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Sample records for carbon ion-implanted diamond

  1. Modification of diamond-like carbon films by nitrogen incorporation via plasma immersion ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flege, S., E-mail: flege@ca.tu-darmstadt.de [Materials Science, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Alarich-Weiss-Str. 2, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Hatada, R.; Hoefling, M.; Hanauer, A.; Abel, A. [Materials Science, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Alarich-Weiss-Str. 2, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Baba, K. [Industrial Technology Center of Nagasaki, Applied Technology Division, Omura, Nagasaki 856-0026 (Japan); Ensinger, W. [Materials Science, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Alarich-Weiss-Str. 2, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • Nitrogen containing diamond-like carbon films were prepared by a plasma ignited by a high voltage. • Variation of preparation method (N{sub 2} implantation, N{sub 2} and C{sub 2}H{sub 4} co-deposition). • Maximum nitrogen content similar for co-deposition and implantation. • Electrical resistivity decreases for small nitrogen contents, increases again for higher contents. - Abstract: The addition of nitrogen to diamond-like carbon films affects properties such as the inner stress of the film, the conductivity, biocompatibility and wettability. The nitrogen content is limited, though, and the maximum concentration depends on the preparation method. Here, plasma immersion ion implantation was used for the deposition of the films, without the use of a separate plasma source, i.e. the plasma was generated by a high voltage applied to the samples. The plasma gas consisted of a mixture of C{sub 2}H{sub 4} and N{sub 2}, the substrates were silicon and glass. By changing the experimental parameters (high voltage, pulse length and repetition rate and gas flow ratio) layers with different N content were prepared. Additionally, some samples were prepared using a DC voltage. The nitrogen content and bonding was investigated with SIMS, AES, XPS, FTIR and Raman spectroscopy. Their influence on the electrical resistivity of the films was investigated. Depending on the preparation conditions different nitrogen contents were realized with maximum contents around 11 at.%. Those values were compared with the nitrogen concentration that can be achieved by implantation of nitrogen into a DLC film.

  2. Diamond-like carbon films synthesized on bearing steel surface by plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Hong-xi; TANG Bao-yin; WANG Lang-ping; WANG Xiao-feng; YU Yong-hao; SUN Tao; HU Li-guo

    2004-01-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films were synthesized by plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (PIIID) on 9Cr18 bearing steel surface. Influences of working gas pressure and pulse width of the bias voltage on properties of the thin film were investigated. The chemical compositions of the as-deposited films were characterized by Raman spectroscopy. The micro-hardness, friction and wear behavior, corrosion resistance of the samples were evaluated, respectively. Compared with uncoated substrates, micro-hardness results reveal that the maximum is increased by 88.7%. In addition, the friction coefficient decreases to about 0.1, and the corrosion resistance of treated coupons surface are improved significantly.

  3. Effective Stress Reduction in Diamond Films on Alumina by Carbon Ion Implantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    方志军; 夏义本; 王林军; 张伟丽; 马哲国; 张明龙

    2002-01-01

    We show the effective stress reduction in diamond films by implanting carbon ions into alumina substrates prior to the diamond deposition. Residual stresses in the films are evaluated by Raman spectroscopy and a more reliable method for stress determination is presented for the quantitative measurement of stress evolution. It is found that compressive stresses in the diamond films can be partly offset by the compressive stresses in the alumina substrates, which are caused by the ion pre-implantation. At the same time, the difference between the offset by the pre-stressed substrates and the total stress reduction indicates that some other mechanisms are also active.

  4. Effective stress reduction in diamond films on alumina by carbon ion implantation

    CERN Document Server

    Fang Zhi Jun; Wang Li; Zhang Wei; Ma Zhe Guo; Zhang Ming

    2002-01-01

    The authors show the effective stress reduction in diamond films by implanting carbon ions into alumina substrates prior to the diamond deposition. Residual stresses in the films are evaluated by Raman spectroscopy and a more reliable method for stress determination is presented for the quantitative measurement of stress evolution. It is found that compressive stresses in the diamond films can be partly offset by the compressive stresses in the alumina substrates, which are caused by the ion pre-implantation. At the same time, the difference between the offset by the pre-stressed substrates and the total stress reduction indicates that some other mechanisms are also active

  5. Effect of Fe ion implantation on tribological properties and Raman spectra characteristics of diamond-like carbon film

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIA Wen-Bao; SUN Zhuo

    2004-01-01

    Fe ions in the fluence range of 2 × 1015 to 1×1017 cm -2 were implanted into diamond-like carbon (DLC) thin film of 100 nm thick, which were deposited on silicon substrate by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition.Effects of Fe ion implantation on microstructure and friction coefficient of the DLC were studied. With increasing Fe ion fluence, friction coefficient of the DLC film increased as compared with that of DLC without implantation, and then decreased. The Raman spectra characteristics also show a dependence on the Fe ion fluence. With increasing the ion fluence, the sp2 bonding increased in the DLC film, resulting in the decrease of friction coefficient of the film after implantation. Substantial surface roughness was also measured.

  6. Transition Metal Ion Implantation into Diamond-Like Carbon Coatings: Development of a Base Material for Gas Sensing Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Markwitz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Micrometre thick diamond-like carbon (DLC coatings produced by direct ion deposition were implanted with 30 keV Ar+ and transition metal ions in the lower percentage (<10 at.% range. Theoretical calculations showed that the ions are implanted just beneath the surface, which was confirmed with RBS measurements. Atomic force microscope scans revealed that the surface roughness increases when implanted with Ar+ and Cu+ ions, whereas a smoothing of the surface from 5.2 to 2.7 nm and a grain size reduction from 175 to 93 nm are measured for Ag+ implanted coatings with a fluence of 1.24×1016 at. cm−2. Calculated hydrogen and carbon depth profiles showed surprisingly significant changes in concentrations in the near-surface region of the DLC coatings, particularly when implanted with Ag+ ions. Hydrogen accumulates up to 32 at.% and the minimum of the carbon distribution is shifted towards the surface which may be the cause of the surface smoothing effect. The ion implantations caused an increase in electrical conductivity of the DLC coatings, which is important for the development of solid-state gas sensors based on DLC coatings.

  7. Diamond-like carbon produced by plasma source ion implantation as a corrosion barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lillard, R.S.; Butt, D.P.; Taylor, T.N.; Walter, K.C.; Nastasi, M.

    1998-03-01

    There currently exists a broad range of applications for which the ability to produce an adherent, hard, wear and, corrosion-resistant coating plays a vital role. These applications include engine components, orthopedic devices, textile manufacturing components, hard disk media, optical coatings, and cutting and machining tools (e.g., punches, taps, scoring dies, and extrusion dies). Ion beam processing can play an important role in all of these technologies. Plasma source ion implantation (PSII) is an emerging technology which has the potential to overcome the limitations of conventional ion implantation by: (1) reducing the time and expense for implanting onto complex shapes and large areas and (2) extending the thickness of the modification zone through ion beam enhanced plasma growth of surface coatings. In PSII, targets are placed directly in a plasma source and then pulse biased to produce a non-line-of-sight process for complex-shaped targets without complex fixturing. If the pulse bias is a relatively high negative potential (20 to 100 kV) ion implantation will result. If however, a low voltage (50--1,200 eV) high duty cycle pulse bias is applied, film deposition from the chamber gas will result, thereby increasing the extent of the surface modification into the 1--10 micron regime. To evaluate the potential for DLC to be used as a corrosion barrier, Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) and traditional electrochemistry techniques were used to investigate the breakdown mechanism in chloride and nonchloride containing environments. The effect of surface preparation on coating breakdown was also evaluated.

  8. Preparation and Properties of Ag-Containing Diamond-Like Carbon Films by Magnetron Plasma Source Ion Implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Baba

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The doping effect of silver on the structure and properties of diamond-like carbon (DLC films was investigated. The samples were prepared by a process combining acetylene plasma source ion implantation (high-voltage pulses of −10 kV with reactive magnetron sputtering of an Ag disc. A mixture of two gases, argon, and acetylene was introduced into the discharge chamber as working gas for plasma formation. A negative high-voltage pulse was applied to the substrate holder, thus, accelerating ions towards the substrate. The chemical composition of the deposited films was modified by the respective gas flows and determined using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry. The silver concentration within the DLC films influenced the structure and the tribological properties. The surface roughness, as observed by scanning electron microscopy, increased with silver concentration. The film structure was characterized by Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffractometry (XRD. The DLC films were mainly amorphous, containing crystalline silver, with the amount of silver depending on the process conditions. The tribological properties of the films were improved by the silver doping. The lowest friction coefficient of around 0.06 was derived at a low silver content.

  9. Ion implantation of diamond: Damage, doping, and lift-off

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parikh, N.R.; McGucken, E.; Swanson, M.L. [North Carolina Univ., Chapel Hill, NC (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Hunn, J.D.; White, C.W.; Zuhr, R.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1993-09-01

    In order to make good quality economical diamond electronic devices, it is essential to grow films and to dope these films to obtain n- and p- type conductivity. This review talk discuss first doping by ion implantation plus annealing of the implantation damage, and second flow to make large area single crystal diamonds. C implantation damage below an estimated Frenkel defect concentration of 7% could be recovered almost completely by annealing at 950C. For a defect concentration between 7 and 10%, a stable damage form of diamond (``green diamond``) was formed by annealing. At still higher damage levels, the diamond graphitized. To introduce p-type doping, we have co-implanted B and C into natural diamond at 77K, followed by annealing up to 1100C. The resulting semiconducting material has electrical properties similar to those of natural B-doped diamond. To create n-type diamond, we have implanted Na{sup +}, P+ and As{sup +} ions and have observed semiconducting behavior. This has been compared with carbon or noble element implantation, in an attempt to isolate the effect of radiation damage. Recently, in order to obtain large area signal crystals, we have developed a novel technique for removing thin layers of diamond from bulk or homoepitaxial films. This method consists of ion implantation, followed by selective etching. High energy (4--5 MeV) implantation of carbon or oxygen ions creates a well-defined layer of damaged diamond buried at a controlled depth. This layer is graphitized and selectivity etched either by heating at 550C in an oxygen ambient or by electrolysis. This process successfully lifts off the diamond plate above the graphite layer. The lift-off method, combined with well-established homoepitaxial growth processes, has potential for fabrication of large area single-crystal diamond sheets.

  10. Preparation of Ag-containing diamond-like carbon films on the interior surface of tubes by a combined method of plasma source ion implantation and DC sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatada, R., E-mail: hatada@ca.tu-darmstadt.de [Technische Universität Darmstadt, Department of Materials Science, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Flege, S.; Bobrich, A.; Ensinger, W.; Dietz, C. [Technische Universität Darmstadt, Department of Materials Science, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Baba, K. [Industrial Technology Center of Nagasaki, Applied Technology Division, Omura, Nagasaki 856-0026 (Japan); Sawase, T.; Watamoto, T. [Nagasaki University, Department of Applied Prosthodontics, Nagasaki 852-8523 (Japan); Matsutani, T. [Technische Universität Darmstadt, Department of Materials Science, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Kinki University, Department of Electric and Electronic Engineering, Higashi-osaka 577-2332 (Japan)

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • Deposition of Ag-containing diamond-like carbon films inside of tubes. • Combination of plasma source ion implantation and DC sputtering. • Antibacterial effect against S. aureus bacteria. - Abstract: Adhesive diamond-like carbon (DLC) films can be prepared by plasma source ion implantation (PSII), which is also suitable for the treatment of the inner surface of a tube. Incorporation of a metal into the DLC film provides a possibility to change the characteristics of the DLC film. One source for the metal is DC sputtering. In this study PSII and DC sputtering were combined to prepare DLC films containing low concentrations of Ag on the interior surfaces of stainless steel tubes. A DLC film was deposited using a C{sub 2}H{sub 4} plasma with the help of an auxiliary electrode inside of the tube. This electrode was then used as a target for the DC sputtering. A mixture of the gases Ar and C{sub 2}H{sub 4} was used to sputter the silver. By changing the gas flow ratios and process time, the resulting Ag content of the films could be varied. Sample characterizations were performed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, secondary ion mass spectrometry, atomic force microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Additionally, a ball-on-disk test was performed to investigate the tribological properties of the films. The antibacterial activity was determined using Staphylococcus aureus bacteria.

  11. Ion-Implanted Diamond Films and Their Tribological Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Richard L. C.; Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Korenyi-Both, Andras L.; Garscadden, Alan; Barnes, Paul N.

    1993-01-01

    This paper reports the physical characterization and tribological evaluation of ion-implanted diamond films. Diamond films were produced by microwave plasma, chemical vapor deposition technique. Diamond films with various grain sizes (0.3 and 3 microns) and roughness (9.1 and 92.1 nm r.m.s. respectively) were implanted with C(+) (m/e = 12) at an ion energy of 160 eV and a fluence of 6.72 x 10(exp 17) ions/sq cm. Unidirectional sliding friction experiments were conducted in ultrahigh vacuum (6.6 x 10(exp -7)Pa), dry nitrogen and humid air (40% RH) environments. The effects of C(+) ion bombardment on fine and coarse-grained diamond films are as follows: the surface morphology of the diamond films did not change; the surface roughness increased (16.3 and 135.3 nm r.m.s.); the diamond structures were damaged and formed a thin layer of amorphous non-diamond carbon; the friction coefficients dramatically decreased in the ultrahigh vacuum (0.1 and 0.4); the friction coefficients decreased slightly in the dry nitrogen and humid air environments.

  12. Preparation of Metal-Containing Diamond-Like Carbon Films by Magnetron Sputtering and Plasma Source Ion Implantation and Their Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Flege

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Metal-containing diamond-like carbon (Me-DLC films were prepared by a combination of plasma source ion implantation (PSII and reactive magnetron sputtering. Two metals were used that differ in their tendency to form carbide and possess a different sputter yield, that is, Cu with a relatively high sputter yield and Ti with a comparatively low one. The DLC film preparation was based on the hydrocarbon gas ethylene (C2H4. The preparation technique is described and the parameters influencing the metal content within the film are discussed. Film properties that are changed by the metal addition, such as structure, electrical resistivity, and friction coefficient, were evaluated and compared with those of pure DLC films as well as with literature values for Me-DLC films prepared with a different hydrocarbon gas or containing other metals.

  13. Cluster Ion Implantation in Graphite and Diamond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Popok, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    Cluster ion beam technique is a versatile tool which can be used for controllable formation of nanosize objects as well as modification and processing of surfaces and shallow layers on an atomic scale. The current paper present an overview and analysis of data obtained on a few sets of graphite a...... implantation. Implantation of cobalt and argon clusters into two different allotropic forms of carbon, namely, graphite and diamond is analysed and compared in order to approach universal theory of cluster stopping in matter....... and diamond samples implanted by keV-energy size-selected cobalt and argon clusters. One of the emphases is put on pinning of metal clusters on graphite with a possibility of following selective etching of graphene layers. The other topic of concern is related to the development of scaling law for cluster...

  14. Preparation of Ag-containing diamond-like carbon films on the interior surface of tubes by a combined method of plasma source ion implantation and DC sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatada, R.; Flege, S.; Bobrich, A.; Ensinger, W.; Dietz, C.; Baba, K.; Sawase, T.; Watamoto, T.; Matsutani, T.

    2014-08-01

    Adhesive diamond-like carbon (DLC) films can be prepared by plasma source ion implantation (PSII), which is also suitable for the treatment of the inner surface of a tube. Incorporation of a metal into the DLC film provides a possibility to change the characteristics of the DLC film. One source for the metal is DC sputtering. In this study PSII and DC sputtering were combined to prepare DLC films containing low concentrations of Ag on the interior surfaces of stainless steel tubes. A DLC film was deposited using a C2H4 plasma with the help of an auxiliary electrode inside of the tube. This electrode was then used as a target for the DC sputtering. A mixture of the gases Ar and C2H4 was used to sputter the silver. By changing the gas flow ratios and process time, the resulting Ag content of the films could be varied. Sample characterizations were performed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, secondary ion mass spectrometry, atomic force microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Additionally, a ball-on-disk test was performed to investigate the tribological properties of the films. The antibacterial activity was determined using Staphylococcus aureus bacteria.

  15. Evidence of light guiding in ion-implanted diamond

    CERN Document Server

    Lagomarsino, S; Bosia, F; Vannoni, M; Calusi, S; Giuntini, L; Massi, M

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of fabricating light-waveguiding microstructures in bulk single-crystal diamond by means of direct ion implantation with a scanning microbeam, resulting in the modulation of the refractive index of the ion-beam damaged crystal. Direct evidence of waveguiding through such buried microchannels is obtained with a phase-shift micro-interferometric method allowing the study of the multi-modal structure of the propagating electromagnetic field. The possibility of defining optical and photonic structures by direct ion writing opens a range of new possibilities in the design of quantum-optical devices in bulk single crystal diamond.

  16. Homo-epitaxial diamond film growth on ion implanted diamond substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiser, P.S.; Prawer, S.; Nugent, K.W.; Bettiol, A.A.; Kostidis, L.I.; Jamieson, D.N. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1996-12-31

    The nucleation of CVD diamond is a complicated process, governed by many interrelated parameters. In the present work we attempt to elucidate the effect of strain on the growth of a homo-epitaxial CVD diamond. We have employed laterally confined high dose (MeV) Helium ion implantation to produce surface swelling of the substrate. The strain is enhanced by the lateral confinement of the implanted region to squares of 100 x 100 {mu}m{sup 2}. After ion implantation, micro-Raman spectroscopy was employed to map the surface strain. The substrates were then inserted into a CVD reactor and a CVD diamond film was grown upon them. Since the strained regions were laterally confined, it was then possible to monitor the effect of strain on diamond nucleation. The substrates were also analysed using Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy (RBS), Proton induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) and Ion Beam induced Luminescence (IBIL). 7 refs., 5 figs.

  17. Effect of Mo ion-implantation on the adhesion of diamond coatings

    CERN Document Server

    Yang Shie; Wang Xiao Ping; Li Hui; Ma Bing Xian; Qin Guang Yong; Zhang Bing Lin

    2002-01-01

    Diamond coatings were deposited on the cobalt-cemented tungsten carbide (YG6) substrates, which have been implanted with Mo ions, by microwave plasma CVD (MPCVD) method. The effect of ion-implantation on the adhesion of diamond coatings was studied. The results showed that the chemical compositions of cemented carbide substrate surfaces change obviously after Mo ion-implantation; and the adhesion strength between the CVD diamond coatings and the substrates implanted with Mo ions in proper concentration is improved remarkably

  18. Formation of silicon carbide and diamond nanoparticles in the surface layer of a silicon target during short-pulse carbon ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remnev, G. E.; Ivanov, Yu. F.; Naiden, E. P.; Saltymakov, M. S.; Stepanov, A. V.; Shtan'ko, V. F.

    2009-04-01

    Synthesis of silicon carbide and diamond nanoparticles is studied during short-pulse implantation of carbon ions and protons into a silicon target. The experiments are carried out using a TEMP source of pulsed powerful ion beams based on a magnetically insulated diode with radial magnetic field B r . The beam parameters are as follows: the ion energy is 300 keV, the pulse duration is 80 ns, the beam consists of carbon ions and protons, and the ion current density is 30 A/cm2. Single-crystal silicon wafers serve as a target. SiC nanoparticles and nanodiamonds form in the surface layer of silicon subjected to more than 100 pulses. The average coherent domain sizes in the SiC particles and nanodiamonds are 12-16 and 8-9 nm, respectively.

  19. Generation of Nitrogen-Vacancy Centers in Diamond with Ion Implantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUI Jin-Ming; CHEN Xiang-Dong; FAN Le-Le; GONG Zhao-Jun; ZOU Chong-Wen; SUN Fang-Wen; HAN Zheng-Fu; GUO Guang-Can

    2012-01-01

    Nitrogen-vacancy defect color centers are created in a high purity single crystal diamond by nitrogen-ion implantation.Both optical spectrum and optically detected magnetic resonance are measured for these artificial quantum emitters.Moreover,with a suitable mask,a lattice composed of nitrogen-vacancy centers is fabricated.Rabi oscillation driven by micro-waves is carried out to show the quality of the ion implantation and potential in quantum manipulation.Along with compatible standard lithography,such an implantation technique shows high potential in future to make structures with nitrogen-vacancy centers for diamond photonics and integrated photonic quantum chip.

  20. Surface modification of commercial tin coatings by carbon ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, L.J.; Sood, D.K.; Manory, R.R. [Royal Melbourne Inst. of Tech., VIC (Australia)

    1993-12-31

    Commercial TiN coatings of about 2 {mu}m thickness on high speed steel substrates were implanted at room temperature with 95 keV carbon ions at nominal doses between 1 x 10{sup 17} - 8x10{sup 17} ions cm{sup -2}. Carbon ion implantation induced a significant improvement in ultramicrohardness, friction coefficient and wear properties. The surface microhardness increases monotonically by up to 115% until a critical dose is reached. Beyond this dose the hardness decreases, but remains higher than that of unimplanted sample. A lower friction coefficient and a longer transition period towards a steady state condition were obtained by carbon ion implantation. The changes in tribomechanical properties are discussed in terms of radiation damage and possible formation of a second phase rich in carbon. 6 refs., 3 figs.

  1. Characterization of surface enhancement of carbon ion-implanted TiN coatings by metal vapor vacuum arc ion implantation

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, C L

    2002-01-01

    The modification of the surfaces of energetic carbon-implanted TiN films using metal vapor vacuum arc (MEVVA) ion implantation was investigated, by varying ion energy and dose. The microhardness, microstructure and chemical states of carbon, implanted on the surface layer of TiN films, were examined, as functions of ion energy and dose, by nanoindenter, transmission electron microscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Results revealed that the microhardness increased from 16.8 up to 25.3 GPa and the friction coefficient decreased to approximately 0.2, depending on the implanted ion energy and dose. The result is attributed to the new microcrystalline phases of TiCN and TiC formed, and carbon concentration saturation of the implanted matrix can enhance the partial mechanical property of TiN films after MEVVA treatment. The concentration distribution, implantation depth and chemical states of carbon-implanted TiN coatings depended strongly on the ion dose and...

  2. Improvement on electrical conductivity and electron field emission properties of Au-ion implanted ultrananocrystalline diamond films by using Au-Si eutectic substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sankaran, K. J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsin-Chu Taiwan 300, Taiwan (China); Institute for Materials Research (IMO), Hasselt University, 3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium); Sundaravel, B. [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Tai, N. H., E-mail: nhtai@mx.nthu.edu.tw, E-mail: inanlin@mail.tku.edu.tw [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsin-Chu Taiwan 300, Taiwan (China); Lin, I. N., E-mail: nhtai@mx.nthu.edu.tw, E-mail: inanlin@mail.tku.edu.tw [Department of Physics, Tamkang University, Tamsui, Taiwan 251, Taiwan (China)

    2015-08-28

    In the present work, Au-Si eutectic layer was used to enhance the electrical conductivity/electron field emission (EFE) properties of Au-ion implanted ultrananocrystalline diamond (Au-UNCD) films grown on Si substrates. The electrical conductivity was improved to a value of 230 (Ω cm){sup −1}, and the EFE properties was enhanced reporting a low turn-on field of 2.1 V/μm with high EFE current density of 5.3 mA/cm{sup 2} (at an applied field of 4.9 V/μm) for the Au-UNCD films. The formation of SiC phase circumvents the formation of amorphous carbon prior to the nucleation of diamond on Si substrates. Consequently, the electron transport efficiency of the UNCD-to-Si interface increases, thereby improving the conductivity as well as the EFE properties. Moreover, the salient feature of these processes is that the sputtering deposition of Au-coating for preparing the Au-Si interlayer, the microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition process for growing the UNCD films, and the Au-ion implantation process for inducing the nanographitic phases are standard thin film preparation techniques, which are simple, robust, and easily scalable. The availability of these highly conducting UNCD films with superior EFE characteristics may open up a pathway for the development of high-definition flat panel displays and plasma devices.

  3. Improvement of polydimethylsiloxane guide tube for nerve regeneration treatment by carbon negative-ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuji, H. E-mail: tsuji@kuee.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Izukawa, M.; Ikeguchi, R.; Kakinoki, R.; Sato, H.; Gotoh, Y.; Ishikawa, J

    2003-05-01

    Modification of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) rubber by negative ion-implantation was investigated for improvement of nerve regeneration property. The PDMS rubber surface was found to have more hydrophilic property after carbon negative-ion implantation than before. At the conditions of 10 keV and 3.0 x 10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2}, the contact angle decreased to 83 deg. from 100 deg. . The reason of the hydrophilic modification is due to hydrophilic functional groups such as hydroxyl formed at the surface by radiation effect of ion implantation. The in vivo regeneration test of rat sciatic nerve was performed by using 18-mm-long PDMS rubber tubes with inner diameter of 2 mm, the inner surface of which was implanted with carbon negative ions at the above conditions. At 24 weeks after the clinical surgery, the sciatic nerve was regenerated through the tube between the proximal and distal nerve stumps.

  4. P掺杂类金刚石薄膜的制备及生物学行为研究%Phosphorus doped diamond-like carbon films fabricated by plasma immersion ion implantation - deposition and study of biological behavior

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王进; 杨萍; 陈俊英; 冷永祥; 万国江; 孙鸿; 赵安莎; 黄楠

    2004-01-01

    应用等离子体浸没离子注入与沉积方法合成了磷掺杂的类金刚石(diamond like carbon,DLC)薄膜.结构分析表明磷以微米级岛状结构分散于DLC薄膜表层,P的掺杂增加了DLC薄膜的无序性,俄歇能谱表明岛型区域是由P、C、O三种元素形成的化合物.掺杂表面表现出强烈的亲水性(水接触角为16.9°),体外血小板粘附实验结果显示,P掺杂DLC薄膜表面粘附的血小板少且变形小,表现出的血液相容性优于热解碳和未改性DLC.

  5. The microstructural evolution of ultrananocrystalline diamond films due to P ion implantation process—the annealing effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Sheng-Chang; Yeh, Chien-Jui; Leou, Keh-Chyang, E-mail: kcleou@ess.nthu.edu.tw [Department of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Kurian, Joji; Lin, I.-Nan, E-mail: inanlin@mail.tku.edu.tw [Department of Physics, Tamkang University, Tamsui 251, Taiwan (China); Dong, Chung-Li [Scientific Research Division, National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Niu, Huan [Nuclear Science and Technology, Development Center Accelerator Division, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China)

    2014-11-14

    The microstructural evolution of UNCD films which are P-ion implanted and annealed at 600 °C (or 800 °C) is systematically investigated. The difference of interaction that the UNCD content undergoes along the trajectory of the incident P-ions is reflected in the alteration of the granular structure. In regions where the P-ions reside, the “interacting zone,” which is found at about 300 nm beneath the surface of the films, coalescence of diamond grains occurs inducing nano-graphitic clusters. The annealing at 600 °C (or 800 °C) heals the defects and, in some cases, forms interconnected graphitic filaments that result in the decrease in surface resistance. However, the annealing at 600 °C (800 °C) induces marked UNCD-to-Si layers interaction. This interaction due to the annealing processes hinders the electron transport across the interface and degrades the electron field emission properties of the UNCD films. These microstructural evolution processes very well account for the phenomenon elaborating that, in spite of enhanced conductivity of the UNCD films along the film's surface due to the P-ion implantation and annealing processes, the electron field emission properties for these UNCD films do not improve.

  6. Phase Transformation and Enhancing Electron Field Emission Properties in Microcrystalline Diamond Films Induced by Cu Ion Implantation and Rapid Annealing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-Yan Shen; Yi-Xin Zhang; Ting Qi; Yu Qiao; Yu-Xin Jia; Hong-Jun Hei; Zhi-Yong He

    2016-01-01

    Cu ion implantation and subsequent rapid annealing at 500℃ in N2 result in low surface resistivity of 1.611 ohm/sq with high mobility of 290 cm2 V-1 S-1 for microcrystalline diamond (MCD) films.Its electrical field emission behavior can be turned on at Eo =2.6 V/μm,attaining a current density of 19.5μA/cm2 at an applied field of 3.5 V/μm.Field emission scanning electron microscopy combined with Raman and x-ray photoelectron microscopy reveal that the formation of Cu nanoparticles in MCD films can catalytically convert the less conducting disorder/a-C phases into graphitic phases and can provoke the formation of nanographite in the films,forming conduction channels for electron transportation.

  7. High temperature annealing studies of strontium ion implanted glassy carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odutemowo, O. S.; Malherbe, J. B.; Prinsloo, L.; Langa, D. F.; Wendler, E.

    2016-03-01

    Glassy carbon samples were implanted with 200 keV strontium ions to a fluence of 2 × 1016 ions/cm2 at room temperature. Analysis with Raman spectroscopy showed that ion bombardment amorphises the glassy carbon structure. Partial recovery of the glassy carbon structure was achieved after the implanted sample was vacuum annealed at 900 °C for 1 h. Annealing the strontium ion bombarded sample at 2000 °C for 5 h resulted in recovery of the glassy carbon substrate with the intensity of the D peak becoming lower than that of the pristine glassy carbon. Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) showed that the implanted strontium diffused towards the surface of the glassy carbon after annealing the sample at 900 °C. This diffusion was also accompanied by loss of the implanted strontium. Comparison between the as-implanted and 900 °C depth profiles showed that less than 30% of the strontium was retained in the glassy carbon after heat treatment at 900 °C. The RBS profile after annealing at 2000 °C indicated that no strontium ions were retained after heat treatment at this temperature.

  8. High temperature annealing studies of strontium ion implanted glassy carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odutemowo, O.S., E-mail: u12052613@tuks.co.za [Department of Physics, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0002 (South Africa); Malherbe, J.B.; Prinsloo, L.; Langa, D.F. [Department of Physics, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0002 (South Africa); Wendler, E. [Institut für Festkörperphysik, Friedrich-Schiller University, Jena (Germany)

    2016-03-15

    Glassy carbon samples were implanted with 200 keV strontium ions to a fluence of 2 × 10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2} at room temperature. Analysis with Raman spectroscopy showed that ion bombardment amorphises the glassy carbon structure. Partial recovery of the glassy carbon structure was achieved after the implanted sample was vacuum annealed at 900 °C for 1 h. Annealing the strontium ion bombarded sample at 2000 °C for 5 h resulted in recovery of the glassy carbon substrate with the intensity of the D peak becoming lower than that of the pristine glassy carbon. Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) showed that the implanted strontium diffused towards the surface of the glassy carbon after annealing the sample at 900 °C. This diffusion was also accompanied by loss of the implanted strontium. Comparison between the as-implanted and 900 °C depth profiles showed that less than 30% of the strontium was retained in the glassy carbon after heat treatment at 900 °C. The RBS profile after annealing at 2000 °C indicated that no strontium ions were retained after heat treatment at this temperature.

  9. Synthesis of amorphous carbon nitride by ion implantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ChenZ.; OlofinjanaA.; BellJ

    2001-01-01

    N2+ were implanted into diamondlike carbon (DLC) films in an attempt to synthesizeamorphous carbon nitride. The DLC films were previously deposited on steel substrate by using anion beam sputtering deposition (IBSD) where a single Kaufman type ion gun with argon sourcewas used to sputter a graphite target and simultaneously bombard the growing film. Parallel to theion implantation route, amorphous carbon nitride films were also synthesized by directly using thereactive ion beam sputtering deposition (RIBSD) with nitrogen source to incorporate nitrogen intothe film. The structure and properties of the films were determined by using Raman spectroscopy,XPS and nano-indentation. The implantation of N2+ into a-C films offers a higher hardness thanthat directly synthesized by RIBSD, probably through an increase in sp3/sp2 ratio and in the pro-portion of nitrogen atoms chemically bonding to carbon atoms. The results show that althoughthere are differences in film composition, structure and properties between these two processes,both methods can be used for synthesis of nitrogen-containing amorphous DLC thin films whichsignificantly modify the substrate surface.

  10. Investigation of low-resistivity from hydrogenated lightly B-doped diamond by ion implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui Xia Yan et al

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We have implanted boron (B ions (dosage: 5×1014 cm-2 into diamond and then hydrogenated the sample by implantating hydrogen ions at room temperature. A p-type diamond material with a low resistivity of 7.37 mΩ cm has been obtained in our experiment, which suggests that the hydrogenation of B-doped diamond results in a low-resistivity p-type material. Interestingly, inverse annealing, in which carrier concentration decreased with increasing annealing temperature, was observed at annealing temperatures above 600 °C. In addition, the formation mechanism of a low-resistivity material has been studied by density functional theory calculation using a plane wave method.

  11. ESR studies of high-energy phosphorus-ion implanted synthetic diamond crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isoya, J. [University of Library and Information Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Kanda, H.; Morita, Y.; Ohshima, T.

    1997-03-01

    Phosphorus is among potential n-type dopants in diamond. High pressure synthetic diamond crystals of type IIa implanted with high energy (9-18 MeV) phosphorus ions have been studied by using electron spin resonance (ESR) technique. The intensity and the linewidth of the ESR signal attributed to the dangling bond of the amorphous phase varied with the implantation dose, suggesting the nature of the amorphization varies with the dose. The ESR signals of point defects have been observed in the low dose as-implanted crystals and in the high dose crystals annealed at high temperature and at high pressure. (author)

  12. Optical properties of K9 glass waveguides fabricated by using carbon-ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chun-Xiao; Wei, Wei; Fu, Li-Li; Zhu, Xu-Feng; Guo, Hai-Tao; Li, Wei-Nan; Lin, She-Bao

    2016-07-01

    K9 glass is a material with promising properties that make it attractive for optical devices. Ion implantation is a powerful technique to form waveguides with controllable depth and refractive index profile. In this work, optical planar waveguide structures were fabricated in K9 glasses by using 6.0-MeV C3+-ion implantation with a fluence of 1.0 × 1015 ions/cm2. The effective refractive indices of the guided modes were measured by using a prism-coupling system. The refractive index change in the ion-irradiated region was simulated by using the intensity calculation method. The modal intensity profile of the waveguide was calculated and measured by using the finite difference beam propagation method and the end-face coupling technique, respectively. The transmission spectra before and after the implantation showed that the main absorption band was not influenced by the low fluence dopants. The optical properties of the carbon-implanted K9 glass waveguides show promise for use as integrated photonic devices.

  13. Lubrication by Diamond and Diamondlike Carbon Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1997-01-01

    Regardless of environment (ultrahigh vacuum, humid air, dry nitrogen, or water), ion-beam-deposited diamondlike carbon (DLC) and nitrogen-ion-implanted, chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) diamond films had low steady-state coefficients of friction (less than 0.1) and low wear rates (less than or equal to 10(exp -6)cu mm/N(dot)m). These films can be used as effective wear-resistant, self-lubricating coatings regardless of environment. On the other hand, as-deposited, fine-grain CVD diamond films; polished, coarse-grain CVD diamond films; and polished and then fluorinated, coarse-grain CVD diamond films can be used as effective wear-resistant, self-lubricating coatings in humid air, in dry nitrogen, and in water, but they had a high coefficient of friction and a high wear rate in ultrahigh vacuum. The polished, coarse-grain CVD diamond film revealed an extremely low wear rate, far less than 10(exp 10) cu mm/N(dot)m, in water.

  14. Annealing effects on the migration of ion-implanted cadmium in glassy carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlatshwayo, T. T.; Sebitla, L. D.; Njoroge, E. G.; Mlambo, M.; Malherbe, J. B.

    2017-03-01

    The migration behaviour of cadmium (Cd) implanted into glassy carbon and the effects of annealing on radiation damage introduced by ion implantation were investigated. The glassy carbon substrates were implanted with Cd at a dose of 2 × 1016 ions/cm2 and energy of 360 keV. The implantation was performed at room temperature (RT), 430 °C and 600 °C. The RT implanted samples were isochronally annealed in vacuum at 350, 500 and 600 °C for 1 h and isothermally annealed at 350 °C up to 4 h. The as-implanted and annealed samples were characterized by Raman spectroscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS). Raman results revealed that implantation at room temperature amorphized the glassy carbon structure while high temperature implantations resulted in slightly less radiation damage. Isochronal annealing of the RT implanted samples resulted in some recrystallization as a function of increasing temperature. The original glassy carbon structure was not achieved at the highest annealing temperature of 600 °C. Diffusion of Cd in glassy carbon was already taking place during implantation at 430 °C. This diffusion of Cd was accompanied by significant loss from the surface during implantation at 600 °C. Isochronal annealing of the room temperature implanted samples at 350 °C for 1 h caused Cd to diffuse towards the bulk while isothermal annealing at 500 and 600 °C resulted in the migration of implanted Cd toward the surface accompanied by a loss of Cd from the surface. Isothermal annealing at 350 °C for 1 h caused Cd to diffuse towards the bulk while for annealing time >1 h Cd diffused towards the surface. These results were interpreted in terms of trapping and de-trapping of implanted Cd by radiation damage.

  15. The effect of ion implantation on the tribomechanical properties of carbon fibre reinforced polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mistica, R.; Sood, D.K. [Royal Melbourne Inst. of Tech., VIC (Australia); Janardhana, M.N. [Deakin University, Geelong, VIC (Australia). School of Engineering and Technology

    1993-12-31

    Graphite fibre reinforced epoxy composite material (GFRP) is used extensively in the aerospace and other industries for structural application. The trend is to address the 20 to 30 year life endurance of this material in service. Mechanical joints in air crafts are exposed to dynamic loads during service and wear may be experienced by the composite material joint. Generally it has been shown that graphite fibre reinforced polymers have superior wear and friction properties as compared with the unfilled polymers. In the described experiment, ion implantation was used as a novel surface treatment. Wear and friction of a polymer composite material (GFRP) was studied and ion implantation was used in order to observe the effect on the tribomechanical properties of the material. It was found that ion implantation of C on GFRP sliding against Ti changes the tribological properties of the system, and in particular decreases the coefficient of friction and wear. 4 refs., 2 figs.

  16. On the efficiency of combined ion implantation for the creation of near-surface nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Favaro de Oliveira, Felipe; Momenzadeh, Seyed Ali; Antonov, Denis; Fedder, Helmut; Denisenko, Andrej [3. Institute of Physics, Research Center SCoPE and IQST, University of Stuttgart (Germany); Wrachtrup, Joerg [3. Institute of Physics, Research Center SCoPE and IQST, University of Stuttgart (Germany); Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Stuttgart (Germany)

    2016-08-15

    The efficiency of co-implantation of different ion species to generate near-surface nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond is analyzed by comparing the areal densities of NV centers corresponding to various experimental conditions. In particular, the effect of helium (6 keV He{sub 2}{sup +}) and carbon (10 keV C{sup +}) co-implantation within a wide range of ion fluences are studied. The total density of NV centers by co-implantation are shown to be basically a sum of the nitrogen-induced NV centers and those activated from residual nitrogen impurities present in the substrate (approximately 1ppb) by the excess of vacancies at the carbon- and helium-induced ion tracks. Such low efficiency of the co-implantation events is discussed considering the model of local clusters of vacancies at each implantation-induced ion track. This is also experimentally supported by the presence of a photoluminescence (PL) background related to radiation-induced defects measured within all implanted areas with high carbon and helium ion fluences. Further limits set by the annealing temperature are also discussed. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  17. Improvement of the corrosion and tribological properties of CSS-42L aerospace bearing steel using carbon ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fangfang; Zhou, Chungen; Zheng, Lijing; Zhang, Hu

    2017-01-01

    The aerospace bearings steel CSS-42L was ion implanted by carbon with implantation fluxes of 5 × 1016 ions cm-2. The composition, microstructure and hardness of the carbon implanted samples were characterized using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and nanoindentation tests. The corrosion and tribological properties were also evaluated in the present work. The results shown that carbon implantation produced an amorphous layer and graphitic bounds formed at the near surface of CSS-42L steel. In the electrochemical test, the carbon implanted samples suggested lower current densities and corrosion rates. Carbon ion implanted samples shown a relative Cr-enrichment at the surface as compared with nonimplanted samples. The improved corrosion resistance is believed to be related to the formed amorphous layer, the enhancement of Cr diffusion in the carbon implantation layer which contributed the formation of passive film on the surface, the decrease of free electrons which caused by the increase of carbon fraction. The external hard layer had positive effect on the wear resistance, reducing strongly the friction coefficient about 30% and the abrasive-adhesive mechanism present in the unimplanted samples was not modified by the implantation process.

  18. Structure and tribological properties of modified layer on 2024 aluminum alloy by plasma-based ion implantation with nitrogen/titanium/carbon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张玲召; 廖家轩; 夏立芳; 刘维民; 徐洮; 薛群基

    2003-01-01

    2024 aluminum alloy was implanted with nitrogen then titanium finally carbon by plasma-based ion implantatio to form a gradient layer.The structure and tribological properties of the layer were investigated.Its composition profiles and chemical states were analyzed with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy(XPS).The surface carbonlayer was analyzed by Raman spectrum.The appearances were observed by atomic force microscope(AFM).Thesurface hardness was measured with the mechanical property microprobe.The dry wear tests against GCr15 steelball at various sliding loads were performed with a ball-on-disk wear tester in ambient environment.The resultsshow that the thickness of the modified layer is 1 200 nm,the carbon layer is a smooth and compact diamond-likecarbon(DLC)films,and the carbon-titanium interface is broadened due to carbon ions implantation,resulting in agood composition and structure transition between DLC films and titanium layer.Surface hardness is improvedmarkedly,with a slow and uniform change.Tribological properties are improved greatly although they reduce withthe increase of sliding loads because the modified layer becomes thin rapidly.

  19. Influence of 400 keV carbon ion implantation on structural, optical and electrical properties of PMMA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arif, Shafaq, E-mail: sarif2005@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Lahore College for Women University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Rafique, M. Shahid [Department of Physics, University of Engineering & Technology, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Saleemi, Farhat; Sagheer, Riffat [Department of Physics, Lahore College for Women University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Naab, Fabian; Toader, Ovidiu [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, Michigan Ion Beam Laboratory, University of Michigan, MI 48109-2104 (United States); Mahmood, Arshad; Rashid, Rashad [National Institute of Lasers and Optronics (NILOP), P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); Mahmood, Mazhar [Department of Metallurgy & Materials Engineering, Pakistan Institute of Engineering & Applied Sciences (PIEAS), Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2015-09-01

    Ion implantation is a useful technique to modify surface properties of polymers without altering their bulk properties. The objective of this work is to explore the 400 keV C{sup +} ion implantation effects on PMMA at different fluences ranging from 5 × 10{sup 13} to 5 × 10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2}. The surface topographical examination of irradiated samples has been performed using Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). The structural and chemical modifications in implanted PMMA are examined by Raman and Fourier Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) respectively. The effects of carbon ion implantation on optical properties of PMMA are investigated by UV–Visible spectroscopy. The modifications in electrical conductivity have been measured using a four point probe technique. AFM images reveal a decrease in surface roughness of PMMA with an increase in ion fluence from 5 × 10{sup 14} to 5 × 10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2}. The existence of amorphization and sp{sup 2}-carbon clusterization has been confirmed by Raman and FTIR spectroscopic analysis. The UV–Visible data shows a prominent red shift in absorption edge as a function of ion fluence. This shift displays a continuous reduction in optical band gap (from 3.13 to 0.66 eV) due to formation of carbon clusters. Moreover, size of carbon clusters and photoconductivity are found to increase with increasing ion fluence. The ion-induced carbonaceous clusters are believed to be responsible for an increase in electrical conductivity of PMMA from (2.14 ± 0.06) × 10{sup −10} (Ω-cm){sup −1} (pristine) to (0.32 ± 0.01) × 10{sup −5} (Ω-cm){sup −1} (irradiated sample)

  20. Fabrication and characterization of a co-planar detector in diamond for low energy single ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, J. B. S.; Aguirre, B. A.; Pacheco, J. L.; Vizkelethy, G.; Bielejec, E.

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate low energy single ion detection using a co-planar detector fabricated on a diamond substrate and characterized by ion beam induced charge collection. Histograms are taken with low fluence ion pulses illustrating quantized ion detection down to a single ion with a signal-to-noise ratio of approximately 10. We anticipate that this detection technique can serve as a basis to optimize the yield of single color centers in diamond. The ability to count ions into a diamond substrate is expected to reduce the uncertainty in the yield of color center formation by removing Poisson statistics from the implantation process.

  1. Optical planar waveguide in sodium-doped calcium barium niobate crystals by carbon ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Jin-Hua, E-mail: zhaojinhuazjh@gmail.com [School of Science, Shandong Jianzhu University, Jinan 250101 (China); Qin, Xi-Feng; Wang, Feng-Xiang; Fu, Gang; Wang, Hui-Lin [School of Science, Shandong Jianzhu University, Jinan 250101 (China); Wang, Xue-Lin [School of Physics, Key Laboratory of Particle Physics and Particle Irradiation, Ministry of Education, and State Key Laboratory of Crystal Materials, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China)

    2013-07-15

    There is great interest in niobate crystals which belong to the tetragonal tungsten bronze (TTB) families owing to their intriguing properties. As one representative of such crystals, CBN (calcium barium niobate) has attracted rapidly growing attention. Because it has a higher Curie temperature than SBN (strontium barium niobate), possesses outstanding ferroelectric and it possesses optical properties. In addition, doped with sodium, CBN will show a higher Curie temperature than pure CBN. We report on the fabrication and characterization of optical planar waveguide in x-cut sodium-doped calcium barium niobate crystal by using C ion implantation. The guided-mode properties at the wavelength of 633 and 1539 nm are investigated through prism-coupling measurements, respectively. By applying direct end-face coupling arrangement, the near-field optical intensity distribution of waveguide modes is measured at 633 nm. For comparison, the modal profile of the same guided mode is also numerically calculated by the finite difference beam-propagation method via computer software BeamPROP. The transmission spectra of the waveguide before and after ion implantation treatments were investigated also. Our experiment results reveal that the waveguide could propagate light with transverse magnetic polarized direction only and it is assumed that the polarization selectivity of CBN crystal may responsible for this phenomenon.

  2. Diamondlike carbon deposition on plastic films by plasma source ion implantation

    CERN Document Server

    Tanaka, T; Shinohara, M; Takagi, T

    2002-01-01

    Application of pulsed high negative voltage (approx 10 mu s pulse width, 300-900 pulses per second) to a substrate is found to induce discharge, thereby increasing ion current with an inductively coupled plasma source. This plasma source ion beam implantation (PSII) technique is investigated for the pretreatment and deposition of diamond-like carbon (DLC) thin layer on polyethylene terepthalate (PET) film. Pretreatment of PET with N sub 2 and Ar plasma is expected to provide added barrier effects when coupled with DLC deposition, with possible application to fabrication of PET beverage bottles. PSII treatment using N sub 2 and Ar in separate stages is found to change the color of the PET film, effectively increasing near-ultraviolet absorption. The effects of this pretreatment on the chemical bonding of C, H, and O are examined by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). DLC thin film was successfully deposited on the PET film. The surface of the DLC thin layer is observed to be smooth by scanning electron mic...

  3. The n-type conduction and microstructural properties of phosphorus ion implanted nanocrystalline diamond films%磷离子注入纳米金刚石薄膜的n型导电性能与微结构研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡晓君; 胡衡; 陈小虎; 许贝

    2011-01-01

    Phosphorus ions are implanted into nanocrystalline diamond ( NCD) films followed by being annealed at different temperatures. The results show that the samples exhibit good n-type conductivity when annealing temperature is increased to 800 ℃ and above. Raman spectroscopy and electron paramagnetic resonance measurements display that the sample with a larger quantity of diamond phase with better lattice perfection has a lower resistivity. It is indicated that nano-sized diamond grains make contributions to the n-type conductivity in the films. After 1000 ℃ annealing, the amorphous carbon grain boundaries become more ordered, which leads the dangling carbon bonds to decrease and the resistivity of the film to increases. It is revealed that the amorphous carbon grain boundaries supply a conduction path to the n-type phosphorus ion implanted nanocrystalline diamond grains.%系统研究了磷离子注入并在不同温度退火后的纳米金刚石薄膜的微结构和电学性能.研究表明,当退火温度达到800℃以上时,薄膜呈良好的n型电导.Raman光谱和电子顺磁共振谱的结果表明,薄膜中金刚石相含量越高和完整性越好,薄膜电阻率越低.这说明纳米金刚石晶粒为薄膜提供了电导.1000℃退火后,薄膜晶界中的非晶石墨相有序度提高,碳悬键数量降低,薄膜电阻率升高.薄膜导电机理为磷离子注入的纳米金刚石晶粒提供了n型电导,非晶碳晶界为其电导提供了传输路径.

  4. Influence of Zn ion implantation on structures and field emission properties of multi-walled carbon nanotube arrays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The structures and field emission properties of multi-walled carbon nanotube arrays implanted with Zn+ by MEVVA ion implanter have been investigated.The results revealed that Zn+implantation induced structural damage and that the top of carbon nanotubes with multi-layered graphite structure were transformed into carbon nanowires with amorphous structure.Meanwhile,C:Zn solid solution was synthesized after Zn+ implantation.The turn-on field and threshold field were 0.80 and 1.31 V/μm,respectively for original multi-walled carbon nanotube arrays and were reduced to 0.66 and 1.04 V/μm due to the synthesis of C and Zn composite,in which the work function was reduced after low doses of Zn+implantation.It is indicated that low doses of Zn+implantation can improve field emission performance of multi-walled carbon nanotube arrays.Otherwise,high doses of Zn+implantation can reduce field emission properties of multi-walled carbon nanotube arrays,because radiation damage reduces the electric field enhancement factor.

  5. Formation of amorphous carbon on the surface of poly(ethylene terephthalate) by helium plasma based ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toth, A., E-mail: totha@chemres.hu [Institute of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Chemical Research Center, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, H-1525 Budapest, P.O. Box 17 (Hungary); Veres, M. [Research Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, H-1525 Budapest, P.O. Box 49 (Hungary); Kereszturi, K.; Mohai, M.; Bertoti, I.; Szepvoelgyi, J. [Institute of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Chemical Research Center, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, H-1525 Budapest, P.O. Box 17 (Hungary)

    2011-08-15

    The surface modification of poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) by helium plasma based ion implantation (He PBII) was studied. The effect of the main process parameters (acceleration voltage, fluence and fluence rate) on the alterations of the surface chemical composition and structure were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Raman spectroscopy. According to SRIM calculations, at ion energies above 2 keV the stopping power of PET for He{sup +} ions is dominated by the electronic component and the contribution of the nuclear component is relatively small. Degradation of the ester group and carbonisation were observed by XPS due to elimination of O-rich fragments. The total C-content of the modified layer increased with the increase of fluence rate and acceleration voltage of particles, enabling the purposeful alteration of the surface composition. A strong broadening was detected in the Raman spectrum between 1000 and 1700 cm{sup -1}, testifying to the intense formation of amorphous carbon. The area ratio of the D ({approx}1410 cm{sup -1}) to G ({approx}1570 cm{sup -1}) band increased with the increase of particle fluence and the increase of acceleration voltage, offering the possibility of tailoring the chemical structure of the amorphous carbon layer created by the He PBII treatment.

  6. A study on biocompatibility and bactericidal properties of pyrolytic carbon by silver ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, H.Q. [College of Physics and Electronic Information Science, Tianjin Normal University, Tianjin 300074 (China); Liu, T. [College of Physics and Electronic Information Science, Tianjin Normal University, Tianjin 300074 (China); Liu, X. [Tianjin Urinary Surgery Institute, Tianjin 300211 (China); Gu, H.Q. [Tianjin Urinary Surgery Institute, Tianjin 300211 (China); Zhao, J. [College of Physics and Electronic Information Science, Tianjin Normal University, Tianjin 300074 (China)]. E-mail: jiezhao1943@126.com

    2007-02-15

    The biocompatibility and bactericidal properties of Ag{sup +}-implanted pyrolytic carbon were investigated by means of Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli bacteria and some biocompatible experiments. The pyrolytic carbon samples were implanted by silver ions with the dose ranging from 5 x 10{sup 14} to 5 x 10{sup 18} ions/cm{sup 2} at an energy of 70 keV. The silver distribution in pyrolytic carbon was characterized by Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS). The results show that the bactericidal rate for both S. aureus and E. coli increase with the ion dose when the silver ion dose is under the saturated dose of 5 x 10{sup 17} ions/cm{sup 2}. The bactericidal rate is over 97% when the ion dose exceeds that value. In comparison with the reference sample, Ag{sup +}-implanted pyrolytic carbon shows a good biocompatibility and without biotoxication by means of cytotoxicity, hemolysis and platelet tests. RBS analyses show that silver atoms penetrate into the sample surface and form a silver-rich surface region which plays an important role in killing bacteria. When the ion dose is not exceed 1 x 10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2}, the structure of Ag{sup +}-implanted pyrolytic carbon is kept unchanged maintaining the original biocompatibility.

  7. Ion implantation technology

    CERN Document Server

    Downey, DF; Jones, KS; Ryding, G

    1993-01-01

    Ion implantation technology has made a major contribution to the dramatic advances in integrated circuit technology since the early 1970's. The ever-present need for accurate models in ion implanted species will become absolutely vital in the future due to shrinking feature sizes. Successful wide application of ion implantation, as well as exploitation of newly identified opportunities, will require the development of comprehensive implant models. The 141 papers (including 24 invited papers) in this volume address the most recent developments in this field. New structures and possible approach

  8. Helium and carbon isotopes in Indian diamonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiens, R.; Lal, D.; Craig, H.

    1990-09-01

    Helium and carbon isotope measurements in Indian diamonds (from Andhra Pradesh) were carried out using samples that included mined diamonds from primary kimberlite source rocks and alluvial diamonds from river gravel. The He and C isotope concentrations in diamonds from these two sources were compared, and the Indian diamonds were compared to those from other regions. Results indicate that most of the He-3 in the alluvial diamonds is of cosmogenic origin and that the alluvial diamonds may also have a significant He-4 component due to alpha particles implanted during storage in a secondary matrix. One diamond, a mined kimberlite specimen, was found to have the lowest He-4 content (0.018 microcc/g) so far recorded in diamonds.

  9. Raman microprobe measurements of stress in ion implanted materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nugent, K.W.; Prawer, S.; Weiser, P.S.; Dooley, S.P. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1993-12-31

    Raman microprobe measurements of ion implanted diamond and silicon have shown significant shifts in the Raman line due to stresses in the materials. The Raman line shifts to higher energy if the stress is compressive and to lower energy for tensile stress{sup 1}. The silicon sample was implanted in a 60 {mu}m square with 2.56 x 10{sup 17} ions per square centimeter of 2 MeV Helium. This led to the formation of raised squares with the top 370mm above the original surface. In Raman studies of silicon using visible light, the depth of penetration of the laser beam into the sample is much less than one micron. It was found that the Raman line is due to the silicon overlying the damage region. The diamond sample was implanted with 2 x 10{sup 15} ions per square centimeter of 2.8 MeV carbon. It was concluded that the Raman spectrum could provide information concerning both the magnitude and the direction of stress in an ion implanted sample. It was possible in some cases to determine whether the stress direction is parallel or perpendicular to the sample surface. 1 refs., 2 figs.

  10. Enhanced Photocatalytic Activity of C-TiO2 Thin Films Prepared by Magnetron Sputtering and Post-carbon Ion Implantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Shengyun; YAN Bingxi; CAO Minjian; SHEN Jie

    2015-01-01

    TiO2 thin films were fabricated by RF magnetron sputtering on titanium substrates and then implanted with different amounts of carbon. The microstructure, valence states and optical characteristics of each sample were investigated by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and UV-vis diffuse reflection spectroscopy. Photoelectric property was evaluated under visible light using a xenon lamp as illuminant. The experimental results indicate that the implanting carbon concentration has a significant influence on film’s micro structure and element valence states. The dominant valence states of carbon vary as carbon content increases. Carbon ion implantation remarkably enhances the current density and photocatalytic capability of TiO2 thin films. The optimized implanting content is 9.83×1017 ion/cm2, which gives rise to a 150%increased photocurrent and degradation rate.

  11. Ion implantation in polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wintersgill, M. C.

    1984-02-01

    An introductory overview will be given of the effects of ion implantation on polymers, and certain areas will be examined in more detail. Radiation effects in general and ion implantation in particular, in the field of polymers, present a number of contrasts with those in ionic crystals, the most obvious difference being that the chemical effects of both the implanted species and the energy transfer to the host may profoundly change the nature of the target material. Common effects include crosslinking and scission of polymer chains, gas evolution, double bond formation and the formation of additional free radicals. Research has spanned the chemical processes involved, including polymerization reactions achievable only with the use of radiation, to applied research dealing both with the effects of radiation on polymers already in commercial use and the tailoring of new materials to specific applications. Polymers are commonly divided into two groups, in describing their behavior under irradiation. Group I includes materials which form crosslinks between molecules, whereas Group II materials tend to degrade. In basic research, interest has centered on Group I materials and of these polyethylene has been studied most intensively. Applied materials research has investigated a variety of polymers, particularly those used in cable insulation, and those utilized in ion beam lithography of etch masks. Currently there is also great interest in enhancing the conducting properties of polymers, and these uses would tend to involve the doping capabilities of ion implantation, rather than the energy deposition.

  12. Surface properties of diamond-like carbon films prepared by CVD and PVD methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Dong-Ping; Liu Yan-Hong; Chen Bao-Xiang

    2006-01-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films have been deposited using three different techniques: (a) electron cyclotron resonance-plasma source ion implantation, (b) low-pressure dielectric barrier discharge, (c) filtered-pulsed cathodic arc discharge. The surface and mechanical properties of these films are compared using atomic force microscopebased tests. The experimental results show that hydrogenated DLC films are covered with soft surface layers enriched with hydrogen and sp3 hybridized carbon while the soft surface layers of tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) films have graphite-like structure. The formation of soft surface layers can be associated with the surface diffusion and growth induced by the low-energy deposition process. For typical CVD methods, the atomic hydrogen in the plasmas can contribute to the formation of hydrogen and sp3 hybridized carbon enriched surface layers. The high-energy ion implantation causes the rearrangement of atoms beneath the surface layer and leads to an increase in film density. The ta-C films can be deposited using the medium energy carbon ions in the highly-ionized plasma.

  13. Films Composed Of Diamond And Diamondlike Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shing, Yuh-Han

    1995-01-01

    Proposed films composed of diamond and diamondlike carbon useful as wear-resistant and self-lubricating protective and tribological coats at extreme temperatures and in corrosive and oxidizing environments. Films have wide variety of industrial applications.

  14. Elimination of carbon vacancies in 4H-SiC epi-layers by near-surface ion implantation: Influence of the ion species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayedh, H. M.; Svensson, B. G. [University of Oslo, Department of Physics/Center for Materials Science and Nanotechnology, P.O. Box 1048 Blindern, N-0316 Oslo (Norway); Hallén, A. [School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Royal Institute of Technology, SE-164 40 Kista-Stockholm (Sweden)

    2015-11-07

    The carbon vacancy (V{sub C}) is a prevailing point defect in high-purity 4H-SiC epitaxial layers, and it plays a decisive role in controlling the charge carrier lifetime. One concept of reducing the V{sub C}-concentration is based on carbon self-ion implantation in a near surface layer followed by thermal annealing. This leads to injection of carbon interstitials (C{sub i}'s) and annihilation of V{sub C}'s in the epi-layer “bulk”. Here, we show that the excess of C atoms introduced by the self-ion implantation plays a negligible role in the V{sub C} annihilation. Actually, employing normalized implantation conditions with respect to displaced C atoms, other heavier ions like Al and Si are found to be more efficient in annihilating V{sub C}'s. Concentrations of V{sub C} below ∼2 × 10{sup 11} cm{sup −3} can be reached already after annealing at 1400 °C, as monitored by deep-level transient spectroscopy. This corresponds to a reduction in the V{sub C}-concentration by about a factor of 40 relative to the as-grown state of the epi-layers studied. The negligible role of the implanted species itself can be understood from simulation results showing that the concentration of displaced C atoms exceeds the concentration of implanted species by two to three orders of magnitude. The higher efficiency for Al and Si ions is attributed to the generation of collision cascades with a sufficiently high energy density to promote C{sub i}-clustering and reduce dynamic defect annealing. These C{sub i}-related clusters will subsequently dissolve during the post-implant annealing giving rise to enhanced C{sub i} injection. However, at annealing temperatures above 1500 °C, thermodynamic equilibrium conditions start to apply for the V{sub C}-concentration, which limit the net effect of the C{sub i} injection, and a competition between the two processes occurs.

  15. Semiconductor Ion Implanters

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKinnon, Barry A.; Ruffell, John P.

    2011-06-01

    In 1953 the Raytheon CK722 transistor was priced at 7.60. Based upon this, an Intel Xeon Quad Core processor containing 820,000,000 transistors should list at 6.2 billion! Particle accelerator technology plays an important part in the remarkable story of why that Intel product can be purchased today for a few hundred dollars. Most people of the mid twentieth century would be astonished at the ubiquity of semiconductors in the products we now buy and use every day. Though relatively expensive in the nineteen fifties they now exist in a wide range of items from high-end multicore microprocessors like the Intel product to disposable items containing `only' hundreds or thousands like RFID chips and talking greeting cards. This historical development has been fueled by continuous advancement of the several individual technologies involved in the production of semiconductor devices including Ion Implantation and the charged particle beamlines at the heart of implant machines. In the course of its 40 year development, the worldwide implanter industry has reached annual sales levels around 2B, installed thousands of dedicated machines and directly employs thousands of workers. It represents in all these measures, as much and possibly more than any other industrial application of particle accelerator technology. This presentation discusses the history of implanter development. It touches on some of the people involved and on some of the developmental changes and challenges imposed as the requirements of the semiconductor industry evolved.

  16. High-energy ion implantation for ULSI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsukamoto, K.; Komori, S.; Kuroi, T.; Akasaka, Y. (LSI R and D Lab., Mitsubishi Electric Corp., Itami (Japan))

    1991-07-01

    The ''well engineering'' of a retrograde twin well formed by high-energy ion implantation for 0.5 {mu}m CMOS is demonstrated to be quite useful in improving many device characteristics, such as leakage current reduction, soft-error immunity, low latchup susceptibility, smaller device isolation dimensions, etc. In forming a heavily doped buried layer by high-energy ion implantation, a drastic reduction in leakage current has been found. This would be caused by gettering of impurities or microdefects by secondary defects which are induced either by implantation of dopant itself (''self-gettering'') or by an additional implantation of oxygen, carbon or fluorine (''proximity gettering''). (orig.).

  17. Transverse microanalysis of high energy Ion implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dooley, S.P.; Jamieson, D.N.; Nugent, K.W.; Prawer, S. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1996-12-31

    High energy ion implants in semiconductor materials have been analyzed by Channeling Contrast Microscopy (CCM) perpendicular to the implant direction, allowing imaging of the entire ion track. The damage produced by Channeled and Random 1.4 MeV H{sup +} implants into the edge of a <100> type IIa diamond wafer were analyzed by channeling into the face of the crystal. The results showed negligible damage in the surface region of the implants, and swelling induced misalignment at the end of range of the implants. Channeled 1.4 MeV H{sup +} implants in diamond had a range only 9% deeper than Random implants, which could be accounted for by dechanneling of the beam. The channeling of H{sup +}{sub 2} ions has been previously found to be identical to that of protons of half energy, however the current experiment has shown a 1% increase in {chi}{sub min} for H{sup +}{sub 2} in diamond compared to H{sup +} at 1,2 MeV per proton. This is due to repulsion between protons within the same channel. 5 refs., 2 figs.

  18. Characterization of the Diamond-like Carbon Based Functionally Gradient Film

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Diamond-like carbon coatings have been used as solid lubricating coatings in vacuum technology for their goodphysical and chemical properties. In this paper, the hybrid technique of unbalanced magnetron sputtering and plasmaimmersion ion implantation (PIll) was adopted to fabricate diamond-like carbon-based functionally gradient film,N/TiN/Ti(N,C)/DLC, on the 304 stainless steel substrate. The film was characterized by using Raman spectroscopyand glancing X-ray diffraction (GXRD), and the topography and surface roughness of the film was observed usingAFM. The mechanical properties of the film were evaluated by nano-indentation. The results showed that the surfaceroughness of the film was approximately 0.732 nm. The hardness and elastic modulus, fracture toughness andinterfacial fracture toughness of N/TiN/Ti(N,C)/DLC functionally gradient film were about 19.84 GPa, 190.03 GPa,3.75 MPa.m1/2 and 5.68 MPa@m1/2, respectively. Compared with that of DLC monolayer and C/TiC/DLC multilayer,this DLC gradient film has better qualities as a solid lubricating coating.

  19. Ion implanted dielectric elastomer circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Benjamin M.; Rosset, Samuel; Anderson, Iain A.; Shea, Herbert R.

    2013-06-01

    Starfish and octopuses control their infinite degree-of-freedom arms with panache—capabilities typical of nature where the distribution of reflex-like intelligence throughout soft muscular networks greatly outperforms anything hard, heavy, and man-made. Dielectric elastomer actuators show great promise for soft artificial muscle networks. One way to make them smart is with piezo-resistive Dielectric Elastomer Switches (DES) that can be combined with artificial muscles to create arbitrary digital logic circuits. Unfortunately there are currently no reliable materials or fabrication process. Thus devices typically fail within a few thousand cycles. As a first step in the search for better materials we present a preliminary exploration of piezo-resistors made with filtered cathodic vacuum arc metal ion implantation. DES were formed on polydimethylsiloxane silicone membranes out of ion implanted gold nano-clusters. We propose that there are four distinct regimes (high dose, above percolation, on percolation, low dose) in which gold ion implanted piezo-resistors can operate and present experimental results on implanted piezo-resistors switching high voltages as well as a simple artificial muscle inverter. While gold ion implanted DES are limited by high hysteresis and low sensitivity, they already show promise for a range of applications including hysteretic oscillators and soft generators. With improvements to implanter process control the promise of artificial muscle circuitry for soft smart actuator networks could become a reality.

  20. Plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition of DLC coating for modification of orthodontic magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wongsarat, W. [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Sarapirom, S. [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); National Metal and Materials Technology Center, 114 Thailand Science Park, Paholyothin Road, Klong 1, Klong Luang, Pathumthani, Bangkok 12120 (Thailand); Aukkaravittayapun, S. [National Metal and Materials Technology Center, 114 Thailand Science Park, Paholyothin Road, Klong 1, Klong Luang, Pathumthani, Bangkok 12120 (Thailand); Jotikasthira, D. [Department of Odontology-Oral Pathology, Faculty of Dentistry, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Boonyawan, D. [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Yu, L.D., E-mail: yuld@fnrf.science.cmu.ac.th [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand)

    2012-02-01

    This study was aimed to use the plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (PIII-D) technique to form diamond-like carbon (DLC) thin films on orthodontic magnets to solve the corrosion problem. To search for the optimal material modification effect, PIII-D conditions including gases, processing time, and pulsing mode were varied. The formation of DLC films was confirmed and characterized with Raman spectra. The intensity of the remnant magnetic field of the magnets and the hardness, adhesion and thickness of the thin films were then measured. A corrosion test was carried out using clinic dental fluid. Improved benefits including a satisfying hardness, adhesion, remnant magnetic strength and corrosion resistance of the DLC coating could be achieved by using a higher interrupting time ratio and shorter processing time.

  1. Analysis of the carbon source for diamond crystal growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Li; XU Bin; LI MuSen

    2008-01-01

    The lattice constants of diamond and graphite at high pressure and high temperature (HPHT) were calculated on the basis of linear expansion coefficient and elastic constant. According to the empirical electron theory of solids and molecules (EET), the valence electron structures (VESs) of diamond, graphite crystal and their common planes were calculated. The relationship between diamond and graphite structure was analyzed based on the boundary condition of the improved Thomas-Fermi-Dirac theory by Cheng (TFDC). It was found that the electron densities of common planes in graphite were not continuous with those of planes in diamond at the first order of approximation. The results show that during the course of diamond single crystal growth at HPHT with metal catalyst, the carbon sources forming diamond structure do not come from the graphite structure directly. The diamond growth mechanism was discussed from the viewpoint of valence electron structure.

