WorldWideScience

Sample records for carbon ion implantation

  1. Study on organosilicon plasma polymers implanted by carbon ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radeva, E; Yourukova, L; Kolentsov, K; Balabanov, S; Zhechev, D; Steflekova, V [Georgi Nadjakov Institute of Solid State Physics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 72 Tzarigradsko Chaussee, 1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); Amov, B [Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 72 Tzarigradsko Chaussee, 1784 Sofia (Bulgaria)], E-mail: eradeva@issp.bas.bg

    2008-05-01

    In the present work plasma polymer films obtained from hexamethyldisiloxane have been implanted by carbon ions at three different doses. The photoluminescent properties of the implanted polymers were investigated. The optical transmission of these polymer layers was investigated in the visible spectral region. Their electrical parameters were also measured. It was found that the resulting changes do not worsen the protective properties of the implanted polymer layer. The variations in the properties studied might be ascribed to the nanostructured carbon clusters formed on the polymer surface. The results obtained could form the basis for further optimization of the polymer structure by carbon ion implantation in view of applications in electroluminescent display structures.

  2. Ion implantation inhibits cell attachment to glassy polymeric carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Implantation of MeV gold, oxygen, carbon ions into GPC alters the surface topography of GPC and enhances the already strong tendency for cells to attach to GPC. We have shown that implantation of silver ions near the surface strongly inhibits cell growth on GPC. Both enhanced adhesion of and inhibition of cell growth are desirable improvements on cardiac implants that have long been successfully fabricated from biocompatible glassy polymeric carbon (GPC). In vitro biocompatibility tests have been carried out with model cell lines to demonstrate that ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD) of silver, as well as silver ion bombardment, can favorably influence the surface of GPC for biomedical applications

  3. Surface modification of commercial tin coatings by carbon ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, L.J.; Sood, D.K.; Manory, R.R. [Royal Melbourne Inst. of Tech., VIC (Australia)

    1993-12-31

    Commercial TiN coatings of about 2 {mu}m thickness on high speed steel substrates were implanted at room temperature with 95 keV carbon ions at nominal doses between 1 x 10{sup 17} - 8x10{sup 17} ions cm{sup -2}. Carbon ion implantation induced a significant improvement in ultramicrohardness, friction coefficient and wear properties. The surface microhardness increases monotonically by up to 115% until a critical dose is reached. Beyond this dose the hardness decreases, but remains higher than that of unimplanted sample. A lower friction coefficient and a longer transition period towards a steady state condition were obtained by carbon ion implantation. The changes in tribomechanical properties are discussed in terms of radiation damage and possible formation of a second phase rich in carbon. 6 refs., 3 figs.

  4. High temperature annealing studies of strontium ion implanted glassy carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odutemowo, O. S.; Malherbe, J. B.; Prinsloo, L.; Langa, D. F.; Wendler, E.

    2016-03-01

    Glassy carbon samples were implanted with 200 keV strontium ions to a fluence of 2 × 1016 ions/cm2 at room temperature. Analysis with Raman spectroscopy showed that ion bombardment amorphises the glassy carbon structure. Partial recovery of the glassy carbon structure was achieved after the implanted sample was vacuum annealed at 900 °C for 1 h. Annealing the strontium ion bombarded sample at 2000 °C for 5 h resulted in recovery of the glassy carbon substrate with the intensity of the D peak becoming lower than that of the pristine glassy carbon. Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) showed that the implanted strontium diffused towards the surface of the glassy carbon after annealing the sample at 900 °C. This diffusion was also accompanied by loss of the implanted strontium. Comparison between the as-implanted and 900 °C depth profiles showed that less than 30% of the strontium was retained in the glassy carbon after heat treatment at 900 °C. The RBS profile after annealing at 2000 °C indicated that no strontium ions were retained after heat treatment at this temperature.

  5. Characterization of carbon ion implantation induced graded microstructure and phase transformation in stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Austenitic stainless steel 316L is ion implanted by carbon with implantation fluences of 1.2 × 1017 ions-cm− 2, 2.4 × 1017 ions-cm− 2, and 4.8 × 1017 ions-cm− 2. The ion implantation induced graded microstructure and phase transformation in stainless steel is investigated by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. The corrosion resistance is evaluated by potentiodynamic test. It is found that the initial phase is austenite with a small amount of ferrite. After low fluence carbon ion implantation, an amorphous layer and ferrite phase enriched region underneath are formed. Nanophase particles precipitate from the amorphous layer due to energy minimization and irradiation at larger ion implantation fluence. The morphology of the precipitated nanophase particles changes from circular to dumbbell-like with increasing implantation fluence. The corrosion resistance of stainless steel is enhanced by the formation of amorphous layer and graphitic solid state carbon after carbon ion implantation. - Highlights: • Carbon implantation leads to phase transformation from austenite to ferrite. • The passive film on SS316L becomes thinner after carbon ion implantation. • An amorphous layer is formed by carbon ion implantation. • Nanophase precipitate from amorphous layer at higher ion implantation fluence. • Corrosion resistance of SS316L is improved by carbon implantation

  6. Characterization of surface enhancement of carbon ion-implanted TiN coatings by metal vapor vacuum arc ion implantation

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, C L

    2002-01-01

    The modification of the surfaces of energetic carbon-implanted TiN films using metal vapor vacuum arc (MEVVA) ion implantation was investigated, by varying ion energy and dose. The microhardness, microstructure and chemical states of carbon, implanted on the surface layer of TiN films, were examined, as functions of ion energy and dose, by nanoindenter, transmission electron microscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Results revealed that the microhardness increased from 16.8 up to 25.3 GPa and the friction coefficient decreased to approximately 0.2, depending on the implanted ion energy and dose. The result is attributed to the new microcrystalline phases of TiCN and TiC formed, and carbon concentration saturation of the implanted matrix can enhance the partial mechanical property of TiN films after MEVVA treatment. The concentration distribution, implantation depth and chemical states of carbon-implanted TiN coatings depended strongly on the ion dose and...

  7. Synthesis of amorphous carbon nitride by ion implantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ChenZ.; OlofinjanaA.; BellJ

    2001-01-01

    N2+ were implanted into diamondlike carbon (DLC) films in an attempt to synthesizeamorphous carbon nitride. The DLC films were previously deposited on steel substrate by using anion beam sputtering deposition (IBSD) where a single Kaufman type ion gun with argon sourcewas used to sputter a graphite target and simultaneously bombard the growing film. Parallel to theion implantation route, amorphous carbon nitride films were also synthesized by directly using thereactive ion beam sputtering deposition (RIBSD) with nitrogen source to incorporate nitrogen intothe film. The structure and properties of the films were determined by using Raman spectroscopy,XPS and nano-indentation. The implantation of N2+ into a-C films offers a higher hardness thanthat directly synthesized by RIBSD, probably through an increase in sp3/sp2 ratio and in the pro-portion of nitrogen atoms chemically bonding to carbon atoms. The results show that althoughthere are differences in film composition, structure and properties between these two processes,both methods can be used for synthesis of nitrogen-containing amorphous DLC thin films whichsignificantly modify the substrate surface.

  8. Ion implanted pyrolitic carbon for the hip prosthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Hip joint arthroplasty is a successful surgical procedure, but loosening induced by polyethylene wear debris continues to be a problem. Fine grained isotropic graphite (POCO ZXF-5Q) coated with Pyrolite (trademark of Carbomedics Inc.) combines biocompatibility, strength and tribological properties which could be utilised in a hip prosthesis. Some preliminary work has been conducted on this material, and the effect nitrogen ion implantation has on its wear resistance. Finite element analysis was conducted on a femoral head of a canine hip prosthesis with diameter 19mm made from POCO ZXF-5Q . An optimum design was obtained after design variables such as taper angle and width, internal recess radius, crown thickness were varied so that internal stresses were minimised. This was then translated into an human sized femoral head with diameter 28mm, which was subjected to mechanical testing. Loading was at 20 deg C to the taper, with loading rate 10kN/s used in static loading, whilst fatigue testing was carried out between 300 - 3000N at 30Hz for 107 cycles. Pin-on-disc wear testing was carried out using a CSEM Tribometer. A 1N load was applied to 6mm diameter pins. Wear track radii were 11 and 13mm, with linear velocity 5cm/s and sliding distance 2.5km. Test temperature was 37±1degC with Ringer solution and bovine serum being used as lubricant. Nitrogen implanted samples were irradiated to a dose of 5x1016 ions.cm-2 at 50keV. Static testing was carried out to loads of 8000N and all five POCO ZXF-5Q femoral heads tested survived. Then three of these pre-tested femoral heads were subjected to fatigue testing and no failures occured before 107 cycles. Wear was reduced by nitrogen ion implantation only when an irradiated pin was tested against as polished Pyrolite. Nitrogen ion implanted Pyrolite on a POCO ZXF-5Q substrate may have clinical potential. The substrate has appropriate mechanical properties, and nitrogen ion implantation can improve the already

  9. Immobilization of extracellular matrix on polymeric materials by carbon-negative-ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Hiroshi; Sommani, Piyanuch; Muto, Takashi; Utagawa, Yoshiyuki; Sakai, Shun; Sato, Hiroko; Gotoh, Yasuhito; Ishikawa, Junzo

    2005-08-01

    Effects of ion implantation into polystyrene (PS), silicone rubber (SR) and poly-L-lactic acid (PLA) have been investigated for immobilization of extracellular matrix. Carbon negative ions were implanted into PS and SR sheets at various energies between 5-30 keV and various doses between 1.0 × 1014-1.0 × 1016 ions/cm2. Contact angles of pure water on C-implanted surfaces of PS and SR were decreased as increase in ion energy and in dose due to formation of functional groups such as OH and C-O. Selective attachment of nerve cells was observed on C-implanted them at 10 keV and 3 × 1015 ions/cm2 after in vitro cell culture of nerve cells of PC-12 h. Neurite outgrowth also extended over the implanted area. After dipping in a serum medium and in a fibronectin solution for 2 h, the detection of N 1s electrons by X-ray induced photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) revealed a significant distinction of protein adhesion on the implanted area. Thus, immobilization of proteins on surface is used for considering the selective cell-attachment. For PLA, the selective attachment of cells and protein depended on the implantation conditions.

  10. Ion-implanted Mechanism of the Deposition Process for Diamond-Like Carbon Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xue-Min; WU Wei-Dong; WANG Yu-Ying; WANG Hai-Ping; GE Fang-Fang; TANG Yong-Jian; JU Xin

    2011-01-01

    Due to the local densification, high-energy C and doped ions can greatly affect the bonding configurations of diamond-like carbon films. We investigate the corresponding affection of different incident ions with energy from WeV to 600eV by Monte Carlo methods. The ion-implanted mechanism called the subplantation (for C, N, O, W, Y, etc.) is confirmed. Obvious thermal effect could be induced by the subplantation of the incident ions. Further, the subplantation of C ions is proved by in situ reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED). The observation from an atomic force microscope (AFM) indicates that the initial implantation of C ions might result in the final primitive-cell-like morphology of the smooth film (in an area of 1.2 mm × 0.9 mm, rms roughness smaller than 20 nm by Wyko).

  11. Effective Stress Reduction in Diamond Films on Alumina by Carbon Ion Implantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    方志军; 夏义本; 王林军; 张伟丽; 马哲国; 张明龙

    2002-01-01

    We show the effective stress reduction in diamond films by implanting carbon ions into alumina substrates prior to the diamond deposition. Residual stresses in the films are evaluated by Raman spectroscopy and a more reliable method for stress determination is presented for the quantitative measurement of stress evolution. It is found that compressive stresses in the diamond films can be partly offset by the compressive stresses in the alumina substrates, which are caused by the ion pre-implantation. At the same time, the difference between the offset by the pre-stressed substrates and the total stress reduction indicates that some other mechanisms are also active.

  12. In-situ observation of sputtered particles for carbon implanted tungsten during energetic isotope ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oya, Y.; Sato, M.; Uchimura, H.; Okuno, K. [Graduate School of Science, Shizuoka University, Shizuoka (Japan); Ashikawa, N.; Sagara, A. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Gifu (Japan); Yoshida, N. [Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Kasuga (Japan); Hatano, Y. [Hydrogen Isotope Research Center, University of Toyama, Toyama (Japan)

    2015-03-15

    Tungsten is a candidate for plasma facing materials in future fusion reactors. During DT plasma operations, carbon as an impurity will bombard tungsten, leading to the formation of tungsten-carbon (WC) layer and affecting tritium recycling behavior. The effect of carbon implantation for the dynamic recycling of deuterium, which demonstrates tritium recycling, including retention and sputtering, has been investigated using in-situ sputtered particle measurements. The C{sup +} implanted W, WC and HOPG were prepared and dynamic sputtered particles were measured during H{sub 2}{sup +} irradiation. It has been found that the major hydrocarbon species for C{sup +} implanted tungsten is CH{sub 3}, while for WC and HOPG (Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite) it is CH{sub 4}. The chemical state of hydrocarbon is controlled by the H concentration in a W-C mixed layer. The amount of C-H bond and the retention of H trapped by carbon atom should control the chemical form of hydrocarbon sputtered by H{sub 2}{sup +} irradiation and the desorption of CH{sub 3} and CH{sub 2} are due to chemical sputtering, although that for CH is physical sputtering. The activation energy for CH{sub 3} desorption has been estimated to be 0.4 eV, corresponding to the trapping process of hydrogen by carbon through the diffusion in W. It is concluded that the chemical states of hydrocarbon sputtered by H{sub 2}{sup +} irradiation for W is determined by the amount of C-H bond on the W surface. (authors)

  13. Improvement on corrosion resistance of NiTi orthopedic materials by carbon plasma immersion ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Ray W. Y.; Ho, Joan P. Y.; Luk, Camille M. Y.; Liu, Xuanyong; Chung, Jonathan C. Y.; Chu, Paul K.; Yeung, Kelvin W. K.; Lu, William W.; Cheung, Kenneth M. C.

    2006-01-01

    Nickel-titanium shape memory alloys (NiTi) have potential applications as orthopedic implants because of their unique super-elastic properties and shape memory effects. However, the problem of out-diffusion of harmful Ni ions from the alloys during prolonged use inside a human body must be overcome before they can be widely used in orthopedic implants. In this work, we enhance the corrosion resistance of NiTi using carbon plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (PIII&D). Our corrosion and simulated body fluid tests indicate that either an ion-mixed amorphous carbon coating fabricated by PIII&D or direct carbon PIII can drastically improve the corrosion resistance and block the out-diffusion of Ni from the materials. Results of atomic force microscopy (AFM) indicate that both C2H2-PIII&D and C2H2-PIII do not roughen the original flat surface to an extent that can lead to degradation in corrosion resistance.

  14. The tribological properties of nanometre carbon films prepared by plasma-based ion implantation at various implanting voltages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    About 30 nm thick nanometre carbon films have been prepared on Si wafers by plasma-based ion implantation at various implanting voltages. The ball-on-disc sliding friction experiments show that the tribological properties of these carbon films are in good agreement with the corresponding structure characteristics which strongly depend on the implanting voltage. These structure characteristics include the film roughness, the film thickness, the C-Si transition layer between the carbon film and the Si substrate and the sp3/sp2 ratio. As the implanting voltage increases, the roughness and the thickness decrease, the C-Si transition layer thickens and the sp3/sp2 ratio first increases to the maximum value at about 30 kV and then decreases. 3 kV and below correspond to bad tribological properties owing to polymer-like carbon (PLC) film and no C-Si transition layer with poor adhesion to the Si substrate. When the implanting voltage increases to over 3 kV, a C-Si transition layer is gradually formed and thickens with increasing adhesion, and the PLC film is gradually turned into a diamond-like carbon (DLC) film, and hence the tribological properties are gradually improved and reach the best values at 30 kV. 10-50 kV correspond to two orders of increase in wear life, close to zero volume wear rate, but about 0.3 friction coefficient at 0.1 N applied load. With the increase in the applied load, the wear life and the friction coefficient decrease and the wear rate increases. For Si wafers coated with the DLC films at 30 kV, in the range of 0.5-1 N, there is an appropriate value corresponding to the wear life of above 18 000 s, friction coefficient of about 0.1 and wear rate of 10-9 mm3 N-1 m-1 level. Additionally, the wear mechanism is discussed

  15. Transition Metal Ion Implantation into Diamond-Like Carbon Coatings: Development of a Base Material for Gas Sensing Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Markwitz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Micrometre thick diamond-like carbon (DLC coatings produced by direct ion deposition were implanted with 30 keV Ar+ and transition metal ions in the lower percentage (<10 at.% range. Theoretical calculations showed that the ions are implanted just beneath the surface, which was confirmed with RBS measurements. Atomic force microscope scans revealed that the surface roughness increases when implanted with Ar+ and Cu+ ions, whereas a smoothing of the surface from 5.2 to 2.7 nm and a grain size reduction from 175 to 93 nm are measured for Ag+ implanted coatings with a fluence of 1.24×1016 at. cm−2. Calculated hydrogen and carbon depth profiles showed surprisingly significant changes in concentrations in the near-surface region of the DLC coatings, particularly when implanted with Ag+ ions. Hydrogen accumulates up to 32 at.% and the minimum of the carbon distribution is shifted towards the surface which may be the cause of the surface smoothing effect. The ion implantations caused an increase in electrical conductivity of the DLC coatings, which is important for the development of solid-state gas sensors based on DLC coatings.

  16. Influence of Zn ion implantation on structures and field emission properties of multi-walled carbon nanotube arrays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The structures and field emission properties of multi-walled carbon nanotube arrays implanted with Zn+ by MEVVA ion implanter have been investigated.The results revealed that Zn+implantation induced structural damage and that the top of carbon nanotubes with multi-layered graphite structure were transformed into carbon nanowires with amorphous structure.Meanwhile,C:Zn solid solution was synthesized after Zn+ implantation.The turn-on field and threshold field were 0.80 and 1.31 V/μm,respectively for original multi-walled carbon nanotube arrays and were reduced to 0.66 and 1.04 V/μm due to the synthesis of C and Zn composite,in which the work function was reduced after low doses of Zn+implantation.It is indicated that low doses of Zn+implantation can improve field emission performance of multi-walled carbon nanotube arrays.Otherwise,high doses of Zn+implantation can reduce field emission properties of multi-walled carbon nanotube arrays,because radiation damage reduces the electric field enhancement factor.

  17. Ion implantation technology

    CERN Document Server

    Downey, DF; Jones, KS; Ryding, G

    1993-01-01

    Ion implantation technology has made a major contribution to the dramatic advances in integrated circuit technology since the early 1970's. The ever-present need for accurate models in ion implanted species will become absolutely vital in the future due to shrinking feature sizes. Successful wide application of ion implantation, as well as exploitation of newly identified opportunities, will require the development of comprehensive implant models. The 141 papers (including 24 invited papers) in this volume address the most recent developments in this field. New structures and possible approach

  18. Influence of 400 keV carbon ion implantation on structural, optical and electrical properties of PMMA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion implantation is a useful technique to modify surface properties of polymers without altering their bulk properties. The objective of this work is to explore the 400 keV C+ ion implantation effects on PMMA at different fluences ranging from 5 × 1013 to 5 × 1015 ions/cm2. The surface topographical examination of irradiated samples has been performed using Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). The structural and chemical modifications in implanted PMMA are examined by Raman and Fourier Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) respectively. The effects of carbon ion implantation on optical properties of PMMA are investigated by UV–Visible spectroscopy. The modifications in electrical conductivity have been measured using a four point probe technique. AFM images reveal a decrease in surface roughness of PMMA with an increase in ion fluence from 5 × 1014 to 5 × 1015 ions/cm2. The existence of amorphization and sp2-carbon clusterization has been confirmed by Raman and FTIR spectroscopic analysis. The UV–Visible data shows a prominent red shift in absorption edge as a function of ion fluence. This shift displays a continuous reduction in optical band gap (from 3.13 to 0.66 eV) due to formation of carbon clusters. Moreover, size of carbon clusters and photoconductivity are found to increase with increasing ion fluence. The ion-induced carbonaceous clusters are believed to be responsible for an increase in electrical conductivity of PMMA from (2.14 ± 0.06) × 10−10 (Ω-cm)−1 (pristine) to (0.32 ± 0.01) × 10−5 (Ω-cm)−1 (irradiated sample)

  19. Diamondlike carbon deposition on plastic films by plasma source ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Application of pulsed high negative voltage (∼10 μs pulse width, 300-900 pulses per second) to a substrate is found to induce discharge, thereby increasing ion current with an inductively coupled plasma source. This plasma source ion beam implantation (PSII) technique is investigated for the pretreatment and deposition of diamond-like carbon (DLC) thin layer on polyethylene terepthalate (PET) film. Pretreatment of PET with N2 and Ar plasma is expected to provide added barrier effects when coupled with DLC deposition, with possible application to fabrication of PET beverage bottles. PSII treatment using N2 and Ar in separate stages is found to change the color of the PET film, effectively increasing near-ultraviolet absorption. The effects of this pretreatment on the chemical bonding of C, H, and O are examined by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). DLC thin film was successfully deposited on the PET film. The surface of the DLC thin layer is observed to be smooth by scanning electron microscopy, and its structure characteristics are examined by XPS and laser Raman spectroscopy. Subsequent processing using acetylene or acetylene and Ar (20%) produced thin carbon layers that are confirmed to be graphite-dominated DLC. Also, this PSII method is employed in order to deposit the DLC layer on the inside surface of the PET bottle and to reduce oxygen permeation rate by 40%

  20. Diamondlike carbon deposition on plastic films by plasma source ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, T.; Yoshida, M.; Shinohara, M.; Takagi, T.

    2002-05-01

    Application of pulsed high negative voltage (~10 μs pulse width, 300-900 pulses per second) to a substrate is found to induce discharge, thereby increasing ion current with an inductively coupled plasma source. This plasma source ion beam implantation (PSII) technique is investigated for the pretreatment and deposition of diamond-like carbon (DLC) thin layer on polyethylene terepthalate (PET) film. Pretreatment of PET with N2 and Ar plasma is expected to provide added barrier effects when coupled with DLC deposition, with possible application to fabrication of PET beverage bottles. PSII treatment using N2 and Ar in separate stages is found to change the color of the PET film, effectively increasing near-ultraviolet absorption. The effects of this pretreatment on the chemical bonding of C, H, and O are examined by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). DLC thin film was successfully deposited on the PET film. The surface of the DLC thin layer is observed to be smooth by scanning electron microscopy, and its structure characteristics are examined by XPS and laser Raman spectroscopy. Subsequent processing using acetylene or acetylene and Ar (20%) produced thin carbon layers that are confirmed to be graphite-dominated DLC. Also, this PSII method is employed in order to deposit the DLC layer on the inside surface of the PET bottle and to reduce oxygen permeation rate by 40%.

  1. Ion Implantation of Polymers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Popok, Vladimir

    2012-01-01

    The current paper presents a state-of-the-art review in the field of ion implantation of polymers. Numerous published studies of polymers modified by ion beams are analysed. General aspects of ion stopping, latent track formation and changes of structure and composition of organic materials...... are discussed. Related to that, the effects of radiothermolysis, degassing and carbonisation are considered. Specificity of depth distributions of implanted into polymers impurities is analysed and the case of high-fluence implantation is emphasised. Within rather broad topic of ion bombardment, the focus...... is put on the low-energy implantation of metal ions causing the nucleation and growth of nanoparticles in the shallow polymer layers. Electrical, optical and magnetic properties of metal/polymer composites are under the discussion and the approaches towards practical applications are overviewed....

  2. Modification of diamond-like carbon films by nitrogen incorporation via plasma immersion ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flege, S.; Hatada, R.; Hoefling, M.; Hanauer, A.; Abel, A.; Baba, K.; Ensinger, W.

    2015-12-01

    The addition of nitrogen to diamond-like carbon films affects properties such as the inner stress of the film, the conductivity, biocompatibility and wettability. The nitrogen content is limited, though, and the maximum concentration depends on the preparation method. Here, plasma immersion ion implantation was used for the deposition of the films, without the use of a separate plasma source, i.e. the plasma was generated by a high voltage applied to the samples. The plasma gas consisted of a mixture of C2H4 and N2, the substrates were silicon and glass. By changing the experimental parameters (high voltage, pulse length and repetition rate and gas flow ratio) layers with different N content were prepared. Additionally, some samples were prepared using a DC voltage. The nitrogen content and bonding was investigated with SIMS, AES, XPS, FTIR and Raman spectroscopy. Their influence on the electrical resistivity of the films was investigated. Depending on the preparation conditions different nitrogen contents were realized with maximum contents around 11 at.%. Those values were compared with the nitrogen concentration that can be achieved by implantation of nitrogen into a DLC film.

  3. Diamondlike carbon deposition on plastic films by plasma source ion implantation

    CERN Document Server

    Tanaka, T; Shinohara, M; Takagi, T

    2002-01-01

    Application of pulsed high negative voltage (approx 10 mu s pulse width, 300-900 pulses per second) to a substrate is found to induce discharge, thereby increasing ion current with an inductively coupled plasma source. This plasma source ion beam implantation (PSII) technique is investigated for the pretreatment and deposition of diamond-like carbon (DLC) thin layer on polyethylene terepthalate (PET) film. Pretreatment of PET with N sub 2 and Ar plasma is expected to provide added barrier effects when coupled with DLC deposition, with possible application to fabrication of PET beverage bottles. PSII treatment using N sub 2 and Ar in separate stages is found to change the color of the PET film, effectively increasing near-ultraviolet absorption. The effects of this pretreatment on the chemical bonding of C, H, and O are examined by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). DLC thin film was successfully deposited on the PET film. The surface of the DLC thin layer is observed to be smooth by scanning electron mic...

  4. The effect of ion implantation on the tribomechanical properties of carbon fibre reinforced polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mistica, R.; Sood, D.K. [Royal Melbourne Inst. of Tech., VIC (Australia); Janardhana, M.N. [Deakin University, Geelong, VIC (Australia). School of Engineering and Technology

    1993-12-31

    Graphite fibre reinforced epoxy composite material (GFRP) is used extensively in the aerospace and other industries for structural application. The trend is to address the 20 to 30 year life endurance of this material in service. Mechanical joints in air crafts are exposed to dynamic loads during service and wear may be experienced by the composite material joint. Generally it has been shown that graphite fibre reinforced polymers have superior wear and friction properties as compared with the unfilled polymers. In the described experiment, ion implantation was used as a novel surface treatment. Wear and friction of a polymer composite material (GFRP) was studied and ion implantation was used in order to observe the effect on the tribomechanical properties of the material. It was found that ion implantation of C on GFRP sliding against Ti changes the tribological properties of the system, and in particular decreases the coefficient of friction and wear. 4 refs., 2 figs.

  5. Optical properties and oxidation of carbonized and cross-linked structures formed in polycarbonate by plasma immersion ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosobrodova, E.; Kondyurin, A.; Chrzanowski, W.; McCulloch, D. G.; McKenzie, D. R.; Bilek, M. M. M.

    2014-06-01

    At ion fluences higher than 5 · 1015 ions/cm2, plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) of polycarbonate (PC) results in a formation of a carbonized surface layer. The thickness of this layer is close to the depth of ion penetration. A comparison of PIII treated, spin-coated PC films with pre-treatment thicknesses designed to match and exceed the carbonized layer thickness is employed to study the properties of the carbonised layer independently from the less modified underlying structure. At ion fluencies higher than 1016 ions/cm2, the thinner PC film is completely transformed into an amorphous carbon-like material with no traces of the initial PC structure. The thicker films, however, incorporated two layers: a top carbonised layer and a cross-linked layer below. Compared to the two-layered PC film, the completely carbonized layer was found to have a much higher concentration of Cdbnd O bonds and much lower concentration of O-H bonds after exposure to atmospheric oxygen. The refractive index of the thicker PC films PIII treated with high ion fluencies is close to the refractive index of diamond-like carbon. Anomalous dispersion of the refractive index of the thicker PC films is observed after formation of the carbonised layer. The refractive index of the thinner PC film has normal dispersion at all ion fluences. At ion fluences of 2 · 1016 ions/cm2, both PC films were found to have the same etching rate as polystyrene. Washing in dichloromethane had no effect on the carbonised layer but affected the underlying material in the case of the thicker PC films leading to a wrinkled structure up to ion fluences of 2 · 1016 ions/cm2. At this and higher fluence, areas of an ordered island-like structure were observed.

  6. Optical properties and oxidation of carbonized and cross-linked structures formed in polycarbonate by plasma immersion ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosobrodova, E., E-mail: elenak@physics.usyd.edu.au [Department of Applied Plasma and Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Kondyurin, A. [Department of Applied Plasma and Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Chrzanowski, W. [Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Department of Nanobiomedical Science and BK21 PLUS NBM Global Research, Center for Regenerative Medicine, Dankook University, Cheonan 330-714 (Korea, Republic of); McCulloch, D.G. [School of Applied Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria 3001 (Australia); McKenzie, D.R.; Bilek, M.M.M. [Department of Applied Plasma and Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2014-06-01

    Highlights: • Structure and properties of polycarbonate films spin-coated on silicon are studied. • The films have two thicknesses: thicker and thinner than a depth of ion penetration. • Effect of radio frequency plasma and plasma immersion ion implantation is compared. - Abstract: At ion fluences higher than 5 · 10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2}, plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) of polycarbonate (PC) results in a formation of a carbonized surface layer. The thickness of this layer is close to the depth of ion penetration. A comparison of PIII treated, spin-coated PC films with pre-treatment thicknesses designed to match and exceed the carbonized layer thickness is employed to study the properties of the carbonised layer independently from the less modified underlying structure. At ion fluencies higher than 10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2}, the thinner PC film is completely transformed into an amorphous carbon-like material with no traces of the initial PC structure. The thicker films, however, incorporated two layers: a top carbonised layer and a cross-linked layer below. Compared to the two-layered PC film, the completely carbonized layer was found to have a much higher concentration of C=O bonds and much lower concentration of O–H bonds after exposure to atmospheric oxygen. The refractive index of the thicker PC films PIII treated with high ion fluencies is close to the refractive index of diamond-like carbon. Anomalous dispersion of the refractive index of the thicker PC films is observed after formation of the carbonised layer. The refractive index of the thinner PC film has normal dispersion at all ion fluences. At ion fluences of 2 · 10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2}, both PC films were found to have the same etching rate as polystyrene. Washing in dichloromethane had no effect on the carbonised layer but affected the underlying material in the case of the thicker PC films leading to a wrinkled structure up to ion fluences of 2 · 10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2}. At

  7. Elimination of carbon vacancies in 4H-SiC epi-layers by near-surface ion implantation: Influence of the ion species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The carbon vacancy (VC) is a prevailing point defect in high-purity 4H-SiC epitaxial layers, and it plays a decisive role in controlling the charge carrier lifetime. One concept of reducing the VC-concentration is based on carbon self-ion implantation in a near surface layer followed by thermal annealing. This leads to injection of carbon interstitials (Ci's) and annihilation of VC's in the epi-layer “bulk”. Here, we show that the excess of C atoms introduced by the self-ion implantation plays a negligible role in the VC annihilation. Actually, employing normalized implantation conditions with respect to displaced C atoms, other heavier ions like Al and Si are found to be more efficient in annihilating VC's. Concentrations of VC below ∼2 × 1011 cm−3 can be reached already after annealing at 1400 °C, as monitored by deep-level transient spectroscopy. This corresponds to a reduction in the VC-concentration by about a factor of 40 relative to the as-grown state of the epi-layers studied. The negligible role of the implanted species itself can be understood from simulation results showing that the concentration of displaced C atoms exceeds the concentration of implanted species by two to three orders of magnitude. The higher efficiency for Al and Si ions is attributed to the generation of collision cascades with a sufficiently high energy density to promote Ci-clustering and reduce dynamic defect annealing. These Ci-related clusters will subsequently dissolve during the post-implant annealing giving rise to enhanced Ci injection. However, at annealing temperatures above 1500 °C, thermodynamic equilibrium conditions start to apply for the VC-concentration, which limit the net effect of the Ci injection, and a competition between the two processes occurs

  8. Ion implantation in polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wintersgill, M. C.

    1984-02-01

    An introductory overview will be given of the effects of ion implantation on polymers, and certain areas will be examined in more detail. Radiation effects in general and ion implantation in particular, in the field of polymers, present a number of contrasts with those in ionic crystals, the most obvious difference being that the chemical effects of both the implanted species and the energy transfer to the host may profoundly change the nature of the target material. Common effects include crosslinking and scission of polymer chains, gas evolution, double bond formation and the formation of additional free radicals. Research has spanned the chemical processes involved, including polymerization reactions achievable only with the use of radiation, to applied research dealing both with the effects of radiation on polymers already in commercial use and the tailoring of new materials to specific applications. Polymers are commonly divided into two groups, in describing their behavior under irradiation. Group I includes materials which form crosslinks between molecules, whereas Group II materials tend to degrade. In basic research, interest has centered on Group I materials and of these polyethylene has been studied most intensively. Applied materials research has investigated a variety of polymers, particularly those used in cable insulation, and those utilized in ion beam lithography of etch masks. Currently there is also great interest in enhancing the conducting properties of polymers, and these uses would tend to involve the doping capabilities of ion implantation, rather than the energy deposition.

  9. Preparation of Diamond-Like carbon Films in methane by Electron Cyclotron Resonance Microwave Plasma Source Ion Implantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李新; 唐祯安; 马国佳; 吴志猛; 邓新绿

    2003-01-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films were prepared on Si (100) substrates by ion implantation from an electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasma source. During the implantation, 650 W microwave power was used to produce discharge plasma with methane as working gas, and -20 kV voltage pulses were applied to the substrate holder to accelerate ions in the plasma. Confocal Raman spectra confirmed the DLC characteristics of the films.Fourier-transform infrared characterization indicates that the DLC films were composed of sp3 and sp2 carbonbonded hydrogen. The hardness of the films was evaluated with a Nano Indenter-XP System. The result shows that the highest hardness value was 14.6GPa. The surface rms roughness of the films was as low as 0. 104nm measured with an atomic force microscope. The friction coefficient of the films was checked using a ball-on-disk microtribometer. The average friction coefficient is approximately 0.122.

  10. Enhanced Photocatalytic Activity of C-TiO2 Thin Films Prepared by Magnetron Sputtering and Post-carbon Ion Implantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Shengyun; YAN Bingxi; CAO Minjian; SHEN Jie

    2015-01-01

    TiO2 thin films were fabricated by RF magnetron sputtering on titanium substrates and then implanted with different amounts of carbon. The microstructure, valence states and optical characteristics of each sample were investigated by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and UV-vis diffuse reflection spectroscopy. Photoelectric property was evaluated under visible light using a xenon lamp as illuminant. The experimental results indicate that the implanting carbon concentration has a significant influence on film’s micro structure and element valence states. The dominant valence states of carbon vary as carbon content increases. Carbon ion implantation remarkably enhances the current density and photocatalytic capability of TiO2 thin films. The optimized implanting content is 9.83×1017 ion/cm2, which gives rise to a 150%increased photocurrent and degradation rate.

  11. Diamond-like carbon films synthesized on bearing steel surface by plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Hong-xi; TANG Bao-yin; WANG Lang-ping; WANG Xiao-feng; YU Yong-hao; SUN Tao; HU Li-guo

    2004-01-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films were synthesized by plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (PIIID) on 9Cr18 bearing steel surface. Influences of working gas pressure and pulse width of the bias voltage on properties of the thin film were investigated. The chemical compositions of the as-deposited films were characterized by Raman spectroscopy. The micro-hardness, friction and wear behavior, corrosion resistance of the samples were evaluated, respectively. Compared with uncoated substrates, micro-hardness results reveal that the maximum is increased by 88.7%. In addition, the friction coefficient decreases to about 0.1, and the corrosion resistance of treated coupons surface are improved significantly.

  12. Ion implantation into concave polymer surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new technique for ion implantation into concave surface of insulating materials is proposed and experimentally studied. The principle is roughly described by referring to modifying inner surface of a PET (polyethylene terephthalate) bottle. An electrode that is supplied with positive high-voltage pulses is inserted into the bottle. Both plasma formation and ion implantation are simultaneously realized by the same high-voltage pulses. Ion sheath with a certain thickness that depends on plasma parameters is formed just on the inner surface of the bottle. Since the plasma potential is very close to that of the electrode, ions from the plasma are accelerated in the sheath and implanted perpendicularly into the bottle's inner surface. Laser Raman spectroscopy shows that the inner surface of an ion-implanted PET bottle is modified into DLC (diamond-like carbon). Gas permeation measurement shows that gas-barrier property enhances due to the modification

  13. Ion implantation into concave polymer surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakudo, N.; Shinohara, T.; Amaya, S.; Endo, H.; Okuji, S.; Ikenaga, N.

    2006-01-01

    A new technique for ion implantation into concave surface of insulating materials is proposed and experimentally studied. The principle is roughly described by referring to modifying inner surface of a PET (polyethylene terephthalate) bottle. An electrode that is supplied with positive high-voltage pulses is inserted into the bottle. Both plasma formation and ion implantation are simultaneously realized by the same high-voltage pulses. Ion sheath with a certain thickness that depends on plasma parameters is formed just on the inner surface of the bottle. Since the plasma potential is very close to that of the electrode, ions from the plasma are accelerated in the sheath and implanted perpendicularly into the bottle's inner surface. Laser Raman spectroscopy shows that the inner surface of an ion-implanted PET bottle is modified into DLC (diamond-like carbon). Gas permeation measurement shows that gas-barrier property enhances due to the modification.

  14. Elimination of carbon vacancies in 4H-SiC epi-layers by near-surface ion implantation: Influence of the ion species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayedh, H. M.; Svensson, B. G. [University of Oslo, Department of Physics/Center for Materials Science and Nanotechnology, P.O. Box 1048 Blindern, N-0316 Oslo (Norway); Hallén, A. [School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Royal Institute of Technology, SE-164 40 Kista-Stockholm (Sweden)

    2015-11-07

    The carbon vacancy (V{sub C}) is a prevailing point defect in high-purity 4H-SiC epitaxial layers, and it plays a decisive role in controlling the charge carrier lifetime. One concept of reducing the V{sub C}-concentration is based on carbon self-ion implantation in a near surface layer followed by thermal annealing. This leads to injection of carbon interstitials (C{sub i}'s) and annihilation of V{sub C}'s in the epi-layer “bulk”. Here, we show that the excess of C atoms introduced by the self-ion implantation plays a negligible role in the V{sub C} annihilation. Actually, employing normalized implantation conditions with respect to displaced C atoms, other heavier ions like Al and Si are found to be more efficient in annihilating V{sub C}'s. Concentrations of V{sub C} below ∼2 × 10{sup 11} cm{sup −3} can be reached already after annealing at 1400 °C, as monitored by deep-level transient spectroscopy. This corresponds to a reduction in the V{sub C}-concentration by about a factor of 40 relative to the as-grown state of the epi-layers studied. The negligible role of the implanted species itself can be understood from simulation results showing that the concentration of displaced C atoms exceeds the concentration of implanted species by two to three orders of magnitude. The higher efficiency for Al and Si ions is attributed to the generation of collision cascades with a sufficiently high energy density to promote C{sub i}-clustering and reduce dynamic defect annealing. These C{sub i}-related clusters will subsequently dissolve during the post-implant annealing giving rise to enhanced C{sub i} injection. However, at annealing temperatures above 1500 °C, thermodynamic equilibrium conditions start to apply for the V{sub C}-concentration, which limit the net effect of the C{sub i} injection, and a competition between the two processes occurs.

  15. Preparation of diamond-like carbon films in methane by electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasma source ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films were prepared on Si(100) substrates by ion implantation from an electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasma source. During the implantation, 650 W microwave power was used to produce discharge plasma with methane as working gas, and -20 kV voltage pulses were applied to the substrate holder to accelerate ions in the plasma. Confocal Raman spectra confirmed the DLC characteristics of the films. Fourier-transform infrared characterization indicates that the DLC films were composed of sp3 and sp2 carbon-bonded hydrogen. The hardness of the films was evaluated with a Nano Indenter-XP System. The result shows that the highest hardness value was 14.6 GPa. The surface rms roughness of the films was as low as 0.104 nm measured with an atomic force microscope. The friction coefficient of the films was checked using a ball-on-disk microtribometer. The average friction coefficient is approximately 0.122

  16. Molecular ion sources for low energy semiconductor ion implantation (invited).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershcovitch, A; Gushenets, V I; Seleznev, D N; Bugaev, A S; Dugin, S; Oks, E M; Kulevoy, T V; Alexeyenko, O; Kozlov, A; Kropachev, G N; Kuibeda, R P; Minaev, S; Vizir, A; Yushkov, G Yu

    2016-02-01

    Smaller semiconductors require shallow, low energy ion implantation, resulting space charge effects, which reduced beam currents and production rates. To increase production rates, molecular ions are used. Boron and phosphorous (or arsenic) implantation is needed for P-type and N-type semiconductors, respectively. Carborane, which is the most stable molecular boron ion leaves unacceptable carbon residue on extraction grids. A self-cleaning carborane acid compound (C4H12B10O4) was synthesized and utilized in the ITEP Bernas ion source resulting in large carborane ion output, without carbon residue. Pure gaseous processes are desired to enable rapid switch among ion species. Molecular phosphorous was generated by introducing phosphine in dissociators via 4PH3 = P4 + 6H2; generated molecular phosphorous in a pure gaseous process was then injected into the HCEI Calutron-Bernas ion source, from which P4(+) ion beams were extracted. Results from devices and some additional concepts are described. PMID:26932065

  17. Molecular ion sources for low energy semiconductor ion implantation (invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershcovitch, A.; Gushenets, V. I.; Seleznev, D. N.; Bugaev, A. S.; Dugin, S.; Oks, E. M.; Kulevoy, T. V.; Alexeyenko, O.; Kozlov, A.; Kropachev, G. N.; Kuibeda, R. P.; Minaev, S.; Vizir, A.; Yushkov, G. Yu.

    2016-02-01

    Smaller semiconductors require shallow, low energy ion implantation, resulting space charge effects, which reduced beam currents and production rates. To increase production rates, molecular ions are used. Boron and phosphorous (or arsenic) implantation is needed for P-type and N-type semiconductors, respectively. Carborane, which is the most stable molecular boron ion leaves unacceptable carbon residue on extraction grids. A self-cleaning carborane acid compound (C4H12B10O4) was synthesized and utilized in the ITEP Bernas ion source resulting in large carborane ion output, without carbon residue. Pure gaseous processes are desired to enable rapid switch among ion species. Molecular phosphorous was generated by introducing phosphine in dissociators via 4PH3 = P4 + 6H2; generated molecular phosphorous in a pure gaseous process was then injected into the HCEI Calutron-Bernas ion source, from which P4+ ion beams were extracted. Results from devices and some additional concepts are described.

  18. Carbon nanotube growth from catalytic nano-clusters formed by hot-ion-implantation into the SiO{sub 2}/Si interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoshino, Yasushi, E-mail: yhoshino@kanagawa-u.ac.jp [Department of Information Sciences, Kanagawa University, 2946 Tsuchiya, Hiratsuka, Kanagawa 259-1293 (Japan); Arima, Hiroki; Yokoyama, Ai; Saito, Yasunao; Nakata, Jyoji [Department of Information Sciences, Kanagawa University, 2946 Tsuchiya, Hiratsuka, Kanagawa 259-1293 (Japan)

    2012-07-01

    We have studied growth of chirality-controlled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) from hot-implantation-formed catalytic nano-clusters in a thermally grown SiO{sub 2}/Si substrate. This procedure has the advantage of high controllability of the diameter and the number of clusters by optimizing the conditions of the ion implantation. In the present study, Co{sup +} ions with ion dose of 8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2} are implanted in the vicinity of the SiO{sub 2}/Si interface at 300 Degree-Sign C temperature. The implanted Co atoms located in the SiO{sub 2} layer has an amorphous-like structure with a cluster diameter of several nm. In contrast, implanted Co atoms in the Si substrate are found to take a cobalt silicide structure, confirmed by the high-resolution image of transmission electron microscope. CNTs are grown by microwave-plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. We have confirmed a large amount of vertically-aligned multi-walled CNTs from the Co nano-clusters formed by the hot-ion-implantation near the SiO{sub 2}/Si interface.

  19. Carbon coatings for medical implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Bakowicz-Mitura

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In this paper we report in vitro and in vivo results of Nanocrystalline Diamond Coatings whichare used in medicine onto medical implants The very important property of carbon coatings is the protectionliving organism against the metalosis. Different medical implants with complicated shapes are covering byNanocrystalline Diamond Coatings by RF dense plasma CVD.Design/methodology/approach: 1 Material characterizations of deposited coatings have been evaluated by using:Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM, Atomic Force Microscopy(AFM, Auger electron spectroscopy (AES, microX-Ray Spectroscopy and bend test 2 Biological investigationbased on: (a in vivo and (b in vitro examinations as well (c clinical investigations – contact allergy.Findings: It was revealed that Nanocrystalline Diamond Coatings form the barrier diffusion between implantand human environment as a consequence prevent leaching of metallic ions into the body. Additionally, theresearch on carbon coatings proved that diamond layers are biocompatible with living organism. Contact allergyon nickel is inhibited by diamond powders.Practical implications: Practical application metal implants with NCD in orthopedy, cardiosurgery, oralsurgery, maxillo-facial surgery and dermatology.Originality/value: We have observed anti-inflammatory, antiallergic and anticancerogenic responses from thecarbon coatings layers onto medical implants like wires and screws.

  20. Mechanical properties of amorphous hydrogenated carbon films fabricated on polyethylene terephthalate foils by plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H) films have been deposited on polyethylene terephthalate by plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition. The influence of deposition parameters such as gas pressure, bias voltage, and nitrogen incorporation on the mechanical properties of the a-C:H films are investigated. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveals that the ratio of sp3 to sp2 is 0.24 indicating that the film is mainly composed of graphitelike carbon. Nanoindentation tests disclose enhanced surface hardness of ∼6 GPa. The friction coefficient of the film deposited at higher gas pressure, for instance, 2.0 Pa, is lower than that of the film deposited at a lower pressure such as 0.5 Pa. The films deposited using a low bias voltage tend to fail easily in the friction tests and nitrogen incorporation into the a-C:H films decreases the friction coefficient. Mechanical folding tests show that deformation failure is worse on a thinner a-C:H film

  1. Mutation breeding by ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zengliang; Deng, Jianguo; He, Jianjun; Huo, Yuping; Wu, Yuejin; Wang, Xuedong; Lui, Guifu

    1991-07-01

    Ion implantation as a new mutagenic method has been used in the rice breeding program since 1986, and for mutation breeding of other crops later. It has been shown, in principle and in practice, that this method has many outstanding advantages: lower damage rate; higher mutation rate and wider mutational spectrum. Many new lines of rice with higher yield rate; broader disease resistance; shorter growing period but higher quality have been bred from ion beam induced mutants. Some of these lines have been utilized for the intersubspecies hybridization. Several new lines of cotton, wheat and other crops are now in breeding. Some biophysical effects of ion implantation for crop seeds have been studied.

