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Sample records for carbon iron filings

  1. Amorphous iron (II) carbonate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sel, Ozlem; Radha, A.V.; Dideriksen, Knud;

    2012-01-01

    exothermic than that of amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC). This suggests that enthalpy of crystallization in carbonate systems is ionic-size controlled, which may have significant implications in a wide variety of conditions, including geological sequestration of anthropogenic carbon dioxide.......Abstract The synthesis, characterization and crystallization energetics of amorphous iron (II) carbonate (AFC) are reported. AFC may form as a precursor for siderite (FeCO3). The enthalpy of crystallization (DHcrys) of AFC is similar to that of amorphous magnesium carbonate (AMC) and more...

  2. Iron filings cement engineered soil mix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bioretention cells are used in urban stormwater management to reduce storm surge and nutrient loss. The cells are filled with mixtures of soil, sand, compost, and other materials, and are underlain by a drain. The purpose of this study was to determine if iron filings would be a suitable filter for ...

  3. Carbon-Supported Iron Oxide Particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meaz, T.; Mørup, Steen; Koch, C. Bender

    1996-01-01

    A carbon black ws impregnated with 6 wt% iron using an aqueous solution of iron nitrate. The impregnated carbon was initially dried at 125 C. The effect of heating of the iron oxide phase was investigated at temperatures between 200 and 600 C using Mossbauer spectroscopy. All heat treatments were...... done in an oxygen-containing atmosphere. Ferrihydrite is formed and is stable at and below a temperature of 300 C. At 600 C small particles of maghemite is the dominant iron oxide. A transformation reaction is suggested....

  4. Carbon-Supported Iron Oxide Particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meaz, T.; Mørup, Steen; Koch, C. Bender

    1996-01-01

    A carbon black ws impregnated with 6 wt% iron using an aqueous solution of iron nitrate. The impregnated carbon was initially dried at 125 C. The effect of heating of the iron oxide phase was investigated at temperatures between 200 and 600 C using Mossbauer spectroscopy. All heat treatments were...... done in an oxygen-containing atmosphere. Ferrihydrite is formed and is stable at and below a temperature of 300 C. At 600 C small particles of maghemite is the dominant iron oxide. A transformation reaction is suggested....

  5. Iron, phytoplankton growth, and the carbon cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, Joseph H; Paytan, Adina

    2005-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient for all living organisms. Iron is required for the synthesis of chlorophyll and of several photosynthetic electron transport proteins and for the reduction of CO2, SO4(2-), and NO3(-) during the photosynthetic production of organic compounds. Iron concentrations in vast areas of the ocean are very low (iron in oxic seawater. Low iron concentrations have been shown to limit primary production rates, biomass accumulation, and ecosystem structure in a variety of open-ocean environments, including the equatorial Pacific, the subarctic Pacific and the Southern Ocean and even in some coastal areas. Oceanic primary production, the transfer of carbon dioxide into organic carbon by photosynthetic plankton (phytoplankton), is one process by which atmospheric CO2 can be transferred to the deep ocean and sequestered for long periods of time. Accordingly, iron limitation of primary producers likely plays a major role in the global carbon cycle. It has been suggested that variations in oceanic primary productivity, spurred by changes in the deposition of iron in atmospheric dust, control atmospheric CO2 concentrations, and hence global climate, over glacial-interglacial timescales. A contemporary application of this "iron hypothesis" promotes the large-scale iron fertilization of ocean regions as a means of enhancing the ability of the ocean to store anthropogenic CO2 and mitigate 21st century climate change. Recent in situ iron enrichment experiments in the HNLC regions, however, cast doubt on the efficacy and advisability of iron fertilization schemes. The experiments have confirmed the role of iron in regulating primary productivity, but resulted in only small carbon export fluxes to the depths necessary for long-term sequestration. Above all, these experiments and other studies of iron biogeochemistry over the last two decades have begun to illustrate the great complexity of the ocean system. Attempts to engineer this system are likely to

  6. Cast Iron With High Carbon Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curreri, P. A.; Hendrix, J. C.; Stefanescu, D. M.

    1986-01-01

    Method proposed for solidifying high-carbon cast iron without carbon particles segregating at upper surface. Solidification carried out in low gravity, for example on airplane flying free-fall parabolic trajectory. Many different microstructures obtained by proposed technique, and percentage by weight of carbon retained in melt much higher than at present.

  7. Iron cycling at corroding carbon steel surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jason S; McBeth, Joyce M; Ray, Richard I; Little, Brenda J; Emerson, David

    2013-01-01

    Surfaces of carbon steel (CS) exposed to mixed cultures of iron-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) and dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria (FeRB) in seawater media under aerobic conditions were rougher than surfaces of CS exposed to pure cultures of either type of microorganism. The roughened surface, demonstrated by profilometry, is an indication of loss of metal from the surface. In the presence of CS, aerobically grown FeOB produced tight, twisted helical stalks encrusted with iron oxides. When CS was exposed anaerobically in the presence of FeRB, some surface oxides were removed. However, when the same FeOB and FeRB were grown together in an aerobic medium, FeOB stalks were less encrusted with iron oxides and appeared less tightly coiled. These observations suggest that iron oxides on the stalks were reduced and solubilized by the FeRB. Roughened surfaces of CS and denuded stalks were replicated with culture combinations of different species of FeOB and FeRB under three experimental conditions. Measurements of electrochemical polarization resistance established different rates of corrosion of CS in aerobic and anaerobic media, but could not differentiate rate differences between sterile controls and inoculated exposures for a given bulk concentration of dissolved oxygen. Similarly, total iron in the electrolyte could not be used to differentiate treatments. The experiments demonstrate the potential for iron cycling (oxidation and reduction) on corroding CS in aerobic seawater media.

  8. Reductive denitrification of nitrate by scrap iron filings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAO Zhi-wei; XU Xin-hua; WANG Da-hui

    2005-01-01

    Reduction of nitrate by zero-valent iron is a highly exergonic reaction that has long been known to occur. Use of scrap iron filings (SIF) as the PRB (Permeable Reactive Barrier) material can be used to recycle certain by-products, and identify cheaper replacements for expensive conventional PRB materials, especially pure metallic iron. The feasibility of reductive denitrification of nitrate by SIF was studied by batch experiments. Operational parameters such as pH value, SIF dosage and initial concentration of nitrate were investigated. The removal efficiency of nitrate reached 80% under the conditions of pH of 2.5, nitrate initial concentration of 45 mg/L and SIF dosage of 100 g/L within 4 h. Results indicated that nitrate removal is inversely related to pH. Low pH value condition favors for the nitrate transformation. Different from the results of others who studied nitrate reduction using iron powder, we found that there was a lag time before nitrate reduction occurs, even at low pH. Finally, the possible mechanism of nitrate reduction by Fe0 is discussed.

  9. Voronoi analysis of the short-range atomic structure in iron and iron-carbon melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobolev, Andrey; Mirzoev, Alexander

    2015-08-01

    In this work, we simulated the atomic structure of liquid iron and iron-carbon alloys by means of ab initio molecular dynamics. Voronoi analysis was used to highlight changes in the close environments of Fe atoms as carbon concentration in the melt increases. We have found, that even high concentrations of carbon do not affect short-range atomic order of iron atoms — it remains effectively the same as in pure iron melts.

  10. Experimental Study on Treatment of Trichloroethylene Emission by Absorption Combined with Iron Filings-Activated Carbon Micro-Electrolysis%溶液吸收结合铁碳微电解法处理三氯乙烯废气实验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王莉莉; 黄立维; 黄桂凤; 陈金媛

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of trichloroethylene (TCE) in gas stream by absorption combined with iron filings-activated carbon(Fe-AC) micro-electrolysis was experimentally investigated. The experiment was conducted in a tubular reactor filled with iron filings, activated carbon powder and iron filings-activated carbon combination, respectively. All the fillings were immerged in acidic water solutions. The gas stream containing TCE is introduced to the reactor from the bottom of reactor and flows through the Fe-AC micro-electrolysis zone, and then discharges from the top of reactor. Experimental result shows that the removal of TCE is higher with Fe-AC combination as the filling material than that with only iron filings or active carbon as filling materials. After reaction, the production of Cl-in aqueous solution was confirmed for both using iron filings and Fe-AC combination as fillings. However, the production of Cl-is much more with using Fe-AC combination as fillings, which is attributed to the effect of Fe-AC micro-electrolysis in the solution. It was also found that both the dechloridation and removal of TCE increase with the decrease of solution pH value.%采用溶液吸收结合铁碳微电解反应处理气流中的三氯乙烯(TCE)废气。实验采用管式反应器,管内分别充填铁屑、活性碳和铁屑-活性炭(Fe-AC)组合填料,所有填料浸没在酸性吸收液中。含有TCE的气体从反应器下部导入,经铁屑-活性炭(Fe-AC)微电解区后,从反应器上部排出。研究了铁屑、活性炭及铁屑-活性炭(Fe-AC)组合三种条件下对TCE的去除效果,考察了溶液pH对TCE去除率的影响。实验结果表明采用Fe-AC组合对TCE废气的去除率要高于在溶液中分别添加铁屑或活性炭的情况,在铁屑和Fe-AC作用下的吸收液中均测得氯离子存在,表明铁屑和Fe-AC体系都具有脱氯还原的效果,而Fe-AC微电解对TCE的脱氯效果更好;较低的pH值有利于提高TCE的还原脱氯和去除效果。

  11. Tropical forest soil microbial communities couple iron and carbon biogeochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubinsky, E.A.; Silver, W.L.; Firestone, M.K.

    2009-10-15

    We report that iron-reducing bacteria are primary mediators of anaerobic carbon oxidation in upland tropical soils spanning a rainfall gradient (3500 - 5000 mm yr-1) in northeast Puerto Rico. The abundant rainfall and high net primary productivity of these tropical forests provide optimal soil habitat for iron-reducing and iron-oxidizing bacteria. Spatially and temporally dynamic redox conditions make iron-transforming microbial communities central to the belowground carbon cycle in these wet tropical forests. The exceedingly high abundance of iron-reducing bacteria (up to 1.2 x 10{sup 9} cells per gram soil) indicated that they possess extensive metabolic capacity to catalyze the reduction of iron minerals. In soils from the higher rainfall sites, measured rates of ferric iron reduction could account for up to 44 % of organic carbon oxidation. Iron reducers appeared to compete with methanogens when labile carbon availability was limited. We found large numbers of bacteria that oxidize reduced iron at sites with high rates of iron reduction and large numbers of iron-reducers. the coexistence of large populations of ironreducing and iron-oxidizing bacteria is evidence for rapid iron cycling between its reduced and oxidized states, and suggests that mutualistic interactions among these bacteria ultimately fuel organic carbon oxidation and inhibit CH4 production in these upland tropical forests.

  12. Synthesis of Carbon Encapsulated Mono- and Multi-Iron Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Reza Sanaee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Core–shell nanostructures of carbon encapsulated iron nanoparticles (CEINPs show unique properties and technological applications, because carbon shell provides extreme chemical stability and protects pure iron core against oxidation without impairing the possibility of functionalization of the carbon surface. Enhancing iron core magnetic properties and, in parallel, improving carbon shell sealing are the two major challenges in the synthesis of CEINPs. Here, we present the synthesis of both CEINPs and a new carbon encapsulated multi-iron nanoparticle by a new modified arc discharge reactor. The nanoparticle size, composition, and crystallinity and the magnetic properties have been studied. The morphological properties were observed by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. In order to evaluate carbon shell protection, the iron cores were characterized by selected area diffraction and fast Fourier transform techniques as well as by electron energy loss and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopies. Afterward, the magnetic properties were investigated using a superconducting quantum interference device. As main results, spherical, oval, and multi-iron cores were controllably synthesized by this new modified arc discharge method. The carbon shell with high crystallinity exhibited sufficient protection against oxidation of pure iron cores. The presented results also provided new elements for understanding the growth mechanism of iron core and carbon shell.

  13. In-situ activation of persulfate by iron filings and degradation of 1,4-dioxane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Hua; Brusseau, Mark L; Wang, Yake; Yan, Ni; Quig, Lauren; Johnson, Gwynn R

    2015-10-15

    Activation of persulfate by iron filings and subsequent degradation of 1,4-dioxane (dioxane) was studied in both batch-reactor and column systems to evaluate the potential of a persulfate-enhanced permeable reactive barrier (PRB) system for combined oxidative-reductive removal of organic contaminants from groundwater. In batch experiments, decomposition of persulfate to sulfate and degradation of dioxane both occurred rapidly in the presence of iron filings. Conversely, dioxane degradation by persulfate was considerably slower in the absence of iron filings. For the column experiments, decomposition and retardation of persulfate was observed for transport in the columns packed with iron filings, whereas no decomposition or retardation was observed for transport in columns packed with a reference quartz sand. Both sulfate production and dioxane degradation were observed for the iron-filings columns, but not for the sand column. The pH of the column effluent increased temporarily before persulfate breakthrough, and significant increases in both ferrous and ferric iron coincided with persulfate breakthrough. Multiple species of free radicals were produced from persulfate activation as determined by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The impact of the oxidation process on solution composition and iron-filings surface chemistry was examined using ICP-MS, SEM-EDS, and XRD analyses. A two-stage reaction mechanism is proposed to describe the oxidation process, consisting of a first stage of rapid, solution-based, radical-driven decomposition of dioxane and a second stage governed by rate-limited surface reaction. The results of this study show successful persulfate activation using iron filings, and the potential to apply an enhanced PRB method for improving in-situ removal of organic contaminants from groundwater.

  14. Iron-carbonate interaction at Earth's core-mantle boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorfman, S. M.; Badro, J.; Nabiei, F.; Prakapenka, V.; Gillet, P.

    2015-12-01

    Carbon storage and flux in the deep Earth are moderated by oxygen fugacity and interactions with iron-bearing phases. The amount of carbon stored in Earth's mantle versus the core depends on carbon-iron chemistry at the core-mantle boundary. Oxidized carbonates subducted from Earth's surface to the lowermost mantle may encounter reduced Fe0 metal from disproportionation of Fe2+ in lower mantle silicates or mixing with the core. To understand the fate of carbonates in the lowermost mantle, we have performed experiments on sandwiches of single-crystal (Ca0.6Mg0.4)CO3 dolomite and Fe foil in the laser-heated diamond anvil cell at lower mantle conditions of 49-110 GPa and 1800-2500 K. Syntheses were conducted with in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction to identify phase assemblages. After quench to ambient conditions, samples were sectioned with a focused Ga+ ion beam for composition analysis with transmission electron microscopy. At the centers of the heated spots, iron melted and reacted completely with the carbonate to form magnesiowüstite, iron carbide, diamond, magnesium-rich carbonate and calcium carbonate. In samples heated at 49 and 64 GPa, the two carbonates exhibit a eutectoid texture. In the sample heated at 110 GPa, the carbonates form rounded ~150-nm-diameter grains with a higher modal proportion of interspersed diamonds. The presence of reduced iron in the deep lower mantle and core-mantle boundary region will promote the formation of diamonds in carbonate-bearing subducted slabs. The complete reaction of metallic iron to oxides and carbides in the presence of mantle carbonate supports the formation of these phases at the Earth's core-mantle boundary and in ultra-low velocity zones.

  15. 75 FR 66083 - Iron Mask Hydro, LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing and Soliciting...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-27

    ... Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Iron Mask Hydro, LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application..., 2010. On May 6, 2010, and supplemented on July 15, 2010, Iron Mask Hydro, LLC filed an application for... the feasibility of the Iron Mask Pumped Storage Project to be located near the U.S. Bureau...

  16. 75 FR 53963 - Iron Mask Hydro, LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing and Soliciting...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-02

    ... Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Iron Mask Hydro, LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application..., 2010. On May 6, 2010, Iron Mask Hydro, LLC filed an application for a preliminary permit, pursuant to section 4(f) of the Federal Power Act (FPA), proposing to study the feasibility of the Iron Mask...

  17. Iron-carbon composites for the remediation of chlorinated hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunkara, Bhanu Kiran

    This research is focused on engineering submicron spherical carbon particles as effective carriers/supports for nanoscale zerovalent iron (NZVI) particles to address the in situ remediation of soil and groundwater chlorinated contaminants. Chlorinated hydrocarbons such as trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) form a class of dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) toxic contaminants in soil and groundwater. The in situ injection of NZVI particles to reduce DNAPLs is a potentially simple, cost-effective, and environmentally benign technology that has become a preferred method in the remediation of these compounds. However, unsupported NZVI particles exhibit ferromagnetism leading to particle aggregation and loss in mobility through the subsurface. This work demonstrates two approaches to prepare carbon supported NZVI (iron-carbon composites) particles. The objective is to establish these iron-carbon composites as extremely useful materials for the environmental remediation of chlorinated hydrocarbons and suitable materials for the in situ injection technology. This research also demonstrates that it is possible to vary the placement of iron nanoparticles either on the external surface or within the interior of carbon microspheres using a one-step aerosol-based process. The simple process of modifying iron placement has significant potential applications in heterogeneous catalysis as both the iron and carbon are widely used catalysts and catalyst supports. Furthermore, the aerosol-based process is applied to prepare new class of supported catalytic materials such as carbon-supported palladium nanoparticles for ex situ remediation of contaminated water. The iron-carbon composites developed in this research have multiple functionalities (a) they are reactive and function effectively in reductive dehalogenation (b) they are highly adsorptive thereby bringing the chlorinated compound to the proximity of the reactive sites and also serving as adsorption

  18. Carbon content of austenite in austempered ductile iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, L.C. [Kuang Wu Inst. of Tech. and Commerce, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1998-06-05

    The development of austempered ductile iron (ADI) is a major achievement in cast iron technology. The austempering heat treatment enables the ductile cast iron containing mainly strong bainitic ferrite and ductile carbon-enriched austenite, with some martensite transforms from austenite during cooling down to room temperature. A key factor controlling the stability of the retained austenite can be evaluated soundly using the thermodynamics principles. It is the purpose here to demonstrate that the data of ADI from numerous sources have a similar trend.

  19. Carbon monoxide and iron modulate plasmatic coagulation in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Vance G; Pretorius, Etheresia; Bester, Janette; Jacobsen, Wayne K; Boyle, Patrick K; Reinhard, Joao P

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a significant source of morbidity and mortality for millions of people worldwide, and multiple potential etiologies have been postulated to contribute to AD. Among these, spontaneous cerebral emboli and increased cerebral and circulating heme oxygenase (Hmox) activity in AD patients are of particular interest, as two of the products of Hmox activity, carbon monoxide (CO) and iron enhance plasmatic coagulation and modify the ultrastructure of thrombi. We hypothesized that patients afflicted with AD would have coagulation kinetics modulated by CO and iron. Using viscoelastic assessments of coagulation, it was determined with a small cohort (n=11) of AD patients that all had enhancement of coagulation by CO, iron, or both. In a complementary fashion, it was determined that a separate cohort (n=12) of AD patients had thrombi with ultrastructural features consistent with iron and CO exposure as assessed with scanning electron microscopy. Further, when stratified by normal or abnormally increased serum ferritin concentrations (which can be increased by Hmox), the AD patients with abnormal ferritin concentrations had significantly thinner fibrin fiber diameters, not unlike that noted when normal plasma is mixed with iron or CO. In sum, AD patients were noted to have plasmatic coagulation kinetic and thrombus ultrastructural changes consistent with exposure to CO and iron. Future investigation of CO and iron in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease is warranted.

  20. Iron Cycling at Corroding Carbon Steel Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Tian J. 1998. Manganite reduction by Shewanella putrefaciens mr-4. Am Mineral. 83:1564–1572. Larsen O, Postma D. 2001. Kinetics of reductive bulk...of the genus Shewanella ). Inhibitor and competition experiments suggest that Fe3+ is an efficient electron acceptor similar to nitrate in redox abil... Shewanella sp. and Lovley et al. (1987) working with Geobacter sp. demonstrated that solid manganese and iron oxides, respectively, could serve as electron

  1. Deactivation by carbon of iron catalysts for indirect liquefaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartholomew, C.H.

    1991-01-10

    Although promoted cobalt and iron catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis of gasoline feedstock were first developed more than three decades ago, a major technical problem still limiting the commercial use of these catalysts today is carbon deactivation. This report describes recent progress in a fundamental, three-year investigation of carbon formation and its effects on the activity and selectivity of promoted iron catalysts for FT synthesis, the objectives of which are to: determine rates and mechanisms of carbon deactivation of unsupported Fe and Fe/K catalysts during CO hydrogenation over a range of CO concentrations, CO:H{sub 2} ratios, and temperatures; and model the rates of deactivation of the same catalysts in fixed-bed reactors. To accomplish the above objectives, the project is divided into the following tasks: (1) determine the kinetics of reaction and of carbon deactivation during CO hydrogenation on Fe and Fe/K catalysts coated on monolith bodies. (2) Determine the reactivities and types of carbon deposited during reaction on the same catalysts from temperature-programmed-surface-reaction spectroscopy (TPSR) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Determine the types of iron carbides formed at various temperatures and H{sub 2}/CO ratios using x-ray diffraction and Moessbauer spectroscopy. (3) Develop mathematical deactivation models which include heat and mass transport contributions for FT synthesis is packed-bed reactors. Progress to date is described. 48 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Deactivation by carbon of iron catalysts for indirect liquefaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartholomew, C H

    1991-02-14

    Progress is reported for a four-year fundamental investigation of carbon formation and its effects on the activity and selectivity of promoted iron catalysts for FT synthesis, the objectives of which were to (1) determine rates and mechanisms of carbon deactivation of unsupported Fe and Fe/K catalysts during CO hydrogenation and (2) model the global rates of deactivation at the surface of the catalyst for the same catalysts. A computer-automated reactor system to be used in the kinetic and deactivation studies was designed, constructed and tested. Kinetic data for CO hydrogenation on unsupported, unpromoted iron, 99% Fe/1% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and K-promoted 99% Fe/1% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts were obtained as functions of temperature, reactant particle pressures and time. The activity/selectivity and kinetic data are consistent with those previously reported for supported, unpromoted and promoted iron. Two kinds of deactivation were observed during FT synthesis on these samples: (1) loss of surface area after reduction of unsupported, unpromoted iron at 400{degree}C and (2) loss of activity with time due to carbon deposition, especially in the case of K-promoted 99% Fe/1% A1{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Deactivation rate data were obtained for CO hydrogenation on promoted Fe as a function of time, temperature, and H{sub 2}/CO ratio. 50 refs., 24 figs., 5 tabs.

  3. Iron carbonates in the Earth's lower mantle: reality or imagination?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerantola, V.; McCammon, C. A.; Merlini, M.; Bykova, E.; Kupenko, I.; Ismailova, L.; Chumakov, A. I.; Kantor, I.; Dubrovinsky, L. S.; Prescher, C.

    2015-12-01

    Carbonates play a fundamental role in the recycling of carbon inside our planet due to their presence in oceanic slabs that sink through the Earth's interior. Through this process, iron carbonates are potential stable carbon-bearing minerals in the deep mantle in part due to spin crossover of ferrous iron. Our goal is to identify which minerals may be the dominant carriers of carbon into the deep mantle at the relevant conditions of fO2, P and T. All experiments were performed using synthetic FeCO3 and MgFeCO3 single crystals in laser heated diamond anvil cells up to 100 GPa and 3000 K in order to simulate the conditions prevailing in the Earth's lower mantle. Transformation and decomposition products of the original carbonates were characterized at different synchrotron facilities by means of single-crystal XRD, synchrotron Mössbauer source spectroscopy and XANES techniques. At deep lower mantle conditions, we observed the transformation of FeCO3 to two new HP-carbonate structures, monoclinic Fe22+Fe23+C4O13 and trigonal Fe43+(CO4)3, both characterized by the presence of CO4 tetrahedra with different degrees of polymerization. At shallower depths in the lower mantle where temperatures are lower following the geotherm, Fe-carbonates decompose to different Fe-oxides instead of new HP-carbonates. However, at slab temperatures several hundred degrees lower than the surrounding mantle, carbonates could be stabilized until reaching conditions that trigger their transformation to HP-structures. We postulate that Fe-rich carbonates could exist in regions down to the core-mantle boundary in the proximity of subducting slabs, i.e., a "cold" environment with relatively high fO2.

  4. 77 FR 20380 - Iron Energy LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing Includes Request for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Iron Energy LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing...-referenced proceeding of Iron Energy LLC's application for market-based rate authority, with an...

  5. Iron and mixing affect biological carbon uptake in SOIREE and EisenEx, two Southern Ocean iron fertilisation experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, Dorothee C.E.; Bozec, Yann; Nightingale, Philip D.; Goldson, Laura; Messias, Marie-José; Baar, Hein J.W. de; Liddicoat, Malcolm; Skjelvan, Ingunn; Strass, Volker; Watson, Andrew J.

    2005-01-01

    This study explores the changes in the surface water fugacity of carbon dioxide (fCO2) and biological carbon uptake in two Southern Ocean iron fertilisation experiments with different hydrographic regimes. The Southern Ocean Iron Release Experiment (SOIREE) experiment was carried out south of the An

  6. Iron-catalysed carbon-carbon single bond activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Johannes E M N; Plietker, Bernd

    2013-02-28

    In search of recent challenges in synthetic organic chemistry transformations of substrates possessing formally unreactive bonds have been thoroughly addressed. Amongst those reactions a small number of iron-catalysed reactions have emerged and will be presented showcasing that only a mere starting-point has been reached and many opportunities are to be found in this area.

  7. Atomistic modeling of carbon Cottrell atmospheres in bcc iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veiga, R. G. A.; Perez, M.; Becquart, C. S.; Domain, C.

    2013-01-01

    Atomistic simulations with an EAM interatomic potential were used to evaluate carbon-dislocation binding energies in bcc iron. These binding energies were then used to calculate the occupation probability of interstitial sites in the vicinity of an edge and a screw dislocation. The saturation concentration due to carbon-carbon interactions was also estimated by atomistic simulations in the dislocation core and taken as an upper limit for carbon concentration in a Cottrell atmosphere. We obtained a maximum concentration of 10 ± 1 at.% C at T = 0 K within a radius of 1 nm from the dislocation lines. The spatial carbon distributions around the line defects revealed that the Cottrell atmosphere associated with an edge dislocation is denser than that around a screw dislocation, in contrast with the predictions of the classical model of Cochardt and colleagues. Moreover, the present Cottrell atmosphere model is in reasonable quantitative accord with the three-dimensional atom probe data available in the literature.

  8. Corrosion of carbon-alloyed iron aluminides

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Sen; R Balasubramaniam; A V Ramesh Kumar

    2000-10-01

    The corrosion behaviour of two carbon-alloyed intermetallics of composition Fe–28.1Al–2.1C and Fe–27.5Al–3.7C has been studied and compared with that of binary intermetallics. Potentiodynamic polarization studies indicated that the intermetallics exhibited active–passive behaviour in an acidic solution of pH = 1, whereas they exhibited stable passivity in a buffer solution of pH 8.4. Corrosion rates were also obtained by immersion testing. The variation of corrosion rate as a function of time was similar for both the intermetallics. The variation in corrosion rate as a function of time has been explained based on the observed potentiodynamic polarization behaviour. Scanning electron microscopy of corroded surfaces indicated that the carbon-alloyed intermetallics were susceptible to galvanic corrosion, due to the presence of carbides.

  9. Sintering studies on iron-carbon-copper compacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perianayagam Philomen-D-Anand Raj

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sintered Iron-Carbon-Copper parts are among the most widely used powder metallurgy product in automobile. In this paper, studies have been carried out to find out the sintering characteristics of iron-carbon-copper compacts when sintered in nitrogen atmosphere. The effects of various processing parameters on the sintering characteristics were studied. The various processing parameters considered were compaction pressure, green density and sintering temperature. The sintering characteristics determined were sintered density, porosity, dimensional change, micro hardness and radial crush strength. The results obtained have been discussed on the basis of micro structural observations. The characteristics of SEM fractography were also used to determine the mechanism of fracture. The fracture energy is strongly dependent on density of the compact.

  10. Electro- and thermotransport of carbon in iron-nickel alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okafor, I.C.I.

    1980-03-01

    Results of studies on the electrotransport, thermotransport and chemical diffusion of carbon in ..gamma..-phase iron - 32.5 wt % nickel alloys are described. The transport parameters, Z, Q and D were measured as a fucntion of temperature and carbon concentration and values for the activation energies for diffusion and electrotransport were obtained. The solubility limit of carbon in ..gamma..-Fe-32.5 wt % Ni for the temperature range 850 to 1200/sup 0/C and the electrical resistivity versus temperature for carbon concentrations of 0.0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.5 and 0.86 wt % C between 25 and 1350/sup 0/C were determined. An anomalously large mass transport effect observed in two-phase alloy during thermotransport experiments was investigated for the Fe-Ni-C system.

  11. Carbon Xerogel-supported Iron as a Catalyst in Combustion Synthesis of Carbon Fibrous Nanostructures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wojciech Kiciriski; Joanna Lasota

    2012-01-01

    The catalytically assisted self-propagating high-temperature synthesis of carbon fibrous nanostructures, where the iron-doped colloidal carbon xerogel is proposed as a catalyst system, was examined. The carbon xerogel was prepared through carbonization of an iron doped organic xerogel at temperatures ranging from 600 to 1050℃. The reaction between calcium carbide and hexachloroethane in the presence of sodium azide is exothermic enough to proceed at a high temperature, self-sustaining regime. The combustion reactions of those mixtures enriched with iron-doped carbon xerogels were conducted in a stainless steel reactor---calorimetric bomb under an initial pressure of 1 MPa of argon. Scanning electron microscopy analysis of the combustion products revealed low yield of various type of carbon fibers (presumably nanotubes), which grew via the tip-growth mechanism. The fibrous nanostructures were found in the vicinity of the spot of ignition, while in the outer and cooler area of the reactor, dusty products with soot-like morphology dominated. No significant correlation between the pyrolysis temperature of the carbon xerogel and the morphology of the obtained carbon fibrous nanostructures was observed.

  12. Iron-Doped Carbon Aerogels: Novel Porous Substrates for Direct Growth of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, S. A.; Baumann, T. F.; Kong, J.; Satcher, J. H.; Dresselhaus, M. S.

    2007-02-20

    We present the synthesis and characterization of Fe-doped carbon aerogels (CAs) and demonstrate the ability to grow carbon nanotubes directly on monoliths of these materials to afford novel carbon aerogel-carbon nanotube composites. Preparation of the Fe-doped CAs begins with the sol-gel polymerization of the potassium salt of 2,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid with formaldehyde, affording K{sup +}-doped gels that can then be converted to Fe{sup 2+}- or Fe{sup 3+}-doped gels through an ion exchange process, dried with supercritical CO{sub 2} and subsequently carbonized under an inert atmosphere. Analysis of the Fe-doped CAs by TEM, XRD and XPS revealed that the doped iron species are reduced during carbonization to form metallic iron and iron carbide nanoparticles. The sizes and chemical composition of the reduced Fe species were related to pyrolysis temperature as well as the type of iron salt used in the ion exchange process. Raman spectroscopy and XRD analysis further reveal that, despite the presence of the Fe species, the CA framework is not significantly graphitized during pyrolysis. The Fe-doped CAs were subsequently placed in a thermal CVD reactor and exposed to a mixture of CH{sub 4} (1000 sccm), H{sub 2} (500 sccm), and C{sub 2}H{sub 4} (20 sccm) at temperatures ranging from 600 to 800 C for 10 minutes, resulting in direct growth of carbon nanotubes on the aerogel monoliths. Carbon nanotubes grown by this method appear to be multiwalled ({approx}25 nm in diameter and up to 4 mm long) and grow through a tip-growth mechanism that pushes catalytic iron particles out of the aerogel framework. The highest yield of CNTs were grown on Fe-doped CAs pyrolyzed at 800 C treated at CVD temperatures of 700 C.

  13. Iron-Doped Carbon Aerogels: Novel Porous Substrates for Direct Growth of Carbon Nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steiner, S A; Baumann, T F; Kong, J; Satcher, J H; Dresselhaus, M S

    2007-02-15

    We present the synthesis and characterization of Fe-doped carbon aerogels (CAs) and demonstrate the ability to grow carbon nanotubes directly on monoliths of these materials to afford novel carbon aerogel-carbon nanotube composites. Preparation of the Fe-doped CAs begins with the sol-gel polymerization of the potassium salt of 2,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid with formaldehyde, affording K{sup +}-doped gels that can then be converted to Fe{sup 2+}- or Fe{sup 3+}-doped gels through an ion exchange process, dried with supercritical CO{sub 2} and subsequently carbonized under an inert atmosphere. Analysis of the Fe-doped CAs by TEM, XRD and XPS revealed that the doped iron species are reduced during carbonization to form metallic iron and iron carbide nanoparticles. The sizes and chemical composition of the reduced Fe species were related to pyrolysis temperature as well as the type of iron salt used in the ion exchange process. Raman spectroscopy and XRD analysis further reveal that, despite the presence of the Fe species, the CA framework is not significantly graphitized during pyrolysis. The Fe-doped CAs were subsequently placed in a thermal CVD reactor and exposed to a mixture of CH{sub 4} (1000 sccm), H{sub 2} (500 sccm), and C{sub 2}H{sub 4} (20 sccm) at temperatures ranging from 600 to 800 C for 10 minutes, resulting in direct growth of carbon nanotubes on the aerogel monoliths. Carbon nanotubes grown by this method appear to be multiwalled ({approx}25 nm in diameter and up to 4 mm long) and grow through a tip-growth mechanism that pushes catalytic iron particles out of the aerogel framework. The highest yield of CNTs were grown on Fe-doped CAs pyrolyzed at 800 C treated at CVD temperatures of 700 C.

  14. Parametric studies on iron-carbon composite nanoparticles synthesized by laser pyrolysis for increased passivation and high iron content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumitrache, F.; Morjan, I.; Fleaca, C.; Birjega, R.; Vasile, E.; Kuncser, V.; Alexandrescu, R.

    2011-04-01

    Iron/iron carbide core and carbon shell nanoparticles with improved magnetic properties were successfully synthesized by laser pyrolysis. As iron and carbon precursors, iron pentacarbonyl and pure or argon-diluted acetylene/ethylene mixtures, respectively, were used. The aim of the present optimization is the improvement of the magnetic properties of the nanomaterials by the increase of the iron percent in powders simultaneously to the maintaining of the protective character of the carbon coverage of nanoparticles. The chemical content and the crystalline structure were monitored by EDX, XRD and TEM techniques. In the first study, the content of acetylene as carbon source was diminished from 75% to 0%. Consequently the percent iron increased from 10 at.% to 28 at.% while oxygen remained relatively constant (around 5 at.%). In the second step, only diluted ethylene was used (maximum 87.5 vol.% Ar). In this case, an increase of iron to 46 at.% is observed. An optimum 50% carbon source dilution was found. Above this value, the carbon content increases and below it, superficial oxidation increases through the diminishing of the carbon shell. The magnetic properties and the Fe phase composition of the Fe-C samples were analyzed by temperature dependent Mössbauer spectroscopy.

  15. Benzene Removal by Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Decorated Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aamir Abbas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, carbon nanotubes (CNTs impregnated with iron oxide nanoparticles were employed for the removal of benzene from water. The adsorbents were characterized using scanning electron microscope, X-ray diffraction, BET surface area, and thermogravimetric analysis. Batch adsorption experiments were carried out to study the adsorptive removal of benzene and the effect of parameters such as pH, contact time, and adsorbent dosage. The maximum removal of benzene was 61% with iron oxide impregnated CNTs at an adsorbent dosage 100 mg, shaking speed 200 rpm, contact time 2 hours, initial concentration 1 ppm, and pH 6. However, raw CNTs showed only 53% removal under same experimental conditions. Pseudo-first-order kinetic model was found well to describe the obtained data on benzene removal from water. Initial concentration was varied from 1 to 200 mg/L for isotherms study. Langmuir isotherm model was observed to best describe the adsorption data. The maximum adsorption capacities were 987.58 mg/g and 517.27 mg/g for iron oxide impregnated CNTs and raw CNTs, respectively. Experimental results revealed that impregnation with iron oxide nanoparticles significantly increased the removal efficiency of CNTs.

  16. Magnetic properties of iron particles embedded in multiwall carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arya, Ved Prakash; Prasad, V; Kumar, P S Anil

    2009-09-01

    Iron nanoparticles are embedded in multiwall carbon nanotubes by the chemical vapor deposition, where benzene and ferrocene are taken as precursor materials. Varying quantity of iron particles are embedded in these tubes by taking different amount of ferrocene. These particles exhibit a magnetic moment up to 98 emu/g and an enhanced coercivity in the range of 500-2000 Oe. Negative magnetoresistance approximately 10% is observed in the presence of magnetic field up to 11 T applied at various temperatures in the range of 1.3 K-300 K. It is argued that the enhanced coercivity is due to the shape anisotropy. The negative magnetoresistance is believed to be due to the weak localization and spin dependent scattering of electrons by the ferromagnetic particles. In addition we also observe a dependence of the magnetoresistance on the direction of applied field and this is correlated with the shape anisotropy of the Fe particles.

  17. Low temperature synthesis of iron containing carbon nanoparticles in critical carbon dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasumura, Takashi; Fukuda, Takahiro; Whitby, Raymond L. D.; Aschenbrenner, Ortrud; Maekawa, Toru

    2011-01-01

    We develop a low temperature, organic solvent-free method of producing iron containing carbon (Fe@C) nanoparticles. We show that Fe@C nanoparticles are self-assembled by mixing ferrocene with sub-critical (25.0 °C), near-critical (31.0 °C) and super-critical (41.0 °C) carbon dioxide and irradiating the solutions with UV laser of 266-nm wavelength. The diameter of the iron particles varies from 1 to 100 nm, whereas that of Fe@C particles ranges from 200 nm to 1 μm. Bamboo-shaped structures are also formed by iron particles and carbon layers. There is no appreciable effect of the temperature on the quantity and diameter distributions of the particles produced. The Fe@C nanoparticles show soft ferromagnetic characteristics. Iron particles are crystallised, composed of bcc and fcc lattice structures, and the carbon shells are graphitised after irradiation of electron beams.

  18. Iron nanoparticles embedded in carbon films: structural and optical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashayekhi, Fatemeh; Shafiekhani, Azizollah; Sebt, Seyed Ali

    2016-06-01

    In the present work amorphous hydrogenated carbon films with sputtered iron nanoparticles (Fe NPs @ a-C:H) were deposited by co-deposition of RF-sputtering and RF-plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition methods using acetylene gas and iron target on quartz and silicon substrates. Samples were prepared in different initial pressures and during constant deposition time. The crystalline structure of Fe NPs @ a-C:H was studied using X-ray diffraction and selected area electron diffraction patterns. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis presents that increasing the initial pressure decreases the atomic ratio of Fe/C and the sp3-hybridized carbon content in prepared samples. The transmission electron microscope image shows the encapsulated Fe NPs in carbon films. The optical properties and localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of samples were studied using UV-visible spectrophotometry, which is shown that increasing of Fe content decreases the intensity of LSPR peak and increases the optical band gap.

  19. Microstructure and properties of pure iron/copper composite cladding layers on carbon steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Long; Huang, Yong-xian; Lü, Shi-xiong; Huang, Ti-fang; Lü, Zong-liang

    2016-08-01

    In the present study, pure iron/copper composite metal cladding was deposited onto carbon steel by tungsten inert gas welding. The study focused on interfacial morphological, microstructural, and mechanical analyses of the composite cladding layers. Iron liquid-solid-phase zones were formed at copper/steel and iron interfaces because of the melting of the steel substrate and iron. Iron concentrated in the copper cladding layer was observed to exhibit belt, globule, and dendrite morphologies. The appearance of iron-rich globules indicated the occurrence of liquid phase separation (LPS) prior to solidification, and iron-rich dendrites crystallized without the occurrence of LPS. The maximum microhardness of the iron/steel interface was lower than that of the copper/steel interface because of the diffusion of elemental carbon. All samples fractured in the cladding layers. Because of a relatively lower strength of the copper layer, a short plateau region appeared when shear movement was from copper to iron.

  20. Development of carbon composite iron ore micropellets by using the microfines of iron ore and carbon-bearing materials in iron making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Jagannath; Ghorai, Satadal; Das, Avimanyu

    2015-02-01

    Iron ore microfines and concentrate have very limited uses in sintering processes. They are used in pelletization; however, this process is cost intensive. Furthermore, the microfines of non-coking coal and other carbon-bearing materials, e.g., blast-furnace flue dust (BFD) and coke fines, are not used extensively in the metallurgical industry because of operational difficulties and handling problems. In the present work, to utilize these microfines, coal composite iron oxide micropellets (2-6 mm in size) were produced through an innovative technique in which lime and molasses were used as binding materials in the micropellets. The micropellets were subsequently treated with CO2 or the industrial waste gas to induce the chemical bond formation. The results show that, at a very high carbon level of 22wt% (38wt% coal), the cold crushing strength and abrasion index of the micropellets are 2.5-3 kg/cm2 and 5wt%-9wt%, respectively; these values indicate that the pellets are suitable for cold handling. The developed micropellets have strong potential as a heat source in smelting reduction in iron making and sintering to reduce coke breeze. The micropellets produced with BFD and coke fines (8wt%-12wt%) were used in iron ore sintering and were observed to reduce the coke breeze consumption by 3%-4%. The quality of the produced sinter was at par with that of the conventional blast-furnace sinter.

  1. A study of Reactive Red 198 adsorption on iron filings from aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azhdarpoor, Abooalfazl; Nikmanesh, Roya; Khademi, Fahime

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, reactive dyes have been widely used in textile industries with particular efficiency. They dyes are often toxic, carcinogenic and mutagenic. Improper treatment and non-scientific disposal of dyed wastewater from these industries into water sources has created many environmental problems and concerns around the world. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the efficiency of iron filings in adsorption of Reactive Red 198 from aqueous solutions. This study was conducted using an experimental method at the laboratory scale. In this study, the effects of operating parameters such as pH (1-11), initial dye concentration (40-400 mg/L), contact time (5-120 min) and iron dose (0.1-1 g) with a mesh ofDye concentration was determined using a spectrophotometer at a wavelength of 520 nm. The results indicated that maximum adsorption capacity of the dye in question was obtained at pH 3, contact time of 60 min and adsorbent dose of 1 g. At initial dye concentration of 100 and 200 mg/L, by increasing the dose of waste iron from 0.1 to 1 g, the removal percentage increased from approximately 76.89% to 97.28% and from 22.64% to 68.03%, respectively. At pH 3, contact time of 5 min and constant waste iron dose of 0.8 g, the dye removal efficiency was 85.34%. By increasing the contact time to 120 min, the removal efficiency increased to 99.2%. Welding iron waste as an inexpensive and available adsorbent has an optimum ability for adsorption of Reactive Red 198 from aqueous solutions.

  2. Study on the serialization and applications of low carbon ductile iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHU Xin-fu; SHU Rui; CHANG Dian-cun; ZHANG Xiao-long; ZHU Yan-dong; LI Ling-fang; LI Yu-zhong

    2005-01-01

    Both the production process and the chemical composition of Sx were studied, and the serialization of iow carbon ductile iron was also discussed. It was indicated that Sx modifier was sensitive to the carbon equivalent (CE) of molten iron and to some alloying elements too. When the CE of molten iron and the contents of alloying elements were changed, the content of Sx must be revised with the change correspondingly. Low carbon ductile iron can be stably changed into the one that non-carbon acicular ferrite and retained austenite (about 25%-28%) by quasi-casting bainitic process of using Sx-2 modifier treated Si-Mn-Cr-Cu-alloyed low carbon molten iron. The austenitic low carbon as-cast ductile iron could be obtained by the Ni-Si-Cr 35 5 2 percent alloys molten iron with less than 2% carbon treated by type Sx-3 modifier. The high-toughness ferritic low carbon as-cast ductile iron which contained more than 85 % ferrite in matrix could be got after the molten iron treated by type Sx-4 modifier, and it's elongation was more than 10 %.

  3. Study on the serialization and applications of low carbon ductile iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SHU Xin-fu

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Both the production process and the chemical composition of Sx were studied, and the serialization of low carbon ductile iron was also discussed. It was indicated that Sx modifier was sensitive to the carbon equivalent (CE of molten iron and to some alloying elements too. When the CE of molten iron and the contents of alloying elements were changed, the content of Sx must be revised with the change correspondingly. Low carbon ductile iron can be stably changed into the one that non-carbon acicular ferrite and retained austenite (about 25%-28% by quasi-casting bainitic process of using Sx-2 modifier treated Si-Mn-Cr-Cu-alloyed low carbon molten iron. The austenitic low carbon as-cast ductile iron could be obtained by the Ni-Si-Cr 35 5 2 percent alloys molten iron with less than 2% carbon treated by type Sx-3 modifier. The high-toughness ferritic low carbon as-cast ductile iron which contained more than 85 % ferrite in matrix could be got after the molten iron treated by type Sx-4 modifier, and it's elongation was more than 10 %.

  4. Deactivation by carbon of iron catalysts for indirect liquefaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartholomew, C.H.

    1990-10-29

    This report describes recent progress in a fundamental, three-year investigation of carbon formation and its effects on the activity and selectivity of promoted iron catalysts for synthesis, the objectives of which are: determine rates and mechanisms of carbon deactivation of unsupported Fe and Fe/K catalysts during CO hydrogenation over a range of CO concentrations, CO:H{sub 2} ratios, and temperatures; model the rates of deactivation of the same catalysts in fixed-bed reactors. During the fourteenth quarter design of software for a computer-automated reactor system to be used in the kinetic and deactivation studies was continued. Further progress was made toward the completion of the control language, control routines, and software for operating this system. Progress was also made towards testing of the system hardware and software. 47 refs.

  5. Biomass as a Source of Renewable Carbon for Iron and Steelmaking

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Norgate, Terry; Haque, Nawshad; Somerville, Michael; Jahanshahi, Sharif

    2012-01-01

    Fossil fuel-based carbon is widely used in iron and steelmaking in a number of forms, and the replacement of these materials with renewable carbon derived from biomass is seen as offering the greatest...

  6. Evolution of the gas atmosphere during filing the sand moulds with iron alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Mocek

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Evolution of atmosphere of the mould cavity when pouring the cast iron has been analyzed. It was find that in dry sand mold the cavity is filled by air throughout the casting time. In green sand the air is removed by the water vapor the hydrogen or carbon oxides formed in contact with the liquid metal. The theoretical results have been confirmed experimentally.

  7. Study of the Effect of Reduced Iron Temperature Rising on Total Carbon Formation in Iron Reactor Isobaric and Cooling Zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bayu Alamsari

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We presented the mathematical model in the iron reactor. The model was limited to Isobaric Zone and Cooling Zone termed as IZ and CZ, respectively. The simulation was done by adapting the heat and mass transfer equations. The main purpose of this paper is to estimate the temperature increasing effect of reduced-iron on sponge-iron quality. The calculations are solved using Finite Element Method (FEM. The results showed that the temperature and concentration values from the simulation have high similarity to the reference data with Root-Mean-Square Error (RMSE about 0.7. The formation of total-carbon in the both zones decreased metallization degree until 1.72%. The increase in reduced-iron temperature higher than 1200 K produces total-carbon higher than 3%. Thus the increase in reduced-iron temperature more than 1200 K is not recommended because it can decrease metallization degree.

  8. Fabrication of Fischer-Tropsch Catalysts by Deposition of Iron Nanocrystals on Carbon Nanotubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Casavola, Marianna; Hermannsdoerfer, Justus; de Jonge, Niels; Dugulan, A. Iulian; de Jong, Krijn P.

    2015-01-01

    The fabrication of supported catalysts consisting of colloidal iron oxide nanocrystals with tunable size, geometry, and loadinghomogeneously dispersed on carbon nanotube (CNT) supportsis described herein. The catalyst synthesis is performed in a two-step approach. First, colloidal iron and iron oxid

  9. Deactivation by carbon of iron catalysts for indirect liquefaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartholomew, C.H.

    1990-10-11

    This report describes recent progress in a fundamental, three-year investigation of carbon formation and its effects on the activity and selectivity of promoted iron catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis, the objectives of which are: determine rates and mechanisms of carbon deactivation of unsupported Fe and Fe/K catalysts during CO hydrogenation over a range of CO concentrations, CO:H{sub 2} ratios, and temperatures; model the rates of deactivation of the same catalysts in fixed-bed reactors. During the thirteenth quarter design of software for a computer-automated reactor system to be used in the kinetic and deactivation studies was continued. Further progress was made toward the completion of the control language, control routines, and software for operating this system. Progress was also made on the testing of the system hardware and software. H{sub 2} chemisorption capacities and activity selectivity data were also measured for three iron catalysts promoted with 1% alumina. 47 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Performance of iron filings and activated sludge as media for permeable reactive barriers to treat zinc contaminated groundwater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chayapat Hassapak

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Zinc is one of the important contaminants in groundwater. Removal of zinc by iron filings, activated sludge and lateritic soil was studied with batch test. The lowest optimum pH for removal of zinc by iron filings, activated sludge and lateritic soil was 6. From isotherm studies iron filings and activated sludge were chosen as media for permeable reactive barrier (PRB. The PRB of 0.5-m thick was simulated in the unconfined aquifer with the distance of 21.5 m downgradient of the zinc contaminated site having constant concentration of 100 mg/l. The groundwater flow in the site was induced by the hydraulic gradient of 0.02. Simulation results indicated that the concentration of zinc of treated groundwater was less than 5 mg/l, which met Thai Groundwater Quality Standard for Drinking Purposes. The continuous PRBs using iron filings and activated sludge could treat zinc for 2,170 and 2,248 days, respectively

  11. Liquid Phase Plasma Synthesis of Iron Oxide/Carbon Composite as Dielectric Material for Capacitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heon Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Iron oxide/carbon composite was synthesized using a liquid phase plasma process to be used as the electrode of supercapacitor. Spherical iron oxide nanoparticles with the size of 5~10 nm were dispersed uniformly on carbon powder surface. The specific capacitance of the composite increased with increasing quantity of iron oxide precipitate on the carbon powder up to a certain quantity. When the quantity of the iron oxide precipitate exceeds the threshold, however, the specific capacitance was rather reduced by the addition of precipitate. The iron oxide/carbon composite containing an optimum quantity (0.33 atomic % of iron oxide precipitate exhibited the smallest resistance and the largest initial resistance slope.

  12. Closed system Fischer-Tropsch synthesis over meteoritic iron, iron ore and nickel-iron alloy. [deuterium-carbon monoxide reaction catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nooner, D. W.; Gibert, J. M.; Gelpi, E.; Oro, J.

    1976-01-01

    Experiments were performed in which meteoritic iron, iron ore and nickel-iron alloy were used to catalyze (in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis) the reaction of deuterium and carbon monoxide in a closed vessel. Normal alkanes and alkenes and their monomethyl substituted isomers and aromatic hydrocarbons were synthesized. Iron oxide and oxidized-reduced Canyon Diablo used as Fischer-Tropsch catalysts were found to produce aromatic hydrocarbons in distributions having many of the features of those observed in carbonaceous chondrites, but only at temperatures and reaction times well above 300 C and 6-8 h.

  13. Iron oxide nanoparticles embedded in activated carbons prepared from hydrothermally treated waste biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Wenming; Björkman, Eva; Yun, Yifeng; Lilliestråle, Malte; Hedin, Niklas

    2014-03-01

    Particles of iron oxide (Fe3O4 ; 20–40 nm) were embedded within activated carbons during the activation of hydrothermally carbonized (HTC) biomasses in a flow of CO2. Four different HTC biomass samples (horse manure, grass cuttings, beer production waste, and biosludge) were used as precursors for the activated carbons. Nanoparticles of iron oxide formed from iron catalyst included in the HTC biomasses. After systematic optimization, the activated carbons had specific surface areas of about 800 m2g1. The pore size distributions of the activated carbons depended strongly on the degree of carbonization of the precursors. Activated carbons prepared from highly carbonized precursors had mainly micropores, whereas those prepared from less carbonized precursors contained mainly mesopores. Given the strong magnetism of the activated carbon–nano-Fe3O4 composites, they could be particularly useful for water purification.

  14. Effect of natural iron fertilization on carbon sequestration in the Southern Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blain, Stéphane; Quéguiner, Bernard; Armand, Leanne; Belviso, Sauveur; Bombled, Bruno; Bopp, Laurent; Bowie, Andrew; Brunet, Christian; Brussaard, Corina; Carlotti, François; Christaki, Urania; Corbière, Antoine; Durand, Isabelle; Ebersbach, Frederike; Fuda, Jean-Luc; Garcia, Nicole; Gerringa, Loes; Griffiths, Brian; Guigue, Catherine; Guillerm, Christophe; Jacquet, Stéphanie; Jeandel, Catherine; Laan, Patrick; Lefèvre, Dominique; Lo Monaco, Claire; Malits, Andrea; Mosseri, Julie; Obernosterer, Ingrid; Park, Young-Hyang; Picheral, Marc; Pondaven, Philippe; Remenyi, Thomas; Sandroni, Valérie; Sarthou, Géraldine; Savoye, Nicolas; Scouarnec, Lionel; Souhaut, Marc; Thuiller, Doris; Timmermans, Klaas; Trull, Thomas; Uitz, Julia; van Beek, Pieter; Veldhuis, Marcel; Vincent, Dorothée; Viollier, Eric; Vong, Lilita; Wagener, Thibaut

    2007-04-26

    The availability of iron limits primary productivity and the associated uptake of carbon over large areas of the ocean. Iron thus plays an important role in the carbon cycle, and changes in its supply to the surface ocean may have had a significant effect on atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations over glacial-interglacial cycles. To date, the role of iron in carbon cycling has largely been assessed using short-term iron-addition experiments. It is difficult, however, to reliably assess the magnitude of carbon export to the ocean interior using such methods, and the short observational periods preclude extrapolation of the results to longer timescales. Here we report observations of a phytoplankton bloom induced by natural iron fertilization--an approach that offers the opportunity to overcome some of the limitations of short-term experiments. We found that a large phytoplankton bloom over the Kerguelen plateau in the Southern Ocean was sustained by the supply of iron and major nutrients to surface waters from iron-rich deep water below. The efficiency of fertilization, defined as the ratio of the carbon export to the amount of iron supplied, was at least ten times higher than previous estimates from short-term blooms induced by iron-addition experiments. This result sheds new light on the effect of long-term fertilization by iron and macronutrients on carbon sequestration, suggesting that changes in iron supply from below--as invoked in some palaeoclimatic and future climate change scenarios--may have a more significant effect on atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations than previously thought.

  15. Research on Welding Test of Grey Cast Iron and Low-Carbon Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Grey cast iron's welding itself is a complex proble m.So proper welding materials must be selected,complex welding techniques such as preheating before weldingslow cooling after welding etc,should be taken. However the carbon component in low-carbon steel is comparatively low,the carbo n of welded joint will diffuse to the low-carbon steel when it is welded with gr ey cast iron,which will cause the component of carbon greatly increased at the low-carbon steel side in HAZ,high carbon martensite and cracks ...

  16. Iron-carbon nanocomposite obtained by laser-induced gas-phase reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumitrache, Florian V.; Morjan, Ion G.; Alexandrescu, Rodica; Rand, B.; Ciupina, Victor; Prodan, G.; Voicu, Ion N.; Sandu, Ioan C.; Soare, I.; Ploscaru, M.; Fleaca, C.; Brydson, R.; Vasile, Eugen

    2003-07-01

    Iron-carbon composite nanopowders have been synthesized by the CO2 laser pyrolysis of gas-phase reactants. The experimental device allows for a very low reaction time and a rapid freezing that creates nanoscale-condensed particles. Iron pentacarbonyl and ethylene-acetylene mixtures were used as iron and carbon precursors. In a two-steps experiment, the reaction products may present themselves as iron-based nanoparticles dispersed in a carbon matrix. By a careful control of experimental parameters and radiation geometries we demonstrate the feasibility of an efficient and well-controlled, single-step technique for the production of iron-based nano-cores embedded in carbon layers. Highly dispersed nanoparticles, narrow size distributions and particles with about 4.5 - 6 nm mean diameters were obtained. Electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy were used in order to analyze the structure and composition of the obtained nanopowders as well as their Soxhlet residue.

  17. Preservation of iron(II) by carbon-rich matrices in a hydrothermal plume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toner, Brandy M.; Fakra, Sirine C.; Manganini, Steven J.; Santelli, Cara M.; Marcus, Matthew A.; Moffett, James W.; Rouxel, Olivier; German, Christopher R.; Edwards, Katrina J.

    2008-09-20

    Hydrothermal venting associated with mid-ocean ridge volcanism is globally widespread. This venting is responsible for a dissolved iron flux to the ocean that is approximately equal to that associated with continental riverine runoff. For hydrothermal fluxes, it has long been assumed that most of the iron entering the oceans is precipitated in inorganic forms. However, the possibility of globally significant fluxes of iron escaping these mass precipitation events and entering open-ocean cycles is now being debated, and two recent studies suggest that dissolved organic ligands might influence the fate of hydrothermally vented metals. Here we present spectromicroscopic measurements of iron and carbon in hydrothermal plume particles at the East Pacific Rise mid-ocean ridge. We show that organic carbon-rich matrices, containing evenly dispersed iron(II)-rich materials, are pervasive in hydrothermal plume particles. The absence of discrete iron(II) particles suggests that the carbon and iron associate through sorption or complexation. We suggest that these carbon matrices stabilize iron(II) released from hydrothermal vents in the region, preventing its oxidation and/or precipitation as insoluble minerals. Our findings have implications for deep-sea biogeochemical cycling of iron, a widely recognized limiting nutrient in the oceans.

  18. Carbon nanomaterial Formation on Fresh-Reduced Iron by Converted Natural Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebesnyi, A.; Kotov, V.; Sviatenko, A.; Filonenko, D.; Khovavko, A.; Bondarenko, B.

    2017-02-01

    The mechanism of carbon nanomaterial formation at moderate temperatures while processing fresh-reduced iron by products of air conversion of natural gas is considered. It is shown that under given conditions, the size and the shape of the resulting carbon are dependent on the temperature and the size of microscopic iron grains formed during reduction. These iron grains are the catalyzer of the reaction of carbon monoxide disproportionation. It is concluded that the formation of a nucleus of the new carbon phase occurs at the contact boundaries of neighboring grains of newly reduced iron with the subsequent formation in these places of ring-shaped carbon cuffs. Nanotubes are forming as a result of further carbon crystallization, and separation of iron particles from the main mass is occurring, i.e., there is a fragmentation of the substance of the catalyst. According to the results of laboratory studies, the optimum temperature of carbon nanotube formation in the environment of converted gas is 600-650 °C. The evidence of the hypothesis that the mechanism of the reaction of carbon monoxide disproportionation flows through the intermediate stage of iron oxides formation is given.

  19. The archetype gamma-class carbonic anhydrase (Cam) contains iron when synthesized in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macauley, Sheridan R; Zimmerman, Sabrina A; Apolinario, Ethel E; Evilia, Caryn; Hou, Ya-Ming; Ferry, James G; Sowers, Kevin R

    2009-02-10

    A recombinant protein overproduction system was developed in Methanosarcina acetivorans to facilitate biochemical characterization of oxygen-sensitive metalloenzymes from strictly anaerobic species in the Archaea domain. The system was used to overproduce the archetype of the independently evolved gamma-class carbonic anhydrase. The overproduced enzyme was oxygen sensitive and had full incorporation of iron instead of zinc observed when overproduced in Escherichia coli. This, the first report of in vivo iron incorporation for any carbonic anhydrase, supports the need to reevaluate the role of iron in all classes of carbonic anhydrases derived from anaerobic environments.

  20. Enriched iron(III-reducing bacterial communities are shaped by carbon substrate and iron oxide mineralogy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J. Lentini

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Iron (Fe oxides exist in a spectrum of structures in the environment, with ferrihydrite widely considered the most bioavailable phase. Yet, ferrihydrite is unstable and rapidly transforms to more crystalline Fe(III oxides (e.g., goethite, hematite, which are poorly reduced by model dissimilatory Fe(III-reducing microorganisms. This begs the question, what processes and microbial groups are responsible for reduction of crystalline Fe(III oxides within sedimentary environments? Further, how do changes in Fe mineralogy shape oxide-hosted microbial populations? To address these questions, we conducted a large-scale cultivation effort using various Fe(III oxides (ferrihydrite, goethite, hematite and carbon substrates (glucose, lactate, acetate along a dilution gradient to enrich for microbial populations capable of reducing Fe oxides spanning a wide range of crystallinities and reduction potentials. While carbon source was the most important variable shaping community composition within Fe(III-reducing enrichments, both Fe oxide type and sediment dilution also had a substantial influence. For instance, with acetate as the carbon source, only ferrihydrite enrichments displayed a significant amount of Fe(III reduction and the well known dissimilatory metal reducer Geobacter sp. was the dominant organism enriched. In contrast, when glucose and lactate were provided, all three Fe oxides were reduced and reduction coincided with the presence of fermentative (e.g. Enterobacter spp. and sulfate-reducing bacteria (e.g. Desulfovibrio spp.. Thus, changes in Fe oxide structure and resource availability may shift Fe(III-reducing communities between dominantly metal-respiring to fermenting and/or sulfate-reducing organisms which are capable of reducing more recalcitrant Fe phases. These findings highlight the need for further targeted investigations into the composition and activity of speciation-directed metal-reducing populations within natural environments.

  1. The effect of some fluids on surface oxidation and amount of released iron of stainless steel endodontic files.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saghiri, Mohammad Ali; García-Godoy, Franklin; Lotfi, Mehrdad; Mehrvazfar, Peyman; Aminsobhani, Mohsen; Rezaie, Samad; Asgar, Kamal

    2012-01-01

    Endodontic files come in contact with blood, infected pulp tissue, and irrigating solutions during root canal therapy. Some instruments such as stereomicroscopy and scanning electron microscopy are used to observe corrosion of endodontic files which are complicated and dependent on preparation methods. Having knowledge of the corrosion and ion release of endodontic files can help in drawing firm deductions as to which files would perform better in the clinical scenario. Therefore, we have used energy dispersive X-ray analysis and an atomic absorption spectrophotometer to track oxygen on the surface and iron in the exposed media to observe the oxidative rate of the media. In this study, corrosion by blood was higher than other biological fluids, but less than with sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl). Observations of energy dispersive X-ray analysis and atomic absorption spectrophotometer results demonstrated that after exposure the amount of oxygen on the surface and surrounding areas increased. Therefore, the files should be rinsed as soon as possible during and after use to hinder the oxidation rate, but blood may produce a different behavior and it might be considered as a decreased risk of broken stainless steel files remaining in the root canal after treatment.

  2. Iron nanoparticles grown in a carbon arc discharge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, G.L.; du Marchie van Voorthuysen, E.H.; Szymanski, K.; Boom, G; Verwerft, M.G M; Jonkman, H.T.; Niesen, L

    1996-01-01

    Iron particles, encapsulated by graphite layers, were produced by means of the Kratschmer are discharge method in an iron pentacarbonyl atmosphere. The Mossbauer effect is dominated by the vibration of the particles as a whole. Superparamagnetism is dominant for iron oxide particles. No endohedral

  3. Iron nanoparticles grown in a carbon arc discharge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, G.L.; du Marchie van Voorthuysen, E.H.; Szymanski, K.; Boom, G; Verwerft, M.G M; Jonkman, H.T.; Niesen, L

    1996-01-01

    Iron particles, encapsulated by graphite layers, were produced by means of the Kratschmer are discharge method in an iron pentacarbonyl atmosphere. The Mossbauer effect is dominated by the vibration of the particles as a whole. Superparamagnetism is dominant for iron oxide particles. No endohedral i

  4. Iron nanoparticles grown in a carbon arc discharge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, G.L.; du Marchie van Voorthuysen, E.H.; Szymanski, K.; Boom, G; Verwerft, M.G M; Jonkman, H.T.; Niesen, L

    1996-01-01

    Iron particles, encapsulated by graphite layers, were produced by means of the Kratschmer are discharge method in an iron pentacarbonyl atmosphere. The Mossbauer effect is dominated by the vibration of the particles as a whole. Superparamagnetism is dominant for iron oxide particles. No endohedral i

  5. Synthesis of lithium iron phosphate/carbon microspheres by using polyacrylic acid coated iron phosphate nanoparticles derived from iron(III) acrylate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dongwei; He, Yan-Bing; Chu, Xiaodong; Ding, Zhaojun; Li, Baohua; He, Jianfu; Du, Hongda; Qin, Xianying; Kang, Feiyu

    2015-03-01

    Lithium iron phosphate/carbon (LiFePO4 /C) microspheres with high rate and cycling performance are synthesized from iron phosphate/polyacrylic acid (FePO4 /PAA) nanoparticles. Iron(III) acrylate is used as a precursor for both the iron and carbon sources. FePO4 nanoparticles are first produced by a coprecipitation reaction. The byproduct, acrylic acid ions, is polymerized in situ to form a uniform PAA layer on the surface of the FePO4 nanoparticles. The as-prepared LiFePO4 /C microspheres are composed of primary nanoparticles with sizes of 40-50 nm. The nanoparticles are fully coated with a thin, uniform carbon layer derived from the decomposition of the PAA layer. The uniform carbon-coating layer cooperates with interstitial and boundary carbon derived from sucrose successfully to construct an excellent interconnecting conductive network in the microspheres. As a result of the unique structure, the as-prepared LiFePO4 /C microspheres display both high electronic and ionic conductivities, which contribute to their high rate performance (162.9 mAh g(-1) at 0.1C and 126.1 mAh g(-1) at 5C) and excellent cycling stability (97.1% of capacity retention after 500 cycles at 5C/5C).

  6. Simple and Precise Quantification of Iron Catalyst Content in Carbon Nanotubes Using UV/Visible Spectroscopy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Agustina, Elsye; Goak, Jeungchoon; Lee, Suntae; Seo, Youngho; Park, Jun‐Young; Lee, Naesung

    2015-01-01

    Iron catalysts have been used widely for the mass production of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with high yield. In this study, UV/visible spectroscopy was used to determine the Fe catalyst content in CNTs using a colorimetric technique...

  7. Effects of carbon content and solidification rate on thermal conductivity of grey cast iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The thermal conductivity or diffusivity of pearlitic grey irons with various carbon contents is investigated by the laser flash method. The materials are cast in controlled thermal environments and produced in three dissimilar cooling rates. The cooling rate together with the carbon content largely influence the thermal conductivity of grey iron. Linear relationships exist between the thermal conductivity and the carbon content, the carbon equivalent and the fraction of former primary solidified austenite transformed into pearlite. The work shows that optimal thermal transport properties are obtained at medium cooling rates. Equations describing the thermal conductivity of pearlite,solidified as pre-eutectic austenite, and the eutectic of grey iron are derived. The thermal conductivity of pearlitic grey iron is modeled at both room temperature and elevated temperature with good accuracy.

  8. Effects of Carbon Content and Solidification Rate on the Thermal Conductivity of Grey Cast Iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Daniel Holmgren; Attila Diószegi; Ingvar L.Svensson

    2008-01-01

    The thermal conductivity/diffusivity of pearlitic grey irons with various carbon contents was investi- gated by the laser flash method. The materials were cast in controlled thermal environments producing three dissimilar cooling rates. The cooling rates together with the carbon content largely influence the thermal conductivity of grey iron. Linear relationships exist between the thermal conductivity and the carbon content, the carbon equivalent, and the fraction of the former primary solidified austenite transformed into pearlite. The results show that the optimal thermal transport properties are obtained at medium cooling rates. Equa- tions are given for the thermal conductivity of pearlite, solidified as pre-eutectic austenite, and the eutectic of grey iron. The thermal conductivity of pearlitic grey iron is modelled at both room temperature and elevated temperatures with good accuracy.

  9. Effects of carbon content and solidification rate on thermal conductivity of grey cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Holmgren

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The thermal conductivity or diffusivity of pearlitic grey irons with various carbon contents is investigated by the laser flash method. The materials are cast in controlled thermal environments and produced in three dissimilar cooling rates. The cooling rate together with the carbon content largely influence the thermal conductivity of grey iron. Linear relationships exist between the thermal conductivity and the carbon content, the carbon equivalent and the fraction of former primary solidified austenite transformed into pearlite. The work shows that optimal thermal transport properties are obtained at medium cooling rates. Equations describing the thermal conductivity of pearlite,solidified as pre-eutectic austenite, and the eutectic of grey iron are derived. The thermal conductivity of pearlitic grey iron is modeled at both room temperature and elevated temperature with good accuracy.

  10. Microwave-assisted combustion synthesis of nano iron oxide/iron-coated activated carbon, anthracite, cellulose fiber, and silica, with arsenic adsorption studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combustion synthesis of iron oxide/iron coated carbons such as activated carbon, anthracite, cellulose fiber and silica is described. The reactions were carried out in alumina crucibles using a Panasonic kitchen microwave with inverter technology, and the reaction process was com...

  11. Preparation of iron-impregnated granular activated carbon for arsenic removal from drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Qigang; Lin, Wei; Ying, Wei-chi

    2010-12-15

    Granular activated carbon (GAC) was impregnated with iron through a new multi-step procedure using ferrous chloride as the precursor for removing arsenic from drinking water. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis demonstrated that the impregnated iron was distributed evenly on the internal surface of the GAC. Impregnated iron formed nano-size particles, and existed in both crystalline (akaganeite) and amorphous iron forms. Iron-impregnated GACs (Fe-GACs) were treated with sodium hydroxide to stabilize iron in GAC and impregnated iron was found very stable at the common pH range in water treatments. Synthetic arsenate-contaminated drinking water was used in isotherm tests to evaluate arsenic adsorption capacities and iron use efficiencies of Fe-GACs with iron contents ranging from 1.64% to 12.13% (by weight). Nonlinear regression was used to obtain unbiased estimates of Langmuir model parameters. The arsenic adsorption capacity of Fe-GAC increased significantly with impregnated iron up to 4.22% and then decreased with more impregnated iron. Fe-GACs synthesized in this study exhibited higher affinity for arsenate as compared with references in literature and shows great potential for real implementations.

  12. Suitability of Recycled Polyethylene/Palm Kernel Shell-Iron Filings Composite for Automobile Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.A. Samotu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A recycling aimed research was carried out to produce a new composite material and proffer suggestion for the possible use of the newly developed composite material. The empty water sachet (commonly called pure water nylon in Nigeria, was used as a matrix, which was reinforced by carbonized palm kernel shell (CPKS particulate and iron fillings. The percentage composition of iron fillings was maintained at 5 wt%, while that of palm kernel shell ash was varied from 5 wt% - 20 wt% at an interval of 5 %. The composites were compounded and compressively moulded. Physical and mechanical properties of the composites were tested for alongside three conventional car bumper samples, and the results obtained shows that the composite material could be used to produce a car bumper among other parts of automobile like dashboard due to their impact strength and low density. Impact strength - density ratio for the materials gave prime information on the possible application of the developed material. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM was used to examine the distribution of the reinforcement within the matrix. After results analysis, materials with 5 wt% of CPKS and that with 10 wt% of CPKS were recommended for the car bumper production following their high impact strength - density ratio of 0.26 and 0.19 respectively, which are higher as compared to that of a conventional bumper material measured alongside the composite materials.