  2. Advances in PSII Deposited Diamond-Like Carbon Coatings for Use as a Barrier to Corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lillard, R.S.; Butt, D.P.; Baker, N.P.; Walter, K.C.; Nastasi, M.

    1998-10-01

    Plasma source ion implantation (PSII) is a non line of sight process for implanting complex shaped targets without the need for complex fixturing. The breakdown initiation of materials coated with diamond-like carbon (DLC) produced by PSII occurs at defects in the DLC which expose the underlying material. To summarize these findings, a galvanic couple is established between the coating and exposed material at the base of the defect. Pitting and oxidation of the base and metal leads to the development of mechanical stress in the coating and eventually spallation of the coating. This paper presents our current progress in attempting to mitigate the breakdown of these coatings by implanting the parent material prior to coating with DLC. Ideally one would like to implant the parent material with chromium or molybdenum which are known to improve corrosion resistance, however, the necessary organometallics needed to implant these materials with PSII are not yet available. Here we report on the effects of carbon, nitrogen, and boron implantation on the susceptibility of PSII-DLC coated mild steel to breakdown.

  3. Novel phase of carbon, ferromagnetism, and conversion into diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narayan, Jagdish, E-mail: narayan@ncsu.edu; Bhaumik, Anagh [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Centennial Campus, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-7907 (United States)

    2015-12-07

    We report the discovery of a new phase of carbon (referred to as Q-carbon) and address fundamental issues related to direct conversion of carbon into diamond at ambient temperatures and pressures in air without any need for catalyst and presence of hydrogen. The Q-carbon is formed as result of quenching from super undercooled state by using high-power nanosecond laser pulses. We discuss the equilibrium phase diagram (P vs. T) of carbon and show that by rapid quenching kinetics can shift thermodynamic graphite/diamond/liquid carbon triple point from 5000 K/12 GPa to super undercooled carbon at atmospheric pressure in air. It is shown that nanosecond laser heating of diamond-like amorphous carbon on sapphire, glass, and polymer substrates can be confined to melt carbon in a super undercooled state. By quenching the carbon from the super undercooled state, we have created a new state of carbon (Q-carbon) from which nanodiamond, microdiamond, microneedles, and single-crystal thin films are formed depending upon the nucleation and growth times allowed for diamond formation. The Q-carbon quenched from liquid is a new state of solid carbon with a higher mass density than amorphous carbon and a mixture of mostly fourfold sp{sup 3} (75%–85%) with the rest being threefold sp{sup 2} bonded carbon (with distinct entropy). It is expected to have new and improved mechanical hardness, electrical conductivity, chemical, and physical properties, including room-temperature ferromagnetism (RTFM) and enhanced field emission. Here we present interesting results on RTFM, enhanced electrical conductivity and surface potential of Q-carbon to emphasize its unique properties. The Q-carbon exhibits robust bulk ferromagnetism with estimated Curie temperature of about 500 K and saturation magnetization value of 20 emu g{sup −1}. From the Q-carbon, diamond phase is nucleated and a variety of micro- and nanostructures and large-area single-crystal diamond sheets are grown by allowing

  4. Mantle Degassing and Diamond Genesis:A Carbon Isotope Perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑永飞

    1994-01-01

    The effect of Co2 and CH4 degassing from the mantle on the carbon isotopic composition of diamond has been quantitatively modeled in terms of the principles of Rayleigh distillation.Assuming the δ13 C value of -5‰ for the mantle,the outgassing of CO2 can result in the large negative δ13 C values of diamond,whereas the outgassing of CH4 can drive the δ13C values of diamond in the positive direction.The theoretical expectations can be used to explain the full range of δ13 C values from-34.4‰5 to+5‰ observed for natural diamonds.It is possible that diamond formation was triggered by the degassing of Co2 and/or CH4 from the mantle and the associated fractional crystallization of carbonate-bearing melt.

  5. Ion implantation of superhard ceramic cutting tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Y. Kevin; Liu, Jie

    2004-08-01

    Despite numerous reports of tool life increase by ion implantation in machining operations, ion implantation applications of cutting tools remain limited, especially for ceramic tools. Mechanisms of tool-life improvement by implantation are not clearly established due to complexity of both implantation and tool-wear processes. In an attempt to improve performance of cubic boron nitride (CBN) tools for hard machining by ion implantation, a literature survey of ion-implanted cutting tools was carried out with a focus on mechanisms of tool-wear reduction by ion implantation. Implantation and machining experiments were then conducted to investigate implantation effects on CBN tools in hard machining. A batch of CBN tools was implanted with nitrogen ions at 150 keV and 2.5×1017 ions/cm2 and further used to cut 61 HRc AISI 52100 steel at different conditions. Results show that ion implantation has strong effects on partsurface finish, moderate effect on cutting forces, but an insignificant impact on tool wear. Friction coefficients, estimated from measured cutting forces, are possibly reduced by ion implantation, which may improve surface finish. However, surprisingly, 2-D orthogonal cutting to evaluate tribological loading in hard machining showed no difference on contact stresses and friction coefficients between implanted and nonimplanted CBN tools.

  6. Graphene diamond-like carbon films heterostructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Fang; Afandi, Abdulkareem; Jackman, Richard B., E-mail: r.jackman@ucl.ac.uk [London Centre for Nanotechnology, Electronic and Electrical Engineering Department, University College London, 17-19 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AH (United Kingdom)

    2015-03-09

    A limitation to the potential use of graphene as an electronic material is the lack of control over the 2D materials properties once it is deposited on a supporting substrate. Here, the use of Diamond-like Carbon (DLC) interlayers between the substrate and the graphene is shown to offer the prospect of overcoming this problem. The DLC films used here, more properly known as a-C:H with ∼25% hydrogen content, have been terminated with N or F moieties prior to graphene deposition. It is found that nitrogen terminations lead to an optical band gap shrinkage in the DLC, whilst fluorine groups reduce the DLC's surface energy. CVD monolayer graphene subsequently transferred to DLC, N terminated DLC, and F terminated DLC has then been studied with AFM, Raman and XPS analysis, and correlated with Hall effect measurements that give an insight into the heterostructures electrical properties. The results show that different terminations strongly affect the electronic properties of the graphene heterostructures. G-F-DLC samples were p-type and displayed considerably higher mobility than the other heterostructures, whilst G-N-DLC samples supported higher carrier densities, being almost metallic in character. Since it would be possible to locally pattern the distribution of these differing surface terminations, this work offers the prospect for 2D lateral control of the electronic properties of graphene layers for device applications.

  7. Graphene diamond-like carbon films heterostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Fang; Afandi, Abdulkareem; Jackman, Richard B.

    2015-03-01

    A limitation to the potential use of graphene as an electronic material is the lack of control over the 2D materials properties once it is deposited on a supporting substrate. Here, the use of Diamond-like Carbon (DLC) interlayers between the substrate and the graphene is shown to offer the prospect of overcoming this problem. The DLC films used here, more properly known as a-C:H with ˜25% hydrogen content, have been terminated with N or F moieties prior to graphene deposition. It is found that nitrogen terminations lead to an optical band gap shrinkage in the DLC, whilst fluorine groups reduce the DLC's surface energy. CVD monolayer graphene subsequently transferred to DLC, N terminated DLC, and F terminated DLC has then been studied with AFM, Raman and XPS analysis, and correlated with Hall effect measurements that give an insight into the heterostructures electrical properties. The results show that different terminations strongly affect the electronic properties of the graphene heterostructures. G-F-DLC samples were p-type and displayed considerably higher mobility than the other heterostructures, whilst G-N-DLC samples supported higher carrier densities, being almost metallic in character. Since it would be possible to locally pattern the distribution of these differing surface terminations, this work offers the prospect for 2D lateral control of the electronic properties of graphene layers for device applications.

  8. In vitro evaluation of diamond-like carbon coatings with a Si/SiC {sub x} interlayer on surgical NiTi alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, C.L. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); State Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Chu, Paul K. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)]. E-mail: paul.chu@cityu.edu.hk; Yang, D.Z. [State Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2007-04-15

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings were produced with a Si/SiC {sub x} interlayer by a hybrid plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition process to improve the adhesion between the carbon layer and surgical NiTi alloy substrate. The structure, mechanical properties, corrosion resistance and biocompatibility of the coatings were evaluated in vitro by Raman spectroscopy, pin-on-disk tests, potentiodynamic polarization tests and simulated fluid immersion tests. The DLC coatings with a Si/SiC {sub x} interlayer of a suitable thickness have better adhesion, lower friction coefficients and enhanced corrosion resistance. In the simulated body fluid tests, the coatings exhibit effective corrosion protection and good biocompatibility as indicated by PC12 cell cultures. DLC films fabricated on a Si/SiC {sub x} interlayer have high potential as protective coatings for biomedical NiTi materials.

  9. Silicon technologies ion implantation and thermal treatment

    CERN Document Server

    Baudrant, Annie

    2013-01-01

    The main purpose of this book is to remind new engineers in silicon foundry, the fundamental physical and chemical rules in major Front end treatments: oxidation, epitaxy, ion implantation and impurities diffusion.

  10. Ion induced transformation of polymer films into diamond-like carbon incorporating silver nano particles; Ioneninduzierte Umwandlung von Polymerschichten zu diamantaehnlichem Kohlenstoff mit darin enthaltenen Silber-Nanopartikeln

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarz, Florian P.

    2010-03-26

    Silver containing diamond-like carbon (DLC) is an interesting material for medical engineering from several points of view. On the one hand DLC provides high mechanical robustness. It can be used as biocompatible and wear resistant coating for joint replacing implants. On the other hand silver has antimicrobial properties, which could reduce post-operative inflammations. However conventional production of Ag-DLC by co-deposition of silver and carbon in a plasma process is problematic since it does not allow for a separate control of nano particle morphology and matrix properties. In this work an alternative production method has been developed to circumvent this problem. In metall-DLC-production by ion implantation into a nano composite, silver nano particles are initially formed in solution and then incorporated within a polymer matrix. Finally the polymer is transformed into DLC by ion implantation. The aspects and single steps of this method were investigated with regard to the resulting material's properties. The goal was to design an economically relevant deposition method. Based on experimental results a model of the transformation process has been established, which has also been implemented in a computer simulation. Finally the antibacterial properties of the material have been checked in a biomedical test. Here a bacterial killing rate of 90% could be achieved. (orig.)

  11. Workshop on diamond and diamond-like-carbon films for the transportation industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, F.A.; Moores, D.K. [eds.

    1993-01-01

    Applications exist in advanced transportation systems as well as in manufacturing processes that would benefit from superior tribological properties of diamond, diamond-like-carbon and cubic boron nitride coatings. Their superior hardness make them ideal candidates as protective coatings to reduce adhesive, abrasive and erosive wear in advanced diesel engines, gas turbines and spark-ignited engines and in machining and manufacturing tools as well. The high thermal conductivity of diamond also makes it desirable for thermal management not only in tribological applications but also in high-power electronic devices and possibly large braking systems. A workshop has been recently held at Argonne National Laboratory entitled ``Diamond and Diamond-Like-Carbon Films for Transportation Applications`` which was attended by 85 scientists and engineers including top people involved in the basic technology of these films and also representatives from many US industrial companies. A working group on applications endorsed 18 different applications for these films in the transportation area alone. Separate abstracts have been prepared.

  12. Improving Sustainability of Ion Implant Modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Jim

    2011-01-01

    Semiconductor fabs have long been pressured to manage capital costs, reduce energy consumption and increasingly improve efforts to recycle and recover resources. Ion implant tools have been high-profile offenders on all three fronts. They draw such large volumes of air for heat dissipation and risk reduction that historically, they are the largest consumer of cleanroom air of any process tool—and develop energy usage and resource profiles to match. This paper presents a documented approach to reduce their energy consumption and dramatically downsize on-site facilities support for cleanroom air manufacture and abatement. The combination produces significant capital expenditure savings. The case entails applying SAGS Type 1 (sub-atmospheric gas systems) toxic gas packaging to enable engineering adaptations that deliver the energy savings and cost benefits without any reduction in environmental health and safety. The paper also summarizes benefits as they relate to reducing a fabs carbon emission footprint (and longer range advantages relative to potential cap and trade programs) with existing technology.

  13. Panel 2 - properties of diamond and diamond-like-carbon films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blau, P.J.; Clausing, R.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Ajayi, O.O.; Liu, Y.Y.; Purohit, A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Bartelt, P.F. [Deere & Co., Moline, IL (United States); Baughman, R.H. [Allied Signal, Morristown, NJ (United States); Bhushan, B. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus (United States); Cooper, C.V. [United Technologies Research Center, East Hartford, CT (United States); Dugger, M.T. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Freedman, A. [Aerodyne Research, Inc., Billerica, MA (United States); Larsen-Basse, J. [National Science Foundation, Washington, DC (United States); McGuire, N.R. [Caterpillar, Peoria, IL (United States); Messier, R.F. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park (United States); Noble, G.L.; Ostrowki, M.H. [John Crane, Inc., Morton Grove, IL (United States); Sartwell, B.D. [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States); Wei, R. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins (United States)

    1993-01-01

    This panel attempted to identify and prioritize research and development needs in determining the physical, mechanical and chemical properties of diamond and diamond-like-carbon films (D/DLCF). Three specific goals were established. They were: (1) To identify problem areas which produce concern and require a better knowledge of D/DLCF properties. (2) To identify and prioritize key properties of D/DLCF to promote transportation applications. (3) To identify needs for improvement in properties-measurement methods. Each of these goals is addressed subsequently.

  14. Single-layer nano-carbon film, diamond film, and diamond/nano-carbon composite film field emission performance comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoping; Wang, Jinye; Wang, Lijun

    2016-05-01

    A series of single-layer nano-carbon (SNC) films, diamond films, and diamond/nano-carbon (D/NC) composite films have been prepared on the highly doped silicon substrate by using microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition techniques. The films were characterised by scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and field emission I-V measurements. The experimental results indicated that the field emission maximum current density of D/NC composite films is 11.8-17.8 times that of diamond films. And the field emission current density of D/NC composite films is 2.9-5 times that of SNC films at an electric field of 3.0 V/μm. At the same time, the D/NC composite film exhibits the advantage of improved reproducibility and long term stability (both of the nano-carbon film within the D/NC composite cathode and the SNC cathode were prepared under the same experimental conditions). And for the D/NC composite sample, a high current density of 10 mA/cm2 at an electric field of 3.0 V/μm was obtained. Diamond layer can effectively improve the field emission characteristics of nano-carbon film. The reason may be due to the diamond film acts as the electron acceleration layer.

  15. Diamond and Carbon Nanotube Composites for Supercapacitor Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, João Vitor Silva; May, Paul William; Corat, Evaldo José; Peterlevitz, Alfredo Carlos; Pinheiro, Romário Araújo; Zanin, Hudson

    2017-02-01

    We report on the synthesis and electrochemical properties of diamond grown onto vertically aligned carbon nanotubes with high surface areas as a template, resulting in a composite material exhibiting high double-layer capacitance as well as low electrochemical impedance electrodes suitable for applications as supercapacitor devices. We contrast results from devices fabricated with samples which differ in both their initial substrates (Si and Ti) and their final diamond coatings, such as boron-doped diamond and diamond-like carbon (DLC). We present for first time a conducting model for non-doped DLC thin-films. All samples were characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopy. Our results show specific capacitance as high as 8.25 F g-1 (˜1 F cm-2) and gravimetric specific energy and power as high as 0.7 W h kg-1 and 176.4 W kg-1, respectively, which suggest that these diamond/carbon nanotube composite electrodes are excellent candidates for supercapacitor fabrication.

  16. Diamond and Carbon Nanotube Composites for Supercapacitor Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, João Vitor Silva; May, Paul William; Corat, Evaldo José; Peterlevitz, Alfredo Carlos; Pinheiro, Romário Araújo; Zanin, Hudson

    2016-10-01

    We report on the synthesis and electrochemical properties of diamond grown onto vertically aligned carbon nanotubes with high surface areas as a template, resulting in a composite material exhibiting high double-layer capacitance as well as low electrochemical impedance electrodes suitable for applications as supercapacitor devices. We contrast results from devices fabricated with samples which differ in both their initial substrates (Si and Ti) and their final diamond coatings, such as boron-doped diamond and diamond-like carbon (DLC). We present for first time a conducting model for non-doped DLC thin-films. All samples were characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopy. Our results show specific capacitance as high as 8.25 F g-1 (˜1 F cm-2) and gravimetric specific energy and power as high as 0.7 W h kg-1 and 176.4 W kg-1, respectively, which suggest that these diamond/carbon nanotube composite electrodes are excellent candidates for supercapacitor fabrication.

  17. HRTEM study of Popigai impact diamond: heterogeneous diamond nanostructures in native amorphous carbon matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kis, Viktoria K.; Shumilova, Tatyana; Masaitis, Victor

    2016-07-01

    High-resolution transmission electron microscopy was applied for the detailed nanostructural investigation of Popigai impact diamonds with the aim of revealing the nature of the amorphous carbon of the matrix. The successful application of two complementary specimen preparation methods, focused ion beam (FIB) milling and mechanical cleavage, allowed direct imaging of nanotwinned nanodiamond crystals embedded in a native amorphous carbon matrix for the first time. Based on its stability under the electron beam, native amorphous carbon can be easily distinguished from the amorphous carbon layer produced by FIB milling during specimen preparation. Electron energy loss spectroscopy of the native amorphous carbon revealed the dominance of sp 2-bonded carbon and the presence of a small amount of oxygen. The heterogeneous size distribution and twin density of the nanodiamond crystals and the structural properties of the native amorphous carbon are presumably related to non-graphitic (organic) carbon precursor material.

  18. Carbon nanotube reinforced metal binder for diamond cutting tools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sidorenko, Daria; Mishnaevsky, Leon; Levashov, Evgeny;

    2015-01-01

    The potential of carbon nanotube reinforcement of metallic binders for the improvement of quality and efficiency of diamond cutting wheels is studied. The effect of multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) reinforcement on the mechanical properties i.e. hardness, Young modulus, strength and deformation...... behavior of copper and iron based binder for diamond cutting wheels is investigated experimentally and numerically. Computational micromechanical studies were carried out to clarify the mechanisms of the MWCNT material strengthening. It is demonstrated that the adding of MWCNTs leads to the decrease...... of grain size of the structural constituents of the binder, what in turn leads to the improved simultaneously hardness, Young modulus, plastic extension, bending strength and performances of the metallic binders. Comparing service properties of diamond end-cutting drill bits with and without MWCNT one...

  19. Classroom Demonstration: Combustion of Diamond to Carbon Dioxide Followed by Reduction to Graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyauchi, Takuya; Kamata, Masahiro

    2012-01-01

    An educational demonstration shows the combustion of carbon to carbon dioxide and then the reduction of carbon dioxide to carbon. A melee diamond is the source of the carbon and the reaction is carried out in a closed flask. The demonstration helps students to realize that diamonds are made of carbon and that atoms do not change or vanish in…

  20. Flexible diamond-like carbon film coated on rubber

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pei, Y.T.; Bui, X.L.; Pal, J.P. van der; Martinez-Martinez, D.; Hosson, J.Th.M. De

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic rubber seals are major sources of friction of lubrication systems and bearings, which may take up to 70% of the total friction. The solution we present is to coat rubbers with diamond-like carbon (DLC) thin films by which the coefficient of friction is reduced to less than one tenth. Coating

  1. Flexible protective diamond-like carbon film on rubber

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pei, Y.T.; Bui, X.L.; Hosson, J.Th.M. De

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we report an experimental approach to deposit flexible diamond-like carbon (DLC) films on rubber via self-segmentation. By making use of the substantial thermal mismatch between the DLC film and rubber substrate a dense network of cracks forms in the DLC film, contributing to its flexi

  2. Stress in tungsten carbide-diamond like carbon multilayer coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pujada, B.R.; Tichelaar, F.D.; Janssen, G.C.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    Tungsten carbide-diamond like carbon (WC-DLC) multilayer coatings have been prepared by sputter deposition from a tungsten-carbide target and periodic switching on and off of the reactive acetylene gas flow. The stress in the resulting WC-DLC multilayers has been studied by substrate curvature. Peri

  3. Growth stress in tungsten carbide-diamond-like carbon coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pujada, B.R.; Tichelaar, F.D.; Arnoldbik, W.M.; Sloof, W.G.; Janssen, G.C.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Growth stress in tungsten carbide-diamond-like carbon coatings, sputter deposited in a reactive argon/acetylene plasma, has been studied as a function of the acetylene partial pressure. Stress and microstructure have been investigated by wafer curvature and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) whe

  4. The Comparison of Biocompatibility Properties between Ti Alloys and Fluorinated Diamond-Like Carbon Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chavin Jongwannasiri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Titanium and titanium alloys have found several applications in the biomedical field due to their unique biocompatibility. However, there are problems associated with these materials in applications in which there is direct contact with blood, for instance, thrombogenesis and protein adsorption. Surface modification is one of the effective methods used to improve the performance of Ti and Ti alloys in these circumstances. In this study, fluorinated diamond-like carbon (F-DLC films are chosen to take into account the biocompatible properties compared with Ti alloys. F-DLC films were prepared on NiTi substrates by a plasma-based ion implantation (PBII technique using acetylene (C2H2 and tetrafluoromethane (CF4 as plasma sources. The structure of the films was characterized by Raman spectroscopy. The contact angle and surface energy were also measured. Protein adsorption was performed by treating the films with bovine serum albumin and fibrinogen. The electrochemical corrosion behavior was investigated in Hanks’ solution by means of a potentiodynamic polarization technique. Cytotoxicity tests were performed using MTT assay and dyed fluorescence. The results indicate that F-DLC films present their hydrophobic surfaces due to a high contact angle and low surface energy. These films can support the higher albumin-to-fibrinogen ratio as compared to Ti alloys. They tend to suppress the platelet adhesion. Furthermore, F-DLC films exhibit better corrosion resistance and less cytotoxicity on their surfaces. It can be concluded that F-DLC films can improve the biocompatibility properties of Ti alloys.

  5. Optimization of the ion implantation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maczka, D.; Latuszynski, A.; Kuduk, R.; Partyka, J.

    This work is devoted to the optimization of the ion implantation process in the implanter Unimas of the Institute of Physics, Maria Curie-Sklodowska University, Lublin. The results obtained during several years of operation allow us to determine the optimal work parameters of the device [1-3].

  6. Cell attachment on ion implanted titanium surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.S. Sreejith

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Of outmost importance for the successful use of an implant is a good adhesion of the surrounding tissue to the biomaterial. In addition to the surface composition of the implant, the surface topography also influences the properties of the adherent cells. In the present investigation, ion implanted and untreated surfaces were compared for cell adhesion and spreading.Design/methodology/approach: The surface topography of the surfaces were analyzed using AFM and the cell studies with SEM.Findings: The results of our present investigation is indicative of the fact that ion implanted titanium surface offer better cell binding affinity compared to untreated/polished surface.Practical implications: Success of non-biodegradable implants will first and foremost depend on biocompatibility, followed by the capacity of the surface topography of the implants to evince desired cell matrix, surface cell matrix interactions. In the present study, the cell growth on ion implanted Ti material is analyzed and discussed.Originality/value: In this paper, we have utilized ion implantation technique, which will produce nano-texturing of the surface without producing any detrimental effects to both the dimensions and properties of the implants.

  7. Proximity gettering of C3H5 carbon cluster ion-implanted silicon wafers for CMOS image sensors: Gettering effects of transition metal, oxygen, and hydrogen impurities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurita, Kazunari; Kadono, Takeshi; Okuyama, Ryousuke; Hirose, Ryo; Onaka-Masada, Ayumi; Koga, Yoshihiro; Okuda, Hidehiko

    2016-12-01

    A new technique is described for manufacturing silicon wafers with the highest capability yet reported for gettering transition metallic, oxygen, and hydrogen impurities in CMOS image sensor fabrication. It is demonstrated that this technique can implant wafers simultaneously with carbon and hydrogen elements that form the projection range by using hydrocarbon compounds. Furthermore, these wafers can getter oxygen impurities out-diffused from the silicon substrate to the carbon cluster ion projection range during heat treatment. Therefore, they can reduce the formation of transition metals and oxygen-related defects in the device active regions and improve electrical performance characteristics, such as dark current and image lag characteristics. The new technique enables the formation of high-gettering-capability sinks for transition metals, oxygen, and hydrogen impurities under device active regions of CMOS image sensors. The wafers formed by this technique have the potential to significantly reduce dark current in advanced CMOS image sensors.

  8. Plasma deposited diamond-like carbon films for large neutralarrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, I.G.; Blakely, E.A.; Bjornstad, K.A.; Galvin, J.E.; Monteiro, O.R.; Sangyuenyongpipat, S.

    2004-07-15

    To understand how large systems of neurons communicate, we need to develop methods for growing patterned networks of large numbers of neurons. We have found that diamond-like carbon thin films formed by energetic deposition from a filtered vacuum arc carbon plasma can serve as ''neuron friendly'' substrates for the growth of large neural arrays. Lithographic masks can be used to form patterns of diamond-like carbon, and regions of selective neuronal attachment can form patterned neural arrays. In the work described here, we used glass microscope slides as substrates on which diamond-like carbon was deposited. PC-12 rat neurons were then cultured on the treated substrates and cell growth monitored. Neuron growth showed excellent contrast, with prolific growth on the treated surfaces and very low growth on the untreated surfaces. Here we describe the vacuum arc plasma deposition technique employed, and summarize results demonstrating that the approach can be used to form large patterns of neurons.

  9. RBS and ERDA determinations of depth distributions of high-dose carbon ions implanted in silicon for silicon carbide synthesis study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intarasiri, S.; Kamwanna, T.; Hallén, A.; Yu, L. D.; Janson, M. S.; Thongleum, C.; Possnert, G.; Singkarat, S.

    2006-08-01

    For ion beam synthesis of silicon carbide (SiC), a knowledge of the depth distribution of implanted carbon ions in silicon is crucial for successful development. Based on its simplicity and availability, we selected Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) as an analysis technique for this purpose. A self-developed computer program dedicated to extract depth profiles of lighter impurities in heavier matrix is established. For control, calculated results are compared with an other ion beam analysis (IBA) technique superior for studying lighter impurity in heavier substrate i.e. elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA). The RBS was performed with a 1.7-MV Tandetron accelerator using He2+ as the probe ions. The ERDA was performed with a 5-MV Pelletron accelerator using I8+ as the probe ions. This work shows that the RBS-extracted data had no significant deviations from those of ERDA and simulations by SRIM2003 and SIIMPL computer codes. We also found that annealing at temperatures as high as 1000 °C had quite limited effect on the redistribution of carbon in silicon.

  10. RBS and ERDA determinations of depth distributions of high-dose carbon ions implanted in silicon for silicon-carbide synthesis study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Intarasiri, S. [FNRF, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand) and Institute for Science and Technology Research and Development, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand)]. E-mail: saweat@yahoo.com; Kamwanna, T. [FNRF, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Hallen, A. [Royal Institute of Technology, Department of Microelectronics and Information Technology, Electrum 229, S-164 40 Kista-Stockholm (Sweden); Yu, L.D. [FNRF, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Janson, M.S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, B140, Frederick Reines Hall, University of California, Irvine, CA 92 697 (United States); Thongleum, C. [Institute for Science and Technology Research and Development, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Possnert, G. [Angstrom Laboratory, Division of Ion Physics, Uppsala University, SE-751 21 Uppsala (Sweden); Singkarat, S. [FNRF, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand)

    2006-08-15

    For ion beam synthesis of silicon carbide (SiC), a knowledge of the depth distribution of implanted carbon ions in silicon is crucial for successful development. Based on its simplicity and availability, we selected Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) as an analysis technique for this purpose. A self-developed computer program dedicated to extract depth profiles of lighter impurities in heavier matrix is established. For control, calculated results are compared with an other ion beam analysis (IBA) technique superior for studying lighter impurity in heavier substrate i.e. elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA). The RBS was performed with a 1.7-MV Tandetron accelerator using He{sup 2+} as the probe ions. The ERDA was performed with a 5-MV Pelletron accelerator using I{sup 8+} as the probe ions. This work shows that the RBS-extracted data had no significant deviations from those of ERDA and simulations by SRIM2003 and SIIMPL computer codes. We also found that annealing at temperatures as high as 1000 deg. C had quite limited effect on the redistribution of carbon in silicon.

  11. Preparation and Thermal Characterization of Diamond-Like Carbon Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAI Su-Yuan; TANG Zhen-An; HUANG Zheng-Xing; Yu Jun; WANG Jing; LIU Gui-Chang

    2009-01-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films are prepared on silicon substrates by microwave electron cyclotron resonance plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Raman spectroscopy indicates that the films have an amorphous structure and typical characteristics. The topographies of the films are presented by AFM images. Effective thermal conductivities of the films are measured using a nanosecond pulsed photothermal reflectance method. The results show that thermal conductivity is dominated by the microstructure of the films.

  12. Ion implantation in crystalline and amorphous materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasch, Al F.

    1998-05-01

    Ion implantation continues to be the selective doping technique of choice in silicon integrated circuit (IC) manufacturing, and its applications continue to grow in doping, damage gettering, and process simplification. However, in both technology and manufacturing equipment development there is a rapidly increasing need to understand in detail the dependence of implanted impurity profiles and implant-induced damage profiles in silicon on all key implant parameters. These reasons include largely reduced thermal budgets in IC processing, heavy emphasis on control of equipment and process costs, and the need for rigid manufacturing control. Towards this end, accurate, comprehensive, and computationally efficient models for ion implanted profiles (impurity and damage) in silicon are indispensable. These models greatly facilitate more timely technology development and implementation in manufacturing, improved manufacturing process control; and the development of new ion implantation tools can be executed more efficiently. This talk describes ion implant models and simulators developed in the ion implant modeling research/education project at the University of Texas at Austin. Physically based models for ion implantation into single-crystal Si have been developed for the commonly used implant species B, BF(2), As, P, and Si for the most commonly used implant energy ranges. These models have explicit dependence on the major implant parameters (energy, dose, tilt angle and rotation angle). In addition, the models have been extensively verified by the vast amount of experimental data which has been obtained in the experimental part of this project. The models have been extended down to ultra-low implant energies (model has been developed which accurately predicts as-implanted profiles for B and P up to at least 2.5 and 5 MeV, respectively. In addition, for energies below 200keV (the most commonly used energies), a rigorous physically based implant-induced damage model has

  13. Plasma Processes : Microwave plasma deposition of diamond like carbon coatings

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D S Patil; K Ramachandran; N Venkatramani; M Pandey; R D'Cunha

    2000-11-01

    The promising applications of the microwave plasmas have been appearing in the fields of chemical processes and semiconductor manufacturing. Applications include surface deposition of all types including diamond/diamond like carbon (DLC) coatings, etching of semiconductors, promotion of organic reactions, etching of polymers to improve bonding of the other materials etc. With a 2.45 GHz, 700 W, microwave induced plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD) system set up in our laboratory we have deposited diamond like carbon coatings. The microwave plasma generation was effected using a wave guide single mode applicator. We have deposited DLC coatings on the substrates like stainless steel, Cu–Be, Cu and Si. The deposited coatings have been characterized by FTIR, Raman spectroscopy and ellipsometric techniques. The results show that we have achieved depositing ∼ 95% sp3 bonded carbon in the films. The films are uniform with golden yellow color. The films are found to be excellent insulators. The ellipsometric measurements of optical constant on silicon substrates indicate that the films are transparent above 900 nm.

  14. Surface microanalytical studies of nitrogen ion-implanted steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Charles G.; Meeker, G. P.; Baumann, Scott M.; Norberg, James C.; Legg, Keith O.

    1985-03-01

    Five types of industrial steels, 1018, 52100, M-2, 440C, and 304 were ion implanted with nitrogen and subjected to surface microanalysis by three independent surface techniques: AES, RBS, and SIMS. The results provided understanding for earlier observations of the properties of various types of steel after nitrogen implantation. The steels that retained the most nitrogen and that have been reported to benefit the most in improved tribological properties from ion implantation were ferritic carbon and austenitic stainless steels, such as soft 1018 and 304, respectively. Heat-treated martensitic carbon steels such as 52100 and M-2 tool steel were found to retain the least nitrogen, and they have been reported to benefit less from nitrogen implantation; however, the interaction of transition metal carbides in M-2 with nitrogen has not been clarified. The data showed that 440C steel retained as much nitrogen as 1018 and 304, but treatment benefits may be limited to improvements in properties related to toughness and impact resistance.

  15. Study of CVD diamond layers with amorphous carbon admixture by Raman scattering spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dychalska Anna

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Raman spectroscopy is a most often used standard technique for characterization of different carbon materials. In this work we present the Raman spectra of polycrystalline diamond layers of different quality, synthesized by Hot Filament Chemical Vapor Deposition method (HF CVD. We show how to use Raman spectroscopy for the analysis of the Raman bands to determine the structure of diamond films as well as the structure of amorphous carbon admixture. Raman spectroscopy has become an important technique for the analysis of CVD diamond films. The first-order diamond Raman peak at ca. 1332 cm−1 is an unambiguous evidence for the presence of diamond phase in the deposited layer. However, the existence of non-diamond carbon components in a CVD diamond layer produces several overlapping peaks in the same wavenumber region as the first order diamond peak. The intensities, wavenumber, full width at half maximum (FWHM of these bands are dependent on quality of diamond layer which is dependent on the deposition conditions. The aim of the present work is to relate the features of diamond Raman spectra to the features of Raman spectra of non-diamond phase admixture and occurrence of other carbon structures in the obtained diamond thin films.

  16. Ion sources for ion implantation technology (invited)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakai, Shigeki, E-mail: sakai-shigeki@nissin.co.jp; Hamamoto, Nariaki; Inouchi, Yutaka; Umisedo, Sei; Miyamoto, Naoki [Nissin Ion Equipment co., ltd, 575 Kuze-Tonoshiro-cho Minami-ku, Kyoto 601-8205 (Japan)

    2014-02-15

    Ion sources for ion implantation are introduced. The technique is applied not only to large scale integration (LSI) devices but also to flat panel display. For LSI fabrication, ion source scheduled maintenance cycle is most important. For CMOS image sensor devices, metal contamination at implanted wafer is most important. On the other hand, to fabricate miniaturized devices, cluster ion implantation has been proposed to make shallow PN junction. While for power devices such as silicon carbide, aluminum ion is required. For doping processes of LCD fabrication, a large ion source is required. The extraction area is about 150 cm × 10 cm, and the beam uniformity is important as well as the total target beam current.

  17. Ion Implantation and Synthesis of Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Nastasi, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Ion implantation is one of the key processing steps in silicon integrated circuit technology. Some integrated circuits require up to 17 implantation steps and circuits are seldom processed with less than 10 implantation steps. Controlled doping at controlled depths is an essential feature of implantation. Ion beam processing can also be used to improve corrosion resistance, to harden surfaces, to reduce wear and, in general, to improve materials properties. This book presents the physics and materials science of ion implantation and ion beam modification of materials. It covers ion-solid interactions used to predict ion ranges, ion straggling and lattice disorder. Also treated are shallow-junction formation and slicing silicon with hydrogen ion beams. Topics important for materials modification, such as ion-beam mixing, stresses, and sputtering, are also described.

  18. Diamond nanospherulite: A novel material produced at carbon-water interface by pulsed-laser ablation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王育煌; 黄群健; 陈忠; 黄荣彬; 郑兰荪

    1997-01-01

    Formation of carbon nanoparticles with perfectly spherical.shape and diamond structure (diamond nanospherulite) by laser-ablating a variety of carbon samples in water is reported for the first time The studies reveal that molten carbon nanoparticles generated by laser ablation are quenched directly by water and end up as diamond nanospherulites,possibly due to the high pressure arising from surface tension and the high stability resulting from termination of dangling bonds with hydrogen atoms.

  19. Improving electric contacts by ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Shiru; Zhang Ying; Zheng Tiampi

    1989-01-01

    This article studies the improvement of electric contacts by ion implantation. 1 x 10/sup 17/ cm/sup -2/ of N/sup +/ and N/sub 2//sup +/ was implanted into two kinds of electric contacts, then a make-and-break test was made with the low voltage electrical apparatus. The weight loss of the contacts, temperature rise, contact resistance and transfer of material between the two contacts were measured. The contacts implanted by ions have improved electrical erosion properties.

  20. Spectroscopic studies of ion implanted PPV films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreau, C. (Cavendish Lab., Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom)); Friend, R.H. (Cavendish Lab., Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom)); Sarnecki, G.J. (Cavendish Lab., Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom)); Lucas, B. (LEPOFI, Faculte des Sciences, 87 - Limoges (France)); Moliton, A. (LEPOFI, Faculte des Sciences, 87 - Limoges (France)); Ratier, B. (LEPOFI, Faculte des Sciences, 87 - Limoges (France)); Belorgeot, C. (Lab. de Physique Moleculaire, Faculte des Sciences, 87 - Limoges (France))

    1993-03-15

    The main results of the spectroscopic analyses (infrared and ultraviolet - visible - near infrared) carried out on PPV films before and after ion implantation with halogen and alkali ions are presented in this paper. The influence of both ions nature and implantation parameters on optical properties of this polymer have been pointed out and the appearance of a weak band due to doping has been observed by infrared spectroscopy. (orig.)

  1. Properties of Diamond Film/Alumina Composites for Integrated Circuits with Ultra-High Speed and High Power

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Lin-Jun; XIA Yi-Ben; FANG Zhi-Jun; ZHANG Ming-Long; SHEN Hu-Jiang

    2004-01-01

    @@ We report the properties of the diamond film/alumina composites which were thought of as promising substrate materials for integrated circuits with ultra-high speed and high power. The measurement results of dielectric properties of diamond film/alumina composites show that the coating of CVD diamond films could effectively reduce the dielectric constant of the composite. Carbon ion implantation into alumina substrates prior to the diamond deposition can reduce the dielectric loss of the composite from 5 × 10-3 to 2 × 10-3, and can give the composite better frequency stability. The thermal conductivity of composites could be obviously increased by coating CVD diamond film. The composite has a dielectric constant of 6.5 and a thermal conductivity of 3.98 W/(cmK) when the thickness of diamond film is up to 100 μm.

  2. High Energy Radial Deposition of Diamond-Like Carbon Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konrad Suschke

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Diamond-like carbon (DLC coatings were deposited with a new direct ion deposition system using a novel 360 degree ion source operating at acceleration voltage between 4 and 8 kV. Cross-sectional TEM images show that the coatings have a three layered structure which originates from changes in the deposition parameters taking into account ion source condition, ion current density, deposition angles, ion sputtering and ion source movement. Varying structural growth conditions can be achieved by tailoring the deposition parameters. The coatings show good promise for industrial use due to their high hardness, low friction and excellent adhesion to the surface of the samples.

  3. Diamond-Like Carbon Nanorods and Fabrication Thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varshney, Deepak (Inventor); Makarov, Vladimir (Inventor); Morell, Gerardo (Inventor); Saxena, Puja (Inventor); Weiner, Brad (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Novel sp. (sup 3) rich diamond-like carbon (DLC) nanorod films were fabricated by hot filament chemical vapor deposition technique. The results are indicative of a bottom-up self-assembly synthesis process, which results in a hierarchical structure that consists of microscale papillae comprising numerous nanorods. The papillae have diameters ranging from 2 to 4 microns and the nanorods have diameters in the 35-45 nanometer range. A growth mechanism based on the vapor liquid-solid mechanism is proposed that accounts for the morphological aspects in the micro- and nano-scales.

  4. Nitrogen-incorporated ultrananocrystalline diamond and multi-layer-graphene-like hybrid carbon films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzeng, Yonhua; Yeh, Shoupu; Fang, Wei Cheng; Chu, Yuehchieh

    2014-03-01

    Nitrogen-incorporated ultrananocrystalline diamond (N-UNCD) and multi-layer-graphene-like hybrid carbon films have been synthesized by microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MPECVD) on oxidized silicon which is pre-seeded with diamond nanoparticles. MPECVD of N-UNCD on nanodiamond seeds produces a base layer, from which carbon structures nucleate and grow perpendicularly to form standing carbon platelets. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy and Raman scattering measurements reveal that these carbon platelets are comprised of ultrananocrystalline diamond embedded in multilayer-graphene-like carbon structures. The hybrid carbon films are of low electrical resistivity. UNCD grains in the N-UNCD base layer and the hybrid carbon platelets serve as high-density diamond nuclei for the deposition of an electrically insulating UNCD film on it. Biocompatible carbon-based heaters made of low-resistivity hybrid carbon heaters encapsulated by insulating UNCD for possible electrosurgical applications have been demonstrated.

  5. Selective growth of diamond by hot filament CVD using patterned carbon film as mask

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Zhoutong; YANG Shumin; LI Qintao; ZHU Dezhang; GONG Jinlong

    2008-01-01

    Selected-area deposition (SAD) of diamond films was achieved on silicon substrates with carbon film mask by hot filament chemical vapor deposition. Needle tip scraped lines were used to grow diamond films. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) investigation demonstrates that highly selective and sharp edged diamond films were produced. The results also demonstrate that the proper substrate temperature is very important for diamond selective growth in this deposition process. Since the enhancement of diamond growth was not observed on the needle tip scraped area of Si wafer with diamond powder scratching, the selective growth was considered to be closely correlated to silicon carbide formed during carbon film deposition and the residual carbon in the scraped area.

  6. Phase diagram with a region of liquid carbon-diamond metastable states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basharin, A. Yu.; Dozhdikov, V. S.; Kirillin, A. V.; Turchaninov, M. A.; Fokin, L. R.

    2010-06-01

    Metastable cubic diamond has been found in the structure of solid carbon obtained by quenching of a liquid phase at a pressure (0.012 GPa) much lower than that corresponding to the existence of stable diamond. It is suggested that this metastable diamond is formed as a result of the recalescence of supercooled liquid carbon to the melting point ( T dm) of metastable diamond due to a lower energy barrier for the formation of diamond as compared to that of graphite. A comparison between the calculated Gibbs energies of metastable phases provided an estimate of T dm = 4160 ± 50 K. For the first time, metastable continuations of the curve of diamond melting at pressures of up to 0.012 GPa are constructed on the phase diagrams of carbon (according to various published data) using analytical curves described by a two-parametric Simon equation.

  7. Synthesis of copper nanoparticles in polycarbonate by ion implantation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Annu Sharma; Suman Bahniwal; Sanjeev Aggarwal; S Chopra; D Kanjilal

    2011-07-01

    Copper nanoparticles have been synthesized in polycarbonate by 75 KeV Cu– ion implantation with various doses ranging from 6.4 × 1015 to 1.6 × 1017 ions/cm2 with a beam current density of 800 nA/cm2. The composites formed were structurally characterized using Ultraviolet-Visible (UV-Visible) absorption spectroscopy. The appearance of particle plasmon resonance peak, characteristic of copper nanoparticles at 603 nm in absorption spectra of polycarbonate implanted to a dose of 1.6 × 1017 ions/cm2, indicates towards the formation of copper nanoparticles in polycarbonate. Transmission electron microscopy further confirms the formation of copper nanoparticles having size ∼ 3.15 nm. The formation of copper nanoparticles in the layers carbonized by Cu– implantation has been discussed. The synthesized copper-polycarbonate nanocomposite has been found to be more conducting than polycarbonate as ascertained using current–voltage characteristics.

  8. Paramagnetism in ion-implanted oxides

    CERN Document Server

    Mølholt, Torben Esmann; Gíslason, Hafliði Pétur; Ólafsson, Sveinn

    This thesis describes the investigation on para-magnetism in dilute ion-implanted single-crystal oxide samples studied by on- and off-line $^{57}$Fe emission Mössbauer spectroscopy. The ion-implantation of the radioactive isotopes ( $^{57}$Mn and $^{57}$Co) was performed at the ISOLDE facility at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland. The off-line measurements were performed at Aarhus University, Denmark. Mössbauer spectroscopy is a unique method, giving simultaneously local information on valence/spin state of the $^{57}$Fe probe atoms, site symmetry and magnetic properties on an atomic scale. The utilisation of emission Mössbauer spectroscopy opens up many new possibilities compared with traditional transmission Mössbauer spectroscopy. Among them is the possibility of working with a low concentration below 10$^{-4}$ –10$^{-3}$ at.%, where the implanted Mössbauer $^{57}$Fe probes are truly dilute impurities exclusively interacting with their nearest neighbours and therefore the possibility of crea...

  9. PLEPS study of ions implanted RAFM steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sojak, S.; Slugeň, V.; Egger, W.; Ravelli, L.; Petriska, M.; Veterníková, J.; Stacho, M.; Sabelová, V.

    2014-04-01

    Current nuclear power plants (NPP) require radiation, heat and mechanical resistance of their structural materials with the ability to stay operational during NPP planned lifetime. Radiation damage much higher, than in the current NPP, is expected in new generations of nuclear power plants, such as Generation IV and fusion reactors. Investigation of perspective structural materials for new generations of nuclear power plants is among others focused on study of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels. These steels have good characteristics as reduced activation, good resistance to volume swelling, good radiation, and heat resistance. Our experiments were focused on the study of microstructural changes of binary Fe-Cr alloys with different chromium content after irradiation, experimentally simulated by ion implantations. Fe-Cr alloys were examined, by Pulsed Low Energy Positron System (PLEPS) at FRM II reactor in Garching (Munich), after helium ion implantations at the dose of 0.1 C/cm2. The investigation was focused on the chromium effect and the radiation defects resistivity. In particular, the vacancy type defects (monovacancies, vacancy clusters) have been studied. Based on our previous results achieved by conventional lifetime technique, the decrease of the defects size with increasing content of chromium is expected also for PLEPS measurements.

  10. Ion implantations of oxide dispersion strengthened steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sojak, S.; Simeg Veternikova, J.; Slugen, V.; Petriska, M.; Stacho, M.

    2015-12-01

    This paper is focused on a study of radiation damage and thermal stability of high chromium oxide dispersion strengthened steel MA 956 (20% Cr), which belongs to the most perspective structural materials for the newest generation of nuclear reactors - Generation IV. The radiation damage was simulated by the implantation of hydrogen ions up to the depth of about 5 μm, which was performed at a linear accelerator owned by Slovak University of Technology. The ODS steel MA 956 was available for study in as-received state after different thermal treatments as well as in ions implanted state. Energy of the hydrogen ions chosen for the implantation was 800 keV and the implantation fluence of 6.24 × 1017 ions/cm2. The investigated specimens were measured by non-destructive technique Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy in order to study the defect behavior after different thermal treatments in the as-received state and after the hydrogen ions implantation. Although, different resistance to defect production was observed in individual specimens of MA 956 during the irradiation, all implanted specimens contain larger defects than the ones in as-received state.

  11. Atmospheric Plasma Deposition of Diamond-like Carbon Coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ladwig, Angela

    2008-01-23

    There is great demand for thin functional coatings in the semiconductor, optics, electronics, medical, automotive and aerospace industries [1-13]. As fabricated components become smaller and more complex, the properties of the materials’ surface take on greater importance. Thin coatings play a key role in tailoring surfaces to give them the desired hardness, wear resistance, chemical inertness, and electrical characteristics. Diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings possess an array of desirable properties, including outstanding abrasion and wear resistance, chemical inertness, hardness, a low coefficient of friction and exceptionally high dielectric strength [14-22]. Diamond-like carbon is considered to be an amorphous material, containing a mixture of sp2 and sp3 bonded carbon. Based on the percentage of sp3 carbon and the hydrogen content, four different types of DLC coatings have been identified: tetrahedral carbon (ta-C), hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) hard, a-C:H soft, and hydrogenated tetrahedral carbon (ta-C:H) [20,24,25]. Possessing the highest hardness of 80 GPa, ta-C possesses an sp3 carbon content of 80 to 88u%, and no appreciable hydrogen content whereas a-C:H soft possesses a hardness of less than 10 GPa, contains an sp3 carbon content of 60% and a hydrogen content between 30 to 50%. Methods used to deposit DLC coatings include ion beam deposition, cathodic arc spray, pulsed laser ablation, argon ion sputtering, and plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition [73-83]. Researchers contend that several advantages exist when depositing DLC coatings in a low-pressure environment. For example, ion beam processes are widely utilized since the ion bombardment is thought to promote denser sp3-bonded carbon networks. Other processes, such as sputtering, are better suited for coating large parts [29,30,44]. However, the deposition of DLC in a vacuum system has several disadvantages, including high equipment cost and restrictions on the size and shape of

  12. Microstructural analyses of amorphic diamond, i-C, and amorphous carbon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Collins, C. B.; Davanloo, F.; Jander, D.R.;

    1992-01-01

    Recent experiments have identified the microstructure of amorphic diamond with a model of packed nodules of amorphous diamond expected theoretically. However, this success has left in doubt the relationship of amorphic diamond to other noncrystalline forms of carbon. This work reports...... the comparative examinations of the microstructures of samples of amorphic diamond, i-C, and amorphous carbon. Four distinct morphologies were found that correlated closely with the energy densities used in preparing the different materials. Journal of Applied Physics is copyrighted by The American Institute...

  13. The effect of metal ion implantation on the surface mechanical properties of Mylar (PET)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, W.; Sood, D.K. [Royal Melbourne Inst. of Tech., VIC (Australia); Yao, X.; Brown, I.G. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Lawrence Berkeley Lab.

    1993-12-31

    Ion implantation of polymers leads to the formation of new carbonaceous materials, the revolution during implantation of various species consists of (1) ion beam induced damage: chain scission, crosslinking, molecular emission of volatile elements and compounds, stoichiometric change in the surface layer of pristine polymers; and (2) chemical effect between ion and target materials: microalloying and precipitation. Literature regarding ion implanted polymers shows that the reorganisation of the carbon network after implantation can dramatically modify several properties of pristine polymers solubility, molecular weight, and electrical, optical and mechanical properties. However, ion implantation of polymers is actually a very complex interaction which depends on not only ion species, implantation condition, but also polymer type and specific structure. In this paper the effect of Ag or Ti ions implantation on surface mechanical properties of PET (polyethylenne terephthalate) polymer is reported. There was a clear deterioration in wear resistance after implantation of both Ag and Ti ions. It is suggested that the increment of wear after implantation may result from not only ion damage but also chemical effect between ion and target material. 3 refs., 1 tab., 2 figs.

  14. Diamond dissolution and the production of methane and other carbon-bearing species in hydrothermal diamond-anvil cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, I.-Ming; Anderson, Alan J.

    2009-01-01

    Raman analysis of the vapor phase formed after heating pure water to near critical (355-374 ??C) temperatures in a hydrothermal diamond-anvil cell (HDAC) reveals the synthesis of abiogenic methane. This unexpected result demonstrates the chemical reactivity of diamond at relatively low temperatures. The rate of methane production from the reaction between water and diamond increases with increasing temperature and is enhanced by the presence of a metal gasket (Re, Ir, or Inconel) which is compressed between the diamond anvils to seal the aqueous sample. The minimum detection limit for methane using Raman spectroscopy was determined to be ca. 0.047 MPa, indicating that more than 1.4 nanograms (or 8.6 ?? 10-11 mol) of methane were produced in the HDAC at 355 ??C and 30 MPa over a period of ten minutes. At temperatures of 650 ??C and greater, hydrogen and carbon dioxide were detected in addition to methane. The production of abiogenic methane, observed in all HDAC experiments where a gasket was used, necessitates a reexamination of the assumed chemical systems and intensive parameters reported in previous hydrothermal investigations employing diamonds. The results also demonstrate the need to minimize or eliminate the production of methane and other carbonic species in experiments by containing the sample within a HDAC without using a metal gasket.

  15. Formation of conducting nanochannels in diamond-like carbon films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evtukh, A.; Litovchenko, V.; Semenenko, M.; Yilmazoglu, O.; Mutamba, K.; Hartnagel, H. L.; Pavlidis, D.

    2006-09-01

    A sharp increase of the emission current at high electric fields and a decrease of the threshold voltage after pre-breakdown conditioning of diamond-like carbon (DLC) films have been measured. This effect was observed for DLC-coated silicon tips and GaAs wedges. During electron field emission (EFE) at high electric fields the energy barriers caused by an sp3 phase between sp2 inclusions can be broken, resulting in the formation of conducting nanochannels between the semiconductor-DLC interface and the surface of the DLC film. At high current densities and the resulting local heating, the diamond-like sp3 phase transforms into a conducting graphite-like sp2 phase. As a result an electrical conducting nanostructured channel is formed in the DLC film. The diameter of the conducting nanochannel was estimated from the reduced threshold voltage after pre-breakdown conditioning to be in the range of 5-25 nm. The presence of this nanochannel in an insulating matrix leads to a local enhancement of the electric field and a reduced threshold voltage for EFE. Based on the observed features an efficient method of conducting nanochannel matrix formation in flat DLC films for improved EFE efficiency is proposed. It mainly uses a silicon tip array as an upper electrode in contact with the DLC film. The formation of nanochannels starts at the interface between the tips and the DLC film. This opens new possibilities of aligned and high-density conducting channel formation.

  16. Low voltage electrodeposition of diamond like carbon (DLC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreejith, K.; Nuwad, J.; Pillai, C. G. S.

    2005-10-01

    Attempt has been made to deposit diamond like carbon (DLC) films from ethanol through electrodeposition at low voltages (80-300 V) at 1 mm interelectrode separation. The films were characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and Auger electron Spectroscopy (AES). AFM investigations revealed the grain sizes are of tens of nanometers. The films were found to be continuous, smooth and close packed. Presence of peaks at 2958, 2929 and 2869 cm -1 in FTIR spectrum indicates the bonding states to be of predominantly sp 3 type (C-H). Raman spectroscopy analysis revealed two broad bands at ˜1350 and ˜1570 cm -1. The downshift of the G-band of graphite is indicative of presence of DLC. Analysis of the Raman spectra for the samples revealed an improvement in the film quality with increase in the voltage. Micro Raman investigations indicate the formation of diamond phase at the deposition potential of 80 V. The sp 2 contents the films calculated from Auger electron spectra were calculated and were found to be 31, 19 and 7.8% for the samples prepared at 80, 150 and 300 V, respectively. A tentative mechanism for the formation of DLC has been proposed. These results indicate the possibility of deposition of DLC at low voltage.

  17. Low voltage electrodeposition of diamond like carbon (DLC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sreejith, K. [Novel Materials and Structural Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Nuwad, J. [Novel Materials and Structural Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Pillai, C.G.S. [Novel Materials and Structural Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India)]. E-mail: cgspil@apsara.barc.ernet.in

    2005-10-15

    Attempt has been made to deposit diamond like carbon (DLC) films from ethanol through electrodeposition at low voltages (80-300 V) at 1 mm interelectrode separation. The films were characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and Auger electron Spectroscopy (AES). AFM investigations revealed the grain sizes are of tens of nanometers. The films were found to be continuous, smooth and close packed. Presence of peaks at 2958, 2929 and 2869 cm{sup -1} in FTIR spectrum indicates the bonding states to be of predominantly sp{sup 3} type (C-H). Raman spectroscopy analysis revealed two broad bands at {approx}1350 and {approx}1570 cm{sup -1}. The downshift of the G-band of graphite is indicative of presence of DLC. Analysis of the Raman spectra for the samples revealed an improvement in the film quality with increase in the voltage. Micro Raman investigations indicate the formation of diamond phase at the deposition potential of 80 V. The sp{sup 2} contents the films calculated from Auger electron spectra were calculated and were found to be 31, 19 and 7.8% for the samples prepared at 80, 150 and 300 V, respectively. A tentative mechanism for the formation of DLC has been proposed. These results indicate the possibility of deposition of DLC at low voltage.

  18. Surface modification of sapphire by ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McHargue, C.J.

    1998-11-01

    The range of microstructures and properties of sapphire (single crystalline Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) that are produced by ion implantation are discussed with respect to the implantation parameters of ion species, fluence, irradiation temperature and the orientation of the ion beam relative to crystallographic axes. The microstructure of implanted sapphire may be crystalline with varying concentrations of defects or it may be amorphous perhaps with short-range order. At moderate to high fluences, implanted metallic ions often coalesce into pure metallic colloids and gas ions form bubbles. Many of the implanted microstructural features have been identified from studies using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), optical spectroscopy, Moessbauer spectroscopy, and Rutherford backscattering-channeling. The chemical, mechanical, and physical properties reflect the microstructures.

  19. Synthesis of titanium sapphire by ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morpeth, L.D.; McCallum, J.C.; Nugent, K.W. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1998-06-01

    Since laser action was first demonstrated in titanium sapphire (Ti:Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) in 1982, it has become the most widely used tunable solid state laser source. The development of a titanium sapphire laser in a waveguide geometry would yield an elegant, compact, versatile and highly tunable light source useful for applications in many areas including optical telecommunications. We are investigating whether ion implantation techniques can be utilised to produce suitable crystal quality and waveguide geometry for fabrication of a Ti:Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} waveguide laser. The implantation of Ti and O ions into c-axis oriented {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} followed by subsequent thermal annealing under various conditions has been investigated as a means of forming the waveguide and optimising the fraction of Ti ions that have the correct oxidation state required for laser operation. A Raman Microprobe is being used to investigate the photo-luminescence associated with Ti{sup 3+} ion. Initial photoluminescence measurements of ion implanted samples are encouraging and reveal a broad luminescence profile over a range of {approx} .6 to .9 {mu}m, similar to that expected from Ti{sup 3+}. Rutherford Backscattering and Ion Channelling analysis have been used to study the crystal structure of the samples following implantation and annealing. This enables optimisation of the implantation parameters and annealing conditions to minimise defect levels which would otherwise limit the ability of light to propagate in the Ti:Al{sub 2O}3 waveguide. (authors). 8 refs., 3 figs.

  20. Local structure of liquid carbon controls diamond nucleation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghiringhelli, L.M.; Valeriani, C.; Meijer, E.J.; Frenkel, D.

    2009-01-01

    Diamonds melt at temperatures above 4000 K. There are no measurements of the steady-state rate of the reverse process: diamond nucleation from the melt, because experiments are difficult at these extreme temperatures and pressures. Using numerical simulations, we estimate the diamond nucleation rate

  1. Local Structure of Liquid Carbon Controls Diamond Nucleation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghiringhelli, L.M.; Valeriani, C.; Meijer, E.J.; Frenkel, D.

    2007-01-01

    Diamonds melt at temperatures above 4000 K. There are no measurements of the steady-state rate of the reverse process, i.e., diamond nucleation from the melt, because experiments are difficult at these extreme temperatures and pressures. Using numerical simulations, we estimate the diamond nucleatio

  2. Development of Diamond-like Carbon Fibre Wheel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏源迁; 山口勝美; 洞口巌; 竹内雅之

    2004-01-01

    A unique diamond-like carbon (DLC) grinding wheel was developed, in which the DLC fibres were made by rolling Al sheets coated with DLC films and aligned normally to the grinding wheel surface by laminating Al sheets together with DLC fibres. In this paper, the formation process of DLC fibres and the fabrication process of a DLC fibre wheel were investigated. Many grinding experiments were also carried out on a precision NC plane milling machine using a newly developed DLC wheel. Grinding of specimens of silicon wafers, optical glasses, quartz, granites and hardened die steel SKD11 demonstrated the capabilities of nanometer surface finish. A smooth surface with a roughness value of Ra2.5nm (Ry26nm) was achieved.

  3. Advances in targetry with thin diamond-like carbon foils

    CERN Document Server

    Liechtenstein, V K; Olshanski, E D; Repnow, R; Levin, J; Hellborg, R; Persson, P; Schenkel, T

    2002-01-01

    Thin and stable diamond-like carbon (DLC) foils, which were fabricated at the Kurchatov Institute by sputter deposition, have proved recently to be advantageous for stripping and secondary electron timing of high energy heavy ions in a number of accelerator experiments. This resulted in expanding applications of these DLC foils which necessitated further development efforts directed toward the following applications of DLC targetry: (i) thin stripper foils for lower energy tandem accelerators, (ii) enlarged (up to 66 mm in diameter) stop foils for improved time-of-flight elastic recoil detection ion beam analysis, and (iii) ultra-thin (about 0.6 mu g/cm sup 2) DLC foils for some fundamental and applied physics experiments. Along with the fabrication of thin DLC stripper foils for tandem accelerators, much thicker (up to 200 mu g/cm sup 2) foils for post-stripping of heavy-ion beams in higher energy linacs, are within reach.

  4. Cell attachment on diamond-like carbon coating

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D J Li; H Q Gu

    2002-02-01

    Preliminary results of diamond-like carbon (DLC) coating with its novel properties with no toxicity have caused a strong interest of commercial manufacturers of surgical implants. DLC coatings were prepared on polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) at room temperature using ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD). It could be shown by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy that DLC coating prepared by 800 eV CH+ beam bombardment possessed a higher fraction of 3 bonds in the structure of mixed 3 + 2 bonding, resulting in a higher hydrophobicity. The results of the cell attachment tests indicated that DLC coatings exhibited low macrophage attachment and provided desirable surface for the normal cellular growth and morphology of the fibroblasts. At the same time, the number of both neutral granulocytes and platelets adhering to DLC coatings decreased significantly. These findings showed that DLC was a better coating with desirable tissue and blood compatibility.

  5. Optically transparent, scratch-resistant, diamond-like carbon coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiao-Ming; Lee, Deok-Hyung; Nastasi, Michael A.; Walter, Kevin C.; Tuszewski, Michel G.

    2003-06-03

    A plasma-based method for the deposition of diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings is described. The process uses a radio-frequency inductively coupled discharge to generate a plasma at relatively low gas pressures. The deposition process is environmentally friendly and scaleable to large areas, and components that have geometrically complicated surfaces can be processed. The method has been used to deposit adherent 100-400 nm thick DLC coatings on metals, glass, and polymers. These coatings are between three and four times harder than steel and are therefore scratch resistant, and transparent to visible light. Boron and silicon doping of the DLC coatings have produced coatings having improved optical properties and lower coating stress levels, but with slightly lower hardness.

  6. Electrical conditioning of diamond-like carbon films for the formation of coated field emission cathodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenenko, M.; Okrepka, G.; Yilmazoglu, O.; Hartnagel, H. L.; Pavlidis, D.

    2010-11-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films deposited on different substrates by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition were investigated. Bonding states and film quality were characterized by FT-IR spectroscopy. The influence of the power of plasma and the deposition time on the sp2/sp3 ratio as well as the concentration of CHn bonds was studied. The influence of sp2/sp3 ratio on the formation process of conducting channels in diamond-like carbon films as a result of electrical breakdown was determined. Reproducible increase of diamond-like carbon film conductivity, with initial sp2/sp3 ratio larger than 0.16, was observed after electrical breakdown.

  7. Heteroepitaxial diamond growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markunas, R. J.; Rudder, R. A.; Posthill, J. B.; Thomas, R. E.; Hudson, G.

    1994-02-01

    Technical highlights from 1993 include the following: Growth Chemistries: A clear correlation was observed between ionization potential of feedstock gasses and critical power necessary for inductive coupling of the plasma and consequent diamond growth. Substrate preparation and epitaxial film quality: Ion-implantation of C and O has been coupled with either electrochemical etching or acid cleaning for surface preparation prior to homoepitaxial growth. Reactor modifications: Key improvements were made to the RF reactor to allow for long growths to consolidate substrates. Liquid mass flow controllers were added to precisely meter both the water and selected alcohol. Ion-implantation and lift off: Lift off of diamond platelets has been achieved with two processes. Ion-implantation of either C or O followed by annealing and implantation of either C or O followed by water based electrolysis. Diamond characterization: Development of novel detect characterization techniques: (1) Etch delineation of defects by exposure to propane torch flame. (2) Hydrogen plasma exposure to enhance secondary electron emission and provide non-topographical defect contrast. Acetylene will react at room temperature with sites created by partial desorption of oxygen from the (100) diamond surface. Thermal desorption measurements give an apparent activation energy for CO desorption from diamond (100) of 45 kcal/mol. Quantum chemical calculations indicate an activation energy of 38 kcal/mol for CO desorption. Ab initio calculations on (100) surfaces indicates that oxygen adsorbed at one dimer site has an effect on the dimerization of an adjacent site.

  8. Investigation of Carbon ion-implanted waveguides in tungsten bronze (Ca0.28Ba0.72)0.25(Sr0.6Ba0.4)0.75Nb2O6 single crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Yang; Wang, Chuan-Kui; Li, Zong-Liang; Ren, Ying-Ying

    2014-09-01

    Planar optical waveguides were fabricated in (Ca0.28Ba0.72)0.25(Sr0.6Ba0.4)0.75Nb2O6 (CSBN25) crystal by 6.0-MeV C+ ion implantation with fluences of 2, 4 and 6 × 1014 ions/cm2 at room temperature. The mode parameters, refractive indices profiles are measured and the refractive indices behavior in the waveguide region is discussed. The shape of nuclear energy loss distribution of the C+ implantation was similar to those of the waveguide refractive index profiles, which means an inherent relationship between the waveguide formation and the energetic energy deposition. The extraordinary refractive index has a small positive change in the surface region after the implantation.

  9. Molecular ion sources for low energy semiconductor ion implantation (invited)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hershcovitch, A., E-mail: hershcovitch@bnl.gov [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Gushenets, V. I.; Bugaev, A. S.; Oks, E. M.; Vizir, A.; Yushkov, G. Yu. [High Current Electronics Institute, Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk 634055 (Russian Federation); Seleznev, D. N.; Kulevoy, T. V.; Kozlov, A.; Kropachev, G. N.; Kuibeda, R. P.; Minaev, S. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow 117218 (Russian Federation); Dugin, S.; Alexeyenko, O. [State Scientific Center of the Russian Federation State Research Institute for Chemistry and Technology of Organoelement Compounds, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2016-02-15

    Smaller semiconductors require shallow, low energy ion implantation, resulting space charge effects, which reduced beam currents and production rates. To increase production rates, molecular ions are used. Boron and phosphorous (or arsenic) implantation is needed for P-type and N-type semiconductors, respectively. Carborane, which is the most stable molecular boron ion leaves unacceptable carbon residue on extraction grids. A self-cleaning carborane acid compound (C{sub 4}H{sub 12}B{sub 10}O{sub 4}) was synthesized and utilized in the ITEP Bernas ion source resulting in large carborane ion output, without carbon residue. Pure gaseous processes are desired to enable rapid switch among ion species. Molecular phosphorous was generated by introducing phosphine in dissociators via 4PH{sub 3} = P{sub 4} + 6H{sub 2}; generated molecular phosphorous in a pure gaseous process was then injected into the HCEI Calutron-Bernas ion source, from which P{sub 4}{sup +} ion beams were extracted. Results from devices and some additional concepts are described.

  10. Characterisation of polystyrene coatings after plasma immersion ion implantation and adsorption of protein

    CERN Document Server

    Dekker, S; Steel, B; Bilek, M M M; McKenzie, D R; James, M

    2012-01-01

    A polystyrene film spun onto polished silicon substrates was implanted with either nitrogen or argon ions using plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) and subsequently investigated by X-ray and neutron reflectometry, UV-VIS and FTIR ellipsometry, as well as by FTIR and Raman spectroscopy. The depth profile of the densified carbon structures resulting from the ion collision cascades in the polystyrene coating are clearly observed by both X-ray and neutron reflectometry. Argon ions produce a higher density modified layer at a shallower depth than nitrogen ions. The thickness measured for these graded layers agrees with the expected depths of ion implantation as calculated by SRIM. The sensitivity of X-ray and neutron reflectometry allows resolution of density and hydrogen content gradients within the graphitized layers. The treated layers were found to covalently immobilized protein directly from solution. The tropoelastin protein monolayers immobilized on the surface were characterized. Tropoelastin remained...

