.J.; Smith, C.L.; Ross, A. J.; Verchovsky, A. B.; Grady, M. M.; Jenniskens, P.; Shaddad, M.H.

    2015-01-01

    This study characterizes carbon and nitrogen abundances and isotopic compositions in ureilitic fragments of Almahata Sitta. Ureilites are carbon-rich (containing up to 7 wt% C) and were formed early in solar system history, thus the origin of carbon in ureilites has significance for the origin of solar system carbon. These samples were collected soon after they fell, so they are among the freshest ureilite samples available and were analyzed using stepped combustion mass spectrometry. They co...

  3. Carbon and Oxygen Isotopic Ratios for Nearby Miras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkle, Kenneth H.; Lebzelter, Thomas; Straniero, Oscar

    2016-07-01

    Carbon and oxygen isotopic ratios are reported for a sample of 46 Mira and SRa-type variable asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. Vibration-rotation first and second-overtone CO lines in 1.5-2.5 μm spectra were measured to derive isotopic ratios for 12C/13C, 16O/17O, and 16O/18O. Comparisons with previous measurements for individual stars and with various samples of evolved stars, as available in the extant literature, are discussed. Models for solar composition AGB stars of different initial masses are used to interpret our results. We find that the majority of M-stars have main sequence masses ≤2 M ⊙ and have not experienced sizable third dredge-up (TDU) episodes. The progenitors of the four S-type stars in our sample are slightly more massive. Of the six C-stars in the sample three have clear evidence relating their origin to the occurrence of TDU. Comparisons with O-rich presolar grains from AGB stars that lived before the formation of the solar system reveal variations in the interstellar medium chemical composition. The present generation of low-mass AGB stars, as represented by our sample of long period variables (LPVs), shows a large spread of 16O/17O ratios, similar to that of group 1 presolar grains and in agreement with theoretical expectations for the composition of mass 1.2-2 M ⊙ stars after the first dredge-up. In contrast, the 16O/18O ratios of present-day LPVs are definitely smaller than those of group 1 grains. This is most probably a consequence of the the decrease with time of the 16O/18O ratio in the interstellar medium due to the chemical evolution of the Milky Way. One star in our sample has an O composition similar to that of group 2 presolar grains originating in an AGB star undergoing extra-mixing. This may indicate that the extra-mixing process is hampered at high metallicity, or, equivalently, favored at low metallicity. Similarly to O-rich grains, no star in our sample shows evidence of hot bottom burning, which is expected for

  4. Carbon and Oxygen Isotopic Ratios for Nearby Miras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkle, Kenneth H.; Lebzelter, Thomas; Straniero, Oscar

    2016-07-01

    Carbon and oxygen isotopic ratios are reported for a sample of 46 Mira and SRa-type variable asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. Vibration–rotation first and second-overtone CO lines in 1.5–2.5 μm spectra were measured to derive isotopic ratios for 12C/13C, 16O/17O, and 16O/18O. Comparisons with previous measurements for individual stars and with various samples of evolved stars, as available in the extant literature, are discussed. Models for solar composition AGB stars of different initial masses are used to interpret our results. We find that the majority of M-stars have main sequence masses ≤2 M ⊙ and have not experienced sizable third dredge-up (TDU) episodes. The progenitors of the four S-type stars in our sample are slightly more massive. Of the six C-stars in the sample three have clear evidence relating their origin to the occurrence of TDU. Comparisons with O-rich presolar grains from AGB stars that lived before the formation of the solar system reveal variations in the interstellar medium chemical composition. The present generation of low-mass AGB stars, as represented by our sample of long period variables (LPVs), shows a large spread of 16O/17O ratios, similar to that of group 1 presolar grains and in agreement with theoretical expectations for the composition of mass 1.2–2 M ⊙ stars after the first dredge-up. In contrast, the 16O/18O ratios of present-day LPVs are definitely smaller than those of group 1 grains. This is most probably a consequence of the the decrease with time of the 16O/18O ratio in the interstellar medium due to the chemical evolution of the Milky Way. One star in our sample has an O composition similar to that of group 2 presolar grains originating in an AGB star undergoing extra-mixing. This may indicate that the extra-mixing process is hampered at high metallicity, or, equivalently, favored at low metallicity. Similarly to O-rich grains, no star in our sample shows evidence of hot bottom burning, which is expected

  5. Stable isotope (C, O) and monovalent cation fractionation upon synthesis of carbonate-bearing hydroxyl apatite (CHAP) via calcite transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böttcher, Michael E.; Schmiedinger, Iris; Wacker, Ulrike; Conrad, Anika C.; Grathoff, Georg; Schmidt, Burkhard; Bahlo, Rainer; Gehlken, Peer-L.; Fiebig, Jens

    2016-04-01

    Carbonate-bearing hydroxyl-apatite (CHAP) is of fundamental and applied interest to the (bio)geochemical, paleontological, medical and material science communities, since it forms the basic mineral phase in human and animal teeth and bones. In addition, it is found in non-biogenic phosphate deposits. The stable isotope and foreign element composition of biogenic CHAP is widely used to estimate the formation conditions. This requires careful experimental calibration under well-defined boundary conditions. Within the DFG project EXCALIBOR, synthesis of carbonate-bearing hydroxyapatite was conducted via the transformation of synthetic calcite powder in aqueous solution as a function of time, pH, and temperature using batch-type experiments. The aqueous solution was analyzed for the carbon isotope composition of dissolved inorganic carbonate (gas irmMS), the oxygen isotope composition of water (LCRDS), and the cationic composition. The solid was characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, micro Raman and FTIR spectroscopy, SEM-EDX, elemental analysis (EA, ICP-OES) and gas irmMS. Temperature was found to significantly impact the transformation rate of calcite to CHAP. Upon complete transformation, CHAP was found to contain up to 5% dwt carbonate, depending on the solution composition (e.g., pH), both incorporated on the A and B type position of the crystal lattice. The oxygen isotope fractionation between water and CHAP decreased with increasing temperature with a tentative slope shallower than those reported in the literature for apatite, calcite or aragonite. In addition, the presence of dissolved NH4+, K+ or Na+ in aqueous solution led to partial incorporation into the CHAP lattice. How these distortions of the crystal lattice may impact stable isotope discrimination is subject of future investigations.

  6. Stable Isotope Measurements of Carbon Dioxide, Methane, and Hydrogen Sulfide Gas Using Frequency Modulation Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak-Lovato, K.

    2014-12-01

    Seepage from enhanced oil recovery, carbon storage, and natural gas sites can emit trace gases such as carbon dioxide, methane, and hydrogen sulfide. Trace gas emission at these locations demonstrate unique light stable isotope signatures that provide information to enable source identification of the material. Light stable isotope detection through surface monitoring, offers the ability to distinguish between trace gases emitted from sources such as, biological (fertilizers and wastes), mineral (coal or seams), or liquid organic systems (oil and gas reservoirs). To make light stable isotope measurements, we employ the ultra-sensitive technique, frequency modulation spectroscopy (FMS). FMS is an absorption technique with sensitivity enhancements approximately 100-1000x more than standard absorption spectroscopy with the advantage of providing stable isotope signature information. We have developed an integrated in situ (point source) system that measures carbon dioxide, methane and hydrogen sulfide with isotopic resolution and enhanced sensitivity. The in situ instrument involves the continuous collection of air and records the stable isotope ratio for the gas being detected. We have included in-line flask collection points to obtain gas samples for validation of isotopic concentrations using our in-house isotope ratio mass spectroscopy (IRMS). We present calibration curves for each species addressed above to demonstrate the sensitivity and accuracy of the system. We also show field deployment data demonstrating the capabilities of the system in making live dynamic measurements from an active source.

  7. Variation of terrestrial ecosystem recorded by stable carbon isotopes of fossils in northern China during the Quaternary

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Stable carbon isotopes of C3 and C4 plants have completely distinct δ13C values respectively. Carbonate in tooth enamel of herbivorous mammals is significantly and regularly enriched in 13C compared to source carbon. As a result, we can reconstruct distributions of C3 and C4 plants in geological history based on carbon isotopes of mammalian tooth enamel. Carbon isotopes of 70 mammalian tooth enamel samples from 11 Quaternary localities in northern China are analyzed. This analysis indicates that C3 plants were dominant in the terrestrial ecosystem of northern China during the Quaternary, which is completely different from Pakistan with relatively close latitudes where C4 plants were absolutely dominant. The great difference was caused by the uplift of the Tibetan Plateau. A simulation implied that a marked temperature decrease would happen in the north side of the Tibetan Plateau, but a temperature increase in the south side. The warming condition caused the transition from C3 to C4 plants in Pakistan situated in the south side of this plateau. In the north side, on the contrary, the cooling condition restrained the distribution of C4 plants. As a result, C3 plants have been dominant in northern China until now.

  8. The impact of recycling of organic carbon on the stable carbon isotopic composition of dissolved inorganic carbon in a stratified marine system (Kyllaren fjord, Norway)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breugel, Y. van; Schouten, S.; Paetzel, M.; Nordeide, R.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.