  13. Iron [Fe(0)]-rich substrate based on iron-carbon micro-electrolysis for phosphorus adsorption in aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Shihai; Li, Desheng; Yang, Xue; Xing, Wei; Li, Jinlong; Zhang, Qi

    2017-02-01

    The phosphorus (P) adsorption properties of an iron [Fe(0)]-rich substrate (IRS) composed of iron scraps and activated carbon were investigated based on iron-carbon micro-electrolysis (IC-ME) and compared to the substrates commonly used in constructed wetlands (CWs) to provide an initial characterization of the [Fe(0)]-rich substrate. The results showed that P was precipitated by Fe(III) dissolved from the galvanic cell reactions in the IRS and the reaction was suppressed by the pH and stopped when the pH exceeded 8.90 ± 0.09. The adsorption capacity of the IRS decreased by only 4.6% in the second round of adsorption due to Fe(0) consumption in the first round. Substrates with high Ca- and Mg-oxide contents and high Fe- and Al-oxide contents had higher P adsorption capacities at high and low pH values, respectively. Substrates containing high Fe and Al concentrations and low Ca concentrations were more resistant to decreases in the P adsorption capacity resulting from organic matter (OM) accumulation. The IRS with an iron scrap to activated carbon volume ratio of 3:2 resulted in the highest P adsorption capacity (9.34 ± 0.14 g P kg(-1)), with minimal pH change and strong adaptability to OM accumulation. The Fe(0)-rich substrate has the considerable potential for being used as a CW substrate.

  14. Chemical Degradation of the Cathodic Electrical Contact Between Carbon and Cast Iron in Aluminum Production Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brassard, Martin; Désilets, Martin; Soucy, Gervais; Bilodeau, Jean-François; Forté, Martin

    2017-06-01

    The cathodic carbon to cast iron electrical contact degradation is one of the factors to consider in the cathode voltage drop (CVD) increase over the lifetime of aluminum production cells. Lab-scale experiments were carried out to study the cast iron to carbon interface chemical degradation and the impact of important cell parameters like temperature and bath chemistry. Laboratory degradation results were compared with industrial samples. A thermoelectric Ansys numerical model was then used to predict the effect of cast iron surface degradation over CVD. Results show that the aluminum formation on the cast iron surface and its subsequent diffusion creates an immiscible mixture of Fe-Al metal alloy and electrolytic bath. Disparities were also observed between industrial samples taken from two different technologies, suggesting that the degradation can be slowed down. Thermoelectric calculations finally revealed that the impact of the contact resistance augmentation is by far greater than the cast iron degradation.

  15. Chemical Degradation of the Cathodic Electrical Contact Between Carbon and Cast Iron in Aluminum Production Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brassard, Martin; Désilets, Martin; Soucy, Gervais; Bilodeau, Jean-François; Forté, Martin

    2017-02-01

    The cathodic carbon to cast iron electrical contact degradation is one of the factors to consider in the cathode voltage drop (CVD) increase over the lifetime of aluminum production cells. Lab-scale experiments were carried out to study the cast iron to carbon interface chemical degradation and the impact of important cell parameters like temperature and bath chemistry. Laboratory degradation results were compared with industrial samples. A thermoelectric Ansys numerical model was then used to predict the effect of cast iron surface degradation over CVD. Results show that the aluminum formation on the cast iron surface and its subsequent diffusion creates an immiscible mixture of Fe-Al metal alloy and electrolytic bath. Disparities were also observed between industrial samples taken from two different technologies, suggesting that the degradation can be slowed down. Thermoelectric calculations finally revealed that the impact of the contact resistance augmentation is by far greater than the cast iron degradation.

  16. Microstructure and properties of pure iron/copper composite cladding layers on carbon steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Long Wan; Yong-xian Huang; Shi-xiong L; Ti-fang Huang; Zong-liang L

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, pure iron/copper composite metal cladding was deposited onto carbon steel by tungsten inert gas welding. The study focused on interfacial morphological, microstructural, and mechanical analyses of the composite cladding layers. Iron liq-uid–solid-phase zones were formed at copper/steel and iron interfaces because of the melting of the steel substrate and iron. Iron concentrated in the copper cladding layer was observed to exhibit belt, globule, and dendrite morphologies. The appearance of iron-rich globules indicated the occurrence of liquid phase separation (LPS) prior to solidification, and iron-rich dendrites crystallized without the occurrence of LPS. The maximum microhardness of the iron/steel interface was lower than that of the copper/steel interface because of the diffusion of elemental carbon. All samples fractured in the cladding layers. Because of a relatively lower strength of the copper layer, a short plateau region ap-peared when shear movement was from copper to iron.

  17. Synthesis of Iron-containing Carbon Microparticles from Deoiled Asphalt and Ferrocene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Yong-zhen; ZHANG Chun-yi; JI Wei-yun; LIU Xu-guang; XU Bing-she

    2006-01-01

    The deoiled asphalt as the carbon source and the ferrocene as the metal source and the catalyst precursor were chosen to synthesize iron-containing carbon microparticles through co-carbonization at the temperature of about 450 ℃ for 3 h. The resulting products were treated at 2 000 ℃ for 2 h. All samples were examined by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results show that the iron particles in the heat-treated material are completely coated by carbon. In addition to the fully filled carbon microparticles as well as hollow carbon ones, also form carbon fibers with hollow centers. The formation mechanism of the as-prepared products was discussed briefly.

  18. Pore- and micro-structural characterization of a novel structural binder based on iron carbonation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Sumanta, E-mail: Sumanta.Das@asu.edu [School of Sustainable Engineering and the Built Environment, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ (United States); Stone, David, E-mail: dajstone@gmail.com [Iron Shell LLC, Tucson, AZ (United States); Convey, Diana, E-mail: Diana.Convey@asu.edu [LeRoy Eyring Center for Solid State Science, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ (United States); Neithalath, Narayanan, E-mail: Narayanan.Neithalath@asu.edu [School of Sustainable Engineering and the Built Environment, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ (United States)

    2014-12-15

    The pore- and micro-structural features of a novel binding material based on the carbonation of waste metallic iron powder are reported in this paper. The binder contains metallic iron powder as the major ingredient, followed by additives containing silica and alumina to facilitate favorable reaction product formation. Compressive strengths sufficient for a majority of concrete applications are attained. The material pore structure is investigated primarily through mercury intrusion porosimetry whereas electron microscopy is used for microstructural characterization. Reduction in the overall porosity and the average pore size with an increase in carbonation duration from 1 day to 4 days is noticed. The pore structure features are used in predictive models for gas and moisture transport (water vapor diffusivity and moisture permeability) through the porous medium which dictates its long-term durability when used in structural applications. Comparisons of the pore structure with those of a Portland cement paste are also provided. The morphology of the reaction products in the iron-based binder, and the distribution of constituent elements in the microstructure are also reported. - Highlights: • Carbonation of iron produces a dense microstructure. • Pore volume in iron carbonate lower, critical size higher than those in OPC pastes • Reaction product contains iron, carbon, silicon, aluminum and calcium. • Power-law for porosity-moisture permeability relationship was established.

  19. Electrophoretic deposition of iron catalyst on C-fiber textiles for the growth of carbon nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Won; Lee, Chang-Seop

    2014-11-01

    In this study, carbon nanofibers synthesis has been conducted by chemical vapor deposition on C-fiber textiles coated with an iron catalyst via electrophoretic deposition. C-fiber textiles were oxidized with nitric acid before the iron catalyst was plated by electrophoretic deposition. Due to oxidation, the hydroxyl group was created on the C-fiber textiles and was used as an active site for iron catalyst deposition. It was verified that the iron catalyst was deposited on the C-fiber textiles, while current, voltage, and deposition time varied and the concentration of electrolyte was kept constant in electrophoretic deposition. After being deposited, the iron particles were dried in oven for 24 hours and reduced by hydrogen gas in a furnace. Ethylene gas was introduced for the growth of carbon nanofibers and the growth temperature was then varied to find the optimal growth temperature of the carbon nanofibers. Thus, the characteristics of carbon nanofibers were analyzed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS), N2-sorption (BET), X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). It is verified that the iron particles were most evenly deposited at 0.1 A for 3 minutes. Carbon nanofibers grew to 150-200 nm most evenly at 600 degrees C via temperature variations in CVD.

  20. Trace-Element Analyses of Carbonate Minerals in the Gunflint Banded Iron Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pun, Aurora; Papike, James J.; Shearer, C. K.

    2002-01-01

    We report on the petrography, mineralogy and trace-element abundances of individual carbonate grains in the Early Proterozoic Gunflint BIF (Banded Iron Formation). Trace-element data may be used as environmental recorders of the fluid evolution from which the various carbonate phases precipitated. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  1. Trace-Element Analyses of Carbonate Minerals in the Gunflint Banded Iron Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pun, Aurora; Papike, James J.; Shearer, C. K.

    2002-01-01

    We report on the petrography, mineralogy and trace-element abundances of individual carbonate grains in the Early Proterozoic Gunflint BIF (Banded Iron Formation). Trace-element data may be used as environmental recorders of the fluid evolution from which the various carbonate phases precipitated. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  2. Methylation of secondary amines with dialkyl carbonates and hydrosilanes catalysed by iron complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jianxia; Darcel, Christophe; Sortais, Jean-Baptiste

    2014-11-25

    Methylation of secondary amines was achieved using dimethyl carbonate or diethyl carbonate as the C1 source under the catalysis of well-defined half-sandwich iron complexes bearing an N-heterocyclic carbene ligand. The reaction proceeded under mild conditions in the presence of hydrosilanes as the reductants, and the amines were obtained with good to excellent isolated yields.

  3. Increase of the Photocatalytic Activity of TiO by Carbon and Iron Modifications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Tryba

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Modification of TiO2 by doping of a residue carbon and iron can give enhanced photoactivity of TiO2. Iron adsorbed on the surface of TiO2 can be an electron or hole scavenger and results in the improvement of the separation of free carriers. The presence of carbon can increase the concentration of organic pollutants on the surface of TiO2 facilitating the contact of the reactive species with the organic molecules. Carbon-doped TiO2 can extend the absorption of the light to the visible region and makes the photocatalysts active under visible-light irradiation. It was proved that TiO2 modified by carbon and iron can work in both photocatalysis and photo-Fenton processes, when H2O2 is used, enhancing markedly the rate of the organic compounds decomposition such as phenol, humic acids and dyes. The photocatalytic decomposition of organic compounds on TiO2 modified by iron and carbon is going by the complex reactions of iron with the intermediates, what significantly accelerate the process of their decomposition. The presence of carbon in such photocatalyst retards the inconvenient reaction of OH radicals scavenging by H2O2, which occurs when Fe-TiO2 photocatalyst is used.

  4. The Modification of Carbon with Iron Oxide Synthesized in Electrolysis Using the Arc Discharge Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endah Saraswati, Teguh; Dewi Indah Prasiwi, Oktaviana; Masykur, Abu; Handayani, Nestri; Anwar, Miftahul

    2017-02-01

    The modification of carbon-based nanomaterials with metals is widely studied due to its unique properties. Here, the modification of carbon nanomaterial with iron oxide has been successfully carried out. This modification was achieved using arc discharge in 50% ethanol liquid media. The anode used in the arc discharge was prepared from a mixture of carbon and iron oxide that was synthesized in electrolysis and was then calcined at 250°C with silicon binder with a mass ratio of 3:1:1, and the cathode used was graphite rod. Both electrodes were set in the nearest gap that could provide an arc during arc-discharging, leading to carbon-based nanoparticle formation. The diffractogram pattern of the X-ray diffraction of the fabricated nanoparticles confirmed the typical peak of carbon, iron oxide and iron. The magnetization value of the result analysis of the vibrating sample magnetometer was 9.9 emu/g. The bandgap energy measurement using diffuse reflectance ultra violet was estimated to be 2.18 eV. Using the transmission electron microscopy, the structure of the nanomaterial produced was observed as carbon-encapsulated iron compound nanoparticles.

  5. Wetting of Liquid Iron in Carbon Nanotubes and on Graphene Sheets: A Molecular Dynamics Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Yu-Feng; YANG Yang; SUN De-Yan

    2011-01-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, we study the wetting of liquid iron in a carbon nanotube and on a graphene sheet. It is found that the contact angle of a droplet in a carbon nanotube increases linearly with the increase of wall curvature but is independent of the length of the filled liquid. The contact angle for a droplet on a graphene sheet decreases with the increasing droplet size. The line tension of a droplet on a graphene sheet is also obtained.Detailed studies show that liquid iron near the carbon walls exhibits the ordering tendencies in both the normal and tangential directions.

  6. Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iron is a mineral that our bodies need for many functions. For example, iron is part of hemoglobin, a protein which carries ... It helps our muscles store and use oxygen. Iron is also part of many other proteins and ...

  7. Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of iron stored in the body become low, iron deficiency anemia sets in. Red blood cells become smaller and ... from the lungs throughout the body. Symptoms of iron deficiency anemia include tiredness and lack of energy, GI upset, ...

  8. The X-625 Groundwater Treatment Facility: A field-scale test of trichloroethylene dechlorination using iron filings for the X-120/X-749 groundwater plume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, L.; West, O.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Korte, N.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., Grand Junction, CO (United States)] [and others

    1997-09-01

    The dehalogenation of chlorinated solvents by zero-valence iron has recently become the subject of intensive research and development as a potentially cost-effective, passive treatment for contaminated groundwater through reactive barriers. Because of its successful application in the laboratory and other field sites, the X-625 Groundwater Treatment Facility (GTF) was constructed to evaluate reactive barrier technology for remediating trichloroethylene (TCE)-contaminated groundwater at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS). The X-625 GTF was built to fulfill the following technical objectives: (1) to test reactive barrier materials (e.g., iron filings) under realistic groundwater conditions for long term applications, (2) to obtain rates at which TCE degrades and to determine by-products for the reactive barrier materials tested, and (3) to clean up the TCE-contaminated water in the X-120 plume. The X-625 is providing important field-scale and long-term for the evaluation and design of reactive barriers at PORTS. The X-625 GTS is a unique facility not only because it is where site remediation is being performed, but it is also where research scientists and process engineers can test other promising reactive barrier materials. In addition, the data collected from X-625 GTF can be used to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of replacing the activated carbon units in the pump-and-treat facilities at PORTS.

  9. Asynchronous Reductive Release of Iron and Organic Carbon from Hematite-Humic Acid Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, D.; Poulson, S.; Sumaila, S.; Dynes, J.; McBeth, J. M.; Yang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Association with solid-phase iron plays an important role in the accumulation and stabilization of soil organic matter (SOM). Ferric minerals are subject to redox reactions, which can compromise the stability of iron-bound SOM. To date, there is limited information available concerning the fate of iron-bound SOM during redox reactions. In this study, we investigated the release kinetics of hematite-bound organic carbon (OC) during the abiotic reduction of hematite-humic acid (HA) complexes by dithionite, as an analog for the fate of iron-bound SOM in natural redox reactions. Carbon 1s near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy was used to examine the ratio of the aromatic, phenolic and carboxylic/imide functional groups of the adsorbed OC before and after reduction. Our results indicate that the reductive release of iron obeyed first-order kinetics with release rate constants of 6.67×10-3 to 13.0×10-3 min-1. The iron-bound OC was released rapidly during the initial stage with release rate constants of 0.011 to 1.49 min-1, and then became stable with residual fractions of 4.6% to 58.2% between 120 and 240 min. The release rate of aromatic OC was much faster than for the non-aromatic fraction of HA, and 90% of aromatic OC was released within the first hour for most samples. The more rapid release of aromatic OC was attributed to its potential distribution on the outer layer because of steric effects and the possible reduction of quinoids. Our findings show that in the reductive reaction the mobilization of iron-bound organic carbon was asynchronous with the reduction of iron, and aromatic carbon was released more readily than other organic components. This study illustrates the importance of evaluating the stability of iron-bound SOM, especially under aerobic-anaerobic transition conditions.

  10. Iron and carbon metabolism by a mineral-oxidizing Alicyclobacillus-like bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahya, Adibah; Hallberg, Kevin B; Johnson, D Barrie

    2008-04-01

    A novel iron-oxidizing, moderately thermophilic, acidophilic bacterium (strain "GSM") was isolated from mineral spoil taken from a gold mine in Montana. Biomolecular analysis showed that it was most closely related to Alicyclobacillus tolerans, although the two bacteria differed in some key respects, including the absence (in strain GSM) of varpi-alicyclic fatty acids and in their chromosomal base compositions. Isolate GSM was able to grow in oxygen-free media using ferric iron as terminal electron acceptor confirming that it was a facultative anaerobe, a trait not previously described in Alicyclobacillus spp.. The acidophile used both organic and inorganic sources of energy and carbon, although growth and iron oxidation by isolate GSM was uncoupled in media that contained both fructose and ferrous iron. Fructose utilization suppressed iron oxidation, and oxidation of ferrous iron occurred only when fructose was depleted. In contrast, fructose catabolism was suppressed when bacteria were harvested while actively oxidizing iron, suggesting that both ferrous iron- and fructose-oxidation are inducible in this acidophile. Isolate GSM accelerated the oxidative dissolution of pyrite in liquid media either free of, or amended with, organic carbon, although redox potentials were significantly different in these media. The potential of this isolate for commercial mineral processing is discussed.

  11. Hydrogen Storage in Iron/Carbon Nanopowder Composite Materials: Effect of Varying Spiked Iron Content on Hydrogen Adsorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Lin Chu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the effects of varying the spiked iron content of iron/carbon nanopowder (Fe/CNP composite materials on hydrogen storage capacity. Among four such samples, a maximum hydrogen uptake of approximately 0.48 wt% was obtained with 14 wt% of spiked iron under 37 atm and 300 K. This higher hydrogen uptake capacity was believed to be closely related to the physisorption mechanism rather than chemisorption. In this case, the formation of maghemite catalyzed the attraction of hydrogen molecules and the CNP skeleton was the principal absorbent material for hydrogen storage. However, as the iron content exceeded 14 wt%, the formation of larger and poorly dispersed maghemite grains reduced the available surface areas of CNP for the storage of hydrogen molecules, leading to decreased uptake. Our study shows that hydrogen uptake capacities can be improved by appropriately adjusting the surface polarities of the CNP with well dispersed iron oxides crystals.

  12. Effects of iron and calcium carbonate on the variation and cycling of carbon source in integrated wastewater treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhimiao, Zhao; Xinshan, Song; Yufeng, Zhao; Yanping, Xiao; Yuhui, Wang; Junfeng, Wang; Denghua, Yan

    2017-02-01

    Iron and calcium carbonate were added in wastewater treatments as the adjusting agents to improve the contaminant removal performance and regulate the variation of carbon source in integrated treatments. At different temperatures, the addition of the adjusting agents obviously improved the nitrogen and phosphorous removals. TN and TP removals were respectively increased by 29.41% and 23.83% in AC-100 treatment under 1-day HRT. Carbon source from dead algae was supplied as green microbial carbon source and Fe(2+) was supplied as carbon source surrogate. COD concentration was increased to 30mg/L and above, so the problem of the shortage of carbon source was solved. Dead algae and Fe(2+) as carbon source supplement or surrogate played significant role, which was proved by microbial community analysis. According to the denitrification performance in the treatments, dead algae as green microbial carbon source combined with iron and calcium carbonate was the optimal supplement carbon source in wastewater treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Upgrading and dephosphorization of Western Australian iron ore using reduction roasting by adding sodium carbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, De-qing; Chun, Tie-jun; Pan, Jian; Lu, Li-ming; He, Zhen

    2013-06-01

    The technology of direct reduction by adding sodium carbonate (Na2CO3) and magnetic separation was developed to treat Western Australian high phosphorus iron ore. The iron ore and reduced product were investigated by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. It is found that phosphorus exists within limonite in the form of solid solution, which cannot be removed through traditional ways. During reduction roasting, Na2CO3 reacts with gangue minerals (SiO2 and Al2O3), forming aluminum silicate-containing phosphorus and damaging the ore structure, which promotes the separation between iron and phosphorus during magnetic separation. Meanwhile, Na2CO3 also improves the growth of iron grains, increasing the iron grade and iron recovery. The iron concentrate, assaying 94.12wt% Fe and 0.07wt% P at the iron recovery of 96.83% and the dephosphorization rate of 74.08%, is obtained under the optimum conditions. The final product (metal iron powder) after briquetting can be used as the burden for steelmaking by an electric arc furnace to replace scrap steel.

  14. Synthesis and characterization of homogeneous interstitial solutions of nitrogen and carbon in iron-based lattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brink, Bastian Klüge

    work in synthesis and characterization of interstitial solutions ofnitrogen and carbon in iron-based lattices. In order to avoid the influences of gradients incomposition and residual stresses, which are typically found in treated surface layers,homogenous samples are needed. These were prepared from...... pure iron or austeniticstainless steel using gaseous mixtures of ammonia, hydrogen, acetylene and propene atelevated temperatures.Structural and magnetic properties have been characterized with neutron diffraction,vibrating sample magnetometry and Mössbauer spectroscopy. Thermal expansion...... anddecomposition was studied in inert atmospheres with in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction.Thermal decomposition sequences for iron carbides and carbonitrides, as well as for so-called expanded austenite, were established.In ε-iron nitride, partial substitution of nitrogen by carbon causes an increase...

  15. The reduction of iron oxides by volatiles in a rotary hearth furnace process: Part II. The reduction of iron oxide/carbon composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, I.; Fruehan, R. J.

    2006-04-01

    The reduction of iron oxide/carbon composite pellets with hydrogen at 900 °C to 1000 °C was studied. Compared to hydrogen, the reduction by carbon was negligible at 900 °C and below. However, significant carbon oxidation of the iron oxide/graphite pellets by H2O generated from the reduction of Fe2O3 by H2 was observed. At higher temperatures, reduction by carbon complicates the overall reduction mechanism, with the iron oxide/graphite composite pellet found to be more reactive than the iron oxide/char composite pellet. From the scanning electron micrographs, partially reduced composite pellets showed a typical topochemical interface with an intermediate region between an oxygen-rich unreacted core and an iron-rich outer shell. To determine the possibility of reduction by volatiles, a layer of iron oxide powders was spread on top of a high volatile containing bituminous coal and heated inside a reactor using infra-red radiation. By separating the individual reactions involved for an iron oxide/coal mixture where a complex set of reactions occur simultaneously, it was possible to determine the sole effect of volatile reduction. It was found that the light reducing gases evolve initially and react with the iron oxide, with complex hydrocarbons evolving at the later stages. The volatiles caused about 20 to 50 pct reduction of the iron oxide.

  16. Microwave-Assisted Combustion Synthesis of Nano Iron Oxide/Iron-Coated Activated Carbon, Anthracite, Cellulose Fiber, and Silica, with Arsenic Adsorption Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mallikarjuna N. Nadagouda

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Combustion synthesis of iron oxide/iron coated carbons such as activated carbon, anthracite, cellulose fiber, and silica is described. The reactions were carried out in alumina crucibles using a Panasonic kitchen microwave with inverter technology, and the reaction process was completed within a few minutes. The method used no additional fuel and nitrate, which is present in the precursor itself, to drive the reaction. The obtained samples were then characterized with X-ray mapping, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDS, selected area diffraction pattern (SAED, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD, and inductively coupled plasma (ICP spectroscopy. The size of the iron oxide/iron nanoparticle-coated activated carbon, anthracite, cellulose fiber, and silica samples were found to be in the nano range (50–400 nm. The iron oxide/iron nanoparticles mostly crystallized into cubic symmetry which was confirmed by SAED. The XRD pattern indicated that iron oxide/iron nano particles existed in four major phases. That is, γ-Fe2O3, α-Fe2O3, Fe3O4, and Fe. These iron-coated activated carbon, anthracite, cellulose fiber, and silica samples were tested for arsenic adsorption through batch experiments, revealing that few samples had significant arsenic adsorption.

  17. Computational studies of small carbon and iron-carbon systems relevant to carbon nanotube growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Haiming; Rosén, Arne; Harutyunyan, Avetik; Curtarolo, Stefano; Bolton, Kim

    2008-11-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations show that dimers and longer carbon strings are more stable than individual atoms on Fe(111) surfaces. It is therefore necessary to consider the formation of these species on the metal surfaces and their effect on the mechanism of single-walled nanotube (SWNT) growth. The good agreement between the trends (energies and structures) obtained using DFT and those based on the Brenner and AIREBO models indicate that these analytic models provide adequate descriptions of the supported carbon systems needed for valid molecular dynamics simulations of SWNT growth. In contrast, the AIREBO model provides a better description of the relative energies for isolated carbon species, and this model is preferred over the Brenner potential when simulating SWNT growth in the absence of metal particles. However, the PM3 semiempirical model appears to provide an even better description for these systems and, given sufficient computer resources, direct dynamics methods based on this model may be preferred.

  18. Arc-Discharge Synthesis of Iron Encapsulated in Carbon Nanoparticles for Biomedical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Chaitoglou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present work is to improve the protection against the oxidation that usually appears in core@shell nanoparticles. Spherical iron nanoparticles coated with a carbon shell were obtained by a modified arc-discharge reactor, which permits controlling the diameter of the iron core and the carbon shell of the particles. Oxidized iron nanoparticles involve a loss of the magnetic characteristics and also changes in the chemical properties. Our nanoparticles show superparamagnetic behavior and high magnetic saturation owing to the high purity α-Fe of core and to the high core sealing, provided by the carbon shell. A liquid iron precursor was injected in the plasma spot dragged by an inert gas flow. A fixed arc-discharge current of 40 A was used to secure a stable discharge, and several samples were produced at different conditions. Transmission electron microscopy indicated an iron core diameter between 5 and 9 nm. Selected area electron diffraction provided evidences of a highly crystalline and dense iron core. The magnetic properties were studied up to 5 K temperature using a superconducting quantum interference device. The results reveal a superparamagnetic behaviour, a narrow size distribution (σg=1.22, and an average diameter of 6 nm for nanoparticles having a blocking temperature near 40 K.

  19. Nitrogen-doped carbon-supported cobalt-iron oxygen reduction catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelenay, Piotr; Wu, Gang

    2014-04-29

    A Fe--Co hybrid catalyst for oxygen reaction reduction was prepared by a two part process. The first part involves reacting an ethyleneamine with a cobalt-containing precursor to form a cobalt-containing complex, combining the cobalt-containing complex with an electroconductive carbon supporting material, heating the cobalt-containing complex and carbon supporting material under conditions suitable to convert the cobalt-containing complex and carbon supporting material into a cobalt-containing catalyst support. The second part of the process involves polymerizing an aniline in the presence of said cobalt-containing catalyst support and an iron-containing compound under conditions suitable to form a supported, cobalt-containing, iron-bound polyaniline species, and subjecting said supported, cobalt-containing, iron bound polyaniline species to conditions suitable for producing a Fe--Co hybrid catalyst.

  20. Ion microprobe analyses of carbon in Fe-Ni metal in iron meteorites and mesosiderites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Joseph I.; Huss, Gary R.; Scott, Edward R. D.

    2017-03-01

    Carbon concentrations in kamacite, taenite, and plessite (kamacite-taenite intergrowths) were measured in 18 iron meteorites and 2 mesosiderites using the Cameca ims 1280 ion microprobe at the University of Hawai'i with a 5-7 μm beam and a detection limit of groups. Carbon concentrations range from ∼100 to ∼1000 ppm in taenite and plessite in groups IAB, IIICD, and IIIAB, which contain graphite and/or carbides, but only 2-6 ppm in groups IVA, IVB and the ungrouped iron, Tishomingo, which lack graphite and carbides. Carbon contents in kamacite range from ∼2 to ∼10 ppm in most studied meteorites, including IIAB, but higher abundances were found in kamacite from IAB Pitts subgroup meteorites Pitts and Woodbine (12-15 ppm). Our carbon abundances for kamacite are lower than most published ion probe data, indicating that earlier carbon measurements had contamination problems. Grains of taenite and fine-grained plessite in carbon-rich meteorites, which all have normal M-shaped nickel profiles due to slow cooling, have diverse carbon contents and zoning profiles. This is because taenite decomposed by diverse mechanisms over a range of temperatures, when nickel could only diffuse over sub-μm distances. Carbon diffusion through taenite to growing carbides was rapid at the upper end of this temperature range, but was very limited at the lower end of the temperature range. In mesosiderites, carbon increases from 12 ppm in tetrataenite to 40-115 ppm in cloudy taenite as nickel decreases from 50% to 35%. Low carbon levels in tetrataenite may reflect ordering of iron and nickel; higher carbon in cloudy taenite is attributed to metastable bcc phase, possibly martensite, with ∼300 ppm carbon intergrown with tetrataenite. Pearlitic plessite, which only forms in carbon-rich irons, contains much less carbon than martensitic plessite: 10-20 ppm and 300-500, respectively, in IAB irons. Pearlitic plessite consists of μm-scale intergrowths of low-nickel kamacite and

  1. Sub-monolayers of carbon on alpha-iron facets: an ab-initio study

    CERN Document Server

    Riikonen, S; Nieminen, R M

    2010-01-01

    Motivated by recent in situ studies of carbon nanotube growth from large transition-metal nanoparticles, we study various alpha-iron (ferrite) facets at different carbon concentrations using ab initio methods. The studied (110), (100) and (111) facets show qualitatively different behaviour when carbon concentration changes. In particular, adsorbed carbon atoms repel each other on the (110) facet, resulting in carbon dimer and graphitic material formation. Carbon on the (100) facet forms stable structures at concentrations of about 0.5 monolayer and at 1.0 monolayer this facet becomes unstable due to a frustration of the top layer iron atoms. The stability of the (111) facet is weakly affected by the amount of adsorbed carbon and its stability increases further with respect to the (100) facet with increasing carbon concentration. The exchange of carbon atoms between the surface and sub-surface regions on the (111) facet is easier than on the other facets and the formation of carbon dimers is exothermic. These ...

  2. Microwave-Assisted Combustion Synthesis of Nano Iron Oxide/Iron-Coated Activated Carbon, Anthracite, Cellulose Fiber, and Silica, with Arsenic Adsorption Studies

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Combustion synthesis of iron oxide/iron coated carbons such as activated carbon, anthracite, cellulose fiber, and silica is described. The reactions were carried out in alumina crucibles using a Panasonic kitchen microwave with inverter technology, and the reaction process was completed within a few minutes. The method used no additional fuel and nitrate, which is present in the precursor itself, to drive the reaction. The obtained samples were then characterized with X-ray mapping, scanning...

  3. Iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob Bondo; Moen, I W; Mandrup-Poulsen, T

    2014-01-01

    The interest in the role of ferrous iron in diabetes pathophysiology has been revived by recent evidence of iron as an important determinant of pancreatic islet inflammation and as a biomarker of diabetes risk and mortality. The iron metabolism in the β-cell is complex. Excess free iron is toxic......, but at the same time, iron is required for normal β-cell function and thereby glucose homeostasis. In the pathogenesis of diabetes, iron generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) by participating in the Fenton chemistry, which can induce oxidative damage and apoptosis. The aim of this review is to present...... and discuss recent evidence, suggesting that iron is a key pathogenic factor in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes with a focus on inflammatory pathways. Pro-inflammatory cytokine-induced β-cell death is not fully understood, but may include iron-induced ROS formation resulting in dedifferentiation by activation...

  4. Efficiency of carbon removal per added iron in ocean iron fertilization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Baar, Hein J. W.; Gerringa, Loes J. A.; Laan, Patrick; Timmermans, Klaas R.

    2008-01-01

    The major response to ocean iron fertilization is by large diatoms, which at Fe-replete ambient seawater show an optimum C:Fe elemental ratio of similar to 23 000 and a higher ratio of similar to 160 000 or more under Fe-limited conditions. The efficiency of CO2 drawdown during the several weeks of

  5. Entrapment of ancient and modern organic carbon by iron on the Eurasian Arctic Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvado, Joan A.; Tesi, Tommaso; Semiletov, Igor P.; Dudarev, Oleg V.; Gustafsson, Örjan

    2015-04-01

    Given the potential for climate-carbon feedbacks in the Siberian-Arctic land-ocean system, there is a need for improved understanding of carbon cycle processes (Vonk et al., 2012). The entrapment of organic carbon in sediments is a key factor to attenuate the outgassing of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere. In this context, there is a pressing need to understand the mechanisms that control preservation and accumulations of organic carbon in marine sediments. Recently, the role of iron oxides in the preservation of organic matter globally has been outlined (Lalonde et al., 2012). In the present study, the composition of organic carbon associated to reactive iron (OC-Fe) on the Eurasian Arctic Shelf is evaluated. For this purpose, sediment cores and grab samples were collected in the shelves of the Kara Sea, Laptev Sea and East Siberian Sea from 9 to 69 m water depth. Experiments were conducted to extract the OC-Fe from the sediments by applying a citrate-dithionite iron reduction method -accurately control corrected- and analyze the δ13C, % OC and Δ14C of the bulk and iron-associated fractions. The results show that 11.0 ± 5.5% of organic carbon in surface-sediments of the Siberian Arctic Shelf is attached to reactive iron. The Δ14C and δ13C signatures presented sharply contrasting offsets between the sedimentary bulk and the OC-Fe. The OC-Fe is much younger than the OC-bulk in the eastern East Siberian Sea and older in the Laptev Sea. The same offsets were observed using a dual-carbon endmember mixing model showing that the iron fraction is mainly composed by young marine plankton organic carbon in the eastern East Siberian Sea and pre-aged thawing permafrost in the Laptev Sea. Overall, it seems that (i) some of this pre-aged organic carbon still remains bound to iron oxides after permafrost thawing and (ii) the iron oxides are transferring dissolved organic carbon to the sediment. This study presents the first analyses of Δ14C ever done in the OC

  6. The anaerobic corrosion of carbon steel and cast iron in artificial groundwaters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smart, N.R. [AEA Technology plc, Culham Science Centre (United Kingdom); Blackwood, D.J. [National Univ. of Singapore (Singapore); Werme, L. [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden)

    2001-07-01

    In Sweden, high level radioactive waste will be disposed of in a canister with a copper outer and a cast iron or carbon steel inner. If the iron insert comes into contact with anoxic geological water, anaerobic corrosion leading to the generation of hydrogen will occur. This paper presents a study of the anaerobic corrosion of carbon steel and cast iron in artificial Swedish granitic groundwaters. Electrochemical methods and gas collection techniques were used to assess the mechanisms and rates of corrosion and the associated hydrogen gas production over a range of conditions. The corrosion rate is high initially but is anodically limited by the slow formation of a duplex magnetite film. The effects of key environmental parameters such as temperature and ionic strength on the anaerobic corrosion rate are discussed.

  7. Iron-mediated soil carbon response to water-table decline in an alpine wetland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yiyun; Wang, Hao; He, Jin-Sheng; Feng, Xiaojuan

    2017-06-01

    The tremendous reservoir of soil organic carbon (SOC) in wetlands is being threatened by water-table decline (WTD) globally. However, the SOC response to WTD remains highly uncertain. Here we examine the under-investigated role of iron (Fe) in mediating soil enzyme activity and lignin stabilization in a mesocosm WTD experiment in an alpine wetland. In contrast to the classic `enzyme latch' theory, phenol oxidative activity is mainly controlled by ferrous iron [Fe(II)] and declines with WTD, leading to an accumulation of dissolvable aromatics and a reduced activity of hydrolytic enzyme. Furthermore, using dithionite to remove Fe oxides, we observe a significant increase of Fe-protected lignin phenols in the air-exposed soils. Fe oxidation hence acts as an `iron gate' against the `enzyme latch' in regulating wetland SOC dynamics under oxygen exposure. This newly recognized mechanism may be key to predicting wetland soil carbon storage with intensified WTD in a changing climate.

  8. Iron assisted growth of copper-tipped multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, Z R; Szwarcman, D; Lereah, Y; Markovich, G; Hanein, Y

    2007-12-12

    Carbon nanotubes incorporating copper are highly sought after for nanoelectronic applications. Indeed, several recent studies have demonstrated the production of copper-tipped nanotubes using the chemical vapor deposition method. Here we present the growth and detailed characterization of such copper-tipped nanotubes. The nanotubes grown were of a 'bamboo-like' structure, consisting of stacked cups of graphene, and were produced by chemical vapor deposition employing iron and copper nanoparticles as a catalyst and metal source respectively. Transmission electron microscopy and electron holography analysis of the tips of these nanotubes revealed a small crystalline iron particle on the inner side of the copper tip, with the nanotube structure encapsulating the iron. This form of growth may allow the formation of similar structures with various other metal-tipped carbon nanotubes to be manufactured.

  9. Magnetic studies of polystyrene/iron-filled multi-wall carbon nanotube composite films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarova, T. L.; Zakharchuk, I.; Geydt, P.; Lahderanta, E.; Komlev, A. A.; Zyrianova, A. A.; Kanygin, M. A.; Sedelnikova, O. V.; Suslyaev, V. I.; Bulusheva, L. G.; Okotrub, A. V.

    2016-10-01

    Polystyrene/iron-filled multi-wall carbon nanotube composite films were prepared by solution processing, forge-rolling and stretching methods. Elongated iron carbide nanoparticles formed because of catalytic growth are situated inside the hollow cavity of the nanotubes. Magnetic susceptibility measurements as well as records of isothermal hysteresis loops performed in three perpendicular directions of magnetic field confirmed that the nanotubes have a preferential alignment in the matrix. Strong diamagnetic anisotropy in the composites emerges not only from the MWCNTs but also from the polystyrene matrix. The polymer sticks to the honeycomb lattice through the interaction of the π-orbitals of the phenyl ring and those of the carbon nanotube, contributing to anisotropic diamagnetic response. The contribution of iron nanoparticles to overall magnetic response strongly depends on nanotube concentration in the composite as well as on matrix-filler non-covalent stacking, which influences magnetic interparticle interactions.

  10. Iron and ruthenium nanoparticles in carbon prepared by thermolysis of buckymetallocenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakae, Takahiro; Matsuo, Yutaka; Takagi, Masatoshi; Sato, Yuta; Suenaga, Kazu; Nakamura, Eiichi

    2009-03-02

    Thermolysis of fullerene iron and ruthenium complexes (buckymetallocene M(C(60)R(5))Cp (M = Fe; R = Ph (1) and Me (2), M = Ru; R = Ph (3), Me (4)) under a nitrogen atmosphere produced metal nanoparticles dispersed in carbon materials. The thermal degradation processes of the buckymetallocenes were studied by TG-DTA, TEM with a heating sample stage, and VT-XRD. Variation of the thermolysis temperature led to a change in the size of the nanoparticles and the morphology of the carbon materials. Thermolysis of buckyferrocene at 700 degrees C gave highly dispersed iron nanoparticles (average diameter of 7.4 nm). After thermal treatment at 900 degrees C, graphite structures such as carbon nanocapsules and carbon nanotubes formed because of the catalytic activity of the iron nanoparticles. Ruthenium nanoparticles prepared from buckyruthenocene were much smaller than the iron counterparts, and did not catalyze the formation of graphite structures. When buckyruthenocene absorbed on silica gel was heated at 500 degrees C under a hydrogen atmosphere, the resulting ruthenium nanoparticles showed high activity in catalytic hydrogenation.

  11. RESEARCH OF INFLUENCE OF ALLOYING BY BORON ON PROPERTIES THE IRON-CARBON ALLOYS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. V. Kobyakov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It is shown that for improvement of physical-mechanical properties of the cast products which have hard usage, the boron carbide, which can be used at carrying out process of thermo-chemical treatment of cast products of iron-carbon alloy, is of great interest.

  12. Electrocatalytic detection of dopamine at single-walled carbon nanotubes–iron (III) oxide nanoparticles platform

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Adekunle, AS

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Electrochemical sensors using edge-plane pyrolytic graphite electrode (EPPGEs) modified with singlewall carbon nanotubes–iron (III) oxide (SWCNT/Fe2O3) nanoparticles for the sensitive detection of dopamine (DA) are described for the first time...

  13. In-Situ Regeneration of Saturated Granular Activated Carbon by an Iron Oxide Nanocatalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granular activated carbon (GAC) can remove trace organic pollutants and natural organic matter (NOM) from industrial and municipal waters. This paper evaluates an iron nanocatalyst approach, based on Fenton-like oxidation reactions, to regenerate spent GAC within a packed bed con...

  14. The formation of filamentous carbon on iron and nickel catalysts : II. Mechanism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kock, A.J.H.M.; Bokx, P.K. de; Boellaard, E.; Klop, W.; Geus, John W.

    1985-01-01

    The mechanism of filamentous carbon growth on iron and nickel catalysts has been studied using a combination of magnetic techniques and temperature-programmed hydrogenation. CO and CH4 were used as carburizing agents. It is concluded that high carbide contents are a prerequisite for the nucleation o

  15. Iron encapsulated within pod-like carbon nanotubes for oxygen reduction reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Dehui; Yu, Liang; Chen, Xiaoqi; Wang, Guoxiong; Jin, Li; Pan, Xiulian; Deng, Jiao; Sun, Gongquan; Bao, Xinhe

    2013-01-01

    Chainmail for catalysts: a catalyst with iron nanoparticles confined inside pea-pod-like carbon nanotubes exhibits a high activity and remarkable stability as a cathode catalyst in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC), even in presence of SO(2). The approach offers a new route to electro- and heterogeneous catalysts for harsh conditions.

  16. A new nanoscale metastable iron phase in carbon steels

    OpenAIRE

    Tianwei Liu; Danxia Zhang; Qing Liu; Yanjun Zheng; Yanjing Su; Xinqing Zhao; Jiang Yin; Minghui Song; Dehai Ping

    2015-01-01

    Metastable ω phase is common in body-centred cubic (bcc) metals and alloys, including high-alloying steels. Recent theoretical calculations also suggest that the ω structure may act as an intermediate phase for face-centred cubic (fcc)-to-bcc transformation. Thus far, the role of the ω phase played in fcc-bcc martensitic transformation in carbon steels has not been reported. In previous investigations on martensitic carbon steels, extra electron diffraction spots were frequently observed by t...

  17. Kinetics of Reduction of MnO in Molten Slag with Carbon Undersaturated Liquid Iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The reduction of MnO in molten slag with carbon undersaturated iron was studied. It was found that the process is affected by the carbon content of molten metal and the temperature. The higher the carbon content and the temperature, the faster both the reduction and the emerging of the hump on curve of ωFeO, the larger the difference betwe en ωFeO, max and ωFeO, e. The phenomena were explained with three-step reaction model.

  18. Aligned carbon nanotubes catalytically grown on iron-based nanoparticles obtained by laser-induced CVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Normand, F. [Groupe Surfaces and Interfaces, IPCMS, UMR 7504 CNRS, Bat 70, 23 rue du Loess, 67034 Strasbourg Cedex (France)], E-mail: Francois.Le-Normand@ipcms.u-strasbg.fr; Cojocaru, C.S.; Ersen, O. [Groupe Surfaces and Interfaces, IPCMS, UMR 7504 CNRS, Bat 70, 23 rue du Loess, 67034 Strasbourg Cedex (France); Legagneux, P.; Gangloff, L. [THALES R and T, Departementale 128, 91747 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Fleaca, C. [Groupe Surfaces and Interfaces, IPCMS, UMR 7504 CNRS, Bat 70, 23 rue du Loess, 67034 Strasbourg Cedex (France); National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Laser Department, P.O. Box MG-36, R-76900 Bucharest (Romania); Alexandrescu, R.; Dumitrache, F.; Morjan, I. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Laser Department, P.O. Box MG-36, R-76900 Bucharest (Romania)

    2007-12-15

    Iron-based nanoparticles are prepared by a laser-induced chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. They are characterized as body-centered Fe and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} (maghemite/magnetite) particles with sizes {<=}5 and 10 nm, respectively. The Fe particles are embedded in a protective carbon matrix. Both kind of particles are dispersed by spin-coating on SiO{sub 2}/Si(1 0 0) flat substrates. They are used as catalyst to grow carbon nanotubes by a plasma- and filaments-assisted catalytic CVD process (PE-HF-CCVD). Vertically oriented and thin carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were grown with few differences between the two samples, except the diameter in relation to the initial size of the iron particles, and the density. The electron field emission of these samples exhibit quite interesting behavior with a low turn-on voltage at around 1 V/{mu}m.

  19. Aligned carbon nanotubes catalytically grown on iron-based nanoparticles obtained by laser-induced CVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Normand, F.; Cojocaru, C. S.; Ersen, O.; Legagneux, P.; Gangloff, L.; Fleaca, C.; Alexandrescu, R.; Dumitrache, F.; Morjan, I.

    2007-12-01

    Iron-based nanoparticles are prepared by a laser-induced chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. They are characterized as body-centered Fe and Fe 2O 3 (maghemite/magnetite) particles with sizes ≤5 and 10 nm, respectively. The Fe particles are embedded in a protective carbon matrix. Both kind of particles are dispersed by spin-coating on SiO 2/Si(1 0 0) flat substrates. They are used as catalyst to grow carbon nanotubes by a plasma- and filaments-assisted catalytic CVD process (PE-HF-CCVD). Vertically oriented and thin carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were grown with few differences between the two samples, except the diameter in relation to the initial size of the iron particles, and the density. The electron field emission of these samples exhibit quite interesting behavior with a low turn-on voltage at around 1 V/μm.

  20. Electrochemical removal of hexavalent chromium from wastewater using Platinum-Iron/Iron-carbon nanotubes and bipolar Electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoshyar Hossini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In recent decades, electrocoagulation (EC has engrossed much attention as an environmental-friendly and effectiveness process. In addition, the EC process is a potential suitable way for treatment of wastewater with concern to costs and environment. The object of this study was electrochemical evaluation of chromium removal from industrial wastewater using Platinum and carbon nanotubes electrodes. Materials and Methods: The effect of key variables including pH (3–9, hexavalent chromium concentration (50–300 mg/l, supporting electrolyte (NaCl, KCl, Na2CO3 and KNO3 and its dosage, Oxidation-Reduction variations, sludge generation rate and current density (2–20 mA/cm2 was determined. Results: Based on experimental data, optimum conditions were determined in 20, 120 min, pH 3, NaCl 0.5% and 100 mg/L initial concentration of chromium. Conclusions: Removal of hexavalent chromium from the wastewater could be successfully performanced using Platinum-Iron/Iron-carbon nanotubes and bipolar Electrodes.

  1. Mössbauer study of carbon coated iron magnetic nanoparticles produced by simultaneous reduction/pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendonça, Fernanda G.; Ardisson, José D.; Rosmaninho, Marcelo G.; Lago, Rochel M.; Tristão, Juliana C.

    2011-11-01

    Magnetic iron nanoparticles immersed in a carbon matrix were produced by a combined process of controlled dispersion of Fe3 + ions in sucrose, thermal decomposition with simultaneous reduction of iron cores and the formation of the porous carbonaceous matrix. The materials were prepared with iron contents of 1, 4 and 8 in %wt in sucrose and heated at 400, 600 and 800°. The samples were analyzed by XRD, Mössbauer spectroscopy, magnetization measurements, TG, SEM and TEM. The materials prepared at 400° are composed essentially of Fe3O4 particles and carbon, while treatments at higher temperatures, e.g. 600 and 800° produced as main phases Fe0 and Fe3C. The Mössbauer spectra of samples heated at 400° showed two sextets characteristic of a magnetite phase and other contributions compatible with Fe3 + and Fe2 + phases in a carbonaceous matrix. Samples treated at temperatures above 600° showed the presence of metallic iron with concentrations between 16-43%. The samples heated at 800° produced higher amounts of Fe3C (between 20% and 58%). SEM showed for the iron 8% sample treated at 600-800°C particle sizes smaller than 50 nm. Due to the presence of Fe0 particles in the carbonaceous porous matrix the materials have great potential for application as magnetic adsorbents.

  2. Low-carbon transition of iron and steel industry in China: carbon intensity, economic growth and policy intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Bing; Li, Xiao; Qiao, Yuanbo; Shi, Lei

    2015-02-01

    As the biggest iron and steel producer in the world and one of the highest CO2 emission sectors, China's iron and steel industry is undergoing a low-carbon transition accompanied by remarkable technological progress and investment adjustment, in response to the macroeconomic climate and policy intervention. Many drivers of the CO2 emissions of the iron and steel industry have been explored, but the relationships between CO2 abatement, investment and technological expenditure, and their connections with the economic growth and governmental policies in China, have not been conjointly and empirically examined. We proposed a concise conceptual model and an econometric model to investigate this crucial question. The results of regression, Granger causality test and impulse response analysis indicated that technological expenditure can significantly reduce CO2 emissions, and that investment expansion showed a negative impact on CO2 emission reduction. It was also argued with empirical evidence that a good economic situation favored CO2 abatement in China's iron and steel industry, while achieving CO2 emission reduction in this industrial sector did not necessarily threaten economic growth. This shed light on the dispute over balancing emission cutting and economic growth. Regarding the policy aspects, the year 2000 was found to be an important turning point for policy evolution and the development of the iron and steel industry in China. The subsequent command and control policies had a significant, positive effect on CO2 abatement.

  3. Carbon diffusion in solid iron as function of pressure and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagno, V.; Crispin, K. L.; Fei, Y.

    2012-12-01

    The knowledge of carbon diffusion in metallic iron is of importance for both industrial and geological applications. In industry the diffusion properties of carbon apply to the massive production of steel through carburizing and galvanization processes at high temperature with the aim to improve the hardness and rust resistance of such materials. In geoscience the diffusion of carbon in metallic phases at high pressure and temperature is important for determining the rate of reactions and crystal growth of carbide phases likely coexisting with mantle silicates. Due to a small atomic radius, carbon is expected to dissolve by interstitial diffusion in solid metals. However, to date there are no experimental data available to understand the role that pressure plays on the mobilization of carbon through solid iron. Further, for light elements such as carbon or sulfur the activation energy is assumed to be lower than in case of lattice diffusion. However, with increasing pressure the activation volume must be taken into account to better understand diffusion processes at the atomic scale. We performed experiments using multianvil and piston cylinder devices at pressures between 1.5 and 6 GPa and temperature of 700-1200°C. Experiments were carried out using cylindrical glassy carbon sandwiched between layers of pure iron rods of known thickness enclosed in MgO capsule. Analytical techniques included FE-SEM for textural observation and accurate analyses of the interface between layers, while concentration profiles were measured using the electron microprobe with an optimized standardization procedure. Concentration profiles of carbon in iron were computed to determine the diffusion coefficients based on Fick's second law formulation assuming isotropic one dimension diffusion. Preliminary results confirm the positive temperature dependence of the diffusion coefficient for carbon widely discussed in literature. However, our results also show that a significant increase in

  4. Removal of trichloroethylene by zerovalent iron/activated carbon derived from agricultural wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yuh-fan; Cheng, Yu-ling; Shih, Yang-hsin

    2013-11-15

    Activated carbon (AC) and zerovalent iron (ZVI) have been widely used in the adsorption and dehalogenation process, respectively, for the removal of organic compounds in environmental treatments. This study aims to prepare ZVI/AC derived from an agricultural waste, coir pith, through simple one-step pyrolysis. The effect of activation temperature and time on the surface area, iron content, and zerovalent iron ratio of ZVI/AC was systemically investigated. The results indicated that the activation of AC by FeSO4 significantly increased surface area of AC and distributed elemental iron over the AC. The X-ray diffraction (XRD), electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA), and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectra of ZVI/AC revealed that zerovalent iron was present. As compared to AC without FeSO4 activation, ZVI/AC increased the trichloroethylene removal rate constant by 7 times. The dechlorination ability of ZVI/AC was dominated by the zerovalent iron content. We have shown that lab-made ZVI/AC from coir pith can effectively adsorb and dehalogenate the chlorinated compounds in water.

  5. Iron filled carbon nanotubes as novel monopole-like sensors for quantitative magnetic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolny, F.; Mühl, T.; Weissker, U.; Lipert, K.; Schumann, J.; Leonhardt, A.; Büchner, B.

    2010-10-01

    We present a novel ultrahigh stability sensor for quantitative magnetic force microscopy (MFM) based on an iron filled carbon nanotube. In contrast to the complex magnetic structure of conventional MFM probes, this sensor constitutes a nanomagnet with defined properties. The long iron nanowire can be regarded as an extended dipole of which only the monopole close to the sample surface is involved in the imaging process. We demonstrate its potential for high resolution imaging. Moreover, we present an easy routine to determine its monopole moment and prove that this calibration, unlike other approaches, is universally applicable. For the first time this enables straightforward quantitative MFM measurements.

  6. ABOUT MECHANISM OF STRUCTURE FORMATION OF PARTICULAR SOLID CARBONIC PHASE IN NANOCOMPOSITE ON THE BASIS OF IRON AND NANO-DISPERSE CARBON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Kuis

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism of structure formation in super-solid carbon phase in nanocomposite on the basis of iron and nano-disperse carbon, which can be used at development of technology and composition of creation of new materials using inexpensive nano-carbon materials is offered.

  7. Binary iron-carbon nanoparticle synthesis in photolysis of Fe(CO)5 with methane and acetylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eremin, A. V.; Gurentsov, E. V.; Mikheyeva, E. Yu; Musikhin, S. A.

    2016-11-01

    The experimental investigation of iron-carbon nanoparticles synthesis by joint laser photolysis of iron pentacarbonyl in the mixture with methane or acetylene has been carried out. The radiation source used for photo-dissociation of precursors was a pulsed Nd:Yag laser operated at a wavelength of 266 nm. Under uv radiation the molecules of Fe(CO)5 decomposed, forming atomic iron vapor and unsaturated carbonyls at well-known and readily controllable parameters. The subsequent condensation of supersaturated metal vapor resulted in small iron clusters and nanoparticles formation. It was assumed that the active catalytic surface of metal nanoparticles could activate the hydrocarbon molecules up to carbon layer formation on their surface. The growth process of the nanoparticles was observed by a method of laser light extinction. Additionally nanoparticle samples were investigated by a transmission electron microscope. The particle sizes were measured by microphotographs treatment. The sizes of synthesized particles from methane-iron-pentacarbonyl mixture were found to be in a range of 4-16 nm with a count median diameter of 8.9 nm and standard deviation of 1.13. These particles consisted of iron oxide without any carbon content. The particles formed in photolysis of acetylene-iron-pentacarbonyl mixture had the sizes of 3-7 nm with count median diameter of 4 nm and standard deviation of 1.28 and contained the essential amount of carbon. The iron cores were surrounded with a carbon shell.

  8. Ab initio analysis of the carbon solubility limits in various iron allotropes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Olga; Friak, Martin; Neugebauer, Joerg [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Eisenforschung GmbH, Max-Planck-Str. 1, 402 37, Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    The solubility limits of carbon in various iron phases are of critical importance for many steel-industry applications. The actual values are difficult to measure accurately in ferrite and they have so far not be determined theoretically from first principles in austenite. The solubility limits of carbon in {alpha}, {beta}, {gamma}, and {delta} iron have been thus determined employing density functional theory calculations over the entire temperature range. The results show excellent agreement with experiment. The two-orders-of-magnitude higher solubility of carbon in austenite than in ferrite has been quantitatively analyzed and a complex interplay between two distinct phenomena has been found. First, the number of first nearest neighbors is higher in the fcc structure than in the bcc structure and the carbon atom is consequently more strongly bound, and secondly, the strain energy between the C-interstitial and the surrounding iron matrix is lower in the fcc lattice. The details of the actual magnetic state have not been found as important as the above mentioned two mechanisms.

  9. High-temperature XRD study of thermally induced structural and chemical changes in iron oxide nanoparticles embedded in porous carbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schettino, M. A.; Freitas, J. C. C., E-mail: jairccfreitas@yahoo.com.b [Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo, Departamento de Fisica (Brazil); Morigaki, M. K. [Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo, Departamento de Quimica (Brazil); Nunes, E.; Cunha, A. G.; Passamani, E. C.; Emmerich, F. G. [Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo, Departamento de Fisica (Brazil)

    2010-10-15

    Magnetic carbon-based nanomaterials have promising applications in many fields owing to their biocompatibility and thermal/mechanical stability. This study describes a high-temperature X-ray diffraction (XRD) study of the chemical and structural transformations suffered by superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles embedded in porous carbons. The nanoparticles were prepared from the decomposition of iron pentacarbonyl over porous carbons, resulting in nanometer-sized iron oxides homogeneously dispersed into the carbon matrix. The thermally induced changes in these materials were followed by in situ high-temperature XRD, using synchrotron radiation. The growing of the nanoparticles and of the carbon crystallites were first observed, followed by the reduction of the iron oxides to form {alpha}-Fe (at temperatures as low as 400 {sup o}C in some cases) and {gamma}-Fe(C). The temperatures at which these chemical reactions occurred were dependent on the total time spent on heating and on the nature of the iron oxides formed in the as prepared materials. A noticeably large thermal expansion coefficient was also observed for the iron oxide nanocrystals. The formation of austenitic iron, stabilized by the presence of carbon, was found to be only partially reversible upon cooling.

  10. The Influence of Saturation of Cast Iron Austenite with Carbon on the Ausferrite Transformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Giętka

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Austenitizing during quench hardening of the ductile cast iron influences the content of carbon in austenite depending on the soaking heat. On the other hand, the saturation of austenite impacts its transformation in the ausferritizing process of a metal matrix and forming of microstructure. Ductile cast iron with the ferrite matrix was hardened with isothermal transformation in the range of ausferritizing in temperature tpi = 400 i 300 0C and the range of time τpi = 7,5 �� 240 min. Specimens were gradually austenitized. They were soaked in the nominal temperature tγ = 950 0C, then precooled to the temperature tγ’ = 850 and 800 0C. Microstructure was investigated, there were also defined the proportion of austenite in the matrix of the cast iron and the content of carbon in it and hardness and impact strength in unnotched specimens. It was stated, that the precooling temperature deciding on the content of carbon in austenite influences kinetics of the ausferritic transformation, the content of carbon in the γ phase and impact strength and, in a less degree, hardness. As a result of gradual austenitizing the cast iron after quench hardening, in some conditions of treatment, reached mechanical properties corresponding, according to the ASTM A 897 standard, with high grades of ADI. Chilling in the range of austenitizing in temperature 850 and 800 0C led to the decrease of carbon in austenite what influenced positively on the matrix microstructure and properties of the ADI. Investigations in this range will be continued.

  11. Remediation of Nitrate-contaminated Groundwater by a Mixture of Iron and Activated Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Guoxin; Liu, Fei; Jin, Aifang; Qin, Xiaopeng

    2010-11-01

    Nitrate contamination in groundwater has become a major environmental and health problem worldwide. The aim of the present study is to remediate groundwater contaminated by nitrate and develop potential reactive materials to be used in PRBs (Permeable Reactive Barriers). A new approach was proposed for abiotic groundwater remediation by reactive materials of iron chips and granular activated carbon particles. Batch tests were conducted and remediation mechanisms were discussed. The results show that nitrate decreases from 86.31 to 33.79 mgṡL-1 under the conditions of near neutral pH and reaction time of 1h. The combination of iron chips and activated carbon particles is cost-effective and suitable for further use as denitrification media in PRBs. Nitrogen species don't change significantly with the further increase in reaction time (>1 h). The iron-activated carbon-water-nitrate system tends to be steady-state. Small amounts of ammonium and nitrite (0.033-0.039 and 0.14-3.54 mgṡL-1, respectively) appear at reaction time from 0 h to 5 h. There is no substantial accumulation of nitrogen products in the system. The removal rate of nitrate only reaches 16.11% by sole iron chips at reaction time of 5 h, while 63.57% by the mixture of iron chips and activated carbon particles. There is significantly synergistic and promotive effect of mixing the two different types of materials on nitrate treatment. Fe/C ratio (1/1.5-1/2.5) doesn't cause dramatically different residual nitrate concentrations (24.09-26.70 mgṡL-1). Nitrate can't be limitlessly decreased with decreasing Fe/C ratio. The concomitant occurrences of chemical reduction, galvanic cell reaction, electrophoretic accumulation, chemical coagulation, and physical adsorption are all responsible for the overall nitrate removal by iron allied with activated carbon. To accurately quantify various nitrogen species, further studies on adsorption mechanisms of nitrite and nitrate are needed.

  12. Wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation of phenol with FeAC (iron-embedded activated carbon) catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Rey-May; Chen, Shih-Hsiung; Huang, Cheng-Hsien; Hung, Mu-Ya; Chang, Jing-Song; Lai, Cheng-Lee

    2010-01-01

    This investigation aims at exploring the catalytic oxidation activity of iron-embedded activated carbon (FeAC) and the application for the degradation of phenol in the wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation (WHPCO). FeAC catalysts were prepared by pre-impregnating iron in coconut shell with various iron loadings in the range of 27.5 to 46.5% before they were activated. The FeAC catalysts were characterised by measuring their surface area, pore distribution, functional groups on the surface, and X-ray diffraction patterns. The effects of iron loading strongly inhibited the pore development of the catalyst but benefited the oxidation activity in WHPCO. It was found that the complete conversion of phenol was observed with all FeAC catalysts in oxidation. High level of chemical oxygen demand (COD) abatement can be achieved within the first 30 minutes of oxidation. The iron embedded in the activated carbon showed good performance in the degradation and mineralisation of phenol during the oxidation due to the active sites as iron oxides formed on the surface of the activated carbon. It was found that the embedding irons were presented in gamma-Fe(2)O(3), alpha-Fe(2)O(3), and alpha-FeCOOH forms on the activated carbon. The aging tests on FeAC catalysts showed less activity loss, and less iron leaching was found after four oxidation runs.

  13. Oxygen Reduction Electrocatalysts Based on Coupled Iron Nitride Nanoparticles with Nitrogen-Doped Carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Jung Park

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Aimed at developing a highly active and stable non-precious metal electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR, a novel FexNy/NC nanocomposite—that is composed of highly dispersed iron nitride nanoparticles supported on nitrogen-doped carbon (NC—was prepared by pyrolyzing carbon black with an iron-containing precursor in an NH3 atmosphere. The influence of the various synthetic parameters such as the Fe precursor, Fe content, pyrolysis temperature and pyrolysis time on ORR performance of the prepared iron nitride nanoparticles was investigated. The formed phases were determined by experimental and simulated X-ray diffraction (XRD of numerous iron nitride species. We found that Fe3N phase creates superactive non-metallic catalytic sites for ORR that are more active than those of the constituents. The optimized Fe3N/NC nanocomposite exhibited excellent ORR activity and a direct four-electron pathway in alkaline solution. Furthermore, the hybrid material showed outstanding catalytic durability in alkaline electrolyte, even after 4,000 potential cycles.

  14. Magnetic studies of polystyrene/iron-filled multi-wall carbon nanotube composite films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makarova, T.L., E-mail: Tatyana.makarova@lut.fi [Lappeenranta University of Technology, FI-53851 Lappeenranta (Finland); Ioffe Institute, St Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation); Zakharchuk, I.; Geydt, P.; Lahderanta, E. [Lappeenranta University of Technology, FI-53851 Lappeenranta (Finland); Komlev, A.A. [St Petersburg State Electrotechnical University, St Petersburg 197376 (Russian Federation); Zyrianova, A.A. [Ioffe Institute, St Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation); Kanygin, M.A. [Nikolaev Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, SB RAS, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Sedelnikova, O.V. [Nikolaev Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, SB RAS, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Suslyaev, V.I [Tomsk State University, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Bulusheva, L.G.; Okotrub, A.V. [Nikolaev Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, SB RAS, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation)

    2016-10-01

    Polystyrene/iron-filled multi-wall carbon nanotube composite films were prepared by solution processing, forge-rolling and stretching methods. Elongated iron carbide nanoparticles formed because of catalytic growth are situated inside the hollow cavity of the nanotubes. Magnetic susceptibility measurements as well as records of isothermal hysteresis loops performed in three perpendicular directions of magnetic field confirmed that the nanotubes have a preferential alignment in the matrix. Strong diamagnetic anisotropy in the composites emerges not only from the MWCNTs but also from the polystyrene matrix. The polymer sticks to the honeycomb lattice through the interaction of the π-orbitals of the phenyl ring and those of the carbon nanotube, contributing to anisotropic diamagnetic response. The contribution of iron nanoparticles to overall magnetic response strongly depends on nanotube concentration in the composite as well as on matrix-filler non-covalent stacking, which influences magnetic interparticle interactions. - Highlights: • . Nanotube/polystyrene composites were prepared by stretching and forge-rolling methods. • Anisotropic response of the composites mainly comes from the phenyl aromatic rings. • Magnetism of iron-based nanoparticles is governed by interactions with the matrix.

  15. Soil organic carbon stabilization by iron in permafrost regions of the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, C. C.; Zhang, T. J.; Zhao, Q.; Guo, H.; Zhong, W.; Su, H.; Wu, Q. B.

    2016-10-01

    A close relationship exists between soil organic carbon (SOC) and reactive iron; however, little is known about the role of iron in SOC preservation in permafrost regions. We determined the amount of SOC associated with reactive iron phases (OC-Fe) in the permafrost regions of the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau (QTP). The results showed that the percentage of OC-Fe ranged between 0.9% and 59.5% in the upper 30 cm of soil and that the OC-Fe represented 19.5 ± 12.3% of the total SOC pool. No clear vertical distribution pattern in OC-Fe was present in the upper 1 m of soil. Throughout the year, the OC-Fe accounted for relatively stable proportions of the total SOC pool. This study suggests that approximately 20% of SOC is a potential rusty OC pool in the permafrost regions of the QTP. Biogeochemical processes related to the reaction of iron may play important roles in soil carbon cycles in permafrost regions.

  16. Air stable iron/iron carbide magnetic nanoparticles embedded in amorphous carbon globules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadhanala, Hari Krishna; Nanda, Karuna Kar

    2015-06-01

    We have synthesized Fe/Fe3C magnetic nanoparticles embedded in an amorphous carbon globule by pyrolysing of benzene, ferrocene and hydroboric acid. The diameter of the globules is ˜ 1 µm and that of Fe/Fe3C magnetic nanoparticles is ˜ 40 nm. The globules exhibit ferromagnetic like behavior and the magnetization as well as the coercivity is found to increases with decreasing temperature.

  17. Functionalization and Area-Selective Deposition of Magnetic Carbon-Coated Iron Nanoparticles from Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Widenkvist

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A route to area-selective deposition of carbon-coated iron nanoparticles, involving chemical modification of the surface of the particles, is described. Partial oxidative etching of the coating introduces carboxylic groups, which then are esterified. The functionalized particles can be selectively deposited on the Si areas of Si/SiO2 substrates by a simple dipping procedure. Nanoparticles and nanoassemblies have been analyzed using SEM, TEM, and XPS.

  18. Origin of conductivity cross over in entangled multi-walled carbon nanotube network filled by iron

    OpenAIRE

    Chimowa, George; Linganiso, Ella C.; Churochkin, Dmitry; Neil J. Coville; Bhattacharyya, Somnath

    2011-01-01

    A realistic transport model showing the interplay of the hopping transport between the outer shells of iron filled entangled multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) and the diffusive transport through the inner part of the tubes, as a function of the filling percentage, is developed. This model is based on low-temperature electrical resistivity and magneto-resistance (MR) measurements. The conductivity at low temperatures showed a crossover from Efros-Shklovski (E-S) variable range hopping (VRH)...

  19. Reduction Behaviors of Carbon Composite Iron Oxide Briquette Under Oxidation Atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ki-Woo; Kim, Kang-Min; Kwon, Jae-Hong; Han, Jeong-Whan [Inha University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Son, Sang-Han [POSCO, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-01-15

    The carbon composite iron oxide briquette (CCB) is considered a potential solution to the upcoming use of low grade iron resources in the ironmaking process. CCB is able to reduce raw material cost by enabling the use of low grade powdered iron ores and coal. Additionally, the fast reduction of iron oxides by direct contact with coal can be utilized. In this study, the reduction behaviors of CCB were investigated in the temperature range of 200-1200 ℃ under oxidizing atmosphere. Briquettes were prepared by mixing iron ore and coal in a weight ratio of 8:2. Then reduction experiments were carried out in a mixed gas atmosphere of N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, and CO{sub 2}. Compressive strength tests and quantitative analysis were performed by taking samples at each target temperature. In addition, the reduction degree depending on the reaction time was evaluated by off-gas analysis during the reduction test. It was found that the compressive strength and the metallization degree of the reduced briquettes increased with increases in the reaction temperature and holding time. However, it tended to decrease when the re-oxidation phenomenon was caused by injected oxygen. The degree of reduction reached a maximum value in 26 minutes. Therefore, the re-oxidation phenomenon becomes dominant after 26 minutes.

  20. Aligned carbon nanotubes catalytically grown on iron-based nanoparticles obtained by laser-induced CVD

    OpenAIRE

    Le Normand, Francois; Cojocaru, Costel Sorin; Ersen, Ovidiu; Legagneux, Pierre; Gangloff, Laurent; Fleaca, C.; Alexandrescu, Rodica; Dumitrache, Florin; Morjan, Ion

    2007-01-01

    International audience; Iron-based nanoparticles are prepared by a laser-induced chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. They are characterized as body-centered Fe and Fe2O3 (maghemite/magnetite) particles with sizes ::;5 and 10 nm, respectively. The Fe particles are embedded in a protective carbon matrix. Both kind of particles are dispersed by spin-coating on SiO2/Si(1 0 0) flat substrates. They are used as catalyst to grow carbon nanotubes by a plasma- and filaments-assisted catalytic CVD...

  1. Ab initio study of spin-dependent transport in carbon nanotubes with iron and vanadium adatoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fürst, Joachim Alexander; Brandbyge, Mads; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2008-01-01

    We present an ab initio study of spin-dependent transport in armchair carbon nanotubes with transition metal adsorbates: iron or vanadium. The method based on density functional theory and nonequilibrium Green's functions is used to compute the electronic structure and zero-bias conductance...... (majority or minority) being scattered depends on the adsorbate and is explained in terms of d-state filling. We contrast the single-walled carbon nanotube results to the simpler case of the adsorbate on a flat graphene sheet with periodic boundary conditions and corresponding width in the zigzag direction...

  2. Growth of bridging carbon nanofibers in cracks formed by heat-treating iron oxide thin sheets in acetylene gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Hikata

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available We produced novel carbon nanofibers (CNFs by oxidizing high-purity iron foil and then carburizing it in acetylene gas flow. This formed cracks in the heat-treated iron foil with CNFs bridging the two walls of each crack. The CNFs were drawn out from the walls as the crack opened during heat treatment. This will be a new method to grow and arrange carbon nanotubes and nanosheets without using metal nanoparticles or template substrates.

  3. Growth of bridging carbon nanofibers in cracks formed by heat-treating iron oxide thin sheets in acetylene gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hikata, Takeshi; Okubo, Soichiro; Higashi, Yugo; Matsuba, Teruaki; Utsunomiya, Risa; Tsurekawa, Sadahiro; Murakami, Katsuhisa; Fujita, Jun-ichi

    2013-04-01

    We produced novel carbon nanofibers (CNFs) by oxidizing high-purity iron foil and then carburizing it in acetylene gas flow. This formed cracks in the heat-treated iron foil with CNFs bridging the two walls of each crack. The CNFs were drawn out from the walls as the crack opened during heat treatment. This will be a new method to grow and arrange carbon nanotubes and nanosheets without using metal nanoparticles or template substrates.

  4. Microscopic insight into the bilateral formation of carbon spirals from a symmetric iron core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiozawa, Hidetsugu; Bachmatiuk, Alicja; Stangl, Andreas; Cox, David C; Silva, S Ravi P; Rümmeli, Mark H; Pichler, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Mirrored carbon-spirals have been produced from pressured ferrocene via the bilateral extrusion of the spiral pairs from an iron core. A parametric plot of the surface geometry displays the fractal growth of the conical helix made with the logarithmic spiral. Electron microscopy studies show the core is a crystalline cementite which grows and transforms its shape from spherical to biconical as it extrudes two spiralling carbon arms. In a cross section along the arms we observe graphitic flakes arranged in a herringbone structure, normal to which defects propagate. Local-wave-pattern analysis reveals nanoscale defect patterns of two-fold symmetry around the core. The data suggest that the bilateral growth originates from a globular cementite crystal with molten surfaces and the nano-defects shape emerging hexagonal carbon into a fractal structure. Understanding and knowledge obtained provide a basis for the controlled production of advanced carbon materials with designed geometries.