  11. Effect of Carbon Source with Different Graphitization Degrees on the Synthesis of Diamond

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Wan-Qiang; MA Hong-AN; LI Xiao-Lei; LINAG Zhong-Zhu; LIU Mi-Lan; LI Rui; JIA Xiao-Peng

    2007-01-01

    Using three kinds of graphites with different graphitization degrees as carbon source and Fe-Ni alloy powder as catalyst, the synthesis of diamond crystals is performed in a cubic anvil high-pressure and high-temperature apparatus (SPD-6×1200). Diamond crystals with perfect hexoctahedron shape are successfully synthesized at pressure from 5.0 to 5.5GPa and at temperature from 1570 to 1770K. The synthetic conditions, nucleation, morphology, inclusion and granularity of diamond crystals are studied. The temperature and pressure increase with the increase of the graphitization degree of graphite. The quantity of nucleation and granularity of diamonds decreases with the increase of graphitization degree of graphite under the same synthesis conditions. Moreover, according to the results of the Mossbauer spectrum, the composition of inclusions is mainly Fes C and Fe-Ni alloy phases in diamond crystals synthesized with three kinds of graphites.

  12. Electronic Power System Application of Diamond-Like Carbon Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Richard L. C.; Kosai, H.; Fries-Carr, S.; Weimer, J.; Freeman, M.; Schwarze, G. E.

    2003-01-01

    A prototype manufacturing technology for producing high volume efficiency and high energy density diamond-like carbon (DLC) capacitors has been developed. Unique dual ion-beam deposition and web-handling systems have been designed and constructed to deposit high quality DLC films simultaneously on both sides of capacitor grade aluminum foil and aluminum-coated polymer films. An optimized process, using inductively coupled RF ion sources, has been used to synthesize electrically robust DLC films. DLC films are amorphous and highly flexible, making them suitable for the production of wound capacitors. DLC capacitors are reliable and stable over a wide range of AC frequencies from 20 Hz to 1 MHz, and over a temperature range from .500 C to 3000 C. The compact DLC capacitors offer at least a 50% decrease in weight and volume and a greater than 50% increase in temperature handling capability over equal value capacitors built with existing technologies. The DLC capacitors will be suitable for high temperature, high voltage, pulsed power and filter applications.

  13. The irradiation studies on diamond-like carbon films

    CERN Document Server

    LiuGuIang; Xie Er Qin

    2002-01-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films have been deposited on glass substrates using radio-frequency (r.f.) plasma deposition method. gamma-ray, ultraviolet (UV) ray and neutron beam were used to irradiate the DLC films. Raman spectroscopy and infrared (IR) spectroscopy were used to characterize the changing characteristics of SP sup 3 C-H bond and hydrogen content in the films due to the irradiations. It showed that, the damage degrees of the gamma-ray, UV ray and neutron beam on the SP sup 3 C-H bonds are different. Among them, the damage of gamma-ray on the SP sup 3 C-H bond is the weakest. When the irradiation dose of gamma-ray reaches 10x10 sup 4 Gy, the SP sup 3 C-H bond reduces about 50% in number. The square resistance of the films is reduced due to the irradiation of UV ray and this is caused by severe oxidation of the films. Compared with that of the as-deposited one, the IR transmittance of the films irradiated by both gamma-ray and neutron beam is increased to some extent. By using the results on optical...

  14. STUDY OF RAY IRRADIATION ON DIAMOND-LIKE CARBON FILMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    G.A.Liu; T.M.Wang; E.Q.Xie

    2002-01-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films have been deposited on glass substrates using radio-frequency (rf) plasma deposition method, γ-ray, ultraviolet (UV) ray were used toirradiate the DLC films. Raman spectroscopy and infrared (IR) spectroscopy were usedto characterize the changing characteristics of SP3 C-H bond and hydrogen content inthe films due to the irradiations. The results show that, the damage degrees induced bythe UV ray on the SP3 C-H bonds are much stronger than that by the γ-ray. When theirradiation dose of γ-ray reaches 10× 104Gy, the SP3 C-H bond reduces about 50% innumber. The square electrical resistance of the films is reduced due to the irradiationof UV ray and this is caused by severe oxidation of the films. By using the results onoptical gap of the films and the fully constrained network theory, the hydrogen contentin the as-deposited films is estimated to be 10-25at.%.

  15. Correlated carbon and oxygen isotope signatures in eclogitic diamonds with coesite inclusions: A SIMS investigation of diamonds from Guaniamo, Argyle and Orapa mines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, D. J.; Page, Z.; Harte, B.; Valley, J.; Channer, D.; Jaques, L.

    2006-12-01

    Using ion microprobes and secondary-ion mass spectrometry we have analyzed the carbon and oxygen isotopic composition of eclogite-suite diamonds and their coesite inclusions, respectively, from three suites of diamonds of Proterozoic age. Extremely high (for the mantle) oxygen isotope values (delta 18O of +10.2 to +16.9 per mil VSMOW) are preserved in coesites included in eclogitic diamonds from Guaniamo, Venezuela (Schulze et al., Nature, 2003), providing compelling evidence for an origin of their eclogite hosts by subduction of sea water altered ocean floor basalts. In situ SIMS analyses of their host diamonds yield carbon isotope values (delta 13C) of -12 to -18 per mil PDB. SIMS analyses of coesite inclusions from Argyle, Australia diamonds previously analyzed by combustion methods for d13C composition (Jaques et al., Proc. 4th Kimb. Conf, 1989), also yield anomalously high d18O values (+6.8 to +16.0 per mil VSMOW), that correlate with the anomalously low carbon isotope values (-10.3 to -14.1 per mil PDB). One coesite-bearing diamond from Orapa, Botswana analyzed in situ by SIMS has a d18O value of the coesite of +8.5 per mil VSMOW and a d13C value of the adjacent diamond host of -9.0 per mil PDB. A second Orapa stone has a SIMS carbon isotope compositional range of d13C = -14 to -16 per mil PDB, but the coesite is too small for ion probe analysis. At each of these localities, carbon isotope values of coesite-bearing diamonds that are lower than typical of mantle carbon are correlated with oxygen isotope compositions of included coesites that are substantially above the common mantle oxygen isotope range. Such results are not in accord with diamond genesis models involving formation of eclogitic diamonds from igneous melts undergoing fractionation in the mantle or by crystallization from primordial inhomogeneities in Earth's mantle. By analogy with the oxygen isotope compositions of altered ocean floor basalts and Alpine (subduction zone) eclogites they are

  16. Synthesis of Boron-doped Diamond/Porous Ti Composite Materials——Effect of Carbon Concentration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Ming; CHANG Ming; LI Xiaowei

    2012-01-01

    Highly boron-doped diamond films were deposited on porous titanium substrates by hot filament chemical vapor deposition technique.The morphology variation of highly boron-doped diamond films grown on porous titanium substrates was investigated,and the effects of carbon concentration on nucleation density and diamond growth were also studied.The continuous change of surface morphology and structure of diamond film were characterized by scanning electron microscopy.The structures of diamond film and interlayer were analyzed by X-ray diffraction.The quality of boron-doped diamond film was confirmed by visible Raman spectroscopy.The experimental results reveal that surface morphology and quality of boron-doped diamond films are various due to the change of carbon concentration.The thickness of intermediate layer decreases with the carbon concentration increasing.

  17. Experimental Investigation and Numerical Simulation on Interfacial Carbon Diffusion of Diamond Tool and Ferrous Metals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZOU Lai; ZHOU Ming

    2016-01-01

    We numerically simulated and experimentally studied the interfacial carbon diffusion between diamond tool and workpiece materials. A diffusion model with respect to carbon atoms of diamond tool penetrating into chips and machined surface was established. The numerical simulation results of the diffusion process reveal that the distribution laws of carbon atoms concentration have a close relationship with the diffusion distance, the diffusion time, and the original carbon concentration of the work material. In addition, diamond face cutting tests of die steels with different carbon content are conducted at different depth of cuts and feed rates to verify the previous simulation results. The micro-morphology of the chips is detected by scanning electron microscopy. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis was proposed to investigate the change in carbon content of the chips surface. The experimental results of this work are of beneift to a better understanding on the diffusion wear mechanism in single crystal diamond cutting of ferrous metals. Moreover, the experimental results show that the diffusion wear of diamond could be reduced markedly by applying ultrasonic vibration to the cutting tool compared with conventional turning.

  18. Characterization of Diamond Like Carbon Film%DLC膜的表征方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙艳明

    2012-01-01

    DLC(Diamond like carbon)薄膜的表征方法很多,发展的很快,在实验中我们经常采用多种性能测试方法,综合分析,得到较可靠的信息。%Diamond like carbon film has many characterization,growing fast.In the experiment,we often use a variety of performance test,comprehensive analysis,to obtain more reliable information.

  19. Nanometer structure and conductor mechanism of polymer modified by metal ion implantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴瑜光; 张通和; 张燕文; 张荟星; 张孝吉; 周固

    2001-01-01

    Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) has been modified by Ag, Ti, Cu and Si ion implanta-tion with a dose ranging from 1 × l016 to 2 x 1017 ions/cm2 using a metal vapor vacuum arc (MEVVA)source. The electrical properties of PET have been improved by metal ion implantation. The resistivityof implanted PET decreased obviously with an increase in ion dose. The results show that the conduc-tive behavior of a metal ion implanted sample is different from Si-implantation samples. In order to un-derstant the mechanism of electrical conduction, the structures of implanted layer were observed in de-tail by XRD and TEM. The nano carbon particles were dispersed in implanted PET. The nano metallicparticles were built up in metallic ion implanted layers with dose range from 1 × 1016 to 1 x 1017 ions/cm2. The nanometer metal net structure was formed in implanted layer when a dose of 2 x 1017ions/cm2 is reached. Anomalous fractal growths were observed. These surface structure changes revealedconducting mechanism evolution, lt is believed that the change would result in an improvement of theconductive properties. The conducting mechanism will be changed with increasing metal ion dose.

  20. Carbon and Nitrogen Isotope Systematics in a Sector-Zoned Diamond from the Mir Kimberlite, Yakutia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauri, E.; Bulanova, G.; Pearson, G.; Griffin, B.

    2002-05-01

    A single Yakutian octahedral diamond, displaying striking cubic and octahedral growth sectors surrounded by an octahedral rim, has been analysed for carbon and nitrogen isotopic compositions by SIMS and for nitrogen concentration (by SIMS and FTIR) and nitrogen aggregation state (FTIR). A graphite "seed" inclusion identified within the diamond, enriched in K, Ca, Ti, Rb and Sr, provides evidence that the diamond may have grown from a carbonate melt/fluid interacting with upper mantle rocks. Carbon and nitrogen isotope compositions become progressively heavier from the core region (d13C = -7 to -5 and d15N= -3) towards the inner rim zones (d13C = -3 and d15N = +8.9 to +5) of the diamond. Nitrogen concentration and aggregation measurements show corresponding decreases that generally correlate with the isotopic variations. These systematic variations within the core and intermediate regions of the diamond are consistent with their formation during diamond growth from CO2-rich fluids as a continuous event, accompanied by slight progressive isotopic fractionation of carbon and nitrogen. However, the observed isotope and nitrogen abundance trends are not those predicted from thermodynamic modelling of fluid-solid equilibria in a C-N-O-H-bearing system due to changes in parameters such as fO2 (Deines, 1980; Deines et al 1989). Within the finely-zoned octahedral rim region, non-systematic variations in nitrogen abundance, nitrogen aggregation, and nitrogen and carbon isotope ratios were observed. Several interpretations are given for this phenomenon, including kinetic effects during growth of the diamond rim under different conditions from those of the core-intermediate regions, or rapidly changing fluid sources during the growth. No fractionation of nitrogen isotopes between cubic and octahedral growth zones was identified within the studied diamond, in contrast with the fractionation phenomena found in synthetic diamonds of mixed growth. Our results illustrate the

  1. Investigation on the formation of tungsten carbide in tungsten-containing diamond like carbon coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strondl, C.; Carvalho, N.M.; Hosson, J.Th.M. De; Kolk, G.J. van der

    2003-01-01

    A series of tungsten-containing diamond-like carbon (Me-DLC) coatings have been produced by unbalanced magnetron sputtering using a Hauzer HTC-1000 production PVD system. Sputtering from WC targets has been used to form W-C:H coatings. The metal to carbon ratio has been varied to study changes in th

  2. Nanoscale triboactivity of functionalized c-Si surfaces by Fe+ ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, B.; Alves, E.; Colaço, R.

    2016-04-01

    In the present work, we present a study of the effect of Fe+ ion implantation on the tribological response at nanoscale contact lengths of crystalline silicon (c-Si) surfaces. (1 0 0) silicon wafers were implanted with Fe+ at a fluence of 2  ×  1017 cm-2, followed by annealing treatments at temperatures of 800 °C and 1000 °C. After microstructural characterization, nanoabrasive wear tests were performed with an atomic force microscope (AFM) using an AFM diamond tip with a stiff steel cantilever that enables the application of loads between 1 μN and 8 μN. After the nanowear tests, the same AFM was used to visualize and measure the worn craters. It was observed that the as-implanted samples present the poorest nanowear response, i.e. the highest wear rate, even higher than that of the unimplanted Si wafers used as a reference. Nevertheless, annealing treatments result in a measurable increase in the nanowear resistance. In this way we show that Fe+ ion implantation of c-Si, followed by the proper post-heat treatment, results in the formation of FeSi2 nanoprecipitates finely dispersed in a recrystallized matrix. This can be a valuable way of optimizing the nanotribological behavior of silicon.

  3. Mineral inclusions in sublithospheric diamonds from Juina, Brazil: Subducted protoliths, carbonated melts and protokimberlite magmatism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Michael; Bulanova, Galina; Smith, Chris; Armstrong, Lora; Kohn, Simon; Blundy, Jon; Gobbo, Luiz

    2010-05-01

    A suite of Type II Diamonds from the Cretaceous Collier 4 kimberlite pipe, Juina Kimberlite Field, Brazil, include syngenetic mineral inclusions comprising a remarkable range of compositions that include calcium- and titanium-rich perovskite, Ca-rich majoritic garnet, olivine, TAPP phase, CAS phase, K-hollandite phase, SiO2, FeO, native iron, low-Ni sulphides, and Ca-Mg carbonate. The diamonds also exhibit a range in carbon isotopic composition (δ13C ) that effectively spans that observed in the global diamond population. Diamonds with heavy, mantle-like δ13C (-5 to -10) contain mineral inclusions indicating a transition zone origin from mafic protoliths. Diamonds with intermediate δ13C (-12 to -15) contain inclusions with chemistry indicating crystallization from near-primary and differentiated carbonated melts derived from oceanic crust in the deep upper mantle or transition zone. Diamonds with extremely light δ13C (~ -25) host inclusions with chemistry akin to high pressure-temperature phases expected to form in the transition zone from subducted pelagic sediments. Collectively, the Collier 4 diamonds and their inclusions indicate multi-stage growth histories in dynamically changing chemical environments. A 206Pb/238U age of 101±7 Ma on a CaTiSi-perovskite inclusion is close to the kimberlite emplacement time (93.1 ±1.5 Ma). This young inclusion age, together with the chemical and isotopic characteristics indicating the role of subducted materials, suggest a model in which the generation of sublithospheric diamonds and their inclusions, and the proto-kimberlite magmas, are related genetically to the interaction of subducted lithosphere and a Cretaceous plume.

  4. Carbon and nitrogen isotope systematics in diamond: Different sensitivities to isotopic fractionation or a decoupled origin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogberg, K.; Stachel, T.; Stern, R. A.

    2016-11-01

    Using stable isotope data obtained on multiple aliquots of diamonds from worldwide sources, it has been argued that carbon and nitrogen in diamond are decoupled. Here we re-investigate the carbon-nitrogen relationship based on the most comprehensive microbeam data set to date of stable isotopes and nitrogen concentrations in diamonds (n = 94) from a single locality. Our diamond samples, derived from two kimberlites in the Chidliak Field (NE Canada), show large variability in δ13C (- 28.4 ‰ to - 1.1‰, mode at - 5.8‰), δ15N (- 5.8 to + 18.8‰, mode at - 3.0‰) and nitrogen contents ([N]; 3800 to less than 1 at.ppm). In combination, cathodoluminescence imaging and microbeam analyses reveal that the diamonds grew from multiple fluid pulses, with at least one major hiatus documented in some samples that was associated with a resorption event and an abrupt change from low δ13C and [N] to mantle-like δ13C and high [N]. Overall, δ13C appears to be uncorrelated to δ15N and [N] on both the inter- and intra-diamond levels. Co-variations of δ15N-log[N], however, result in at least two parallel, negatively correlated linear arrays, which are also present on the level of the individual diamonds falling on these two trends. These arrays emerge from the two principal data clusters, are characterized by slightly negative and slightly positive δ15N (about - 3 and + 2‰, respectively) and variable but overall high [N]. Using published values for the diamond-fluid nitrogen isotope fractionation factor and nitrogen partition coefficient, these trends are perfectly reproduced by a Rayleigh fractionation model. Overall, three key elements are identified in the formation of the diamond suite studied: (1.) a low δ13C and low [N] component that possibly is directly associated with an eclogitic diamond substrate or introduced during an early stage fluid event. (2.) Repeated influx of a variably nitrogen-rich mantle fluid (mildly negative δ13C and δ15N). (3.) In waning

  5. Statistical 3D damage accumulation model for ion implant simulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez-Mangas, J.M. E-mail: jesman@ele.uva.es; Lazaro, J.; Enriquez, L.; Bailon, L.; Barbolla, J.; Jaraiz, M

    2003-04-01

    A statistical 3D damage accumulation model, based on the modified Kinchin-Pease formula, for ion implant simulation has been included in our physically based ion implantation code. It has only one fitting parameter for electronic stopping and uses 3D electron density distributions for different types of targets including compound semiconductors. Also, a statistical noise reduction mechanism based on the dose division is used. The model has been adapted to be run under parallel execution in order to speed up the calculation in 3D structures. Sequential ion implantation has been modelled including previous damage profiles. It can also simulate the implantation of molecular and cluster projectiles. Comparisons of simulated doping profiles with experimental SIMS profiles are presented. Also comparisons between simulated amorphization and experimental RBS profiles are shown. An analysis of sequential versus parallel processing is provided.

  6. Fe doped Magnetic Nanodiamonds made by Ion Implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chienhsu; Cho, I. C.; Jian, Hui-Shan; Niu, H.

    2017-02-01

    Here we present a simple physical method to prepare magnetic nanodiamonds (NDs) using high dose Fe ion-implantation. The Fe atoms are embedded into NDs through Fe ion-implantation and the crystal structure of NDs are recovered by thermal annealing. The results of TEM and Raman examinations indicated the crystal structure of the Fe implanted NDs is recovered completely. The SQUID-VSM measurement shows the Fe-NDs possess room temperature ferromagnetism. That means the Fe atoms are distributed inside the NDs without affecting NDs crystal structure, so the NDs can preserve the original physical and chemical properties of the NDs. In addition, the ion-implantation-introduced magnetic property might make the NDs to become suitable for variety of medical applications.

  7. Accelerating degradation rate of pure iron by zinc ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tao; Zheng, Yufeng; Han, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Pure iron has been considered as a promising candidate for biodegradable implant applications. However, a faster degradation rate of pure iron is needed to meet the clinical requirement. In this work, metal vapor vacuum arc technology was adopted to implant zinc ions into the surface of pure iron. Results showed that the implantation depth of zinc ions was about 60 nm. The degradation rate of pure iron was found to be accelerated after zinc ion implantation. The cytotoxicity tests revealed that the implanted zinc ions brought a slight increase on cytotoxicity of the tested cells. In terms of hemocompatibility, the hemolysis of zinc ion implanted pure iron was lower than 2%. However, zinc ions might induce more adhered and activated platelets on the surface of pure iron. Overall, zinc ion implantation can be a feasible way to accelerate the degradation rate of pure iron for biodegradable applications. PMID:27482462

  8. Optical attenuation in ion-implanted silicon waveguide racetrack resonators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doylend, J K; Jessop, P E; Knights, A P

    2011-08-01

    The optical absorption at wavelengths near 1550 nm has been quantified as a function of annealing temperature in ion-implanted silicon-on-insulator racetrack resonators. The variation of the output characteristics of the bus waveguide versus the concentration of implantation-induced lattice disorder in the ring is used to develop a novel method for the determination of the coupling and round-trip loss of the resonator, independently. This experimental procedure has general applicability for the determination of these parameters. Significant propagation loss is found to persist following annealing at temperatures previously observed to remove the majority of ion implantation damage. It is suggested that these annealing characteristics are a consequence of an ion implantation range which is greater than the silicon waveguide layer thickness.

  9. Ion implantation for manufacturing bent and periodically bent crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellucci, Valerio; Camattari, Riccardo; Guidi, Vincenzo, E-mail: guidi@fe.infn.it; Mazzolari, Andrea; Paternò, Gianfranco [Department of Physics and Earth Sciences, University of Ferrara, Via Saragat 1/c, 44122 Ferrara, Italy and INFN, Section of Ferrara (Italy); Mattei, Giovanni, E-mail: giovanni.mattei@unipd.it; Scian, Carlo [Department of Physics and Astronomy Galileo Galilei, University of Padova, Via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova (Italy); Lanzoni, Luca [Dipertimento di Economia e Tecnologia, Università degli Studi della Repubblica di San Marino, Salita alla Rocca, 44, 47890 San Marino Città (San Marino)

    2015-08-10

    Ion implantation is proposed to produce self-standing bent monocrystals. A Si sample 0.2 mm thick was bent to a radius of curvature of 10.5 m. The sample curvature was characterized by interferometric measurements; the crystalline quality of the bulk was tested by X-ray diffraction in transmission geometry through synchrotron light at ESRF (Grenoble, France). Dislocations induced by ion implantation affect only a very superficial layer of the sample, namely, the damaged region is confined in a layer 1 μm thick. Finally, an elective application of a deformed crystal through ion implantation is here proposed, i.e., the realization of a crystalline undulator to produce X-ray beams.

  10. Fe doped Magnetic Nanodiamonds made by Ion Implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, ChienHsu; Cho, I C; Jian, Hui-Shan; Niu, H

    2017-02-09

    Here we present a simple physical method to prepare magnetic nanodiamonds (NDs) using high dose Fe ion-implantation. The Fe atoms are embedded into NDs through Fe ion-implantation and the crystal structure of NDs are recovered by thermal annealing. The results of TEM and Raman examinations indicated the crystal structure of the Fe implanted NDs is recovered completely. The SQUID-VSM measurement shows the Fe-NDs possess room temperature ferromagnetism. That means the Fe atoms are distributed inside the NDs without affecting NDs crystal structure, so the NDs can preserve the original physical and chemical properties of the NDs. In addition, the ion-implantation-introduced magnetic property might make the NDs to become suitable for variety of medical applications.

  11. Statistical 3D damage accumulation model for ion implant simulators

    CERN Document Server

    Hernandez-Mangas, J M; Enriquez, L E; Bailon, L; Barbolla, J; Jaraiz, M

    2003-01-01

    A statistical 3D damage accumulation model, based on the modified Kinchin-Pease formula, for ion implant simulation has been included in our physically based ion implantation code. It has only one fitting parameter for electronic stopping and uses 3D electron density distributions for different types of targets including compound semiconductors. Also, a statistical noise reduction mechanism based on the dose division is used. The model has been adapted to be run under parallel execution in order to speed up the calculation in 3D structures. Sequential ion implantation has been modelled including previous damage profiles. It can also simulate the implantation of molecular and cluster projectiles. Comparisons of simulated doping profiles with experimental SIMS profiles are presented. Also comparisons between simulated amorphization and experimental RBS profiles are shown. An analysis of sequential versus parallel processing is provided.

  12. Rolling contact fatigue life of ion-implanted GCr15

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Presents an experimental research into the rooling contact fatigue life of GCr15 steel with Tix N, TiX N + Ag and Tix N + DLC layers ion-implanted using the plasma ion-implantation technology on a ball-rod style high-speed con tact fatigue tester, and concludes with test results that the fatigue life increases to varying degrees with Tix N, Tix N + Ag, and Tix N + DLC layers implanted, and increases 1.8 times with Tix N + Ag layer implanted, hairline cracks grow continuously into fatigue pits under the action of shear stress in the superficial layer of material, and ion-implantation acts to prevent initiation of cracks and slow down propagation of cracks.

  13. Effects of a carbon convection field on large diamond growth under high-pressure high-temperature conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hu Mei-Hua; Li Shang-Sheng; Ma Hong-An; Su Tai-Chao; Li Xiao-Lei; Hu Qiang; Jia Xiao-Peng

    2012-01-01

    Large diamond crystals were successfully synthesized by a FeNi-C system using the temperature gradient method under high-pressure high-temperature conditions.The assembly of the growth cell was improved and the growth process of diamond was investigated.Effects of the symmetry of the carbon convection field around the growing diamond crystal were investigated systematically by adjusting the position of the seed crystal in the melted catalyst/solvent.The results indicate that the morphologies and metal inclusion distributions of the synthetic diamond crystals vary obviously in both symmetric and non-symmetric carbon convection fields with temperature.Moreover,the finite element method was applied to analyze the carbon convection mode of the melted catalyst/solvent around the diamond crystal.This work is helpful for understanding the growth mechanism of diamond.

  14. Semiconductor applications of plasma immersion ion implantation technology

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mukesh Kumar; Rajkumar; Dinesh Kumar; P J George

    2002-11-01

    Many semiconductor integrated circuit manufacturing processes require high dose of implantation at very low energies. Conventional beam line ion implantation system suffers from low beam current at low energies, therefore, cannot be used economically for high dose applications. Plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) is emerging as a potential technique for such implantations. This method offers high dose rate irrespective of implantation energy. In the present study nitrogen ions were implanted using PIII in order to modify the properties of silicon and some refractory metal films. Oxidation behaviour of silicon was observed for different implantation doses. Diffusion barrier properties of refractory barrier metals were studied for copper metallization.

  15. Ion beam analysis of metal ion implanted surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, P.J.; Chu, J.W.; Johnson, E.P.; Noorman, J.T. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia); Sood, D.K. [Royal Melbourne Inst. of Tech., VIC (Australia)

    1993-12-31

    Ion implantation is an established method for altering the surface properties of many materials. While a variety of analytical techniques are available for the characterisation of implanted surfaces, those based on particle accelerators such as Rutherford backscattering (RBS) and nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) provide some of the most useful and powerful for this purpose. Application of the latter techniques to metal ion implantation research at ANSTO will be described with particular reference to specific examples from recent studies. Where possible, the information obtained from ion beam analysis will be compared with that derived from other techniques such as Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX) and Auger spectroscopies. 4 refs., 5 figs.

  16. Ion implantation induced nanotopography on titanium and bone cell adhesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braceras, Iñigo, E-mail: inigo.braceras@tecnalia.com [Tecnalia, Mikeletegi Pasealekua 2, 20009 Donostia-San Sebastian (Spain); CIBER de Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (Ciber-BBN) (Spain); Vera, Carolina; Ayerdi-Izquierdo, Ana [Tecnalia, Mikeletegi Pasealekua 2, 20009 Donostia-San Sebastian (Spain); CIBER de Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (Ciber-BBN) (Spain); Muñoz, Roberto [Tecnalia, Mikeletegi Pasealekua 2, 20009 Donostia-San Sebastian (Spain); Lorenzo, Jaione; Alvarez, Noelia [Tecnalia, Mikeletegi Pasealekua 2, 20009 Donostia-San Sebastian (Spain); CIBER de Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (Ciber-BBN) (Spain); Maeztu, Miguel Ángel de [Private Practice, P° San Francisco, 43 A-1°, 20400 Tolosa (Spain)

    2014-08-15

    Graphical abstract: Titanium surfaces modified by inert ion implantation affect cell adhesion through modification of the nanotopography in the same dimensional range of that of human bone inorganic phases. - Highlights: • Inert ion implantation on Ti modifies surface nanotopography and bone cell adhesion. • Ion implantation can produce nanostructured surfaces on titanium in the very same range as of those of the mineral phase of the human bone. • Appropriate tool for studying the relevance of nanostructured surfaces on bone mineralization and implant osseointegration. • Ion implantation induced nanotopography have a statistically significant influence on bone cell adhesion. - Abstract: Permanent endo-osseous implants require a fast, reliable and consistent osseointegration, i.e. intimate bonding between bone and implant, so biomechanical loads can be safely transferred. Among the parameters that affect this process, it is widely admitted that implant surface topography, surface energy and composition play an important role. Most surface treatments to improve osseointegration focus on micro-scale features, as few can effectively control the effects of the treatment at nanoscale. On the other hand, ion implantation allows controlling such nanofeatures. This study has investigated the nanotopography of titanium, as induced by different ion implantation surface treatments, its similarity with human bone tissue structure and its effect on human bone cell adhesion, as a first step in the process of osseointegration. The effect of ion implantation treatment parameters such as energy (40–80 keV), fluence (1–2 e17 ion/cm{sup 2}) and ion species (Kr, Ar, Ne and Xe) on the nanotopography of medical grade titanium has been measured and assessed by AFM and contact angle. Then, in vitro tests have been performed to assess the effect of these nanotopographies on osteoblast adhesion. The results have shown that the nanostructure of bone and the studied ion implanted

  17. Compilation of diamond-like carbon properties for barriers and hard coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Outka, D.A.; Hsu, Wen L.; Phillips, K.; Boehme, D.R.; Yang, N.Y.C.; Ottesen, D.K.; Johnsen, H.A.; Clift, W.M. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Headley, T.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-05-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) is an amorphous form of carbon which resembles diamond in its hardness, lubricity, and resistance to chemical attack. Such properties make DLC of interest for use in barrier and hard coating technology. This report examines a variety of properties of DLC coatings. This includes examining substrates on which DLC coatings can be deposited; the resistance of DLC coatings to various chemical agents; adhension of DLC coatings; and characterization of DLC coatings by electron microscopy, FTIR, sputter depth profiling, stress measurements and nanoindentation.

  18. Superlow friction behavior of diamond-like carbon coatings: Time and speed effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimberg, J. A.; Wahl, K. J.; Singer, I. L.; Erdemir, A.

    2001-04-01

    The friction behavior of a diamond-like carbon coating was studied in reciprocating sliding contact at speeds from 0.01 to 5 mm/s, in dry nitrogen. "Superlow" friction coefficients of 0.003-0.008 were obtained in continuous sliding at the higher speeds (>1 mm/s). However, friction coefficients rose to values typical of diamond-like carbon in dry and ambient air (0.01-0.1) at lower speeds (sustained, suppressed, and recovered as a function of exposure time, demonstrating that duty cycle cannot be ignored when predicting performance of superlow friction coatings in devices.

  19. Micron-scale coupled carbon isotope and nitrogen abundance variations in diamonds: Evidence for episodic diamond formation beneath the Siberian Craton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggers de Vries, D. F.; Bulanova, G. P.; De Corte, K.; Pearson, D. G.; Craven, J. A.; Davies, G. R.

    2013-01-01

    The internal structure and growth history of six macro-diamonds from kimberlite pipes in Yakutia (Russia) were investigated with cathodoluminescence imaging and coupled carbon isotope and nitrogen abundance analyses along detailed core to rim traverses. The diamonds are characterised by octahedral zonation with layer-by-layer growth. High spatial resolution SIMS profiles establish that there is no exchange of the carbon isotope composition across growth boundaries at the μm scale and that isotopic variations observed between (sub)zones within the diamonds are primary. The macro-diamonds have δ13C values that vary within 2‰ of -5.3‰ and their nitrogen contents range between 0-1334 at. ppm. There are markedly different nitrogen aggregation states between major growth zones within individual diamonds that demonstrate Yakutian diamonds grew in multiple growth events. Growth intervals were punctuated by stages of dissolution now associated with <10 μm wide zones of nitrogen absent type II diamond. Across these resorption interfaces carbon isotope ratios and nitrogen contents record shifts between 0.5-2.3‰ and up to 407 at. ppm, respectively. Co-variation in δ13C value-nitrogen content suggests that parts of individual diamonds precipitated in a Rayleigh process from either oxidised or reduced fluids/melts, with two single diamonds showing evidence of both fluid types. Modelling the co-variation establishes that nitrogen is a compatible element in diamond relative to its growth medium and that the nitrogen partition coefficient is different between oxidised (3-4.1) and reduced (3) sources. The reduced sources have δ13C values between -7.3‰ and -4.6‰, while the oxidised sources have higher δ13C values between -5.8‰ and -1.8‰ (if grown from carbonatitic media) or between -3.8‰ and +0.2‰ (if grown from CO2-rich media). It is therefore concluded that individual Yakutian diamonds originate from distinct fluids/melts of variable compositions. The

  20. Interaction of carbon nanotubes and diamonds under hot-filament chemical vapor deposition conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, Nagraj

    A composite of CNTs and diamond can be expected to have unique mechanical, electrical and thermal properties due to the synergetic combination of the excellent properties of these two allotropes of carbon. The composite may find applications in various fields that require a combination of good mechanical, thermal, electrical and optical properties such as, wear-resistant coatings, thermal management of integrated chips (ICs), and field emission devices. This research is devoted to the experimental studies of phase stability of diamond and CNTs under chemical vapor deposition conditions to investigate the possibility of combining these materials to produce a hybrid composite. Growth of the hybrid material is investigated by starting with a pre-existing film of CNTs and subsequently growing diamond on it. The diamond growth phase space is systematically scanned to determine optimal conditions where diamond nucleates on the CNT without destroying it. Various techniques including SEM, TEM, and Micro Raman spectroscopy are used to characterize the hybrid material. A selective window where the diamond directly nucleates on the CNT without destroying the underlying CNT network is identified. Based on the material characterization, a growth mechanism based on etching of CNT at the defective sites to produce sp3 dangling bonds onto which diamond nucleates is proposed. Though a hybrid material is synthesized, the nucleation density of diamond on the CNTs is low and highly non-homogenous. Improvements to the CNT dispersion in the hybrid material are investigated in order to produce a homogenous material with predictable CNT loading fractions and to probe the low nucleation density of diamond on the CNT. The effect of several dispersion techniques and solvents on CNT surface homogeneity is studied using SEM, and a novel, vacuum drying based approach using CNT/dichlorobenzene dispersions is suggested. SEM and Raman analysis of the early stage nucleation are used to develop a

  1. Deposition of DLC Coating on Biomedical TiNi Alloys by Plasma Based Ion Implantation to Improve Surface Properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Diamond-like carbon ( DLC ) -films were successfully deposited on Ti- 50.8at% Ni using plasma based ion implantation (PBII) technique. The influence of the pulsed negative bias voltage applied to the substrate from 12 kV to 40 kV on the microstructure, nano- indentation hardness and Young' s modulus, the surface characteristics and corrosion resistant property as well as hemocompatibility were investigated. The experimental results showed that C 1 s peak depended heavily on the bias voltage. With the increase of bias voltage , the ratio of sp2 / sp3 -first decreased, renching a minimum value at 20 kV, and then increased. The DLC coating deposited at20 kV showed the highest hardness and elastic modulus values as a result of lower sp2 / sp3 ratio. The RMS values first decreased from 7.202 nm( 12 kV) to 5.279 nm(20 kV), and then increased to 11.449 nm(30 kV) and7.060 nm(40 kV). The uncoated TiNi alloy showed severe pitting corrosion, due to the presence of Cl-ions in the solution. On the contrary, the DLC coated sample showed very little pitting corrosion and behaved better corrosion resistant property especially for the specimens deposited at 20 kV bias voltages. The platelet adhesion test show that the hemocompatibility of DLC coated TiNi alloy is much better than that of bare TiNi alloy, and the hemocompatibility performauce of DLC coated TiNi alloy deposited at 20 kV is superior to that of other coated specimens.

  2. Plasma immersion ion implantation. (Latest citations from the EI Compendex*plus database). Published Search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-01-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) and equipment. PIII is a new technique to implant plasma ions into materials for surface modification and treatment. Topics include plasma nitriding, semiconductor doping, ion energy distribution, ion dose, pulsed plasma, metal plasma, and defect passivation. References also review applications in semiconductor device and integrated circuit manufacture, silicon material fabrication, aerospace bearings, carbon coatings on metals, and ceramic coatings. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  3. Ion Implanted Passivated Contacts for Interdigitated Back Contacted Solar Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, David L.; Nemeth, William; LaSalvia, Vincenzo; Reedy, Robert; Bateman, Nicholas; Stradins, Pauls

    2015-06-14

    We describe work towards an interdigitated back contacted (IBC) solar cell utilizing ion implanted, passivated contacts. Formation of electron and hole passivated contacts to n-type CZ wafers using tunneling SiO2 and ion implanted amorphous silicon (a-Si) are described. P and B were ion implanted into intrinsic amorphous Si films at several doses and energies. A series of post-implant anneals showed that the passivation quality improved with increasing annealing temperatures up to 900 degrees C. The recombination parameter, Jo, as measured by a Sinton lifetime tester, was Jo ~ 14 fA/cm2 for Si:P, and Jo ~ 56 fA/cm2 for Si:B contacts. The contact resistivity for the passivated contacts, as measured by TLM patterns, was 14 milliohm-cm2 for the n-type contact and 0.6 milliohm-cm2 for the p-type contact. These Jo and pcontact values are encouraging for forming IBC cells using ion implantation to spatially define dopants.

  4. Ion implantation of CdTe single crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiecek Tomasz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Ion implantation is a technique which is widely used in industry for unique modification of metal surface for medical applications. In semiconductor silicon technology ion implantation is also widely used for thin layer electronic or optoelectronic devices production. For other semiconductor materials this technique is still at an early stage. In this paper based on literature data we present the main features of the implantation of CdTe single crystals as well as some of the major problems which are likely to occur when dealing with them. The most unexpected feature is the high resistance of these crystals against the amorphization caused by ion implantation even at high doses (1017 1/cm2. The second property is the disposal of defects much deeper in the sample then it follows from the modeling calculations. The outline of principles of the ion implantation is included in the paper. The data based on RBS measurements and modeling results obtained by using SRIM software were taken into account.

  5. Microactuators based on ion implanted dielectric electroactive polymer (EAP) membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dubois, Philippe; Rosset, Samuel; Koster, Sander; Stauffer, Johann; Mikhailov, Serguei; Dadras, Massoud; de Rooij, Nico-F.; Shea, Herbert

    2006-01-01

    We report on the first successfully microfabricated and tested ion implanted dielectric electroactive polymer (DEAP) actuators. Dielectric EAP (DEAP) actuators combine exceptionally high energy-density with large amplitude displacements [S. Ashley, Artificial muscles, Sci. Am. 289 (2003) 52-59: R. P

  6. Buried injector logic, a vertical IIL using deep ion implantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mouthaan, A.J.

    1987-01-01

    A vertically integrated alternative for integrated injection logic has been realized, named buried injector logic (BIL). 1 MeV ion implantations are used to create buried layers. The vertical pnp and npn transistors have thin base regions and exhibit a limited charge accumulation if a gate is satura

  7. Electronic properties of ion-implanted yttria-stabilized zirconia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vohrer, U.; Wiemhöfer, H.-D.; Göpel, W.; Hassel, van B.A.; Burggraaf, A.J.

    1993-01-01

    Ion implantation of iron and titanium has been applied to modify the surface properties of polycrystalline yttria-stabilized zirconia ((ZrO2)0.87(YO1.5)0.13 (YSZ)) discs in an attempt to prepare surfaces with a mixed conductivity and by this an enhanced surface oxygen exchange kinetics. Surface-sen

  8. Ion implantation of CdTe single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiecek, Tomasz; Popovich, Volodymir; Bester, Mariusz; Kuzma, Marian

    2016-12-01

    Ion implantation is a technique which is widely used in industry for unique modification of metal surface for medical applications. In semiconductor silicon technology ion implantation is also widely used for thin layer electronic or optoelectronic devices production. For other semiconductor materials this technique is still at an early stage. In this paper based on literature data we present the main features of the implantation of CdTe single crystals as well as some of the major problems which are likely to occur when dealing with them. The most unexpected feature is the high resistance of these crystals against the amorphization caused by ion implantation even at high doses (1017 1/cm2). The second property is the disposal of defects much deeper in the sample then it follows from the modeling calculations. The outline of principles of the ion implantation is included in the paper. The data based on RBS measurements and modeling results obtained by using SRIM software were taken into account.

  9. Development of vertical compact ion implanter for gemstones applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Intarasiri, S., E-mail: saweat@gmail.com [Science and Technology Research Institute, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Wijaikhum, A. [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Bootkul, D., E-mail: mo_duangkhae@hotmail.com [Department of General Science (Gems and Jewelry), Faculty of Science, Srinakharinwirot University, Bangkok 10110 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Suwannakachorn, D.; Tippawan, U.; Yu, L.D.; Singkarat, S. [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand)

    2014-08-15

    Ion implantation technique was applied as an effective non-toxic treatment of the local Thai natural corundum including sapphires and rubies for the enhancement of essential qualities of the gemstones. Energetic oxygen and nitrogen ions in keV range of various fluences were implanted into the precious stones. It has been thoroughly proved that ion implantation can definitely modify the gems to desirable colors together with changing their color distribution, transparency and luster properties. These modifications lead to the improvement in quality of the natural corundum and thus its market value. Possible mechanisms of these modifications have been proposed. The main causes could be the changes in oxidation states of impurities of transition metals, induction of charge transfer from one metal cation to another and the production of color centers. For these purposes, an ion implanter of the kind that is traditionally used in semiconductor wafer fabrication had already been successfully applied for the ion beam bombardment of natural corundum. However, it is not practical for implanting the irregular shape and size of gem samples, and too costly to be economically accepted by the gem and jewelry industry. Accordingly, a specialized ion implanter has been requested by the gem traders. We have succeeded in developing a prototype high-current vertical compact ion implanter only 1.36 m long, from ion source to irradiation chamber, for these purposes. It has been proved to be very effective for corundum, for example, color improvement of blue sapphire, induction of violet sapphire from low value pink sapphire, and amelioration of lead-glass-filled rubies. Details of the implanter and recent implantation results are presented.

  10. Development of vertical compact ion implanter for gemstones applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intarasiri, S.; Wijaikhum, A.; Bootkul, D.; Suwannakachorn, D.; Tippawan, U.; Yu, L. D.; Singkarat, S.

    2014-08-01

    Ion implantation technique was applied as an effective non-toxic treatment of the local Thai natural corundum including sapphires and rubies for the enhancement of essential qualities of the gemstones. Energetic oxygen and nitrogen ions in keV range of various fluences were implanted into the precious stones. It has been thoroughly proved that ion implantation can definitely modify the gems to desirable colors together with changing their color distribution, transparency and luster properties. These modifications lead to the improvement in quality of the natural corundum and thus its market value. Possible mechanisms of these modifications have been proposed. The main causes could be the changes in oxidation states of impurities of transition metals, induction of charge transfer from one metal cation to another and the production of color centers. For these purposes, an ion implanter of the kind that is traditionally used in semiconductor wafer fabrication had already been successfully applied for the ion beam bombardment of natural corundum. However, it is not practical for implanting the irregular shape and size of gem samples, and too costly to be economically accepted by the gem and jewelry industry. Accordingly, a specialized ion implanter has been requested by the gem traders. We have succeeded in developing a prototype high-current vertical compact ion implanter only 1.36 m long, from ion source to irradiation chamber, for these purposes. It has been proved to be very effective for corundum, for example, color improvement of blue sapphire, induction of violet sapphire from low value pink sapphire, and amelioration of lead-glass-filled rubies. Details of the implanter and recent implantation results are presented.

  11. Diamond and Hydrogenated Carbons for Advanced Batteries and Fuel Cells: Fundamental Studies and Applications.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swain; Greg M.

    2009-04-13

    The original funding under this project number was awarded for a period 12/1999 until 12/2002 under the project title Diamond and Hydrogenated Carbons for Advanced Batteries and Fuel Cells: Fundamental Studies and Applications. The project was extended until 06/2003 at which time a renewal proposal was awarded for a period 06/2003 until 06/2008 under the project title Metal/Diamond Composite Thin-Film Electrodes: New Carbon Supported Catalytic Electrodes. The work under DE-FG02-01ER15120 was initiated about the time the PI moved his research group from the Department of Chemistry at Utah State University to the Department of Chemistry at Michigan State University. This DOE-funded research was focused on (i) understanding structure-function relationships at boron-doped diamond thin-film electrodes, (ii) understanding metal phase formation on diamond thin films and developing electrochemical approaches for producing highly dispersed electrocatalyst particles (e.g., Pt) of small nominal particle size, (iii) studying the electrochemical activity of the electrocatalytic electrodes for hydrogen oxidation and oxygen reduction and (iv) conducting the initial synthesis of high surface area diamond powders and evaluating their electrical and electrochemical properties when mixed with a Teflon binder.

  12. Coesite-Diamond Assemblage in Ultrahigh Pressure Crustal and Mantle rocks: Evidence for Carbon Recycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobolev, N. V.

    2010-12-01

    press, Contr. Min. Petr.). This extensive wide range in δ13C (PDB) for coesite-bearing diamonds, from -28 to +1.5 ‰, along with common crustal δ18O (SMOW) values from the principal rock-forming minerals (garnet and clinopyroxene) and accessory mineral (coesite), is typical for diamondiferous mantle eclogites, crustal UHPM rocks, and DIs. The petrogenetic evidences from all these rocks and minerals are indicative of major subduction of crustal protoliths (Ringwood, 1972, EPSL, 14:233), including the recycling of crustal carbon into diamonds in mantle eclogites, first speculated on by V.S. Sobolev and N.V. Sobolev (1980, Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR, 249: 1217).

  13. Cell adhesion and growth on ultrananocrystalline diamond and diamond-like carbon films after different surface modifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miksovsky, J. [Institute of Nanostructure Technologies and Analytics, Center for Interdisciplinary Nanostructure Science and Technology, University of Kassel (Germany); Institute of Physics ASCR, Prague (Czech Republic); Czech Technical University in Prague, Faculty of Biomedical Engineering, Kladno (Czech Republic); Voss, A. [Institute of Nanostructure Technologies and Analytics, Center for Interdisciplinary Nanostructure Science and Technology, University of Kassel (Germany); Kozarova, R. [Institute of Molecular Biology, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia (Bulgaria); Kocourek, T.; Pisarik, P. [Institute of Physics ASCR, Prague (Czech Republic); Czech Technical University in Prague, Faculty of Biomedical Engineering, Kladno (Czech Republic); Ceccone, G. [Unit Nanobiosciences, European Commission Joint Research Centre, Ispra (Italy); Kulisch, W. [Institute of Nanostructure Technologies and Analytics, Center for Interdisciplinary Nanostructure Science and Technology, University of Kassel (Germany); Jelinek, M. [Institute of Physics ASCR, Prague (Czech Republic); Czech Technical University in Prague, Faculty of Biomedical Engineering, Kladno (Czech Republic); Apostolova, M.D. [Institute of Molecular Biology, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia (Bulgaria); Reithmaier, J.P. [Institute of Nanostructure Technologies and Analytics, Center for Interdisciplinary Nanostructure Science and Technology, University of Kassel (Germany); Popov, C., E-mail: popov@ina.uni-kassel.de [Institute of Nanostructure Technologies and Analytics, Center for Interdisciplinary Nanostructure Science and Technology, University of Kassel (Germany)

    2014-04-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • UNCD and DLC films were modified by UV/O{sub 3} treatments, O{sub 2} or NH{sub 3}-containing plasmas. • Surface composition, wettability and surface energy change upon modifications. • Higher efficiency of UNCD modifications was observed. • Cell attachment and growth were influenced by the surface termination and roughness. - Abstract: Diamond and diamond-like carbon (DLC) films possess a set of excellent physical and chemical properties which together with a high biocompatibility make them attractive candidates for a number of medical and biotechnological applications. In the current work thin ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) and DLC films were comparatively investigated with respect to cell attachment and proliferation after different surface modifications. The UNCD films were prepared by microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition, the DLC films by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The films were comprehensively characterized with respect to their basic properties, e.g. crystallinity, morphology, chemical bonding nature, etc. Afterwards the UNCD and DLC films were modified applying O{sub 2} or NH{sub 3}/N{sub 2} plasmas and UV/O{sub 3} treatments to alter their surface termination. The surface composition of as-grown and modified samples was studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Furthermore the films were characterized by contact angle measurements with water, formamide, 1-decanol and diiodomethane; from the results obtained the surface energy with its dispersive and polar components was calculated. The adhesion and proliferation of MG63 osteosarcoma cells on the different UNCD and DLC samples were assessed by measurement of the cell attachment efficiency and MTT assays. The determined cell densities were compared and correlated with the surface properties of as-deposited and modified UNCD and DLC films.

  14. On the quantification of unbound hydrogen in diamond-like carbon-based thin films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pei, Y.T.; Chechenin, N.G.; Chernykh, P.N.; Turkin, A; Vainchtein, David; Hosson, J.Th.M. De

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a new and straightforward approach to quantify the content of unbound hydrogen in diamond-like carbon-based films. In the case of TiC/a-C:H nanocomposite films it is shown that the content of unbound and bound hydrogen can be deconvoluted via thermal release and elastic recoil de

  15. Modification of rubber surface with hydrogenated diamond-like carbon thin films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pei, Y. T.; Bui, X. L.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.; Laudon, M; Romanowicz, B

    2009-01-01

    Thin films of hydrogenated diamond-like carbon (DLC) have been deposited on hydrogenated nitrile butadiene rubber (HNBR) for reduction of friction and enhancement of wear resistance of dynamic rubber seals, by sputtering graphite targets in C(2)H(2)/Ar plasma. The wax removal and pre-deposition plas

  16. Flexible diamond-like carbon thin film coated rubbers: fundamentals and applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pei, Y.T.

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic rubber seals are major sources of friction of lubrication systems and bearings, which may take up to 75% of the total friction. The solution we present is to coat rubbers with diamond-like carbon (DLC) thin film, by which the coefficient of friction is reduced to less than one tenth. Coating

  17. Flexible diamond-like carbon thin film coated on rubbers: fundamentals and applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pei, Yutao

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic rubber seals are the major source of friction in lubrication systems and bearings, which may take up to 70% of the total friction. Our solution is to coat rubbers with flexible diamond-like carbon (DLC) thin film by which the coefficient of friction is reduced from above 1.5 to below 0.15. C

  18. Microstructure and tribological performance of diamond-like carbon films deposited on hydrogenated rubber

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pal, J.P. van der; Martinez Martinez, Diego; Pei, Y.T.; Rudolf, P.; Hosson, J.Th.M. De

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, the microstructure and tribological performance of diamond-like carbon (DLC) films prepared by plasma chemical vapor deposition on hydrogenated nitrile butadiene rubbers (HNBR) are studied. Different negative variations of temperature during film growth were selected by proper changes

  19. Deposition and characterization of hydrogenated diamond-like carbon thin films on rubber seals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pei, Y.T.; Bui, X.L.; Hosson, J.Th.M. De

    2010-01-01

    Thin films of hydrogenated diamond-like carbon (DLC) have been deposited on hydrogenated nitrile butadiene rubber (HNBR) for reduction of friction and enhancement of wear resistance of dynamic rubber seals. The wax removal and pre-deposition plasma treatment of HNBR substrates are proven to be cruci

  20. Bacterial Adhesion to Diamond-like Carbon as Compared to Stainless Steel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soininen, Antti; Tiainen, Veli-Matti; Konttinen, Yrjo T.; van der Mei, Henny C.; Busscher, Henk J.; Sharma, Prashant K.

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings are suitable candidates for application on biomedical devices and implants, due to their high hardness, low friction, high wear and corrosion resistance, chemical inertness, smoothness, and tissue and blood compatibility. However, most s

  1. Nanocrystalline diamond in carbon implanted SiO{sub 2}.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsoi, K.A.; Prawer, S.; Nugent, K.W.; Walker, R. J.; Weiser, P.S. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1996-12-31

    Recently, it was reported that nanocrystalline diamond can be produced via laser annealing of a high dose C implanted fused quartz (SiO{sub 2}) substrate. The aim of this investigation is to reproduce this result on higher C{sup +} dose samples and the non-implanted silicon sample, as well as optimise the power range and annealing time for the production of these nanocrystals of diamond. In order to provide a wide range of laser powers the samples were annealed using an Ar ion Raman laser. The resulting annealed spots were analysed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Raman analysis. These techniques are employed to determine the type of bonding produced after laser annealing has occurred. 4 refs., 5 figs.

  2. A New Empirical Model for Estimation of sp3 Fraction in Diamond-Like Carbon Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Hai-Yang; WANG Li-Wu; JIANG Hui; HUANG Ning-Kang

    2007-01-01

    A new empirical model to estimate the content of sp3 in diamond-like carbon (DLC) films is presented, based on the conventional Raman spectra excited by 488nm or 514nm visible light for different carbons. It is found that bandwidth of the G peak is related to the sp3 fraction. A wider bandwidth of the G peak shows a higher sp3 fraction in DLC films.

  3. Lithium Nitride Synthesized by in situ Lithium Deposition and Ion Implantation for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishitama, Shintaro; Baba, Yuji; Fujii, Ryo; Nakamura, Masaru; Imahori, Yoshio

    Li3N synthesis on Li deposition layer was conducted without H2O and O2 by in situ lithium deposition in high vacuum chamber of 10-6 Pa and ion implantation techniques and the thermo-chemical stability of the Li3N/Li/Cu tri-layered target for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) under laser heating and air exposure was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Following conclusions were derived; (1) Li3N/Li/Cu tri-layered target with very low oxide and carbon contamination was synthesized by in situ lithium vacuum deposition and N2+ ion implantation without H2O and O2 additions, (2) The starting temperature of evaporation of Li3N/Li/Cu tri-layered target increased by 120K compared to that of the Li/Cu target and (3) Remarkable oxidation and carbon contamination were observed on the surface of Li3N/Li/Cu after air exposure and these contaminated compositions was not removed by Ar+ heavy sputtering.

  4. N + surface doping on nanoscale polymer fabrics via ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho Wong, Kenneth Kar; Zinke-Allmang, Martin; Wan, Wankei

    2006-08-01

    Non-woven poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) fabrics composed of small diameter (∼110 nm) fibers have been spun by an electrospinning technique and then have been modified by ion implantation. 1.7 MeV N+ ion implantation with a dose of 1.2 × 1016 ions/cm2 was applied on the fabrics through a metal foil at room temperature. By using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), no surface morphology degradation has been observed on the fabric after the ion beam treatment. The diameter of the fibers has shrunk by 30% to about 74 nm. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) show that nitrogen surface doping was achieved and the formation of two new functional chemical groups (N-Cdbnd O and C-N) in the PVA is observed.

  5. Ion implantation phenomena in 4H-silicon carbide

    CERN Document Server

    Phelps, Gordon James

    2003-01-01

    Silicon Carbide is a promising wide band gap semiconductor with many new properties yet to be established and investigated. Ion implantation is the dominant method of incorporating dopant materials into the Silicon Carbide crystalline structure for electronic device fabrication. The implantation process of dopants into Silicon Carbide, both theoretical and practical, is described in this Thesis. Additional fabrication process steps, such as annealing, and their implications are also described. To gain further insight into the process of ion implantation into Silicon Carbide, the detailed design of a special test die is discussed. The aim of the special test die was to obtain general information such as implanted dopant sheet resistivity and to test a novel bipolar transistor design. The fabrication steps involved for the special test die are discussed in detail. The results from the special test die take the form of specific electrical measurements, together with detailed visual observations provided by a sca...

  6. Characterization of duplex hard coatings with additional ion implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Škorić

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present the results of a study of TiN thin fi lms which are deposited by a Physical Vapour Deposition (PVD and Ion Beam Assisted Deposition (IBAD. In the present investigation the subsequent ion implantation was provided with N+2 ions. The ion implantation was applied to enhance the mechanical properties of surface. The thin film deposition process exerts a number of eff ects such as crystallographic orientation, morphology, topography, densifi cation of the fi lms. The evolution of the microstructure from porous and columnar grains to densel packed grains is accompanied by changes in mechanical and physical properties. A variety of analytic techniques were used for characterization, such as scratch test, calo test, Scanning electron microscopy (SEM, Atomic Force Microscope (AFM, X-ray diff raction (XRD and Energy Dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX.

  7. Fe doped Magnetic Nanodiamonds made by Ion Implantation

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, ChienHsu; Jian, Hui-Shan; Niu, H

    2016-01-01

    Here we present a simple physical method to produce magnetic nanodiamonds (NDs) using high dose Fe ion-implantation. The Fe atoms are distributed inside the NDs without affecting their crystal structure. So the NDs can be still functionalized through surface modification for targeted chemotherapy and the added magnetic property will make the NDs suitable for localized thermal treatment for cancer cells without the toxicity from the Fe atoms being directly in contact with the living tissue.

  8. Ion implantation induced blistering of rutile single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang, Bing-Xi [School of Physics, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong 250100 (China); Jiao, Yang [College of Physics and Electronics, Shandong Normal University, Jinan, Shandong 250100 (China); Guan, Jing [School of Physics, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong 250100 (China); Wang, Lei [School of Physics, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong 250100 (China); Key Laboratory of Nanodevices and Applications, Suzhou Institute of Nano-Tech and Nano-Bionics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China)

    2015-07-01

    The rutile single crystals were implanted by 200 keV He{sup +} ions with a series fluence and annealed at different temperatures to investigate the blistering behavior. The Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, optical microscope and X-ray diffraction were employed to characterize the implantation induced lattice damage and blistering. It was found that the blistering on rutile surface region can be realized by He{sup +} ion implantation with appropriate fluence and the following thermal annealing.

  9. Dual-ion-beam deposition of carbon films with diamond-like properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirtich, M. J.; Swec, D. M.; Angus, J. C.

    1985-01-01

    A single and dual ion beam system was used to generate amorphous carbon films with diamond like properties. A methane/argon mixture at a molar ratio of 0.28 was ionized in the low pressure discharge chamber of a 30-cm-diameter ion source. A second ion source, 8 cm in diameter was used to direct a beam of 600 eV Argon ions on the substrates (fused silica or silicon) while the deposition from the 30-cm ion source was taking place. Nuclear reaction and combustion analysis indicate H/C ratios for the films to be 1.00. This high value of H/C, it is felt, allowed the films to have good transmittance. The films were impervious to reagents which dissolve graphitic and polymeric carbon structures. Although the measured density of the films was approximately 1.8 gm/cu cm, a value lower than diamond, the films exhibited other properties that were relatively close to diamond. These films were compared with diamond like films generated by sputtering a graphite target.

  10. Homogenization of carbonate-bearing microinclusions in diamond at P- T parameters of the upper mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragozin, A. L.; Palyanov, Yu. N.; Zedgenizov, D. A.; Kalinin, A. A.; Shatsky, V. S.

    2016-10-01

    The staged high-pressure annealing of natural cubic diamonds with numerous melt microinclusions from the Internatsional'naya kimberlite pipe was studied experimentally. The results mainly show that the carbonate phases, the daughter phases in partially crystallized microinclusions in diamonds, may undergo phase transformations under the mantle P- T conditions. Most likely, partial melting and further dissolution of dolomite in the carbonate-silicate melt (homogenization of inclusions) occur in inclusions. The experimental data on the staged high-pressure annealing of diamonds with melt microinclusions allow us to estimate the temperature of their homogenization as 1400-1500°C. Thus, cubic diamonds from the Internatsional'naya pipe could have been formed under quite high temperatures corresponding to the lithosphere/asthenosphere boundary. However, it should be noted that the effect of selective capture of inclusions with partial loss of volatiles in relation to the composition of the crystallization medium is not excluded during the growth. This may increase the temperature of their homogenization significantly between 1400 and 1500°C.

  11. Non-Lubricated Diamond-Coated Bearings Reinforced by Carbon Fibers to Work in Lunar Dust Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In Phase I, we made prototype sliding bearings from functionally-graded, diamond-coated carbon-fiber reinforced composite. In dry-sliding experiments, the friction...

  12. Non-Lubricated Diamond-Coated Bearings Reinforced by Carbon Fibers to Work in Lunar Dust Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop low cost diamond composite bearings utilizing our new high pressure technology for carbon fiber reinforced 3-D C/C composites and mixtures of...

  13. 不同消毒方法对碳离子改性硅橡胶表面自由能及邵氏硬度的影响%Effect of different disinfection methods on surface free energy and Shore hardness of carbon ion-implanted silicone rubber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周鑫; 陈兴; 石小花; 王韶亮; 雷泽源; 樊东力; 张一鸣

    2016-01-01

    目的 初步探讨碳离子硅橡胶经过不同消毒试剂与方法处理后其表面亲疏水性、表面自由能以及邵氏硬度的变化情况.方法 碳离子硅橡胶经过70%酒精、2%碱性戊二醛、0.5%碘伏、5.25%次氯酸钠、3%过氧化氢以及134℃高温、高压等消毒试剂或方法处理后,采用静态接触角测定仪检测其表面水、甘油接触角以及邵氏硬度变化情况,采用Owen-Wendt公式计算表面自由能γs、极性分量γsp以及非极性分量γsd变化.结果 碳离子硅橡胶经过5.25%次氯酸钠以及3%过氧化氢处理后,其表面接触角以及表面自由能发生明显变化,前者使得其表面呈现出完全的亲水性;70%酒精、2%碱性戊二醛、0.5%碘伏以及134℃高温、高压等方法对材料表面接触角以及表面自由能等影响较小.不同处理组材料表面邵氏硬度差异均无统计学意义.结论 70%酒精以及134℃高温、高压等消毒方法对碳离子硅橡胶表面性能影响最小,结合操作便利性等因素,70%酒精可认为是该材料最适宜的消毒处理方式.而次氯酸钠消毒液极不利于该材料表面形貌维持,不宜采用.%Objective To study the changes of surface contact angle,surface free energy and Shore hardness of carbon ion-implanted silicone rubber disinfected by different methods.Methods Carbon ionimplanted silicone rubber was treated with 70% alcohol,2% alkaline glutaraldehyde,0.5% iodine volts,5.25% sodium hypochlorite,3% hydrogen peroxide respectively,and high temperature of 134℃ under high pressure for 2 h,and then the surface contact angle and Shore hardness were tested with a contact angle instrument and a Shore durometer (type A).Surface free energy,polar component and nonpolar component were calculated with Owen-Wendt methods.Results The surface quality of carbon ion-implanted silicone rubber was changed after disinfection with 3% hydrogen peroxide and 5.25% sodium

  14. Zinc-ion implanted and deposited titanium surfaces reduce adhesion of Streptococccus mutans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Juan, E-mail: doctorxue@126.com [Implant Center, School of Stomatology Jilin University, Changchun, Jilin (China) and Stomatological Hospital, Urumqi, Xinjiang (China); Ding Gang [Department of Stomatology, Yidu Central Hospital, Weifang, Shandong (China); Capital Medical University School of Stomatology, Beijing (China); Li Jinlu; Yang Shenhui; Fang Bisong [Capital Medical University School of Stomatology, Beijing (China); Sun Hongchen, E-mail: hcsun@jlu.edu.cn [Implant Center, School of Stomatology Jilin University, Changchun, Jilin (China); Zhou Yanmin, E-mail: zhouym62@126.com [Implant Center, School of Stomatology Jilin University, Changchun, Jilin (China)

    2010-10-01

    While titanium (Ti) is a commonly used dental implant material with advantageous biocompatible and mechanical properties, native Ti surfaces do not have the ability to prevent bacterial colonization. The objective of this study was to evaluate the chemical composition and bacterial adhesive properties of zinc (Zn) ion implanted and deposited Ti surfaces (Zn-PIIID-Ti) as potential dental implant materials. Surfaces of pure Ti (cp-Ti) were modified with increasing concentrations of Zn using plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (PIIID), and elemental surface compositions were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectrometry (XPS). To evaluate bacterial responses, Streptococcus mutans were seeded onto the modifiedTi surfaces for 48 h and subsequently observed by scanning electron microscopy. Relative numbers of bacteria on each surface were assessed by collecting the adhered bacteria, reculturing and counting colony forming units after 48 h on bacterial grade plates. Ti, oxygen and carbon elements were detected on all surfaces by XPS. Increased Zn signals were detected on Zn-PIIID-Ti surfaces, correlating with an increase of Zn-deposition time. Substantial numbers of S. mutans adhered to cp-Ti samples, whereas bacterial adhesion on Zn-PIIID-Ti surfaces signficantly decreased as the Zn concentration increased (p < 0.01). In conclusion, PIIID can successfully introduce Zn onto a Ti surface, forming a modified surface layer bearing Zn ions that consequently deter adhesion of S. mutans, a common bacterium in the oral environment.

  15. Zinc-ion implanted and deposited titanium surfaces reduce adhesion of Streptococccus mutans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Juan; Ding, Gang; Li, Jinlu; Yang, Shenhui; Fang, Bisong; Sun, Hongchen; Zhou, Yanmin

    2010-10-01

    While titanium (Ti) is a commonly used dental implant material with advantageous biocompatible and mechanical properties, native Ti surfaces do not have the ability to prevent bacterial colonization. The objective of this study was to evaluate the chemical composition and bacterial adhesive properties of zinc (Zn) ion implanted and deposited Ti surfaces (Zn-PIIID-Ti) as potential dental implant materials. Surfaces of pure Ti (cp-Ti) were modified with increasing concentrations of Zn using plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (PIIID), and elemental surface compositions were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectrometry (XPS). To evaluate bacterial responses, Streptococcus mutans were seeded onto the modifiedTi surfaces for 48 h and subsequently observed by scanning electron microscopy. Relative numbers of bacteria on each surface were assessed by collecting the adhered bacteria, reculturing and counting colony forming units after 48 h on bacterial grade plates. Ti, oxygen and carbon elements were detected on all surfaces by XPS. Increased Zn signals were detected on Zn-PIIID-Ti surfaces, correlating with an increase of Zn-deposition time. Substantial numbers of S. mutans adhered to cp-Ti samples, whereas bacterial adhesion on Zn-PIIID-Ti surfaces signficantly decreased as the Zn concentration increased ( p S. mutans, a common bacterium in the oral environment.

  16. Nanostructured Diamond-Like Carbon Films Grown by Off-Axis Pulsed Laser Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong Shan Yap

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured diamond-like carbon (DLC films instead of the ultrasmooth film were obtained by pulsed laser ablation of pyrolytic graphite. Deposition was performed at room temperature in vacuum with substrates placed at off-axis position. The configuration utilized high density plasma plume arriving at low effective angle for the formation of nanostructured DLC. Nanostructures with maximum size of 50 nm were deposited as compared to the ultrasmooth DLC films obtained in a conventional deposition. The Raman spectra of the films confirmed that the films were diamond-like/amorphous in nature. Although grown at an angle, ion energy of >35 eV was obtained at the off-axis position. This was proposed to be responsible for subplantation growth of sp3 hybridized carbon. The condensation of energetic clusters and oblique angle deposition correspondingly gave rise to the formation of nanostructured DLC in this study.