    2005-01-01

    A negative carbon isotope shift in sedimentary organic carbon deposited in stratified marine and lacustrine systems has often been inferred to be a consequence of the process of recycling of respired and, therefore, 13C-depleted, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) formed from mineralization of descend

  9. New carbon-isotope evidence from the Polish Basin for a major carbon-cycle perturbation at the Triassic-Jurassic Boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pointer, Robyn; Hesselbo, Stephen; Littler, Kate; Pieńkowski, Grzegorz; Hodbod, Marta

    2016-04-01

    Carbon-isotope analysis of fossil plant material from a Polish core provides new evidence of a perturbation to the atmospheric carbon-cycle at the Triassic-Jurassic boundary (~201 Ma). The Triassic-Jurassic boundary was a time of extreme climate change which also coincided with the end-Triassic mass extinction. The new data will allow us to identify climatic changes in the Polish Basin across the Triassic-Jurassic boundary and evaluate these changes on a broader scale by comparison to data from other sites located around the world. The Niekłan borehole core, located in the southern Polish Basin, provides a ~200 metre-long terrestrial record spanning the Rhaetian and Hettangian, including the Triassic-Jurassic boundary (~208-199 Ma). The Niekłan core consists of interbedded fluvial and lacustrine sediments containing preserved plant material and thus provides an excellent opportunity to study both terrestrial palaeoenvironmental changes in the Polish Basin and perturbations in the carbon-cycle more broadly. Carbon-isotope analysis of macrofossil plant material and microscopic woody phytoclasts from the Niekłan core reveals a negative carbon-isotope excursion (CIE) of ~-3‰ at the end of the Rhaetian, before a gradual return to more positive values thereafter. The negative CIE suggests an injection of isotopically-light carbon into the atmosphere occurred just before the Triassic-Jurassic boundary. Likely sources of this carbon include volcanogenic gases, methane released from gas hydrates, or a combination of the two. The negative CIE seen in plant material at Niekłan is also recorded in a variety of geological materials from contemporaneous sites world-wide. These time-equivalent, but geographically separated, records indicate that the negative CIE recorded in the Niekłan plant material is the result of a regional or global carbon-cycle perturbation and is not merely a local signal. Future work will focus on using a range of palaeoenvironmental proxies in

  10. Unsaturated zone carbon dioxide flux, mixing, and isotopic composition at the USGS Amargosa Desert Research Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conaway, C. H.; Thordsen, J. J.; Thomas, B.; Haase, K.; Moreo, M. T.; Walvoord, M. A.; Andraski, B. J.; Stonestrom, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    Elevated concentrations of tritium, radiocarbon, and volatile organic compounds at the USGS Amargosa Desert Research Site, adjacent to a low-level radioactive waste disposal facility, have stimulated research on factors affecting transport of these contaminants. This research includes an examination of unsaturated zone carbon dioxide (CO2) fluxes, mixing, and isotopic composition, which can help in understanding these factors. In late April 2015 we collected 76 soil-gas samples in multi-layer foil bags from existing 1.5-m deep tubes, both inside and outside the low-level waste area, as well as from two 110-m-deep multilevel gas-sampling boreholes and a distant background site. These samples were analyzed for carbon dioxide concentration and isotopic composition by direct injection into a cavity ring-down spectrometer. Graphical analysis of results indicates mixing of CO2 characteristic of the root zone (δ13C -18 ‰ VPDB), deep soil gas of the capillary fringe (-20‰), and CO2 produced by microbial respiration of organic matter disposed in the waste area trenches (-28‰). Land-surface boundary conditions are being constrained by the application of a novel non-dispersive infrared sensor and traditional concentration and flux measurements, including discrete CO2 flux data using a gas chamber method to complement continuous data from surface- and tower-based CO2 sensors. These results shed light on radionuclide and VOC mobilization and transport mechanisms from this and similar waste disposal facilities.

  11. Carbon and hydrogen isotopic effects of stomatal density in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyejung; Feakins, Sarah J.; Sternberg, Leonel da S. L.

    2016-04-01

    Stomata are key gateways mediating carbon uptake and water loss from plants. Varied stomatal densities in fossil leaves raise the possibility that isotope effects associated with the openness of exchange may have mediated plant wax biomarker isotopic proxies for paleovegetation and paleoclimate in the geological record. Here we use Arabidopsis thaliana, a widely used model organism, to provide the first controlled tests of stomatal density on carbon and hydrogen isotopic compositions of cuticular waxes. Laboratory grown wildtype and mutants with suppressed and overexpressed stomatal densities allow us to directly test the isotope effects of stomatal densities independent of most other environmental or biological variables. Hydrogen isotope (D/H) measurements of both plant waters and plant wax n-alkanes allow us to directly constrain the isotopic effects of leaf water isotopic enrichment via transpiration and biosynthetic fractionations, which together determine the net fractionation between irrigation water and n-alkane hydrogen isotopic composition. We also measure carbon isotopic fractionations of n-alkanes and bulk leaf tissue associated with different stomatal densities. We find offsets of +15‰ for δD and -3‰ for δ13C for the overexpressed mutant compared to the suppressed mutant. Since the range of stomatal densities expressed is comparable to that found in extant plants and the Cenozoic fossil record, the results allow us to consider the magnitude of isotope effects that may be incurred by these plant adaptive responses. This study highlights the potential of genetic mutants to isolate individual isotope effects and add to our fundamental understanding of how genetics and physiology influence plant biochemicals including plant wax biomarkers.

  12. Zinc isotope evidence for a large-scale carbonated mantle beneath eastern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sheng-Ao; Wang, Ze-Zhou; Li, Shu-Guang; Huang, Jian; Yang, Wei

    2016-06-01

    A large set of zinc (Zn) stable isotope data for continental basalts from eastern China were reported to investigate the application of Zn isotopes as a new tracer of deep carbonate cycling. All of the basalts with ages of 120 Ma basalts from eastern China (0.27 ± 0.06‰; 2sd). Given that Zn isotope fractionation during magmatic differentiation is limited (≤0.1‰), the elevated δ66Zn values reflect the involvement of isotopically heavy crustal materials (e.g., carbonates with an average δ66Zn of ∼0.91‰) in the mantle sources. SiO2 contents of the recycled Mg (Zn)-rich carbonates in the mantle beneath eastern China since the Late Mesozoic. Since Zn is a trace element in the mantle and Zn isotopic compositions of marine carbonates and the mantle differ markedly, we highlight Zn isotopes as a new and useful tool of tracing deep carbonate cycling in the Earth's mantle.

  13. Paleoenvironments in Meso-Neoproterozoic carbonates of the Mbuji-Mayi Supergroup (Democratic Republic of Congo) - Microfacies analysis combined with C-O-Sr isotopes, major-trace elements and REE + Y distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delpomdor, F.; Blanpied, C.; Virgone, A.; Préat, A.

    2013-12-01

    The Meso- and Neoproterozoic Mbuji-Mayi Supergroup (1155 Ma to ca. 800 Ma) was deposited in the SE-NW trending siliciclastic-carbonate failed-rift in the Sankuru-Mbuji-Mayi-Lomami-Lovoy Basin. Drillcore- and outcrop-derived microfacies, isotope (C, O and Sr) compositions of carbonates and REE + Y distributions are integrated to unravel the paleoenvironmental and chemical conditions prevailing during deposition and alteration (or contamination) of the Mbuji-Mayi carbonates. The carbonate succession (BIe subgroup and BIIa to BIIe subgroups), composed of 11 microfacies (MF), records the evolution of a marine ramp submitted to evaporation, with basinal and low-energy outer-ramp environments (MF1-MF5), biohermal mid-ramp (MF6) and restricted tide-dominated lagoon inner-ramp (MF7-MF9) settings, overlain by lacustrine (MF10) and sabkha (MF11) environments. The ramp margin is characterized by thick stacks of stromatolitic bioherms. δ13C and δ18O relationships in the Mbuji-Mayi carbonates allow discrimination between meteoric (δ13C: -7.5‰ to +0.0‰, δ18O: -7.0‰ to -1.0‰) and burial lithifications (δ13C: -1.5‰ to +0.0‰, δ18O: -15.1‰ to -7.0‰), that overprinted a primary marine signal (δ13C: -1.5‰ to +2.0‰, δ18O: -3.0‰ to +0.5‰) partially preserved in the subgroups. Unaltered pristine signals are found in the Mbuji-Mayi carbonates with 87Sr/86Sr ratios (0.7065-0.7082) similar to those of the marine-preserved strontium signatures of the early Neoproterozoic oceans. The PAAS-normalized REE + Y distributions indicate that the BIe carbonates were altered by Fe-oxide-rich hydrothermal fluids. BIIb and BIIe carbonates exhibit uniform light REE depleted patterns suggesting inputs of detrital river material whereas a marine seawater, highlighted by the REE + Y distributions is preserved in BIIc and BIId carbonates. The pattern of carbon, oxygen and strontium isotopic variations in the Mbuji-Mayi carbonates reflects deposition and early diagenesis in

  14. Stable Isotopic Evidence for a Pedogenic Origin of Carbonates in Trench 14 near Yucca Mountain, Nevada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quade, J; Cerling, T E

    1990-12-14

    Layered carbonate and silica encrust fault fractures exposed in Trench 14 near Yucca Mountain, site of the proposed high-level nuclear waste repository in southern Nevada. Comparison of the stable carbon and oxygen isotopic compositions of the fracture carbonates with those of modern soil carbonates in the area shows that the fracture carbonates are pedogenic in origin and that they likely formed in the presence of vegetation and rainfall typical of a glacial climate. Their isotopic composition differs markedly from that of carbonate associated with nearby springs. The regional water table therefore remained below the level of Trench 14 during the time that the carbonates and silica precipitated, a period probably covering parts of at least the last 300,000 years. PMID:17818282

  15. Oxygen isotopic constraints on the genesis of carbonates from Martian meteorite ALH84001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leshin, Laurie A.; McKeegan, Kevin D.; Harvey, Ralph P.