  5. A new nanoscale metastable iron phase in carbon steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tianwei; Zhang, Danxia; Liu, Qing; Zheng, Yanjun; Su, Yanjing; Zhao, Xinqing; Yin, Jiang; Song, Minghui; Ping, Dehai

    2015-10-01

    Metastable ω phase is common in body-centred cubic (bcc) metals and alloys, including high-alloying steels. Recent theoretical calculations also suggest that the ω structure may act as an intermediate phase for face-centred cubic (fcc)-to-bcc transformation. Thus far, the role of the ω phase played in fcc-bcc martensitic transformation in carbon steels has not been reported. In previous investigations on martensitic carbon steels, extra electron diffraction spots were frequently observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and these spots were historically ascribed to the diffraction arising from either internal twins or carbides. In this paper, an intensive TEM investigation revealed that the extra spots are in fact attributed to the metastable ω phase in particle-like morphology with an overall size of several or dozens of nanometres. The strict orientation relationships between the ω phase and the ferrite matrix are in good agreement with those of the hexagonal (P6/mmm) ω phase in other bcc metals and alloys. The identification of the ω phase as well as the extra diffraction spots might provide a clue to help understand the physical mechanism of martensitic transformation in steels.

  6. A new nanoscale metastable iron phase in carbon steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tianwei; Zhang, Danxia; Liu, Qing; Zheng, Yanjun; Su, Yanjing; Zhao, Xinqing; Yin, Jiang; Song, Minghui; Ping, Dehai

    2015-01-01

    Metastable ω phase is common in body-centred cubic (bcc) metals and alloys, including high-alloying steels. Recent theoretical calculations also suggest that the ω structure may act as an intermediate phase for face-centred cubic (fcc)-to-bcc transformation. Thus far, the role of the ω phase played in fcc-bcc martensitic transformation in carbon steels has not been reported. In previous investigations on martensitic carbon steels, extra electron diffraction spots were frequently observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and these spots were historically ascribed to the diffraction arising from either internal twins or carbides. In this paper, an intensive TEM investigation revealed that the extra spots are in fact attributed to the metastable ω phase in particle-like morphology with an overall size of several or dozens of nanometres. The strict orientation relationships between the ω phase and the ferrite matrix are in good agreement with those of the hexagonal (P6/mmm) ω phase in other bcc metals and alloys. The identification of the ω phase as well as the extra diffraction spots might provide a clue to help understand the physical mechanism of martensitic transformation in steels. PMID:26503890

  7. Adsorption Efficiency of Iron Modified Carbons for Removal of Pb(II Ions from Aqueous Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hossein Salmani

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: The Lead causes severe damage to several systems of the body, especially to bony tissues. Until now, several low-cost biosorbents have been studied for removal of heavy metal ions from aqueous solutions. In the present study, carbonized pomegranate peels modified with Fe2+ and Fe3+ ions and then it was investigated for removal of Pb(II ions from aqueous solution. Materials and methods: the washed granola of pomegranate peel was separately socked with FeCl3 and FeCl2 solutions for 24 h. Then, the granules were carbonized at 400 ºC for 3 h in a programmable furnace in the atmosphere of nitrogen. The adsorption experiments were carried out for two types of iron-modified carbons by batch adsorption using one variable at a time procedures. Results: The optimum conditions were found as contact time 90 min, initial concentration 50 mg/l, and adsorbent dose, 1.00 g/100 ml solution. Maximum removal efficiency was calculated as 84% and 89% for Fe3+ and Fe2+ impregnated pomegranate peel carbons respectively. Conclusion: The iron treatment pomegranate peel carbons modified their surfaces for adsorption of heavy metals. The results showed that chemical modification of the low-cost adsorbents originating from agricultural waste has stood out for metal removal capabilities.

  8. Effects of iron-aluminium oxides and organic carbon on aggregate stability of bauxite residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Feng; Li, Yubing; Xue, Shengguo; Hartley, William; Wu, Hao

    2016-05-01

    In order to successfully establish vegetation on bauxite residue, properties such as aggregate structure and stability require improvement. Spontaneous plant colonization on the deposits in Central China over the last 20 years has revealed that natural processes may improve the physical condition of bauxite residues. Samples from three different stacking ages were selected to determine aggregate formation and stability and its relationship with iron-aluminium oxides and organic carbon. The residue aggregate particles became coarser in both dry and wet sieving processes. The mean weight diameter (MWD) and geometry mean diameter (GMD) increased significantly, and the proportion of aggregate destruction (PAD) decreased. Natural stacking processes could increase aggregate stability and erosion resistant of bauxite residues. Free iron oxides and amorphous aluminium oxides were the major forms in bauxite residues, but there was no significant correlation between the iron-aluminium oxides and aggregate stability. Aromatic-C, alkanes-C, aliphatic-C and alkenes-C were the major functional groups present in the residues. With increasing stacking age, total organic carbon content and aggregate-associated organic carbon both increased. Alkanes-C, aliphatic-C and alkenes-C increased and were mainly distributed in macro-aggregates, whereas aromatic-C was mainly distributed in aluminium oxides maybe more important for stability of micro-aggregates.

  9. Nitrogen removal efficiency of iron-carbon micro-electrolysis system treating high nitrate nitrogen organic pharmaceutical wastewater

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周健; 段送华; 陈垚; 胡斌

    2009-01-01

    The nitrate nitrogen removal efficiency of iron-carbon micro-electrolysis system was discussed in treating pharmaceutical wastewater with high nitrogen and refractory organic concentration. The results show that the granularity of fillings,pH,volume ratios of iron-carbon and gas-water,and HRT. have significant effects on the nitrogen removal efficiency of iron-carbon micro-electrolysis system. The iron-carbon micro-electrolysis system has a good removal efficiency of pharmaceutical wastewater with high nitrogen and refractory organic concentration when the influent TN,NH4+-N,NO3--N and BOD5/CODCr are 823 mg/L,30 mg/L,793 mg/L and 0.1,respectively,at the granularity of iron and carbon 0.425 mm,pH 3,iron-carbon ratio 3,gas-water ratio 5,HRT 1.5 h,and the removal rates of TN,NH4+-N and NO3--N achieve 51.5%,70% and 50.94%,respectively.

  10. Chlorine and carbon isotope measurements can help assessing the effectivenes of a zero valent iron barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cretnik, S.; Audi, C.; Bernstein, A.; Palau, J.; Soler, A.; Elsner, M.

    2012-04-01

    Chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAH's) such as trichloroethene (TCE), cis-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) and vinylchloride (VC) are extensively used in industrial applications. One of the most promising remediation techniques for CAH's in groundwater is their removal via abiotic reductive dechlorination using Zero Valent Iron (ZVI). This is applied for the treatment of contaminated sites by installing permeable reactive barriers (PRB). In this study, isotope fractionation of chlorinated ethylenes in transformation by cast iron has been investigated, because such types of iron are commonly used in PRBs. Batch experiments have been carried out in closed flasks, containing cast iron with aqueous solutions of TCE, cDCE and VC. These substrates and their respective products have been monitored by headspace samplings for their concentration (by GC-FID) and isotope fractionation of carbon and chlorine (by GC-IRMS). A decreasing reactivity trend was observed when compounds contain less chlorine atoms, with differences in rate constants of about one order of magnitude between each of the substances TCE > cDCE > VC. This resulted in the accumulation of products with fewer chlorine atoms. Therefore a similar observation can be expected if degradation in the field is incomplete, for example in the case of aged or improperly designed PRB. Pronounced carbon and chlorine isotope fractionation was measured for each of the compounds, and characteristic dual isotope plots (C, Cl) were obtained for TCE and cDCE. These results may serve as an important reference for the interpretation of isotope data from field sites, since stable isotope fractionation is widely recognized as robust indicator for such pollutant transformations. However, carbon isotope fractionation in a given parent compound may be caused by either abiotic or biotic degradation. In the field, it can therefore be difficult to delineate the contribution of abiotic transformation by PRB in the presence of ongoing

  11. Sulfur reactions and cryptic cross-linkages to oxygen, iron, and carbon cyclin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druschel, G.; Kafantaris, F. C. A.; Fike, D. A.; Schmitt-Kopplin, P.; Dvorski, S.; Oduro, H.

    2014-12-01

    Sulfur speciation in any setting is controlled by a complex series of redox reactions, polymerization, and complexation reactions that are affected by both biotic and abiotic processes. Additionally there are several crossroads of reactions with oxygen, carbon, and iron in which polysulfide molecules serve as a key reaction component that affects not only sulfur speciation, but the speciation, solubility, and bioavailability of these elements as well. Utilizing a combination of analytical approaches including electrochemistry, spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and chromatography, we have started to unravel the interconnections between sulfur and other key elements, and how microorganisms may be either direct or indirect contributors to these chemical and mineralogical signatures. In microbial mats, we have observed microbial production of significant hydrogen peroxide under UV-stressed conditions. This peroxide interaction with hydrogen sulfide changes the kinetics and the pathways of abiotic sulfur reactions, potentially affecting the overall bioavailability and isotopic fractionations for specific reactions via a change in the linkage between oxygen and sulfur cycling. In systems containing significant iron, we have observed the production of an electroactive form of ferrous iron and sulfide (FeS(aq)) that is of a size that can be described between a dissolved molecular cluster and a small nanoparticle. This FeS(aq) can be a significant fraction of the dissolved iron or sulfide in a system, and is a key part of both the solubility of iron and sulfur and the pathways potentially important for pyritization reactions. In systems where we investigate the links between sulfur and carbon, laboratory and field experiments indicate a wide range of large and more reduced organic compounds are highly reactive towards polysulfide. Utilizing Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry in conjunction with electrochemistry and chromatography, we are seeing a

  12. Moessbauer study of carbon coated iron magnetic nanoparticles produced by simultaneous reduction/pyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendonca, Fernanda G. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Departamento de Quimica - ICEx (Brazil); Ardisson, Jose D. [CDTN, Laboratorio de Fisica Aplicada, Centro de Desenvolvimento de Tecnologia Nuclear (Brazil); Rosmaninho, Marcelo G.; Lago, Rochel M.; Tristao, Juliana C., E-mail: juliana@ufv.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Departamento de Quimica - ICEx (Brazil)

    2011-11-15

    Magnetic iron nanoparticles immersed in a carbon matrix were produced by a combined process of controlled dispersion of Fe{sup 3 + } ions in sucrose, thermal decomposition with simultaneous reduction of iron cores and the formation of the porous carbonaceous matrix. The materials were prepared with iron contents of 1, 4 and 8 in %wt in sucrose and heated at 400, 600 and 800 Degree-Sign . The samples were analyzed by XRD, Moessbauer spectroscopy, magnetization measurements, TG, SEM and TEM. The materials prepared at 400 Degree-Sign are composed essentially of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} particles and carbon, while treatments at higher temperatures, e.g. 600 and 800 Degree-Sign produced as main phases Fe{sup 0} and Fe{sub 3}C. The Moessbauer spectra of samples heated at 400 Degree-Sign showed two sextets characteristic of a magnetite phase and other contributions compatible with Fe{sup 3 + } and Fe{sup 2 + } phases in a carbonaceous matrix. Samples treated at temperatures above 600 Degree-Sign showed the presence of metallic iron with concentrations between 16-43%. The samples heated at 800 Degree-Sign produced higher amounts of Fe{sub 3}C (between 20% and 58%). SEM showed for the iron 8% sample treated at 600-800 Degree-Sign C particle sizes smaller than 50 nm. Due to the presence of Fe{sup 0} particles in the carbonaceous porous matrix the materials have great potential for application as magnetic adsorbents.

  13. Carbon dioxide hydrogenation to aromatic hydrocarbons by using an iron/iron oxide nanocatalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongwang Wang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The quest for renewable and cleaner energy sources to meet the rapid population and economic growth is more urgent than ever before. Being the most abundant carbon source in the atmosphere of Earth, CO2 can be used as an inexpensive C1 building block in the synthesis of aromatic fuels for internal combustion engines. We designed a process capable of synthesizing benzene, toluene, xylenes and mesitylene from CO2 and H2 at modest temperatures (T = 380 to 540 °C employing Fe/Fe3O4 nanoparticles as catalyst. The synthesis of the catalyst and the mechanism of CO2-hydrogenation will be discussed, as well as further applications of Fe/Fe3O4 nanoparticles in catalysis.

  14. Effects of magnetic field intensity on carbon diffusion coefficient in pure iron in γ-Fe temperature region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yan; Duan, Guosheng; Zhao, Xiang

    2015-03-01

    Effects of magnetic field intensity on carbon diffusion coefficient in pure iron in the γ-Fe temperature region were investigated using carburizing technology. The carbon penetration profiles from the iron surface to interior were measured by field emission electron probe microanalyzer. The carbon diffusion coefficient in pure iron carburized with different magnetic field intensities was calculated according to the Fick's second law. It was found that the magnetic field intensity could obviously affect the carbon diffusion coefficient in pure iron in the γ-Fe temperature region, and the carbon diffusion coefficient decreased obviously with the enhancement of magnetic field intensity, when the magnetic field intensity was higher than 1 T, the carbon diffusion coefficient in field annealed specimen was less than half of that of the nonfield annealed specimen, further enhancing the magnetic field intensity, the carbon diffusion coefficient basically remains unchanged. The stiffening of lattice due to field-induced magnetic ordering was responsible for an increase in activation barrier for jumping carbon atoms. The greater the magnetic field intensity, the stronger the inhibiting effect of magnetic field on carbon diffusion.

  15. Nano-scaled iron-carbon precipitates in HSLC and HSLA steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    This paper studies the composition, quantity and particle size distribution of nano-scaled precipitates with size less than 20 nm in high strength low carbon (HSLC) steel and their effects on mechanical properties of HSLC steel by means of mass balance calculation of nano-scaled precipitates measured by chemical phase analysis plus SAXS method, high-resolution TEM analysis and thermodynamics calculation, as well as temper rapid cooling treatment of ZJ330. It is found that there existed a large quantity of nano-scaled iron-carbon precipitates with size less than 18 nm in low carbon steel produced by CSP and they are mainly Fe-O-C and Fe-Ti-O-C precipitates formed below temperature A1. These precipitates have ob- vious precipitation strengthening effect on HSLC steel and this may be regarded as one of the main reasons why HSLC steel has higher strength. There also existed a lot of iron-carbon precipitates with size less than 36 nm in HSLA steels.

  16. Nano-scaled iron-carbon precipitates in HSLC and HSLA steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Jie; WU HuaJie; LIU YangChun; KANG YongLin

    2007-01-01

    This paper studies the composition, quantity and particle size distribution of nano-scaled precipitates with size less than 20 nm in high strength Iow carbon (HSLC) steel and their effects on mechanical properties of HSLC steel by means of mass balance calculation of nano-scaled precipitates measured by chemical phase analysis plus SAXS method, high-resolution TEM analysis and thermodynamics calculation, as well as temper rapid cooling treatment of ZJ330. It is found that there existed a large quantity of nano-scaled iron-carbon precipitates with size less than 18 nm in Iow carbon steel produced by CSP and they are mainly Fe-O-C and Fe-Ti-O-C precipitates formed below temperature A1. These precipitates have obvious precipitation strengthening effect on HSLC steel and this may be regarded as one of the main reasons why HSLC steel has higher strength. There also existed a lot of iron-carbon precipitates with size less than 36 nm in HSLA steels.

  17. A general strategy toward graphitized carbon coating on iron oxides as advanced anodes for lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Chunyan; Zhou, Weiwei; Wang, Bin; Li, Xin; Wang, Dong; Zhang, Yong; Wen, Guangwu

    2017-08-01

    Integration of carbon materials with benign iron oxides is blazing a trail in constructing high-performance anodes for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). In this paper, a unique general, simple, and controllable strategy is developed toward in situ uniform coating of iron oxide nanostructures with graphitized carbon (GrC) layers. The basic synthetic procedure only involves a simple dip-coating process for the loading of Ni-containing seeds and a subsequent Ni-catalyzed chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process for the growth of GrC layers. More importantly, the CVD treatment is conducted at a quite low temperature (450 °C) and with extremely facile liquid carbon sources consisting of ethylene glycol (EG) and ethanol (EA). The GrC content of the resulting hybrids can be controllably regulated by altering the amount of carbon sources. The electrochemical results reveal remarkable performance enhancements of iron oxide@GrC hybrids compared with pristine iron oxides in terms of high specific capacity, excellent rate and cycling performance. This can be attributed to the network-like GrC coating, which can improve not only the electronic conductivity but also the structural integrity of iron oxides. Moreover, the lithium storage performance of samples with different GrC contents is measured, manifesting that optimized electrochemical property can be achieved with appropriate carbon content. Additionally, the superiority of GrC coating is demonstrated by the advanced performance of iron oxide@GrC compared with its corresponding counterpart, i.e., iron oxides with amorphous carbon (AmC) coating. All these results indicate the as-proposed protocol of GrC coating may pave the way for iron oxides to be promising anodes for LIBs.

  18. Chromium removal by combining the magnetic properties of iron oxide with adsorption properties of carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, V K; Agarwal, Shilpi; Saleh, Tawfik A

    2011-03-01

    The adsorption features of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with the magnetic properties of iron oxides have been combined in a composite to produce a magnetic adsorbent. Composites of MWCNT/nano-iron oxide were prepared, and were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). XRD suggests that the magnetic phase formed is maghemite and/or magnetite. FESEM image shows nano-iron oxides attached to a network of MWCNTs. The adsorption capability of the composites was tested in batch and fixed bed modes. The composites have demonstrated a superior adsorption capability to that of activated carbon. The results also show that the adsorptions of Cr(III) on the composites is strongly dependent on contact time, agitation speed and pH, in the batch mode; and on flow rate and the bed thickness in the fixed bed mode. Along with the high surface area of the MWCNTs, the advantage of the magnetic composite is that it can be used as adsorbent for contaminants in water and can be subsequently controlled and removed from the medium by a simple magnetic process. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Influences of iron and calcium carbonate on wastewater treatment performances of algae based reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhimiao; Song, Xinshan; Wang, Wei; Xiao, Yanping; Gong, Zhijie; Wang, Yuhui; Zhao, Yufeng; Chen, Yu; Mei, Mengyuan

    2016-09-01

    The influences of iron and calcium carbonate (CaCO3) addition in wastewater treatments reactors performance were investigated. Adding different concentrations of Fe(3+) (5, 10, 30 and 50mmol/m(3)), iron and CaCO3 powder led to changes in algal characteristics and physico-chemical and microbiological properties. According to the investigation results, nutrient removal efficiency in algae based reactors was obviously increased by the addition of 10mmol/m(3) Fe(3+), iron (5mmol/m(3)) and CaCO3 powder (0.2gm(-3)) and the removal efficiencies of BOD5, TN, and TP in Stage 2 were respectively increased by 28%, 8.9%, and 22%. The improvements in physico-chemical performances were verified by microbial community tests (bacteria quantity, activity and community measured in most probable number, extracellular enzymes activity, and Biolog Eco Plates). Microbial variations indicated the coexistence of Fe ions and carbonate-bicarbonate, which triggered the synergistic effect of physico-chemical action and microbial factors in algae based reactors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. India's iron and steel industry: Productivity, energy efficiency and carbon emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schumacher, Katja; Sathaye, Jayant

    1998-10-01

    Historical estimates of productivity growth in India's iron and steel sector vary from indicating an improvement to a decline in the sector's productivity. The variance may be traced to the time period of study, source of data for analysis, and type of indices and econometric specifications used for reporting productivity growth. The authors derive both growth accounting and econometric estimates of productivity growth for this sector. Their results show that over the observed period from 1973--74 to 1993--94 productivity declined by 1.71{percent} as indicated by the Translog index. Calculations of the Kendrick and Solow indices support this finding. Using a translog specification the econometric analysis reveals that technical progress in India's iron and steel sector has been biased towards the use of energy and material, while it has been capital and labor saving. The decline in productivity was caused largely by the protective policy regarding price and distribution of iron and steel as well as by large inefficiencies in public sector integrated steel plants. Will these trends continue into the future, particularly where energy use is concerned? Most likely they will not. The authors examine the current changes in structure and energy efficiency undergoing in the sector. Their analysis shows that with the liberalization of the iron and steel sector, the industry is rapidly moving towards world-best technology, which will result in fewer carbon emissions and more efficient energy use in existing and future plants.

  1. Pathways to a low-carbon iron and steel industry in the medium-term – the case of Germany

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arens, Marlene; Worrell, Ernst|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/106856715; Eichhammer, Wolfgang|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/412493780; Hasanbeigi, Ali; Zhang, Qi

    2017-01-01

    The iron and steel industry is a major industrial emitter of carbon dioxide globally and in Germany. If European and German climate targets were set as equal proportional reduction targets (referred to here as “flat” targets) among sectors, the German steel industry would have to reduce its carbon

  2. Pathways to a low-carbon iron and steel industry in the medium-term – the case of Germany

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arens, Marlene; Worrell, Ernst; Eichhammer, Wolfgang; Hasanbeigi, Ali; Zhang, Qi

    2016-01-01

    The iron and steel industry is a major industrial emitter of carbon dioxide globally and in Germany. If European and German climate targets were set as equal proportional reduction targets (referred to here as “flat” targets) among sectors, the German steel industry would have to reduce its carbon d

  3. Processes at interfaces: the effect of carbonate on the dissolution of iron and uranium oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grive, M.; Duro, L.; Bruno, J. [Enviros Spain, Pg. Rubi, 29-31, 08197- Valldoreix, Barcelona (Spain); Pablo, J. de [DEQ Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, 08028-Barcelona (Spain)

    2005-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Iron oxides and hydroxides can strongly affect the mobility of radionuclides and, in particular of uranium in oxic groundwaters. The iron cycle is one of the most dynamic systems in the geosphere. Precipitation and dissolution of iron(III) oxy-hydroxides is normally a fast process, and transformations of the ferric phases can lead to immobilisation-mobilization of the trace components associated to these solid phases. Therefore, the understanding of the effect of the different parameters affecting the dynamics of the iron(III) system is paramount to address the migration of the trace components affected by this system. One of the parameters that importantly affects the behaviour of iron(III) solids is carbonate. This ligand, besides forming strong complexes with some radionuclides such as uranium, also forms stable aqueous species with Fe(III). Although the uranium-carbonate complexation has been extensively studied, and the stability of the different species formed is well established, the speciation of Fe(III) in the presence of carbonate is not sufficiently well understood and, therefore, its effect on the mobilization of associated radionuclides is neither sufficiently well addressed. The work presented is focused on the understanding of the effect of carbonate in the solubility and kinetics of dissolution of iron(III) oxides. The results of laboratory experiments on the effect of carbonate on the solubility and kinetics of dissolution of ferri-hydrite and hematite are presented. From the interpretation of the experimental data, the following conclusions have been drawn: 1.- The solubility of ferri-hydrite and hematite is enhanced in the presence of CO{sub 2} mainly due to the formation of two different aqueous complexes, FeOHCO{sub 3} (aq) and Fe(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 3-} with the following stability constants: Fe{sup 3+} + yH{sub 2}O + zCO{sub 3}{sup 2-} {r_reversible} Fe(OH){sub y}(CO{sub 3}){sub z}{sup 3-y-2z} + y

  4. Preparation of iron oxide-impregnated spherical granular activated carbon-carbon composite and its photocatalytic removal of methylene blue in the presence of oxalic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadirova, Zukhra C; Hojamberdiev, Mirabbos; Katsumata, Ken-Ichi; Isobe, Toshihiro; Matsushita, Nobuhiro; Nakajima, Akira; Sharipov, Khasan; Okada, Kiyoshi

    2014-01-01

    The spherical granular activated carbon-carbon composites (GAC-Fe) with different iron oxide contents (Fe mass% = 0.6-10) were prepared by a pore volume impregnation method. The X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and N2-adsorption results confirm the presence of amorphous iron oxide, pyrolytic carbon, and graphitized globular carbon nanoparticles covered with amorphous carbon in the CAG-Fe. The rate of photodegradation of methylene blue (MB) in aqueous solution under UV light in the presence of oxalic acid correlates with porosity of the prepared materials. The total MB removal includes the combination of adsorption and photodegradation without the addition of H2O2. The results of total organic carbon (TOC) analysis reveal that the decolorization of MB in aqueous solution containing oxalic acid corresponds to the decomposition of organic compounds to CO2 and H2O.

  5. Low temperature magnetoresistance and magnetization studies of iron encapsulated multiwall carbon nanotube/polyvinyl chloride composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasanthkumar, M. S.; Sameera, I.; Bhatia, Ravi; Prasad, V.; Jayanna, H. S.

    2015-01-01

    We present the experimental results of temperature dependent magnetoresistance (MR) and the magnetization studies of iron encapsulated multiwall carbon nanotube (MWCNT)/polyvinyl chloride (PVC) composites with different wt% of MWCNTs. Transmission electron microscopy characterization shows that MWCNTs are encapsulated with rod-shaped iron nanoparticles of aspect ratio of ~3. The MR behavior of 1.9 wt% MWCNT/PVC sample shows dominance of forward scattering and wave function shrinkage whereas, weak localization and electron-electron interactions explain the MR data of higher wt% samples (9.1, 16.6 and 44.4 wt%). The composites of 4.7 and 9.1 wt% exhibit ferromagnetic behavior at all temperatures with room temperature coercivities of ~1036 and 628 Oe, respectively.

  6. Effect of accelerated carbonation and zero valent iron on metal leaching from bottom ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, M; Andreas, L; Lagerkvist, A

    2016-05-01

    About 85% of the ashes produced in Sweden originated from the incineration of municipal solid waste and biofuel. The rest comes from the thermal treatment of recycled wood, peat, charcoal and others. About 68% of all ashes annually produced in Sweden are used for constructions on landfills, mainly slopes, roads and embankments, and only 3% for construction of roads and working surfaces outside the landfills (SCB, 2013). Since waste bottom ash (BA) often has similar properties to crushed bedrock or gravel, it could be used for road constructions to a larger extent. However, the leaching of e.g. Cr, Cu, Mo, Pb and Zn can cause a threat to the surrounding environment if the material is used as it is. Carbonation is a commonly used pre-treatment method, yet it is not always sufficient. As leaching from aged ash is often controlled by adsorption to iron oxides, increasing the number of Fe oxide sorption sites can be a way to control the leaching of several critical elements. The importance of iron oxides as sorption sites for metals is known from both mineralogical studies of bottom ash and from the remediation of contaminated soil, where iron is used as an amendment. In this study, zero valent iron (Fe(0)) was added prior to accelerated carbonation in order to increase the number of adsorption sites for metals and thereby reduce leaching. Batch, column and pHstat leaching tests were performed and the leaching behaviour was evaluated with multivariate data analysis. It showed that leaching changed distinctly after the tested treatments, in particular after the combined treatment. Especially, the leaching of Cr and Cu clearly decreased as a result of accelerated carbonation. The combination of accelerated carbonation with Fe(0) addition reduced the leaching of Cr and Cu even further and reduced also the leaching of Mo, Zn, Pb and Cd compared to untreated BA. Compared with only accelerated carbonation, the Fe(0) addition significantly reduced the leaching of Cr, Cu and Mo

  7. Treatment of naphthalene derivatives with iron-carbon micro-electrolysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yu-ping; WANG Lian-jun; PENG Pan-ying; LU Tian-hong

    2006-01-01

    The degradation of five naphthalene derivatives in the simulated wastewater was investigated using the iron-carbon micro-electrolysis method. The optimal initial pH of solution and adsorption of iron-carbon and removal efficiency of the total organic carbon(TOC) were investigated. The results show that the removal efficiency of the naphthalene derivatives can reach 48.9%-92.6% and the removal efficiency of TOC is 42.8%-78.0% for the simulated wastewater with 200 mg/L naphthalene derivatives at optimal pH of 2.0-2.5 after 120 min treatment. The degradation of five naphthalene derivatives with the micro-electrolysis shows the apparent first-order kinetics and the order of removal efficiency of the naphthalene derivatives is sodium 2-naphthalenesulfonate, 2-naphthol, 2, 7-dihydroxynaphthalene, 1-naphthamine, 1-naphthol-8-sulfonic acid in turn. It is illustrated that the substituents of the naphthalene ring can affect the removal efficiency of naphthalene due to their electron-withdrawing or electron-donating ability.

  8. Carbon Solubility in Silicon-Iron-Bearing Metals during Core Formation on Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Kaaden, Kathleen E.; McCubbin, Francis M.; Ross, D. Kent; Rapp, Jennifer F.; Danielson, Lisa R.; Keller, Lindsay P.; Righter, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Recent results obtained from the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft showed the surface of Mercury has high S abundances (approximately 4 wt%) and low Iron(II) Oxide abundances (less than 2 wt%). Based on these extreme values, the oxygen fugacity of Mercury's surface materials was estimated to be approximately 3 to 7 log(sub 10) units below the IW buffer (Delta IW-3 to Delta IW-7). This highly reducing nature of the planet has resulted in a large core and relatively thin mantle, extending to only approximately 420 km depth (corresponding to a core-mantle boundary pressure of approximately 4-7 GPa) within the planet. Furthermore, MESSENGER results have suggested the presence of carbon on the surface of the planet. Previous experimental results from have also suggested the possibility of a primary floatation crust on Mercury composed of graphite, produced after a global magma ocean event. With these exotic conditions of this compositional end-member planet, it begs the question, what is the core composition of Mercury? Although no definitive conclusion has been reached, previous studies have made advances towards answering this question. Riner et al. and Chen et al. looked at iron sulfide systems and implemented various crystallization and layered core scenarios to try and determine the composition and structure of Mercury's core. Malavergne et al. examined core crystallization scenarios in the presence of sulfur and silicon. Hauck et al. used the most recent geophysical constraints from the MESSENGER spacecraft to model the internal structure of Mercury, including the core, in a iron-sulfur-silicon system. More recently, Chabot et al. conducted a series of metal-silicate partitioning experiments in a iron-sulfur-silicon system. These results showed the core of Mercury has the potential to contain more than 15 wt% silicon. However, with the newest results from MESSENGER's low altitude campaign, carbon is another

  9. Characterization and (10)Be content of iron carbonate concretions for genetic aspects - Weathering, desert varnish or burning: Rim effects in iron carbonate concretions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polgári, Márta; Bérczi, Szaniszló; Horiuchi, Kazuho; Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki; Kovács, Tibor; Józsa, Sándor; Bendő, Zsolt; Fintor, Krisztián; Fekete, József; Homonnay, Zoltán; Kuzmann, Ernő; Gucsik, Arnold; Gyollai, Ildikó; Kovács, János; Dódony, István

    2017-07-01

    The research investigated three iron carbonate (siderite) sedimentary concretions from Nagykovácsi, Úri and Délegyháza, Hungary. To identify possible source rocks and effects of the glaze-like exposed surface of the concretions, we carried on comparative petrological, mineralogical, geochemical and isotopic studies. The samples were microbially mediated siderite concretions with embedded metamorphous and igneous mineral clasts, and had specific rim belts characterized by semi-concentric outer Fe-oxide layers, fluffy pyrite-rich outer belts and siderite inner parts. We investigated the cross section of the Fe-carbonate concretions by independent methodologies in order to identify their rim effects. Their surficial oxide layers showed evidence of degassing of the exposed surface caused most probably by elevated temperatures. The inner rim pyrite belt in the concretions excluded the possibility of a prolonged wet surface environment. Microtextural and mineralogical features did not support desert varnish formation. (10)Be nuclide values of the Nagykovácsi and Uri concretions were far above the level of terrestrial in-situ cosmogenic nuclides, but they were consistent with the lowest levels for meteorites. Though the data were not conclusive to confirm any kind of known origin, they are contradictary, and open possibilities for a scenario of terrestrial meteorite origin. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Carbon-11 radiolabeling of iron-oxide nanoparticles for dual-modality PET/MR imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ramesh; Xu, Youwen; Kim, Sung Won; Schueller, Michael J.; Alexoff, David; Smith, S. David; Wang, Wei; Schlyer, David

    2013-07-01

    Dual-modality imaging, using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Positron Emission Tomography (PET) simultaneously, is a powerful tool to gain valuable information correlating structure with function in biomedicine. The advantage of this dual approach is that the strengths of one modality can balance the weaknesses of the other. However, success of this technique requires developing imaging probes suitable for both. Here, we report on the development of a nanoparticle labeling procedure via covalent bonding with carbon-11 PET isotope. Carbon-11 in the form of [11C]methyl iodide was used as a methylation agent to react with carboxylic acid (-COOH) and amine (-NH2) functional groups of ligands bound to the nanoparticles (NPs). The surface coating ligands present on superparamagnetic iron-oxide nanoparticles (SPIO NPs) were radiolabeled to achieve dual-modality PET/MR imaging capabilities. The proof-of-concept dual-modality PET/MR imaging using the radiolabeled SPIO NPs was demonstrated in an in vivo experiment.Dual-modality imaging, using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Positron Emission Tomography (PET) simultaneously, is a powerful tool to gain valuable information correlating structure with function in biomedicine. The advantage of this dual approach is that the strengths of one modality can balance the weaknesses of the other. However, success of this technique requires developing imaging probes suitable for both. Here, we report on the development of a nanoparticle labeling procedure via covalent bonding with carbon-11 PET isotope. Carbon-11 in the form of [11C]methyl iodide was used as a methylation agent to react with carboxylic acid (-COOH) and amine (-NH2) functional groups of ligands bound to the nanoparticles (NPs). The surface coating ligands present on superparamagnetic iron-oxide nanoparticles (SPIO NPs) were radiolabeled to achieve dual-modality PET/MR imaging capabilities. The proof-of-concept dual-modality PET/MR imaging using the radiolabeled

  11. Synthesis and characterization of iron-cobalt (FeCo) alloy nanoparticles supported on carbon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koutsopoulos, Sotiris; Barfod, Rasmus; Eriksen, Kim Michael

    2017-01-01

    of the alloy nanoparticles differed depending on the preparation method. When the wet impregnation technique of acetate precursor salts of Fe and Co were used for the synthesis, the size of FeCo alloy nanoparticles was approximately 13 nm. FeCo alloy nanoparticles were characterized by crystallography (XRD...... and mechanically stable for prolonged periods of time. AFM analysis showed that the FeCo nanoparticles were formed on the surface of the carrier. The results of this study suggest that using these easy and inexpensive synthetic methods iron-cobalt nanoparticles can be formed on carbon microparticles support...

  12. Simple and Precise Quantification of Iron Catalyst Content in Carbon Nanotubes Using UV/Visible Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Agustina, Elsye; Goak, Jeungchoon; Lee, Suntae; Seo, Youngho; Park, Jun-Young; Lee, Naesung

    2015-01-01

    Iron catalysts have been used widely for the mass production of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with high yield. In this study, UV/visible spectroscopy was used to determine the Fe catalyst content in CNTs using a colorimetric technique. Fe ions in solution form red–orange complexes with 1,10-phenanthroline, producing an absorption peak at λ=510 nm, the intensity of which is proportional to the solution Fe concentration. A series of standard Fe solutions were formulated to establish the relationship ...

  13. Iron-carbide cluster thermal dynamics for catalyzed carbon nanotube growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Feng; Bolton, Kim; Rosén, Arne

    2004-07-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been used to study the thermal behavior of FeN-mCm clusters where N, the total number of atoms, extends up to 2400. Comparison of the computed results with experimental data shows that the simulations yield the correct trends for the liquid-solid region of the iron-carbide phase diagram as well as the correct dependence of cluster melting point as a function of cluster size. The calculation indicates that, when carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are grown on large (>3-4 nm) catalyst particles at low temperatures (melting of the cluster. .

  14. Hematite Core Nanoparticles with Carbon Shell: Potential for Environmentally Friendly Production from Iron Mining Sludge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stević, Dragana; Mihajlović, Dijana; Kukobat, Radovan; Hattori, Yoshiyuki; Sagisaka, Kento; Kaneko, Katsumi; Atlagić, Suzana Gotovac

    2016-08-01

    Hematite nanoparticles with amorphous, yet relatively uniform carbon shell, were produced based exclusively on the waste sludge from the iron mine as the raw material. The procedure for acid digestion-based purification of the sludge with the full recovery of acid vapors and the remaining non-toxic rubble is described. Synthesis of the hematite nanoparticles was performed by the arrested precipitation method with cationic surfactant. The particles were thoroughly characterized and the potential of their economical production for the battery industry is indicated.

  15. Effects of iron-reducing bacteria on carbon steel corrosion induced by thermophilic sulfate-reducing consortia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia-Cantero, Eduardo; Peña-Cabriales, Juan José

    2014-02-28

    Four thermophilic bacterial species, including the iron-reducing bacterium Geobacillus sp. G2 and the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfotomaculum sp. SRB-M, were employed to integrate a bacterial consortium. A second consortium was integrated with the same bacteria, except for Geobacillus sp. G2. Carbon steel coupons were subjected to batch cultures of both consortia. The corrosion induced by the complete consortium was 10 times higher than that induced by the second consortium, and the ferrous ion concentration was consistently higher in iron-reducing consortia. Scanning electronic microscopy analysis of the carbon steel surface showed mineral films colonized by bacteria. The complete consortium caused profuse fracturing of the mineral film, whereas the non-iron-reducing consortium did not generate fractures. These data show that the iron-reducing activity of Geobacillus sp. G2 promotes fracturing of mineral films, thereby increasing steel corrosion.

  16. Formation mechanism of spheroidal carbide in ultra-low carbon ductile cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin-guo Fu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The formation mechanism of the spheroidal carbide in the ultra-low carbon ductile cast iron fabricated by the metal mold casting technique was systematically investigated. The results demonstrated that the spheroidal carbide belonged to eutectic carbide and crystallized in the isolated eutectic liquid phase area. The formation process of the spheroidal carbide was related to the contact and the intersection between the primary dendrite and the secondary dendrite of austenite. The oxides of magnesium, rare earths and other elements can act as heterogeneous nucleation sites for the spheroidal carbide. It was also found that the amount of the spheroidal carbide would increase with an increase in carbon content. The cooling rate has an important influence on the spheroidal carbide under the same chemical composition condition.

  17. Final Report: The Impact of Carbonate on Surface Protonation, Electron Transfer and Crystallization Reactions in Iron Oxide Nanoparticles and Colloids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, David Adams [The University of Alabama

    2013-07-02

    This project addresses key issues of importance in the geochemical behavior of iron oxides and in the geochemical cycling of carbon and iron. For Fe, we are specifically studying the influence of carbonate on electron transfer reactions, solid phase transformations, and the binding of carbonate to reactive sites on the edges of particles. The emphasis on carbonate arises because it is widely present in the natural environment, is known to bind strongly to oxide surfaces, is reactive on the time scales of interest, and has a speciation driven by acid-base reactions. The geochemical behavior of carbonate strongly influences global climate change and CO{sub 2} sequestration technologies. Our goal is to answer key questions with regards to specific site binding, electron transfer reactions, and crystallization reactions of iron oxides that impact both the geochemical cycling of iron and CO{sub 2} species. Our work is focused on the molecular level description of carbonate chemistry in solution including the prediction of isotope fractionation factors. We have also done work on critical atmospheric species.

  18. One-step synthesis of nitrogen-iron coordinated carbon nanotube catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Woongchul; Yang, Gang; Kim, Suk Lae; Liu, Peng; Sue, Hung-Jue; Yu, Choongho

    2016-05-01

    Prohibitively expensive precious metal catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) have been one of the major hurdles in a wide use of electrochemical cells. Recent significant efforts to develop precious metal free catalysts have resulted in excellent catalytic activities. However, complicated and time-consuming synthesis processes have negated the cost benefit. Moreover, detailed analysis about catalytically active sites and the role of each element in these high-performance catalysts containing nanomaterials for large surface areas are often lacking. Here we report a facile one-step synthesis method of nitrogen-iron coordinated carbon nanotube (CNT) catalysts without precious metals. Our catalysts show excellent long-term stability and onset ORR potential comparable to those of other precious metal free catalysts, and the maximum limiting current density from our catalysts is larger than that of the Pt-based catalysts. We carry out a series of synthesis and characterization experiments with/without iron and nitrogen in CNT, and identify that the coordination of nitrogen and iron in CNT plays a key role in achieving the excellent catalytic performances. We anticipate our one-step process could be used for mass production of precious metal free electrocatalysts for a wide range of electrochemical cells including fuel cells and metal-air batteries.

  19. Geochemical modeling of iron, sulfur, oxygen and carbon in a coastal plain aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, C.J.; Schoonen, M.A.A.; Candela, J.L.

    2000-01-01

    Fe(III) reduction in the Magothy aquifer of Long Island, NY, results in high dissolved-iron concentrations that degrade water quality. Geochemical modeling was used to constrain iron-related geochemical processes and redox zonation along a flow path. The observed increase in dissolved inorganic carbon is consistent with the oxidation of sedimentary organic matter coupled to the reduction of O2 and SO4/2- in the aerobic zone, and to the reduction of SO4/2- in the anaerobic zone; estimated rates of CO2 production through reduction of Fe(III) were relatively minor by comparison. The rates of CO2 production calculated from dissolved inorganic carbon mass transfer (2.55 x 10-4 to 48.6 x 10-4 mmol 1-1 yr-1) generally were comparable to the calculated rates of CO2 production by the combined reduction of O2, Fe(III) and SO4/2- (1.31 x 10-4 to 15 x 10-4 mmol 1-1 yr-1). The overall increase in SO4/2- concentrations along the flow path, together with the results of mass-balance calculations, and variations in ??34S values along the flow path indicate that SO4/2- loss through microbial reduction is exceeded by SO4/2- gain through diffusion from sediments and through the oxidation of FeS2. Geochemichal and microbial data on cores indicate that Fe(III) oxyhydroxide coatings on sediment grains in local, organic carbon- and SO4/2- -rich zones have localized SO4/2- -reducing zones in which the formation of iron disulfides been depleted by microbial reduction and resulted in decreases dissolved iron concentrations. These localized zones of SO4/2- reduction, which are important for assessing zones of low dissolved iron for water-supply development, could be overlooked by aquifer studies that rely only on groundwater data from well-water samples for geochemical modeling. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V.Fe(III) reduction in the Magothy aquifer of Long Island, NY, results in high dissolved-iron concentrations that degrade water quality. Geochemical modeling was used to constrain iron

  20. Preparation of carbon-encapsulated iron nanoparticles in high yield by DC arc discharge and their characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Fan [Department of Chemistry, School of Science, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Cui, Lan; Lin, Kui [Center of Analysis, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Jin, Feng-min; Wang, Bin [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Shi, Shu-xiu [Department of Chemistry, School of Science, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Yang, De-an [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Wang, Hui [Center of Analysis, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); He, Fei [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Chen, Xiao-ping [Center of Analysis, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Cui, Shen, E-mail: cuishen@tju.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, School of Science, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2013-03-15

    Highlights: ► CEINPs with core–shell structure and high Fe content were prepared in high yield by DC arc discharge. ► The anode II with a mass ratio of total iron to carbon 8:1 was used in DC arc discharge. ► The possible process of formation of CEINPs is briefly discussed. ► The uniformity of composition of anode is very important for the formation of CEINPs. ► The MEF and MMF of iron element may also play an important role in the formation of CEINPs. -- Abstract: Carbon-encapsulated iron nanoparticles (CEINPs) were prepared by DC arc discharge under nitrogen atmosphere of high temperature. The products were characterized by transmission electron microscope (TEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM), X-ray diffractometer (XRD), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscope, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscope (XPS), and their magnetic properties were measured by physical property measurement system (PPMS). The product B{sub I}, obtained from the anode I, contains the nanoparticles of iron and iron carbide, and carbon coating with imperfect and disordered layer structure. The product B{sub II}, obtained from the anode II, mainly consists of CEINPs, whose cores mainly consist of iron and iron carbide and shells contain about 3–7 graphitic layers. The iron contents in the products B{sub I} and B{sub II} are 44.8 and 82.6 wt.%, respectively. The products B{sub I} and B{sub II} have similar phase composition which includes carbon, iron, iron carbide, ferrous and ferric oxide, iron nitride, and carbon nitride. The saturation magnetization (Ms) of the products B{sub I} and B{sub II} are 29.35 and 88.66 emu/g and their coercivity (Hc) are 220 and 240 Oe, respectively. The total yields of all the products formed in the arc discharge chamber from anodes I and II, except for the cylinder-shaped deposits formed on the top of the cathode, are 25.8 and 22.3 wt.%, respectively. The possible process of formation of CEINPs is briefly discussed on

  1. Water equivalent thickness values of materials used in beams of protons, helium, carbon and iron ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Rui; Newhauser, Wayne D [Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Texas at Houston, 6767 Bertner, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Taddei, Phillip J [Department of Radiation Physics, Unit 1202, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Fitzek, Markus M [Midwest Proton Radiotherapy Institute, 2425 Milo B Sampson Lane, Bloomington, IN 47408 (United States)], E-mail: wnewhaus@mdanderson.org

    2010-05-07

    Heavy charged particle beam radiotherapy for cancer is of increasing interest because it delivers a highly conformal radiation dose to the target volume. Accurate knowledge of the range of a heavy charged particle beam after it penetrates a patient's body or other materials in the beam line is very important and is usually stated in terms of the water equivalent thickness (WET). However, methods of calculating WET for heavy charged particle beams are lacking. Our objective was to test several simple analytical formulas previously developed for proton beams for their ability to calculate WET values for materials exposed to beams of protons, helium, carbon and iron ions. Experimentally measured heavy charged particle beam ranges and WET values from an iterative numerical method were compared with the WET values calculated by the analytical formulas. In most cases, the deviations were within 1 mm. We conclude that the analytical formulas originally developed for proton beams can also be used to calculate WET values for helium, carbon and iron ion beams with good accuracy.

  2. Removal of Trace Arsenic to Meet Drinking Water Standards Using Iron Oxide Coated Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntim, Susana Addo; Mitra, Somenath

    2011-05-12

    This study presents the removal of trace level arsenic to meet drinking water standards using an iron oxide-multi-walled carbon nanotube (Fe-MWCNT) hybrid as a sorbent. The synthesis was facilitated by the high degree of nanotube functionalization using a microwave assisted process, and a controlled assembly of iron oxide was possible where the MWCNT served as an effective support for the oxide. In the final product, 11 % of the carbon atoms were attached to Fe. The Fe-MWCNT was effective in arsenic removal to below the drinking water standard levels of 10 µg L(-1). The absorption capacity of the composite was 1723 µg g(-1) and 189 µg g(-1) for As(III) and As(V) respectively. The adsorption of As(V) on Fe-MWCNT was faster than that of As(III). The pseudo-second order rate equation was found to effectively describe the kinetics of arsenic adsorption. The adsorption isotherms for As(III) and As(V) fitted both the Langmuir and Freundlich models.

  3. Ameliorated Austenite Carbon Content Control in Austempered Ductile Irons by Support Vector Regression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan-Yun Yang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Austempered ductile iron has emerged as a notable material in several engineering fields, including marine applications. The initial austenite carbon content after austenization transform but before austempering process for generating bainite matrix proved critical in controlling the resulted microstructure and thus mechanical properties. In this paper, support vector regression is employed in order to establish a relationship between the initial carbon concentration in the austenite with austenization temperature and alloy contents, thereby exercising improved control in the mechanical properties of the austempered ductile irons. Particularly, the paper emphasizes a methodology tailored to deal with a limited amount of available data with intrinsically contracted and skewed distribution. The collected information from a variety of data sources presents another challenge of highly uncertain variance. The authors present a hybrid model consisting of a procedure of a histogram equalizer and a procedure of a support-vector-machine (SVM- based regression to gain a more robust relationship to respond to the challenges. The results show greatly improved accuracy of the proposed model in comparison to two former established methodologies. The sum squared error of the present model is less than one fifth of that of the two previous models.

  4. Arsenic transformation and adsorption by iron hydroxide/manganese dioxide doped straw activated carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Ying; Tong, Qiang; Shan, Weijun; Xing, Zhiqiang; Wang, Yuejiao; Wen, Siqi; Lou, Zhenning

    2017-09-01

    Iron hydroxide/manganese dioxide doped straw activated carbon was synthesized for As(III) adsorption. The Fe-Mn-SAc adsorbent has two advantages, on the one hand, the straw active carbon has a large surface area (1360.99 m2 g-1) for FeOOH and MnO2 deposition, on the other hand, the manganese dioxide has oxidative property as a redox potential of (MnO2 + H+)/Mn2+, which could convert As(III) into As(V). Combined with the arsenic species after reacting with Fe-Mn-SAc, the As(III) transformation and adsorption mechanism was discussed. H2AsO4-oxidized from As(III) reacts with the Fe-Mn-SAc by electrostatic interaction, and unoxidized As(III) as H3AsO3 reacts with SAc and/or iron oxide surface by chelation effect. The adsorption was well-described by Langmuir isotherms model, and the adsorption capacity of As(III) was 75.82 mg g-1 at pH 3. Therefore, considering the straw as waste biomass material, the biosorbent (Fe-Mn-SAc) is promising to be exploited for applications in the treatment of industrial wastewaters containing a certain ratio of arsenic and germanium.

  5. Water equivalent thickness values of materials used in beams of protons, helium, carbon and iron ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Taddei, Phillip J; Fitzek, Markus M; Newhauser, Wayne D

    2010-05-07

    Heavy charged particle beam radiotherapy for cancer is of increasing interest because it delivers a highly conformal radiation dose to the target volume. Accurate knowledge of the range of a heavy charged particle beam after it penetrates a patient's body or other materials in the beam line is very important and is usually stated in terms of the water equivalent thickness (WET). However, methods of calculating WET for heavy charged particle beams are lacking. Our objective was to test several simple analytical formulas previously developed for proton beams for their ability to calculate WET values for materials exposed to beams of protons, helium, carbon and iron ions. Experimentally measured heavy charged particle beam ranges and WET values from an iterative numerical method were compared with the WET values calculated by the analytical formulas. In most cases, the deviations were within 1 mm. We conclude that the analytical formulas originally developed for proton beams can also be used to calculate WET values for helium, carbon and iron ion beams with good accuracy.

  6. Magnetic graphene-carbon nanotube iron nanocomposites as adsorbents and antibacterial agents for water purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Virender K; McDonald, Thomas J; Kim, Hyunook; Garg, Vijayendra K

    2015-11-01

    One of the biggest challenges of the 21st century is to provide clean and affordable water through protecting source and purifying polluted waters. This review presents advances made in the synthesis of carbon- and iron-based nanomaterials, graphene-carbon nanotubes-iron oxides, which can remove pollutants and inactivate virus and bacteria efficiently in water. The three-dimensional graphene and graphene oxide based nanostructures exhibit large surface area and sorption sites that provide higher adsorption capacity to remove pollutants than two-dimensional graphene-based adsorbents and other conventional adsorbents. Examples are presented to demonstrate removal of metals (e.g., Cu, Pb, Cr(VI), and As) and organics (e.g., dyes and oil) by grapheme-based nanostructures. Inactivation of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial species (e.g., Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus) is also shown. A mechanism involving the interaction of adsorbents and pollutants is briefly discussed. Magnetic graphene-based nanomaterials can easily be separated from the treated water using an external magnet; however, there are challenges in implementing the graphene-based nanotechnology in treating real water.

  7. Acrylic acid-allylpolyethoxy carboxylate copolymer dispersant for calcium carbonate and iron(III) hydroxide scales in cooling water systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Guangqing; Huang, Jingyi; Zhou, Yuming; Yao, Qingzhao; Ling, Lei; Zhang, Peixin; Fu, Change [Southeast Univ., Nanjing (China). School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering; Wu, Wendao; Sun, Wei; Hu, Zhengjun [Jianghai Chemical Co., Ltd., Changzhou (China)

    2012-05-15

    A novel environmentally friendly type of calcium carbonate and iron(III) scale inhibitor (ALn) was synthesized. The anti-scale property of the Acrylic acid-allylpolyethoxy carboxylate copolymer (AA-APELn or ALn) towards CaCO{sub 3} and iron(III) in the artificial cooling water was studied through static scale inhibition tests. The observation shows that both calcium carbonate and iron(III) inhibition increase with increasing the degree of polymerization of ALn from 5 to 15, and the dosage of ALn plays an important role on calcium carbonate and iron(III)-inhibition. The effect on formation of CaCO{sub 3} was investigated with a combination of scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) analysis and Fourier transform infrared spectrometer, respectively. The results showed that the ALn copolymer not only influences calcium carbonate crystal morphology and crystal size but also the crystallinity. The crystallization of CaCO{sub 3} in the absence of inhibitor was rhombohedral calcite crystal, whereas a mixture of calcite with vaterite crystals was found in the presence of the ALn copolymer. Inhibition mechanism is proposed that the interactions between calcium or iron ions and polyethylene glycol (PEG) are the fundamental impetus to restrain the formation of the scale in cooling water systems. (orig.)

  8. Corrosion Inhibiting Mechanism of Nitrite Ion on the Passivation of Carbon Steel and Ductile Cast Iron for Nuclear Power Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. T. Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available While NaNO2 addition can greatly inhibit the corrosion of carbon steel and ductile cast iron, in order to improve the similar corrosion resistance, ca. 100 times more NaNO2 addition is needed for ductile cast iron compared to carbon steel. A corrosion and inhibition mechanism is proposed whereby NO2- ion is added to oxidize. The NO2- ion can be reduced to nitrogen compounds and these compounds may be absorbed on the surface of graphite. Therefore, since nitrite ion needs to oxidize the surface of matrix and needs to passivate the galvanic corroded area and since it is absorbed on the surface of graphite, a greater amount of corrosion inhibitor needs to be added to ductile cast iron compared to carbon steel. The passive film of carbon steel and ductile cast iron, formed by NaNO2 addition showed N-type semiconductive properties and its resistance, is increased; the passive current density is thus decreased and the corrosion rate is then lowered. In addition, the film is mainly composed of iron oxide due to the oxidation by NO2- ion; however, regardless of the alloys, nitrogen compounds (not nitrite were detected at the outermost surface but were not incorporated in the inner oxide.

  9. Enhanced cathode performance of nano-sized lithium iron phosphate composite using polytetrafluoroethylene as carbon precursor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avci, Ercan

    2014-12-01

    Herein we report a facile and efficient solid state synthesis of carbon coated lithium iron phosphate (LiFePO4/C) cathode material achieved through the pyrolysis of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). The current investigation is comparatively analyzed with the results of the composites of LiFePO4/C (LFP/C) synthesized using polystyrene-block-polybutadiene (PS-b-PBD), polyethyhylene (PE) and sucrose as carbon precursors. The optimized LFP/CPTFE composite is synthesized at 700 °C using 10 wt.% PTFE. The composite exhibits remarkable improvement in capacity, cyclability and rate capability compared to those of LFP/C synthesized using (PS-b-PBD), PE and sucrose. The specific discharge capacities as high as 166 mA h g-1 (theoretical capacity: 170 mA h g-1) at 0.2 C and 114 mA h g-1 at 10 C rates were achieved with LFP/CPTFE. In addition, the composite exhibits a long-term cycling stability with the capacity loss of only 11.4% after 1000 cycles. PTFE shifts the size distribution of the composite to nanometer scale (approximately 120 nm), however the addition of sucrose and other polymers do not have such an effect. According to TEM and XPS analysis, LFP/CPTFE particles are mostly coated with a few nanometers thick carbon layer forming a core-shell structure. Residual carbon does not contain fluorine.

  10. Thick-shelled, grazer-protected diatoms decouple ocean carbon and silicon cycles in the iron-limited Antarctic Circumpolar Current

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Assmy, P.; Smetacek, V.; Klaas, C.; Henjes, J.; Strass, V.H.; Arrieta, J.M.; Bathmann, U.; Cisewski, B.; Fuchs, N.; Herndl, G.J.

    2013-01-01

    Diatoms of the iron-replete continental margins and North Atlantic are key exporters of organic carbon. In contrast, diatoms of the iron-limited Antarctic Circumpolar Current sequester silicon, but comparatively little carbon, in the underlying deep ocean and sediments. Because the Southern Ocean is

  11. Transport of zero-valent iron nanoparticles in carbonate-rich porous aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laumann, S.; Micic, V.; Hofmann, T.

    2012-04-01

    Use of nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) for in situ dechlorination of chlorinated solvents in groundwater is a promising remediation technology, due to a high dechlorination efficiency of nZVI and possible applications in e.g., great depth or under above-ground infrastructure. The success of the in situ nZVI dechlorination strongly depends on the particle delivery to the contaminants. Previous studies reported a limited transport of nZVI through porous media (cm- to dm-range) and this has been recognized as one of the major obstacles in a widespread utilization of this technology (TRATNYEK & JOHNSON, 2006). Factors that limit the transport are particle aggregation and deposition onto the aquifer solids. Both depend on particle properties (e.g., size, shape, iron content, surface coating, surface charge), on concentrations of suspensions, and on site-specific parameters, such as the groundwater chemistry and the properties and inhomogeneity of the aquifer material. Adsorbed anionic polyelectrolyte coatings provide electrostatic double layer repulsions between negatively charged nZVI particles (SALEH ET AL., 2007), hindering their aggregation and also deposition on the negatively charged quartz surfaces (usually prevailing in aquifers). However, it is shown that the presence of surface charge heterogeneities in the aquifer effects the particle transport (JOHNSON ET AL., 1996). Carbonates, iron oxides, and the edges of clay minerals, for instance, carry a positive surface charge at neutral pH (often encountered in groundwater). This leads to a favorable deposition of negatively charged nZVI particles onto carbonates, metal oxide impurities or clay edges, and finally to a decreased particle transport. Considering the high proportion of carbonates commonly encountered in Alpine porous aquifers, in this study we aimed to evaluate the transport of commercially available polyelectrolyte coated nZVI (polyacrylic acid coated-nZVI, NANOIRON s.r.o., CZ) in both quartz and

  12. Carbon-bearing iron phases and the carbon isotope composition of the deep Earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horita, Juske; Polyakov, Veniamin B

    2015-01-06

    The carbon budget and dynamics of the Earth's interior, including the core, are currently very poorly understood. Diamond-bearing, mantle-derived rocks show a very well defined peak at δ(13)C ≈ -5 ± 3‰ with a very broad distribution to lower values (∼-40‰). The processes that have produced the wide δ(13)C distributions to the observed low δ(13)C values in the deep Earth have been extensively debated, but few viable models have been proposed. Here, we present a model for understanding carbon isotope distributions within the deep Earth, involving Fe-C phases (Fe carbides and C dissolved in Fe-Ni metal). Our theoretical calculations show that Fe and Si carbides can be significantly depleted in (13)C relative to other C-bearing materials even at mantle temperatures. Thus, the redox freezing and melting cycles of lithosphere via subduction upwelling in the deep Earth that involve the Fe-C phases can readily produce diamond with the observed low δ(13)C values. The sharp contrast in the δ(13)C distributions of peridotitic and eclogitic diamonds may reflect differences in their carbon cycles, controlled by the evolution of geodynamical processes around 2.5-3 Ga. Our model also predicts that the core contains C with low δ(13)C values and that an average δ(13)C value of the bulk Earth could be much lower than ∼-5‰, consistent with those of chondrites and other planetary body. The heterogeneous and depleted δ(13)C values of the deep Earth have implications, not only for its accretion-differentiation history but also for carbon isotope biosignatures for early life on the Earth.

  13. The effect of induced anoxia and reoxygenation on benthic fluxes of organic carbon, phosphate, iron, and manganese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoog, Annelie C; Arias-Esquivel, Victor A

    2009-11-15

    Eutrophication causes seasonally anoxic bottom waters in coastal environments, but we lack information on effects of onset of anoxia and subsequent reoxygenation on benthic fluxes of redox-sensitive minerals and associated organic carbon (OC). As the first study, we determined the effect of inducing anoxia and subsequently restoring oxic conditions in mesocosms with surface sediment and water from a coastal environment. These concentration changes were compared with those in an oxygenated control. We determined water column concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), particulate organic carbon (POC), iron, manganese, and phosphate. Benthic fluxes of DOC, POC, and iron increased at the onset of anoxia in oxygen-depleted treatments. DOC and iron concentrations increased concomitantly towards maxima, which may have indicated reductive dissolution of FeOOH and release of associated OC. The subsequent concomitant concentration decreases may have been the result of coprecipitation of OC with iron-containing minerals. In contrast, the phosphate-concentration increase occurred several days after the onset of anoxia and the manganese concentration was not affected by the onset of anoxia. Restoring oxic conditions resulted in a decrease in DOC, POC, and phosphate concentrations, which may indicate coprecipitation of OC with phosphate-containing minerals. The high DOC fluxes at the onset of anoxia indicate that redox oscillations may be important in OC degradation. Further, our results indicate a close coupling between OC cycling and dissolution/precipitation of iron-containing minerals in intermittently anoxic sediments.

  14. Gold catalysts supported on nanosized iron oxide for low-temperature oxidation of carbon monoxide and formaldehyde

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zheng; Zhang, Weidong; Li, Yi; Huang, Zuming; Guo, Huishan; Wu, Feng; Li, Jinjun

    2016-02-01

    This study aimed to optimize synthesis of gold catalyst supported on nanosized iron oxide and to evaluate the activity in oxidation of carbon monoxide and formaldehyde. Nanosized iron oxide was prepared from a colloidal dispersion of hydrous iron oxide through a dispersion-precipitation method. Gold was adsorbed onto nanosized iron oxide under self-generated basic conditions. Characterization results indicate that the iron oxide consisted of hematite/maghemite composite with primary particle sizes of 6-8 nm. Gold was highly dispersed on the surface of the support. The catalysts showed good activity in the oxidation of airborne carbon monoxide and formaldehyde. The optimal pH for their synthesis was ∼7. The catalytic performance could be enhanced by extending the adsorption time of gold species on the support within 21 h. The optimized catalyst was capable of achieving complete oxidation of 1% carbon monoxide at -20 °C and 33% conversion of 450 ppm formaldehyde at ambient temperature. The catalyst may be applicable to indoor air purification.

  15. Probing the Interfacial Interaction in Layered-Carbon-Stabilized Iron Oxide Nanostructures: A Soft X-ray Spectroscopic Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Liu, Jinyin; Zhao, Guanqi; Gao, Yongjun; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Glans, Per-Anders; Guo, Jinghua; Ma, Ding; Sun, Xu-Hui; Zhong, Jun

    2015-04-22

    We have stabilized the iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) of various sizes on layered carbon materials (Fe-oxide/C) that show excellent catalytic performance. From the characterization of X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES), scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) and X-ray magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy (XMCD), a strong interfacial interaction in the Fe-oxide/C hybrids has been observed between the small iron oxide NPs and layered carbon in contrast to the weak interaction in the large iron oxide NPs. The interfacial interaction between the NPs and layered carbon is found to link with the improved catalytic performance. In addition, the Fe L-edge XMCD spectra show that the large iron oxide NPs are mainly γ-Fe2O3 with a strong ferromagnetic property, whereas the small iron oxide NPs with strong interfacial interaction are mainly α-Fe2O3 or amorphous Fe2O3 with a nonmagnetic property. The results strongly suggest that the interfacial interaction plays a key role for the catalytic performance, and the experimental findings may provide guidance toward rational design of high-performance catalysts.

  16. Selective catalytic reduction of sulfur dioxide by carbon monoxide over iron oxide supported on activated carbon

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The selective reduction of sulfur dioxide with carbon monoxide to elemental sulfur was studied over AC-supported transition-metal oxide catalysts. According to the study, Fe2O3/AC was the most active catalyst among the 4 AC-supported catalysts tested. By using Fe2O3/AC, the best catalyst, when the feed conditions were properly optimized (CO/SO2 molar ratio = 2:1; sulfidation temperature, 400 °C; Fe content, 20 wt%; GHSV = 7000 mL g-1 h-1), 95.43% sulfur dioxide conversion and 86.59% sulfur yi...

  17. Simple-Cubic Carbon Frameworks with Atomically Dispersed Iron Dopants toward High-Efficiency Oxygen Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Biwei; Wang, Xinxia; Zou, Jinxiang; Yan, Yancui; Xie, Songhai; Hu, Guangzhi; Li, Yanguang; Dong, Angang

    2017-03-08

    Iron and nitrogen codoped carbons (Fe-N-C) have attracted increasingly greater attention as electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Although challenging, the synthesis of Fe-N-C catalysts with highly dispersed and fully exposed active sites is of critical importance for improving the ORR activity. Here, we report a new type of graphitic Fe-N-C catalysts featuring numerous Fe single atoms anchored on a three-dimensional simple-cubic carbon framework. The Fe-N-C catalyst, derived from self-assembled Fe3O4 nanocube superlattices, was prepared by in situ ligand carbonization followed by acid etching and ammonia activation. Benefiting from its homogeneously dispersed and fully accessible active sites, highly graphitic nature, and enhanced mass transport, our Fe-N-C catalyst outperformed Pt/C and many previously reported Fe-N-C catalysts for ORR. Furthermore, when used for constructing the cathode for zinc-air batteries, our Fe-N-C catalyst exhibited current and power densities comparable to those of the state-of-the-art Pt/C catalyst.

  18. Additive-Driven Self-Assembly of Well Ordered Mesoporous Carbon/Iron Oxide Nanoparticle Composites for Supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ying; Wang, Xinyu; Qian, Gang; Watkins, James; Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, University of Massachusetts Amherst Team

    2014-03-01

    Supercapacitors have attracted significant attention as energy storage devices for applications to meet the requirements of fast charge and discharge, high power density, and long cycle life. Recent research efforts demonstrate that the metal oxide- mesoporous carbon nanocomposite materials are indeed a class of promising electrode materials for high performance supercapacitors. However several major drawbacks for metal oxide-carbon nanocomposite materials remain, such as relatively low loadings of the metal oxide, aggregation of nanoparticles, and the lack of an ordered mesoporous structure. Here we demonstrate that well ordered mesoporous carbon/iron oxide composites can be prepared through simple carbonization of blends of block copolymers serving as the source of carbon and a porogen, e.g., poly(t-butyl acrylate)-block-polyacrylonitrile (PtBA-b-PAN), and iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs). Strong interactions between phenol-functionalized iron oxide NPs and polyacrylonitrile result in a preferential dispersion of the nanoparticles within the PAN domains and leads to ordered nanostructured mesoporous carbon framework containing upto 30 wt This work was supported by the NSF Center for Hierarchical Manufacturing at the University of Massachusetts (CMMI-1025020).

  19. Effect of hydrogen on the mechanical behaviour of carbon-alloyed Fe3Al-based iron aluminides

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Sen; R Balasubramaniam

    2002-06-01

    The effect of hydrogen on the mechanical behaviour of two carbon-alloyed iron aluminides was studied. Weakening of some carbide–metal interfaces in the presence of hydrogen was indicated. The effect of cathodic hydrogen charging on the microstructure has also been addressed.

  20. Synthesis of iron-based chemical looping sorbents integrated with pH swing carbon mineral sequestration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyung Ray; Lee, Dong Hyun; Fan, Liang-Shih; Park, Ah-Hyung Alissa

    2009-12-01

    The previously developed pH swing carbon mineral sequestration immobilizes the gaseous CO2 into a thermodynamically stable solid, MgCO3, using Mg-bearing minerals such as serpentine. This mineral carbonation technology is particularly promising since it generates value-added solid products: high surface area silica, iron oxide, and magnesium carbonate, while providing a safe and permanent storage option for CO2. By carefully controlling the pH of the system, these solids products can be produced with high purity. This study focuses on the synthesis of iron oxide particles as a chemical looping sorbent in order to achieve the integration between carbon capture and storage technologies. Since the solubility of Fe in aqueous phase is relatively low at neutral pH, the effect of the weak acid and chelating agents on the extraction of Fe from serpentine was investigated. The synthesized iron-based chemical looping sorbent was found to be as effective as commercially available iron oxide nanoparticles at converting syngas into high purity H2, while producing a sequestration-ready CO2 stream.

  1. Heterogeneous catalytic ozonation of dibutyl phthalate in aqueous solution in the presence of iron-loaded activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yuanxing; Cui, Chenchen; Zhang, Daofang; Li, Liang; Pan, Ding

    2015-01-01

    Iron-loaded activated carbon was prepared and used as catalyst in heterogeneous catalytic ozonation of dibutyl phthalate (DBP). The catalytic activity of iron-loaded activated carbon was investigated under various conditions and the mechanisms of DBP removal were deduced. Characterization of catalyst indicated that the iron loaded on activated carbon was mainly in the form of goethite, which reduced its surface area, pore volume and pore diameter. The presence of metals on activated carbon positively contributed to its catalytic activity in ozonation of DBP. Iron loading content of 15% and initial water pH of 8 achieved highest DBP removal among all the tried conditions. Catalyst dosage of 10 mg L(-1) led to approximately 25% of increase in DBP (initial concentration 2 mg L(-1)) removal in 60 min as compared with ozone alone, and when catalyst dosage increased to 100 mg L(-1), the DBP removal was further improved by 46%. Based on a comparison of reaction rates for direct and indirect transformation of DBP, the increased removal of DBP in this study likely occurred via transformation of ozone into hydroxyl radicals on the catalyst surface.

  2. Synthesis of binary iron-carbon nanoparticles by UV laser photolysis of Fe(CO)5 with various hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eremin, A. V.; Gurentsov, E. V.; Musikhin, S. A.

    2016-10-01

    In this study the laser photolysis of the mixtures containing vapors of various hydrocarbons and iron pentacarbonyl was implemented to nanoparticle formation. The radiation source used for photo-dissociation of precursors was a pulsed Nd:Yag laser operated at a wavelength of 266 nm. Under UV radiation the molecules of Fe(CO)5 decomposed, forming atomic iron vapor and unsaturated carbonyls at well-known and readily controllable parameters. The subsequent condensation of supersaturated metal vapor resulted in small iron clusters and nanoparticles formation. The growth process of the nanoparticles was observed by a method of laser light extinction. Laser induced incandescence technique was applied for particle sizing during the process of their formation. Additionally nanoparticle samples were investigated by a transmission electron microscope. The particle size distribution was measured by statistical treatment of microphotographs. The elemental analysis by energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and electron diffraction pattern gave the composition and structure of nanoparticles. The core-shell iron-carbon nanoparticles were synthesized by joint laser photolysis of iron pentacarbonyl with benzene and acetylene. The photolysis of the mixtures of toluene, butanol and methane with iron pentacarbonyl revealed in a pure iron particles formation which fast oxidized in air when were extracted out of the reactor.

  3. Synthesis and Electrochemical Lithium Storage Behavior of Carbon Nanotubes Filled with Iron Sulfide Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wan-Jing; Liu, Chang; Zhang, Lili; Hou, Peng-Xiang; Li, Feng; Zhang, Bao; Cheng, Hui-Ming

    2016-10-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) filled with iron sulfide nanoparticles (NPs) are prepared by inserting sulfur and ferrocene into the hollow core of CNTs followed by heat treatment. It is found that pyrrhotite-11T iron sulfide (Fe-S) NPs with an average size of ≈15 nm are encapsulated in the tubular cavity of the CNTs (Fe-S@CNTs), and each particle is a single crystal. When used as the anode material of lithium-ion batteries, the Fe-S@CNT material exhibits excellent electrochemical lithium storage performance in terms of high reversible capacity, good cyclic stability, and desirable rate capability. In situ transmission electron microscopy studies show that the CNTs not only play an essential role in accommodating the volume expansion of the Fe-S NPs but also provide a fast transport path for Li ions. The results demonstrate that CNTs act as a unique nanocontainer and reactor that permit the loading and formation of electrochemically active materials with desirable electrochemical lithium storage performance. CNTs with their superior structural stability and Li-ion transfer kinetics are responsible for the improved rate capability and cycling performance of Fe-S NPs in CNTs.