  17. Plasmonic Properties of Nanostructured Diamond Like Carbon/Silver Nanocomposite Films with Nanohole Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šarūnas MEŠKINIS

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Plasmonic properties of the diamond like carbon nanocomposite films with embedded silver nanoparticles with patterned nanohole arrays were analyzed in this study. The films were deposited by unbalanced reactive magnetron sputtering of silver target. Nanopatterning of the films was performed by combining electron beam nanolithography and ion beam etching techniques. Modeling of plasmonic properties was done using the classical Maxwell-Garnett theory. Modeling data and experimental results were in good accordance. Formation of the nanohole pattern in diamond like carbon films doped with silver resulted in decreased intensity of the surface plasmon resonance absorbance peak. No new absorbance or transmittance peaks were observed after the nanopattering. It was explained by extraordinary transmission effect in nanostructured DLC : Ag film films due to plasmon polariton resonance inside of the nanoholes.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.22.4.13193

  18. Diamond-like carbon formation for various positions by pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yap, Seong-Shan [Faculty of Engineering, Multimedia University, 63100 Cyberjaya, Selangor (Malaysia)]. E-mail: ssyap@mmu.edu.my; Tou, Teck-Yong [Faculty of Engineering, Multimedia University, 63100 Cyberjaya, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2005-07-30

    Pulsed laser ablation of pyrolytic graphite target was carried out by an Nd-YAG laser with {lambda} = 1064 nm and fluence in the range of 1-10 J/cm{sup 2}. The plume was produced by focusing the laser beam and rastering over a 6.5 mm x 6.5 mm area on the graphite target. The substrates were placed at two positions: on-axis position facing the target and off-axis position in the target plane with 2 mm offset from the ablation site. Diamond-like carbon was formed on the substrates at both positions and on the ablated area as detected by Raman spectroscopy. Rough and granular surface was observed for the samples placed in the target plane and smooth diamond-like carbon films for the samples placed facing the target as observed by SEM and optical microscopy.

  19. Highly Stripped Ion Sources for MeV Ion Implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hershcovitch, Ady

    2009-06-30

    Original technical objectives of CRADA number PVI C-03-09 between BNL and Poole Ventura, Inc. (PVI) were to develop an intense, high charge state, ion source for MeV ion implanters. Present day high-energy ion implanters utilize low charge state (usually single charge) ion sources in combination with rf accelerators. Usually, a MV LINAC is used for acceleration of a few rnA. It is desirable to have instead an intense, high charge state ion source on a relatively low energy platform (de acceleration) to generate high-energy ion beams for implantation. This de acceleration of ions will be far more efficient (in energy utilization). The resultant implanter will be smaller in size. It will generate higher quality ion beams (with lower emittance) for fabrication of superior semiconductor products. In addition to energy and cost savings, the implanter will operate at a lower level of health risks associated with ion implantation. An additional aim of the project was to producing a product that can lead to long­ term job creation in Russia and/or in the US. R&D was conducted in two Russian Centers (one in Tomsk and Seversk, the other in Moscow) under the guidance ofPVI personnel and the BNL PI. Multiple approaches were pursued, developed, and tested at various locations with the best candidate for commercialization delivered and tested at on an implanter at the PVI client Axcelis. Technical developments were exciting: record output currents of high charge state phosphorus and antimony were achieved; a Calutron-Bemas ion source with a 70% output of boron ion current (compared to 25% in present state-of-the-art). Record steady state output currents of higher charge state phosphorous and antimony and P ions: P{sup 2+} (8.6 pmA), P{sup 3+} (1.9 pmA), and P{sup 4+} (0.12 pmA) and 16.2, 7.6, 3.3, and 2.2 pmA of Sb{sup 3+} Sb {sup 4 +}, Sb{sup 5+}, and Sb{sup 6+} respectively. Ultimate commercialization goals did not succeed (even though a number of the products like high

  20. Optical and morphological properties of porous diamond-like-carbon films deposited by magnetron sputtering

    OpenAIRE

    Baroni, M. P. M. A.; Conceição, M. Ventura; Rosa, R. R.; Persson, C.; Arwin, H.; Silva Jr., E.F. da; Roman, L.S.; Nakamura, O.; I. Pepe; Silva, A. Ferreira da

    2006-01-01

    RESTRITO Porous diamond-like-carbon (PDLC) thin films obtained on silicon substrate by DC low energy magnetron sputtering have been investigated by photoluminescence, transmission and reflection spectroscopy, photoacoustic and spectroscopic ellipsometry. The absorption features observed for these films show similarities with those of porous silicon (PS) as well as in the performed gradient structural pattern classification of the SFM porosity, by means of the computational GPA-flyby enviro...

  1. A Comparative Study of Three Different Chemical Vapor Deposition Techniques of Carbon Nanotube Growth on Diamond Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    1187–1194, 2010. [28] L. T. Sun, J. L. Gong , Z. Y. Zhu et al., “Nanocrystalline diamond from carbon nanotubes,” Applied Physics Letters, vol. 84, no. 15...pp. 759–760, 1994. [33] G. Zhang, P. Qi , X. Wang et al., “Hydrogenation and hydro- carbonation and etching of single-walled carbon nanotubes,” Journal

  2. Thermal Conductivity of Diamond Packed Electrospun PAN-Based Carbon Fibers Incorporated with Multi Wall Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Qi; Lu, Chunyuan; Tulugan, Kelimu; Jin, Chunzi; Yoon, Soo Jong; Park, Yeong Min; Kim, Tae Gyu

    2016-02-01

    Multi wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and diamond are renowned as superlative material due to their relatively high thermal conductivity and hardness while comparing with any bulk materials. In this research, polyacrylonitrile (PAN) solution incorporated with MWCNTs at an alteration of mass fractions (0 wt%, 0.6 wt%, 1 wt%, 2 wt%) were fabricated via electrospinning under optimized parameters. Dried composite nanofibers were stabilized and carbonized, after which water base polytrafluorethylene (PTFE) mixed with nano diamond powder solution was spin coated on them. Scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray scattering and Laserflash thermal conductivity were used to characterize the composite nanofiber sheets. The result shows that the thermal conductivity increased to 4.825 W/m K from 2.061 W/mK. The improvement of thermal conductivities is suggesting the incorporation of MWCNTs.

  3. A comparative study of the field emission properties of aligned carbon nanostructures films, from carbon nanotubes to diamond

    OpenAIRE

    Le Normand, Francois; Cojocaru, Costel Sorin; Fleaca, Claudiu; Li, J. Q.; Vincent, Pascal; Pirio, Gilles; Gangloff, Laurent; Nedellec, Yanick; Legagneux, Pierre

    2007-01-01

    International audience; The electron field emission properties of different graphitic and diamond-like nanostructures films are compared. They are prepared in the same CVD chamber on SiO{2}/Si(100) and Si(100) flat surfaces, respectively. These nanostructures are thoroughly characterized by scanning electron emission (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). Films of dense aligned carbon nan...

  4. Proceedings of the conference on electrochemistry of carbon allotropes: Graphite, fullerenes and diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinoshita, K. [ed.] [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Scherson, D. [ed.] [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States)

    1998-02-01

    This conference provided an opportunity for electrochemists, physicists, materials scientists and engineers to meet and exchange information on different carbon allotropes. The presentations and discussion among the participants provided a forum to develop recommendations on research and development which are relevant to the electrochemistry of carbon allotropes. The following topics which are relevant to the electrochemistry of carbon allotropes were addressed: Graphitized and disordered carbons, as Li-ion intercalation anodes for high-energy-density, high-power-density Li-based secondary batteries; Carbons as substrate materials for catalysis and electrocatalysis; Boron-doped diamond film electrodes; and Electrochemical characterization and electrosynthesis of fullerenes and fullerene-type materials. Abstracts of the presentations are presented.

  5. Selective formation of diamond-like carbon coating by surface catalyst patterning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palnichenko, A.V.; Mátéfi-Tempfli, M.; Mátéfi-Tempfli, Stefan

    2004-01-01

    The selective formation of diamond-like carbon coating by surface catalyst patterning was studied. DLC films was deposited using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition, filtered vacuum arc deposition, laser ablation, magnetron sputtering and ion-beam lithography methods. The DLC coatings were...... obtained by means of a single short and intensive carbon plasma deposition pulse. The deposited DLC coating was characterized by micro-Raman spectroscopy measurements. The DLC coating process gave rise to wide potential possibilities in micro-devices manufacturing productions....

  6. Hybrid Quantum Device with Nitrogen-Vacancy Centers in Diamond Coupled to Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peng-Bo; Xiang, Ze-Liang; Rabl, Peter; Nori, Franco

    2016-07-01

    We show that nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond interfaced with a suspended carbon nanotube carrying a dc current can facilitate a spin-nanomechanical hybrid device. We demonstrate that strong magnetomechanical interactions between a single NV spin and the vibrational mode of the suspended nanotube can be engineered and dynamically tuned by external control over the system parameters. This spin-nanomechanical setup with strong, intrinsic, and tunable magnetomechanical couplings allows for the construction of hybrid quantum devices with NV centers and carbon-based nanostructures, as well as phonon-mediated quantum information processing with spin qubits.

  7. Carbon nanoscrolls on the surface of nanocrystalline graphite and diamond films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skovorodnikov, N. O., E-mail: ismagil@polly.phys.msu.ru; Malykhin, S. A. [Moscow State University, Faculty of Physics (Russian Federation); Tuyakova, F. T. [Moscow State Technical University of Radio Engineering, Electronics, and Automation (Russian Federation); Ismagilov, R. R.; Obraztsov, A. N. [Moscow State University, Faculty of Physics (Russian Federation)

    2015-07-15

    Nanocrystalline graphite and diamond films with needlelike nanostructures on their surface have been obtained by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. According to the experimental data, these aggregates have the same nature for films of both types: they are tubular carbon nanoscrolls with a polygonal cross section. Nanoscrolls are formed by a helically folded graphene sheet; they look like twisted prisms. The needlelike prismatic structures have an average diameter in the range of 50‒500 nm, and their length reaches several micrometers. Possible mechanisms of formation of carbon nanostructures are discussed.

  8. Detection of ion implanted patterns in silicon using STM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun-Soo; Ramanayaka, A. N.; Dwyer, K. J.; Stewart, M. D., Jr.; Pomeroy, J. M.

    Ion implanted regions in silicon are scanned using STM to detect features which will facilitate in-situ overlay and alignment of STM hydrogen patterned nano-devices. STM hydrogen lithography is used to make atomically precise devices such as single electron transistors and single atom qubits. However, with currently available imaging techniques, we are limited to make devices on a single plane using STM lithography. In-situ detection of high local doping concentrations using STM will allow precise alignment between the multiple layers of buried nano-devices and metal electrodes.

  9. Development of a microwave ion source for ion implantations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, N., E-mail: Nbk-Takahashi@shi.co.jp; Murata, H.; Kitami, H.; Mitsubori, H.; Sakuraba, J.; Soga, T.; Aoki, Y.; Katoh, T. [Technology Research Center, Sumitomo Heavy Industries Ltd., Yokosuka, Kanagawa 237-8555 (Japan)

    2016-02-15

    A microwave ion source is expected to have a long lifetime, as it has fewer consumables. Thus, we are in the process of developing a microwave ion source for ion implantation applications. In this paper, we report on a newly developed plasma chamber and the extracted P{sup +} beam currents. The volume of the plasma chamber is optimized by varying the length of a boron nitride block installed within the chamber. The extracted P{sup +} beam current is more than 30 mA, at a 25 kV acceleration voltage, using PH{sub 3} gas.

  10. Temperature-dependant study of phosphorus ion implantation in germanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razali, M. A.; Smith, A. J.; Jeynes, C.; Gwilliam, R. M.

    2012-11-01

    We present experimental results on shallow junction formation in germanium by phosphorus ion implantation and standard rapid thermal processing. An attempt is made to improve phosphorus activation by implanting phosphorus at high and low temperature. The focus is on studying the germanium damage and phosphorus activation as a function of implant temperature. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry with channelling and Hall Effect measurements are employed for characterisation of germanium damage and phosphorus activation, respectively. High and low temperature implants were found to be better compared to room temperature implant.

  11. Ion Implantation in III-V Compound Semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-09-01

    340 keV H + -0 Ga P  O UES-723-292 !:• (H o>ray *P-K X - rayO Ga-K X -ray iii! RBS * ..I -iO.. 0 10I to1. 01 • .0 -. I0 1 LI =i, O I 0 01 0.J 10...Identity by blo ," pume) Ion Implantation, GaAs, Hall effect, electrical resistivity, Rutherford Backscattering (RBS), channeling, Proton induced x -ray...Mebility (jH) upon Aiinealing Temperature (TA) for 1 X 101 /cm• Dose Samples of GaAs:Mg with Three Different Capping Methods 33 p 14 Dependence of Surface

  12. Cooperative emission in ion implanted Yb:YAG waveguides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vazquez, G V; Desirena, H; De la Rosa, E [Centro de Investigaciones en Optica, Loma del Bosque 115, Lomas del Campestre, 37150 Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico); Flores-Romero, E; Rickards, J; Trejo-Luna, R [Instituto de Fisica, UNAM, Apartado Postal 20364, 01000 Mexico, D. F. (Mexico); Marquez, H, E-mail: gvvazquez@cio.mx [Departamento de Optica, CICESE, Km 107 Carr. Tijuana-Ensenada, 22860 Ensenada, B. C. (Mexico)

    2011-01-01

    In this work, we report the analysis of spectroscopic properties of waveguides fabricated by ion implantation in YAG doped with Yb{sup 3+} ions. Three emission bands were detected in the blue, green and red regions under 970-nm excitation. The strong blue-green emission can be explained by a cooperative process between ytterbium ion pairs, leading to emission centered at 514 nm. The additional blue bands as well as green and red emission bands are attributed to the presence of Tm{sup 3+} and Er{sup 3+} traces. The results include absorption and emission curves as well as decay time rates.

  13. Effects of COOH+ ion implantation on hemocompatibility of polypropylene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI; Dejun(李德军); NIU; Lifang(牛丽芳)

    2002-01-01

    Carboxyl ion (COOH+) implantation was performed at 50 keV with different fluences for polypropylene. Hemocompatibility tests show that blood coagulation time and recalcification time of polypropylene were enhanced significantly with the increasing fluence. At the same time, the human endothelial cells grown on the surface of the implanted samples exhibited normal cellular growth and morphology. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and water contact angle analysis showed that COOH+ ion implantation rearranges chemical bonds and produces some new polar O-containing groups on the surface. The formation of polar functional groups, together with increase of roughness, induced an increase in hydrophilicity, which in turn improved the surface hemocompatibility of polypropylene.

  14. Conditions for forming composite carbon nanotube-diamond like carbon material that retain the good properties of both materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Wei, E-mail: wei.ren@helsinki.fi; Avchaciov, Konstantin; Nordlund, Kai [Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 43, FIN-00014 Helsinki (Finland); Iyer, Ajai; Koskinen, Jari [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, School of Chemical Technology, Aalto University, P.O. Box 16200, 00076 Espoo (Finland); Kaskela, Antti; Kauppinen, Esko I. [NanoMaterials Group, Department of Applied Physics, Aalto University School of Science, P.O. Box 15100, 00076 Aalto (Finland)

    2015-11-21

    Carbon nanotubes are of wide interest due to their excellent properties such as tensile strength and electrical and thermal conductivity, but are not, when placed alone on a substrate, well resistant to mechanical wear. Diamond-like carbon (DLC), on the other hand, is widely used in applications due to its very good wear resistance. Combining the two materials could provide a very durable pure carbon nanomaterial enabling to benefit from the best properties of both carbon allotropes. However, the synthesis of high-quality diamond-like carbon uses energetic plasmas, which can damage the nanotubes. From previous works it is neither clear whether the quality of the tubes remains good after DLC deposition, nor whether the DLC above the tubes retains the high sp{sup 3} bonding fraction. In this work, we use experiments and classical molecular dynamics simulations to study the mechanisms of DLC formation on various carbon nanotube compositions. The results show that high-sp{sup 3}-content DLC can be formed provided the deposition conditions allow for sidewards pressure to form from a substrate close beneath the tubes. Under optimal DLC formation energies of around 40–70 eV, the top two nanotube atom layers are fully destroyed by the plasma deposition, but layers below this can retain their structural integrity.

  15. Conditions for forming composite carbon nanotube-diamond like carbon material that retain the good properties of both materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Wei; Iyer, Ajai; Koskinen, Jari; Kaskela, Antti; Kauppinen, Esko I.; Avchaciov, Konstantin; Nordlund, Kai

    2015-11-01

    Carbon nanotubes are of wide interest due to their excellent properties such as tensile strength and electrical and thermal conductivity, but are not, when placed alone on a substrate, well resistant to mechanical wear. Diamond-like carbon (DLC), on the other hand, is widely used in applications due to its very good wear resistance. Combining the two materials could provide a very durable pure carbon nanomaterial enabling to benefit from the best properties of both carbon allotropes. However, the synthesis of high-quality diamond-like carbon uses energetic plasmas, which can damage the nanotubes. From previous works it is neither clear whether the quality of the tubes remains good after DLC deposition, nor whether the DLC above the tubes retains the high sp3 bonding fraction. In this work, we use experiments and classical molecular dynamics simulations to study the mechanisms of DLC formation on various carbon nanotube compositions. The results show that high-sp3-content DLC can be formed provided the deposition conditions allow for sidewards pressure to form from a substrate close beneath the tubes. Under optimal DLC formation energies of around 40-70 eV, the top two nanotube atom layers are fully destroyed by the plasma deposition, but layers below this can retain their structural integrity.

  16. Surface characterization and orientation interaction between diamond- like carbon layer structure and dimeric liquid crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naradikian, H.; Petrov, M.; Katranchev, B.; Milenov, T.; Tinchev, S.

    2017-01-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) and amorphous carbon films are very promising type of semiconductor materials. Depending on the hybridization sp2/sp3 ratio, the material’s band gap varies between 0.8 and 3 eV. Moreover carbon films possess different interesting for practice properties: comparable to the Silicon, Diamond like structure has 22-time better thermal conductivity etc. Here we present one type of implementation of such type nanostructure. That is one attempt for orientation of dimeric LC by using of pre-deposited DLC layer with different ratio of sp2/sp3 hybridized carbon content. It could be expected a pronounced π1-π2interaction between s and p orbital levels on the surface and the dimeric ring of LC. We present comparison of surface anchoring strengths of both orientation inter-surfaces DLC/dimeric LC and single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT)/dimeric LC. The mechanism of interaction of dimeric LC and activated surfaces with DLC or SWCNT will be discussed. In both cases we have π-π interaction, which in combination with hydrogen bonding, typical for the dimeric LCs, influence the LC alignment. The Raman spectroscopy data evidenced the presence of charge transfer between contacting hexagonal rings of DLC and the C = O groups of the LC molecules.

  17. Study of facing target sputtered diamond-like carbon overcoats for hard disk drive media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seet, H.L., E-mail: SEET_Hang_Li@dsi.a-star.edu.sg [Data Storage Institute, A*STAR Agency for Science, Technology and Research, 5 Engineering Drive 1, 117608 (Singapore); Ng, K.K.; Chen, X.Y. [Data Storage Institute, A*STAR Agency for Science, Technology and Research, 5 Engineering Drive 1, 117608 (Singapore); Yang, P. [Singapore Synchrotron Light Source (SSLS), National University of Singapore, 5 Research Link, 117603 (Singapore); Shen, L. [Institute of Materials Research and Engineering, A*STAR Agency for Science, Technology and Research, 3 Research Link, 117602 (Singapore); Ji, R.; Ng, H.X.; Lim, C.B. [Data Storage Institute, A*STAR Agency for Science, Technology and Research, 5 Engineering Drive 1, 117608 (Singapore)

    2015-07-01

    The demand for higher areal density in the hard disk drive industry has fuelled extensive research efforts and focuses on magnetic spacing reduction. In the head–disk interface arena, one of the key focuses is to reduce the carbon overcoat thickness without compromising the overcoat protection performance. Thus, in the search for alternative methods to reduce the carbon overcoat thickness, the facing target sputtering (FTS) process for diamond-like carbon deposition has been investigated. The resulting properties have been presented in this paper, with comparison to conventional diamond-like carbon (DLC) layers by other processes such as chemical vapor deposition and reactive sputtering with nitrogen. X-ray reflectometry results showed that facing target sputtered DLC samples displayed significantly higher density, at 2.87 g/cm{sup 3}, as compared to hydrogenated and nitrogenated DLC samples. This was attributed to the higher sp{sup 3} content, as obtained by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements. As a result of the high sp{sup 3} content, hardness of the FTS deposited samples was higher than that of the hydrogenated and nitrogenated DLC samples. In addition, the surface energy of FTS samples was observed to be comparable, but lower, than that of nitrogenated DLC samples through contact angle measurements. Clearances comparable to that of conventional DLC samples were achieved and the sample disks were flyable. Wear performance tests also revealed more wear resistance for the FTS deposited DLC samples, but also higher head wear. - Highlights: • Facing target sputtered (FTS) diamond-like carbon (DLC) samples were studied. • FTS DLC samples possess higher density and hardness. • Surface conditions and flyability performances for FTS DLC samples were comparable. • Wear tests on FTS DLC samples showed lower media wear, but higher head wear.

  18. Catalytic carbonization of wood charcoal : graphite or diamond?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hata, T; Vystavel, T; Bronsveld, P; DeHosson, J; Kikuchi, H; Nishimiya, K; Imamura, Y

    2004-01-01

    We report on the process of making graphite out of wood by catalytic carbonization. Two different types of microstructure were observed. One type being typical for graphitization of wood without the effect of a catalyst, the main characteristic being the typical fibrillar microstructure related back

  19. Optical and Electrical Properties Evolution of Diamond-Like Carbon Thin Films with Deposition Temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Xu-Li; LI Qing-Shan; KONG Xiang-He

    2009-01-01

    Optical and electrical properties of diamond-like carbon (DLC) films deposited by pulsed laser ablation of graphite target at different substrate temperatures are reported. By varying the deposition temperature from 400 to 25℃, the film optical transparency and electrical resistivity increase severely. Most importantly, the transparency and resistivity properties of the DLC films can be tailored to approaching diamond by adjusting the deposition temperature, which is critical to many applications. DLC films deposited at low temperatures show excellent optical transmittance and high resistivity. Over the same temperature regime an increase of the spa bonded C content is observed using visible Raman spectroscopy, which is responsible for the enhanced transparency and resistivity properties.

  20. Irradiation Effect of γ Rays on Diamond-Like Carbon Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Diamond-like carbon films, prepared by RF glow discharge on glasssubstrates, were irradiated by γ rays. The as-deposited and irradiated films were characterized by Raman spectroscopy, electrical resistivity, and infrared transmittance. It is shown that the irradiation of the γ rays can lead to the breaking of SP3C-H and SP2C-H bonds, slight increasing of SP3C-C bonds, and induced hydrogen recombination with H2 molecules, subsequently diffusing to the surface of the films. When the γ rays irradiation dose reached 10×104 Gy, the numbers of SP3C-H bonds was decreased by about 50%, the resistivity of irradiated DLC films was increased, and the diamond-like character of the films became more obvious. The structure of DLC films was modified when irradiated by γ rays. The irradiation mechanisms are briefly discussed.

  1. Compensation effects in C{sub 60} doped by ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trouillas, P.; Ratier, B.; Moliton, A. [LEPOFI, Faculte des Sciences, Limoges (France)

    1995-12-31

    We have studied electrical transport phenomena after ion implantation in sublimed C{sub 60} films. A n type doping exists with 30 KeV potassium ion irradiations and low fluences (D < 10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2}). However degradation effects have been noted. So we have tried to discriminate doping and damage effects. Studies about the compensation phenomenum have been performed in order to prove the chemical role of the potassium atoms. An electron transfer from the alkali metal is sure; but a strong competition exists between degradation and doping phenomena. Finally, the intact C{sub 60} molecules are the insulator barriers, K{sub 3}C{sub 60} and isolated carbon atoms are the conductor phase for an heterogeneous media model. (Author).

  2. Preparation and Investigation of Diamond-like Carbon Stripper Foils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN; Qi-wen; DU; Ying-hui; ZHANG; Rong; XU; Guo-ji

    2013-01-01

    1 Preparation of DLC stripper foils For DLC stripper foils of about 5μg/cm2 thickness,the following methods were used.The DLC foils of about 4μg/cm2 thicknesses were produced by FCVA onto glass slides coated with betaine-saccharose as releasing agent,which was previously covered with the evaporated carbon layers of about 1μg/cm2

  3. Structural modification of tantalum crystal induced by nitrogen ion implantation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A H RAMEZANI; M R HANTEHZADEH; M GHORANNEVISS; E DARABI

    2016-06-01

    This paper investigates the effect of nitrogen ion implantation on tantalum surface structure. In this experiment, nitrogen ions which had an energy of 30 keV and doses of $1 \\times 10^{17}$ to $10 \\times 10^{17}$ ions cm$^{−2}$ were used. X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) was applied for both the metallic Ta substrate and the study of new structures that have been created through the nitrogen ion implantation. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was also used tocheck the roughness variations prior to and also after the implantation phase. The experimental results show the formation of hexagonal tantalum nitride (TaN$_{0.43}$) in addition to the fact that by increasing the ion dose, the nitrogen atoms occupy more interstitial spaces in the target crystal. The nitride phase also seen for $3\\times 10^{17}$ and $5\\times 10^{17}$ ions cm$^{−2}$, while it disappeared for higher dose of $7\\times 10^{17}$ and $1\\times 10^{18}$ ions cm$^{−2}$. The FWHM of the dominant peak of tantalum nitride suggest the growth of the crystallite’s size, which is in agreement with the AFM results ofthe grains.

  4. Self-organized surface ripple pattern formation by ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofsäss, Hans; Zhang, Kun; Bobes, Omar

    2016-10-01

    Ion induced ripple pattern formation on solid surfaces has been extensively studied in the past and the theories describing curvature dependent ion erosion as well as redistribution of recoil atoms have been very successful in explaining many features of the pattern formation. Since most experimental studies use noble gas ion irradiation, the incorporation of the ions into the films is usually neglected. In this work we show that the incorporation or implantation of non-volatile ions also leads to a curvature dependent term in the equation of motion of a surface height profile. The implantation of ions can be interpreted as a negative sputter yield; and therefore, the effect of ion implantation is opposite to the one of ion erosion. For angles up to about 50°, implantation of ions stabilizes the surface, whereas above 50°, ion implantation contributes to the destabilization of the surface. We present simulations of the curvature coefficients using the crater function formalism and we compare the simulation results to the experimental data on the ion induced pattern formation using non-volatile ions. We present several model cases, where the incorporation of ions is a crucial requirement for the pattern formation.

  5. Terahertz generation from Cu ion implantation into lithium niobate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yuhua, E-mail: wyh61@163.com [Hubei Province Key Laboratory of Systems Science in Metallurgical Process, Wuhan university of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430081 (China); Wang, Ruwu; Yuan, Jie [Hubei Province Key Laboratory of Systems Science in Metallurgical Process, Wuhan university of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430081 (China); Wang, Yumei [Department of Nephrology, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022 (China)

    2014-03-15

    In this letter, the authors present first observation of terahertz generation from Cu implantation of lithium niobate crystal substrate. Lithium niobate single crystal is grown by Czochralski method. Metal nanoparticles synthesized by Cu ion implantation were implanted into lithium niobate single crystal using metal vapor vacuum arc (MEVVA) ion source. 1 kHz, 35 fs laser pulse centred at 800 nm was focused onto the samples. The supercontinuum spectra of the sample are obtained. Terahertz was generated via this kind of sample and investigated using the electro-optical sampling technique. The findings suggest that under the investigated implantation parameter, a strong spectral component in excess of 0.46 THz emission was found from Cu ion implantation of lithium niobate. -- Highlights: • We first observation of terahertz generation from Cu implantation of lithium niobate crystal substrate. • Lithium niobate single crystal is grown by Czochralski method. Cu nanoparticles in lithium niobate have been formed by using MEVVA ion source. • The THz bandwidth and center from this kind of sample were determined.

  6. Industrial plasma immersion ion implanter and its applications

    CERN Document Server

    Tong Hong Hui; Huo Yan Feng; Wang Ke; Mu Li Lan; Feng Tie Min; Zhao Jun; Yan Bing; Geng Man

    2002-01-01

    A new generation industrial plasma immersion ion implanter was developed recently in South-western Institute of Physics and some experimental results are reported. The vacuum chamber with 900 mm in diameter and 1050 mm in height stands vertically. The pumping system includes turbo -pump and mechanical pump and it can be automatically controlled by PLC. The background pressure is less than 4 x 10 sup - sup 4 Pa. The plasma in the chamber can be generated by hot-filament discharge and three high-efficiency magnetic filter metal plasma sources, so that the plasma immersion ion implantation and enhanced deposition can be done. The maximum pulse voltage output is 80 kV, maximum pulse current is 60 A, repetition frequency is 50-500 Hz, and the pulse rise time is less than 2 mu s. The power modulator can operate in the pulse bunching mode if necessary. In general, the plasma density is 10 sup 8 -10 sup 1 sup 0 cm sup - sup 3 , the film deposition rate is 0.1-0.5 nm/s

  7. Ion sources for energy extremes of ion implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershcovitch, A; Johnson, B M; Batalin, V A; Kropachev, G N; Kuibeda, R P; Kulevoy, T V; Kolomiets, A A; Pershin, V I; Petrenko, S V; Rudskoy, I; Seleznev, D N; Bugaev, A S; Gushenets, V I; Litovko, I V; Oks, E M; Yushkov, G Yu; Masunov, E S; Polozov, S M; Poole, H J; Storozhenko, P A; Svarovski, A Ya

    2008-02-01

    For the past four years a joint research and development effort designed to develop steady state, intense ion sources has been in progress with the ultimate goal to develop ion sources and techniques that meet the two energy extreme range needs of meV and hundreads of eV ion implanters. This endeavor has already resulted in record steady state output currents of high charge state of antimony and phosphorus ions: P(2+) [8.6 pmA (particle milliampere)], P(3+) (1.9 pmA), and P(4+) (0.12 pmA) and 16.2, 7.6, 3.3, and 2.2 pmA of Sb(3+)Sb(4+), Sb(5+), and Sb(6+) respectively. For low energy ion implantation, our efforts involve molecular ions and a novel plasmaless/gasless deceleration method. To date, 1 emA (electrical milliampere) of positive decaborane ions was extracted at 10 keV and smaller currents of negative decaborane ions were also extracted. Additionally, boron current fraction of over 70% was extracted from a Bernas-Calutron ion source, which represents a factor of 3.5 improvement over currently employed ion sources.

  8. Mass spectrometry improvement on an high current ion implanter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopes, J.G., E-mail: jgabriel@deea.isel.ipl.pt [Instituto Superior de Engenharia de Lisboa and Centro de Fisica Nuclear of the University of Lisbon, Rua Conselheiro Emidio Navarro, 1, 1959-007 Lisbon (Portugal); Alegria, F.C., E-mail: falegria@lx.it.pt [Instituto Superior Tecnico/Technical University of Lisbon and Instituto de Telecomunicacoes, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Redondo, L.M., E-mail: lmredondo@deea.isel.ipl.pt [Instituto Superior de Engenharia de Lisboa and Centro de Fisica Nuclear of the University of Lisbon, Rua Conselheiro Emidio Navarro, 1, 1959-007 Lisbon (Portugal); Rocha, J., E-mail: jrocha@itn.pt [Instituto Tecnologico Nuclear, Estrada Nacional 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Alves, E., E-mail: ealves@itn.pt [Instituto Tecnologico Nuclear, Estrada Nacional 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal)

    2011-12-15

    The development of accurate mass spectrometry, enabling the identification of all the ions extracted from the ion source in a high current implanter is described. The spectrometry system uses two signals (x-y graphic), one proportional to the magnetic field (x-axes), taken from the high-voltage potential with an optic fiber system, and the other proportional to the beam current intensity (y-axes), taken from a beam-stop. The ion beam mass register in a mass spectrum of all the elements magnetically analyzed with the same radius and defined by a pair of analyzing slits as a function of their beam intensity is presented. The developed system uses a PC to control the displaying of the extracted beam mass spectrum, and also recording of all data acquired for posterior analysis. The operator uses a LabVIEW code that enables the interfacing between an I/O board and the ion implanter. The experimental results from an ion implantation experiment are shown.

  9. ION SOURCES FOR ENERGY EXTREMES OF ION IMPLANTATION.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HERSCHCOVITCH,A.; JOHNSON, B.M.; BATALIN, V.A.; KROPACHEV, G.N.; KUIBEDA, R.P.; KULEVOY, T.V.; KOLOMIETS, A.A.; PERSHIN, V.I.; PETRENKO, S.V.; RUDSKOY, I.; SELEZNEV, D.N.; BUGAEV, A.S.; GUSHENETS, V.I.; LITOVKO, I.V.; OKS, E.M.; YUSHKOV, G. YU.; MASEUNOV, E.S.; POLOZOV, S.M.; POOLE, H.J.; STOROZHENKO, P.A.; SVAROVSKI, YA.

    2007-08-26

    For the past four years a joint research and development effort designed to develop steady state, intense ion sources has been in progress with the ultimate goal to develop ion sources and techniques, which meet the two energy extreme range needs of mega-electron-volt and 100's of electron-volt ion implanters. This endeavor has already resulted in record steady state output currents of high charge state of Antimony and Phosphorous ions: P{sup 2+} (8.6 pmA), P{sup 3+} (1.9 pmA), and P{sup 4+} (0.12 pmA) and 16.2, 7.6, 3.3, and 2.2 pmA of Sb{sup 3+} Sb{sup 4+}, Sb{sup 5+}, and Sb{sup 6+} respectively. For low energy ion implantation our efforts involve molecular ions and a novel plasmaless/gasless deceleration method. To date, 1 emA of positive Decaborane ions were extracted at 10 keV and smaller currents of negative Decaborane ions were also extracted. Additionally, Boron current fraction of over 70% was extracted from a Bemas-Calutron ion source, which represents a factor of 3.5 improvement over currently employed ion sources.

  10. Titanium Nitride and Nitrogen Ion Implanted Coated Dental Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David W. Berzins

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Titanium nitride and/or nitrogen ion implanted coated dental materials have been investigated since the mid-1980s and considered in various applications in dentistry such as implants, abutments, orthodontic wires, endodontic files, periodontal/oral hygiene instruments, and casting alloys for fixed restorations. Multiple methodologies have been employed to create the coatings, but detailed structural analysis of the coatings is generally lacking in the dental literature. Depending on application, the purpose of the coating is to provide increased surface hardness, abrasion/wear resistance, esthetics, and corrosion resistance, lower friction, as well as greater beneficial interaction with adjacent biological and material substrates. While many studies have reported on the achievement of these properties, a consensus is not always clear. Additionally, few studies have been conducted to assess the efficacy of the coatings in a clinical setting. Overall, titanium nitride and/or nitrogen ion implanted coated dental materials potentially offer advantages over uncoated counterparts, but more investigation is needed to document the structure of the coatings and their clinical effectiveness.

  11. Ion-implantation and analysis for doped silicon slot waveguides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCallum J. C.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available We have utilised ion implantation to fabricate silicon nanocrystal sensitised erbium-doped slot waveguide structures in a Si/SiO2/Si layered configuration and photoluminescence (PL and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS to analyse these structures. Slot waveguide structures in which light is confined to a nanometre-scale low-index region between two high-index regions potentially offer significant advantages for realisation of electrically-pumped Si devices with optical gain and possibly quantum optical devices. We are currently investigating an alternative pathway in which high quality thermal oxides are grown on silicon and ion implantation is used to introduce the Er and Si-ncs into the SiO2 layer. This approach provides considerable control over the Er and Si-nc concentrations and depth profiles which is important for exploring the available parameter space and developing optimised structures. RBS is well-suited to compositional analysis of these layered structures. To improve the depth sensitivity we have used a 1 MeV α beam and results indicate that a layered silicon-Er:SiO2/silicon structure has been fabricated as desired. In this paper structural results will be compared to Er photoluminescence profiles for samples processed under a range of conditions.

  12. Origin of sub-lithospheric diamonds from the Juina-5 kimberlite (Brazil): constraints from carbon isotopes and inclusion compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, A. R.; Kohn, S. C.; Bulanova, G. P.; Smith, C. B.; Araujo, D.; Walter, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    Forty-one diamonds sourced from the Juina-5 kimberlite pipe in Southern Brazil, which contain optically identifiable inclusions, have been studied using an integrated approach. The diamonds contain <20 ppm nitrogen (N) that is fully aggregated as B centres. Internal structures in several diamonds revealed using cathodoluminescence (CL) are unlike those normally observed in lithospheric samples. The majority of the diamonds are composed of isotopically light carbon, and the collection has a unimodal distribution heavily skewed towards δ13C ~ -25 ‰. Individual diamonds can display large carbon isotope heterogeneity of up to ~15 ‰ and predominantly have isotopically lighter cores displaying blue CL, and heavier rims with green CL. The light carbon isotopic compositions are interpreted as evidence of diamond growth from abiotic organic carbon added to the oceanic crust during hydrothermal alteration. The bulk isotopic composition of the oceanic crust, carbonates plus organics, is equal to the composition of mantle carbon (-5 ‰), and we suggest that recycling/mixing of subducted material will replenish this reservoir over geological time. Several exposed, syngenetic inclusions have bulk compositions consistent with former eclogitic magnesium silicate perovskite, calcium silicate perovskite and NAL or CF phases that have re-equilibrated during their exhumation to the surface. There are multiple occurrences of majoritic garnet with pyroxene exsolution, coesite with and without kyanite exsolution, clinopyroxene, Fe or Fe-carbide and sulphide minerals alongside single occurrences of olivine and ferropericlase. As a group, the inclusions have eclogitic affinity and provide evidence for diamond formation at pressures extending to Earth's deep transition zone and possibly the lower mantle. It is observed that the major element composition of inclusions and isotopic compositions of host Juina-5 diamonds are not correlated. The diamond and inclusion compositions are

  13. Microstructure and chemical bond evolution of diamond-like carbon films machined by femtosecond laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jing; Wang, Chunhui [Science and Technology on Thermostructure Composite Materials Laboratory, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China); Liu, Yongsheng, E-mail: yongshengliu@nwpu.edu.cn [Science and Technology on Thermostructure Composite Materials Laboratory, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China); Cheng, Laifei [Science and Technology on Thermostructure Composite Materials Laboratory, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China); Li, Weinan [State Key Laboratory of Transient Optics and Photonics, Xi’an Institute of Optics and Precision Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xi’an 10068 (China); Zhang, Qing [Science and Technology on Thermostructure Composite Materials Laboratory, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China); Yang, Xiaojun [State Key Laboratory of Transient Optics and Photonics, Xi’an Institute of Optics and Precision Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xi’an 10068 (China)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • The machining depth was essentially proportional to the laser power. • The well patterned microgrooves and ripple structures with nanoparticles were formed distinctly in the channels. And the number of nanoparticles increased with the processing power as well. • It revealed a conversion from amorphous carbon to nanocrystalline graphite after laser treated with increasing laser power. • It showed that a great decrease of sp{sup 3}/sp{sup 2} after laser treatment. - Abstract: Femtosecond laser is of great interest for machining high melting point and hardness materials such as diamond-like carbon, SiC ceramic, et al. In present work, the microstructural and chemical bond evolution of diamond-like carbon films were investigated using electron microscopy and spectroscopy techniques after machined by diverse femtosecond laser power in air. The results showed the machining depth was essentially proportional to the laser power. The well patterned microgrooves and ripple structures with nanoparticles were formed distinctly in the channels. Considering the D and G Raman band parameters on the laser irradiation, it revealed a conversion from amorphous carbon to nanocrystalline graphite after laser treated with increasing laser power. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis showed a great decrease of sp{sup 3}/sp{sup 2} after laser treatment.

  14. Single ion impact detection and scanning probe aligned ion implantation for quantum bit formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weis, Christoph D.

    2011-10-04

    Quantum computing and quantum information processing is a promising path to replace classical information processing via conventional computers which are approaching fundamental physical limits. Instead of classical bits, quantum bits (qubits) are utilized for computing operations. Due to quantum mechanical phenomena such as superposition and entanglement, a completely different way of information processing is achieved, enabling enhanced performance for certain problem sets. Various proposals exist on how to realize a quantum bit. Among them are electron or nuclear spins of defect centers in solid state systems. Two such candidates with spin degree of freedom are single donor atoms in silicon and nitrogen vacancy (NV) defect centers in diamond. Both qubit candidates possess extraordinary qualities which makes them promising building blocks. Besides certain advantages, the qubits share the necessity to be placed precisely in their host materials and device structures. A commonly used method is to introduce the donor atoms into the substrate materials via ion implantation. For this, focused ion beam systems can be used, or collimation techniques as in this work. A broad ion beam hits the back of a scanning probe microscope (SPM) cantilever with incorporated apertures. The high resolution imaging capabilities of the SPM allows the non destructive location of device areas and the alignment of the cantilever and thus collimated ion beam spot to the desired implant locations. In this work, this technique is explored, applied and pushed forward to meet necessary precision requirements. The alignment of the ion beam to surface features, which are sensitive to ion impacts and thus act as detectors, is demonstrated. The technique is also used to create NV center arrays in diamond substrates. Further, single ion impacts into silicon device structures are detected which enables deliberate single ion doping.

  15. Temperature Dependence of Electroresistivity, Negative and Positive Magnetoresistivity of Graphite/Diamond Nanocomposites and Onion-Like Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-11-01

    of graphite/diamond nanocomposites (GDNC) and onion-like carbon (OLC) prepared by vacuum annealing of nanodiamond (ND) at various fixed temperatures...properties of carbon materials is of interest due to wide practical applications and provides information on their structural perfection and

  16. Mineral inclusions in sublithospheric diamonds from Collier 4 kimberlite pipe, Juina, Brazil: subducted protoliths, carbonated melts and primary kimberlite magmatism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulanova, Galina P.; Walter, Michael J.; Smith, Chris B.; Kohn, Simon C.; Armstrong, Lora S.; Blundy, Jon; Gobbo, Luiz

    2010-10-01

    We report on a suite of diamonds from the Cretaceous Collier 4 kimberlite pipe, Juina, Brazil, that are predominantly nitrogen-free type II crystals showing complex internal growth structures. Syngenetic mineral inclusions comprise calcium- and titanium-rich phases with perovskite stoichiometry, Ca-rich majoritic-garnet, clinopyroxene, olivine, TAPP phase, minerals with stoichiometries of CAS and K-hollandite phases, SiO2, FeO, native iron, low-Ni sulfides, and Ca-Mg-carbonate. We divide the diamonds into three groups on the basis of the carbon isotope compositions (δ13C) of diamond core zones. Group 1 diamonds have heavy, mantle-like δ13C (-5 to -10‰) with mineral inclusions indicating a transition zone origin from mafic protoliths. Group 2 diamonds have intermediate δ13C (-12 to -15‰), with inclusion compositions indicating crystallization from near-primary and differentiated carbonated melts derived from oceanic crust in the deep upper mantle or transition zone. A 206Pb/238U age of 101 ± 7 Ma on a CaTiSi-perovskite inclusion (Group 2) is close to the kimberlite emplacement time (93.1 ± 1.5 Ma). Group 3 diamonds have extremely light δ13C (-25‰), and host inclusions have compositions akin to high-pressure-temperature phases expected to be stable in pelagic sediments subducted to transition zone depths. Collectively, the Collier 4 diamonds and their inclusions indicate multi-stage, polybaric growth histories in dynamically changing chemical environments. The young inclusion age, the ubiquitous chemical and isotopic characteristics indicative of subducted materials, and the regional tectonic history, suggest a model in which generation of sublithospheric diamonds and their inclusions, and the proto-kimberlite magmas, are related genetically, temporally and geographically to the interaction of subducted lithosphere and a Cretaceous plume.

  17. Surface Functionalization of Plasma Treated Ultrananocrystalline Diamond/Amorphous Carbon Composite Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Hermann; Popov, Cyril; Kulisch, Wilhelm; Spassov, G.; Reithmaier, Johann Peter

    Diamond possesses a number of outstanding properties which make it a perspective material as platform for preparation of biosensors. The diamond surface needs to be activated before the chemical attachment of crosslinkers with which biomolecules can interact. In the current work we have investigated the modification of ultrananocrystalline diamond/amorphous carbon (UNCD/a-C) films by oxygen and ammonia plasmas. Afterwards the layers were functionalized in a further step to obtain thiol-active maleimide groups on the surface. We studied the possibility for direct binding of maleimide to terminal OH-groups on the UNCD surface and for silanization with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) to obtain NH2-groups for the following attachment of sulfosuccinimidyl 4-(N-maleimidomethyl)-cyclohexane-1-carboxylate (SSMCC). The thiol-bearing fluorescein-related dye 5-((2-(and-3)-S-(acetylmercapto) succinoyl) amino) fluorescein (SAMSA) was immobilized as an model biomolecule to evaluate the achieved thiol-activity by fluorescence microscopy. The results of the above mentioned surface modification and functionalization steps were investigated by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and contact angle measurements.

  18. A comparative study of the field emission properties of aligned carbon nanostructures films, from carbon nanotubes to diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Normand, F.; Cojocaru, C. S.; Fleaca, C.; Li, J. Q.; Vincent, P.; Pirio, G.; Gangloff, L.; Nedellec, Y.; Legagneux, P.

    2007-05-01

    The electron field emission properties of different graphitic and diamond-like nanostructures films are compared. They are prepared in the same CVD chamber on SiO{2}/Si(100) and Si(100) flat surfaces, respectively. These nanostructures are thoroughly characterized by scanning electron emission (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). Films of dense aligned carbon nanotubes by far display the lowest threshold fields around few V/μ m and the largest emission currents. Carbon nanofibers, with platelet arrangement of the graphitic planes parallel to the substrate, exhibit higher emission thresholds around 10 V/μ m. Diamond nanostructures, either modified through ammonia incorporation within the gas phase or not, exhibit the largest emission threshold around 25 V/μ m. The high enhancement factors, deduced from the Fowler-Nordheim plots, can explain the low emission thresholds whereas limitations to the electron transport ever occur through different processes (i) surface modifications of the surface, as the transformation of the SiO{2} barrier layer into SiN{x} in the presence of ammonia evidenced by XPS; (ii) different orientation of the graphitic basal planes relative to the direction of electron transport (carbon nanofiber) and (iii) presence of a graphitic nest at the interface of the carbon nanostructure and the substrate, observed when catalyst is deposited through mild evaporation.

  19. Dose-time relation in BF3 plasma immersion ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Jiqun; Round, Mark; Qin, Shu; Chan, Chung

    1995-03-01

    Etching and deposition rates of silicon and SiO2 during BF3 plasma immersion ion implantation are measured. The relation between total dose and plasma immersion ion implantation processing time is developed through computer modeling. The results are in very good agreement with the experimental data. Comparison with a previously published model is also given.

  20. Effect of Implantation Machine Parameters on N+ ion Implantation for Upland Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) Pollen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUE Jieyu; YU Lixiang; WU Yuejin; TANG Canming

    2008-01-01

    Effect of parameters of ion implantation machine,including ion energy,total dose,dose rate,impulse energy and implantation interval on the pollen grains of upland cotton implanted with nitrogen ion beam were studied.The best parameters were screened out.The results also showed that the vacuum condition before the nitrogen ion implantation does not affect the pollen viability.

  1. Preparation and Characteristics of Nanoscale Diamond-Like Carbon Films for Resistive Memory Applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Di; XIE Dan; ZHANG Chen-Hui; ZHANG Di; NIU Jie-Bin; QIAN He; LIU Li-Tian

    2010-01-01

    @@ We propose diamond-like carbon(DLC)as the resistance change material for nonvolatile memory applications.Nanoscale DLC films are prepared by filtered cathodic vacuum arc technique and integrated to W/DLC/W structure devices.The deposited DLC film has a thickness of about 2O nm and high sp3 fraction content.Reversible bistable resistive switching from a high resistance state to a low resistance state,and vice versa,is observed under appropriate unipolar stimulation pulses.

  2. Corrosion, friction and wear performance of diamond – like carbon (DLC coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Madej

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The a - C:H:W, TiN/a - C:H:W and the CrN/a - C:H:W coatings were deposited on steel surface by physical vapour deposition methods and studied for corrosion and tribological properties, after elemental and structural analysis. In friction pairs the elements coated with diamond-like carbon showed better tribological properties than the elements without coatings. The presence of interlayers in coatings contributed to an improvement in the tribological properties but decreased corrosion resistance.

  3. Deposition of diamond like carbon films by using a single ion gun with varying beam source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Jin-qiu; Chen Zhu-ping

    2001-01-01

    Diamond like carbon films have been successfully deposited on the steel substrate, by using a single ion gun with varying beam source. The films may appear blue, yellow and transparent in color, which was found related to contaminants from the sample holder and could be avoided. The thickness of the films ranges from tens up to 200 nanometers, and the hardness is in the range 20 to 30 GPa. Raman analytical results reveal the films are in amorphous structure. The effects of different beam source on the films structure are further discussed.

  4. Advances in multi-spectral Diamond-Like Carbon (DLC) coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keck, Jason; Karp, Christopher

    2014-05-01

    We discuss the development and applications of a new approach to Diamond-Like Carbon (DLC) coating that provides the durability of traditional DLC coatings, with the addition of significantly more transmission at visible wavelengths and greater transmission in the IR. We developed a deposition system design that incorporates multiple coating technologies, allowing for multiple material design approaches. This has enabled the manufacture of DLC coatings with improved extended spectral properties, suitable for applications in which the coating must withstand airborne particulate impacts, corrosive fluids, environmental extremes, and abrasive physical handling, while offering better than typical transmission in the visible or infrared wavelength regions, or both.

  5. Study of relationship between structure and transmittance of diamond-like carbon (DLC) films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, the transparent hard diamond-like carbon (DLC) films were deposited on glass substrate by magnetic confined radio-frequency plasma chemical vapor deposition. The structure of films was studied by Raman spectra and X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS), the transmittance of films by Spectrophotometer. The mechanism of the influence of films structure on transmittance of the films was discussed. The results show that the thickness of films was lower than 100nm, and the transmittance was over 90% in 380-780 nm region. Discussion in theory on the influence of film structure on transmittance was correspondence to experiment results.

  6. Etching and structure transformations in uncured epoxy resin under rf-plasma and plasma immersion ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondyurin, Alexey; Bilek, Marcela

    2010-05-01

    Uncured epoxy resin was spun onto silicon wafer and treated by plasma and plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) by argon ions with energy up to 20 keV. Ellipsometry, FTIR spectroscopy and optical microscopy methods were used for analysis. The etching, carbonization, oxidation and crosslinking effects were observed. The curing reactions in modified epoxy resin are observed without a hardening agent. A model of structural transformations in epoxy resin under plasma and ion beam irradiation is proposed and discussed in relation to processes in a space environment.

  7. Friction and wear properties of N+ ion implanted nylon 1010

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIONG Dang-sheng

    2004-01-01

    The PA1010 was implanted with 450 keV N+ ions to three doses of 5× 1014 cm-2 , 2.5× 1015 cm-2 and 1.25 × 1016 cm-2. The friction and wear behaviors of the ion implanted PA1010 disks rubbing with two ceramic (ZrO2 and Si3N4) balls were studied using a pin-on-disk tribometer under dry friction. The results shows that the wear resistance of PA1010 is increased with the increasing implantation doses. The adhesion, plastic deformation and plow groove are wearing mechanisms for un-implanted PA1010, while abrasive wear for implanted PA1010.

  8. Bacterial adhesion on ion-implanted stainless steel surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Q. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 4HN (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: q.zhao@dundee.ac.uk; Liu, Y. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 4HN (United Kingdom); Wang, C. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 4HN (United Kingdom); Wang, S. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 4HN (United Kingdom); Peng, N. [Surrey Ion Beam Centre, University of Surrey, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Jeynes, C. [Surrey Ion Beam Centre, University of Surrey, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

    2007-08-31

    Stainless steel disks were implanted with N{sup +}, O{sup +} and SiF{sub 3} {sup +}, respectively at the Surrey Ion Beam Centre. The surface properties of the implanted surfaces were analyzed, including surface chemical composition, surface topography, surface roughness and surface free energy. Bacterial adhesion of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus, which frequently cause medical device-associated infections was evaluated under static condition and laminar flow condition. The effect of contact time, growth media and surface properties of the ion-implanted steels on bacterial adhesion was investigated. The experimental results showed that SiF{sub 3} {sup +}-implanted stainless steel performed much better than N{sup +}-implanted steel, O{sup +}-implanted steel and untreated stainless steel control on reducing bacterial attachment under identical experimental conditions.

  9. Hardening of Metallic Materials Using Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation (PIII)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yufan; Clark, Mike; Flanagan, Ken; Milhone, Jason; Nonn, Paul; Forest, Cary

    2016-10-01

    A new approach of Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation (PIII) has been developed with the Plasma Couette Experiment Upgrade (PCX-U). The new approach efficiently reduces the duty cycle under the same average power for PIII. The experiment uses a Nitrogen plasma at a relatively high density of 1010 1011 cm-3 with ion temperatures of working cycle. The samples (Alloy Steel 9310) are analyzed by a Vicker Hardness Tester to study the hardness and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) to study implantation density and depth. Different magnetic fields are also applied on samples to reduce the energy loss and secondary emission. Higher efficiency of implantation is expected from this experiment and the results will be presented. Hilldale Undergraduate/Faculty Research Fellowship of University of Wisconsin-Madison; Professor Cary Forest's Kellett Mid-Career Faculty Award.

  10. Plasma immersion ion implantation for reducing metal ion release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz, C.; Garcia, J. A.; Maendl, S.; Pereiro, R.; Fernandez, B.; Rodriguez, R. J. [Centro de Ingenieria Avanzada de Superficies AIN, 31191, Cordovilla-Pamplona (Spain); Leibniz-Institut fuer Oberflaechenmodifizierung, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Universidad de Oviedo, Departamento Quimica Fisica y Analitica (Spain); Centro de Ingenieria Avanzada de Superficies AIN, 31191, Cordovilla-Pamplona (Spain)

    2012-11-06

    Plasma immersion ion implantation of Nitrogen and Oxygen on CoCrMo alloys was carried out to improve the tribological and corrosion behaviors of these biomedical alloys. In order to optimize the implantation results we were carried experiments at different temperatures. Tribocorrosion tests in bovine serum were used to measure Co, Cr and Mo releasing by using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry analysis after tests. Also, X-ray Diffraction analysis were employed in order to explain any obtained difference in wear rate and corrosion tests. Wear tests reveals important decreases in rate of more than one order of magnitude for the best treatment. Moreover decreases in metal release were found for all the implanted samples, preserving the same corrosion resistance of the unimplanted samples. Finally this paper gathers an analysis, in terms of implantation parameters and achieved properties for industrial implementation of these treatments.

  11. Study of ion implantation profiles by the PIXE technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midy, P.; Lagarde, G.; Brissaud, I.; Frontier, J. P.; Chaumont, J.

    1998-03-01

    The RBS technique is currently used with alpha particles as a non-destructive way of studying concentration depth profiles. This technique is especially convenient in characterizing heavy atom distributions inside a matrix of lighter elements, and its use is less convenient in the case of light elements in a matrix of heavier ones. On the other hand the probing depth is limited by the small range of alpha particles in the matrix. We present here a new procedure for determining ion implantation profiles by means of the PIXE technique and by varying the impinging proton energy. As an example, silicon ions of two energies have been implanted into pure titanium samples in order to obtain implantation profiles with a double peak. The results presented here are in good agreement with the calculations using the TRIM code.

  12. Thin hydroxyapatite surface layers on titanium produced by ion implantation

    CERN Document Server

    Baumann, H; Bilger, G; Jones, D; Symietz, I

    2002-01-01

    In medicine metallic implants are widely used as hip replacement protheses or artificial teeth. The biocompatibility is in all cases the most important requirement. Hydroxyapatite (HAp) is frequently used as coating on metallic implants because of its high acceptance by the human body. In this paper a process is described by which a HAp surface layer is produced by ion implantation with a continuous transition to the bulk material. Calcium and phosphorus ions are successively implanted into titanium under different vacuum conditions by backfilling oxygen into the implantation chamber. Afterwards the implanted samples are thermally treated. The elemental composition inside the implanted region was determined by nuclear analysis methods as (alpha,alpha) backscattering and the resonant nuclear reaction sup 1 H( sup 1 sup 5 N,alpha gamma) sup 1 sup 2 C. The results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicate the formation of HAp. In addition a first biocompatibility test was performed to compare the growing of m...

  13. Surface induced reactivity for titanium by ion implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, M T; Reuther, H; Matz, W; Mueller, R; Steiner, G; Oswald, S; Zyganov, I

    2000-06-01

    Calcium and phosphorus storage in a thin layer of titanium surface was achieved by ion implantation. We study the reactivity of this surface in response to a hydrothermal treatment. The incipient implanted species are observed to convert to Ca(2+) and PO(4)(3-), the precursors for generating calcium phosphate polymorphs. Hydroxyapatite is formed from these precursors by an interface-liquid mediated mineralization preceded by the hydrolysis of oxygen compounds of Ca and P from the solid phase. The morphology and organization of apatite mineral is controlled by the fluid dynamics reflecting the surface remodeling to adapt to the available local environment. Exposed to calcium and phosphate ion containing solution, the hydrothermally treated surface templates hydroxyapatite deposition. Ca and P implanted Ti surface was shown to be chemically and morphologically actively involved in the interfacial reactions.

  14. Dry Machining Tool Design via Chlorine Ion Implantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tatsuhiko Aizawa; Atsushi Mitsuo; Shigeo Yamamoto; Shinji Muraishi; Taro Sumitomo

    2004-01-01

    Dry machining has become a key issue to significantly reduce the wastes of used lubricants and cleaning agents and to improve the environmental consciousness for medical and food applications of special tooling. Since the tools and metallic works are in direct contact in dry, severe adhesive wear and oxidation are thought to occur even at the presence of hard protective coatings. Self-lubrication mechanism with use of lubricous oxide films is found to be effective for dry machining. Through the chlorine ion implantation to tools, titanium base oxides are in-situ formed on the tool surface.This oxide deforms elasto-plastically so that both friction coefficient and wear volume are reduced even in the high-speed cutting.

  15. Dry Machining Tool Design via Chlorine Ion Implantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TatsuhikoAizawa; AtsushiMitsuo; ShigeoYamamoto; ShinjiMuraishi; TaroSumitomo

    2004-01-01

    Dry machining has become a key issue to significantly reduce the wastes of used lubricants and cleaning agents and to improve the environmental consciousness for medical and food applications of special tooling. Since the tools and metallic works are in direct contact in dry, severe adhesive wear and oxidation are thought to occur even at the presence of hard protective coatings. Self-lubrication mechanism with use of lubricous oxide films is found to be effective for dry machining. Through the chlorine ion implantation to tools, titanium base oxides are in-situ formed on the tool surface. This oxide deforms elasto-plastically so that both friction coefficient and wear volume are reduced even in the high-speed cutting.

  16. Argon plasma immersion ion implantation of polystyrene films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondyurin, A. [Applied and Plasma Physics, School of Physics (A28), University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia)], E-mail: kond@mailcity.com; Gan, B.K.; Bilek, M.M.M.; McKenzie, D.R.; Mizuno, K. [Applied and Plasma Physics, School of Physics (A28), University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia); Wuhrer, R. [Microstructural Analysis Unit, University of Technology Sydney, P.O. Box 123, Broadway, NSW 2007 (Australia)

    2008-04-15

    Plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII), using bias voltages of 5, 10, 15 and 20 kV in an argon plasma and fluences in the range of 2 x 10{sup 14}-2 x 10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2}, was applied to 100 nm polystyrene films coated on silicon wafer substrates. The etching kinetics and structural changes induced in the polystyrene films were investigated with ellipsometry, Raman and FTIR spectroscopies, optical and scanning electron microscopies, atomic force microscopy and contact angle measurements. Effects such as carbonisation, oxidation and cross-linking were observed and their dependence on the applied bias voltage is reported. Variations in the etching rate during the PIII process and its relationship to carbonisation of the modified surface layer are explored.

  17. Continuous production of carbon nanotubes and diamond films by swirled floating catalyst chemical vapour deposition method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.E. Iyuke

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Various techniques for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes (CNTs are being developed to meet an increasing demand as a result of their versatile applications. Swirled floating catalyst chemical vapour deposition (SFCCVD is one of these techniques. This method was used to synthesise CNTs on a continuous basis using acetylene gas as a carbon source, ferrocene dissolved in xylene as a catalyst precursor, and both hydrogen and argon as carrier gases. Transmission electron microscopy analyses revealed that a mixture of single and multi-wall carbon nanotubes and other carbon nanomaterials were produced within the pyrolytic temperature range of 900–1 100°C and acetylene flow rate range of 118–370 ml min–1. Image comparison of raw and purified products showed that low contents of iron particles and amorphous carbon were contained in the synthesised carbon nanotubes. Diamond films were produced at high ferrocene concentration, hydrogen flow rate and pyrolysis temperatures, while carbon nanoballs were formed and attached to the surface of theCNTs at low ferrocene content and low pyrolysis temperature.

  18. Electron-Beam Irradiation Effect on Thermal and Mechanical Properties of Nylon-6 Nanocomposite Fibers Infused with Diamond and Diamond Coated Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imam, Muhammad A.; Jeelani, Shaik; Rangari, Vijaya K.; Gome, Michelle G.; Moura, Esperidiana. A. B.

    2016-02-01

    Nylon-6 is an engineering plastic with excellent properties and processability, which are essential in several industrial applications. The addition of filler such as diamond (DN) and diamond coated carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to form molded composites may increase the range of Nylon-6 applications due to the resulting increase in strength. The effects of electron-beam irradiation on these thermoplastic nanocomposites are either increase in the cross-linking or causes chain scission. In this study, DN-coated CNTs were synthesized using the sonochemical technique in the presence of cationic surfactant cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB). The DN-coated CNTs nanoparticles and diamond nanoparticles were then introduced into Nylon-6 polymer through a melt extrusion process to form nanocomposite fibers. They were further tested for their mechanical (Tensile) and thermal properties (thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC)). These composites were further exposed to the electron-beam (160kGy, 132kGy and 99kGy) irradiation using a 1.5MeV electron-beam accelerator, at room temperature, in the presence of air and tested for their thermal and mechanical properties. The best ultimate tensile strength was found to be 690MPa and 864MPa irradiated at 132 for DN/CNTs/Nylon-6 and Diamond/Nylon-6 nanocomposite fiber as compared to 346MPa and 321MPa for DN/CNTs/Nylon-6 and Diamond/Nylon-6 nanocomposite fiber without irradiation. The neat Nylon-6 tensile strength was 240MPa. These results are consistent with the activation energy calculated from TGA graphs. DSC analysis result shows that the slight increase in glass transition temperature (Tg) and decrease in melting temperature (Tm) which was expected from high electron-beam radiation dose.

  19. Synthesis and characterization of boron incorporated diamond-like carbon thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, L.L. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, 57 Campus Drive, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5A9 (Canada); Yang, Q., E-mail: qiaoqin.yang@usask.ca [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, 57 Campus Drive, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5A9 (Canada); Tang, Y.; Yang, L.; Zhang, C. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, 57 Campus Drive, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5A9 (Canada); Hu, Y.; Cui, X. [Canadian Light Source Inc., 101 Perimeter Road, Saskatoon, SK S7N 0X4 (Canada)

    2015-08-31

    Boron incorporated diamond-like carbon (B-DLC) (up to 8 wt.% boron) thin films were synthesized on silicon wafers using biased target ion beam deposition technique, where diamond-like carbon (DLC) was deposited by ion beam deposition and boron (B) was simultaneously incorporated by biased target sputtering of a boron carbide (B{sub 4}C) target under different conditions. Pure DLC films and B–C films were also synthesized by ion beam deposition and biased target sputtering of B{sub 4}C under similar conditions, respectively, as reference samples. The microstructure and mechanical properties of the synthesized films have been characterized by various technologies. It has been found that B exists in different states in B-DLC, including carbon-rich and B-rich boron carbides, boron suboxide and boron oxide, and the oxidation of B probably occurs during the film deposition. The incorporation of B into DLC leads to the increase of sp{sup 3} bonded carbon in the films, the increase of both film hardness and elastic modulus, and the decrease of both surface roughness and friction coefficient. Furthermore, the content of sp{sup 3} bonded carbon, film hardness and elastic modulus increase, and the film surface roughness and friction coefficient decrease with the increase of B-rich carbide in the B-DLC films. - Highlights: • Biased target ion beam deposition technique is promising to produce high quality DLC based thin films; • Boron exists in different states in B-DLC thin films; • The incorporation of B to DLC with different levels leads to improved film properties; • The fraction of sp{sup 3} bonded C in B-DLC thin films increase with the increase of B-rich carbide content in the films.

  20. X-ray photoelectron study of Si{sup +} ion implanted polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsvetkova, T; Balabanov, S; Bischoff, L; Krastev, V; Stefanov, P; Avramova, I, E-mail: tania_tsvetkova@yahoo.co.u

    2010-11-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to characterize different polymer materials implanted with low energy Si{sup +} ions (E=30 keV, D= 1.10{sup 17} cm{sup -2}). Two kinds of polymers were studied - ultra-high-molecular-weight poly-ethylene (UHMWPE), and poly-methyl-methacrylate (PMMA). The non-implanted polymer materials show the expected variety of chemical bonds: carbon-carbon, carbon being three- and fourfold coordinated, and carbon-oxygen in the case of PMMA samples. The X-ray photoelectron and Raman spectra show that Si{sup +} ion implantation leads to the introduction of additional disorder in the polymer material. The X-ray photoelectron spectra of the implanted polymers show that, in addition to already mentioned bonds, silicon creates new bonds with the host elements - Si-C and Si-O, together with additional Si dangling bonds as revealed by the valence band study of the implanted polymer materials.

  1. Formation of Ultrananocrystalline Diamond/Amorphous Carbon Composite Films in Vacuum Using Coaxial Arc Plasma Gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanada, Kenji; Yoshida, Tomohiro; Nakagawa, You; Yoshitake, Tsuyoshi

    2010-12-01

    Ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD)/nonhydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C) composite films were grown in vacuum using a coaxial arc plasma gun. From the X-ray diffraction measurement, the UNCD crystallite size was estimated to be 1.6 nm. This size is dramatically reduced from that (2.3 nm) of UNCD/hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) composite films grown in a hydrogen atmosphere. The sp3/(sp3 + sp2) value, which was estimated from the X-ray photoemission spectrum, was also reduced to be 41%. A reason for it might be the reduction in the UNCD crystallite size. From the near-edge X-ray absorption fine-structure (NEXAFS) spectrum, it was found that the π*C=C and π*C≡C bonds are preferentially formed instead of the σ*C-H bonds in the UNCD/a-C:H films. Since the extremely small UNCD crystallites (1.6 nm) correspond to the nuclei of diamond, we consider that UNCD crystallite formation should be due predominantly to nucleation. The supersaturated condition required for nucleation is expected to be realized in the deposition using the coaxial arc plasma gun.

  2. Architectural design of diamond-like carbon coatings for long-lasting joint replacements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yujing; Zhao, Xiaoli; Zhang, Lai-Chang; Habibi, Daryoush; Xie, Zonghan

    2013-07-01

    Surface engineering through the application of super-hard, low-friction coatings as a potential approach for increasing the durability of metal-on-metal replacements is attracting significant attention. In this study innovative design strategies are proposed for the development of diamond-like-carbon (DLC) coatings against the damage caused by wear particles on the joint replacements. Finite element modeling is used to analyze stress distributions induced by wear particles of different sizes in the newly-designed coating in comparison to its conventional monolithic counterpart. The critical roles of architectural design in regulating stress concentrations and suppressing crack initiation within the coatings is elucidated. Notably, the introduction of multilayer structure with graded modulus is effective in modifying the stress field and reducing the magnitude and size of stress concentrations in the DLC diamond-like-carbon coatings. The new design is expected to greatly improve the load-carrying ability of surface coatings on prosthetic implants, in addition to the provision of damage tolerance through crack arrest.