    1997-03-01

    With a crystallization age of 4.5 Ga, ALH84001 is unique among the Martian meteorites. It is also the only Martian meteorite that contains an appreciable amount of carbonate, and significantly, this carbonate occurs without associated secondary hydrated minerals. Moreover, McKay et al. (1996) have suggested that ALH84001 contains evidence of past Martian life in the form of nanofossils, biogenic minerals, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The presence of carbonate in ALH84001 is especially significant. The early Martian environment is thought to have been more hospitable to life than todays cold, dry climate. In order to better assess the true delta-O-18 values, as well as the isotopic diversity and complexity of the ALH84001 carbonates, direct measurements of the oxygen and carbon isotopic compositions of individual carbonate phases are needed. Here we report in situ analyses of delta-O-18 values in carbonates from two polished thin sections of ALH84001.

  16. Carbon-Isotope Chemostratigraphy of the Yellow Cat Member of the Cretaceous Cedar Mountain Formation, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, C. A.; Hatzell, G.; Suarez, M. B.; Salazar-Verdin, J.; Al-Suwaidi, A. H.; Kirkland, J. I.

    2014-12-01

    Paleosols and lacustrine sediments of the Yellow Cat Member (YCM), Cedar Mountain Formation (CMF), Eastern Utah were collected at the "Lake Madsen" (a dominantly lacustrine section) and Doelling's Bowl (a mixed lacustrine/ palustrine/ paleosol section) and analyzed for bulk organic carbon isotopes (δ13Corg) . The YCM is thought to span the Barremian to Aptian based on dinosaur faunal assemblages. Correlation with distinct carbon isotope excursions (CIE) specifically those associated with the Selli Event or OAE 1a would allow insight into the response of terrestrial ecosystems to C-cycle perturbations during the Aptian, and may improve chronostratigraphy. Lake Madsen data ranges between a minimum of -28.5‰ and a maximum of -21.4‰ with an average of ~ -25‰ and shows a stepped negative isotope excursion of -3‰., with three distinct negative steps starting ~ 7.5 m above the Jurassic Morrison Formation and an intervening large positive excursion ~ 4.5 m from the base of the Poison Strip Sandstone (~119Ma) Member of the CMF. Doelling's Bowl data spans a longer vertical distance and ranges from a minimum of -29.0‰ to a maximum of -25.7‰, averages -27.7‰ and is somewhat cyclic in nature. δ13Corg chemostratigraphic profile for Doelling's Bowl poorly correlates to the Lake Madsen section, likely due to recycling of organic C and wet/dry cycles of the palustrine environment. Correlation of the Lake Madsen section to marine δ13CCO3 curve from Cismon Valley of the southern Alps indicates the lower Aptian C-isotope excursions C1 to C6, with the distinctive C3 negative CIE occur at the top of the Yellow Cat Member, therefore documenting a terrestrial manifestation of the CIE associated with OAE1a - Selli Event. This suggests the age of the majority of the Yellow Cat Member is Barremian to lower Aptian and the Barremian-Aptian boundary occurs at the top of the Member ~ 25cm below the base of the Poison Strip Sandstone. Further isotopic analysis of vertebrate

  17. Unit of stable isotopic N15 analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The continuous and growing demand of crops and cattle for the domestic inhabitants, forces the search of technical solutions in agriculture. One of the solutions able to be covered in a near future it is the escalation of agricultural production in lands already being cultivated, either by means of an intensification of cultivation and / or increasing the unitary yields. In the intensive cropping systems, the crops extract substantial quantities of nutriments that is recovered by means of the application of fertilizers. Due to the lack of resources and to the increase of commercial inputs prices, it has been necessary to pay attention to the analysis and improvement of low inputs cropping systems and to the effective use of resources. Everything has made to establish a concept of plant nutrition focused system, which integrate the sources of nutriments for plants and the production factors of crops in a productive cropping system, to improve the fertility of soils, the agricultural productivity and profitability. This system includes the biggest efficiency of chemical fertilizers as the maximum profit of alternative sources of nutriments, such as organic fertilizers, citrate-phosphate rocks and biological nitrogen fixation. By means of field experiments under different environmental conditions (soils and climate) it can be determined the best combination of fertilizers practice (dose, placement, opportunity and source) for selected cropping systems. The experimentation with fertilizer, marked with stable and radioactive isotopes, provides a direct and express method to obtain conclusive answers to the questions: where, when and how should be applied. The fertilizers marked with N15 have been used to understand the application of marked fertilizer to the cultivations, and the determination of the proportion of crops nutritious element derived from fertilizer. The isotopic techniques offer a fast and reliable mean to obtain information about the distribution of

  18. Carbon Stable Isotopes as Indicators of Coastal Eutrophication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coastal ecologists and managers have frequently used nitrogen stable isotopes (δ15N) to trace and monitor anthropogenic nitrogen (N) in coastal ecosystems. However, the interpretation of δ15N data can often be challenging, if not confounding, as the isotope values fractionate su...

  19. Stratigraphy on Oxygen and Carbon Isotope of Paciran Formation East Java

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paleotemperature fluctuation in tropical zone (centennial and decad al scale) has been known. It's based on stable isotopic analysis from each of unconformity zones. Those boundaries have derived on reef units of shallows marine reef complex of Paciran Formation, Tuban area in Northeast Java Basin. From 25 samples have been choosen on undeformed calcite and analyzed by oxygen and carbon stable isotope. It used to validizing a sea level changes during the formation to Reef 1 to Reef 17 from Paciran formation with sea surface temperature (SST) since 4 Ma until now. On early forming of Reef 1 to Reef 3 (since 4 Ma - 2,88 Ma), sea level occurred marine flooding surface. Since the formation of reef 4 (2,59 Ma) to Reef 8 (1,4 Ma) occurred stagnant temperature and almost to warmer condition. Then, δ18O have arise up drastically to 5 0/00 and shows warmer condition to Reef 8 formation, in contrary, the sea level have been arised to Reef 10 formation (0,7 Ma). The temperature have been fluctuated between 0,5o and 1oC until the formation of Reef 17 (Early Holocene) and continued to Reef 17 formation at 2oC based on the rapidity sampling of Po rites sp. Wholly, in centennial scale, since the formation of Reef 4 (2,59 Ma) to Reef 17 (1 Ma), the curve of oxygen stable isotope shows decrease or cooler condition. Those condition have conducted to sea level drop since the formation to Reef 7 and Reef 8. There are 4 periods of interglacial since the formation of Reef 4. The warmer condition indicated since the formation of Reef 9, Reef 11 and Reef 17. Recently, a curve of oxygen isotopes reveals warmer drastically or sea level have been arisen. (author)

  20. Mapping Soil Carbon from Cradle to Grave: 'Omic and Isotope Based Measurements of Root C Transformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pett-Ridge, J.; Nuccio, E. E.; Shi, S.; Neurath, R.; Brodie, E.; Zhou, J.; Lipton, M. S.; Herman, D.; Firestone, M.

    2014-12-01

    Carbon cycling in the rhizosphere is a nexus of biophysical interactions between plant roots, microorganisms, and the soil organo-mineral matrix. Plant roots are the primary inputs of soil organic C; the presence of roots significantly alters rates of organic matter mineralization by soil microbes. Our research on how roots influence decomposition of soil organic matter in both simplified and complex microcosms uses geochemical characterization, molecular microbiology, isotope tracing, 'omics and novel imaging approaches ('ChipSIP' and 'STXM-SIMS') to trace the fate of isotopically labelled root exudates and plant tissues. Our work seeks to understand the genomic basis for how organic C transformation and decomposition in soil is altered by interactions between plant roots and the soil microbial community (bacteria, archaea, fungi, microfauna). We hypothesize that root-exudate stimulation of soil microbial populations results in the altered expression of transcripts and proteins involved in decomposition of macromolecular C compounds. Using an isotope array that allows us to follow root C into bacterial, fungal, and microfaunal communities, we have tracked movement of 13C from labeled exudates and 15N from labeled root litter into the soil microbial community, and linked this data to 16S profiles and community gene transcripts. By integrating stable isotopes as tracers of natural resource utilization (i.e. root litter), and analysis of the functional properties of the communities that respond to those resources, we can identify the molecular pathways that are stimulated in the soil microbiome in response to root litter, living roots, and their interfaces.