  4. Effect of cerium addition on microstructures of carbon-alloyed iron aluminides

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Sriram; R Balasubramaniam; M N Mungole; S Bharagava; R G Baligidad

    2005-10-01

    The effect of Ce addition on the microstructure of carbon-alloyed Fe3Al-based intermetallic has been studied. Three different alloys of composition, Fe–18.5Al–3.6C, Fe–20.0Al–2.0C and Fe–19.2Al–3.3C–0.07Ce (in at%), were prepared by electroslag remelting process. Their microstructures were characterized using optical and scanning electron microscopies. Stereological methods were utilized to understand the observed microstructures. All the alloys exhibited a typical two-phase microstructure consisting of Fe3AlC carbides in an iron aluminide matrix. In the alloy without Ce addition, large bulky carbides were equally distributed throughout the matrix with many smaller precipitates interspersed in between. In the alloy with Ce addition, the carbide grain sizes were finer and uniformly distributed throughout the matrix. The effect of Ce addition on the carbide morphology has been explained based on the known effect of Ce in modifying carbide morphology in cast irons.

  5. CO2 hydrogenation to hydrocarbons over iron nanoparticles supported on oxygen-functionalized carbon nanotubes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ly May Chew; Holger Ruland; Hendrik J Schulte; Wei Xia; Martin Muhler

    2014-03-01

    Hydrogenation of CO2 to hydrocarbons over iron nanoparticles supported on oxygenfunctionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes was studied in a fixed-bed U-tube reactor at 25 bar with a H2:CO2 ratio of 3. Conversion of CO2 was approximately 35% yielding C1-C5 products at 360°C with methane and CO as major products. The CO2 equilibrium conversion for temperatures in the range of 320° to 420°C was analysed by using CHEMCAD simulation software. Comparison between experimental and simulated degrees of CO2 conversion shows that reverse water gas shift equilibrium had been achieved in the investigated temperature range and that less than 47% of CO2 can be converted to CO at 420°C.

  6. Influence of substitutional atoms on the Snoek peak of carbon in b.c.c. iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saitoh, Hajime; Yoshinaga, Naoki; Ushioda, Kohsaku

    2004-03-08

    The influence of substitutional atoms (Mn, P, Si, Al, Cr, Co) on the C Snoek peak in b.c.c. iron was investigated. In the dilute range of the substitutes, the addition of Co, Mn, Cr, Si, P and Al resulted in the decreases in Snoek peak height in this ascending order. However, the addition of Mn to the Fe-C-P alloy hardly changes Snoek peak height. There is even a case that Snoek peak height is increased by further Mn addition to this alloy. They can be explained systematically by the proposed model wherein the solute carbon present in the influence region where the lattice distortion around the substitute is greater than the threshold value cannot contribute to the Snoek peak. The strain field generated by a substitutional atom due to the difference in atomic size is concluded to be the main reason for the reduction in Snoek peak height.

  7. Thermodynamics of chromium and iron in carbonate salts at 650(0)C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, H. S.; Devan, J. H.

    1985-05-01

    Chemical equilibria of chromium and iron in Li2CO3-K2CO3 were investigated in conjunction with corrosion studies of current collector materials for molten-carbonate fuel cells. The SOLGASMIX-PV computer program was used to perform thermochemical calculations to establish equilibrium phase relationships under various gas atmospheres at 650(0)C. Phase stability diagrams were constructed for the systems Cr-Li-C-O, Cr-K-C-O, Cr-Li-K-C-O, Fe-Li-C-O, Fe-K-C-O, and Fe-Li-K-C-O at 650(0)C. These predicted phase relationships were checked experimentally by thermogravimetric analysis, differential thermal analysis, and X-ray diffraction. The experimental results generally confirmed that reaction paths were consistent with the calculated phase stability diagrams.

  8. Methods to Predict Stresses in Cutting Inserts Brazed Using Iron-Carbon Brazing Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konovodov, V. V.; Valentov, A. V.; Retuynskiy, O. Yu; Esekuev, Sh B.

    2016-04-01

    This work describes a method for predicting residual and operating stresses in a flat-form tool insert made of tungsten free carbides brazed using iron-carbon alloy. According to the studies’ results it is concluded that the recommendations relating to the limitation of a melting point of tool brazing alloys (950-1100°C according to different data) are connected with a negative impact on tools as a composite made of dissimilar materials rather than on hard alloys as a tool material. Due to the cooling process stresses inevitably occur in the brazed joint of dissimilar materials, and these stresses increase with the higher solidification temperature of the brazing alloy.

  9. Phase stability of iron-carbon nanocarbides and implications for the growth of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awasthi, Neha

    Catalyst nanoparticles play a crucial role in the synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotubes by chemical vapor deposition technique. Understanding the thermal behavior of the nano-catalysts, their interaction with Carbon and stability of nanocarbides can give better insight into the growth mechanism and control over selective, yield of nanotubes. In this work, we present results using first-principle calculations and classical molecular dynamics simulations to understand the thermodynamics of free and Al2O3 supported Fe-C nanoparticles. We observe that the substrate plays an important role during the growth reaction by increasing the melting temperatures of small and medium size Fe nanoparticles. We investigate Fe-C phase diagrams for small Fe nanoparticles (d˜2nm) and discover that as the size of the Fe nanoparticle is reduced, the eutectic point shifted significantly toward lower temperatures, as expected from the Gibbs-Thomson law, and also toward lower concentrations of C. We devise a simple model based on the Young-Laplace pressure-radius relation, to predict the behavior of the phases competing for stability in Fe-C nanoclusters at low temperature. We identify ranges of nanoparticle sizes which are compatible for steady state-, limited- and no-growth of SWCNTs corresponding to unaffected, reduced and no solubility of C in the Fe nanoparticles. We also calculate Fe-Mo-C ternary phase diagrams to investigate the behavior of bimetallic Fe:Mo catalyst nanoparticles. Our results show that addition of Mo (upto small concentrations) lowers the minimum radius when stable carbides nucleate and poison the catalyst, which enables a larger range of catalyst nanoparticles sizes to nucleate nanotubes. We also find that pure Fe has the highest surface concentration in Fe:Mo nanoparticles and is likely to be the active nucleation site for nanotubes.

  10. Degradation of nitrobenzene-containing wastewater by carbon nanotubes immobilized nanoscale zerovalent iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Weizhou; Feng, Zhirong; Liu, Youzhi; Jiang, Huihui

    2016-07-01

    Nanoscaled zerovalent iron (NZVI)-multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) composite materials were prepared by in situ reduction of Fe2+ onto CNTs for nitrobenzene (NB) degradation. The morphologies and the composites of the prepared materials were characterized by SEM, TEM, and XRD. The results showed that the agglomeration of NZVI decreased with NZVI dispersed well onto the surfaces of CNTs, the particle size of NZVI on CNTs was about 20-50 nm. The BET surface areas of NZVI-CNTs was about 95.8 m2/g, which was 39 % higher than that of bare NZVI. For storage, the prepared NZVI-CNTs were concentrated into slurry and stored in situ as fresh slurry without drying. Contrast experiment results showed that the removal efficiency of NB by NZVI-CNTs fresh slurry was 30 % higher than that of vacuum-dried NZVI-CNTs, which indicates that storing in situ as fresh slurry can be an alternative strategy for nanoparticle storage. Batch experiment results showed that NB could be degraded to aniline by NZVI-CNTs rapidly, and the appropriate pH can be conducted at a relatively wide range from 2.0 to 9.0. The optimum mass ratio of iron-carbon was 1:1, and removal efficiency of NB by NZVI-CNTs with this mass ratio can achieve 100 % within 1 min. The degradation process of NB to intermediates was accelerated significantly by NZVI-CNTs, however, there was still a long term for the intermediates to transfer completely into the final product of aniline. The existence of CNTs can improve the formation of aniline through accelerating the electron transfer by forming microscopic galvanic cells with NZVI.

  11. Giant pumping of single-file water molecules in a carbon nanotube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y; Zhao, Y J; Huang, J P

    2011-11-17

    Achieving a fast, unidirectional flow of single-file water molecules (UFSWM) across nanochannels is important for membrane-based water purification or seawater desalination. For this purpose, electro-osmosis methods are recognized as a very promising approach and have been extensively discussed in the literature. Utilizing molecular dynamics simulations, here we propose a design for pumping water molecules in a single-walled carbon nanotube in the presence of a linearly gradient electric (GE) field. Such a GE field is inspired by GE fields generated from charged ions located adjacent to biological membrane water nanochannels that can conduct water in and out of cells and can be experimentally achieved by using the charged tip of an atomic force microscope. As a result, the maximum speed of the UFSWM can be 1 or 2 orders of magnitude larger than that in a uniform electric (UE) field. Also, inverse transportation of water molecules does not exist in case of the GE field but can appear for the UE field. Thus, the GE field yields a much more efficient UFSWM than the UE field. The giant pumping ability as revealed is attributed to the nonzero net electrostatic force acting on each water molecule confined in the nanotube. These observations have significance for the design of nanoscale devices for readily achieving controllable UFSWM at high speed.

  12. Zero-valent iron particles embedded on the mesoporous silica-carbon for chromium (VI) removal from aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Kun; Gao, Yuan; Zhou, Lin; Zhang, Xianming

    2016-09-01

    Nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) particles were embedded on the walls of mesoporous silica-carbon (MSC) under the conditions of high-temperature carbonization and reduction and used to remove chromium (VI) from aqueous solution. The structure and textural properties of nZVI-MSC were characterized by the powder X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and N2 adsorption and desorption. The results show that nZVI-MSC has highly ordered mesoporous structure and large surface area, indistinguishable with that of MSC. Compared with the support MSC and iron particles supported on the activated carbon (nZVI/AC), nZVI-MSC exhibited much higher Cr(VI) removal efficiency with about 98 %. The removal process obeys a pseudo first-order model. Such excellent performance of nZVI-MSC could be ascribed to the large surface and iron particles embedded on the walls of the MSC, forming an intimate contact with the MSC. It is proposed that this feature might create certain micro-electrode on the interface of iron particles and MSC, which prevented the formation of metal oxide on the surface and provided fresh Fe surface for Cr(VI) removal.

  13. Effect of iron on the dissolution of bovine enamel powder in vitro by carbonated beverages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Melissa Thiemi; Maria, Andrea Gutierrez; Sales-Peres, Sílvia Helena de Carvalho; Buzalaf, Marília Afonso Rabelo

    2007-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate, in vitro, the effect of iron on the dissolution of bovine enamel powder, when added to two carbonated beverages. Powdered enamel was produced by griding enamel fragments of bovine incisor in a steel pestle and mortar. Particles between 75 and 106 microm were selected using appropriated meshes. At time zero, the carbonated beverage (Coke or Sprite Zero) was added to powdered enamel (1 mg enamel powder/10 microL of beverage) and vortexed for 30 s. The sample was immediately centrifuged (11,000 rpm) for 30 s and the supernatant was removed at 1 min 40 s. This procedure was repeated five times with the beverage containing increasing ferrous sulphate concentrations (1.25, 2.5, 5, 10, 15, 30 and 60 mmol/L). The phosphate released in the medium was analysed spectrophotometrically. Data were analysed using ANOVA and Tukey's test (pbeverages and the type of acid in these beverages seems to modulate this effect.

  14. Comparison of atomistic and elasticity approaches for carbon diffusion near line defects in {alpha}-iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veiga, R.G.A., E-mail: rgaveiga@gmail.com [Universite de Lyon, INSA Lyon, Laboratoire MATEIS, UMR CNRS 5510, 25 Avenue Jean Capelle, F69621, Villeurbanne (France); Perez, M. [Universite de Lyon, INSA Lyon, Laboratoire MATEIS, UMR CNRS 5510, 25 Avenue Jean Capelle, F69621, Villeurbanne (France); Becquart, C.S. [Unite Materiaux et Transformations (UMET), Ecole Nationale Superieure de Chimie de Lille, UMR CNRS 8207, Bat. C6, F59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France); Laboratoire commun EDF-CNRS Etude et Modelisation des Microstructures pour le Vieillissement des Materiaux (EM2VM) (France); Clouet, E. [Service de Recherches de Metallurgie Physique, CEA/Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Domain, C. [EDF, Recherche et Developpement, Materiaux et Mecanique des Composants, Les Renardieres, F77250 Moret sur Loing (France); Laboratoire commun EDF-CNRS Etude et Modelisation des Microstructures pour le Vieillissement des Materiaux (EM2VM) (France)

    2011-10-15

    Energy barriers for carbon migration in the neighborhood of line defects in body-centered cubic iron have been obtained by atomistic simulations. For this purpose, molecular statics with an Fe-C interatomic potential, based on the embedded atom method, has been employed. Results of these simulations have been compared to the predictions of anisotropic elasticity theory. The agreement is better for a carbon atom sitting on an octahedral site (energy minimum) than one on a tetrahedral site (saddle point). Absolute differences in the energy barriers obtained by the two methods are usually below 5 meV at distances larger than 1.5 nm from a screw dislocation and 2 nm (up to 4 nm in the glide plane) from the edge dislocation. Atomistic kinetic Monte Carlo simulations performed at T = 300 K and additional analysis based on the activation energies obtained by both methods show that they are in good qualitative agreement, despite some important quantitative discrepancies due to the large absolute errors found near the dislocation cores.

  15. Sedimentary iron inputs stimulate seagrass ( Posidonia oceanica) population growth in carbonate sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marbà, Núria; Duarte, Carlos M.; Holmer, Marianne; Calleja, Maria Ll.; Álvarez, Elvira; Díaz-Almela, Elena; Garcias-Bonet, Neus

    2008-02-01

    The relationship between sedimentary Fe inputs and net seagrass population growth across a range of Posidonia oceanica meadows growing in carbonate Mediterranean sediments (Balearic Islands, Spain; SE Iberian Peninsula, Spain; Limassol, Cyprus; Sounion, Greece) was examined using comparative analysis. Sedimentary Fe inputs were measured using benthic sediment traps and the net population growth of P. oceanica meadows was assessed using direct census of tagged plants. The meadows examined ranged from meadows undergoing a severe decline to expanding meadows (specific net population growth, from -0.14 yr -1 to 0.05 yr -1). Similarly, Fe inputs to the meadows ranged almost an order of magnitude across meadows (8.6-69.1 mg Fe m -2 d -1). There was a significant, positive relationship between sedimentary iron inputs and seagrass net population growth, accounting for 36% of the variability in population growth across meadows. The relationship obtained suggested that seagrass meadows receiving Fe inputs below 43 mg Fe m -2 d -1 are vulnerable and in risk of decline, confirming the pivotal role of Fe in the control of growth and the stability of seagrass meadows in carbonate sediments.

  16. Iron oxide-decorated carbon for supercapacitor anodes with ultrahigh energy density and outstanding cycling stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Cao; Liu, Jilei; Wang, Yadong; Mao, Lu; Fan, Zhanxi; Shen, Zexiang; Zhang, Hua; Wang, John

    2015-05-26

    Supercapacitor with ultrahigh energy density (e.g., comparable with those of rechargeable batteries) and long cycling ability (>50000 cycles) is attractive for the next-generation energy storage devices. The energy density of carbonaceous material electrodes can be effectively improved by combining with certain metal oxides/hydroxides, but many at the expenses of power density and long-time cycling stability. To achieve an optimized overall electrochemical performance, rationally designed electrode structures with proper control in metal oxide/carbon are highly desirable. Here we have successfully realized an ultrahigh-energy and long-life supercapacitor anode by developing a hierarchical graphite foam-carbon nanotube framework and coating the surface with a thin layer of iron oxide (GF-CNT@Fe2O3). The full cell of anode based on this structure gives rise to a high energy of ∼74.7 Wh/kg at a power of ∼1400 W/kg, and ∼95.4% of the capacitance can be retained after 50000 cycles of charge-discharge. These performance features are superior among those reported for metal oxide based supercapacitors, making it a promising candidate for the next generation of high-performance electrochemical energy storage.

  17. The removal of uranium onto carbon-supported nanoscale zero-valent iron particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Richard A.; Scott, Thomas

    2014-12-01

    In the current work carbon-supported nanoscale zero-valent iron particles (CS nZVI), synthesised by the vacuum heat treatment of ferric citrate trihydrate absorbed onto carbon black, have been tested for the removal of uranium (U) from natural and synthetic waters. Two types of CS nZVI were tested, one vacuum annealed at 600 °C for 4 h and the other vacuum annealed at 700 °C for 4 h, with their U removal behaviour compared to nZVI synthesised via the reduction of ferrous iron using sodium borohydride. The batch systems were analysed over a 28-day reaction period during which the liquid and nanoparticulate solids were periodically analysed to determine chemical evolution of the solutions and particulates. Results demonstrate a well-defined difference between the two types of CS nZVI, with greater U removal exhibited by the nanomaterial synthesised at 700 °C. The mechanism has been attributed to the CS nZVI synthesised at 700 °C exhibiting (i) a greater proportion of surface oxide Fe2+ to Fe3+ (0.34 compared to 0.28); (ii) a greater conversion of ferric citrate trihydrate [2Fe(C6H5O7)·H2O] to Fe0; and (iii) a larger surface area (108.67 compared to 88.61 m2 g-1). Lower maximum U uptake was recorded for both types of CS nZVI in comparison with the borohydride-reduced nZVI. A lower decrease in solution Eh and DO was also recorded, indicating that less chemical reduction of U was achieved by the CS nZVI. Despite this, lower U desorption in the latter stages of the experiment (>7 days) was recorded for the CS nZVI synthesised at 700 °C, indicating that carbon black in the CS nZVI is likely to have contributed towards U sorption and retention. Overall, it can be stated that the borohydride-reduced nZVI were significantly more effective than CS nZVI for U removal over relatively short timescales (e.g. <48 h), however, they were more susceptible to U desorption over extended time periods.

  18. The removal of uranium onto carbon-supported nanoscale zero-valent iron particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crane, Richard A., E-mail: richardandrewcrane@gmail.com; Scott, Thomas [University of Bristol, School of Physics, Interface Analysis Centre (United Kingdom)

    2014-12-15

    In the current work carbon-supported nanoscale zero-valent iron particles (CS nZVI), synthesised by the vacuum heat treatment of ferric citrate trihydrate absorbed onto carbon black, have been tested for the removal of uranium (U) from natural and synthetic waters. Two types of CS nZVI were tested, one vacuum annealed at 600 °C for 4 h and the other vacuum annealed at 700 °C for 4 h, with their U removal behaviour compared to nZVI synthesised via the reduction of ferrous iron using sodium borohydride. The batch systems were analysed over a 28-day reaction period during which the liquid and nanoparticulate solids were periodically analysed to determine chemical evolution of the solutions and particulates. Results demonstrate a well-defined difference between the two types of CS nZVI, with greater U removal exhibited by the nanomaterial synthesised at 700 °C. The mechanism has been attributed to the CS nZVI synthesised at 700 °C exhibiting (i) a greater proportion of surface oxide Fe{sup 2+} to Fe{sup 3+} (0.34 compared to 0.28); (ii) a greater conversion of ferric citrate trihydrate [2Fe(C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O{sub 7})·H{sub 2}O] to Fe{sup 0}; and (iii) a larger surface area (108.67 compared to 88.61 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}). Lower maximum U uptake was recorded for both types of CS nZVI in comparison with the borohydride-reduced nZVI. A lower decrease in solution Eh and DO was also recorded, indicating that less chemical reduction of U was achieved by the CS nZVI. Despite this, lower U desorption in the latter stages of the experiment (>7 days) was recorded for the CS nZVI synthesised at 700 °C, indicating that carbon black in the CS nZVI is likely to have contributed towards U sorption and retention. Overall, it can be stated that the borohydride-reduced nZVI were significantly more effective than CS nZVI for U removal over relatively short timescales (e.g. <48 h), however, they were more susceptible to U desorption over extended time periods.

  19. Role of iron oxide impurities in electrocatalysis by multiwall carbon nanotubes: An investigation using a novel magnetically modified ITO electrodes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kanchan M Samant; Vrushali S Joshi; Kashinath R Patil; Santosh K Haram

    2014-04-01

    The role of iron oxide impurities in the electrocatalytic properties of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) prepared by catalytic chemical vapour decomposition method (CCVD) is studied in detail. A novel magnetically modified electrodes have been developed by which MWCNTs were immobilized on indium-tin oxide (ITO) electrodes, without any chemical binders. The electro-catalytic oxidation of dopamine, and reduction of hydrogen peroxide have been studied by cyclic voltammetry on magnetically modified electrodes with (i) MWCNTs with occluded iron oxide impurities (Fe-MWCNTs), (ii) MWCNTs grown on iron oxide nanoparticle particulate films (Io-MWCNTs) and (iii) pristine iron oxide nanoparticle particulate film (Io-NPs). A shift towards less positive potentials for the oxidation of dopamine was observed which is in the order of Fe-MWCNTs < Io-MWCNTs < Io-NPs. Similarly, trend towards less negative potentials for the reduction of hydrogen peroxide was observed. Thus, the electrocatalytic activities displayed by MWCNTs have been attributed to the iron oxide impurities associated with it. The systematic variation was related to the nature of interaction of iron oxide nanoparticles with MWCNT surface.

  20. Electroless deposition of bis(4'-(4-Pyridyl)-2,2':6',2''-terpyridine)iron(II) thiocyanate complex onto carbon nanotubes modified glassy carbon electrode: application to simultaneous determination of ascorbic acid, dopamine and uric acid

    OpenAIRE

    Kamyabi,M. A; Narimani,O; Monfared,H. H

    2011-01-01

    A glassy carbon (GC) electrode modified by multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) and bis(pyterpy)iron(II) thiocyanate complex (pyterpy = 4'-(4-pyridyl)-2,2':6',2''-terpyridine) was investigated by voltammetric methods in acetate buffer solution (pH 5). Performances of the iron(II)-complex/MWNTs modified electrode were evaluated with differential pulse voltammetry and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The modified glassy carbon electrode shows an excellent electrochemical response for ascorb...

  1. Towards the comprehension of the role of copper and iron in MSWI fly ash carbon degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grandesso, E.; Arosio, C.; Collina, E.; Lasagni, M.; Pitea, D. [Universita Milano-Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Fermo, P. [Universita degli Studi di Milano, Milano (Italy)

    2004-09-15

    The formation of PolyChlorinated Dibenzo-p-Dioxins (PCDD) and PolyChlorinated DibenzoFurans (PCDF) from many anthropogenic sources has been noticed since the 1970s. In particular, municipal solid waste incinerators (MSWI) are a source of PCDD/F and their formation has been proposed to occur by various homogeneous and heterogeneous mechanisms. In the low temperature range (200-600 C) two mechanisms generally are accepted: (i) heterogeneous reactions on the fly ash surface involving gas-phase or adsorbed precursors such as chlorinated phenols, chlorinated benzenes and polychlorinated biphenyls and (ii) the formation, eventually catalysed, from fly ash carbon, chlorine and oxygen. In the latter, usually termed the de novo synthesis, contradictory conclusions are provided about the key parameters and their role. Apart from temperature and reaction time, these parameters include: the amount and structure of carbon in the fly ash; the chlorine speciation together with the relative importance of gas-phase inorganic chlorine with respect to extractable organic chlorine, ash-bound chlorine, inorganic chlorides such as metal chloride or water-soluble earth metal chloride; the oxygen percentage in the reaction atmosphere. As for the metal chlorides, copper(II) chloride has proven to be very active in promoting PCDDs/Fs formation even if less efficiently, iron(III) chlorides participates in or promotes formation via de novo synthesis. In a previous paper we reported the CO{sub 2} evolution curves from MSWI fly ash and model systems studied by means of the TG-FTIR technique. Model systems consisted of physically ground mixtures of active carbon, C, a silica, SiO{sub 2}, matrix, and CuCl{sub 2} or CuO or CuSO{sub 4}. It was shown that the number of peaks in the curves depended on the system studied. Thus it was possible to conclude that low temperature carbon oxidation was highly dependent on the catalyst added to the model mixtures as well as on the metals already present in

  2. Recovery of iron, carbon and zinc from steel plant waste oxides using the AISI-DOE postcombustion smelting technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarma, B. [Praxair, Inc., Tarrytown, NY (United States); Downing, K.B. [Fluor Daniel, Greenville, SC (United States); Aukrust, E.

    1996-09-01

    This report describes a process to recover steel plant waste oxides to be used in the production of hot metal. The process flowsheet used at the pilot plant. Coal/coke breeze and iron ore pellets/waste oxides are charged into the smelting reactor. The waste oxides are either agglomerated into briquettes (1 inch) using a binder or micro-agglomerated into pellets (1/4 inch) without the use of a binder. The iron oxides dissolve in the slag and are reduced by carbon to produce molten iron. The gangue oxides present in the raw materials report to the slag. Coal charged to the smelter is both the fuel as well as the reductant. Carbon present in the waste oxides is also used as the fuel/reductant resulting in a decrease in the coal requirement. Oxygen is top blown through a central, water-cooled, dual circuit lance. Nitrogen is injected through tuyeres at the bottom of the reactor for stirring purposes. The hot metal and slag produced in the smelting reactor are tapped at regular intervals through a single taphole using a mudgun and drill system. The energy requirements of the process are provided by (i) the combustion of carbon to carbon monoxide, referred to as primary combustion and (ii) the combustion of CO and H{sub 2} to CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O, known as postcombustion.

  3. The effect of pyrolysis temperature on the physical properties of monolithic carbons derived from solid iron bamboo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krzesinska, Marta [Institute of Chemistry and Environment Protection, Jan Dlugosz University Czestochowa, Al. Armii Krajowej 13-15, 42-200 Czestochowa (Poland); Institute of Coal Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, Sowinskiego 5, 44-121 Gliwice (Poland); Zachariasz, Justyna [Institute of Coal Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, Sowinskiego 5, 44-121 Gliwice (Poland)

    2007-08-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of pyrolysis temperature on the physical properties of new monolithic porous carbon materials derived from exceptional kind of bamboo characterized by solid, very strong stem, i.e., from iron bamboo (Dendrocalamus strictus). Raw and carbonised bamboo (carbon content up to 82%) was characterized using various methods: elemental analysis, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), helium gas densitometry, ultrasonic measurements, light and scanning electron microscopes. The DSC thermogram showed that the thermal decomposition of iron bamboo was characterized by T{sub 1} = 264 C and T{sub 2} = 356 C, i.e., was finished at T > 400 C. For the higher carbonisation temperatures, above 600 C, weight loss and carbon content were found to be almost constant, while the true density and the elastic parameters: the ultrasonic velocity and the dynamic elastic modulus still increased. This means that more intensive heating did not remove any compounds from stem, but there was probably reorganization of structure of carbonised iron bamboo, resulting in more compact matrix in porous carbon. (author)

  4. Study of carbon and silicon loss through oxidation in cast iron base metal using rotary furnace for melting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvester Olanrewaju OMOLE

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The projection of loss of carbon and silicon through oxidation is uncertain phenomenon depending on the furnace used for melting, which affect the carbon equivalent value (CEV of cast iron produced. CEV enhances the fluidity of molten metal as well as having great effects on the mechanical properties of cast products. Study on the way elemental loss takes place during melting with rotary furnace will give idea of approach to minimize the loss. Therefore, the aim of this work is to study the magnitude of the elemental loss with rotary furnace and means to minimize the loss. 60kg of grey cast iron scrap was charged into rotary furnace of 100kg capacity after preheating the furnace for 40 minutes. Graphite and ferrosilicon was added to the charge in order to obtain a theoretical composition of not less than 4.0% carbon and 2.0% silicon. Charges in the furnace were heated to obtain molten metal which was tapped at 1400°C. Tapping was done for casting at three different times. The castings solidified in sand mould and allowed to cool to room temperature in the mould. Castings were denoted as sample 1, 2 and 3. Final compositions of each casting were analyzed with optical light emission spectrometer. Sample 1 has 2.95% carbon and 1.82% silicon. Sample 2 has 2.88% carbon and 1.70% silicon and sample 3 has 2.75% carbon and 1.63% silicon.

  5. Effect of Rare Earth Alloy Modification on High Carbon Equivalent Gray Cast Iron of Automotive Brake Drum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Daowen; LI Zhu; HUANG Jie

    2012-01-01

    Effect of rare earth alloy modification on properties and microstructure of high carbon equivalent gray cast iron was investigated.The experimental results show that in the way of mechanical property,when the addition of rare earth alloy is 0.2% and 0.3%,the tensile strength of cast iron increases.In the way of microstructure,the addition of rare earth alloy increases the number of primary austenite dendrites,reduces secondary dendritic arm spacing,and changes the eutectic size and quantity.When rare earth alloy is added into gray cast iron,the morphology and quantity of graphite play a major role on the improvement of tensile strength.

  6. Native iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brooks, Charles Kent

    2015-01-01

    , a situation unique in the Solar System. In such a world, iron metal is unstable and, as we all know, oxidizes to the ferric iron compounds we call 'rust'. If we require iron metal it must be produced at high temperatures by reacting iron ore, usually a mixture of ferrous (Fe2+) and ferric (Fe3+) oxides (Fe2O3......, hematite, or FeO.Fe2O3, magnetite), with carbon in the form of coke. This is carried out in a blast furnace. Although the Earth's core consists of metallic iron, which may also be present in parts of the mantle, this is inaccessible to us, so we must make our own. In West Greenland, however, some almost...... unique examples of iron metal, otherwise called 'native iron' or 'telluric iron', occur naturally....

  7. Synthesis, characterization and adsorptive properties of carbon with iron nanoparticles and iron carbide for the removal of As(V) from water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez-Muñiz, O E; García-Rosales, G; Ordoñez-Regil, E; Olguin, M T; Cabral-Prieto, A

    2013-01-15

    This manuscript presents the synthesis of carbon modified with iron nanoparticles (CFe) and iron carbide (CarFe) from the pyrolyzed crown leaves of pineapple (Ananas comosus) treated with iron salts. The materials that were obtained were used for the removal of As(V) from aqueous media. The carbonaceous materials were characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and Mossbauer Spectroscopy. The specific area (BET), number site density and point of zero charge (pH(pzc)) were also determined. The kinetic parameters were obtained by fitting the experimental data to the pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order models. Different isotherm models were applied to describe the As(V) adsorption behavior. The kinetics of As(V) sorption by CFe and CarFe was well defined for the pseudo-second-order model (R(2) = 0.9994 and 0.999, respectively). The maximum As(V) uptake was 1.8 mg g(-1) for CFe and 1.4 mg g(-1) for CarFe. The results obtained indicated that both materials are equally useful for As(V) sorption. The As(V) experimental isotherm data were described by the Freundlich model for CFe and CarFe.

  8. Adsorption of Toluene and Paraxylene from Aqueous Solution Using Pure and Iron Oxide Impregnated Carbon Nanotubes: Kinetics and Isotherms Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Aamir; Ihsanullah; Al-Baghli, Nadhir A. H.

    2017-01-01

    Multiwall carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and iron oxide impregnated carbon nanotubes (CNTs-iron oxide) were investigated for the adsorption of hazardous toluene and paraxylene (p-xylene) from aqueous solution. Pure CNTs were impregnated with iron oxides nanoparticles using wet impregnation technique. Various characterization techniques including thermogravimetric analysis, scanning electron microscopy, elemental dispersion spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and nitrogen adsorption analysis were used to study the thermal degradation, surface morphology, purity, and surface area of the materials. Batch adsorption experiments show that iron oxide impregnated CNTs have higher degree of removal of p-xylene (i.e., 90%) compared with toluene (i.e., 70%), for soaking time 2 h, with pollutant initial concentration 100 ppm, at pH 6 and shaking speed of 200 rpm at 25°C. Pseudo-second-order model provides better fitting for the toluene and p-xylene adsorption. Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models demonstrate good fitting for the adsorption data of toluene and p-xylene. PMID:28386208

  9. Degradation mechanism of Direct Pink 12B treated by iron-carbon micro-electrolysis and Fenton reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiquan; Gong, Xiaokang; Zhang, Qiuxia; Du, Haijuan

    2013-12-01

    The Direct Pink 12B dye was treated by iron-carbon micro-electrolysis (ICME) and Fenton oxidation. The degradation pathway of Direct Pink 12B dye was inferred by ultraviolet visible (UV-Vis), infrared absorption spectrum (IR) and high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS). The major reason of decolorization was that the conjugate structure was disrupted in the iron-carbon micro-electrolysis (ICME) process. However, the dye was not degraded completely because benzene rings and naphthalene rings were not broken. In the Fenton oxidation process, the azo bond groups surrounded by higher electron cloud density were first attacked by hydroxyl radicals to decolorize the dye molecule. Finally benzene rings and naphthalene rings were mineralized to H2O and CO2 under the oxidation of hydroxyl radicals. Copyright © 2013 The Research Centre for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Reduction-melting behaviors of boron-bearing iron concentrate/carbon composite pellets with addition of CaO

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing-song Wang

    2015-01-01

    Although the total amount of boron resources in China is high, the grades of these resources are low. The authors have already proposed a new comprehensive utilization process of boron-bearing iron concentrate based on the iron nugget process. The present work de-scribes a further optimization of the conditions used in the previous study. The effects of CaO on the reduction–melting behavior and proper-ties of the boron-rich slag are presented. CaO improved the reduction of boron-bearing iron concentrate/carbon composite pellets when its content was less than 1wt%. Melting separation of the composite pellets became difficult with the CaO content increased. The sulfur content of the iron nugget gradually decreased from 0.16wt%to 0.046wt%as the CaO content of the pellets increased from 1wt%to 5wt%. CaO negatively affected the iron yield and boron extraction efficiency of the boron-rich slag. The mineral phase evolution of the boron-rich slag during the reduction–melting separation of the composite pellets with added CaO was also deduced.

  11. A novel method of synthesizing cyclodextrin grafted multiwall carbon nanotubes/iron oxides and its adsorption of organic pollutant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Jiang, Xinyu; Chen, Xiaoqing

    2014-11-01

    A novel methodology for the synthesis of the multiwalled carbon nanotubes/iron oxides modified by β-cyclodextrin (denoted as MWCNTs/iron oxides/β-CD) was proposed using 1,6-diisocyanatohexane as cross-linker in N,N-dimethyl formamide, which avoided complex steps in the link of β-cyclodextrin and MWCNTs/iron oxides via conventional synthetic methods. The characteristic results of Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) showed that β-CD was grafted onto the MWCNTs/iron oxides successfully. In addition, vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and magnetic separation experiment suggested that the prepared composite exhibited preferable magnetic property and good dispersion property in aqueous solution. The effects of contact time, initial adsorbent content, solution pH and temperature on the adsorption of p-nitrophenol (PNP) were studied systematically. The adsorption kinetics and equilibrium isotherms data fitted well with pseudo-second-order kinetic equation and Langmuir isotherm model, respectively. Furthermore, the adsorption-desorption experiment of PNP demonstrated that MWCNTs/iron oxides/β-CD is a cost-effective material with high regeneration efficiency.

  12. A novel method of synthesizing cyclodextrin grafted multiwall carbon nanotubes/iron oxides and its adsorption of organic pollutant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Wei; Jiang, Xinyu [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Chen, Xiaoqing, E-mail: xqchen@csu.edu.cn [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Resource-conserving and Environment-friendly Society and Ecological Civilization (China)

    2014-11-30

    Highlights: • A cost-effective and one-step method for grafting cyclodextrin onto magnetic material. • Relatively good separation and regeneration properties as adsorbent. • The adsorption capacities are comparable with other adsorbents reported previously. - Abstract: A novel methodology for the synthesis of the multiwalled carbon nanotubes/iron oxides modified by β-cyclodextrin (denoted as MWCNTs/iron oxides/β-CD) was proposed using 1,6-diisocyanatohexane as cross-linker in N,N-dimethyl formamide, which avoided complex steps in the link of β-cyclodextrin and MWCNTs/iron oxides via conventional synthetic methods. The characteristic results of Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) showed that β-CD was grafted onto the MWCNTs/iron oxides successfully. In addition, vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and magnetic separation experiment suggested that the prepared composite exhibited preferable magnetic property and good dispersion property in aqueous solution. The effects of contact time, initial adsorbent content, solution pH and temperature on the adsorption of p-nitrophenol (PNP) were studied systematically. The adsorption kinetics and equilibrium isotherms data fitted well with pseudo-second-order kinetic equation and Langmuir isotherm model, respectively. Furthermore, the adsorption-desorption experiment of PNP demonstrated that MWCNTs/iron oxides/β-CD is a cost-effective material with high regeneration efficiency.

  13. Influence of carbon chain length on the synthesis and yield of fatty amine-coated iron-platinum nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Robert M.; Monson, Todd C.; Gullapalli, Rama R.

    2014-06-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles are among the most widely used and characterized magnetic nanoparticles. However, metal alloys such as superparamagnetic iron-platinum particles (SIPPs), which have better magnetic properties, are receiving increased attention. Scalable techniques to routinely synthesize SIPPs in bulk need further study. Here, we focus on the role played by the fatty amine ligand in the formation of the bimetallic FePt nanocrystal. More specifically, we compare the effect of varying lengths of fatty amine ligands on the shape, structure, uniformity, composition, and magnetic properties of the SIPPs. We synthesized SIPPs by employing a `green' thermal decomposition reaction using fatty amine ligands containing 12 to 18 carbons in length. Greater fatty amine chain length increased the polydispersity, particle concentration, iron concentration, and the stability of the SIPPs. Additionally, longer reflux times increased the diameter of the particles, but decreased the iron concentration, suggesting that shorter reaction times are preferable. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy of the SIPPs indicates that the ligands are successfully bound to the FePt cores through the amine group. Superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry measurements suggest that all of the SIPPs were superparamagnetic at room temperature and that SIPPs synthesized using tetradecylamine had the highest saturation magnetization. Our findings indicate that the octadecylamine ligand, which is currently used for the routine synthesis of SIPPs, may not be optimal. Overall, we found that using tetradecylamine and a 30-min reflux reaction resulted in optimal particles with the highest degree of monodispersity, iron content, stability, and saturation magnetization.

  14. Metal-Organic Framework Derived Iron Sulfide-Carbon Core-Shell Nanorods as a Conversion-Type Battery Material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Wei; Li, Shuo; Cao, Xianyi

    2017-01-01

    to prepare carbon-encapsulated ploy iron sulfide through solid-state chemical sulfurizing. The resulting core-shell nanorods consisting of approximately 13% carbon and 87% Fe7S8 have a hierarchically porous structure and a very high specific surface area of 277 m2g-1. When tested for use in fabrication...... of systematic structural analysis and microscopic mapping, we discuss the charge-discharge mechanisms and the crucial factors associated with the stability and structural changes upon charge-discharge cycling....

  15. Effect of high heating and cooling rate on interface of diffusion bonded gray cast iron to medium carbon steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurt, B. [Firat University, Technical Education Faculty, Metal Department, 23119 Elazig (Turkey); Orhan, N. [Firat University, Technical Education Faculty, Metal Department, 23119 Elazig (Turkey)]. E-mail: norhan@firat.edu.tr; Hascalik, A. [Firat University, Technical Education Faculty, Department of Manufacturing, Elazig (Turkey)

    2007-07-01

    In the present study, a gray cast iron and a medium carbon steel couple were diffusion bonded at the temperatures of 850, 900, 950 and 1000 deg. C under a pressure of 8 MPa for 30 min, and the effects of temperature and high heating and cooling rate on interface formations and microstructure were investigated. After diffusion bonding, scanning electron microscopy, shear test measurements and microhardness measurement of interface region were made. The microstructure at the inside of medium carbon steel of bonded couple consisted of martensite. As a result, from the microstructural observations, a good bonding along the interface of the bonded couples and the interface is free from voids and microcracks.

  16. Simulation of reduction of iron-oxide-carbon composite pellets in a rotary hearth furnace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halder, Sabuj

    The primary motivation of this work is to evaluate a new alternative ironmaking process which involves the combination of a Rotary Hearth Furnace (RHF) with an iron bath smelter. This work is concerned primarily, with the productivity of the RHF. It is known that the reduction in the RHF is controlled by chemical kinetics of the carbon oxidation and wustite reduction reactions as well as by heat transfer to the pellet surface and within the pellet. It is heat transfer to the pellet which limits the number of layers of pellets in the pellet bed in the RHF and thus, the overall productivity. Different types of carbon like graphite, coal-char and wood charcoal were examined. Part of the research was to investigate the chemical kinetics by de-coupling it from the influence of heat and mass transfer. This was accomplished by carrying out reduction experiments using small iron-oxide-carbon powder composite mixtures. The reaction rate constants were determined by fitting the experimental mass loss with a mixed reaction model. This model accounts for the carbon oxidation by CO2 and wustite reduction by CO, which are the primary rate controlling surface-chemical reactions in the composite system. The reaction rate constants have been obtained using wustite-coal-char powder mixtures and wustite-wood-charcoal mixtures. The wustite for these mixtures was obtained from two iron-oxide sources: artificial porous analytical hematite (PAH) and hematite ore tailings. In the next phase of this study, larger scale experiments were conducted in a RHF simulator using spherical composite pellets. Measurement of the reaction rates was accomplished using off-gas analysis. Different combinations of raw materials for the pellets were investigated. These included artificial ferric oxide as well as naturally existing hematite and taconite ores. Graphite, coal-char and wood-charcoal were the reductants. Experiments were conducted using a single layer, a double layer and a triple layer of

  17. Adsorption efficiencies of calcium (II ion and iron (II ion on activated carbon obtained from pericarp of rubber fruit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orawan Sirichote

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Determination of adsorption efficiencies of activated carbon from pericarp of rubber fruit for calcium (II ion and iron (II ion has been performed by flowing the solutions of these ions through a column of activated carbon. The weights of activated carbon in 500 mL buret column (diameter 3.2 cm for flowing calcium (II ion and iron (II ion solutions were 15 g and 10 g, respectively. The initial concentration of calcium ion was prepared to be about eight times more diluted than the true concentration found in the groundwater from the lower part of southern Thailand. Calcium (II ion concentrations were analysed by EDTA titration and its initial concentration was found to be 23.55 ppm. With a flow rate of 26 mL/min, the adsorption efficiency was 11.4 % with passed through volume 4.75 L. Iron (II ion concentrations were analysed by spectrophotometric method; its initial concentration was found to be 1.5565 ppm. At a flow rate of 22 mL/min, the adsorption efficiency was 0.42 % with passed through volume of 34.0 L.

  18. Enhanced microwave absorbing properties of carbonyl iron-doped Ag/ordered mesoporous carbon nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Hongjing, E-mail: wuhongjing@mail.nwpu.edu.cn [Department of Applied Physics, School of Science, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072 (China); Wang Liuding, E-mail: wangld@nwpu.edu.cn [Department of Applied Physics, School of Science, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072 (China); Wang Yiming; Guo Shaoli; Shen Zhongyuan [Department of Applied Physics, School of Science, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072 (China)

    2012-04-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ag/OMC-CI paraffin wax composites were successfully prepared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reflection loss value below -10 dB at 12 GHz was obtained. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ag/OMC-CI showed excellent microwave absorption with respect to OMC-CI and Ag/OMC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This could be attributed to the enhancement of interfacial polarization. - Abstract: Microwave absorbing materials carbonyl iron (CI)-doped Ag/ordered mesoporous carbon (OMC) paraffin wax composites were prepared by colloidal deposition and impregnation methods, and their electromagnetic and microwave absorbing properties were investigated in the frequency ranging from 2 to 18 GHz. The microstructures and chemical compositions of the Ag/OMC and Ag/OMC-CI paraffin wax composites were characterized by TEM, XRD, XPS, SEM and EDS, respectively. The complex permittivity of the paraffin wax composites show dual resonance behavior, resulting from the multi-interfaces among Ag nanoparticles, OMC nanorods, CI and paraffin wax. The magnetic loss was mainly caused by natural resonance and eddy current loss, respectively. The minimum reflection loss (RL) value of Ag/OMC-CI was below -10 dB at 12 GHz, which were superior to those of OMC-CI and Ag/OMC. This phenomenon is attributed to the enhancement of dielectric polarization and magnetic loss.

  19. Simple and Precise Quantification of Iron Catalyst Content in Carbon Nanotubes Using UV/Visible Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agustina, Elsye; Goak, Jeungchoon; Lee, Suntae; Seo, Youngho; Park, Jun-Young; Lee, Naesung

    2015-10-01

    Iron catalysts have been used widely for the mass production of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with high yield. In this study, UV/visible spectroscopy was used to determine the Fe catalyst content in CNTs using a colorimetric technique. Fe ions in solution form red-orange complexes with 1,10-phenanthroline, producing an absorption peak at λ=510 nm, the intensity of which is proportional to the solution Fe concentration. A series of standard Fe solutions were formulated to establish the relationship between optical absorbance and Fe concentration. Many Fe catalysts were microscopically observed to be encased by graphitic layers, thus preventing their extraction. Fe catalyst dissolution from CNTs was investigated with various single and mixed acids, and Fe concentration was found to be highest with CNTs being held at reflux in HClO4/HNO3 and H2SO4/HNO3 mixtures. This novel colorimetric method to measure Fe concentrations by UV/Vis spectroscopy was validated by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy, indicating its reliability and applicability to asses Fe content in CNTs.

  20. Mercury remediation in wetland sediment using zero-valent iron and granular activated carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Ariel S.; Huntington, Thomas G.; Marvin-DiPasquale, Mark C.; Amirbahman, Aria

    2016-01-01

    Wetlands are hotspots for production of toxic methylmercury (MeHg) that can bioaccumulate in the food web. The objective of this study was to determine whether the application of zero-valent iron (ZVI) or granular activated carbon (GAC) to wetland sediment could reduce MeHg production and bioavailability to benthic organisms. Field mesocosms were installed in a wetland fringing Hodgdon Pond (Maine, USA), and ZVI and GAC were applied. Pore-water MeHg concentrations were lower in treated compared with untreated mesocosms; however, sediment MeHg, as well as total Hg (THg), concentrations were not significantly different between treated and untreated mesocosms, suggesting that smaller pore-water MeHg concentrations in treated sediment were likely due to adsorption to ZVI and GAC, rather than inhibition of MeHg production. In laboratory experiments with intact vegetated sediment clumps, amendments did not significantly change sediment THg and MeHg concentrations; however, the mean pore-water MeHg and MeHg:THg ratios were lower in the amended sediment than the control. In the laboratory microcosms, snails (Lymnaea stagnalis) accumulated less MeHg in sediment treated with ZVI or GAC. The study results suggest that both GAC and ZVI have potential for reducing MeHg bioaccumulation in wetland sediment.

  1. Phosphonate removal from discharged circulating cooling water using iron-carbon micro-electrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhen; Qiao, Weimin; Lin, Yangbo; Shen, Xuelian; Hu, Dalong; Zhang, Jianqiao; Jiang, Lu-Man; Wang, Luochun

    2014-01-01

    Phosphonate is a commonly used corrosion and scale inhibitor for a circulating cooling water (CCW) system. Its discharge could cause eutrophication of receiving waters. The iron-carbon (Fe/C) micro-electrolysis technology was used to degrade and remove phosphonate from discharged CCW. The influences of initial pH, Fe/C ratio (FCR) and temperature on phosphonate removal were investigated in a series of batch tests and optimized by response surface methodology. The quadratic model of phosphonate removal was obtained with satisfactory degrees of fitness. The optimum conditions with total phosphorus removal efficiency of 95% were obtained at pH 7.0, FCR of 1.25, and temperature of 45 °C. The phosphonate removal mechanisms were also studied. Phosphonate removal occurred predominantly via two consecutive reactive phases: the degradation of phosphonate complexes (Ca-phosphonate) and the precipitation of Fe/C micro-electrolysis products (PO₄(3-), Ca²⁺ and Fe³⁺).

  2. Novel synthesis of carbon spheres supported nanoscale zero-valent iron for removal of metronidazole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiangyu; Du, Yi; Ma, Jun

    2016-12-01

    For the first time, carbon spheres-supported nanoscale zero-valent iron (NZVI/CSs) were successfully synthesized as functionalized composite via liquid phase reduction method and adopted for removal of a typical antibiotic, metronidazole (MNZ), from wastewater. The resultant composite (NZVI/CSs) exhibit higher reactivity, excellent stability, enhanced dispersion, and improved longevity over the reaction course due to the presence of the charged carboxyl groups and hydroxyl groups on the surfaces of CSs. The results show that 94.18% of MNZ was removed using NZVI/CSs after 6 min, while only 36.45% and 8.78% of MNZ were removed using NZVI and CSs, respectively. The galvanic cell system between NZVI and CSs was essential for enhancing MNZ reduction in aqueous solution. Furthermore, the new findings include kinetics for MNZ removal by NZVI/CSs composite could be well expressed by a revised two-parameter pseudo-first-order model. Finally, the possible degradation mechanism was proposed, which was based on the analysis of degraded products by high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS). Different important factors impacting on MNZ removal (including mass ratio of NZVI to CSs, initial concentration, pH value and solution temperature) were investigated as well. Overall, this study provides a promising alternative material and environmental pollution management option for antibiotic wastewater treatment.

  3. Sequestration of non-pure carbon dioxide streams in iron oxyhydroxide-containing saline repositories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, S.; Rosenbauer, Robert J.; Palandri, James L.; Maroto-Valer, M. Mercedes

    2012-01-01

    Iron oxyhydroxide, goethite (α-FeOOH), was evaluated as a potential formation mineral reactant for trapping CO2 in a mineral phase such as siderite (FeCO3), when a mixture of CO2-SO 2 flue gas is injected into a saline aquifer. Two thermodynamic simulations were conducted, equilibrating a CO2-SO2 fluid mixture with a NaCl-brine and Fe-rich rocks at 150 °C and 300 bar. The modeling studies evaluated mineral and fluid composition at equilibrium and the influence of pH buffering in the system. Results show siderite precipitates both in the buffered and unbuffered system; however, the presence of an alkaline pH buffer enhances the stability of the carbonate. Based on the model, an experiment was designed to compare with thermodynamic predictions. A CO2-SO2 gas mixture was reacted in 150 ml of NaCl-NaOH brine containing 10 g of goethite at 150 °C and 300 bar for 24 days. Mineralogical and brine chemistry confirmed siderite as the predominant reaction product in the system. Seventy-six mg of CO2 are sequestered in siderite per 10 g of goethite.

  4. Co-adsorption of Trichloroethylene and Arsenate by Iron-Impregnated Granular Activated Carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Baolin; Kim, Eun-Sik

    2016-05-01

    Co-adsorption of trichloroethylene (TCE) and arsenate [As(V)] was investigated using modified granular activated carbons (GAC): untreated, sodium hypochlorite-treated (NaClO-GAC), and NaClO with iron-treated GAC (NaClO/Fe-GAC). Batch experiments of single- [TCE or As(V)] and binary- [TCE and As(V)] components solutions are evaluated through Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models and adsorption kinetic tests. In the single-component system, the adsorption capacity of As(V) was increased by the NaClO-GAC and the NaClO/Fe-GAC. The untreated GAC showed a low adsorption capacity for As(V). Adsorption of TCE by the NaClO/Fe-GAC was maximized, with an increased Freundlich constant. Removal of TCE in the binary-component system was decreased 15% by the untreated GAC, and NaClO- and NaClO/Fe-GAC showed similar efficiency to the single-component system because of the different chemical status of the GAC surfaces. Results of the adsorption isotherms of As(V) in the binary-component system were similar to adsorption isotherms of the single-component system. The adsorption affinities of single- and binary-component systems corresponded with electron transfer, competitive adsorption, and physicochemical properties.

  5. Enhanced degradation of carbon tetrachloride by surfactant-modified zero-valent iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG Ya-feng; GUAN Bao-hong; WU Zhong-biao; WANG Da-hui

    2006-01-01

    Sorption of carbon tetrachloride (CT) by zero-valent iron (ZVI) is the rate-limiting step in the degradation of CT, so the sorption capacity of ZVI is of great importance. This experiment was aimed at enhancing the sorption of CT by ZVI and the degradation rate of CT by modification of surfactants. This study showed that ZVI modified by cationic surfactants has favorable synergistic effect on the degradation of CT. The CT degradation rate of ZVI modified by cetyl pyridinium bromide (CPB) was higher than that of the unmodified ZVI by 130%, and the CT degradation rate of ZVI modified by cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) was higher than that of the unmodified ZVI by 81%. This study also showed that the best degradation effect is obtained at the near critical micelle concentrations (CMC) and that high loaded cationic surfactant does not have good synergistic effect on the degradation due to its hydrophilicity and the block in surface reduction sites. Furthermore degradation of CT by ZVI modified by nonionic surfactant has not positive effect on the degradation as the ionic surfactant and the ZVI modified by anionic surfactant has hardly any obvious effects on the degradation.

  6. 铁屑-微生物协同还原去除水体中Cr(Ⅵ)研究%Removal of Cr(VI) by Iron Filings with Microorganisms to Recover Iron Reactivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汤洁; 王卓行; 徐新华

    2013-01-01

    考察了铁屑和微生物对受污染水体中Cr(Ⅵ)的还原去除能力以及Cr(Ⅵ)去除效率的影响因素,分析了反应后铁屑表面的组成以及Cr(Ⅵ)还原产物的形态特征.结果表明,铁屑-微生物协同处理对水体Cr(Ⅵ)的去除具有促进作用,在18h内Cr(Ⅵ)去除率就可达到100%.在25~ 42℃范围内,温度升高有利于Cr(Ⅵ)的去除;Cr(Ⅵ)还原去除的最适宜初始pH为5.8.Cr(Ⅵ)去除效率随着铁屑投加量和微生物接种量的增大而增大,随着Cr(Ⅵ)初始浓度的增大而减小.Mn2+、Zn2+、Co2+、Cu2+和Ni2+离子对Cr(Ⅵ)的还原去除都有一定的抑制作用,其中Mn2+的影响最小,Ni2+的抑制作用最为明显.XPS分析结果显示,铁屑表面吸附和沉积了Cr元素,且有Cr(Ⅲ)和Cr(Ⅵ)两种价态;Cr2p3/2轨道处的出峰由Cr(Ⅲ)在(576.8±0.1)eV处的峰和Cr(Ⅵ)在(578.1 ±0.1)eV处的峰叠加而成,还原产物Cr(Ⅲ)极有可能以Cr(OH)3以及铁铬氧化水合物[FexCr1-x(OH)3]形式存在.%The reduction of Cr(Ⅵ) by iron filings and microorganisms was carried out during our investigation.Effects of factors (e.g.temperature,initial pH,iron filings loadings,inoculum size,initial concentration of Cr(Ⅵ) and other ions) on Cr(Ⅵ) reduction were studied,and the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was applied to explore elements composition on the surface of iron filings.Experimental results revealed a promotion of Cr(Ⅵ) reduction by iron filings with the presence of microorganisms,and the Cr(Ⅵ) removal was complete within 18 h.Results showed the Cr(VI) reduction preferred a higher temperature within the range of 25-42℃ and the optimum initial pH was supposed to be 5.8.The efficiency of Cr(Ⅵ) reduction was increased with increasing amounts of iron filings and microorganisms,and was decreased with the increasing initial concentration of Cr(Ⅵ).Mn2+ 、Zn2+ 、Co2+ 、Cu2+ and Ni2+ ions could cause varying degrees of inhibition of Cr(VI) reduction

  7. Iron-bound organic carbon in forest soils: quantification and characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qian; Poulson, Simon R.; Obrist, Daniel; Sumaila, Samira; Dynes, James J.; McBeth, Joyce M.; Yang, Yu

    2016-08-01

    Iron oxide minerals play an important role in stabilizing organic carbon (OC) and regulating the biogeochemical cycles of OC on the earth surface. To predict the fate of OC, it is essential to understand the amount, spatial variability, and characteristics of Fe-bound OC in natural soils. In this study, we investigated the concentrations and characteristics of Fe-bound OC in soils collected from 14 forests in the United States and determined the impact of ecogeographical variables and soil physicochemical properties on the association of OC and Fe minerals. On average, Fe-bound OC contributed 37.8 % of total OC (TOC) in forest soils. Atomic ratios of OC : Fe ranged from 0.56 to 17.7, with values of 1-10 for most samples, and the ratios indicate the importance of both sorptive and incorporative interactions. The fraction of Fe-bound OC in TOC (fFe-OC) was not related to the concentration of reactive Fe, which suggests that the importance of association with Fe in OC accumulation was not governed by the concentration of reactive Fe. Concentrations of Fe-bound OC and fFe-OC increased with latitude and reached peak values at a site with a mean annual temperature of 6.6 °C. Attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) analyses revealed that Fe-bound OC was less aliphatic than non-Fe-bound OC. Fe-bound OC also was more enriched in 13C compared to the non-Fe-bound OC, but C / N ratios did not differ substantially. In summary, 13C-enriched OC with less aliphatic carbon and more carboxylic carbon was associated with Fe minerals in the soils, with values of fFe-OC being controlled by both sorptive and incorporative associations between Fe and OC. Overall, this study demonstrates that Fe oxides play an important role in regulating the biogeochemical cycles of C in forest soils and uncovers the governing factors for the spatial variability and characteristics of Fe-bound OC.

  8. Internalization of carbon black and maghemite iron oxide nanoparticle mixtures leads to oxidant production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, J Michael; Ho, Shu; Hwang, Wonjoong; Zebda, Rema; Cummins, Kyle; Soriaga, Manuel P; Taylor, Robert; Guo, Bing; Sayes, Christie M

    2010-12-20

    The risk of potential human exposure to mixed nanomaterials in consumer, occupational, and medicinal settings is increasing as nanomaterials enter both the workplace and the marketplace. In this study, we investigated the toxicity of mixed engineered carbon black (ECB) and maghemite iron oxide (Fe(2)O(3)) nanoparticles in a cellular system to understand the mechanism of toxicity and potential methods of toxicity mitigation. Lung epithelial cells (A549) were exposed to mixed Fe(2)O(3) and ECB nanoparticles, mixed Fe(2)O(3) and ECB nanoparticles with the addition of L-ascorbic acid, and mixed Fe(2)O(3) and surface-oxidized engineered carbon black (ox-ECB) nanoparticles. The nanoparticles were characterized using transmission electron microscopy, nitrogen adsorption surface area measurement (BET), X-ray diffraction, and surface charge measurement. The carbon black nanoparticles were also characterized with a reductive capacity assay and by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The cellular uptake of nanoparticles was analyzed via transmission electron microscopy and fluorescence microscopy; the cellular uptake of iron was quantified using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Both the MTT assay and the ethidium homodimer and calcein AM live/dead assay were used to measure cellular proliferation and cytotoxicity, respectively. The dichlorofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA) assay was used to measure the intracellular generation of reactive oxygen species. Results show that both Fe(2)O(3) and ECB (or Fe(2)O(3) and ox-ECB) were co-internalized in intracellular vesicles. Additionally, after exposure to the mixture of nanoparticles, the amount of acidified lysosomes increased over time. The cellular uptake of Fe(2)O(3) nanoparticles was unaffected by mixing with ECB. Significant oxidant production occurred in cells exposed to mixed Fe(2)O(3) and ECB, but not in cells exposed to mixed Fe(2)O(3) and ox-ECB or in cells exposed to Fe(2)O(3) and ECB with the

  9. Electron energy-loss spectroscopy characterization and microwave absorption of iron-filled carbon-nitrogen nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Che Renchao [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, PO Box 603, Beijing, 100080 (China); Liang Chongyun [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, PO Box 603, Beijing, 100080 (China); Shi Honglong [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, PO Box 603, Beijing, 100080 (China); Zhou Xingui [Key Lab of New Ceramic Fibers and Composites, School of Aerospace and Materials Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China); Yang Xinan [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, PO Box 603, Beijing, 100080 (China)

    2007-09-05

    Iron-filled carbon-nitrogen (Fe/CN{sub x}) nanotubes and iron-filled carbon (Fe/C) nanotubes were synthesized at 900 deg. C through a pyrolysis reaction of ferrocene/acetonitrile and ferrocene/xylene, respectively. The differences of structure and composition between the Fe/CN{sub x} nanotubes and Fe/C nanotubes were investigated by transmission electron microscopy and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). It was found that the morphology of Fe/CN{sub x} nanotubes is more corrugated than that of the Fe/C nanotubes due to the incorporation of nitrogen. By comparing the Fe L{sub 2,3} electron energy-loss spectra of Fe/CN{sub x} nanotubes to those of the Fe/C nanotubes, the electron states at the interface between Fe and the tubular wall of both Fe/CN{sub x} nanotubes and Fe/C nanotubes were investigated. At the boundary between Fe and the wall of a CN{sub x} nanotube, the additional electrons contributed from the doped 'pyridinic-like' nitrogen might transfer to the empty 3d orbital of the encapsulated iron, therefore leading to an intensity suppression of the iron L{sub 2,3} edge and an intensity enhancement of the carbon K edge. However, such an effect could not be found in Fe/C nanotubes. Microwave absorption properties of both Fe/CN{sub x} and Fe/C nanocomposites at 2-18 GHz band were studied.

  10. Immobilized Tannin from Sanseviera trifasciata on Carbon as Adsorbent For Iron(II in Polluted Water Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irfan Hanafi Arif

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The organic-agricultural waste resulted from local farmer or community gardening recently paid public attention. The presence and easily grown of “Lidah Mertua” or Sanseviera trifasciata being focused on potency investigation for its prospecting application. It was reported contain some phenolic and also tannin extracted from aqueous solvents. This paper revealed recent investigation applying of its isolated tannin from leave part to modifying of activated carbon. The previous report published that carbon were able to adsorb some toxic heavy metals. However, it has some limitation including lower capacity adsorption. Impregnated or immobilized the tannin-isolated from S. trifasciata leaves was able to modify the carbon functionality, physical appearance, pores size, and it adsorption capacity. Both Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption mechanism model also disclosed the developed adsorbent mechanism of iron(II adsorption on the adsorbent tannin-immobolized on carbon. The real test using community well drilling water source also gave important finding on the concentration of iron(II contained on water source.

  11. Removal of 1-naphthylamine from aqueous solution by multiwall carbon nanotubes/iron oxides/cyclodextrin composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jun; Shao, Dadong; Chen, Changlun; Sheng, Guodong; Ren, Xuemei; Wang, Xiangke

    2011-01-15

    The adsorption of 1-naphthylamine on multiwall carbon nanotubes/iron oxides/β-cyclodextrin composite (denoted by MWCNTs/iron oxides/CD) prepared by using plasma-induced grafting technique was investigated by batch technique under ambient conditions. The effect of contact time, pH, adsorbent content, temperature and initial 1-naphthylamine concentration, on 1-naphthylamine adsorption to MWCNTs/iron oxides/CD was examined. The adsorption of 1-naphthylamine on MWCNTs/iron oxides/CD was dependent on pH, adsorbent content, and temperature. The 1-napthylamien was adsorbed rapidly at the first 50h, and thereafter attained the adsorption saturation at 80h. The adsorption kinetic data were well described by the pseuso-second-order rate model. The adsorption isotherms were fitted by the Langmuir model better than by the Freundlich model. The maximum adsorption capacity of 1-naphthylamine was 200.0mg/g. The adsorption thermodynamic parameters of standard enthalpy (ΔH(0)), standard entropy changes (ΔS(0)), and standard free energy (ΔG(0)) were calculated from temperature dependent adsorption isotherms. The values of ΔH(0) and ΔG(0) suggested that the adsorption of 1-naphthylamine on MWCNTs/iron oxides/CD was endothermic and spontaneous. The electron-donor-acceptor interaction, Hydrophobic interaction, and Lewis acid-base interaction may play an important role in 1-naphthylamine adsorption. The results show that MWCNTs/iron oxides/CD is a promising magnetic nanomaterial for the preconcentration and separation of organic pollutants from aqueous solutions in environmental pollution cleanup. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Removal of 1-naphthylamine from aqueous solution by multiwall carbon nanotubes/iron oxides/cyclodextrin composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu Jun; Shao Dadong [Key Laboratory of Novel Thin Film Solar Cells, Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 1126, 230031 Hefei (China); Chen Changlun, E-mail: clchen@ipp.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Novel Thin Film Solar Cells, Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 1126, 230031 Hefei (China); Sheng Guodong; Ren Xuemei [Key Laboratory of Novel Thin Film Solar Cells, Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 1126, 230031 Hefei (China); Wang Xiangke, E-mail: xkwang@ipp.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Novel Thin Film Solar Cells, Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 1126, 230031 Hefei (China)

    2011-01-15

    The adsorption of 1-naphthylamine on multiwall carbon nanotubes/iron oxides/{beta}-cyclodextrin composite (denoted by MWCNTs/iron oxides/CD) prepared by using plasma-induced grafting technique was investigated by batch technique under ambient conditions. The effect of contact time, pH, adsorbent content, temperature and initial 1-naphthylamine concentration, on 1-naphthylamine adsorption to MWCNTs/iron oxides/CD was examined. The adsorption of 1-naphthylamine on MWCNTs/iron oxides/CD was dependent on pH, adsorbent content, and temperature. The 1-napthylamien was adsorbed rapidly at the first 50 h, and thereafter attained the adsorption saturation at 80 h. The adsorption kinetic data were well described by the pseuso-second-order rate model. The adsorption isotherms were fitted by the Langmuir model better than by the Freundlich model. The maximum adsorption capacity of 1-naphthylamine was 200.0 mg/g. The adsorption thermodynamic parameters of standard enthalpy ({Delta}H{sup 0}), standard entropy changes ({Delta}S{sup 0}), and standard free energy ({Delta}G{sup 0}) were calculated from temperature dependent adsorption isotherms. The values of {Delta}H{sup 0} and {Delta}G{sup 0} suggested that the adsorption of 1-naphthylamine on MWCNTs/iron oxides/CD was endothermic and spontaneous. The electron-donor-acceptor interaction, Hydrophobic interaction, and Lewis acid-base interaction may play an important role in 1-naphthylamine adsorption. The results show that MWCNTs/iron oxides/CD is a promising magnetic nanomaterial for the preconcentration and separation of organic pollutants from aqueous solutions in environmental pollution cleanup.

  13. Control of iron nanoparticle size by manipulating PEG-ethanol colloidal solutions and spin-coating parameters for the growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Choon-Ming Seah; Siang-Piao Chai; Satoshi Ichikawa; Abdul Rahman Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    Iron catalyst nanoparticles were prepared on silicon wafers by spin-coating colloidal solutions containing iron nitrate,polyethylene glycol (PEG) and absolute ethanol.The effects of various spin-coating conditions were investigated.The findings showed that the size of the iron particles was governed by the composition of the colloidal solution used and that a high angular speed was responsible for the formation of a thin colloidal film.The effect of angular acceleration on the size and distribution of the iron particles were found to be insignificant.It was observed that a longer spin-coating duration provoked the agglomeration of iron particles,leading to the formation of large particles.We also showed that single-walled carbon nanotubes could be grown from the smallest iron catalyst nanoparticles after the chemical vapor deposition of methane.

  14. The efficiency of magnetic carbon activated by iron oxide nanoparticles in removing of Cu (II from aqueous solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salehe Salehnia

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Copper ions, due to forming complexes with organic and mineral compounds, can have worrying effects on health and environment. In the present study, the effect of powdered magnetic carbon activated by iron-oxide nanoparticles in removing of CU (V; II from aqueous solutions was assessed. Materials and Methods: This experimental study aimed at determining the effect of powdered magnetic carbon activated  by iron-oxide nanoparticles  parameters including PH, contact time, absorbing dose, and initial concentration on copper(II removal .from aqueous solutions; through an indirect current. In order to assess the qualities of the synthetized adsorbent, TGA, FT-IR and SEM tests were applied. Residual concentration of copper was measured at 324nm wavelength by means of atomic absorption spectrometry flame. The obtained data was analyzed using Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm model. Result: It was found that synthetic nanoparticles(PH=10, with the adsorbent dosage of 1gr/l, can remove more than 96% of copper ions from aqueous solutions at 2 minutes. Also, the results showed that copper absorption pattern is more in accord with Langmuir model.  Conclusion: Based on the current findings , magnetic synthesized nanoparticles coated with carbon. are in sporadic form in aqueous solutions. and can easily be separated using external magnetic environment. Moreover, because of existant active carbon sites absorption in iron oxide structure suferficial absorbtion capacity increases and and these nanoparticles reveal to have a high performance in the removing process of copper pollutants from aqueous solutions.

  15. Decomposition analysis of energy-related carbon dioxide emissions in the iron and steel industry in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenqiang SUN; Jiuju CAI, Hai YU, Lei DAI

    2012-01-01

    This work aims to identify the main factors influencing the energy-related carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from the iron and steel industry in China during the period of 1995-2007. The logarithmic mean divisia index (LMDI) technique was applied with period-wise analysis and time-series analysis. Changes in energy- related CO2 emissions were decomposed into four factors: emission factor effect, energy structure effect, energy consumption effect, and the steel production effect. The results show that steel production is the major factor responsible for the rise in CO2 emissions during the sampling period; on the other hand the energy consump- tion is the largest contributor to the decrease in C02 emissions. To a lesser extent, the emission factor and energy structure effects have both negative and positive contributions to C02 emissions, respectively. Policy implications are provided regarding the reduction of C02 emissions from the iron and steel industry in China, such as controlling the overgrowth of steel production, improving energy-saving technologies, and introducing low-carbon energy sources into the iron and steel industry.

  16. Improved removal of arsenic from groundwater using pre-corroded steel and iron tailored granular activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, J; Cannon, F S; Chen, W; Dempsey, B A

    2010-01-01

    The authors have combined corrosion of steel fittings or perforated sheets with granular activated carbon (GAC) that had been pre-treated with Fe(III)-citrate, to produce an innovative and low-maintenance technique for removing arsenic from groundwater. Removal of arsenic was measured using two GAC column configurations: rapid small scale column tests (RSSCT's) and mini-column tests. Independent variables included pH, pre-corrosion procedure, and idling of the column (i.e. intentionally stopping flow for defined times in order to create reducing conditions). Use of corroded steel plus pre-treated GAC removed arsenic to below 10 microg/L for up to 248,000 bed volumes (BV) at pH 6, compared to 7,000 BVs for pre-treated GAC without pre-corroded steel. Performance was not as good at pH 6.5 or 7.5. Idling the system recovered the iron corrosion ability by reducing the passive Fe(III) layer on pre-corroded steel surface, as a result the BVs to arsenic breakthrough was doubled. But idling also caused brief periods of arsenic and iron release after restart, due to reductive dissolution of arsenic-containing ferric oxides. GAC was also effective as filtration media for removal of iron (hydr)oxide particles (and associated arsenic) that was released from the pre-corroded iron.

  17. Adsorption behavior of multiwall carbon nanotube/iron oxide magnetic composites for Ni(II) and Sr(II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Changlun; Hu, Jun; Shao, Dadong; Li, Jiaxing; Wang, Xiangke

    2009-05-30

    Multiwall carbon nanotube (MWCNT)/iron oxide magnetic composites were prepared, and were characterized by scan electron microscopy using a field emission scanning electron microscope, X-ray diffraction and vibrating sample magnetometer. The adsorptions of Ni(II) and Sr(II) onto MWCNT/iron oxide magnetic composites were studied as a function of pH and ionic strength. The results show that the adsorptions of Ni(II) and Sr(II) on the magnetic composites is strongly dependent on pH and ionic strength. The adsorption capacity of the magnetic composites is much higher than that of MWCNTs and iron oxides. The solid magnetic composites can be separated from the solution by a magnetic process. The Langmuir model fits the adsorption isotherm data of Ni(II) better than the Freundlich model. Results of desorption study shows that Ni(II) adsorbed onto the magnetic composites can be easily desorbed at pH<2.0. MWCNT/iron oxide magnetic composites may be a promising candidate for pre-concentration and solidification of heavy metal ions and radionuclides from large volumes of aqueous solution, as required for remediation purposes.