  2. Ion implanted dielectric elastomer circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Benjamin M.; Rosset, Samuel; Anderson, Iain A.; Shea, Herbert R.

    2013-06-01

    Starfish and octopuses control their infinite degree-of-freedom arms with panache—capabilities typical of nature where the distribution of reflex-like intelligence throughout soft muscular networks greatly outperforms anything hard, heavy, and man-made. Dielectric elastomer actuators show great promise for soft artificial muscle networks. One way to make them smart is with piezo-resistive Dielectric Elastomer Switches (DES) that can be combined with artificial muscles to create arbitrary digital logic circuits. Unfortunately there are currently no reliable materials or fabrication process. Thus devices typically fail within a few thousand cycles. As a first step in the search for better materials we present a preliminary exploration of piezo-resistors made with filtered cathodic vacuum arc metal ion implantation. DES were formed on polydimethylsiloxane silicone membranes out of ion implanted gold nano-clusters. We propose that there are four distinct regimes (high dose, above percolation, on percolation, low dose) in which gold ion implanted piezo-resistors can operate and present experimental results on implanted piezo-resistors switching high voltages as well as a simple artificial muscle inverter. While gold ion implanted DES are limited by high hysteresis and low sensitivity, they already show promise for a range of applications including hysteretic oscillators and soft generators. With improvements to implanter process control the promise of artificial muscle circuitry for soft smart actuator networks could become a reality.

  3. Physical and Tribological Characteristics of Ion-Implanted Diamond Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, K.; Heidger, S.; Korenyi-Both, A. L.; Jayne, D. T.; Herrera-Fierro, P.; Shogrin, B.; Wilbur, P. J.; Wu, R. L. C.; Garscadden, A.; Barnes, P. N.

    1994-01-01

    Unidirectional sliding friction experiments were conducted with a natural, polished diamond pin in contact with both as-deposited and carbon-ion-implanted diamond films in ultrahigh vacuum. Diamond films were deposited on silicon, silicon carbide, and silicon nitride by microwave-plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition. The as-deposited diamond films were impacted with carbon ions at an accelerating energy of 60 keV and a current density of 50 micron A/cm(exp 2) for approximately 6 min, resulting in a dose of 1.2 x 10(exp 17) carbon ions/cm(exp 2). The results indicate that the carbon ion implantation produced a thin surface layer of amorphous, nondiamond carbon. The nondiamond carbon greatly decreased both friction and wear of the diamond films. The coefficients of friction for the carbon-ion-implanted, fine-grain diamond films were less than 0.1, factors of 20 to 30 lower than those for the as-deposited, fine-grain diamond films. The coefficients of friction for the carbon-ion-implanted, coarse-grain diamond films were approximately 0.35, a factor of five lower than those for the as-deposited, coarse-grain diamond films. The wear rates for the carbon-ion-implanted, diamond films were on the order of 10(exp -6) mm(exp 3)/Nm, factors of 30 to 80 lower than that for the as-deposited diamond films, regardless of grain size. The friction of the carbon-ion-implanted diamond films was greatly reduced because the amorphous, nondiamond carbon, which had a low shear strength, was restricted to the surface layers (less than 0.1 micron thick) and because the underlying diamond materials retained their high hardness. In conclusion, the carbon-ion-implanted, fine-grain diamond films can be used effectively as wear resistant, self-lubricating coatings for ceramics, such as silicon nitride and silicon carbide, in ultrahigh vacuum.

  4. Passivation of carbon steel through mercury implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilbur, P. J.; Robinson, R. S.

    1981-01-01

    An experiment, in which carbon steel samples were implanted with mercury ions from a broad beam ion source and their corrosion characteristics in air were evaluated, is described. Mercury doses of a few mA min/square cm at energies of a few hundred electron volts are shown to effect significant improvements in the corrosion resistance of the treated surfaces. In a warm moist environment the onset of rusting was extended from 15 min. for an untreated sample to approximately 30 hrs. for one implanted at a dose of 33 mA min/square cm with 1000 eV mercury ions.

  5. Optical effects of ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book, the thirteenth in the series ''Cambridge Studies in Modern Optics,'' represents the first attempt to provide a detailed description of the factors and processes that govern the optical properties of ion implanted materials. It begins with a survey of the basic physics and practical methods involved, then goes on to discuss the topics of optical absorption and luminescence. The authors present the basic theory of optical waveguides and their analysis and examine how ion implantation can be used in the production of optical waveguides. The concluding chapter deals with the progress being made in the development of device-oriented waveguide structures and how ion implantation is being used to achieve these ends

  6. Molecular ion sources for low energy semiconductor ion implantation (invited)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hershcovitch, A., E-mail: hershcovitch@bnl.gov [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Gushenets, V. I.; Bugaev, A. S.; Oks, E. M.; Vizir, A.; Yushkov, G. Yu. [High Current Electronics Institute, Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk 634055 (Russian Federation); Seleznev, D. N.; Kulevoy, T. V.; Kozlov, A.; Kropachev, G. N.; Kuibeda, R. P.; Minaev, S. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow 117218 (Russian Federation); Dugin, S.; Alexeyenko, O. [State Scientific Center of the Russian Federation State Research Institute for Chemistry and Technology of Organoelement Compounds, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2016-02-15

    Smaller semiconductors require shallow, low energy ion implantation, resulting space charge effects, which reduced beam currents and production rates. To increase production rates, molecular ions are used. Boron and phosphorous (or arsenic) implantation is needed for P-type and N-type semiconductors, respectively. Carborane, which is the most stable molecular boron ion leaves unacceptable carbon residue on extraction grids. A self-cleaning carborane acid compound (C{sub 4}H{sub 12}B{sub 10}O{sub 4}) was synthesized and utilized in the ITEP Bernas ion source resulting in large carborane ion output, without carbon residue. Pure gaseous processes are desired to enable rapid switch among ion species. Molecular phosphorous was generated by introducing phosphine in dissociators via 4PH{sub 3} = P{sub 4} + 6H{sub 2}; generated molecular phosphorous in a pure gaseous process was then injected into the HCEI Calutron-Bernas ion source, from which P{sub 4}{sup +} ion beams were extracted. Results from devices and some additional concepts are described.

  7. Modification of mechanical properties through ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fatigue, internal friction, and cavitation-erosion properties of plain steel, containing 0.18 wt.% carbon (AISI 1018), have been modified by implantation with nitrogen molecules of 150 KeV energy. It is suggested that these phenomena are related to the interactions of the implant with dislocations. Specifically, room temperature, high-cycle fatigue-lifetime can be significantly extended when the implanted specimens are aged for times sufficiently long to enable interstitial migration to and association with near-surface dislocations. Acoustically-induced cavitation-erosion behavior in distilled water at ambient temperature is also found to be improved by implantation. The role played by interstitial-dislocation association in improving these properties is examined with ultra-high sensitive internal friction and with scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Such experiments are aiding in an elucidation of the fate of the implanted nitrogen in body-centered cubic steels. These preliminary results indicate the potential applications of ion implantation for the improvement of surface-related mechanical properties. (author)

  8. Structure and tribological properties of modified layer on 2024 aluminum alloy by plasma-based ion implantation with nitrogen/titanium/carbon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张玲召; 廖家轩; 夏立芳; 刘维民; 徐洮; 薛群基

    2003-01-01

    2024 aluminum alloy was implanted with nitrogen then titanium finally carbon by plasma-based ion implantatio to form a gradient layer.The structure and tribological properties of the layer were investigated.Its composition profiles and chemical states were analyzed with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy(XPS).The surface carbonlayer was analyzed by Raman spectrum.The appearances were observed by atomic force microscope(AFM).Thesurface hardness was measured with the mechanical property microprobe.The dry wear tests against GCr15 steelball at various sliding loads were performed with a ball-on-disk wear tester in ambient environment.The resultsshow that the thickness of the modified layer is 1 200 nm,the carbon layer is a smooth and compact diamond-likecarbon(DLC)films,and the carbon-titanium interface is broadened due to carbon ions implantation,resulting in agood composition and structure transition between DLC films and titanium layer.Surface hardness is improvedmarkedly,with a slow and uniform change.Tribological properties are improved greatly although they reduce withthe increase of sliding loads because the modified layer becomes thin rapidly.

  9. Annealing of ion implanted silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The newer uses of ion implantation require a higher dose rate. This has led to the introduction of high beam current implanters; the wafers move in front of a stationary beam to give a scanning effect. This can lead to non-uniform heating of the wafer. Variations in the sheet resistance of the layers can be very non-uniform following thermal annealing. Non-uniformity in the effective doping both over a single wafer and from one wafer to another, can affect the usefulness of ion implantation in high dose rate applications. Experiments to determine the extent of non-uniformity in sheet resistance, and to see if it is correlated to the annealing scheme have been carried out. Details of the implantation parameters are given. It was found that best results were obtained when layers were annealed at the maximum possible temperature. For arsenic, phosphorus and antimony layers, improvements were observed up to 12000C and boron up to 9500C. Usually, it is best to heat the layer directly to the maximum temperature to produce the most uniform layer; with phosphorus layers however it is better to pre-heat to 10500C. (U.K.)

  10. Preparation of Ag-containing diamond-like carbon films on the interior surface of tubes by a combined method of plasma source ion implantation and DC sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatada, R., E-mail: hatada@ca.tu-darmstadt.de [Technische Universität Darmstadt, Department of Materials Science, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Flege, S.; Bobrich, A.; Ensinger, W.; Dietz, C. [Technische Universität Darmstadt, Department of Materials Science, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Baba, K. [Industrial Technology Center of Nagasaki, Applied Technology Division, Omura, Nagasaki 856-0026 (Japan); Sawase, T.; Watamoto, T. [Nagasaki University, Department of Applied Prosthodontics, Nagasaki 852-8523 (Japan); Matsutani, T. [Technische Universität Darmstadt, Department of Materials Science, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Kinki University, Department of Electric and Electronic Engineering, Higashi-osaka 577-2332 (Japan)

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • Deposition of Ag-containing diamond-like carbon films inside of tubes. • Combination of plasma source ion implantation and DC sputtering. • Antibacterial effect against S. aureus bacteria. - Abstract: Adhesive diamond-like carbon (DLC) films can be prepared by plasma source ion implantation (PSII), which is also suitable for the treatment of the inner surface of a tube. Incorporation of a metal into the DLC film provides a possibility to change the characteristics of the DLC film. One source for the metal is DC sputtering. In this study PSII and DC sputtering were combined to prepare DLC films containing low concentrations of Ag on the interior surfaces of stainless steel tubes. A DLC film was deposited using a C{sub 2}H{sub 4} plasma with the help of an auxiliary electrode inside of the tube. This electrode was then used as a target for the DC sputtering. A mixture of the gases Ar and C{sub 2}H{sub 4} was used to sputter the silver. By changing the gas flow ratios and process time, the resulting Ag content of the films could be varied. Sample characterizations were performed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, secondary ion mass spectrometry, atomic force microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Additionally, a ball-on-disk test was performed to investigate the tribological properties of the films. The antibacterial activity was determined using Staphylococcus aureus bacteria.

  11. Carbon coatings for medical implants

    OpenAIRE

    K. Bakowicz-Mitura; P. Couvrat; I. Kotela; P. Louda; D. Batory; J. Grabarczyk

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: In this paper we report in vitro and in vivo results of Nanocrystalline Diamond Coatings whichare used in medicine onto medical implants The very important property of carbon coatings is the protectionliving organism against the metalosis. Different medical implants with complicated shapes are covering byNanocrystalline Diamond Coatings by RF dense plasma CVD.Design/methodology/approach: 1) Material characterizations of deposited coatings have been evaluated by using:Transmission Ele...

  12. Multi-energy ion implantation from high-intensity laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cutroneo Mariapompea

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The laser-matter interaction using nominal laser intensity above 1015 W/cm2 generates in vacuum non-equilibrium plasmas accelerating ions at energies from tens keV up to hundreds MeV. From thin targets, using the TNSA regime, plasma is generated in the forward direction accelerating ions above 1 MeV per charge state and inducing high-ionization states. Generally, the ion energies follow a Boltzmann-like distribution characterized by a cutoff at high energy and by a Coulomb-shift towards high energy increasing the ion charge state. The accelerated ions are emitted with the high directivity, depending on the ion charge state and ion mass, along the normal to the target surface. The ion fluencies depend on the ablated mass by laser, indeed it is low for thin targets. Ions accelerated from plasma can be implanted on different substrates such as Si crystals, glassy-carbon and polymers at different fluences. The ion dose increment of implanted substrates is obtainable with repetitive laser shots and with repetitive plasma emissions. Ion beam analytical methods (IBA, such as Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS, elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA and proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE can be employed to analyse the implanted species in the substrates. Such analyses represent ‘off-line’ methods to extrapolate and to character the plasma ion stream emission as well as to investigate the chemical and physical modifications of the implanted surface. The multi-energy and species ion implantation from plasma, at high fluency, changes the physical and chemical properties of the implanted substrates, in fact, many parameters, such as morphology, hardness, optical and mechanical properties, wetting ability and nanostructure generation may be modified through the thermal-assisted implantation by multi-energy ions from laser-generated plasma.

  13. Stoichiometric disturbances in ion implanted silicon carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morvan, E.; Monserrat, J.; Rebollo, J.; Flores, D.; Jorda, X. [Centro Nacional de Microelectronica, Barcelona (Spain); Locatelli, M.L.; Ottaviani, L. [CEGELY ECPA, INSA de Lyon, Villeurbanne (France)

    1998-08-01

    Monte Carlo simulations of stoichiometric disturbances induced by ion implantation into 6H-SiC single crystal are presented. By following the recoils trajectories during the implantation simulation it is possible to construct C and Si related point defects distributions, which in turns give the post implantation stoichiometry of the SiC crystal. The results show net concentrations of ``stable`` point defects and stoichiometric disturbances of the order of the chemical concentration of the implanted impurity. This phenomenon could play an important role during subsequent annealing steps. Some practical examples of ion implantation are simulated and discussed. (orig.) 4 refs.

  14. Improving electric contacts by ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Shiru; Zhang Ying; Zheng Tiampi

    1989-01-01

    This article studies the improvement of electric contacts by ion implantation. 1 x 10/sup 17/ cm/sup -2/ of N/sup +/ and N/sub 2//sup +/ was implanted into two kinds of electric contacts, then a make-and-break test was made with the low voltage electrical apparatus. The weight loss of the contacts, temperature rise, contact resistance and transfer of material between the two contacts were measured. The contacts implanted by ions have improved electrical erosion properties.

  15. Paramagnetic defects in multistage ion-implanted polyamide films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The growing interest in the recent years in the ion implantation of polymer materials is due to the possibility of its using as a new materials for functional electronic and optic elements fabrication. The last investigations show that the ion implantation to polymer films allows to form a buried conductive layers and opens up the possibility for transistor-like devices creation. Therefore the necessity to estimate the correlation between the polymer structure transformation and optimal implantation regimes exist. Thin (40-50 μm) two-layer polymer films consisted of polyethylene and polyamide-6 are investigated. Implantation with boron ions to doses of 3*1016 cm-2 carried out into polyamide layer in multistage regimes with energies of 60, 80 and 100 keV. For first group of samples energies are increased from 60 to 100 keV for each subsequent stage. For second one - energies are decreased from stage to stage. The thick of radiation-damaged layer are estimated from TRIM-code calculation and experimental results on the boron ions ranges and amount of 500 nm for energy of 100 keV, 430 nm for 80 keV and 350 nm for 60 keV. It was found that the multistage implantation performed under conditions where the implantation energy increases from step to step results in the decrease of the paramagnetic centres concentration in the implanted layer and narrowing of the ESR linewidth. It can be inferred that under these implantation conditions the lattice-order of the polymer layer which ions pass repeatedly occurs. This restructurization being accompanied with the compensation of the terminated carbon bonds and strong exchange interaction between π-electrons in the implanted polymer. By contrast, the decrease in the ion energy during the implantation leads to the progressive accumulation of the paramagnetic centres in the implanted layers, i.e. the radicals produced in the earlier implantation steps do not exhibit serious degradation during the subsequent implantation. The

  16. Single atom devices by ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To expand the capabilities of semiconductor devices for new functions exploiting the quantum states of single donors or other impurity atoms requires a deterministic fabrication method. Ion implantation is a standard tool of the semiconductor industry and we have developed pathways to deterministic ion implantation to address this challenge. Although ion straggling limits the precision with which atoms can be positioned, for single atom devices it is possible to use post-implantation techniques to locate favourably placed atoms in devices for control and readout. However, large-scale devices will require improved precision. We examine here how the method of ion beam induced charge, already demonstrated for the deterministic ion implantation of 14 keV P donor atoms in silicon, can be used to implant a non-Poisson distribution of ions in silicon. Further, we demonstrate the method can be developed to higher precision by the incorporation of new deterministic ion implantation strategies that employ on-chip detectors with internal charge gain. In a silicon device we show a pulse height spectrum for 14 keV P ion impact that shows an internal gain of 3 that has the potential of allowing deterministic implantation of sub-14 keV P ions with reduced straggling. (paper)

  17. Engineering single photon emitters by ion implantation in diamond

    OpenAIRE

    Naydenov, B.; Kolesov, R.; Batalov, A.; Meijer, J; Pezzagna, S.; Rogalla, D.; Jelezko, F.; Wrachtrup, J.

    2009-01-01

    Diamond provides unique technological platform for quantum technologies including quantum computing and communication. Controlled fabrication of optically active defects is a key element for such quantum toolkit. Here we report the production of single color centers emitting in the blue spectral region by high energy implantation of carbon ions. We demonstrate that single implanted defects show sub-poissonian statistics of the emitted photons and can be explored as single photon source in qua...

  18. High energy ion implantation for IC processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this thesis the results of fundamental research on high energy ion implantation in silicon are presented and discussed. The implantations have been carried out with the 500 kV HVEE ion implantation machine, that was acquired in 1981 by the IC technology and Electronics group at Twente University of Technology. The damage and anneal behaviour of 1 MeV boron implantations to a dose of 1013/cm2 have been investigated as a function of anneal temperature by sheet resistance, Hall and noise measurements. (Auth.)

  19. Effective implantation of light emitting centers by plasma immersion ion implantation and focused ion beam methods into nanosized diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Himics, L., E-mail: himics.laszlo@wigner.mta.hu [Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, Wigner Research Center for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Tóth, S.; Veres, M. [Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, Wigner Research Center for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Tóth, A. [Institute of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Research Centre for Natural Sciences, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 17, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Koós, M. [Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, Wigner Research Center for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Characteristics of nitrogen implantation of nanodiamond using two low ion energy ion implantation methods were compared. • Formation of complex nitrogen-related defect centers was promoted by subsequent helium implantation and heat treatments. • Depth profiles of the implanted ions and the generated vacancies were determined using SRIM calculations. • The presence of nitrogen impurity was demonstrated by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopic measurements. • A new nitrogen related band was detected in the photoluminescence spectrum of the implanted samples that was attributed to the N3 color center in nanodiamond. - Abstract: Two different implantation techniques, plasma immersion ion implantation and focused ion beam, were used to introduce nitrogen ions into detonation nanodiamond crystals with the aim to create nitrogen-vacancy related optically active centers of light emission in near UV region. Previously samples were subjected to a defect creation process by helium irradiation in both cases. Heat treatments at different temperatures (750 °C, 450 °C) were applied in order to initiate the formation of nitrogen-vacancy related complex centers and to decrease the sp{sup 2} carbon content formed under different treatments. As a result, a relatively narrow and intensive emission band with fine structure at 2.98, 2.83 and 2.71 eV photon energies was observed in the light emission spectrum. It was assigned to the N3 complex defect center. The formation of this defect center can be expected by taking into account the relatively high dose of implanted nitrogen ions and the overlapped depth distribution of vacancies and nitrogen. The calculated depth profiles distribution for both implanted nitrogen and helium by SRIM simulation support this expectation.

  20. Effective implantation of light emitting centers by plasma immersion ion implantation and focused ion beam methods into nanosized diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Characteristics of nitrogen implantation of nanodiamond using two low ion energy ion implantation methods were compared. • Formation of complex nitrogen-related defect centers was promoted by subsequent helium implantation and heat treatments. • Depth profiles of the implanted ions and the generated vacancies were determined using SRIM calculations. • The presence of nitrogen impurity was demonstrated by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopic measurements. • A new nitrogen related band was detected in the photoluminescence spectrum of the implanted samples that was attributed to the N3 color center in nanodiamond. - Abstract: Two different implantation techniques, plasma immersion ion implantation and focused ion beam, were used to introduce nitrogen ions into detonation nanodiamond crystals with the aim to create nitrogen-vacancy related optically active centers of light emission in near UV region. Previously samples were subjected to a defect creation process by helium irradiation in both cases. Heat treatments at different temperatures (750 °C, 450 °C) were applied in order to initiate the formation of nitrogen-vacancy related complex centers and to decrease the sp2 carbon content formed under different treatments. As a result, a relatively narrow and intensive emission band with fine structure at 2.98, 2.83 and 2.71 eV photon energies was observed in the light emission spectrum. It was assigned to the N3 complex defect center. The formation of this defect center can be expected by taking into account the relatively high dose of implanted nitrogen ions and the overlapped depth distribution of vacancies and nitrogen. The calculated depth profiles distribution for both implanted nitrogen and helium by SRIM simulation support this expectation

  1. Vibrational spectroscopy of Ga+ ion implanted ta-C films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berova, M.; Sandulov, M.; Tsvetkova, T.; Bischoff, L.; Boettger, R.; Abrashev, M.

    2016-02-01

    In the present work, low energy Ga+ ion beam implantation was used for the structural and optical properties modification of tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) thin films, using gallium (Ga+) as the ion species. Thin film samples (d∼40nm) of ta-C, deposited by filtered cathodic vacuum arc (FCVA), have been implanted with Ga+ at ion energy E = 20 keV and ion doses D=3.1014÷3.1015 cm-2. The Ga+ ion beam induced structural modification of the implanted material results in a considerable change of its optical properties, displayed in a significant shift of the optical absorption edge to lower photon energies as obtained from optical transmission measurements. This shift is accompanied by a considerable increase of the absorption coefficient (photo-darkening effect) in the measured photon energy range (0.5÷3.0 eV). These effects could be attributed both to additional defect introduction and increased graphitisation, as well as to accompanying formation of bonds between the implanted ions and the host atoms of the target, as confirmed by infra-red (IR) and Raman measurements. The optical contrast thus obtained (between implanted and unimplanted film material) could be made use of for information archiving, in the area of high-density optical data storage, while using focused Ga+ ion beams.

  2. Dislocation climb in copper after ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At present, ion implantation is used widely for the modification of subsurface layers of metallic materials to improve the service characteristics of machine components and tools. The aim of this work was the experimental examination of the 'long-range effect' in coarse-grain copper in high-dose ion implantation. In this method, special attention is given to the preparation of specimens both for the case and for the examination by the method of electron microscopy and also to the ion implantation conditions

  3. Silicon technologies ion implantation and thermal treatment

    CERN Document Server

    Baudrant, Annie

    2013-01-01

    The main purpose of this book is to remind new engineers in silicon foundry, the fundamental physical and chemical rules in major Front end treatments: oxidation, epitaxy, ion implantation and impurities diffusion.

  4. Radioactive ion implantation of thermoplastic elastomers

    OpenAIRE

    Borcea, Veronica

    2008-01-01

    The radioactive ion implantation wear measuring method (RII) has been used for many years as a tool to make highly sensitive real-time in-situ measurements of wear and corrosion in metallic or ceramic materials. The method consists of the controlled implantation of radioactive ions of limited decay time in a thin layer at the surface of the material. The progressive abrasion of the material results in a decline in radioactivity which is followed to monitor material losses. The application ...

  5. Effect of Implantation Machine Parameters on N+ ion Implantation for Upland Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) Pollen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUE Jieyu; YU Lixiang; WU Yuejin; TANG Canming

    2008-01-01

    Effect of parameters of ion implantation machine,including ion energy,total dose,dose rate,impulse energy and implantation interval on the pollen grains of upland cotton implanted with nitrogen ion beam were studied.The best parameters were screened out.The results also showed that the vacuum condition before the nitrogen ion implantation does not affect the pollen viability.

  6. Ion implantation of diamond: Damage, doping, and lift-off

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parikh, N.R.; McGucken, E.; Swanson, M.L. [North Carolina Univ., Chapel Hill, NC (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Hunn, J.D.; White, C.W.; Zuhr, R.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1993-09-01

    In order to make good quality economical diamond electronic devices, it is essential to grow films and to dope these films to obtain n- and p- type conductivity. This review talk discuss first doping by ion implantation plus annealing of the implantation damage, and second flow to make large area single crystal diamonds. C implantation damage below an estimated Frenkel defect concentration of 7% could be recovered almost completely by annealing at 950C. For a defect concentration between 7 and 10%, a stable damage form of diamond (``green diamond``) was formed by annealing. At still higher damage levels, the diamond graphitized. To introduce p-type doping, we have co-implanted B and C into natural diamond at 77K, followed by annealing up to 1100C. The resulting semiconducting material has electrical properties similar to those of natural B-doped diamond. To create n-type diamond, we have implanted Na{sup +}, P+ and As{sup +} ions and have observed semiconducting behavior. This has been compared with carbon or noble element implantation, in an attempt to isolate the effect of radiation damage. Recently, in order to obtain large area signal crystals, we have developed a novel technique for removing thin layers of diamond from bulk or homoepitaxial films. This method consists of ion implantation, followed by selective etching. High energy (4--5 MeV) implantation of carbon or oxygen ions creates a well-defined layer of damaged diamond buried at a controlled depth. This layer is graphitized and selectivity etched either by heating at 550C in an oxygen ambient or by electrolysis. This process successfully lifts off the diamond plate above the graphite layer. The lift-off method, combined with well-established homoepitaxial growth processes, has potential for fabrication of large area single-crystal diamond sheets.

  7. The effects of cluster carbon implantation at low temperature on damage recovery after annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onoda, Hiroshi; Nakashima, Yoshiki; Hamamoto, Nariaki; Nagayama, Tsutomu; Koga, Yuji; Umisedo, Sei; Kawamura, Yasunori; Hashimoto, Masahiro

    2012-11-01

    Amorphous Si layer formation with cluster carbon ion implantations at low substrate temperature and its effects on damage recovery and diffusion suppression have been discussed. Cluster carbon molecule species (C3Hx˜C7Hx), implantation temperature (RT ˜ -60°C), implantation dose and energy were used as parameters. Amorphous Si formation by cluster carbon implantation is more effective compared with monomer carbon implantation. Low temperature cluster carbon implantations increase amorphous Si thickness far beyond monomer carbon implantation even at very low temperature. Amorphous-crystal interface smoothness was characterized by Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy, and is improved by lower temperature implantations. The smoothness improvement affects the residual damage, End of Range Defects, after annealing. Thicker amorphous Si over 100 nm depth can be formed with light Cn+ molecule implantations. That makes it possible to suppress wide distributed phosphorus diffusion.

  8. Synthesis of copper nanoparticles in polycarbonate by ion implantation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Annu Sharma; Suman Bahniwal; Sanjeev Aggarwal; S Chopra; D Kanjilal

    2011-07-01

    Copper nanoparticles have been synthesized in polycarbonate by 75 KeV Cu– ion implantation with various doses ranging from 6.4 × 1015 to 1.6 × 1017 ions/cm2 with a beam current density of 800 nA/cm2. The composites formed were structurally characterized using Ultraviolet-Visible (UV-Visible) absorption spectroscopy. The appearance of particle plasmon resonance peak, characteristic of copper nanoparticles at 603 nm in absorption spectra of polycarbonate implanted to a dose of 1.6 × 1017 ions/cm2, indicates towards the formation of copper nanoparticles in polycarbonate. Transmission electron microscopy further confirms the formation of copper nanoparticles having size ∼ 3.15 nm. The formation of copper nanoparticles in the layers carbonized by Cu– implantation has been discussed. The synthesized copper-polycarbonate nanocomposite has been found to be more conducting than polycarbonate as ascertained using current–voltage characteristics.

  9. Ion beam analysis of metal ion implanted surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, P.J.; Chu, J.W.; Johnson, E.P.; Noorman, J.T. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia); Sood, D.K. [Royal Melbourne Inst. of Tech., VIC (Australia)

    1993-12-31

    Ion implantation is an established method for altering the surface properties of many materials. While a variety of analytical techniques are available for the characterisation of implanted surfaces, those based on particle accelerators such as Rutherford backscattering (RBS) and nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) provide some of the most useful and powerful for this purpose. Application of the latter techniques to metal ion implantation research at ANSTO will be described with particular reference to specific examples from recent studies. Where possible, the information obtained from ion beam analysis will be compared with that derived from other techniques such as Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX) and Auger spectroscopies. 4 refs., 5 figs.

  10. Ion implantations of oxide dispersion strengthened steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sojak, S.; Simeg Veternikova, J.; Slugen, V.; Petriska, M.; Stacho, M.

    2015-12-01

    This paper is focused on a study of radiation damage and thermal stability of high chromium oxide dispersion strengthened steel MA 956 (20% Cr), which belongs to the most perspective structural materials for the newest generation of nuclear reactors - Generation IV. The radiation damage was simulated by the implantation of hydrogen ions up to the depth of about 5 μm, which was performed at a linear accelerator owned by Slovak University of Technology. The ODS steel MA 956 was available for study in as-received state after different thermal treatments as well as in ions implanted state. Energy of the hydrogen ions chosen for the implantation was 800 keV and the implantation fluence of 6.24 × 1017 ions/cm2. The investigated specimens were measured by non-destructive technique Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy in order to study the defect behavior after different thermal treatments in the as-received state and after the hydrogen ions implantation. Although, different resistance to defect production was observed in individual specimens of MA 956 during the irradiation, all implanted specimens contain larger defects than the ones in as-received state.

  11. Highly Stripped Ion Sources for MeV Ion Implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hershcovitch, Ady

    2009-06-30

    Original technical objectives of CRADA number PVI C-03-09 between BNL and Poole Ventura, Inc. (PVI) were to develop an intense, high charge state, ion source for MeV ion implanters. Present day high-energy ion implanters utilize low charge state (usually single charge) ion sources in combination with rf accelerators. Usually, a MV LINAC is used for acceleration of a few rnA. It is desirable to have instead an intense, high charge state ion source on a relatively low energy platform (de acceleration) to generate high-energy ion beams for implantation. This de acceleration of ions will be far more efficient (in energy utilization). The resultant implanter will be smaller in size. It will generate higher quality ion beams (with lower emittance) for fabrication of superior semiconductor products. In addition to energy and cost savings, the implanter will operate at a lower level of health risks associated with ion implantation. An additional aim of the project was to producing a product that can lead to long­ term job creation in Russia and/or in the US. R&D was conducted in two Russian Centers (one in Tomsk and Seversk, the other in Moscow) under the guidance ofPVI personnel and the BNL PI. Multiple approaches were pursued, developed, and tested at various locations with the best candidate for commercialization delivered and tested at on an implanter at the PVI client Axcelis. Technical developments were exciting: record output currents of high charge state phosphorus and antimony were achieved; a Calutron-Bemas ion source with a 70% output of boron ion current (compared to 25% in present state-of-the-art). Record steady state output currents of higher charge state phosphorous and antimony and P ions: P{sup 2+} (8.6 pmA), P{sup 3+} (1.9 pmA), and P{sup 4+} (0.12 pmA) and 16.2, 7.6, 3.3, and 2.2 pmA of Sb{sup 3+} Sb {sup 4 +}, Sb{sup 5+}, and Sb{sup 6+} respectively. Ultimate commercialization goals did not succeed (even though a number of the products like high

  12. Transverse microanalysis of high energy Ion implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dooley, S.P.; Jamieson, D.N.; Nugent, K.W.; Prawer, S. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1996-12-31

    High energy ion implants in semiconductor materials have been analyzed by Channeling Contrast Microscopy (CCM) perpendicular to the implant direction, allowing imaging of the entire ion track. The damage produced by Channeled and Random 1.4 MeV H{sup +} implants into the edge of a <100> type IIa diamond wafer were analyzed by channeling into the face of the crystal. The results showed negligible damage in the surface region of the implants, and swelling induced misalignment at the end of range of the implants. Channeled 1.4 MeV H{sup +} implants in diamond had a range only 9% deeper than Random implants, which could be accounted for by dechanneling of the beam. The channeling of H{sup +}{sub 2} ions has been previously found to be identical to that of protons of half energy, however the current experiment has shown a 1% increase in {chi}{sub min} for H{sup +}{sub 2} in diamond compared to H{sup +} at 1,2 MeV per proton. This is due to repulsion between protons within the same channel. 5 refs., 2 figs.

  13. Long range implantation by MEVVA metal ion source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Metal vapor vacuum arc (MEVVA) source ion implantation is a new technology used for achieving long range ion impantation.It is very important for research and application of the ion beammodification of materials. The results showthat the implanted atom diffusion coefficient increases in Mo implanted Al with high ion flux andhigh dose. The implanted depth is 311.6 times greater than that ofthe corresponding ion range. The ionspecies, doses and ion fluxes play an important part in the long-range implantation. Especially,thermal atom chemistry have specific effect on the long-range implantation during high ion fluximplantation at transient high target temperature.

  14. Ion implantation of silicon nitride ball bearings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, J.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Miner, J.R. [United Technologies, Pratt and Whitney, West Palm Beach, FL (United States)

    1996-09-01

    Hypothesis for ion implantation effect was that stress concentrations reflected into the bulk due to topography such as polishing imperfections, texture in the race, or transferred material, might be reduced due to surface amorphization. 42 control samples were tested to an intended runout period of 60 h. Six ion implanted balls were tested to an extended period of 150 h. Accelerated testing was done in a V groove so that wear was on two narrow wear tracks. Rutherford backscattering, XRPS, profilometry, optical microscopy, nanoindentation hardness, and white light interferometry were used. The balls were implanted with 150-keV C ions at fluence 1.1x10{sup 17}/cm{sup 2}. The samples had preexisting surface defects (C-cracks), so the failure rate of the control group was unacceptable. None of the ion-implanted samples failed in 150 h of testing. Probability of randomly selecting 6 samples from the control group that would perform this well is about 5%, so there is good probability that ion implantation improved performance. Possible reasons are discussed. Wear tracks, microstructure, and impurity content were studied in possible relation to C-cracks.

  15. Oxidation of polyethylene implanted with low energy magnesium ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deslandes, Alec, E-mail: acd@ansto.gov.au [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Sydney (Australia); Ionescu, Mihail, E-mail: mio@ansto.gov.au [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Sydney (Australia); Karatchevtseva, Inna, E-mail: ikm@ansto.gov.au [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Sydney (Australia); Siegele, Rainer, E-mail: rns@ansto.gov.au [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Sydney (Australia); Cohen, David D., E-mail: dcz@ansto.gov.au [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Sydney (Australia)

    2013-07-15

    The oxidation of polyethylene implanted with low energy, i.e. 25–50 keV, Mg ions to fluences from 5 × 10{sup 12}–5 × 10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2} was studied. Rutherford back-scattering spectroscopy showed all implanted samples gained oxygen but the distribution did not match that of the implanted Mg. An increase in carbon content was also observed for the near-surface region. Depth profiles of hydrogen were obtained via elastic recoil detection analysis, showing that hydrogen was lost throughout and beyond the range of the Mg ions, producing unsaturated and chemically active sites available for oxidation. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy revealed the formation of carbon–oxygen bonding such as carbonyl groups, but showed no evidence of oxidised magnesium. Raman spectroscopy showed disordered and graphitic carbon bonding configurations were created by the irradiation, but no evidence of oxidised magnesium. The implantation of films to high fluence produced a carbonized surface-layer that made the irradiated polymer more resistant to oxidation.

  16. Ion implantation of boron in germanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, K.S.

    1985-05-01

    Ion implantation of /sup 11/B/sup +/ into room temperature Ge samples leads to a p-type layer prior to any post implant annealing steps. Variable temperature Hall measurements and deep level transient spectroscopy experiments indicate that room temperature implantation of /sup 11/B/sup +/ into Ge results in 100% of the boron ions being electrically active as shallow acceptor, over the entire dose range (5 x 10/sup 11//cm/sup 2/ to 1 x 10/sup 14//cm/sup 2/) and energy range (25 keV to 100 keV) investigated, without any post implant annealing. The concentration of damage related acceptor centers is only 10% of the boron related, shallow acceptor center concentration for low energy implants (25 keV), but becomes dominant at high energies (100 keV) and low doses (<1 x 10/sup 12//cm/sup 2/). Three damage related hole traps are produced by ion implantation of /sup 11/B/sup +/. Two of these hole traps have also been observed in ..gamma..-irradiated Ge and may be oxygen-vacancy related defects, while the third trap may be divacancy related. All three traps anneal out at low temperatures (<300/sup 0/C). Boron, from room temperature implantation of BF/sub 2//sup +/ into Ge, is not substitutionally active prior to a post implant annealing step of 250/sup 0/C for 30 minutes. After annealing additional shallow acceptors are observed in BF/sub 2//sup +/ implanted samples which may be due to fluorine or flourine related complexes which are electrically active.

  17. Plasma immersion ion implantation for silicon processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yankov, Rossen A.; Mändl, Stephan

    2001-04-01

    Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation (PIII) is a technology which is currently widely investigated as an alternative to conventional beam line implantation for ultrashallow doping beyond the 0.15 m technology. However, there are several other application areas in modern semiconductor processing. In this paper a detailed discussion of the PIII process for semiconductors and of actual as well as future applications is given. Besides the well known advantages of PIII - fast process, implantation of the whole surface, low cost of ownership - several peculiarities - like spread of the implantation energy due to finite rise time or collisions, no mass separation, high secondary electron emission - must be mentioned. However, they can be overcome by adjusting the system and the process parameters. Considering the applications, ultrashallow junction formation by PIII is an established industrial process, whereas SIMOX and Smart-Cut by oxygen and hydrogen implantation are current topics between research and introduction into industry. Further applications of PIII, of which some already are research topics and some are only investigated by conventional ion implantation, include seeding for metal deposition, gettering of metal impurities, etch stop layers and helium implantation for localized lifetime control.

  18. High dose uranium ion implantation into silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Implantation of uranium ions into silicon to a maximum dose of 6 x 1016 atoms/cm2, with a maximum concentration of 6 x 1021 atoms/cm3, has been carried out. This concentration corresponds to 12 at. % of uranium in the silicon host material. The implanted uranium content was measured by Rutherford backscattering and confirmed by a measurement of the alpha-particle activity of the buried uranium layer. The range and straggling of the uranium, and sputtering of the silicon target by uranium, were measured and are compared with theoretical estimates. The implantation was performed at an ion mean energy of 157 keV using a new kind of high current metal ion source

  19. Simulation of ion implantation for ULSI technology

    CERN Document Server

    Hoessinger, A

    2000-01-01

    approximately constant an almost linear performance gain could be achieved by the parallelization method, even if a fairly slow network connects the workstations. Finally, the developed Monte-Carlo ion implantation simulator is applied to a set of examples making use of some of the special features of the simulator. Additionally a small operating manual for the simulator is included in the appendix. been developed and implemented. These methods enable to treat the implantation of molecular ions and atom clusters and thus the implantation of BF, which is a widely used for the doping with boron atoms. By providing two methods for the simulation of molecular ions the functionality of the simulator can be adapted to the problem requirements. While the simplified molecular method needs less computation time, the full molecular method provides more precise results. Another part of this work was the design and the implementation of a point response interface method. It allows to interface Monte-Carlo simulation resu...

  20. Carbon Ion Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels; Hansen, David Christoffer; Herrmann, Rochus;

    On the importance of choice of target size for selective boosting of hypoxic tumor subvolumina in carbon ion therapy Purpose: Functional imaging methods in radiotherapy are maturing and can to some extent uncover radio resistant structures found within a tumour entity. Selective boost of identified...... effect. All cell lines investigated here did not reach an OER of 1, even for the smaller structures, which may indicate that the achievable dose average LET of carbon ions is too low, and heavier ions than carbon may be considered for functional LET-painting....

  1. Friction and wear study of diamond-like carbon gradient coatings on Ti6Al4V substrate prepared by plasma source ion implant-ion beam enhanced deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DLC gradient coatings had been deposited on Ti6Al4V alloy substrate by plasma source ion implantation-ion beam enhanced deposition method and their friction and wear behavior sliding against ultra high molecular weight polyethylene counterpart were investigated. The results showed that DLC gradient coated Ti6Al4V had low friction coefficient, which reduced 24, 14 and 10% compared with non-coated Ti6Al4V alloy under dry sliding, lubrication of bovine serum and 0.9% NaCl solution, respectively. DLC gradient coated Ti6Al4V showed significantly improved wear resistance, the wear rate was about half of non-coated Ti6Al4V alloy. The wear of ultra high molecular weight polyethylene counterpart was also reduced. High adhesion to Ti6Al4V substrate of DLC gradient coatings and surface structure played important roles in improved tribological performance, serious oxidative wear was eliminated when DLC gradient coating was applied to the Ti6Al4V alloy

  2. Iron ion implantation into C60 layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. The soccer ball shaped carbon molecule consisting of 60 carbon atoms (C60, fullerene) was discovered in 1985. Since that time the fullerene has become intensively studied. This special molecule has much potential in medical care, biotechnology and nanotechnology. We are motivated to produce special type fullerenes, so called endohedral fullerenes (some alien atoms are encapsulated inside the fullerene cage). The spring of our motivation is that the Fe at C60 could be applied as a contrast material for MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) or microwave heat therapy. One way to make X at C60 is the surface production using an ECRIS (Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source). An evaporated or preprepared fullerene layer is irradiated by ions to form a new material during the implantation. By this method several kinds of atomic species, such as Li, Na, K, Rb, Xe were encapsulated into the fullerenes. However evidence for the Fe at C60 has not been found yet. During the analysis of the irradiated samples three questions must be answered. 1. Are there iron atoms in the layer and where? 2. Does the iron bond to the fullerene? 3. How does the iron bond to the fullerene, inside or outside? Using different investigation tools, SNMS (Secondary Neural Mass Spectrometer), MALDI-TOF (Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Time of Flight), XPS (Xray Photoelectron Spectroscopy) or HPLC (High-Performance Liquid Chromatography), all these questions could be clarified step by step. In this paper we made the first steps to answer the first question: fullerene layers irradiated by iron ion beam delivered by the ATOMKI-ECRIS have been analyzed by the ATOMKI-SNMS. The evaporated 90 - 120 nm thick fullerene layers on Si holder were irradiated by Fe5+ and Fe+ ion beams produced from Ferrocene vapor. Samples were irradiated with two different doses (5 1018 ion/cm3 and 1022 ion/cm3) at four ion energies (65 keV, 6.5 keV, 0.2 keV and two of these samples

  3. The effect of metal ion implantation on the surface mechanical properties of Mylar (PET)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, W.; Sood, D.K. [Royal Melbourne Inst. of Tech., VIC (Australia); Yao, X.; Brown, I.G. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Lawrence Berkeley Lab.

    1993-12-31

    Ion implantation of polymers leads to the formation of new carbonaceous materials, the revolution during implantation of various species consists of (1) ion beam induced damage: chain scission, crosslinking, molecular emission of volatile elements and compounds, stoichiometric change in the surface layer of pristine polymers; and (2) chemical effect between ion and target materials: microalloying and precipitation. Literature regarding ion implanted polymers shows that the reorganisation of the carbon network after implantation can dramatically modify several properties of pristine polymers solubility, molecular weight, and electrical, optical and mechanical properties. However, ion implantation of polymers is actually a very complex interaction which depends on not only ion species, implantation condition, but also polymer type and specific structure. In this paper the effect of Ag or Ti ions implantation on surface mechanical properties of PET (polyethylenne terephthalate) polymer is reported. There was a clear deterioration in wear resistance after implantation of both Ag and Ti ions. It is suggested that the increment of wear after implantation may result from not only ion damage but also chemical effect between ion and target material. 3 refs., 1 tab., 2 figs.

  4. Engineering single photon emitters by ion implantation in diamond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naydenov, B; Kolesov, R; Batalov, A; Meijer, J; Pezzagna, S; Rogalla, D; Jelezko, F; Wrachtrup, J

    2009-11-01

    Diamond provides unique technological platform for quantum technologies including quantum computing and communication. Controlled fabrication of optically active defects is a key element for such quantum toolkit. Here we report the production of single color centers emitting in the blue spectral region by high energy implantation of carbon ions. We demonstrate that single implanted defects show sub-poissonian statistics of the emitted photons and can be explored as single photon source in quantum cryptography. Strong zero phonon line at 470.5 nm allows unambiguous identification of this defect as interstitial-related TR12 color center. PMID:19956415

  5. Cobalt alloy ion sources for focused ion beam implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muehle, R.; Doebeli, M. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Zimmermann, P. [Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule, Zurich (Switzerland)

    1997-09-01

    Cobalt alloy ion sources have been developed for silicide formation by focused ion beam implantation. Four eutectic alloys AuCo, CoGe, CoY and AuCoGe were produced by electron beam welding. The AuCo liquid alloy ion source was investigated in detail. We have measured the emission current stability, the current-voltage characteristics, and the mass spectrum as a function of the mission current. (author) 1 fig., 2 refs.

  6. Surface modification by ion implantation and ion beam mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After its successful applications in the semiconductor industry, ion implantation is being employed for other technical applications. The main process in ion implantation is the introduction of additive elements to change the composition and properties of the surface region of a material. We present results demonstrating the important improvement of the wear resistance and friction in a NiTi alloy implanted with nitrogen. The formation of hard TiN precipitates embedded in an amorphous layer is responsible for such modifications. The generation of many atomic displacements in collision cascades during implantation can be also employed as a modification process itself. For instance, the chemical disordering in an implanted Fe60Al40 alloy induces a para- to ferromagnetic transition. The formation of an amorphous surface alloy by ion irradiation at a temperature of 15 K has been shown in Ni50Al50 by in situ RBS, channelling and TEM. The new method of dynamic ion mixing (DIM) combines ion bombardment with simultaneous material deposition and allows thicker adherent coatings to be built up, this is shown for both metallic Cu50Ni50 and ceramic TiB2 coatings. Recent results demonstrating a significant increase in fatigue lifetime of a coated 316 L stainless steel are also reported and discussed. (orig.)