  1. Compound-Specific Isotope Analysis of Diesel Fuels in a Forensic Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammad, Syahidah; Frew, Russell; Hayman, Alan

    2015-02-01

    Compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) offers great potential as a tool to provide chemical evidence in a forensic investigation. Many attempts to trace environmental oil spills were successful where isotopic values were particularly distinct. However, difficulties arise when a large data set is analyzed and the isotopic differences between samples are subtle. In the present study, discrimination of diesel oils involved in a diesel theft case was carried out to infer the relatedness of the samples to potential source samples. This discriminatory analysis used a suite of hydrocarbon diagnostic indices, alkanes, to generate carbon and hydrogen isotopic data of the compositions of the compounds which were then processed using multivariate statistical analyses to infer the relatedness of the data set. The results from this analysis were put into context by comparing the data with the δ13C and δ2H of alkanes in commercial diesel samples obtained from various locations in the South Island of New Zealand. Based on the isotopic character of the alkanes, it is suggested that diesel fuels involved in the diesel theft case were distinguishable. This manuscript shows that CSIA when used in tandem with multivariate statistical analysis provide a defensible means to differentiate and source-apportion qualitatively similar oils at the molecular level. This approach was able to overcome confounding challenges posed by the near single-point source of origin i.e. the very subtle differences in isotopic values between the samples.

  2. Deep ocean ventilation, carbon isotopes, marine sedimentation and the deglacial CO2 rise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Heinze

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The link between the atmospheric CO2 level and the ventilation state of the deep ocean is an important building block of the key hypotheses put forth to explain glacial-interglacial CO2 fluctuations. In this study, we systematically examine the sensitivity of atmospheric CO2 and its carbon isotope composition to changes in deep ocean ventilation, the ocean carbon pumps, and sediment formation in a global 3-D ocean-sediment carbon cycle model. Our results provide support for the hypothesis that a break up of Southern Ocean stratification and invigorated deep ocean ventilation were the dominant drivers for the early deglacial CO2 rise of ~35 ppm between the Last Glacial Maximum and 14.6 ka BP. Another rise of 10 ppm until the end of the Holocene is attributed to carbonate compensation responding to the early deglacial change in ocean circulation. Our reasoning is based on a multi-proxy analysis which indicates that an acceleration of deep ocean ventilation during early deglaciation is not only consistent with recorded atmospheric CO2 but also with the reconstructed opal sedimentation peak in the Southern Ocean at around 16 ka BP, the record of atmospheric δ13CCO2, and the reconstructed changes in the Pacific CaCO3 saturation horizon.

  3. Variability in carbon isotope fractionation of trichloroethene during degradation by persulfate activated with zero-valent iron: Effects of inorganic anions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yunde; Zhou, Aiguo; Gan, Yiqun; Li, Xiaoqian

    2016-04-01

    Stable carbon isotope analysis has the potential to be used for assessing the performance of in situ remediation of organic contaminants. Successful application of this isotope technique requires understanding the magnitude and variability in carbon isotope fractionation associated with the reactions under consideration. This study investigated the influence of inorganic anions (sulfate, bicarbonate, and chloride) on carbon isotope fractionation of trichloroethene (TCE) during its degradation by persulfate activated with zero-valent iron. The results demonstrated that the significant carbon isotope fractionation (enrichment factors ε ranging from -3.4±0.3 to -4.3±0.3‰) was independent on the zero-iron dosage, sulfate concentration, and bicarbonate concentration. However, the ε values (ranging from -7.0±0.4 to -13.6±1.2‰) were dependent on the chloride concentration, indicating that chloride could significantly affect carbon isotope fractionation during TCE degradation by persulfate activated with zero-valent iron. The dependence of ε values on chloride concentration, indicated that TCE degradation mechanisms may be different from the degradation mechanism caused by sulfate radical (SO4(-)). Ignoring the effect of chloride on ε value may cause numerous uncertainties in quantitative assessment of the performance of the in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO). PMID:26784392

  4. Carbon Isotopic tests on the Origins of the Shuram Anomaly from the San Juan Fm., Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgin, E. B.

    2015-12-01

    Carbon isotope anomalies are associated with perturbations to the carbon cycle that offer insight into the geochemical evolution of the Earth. The largest Carbon isotope anomaly in earth history is the Shuram, which remains poorly understood in spite of being linked to the oxygenation of earth, the rise of metazoans, and a complete reorganization of the carbon cycle. From a basin transect of the carbonate-dominated San Juan Formation in southern Peru, we present evidence for the first clear example of the Shuram isotope anomaly in South America. Unique to this succession are ~140 meters of organic-rich black shale within the anomaly, containing as much as 4% TOC. Preliminary data from the organic-rich black shales of the San Juan Fm. confirm that δ13Corg is relatively invariant and does not covary with δ13Ccarb. These observations are consistent with other Shuram sections and support various models: an exogenous carbon source, an enlarged dissolved organic carbon pool, as well as authigenic carbonate production in organic-rich anoxic sediments. Critical tests of these models have been complicated by a paucity of organics in Shuram facies worldwide. Further analyses of the robust organics from the Shuram facies of the San Juan Fm. therefore hold promise in shedding light on the origin of the Shuram isotope anomaly and critical earth history events to which it has been linked.

  5. Canopy-scale kinetic fractionation of atmospheric carbon dioxide and water vapour isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    The isotopic fluxes of carbon dioxide (CO2) and water vapour (H2O) between the atmosphere and terrestrial plants provide powerful constraints on carbon sequestration on land 1-2, changes in vegetation cover 3 and the Earth’s Dole effect 4. Past studies, relying mainly on leaf-scale observations, hav...

  6. Soil organic carbon assessments in cropping systems using isotopic techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín De Dios Herrero, Juan; Cruz Colazo, Juan; Guzman, María Laura; Saenz, Claudio; Sager, Ricardo; Sakadevan, Karuppan

    2016-04-01

    Introduction of improved farming practices are important to address the challenges of agricultural production, food security, climate change and resource use efficiency. The integration of livestock with crops provides many benefits including: (1) resource conservation, (2) ecosystem services, (3) soil quality improvements, and (4) risk reduction through diversification of enterprises. Integrated crop livestock systems (ICLS) with the combination of no-tillage and pastures are useful practices to enhance soil organic carbon (SOC) compared with continuous cropping systems (CCS). In this study, the SOC and its fractions in two cropping systems namely (1) ICLS, and (2) CCS were evaluated in Southern Santa Fe Province in Argentina, and the use of delta carbon-13 technique and soil physical fractionation were evaluated to identify sources of SOC in these systems. Two farms inside the same soil cartographic unit and landscape position in the region were compared. The ICLS farm produces lucerne (Medicago sativa Merrill) and oat (Avena sativa L.) grazed by cattle alternatively with grain summer crops sequence of soybean (Glicine max L.) and corn (Zea mays L.), and the farm under continuous cropping system (CCS) produces soybean and corn in a continuous sequence. The soil in the area is predominantly a Typic Hapludoll. Soil samples from 0-5 and 0-20 cm depths (n=4) after the harvest of grain crops were collected in each system and analyzed for total organic carbon (SOC, 0-2000 μm), particulate organic carbon (POC, 50-100 μm) and mineral organic carbon (MOC, ANOVA and Tukey statistical analysis were carried out for all data. The SOC was higher in ICLS than in CCS at both depths (20.8 vs 17.7 g kg-1 for 0-5 cm and 16.1 vs 12.7 g kg-1 at 0-20 cm, respectively, P<0.05). MOC was similar at both depths, and POC was higher in CCS than in ICLS at 0-5 cm, while at 0-20 cm this trend was opposite. This is probably due to the presence of deep roots under pastures in ICLS. Delta

  7. Radionuclide Data Analysis and Evaluation: More Information From Fewer Isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinke, A.; McIntyre, J.; Cooper, M.; Haas, D.; Lowrey, J.; Miley, H.; Schrom, B.; Suckow, T.

    2013-12-01

    The analysis of the International Monitoring System radionuclide data sets provides daily concentrations for both particulate and radioxenon isotopes. These isotopes can come from many potential sources such as nuclear reactors, nuclear physics experiments, and medical isotope production. These interesting but irrelevant sources have several of the same radio-isotopic signatures from above or underground nuclear explosions and must be ruled out as part of the determination that an event originated as a nuclear explosion. There are several methods under development that aid in this determination and this poster will briefly cover each: radio-isotopic ratios and parent daughter relationships, co-detection of radioxenon and isotopes found on particulates, and past detection history.

  8. Seasonal variation in kangaroo tooth enamel oxygen and carbon isotopes in southern Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookman, Tom H.; Ambrose, Stanley H.

    2012-09-01

    Serial sampling of tooth enamel growth increments for carbon and oxygen isotopic analyses of Macropus (kangaroo) teeth was performed to assess the potential for reconstructing paleoseasonality. The carbon isotope composition of tooth enamel apatite carbonate reflects the proportional intake of C3 and C4 vegetation. The oxygen isotopic composition of enamel reflects that of ingested and metabolic water. Tooth enamel forms sequentially from the tip of the crown to the base, so dietary and environmental changes during the tooth's formation can be detected. δ13C and δ18O values were determined for a series of enamel samples drilled from the 3rd and 4th molars of kangaroos that were collected along a 900 km north-south transect in southern Australia. The serial sampling method did not yield pronounced seasonal isotopic variation patterns in Macropus enamel. The full extent of dietary isotopic variation may be obscured by attenuation of the isotopic signal during enamel mineralisation. Brachydont (low-crowned) Macropus teeth may be less sensitive to seasonal variation in isotopic composition due to time-averaging during mineralisation. However, geographic variations observed suggest that there may be potential for tracking latitudinal shifts in vegetation zones and seasonal environmental patterns in response to climate change.