  18. Transmission electron microscopy of carbon-coated and iron-doped titania nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Anjum, Dalaver H.

    2016-08-02

    We present a study on the properties of iron (Fe)-doped and carbon (C)-coated titania (TiO2) nanoparticles (NPs) which has been compiled by using x-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). These TiO2 NPs were prepared by using the flame synthesis method. This method allows the simultaneous C coating and Fe doping of TiO2 NPs. XRD investigations revealed that the phase of the prepared NPs was anatase TiO2. Conventional TEM analysis showed that the average size of the TiO2 NPs was about 65 nm and that the NPs were uniformly coated with the element C. Furthermore, from the x-ray energy dispersive spectrometry analysis, it was found that about 8 at.% Fe was present in the synthesized samples. High-resolution TEM (HRTEM) revealed the graphitized carbon structure of the layer surrounding the prepared TiO2 NPs. HRTEM analysis further revealed that the NPs possessed the crystalline structure of anatase titania. Energy-filtered TEM (EFTEM) analysis showed the C coating and Fe doping of the NPs. The ratio of L3 and L2 peaks for the Ti-L23 and Fe-L23 edges present in the core loss electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) revealed a +4 oxidation state for the Ti and a +3 oxidation state for the Fe. These EELS results were further confirmed with XPS analysis. The electronic properties of the samples were investigated by applying Kramers-Kronig analysis to the low-loss EELS spectra acquired from the prepared NPs. The presented results showed that the band gap energy of the TiO2 NPs decreased from an original value of 3.2 eV to about 2.2 eV, which is quite close to the ideal band gap energy of 1.65 eV for photocatalysis semiconductors. The observed decrease in band gap energy of the TiO2 NPs was attributed to the presence of Fe atoms at the lattice sites of the anatase TiO2 lattice. In short, C-coated and Fe-doped TiO2 NPs were synthesized with a rather cost-effective and comparatively easily scalable method. The

  19. Transmission electron microscopy of carbon-coated and iron-doped titania nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anjum, Dalaver H.; Memon, Nasir K.; Ismail, Mohamed; Hedhili, Mohamed N.; Sharif, Usman; Chung, Suk Ho

    2016-09-01

    We present a study on the properties of iron (Fe)-doped and carbon (C)-coated titania (TiO2) nanoparticles (NPs) which has been compiled by using x-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). These TiO2 NPs were prepared by using the flame synthesis method. This method allows the simultaneous C coating and Fe doping of TiO2 NPs. XRD investigations revealed that the phase of the prepared NPs was anatase TiO2. Conventional TEM analysis showed that the average size of the TiO2 NPs was about 65 nm and that the NPs were uniformly coated with the element C. Furthermore, from the x-ray energy dispersive spectrometry analysis, it was found that about 8 at.% Fe was present in the synthesized samples. High-resolution TEM (HRTEM) revealed the graphitized carbon structure of the layer surrounding the prepared TiO2 NPs. HRTEM analysis further revealed that the NPs possessed the crystalline structure of anatase titania. Energy-filtered TEM (EFTEM) analysis showed the C coating and Fe doping of the NPs. The ratio of L3 and L2 peaks for the Ti-L23 and Fe-L23 edges present in the core loss electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) revealed a +4 oxidation state for the Ti and a +3 oxidation state for the Fe. These EELS results were further confirmed with XPS analysis. The electronic properties of the samples were investigated by applying Kramers-Kronig analysis to the low-loss EELS spectra acquired from the prepared NPs. The presented results showed that the band gap energy of the TiO2 NPs decreased from an original value of 3.2 eV to about 2.2 eV, which is quite close to the ideal band gap energy of 1.65 eV for photocatalysis semiconductors. The observed decrease in band gap energy of the TiO2 NPs was attributed to the presence of Fe atoms at the lattice sites of the anatase TiO2 lattice. In short, C-coated and Fe-doped TiO2 NPs were synthesized with a rather cost-effective and comparatively easily scalable method. The

  20. Bio-inspired computational design of iron catalysts for the hydrogenation of carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xinzheng

    2015-08-25

    Inspired by the active site structure of monoiron hydrogenase, a series of iron complexes are built using experimentally ready-made acylmethylpyridinol and aliphatic PNP pincer ligands. Density functional theory calculations indicate that the newly designed iron complexes are very promising to catalyze the formation of formic acid from H2 and CO2.

  1. Catalytic hydrogenation of carbon monoxide to alkenes over partially degraded iron-cobalt complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snel, R.

    1989-01-01

    Complex-derived iron-cobalt alloy catalysts have been studied under conditions similar to those normally prevailing in industry. Despite reports in the literature indicating unusual selectivities with iron-cobalt alloy catalysts under atmospheric pressure conditions, no deviations from normal select

  2. Synthesis and characterization of poly(divinylbenzene)-coated magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as precursor for the formation of air-stable carbon-coated iron crystalline nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boguslavsky, Yonit; Margel, Shlomo

    2008-01-01

    Maghemite (gamma-Fe2O3) nanoparticles of 15 +/- 3 nm diameter were prepared by nucleation of gelatin/iron oxide followed by growth of gamma-Fe2O3 films onto these nuclei. The gamma-Fe2O3 nanoparticles were coated with polydivinylbenzene (PDVB) by emulsion polymerization of divinylbenzene (DVB) in an aqueous continuous phase containing the gamma-Fe2O3 nanoparticles. The PDVB-coated gamma-Fe2O3 nanoparticles, dispersed in water, were separated from homo-PDVB nanoparticles using the high gradient magnetic field (HGMF) technique. The influence of DVB concentration on the amount of PDVB coating, on the size and size distribution of the coated gamma-Fe2O3 nanoparticles and on their magnetic properties, has been investigated. Air-stable carbon-coated iron (alpha-Fe/C) crystalline nanoparticles of 41 +/- 12 nm diameter have been prepared by annealing the PDVB-coated gamma-Fe2O3 nanoparticles at 1050 degrees C in an inert atmosphere. These nanoparticles exhibit high saturation magnetization value (83 emu g(-1)) and excellent resistance to oxidation. Characterization of the PDVB-coated gamma-Fe2O3 and of the alpha-Fe/C nanoparticles has been accomplished by TEM, HRTEM, DLS, FTIR, XRD, thermal analysis, zeta-potential, and magnetic measurements.

  3. Chemical oxygen demand removal efficiency and limited factors study of aminosilicone polymers in a water emulsion by iron-carbon micro-electrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shangyuan; Liang, Zhiwei; Yu, Huadong; Wang, Yunlong; Chen, Yingxu

    2014-02-01

    Micro-electrolysis was applied in the present study to investigate the effect of pH, iron-carbon mass ratio, contact time, and treatment batch on the removal efficiency of chemical oxygen demand (COD) within an aminosilicone emulsion. The results exhibited that the removal efficiency of COD decreased linearly with the batch increase, and this tendency was consistent under the various conditions. The adsorption of activated carbons contributes a large portion to the elimination of COD within the aminosilicone emulsion. The oxidation action of iron-carbon micro-electrolysis was proven and the aminosilicone emulsion's COD removal contribution was approximately 16%. Aminosilicone polymers were adsorbed on the surface of activated carbons and iron chips, which contributes to the decline of COD removal efficiency and limits the contribution of oxidation action.

  4. Hot Corrosion Behavior of High-Chromium, High-Carbon Cast Irons in NaCl-KCl Molten Salts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Vuelvas-Rayo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A study on the corrosion behavior of a series of experimental high-chromium (18.53–30.48 wt.%, high-carbon (3.82–5.17% cast irons in NaCl-KCl (1 : 1 M at 670°C has been evaluated by using weight loss technique and compared with a 304-type stainless steel. It was found that all castings had a higher corrosion rate than conventional 304SS and that the addition of Cr increased the degradation rate of the cast irons. Additionally, corrosion rate increased by increasing the C contents up to 4.29%, but it decreased with a further increase in its contents. Results are discussed in terms of consumption of the Cr2O3 layer by the melt.

  5. Understanding the adsorptive interactions of arsenate-iron nanoparticles with curved fullerene-like sheets in activated carbon using a quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics computational approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Nguyen Ngoc; Cam, Le Minh; Ha, Nguyen Thi Thu; Goh, Bee-Min; Saunders, Martin; Jiang, Zhong-Tao; Altarawneh, Mohammednoor; Dlugogorski, Bogdan Z; El-Harbawi, Mohanad; Yin, Chun-Yang

    2017-06-07

    The prevalence of global arsenic groundwater contamination has driven widespread research on developing effective treatment systems including adsorption using various sorbents. The uptake of arsenic-based contaminants onto established sorbents such as activated carbon (AC) can be effectively enhanced via immobilization/impregnation of iron-based elements on the porous AC surface. Recent suggestions that AC pores structurally consist of an eclectic mix of curved fullerene-like sheets may affect the arsenic adsorption dynamics within the AC pores and is further complicated by the presence of nano-sized iron-based elements. We have therefore, attempted to shed light on the adsorptive interactions of arsenate-iron nanoparticles with curved fullerene-like sheets by using hybridized quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QMMM) calculations and microscopy characterization. It is found that, subsequent to optimization, chemisorption between HAsO4(2-) and the AC carbon sheet (endothermic process) is virtually non-existent - this observation is supported by experimental results. Conversely, the incorporation of iron nanoparticles (FeNPs) into the AC carbon sheet greatly facilitates chemisorption of HAsO4(2-). Our calculation implies that iron carbide is formed at the junction between the iron and the AC interface and this tightly chemosorbed layer prevents detachment of the FeNPs on the AC surface. Other aspects including electronic structure/properties, carbon arrangement defects and rate of adsorptive interaction, which are determined using the Climbing-Image NEB method, are also discussed.

  6. Ignition delays in methane-oxygen mixture in the presence of small amount of iron or carbon nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eremin, A. V.; Gurentsov, E. V.

    2016-11-01

    The influence of small additions (0.3-2 ppm) of iron or carbon nanoparticles on ignition delay times in stoichiometric mixture of 20% (methane + oxygen) diluted in argon was investigated. The experiments were performed in 50 mm diameter shock tube behind reflected shock waves. The nanoparticles were synthesized in pyrolysis of 0.5-1% Fe(CO)5 and 1-2% of C6H6 diluted in argon in the experiment before the ignition test. The residual nanoparticles were pulled into the flow behind incident and reflected shock wave from the shock tube walls and their volume fraction was measured by laser light extinction at the wavelength 633 nm. Additions of 0.3-2 ppm of iron nanoparticles to stoichiometric methane-oxygen mixture resulted in twofold decrease of ignition delays at temperatures below 1400 K relatively to calculated and experimental data for the mixture without nanoparticle addition. At additions of 0.4-1 ppm of carbon nanoparticles to stoichiometric methane-oxygen mixture a weak decrease of ignition delay relatively to the calculated data for the mixture without additives of carbon nanoparticles was observed.

  7. Interference of iron as a coagulant on MIB removal by powdered activated carbon adsorption for low turbidity waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seckler, Ferreira Filho Sidney; Margarida, Marchetto; Rosemeire, Alves Laganaro

    2013-08-01

    Powered activated carbon (PAC) is widely used in water treatment plants to minimize odors in drinking water. This study investigated the removal of 2-methylisoborneol (MIB) by PAC adsorption, combined with coagulation using iron as a coagulant. The adsorption and coagulation process were studied through different case scenarios of jar tests. The analysis evaluated the effect of PAC dosing in the liquid phase immediately before or after the coagulant addition. Ferric sulphate was used as the coagulant with dosages from 10 to 30 mg/L, and PAC dosages varied from 10 to 40 mg/L. The highest MIB removal efficiency (about 70%) was achieved without the coagulant addition and with the highest PAC dosage (40 mg/L). Lower MIB removal efficiencies were observed in the presence of coagulant, showing a clear interference of the iron precipitate or coagulant in the adsorption process. The degree of interference of the coagulation process in the MIB removal was proportional to the ratio of ferric hydroxide mass to the PAC mass. For both cases of PAC dosing, upstream and downstream of the coagulant injection point, the MIB removal efficiency was similar. However, MIB removal efficiency was 15% lower when compared with experiments without the coagulant application. This interference in the MIB adsorption occurs potentially because the coagulant coats the surface of the carbon and interferes with the MIB coming in contact with the carbon's surface and pores. This constraint requires an increase of the PAC dosage to provide the same efficiency observed without coagulation.

  8. Removal of 2-ClBP from soil-water system using activated carbon supported nanoscale zerovalent iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Yu, Tian; Han, Xiaolin; Ying, Weichi

    2016-09-01

    We explored the feasibility and removal mechanism of removing 2-chlorobiphenyl (2-ClBP) from soil-water system using granular activated carbon (GAC) impregnated with nanoscale zerovalent iron (reactive activated carbon or RAC). The RAC samples were successfully synthesized by the liquid precipitation method. The mesoporous GAC based RAC with low iron content (1.32%) exhibited higher 2-ClBP removal efficiency (54.6%) in the water phase. The result of Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetic model implied that the different molecular structures between 2-ClBP and trichloroethylene (TCE) resulted in more difference in dechlorination reaction rates on RAC than adsorption capacities. Compared to removing 2-ClBP in the water phase, RAC removed the 2-ClBP more slowly in the soil phase due to the significant external mass transfer resistance. However, in the soil phase, a better removal capacity of RAC was observed than its base GAC because the chemical dechlorination played a more important role in total removal process for 2-ClBP. This important result verified the effectiveness of RAC for removing 2-ClBP in the soil phase. Although reducing the total RAC removal rate of 2-ClBP, soil organic matter (SOM), especially the soft carbon, also served as an electron transfer medium to promote the dechlorination of 2-ClBP in the long term.

  9. Energy of the Isolated Metastable Iron-Nickel FCC Nanocluster with a Carbon Atom in the Tetragonal Interstice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondarenko, Natalya V; Nedolya, Anatoliy V

    2017-12-01

    The energy of the isolated iron-nickel nanocluster was calculated by molecular mechanics method using Lennard-Jones potential. The cluster included a carbon atom that drifted from an inside octahedral interstice to a tetrahedral interstice in [Formula: see text] direction and after that in direction to the surface. In addition, one of 14 iron atoms was replaced by a nickel atom, the position of which was changing during simulation.The energy of the nanocluster was estimated at the different interatomic distances. As a result of simulation, the optimal interatomic distances of Fe-Ni-C nanocluster was chosen for the simulation, in which height of the potential barrier was maximal and face-centered cubic (FCC) nanocluster was the most stable.It is shown that there were three main positions of a nickel atom that significantly affected nanocluster's energy.The calculation results indicated that position of the carbon atom in the octahedral interstice was more energetically favorable than tetrahedral interstice in the case of FCC nanocluster. On the other side, the potential barrier was smaller in the direction [Formula: see text] than in the direction .This indicates that there are two ways for carbon atom to drift to the surface of the nanocluster.

  10. A field investigation on transport of carbon-supported nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) in groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, J; Meißner, T; Potthoff, A; Bleyl, S; Georgi, A; Mackenzie, K; Trabitzsch, R; Werban, U; Oswald, S E

    2015-10-01

    The application of nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) for subsurface remediation of groundwater contaminants is a promising new technology, which can be understood as alternative to the permeable reactive barrier technique using granular iron. Dechlorination of organic contaminants by zero-valent iron seems promising. Currently, one limitation to widespread deployment is the fast agglomeration and sedimentation of nZVI in colloidal suspensions, even more so when in soils and sediments, which limits the applicability for the treatment of sources and plumes of contamination. Colloid-supported nZVI shows promising characteristics to overcome these limitations. Mobility of Carbo-Iron Colloids (CIC) - a newly developed composite material based on finely ground activated carbon as a carrier for nZVI - was tested in a field application: In this study, a horizontal dipole flow field was established between two wells separated by 5.3m in a confined, natural aquifer. The injection/extraction rate was 500L/h. Approximately 1.2kg of CIC was suspended with the polyanionic stabilizer carboxymethyl cellulose. The suspension was introduced into the aquifer at the injection well. Breakthrough of CIC was observed visually and based on total particle and iron concentrations detected in samples from the extraction well. Filtration of water samples revealed a particle breakthrough of about 12% of the amount introduced. This demonstrates high mobility of CIC particles and we suggest that nZVI carried on CIC can be used for contaminant plume remediation by in-situ formation of reactive barriers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. SURFACE CHARACTER OF IRON OXIDE/CARBON NANOPARTICLES SYNTHESIZED BY SUBMERGED ARC DISCHARGE METHOD IN ETHANOL/UREA MEDIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teguh Endah Saraswati

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles modified with carbon has been successfully performed by submerged arc-discharge method in ethanol/urea medium. Iron oxide used in the fabrication process was prepared by iron electrolysis in an electrolyte solution of NaCl. Fabrication of nanoparticles in this method uses two graphite electrodes. One of them was made in a pointed shape and the other graphite electrodes hollowed out and filled with a mixture of iron oxide, graphite and glue silica (as binder with a ratio of 1:3:1 (w/w/w. The liquid medium used in this method is a mixture solution of ethanol 50% and urea (0%, 10%, 25% and 50% with a volume ratio of 1:1 (v/v. The crystalline of iron oxide was characterized using X-Ray Diffraction (XRD, compared to JCPDS No. 89-0597, No. 89-0691 and No. 39-1346. Variations in the urea concentration in the liquid medium provided the changes of the surface character of the synthesized nanoparticles. The changes of surface character were analyzed by the Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR spectra and nanoparticle dispersion in water and ethanol. FTIR spectra showed the absorption of Fe-O, CH, CN, C = O, OH and NH at 460-555 cm-1, 650-1000 cm-1, 1000-1350 cm-1, 1640-1680 cm-1, 2400-3400 cm-1, 3200-3400 cm-1, 3100-3500 cm-1, respectively. The best hydrophilic surface character achieved when the nanoparticle was synthesized in medium of ethanol 50% with the addition of urea50%. The existence of a functional group attached on the surface of nanoparticles synthesized in ethanol/urea makes these nanoparticles had better dispersion than nanoparticles synthesized in ethanol medium without urea addition.

  12. Catalyst Design Using Nanoporous Iron for the Chemical Vapor Deposition Synthesis of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarek M. Abdel-Fattah

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs have been synthesized via a novel chemical vapor deposition (CVD approach utilizing nanoporous, iron-supported catalysts. Stable aqueous dispersions of the CVD-grown nanotubes using an anionic surfactant were also obtained. The properties of the as-produced SWNTs were characterized through atomic force microscopy and Raman spectroscopy and compared with purified SWNTs produced via the high-pressure CO (HiPCO method as a reference, and the nanotubes were observed with greater lengths than those of similarly processed HiPCO SWNTs.

  13. Synthesis of magnetite from iron-rich mine water using sodium carbonate

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Akinwekomi, V

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available and O on the matrices of synthesized material hence confirming that the recovered material is magnetite. This study successfully proved that magnetite nanoparticles can be synthesized from iron-rich mine drainage....

  14. MATHEMATICAL FORMALISM AND SOFTWARE FOR PROCESSING OF IMAGES OF IRON-CARBON ALLOYS MICROSTRUCTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Chichko

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The description of mathematical apparatus, algorithms and software АОМ-1 and АОМ-2, used for computer processing and quantitative analysis of microstructures of pearlitic steels and grey irons, is given.

  15. Removal of polybrominated diphenyl ethers by biomass carbon-supported nanoscale zerovalent iron particles: influencing factors, kinetics, and mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Rongbing; Xu, Zhen; Peng, Lin; Bi, Dongsu

    2016-12-01

    In this study, nanoscale zerovalent iron (NZVI) immobilized on biomass carbon was used for the high efficient removal of BDE 209. NZVI supported on biomass carbon minimized the aggregation of NZVI particles resulting in the increased reaction performance. The proposed removal mechanism included the adsorption of BDE 209 on the surface or interior of the biomass carbon NZVI (BC-NZVI) particles and the subsequent debromination of BDE 209 by NZVI while biomass carbon served as an electron shuttle. BC-NZVI particles and the interaction between BC-NZVI particles and BDE 209 were characterized by TEM, XRD, and XPS. The removal reaction followed a pseudo-first-order rate expression under different reaction conditions, and the k obs was higher than that of other NZVI-supported materials. The debromination of BDE 209 by BC-NZVI was a stepwise process from nona-BDE to DE. A proposed pathway suggested that supporting NZVI on biomass carbon has potential as a promising technique for in situ organic-contaminated groundwater remediation.

  16. Respiratory Effects of Inhaled Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes: The Role of Particle Morphology and Iron Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madl, Amy Kathleen

    Nanotechnology provides promise for significant advancements in a number of different fields including imaging, electronics, and therapeutics. With worldwide production of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) exceeding over 500 metric tons annually and industry growth expecting to double over the next 5 yr, there are concerns our understanding of the hazards of these nanomaterials may not be keeping pace with market demand. The physicochemical properties of CNTs may delineate the key features that determine either toxicity or biocompatibility and assist in evaluating the potential health risks posed in industrial and consumer product settings. We hypothesized that the iron content and morphology of inhaled single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) influences the extent of cellular injury and alters homeostasis in the lung. To address this hypothesis, (1) an aerosol system was developed to deliver carbon-based nanomaterials in a manner of exposure that is physiologically and environmentally relevant (e.g., inhalation), (2) acute (1 d) and subacute (10 d) nose-only inhalation studies to a well-characterized aerosol of iron-containing (FeSWCNT) versus cleaned (iron removed, cSWCNTs) SWCNTs were conducted to evaluate the time-course patterns of possible injury through measurement of markers of cytotoxicity, inflammation, and cellular remodeling/homeostasis, and (3) the effects of SWCNTs were compared to other well-studied materials (e.g. non-fibrous, low-iron content ultrafine carbon black and fibrous, high-iron content, highly persistent, durable and potent carcinogen crocidolite) to offer insights into the relative toxicity of these nanomaterials as well as the possible mechanisms by which the effects occur. Rats (SD) were exposed to either aerosolized SWCNTs (raw FeSWCNT or purified cSWCNT), carbon black (CB), crocidolite, or fresh air via nose-only inhalation. Markers of inflammation and cytotoxicity in lung lavage, mucin in different airway generations, and collagen in the

  17. Corrosion Behavior of Pipeline Carbon Steel under Different Iron Oxide Deposits in the District Heating System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Sang Kim

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion behavior of pipeline steel covered by iron oxides (α-FeOOH; Fe3O4 and Fe2O3 was investigated in simulated district heating water. In potentiodynamic polarization tests; the corrosion rate of pipeline steel is increased under the iron oxide but the increaseing rate is different due to the differnet chemical reactions of the covered iron oxides. Pitting corrosion was only observed on the α-FeOOH-covered specimen; which is caused by the crevice corrosion under the α-FeOOH. From Mott-Schottky and X-ray diffraction results; the surface reaction and oxide layer were dependent on the kind of iron oxides. The iron oxides deposit increases the failure risk of the pipeline and localized corrosion can be occurred under the α-FeOOH-covered region of the pipeline. Thus, prevention methods for the iron oxide deposit in the district pipeline system such as filtering or periodic chemical cleaning are needed.

  18. Linking carbon and iron cycles by investigating transport, fate and mineralogy of iron-bearing colloids from peat-draining rivers - Scotland as model for high-latitude rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Deborah; Crocket, Kirsty; Brand, Tim; Stutter, Marc; Wilson, Clare; Schröder, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Linking carbon and iron cycles by investigating transport, fate and mineralogy of iron-bearing colloids from peat-draining rivers - Scotland as model for high-latitude rivers Wood, D.A¹, Crocket, K², Brand, T², Stutter, M³, Wilson, C¹ & Schröder, C¹ ¹Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Stirling, Stirling, FK9 4LA ²Scottish Association for Marine Science, University of the Highlands and Islands, Dunbeg, Oban, PA37 1QA ³James Hutton Institute, Craigiebuckler, Aberdeen, AB15 8QH The biogeochemical iron cycle exerts significant control on the carbon cycle¹. Iron is a limiting nutrient in large areas of the world's oceans and its bioavailability controls CO2 uptake by marine photosynthesizing microorganisms. While atmospheric iron inputs to the open ocean have been extensively measured, global river inputs have likely been underestimated because most major world rivers exhibit extensive iron removal by flocculation and sedimentation during seawater mixing. Iron minerals and organic matter mutually stabilise each other², which results in a 'rusty carbon sink' in sediments³ on the one hand but may also enhance transport beyond the salinity gradient on the other. Humic-rich, high latitude rivers have a higher iron-carrying capacity⁴-⁶ but are underrepresented in iron flux calculations. The West Coast sea lochs in Scotland are fed by predominantly peatland drainage catchments, and the rivers entering the sea lochs carry a high load of organic matter. The short distance between many of these catchments and the coastal ocean facilitates source-to-sea research investigating transport, fate and mineralogy of iron-bearing colloids providing a good analogue for similar high latitude fjordic systems. We use SeaFAST+ICP-MS and Mössbauer spectroscopy to survey trace metal concentrations, with emphasis on iron concentrations, speciation and mineralogy, across salinity gradients. In combination with ultra-filtration techniques, this allows

  19. Iron carbide as a source of carbon for graphite and diamond formation under lithospheric mantle P-T parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bataleva, Yuliya V.; Palyanov, Yuri N.; Borzdov, Yuri M.; Bayukov, Oleg A.; Zdrokov, Evgeniy V.

    2017-08-01

    Experimental modeling of natural carbide-involving reactions, implicated in the graphite and diamond formation and estimation of the iron carbide stability in the presence of S-bearing fluids, sulfide melts as well as mantle silicates and oxides, was performed using a multi-anvil high-pressure split-sphere apparatus. Experiments were carried out in the carbide-sulfur (Fe3C-S), carbide-sulfur-oxide (Fe3C-S-SiO2-MgO) and carbide-sulfide (Fe3C-FeS2) systems, at pressure of 6.3 GPa, temperatures in the range of 900-1600 °C and run time of 18-40 h. During the interaction of cohenite with S-rich reduced fluid or pyrite at 900-1100 °C, extraction of carbon from carbide was realized, resulting in the formation of graphite in assemblage with pyrrhotite and cohenite. At higher temperatures complete reaction of cohenite with newly-formed sulfide melt was found to produce metal-sulfide melt with dissolved carbon (Fe64S27C9 (1200 °C)-Fe54S40C6 (1500 °C), at.%), which acted as a crystallization medium for graphite (1200-1600 °C) and diamond growth on seeds (1300-1600 °C). Reactions of cohenite and oxides with S-rich reduced fluid resulted in the formation of graphite in assemblage with highly ferrous orthopyroxene and pyrrhotite (900-1100 °C) or in hypersthene formation, as well as graphite crystallization and diamond growth on seeds in the Fe-S-C melt (1200-1600 °C). We show that the main processes of carbide interaction with S-rich fluid or sulfide melt are recrystallization of cohenite (900-1100 °C), extraction of carbon and iron in the sulfide melt, and graphite formation and diamond growth in the metal-sulfide melt with dissolved carbon. Our results evidence that iron carbide can act as carbon source in the processes of natural graphite and diamond formation under reduced mantle conditions. We experimentally demonstrate that cohenite in natural environments can be partially consumed in the reactions with mantle silicates and oxides, and is absolutely unstable in

  20. Purity-enhanced bulk synthesis of thin single-wall carbon nanotubes using iron-copper catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, H. E.; Miyata, Y.; Nakayama, T.; Chen, S.; Kitaura, R.; Shinohara, H.

    2011-09-01

    We report high purity and high yield synthesis of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) of narrow diameter from iron-copper bimetal catalysts. The SWCNTs with diameter of 0.8-1.2 nm are synthesized using the zeolite-supported alcohol chemical vapour deposition method. Single metal and bimetal catalysts are systematically investigated to achieve both the enhancement of SWCNT yield and the suppression of the undesired formation of graphitic impurities. The relative yield and purity of SWCNTs are quantified using optical absorption spectroscopy with an ultracentrifuge-based purification technique. For the single metal catalyst, iron shows the highest catalytic activity compared with the other metals such as cobalt, nickel, molybdenum, copper, and platinum. It has been found that the addition of copper to iron results in the suppression of carbonaceous impurity formation without decreasing the SWCNT yield. The purity-enhanced SWCNT shows fairly low sheet resistance due to the improvement of inter-nanotube contacts. This scalable design of SWCNT synthesis with enhanced purity is therefore a promising tool for shaping future high performance devices.

  1. The effect of carbon type on arsenic and trichloroethylene removal capabilities of iron (hydr)oxide nanoparticle-impregnated granulated activated carbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Anne Marie; Hristovski, Kiril D; Möller, Teresia; Westerhoff, Paul; Sylvester, Paul

    2010-11-15

    This study investigates the impact of the type of virgin granular activated carbon (GAC) media used to synthesize iron (hydr)oxide nanoparticle-impregnated granular activated carbon (Fe-GAC) on its properties and its ability to remove arsenate and organic trichloroethylene (TCE) from water. Two Fe-GAC media were synthesized via a permanganate/ferrous ion synthesis method using bituminous and lignite-based virgin GAC. Data obtained from an array of characterization techniques (pore size distribution, surface charge, etc.) in correlation with batch equilibrium tests, and continuous flow modeling suggested that GAC type and pore size distribution control the iron (nanoparticle) contents, Fe-GAC synthesis mechanisms, and contaminant removal performances. Pore surface diffusion model calculations predicted that lignite Fe-GAC could remove ∼6.3 L g(-1) dry media and ∼4 L g(-1) dry media of water contaminated with 30 μg L(-1) TCE and arsenic, respectively. In contrast, the bituminous Fe-GAC could remove only ∼0.2 L/g dry media for TCE and ∼2.8 L/g dry media for As of the same contaminated water. The results show that arsenic removal capability is increased while TCE removal is decreased as a result of Fe nanoparticle impregnation. This tradeoff is related to several factors, of which changes in surface properties and pore size distributions appeared to be the most dominant.

  2. Synthetic iron (hydr)oxide-glucose associations in subsurface soil: Effects on decomposability of mineral associated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porras, R C; Hicks Pries, C E; Torn, M S; Nico, P S

    2017-09-13

    Soils are a globally important reservoir of organic carbon. There is a growing understanding that interactions with soil mineral phases contribute to the accumulation and retention of otherwise degradable organic matter (OM) in soils and sediments. However, the bioavailability of organic compounds in mineral-organic-associations (MOAs), especially under varying environmental conditions is not well known. To assess the impact of mineral association and warming on the decomposition of an easily respirable organic substrate (glucose), we conducted a series of laboratory incubations at different temperatures with field-collected soils from 10 to 20cm, 50-60cm, and 80-90cm depth. We added (13)C-labeled glucose either directly to native soil or sorbed to one of two synthetic iron (hydr)oxide phases (goethite and ferrihydrite) that differ in crystallinity and affinity for sorbing glucose. We found that: (1) association with the Fe (hydr)oxide minerals reduced the decomposition rate of glucose by >99.5% relative to rate of decomposition for free glucose in soil; (2) the respiration rate per gram carbon did not differ appreciably with depth, suggesting a similar degree of decomposability for native C across depths and that under the incubation conditions total carbon availability represents the principal limitation on respiration under these conditions as opposed to reduced abundance of decomposers or moisture and oxygen limitations; (3) addition of free glucose enhanced native carbon respiration at all soil depths with the largest effect at 50-60cm; (4) in general respiration of the organo-mineral complex (glucose and iron-(hydr)oxide) was less temperature sensitive than was respiration of native carbon; (5) the addition of organic free mineral decreased the rate of soil respiration in the intermediate 50-60cm depth soil. The results emphasize the key role of MOAs in regulating the fluxes of carbon from soils to the atmosphere and in turn the stocks of soil carbon

  3. Scientific Opinion on the safety assessment of the active substances, sodium erythorbate, sodium carbonate, sodium bicarbonate, iron sulphate, activated carbon, cellulose, calcium hydroxide, calcium chloride and water, for use as active system in food contact materials

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    This scientific opinion of EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids deals with the safety assessment of the active substances sodium erythorbate, sodium carbonate, sodium bicarbonate, iron sulfate, activated carbon, cellulose, calcium hydroxide, calcium chloride and water, used in mixture which is packed into sachets for absorbing oxygen/carbon dioxide emitting from/into the headspace surrounding packed food. All substances of this formulation have been e...

  4. Active site formation mechanism of carbon-based oxygen reduction catalysts derived from a hyperbranched iron phthalocyanine polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiraike, Yusuke; Saito, Makoto; Niwa, Hideharu; Kobayashi, Masaki; Harada, Yoshihisa; Oshima, Masaharu; Kim, Jaehong; Nabae, Yuta; Kakimoto, Masa-aki

    2015-04-01

    Carbon-based cathode catalysts derived from a hyperbranched iron phthalocyanine polymer (HB-FePc) were characterized, and their active-site formation mechanism was studied by synchrotron-based spectroscopy. The properties of the HB-FePc catalyst are compared with those of a catalyst with high oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity synthesized from a mixture of iron phthalocyanine and phenolic resin (FePc/PhRs). Electrochemical measurements demonstrate that the HB-FePc catalyst does not lose its ORR activity up to 900°C, whereas that of the FePc/PhRs catalyst decreases above 700°C. Hard X-ray photoemission spectra reveal that the HB-FePc catalysts retain more nitrogen components than the FePc/PhRs catalysts between pyrolysis temperatures of 600°C and 800°C. This is because the linked structure of the HB-FePc precursor has high thermostability against nitrogen desorption. Consequently, effective doping of active nitrogen species into the sp 2 carbon network of the HB-FePc catalysts may occur up to 900°C.

  5. Active site formation mechanism of carbon-based oxygen reduction catalysts derived from a hyperbranched iron phthalocyanine polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiraike, Yusuke; Saito, Makoto; Niwa, Hideharu; Kobayashi, Masaki; Harada, Yoshihisa; Oshima, Masaharu; Kim, Jaehong; Nabae, Yuta; Kakimoto, Masa-Aki

    2015-01-01

    Carbon-based cathode catalysts derived from a hyperbranched iron phthalocyanine polymer (HB-FePc) were characterized, and their active-site formation mechanism was studied by synchrotron-based spectroscopy. The properties of the HB-FePc catalyst are compared with those of a catalyst with high oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity synthesized from a mixture of iron phthalocyanine and phenolic resin (FePc/PhRs). Electrochemical measurements demonstrate that the HB-FePc catalyst does not lose its ORR activity up to 900°C, whereas that of the FePc/PhRs catalyst decreases above 700°C. Hard X-ray photoemission spectra reveal that the HB-FePc catalysts retain more nitrogen components than the FePc/PhRs catalysts between pyrolysis temperatures of 600°C and 800°C. This is because the linked structure of the HB-FePc precursor has high thermostability against nitrogen desorption. Consequently, effective doping of active nitrogen species into the sp (2) carbon network of the HB-FePc catalysts may occur up to 900°C.

  6. Emerging Energy-efficiency and Carbon Dioxide Emissions-reduction Technologies for the Iron and Steel Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasanbeigi, Ali [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts Dept.. China Energy Group; Price, Lynn [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts Dept.. China Energy Group; Arens, Marlene [Fraunhofer Inst. for Systems and Innovation Research (ISI), Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2013-01-31

    Iron and steel manufacturing is among the most energy-intensive industries and accounts for the largest share, approximately 27 percent, of global carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from the manufacturing sector. The ongoing increase in world steel demand means that this industry’s energy use and CO2 emissions continue to grow, so there is significant incentive to develop, commercialize and adopt emerging energy-efficiency and CO2 emissions-reduction technologies for steel production. Although studies from around the world have identified a wide range of energy-efficiency technologies applicable to the steel industry that have already been commercialized, information is limited and/or scattered regarding emerging or advanced energy-efficiency and low-carbon technologies that are not yet commercialized. This report consolidates available information on 56 emerging iron and steel industry technologies, with the intent of providing a well-structured database of information on these technologies for engineers, researchers, investors, steel companies, policy makers, and other interested parties. For each technology included, we provide information on energy savings and environmental and other benefits, costs, and commercialization status; we also identify references for more information.

  7. kinetics of the coupled gas-iron reactions involving silicon and carbon

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    1985-09-01

    Sep 1, 1985 ... and a gas phase consisting carbon monoxide, silicon monoxide and carbon dioxide. ... limited by oxygen in the metal boundary layer at the slag- ... the furnace into the reaction chamber the carbon monoxide acting as both a ...

  8. The Speciation of Particulate Iron and Carbon in the East Pacific Rise 15oS Near-field Hydrothermal Plume and Underlying Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toner, B. M.; Lam, P. J.; Nicholas, S. L.; Ohnemus, D.; Hoffman, C. L.; Fitzsimmons, J. N.; Sherrell, R. M.; German, C. R.

    2014-12-01

    Particulate iron and carbon speciation were measured for water column and sediment samples collected at the East Pacific Rise ridge axis (15oS; Station 18) and approximately 80 km down-current (Station 20) during the US GEOTRACES Eastern Pacific Zonal Transect cruise. Water column particles were collected by in situ filtration (0.2 micron, polycarbonate) from above, within, and below the hydrothermal plume. Water column samples were handled in an anaerobic chamber and stored frozen under inert gas shipboard, and protected from ambient oxygen during analysis. The flocculant, top-layer of the sediments was sampled shipboard under ambient conditions and stored frozen until analysis. Iron and carbon speciation were measured using X-ray microprobe (10.3.2) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) instruments at the Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA, USA. Iron (1s and 2p) and carbon (1s) X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy and imaging for particles revealed that: (1) in comparison to the above plume sample, organic carbon is abundant in particles within and below the plume, as well as in surface sediments; (2) iron sulfides are not detectable in any water column sample investigated so far; (3) the fraction of non-sulfide reduced iron is highest in the below plume samples; and (4) the below plume sample is rich in free-living microbial cells.

  9. Toward uniform and ultrathin carbon layer coating on lithium iron phosphate using liquid carbon dioxide for enhanced electrochemical performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Seung-Ah; Kim, Dong Hyun; Chung, Kyung Yoon; Chang, Wonyoung; Yoo, Jibeom; Kim, Jaehoon

    2014-09-01

    In this communication, uniform and ultrathin carbon coating on LiFePO4 (LFP) particles are performed using liquid carbon dioxide (l-CO2)-based free-meniscus coating. The uniform and conformal coverage of the carbon layer on LFP with a thickness of 3.3 nm, and a uniform distribution of carbon on the entire surface of the LFP particle are confirmed. The carbon-coated LFP (C-LFP) with a carbon content of 1.9 wt.% obtained using l-CO2-based coating exhibits a discharge capacity of 169 mAh g-1 at 0.1 C and 71 mAh g-1 at 30 C, while much lower discharge capacity of 146 mAh g-1 at 0.1 C and 17 mAh g-1 at 30 C is observed when C-LFP with an optimized carbon content of 6.0 wt.% is prepared using conventional aqueous-based coating.

  10. A microfibre assembly of an iron-carbon composite with giant magnetisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Ying; Liu, Pu; Xiao, Jun; Li, Hongbo; Wang, Chengxin; Yang, Guowei

    2013-10-01

    Iron carbide is among the oldest known materials. The utility of this ancient advanced material is greatly extended in its nanostructured forms. We demonstrate for the first time that one-dimensional iron carbide microfibres can be assembled in liquid using strong magnetic field-assisted laser ablation. The giant saturation magnetisation of these particles was measured a 261 emu/g at room temperature, which is the best value reported to date for iron nitride and carbide nanostructures, is 5.5 times greater than the 47 emu/g reported for Fe3C nanoparticles, and exceeds the 212 emu/g for bulk Fe. The magnetic field-induced dipolar interactions of the magnetic nanospheres and the nanochains played a key role in determining the shape of the product. These findings lead to a variety of promising applications for this unique nanostructure including its use as a magnetically guided transporter for biomedicine and as a magnetic recording material.

  11. Optimization of Synthesis Condition for Nanoscale Zero Valent Iron Immobilization on Granular Activated Carbon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Henrik Rasmus; Hwang, Yuhoon; Mines, Paul D.

    2016-01-01

    Nanoscale zero valent iron (nZVI) has been intensively studied for the treatment of a plethora of pollutants through reductive reaction, however, the nano size should be of concern when nZVI is considered for water treatment, due to difficulties in recovery. The loss of nZVI causes not only...... Fe/GAC composite were suggested. Both total iron content and Fe0 content can be significantly affected by preparation processes, therefore, it was important to avoid oxidation during preparation to achieve higher reduction capacity. Synthesis conditions such as reduction time and existence...

  12. The Optimization of Costs and the Carbon Content in Cast Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Grzybowska

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available In the article was introduced the conceptions of the optimization of the cast-iron batch near the use the mathematical programmer MATLAB. The results of industrial tests were showed with the use of the batch from sheet metals. It was showed on the possibility of formulating the tasks of optimizing with the use of the programming linear. It was showed on more effective utilization the power of productive foundries and minimalizing losses coming into being in the result of the inappropriate selection of the raw material composition. The conduct of optimizing the intervention of the fusion of cast iron was talked over.

  13. Quantum chemical molecular dynamics simulation of single-walled carbon nanotube cap nucleation on an iron particle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Yasuhito; Okamoto, Yoshiko; Page, Alister J; Irle, Stephan; Morokuma, Keiji

    2009-11-24

    The atomic scale details of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) nucleation on metal catalyst particles are elusive to experimental observations. Computer simulation of metal-catalyzed SWNT nucleation is a challenging topic but potentially of great importance to understand the factors affecting SWNT diameters, chirality, and growth efficiency. In this work, we use nonequilibrium density functional tight-binding molecular dynamics simulations and report nucleation of sp(2)-carbon cap structures on an iron particle consisting of 38 atoms. One C(2) molecule was placed every 1.0 ps around an Fe(38) cluster for 30 ps, after which a further 410 ps of annealing simulation without carbon supply was performed. We find that sp(2)-carbon network nucleation and annealing processes occur in three sequential and repetitive stages: (A) polyyne chains on the metal surface react with each other to evolve into a Y-shaped polyyne junction, which preferentially form a five-membered ring as a nucleus; (B) polyyne chains on the first five-membered ring form an additional fused five- or six-membered ring; and (C) pentagon-to-hexagon self-healing rearrangement takes place with the help of short-lived polyyne chains, stabilized by the mobile metal atoms. The observed nucleation process resembles the formation of a fullerene cage. However, the metal particle plays a key role in differentiating the nucleation process from fullerene cage formation, most importantly by keeping the growing cap structure from closing into a fullerene cage and by keeping the carbon edge "alive" for the addition of new carbon material.

  14. What would be the effects of a carbon tax in Japan: an historic analysis of subsidies and fuel pricing on the iron & steel, chemical, and machinery industries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takako Wakiyama

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study examines how a carbon tax could affect industrial-related carbon dioxide (CO2 emissions in Japan. Rather than forecasting the effects of a tax, the paper employs a time-series autoregressive moving average (ARMA model to determine how past subsidies and fuel price changes affected investments in energy and carbon intensity in Japan’s iron & steel, chemical, and machinery industries from 1993 to 2004. The results suggest the impacts varied greatly across industries. In the iron & steel industry, subsidies and price changes produced negligible effects on investments in energy and carbon intensity. This may be because existing iron & steel technologies have long lifetimes and substantial replacement costs. It may also be because the few large companies dominating the industry were relatively immune to subsidy provisions and pricing changes. In the chemical industry, subsidies and fuel prices gave rise to investments that improved carbon and energy intensity. This may be because the industry has relatively higher operation costs that could be cut easily given financial incentives. In the machinery industry, two of three fuel price changes (oil and gas, but not subsidy provisions, yielded improvements in carbon and energy intensity. This may reflect the heterogeneity of companies and products comprising the industry. Overall, the study underscores that policymakers need to tailor the rates and revenue recycling provisions of a carbon tax to an industry’s unique features to stimulate CO2 reductions.

  15. Interference of iron as a coagulant on MIB removal by powdered activated carbon adsorption for low turbidity waters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ferreira Filho SIDNEY SECKLER; Marchetto MARGARIDA; Alves Laganaro ROSEMEIRE

    2013-01-01

    Powered activated carbon (PAC) is widely used in water treatment plants to minimize odors in drinking water.This study investigated the removal of 2-methylisoborneol (MIB) by PAC adsorption,combined with coagulation using iron as a coagulant.The adsorption and coagulation process were studied through different case scenarios of jar tests.The analysis evaluated the effect of PAC dosing in the liquid phase immediately before or after the coagulant addition.Ferric sulphate was used as the coagulant with dosages from 10 to 30 mg/L,and PAC dosages varied from 10 to 40 mg/L.The highest MIB removal efficiency (about 70%) was achieved without the coagulant addition and with the highest PAC dosage (40 mg/L).Lower MIB removal efficiencies were observed in the presence of coagulant,showing a clear interference of the iron precipitate or coagulant in the adsorption process.The degree of interference of the coagulation process in the MIB removal was proportional to the ratio of ferric hydroxide mass to the PAC mass.For both cases of PAC dosing,upstream and downstream of the coagulant injection point,the MIB removal efficiency was similar.However,MIB removal efficiency was 15% lower when compared with experiments without the coagulant application.This interference in the MIB adsorption occurs potentially because the coagulant coats the surface of the carbon and interferes with the MIB coming in contact with the carbon's surface and pores.This constraint requires an increase of the PAC dosage to provide the same efficiency observed without coagulation.

  16. Carbon monoxide interacts with auxin and nitric oxide to cope with iron deficiency in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    To clarify the roles of CO, NO and auxin in the plant response to iron deficiency and to establish how the signaling molecules interact to enhance Fe acquisition, we conducted physiological, genetic, and molecular analyses that compared the responses of various Arabidopsis mutants, including hy1 (CO...

  17. Comparative study on the oxygen reduction reaction electrocatalytic activities of iron phthalocyanines supported on reduced graphene oxide, mesoporous carbon vesicle, and ordered mesoporous carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mian; Bo, Xiangjie; Zhang, Yufan; Han, Ce; Guo, Liping

    2014-10-01

    Iron phthalocyanine (FePc) is combined with different carbon matrixes (reduced graphene oxide (RGO), mesoporous carbon vesicle (MCV), and ordered mesoporous carbon (OMC)) through non-covalent π-π interaction. The nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherms display that their specific surface areas obey an order of OMC > MCV > RGO. Raman spectroscopy reveals that OMC contains the most surface active sites. Meanwhile, SEM images show that the FePc monomers are more evenly dispersed on OMC than on MCV or RGO. Electrochemical measurements also display that oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is catalyzed more easily on the FePc/OMC than on the FePc, FePc/MCV, and FePc/RGO, undoubtedly testifying the importances of specific surface area and surface active sites of OMC matrix for uniformly dispersing FePc molecules and then improving the ORR performances. Particularly, experiment results reveal that the FePc/OMC catalyst displays an enhanced 4-electron pathway in ORR either in acid or in alkaline media. Meanwhile, the FePc/OMC also shows better durability and superior stability towards methanol crossover than the Pt/OMC catalyst in both acid and alkaline media, potentially making the FePc/OMC a non-precious metal catalyst for ORR in fuel cells.

  18. Surface Modification of Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes via Hemoglobin-Derived Iron and Nitrogen-Rich Carbon Nanolayers for the Electrocatalysis of Oxygen Reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wensheng Li

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The great challenge of boosting the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR activity of non-noble-metal electrocatalysts is how to achieve effective exposure and full utilization of nitrogen-rich active sites. To realize the goals of high utilization of active sites and fast electron transport, here we report a new strategy for synthesis of an iron and nitrogen co-doped carbon nanolayers-wrapped multi-walled carbon nanotubes as ORR electrocatalyst (N-C@CNT-Fe via using partially carbonized hemoglobin as a single-source precursor. The onset and half-wave potentials for ORR of N-C@CNT-Fe are only 45 and 54 mV lower than those on a commercial Pt/C (20 wt.% Pt catalyst, respectively. Besides, this catalyst prepared in this work has been confirmed to follow a four-electron reaction mechanism in ORR process, and also displays ultra-high electrochemical cycling stability in both acidic and alkaline electrolytes. The enhancement of ORR activity can be not only attributed to full exposure and utilization of active site structures, but also can be resulted from the improvement of electrical conductivity owing to the introduction of CNT support. The analysis of X-ray photoelectric spectroscopy shows that both Fe–N and graphitic-N species may be the ORR active site structures of the prepared catalyst. Our study can provide a valuable idea for effective improvement of the electrocatalytic activity of non-noble-metal ORR catalysts.

  19. Influence of moderate pre-oxidation treatment on the physical, chemical and phosphate adsorption properties of iron-containing activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhengfang; Shi, Mo; Li, Jihua; Zheng, Zheng

    2014-03-01

    A novel adsorbent based on iron oxide dispersed over activated carbon (AC) were prepared, and used for phosphate removal from aqueous solutions. The influence of pre-oxidation treatment on the physical, chemical and phosphate adsorption properties of iron-containing AC were determined. Two series of ACs, non-oxidized and oxidized carbon modified by iron (denoted as AC-Fe and AC/O-Fe), resulted in a maximum impregnated iron of 4.03% and 7.56%, respectively. AC/O-Fe showed 34.0%-46.6% higher phosphate removal efficiency than the AC-Fe did. This was first attributed to the moderate pre-oxidation of raw AC by nitric acid, achieved by dosing Fe(II) after a pre-oxidation, to obtain higher iron loading, which is favorable for phosphate adsorption. Additionally, the in-situ formed active site on the surface of carbon, which was derived from the oxidation of Fe(II) by nitric acid dominated the remarkably high efficiency with respect to the removal of phosphate. The activation energy for adsorption was calculated to be 10.53 and 18.88 kJ/mol for AC-Fe and AC/O-Fe, respectively. The results showed that the surface mass transfer and intra-particle diffusion were simultaneously occurring during the process and contribute to the adsorption mechanism.

  20. Carbon nanotube filled with magnetic iron oxide and modified with polyamidoamine dendrimers for immobilizing lipase toward application in biodiesel production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yanli; Su, Feng; Li, Kai; Ke, Caixia; Yan, Yunjun

    2017-01-01

    Superparamagnetic multi-walled carbon nanotubes (mMWCNTs) were prepared by filling multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with iron oxide, and further modified by linking polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers (mMWCNTs-PAMAM) on the surface. Then, mMWCNTs-PAMAM was employed as the carrier and successfully immobilized Burkholderia cepacia lipase (BCL) via a covalent method (BCL-mMWCNTs-G3). The maximum activity recovery of the immobilized lipase was 1,716% and the specific activity increased to 77,460 U/g-protein, 17-fold higher than that of the free enzyme. The immobilized lipase displayed significantly enhanced thermostability and pH-resistance, and could efficiently catalyze transesterification to produce biodiesel at a conversion rate of 92.8%. Moreover, it possessed better recycling performance. After 20 cycles of repeated used, it still retained ca. 90% of its original activity, since the carbon nanotube−enzyme conjugates could be easily separated from the reaction mixture by using a magnet. This study provides a new perspective for biotechnological applications by adding a magnetic property to the unique intrinsic properties of nanotubes. PMID:28358395

  1. Corrosion behavior of carbon steel in the presence of two novel iron-oxidizing bacteria isolated from sewage treatment plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashassi-Sorkhabi, H; Moradi-Haghighi, M; Zarrini, G; Javaherdashti, R

    2012-02-01

    In this work, two novel iron oxidizing bacteria (IOB), namely Gordonia sp. MZ-89 and Enterobacter sp. M01101, were isolated from sewage treatment plants and identified by biochemical and molecular methods. Then, microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) of carbon steel in the presence of these bacteria was investigated. The electrochemical techniques such as potentiodynamic polarization measurements and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were used to measure the corrosion rate and observe the corrosion mechanism. The results showed that the existence of these microorganisms decreased the corrosion potential and enhanced the corrosion rate. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images revealed the ground boundary attacks and pitting on carbon steel samples in the presence of these bacteria after polarization. Corrosion scales were identified with X-ray diffraction (XRD). It was demonstrated that these bacteria can greatly affect the crystalline phase of corrosion products that also confirmed by SEM results. It was inferred that these bacteria were responsible for the corrosion of carbon steel, especially in the form of localized corrosion.

  2. Inhibitory effects of multiwall carbon nanotubes with high iron impurity on viability and neuronal differentiation in cultured PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Li; Jiang, Aihua; Chen, Rui; Li, Chen-zhong; Wang, Liming; Qu, Ying; Wang, Peng; Zhao, Yuliang; Chen, Chunying

    2013-11-08

    The increasing use of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in biomedical applications has garnered a great concern on their potential negative effects to human health. CNTs have been reported to potentially disrupt normal neuronal function and they were speculated to accumulate and cause brain damage, although a lot of distinct and exceptional properties and potential wide applications have been associated with this material in neurobiology. Fe impurities strapped inside the CNTs may be partially responsible for neurotoxicity generation. In the present study, we selected rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells to investigate and compare the effects of two kinds of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with different concentrations of Fe impurities which usually come from the massive production of CNTs by chemical vapor deposition. Exposure to Fe-high MWCNTs can reduce cell viability and increase cytoskeletal disruption of undifferentiated PC12 cells, diminish the ability to form mature neurites, and then adversely influence the neuronal dopaminergic phenotype in NGF-treated PC-12 cells. The present results highlight the critical role of iron residue in the adverse response to MWCNTs exposure in neural cells. These findings provide useful information for understanding the toxicity and safe application of carbon nanotubes.

  3. Activated Biochars with Iron for In-Situ Sequestration of Organics, Metals and Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-30

    biochar. o Investigate mechanism of Hg adsorption in poultry litter activated biochar o Collaborate with USDA and a carbon manufacturer (Calgon pilot...23 Table 5. Kds for Hg and MeHg sorption isotherms ...................................................................... 32 Table...Trichloroethylene (TCE) Mercury ( Hg ) Methylmercury (MeHg) Keywords Biochar, Activated Carbon, PCBs, PAHs, Mercury, Methylmercury, contaminant

  4. Thermal Conversion of Pine Wood Char to Carbon Nanomaterials in the Presence of Iron Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung Phil Mun; Zhiyong Cai; Fumiya Watanabe; Umesh P. Agarwal; Jilei. Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Southern yellow pine (Pinus taeda) wood char powder was thermally treated at 1,000:C in the presence of a 25-nm-size Fe nanoparticle catalyst. The thermally treated carbon materials were analyzed by Raman spectroscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Well-aligned graphitic carbon structures with 15 to 17 layers on...

  5. Morphological forms of carbon and their utilizations at formation of iron casting surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Jelínek

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Model pyrolysis made possible to identify three solid products of carbonaceous additives. Lustrous carbon is the most important form of the pyrolysis carbon. With its structure and physical and chemical properties it comes near to graphite. Amorphous carbon with turbo-stratic lattice, higher oxireactivity, and lower protective function against liquid metal comes near to carbon black. Semicoke also plays a non-negligible role. All forms of carbon have an important representation in oolitized quartz grain also during forming the casting surface. While amorphous carbon is formed directly from the gaseous phase by homogeneous nucleation, lustrous carbon, with regard to similarity of lattices with quartz, is formed by heterogeneous nucleation on grains. High covering power and low oxireactivity give its highest protecting power of the mould face. New experimental equipment made possible to check a possibility of use of new composite bentonite binders containing „process carbon“(graphite, anthracite, amorphous carbon. The BTEX content in exhalations and in waste sands too was considerably decreased with high smoothness of castings.

  6. Formation and transformation of a short range ordered iron carbonate precursor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dideriksen, Knud; Frandsen, Cathrine; Bovet, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Fe(II)-carbonates, such as siderite, form in environments where O2 is scarce, e.g., during marine sediment diagenesis, corrosion and possibly CO2 sequestration, but little is known about their formation pathways. We show that early precipitates from carbonate solutions containing 0.1M Fe(II) with...

  7. Iron-containing N-doped carbon electrocatalysts for the cogeneration of hydroxylamine and electricity in a H-2-NO fuel cell

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daems, Nick; Sheng, Xia; Alvarez-Gallego, Yolanda; Vankelecom, Ivo F. J.; Pescarmona, Paolo P.

    2016-01-01

    Iron-containing N-doped carbon materials were investigated as electrocatalysts for the cogeneration of hydroxylamine (NH2OH) and electricity in a H-2-NO fuel cell. This electrochemical route for the production of hydroxylamine is a greener alternative to the present industrial synthesis, because it

  8. Electrochemical characterization of mixed self-assembled films of water-soluble single-walled carbon nanotube-poly(m-aminobenzene sulfonic acid) and Iron(II) tetrasulfophthalocyanine

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Agboola, BO

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The redox activities of water-soluble iron(II) tetrasulfophthalocyanine (FeTSPc) and single-walled carbon nanotube-poly(m-aminobenzene sulfonic acid) (SWCNT-PABS) adsorbed on a gold surface precoated with a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of 2...

  9. Systematic variation of the sodium/sulfur promoter content on carbon-supported iron catalysts for the Fischer-Tropsch to olefins reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oschatz, M.; Krans, N.A.; Xie, J.; de Jong, K.P.

    2016-01-01

    The Fischer–Tropsch to olefins (FTO) process is a method for the direct conversion of synthesis gas to lower C2–C4 olefins. Carbon-supported iron carbide nanoparticles are attractive catalysts for this reaction. The catalytic activity can be improved and undesired formation of alkanes can be suppres

  10. Effects of resuspension on benthic fluxes of oxygen, nutrients, dissolved inorganic carbon, iron and manganese in the Gulf of Finland, Baltic Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Almroth, E.; Tengberg, A.; Andersson, J.H.; Pakhomova, S.; Hall, P.O.J.

    2009-01-01

    The effect of resuspension on benthic fluxes of oxygen (O2), ammonium (NH4+), nitrate (NO3-), phosphate (PO43-), silicate (Si(OH)4), dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), total dissolved iron (Fe) and total dissolved manganese (Mn) was studied at three different stations in the Gulf of Finland (GoF),

  11. Coal proximate analysis and pyrite contents by the TM/TG method: the problem of iron-bearing carbonates. [Thermomagnetic/thermogravimetric

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warne, S.S.J.

    1985-01-01

    The presence of siderite was found to give falsely high values for pyrite content in the thermomagnetic-thermogravimetric method, but other iron-bearing species had no effect. The use of DTA in N/sub 2/ and CO/sub 2/ is proposed as a method of detecting Fe carbonates.

  12. Formation of carbon nanotubes on iron/cobalt oxides supported on zeolite-Y : Effect of zeolite textural properties and particle morphology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Triantafyllidis, K. S.; Karakoulia, S. A.; Gournis, D.; Delimitis, A.; Nalbandian, L.; Maccallini, E.; Rudolf, P.

    2008-01-01

    The effect of the textural properties and morphology of zeolite Y, used as support of iron (Fe) or cobalt (Co) oxides, on the quantity and quality of the multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) synthesized by catalytic chemical vapour deposition (CCVD) of acetylene was studied. The parent zeolite Y was

  13. Systematic variation of the sodium/sulfur promoter content on carbon-supported iron catalysts for the Fischer-Tropsch to olefins reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oschatz, M.; Krans, N.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/41128942X; Xie, J.; de Jong, K.P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/06885580X

    2016-01-01

    The Fischer–Tropsch to olefins (FTO) process is a method for the direct conversion of synthesis gas to lower C2–C4 olefins. Carbon-supported iron carbide nanoparticles are attractive catalysts for this reaction. The catalytic activity can be improved and undesired formation of alkanes can be

  14. Formation of carbon nanotubes on iron/cobalt oxides supported on zeolite-Y : Effect of zeolite textural properties and particle morphology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Triantafyllidis, K. S.; Karakoulia, S. A.; Gournis, D.; Delimitis, A.; Nalbandian, L.; Maccallini, E.; Rudolf, P.

    2008-01-01

    The effect of the textural properties and morphology of zeolite Y, used as support of iron (Fe) or cobalt (Co) oxides, on the quantity and quality of the multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) synthesized by catalytic chemical vapour deposition (CCVD) of acetylene was studied. The parent zeolite Y was

  15. Nanoscale zero-valent iron impregnation of covalent organic polymer grafted activated carbon for water treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mines, Paul D.; Uthuppu, Basil; Thirion, Damien

    2016-01-01

    The use of nanoscale zero valent iron (nZVI) has quickly become a leading research material for the treatment of typically hard to degrade contaminants found in groundwater. These contaminants include antibiotics, pesticides, halogenated organics, heavy metals, among others. However, the effectiv......The use of nanoscale zero valent iron (nZVI) has quickly become a leading research material for the treatment of typically hard to degrade contaminants found in groundwater. These contaminants include antibiotics, pesticides, halogenated organics, heavy metals, among others. However...... electron microscopy (TEM), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). We also monitored the degradation and/or adsorption of various contaminants (e.g. chlorinated organics like trichloroethylene and trichloroethane, and heavy metals like cadmium and nickel) to produce the kinetics of the interactions....

  16. Mechanistic characterization and inhibition of sphingomyelinase C over substituted Iron Schiff bases of chitosan adsorbed on glassy carbon electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caro, Claudia A; Lillo, Luis; Valenzuela, Francisco J; Cabello, Gerardo

    2017-02-01

    The medical treatment of laxoscelisms is based solely on supportive measures. Although equine antiserum for Sphingomyelinase C (SMASE) and D isomers are available, it is not used due to the risk of an anaphylactic reaction and its unproven efficacy. As potential enzyme inhibitors, derivatives of Iron chitosan complexes were studied (Shiff base having -R = -H, -Cl, -Br, -F, -OCH3, -CH3, -NO2). These chitosan complexes were chosen because they have revealed good results in medicine and catalysis due to their biodegradable characteristics and bioavailability. Besides considering that these complexes have not been studied in relation to this toxin. The mechanisms underlying the catalytic and catcher effects of Iron chitosan complexes were studied using electrochemistry, UV-Vis spectroscopy and microscopic assay at physiological pH. The electrochemical studies showed that one of seven Schiff bases of chitosan adsorbed on glassy carbon electrode was electrocatalytically active for the oxidation of sphingomyelinase at 1.27 V, and that allowed proposing a reaction scheme for SMASE oxidation by adsorbed Iron complexes. On the other hand, even though the spectroscopic studies indicated that there was no chemical bond formation between the complex and SMASE in solution, the microscopic studies showed that this complex proved to be a remarkable cellular protector in presence of the enzyme. In conclusion, Shiff base of chitosan with R = -CH3 was the only active complex in front of sphingomyelinase C, protecting red blood cells, according to our electrochemical and microscopic studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Removal of arsenate and 17alpha-ethinyl estradiol (EE2) by iron (hydr)oxide modified activated carbon fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hristovski, Kiril D; Nguyen, Hanhphuc; Westerhoff, Paul K

    2009-03-01

    Activated carbon fibers (ACF) were modified with iron (hydr)oxide and studied to determine their suitability to remove arsenate and 17alpha -ethinyl estradiol (EE2) from water. Two synthesis methods, one involving aqueous KMnO(4) pretreatment followed by Fe(II) treatment, and the other involving reaction with Fe(III) in an organic solvent followed by NaOH treatment, were used to produce modified ACF media containing 5.9% and 8.4% iron by dry weight, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Electron dispersion X-ray (EDX) techniques indicated slightly higher iron content near the outer edges of the fibers. Pseudo-equilibrium batch test experimental data at pH = 7.0 +/- 0.1 in 5 mM NaHCO(3) buffered ultrapure water containing approximately 100 micro g(As)/L and approximately 500 micro gEE2/L were fitted with the Freundlich isotherm model (q = K x C(E)(1/n)). The adsorption capacity parameters (K) were approximately 2586 (micro gAs/gFe)(L/micro gAs)(1/n) and approximately 425 (micro gAs/gFe)(L/micro gAs)(1/n)), respectively, for the KMnO(4)/Fe(II) and Fe(III)/NaOH treated media. The KMnO(4)/Fe(II) media exhibited a lower adsorption capacity at 99% EE2 removal than did the Fe(III)/NaOH treated media (1.3 mgEE2/g -dry -media vs. 1.8 mgEE2/g -dry -media). The arsenate adsorption intensity parameters (1/n) for both modified ACF media were < 0.29, implying very favorable adsorption, which suggests that this type of media may be suitable for single point -of -use applications in which arsenic and organic co-contaminants require simultaneous removal and the depth of the packed bed is the key factor.

  18. Scientific Opinion on the safety assessment of the active substances, sodium erythorbate, sodium carbonate, sodium bicarbonate, iron sulphate, activated carbon, cellulose, calcium hydroxide, calcium chloride and water, for use as active system in food contact materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This scientific opinion of EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids deals with the safety assessment of the active substances sodium erythorbate, sodium carbonate, sodium bicarbonate, iron sulfate, activated carbon, cellulose, calcium hydroxide, calcium chloride and water, used in mixture which is packed into sachets for absorbing oxygen/carbon dioxide emitting from/into the headspace surrounding packed food. All substances of this formulation have been evaluated and approved for use as additives in plastic food contact materials or as food additives. No migration of calcium, iron and sodium ions was detected. No volatile organic compounds other than carbon dioxide were detected at the limit of detection of 0.5 μg/l. The CEF Panel concluded that the use of the substances sodium erythorbate, sodium carbonate, sodium bicarbonate, iron sulfate, activated carbon, cellulose, calcium hydroxide, calcium chloride and water does not raise a safety concern when used in oxygen absorber/carbon dioxide emitter systems, in sachets that prevent the physical release of their contents into the food. The sachets are to be placed in the headspace of the packaging and as such may come into occasional contact with the food, e.g. during handling. The sachet should not come into direct contact with liquid foods or foods that have and external aqueous liquid phase on the surface (liquid or exudates.

  19. 碳包覆铁纳米颗粒的气相爆轰合成%Gaseous Detonation Synthesis of Carbon-Encapsulated Iron Nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闫鸿浩; 赵铁军; 李晓杰; 王小红

    2016-01-01

    Carbon-encapsulated iron nanoparticles were formed using a gaseous detonation method in a mixture of hydrogen and oxygen in which the powder and gaseous forms of ferrocene were used as the raw materials.X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy analysis shows that using either of the two different states of ferrocene yields carbon-encapsulated iron nanoparticles.The encapsulated particles were composed of iron or iron-carbon compounds as the core,and the outer shell was mainly composed of graphitic carbon.The sizes of most spherical nanoparticles varied between 5 and 30 nm.When using gaseous ferrocene in the detonation,the particle size distribution was narrower,the thickness of the shell layer was more uniform,and the particles had a higher sphericity.Using the iron-carbon alloy phase diagram,an analysis of the mechanism for gaseous detonation synthesis of carbon-encapsulated iron nanoparticles was carried out.The magnetic hysteresis loops of carbon-encapsulated iron nanoparticles were analyzed,which exhibit the dual natures of hard magnetic and paramagnetic.%以粉末状与气态二茂铁为原料,以氢气和氧气混合气体为爆轰能源,采用气相爆轰法进行了合成碳包覆铁纳米颗粒实验.XRD和TEM实验结果表明,采用两种不同状态的二茂铁,均得到了纳米碳包覆铁颗粒.该包覆颗粒的组成核为铁或铁碳化合物,外层壳主要由石墨碳组成,大部分球形纳米颗粒尺寸分布于5~30 nm之间.通过对比发现,采用气态二茂铁爆轰时,所得到的碳包铁粒度分布较为集中,壳层厚度比较均匀,且粒子具有较好的球形状.最后结合铁碳合金相图,从热处理角度对气相爆轰合成碳包覆铁纳米颗粒的机理进行了分析,得出产物中α-Fe与Fe3C的形成过程.分析了碳包覆铁纳米颗粒的磁滞回线,其表现出硬磁性与顺磁性双重性质.

  20. Removal of aluminum, iron and manganese ions from industrial wastes using granular activated carbon and Amberlite IR-120H

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed E. Goher

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The removal of aluminum, iron and manganese from some pollution sources that drain into Ismailia Canal has been investigated using two different sorbents; granular activated carbon (GAC and Amberlite IR-120H (AIR-120H. Batch equilibrium experiments showed that the two sorbents have maximum removal efficiency for aluminum and iron pH 5 and 10 min contact time in ambient room temperature, while pH 7 and 30 min were the most appropriate for manganese removal. Dosage of 2 g/l for both GAC and AIR-120H was established to give the maximum removal capacity. At optimum conditions, the removal trend was in order of Al+3 > Fe+2 > Mn+2 with 99.2, 99.02 and 79.05 and 99.55, 99.42 and 96.65% of metal removal with GAC and AIR-120H, respectively. For the three metals, Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms showed higher R2 values, with a slightly better fitting for the Langmuir model. In addition, separation factors (RL and exponent (n values indicated favorable Langmuir (0 < RL < 1 and Freundlich (1 < n < 10 approach. GAC and AIR-120H can be used as excellent alternative, effective and inexpensive materials to remove high amounts of heavy metals from waste water.

  1. A new one-step synthesis method for coating multi-walled carbon nanotubes with iron oxide nanorods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song Haojie, E-mail: songhj@ujs.edu.cn; Qian Jing [Jiangsu University, School of Material Science and Engineering (China); Jia Xiaohua [Jiangsu University, School of the Environment (China); Yang Xiaofei; Tang Hua; Min Chunying [Jiangsu University, School of Material Science and Engineering (China)

    2012-01-15

    A facile solution-chemical method has been developed to be capable of covering a multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNTs) with iron oxide nanorods without using any bridging species. MWNTs in this composite were decorated randomly by {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanorods with diameters in the range of 3-5 nm and lengths of 15-30 nm. The formation route to anchor {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanorods onto MWNTs was proposed as the intercalation and adsorption of iron ions onto the wall of MWNTs, followed by the nucleation and growth of {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanorods. {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/MWNTs nanocomposites show specific high Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface areas. The photocatalytic activity experiment indicated that the prepared {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/MWNTs nanocomposites exhibited a higher photocatalytic activity for the photocatalytic decolorization of rhodamine B aqueous solution under the visible-light illumination than the single phase {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} samples. This methodology made the synthesis of MWNTs-nanorods composites possible and may be further extended to prepare more complicated nanocomposites based on MWNTs for technological applications.

  2. Adsorption and photodegradation of methylene blue by iron oxide impregnated on granular activated carbons in an oxalate solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadirova, Zukhra C., E-mail: zuhra_kadirova@yahoo.com [Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Republic of Uzbekistan, Mirzo Ulugbek Str. 77a, Tashkent 100170 (Uzbekistan); Materials and Structures Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Katsumata, Ken-ichi [Materials and Structures Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Isobe, Toshihiro [Department of Metallurgy and Ceramics Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 O-okayama, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8552 (Japan); Matsushita, Nobuhiro [Materials and Structures Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Nakajima, Akira [Department of Metallurgy and Ceramics Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 O-okayama, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8552 (Japan); Okada, Kiyoshi [Materials and Structures Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan)

    2013-11-01

    The photocatalytic adsorbents BAU-OA, BAU-CL and BAU-HA with varying iron oxide content (9–10 mass%) were prepared by heat treatment at 250 °C from commercial activated carbon (BAU) impregnated with iron oxalate, chloride, tris-benzohydroxamate, respectively. The XRD patterns showed amorphous structure in the BAU-CL sample (S{sub BET} 50 m{sup 2}/g) and low crystallinity (as FeOOH and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} phases) in the BAU-HA and BAU-OA samples (S{sub BET} 4 and 111 m{sup 2}/g, respectively). The methylene blue adsorption capacities was decreased in order of BAU-OA < BAU-CL < BAU-HA sample and the adsorption followed Langmuir model. The apparent MB photodegradation rate constant (k{sub app}) was increased in same order BAU-HA < BAU-CL < BAU-OA under the standard experimental conditions (initial MB concentrations 0.015–0.025 mM; sample content – 10 mg/l; initial oxalic acid concentration – 0.43 mM; pH 3–4; UV illumination). The process included high efficiency combination of adsorption, heterogeneous and homogeneous catalysis under UV and solar lights illumination without addition of hydrogen peroxide. The detoxification of water sample containing organic dyes was confirmed after combined sorption-photocatalytic treatment.