  3. Influence of thermal heating on diamond-like carbon film properties prepared by filtered cathodic arc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khamnualthong, N., E-mail: nattapornkh@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, Bangkok, 10140 (Thailand); Western Digital Thailand Co. Ltd, Ayutthaya, 13160 (Thailand); Siangchaew, K. [Western Digital Thailand Co. Ltd, Ayutthaya, 13160 (Thailand); Limsuwan, P. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, Bangkok, 10140 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, CHE, Ministry of Education, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand)

    2013-10-01

    Tetrahedral amorphous diamond-like carbon (ta-DLC) films were deposited on magnetic recording heads using the filtered cathodic arc method. The deposited film thickness was on the order of several nanometers. The DLC films were then annealed to 100 °C–300 °C for 30 and 60 min, and the structure of the ta-DLC films was investigated using Raman spectroscopy, where the gross changes were observed in the Raman D and G peaks. Detailed interpretation concluded that there was sp{sup 2} clustering as a function of temperature, and there was no sp{sup 3}-to-sp{sup 2} conversion after heating up to 300 °C. Furthermore, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy suggested that oxidation of both the ta-DLC film and the adhesion layer occurs at 300 °C. Additionally, more film wear was observed with heating as measured by a nanoindenter. - Highlights: • Tetrahedral-amorphous diamond-like carbon (ta-DLC) by filtered cathodic arc • ta-DLC used in magnetic recording head as head overcoat • ta-DLC thickness range of less than 2 nm • ta-DLC property dependence on heating • Temperature effect range of up to 300 °C.

  4. The depth of sub-lithospheric diamond formation and the redistribution of carbon in the deep mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Christopher; Frost, Daniel J.

    2017-03-01

    respectively. Macroscopic diamond formation in rocks with pyroxenite compositions are likely facilitated in the deep mantle by higher average oxidation states and low mineral H2 O solubility compared to the surrounding mantle, which aid the mobility of C-O-H volatile species. The apparent lack of inclusions with a peridotite affinity may result from generally low oxygen fugacities in such lithologies, which reduces carbon mobility, and the lack of a suitable oxidising agent to allow diamonds to form from CH4. This glimpse of deep carbon cycle processes implies that heterogeneities in the carbon content, redox state and chemical composition of the mantle may be strongly coupled.

  5. Diamond-Like Carbon Film Deposition Using DC Ion Source with Cold Hollow Cathode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. F. Shevchenko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon diamond-like thin films on a silicon substrate were deposited by direct reactive ion beam method with an ion source based on Penning direct-current discharge system with cold hollow cathode. Deposition was performed under various conditions. The pressure (12–200 mPa and the plasma-forming gas composition consisting of different organic compounds and hydrogen (C3H8, CH4, Si(CH32Cl2, H2, the voltage of accelerating gap in the range 0.5–5 kV, and the substrate temperature in the range 20–850°C were varied. Synthesized films were researched using nanoindentation, Raman, and FTIR spectroscopy methods. Analysis of the experimental results was made in accordance with a developed model describing processes of growth of the amorphous and crystalline carbon materials.

  6. A Comparative Study of Three Different Chemical Vapor Deposition Techniques of Carbon Nanotube Growth on Diamond Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betty T. Quinton

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper compares between the methods of growing carbon nanotubes (CNTs on diamond substrates and evaluates the quality of the CNTs and the interfacial strength. One potential application for these materials is a heat sink/spreader for high-power electronic devices. The CNTs and diamond substrates have a significantly higher specific thermal conductivity than traditional heat sink/spreader materials making them good replacement candidates. Only limited research has been performed on these CNT/diamond structures and their suitability of different growth methods. This study investigates three potential chemical vapor deposition (CVD techniques for growing CNTs on diamond: thermal CVD (T-CVD, microwave plasma-enhanced CVD (MPE-CVD, and floating catalyst thermal CVD (FCT-CVD. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM were used to analyze the morphology and topology of the CNTs. Raman spectroscopy was used to assess the quality of the CNTs by determining the ID/IG peak intensity ratios. Additionally, the CNT/diamond samples were sonicated for qualitative comparisons of the durability of the CNT forests. T-CVD provided the largest diameter tubes, with catalysts residing mainly at the CNT/diamond interface. The MPE-CVD process yielded non uniform defective CNTs, and FCT-CVD resulted in the smallest diameter CNTs with catalyst particles imbedded throughout the length of the nanotubes.

  7. Algorithm for statistical noise reduction in three-dimensional ion implant simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez-Mangas, J.M. E-mail: jesman@ele.uva.es; Arias, J.; Jaraiz, M.; Bailon, L.; Barbolla, J

    2001-05-01

    As integrated circuit devices scale into the deep sub-micron regime, ion implantation will continue to be the primary means of introducing dopant atoms into silicon. Different types of impurity profiles such as ultra-shallow profiles and retrograde profiles are necessary for deep submicron devices in order to realize the desired device performance. A new algorithm to reduce the statistical noise in three-dimensional ion implant simulations both in the lateral and shallow/deep regions of the profile is presented. The computational effort in BCA Monte Carlo ion implant simulation is also reduced.

  8. Structure analysis of bimetallic Co-Au nanoparticles formed by sequential ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hua-jian; Wang, Yu-hua; Zhang, Xiao-jian; Song, Shu-peng; chen, Hong; Zhang, Ke; Xiong, Zu-zhao; Ji, Ling-ling; Dai, Hou-mei; Wang, Deng-jing; Lu, Jian-duo; Wang, Ru-wu; Zheng, Li-rong

    2016-08-01

    Co-Au alloy Metallic nanoparticles (MNPs) are formed by sequential ion implantation of Co and Au into silica glass at room temperature. The ion ranges of Au ions implantation process have been displayed to show the ion distribution. We have used the atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to investigate the formation of bimetallic nanoparticles. The extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) has been used to study the local structural information of bimetallic nanoparticles. With the increase of Au ion implantation, the local environments of Co ions are changed enormously. Hence, three oscillations, respectively, Co-O, Co-Co and Co-Au coordination are determined.

  9. Flexible diamond-like carbon films on rubber : On the origin of self-acting segmentation and film flexibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pei, Y.T.; Bui, X.L.; Pal, J.P. van der; Martinez-Martinez, D.; Zhou, X.B.; Hosson, J.Th.M. De

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports an experimental approach to deposit flexible diamond-like carbon (DLC) films on hydrogenated nitrile butadiene rubber (HNBR) with plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition and an analytical model to describe the self-segmentation mechanism of the DLC films. By making use of the su

  10. Flexible diamond-like carbon films on rubber : Friction and the effect of viscoelastic deformation of rubber substrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pei, Y. T.; Martinez-Martinez, D.; van der Pal, J. P.; Bui, X. L.; Zhou, X. B.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper focuses on the frictional behavior of flexible diamond-like carbon (DLC) film-coated hydrogenated nitrile butadiene rubber. By making use of the substantial thermal mismatch between DLC film and rubber substrate, a dense network of cracks forms in the DLC films and contributes to flexibil

  11. Crack formation mechanisms during micro and macro indentation of diamond-like carbon coatings on elastic-plastic substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, N.B.; Fischer-Cripps, A.C.; Swain, M.V.

    1998-01-01

    of cracking and the fracture mechanisms taking place. In the study various diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings deposited onto stainless steel and tool steel were investigated. Results primarily for one DLC system will be presented here. (C) 1998 Published by Elsevier Science S.A. All rights reserved....

  12. Adhesion improvement of hydrogenated diamond-like carbon thin films by pre-deposition plasma treatment of rubber substrate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bui, X.L.; Pei, Y.T.; Mulder, E.D.G.; Hosson, J.Th.M. De

    2009-01-01

    For reduction of friction and enhancement of wear resistance of dynamic rubber seals, thin films of hydrogenated diamond-like carbon (DLC) have been deposited on hydrogenated nitrile butadiene rubber (HNBR) via magnetron-enhanced plasma chemical vapor deposition (ME-PCVD). Pre-deposition plasma trea

  13. Influence of load on the dry frictional performance of alkyl acrylate copolymer elastomers coated with diamond-like carbon films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martinez, D. Martinez; Nohava, Jiri; De Hosson, J. Th. M.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, the influence of applied load on the frictional behavior of alkyl acrylate copolymer elastomers coated with diamond- like carbon films is studied at dry conditions. The performance of two coatings with very different microstructure (patched vs. continuous film) is compared with the unc

  14. On the nature of the coefficient of friction of diamond-like carbon films deposited on rubber

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martinez-Martinez, D.; van der Pal, J. P.; Schenkel, M.; Shaha, K. P.; Pei, Y. T.; De Hosson, J. Th M.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, the nature of the coefficient of friction (CoF) of diamond-like carbon (DLC)-protected rubbers is studied. The relative importance of the viscoelastic and adhesive contributions to the overall friction is evaluated experimentally by modifying the contact load and the adhesive strength

  15. Preparation of Diamond-like Carbon Films on the Surface of Ti Alloy by Electro-deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fenglei SHEN; Hongwei WANG; Dijiang WEN

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, diamond-like carbon (DLC) fi[ms were deposited on Ti alloy by electro-deposition. DLC films were brown and composed of the compact grains whose diameter was about 400 nm. Examined by XPS, the main composition of the films was carbon. In the Raman spectrum, there were a broad peak at 1350 cm-1 and a broad peak at 1600 cm-1, which indicated that the films were DLC films.

  16. Ion implantation damage and crystalline-amorphous transition in Ge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Impellizzeri, G.; Mirabella, S.; Grimaldi, M.G. [Universita di Catania, MATIS IMM-CNR (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Catania (Italy)

    2011-05-15

    Experimental studies on the damage produced in (100) Ge substrates by implantation of Ge{sup +} ions at different energies (from 25 to 600 keV), fluences (from 2 x 10{sup 13} to 4 x 10{sup 14} cm{sup -2}) and temperature (room temperature, RT, or liquid-nitrogen temperature, LN{sub 2}T) have been performed by using the Rutherford backscattering spectrometry technique. We demonstrated that the higher damage rate of Ge with respect to Si is due to both the high stopping power of germanium atoms and the low mobility of point defects within the collision cascades. The amorphization of Ge has been modeled by employing the critical damage energy density model in a large range of implantation energies and fluences both at RT and LN{sub 2}T. The experimental results for implantation at LN{sub 2}T were fitted using a critical damage energy density of {proportional_to}1 eV/atom. A fictitious value of {proportional_to}5 eV/atom was obtained for the samples implanted at RT, essentially because at RT the damage annihilation plays a non-negligible role against the crystalline-amorphous transition phase. The critical damage energy density model was found to stand also for other ions implanted in crystalline Ge (Ar{sup +} and Ga{sup +}). (orig.)

  17. Electrical properties of oxygen ion-implanted InP

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, L.; Anderson, W. A.

    1992-10-01

    The effect of oxygen ion implantation on defect levels and the electrical properties of undoped InP ( n-type) and Sn-doped InP have been investigated as a function of postimplant annealing at temperatures of 300 and 400° C. The surface interruption by ion bombardment was studied by a non-invasive optical technique—photoreflectance (PR) spectroscopy. Current-voltage (I-V) characterization and deep level transient spectros-copy (DLTS) were carried out. The free carrier compensation mechanism was studied from the microstructure behavior of defect levels associated with O+ implantation. Free carriers may be trapped in both residual and ion-bombardment-induced defect sites. Rapid thermal annealing (RTA) performed at different temperatures showed that if residual traps were removed by annealing, the compensation efficiency will be enhanced. Post-implant RTA treatment showed that at the higher temperature (400°C), trapped carriers may be re-excited, resulting in a weakened compensation. Comparing the results of undoped and Sn-doped InP indicated that the carrier compensation effect is substrate doping dependent.

  18. MAGNESIUM PRECIPITATION AND DIFUSSION IN Mg+ ION IMPLANTED SILICON CARBIDE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Weilin; Jung, Hee Joon; Kovarik, Libor; Wang, Zhaoying; Roosendaal, Timothy J.; Zhu, Zihua; Edwards, Danny J.; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Henager, Charles H.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Wang, Yongqiang

    2015-03-02

    As a candidate material for fusion reactor applications, silicon carbide (SiC) undergoes transmutation reactions under high-energy neutron irradiation with magnesium as the major metallic transmutant; the others include aluminum, beryllium and phosphorus in addition to helium and hydrogen gaseous species. Calculations by Sawan et al. predict that at a dose of ~100 dpa (displacements per atom), there is ~0.5 at.% Mg generated in SiC. The impact of these transmutants on SiC structural stability is currently unknown. This study uses ion implantation to introduce Mg into SiC. Multiaxial ion-channeling analysis of the as-produced damage state indicates a lower dechanneling yield observed along the <100> axis. The microstructure of the annealed sample was examined using high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy. The results show a high concentration of likely non-faulted tetrahedral voids and possible stacking fault tetrahedra near the damage peak. In addition to lattice distortion, dislocations and intrinsic and extrinsic stacking faults are also observed. Magnesium in 3C–SiC prefers to substitute for Si and it forms precipitates of cubic Mg2Si and tetragonal MgC2. The diffusion coefficient of Mg in 3C–SiC single crystal at 1573 K has been determined to be 3.8 ± 0.4E-19 m2/s.

  19. Photoluminescence evolution in self-ion-implanted and annealed silicon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Yu; Wang Chong; Yang Rui-Dong; Li Liang; Xiong Fei; Bao Ji-Ming

    2009-01-01

    Si+ ion-implanted silicon wafers are annealed at different temperatures from room temperature to 950℃ and then characterized by using the photoluminescence (PL) technique at different recorded temperatures (RETs). Plentiful optical features are observed and identified clearly in these PL curves. The PL spectra of these samples annealed in different temperature ranges are correspondingly dominated by different emission peaks. Several characteristic features, such as an R line, S bands, a W line, the phonon-assistant W~(TA) and Si~(TO) peaks, can be detected in the PL spectra of samples annealed at different temperatures. For the samples annealed at 800 ℃, emission peaks from the dislocations bounded at the deep energy levels of the forbidden band, such as D_1 and D_2 bands, can be observed at a temperature as high as 280 K. These data strongly indicate that a severe transformation of defect structures could be manipulated by the annealing and recorded temperatures. The deactivation energies of the main optical features are extracted from the PL data at different temperatures.

  20. Antibacterial PVD coatings doped with silver by ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osés, J.; Palacio, J. F.; Kulkarni, S.; Medrano, A.; García, J. A.; Rodríguez, R.

    2014-08-01

    The antibacterial effect of certain metal ions, like silver, has been exploited since antiquity. Obviously, the ways to employ the biocide activity of this element have evolved throughout time and it is currently used in a wide range of clinical applications. The work presented here reports the results of an investigation focused on combining the protective properties of PVD coatings with the biocide property of silver, applied by ion implantation. For this purpose, chromium nitride layers were doped with silver implanted at two different doses (5 × 1016 and 1 × 1017 ion/cm2) at 100 keV of energy and perpendicular incidence. Full characterization of the coatings was performed to determine its topographical and mechanical properties. The concentration profile of Ag was analyzed by GD-OES. The thickness of the layers, nano-hardness, roughness, wear resistance and coefficient of friction were measured. Finally, the anti-bacterial efficacy of the coatings was determined following the JIS Z-2801:2010 Standard. The results provide clear insights into the efficacy of silver for antibacterial purposes, as well as on its influence in the mechanical and tribological behaviour of the coatings matrix.

  1. Comprehensive modeling of ion-implant amorphization in silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mok, K.R.C. [Departamento de E. y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, ETSIT Campus Miguel Delibes, 47011 Valladolid (Spain) and Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, National University of Singapore, 4 Engineering Drive 4, Singapore 117576 (Singapore)]. E-mail: g0202446@nus.edu.sg; Jaraiz, M. [Departamento de E. y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, ETSIT Campus Miguel Delibes, 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Martin-Bragado, I. [Departamento de E. y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, ETSIT Campus Miguel Delibes, 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Synopsys, Karl-Hammerschmidt Strasse 34, D-85609 Aschheim/Dornach (Germany); Rubio, J.E. [Departamento de E. y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, ETSIT Campus Miguel Delibes, 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Castrillo, P. [Departamento de E. y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, ETSIT Campus Miguel Delibes, 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Pinacho, R. [Departamento de E. y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, ETSIT Campus Miguel Delibes, 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Srinivasan, M.P. [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, National University of Singapore, 4 Engineering Drive 4, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Benistant, F. [Chartered Semiconductor Manufacturing. 60 Woodlands Industrial Park D, Street 2, Singapore 738406 (Singapore)

    2005-12-05

    A physically based model has been developed to simulate the ion-implant induced damage accumulation up to amorphization in silicon. Based on damage structures known as amorphous pockets (AP), which are three-dimensional, irregularly shaped agglomerates of interstitials (I) and vacancies (V) surrounded by crystalline silicon, the model is able to reproduce a wide range of experimental observations of damage accumulation and amorphization with interdependent implantation parameters. Instead of recrystallizing the I's and V's instantaneously, the recrystallization rate of an AP containing nI and mV is a function of its effective size, defined as min(n, m), irrespective of its internal spatial configuration. The parameters used in the model were calibrated using the experimental silicon amorphous-crystalline transition temperature as a function of dose rate for C, Si, and Ge. The model is able to show the superlinear damage build-up with dose, the extent of amorphous layer and the superadditivity effect of polyatomic ions.

  2. Bimodal distribution of damage morphology generated by ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mok, K.R.C. [Departamento de E. y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, ETSIT Campus Miguel Delibes, 47011 Valladolid (Spain) and Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, National University of Singapore, Engineering Drive 4, Singapore 117576 (Singapore)]. E-mail: g0202446@nus.edu.sg; Jaraiz, M. [Departamento de E. y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, ETSIT Campus Miguel Delibes, 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Martin-Bragado, I. [Departamento de E. y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, ETSIT Campus Miguel Delibes, 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Synopsys, Karl-Hammerschmidt Strasse 34, D-85609 Aschheim/Dornach (Germany); Rubio, J.E. [Departamento de E. y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, ETSIT Campus Miguel Delibes, 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Castrillo, P. [Departamento de E. y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, ETSIT Campus Miguel Delibes, 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Pinacho, R. [Departamento de E. y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, ETSIT Campus Miguel Delibes, 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Srinivasan, M.P. [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, National University of Singapore, Engineering Drive 4, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Benistant, F. [Chartered Semiconductor Manufacturing, 60 Woodlands Industrial Park D Street 2, Singapore 738406 (Singapore)

    2005-12-05

    A nucleation and evolution model of damage based on amorphous pockets (APs) has recently been developed and implemented in an atomistic kinetic Monte Carlo simulator. In the model, APs are disordered structures (I {sub n}V {sub m}), which are agglomerates of interstitials (I) and vacancies (V). This model has been used to study the composition and size distribution of APs during different ion implantations. Depending strongly on the dose rate, ion mass and implant temperature, the APs can evolve to a defect population where the agglomerates have a similar number of I and V (n {approx} m), or to a defect population with pure I (m {approx} 0) and pure V (n {approx} 0) clusters, or a mixture of APs and clusters. This behaviour corresponds to a bimodal (APs/clusters) distribution of damage. As the AP have different thermal stability compared to the I and V clusters, the same damage concentration obtained through different implant conditions has a different damage morphology and, consequently, exhibit a different resistance to subsequent thermal treatments.

  3. EPR of ion-implanted, laser-annealed silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brower, K.L.; Peercy, P.S.

    1979-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance and ion backscattering measurements were made on ion-implanted, pulsed laser-annealed silicon. For phosphorus-implanted silicon (3 x 10/sup 13/ 200 keV P/sup +//cm/sup 2/) the electrical activity of the implanted donors is restored after laser annealing with greater than or equal to 1.8 J/cm/sup 2/. Silicon made amorphous with 2 x 10/sup 15/ 200 keV Si/sup +//cm/sup 2/ and implanted with 3 x 10/sup 13/ 200 keV P/sup +//cm/sup 2/ can be restored to crystallinity after laser annealing, but electrical activity of the P was not restored due to residual defects for laser energies less than or equal to 3 J/cm/sup 2/. Electrical activity can be restored, at least in part, for amorphous silicon implanted at lower energies (approx. = 50 keV). We also observed that N/sub 2/ reacts with amorphous silicon surfaces to form silicon-nitride. Under laser annealing the N is redistributed and exists as an N interstitial within the implanted layer.

  4. Transport properties of ion implanted poly (p-phenylene vinylene)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucas, B. (LEPOFI, Faculte des Sciences, 87 Limoges (France)); Ratier, B. (LEPOFI, Faculte des Sciences, 87 Limoges (France)); Moliton, A. (LEPOFI, Faculte des Sciences, 87 Limoges (France)); Moreau, C. (Cavendish Lab., Univ. of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom)); Friend, R.H. (Cavendish Lab., Univ. of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom))

    1993-04-19

    We have studied the effect of ion implantation on transport properties (thermopower S, dc conductivity [sigma], ac conductivity [sigma][sub T]) of poly (p-phenylene vinylene). We have noticed that the thermopower sign is characteristic of the implanted ion (S > 0 for halogen, S < 0 for alkali) at low implantation energy (E [<=] 50 keV). The slope of [sigma] = f (T[sup -1]) varies, with values for activation energy between 32 meV (D = 10[sup 16] ions/cm[sup 2]) and 57 meV (D = 10[sup 15] ions/cm[sup 2]): the activation energy falls as the fluence increases in the case of implantation at low energy (E [<=] 50 keV). AC conductivity has been studied as a function of frequency v (v = 20 Hz - 1 MHz) and of temperatures T (T = 100 K - 380 K). For lower fluences (D = 2.10[sup 15] ions/cm[sup 2]), at low temperatures the ac conductivity shows hopping behaviour, switching to activated behaviour at higher temperatures. For higher fluences (D = 2.10[sup 16] ions/cm[sup 2]) the main processes are thermally activated. Thus for a high implantation energy (E = 250 keV), the related conductivity is less thermally activated and the curve [sigma][sub T] = f (1/T) slightly depends on temperature (hopping mechanism). (orig.)

  5. Sheath overlap during very large scale plasma source ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cluggish, B. P.; Munson, C. P.

    1998-12-01

    Measurements of plasma source ion implantation have been performed on a large target of complex geometry. The target consists of 1000 aluminum, automotive piston surrogates mounted on four racks; total surface area is over 16 m2. The four racks are positioned parallel to each other, 0.25 m apart, in an 8 m3 vacuum chamber. The racks of pistons are immersed in a capacitive radio frequency plasma, with an argon gas pressure of 20-65 mPa. Langmuir probe measurements indicate that the plasma density profile is highly nonuniform, due to particle losses to the racks of pistons. The plasma ions are implanted into the pistons by pulse biasing the workpiece to negative voltages as low as -18 kV for up to 20 μs. During the voltage pulse, the high-voltage sheaths from adjacent racks of pistons converge towards each other. At plasma densities less than 109 cm-3 the sheaths are observed to overlap. Measurements of the sheath overlap time are compared with standard analytic theory and with simulations run with a two-dimensional particle-in-cell code.

  6. The compaction of fused silica resulting from ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, C.M.; Ridgway, M.C. [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia); Leech, P.L. [Telstra Research Laboratories, Clayton, Victoria (Australia)

    1996-12-31

    Ion implantation of fused silica results in compaction and consequently an increase in refractive index. This method of modifying the near-surface region has been shown as a potential means for fabricating single mode channel waveguides. This study has measured the compaction of the implanted regions for Si implantations as a function of dose (2x10{sup 12} - 6x10{sup l6} ions/cm{sup 2}), energy (1-9 MeV) and post-implantation annealing temperature (200-900 degree C). For a given energy, a dose-dependence of the step height (depth of compacted region) is observed for doses less than {approx}10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2}. At higher doses the step height saturates. For a given dose, a linear trend is evident for the step height as a function of energy suggesting that the major mechanism for this compaction is electronic stopping. As the annealing temperature increases, the step height gradually decreases from {approx}0.1-0.2 {mu} to -10-20% of the original value. From the annealing data, it is possible to extract an activation energy of 0.08 eV associated with the thermal removal of the compacted region. 4 refs., 4 figs.

  7. Investigation of Carbon ion-implanted waveguides in tungsten bronze (Ca{sub 0.28}Ba{sub 0.72}){sub 0.25}(Sr{sub 0.6}Ba{sub 0.4}){sub 0.75}Nb{sub 2}O{sub 6} single crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiao, Yang, E-mail: sdujy@163.com; Wang, Chuan-Kui; Li, Zong-Liang; Ren, Ying-Ying

    2014-09-01

    Highlights: •Fabrication of planar waveguides in CSBN25 crystal by MeV C ion implantation at low fluence. •The extraordinary index has a small positive change in the surface region after the implantation. •The relation between index profile parameters and C{sup +} ion energy loss were considered. -- Abstract: Planar optical waveguides were fabricated in (Ca{sub 0.28}Ba{sub 0.72}){sub 0.25}(Sr{sub 0.6}Ba{sub 0.4}){sub 0.75}Nb{sub 2}O{sub 6} (CSBN25) crystal by 6.0-MeV C{sup +} ion implantation with fluences of 2, 4 and 6 × 10{sup 14} ions/cm{sup 2} at room temperature. The mode parameters, refractive indices profiles are measured and the refractive indices behavior in the waveguide region is discussed. The shape of nuclear energy loss distribution of the C{sup +} implantation was similar to those of the waveguide refractive index profiles, which means an inherent relationship between the waveguide formation and the energetic energy deposition. The extraordinary refractive index has a small positive change in the surface region after the implantation.

  8. Synthesis of graphene and graphene nanostructures by ion implantation and pulsed laser annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaotie; Berke, Kara; Rudawski, Nicholas G.; Venkatachalam, Dinesh K.; Elliman, Robert G.; Fridmann, Joel; Hebard, Arthur F.; Ren, Fan; Gila, Brent P.; Appleton, Bill R.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we report a systematic study that shows how the numerous processing parameters associated with ion implantation (II) and pulsed laser annealing (PLA) can be manipulated to control the quantity and quality of graphene (G), few-layer graphene (FLG), and other carbon nanostructures selectively synthesized in crystalline SiC (c-SiC). Controlled implantations of Si- plus C- and Au+ ions in c-SiC showed that both the thickness of the amorphous layer formed by ion damage and the doping effect of the implanted Au enhance the formation of G and FLG during PLA. The relative contributions of the amorphous and doping effects were studied separately, and thermal simulation calculations were used to estimate surface temperatures and to help understand the phase changes occurring during PLA. In addition to the amorphous layer thickness and catalytic doping effects, other enhancement effects were found to depend on other ion species, the annealing environment, PLA fluence and number of pulses, and even laser frequency. Optimum II and PLA conditions are identified and possible mechanisms for selective synthesis of G, FLG, and carbon nanostructures are discussed.

  9. Characteristics of diamond – like carbon(DLC film deposited by PACVD process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Lukaszkowicz

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Diamond – like carbon (DLC film is promising materials for many technical and engineering applications. DLC films are used in many different industries for example: in medicine, in electronics, in optics and the automotive industry. They have excellent tribological properties (low friction coefficient, chemical inertness and high mechanical hardness. This paper provides an analysis of the microstructure, mechanical and tribological properties of DLC films. In the study of the coating used several surface sensitive techniques and methods, i.e. High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM, Raman spectroscopy and tribological tests like ball-on-disc. HRTEM investigation shows an amorphous character of DLC layer. In sliding dry friction conditions the friction coefficient for the investigated elements is set in the range between 0.02-0.03. The investigated coating reveals high wear resistance. The coating demonstrated a good adhesion to the substrate.

  10. Stress reduction of Cu-doped diamond-like carbon films from ab initio calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaowei Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Structure and properties of Cu-doped diamond-like carbon films (DLC were investigated using ab initio calculations. The effect of Cu concentrations (1.56∼7.81 at.% on atomic bond structure was mainly analyzed to clarify the residual stress reduction mechanism. Results showed that with introducing Cu into DLC films, the residual compressive stress decreased firstly and then increased for each case with the obvious deterioration of mechanical properties, which was in agreement with the experimental results. Structural analysis revealed that the weak Cu-C bond and the relaxation of both the distorted bond angles and bond lengths accounted for the significant reduction of residual compressive stress, while at the higher Cu concentration the increase of residual stress attributed to the existence of distorted Cu-C structures and the increased fraction of distorted C-C bond lengths.

  11. Stress reduction of Cu-doped diamond-like carbon films from ab initio calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xiaowei; Ke, Peiling; Wang, Aiying, E-mail: aywang@nimte.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Marine Materials and Related Technologies, Zhejiang Key Laboratory of Marine Materials and Protective Technologies, Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo 315201 (China)

    2015-01-15

    Structure and properties of Cu-doped diamond-like carbon films (DLC) were investigated using ab initio calculations. The effect of Cu concentrations (1.56∼7.81 at.%) on atomic bond structure was mainly analyzed to clarify the residual stress reduction mechanism. Results showed that with introducing Cu into DLC films, the residual compressive stress decreased firstly and then increased for each case with the obvious deterioration of mechanical properties, which was in agreement with the experimental results. Structural analysis revealed that the weak Cu-C bond and the relaxation of both the distorted bond angles and bond lengths accounted for the significant reduction of residual compressive stress, while at the higher Cu concentration the increase of residual stress attributed to the existence of distorted Cu-C structures and the increased fraction of distorted C-C bond lengths.

  12. Tribological Characteristic of Diamond-like Carbon Films Investigated by Lateral Force Microscope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DINGJian-ning; ZHUShou-xing; FANZhen; LIChang-sheng; CAILan; YANGJi-chang

    2004-01-01

    Tribological characteristic of different thick diamond- like carbon (DLC) fihns was stymied. A geometrical method was applied to calibrate the cantilever spring constant and to calculate tbe normal and lateral forces, respectively. Experimental results show that the lateral force under different applied loads is proportional to the normal force for the DLC films with the thickness of 153.4nm and 64.9nm. However, for the thickness of 4.48nm and 2.78nm DLC films, lateral force is nonlinear to normal force, which is opposed to the Amonton's law. The single asperity regime and the DMT model were put forward to predict the possible nanotribological mecb-anism between the probe and DLC film.

  13. Properties of Diamond-Like Carbon Films Synthesized by Dual-Target Unbalanced Magnetron Sputtering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Cui; LI Guo-Qing; GOU Wei; MU Zong-Xin; ZHANG Cheng-Wu

    2004-01-01

    @@ Smooth, dense and uniform diamond-like carbon films (DLC films) for industrial applications have successfully been prepared by dual-target unbalanced magnetron sputtering and the DLC characteristics of the films are confirmed by Raman spectra. It is found that the sputtering current of target plays an important role in the DLC film deposition. Deposition rate of 3.5μm/h is obtained by using the sputtering current of 30 A. The friction coefficient of the films is 0.2-0.225 measured by using a pin-on-disc microtribometer. The structure of the films tends to have a growth of sp3 bonds content at high sputtering current. The compressive residual stress in the films increases with the increasing sputtering current of the target.

  14. Role of atomic transverse migration in growth of diamond-like carbon films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma Tian-Bao; Hu Yuan-Zhong; Wang Hui

    2007-01-01

    The growth of diamond-like carbon (DLC) films is studied using molecular dynamics simulations. The effect of impact angle on film structure is carefully studied, which shows that the transverse migration of the incident atoms is the main channel of film relaxation. A transverse-migration-induced film relaxation model is presented to elucidate the process of film relaxation which advances the original model of subplantation. The process of DLC film growth on a rough surface is also investigated, as well as the evolution of microstructure and surface morphology of the film. A preferential-to-homogeneous growth mode and a smoothing of the film are observed, which are due to the transverse migration of the incident atoms.

  15. Fabrication of Diamond-like Carbon Films by Ion Assisted Middle Frequency Unbalanced Magnetron Sputtering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yi-chen; SUN Shao-ni; ZHOU Yi; MA Sheng-ge; BA De-chun

    2006-01-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films are deposited by the Hall ion source assisted by the mid-frequency unbalanced magnetron sputtering technique. The effects of the substrate voltage bias, the substrate temperature, the Hall discharging current and the argon/nitrogen ratio on the DLC film's performance were studied. The experimental results show that the film's surface roughness, the hardness and the Young's modulus increase firstly and then decrease with the bias voltage incrementally increases. Also when the substrate temperature rises, the surface roughness of the film varies slightly, but its hardness and Young's modulus firstly increase followed by a sharp decrease when the temperature surpassing 120 ℃. With the Hall discharging current incrementally rising, the hardness and Young's modulus of the film decrease and the surface roughness of the film on 316L stainless steel firstly decreased and then remains constant.

  16. Electron-beam induced diamond-like-carbon passivation of plasmonic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaur, Eugeniu; Sadatnajafi, Catherine; Langley, Daniel; Lin, Jiao; Kou, Shan Shan; Abbey, Brian

    2015-12-01

    Engineered materials with feature sizes on the order of a few nanometres offer the potential for producing metamaterials with properties which may differ significantly from their bulk counterpart. Here we describe the production of plasmonic colour filters using periodic arrays of nanoscale cross shaped apertures fabricated in optically opaque silver films. Due to its relatively low loss in the visible and near infrared range, silver is a popular choice for plasmonic devices, however it is also unstable in wet or even ambient conditions. Here we show that ultra-thin layers of Diamond-Like Carbon (DLC) can be used to prevent degradation due to oxidative stress, ageing and corrosion. We demonstrate that DLC effectively protects the sub-micron features which make up the plasmonic colour filter under both atmospheric conditions and accelerated aging using iodine gas. Through a systematic study we confirm that the nanometre thick DLC layers have no effect on the device functionality or performance.

  17. Diamond like carbon coatings deposited by microwave plasma CVD: XPS and ellipsometric studies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R M Dey; M Pandey; D Bhattacharyya; D S Patil; S K Kulkarni

    2007-12-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films were deposited by microwave assisted chemical vapour deposition system using d.c. bias voltage ranging from –100 V to –300 V. These films were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and spectroscopic ellipsometry techniques for estimating 3/2 ratio. The 3/2 ratio obtained by XPS is found to have an opposite trend to that obtained by spectroscopic ellipsometry. These results are explained using sub-plantation picture of DLC growth. Our results clearly indicate that the film is composed of two different layers, having entirely different properties in terms of void percentage and 3/2 ratio. The upper layer is relatively thinner as compared to the bottom layer.

  18. Oxygen plasma etching of silver-incorporated diamond-like carbon films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marciano, F.R., E-mail: fernanda@las.inpe.b [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Laboratorio Associado de Sensores e Materiais (LAS), Av. dos Astronautas 1758, Sao Jose dos Campos, 12227-010, SP (Brazil); Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica (ITA), Centro Tecnico Aeroespacial (CTA), Pca. Marechal Eduardo Gomes, 50-Sao Jose dos Campos, 12228-900, SP (Brazil); Bonetti, L.F. [Clorovale Diamantes Industria e Comercio Ltda, Estr. do Torrao de Ouro, 500-Sao Jose dos Campos, 12229-390, SP (Brazil); Pessoa, R.S.; Massi, M. [Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica (ITA), Centro Tecnico Aeroespacial (CTA), Pca. Marechal Eduardo Gomes, 50-Sao Jose dos Campos, 12228-900, SP (Brazil); Santos, L.V.; Trava-Airoldi, V.J. [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Laboratorio Associado de Sensores e Materiais (LAS), Av. dos Astronautas 1758, Sao Jose dos Campos, 12227-010, SP (Brazil)

    2009-08-03

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) film as a solid lubricant coating represents an important area of investigation related to space devices. The environment for such devices involves high vacuum and high concentration of atomic oxygen. The purpose of this paper is to study the behavior of silver-incorporated DLC thin films against oxygen plasma etching. Silver nanoparticles were produced through an electrochemical process and incorporated into DLC bulk during the deposition process using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique. The presence of silver does not affect significantly DLC quality and reduces by more than 50% the oxygen plasma etching. Our results demonstrated that silver nanoparticles protect DLC films against etching process, which may increase their lifetime in low earth orbit environment.

  19. In Vitro Durability - Pivot bearing with Diamond Like Carbon for Ventricular Assist Devices

    CERN Document Server

    de Sá, Rosa Corrêa Leoncio; Leão, Tarcísio Fernandes; da Silva, Evandro Drigo; da Fonseca, Jeison Willian Gomes; da Silva, Bruno Utiyama; Leal, Edir Branzoni; Moro, João Roberto; de Andrade, Aron José Pazin; Bock, Eduardo Guy Perpétuo

    2015-01-01

    Institute Dante Pazzanese of Cardiology (IDPC) develops Ventricular Assist Devices (VAD) that can stabilize the hemodynamics of patients with severe heart failure before, during and/or after the medical practice; can be temporary or permanent. The ADV's centrifugal basically consist of a rotor suspended for system pivoting bearing; the PIVOT is the axis with movement of rotational and the bearing is the bearing surface. As a whole system of an implantable VAD should be made of long-life biomaterial so that there is no degradation or deformation during application time; surface modification techniques have been widely studied and implemented to improve properties such as biocompatibility and durability of applicable materials. The Chemical Vapour Deposition technique allows substrates having melting point higher than 300 {\\deg}C to be coated, encapsulated, with a diamond like carbon film (DLC); The test simulated the actual conditions in which the system of support remains while applying a ADV. The results hav...

  20. Velocity dependence of coefficient of friction of diamond like carbon coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Neha; Kumar, Niranjan; Dash, S.; Tyagi, A. K.

    2012-06-01

    The velocity dependence of coefficient of friction (CoF) of hydrogen-free and hydrogenated Diamond Like Carbon (DLC) coatings was studied on sliding. In low velocity regime, CoF of hydrogen-free DLC was found to increase which may be linked to a thermally activated pre-mature breaking of the surface asperities. However, CoF of hydrogenated DLC was found to decrease due to formation of graphite like lubricious layer and sustainability of cross-linked network of H-bonded atoms. In high velocity regime, CoF of hydrogen free DLC increases marginally due to an inefficient transfer of thermal energy while that of hydrogenated DLC increases due to rapid formation and rupture of atomic bonds.

  1. Mechanical stability of the diamond-like carbon film on nitinol vascular stents under cyclic loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun-Jong [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Kwan-ak, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Advanced Functional Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seung-buk, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Myoung-Woon [Future Fusion Technology Laboratory, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seung-buk, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: mwmoon@kist.re.kr; Lee, Kwang-Ryeol [Future Fusion Technology Laboratory, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seung-buk, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Seok, Hyun-Kwang; Han, Seung-Hee [Advanced Functional Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seung-buk, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Jae-Woo; Shin, Kyong-Min [Taewoong Medical Inc. Ltd, Gimpo, Gyeonggi 415-873 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Kyu Hwan [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Kwan-ak, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-01

    The mechanical stability of diamond-like carbon (DLC) films coated on nitinol vascular stents was investigated under cyclic loading condition by employing a stent crimping system. DLC films were coated on the vascular stent of a three dimensional structure by using a hybrid ion beam system with rotating jig. The cracking or delamination of the DLC coating occurred dominantly near the hinge connecting the V-shaped segments of the stent where the maximum strain was induced by a cyclic loading of contraction and extension. However the failures were significantly suppressed as the amorphous Si (a-Si) buffer layer thickness increased. Interfacial adhesion strength was estimated from the spalled crack size in the DLC coating for various values of the a-Si buffer layer thickness.

  2. Cell adhesion of F{sup +} ion implantation of intraocular lens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, D.J. E-mail: dejunli@hotmail.com; Cui, F.Z.; Gu, H.Q

    1999-04-01

    The cell adhesion of ion implanted polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) intraocular lens was studied using cultured cells in vitro. F{sup +} ion implantation was performed at the energies of 40, 60, 80, 100 keV with the fluences ranging from 5x10{sup 13} to 1x10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2} at room temperature. The cell adhesion tests gave interesting results that the number of the neutral granulocytes and the macrophages adhering on surface were reduced significantly after ion implantation. The optimal fluence was about 4x10{sup 14} ions/cm{sup 2}. The hydrophobicity imparted to the lens surface was also enhanced. The results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis indicated that ion implantation resulted in the cleavage of some pendant groups, the oxidation of the surface, and the formation of some new chemical bonds, which was probably the main reason for the cell adhesion change.

  3. The third generation multi-purpose plasma immersion ion implanter for surface modification of materials

    CERN Document Server

    Tang Bao Yin; Wang Xiao Feng; Gan Kong Yin; Wang Song Yan; Chu, P K; Huang Nian Ning; Sun Hong

    2002-01-01

    The third generation multi-purpose plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) equipment has been successfully used for research and development of surface modification of biomedical materials, metals and their alloys in the Southwest Jiaotong University. The implanter equipped with intense current, pulsed cathodic arc metal plasma sources which have both strong coating function and gas and metal ion implantation function. Its pulse high voltage power supply can provide big output current. It can acquire very good implantation dose uniformity. The equipment can both perform ion implantation and combine ion implantation with sputtering deposition and coating to form many kinds of synthetic surface modification techniques. The main design principles, features of important components and achievement of research works in recent time have been described

  4. Surface properties of nitrogen-ion-implanted TiNi shape memory alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    X-ray diffraction (XRD), auger electron spectroscopy (AES), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to characterize the surface properties of the N+-ion-implanted TiNi alloy.There is a high nitrogen content region at the outermost surface of the N+-ion-implanted TiNi alloy.The detected nitrogen exists mainly in the form of TiN.Small amounts of Ti3O5 and TiO2 also exist on the surface of the N+-ion-implanted TiNi sample.The modified layer of the N+-ion-implanted sample can work as an obstacle layer of the nickel's dissolution, which obstructs Ni dissolving from the TiNi surface effectively.

  5. Single-Ion Implantation for the Development of Si-Based MOSFET Devices with Quantum Functionalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey C. McCallum

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Interest in single-ion implantation is driven in part by research into development of solid-state devices that exhibit quantum behaviour in their electronic or optical characteristics. Here, we provide an overview of international research work on single ion implantation and single ion detection for development of electronic devices for quantum computing. The scope of international research into single ion implantation is presented in the context of our own research in the Centre for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology in Australia. Various single ion detection schemes are presented, and limitations on dopant placement accuracy due to ion straggling are discussed together with pathways for scale-up to multiple quantum devices on the one chip. Possible future directions for ion implantation in quantum computing and communications are also discussed.

  6. Kinetics and thermodynamics of human serum albumin adsorption on silicon doped diamond like carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, Mukhtar H., E-mail: ahmed-m@email.ulster.ac.uk; Byrne, John A.; McLaughlin, James

    2015-03-15

    To gain a better understanding of protein adsorption onto biomaterial surfaces is required for the control of biocompatibility and bioactivity. Various samples of diamond like carbon (DLC) and silicon-doped DLC were synthesised using plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD). The effects of surface morphology on the interaction of human serum albumin (HSA) with doped and undoped DLC films was investigated using spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) and other surface analysis techniques. The results highlighted an increase in both contact angle and hydrophobicity with increasing silicon dopant levels. A reduction on the contact angle values. After adsorption of HSA, the films showed a reduction in the contact angle with a significant change in the cosΔ and this gap increased with increasing surface coverage of HSA. The adsorption kinetics of HSA were also investigated and revealed that the maximum adsorption occurred at pH 5.0 and the process involved chemisorption. The experimental isotherm data were analysed using the Langmuir and Freundlich‎ models. The amount of HSA adsorbed increased with contact time and reached saturation ‎after 30 min. The adsorption ‎process was found to be pseudo first order with respect to the bulk concentration and was dependent on both the concentration of protein and surface characteristics of the samples. The amount of adsorbed HSA was higher with higher levels of silicon doping of the DLC. Therefore, doping DLC may provide an approach to controlling the protein adsorption. - Graphical abstract: The average thickness layer of HSA measurement onto surfaces of DLC and Si-DLC. - Highlights: • Diamond Like Carbon (DLC) and Silicon doped DLC were synthesised and characterised. • Si-DLC increases the hydrophobicity and decreases the surface free energy. • Adsorption study using human serum albumin (HSA). • The adsorbed amount of HSA increases with increasing of Silicon content DLC. • Adsorption process follow pseudo

  7. Direction-dependent RBS channelling studies in ion implanted LiNbO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendler, E.; Becker, G.; Rensberg, J.; Schmidt, E.; Wolf, S.; Wesch, W.

    2016-07-01

    Damage formation in ion implanted LiNbO3 was studied by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) along various directions of the LiNbO3 crystal. From the results obtained it can be unambiguously concluded that Nb atoms being displaced during ion implantation preferably occupy the free octahedron sites of the LiNbO3 lattice structure and most likely also form NbLi antisite defects.

  8. NANOMECHANICAL AND CORROSION PROPERTIES OF ZK60 MAGNESIUM ALLOY IMPROVED BY GD ION IMPLANTATION

    OpenAIRE

    XUE WEI TAO; ZHANG ZHONG WANG; XIAO BO ZHANG; ZHI XIN BA; YA MEI WANG

    2014-01-01

    Gadolinium (Gd) ion implantation with doses from 2.5 × 1016 to 1 × 1017 ions/cm2 into ZK60 magnesium alloy was carried out to improve its surface properties. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), nanoindenter, electrochemical workstation and scanning electron microscope (SEM) were applied to analyze the chemical composition, nanomechanical properties and corrosion characteristics of the implanted layer. The results indicate that Gd ion implantation produces a hybrid-structure protective lay...

  9. A simple ion implanter for material modifications in agriculture and gemmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singkarat, S.; Wijaikhum, A.; Suwannakachorn, D.; Tippawan, U.; Intarasiri, S.; Bootkul, D.; Phanchaisri, B.; Techarung, J.; Rhodes, M. W.; Suwankosum, R.; Rattanarin, S.; Yu, L. D.

    2015-12-01

    In our efforts in developing ion beam technology for novel applications in biology and gemmology, an economic simple compact ion implanter especially for the purpose was constructed. The designing of the machine was aimed at providing our users with a simple, economic, user friendly, convenient and easily operateable ion implanter for ion implantation of biological living materials and gemstones for biotechnological applications and modification of gemstones, which would eventually contribute to the national agriculture, biomedicine and gem-industry developments. The machine was in a vertical setup so that the samples could be placed horizontally and even without fixing; in a non-mass-analyzing ion implanter style using mixed molecular and atomic nitrogen (N) ions so that material modifications could be more effective; equipped with a focusing/defocusing lens and an X-Y beam scanner so that a broad beam could be possible; and also equipped with a relatively small target chamber so that living biological samples could survive from the vacuum period during ion implantation. To save equipment materials and costs, most of the components of the machine were taken from decommissioned ion beam facilities. The maximum accelerating voltage of the accelerator was 100 kV, ideally necessary for crop mutation induction and gem modification by ion beams from our experience. N-ion implantation of local rice seeds and cut gemstones was carried out. Various phenotype changes of grown rice from the ion-implanted seeds and improvements in gemmological quality of the ion-bombarded gemstones were observed. The success in development of such a low-cost and simple-structured ion implanter provides developing countries with a model of utilizing our limited resources to develop novel accelerator-based technologies and applications.

  10. Development of physical fundamentals and computer design of technology of ion implantation of metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolobov, Yu.P.; Sharkeev, Yu.P.; Abdrashitov, V.G.; Kashin, O.A

    2001-07-01

    The unique possibilities of controlled modification of the chemical composition, structure and properties of thin surface films of metals and alloys are offered by the method of high-dose ion implantation (Hll). Modification of the surface of materials by ion implantation has been used on an increasing scale as an industrial technology of ensuring a large increase of the service life of components and tools. It is urgent to investigate the physical fundamentals of this promising technology.

  11. Passive Mechanisms of Surfaces Produced by Ion Beam Mixing and Ion Implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-05-01

    34 evaporated thin film of several hundreds to thousands angstroms thickness is induced to intermix with the substrate using the collisional cascades...behavior of the ion implanted samples was silar to that of Al and the pitting potentials of the ion implanted samples ere 115 to 155 mV higher than that of...state so that the desired mixed oxide films were not formed. Ion beam mixing did impart additional stability compared to as-deposited samples since the

  12. A simple ion implanter for material modifications in agriculture and gemmology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singkarat, S. [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Wijaikhum, A. [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Department of Physics, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Suwannakachorn, D.; Tippawan, U. [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Intarasiri, S. [Science and Technology Research Institute, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Bootkul, D. [Department of General Science, Faculty of Science, Srinakharinwirot University, Bangkok 10110 (Thailand); Phanchaisri, B.; Techarung, J. [Science and Technology Research Institute, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Rhodes, M.W.; Suwankosum, R.; Rattanarin, S. [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Yu, L.D., E-mail: yuld@thep-center.org [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand)

    2015-12-15

    In our efforts in developing ion beam technology for novel applications in biology and gemmology, an economic simple compact ion implanter especially for the purpose was constructed. The designing of the machine was aimed at providing our users with a simple, economic, user friendly, convenient and easily operateable ion implanter for ion implantation of biological living materials and gemstones for biotechnological applications and modification of gemstones, which would eventually contribute to the national agriculture, biomedicine and gem-industry developments. The machine was in a vertical setup so that the samples could be placed horizontally and even without fixing; in a non-mass-analyzing ion implanter style using mixed molecular and atomic nitrogen (N) ions so that material modifications could be more effective; equipped with a focusing/defocusing lens and an X–Y beam scanner so that a broad beam could be possible; and also equipped with a relatively small target chamber so that living biological samples could survive from the vacuum period during ion implantation. To save equipment materials and costs, most of the components of the machine were taken from decommissioned ion beam facilities. The maximum accelerating voltage of the accelerator was 100 kV, ideally necessary for crop mutation induction and gem modification by ion beams from our experience. N-ion implantation of local rice seeds and cut gemstones was carried out. Various phenotype changes of grown rice from the ion-implanted seeds and improvements in gemmological quality of the ion-bombarded gemstones were observed. The success in development of such a low-cost and simple-structured ion implanter provides developing countries with a model of utilizing our limited resources to develop novel accelerator-based technologies and applications.

  13. Direction-dependent RBS channelling studies in ion implanted LiNbO{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wendler, E., E-mail: elke.wendler@uni-jena.de; Becker, G.; Rensberg, J.; Schmidt, E.; Wolf, S.; Wesch, W.

    2016-07-15

    Damage formation in ion implanted LiNbO{sub 3} was studied by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) along various directions of the LiNbO{sub 3} crystal. From the results obtained it can be unambiguously concluded that Nb atoms being displaced during ion implantation preferably occupy the free octahedron sites of the LiNbO{sub 3} lattice structure and most likely also form Nb{sub Li} antisite defects.

  14. Structure analysis of bimetallic Co–Au nanoparticles formed by sequential ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Hua-jian [Hubei province Key Laboratory of Systems Science in Metallurgical Process, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430081 (China); Wang, Yu-hua, E-mail: wangyuhua@wust.edu.cn [Hubei province Key Laboratory of Systems Science in Metallurgical Process, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430081 (China); Zhang, Xiao-jian [Hubei province Key Laboratory of Systems Science in Metallurgical Process, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430081 (China); Song, Shu-peng [State Key Laboratory of Refractories and Metallurgy, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430081 (China); Chen, Hong; Zhang, Ke; Xiong, Zu-zhao; Ji, Ling-ling; Dai, Hou-mei; Wang, Deng-jing; Lu, Jian-duo; Wang, Ru-wu [Hubei province Key Laboratory of Systems Science in Metallurgical Process, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430081 (China); Zheng, Li-rong [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Co–Au alloy Metallic nanoparticles (MNPs) are formed by ion implantation in silica glass. • The ion ranges of Au ions implantation process have been displayed to show the ion distribution. • EXAFS, AFM and TEM have been used to study the local structural information of imetallic nanoparticles. • With the increase of Au ion implantation, the local environments of Co ions are changed enormously. Three oscillations are determined. - Abstract: Co–Au alloy Metallic nanoparticles (MNPs) are formed by sequential ion implantation of Co and Au into silica glass at room temperature. The ion ranges of Au ions implantation process have been displayed to show the ion distribution. We have used the atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to investigate the formation of bimetallic nanoparticles. The extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) has been used to study the local structural information of bimetallic nanoparticles. With the increase of Au ion implantation, the local environments of Co ions are changed enormously. Hence, three oscillations, respectively, Co–O, Co–Co and Co–Au coordination are determined.

  15. N and Cr ion implantation of natural ruby surfaces and their characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, K. Sudheendra; Sahoo, Rakesh K.; Dash, Tapan; Magudapathy, P.; Panigrahi, B. K.; Nayak, B. B.; Mishra, B. K.

    2016-04-01

    Energetic ions of N and Cr were used to implant the surfaces of natural rubies (low aesthetic quality). Surface colours of the specimens were found to change after ion implantation. The samples without and with ion implantation were characterized by diffuse reflectance spectra in ultra violet and visible region (DRS-UV-Vis), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), selected area electron diffraction (SAED) and nano-indentation. While the Cr-ion implantation produced deep red surface colour (pigeon eye red) in polished raw sample (without heat treatment), the N-ion implantation produced a mixed tone of dark blue, greenish blue and violet surface colour in the heat treated sample. In the case of heat treated sample at 3 × 1017 N-ions/cm2 fluence, formation of colour centres (F+, F2, F2+ and F22+) by ion implantation process is attributed to explain the development of the modified surface colours. Certain degree of surface amorphization was observed to be associated with the above N-ion implantation.

  16. Electrochemical performance of porous diamond-like carbon electrodes for sensing hormones, neurotransmitters, and endocrine disruptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Tiago A; Zanin, Hudson; May, Paul W; Corat, Evaldo J; Fatibello-Filho, Orlando

    2014-12-10

    Porous diamond-like carbon (DLC) electrodes have been prepared, and their electrochemical performance was explored. For electrode preparation, a thin DLC film was deposited onto a densely packed forest of highly porous, vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes (VACNT). DLC deposition caused the tips of the carbon nanotubes to clump together to form a microstructured surface with an enlarged surface area. DLC:VACNT electrodes show fast charge transfer, which is promising for several electrochemical applications, including electroanalysis. DLC:VACNT electrodes were applied to the determination of targeted molecules such as dopamine (DA) and epinephrine (EP), which are neurotransmitters/hormones, and acetaminophen (AC), an endocrine disruptor. Using simple and low-cost techniques, such as cyclic voltammetry, analytical curves in the concentration range from 10 to 100 μmol L(-1) were obtained and excellent analytical parameters achieved, including high analytical sensitivity, good response stability, and low limits of detection of 2.9, 4.5, and 2.3 μmol L(-1) for DA, EP, and AC, respectively.

  17. Molecular dynamics simulation of the deposition process of hydrogenated diamond-like carbon (DLC) films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG YuJun; DONG GuangNeng; MAO JunHong; XIE YouBai

    2008-01-01

    The deposition process of hydrogenated diamond-like carbon (DLC) film greatly affects its frictional properties. In this study, CH3 radicals are selected as source species to deposit hydrogenated DLC films for molecular dynamics simulation. The growth and structural properties of hydrogenated DLC films are investigated and elucidated in detail. By comparison and statistical analysis, the authors find that the ratio of carbon to hydrogen in the films generally shows a monotonously increasing trend with the increase of impact energy. Carbon atoms are more reactive during deposition and more liable to bond with substrate atoms than hydrogen atoms. In addition, there exists a peak value of the number of hydrogen atoms deposited in hydrogenated DLC films. The trends of the variation are opposite on the two sides of this peak point, and itbecomes stable when impact energy is greater than 80 eV. The average relative density also indicates a rising trend along with the increment of impact energy, while it does not reach the saturation value until impact energy comes to 50 eV. The hydrogen content in source species is a key factor to determine the hydrogen content in hydrogenated DLC films. When the hydrogen content in source species is high, the hydrogen content in hydrogenated DLC films is accordingly high.

  18. Influence of Si ion implantation on structure and morphology of g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varalakshmi, B.; Sreenivasulu, K.V. [School of Engineering Sciences and Technology (SEST), University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500046 (India); Asokan, K. [Inter University Accelerator Centre (IUAC), Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, Near Vasant Kunj, New Delhi 110067 (India); Srikanth, V.V.S.S., E-mail: vvsssse@uohyd.ernet.in [School of Engineering Sciences and Technology (SEST), University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500046 (India)

    2016-07-15

    Effect of Si ion implantation on structural and morphological features of graphite-like carbon nitride (g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}) was investigated. g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} was prepared by using a simple atmospheric thermal decomposition process. The g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} pellets were irradiated with a Si ion beam of energy 200 keV with different fluencies. Structural, morphological and elemental, and phase analysis of the implanted samples in comparison with the pristine samples was carried out by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) techniques, respectively. The observations revealed that Si ion implantation results in a negligible change in the crystallite size and alteration of the network-like to the sheet-like morphology of g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} and Si ions in the g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} network.

  19. Erbium ion implantation into different crystallographic cuts of lithium niobate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nekvindova, P.; Svecova, B.; Cajzl, J.; Mackova, A.; Malinsky, P.; Oswald, J.; Kolistsch, A.; Spirkova, J.

    2012-02-01

    Single crystals like lithium niobate are frequently doped with optically active rare-earth or transition-metal ions for a variety of applications in optical devices such as solid-state lasers, amplifiers or sensors. To exploit the potential of the Er:LiNbO 3, one must ensure high intensity of the 1.5 μm luminescence as an inevitable prerequisite. One of the important factors influencing the luminescence properties of a lasing ion is the crystal field of the surrounding, which is inevitably determined by the crystal structure of the pertinent material. From that point it is clear that it cannot be easy to affect the resulting luminescence properties - intensity or position of the luminescence band - without changing the structure of the substrate. However, there is a possibility to utilise a potential of the ion implantation of the lasing ions, optionally accompanied with a sensitising one, that can, besides the doping, also modify the structure of the treated area od the crystal. This effect can be eventually enhanced by a post-implantation annealing that may help to recover the damaged structure and hence to improve the desired luminescence. In this paper we are going to report on our experiments with ion-implantation technique followed with subsequent annealing could be a useful way to influence the crystal field of LN. Optically active Er:LiNbO 3 layers were fabricated by medium energy implantation under various experimental conditions. The Er + ions were implanted at energies of 330 and 500 keV with fluences ranging from 1.0 × 10 15 to 1.0 × 10 16 ion cm -2 into LiNbO 3 single-crystal cuts of both common and special orientations. The as-implanted samples were annealed in air and oxygen at two different temperatures (350 and 600 °C) for 5 h. The depth concentration profiles of the implanted erbium were measured by Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy (RBS) using 2 MeV He + ions. The photoluminescence spectra of the samples were measured to determine the

  20. Screening of Bioflocculant-Producing Strain by Ion Implantation and Flocculating Characteristics of Bioflocculants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peirui; Li, Zongwei; Li, Zongyi; Qin, Guangyong; Huo, Yuping

    2008-06-01

    A bioflocculant-producing mutator strain, NIM-192, was screened out through nitrogen ion implanting into FJ-7 strain. The results showed that NIM-192 had good genetic stability and high flocculating activity, and the flocculating rate increased by 34.26% than that of the original. Sucrose, complex nitrogen source contained yeast extract, urea and pH 7.0 ~ 9.0 were chosen as the best carbon source, nitrogen source and initial solution pH for bioflocculant production, respectively. The bioflocculant kept high and stable flocculating activity at alkalinous reaction mixture with a pH beyond 7.0, while the flocculating activity was remarkably reduced when the reaction pH was lower than 7.0. Addition of many cations could obviously increase the flocculating rate, among which Ca2+ demonstrated the best effect. The bioflocculant had very strong acid-base stability and thermo-stability. The flocculating rate kept over 86% when pH of the bioflocculant was in a range of 3.0 ~ 12.0, and the change of flocculating activity was not great when heated at 100°C for 60 min.

  1. Screening of Bioflocculant-Producing Strain by Ion Implantation and Flocculating Characteristics of Bioflocculants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Peirui; LI Zongwei; LI Zongyi; QIN Guangyong; HUO Yuping

    2008-01-01

    A bioflocculant-producing mutator strain, NIM-192, was screened out through nitro-gen ion implanting into F J-7 strain. The results showed that NIM-192 had good genetic stability and high flocculating activity, and the flocculating rate increased by 34.26% than that of the orig-inal. Sucrose, complex nitrogen source contained yeast extract, urea and pH 7.0 ~ 9.0 were chosen as the best carbon source, nitrogen source and initial solution pH for bioflocculant production, respectively. The bioflocculant kept high and stable flocculating activity at alkalinous reaction mixture with a pH beyond 7.0, while the flocculating activity was remarkably reduced when the reaction pH was lower than 7.0. Addition of many cations could obviously increase the flocculating rate, among which Ca2+ demonstrated the best effect. The bioflocculant had very strong acid-base stability and thermo-stability.The flocculating rate kept over 86% when pH of the bioflocculant was in a range of 3.0 ~ 12.0, and the change of flocculating activity was not great when heated at 100℃ for 60 min.

  2. XPS and micro-mechanical characterisation of nitrogen ion implanted low alloy steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A.O.Olofinjana; Z.Chen; J.M.Bell

    2001-01-01

    The surface composition of low alloy steel after N2+ implantation was studied with X-rayphoto-electron spectroscopy (XPS). The effect of the implantation on the mechanical hardnesswas evaluated by ultra-micro hardness indentation. Chemical characterisation of the surface indi-cated that a thin layer rich in N, C and Si was formed. It is shown that Fe played little role in thechemical composition and the structure of the modified surface. The mechanical hardness of N2+implanted surface was 35-50 GPa compared with a value of 10 GPa for the untreated sample. Itis thought that the high hardness observed on the surface and in the sub-surface was as a resultof chemical modification to form a film of Si doped carbon nitride. There is strong evidence fromthe XPS and the nanoindentation studies that the bonding structure of the C-N in the near surfaceis essentially sp3 types expected in crystalline C3N4. The value of nitrogen ion implantation asprocess for improving the wear resistance of low alloy steels is emphasized.

  3. Multiple ion implantation effects on hardness and fatigue properties of Fe13Cr15Ni alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, G. R.; Lee, E. H.; Boatner, L. A.; Chin, B. A.; Mansur, L. K.

    1992-09-01

    Eight complex alloys based on the composition Fe13Cr15Ni2Mo2Mn0.2Ti0.8Si0.06C were implanted simultaneously with 400 keV boron and 550 keV nitrogen, and investigated for microhardness changes and bending fatigue life. The dual implantation was found to decrease the fatigue life of all eight alloys although the implantation increased near-surface hardness of all eight alloys. This result was in contrast to the significant improvements found in the fatigue life of four B, N implanted simple Fe13Cr15Ni alloys. It was determined that the implantation suppressed surface slip band formation, the usual crack initiation site, but in the complex alloys, this suppression promoted a shift to grain boundary cracking. A similar phenomenon was also observed when the simple Fe13Cr15Ni alloys were simultaneously implanted with boron, nitrogen and carbon wherein fatigue life decreased, and gain, grain boundary cracks were observed. To test the hypothesis that ion implantation made the overall surface more fatigue resistant but led to a shift to grain boundary cracking, single crystal specimens of the ternary Fe15Cr15Ni were also implanted with boron and nitrogen ions. The fatigue life decreased for the single crystal specimens also, due to concentration of applied stress along fewer slip bands as compared to the control single crystal specimens were applied stress was relieved by slip band formation over the entire gauge region.

  4. Effect of ion implantation upon erosion resistance of polyimide films in space environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUO Shu-wang; LI Mei-shuan; ZHOU Yan-chun

    2006-01-01

    The atomic oxygen (AO) resistance of Si ion implanted polyimide films in the ground-based AO simulation facility was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM),X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). The results show that at the initial stage of AO exposure the implanted sample has a small mass change,and then is stabilized. The erosion yield of the implanted polyimide film decreases by about two orders of magnitude compared with that of the polyimide film. The analysis through XPS and AES indicates that a continuous high-quality protective oxide-based (SiO2) surface layer is formed on the implanted polyimide films after the AO exposure. It can provide high-quality erosion protection for these materials. The implanted polyimide fully restores its original color and the carbonization effect disappears on the whole after AO exposure. Thermal-optical properties and surface morphology of the implanted polyimide materials are not altered. The modified materials have a markedly increased erosion resistance in AO environment.

  5. Plasma deposition of diamond-like carbon and fluorinated amorphous carbon and the resultant properties and structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glew, Alexander David

    Researchers first created diamondlike carbon (DLC) 50 years ago, but it has only been the subject of intense research for the last decade. DLC is a highly stressed thin film that exists as a mixture of diamond like sp 3 and graphite like sp2 bonded carbon, with 0--50% H. Many believe that high intrinsic stress states are necessary to stabilize the carbon spa content responsible for the high hardness of DLC. This author's goals include fabricating high quality fluorinated amorphous carbon (FLAC) films by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD), exploring the relationships between the processing parameters and the dielectric value, as well as the related material properties which limit the useful application of FLAC. An improved understanding of the fundamentals behind FLAC processing may allow workers to improve upon the properties limiting its use, such as intrinsic stress, thermal stability, and thermal conductivity. DLC and FLAC film hardness ranged from 14--16 GP and 16--18 GPa respectively. Their film stress ranged from 800 MPa to a 10 GPa. A study of the thickness dependent properties showed that only films thicker than 200 nm were able to achieve stresses greater than approximately 1.6 GPa, the room temperature transition pressure of graphite to diamond. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements also yielded different C sp3 contents for films of varying thickness deposited under the same conditions, helping to confirm a thickness dependence of film properties greater than 200 nm. Observation of the stress in real time during annealing of the films on Si wafers yielded activation energy values for the stress relief of DLC and FLAC as 0.11 and 0.24 eV respectively, and the CTE of DLC as 10.6 x 10-6 C-1. The stress relief mechanism consists of kinetically limited network arrangements that occur in highly stressed zones due heating, which are also the cause of the reduction in dielectric constant that occurs during rapid thermal annealing. Thermal

  6. Development and Characterization of a Diamond-Insulated Graphitic Multi Electrode Array Realized with Ion Beam Lithography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Picollo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The detection of quantal exocytic events from neurons and neuroendocrine cells is a challenging task in neuroscience. One of the most promising platforms for the development of a new generation of biosensors is diamond, due to its biocompatibility, transparency and chemical inertness. Moreover, the electrical properties of diamond can be turned from a perfect insulator into a conductive material (resistivity ~mΩ·cm by exploiting the metastable nature of this allotropic form of carbon. A 16‑channels MEA (Multi Electrode Array suitable for cell culture growing has been fabricated by means of ion implantation. A focused 1.2 MeV He+ beam was scanned on a IIa single-crystal diamond sample (4.5 × 4.5 × 0.5 mm3 to cause highly damaged sub-superficial structures that were defined with micrometric spatial resolution. After implantation, the sample was annealed. This process provides the conversion of the sub-superficial highly damaged regions to a graphitic phase embedded in a highly insulating diamond matrix. Thanks to a three-dimensional masking technique, the endpoints of the sub-superficial channels emerge in contact with the sample surface, therefore being available as sensing electrodes. Cyclic voltammetry and amperometry measurements of solutions with increasing concentrations of adrenaline were performed to characterize the biosensor sensitivity. The reported results demonstrate that this new type of biosensor is suitable for in vitro detection of catecholamine release.

  7. Development and characterization of a diamond-insulated graphitic multi electrode array realized with ion beam lithography

    CERN Document Server

    Picollo, F; Carbone, E; Croin, L; Enrico, E; Forneris, J; Gosso, S; Olivero, P; Pasquarelli, A; Carabelli, V

    2016-01-01

    The detection of quantal exocytic events from neurons and neuroendocrine cells is a challenging task in neuroscience. One of the most promising platforms for the development of a new generation of biosensors is diamond, due to its biocompatibility, transparency and chemical inertness. Moreover, the electrical properties of diamond can be turned from a perfect insulator into a conductive material (resistivity Ohm cm) by exploiting the metastable nature of this allotropic form of carbon. A 16 channels MEA (Multi Electrode Array) suitable for cell culture growing has been fabricated by means of ion implantation. A focused 1.2 MeV He+ beam was scanned on a IIa single-crystal diamond sample (4.5x4.5x0.5 mm3) to cause highly damaged sub-superficial structures that were defined with micrometric spatial resolution. After implantation, the sample was annealed. This process provides the conversion of the sub-superficial highly damaged regions to a graphitic phase embedded in a highly insulating diamond matrix. Thanks t...