  9. Carbon isotope anomaly in the major plant C1 pool and its global biogeochemical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. T. G. Hamilton

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available We report that the most abundant C1 units of terrestrial plants, the methoxyl groups of pectin and lignin, have a unique carbon isotope signature exceptionally depleted in 13C. Plant-derived C1 volatile organic compounds (VOCs are also anomalously depleted in 13C compared with Cn+1 VOCs. The results confirm that the plant methoxyl pool is the predominant source of biospheric C1 compounds of plant origin such as methanol, chloromethane and bromomethane. Furthermore this pool, comprising ca. 2.5% of carbon in plant biomass, represents an important substrate for methanogenesis and could be a significant source of isotopically light methane entering the atmosphere. Our findings have significant implications for the use of carbon isotope ratios in elucidation of global carbon cycling. Moreover methoxyl groups could act as markers for biological activity in organic matter of terrestrial and extraterrestrial origin.

  10. Carbon isotope anomaly in the major plant C1 pool and its global biogeochemical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Keppler

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We report that the most abundant C1 units of terrestrial plants, the methoxyl groups of pectin and lignin, have a unique carbon isotope signature exceptionally depleted in 13C. Plant-derived C1 volatile organic compounds (VOCs are also anomalously depleted in 13C compared with Cn+1 VOCs. The results confirm that the plant methoxyl pool is the predominant source of biospheric C1 compounds of plant origin such as methanol, chloromethane and bromomethane. Furthermore this pool, comprising ca 2.5% of carbon in plant biomass, could be an important substrate for methanogenesis and thus be envisaged as a possible source of isotopically light methane entering the atmosphere. Our findings have significant implications for the use of carbon isotope ratios in elucidation of global carbon cycling. Moreover methoxyl groups could act as markers for biological activity in organic matter of terrestrial and extraterrestrial origin.

  11. Organic Carbon Isotope Geochemistry of the Neoproterozoic Doushantuo Formation, South China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Qingjun; LIU Congqiang; Harald STRAUSS; Tatiana GOLDBERG; ZHU Maoyan; PI Daohui; WANG Jian

    2006-01-01

    The Neoproterozoic Doushantuo Formation on the Yangtze Platform, South China,documents a sedimentary succession with different sedimentary facies from carbonate platform to slope and to deep sea basin, and hosts one of the world-class phosphorite deposits. In these strata,exquisitely preserved fossils have been discovered: the Weng'an biota. This study presents carbon isotope geochemistry which is associated paired carbonate and organic matter from the Weng'an section of a carbonate platform (shelf of the Yangtze Platform, Guizhou Province) from the Songtao section and Nanming section of a transition belt (slope of the Yangtze Platform, Guizhou Province) and from the Yanwutan section (basin area of the Yangtze Platform, Hunan Province). Environmental variations and bio-events on the Yangtze Platform during the Late Neoproterozoic and their causal relationship are discussed. Negative carbon isotope values for carbonate and organic carbon (mean δ13Corg = -35.0%) from the uppermost Nantuo Formation are followed by an overall increase in δ13C up-section. Carbon isotope values vary between -9.9% and 3.6% for carbonate and between -35.6% and -21.5% for organic carbon, respectively. Heavier δ13Ccarb values suggest an increase in organic carbon burial, possibly related to increasing productivity (such as the Weng'an biota). The δ13C values of the sediments from the Doushantuo Formation decreased from the platform via the slope to basin,reflecting a reduced environment with minor dissolved inorganic carbon possibly due to a lower primary productivity. It is deduced that the classical upwelling process, the stratification structure and the hydrothermal eruption are principally important mechanisms to interpret the carbon isotopic compositions of the sediments from the Doushantuo Formation.

  12. Towards a better understanding of magnesium-isotope ratios from marine skeletal carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hippler, Dorothee; Buhl, Dieter; Witbaard, Rob; Richter, Detlev K.; Immenhauser, Adrian

    2009-10-01

    This study presents magnesium stable-isotope compositions of various biogenic carbonates of several marine calcifying organisms and an algae species, seawater samples collected from the western Dutch Wadden Sea, and reference materials. The aim of this study is to explore the influence of mineralogy, taxonomy and environmental factors (e.g., seawater isotopic composition, temperature, salinity) on magnesium-isotopic (δ 26Mg) ratios of skeletal carbonates. Using high-precision multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, we observed that the magnesium-isotopic composition of seawater from the semi-enclosed Dutch Wadden Sea is identical to that of open marine seawater. We further found that a considerable component of the observed variability in δ 26Mg values of marine skeletal carbonates can be attributed to differences in mineralogy. Furthermore, magnesium-isotope fractionation is species-dependent, with all skeletal carbonates being isotopically lighter than seawater. While δ 26Mg values of skeletal aragonite and high-magnesium calcite of coralline red algae indicate the absence or negligibility of metabolic influences, the δ 26Mg values of echinoids, brachiopods and bivalves likely result from a taxon-specific level of control on Mg-isotope incorporation during biocalcification. Moreover, no resolvable salinity and temperature effect were observed for coralline red algae and echinoids. In contrast, Mg-isotope data of bivalves yield ambiguous results, which require further validation. The data presented here, point to a limited use of Mg isotopes as temperature proxy, but highlight the method's potential as tracer of seawater chemistry through Earth's history.

  13. An analytical system for studying the stable isotopes of carbon monoxide using continuous flow-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (CF-IRMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. L. Pathirana

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In the atmosphere, carbon monoxide (CO is the major sink for the hydroxyl radical (OH •, has multiple anthropogenic and natural sources and considerable spatial and seasonal variability. Measurements of CO isotopic composition are useful in constraining the strengths of its individual source and sink processes and thus its global cycle. A fully automated system for δ13C and δ18O analysis has been developed to extract CO from an air sample, convert CO into carbon dioxide (CO2 using the Schütze reagent, and then determine the isotopic composition in an isotope ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS. The entire system is continuously flushed with high-purity helium (He, the carrier gas. The blank signal of the Schütze reagent is only 1–3% of the typical sample size. The repeatability is 0.1‰ for δ13C and 0.2‰ for δ18O. The peak area allows simultaneous determination of the mole fraction with an analytical repeatability of ~0.7 nmol mol−1 for 100 mL of typical ambient air (185.4 nmol mol−1 of CO. A single, automated, measurement is performed in 18 min, so multiple measurements can be combined conveniently to improve precision.

  14. Highly Efficient Quantum Sieving in Porous Graphene-like Carbon Nitride for Light Isotopes Separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Yuanyuan; Li, Feng; Zhou, Hongcai; Zhao, Mingwen

    2016-01-01

    Light isotopes separation, such as 3He/4He, H2/D2, H2/T2, etc., is crucial for various advanced technologies including isotope labeling, nuclear weapons, cryogenics and power generation. However, their nearly identical chemical properties made the separation challenging. The low productivity of the present isotopes separation approaches hinders the relevant applications. An efficient membrane with high performance for isotopes separation is quite appealing. Based on first-principles calculations, we theoretically demonstrated that highly efficient light isotopes separation, such as 3He/4He, can be reached in a porous graphene-like carbon nitride material via quantum sieving effect. Under moderate tensile strain, the quantum sieving of the carbon nitride membrane can be effectively tuned in a continuous way, leading to a temperature window with high 3He/4He selectivity and permeance acceptable for efficient isotopes harvest in industrial application. This mechanism also holds for separation of other light isotopes, such as H2/D2, H2/T2. Such tunable quantum sieving opens a promising avenue for light isotopes separation for industrial application. PMID:26813491

  15. Highly Efficient Quantum Sieving in Porous Graphene-like Carbon Nitride for Light Isotopes Separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Yuanyuan; Li, Feng; Zhou, Hongcai; Zhao, Mingwen

    2016-01-01

    Light isotopes separation, such as 3He/4He, H2/D2, H2/T2, etc., is crucial for various advanced technologies including isotope labeling, nuclear weapons, cryogenics and power generation. However, their nearly identical chemical properties made the separation challenging. The low productivity of the present isotopes separation approaches hinders the relevant applications. An efficient membrane with high performance for isotopes separation is quite appealing. Based on first-principles calculations, we theoretically demonstrated that highly efficient light isotopes separation, such as 3He/4He, can be reached in a porous graphene-like carbon nitride material via quantum sieving effect. Under moderate tensile strain, the quantum sieving of the carbon nitride membrane can be effectively tuned in a continuous way, leading to a temperature window with high 3He/4He selectivity and permeance acceptable for efficient isotopes harvest in industrial application. This mechanism also holds for separation of other light isotopes, such as H2/D2, H2/T2. Such tunable quantum sieving opens a promising avenue for light isotopes separation for industrial application.

  16. In Situ Analysis of Organics and Isotopes at Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahaffy, P. R.; Atreya, S. K.; Brinckerhoff, W. B.; Cabane, M.; Coll, P.; Demick, J.; Harpold, D. N.; Ming, D.; Niemann, H.; Owen, T.; Raulin, F.; Scott, J.; Webster, C.