  7. Improving Sustainability of Ion Implant Modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Jim

    2011-01-01

    Semiconductor fabs have long been pressured to manage capital costs, reduce energy consumption and increasingly improve efforts to recycle and recover resources. Ion implant tools have been high-profile offenders on all three fronts. They draw such large volumes of air for heat dissipation and risk reduction that historically, they are the largest consumer of cleanroom air of any process tool—and develop energy usage and resource profiles to match. This paper presents a documented approach to reduce their energy consumption and dramatically downsize on-site facilities support for cleanroom air manufacture and abatement. The combination produces significant capital expenditure savings. The case entails applying SAGS Type 1 (sub-atmospheric gas systems) toxic gas packaging to enable engineering adaptations that deliver the energy savings and cost benefits without any reduction in environmental health and safety. The paper also summarizes benefits as they relate to reducing a fabs carbon emission footprint (and longer range advantages relative to potential cap and trade programs) with existing technology.

  8. Hybrid quantum circuit with implanted erbium ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Probst, S.; Rotzinger, H.; Tkalčec, A. [Physikalisches Institut, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, D-76128 Karlsruhe (Germany); Kukharchyk, N.; Wieck, A. D. [Angewandte Festkörperphysik, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universitätsstraße 150, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Wünsch, S.; Siegel, M. [Institut für Mikro- und Nanoelektronische Systeme, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, D-76189 Karlsruhe (Germany); Ustinov, A. V. [Physikalisches Institut, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, D-76128 Karlsruhe (Germany); Laboratory of Superconducting Metamaterials, National University of Science and Technology “MISIS,” Moscow 119049 (Russian Federation); Bushev, P. A. [Experimentalphysik, Universität des Saarlandes, D-66123 Saarbrücken (Germany)

    2014-10-20

    We report on hybrid circuit quantum electrodynamics experiments with focused ion beam implanted Er{sup 3+} ions in Y{sub 2}SiO{sub 5} coupled to an array of superconducting lumped element microwave resonators. The Y{sub 2}SiO{sub 5} crystal is divided into several areas with distinct erbium doping concentrations, each coupled to a separate resonator. The coupling strength is varied from 5 MHz to 18.7 MHz, while the linewidth ranges between 50 MHz and 130 MHz. We confirm the paramagnetic properties of the implanted spin ensemble by evaluating the temperature dependence of the coupling. The efficiency of the implantation process is analyzed and the results are compared to a bulk doped Er:Y{sub 2}SiO{sub 5} sample. We demonstrate the integration of these engineered erbium spin ensembles with superconducting circuits.

  9. Raman microprobe measurements of stress in ion implanted materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nugent, K.W.; Prawer, S.; Weiser, P.S.; Dooley, S.P. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1993-12-31

    Raman microprobe measurements of ion implanted diamond and silicon have shown significant shifts in the Raman line due to stresses in the materials. The Raman line shifts to higher energy if the stress is compressive and to lower energy for tensile stress{sup 1}. The silicon sample was implanted in a 60 {mu}m square with 2.56 x 10{sup 17} ions per square centimeter of 2 MeV Helium. This led to the formation of raised squares with the top 370mm above the original surface. In Raman studies of silicon using visible light, the depth of penetration of the laser beam into the sample is much less than one micron. It was found that the Raman line is due to the silicon overlying the damage region. The diamond sample was implanted with 2 x 10{sup 15} ions per square centimeter of 2.8 MeV carbon. It was concluded that the Raman spectrum could provide information concerning both the magnitude and the direction of stress in an ion implanted sample. It was possible in some cases to determine whether the stress direction is parallel or perpendicular to the sample surface. 1 refs., 2 figs.

  10. Nanometer structure and conductor mechanism of polymer modified by metal ion implantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) has been modified by Ag, Ti, Cu and Si ion implanta-tion with a dose ranging from 1 × l016 to 2 x 1017 ions/cm2 using a metal vapor vacuum arc (MEVVA)source. The electrical properties of PET have been improved by metal ion implantation. The resistivityof implanted PET decreased obviously with an increase in ion dose. The results show that the conduc-tive behavior of a metal ion implanted sample is different from Si-implantation samples. In order to un-derstant the mechanism of electrical conduction, the structures of implanted layer were observed in de-tail by XRD and TEM. The nano carbon particles were dispersed in implanted PET. The nano metallicparticles were built up in metallic ion implanted layers with dose range from 1 × 1016 to 1 x 1017 ions/cm2. The nanometer metal net structure was formed in implanted layer when a dose of 2 x 1017ions/cm2 is reached. Anomalous fractal growths were observed. These surface structure changes revealedconducting mechanism evolution, lt is believed that the change would result in an improvement of theconductive properties. The conducting mechanism will be changed with increasing metal ion dose.

  11. /sup 252/Cf plasma desorption in ion implanted mica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maurette, M. (Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France). Centre de Spectrometrie Nucleaire et de Spectrometrie de Masse); Banifatemi, A.; Della-Negra, S.; Le Beyec, Y. (Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France). Inst. de Physique Nucleaire)

    1983-05-12

    The potential of heavy-ion stimulated desorption of ions (HISD) for investigating ion implantation effects in insulators is outlined, and a very strong enhancement in HISD of ionized species from ion implanted mica is reported. This enhancement, which generates heavy-ion clusters up to mass approximately equal to 500 AMU, grows around a critical fluence of implanted ions, and originates from two distinct types of radiation damage defects.

  12. Semiconductor applications of plasma immersion ion implantation technology

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mukesh Kumar; Rajkumar; Dinesh Kumar; P J George

    2002-11-01

    Many semiconductor integrated circuit manufacturing processes require high dose of implantation at very low energies. Conventional beam line ion implantation system suffers from low beam current at low energies, therefore, cannot be used economically for high dose applications. Plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) is emerging as a potential technique for such implantations. This method offers high dose rate irrespective of implantation energy. In the present study nitrogen ions were implanted using PIII in order to modify the properties of silicon and some refractory metal films. Oxidation behaviour of silicon was observed for different implantation doses. Diffusion barrier properties of refractory barrier metals were studied for copper metallization.

  13. Doping of silicon carbide by ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It appeared that in some fields, as the hostile environments (high temperature or irradiation), the silicon compounds showed limitations resulting from the electrical and mechanical properties. Doping of 4H and 6H silicon carbide by ion implantation is studied from a physicochemical and electrical point of view. It is necessary to obtain n-type and p-type material to realize high power and/or high frequency devices, such as MESFETs and Schottky diodes. First, physical and electrical properties of silicon carbide are presented and the interest of developing a process technology on this material is emphasised. Then, physical characteristics of ion implantation and particularly classical dopant implantation, such as nitrogen, for n-type doping, and aluminium and boron, for p-type doping are described. Results with these dopants are presented and analysed. Optimal conditions are extracted from these experiences so as to obtain a good crystal quality and a surface state allowing device fabrication. Electrical conduction is then described in the 4H and 6H-SiC polytypes. Freezing of free carriers and scattering processes are described. Electrical measurements are carried out using Hall effect on Van der Panw test patterns, and 4 point probe method are used to draw the type of the material, free carrier concentrations, resistivity and mobility of the implanted doped layers. These results are commented and compared to the theoretical analysis. The influence of the technological process on electrical conduction is studied in view of fabricating implanted silicon carbide devices. (author)

  14. Effects of electrical conductivity of substrate materials on microstructure of diamond-like carbon films prepared by bipolar-type plasma based ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films are prepared by a bipolar-type plasma based ion implantation, and the structural differences between DLC films deposited on different electrical conductive substrates, i.e., conductive Si wafers and insulating glass plates are examined by Raman spectroscopy and x-ray photo emission spectroscopy (XPS). In the Raman measurements, graphite (G) and disorder (D) peaks are observed for both samples. However, the additional photo luminescence is overlapped on the spectra in the case of on-glass sample. To elucidate the structural difference, the intensity ratio of D to G peak (I(D)/I(G)), G peak position and full width at half maximum (FWHM) are obtained by curve fitting using Gaussian function and linear baseline. It is found that the I(D)/I(G) is lower, G peak position is higher and FWHM of G peak is narrower for on-glass sample than for on-Si sample. According to Robertson [1], lower I(D)/I(G) seems more sp3 C-C bonding in amount for on-glass sample. In contrast, higher G peak position and narrower FWHM of G peak suggest less sp3 C-C bonding in amount for on-glass sample. The results of XPS analysis with C1s spectra reveal that sp3 ratio, i.e., the intensity ratio of sp3/(sp3+sp2) is smaller for on-glass sample than for on-Si sample. The inconsistency of the trend between I(D)/I(G) and other parameters (G peak position and FWHM of G peak) might be caused by the overlap of photo luminescence signal on Raman spectrum as to on-glass sample. From these results, it is considered that sp3 C-C bonding is reduced in amount when using insulating substrate in comparison with conductive substrate.

  15. Ballistic self-annealing during ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion implantation conditions are considered during which the energy, dissipated in the collision cascades, is low enough to ensure that the defects, which are generated during these collisions, consist primarily of vacancies and interstitial atoms. It is proposed that ballistic self-annealing is possible when the point defect density becomes high enough, provided that none, or very few, of the interstitial atoms escape from the layer being implanted. Under these conditions, the fraction of ballistic atoms, generated within the collision cascades from substitutional sites, decreases with increasing ion dose. Furthermore, the fraction of ballistic atoms, which finally end up within vacancies, increases with increasing vacancy density. Provided the crystal structure does not collapse, a damage threshold should be approached where just as many atoms are knocked out of substitutional sites as the number of ballistic atoms that fall back into vacancies. Under these conditions, the average point defect density should approach saturation. This model is applied to recently published Raman data that have been measured on a 3 MeV He+-ion implanted diamond (Orwa et al 2000 Phys. Rev. B 62 5461). The conclusion is reached that this ballistic self-annealing model describes the latter data better than a model in which it is assumed that the saturation in radiation damage is caused by amorphization of the implanted layer. (author)

  16. Surface microanalytical studies of nitrogen ion-implanted steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Charles G.; Meeker, G. P.; Baumann, Scott M.; Norberg, James C.; Legg, Keith O.

    1985-03-01

    Five types of industrial steels, 1018, 52100, M-2, 440C, and 304 were ion implanted with nitrogen and subjected to surface microanalysis by three independent surface techniques: AES, RBS, and SIMS. The results provided understanding for earlier observations of the properties of various types of steel after nitrogen implantation. The steels that retained the most nitrogen and that have been reported to benefit the most in improved tribological properties from ion implantation were ferritic carbon and austenitic stainless steels, such as soft 1018 and 304, respectively. Heat-treated martensitic carbon steels such as 52100 and M-2 tool steel were found to retain the least nitrogen, and they have been reported to benefit less from nitrogen implantation; however, the interaction of transition metal carbides in M-2 with nitrogen has not been clarified. The data showed that 440C steel retained as much nitrogen as 1018 and 304, but treatment benefits may be limited to improvements in properties related to toughness and impact resistance.

  17. Ion sources for energy extremes of ion implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershcovitch, A; Johnson, B M; Batalin, V A; Kropachev, G N; Kuibeda, R P; Kulevoy, T V; Kolomiets, A A; Pershin, V I; Petrenko, S V; Rudskoy, I; Seleznev, D N; Bugaev, A S; Gushenets, V I; Litovko, I V; Oks, E M; Yushkov, G Yu; Masunov, E S; Polozov, S M; Poole, H J; Storozhenko, P A; Svarovski, A Ya

    2008-02-01

    For the past four years a joint research and development effort designed to develop steady state, intense ion sources has been in progress with the ultimate goal to develop ion sources and techniques that meet the two energy extreme range needs of meV and hundreads of eV ion implanters. This endeavor has already resulted in record steady state output currents of high charge state of antimony and phosphorus ions: P(2+) [8.6 pmA (particle milliampere)], P(3+) (1.9 pmA), and P(4+) (0.12 pmA) and 16.2, 7.6, 3.3, and 2.2 pmA of Sb(3+)Sb(4+), Sb(5+), and Sb(6+) respectively. For low energy ion implantation, our efforts involve molecular ions and a novel plasmaless/gasless deceleration method. To date, 1 emA (electrical milliampere) of positive decaborane ions was extracted at 10 keV and smaller currents of negative decaborane ions were also extracted. Additionally, boron current fraction of over 70% was extracted from a Bernas-Calutron ion source, which represents a factor of 3.5 improvement over currently employed ion sources.

  18. Development of ion sources for implantation technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion implantation for modification of surface properties of large areas requires ion sources of a particular type. The sources must be capable of producing rather high currents within somewhat poor vacuum conditions. Two types of source are typically used, the glow discharge and the vacuum arc. This paper describes both types. The glow discharge source has a low discharge voltage to minimize beam contamination from metal ions sputtered from the source chamber. To maintain the discharge, electrons are injected from outside the source chamber. The glow discharge source will generate up to 20 mA beam currents. The vacuum arc sources have the advantage of producing high currents of metal ions using a penning discharge. Metal ion currents up to 70 mA are mentioned

  19. Ion beam sputter implantation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By means of ion beam atomizing or sputtering an integrally composed coating, the composition of which continuously changes from 100% of the substrate to 100% of the coating, can be surfaced on a substrate (e.g. molten quartz on plastic lenses). In order to do this in the facility there is directed a primary beam of accelerated noble gas ions on a target from the group of the following materials: SiO2, Al2O3, Corning Glass 7070, Corning Glass 7740 or borosilicate glass. The particles leaving the target are directed on the substrate by means of an acceleration potential of up to 10 KV. There may, however, be coated also metal layers (Ni, Co) on a mylar film resulting in a semireflecting metal film. (RW)

  20. Plasma immersion ion implantation for reducing metal ion release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz, C.; Garcia, J. A.; Maendl, S.; Pereiro, R.; Fernandez, B.; Rodriguez, R. J. [Centro de Ingenieria Avanzada de Superficies AIN, 31191, Cordovilla-Pamplona (Spain); Leibniz-Institut fuer Oberflaechenmodifizierung, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Universidad de Oviedo, Departamento Quimica Fisica y Analitica (Spain); Centro de Ingenieria Avanzada de Superficies AIN, 31191, Cordovilla-Pamplona (Spain)

    2012-11-06

    Plasma immersion ion implantation of Nitrogen and Oxygen on CoCrMo alloys was carried out to improve the tribological and corrosion behaviors of these biomedical alloys. In order to optimize the implantation results we were carried experiments at different temperatures. Tribocorrosion tests in bovine serum were used to measure Co, Cr and Mo releasing by using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry analysis after tests. Also, X-ray Diffraction analysis were employed in order to explain any obtained difference in wear rate and corrosion tests. Wear tests reveals important decreases in rate of more than one order of magnitude for the best treatment. Moreover decreases in metal release were found for all the implanted samples, preserving the same corrosion resistance of the unimplanted samples. Finally this paper gathers an analysis, in terms of implantation parameters and achieved properties for industrial implementation of these treatments.

  1. Accelerating degradation rate of pure iron by zinc ion implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tao; Zheng, Yufeng; Han, Yong

    2016-12-01

    Pure iron has been considered as a promising candidate for biodegradable implant applications. However, a faster degradation rate of pure iron is needed to meet the clinical requirement. In this work, metal vapor vacuum arc technology was adopted to implant zinc ions into the surface of pure iron. Results showed that the implantation depth of zinc ions was about 60 nm. The degradation rate of pure iron was found to be accelerated after zinc ion implantation. The cytotoxicity tests revealed that the implanted zinc ions brought a slight increase on cytotoxicity of the tested cells. In terms of hemocompatibility, the hemolysis of zinc ion implanted pure iron was lower than 2%. However, zinc ions might induce more adhered and activated platelets on the surface of pure iron. Overall, zinc ion implantation can be a feasible way to accelerate the degradation rate of pure iron for biodegradable applications. PMID:27482462

  2. Formation of Si/SiC multilayers by low-energy ion implantation and thermal annealing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dobrovolskiy, S.; Yakshin, A. E.; Tichelaar, F. D.; Verhoeven, J.; E. Louis,; F. Bijkerk,

    2010-01-01

    Si/SiC multilayer systems for XUV reflection optics with a periodicity of 10-20 nm were produced by sequential deposition of Si and implantation of 1 key CHx+ ions. Only about 3% of the implanted carbon was transferred into the SIC, with a thin, 0.5-1 nm, buried SIC layer being formed. We investigat

  3. Nonlinear damage effect in graphene synthesis by C-cluster ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present few-layer graphene synthesis by negative carbon cluster ion implantation with C1, C2, and C4 at energies below 20 keV. The small C-clusters were produced by a source of negative ion by cesium sputtering with medium beam current. We show that the nonlinear effect in cluster-induced damage is favorable for graphene precipitation compared with monomer carbon ions. The nonlinear damage effect in cluster ion implantation shows positive impact on disorder reduction, film uniformity, and the surface smoothness in graphene synthesis.

  4. Ion implantation effects in crystalline quartz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantilever beam measurements of the stress induced in crystalline quartz by implantation of 150 keV Ar and/or 250 keV He have shown that the data scale with energy into collisional processes. The damage state induced by the Ar implants does not lend itself to efficient utilization of the electronic component of subsequent He implantation in producing further disorder. The damage depth has been measured (optically) for a number of ions (1x1016 250 keV/cm2) and has been found to vary (relative to TRIM values) from about 0.63Rp for He to about 1.84Rp for Xe. RBS measurements of range for Ar to Au give values in fair agreement with the optical values. The ratio of the measured (optical) ranges to the predicted (TRIM) ranges, when plotted as a function of collisional energy deposition, indicates that extended damage (beyond ion range) occurs for deposition energies > ∝ 1x1022 keV/cm3. The damage persists even after 900degC anneals. The effects of ion-induced stress may be an important factor in the establishment of the extended damage state. (orig.)

  5. Lithium ion implantation effects in MgO (100)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Huis, MA; Fedorov, AV; van Veen, A; Labohm, F; Schut, H; Mijnarends, PE; Kooi, BJ; De Hosson, JTM; Triftshauser, W; Kogel, G; Sperr, P

    2001-01-01

    Single crystals of MgO (100) were implanted with 10(16) (6)Li ions cm(-2) at an energy of 30 keV. After ion implantation the samples were annealed isochronally in air at temperatures up to 1200K. After implantation and after each annealing step, the defect evolution was monitored with optical absorp

  6. Development of a microwave ion source for ion implantations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, N., E-mail: Nbk-Takahashi@shi.co.jp; Murata, H.; Kitami, H.; Mitsubori, H.; Sakuraba, J.; Soga, T.; Aoki, Y.; Katoh, T. [Technology Research Center, Sumitomo Heavy Industries Ltd., Yokosuka, Kanagawa 237-8555 (Japan)

    2016-02-15

    A microwave ion source is expected to have a long lifetime, as it has fewer consumables. Thus, we are in the process of developing a microwave ion source for ion implantation applications. In this paper, we report on a newly developed plasma chamber and the extracted P{sup +} beam currents. The volume of the plasma chamber is optimized by varying the length of a boron nitride block installed within the chamber. The extracted P{sup +} beam current is more than 30 mA, at a 25 kV acceleration voltage, using PH{sub 3} gas.

  7. Temperature behavior of damage in sapphire implanted with light ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves, E. [Ion Beam Laboratory, Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Sacavem 2686-953 (Portugal); Centro de Fisica Nuclear da Universidade de Lisboa, Lisbon (Portugal)], E-mail: ealves@itn.pt; Marques, C. [Ion Beam Laboratory, Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Sacavem 2686-953 (Portugal); Centro de Fisica Nuclear da Universidade de Lisboa, Lisbon (Portugal); Safran, G. [Research Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Science, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); McHargue, Carl J. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-0750 (United States)

    2009-05-01

    In this study, we compare and discuss the defect behavior of sapphire single crystals implanted with different fluences (1 x 10{sup 16}-1 x 10{sup 17} cm{sup -2}) of carbon and nitrogen with 150 keV. The implantation temperatures were RT, 500 deg. C and 1000 deg. C to study the influence of temperature on the defect structures. For all the ions the Rutherford backscattering-channeling (RBS-C) results indicate a surface region with low residual disorder in the Al-sublattice. Near the end of range the channeled spectrum almost reaches the random indicating a high damage level for fluences of 1 x 10{sup 17} cm{sup -2}. The transmission electron microscopy (TEM) photographs show a layered contrast feature for the C implanted sample where a buried amorphous region is present. For the N implanted sample the Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS) elemental mapping give evidence for the presence of a buried damage layer decorated with bubbles. Samples implanted at high temperatures (500 deg. C and 1000 deg. C) show a strong contrast fluctuation indicating a defective crystalline structure of sapphire.

  8. Carbon fiber-reinforced carbon as a potential implant material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, D; Williams, D F; Hill, J

    1978-01-01

    A carbon fiber-reinforced carbon is being evaluated as a promising implant material. In a unidirectional composite, high strengths (1200 MN/m2 longitudinal flexural strength) and high modulus (140 GN/m2 flexural modulus) may be obtained with an interlaminar shear strength of 18 MN/m2. Alternatively, layers of fibers may be laid in two directions to give more isotopic properties. The compatibility of the material with bone has been studied by implanting specimens in holes drilled in rat femora. For a period of up to 8 weeks, a thin layer of fibrous tissue bridged the gap between bone and implant; but this tissue mineralizes and by 10 weeks, bone can be observed adjacent to the implant, giving firm fixation. Potential applications include endosseous dental implants where a greater strength in the neck than that provided by unreinforced carbon would be advantageous.

  9. Paramagnetism in ion-implanted oxides

    CERN Document Server

    Mølholt, Torben Esmann; Gíslason, Hafliði Pétur; Ólafsson, Sveinn

    This thesis describes the investigation on para-magnetism in dilute ion-implanted single-crystal oxide samples studied by on- and off-line $^{57}$Fe emission Mössbauer spectroscopy. The ion-implantation of the radioactive isotopes ( $^{57}$Mn and $^{57}$Co) was performed at the ISOLDE facility at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland. The off-line measurements were performed at Aarhus University, Denmark. Mössbauer spectroscopy is a unique method, giving simultaneously local information on valence/spin state of the $^{57}$Fe probe atoms, site symmetry and magnetic properties on an atomic scale. The utilisation of emission Mössbauer spectroscopy opens up many new possibilities compared with traditional transmission Mössbauer spectroscopy. Among them is the possibility of working with a low concentration below 10$^{-4}$ –10$^{-3}$ at.%, where the implanted Mössbauer $^{57}$Fe probes are truly dilute impurities exclusively interacting with their nearest neighbours and therefore the possibility of crea...

  10. Biodegradable radioactive implants for glaucoma filtering surgery produced by ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assmann, W. [Department fuer Physik, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, 85748 Garching (Germany)]. E-mail: walter.assmann@lmu.de; Schubert, M. [Department fuer Physik, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, 85748 Garching (Germany); Held, A. [Augenklinik, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, 81675 Munich (Germany); Pichler, A. [Augenklinik, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, 81675 Muenchen (Germany); Chill, A. [Zentralinstitut fuer Medizintechnik, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, 85748 Garching (Germany); Kiermaier, S. [Zentralinstitut fuer Medizintechnik, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, 85748 Garching (Germany); Schloesser, K. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Busch, H. [NTTF GmbH, 53619 Rheinbreitbach (Germany); Schenk, K. [NTTF GmbH, 53619 Rheinbreitbach (Germany); Streufert, D. [Acri.Tec GmbH, 16761 Hennigsdorf (Germany); Lanzl, I. [Augenklinik, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, 81675 Munich (Germany)

    2007-04-15

    A biodegradable, {beta}-emitting implant has been developed and successfully tested which prevents fresh intraocular pressure increase after glaucoma filtering surgery. Ion implantation has been used to load the polymeric implants with the {beta}-emitter {sup 32}P. The influence of ion implantation and gamma sterilisation on degradation and {sup 32}P-fixation behavior has been studied by ion beam and chemical analysis. Irradiation effects due to the applied ion fluence (10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2}) and gamma dose (25 kGy) are found to be tolerable.

  11. Studying of ion implantation effect on the biology in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since low energy ion effect on the biology was observed, the ion implantation as a new mutagenic source has been widely used in improving crops and modifying microbes in China. The basic phenomenon of ion implantation effect on the biology and analytical results are reported, and the examples of its application and its further development are shown

  12. Computational stochastic model of ions implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zmievskaya, Galina I., E-mail: zmi@gmail.ru; Bondareva, Anna L., E-mail: bal310775@yandex.ru [M.V. Keldysh Institute of Applied Mathematics RAS, 4,Miusskaya sq., 125047 Moscow (Russian Federation); Levchenko, Tatiana V., E-mail: tatlevchenko@mail.ru [VNII Geosystem Russian Federal Center, Varshavskoye roadway, 8, Moscow (Russian Federation); Maino, Giuseppe, E-mail: giuseppe.maino@enea.it [Scuola di Lettere e BeniCulturali, University di Bologna, sede di Ravenna, via Mariani 5, 48100 Ravenna (Italy)

    2015-03-10

    Implantation flux ions into crystal leads to phase transition /PT/ 1-st kind. Damaging lattice is associated with processes clustering vacancies and gaseous bubbles as well their brownian motion. System of stochastic differential equations /SDEs/ Ito for evolution stochastic dynamical variables corresponds to the superposition Wiener processes. The kinetic equations in partial derivatives /KE/, Kolmogorov-Feller and Einstein-Smolukhovskii, were formulated for nucleation into lattice of weakly soluble gases. According theory, coefficients of stochastic and kinetic equations uniquely related. Radiation stimulated phase transition are characterized by kinetic distribution functions /DFs/ of implanted clusters versus their sizes and depth of gas penetration into lattice. Macroscopic parameters of kinetics such as the porosity and stress calculated in thin layers metal/dielectric due to Xe{sup ++} irradiation are attracted as example. Predictions of porosity, important for validation accumulation stresses in surfaces, can be applied at restoring of objects the cultural heritage.

  13. Production of Endohedral Fullerenes by Ion Implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diener, M.D.; Alford, J. M.; Mirzadeh, S.

    2007-05-31

    The empty interior cavity of fullerenes has long been touted for containment of radionuclides during in vivo transport, during radioimmunotherapy (RIT) and radioimaging for example. As the chemistry required to open a hole in fullerene is complex and exceedingly unlikely to occur in vivo, and conformational stability of the fullerene cage is absolute, atoms trapped within fullerenes can only be released during extremely energetic events. Encapsulating radionuclides in fullerenes could therefore potentially eliminate undesired toxicity resulting from leakage and catabolism of radionuclides administered with other techniques. At the start of this project however, methods for production of transition metal and p-electron metal endohedral fullerenes were completely unknown, and only one method for production of endohedral radiofullerenes was known. They therefore investigated three different methods for the production of therapeutically useful endohedral metallofullerenes: (1) implantation of ions using the high intensity ion beam at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Surface Modification and Characterization Research Center (SMAC) and fullerenes as the target; (2) implantation of ions using the recoil energy following alpha decay; and (3) implantation of ions using the recoil energy following neutron capture, using ORNL's High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) as a thermal neutron source. While they were unable to obtain evidence of successful implantation using the ion beam at SMAC, recoil following alpha decay and neutron capture were both found to be economically viable methods for the production of therapeutically useful radiofullerenes. In this report, the procedures for preparing fullerenes containing the isotopes {sup 212}Pb, {sup 212}Bi, {sup 213}Bi, and {sup 177}Lu are described. None of these endohedral fullerenes had ever previously been prepared, and all of these radioisotopes are actively under investigation for RIT. Additionally, the chemistry for

  14. Effect of Implantation Machine Parameters on N+ ion Implantation for Upland Cotton(Gossypium hirsutum L.) Pollen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Jieyu; Yu, Lixiang; Wu, Yuejin; Tang, Canming

    2008-10-01

    Effect of parameters of ion implantation machine, including ion energy, total dose, dose rate, impulse energy and implantation interval on the pollen grains of upland cotton implanted with nitrogen ion beam were studied. The best parameters were screened out. The results also showed that the vacuum condition before the nitrogen ion implantation does not affect the pollen viability.

  15. Ion-implanted diamond films and their tribological properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports the physical characterization and tribological evaluation of ion-implanted diamond films. Diamond films were produced by microwave plasma, chemical vapor deposition technique. Diamond films with various grain sizes (0.3 and 3 μm) and roughness (9.1 and 92.1 nm r.m.s. respectively) were implanted with C+ (m/e=12) at an ion energy of 160 eV and a fluence of 6.72 x 1017 ions cm-2. Unidirectional sliding friction experiments were conducted in ultrahigh vacuum (6.6 x 10-7 Pa), dry nitrogen and humid air (40% RH) environments. The effects of C+ ion bombardment on fine and coarse-grained diamond films are as follows: the surface morphology of the diamond films did not change; the surface roughness increased (16.3 and 135.3 nm r.m.s.); the diamond structures were damaged and formed a thin layer of amorphous non-diamond carbon; the friction coefficients dramatically decreased in the ultrahigh vacuum (0.1 and 0.4); the friction coefficients decreased slightly in the dry nitrogen and humid air environments. (orig.)

  16. Plasma immersion ion implantation. (Latest citations from the EI Compendex*plus database). Published Search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-01-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) and equipment. PIII is a new technique to implant plasma ions into materials for surface modification and treatment. Topics include plasma nitriding, semiconductor doping, ion energy distribution, ion dose, pulsed plasma, metal plasma, and defect passivation. References also review applications in semiconductor device and integrated circuit manufacture, silicon material fabrication, aerospace bearings, carbon coatings on metals, and ceramic coatings. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  17. Experimental investigation of plasma-immersion ion implantation treatment for biocompatible polyurethane implants production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iziumov, R. I.; Beliaev, A. Y.; Kondyurina, I. V.; Shardakov, I. N.; Kondyurin, A. V.; Bilek, M. M.; McKenzie, D. R.

    2016-04-01

    Modification of the surface layer of polyurethane with plasma-immersion ion implantation (PIII) and studying its physical and chemical changes have been discussed in this paper. The goal of the research was to obtain carbonized layer allowing creating biocompatible polyurethane implants. The experiments of PIII treatment in various modes were performed. The investigation of the modified surface characteristics was carried out by observing the kinetics of free surface energy for two weeks after treatment. The regularities between treatment time and the level of free surface energy were detected. The explanation of high energy level was given through the appearance of free radicals in the surface layer of material. The confirmation of the chemical activation of the polyurethane surface after PIII treatment was obtained.

  18. PLEPS study of ions implanted RAFM steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sojak, S.; Slugeň, V.; Egger, W.; Ravelli, L.; Petriska, M.; Veterníková, J.; Stacho, M.; Sabelová, V.

    2014-04-01

    Current nuclear power plants (NPP) require radiation, heat and mechanical resistance of their structural materials with the ability to stay operational during NPP planned lifetime. Radiation damage much higher, than in the current NPP, is expected in new generations of nuclear power plants, such as Generation IV and fusion reactors. Investigation of perspective structural materials for new generations of nuclear power plants is among others focused on study of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels. These steels have good characteristics as reduced activation, good resistance to volume swelling, good radiation, and heat resistance. Our experiments were focused on the study of microstructural changes of binary Fe-Cr alloys with different chromium content after irradiation, experimentally simulated by ion implantations. Fe-Cr alloys were examined, by Pulsed Low Energy Positron System (PLEPS) at FRM II reactor in Garching (Munich), after helium ion implantations at the dose of 0.1 C/cm2. The investigation was focused on the chromium effect and the radiation defects resistivity. In particular, the vacancy type defects (monovacancies, vacancy clusters) have been studied. Based on our previous results achieved by conventional lifetime technique, the decrease of the defects size with increasing content of chromium is expected also for PLEPS measurements.

  19. Characterisation of polystyrene coatings after plasma immersion ion implantation and adsorption of protein

    CERN Document Server

    Dekker, S; Steel, B; Bilek, M M M; McKenzie, D R; James, M

    2012-01-01

    A polystyrene film spun onto polished silicon substrates was implanted with either nitrogen or argon ions using plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) and subsequently investigated by X-ray and neutron reflectometry, UV-VIS and FTIR ellipsometry, as well as by FTIR and Raman spectroscopy. The depth profile of the densified carbon structures resulting from the ion collision cascades in the polystyrene coating are clearly observed by both X-ray and neutron reflectometry. Argon ions produce a higher density modified layer at a shallower depth than nitrogen ions. The thickness measured for these graded layers agrees with the expected depths of ion implantation as calculated by SRIM. The sensitivity of X-ray and neutron reflectometry allows resolution of density and hydrogen content gradients within the graphitized layers. The treated layers were found to covalently immobilized protein directly from solution. The tropoelastin protein monolayers immobilized on the surface were characterized. Tropoelastin remained...

  20. Biological Effects on Fruit Fly by N+ ion Beam Implantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Mutation induced by low energy ion beam implantation has beenapplied widely both in plants and microbes. However, due to the vacuum limitation, such ion implantation into animals was never studied except for silkworm. In this study, Pupae of fruit fly were irradiated with different dosage N+ ions at energy 20 KeV to study the biological effect of ion beam on animal. The results showed a saddle-like curve exists between incubate rate and dosage. Damage of pupae by ion beam implantation was observed using scanning electron microscope. Some individuals with incomplete wing were obtained after implantation but no similar character was observed in their offspring. Furthermore, about 5.47% mutants with wide variation appeared in M1 generation. Therefore, ion beam implantation could be widely used for mutation breeding.

  1. Optical properties of nano-structured material in ion-implanted polymer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Being of importance for applications of ion-implanted PMMA in integrated optics, optoelectronics and optical communication, we have studied the optical properties (controlled through the complex refractive index) of nano-structured material in silicon ion (Si+) implanted polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). PMMA was implanted with Si+ ions accelerated to a relatively low energy of 50 keV at a high fluence of 3.2×1015 Si+/cm2. The carbon nano-clustered material in the ion-modified surface layer of Si+-implanted PMMA of a thickness of about 100 nm was optically characterized by reflectance measurements, as well as by reflection ellipsometry at a wavelength of 632.8 nm (He-Ne laser)

  2. Plasma protein adsorption onto cell attachment controlled ion implanted collagen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion implantation into collagen (Type I) coated inner surfaces of test tubes with a length of 50 mm and inner diameter of 2 and 3 mm were performed to develop hybrid type small-diameter artificial vascular grafts. He+ ion implanted collagen coated grafts with a fluence of 1x1014 ions/cm2 replacing femoral arteries exhibited excellent graft patency. To obtain information about the relationship between plasma protein adsorption and antithrombogenicity of ion implanted collagen surfaces, protein adsorption measurements, platelet adhesion test, and animal study were performed. The amount of fibrinogen, fibronectin and albumin showed minimum value at a fluence of 1x1014 ions/cm2. The adsorption of fibrinogen and fibronectin to surfaces is known to promote the adhesion of platelets. The results indicated that antithrombogenicity of He+ ion-implanted collagen with a fluence of 1x1014 ions/cm2 was caused by the reduction of the amount of adsorbed proteins

  3. Status of the ADFA/ANU implanter for radioactive Ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byrne, A.P. [Australian National University, Canberra, ACT (Australia). Department of Nuclear Physics and The Faculties and Department of Physics; Chaplin, D.H.; Wei, J.X.; Hutchenson, W. [New South Wales University, Kensington, NSW (Australia). Dept. of Physics, University College, ADFA

    1998-06-01

    An ion implanter designed for use with radioactive ions is being constructed at the NSW University, in the Department of Physics, University College ADFA as part of an ANU/ADFA collaboration. The implanter will be used in the first instance to provide controlled implantation of radioisotopes into material samples to be subsequently studied by hyperfine interaction techniques. In particular, the ADFA group will be using the NMRON and MAPON techniques, while the ANU group intends to implant short lived isotopes for Perturbed Angular Correlation studies of semiconductor materials. The device has been designed to implant all beams up to an energy of 150 keV and is based on an NEC SNICS II ion source and a {rho} = 0.467m 90 deg bending magnet. The present configuration employs a negative ion source, however, in order for a greater flexibility the system has been also designed to allow for operation with positive ions. 1 refs., 2 figs.

  4. Implantation of Energetic D+ Ions into Carbon Dioxide Ices and Implications for our Solar System: Formation of D2O and D2CO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Chris J.; Ennis, Courtney P.; Kaiser, Ralf I.

    2014-10-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) ices were irradiated with energetic D+ ions to simulate the exposure of oxygen-bearing solar system ices to energetic protons from the solar wind and magnetospheric sources. The formation of species was observed online and in situ by exploiting FTIR spectroscopy. Molecular products include ozone (O3), carbon oxides (CO3(C 2v , D 3h ), CO4, CO5, CO6), D2-water (D2O), and D2-carbonic acid (D2CO3). Species released into the gas phase were sampled via a quadrupole mass spectrometer, and possible minor contributions from D2-formaldehyde (D2CO), D4-methanol (CD3OD), and D2-formic acid (DCOOD) were additionally identified. The feasibility of several reaction networks was investigated by determining their ability to fit the observed temporal column densities of 10 key species that were quantified during the irradiation period. Directly relevant to the CO2-bearing ices of comets, icy satellites in the outer solar system, and the ice caps on Mars, this work illustrates for the first time that D2-water is formed as a product of the exposure of CO2 ices to D+ ions. These findings provide strong support for water formation from oxygen-bearing materials via non-thermal hydrogen atoms, and predict reaction pathways that are likely to be unfolding on the surfaces of asteroids and the Moon.

  5. Implantation of energetic D+ ions into carbon dioxide ices and implications for our solar system: formation of D2O and D2CO3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) ices were irradiated with energetic D+ ions to simulate the exposure of oxygen-bearing solar system ices to energetic protons from the solar wind and magnetospheric sources. The formation of species was observed online and in situ by exploiting FTIR spectroscopy. Molecular products include ozone (O3), carbon oxides (CO3(C 2v, D 3h), CO4, CO5, CO6), D2-water (D2O), and D2-carbonic acid (D2CO3). Species released into the gas phase were sampled via a quadrupole mass spectrometer, and possible minor contributions from D2-formaldehyde (D2CO), D4-methanol (CD3OD), and D2-formic acid (DCOOD) were additionally identified. The feasibility of several reaction networks was investigated by determining their ability to fit the observed temporal column densities of 10 key species that were quantified during the irradiation period. Directly relevant to the CO2-bearing ices of comets, icy satellites in the outer solar system, and the ice caps on Mars, this work illustrates for the first time that D2-water is formed as a product of the exposure of CO2 ices to D+ ions. These findings provide strong support for water formation from oxygen-bearing materials via non-thermal hydrogen atoms, and predict reaction pathways that are likely to be unfolding on the surfaces of asteroids and the Moon.

  6. Self-organized surface ripple pattern formation by ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofsäss, Hans; Zhang, Kun; Bobes, Omar

    2016-10-01

    Ion induced ripple pattern formation on solid surfaces has been extensively studied in the past and the theories describing curvature dependent ion erosion as well as redistribution of recoil atoms have been very successful in explaining many features of the pattern formation. Since most experimental studies use noble gas ion irradiation, the incorporation of the ions into the films is usually neglected. In this work we show that the incorporation or implantation of non-volatile ions also leads to a curvature dependent term in the equation of motion of a surface height profile. The implantation of ions can be interpreted as a negative sputter yield; and therefore, the effect of ion implantation is opposite to the one of ion erosion. For angles up to about 50°, implantation of ions stabilizes the surface, whereas above 50°, ion implantation contributes to the destabilization of the surface. We present simulations of the curvature coefficients using the crater function formalism and we compare the simulation results to the experimental data on the ion induced pattern formation using non-volatile ions. We present several model cases, where the incorporation of ions is a crucial requirement for the pattern formation.

  7. Preparation of Platinum Implanted Glassy Carbon Electrode and Electro-oxidation of Formic Acid and Formaldehyde

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The glassy carbon substrates were bombarded with 5×1017 ions/cm2 of platinum.The surface composition of implanted electrode and concentration-depth profiles of various elements were measured by AES.The chemical state of Pt in glassy carbon electrode implanted with platinum (Pt/GC) was detected by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS).The electro-oxidation of HCOOH and HCHO have been investigated on Pt/GC and smooth Pt electrodes.The results show that the platinum implanted into glassy carbon is much more active than the smooth platinum metal for electro-oxidation of HCOOH and HCHO.

  8. Proton and carbon ion therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Lomax, Tony

    2013-01-01

    Proton and Carbon Ion Therapy is an up-to-date guide to using proton and carbon ion therapy in modern cancer treatment. The book covers the physics and radiobiology basics of proton and ion beams, dosimetry methods and radiation measurements, and treatment delivery systems. It gives practical guidance on patient setup, target localization, and treatment planning for clinical proton and carbon ion therapy. The text also offers detailed reports on the treatment of pediatric cancers, lymphomas, and various other cancers. After an overview, the book focuses on the fundamental aspects of proton and carbon ion therapy equipment, including accelerators, gantries, and delivery systems. It then discusses dosimetry, biology, imaging, and treatment planning basics and provides clinical guidelines on the use of proton and carbon ion therapy for the treatment of specific cancers. Suitable for anyone involved with medical physics and radiation therapy, this book offers a balanced and critical assessment of state-of-the-art...

  9. Nitrogen ion implantation into various materials using 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Chang Seouk [Busan Center, Korea Basic Science Institute, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); School of Mechanical Engineering, Pusan National University, Pusan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Byoung-Seob; Choi, Seyong; Yoon, Jang-Hee; Kim, Hyun Gyu; Ok, Jung-Woo; Park, Jin Yong; Kim, Seong Jun; Bahng, Jungbae; Hong, Jonggi; Won, Mi-Sook, E-mail: mswon@kbsi.re.kr [Busan Center, Korea Basic Science Institute, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seung Wook, E-mail: Seunglee@pusan.ac.kr [School of Mechanical Engineering, Pusan National University, Pusan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    The installation of the 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) ion implantation beamline was recently completed at the Korea Basic Science Institute. The apparatus contains a beam monitoring system and a sample holder for the ion implantation process. The new implantation system can function as a multipurpose tool since it can implant a variety of ions, ranging hydrogen to uranium, into different materials with precise control and with implantation areas as large as 1–10 mm{sup 2}. The implantation chamber was designed to measure the beam properties with a diagnostic system as well as to perform ion implantation with an in situ system including a mass spectrometer. This advanced implantation system can be employed in novel applications, including the production of a variety of new materials such as metals, polymers, and ceramics and the irradiation testing and fabrication of structural and functional materials to be used in future nuclear fusion reactors. In this investigation, the first nitrogen ion implantation experiments were conducted using the new system. The 28 GHz ECRIS implanted low-energy, multi-charged nitrogen ions into copper, zinc, and cobalt substrates, and the ion implantation depth profiles were obtained. SRIM 2013 code was used to calculate the profiles under identical conditions, and the experimental and simulation results are presented and compared in this report. The depths and ranges of the ion distributions in the experimental and simulation results agree closely and demonstrate that the new system will enable the treatment of various substrates for advanced materials research.

  10. Nitrogen ion implantation into various materials using 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Chang Seouk; Lee, Byoung-Seob; Choi, Seyong; Yoon, Jang-Hee; Kim, Hyun Gyu; Ok, Jung-Woo; Park, Jin Yong; Kim, Seong Jun; Bahng, Jungbae; Hong, Jonggi; Lee, Seung Wook; Won, Mi-Sook

    2016-02-01

    The installation of the 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) ion implantation beamline was recently completed at the Korea Basic Science Institute. The apparatus contains a beam monitoring system and a sample holder for the ion implantation process. The new implantation system can function as a multipurpose tool since it can implant a variety of ions, ranging hydrogen to uranium, into different materials with precise control and with implantation areas as large as 1-10 mm2. The implantation chamber was designed to measure the beam properties with a diagnostic system as well as to perform ion implantation with an in situ system including a mass spectrometer. This advanced implantation system can be employed in novel applications, including the production of a variety of new materials such as metals, polymers, and ceramics and the irradiation testing and fabrication of structural and functional materials to be used in future nuclear fusion reactors. In this investigation, the first nitrogen ion implantation experiments were conducted using the new system. The 28 GHz ECRIS implanted low-energy, multi-charged nitrogen ions into copper, zinc, and cobalt substrates, and the ion implantation depth profiles were obtained. SRIM 2013 code was used to calculate the profiles under identical conditions, and the experimental and simulation results are presented and compared in this report. The depths and ranges of the ion distributions in the experimental and simulation results agree closely and demonstrate that the new system will enable the treatment of various substrates for advanced materials research.

  11. Nitrogen ion implantation into various materials using 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The installation of the 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) ion implantation beamline was recently completed at the Korea Basic Science Institute. The apparatus contains a beam monitoring system and a sample holder for the ion implantation process. The new implantation system can function as a multipurpose tool since it can implant a variety of ions, ranging hydrogen to uranium, into different materials with precise control and with implantation areas as large as 1–10 mm2. The implantation chamber was designed to measure the beam properties with a diagnostic system as well as to perform ion implantation with an in situ system including a mass spectrometer. This advanced implantation system can be employed in novel applications, including the production of a variety of new materials such as metals, polymers, and ceramics and the irradiation testing and fabrication of structural and functional materials to be used in future nuclear fusion reactors. In this investigation, the first nitrogen ion implantation experiments were conducted using the new system. The 28 GHz ECRIS implanted low-energy, multi-charged nitrogen ions into copper, zinc, and cobalt substrates, and the ion implantation depth profiles were obtained. SRIM 2013 code was used to calculate the profiles under identical conditions, and the experimental and simulation results are presented and compared in this report. The depths and ranges of the ion distributions in the experimental and simulation results agree closely and demonstrate that the new system will enable the treatment of various substrates for advanced materials research

  12. Thin hydroxyapatite surface layers on titanium produced by ion implantation

    CERN Document Server

    Baumann, H; Bilger, G; Jones, D; Symietz, I

    2002-01-01

    In medicine metallic implants are widely used as hip replacement protheses or artificial teeth. The biocompatibility is in all cases the most important requirement. Hydroxyapatite (HAp) is frequently used as coating on metallic implants because of its high acceptance by the human body. In this paper a process is described by which a HAp surface layer is produced by ion implantation with a continuous transition to the bulk material. Calcium and phosphorus ions are successively implanted into titanium under different vacuum conditions by backfilling oxygen into the implantation chamber. Afterwards the implanted samples are thermally treated. The elemental composition inside the implanted region was determined by nuclear analysis methods as (alpha,alpha) backscattering and the resonant nuclear reaction sup 1 H( sup 1 sup 5 N,alpha gamma) sup 1 sup 2 C. The results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicate the formation of HAp. In addition a first biocompatibility test was performed to compare the growing of m...