  8. Preparation and investigation of diamond-like carbon stripper foils by filtered cathodic vacuum arc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Qiwen, E-mail: fanqiwen0926@163.com [Department of Nuclear Physics, China Institute of Atomic Energy, P.O. Box 275(62), Beijing 102413 (China); Du, Yinghui; Zhang, Rong; Xu, Guoji [Department of Nuclear Physics, China Institute of Atomic Energy, P.O. Box 275(62), Beijing 102413 (China)

    2013-04-21

    Thin diamond-like carbon (DLC) stripper foils ∼5μg/cm{sup 2} in thickness were produced and evaluated as heavy-ion strippers for the Beijing HI-13 Tandem Accelerator. The DLC layers ∼4μg/cm{sup 2} in thickness were produced by the filtered cathodic vacuum arc technology onto glass slides coated with betaine–saccharose as releasing agent, which were previously covered with evaporated carbon layers ∼1μg/cm{sup 2} in thickness by the controlled ac arc-discharge method. Irradiation lifetimes of the DLC stripper foils were tested using the heavy-ion beams at the terminal of the Beijing HI-13 Tandem Accelerator, and compared with those of the standard carbon stripper foils made by the combined dc and ac arc-discharge method. The measurements indicate that the DLC stripper foils outlast the standard combined dc and ac arc-discharge carbon stripper foils by a factor of at least 13 and 4 for the {sup 197}Au{sup −} (∼9MeV, ∼1μA) and {sup 63}Cu{sup −} (∼9MeV, ∼1μA) ion beams, respectively. The structure and properties of the DLC foils deposited onto silicon substrates by the filtered cathodic vacuum arc technology were also evaluated and analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The scanning electron microscopy images show that the DLC foils contain hardly droplets through the double 90° filters. The X-ray photoelectron spectrum indicates that sp{sup 3} bonds of the DLC foils exceed 70%. The integral intensity ratio of the D peak to the G peak (I{sub D}/I{sub G}) measured by the Raman spectroscopy is 0.78.

  9. Near-surface hydrogen depletion of diamond-like carbon films produced by direct ion deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markwitz, Andreas, E-mail: A.Markwitz@gns.cri.nz [GNS Science, Lower Hutt (New Zealand); The MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology (New Zealand); Gupta, Prasanth [GNS Science, Lower Hutt (New Zealand); The MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology (New Zealand); Mohr, Berit [GNS Science, Lower Hutt (New Zealand); Hübner, René [Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (Germany); Leveneur, Jerome; Zondervan, Albert [GNS Science, Lower Hutt (New Zealand); Becker, Hans-Werner [RUBION, Ruhr-University Bochum (Germany)

    2016-03-15

    Amorphous atomically flat diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings were produced by direct ion deposition using a system based on a Penning ion source, butane precursor gas and post acceleration. Hydrogen depth profiles of the DLC coatings were measured with the 15N R-NRA method using the resonant nuclear reaction {sup 1}H({sup 15}N, αγ){sup 12}C (E{sub res} = 6.385 MeV). The films produced at 3.0–10.5 kV acceleration voltage show two main effects. First, compared to average elemental composition of the film, the near-surface region is hydrogen depleted. The increase of the hydrogen concentration by 3% from the near-surface region towards the bulk is attributed to a growth model which favours the formation of sp{sup 2} hybridised carbon rich films in the film formation zone. Secondly, the depth at which the maximum hydrogen concentration is measured increases with acceleration voltage and is proportional to the penetration depth of protons produced by the ion source from the precursor gas. The observed effects are explained by a deposition process that takes into account the contributions of ion species, hydrogen effusion and preferential displacement of atoms during direct ion deposition.

  10. Structural and mechanical properties of diamond-like carbon films deposited by direct current magnetron sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broitman, E.; Hellgren, N.; Czigány, Zs.; Twesten, R. D.; Luning, J.; Petrov, I.; Hultman, L.; Holloway, B. C.

    2003-07-01

    The microstructure, morphology, and mechanical properties of diamond-like carbon (DLC) films deposited by direct current magnetron sputtering were investigated for microelectromechanical systems applications. Film properties were found to vary markedly with the ion energy (Eion) and ion-to-carbon flux ratio (Jion/JC). Cross-sectional high-resolution transmission electron microscopy revealed an amorphous microstructure. However, the presence of nanometer-sized domains at Eion~85 eV was detected. Film stresses, σ, which were compressive in all cases, ranged from 0.5 to 3.5 GPa and depended on the flux ratio as well as ion energy. The hardness (H), Young's moduli (ɛ), and elastic recovery (R) increased with Eion to maximum values of H=27 GPa, ɛ=250 GPa, and R=68% at Eion=85 eV and Jion/JC=4.4. However, near edge x-ray absorption fine structure and electron energy-loss spectrum analysis showed that the sp2/sp3 content of the films does not change with Eion or Jion/JC. The measured change in mechanical properties without a corresponding change in sp2/sp3 ratio is not consistent with any previously published models. We suggest that, in the ranges 5 eV <=Eion<=85 eV and 1.1 <=Jion/JC<=6.8, the presence of defective graphite formed by subplanted C and Ar atoms has the dominant influence on the mechanical properties of DLC films.

  11. Graphite-like and Diamond-like Carbon Coatings with Exceptional Tribological Properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M.Jarratt; S.K.Field; S.Yang; D.G.Teer

    2004-01-01

    Two hard, carbon-based solid lubricant coatings, Graphit-iCTM and Dymon-iCTM, have been developed that offer considerable benefits for industry. Both of these new coatings have a high tribological load-bearing capacity, exceptional wear resistance and very low friction, even in dry or lubricant-starved contact. This is in contrast to many commercial diamond-like carbon, DLC coatings, which tend to be highly stressed and therefore brittle, making them unsuitable for high load bearing industrial applications. The development of the new solid lubricant coatings is described, and details of their tribological performance in dry, water and oil-lubricated environments are given. The structure of the coatings has been investigated and related to the tribological properties, and the mechanism for the low friction and wea rrates is discussed. The coatings have been used to successfully improve the lifetime and efficiency of many highly loaded mechanical parts, including automotive fuel injection components, gears, bearings, tappets (cam followers), gudgeon (wrist) pins, etc. They also offer benefits for tooling and are widely used in forming or machining of non-ferrous alloys, and extensively on dies and moulds. Other industrial application areas include electrical devices that require either high conductivity or insulation, optical devices requiring abrasion resistance and surgical tools and implants.

  12. Graphite-like and Diamond-like Carbon Coatings with Exceptional Tribological Properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. Jarratt; S. K. Field; S. Yang; D.G. Teer

    2004-01-01

    Two hard, carbon-based solid lubricant coatings, Graphit-iCTM and Dymon-iCTM, have been developed that offer considerable benefits for industry. Both of these new coatings have a high tribological load-bearing capacity,exceptional wear resistance and very low friction, even in dry or lubricant-starved contact. This is in contrast to many commercial diamond-like carbon, DLC coatings, which tend to be highly stressed and therefore brittle, making them unsuitable for high load bearing industrial applications. The development of the new solid lubricant coatings is described,and details of their tribological performance in dry, water and oil-lubricated environments are given. The structure of the coatings has been investigated and related to the tribological properties, and the mechanism for the low friction and wear rates is discussed. The coatings have been used to successfully improve the lifetime and efficiency of many highly loaded mechanical parts, including automotive fuel injection components, gears, bearings, tappets (cam followers), gudgeon (wrist)pins, etc. They also offer benefits for tooling and are widely used in forming or machining of non-ferrous alloys, and extensively on dies and moulds. Other industrial application areas include electrical devices that require either high conductivity or insulation, optical devices requiring abrasion resistance and surgical tools and implants.

  13. Target-plane deposition of diamond-like carbon in pulsed laser ablation of graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yap, S.S. [Faculty of Engineering, Multimedia University, 63100 Cyberjaya, Selangor (Malaysia); Tou, T.Y. [Faculty of Engineering, Multimedia University, 63100 Cyberjaya, Selangor (Malaysia)], E-mail: tytou@mmu.edu.my

    2007-10-15

    In pulsed Nd:YAG laser ablation of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) at 10{sup -6} Torr, diamond-like carbon (DLC) are deposited at laser wavelengths of 1064, 532, and 355 nm on substrates placed in the target-plane. These target-plane samples are found to contain varying sp{sup 3} content and composed of nanostructures of 40-200 nm in size depending on the laser wavelength and laser fluence. The material and origin of sp{sup 3} in the target-plane samples is closely correlated to that in the laser-modified HOPG surface layer, and hardly from the backward deposition of ablated carbon plume. The surface morphology of the target-plane samples shows the columnar growth and with a tendency for agglomeration between nanograins, in particular for long laser wavelength at 1064 nm. It is also proposed that DLC formation mechanism at the laser-ablated HOPG is possibly via the laser-induced subsurface melting and resolidification.

  14. Fine Structural and Carbon Source Analysis for Diamond Crystal Growth using an Fe-Ni-C System at High Pressure and High Temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Xiao-Hong; XU Bin; NIU Zhen; ZHAI Tong-Guang; TIAN Bin

    2012-01-01

    Diamond is synthesized in an Fe-Ni-C system at high pressure and high temperature,the C sp3 content profile through different thicknesses of interface between diamond and the catalyst film is measured by using electron energy loss spectroscopy.It is found that the Csp3 content varies from 87.33% to 78.15% when the measured position is located at the inner face near the diamond and then changes to 6 μm further away.Transmission electron microscope examinations show that there are different phases in the interface,such as Fe3C,γ-(Fe,Ni),and graphite,but the graphite phase diminishes gradually towards the inner face of the interface.These results profoundly indicate that the carbon atoms,required for diamond growth,could only come from the carbon-rich phase,Fe3C,but not directly from the graphite.It is possible that carbon atoms from the graphite in the interface first react with Fe atoms to produce carbide Fe3 C during diamond synthesis at high pressure and high temperature.The Fe3 C finally decomposes into carbon atoms with the sp3 electron state at the interface to form the diamond.%Diamond is synthesized in an Fe-Ni-C system at high pressure and high temperature, the Csp3 content profile through different thicknesses of interface between diamond and the catalyst film is measured by using electron energy loss spectroscopy. It is found that the Csp3 content varies from 87.33% to 78.15% when the measured position is located at the inner face near the diamond and then changes to 6μm further away. Transmission electron microscope examinations show that there are different phases in the interface, such as Fe3 C1 γ-(Fe,Ni), and graphite, but the graphite phase diminishes gradually towards the inner face of the interface. These results profoundly indicate that the carbon atoms, required for diamond growth, could only come from the carbon-rich phase, Fe3C, but not directly from the graphite. It is possible that carbon atoms from the graphite in the interface first

  15. Technology for boron-doped layers formation on the diamond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zyablyuk K. N.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The authors investigated natural type IIa diamond crystals and CVD diamond films. The article presents electrophysical parameters of the structures obtained in different modes of ion implantation of boron into the crystal with further annealing. Parameters of the crystals with a high nitrogen impurity density indicate that they can be used for the manufacture of microwave field-effect transistors operating at room temperature. CVD diamond films doped with boron during the growth process also have the required for MOSFET manufacture carrier mobility. However, due to the high activation energy of boron, the required channel conductivity is achieved at high operating temperatures.

  16. Free standing diamond-like carbon thin films by PLD for laser based electrons/protons acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thema, F.T.; Beukes, P.; Ngom, B.D. [UNESCO Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk Ridge, PO Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West, 7129, PO Box722, Western Cape Province (South Africa); Manikandan, E., E-mail: mani@tlabs.ac.za [UNESCO Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk Ridge, PO Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West, 7129, PO Box722, Western Cape Province (South Africa); Central Research Laboratory, Sree Balaji Medical College & Hospital (SBMCH), Chrompet, Bharath University, Chennai, 600044 (India); Maaza, M., E-mail: maaza@tlabs.ac.za [UNESCO Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk Ridge, PO Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West, 7129, PO Box722, Western Cape Province (South Africa)

    2015-11-05

    This study we reports for the first time on the synthesis and optical characteristics of free standing diamond-like carbon (DLC) deposited by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) onto graphene buffer layers for ultrahigh intensity laser based electron/proton acceleration applications. The fingerprint techniques of micro-Raman, UV–VIS–NIR and the IR spectroscopic investigations indicate that the suitability of such free standing DLC thin-films within the laser window and long wave infrared (LWIR) spectral range and hence their appropriateness for the targeted applications. - Highlights: • We report for the first time synthesis of free standing diamond-like carbon. • Pulsed laser deposition onto graphene buffer layers. • Fingerprint techniques of micro-Raman, UV–VIS–NIR and the IR spectroscopic investigations. • Ultrahigh intensity laser based electron/proton acceleration applications. • This material's suitable for the laser window and long wave infrared (LWIR) spectral range.

  17. Dry And Ringer Solution Lubricated Tribology Of Thin Osseoconductive Metal Oxides And Diamond-Like Carbon Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waldhauser W.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Achieving fast and strong adhesion to jawbone is essential for dental implants. Thin deposited films may improve osseointegration, but they are prone to cohesive and adhesive fracture due to high stresses while screwing the implant into the bone, leading to bared, less osteoconductive substrate surfaces and nano- and micro-particles in the bone. Aim of this work is the investigation of the cohesion and adhesion failure stresses of osteoconductive tantalum, titanium, silicon, zirconium and aluminium oxide and diamond-like carbon films. The tribological behaviour under dry and lubricated conditions (Ringer solution reveals best results for diamond-like carbon, while cohesion and adhesion of zirconium oxide films is highest.

  18. Analysis of the cytotoxicity of carbon-based nanoparticles, diamond and graphite, in human glioblastoma and hepatoma cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolina Ewa Zakrzewska

    Full Text Available Nanoparticles have attracted a great deal of attention as carriers for drug delivery to cancer cells. However, reports on their potential cytotoxicity raise questions of their safety and this matter needs attentive consideration. In this paper, for the first time, the cytotoxic effects of two carbon based nanoparticles, diamond and graphite, on glioblastoma and hepatoma cells were compared. First, we confirmed previous results that diamond nanoparticles are practically nontoxic. Second, graphite nanoparticles exhibited a negative impact on glioblastoma, but not on hepatoma cells. The studied carbon nanoparticles could be a potentially useful tool for therapeutics delivery to the brain tissue with minimal side effects on the hepatocytes. Furthermore, we showed the influence of the nanoparticles on the stable, fluorescently labeled tumor cell lines and concluded that the labeled cells are suitable for drug cytotoxicity tests.

  19. Fabrication of ZnO nanoparticles-embedded hydrogenated diamond-like carbon films by electrochemical deposition technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Pei-Zeng; Li Rui-Shan; Pan Xiao-Jun; Xie Er-Qing

    2013-01-01

    ZnO nanoparticles-embedded hydrogenated diamond-like carbon (ZnO-DLC) films have been prepared by electrochemical deposition in ambient conditions.The morphology,composition,and microstructure of the films have been investigated.The results show that the resultant films are hydrogenated diamond-like carbon films embedded with ZnO nanoparticles in wurtzite structure,and the content and size of the ZnO nanoparticles increase with increasing deposition voltage,which are confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS),Raman,and transmission electron microscope (TEM).Furthermore,a possible mechanism used to describe the growth process of ZnO-DLC films by electrochemical deposition is also discussed.

  20. Adhesion improvement of hydrogenated diamond-like carbon thin films by pre-deposition plasma treatment of rubber substrate

    OpenAIRE

    Bui, X. L.; Pei, Y.T.; Mulder, E.D.G.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.

    2009-01-01

    For reduction of friction and enhancement of wear resistance of dynamic rubber seals, thin films of hydrogenated diamond-like carbon (DLC) have been deposited on hydrogenated nitrile butadiene rubber (HNBR) via magnetron-enhanced plasma chemical vapor deposition (ME-PCVD). Pre-deposition plasma treatment of HNBR substrate is proved to be crucial for the improvement of film performance due to enhanced interfacial adhesion. The columnar structure and the crack network formed during deposition e...

  1. Robust control of entanglement in a Nitrogen-vacancy centre coupled to a Carbon-13 nuclear spin in diamond

    OpenAIRE

    Said, R S; Twamley, J.

    2009-01-01

    We address a problem of generating a robust entangling gate between electronic and nuclear spins in the system of a single nitrogen-vacany centre coupled to a nearest Carbon-13 atom in diamond against certain types of systematic errors such as pulse-length and off-resonance errors. We analyse the robustness of various control schemes: sequential pulses, composite pulses and numerically-optimised pulses. We find that numerically-optimised pulses, produced by the gradient ascent pulse engineeri...

  2. SEM analysis of ion implanted SiC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malherbe, Johan B., E-mail: johan.malherbe@up.ac.za [Department of Physics, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0002 (South Africa); Berg, N.G. van der; Botha, A.J.; Friedland, E.; Hlatshwayo, T.T.; Kuhudzai, R.J. [Department of Physics, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0002 (South Africa); Wendler, E.; Wesch, W. [Institut für Festkörperphysik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität, 07743 Jena (Germany); Chakraborty, P. [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700 064 (India); Silveira, E.F. da [Physics Department, Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2013-11-15

    SiC is a material used in two future energy production technologies, firstly as a photovoltaic layer to harness the UV spectrum in high efficient power solar cells, and secondly as a diffusion barrier material for radioactive fission products in the fuel elements of the next generation of nuclear power plants. For both applications, there is an interest in the implantation of reactive and non-reactive ions into SiC and their effects on the properties of the SiC. In this study 360 keV Ag{sup +}, I{sup +} and Xe{sup +} ions were separately implanted into 6H–SiC and in polycrystalline SiC at various substrate temperatures. The implanted samples were also annealed in vacuum at temperatures ranging from 900 °C to 1600 °C for various times. In recent years, there had been significant advances in scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with the introduction of an in-lens detector combined with field emission electron guns. This allows defects in solids, such as radiation damage created by the implanted ions, to be detected with SEM. Cross-sectional SEM images of 6H–SiC wafers implanted with 360 keV Ag{sup +} ions at room temperature and at 600 °C and then vacuum annealed at different temperatures revealed the implanted layers and their thicknesses. A similar result is shown of 360 keV I{sup +} ions implanted at 600 °C into 6H–SiC and annealed at 1600 °C. The 6H–SiC is not amorphized but remained crystalline when implanting at 600 °C. There are differences in the microstructure of 6H–SiC implanted with silver at the two temperatures as well as with reactive iodine ions. Voids (bubbles) are created in the implanted layers into which the precipitation of silver and iodine can occur after annealing of the samples. The crystallinity of the substrate via implantation temperature caused differences in the distribution and size of the voids. Implantation of xenon ions in polycrystalline SiC at 350 °C does not amorphize the substrate as is the case with room

  3. Mg ion implantation on SLA-treated titanium surface and its effects on the behavior of mesenchymal stem cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Beom-Su; Kim, Jin Seong [Wonkwang Bone Regeneration Research Institute, Wonkwang University, Iksan 570-749 (Korea, Republic of); Bonecell Biotech Inc., 77, Dunsan-ro, Seo-gu, Daejeon 302-830 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Young Min [DIO Corporation, 66, Centum seo-ro, Haeundae-gu, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Bo-Young [Department of Oral and maxillofacial Surgery, Wonkwang University Daejeon Dental Hospital, Daejeon 302-830 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jun, E-mail: omslee@wku.ac.kr [Wonkwang Bone Regeneration Research Institute, Wonkwang University, Iksan 570-749 (Korea, Republic of); Bonecell Biotech Inc., 77, Dunsan-ro, Seo-gu, Daejeon 302-830 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-04-01

    Magnesium (Mg) is one of the most important ions associated with bone osseointegration. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cellular effects of Mg implantation in titanium (Ti) surfaces treated with sand blast using large grit and acid etching (SLA). Mg ions were implanted into the surface via vacuum arc source ion implantation. The surface morphology, chemical properties, and the amount of Mg ion release were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS), and inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometer (ICP-OES). Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were used to evaluate cellular parameters such as proliferation, cytotoxicity, and adhesion morphology by MTS assay, live/dead assay, and SEM. Furthermore, osteoblast differentiation was determined on the basis of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and the degree of calcium accumulation. In the Mg ion-implanted disk, 2.3 × 10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2} was retained. However, after Mg ion implantation, the surface morphology did not change. Implanted Mg ions were rapidly released during the first 7 days in vitro. The MTS assay, live/dead assay, and SEM demonstrated increased cell attachment and growth on the Mg ion-implanted surface. In particular, Mg ion implantation increased the initial cell adhesion, and in an osteoblast differentiation assay, ALP activity and calcium accumulation. These findings suggest that Mg ion implantation using the plasma source ion implantation (PSII) technique may be useful for SLA-treated Ti dental implants to improve their osseointegration capacity. - Highlights: ► Mg ion was coated onto surface of SLA treated titanium via vacuum arc source ion implantation method. ► The morphological characteristics did not change after Mg ion implantation. ► Mg ion implanted SLA Ti is highly cytocompatible. ► Initial cell adhesion of MSCs is improved by Mg ion implantation. ► Mg ion implantation

  4. The effectiveness of Ti implants as barriers to carbon diffusion in Ti implanted steel under CVD diamond deposition conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiser, P.S.; Prawer, S. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics; Hoffman, A. [Technion-Israel Inst. of Tech., Haifa (Israel). Dept. of Chemistry; Evan, P.J. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia); Paterson, P.J.K. [Royal Melbourne Inst. of Tech., VIC (Australia)

    1993-12-31

    The growth of chemical vapour deposited (CVD) diamond onto iron based substrates complicated by preferential soot formation and carbon diffusion into the substrate [1], leading to poor quality films and poor adhesion. In the initial stages of exposure to a microwave plasma, a layer of graphite is rapidly formed on an untreated Fe based substrate. Once this graphite layer reaches a certain thickness, reasonable quality diamond nucleates and grows upon it. However, the diamond film easily delaminates from the substrate, the weak link being the graphitic layer. Following an initial success in using a TiN barrier layer to inhibit the formation of such a graphitic layer the authors report on attempts to use an implanted Ti layer for the same purpose. This work was prompted by observation that, although the TiN proved to be an extremely effective diffusion barrier, adhesion may be further enhanced by the formation of a TiC interface layer between the diamond film and the Fe substrate. 3 refs., 6 figs.

  5. Nitrogen ion implantation into various materials using 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Chang Seouk [Busan Center, Korea Basic Science Institute, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); School of Mechanical Engineering, Pusan National University, Pusan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Byoung-Seob; Choi, Seyong; Yoon, Jang-Hee; Kim, Hyun Gyu; Ok, Jung-Woo; Park, Jin Yong; Kim, Seong Jun; Bahng, Jungbae; Hong, Jonggi; Won, Mi-Sook, E-mail: mswon@kbsi.re.kr [Busan Center, Korea Basic Science Institute, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seung Wook, E-mail: Seunglee@pusan.ac.kr [School of Mechanical Engineering, Pusan National University, Pusan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    The installation of the 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) ion implantation beamline was recently completed at the Korea Basic Science Institute. The apparatus contains a beam monitoring system and a sample holder for the ion implantation process. The new implantation system can function as a multipurpose tool since it can implant a variety of ions, ranging hydrogen to uranium, into different materials with precise control and with implantation areas as large as 1–10 mm{sup 2}. The implantation chamber was designed to measure the beam properties with a diagnostic system as well as to perform ion implantation with an in situ system including a mass spectrometer. This advanced implantation system can be employed in novel applications, including the production of a variety of new materials such as metals, polymers, and ceramics and the irradiation testing and fabrication of structural and functional materials to be used in future nuclear fusion reactors. In this investigation, the first nitrogen ion implantation experiments were conducted using the new system. The 28 GHz ECRIS implanted low-energy, multi-charged nitrogen ions into copper, zinc, and cobalt substrates, and the ion implantation depth profiles were obtained. SRIM 2013 code was used to calculate the profiles under identical conditions, and the experimental and simulation results are presented and compared in this report. The depths and ranges of the ion distributions in the experimental and simulation results agree closely and demonstrate that the new system will enable the treatment of various substrates for advanced materials research.

  6. Effect of calcium-ion implantation on the corrosion resistance and biocompatibility of titanium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupa, D; Baszkiewicz, J; Kozubowski, J A; Barcz, A; Sobczak, J W; Bilińiski, A; Lewandowska-Szumieł, M D; Rajchel, B

    2001-08-01

    This work presents data on the structure and corrosion resistance of titanium after calcium-ion implantation with a dose of 10(17) Ca+/cm2. The ion energy was 25 keV. Transmission electron microscopy was used to investigate the microstructure of the implanted layer. The chemical composition of the surface layer was examined by XPS and SIMS. The corrosion resistance was examined by electrochemical methods in a simulated body fluid (SBF) at a temperature of 37 degrees C. Biocompatibility tests in vitro were performed in a culture of human derived bone cells (HDBC) in direct contact with the materials tested. Both, the viability of the cells determined by an XTT assay and activity of the cells evaluated by alkaline phosphatase activity measurements in contact with implanted and non-implanted titanium samples were detected. The morphology of the cells spread on the surface of the materials examined was also observed. The results confirmed the biocompatibility of both calcium-ion-implanted and non-implanted titanium under the conditions of the experiment. As shown by TEM results, the surface layer formed during calcium-ion implantation was amorphous. The results of electrochemical examinations indicate that calcium-ion implantation increases the corrosion resistance, but only under stationary conditions; during anodic polarization the calcium-ion-implanted samples undergo pitting corrosion. The breakdown potential is high (2.7-3 V).

  7. Monitoring of ion implantation in microelectronics production environment using multi-channel reflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebersbach, Peter; Urbanowicz, Adam M.; Likhachev, Dmitry; Hartig, Carsten

    2016-03-01

    Optical metrology techniques such as ellipsometry and reflectometry are very powerful for routine process monitoring and control in the modern semiconductor manufacturing industry. However, both methods rely on optical modeling therefore, the optical properties of all materials in the stack need to be characterized a priori or determined during characterization. Some processes such as ion implantation and subsequent annealing produce slight variations in material properties within wafer, wafer-to-wafer, and lot-to-lot; such variation can degrade the dimensional measurement accuracy for both unpatterned optical measurements as well as patterned (2D and 3D) scatterometry measurements. These variations can be accounted for if the optical model of the structure under investigation allows one to extract not just dimensional but also material information already residing within the optical spectra. This paper focuses on modeling of ion implanted and annealed poly Si stacks typically used in high-k technology. Monitoring of ion implantation is often a blind spot in mass production due to capability issues and other limitations of common methods. Typically, the ion implantation dose can be controlled by research-grade ellipsometers with extended infrared range. We demonstrate that multi-channel spectroscopic reflectometry can also be used for ion implant monitoring in the mass-production environment. Our findings are applicable across all technology nodes.

  8. Improved tribological performance of PEEK polymers by application of diamond-like carbon coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KTomaszewski, P.; Pei, Y. T.; Verkerke, G. J.; De Hosson, J. Th M.

    2014-01-01

    Overall high mechanical strength, an elastic modulus comparable to bone and low cost make polyetheretherketone (PEEK) an interesting biomaterial. However, high friction coefficient (CoF) and wear restrict its orthopaedic use to non-articulating applications. A solution might be offered by diamond-li

  9. Fundamental Discovery of New Phases and Direct Conversion of Carbon into Diamond and hBN into cBN and Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Jagdish; Bhaumik, Anagh

    2016-04-01

    We review the discovery of new phases of carbon (Q-carbon) and BN (Q-BN) and address critical issues related to direct conversion of carbon into diamond and hBN into cBN at ambient temperatures and pressures in air without any need for catalyst and the presence of hydrogen. The Q-carbon and Q-BN are formed as a result of quenching from super undercooled state by using high-power nanosecond laser pulses. We discuss the equilibrium phase diagram ( P vs T) of carbon, and show that by rapid quenching, kinetics can shift thermodynamic graphite/diamond/liquid carbon triple point from 5000 K/12 GPa to super undercooled carbon at atmospheric pressure in air. Similarly, the hBN-cBN-Liquid triple point is shifted from 3500 K/9.5 GPa to as low as 2800 K and atmospheric pressure. It is shown that nanosecond laser heating of amorphous carbon and nanocrystalline BN on sapphire, glass, and polymer substrates can be confined to melt in a super undercooled state. By quenching this super undercooled state, we have created a new state of carbon (Q-carbon) and BN (Q-BN) from which nanocrystals, microcrystals, nanoneedles, microneedles, and thin films are formed depending upon the nucleation and growth times allowed and the presence of growth template. The large-area epitaxial diamond and cBN films are formed, when appropriate planar matching or lattice matching template is provided for growth from super undercooled liquid. The Q-phases have unique atomic structure and bonding characteristics as determined by high-resolution SEM and backscatter diffraction, HRTEM, STEM-Z, EELS, and Raman spectroscopy, and exhibit new and improved mechanical hardness, electrical conductivity, and chemical and physical properties, including room-temperature ferromagnetism and enhanced field emission. The Q-carbon exhibits robust bulk ferromagnetism with estimated Curie temperature of about 500 K and saturation magnetization value of 20 emu g-1. We have also deposited diamond on cBN by using a novel

  10. Deposition of Diamond-Like carbon Films by High-Intensity Pulsed Ion Beam Ablation at Various Substrate Temperatures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梅显秀; 刘振民; 马腾才; 董闯

    2003-01-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films have been deposited on to Si substrates at substrate temperatures from 25℃to 400 ℃ by a high-intensity pulsed-ion-beam (HIPIB) ablation deposition technique. The formation of DLC is confirmed by Raman spectroscopy. According to an x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis, the concentration of spa carbon in the films is about 40% when the substrate temperature is below 300 ℃. With increasing substrate temperature from 25 ℃ to 400 ℃, the concentration of sp3 carbon decreases from 43% to 8%. In other words,sp3 carbon is graphitized into sp2 carbon when the substrate temperature is above 300 ℃. The results of xray diffraction and atomic force microscopy show that, with increasing the substrate temperature, the surface roughness and the friction coefficient increase, and the microhardness and the residual stress of the films decrease.

  11. Influence of Third Particle on the Tribological Behaviors of Diamond-like Carbon Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Lichun; Srikanth, Narasimalu; Kang, Guozheng; Zhou, Kun

    2016-12-01

    Tribological mechanisms of diamond-like carbon (DLC) films in a sand-dust environment are commonly unclear due to the complicated three-body abrasion caused by sand particles. This study investigates the three-body abrasion of the DLC film via molecular dynamics simulations. The influence factors such as the load, velocity, shape of the particle and its size are considered. It has been found that the friction and wear of the DLC film are determined by adhesion at a small load but dominated by both adhesion and plowing at a large load. A high velocity can increase the friction of the DLC film but decrease its wear, due to the response of its networks to a high strain rate indicated by such velocity. The shape of the particle highly affects its movement mode and thus changes the friction and wear of the DLC film. It is found that a small-sized particle can increase the friction and wear of the DLC film by enhancing plowing. These unique tribological mechanisms of the DLC film can help to promote its wide applications in a sand-dust environment.

  12. Collision cascades enhanced hydrogen redistribution in cobalt implanted hydrogenated diamond-like carbon films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, P.; Becker, H.-W.; Williams, G. V. M.; Hübner, R.; Heinig, K.-H.; Markwitz, A.

    2017-03-01

    Hydrogenated diamond-like carbon films produced by C3H6 deposition at 5 kV and implanted at room temperature with 30 keV Co atoms to 12 at.% show not only a bimodal distribution of Co atoms but also a massive redistribution of hydrogen in the films. Resonant nuclear reaction analysis was used to measure the hydrogen depth profiles (15N-method). Depletion of hydrogen near the surface was measured to be as low as 7 at.% followed by hydrogen accumulation from 27 to 35 at.%. A model is proposed considering the thermal energy deposited by collision cascade for thermal insulators. In this model, sufficient energy is provided for dissociated hydrogen to diffuse out of the sample from the surface and diffuse into the sample towards the interface which is however limited by the range of the incoming Co ions. At a hydrogen concentration of ∼35 at.%, the concentration gradient of the mobile unbounded hydrogen atoms is neutralised effectively stopping diffusion towards the interface. The results point towards new routes of controlling the composition and distribution of elements at the nanoscale within a base matrix without using any heat treatment methods. Exploring these opportunities can lead to a new horizon of materials and device engineering needed for enabling advanced technologies and applications.

  13. Cavitation erosion resistance of diamond-like carbon coating on stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Feng; Jiang, Shuyun, E-mail: jiangshy@seu.edu.cn

    2014-02-15

    Two diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings are prepared on stainless steel 304 by cathodic arc plasma deposition technology at different substrate bias voltages and arc currents (−200 V/80 A, labeled DLC-1, and −100 V/60 A, labeled DLC-2). Cavitation tests are performed by using a rotating-disk test rig to explore the cavitation erosion resistance of the DLC coating. The mass losses, surface morphologies, chemical compositions and the phase constituents of the specimens after cavitation tests are examined by using digital balance, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), respectively. The results indicate that the DLC-2 coatings can elongate the incubation period of stainless steel, leading to an excellent cavitation erosion resistance as compared to the untreated stainless steel specimens. After duration of 100 h cavitation test, serious damaged surfaces and plenty of scratches can be observed on the surfaces of the stainless steel specimens, while only a few grooves and tiny pits are observed on the DLC-2 coatings. It is concluded that, decreasing micro defects and increasing adhesion can reduce the delamination of DLC coating, and the erosion continues in the stainless steel substrate after DLC coating failure, and the eroded surface of the substrate is subjected to the combined action from cavitation erosion and slurry erosion.

  14. Antithrombogenicity of Fluorinated Diamond-Like Carbon Films Coated Nano Porous Polyethersulfone (PES Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norihisa Miki

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A nano porous polyethersulfone (PES membrane is widely used for aspects of nanofiltration, such as purification, fractionation and dialysis. However, the low-blood-compatibility characteristic of PES membrane causes platelets and blood cells to stick to the surface of the membrane and degrades ions diffusion through membrane, which further limits its application for dialysis systems. In this study, we deposited the fluorinated-diamond-like-carbon (F-DLC onto the finger like structure layer of the PES membrane. By doing this, we have the F-DLC films coating the membrane surface without sacrificing the membrane permeability. In addition, we examined antithrombogenicity of the F-DLC/PES membranes using a microfluidic device, and experimentally found that F-DLC drastically reduced the amount of blood cells attached to the surface. We have also conducted long-term experiments for 24 days and the diffusion characteristics were found to be deteriorated due to fouling without any surface modification. On the other hand, the membranes coated by F-DLC film gave a consistent diffusion coefficient of ions transfer through a membrane porous. Therefore, F-DLC films can be a great candidate to improve the antithrombogenic characteristics of the membrane surfaces in hemodialysis systems.

  15. Iron, nitrogen and silicon doped diamond like carbon (DLC) thin films: A comparative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ray, Sekhar C., E-mail: Raysc@unisa.ac.za [Department of Physics, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, University of South Africa, Private Bag X6, Florida, 1710, Science Campus, Christiaan de Wet and Pioneer Avenue, Florida Park, Johannesburg (South Africa); Pong, W.F. [Department of Physics, Tamkang University, Tamsui 251, New Taipei City, Taiwan (China); Papakonstantinou, P. [Nanotechnology and Integrated Bio-Engineering Centre, University of Ulster, Shore Road, Newtownabbey BT37 0QB (United Kingdom)

    2016-07-01

    The X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), valence band photoemission (VB-PES) and Raman spectroscopy results show that the incorporation of nitrogen in pulsed laser deposited diamond like carbon (DLC) thin films, reverts the sp{sup 3} network to sp{sup 2} as evidenced by an increase of the sp{sup 2} cluster and I{sub D}/I{sub G} ratio in C K-edge XANES and Raman spectra respectively which reduces the hardness/Young's modulus into the film network. Si-doped DLC film deposited in a plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition process reduces the sp{sup 2} cluster and I{sub D}/I{sub G} ratio that causes the decrease of hardness/Young's modulus of the film structure. The Fe-doped DLC films deposited by dip coating technique increase the hardness/Young's modulus with an increase of sp{sup 3}-content in DLC film structure. - Highlights: • Fe, N and Si doped DLC films deposited by dip, PLD and PECVD methods respectively • DLC:Fe thin films have higher hardness/Young's modulus than DLC:N(:Si) thin films. • sp{sup 3} and sp{sup 2} contents are estimated from C K-edge XANES and VB-PES measurements.

  16. INFLUENCE OF THE SILICON INTERLAYER ON DIAMOND-LIKE CARBON FILMS DEPOSITED ON GLASS SUBSTRATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deiler Antonio Lima Oliveira

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Diamond-like carbon (DLC films as a hard protective coating have achieved great success in a diversity of technological applications. However, adhesion of DLC films to substrates can restrict their applications. The influence of a silicon interlayer in order to improve DLC adhesion on glass substrates was investigated. Amorphous silicon interlayer and DLC films were deposited using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition from silane and methane, respectively. The bonding structure, transmittance, refraction index, and adherence of the films were also evaluated regarding the thickness of the silicon interlayer. Raman scattering spectroscopy did not show any substantial difference in DLC structure due to the interlayer thickness of the silicon. Optical measurements showed a sharp decrease of transmittance in the ultra-violet region caused by the fundamental absorption of the light. In addition, the absorption edge of transmittance shifted toward longer wavelength side in the ultra-violet region as the thickness of the silicon interlayer increased. The tribological results showed an increase of DLC adherence as the silicon interlayer increased, which was characterized by less cracks around the grooves.

  17. Characterization of boron doped diamond-like carbon film by HRTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, X.J., E-mail: lixj@alum.imr.ac.cn [College of Material Science and Engineering, Key Laboratory of Advanced Structural Materials, Ministry of Education, Changchun University of Technology, Changchun 130012 (China); He, L.L., E-mail: llhe@imr.ac.cn [Shenyang National Lab of Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Li, Y.S. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5A9 (Canada); Plasma Physics Laboratory, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5E2 (Canada); Yang, Q. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5A9 (Canada); Hirose, A. [Plasma Physics Laboratory, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5E2 (Canada)

    2015-12-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The microstructure of B-DLC film is studied by HRTEM in cross-sectional observation. • Many crystalline nanoparticles dispersed in the amorphous matrix film are observed. • Through composition and structure analysis, the nanoparticles are identified as B{sub 2}O. • The work implies the doped B element exists as oxide state in the B-DLC film. - Abstract: Boron doped diamond-like carbon (B-DLC) film was synthesized on silicon (1 0 0) wafer by biased target ion beam deposition. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) is employed to investigate the microstructure of the B-DLC thin film in cross-sectional observation. Many crystalline nanoparticles randomly dispersed and embedded in the amorphous matrix film are observed. Through chemical compositional analysis of the B-DLC film, some amount of O element is confirmed to be contained. And also, some nanoparticles with near zone axes are indexed, which are accordance with B{sub 2}O phase. Therefore, the contained O element causing the B element oxidized is proposed, resulting in the formation of the nanoparticles. Our work indicates that in the B-DLC film a significant amount of the doped B element exists as boron suboxide nanoparticles.

  18. Effect of composition on mechanical behaviour of diamond-like carbon coatings modified with titanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caschera, D., E-mail: daniela.caschera@ismn.cnr.i [Institute for the Study of Nanostructured Materials, ISMN - CNR, P.O. Box 10, 00015 Monterotondo Stazione (Italy); Federici, F.; Pandolfi, L.; Kaciulis, S. [Institute for the Study of Nanostructured Materials, ISMN - CNR, P.O. Box 10, 00015 Monterotondo Stazione (Italy); Sebastiani, M.; Bemporad, E. [Dip.to di Ingegneria Industriale e Meccanica, Universita di Roma Tre, Via Vasca Navale 84, 00146 Roma (Italy); Padeletti, G. [Institute for the Study of Nanostructured Materials, ISMN - CNR, P.O. Box 10, 00015 Monterotondo Stazione (Italy)

    2011-03-01

    In this study, diamond-like carbon (DLC) films modified with titanium were deposited by plasma decomposition of metallorganic precursor, titanium isopropoxide in CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2}/Ar gas atmosphere. The obtained films were composed of amorphous titanium oxide and nanocrystalline titanium carbide, embedded in an amorphous hydrogenated (a-C:H) matrix. The TiC/TiO{sub 2} ratio in the DLC matrix was found to be dependent on the deposition parameters. The dependence of the films chemical composition on gas mixture and substrate temperature was investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, whereas the crystallinity of TiC nanoparticles and their dimension were evaluated by X-ray diffraction. The size of TiC crystallites varied from 10 to 35 nm, depending on the process parameters. The intrinsic hardness of 10-13 GPa, elastic modulus of 170-200 GPa and hardness-to-modulus ratio of obtained coatings were measured by the nanoindentation technique. Obtained results demonstrated a correlation of mechanical properties with the chemical composition and the ratio of amorphous/crystalline phases in the films. In particular, the formation of nanocrystalline TiC with atomic concentration not exceeding 10% and with grain size between 10 nm and 15 nm resulted in significantly enhanced mechanical properties of composite material in comparison with ordinary DLC films.

  19. Optical and mechanical properties of diamond like carbon films deposited by microwave ECR plasma CVD

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S B Singh; M Pandey; N Chand; A Biswas; D Bhattacharya; S Dash; A K Tyagi; R M Dey; S K Kulkarni; D S Patil

    2008-10-01

    Diamond like carbon (DLC) films were deposited on Si (111) substrates by microwave electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma chemical vapour deposition (CVD) process using plasma of argon and methane gases. During deposition, a d.c. self-bias was applied to the substrates by application of 13.56 MHz rf power. DLC films deposited at three different bias voltages (–60 V, –100 V and –150 V) were characterized by FTIR, Raman spectroscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry to study the variation in the bonding and optical properties of the deposited coatings with process parameters. The mechanical properties such as hardness and elastic modulus were measured by load depth sensing indentation technique. The DLC film deposited at –100 V bias exhibit high hardness (∼ 19 GPa), high elastic modulus (∼ 160 GPa) and high refractive index (∼ 2.16–2.26) as compared to films deposited at –60 V and –150 V substrate bias. This study clearly shows the significance of substrate bias in controlling the optical and mechanical properties of DLC films.

  20. The Influence of Titanium Dioxide on Diamond-Like Carbon Biocompatibility for Dental Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. C. Wachesk

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The physical and chemical characteristics of diamond-like carbon (DLC films make them suitable for implantable medical and odontological interests. Despite their good interactions with biological environment, incorporated nanoparticles can significantly enhance DLC properties. This manuscript studies the potential of titanium dioxide (TiO2 incorporated-DLC films in dental applications. In this scene, both osteoblasts attachment and spreading on the coatings and their corrosion characteristics in artificial saliva were investigated. The films were grown on 304 stainless steel substrates using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Raman scattering spectroscopy characterized the film structure. As the concentration of TiO2 increased, the films increased the osteoblast viability (MTT assay, becoming more thermodynamically favorable to cell spreading (WAd values became more negative. The increasing number of osteoblast nuclei indicates a higher adhesion between the cells and the films. The potentiodynamic polarization test in artificial saliva shows an increase in corrosion protection when TiO2 are present. These results show the potential use of TiO2-DLC films in implantable surfaces.

  1. Strength and Fracture Resistance of Amorphous Diamond-Like Carbon Films for MEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. N. Jonnalagadda

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical strength and mixed mode I/II fracture toughness of hydrogen-free tetrahedral amorphous diamond-like carbon (ta-C films, grown by pulsed laser deposition, are discussed in connection to material flaws and its microstructure. The failure properties of ta-C were obtained from films with thicknesses 0.5–3 μm and specimen widths 10–20 μm. The smallest test samples with 10 μm gage section averaged a strength of 7.3 ± 1.2 GPa, while the strength of 20-μm specimens with thicknesses 0.5–3 μm varied between 2.2–5.7 GPa. The scaling of the mechanical strength with specimen thickness and dimensions was owed to deposition-induced surface flaws, and, only in the smallest specimens, RIE patterning generated specimen sidewall flaws. The mode I fracture toughness of ta-C films is KIc=4.4±0.4 MPam, while the results from mixed mode I/II fracture experiments with cracks arbitrarily oriented in the plane of the film compared very well with theoretical predictions.

  2. Effects of diamond-like carbon thin film in organic light emitting devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yap, Seong-Shan; Yong, Thian-Khok [Faculty of Engineering, Multimedia University, Cyberjaya, 63100 Selangor (Malaysia); Tou, Teck-Yong, E-mail: tytou@mmu.edu.m [Faculty of Engineering, Multimedia University, Cyberjaya, 63100 Selangor (Malaysia)

    2009-07-01

    Ultrathin diamond-like carbon (DLC) was deposited by pulsed Nd:YAG laserablation of graphite target on the indium tin oxide (ITO) surface that functioned as the buffered anode for single-layer organic light emitting devices (OLEDs). Deposited by 355 nm Nd:YAG laser, DLC films were characterized by the Raman spectroscopy and the bulk resistivity measurement. Insertion of DLC in the hole-transport ITO/DLC/TPD/Al device slightly increased the injection current density and reduced the turn-on voltage. But DLC insertion in the electron-transport ITO/DLC/Alq{sub 3}/Al device greatly decreased the injection current density and increased the turn-on voltage. For the ITO/DLC/(TPD + Alq{sub 3} + PVK)/Al device, that was doped with Alq{sub 3} and TPD, improved performance with a higher current density and brightness were consistently obtained. Possible mechanisms for the DLC effect in these single-layer devices were discussed.

  3. X-ray reflectivity study of bias graded diamond like carbon film synthesized by ECR plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R M Dey; S K Deshpande; S B Singh; N Chand; D S Patil; S K Kulkarni

    2013-02-01

    Diamond like carbon (DLC) coatings were deposited on silicon substrates by microwave electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma CVD process using plasma of Ar and CH4 gases under the influence of negative d.c. self bias generated on the substrates by application of RF (13.56 MHz) power. The negative bias voltage was varied from −60 V to −150 V during deposition of DLC films on Si substrate. Detailed X-ray reflectivity (XRR) study was carried out to find out film properties like surface roughness, thickness and density of the films as a function of variation of negative bias voltage. The study shows that the DLC films constituted of composite layer i.e. the upper sub surface layer followed by denser bottom layer representing the bulk of the film. The upper layer is relatively thinner as compared to the bottom layer. The XRR study was an attempt to substantiate the sub-plantation model for DLC film growth.

  4. Synthesis and Characteristics of Diamond-like Carbon Films Deposited on Quartz Substrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄卫东; 丁鼎; 詹如娟

    2004-01-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films are deposited on quartz substrate using pure CH4 in the surface wave plasma equipment. A direct current negative bias up to -90 V is applied to the substrate to investigate the bias effect on the film characteristics. Deposited films are characterized by Raman spectroscopy, infrared (IR) and ultraviolet-visible absorption techniques.There are two broad Raman peaks around 1340 cm-1 and 1600 cm-1 and the first one has a greater sp3 component with an increased bias. Infrared spectroscopy has three sp3 C-H modes at 2852 cm-1, 2926 cm- 1 and 2962 cm-1, respectively and also shows an intensity increase with the negative bias. Optical band gap is calculated from the ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy and the increased values with negative bias and deposition time are obtained. After a thermal anneal at about 500 ℃ for an hour to the film deposited under the bias of-90 V, we get an almost unchanged Raman spectrum and a peak intensity-reduced IR signal, which indicates a reduced H-content in the film. Meanwhile the optical band gap changed from 0.85 eV to 1.5 eV.

  5. The nano-scratch behaviour of different diamond-like carbon film-substrate systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang Liye [State-Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behaviour of Materials, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an, 710049 (China); Lu Jian [LASMIS, Universite de Technologie de Troyes, 10010 Troyes (France); Xu Kewei [State-Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behaviour of Materials, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an, 710049 (China)

    2004-08-07

    The nano-scratch behaviour of diamond-like carbon films on a Ti alloy and Si substrate was evaluated. For both samples, three processes-fully elastic recovery, plastic deformation, and delamination and pulling-off of the films, occur successively with increasing load during scratching. The loads (Lc{sub L}) corresponding to the peeling-off of the films during the up-loading were 75 and 70 mN for Ti alloy and Si. However, the films on Si were delaminated during unloading, and the relevant load (Lc{sub U}) was only 45 mN. This probably originates from the distribution status of the plastic deformation both in the films and the substrates. Therefore, the nano-scratch test can be applied not only to obtain the cracking resistance (Lc{sub L}) characterizing the cohesion strength of films during up-loading but also to determine the delamination resistance (Lc{sub U}) related to the adhesion strength of the film-substrate during unloading.

  6. Application of nitrogen-doped ultrananocrystalline diamond/hydrogenated amorphous carbon composite films for ultraviolet detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zkria, Abdelrahman; Gima, Hiroki; Yoshitake, Tsuyoshi

    2017-03-01

    Nitrogen-doped ultrananocrystalline diamond/hydrogenated amorphous carbon (UNCD/a-C:H) films were grown by coaxial arc plasma deposition in the ambient of nitrogen and hydrogen mixed gases. Synthesized films were structurally investigated by X-ray photoemission and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopies. A heterojunction with p-type Si substrate was fabricated to study the ultraviolet photodetection properties of the film. Capacitance-voltage measurements assure the expansion of a depletion region into the film side. Current-voltage curves in the dark showed a good rectifying behaviour in the bias voltages range between ±5 V. Under 254 nm monochromatic light, the heterojunction shows a capability of deep ultraviolet light detection, which can be attribute to the existence of UNCD grains. As the diode was cooled from 300 K down to 150 K, the detectivity has a notable enhancement from 1.94 × 105 cm Hz1/2 W-1 at 300 K to 5.11 × 1010 cm Hz1/2 W-1 at 150 K, which is mainly due to a remarkable reduction in the leakage current at low temperatures. It was experimentally demonstrated that nitrogen-doped UNCD/a-C:H film works as ultraviolet-range photovoltaic material.

  7. Cavitation erosion resistance of diamond-like carbon coating on stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Feng; Jiang, Shuyun

    2014-02-01

    Two diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings are prepared on stainless steel 304 by cathodic arc plasma deposition technology at different substrate bias voltages and arc currents (-200 V/80 A, labeled DLC-1, and -100 V/60 A, labeled DLC-2). Cavitation tests are performed by using a rotating-disk test rig to explore the cavitation erosion resistance of the DLC coating. The mass losses, surface morphologies, chemical compositions and the phase constituents of the specimens after cavitation tests are examined by using digital balance, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), respectively. The results indicate that the DLC-2 coatings can elongate the incubation period of stainless steel, leading to an excellent cavitation erosion resistance as compared to the untreated stainless steel specimens. After duration of 100 h cavitation test, serious damaged surfaces and plenty of scratches can be observed on the surfaces of the stainless steel specimens, while only a few grooves and tiny pits are observed on the DLC-2 coatings. It is concluded that, decreasing micro defects and increasing adhesion can reduce the delamination of DLC coating, and the erosion continues in the stainless steel substrate after DLC coating failure, and the eroded surface of the substrate is subjected to the combined action from cavitation erosion and slurry erosion.

  8. Deodorisation effect of diamond-like carbon/titanium dioxide multilayer thin films deposited onto polypropylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozeki, K., E-mail: ozeki@mx.ibaraki.ac.jp [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Ibaraki University, 4-12-1, Nakanarusawa, Hitachi, Ibaraki 316-8511 (Japan); Frontier Research Center for Applied Atomic Sciences, 162-1 Shirakata, Toukai, Ibaraki 319-1106 (Japan); Hirakuri, K.K. [Applied Systems Engineering, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Denki University, Ishizaka, Hatoyama, Hiki, Saitama 350-0394 (Japan); Masuzawa, T. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Ibaraki University, 4-12-1, Nakanarusawa, Hitachi, Ibaraki 316-8511 (Japan)

    2011-04-15

    Many types of plastic containers have been used for the storage of food. In the present study, diamond-like carbon (DLC)/titanium oxide (TiO{sub 2}) multilayer thin films were deposited on polypropylene (PP) to prevent flavour retention and to remove flavour in plastic containers. For the flavour removal test, two types of multilayer films were prepared, DLC/TiO{sub 2} films and DLC/TiO{sub 2}/DLC films. The residual gas concentration of acetaldehyde, ethylene, and turmeric compounds in bottle including the DLC/TiO{sub 2}-coated and the DLC/TiO{sub 2}/DLC-coated PP plates were measured after UV radiation, and the amount of adsorbed compounds to the plates was determined. The percentages of residual gas for acetaldehyde, ethylene, and turmeric with the DLC/TiO{sub 2} coated plates were 0.8%, 65.2% and 75.0% after 40 h of UV radiation, respectively. For the DLC/TiO{sub 2}/DLC film, the percentages of residual gas for acetaldehyde, ethylene and turmeric decreased to 34.9%, 76.0% and 85.3% after 40 h of UV radiation, respectively. The DLC/TiO{sub 2}/DLC film had a photocatalytic effect even though the TiO{sub 2} film was covered with the DLC film.

  9. Annealing Effects on Structure and Optical Properties of Diamond-Like Carbon Films Containing Silver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meškinis, Šarūnas; Čiegis, Arvydas; Vasiliauskas, Andrius; Šlapikas, Kęstutis; Gudaitis, Rimantas; Yaremchuk, Iryna; Fitio, Volodymyr; Bobitski, Yaroslav; Tamulevičius, Sigitas

    2016-12-01

    In the present study, diamond-like carbon films with embedded Ag nanoparticles (DLC:Ag) were deposited by reactive magnetron sputtering. Structure of the films was investigated by Raman scattering spectroscopy. Atomic force microscopy was used to define thickness of DLC:Ag films as well as to study the surface morphology and size distribution of Ag nanoparticles. Optical absorbance and reflectance spectra of the films were studied in the 180-1100-nm range. Air annealing effects on structure and optical properties of the DLC:Ag were investigated. Annealing temperatures were varied in the 180-400 °C range. Changes of size and shape of the Ag nanoclusters took place due to agglomeration. It was found that air annealing of DLC:Ag films can result in graphitization following destruction of the DLC matrix. Additional activation of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) effect in DLC:Ag films can be achieved by properly selecting annealing conditions. Annealing resulted in blueshift as well as significant narrowing of the plasmonic absorbance and reflectance peaks. Moreover, quadrupole surface plasmon resonance peaks appeared. Modeling of absorption spectra of the nanoclusters depending on the shape and surrounding media has been carried out.

  10. Porous Silicon Coated with Ultrathin Diamond-Like Carbon Film Cathodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evtukh, A A; Litovchenko, V G; Litvin, Y M; Fedin, D V; Rassamakin, Y V; Sarikov, A V; Chakhovskoi, A G; Felter, T E

    2001-04-01

    The main requirements to electron field emission cathodes are their efficiency, stability and uniformity. In this work we combined the properties of porous silicon layers and diamond-like carbon (DLC) film to obtain emission cathodes with improved parameters. The layered structures of porous silicon and DLC film were formed both on flat n-Si surface and silicon tips created by chemical etching. The conditions of the anodic and stain etching of silicon in HF containing solution under the illumination have been widely changed. The influence of thin ({le} 10nm) DLC film coating of the porous silicon layer on electron emission has been investigated. The parameters of emission efficiency such as field enhancement coefficient, effective emission areas and threshold voltages have been estimated from current-voltage dependencies to compare and characterize different layered structures. The improvement of the emission efficiency of silicon tip arrays with porous layers coated with thin DLC film has been observed. These silicon-based structures are promising for flat panel display applications.

  11. Negative Resistance Effect and Charge Transfer Mechanisms in the lon Beam Deposited Diamond Like Carbon Superlattices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrius VASILIAUSKAS

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present study DLC:SiOx/DLC/DLC:SiOx/nSi and DLC:SiOx/DLC/DLC:SiOx/pSi structures were fabricated by ion beam deposition using a closed drift ion source. Current-voltage (I-V characteristics of the multilayer samples were measured at room temperature. The main charge transfer mechanisms were considered. Unstable negative resistance effect was observed for some DLC:SiOx/DLC/DLC:SiOx/nSi and DLC:SiOx/DLC/DLC:SiOx/pSi structures. In the case of the diamond like carbon superlattices fabricated on nSi it was observed only during the first measurement. In the case of the some DLC:SiOx/DLC/DLC:SiOx/pSi negative resistance "withstood" several measurements. Changes of the charge carrier mechanisms were observed along with the dissapear of the negative resistance peaks. It seems, that in such a case influence of the bulk related charge transfer mechanisms such as Poole-Frenkel emission increased, while the influence of the contact limited charge transfer mechanisms such as Schottky emission decreased. Observed results were be explained by current flow through the local microconducting channels and subsequent destruction of the localized current pathways as a result of the heating by flowing electric current.http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.17.1.240

  12. Retardation of surface corrosion of biodegradable magnesium-based materials by aluminum ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Guosong; Xu, Ruizhen; Feng, Kai; Wu, Shuilin; Wu, Zhengwei; Sun, Guangyong; Zheng, Gang; Li, Guangyao; Chu, Paul K.

    2012-07-01

    Aluminum ion implantation is employed to modify pure Mg as well as AZ31 and AZ91 magnesium alloys and their surface degradation behavior in simulated body fluids is studied. Polarization tests performed in conjunction with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) reveal that the surface corrosion resistance after Al ion implantation is improved appreciably. This enhancement can be attributed to the formation of a gradient surface structure with a gradual transition from an Al-rich oxide layer to Al-rich metal layer. Compared to the high Al-content magnesium alloy (AZ91), a larger reduction in the degradation rate is achieved from pure magnesium and AZ31. Our results reveal that the surface corrosion resistance of Mg alloys with no or low Al content can be improved by Al ion implantation.

  13. Morphology Control and Optical Absorption Properties of Ag Nanoparticles by Ion Implantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    G.X. Cai; F. Ren; X.H. Xiao; L.X. Fan; X.D. Zhou; C.Z. Jiang

    2009-01-01

    Ion implantation is a powerful method for fabricating nanoparticles in dielectric. For the actual application of nanoparticle composites, a careful control of nanoparticles has to be achieved. In this letter, the size, distribution and morphology of Ag nanoparticles are controlled by controlling the ion current density, ion implantation sequence and ion irradiation dose. Single layer Ag nanoparticles are formed by Ag~+ ion implantation at current density of 2.5 μA/cm~2. By Ag and Cu ions sequential implantation, the size of single layer Ag nanoparticles increases. While, by Cu and Ag ions sequential implantation, uniform Ag nanoparticles with wide distribution are formed. The morphology of Ag nanoparticles changes to hollow and sandwiched nanoparticles by Cu~+ ion irradiation to doses of 3×10~(16) and 5×10~(16) ions/cm~2. The optical absorption properties of Ag nanoparticles are also tailored by these ways.

  14. Interferometric pump-probe characterization of the nonlocal response of optically transparent ion implanted polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanov, Ivan L.; Hadjichristov, Georgi B.

    2012-03-01

    Optical interferometric technique is applied to characterize the nonlocal response of optically transparent ion implanted polymers. The thermal nonlinearity of the ion-modified material in the near-surface region is induced by continuous wave (cw) laser irradiation at a relatively low intensity. The interferometry approach is demonstrated for a subsurface layer of a thickness of about 100 nm formed in bulk polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) by implantation with silicon ions at an energy of 50 keV and fluence in the range 1014-1017 cm-2. The laser-induced thermooptic effect in this layer is finely probed by interferometric imaging. The interference phase distribution in the plane of the ion implanted layer is indicative for the thermal nonlinearity of the near-surface region of ion implanted optically transparent polymeric materials.

  15. FRACTAL PATTERN GROWTH OF METAL ATOM CLUSTERS IN ION IMPLANTED POLYMERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG TONG-HE; WU YU-GUANG; SANG HAI-BO; ZHOU GU

    2001-01-01

    The fractal and multi-fractal patterns of metal atoms are observed in the surface layer and cross section of a metal ion implanted polymer using TEM and SEM for the first time. The surface structure in the metal ion implanted polyethylene terephthalane (PET) is the random fractal. Certain average quantities of the random geometric patterns contain self-similarity. Some growth origins appeared in the fractal pattern which has a dimension of 1.67. The network structure of the fractal patterns is formed in cross section, having a fractal dimension of 1.87. So it can be seen that the fractal pattern is three-dimensional space fractal. We also find the collision cascade fractal in the cross section of implanted nylon, which is similar to the collision cascade pattern in transverse view calculated by the TRIM computer program. Finally, the mechanism for the formation and growth of the fractal patterns during ion implantation is discussed.

  16. FATIGUE LIFE PREDICTION OF COMMERCIALLY PURE TITANIUM AFTER NITROGEN ION IMPLANTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurdin Ali

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Prediction of fatigue life has become an interesting issue in biomaterial engineering and design for reliability and quality purposes, particularly for biometallic material with modified surfaces. Commercially pure titanium (Cp-Ti implanted with nitrogen ions is a potential metallic biomaterial of the future. The effect of nitrogen ion implantation on fatigue behavior of Cp-Ti was investigated by means of axial loading conditions. The as-received and nitrogen-ion implanted specimens with the energy of 100 keV and dose of 2 × 1017 ions cm-2, were used to determine the fatigue properties and to predict the life cycle of the specimens. The effect of nitrogen ion implantation indicated revealed improved the tensile strength due to the formation of nitride phases, TiN and Ti2N. The fatigue strength of Cp-Ti and Nii-Ti was 250 and 260 MPa, respectively. The analytical results show good agreement with experimental results.

  17. Advanced transmission electron microscopy studies in low-energy ion implanted Si Semiconductors; Junctions; Silicon

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, T S

    2002-01-01

    As the dimensions of semiconductor devices shrink down to 0.1 mu m and beyond, low energy ion implantation is required to introduce shallower junctions to match such small devices. In this work, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is employed to analyse low energy implanted junctions with both structural and chemical analyses. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) has been employed to observe Si crystal damage and amorphization due to low energy B sup + /As sup + ion implantations, and also, defect formation/annihilation during rapid thermal annealing (RTA). The damage effects due to different implant temperatures between 300 deg C and -150 deg C are also discussed. Since knowledge of the distribution of low energy ion implanted dopants in Si is extremely important for semiconductor device processing, energy filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) has been employed to determine implanted B distributions in Si while Z-contrast imaging and X-ray analytical mapping techniques are ...

  18. Development of industrial ion implantation and ion assisted coating processes: A perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legg, Keith O.; Solnick-Legg, Hillary

    1989-04-01

    Ion beam processes have gone through a series of developmental stages, from being the mainstay of the semiconductor industry for production of integrated circuits, to new commercial processes for biomedical, aerospace and other industries. Although research is still continuing on surface modification using ion beam methods, ion implantation and ion assisted coatings for treatment of metals, ceramics, polymers and composites must now be considered viable industrial processes of benefit in a wide variety of applications. However, ion implantation methods face various barriers to acceptability, in terms not only of other surface treatment processes, but for implantation itself. This paper will discuss some of the challenges faced by a small company whose primary business is development and marketing of ion implantation and ion-assisted coating processes.

  19. Optical and magnetic properties of nitrogen ion implanted MgO single crystal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Chun-Ming; Gu Hai-Quan; Xiang Xia; Zhang Yan; Jiang Yong; Chen Meng; Zu Xiao-Tao

    2011-01-01

    The microstructure, optical property and magnetism of nitrogen ion implanted single MgO crystals are studied.A parallel investigation is also performed in an iron ion implanted single MgO sample as a reference. Large structural,optical and magnetic differences are obtained between the nitrogen and iron implanted samples. Room temperature ferromagnetism with a fairly large coercivity field of 300 Oe (1 Oe=79.5775 A/m), a remanence of 38% and a slightly changed optical absorption is obtained in the sample implanted using nitrogen with a dose of 1×1018 ions/cm2. Transition metal contamination and defects induced magnetism can be excluded when compared with those of the iron ion implanted sample, and the nitrogen doping is considered to be the main origin of ferromagnetism.

  20. Effects of nitrogen ion implantation on Ca2+ concentration and membrane potential of pollen cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The effects of low energy nitrogen ion implantation on Ca2+ concentration and membrane potential of lily (lilium davidii Duch) pollen cell have been studied. The results showed that the Ca2+ concentration was increased when pollen grain was implanted by nitrogen ion with energy 100keV and dose 1013 ions/cra2. However, the increase of Ca2+ concentration was partly inhibited by the addition of Ca2+channel inhibitor depending on dose. And nitrogen ion implantation caused depolarization of pollen cell membrane potential. In other words, membrane potential was increased,but the effect decreased by adding Ca2+ channel inhibitor.However, it was still significantly higher than the membrane potential of control cells. It was indicated that the depolarization of cell membrane potential opened the calcium channel on the membrane that caused the increasing of intraceilular calcium concentration. This might be an earlier step of the effect of low energy nitrogen ion implantation on pollen germination.

  1. Cathodoluminescence of Cr-doped diamond-like carbon film by filtered cathodic vacuum arc plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Meng-Wen; Jao, Jui-Yun [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chung Hsing University, 250 Kuo Kuang Road, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Lin, Chun-Chun; Hsieh, Wei-Jen; Yang, Yu-Hsiang [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, 101, Sec. 2, Kuang-Fu Road, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Cheng, Li-Shin; Shieu, F.S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chung Hsing University, 250 Kuo Kuang Road, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Shih, Han C., E-mail: hcshih@mx.nthu.edu.tw [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chung Hsing University, 250 Kuo Kuang Road, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, 101, Sec. 2, Kuang-Fu Road, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Institute of Materials Science and Nanotechnology, Chinese Culture University, 55 Hwa Kang Road, Yang Ming Shan, Taipei 111, Taiwan (China)

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The formation of the DLC:Cr films dependent on the flow rates of C{sub 2}H{sub 2}/Ar have been achieved in our FCVA plasma. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The amorphous DLC:Cr have high sp{sup 2} content can be completely converted to nanocrystalline Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of doping with Cr is apparently to change the band structure of the DLC and its consequent cathodoluminescence property. - Abstract: Cr doped diamond-like carbon (DLC:Cr) film was synthesized in various flow rates of C{sub 2}H{sub 2}/Ar under a substrate voltage of -50 V at 500 Degree-Sign C by a filtered cathodic vacuum arc plasma. This work has found that the structure of the films was correlated to the flow rate of C{sub 2}H{sub 2}/Ar but the luminescence properties are similar. The cathodoluminescence spectra of DLC:Cr films obtained at 1.9-2.4 eV verifies that the luminescence from the films is in the visible region. The incorporation of Cr into the carbon network results in red emission shifted to 1.99 eV and the orange emission (2.03 eV) also appeared due to the transitions between chromium-related electron levels and {sigma}* states. The peak at 2.10 eV may result from the defects of the structures in DLC:Cr films.