    2003-05-01

    The recent success of the "follow the water" imperative for Mars exploration is tempered by the fact that more than 2 decades after Viking, much remains unknown about the state of carbon at the planet's surface. Therefore, a key objective for lander missions that follow MER will be a search for the location and nature of organic molecules and other carbon containing species. Reduced or partially oxidized compounds may reveal the nature of ancient or even present biotic or prebiotic processes. Ongoing definition and development of advanced techniques and protocols to "follow the carbon" will be described. For example, an instrument suite presently under development to be proposed for inclusion on the 2009 Mars Science Laboratory consists of an advanced gas chromatograph mass spectrometer (GCMS) with derivatization capability coupled with a laser desorption time-of-flight mass spectrometer (LDMS) and a tunable laser spectrometer (TLS). The suite is designated SAM (for Sample Analysis at Mars) and is designed to carry out analysis of both atmospheric gases and volatiles released from solid phase soils, rock samples, and ices. Volatile organic molecules and their pyrolysis products are analyzed by the GCMS and TLS, and refractory organics and elements by the LDMS. Additional objectives include higher precision measurements than have been obtained, to date, of the abundances and isotope ratios of the noble gases and a range of light elements including H, C, O, and N in both the atmosphere and soil. SAM can also contribute to geochemical objectives with the identification of various minerals through evolved gas analysis (EGA) of stable thermal decomposition products such as H2O, CO2, and oxides of nitrogen and sulfur using the MS and TLS as the detector. Recent EGA studies on Mars analogue materials that illustrate this capability are described. This work is supported by funding from NASA and CNES

  17. Demonstration of Carbon Catabolite Repression in Naphthalene Degrading Soil Bacteria via Raman Spectroscopy Based Stable Isotope Probing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar B N, Vinay; Guo, Shuxia; Bocklitz, Thomas; Rösch, Petra; Popp, Jürgen

    2016-08-01

    Carbon catabolite repression (CCR) is a regulatory phenomenon occurring in both lower organisms like bacteria and higher organisms like yeast, which allows them to preferentially utilize a specific carbon source to achieve highest metabolic activity and cell growth. CCR has been intensely studied in the model organisms Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis by following diauxic growth curves, assays to estimate the utilization or depletion of carbon sources, enzyme assays, Western blotting and mass spectrometric analysis to monitor and quantify the involvement of specific enzymes and proteins involved in CCR. In this study, we have visualized this process in three species of naphthalene degrading soil bacteria at a single cell level via Raman spectroscopy based stable isotope probing (Raman-SIP) using a single and double labeling approach. This is achieved using a combination of (2)H and (13)C isotope labeled carbon sources like glucose, galactose, fructose, and naphthalene. Time dependent metabolic flux of (13)C and (2)H isotopes has been followed via semi quantification and 2D Raman correlation analysis. For this, the relative intensities of Raman marker bands corresponding to (2)H and (13)C incorporation in newly synthesized macromolecules like proteins and lipids have been utilized. The 2D correlation analysis of time dependent Raman spectra readily identified small sequential changes resulting from isotope incorporation. Overall, we show that Raman-SIP has the potential to be used to obtain information about regulatory processes like CCR in bacteria at a single cell level within a time span of 3 h in fast growing bacteria. We also demonstrate the potential of this approach in identifying the most efficient naphthalene degraders asserting its importance for use in bioremediation. PMID:27305464

  18. 大气痕量挥发性有机物碳同位素分析研究进展%Review on Carbon Isotope Analysis of Atmospheric Trace Volatile Organic Compounds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭送军; 文晟; 王新明; 盛国英; 傅家谟

    2011-01-01

    对于大气痕量挥发性有机物的研究,浓度测量方法在满足科学研究的要求方面尚有欠缺,相比之下,同位素测量方法具有测量精度高、对源解析准确和测量误差小的特点且发展迅速,该方法在大气痕量挥发性有机物的研究中所起到的作用日益显著;但由于同位素测量技术对大气样品质量的要求很高,故目前该方法在大气环境科学的研究领域中还不能普及,今后随着该项技术的发展,同位素方法将会在大气环境科学研究领域中发挥越来越重要的作用.文章综述了同位素方法在大气痕量挥发性有机物如非甲烷烃、一氯甲烷和羧基化合物的源研究进展以及从源向大气环境转化过程中的同位素分馏特征,同时展望了该方法在大气痕量挥发性有机化合物研究中的发展趋势.%Concentration measurement is often difficult to meet the requirement of scientific research for atmospheric trace volatile organics to some degrees. With the rapid development of isotope technique in recent years, the isotope method is becoming a powerful tool with high measurement precision, accurate source analysis and small deviation. However the isotope measurement still cannot be universal in the field of atmospheric environment due to its high requirement of atmospheric samples. Use of isotope method to study non-methane hydrocarbons, CH:,C1 and carbonyls in the atmosphere was reviewed, including isotope signature of different sources and kinetic isotope effects associated with atmospheric transportation process. The trends of isotope technique in research of trace organic species were also prospected.

  19. Stable Carbon Isotope Ratios of Phenolic Compounds in Secondary Particulate Organic Matter Formed by Photooxidation of Toluene

    CERN Document Server

    Irei, Satoshi; Huang, Lin; Auld, Janeen; Collin, Fabrice; Hastie, Donald

    2014-01-01

    Compound-specific stable carbon isotope ratios for phenolic compounds in secondary particulate organic matter (POM) formed by photooxidation of toluene were studied. Secondary POM generated by photooxidation of toluene using a continuous-flow reactor and an 8 cubic meter indoor smog chamber was collected, and then extracted with acetonitrile. Eight phenolic compounds were identified in the extracts by a gas chromatograph coupled with a mass spectrometer, and their compound-specific stable carbon isotope ratios were determined by a gas chromatograph coupled with a combustion furnace followed by an isotope ratio mass spectrometer. The majority of the products, including methylnitrophenols and methylnitrocatechols, were isotopically depleted by 5 to 6 permil compared to the initial isotope ratio for toluene, whereas the isotope ratio for 4_nitrophenol remained the same as the initial isotope ratio for toluene. Based on the reaction mechanisms postulated in literature, stable carbon isotope ratios of these produc...

  20. Stable carbon isotopes of dissolved inorganic carbon for a zonal transect across the subpolar North Atlantic Ocean in summer 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, Matthew P.; Greatrix, Florence M.; Tynan, Eithne; Achterberg, Eric P.; Griffiths, Alex M.; Fry, Claudia H.; Garley, Rebecca; McDonald, Alison; Boyce, Adrian J.

    2016-06-01

    The stable carbon isotope composition of dissolved inorganic carbon (δ13CDIC) in seawater was measured in samples collected during June-July 2014 in the subpolar North Atlantic. Sample collection was carried out on the RRS James Clark Ross cruise JR302, part of the "Radiatively Active Gases from the North Atlantic Region and Climate Change" (RAGNARoCC) research programme. The observed δ13CDIC values for cruise JR302 fall in a range from -0.07 to +1.95 ‰, relative to the Vienna Pee Dee Belemnite standard. From duplicate samples collected during the cruise, the 1σ precision for the 341 results is 0.08 ‰, which is similar to our previous work and other studies of this kind. We also performed a cross-over analysis using nearby historical δ13CDIC data, which indicated that there were no significant systematic offsets between our measurements and previously published results. We also included seawater reference material (RM) produced by A. G. Dickson (Scripps Institution of Oceanography, USA) in every batch of analysis, enabling us to improve upon the calibration and quality-control procedures from a previous study. The δ13CDIC is consistent within each RM batch, although its value is not certified. We report δ13CDIC values of 1.15 ± 0.03 ‰ and 1.27 ± 0.05 ‰ for batches 141 and 144 respectively. Our JR302 δ13CDIC data can be used - along with measurements of other biogeochemical variables - to constrain the processes that control DIC in the interior ocean, in particular the oceanic uptake of anthropogenic carbon dioxide and the biological carbon pump. Our δ13CDIC results are available from the British Oceanographic Data Centre - doi:10.5285/22235f1a-b7f3-687f-e053-6c86abc0c8a6.

  1. Carbon dioxide effects research and assessment program. Proceedings of the International Meeting on Stable Isotopes in Tree-Ring Research, New Paltz, New York, May 22-25, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacoby, G [ed.

    1980-12-01

    Information about the past and present concentrations of CO/sub 2/ in the atmosphere and variations in climate can be obtained from measurements of stable isotopes in tree rings; specifically carbon-13, oxygen-18 and deuterium. The analysis of these stable isotopes in tree rings is a relatively new and rapidly developing field. This proceedings volume contains most of the papers presented at the meeting. The first paper gives an overview of the status of carbon-13 research. Papers relating to carbon-13 are in section I and grouped separately from the contributions on carbon-14. Although the meeting was primarily concerned with stable isotopes, all carbon isotopic analysis may be helpful in understanding the carbon-13 record in tree rings. The papers on hydrogen and oxygen isotope studies are in sections II and III respectively. The remaining sections contain papers that consider more than one isotope at a time, general topics related to isotopes, atmospheric changes and tree growth, and methods of isotopic analysis.