  3. Sorptive Uptake Studies of an Aryl-Arsenical with Iron Oxide Composites on an Activated Carbon Support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae H. Kwon

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Sorption uptake kinetics and equilibrium studies for 4-hydroxy-3-nitrobenzene arsonic acid (roxarsone was evaluated with synthetic magnetite (Mag-P, commercial magnetite (Mag-C, magnetite 10%, 19%, and 32% composite material (CM-10, -19, -32 that contains granular activated carbon (GAC, and synthetic goethite at pH 7.00 in water at 21 °C for 24 h. GAC showed the highest sorptive removal of roxarsone and the relative uptake for each sorbent material with roxarsone are listed in descending order as follows: GAC (471 mg/g > goethite (418 mg/g > CM-10 (377 mg/g CM-19 (254 mg/g > CM-32 (227 mg/g > Mag-P (132 mg/g > Mag-C (29.5 mg/g. The As (V moiety of roxarsone is adsorbed onto the surface of the iron oxide/oxyhydrate and is inferred as inner-sphere surface complexes; monodentate-mononuclear, bidentate-mononuclear, and bidentate-binuclear depending on the protolytic speciation of roxarsone. The phenyl ring of roxarsone provides the primary driving force for the sorptive interaction with the graphene surface of GAC and its composites. Thus, magnetite composites are proposed as multi-purpose adsorbents for the co-removal of inorganic and organic arsenicals due to the presence of graphenic and iron oxide active adsorption sites.

  4. Mechanism of enhanced nitrate reduction via micro-electrolysis at the powdered zero-valent iron/activated carbon interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jinghuan; Song, Guangyu; Liu, Jianyong; Qian, Guangren; Xu, Zhi Ping

    2014-12-01

    Nitrate reduction by zero-valent iron (Fe(0)) powder always works well only at controlled pH lower than 4 due to the formation of iron (hydr)oxides on its surface. Fe(0) powder combined with activated carbon (AC), i.e., Fe(0)/AC micro-electrolysis system, was first introduced to enhance nitrate reduction in aqueous solution. Comparative study was carried out to investigate nitrate reduction by Fe(0)/AC system and Fe(0) under near-neutral conditions, showing that the Fe(0)/AC system successfully reduced nitrate even at initial pH 6 with the reduction efficiency of up to 73%, whereas for Fe(0) only ∼10%. The effect of Fe(0) to AC mass ratio on nitrate reduction efficiency was examined. Easier nitrate reduction was achieved with more contact between Fe(0) and AC as the result of decreasing Fe(0) to AC mass ratio. Ferrous ion and oxidation-reduction potential were measured to understand the mechanism of enhanced nitrate reduction by Fe(0)/AC micro-electrolysis. The results suggest that a relative potential difference drives much more electrons from Fe(0) to AC, thus generating adsorbed atomic hydrogen which makes it possible for nitrate to be reduced at near-neural pH. Fe(0)/AC micro-electrolysis thus presents a great potential for practical application in nitrate wastewater treatment without excessive pH adjustment.

  5. Adsorption of low concentration ceftazidime from aqueous solutions using impregnated activated carbon promoted by Iron, Copper and Aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiang; Zhang, Hua; Sun, Zhirong

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, three impregnated activated carbon IAC (AC-Cu, AC-Fe, and AC-Al) promoted by Iron, Copper and Aluminum were used for adsorption of ceftazidime. Iron(III), Copper(II) and Aluminum(III) nitrate were used as an impregnant. The IACs were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area analyzer, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS).The influence of factors, such as ion strength, pH, temperature, initial concentration, and concentration of natural organic matter organic matter on the adsorption process were studied. The adsorption kinetics and isotherms of ceftazidime were studied for the three IACs. The results showed that the adsorption was accurately represented by pseudo-second order model. Under different temperature, the maximum adsorption quantity of ceftazidime on AC-Cu calculated by pseudo-second order kinetic model were 200.0 mg g-1 (298 K), 196.1 mg g-1 (303 K) and 185.2 mg g-1 (308 K). It was much higher than that of AC-Fe and AC-Al. And the process was controlled by both film diffusion and intra particle mass transport. The results also showed that, the Freundlich and Temkin isotherm fit the adsorption well.

  6. Immobilization of the iron on the surface of non-woven carbon fiber for use in a microbial fuel cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nichanan Phansroy

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Iron particles were immobilized onto non-woven carbon fiber via electroplating for use in a microbial fuel cell (MFC. Electroplating was performed under an applied voltage at a current of 0.2 A for 5, 10, and 15 min. The scanning electron microscope (SEM observations show that 5 min was not adequate for the particles to be immobilized, whereas 10 and 15 min of electroplating resulted in an adequate number of particles on the surface. To evaluate the strength of the binding of iron via electroplating on the surface of the fiber, the samples were washed with pure water and observed using an SEM. The 10 min electroplated sample has a larger surface area, which is suitable for the MFC anode, than the 15 min electroplated sample. According to X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis, the peaks corresponded to those of Fe2O3, and the sample dipped into tannic acid shows the peaks of Fe3O4. The amount of biofilm of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was evaluated using crystal violet staining, and living bacteria were counted as colony forming units. Electroplated Fe2O3 and Fe3O4 were found to be effective for producing biofilm and immobilizing S. oneidensis MR-1.

  7. Use of Pyrolyzed Iron Ethylenediaminetetraacetic Acid Modified Activated Carbon as Air–Cathode Catalyst in Microbial Fuel Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Xia, Xue

    2013-08-28

    Activated carbon (AC) is a cost-effective catalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in air-cathode microbial fuel cells (MFCs). To enhance the catalytic activity of AC cathodes, AC powders were pyrolyzed with iron ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (FeEDTA) at a weight ratio of FeEDTA:AC = 0.2:1. MFCs with FeEDTA modified AC cathodes and a stainless steel mesh current collector produced a maximum power density of 1580 ± 80 mW/m2, which was 10% higher than that of plain AC cathodes (1440 ± 60 mW/m 2) and comparable to Pt cathodes (1550 ± 10 mW/m2). Further increases in the ratio of FeEDTA:AC resulted in a decrease in performance. The durability of AC-based cathodes was much better than Pt-catalyzed cathodes. After 4.5 months of operation, the maximum power density of Pt cathode MFCs was 50% lower than MFCs with the AC cathodes. Pyridinic nitrogen, quaternary nitrogen and iron species likely contributed to the increased activity of FeEDTA modified AC. These results show that pyrolyzing AC with FeEDTA is a cost-effective and durable way to increase the catalytic activity of AC. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  8. Synthesis of nanoscale zero-valent iron/ordered mesoporous carbon for adsorption and synergistic reduction of nitrobenzene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Xiaofeng; Li, Jiansheng; Zhu, Wen; Zhu, Yaoyao; Sun, Xiuyun; Shen, Jinyou; Han, Weiqing; Wang, Lianjun

    2012-05-01

    Nanoscale zero-valent iron (NZVI) supported on ordered mesoporous carbon (OMC) was synthesized through liquid phase reduction route. The NZVI/OMC composite was characterized by X-ray diffraction, N(2) adsorption/desorption and transmission electron microscopy. Results reveal that the composite possesses ordered mesostructure with NZVI distributing homogeneously on the surface of OMC support. The removal effects of nitrobenzene (NB) in water with OMC, NZVI/OMC and non-supported NZVI were evaluated. Results indicate that NZVI/OMC shows enhanced removal efficiency, which is attributed to its adsorption and synergistic reduction for NB. The transformation process of NB was further investigated by HPLC. Nitrosobenzene and phenylhydroxylamine were detected as intermediate products and aniline was the final reductive product.

  9. Early season mesopelagic carbon remineralization and transfer efficiency in the naturally iron-fertilized Kerguelen area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquet, S. H. M.; Dehairs, F.; Cavagna, A. J.; Planchon, F.; Monin, L.; André, L.; Closset, I.; Cardinal, D.

    2014-06-01

    We report on the zonal variability of mesopelagic particulate organic carbon) remineralization and deep carbon transfer potential during the Kerguelen Ocean and Plateau compared Study 2 expedition (KEOPS 2; October-November 2011) in an area of the Polar Front supporting recurrent massive blooms from natural Fe fertilization. Mesopelagic carbon remineralization was assessed using the excess, non-lithogenic particulate barium (Baxs) inventories in mesopelagic waters and compared with surface primary and export productions. Results for this early season study are compared with results obtained earlier (2005; KEOPS 1) for the same area during summer. For the Kerguelen plateau (A3 site) we observe a similar functioning of the mesopelagic ecosystem during both seasons (spring and summer), with less that 30% of carbon exported from the upper 150 m being remineralized in the mesopelagic column (150-400 m). For deeper stations (> 2000 m) located on the margin, inside a Polar Front meander, as well as in the vicinity of the Polar Front, east of Kerguelen, remineralization in the upper 400 m in general represents > 30% of carbon export, but when considering the upper 800 m, in some cases, the entire flux of exported carbon is remineralized. It appears that above the plateau (A3 site) mesopelagic remineralization is not a major barrier to the transfer of organic matter to the sea-floor (close to 500 m). There the efficiency of carbon sequestration into the bottom waters (> 400 m) reached up to 87% of the carbon exported from the upper 150 m. In contrast, at the deeper locations mesopelagic remineralization clearly limits the sequestration of carbon to depths > 400 m. For sites at the margin of the plateau (station E-4W) and the Polar front (station F-L), mesopelagic remineralization even exceeds upper 150 m export, resulting in a null sequestration efficiency to depths > 800 m. In the Polar Front meander, where successive stations form a time series, the capacity of the

  10. Early season mesopelagic carbon remineralization and transfer efficiency in the naturally iron-fertilized Kerguelen area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. H. M. Jacquet

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We report on the zonal variability of mesopelagic particulate organic carbon remineralization and deep carbon transfer potential during the Kerguelen Ocean and Plateau compared Study 2 expedition (KEOPS 2; October–November 2011 in an area of the Polar Front supporting recurrent massive blooms from natural Fe fertilization. Mesopelagic carbon remineralization was assessed using the excess, non-lithogenic particulate barium (Baxs inventories in mesopelagic waters and compared with surface primary and export productions. Results for this early season study are compared with results obtained earlier (2005; KEOPS 1 for the same area during summer. For the Kerguelen plateau (A3 site we observe a similar functioning of the mesopelagic ecosystem during both seasons (spring and summer, with less that 30% of carbon exported from the upper 150 m being remineralized in the mesopelagic column (150–400 m. For deeper stations (> 2000 m located on the margin, inside a Polar Front meander, as well as in the vicinity of the Polar Front, east of Kerguelen, remineralization in the upper 400 m in general represents > 30% of carbon export, but when considering the upper 800 m, in some cases, the entire flux of exported carbon is remineralized. It appears that above the plateau (A3 site mesopelagic remineralization is not a major barrier to the transfer of organic matter to the sea-floor (close to 500 m. There the efficiency of carbon sequestration into the bottom waters (> 400 m reached up to 87% of the carbon exported from the upper 150 m. In contrast, at the deeper locations mesopelagic remineralization clearly limits the sequestration of carbon to depths > 400 m. For sites at the margin of the plateau (station E-4W and the Polar front (station F-L, mesopelagic remineralization even exceeds upper 150 m export, resulting in a null sequestration efficiency to depths > 800 m. In the Polar Front meander, where successive stations form a time series, the capacity of

  11. Millimeter-scale variations of stable isotope abundances in carbonates from banded iron-formations in the Hamersley Group of Western Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baur, M. E.; Hayes, J. M.; Studley, S. A.; Walter, M. R.

    1985-01-01

    Several diamond drill cores from formations within the Hamersley Group of Western Australia have been studied for evidence of short-range variations in the isotopic compositions of the carbonates. For a set of 32 adjacent microbands analyzed in a specimen from the Marra Mamba Iron Formation, carbon isotope compositions of individual microbands ranged from -2.8 to -19.8 per mil compared to PDB and oxygen isotope compositions ranged from 10.2 to 20.8 per mil compared to SMOW. A pattern of alternating abundances was present, with the average isotopic contrasts between adjacent microbands being 3.0 per mil for carbon and 3.1 per mil for oxygen. Similar results were obtained for a suite of 34 microbands (in four groups) from the Bruno's Band unit of the Mount Sylvia Formation. Difficulties were experienced in preparing samples of single microbands from the Dales Gorge Member of the Brockman Iron Formation, but overall isotopic compositions were in good agreement with values reported by previous authors. Chemical analyses showed that isotopically light carbon and oxygen were correlated with increased concentrations of iron. The preservation of these millimeter-scale variations in isotopic abundances is interpreted as inconsistent with a metamorphic origin for the isotopically light carbon in the BIF carbonates. A biological origin is favored for the correlated variations in 13C and Fe, and it is suggested that the 13C-depleted carbonates may derive either from fermentative metabolism or from anaerobic respiration. A model is presented in which these processes occur near the sediment-water interface and are coupled with an initial oxidative precipitation of the iron.

  12. Differential Bystander Signaling Between Radioresistant Chondrosarcoma Cells and Fibroblasts After X-Ray, Proton, Iron Ion and Carbon Ion Exposures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wakatsuki, Masaru, E-mail: wa@mbe.nifty.com [Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Magpayo, Nicole; Kawamura, Hidemasa; Held, Kathryn D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Chondrosarcoma is well known as a radioresistant tumor, but the mechanisms underlying that resistance are still unclear. The bystander effect is well documented in the field of radiation biology. We investigated the bystander response induced by X-rays, protons, carbon ions, and iron ions in chondrosarcoma cells using a transwell insert co-culture system that precludes physical contact between targeted and bystander cells. Methods and Materials: Human chondrosarcoma cells were irradiated with 0.1-, 0.5-, 1-, and 2-Gy X-rays, protons, carbon ions or iron ions using a transwell insert co-culture system. Formation of micronuclei and p53 binding protein 1 staining in bystander and irradiated cells were analyzed and bystander signaling between mixed cultures of chondrosarcoma cells, and normal human skin fibroblasts was investigated. Results: In this study, we show that the fraction of cells with DNA damages in irradiated chondrosarcoma cells showed dose-dependent increases with all beams. However, the fraction of cells with DNA damages in all bystander chondrosarcoma cells did not show any change from the levels in control cells. In the bystander signaling between mixed cultures of chondrosarcoma cells and fibroblasts, the amount of micronucleus formation in all bystander chondrosarcoma cells co-cultured with irradiated fibroblasts were the same as the levels for control cells. However, all bystander fibroblasts co-cultured with irradiated chondrosarcoma cells showed significant increases in the fraction of micronucleated cells compared to the rate of control cells. Conclusions: We conclude that chondrosarcoma cells in the transwell insert co-culture system could release bystander stimulations but could not develop bystander responses.

  13. Effect of reaction environments on the reactivity of PCB (2-chlorobiphenyl) over activated carbon impregnated with palladized iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hyeok [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Texas at Arlington, 416 Yates Drive, Arlington, TX 76019-0308 (United States); Al-Abed, Souhail R., E-mail: al-abed.souhail@epa.gov [National Risk Management Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 26 West Martin Luther King Drive, Cincinnati, OH 45268 (United States)

    2010-07-15

    Reactive activated carbon (RAC) impregnated with palladized iron nanoparticles has been developed to treat polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). In this study, we evaluated the effects of various reaction environments on the adsorption-mediated dechlorination of 2-chlorobiphenyl (2-ClBP) in the RAC system. The results were discussed in close connection to the implementation issue of the RAC system for the remediation of contaminated sites with PCBs. Adsorption event of 2-ClBP onto RAC limited the overall performance under condition with a 2-ClBP/RAC mass ratio of less than 1.0 x 10{sup -4} above which dechlorination of 2-ClBP adsorbed to RAC was the reaction rate-determining step. Acidic and basic conditions were harmful to 2-ClBP adsorption and iron stability while neutral pH showed the highest adsorption-promoted dechlorination of 2-ClBP and negligible metal leaching. Coexisting natural organic matter (NOM) slightly inhibited 2-ClBP adsorption onto RAC due to the partial partitioning of 2-ClBP into NOM in the liquid phase while the 2-ClBP absorbed into NOM, which also tended to adsorb onto RAC, was less available for the dechlorination reaction. Common anions slowed down 2-ClBP adsorption but adsorbed 2-ClBP was almost simultaneously dechlorinated. Some exceptions included strong inhibitory effect of carbonate species on 2-ClBP adsorption and severe detrimental effect of sulfite on 2-ClBP dechlorination. Results on treatment of 2-ClBP spiked to actual sediment supernatants implied site-specific reactivity of RAC.

  14. Iron and activated carbon to remove the VOC; Fer et charbon actif pour eliminer les COV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batra, V.S. [Institut des Ressources et de l' Energie, New Delhi (India); Lamonier, J.F. [Lille-1 Univ., UMR CNRS 8181, Unite de Catalyse et de Chimie du solide, 59 (France)

    2010-11-15

    This work proposes an adsorbent/catalyst material synthesized from sugarcane activated carbon and red muds coming from the aluminium industry. A low cost solution to treat the volatile organic compounds. (O.M.)

  15. Variability in carbon isotope fractionation of trichloroethene during degradation by persulfate activated with zero-valent iron: Effects of inorganic anions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yunde; Zhou, Aiguo; Gan, Yiqun; Li, Xiaoqian

    2016-04-01

    Stable carbon isotope analysis has the potential to be used for assessing the performance of in situ remediation of organic contaminants. Successful application of this isotope technique requires understanding the magnitude and variability in carbon isotope fractionation associated with the reactions under consideration. This study investigated the influence of inorganic anions (sulfate, bicarbonate, and chloride) on carbon isotope fractionation of trichloroethene (TCE) during its degradation by persulfate activated with zero-valent iron. The results demonstrated that the significant carbon isotope fractionation (enrichment factors ε ranging from -3.4±0.3 to -4.3±0.3‰) was independent on the zero-iron dosage, sulfate concentration, and bicarbonate concentration. However, the ε values (ranging from -7.0±0.4 to -13.6±1.2‰) were dependent on the chloride concentration, indicating that chloride could significantly affect carbon isotope fractionation during TCE degradation by persulfate activated with zero-valent iron. The dependence of ε values on chloride concentration, indicated that TCE degradation mechanisms may be different from the degradation mechanism caused by sulfate radical (SO4(-)). Ignoring the effect of chloride on ε value may cause numerous uncertainties in quantitative assessment of the performance of the in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO).

  16. Colour Metallography of Cast Iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Jiyang; Liu Jincheng

    2010-01-01

    @@ Chapter 3 Spheroidal Graphite Cast Iron(I) Spheroidal Graphite Cast Iron, SG iron in short, refers to the cast iron in which graphite precipitates as spheroidal shape during solidification of liquid iron. The graphite in common commercial cast iron can only be changed from flake to spheroidal shape by spheroidising treatment. Since spheroidal graphite reduces the cutting effect of stress concentration, the metal matrix strength of SG iron can be applied around 70%-90%, thus the mechanical property of SG iron is significantly superior to other cast irons;even the tensile strength of SG iron is higher than that carbon steel.

  17. Application of polypyrrole multi-walled carbon nanotube composite layer for detection of mercury, lead and iron ions using surface plasmon resonance technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadrolhosseini, Amir Reza; Noor, A S M; Bahrami, Afarin; Lim, H N; Talib, Zainal Abidin; Mahdi, Mohd Adzir

    2014-01-01

    Polypyrrole multi-walled carbon nanotube composite layers were used to modify the gold layer to measure heavy metal ions using the surface plasmon resonance technique. The new sensor was fabricated to detect trace amounts of mercury (Hg), lead (Pb), and iron (Fe) ions. In the present research, the sensitivity of a polypyrrole multi-walled carbon nanotube composite layer and a polypyrrole layer were compared. The application of polypyrrole multi-walled carbon nanotubes enhanced the sensitivity and accuracy of the sensor for detecting ions in an aqueous solution due to the binding of mercury, lead, and iron ions to the sensing layer. The Hg ion bonded to the sensing layer more strongly than did the Pb and Fe ions. The limitation of the sensor was calculated to be about 0.1 ppm, which produced an angle shift in the region of 0.3° to 0.6°.

  18. Carbon export in the naturally iron-fertilized Kerguelen area of the Southern Ocean based on the 234Th approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planchon, F.; Ballas, D.; Cavagna, A.-J.; Bowie, A. R.; Davies, D.; Trull, T.; Laurenceau-Cornec, E. C.; Van Der Merwe, P.; Dehairs, F.

    2015-06-01

    This study examined upper-ocean particulate organic carbon (POC) export using the 234Th approach as part of the second KErguelen Ocean and Plateau compared Study expedition (KEOPS2). Our aim was to characterize the spatial and the temporal variability of POC export during austral spring (October-November 2011) in the Fe-fertilized area of the Kerguelen Plateau region. POC export fluxes were estimated at high productivity sites over and downstream of the plateau and compared to a high-nutrient low-chlorophyll (HNLC) area upstream of the plateau in order to assess the impact of iron-induced productivity on the vertical export of carbon. Deficits in 234Th activities were observed at all stations in surface waters, indicating early scavenging by particles in austral spring. 234Th export was lowest at the reference station R-2 and highest in the recirculation region (E stations) where a pseudo-Lagrangian survey was conducted. In comparison 234Th export over the central plateau and north of the polar front (PF) was relatively limited throughout the survey. However, the 234Th results support that Fe fertilization increased particle export in all iron-fertilized waters. The impact was greatest in the recirculation feature (3-4 fold at 200 m depth, relative to the reference station), but more moderate over the central Kerguelen Plateau and in the northern plume of the Kerguelen bloom (~2-fold at 200 m depth). The C : Th ratio of large (>53 μm) potentially sinking particles collected via sequential filtration using in situ pumping (ISP) systems was used to convert the 234Th flux into a POC export flux. The C : Th ratios of sinking particles were highly variable (3.1 ± 0.1 to 10.5 ± 0.2 μmol dpm-1) with no clear site-related trend, despite the variety of ecosystem responses in the fertilized regions. C : Th ratios showed a decreasing trend between 100 and 200 m depth suggesting preferential carbon loss relative to 234Th possibly due to heterotrophic degradation and

  19. Early spring mesopelagic carbon remineralization and transfer efficiency in the naturally iron-fertilized Kerguelen area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquet, S. H. M.; Dehairs, F.; Lefèvre, D.; Cavagna, A. J.; Planchon, F.; Christaki, U.; Monin, L.; André, L.; Closset, I.; Cardinal, D.

    2015-03-01

    We report on the zonal variability of mesopelagic particulate organic carbon remineralization and deep carbon transfer potential during the Kerguelen Ocean and Plateau compared Study 2 expedition (KEOPS 2; October-November 2011) in an area of the polar front supporting recurrent massive blooms from natural Fe fertilization. Mesopelagic carbon remineralization (MR) was assessed using the excess, non-lithogenic particulate barium (Baxs) inventories in mesopelagic waters and compared with bacterial production (BP), surface primary production (PP) and export production (EP). Results for this early season study are compared with the results obtained during a previous study (2005; KEOPS 1) for the same area at a later stage of the phytoplankton bloom. Our results reveal the patchiness of the seasonal advancement and of the establishment of remineralization processes between the plateau (A3) and polar front sites during KEOPS 2. For the Kerguelen plateau (A3 site) we observe a similar functioning of the mesopelagic ecosystem during both seasons (spring and summer), with low and rather stable remineralization fluxes in the mesopelagic column (150-400 m). The shallow water column (~500 m), the lateral advection, the zooplankton grazing pressure and the pulsed nature of the particulate organic carbon (POC) transfer at A3 seem to drive the extent of MR processes on the plateau. For deeper stations (>2000 m) located on the margin, inside a polar front meander, as well as in the vicinity of the polar front, east of Kerguelen, remineralization in the upper 400 m in general represents a larger part of surface carbon export. However, when considering the upper 800 m, in some cases, the entire flux of exported carbon is remineralized. In the polar front meander, where successive stations form a time series, two successive events of particle transfer were evidenced by remineralization rates: a first mesopelagic and deep transfer from a past bloom before the cruise, and a second

  20. The inclusion of MgH2 into iron oxide and nickel oxide modified mesoporous carbon sorbent, an investigation on hydrogen production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moradi Seyyed Ershad

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, we investigated the hydrogen desorption properties of nano-sized MgH2 that was loaded on ordered mesoporous carbon (OMC surface that had been already modified with nickel and iron oxide nanoparticles. The surface modified mesoporous carbon was characterized by BET surface area and X-ray diffraction (XRD analysis. The amount of MgH2 on the carbon surface was confirmed by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA. Dehydrogenation data of MgH2 on the ordered mesoporous carbon were collected for the pressure up to 8 MPa (80 bar at 500 K. The incorporated MgH2 on nickel oxide-mesoporous carbon nanocomposite had faster dehydrogenation kinetics compared to incorporated MgH2 on iron oxide-mesoporous carbon nanocomposite as well as incorporated MgH2 on mesoporous carbon. This can be attributed to the particle size of the former being smaller than that of the latter, as well as much accessible nanosized surface of loaded MgH2.

  1. The origin of long-period lattice spacings observed in iron-carbide nanowires encapsulated by multiwall carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boi, Filippo S; Mountjoy, Gavin; Luklinska, Zofia; Spillane, Liam; Karlsson, Lisa S; Wilson, Rory M; Corrias, Anna; Baxendale, Mark

    2013-10-01

    Structures comprising single-crystal, iron-carbon-based nanowires encapsulated by multiwall carbon nanotubes self-organize on inert substrates exposed to the products of ferrocene pyrolysis at high temperature. The most commonly observed encapsulated phases are Fe₃C, α-Fe, and γ-Fe. The observation of anomalously long-period lattice spacings in these nanowires has caused confusion since reflections from lattice spacings of ≥ 0.4 nm are kinematically forbidden for Fe₃C, most of the rarely observed, less stable carbides, α-Fe, and g-Fe. Through high-resolution electron microscopy, selective area electron diffraction, and electron energy loss spectroscopy we demonstrate that the observed long-period lattice spacings of 0.49, 0.66, and 0.44 nm correspond to reflections from the (100), (010), and (001) planes of orthorhombic Fe₃C (space group Pnma). Observation of these forbidden reflections results from dynamic scattering of the incident beam as first observed in bulk Fe₃C crystals.With small amounts of beam tilt these reflections can have significant intensities for crystals containing glide planes such as Fe₃C with space groups Pnma or Pbmn.

  2. Tungsten carbide encapsulated in nitrogen-doped carbon with iron/cobalt carbides electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Chen, Jinwei; Jiang, Yiwu; Zhou, Feilong; Wang, Gang; Wang, Ruilin

    2016-12-01

    This work presents a type of hybrid catalyst prepared through an environmental and simple method, combining a pyrolysis of transition metal precursors, a nitrogen-containing material, and a tungsten source to achieve a one-pot synthesis of N-doping carbon, tungsten carbides, and iron/cobalt carbides (Fe/Co/WC@NC). The obtained Fe/Co/WC@NC consists of uniform Fe3C and Co3C nanoparticles encapsulated in graphitized carbon with surface nitrogen doping, closely wrapped around a plate-like tungsten carbide (WC) that functions as an efficient oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalyst. The introduction of WC is found to promote the ORR activity of Fe/Co-based carbide electrocatalysts, which is attributed to the synergistic catalysts of WC, Fe3C, and Co3C. Results suggest that the composite exhibits comparable electrocatalytic activity, higher durability, and ability for methanol tolerance compared with commercial Pt/C for ORR in alkaline electrolyte. These advantages make Fe/Co/WC@NC a promising ORR electrocatalyst and a cost-effective alternative to Pt/C for practical application as fuel cell.

  3. Iron-rich nanoparticle encapsulated, nitrogen doped porous carbon materials as efficient cathode electrocatalyst for microbial fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Guolong; Zhu, Youlong; Lu, Lu; Xu, Kongliang; Wang, Heming; Jin, Yinghua; Jason Ren, Zhiyong; Liu, Zhenning; Zhang, Wei

    2016-05-01

    Developing efficient, readily available, and sustainable electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in neutral medium is of great importance to practical applications of microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Herein, a porous nitrogen-doped carbon material with encapsulated Fe-based nanoparticles (Fe-Nx/C) has been developed and utilized as an efficient ORR catalyst in MFCs. The material was obtained through pyrolysis of a highly porous organic polymer containing iron(II) porphyrins. The characterizations of morphology, crystalline structure and elemental composition reveal that Fe-Nx/C consists of well-dispersed Fe-based nanoparticles coated by N-doped graphitic carbon layer. ORR catalytic performance of Fe-Nx/C has been evaluated through cyclic voltammetry and rotating ring-disk electrode measurements, and its application as a cathode electrocatalyst in an air-cathode single-chamber MFC has been investigated. Fe-Nx/C exhibits comparable or better performance in MFCs than 20% Pt/C, displaying higher cell voltage (601 mV vs. 591 mV), maximum power density (1227 mW m-2 vs. 1031 mW m-2) and Coulombic efficiency (50% vs. 31%). These findings indicate that Fe-Nx/C is more tolerant and durable than Pt/C in a system with bacteria metabolism and thus holds great potential for practical MFC applications.

  4. Hierarchically-Porous Carbon Derived from a Large-Scale Iron-based Organometallic Complex for Versatile Energy Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Chao-Ying; Li, Huan-Huan; Wang, Hai-Feng; Sun, Hai-Zhu; Wu, Xing-Long; Zhang, Jing-Ping

    2016-06-22

    Inspired by the preparation of the hierarchically-porous carbon (HPC) derived from metal organic frameworks (MOFs) for energy storage, in this work, a simple iron-based metal- organic complex (MOC), which was simpler and cheaper compared with the MOF, was selected to achieve versatile energy storage. The intertwined 1 D nanospindles and enriched-oxygen doping of the HPC was obtained after one-step carbonization of the MOC. When employed in lithium-ion batteries, the HPC exhibited reversible capacity of 778 mA h g(-1) after 60 cycles at 50 mA g(-1) . Moreover, the HPC maintained a capacity of 188 mA h g(-1) after 400 cycles at 100 mA g(-1) as the anode material in a sodium-ion battery. In addition, the HPC served as the cathode matrix for evaluation of a lithium-sulfur battery. The general preparation process of the HPC is commercial, which is responsible for the large-scale production for its practical application. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. High-carbon fly-ash as a binder for iron ore pellets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawatra, S.K.; Eisele, T.C.; Ripke, S.J.; Ramirez, G.

    1999-09-01

    The goal of this project was to convert currently unusable fly-ashes into a material that can be used as a binder for iron ore. Such a binder would also be useful for other high-volume markets, including foundry sand mold binders. Previously, the investigators used fly-ash in combination with calcium hydroxide as an additive while calcium chloride was added as a hardening accelerator. However, the addition of chloride salts have a detrimental effect because chlorine causes corrosion in processing equipment. Therefore, other potential hardening accelerators were investigated during this project. During production, dried iron-ore pellets are required to have crushing strength of at least 22.2 newtons (5 pounds force) per 12.7 mm (1/2 inch) diameter pellet. The pellets are then sintered at temperatures up to 1300 C and must not exhibit a significant degree of spalling or cracking. Pellets will therefore be tested to determine whether acceptable dry crushing strengths can be achieved.

  6. Prussian blue analogue derived magnetic carbon/cobalt/iron nanocomposite as an efficient and recyclable catalyst for activation of peroxymonosulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kun-Yi Andrew; Chen, Bo-Jau

    2017-01-01

    A Prussian blue analogue, cobalt hexacyanoferrate Co3[Fe(CN)6]2, was used for the first time to prepare a magnetic carbon/cobalt/iron (MCCI) nanocomposite via one-step carbonization of Co3[Fe(CN)6]2. The resulting MCCI consisted of evenly-distributed cobalt and cobalt ferrite in a porous carbonaceous matrix, making it an attractive magnetic heterogeneous catalyst for activating peroxymonosulfate (PMS). As Rhodamine B (RhB) degradation was adopted as a model test for evaluating activation capability of MCCI, factors influencing RhB degradation were thoroughly examined, including MCCI and PMS dosages, temperature, pH, salt and radical scavengers. A higher MCCI dosage noticeably facilitated the degradation kinetics, whereas insufficient PMS dosage led to ineffective degradation. RhB degradation by MCCI-activated PMS was much more favorable at high temperatures and under neutral conditions. The presence of high concentration of salt slightly interfered with RhB degradation by MCCI-activated PMS. Through examining effects of radical scavengers, RhB degradation by MCCI-activated PMS can be primarily attributed to sulfate radicals instead of a combination of sulfate and hydroxyl radicals. Compared to Co3O4, a typical catalyst for PMS activation, MCCI also exhibited a higher catalytic activity for activating PMS. In addition, MCCI was proven as a durable and recyclable catalyst for activating PMS over multiple cycles without efficiency loss and significant changes of chemical characteristics. These features demonstrate that MCCI, simply prepared from a one-step carbonization of Co3[Fe(CN)6]2 is a promising heterogeneous catalyst for activating PMS to degrade organic pollutants.

  7. Performance Evaluation of In-Situ Iron Reactive Barriers at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, D.B.

    2003-12-30

    were still loose and not clogged after approximately 2.5 years of barrier installation. However, significant amounts of cemented iron filings were observed in the upgradient portion of the iron. In particular, the cementation appeared to have increased significantly over time from the 1999 to 2000 coring events in both the upgradient and downgradient portions of the iron. Minerals identified by scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive x-ray (EDX), and x-ray diffraction (XRD) that have precipitated in the iron include iron sulfide, calcium carbonate (aragonite), iron oxyhydroxides (goethite, akagneite, amorphous), siderite (iron carbonate), makinawite, and green rusts. These mineral precipitants are responsible for the cementation observed within the iron barrier. Elevated microbial activity and increased diversity within and in the vicinity of the iron barrier were also observed, particularly denitrifiers and sulfate-reducers, which may have been responsible or partially responsible for the removal of nitrate and sulfate in groundwater and the formation of ferrous sulfide minerals within the iron barrier. Hydraulic gradients across the Pathway 2 site have remained relatively stable and consistent from east to west. Increases and decreases in the gradients across the site observed over the past 2.5 years appear to be primarily related to recharge during precipitation events and seasonal fluctuations. However, closer inspection of gradient fluctuations within the iron appear to indicate that cementation within the iron may be starting to impact groundwater flow through the iron. Since the spring of 1999, recharge events have had a more pronounced impact on hydraulic gradients observed between wells located upgradient, within, and downgradient of the iron. This data suggests that the connectivity of the iron and gravel in the upgradient portion of the trench to the iron and gravel in the downgradient portion of the trench may be decreasing over time due to

  8. Permeable reactive barrier of surface hydrophobic granular activated carbon coupled with elemental iron for the removal of 2,4-dichlorophenol in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Ji, E-mail: yangji@ecust.edu.cn [School of Resources and Environmental Engineering, State Environmental Protection Key Laboratory of Environmental Risk Assessment and Control on Chemical Process, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Cao Limei; Guo Rui; Jia Jinping [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2010-12-15

    Granular activated carbon was modified with dimethyl dichlorosilane to improve its surface hydrophobicity, and therefore to improve the performance of permeable reactive barrier constructed with the modified granular activated carbon and elemental iron. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy shows that the surface silicon concentration of the modified granular activated carbon is higher than that of the original one, leading to the increased surface hydrophobicity. Although the specific surface area decreased from 895 to 835 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}, the modified granular activated carbon could adsorb 20% more 2,4-dichlorophenol than the original one did in water. It is also proven that the permeable reactive barrier with the modified granular activated carbon is more efficient at 2,4-dichlorophenol dechlorination, in which process 2,4-dichlorophenol is transformed to 2-chlorophenol or 4-chlorophenol then to phenol, or to phenol directly.

  9. Influence of seasonal and geochemical changes on the geomicrobiology of an iron carbonate mineral water spring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegler, Florian; Lösekann-Behrens, Tina; Hanselmann, Kurt; Behrens, Sebastian; Kappler, Andreas

    2012-10-01

    Fuschna Spring in the Swiss Alps (Engadin region) is a bicarbonate iron(II)-rich, pH-neutral mineral water spring that is dominated visually by dark green microbial mats at the side of the flow channel and orange iron(III) (oxyhydr)oxides in the flow channel. Gradients of O(2), dissolved iron(II), and bicarbonate establish in the water. Our goals were to identify the dominating biogeochemical processes and to determine to which extent changing geochemical conditions along the flow path and seasonal changes influence mineral identity, crystallinity, and microbial diversity. Geochemical analysis showed microoxic water at the spring outlet which became fully oxygenated within 2.3 m downstream. X-ray diffraction and Mössbauer spectroscopy revealed calcite (CaCO(3)) and ferrihydrite [Fe(OH)(3)] to be the dominant minerals which increased in crystallinity with increasing distance from the spring outlet. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis banding pattern cluster analysis revealed that the microbial community composition shifted mainly with seasons and to a lesser extent along the flow path. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis showed that microbial communities differ between the flow channel and the flanking microbial mat. Microbial community analysis in combination with most-probable-number analyses and quantitative PCR (qPCR) showed that the mat was dominated by cyanobacteria and the channel was dominated by microaerophilic Fe(II) oxidizers (1.97 × 10(7) ± 4.36 × 10(6) 16S rRNA gene copies g(-1) using Gallionella-specific qPCR primers), while high numbers of Fe(III) reducers (10(9) cells/g) were identified in both the mat and the flow channel. Phototrophic and nitrate-reducing Fe(II) oxidizers were present as well, although in lower numbers (10(3) to 10(4) cells/g). In summary, our data suggest that mainly seasonal changes caused microbial community shifts, while geochemical gradients along the flow path influenced mineral crystallinity.

  10. Lithium iron phosphate/carbon nanocomposite film cathodes for high energy lithium ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Yanyi; Liu Dawei; Zhang Qifeng [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Yu Danmei [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Liu Jun [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard, P.O. Box 999, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Cao Guozhong, E-mail: gzcao@u.washington.ed [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)

    2011-02-01

    This paper reports sol-gel derived nanostructured LiFePO{sub 4}/carbon nanocomposite film cathodes exhibiting enhanced electrochemical properties and cyclic stabilities. LiFePO{sub 4}/carbon films were obtained by spreading sol on Pt coated Si wafer followed by ambient drying overnight and annealing/pyrolysis at elevated temperature in nitrogen. Uniform and crack-free LiFePO{sub 4}/carbon nanocomposite films were readily obtained and showed olivine phase as determined by means of X-Ray Diffractometry. The electrochemical characterization revealed that, at a current density of 200 mA/g (1.2 C), the nanocomposite film cathodes demonstrated an initial lithium-ion intercalation capacity of 312 mAh/g, and 218 mAh/g after 20 cycles, exceeding the theoretical storage capacity of conventional LiFePO{sub 4} electrode. Such enhanced Li-ion intercalation performance could be attributed to the nanocomposite structure with fine crystallite size below 20 nm as well as the poor crystallinity which provides a partially open structure allowing easy mass transport and volume change associated with Li-ion intercalation. Moreover the surface defect introduced by carbon nanocoating could also effectively facilitate the charge transfer and phase transitions.

  11. Lithium iron phosphate/carbon nanocomposite film cathodes for high energy lithium ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yanyi; Liu, Dawei; Zhang, Qifeng; Yu, Danmei; Liu, Jun; Cao, Guozhong

    2011-02-01

    This paper reports sol-gel derived nanostructured LiFePO4/carbon nanocomposite film cathodes exhibiting enhanced electrochemical properties and cyclic stabilities. LiFePO4/carbon films were obtained by spreading sol on Pt coated Si wafer followed by ambient drying overnight and annealing/pyrolysis at elevated temperature in nitrogen. Uniform and crack-free LiFePO4/carbon nanocomposite films were readily obtained and showed olivine phase as determined by means of X-Ray Diffractometry. The electrochemical characterization revealed that, at a current density of 200 mA/g (1.2 C), the nanocomposite film cathodes demonstrated an initial lithium-ion intercalation capacity of 312 mAh/g, and 218 mAh/g after 20 cycles, exceeding the theoretical storage capacity of conventional LiFePO4 electrode. Such enhanced Li-ion intercalation performance could be attributed to the nanocomposite structure with fine crystallite size below 20 nm as well as the poor crystallinity which provides a partially open structure allowing easy mass transport and volume change associated with Li-ion intercalation. Moreover the surface defect introduced by carbon nanocoating could also effectively facilitate the charge transfer and phase transitions.

  12. Analysis of the optimization possibilities to recover the powdery wastes containing iron and carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, Darius-Alexandru; Vilceanu, Lucia; Socalici, Ana

    2016-06-01

    Most industrial activities result in one or more secondary products and wastes besides the primary product, with a variety of uses. The iron & steel industry is highly energy intensive, but it is also a major source of environmental pollution with gases and dusts, especially the extractive branch. The researches aimed the recovery of the dust from the sintering plants and blast furnaces through the briquetting technology. Its recovery is required either for preventing the pollution or for reducing the consumption of raw materials. The mechanical properties are important for the quality of briquettes. We presented in this paper a series of mathematical correlations among the mechanical properties and the components of the briquetting batch, obtained using Excel spreadsheet and MATLAB programs. After analysing the results, we choose the optimal variation limits for the briquetting batch components.

  13. First-principles calculations of high-pressure iron-bearing monoclinic dolomite and single-cation carbonates with internally consistent Hubbard U

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomatova, Natalia V.; Asimow, Paul D.

    2017-08-01

    It has been proposed that iron has a significant effect on the relative stability of carbonate phases at high pressures, possibly even stabilizing double-cation carbonates (e.g., dolomite) with respect to single-cation carbonates (e.g., magnesite, aragonite and siderite). X-ray diffraction experiments have shown that dolomite transforms at 35 GPa to a high-pressure polymorph that is stable to decomposition; however, there has been disagreement on the structure of the high-pressure phase (Mao et al. in Geophys Res Lett 38, 2011. doi: 10.1029/2011GL049519; Merlini et al. in Proc Natl Acad Sci 109:13509-13514, 2012. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1201336109). Ab initio calculations interfaced with an evolutionary structure prediction algorithm demonstrated that a C2/c polymorph of pure CaMg(CO3)2 dolomite is more stable than previously reported structures (Solomatova and Asimow in Am Mineral 102:210-215, 2017, doi: 10.2138/am-2017-5830). In this study, we calculate the relative enthalpies up to 80 GPa for a set of carbonate phases including Fe-bearing solutions and endmembers, using the generalized gradient approximation and a Hubbard U parameter calculated through linear response theory to accurately characterize the electronic structure of Fe. When calculated with a constant U of 4 eV, the spin transition pressure of (Mg,Fe)CO3 agrees well with experiments, whereas an internally consistent U overestimates the spin transition pressure by 50 GPa. However, whether we use constant or internally consistent U values, a higher iron concentration increases the stability field of dolomite C2/c with respect to single-cation carbonate assemblages, but iron-free dolomite is not stable with respect to single-cation carbonates at any pressure. Thus, high-pressure polymorphs of Fe-bearing dolomite could in fact represent an important reservoir for carbon storage within oxidized sections of Earth's mantle.

  14. Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Options in ISEEM Global Energy Model: 2010-2050 Scenario Analysis for Least-Cost Carbon Reduction in Iron and Steel Sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karali, Nihan; Xu, Tengfang; Sathaye, Jayant

    2013-12-01

    The goal of the modeling work carried out in this project was to quantify long-term scenarios for the future emission reduction potentials in the iron and steel sector. The main focus of the project is to examine the impacts of carbon reduction options in the U.S. iron and steel sector under a set of selected scenarios. In order to advance the understanding of carbon emission reduction potential on the national and global scales, and to evaluate the regional impacts of potential U.S. mitigation strategies (e.g., commodity and carbon trading), we also included and examined the carbon reduction scenarios in China’s and India’s iron and steel sectors in this project. For this purpose, a new bottom-up energy modeling framework, the Industrial Sector Energy Efficiency Modeling (ISEEM), (Karali et al. 2012) was used to provide detailed annual projections starting from 2010 through 2050. We used the ISEEM modeling framework to carry out detailed analysis, on a country-by-country basis, for the U.S., China’s, and India’s iron and steel sectors. The ISEEM model applicable to iron and steel section, called ISEEM-IS, is developed to estimate and evaluate carbon emissions scenarios under several alternative mitigation options - including policies (e.g., carbon caps), commodity trading, and carbon trading. The projections will help us to better understand emission reduction potentials with technological and economic implications. The database for input of ISEEM-IS model consists of data and information compiled from various resources such as World Steel Association (WSA), the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), China Steel Year Books, India Bureau of Mines (IBM), Energy Information Administration (EIA), and recent LBNL studies on bottom-up techno-economic analysis of energy efficiency measures in the iron and steel sector of the U.S., China, and India, including long-term steel production in China. In the ISEEM-IS model, production technology and manufacturing details are

  15. Quasiphase Transition in a Single File of Water Molecules Encapsulated in (6,5) Carbon Nanotubes Observed by Temperature-Dependent Photoluminescence Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xuedan; Cambré, Sofie; Wenseleers, Wim; Doorn, Stephen K.; Htoon, Han

    2017-01-01

    Molecules confined inside single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) behave quite differently from their bulk analogues. In this Letter we present temperature-dependent (4.2 K up to room temperature) photoluminescence (PL) spectra of water-filled and empty single-chirality (6,5) SWCNTs. Superimposed on a linear temperature-dependent PL spectral shift of the empty SWCNTs, an additional stepwise PL spectral shift of the water-filled SWCNTs is observed at ˜150 K . With the empty SWCNTs serving as an ideal reference system, we assign this shift to temperature-induced changes occurring in the single-file chain of water molecules encapsulated in the tubes. Our molecular dynamics simulations further support the occurrence of a quasiphase transition of the orientational order of the water dipoles in the single-file chain.

  16. Synthesis and Characterization of Iron-impregnated Pre-oxidized Activated Carbon Prepared by Microwave Radiation for As(V) Removal from Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurum, Yuda; Yurum, Alp; Ozlem Kocabas, Zuleyha; Semiat, Raphael

    2013-04-01

    One of the most efficient ways to treat water is probably by adsorption and catalytic oxidation. Surely, for such a process to be economical, the catalyst and the adsorber should have a high catalytic activity and adsorption capacity, and be inexpensive. One of these materials is iron oxide, which is studied and used in areas like catalysis and environmental applications. It is known that synthesizing iron oxides in nano size enhances the catalytic activity. Pre-oxidized activated carbons impregnated with iron-based nanoparticles are prepared in a single step under hydrothermal conditions with microwave radiation. The hydrothermal treatment provides an important advantage by forming fine particles that can easily impregnate deep in to the porous support by the help of water. Their efficiency for the removal of As(V) from water was compared with the pure pre-oxidized activated carbon and iron oxide nanoparticles impregnated without microwave radiation. The synthesized nanomaterials with different iron oxide loadings were characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area analyzer. Iron loadings were calculated using flame atomic absorbance. Microwave radiation provided much faster iron impregnation on the active carbon surface. At the first stage of microwave radiation iron oxide impregnation is low but after 6 minutes, iron oxide nanoparticles of 100 nm size started to cover the surface homogeneously. Further treatment with microwave increased the size of particles and the amount of surface coverage. Additionally, with microwave hydrothermal treatment, relatively higher iron oxide loadings were achieved within 10 minutes. From the XRD characterization it was seen that at the first stage of radiation, iron deposited in the form of β-FeOOH, but after the first stage the structure became Fe2O3. While radiation increased the surface area of the material during the first stages, at the last stage

  17. On the thermal stability of vacancy-carbon complexes in alpha iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terentyev, D; Bonny, G; Bakaev, A; Van Neck, D

    2012-09-26

    In this work we have summarized the available ab initio data addressing the interaction of carbon with vacancy defects in bcc Fe and performed additional calculations to extend the available dataset. Using an ab initio based parameterization, we apply object kinetic Monte Carlo (OKMC) simulations to model the process of isochronal annealing in bcc Fe doped with carbon to compare with experimental data. As a result of this work, we clarify that a binding energy of ~0.65 eV for a vacancy-carbon (V-C) pair fits the available experimental data best. It is found that the V (2)-C complex is less stable than the V-C pair and its dissociation with activation energy of 0.55 + 0.49 eV also rationalizes a number of experimental data where the breakup of V-C complexes was assumed instead. From the summarized ab initio data, the subsequently obtained OKMC results and critical discussion, provided here, we suggest that the twofold interpretation of the V-C binding energy, which is believed to vary between 0.47 and 0.65 eV, depending on the ab initio approximation, should be removed. The stability and mobility of small and presumably immobile SIA clusters formed at stage II is also discussed in the view of experimental data.

  18. Iron and carbon isotope evidence for ecosystem and environmental diversity in the ˜ 2.7 to 2.5 Ga Hamersley Province, Western Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czaja, Andrew D.; Johnson, Clark M.; Beard, Brian L.; Eigenbrode, Jennifer L.; Freeman, Katherine H.; Yamaguchi, Kosei E.

    2010-03-01

    The largest excursion in kerogen δ13C and bulk/mineral δ56Fe values yet measured in the ancient rock record occurs in rocks of ˜ 2.7 to 2.5 Ga age. New Fe isotope data integrated with previously collected C isotope data on the same samples document the metabolic diversity of microbial communities in the Neoarchean Hamersley Province of the Pilbara Craton in Western Australia. Samples of shales, carbonates, and mixed carbonate/shale lithologies were collected from three drill cores; two cores from the depocenter of the province and one from the margin. Shallow-water clastic/carbonate rocks deposited in the center of the province (Tumbiana Formation) record kerogen δ13C values that indicate C cycling by various anaerobic or aerobic methane pathways, but the restricted range in δ56Fe values indicates little or no Fe redox cycling. Deep-water sediments deposited contemporaneously in both parts of the Hamersley Province (Jeerinah Formation) record slightly positive δ56Fe values in the relatively shallower and suboxic margin, but strongly negative δ56Fe values in the deeper euxinic depocenter of the province, a pattern consistent with Fe cycling via a basin Fe shuttle, driven by bacterial dissimilatory iron reduction (DIR). Kerogen δ13C values from these units indicate coupling of microbial Fe cycling to aerobic methanotrophy or anaerobic oxidation of methane. Younger black shales, intercalated with iron formation (Marra Mamba Iron Formation) in the depocenter, record a shift to near-zero δ56Fe values reflecting an Fe budget dominated by hydrothermal and clastic sources. However, time-equivalent, Fe-rich carbonate/shale lithologies deposited on the margin of the province (Carawine Dolomite) have δ56Fe values that steadily decrease from near zero to strongly negative values. These relatively Fe-rich carbonates may reflect a carbonate trap of a DIR-driven Fe shuttle, similar to the sulfidic trap in the euxinic portion of the Jeerinah Formation. In contrast

  19. Iron: A Biogeochemical Engine That Drives Carbon, Nitrogen, and Phosphorus Cycling in Humid Tropical Forest Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, W. L.; Hall, S. J.; Thompson, A.; Yang, W. H.

    2014-12-01

    The abundance of redox active Fe minerals has the potential to alter the storage and loss of C, contribute to gaseous N emissions, and control P retention in upland tropical forest soils. High concentrations of short-range order Fe minerals led to Fe(II) production rates of 26-206 μg g d-1 under short-term low redox conditions (Chacón et al. 2006, Liptzin and Silver 2009, Dubinsky et al. 2010). Potential C mineralization from Fe(II) reduction was 34-263 g CO2-C m-2 y-1, C losses equivalent to approximately 10-60 % of annual litterfall production in this forest. Decreased acidity during Fe reduction can destabilize soil aggregates and lead to C losses. Iron is rapidly reoxidized during aerobic periods, which can subsequently lead to C stabilization via complexation reactions. Fe oxidation can also stimulate C losses via pH-driven dissolved organic C production and directly via Fenton reactions. In laboratory experiments, rates of CO2 production were strongly linearly correlated with Fe(II) loss under aerobic conditions, increasing by 0.51 ± 0.02 µg CO2-C g soil h-1 respired for each mg of Fe(II) g-1 soil oxidized or sorbed (Hall and Silver 2013). Iron oxidation has also been linked to dissimilatory NO3- reduction to NH4+ leading to N retention in ecosystems. Fe(III) reduction coupled with NH4+ oxidation (Feammox) can lead to N losses as dinitrogen gas (N2) or nitrous oxide (N2O), a potent greenhouse gas. Estimates suggest that Feammox resulted in gaseous N losses of 1-4 kg N ha-1 y-1 (Yang et al. 2012), rates equivalent to total denitrification in this forest. Oxidized Fe can strongly bind P decreasing it's availability to plant roots. While this is commonly cited as a potential limitation to net primary production in tropical forests, it also helps to retain P in ecosystems with high rainfall and potential leaching losses. Microbial biomass P availability increased significantly with Fe(II) production, suggesting the P mobilized during Fe(II) reduction was

  20. Colour Metallography of Cast Iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Jiyang; Liu Jincheng

    2011-01-01

    White Cast Iron (Ⅰ) White cast iron or ‘white iron' refers to the type of cast iron in which all of the carbon exists as carbide;there is no graphite in the as-cast structure and the fractured surface shows a white colour.White cast iron can be divided in three classes:· Normal white cast iron — this iron contains only C,Si,Mn,P and S,with no other alloying elements.· Low-alloy white cast iron — the total mass fraction of alloying elements is less than 5%.

  1. Flotation of a new chelate collector on fine refractory iron ore-containing carbonate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王婷霞; 朱一民; 桂夏辉

    2016-01-01

    A suitable and efficient flotation collector at normal atmospheric temperature for Donganshan iron ore was developed. A new chelate collector W-2 was synthesized. At 30 °C, condition flotation tests on mixed magnetic concentrate of Donganshan sintering plant established the best reagent system. With the optimum reagent system, one direct flotation and one reverse flotation including one roughing, one cleaning and two scavenging stages have been conducted. After closed-circuit flotation, excellent indices were obtained with grade of siderite concentrate of 36.49%, recovery rate of 10.65%, and loss on ignition of 11.17%, and the grade of hematite concentrate reached 66.27%, with recovery rate of 78.25%, tailing grade of 16.22%, and recovery rate of 11.10%. To analyze the mechanism of action from W-2 to quartz and siderite, zeta potential and FTIR spectra were detected. Results showed that after reaction with W-2, the zeta potential of quartz and siderite evidently changed, which resulted from hydrogen bond between quartz and W-2, and a certain chemical action between siderite and W-2. In addition, the electronegativity equalization principle was used to calculate electronegativity of active adsorption sites and analysis on reagent molecular structure showed that W-2 molecule had five active adsorption sites. Results showed that the electronegativity of atoms N and O in W-2 presented a substantial increase, and the synergy of atomic sites allowed considerable enhancement of collecting ability.

  2. Variability in carbon isotope fractionation of trichloroethene during degradation by persulfate activated with zero-valent iron: Effects of inorganic anions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yunde [State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); School of Environmental Studies, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); Zhou, Aiguo, E-mail: aiguozhou@cug.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); School of Environmental Studies, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); Gan, Yiqun; Li, Xiaoqian [State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); School of Environmental Studies, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2016-04-01

    Stable carbon isotope analysis has the potential to be used for assessing the performance of in situ remediation of organic contaminants. Successful application of this isotope technique requires understanding the magnitude and variability in carbon isotope fractionation associated with the reactions under consideration. This study investigated the influence of inorganic anions (sulfate, bicarbonate, and chloride) on carbon isotope fractionation of trichloroethene (TCE) during its degradation by persulfate activated with zero-valent iron. The results demonstrated that the significant carbon isotope fractionation (enrichment factors ε ranging from − 3.4 ± 0.3 to − 4.3 ± 0.3 ‰) was independent on the zero-iron dosage, sulfate concentration, and bicarbonate concentration. However, the ε values (ranging from − 7.0 ± 0.4 to − 13.6 ± 1.2 ‰) were dependent on the chloride concentration, indicating that chloride could significantly affect carbon isotope fractionation during TCE degradation by persulfate activated with zero-valent iron. The dependence of ε values on chloride concentration, indicated that TCE degradation mechanisms may be different from the degradation mechanism caused by sulfate radical (SO{sub 4}·{sup −}). Ignoring the effect of chloride on ε value may cause numerous uncertainties in quantitative assessment of the performance of the in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO). - Highlights: • Significant C isotope fractionation for TCE degradation by Fe{sup 0} activated persulfate. • The enrichment factors was independent of Fe{sup 0}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2−}, or HCO{sub 3}{sup −} concentration. • Cl{sup −} significantly influenced the carbon isotope fractionation.

  3. Surface-Plasmon-Enhanced Photodriven CO2 Reduction Catalyzed by Metal-Organic-Framework-Derived Iron Nanoparticles Encapsulated by Ultrathin Carbon Layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huabin; Wang, Tao; Wang, Junjie; Liu, Huimin; Dao, Thang Duy; Li, Mu; Liu, Guigao; Meng, Xianguang; Chang, Kun; Shi, Li; Nagao, Tadaaki; Ye, Jinhua

    2016-05-01

    Highly efficient utilization of solar light with an excellent reduction capacity is achieved for plasmonic Fe@C nanostructures. By carbon layer coating, the optimized catalyst exhibits enhanced selectivity and stability applied to the solar-driven reduction of CO2 into CO. The surface-plasmon effect of iron particles is proposed to excite CO2 molecules, and thereby facilitates the final reaction activity.

  4. 铁屑柱处理低浓度含铬废水的实验及应用%TEST OF THE TREATMENT OF LOW CONCENTRATION CHROMIUM-CONTAINING WASTEWATER BY IRON FILING-FILLED COLUMN AND ITS APPLICATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马丽娜; 王兴润; 任大军; 颜湘华; 买帅

    2011-01-01

    A new method for treating low concentration chromium-containing wastewater by iron filing-filled column is introduced.Aiming at the influential factor of this method on the runtime of removal of Cr(Ⅵ),tests are given to the iron filling height,backwash elixir choice,the number of backwash and the relationship of complete failure time and concentration.Technological parameters of the reactions have been obtained,which were applied to actual projects successfully.The results show that the low concentration chromium-containing wastewater treated by column filling with iron filing can meet the national discharge standard.Practice has proved that the process has less investment,low cost,simple operation and good results.%介绍一种处理低浓度含铬地下水的方法——铁屑柱法,就该法对去除六价铬的运行时间的影响因素铁屑填充高度、反冲洗药剂、反冲洗次数以及完全失效时间与出水浓度的关系进行了实验,得到了较佳的反应工艺参数,并成功应用于工程实例。结果表明:用铁柱法处理低浓度含铬废水,出水达到国家地下水排放标准。实践证明该工艺投资少,处理成本低,运行简单,效果好。

  5. Effect of Carbon on Grain Boundary Segregation of Phosphorus and Phosphorus-Induced Intergranular Fracture in High Purity Iron with Phosphorus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The segregation of carbon at grain boundaries and its effect on phosphorus segregation and phosphorus-induced intergranular fracture in the alloy of high purity iron with phosphorus were investigated by scanning Auger electron spectroscopy, impact test and SEM observation of fractured surface. The experimental results showed that the carbon segregation at grain boundaries decreases the phosphorus segregation, and a change of fracture mode from intergranular fracture to transgranular one, hence a decrease of ductile-brittle transition temperature is observed. The mechanism of these effects was discussed.

  6. Selective Extraction Methods for Aluminium, Iron and Organic Carbon from Montane Volcanic Ash Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    B. JANSEN; F. H. TONNEIJCK; J. M. VERSTRATEN

    2011-01-01

    Montane volcanic ash soils contain disproportionate amounts of soil organic carbon and thereby play an often underestimated role in the global carbon cycle.Given the central role of A1 and Fe in stabilizing organic matter in volcanic ash soils,we assessed various extraction methods of A1,Fe,and C fractions from montane volcanic ash soils in northern Ecuador,aiming at elucidating the role of A1 and Fe in stabilizing soil organic matter (SOM).We found extractions with cold sodium hydroxide,ammonium oxalate/oxalic acid,sodium pyrophosphate,and sodium tetraborate to be particularly useful.Combination of these methods yielded information about the role of the mineral phase in stabilizing organic matter and the differences in type and degree of complexation of organic matter with Al and Fe in the various horizons and soil profiles.Sodium tetraborate extraction proved the only soft extraction method that yielded simultaneous information about the Al,Fe,and C fractions extracted.It also appeared to differentiate between SOM fractions of different stability.The fractions of copper chloride- and potassium chloride-extractable A1 were useful in assessing the total reactive and toxic Al fractions,respectively.The classical subdivision of organic matter into humic acids,fulvic acids,and humin added little useful information.The use of fulvic acids as a proxy for mobile organic matter as done in several model-based approaches seems invalid in the soils studied.

  7. Synthesis of novel nitrogen-doped carbon dots for highly selective detection of iron ion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Pengfei; Yao, Yixin; Zhou, Huimin; Zhang, Jin; Pang, Zengyuan; Ao, Kelong; Cai, Yibing; Wei, Qufu

    2017-04-01

    Herein, we report an eco-friendly and simple fluorescent nitrogen-doped carbon quantum dot (N-CQD) biosensor which was synthesized via a hydrothermal method using erhanediamine (EDA) and citric acid (CA) as precursors. The surface functionalization of N-CQDs exhibited a bright blue emission under the excitation wavelength of 350 nm. The obtained N-CQDs were characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. It was found that the surface of the CQDs was successfully functionalized. After that, as-prepared N-CQDs were further applied in Fe(III) detection. Spectroscopic data indicated that fluorescent carbon-based nanomaterials displayed a sensitive response to Fe3+ in the range of 0.5–1000 μM as a fluorescence sensor in real environmental samples. Furthermore, the results also showed that a novel N-CQD nanomaterial could be employed as an ideal fluorescent Fe(III) probe.

  8. Directional growth of pearlite in iron--carbon eutectoid alloys. [Rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pearson, D.D.

    1977-02-01

    Pearlite was transformed directionally by passing a zone of austenite through high purity Fe--C alloy bars of eutectoid composition. Using a small embedded thermocouple, the temperature gradient at both the austenitizing edge and the pearlite transformation edge of the austenitic zone was recorded. A sharp change in gradient occurred due to the change in thermal conductivity between the phases at each interface. The point of change in gradient enabled the temperature of both interfaces to be determined as a function of velocity. It was found that the undercooling of the pearlite transformation interface below the eutectoid temperature was quadratically dependent on the velocity of transformation. No superheating at the austenitizing interface was observed. Interlamellar spacing measurements of pearlite showed an inverse quadratic dependence of spacing on velocity. These two results are compared with theory. Volume diffusion of carbon through austenite adequately describes the kinetics of the decomposition of austenite to pearlite although extrapolated carbon diffusivities from high temperature austenite data are a factor of 2 to 4 too small. The interlamellar spacing of pearlite and the pearlite transformation interface temperature as a function of velocity are compared to other constant velocity transformation studies as well as isothermal investigations. Results of these comparisons indicate that pearlite forms via the same kinetics either isothermally or at constant velocity. The maximum rate at which pearlite can be forced to grow continuously under forced velocity conditions is shown to be approximately 100 ..mu..m/sec.

  9. Coupling of Carbon Dioxide with Epoxides Efficiently Catalyzed by Thioether-Triphenolate Bimetallic Iron(III) Complexes: Catalyst Structure-Reactivity Relationship and Mechanistic DFT Study

    KAUST Repository

    Della Monica, Francesco

    2016-08-25

    A series of dinuclear iron(III)I complexes supported by thioether-triphenolate ligands have been prepared to attain highly Lewis acidic catalysts. In combination with tetrabutylammonium bromide (TBAB) they are highly active catalysts in the synthesis of cyclic organic carbonates through the coupling of carbon dioxide to epoxides with the highest initial turnover frequencies reported to date for the conversion of propylene oxide to propylene carbonate for iron-based catalysts (5200h-1; 120°C, 2MPa, 1h). In particular, these complexes are shown to be highly selective catalysts for the coupling of carbon dioxide to internal oxiranes affording the corresponding cyclic carbonates in good yield and with retention of the initial stereochemical configuration. A density functional theory (DFT) investigation provides a rational for the relative high activity found for these Fe(III) complexes, showing the fundamental role of the hemilabile sulfur atom in the ligand skeleton to promote reactivity. Notably, in spite of the dinuclear nature of the catalyst precursor only one metal center is involved in the catalytic cycle. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Synthesis, characterization and performance in arsenic removal of iron-doped activated carbons prepared by impregnation with Fe(III) and Fe(II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñiz, G; Fierro, V; Celzard, A; Furdin, G; Gonzalez-Sánchez, G; Ballinas, M L

    2009-06-15

    Arsenic removal from natural well water from the state of Chihuahua (Mexico) is investigated by adsorption using a commercial activated carbon (AC). The latter is used as such, or after oxidation by several chemicals in aqueous solution: nitric acid, hydrogen peroxide, and ammonium persulphate. Raw and oxidised activated carbons are fully characterised (elementary analysis, surface chemistry, pore texture parameters, pH(ZC), and TEM observation). Adsorption of As is measured in the aforementioned water, containing ca. 300 ppb of arsenic: removal of As is poor with the raw AC, and only the most oxidised carbons exhibit higher performances. By contrast, iron-doped ACs are much more efficient for that purpose, though their As uptake strongly depends on their preparation conditions: a number of samples were synthesised by impregnation of raw and oxidised ACs with HCl aqueous solutions of either FeCl(3) or FeCl(2) at various concentrations and various pH. It is shown that iron(II) chloride is better for obtaining high iron contents in the resultant ACs (up to 8.34 wt.%), leading to high As uptake, close to 0.036 mg As/g C. In these conditions, 100% of the As initially present in the natural well water is removed, as soon as the Fe content of the adsorbent is higher than 2 wt.%.

  11. Iron-carbon Ball and Optimization of Its Applied Technology in Converter%铁碳球及其转炉应用技术优化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵志刚; 马勇; 简龙; 郭猛; 毛志勇; 王小善

    2015-01-01

    The process practice of iron-carbon balls applied by the 260 t converter in Angang is introduced. By taking such measures as optimizing charging mode, adding time of iron-carbon balls, the operation of lance and nitrogen flow rate of the converter bottom blowing, the usage of iron-carbon balls is increased, the ratio of excessive slag cut down, the overflow of dust and fume reduced, all of which has less effect on the end point content of nitrogen in molten steel by bottom blowing converter.%介绍了鞍钢260 t转炉应用铁碳球的工艺实践。通过采取优化铁碳球加料方式、加入时机、氧枪操作及转炉底吹流量等措施,增加了铁碳球的使用量,降低了溢渣比率,烟尘外溢现象减轻,对转炉终点氮含量影响不大。

  12. Synthesis, characterization and performance in arsenic removal of iron-doped activated carbons prepared by impregnation with Fe(III) and Fe(II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muniz, G. [Laboratoire de Chimie du Solide Mineral, Nancy-Universite, UMR CNRS 7555, BP 239, 54506 Vandoeuvre-les Nancy (France); Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Autonoma de Chihuahua, Circuito Universitario S/N, Chihuahua (Mexico); Fierro, V., E-mail: Vanessa.Fierro@lcsm-uhp.nancy.fr [Laboratoire de Chimie du Solide Mineral, Nancy-Universite, UMR CNRS 7555, BP 239, 54506 Vandoeuvre-les Nancy (France); Celzard, A. [Laboratoire de Chimie du Solide Mineral, UMR CNRS 7555, Nancy-Universite, ENSTIB, 27 rue du Merle Blanc, BP 1041, 88051 Epinal Cedex 9 (France); Furdin, G. [Laboratoire de Chimie du Solide Mineral, Nancy-Universite, UMR CNRS 7555, BP 239, 54506 Vandoeuvre-les Nancy (France); Gonzalez-Sanchez, G. [Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados (CIMAV) Miguel de Cervantes 120, Compl. Ind. Chih., 31109 Chihuahua (Mexico); Ballinas, M.L. [Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Autonoma de Chihuahua, Circuito Universitario S/N, Chihuahua (Mexico)

    2009-06-15

    Arsenic removal from natural well water from the state of Chihuahua (Mexico) is investigated by adsorption using a commercial activated carbon (AC). The latter is used as such, or after oxidation by several chemicals in aqueous solution: nitric acid, hydrogen peroxide, and ammonium persulphate. Raw and oxidised activated carbons are fully characterised (elementary analysis, surface chemistry, pore texture parameters, pH{sub ZC}, and TEM observation). Adsorption of As is measured in the aforementioned water, containing ca. 300 ppb of arsenic: removal of As is poor with the raw AC, and only the most oxidised carbons exhibit higher performances. By contrast, iron-doped ACs are much more efficient for that purpose, though their As uptake strongly depends on their preparation conditions: a number of samples were synthesised by impregnation of raw and oxidised ACs with HCl aqueous solutions of either FeCl{sub 3} or FeCl{sub 2} at various concentrations and various pH. It is shown that iron(II) chloride is better for obtaining high iron contents in the resultant ACs (up to 8.34 wt.%), leading to high As uptake, close to 0.036 mg As/g C. In these conditions, 100% of the As initially present in the natural well water is removed, as soon as the Fe content of the adsorbent is higher than 2 wt.%.

  13. Facile synthesis of nitrogen-doped carbon dots and its application as sensing probes for serum iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Long; Hou, Juan; Li, Huiyu; Zhao, Qi; Zhang, Fengshuang; Zhao, Jiahui [Jilin University, College of Chemistry (China); Ding, Hong [Jilin University, State Key Laboratory of Inorganic Synthesis and Preparative Chemistry, College of Chemistry (China); Ding, Lan, E-mail: dinglan@jlu.edu.cn [Jilin University, College of Chemistry (China)

    2015-11-15

    In this paper, nitrogen-doped carbon dots (N-CDs) with a quantum yield of 23.6 % were successfully synthesized by microwave pyrolysis of urea using diethylene glycol as the high boiling point reaction medium. The N-CDs were spherical and monodisperse with a size distribution between 1.5 and 5.5 nm. The N-CDs exhibited excellent water-soluble property and remarkable stability under extreme ionic strengths and light illumination. The fluorescence of the N-CDs could be quenched by Fe{sup 3+} through the static quenching mechanism, but not by other common metal ions. On this basis, the N-CDs can be used as a facile sensing platform for label-free sensitive and selective detection of Fe{sup 3+} in a linear range of 1.6–333.3 μmol L{sup −1}, and the detection limit was 0.45 μmol L{sup −1} obtained at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3. Importantly, the N-CDs-based fluorescent probe was successfully applied to the direct analysis of iron contents in human serum samples, which demonstrated potential applications in biological and clinical analysis.

  14. Fabrication of plain carbon steel/high chromium white cast iron bimetal by a liquid-solid composite casting process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    V Javaheri; H Rastegari; M Naseri

    2015-01-01

    High-chromium white cast iron (HCWCI) is one of the most widely used engineering materials in the mining and cement indus-tries. However, in some components, such as the pulverizer plates of ash mills, the poor machinability of HCWCI creates difficulties. The bimetal casting technique is a suitable method for improving the machinability of HCWCI by joining an easily machined layer of plain car-bon steel (PCS) to its hard part. In this study, the possibility of PCS/HCWCI bimetal casting was investigated using sand casting. The inves-tigation was conducted by optical and electron microscopy and non-destructive, impact toughness, and tensile tests. The hardness and chemical composition profiles on both sides of the interface were plotted in this study. The results indicated that a conventional and low-cost casting technique could be a reliable method for producing PCS/HCWCI bimetal. The interfacial microstructure comprised two distinct lay-ers:a very fine, partially spheroidized pearlite layer and a coarse full pearlite layer. Moreover, characterization of the microstructure revealed that the interface was free of defects.