  2. Decrease of Staphylococcal adhesion on surgical stainless steel after Si ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braceras, Iñigo, E-mail: inigo.braceras@tecnalia.com [Tecnalia, Mikeletegi Pasealekua 2, 20009 Donostia-San Sebastian (Spain); CIBER de Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (CIBER-BBN) (Spain); Pacha-Olivenza, Miguel A. [CIBER de Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (CIBER-BBN) (Spain); Universidad de Extremadura, Departamento de Física Aplicada, Facultad de Ciencias, Av. Elvas s/n, 06006 Badajoz (Spain); Calzado-Martín, Alicia [Hospital Universitario La Paz-IdiPAZ, Paseo de la Castellana 261, 28046 Madrid (Spain); CIBER de Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (CIBER-BBN) (Spain); Multigner, Marta [Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Metalúrgicas, CENIM-CSIC, Avda Gregorio del Amo 8, 28040 Madrid (Spain); CIBER de Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (CIBER-BBN) (Spain); Vera, Carolina [Tecnalia, Mikeletegi Pasealekua 2, 20009 Donostia-San Sebastian (Spain); CIBER de Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (CIBER-BBN) (Spain); Broncano, Luis Labajos-; Gallardo-Moreno, Amparo M. [Universidad de Extremadura, Departamento de Física Aplicada, Facultad de Ciencias, Av. Elvas s/n, 06006 Badajoz (Spain); CIBER de Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (CIBER-BBN) (Spain); González-Carrasco, José Luis [Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Metalúrgicas, CENIM-CSIC, Avda Gregorio del Amo 8, 28040 Madrid (Spain); CIBER de Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (CIBER-BBN) (Spain); Vilaboa, Nuria [Hospital Universitario La Paz-IdiPAZ, Paseo de la Castellana 261, 28046 Madrid (Spain); CIBER de Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (CIBER-BBN) (Spain); and others

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • Si ion implantation of AISI 316LVM medical grade alloy might reduce bacterial adhesion and colonization. • Si ion implantation does not impair the attachment, viability and matrix maturation of human mesenchymal stem cells. • Nano-topography and surface chemistry changes account for the Si ion implantation induced effects. - Abstract: 316LVM austenitic stainless steel is often the material of choice on temporal musculoskeletal implants and surgical tools as it combines good mechanical properties and acceptable corrosion resistance to the physiologic media, being additionally relatively inexpensive. This study has aimed at improving the resistance to bacterial colonization of this surgical stainless steel, without compromising its biocompatibility and resistance. To achieve this aim, the effect of Si ion implantation on 316LVM has been studied. First, the effect of the ion implantation parameters (50 keV; fluence: 2.5–5 × 10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2}; angle of incidence: 45–90°) has been assessed in terms of depth profiling of chemical composition by XPS and nano-topography evaluation by AFM. The in vitro biocompatibility of the alloy has been evaluated with human mesenchymal stem cells. Finally, bacterial adhesion of Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus on these surfaces has been assessed. Reduction of bacterial adhesion on Si implanted 316LVM is dependent on the implantation conditions as well as the features of the bacterial strains, offering a promising implantable biomaterial in terms of biocompatibility, mechanical properties and resistance to bacterial colonization. The effects of surface composition and nano-topography on bacterial adhesion, directly related to ion implantation conditions, are also discussed.

  3. Electroanalytical investigation and determination of pefloxacin in pharmaceuticals and serum at boron-doped diamond and glassy carbon electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uslu, Bengi; Topal, Burcu Dogan; Ozkan, Sibel A

    2008-02-15

    The anodic behavior and determination of pefloxacin on boron-doped diamond and glassy carbon electrodes were investigated using cyclic, linear sweep, differential pulse and square wave voltammetric techniques. In cyclic voltammetry, pefloxacin shows one main irreversible oxidation peak and additional one irreversible ill-defined wave depending on pH values for both electrodes. The results indicate that the process of pefloxacin is irreversible and diffusion controlled on boron-doped diamond electrode and irreversible but adsorption controlled on glassy carbon electrode. The peak current is found to be linear over the range of concentration 2x10(-6) to 2x10(-4)M in 0.5M H(2)SO(4) at about +1.20V (versus Ag/AgCl) for differential pulse and square wave voltammetric technique using boron-doped diamond electrode. The repeatability, reproducibility, precision and accuracy of the methods in all media were investigated. Selectivity, precision and accuracy of the developed methods were also checked by recovery studies. The procedures were successfully applied to the determination of the drug in pharmaceutical dosage forms and humans serum samples with good recovery results. No electroactive interferences from the excipients and endogenous substances were found in the pharmaceutical dosage forms and biological samples, respectively.

  4. Simulation methods of ion sheath dynamics in plasma source ion implantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jiuli; ZHANG Guling; WANG Younian; LIU Yuanfu; LIU Chizi; YANG Size

    2004-01-01

    Progress of the theoretical studies on the ion sheath dynamics in plasma source ion implantation (PSII) is reviewed in this paper. Several models for simulating the ion sheath dynamics in PSII are provided. The main problem of nonuniform ion implantation on the target in PSII is discussed by analyzing some calculated results. In addition, based on the relative researches in our laboratory, some calculated results of the ion sheath dynamics in PSII for inner surface modification of a cylindrical bore are presented. Finally, new ideas and tendency for future researches on ion sheath dynamics in PSII are proposed.

  5. CEMS-investigations of AISI M2 steel after nitrogen plasma immersion ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uglov, V.V. E-mail: info@research.bsu.unibel.by; Kholmetskii, A.L.; Kuleshov, A.K.; Fedotova, J.A.; Rusalsky, D.P.; Khodasevich, V.V.; Ruebenbauer, K.; Richter, E.; Guenzel, R.; Parascandola, S

    1999-01-02

    Plasma-immersion ion implantation (PIII) and high-current ion implantation (HCII) of nitrogen into M2 steel were carried out. The formation of a multilayer system consisting of a surface layer of austenite on top of {epsilon}-Fe{sub 3}N nitride precipitates was manifested in M2 steel after PIII. HCII forms a thick (more than 14 {mu}m) layer with {epsilon}-Fe{sub 3}N precipitates. Apparently, the formation of the austenite layer after PIII is connected with a local tempering of the steel surface by the pulsed nitrogen ion beam.

  6. Effect of disorder and defects in ion-implanted semiconductors electrical and physiochemical characterization

    CERN Document Server

    Willardson, Robert K; Christofides, Constantinos; Ghibaudo, Gerard

    2014-01-01

    Defects in ion-implanted semiconductors are important and will likely gain increased importance in the future as annealing temperatures are reduced with successive IC generations. Novel implant approaches, such as MdV implantation, create new types of defects whose origin and annealing characteristics will need to be addressed. Publications in this field mainly focus on the effects of ion implantation on the material and the modification in the implanted layer afterhigh temperature annealing.Electrical and Physicochemical Characterization focuses on the physics of the annealing kine

  7. X-ray diffuse scattering investigation of defects in ion implanted and annealed silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, C.H.; Patel, J.R. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)]|[Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Beck, U.; Metzger, T.H. [Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Sektion Physik

    1998-12-31

    To characterize the point defects and point defect clusters introduced by ion implantation and annealing, the authors have used grazing incidence x-rays to measure the diffuse scattering in the tails of Bragg peaks (Huang Scattering). An analysis of the diffuse scattered intensity will allow the authors to characterize the nature of point defects or defect clusters introduced by ion implantation. They have also observed unexpected satellite peaks in the diffuse scattering tails. Possible causes for the occurrence of the peaks will be discussed.

  8. Biodegradable radioactive implants for glaucoma filtering surgery produced by ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assmann, W. [Department fuer Physik, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, 85748 Garching (Germany)]. E-mail: walter.assmann@lmu.de; Schubert, M. [Department fuer Physik, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, 85748 Garching (Germany); Held, A. [Augenklinik, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, 81675 Munich (Germany); Pichler, A. [Augenklinik, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, 81675 Muenchen (Germany); Chill, A. [Zentralinstitut fuer Medizintechnik, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, 85748 Garching (Germany); Kiermaier, S. [Zentralinstitut fuer Medizintechnik, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, 85748 Garching (Germany); Schloesser, K. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Busch, H. [NTTF GmbH, 53619 Rheinbreitbach (Germany); Schenk, K. [NTTF GmbH, 53619 Rheinbreitbach (Germany); Streufert, D. [Acri.Tec GmbH, 16761 Hennigsdorf (Germany); Lanzl, I. [Augenklinik, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, 81675 Munich (Germany)

    2007-04-15

    A biodegradable, {beta}-emitting implant has been developed and successfully tested which prevents fresh intraocular pressure increase after glaucoma filtering surgery. Ion implantation has been used to load the polymeric implants with the {beta}-emitter {sup 32}P. The influence of ion implantation and gamma sterilisation on degradation and {sup 32}P-fixation behavior has been studied by ion beam and chemical analysis. Irradiation effects due to the applied ion fluence (10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2}) and gamma dose (25 kGy) are found to be tolerable.

  9. A comparison of batch and single wafer high dose arsenic ion implantation techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irwin, R.B.; Filo, A.J.; Kannan, V.C.; Feygenson, A.; Prematta, R.J.

    1989-04-01

    High dose, low energy (4x10/sup 15/ cm/sup -2/ at 15 keV) arsenic ion implantation into silicon was performed in batch and single wafer mode using medium and high current ion implanters. An investigation of implanted and annealed samples by Rutherford backscattering (RBS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), thermal wave technique, and sheet resistance mapping showed little to no difference of arsenic profiles and residual damage between batch and single wafer implantation conditions when the sample temperature during implantation was kept below 120/sup 0/C. (orig.).

  10. A comparison of batch and single wafer high dose arsenic ion implantation techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, R. B.; Filo, A. J.; Kannan, V. C.; Feygenson, A.; Prematta, R. J.

    1989-04-01

    High dose, low energy (4×10 15 cm -2 at 15 keV) arsenic ion implantation into silicon was performed in batch and single wafer mode using medium and high current ion implanters. An investigation of implanted and annealed samples by Rutherford backscattering (RBS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), thermal wave technique, and sheet resistance mapping showed little to no difference of arsenic profiles and residual damage between batch and single wafer implantation conditions when the sample temperature during implantation was kept below 120° C.

  11. Ultrathin diamond-like carbon films deposited by filtered carbon vacuum arcs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anders, Andre; Fong, Walton; Kulkarni, Ashok; Ryan, Francis W.; Bhatia, C. Singh

    2001-07-13

    Ultrathin (< 5 nm) hard carbon films are of great interest to the magnetic storage industry as the areal density approaches 100 Gbit/in{sup 2}. These films are used as overcoats to protect the magnetic layers on disk media and the active elements of the read-write slider. Tetrahedral amorphous carbon films can be produced by filtered cathodic arc deposition, but the films will only be accepted by the storage industry only if the ''macroparticle'' issue has been solved. Better plasma filters have been developed over recent years. Emphasis is put on the promising twist filter system - a compact, open structure that operates with pulsed arcs and high magnetic field. Based on corrosion tests it is shown that the macroparticle reduction by the twist filter is satisfactory for this demanding application, while plasma throughput is very high. Ultrathin hard carbon films have been synthesized using S-filter and twist filter systems. Film properties such as hardness, elastic modulus, wear, and corrosion resistance have been tested.

  12. Intertwisted fibrillar diamond-like carbon films prepared by electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨武保; 王久丽; 张谷令; 范松华; 刘赤子; 杨思泽

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, the structures, optical and mechanical properties of diamond-like carbon films are studied, which are prepared by a self-fabricated electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasma chemical vapour deposition method at room temperature in the ambient gases of mixed acetylene and nitrogen. The morphology and microstructure of the processed film are characterized by the atomic force microscope image, Raman spectra and middle Fourier transform infrared transmittance spectra, which reveal that there is an intertwisted fibrillar diamond-like structure in the film and the film is mainly composed of sp3 CH, sp3 C-C, sp2 C=C, C=N and C60. The film micro-hardness and bulk modulus are measured by a nano-indenter and the refractive constant and deposition rate are also calculated.

  13. Effect of Implantation Machine Parameters on N+ ion Implantation for Upland Cotton(Gossypium hirsutum L.) Pollen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Jieyu; Yu, Lixiang; Wu, Yuejin; Tang, Canming

    2008-10-01

    Effect of parameters of ion implantation machine, including ion energy, total dose, dose rate, impulse energy and implantation interval on the pollen grains of upland cotton implanted with nitrogen ion beam were studied. The best parameters were screened out. The results also showed that the vacuum condition before the nitrogen ion implantation does not affect the pollen viability.

  14. The characterization of low energy molecular hydrogen ion—induced defects in synthetic diamond by optical absorption

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MaZhong-Quan; AokiY; 等

    1998-01-01

    The results of optical absorption analysis of the synthetic diamonds(type Ib) which were implanted with 40 keV molecular hydrogen ions at doses of 1015-1017H/cm2(at 100K),showed that the increase of optical density(OD) of modified layer(-140nm) in UV-VIS region was dependent upon the damage level caused by ion implantation process.The range of relative optical band gap(Er.opt) around 2.0eV suggested that an amorphous carbon network structure like a-C film,which probably contains some localized subtetrabedral-coordinated clusters embedded in the fourflod(sp3) sites.was tentatively found in this layer,basing on the optical gap of carbon materials.The evolution of Er,opt with ion fluence indicated that no more hydrogenated carbon compositions were produced in as -implanted samples,while the increase of Er,opt with annealing temperature was very similar to that of hydrogen content dependence of Eopt in hydrogenately amorphous carbon(a-C:H):In addition the optical inhomogeneity of type Ib diamond has been revealed by a 2-dimension topograph in transmission mode at λ=430nm。

  15. Protein arrangement on modified diamond-like carbon surfaces – An ARXPS study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oosterbeek, Reece N., E-mail: reece.oosterbeek@auckland.ac.nz [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, The University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019 (New Zealand); Seal, Christopher K. [Light Metals Research Centre, The University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019 (New Zealand); Hyland, Margaret M. [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, The University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019 (New Zealand)

    2014-12-01

    Highlights: • DLC coatings were modified by Ar{sup +} ion sputtering and laser graphitisation. • The surface properties of the coatings were measured, and it was found that the above methods increased sp{sup 2} content and altered surface energy. • ARXPS was used to observe protein arrangement on the surface. • Polar CO/CN groups were seen to be segregated towards the interface, indicating they play an important role in bonding. • This segregation increased with increasing polar surface energy, indicating an increased net attraction between polar groups. - Abstract: Understanding the nature of the interface between a biomaterial implant and the biological fluid is an essential step towards creating improved implant materials. This study examined a diamond-like carbon coating biomaterial, the surface energy of which was modified by Ar{sup +} ion sputtering and laser graphitisation. The arrangement of proteins was analysed by angle resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and the effects of the polar component of surface energy on this arrangement were observed. It was seen that polar groups (such as CN, CO) are more attracted to the coating surface due to the stronger polar interactions. This results in a segregation of these groups to the DLC–protein interface; at increasing takeoff angle (further from to DLC–protein interface) fewer of these polar groups are seen. Correspondingly, groups that interact mainly by dispersive forces (CC, CH) were found to increase in intensity as takeoff angle increased, indicating they are segregated away from the DLC–protein interface. The magnitude of the segregation was seen to increase with increasing polar surface energy, this was attributed to an increased net attraction between the solid surface and polar groups at higher polar surface energy (γ{sub S}{sup p})

  16. Electrical and magnetic properties of electrodeposited nickel incorporated diamond-like carbon thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandey, B., E-mail: pandey.beauty@yahoo.com [Department of Applied Physics, Indian School of Mines, Dhanbad 826004 (India); Das, D. [UGC-DAE CSR, Sector III/LB-8, Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700098 (India); Kar, A.K. [Department of Applied Physics, Indian School of Mines, Dhanbad 826004 (India)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Electrical and magnetic properties of DLC and Ni-DLC thin films are studied. • The ohmicity and conductivity of DLC films rise with nickel addition. • The ohmicity of Ni-DLC is enhanced with increase in dilution of electrolyte. • Dielectric loss is high for Ni-DLC and decreases with frequency till 100 kHz. • (m–H) and (m–T) curves of Ni-DLC indicate superparamagnetic behavior. - Abstract: Nanocomposite diamond-like carbon (DLC) thin films have been synthesized by incorporating nickel (Ni) nanoparticles in DLC matrix with varying concentration of nickel. DLC and Ni-DLC thin films have been deposited on ITO coated glass substrates employing low voltage electrodeposition method. Electrical properties of the samples were studied by measuring current–voltage characteristics and dielectric properties. The current approaches toward an ohmic behavior with metal addition. This tendency of increasing ohmicity is enhanced with increase in dilution of the electrolyte. The conductivity increases with Ni addition and interestingly it continues to increase with dilution of Ni concentration in the electrolyte in the range of our study. Magnetic properties for DLC and Ni-DLC thin film samples were examined by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements and Super Conducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) measurements. g-Value for DLC is 2.074, whereas it decreases to 2.055 with Ni addition in the electrolyte. This decrement arises from the increased sp{sup 2} content in DLC matrix. The magnetic moment vs. magnetic field (m–H) curves of Ni-DLC indicate superparamagnetic behavior which may be due to ferromagnetic contribution from the incorporated nickel nanoparticles in the DLC matrix. The ZFC curve of Ni-DLC after the blocking temperature shows a combined contribution of ferromagnetic, superparamagnetic and paramagnetic nature of the materials persisting up to 300 K.

  17. Microstructure and tribological performance of diamond-like carbon films deposited on hydrogenated rubber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pal, J.P. van der [Materials Innovation Institute M2i, Department of Applied Physics, University of Groningen, Nijenborgh 4, 9747 AG Groningen (Netherlands); Martinez-Martinez, D., E-mail: d.martinez.martinez@rug.nl [Materials Innovation Institute M2i, Department of Applied Physics, University of Groningen, Nijenborgh 4, 9747 AG Groningen (Netherlands); Pei, Y.T., E-mail: y.pei@rug.nl [Materials Innovation Institute M2i, Department of Applied Physics, University of Groningen, Nijenborgh 4, 9747 AG Groningen (Netherlands); Rudolf, P. [Zernike Institute for Advanced Materials, University of Groningen, Nijenborgh 4, 9747 AG Groningen (Netherlands); De Hosson, J.Th.M. [Materials Innovation Institute M2i, Department of Applied Physics, University of Groningen, Nijenborgh 4, 9747 AG Groningen (Netherlands)

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, the microstructure and tribological performance of diamond-like carbon (DLC) films prepared by plasma chemical vapor deposition on hydrogenated nitrile butadiene rubbers (HNBR) are studied. Different negative variations of temperature during film growth were selected by proper changes of the bias voltage. Raman measurements show a similar bonding regardless of the voltages used. A columnar growth and a tile-like microstructure of the DLC films were identified by scanning electron microscopy. Patch sizes can be correlated with the deposition conditions. The coefficient of friction (CoF) of DLC film coated HNBR was found to be much lower than that of the unprotected rubber, and more reduced for the DLC films with smaller patch sizes, which is explained by a better flexibility and conformity of the film during testing. In one of the samples, unexpected low CoF was observed, which was attributed to a modification of the mechanical properties of the rubber during the plasma treatment at high voltage. This issue was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, which indicated a modification of the cross linking in the rubber. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bias voltage does not vary the chemical bonding and surface morphology of films. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Film structure is patched, whose size depends on the etching and deposition voltages. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The frictional behavior can be correlated with the patch size of the films. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Surface analysis showed that rubber x-linking is modified by etching at high voltage. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Modification of rubber x-linking leads to a different frictional behavior.

  18. Dissolution effect and cytotoxicity of diamond-like carbon coatings on orthodontic archwires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Shinya; Ohgoe, Yasuharu; Ozeki, Kazuhide; Hirakuri, Kenji; Aoki, Hideki

    2007-12-01

    Nickel-titanium (NiTi) has been used for implants in orthodontics due to the unique properties such as shape memory effect and superelasticity. However, NiTi alloys are eroded in the oral cavity because they are immersed by saliva with enzymolysis. Their reactions lead corrosion and nickel release into the body. The higher concentrations of Ni release may generate harmful reactions. Ni release causes allergenic, toxic and carcinogenic reactions. It is well known that diamond-like carbon (DLC) films have excellent properties, such as extreme hardness, low friction coefficients, high wear resistance. In addition, DLC film has many other superior properties as a protective coating for biomedical applications such as biocompatibility and chemical inertness. Therefore, DLC film has received enormous attention as a biocompatible coating. In this study, DLC film coated NiTi orthodontic archwires to protect Ni release into the oral cavity. Each wire was immersed in physiological saline at the temperature 37 degrees C for 6 months. The release concentration of Ni ions was detected using microwave induced plasma mass spectrometry (MIP-MS) with the resolution of ppb level. The toxic effect of Ni release was studied the cell growth using squamous carcinoma cells. These cells were seeded in 24 well culture plates and materials were immersed in each well directly. The concentration of Ni ions in the solutions had been reduced one-sixth by DLC films when compared with non-coated wire. This study indicated that DLC films have the protective effect of the diffusion and the non-cytotoxicity in corrosive environment.

  19. Diamond-like carbon coatings for the protection of metallic artefacts: effect on the aesthetic appearance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraldi, Federica; Angelini, Emma; Caschera, Daniela; Mezzi, Alessio; Riccucci, Cristina; Caro, Tilde De

    2014-03-01

    Plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) is an environmentally friendly process used to deposit a variety of nano-structured coatings for the protection or the surface modification of metallic artefacts like the SiO2-like films that have been successfully tested on ancient silver, bronze and iron artefacts as barriers against aggressive agents. This paper deals with the preliminary results of a wider investigation aimed to the development of eco-sustainable coatings for the protection of Cu and Ag-based artefacts of archaeological and historic interest. Diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings have been deposited by PECVD in different experimental conditions, in a capacitively coupled asymmetric plasma reactor, placing the substrates either on electrically powered electrode (cathodic mode) or grounded electrode (anodic mode) with and without hydrogen addition in the gas mixture. The final goal is to develop a coating with good protective effectiveness against aggressive atmospheres and contemporarily with negligible effects on the aesthetic appearance of the artefacts. The evaluation of possible colour changes of the surface patinas, due to coating process, was performed by optical microscopy and colorimetric measurements. Furthermore, to evaluate the reversibility of the thin DLC layer, an etching treatment in oxygen plasma has been successfully carried out and optimized. The chemical-physical characterization of the deposited DLC coatings was performed by means of the combined use of micro-Raman and XPS spectroscopies. The results show that the DLC films obtained in the anodic mode, may be proposed as a viable alternative to polymeric coatings for the protection of metallic ancient objects.

  20. Effect of Sequential Ions Implantation on Structure of Cu, Ag Nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Xiang-heng; LU Zhuo-yu; GUO Li-ping; REN Feng; CHEN Dong-liang; WU Zi-yu; JIA Quan-jie

    2007-01-01

    The preparation of metal nanoparticles composites by Cu, Ag ions sequential implantation is studied. The formation of Cu, Ag nanoparticles has been evidenced by grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, extended x-ray absorption fine structure and transmission electron microscopy. With the increase of Ag ion implantation dose, the size and density of Ag nanoparticles increase significantly.

  1. Enhanced Physicochemical and Biological Properties of Ion-Implanted Titanium Using Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Csaba Hegedűs

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The surface properties of metallic implants play an important role in their clinical success. Improving upon the inherent shortcomings of Ti implants, such as poor bioactivity, is imperative for achieving clinical use. In this study, we have developed a Ti implant modified with Ca or dual Ca + Si ions on the surface using an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS. The physicochemical and biological properties of ion-implanted Ti surfaces were analyzed using various analytical techniques, such as surface analyses, potentiodynamic polarization and cell culture. Experimental results indicated that a rough morphology was observed on the Ti substrate surface modified by ECRIS plasma ions. The in vitro electrochemical measurement results also indicated that the Ca + Si ion-implanted surface had a more beneficial and desired behavior than the pristine Ti substrate. Compared to the pristine Ti substrate, all ion-implanted samples had a lower hemolysis ratio. MG63 cells cultured on the high Ca and dual Ca + Si ion-implanted surfaces revealed significantly greater cell viability in comparison to the pristine Ti substrate. In conclusion, surface modification by electron cyclotron resonance Ca and Si ion sources could be an effective method for Ti implants.

  2. Comparative investigation of damage induced by diatomic and monoatomic ion implantation in silicon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lohner, T.; Toth, L.; Fried, M.; Khanh, N.Q.; Yang, Gen Qing; Lu, Lin Chen; Zou, Shichang; Hanekamp, L.J.; Silfhout, van A.; Gyulai, J.

    1994-01-01

    The damaging effect of mono- and diatomic phosphorus and arsenic ions implanted into silicon was investigated by spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) and high-depth-resolution Rutherford backscattering and channeling techniques. A comparison was made between the two methods to check the capability of ell

  3. Effect of phosphorus-ion implantation on the corrosion resistance and biocompatibility of titanium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupa, D; Baszkiewicz, J; Kozubowski, J A; Barcz, A; Sobczak, J W; Biliński, A; Lewandowska-Szumieł, M; Rajchel, B

    2002-08-01

    This work presents data on the structure and corrosion resistance of titanium after phosphorus-ion implantation with a dose of 10(17)P/cm2. The ion energy was 25keV. Transmission electron microscopy was used to investigate the microstructure of the implanted layer. The chemical composition of the surface layer was examined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry. The corrosion resistance was examined by electrochemical methods in a simulated body fluid at a temperature of 37 C. Biocompatibility tests in vitro were performed in a culture of human derived bone cells in direct contact with the materials tested. Both, the viability of the cells determined by an XTT assay and activity of the cells evaluated by alkaline phosphatase activity measurements in contact with implanted and non-implanted titanium samples were detected. The morphology of the cells spread on the surface of the materials examined was also observed. The results confirmed the biocompatibility of both phosphorus-ion-implanted and non-implanted titanium under the conditions of the experiment. As shown by transmission electron microscope results, the surface layer formed during phosphorus-ion implantation was amorphous. The results of electrochemical examinations indicate that phosphorus-ion implantation increases the corrosion resistance after short-term as well as long-term exposures.

  4. Pulse height defect of energetic heavy ions in ion-implanted Si detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquali, G.; Casini, G.; Bini, M.; Calamai, S.; Olmi, A.; Poggi, G.; Stefanini, A. A.; Saint-Laurent, F.; Steckmeyer, J. C.

    1998-02-01

    The pulse height defect in ion-implanted silicon detectors for elastically scattered 93Nb, 100Mo, 116Sn, 120Sn and 129Xe ions, at energies ranging from about 4 to 25 A MeV has been measured. The results are compared with two widely used parametrizations taken from the literature.

  5. Pulse height defect of energetic heavy ions in ion-implanted Si detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasquali, G.; Casini, G.; Bini, M.; Calamai, S.; Olmi, A.; Poggi, G.; Stefanini, A.A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Florence (Italy)]|[Univ. of Florence (Italy); Saint-Laurent, F. [DRFC/STEP, CEN Cadarache, 13108 Saint Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Steckmeyer, J.C. [Laboratoire de Physique Corpuscolaire, ISMRA, 14050 Caen Cedex (France)

    1998-03-01

    The pulse height defect in ion-implanted silicon detectors for elastically scattered {sup 93}Nb, {sup 100}Mo, {sup 116}Sn, {sup 120}Sn and {sup 129}Xe ions, at energies ranging from about 4 to 25 A MeV has been measured. The results are compared with two widely used parametrizations taken from the literature. (orig.). 14 refs.

  6. Germanium ion implantation to Improve Crystallinity during Solid Phase Epitaxy and the effect of AMU Contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, K. S.; Yoo, D. H.; Son, G. H.; Lee, C. H.; Noh, J. H.; Han, J. J.; Yu, Y. S.; Hyung, Y. W.; Yang, J. K.; Song, D. G.; Lim, T. J.; Kim, Y. K.; Lee, S. C.; Lee, H. D.; Moon, J. T.

    2006-11-01

    Germanium ion implantation was investigated for crystallinity enhancement during solid phase epitaxial regrowth (SPE) using high current implantation equipment. Electron back-scatter diffraction(EBSD) measurement showed numerical increase of 19 percent of signal, which might be due to pre-amorphization effect on silicon layer deposited by LPCVD process with germanium ion implantation. On the other hand, electrical property such as off-leakage current of NMOS transistor degraded in specific regions of wafers, which implied non-uniform distribution of donor-type impurities into channel area. It was confirmed that arsenic atoms were incorporated into silicon layer during germanium ion implantation. Since the equipment for germanium pre-amorphization implantation(PAI) was using several source gases such as BF3 and AsH3, atomic mass unit(AMU) contamination during PAI of germanium with AMU 74 caused the incorporation of arsenic with AMU 75 which resided in arc-chamber and other parts of the equipment. It was effective to use germanium isotope of AMU 72 to suppress AMU contamination, however it led serious reduction of productivity because of decrease in beam current by 30 percent as known to be difference in isotope abundance. It was effective to use enriched germanium source gas with AMU 72 in order to improve productivity. Spatial distribution of arsenic impurities in wafers was closely related to hardware configuration of ion implantation equipment.

  7. Capacitance-voltage characteristics of GaAs ion-implanted structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Privalov E. N.

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available A noniterative numerical method is proposed to calculate the barrier capacitance of GaAs ion-implanted structures as a function of the Schottky barrier bias. The features of the low- and high-frequency capacitance-voltage characteristics of these structures which are due to the presence of deep traps are elucidated.

  8. (n,p) emission channeling measurements on ion-implanted beryllium

    CERN Multimedia

    Jakubek, J; Uher, J

    2007-01-01

    We propose to perform emission-channeling measurements using thermal neutron induced proton emission from ion-implanted $^{7}$Be. The physics questions addressed concern the beryllium doping of III-V and II-VI semiconductors and the host dependence of the electron capture half-life of $^{7}$Be.

  9. SURFACE MODIFICATION OF TITANIUM FILMS WITH SODIUM ION IMPLANTATION: SURFACE PROPERTIES AND PROTEIN ADSORPTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K. Y. Cai

    2007-01-01

    Sodium implanted titanium films with different ion doses were characterized to correlate their ion implantation parameters. Native titanium films and ion implanted titanium films were characterized with combined techniques of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and light microscopy (LM). The surface presented increased sodium concentration on treated titanium films with ion dose increasing, except for the group with the highest ion dose of 4× 1017 ions/cm2. XPS depth profiling displayed that sodium entered titanium film around 25-50 nm depth depending on its implantation ion dose. AFM characterization showed that sodium ion implantation treatment changed the surface morphology from a relatively smooth titanium film to rough surfaces corresponding to different implantation doses.After sodium implantation, implanted titanium films presented big particles with island structure morphology. The surface morphology and particle growth displayed the corresponding trend.Fibrinogen adsorption on these titanium films was performed to correlate with the surface properties of treated titanium films. The results show that protein adsorption on ion-implanted samples with dose of 2 × 1017 and 4 × 1017 are statistically higher (p < 0. 01) than samples treated with dose of 5×1016 and 1 ×1017, as well as the control samples.

  10. Platelet adhesion and plasma protein adsorption control of collagen surfaces by He{sup +} ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurotobi, K. E-mail: kurotobi@postman.riken.go.jp; Suzuki, Y.; Nakajima, H.; Suzuki, H.; Iwaki, M

    2003-05-01

    He{sup +} ion implanted collagen-coated tubes with a fluence of 1 x 10{sup 14} ions/cm{sup 2} were exhibited antithrombogenicity. To investigate the mechanisms of antithrombogenicity of these samples, plasma protein adsorption assay and platelet adhesion experiments were performed. The adsorption of fibrinogen (Fg) and von Willebrand factor (vWf) was minimum on the He{sup +} ion implanted collagen with a fluence of 1 x 10{sup 14} ions/cm{sup 2}. Platelet adhesion (using platelet rich plasma) was inhibited on the He{sup +} ion implanted collagen with a fluence of 1 x 10{sup 14} ions/cm{sup 2} and was accelerated on the untreated collagen and ion implanted collagen with fluences of 1 x 10{sup 13}, 1 x 10{sup 15} and 1 x 10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2}. Platelet activation with washed platelets was observed on untreated collagen and He{sup +} ion implanted collagen with a fluence of 1 x 10{sup 14} ions/cm{sup 2} and was inhibited with fluences of 1 x 10{sup 13}, 1 x 10{sup 15} and 1 x 10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2}. Generally, platelets can react with a specific ligand inside the collagen (GFOGER sequence). The results of platelets adhesion experiments using washed platelets indicated that there were no ligands such as GFOGER on the He{sup +} ion implanted collagen over a fluence of 1 x 10{sup 13} ions/cm{sup 2}. On the 1 x 10{sup 14} ions/cm{sup 2} implanted collagen, no platelet activation was observed due to the influence of plasma proteins. >From the above, it is concluded that the decrease of adsorbed Fg and vWf caused the antithrombogenicity of He{sup +} ion implanted collagen with a fluence of 1 x 10{sup 14} ions/cm{sup 2} and that plasma protein adsorption took an important role repairing the graft surface.

  11. Microwave activation of electrochemical processes: High temperature phenol and triclosan electro-oxidation at carbon and diamond electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghanem, Mohamed A.; Marken, Frank [Department of Chemistry, University of Bath, Bath BA2 7AY (United Kingdom); Compton, Richard G.; Coles, Barry A. [Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory, Oxford University, Oxford OX1 3QZ (United Kingdom); Psillakis, Elefteria [Laboratory of Aquatic Chemistry, Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Crete, Polytechnioupolis, 73100 Chania-Crete (Greece); Kulandainathan, M. Anbu [Central Electrochemical Research Institute, Karaikudi (India)

    2007-12-20

    The electrochemical oxidation of phenolic compounds in aqueous media is known to be affected by the formation of electro-polymerized organic layers which lead to partial or complete electrode blocking. In this study the effect of high intensity microwave radiation applied locally at the electrode surface is investigated for the oxidation of phenol and triclosan in alkaline solution at a 500 {mu}m diameter glassy carbon or at a 500 {mu}m x 500 {mu}m boron-doped diamond electrode. The temperature at the electrode surface and mass transport enhancement are determined by calibration with the Fe(CN){sub 6}{sup 3-/4-} redox system in aqueous 0.3 M NaOH and 0.2 NaCl (pH 12) solution. The calibration shows that strong thermal and mass transport effects occur at both glassy carbon and boron-doped diamond electrodes. The average electrode temperature reaches up to 390 K and mass transport enhancements of more than 20-fold are possible. For the phenol electro-oxidation at glassy carbon electrodes and at a concentration below 2 mM a multi-electron oxidation (ca. 4 electrons) occurs in the presence of microwave radiation. For the electro-oxidation of the more hydrophobic triclosan only the one-electron oxidation occurs. Although currents are enhanced in presence of microwave radiation, rapid blocking of the electrode surface in particular at high phenol concentrations still occurs. (author)

  12. Electrodeposition of diamond-like carbon films on titanium alloy using organic liquids: Corrosion and wear resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falcade, Tiago, E-mail: tiago.falcade@ufrgs.br [Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, 9500 Bento Goncalves Ave. Sector 4, Building 75, 2nd floor, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Shmitzhaus, Tobias Eduardo, E-mail: tobiasschmitzhaus@gmail.com [Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Gomes dos Reis, Otavio, E-mail: otavio_gomes214@hotmail.com [Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Vargas, Andre Luis Marin; Huebler, Roberto [Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio Grande do Sul (Brazil); Mueller, Iduvirges Lourdes, E-mail: ilmuller@ufrgs.br [Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Fraga Malfatti, Celia de, E-mail: celia.malfatti@ufrgs.br [Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2012-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The electrodeposition may be conducted at room temperature. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The DLC films have good resistance to corrosion in saline environments. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The films have lower coefficient of friction than the uncoated substrate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The abrasive wear protection is evident in coated systems. - Abstract: Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films have been studied as coatings for corrosion protection and wear resistance because they have excellent chemical inertness in traditional corrosive environments, besides presenting a significant reduction in coefficient of friction. Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films obtained by electrochemical deposition techniques have attracted a lot of interest, regarding their potential in relation to the vapor phase deposition techniques. The electrochemical deposition techniques are carried out at room temperature and do not need vacuum system, making easier this way the technological transfer. At high electric fields, the organic molecules polarize and react on the electrode surface, forming carbon films. The aim of this work was to obtain DLC films onto Ti6Al4V substrate using as electrolyte: acetonitrile (ACN) and N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF). The films were characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Raman spectroscopy, potentiodynamic polarization and wear tests. The results show that these films can improve, significantly, the corrosion resistance of titanium and its alloys and their wear resistance.

  13. Composition and morphology of metal-containing diamond-like carbon films obtained by reactive magnetron sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corbella, C. [FEMAN Group, Departament de Fisica Aplicada i Optica, Universitat de Barcelona, Av. Diagonal 647, E08028 Barcelona (Spain)]. E-mail: corbella@ub.edu; Pascual, E. [FEMAN Group, Departament de Fisica Aplicada i Optica, Universitat de Barcelona, Av. Diagonal 647, E08028 Barcelona (Spain); Oncins, G. [Serveis Cientificotecnics, Universitat de Barcelona, PCB, c/ Josep Samitier 1-5, E08028 Barcelona (Spain); Canal, C. [Departamento de Tecnologia de Tensioactivos IQAB-CSIC, c/ Jordi Girona 18-26, E08034 Barcelona (Spain); Andujar, J.L. [FEMAN Group, Departament de Fisica Aplicada i Optica, Universitat de Barcelona, Av. Diagonal 647, E08028 Barcelona (Spain); Bertran, E. [FEMAN Group, Departament de Fisica Aplicada i Optica, Universitat de Barcelona, Av. Diagonal 647, E08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2005-06-22

    The addition of metal atoms within the matrix of diamond-like carbon films leads to the improvement of their mechanical properties. The present paper discusses the relationship between the composition and morphology of metal-containing (W, Nb, Mo, Ti) diamond-like carbon thin films deposited at room temperature by reactive magnetron sputtering from a metal target in an argon and methane atmosphere. Composition was measured either by electron microprobe technique or by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and shows a smooth variation with relative methane flow. High relative methane flows lead to a bulk saturation of carbon atoms, which leads to a lack of homogeneity in the films as confirmed by secondary ion mass spectrometry. Cross-section micrographs were observed by transmission electron microscopy and revealed a structure strongly influenced by the metal inserted and its abundance. The surface pattern obtained by scanning electrochemical potential microscopy provided the metallicity distribution. These measurements were completed with atomic force microscopy of the surface. Selected area electron diffraction and X-ray diffraction measurements provided data of the crystalline structure along with nano-crystallite size. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy provided images of these crystallites.

  14. Diamond growth in mantle fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bureau, Hélène; Frost, Daniel J.; Bolfan-Casanova, Nathalie; Leroy, Clémence; Esteve, Imène; Cordier, Patrick

    2016-11-01

    In the upper mantle, diamonds can potentially grow from various forms of media (solid, gas, fluid) with a range of compositions (e.g. graphite, C-O-H fluids, silicate or carbonate melts). Inclusions trapped in diamonds are one of the few diagnostic tools that can constrain diamond growth conditions in the Earth's mantle. In this study, inclusion-bearing diamonds have been synthesized to understand the growth conditions of natural diamonds in the upper mantle. Diamonds containing syngenetic inclusions were synthesized in multi-anvil presses employing starting mixtures of carbonates, and silicate compositions in the presence of pure water and saline fluids (H2O-NaCl). Experiments were performed at conditions compatible with the Earth's geotherm (7 GPa, 1300-1400 °C). Results show that within the timescale of the experiments (6 to 30 h) diamond growth occurs if water and carbonates are present in the fluid phase. Water promotes faster diamond growth (up to 14 mm/year at 1400 °C, 7 GPa, 10 g/l NaCl), which is favorable to the inclusion trapping process. At 7 GPa, temperature and fluid composition are the main factors controlling diamond growth. In these experiments, diamonds grew in the presence of two fluids: an aqueous fluid and a hydrous silicate melt. The carbon source for diamond growth must be carbonate (CO32) dissolved in the melt or carbon dioxide species in the aqueous fluid (CO2aq). The presence of NaCl affects the growth kinetics but is not a prerequisite for inclusion-bearing diamond formation. The presence of small discrete or isolated volumes of water-rich fluids is necessary to grow inclusion-bearing peridotitic, eclogitic, fibrous, cloudy and coated diamonds, and may also be involved in the growth of ultradeep, ultrahigh-pressure metamorphic diamonds.

  15. Metal/Diamond Composite Thin-Film Electrodes: New Carbon Supported Catalytic Electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greg M. Swain, PI

    2009-03-10

    The DOE-funded research conducted by the Swain group was focused on (i) understanding structure-function relationships at boron-doped diamond thin-film electrodes, (ii) understanding metal phase formation on diamond thin films and developing electrochemical approaches for producing highly dispersed electrocatalyst particles (e.g., Pt) of small nominal particle size, (iii) studying the electrochemical activity of the electrocatalytic electrodes for hydrogen oxidation and oxygen reduction and (iv) conducting the initial synthesis of high surface area diamond powders and evaluating their electrical and electrochemical properties when mixed with a Teflon binder. (Note: All potentials are reported versus Ag/AgCl (sat'd KCl) and cm{sup 2} refers to the electrode geometric area, unless otherwise stated).

  16. Copper-Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes and Copper-Diamond Composites for Advanced Rocket Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Biliyar N.; Ellis, Dave L.; Smelyanskiy, Vadim; Foygel, Michael; Rape, Aaron; Singh, Jogender; Vohra, Yogesh K.; Thomas, Vinoy; Otte, Kyle G.; Li, Deyu

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on the research effort to improve the thermal conductivity of the copper-based alloy NARloy-Z (Cu-3 wt.%Ag-0.5 wt.% Zr), the state-of-the-art alloy used to make combustion chamber liners in regeneratively-cooled liquid rocket engines, using nanotechnology. The approach was to embed high thermal conductivity multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and diamond (D) particles in the NARloy-Z matrix using powder metallurgy techniques. The thermal conductivity of MWCNTs and D have been reported to be 5 to 10 times that of NARloy-Z. Hence, 10 to 20 vol. % MWCNT finely dispersed in NARloy-Z matrix could nearly double the thermal conductivity, provided there is a good thermal bond between MWCNTs and copper matrix. Quantum mechanics-based modeling showed that zirconium (Zr) in NARloy-Z should form ZrC at the MWCNT-Cu interface and provide a good thermal bond. In this study, NARloy-Z powder was blended with MWCNTs in a ball mill, and the resulting mixture was consolidated under high pressure and temperature using Field Assisted Sintering Technology (FAST). Microstructural analysis showed that the MWCNTs, which were provided as tangles of MWCNTs by the manufacturer, did not detangle well during blending and formed clumps at the prior particle boundaries. The composites made form these powders showed lower thermal conductivity than the base NARloy-Z. To eliminate the observed physical agglomeration, tangled multiwall MWCNTs were separated by acid treatment and electroless plated with a thin layer of chromium to keep them separated during further processing. Separately, the thermal conductivities of MWCNTs used in this work were measured, and the results showed very low values, a major factor in the low thermal conductivity of the composite. On the other hand, D particles embedded in NARloy-Z matrix showed much improved thermal conductivity. Elemental analysis showed migration of Zr to the NARloy-Z-D interface to form ZrC, which appeared to provide a low contact

  17. Copper Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes and Copper-Diamond Composites for Advanced Rocket Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Biliyar N.; Ellis, Dave L.; Smelyanskiy, Vadim; Foygel, Michael; Singh, Jogender; Rape, Aaron; Vohra, Yogesh; Thomas, Vinoy; Li, Deyu; Otte, Kyle

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on the research effort to improve the thermal conductivity of the copper-based alloy NARloy-Z (Cu-3 wt.%Ag-0.5 wt.% Zr), the state-of-the-art alloy used to make combustion chamber liners in regeneratively-cooled liquid rocket engines, using nanotechnology. The approach was to embed high thermal conductivity multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and diamond (D) particles in the NARloy-Z matrix using powder metallurgy techniques. The thermal conductivity of MWCNTs and D have been reported to be 5 to 10 times that of NARloy-Z. Hence, 10 to 20 vol. % MWCNT finely dispersed in NARloy-Z matrix could nearly double the thermal conductivity, provided there is a good thermal bond between MWCNTs and copper matrix. Quantum mechanics-based modeling showed that zirconium (Zr) in NARloy-Z should form ZrC at the MWCNT-Cu interface and provide a good thermal bond. In this study, NARloy-Z powder was blended with MWCNTs in a ball mill, and the resulting mixture was consolidated under high pressure and temperature using Field Assisted Sintering Technology (FAST). Microstructural analysis showed that the MWCNTs, which were provided as tangles of MWCNTs by the manufacturer, did not detangle well during blending and formed clumps at the prior particle boundaries. The composites made form these powders showed lower thermal conductivity than the base NARloy-Z. To eliminate the observed physical agglomeration, tangled multiwall MWCNTs were separated by acid treatment and electroless plated with a thin layer of chromium to keep them separated during further processing. Separately, the thermal conductivities of MWCNTs used in this work were measured, and the results showed very low values, a major factor in the low thermal conductivity of the composite. On the other hand, D particles embedded in NARloy-Z matrix showed much improved thermal conductivity. Elemental analysis showed migration of Zr to the NARloy-Z-D interface to form ZrC, which appeared to provide a low contact

  18. Gas Permeation, Mechanical Behavior and Cytocompatibility of Ultrathin Pure and Doped Diamond-Like Carbon and Silicon Oxide Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juergen M. Lackner

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Protective ultra-thin barrier films gather increasing economic interest for controlling permeation and diffusion from the biological surrounding in implanted sensor and electronic devices in future medicine. Thus, the aim of this work was a benchmarking of the mechanical oxygen permeation barrier, cytocompatibility, and microbiological properties of inorganic ~25 nm thin films, deposited by vacuum deposition techniques on 50 µm thin polyetheretherketone (PEEK foils. Plasma-activated chemical vapor deposition (direct deposition from an ion source was applied to deposit pure and nitrogen doped diamond-like carbon films, while physical vapor deposition (magnetron sputtering in pulsed DC mode was used for the formation of silicon as well as titanium doped diamond-like carbon films. Silicon oxide films were deposited by radio frequency magnetron sputtering. The results indicate a strong influence of nanoporosity on the oxygen transmission rate for all coating types, while the low content of microporosity (particulates, etc. is shown to be of lesser importance. Due to the low thickness of the foil substrates, being easily bent, the toughness as a measure of tendency to film fracture together with the elasticity index of the thin films influence the oxygen barrier. All investigated coatings are non-pyrogenic, cause no cytotoxic effects and do not influence bacterial growth.

  19. Development of a radio frequency atmospheric pressure plasma jet for diamond-like carbon coatings on stainless steel substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohbatzadeh, F.; Samadi, O.; Siadati, S. N.; Etaati, G. R.; Asadi, E.; Safari, R.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, an atmospheric pressure plasma jet with capacitively coupled radio frequency discharge was developed for diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings on stainless steel substrates. The plasma jet was generated by argon-methane mixture and its physical parameters were investigated. Relation between the plasma jet length and width of the powered electrode was discussed. Optical and electrical characteristics were studied by optical emission spectroscopy, voltage and current probes, respectively. The evolutions of various species like ArI, C2 and CH along the jet axis were investigated. Electron temperature and density were estimated by Boltzmann plot method and Saha-Boltzmann equation, respectively. Finally, a diamond-like carbon coating was deposited on stainless steel-304 substrates by the atmospheric pressure radio frequency plasma jet in ambient air. Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy and Vickers hardness test were used to study the deposited films. The length of the jet was increased by increasing the width of the powered electrode. The estimated electron temperature and density were 1.43 eV and 1.39 × 1015 cm-3, respectively. Averaged Vicker's hardness of the coated sample was three times greater than that of the substrate. The SEM images of the deposited thin films revealed a 4.5 μm DLC coated for 20 min.

  20. Laser plasma ion implantation and deposition of platinum for SiC-based hydrogen detector fabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fominski, V. Yu., E-mail: vyfominskij@mephi.ru [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI, Kashirskoe sh., 31, Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation); Grigoriev, S.N. [Moscow State University of Technology STANKIN, Vadkovskii per., 3a, Moscow 127005 (Russian Federation); Romanov, R.I. [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI, Kashirskoe sh., 31, Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation); Gnedovets, A.G. [Baikov Institute of Metallurgy and Materials Science, Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninsky Prospect 49, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Chernykh, P.N. [Lomonosov Moscow State University Scobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1(2) Leninskie Gory, GSP-1, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: •Pt ion implantation and film deposition were carried out using pulsed laser plume. •Experimental diagnostics and modeling of Pt ion implantation in SiC were performed. •Mechanism of Pt depth distribution in SiC substrate was determined. •Layered structure of Pt on Pt-doped SiC crystal was used to detect hydrogen at 500 °C. •The response of sensor to hydrogen was pronounced and stable after long-term tests. -- Abstract: A pulsed plasma plume obtained by pulsed laser irradiation of a Pt target was used to fabricate a hydrogen sensor on a 6H–SiC single crystal by means of ion implantation followed by thin film deposition. To realize the ion implantation, high voltage pulses with positive polarity were applied to the Pt target when the laser plasma expanded from the target to the SiC substrate. Experimental diagnostics of pulsed ion beams extracted from laser-produced plasma were performed and the structure of the SiC crystal after high-temperature (500 °C) ion implantation was studied by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy of {sup 4}He{sup +} ions. At the same time, a one-dimensional model of the plasma movement in a pulsed electric field was developed and simulations were carried out using the particle-in-cell method. Modeling allowed determination of the ion energy distribution depending on the delay time of the high voltage pulse after the laser pulse. The calculated energy distribution of Pt ions was used to predict the depth profile of implanted Pt ions in the SiC substrate. The predicted profile agreed sufficiently well with the experimentally measured depth distribution of Pt in the SiC substrate. To characterize the fabricated SiC sensor, the current flow through a barrier structure was studied. The volt–ampere characteristics of the structure were measured in air and in a mixture of air and hydrogen (2%) at a temperature of 500 °C. The characteristic value of the change in voltage exceeded 2 V at the bias current of 1 mA when

  1. Surface engineering of a Zr-based bulk metallic glass with low energy Ar- or Ca-ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Lu; Zhu, Chao [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-2100 (United States); Muntele, Claudiu I. [Center for Irradiation Materials, Alabama A and M University, P. O. Box 1447, Normal, AL 35762 (United States); Zhang, Tao [Key Laboratory of Aerospace Materials and Performance (Ministry of Education), School of Materials Science and Engineering, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Liaw, Peter K. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-2100 (United States); He, Wei, E-mail: whe5@utk.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-2100 (United States); Department of Mechanical, Aerospace and Biomedical Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-2210 (United States)

    2015-02-01

    In the present study, low energy ion implantation was employed to engineer the surface of a Zr-based bulk metallic glass (BMG), aiming at improving the biocompatibility and imparting bioactivity to the surface. Ca- or Ar-ions were implanted at 10 or 50 keV at a fluence of 8 × 10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2} to (Zr{sub 0.55}Al{sub 0.10}Ni{sub 0.05}Cu{sub 0.30}){sub 99}Y{sub 1} (at.%) BMG. The effects of ion implantation on material properties and subsequent cellular responses were investigated. Both Ar- and Ca-ion implantations were suggested to induce atom displacements on the surfaces according to the Monte-Carlo simulation. The change of atomic environment of Zr in the surface regions as implied by the alteration in X-ray absorption measurements at Zr K-edge. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed that the ion implantation process has modified the surface chemical compositions and indicated the presence of Ca after Ca-ion implantation. The surface nanohardness has been enhanced by implantation of either ion species, with Ca-ion implantation showing more prominent effect. The BMG surfaces were altered to be more hydrophobic after ion implantation, which can be attributed to the reduced amount of hydroxyl groups on the implanted surfaces. Higher numbers of adherent cells were found on Ar- and Ca-ion implanted samples, while more pronounced cell adhesion was observed on Ca-ion implanted substrates. The low energy ion implantation resulted in concurrent modifications in atomic structure, nanohardness, surface chemistry, hydrophobicity, and cell behavior on the surface of the Zr-based BMG, which were proposed to be mutually correlated with each other. - Highlights: • Low energy ion implantation of a Zr-based BMG for bone implant applications • Concurrent modifications in surface structure and properties after irradiation • Promoted adhesion of bone-forming cells after Ar- or Ca-ion implantation.

  2. Passive Q-switching of diode-pumped Yb:YAG microchip laser with ion-implanted GaAs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yonggang Wang(王勇刚); Xiaoyu Ma(马骁宇); Bin Zhong(钟斌); Desong Wang(王德松); Qiulin Zhang(张秋琳); Baohua Feng(冯宝华)

    2004-01-01

    We reported a passive Q-switched diode laser pumped Yb:YAG microchip laser with an ion-implanted semiinsulating GaAs wafer. The wafer was implanted with 400-kev As+ in the concentration of 1016 ions/cm2.To decrease the non-saturable loss, we annealed the ion-implanted GaAs at 500 ℃ for 5 minutes and coated both sides of the ion-implanted GaAs with antireflection (AR) and high reflection (HR) films,respectively. Using GaAs wafer as an absorber and an output coupler, we obtained 52-ns pulse duration of single pulse.

  3. Effect of ion-implantation enhanced intermixing on luminescence of InAs/InP quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Q.; Barik, S.; Tan, H. H.; Jagadish, C.

    2008-10-01

    Temperature dependent photoluminescence spectra of ion implanted InAs/InP quantum dots (QDs) followed by rapid thermal annealing were studied. By employing a recently developed luminescence model for localized states ensemble, the broadening of the distribution of the localized QD states was determined from the fitting to the luminescence peak energy positions. The broadening of the distribution of the localized QD states reduces due to ion-implantation enhanced intermixing. The contribution of carrier distribution within the localized QD states to the luminescence linewidth decreases after ion-implantation enhanced intermixing. The effect of doses and types of ions used for implantation were also investigated.

  4. Effect of ion-implantation enhanced intermixing on luminescence of InAs/InP quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Q; Barik, S; Tan, H H; Jagadish, C [Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra 0200 (Australia)], E-mail: qing.li@anu.edu.au

    2008-10-21

    Temperature dependent photoluminescence spectra of ion implanted InAs/InP quantum dots (QDs) followed by rapid thermal annealing were studied. By employing a recently developed luminescence model for localized states ensemble, the broadening of the distribution of the localized QD states was determined from the fitting to the luminescence peak energy positions. The broadening of the distribution of the localized QD states reduces due to ion-implantation enhanced intermixing. The contribution of carrier distribution within the localized QD states to the luminescence linewidth decreases after ion-implantation enhanced intermixing. The effect of doses and types of ions used for implantation were also investigated.

  5. Ca(Ti,Si)O3 Diamond Inclusions Crystallized From Carbonate Melts in the Transition Zone: Experimental Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, L. S.; Walter, M. J.; Keshav, S.; Bulanova, G.; Pickles, J.; Lord, O. T.; Lennie, A.

    2007-12-01

    Composite diamond inclusions consisting of coexisting endmember CaSiO3 and CaTiO3 are rare but occur in diamond populations from Juina, Brazil1-2. Phase relations show that above ~9 GPa (at 1500 K) a perovskite-structured solid solution exists between these endmembers, while at lower pressures intermediate compositions produce coexisting CaTiO3-perovskite and CaSiO3 in the walstromite structure3. Inclusions with `perovskite' stoichiometry are commonly interpreted as fragments of solid mantle from the transition zone or lower mantle4-6. Here we report on two composite diamond inclusions from Juina kimberlite, and can effectively eliminate a subsolidus origin on the basis of experimental mineral phase relations. Instead, based on new melting experiments we find that the inclusions most likely crystallized directly from Ca-rich carbonate melts. Like other workers1-2 we interpret the composite inclusions as exsolution products of a high-pressure Ca(Ti,Si)O3 perovskite stable in the transition zone. Our bulk inclusion compositions are estimated to contain 50- 65 mol% CaTiO3, and are remarkably low in MgSiO3 component at less than 0.2 mol%. Experiments have shown that in peridotite or eclogite lithologies, Ca-rich perovskite in equilibrium with an MgSiO3-phase (majorite or Mg-perovskite) have about 3 to 7 mol% MgSiO37-8. Here we report on new subsolidus laser-heated diamond anvil cell experiments at 20-50 GPa in the ternary system CaSiO3-CaTiO3-MgSiO3 that bracket the CaTi-rich limb of the solvus between Ca- and Mg-rich perovskites. All experiments were made at 2000 (±200) K for 45-75 min, and were analysed using synchrotron micro-focus X-ray diffraction. We find that the solubility of MgSiO3 in CaTi-perovskite solid solutions increases significantly with increasing CaTiO3 component. Thus, Ti-rich calcium perovskite in peridotite or eclogite lithologies should have very high, not exceptionally low, MgSiO3 component. Accordingly, a subsolidus paragenesis is unlikely for

  6. Characteristics of Nitrogen Doped Diamond-Like Carbon Films Prepared by Unbalanced Magnetron Sputtering for Electronic Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jaehyeong; Choi, Byung Hui; Yun, Jung-Hyun; Park, Yong Seob

    2016-05-01

    Synthetic diamond-like carbon (DLC) is a carbon-based material used mainly in cutting tool coatings and as an abrasive material. The market for DLC has expanded into electronics, optics, and acoustics because of its distinct electrical and optical properties. In this work, n-doped DLC (N:DLC) films were deposited on p-type silicon substrates using an unbalanced magnetron sputtering (UBMS) method. We investigated the effect of the working pressure on the microstructure and electrical properties of n-doped DLC films. The structural properties of N:DLC films were investigated by Raman spectroscopy and SEM-EDX, and the electrical properties of films were investigated by observing the changes in the resistivity and current-voltage (I-V) properties. The N:DLC films prepared by UBMS in this study demonstrated good conducting and physical properties with n-doping.

  7. Structural characteristics of surface-functionalized nitrogen-doped diamond-like carbon films and effective adjustment to cell attachment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ai-Ping; Liu, Min; Yu, Jian-Can; Qian, Guo-Dong; Tang, Wei-Hua

    2015-05-01

    Nitrogen-doped diamond-like carbon (DLC:N) films prepared by the filtered cathodic vacuum arc technology are functionalized with various chemical molecules including dopamine (DA), 3-Aminobenzeneboronic acid (APBA), and adenosine triphosphate (ATP), and the impacts of surface functionalities on the surface morphologies, compositions, microstructures, and cell compatibility of the DLC:N films are systematically investigated. We demonstrate that the surface groups of DLC:N have a significant effect on the surface and structural properties of the film. The activity of PC12 cells depends on the particular type of surface functional groups of DLC:N films regardless of surface roughness and wettability. Our research offers a novel way for designing functionalized carbon films as tailorable substrates for biosensors and biomedical engineering applications. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51272237, 51272231, and 51010002) and the China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (Grant Nos. 2012M520063, 2013T60587, and Bsh1201016).

  8. Simulation two-beam high-dose ion implantation in solid-state targets

    CERN Document Server

    Komarov, A F

    2001-01-01

    The physicomathematical model and the program on the BEAM2HD dynamic modeling make it possible to model the process of the single- or two-beam high-dose ion implantation into the multilayer and multicomponent targets, is developed. The number of layer thereby does not exceed three and the number of various types of atoms in each layer does not exceed seven. The modeling is realized through the Monte-Carlo method. The numerical results of the work on formation of the C sub x sub-> sub 3 N sub y sub-> sub 4 supersolid layers through the nitrogen two-beam high-dose ion implantation into the Si sub 3 N sub 4 /C/Si sub 3 N sub 4 /Si multilayer system are presented

  9. Measurement of lattice damage caused by ion-implantation doping of semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunsperger, R. G.; Wolf, E. D.; Shifrin, G. A.; Marsh, O. J.; Jamba, D. M.

    1971-01-01

    Discussion of two new techniques used to measure the lattice damage produced in GaAs by the implantation of 60 keV cadmium ions. In the first method, optical reflection spectra of the ion-implanted samples were measured in the wavelength range from 2000 to 4600 A. The decrease in reflectivity resulting from ion-implantation was used to determine the relative amount of lattice damage as a function of ion dose. The second technique employed the scanning electron microscope. Patterns very similar in appearance to Kikuchi electron diffraction patterns are obtained when the secondary and/or backscattered electron intensity is displayed as a function of the angle of incidence of the electron beam on a single crystal surface. The results of measurements made by both methods are compared with each other and with data obtained by the method of measuring lattice damage by Rutherford scattering of 1 MeV helium ions.

  10. Nanomechanical and Corrosion Properties of ZK60 Magnesium Alloy Improved by GD Ion Implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Xue Wei; Wang, Zhang Zhong; Zhang, Xiao Bo; Ba, Zhi Xin; Wang, Ya Mei

    2014-09-01

    Gadolinium (Gd) ion implantation with doses from 2.5 × 1016 to 1 × 1017 ions/cm2 into ZK60 magnesium alloy was carried out to improve its surface properties. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), nanoindenter, electrochemical workstation and scanning electron microscope (SEM) were applied to analyze the chemical composition, nanomechanical properties and corrosion characteristics of the implanted layer. The results indicate that Gd ion implantation produces a hybrid-structure protective layer composed of MgO, Gd2O3 and metallic Gd in ZK60 magnesium alloy. The surface hardness and modulus of the Gd implanted magnesium alloy are improved by about 300% and 100%, respectively with the dose of 1 × 1017 ions/cm2, while the slowest corrosion rate of the magnesium alloy in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution is obtained with the dose of 5 × 1016 ions/cm2.

  11. Understanding and engineering of NiGe/Ge junction formed by phosphorus ion implantation after germanidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oka, Hiroshi, E-mail: oka@asf.mls.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp; Minoura, Yuya; Hosoi, Takuji; Shimura, Takayoshi; Watanabe, Heiji [Department of Material and Life Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2014-08-11

    Modulation of the effective electron Schottky barrier height (eSBH) of NiGe/Ge contacts induced by phosphorus ion implantation after germanide formation was investigated by considering local inhomogeneity in the eSBH. Systematic studies of NiGe/Ge contact devices having various germanide thicknesses and ion implantation areas indicated the threshold dopant concentration at the NiGe/Ge interface required for eSBH modulation and negligible dopant diffusion even at NiGe/Ge interface during drive-in annealing, leading to variation in the eSBH between the bottom and sidewall portions of the NiGe regions. Consequently, this method makes it possible to design source/drain contacts with low-resistivity Ohmic and ideal rectifying characteristics for future Ge-based transistors.

  12. An All Solid-State Pulsed Power Generator for Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation (PⅢ)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Kefu; QIU Jian; WU Yifan

    2009-01-01

    An all solid-state pulsed power generator for plasma immersion ion implantation (PⅢ) is described. The pulsed power system is based on a Marx circuit configuration and semi-conductor switches, which have many advantages in adjustable repetition frequency, pulse width modulation and long serving life compared with the conventional circuit category, tube-based technologies such as gridded vacuum tubes, thyratrons, pulse forming networks and transformers.The operation of PⅢ with pulse repetition frequencies up to 500 Hz has been achieved at a pulse voltage amplitude from 2 kV to 60 kV, with an adjustable pulse duration from 1 μs to 100 μs.The proposed system and its performance, as used to drive a plasma ion implantation chamber,axe described in detail on the basis of the experimental results.

  13. N{sup +} surface doping on nanoscale polymer fabrics via ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho Wong, Kenneth Kar [Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Western Ontario, London, Ont., N6A 3K7 (Canada)]. E-mail: khwong@uwo.ca; Zinke-Allmang, Martin [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, London, Ont., N6A 3K7 (Canada); Wan Wankei [Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, University of Western Ontario, London, Ont., N6A 3K7 (Canada); Graduate Program in Biomedical Engineering, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ont., N6A 3K7 (Canada)

    2006-08-15

    Non-woven poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) fabrics composed of small diameter ({approx}110 nm) fibers have been spun by an electrospinning technique and then have been modified by ion implantation. 1.7 MeV N{sup +} ion implantation with a dose of 1.2 x 10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2} was applied on the fabrics through a metal foil at room temperature. By using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), no surface morphology degradation has been observed on the fabric after the ion beam treatment. The diameter of the fibers has shrunk by 30% to about 74 nm. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) show that nitrogen surface doping was achieved and the formation of two new functional chemical groups (N-C=O and C-N) in the PVA is observed.

  14. Blistering and cracking of LiTaO{sub 3} single crystal under helium ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Changdong; Lu, Fei; Ma, Yujie [Shandong University, School of Information Science and Engineering, Jinan, Shandong (China)

    2014-11-29

    Blistering and cracking in LiTaO{sub 3} surface are investigated after 200-keV helium ion implantation and subsequent post-implantation annealing. Rutherford backscattering/channeling is used to examine the lattice damage caused by ion implantation. Blistering is observed through optical microscopy in a dynamic heating process. Atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy measurements are used to detect the LiTaO{sub 3} surface morphology. Experimental results show that blistering and flaking are dependent on implantation fluence, beam current, and also annealing temperature. We speculate that the surface cracking of He{sup +}-implanted LiTaO{sub 3} results from the implantation-induced stress and compression. (orig.)

  15. Automated Array Assembly, Phase 2. [making ion implanted and furnace annealed solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daiello, R. V.

    1979-01-01

    The large scale production of silicon solar cell array panels is discussed. The cost and performance of three manufacturing sequences designed to convert silicon sheet and wafers into solar panels is analyzed. The production of ion implanted and furnace annealed solar cells made using solar grade n- and p-type wafers is examined. The performance of production size lots is examined with regard to the relationship between the ion implant and furnace anneal parameters and the ability to form consistently good thick film screen printed contacts. The spray on antireflection coating process is evaluated. The performance of several lots of cells before and after coating is measured. The structure and refractive index of the RCA I (TiO2) coating is compared with commercial solutions. Sensitivity of coated, screen printed cells to the post heat treatment required to cure the films is assessed.

  16. Synthesis and characterisation of ion-implanted epoxy composites for X-ray shielding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noor Azman, N.Z. [Department of Imaging and Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Curtin University, GPO Box U1987, Perth, WA 6845 (Australia); School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 Penang (Malaysia); Siddiqui, S.A. [Department of Imaging and Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Curtin University, GPO Box U1987, Perth, WA 6845 (Australia); Ionescu, M. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), Lucas Heights, NSW 2234 (Australia); Low, I.M., E-mail: j.low@curtin.edu.au [Department of Imaging and Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Curtin University, GPO Box U1987, Perth, WA 6845 (Australia)

    2012-09-15

    The epoxy samples were implanted with heavy ions such as tungsten (W), gold (Au) and lead (Pb) to investigate the attenuation characteristics of these composites. Near-surface composition depth profiling of ion-implanted epoxy systems was studied using Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy (RBS). The effect of implanted ions on the X-ray attenuation was studied with a general diagnostic X-ray machine with X-ray tube voltages from 40 to 100 kV at constant exposure 10 mAs. Results show that the threshold of implanted ions above which X-ray mass attenuation coefficient, {mu}{sub m} of the ion-implanted epoxy composite is distinguishably higher than the {mu}{sub m} of the pure epoxy sample is different for W, Au and Pb.

  17. Influence of Temperature on Nitrogen Ion Implantation of Ti6Al4V Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In order to achieve increased layer thickness, and wearing resistance, enhanced ion implantation with nitrogen has been carried out at temperatures of 100, 200, 400, and 600℃ with a dose of 4× 1018 ions. cm-2. Using the Plasma Source Ion Implantation (PSⅡ) device, specimens of Ti6Al4V alloy were implanted at elevated temperatures, using the ion flux as the heating source. Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), X-ray Diffraction (XRD), micro-hardness measurements and pin-on-disk wearing tester were utilized to evaluate the surface property improvements. The thickness of the implanted layer increased by about an order of magnitude when the temperature was elevated from 100 to 600℃. Higher surface hardness and wearing resistance was also obtained in implantation under higher temperature. XRD image showed the presence of titanium nitrides on the implanted surface.