  2. Analyzing carbon losses from dry soils after precipitation pulses by stable carbon isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unger, Stephan; Máguas, Cristina; Santos-Pereira, João.; Werner, Christiane

    2010-05-01

    Rain events after drought periods strongly increase soil respiration (Birch effect) and affect plant activity, and thus, may influence the isotopic signal of ecosystem respiration. These CO2-pulses may largely affect the C-balance of arid and semi-arid systems. Here, we evaluate the origins of the Birch effect in a Mediterranean forest and its influence on the isotopic signal of ecosystem (δ13CR) and soil respiration (δ13CSoil). We conducted artificial rain pulses in May and August 2005 and estimated δ13CSoil on intact vegetation, bare and root-free soil in response to watering. After watering in May δ13CSoil showed strong enrichment (-18) and a rapid return to initial values (-27). This transient enrichment was smaller in August than in May (ca. -22). Further, we compared δ13CR and δ13CSoil after first natural rains in October 2005, where both revealed a good relationship over the diurnal and the fortnight cycle. We hypothesize that the 'Birch effect' immediately after irrigation is the result of a hypo-osmotic stress response of the soil microbial community: during sudden moisture changes enriched osmoregulants are rapidly released and mineralized by the soil microbes to avoid cell lysis. After the pulse soil respiration followed a common moisture response. The overall impact of the Birch effect on C-sequestration will depend on both timing and frequency of the rains and thus, on whether the respired CO2 source is microbial or soil organic matter carbon.

  3. The atmospheric signal of terrestrial carbon isotopic discrimination and its implication for partitioning carbon fluxes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 13C/12C ratio in atmospheric carbon dioxide has been measured in samples taken in the NOAA/CMDL network since 1991. By examining the relationship between weekly anomalies in 13C and CO2 at continental sites in the network, we infer temporal and spatial values for the isotopic signature of terrestrial CO2 fluxes. We can convert these isotopic signatures to values of discrimination if we assume the atmospheric starting point for photosynthesis. The average discrimination in the Northern Hemisphere between 30 and 50 deg N is calculated to be 16.6 ± 0.2 per mil. In contrast to some earlier modeling studies, we find no strong latitudinal gradient in discrimination. However, we do observe that discrimination in Eurasia is larger than in North America, which is consistent with two modeling studies. We also observe a possible trend in the North American average of discrimination toward less discrimination. There is no apparent trend in the Eurasian average or at any individual sites. However, there is interannual variability on the order of 2 per mil at several sites and regions. Finally, we calculate the northern temperate terrestrial CO2 flux replacing our previous discrimination values of about 18 per mil with the average value of 16.6 calculated in this study. We find this enhances the terrestrial sink by about 0.4 GtC/yr

  4. Coordinated In Situ Nanosims Analyses of H-C-O Isotopes in ALH 84001 Carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usui, T.; Alexander, C. M. O'D.; Wang, J.; Simon, J. I.; Jones, J. H.

    2016-01-01

    The surface geology and geomorphology of Mars indicate that it was once warm enough to maintain a large body of liquid water on its surface, though such a warm environment might have been transient. This study reports the hydrogen, carbon, and oxygen isotope compositions of the ancient atmosphere/hydrosphere of Mars based on in situ ion microprobe analyses of approximately 4 Ga-old carbonates in Allan Hills (ALH) 84001. The ALH 84001 carbonates are the most promising targets because they are thought to have formed from fluid that was closely associated with the Noachian atmosphere. While there are a number of carbon and oxygen isotope studies of the ALH 84001 carbonates, in situ hydrogen isotope analyses of these carbonates are limited and were reported more than a decade ago. Well-documented coordinated in situ analyses of carbon, oxygen and hydrogen isotopes provide an internally consistent dataset that can be used to constrain the nature of the Noachian atmosphere/hydrosphere and may eventually shed light on the hypothesis of ancient watery Mars.

  5. Stable carbon isotope ratios of ambient secondary organic aerosols in Toronto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saccon, M.; Kornilova, A.; Huang, L.; Moukhtar, S.; Rudolph, J.

    2015-09-01

    A method to quantify concentrations and stable carbon isotope ratios of secondary organic aerosols has been applied to study atmospheric nitrophenols in Toronto, Canada. The sampling of five nitrophenols, all with substantial secondary formation from the photooxidation of aromatic volatile organic compounds (VOCs), was conducted in the gas phase and particulate matter (PM) together and in PM alone. Their concentrations in the atmosphere are in the low ng m-3 range and, consequently, a large volume of air (> 1000 m3) is needed to analyze samples for stable carbon isotope ratios, resulting in sampling periods of typically 24 h. While this extended sampling period increases the representativeness of average values, it at the same time reduces possibilities to identify meteorological conditions or atmospheric pollution levels determining nitrophenol concentrations and isotope ratios. Average measured carbon isotope ratios of the different nitrophenols are between -34 and -33 ‰, which is well within the range predicted by mass balance. However, the observed carbon isotope ratios cover a range of nearly 9 ‰ and approximately 20 % of the isotope ratios of the products have isotope ratios lower than predicted from the kinetic isotope effect of the first step of the reaction mechanism and the isotope ratio of the precursor. This can be explained by isotope fractionation during reaction steps following the initial reaction of the precursor VOCs with the OH radical. Limited evidence for local production of nitrophenols is observed since sampling was done in the Toronto area, an urban center with significant anthropogenic emission sources. Strong evidence for significant local formation of nitrophenols is only found for samples collected in summer. On average, the difference in carbon isotope ratios between nitrophenols in the particle phase and in the gas phase is insignificant, but for a limited number of observations in summer, a substantial difference is observed. This

  6. The key factor limiting plant growth in cold and humid alpine areas also plays a dominant role in plant carbon isotope discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Meng; Wang, Guoan; Li, Xiaoliang; Cai, Xiaobu; Li, Xiaolin; Christie, Peter; Zhang, Junling

    2015-01-01

    Many environmental factors affect carbon isotope discrimination in plants, yet the predominant factor influencing this process is generally assumed to be the key growth-limiting factor. However, to our knowledge this hypothesis has not been confirmed. We therefore determined the carbon isotope composition (δ13C) of plants growing in two cold and humid mountain regions where temperature is considered to be the key growth-limiting factor. Mean annual temperature (MAT) showed a significant impact on variation in carbon isotope discrimination value (Δ) irrespective of study area or plant functional type with either partial correlation or regression analysis, but the correlation between Δ and soil water content (SWC) was usually not significant. In multiple stepwise regression analysis, MAT was either the first or the only variable selected into the prediction model of Δ against MAT and SWC, indicating that the effect of temperature on carbon isotope discrimination was predominant. The results therefore provide evidence that the key growth-limiting factor is also crucial for plant carbon isotope discrimination. Changes in leaf morphology, water viscosity and carboxylation efficiency with temperature may be responsible for the observed positive correlation between Δ and temperature. PMID:26579188

  7. Large carbon isotope fractionation associated with oxidation of methyl halides by methylotrophic bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, L.G.; Kalin, Robert M.; McCauley, S.E.; Hamilton, John T.G.; Harper, D.B.; Millet, D.B.; Oremland, R.S.; Goldstein, Allen H.

    2001-01-01

    The largest biological fractionations of stable carbon isotopes observed in nature occur during production of methane by methanogenic archaea. These fractionations result in substantial (as much as ???70???) shifts in ??13C relative to the initial substrate. We now report that a stable carbon isotopic fractionation of comparable magnitude (up to 70???) occurs during oxidation of methyl halides by methylotrophic bacteria. We have demonstrated biological fractionation with whole Cells of three methylotrophs (strain IMB-1, strain CC495, and strain MB2) and, to a lesser extent, with the purified cobalamin-dependent methyltransferase enzyme obtained from strain CC495. Thus, the genetic similarities recently reported between methylotrophs, and methanogens with respect to their pathways for C1-unit metabolism are also reflected in the carbon isotopic fractionations achieved by these organisms. We found that only part of the observed fractionation of carbon isotopes could be accounted for by the activity of the corrinoid methyltransferase enzyme, suggesting fractionation by enzymes further along the degradation pathway. These observations are of potential biogeochemical significance in the application of stable carbon isotope ratios to constrain the tropospheric budgets for the ozone-depleting halocarbons, methyl bromide and methyl chloride.

  8. Carbon and oxygen isotope variations of the Middle-Late Triassic Al Aziziyah Formation, northwest Libya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moustafa, Mohamed S. H.; Pope, Michael C.; Grossman, Ethan L.; Mriheel, Ibrahim Y.

    2016-06-01

    This study presents the δ13C and δ18O records from whole rock samples of the Middle-Late Triassic (Ladinian-Carnian) Al Aziziyah Formation that were deposited on a gently sloping carbonate ramp within the Jifarah Basin of Northwest Libya. The Al Aziziyah Formation consists of gray limestone, dolomite, and dolomitic limestone interbedded with shale. The Ghryan Dome and Kaf Bates sections were sampled and analyzed for carbon and oxygen isotope chemostratigraphy to integrate high-resolution carbon isotope data with an outcrop-based stratigraphy, to provide better age control of the Al Aziziyah Formation. This study also discusses the relation between the facies architecture of the Al Aziziyah Formation and the carbon isotope values. Seven stages of relative sea level rise and fall within the Ghryan Dome were identified based on facies stacking patterns, field observations and carbon stable isotopes. The Al Aziziyah Formation δ13C chemostratigraphic curve can be partially correlated with the Triassic global δ13C curve. This correlation indicates that the Al Aziziyah Formation was deposited during the Ladinian and early Carnian. No straight-forward relationship is seen between δ13C and relative sea level probably because local influences complicated systematic environmental and diagenetic isotopic effects associated with sea level change.