  13. Co-axial ECR plasma system for radioactive ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fortin, M A [INRS-EMT (Universite du Quebec), 1650 boul. Lionel Boulet, Varennes, Quebec J3X 1S2 (Canada); Marion, F [INRS-EMT (Universite du Quebec), 1650 boul. Lionel Boulet, Varennes, Quebec J3X 1S2 (Canada); Stansfield, B [INRS-EMT (Universite du Quebec), 1650 boul. Lionel Boulet, Varennes, Quebec J3X 1S2 (Canada); Paynter, R W [INRS-EMT (Universite du Quebec), 1650 boul. Lionel Boulet, Varennes, Quebec J3X 1S2 (Canada); Sarkar, D [INRS-EMT (Universite du Quebec), 1650 boul. Lionel Boulet, Varennes, Quebec J3X 1S2 (Canada); Sarkissian, A [Plasmionique Inc., 1650 boul. Lionel Boulet, Varennes, Quebec J3X 1S2 (Canada); Terreault, B [INRS-EMT (Universite du Quebec), 1650 boul. Lionel Boulet, Varennes, Quebec J3X 1S2 (Canada)

    2005-08-01

    A pulsed, co-axial electron cyclotron resonance (ECR, 2.45 GHz) plasma reactor was designed and tested to demonstrate the feasibility of plasma-based radioactive ion implantation ({sup 32}P radioisotope). The geometry of the reactor was designed to produce an efficient implantation of cylindrical implants. Therefore, the reactor is cylindrical in shape, and is equipped with a cylindrical grid in a co-axial geometry. The plasma is created between the wall and the grid; the plasma surrounds the implant, allowing for a radial implantation. A 1 ms microwave pulse creates a plasma in argon, which sputters material from a radioactive cathode. A fraction of the radioisotopes is then ionized, and the ions are implanted into negatively biased metal samples. The plasma was characterized by means of electrostatic probes, giving spatial evaluations of the electron temperature, plasma potential and electron density. Titanium samples were implanted with {sup 32}P during a study that aimed at optimizing the position of the radioactive sputter cathode in the plasma. From an analysis of the distribution of the radioactive fragments, we deduce that the plasma potential has a marked effect on the ion trajectories. In particular, it provides a more uniform implantation distribution than one would otherwise expect. For plasma densities {approx}8 x 10{sup 10} cm{sup -3}, implantation efficiencies as high as 1% are measured; this is about 100 times higher than conventional beam-line ion implantation.

  14. Formation of Si/SiC multilayers by low-energy ion implantation and thermal annealing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dobrovolskiy, S.; Yakshin, A.E.; Tichelaar, F.D.; Verhoeven, J.; Louis, E.; Bijkerk, F.

    2010-01-01

    Si/SiC multilayer systems for XUV reflection optics with a periodicity of 10–20 nm were produced by sequential deposition of Si and implantation of 1 keV View the MathML source ions. Only about 3% of the implanted carbon was transferred into the SiC, with a thin, 0.5–1 nm, buried SiC layer being fo

  15. Temperature-dependant study of phosphorus ion implantation in germanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razali, M. A.; Smith, A. J.; Jeynes, C.; Gwilliam, R. M.

    2012-11-01

    We present experimental results on shallow junction formation in germanium by phosphorus ion implantation and standard rapid thermal processing. An attempt is made to improve phosphorus activation by implanting phosphorus at high and low temperature. The focus is on studying the germanium damage and phosphorus activation as a function of implant temperature. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry with channelling and Hall Effect measurements are employed for characterisation of germanium damage and phosphorus activation, respectively. High and low temperature implants were found to be better compared to room temperature implant.

  16. Influence of Si ion implantation on structure and morphology of g-C3N4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varalakshmi, B.; Sreenivasulu, K. V.; Asokan, K.; Srikanth, V. V. S. S.

    2016-07-01

    Effect of Si ion implantation on structural and morphological features of graphite-like carbon nitride (g-C3N4) was investigated. g-C3N4 was prepared by using a simple atmospheric thermal decomposition process. The g-C3N4 pellets were irradiated with a Si ion beam of energy 200 keV with different fluencies. Structural, morphological and elemental, and phase analysis of the implanted samples in comparison with the pristine samples was carried out by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) techniques, respectively. The observations revealed that Si ion implantation results in a negligible change in the crystallite size and alteration of the network-like to the sheet-like morphology of g-C3N4 and Si ions in the g-C3N4 network.

  17. Development of vertical compact ion implanter for gemstones applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intarasiri, S.; Wijaikhum, A.; Bootkul, D.; Suwannakachorn, D.; Tippawan, U.; Yu, L. D.; Singkarat, S.

    2014-08-01

    Ion implantation technique was applied as an effective non-toxic treatment of the local Thai natural corundum including sapphires and rubies for the enhancement of essential qualities of the gemstones. Energetic oxygen and nitrogen ions in keV range of various fluences were implanted into the precious stones. It has been thoroughly proved that ion implantation can definitely modify the gems to desirable colors together with changing their color distribution, transparency and luster properties. These modifications lead to the improvement in quality of the natural corundum and thus its market value. Possible mechanisms of these modifications have been proposed. The main causes could be the changes in oxidation states of impurities of transition metals, induction of charge transfer from one metal cation to another and the production of color centers. For these purposes, an ion implanter of the kind that is traditionally used in semiconductor wafer fabrication had already been successfully applied for the ion beam bombardment of natural corundum. However, it is not practical for implanting the irregular shape and size of gem samples, and too costly to be economically accepted by the gem and jewelry industry. Accordingly, a specialized ion implanter has been requested by the gem traders. We have succeeded in developing a prototype high-current vertical compact ion implanter only 1.36 m long, from ion source to irradiation chamber, for these purposes. It has been proved to be very effective for corundum, for example, color improvement of blue sapphire, induction of violet sapphire from low value pink sapphire, and amelioration of lead-glass-filled rubies. Details of the implanter and recent implantation results are presented.

  18. Development of vertical compact ion implanter for gemstones applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Intarasiri, S., E-mail: saweat@gmail.com [Science and Technology Research Institute, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Wijaikhum, A. [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Bootkul, D., E-mail: mo_duangkhae@hotmail.com [Department of General Science (Gems and Jewelry), Faculty of Science, Srinakharinwirot University, Bangkok 10110 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Suwannakachorn, D.; Tippawan, U.; Yu, L.D.; Singkarat, S. [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand)

    2014-08-15

    Ion implantation technique was applied as an effective non-toxic treatment of the local Thai natural corundum including sapphires and rubies for the enhancement of essential qualities of the gemstones. Energetic oxygen and nitrogen ions in keV range of various fluences were implanted into the precious stones. It has been thoroughly proved that ion implantation can definitely modify the gems to desirable colors together with changing their color distribution, transparency and luster properties. These modifications lead to the improvement in quality of the natural corundum and thus its market value. Possible mechanisms of these modifications have been proposed. The main causes could be the changes in oxidation states of impurities of transition metals, induction of charge transfer from one metal cation to another and the production of color centers. For these purposes, an ion implanter of the kind that is traditionally used in semiconductor wafer fabrication had already been successfully applied for the ion beam bombardment of natural corundum. However, it is not practical for implanting the irregular shape and size of gem samples, and too costly to be economically accepted by the gem and jewelry industry. Accordingly, a specialized ion implanter has been requested by the gem traders. We have succeeded in developing a prototype high-current vertical compact ion implanter only 1.36 m long, from ion source to irradiation chamber, for these purposes. It has been proved to be very effective for corundum, for example, color improvement of blue sapphire, induction of violet sapphire from low value pink sapphire, and amelioration of lead-glass-filled rubies. Details of the implanter and recent implantation results are presented.

  19. Bacterial adhesion on ion-implanted stainless steel surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Q. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 4HN (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: q.zhao@dundee.ac.uk; Liu, Y. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 4HN (United Kingdom); Wang, C. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 4HN (United Kingdom); Wang, S. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 4HN (United Kingdom); Peng, N. [Surrey Ion Beam Centre, University of Surrey, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Jeynes, C. [Surrey Ion Beam Centre, University of Surrey, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

    2007-08-31

    Stainless steel disks were implanted with N{sup +}, O{sup +} and SiF{sub 3} {sup +}, respectively at the Surrey Ion Beam Centre. The surface properties of the implanted surfaces were analyzed, including surface chemical composition, surface topography, surface roughness and surface free energy. Bacterial adhesion of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus, which frequently cause medical device-associated infections was evaluated under static condition and laminar flow condition. The effect of contact time, growth media and surface properties of the ion-implanted steels on bacterial adhesion was investigated. The experimental results showed that SiF{sub 3} {sup +}-implanted stainless steel performed much better than N{sup +}-implanted steel, O{sup +}-implanted steel and untreated stainless steel control on reducing bacterial attachment under identical experimental conditions.

  20. Bacterial adhesion on ion-implanted stainless steel surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stainless steel disks were implanted with N+, O+ and SiF3+, respectively at the Surrey Ion Beam Centre. The surface properties of the implanted surfaces were analyzed, including surface chemical composition, surface topography, surface roughness and surface free energy. Bacterial adhesion of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus, which frequently cause medical device-associated infections was evaluated under static condition and laminar flow condition. The effect of contact time, growth media and surface properties of the ion-implanted steels on bacterial adhesion was investigated. The experimental results showed that SiF3+-implanted stainless steel performed much better than N+-implanted steel, O+-implanted steel and untreated stainless steel control on reducing bacterial attachment under identical experimental conditions

  1. Bacterial adhesion on ion-implanted stainless steel surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Q.; Liu, Y.; Wang, C.; Wang, S.; Peng, N.; Jeynes, C.

    2007-08-01

    Stainless steel disks were implanted with N +, O + and SiF 3+, respectively at the Surrey Ion Beam Centre. The surface properties of the implanted surfaces were analyzed, including surface chemical composition, surface topography, surface roughness and surface free energy. Bacterial adhesion of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus, which frequently cause medical device-associated infections was evaluated under static condition and laminar flow condition. The effect of contact time, growth media and surface properties of the ion-implanted steels on bacterial adhesion was investigated. The experimental results showed that SiF 3+-implanted stainless steel performed much better than N +-implanted steel, O +-implanted steel and untreated stainless steel control on reducing bacterial attachment under identical experimental conditions.

  2. Investigation of corrosion and ion release from titanium dental implant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A thin passive titanium dioxide, in its stoichiometric form, has a very high corrosion resistance, but the same conclusion can not be made on corrosion resistance of a surface which is not stoichiometrically titanium dioxide, or even a surface which is a composition of various elements and oxides. In practice, the implants available on the market have an oxide surface contaminated with other elements. The aim of this paper is to correlate clinical observations that show the deterioration of Ti made implants after certain period of insertion in the patients, and in vitro corrosion resistance of Ti implants with surface passive oxide layer. For this purpose, surface analysis of the retrieved failed implants were performed and in vivo animal experiments with relation to ion release from implants were done. Finally, on the basis of the clinical observation, in vivo animal test, and in vitro electrochemical corrosion test, a model is proposed to explain the corrosion and ion release from the Ti implant. (author)

  3. Ionizing Dose Effect of Thermal Oxides Implanted with Si+ Ions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Ming; LUO Hong-Wei; ZHANG Zheng-Xuan; ZHANG En-Xia; YANG Hui; TIAN Hao; WANG Ru; YU Wen-Jie

    2007-01-01

    Total ionizing dose effects of Si+ ion implanted thermal oxides are studied by 10keV x-ray irradiation. Photo-luminescence (PL) method is engaged to investigate nanostructures of samples. Ar+ implanted samples are also studied by the same way to provide a comparison. The results show that Si+ implantation following with high temperature annealing can significantly reduce the radiation induced Hatband shift, which is caused by net positive charge accumulation in oxides. This reduction is attributed to the formation of Si nanoscale structures. Ar+ implantation is also found to reduce the radiation induced Satband shift, while it is different that the reduction with Si+ implantation shows little dependence on implant dose of Ar+ ions. This is explained by possible increase of recombination centres.

  4. A broad chemical and structural characterization of the damaged region of carbon implanted alumina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As candidate materials for future thermonuclear fusion reactors, isolating ceramics will be submitted to high energy gamma and neutron radiation fluxes together with an intense particle flux. Amorphization cannot be tolerated in ceramics for fusion applications, due to the associated volume change and the deterioration of mechanical properties. Therefore, a comprehensive study was carried out to examine the effects of carbon beam irradiation on polycrystalline aluminium oxide (Al2O3), a ceramic component of some diagnostic and plasma heating systems. Complementary techniques have allowed a complete chemical and structural surface analysis of the implanted alumina. Implantation with 75 keV, mono-energetic carbon ions at doses of 1 x 1017 and 5 x 1017 ions/cm2 was performed on polished and thermally treated ceramic discs. The alumina targets were kept below 120 deg. C. The structural modifications induced during ion irradiation were studied by the GXRD and TEM techniques. Under these conditions, alumina is readily amorphized by carbon ions, the thickness of the ion-beam induced disordered area increasing with the ion dose. Matrix elements and ion implanted profiles were followed as a function of depth by using ToF-SIMS, indicating the maximum concentration of implanted ions to be in the deeper half of the amorphous region. Ion distribution and chemical modifications caused in the Al2O3 substrate by carbon irradiation were corroborated with XPS. The amount of oxygen in the vicinity of the implanted alumina surface was reduced, suggesting that this element was selectively sputtered during carbon irradiation. The intensity of those peaks referring to Al-O bonds diminishes, while contributions of reduced aluminium and metal carbides are found at the maximum of the carbon distribution. TEM observations on low temperature thermally annealed specimens indicate partial recovery of the initial crystalline structure.

  5. A broad chemical and structural characterization of the damaged region of carbon implanted alumina

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, M.; Román, R.; Maffiotte, C.; González-Casablanca, J.; Perez, R.; Hole, D.

    2009-05-01

    As candidate materials for future thermonuclear fusion reactors, isolating ceramics will be submitted to high energy gamma and neutron radiation fluxes together with an intense particle flux. Amorphization cannot be tolerated in ceramics for fusion applications, due to the associated volume change and the deterioration of mechanical properties. Therefore, a comprehensive study was carried out to examine the effects of carbon beam irradiation on polycrystalline aluminium oxide (Al2O3), a ceramic component of some diagnostic and plasma heating systems. Complementary techniques have allowed a complete chemical and structural surface analysis of the implanted alumina. Implantation with 75 keV, mono-energetic carbon ions at doses of 1 × 1017 and 5 × 1017 ions/cm2 was performed on polished and thermally treated ceramic discs. The alumina targets were kept below 120 °C. The structural modifications induced during ion irradiation were studied by the GXRD and TEM techniques. Under these conditions, alumina is readily amorphized by carbon ions, the thickness of the ion-beam induced disordered area increasing with the ion dose. Matrix elements and ion implanted profiles were followed as a function of depth by using ToF-SIMS, indicating the maximum concentration of implanted ions to be in the deeper half of the amorphous region. Ion distribution and chemical modifications caused in the Al2O3 substrate by carbon irradiation were corroborated with XPS. The amount of oxygen in the vicinity of the implanted alumina surface was reduced, suggesting that this element was selectively sputtered during carbon irradiation. The intensity of those peaks referring to Al-O bonds diminishes, while contributions of reduced aluminium and metal carbides are found at the maximum of the carbon distribution. TEM observations on low temperature thermally annealed specimens indicate partial recovery of the initial crystalline structure.

  6. Software for goniometer control in the Triple Ion Implantation Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, W.R.

    1994-02-01

    A computer program is described tat controls the goniometer employed in the ion scattering chamber of the Triple Ion Implantation Facility (TIF) in the Metals and Ceramics Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Details of goniometer operation and its incorporation into the ion scattering setup specific to the TIF are also discussed.

  7. Investigations on the characterization of ion implanted hexagonal boron nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aradi, E.; Naidoo, S. R.; Erasmus, R. M.; Julies, B.; Derry, T. E.

    2013-07-01

    The effect of ion implantation on hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) is studied herein. We use boron as an ion of choice to introduce radiation damage into h-BN, at fluences ranging from 1 × 1014-1 × 1016 ions/cm2 and implantation energy ranges from 40 to 160 keV. The thermal dependence is also investigated by varying the annealing temperature from room temperature to 400 °C after implantation. Raman spectroscopy showed Raman active defects one of which is possibly related to the formation of cubic boron nitride nanocrystals (nc-BN) within the implanted range. The relationship of these defect induced Raman active peaks was investigated by varying the implantation parameters. The preliminary Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) results also are reported briefly.

  8. Self-diffusion of ion-implanted tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tracer self-diffusion studies with ion-implanted stable isotopes require a high fluence of implanted ions (>1015 ions/cm2) due to the natural tracer background concentration present in a sample. Such a high fluence leads to considerable implantation damage, where a large part of the tracer is immobilized and does not take place in the diffusion process. As a consequence, diffusion profiles are observed which cannot be described with Fick's second law. In this study, a set of differential equations is presented, describing the diffusion of implanted isotopes as a trap-limited process with a sink and a source term, where the tracer atoms form immobile complexes with implantation damage-induced defects. These equations are solved numerically for the example of nitrogen diffusion in amorphous Si-B-C-N ceramics in order to illustrate diffusivity determination. The results are compared to the analytical solution of Fick's second law

  9. Rolling contact fatigue life of ion-implanted GCr15

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Presents an experimental research into the rooling contact fatigue life of GCr15 steel with Tix N, TiX N + Ag and Tix N + DLC layers ion-implanted using the plasma ion-implantation technology on a ball-rod style high-speed con tact fatigue tester, and concludes with test results that the fatigue life increases to varying degrees with Tix N, Tix N + Ag, and Tix N + DLC layers implanted, and increases 1.8 times with Tix N + Ag layer implanted, hairline cracks grow continuously into fatigue pits under the action of shear stress in the superficial layer of material, and ion-implantation acts to prevent initiation of cracks and slow down propagation of cracks.

  10. Channel waveguides formed by ion implantation of PECVD grown silica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low loss channel waveguides have been formed in silica-on-silicon by implantation with 5 MeV Si and Ge ions. In these experiments, the substrate was comprised of an undoped layer of silica (30 μm thick) which was grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD). The optical loss characteristics of the waveguides, as measured at both λ 1300 and 1550 nm, were independent of the implanted ion species. A minimum in the attenuation loss (α) of ∼0.10-0.20 dB/cm was obtained following both a pre-implant (1050oC) and a post-implant (400-500oC) anneal of the waveguides. The ability to produce a minimum in α by pre-implant annealing has been attributed to the thermally induced relaxation of the densified structure in the as-grown layer. Only a comparatively small degree of compaction was measured for Si-implanted samples which did not receive a pre-implant anneal. In contrast, the much larger degree of compaction in the pre-implant annealed samples was similar in magnitiude to that observed in fused silica. These are the first reported examples of ion-implanted waveguides using a substrate of silica grown by PECVD. (author)

  11. Ion implantation induced nanotopography on titanium and bone cell adhesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braceras, Iñigo, E-mail: inigo.braceras@tecnalia.com [Tecnalia, Mikeletegi Pasealekua 2, 20009 Donostia-San Sebastian (Spain); CIBER de Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (Ciber-BBN) (Spain); Vera, Carolina; Ayerdi-Izquierdo, Ana [Tecnalia, Mikeletegi Pasealekua 2, 20009 Donostia-San Sebastian (Spain); CIBER de Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (Ciber-BBN) (Spain); Muñoz, Roberto [Tecnalia, Mikeletegi Pasealekua 2, 20009 Donostia-San Sebastian (Spain); Lorenzo, Jaione; Alvarez, Noelia [Tecnalia, Mikeletegi Pasealekua 2, 20009 Donostia-San Sebastian (Spain); CIBER de Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (Ciber-BBN) (Spain); Maeztu, Miguel Ángel de [Private Practice, P° San Francisco, 43 A-1°, 20400 Tolosa (Spain)

    2014-08-15

    Graphical abstract: Titanium surfaces modified by inert ion implantation affect cell adhesion through modification of the nanotopography in the same dimensional range of that of human bone inorganic phases. - Highlights: • Inert ion implantation on Ti modifies surface nanotopography and bone cell adhesion. • Ion implantation can produce nanostructured surfaces on titanium in the very same range as of those of the mineral phase of the human bone. • Appropriate tool for studying the relevance of nanostructured surfaces on bone mineralization and implant osseointegration. • Ion implantation induced nanotopography have a statistically significant influence on bone cell adhesion. - Abstract: Permanent endo-osseous implants require a fast, reliable and consistent osseointegration, i.e. intimate bonding between bone and implant, so biomechanical loads can be safely transferred. Among the parameters that affect this process, it is widely admitted that implant surface topography, surface energy and composition play an important role. Most surface treatments to improve osseointegration focus on micro-scale features, as few can effectively control the effects of the treatment at nanoscale. On the other hand, ion implantation allows controlling such nanofeatures. This study has investigated the nanotopography of titanium, as induced by different ion implantation surface treatments, its similarity with human bone tissue structure and its effect on human bone cell adhesion, as a first step in the process of osseointegration. The effect of ion implantation treatment parameters such as energy (40–80 keV), fluence (1–2 e17 ion/cm{sup 2}) and ion species (Kr, Ar, Ne and Xe) on the nanotopography of medical grade titanium has been measured and assessed by AFM and contact angle. Then, in vitro tests have been performed to assess the effect of these nanotopographies on osteoblast adhesion. The results have shown that the nanostructure of bone and the studied ion implanted

  12. Caborane beam from ITEP Bernas ion source for semiconductor implanters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seleznev, D.; Hershcovitch, A.; Kropachev, G.; Kozlov, A.; Kuibeda, R.; Koshelev, V.; Kulevoy, T.; Jonson, B.; Poole, J.; Alexeyenko, O.; Gurkova, E.; Oks, E.; Gushenets, V.; Polozov, S.; Masunov, E.

    2010-02-01

    A joint research and development of steady state intense boron ion sources for hundreds of electron-volt ion implanters has been in progress for the past 5 years. The difficulties of extraction and transportation of low energy boron beams can be solved by implanting clusters of boron atoms. In Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics (ITEP) the Bernas ion source successfully generated the beam of decaborane ions. The carborane (C{sub 2}B{sub 10}H{sub 12}) ion beam is more attractive material due to its better thermal stability. The results of carborane ion beam generation are presented. The result of the beam implantation into the silicon wafer is presented as well.

  13. Low energy negative ion implanter facility at IUAC, New Delhi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A low energy negative ion implanter facility had been developed at IUAC. The typical ion energies of this facility are in the range of 30 KeV to 200 KeV. It is capable of delivering ion species having masses 1H to 197Au. The facility is equipped with a sputter base negative ion source namely MC- SNICS (multi cathode -source of negative ion by cesium sputtering) placed on a high voltage platform (200 kV) for generating negative ion beams. The beam line essentially consists of a negative ion source, an accelerating column, focusing devices such as electrostatic quadruple triplets, an analyzer magnet for selecting the particular ion beam as well as transporting in a particular direction and finally, an ion implantation chamber. The analyzer magnet has a maximum rigidity, R =mE/Z2 of 34 (where m- mass in a.m.u., E- energy in MeV, Z- charge state) thereby, it restricts the energies of the higher mass ions at 150 keV. The ion beam optics for this facility was calculated using GIOS and GICOSY software codes. The control system used for its operation is indigenously developed. The optimized or minimum ion beam spot size obtained is 5 mm x 5 mm (but, variable with ion energy and mass). An electrostatic scanner placed in front of the implantation chamber allows a uniform ion implantation on the samples of sizes up to 15 mm x 15 mm. The facility is in regular operation for ion implantation purposes especially for material science experiments. (author)

  14. Industrial applications of ion implantation into metal surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The modern materials processing technique, ion implantation, has intriguing and attractive features that stimulate the imaginations of scientists and technologists. Success of the technique for introducing dopants into semiconductors has resulted in a stable and growing infrastructure of capital equipment and skills for use of the technique in the economy. Attention has turned to possible use of ion implantation for modification of nearly all surface related properties of materials - optical, chemical and corrosive, tribological, and several others. This presentation provides an introduction to fundamental aspects of equipment, technique, and materials science of ion implantation. Practical and economic factors pertaining to the technology are discussed. Applications and potential applications are surveyed. There are already available a number of ion-implanted products, including ball-and-roller bearings and races, punches-and-dies, injection screws for plastics molding, etc., of potential interest to the machine tool industry

  15. Industrial applications of ion implantation into metal surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, J.M.

    1987-07-01

    The modern materials processing technique, ion implantation, has intriguing and attractive features that stimulate the imaginations of scientists and technologists. Success of the technique for introducing dopants into semiconductors has resulted in a stable and growing infrastructure of capital equipment and skills for use of the technique in the economy. Attention has turned to possible use of ion implantation for modification of nearly all surface related properties of materials - optical, chemical and corrosive, tribological, and several others. This presentation provides an introduction to fundamental aspects of equipment, technique, and materials science of ion implantation. Practical and economic factors pertaining to the technology are discussed. Applications and potential applications are surveyed. There are already available a number of ion-implanted products, including ball-and-roller bearings and races, punches-and-dies, injection screws for plastics molding, etc., of potential interest to the machine tool industry.

  16. Ion-implanted GaAs slow wave monolithic structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of MeV ion-implantation for realization of a GaAs monolithically compatible device is demonstrated. Ion implants up to 6 MeV in energy are used employing Si and S atoms. The fabricated device is an electromagnetic slow wave microstrip-like structure designed for performance into the millimeter wave regime. Phase shift theta and insertion loss L measurements are performed for frequencies 2-18 GHz at room temperature. Comparison of the experimental ion-implanted device results to epitaxial device results indicates comparable electrical performance, with no more than a 30% reduction in theta but with an improvement in loss behavior, namely a L reduction up to 40%. These theta and L differences between the ion-implanted and epitaxial devices are attributed to differences in doping profiles. Theoretical modelling of theta characteristics produces agreement with experimental data to within a few percent. (author)

  17. Emission Characteristics of Ion-Implanted Silicon Emitter Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Takayuki; Kanemaru, Seigo; Tanoue, Hisao; Itoh, Junji

    1995-12-01

    An ion implantation technique has been applied to control the energy band structure of Si field-emitter tip surface. B+ or P+ ions were implanted after fabrication of a gated emitter structure. No changes in emitter structure were observed after ion implantation and successive annealing at 800° C. Current-voltage ( I-V ) characteristics of n, p, p/n and n/p emitter tips were measured: p/n indicates an n-type tip with B+ ions implanted into the tip surface. It was found from the experimental results that n and p/n tips had I-V characteristics in agreement with the Fowler-Nordheim theory. The p and n/p tips, on the other hand, exhibited a current saturation property in high electric field. The present saturation mechanism is explained by considering the energy band structure of the tip surface.

  18. SEM analysis of ion implanted SiC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malherbe, Johan B., E-mail: johan.malherbe@up.ac.za [Department of Physics, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0002 (South Africa); Berg, N.G. van der; Botha, A.J.; Friedland, E.; Hlatshwayo, T.T.; Kuhudzai, R.J. [Department of Physics, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0002 (South Africa); Wendler, E.; Wesch, W. [Institut für Festkörperphysik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität, 07743 Jena (Germany); Chakraborty, P. [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700 064 (India); Silveira, E.F. da [Physics Department, Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2013-11-15

    SiC is a material used in two future energy production technologies, firstly as a photovoltaic layer to harness the UV spectrum in high efficient power solar cells, and secondly as a diffusion barrier material for radioactive fission products in the fuel elements of the next generation of nuclear power plants. For both applications, there is an interest in the implantation of reactive and non-reactive ions into SiC and their effects on the properties of the SiC. In this study 360 keV Ag{sup +}, I{sup +} and Xe{sup +} ions were separately implanted into 6H–SiC and in polycrystalline SiC at various substrate temperatures. The implanted samples were also annealed in vacuum at temperatures ranging from 900 °C to 1600 °C for various times. In recent years, there had been significant advances in scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with the introduction of an in-lens detector combined with field emission electron guns. This allows defects in solids, such as radiation damage created by the implanted ions, to be detected with SEM. Cross-sectional SEM images of 6H–SiC wafers implanted with 360 keV Ag{sup +} ions at room temperature and at 600 °C and then vacuum annealed at different temperatures revealed the implanted layers and their thicknesses. A similar result is shown of 360 keV I{sup +} ions implanted at 600 °C into 6H–SiC and annealed at 1600 °C. The 6H–SiC is not amorphized but remained crystalline when implanting at 600 °C. There are differences in the microstructure of 6H–SiC implanted with silver at the two temperatures as well as with reactive iodine ions. Voids (bubbles) are created in the implanted layers into which the precipitation of silver and iodine can occur after annealing of the samples. The crystallinity of the substrate via implantation temperature caused differences in the distribution and size of the voids. Implantation of xenon ions in polycrystalline SiC at 350 °C does not amorphize the substrate as is the case with room

  19. Experimental studies of superhard materials carbon nitride CNx prepared by ion-beam synthesis method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    辛火平; 林成鲁; 许华平; 邹世昌; 石晓红; 吴兴龙; 朱宏; P.L.FHemment

    1996-01-01

    Formation of superhard materials carbon nitride CNt by using ion-beam synthesis method is reported.100-keV high-dose N+ ions were implanted into carbon thin films at different temperatures.The samples were evaluated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS),Fourier transformation-infrared absorption spectroscopy (FTIR),Raman spectroscopy,cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM),Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS).X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) and Vickers microhardness measurement.The results show that the buried carbon nitride CN> layer has been successfully formed by using 100-keV high-dose N+ ions implantation into carbon thin film.Implantation of reactive ions into silicon (IRIS) computer program has been used to simulate the formation of the buried β-C3N4 layer as N+ ions are implanted into carbon.A good agreement between experimental measurements and IRIS simulation is found.

  20. Effects of N + B ion implantation on the tribological behaviour of GCr15 bearing steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ion implantation of N + B (3.1 x 1017 N ions cm-2 at 90 keV followed by 3.2 x 1017 B ions cm-2 at 90 keV) into GCr15 bearing steel was carried out. The phase structure and the distribution and binding energy of elements in the implanted layer were investigated using X-ray diffraction. Auger electron spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The dry sliding friction and wear behaviour of the implanted layer and GCr15 bearing steel substrate was also examined in detail using a friction and wear machine. It is found that a surface layer with a lower friction coefficient and a higher wear resistance than the substrate was obtained by implanting N + B into GCr15 bearing steel. Because of dispersion strengthening of the hexagonal BN phase and ε-Fe2N-Fe3N phase and solid solution strengthening of B atoms, the surface hardness of the implanted layer is increased. As a result of the increased hardness and the existence of a graphite-like carbon film on the surface of the implanted layer, the antiadhesive and antiabrasive properties of the implanted layer were considerably enhanced. The friction coefficient was reduced from 0.60 to 0.20 and the wear resistance was also greatly improved. (orig.)

  1. Microhardness tests of stainless steel 52100 implanted with nitrogen and carbon dioxide

    CERN Document Server

    Mardanian, M; Taheri, Z

    2003-01-01

    In this research work, samples of stainless steel 52100 disks were implanted with nitrogen and carbon dioxide ions at the energy of 90 keV. Microhardness measurement were performed to determine the hardness of the surface. The N-2 sup + implanted steels at the doses of 1x10 sup 1 8 ions cm sup sub 2 gave the highest hardness of 49.70%, while for the CO sub 2 sup + ions implantation, the hardness of 17% and 5% were obtained at the doses of 3x10 sup 1 8 and 1x10 sup 1 9 ions cm sup - 2, respectively. To support the interpretation of our microhardness results the implanted surface were analyzed by the use of XRD method. Our results indicated that the hardness of the N sub 2 sup + implanted samples are due to formation of beta-Cr N phase in the surface layer, while in the CO sub 2 + implanted samples no observation of carbon as graphite or carbide was made. In addition, the absence of any hump in the XRD spectrum indicating that carbon is not in the amorphous phase either.

  2. Multiple ion implantation effects on hardness and fatigue properties of Fe13Cr15Ni alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, G. R.; Lee, E. H.; Boatner, L. A.; Chin, B. A.; Mansur, L. K.

    1992-09-01

    Eight complex alloys based on the composition Fe13Cr15Ni2Mo2Mn0.2Ti0.8Si0.06C were implanted simultaneously with 400 keV boron and 550 keV nitrogen, and investigated for microhardness changes and bending fatigue life. The dual implantation was found to decrease the fatigue life of all eight alloys although the implantation increased near-surface hardness of all eight alloys. This result was in contrast to the significant improvements found in the fatigue life of four B, N implanted simple Fe13Cr15Ni alloys. It was determined that the implantation suppressed surface slip band formation, the usual crack initiation site, but in the complex alloys, this suppression promoted a shift to grain boundary cracking. A similar phenomenon was also observed when the simple Fe13Cr15Ni alloys were simultaneously implanted with boron, nitrogen and carbon wherein fatigue life decreased, and gain, grain boundary cracks were observed. To test the hypothesis that ion implantation made the overall surface more fatigue resistant but led to a shift to grain boundary cracking, single crystal specimens of the ternary Fe15Cr15Ni were also implanted with boron and nitrogen ions. The fatigue life decreased for the single crystal specimens also, due to concentration of applied stress along fewer slip bands as compared to the control single crystal specimens were applied stress was relieved by slip band formation over the entire gauge region.

  3. Effects of COOH+ ion implantation on hemocompatibility of polypropylene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI; Dejun(李德军); NIU; Lifang(牛丽芳)

    2002-01-01

    Carboxyl ion (COOH+) implantation was performed at 50 keV with different fluences for polypropylene. Hemocompatibility tests show that blood coagulation time and recalcification time of polypropylene were enhanced significantly with the increasing fluence. At the same time, the human endothelial cells grown on the surface of the implanted samples exhibited normal cellular growth and morphology. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and water contact angle analysis showed that COOH+ ion implantation rearranges chemical bonds and produces some new polar O-containing groups on the surface. The formation of polar functional groups, together with increase of roughness, induced an increase in hydrophilicity, which in turn improved the surface hemocompatibility of polypropylene.

  4. The Mechanical and Tribological Properties or Ion Implanted Ceramics

    OpenAIRE

    Bull, Stephen John

    1988-01-01

    The mechanical properties of ion implanted ceramics are primarily a function of the radiation damage produced by the implantation process. For crystalline ceramics this damage is chiefly nuclear displacements, though for glasses electronic effects have also been observed. In this study a number of single crystal and polycrystalline ceramics and a soda-lime-silica glass have been implanted with a range of ions in the energy range 90keV to 400keV and the changes in mechanical properties prod...

  5. X-ray photoelectron study of Si{sup +} ion implanted polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsvetkova, T; Balabanov, S; Bischoff, L; Krastev, V; Stefanov, P; Avramova, I, E-mail: tania_tsvetkova@yahoo.co.u

    2010-11-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to characterize different polymer materials implanted with low energy Si{sup +} ions (E=30 keV, D= 1.10{sup 17} cm{sup -2}). Two kinds of polymers were studied - ultra-high-molecular-weight poly-ethylene (UHMWPE), and poly-methyl-methacrylate (PMMA). The non-implanted polymer materials show the expected variety of chemical bonds: carbon-carbon, carbon being three- and fourfold coordinated, and carbon-oxygen in the case of PMMA samples. The X-ray photoelectron and Raman spectra show that Si{sup +} ion implantation leads to the introduction of additional disorder in the polymer material. The X-ray photoelectron spectra of the implanted polymers show that, in addition to already mentioned bonds, silicon creates new bonds with the host elements - Si-C and Si-O, together with additional Si dangling bonds as revealed by the valence band study of the implanted polymer materials.

  6. Effect of lanthanum ion implantation on oxidation behavior of zircaloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoyang Liu; Xinde Bai

    2004-01-01

    In order to investigate the effect of lanthanum ion imprantation on the oxidation behavior of zircaloy at 500℃, Zircaloy specimens were implanted by lanthanum ions with a dose range from 5×1016 to 2×1017 ions/cm2 at room temperature, and then oxidized at 500℃ for 100 min. The valence of the oxides in the scale was analyzed by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). The phase structures of the oxides in the scale were examined by Glancing Angle X-ray Diffraction (GAXRD). With the increase of implanted lanthanum ions dose, the phase structures in the oxide scale are transformed from monoclinic zirconia to hexagonal one and then to monoclinic one again. The measurement of weight gain showed that a similar change from the decreased gain to increased one again is achieved in the oxidation behavior of lanthanum ion implanted zircaloy compared with that of as-received zircaloy.

  7. Statistical 3D damage accumulation model for ion implant simulators

    CERN Document Server

    Hernandez-Mangas, J M; Enriquez, L E; Bailon, L; Barbolla, J; Jaraiz, M

    2003-01-01

    A statistical 3D damage accumulation model, based on the modified Kinchin-Pease formula, for ion implant simulation has been included in our physically based ion implantation code. It has only one fitting parameter for electronic stopping and uses 3D electron density distributions for different types of targets including compound semiconductors. Also, a statistical noise reduction mechanism based on the dose division is used. The model has been adapted to be run under parallel execution in order to speed up the calculation in 3D structures. Sequential ion implantation has been modelled including previous damage profiles. It can also simulate the implantation of molecular and cluster projectiles. Comparisons of simulated doping profiles with experimental SIMS profiles are presented. Also comparisons between simulated amorphization and experimental RBS profiles are shown. An analysis of sequential versus parallel processing is provided.

  8. TEM study of amorphous alloys produced by ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion implantation is a technique for introducing foreign elements into surface layers of solids. Ions, as a suitably accelerated beam, penetrate the surface, slow down by collisions with target atoms to produce a doped layer. This non-equilibrium technique can provide a wide range of alloys without the restrictions imposed by equilibrium phase diagrams. This paper reports on the production of some amorphous transition metal-metalloid alloys by implantation. Thinned foils of Ni, Fe and stainless steel were implanted at room temperature with Dy+ and P+ ions at doses between 1013 - 1017 ions/cm2 at energies of 20 and 40 keV respectively. Transmission electron microscopy and selected area diffraction analysis were used to investigate the implanted specimens. Radial diffracted intensity measurements confirmed the presence of an amorphous implanted layer. The peak positions of the maxima are in good agreement with data for similar alloys produced by conventional techniques. Only certain ion/target combinations produce these amorphous layers. Implantations at doses lower than those needed for amorphization often result in formation of new crystalline phases such as an h.c.p. phase in nickel and a b.c.c. phase in stainless steel. (Auth.)

  9. Enhanced Physicochemical and Biological Properties of Ion-Implanted Titanium Using Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Csaba Hegedűs

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The surface properties of metallic implants play an important role in their clinical success. Improving upon the inherent shortcomings of Ti implants, such as poor bioactivity, is imperative for achieving clinical use. In this study, we have developed a Ti implant modified with Ca or dual Ca + Si ions on the surface using an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS. The physicochemical and biological properties of ion-implanted Ti surfaces were analyzed using various analytical techniques, such as surface analyses, potentiodynamic polarization and cell culture. Experimental results indicated that a rough morphology was observed on the Ti substrate surface modified by ECRIS plasma ions. The in vitro electrochemical measurement results also indicated that the Ca + Si ion-implanted surface had a more beneficial and desired behavior than the pristine Ti substrate. Compared to the pristine Ti substrate, all ion-implanted samples had a lower hemolysis ratio. MG63 cells cultured on the high Ca and dual Ca + Si ion-implanted surfaces revealed significantly greater cell viability in comparison to the pristine Ti substrate. In conclusion, surface modification by electron cyclotron resonance Ca and Si ion sources could be an effective method for Ti implants.

  10. Ion implantation facility for precision doping of semiconductor devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: We have developed an ion implantation system for application to: the nano-fabrication of p-type and n-type silicon devices; the fabrication of silicon nano-resistors; single phosphorus doping of silicon-based quantum computer devices; the doping of diamond-based devices; the study of ion beam physics of low energy ion interactions with solids. The system reliably delivers a wide range of ion spices, including B+, Te+, P+, C+, N+ and H+ with an energy up to 15 keV. The ion implanter operates in the mode of beam-on-demand control triggered by signals from the substrate and the beam current is adjustable in a wide range from ∼mA to a few ions per-second. The beam purity of each ion species is routinely monitored and analysed using micro-ERDA/PIXE/RBS. Copyright (2005) Australian Institute of Physics

  11. Surface bioactivity of plasma implanted silicon and amorphous carbon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Paul K CHU

    2004-01-01

    Plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (PⅢ&D) has been shown to be an effective technique to enhance the surface bioactivity of materials. In this paper, recent progress made in our laboratory on plasma surface modification single-crystal silicon and amorphous carbon is reviewed. Silicon is the most important material in the integrated circuit industry but its surface biocompatibility has not been investigated in details. We have recently performed hydrogen PⅢ into silicon and observed the biomimetic growth of apatite on its surface in simulated body fluid. Diamond-like carbon (DLC) is widely used in the industry due to its excellent mechanical properties and chemical inertness. The use of this material in biomedical engineering has also attracted much attention. It has been observed in our laboratory that doping DLC with nitrogen by means of PⅢ can improve the surface blood compatibility. The properties as well as in vitro biological test results will be discussed in this article.

  12. Effect of ion implantation on apple wine yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The wild type apple wine yeast Y02 was treated by ion implantation with the dose of 8 x 1015 ion/cm2. As results, a special mutant strain, IONII-11 dry, was obtained. The morphology characters, partial biochemistry characters, mycelium protein of the mutant strain were distinctively changed compared with original strain Y02. After the fermentation test ,the apple wine producing rate of the mutant strain increased 22.4% compared with original strain. These results showed that ion implantation was an effective method for mutagenesis

  13. Compression of self-ion implanted iron micropillars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Self-ion implantation used to cause cascade damage in pure iron. ► Increase in hardness measured in implanted region using nanoindentation. ► Micropillars manufactured and tested in both implanted and unimplanted material. ► Marked difference in deformation mechanisms in each set of pillars seen using scanning electron microscopy. ► No difference in yield stress seen, suggesting it is difficult to use micro-compression to understand bulk properties. - Abstract: Ion implantation causes displacement damage in materials, leading to the formation of small dislocation loops and can cause changes to the material’s mechanical properties. Samples of pure Fe were subjected to Fe+ implantation at 275 °C, producing damage of ∼6 dpa to ∼1 μm depth. Nanoindentation into implanted material shows an increase in hardness compared to unimplanted material. Micropillars were manufactured in cross-section specimens of implanted and unimplanted material and compressed using a nanoindenter. The implanted pillars have a deformation mode which differs markedly from the unimplanted pillars but show no change in yield-stress. This suggests that the controlling mechanism for deformation is different between nanoindentation and micropillar compression and that care is needed if using micropillar compression to extract bulk properties of irradiated materials.

  14. Terahertz generation from Cu ion implantation into lithium niobate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yuhua, E-mail: wyh61@163.com [Hubei Province Key Laboratory of Systems Science in Metallurgical Process, Wuhan university of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430081 (China); Wang, Ruwu; Yuan, Jie [Hubei Province Key Laboratory of Systems Science in Metallurgical Process, Wuhan university of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430081 (China); Wang, Yumei [Department of Nephrology, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022 (China)

    2014-03-15

    In this letter, the authors present first observation of terahertz generation from Cu implantation of lithium niobate crystal substrate. Lithium niobate single crystal is grown by Czochralski method. Metal nanoparticles synthesized by Cu ion implantation were implanted into lithium niobate single crystal using metal vapor vacuum arc (MEVVA) ion source. 1 kHz, 35 fs laser pulse centred at 800 nm was focused onto the samples. The supercontinuum spectra of the sample are obtained. Terahertz was generated via this kind of sample and investigated using the electro-optical sampling technique. The findings suggest that under the investigated implantation parameter, a strong spectral component in excess of 0.46 THz emission was found from Cu ion implantation of lithium niobate. -- Highlights: • We first observation of terahertz generation from Cu implantation of lithium niobate crystal substrate. • Lithium niobate single crystal is grown by Czochralski method. Cu nanoparticles in lithium niobate have been formed by using MEVVA ion source. • The THz bandwidth and center from this kind of sample were determined.

  15. Divacancy formation by polyatomic ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The production of the neutral divacancy absorption band (1.8 μm at 3000K) by the polyatomic series C+ (70 keV), CO+ (163 keV), CO2+ (256 keV), and by O1+ (85 keV), O2+ (170 keV), O3+ (255 keV) has been investigated. The oxygen series is emphasized because equal total energy and impurity deposition can be achieved simultaneously. For fluences significantly less than those required for amorphous layer formation, divacancy formation by 255 keV O3+ implantation at 3000K is approximately 1.5 times that for an equal atomic dose introduced by 85 keV O1+ implantation. Divacancy formation at 800K followed by heating to 3000K, is approximately 1.3 times that for an equivalent implantation at 3000K. An enhanced probability for divacancy formation with increasing initial defect density is suggested to explain the polyatomic and temperature effects. For polyatomic implantation the initial defect density is increased by simultaneous collisions within a cascade, while suppressed annealing allows accumulation of initial defects for low temperature implantation. Defect annealing for energy deposition near the crystalline-to-amorphous transition is especially important in determining the nature of the disorder. The results are compared with previous channeling-backscattering measurements of disorder produced by polyatomic implantation

  16. Simulation methods of ion sheath dynamics in plasma source ion implantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jiuli; ZHANG Guling; WANG Younian; LIU Yuanfu; LIU Chizi; YANG Size

    2004-01-01

    Progress of the theoretical studies on the ion sheath dynamics in plasma source ion implantation (PSII) is reviewed in this paper. Several models for simulating the ion sheath dynamics in PSII are provided. The main problem of nonuniform ion implantation on the target in PSII is discussed by analyzing some calculated results. In addition, based on the relative researches in our laboratory, some calculated results of the ion sheath dynamics in PSII for inner surface modification of a cylindrical bore are presented. Finally, new ideas and tendency for future researches on ion sheath dynamics in PSII are proposed.