  15. Alignment of carbon iron into polydimethylsiloxane to create conductive composite with low percolation threshold and high piezoresistivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Shuai; Wang, R.; Wang, Xiaojie

    2016-04-01

    With the development of soft materials for applications in flexible tactile sensors, metal particles/insulated polymer composites have been studied for many years. This article proposes a method to prepare carbon iron particles (CIPs)/polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) conductive composite with low percolation threshold and highly piezoresistive stain sensitivity. CIPs-PDMS composites with various filler volume fraction were cured under a magnetic field over 1.0 T to create chain-like structure resulting in anisotropy of conductive materials. The electrical resistivity for the longitudinal direction were measured as a function of filler volume fraction to understand the electrical percolation behavior. In this study, the percolation threshold of CIPs-PDMS composite cured under a magnetic field can be as low as 0.1 vol.%, which is much less than most of those studies in particulate composites. Meanwhile, the effects of compressive strain on the electrical properties of CIPs-PDMS composites were also investigated. The strain sensitivity depends on filler volume fraction and decreases with the increasing of compressive strain. It has been found that the composites containing a small amount of CI particles curing under a magnetic field exhibit a high strain sensitivity of over 150. The microstructures were measured by using a scanning electron microscope (SEM), and the results were also reported in this paper.

  16. Impact of iron-reducing bacteria on the corrosion rate of carbon steel under simulated geological disposal conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schütz, Marta K; Schlegel, Michel L; Libert, Marie; Bildstein, Olivier

    2015-06-16

    The current projects for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste rely on underground burial and confinement by metallic envelopes that are susceptible to corrosion processes. The impact of microbial activity must be fully clarified in order to provide biological parameters for predictive reactive transport models. This study investigates the impact of hydrogenotrophic iron-reducing bacteria (Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1) on the corrosion rate of carbon steel under simulated geological disposal conditions by using a geochemical approach. It was found that corrosion damage changes mostly according to the experimental solution (i.e., chemical composition). Magnetite and vivianite were identified as the main corrosion products. In the presence of bacteria, the corrosion rate increased by a factor of 1.3 (according to weight loss analysis) to 1.8 (according to H2 measurements), and the detected amount of magnetite diminished. The mechanism likely to enhance corrosion is the destabilization and dissolution of the passivating magnetite layer by reduction of structural Fe(III) coupled to H2 oxidation.

  17. Simultaneous addition of zero-valent iron and activated carbon on enhanced mesophilic anaerobic digestion of waste-activated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tongyu; Qin, Yujie; Cao, Yan; Han, Bin; Ren, Junyi

    2017-08-11

    The performance of biogas generation and sludge degradation was studied under different zero-valent iron/activated carbon (ZVI/AC) ratios in detail in mesophilic anaerobic digestion of sludge. A good enhancement of methane production was obtained at the 10:1 ZVI/AC ratio, and the cumulative methane production was 132.1 mL/g VS, 37.6% higher than the blank. The methane content at the 10:1 ZVI/AC ratio reached 68.8%, which was higher than the blank (55.2%) and the sludge-added AC alone (59.6%). For sludge degradation, the removal efficiencies of total chemical oxygen demand (TCOD), proteins, and polysaccharides were all the highest at the 10:1 ZVI/AC ratio. The concentration of available phosphorus (AP) decreased after anaerobic digestion process. On the other hand, the concentrations of available nitrogen (AN) and available potassium (AK) increased after the anaerobic digestion process and showed a gradually decreasing trend with increasing ZVI/AC ratio. The concentrations of AN and AK were 2303.1-4200.3 and 274.7-388.3 mg/kg, showing a potential for land utilization.

  18. The effect of carbon monoxide integrating nitric oxide through auxin signal in Arabidopsis to modulate iron deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liming eYang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Carbon monoxide (CO and nitric oxide (NO are essential modulators that regulate the plant response to iron deficiency (-Fe. Auxin is a phytohormone that plays important roles in plant growth and development. We report here that in Arabidopsis –Fe enhanced heme oxygenase-dependent CO generation and auxin transport through redistribution of PIN1 protein, which subsequently increased NO accumulation; NO signaling regulated the activity of ferric chelate reductase (FCR and the expression of Fe-uptake genes including basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor (FIT and the ferric reduction oxidase 2 (FRO2. Over-expression of HY1 encoding heme oxygenase, or treatment with CO donor enhanced basipetal auxin transport, FCR activity, and the expressions of FIT and FRO2 under –Fe. Such effects were compromised in the mutant aux1-7 impaired in auxin transport or in the mutant noa1 or nia1/nia2 defective in NO biosynthesis. -Fe failed to promote auxin transport and FCR activity in hy1 mutant; such inability was reversed in the double mutant of hy1/yucca1 with elevated auxin production, or in hy1/cue1 mutant with NO over-accumulation. Taken together, our results suggest that CO modulates NO signaling through auxin to cope with Fe deficiency in Arabidopsis.

  19. Effects of Multi-walled Carbon Nanotubes on the Electromagnetic Absorbing Characteristics of Composites Filled with Carbonyl Iron Particles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yonggang Xu; Deyuan Zhang; Jun Cai; Liming Yuan; Wenqiang Zhang

    2012-01-01

    The electromagnetic (EM) wave absorbing property of silicone rubber filled with carbonyl iron particles (CIPs) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) was examined. Absorbents including MWCNTs and spherical/ flaky CIPs were added to silicone rubber using a two-roll mixer. The complex permittivity and complex permeability were measured over the frequency range of 1-18 GHz. The two EM parameters were verified and the uniform dispersion of MWCNTs and ClPs was confirmed by comparing the measured reflection loss (RL) with the calculated one. As the MWCNT weight percent increased, the RL of the spherical CIPs/silicone rubber composites changed insignificantly. It was attributed to the random distribution of spherical ClPs and less content of MWCNTs. On the contrary, for composites filled with flaky ClPs the absorption bandwidth increased at thickness 0.5 mm (RL value lower than -5 dB in 8-18 GHz) and the absorption ratio increased at lower frequency (minimum -35 dB at 3.5 GHz). This effect was attributed to the oriented distribution of flaky CIPs caused by interactions between the two absorbents. Therefore, mixing MWCNTs and flaky CIPs could achieve wider-band and higher-absorption ratio absorbing materials.

  20. Enhanced decolorization of methyl orange in aqueous solution using iron-carbon micro-electrolysis activation of sodium persulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peng; Liu, Zhipeng; Wang, Xuegang; Guo, Yadan; Wang, Lizhang

    2017-08-01

    Reactivity of sodium persulfate (PS) in the decolorization of methyl orange (MO) in aqueous solution using an iron-carbon micro-electrolysis (ICE) method was investigated. The effects of sodium persulfate doses, pH, Fe-to-C mass ratios, initial MO concentration as well as the reaction temperature were comprehensively studied in batch experiments. The ICE-PS coupled process was more suitable for wide ranges of pH, initial MO concentration and reaction temperature, accompanied by the reduction of Fe compared ICE. The MO removal efficiency improved substantially by ICE-PS technique, 76.03% for ICE and 91.27% for ICE-PS at experimental conditions of pH 3.0, Fe-to-C mass ratio 3:1, PS addition 10 mM and initial MO concentration 0.61 mM. Furthermore, the biodegradability index (BI) dramatically increased from 0.26 to 0.65. The binary hydroxyl and sulfate radicals that non-selectively degrade MO to the derivatives with small molecules are ascribed to ICE-PS method as detected by the UV-vis spectra. The PS activation resource was Fe(2+) through the hydroxyl radical quenching reaction by the additive tert-butanol (TBA). This study provides an in-depth theoretical understanding of the development and wide commercial application of the ICE technology to refractory industrial dye wastewater treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Facile synthesis of nitrogen-doped carbon dots and its application as sensing probes for serum iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Long; Hou, Juan; Li, Huiyu; Zhao, Qi; Zhang, Fengshuang; Zhao, Jiahui; Ding, Hong; Ding, Lan

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, nitrogen-doped carbon dots (N-CDs) with a quantum yield of 23.6 % were successfully synthesized by microwave pyrolysis of urea using diethylene glycol as the high boiling point reaction medium. The N-CDs were spherical and monodisperse with a size distribution between 1.5 and 5.5 nm. The N-CDs exhibited excellent water-soluble property and remarkable stability under extreme ionic strengths and light illumination. The fluorescence of the N-CDs could be quenched by Fe3+ through the static quenching mechanism, but not by other common metal ions. On this basis, the N-CDs can be used as a facile sensing platform for label-free sensitive and selective detection of Fe3+ in a linear range of 1.6-333.3 μmol L-1, and the detection limit was 0.45 μmol L-1 obtained at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3. Importantly, the N-CDs-based fluorescent probe was successfully applied to the direct analysis of iron contents in human serum samples, which demonstrated potential applications in biological and clinical analysis.

  2. Synthesis of granular activated carbon/zero valent iron composites for simultaneous adsorption/dechlorination of trichloroethylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Hui-Hsin; Su, Jhih-Gang; Liang, Chenju

    2011-08-30

    The coupling adsorption and degradation of trichloroethylene (TCE) through dechlorination using synthetic granular activated carbon and zerovalent iron (GAC-ZVI) composites was studied. The GAC-ZVI composites were prepared from aqueous Fe(2+) solutions by impregnation with and without the use of a PEG dispersant and then heated at 105°C or 700°C under a stream of N(2). Pseudo-first-order rate constant data on the removal of TCE demonstrates that the adsorption kinetics of GAC is similar to those of GAC-ZVI composites. However, the usage of GAC-ZVI composites liberated a greater amount of Cl than when ZVI was used alone. The highest degree of reductive dechlorination of TCE was achieved using a GAC-ZVI700P composite (synthesized using PEG under 700°C). A modified Langmuir-Hinshelwood rate law was employed to depict the behavior of Cl liberation. As a result, a zero-order Cl liberation reaction was observed and the desorption limited TCE degradation rate constant decreased as the composite dosage was increased. The GAC-ZVI composites can be employed as a reactive GAC that is not subject to the limitations of using GAC and ZVI separately.

  3. High Cr white cast iron/carbon steel bimetal liner by lost foam casting with liquid-liquid composite process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Xiaofeng

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Liners in wet ball mill for mineral processing industry must bear abrasive wear and corrosive wear, and consequently, the service life of the liner made from traditional materials, such as Hadfield steel and alloyed steels, is typically less than ten months. Bimetal liner, made from high Cr white cast iron and carbon steel, has been successfully developed by using liquid-liquid composite lost foam casting process. The microstructure and interface of the composite were analyzed using optical microscope, SEM, EDX and XRD. Micrographs indicate that the boundary of bimetal combination regions is staggered like dogtooth, two liquid metals are not mixed, and the interface presents excellent metallurgical bonding state. After heat treatment, the composite liner specimens have shown excellent properties, including hardness > 61 HRC, fracture toughness αk >16.5 J·cm-2 and bending strength >1,600 MPa. Wear comparison was made between the bimetal composite liner and alloyed steel liner in an industrial hematite ball mill of WISCO, and the results of eight-month test in wet grinding environment have proved that the service life of the bimetal composite liner is three times as long as that of the alloyed steel liner.

  4. High Pressure Melting of Iron with Nonmetals Sulfur, Carbon, Oxygen, and Hydrogen: Implications for Planetary Cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buono, Antonio Salvatore

    The earth's core consists of a solid metallic center surrounded by a liquid metallic outer layer. Understanding the compositions of the inner and outer cores allows us to better understand the dynamics of the earth's core, as well as the dynamics of the cores of other terrestrial planets and moons. The density and size of the earth's core indicate that it is approximately 90% metallic, predominantly iron, with about 10% light elements. Iron meteorites, believed to be the remnants of planetary cores, provide further constraints on the composition of the earth's core, indicating a composition of 86% iron, 4% nickel, and 10% light elements. Any potential candidate for the major light element core component must meet two criteria: first, it must have high cosmic abundances and second, it must be compatible with Fe. Given these two constraints there are five plausible elements that could be the major light element in the core: H, O, C, S, and Si. Of these five possible candidates this thesis focuses on S and C as well exploring the effect of minor amounts of O and H on the eutectic temperature in a Fe-FeS core. We look at two specific aspects of the Fe-FeS system: first, the shape of the liquidus as a function of pressure, second, a possible cause for the reported variations in the eutectic temperature, which draws on the effect of H and O. Finally we look at the effect of S and C on partitioning behavior of Ni, Pt, Re,Co, Os and W between cohenite and metallic liquid. We are interested in constraining the shape of the Fe-FeS liquidus because as a planet with a S-enriched core cools, the thermal and compositional evolution of its core is constrained by this liquidus. In Chapter 1 I present an equation that allows for calculation of the temperature along the liquidus as a function of pressure and composition for Fe-rich compositions and pressures from 1 bar to 10 GPa. One particularly interesting feature of the Fe --rich side of the Fe-FeS eutectic is the sigmoidal shape

  5. Effect of Amount of Carbon on the Reduction Efficiency of Iron Ore-Coal Composite Pellets in Multi-layer Bed Rotary Hearth Furnace (RHF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Srinibash; Roy, Gour Gopal

    2016-08-01

    The effect of carbon-to-hematite molar ratio has been studied on the reduction efficiency of iron ore-coal composite pellet reduced at 1523 K (1250 °C) for 20 minutes in a laboratory scale multi-layer bed rotary hearth furnace (RHF). Reduced pellets have been characterized through weight loss measurement, estimation of porosity, shrinkage, qualitative and quantitative phase analysis by XRD. Performance parameters such as the degree of reduction, metallization, carbon efficiency, productivity, and compressive strength have been calculated to compare the process efficacy at different carbon levels in the pellets. Pellets with optimum carbon-to-hematite ratio (C/Fe2O3 molar ratio = 1.66) that is much below the stoichiometric carbon required for direct reduction of hematite yielded maximum reduction, better carbon utilization, and productivity for all three layers. Top layer exhibited maximum reduction at comparatively lower carbon level (C/Fe2O3 molar ratio 2.33). Correlation between degree of reduction and metallization indicated non-isothermal kinetics influenced by heat and mass transfer in multi-layer bed RHF. Compressive strength of the partially reduced pellet with optimum carbon content (C/Fe2O3 molar ratio = 1.66) showed that they could be potentially used as an alternate feed in a blast furnace or any other smelting reactor.

  6. Ocean iron cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Philip W.

    Interest in the biogeochemical cycle of iron has grown rapidly over the last two decades, due to the potential role of this element in modulating global climate in the geological past and ocean productivity in the present day. This trace metal has a disproportionately large effect (1 × 105 C:Fe) on photosynthetic carbon fixation by phytoplankton. In around one third of the open ocean, so-called high-nitrate low-chlorophyll (HNLC) regions, the resident phytoplankton have low growth rates despite an abundance of plant nutrients. This is due to the low supply of iron. Iron is present in the ocean in three phases, dissolved, colloidal, and particulate (biogenic and lithogenic). However, iron chemistry is complex with interactions between chemistry and biology such as the production of iron-binding siderophores by oceanic bacteria. This results in the interplay of inorganic chemistry, photochemistry, and organic complexation. Sources of new iron include dust deposition, upwelling of iron-rich deep waters, and the resuspension and lateral transport of sediments. Sinks for iron are mainly biological as evidenced by the vertical nutrient-like profile for dissolved iron in the ocean. Iron is rapidly recycled by the upper ocean biota within a so-called "ferrous wheel." The fe ratio [(new iron)/(new + regenerated iron)] provides an index of the relative supply of iron to the biota by new versus recycled iron. Over the last 15 years, interest in the potential role of iron in shaping climate in the geological past resulted in some of the most ambitious experiments in oceanography: large-scale (i.e., 50-1000 km2) iron enrichment of HNLC waters. They have provided valuable insights into how iron supply influences the biogeochemical cycles of elements such as carbon, sulfur, silicon, nitrogen, and phosphate.

  7. Paleozoic Akiyoshi broken limestone of iron and carbon-bearing quenched veins by impacts on water Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Y.

    2015-12-01

    As active Earth has been described by the present site after accretionary moved formations through the surface. In fact, the present Japanese Islands have less young volcanic rocks compared with much sedimentary rocks (ca. 60 vol. % ) of the Paleozoic Akiyoshi limestone remained from ocean-floor aggregates and uplifted to form the brecciated plateau in the Miocene at present site of Sea of Japan. The main purpose of the paper is to elucidate the in-situ material evidence of brecciated limestone blocks. The Akiyoshi underground samples (up to 250m in depth from the Kaerimizu site) drilled by the Akiyoshi Science Museum show significant changes of physical properties of powdered calcite minerals along the fossil reversal distributions [1-4] with anomalous abundances of siderophiles of bulk XRF data analysis at the bottom of 243m in depth[3]. The present in-situ data of FE-ASEM and Raman data show that the deep samples have re- crystallized calcite-halite and rapid veins with iron-carbon grains with shocked nano-carbon [2-4]. To compare with overseas samples, four American Paleozoic samples are investigated in this study of Carlsbad limestone, Sierra Madera Permian limestone, Alamo breccias and Santa-Fe breccias, where the Santa-Fe sample contains shocked quartz and limestone with fluid-tube texture and separated nano-carbon grains in this study [4]. The Akiyoshi limestone formed near at Equator has been remained as shallow impact breccias stored in the interior with Chinese blocks to present site by continental drift process followed by recent impact to be uplifted at the formed site of the Japan islands [4], which might be typical characteristics of active water planet Earth. Reference: [1] Miura Y. (1986): Bull. Akiyoshi-Dai Museum of Natural History (Yamaguchi), 22, 1-22. [3] Miura Y. (1996): Shock-wave Handbook (SV-Tokyo), p.1073-1209. [4] Miura Y. (2014, 2015): Japan G U-2014,2015 (English), each pp.1.

  8. Diurnal variation in the coupling of photosynthetic electron transport and carbon fixation in iron-limited phytoplankton in the NE subarctic Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuback, Nina; Flecken, Mirkko; Maldonado, Maria T.; Tortell, Philippe D.

    2016-02-01

    Active chlorophyll a fluorescence approaches, including fast repetition rate fluorometry (FRRF), have the potential to provide estimates of phytoplankton primary productivity at an unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution. FRRF-derived productivity rates are based on estimates of charge separation in reaction center II (ETRRCII), which must be converted into ecologically relevant units of carbon fixation. Understanding sources of variability in the coupling of ETRRCII and carbon fixation provides physiological insight into phytoplankton photosynthesis and is critical for the application of FRRF as a primary productivity measurement tool. In the present study, we simultaneously measured phytoplankton carbon fixation and ETRRCII in the iron-limited NE subarctic Pacific over the course of a diurnal cycle. We show that rates of ETRRCII are closely tied to the diurnal cycle in light availability, whereas rates of carbon fixation appear to be influenced by endogenous changes in metabolic energy allocation under iron-limited conditions. Unsynchronized diurnal oscillations of the two rates led to 3.5-fold changes in the conversion factor between ETRRCII and carbon fixation (Kc / nPSII). Consequently, diurnal variability in phytoplankton carbon fixation cannot be adequately captured with FRRF approaches if a constant conversion factor is applied. Utilizing several auxiliary photophysiological measurements, we observed that a high conversion factor is associated with conditions of excess light and correlates with the increased expression of non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) in the pigment antenna, as derived from FRRF measurements. The observed correlation between NPQ and Kc / nPSII requires further validation but has the potential to improve estimates of phytoplankton carbon fixation rates from FRRF measurements alone.

  9. Iron, nitrogen and silicon doped diamond like carbon (DLC) thin films: A comparative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ray, Sekhar C., E-mail: Raysc@unisa.ac.za [Department of Physics, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, University of South Africa, Private Bag X6, Florida, 1710, Science Campus, Christiaan de Wet and Pioneer Avenue, Florida Park, Johannesburg (South Africa); Pong, W.F. [Department of Physics, Tamkang University, Tamsui 251, New Taipei City, Taiwan (China); Papakonstantinou, P. [Nanotechnology and Integrated Bio-Engineering Centre, University of Ulster, Shore Road, Newtownabbey BT37 0QB (United Kingdom)

    2016-07-01

    The X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), valence band photoemission (VB-PES) and Raman spectroscopy results show that the incorporation of nitrogen in pulsed laser deposited diamond like carbon (DLC) thin films, reverts the sp{sup 3} network to sp{sup 2} as evidenced by an increase of the sp{sup 2} cluster and I{sub D}/I{sub G} ratio in C K-edge XANES and Raman spectra respectively which reduces the hardness/Young's modulus into the film network. Si-doped DLC film deposited in a plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition process reduces the sp{sup 2} cluster and I{sub D}/I{sub G} ratio that causes the decrease of hardness/Young's modulus of the film structure. The Fe-doped DLC films deposited by dip coating technique increase the hardness/Young's modulus with an increase of sp{sup 3}-content in DLC film structure. - Highlights: • Fe, N and Si doped DLC films deposited by dip, PLD and PECVD methods respectively • DLC:Fe thin films have higher hardness/Young's modulus than DLC:N(:Si) thin films. • sp{sup 3} and sp{sup 2} contents are estimated from C K-edge XANES and VB-PES measurements.

  10. Organomineral Complexation at the Nanoscale: Iron Speciation and Soil Carbon Stabilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coward, E.; Thompson, A.; Plante, A. F.

    2016-12-01

    Much of the uncertainty in the biogeochemical behavior of soil carbon (C) in tropical ecosystems derives from an incomplete understanding of soil C stabilization processes. The 2:1 phyllosilicate clays often associated with temperate organomineral complexation are largely absent in tropical soils due to extensive weathering. In contrast, these soils contain an abundance of Fe- and Al-containing short-range-order (SRO) mineral phases capable of C stabilization through sorption or co-precipitation, largely enabled by high specific surface area (SSA). SRO-mediated organomineral associations may thus prove a critical, yet matrix-selective, driver of the long-term C stabilization capacity observed in tropical soils. Characterizing the interactions between inherently heterogeneous organic matter and amorphous mineralogy presses the limits of current analytical techniques. This work pairs inorganic selective dissolution with high-resolution assessment of Fe speciation to determine the contribution of extracted mineral phases to the mineral matrix, and to C stabilization capacity. Surface (0-20 cm) samples were taken from 20 quantitative soil pits within the Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory in northeast Puerto Rico stratified across granodioritic and volcaniclastic parent materials. 57Fe-Mössbauer spectroscopy (MBS) and x-ray diffraction (XRD) before and after Fe-SOM extraction were used to assess changes in the mineralogical matrix associated with SOM dissolution, while N2-BET sorption was used to determine the contributions of the extractable phases to SSA. Results indicate (1) selective extraction of soil C produces significant shifts in Fe phase distribution, (2) SRO minerals contribute substantially to SSA, and (3) SRO minerals appear protected by more crystalline phases via physical mechanisms, rather than dissolution-dependent chemical bonds. This nanoscale characterization of Fe-C complexes thus provides evidence for both anticipated mineral-organic and

  11. A density functional theory study of the carbon-coating effects on lithium iron borate battery electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loftager, Simon; García-Lastra, Juan María; Vegge, Tejs

    2017-01-18

    Lithium iron borate (LiFeBO3) is a promising cathode material due to its high theoretical specific capacity, inexpensive components and small volume change during operation. Yet, challenges related to severe air- and moisture-induced degradation have prompted the utilization of a protective coating on the electrode which also improves the electronic conductivity. However, not much is known about the preferential geometries of the coating as well as how these coating-electrode interfaces influence the lithium diffusion between the coating and the electrode. Here, we therefore present a density functional theory (DFT) study of the anchoring configurations of carbon coating on the LiFeBO3 electrode and its implications on the interfacial lithium diffusion. Due to large barriers associated with Li-ion diffusion through a parallel-oriented pristine graphene coating on the FeBO3 and LiFeBO3 electrode surfaces, large structural defects in the graphene coating are required for fast Li-ion diffusion. However, such defects are expected to exist only in small concentrations due to their high formation energies. Alternative coating geometries were therefore investigated, and the configuration in which the coating layers were anchored normal to the electrode surface at B and O atoms was found to be most stable. Nudged elastic band (NEB) calculations of the lithium diffusion barriers across the interface between the optimally oriented coating layers and the electrode show no kinetic limitations for lithium extraction and insertion. Additionally, this graphite-coating configuration showed partial blocking of electrode-degrading species.

  12. Simultaneous Electrochemical Detection of Dopamine and Ascorbic Acid Using an Iron Oxide/Reduced Graphene Oxide Modified Glassy Carbon Electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teo Peik-See

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The fabrication of an electrochemical sensor based on an iron oxide/graphene modified glassy carbon electrode (Fe3O4/rGO/GCE and its simultaneous detection of dopamine (DA and ascorbic acid (AA is described here. The Fe3O4/rGO nanocomposite was synthesized via a simple, one step in-situ wet chemical method and characterized by different techniques. The presence of Fe3O4 nanoparticles on the surface of rGO sheets was confirmed by FESEM and TEM images. The electrochemical behavior of Fe3O4/rGO/GCE towards electrocatalytic oxidation of DA was investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV analysis. The electrochemical studies revealed that the Fe3O4/rGO/GCE dramatically increased the current response against the DA, due to the synergistic effect emerged between Fe3O4 and rGO. This implies that Fe3O4/rGO/GCE could exhibit excellent electrocatalytic activity and remarkable electron transfer kinetics towards the oxidation of DA. Moreover, the modified sensor electrode portrayed sensitivity and selectivity for simultaneous determination of AA and DA. The observed DPVs response linearly depends on AA and DA concentration in the range of 1–9 mM and 0.5–100 µM, with correlation coefficients of 0.995 and 0.996, respectively. The detection limit of (S/N = 3 was found to be 0.42 and 0.12 µM for AA and DA, respectively.

  13. Silver/iron oxide/graphitic carbon composites as bacteriostatic catalysts for enhancing oxygen reduction in microbial fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ming; You, Shijie; Gong, Xiaobo; Dai, Ying; Zou, Jinlong; Fu, Honggang

    2015-06-01

    Biofilms from anode heterotrophic bacteria are inevitably formed over cathodic catalytic sites, limiting the performances of single-chamber microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Graphitic carbon (GC) - based nano silver/iron oxide (AgNPs/Fe3O4/GC) composites are prepared from waste pomelo skin and used as antibacterial oxygen reduction catalysts for MFCs. AgNPs and Fe3O4 are introduced in situ into the composites by one-step carbothermal reduction, enhancing their conductivity and catalytic activity. To investigate the effects of Fe species on the antibacterial and catalytic properties, AgNPs/Fe3O4/GC is washed with sulfuric acid (1 mol L-1) for 0.5 h, 1 h, and 5 h and marked as AgNPs/Fe3O4/GC-x (x = 0.5 h, 1 h and 5 h, respectively). A maximum power density of 1712 ± 35 mW m-2 is obtained by AgNPs/Fe3O4/GC-1 h, which declines by 4.12% after 17 cycles. Under catalysis of all AgNP-containing catalysts, oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) proceeds via the 4e- pathway, and no toxic effects to anode microorganisms result from inhibiting the cathodic biofilm overgrowth. With the exception of AgNPs/Fe3O4/GC-5 h, the AgNPs-containing composites exhibit remarkable power output and coulombic efficiency through lowering proton transfer resistance and air-cathode biofouling. This study provides a perspective for the practical application of MFCs using these efficient antibacterial ORR catalysts.

  14. Variations of iron flux and organic carbon remineralization in a subterranean estuary caused by interannual variations in recharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Moutusi; Martin, Jonathan B.; Cable, Jaye E.; Smith, Christopher G.

    2013-01-01

    We determine the inter-annual variations in diagenetic reaction rates of sedimentary iron (Fe ) in an east Florida subterranean estuary and evaluate the connection between metal fluxes and recharge to the coastal aquifer. Over the three-year study period (from 2004 to 2007), the amount of Fe-oxides reduced at the study site decreased from 192 g/yr to 153 g/yr and associated organic carbon (OC) remineralization decreased from 48 g/yr to 38 g/yr. These reductions occurred although the Fe-oxide reduction rates remained constant around 1 mg/cm2/yr. These results suggest that changes in flow rates of submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) related to changes in precipitation may be important to fluxes of the diagenetic reaction products. Rainfall at a weather station approximately 5 km from the field area decreased from 12.6 cm/month to 8.4 cm/month from 2004 to 2007. Monthly potential evapotranspiration (PET) calculated from Thornthwaite’s method indicated potential evapotranspiration cycled from about 3 cm/month in the winter to about 15 cm/month in the summer so that net annual recharge to the aquifer decreased from 40 cm in 2004 to -10 cm in 2007. Simultaneously, with the decrease in recharge of groundwater, freshwater SGD decreased by around 20% and caused the originally 25 m wide freshwater seepage face to decrease in width by about 5 m. The smaller seepage face reduced the area under which Fe-oxides were undergoing reductive dissolution. Consequently, the observed decrease in Fe flux is controlled by hydrology of the subterranean estuary. These results point out the need to better understand linkages between temporal variations in diagenetic reactions and changes in flow within subterranean estuaries in order to accurately constrain their contribution to oceanic fluxes of solutes from subterranean estuaries.

  15. Role of a silicate phase in the reduction of iron and chromium and their oxidation with carbide formation during the manufacture of carbon ferrochrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roshchin, V. E.; Roshchin, A. V.; Akhmetov, K. T.; Salikhov, S. P.

    2016-11-01

    The reactions of reduction of chromium and iron from chromospinelide and the reactions of carbide formation from the reduced metals are separated in space in experiments performed on ore grains with an artificially applied silicate shell. It is found that the silicate layer that isolates spinelide fro direct contact with carbon takes part in the reactions of both reduction and carbide formation. Free carbon extracts oxygen anions from the layer at the contact surface with the formation of CO, and the forming anion vacancies transfer "excess" electrons to the iron and chromium cations in the spinelide lattice and reduce them. Free and carbide-fixed carbon extracts iron and chromium cations from the silicate layer, and carbides form on the surface. The cation vacancies and electron holes (high-charge cations) that form in the silicate phase under these conditions are involved in the oxidation of the metal reduced in spinelide and cause its dissolution in the silicate phase and the precipitation of lower carbides on the surface of the silicate phase. The structure that is characterized of carbon ferrochrome forms on the surface of the silicate phase. Carbide formation is slower than reduction because of higher energy consumed for the formation of high-charge cations and the transfer of cations from the spinelide volume to the outer surface of the silicate phase. In the absence of a silicate layer, a carbide shell blocks the contact of carbon with oxides, which leads to the stop of reduction and, then, carbide formation. In the presence of a silicate (slag) shell around a spinelide grain, the following two concentration galvanic cells operate in parallel: an oxygen (reduction) cell and a metal (oxidation) cell. The parallel operation of the two galvanic cells with a common electrolyte (silicate phase) results in a decrease in the electric potentials between spinelide inside the silicate phase and carbon and carbides on its surface, and each of the processes is

  16. Synthesis of nanostructured iron oxides dispersed in carbon materials and in situ XRD study of the changes caused by thermal treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonçalves, Gustavo R.; Schettino, Miguel A. [Federal University of Espírito Santo, Laboratory of Carbon and Ceramic Materials, Department of Physics (Brazil); Morigaki, Milton K. [Federal University of Espírito Santo, Department of Chemistry (Brazil); Nunes, Evaristo; Cunha, Alfredo G.; Emmerich, Francisco G. [Federal University of Espírito Santo, Laboratory of Carbon and Ceramic Materials, Department of Physics (Brazil); Passamani, Edson C. [Federal University of Espírito Santo, Laboratory of Magnetometry and Mössbauer Spectroscopy, Department of Physics (Brazil); Baggio-Saitovitch, Elisa [Brazilian Center for Physical Research (CBPF) (Brazil); Freitas, Jair C. C., E-mail: jairccfreitas@yahoo.com.br [Federal University of Espírito Santo, Laboratory of Carbon and Ceramic Materials, Department of Physics (Brazil)

    2015-07-15

    Carbon-based magnetic nanocomposites are of large interest for applications in catalysis, magnetic separation, water cleaning, and magnetic resonance imaging, among others. This work describes the synthesis of nanocomposites consisting of iron oxides dispersed into a char (obtained from the carbonization at 700 °C of a lignocellulosic precursor) and the study of the thermal transformations occurring in these materials as a consequence of heat treatments. The materials were prepared by impregnation of the char with iron nitrate in the presence of ammonium hydroxide in aqueous suspension. X-ray diffraction experiments performed using synchrotron radiation and Mössbauer spectroscopy showed that the as-prepared material was composed of amorphous Fe{sup 3+} oxides. Scanning electron microscopy images combined with energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry indicated a homogeneous dispersion of iron oxides and of silica particles (naturally present in the lignocellulosic precursor) throughout the char. X-ray diffractograms recorded in situ during the heat treatment of the as-prepared material showed the presence of small hematite crystallites (average size ∼22 nm) starting from ca. 300 °C. Further heating caused a progressive growth of the hematite crystallites up to ca. 500 °C, when the conversion to magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) started to take place. At higher temperatures, wüstite (Fe{sub 1−x}O) was detected as an intermediate phase and austenitic iron (γ-Fe) became the dominant phase at temperatures from 900 °C. A steep weight loss was observed in the TG curve accompanying this last reduction stage; upon cooling, γ-Fe was converted into α-Fe (ferrite), which was the dominant phase at room temperature in this heat-treated sample.

  17. Ocean iron fertilization

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naqvi, S.W.A.; Smetacek, V.

    In 2009 and 2010, an Indo-German scientific expedition dusted the ocean with iron to stimulate the biological pump that captures atmosphereic carbon dioxide. Two onboard scientists tell the story of this controversial project. Besides raising...

  18. Scalable Dry Production Process of a Superior 3D Net-Like Carbon-Based Iron Oxide Anode Material for Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Du, Haoran; Kuai, Long; Huang, Kuangfu; Xia, Yuanyuan; Geng, Baoyou

    2017-10-02

    Carbon-based transition-metal oxides are considered as an appropriate anode material candidate for lithium-ion batteries. Herein, a simple and scalable dry production process is developed to produce carbon-encapsulated 3D net-like FeOx /C materials. The process is simply associated with the pyrolysis of a solid carbon source, such as filter paper, adsorbed with ferrite nitrate. The carbon derived from filter paper induces a carbothermal reduction to form metallic Fe, the addition of carbon and iron increase the conductivity of this material. As expected, this 3D net-like FeOx /C composite delivers an excellent charge capacity of 851.3 mAh g(-1) after 50 cycles at 0.2 A g(-1) as well as high stability and rate performance of 714.7 mAh g(-1) after 300 cycles at 1 A g(-1) . Superior performance, harmlessness, low costs, and high yield may greatly stimulate the practical application of the products as anode materials in lithium-ion batteries. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Multi-walled carbon nanotube-reinforced porous iron oxide as a superior anode material for lithium ion battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pang, Xin-Jing; Zhang, Juan; Qi, Gong-Wei; Dai, Xiao-Hui; Zhou, Jun-Ping [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shandong University, No. 27, Shanda Nan Rd., Jinan 250100 (China); Zhang, Shu-Yong, E-mail: syzhang@sdu.edu.cn [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shandong University, No. 27, Shanda Nan Rd., Jinan 250100 (China); National Key Lab of Crystal, Shandong University, No. 27, Shanda Nan Rd., Jinan 250100 (China)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Electrochemical performance of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} is improved by combining different approaches. • Porous Cu substrate is used to enlarge surface area and improve conductivity. • MWCNT is used to reinforce the electrode structure and change morphology of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}. • Reversible capacity, capacity retention and high-rate performance are improved. - Abstract: Multi-walled carbon nanotube-reinforced porous iron oxide (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/MWCNT) is synthesized by a two-step approach with porous Cu substrate serving as current collector. Porous Cu substrate is prepared through electroless deposition with hydrogen bubble serving as template. Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/MWCNT composites are prepared by the electrodeposition of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} in the presence of dispersed MWCNTs from a Fe{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3} solution with MWCNT suspension. Results showed that Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} forms granular nanoparticles on the porous Cu substrate with several MWCNTs embedded in it. Adding MWCNTs changes the morphology of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}. Smooth Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, smooth Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/MWCNT, and porous Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} composites are also prepared for comparison. When used as anode materials, porous Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/MWCNT composites have a reversible capacity of approximately 601 mA h g{sup −1} at the 60th cycle at a cycling rate of 100 mA g{sup −1}. This value is higher than that of the other materials. The reversible capacity at a cycling rate of 10,000 mA g{sup −1} is approximately 50% of that at 100 mA g{sup −1}. Therefore, the MWCNT-reinforced porous Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} composite exhibits much better reversible capacity, capacity retention, and high-rate performance than the other samples. This finding can be ascribed to the porous structure of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, better conductivity of porous Cu substrate and MWCNTs, and the morphology change of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles upon the addition of MWCNTs.

  20. Effect of chromium and carbon contents in cast iron on bonded microstructure of copper brazed high chromium cast iron and mild steel. Braze ho ni yoru kokuromu chutetsu to ko hagane no setsugo soshiki ni oyobosu chutetsuchu kuromu oyobi tansoryo no eikyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaguri, N.; Matsubara, Y. (Kurume College of Technology, Fukuoka (Japan)); Ogi, K. (Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan))

    1993-08-25

    For the purpose of enhancing toughness, workability and weldability of high chromium castiron, hypoeutectic, eutectic and hypereutectic high chromium cast irons containing 10 to 30mass% Cr and mild steel were bonded by the brazing method using pure copper filler. This paper describes the effect of chromium and carbon contents in cast iron on the microstructural variations and behaviors of alloying elements in the bonded zone. The length of rod-like crystal precipitated at the cast iron-copper interface and the width of bonded zone decreased with an increase in Cr/C value of cast iron. It was considered that this is because diffusion of iron from steel to cast iron becomes less due to the decrease of difference in chemical potential of iron between the cast iron and the steel sides. Furthermore, alloy phase was composed of Fe, Cr, Cu and C, and the iron concentration in the alloy phase decreased and the chromium concentration increased with increasing the Cr/C value. The copper concentration was almost constant independent of the Cr/C value. It was suggested that the growth of alloy phase occurs under the diffusion control. 9 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Layer-By-Layer Assembled Hybrid Film of Carbon Nanotubes/Iron Oxide Nanocrystals for Reagentless Electrochemical Detection of H2O2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miao, Yuqing; Wang, Hua; Shao, Yuyan; Tang, Zhiwen; Wang, Jun; Lin, Yuehe

    2009-04-01

    A new approach to construct a reagentless H2O2 electrochemical sensor is described. Iron oxide magnetic nanocystals (IOMNs), as peroxidase mimetics, were employed to assemble a multilayer structure layer by layer. Polythionin was electrodeposited onto the glassy carbon electrode surface to introduce amino groups. Carboxyl functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes, amino functionalized IOMNs, and thionin monomers were anchored onto a polythionin-functionalized GC surface in order by carbodiimide or glutaraldehyde chemistry. The resulting multilayer construction with three layers of IOMNs and thionin mediator exhibits excellent electrochemical response to the reduction of H2O2, whereas such a modified electrode with one layer construction only yields a slight response to H2O2 of the same concentration. The tethered MWCNs enlarge the amount of immobilized IOMNs and effectively shuttle electrons between the electrode and the thionin.

  2. Enhanced oxygen reduction reaction activity of iron-containing nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes for alkaline direct methanol fuel cell application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratso, Sander; Kruusenberg, Ivar; Sarapuu, Ave; Rauwel, Protima; Saar, Rando; Joost, Urmas; Aruväli, Jaan; Kanninen, Petri; Kallio, Tanja; Tammeveski, Kaido

    2016-11-01

    Non-precious metal catalysts for electrochemical oxygen reduction reaction are synthesised by pyrolysis of multi-walled carbon nanotubes in the presence of nitrogen and iron precursors. For the physico-chemical characterisation of the catalysts transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction are used. The electrocatalytic activity of the catalysts for oxygen reduction is studied in 0.1 M KOH solution using the rotating disk electrode method. The Fe-containing nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes exhibit an enhanced electrocatalytic performance as compared to metal-free counterparts and their electrocatalytic activity is comparable to that of commercial Pt/C catalyst. Alkaline direct methanol fuel cell tests also show performance close to Pt/C. Thus, these materials can be considered as promising cathode catalysts for application in alkaline fuel cells.

  3. The possible contribution of a mantle-derived fluid to the Ningwu porphyry iron deposits- Evidence from carbon and strontium isotopes of apatites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinjie Yu; Jingwen Mao; Changqing Zhang

    2008-01-01

    Apatite is a characteristic mineral for the iron deposits in the Ningwu region. Apatite shows a range of δ13CPDB values from -9.6‰ to-0.6‰, and most of them with the δ13CPDB values distributed in a range of mantle carbon (I.e., -2%0 to -9%0), except for samples T-06-1and J-06-3. Apatites in the Ningwu porphyry iron deposits yield a narrow variation range of 87Sr/86Sr values from 0.706326 to 0.707577,similar to those of the volcanic and subvolcanic rocks and higher than that of a typical mantle-derived magmatic apatite (I.e., about0.7040), indicating that formation of the apatites was involved with crust material contamination. δ13CPDB and 87Sr/86Sr values of the apatite indicate a possible contribution of mantle-derived fluid and material to formation of the Ningwu porphyry iron deposits,supported by regional geology, regional gravities and geochemistry of the volcanic and subvolcanic rocks in the Ningwu region.

  4. Adsorption of iron(III), cobalt(II), and nickel(II) on activated carbon derived from Xanthoceras Sorbifolia Bunge hull: mechanisms, kinetics and influencing parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaotao; Hao, Yinan; Wang, Ximing; Chen, Zhangjing

    2017-04-01

    Xanthoceras Sorbifolia Bunge hull activated carbon (XSA) was prepared and characterized by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller analysis, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy. The ability of XSA as an adsorbent was investigated for the removal of the iron group ions Fe(III), Co(II), and Ni(II) from aqueous solution. Optimum adsorption parameters were determined based on the initial concentrations of the iron group ions, pH, adsorption temperature, and adsorption time in adsorption studies. The maximum monolayer adsorption capacities were 241.13 mg/g for Fe(III), 126.05 mg/g for Co(II), and 187.96 mg/g for Ni(II), respectively. Adsorption kinetics and isotherms showed that the adsorption process best fitted the nonlinear pseudo-second-order and Langmuir models, and the affinity of the ions for XSA decreased as follows: Fe(III) > Ni(II) > Co(II). Regeneration studies indicated that XSA could be used after several consecutive adsorption/desorption cycles using HNO3. Fourier transform infrared and EDX spectra revealed the chemical adsorption value of XSA as an adsorbent for removing iron group ions from aqueous solutions.

  5. Mass transport of carbon in one and two phase iron-nickel alloys in a temperature gradient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okafor, I.C.I.; Carlson, O.N.; Martin, D.M.

    1983-10-01

    The flux of carbon atoms induced by an applied temperature gradient on a specimen was investigated for an Fe-32.5 wt pct Ni alloy for six carbon concentrations. Carbon was found to migrate to the higher temperature region in the low carbon single phase alloys. However, in the higher carbon alloys an abrupt jump in carbon concentrations results when a portion of the specimen is in a two-phase region while the portion in the one-phase region exhibits the usual solute migration toward the higher temperature. A value of -12.2 + or - 0.4 kJ mol/sup -1/ was obtained for the heat of transport of carbon in the ..gamma..-phase Fe-Ni alloys for a wide range of carbon concentrations. A model for diffusion and thermotransport in multiphase systems is presented to explain the observed results.

  6. Cobalt- and iron-based nanoparticles hosted in SBA-15 mesoporous silica and activated carbon from biomass: Effect of modification procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsoncheva, Tanya; Genova, Izabela; Paneva, Daniela; Dimitrov, Momtchil; Tsyntsarski, Boyko; Velinov, Nicolay; Ivanova, Radostina; Issa, Gloria; Kovacheva, Daniela; Budinova, Temenujka; Mitov, Ivan; Petrov, Narzislav

    2015-10-01

    Ordered mesoporous silica of SBA-15 type and activated carbon, prepared from waste biomass (peach stones), are used as host matrix of nanosized iron and cobalt particles. The effect of preparation procedure on the state of loaded nanoparticles is in the focus of investigation. The obtained materials are characterized by Boehm method, low temperature physisorption of nitrogen, XRD, UV-Vis, FTIR, Mossbauer spectroscopy and temperature programmed reduction with hydrogen. The catalytic behaviour of the samples is tested in methanol decomposition. The dispersion, oxidative state and catalytic behaviour of loaded cobalt and iron nanoparticles are successfully tuned both by the nature of porous support and the metal precursor used during the samples preparation. Facile effect of active phase deposition from aqueous solution of nitrate precursors is assumed for activated carbon support. For the silica based materials the catalytic activity could be significantly improved when cobalt acetylacetonate is used during the modification. The complex effect of pore topology and surface functionality of different supports on the active phase formation is discussed.

  7. Determination of Lead, Copper and Iron Contents in Palladium-Carbon by ICP-AES%ICP-AES法测定钯炭中铅、铜和铁量

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任传婷; 徐光; 唐发静; 李青; 马媛; 方卫; 李光俐; 甘建壮

    2015-01-01

    A simple accurate and precise analytical method for the determination of lead, copper and iron in palladium-carbon catalysts by ICP-AES was proposed. The digestion of sample which contains lead, copper and iron in the range between 0.01%~0.1% in fresh or spent palladium-carbon, was obtained using both HNO3 and HClO4. The recoveries were ranged from 95.8% to 100.9%. The precision, expressed as relative standard deviation (RSD) of the method, is better than 5%.%采用硝酸-高氯酸分解试样,ICP-AES法同时测定铅、铜和铁.建立了一个准确、快速、简便的测定方法,适用于新制和失效钯炭中铅、铜和铁量的测定.Pb、Cu、Fe测定范围为0.01%~0.1%;方法的加标回收率为95.8%~100.9%;相对标准偏差RSD<5%.

  8. Capturing phosphates with iron enhanced sand filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Andrew J; Gulliver, John S; Weiss, Peter T

    2012-06-01

    Most treatment practices for urban runoff capture pollutants such as phosphorus by either settling or filtration while dissolved phosphorus, typically as phosphates, is untreated. Dissolved phosphorus, however, represents an average 45% of total phosphorus in stormwater runoff and can be more than 95%. In this study, a new stormwater treatment technology to capture phosphate, called the Minnesota Filter, is introduced. The filter comprises iron filings mixed with sand and is tested for phosphate removal from synthetic stormwater. Results indicate that sand mixed with 5% iron filings captures an average of 88% phosphate for at least 200 m of treated depth, which is significantly greater than a sand filter without iron filings. Neither incorporation of iron filings into a sand filter nor capture of phosphates onto iron filings in column experiments had a significant effect on the hydraulic conductivity of the filter at mixtures of 5% or less iron by weight. Field applications with up to 10.7% iron were operated over 1 year without detrimental effects upon hydraulic conductivity. A model is applied and fit to column studies to predict the field performance of iron-enhanced sand filters. The model predictions are verified through the predicted performance of the filters in removing phosphates in field applications. Practical applications of the technology, both existing and proposed, are presented so stormwater managers can begin implementation.

  9. Incorporation, oxidation and pyrolysis of ferrocene into porous silica glass: a route to different silica/carbon and silica/iron oxide nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnitzler, Mariane C; Mangrich, Antônio S; Macedo, Waldemar A A; Ardisson, José D; Zarbin, Aldo J G

    2006-12-25

    This work reports the incorporation of ferrocene into a porous silica glass under ambient temperature and atmosphere. After or during the ferrocene incorporation, the spontaneous formation of ferricinium ions was observed by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), UV-visible, X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES), and 57Fe Mössbauer measurements. It was shown that the oxidation of ferrocene molecules to ferricinium ions was promoted by air and that the Si-O- groups on the surface of the pores act as counteranions. Pyrolysis of the porous glass/ferricinium material under argon atmosphere and variable temperature yields different glass/carbon nanocomposites, which were subsequently treated with an HF solution in order to remove the glassy fraction. The resulting insoluble carbon materials were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman, and EPR spectroscopy and consisted of amorphous carbon when the pyrolysis was carried out at 900 or 1000 degrees C and of a mixture of carbon nanotubes and carbonaceous materials at a pyrolysis temperature of 1100 degrees C. When the pyrolysis was conducted under air, the incorporated ferricinium forms alpha-Fe2O3, and the resulting material is a transparent and highly homogeneous glass/iron oxide nanocomposite.

  10. Multistep Reduction Kinetics of Fine Iron Ore with Carbon Monoxide in a Micro Fluidized Bed Reaction Analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongsheng; Zheng, Zhong; Chen, Zhiwei; Yu, Wenzhou; Yue, Junrong

    2017-04-01

    The reduction kinetics of Brazilian hematite by CO is investigated in a Micro Fluidized Bed Reaction Analyzer (MFBRA) using an analyzing method based on Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (JMA) model at temperatures of 973 K (700 °C), 1023 K (750 °C), 1073 K (800 °C), and 1123 K (850 °C). The solid products at different reduction stages are evaluated by SEM/EDS and XRD technologies. Results indicate that the reduction process is better to be discussed in terms of a parallel reaction model that consists of the reactions of hematite to wüstite and wüstite to iron, rather than a stepwise route. Meanwhile, the controlling mechanism of the reduction process is found to vary with temperature and the degree of conversion. The overall process is controlled by the gas-solid reaction occurring at the iron/wüstite interface in the initial stages, and then is limited by the nucleation of wüstite, and finally shifts to diffusion control. Moreover, the reactions of hematite to wüstite and wüstite to iron take place simultaneously but with different time dependences, and the apparent activation energies of hematite to wüstite and wüstite to iron are determined as 83.61 and 80.40 KJ/mol, respectively.

  11. Multistep Reduction Kinetics of Fine Iron Ore with Carbon Monoxide in a Micro Fluidized Bed Reaction Analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongsheng; Zheng, Zhong; Chen, Zhiwei; Yu, Wenzhou; Yue, Junrong

    2017-01-01

    The reduction kinetics of Brazilian hematite by CO is investigated in a Micro Fluidized Bed Reaction Analyzer (MFBRA) using an analyzing method based on Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (JMA) model at temperatures of 973 K (700 °C), 1023 K (750 °C), 1073 K (800 °C), and 1123 K (850 °C). The solid products at different reduction stages are evaluated by SEM/EDS and XRD technologies. Results indicate that the reduction process is better to be discussed in terms of a parallel reaction model that consists of the reactions of hematite to wüstite and wüstite to iron, rather than a stepwise route. Meanwhile, the controlling mechanism of the reduction process is found to vary with temperature and the degree of conversion. The overall process is controlled by the gas-solid reaction occurring at the iron/wüstite interface in the initial stages, and then is limited by the nucleation of wüstite, and finally shifts to diffusion control. Moreover, the reactions of hematite to wüstite and wüstite to iron take place simultaneously but with different time dependences, and the apparent activation energies of hematite to wüstite and wüstite to iron are determined as 83.61 and 80.40 KJ/mol, respectively.

  12. Technological change and industrial energy efficiency : Exploring the low-carbon transformation of the German iron and steel industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arens, M.

    2017-01-01

    Climate change is a key challenge of our time. The iron and steel industry emits 6.5 % of global anthropogenic CO2 that is likely to drive global warming. Greenhouse gases, among these CO2, are to be reduced to 5-20% of today’s level in industrialised countries. Thus, the steel sector must make sign

  13. Indications of Coupled Carbon and Iron Cycling at a Hydrocarbon-Contaminated Site from Time-Lapse Magnetic Susceptibility (MS) Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, A.; Slater, L. D.; Atekwana, E. A.; Rossbach, S.; Ntarlagiannis, D.; Bekins, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetic susceptibility (MS) data acquired at hydrocarbon contaminated sites have documented enhanced MS within the smear zone (zone of water table fluctuation at hydrocarbon contaminated location) coincident with the free phase (mobile or free liquids moving down through the unsaturated zone independent of the direction of flow of the groundwater or surface water) hydrocarbon plume These studies suggest that magnetic susceptibility can be used as a tool to: (1) infer regions of hydrocarbon contamination, and (2) investigate intrinsic bioremediation by iron reducing bacteria. We performed a campaign of time-lapse MS monitoring at the National Crude Oil Spill Fate and Natural Attenuation Research Site (Bemidji, MN) between July 2011 and August 2015. This highly instrumented site has multiple boreholes installed through the free phase, dissolved phase and uncontaminated portions of the aquifer impacted by an oil spill resulting from a pipeline rupture in 1979. Magnetic susceptibility (MS) data acquired in 2011 showed that MS values in the smear zone are higher than in the dissolved phase plume and background, leading to the hypothesis that MS measurements could be used to monitor the long-term progress of biodegradation at the site. However, repeated MS data acquired in 2014 and 2015 showed strong changes in the character of the MS signal in the smear zone with multiple free phase contamination locations showing a strong suppression of the signal relative to that observed in 2011. Other locations in the dissolved phase of the plume show evidence for vertical migration of the zone of enhanced MS, possibly due to changes in the redox profiles driven by hydrology. Such changes in the MS signal are hypothesized to result from either variations in Fe(II)/Fe(III) ratios in the magnetite or changes in the magnetite concentration associated with coupled carbon and iron biogeochemistry. This work is generating a unique time-lapse geophysical dataset providing information on

  14. File sharing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eijk, N.

    2011-01-01

    File sharing’ has become generally accepted on the Internet. Users share files for downloading music, films, games, software etc. In this note, we have a closer look at the definition of file sharing, the legal and policy-based context as well as enforcement issues. The economic and cultural impact

  15. Progress on Treatment Technique of Iron-carbon Micro-electrolysis for Nitrobenzene Waste-water%铁碳微电解预处理硝基苯废水工艺研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张维涛

    2015-01-01

    Iron-carbon micro-electrolysis is a kind of high efficient, low-cost pretreatment technology for waste-water.Reaction process includes redox, electric enrichment, physical adsorption and coagulation sedimentation.The research progress of pre-treatment of nitrobenzene waste-water was introduced, and process factors on iron-carbon micro-electrolysis pretreatment of nitrobenzene waste-water were summarized and analyzed.The optimal pH value was between 2~3, the iron/carbon mass ratio was between (2:1)~(1:1), iron type was industrial scrap iron, dissolved oxygen had inhibitory effect, and the reaction mechanism was introduced.The future research of iron-carbon micro-electrolysis was prospected.%铁碳微电解是一种高效、廉价的废水预处理技术,反应过程主要包括氧化还原、电富集、物理吸附和混凝沉降等。本文介绍了其预处理硝基苯废水的研究进展,对铁碳微电解预处理硝基苯废水的工艺影响因素进行了总结和分析,得出最适宜pH值为2~3之间,铁/碳剂质量比为(2:1)~(1:1)之间,铁类型为工业废铁,溶解氧具有抑制作用;并对对反应机理研究进行介绍。最后对铁碳微电解技术未来研究重点作了展望。

  16. Identification of carbon-encapsulated iron nanoparticles as active species in non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varnell, Jason A.; Tse, Edmund C. M.; Schulz, Charles E.; Fister, Tim T.; Haasch, Richard T.; Timoshenko, Janis; Frenkel, Anatoly I.; Gewirth, Andrew A.

    2016-08-01

    The widespread use of fuel cells is currently limited by the lack of efficient and cost-effective catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction. Iron-based non-precious metal catalysts exhibit promising activity and stability, as an alternative to state-of-the-art platinum catalysts. However, the identity of the active species in non-precious metal catalysts remains elusive, impeding the development of new catalysts. Here we demonstrate the reversible deactivation and reactivation of an iron-based non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalyst achieved using high-temperature gas-phase chlorine and hydrogen treatments. In addition, we observe a decrease in catalyst heterogeneity following treatment with chlorine and hydrogen, using Mössbauer and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Our study reveals that protected sites adjacent to iron nanoparticles are responsible for the observed activity and stability of the catalyst. These findings may allow for the design and synthesis of enhanced non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalysts with a higher density of active sites.

  17. Identification of carbon-encapsulated iron nanoparticles as active species in non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varnell, Jason A; Tse, Edmund C M; Schulz, Charles E; Fister, Tim T; Haasch, Richard T; Timoshenko, Janis; Frenkel, Anatoly I; Gewirth, Andrew A

    2016-08-19

    The widespread use of fuel cells is currently limited by the lack of efficient and cost-effective catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction. Iron-based non-precious metal catalysts exhibit promising activity and stability, as an alternative to state-of-the-art platinum catalysts. However, the identity of the active species in non-precious metal catalysts remains elusive, impeding the development of new catalysts. Here we demonstrate the reversible deactivation and reactivation of an iron-based non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalyst achieved using high-temperature gas-phase chlorine and hydrogen treatments. In addition, we observe a decrease in catalyst heterogeneity following treatment with chlorine and hydrogen, using Mössbauer and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Our study reveals that protected sites adjacent to iron nanoparticles are responsible for the observed activity and stability of the catalyst. These findings may allow for the design and synthesis of enhanced non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalysts with a higher density of active sites.

  18. Hybrids of Iron-Filled Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes and Anticancer Agents as Potential Magnetic Drug Delivery Systems: In Vitro Studies against Human Melanoma, Colon Carcinoma, and Colon Adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sławomir Boncel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell type, morphology, and functioning are key variables in the construction of efficient “drug-vehicle” hybrids in magnetic drug delivery. Iron-encapsulated multiwall carbon nanotubes (Fe@MWCNTs appear as promising candidates for theranostics due to in situ chemical catalytic vapor deposition (c-CVD synthesis, straightforward organic functionalization, and nanoneedle (1D behavior. Here, model hybrids were synthesized by exploring C-sp2 chemistry ((1+2-cycloaddition of nitrenes and amidation of the outer MWCNT walls combined with anticancer agents, that is, 5-fluorouracil (5FU, purpurin (Purp, and 1,8-naphthalimide DNA intercalators (NIDIs, via linkers. Analyses of the Fe@MWCNT vehicles by SEM, TEM, and Raman spectroscopy revealed their morphology while Mössbauer spectroscopy confirmed the presence of encapsulated ferromagnetic iron-based nanodomains. Cytotoxicity of the hybrids was studied using a 24 h MTS assay combined with the apoptosis and life cycle assays against human melanoma (Me45, colon carcinoma (HCT116+, and colon adenocarcinoma (Caco-2. The cells had different sensitivity to the vehicles themselves as well as to the hybrids. MWCNT-based covalent hybrids of 5FU and Purp emerged as the most promising systems against Me45 and HCT116+ cell lines with the highest in vitro cytotoxicity and proapoptotic activity. Furthermore, nanotubes bearing 4-nitro- and 4-(N-morpholinyl-1,8-naphthalimide DNA intercalators appear as a promising candidate for the treatment of Caco-2.

  19. Electrocatalytic Detection of Amitrole on the Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube – Iron (II tetra-aminophthalocyanine Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tebello Nyokong

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available It is shown that iron(II tetra-aminophthalocyanine complex electropolymerized onto a multi-walled carbon nanotube-modified basal plane pyrolytic graphite electrode greatly enhanced the electrocatalytic detetion of amitrole (a toxic herbicide, resulting in a very low detection limit (0.5 nM and excellent sensitivity of 8.80±0.44 μA/nM, compared to any known work reported so far. The electrocatalytic detection of amitrole at this electrode occurred at less positive potential (~0.3 V vs Ag|ACl and also revealed a typical coupled chemical reaction. The mechanism for this response is proposed. The electrode gave satisfactory selectivity to amitrole in the presence of other potential interfering pesticides in aqueous solutions.

  20. Iron Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as: Serum Iron; Serum Fe Formal name: Iron, serum Related tests: Ferritin ; TIBC, UIBC and Transferrin ; Hemoglobin ; Hematocrit ; Complete Blood Count ; Reticulocyte Count ; Zinc Protoporphyrin ; Iron Tests ; Soluble Transferrin Receptor ... I should know? How is it used? Serum iron, total iron-binding capacity (TIBC) , and/or ...

  1. Study on the influential factors of iron-carbon micro-electrolysis process in treating pharmaceutical sewage%铁炭微电解处理制药废水效能影响因素研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周健; 史孟彬; 王志国; 张永胜; 覃光旭; 胡斌

    2011-01-01

    The paper is aimed at presenting our sludy results on the influential factors of iron-carbon micro-electrolysis process in treating pharmaceutical sewage. As we know, raw medicines for anesthetics usually contain highly concentrated refractory organics and high toxic-ity, but their biodegradability is usually poor. Since such high-strength refractory organics can not be used as carbon source, it is .usually difficult for such sewage to get effectively treated biologically, though several biochemical methods were used such as sulfur-zeolite fixed bed reactor, catalytic inorganic membrane reactor and nanoscale zero valent iron, all of which proved to be limited either because of being too expensive or because of too complicated in structure to operate or manage. In spite of this, iron-carbon micro-electrolysis proves to be the most effective one, which helps to improve the biodegradability of the sewage and remove the refractory organisms and toxicity. Seeing the advantages of iron-carbon micro-electrolysis, we hope to improve the iron-carbon micro-electrolysis system to work out an economic and practical technology for effectively treating such sewage. In proceeding with this study, we have done an investigative iron-carbon micro-electrolysis of a sequential batch reactor in the mode of parallel experiments and the granularity of fillings, influent pH, the iron-carbon ratio, the gas-water ratio and the organic content loading. The results of our study show that it proves to be possible for the iron-carbon micro-electrolysis process to improve its removing rate of the chrominance of pharmaceutical sewage under the conditions of pH 3 with the iron-carbon ratio being 0.5, the granularity of fillings lmm, the organic volume loading being 175.5 kgCOD/(m3 iron-carbon·d) , and a gas-water ratio 10 and HRT 2 h. Under the influent COD and chrominance of 19 000 mg/L and 600, it is possible to make the effluent up to 8 490 mg/L and 20, respectively, with the removal rate of

  2. Microbes: Mini Iron Factories

    OpenAIRE

    Joshi, Kumar Batuk

    2014-01-01

    Microbes have flourished in extreme habitats since beginning of the Earth and have played an important role in geological processes like weathering, mineralization, diagenesis, mineral formation and destruction. Biotic mineralization is one of the most fascinating examples of how microbes have been influencing geological processes. Iron oxidizing and reducing bacteria are capable of precipitating wide varieties of iron oxides (magnetite), carbonates (siderite) and sulphides (greigite) via con...

  3. Microbes: mini iron factories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Kumar Batuk

    2014-12-01

    Microbes have flourished in extreme habitats since beginning of the Earth and have played an important role in geological processes like weathering, mineralization, diagenesis, mineral formation and destruction. Biotic mineralization is one of the most fascinating examples of how microbes have been influencing geological processes. Iron oxidizing and reducing bacteria are capable of precipitating wide varieties of iron oxides (magnetite), carbonates (siderite) and sulphides (greigite) via controlled or induced mineralization processes. Microbes have also been considered to play an important role in the history of evolution of sedimentary rocks on Earth from the formation of banded iron formations during the Archean to modern biotic bog iron and ochre deposits. Here, we discuss the role that microbes have been playing in precipitation of iron and the role and importance of interdisciplinary studies in the field of geology and biology in solving some of the major geological mysteries.

  4. Formation of carbonate pipes in the northern Okinawa Trough linked to strong sulfate exhaustion and iron supply

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xiaotong; Guo, Zixiao; Chen, Shun; Sun, Zhilei; Xu, Hengchao; Ta, Kaiwen; Zhang, Jianchao; Zhang, Lijuan; Li, Jiwei; Du, Mengran

    2017-05-01

    The microbial anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM), a key biogeochemical process that consumes substantial amounts of methane produced in seafloor sediments, can lead to the formation of carbonate deposits at or beneath the sea floor. Although Fe oxide-driven AOM has been identified in cold seep sediments, the exact mode by which it may influence the formation of carbonate deposits remains poorly understood. Here, we characterize the morphology, petrology and geochemistry of a methane-derived Fe-rich carbonate pipe in the northern Okinawa Trough (OT). We detect abundant authigenic pyrites, as well as widespread trace Fe, within microbial mat-like carbonate veins in the pipe. The in situ δ34S values of these pyrites range from -3.9 to 31.6‰ (VCDT), suggesting a strong consumption of seawater sulfate by sulfate-driven AOM at the bottom of sulfate reduction zone. The positive δ56Fe values of pyrite and notable enrichment of Fe in the OT pipe concurrently indicate that the pyrites are primarily derived from Fe oxides in deep sediments. We propose that the Fe-rich carbonate pipe formed at the bottom of sulfate reduction zone, below which Fe-driven AOM, rather than Fe-oxide reduction coupled to organic matter degradation, might be responsible for the abundantly available Fe2+ in the fluids from which pyrites precipitated. The Fe-rich carbonate pipe described in this study probably represents the first fossil example of carbonate deposits linked to Fe-driven AOM. Because Fe-rich carbonate deposits have also been found at other cold seeps worldwide, we infer that similar processes may play an essential role in biogeochemical cycling of sub-seafloor methane and Fe at continental margins.

  5. Reduction of iron-oxide-carbon composites: part II. Rates of reduction of composite pellets in a rotary hearth furnace simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halder, S.; Fruehan, R.J. [Praxair Inc., Tonawanda, NY (United States). Praxair Technological Center

    2008-12-15

    A new ironmaking concept is being proposed that involves the combination of a rotary hearth furnace (RHF) with an iron-bath smelter. The RHF makes use of iron-oxide-carbon composite pellets as the charge material and the final product is direct-reduced iron (DRI) in the solid or molten state. This part of the research includes the development of a reactor that simulated the heat transfer in an RHF. The external heat-transport and high heating rates were simulated by means of infrared (IR) emitting lamps. The reaction rates were measured by analyzing the off-gas and computing both the amount of CO and CO{sub 2} generated and the degree of reduction. The reduction times were found to be comparable to the residence times observed in industrial RHFs. Both artificial ferric oxide (PAH) and naturally occurring hematite and taconite ores were used as the sources of iron oxide. Coal char and devolatilized wood charcoal were the reductants. Wood charcoal appeared to be a faster reductant than coal char. However, in the PAH-containing pellets, the reverse was found to be true because of heat-transfer limitations. For the same type of reductant, hematite-containing pellets were observed to reduce faster than taconite-containing pellets because of the development of internal porosity due to cracking and fissure formation during the Fe2O{sub 3}-to-Fe3O{sub 4} transition. This is, however, absent during the reduction of taconite, which is primarily Fe3O{sub 4}. The PAH-wood-charcoal pellets were found to undergo a significant amount of swelling at low-temperature conditions, which impeded the external heat transport to the lower layers. If the average degree of reduction targeted in an RHF is reduced from 95 to approximately 70 pct by coupling the RHF with a bath smelter, the productivity of the RHF can be enhanced 1.5 to 2 times. The use of a two- or three-layer bed was found to be superior to that of a single layer, for higher productivities.

  6. Reduction of Iron-Oxide-Carbon Composites: Part II. Rates of Reduction of Composite Pellets in a Rotary Hearth Furnace Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halder, S.; Fruehan, R. J.

    2008-12-01

    A new ironmaking concept is being proposed that involves the combination of a rotary hearth furnace (RHF) with an iron-bath smelter. The RHF makes use of iron-oxide-carbon composite pellets as the charge material and the final product is direct-reduced iron (DRI) in the solid or molten state. This part of the research includes the development of a reactor that simulated the heat transfer in an RHF. The external heat-transport and high heating rates were simulated by means of infrared (IR) emitting lamps. The reaction rates were measured by analyzing the off-gas and computing both the amount of CO and CO2 generated and the degree of reduction. The reduction times were found to be comparable to the residence times observed in industrial RHFs. Both artificial ferric oxide (PAH) and naturally occurring hematite and taconite ores were used as the sources of iron oxide. Coal char and devolatilized wood charcoal were the reductants. Wood charcoal appeared to be a faster reductant than coal char. However, in the PAH-containing pellets, the reverse was found to be true because of heat-transfer limitations. For the same type of reductant, hematite-containing pellets were observed to reduce faster than taconite-containing pellets because of the development of internal porosity due to cracking and fissure formation during the Fe2O3-to-Fe3O4 transition. This is, however, absent during the reduction of taconite, which is primarily Fe3O4. The PAH-wood-charcoal pellets were found to undergo a significant amount of swelling at low-temperature conditions, which impeded the external heat transport to the lower layers. If the average degree of reduction targeted in an RHF is reduced from 95 to approximately 70 pct by coupling the RHF with a bath smelter, the productivity of the RHF can be enhanced 1.5 to 2 times. The use of a two- or three-layer bed was found to be superior to that of a single layer, for higher productivities.

  7. Carbothermal synthesis of ordered mesoporous carbon-supported nano zero-valent iron with enhanced stability and activity for hexavalent chromium reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Ying; Hu, Yuchen; Jiang, Baojiang; Zou, Jinlong; Tian, Guohui; Fu, Honggang

    2016-05-15

    Composites of nano zero-valent iron (nZVI) and ordered mesoporous carbon (OMC) are prepared by using simultaneous carbothermal reduction methods. The reactivity and stability of nZVI are expected to be enhanced by embedding it in the ordered pore channels. The structure characteristics of nZVI/OMC and the removal pathway for hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) by nZVI/OMC are investigated. Results show that nZVI/OMC with a surface area of 715.16 m(2) g(-1) is obtained at 900 °C. nZVI with particle sizes of 20-30 nm is uniformly embedded in the OMC skeleton. The stability of nZVI is enhanced by surrounding it with a broad carbon layer and a little γ-Fe is derived from the passivation of α-Fe. Detection of ferric state (Fe 2p3/2, around 711.2eV) species confirms that part of the nZVI on the outer surface is inevitably oxidized by O2, even when unused. The removal efficiency of Cr(VI) (50 mg L(-1)) by nZVI/OMC is near 99% within 10 min through reduction (dominant mechanism) and adsorption. nZVI/OMC has the advantage in removal efficiency and reusability in comparison to nZVI/C, OMC and nZVI. This study suggests that nZVI/OMC has the potential for remediation of heavy metal pollution in water.

  8. Comparing the detection of iron-based pottery pigment on a carbon-coated sherd by SEM-EDS and by Micro-XRF-SEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendleton, Michael W; Washburn, Dorothy K; Ellis, E Ann; Pendleton, Bonnie B

    2014-03-01

    The same sherd was analyzed using a scanning electron microscope with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) and a micro X-ray fluorescence tube attached to a scanning electron microscope (Micro-XRF-SEM) to compare the effectiveness of elemental detection of iron-based pigment. To enhance SEM-EDS mapping, the sherd was carbon coated. The carbon coating was not required to produce Micro-XRF-SEM maps but was applied to maintain an unbiased comparison between the systems. The Micro-XRF-SEM analysis was capable of lower limits of detection than that of the SEM-EDS system, and therefore the Micro-XRF-SEM system could produce elemental maps of elements not easily detected by SEM-EDS mapping systems. Because SEM-EDS and Micro-XRF-SEM have been used for imaging and chemical analysis of biological samples, this comparison of the detection systems should be useful to biologists, especially those involved in bone or tooth (hard tissue) analysis.