  9. Use of carbon isotopes to estimate incorporation of added CO2 by greenhouse-grown tomato plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method is presented which uses the 13C and 14C isotope abundance in CO2-enriched greenhouse crops to determine the percentage of plant organic carbon derived from artificially added CO2. In a greenhouse experiment with CO2 concentrations elevated to 1100 ± 100 microliters per liter during part of the daylight hours and maintained at normal atmospheric concentrations (340 microliters per liter) during the rest of the time, it was shown by 14C analysis that between 41% and 42% of the carbon in tomato plants (Lycopersicon esculentum var 4884) came from the artificially added CO2. Similar results were obtained from 13C analyses when the CO2 pressure-dependent isotope separation was taken into account

  10. In-situ Isotopic Analysis at Nanoscale using Parallel Ion Electron Spectrometry: A Powerful New Paradigm for Correlative Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yedra, Lluís; Eswara, Santhana; Dowsett, David; Wirtz, Tom

    2016-06-01

    Isotopic analysis is of paramount importance across the entire gamut of scientific research. To advance the frontiers of knowledge, a technique for nanoscale isotopic analysis is indispensable. Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) is a well-established technique for analyzing isotopes, but its spatial-resolution is fundamentally limited. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) is a well-known method for high-resolution imaging down to the atomic scale. However, isotopic analysis in TEM is not possible. Here, we introduce a powerful new paradigm for in-situ correlative microscopy called the Parallel Ion Electron Spectrometry by synergizing SIMS with TEM. We demonstrate this technique by distinguishing lithium carbonate nanoparticles according to the isotopic label of lithium, viz. 6Li and 7Li and imaging them at high-resolution by TEM, adding a new dimension to correlative microscopy.

  11. In-situ Isotopic Analysis at Nanoscale using Parallel Ion Electron Spectrometry: A Powerful New Paradigm for Correlative Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yedra, Lluís; Eswara, Santhana; Dowsett, David; Wirtz, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Isotopic analysis is of paramount importance across the entire gamut of scientific research. To advance the frontiers of knowledge, a technique for nanoscale isotopic analysis is indispensable. Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) is a well-established technique for analyzing isotopes, but its spatial-resolution is fundamentally limited. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) is a well-known method for high-resolution imaging down to the atomic scale. However, isotopic analysis in TEM is not possible. Here, we introduce a powerful new paradigm for in-situ correlative microscopy called the Parallel Ion Electron Spectrometry by synergizing SIMS with TEM. We demonstrate this technique by distinguishing lithium carbonate nanoparticles according to the isotopic label of lithium, viz. 6Li and 7Li and imaging them at high-resolution by TEM, adding a new dimension to correlative microscopy. PMID:27350565

  12. Carbon and oxygen isotopic composition of the carbonates from the Jacupiranga and Catalao I carbonatite complexes, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morikiyo, Toshiro (Shinshu Univ., Matsumoto, Nagano (Japan). Faculty of Science); Hirano, Hideo; Matsuhisa, Yukihiro

    1990-11-01

    Carbon and oxygen isotope compositions were measured for carbonates from the Jacupiranga and Catalao I carbonatite complexes in Brazil. The {delta}{sup 13}C values of the Jacupiranga carbonates are uniform, ranging from -6.4 to -5.6 per mille with the average of -6.07 per mille. Except for one sample, the {delta}{sup 18}O values of the carbonates are between 7.1 and 8.1 per mille, and the average value is 7.6 per mille. The isotopic compositions of the Jacupiranga carbonates represent the value of primary igneous carbonatite. The {delta}{sup 13}C values of dolomites are about 0.5 per mille higher than those of calcites. The {delta}{sup 13}C values of carbonates from the Catalao I complex range from -6.8 to -5.2 per mille with the average of -5.83 per mille. Those values are similar to the values of the Jacupiranga carbonates. However, oxygen isotopic compositions of the Catalao I carbonates show a wide range of 8.4 to 22.3 per mille. Carbonates with the lowest {delta}{sup 18}O values in the complex are considered to represent the igneous stage. Carbonates with extremely high {delta}{sup 18}O values of about 22 per mille are considered to have precipitated from low-temperature hydrothermal fluids. The group of intermediate {delta}{sup 18}O values indicates a variable degree of contamination by the {delta}{sup 18}O-rich hydrothermal carbonates. The contribution of secondary stage hydrothermal carbonates seems to be significant in the Catalao I complex as compared with the Jacupiranga complex. The development of a network structure in the Catalao I complex may have enhanced the circulation of the later stage hydrothermal fluids. (author).

  13. Marine Carbon-Sulfur Biogeochemical Cycles during the Steptoean Positive Carbon Isotope Excursion (SPICE) in the Jiangnan Basin, South China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Peng; Yongbo Peng; Xianguo Lang; Haoran Ma; Kangjun Huang; Fangbing Li; Bing Shen

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT:Global occurrences of Steptoean Positive Carbon Isotope Excursion (SPICE) during Late Cambrian recorded a significant perturbation in marine carbon cycle, and might have had profound impacts on the biological evolution. In previous studies, SPICE has been reported from the Jiangnan slope belt in South China. To evaluate the bathymetric extent of SPICE, we investigate the limestone samples from the upper Qingxi Formation in the Shaijiang Section in the Jiangnan Basin. Our results show the positive excursions for both carbonate carbon (δ13C) and organic carbon (δ13Corg) isotopes, as well as the concurrent positive shifts in sulfur isotopes of carbonate associated sulfate (CAS, δ34SCAS) and pyrite (δ34Spyrite), unequivocally indicating the presence of SPICE in the Jiangnan Basin. A 4‰increase inδ13Ccarb of the Qingxi limestone implies the increase of the relative flux of organic carbon burial by a factor of two. Concurrent positive excursions inδ34SCAS andδ34Spyrite have been attributed to the enhanced pyrite burial in oceans with extremely low concentration and spatially heterogeneous isotopic composition of seawater sulfate. Here, we propose that the seawater sulfur isotopic heterogeneity can be generated by volatile organic sulfur compound (VOSC, such as methanethiol and dimethyl sulfide) formation in sulfidic continental margins that were widespread during SPICE. Emission of 32S-enriched VOSC in atmosphere, followed by lateral transportation and aerobic oxidation in atmosphere, and precipitation in open oceans result in a net flux of 32S from continental margins to open oceans, elevatingδ34S of seawater sulfate in continental margins. A simple box model indicates that about 35%to 75%of seawater sulfate in continental margins needs to be transported to open oceans via VOSC formation.

  14. Differentiation of Pigment in Eggs Using Carbon ((13)C/(12)C) and Nitrogen ((15)N/(14)N) Stable Isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Feng M; Shi, Guang Y; Wang, Hui W

    2016-07-01

    Consumers prefer natural and healthy food, but artificial pigments are often abused in egg products. The study aimed at differentiating the origin of pigments in eggs by applying the technique of carbon ((13)C/(12)C) and nitrogen ((15)N/(14)N) stable isotope analysis. Five hundred sixty laying hens were randomly distributed into 14 treatments, which were divided into four groups: maize, carophyll red pigment, carophyll yellow pigment, and a mixture of carophyll red and yellow pigments. Eggs were collected and pretreated to determe the values of the Roche Yolk Color Fan (RCF), δ(13)C, and δ(15)N. With increasing maize content, the RCF and δ(13)C values of yolks increased. Moreover, the RCF values in the three pigment groups were significantly influenced by the artificial colors, but δ(13)C values were not significantly different, regardless of the existence of pigment. The δ(15)N values in all treatments did not vary as regularly as the carbon stable isotope. A strong positive correlation was found between RCF and δ(13)C in the maize group, but no such correlation was be observed in the pigment groups. It is concluded that carbon stable isotope ratio analysis (δ(13)C) of the yolk can be used to differentiate the origin of the pigment added to eggs.

  15. Differentiation of Pigment in Eggs Using Carbon ((13)C/(12)C) and Nitrogen ((15)N/(14)N) Stable Isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Feng M; Shi, Guang Y; Wang, Hui W

    2016-07-01

    Consumers prefer natural and healthy food, but artificial pigments are often abused in egg products. The study aimed at differentiating the origin of pigments in eggs by applying the technique of carbon ((13)C/(12)C) and nitrogen ((15)N/(14)N) stable isotope analysis. Five hundred sixty laying hens were randomly distributed into 14 treatments, which were divided into four groups: maize, carophyll red pigment, carophyll yellow pigment, and a mixture of carophyll red and yellow pigments. Eggs were collected and pretreated to determe the values of the Roche Yolk Color Fan (RCF), δ(13)C, and δ(15)N. With increasing maize content, the RCF and δ(13)C values of yolks increased. Moreover, the RCF values in the three pigment groups were significantly influenced by the artificial colors, but δ(13)C values were not significantly different, regardless of the existence of pigment. The δ(15)N values in all treatments did not vary as regularly as the carbon stable isotope. A strong positive correlation was found between RCF and δ(13)C in the maize group, but no such correlation was be observed in the pigment groups. It is concluded that carbon stable isotope ratio analysis (δ(13)C) of the yolk can be used to differentiate the origin of the pigment added to eggs. PMID:27302905

  16. Stable carbon and oxygen isotope studies of Late Weichselian lake sediments in southern Sweden and northern Poland, with palaeoclimatic implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Late Weichselian lacustrine sediment sequences from southern Sweden and northern Poland were studied by means of stable isotope analysis in order to reconstruct the climatic development and climatically induced environmental changes in the respective regions. The methods used include analyses of the stable carbon