  17. Osteoconductivity of hydrophilic microstructured titanium implants with phosphate ion chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin-Woo; Jang, Je-Hee; Lee, Chong Soo; Hanawa, Takao

    2009-07-01

    This study investigated the surface characteristics and bone response of titanium implants produced by hydrothermal treatment using H(3)PO(4), and compared them with those of implants produced by commercial surface treatment methods - machining, acid etching, grit blasting, grit blasting/acid etching or spark anodization. The surface characteristics were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy, thin-film X-ray diffractometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, contact angle measurement and stylus profilometry. The osteoconductivity of experimental implants was evaluated by removal torque testing and histomorphometric analysis after 6 weeks of implantation in rabbit tibiae. Hydrothermal treatment with H(3)PO(4) and subsequent heat treatment produced a crystalline phosphate ion-incorporated oxide (titanium oxide phosphate hydrate, Ti(2)O(PO(4))(2)(H(2)O)(2); TiP) surface approximately 5microm in thickness, which had needle-like surface microstructures and superior wettability compared with the control surfaces. Significant increases in removal torque forces and bone-to-implant contact values were observed for TiP implants compared with those of the control implants (pcleaning of the implants removed during the removal torque testing, a considerable quantity of attached bone was observed on the surfaces of the TiP implants. PMID:19332400

  18. Surface modification of Natural Rubber by ion implantation: Evidence for implant doping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Predeep, P. [Condensed Matter Physics Laboratory, Sree Narayana College, Kollam 691 001, Kerala (India)]. E-mail: predeep@vsnl.com; Najidha, S. [Semiconductor and Polymer Science Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Rajasthan, Jaipur 302 004 (India); Sreeja, R. [Condensed Matter Physics Laboratory, Sree Narayana College, Kollam 691 001, Kerala (India); Saxena, N.S. [Semiconductor and Polymer Science Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Rajasthan, Jaipur 302 004 (India)

    2005-12-15

    Ion implantation is one of the most powerful and well-known technique for surface modification in polymers. Thin films of Natural Rubber were modified by the implantation of 60 keV N{sup +} ions to the fluences of 10{sup 11}-10{sup 15} cm{sup -2}. The electrical conductivity measurements of irradiated sample show 10 orders of magnitude compared to pristine state. Along with conductivity change there was a noticeable change in color to a dense shiny black for the most highly conducting films. The analysis of temperature dependence of dc electrical conductivity data reveals a three-dimensional variable range hopping mechanism. The microstructural evolution of the virgin and ion-beam modified samples was investigated by spectroscopic analysis such as UV/Vis and FTIR. These spectral studies gave evidence for the production of conjugate double bonds, which is a clear cut indication of implant doping. This is an important result since ion implantation usually does not produce doping in polymeric materials and only a few reports about the possibility of implant doping in polymers are available. The significant aspect of this study is that this confirms, the Natural Rubber's potential to be used as a microelectronic device material. Also an attempt has been made to compare the conductivity enhancement in Natural Rubber by chemical and implant doping.

  19. Surface modification of Natural Rubber by ion implantation: Evidence for implant doping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Predeep, P.; Najidha, S.; Sreeja, R.; Saxena, N. S.

    2005-12-01

    Ion implantation is one of the most powerful and well-known technique for surface modification in polymers. Thin films of Natural Rubber were modified by the implantation of 60 keV N + ions to the fluences of 10 11-10 15 cm -2. The electrical conductivity measurements of irradiated sample show 10 orders of magnitude compared to pristine state. Along with conductivity change there was a noticeable change in color to a dense shiny black for the most highly conducting films. The analysis of temperature dependence of dc electrical conductivity data reveals a three-dimensional variable range hopping mechanism. The microstructural evolution of the virgin and ion-beam modified samples was investigated by spectroscopic analysis such as UV/Vis & FTIR. These spectral studies gave evidence for the production of conjugate double bonds, which is a clear cut indication of implant doping. This is an important result since ion implantation usually does not produce doping in polymeric materials and only a few reports about the possibility of implant doping in polymers are available. The significant aspect of this study is that this confirms, the Natural Rubber's potential to be used as a microelectronic device material. Also an attempt has been made to compare the conductivity enhancement in Natural Rubber by chemical and implant doping.

  20. Diffusion of indium implanted in silicon: The effect of the pre-amorphisation treatment and of the presence of carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gennaro, S. [ITC-irst, Istituto Trentino di Cultura, Centro per la Ricerca Scientifica e Tecnologica, Via Sommarive 18, 38050 Povo, Trento (Italy)]. E-mail: gennaro@itc.it; Barozzi, M. [ITC-irst, Istituto Trentino di Cultura, Centro per la Ricerca Scientifica e Tecnologica, Via Sommarive 18, 38050 Povo, Trento (Italy); Bersani, M. [ITC-irst, Istituto Trentino di Cultura, Centro per la Ricerca Scientifica e Tecnologica, Via Sommarive 18, 38050 Povo, Trento (Italy); Sealy, B.J. [Advanced Technology Institute, School of Electronics and Physical Sciences, University of Surrey, GU2 7XH Guildford, Surrey (United Kingdom); Gwilliam, R. [Advanced Technology Institute, School of Electronics and Physical Sciences, University of Surrey, GU2 7XH Guildford, Surrey (United Kingdom)

    2005-08-01

    We investigate the effect of the pre-amorphisation damage on the structural properties, and dopant diffusion behaviour of indium and carbon co-implanted layers in silicon. Ion implantation of indium and carbon in silicon was used to produce co-implanted specimens. Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy and Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy have been performed on as-implanted and annealed samples to assess in detail the structural properties of the doped layers and the diffusion behaviour. The results have been compared with data obtained for similar implants performed into crystalline silicon to achieve a deeper understanding of the mechanisms driving the diffusion of the indium in silicon in presence of co-implanted species. In particular a reduction of the indium diffusion and a saturation level for the indium substitutional retained dose were observed.

  1. Quantum information process with nanometre precession ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spin state of a single nitrogen-vacancy centre in diamond is one of the most attractive candidate for quantum information processing because of its long spin coherence time. Further more coupling (magnetic dipole) between the spins are required for scalable quantum computing (2-qbit operation). This process requires a high implantation positioning accuracy and nitrogen free clean diamond (<0.1 ppm nitrogen concentration). Here we report recent progress towards single ion implantation within nanometre scale accuracies. (orig.)

  2. Single versus double ion implantation: a deep level study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alfieri, G. [Department of Electronic Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyotodaigaku-katsura, Nishikyo, Kyoto (Japan); Kimoto, T. [Department of Electronic Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyotodaigaku-katsura, Nishikyo, Kyoto (Japan); Photonics and Electronics Science and Engineering Center, Kyoto University, Kyotodaigaku-katsura, Nishikyo, Kyoto (Japan)

    2009-02-15

    We performed a comparison study of electrically active defects generated in single and double ion implantated 4H-SiC epilayers. Capacitance-voltage (C-V) and deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) measurements revealed that dou- ble implantation, is responsible for a different compensation mechanism of the net-acceptor concentration, and for the different nature and annealing behavior of the detected deep levels. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  3. GaAs Hall devices produced by local ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettenpaul, E.; Huber, J.; Weidlich, H.; Flossmann, W.; von Borcke, U.

    1981-08-01

    GaAs Hall devices were produced by complete planar technology using two selective silicon ion implantation steps. The fundamental characteristics of these devices with respect to reproducible implantation dose and geometry of cross-shaped elements are obtained both by experiment and calculation. The prominent properties of the GaAs Hall elements presented are high sensitivity and linearity, small temperature dependence of sensitivity and resistance, and low residual voltage.

  4. Ion implantation induced by Cu ablation at high laser fluence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High energy laser plasma-produced Cu ions have been implanted in silicon substrates placed at different distances and angles with respect to the normal to the surface of the ablated target. The implanted samples have been produced using the iodine high power Prague Asterix Laser System (PALS) using 438 nm wavelength irradiating in vacuum a Cu target. The high laser pulse energy (up to 230 J) and the short pulse duration (400 ps) produced a non-equilibrium plasma expanding mainly along the normal to the Cu target surface. Time-of-flight (TOF) technique was employed, through an electrostatic ion energy analyzer (IEA) placed along the target normal, in order to measure the ion energy, the ion charge state, the energy distribution and the charge state distribution. Ions had a Boltzmann energy distributions with an energy increasing with the charge state. At a laser fluence of the order of 6 x 106 J/cm2, the maximum ion energy was about 600 keV and the maximum charge state was about 27+. In order to investigate the implantation processes, Cu depth profiles have been performed with Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) of 1.5 MeV helium ions, Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) with 3 keV electron beam and 1 keV Ar sputtering ions in combination with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Surface analysis results indicate that Cu ions are implanted within the first surface layers and that the ion penetration ranges are in agreement with the ion energy measured with IEA analysis

  5. Co-implantation of carbon and nitrogen into silicon dioxide for synthesis of carbon nitride materials

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, M B; Nuesca, G; Moore, R

    2002-01-01

    Materials synthesis of carbon nitride has been attempted with co-implantation of carbon and nitrogen into thermally grown SiO sub 2. Following implantation of C and N ions to doses of 10 sup 1 sup 7 cm sup - sup 2 , thermal annealing of the implanted SiO sub 2 sample was conducted at 1000 degree sign C in an N sub 2 ambient. As evidenced in Fourier transform infrared measurements and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, different bonding configurations between C and N, including C-N single bonds, C=N double bonds and C=N triple bonds, were found to develop in the SiO sub 2 film after annealing. Chemical composition profiles obtained with secondary ion mass spectroscopy were correlated with the depth information of the chemical shifts of N 1s core-level electrons, allowing us to examine the formation of C-N bonding for different atomic concentration ratios between N and C. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy showed no sign of the formation of crystalline C sub 3 N sub 4 precipitates in the SiO ...

  6. Quantum-dot composite silicate glasses obtained by ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion implantation is a useful technique to obtain composite materials such as nanocluster-containing silicate glasses. Depending on the choice of the pair 'implanted atom-dielectric host', ion implantation of metals in glass gives rise to the formation of new compounds and/or metallic nanoparticles. In spite of the great interest, processes governing the chemical and physical interaction between the implanted atoms and the atoms in the host matrix are not completely understood. In this paper, metal, alloy and binary compound nanocluster formation is studied after ion implantation in silica and soda-lime glass. Particular emphasis is given to the comparison among different existing approaches to the understanding of the chemical interactions in these systems. As the physical properties of these composites depend on the cluster structure, composition and size, it is important to set procedures for modifying these characteristics. Recent results indicate that thermal treatments in controlled atmosphere of gold + copper double-implanted silica favor the formation of either alloy nanoclusters or copper compounds, depending on the annealing atmosphere

  7. Ion implantation for manufacturing bent and periodically bent crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion implantation is proposed to produce self-standing bent monocrystals. A Si sample 0.2 mm thick was bent to a radius of curvature of 10.5 m. The sample curvature was characterized by interferometric measurements; the crystalline quality of the bulk was tested by X-ray diffraction in transmission geometry through synchrotron light at ESRF (Grenoble, France). Dislocations induced by ion implantation affect only a very superficial layer of the sample, namely, the damaged region is confined in a layer 1 μm thick. Finally, an elective application of a deformed crystal through ion implantation is here proposed, i.e., the realization of a crystalline undulator to produce X-ray beams

  8. Ion implantation for manufacturing bent and periodically bent crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellucci, Valerio; Camattari, Riccardo; Guidi, Vincenzo, E-mail: guidi@fe.infn.it; Mazzolari, Andrea; Paternò, Gianfranco [Department of Physics and Earth Sciences, University of Ferrara, Via Saragat 1/c, 44122 Ferrara, Italy and INFN, Section of Ferrara (Italy); Mattei, Giovanni, E-mail: giovanni.mattei@unipd.it; Scian, Carlo [Department of Physics and Astronomy Galileo Galilei, University of Padova, Via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova (Italy); Lanzoni, Luca [Dipertimento di Economia e Tecnologia, Università degli Studi della Repubblica di San Marino, Salita alla Rocca, 44, 47890 San Marino Città (San Marino)

    2015-08-10

    Ion implantation is proposed to produce self-standing bent monocrystals. A Si sample 0.2 mm thick was bent to a radius of curvature of 10.5 m. The sample curvature was characterized by interferometric measurements; the crystalline quality of the bulk was tested by X-ray diffraction in transmission geometry through synchrotron light at ESRF (Grenoble, France). Dislocations induced by ion implantation affect only a very superficial layer of the sample, namely, the damaged region is confined in a layer 1 μm thick. Finally, an elective application of a deformed crystal through ion implantation is here proposed, i.e., the realization of a crystalline undulator to produce X-ray beams.

  9. Effects of ion implantation on the hardness and friction behaviour of soda-lime silica glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion implantation-induced changes in the near-surface mechanical properties of soda-lime silica glass have been investigated by indentation and scratch testing and have been found to be more complicated than changes in the corresponding properties of crystalline ceramic materials. Argon, nitrogen, carbon and potassium ions were used with energies in the range 45-300 keV. Hardness and scratch friction tests were performed under ambient laboratory conditions. At low doses, a decrease in hardness and an increase in both friction and surface stress are observed which are attributed to the electronic damage produced by ion implantation. At higher doses, the hardness increases again and a maximum is produced similar to the behaviour observed for crystalline materials. Similarly there is found to be a second stress and friction peak at this dose. This behaviour is shown to be due to the build-up of displacement damage produced by ion implantation and is thus very similar to the radiation hardening (and eventual amorphization) behaviour of ion-implanted crystalline ceramics. For glass, ''amorphization'' probably corresponds to some change in the existing amorphous state which, in turn, is responsible for the reduction in hardness, stress and friction at the highest doses. (author)

  10. Ion Implanted Passivated Contacts for Interdigitated Back Contacted Solar Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, David L.; Nemeth, William; LaSalvia, Vincenzo; Reedy, Robert; Bateman, Nicholas; Stradins, Pauls

    2015-06-14

    We describe work towards an interdigitated back contacted (IBC) solar cell utilizing ion implanted, passivated contacts. Formation of electron and hole passivated contacts to n-type CZ wafers using tunneling SiO2 and ion implanted amorphous silicon (a-Si) are described. P and B were ion implanted into intrinsic amorphous Si films at several doses and energies. A series of post-implant anneals showed that the passivation quality improved with increasing annealing temperatures up to 900 degrees C. The recombination parameter, Jo, as measured by a Sinton lifetime tester, was Jo ~ 14 fA/cm2 for Si:P, and Jo ~ 56 fA/cm2 for Si:B contacts. The contact resistivity for the passivated contacts, as measured by TLM patterns, was 14 milliohm-cm2 for the n-type contact and 0.6 milliohm-cm2 for the p-type contact. These Jo and pcontact values are encouraging for forming IBC cells using ion implantation to spatially define dopants.

  11. Cathodoluminescence characterization of ion implanted GaAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cone, M. L.

    1980-03-01

    The unique properties of GaAs make it possible to construct integrated circuit devices that are impossible in Si. The Air Force Avionics Laboratory/AADR has been developing this technology for a number of years. The difficulty of introducing dopants by diffusion has lead ion implantation to play an increasing role in the fabrication process. The present production technique for high performance devices is to fabricate large quantities and select those few that meet the desired specifications. Having a nondestructive technique that can be used to characterize the implantation process during fabrication of the device so as to reject faulty device structures can save valuable time as well as money. Depth-resolved cathodoluminescence is a process that can be used for this purpose. This research develops and verifies a model of cathodoluminescence in ion implanted GaAs. This model can now be used as a tool for further study of ion implanted GaAs. This is the first step in developing cathodoluminescence as a tool for deducing the shape of the ion implanted depth profile in semiconductor materials.

  12. Molecular mechanism of mutagenesis and interaction of incident ions with organism implanted by heavy ions beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a new mutagenesis technique, low energy heavy ion implantation started in China for the study of interaction effect between incident ions and organism, and great achievements have been obtained in crop breeding. The article reviewed the main biological effects induced by heavy ion implantation, including physiology, biochemistry and genetics effects, on levels of cell and chromosome, gene expression, DNA methylation, DNA damage and reparation etc. It compared the differences in mutagenesis for organism by high energy and low energy ion implantation, as well as γ ray radiation. Future investigation topics were proposed, the emphasis of researches in future was pointed out, i.e., the molecular mechanism and effects of gene differential expression of organism treated by ion implantation. (authors)

  13. Hardening of WC-Co alloys by ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hardening effect on the surface layers of WC-Co alloys after Ar+- and N+-ion implantation with the fluence in the range 1 divided by 8.7 x 1017 cm-2 has been investigated at room temperature and under heating with an ion beam. The depth of the Auger distribution profiles and the microhardness of implanted samples were measured. The radiation-stimulated diffusion of nitrogen atoms and the microhardness enhancement were observed. The contribution of the polymorphic Co-phase transformation and the production of Co-N compounds is discussed. (author)

  14. Development of a CMOS process using high energy ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main interest of this thesis is the use of complementary metal oxide semiconductors (CMOS) in electronic technology. Problems in developing a CMOS process are mostly related to the isolation well of p-n junctions. It is shown that by using high energy ion implantation, it is possible to reduce lateral dimensions to obtain a rather high packing density. High energy ion implantation is also presented as a means of simplifying CMOS processing, since extended processing steps at elevated temperatures are superfluous. Process development is also simplified. (Auth.)

  15. Helium ion implantation in zirconium: Bubble formation and growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totemeier, Aaron Robert

    To evaluate the behavior of inert helium gas bubbles in zirconium three variants of the metal were implanted with 140 keV helium ions to a total fluence of 3x1017 cm--2 and characterized in cross-section TEM in their as-implanted state as well as during annealing at different temperatures. The three zirconium alloys included high-purity crystal bar material, Zircaloy-4, and a powder-metallurgically extruded material with high carbon and oxygen concentrations. At a sample depth consistent with a helium concentration of approximately 5 atomic percent, a change in the structure of the zirconium was observed a high density region of small (4nm diameter) bubbles formed at concentrations above 10 atom percent. Initial bubble formation and growth was observed to occurred at a temperature between 400-450 °C and these initial bubbles had a unique planar geometry prior to migration and coalescence into more three-dimensional bubbles. These planar bubbles appear to be aligned with major axes parallel to the TEM specimen surface and their formation and growth is possibly due to an increase in the thermal vacancy flux within the zirconium. The observations of bubble response to high temperature annealing suggest that in zirconium, as in other metals, maximum bubble size is weakly dependent on annealing time, whereas the bubble size distribution is strongly dependent on time. Specimens that underwent a prolonged room temperature aging developed a multimodal bubble size distribution within the high density region of small bubbles, concentrated near the highest helium concentration depth.

  16. Raman scattering in silicon disordered by gold ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavrentiev, Vasily; Vacik, Jiri; Vosecek, Vaclav [NS Lab, Nuclear Physics Institute AS CR, Rez-130, Husinec 250 68 (Czech Republic); Vorlicek, Vladimir [Institute of Physics AS CR, Na Slovance 2, Prague 182 21 (Czech Republic)

    2010-08-15

    Si (111) covered by a 250-nm thick SiO{sub 2} surface layer has been disordered through implantation of 3.035 MeV gold ions within broad range of fluences from 1 x 10{sup 13} ions/cm{sup 2} to 1 x 10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2}. Raman spectroscopy (514.5 nm laser) was applied for characterization of the silicon disordering. Variation of the Raman spectra of silicon after low-fluence implantation (fluences lower than 5 x 10{sup 14} ions/cm{sup 2}) in the vicinity of the transverse optical phonon (1TO) peak reflects the coexistence of bulk Si crystals (c-Si) and Si nanocrystals (nc-Si) in the implanted layer. Implantation with higher fluences yields only the stable 470 cm{sup -1} 1TO peak, corresponding to formation of amorphous phase (a-Si), in this region of the spectra. Detailed analysis of the silicon disorder was performed through calculation of the transverse acoustical phonon (1TA) peak area. The fluence dependence of the peak area reveals qualitative correlation with the depth profile of structural defects in the modified Si layer evaluated from RBS (Rutherford backscattering) experiment and from SRIM (stopping and range of ions in matter) code simulation. This correlation suggests a decrease of the structural disorder in the modified layer region enriched by vacancies. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  17. Structural modification of tantalum crystal induced by nitrogen ion implantation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A H RAMEZANI; M R HANTEHZADEH; M GHORANNEVISS; E DARABI

    2016-06-01

    This paper investigates the effect of nitrogen ion implantation on tantalum surface structure. In this experiment, nitrogen ions which had an energy of 30 keV and doses of $1 \\times 10^{17}$ to $10 \\times 10^{17}$ ions cm$^{−2}$ were used. X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) was applied for both the metallic Ta substrate and the study of new structures that have been created through the nitrogen ion implantation. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was also used tocheck the roughness variations prior to and also after the implantation phase. The experimental results show the formation of hexagonal tantalum nitride (TaN$_{0.43}$) in addition to the fact that by increasing the ion dose, the nitrogen atoms occupy more interstitial spaces in the target crystal. The nitride phase also seen for $3\\times 10^{17}$ and $5\\times 10^{17}$ ions cm$^{−2}$, while it disappeared for higher dose of $7\\times 10^{17}$ and $1\\times 10^{18}$ ions cm$^{−2}$. The FWHM of the dominant peak of tantalum nitride suggest the growth of the crystallite’s size, which is in agreement with the AFM results ofthe grains.

  18. Laser annealing effects of the Raman laser on nitrogen implanted glassy carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbara, D.; Prawer, S.; Jamieson, D.N. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1996-12-31

    Raman analysis is a popular method of investigating crystallite sizes, ordering and the types of bonds that exist in ion irradiated carbon materials, namely graphite, diamond and glassy carbon (G.C.). In particular Raman spectroscopy is used in determining the tetrahedral bonding required for the elusive and potentially important new material called carbon nitride. Carbon nitride, {beta}-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}, is predicted to exist in several forms. Forming the tetrahedral bond between C and N has proved troublesome bain of many experimenters. A proven method for synthesizing novel materials is ion implantation. Thus G.C. was implanted with N at low temperatures so that diffusion of the implanted N would be hindered. G.C. is a relatively hard, chemically inert, graphitic material. The opaque property of G.C. means that Raman spectroscopy will only give information about the structures that exist at the surface and near surface layers. It was decided, after observing conflicting Raman spectra at different laser powers, that an investigation of the laser annealing effects of the Raman laser on the N implanted G.C. was warranted. The results of the preliminary investigation of the effects of increasing the Raman laser power and determining a power density threshold for high dose N implanted G.C. are discussed. 4 refs., 4 figs.

  19. Etching and structure changes in PMMA coating under argon plasma immersion ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondyurin, Alexey, E-mail: kond@mailcity.com [Applied and Plasma Physics, School of Physics A28, University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia); Bilek, Marcela [Applied and Plasma Physics, School of Physics A28, University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia)

    2011-06-15

    A thin (120 nm) polymethylmethacrylate coating was treated by plasma immersion ion implantation with Ar using pulsed bias at 20 kV. Ellipsometry and FTIR spectroscopy and gel-fraction formation were used to detect the structure transformations as a function of ion fluence. The kinetics of etching, variations in refractive index and extinction coefficient in 400-1000 nm of wavelength, concentration changes in carbonyl, ether, methyl and methylene groups all as a function of ion fluence were analyzed. A critical ion fluence of 10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2} was observed to be a border between competing depolymerization and carbonization processes. Chemical reactions responsible for reorganization of the PMMA chemical structure under ion beam treatment are proposed.

  20. Characterization of duplex hard coatings with additional ion implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Škorić

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present the results of a study of TiN thin fi lms which are deposited by a Physical Vapour Deposition (PVD and Ion Beam Assisted Deposition (IBAD. In the present investigation the subsequent ion implantation was provided with N+2 ions. The ion implantation was applied to enhance the mechanical properties of surface. The thin film deposition process exerts a number of eff ects such as crystallographic orientation, morphology, topography, densifi cation of the fi lms. The evolution of the microstructure from porous and columnar grains to densel packed grains is accompanied by changes in mechanical and physical properties. A variety of analytic techniques were used for characterization, such as scratch test, calo test, Scanning electron microscopy (SEM, Atomic Force Microscope (AFM, X-ray diff raction (XRD and Energy Dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX.

  1. Surface induced reactivity for titanium by ion implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, M T; Reuther, H; Matz, W; Mueller, R; Steiner, G; Oswald, S; Zyganov, I

    2000-06-01

    Calcium and phosphorus storage in a thin layer of titanium surface was achieved by ion implantation. We study the reactivity of this surface in response to a hydrothermal treatment. The incipient implanted species are observed to convert to Ca(2+) and PO(4)(3-), the precursors for generating calcium phosphate polymorphs. Hydroxyapatite is formed from these precursors by an interface-liquid mediated mineralization preceded by the hydrolysis of oxygen compounds of Ca and P from the solid phase. The morphology and organization of apatite mineral is controlled by the fluid dynamics reflecting the surface remodeling to adapt to the available local environment. Exposed to calcium and phosphate ion containing solution, the hydrothermally treated surface templates hydroxyapatite deposition. Ca and P implanted Ti surface was shown to be chemically and morphologically actively involved in the interfacial reactions.

  2. Large area buried nanopatterning by broad ion implantation without any mask or direct writing

    OpenAIRE

    Karmakar, Prasanta; Satpati, Biswarup

    2013-01-01

    We have introduced here a simple, single step and cost effective broad ion beam technique for preparation of nanoscale electronic, magnetic, optical and mechanical devices without the need of resist, mask, or focused electron and ion beams. In this approach, broad beam ion implantation of desired atom on a prefabricated ion beam patterned surface promotes site selective deposition by adjusting the local angle of ion implantation. We show that implantation of Fe ions on an O+ induced pre fabri...

  3. Microactuators based on ion implanted dielectric electroactive polymer (EAP) membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dubois, Philippe; Rosset, Samuel; Koster, Sander; Stauffer, Johann; Mikhailov, Serguei; Dadras, Massoud; de Rooij, Nico-F.; Shea, Herbert

    2006-01-01

    We report on the first successfully microfabricated and tested ion implanted dielectric electroactive polymer (DEAP) actuators. Dielectric EAP (DEAP) actuators combine exceptionally high energy-density with large amplitude displacements [S. Ashley, Artificial muscles, Sci. Am. 289 (2003) 52-59: R. P

  4. Effect of Mo ion-implantation on the adhesion of diamond coatings

    CERN Document Server

    Yang Shie; Wang Xiao Ping; Li Hui; Ma Bing Xian; Qin Guang Yong; Zhang Bing Lin

    2002-01-01

    Diamond coatings were deposited on the cobalt-cemented tungsten carbide (YG6) substrates, which have been implanted with Mo ions, by microwave plasma CVD (MPCVD) method. The effect of ion-implantation on the adhesion of diamond coatings was studied. The results showed that the chemical compositions of cemented carbide substrate surfaces change obviously after Mo ion-implantation; and the adhesion strength between the CVD diamond coatings and the substrates implanted with Mo ions in proper concentration is improved remarkably

  5. Suppression of tin precipitation in SiSn alloy layers by implanted carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaiduk, P. I., E-mail: gaiduk@phys.au.dk [Department of Physics and Astronomy/iNANO, Aarhus University, Gustav Wieds Vej 14, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Belarusian State University, prosp. Nezavisimosti 4, 220030 Minsk (Belarus); Lundsgaard Hansen, J., E-mail: johnlh@phys.au.dk; Nylandsted Larsen, A., E-mail: anl@phys.au.dk [Department of Physics and Astronomy/iNANO, Aarhus University, Gustav Wieds Vej 14, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Bregolin, F. L., E-mail: f.lipp-bregolin@hzdr.de; Skorupa, W., E-mail: W.Skorupa@hzdr.de [Department of Semiconductor Materials, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstraße 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany)

    2014-06-09

    By combining transmission electron microscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, we have identified carbon related suppression of dislocations and tin precipitation in supersaturated molecular-beam epitaxial grown SiSn alloy layers. Secondary ion mass spectrometry has exposed the accumulation of carbon in the SiSn layers after high temperature carbon implantation and high temperature thermal treatment. Strain-enhanced separation of point defects and formation of dopant-defect complexes are suggested to be responsible for the effects. The possibility for carbon assisted segregation-free high temperature growth of heteroepitaxial SiSn/Si and GeSn/Si structures is argued.

  6. Coloration of natural beryl by iron ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khaibullin, R.I. E-mail: rik@kfti.knc.ru; Lopatin, O.N.; Vagizov, F.G.; Bazarov, V.V.; Bakhtin, A.I.; Khaibullin, I.B.; Aktas, B

    2003-05-01

    Natural colorless crystals of Ural beryl were implanted at room temperature with 40 keV Fe{sup +} ions with fluences in the range of 0.5-1.5 x 10{sup 17} ion/cm{sup 2}. As-implanted samples show dark-grey tone due to radiation damage of beryl crystal. Subsequent thermal annealing of irradiated crystals in oxygen at 600 deg. C for 30 min results in the color change, to yellowish or yellow-orange tones with golden luster, depending on value of iron fluence. The nature of beryl coloration was studied by optical absorption, Moessbauer and Rutherford backscattering (RBS) spectroscopes. It was established that the thermal treatment of iron-irradiated beryl lead to inward diffusive redistribution of iron ions. An appearance of optical absorption bands connected with charge-transfers O{sup 2-} {yields} Fe{sub VI}{sup 3+} and O{sup 2-} {yields} Fe{sub IV}{sup 2+}, Fe{sub IV}{sup 3+} determine the yellow tone in colored beryls. Most of implanted iron ions are founded in both tetrahedral Fe{sub IV}{sup 2+} and octahedral Fe{sub VI}{sup 3+} sites where they may substitute beryllium and aluminum host ions by isomorphic way.

  7. Mass spectrometry improvement on an high current ion implanter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopes, J.G., E-mail: jgabriel@deea.isel.ipl.pt [Instituto Superior de Engenharia de Lisboa and Centro de Fisica Nuclear of the University of Lisbon, Rua Conselheiro Emidio Navarro, 1, 1959-007 Lisbon (Portugal); Alegria, F.C., E-mail: falegria@lx.it.pt [Instituto Superior Tecnico/Technical University of Lisbon and Instituto de Telecomunicacoes, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Redondo, L.M., E-mail: lmredondo@deea.isel.ipl.pt [Instituto Superior de Engenharia de Lisboa and Centro de Fisica Nuclear of the University of Lisbon, Rua Conselheiro Emidio Navarro, 1, 1959-007 Lisbon (Portugal); Rocha, J., E-mail: jrocha@itn.pt [Instituto Tecnologico Nuclear, Estrada Nacional 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Alves, E., E-mail: ealves@itn.pt [Instituto Tecnologico Nuclear, Estrada Nacional 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal)

    2011-12-15

    The development of accurate mass spectrometry, enabling the identification of all the ions extracted from the ion source in a high current implanter is described. The spectrometry system uses two signals (x-y graphic), one proportional to the magnetic field (x-axes), taken from the high-voltage potential with an optic fiber system, and the other proportional to the beam current intensity (y-axes), taken from a beam-stop. The ion beam mass register in a mass spectrum of all the elements magnetically analyzed with the same radius and defined by a pair of analyzing slits as a function of their beam intensity is presented. The developed system uses a PC to control the displaying of the extracted beam mass spectrum, and also recording of all data acquired for posterior analysis. The operator uses a LabVIEW code that enables the interfacing between an I/O board and the ion implanter. The experimental results from an ion implantation experiment are shown.

  8. Methods for obtaining a uniform volume concentration of implanted ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three simple practical methods of irradiations with high energy particles providing the conditions for obtaining a uniform volume concentration of the implanted ions in the massive samples are described in the present paper. Realization of the condition of two-sided irradiation of a plane sample during its rotation in the flux of the projectiles is the basis of the first method. The use of free air as a filter with varying absorbent ability due to movement of the irradiated sample along ion beam brought to the atmosphere is at the basis of the second method of uniform ion alloying. The third method for obtaining a uniform volume concentration of the implanted ions in a massive sample consists of irradiation of a sample through the absorbent filter in the shape of a foil curved according to the parabolic law moving along its surface. The first method is the most effective for obtaining a great number of the samples, for example, for mechanical tests, the second one - for irradiation in different gaseous media, and the third one - for obtaining high concentrations of the implanted ions under controlled (regulated) thermal and deformation conditions. 2 refs., 7 figs

  9. Evidence of light guiding in ion-implanted diamond

    CERN Document Server

    Lagomarsino, S; Bosia, F; Vannoni, M; Calusi, S; Giuntini, L; Massi, M

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of fabricating light-waveguiding microstructures in bulk single-crystal diamond by means of direct ion implantation with a scanning microbeam, resulting in the modulation of the refractive index of the ion-beam damaged crystal. Direct evidence of waveguiding through such buried microchannels is obtained with a phase-shift micro-interferometric method allowing the study of the multi-modal structure of the propagating electromagnetic field. The possibility of defining optical and photonic structures by direct ion writing opens a range of new possibilities in the design of quantum-optical devices in bulk single crystal diamond.

  10. Resonance ionization of holmium for ion implantation in microcalorimeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, F.; Chrysalidis, K.; Dorrer, H.; Düllmann, Ch. E.; Eberhardt, K.; Haas, R.; Kieck, T.; Mokry, C.; Naubereit, P.; Schmidt, S.; Wendt, K.

    2016-06-01

    The determination of the electron neutrino mass by calorimetric measurement of the 163 Ho electron capture spectrum requires ultra-pure samples. Several collaborations, like ECHo or HOLMES, intend to employ microcalorimeters into which 163 Ho is implanted as an ion beam. This makes a selective and additionally very efficient ion source for holmium mandatory. For this purpose, laser resonance ionization of stable holmium 165 Ho was studied, using a three step excitation scheme driven by pulsed Ti:sapphire lasers. Five measurements with sample sizes of 1014 and 1015 atoms were performed for the efficiency investigation. In average, an excellent ionization efficiency of 32(5) % could be shown, demonstrating the suitability for ion beam implantation.

  11. Cryogenic ion implantation near amorphization threshold dose for halo/extension junction improvement in sub-30 nm device technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hugh; Todorov, Stan; Colombeau, Benjamin; Rodier, Dennis; Kouzminov, Dimitry; Zou Wei; Guo Baonian; Khasgiwale, Niranjan; Decker-Lucke, Kurt [Applied Materials, Varian Semiconductor Equipment, 35 Dory Road, Gloucester, Massachusetts 01930 (United States)

    2012-11-06

    We report on junction advantages of cryogenic ion implantation with medium current implanters. We propose a methodical approach on maximizing cryogenic effects on junction characteristics near the amorphization threshold doses that are typically used for halo implants for sub-30 nm technologies. BF{sub 2}{sup +} implant at a dose of 8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13}cm{sup -2} does not amorphize silicon at room temperature. When implanted at -100 Degree-Sign C, it forms a 30 - 35 nm thick amorphous layer. The cryogenic BF{sub 2}{sup +} implant significantly reduces the depth of the boron distribution, both as-implanted and after anneals, which improves short channel rolloff characteristics. It also creates a shallower n{sup +}-p junction by steepening profiles of arsenic that is subsequently implanted in the surface region. We demonstrate effects of implant sequences, germanium preamorphization, indium and carbon co-implants for extension/halo process integration. When applied to sequences such as Ge+As+C+In+BF{sub 2}{sup +}, the cryogenic implants at -100 Degree-Sign C enable removal of Ge preamorphization, and form more active n{sup +}-p junctions and steeper B and In halo profiles than sequences at room temperature.

  12. The compaction of fused silica resulting from ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion implantation of fused silica results in compaction and consequently an increase in refractive index. This method of modifying the near-surface region has been shown as a potential means for fabricating single mode channel waveguides. This study has measured the compaction of the implanted regions for Si implantations as a function of dose (2x1012 - 6x10l6 ions/cm2), energy (1-9 MeV) and post-implantation annealing temperature (200-900 degree C). For a given energy, a dose-dependence of the step height (depth of compacted region) is observed for doses less than ∼1015 ions/cm2. At higher doses the step height saturates. For a given dose, a linear trend is evident for the step height as a function of energy suggesting that the major mechanism for this compaction is electronic stopping. As the annealing temperature increases, the step height gradually decreases from ∼0.1-0.2 μ to -10-20% of the original value. From the annealing data, it is possible to extract an activation energy of 0.08 eV associated with the thermal removal of the compacted region. 4 refs., 4 figs

  13. The compaction of fused silica resulting from ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, C.M.; Ridgway, M.C. [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia); Leech, P.L. [Telstra Research Laboratories, Clayton, Victoria (Australia)

    1996-12-31

    Ion implantation of fused silica results in compaction and consequently an increase in refractive index. This method of modifying the near-surface region has been shown as a potential means for fabricating single mode channel waveguides. This study has measured the compaction of the implanted regions for Si implantations as a function of dose (2x10{sup 12} - 6x10{sup l6} ions/cm{sup 2}), energy (1-9 MeV) and post-implantation annealing temperature (200-900 degree C). For a given energy, a dose-dependence of the step height (depth of compacted region) is observed for doses less than {approx}10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2}. At higher doses the step height saturates. For a given dose, a linear trend is evident for the step height as a function of energy suggesting that the major mechanism for this compaction is electronic stopping. As the annealing temperature increases, the step height gradually decreases from {approx}0.1-0.2 {mu} to -10-20% of the original value. From the annealing data, it is possible to extract an activation energy of 0.08 eV associated with the thermal removal of the compacted region. 4 refs., 4 figs.

  14. Niobium oxide thin films formed by plasma immersion oxygen ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In analogy to conventional beam-line ion implantation, plasma immersion ion implantation can be combined with a deposition technique to an ion assisted coating process. The structure and composition of a coating and its interface to the substrate can be modified by ion implantation. By means of electron beam evaporation and oxygen plasma immersion ion implantation niobium oxide films were prepared at low substrate temperatures (< 200 C). The film composition and thickness were determined by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. The results show that oxygen plasma immersion ion implantation leads to incorporation of oxygen into niobium in several steps, corresponding to niobium oxide phases with different stoichiometries. By contrast to conventional beam-line ion implantation at low pressures, two channels for oxidation can be distinguished, ion implantation of high-energy species and radiation enhanced in-diffusion of low-energy species from the plasma. The latter is driven by thermodynamic forces. (orig.)

  15. Cluster Ion Implantation in Graphite and Diamond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Popok, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    Cluster ion beam technique is a versatile tool which can be used for controllable formation of nanosize objects as well as modification and processing of surfaces and shallow layers on an atomic scale. The current paper present an overview and analysis of data obtained on a few sets of graphite...

  16. Improvement of graphene quality synthesized by cluster ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphene was prepared by negative C4 cluster ion implantation at 5 keV/atom followed by vacuum thermal annealing and cooling. The surface morphology and structure of samples were studied by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. Improvement of the graphene quality was realized by optimization of the post thermal processes. 1–2 layer graphene was obtained with I2D/IG ratio of 1.43 and ID/IG ratio of 0.07 at the implantation dose of 12 × 1015 atoms/cm2 and annealed at 900 °C followed by cooling at 20 °C/min

  17. [Carbon fiber reinforced polysulfone--a new implant material].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claes, L

    1989-12-01

    Carbon fibre reinforced polysulfone is a composite material which contains two materials of well known biocompatibility. In comparison to metals this composite material has some advantages which makes it favourable particularly for implants in tumor surgery. The custom made arrangement of fibres in the composite allows the development of implants with special mechanical properties. The radiolucency of the material avoids problems caused by the reflection of x-rays, using metal implants. This special property allows the exact calculation of postoperative radiation doses of tumor patients. Simultaneously the structures behind the implants are not hidden. All implants can be machined during the operation to adapt them to the individual anatomical situation. Animal experimental and clinical applications of plates, screws and spinal segmental replacement implants made of this composite material have shown good results so far.

  18. Mobile ions on carbonate surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, Treavor A.; Martin, Scot T.

    2005-07-01

    Surface ions move during the dissolution and growth of minerals. The present study investigates the density and the mobility of surface ions and the structure of the adsorbed water layer with changes in relative humidity (RH). The time evolution of the polarization force, which is induced by an electrically biased tip of an atomic force microscope, shows that the density and the mobility of surface ions increase with rising humidity, a finding which is consistent with increasing surface hydration. A marked change in the observations above 55% RH indicates a transition from a water layer formed by heteroepitaxial two-dimensional growth at low RH to one formed by multilayer three-dimensional growth at high RH. A comparison of the results of several rhombohedral carbonates ( viz. CaCO 3, FeCO 3, ZnCO 3, MgCO 3, and MnCO 3) shows that a long relaxation time of the polarization force at high RH is predictive of a rapid dissolution rate. This finding is rationalized by long lifetimes in terrace positions and hence greater opportunities for detachment of the ion to aqueous solution (i.e., dissolution). Our findings on the density and the mobility of surface ions therefore help to better constrain mechanistic models of hydration, ion exchange, and dissolution/growth.

  19. Zinc-ion implanted and deposited titanium surfaces reduce adhesion of Streptococccus mutans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While titanium (Ti) is a commonly used dental implant material with advantageous biocompatible and mechanical properties, native Ti surfaces do not have the ability to prevent bacterial colonization. The objective of this study was to evaluate the chemical composition and bacterial adhesive properties of zinc (Zn) ion implanted and deposited Ti surfaces (Zn-PIIID-Ti) as potential dental implant materials. Surfaces of pure Ti (cp-Ti) were modified with increasing concentrations of Zn using plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (PIIID), and elemental surface compositions were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectrometry (XPS). To evaluate bacterial responses, Streptococcus mutans were seeded onto the modifiedTi surfaces for 48 h and subsequently observed by scanning electron microscopy. Relative numbers of bacteria on each surface were assessed by collecting the adhered bacteria, reculturing and counting colony forming units after 48 h on bacterial grade plates. Ti, oxygen and carbon elements were detected on all surfaces by XPS. Increased Zn signals were detected on Zn-PIIID-Ti surfaces, correlating with an increase of Zn-deposition time. Substantial numbers of S. mutans adhered to cp-Ti samples, whereas bacterial adhesion on Zn-PIIID-Ti surfaces signficantly decreased as the Zn concentration increased (p < 0.01). In conclusion, PIIID can successfully introduce Zn onto a Ti surface, forming a modified surface layer bearing Zn ions that consequently deter adhesion of S. mutans, a common bacterium in the oral environment.

  20. Zinc-ion implanted and deposited titanium surfaces reduce adhesion of Streptococccus mutans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Juan, E-mail: doctorxue@126.com [Implant Center, School of Stomatology Jilin University, Changchun, Jilin (China) and Stomatological Hospital, Urumqi, Xinjiang (China); Ding Gang [Department of Stomatology, Yidu Central Hospital, Weifang, Shandong (China); Capital Medical University School of Stomatology, Beijing (China); Li Jinlu; Yang Shenhui; Fang Bisong [Capital Medical University School of Stomatology, Beijing (China); Sun Hongchen, E-mail: hcsun@jlu.edu.cn [Implant Center, School of Stomatology Jilin University, Changchun, Jilin (China); Zhou Yanmin, E-mail: zhouym62@126.com [Implant Center, School of Stomatology Jilin University, Changchun, Jilin (China)

    2010-10-01

    While titanium (Ti) is a commonly used dental implant material with advantageous biocompatible and mechanical properties, native Ti surfaces do not have the ability to prevent bacterial colonization. The objective of this study was to evaluate the chemical composition and bacterial adhesive properties of zinc (Zn) ion implanted and deposited Ti surfaces (Zn-PIIID-Ti) as potential dental implant materials. Surfaces of pure Ti (cp-Ti) were modified with increasing concentrations of Zn using plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (PIIID), and elemental surface compositions were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectrometry (XPS). To evaluate bacterial responses, Streptococcus mutans were seeded onto the modifiedTi surfaces for 48 h and subsequently observed by scanning electron microscopy. Relative numbers of bacteria on each surface were assessed by collecting the adhered bacteria, reculturing and counting colony forming units after 48 h on bacterial grade plates. Ti, oxygen and carbon elements were detected on all surfaces by XPS. Increased Zn signals were detected on Zn-PIIID-Ti surfaces, correlating with an increase of Zn-deposition time. Substantial numbers of S. mutans adhered to cp-Ti samples, whereas bacterial adhesion on Zn-PIIID-Ti surfaces signficantly decreased as the Zn concentration increased (p < 0.01). In conclusion, PIIID can successfully introduce Zn onto a Ti surface, forming a modified surface layer bearing Zn ions that consequently deter adhesion of S. mutans, a common bacterium in the oral environment.

  1. [Carbon fiber-reinforced plastics as implant materials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bader, R; Steinhauser, E; Rechl, H; Siebels, W; Mittelmeier, W; Gradinger, R

    2003-01-01

    Carbon fiber-reinforced plastics have been used clinically as an implant material for different applications for over 20 years.A review of technical basics of the composite materials (carbon fibers and matrix systems), fields of application,advantages (e.g., postoperative visualization without distortion in computed and magnetic resonance tomography), and disadvantages with use as an implant material is given. The question of the biocompatibility of carbon fiber-reinforced plastics is discussed on the basis of experimental and clinical studies. Selected implant systems made of carbon composite materials for treatments in orthopedic surgery such as joint replacement, tumor surgery, and spinal operations are presented and assessed. Present applications for carbon fiber reinforced plastics are seen in the field of spinal surgery, both as cages for interbody fusion and vertebral body replacement.

  2. Effect of ion implantation upon erosion resistance of polyimide films in space environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUO Shu-wang; LI Mei-shuan; ZHOU Yan-chun

    2006-01-01

    The atomic oxygen (AO) resistance of Si ion implanted polyimide films in the ground-based AO simulation facility was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM),X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). The results show that at the initial stage of AO exposure the implanted sample has a small mass change,and then is stabilized. The erosion yield of the implanted polyimide film decreases by about two orders of magnitude compared with that of the polyimide film. The analysis through XPS and AES indicates that a continuous high-quality protective oxide-based (SiO2) surface layer is formed on the implanted polyimide films after the AO exposure. It can provide high-quality erosion protection for these materials. The implanted polyimide fully restores its original color and the carbonization effect disappears on the whole after AO exposure. Thermal-optical properties and surface morphology of the implanted polyimide materials are not altered. The modified materials have a markedly increased erosion resistance in AO environment.

  3. Stoichiometric titanium dioxide ion implantation in AISI 304 stainless steel for corrosion protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwig, A.; Decker, M.; Klein, O.; Karl, H.

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the applicability of highly chemically inert titanium dioxide synthesized by ion beam implantation for corrosion protection of AISI 304 stainless steel in sodium chloride solution. More specifically, the prevention of galvanic corrosion between carbon-fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) and AISI 304 was investigated. Corrosion performance of TiO2 implanted AISI 304 - examined for different implantation and annealing parameters - is strongly influenced by implantation fluence. Experimental results show that a fluence of 5 × 1016 cm-2 (Ti+) and 1 × 1017 cm-2 (O+) is sufficient to prevent pitting corrosion significantly, while galvanic corrosion with CFRP can already be noticeably reduced by an implantation fluence of 5 × 1015 cm-2 (Ti+) and 1 × 1016 cm-2 (O+). Surface roughness, implantation energy and annealing at 200 °C and 400 °C show only little influence on the corrosion behavior. TEM analysis indicates the existence of stoichiometric TiO2 inside the steel matrix for medium fluences and the formation of a separated metal oxide layer for high fluences.