  9. Synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotubes by the pyrolysis of a compression activated iron(II) phthalocyanine/phthalocyanine metal-free derivative/ferric acetate mixture

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tawanda Mugadza; Edith Antunes; Tebello Nyokong

    2015-07-01

    This paper reports on the synthesis of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) from an activated mixture of iron (II) phthalocyanine, its metal-free derivative and ferric acetate. The powdered mixture was activated by compression into a tablet by applying a force of 300 kN, followed by re-grinding into powder and heating it to high temperatures (1000°C). The activation by compression resulted in more than 50% debundling of SWCNTs as judged by transition electron microscopy. Acid functionalization of the SWCNTs was confirmed by the increase in the D:G ratio from 0.56 to 0.87 in the Raman spectra and the observation of an average of one carboxylic acid group per 13 carbon atoms from thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). TGA also showed that the initial decomposition temperatures for the activated and non-activated mixtures to be 205°C and 245°C, respectively. Hence, activation leads to the lowering of the pyrolysis temperature of the phthalocyanines. X-ray diffraction, electronic absorption and Fourier transform infrared spectra were also employed to characterize the SWCNT.

  10. Graphene crystal growth by thermal precipitation of focused ion beam induced deposition of carbon precursor via patterned-iron thin layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rius Gemma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, relevant advances on graphene as a building block of integrated circuits (ICs have been demonstrated. Graphene growth and device fabrication related processing has been steadily and intensively powered due to commercial interest; however, there are many challenges associated with the incorporation of graphene into commercial applications which includes challenges associated with the synthesis of this material. Specifically, the controlled deposition of single layer large single crystal graphene on arbitrary supports, is particularly challenging. Previously, we have reported the first demonstration of the transformation of focused ion beam induced deposition of carbon (FIBID-C into patterned graphitic layers by metal-assisted thermal treatment (Ni foils. In this present work, we continue exploiting the FIBID-C approach as a route for graphene deposition. Here, thin patterned Fe layers are used for the catalysis of graphenization and graphitization. We demonstrate the formation of high quality single and few layer graphene, which evidences, the possibility of using Fe as a catalyst for graphene deposition. The mechanism is understood as the minute precipitation of atomic carbon after supersaturation of some iron carbides formed under a high temperature treatment. As a consequence of the complete wetting of FIBID-C and patterned Fe layers, which enable graphene growth, the as-deposited patterns do not preserve their original shape after the thermal treatment

  11. Carbon dioxide fixation by Metallosphaera yellowstonensis and acidothermophilic iron-oxidizing microbial communities from Yellowstone National Park

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jennings, Ryan; Whitmore, Laura M.; Moran, James J.; Kreuzer, Helen W.; Inskeep, William P.

    2014-05-01

    The fixation of inorganic carbon (as carbon dioxide) has been documented in all three domains of life and results in the biosynthesis of a diverse suite of organic compounds that support the growth of heterotrophic organisms. The primary aim of this study was to assess the importance of carbon dioxide fixation in high-temperature Fe(III)-oxide mat communities and in pure cultures of one of the dominant Fe(II)-oxidizing organisms (Metallosphaera yellowstonensis strain MK1) present in situ. Protein-encoding genes of the complete 3-hydroxypropionate/4-hydroxybutyrate (3-HP/4-HB) carbon fixation pathway were identified in pure-cultures of M. yellowstonensis strain MK1. Metagenome sequencing from the same environments also revealed genes for the 3-HP/4-HB pathway belonging to M. yellowstonensis populations, as well as genes for a complete reductive TCA cycle from Hydrogenobaculum spp. (Aquificales). Stable isotope (13CO2) labeling was used to measure the fixation of CO2 by M. yellowstonensis strain MK1, and in ex situ assays containing live Fe(III)-oxide microbial mats. Results showed that M. yellowstonensis strain MK1 fixes CO2 via the 3-HP/4-HB pathway with a fractionation factor of ~ 2.5 ‰. Direct analysis of the 13C composition of dissolved inorganic C (DIC), dissolved organic C (DOC), landscape C and microbial mat C showed that mat C is comprised of both DIC and non-DIC sources. The estimated contribution of DIC carbon to biomass C (> ~ 35%) is reasonably consistent with the relative abundance of known chemolithoautotrophs and corresponding CO2 fixation pathways detected in metagenome sequence. The significance of DIC as a major source of carbon for Fe-oxide mat communities provides a foundation for examining microbial interactions in these systems that are dependent on the activity of autotrophic organisms such as Hydrogenobaculum and Metallosphaera spp.

  12. Direct Biohydrometallurgical Extraction of Iron from Ore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T.C. Eisele

    2005-10-01

    A completely novel approach to iron extraction was investigated, based on reductive leaching of iron by anaerobic bacteria. Microorganisms were collected from an anaerobic bog where natural seepage of dissolved iron was observed. This mixed culture was used to reduce insoluble iron in a magnetite ore to the soluble ferrous (Fe{sup +2}) state. While dissolution rates were slow, concentrations of dissolved iron as high as 3487 mg/l could be reached if sufficient time was allowed. A factorial study of the effects of trace nutrients and different forms of organic matter indicated that the best dissolution rates and highest dissolved iron concentrations were achieved using soluble carbohydrate (sucrose) as the bacterial food source, and that nutrients other than nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, sodium, and acetate were not necessary. A key factor in reaching high levels of dissolved iron was maintaining a high level of carbon dioxide in solution, since the solubility of iron carbonates increases markedly as the quantity of dissolved carbon dioxide increases. Once the iron is dissolved, it has been demonstrated that the ferrous iron can then be electroplated from solution, provided that the concentration of iron is sufficiently high and the hydrogen ion concentration is sufficiently low. However, if the leaching solution is electrolyzed directly, organic matter precipitates at the cathode along with the metallic iron. To prevent this problem, the ferrous iron should be separated from the bulk solution in a more concentrated, purified form. One route to accomplishing this is to take advantage of the change in solubility of ferrous iron as a function of carbon dioxide concentration. By cycling the concentration of carbon dioxide in solution, it is possible to produce an iron-rich concentrate that should be suitable for electrolysis. This represents the first viable hydrometallurgical method for leaching iron directly from ore and producing metallic iron.

  13. Carbon export in the naturally iron-fertilized Kerguelen area of the Southern Ocean based on the 234Th approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Planchon

    2014-11-01

    the PF (station F-L indicating spring biomass accumulation. Comparison with KEOPS1 results indicated that carbon export production is much lower during the onset of the bloom in austral spring in comparison to the peak and declining phase in late summer.

  14. Carbon monoxide gas is not inert, but global, in its consequences for bacterial gene expression, iron acquisition and antibiotic resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wareham, L.K.; Begg, R.; Jesse, H.E.; van Beilen, J.W.A.; Ali, S.; Svistunenko, D.; McLean, S.; Hellingwerf, K.J.; Sanguinetti, G.; Poole, R.K.

    2016-01-01

    Carbon monoxide is a respiratory poison and gaseous signaling molecule. Although CO-releasing molecules (CORMs) deliver CO with temporal and spatial specificity in mammals, and are proven antimicrobial agents, we do not understand the modes of CO toxicity. Our aim was to explore the impact of CO gas

  15. Impact of Organic Carbon Electron Donors on Microbial Community Development under Iron- and Sulfate-Reducing Conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Man Jae Kwon

    Full Text Available Although iron- and sulfate-reducing bacteria in subsurface environments have crucial roles in biogeochemical cycling of C, Fe, and S, how specific electron donors impact the compositional structure and activity of native iron- and/or sulfate-reducing communities is largely unknown. To understand this better, we created bicarbonate-buffered batch systems in duplicate with three different electron donors (acetate, lactate, or glucose paired with ferrihydrite and sulfate as the electron acceptors and inoculated them with subsurface sediment as the microbial inoculum. Sulfate and ferrihydrite reduction occurred simultaneously and were faster with lactate than with acetate. 16S rRNA-based sequence analysis of the communities over time revealed that Desulfotomaculum was the major driver for sulfate reduction coupled with propionate oxidation in lactate-amended incubations. The reduction of sulfate resulted in sulfide production and subsequent abiotic reduction of ferrihydrite. In contrast, glucose promoted faster reduction of ferrihydrite, but without reduction of sulfate. Interestingly, the glucose-amended incubations led to two different biogeochemical trajectories among replicate bottles that resulted in distinct coloration (white and brown. The two outcomes in geochemical evolution might be due to the stochastic evolution of the microbial communities or subtle differences in the initial composition of the fermenting microbial community and its development via the use of different glucose fermentation pathways available within the community. Synchrotron-based x-ray analysis indicated that siderite and amorphous Fe(II were formed in the replicate bottles with glucose, while ferrous sulfide and vivianite were formed with lactate or acetate. These data sets reveal that use of different C utilization pathways projects significant changes in microbial community composition over time that uniquely impact both the geochemistry and mineralogy of subsurface

  16. Study of the recrystallization mechanisms of ultra-high purity iron doped with carbon, manganese and phosphorus; Etude des mecanismes de recristallisation dans le fer de ultra-haute purete dope en carbone, manganese et phosphore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesne, L.

    2000-07-04

    High purity steels have the potential to improve deep drawing properties for automotive applications. Understanding the influence of the chemical composition on the recrystallization mechanisms and on texture development should help to improve their properties. We have studied the influence of 10 ppm of carbon, 1000 ppm of manganese and 120 ppm of phosphorus on the recrystallization mechanisms of ultra-high purity iron (UHP iron > 99.997%). For this purpose we used 4 materials: one undoped (UHP), one doped with C, one doped with C, Mn and one doped With C, Mn, P. In order to restrict grain coarsening in the hot strips, hot rolling was performed in the ferritic region, in one pass of 80% thickness reduction. The hot bands were then fully recrystallized but exhibited non-isotropic textures, with in particular an intense Goss [110]<001> component for the doped materials. The hot-bands were subsequently cold rolled down to a thickness of 0.8 mm corresponding to a thickness reduction of 80%, and then continuously annealed at 10 deg. C/s. The recrystallization kinetics are delayed with the addition of doping elements. In particular, the incubation time for nucleation is shifted towards higher temperatures while the recrystallization velocity increases. The textures of the fully recrystallized materials exhibit a strong Goss component prejudicial for deep drawing properties. We have established that this component can only appear if coarse grains and carbon in solid solution were simultaneously present in the material before deformation. Characterisation of the cold deformed state enabled us to evaluate the energy stored during deformation as a function of the material composition and the grain orientation: - the overall stored energy increases with the doping elements content. - the stored energy in the {gamma} fibre grains is greater than in the {alpha} fibre grains: 30 J/mol for the {gamma} fibre instead of 5 J/mol for the {alpha} fibre, in the undoped UHP iron. In the

  17. Experimental study on comprehensive recycling of carbon,copper,silver,iron from zinc kiln slag%锌窑渣中碳铜银铁综合回收试验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董方; 高利坤; 陈龙; 王鹏; 马方通

    2016-01-01

    There are usually large amounts of carbon powders and many valuable metal elements in zinc kiln .The zinc kiln slag from Yunnan contains 22.31%carbon,1.33%copper and 294 g/t silver,23.41%iron and other val-uable elements ,which makes it have high recycling value .Based on the property of the zinc kiln slag ,the paper carried out experimental study on a combined flotation -magnetic separation process .The results show that the process can ob-tain carbon powders with carbon grade of 78.55 %,carbon recovery rate of 92.60 %;copper concentrates with cop-per grade of 8.13 %,copper recovery rate of 78.61 % and Ag grade of 1890 g/t; and iron concentrates with iron grade of 66.02 %,iron recovery rate of 76.33 %.A fairly high recovery rate is achieved .%锌窑渣通常含有大量炭粉和许多有价金属元素.云南某锌窑渣中含碳22.31%、铜1.33%、银294 g/t、铁23.41%等有价元素,具有较高的回收利用价值.针对该锌窑渣的性质,进行了浮选—磁选联合工艺试验研究.其结果表明:该工艺可获得碳品位78.55%、碳回收率92.60%的炭粉,铜品位8.13%、铜回收率78.61%、含银1890 g/t的铜精矿以及铁品位66.02%、铁回收率76.33%的铁精矿,且均实现了较高的回收率.

  18. Removal of Reactive Red 198 from aqueous solution by combined method multi-walled carbon nanotubes and zero-valent iron:Equilibrium, kinetics, and thermodynamic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sudabeh Pourfadakari; Nader Yousefi; Amir Hossein Mahvi

    2016-01-01

    Dyes often include toxic, carcinogenic compounds and are harmful to humans' health. Therefore, removal of dyes from textile industry wastewater is essential. The present study aimed to evaluate the efficiency of the combina-tion of zero valent iron (ZVI) powder and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in the removal of Reactive Red 198 (RR198) dye from aqueous solution. This applied research was performed in a batch system in the lab-oratory scale. This study investigated the effect of various factors influencing dye removal, including contact time, pH, adsorbent dose, iron powder dose, initial dye concentration, and temperature. The equilibrium adsorption data were analyzed using three common adsorption models:Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin. Besides, kinetic and thermodynamic parameters were used to establish the adsorption mechanism. The results showed, in pH=3, contact time=100 min, ZVI dose=5000 mg·L−1, and MWCNTs dose=600 mg·L−1 in 100 mg·L−1 dye con-centration, the adsorption efficiency increased to 99.16%. Also, adsorption kinetics was best described by the pseudo-second-order model. Equilibrium data fitted well with the Freundlich isotherm (R2=0.99). The negative values ofΔG0 and the positive value ofΔH0 (91.76) indicate that the RR198 adsorption process is spontaneous and endothermic. According to the results, the combination of MWCNTs and ZVI was highly efficient in the re-moval of azo dyes.

  19. Enhanced graphitization of c-CVD grown multi-wall carbon nanotube arrays assisted by removal of encapsulated iron-based phases under thermal treatment in argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boncel, Slawomir, E-mail: slawomir.boncel@polsl.pl [Department of Organic Chemistry, Biochemistry and Biotechnology, Silesian University of Technology, Krzywoustego 4, 44-100 Gliwice (Poland); Koziol, Krzysztof K.K., E-mail: kk292@cam.ac.uk [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, 27 Charles Babbage Road, CB3 0FS Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2014-05-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Annealing of the c-CVD MWCNT arrays toward complete removal of iron nanoparticles. • The ICP-AES protocol established for quantitative analysis of Fe-content in MWCNTs. • The vertical alignment from the as-grown MWCNT arrays found intact after annealing. • A route to decrease number of defects/imperfections in the MWCNT graphene walls. • A foundation for commercial purification of c-CVD derived MWCNTs. - Abstract: The effect of annealing on multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) arrays grown via catalytic Chemical Vapour Deposition (c-CVD) was studied. The treatment enabled to decrease number of defects/imperfections in the graphene walls of MWCNTs’, which was reflected in Raman spectroscopy by reduction of the I{sub D}/I{sub G} ratio by 27%. Moreover, the vertical alignment from the as-synthesized nanotube arrays was found intact after annealing. Not only graphitization of the nanotube walls occurred under annealing, but the amount of metal iron-based catalyst residues (interfering with numerous physicochemical properties, and hence applications of MWCNTs) was reduced from 9.00 wt.% (for pristine MWCNTs) to 0.02 wt.% as detected by Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-AES). This value, established by a new analytical protocol, is the lowest recorded by now for purified c-CVD MWCNTs and, due to operating under atmospheric pressure, medium temperature regime (as for annealing processes), reasonable time-scale and metal residue non-specificity, it could lay the foundation for commercial purification of c-CVD derived MWCNTs.

  20. Combustion iron distribution and deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Chao; Mahowald, N.; Bond, T.; Chuang, P. Y.; Artaxo, P.; Siefert, R.; Chen, Y.; Schauer, J.

    2008-03-01

    Iron is hypothesized to be an important micronutrient for ocean biota, thus modulating carbon dioxide uptake by the ocean biological pump. Studies have assumed that atmospheric deposition of iron to the open ocean is predominantly from mineral aerosols. For the first time we model the source, transport, and deposition of iron from combustion sources. Iron is produced in small quantities during fossil fuel burning, incinerator use, and biomass burning. The sources of combustion iron are concentrated in the industrialized regions and biomass burning regions, largely in the tropics. Model results suggest that combustion iron can represent up to 50% of the total iron deposited, but over open ocean regions it is usually less than 5% of the total iron, with the highest values (ocean biogeochemistry the bioavailability of the iron is important, and this is often estimated by the fraction which is soluble (Fe(II)). Previous studies have argued that atmospheric processing of the relatively insoluble Fe(III) occurs to make it more soluble (Fe(II)). Modeled estimates of soluble iron amounts based solely on atmospheric processing as simulated here cannot match the variability in daily averaged in situ concentration measurements in Korea, which is located close to both combustion and dust sources. The best match to the observations is that there are substantial direct emissions of soluble iron from combustion processes. If we assume observed soluble Fe/black carbon ratios in Korea are representative of the whole globe, we obtain the result that deposition of soluble iron from combustion contributes 20-100% of the soluble iron deposition over many ocean regions. This implies that more work should be done refining the emissions and deposition of combustion sources of soluble iron globally.

  1. CO2 abatement in the iron and steel industry - the case for carbon capture and storage (CCS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.V. Todorut

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The steel industry is amongst the most energy-intensive industries also consuming large amounts of coal and emitting significant volumes of carbon dioxide (CO2. Studies indicate that steelmaking accounts for 6 - 7 % of world anthropogenic CO2 emissions, and 27 % of the total emissions of the world’s manufacturing sector. Steel manufacturers have responded to sustainable resource use and development adopting several measures attaining a reduction in energy consumption of 60 % in the last 50 years. The paper discusses Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS as a CO2 mitigation option, after the 2015 Paris Climate Conference (COP 21 and in relation to the European Regulation for CO2 measurement, reporting and verification.

  2. Effects of carbon and nitrogen on the elastic constants of AISI (American Iron and Steel Institute) type 304 stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ledbetter, H.M.; Austin, M.W.

    1985-01-01

    Nine AISI type 304 stainless steel alloys were studied at room temperature. The carbon-plus-nitrogen contents of these alloys ranged from 0.067 to 0.325 wt.% (from 0.3 to 1.3 at. %). Five elastic constants (the longitudinal modulus, Young's modulus, the shear modulus, the bulk modulus and Poisson's ratio) were determined by a pulse echo ultrasonic method.

  3. Carbon dioxide fixation by Metallosphaera yellowstonensis and acidothermophilic iron-oxidizing microbial communities from Yellowstone National Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Ryan M; Whitmore, Laura M; Moran, James J; Kreuzer, Helen W; Inskeep, William P

    2014-05-01

    The fixation of inorganic carbon has been documented in all three domains of life and results in the biosynthesis of diverse organic compounds that support heterotrophic organisms. The primary aim of this study was to assess carbon dioxide fixation in high-temperature Fe(III)-oxide mat communities and in pure cultures of a dominant Fe(II)-oxidizing organism (Metallosphaera yellowstonensis strain MK1) originally isolated from these environments. Protein-encoding genes of the complete 3-hydroxypropionate/4-hydroxybutyrate (3-HP/4-HB) carbon dioxide fixation pathway were identified in M. yellowstonensis strain MK1. Highly similar M. yellowstonensis genes for this pathway were identified in metagenomes of replicate Fe(III)-oxide mats, as were genes for the reductive tricarboxylic acid cycle from Hydrogenobaculum spp. (Aquificales). Stable-isotope ((13)CO2) labeling demonstrated CO2 fixation by M. yellowstonensis strain MK1 and in ex situ assays containing live Fe(III)-oxide microbial mats. The results showed that strain MK1 fixes CO2 with a fractionation factor of ∼2.5‰. Analysis of the (13)C composition of dissolved inorganic C (DIC), dissolved organic C (DOC), landscape C, and microbial mat C showed that mat C is from both DIC and non-DIC sources. An isotopic mixing model showed that biomass C contains a minimum of 42% C of DIC origin, depending on the fraction of landscape C that is present. The significance of DIC as a major carbon source for Fe(III)-oxide mat communities provides a foundation for examining microbial interactions that are dependent on the activity of autotrophic organisms (i.e., Hydrogenobaculum and Metallosphaera spp.) in simplified natural communities.

  4. Iron nanoparticles decorated multi-wall carbon nanotubes modified carbon paste electrode as an electrochemical sensor for the simultaneous determination of uric acid in the presence of ascorbic acid, dopamine and L-tyrosine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhakta, Arvind K; Mascarenhas, Ronald J; D'Souza, Ozma J; Satpati, Ashis K; Detriche, Simon; Mekhalif, Zineb; Dalhalle, Joseph

    2015-12-01

    Iron nanoparticles decorated multi-wall carbon nanotubes modified carbon paste electrode (Fe-MWCNTs/MCPE) was prepared by bulk-modification method. The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) suggests least charge transfer resistance at the modified electrode. The electrochemical behavior of UA was studied in 0.1M phosphate buffer solution (PBS) of pH3.0 using cyclic voltammetry (CV) while differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) was used for quantification. The spectroelectrochemial study of oxidation of UA at Fe-MWCNTs/MCPE showed a decrease in the absorbance of two peaks with time, which are ascribed to π to π(⁎) and n to π(⁎) transitions. Under optimum condition, the DPV response offered two linear dynamic ranges for UA in the concentration range 7.0×10(-8)M-1.0×10(-6)M and 2.0×10(-6)M-1.0×10(-5)M with detection limit (4.80±0.35)×10(-8)M (S/N=3). The practical analytical application of this sensor was successfully evaluated by determination of spiked UA in clinical samples, such as human blood serum and urine with good percentage recovery. The proposed electrochemical sensor offers a simple, reliable, rapid, reproducible and cost effective analysis of a quaternary mixture of biomolecules containing AA, DA, UA and Tyr which was free from mutual interferences.

  5. Iron deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scrimshaw, N S

    1991-10-01

    The world's leading nutritional problem is iron deficiency. 66% of children and women aged 15-44 years in developing countries have it. Further, 10-20% of women of childbearing age in developed countries are anemic. Iron deficiency is identified with often irreversible impairment of a child's learning ability. It is also associated with low capacity for adults to work which reduces productivity. In addition, it impairs the immune system which reduces the body's ability to fight infection. Iron deficiency also lowers the metabolic rate and the body temperature when exposed to cold. Hemoglobin contains nearly 73% of the body's iron. This iron is always being recycled as more red blood cells are made. The rest of the needed iron does important tasks for the body, such as binds to molecules that are reservoirs of oxygen for muscle cells. This iron comes from our diet, especially meat. Even though some plants, such as spinach, are high in iron, the body can only absorb 1.4-7% of the iron in plants whereas it can absorb 20% of the iron in red meat. In many developing countries, the common vegetarian diets contribute to high rates of iron deficiency. Parasitic diseases and abnormal uterine bleeding also promote iron deficiency. Iron therapy in anemic children can often, but not always, improve behavior and cognitive performance. Iron deficiency during pregnancy often contributes to maternal and perinatal mortality. Yet treatment, if given to a child in time, can lead to normal growth and hinder infections. However, excess iron can be damaging. Too much supplemental iron in a malnourished child promotes fatal infections since the excess iron is available for the pathogens use. Many countries do not have an effective system for diagnosing, treating, and preventing iron deficiency. Therefore a concerted international effort is needed to eliminate iron deficiency in the world.

  6. Extracting phosphoric iron under laboratorial conditions smelting bog iron ores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Török, B.; Thiele, A.

    2013-12-01

    In recent years it has been indicated by archaeometric investigations that phosphoric-iron (P-iron, low carbon steel with 0,5-1,5wt% P), which is an unknown and unused kind of steel in the modern industry, was widely used in different parts of the world in medieval times. In this study we try to explore the role of phosphorus in the arhaeometallurgy of iron and answer some questions regarding the smelting bog iron ores with high P-content. XRF analyses were performed on bog iron ores collected in Somogy county. Smelting experiments were carried out on bog iron ores using a laboratory model built on the basis of previously conducted reconstructed smelting experiments in copies of excavated furnaces. The effect of technological parameters on P-content of the resulted iron bloom was studied. OM and SEM-EDS analyses were carried out on the extracted iron and slag samples. On the basis of the material analyses it can be stated that P-iron is usually extracted but the P-content is highly affected by technological parameters. Typical microstructures of P-iron and of slag could also be identified. It could also be established that arsenic usually solved in high content in iron as well.

  7. Southern Ocean Iron Experiment (SOFex)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coale, Kenneth H.

    2005-07-28

    The Southern Ocean Iron Experiment (SOFeX) was an experiment decades in the planning. It's implementation was among the most complex ship operations that SIO has been involved in. The SOFeX field expedition was successful in creating and tracking two experimentally enriched areas of the Southern Ocean, one characterized by low silicic acid, one characterized by high silicic acid. Both experimental sites were replete with abundant nitrate. About 100 scientists were involved overall. The major findings of this study were significant in several ways: (1) The productivity of the southern ocean is limited by iron availability. (2) Carbon uptake and flux is therefore controlled by iron availability (3) In spite of low silicic acid, iron promotes non-silicious phytoplankton growth and the uptake of carbon dioxide. (4) The transport of fixed carbon from the surface layers proceeds with a C:N ratio that would indicate differential remineralization of nitrogen at shallow depths. (5) These finding have major implications for modeling of carbon export based on nitrate utilization. (6) The general results of the experiment indicate that, beyond other southern ocean enrichment experiments, iron inputs have a much wider impact of productivity and carbon cycling than previously demonstrated. Scientific presentations: Coale, K., Johnson, K, Buesseler, K., 2002. The SOFeX Group. Eos. Trans. AGU 83(47) OS11A-0199. Coale, K., Johnson, K. Buesseler, K., 2002. SOFeX: Southern Ocean Iron Experiments. Overview and Experimental Design. Eos. Trans. AGU 83 (47) OS22D-01. Buesseler, K.,et al. 2002. Does Iron Fertilization Enhance Carbon Sequestration? Particle flux results from the Southern Ocean Iron Experiment. Eos. Trans. AGU 83 (47), OS22D-09. Johnson, K. et al. 2002. Open Ocean Iron Fertilization Experiments From IronEx-I through SOFeX: What We Know and What We Still Need to Understand. Eos. Trans. AGU 83 (47), OS22D-12. Coale, K. H., 2003. Carbon and Nutrient Cycling During the

  8. A density functional theory study of the carbon-coating effects on lithium iron borate battery electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loftager, Simon; García Lastra, Juan Maria; Vegge, Tejs

    2016-01-01

    a density functional theory (DFT) study of the anchoring configurations of carbon coating on the LiFeBO3 electrode and its implications on the interfacial lithium diffusion. Due to large barriers associated with Li-ion diffusion through a parallel-oriented pristine graphene coating on the FeBO3 and LiFeBO3...... electrode surfaces, large structural defects in the graphene coating are required for fast Li-ion diffusion. However, such defects are expected to exist only in small concentrations due to their high formation energies. Alternative coating geometries were therefore investigated, and the configuration...

  9. A density functional theory study of the carbon-coating effects on lithium iron borate battery electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loftager, Simon; García Lastra, Juan Maria; Vegge, Tejs

    2017-01-01

    a density functional theory (DFT) study of the anchoring configurations of carbon coating on the LiFeBO3 electrode and its implications on the interfacial lithium diffusion. Due to large barriers associated with Li-ion diffusion through a parallel-oriented pristine graphene coating on the FeBO3 and LiFeBO3...... electrode surfaces, large structural defects in the graphene coating are required for fast Li-ion diffusion. However, such defects are expected to exist only in small concentrations due to their high formation energies. Alternative coating geometries were therefore investigated, and the configuration...

  10. Sorptive Uptake Studies of an Aryl-Arsenical with Iron Oxide Composites on an Activated Carbon Support

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Sorption uptake kinetics and equilibrium studies for 4-hydroxy-3-nitrobenzene arsonic acid (roxarsone) was evaluated with synthetic magnetite (Mag-P), commercial magnetite (Mag-C), magnetite 10%, 19%, and 32% composite material (CM-10, -19, -32) that contains granular activated carbon (GAC), and synthetic goethite at pH 7.00 in water at 21 °C for 24 h. GAC showed the highest sorptive removal of roxarsone and the relative uptake for each sorbent material with roxarsone are listed in descending...

  11. 铁碳微电解+混凝法预处理高盐染料废水的研究%Treatment of High-salt Dye Wastewater by Iron-carbon Microelectrolysis+Coagulative Precipitation Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马正慧; 何义亮; 冯丽梅; 杨军

    2011-01-01

    对高盐染料废水先采用铁碳微电解法进行处理,出水再经过加石灰混凝进行处理.确定了最佳处理条件:微电解反应时间为5h,pH为3,铁碳质量比为1:2,微电解出水加石灰调节pH值至9左右后混凝沉淀3h.试验结果表明:系统对COD、色度的去除率分别为40.09%和60.1%,废水的可生化性提高到0.32,达到了预处理的效果.%The iron-carbon micro-electrolysis-lime coagulation combined process is used to treat the high-salt dye wastewater. The influence of reaction time, pH, and the volume ratio of iron to carbon is studied. The best treastment conditions are determined. The results show that when the electrolysis reaction time is 5 h, the pH is 3, the volume ratio of iron to carbon in the iron-carbon micro-electrolysis unit is 1: 2, the effluent pH of the micro-electrolysis unit is alkalized to about 9 by lime, and coagulative precipitation is 3 h,then the wastewater COD and color removal rate can reach 40. 09% and 60. 1 %, respectively. The biodegrad-ability of wastewater increases to 0. 32,reaching the pretreatment effect.

  12. Petrology and palaeoenvironmental significance of authigenic iron-rich clays, carbonates and apatite in the Claiborne Group, Middle Eocene, NE Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huggett, J. M.; Gale, A. S.; McCarty, D.

    2010-07-01

    The Claiborne Group (Eocene) in North East Texas consists of clayey sandstones and mudrocks, both with variable proportions of dark green to brown clay pellets deposited in a marginal to open marine setting on the Gulf Coast margin. The composition of concretionary carbonate and clay pellets, from 5 localities, has been investigated using a wide variety of analytical techniques. Our palaeontological, sedimentological, C/S and stable isotope data support an interpretation of marginal marine facies with limited freshwater input, for the Claiborne Group. Dark green (mature) pellets are predominantly associated with transgressive, bioturbated, marine sediments. From the Weches Formation through to the youngest Crockett Formation there is a trend from pellets composed mostly of dark green serpentine-rich mixed layer clay to those of mostly brown (immature) nontronite-rich mixed layer clay. The serpentine is intermediate between odinite and berthierine and may have been originally odinite that has undergone partial transformation to berthierine. Pellet maturity apparently corresponds with the degree of winnowing and sedimentation rate. It does not appear to correspond with global temperature fluctuations, though the serpentine-rich rather than glauconite-rich composition may do. Siderite cement, mostly in the form of concretions, post-dates the iron-rich clay pellets and pre-dates calcite cement. Carbonate and apatite concretions show a wide range of mineral cement textures, reflecting variation in sedimentary environment and early diagenetic processes. Based on water temperatures derived from verneriacardia bivalves a precipitation temperature of 20 °C is assumed for the concretionary siderite. Using this temperature we surmise that the siderite precipitated from marine pore waters with intermittent meteoric water mixing.

  13. Strong contribution of diatom resting spores to deep-sea carbon transfer in naturally iron-fertilized waters downstream of South Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rembauville, M.; Manno, C.; Tarling, G. A.; Blain, S.; Salter, I.

    2016-09-01

    Biogeochemical and diatom export fluxes are presented from two bathypelagic sediment trap deployments in the Antarctic Zone of the Southern Ocean. One of the sediment traps was deployed in very productive, naturally iron-fertilized waters downstream of South Georgia (P3, 2000 m) and compared to a deployment in moderately productive waters upstream of the island system (P2, 1500 m). At both sites significant diatom export events occurred in spring (November) and contained mostly empty cells that were associated with low particulate organic carbon (POC) fluxes. A summer export pulse occurred one month later at P2 (end February/March) compared to P3 (end January). Diatom fluxes at P3 were one order of magnitude higher than at P2, a difference mainly attributed to the short and intense export of resting spores from Chaetoceros Hyalochaete and Thalassiosira antarctica species. Aside from these resting spores, diatom export assemblages at both sites were dominated by empty Fragilariopsis kerguelensis frustules. The fraction of diatoms exported as empty frustules was considerably lower at P3 (52%) than P2 (91%). This difference was related to the flux of intact diatom resting spores at P3 and may partially explain the lower Si:C export stoichiometry observed at P3 (1.1) compared to P2 (1.5). Through the enumeration of full diatom frustules and subsequent biomass calculations we estimate that diatom resting spores account for 42% of annual POC flux in the productive waters downstream of South Georgia. At both sites the contribution of diatom vegetative stages to POC fluxes was considerably lower (carbon vector out of the mixed layer. Furthermore, the contribution or resting spores to POC flux in the bathypelagic ocean and sediments suggests they play a particularly important role in sequestering biologically fixed CO2 over climatically relevant timescales.

  14. Effects of carbon and molybdenum on the microstructures of high chromium white cast irons; Efeito do carbono e do molibdenio na microestrutura dos ferros fundidos brancos de alto cromo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinatora, Amilton; Ambrosio Filho, Francisco; Goldenstein, Helio; Fuoco, Ricardo; Albertin, Eduardo; Mei, Paulo Roberto

    1992-12-31

    The effects of 3 levels of carbon and 1.5% Mo addition on the solidification structures of a 15% chromium white cast iron were studied. The volume fraction of primary austenite and of eutectic carbides, as well as the number of carbide particles per unit length and the mean secondary dendrite arm spacing were measured. By means of thermal analysis, thermal arrest corresponding to the formation of the primary austenite and of the eutectic were determined. The increase in the carbon content and the addition of Mo led to lowering of the thermal arrests and to coarsening of the particles. (author) 15 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  15. Platinum Iron Intermetallic Nanoparticles Supported on Carbon Formed In Situ by High-Pressure Pyrolysis for Efficient Oxygen Reduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Yang; Jensen, Jens Oluf; Zhang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Carbon-supported PtFe alloy catalysts are synthesized by the one-step, high-temperature pyrolysis of Pt, Fe, and C precursors. As a result of the high temperature, the formed PtFe nanoparticles possess highly ordered, face-centered tetragonal, intermetallic structures with a mean size of ≈11.8 nm....... At 0.9 V versus the reversible hydrogen electrode, the PtFe nanoparticles show a 6.8 times higher specific activity than the reference Pt/C catalyst towards the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) as well as excellent stability, most likely because of the durable intermetallic structure and the preleaching...... treatment of the catalyst. During these preliminary syntheses, we found that a portion of the PtFe nanoparticles is buried in the in situ formed carbon phase, which limits Pt utilization in the catalyst and results in a mass-specific activity equivalent to the commercial Pt/C catalyst. Moreover...

  16. Synthesis and characterization of niobium-promoted cobalt/iron catalysts supported on carbon nanotubes for the hydrogenation of carbon monoxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zahra Gholami; Noor Asmawati Mohd Zabidi; Fatemeh Gholami; Mohammadtaghi Vakili

    2016-01-01

    Bimetallic Co/Fe catalysts supported on carbon nanotubes ( CNTs) were prepared, and niobium ( Nb) was added as promoter to the 70Co:30Fe/CNT catalyst. The physicochemical properties of the catalysts were characterized, and the catalytic performances were analyzed at the same operation conditions (H2:CO (volume ratio)= 2:1, p = 1 MPa, and t = 260℃) in a tubular fixed-bed microreactor system. The addition of Nb to the bimetallic catalyst decreases the average size of the oxide nanoparticles and improves the reducibility of the bimetallic catalyst. Evaluation of the catalyst performance in a Fischer-Tropsch reaction shows that the catalyst results in high selectivity to methane, and the selectivity to C5+ increased slightly in the bimetallic catalyst unlike that in the monometallic catalysts. The addition of 1% Nb to the bimetallic catalyst increases CO conversion and selectivity to C5+. Meanwhile, a decrease in methane selectivity is observed.

  17. Removal of Pb(II) and Cu(II) from aqueous solution using multiwalled carbon nanotubes/iron oxide magnetic composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jun; Zhao, Donglin; Wang, Xiangke

    2011-01-01

    Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs)/iron oxide magnetic composites (named as MCs) were prepared by co-precipitation method, and were characterised by scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) in detail. The prepared MCs were employed as an adsorbent for the removal of Pb(II) and Cu(II) ions from wastewater in heavy metal ion pollution cleanup. The results demonstrated that the sorption of Pb(II) and Cu(II) ions was strongly dependent on pH and temperature. The experimental data were well described by Langmuir model, and the monolayer sorption capacity of MCs was found to vary from 10.02 to 31.25 mg/g for Pb(II) and from 3.11 to 8.92 mg/g for Cu(II) at temperature increasing from 293.15 to 353.15 K at pH 5.50. The sorption capacity of Pb(II) on MCs was higher than that of Cu(II), which was attributed to their ionic radius, hydration energies and hydrolysis of their hydroxides. The thermodynamic parameters (i.e., ΔH(0), ΔS(0) and ΔG(0)) were calculated from temperature dependent sorption isotherms, and the results indicated that the sorption of Pb(II) and Cu(II) ions on MCs were spontaneous and endothermic processes.

  18. Preparation of Carbon Nanotube/TiO2 Mesoporous Hybrid Photoanode with Iron Pyrite (FeS2) Thin Films Counter Electrodes for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilic, Bayram; Turkdogan, Sunay; Astam, Aykut; Ozer, Oguz Can; Asgin, Mansur; Cebeci, Hulya; Urk, Deniz; Mucur, Selin Pravadili

    2016-05-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)/TiO2 mesoporous networks can be employed as a new alternative photoanode in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). By using the MWCNT/TiO2 mesoporous as photoanodes in DSSC, we demonstrate that the MWCNT/TiO2 mesoporous photoanode is promising alternative to standard FTO/TiO2 mesoporous based DSSC due to larger specific surface area and high electrochemical activity. We also show that iron pyrite (FeS2) thin films can be used as an efficient counter electrode (CE), an alternative to the conventional high cost Pt based CE. We are able to synthesis FeS2 nanostructures utilizing a very cheap and easy hydrothermal growth route. MWCNT/TiO2 mesoporous based DSSCs with FeS2 CE achieved a high solar conversion efficiency of 7.27% under 100 mW cm‑2 (AM 1.5G 1-Sun) simulated solar irradiance which is considerably (slightly) higher than that of A-CNT/TiO2 mesoporous based DSSCs with Pt CE. Outstanding performance of the FeS2 CE makes it a very promising choice among the various CE materials used in the conventional DSSC and it is expected to be used more often to achieve higher photon-to-electron conversion efficiencies.

  19. Investigation of heavy metal (Cu, Pb, Cd, and Cr) stabilization in river sediment by nano-zero-valent iron/activated carbon composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-fang; Zhang, Jinghui; Zhang, Xiaomao; Wang, Weiya; Li, Yuxiang

    2016-01-01

    Nano-zero-valent iron/activated carbon (nZVI/AC) composite was evaluated for its effectiveness in the stabilization of Cu, Pb, Cd, and Cr in dredged river sediment. Synthetic precipitation leaching procedure (SPLP) and toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) were adopted to compare the effects of nZVI/AC dosage, particle size, time duration, and temperature on heavy metal leachability. The results show that leachability dropped considerably with the addition of nZVI/AC and powdered particles in the size of 0.075-0.18 mm was more effective in stabilization than granular ones. Stabilization effect was stable in long-term and robust against changes in temperature. Tessier sequential extraction revealed that heavy metals were associated with solid particle, inorganic or organic matters in sediment. The addition of nZVI/AC was able to convert relatively weakly bound heavy metals into more strongly bound species and thus reduce the bioavailability and toxicity. Also, the standard potential of heavy metals may decide the mechanism of stabilization process.

  20. Low-cost adsorbent derived and in situ nitrogen/iron co-doped carbon as efficient oxygen reduction catalyst in microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Chun; Wei, Liling; Su, Min; Wang, Gang; Shen, Jianquan

    2016-08-01

    A novel low-cost adsorbent derived and in situ nitrogen/iron co-doped carbon (N/Fe-C) with three-dimensional porous structure is employed as efficient oxygen reduction catalyst in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). The electrochemical active area is significantly improved to 617.19m(2)g(-1) in N/Fe-C by Fe-doping. And N/Fe-C (4.21at.% N, 0.11at.% Fe) exhibits excellent electrocatalytic activity with the oxygen reduction potential of -0.07V (vs. Ag/AgCl) which is comparable to commercial Pt/C. In MFCs tests, the maximum power density and output voltage with N/Fe-C are enhanced to 745mWm(-2) and 562mV (external resistance 1kΩ), which are 11% and 0.72% higher than Pt/C (0.5mgPtcm(-2)), respectively. Besides, the long-term stability of N/Fe-C retains better for more than one week. Moreover, the charge transfer resistance (Rct) values are recorded by the impedance measurements, and the low Rct of N/Fe-C is also result in better catalytic activity.

  1. [Effect of accelerated heavy ions of carbon 12C, neon 20Ne and iron 56Fe on the chromosomal apparatus of human blood lymphocytes in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repina, L A

    2011-01-01

    Cytogenetic assay of the chromosomal apparatus of human blood lymphocytes was carried out after in vitro irradiation by heavy charged particles with high LET values. Blood plasm samples enriched with lymphocytes were irradiated by accelerated ions of carbon 12C (290 MeV/nucleon and LET = 70 keV/microm), neon 20Ne (400 MeV/nucleon and LET = 70 keV/microm), and iron 56Fe (500 MeV/nucleon and LET = 200 keV/microm) in the dose range from 0.25 to 1 Gy. Rate of chromosome aberrations showed a linear dependence on doses from the densely ionizing radiations with high LET values. Frequency of dicentrics and centric rings in human lymphocytes irradiated by 12C with the energy of 290 MeV/nucleon was maximal at 1 Gy (p < 0.05) relative to the other heavy particles. It was found that relative biological effectiveness of heavy nuclei is several times higher than of 60Co gamma-radiation throughout the range of doses in this investigation.

  2. Spark Plasma Sintering of Load-Bearing Iron-Carbon Nanotube-Tricalcium Phosphate CerMets for Orthopaedic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montufar, Edgar B.; Horynová, Miroslava; Casas-Luna, Mariano; Diaz-de-la-Torre, Sebastián; Celko, Ladislav; Klakurková, Lenka; Spotz, Zdenek; Diéguez-Trejo, Guillermo; Fohlerová, Zdenka; Dvorak, Karel; Zikmund, Tomáš; Kaiser, Jozef

    2016-04-01

    Recently, ceramic-metallic composite materials (CerMets) have been investigated for orthopaedic applications with promising results. This first generation of bio-CerMets combine the bioactivity of hydroxyapatite with the mechanical stability of titanium to fabricate bioactive, tough and biomechanically more biocompatible osteosynthetic devices. Nonetheless, these first CerMets are not biodegradable materials and a second surgery is required to remove the implant after bone healing. The present work aims to develop the next generation bio-CerMets, which are potential biodegradable materials. The process to produce the new biodegradable CerMet consisted of mixing powder of soluble and osteoconductive alpha tricalcium phosphate with biocompatible and biodegradable iron with consolidation through spark plasma sintering (SPS). The microstructure, composition and mechanical strength of the new CerMet were studied by metallography, x-ray diffraction and diametral tensile strength tests, respectively. The results show that SPS produces CerMet with higher mechanical performance (120 MPa) than the ceramic component alone (29 MPa) and similar mechanical strength to the pure metallic component (129 MPa). Nonetheless, although a short sintering time (10 min) was used, partial transformation of the alpha tricalcium phosphate into its allotropic and slightly less soluble beta phase was observed. Cell adhesion tests show that osteoblasts are able to attach to the CerMet surface, presenting spread morphology regardless of the component of the material with which they are in contact. However, the degradation process restricted to the small volume of the cell culture well quickly reduces the osteoblast viability.

  3. Removal of chromate in a permeable reactive barrier using zero-valent iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Peter; Locht, T

    2002-01-01

    Chromate is a commonly found groundwater contaminant. Permeable reactive barriers containing zero-valent iron as iron filings are able to remove the chromate by a combined reduction/precipitation reaction. However, due to the passivation of the reduction capability of the iron surfaces by the pre......Chromate is a commonly found groundwater contaminant. Permeable reactive barriers containing zero-valent iron as iron filings are able to remove the chromate by a combined reduction/precipitation reaction. However, due to the passivation of the reduction capability of the iron surfaces...

  4. Iron(III)-Mediated Oxidative Degradation on the Benzylic Carbon of Drug Molecules in the Absence of Initiating Peroxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanda, Kausik K; Blincoe, William D; Allain, Leonardo R; Wuelfing, W Peter; Harmon, Paul A

    2017-05-01

    Metal ions play an important role in oxidative drug degradation. One of the most ubiquitous metal ion impurities in excipients and buffers is Fe(III). In the field of oxidative drug degradation chemistry, the role of Fe(III) has been primarily discussed in terms of its effect in reaction with trace hydroperoxide impurities. However, the role of Fe(III) acting as a direct oxidant of drug molecules, which could operate in the absence of any hydroperoxide impurities, is less common. This work focuses on Fe(III)-induced oxidation of some aromatic drug molecules/drug fragments containing benzylic C-H bonds in the absence of initiating peroxides. Alcohol and ketone degradates are formed at the benzylic carbon atom. The formation of a π-stabilized cation radical is postulated as the key intermediate for the downstream oxidation. Implications are briefly discussed. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Changes of soil organic carbon and complex iron in Momoge Wetland%莫莫格湿地土壤有机碳与络合态铁的动态变化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于秀丽; 许林书

    2012-01-01

    The temporal changes of soil organic carbon and complex iron content were studied in three types wetland soil of Momoge Wetlands, which include Phragmites marsh and Leymus chinensis meadow and Phragmites-Leymus chinensis meadow. The result showed that the highest content of soil total organic carbon is in Phragmites marsh,followed by Leymus chinensis meadow and the lowest is in Phragmites-Leymus chinensis meadow. The content of soil complex iron has the same variation as soil total organic carbon. However, the highest content of soil dissolved organic carbon is in Leymus chinensis meadow,followed by Phragmites-Leymus chinensis meadow and the lowest is in Phragmites marsh. With the soil depth increases,the content of soil total organic carbon,dissolved organic carbon and complex iron decreased gradually. Correlation analysis showed that in the vertical change soil total organic carbon and dissolved organic carbon were positively correlated with soil complex iron. And in the seasonal variation,soil complex iron was negatively correlated with total organic carbon;Between soil dissolved organic carbon with complex iron there were significantly negative correlations in Phragmites marsh and Leymus chinensis meadow soil, but there were significantly negative correlations in Phragmites-Leymus chinensis meadow.%以莫莫格芦苇沼泽、芦苇-羊草草甸和羊草草甸3种类型湿地土壤为对象,研究了土壤总有机碳(TOC)、溶解有机碳(DOC)和络合态铁的动态变化情况.结果表明:3种类型湿地土壤TOC含量芦苇沼泽最高,羊草草旬次之,芦苇-羊草草甸最低;土壤络合态铁含量变化规律与TOC变化相同;土壤DOC含量则表现为羊草草甸最高,芦苇-羊草草甸次之,芦苇沼泽最低.随着土层深度的增加,湿地土壤TOC、DOC以及络合态铁含量都表现为自表层向深层递减的规律.相关性分析表明:从垂直动态变化看,土壤络合态铁与土壤TOC、DOC含量均有正相关关系

  6. Colour Metallography of Cast Iron Chapter 2 Introduction (Ⅰ)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Jiyang; Liu Jincheng

    2009-01-01

    @@ Grey iron is type of cast iron with grey color fracture and carbon precipitated as flake graphite.According to its chemical compostion in Fe-C phase diagram,grey iron is categorised into three types:hypoeutectic,eutecitic,hypereutecitic irons are hypoeutecic compostion.

  7. Saccharides enhance iron bioavailability to Southern Ocean phytoplankton

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hassler, C.S.; Schoemann, V.; Nichols, C.M.; Butler, E.C.V.; Boyd, P.W.; Nichols, C.M.

    2011-01-01

    Iron limits primary productivity in vast regions of the ocean. Given that marine phytoplankton contribute up to 40% of global biological carbon fixation, it is important to understand what parameters control the availability of iron (iron bioavailability) to these organisms. Most studies on iron bio

  8. Síntese e caracterização de nanopartículas de óxido de ferro suportadas em matriz carbonácea: remoção do corante orgânico azul de metileno em água Synthesis and characterization of iron oxide nanoparticles supported on carbon matrix: oxidation of the dye methylene blue in water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maraísa Gonçalves

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work were prepared composites of iron oxide and carbonaceous materials in two different weight proportions (Carbon/Fe 1/1 and 1/2. The physico-chemical properties of the composites were determined by temperature programmed reduction (TPR, adsorption/dessorption of N2, X-ray diffraction (XRD, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS and pulse titration H2. The XRD and XPS analysis showed a cubic iron oxide phase, identified as maghemite, formed over the carbon surface. The particle size of maghemite showed to be within 10-30 nm. Carbon/Fe 1/2 was the most active in MB removal kinetics and ESI-MS studies showed that MB removal by both composites leads to oxidized intermediates.

  9. ACONC Files

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — ACONC files containing simulated ozone and PM2.5 fields that were used to create the model difference plots shown in the journal article. This dataset is associated...

  10. 831 Files

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — SSA-831 file is a collection of initial and reconsideration adjudicative level DDS disability determinations. (A few hearing level cases are also present, but the...

  11. Synthesis of highly photoluminescent carbon dots via citric acid and Tris for iron(III) ions sensors and bioimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ming; Zhou, Zhulong; Gong, Aihua; Zhang, Yan; Li, Qijun

    2015-10-01

    In this work, high quantum yield and strong photoluminescent carbon quantum dots (C-QDs) are successfully synthesized via a facile and green hydrothermal method using citric acid and Tris as precursors. The as-synthesized C-QDs with a quantum yield (QY) as high as 52% were characterized by UV, FT-IR, TEM, XPS and fluorescence spectroscope. TEM results show that C-QDs are mono-dispersed spherical particles and the diameter distribution of C-QDs is 2.8±1.1 nm. The extraordinary photoluminescent properties and low cytotoxicity of C-QDs were obtained through optical property characterization and cytotoxicity assay. In addition, we found that the as-prepared C-QDs had a high affinity for Fe(3+) ions and the response toward Fe(3+) ions was highly linear (R(2)=0.997) over the concentration range from 2 to 50 μM, which could provide an effective platform for portable detection of Fe(3+) ions. Also, it is demonstrated that the photoluminescent C-QDs display hypotoxicity and are biocompatible for use as biosensors in living cells.

  12. Iron Homeostasis and Nutritional Iron Deficiency123

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Nonheme food ferritin (FTN) iron minerals, nonheme iron complexes, and heme iron contribute to the balance between food iron absorption and body iron homeostasis. Iron absorption depends on membrane transporter proteins DMT1, PCP/HCP1, ferroportin (FPN), TRF2, and matriptase 2. Mutations in DMT1 and matriptase-2 cause iron deficiency; mutations in FPN, HFE, and TRF2 cause iron excess. Intracellular iron homeostasis depends on coordinated regulation of iron trafficking and storage proteins enc...

  13. Treatment of Galvanized Wastewater with Minute Corrosive Cell of Iron Filings and Activated Carbon%铁炭微电解法处理镀锌废水

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈凌

    2008-01-01

    介绍了铁炭微电解法处理镀锌废水的基本原理及工艺条件,该技术的关键是pH值的控制.铁炭微电解法基建和运行费用低,基本不加或加少量化学药剂(如酸碱),所用填料主要是工业废铁屑,来源广,价格低廉,耗能小,污泥量少,可以实现以废治废,处理后的水中铬(Ⅵ)浓度为0.05mg/L,远低于国家污水综合排放标准(GB8978-1996)第一类污染物最高允许排放浓度.

  14. Treatment of Galvanized Wastewater with Minute Corrosive Cell of Iron Filings-Activated Carbon%铁炭微电解法处理镀锌废水

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈凌

    2008-01-01

    介绍了铁炭微电解法处理镀锌废水的基本原理及工艺条件,本技术的关键是pH值的控制.铁炭微电解法基建和运行费用低,基本不加或加少量化学药剂(如酸碱),所用填料主要是工业废铁屑,来源广,价格低廉,耗能小,污泥量少,可以实现以废治废,处理后的水中铬(Ⅵ)浓度为0.05mg/L,远低于国家污水综合排放标准(GB8978-1996)第一类污染物最高允许排放浓度.

  15. Process to Produce Iron Nanoparticle Lunar Dust Simulant Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Ching-cheh; McNatt, Jeremiah

    2010-01-01

    A document discusses a method for producing nanophase iron lunar dust composite simulant by heating a mixture of carbon black and current lunar simulant types (mixed oxide including iron oxide) at a high temperature to reduce ionic iron into elemental iron. The product is a chemically modified lunar simulant that can be attracted by a magnet, and has a surface layer with an iron concentration that is increased during the reaction. The iron was found to be -iron and Fe3O4 nanoparticles. The simulant produced with this method contains iron nanoparticles not available previously, and they are stable in ambient air. These nanoparticles can be mass-produced simply.

  16. Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes for toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene removal from aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Fei; Ma, Jie; Wang, Juan; Zhang, Mingzheng; Zheng, Jie

    2016-03-01

    An effectively and functionally magnetic multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNTs) nano-composite (APCNT-KOH) was synthesized by a one-pot and facile method. The residual Fe catalyst particles of the as-prepared MWCNTs were utilized as magnetic materials through KOH activation. The resulting APCNT-KOH exhibited very high adsorption capacities for toluene (T), ethylbenzene (E), and xylene (X) (TEX) pollutants than many other adsorbents, because of their large specific surface area and high degree of surface activity. The adsorption process was found to be pH, ionic strength, and temperature dependent, and the maximum adsorption capacity was observed at pH 6 for TEX pollutants. The adsorption isotherm data were analyzed by applying the Langmuir, Freundlich, and Dubinin-Radushkevich isothermal models. The Langmuir model showed the best fit to the experimental isotherm data with a maximum adsorption capacity(qm,toluene = 63.34 mg/g, qm, ethylbenzene = 249.44 mg/g, qm,m-xylene = 227.05 mg/g, qm,o-xylene = 138.04 mg/g, qm,p-xylene = 105.59 mg/g). Adsorption kinetics of TEX on APCNT-KOH was appropriately described by the pseudo-second-order rate model. The desorption experiments revealed the typical adsorption-desorption hysteresis, indicating that the adsorption and desorption processes of TEX undergo different pathways due to porous structure changes before and after adsorption and desorption. Collective results demonstrate that the functionalized magnetic APCNT-KOH composites are highly-effective adsorbents for TEX removal, which provides a promising and green route for MWCNTs in wastewater treatment.

  17. Identifiable Data Files - Denominator File

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Denominator File combines Medicare beneficiary entitlement status information from administrative enrollment records with third-party payer information and GHP...

  18. 浅议碳排放与废钢铁的节能减排功效%Carbon emission and effect of energy-saving and emission-reducing of iron scrap

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林加冲

    2012-01-01

    CO2 is the main cause of global warming and environmental deterioration. The situation of CO2 emission of iron and steel industry in the world was introduced. According to the current situation in China, the paper proposed it should develop iron scrap industry, and increase the supply capability of iron scrap, which is the main approach for iron industry to get out of crisis and realize low-carbon development and green development.%二氧化碳是导致全球气候变暖、人类生存环境恶化的主要原因。简要介绍世界钢铁工业二氧化碳排放情况,针对我国钢铁工业碳排放的具体情况,提出发展我国废钢产业,提高废钢铁的供应能力,是我国钢铁工业摆脱危机,实现低碳发展、绿色发展的主要途径。

  19. Measurements of cross-section of charge current inclusive of antineutrino scattering off nucleons using carbon, iron, lead and scintillator at MINER$\

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rakotondravohitra, Laza [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2015-08-18

    Neutrino physics is one of the most active fields in the domaine of high energy physics during the last century. The need of precise measurement of neutrino-nucleus interactions required by the neutrino oscillation experiments is a an exiting step. These measurements of cross-section are more than essential for neutrino oscillation experiment. Over the year, many measurements from varieties of experiments have been presented. MINERνA is one of the world leaders in measuring cross-section of neutrino and antineutrino -nucleus interactions. MINERνA is a neutrino-nucleus scattering experiment installed in the few-GeV NuMI beam line at Fermilab. In order to study nuclear dependence, MINERνA is endowed with different types of solid nuclear targets as well are liquid targets such as helium and water. This thesis presents measurements of cross-section of antineutrino scattering off nucleons using a variety of solid nuclear targets, carbon, iron, lead and also polystyrene scintillator (CH). The data set of antineutrino used for this analysis was taken between March and July 2010 with a total of 1.60X1020 protons on target. Charged current inclusive interactions were selected by requiring a positive muon and kinematics limitation of acceptance of the muon spectrometer are applied. The analysis requires neutrino energy between 2GeV et 20GeV and the angle of muon θmu < 17degree . The absolute cross-section # as function of neutrino energy and the differential cross-section dσ/ dxbj measured and shown the corresponding systematics for each nuclear targets. Data results are compared with prediction of the models implemented in the neutrino events generators GENIE 2.6.2 used by the experiment.

  20. Computer files.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, M

    1995-02-01

    From what has been said, several recommendations can be made for users of small personal computers regardless of which operating system they use. If your computer has a large hard disk not specially required by any single application, organize the disk into a small number of volumes. You will then be using the computer as if it had several smaller disks, which will help you to create a logical file structure. The size of individual volumes has to be selected carefully with respect to the files kept in each volume. Otherwise, it may be that you will have too much space in one volume and not enough in another. In each volume, organize the structure of directories and subdirectories logically so that they correspond to the logic of your file content. Be aware of the fact that the directories suggested as default when installing new software are often not the optimum. For instance, it is better to put different graphics packages under a common subdirectory rather than to install them at the same level as all other packages including statistics, text processors, etc. Create a special directory for each task you use the computer. Note that it is a bad practice to keep many different and logically unsorted files in the root directory of any of your volumes. Only system and important service files should be kept there. Although any file may be written all over the disk, access to it will be faster if it is written over the minimum number of cylinders. From time to time, use special programs that reorganize your files in this way.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. 77 FR 59158 - Migratory Bird Hunting; Application for Approval of Copper-Clad Iron Shot and Fluoropolymer Shot...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-26

    ... cladding up to 44.1 of the shot mass. Tungsten-bronze 51.1 tungsten, 44.4 copper, Rare Earth Magnet. 3.9... Shot ***. Iron (steel) iron and carbon Magnet or Hot Shot . Iron-tungsten any proportion of tungsten, Magnet or Hot Shot . and >=1 iron. Iron-tungsten-nickel >=1 iron, any proportion of Magnet or Hot...

  2. Carbon-Oxygen Bond Cleavage by Bis(imino)pyridine Iron Compounds : Catalyst Deactivation Pathways and Observation of Acyl C-O Bond Cleavage in Esters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trovitch, Ryan J.; Lobkovsky, Emil; Bouwkamp, Marco W.; Chirik, Paul J.

    2008-01-01

    Investigations into the substrate scope of bis(imino)pyridine iron-catalyzed hydrogenation and [2 pi + 2 pi]. diene cyclization reactions identified C-O bond cleavage as a principal deactivation pathway. Addition of diallyl or allyl ethyl ether to the bis(imino)pyridine iron dinitrogen complex, ((iP

  3. Analysis on Low Carbon Iron-Making for BF%高炉低碳炼铁分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    左海滨; 张建良; 王筱留

    2012-01-01

    The energy-saving potential for different low carbon ironmaking approaches was investigated facing to the given conditions of materials.The result shows that for the general BF,when the indirect reduction approaches to the chemical balance,the gas utilization can reach up to 56.99% and fuel ratio is decreased by 28.37 kg/t.For oxygen blast furnace,when the top gas is totally recycled the fuel ratio can be reduced to 385.6 kg/t.The fuel ratio can also be reduced through the injection of coke oven gas.About 5.0 kg/t coke ratio can be saved by every 10 m3 COG injection.Along with the oxygen enrichment being improved,the optimal injection volume corresponding to the minimal fuel ratio increases and as a result the lowest fuel ratio decreases.When the oxygen enrichment is 6%-8% and injection volume is 160-180 m3/t.the coke ratio can be reduced maximally by 53-54 kg/t.Using high reactivity coke in blast furnace can decrease temperature of thermal reservation zone and the balance concentration of CO decreases accordingly.When the balance concentration of CO is decreased by the step of 2.5% from 70%-60%,the fuel ratio can be reduced by 10.30-12.20 kg/t theoretically and the reducing rate decreases.%从分析目前高炉炼铁碳消耗的本质出发,针对给定的原燃料条件,利用模型计算分析了当前主要低碳炼铁途径的节碳潜力。结果表明:对于普通高炉而言,间接还原达到平衡时的煤气利用率为56.99%,降低燃料比28.37kg/t。氧气高炉炉顶煤气完全循环利用条件下,最低燃料比为385.6kg/t。喷吹焦炉煤气可以降低燃料比,每增加10m3喷吹量,可降低焦比5.0kg/t左右;此外喷吹量存在极值,随着富氧率提高,获得最低燃料比的喷吹量增大,且最低燃料比降低。最佳喷吹条件为富氧率6%~8%,喷吹量160~180m3/t,可节约焦比53~54kg/t。使用高反应性焦炭可以降低热储备区温度,使间接还原平衡时CO浓度降低,平衡CO浓度从70%~60%,

  4. Scientific Opinion on the safety evaluation of the active substances iron, sodium chloride, water, silica gel, activated carbon, monosodium glutamate, potassium acid tartrate, powdered cellulose, malic acid, chabazite, hydroxypropyl cellulose, potassium carbonate, sodium thiosulfate, propylene glycol, glycerin, polyethyleneglycol sorbitan monooleate, sodium propionate and clinoptilolite for use in food contact materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This scientific opinion of the EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids deals with the safety evaluation of iron based oxygen absorber systems comprising iron, sodium chloride, water, silica gel, activated carbon, monosodium glutamate, potassium acid tartrate, powdered cellulose, malic acid, chabazite, hydroxypropyl cellulose, potassium carbonate, sodium thiosulfate, propylene glycol, glycerin, polyethyleneglycol sorbitan monooleate, sodium propionate and clinoptilolite, incorporated in sachets, patches and cards. Iron, the main active ingredient reacts with oxygen to form iron hydroxide and iron oxide, thereby removing oxygen from the primary packaging. Only activated carbon has not been evaluated as such, but it meets the specifications for activated charcoal which is authorised as additive for plastic materials and articles in contact with foods. All other ingredients of the oxygen absorber formulations have been evaluated and approved for use as additives in plastic food contact materials and/or as food additives and/or food supplements or feed additives. The active system being based on solid ingredients and not intended for direct contact with liquid food or food with an external liquid surface, migration through the gas phase was screened for 9 representative active systems. No volatiles derived from the active mixtures were detected. Therefore the CEF Panel concluded that the substances do not raise a safety concern when used in oxygen absorbers in sachets, patches or cards, placed in the headspace of the packaging or when used in direct contact with food, excluding liquid food or foods that have an external aqueous liquid phase on the surface such as sliced fruits and fresh meat.

  5. Iron load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Cassarà

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent research addressed the main role of hepcidin in the regulation of iron metabolism. However, while this mechanism could be relevant in causing iron load in Thalassemia Intermedia and Sickle-Cell Anemia, its role in Thalassemia Major (TM is marginal. This is mainly due to the high impact of transfusional requirement into the severe increase of body iron. Moreover, the damage of iron load may be worsened by infections, as HCV hepatitis, or liver and endocrinological damage. One of the most relevant associations was found between splenectomy and increase of risk for mortality due,probably, to more severe iron load. These issues suggest as morbidity and mortality of this group of patients they do not depend only by our ability in controlling heart damage but even in preventing or treating particular infections and complications. This finding is supported by the impairment of survival curves in patients with complications different from heart damage. However, because, during recent years different direct and indirect methods to detect iron overload in patients affected by secondary hemochromatosis have been implemented, our ability to maintain under control iron load is significantly improved. Anyway, the future in iron load management remains to be able to have an iron load map of our body for targeting chelation and other medical treatment according to the single organ damage.

  6. 铁碳纳米粒介导顺铂对喉癌细胞敏感性的研究%Effect of carbon coated iron nanoparticles carrying diamminedichloroplatinum on the chemotherapy sensitivity of laryngocarcinoma cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱力; 侯楠; 胡国华

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nanometer technique is one of the effective ways to improve chemotherapy sensitivity of tumor cells by refining dosage form and target action of chemotherapy. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the depression effect of carbon coated iron nanoparticles carrying diamminedichloroplatinum (CCINs-DDP) on Hep-2 laryngocarcinoma cells and expression of caspase 3 and survivin mRNA. METHODS: Hep-2 laryngocarcinoma cells were intervened by iron-carbon nanoparticles and (or) normal saline dispersion of cisplatin. Cells interfered with normal saline were selected as controls. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Methylthiazolyldiphenyl-tetrazolium bromide assay showed that cisplatin could inhibit cell growth of Hep-2 cells, and combined with the iron-carbon nanoparticles, the inhibitory effect was stronger. Cells were not adherent, appeared with slow proliferation and apoptosis. Reverse transcription-PCR results showed that caspase 3 mRNA level of the Hep-2 cells was significantly increased at co-cultured 5 days after treated with iron-carbon nanoparticles combined with cisplatin and simple treated with the cisplatin, but the expression of survivin mRNA was significantly decreased, which was more obviously after treated with iron-carbon nanoparticles combined with cisplatin, but simple application of iron-carbon nanoparticles had no effect on Hep-2 cells. It is indicated that CCINs-DDP can improve the chemotherapy sensitivity of Hep-2 laryngocarcinoma cells on the DDP and also improve therapeutic efficacy of chemotherapeutics.%背景:应用纳米技术对化疗药物进行靶向性改进是增加肿瘤对化疗药物敏感性的有效手段之一.目的:观察铁碳纳米粒搭载顺铂对喉癌Hep-2细胞的抑制作用及对细胞Caspase 3,Survivin mRNA表达的影响.方法:分别应用铁碳纳米粒和(或)顺铂的生理盐水分散液干预喉癌Hep-2细胞,以生理盐水干预的细胞作为对照.结果与结论:MTT检测结果显示,顺铂可明显抑制Hep-2细

  7. Reducing iron deficiency anemia in Bolivian school children: calcium and iron combined versus iron supplementation alone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Melissa; Olivares, Manuel; Brito, Alex; Pizarro, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of combined calcium and iron versus single iron supplementation on iron status in Bolivian schoolchildren. Children ages 6 to 10 y old (N = 195), were randomly assigned to receive either 700 mg Ca (as calcium carbonate) plus 30 mg Fe (as ferrous sulfate) (Ca + Fe group) or 30 mg Fe (as ferrous sulfate) (Fe group). The doses were administered daily, from Monday to Friday, between meals at school over 3 mo. Iron status was assessed at baseline and after intervention. Additionally, overall nutritional status was assessed by anthropometry and an estimation of dietary intake. At baseline, the prevalence of anemia in the Ca + Fe group and the Fe group were 15% and 21.5%, respectively. After 3 mo follow-up, the prevalence of iron deficiency anemia dropped significantly (P Iron dietary intake was within recommended levels, but calcium intake only covered 39% of the Recommended Daily Intake. Combined calcium and iron supplementation is equally as effective as single iron supplementation in reducing the prevalence of iron deficiency anemia in Bolivian school children. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Statistical study to determine the effect of carbon, silicon, nickel and other alloying elements on the mechanical properties of as-cast ferritic ductile irons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacaze, J.; Sertucha, J.; Larranaga, P.; Suarez, R.

    2016-10-01

    There is a great interest in fully ferritic ductile irons due to their structural homogeneity, remarkable ductility and good response when machining. On the other hand the wide variety of raw materials available in foundry plants becomes a problem when controlling the chemical composition of the manufactured alloys. The present work shows a statistical study about the effect of different C, Si, Ni contents and other minor elements on structural and mechanical properties of a group of ferritic ductile iron alloys. A set of equations are finally presented to predict room temperature mechanical properties of ferritic ductile irons by means of their chemical composition and pearlite content. (Author)

  9. Extending hydraulic lifetime of iron walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mackenzie, P.D. [General Electric Corp. Research and Development Center, Schenectady, NY (United States); Sivavec, T.M.; Horney, D.P.

    1997-12-31

    Iron walls for control of groundwaters contaminated with chlorinated solvents and reducible metals are becoming much more widely used and field studies of this technology have proven successful to date. However, there is still much uncertainty in predicting long-term performance. This work focuses on two factors affecting the lifetime of the iron media: plugging at the treatment zone entrance and precipitation in the bulk iron media. Plugging at the system entrance is due principally to dissolved oxygen in the incoming water and is an issue in aerobic aquifers or in ex-situ canister tests. In an in-situ treatment system, plugging would result in a dramatic reduction in flow through the iron zone. Designs to minimize plugging in field applications include use of larger iron particles and admixing sand of comparable size with the iron particles. Mineral precipitation in the bulk iron media can lead to porosity losses in the media, again reducing flow through the treatment zone. Decreases in reactivity of the iron media may also occur. The nature of the mineral precipitation and the factors that affect extent of mineral precipitation are examined by a variety of tools, including tracer tests, aqueous inorganic profiles, and surface analysis techniques. At short treatment times, measured porosity losses are due mainly to entrapment of a film of H{sub 2} gas on the iron surfaces and also to Fe(OH){sub 2} precipitation. Over longer treatment times precipitation of Fe(OH){sub 2} and FeCO{sub 3} in low carbonate waters and of Fe(OH){sub 2}, FeCO{sub 3} and CaCO{sub 3} in higher carbonate waters will begin to dominate porosity losses. Preliminary results of an on-going study to control pH in an iron zone by admixing iron sulfide with iron show no difference in extent of carbonate precipitation versus a 100% iron system, suggesting that these systems are supersaturated with respect to carbonate precipitation.

  10. 77 FR 5865 - In the Matter of Beicang Iron & Steel, Inc.; Order of Suspension of Trading

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-06

    ... COMMISSION In the Matter of Beicang Iron & Steel, Inc.; Order of Suspension of Trading February 2, 2012. It... concerning the securities of Beicang Iron & Steel, Inc. because it has not filed any periodic reports since... protection of investors require a suspension of trading in the securities of Beicang Iron & Steel,...

  11. 溶液吸收结合铁碳微电解法降解模拟废气中二氯甲烷%Degradation of dichloromethane by absorption combined with iron-active carbon micro-electrolysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄桂凤; 黄立维

    2014-01-01

    采用管式反应器,以铁屑和活性炭为填料,溶液吸收结合铁碳微电解反应处理废气中二氯甲烷(DCM)。实验对比了采用铁屑、活性炭和铁屑-活性炭(Fe-C)混合填料3种条件下对 DCM 的去除效果,表明采用 Fe-C混合填料的DCM去除率要高于单独采用铁屑或活性炭作为填料的情况,同时发现Fe-C体系组成的溶液的氧化还原电位(ORP)从反应开始急剧下降,与其他两种条件下有明显的区别;降低溶液初始pH能提高Fe-C体系DCM的脱氯和降解效果,在pH=1.5的条件下,Cl-生成率达最大为2.85%。通过气相色谱仪对反应进出口气体的分析,发现反应后产物主要为甲烷。%The removal of dichloromethane by absorption combined with iron-active carbon micro-electrolysis in a tube reactor filled respectively with iron mash, activate carbon particle and combined iron-active carbon (Fe-C), was investigated. The result shows that removal of DCM is higher for Fe-C mixed packing than for iron mash or activate