  18. Analysis of Accumulating Ability of Heavy Metals in Lotus (Nelumbo nucifera) Improved by Ion Implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianhua; Wang, Naiyan; Zhang, Fengshou

    2012-05-01

    Heavy metals have seriously contaminated soil and water, and done harm to public health. Academician WANG Naiyan proposed that ion-implantation technique should be exploited for environmental bioremediation by mutating and breeding plants or microbes. By implanting N+ into Taikonglian No.1, we have selected and bred two lotus cultivars, Jingguang No.1 and Jingguang No.2. The present study aims at analyzing the feasibility that irradiation can be used for remediation of soil and water from heavy metals. Compared with parent Taikonglian No.1, the uptaking and accumulating ability of heavy metals in two mutated cultivars was obviously improved. So ion implantation technique can indeed be used in bioremediation of heavy metals in soil and water, but it is hard to select and breed a cultivar which can remedy the soil and water from all the heavy metals.

  19. n{sup +}/p diodes by ion implantation: Dopant, extended defects, and impurity concerns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, M.; Venables, D.; Christensen, K.N.; Maher, D.M. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

    1995-08-01

    The present study is concerned with the formation of defect structures resulting from phosphorus ion implantation into p-type, <100> silicon and with the rearrangement as well as removal of defect structures following high temperature annealing. The problematic interaction of background impurities with extended defects also is included in this study, as are the non-illuminated and illuminated electrical characteristics of n+/p diodes that are fabricated using ion implantation. Wafers and diodes that are fabricated using a phosphorus planar diffusion technique are run in parallel and serve as the controls. In this contribution, preliminary results for the cases of a 50 keV implant followed by an anneal at 900{degrees}C/30 min and a diffusion at 825{degrees}C/60 min are summarized.

  20. DLTS of low-energy hydrogen ion implanted n-Si

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deenapanray, P.N.K

    2003-12-31

    We have used deep level transient spectroscopy and capacitance-voltage measurements to study the influence of low-energy hydrogen ion implantation on the creation of defects in n-Si. In particular, we have studied the ion fluence dependence of the free carrier compensation at room temperature, and we have measured the generation of VO-H complex and VP-pair in ion implanted samples. The 7.5 keV H ions created defects in the top 0.3 {mu}m of samples, which resulted in carrier compensation to depths exceeding 1 {mu}m. This effect is not due to defects created by ion channeling but is rather due to the migration of defects as demonstrated using binary collision code MARLOWE.

  1. DLTS of low-energy hydrogen ion implanted n-Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deenapanray, Prakash N. K.

    2003-12-01

    We have used deep level transient spectroscopy and capacitance-voltage measurements to study the influence of low-energy hydrogen ion implantation on the creation of defects in n-Si. In particular, we have studied the ion fluence dependence of the free carrier compensation at room temperature, and we have measured the generation of VO-H complex and VP-pair in ion implanted samples. The 7.5 keV H ions created defects in the top 0.3 μm of samples, which resulted in carrier compensation to depths exceeding 1 μm. This effect is not due to defects created by ion channeling but is rather due to the migration of defects as demonstrated using binary collision code MARLOWE.

  2. Tunnel oxide passivated contacts formed by ion implantation for applications in silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichel, Christian; Feldmann, Frank; Müller, Ralph; Reedy, Robert C.; Lee, Benjamin G.; Young, David L.; Stradins, Paul; Hermle, Martin; Glunz, Stefan W.

    2015-11-01

    Passivated contacts (poly-Si/SiOx/c-Si) doped by shallow ion implantation are an appealing technology for high efficiency silicon solar cells, especially for interdigitated back contact (IBC) solar cells where a masked ion implantation facilitates their fabrication. This paper presents a study on tunnel oxide passivated contacts formed by low-energy ion implantation into amorphous silicon (a-Si) layers and examines the influence of the ion species (P, B, or BF2), the ion implantation dose (5 × 1014 cm-2 to 1 × 1016 cm-2), and the subsequent high-temperature anneal (800 °C or 900 °C) on the passivation quality and junction characteristics using double-sided contacted silicon solar cells. Excellent passivation quality is achieved for n-type passivated contacts by P implantations into either intrinsic (undoped) or in-situ B-doped a-Si layers with implied open-circuit voltages (iVoc) of 725 and 720 mV, respectively. For p-type passivated contacts, BF2 implantations into intrinsic a-Si yield well passivated contacts and allow for iVoc of 690 mV, whereas implanted B gives poor passivation with iVoc of only 640 mV. While solar cells featuring in-situ B-doped selective hole contacts and selective electron contacts with P implanted into intrinsic a-Si layers achieved Voc of 690 mV and fill factor (FF) of 79.1%, selective hole contacts realized by BF2 implantation into intrinsic a-Si suffer from drastically reduced FF which is caused by a non-Ohmic Schottky contact. Finally, implanting P into in-situ B-doped a-Si layers for the purpose of overcompensation (counterdoping) allowed for solar cells with Voc of 680 mV and FF of 80.4%, providing a simplified and promising fabrication process for IBC solar cells featuring passivated contacts.

  3. Variable-temperature sample system for ion implantation at -192 to +500/sup 0/C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuller, C.T.

    1978-04-01

    A variable-temperature sample system based on exchange-gas coupling was developed for ion-implantation use. The sample temperature can be controlled from -192/sup 0/C to +500/sup 0/C with rapid cooling. The system also has provisions for focusing and alignment of the ion beam, electron suppression, temperature monitoring, sample current measuring, and cryo-shielding. Design considerations and operating characteristics are discussed. 5 figures.

  4. Some features of ion mixing during simultaneous ion implantation and deposition of metallic coatings

    CERN Document Server

    Pogrebnyak, A D; Mikhalev, A D; Shablya, V T; Yanovskij, V P

    2001-01-01

    The results on the Ta, Cu ions implantation into the aluminium substrate by simultaneous deposition of these ions in the form of coatings are presented. The complex structure of these coatings from the given elements in the substrate, as well as the increase in the microhardness, adhesion and corrosion resistance growth are determined. It is shown on the basis of the results of the secondary ions energy distribution, that intermetallic phases are formed in the substrate surface layer

  5. Capacitance of High-Voltage Coaxial Cable in Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) is an excellent technique for the surface modification of complex-shaped components. Owing to pulsed operation mode of the high voltage and large slew rate, the capacitance on the high-voltage coaxial cable can be detrimental to the processand cannot be ignored. In fact, a significant portion of the rise-time/fall-time of the implantation voltage pulse and big initial current can be attributed to the coaxial cable.

  6. Conductivity kinetics and conductivity levels of ion implanted poly(paraphenylene) pellets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Huee, C. (LEPOFI, Faculte des Sciences, 87 Limoges (France)); Moreau, C. (LEPOFI, Faculte des Sciences, 87 Limoges (France)); Moliton, A. (LEPOFI, Faculte des Sciences, 87 Limoges (France)); Guille, B. (LEPOFI, Faculte des Sciences, 87 Limoges (France)); Froyer, G. (Lab OCM, CNET, 22 Lannion (France))

    1993-04-19

    We have studied the kinetics of the dc conductivity [sigma][sub dc] of PPP pellets after ion implantation versus implantation parameters (size of ions, current density, fluence). The main process occurs during the vacuum - open air transition: the higher the implantation parameters are, the larger the [sigma][sub dc] decrease is. Finally, the conductivity level is all the higher as the implanted ion is heavy. (orig.)

  7. Surface bioactivity of plasma implanted silicon and amorphous carbon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Paul K CHU

    2004-01-01

    Plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (PⅢ&D) has been shown to be an effective technique to enhance the surface bioactivity of materials. In this paper, recent progress made in our laboratory on plasma surface modification single-crystal silicon and amorphous carbon is reviewed. Silicon is the most important material in the integrated circuit industry but its surface biocompatibility has not been investigated in details. We have recently performed hydrogen PⅢ into silicon and observed the biomimetic growth of apatite on its surface in simulated body fluid. Diamond-like carbon (DLC) is widely used in the industry due to its excellent mechanical properties and chemical inertness. The use of this material in biomedical engineering has also attracted much attention. It has been observed in our laboratory that doping DLC with nitrogen by means of PⅢ can improve the surface blood compatibility. The properties as well as in vitro biological test results will be discussed in this article.

  8. p-Type Quasi-Mono Silicon Solar Cell Fabricated by Ion Implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Ming Lee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The p-type quasi-mono wafer is a novel type of silicon material that is processed using a seed directional solidification technique. This material is a promising alternative to traditional high-cost Czochralski (CZ and float-zone (FZ material. Here, we evaluate the application of an advanced solar cell process featuring a novel method of ion implantation on p-type quasi-mono silicon wafer. The ion implantation process has simplified the normal industrial process flow by eliminating two process steps: the removal of phosphosilicate glass (PSG and the junction isolation process that is required after the conventional thermal POCl3 diffusion process. Moreover, the good passivation performance of the ion implantation process improves Voc. Our results show that, after metallization and cofiring, an average cell efficiency of 18.55% can be achieved using 156 × 156 mm p-type quasi-mono silicon wafer. Furthermore, the absolute cell efficiency obtained using this method is 0.47% higher than that for the traditional POCl3 diffusion process.

  9. Study of Biological Effects of Low Energy Ion Implantation on Tomato and Radish Breeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Qiuxia; Huang, Qunce; Cao, Gangqiang; Ying, Fangqing; Liu, Yanbo; Huang, Wen

    2008-04-01

    Biological effects of 30 keV low energy nitrogen ion implantation on the seeds of five types of tomato and one type of radish were investigated. Results showed that low energy ions have different effects on different vegetables. The whole dose-response curve of the germination ratio did not take on "the shape of saddle", but was a rising and falling waveform with the increase or decrease in ion implantation. In the vegetable of Solanaceae, two outstanding aberrant plants were selected from M1 of Henan No.4 tomato at a dose of 7 × 1017 nitrogen ions/cm2, which had thin-leaves, long-petal and nipple tip fruit stably inherited to M7. Furthermore the analysis of the isozyme showed that the activity of the mutant tomato seedling was distinct in quantity and color. In Raphanus sativus L., the aberrances were obvious in the mutant of radish 791 at a dose of 5 × 1017 nitrogen ions/cm2, and the weight of succulent root and the volume of growth were over twice the control's. At present, many species for breeding have been identified in the field and only stable species have been selected for the experiment of production. It is evident that the low energy ion implantation technology has clear effects on vegetables' genetic improvement.

  10. Experimental study of dropwise condensation on plasma-ion implanted stainless steel tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bani Kananeh, A.; Rausch, M.H.; Froeba, A.P.; Leipertz, A. [Lehrstuhl fuer Technische Thermodynamik (LTT), Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Am Weichselgarten 8, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany)

    2006-12-15

    Plasma-ion implantation was used to achieve stable dropwise condensation of saturated steam on stainless steel tubes. For the investigation of the efficiency of plasma-ion implantation regarding the condensation process a condenser was constructed in order to measure the heat flux density q-dot and the heat transfer coefficient h{sub c} for the condensation of steam on the outside surface of a single horizontal tube. For tubes implanted with a nitrogen ion dose of 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2}, the heat transfer coefficient h{sub c} was found to be larger, by a factor of 3.2, in comparison to values theoretically calculated by the corrected Nusselt film theory. The heat flux density q-dot and the heat transfer coefficient h{sub c} were found to increase with increasing ion dose and steam pressure. The heat transfer coefficient decreases with increasing surface subcooling as it has been found in former work for dropwise condensation on ion implanted vertical plates. (author)

  11. The effects of ion implantation on the beaks of orthodontic pliers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizrahi, E.; Cleaton-Jones, P.E.; Luyckz, S.; Fatti, L.P. (University of the Witwatersrand (South Africa))

    1991-06-01

    The surface of stainless steel may be hardened by bombarding the material with a stream of nitrogen ions generated by a nuclear accelerator. In the present study this technique was used to determine the hardening effect of ion implantation on the beaks of stainless steel orthodontic pliers. Ten orthodontic pliers (Dentarum 003 094) were divided into two equal groups, designated control and experimental. The beaks of the experimental pliers were subjected to ion implantation, after which the tips of the beaks of all the pliers were stressed in an apparatus attached to an Instron testing machine. A cyclical load of 500 N was applied to the handles of the pliers, while a 0.9 mm (0.036 inch) round, stainless steel wire was held between the tips of the beaks. The effect of the stress was assessed by measurement with a traveling microscope of the gap produced between the tips of the beaks. Measurements were taken before loading and after 20, 40, 60, and 80 cycles. Statistical analysis of variance and the two-sample t tests indicated that there was a significant increase in the size of the gap as the pliers were stressed from 0 to 80 cycles (p less than 0.001). Furthermore, the mean gap was significantly greater in the control group than in the experimental group (p less than 0.001). This study suggests that ion implantation increases the hardness of the tips of the beaks of orthodontic pliers.

  12. From plasma immersion ion implantation to deposition: A historical perspective on principles and trends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anders, Andre

    2001-06-14

    Plasma immersion techniques of surface modification are known under a myriad of names. The family of techniques reaches from pure plasma ion implantation, to ion implantation and deposition hybrid modes, to modes that are essentially plasma film deposition with substrate bias. In the most general sense, all plasma immersion techniques have in common that the surface of a substrate (target) is exposed to plasma and that relatively high substrate bias is applied. The bias is usually pulsed. In this review, the roots of immersion techniques are explored, some going back to the 1800s, followed by a discussion of the groundbreaking works of Adler and Conrad in the 1980s. In the 1990s, plasma immersion techniques matured in theoretical understanding, scaling, and the range of applications. First commercial facilities are now operational. Various immersion concepts are compiled and explained in this review. While gas (often nitrogen) ion implantation dominated the early years, film-forming immersion techniques and semiconductor processing gained importance. In the 1980s and 1990s we have seen exponential growth of the field but signs of slowdown are clear since 1998. Nevertheless, plasma immersion techniques have found, and will continue to have, an important place among surface modification techniques.

  13. InGaAsP/InP Double Quantum Well Intermixing Induced by Phosphorus Ion Implantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jie; ZHAO Jie; WANG Yong-chen; HAN De-jun

    2005-01-01

    A quantum well intermixing(QWI) investigation on double quantum well(DQW) structure with two different emitting wavelength caused by phosphorus ion implantation and following rapid thermal annealing (RTA) was carried out by means of photoluminescence(PL). The ion implantation was performed at the energy of 120 kev with the dose ranging from 1 × 1011 cm-2 to 1× 1014 cm-2. The RTA was performed at the temperature of 700 ℃ for 30 s under pure nitrogen protection. The PL measurement implied that the band gap blue-shift from the upper well increases with the ion dose faster than that from lower well and the PL peaks from both QWs remained well separated under the lower dose implantation(~1×1011 cm-2 ) indicating that the implant vacancy distribution affects the QWI. When the ion dose is over ~ 1 × 1012 cm-2 , the band gap blue-shift from both wells increases with the ion dose and finally the two peaks merge together as one peak indicating the ion implantation caused a total intermixing of both quantum wells.

  14. Study of Biological Effects of Low Energy Ion Implantation on Tomato and Radish Breeding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Qiuxia; HUANG Qunce; CAO Gangqiang; YING Fangqing; LIU Yanbo; HUANG Wen

    2008-01-01

    Biological effects of 30 keV low energy nitrogen ion implantation on the seeds of five types of tomato and one type of radish were investigated. Results showed that low energy ions have different effects on different vegetables. The whole dose-response curve of the germination ratio did not take on "the shape of saddle", but was a rising and falling waveform with the increase or decrease in ion implantation. In the vegetable of Solanaceae, two outstanding aberrant plants were selected from M1 of Henan No.4 tomato at a dose of 7×1017 nitrogen ions/cm2, which had thin-leaves, long-petal and nipple tip fruit stably inherited to M7. Furthermore the analysis of the isozyme showed that the activity of the mutant tomato seedling was distinct in quantity and color. In Raphanus sativus L., the aberrances were obvious in the mutant of radish 791 at a dose of 5×1017 nitrogen ions/cm2, and the weight of succulent root and the volume of growth were over twice the control's. At present, many species for breeding have been identified in the field and only stable species have been selected for the experiment of production. It is evident that the low energy ion implantation technology has clear effects on vegetables' genetic improvement.

  15. Peculiarities and application perspectives of metal-ion implants in glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazzoldi, P.; Gonella, F. [Padua Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica; Arnold, G.W. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Battaglin, G. [Venice Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Chimica Fisica; Bertoncello, R. [Padua Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Chimica Inorganica, Metallorganica e Analitica

    1993-12-31

    Ion implantation in insulators causes modifications in the refractive-index as a result of radiation damage, phase separation, or compound formation. As a consequence, light waveguides may be formed with interesting applications in the field of optoelectronics. Recently implantation of metals ions (e.g. silver, copper, gold, lead,...) showed the possibility of small radii colloidal particles formation, in a thin surface layer of the glass substrate. These particles exhibit an electron plasmon resonance which depends on the optical constants of the implanted metal and on the refractive-index of the glass host. The non-linear optical properties of such colloids, in particular the enhancement of optical Kerr susceptibility, suggest that the, ion implantation technique may play an important role for the production of all-optical switching devices. In this paper an analysis of the state-of-the-art of the research in this field will be presented in the framework of ion implantation in glass physics and chemistry.

  16. The air oxidation behavior of lanthanum ion implanted zirconium at 500 deg. C

    CERN Document Server

    Peng, D Q; Chen, X W; Zhou, Q G

    2003-01-01

    The beneficial effect of lanthanum ion implantation on the oxidation behavior of zirconium at 500 deg. C has been studied. Zirconium specimens were implanted by lanthanum ions using a MEVVA source at energy of 40 keV with a fluence range from 1x10 sup 1 sup 6 to 1x10 sup 1 sup 7 ions/cm sup 2 at maximum temperature of 130 deg. C, The weight gain curves were measured after being oxidized in air at 500 deg. C for 100 min, which showed that a significant improvement was achieved in the oxidation behavior of zirconium ion implanted with lanthanum compared with that of the as-received zirconium. The valence of the oxides in the scale was analyzed by X-ray photoemission spectroscopy; and then the depth distributions of the elements in the surface of the samples were obtained by Auger electron spectroscopy. Glancing angle X-ray diffraction at 0.3 deg. incident angles was employed to examine the modification of its phase transformation because of the lanthanum ion implantation in the oxide films. It was obviously fou...

  17. Raman scattering probe of ion-implanted and pulse laser annealed GaAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Prabhat; Jain, K. P.; Abbi, S. C.

    1996-04-01

    We report Raman scattering studies of phosphorus-ion-implanted and subsequently pulse laser annealed (PLA) GaAs. The threshold value of implantation fluence for the disappearance of one-phonon modes in the Raman spectrum of ion-implanted GaAs sample is found to be greater than that for the two-phonon modes by an order of magnitude. The phonon correlation length decreases with increasing disorder. The lattice reconstruction process during PLA creates microcrystallites for incomplete annealing, whose sizes can be given by the phonon correlation lengths, and are found to increase with the annealing power density. The intensity ratio of the Raman spectra corresponding to the allowed longitudinal-optical (LO)-phonon mode to the forbidden transverse-optical (TO)-phonon mode, ILO/ITO, is used as a quantitative measure of crystallinity in the implantation and PLA processes. The threshold annealing power density is estimated to be 20 MW/cm2 for 70 keV phosphorus-ion-implanted GaAs at a fluence of 5×1015 ions/cm2. The localized vibrational mode of phosphorus is observed in PLA samples for fluences above 1×1015 ions/cm2.

  18. 2nd International Conference on Ion Implantation in Semiconductors, Physics and Technology, Fundamental and Applied Aspects

    CERN Document Server

    Graul, Jürgen

    1971-01-01

    In recent years great progress has been made in the field of ion implantation, particularly with respect to applications in semiconductors. It would be impos­ sible not to note the growing interest in this field, both by research groups and those directly concerned with production of devices. Furthermore, as several papers have pointed out, ion implantation and its associated technologies promise exciting advances in the development of new kinds of devices and provide power­ ful new tools for materials investigations. It was, therefore, appropriate to arrange the II. International Conference on Ion Implantation in Semiconductors within the rather short time of one year since the first conference was held in 1970 in Thousand Oaks, California. Although ori­ ginally planned on a small scale with a very limited number of participants, more than two hundred scientists from 15 countries participated in the Conference which was held May 24 - 28, 1971 at the Congress Center in Garmisch-Partenkirchen. This volume c...

  19. Doping effects induced by potassium ion implantation in solid C{sub 60}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trouillas, P. [Faculte des Sci., Limoges (France). Lab. d`Electronique des Polymers sous Faisceau Ionique; Moliton, A. [Faculte des Sci., Limoges (France). Lab. d`Electronique des Polymers sous Faisceau Ionique; Ratier, B. [Faculte des Sci., Limoges (France). Lab. d`Electronique des Polymers sous Faisceau Ionique

    1995-08-01

    Ion implantation is presented here as another technique for investigating the electrical properties of doped solid C{sub 60}. The conductivity and the thermopower have been studied versus the implantation parameters in order to investigate electrical transport phenomena which occur in implanted solid C{sub 60}, and thus prove doping effects. First results on ion implantation in C{sub 60} show a strong competition between damaging (induced by energetic ions) and doping effect (induced by charge transfer). Generally, electron transfers between the potassium atoms and the C{sub 60} molecules produce a conducting phase: up to x{approx} =0.1, metallic K{sub 3}C{sub 60} islands are dispersed in an insulating phase (virgin C{sub 60}); then, for x>0.1, damage plays a major role, leading to conduction paths through the samples (the saturation threshold x{approx} =0.1 is lower than in chemical doping due to the degradations). Potassium ion implantation with low energy (E{approx} =30 keV) and low fluence (D<10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2}) seems to provide the best implantation parameters for doping. Indeed, small ion size, low energy and low fluence are necessary in order to diminish the degradation effects. (orig.)

  20. Long-range effect of ion implantation of Raex and Hardox steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budzyński, P.; Kamiński, M.; Droździel, A.; Wiertel, M.

    2016-09-01

    Ion implantation involves introduction of ionized atoms of any element (nitrogen) to metals thanks to the high kinetic energy that they acquired in the electric field. The distribution of nitrogen ions implanted at E = 65 keV energy and D = 1.1017 N+ /cm2 fluence in the steel sample and vacancies produced by them was calculated using the SRIM program. This result was confirmed by RBS measurements. The initial maximum range of the implanted nitrogen ions is ∼⃒0.17 μm. This value is relatively small compared to the influence of nitriding on the thickness surface layer of modified steel piston rings. Measurements of the friction coefficient during the pin-on-disc tribological test were performed under dry friction conditions. The friction coefficient of the implanted sample increased to values characteristic of an unimplanted sample after ca. 1500 measurement cycles. The depth of wear trace is ca. 2.4 μm. This implies that the thickness of the layer modified by the implantation process is ∼⃒2.4 μm and exceeds the initial range of the implanted ions by an order of magnitude. This effect, referred to as a long-range implantation effect, is caused by migration of vacancies and nitrogen atoms into the sample. This phenomenon makes ion implantation a legitimate process of modification of the surface layer in order to enhance the tribological properties of critical components of internal combustion engines such as steel piston rings.

  1. Plasma immersion ion implantation for the efficient surface modification of medical materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slabodchikov, Vladimir A., E-mail: dipis1991@mail.ru; Borisov, Dmitry P., E-mail: borengin@mail.ru; Kuznetsov, Vladimir M., E-mail: kuznetsov@rec.tsu.ru [National Research Tomsk State University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-27

    The paper reports on a new method of plasma immersion ion implantation for the surface modification of medical materials using the example of nickel-titanium (NiTi) alloys much used for manufacturing medical implants. The chemical composition and surface properties of NiTi alloys doped with silicon by conventional ion implantation and by the proposed plasma immersion method are compared. It is shown that the new plasma immersion method is more efficient than conventional ion beam treatment and provides Si implantation into NiTi surface layers through a depth of a hundred nanometers at low bias voltages (400 V) and temperatures (≤150°C) of the substrate. The research results suggest that the chemical composition and surface properties of materials required for medicine, e.g., NiTi alloys, can be successfully attained through modification by the proposed method of plasma immersion ion implantation and by other methods based on the proposed vacuum equipment without using any conventional ion beam treatment.

  2. THE BEHAVIORS OF 48keV Si IONS IMPLANTED INTO(100)GaAs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘惠珍; 曹德新; 等

    1994-01-01

    The behaviors of Si ions implanted into(100)GaAs at liquid nitrogen temperature with energy of 48keV at the doses of 1×1015-5×1015 ions/cm2 has been investigated in this study.The Rutherford backscattering-channeling (RBS-C) combined with particle induced X-ray emission(PIXE) has been used to determine the sites of the Si atoms in the GaAs substrate.The four-point probe was used to measure the resistance of the GaAs before and after Si ions implantation.The experimental results show that Si atoms occupy not only on Ga site but also on As site.The sheet resistivity of GaAs reduced from 1×109Ω/□to 4.5×106Ω/□ after Si ions implanted.and to 4.0×104 Ω/□ after annealing at 850℃ in argon.These results are consistent with some other investigations,for instance,the results of G.Braunstein et al and R.S.Bhattacharya et al.although the implantation condition is not the same.

  3. Impact of Ion Implantation on Licorice ( Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch ) Growth and Antioxidant Activity Under Drought Stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jingnan; TONG Liping; SHEN Tongwei; LI Jie; WU Lijun; YU Zengliang

    2007-01-01

    Low energy ion beams are known to have stimulation effects on plant generation and to improve plants' intrinsic quality. In the present study, the growth and physiological index of licorice implanted with 0, 8, 10, 12 and 14× (2.6×l015) ions/cm2 were investigated under well-watered and drought-stress conditions. The results showed that a proper dose of ion implantation was particularly efficient in stimulating the licorice growth and improving the plant biomass significantly in both the well-watered and drought-stress conditions. The physiological results of licorice measured by leaf water potential, lipid oxidation, soluble protein and antioxidant system showed a significant correlation between ion implantation and water regime except for leaf water potential. Therefore, the study indicated that ion implantation can enhance licorice's drought tolerance by increasing the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and DPPH (l,l-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl) radical scavenging ability to lower oxidative damage to lipids in plants. Ion beam implantation, therefore, provides an alternative method to enhance licorice drought tolerance.

  4. Energetics, relative stabilities, and size-dependent properties of nanosized carbon clusters of different families: fullerenes, bucky-diamond, icosahedral, and bulk-truncated structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, M; Chaudhuri, I; Leahy, C; Wu, S Y; Jayanthi, C S

    2009-05-14

    Structures and relative stabilities of carbon clusters belonging to different families have been investigated for diameters d simulation. Carbon clusters studied include fullerenes and fullerene-derived structures (e.g., cages and onions), icosahedral structures, bucky-diamond structures, and clusters cut from the bulk diamond with spherical and facetted truncations. The reason for using a semiempirical MD is partly due to the large number of different cases (or carbon allotropes) investigated and partly due to the size of the clusters investigated in this work. The particular flavor of the semiempirical MD scheme is based on a self-consistent and environment-dependent Hamiltonian developed in the framework of linear combination of atomic orbitals. We find that (i) among the families of carbon clusters investigated, fullerene structures have the lowest energy with the relative energy ordering being E(fullerene) structures is likely at d approximately 8 nm, (iii) the highest occupied molecular orbital-lowest unoccupied molecular orbital gap as a function of the diameter for the case of fullerenes shows an oscillatory behavior with the gap ranging from 2 eV to 6 meV, and the gap approaching that of gapless graphite for d > 3.5 nm, and (iv) there can be three types of phase transformations depending on the manner of heating and cooling in our simulated annealing studies: (a) a bucky-diamond structure --> an onionlike structure, (b) an onionlike --> a cage structure, and (c) a bucky-diamond --> a cage structure.

  5. Enhanced nitrogen and phosphorus removal from eutrophic lake water by Ipomoea aquatica with low-energy ion implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Miao; Wu, Yue-Jin; Yu, Zeng-Liang; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Yu, Han-Qing

    2009-03-01

    Ipomoea aquatica with low-energy N+ ion implantation was used for the removal of both nitrogen and phosphorus from the eutrophic Chaohu Lake, China. The biomass growth, nitrate reductase and peroxidase activities of the implanted I. aquatica were found to be higher than those of I. aquatica without ion implantation. Higher NO3-N and PO4-P removal efficiencies were obtained for the I. aquatica irradiation at 25 keV, 3.9 x 10(16) N+ ions/cm(2) and 20 keV 5.2 x 10(16) N+ ions/cm(2), respectively (p phosphorus contents in the plant biomass with ion implantation were also greater than those of the controls. I. aquatica with ion implantation was directly responsible for 51-68% N removal and 54-71% P removal in the three experiments. The results further confirm that the ion implantation could enhance the growth potential of I. aquatica in real eutrophic water and increase its nutrient removal efficiency. Thus, the low-energy ion implantation for aquatic plants could be considered as an approach for in situ phytoremediation and bioremediation of eutrophic waters.

  6. Comparison of proton and phosphorous ion implantation-induced intermixing of InAs/InP quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barik, S; Tan, H H; Jagadish, C [Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory 0200 (Australia)

    2007-05-02

    We report and compare proton and phosphorous ion implantation-induced intermixing of InAs/InP quantum dots (QDs). After ion implantation at 20-300 deg. C, the QDs are rapid thermally annealed at 850 deg. C for 30 s. Proton implantation induces less energy shift than P ion implantation for a given concentration of atomic displacements due to the more efficient dynamic annealing of the defects created by protons. The implantation-induced energy shift reaches a maximum value of about 260 meV for a dose of 5 x 10{sup 12} ions cm{sup -2} in the P ion implanted QDs, which also show narrower PL linewidths compared to the proton implanted QDs. We also report the effects of an InGaAs top cap layer on the ion implantation-induced QD intermixing and show that defect production and annihilation processes evolve differently in InGaAs and InP layers and vary with the implantation temperature. When the implantation is performed at higher temperatures, the energy shift of the P ion implanted QDs capped with an InP layer increases due to the reduction in larger defect cluster formation at higher temperatures, while the energy shift of the proton implanted QDs decreases due to increased dynamic annealing irrespective of their cap layers.

  7. Nanopatterning on silicon surface using atomic force microscopy with diamond-like carbon (DLC-coated Si probe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Jingfang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Atomic force microscope (AFM equipped with diamond-like carbon (DLC-coated Si probe has been used for scratch nanolithography on Si surfaces. The effect of scratch direction, applied tip force, scratch speed, and number of scratches on the size of the scratched geometry has been investigated. The size of the groove differs with scratch direction, which increases with the applied tip force and number of scratches but decreases slightly with scratch speed. Complex nanostructures of arrays of parallel lines and square arrays are further fabricated uniformly and precisely on Si substrates at relatively high scratch speed. DLC-coated Si probe has the potential to be an alternative in AFM-based scratch nanofabrication on hard surfaces.

  8. Investigation of Physical Properties and Electrochemical Behavior of Nitrogen-Doped Diamond-Like Carbon Thin Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rattanakorn Saensak

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This work reports characterizations of diamond-like carbon (DLC films used as electrodes for electrochemical applications. DLC thin films are prepared on glass slides and silicon substrates by radio frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (RF-PECVD using a gas mixture of methane and hydrogen. In addition, the DLC films are doped with nitrogen in order to reduce electrical resistivity. Compared to the undoped DLC films, the electrical resistivity of nitrogen-doped (N-doped DLC films is decreased by three orders of magnitude. Raman spectroscopy and UV/Vis spectroscopy analyses show the structural transformation in N-doped DLC films that causes the reduction of band gap energy. Contact angle measurement at N-doped DLC films indicates increased hydrophobicity. The results obtained from the cyclic voltammetry measurements with Fe(CN63-/Fe(CN64- redox species exhibit the correlation between the physical properties and electrochemical behavior of DLC films.

  9. Dynamic optical properties of amorphous diamond-like carbon nanocomposite films doped with Cu and Ag nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamulevičius, Tomas; Peckus, Domantas; Tamulevičiene, Asta; Vasiliauskas, Andrius; Čiegis, Arvydas; Meškinis, Šarūnas; Tamulevičius, Sigitas

    2014-09-01

    The investigation of relaxation processes in noble metal nanoparticles upon ultrafast excitations by femtosecond laser pulses is useful to understand the origin and the enhancement mechanism of the nonlinear optical properties for metaldielectric nanocomposites. In the current work we analyze diamond like carbon (DLC) film based copper and silver nanocomposites with different metal content synthesized employing unbalanced magnetron sputtering of metal targets with argon ions in acetylene gas atmosphere. Surface morphology and nanoparticle sizes were analyzed employing scanning electron and atomic force microscopy. Optical properties of the nanocomposite films were analyzed employing UV-VIS-NIR spectrometry. Transient absorption measurements were obtained employing Yb:KGW femtosecond laser spectroscopic system (HARPIA, Light Conversion Ltd.). Energy relaxation dynamics in Cu nanoparticles showed some significant differences from Ag nanoparticles. The increase of excitation intensity hasn't show additional nonlinear effects for the excited state relaxation dynamics for both kinds of samples.

  10. Hydrophobic and high transparent honeycomb diamond-like carbon thin film fabricated by facile self-assembled nanosphere lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Kai-Yu; Wei, Da-Hua; Lin, Chii-Ruey; Yu, Yueh-Chung; Yao, Yeong-Der; Lin, Hong-Ming

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we take advantage of a facile fabrication technique called self-assembled nanosphere lithography (SANSL) combining with proper two-step reactive ion etching (RIE) method and radio frequency (RF) sputtering deposition process for manufacturing honeycomb diamond-like carbon (DLC) thin film structures with hydrophobic and high transparent properties. It is found that the DLC thin films deposited on clean glass substrates at the RF power of 100 W with the surface roughness (Ra) of 2.08 nm and the ID/IG ratio of 1.96 are realized. With a fill-factor of 0.691, the honeycomb DLC patterned thin film shows the best transmittance performance of 87% in the wavelength of visible light, and the optimized contact angle measurement is ˜108°. Compared with the pure DLC thin film and original glass substrate, the hydrophobic property of the patterned DLC films is significantly improved by 80 and 160%, respectively.

  11. Reduction in static friction by deposition of a homogeneous diamond-like carbon (DLC) coating on orthodontic brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akaike, Shun; Hayakawa, Tohru; Kobayashi, Daishiro; Aono, Yuko; Hirata, Atsushi; Hiratsuka, Masanori; Nakamura, Yoshiki

    2015-01-01

    In orthodontics, a reduction in static friction between the brackets and wire is important to enable easy tooth movement. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of a homogeneous diamond-like carbon (DLC) coating on the whole surfaces of slots in stainless steel orthodontic brackets on reducing the static friction between the brackets and the wire. The DLC coating was characterized using Raman spectroscopy, surface roughness and contact angle measurements, and SEM observations. Rectangular stainless steel and titanium-molybdenum alloy wires with two different sizes were employed, and the static friction between the brackets and wire was measured under dry and wet conditions. The DLC coating had a thickness of approximately 1.0 μm and an amorphous structure was identified. The results indicated that the DLC coating always led to a reduction in static friction.

  12. Thermal effects on structure and photoluminescence properties of diamond-like carbon films prepared by pulsed laser deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Da; LI Qing-shan; WANG Jing-jing; ZHENG Xue-gang

    2006-01-01

    Un-hydrogenated Diamond-like Carbon (DLC) films were prepared by pulsed laser deposition technique at different substrate temperature.The Raman spectra,the absorption and the photoluminescence spectra were measured.The dependence of structure and photoluminescence properties on deposition temperature were studied in detail.The experimental results indicate that the sp2 sites form small clusters that consist of both olefinic chains and aromatic ring groups within the sp3 matrix.With raising deposition temperature,the optical band gaps increase from 1.87 to 2.85 eV.The main band of photoluminescence centered at around 700nm shifts to short wavelength,and the intensity of this band increases.The photoluminescence can be attributed to carrier localization within an increasing sp2 clusters.It was clarified that the DLC films are ordered with increasing deposition temperature.

  13. Structural and Physical Characteristics of Ultrananocrystalline Diamond/Hydrogenated Amorphous Carbon Composite Films Deposited Using a Coaxial Arc Plasma Gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshitake, Tsuyoshi; Nakagawa, You; Nagano, Akira; Ohtani, Ryota; Setoyama, Hiroyuki; Kobayashi, Eiichi; Sumitani, Kazushi; Agawa, Yoshiaki; Nagayama, Kunihito

    2010-01-01

    Ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD)/hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) films were formed without initial nucleation using a coaxial arc plasma gun. The UNCD crystallite diameters estimated from the X-ray diffraction peaks were approximately 2 nm. The Fourier transform infrared absorption spectrum exhibited an intense sp3-CH peak that might originate from the grain boundaries between UNCD crystallites whose dangling bonds are terminated with hydrogen atoms. A narrow sp3 peak in the photoemission spectrum implied that the film comprises a large number of UNCD crystallites. Large optical absorption coefficients at photon energies larger than 3 eV that might be due to the grain boundaries are specific to the UNCD/a-C:H films.

  14. Study on the Properties of TiN Coatings on Previously Ion-Implanted Pure Magnesium Surface by MEVVA Ion Implantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Hai; CHEN Fei; WANG Jian-ping

    2007-01-01

    A metal vapor vacuum arc (MEVVA) is used in ion implantation for substrate preparation before the deposition process which would ensure the improvement of mechanical properties of the coating.Ti ion is implanted into pure magnesium surface by MEVVA implanter operated with a modified cathode.Implanting energy is kept at 45 keV and dose is set at 3×1017 cm-2.TiN coatings are deposited by magnetically filtered vacuum-arc plasma source on unimplanted and previously implanted substrates.Microstructure and phase composition are analysed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD).The property of corrosion resistance of TiN coatings was studied by CS300P electrochemistry-corrosion workstation,and the main impact factor of the corrosion resistance was also analyzed.

  15. The structure of the tungsten coatings deposited by Combined Magnetron Sputtering and Ion Implantation for nuclear fusion applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigore, E., E-mail: edigrig@infim.ro [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Bucharest, Euratom-MEdC Association (Romania); Ruset, C. [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Bucharest, Euratom-MEdC Association (Romania); Rasinski, M. [Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, Warsaw (Poland); Gherendi, M. [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Bucharest, Euratom-MEdC Association (Romania); Matthews, G.F. [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Euratom Association, Abingdon (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-15

    Combined Magnetron Sputtering and Ion Implantation (CMSII) technology was used for W coating of about 1800 CFC tiles for ITER-like Wall (ILW) at JET and more than 1300 fine grain graphite tiles for ASDEX Upgrade tokamak. Thermal fatigue and carbidization due to the diffusion of the carbon from the substrate were found as main phenomena limiting the service lifetime of the W coatings. Detailed investigation of these coatings using SEM and STEM (scanning transmission electron microscopy) together with the FIB (focused ion beam) cutting technique revealed two fine networks of nano-pores with the size of 10–20 nm for zones of 250–350 nm at CFC-Mo and Mo-W interfaces. Formation of these nano-pores is associated with the energy of the ions striking the coating during the deposition process. By optimizing this energy the nano-pores disappeared. The structure and the performances of the W coatings produced by the new modified technology (CMSII-M) were compared with those deposited by standard benchmark technology. The HHF (high heat flux) tests carried out with an electron beam at a temperature of 1450 °C indicated a decrease of the defects affected area by a factor of about 1.7.

  16. Cryogenic ion implantation near amorphization threshold dose for halo/extension junction improvement in sub-30 nm device technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hugh; Todorov, Stan; Colombeau, Benjamin; Rodier, Dennis; Kouzminov, Dimitry; Zou Wei; Guo Baonian; Khasgiwale, Niranjan; Decker-Lucke, Kurt [Applied Materials, Varian Semiconductor Equipment, 35 Dory Road, Gloucester, Massachusetts 01930 (United States)

    2012-11-06

    We report on junction advantages of cryogenic ion implantation with medium current implanters. We propose a methodical approach on maximizing cryogenic effects on junction characteristics near the amorphization threshold doses that are typically used for halo implants for sub-30 nm technologies. BF{sub 2}{sup +} implant at a dose of 8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13}cm{sup -2} does not amorphize silicon at room temperature. When implanted at -100 Degree-Sign C, it forms a 30 - 35 nm thick amorphous layer. The cryogenic BF{sub 2}{sup +} implant significantly reduces the depth of the boron distribution, both as-implanted and after anneals, which improves short channel rolloff characteristics. It also creates a shallower n{sup +}-p junction by steepening profiles of arsenic that is subsequently implanted in the surface region. We demonstrate effects of implant sequences, germanium preamorphization, indium and carbon co-implants for extension/halo process integration. When applied to sequences such as Ge+As+C+In+BF{sub 2}{sup +}, the cryogenic implants at -100 Degree-Sign C enable removal of Ge preamorphization, and form more active n{sup +}-p junctions and steeper B and In halo profiles than sequences at room temperature.

  17. Studies to Enhance Superconductivity in Thin Film Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Benjamin; Brunke, Lyle; Burke, Jack; Vier, David; Steckl, Andrew; Haugan, Timothy

    2012-02-01

    With research in the area of superconductivity growing, it is no surprise that new efforts are being made to induce superconductivity or increase transition temperatures (Tc) in carbon given its many allotropic forms. Promising results have been published for boron doping in diamond films, and phosphorus doping in highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) films show hints of superconductivity.. Following these examples in the literature, we have begun studies to explore superconductivity in thin film carbon samples doped with different elements. Carbon thin films are prepared by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) on amorphous SiO2/Si and single-crystal substrates. Doping is achieved by depositing from (C1-xMx) single-targets with M = B4C and BN, and also by ion implantation into pure-carbon films. Previous research had indicated that Boron in HOPG did not elicit superconducting properties, but we aim to explore that also in thin film carbon and see if there needs to be a higher doping in the sample if trends were able to be seen in diamond films. Higher onset temperatures, Tc , and current densities, Jc, are hoped to be achieved with doping of the thin film carbon with different elements.

  18. STRUCTURE, MECHANICAL PROPERTIES AND THERMAL STABILITY OF DIAMOND-LIKE CARBON FILMS PREPARED BY ARC ION PLATING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Y.S. Zou; J.D. Zheng; J. Gong; C. Sun; R.F. Huang; L.S. Wen

    2005-01-01

    Diamond-like Carbon (DLC) films have been prepared on Si(100) substrates by arc ion plating in conjunction with pulse bias voltage under H2 atmosphere. The deposited films have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The results show that the surface of the film is smooth and dense without any cracks, and the surface roughness is low. The bonding characteristic of the films has been studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Raman spectroscopy. It shows the sp3 bond content of the film deposited at -200V is 26.7%. The hardness and elastic modulus of the film determined by nanoindentation technique are 30.8 and 250.1GPa, respectively. The tribological characteristic of the films reveals that they have low friction coefficient and good wear-resistance. After deposition, the films have been annealed in the range of 350-700℃ for 1h in vacuum to investigate the thermal stability. Raman spectra indicate that the ID/IG ratio and G peak position have few detectable changes below 500℃. Further increasing the annealing temperature, the hydrogen can be released, the structure rearranges, and the phase transition of sp3 configured carbon to sp2 configured carbon appears.

  19. Study of Fluorine Addition Influence in the Dielectric Constant of Diamond-Like Carbon Thin Film Deposited by Reactive Sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trippe, S. C.; Mansano, R. D.

    The hydrogenated amorphous carbon films (a-C:H) or DLC (Diamond-Like Carbon) films are well known for exhibiting high electrical resistivity, low dielectric constant, high mechanical hardness, low friction coefficient, low superficial roughness and also for being inert. In this paper, we produced fluorinated DLC films (a-C:F), and studied the effect of adding CF4 on the above-mentioned properties of DLC films. These films were produced by a reactive RF magnetron sputtering system using a target of pure carbon in stable graphite allotrope. We performed measurements of electrical characteristic curves of capacitance as a function of applied tension (C-V) and current as a function of the applied tension (I-V). We showed the dielectric constant (k) and the resistivity (ρ) as functions of the CF4 concentration. On films with 65% CF4, we found that k = 2.7, and on films with 70% CF4, ρ = 12.3 × 1011 Ω cm. The value of the electrical breakdown field to films with 70% CF4 is 5.3 × 106 V/cm.

  20. Mg ion implantation on SLA-treated titanium surface and its effects on the behavior of mesenchymal stem cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Beom-Su; Kim, Jin Seong; Park, Young Min; Choi, Bo-Young; Lee, Jun

    2013-04-01

    Magnesium (Mg) is one of the most important ions associated with bone osseointegration. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cellular effects of Mg implantation in titanium (Ti) surfaces treated with sand blast using large grit and acid etching (SLA). Mg ions were implanted into the surface via vacuum arc source ion implantation. The surface morphology, chemical properties, and the amount of Mg ion release were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS), and inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometer (ICP-OES). Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were used to evaluate cellular parameters such as proliferation, cytotoxicity, and adhesion morphology by MTS assay, live/dead assay, and SEM. Furthermore, osteoblast differentiation was determined on the basis of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and the degree of calcium accumulation. In the Mg ion-implanted disk, 2.3×10(16) ions/cm(2) was retained. However, after Mg ion implantation, the surface morphology did not change. Implanted Mg ions were rapidly released during the first 7 days in vitro. The MTS assay, live/dead assay, and SEM demonstrated increased cell attachment and growth on the Mg ion-implanted surface. In particular, Mg ion implantation increased the initial cell adhesion, and in an osteoblast differentiation assay, ALP activity and calcium accumulation. These findings suggest that Mg ion implantation using the plasma source ion implantation (PSII) technique may be useful for SLA-treated Ti dental implants to improve their osseointegration capacity.

  1. Method for machining steel with diamond tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casstevens, John M.

    1986-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a method for machining optical quality inishes and contour accuracies of workpieces of carbon-containing metals such as steel with diamond tooling. The wear rate of the diamond tooling is significantly reduced by saturating the atmosphere at the interface of the workpiece and the diamond tool with a gaseous hydrocarbon during the machining operation. The presence of the gaseous hydrocarbon effectively eliminates the deterioration of the diamond tool by inhibiting or preventing the conversion of the diamond carbon to graphite carbon at the point of contact between the cutting tool and the workpiece.

  2. Single-color centers implanted in diamond nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausmann, Birgit J. M.; Babinec, Thomas M.; Choy, Jennifer T.; Hodges, Jonathan S.; Hong, Sungkun; Bulu, Irfan; Yacoby, Amir; Lukin, Mikhail D.; Lončar, Marko

    2011-04-01

    The development of material-processing techniques that can be used to generate optical diamond nanostructures containing a single-color center is an important problem in quantum science and technology. In this work, we present the combination of ion implantation and top-down diamond nanofabrication in two scenarios: diamond nanopillars and diamond nanowires. The first device consists of a 'shallow' implant (~20 nm) to generate nitrogen-vacancy (NV) color centers near the top surface of the diamond crystal prior to device fabrication. Individual NV centers are then mechanically isolated by etching a regular array of nanopillars in the diamond surface. Photon anti-bunching measurements indicate that a high yield (>10%) of the devices contain a single NV center. The second device demonstrates 'deep' (~1 μm) implantation of individual NV centers into diamond nanowires as a post-processing step. The high single-photon flux of the nanowire geometry, combined with the low background fluorescence of the ultrapure diamond, allowed us to observe sustained photon anti-bunching even at high pump powers.

  3. NEW HIGH STRENGTH AND FASTER DRILLING TSP DIAMOND CUTTERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert Radtke

    2006-01-31

    The manufacture of thermally stable diamond (TSP) cutters for drill bits used in petroleum drilling requires the brazing of two dissimilar materials--TSP diamond and tungsten carbide. The ENDURUS{trademark} thermally stable diamond cutter developed by Technology International, Inc. exhibits (1) high attachment (shear) strength, exceeding 345 MPa (50,000 psi), (2) TSP diamond impact strength increased by 36%, (3) prevents TSP fracture when drilling hard rock, and (4) maintains a sharp edge when drilling hard and abrasive rock. A novel microwave brazing (MWB) method for joining dissimilar materials has been developed. A conventional braze filler metal is combined with microwave heating which minimizes thermal residual stress between materials with dissimilar coefficients of thermal expansion. The process results in preferential heating of the lower thermal expansion diamond material, thus providing the ability to match the thermal expansion of the dissimilar material pair. Methods for brazing with both conventional and exothermic braze filler metals have been developed. Finite element modeling (FEM) assisted in the fabrication of TSP cutters controllable thermal residual stress and high shear attachment strength. Further, a unique cutter design for absorbing shock, the densification of otherwise porous TSP diamond for increased mechanical strength, and diamond ion implantation for increased diamond fracture resistance resulted in successful drill bit tests.

  4. RTV silicone rubber surface modification for cell biocompatibility by negative-ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Chenlong; Wang, Guangfu; Chu, Yingjie; Xu, Ya; Qiu, Menglin; Xu, Mi

    2016-03-01

    A negative cluster ion implantation system was built on the injector of a GIC4117 tandem accelerator. Next, the system was used to study the surface modification of room temperature vulcanization silicone rubber (RTV SR) for cell biocompatibility. The water contact angle was observed to decrease from 117.6° to 99.3° as the C1- implantation dose was increased to 1 × 1016 ions/cm2, and the effects of C1-, C2- and O1- implantation result in only small differences in the water contact angle at 3 × 1015 ions/cm2. These findings indicate that the hydrophilicity of RTV SR improves as the dose is increased and that the radiation effect has a greater influence than the doping effect on the hydrophilicity. There are two factors influence hydrophilicity of RTV: (1) based on the XPS and ATR-FTIR results, it can be inferred that ion implantation breaks the hydrophobic functional groups (Sisbnd CH3, Sisbnd Osbnd Si, Csbnd H) of RTV SR and generates hydrophilic functional groups (sbnd COOH, sbnd OH, Sisbnd (O)x (x = 3,4)). (2) SEM reveals that the implanted surface of RTV SR appears the micro roughness such as cracks and wrinkles. The hydrophilicity should be reduced due to the lotus effect (Zhou Rui et al., 2009). These two factors cancel each other out and make the C-implantation sample becomes more hydrophilic in general terms. Finally, cell culture demonstrates that negative ion-implantation is an effective method to improve the cell biocompatibility of RTV SR.

  5. Metal-nanocluster composites made by ion implantation: A novel third-order nonlinear material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haglund, R.F. Jr.; Yang, L.; Magruder, R.H. III; Becker, K.; Wittig, J.E. [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States); White, C.W.; Zhur, R.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Yang, L.; Dorsinville, R.; Alfano, R.R. [City Univ. of New York, NY (United States)

    1993-03-01

    We describe our recent studies of metal-insulator nanocluster composites made by ion implantation in such substrates as glass and sapphire. The metal clusters have diameters ranging from 3 to 30 nm. The composites exhibit an electronic nonlinear optical response which is fast on the picosecond time scale. In addition to possibilities for technological application, these materials also offer a way of studying unusual properties of composite materials, such as the quantum confinement of conduction-band electrons and the transverse relaxation time T{sub 2} as a function of cluster size.

  6. Metal-nanocluster composites made by ion implantation: A novel third-order nonlinear material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haglund, R.F. Jr.; Yang, L.; Magruder, R.H. III; Becker, K.; Wittig, J.E. (Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States)); White, C.W.; Zhur, R.A. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Yang, L.; Dorsinville, R.; Alfano, R.R. (City Univ. of New York, NY (United States))

    1993-03-01

    We describe our recent studies of metal-insulator nanocluster composites made by ion implantation in such substrates as glass and sapphire. The metal clusters have diameters ranging from 3 to 30 nm. The composites exhibit an electronic nonlinear optical response which is fast on the picosecond time scale. In addition to possibilities for technological application, these materials also offer a way of studying unusual properties of composite materials, such as the quantum confinement of conduction-band electrons and the transverse relaxation time T[sub 2] as a function of cluster size.

  7. Synthesis of ZnO nanocrystals in sapphire by ion implantation and vacuum annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marques, C. [LFI, Dep. Fisica, Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, E.N. 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Centro Fisica Nuclear da Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Prof. Gama Pinto 2, 1649-003 Lisbon (Portugal); Franco, N. [LFI, Dep. Fisica, Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, E.N. 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Centro Fisica Nuclear da Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Prof. Gama Pinto 2, 1649-003 Lisbon (Portugal); Alves, L.C. [LFI, Dep. Fisica, Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, E.N. 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Centro Fisica Nuclear da Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Prof. Gama Pinto 2, 1649-003 Lisbon (Portugal); Silva, R.C. da [LFI, Dep. Fisica, Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, E.N. 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal) and Centro Fisica Nuclear da Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Prof. Gama Pinto 2, 1649-003 Lisbon (Portugal); Alves, E. [LFI, Dep. Fisica, Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, E.N. 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal) and Centro Fisica Nuclear da Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Prof. Gama Pinto 2, 1649-003 Lisbon (Portugal)]. E-mail: ealves@itn.pt; Safran, G. [Research Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Science, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); McHargue, C.J. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-0750 (United States)

    2007-04-15

    The synthesis of embedded ZnO nanoparticles in m-cut sapphire was achieved through high fluence Zn ion implantation, 0.9 x 10{sup 17} cm{sup -2} at room temperature, followed by annealing at 1000 deg. C in vacuum. In c-cut samples subjected to similar annealing conditions only buried precipitates of Zn form. TEM results in these samples show a high concentration of faceted precipitates distributed along the c-plane and the presence of Kirkendall voids distributed along the entire implanted region. In both cases a strong loss of Zn is observed upon annealing, which depends on the sapphire host orientation.

  8. Fabry-perot multilayers for enhancing the diffraction efficiency of ion-implanted gratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escoubas, L; Flory, F O; Lemarchand, F; Drouard, E; Roux, L; Tisserand, S; Albrand, G

    2001-04-01

    Enhancement of the free-space diffraction efficiency of gratings made by titanium-ion implantation is demonstrated both theoretically and experimentally. Indeed, by insertion of a grating into a multilayer dielectric Fabry-Perot cavity, the diffraction efficiency can be increased to as much as 24 times that of a single grating. The sensitivity of the diffraction efficiency to the optogeometrical parameters of the grating or of the Fabry-Perot cavity is discussed. Moreover, a process for performance of a phase grating inside a Fabry-Perot cavity is described, and experimental results concerning efficiency measurements are compared with computed values for various grating periods.

  9. TEM characterization of simultaneous triple ion implanted ODS Fe12Cr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, Vanessa de, E-mail: vanessa.decastro@uc3m.es [Departamento de Física, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Avda. de la Universidad 30, 28911 Leganés, Madrid (Spain); Briceno, Martha [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Johnson Matthey Technology Centre, Blount’s Court Rd, Sonning Common RG4 9NH (United Kingdom); Lozano-Perez, Sergio [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Trocellier, Patrick [CEA, DEN, Service de Recherches de Métallurgie Physique, Laboratoire JANNUS, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Roberts, Steve G. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Pareja, Ramiro [Departamento de Física, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Avda. de la Universidad 30, 28911 Leganés, Madrid (Spain)

    2014-12-15

    Understanding the behavior of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic/martensitic steels under irradiation is vital in the design of advanced fusion reactors. In this work, a simultaneous triple ion implanted ODS Fe12Cr steel was investigated by transmission electron microscopy in order to determine the effect of irradiation on the grain and dislocation structures, oxide nanoparticles and other secondary phases present in the steel. The ODS steel was irradiated at RT with Fe{sup 8+}, He{sup +} and H{sup +} at the JANNUS-Saclay facility to a damage of 4.4 dpa. Results show that ODS nanoparticles appear very stable under these irradiation conditions.

  10. Electronic and Vibrational Spectra of InP Quantum Dots Formed by Sequential Ion Implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, C.; Mu, R.; Tung, Y. S.; Ueda, A.; Henderson, D. O.; White, C. W.

    1997-01-01

    We have performed sequential ion implantation of indium and phosphorus into silica combined with controlled thermal annealing to fabricate InP quantum dots in a dielectric host. Electronic and vibrational spectra were measured for the as-implanted and annealed samples. The annealed samples show a peak in the infrared spectra near 320/cm which is attributed to a surface phonon mode and is in good agreement with the value calculated from Frolich's theory of surface phonon polaritons. The electronic spectra show the development of a band near 390 nm that is attributed to quantum confined InP.

  11. Tunnel oxide passivated contacts formed by ion implantation for applications in silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichel, Christian, E-mail: christian.reichel@ise.fraunhofer.de [Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems (ISE), Heidenhofstrasse 2, 79110 Freiburg (Germany); National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), 15013 Denver West Parkway, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States); Feldmann, Frank; Müller, Ralph; Hermle, Martin; Glunz, Stefan W. [Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems (ISE), Heidenhofstrasse 2, 79110 Freiburg (Germany); Reedy, Robert C.; Lee, Benjamin G.; Young, David L.; Stradins, Paul [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), 15013 Denver West Parkway, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States)

    2015-11-28

    Passivated contacts (poly-Si/SiO{sub x}/c-Si) doped by shallow ion implantation are an appealing technology for high efficiency silicon solar cells, especially for interdigitated back contact (IBC) solar cells where a masked ion implantation facilitates their fabrication. This paper presents a study on tunnel oxide passivated contacts formed by low-energy ion implantation into amorphous silicon (a-Si) layers and examines the influence of the ion species (P, B, or BF{sub 2}), the ion implantation dose (5 × 10{sup 14 }cm{sup −2} to 1 × 10{sup 16 }cm{sup −2}), and the subsequent high-temperature anneal (800 °C or 900 °C) on the passivation quality and junction characteristics using double-sided contacted silicon solar cells. Excellent passivation quality is achieved for n-type passivated contacts by P implantations into either intrinsic (undoped) or in-situ B-doped a-Si layers with implied open-circuit voltages (iV{sub oc}) of 725 and 720 mV, respectively. For p-type passivated contacts, BF{sub 2} implantations into intrinsic a-Si yield well passivated contacts and allow for iV{sub oc} of 690 mV, whereas implanted B gives poor passivation with iV{sub oc} of only 640 mV. While solar cells featuring in-situ B-doped selective hole contacts and selective electron contacts with P implanted into intrinsic a-Si layers achieved V{sub oc} of 690 mV and fill factor (FF) of 79.1%, selective hole contacts realized by BF{sub 2} implantation into intrinsic a-Si suffer from drastically reduced FF which is caused by a non-Ohmic Schottky contact. Finally, implanting P into in-situ B-doped a-Si layers for the purpose of overcompensation (counterdoping) allowed for solar cells with V{sub oc} of 680 mV and FF of 80.4%, providing a simplified and promising fabrication process for IBC solar cells featuring passivated contacts.

  12. Practical plasma immersion ion implantation for stress regulation and treatment of insulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilek, M.M.M.; McKenzie, D.R.; Tarrant, R.N.; Oates, T.W.H.; Ruch, P.; Newton-McGee, K.; Shi, Yang; Tompsett, D.; Nguyen, H.C.; Gan, B.K.; Kwok, D.T. [School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW (Australia)

    2004-07-01

    Plasma immersion ion implantation has been attracting the interest of research groups around the world over the last two decades. The technique has been developed to the stage where it is a well-established technique for a number of materials processing applications, such as plasma nitriding. Recent research has focussed on developing the method for a range of new applications, including stress regulation and control of microstructure, as well as surface treatment of insulators. Recent developments in these technologically important applications are discussed in this paper. (copyright 2004 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  13. Recrystallization and reactivation of dopant atoms in ion-implanted silicon nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukata, Naoki; Takiguchi, Ryo; Ishida, Shinya; Yokono, Shigeki; Hishita, Shunichi; Murakami, Kouichi

    2012-04-24

    Recrystallization of silicon nanowires (SiNWs) after ion implantation strongly depends on the ion doses and species. Full amorphization by high-dose implantation induces polycrystal structures in SiNWs even after high-temperature annealing, with this tendency more pronounced for heavy ions. Hot-implantation techniques dramatically suppress polycrystallization in SiNWs, resulting in reversion to the original single-crystal structures and consequently high reactivation rate of dopant atoms. In this study, the chemical bonding states and electrical activities of implanted boron and phosphorus atoms were evaluated by Raman scattering and electron spin resonance, demonstrating the formation of p- and n-type SiNWs.

  14. Radiochemical neutron activation analysis for certification of ion-implanted phosphorus in silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Rick L; Simons, David S; Guthrie, William F; Lu, John

    2003-08-15

    A radiochemical neutron activation analysis procedure has been developed, critically evaluated, and shown to have the necessary sensitivity, chemical specificity, matrix independence, and precision to certify phosphorus at ion implantation levels in silicon. 32P, produced by neutron capture of 31P, is chemically separated from the sample matrix and measured using a beta proportional counter. The method is used here to certify the amount of phosphorus in SRM 2133 (Phosphorus Implant in Silicon Depth Profile Standard) as (9.58 +/- 0.16) x 10(14) atoms x cm(-2). A detailed evaluation of uncertainties is given.

  15. RTV silicone rubber surface modification for cell biocompatibility by negative-ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Chenlong [Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Material Modification Ministry of Education, College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, 100875 Beijing (China); Wang, Guangfu, E-mail: 88088@bnu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Material Modification Ministry of Education, College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, 100875 Beijing (China); Beijing Radiation Center, 100875 Beijing (China); Chu, Yingjie; Xu, Ya; Qiu, Menglin; Xu, Mi [Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Material Modification Ministry of Education, College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, 100875 Beijing (China)

    2016-03-01

    Highlights: • The radiation effect has a greater influence than doping effect on the hydrophilicity of RTV SR. • The implanted ions result in a new surface atomic bonding state and morphology. • Generating hydrophilic functional groups is a reason for the improved cell biocompatibility. • The micro roughness makes the hydrophilicity should be reduced due to the lotus effect. • Cell culture demonstrates that negative-ion implantation can improve biocompatibility. - Abstract: A negative cluster ion implantation system was built on the injector of a GIC4117 tandem accelerator. Next, the system was used to study the surface modification of room temperature vulcanization silicone rubber (RTV SR) for cell biocompatibility. The water contact angle was observed to decrease from 117.6° to 99.3° as the C{sub 1}{sup −} implantation dose was increased to 1 × 10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2}, and the effects of C{sub 1}{sup −}, C{sub 2}{sup −} and O{sub 1}{sup −} implantation result in only small differences in the water contact angle at 3 × 10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2}. These findings indicate that the hydrophilicity of RTV SR improves as the dose is increased and that the radiation effect has a greater influence than the doping effect on the hydrophilicity. There are two factors influence hydrophilicity of RTV: (1) based on the XPS and ATR-FTIR results, it can be inferred that ion implantation breaks the hydrophobic functional groups (Si−CH{sub 3}, Si−O−Si, C−H) of RTV SR and generates hydrophilic functional groups (−COOH, −OH, Si−(O){sub x} (x = 3,4)). (2) SEM reveals that the implanted surface of RTV SR appears the micro roughness such as cracks and wrinkles. The hydrophilicity should be reduced due to the lotus effect (Zhou Rui et al., 2009). These two factors cancel each other out and make the C-implantation sample becomes more hydrophilic in general terms. Finally, cell culture demonstrates that negative ion-implantation is an effective method

  16. Synthesis of ZnO nanocrystals in sapphire by ion implantation and vacuum annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, C.; Franco, N.; Alves, L. C.; da Silva, R. C.; Alves, E.; Safran, G.; McHargue, C. J.

    2007-04-01

    The synthesis of embedded ZnO nanoparticles in m-cut sapphire was achieved through high fluence Zn ion implantation, 0.9 × 1017 cm-2 at room temperature, followed by annealing at 1000 °C in vacuum. In c-cut samples subjected to similar annealing conditions only buried precipitates of Zn form. TEM results in these samples show a high concentration of faceted precipitates distributed along the c-plane and the presence of Kirkendall voids distributed along the entire implanted region. In both cases a strong loss of Zn is observed upon annealing, which depends on the sapphire host orientation.

  17. Peculiarities of the electron structure of nanosized ion-implanted layers in silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rysbaev, A. S.; Khuzhaniyazov, Zh. B.; Normuradov, M. T.; Rakhimov, A. M.; Bekpulatov, I. R.

    2014-11-01

    The effect of implantation of Ba, P, B, and alkali element ions with a low energy ( E 0 narrowing of the band gap in silicon, which can be explained by overlapping of the wavefunctions of electrons of impurity atoms and the formation of the impurity subband overlapping with the allowed band. After implantation thermal annealing, SiP, BaSi, and SiB3 films of nano-sized thickness are obtained for the first time. Optimal regimes of ion implantation and subsequent annealing for the formation of silicide films are determined, and their electron structure is investigated.

  18. Structural Investigation of Small Cu Clusters Obtained by Ion-Implantation in Amorphous Silica

    OpenAIRE

    1997-01-01

    In this paper we present an EXAFS study on Cu clusters obtained by ion-implantation in amorphous silica substrates. As-implanted and 700°C annealed samples were analyzed both at liquid nitrogen temperature and room temperature in order to determine the structural parameters. Evidence of a lattice contraction beyond the anharmonic correction were found in the tiniest particles, as well as a clear contribution of static disorder to the total Debye-Waller factor. No change of the Debye temperatu...

  19. Production yield of rare-earth ions implanted into an optical crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kornher, Thomas, E-mail: t.kornher@physik.uni-stuttgart.de; Xia, Kangwei; Kolesov, Roman; Reuter, Rolf; Villa, Bruno; Wrachtrup, Jörg [3. Physikalisches Institut, Universität Stuttgart, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Kukharchyk, Nadezhda; Wieck, Andreas D. [Angewandte Festkörperphysik, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, 44780 Bochum (Germany); Siyushev, Petr [Universität Ulm, Institut für Quantenoptik, 89081 Ulm (Germany); Stöhr, Rainer [3. Physikalisches Institut, Universität Stuttgart, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Institute for Quantum Computing, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada); Schreck, Matthias [Experimentalphysik IV, Universität Augsburg, 86159 Augsburg (Germany); Becker, Hans-Werner [RUBION, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, 44780 Bochum (Germany)

    2016-02-01

    Rare-earth (RE) ions doped into desired locations of optical crystals might enable a range of novel integrated photonic devices for quantum applications. With this aim, we have investigated the production yield of cerium and praseodymium by means of ion implantation. As a measure, the collected fluorescence intensity from both implanted samples and single centers was used. With a tailored annealing procedure for cerium, a yield up to 53% was estimated. Praseodymium yield amounts up to 91%. Such high implantation yield indicates a feasibility of creation of nanopatterned rare-earth doping and suggests strong potential of RE species for on-chip photonic devices.

  20. Electronic transition imaging of carbon based materials: The photothreshold of melanin and thermionic field emission from diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garguilo, Jacob

    This study explores electronic transitions in carbon based materials through the use of a custom built, non rastering electron emission microscope. The specifics and history of electron emission are described as well as the equipment used in this study. The materials examined fall into two groups, melanosome films isolated from the human body and polycrystalline diamond tip arrays. A novel technique for determining the photothreshold of a heterogeneous material on a microscopic or smaller scale is developed and applied to melanosome films isolated from the hair, eyes, and brain of human donors. The conversion of the measured photothreshold on the vacuum scale to an electrochemical oxidation potential is discussed and the obtained data is considered based on this conversion. Pheomelanosomes isolated from human hair are shown to have significantly lower photoionization energy than eumelanosomes, indicating their likelihood as sources of oxidative stress. The ionization energies of the hair melanosomes are checked with complimentary procedures. Ocular melanosomes from the retinal pigment epithelium are measured as a function of patient age and melanosome shape. Lipofuscin, also found in the eye, is examined with the same microscopy technique and shown to have a significantly lower ionization threshold than RPE melanosomes. Neuromelanin from the substantia nigra is also examined and shown to have an ionization threshold close to that of eumelanin. A neuromelanin formation model is proposed based on these results. Polycrystalline diamond tip arrays are examined for their use as thermionic energy converter emitters. Thermionic energy conversion is accomplished through the combination of a hot electron emitter in conjunction with a somewhat cooler electron collector. The generated electron current can be used to do work in an external load. It is shown that the tipped structures of these samples result in enhanced emission over the surrounding flat areas, which may prove