  4. Pulse height defect of energetic heavy ions in ion-implanted Si detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquali, G.; Casini, G.; Bini, M.; Calamai, S.; Olmi, A.; Poggi, G.; Stefanini, A. A.; Saint-Laurent, F.; Steckmeyer, J. C.

    1998-02-01

    The pulse height defect in ion-implanted silicon detectors for elastically scattered 93Nb, 100Mo, 116Sn, 120Sn and 129Xe ions, at energies ranging from about 4 to 25 A MeV has been measured. The results are compared with two widely used parametrizations taken from the literature.

  5. Pulse height defect of energetic heavy ions in ion-implanted Si detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasquali, G.; Casini, G.; Bini, M.; Calamai, S.; Olmi, A.; Poggi, G.; Stefanini, A.A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Florence (Italy)]|[Univ. of Florence (Italy); Saint-Laurent, F. [DRFC/STEP, CEN Cadarache, 13108 Saint Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Steckmeyer, J.C. [Laboratoire de Physique Corpuscolaire, ISMRA, 14050 Caen Cedex (France)

    1998-03-01

    The pulse height defect in ion-implanted silicon detectors for elastically scattered {sup 93}Nb, {sup 100}Mo, {sup 116}Sn, {sup 120}Sn and {sup 129}Xe ions, at energies ranging from about 4 to 25 A MeV has been measured. The results are compared with two widely used parametrizations taken from the literature. (orig.). 14 refs.

  6. Hollow cathode ion source for application to an implanter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A hollow cathode ion source has been studied in order to improve the life-time of an ion source for an ion implanter. Both volatile and refractory elements are shown to be ionized using two types of discharge state of the hollow cathode namely hot and cold cathode discharge. The life-time of LaB6 as the hot cathode is more than 150 h and the ion beam currents reach more than 10 mA cm-2 at the extraction voltage of 10 kV. For the cold cathode operation, stable currents of approx. 40 to 70 μA are extracted of refractory metal ions such as W and Mo. (author)

  7. Factors affecting the ion beam implantation in silicon

    CERN Document Server

    El-Shanshoury, A I

    2003-01-01

    The factors affecting the ion beam implantation in silicon have been studied using boron, phosphorus, oxygen, and argon ions having energy range 0.5 ke V-200 ke V. It was found that the range of the ions in silicon increases with the increase of their energy and decreases with the increase of their masses. The ionization process is found to be the main process for causing damage in the silicon matrix whether it is produced by the accelerated ions or by the recoiled silicon atoms. The magnitude of ionization in silicon is found to be inversely proportional to the mass of ions. Ionization produced by ions or recoils shows different contributions to the damage depending on the mass of ions where the ions energy loss to ionization decreases from 70% to 23% as the mass is increased from 11 for boron (B) to 40 for argon (Ar). Its magnitude, as produced by ions, is found to decrease with the increase of their masses. Its value is observed to increase in a complementary way with the mass increase. Ions energy loss to...

  8. Annealing of ion-implanted GaN

    CERN Document Server

    Burchard, A; Stötzler, A; Weissenborn, R; Deicher, M

    1999-01-01

    $^{111m}$Cd and $^{112}$Cd ions have been implanted into GaN. With photoluminescence spectroscopy and perturbed $\\gamma-\\gamma$-angular correlation spectroscopy (PAC) the reduction of implantation damage and the optical activation of the implants have been observed as a function of annealing temperature using different annealing methods. The use of N$_{2}$ or NH$_{3}$ atmosphere during annealing allows temperatures up to 1323k and 1373 K, respectively, but above 1200 K a strong loss of Cd from the GaN has been observed. Annealing GaN together with elementary Al forms a protective layer on the GaN surface allowing annealing temperatures up to 1570 K for 10 min. (11 refs).

  9. ADFA/ANU 150 keV radioactive ion implanter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, J.X.; Chaplin, D.H.; Hutchinson, W.D.; Stewart, G.A. [University College, UNSW, Sydney, NSW (Australia). School of Physics; Byrne, A.P. [Australian National University, Canberra, ACT (Australia). Department of Nuclear Physics, RSPhysSE and Department of Physics, the Faculties

    1998-12-31

    Full text: As foreshadowed at the 10th Australian Conference on Nuclear Techniques of Analysis (Byrne et al), the collaborative project to build a radioactive ion implanter, within the custom designed Radiation Laboratories at Australian Defence Force Academy (ADFA), has recently led to the initial commissioning tests of the instrument described in that report. Primary aims are to serve the hyperfine interactions community interested in Materials Science with particular emphasis on magnetic and semiconductor materials. 2.8 day {sup 111}In will be the first radioactive probe implanted following optimization of beam transport with stable indium. The implanted {sup 111}In samples will be prepared for both time-differential, gamma-gamma, PAC studies at ANU and bruteforce NMRON spectroscopies using the top loading dilution refrigerator at ADFA. In this paper we provide further information on the capabilities of the instrument and the results of the initial commissioning tests

  10. Nitrogen ion implantation of silicon in dense plasma focus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A low energy (1.45 kJ) Mather type plasma focus device is used for nitrogen ion implantation in mono-crystalline silicon. The silicon specimens are exposed to different number of focus shots by placing the targets in front of the anode at a fixed distance. Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction are employed to characterize the implanted specimens. The results indicate that mono-crystalline silicon transforms into amorphous structure through micro-crystalline phase on increasing the implantation dose. Further irradiation of the specimens results in the formation of amorphous Si3N4 layers. High temperature annealing in argon ambient transforms the amorphous Si3N4 into β-Si3N4

  11. Influence of ion species ratio on grid-enhanced plasma source ion implantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Jiu-Li; Zhang Gu-Ling; Liu Yuan-Fu; Wang You-Nian; Liu Chi-Zi; Yang Si-Ze

    2004-01-01

    @@ Grid-enhanced plasma source ion implantation (GEPSII) is a newly proposed technique to modify the inner-surface properties of a cylindrical bore. In this paper, a two-ion fluid model describing nitrogen molecular ions N2+ and atomic ions N+ is used to investigate the ion sheath dynamics between the grid electrode and the inner surface of a cylindrical bore during the GEPSII process, which is an extension of our previous calculations in which only N2+ was considered.Calculations are concentrated on the results of ion dose and impact energy on the target for different ion species ratios in the core plasma. The calculated results show that more atomic ions N+ in the core plasma can raise the ion impact energy and reduce the ion dose on the target.

  12. 4-rod RFQ linac for ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujisawa, Hiroshi; Hamamoto, Nariaki; Inouchi, Yutaka [Nisshin Electric Co. Ltd., Kyoto (Japan)

    1997-03-01

    A 34 MHz 4-rod RFQ linac system has been upgraded in both its rf power efficiency and beam intensity. The linac is able to accelerate in cw operation 0.83 mA of a B{sup +} ion beam from 0.03 to 0.91 MeV with transmission of 61 %. The rf power fed to the RFQ is 29 kW. The unloaded Q-value of the RFQ has been improved approximately 61 % to 5400 by copper-plating stainless steel cooling pipes in the RFQ cavity. (author)

  13. Mechanical properties of ion-implanted tungsten-5 wt% tantalum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion implantation has been used to simulate neutron damage in W-5wt%Ta alloy manufactured by arc melting. Implantations were carried out at damage levels of 0.07, 1.2, 13 and 33 displacements per atom (dpa). The mechanical properties of the ion-implanted layer were investigated by nanoindentation. The hardness increases rapidly from 7.3 GPa in the unimplanted condition to 8.8 GPa at 0.07 dpa. Above this damage level, the increase in hardness is lower, and the hardness change saturates by 13 dpa. In the initial portion of the load-displacement curves, the indentations in unimplanted material show a large 'initial pop-in' corresponding to the onset of plasticity. This is not seen in the implanted samples at any doses. The change in plasticity has also been studied using the nanoindenter in scanning mode to produce a topographical scan around indentations. In the unimplanted condition there is an extensive pile-up around the indentation. At damage levels of 0.07 and 1.2 dpa the extent and height of pile-up are much less. The reasons for this are under further investigation.

  14. Some features of ion mixing during simultaneous ion implantation and deposition of metallic coatings

    CERN Document Server

    Pogrebnyak, A D; Mikhalev, A D; Shablya, V T; Yanovskij, V P

    2001-01-01

    The results on the Ta, Cu ions implantation into the aluminium substrate by simultaneous deposition of these ions in the form of coatings are presented. The complex structure of these coatings from the given elements in the substrate, as well as the increase in the microhardness, adhesion and corrosion resistance growth are determined. It is shown on the basis of the results of the secondary ions energy distribution, that intermetallic phases are formed in the substrate surface layer

  15. The enhanced anticoagulation for graphene induced by COOH(+) ion implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoqi; Cao, Ye; Zhao, Mengli; Deng, Jianhua; Li, Xifei; Li, Dejun

    2015-01-01

    Graphene may have attractive properties for some biomedical applications, but its potential adverse biological effects, in particular, possible modulation when it comes in contact with blood, require further investigation. Little is known about the influence of exposure to COOH(+)-implanted graphene (COOH(+)/graphene) interacting with red blood cells and platelets. In this paper, COOH(+)/graphene was prepared by modified Hummers' method and implanted by COOH(+) ions. The structure and surface chemical and physical properties of COOH(+)/graphene were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and contact angle measurement. Systematic evaluation of anticoagulation, including in vitro platelet adhesion assays and hemolytic assays, proved that COOH(+)/graphene has significant anticoagulation. In addition, at the dose of 5 × 10(17) ions/cm(2), COOH(+)/graphene responded best on platelet adhesion, aggregation, and platelet activation.

  16. Nanoclustering in Silicon Induced by Oxygen Ions Implanted

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Manno

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available We report about the nanoclustering induced by oxygen‐implantation in silicon. A tandem‐type accelerator, with a maximum acceleration voltage of 3 MV, equipped with a sputtering ion source suitable for the production of high current ion beams by sputtering of solid cathodes has been used. The surface modifications and the structure of nanoclusters are investigated. The topographic images, obtained by scanning tunnelling microscope showed that the surface is covered with a dense array of tetragonal nanostructures oriented with respect to the substrate. Raman spectroscopy data allowed us to estimate an average cluster size of about 50 nm. Resistivity and Hall effect measurements evidenced that the electron transport in the implanted silicon samples is affected by the nanoclusters array and it could be explained by thermally activated hopping between localized states.

  17. Rapid Thermal annealing of silicon layers amorphized by ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The recrystallization behavior and the supression mechanisms of the residual defects of silicon layers amorphized by ion implantation, were investigated. The samples were annealed with the aid of a rapid thermal annealing (RTA) system at temperature range from 850 to 12000C, and annealing time up to 120 s. Random and aligned Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy were used to analyse the samples. Similarities in the recrystallization behavior for layers implanted with ions of the same chemical groups such as As or Sb; Ge, Sn or Pb, In or Ga, are observed. The results show that the effective supression of resisual defects of the recrystallired layers is vinculated to the redistribution of impurities via thermal diffusion. (author)

  18. Ion implantation, a method for fabricating light guides in polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulish, J. R.; Franke, H.; Singh, Amarjit; Lessard, Roger A.; Knystautas, Emile J.

    1988-04-01

    Li+ and N+ ions were implanted into aliphatic polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), polyvinylalcohol (PVA), and aromatic polyimide (PI) polycarbonate (PC) polymers in the energy range of 100-130 keV. Planar optical waveguides guiding between one and three modes were formed. For low implantation doses (≤ 1014 ions/cm2), total waveguide loss values at λ=633 nm were found to be less than 2 dB/cm. The changes in the refractive index were found to be very large (Δn≥0.05) in the case of PMMA and PVA. We interpret this change in refractive index as being due to the formation of aromatic compounds in the regions of electronic scattering.

  19. Optical Property of SiC Thin Films Implanted by 120 keV N Ions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SongYin; JinYunfan; WangZhiguang; ZhangChonghong; ZhaoZhimin; DuanJinlai

    2003-01-01

    SiC films on Si substrates were deposited by RF co-sputtering of the Si and C compound target and implanted by 120 keV N ions with MEVVA ion current. The structure, optical property were studied by Fourier transform infrared spectrum (FTIR) and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. The studied results indicated that carbon nitride single bond, double bond and triangle bond (Fig.l) are produced in the SiC film implanted. Its luminescence intensity depends strongly on the quantity of N ions. From the Fig.2 we can clearly observed significant PL peak centred at 365 nm. Because SiC is an indirect energy band clearance semiconductor material, its transition luminescence has to phonon participant. This is a binary process, luminescence rate is small, annealed samples appear crystal and include more nano-size SiC particulate. Based on the quantum limit effect, these nano-particulates not only increase energy band width but also energy band structure becomes direct energy band clearance. N ions implanted enhanced composite efficiency of deep irradiation center in energy band clearance and luminescence center moves towards blue light.

  20. Surface modification of ion implanted ultra high molecular weight polyethylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Jingsheng; Zhu Fuying; Pan Haochang; Cao Jianqing; Zhu Dezhang E-mail: dezhang_zhu@hotmail.com; Xu Hongjie; Cai Qing; Shen Jingen; Chen Lihua; He Zhengrui

    2000-06-02

    The surface modification has been studied for the ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) implanted by 80 keV N{sub 2}{sup +}, C{sub 3}H{sub 8}{sup +} (40 keV N{sup +}, 22 keV C{sup +}) with fluences ranging from 1x10{sup 14} to 5x10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2}. Elastic recoil detection (ERD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) have been employed to characterize the modified surface of the samples. ERD results show that the high energy edge of ERD spectra shifts in the lower energy direction with the increase of implantation fluency, indicating that a hydrogen deficient surface layer is formed after implantation. XPS result shows that injected nitrogen atoms assist in crosslinking by forming chemical bonds with the polymer chains. KyowA's DF-PM reciprocating tester has been used to measure the wear property before and after implantation. The results show that the wear-resistance of samples after N{sub 2}{sup +}, C{sub 3}H{sub 8}{sup +} implantation has been improved by 68 and 47.5 times, respectively. Some interpretations are given to explain the observed phenomena.

  1. Highly antibacterial UHMWPE surfaces by implantation of titanium ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delle Side, D., E-mail: domenico.delleside@le.infn.it [LEAS, Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica “Ennio de Giorgi”, Università del Salento, Lecce (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare – Sezione di Lecce, Lecce (Italy); Nassisi, V.; Giuffreda, E.; Velardi, L. [LEAS, Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica “Ennio de Giorgi”, Università del Salento, Lecce (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare – Sezione di Lecce, Lecce (Italy); Alifano, P.; Talà, A.; Tredici, S.M. [Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Biologiche ed Ambientali, Università del Salento, Lecce (Italy)

    2014-07-15

    The spreading of pathogens represents a serious threat for human beings. Consequently, efficient antimicrobial surfaces are needed in order to reduce risks of contracting severe diseases. In this work we present the first evidences of a new technique to obtain a highly antibacterial Ultra High Molecular Weight Polyethylene (UHMWPE) based on a non-stoichiometric titanium oxide coating, visible-light responsive, obtained through ion implantation.

  2. Urinary catheter with polyurethane coating modified by ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A low friction urinary catheter that could be used without a lubricant is proposed in this work. A polyurethane coating was synthesised on the surface of a metal guide wire catheter. Ion implantation was applied to surface modify the polyurethane coating. FTIR ATR, wetting angle, AFM and friction tests were used for analysis. Low friction was found to be provided by the formation of a hard carbonised layer on the polyurethane surface

  3. Highly antibacterial UHMWPE surfaces by implantation of titanium ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spreading of pathogens represents a serious threat for human beings. Consequently, efficient antimicrobial surfaces are needed in order to reduce risks of contracting severe diseases. In this work we present the first evidences of a new technique to obtain a highly antibacterial Ultra High Molecular Weight Polyethylene (UHMWPE) based on a non-stoichiometric titanium oxide coating, visible-light responsive, obtained through ion implantation

  4. Fe doped Magnetic Nanodiamonds made by Ion Implantation

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, ChienHsu; Jian, Hui-Shan; Niu, H

    2016-01-01

    Here we present a simple physical method to produce magnetic nanodiamonds (NDs) using high dose Fe ion-implantation. The Fe atoms are distributed inside the NDs without affecting their crystal structure. So the NDs can be still functionalized through surface modification for targeted chemotherapy and the added magnetic property will make the NDs suitable for localized thermal treatment for cancer cells without the toxicity from the Fe atoms being directly in contact with the living tissue.

  5. Formation of Nanoscale Intermetallic Phases in Ni Surface Layer at High Intensity Implantation of Al Ions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    I.A.Bozhko; S.V.Fortuna; I.A.Kurzina; I.B.Stepanov; E.V.Kozlov; Yu.P. Sharkeev

    2004-01-01

    The results of experimental study of nanoscale intermetallic formation in surface layer of a metal target at ion implantation are presented. To increase the thickness of the ion implanted surface layer the high intensive ion implantation is used. Compared with the ordinary ion implantation, the high intensive ion implantation allows a much thicker modified surface layer. Pure polycrystalline nickel was chosen as a target. Nickel samples were irradiated with Al ions on the vacuum-arc ion beam and plasma flow source "Raduga-5". It was shown that at the high intensity ion implantation the fine dispersed particles of Ni3Al, NiAl intermetallic compounds and solid solution Al in Ni are formed in the nickel surface layer of 200 nm and thicker. The formation of phases takes place in complete correspondence with the Ni-Al phase diagram.

  6. The effect of ion implantation on cellular adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howlett, C R; Evans, M D; Wildish, K L; Kelly, J C; Fisher, L R; Francis, G W; Best, D J

    1993-01-01

    As there are only a finite number of materials suitable for orthopaedic reconstruction, considerable effort has been devoted recently to investigating ways of altering the surface chemistry of prosthetic materials without altering their bulk properties. Ion beam implantation is one such technique which is appropriate for orthopaedic reconstructive materials. This paper investigates the early effect of ion beam modification on cellular attachment of bone derived cells using a prototype device which measures the strength of attachment of individual cells to a silicon substratum. The results point to several conclusions. (1) There is no evidence that ion beam implantation with nitrogen, phosphorus, manganese or magnesium produces increased adhesion of human bone derived cells. (2) Surface etching with hydrofluoric acid, electron bombardment and thermal oxidation increases the strength of attachment between cells and substrata. (3) There is a correlation between wettability and rate of cellular attachment to oxygen implanted substrata during the first 2 h after cellular seeding. However, the increase in cellular attachment cannot be entirely explained by the change in critical surface tension or via increased fibronectin attachment to the substrata.

  7. Stabilization of organic thin film transistors by ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraboni, B., E-mail: beatrice.fraboni@unibo.it [CNISM and Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Bologna, viale Berti Pichat 6/2, 40127 Bologna (Italy); Cosseddu, P. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Elettrica ed Elettronica, Universita di Cagliari, piazza d' Armi, 09123 Cagliari, Italy and CNR-INFM S3 via Campi 213/a 41100 Modena (Italy); Wang, Y.Q.; Schulze, R.K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory MS-K771 Los Alamos NM 87545 (United States); Cavallini, A. [CNISM and Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Bologna, viale Berti Pichat 6/2, 40127 Bologna (Italy); Nastasi, M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory MS-K771 Los Alamos NM 87545 (United States); Bonfiglio, A. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Elettrica ed Elettronica, Universita di Cagliari, piazza d' Armi, 09123 Cagliari, Italy and CNR-INFM S3 via Campi 213/a 41100 Modena (Italy)

    2012-08-01

    We report on the effects of low energy ion implantation (N and Ne) in the reduction and control of the degradation of pentacene organic thin film transistors (OTFTs) due to the exposure to atmosphere (i.e. oxygen and water). We have observed that a controlled damage depth distribution preserves the functionality of the devices, even if ion implantation induces significant molecular structure modifications, in particular a combination of dehydrogenation and carbonification effects. No relevant changes in the pentacene thin film thickness have been observed. The two major transport parameters that characterize OTFT performance are the carrier mobility and the threshold voltage. We have monitored the effectiveness of this process in stabilizing the device by monitoring the carrier mobility and the threshold voltage over a long time (over 2000 h). Finally, we have assessed by depth resolved X-ray Photoemission Spectroscopy analyses that, by selectively implanting with ions that can react with the hydrocarbon matrix (e.g. N{sup +}), it is possible to locally modify the charge distribution within the organic layer.

  8. Mechanical properties of ion-beam-textured surgical implant alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigand, A. J.

    1977-01-01

    An electron-bombardment Hg ion thruster was used as an ion source to texture surfaces of materials used to make orthopedic and/or dental prostheses or implants. The materials textured include 316 stainless steel, titanium-6% aluminum, 4% vanadium, and cobalt-20% chromium, 15% tungsten. To determine the effect of ion texturing on the ultimate strength and yield strength, stainless steel and Co-Cr-W alloy samples were tensile tested to failure. Three types of samples of both materials were tested. One type was ion-textured (the process also heats each sample to 300 C), another type was simply heated to 300 C in an oven, and the third type was untreated. Stress-strain diagrams, 0.2% offset yield strength data, total elongation data, and area reduction data are presented. Fatigue specimens of ion textured and untextured 316 stainless steel and Ti-6% Al-4% V were tested. Included as an ion textured sample is a Ti-6% Al-4% V sample which was ion machined by means of Ni screen mask so as to produce an array of 140 mu m x 140 mu m x 60 mu m deep pits. Scanning electron microscopy was used to characterize the ion textured surfaces.

  9. Characterization and simulation studies on high tilt ion implantation for precision halo implant applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, B.N. [Varian Semiconductor Equipment Associates, Inc., 35 Dory Road, Gloucester, MA 01930 (United States)]. E-mail: baonian.guo@vsea.com; Zhao, Z.Y. [Spansion LLC, 5204 E. Ben White Blvd., Austin, TX 78741 (United States); Falk, S. [Varian Semiconductor Equipment Associates, Inc., 35 Dory Road, Gloucester, MA 01930 (United States); Liu, J. [Varian Semiconductor Equipment Associates, Inc., 35 Dory Road, Gloucester, MA 01930 (United States); Shim, K.H. [Varian Semiconductor Equipment Associates, Inc., 35 Dory Road, Gloucester, MA 01930 (United States); Jeong, U. [Varian Semiconductor Equipment Associates, Inc., 35 Dory Road, Gloucester, MA 01930 (United States); Mehta, S. [Varian Semiconductor Equipment Associates, Inc., 35 Dory Road, Gloucester, MA 01930 (United States)

    2007-08-15

    Precision dopant placement at high tilt angles for halo applications is required in the fabrication of advanced devices to achieve better transistor characteristics, such as suppression of short channel effects, V {sub t} control and drive current. However, monitoring high tilt implants is not popular in semiconductor fabs, even though most have started monitoring zero-tilt implants in the recent couple of years. In this paper, the authors explore the possibilities of using high tilt angles with higher Miller Index channels. As an example, axial channeling along the <1 1 2> direction is used to evaluate the angle control performance of the VIISta 810EHP medium current ion implanter. Crystal-TRIM (a Monte Carlo simulation code) calculations are compared with experimental SIMS (Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry) profiles. In addition, the effects of wafer orientation on the platen and wafer mis-cut on the dopant profiles are discussed. Metrology characterization, such as ThermaWave{sup TM} and SIMS, of the <1 1 2> ion channeling is presented.

  10. Carbon ion radiotherapy for pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) is the world's first heavy ion accelerator complex dedicated to medical use in a hospital environment. Carbon ion therapy offers the potential advantages of improved dose localization and enhanced biological effects. It has been suggested that carbon ion therapy is effective against radioresistant pancreatic cancer. In April 2000, clinical studies examining the treatment of pancreatic cancer with carbon ions were begun at the HIMAC. As of February 2010, 48 patients treated with preoperative carbon ion radiotherapy and 89 patients treated for locally advanced pancreatic cancer were enrolled into the clinical trials. Both protocols are still ongoing. The interim results of these clinical trials suggest that carbon ion radiotherapy provides good local control and offers a survival advantage for patients with otherwise hard to cure pancreatic cancer, without unacceptable morbidity. (author)

  11. Carbon ion radiotherapy for sarcomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Principles of heavy ion therapy, its application to bone and soft tissue sarcomas and outline of its general state are described. The heavy ion therapy has advantages of its high dose distribution to the target and strong biological effect due to the Bragg peak formation and high linear energy transfer, respectively. The authors use carbon ion generated by Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) for the therapy of performance state 0-2 patients with the sarcomas unresectable, diagnosed pathologically, and of 60 y, 45% and teens, 8%) have been treated, whose tumor site has been the pelvis in 73%, volume >600 mL in 63%, tissue type of bone tumor in 70% (where cordoma has amounted to>200 cases). Five-year local control rate is found 71% and survival, 59%. In 175 therapeutically fresh cases with sacral cordoma of median age 67 y, with median clinical target volume 9 cm, treated with median dose 70.4 GyE/16 irradiations, the 8-y local control rate is found to be 69% and survival, 74%, within the median follow-up 54 months; with severe skin ulcer in 2 cases and deterioration of nervous dysfunction in 15 cases; suggesting the therapy is as effective and useful as surgical resection. At present, the therapy is not applicable to Japan health insurance. In the author's hospital, the heavy ion therapy has been conducted to total of >6,000 patients, which amounting to the largest number in the world. Now, 3 Japanese facilities can do the therapy as well and 3 countries in the world.(T.T.)

  12. Target-ion source unit ionization efficiency measurement by method of stable ion beam implantation

    CERN Document Server

    Panteleev, V.N; Fedorov, D.V; Moroz, F.V; Orlov, S.Yu; Volkov, Yu.M

    The ionization efficiency is one of the most important parameters of an on-line used target-ion source system exploited for production of exotic radioactive beams. The ionization efficiency value determination as a characteristic of a target-ion source unit in the stage of its normalizing before on-line use is a very important step in the course of the preparation for an on-line experiment. At the IRIS facility (Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina) a reliable and rather precise method of the target-ion source unit ionization efficiency measurement by the method of stable beam implantation has been developed. The method worked out exploits an off-line mass-separator for the implantation of the ion beams of selected stable isotopes of different elements into a tantalum foil placed inside the Faraday cup in the focal plane of the mass-separator. The amount of implanted ions has been measured with a high accuracy by the current integrator connected to the Faraday cup. After the implantation of needed a...

  13. Titanium Nitride and Nitrogen Ion Implanted Coated Dental Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David W. Berzins

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Titanium nitride and/or nitrogen ion implanted coated dental materials have been investigated since the mid-1980s and considered in various applications in dentistry such as implants, abutments, orthodontic wires, endodontic files, periodontal/oral hygiene instruments, and casting alloys for fixed restorations. Multiple methodologies have been employed to create the coatings, but detailed structural analysis of the coatings is generally lacking in the dental literature. Depending on application, the purpose of the coating is to provide increased surface hardness, abrasion/wear resistance, esthetics, and corrosion resistance, lower friction, as well as greater beneficial interaction with adjacent biological and material substrates. While many studies have reported on the achievement of these properties, a consensus is not always clear. Additionally, few studies have been conducted to assess the efficacy of the coatings in a clinical setting. Overall, titanium nitride and/or nitrogen ion implanted coated dental materials potentially offer advantages over uncoated counterparts, but more investigation is needed to document the structure of the coatings and their clinical effectiveness.

  14. Plasma ion implantation technology at Hughes Research Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The plasma ion implantation (PII) project at Hughes Research Laboratories (HRL) has as its main objective the evaluation and application of PII technology to improve the tribological properties of metal and nonmetal materials used in aerospace, defense, and commercial applications. The HRL PII facility consists of a 4-ft-diamx8-ft-long vacuum chamber capable of implanting objects weighing up to 7000 lbs, and a high-power (100-kW), high-voltage (100-kV) pulse modulator to provide voltage pulses for implantation. Advanced plasma sources have been developed to produce atomic, as well as molecular, nitrogen and oxygen ions, and PII processes have been developed to treat metal and nonmetal materials. The HRL PII facility has been operational since 1989 and has been used for prototype demonstrations of PII technology to achieve (1) a 2--3x improved wear life of Co/WC drill bits used for printed-wiring-board fabrication, (2) an 8x reduced wear rate for TiN-coated cutting tools, and (3) a 2x increased surface hardness for a 7000-lb polymer object, 3 ft by 5 ft by 1 ft

  15. Metal ion implantation for large scale surface modification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, I.G.

    1992-10-01

    Intense energetic beams of metal ions can be produced by using a metal vapor vacuum arc as the plasma discharge from which the ion beam is formed. We have developed a number of ion sources of this kind and have built a metal ion implantation facility which can produce repetitively pulsed ion beams with mean ion energy up to several hundred key, pulsed beam current of more than an ampere, and time averaged current of several tens of milliamperes delivered onto a downstream target. We've also done some preliminary work on scaling up this technology to very large size. For example, a 50-cm diameter (2000 cm[sup 2]) set of beam formation electrodes was used to produce a pulsed titanium beam with ion current over 7 amperes at a mean ion energy of 100 key. Separately, a dc embodiment has been used to produce a dc titanium ion beam with current over 600 mA, power supply limited in this work, and up to 6 amperes of dc plasma ion current was maintained for over an hour. In a related program we've developed a plasma immersion method for applying thin metallic and compound films in which the added species is atomically mixed to the substrate. By adding a gas flow to the process, well-bonded compound films can also be formed; metallic films and multilayers as well as oxides and nitrides with mixed transition zones some hundreds of angstroms thick have been synthesized. Here we outline these parallel metal-plasma-based research programs and describe the hardware that we've developed and some of the surface modification research that we've done with it.

  16. Ion-implanted PLZT ceramics: a new high-sensitivity image storage medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results were presented of our studies of photoferroelectric (PFE) image storage in H- and He-ion implanted PLZT (lead lanthanum zirconate titanate) ceramics which demonstrate that the photosensitivity of PLZT can be significantly increased by ion implantation in the ceramic surface to be exposed to image light. More recently, implantations of Ar and Ar + Ne into the PLZT surface have produced much greater photosensitivity enhancement. For example, the photosensitivity after implantation with 1.5 x 1014 350 keV Ar/cm2 + 1 x 1015 500 keV Ne/cm2 is increased by about four orders of magnitude over that of unimplanted PLZT. Measurements indicate that the photosensitivity enhancement in ion-implanted PLZT is controlled by implantation-produced disorder which results in marked decreases in dielectric constant and dark conductivity and changes in photoconductivity of the implanted layer. The effects of Ar- and Ar + Ne-implantation are presented along with a phenomenological model which describes the enhancement in photosensitivity obtained by ion implantation. This model takes into account both light- and implantation-induced changes in conductivity and gives quantitative agreement with the measured changes in the coercive voltage V/sub c/ as a function of near-uv light intensity for both unimplanted and implanted PLZT. The model, used in conjunction with calculations of the profiles of implantation-produced disorder, has provided the information needed for co-implanting ions of different masses, e.g., Ar and Ne, to improve photosensitivity

  17. Effect of plasma immersion ion implantation in TiNi implants on its interaction with animal subcutaneous tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotkov, Aleksandr I.; Kashin, Oleg A.; Kudryavtseva, Yuliya A.; Shishkova, Darya K.; Krukovskii, Konstantin V.; Kudryashov, Andrey N.

    2016-08-01

    Here we investigated in vivo interaction of Si-modified titanium nickelide (TiNi) samples with adjacent tissues in a rat subcutaneous implant model to assess the impact of the modification on the biocompatibility of the implant. Modification was performed by plasma immersion ion processing, which allows doping of different elements into surface layers of complex-shaped articles. The aim of modification was to reduce the level of toxic Ni ions on the implant surface for increasing biocompatibility. We identified a thin connective tissue capsule, endothelial cells, and capillary-like structures around the Si-modified implants both 30 and 90 days postimplantation. No signs of inflammation were found. In conclusion, modification of TiNi samples with Si ions increases biocompatibility of the implant.

  18. Modification of anti-bacterial surface properties of textile polymers by vacuum arc ion source implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolaev, A.G., E-mail: nik@opee.hcei.tsc.ru [High Current Electronics Institute, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk 634055 (Russian Federation); Yushkov, G.Yu.; Oks, E.M. [High Current Electronics Institute, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk 634055 (Russian Federation); Oztarhan, A. [Izmir University, Izmir 35140 (Turkey); Akpek, A.; Hames-Kocabas, E.; Urkac, E.S. [Bioengineering Department, Ege University, Bornova 35100, Izmir (Turkey); Brown, I.G. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94708 (United States)

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • Ion implantation. • Anti-bacterial properties. • Textile polymer. • Vacuum arc ion source. - Abstract: Ion implantation provides an important technology for the modification of material surface properties. The vacuum arc ion source is a unique instrument for the generation of intense beams of metal ions as well as gaseous ions, including mixed metal–gas beams with controllable metal:gas ion ratio. Here we describe our exploratory work on the application of vacuum arc ion source-generated ion beams for ion implantation into polymer textile materials for modification of their biological cell compatibility surface properties. We have investigated two specific aspects of cell compatibility: (i) enhancement of the antibacterial characteristics (we chose to use Staphylococcus aureus bacteria) of ion implanted polymer textile fabric, and (ii) the “inverse” concern of enhancement of neural cell growth rate (we chose Rat B-35 neuroblastoma cells) on ion implanted polymer textile. The results of both investigations were positive, with implantation-generated antibacterial efficiency factor up to about 90%, fully comparable to alternative conventional (non-implantation) approaches and with some potentially important advantages over the conventional approach; and with enhancement of neural cell growth rate of up to a factor of 3.5 when grown on suitably implanted polymer textile material.

  19. Si-nanoparticle synthesis using ion implantation and MeV ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chulapakorn, T.; Wolff, M.; Primetzhofer, D.; Possnert, G. [Uppsala University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, P.O. Box 516, 751 20 Uppsala (Sweden); Sychugov, I.; Suvanam, S.S.; Linnros, J. [Royal Institute of Technology, School of Information and Communication Technology, P.O. Box Electrum 229, 164 40 Kista (Sweden); Hallen, A. [Uppsala University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, P.O. Box 516, 751 20 Uppsala (Sweden); Royal Institute of Technology, School of Information and Communication Technology, P.O. Box Electrum 229, 164 40 Kista (Sweden)

    2015-12-15

    A dielectric matrix with embedded Si-nanoparticles may show strong luminescence depending on nanoparticles size, surface properties, Si-excess concentration and matrix type. Ion implantation of Si ions with energies of a few tens to hundreds of keV in a SiO{sub 2} matrix followed by thermal annealing was identified as a powerful method to form such nanoparticles. The aim of the present work is to optimize the synthesis of Si-nanoparticles produced by ion implantation in SiO{sub 2} by employing MeV ion irradiation as an additional annealing process. The luminescence properties are measured by spectrally resolved photoluminescence including PL lifetime measurement, while X-ray reflectometry, atomic force microscopy and ion beam analysis are used to characterize the nanoparticle formation process. The results show that the samples implanted at 20%-Si excess atomic concentration display the highest luminescence and that irradiation of 36 MeV {sup 127}I ions affects the luminosity in terms of wavelength and intensity. It is also demonstrated that the nanoparticle luminescence lifetime decreases as a function of irradiation fluence. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  20. Ion-beam characterization of He implanted into nuclear matrices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pantelica, D.; Thome, L. E-mail: thome@csnsm.in2p3.fr; Enescu, S.E.; Negoita, F.; Ionescu, P.; Stefan, I.; Gentils, A

    2004-06-01

    The behavior of helium produced by the disintegration of actinides is a very important issue in the management of radioactive waste arising from nuclear reactors. The experimental techniques generally used to determine He profiles, based on standard nuclear reaction analysis, are either time consuming or lacking in accuracy. Elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA) with high-energy heavy ions offers the possibility to extract helium profiles in a simpler way. This paper presents results obtained in the case of spinel single crystals implanted with He ions at several fluences (2 x 10{sup 16} and 5 x 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2}), providing different He concentrations ({approx}2 and 5 at.%, respectively). Helium depth profiles were measured by ERDA using high-energy Cu ions, whereas the damage induced by implantation was analyzed by classical Rutherford backscattering and channeling (RBS/C). Good He profiles were recorded, even at the smallest fluence used. Moreover, the combination of ERDA and RBS/C allows one to correlate He profiles and damage distributions.

  1. Osteopontin (OPN is an important protein to mediate improvements in the biocompatibility of C ion-implanted silicone rubber.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao-liang Wang

    Full Text Available Medical device implants are drawing increasing amounts of interest from modern medical practitioners. However, this attention is not evenly spread across all such devices; most of these implantable devices can cause adverse reactions such as inflammation, fibrosis, thrombosis, and infection. In this work, the biocompatibility of silicone rubber (SR was improved through carbon (C ion implantation. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM, atomic force microscopy (AFM, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, and X-ray diffraction (XRD results confirmed that these newly generated carbon-implanted silicone rubbers (C-SRs had large, irregular peaks and deep valleys on their surfaces. The water contact angle of the SR surface decreased significantly after C ion implantation. C ion implantation also changed the surface charge distribution, silicone oxygen rate, and chemical-element distribution of SR to favor cell attachment. The dermal fibroblasts cultured on the surface C-SR grew faster and showed more typical fibroblastic shapes. The expression levels of major adhesion proteins, including talin-1, zyxin, and vinculin, were significantly higher in dermal fibroblasts cultured on C-SR coated plates than in dermal fibroblasts cultured on SR. Those same dermal fibroblasts on C-SRs showed more pronounced adhesion and migration abilities. Osteopontin (OPN, a critical extracellular matrix (ECM protein, was up-regulated and secreted from dermal fibroblasts cultured on C-SR. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9 activity was also increased. These cells were highly mobile and were able to adhere to surfaces, but these abilities were inhibited by the monoclonal antibody against OPN, or by shRNA-mediated MMP-9 knockdown. Together, these results suggest that C ion implantation significantly improves SR biocompatibility, and that OPN is important to promote cell adhesion to the C-SR surface.

  2. Electrical properties of amorphous chalcogenide/silicon heterojunctions modified by ion implantation

    OpenAIRE

    Fedorenko, Yanina G.; Hughes, Mark A.; Colaux, Julien L.; Jeynes, C.; Gwilliam, Russell M.; Homewood, Kevin P.; Yao, Jin; Hewak, Dan W.; Lee, Tae-Hoon; Elliott, Stephen R; Gholipour, B.; Curry, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Doping of amorphous chalcogenide films of rather dissimilar bonding type and resistivity, namely, Ga-La-S, GeTe, and Ge-Sb-Te by means of ion implantation of bismuth is considered. To characterize defects induced by ion-beam implantation space-charge-limited conduction and capacitance-voltage characteristics of amorphous chalcogenide/silicon heterojunctions are investigated. It is shown that ion implantation introduces substantial defect densities in the films and their interfaces with silico...

  3. Ion beam analysis of as-received, H-implanted and post implanted annealed fusion steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Arrabal, R., E-mail: raquel.gonzalez.arrabal@upm.es [Instituto de Fusion Nuclear, ETSI de Industriales, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, E-28006 Madrid (Spain); Munnik, F. [Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, P.O. Box 510119, D-01314 Dresden (Germany); Gonzalez, M. [LNF-CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Romero, P. [Instituto de Fusion Nuclear, ETSI de Industriales, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, E-28006 Madrid (Spain); Heller, R. [Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, P.O. Box 510119, D-01314 Dresden (Germany); Leardini, F. [Departamento de Fisica de Materiales, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Perlado, J.M. [Instituto de Fusion Nuclear, ETSI de Industriales, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, E-28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2012-01-15

    The elemental distribution for as-received (AR), H implanted (AI) and post-implanted annealed (A) Eurofer and ODS-Eurofer steels has been characterized by means of micro Particle Induced X-ray Emission ({mu}-PIXE), micro Elastic Recoil Detection ({mu}-ERD) and Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS). The temperature and time-induced H diffusion has been analyzed by Resonance Nuclear Reaction Analysis (RNRA), Thermal Desorption Spectroscopy (TDS), ERDA and SIMS techniques. {mu}-PIXE measurements point out the presence of inhomogeneities in the Y distribution for ODS-Eurofer samples. RNRA and SIMS experiments evidence that hydrogen easily outdiffuses in these steels even at room temperature. ERD data show that annealing at temperatures as low as 300 Degree-Sign C strongly accelerates the hydrogen diffusion process, driving out up to the 90% of the initial hydrogen.

  4. Structure analysis of bimetallic Co-Au nanoparticles formed by sequential ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hua-jian; Wang, Yu-hua; Zhang, Xiao-jian; Song, Shu-peng; chen, Hong; Zhang, Ke; Xiong, Zu-zhao; Ji, Ling-ling; Dai, Hou-mei; Wang, Deng-jing; Lu, Jian-duo; Wang, Ru-wu; Zheng, Li-rong

    2016-08-01

    Co-Au alloy Metallic nanoparticles (MNPs) are formed by sequential ion implantation of Co and Au into silica glass at room temperature. The ion ranges of Au ions implantation process have been displayed to show the ion distribution. We have used the atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to investigate the formation of bimetallic nanoparticles. The extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) has been used to study the local structural information of bimetallic nanoparticles. With the increase of Au ion implantation, the local environments of Co ions are changed enormously. Hence, three oscillations, respectively, Co-O, Co-Co and Co-Au coordination are determined.

  5. The Structure of Sapphire Implanted with Carbon at Room Temperature and 1000° C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, E.; Marques, C.; Safran, G.; McHargue, Carl J.

    2009-03-01

    Carbon was implanted into sapphire at various temperatures as part of a study of the different defect structures produced by a series of light ions. Implantations were made with 150 keV ions to fluences of 1×1016 and 1×1017ions/cm2 at room temperature (RT) and 1000° C. The defect structures were characterized using Rutherford backscattering-channeling (RBS-C) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The RBS-C spectra indicated low residual disorder for RT implantation at 1×1016 C+/cm2. The de-channeling approached the random value at 1×1017 C+/cm2 and the TEM examination revealed a buried amorphous layer containing embedded sapphire nanocrystals. Damaged layers containing planar defects generally aligned parallel to the surface surrounded this layer. The RBS-C spectra for the sample implanted at 1000° C with 1×1017C+/cm2 suggested a highly damaged but crystalline surface that was confirmed by TEM micrographs.

  6. Simulation and visualization of ion-implantation in diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have explored aspects of ion implantation in diamonds with molecular dynamics and tightbinding atomistic simulations. Relevant experiments and their potential applications as well as our computer models and computational approaches are described. Our simulations have been designed to answer questions proposed by experimental researchers concerning optimal laboratory schedules for the preparation of samples with potential applications to diamond membranes and NV centers for quantum computers. Simulation and visualization of results enable us to peek inside samples where experimental techniques cannot tread. In order to provide the requisite Brazilian component a new connection between these models and bootstrap percolation is made

  7. Surface modification of titanium and titanium alloys by ion implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rautray, Tapash R; Narayanan, R; Kwon, Tae-Yub; Kim, Kyo-Han

    2010-05-01

    Titanium and titanium alloys are widely used in biomedical devices and components, especially as hard tissue replacements as well as in cardiac and cardiovascular applications, because of their desirable properties, such as relatively low modulus, good fatigue strength, formability, machinability, corrosion resistance, and biocompatibility. However, titanium and its alloys cannot meet all of the clinical requirements. Therefore, to improve the biological, chemical, and mechanical properties, surface modification is often performed. In view of this, the current review casts new light on surface modification of titanium and titanium alloys by ion beam implantation.

  8. Titanium and aluminium ions implanted by plasma on polyethylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ion implantation by plasma of titanium and aluminum on polyethylene thin films (PE) is presented. The results indicate that the polymers reacted firstly with the oxygen and/or nitrogen carrying gases, and later its received the metallic particles that formed thin films. The stainless steel and the titanium formed a single phase. The metallic layers grew in the interval of 1 to 2 nm/min, its are thin, but enough to change the hardness of the polymer that it is increased in more of 20 times. (Author)

  9. Structure and phase transformations in tungsten at ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: It is known, that on structural - phase transformations in ionic-implanted layer essential value has interaction of metals with elements of gas environment of an implanter (C, N, O). In the given work results on ionic - beam alloying of tungsten by ions of nitrogen. As an initial material the monocrystalline foil from tungsten by cleanliness of 99.96 % thickness 0.5 mm, cut out as rectangular in the sizes 8·1.5 mm2 is used. With the purpose of removal of the deformed layers samples after machining were exposed to electrolytic polishing. Implantation of ions of nitrogen with energy 70 keV dozes l.87·l017cm-2, 3.74·l017cm-2 and 5.6·1017cm-2 was spent in vacuum (l,3·10-3 Pa) at density of a current ≅1 mA ·cm-2. Thermal annealing carried out in vacuum (6.6·10-3 Pa) through 100 deg.C in a range of temperatures 773-1373 K within one hour each sample. Identification of structure of the modified superficial layers was carried under the roentgenograms received with use of a narrow bunch monochromatized of CuK-α- radiation, directed under a sliding 6 deg. corner to a surface of a sample. At formation of textured phases for specification of results additional shootings were carried out at corners of falling 6 and 15 deg. It is established, that after implantation of ions of nitrogen on roentgenograms there is a set of lines from a polycrystalline phase which represents nitride of tungsten W2N with densely packed FCC-structure. Together with lines of this phase the weak set lines of oxide of tungsten WO3 with monoclinic - structure which arises due to implantation by a method of feedback of oxide from an atmosphere of residual gases of the accelerator is registered also. The analysis of the received results in the following. The relation of nuclear radius of nitrogen to nuclear radius of tantalum makes 0.50. In this case, it agrees the assumptions put forward earlier, based on Hegg's rule, at implantation should be formed mainly simple densely packed

  10. SURFACE MODIFICATION OF TITANIUM FILMS WITH SODIUM ION IMPLANTATION: SURFACE PROPERTIES AND PROTEIN ADSORPTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K. Y. Cai

    2007-01-01

    Sodium implanted titanium films with different ion doses were characterized to correlate their ion implantation parameters. Native titanium films and ion implanted titanium films were characterized with combined techniques of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and light microscopy (LM). The surface presented increased sodium concentration on treated titanium films with ion dose increasing, except for the group with the highest ion dose of 4× 1017 ions/cm2. XPS depth profiling displayed that sodium entered titanium film around 25-50 nm depth depending on its implantation ion dose. AFM characterization showed that sodium ion implantation treatment changed the surface morphology from a relatively smooth titanium film to rough surfaces corresponding to different implantation doses.After sodium implantation, implanted titanium films presented big particles with island structure morphology. The surface morphology and particle growth displayed the corresponding trend.Fibrinogen adsorption on these titanium films was performed to correlate with the surface properties of treated titanium films. The results show that protein adsorption on ion-implanted samples with dose of 2 × 1017 and 4 × 1017 are statistically higher (p < 0. 01) than samples treated with dose of 5×1016 and 1 ×1017, as well as the control samples.

  11. A study on V+ ion-implanted TiO2 photocatalytic films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to improve photocatalytic property of TiO2 films, the films were implanted with 40 keV V+ ions to doses of 0.6 x l016, l x l016, 3 x l016 or 6 x l016 ions/cm2. Optical band gap of the V+ ion-implanted TiO2 films were measured by a spectrophotometer. The results show that the optical band gap of TiO2 films decreased with the increasing implantion dose. Methyl orange (MO) in aqueous solution was catalyzed by the ion-implanted TiO2 films under visible light. (authors)

  12. Research on Surface Modification of 96 Al2O3 by Ni Ion Implantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xiao-hong; SUN Zhi; ZHU Xin; WANG Zhen-zhong

    2006-01-01

    A matrix of 96 Al2O3 ceramics was implanted with Ni ion of different dosages and energies using a MEVVA implanter. Then metallic structures of copper were made on the implanted ceramics, by using selective electroless copper plating. In addition, the characteristics and microstructure of the implanted layer were studied by using the SEM, RBS and XPS. The results show that: 1) the implanted Ni exits as Ni0 , Ni2+, and Ni3+ in the surface of Al2O3 and metal Ni particles precipitate on ceramics during implantation; 2) the concentration of Ni submits to the Gauss distribution along the direction of implantation on the surface of Al2O3 and high Ni concentration on the surface can be obtained if the Ni is implanted with low energy and a high dosage and 3) Ni ion implantation can activate the surface of Al2O3 and induce electroless copper plating on the ceramics.

  13. Carbon nanostructures produced through ion irradiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Several nanostructures we produced by ion irradiation have been reviewed in this paper. By using ions to irradiate two ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene targets respectively, it was found that small fullerenes C20 and C26 were grown, adding two members to the fullerene family. Meanwhile, crystalline diamonds also have been produced by Ar+ ions irradiation of graphite. In the experiment of double ions Ni+ and Ar+ irradiation, nanoscale argon bubbles formed. On the other side, when multi-wall carbon nanotubes were irradiated by C+, many MWCNTs evolved to amorphous carbon nanowires and amorphous carbon nanotubes. And there are possible welding in the crossed nanotubes.

  14. Ion beam technology applications study. [ion impact, implantation, and surface finishing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellen, J. M., Jr.; Zafran, S.; Komatsu, G. K.

    1978-01-01

    Specific perceptions and possible ion beam technology applications were obtained as a result of a literature search and contact interviews with various institutions and individuals which took place over a 5-month period. The use of broad beam electron bombardment ion sources is assessed for materials deposition, removal, and alteration. Special techniques examined include: (1) cleaning, cutting, and texturing for surface treatment; (2) crosslinking of polymers, stress relief in deposited layers, and the creation of defect states in crystalline material by ion impact; and (3) ion implantation during epitaxial growth and the deposition of neutral materials sputtered by the ion beam. The aspects, advantages, and disadvantages of ion beam technology and the competitive role of alternative technologies are discussed.

  15. Metal ion implantation in inert polymers for strain gauge applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metal ion implantation in inert polymers may produce ultra-thin conducting films below the polymer surface. These subsurface films are promising structures for strain gauge applications. To this purpose, polycarbonate substrates were irradiated at room temperature with low-energy metal ions (Cu+ and Ni+) and with fluences in the range between 1 x 1016 and 1 x 1017 ions/cm2, in order to promote the precipitation of dispersed metal nanoparticles or the formation of a continuous thin film. The nanoparticle morphology and the microstructural properties of polymer nanocomposites were investigated by glancing-incidence X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) measurements. At lower fluences (16 ions/cm2) a spontaneous precipitation of spherical-shaped metal nanoparticles occurred below the polymer top-surface (∼50 nm), whereas at higher fluences the aggregation of metal nanoparticles produced the formation of a continuous polycrystalline nanofilm. Furthermore, a characteristic surface plasmon resonance peak was observed for nanocomposites produced at lower ion fluences, due to the presence of Cu nanoparticles. A reduced electrical resistance of the near-surface metal-polymer nanocomposite was measured. The variation of electrical conductivity as a function of the applied surface load was measured: we found a linear relationship and a very small hysteresis.

  16. Phosphorous transient enhanced diffusion suppression and activation enhancement with cluster carbon co-implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakashima, Yoshiki; Hamamoto, Nariaki; Nagayama, Tsutomu; Koga, Yuji; Umisedo, Sei; Kawamura, Yasunori; Hashimoto, Masahiro; Onoda, Hiroshi [Nissin Ion Equipment Co., Ltd., 575 Kuze Tonoshiro-cho, Minami-ku, Kyoto, 601-8205 (Japan)

    2012-11-06

    Carbon co-implantation is well known as an effective method for suppressing boron/phosphorous transient enhanced diffusion (TED). Germanium pre-amorphization implantation (PAI) is usually applied prior to carbon co-implantation for suppressing channeling tail of dopants. In this study, cluster carbon was applied instead of the combination of germanium PAI and monomer carbon co-implantation prior to phosphorous implantation. Dependence of phosphorous activation and TED on amorphous layer thickness, carbon dose, carbon distribution and substrate temperature have been investigated. Cluster carbon implantation enables thick amorphous layer formation and TED suppression at the same time and low temperature implantation enhances the ability of amorphous layer formation so that shallow junction and low Rs can be achieved without Ge implantation.

  17. Modification of magnetic properties of polyethyleneterephthalate by iron ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fe+ ions (40 keV) were implanted into polyethyleneterephthalate (PET) films with fluences of (0.25-1.5) x 1017 cm-2. Magnetic properties of the synthesised Fe:PET composites were studied using superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) technique in temperature range of 2-300 K. For range of fluences (0.5-0.75) x 1017 cm-2 the samples reveal superparamagnetic behaviour at room temperature. At fluences above 0.75 x 1017 cm-2 the strong increase of magnetisation and transition to ferromagnetic properties are registered. Analysis of the magnetic hysteresis loops suggests an easy plane magnetic anisotropy similar to that found for thin magnetic films. Zero-field-cooled (ZFC) and field-cooled (FC) temperature measurements of magnetisation are found to be in agreement with earlier observed formation of Fe nanoparticles (NPs) in the implanted layers. The growth and agglomeration of the NPs forming the quasi-continuous labyrinth-like structure in the polymer film at the highest implantation fluence of 1.5 x 1017 cm-2 is an origin for the transition to the ferromagnetic properties

  18. Modification of magnetic properties of polyethyleneterephthalate by iron ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lukashevich, M.G. [Belarusian State University, Independence Avenue 4, 22050 Minsk (Belarus); Departament de Fisica Fonamental and Institut de Nanociencia i Nanotecnologia, Universitat de Barcelona, Avenue Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Batlle, X. [Departament de Fisica Fonamental and Institut de Nanociencia i Nanotecnologia, Universitat de Barcelona, Avenue Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Labarta, A. [Departament de Fisica Fonamental and Institut de Nanociencia i Nanotecnologia, Universitat de Barcelona, Avenue Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Popok, V.N. [Department of Physics, Goeteborg University, Goeteborg 41296 (Sweden)]. E-mail: popok@physics.gu.se; Zhikharev, V.A. [Kazan State Technology University, K. Marks Street 68, 420015 Kazan (Russian Federation); Kazan Physical-Technical Institute, Sibirsky Trakt 10/7, 420029 Kazan (Russian Federation); Khaibullin, R.I. [Kazan Physical-Technical Institute, Sibirsky Trakt 10/7, 420029 Kazan (Russian Federation); Odzhaev, V.B. [Belarusian State University, Independence Avenue 4, 22050 Minsk (Belarus)

    2007-04-15

    Fe{sup +} ions (40 keV) were implanted into polyethyleneterephthalate (PET) films with fluences of (0.25-1.5) x 10{sup 17} cm{sup -2}. Magnetic properties of the synthesised Fe:PET composites were studied using superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) technique in temperature range of 2-300 K. For range of fluences (0.5-0.75) x 10{sup 17} cm{sup -2} the samples reveal superparamagnetic behaviour at room temperature. At fluences above 0.75 x 10{sup 17} cm{sup -2} the strong increase of magnetisation and transition to ferromagnetic properties are registered. Analysis of the magnetic hysteresis loops suggests an easy plane magnetic anisotropy similar to that found for thin magnetic films. Zero-field-cooled (ZFC) and field-cooled (FC) temperature measurements of magnetisation are found to be in agreement with earlier observed formation of Fe nanoparticles (NPs) in the implanted layers. The growth and agglomeration of the NPs forming the quasi-continuous labyrinth-like structure in the polymer film at the highest implantation fluence of 1.5 x 10{sup 17} cm{sup -2} is an origin for the transition to the ferromagnetic properties.

  19. XPS and micro-mechanical characterisation of nitrogen ion implanted low alloy steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A.O.Olofinjana; Z.Chen; J.M.Bell

    2001-01-01

    The surface composition of low alloy steel after N2+ implantation was studied with X-rayphoto-electron spectroscopy (XPS). The effect of the implantation on the mechanical hardnesswas evaluated by ultra-micro hardness indentation. Chemical characterisation of the surface indi-cated that a thin layer rich in N, C and Si was formed. It is shown that Fe played little role in thechemical composition and the structure of the modified surface. The mechanical hardness of N2+implanted surface was 35-50 GPa compared with a value of 10 GPa for the untreated sample. Itis thought that the high hardness observed on the surface and in the sub-surface was as a resultof chemical modification to form a film of Si doped carbon nitride. There is strong evidence fromthe XPS and the nanoindentation studies that the bonding structure of the C-N in the near surfaceis essentially sp3 types expected in crystalline C3N4. The value of nitrogen ion implantation asprocess for improving the wear resistance of low alloy steels is emphasized.

  20. Ion-implantation and analysis for doped silicon slot waveguides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCallum J. C.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available We have utilised ion implantation to fabricate silicon nanocrystal sensitised erbium-doped slot waveguide structures in a Si/SiO2/Si layered configuration and photoluminescence (PL and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS to analyse these structures. Slot waveguide structures in which light is confined to a nanometre-scale low-index region between two high-index regions potentially offer significant advantages for realisation of electrically-pumped Si devices with optical gain and possibly quantum optical devices. We are currently investigating an alternative pathway in which high quality thermal oxides are grown on silicon and ion implantation is used to introduce the Er and Si-ncs into the SiO2 layer. This approach provides considerable control over the Er and Si-nc concentrations and depth profiles which is important for exploring the available parameter space and developing optimised structures. RBS is well-suited to compositional analysis of these layered structures. To improve the depth sensitivity we have used a 1 MeV α beam and results indicate that a layered silicon-Er:SiO2/silicon structure has been fabricated as desired. In this paper structural results will be compared to Er photoluminescence profiles for samples processed under a range of conditions.

  1. Industrial plasma immersion ion implanter and its applications

    CERN Document Server

    Tong Hong Hui; Huo Yan Feng; Wang Ke; Mu Li Lan; Feng Tie Min; Zhao Jun; Yan Bing; Geng Man

    2002-01-01

    A new generation industrial plasma immersion ion implanter was developed recently in South-western Institute of Physics and some experimental results are reported. The vacuum chamber with 900 mm in diameter and 1050 mm in height stands vertically. The pumping system includes turbo -pump and mechanical pump and it can be automatically controlled by PLC. The background pressure is less than 4 x 10 sup - sup 4 Pa. The plasma in the chamber can be generated by hot-filament discharge and three high-efficiency magnetic filter metal plasma sources, so that the plasma immersion ion implantation and enhanced deposition can be done. The maximum pulse voltage output is 80 kV, maximum pulse current is 60 A, repetition frequency is 50-500 Hz, and the pulse rise time is less than 2 mu s. The power modulator can operate in the pulse bunching mode if necessary. In general, the plasma density is 10 sup 8 -10 sup 1 sup 0 cm sup - sup 3 , the film deposition rate is 0.1-0.5 nm/s

  2. Effects of N+ ion implantation into cubic BN film for tribological usages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cubic boron nitride (c-BN) film was deposited onto a silicon substrate by means of the magnetically enhanced ion-plating method developed by the authors, and ion implantation was performed as a post-treatment using N+ under various conditions. In this study, the crystal structure and tribological properties against diamond of the c-BN film treated by ion implantation were investigated. The results showed that implantation depth increased with an increase in implanting energy even on this c-BN, and it was found that ion damage to the c-BN phase was less when the dosage fell below 8 x 1015 ions cm-2. It was also found that ion implantation was effective in decreasing the friction coefficient when the treated film was contacted with diamond. (orig.)

  3. Heavy ion time-of-flight ERDA of high dose metal implanted germanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dytlewski, N.; Evans, P.J.; Noorman, J.T. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia); Wielunski, L.S. [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), Lindfield, NSW (Australia). Div. of Applied Physics; Bunder, J. [New South Wales Univ., Wollongong, NSW (Australia). Wollongong Univ. Coll

    1996-12-31

    With the thick Ge substrates used in ion implantation, RBS can have difficulty in resolving the mass-depth ambiguities when analysing materials composed of mixtures of elements with nearly equal masses. Additional, and complimentary techniques are thus required. This paper reports the use of heavy ion time-of-flight elastic recoil detection analysis (ToF- ERDA), and conventional RBS in the analysis of Ge(100) implanted with high dose Ti and Cu ions from a MEWA ion source . Heavy ion ToF ERDA has been used to resolve, and profile the implanted transition metal species, and also to study any oxygen incorporation into the sample resulting from the implantation, or subsequential reactions with air or moisture. This work is part of a study on high dose metal ion implantation of medium atomic weight semiconductor materials. 13 refs., 6 figs.

  4. Effect of disorder and defects in ion-implanted semiconductors electrical and physiochemical characterization

    CERN Document Server

    Willardson, Robert K; Christofides, Constantinos; Ghibaudo, Gerard

    2014-01-01

    Defects in ion-implanted semiconductors are important and will likely gain increased importance in the future as annealing temperatures are reduced with successive IC generations. Novel implant approaches, such as MdV implantation, create new types of defects whose origin and annealing characteristics will need to be addressed. Publications in this field mainly focus on the effects of ion implantation on the material and the modification in the implanted layer afterhigh temperature annealing.Electrical and Physicochemical Characterization focuses on the physics of the annealing kine

  5. Aqueous corrosion behaviour of ion-implanted metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We can now look back at 10 years of application of ion beams in corrosion studies. Therefore, after the introduction, we first attempt to give an overview of what has been accomplished during this period in the field of aqueous corrosion, with emphasis on developments in more recent years. Then we present a more detailed discussion of some particular examples of research which make use of different types of corrosion protection mechanism as well as applications of different types of ion beam technique to metal surfaces. These examples include the application of ion beam mixing and ion-beam-assisted vapour deposition to (i) the prevention of localized corrosion, (ii) the reduction of hydrogen uptake by metals (the formation of 'migration barriers'), (iii) corrosion protection by means of ion-beam-mixed monolayers and multilayers of aluminium and boron and (iv) ion-beam-modified carbon layers and their influence on the corrosion of mild steel. Following these examples, we attempt to deduce recommendations for the future application of ion beams in corrosion science. (orig.)

  6. The biomedical properties of polyethylene terephthalate surface modified by silver ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) film is modified by Ag ion implantation with a fluence 1 x 1016 ions/cm2. The results of X-Ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) indicate that silver has been successfully implanted into the surface of PET. The PET samples modified by silver ion implantation have significantly bactericidal property. The capacity of the staphylococcus epidermidis (SE) adhered on the Ag+ implanted PET surface is 5.3 x 106 CFU/ml, but the capacity of the SE adhered on the untreated PET film is 2.23 x 107 CFU/ml. The thromboembolic property is evaluated by in vitro platelet adhesion test, and there is not statistically difference between the untreated PET and the Ag+ implanted PET for the number of adhered and activated platelets. The PET implanted by silver ion has not acute toxicity to endothelial cell (EC) which was evaluated by the release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) test

  7. Influence of Temperature on Nitrogen Ion Implantation of Ti6Al4V Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In order to achieve increased layer thickness, and wearing resistance, enhanced ion implantation with nitrogen has been carried out at temperatures of 100, 200, 400, and 600℃ with a dose of 4× 1018 ions. cm-2. Using the Plasma Source Ion Implantation (PSⅡ) device, specimens of Ti6Al4V alloy were implanted at elevated temperatures, using the ion flux as the heating source. Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), X-ray Diffraction (XRD), micro-hardness measurements and pin-on-disk wearing tester were utilized to evaluate the surface property improvements. The thickness of the implanted layer increased by about an order of magnitude when the temperature was elevated from 100 to 600℃. Higher surface hardness and wearing resistance was also obtained in implantation under higher temperature. XRD image showed the presence of titanium nitrides on the implanted surface.

  8. The third generation multi-purpose plasma immersion ion implanter for surface modification of materials

    CERN Document Server

    Tang Bao Yin; Wang Xiao Feng; Gan Kong Yin; Wang Song Yan; Chu, P K; Huang Nian Ning; Sun Hong

    2002-01-01

    The third generation multi-purpose plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) equipment has been successfully used for research and development of surface modification of biomedical materials, metals and their alloys in the Southwest Jiaotong University. The implanter equipped with intense current, pulsed cathodic arc metal plasma sources which have both strong coating function and gas and metal ion implantation function. Its pulse high voltage power supply can provide big output current. It can acquire very good implantation dose uniformity. The equipment can both perform ion implantation and combine ion implantation with sputtering deposition and coating to form many kinds of synthetic surface modification techniques. The main design principles, features of important components and achievement of research works in recent time have been described

  9. Recrystallization and reactivation of dopant atoms in ion-implanted silicon nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukata, Naoki; Takiguchi, Ryo; Ishida, Shinya; Yokono, Shigeki; Hishita, Shunichi; Murakami, Kouichi

    2012-04-24

    Recrystallization of silicon nanowires (SiNWs) after ion implantation strongly depends on the ion doses and species. Full amorphization by high-dose implantation induces polycrystal structures in SiNWs even after high-temperature annealing, with this tendency more pronounced for heavy ions. Hot-implantation techniques dramatically suppress polycrystallization in SiNWs, resulting in reversion to the original single-crystal structures and consequently high reactivation rate of dopant atoms. In this study, the chemical bonding states and electrical activities of implanted boron and phosphorus atoms were evaluated by Raman scattering and electron spin resonance, demonstrating the formation of p- and n-type SiNWs.

  10. Estimate of the concentration of implanted ions in solid substrates using a web application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, F. H. Vera; Pérez Gutiérrez, B. R.; Dulce-Moreno, H. J.; Duran-Flórez, F.; Niño, E. D. V.

    2016-08-01

    The three-dimensional ionic implantation technique (3DII) is used to modify the surface of solid metal by electric discharges pulsed of high voltage at low pressures. Knowing the density of ions implanted in the surface of a functional element, in a faster and estimated way, will help to optimize the surface treatment technique. Therefore, a web application was developed which from experimental parameters established in a process 3DII estimates the concentration of ions implanted in solid metal substrates. The results obtained in this research work demonstrate the feasibility of the computational web tool to perfect the experiments of surface modification by ion implantation.

  11. Effect of Yttrium Pre-Implantation on Implantation Behavior of Ti-6Al-4V Alloy in Nitrogen Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In order to increase the peak depth of nitrogen atoms during the nitrogen plasma immersion ion implantation of Ti-6Al-4V alloy, the rare earth metal yttrium was applied. In the experiment, yttrium and nitrogen ions were implanted under the voltage of 20 and 30 kV, respectively. In the samples with yttrium pre-implantation for 30 min, the Auger electron spectroscopy(AES) analysis shows that the peak depth of the nitrogen atoms increases from 50 up to 100 nm. It can also be seen from the tribological tests that the wear resistance of these samples is increased remarkably.

  12. Data compilation for depth distribution of ion-induced damage and ion-implanted atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the recent progress of utilizing ion bombardment technique to ion implantation and neutron irradiation simulation, the experimental data have accumulated concerning the depth distribution of deposited atoms and induced damage along ion incident direction. In the ion-induced damage experiments, the density of point defects or void swelling has been investigated as a function of depth. In this study, the data available until the present time are compiled and compared with theoretical prediction represented by E-DEP-1 computer code. It is recognized in general that the experimentally observed damage peak is deeper than that E-DEP-1 calculated using the LSS electronic stopping parameter, k sub(LSS). Agreement between the observation and calculation can be obtained using a modified electronic stopping parameter k = 0.8 - 0.9 k sub(LSS). With regard to the deposited atoms by ion bombardment, the peak of the observed distribution is deeper in some cases and shallower in other cases than that calculated by E-DEP-1, indicating that the modified electronic stopping parameter k is oscillating relative to k sub(LSS). This oscillatory behavior is not recognized in the damage distribution. It is suggested that future work should be made to determine the distribution of ion-induced damage in relation to that of the deposited atoms, since the defect evolution may directly be related to the implanted atoms. (author)

  13. Near-surface recrystallization of the amorphous implanted layer of ion implanted 6H-SiC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhudzai, R.J., E-mail: joeykuhu@yahoo.com [Physics Department, University of Pretoria, Pretoria (South Africa); Berg, N.G. van der; Malherbe, J.B.; Hlatshwayo, T.T.; Theron, C.C. [Physics Department, University of Pretoria, Pretoria (South Africa); Buys, A.V.; Botha, A.J. [Laboratory for Microscopy and Microanalysis, University of Pretoria (South Africa); Wendler, E.; Wesch, W. [Institut Für Festköperphysik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena, Jena (Germany)

    2014-08-01

    The recrystallization and subsequent crystal growth during annealing of amorphous surface layers on 6H-SiC produced by ion implantation is investigated. Amorphous surface layers were produced by ion implantation of 360 keV ions of iodine, silver, xenon, cesium and strontium into single crystalline 6H-silicon carbide samples. The ion fluence for all the implantations were in the order of 10{sup 16} cm{sup −2}. Vacuum annealing of the damaged silicon carbide samples was then performed. The microstructure of SiC surfaces before and after annealing was investigated using a high resolution field emission scanning electron microscope (SEM). SEM analysis was complimented by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). SEM images acquired by an in-lens detector using an accelerating voltage of 2 kV show nano-crystallites developed for all implanted samples after annealing. Larger and more faceted crystallites along with elongated thin crystallites were observed for iodine and xenon implanted 6H-SiC. Crystallites formed on surfaces implanted with strontium and cesium were smaller and less faceted. Strontium, silver and cesium implanted samples also exhibited more cavities on the surface. AFM was used to evaluate the effect of annealing on the surface roughness. For all the amorphous surfaces which were essentially featureless, the root mean square (rms) roughness was approximately 1 nm. The roughness increased to approximately 17 nm for the iodine implanted sample after annealing with the surface roughness below this value for all the other samples. AFM also showed that the largest crystals grew to heights of about 17, 20, 45, 50 and 65 nm for Sr, Cs, Ag, Xe and I implanted samples after annealing at 1200 °C for 5 h respectively. SEM images and AFM analysis suggest that iodine is more effective in promoting crystal growth during the annealing of bombardment-induced amorphous SiC layers than the rest of the ions we implanted. In samples of silicon carbide co-implanted with iodine and

  14. Mg ion implantation on SLA-treated titanium surface and its effects on the behavior of mesenchymal stem cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Beom-Su; Kim, Jin Seong [Wonkwang Bone Regeneration Research Institute, Wonkwang University, Iksan 570-749 (Korea, Republic of); Bonecell Biotech Inc., 77, Dunsan-ro, Seo-gu, Daejeon 302-830 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Young Min [DIO Corporation, 66, Centum seo-ro, Haeundae-gu, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Bo-Young [Department of Oral and maxillofacial Surgery, Wonkwang University Daejeon Dental Hospital, Daejeon 302-830 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jun, E-mail: omslee@wku.ac.kr [Wonkwang Bone Regeneration Research Institute, Wonkwang University, Iksan 570-749 (Korea, Republic of); Bonecell Biotech Inc., 77, Dunsan-ro, Seo-gu, Daejeon 302-830 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-04-01

    Magnesium (Mg) is one of the most important ions associated with bone osseointegration. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cellular effects of Mg implantation in titanium (Ti) surfaces treated with sand blast using large grit and acid etching (SLA). Mg ions were implanted into the surface via vacuum arc source ion implantation. The surface morphology, chemical properties, and the amount of Mg ion release were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS), and inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometer (ICP-OES). Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were used to evaluate cellular parameters such as proliferation, cytotoxicity, and adhesion morphology by MTS assay, live/dead assay, and SEM. Furthermore, osteoblast differentiation was determined on the basis of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and the degree of calcium accumulation. In the Mg ion-implanted disk, 2.3 × 10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2} was retained. However, after Mg ion implantation, the surface morphology did not change. Implanted Mg ions were rapidly released during the first 7 days in vitro. The MTS assay, live/dead assay, and SEM demonstrated increased cell attachment and growth on the Mg ion-implanted surface. In particular, Mg ion implantation increased the initial cell adhesion, and in an osteoblast differentiation assay, ALP activity and calcium accumulation. These findings suggest that Mg ion implantation using the plasma source ion implantation (PSII) technique may be useful for SLA-treated Ti dental implants to improve their osseointegration capacity. - Highlights: ► Mg ion was coated onto surface of SLA treated titanium via vacuum arc source ion implantation method. ► The morphological characteristics did not change after Mg ion implantation. ► Mg ion implanted SLA Ti is highly cytocompatible. ► Initial cell adhesion of MSCs is improved by Mg ion implantation. ► Mg ion implantation

  15. Mg ion implantation on SLA-treated titanium surface and its effects on the behavior of mesenchymal stem cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnesium (Mg) is one of the most important ions associated with bone osseointegration. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cellular effects of Mg implantation in titanium (Ti) surfaces treated with sand blast using large grit and acid etching (SLA). Mg ions were implanted into the surface via vacuum arc source ion implantation. The surface morphology, chemical properties, and the amount of Mg ion release were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS), and inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometer (ICP-OES). Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were used to evaluate cellular parameters such as proliferation, cytotoxicity, and adhesion morphology by MTS assay, live/dead assay, and SEM. Furthermore, osteoblast differentiation was determined on the basis of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and the degree of calcium accumulation. In the Mg ion-implanted disk, 2.3 × 1016 ions/cm2 was retained. However, after Mg ion implantation, the surface morphology did not change. Implanted Mg ions were rapidly released during the first 7 days in vitro. The MTS assay, live/dead assay, and SEM demonstrated increased cell attachment and growth on the Mg ion-implanted surface. In particular, Mg ion implantation increased the initial cell adhesion, and in an osteoblast differentiation assay, ALP activity and calcium accumulation. These findings suggest that Mg ion implantation using the plasma source ion implantation (PSII) technique may be useful for SLA-treated Ti dental implants to improve their osseointegration capacity. - Highlights: ► Mg ion was coated onto surface of SLA treated titanium via vacuum arc source ion implantation method. ► The morphological characteristics did not change after Mg ion implantation. ► Mg ion implanted SLA Ti is highly cytocompatible. ► Initial cell adhesion of MSCs is improved by Mg ion implantation. ► Mg ion implantation improved

  16. Electrical doping of Hg Cd Te by ion implantation and heat treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The general properties of junctions made by ion implantation in Hg Cd Te semiconductor are recalled structure of junctions made by implantation damage, defects, anneals, junctions made by active impurities. The effect of acceptor evolution in this semiconductor after heat treatments and a study of the kinetics are presented. Very high quality devices with very small size and large two-dimensional arrays are shown to be possibly achieved using ion implantation technique of junction formation in the semiconductor epilayers grown by LPE

  17. Single-Ion Implantation for the Development of Si-Based MOSFET Devices with Quantum Functionalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey C. McCallum

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Interest in single-ion implantation is driven in part by research into development of solid-state devices that exhibit quantum behaviour in their electronic or optical characteristics. Here, we provide an overview of international research work on single ion implantation and single ion detection for development of electronic devices for quantum computing. The scope of international research into single ion implantation is presented in the context of our own research in the Centre for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology in Australia. Various single ion detection schemes are presented, and limitations on dopant placement accuracy due to ion straggling are discussed together with pathways for scale-up to multiple quantum devices on the one chip. Possible future directions for ion implantation in quantum computing and communications are also discussed.

  18. Ion implantation reinforcement of the protective efficiency of nickel in artificial sea-water

    CERN Document Server

    Leroy, L; Grosseau-Poussard, J L; Dinhut, J F

    2002-01-01

    Ni bulk specimens have been implanted with Cr, Cu and Ar ions (4x10 sup 1 sup 6 ions/cm sup 2 , 60 keV) in order to distinguish between chemical and radiation damage effects on protection corrosion. The corrosion behaviour in artificial sea-water of ion-implanted and pure Ni has been studied at room temperature by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) technique. EIS spectra of ion-implanted Ni exhibit one capacitance loop while in pure Ni two distinct loops are observed. Moreover an important increase in the polarisation resistance is noticed for all implanted ions. Theses changes in EIS behaviour with implantation is related to the increase of the superficial layer density resulting in a decrease of heterogeneity of the passive layer. Equivalent circuits are proposed to fit the impedance spectra and corresponding electrochemical parameters are deduced.

  19. Cell attachment of polypropylene surface-modified by COOH+ ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carboxy ion (COOH+) implantation was performed at the energy of 50 keV with fluences ranging from 1x1014 to 1x1015 ions/cm2 at room temperature for polypropylene (PP). The effects of ion implantation on cells (immune macrophages, 3T3 mouse fibroblasts and human endothelial cells) were studied in vitro. Tests of cell attachment gave interesting results that the 3T3 mouse fibroblasts and human endothelial cells cultured on the surface of the implanted PP showed much better attachment and proliferation than that on pristine PP. At the same time, the COOH+ ion implantation also induced low macrophage attachment with normal cellular morphology. Results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) analysis showed that COOH+ ion implantation caused the rearrangement of chemical bonds and the formation of some new O-containing groups, which was responsible for the enhancement of the biocompatibility of PP

  20. Synthesis and characterisation of ion-implanted epoxy composites for X-ray shielding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noor Azman, N.Z. [Department of Imaging and Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Curtin University, GPO Box U1987, Perth, WA 6845 (Australia); School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 Penang (Malaysia); Siddiqui, S.A. [Department of Imaging and Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Curtin University, GPO Box U1987, Perth, WA 6845 (Australia); Ionescu, M. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), Lucas Heights, NSW 2234 (Australia); Low, I.M., E-mail: j.low@curtin.edu.au [Department of Imaging and Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Curtin University, GPO Box U1987, Perth, WA 6845 (Australia)

    2012-09-15

    The epoxy samples were implanted with heavy ions such as tungsten (W), gold (Au) and lead (Pb) to investigate the attenuation characteristics of these composites. Near-surface composition depth profiling of ion-implanted epoxy systems was studied using Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy (RBS). The effect of implanted ions on the X-ray attenuation was studied with a general diagnostic X-ray machine with X-ray tube voltages from 40 to 100 kV at constant exposure 10 mAs. Results show that the threshold of implanted ions above which X-ray mass attenuation coefficient, {mu}{sub m} of the ion-implanted epoxy composite is distinguishably higher than the {mu}{sub m} of the pure epoxy sample is different for W, Au and Pb.

  1. On the influence of carbon implantation on the structural properties of hard TiN coatings studied by glancing incidence X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, we investigate the structural properties and, in particular, the residual stress of carbon-implanted TiN coatings by means of glancing incidence X-ray diffraction and secondary ion mass spectrometry techniques. The coatings were grown by ion-beam physical vapor deposition on steel substrates and subsequently implanted at 100 keV with carbon doses of 1x1017,3x1017 and 7x1017 ions/cm2. The carbon depth profiles obtained by secondary ion mass spectrometry enable us to choose the more appropriate X-ray beam incidence angles in order to detect the structural variations in proximity to the implanted region. The X-ray results indicate notable variations both in the crystallinity and in the residual stress and such modifications depend on the carbon dose and penetration depth. In particular, in the coating implanted with a dose of 1x1017 ions/cm2 the initial compressive residual stress is reduced until a penetration depth of at least 400 nm. In addition, the lattice is re-crystallized in the first 100 nm. The coatings implanted with doses of 3x1017 and 7x1017 ions/cm2 have a surface region (100 nm thick) in the tensile stress state and a peak of compressive stress well above the non-implanted value at a depth between Rp and 2Rp. Moreover, the effect of C+ implantation is to reduce the lattice parameters for all the investigated samples. Such results can be explained by considering the defect distribution induced by the implantation process and the competition between the implantation amorphization and the self-annealing behavior

  2. Surface stiffening and enhanced photoluminescence of ion implanted cellulose - polyvinyl alcohol - silica composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanthini, G M; Sakthivel, N; Menon, Ranjini; Nabhiraj, P Y; Gómez-Tejedor, J A; Meseguer-Dueñas, J M; Gómez Ribelles, J L; Krishna, J B M; Kalkura, S Narayana

    2016-11-20

    Novel Cellulose (Cel) reinforced polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)-Silica (Si) composite which has good stability and in vitro degradation was prepared by lyophilization technique and implanted using N(3+) ions of energy 24keV in the fluences of 1×10(15), 5×10(15) and 1×10(16)ions/cm(2). SEM analysis revealed the formation of microstructures, and improved the surface roughness on ion implantation. In addition to these structural changes, the implantation significantly modified the luminescent, thermal and mechanical properties of the samples. The elastic modulus of the implanted samples has increased by about 50 times compared to the pristine which confirms that the stiffness of the sample surface has increased remarkably on ion implantation. The photoluminescence of the native cellulose has improved greatly due to defect site, dangling bonds and hydrogen passivation. Electric conductivity of the ion implanted samples was improved by about 25%. Hence, low energy ion implantation tunes the mechanical property, surface roughness and further induces the formation of nano structures. MG63 cells seeded onto the scaffolds reveals that with the increase in implantation fluence, the cell attachment, viability and proliferation have improved greatly compared to pristine. The enhancement of cell growth of about 59% was observed in the implanted samples compared to pristine. These properties will enable the scaffolds to be ideal for bone tissue engineering and imaging applications. PMID:27561534

  3. Comparison of Wear Resistance Mechanisms of Die Steel Implanted with C and mo Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, M. F.; Yang, J. H.; Luo, X. D.; Zhang, T. H.

    Mo and C ions extracted from a metal vapor vacuum arc ion source were implanted into the surface of die steel (H13) to compare the wear resistance mechanisms of the implanted samples, respectively. The concentration depth profiles of implanted ions were measured using Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy and calculated by a code called TRIDYN. The structures of the implanted steel were observed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and grazing-angle X-ray diffraction, respectively. It was found that the conventional heat-treated H13 steel could not be further hardened by the subsequent implanted C ions, and the thickness of the implanted layer was not an important factor for the Mo and C ion implantation to improve the wear resistance of the H13 steel. Mo ion implantation could obviously improve the wear resistance of the steel at an extraction voltage of 48 kV and a dose of 5 × 1017cm-2 due to formation of a modification layer of little oxidation with Mo2C in the implanted surface.

  4. Study on the Properties of TiN Coatings on Previously Ion-Implanted Pure Magnesium Surface by MEVVA Ion Implantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Hai; CHEN Fei; WANG Jian-ping

    2007-01-01

    A metal vapor vacuum arc (MEVVA) is used in ion implantation for substrate preparation before the deposition process which would ensure the improvement of mechanical properties of the coating.Ti ion is implanted into pure magnesium surface by MEVVA implanter operated with a modified cathode.Implanting energy is kept at 45 keV and dose is set at 3×1017 cm-2.TiN coatings are deposited by magnetically filtered vacuum-arc plasma source on unimplanted and previously implanted substrates.Microstructure and phase composition are analysed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD).The property of corrosion resistance of TiN coatings was studied by CS300P electrochemistry-corrosion workstation,and the main impact factor of the corrosion resistance was also analyzed.

  5. Dry Machining Tool Design via Chlorine Ion Implantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TatsuhikoAizawa; AtsushiMitsuo; ShigeoYamamoto; ShinjiMuraishi; TaroSumitomo

    2004-01-01

    Dry machining has become a key issue to significantly reduce the wastes of used lubricants and cleaning agents and to improve the environmental consciousness for medical and food applications of special tooling. Since the tools and metallic works are in direct contact in dry, severe adhesive wear and oxidation are thought to occur even at the presence of hard protective coatings. Self-lubrication mechanism with use of lubricous oxide films is found to be effective for dry machining. Through the chlorine ion implantation to tools, titanium base oxides are in-situ formed on the tool surface. This oxide deforms elasto-plastically so that both friction coefficient and wear volume are reduced even in the high-speed cutting.

  6. Dry Machining Tool Design via Chlorine Ion Implantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tatsuhiko Aizawa; Atsushi Mitsuo; Shigeo Yamamoto; Shinji Muraishi; Taro Sumitomo

    2004-01-01

    Dry machining has become a key issue to significantly reduce the wastes of used lubricants and cleaning agents and to improve the environmental consciousness for medical and food applications of special tooling. Since the tools and metallic works are in direct contact in dry, severe adhesive wear and oxidation are thought to occur even at the presence of hard protective coatings. Self-lubrication mechanism with use of lubricous oxide films is found to be effective for dry machining. Through the chlorine ion implantation to tools, titanium base oxides are in-situ formed on the tool surface.This oxide deforms elasto-plastically so that both friction coefficient and wear volume are reduced even in the high-speed cutting.

  7. Effectiveness of ion implantation of iron garnet films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tikhonov, A.N.; Fedichkin, G.M.; Yurchenko, S.E.; Suslin, L.A.; Smirnov, I.S.; Shlenov, Yu.V.

    1986-01-01

    The authors seek to determine experimentally what changes of the magnetic bubble properties and of the iron garnet film characteristics resulting from implantation of Ne/sup +/ ions can be used as criteria for assessing the effectiveness of this process in the production of bubble devices. For the experiments, the authors used (YBi)/sub 3/(FeGa)/sub 5/O/sub 12/; (TmBi)/sub 3/(FeGa)/sub 5/O/sub 12/; and (YSmLuCa)/sub 3/(FeGe)/sub 5/O/sub 12/. The orientation of the Gd/sub 3/Ga/sub 5/O/sub 12/ substrate is (111) in all cases. The current density of the H/sup +/ proton beam did not exceed 0.5 micro-A/cm/sup 2/.

  8. A theory of the ion-implanted metal semiconductor contact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A one-dimensional diffusion theory has been used for calculating the current-voltage characteristic of an ion-implanted aluminium-p-silicon contact. The characteristic feature of this contact is the presence of a disordered intermediate layer of about 1,000 A between the pure metal and the semiconductor substrate. The contact resistance of this MaS structure is two orders of magnitude lower than that of an abrupt system. A variation method is given to evaluate the internal potential PHI and the width L of space charge in the case of thermodynamic equilibrium. From the non-linear system of basic equations of diffusion theory a compact expression for the stationary current density is derived in a self-consitent way. (author)

  9. Focussed MeV ion beam implanted waveguides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Von Bibra, M.L.; Roberts, A.; Nugent, K.; Jamieson, D.N. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1996-12-31

    Single mode buried optical waveguides have been fabricated in fused silica by MeV proton implantation using a focussed hydrogen ion beam. The technique has the potential to direct write waveguide devices and produce multi-layered structures, without the need for intermediate steps such as mask fabrication or layered depositions. A micron resolution Confocal Raman Spectrometer has been used to map the distribution of atomic vacancies that forms the waveguiding region. The results are compared with theoretical calculations. Losses of 3 dB cm{sup -1} have been measured in unannealed samples, which decreases to less than 0.5 dB cm{sup -1} after annealing at 500 degrees Celsius. We describe methods for determining the refractive index distribution of single mode buried waveguides from their output intensity distributions via an inversion of the scalar wave equation. (authors). 5 figs.

  10. Ion-beam-sputter modification of the surface morphology of biological implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigand, A. J.; Banks, B. A.

    1977-01-01

    The surface chemistry and texture of materials used for biological implants may significantly influence their performance and biocompatibility. Recent interest in the microscopic control of implant surface texture has led to the evaluation of ion-beam sputtering as a potentially useful surface roughening technique. Ion sources, similar to electron-bombardment ion thrusters designed for propulsive applications, are used to roughen the surfaces of various biocompatible alloys or polymer materials. These materials are typically used for dental implants, orthopedic prostheses, vascular prostheses, and artificial heart components. Masking techniques and resulting surface textures are described along with progress concerning evaluation of the biological response to the ion-beam-sputtered surfaces.

  11. Ion beam sputter modification of the surface morphology of biological implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigand, A. J.; Banks, B. A.

    1976-01-01

    The surface chemistry and texture of materials used for biological implants may significantly influence their performance and biocompatibility. Recent interest in the microscopic control of implant surface texture has led to the evaluation of ion beam sputtering as a potentially useful surface roughening technique. Ion sources, similar to electron bombardment ion thrusters designed for propulsive applications, are used to roughen the surfaces of various biocompatible alloys or polymer materials. These materials are typically used for dental implants, orthopedic prostheses, vascular prostheses, and artificial heart components. Masking techniques and resulting surface textures are described along with progress concerning evaluation of the biological response to the ion beam sputtered surfaces.

  12. Study of phase transformation processes in steel after phosphor ion implantation and following thermal treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the paper process of phase transformation after phosphor ion implantation in steel-45 and annealing in vacuum at 1000 deg C and irradiation by various doses of phosphor ions with energy 100 keV an accelerator are researched by conversion electron method. The phosphor overall solubility in iron is equal 4.53 %. Implantation dose below 6·1017 ions/cm2 allows increase phosphor ions content in implantation region to 35 %. Therefore, iron phosphides (Fe3P, Fe2P and Fe P) forming are possible. (author)

  13. Single ion impact detection and scanning probe aligned ion implantation for quantum bit formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weis, Christoph D.

    2011-10-04

    Quantum computing and quantum information processing is a promising path to replace classical information processing via conventional computers which are approaching fundamental physical limits. Instead of classical bits, quantum bits (qubits) are utilized for computing operations. Due to quantum mechanical phenomena such as superposition and entanglement, a completely different way of information processing is achieved, enabling enhanced performance for certain problem sets. Various proposals exist on how to realize a quantum bit. Among them are electron or nuclear spins of defect centers in solid state systems. Two such candidates with spin degree of freedom are single donor atoms in silicon and nitrogen vacancy (NV) defect centers in diamond. Both qubit candidates possess extraordinary qualities which makes them promising building blocks. Besides certain advantages, the qubits share the necessity to be placed precisely in their host materials and device structures. A commonly used method is to introduce the donor atoms into the substrate materials via ion implantation. For this, focused ion beam systems can be used, or collimation techniques as in this work. A broad ion beam hits the back of a scanning probe microscope (SPM) cantilever with incorporated apertures. The high resolution imaging capabilities of the SPM allows the non destructive location of device areas and the alignment of the cantilever and thus collimated ion beam spot to the desired implant locations. In this work, this technique is explored, applied and pushed forward to meet necessary precision requirements. The alignment of the ion beam to surface features, which are sensitive to ion impacts and thus act as detectors, is demonstrated. The technique is also used to create NV center arrays in diamond substrates. Further, single ion impacts into silicon device structures are detected which enables deliberate single ion doping.

  14. Single ion impact detection and scanning probe aligned ion implantation for quantum bit formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quantum computing and quantum information processing is a promising path to replace classical information processing via conventional computers which are approaching fundamental physical limits. Instead of classical bits, quantum bits (qubits) are utilized for computing operations. Due to quantum mechanical phenomena such as superposition and entanglement, a completely different way of information processing is achieved, enabling enhanced performance for certain problem sets. Various proposals exist on how to realize a quantum bit. Among them are electron or nuclear spins of defect centers in solid state systems. Two such candidates with spin degree of freedom are single donor atoms in silicon and nitrogen vacancy (NV) defect centers in diamond. Both qubit candidates possess extraordinary qualities which makes them promising building blocks. Besides certain advantages, the qubits share the necessity to be placed precisely in their host materials and device structures. A commonly used method is to introduce the donor atoms into the substrate materials via ion implantation. For this, focused ion beam systems can be used, or collimation techniques as in this work. A broad ion beam hits the back of a scanning probe microscope (SPM) cantilever with incorporated apertures. The high resolution imaging capabilities of the SPM allows the non destructive location of device areas and the alignment of the cantilever and thus collimated ion beam spot to the desired implant locations. In this work, this technique is explored, applied and pushed forward to meet necessary precision requirements. The alignment of the ion beam to surface features, which are sensitive to ion impacts and thus act as detectors, is demonstrated. The technique is also used to create NV center arrays in diamond substrates. Further, single ion impacts into silicon device structures are detected which enables deliberate single ion doping.

  15. A simple ion implanter for material modifications in agriculture and gemmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singkarat, S.; Wijaikhum, A.; Suwannakachorn, D.; Tippawan, U.; Intarasiri, S.; Bootkul, D.; Phanchaisri, B.; Techarung, J.; Rhodes, M. W.; Suwankosum, R.; Rattanarin, S.; Yu, L. D.

    2015-12-01

    In our efforts in developing ion beam technology for novel applications in biology and gemmology, an economic simple compact ion implanter especially for the purpose was constructed. The designing of the machine was aimed at providing our users with a simple, economic, user friendly, convenient and easily operateable ion implanter for ion implantation of biological living materials and gemstones for biotechnological applications and modification of gemstones, which would eventually contribute to the national agriculture, biomedicine and gem-industry developments. The machine was in a vertical setup so that the samples could be placed horizontally and even without fixing; in a non-mass-analyzing ion implanter style using mixed molecular and atomic nitrogen (N) ions so that material modifications could be more effective; equipped with a focusing/defocusing lens and an X-Y beam scanner so that a broad beam could be possible; and also equipped with a relatively small target chamber so that living biological samples could survive from the vacuum period during ion implantation. To save equipment materials and costs, most of the components of the machine were taken from decommissioned ion beam facilities. The maximum accelerating voltage of the accelerator was 100 kV, ideally necessary for crop mutation induction and gem modification by ion beams from our experience. N-ion implantation of local rice seeds and cut gemstones was carried out. Various phenotype changes of grown rice from the ion-implanted seeds and improvements in gemmological quality of the ion-bombarded gemstones were observed. The success in development of such a low-cost and simple-structured ion implanter provides developing countries with a model of utilizing our limited resources to develop novel accelerator-based technologies and applications.

  16. Probabilistic predictive modelling of carbon nanocomposites for medical implants design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Matthew; Chui, Chee-Kong

    2015-04-01

    Modelling of the mechanical properties of carbon nanocomposites based on input variables like percentage weight of Carbon Nanotubes (CNT) inclusions is important for the design of medical implants and other structural scaffolds. Current constitutive models for the mechanical properties of nanocomposites may not predict well due to differences in conditions, fabrication techniques and inconsistencies in reagents properties used across industries and laboratories. Furthermore, the mechanical properties of the designed products are not deterministic, but exist as a probabilistic range. A predictive model based on a modified probabilistic surface response algorithm is proposed in this paper to address this issue. Tensile testing of three groups of different CNT weight fractions of carbon nanocomposite samples displays scattered stress-strain curves, with the instantaneous stresses assumed to vary according to a normal distribution at a specific strain. From the probabilistic density function of the experimental data, a two factors Central Composite Design (CCD) experimental matrix based on strain and CNT weight fraction input with their corresponding stress distribution was established. Monte Carlo simulation was carried out on this design matrix to generate a predictive probabilistic polynomial equation. The equation and method was subsequently validated with more tensile experiments and Finite Element (FE) studies. The method was subsequently demonstrated in the design of an artificial tracheal implant. Our algorithm provides an effective way to accurately model the mechanical properties in implants of various compositions based on experimental data of samples. PMID:25658876

  17. Advanced transmission electron microscopy studies in low-energy ion implanted Si Semiconductors; Junctions; Silicon

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, T S

    2002-01-01

    As the dimensions of semiconductor devices shrink down to 0.1 mu m and beyond, low energy ion implantation is required to introduce shallower junctions to match such small devices. In this work, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is employed to analyse low energy implanted junctions with both structural and chemical analyses. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) has been employed to observe Si crystal damage and amorphization due to low energy B sup + /As sup + ion implantations, and also, defect formation/annihilation during rapid thermal annealing (RTA). The damage effects due to different implant temperatures between 300 deg C and -150 deg C are also discussed. Since knowledge of the distribution of low energy ion implanted dopants in Si is extremely important for semiconductor device processing, energy filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) has been employed to determine implanted B distributions in Si while Z-contrast imaging and X-ray analytical mapping techniques are ...

  18. Effects of ion implantation on the abrasive wear of WC-Co

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An explanation of the improved abrasive wear resistance of ion-implanted WC-Co components has been sought. X-ray analysis is reported of scratches produced on polished implanted and non-implanted WC-Co surfaces by a single pass scratch test. It can be inferred from the results that extrusion of cobalt from a WC-Co surface under the stress of an abrading diamond is easier in the non-implanted than in the implanted case; this is the first stage of the abrasion wear process. Transmission electron diffraction of a WC-Co foil, before and after implantation by nitrogen ions, indicated the formation of Co2N microprecipitates during implantation. Precipitation hardening, hindering cobalt extrusion, is offered therefore as the explanation of the improved service life of the components. (U.K.)

  19. Silver nanoparticle-enriched diamond-like carbon implant modification as a mammalian cell compatible surface with antimicrobial properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorzelanny, Christian; Kmeth, Ralf; Obermeier, Andreas; Bauer, Alexander T.; Halter, Natalia; Kümpel, Katharina; Schneider, Matthias F.; Wixforth, Achim; Gollwitzer, Hans; Burgkart, Rainer; Stritzker, Bernd; Schneider, Stefan W.

    2016-03-01

    The implant-bone interface is the scene of competition between microorganisms and distinct types of tissue cells. In the past, various strategies have been followed to support bony integration and to prevent bacterial implant-associated infections. In the present study we investigated the biological properties of diamond-like carbon (DLC) surfaces containing silver nanoparticles. DLC is a promising material for the modification of medical implants providing high mechanical and chemical stability and a high degree of biocompatibility. DLC surface modifications with varying silver concentrations were generated on medical-grade titanium discs, using plasma immersion ion implantation-induced densification of silver nanoparticle-containing polyvinylpyrrolidone polymer solutions. Immersion of implants in aqueous liquids resulted in a rapid silver release reducing the growth of surface-bound and planktonic Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis. Due to the fast and transient release of silver ions from the modified implants, the surfaces became biocompatible, ensuring growth of mammalian cells. Human endothelial cells retained their cellular differentiation as indicated by the intracellular formation of Weibel-Palade bodies and a high responsiveness towards histamine. Our findings indicate that the integration of silver nanoparticles into DLC prevents bacterial colonization due to a fast initial release of silver ions, facilitating the growth of silver susceptible mammalian cells subsequently.

  20. Silver nanoparticle-enriched diamond-like carbon implant modification as a mammalian cell compatible surface with antimicrobial properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorzelanny, Christian; Kmeth, Ralf; Obermeier, Andreas; Bauer, Alexander T.; Halter, Natalia; Kümpel, Katharina; Schneider, Matthias F.; Wixforth, Achim; Gollwitzer, Hans; Burgkart, Rainer; Stritzker, Bernd; Schneider, Stefan W.

    2016-01-01

    The implant-bone interface is the scene of competition between microorganisms and distinct types of tissue cells. In the past, various strategies have been followed to support bony integration and to prevent bacterial implant-associated infections. In the present study we investigated the biological properties of diamond-like carbon (DLC) surfaces containing silver nanoparticles. DLC is a promising material for the modification of medical implants providing high mechanical and chemical stability and a high degree of biocompatibility. DLC surface modifications with varying silver concentrations were generated on medical-grade titanium discs, using plasma immersion ion implantation-induced densification of silver nanoparticle-containing polyvinylpyrrolidone polymer solutions. Immersion of implants in aqueous liquids resulted in a rapid silver release reducing the growth of surface-bound and planktonic Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis. Due to the fast and transient release of silver ions from the modified implants, the surfaces became biocompatible, ensuring growth of mammalian cells. Human endothelial cells retained their cellular differentiation as indicated by the intracellular formation of Weibel-Palade bodies and a high responsiveness towards histamine. Our findings indicate that the integration of silver nanoparticles into DLC prevents bacterial colonization due to a fast initial release of silver ions, facilitating the growth of silver susceptible mammalian cells subsequently. PMID:26955791

  1. N and Cr ion implantation of natural ruby surfaces and their characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, K. Sudheendra; Sahoo, Rakesh K.; Dash, Tapan; Magudapathy, P.; Panigrahi, B. K.; Nayak, B. B.; Mishra, B. K.

    2016-04-01

    Energetic ions of N and Cr were used to implant the surfaces of natural rubies (low aesthetic quality). Surface colours of the specimens were found to change after ion implantation. The samples without and with ion implantation were characterized by diffuse reflectance spectra in ultra violet and visible region (DRS-UV-Vis), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), selected area electron diffraction (SAED) and nano-indentation. While the Cr-ion implantation produced deep red surface colour (pigeon eye red) in polished raw sample (without heat treatment), the N-ion implantation produced a mixed tone of dark blue, greenish blue and violet surface colour in the heat treated sample. In the case of heat treated sample at 3 × 1017 N-ions/cm2 fluence, formation of colour centres (F+, F2, F2+ and F22+) by ion implantation process is attributed to explain the development of the modified surface colours. Certain degree of surface amorphization was observed to be associated with the above N-ion implantation.

  2. Investigation on the Tribology of Co Implanted Stainless Steel Using Metal Vapor Vacuum Arc Ion Source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Junxia GUO; Xun CAI; Qiulong CHEN

    2004-01-01

    AISI 304 stainless steel was ion implanted with Co, and the tribological property on the surface of the stainless steel was investigated. The Co ion implantation was carried out using a metal vapor vacuum arc (Mevva) broad-beam ion source with an extraction voltage of 40 kV, implantation doses of 3×1017/cm2 and 5×1017/cm2, and ion current densities of 13, 22 and 32 μA/cm2. The results showed that the near-surface hardness of Co-implanted stainless steel sample was increased by 50% or more, and it increased with increasing ion current density at first and then declined. The friction coefficient decreased from 0.74 to 0.20 after Co implantation. The wear rate after Co implantation reduced by 25% or more as compared to the unimplanted sample. The wear rate initially decreased with increasing ion current density and then an increase was observed. Within the range of experimental parameters, there exists a critical ion current density for the Co-implanted stainless steel, at which the wear rate decreased with increasing retained dose, going through a minimum and then increased. The critical ion current density in this paper is about 22 μA/cm2.

  3. Spectral Ellipsometry and Electron Backscatter Diffraction Analyses of Silicon Surfaces Implanted with Silver Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazarov, V. V.; Nuzhdin, V. I.; Valeev, V. F.; Vorobev, V. V.; Osin, Yu. N.; Stepanov, A. L.

    2016-03-01

    Amorphous silicon (a-Si) produced on surfaces of single-crystal substrates (c-Si) by low-energy low-dose implantation of silver ions is studied by spectral ellipsometry and electron backscatter diffraction. Implantation was done with an ion energy of 30 keV at a constant ion beam current density of 2 μA/cm2 and doses of 6.24·1012-1.25·1016 ions/cm2 on room temperature substrate targets. Irradiation was carried out with a current density of 0.1-5 μA/cm2 for implantation doses of 6.24·1013 and 1.87·1014 ions/cm2. It was found that spectral ellipsometry is an accurate andreliable method for monitoring low-dose ion implantation processes.

  4. Transferring gfp gene with ion implantation and transient expression of gfp in liliaceous pollen cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN Shibin; CHEN Qizhong; WANG Yugang; ZHAO Weijiang; XU An; YANG Gen; WANG Wenxian; WU Lijun

    2004-01-01

    Liliaceous pollen cells were implanted by 4.0 MeV C2+ ion beam or by 25.0 keV N+ ion beam. Laser confocal scanning microscopy (LCSM) of the implanted intact samples showed that parts of the implanted pollen cells could be stained by propidium iodide (PI). This indicated that energetic ion beam could directly act on cells beneath the pollen coats and made channels for entry of the molecules from outside of the cells. LCSM analysis of green fluorescent protein (GFP) showed that energetic ion beam could mediate transient expression of gfp in treated pollen cells. Compared with 25.0 keV N+ ion beam, implantation of 4.0 MeV C2+ ion beam greatly improved gene transfer efficiency in pollen cells.

  5. Cell adhesion of F{sup +} ion implantation of intraocular lens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, D.J. E-mail: dejunli@hotmail.com; Cui, F.Z.; Gu, H.Q

    1999-04-01

    The cell adhesion of ion implanted polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) intraocular lens was studied using cultured cells in vitro. F{sup +} ion implantation was performed at the energies of 40, 60, 80, 100 keV with the fluences ranging from 5x10{sup 13} to 1x10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2} at room temperature. The cell adhesion tests gave interesting results that the number of the neutral granulocytes and the macrophages adhering on surface were reduced significantly after ion implantation. The optimal fluence was about 4x10{sup 14} ions/cm{sup 2}. The hydrophobicity imparted to the lens surface was also enhanced. The results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis indicated that ion implantation resulted in the cleavage of some pendant groups, the oxidation of the surface, and the formation of some new chemical bonds, which was probably the main reason for the cell adhesion change.

  6. Surface hardness changes induced by O-, Ca- or P-ion implantation into titanium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeyama; Nakao; Morikawa; Yokogawa; Wielunski; Clissold; Bell

    2000-12-30

    Titanium or titanium alloys are very attractive biomedical materials. Biocompatible elements of oxygen, calcium and phosphorus were implanted into titanium and changes of surface hardness were measured using an ultra micro indenter (UMIS-2000). A multiple load-partial unload procedure that can reveal a hardness versus depth profile was adopted. Depth profiles of concentration of implanted ions were obtained by SIMS measurement. For O and P implantation, it is observed that the hardness increases with the increases in the dose. O implantation produced the largest increase in hardness, up to 2.2 times higher than the unimplanted titanium. On the other hand, Ca implantation produced only a small increase in the hardness that was independent of the ion dose. The surface oxide layer of a Ca implanted titanium sample was much thicker than the unimplanted samples or those implanted with O and P ions. The depth of maximum hardness increases with increasing energy of implanted ions. The depths of the maximum hardness occur at indentation depths of one-third to one-eighth of the mean ranges of implanted ions.

  7. Modifying the conductivity of polypyrrole through low-energy lead ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interest lies in the creation of novel nanocomposite materials obtained through mixing, impregnation or incorporation techniques. One such technique is ion implantation which possesses the potential for retaining properties from the base material and implanted material as well as any effects observed from combining the two. To this end low-energy (15 keV) implantation of lead ions of various fluences was performed in conducting polypyrrole films. The presence of lead-rich particles was evidenced through transmission electron microscopy. An interesting trend was observed between fluence and conductivity. Of the fluences tested, the optimum fluences of lead ion implantation in polypyrrole films for enhanced conductivity are 5 × 1014 at. cm−2 and 2 × 1015 at. cm−2. The conductivity and stability appear to result from a combination of effects: polymer degradation arising from ion beam damage, an increase in charge-carriers (dications) present after implantation and precipitation of Pb-rich nanoparticles. Monitoring conductivity over time showed increased retention of conductivity levels after lead implantation. Improvements in stability for polypyrrole open avenues for application and bring polypyrrole one step closer to practical use. A mechanism is suggested for this advantageous retained conductivity. -- Highlights: ► Implanted and characterized polypyrrole films with Pb ions at different fluences. ► Samples indicate high conductivity when implanted with particular fluences. ► Increase in charge carriers and precipitation of conductive Pb-rich phase. ► Conductivity stability is higher for some implanted fluences than for pristine polypyrrole.

  8. Surface engineering of a Zr-based bulk metallic glass with low energy Ar- or Ca-ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present study, low energy ion implantation was employed to engineer the surface of a Zr-based bulk metallic glass (BMG), aiming at improving the biocompatibility and imparting bioactivity to the surface. Ca- or Ar-ions were implanted at 10 or 50 keV at a fluence of 8 × 1015 ions/cm2 to (Zr0.55Al0.10Ni0.05Cu0.30)99Y1 (at.%) BMG. The effects of ion implantation on material properties and subsequent cellular responses were investigated. Both Ar- and Ca-ion implantations were suggested to induce atom displacements on the surfaces according to the Monte-Carlo simulation. The change of atomic environment of Zr in the surface regions as implied by the alteration in X-ray absorption measurements at Zr K-edge. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed that the ion implantation process has modified the surface chemical compositions and indicated the presence of Ca after Ca-ion implantation. The surface nanohardness has been enhanced by implantation of either ion species, with Ca-ion implantation showing more prominent effect. The BMG surfaces were altered to be more hydrophobic after ion implantation, which can be attributed to the reduced amount of hydroxyl groups on the implanted surfaces. Higher numbers of adherent cells were found on Ar- and Ca-ion implanted samples, while more pronounced cell adhesion was observed on Ca-ion implanted substrates. The low energy ion implantation resulted in concurrent modifications in atomic structure, nanohardness, surface chemistry, hydrophobicity, and cell behavior on the surface of the Zr-based BMG, which were proposed to be mutually correlated with each other. - Highlights: • Low energy ion implantation of a Zr-based BMG for bone implant applications • Concurrent modifications in surface structure and properties after irradiation • Promoted adhesion of bone-forming cells after Ar- or Ca-ion implantation

  9. Effect of phosphorus-ion implantation on the corrosion resistance and biocompatibility of titanium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupa, D; Baszkiewicz, J; Kozubowski, J A; Barcz, A; Sobczak, J W; Biliński, A; Lewandowska-Szumieł, M; Rajchel, B

    2002-08-01

    This work presents data on the structure and corrosion resistance of titanium after phosphorus-ion implantation with a dose of 10(17)P/cm2. The ion energy was 25keV. Transmission electron microscopy was used to investigate the microstructure of the implanted layer. The chemical composition of the surface layer was examined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry. The corrosion resistance was examined by electrochemical methods in a simulated body fluid at a temperature of 37 C. Biocompatibility tests in vitro were performed in a culture of human derived bone cells in direct contact with the materials tested. Both, the viability of the cells determined by an XTT assay and activity of the cells evaluated by alkaline phosphatase activity measurements in contact with implanted and non-implanted titanium samples were detected. The morphology of the cells spread on the surface of the materials examined was also observed. The results confirmed the biocompatibility of both phosphorus-ion-implanted and non-implanted titanium under the conditions of the experiment. As shown by transmission electron microscope results, the surface layer formed during phosphorus-ion implantation was amorphous. The results of electrochemical examinations indicate that phosphorus-ion implantation increases the corrosion resistance after short-term as well as long-term exposures.

  10. Optical and magnetic properties of nitrogen ion implanted MgO single crystal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Chun-Ming; Gu Hai-Quan; Xiang Xia; Zhang Yan; Jiang Yong; Chen Meng; Zu Xiao-Tao

    2011-01-01

    The microstructure, optical property and magnetism of nitrogen ion implanted single MgO crystals are studied.A parallel investigation is also performed in an iron ion implanted single MgO sample as a reference. Large structural,optical and magnetic differences are obtained between the nitrogen and iron implanted samples. Room temperature ferromagnetism with a fairly large coercivity field of 300 Oe (1 Oe=79.5775 A/m), a remanence of 38% and a slightly changed optical absorption is obtained in the sample implanted using nitrogen with a dose of 1×1018 ions/cm2. Transition metal contamination and defects induced magnetism can be excluded when compared with those of the iron ion implanted sample, and the nitrogen doping is considered to be the main origin of ferromagnetism.

  11. Antibacterial Property of Martensitic Stainless Steel Generated by Cu Ion Implantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUBo-fan; NIHong-wei; DANZhi-gang; XIONGJuan; XIONGPing-yuan

    2004-01-01

    Copper ions were implanted into a AISI420 martensitic stainless steel (SS) by metal vapor vacuum arc (MEVVA) with a dose range 0.2×1017-5.0×1017cm-2 at the energy of 100keV. The Cu-implanted stainless steel was treated by a special antibacterial treatment subsequently. The phase compositions in the implanted layer were studied by glancing X-ray diffraction (GXRD) and changes of bacterial appearance on the surface of Cu un-implanted SS and Cu-implanted SS with antibacterial treatment SS were observed by bio-TEM (transmission electron microscopy) separately. The results showed that a suitable amount of Cu-rich phase was dispersed in the implanted layer of Cu-implanted SS that was treated by special antibacterial treatment. So the Cu-implanted martensitic stainless steel with antibacterial treatment reveals excellent antibacterial property against both E. coli and S. aureus.

  12. Antibacterial Property of Martensitic Stainless Steel Generated by Cu Ion Implantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Bo-fan; NI Hong-wei; DAN Zhi-gang; XIONG Juan; XIONG Ping-yuan

    2004-01-01

    Copper ions were implanted into a AISI420 martensitic stainless steel (SS) by metal vapor vacuum arc (MEVVA) with a dose range 0.2 ×1017 ~5.0×1017 cm-2 at the energy of 100keV. The Cu-implanted stainless steel was treated by a special antibacterial treatment subsequently. The phase compositions in the implanted layer were studied by glancing X-ray diffraction (GXRD) and changes of bacterial appearance on the surface of Cu un-implanted SS and Cu-implanted SS with antibacterial treatment SS were observed by bio-TEM (transmission electron microscopy) separately. The results showed that a suitable amount of Cu-rich phase was dispersed in the implanted layer of Cu-implanted SS that was treated by special antibacterial treatment. So the Cu-implanted martensitic stainless steel with antibacterial treatment reveals excellent antibacterial property against both E. coli and S. aureus.

  13. MAGNESIUM PRECIPITATION AND DIFUSSION IN Mg+ ION IMPLANTED SILICON CARBIDE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Weilin; Jung, Hee Joon; Kovarik, Libor; Wang, Zhaoying; Roosendaal, Timothy J.; Zhu, Zihua; Edwards, Danny J.; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Henager, Charles H.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Wang, Yongqiang

    2015-03-02

    As a candidate material for fusion reactor applications, silicon carbide (SiC) undergoes transmutation reactions under high-energy neutron irradiation with magnesium as the major metallic transmutant; the others include aluminum, beryllium and phosphorus in addition to helium and hydrogen gaseous species. Calculations by Sawan et al. predict that at a dose of ~100 dpa (displacements per atom), there is ~0.5 at.% Mg generated in SiC. The impact of these transmutants on SiC structural stability is currently unknown. This study uses ion implantation to introduce Mg into SiC. Multiaxial ion-channeling analysis of the as-produced damage state indicates a lower dechanneling yield observed along the <100> axis. The microstructure of the annealed sample was examined using high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy. The results show a high concentration of likely non-faulted tetrahedral voids and possible stacking fault tetrahedra near the damage peak. In addition to lattice distortion, dislocations and intrinsic and extrinsic stacking faults are also observed. Magnesium in 3C–SiC prefers to substitute for Si and it forms precipitates of cubic Mg2Si and tetragonal MgC2. The diffusion coefficient of Mg in 3C–SiC single crystal at 1573 K has been determined to be 3.8 ± 0.4E-19 m2/s.

  14. Improving Passivation Process of Si Nanocrystals Embedded in SiO2 Using Metal Ion Implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jhovani Bornacelli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We studied the photoluminescence (PL of Si nanocrystals (Si-NCs embedded in SiO2 obtained by ion implantation at MeV energy. The Si-NCs are formed at high depth (1-2 μm inside the SiO2 achieving a robust and better protected system. After metal ion implantation (Ag or Au, and a subsequent thermal annealing at 600°C under hydrogen-containing atmosphere, the PL signal exhibits a noticeable increase. The ion metal implantation was done at energies such that its distribution inside the silica does not overlap with the previously implanted Si ion . Under proper annealing Ag or Au nanoparticles (NPs could be nucleated, and the PL signal from Si-NCs could increase due to plasmonic interactions. However, the ion-metal-implantation-induced damage can enhance the amount of hydrogen, or nitrogen, that diffuses into the SiO2 matrix. As a result, the surface defects on Si-NCs can be better passivated, and consequently, the PL of the system is intensified. We have selected different atmospheres (air, H2/N2 and Ar to study the relevance of these annealing gases on the final PL from Si-NCs after metal ion implantation. Studies of PL and time-resolved PL indicate that passivation process of surface defects on Si-NCs is more effective when it is assisted by ion metal implantation.

  15. Mechanical Design of Carbon Ion Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haag, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    Carbon Ion Optics are expected to provide much longer thruster life due to their resistance to sputter erosion. There are a number of different forms of carbon that have been used for fabricating ion thruster optics. The mechanical behavior of carbon is much different than that of most metals, and poses unique design challenges. In order to minimize mission risk, the behavior of carbon must be well understood, and components designed within material limitations. Thermal expansion of the thruster structure must be compatible with thermal expansion of the carbon ion optics. Specially designed interfaces may be needed so that grid gap and aperture alignment are not adversely affected by dissimilar material properties within the thruster. The assembled thruster must be robust and tolerant of launch vibration. The following paper lists some of the characteristics of various carbon materials. Several past ion optics designs are discussed, identifying strengths and weaknesses. Electrostatics and material science are not emphasized so much as the mechanical behavior and integration of grid electrodes into an ion thruster.

  16. Nanocrystalline diamond in carbon implanted SiO{sub 2}.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsoi, K.A.; Prawer, S.; Nugent, K.W.; Walker, R. J.; Weiser, P.S. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1996-12-31

    Recently, it was reported that nanocrystalline diamond can be produced via laser annealing of a high dose C implanted fused quartz (SiO{sub 2}) substrate. The aim of this investigation is to reproduce this result on higher C{sup +} dose samples and the non-implanted silicon sample, as well as optimise the power range and annealing time for the production of these nanocrystals of diamond. In order to provide a wide range of laser powers the samples were annealed using an Ar ion Raman laser. The resulting annealed spots were analysed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Raman analysis. These techniques are employed to determine the type of bonding produced after laser annealing has occurred. 4 refs., 5 figs.

  17. Implantation of energetic D{sup +} ions into carbon dioxide ices and implications for our solar system: formation of D{sub 2}O and D{sub 2}CO{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, Chris J.; Ennis, Courtney P.; Kaiser, Ralf I., E-mail: ralfk@hawaii.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Hawai' i at Mānoa, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)

    2014-10-10

    Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) ices were irradiated with energetic D{sup +} ions to simulate the exposure of oxygen-bearing solar system ices to energetic protons from the solar wind and magnetospheric sources. The formation of species was observed online and in situ by exploiting FTIR spectroscopy. Molecular products include ozone (O{sub 3}), carbon oxides (CO{sub 3}(C {sub 2v}, D {sub 3h}), CO{sub 4}, CO{sub 5}, CO{sub 6}), D2-water (D{sub 2}O), and D2-carbonic acid (D{sub 2}CO{sub 3}). Species released into the gas phase were sampled via a quadrupole mass spectrometer, and possible minor contributions from D2-formaldehyde (D{sub 2}CO), D4-methanol (CD{sub 3}OD), and D2-formic acid (DCOOD) were additionally identified. The feasibility of several reaction networks was investigated by determining their ability to fit the observed temporal column densities of 10 key species that were quantified during the irradiation period. Directly relevant to the CO{sub 2}-bearing ices of comets, icy satellites in the outer solar system, and the ice caps on Mars, this work illustrates for the first time that D2-water is formed as a product of the exposure of CO{sub 2} ices to D{sup +} ions. These findings provide strong support for water formation from oxygen-bearing materials via non-thermal hydrogen atoms, and predict reaction pathways that are likely to be unfolding on the surfaces of asteroids and the Moon.

  18. Effect of dual ion implantation of calcium and phosphorus on the properties of titanium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupa, D; Baszkiewicz, J; Kozubowski, J A; Barcz, A; Sobczak, J W; Biliński, A; Lewandowska-Szumieł, M; Rajchel, B

    2005-06-01

    This study is concerned with the effect of dual implantation of calcium and phosphorus upon the structure, corrosion resistance and biocompatibility of titanium. The ions were implanted in sequence, first Ca and then P, both at a dose of 10(17) ions/cm2 at a beam energy of 25 keV. Transmission electron microscopy was used to investigate the microstructure of the implanted layer. The chemical composition of the implanted layer was examined by XPS and SIMS. The corrosion resistance was determined by electrochemical methods in a simulated body fluid (SBF) at a temperature of 37 degrees C. The biocompatibility tests were performed in vitro in a culture of human-derived bone cells (HDBC) in contact with the tested materials. The viability of the cells was determined by an XTT assay and their activity by the measurements of the alkaline phosphatase activity in contact with implanted and non-implanted titanium samples. The in vitro examinations confirmed that, under the conditions prevailing during the experiments, the biocompatibility of Ca + P ion-implanted titanium was satisfactory. TEM results show that the surface layer formed by the Ca + P implantation is amorphous. The corrosion resistance of titanium, examined by the electrochemical methods, appeared to be increased after the Ca + P ion implantation.

  19. Effects of nitrogen ion implantation on Ca2+ concentration and membrane potential of pollen cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The effects of low energy nitrogen ion implantation on Ca2+ concentration and membrane potential of lily (lilium davidii Duch) pollen cell have been studied. The results showed that the Ca2+ concentration was increased when pollen grain was implanted by nitrogen ion with energy 100keV and dose 1013 ions/cra2. However, the increase of Ca2+ concentration was partly inhibited by the addition of Ca2+channel inhibitor depending on dose. And nitrogen ion implantation caused depolarization of pollen cell membrane potential. In other words, membrane potential was increased,but the effect decreased by adding Ca2+ channel inhibitor.However, it was still significantly higher than the membrane potential of control cells. It was indicated that the depolarization of cell membrane potential opened the calcium channel on the membrane that caused the increasing of intraceilular calcium concentration. This might be an earlier step of the effect of low energy nitrogen ion implantation on pollen germination.

  20. FATIGUE LIFE PREDICTION OF COMMERCIALLY PURE TITANIUM AFTER NITROGEN ION IMPLANTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurdin Ali

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Prediction of fatigue life has become an interesting issue in biomaterial engineering and design for reliability and quality purposes, particularly for biometallic material with modified surfaces. Commercially pure titanium (Cp-Ti implanted with nitrogen ions is a potential metallic biomaterial of the future. The effect of nitrogen ion implantation on fatigue behavior of Cp-Ti was investigated by means of axial loading conditions. The as-received and nitrogen-ion implanted specimens with the energy of 100 keV and dose of 2 × 1017 ions cm-2, were used to determine the fatigue properties and to predict the life cycle of the specimens. The effect of nitrogen ion implantation indicated revealed improved the tensile strength due to the formation of nitride phases, TiN and Ti2N. The fatigue strength of Cp-Ti and Nii-Ti was 250 and 260 MPa, respectively. The analytical results show good agreement with experimental results.

  1. Electrical and structural properties of diamond films implanted by various doses of oxygen ions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hu Xiao-Jun; Ye Jian-Song; Zheng Guo-Qu; Cao Hua-Zhen; Tan Hong-Chuan

    2006-01-01

    Oxygen-doped diamond films are prepared by implanting various dose oxygen ions into the diamond films synthesized by hot filament chemical vapour deposition, and their electrical and structural properties are investigated. Hall effect measurements show that lower dose xygen ion implantation is beneficial to preparing n-type diamonds. The carrier concentration increases with the dose increasing, indicating that oxygen ions supply electrons to the diamonds.The results of AES spectrum indicate that oxygen ions are doped into the diamond films, and the O-implanted depth is around 0.1μm. Raman spectrum measurements indicate that the lower dose oxygen ion implantation at 1014 cm-2or 1015 cm-2 is favourable for producing less damaged O-doped diamond films.

  2. First-principles calculations on implanted TiO2 by 3d transition metal ions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    3d transition metal (V, Cr and Fe) ions are implanted into TiO2 by the method of metal ion implantation. The electronic band structures of TiO2 films doped 3d transition metal ions have been analyzed by ab initio band calculations based on a self-consistent full-potential linearized augmented plane-wave method within the first-principle formalism. Influence of implantation on TiO2 films is examined by the method of UV-visible spectrometry. The results of experiment and calculation show that the optical band gap of TiO2 films is narrowed by ion implantation. The calculation shows that the 3d state of V, Cr and Fe ions plays a significant role in red shift of UV-Vis absorbance spectrum.

  3. Electrochemical study of the corrosion behaviour of copper surfaces modified by nitrogen ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and d.c. polarization resistance measurements (Rp) were used to study the corrosion resistance of surface layers produced by nitrogen ion implantation into copper substrates. Ion implantation was carried out using a Wickham ion beam generator, applying an acceleration voltage of 100 keV, a mean current of 0.40 mA and a nitrogen dosage of 4 x 1017 ions cm-2. Surface analyses were made by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). Electrochemical measurements (EIS and Rp) performed in a 0.6 M sodium chloride solution show nitrogen-implanted specimens have greater a.c. and d.c. apparent polarization resistance than nonimplanted specimens. The results obtained with electrochemical measurements indicate that nitrogen ion implantation in copper forms a protective surface layer which improves the corrosion resistance of the pristine material, a feature of great interest for the design of new contact materials for the electricity and electronic industries. (author)

  4. Lattice location of platinum ions implanted into single crystal zirconia and their annealing behaviour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, D.X. [Royal Melbourne Inst. of Tech., VIC (Australia); Sood, D.K. [Academia Sinica, Shanghai, SH (China). Shanghai Inst. of Nuclear Research; Brown, I.G. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1993-12-31

    Single crystal samples of (100) oriented cubic zirconia stabilised with 9.5 mol % yttria were implanted with platinum ions, using a metal vapour vacuum arc (MEVVA) high current ion implanter, to a nominal dose of 1x10{sup 17} ions/cm{sup 2}. The implanted samples were annealed isothermally in air ambient at 1200 deg C, from 1-24 hours. Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry and Channeling (RBSC) of 2 MeV He ions are employed to determine depth distributions of ion damage, Pt ions and substitutionality of Pt ions before and after annealing. The damage behaviour, Pt migration and lattice location are discussed in terms of metastable phase formation and solid solubility considerations. 7 refs., 3 figs.

  5. Long-range effect of ion implantation of Raex and Hardox steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budzyński, P.; Kamiński, M.; Droździel, A.; Wiertel, M.

    2016-09-01

    Ion implantation involves introduction of ionized atoms of any element (nitrogen) to metals thanks to the high kinetic energy that they acquired in the electric field. The distribution of nitrogen ions implanted at E = 65 keV energy and D = 1.1017 N+ /cm2 fluence in the steel sample and vacancies produced by them was calculated using the SRIM program. This result was confirmed by RBS measurements. The initial maximum range of the implanted nitrogen ions is ∼⃒0.17 μm. This value is relatively small compared to the influence of nitriding on the thickness surface layer of modified steel piston rings. Measurements of the friction coefficient during the pin-on-disc tribological test were performed under dry friction conditions. The friction coefficient of the implanted sample increased to values characteristic of an unimplanted sample after ca. 1500 measurement cycles. The depth of wear trace is ca. 2.4 μm. This implies that the thickness of the layer modified by the implantation process is ∼⃒2.4 μm and exceeds the initial range of the implanted ions by an order of magnitude. This effect, referred to as a long-range implantation effect, is caused by migration of vacancies and nitrogen atoms into the sample. This phenomenon makes ion implantation a legitimate process of modification of the surface layer in order to enhance the tribological properties of critical components of internal combustion engines such as steel piston rings.

  6. Shape memory effect and superelasticity of titanium nickelide alloys implanted with high ion doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The state of the art in ion implantation of superelastic NiTi shape memory alloys is analyzed. Various technological applications of the shape memory effect are outlined. The principles and techiques of ion implantation are described. Specific features of its application for modification of surface layers in surface engineering are considered. Key properties of shape memory alloys and problems in utilization of ion implantation to improve the surface properties of shape memory alloys, such as corrosion resistance, friction coefficient, wear resistance, etc. are discussed. The bibliography includes 162 references

  7. Shallow nitrogen ion implantation: Evolution of chemical state and defect structure in titanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manojkumar, P. A.; Chirayath, V. A.; Balamurugan, A. K.; Krishna, Nanda Gopala; Ilango, S.; Kamruddin, M.; Amarendra, G.; Tyagi, A. K.; Raj, Baldev

    2016-09-01

    Evolution of chemical states and defect structure in titanium during low energy nitrogen ion implantation by Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation (PIII) process is studied. The underlying process of chemical state evolution is investigated using secondary ion mass spectrometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The implantation induced defect structure evolution as a function of dose is elucidated using variable energy positron annihilation Doppler broadening spectroscopy (PAS) and the results were corroborated with chemical state. Formation of 3 layers of defect state was modeled to fit PAS results.

  8. A study of biological effect on plants caused by ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seeds of maize, rice, wheat, rye etc were implanted by nitrogen or phosphorus ions with energy of 35 to 180 keV. The effects on germination percentage, growth speed and plant type were investigated. In the observation of chromosomes, the characters of chromosomes were found normal in mitoses, but abnormal in some meioses. The distributions of implanted ions in seeds were measured by RBS and calculated with TRIM program. The mechanism of biological effects induced by ion implantation and the prospect for application were discussed

  9. Decrease of Staphylococcal adhesion on surgical stainless steel after Si ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braceras, Iñigo, E-mail: inigo.braceras@tecnalia.com [Tecnalia, Mikeletegi Pasealekua 2, 20009 Donostia-San Sebastian (Spain); CIBER de Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (CIBER-BBN) (Spain); Pacha-Olivenza, Miguel A. [CIBER de Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (CIBER-BBN) (Spain); Universidad de Extremadura, Departamento de Física Aplicada, Facultad de Ciencias, Av. Elvas s/n, 06006 Badajoz (Spain); Calzado-Martín, Alicia [Hospital Universitario La Paz-IdiPAZ, Paseo de la Castellana 261, 28046 Madrid (Spain); CIBER de Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (CIBER-BBN) (Spain); Multigner, Marta [Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Metalúrgicas, CENIM-CSIC, Avda Gregorio del Amo 8, 28040 Madrid (Spain); CIBER de Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (CIBER-BBN) (Spain); Vera, Carolina [Tecnalia, Mikeletegi Pasealekua 2, 20009 Donostia-San Sebastian (Spain); CIBER de Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (CIBER-BBN) (Spain); Broncano, Luis Labajos-; Gallardo-Moreno, Amparo M. [Universidad de Extremadura, Departamento de Física Aplicada, Facultad de Ciencias, Av. Elvas s/n, 06006 Badajoz (Spain); CIBER de Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (CIBER-BBN) (Spain); González-Carrasco, José Luis [Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Metalúrgicas, CENIM-CSIC, Avda Gregorio del Amo 8, 28040 Madrid (Spain); CIBER de Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (CIBER-BBN) (Spain); Vilaboa, Nuria [Hospital Universitario La Paz-IdiPAZ, Paseo de la Castellana 261, 28046 Madrid (Spain); CIBER de Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (CIBER-BBN) (Spain); and others

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • Si ion implantation of AISI 316LVM medical grade alloy might reduce bacterial adhesion and colonization. • Si ion implantation does not impair the attachment, viability and matrix maturation of human mesenchymal stem cells. • Nano-topography and surface chemistry changes account for the Si ion implantation induced effects. - Abstract: 316LVM austenitic stainless steel is often the material of choice on temporal musculoskeletal implants and surgical tools as it combines good mechanical properties and acceptable corrosion resistance to the physiologic media, being additionally relatively inexpensive. This study has aimed at improving the resistance to bacterial colonization of this surgical stainless steel, without compromising its biocompatibility and resistance. To achieve this aim, the effect of Si ion implantation on 316LVM has been studied. First, the effect of the ion implantation parameters (50 keV; fluence: 2.5–5 × 10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2}; angle of incidence: 45–90°) has been assessed in terms of depth profiling of chemical composition by XPS and nano-topography evaluation by AFM. The in vitro biocompatibility of the alloy has been evaluated with human mesenchymal stem cells. Finally, bacterial adhesion of Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus on these surfaces has been assessed. Reduction of bacterial adhesion on Si implanted 316LVM is dependent on the implantation conditions as well as the features of the bacterial strains, offering a promising implantable biomaterial in terms of biocompatibility, mechanical properties and resistance to bacterial colonization. The effects of surface composition and nano-topography on bacterial adhesion, directly related to ion implantation conditions, are also discussed.

  10. 21 CFR 878.3500 - Polytetrafluoroethylene with carbon fibers composite implant material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Prosthetic Devices § 878.3500 Polytetrafluoroethylene with carbon fibers composite implant material. (a) Identification. A polytetrafluoroethylene with carbon fibers composite implant material is a porous device... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Polytetrafluoroethylene with carbon...

  11. Influence of implantation of three metallic ions on the mechanical properties of two polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swain, M.V. [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), Lindfield, NSW (Australia). Div. of Applied Physics; Perry, A.J. [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia); Treglio, J.R.

    1996-12-31

    Ion implantation of poly ethylene terephthalate (PET) and polystyrene (PS) with various high energy metallic ions at 70 kV to dose of 3 x 10{sup 16} ions/cm 2 have been made. Measurements of the mechanical properties of the polymers before and after implantation have been made with an ultra microindentation system using both pointed and a small (2 nm) radiused spherical tipped indenter. Significant differences have been observed between the Ti-B dual implanted surfaces and those of the Au and W implanted surfaces. For both the PET and PS the resistance to indenter penetration at very low loads was much greater for the Ti-B dual implanted surfaces. The estimated hardness and modulus versus depth of penetration for both indenters shows that the spherical indenter produces more consistent and less controversial values that are somewhat lower than the optimistic estimates from pointed indenters. 8 refs., 2 fig.

  12. Highly wear-resistant and biocompatible carbon nanocomposite coatings for dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penkov, Oleksiy V; Pukha, Vladimir E; Starikova, Svetlana L; Khadem, Mahdi; Starikov, Vadym V; Maleev, Maxim V; Kim, Dae-Eun

    2016-09-01

    Diamond-like carbon coatings are increasingly used as wear-protective coatings for dental implants, artificial joints, etc. Despite their advantages, they may have several weak points such as high internal stress, poor adhesive properties or high sensitivity to ambient conditions. These weak points could be overcome in the case of a new carbon nanocomposite coating (CNC) deposited by using a C60 ion beam on a Co/Cr alloy. The structure of the coatings was investigated by Raman and XPS spectroscopy. The wear resistance was assessed by using a reciprocating tribotester under the loads up to 0.4 N in both dry and wet sliding conditions. Biocompatibility of the dental implants was tested in vivo on rabbits. Biocompatibility, bioactivity and mechanical durability of the CNC deposited on a Co/Cr alloy were investigated and compared with those of bulk Co/Cr and Ti alloys. The wear resistance of the CNC was found to be 250-650 fold higher compared to the Co/Cr and Ti alloys. Also, the CNC demonstrated much better biological properties with respect to formation of new tissues and absence of negative morphological parameters such as necrosis and demineralization. Development of the CNC is expected to aid in significant improvement of lifetime and quality of implants for dental applications. PMID:27336185

  13. The influence of high-energy ion implantation on Al alloys fine structure and microhardness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The microhardness and fine structure of Al alloys (D16 and Al Mn), implanted with 245 MeV krypton ions to doses of 1013 and 1014 cm-2 have been investigated. The implantation results in the un hardening of dispersion hardening D16 alloy and the hardening of thermally unharden able Al Mn alloy. The change in fine structure parameters of Al matrix of implanted alloys is in good agreement with the change in their microhardness

  14. A combined experimental and theoretical analysis of Fe-implanted TiO2 modified by metal plasma ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Photocatalyst titanium dioxide (TiO2) thin films were prepared using sol-gel process. To improve the photosensitivity of TiO2 at visible light, transition metal of Fe was implanted into TiO2 matrix at 20 keV using the metal plasma ion implantation process. The primary phase of the Fe-implanted TiO2 films is anatase, but X-ray diffraction revealed a slight shift of diffraction peaks toward higher angles due to the substitutional doping of iron. The additional band gap energy levels were created due to the formation of the impurity levels (Fe-O) verified by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, which resulted in a shift of the absorption edge toward a longer wavelength in the absorption spectra. The optical band gap energy of TiO2 films was reduced from 3.22 to 2.87 eV with an increase of Fe ion dosages from 0 to 1 x 1016 ions/cm2. The band gap was determined by the Tauc plots. The photocatalysis efficiency of Fe-implanted TiO2 was assessed using the degradation of methylene blue under ultraviolet and visible light irradiation. The calculated density of states for substitutional Fe-implanted TiO2 was investigated using the first-principle calculations based on the density functional theory. A combined experimental and theoretical Fe-implanted TiO2 film was formed, consistent with the experimentally observed photocatalysis efficiency of Fe-implanted TiO2 in the visible region.

  15. Fractal Pattern Growth in Ti-Implanted Steel with High Ion Flux

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张通和; 吴瑜光; 刘安东

    2002-01-01

    We report on the formation of metal nanometre phase and fractal patterns in steel using metal vapour vacuum arc source ion implantation with high ion flux. The dense nanometre phases are cylindrical and well dispersed in the Ti-implanted layer with an ion flux up to 50μA/cm2. The collision fractal pattern is formed in Ti-implanted steel with an ion flux of 25μA/cm2 and the disconnected fractal pattern is observed with an ion flux of 50μA/cm2.The average density ofnanometre phases decreases from 1.2 × 1011/cm2 to 6.5 × 1010/cm2 as the ion flux increases from 25 μA/cm2 to 50 μA/cm2. Fractal pattern growth is in remarkable agreement with Sander's diffusion-limited aggregation model. The alloy clusters have diffused and aggregated in chains forming branches to grow a beautiful tree during Ti implantation with an ion flux ranging from 75μA/cm2 to 85μA/cm2. We discuss the model of fractal pattern growth during ion implantation with high ion flux.

  16. Mechanisms of Focused Ion Beam Implantation Damage and Recovery in Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, G. P. S.; Hull, R.

    2016-06-01

    The ion current density in focused ion beam (FIB) systems, 0.1-10 A cm-2, is at least three orders of magnitude greater than that in commercial broad ion beam implanters. This large difference in ion current density is expected to strongly affect the damage recovery dynamics. In this work, we study the ion implantation damage and recovery of Si(100) substrates implanted with 1 × 1012-5 × 1015 Si cm-2 fluences of 60-keV Si2+ at normal incidence in a mass-selecting FIB. Additionally, damage and recovery in different broad ion beam implants of 60-keV Si+ were studied for a comparison. For recovering implantation damage, specimens were annealed for different times at 730-900°C in an ultra-high purity nitrogen ambient, and for characterizing damage and recovery, Raman spectroscopy at wavelengths 405 nm and 514 nm was carried out. Raman measurements comprised of measurements of crystalline Si (c-Si) peak height of the peak at 520 cm-1, and the peak shift relative to that of un-implanted reference Si. Our measurements of structural damage—calculated from the attenuation in the c-Si peak heights for the implants relative to that of unimplanted Si(100)—indicates that the FIB implantations lead to a greater as-implanted damage but also typically lead to a better recovery than that for the commercial broad-area implants. The underlying mechanisms for these observations are discussed.

  17. Plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition of DLC coating for modification of orthodontic magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was aimed to use the plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (PIII-D) technique to form diamond-like carbon (DLC) thin films on orthodontic magnets to solve the corrosion problem. To search for the optimal material modification effect, PIII-D conditions including gases, processing time, and pulsing mode were varied. The formation of DLC films was confirmed and characterized with Raman spectra. The intensity of the remnant magnetic field of the magnets and the hardness, adhesion and thickness of the thin films were then measured. A corrosion test was carried out using clinic dental fluid. Improved benefits including a satisfying hardness, adhesion, remnant magnetic strength and corrosion resistance of the DLC coating could be achieved by using a higher interrupting time ratio and shorter processing time.

  18. Plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition of DLC coating for modification of orthodontic magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wongsarat, W. [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Sarapirom, S. [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); National Metal and Materials Technology Center, 114 Thailand Science Park, Paholyothin Road, Klong 1, Klong Luang, Pathumthani, Bangkok 12120 (Thailand); Aukkaravittayapun, S. [National Metal and Materials Technology Center, 114 Thailand Science Park, Paholyothin Road, Klong 1, Klong Luang, Pathumthani, Bangkok 12120 (Thailand); Jotikasthira, D. [Department of Odontology-Oral Pathology, Faculty of Dentistry, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Boonyawan, D. [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Yu, L.D., E-mail: yuld@fnrf.science.cmu.ac.th [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand)

    2012-02-01

    This study was aimed to use the plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (PIII-D) technique to form diamond-like carbon (DLC) thin films on orthodontic magnets to solve the corrosion problem. To search for the optimal material modification effect, PIII-D conditions including gases, processing time, and pulsing mode were varied. The formation of DLC films was confirmed and characterized with Raman spectra. The intensity of the remnant magnetic field of the magnets and the hardness, adhesion and thickness of the thin films were then measured. A corrosion test was carried out using clinic dental fluid. Improved benefits including a satisfying hardness, adhesion, remnant magnetic strength and corrosion resistance of the DLC coating could be achieved by using a higher interrupting time ratio and shorter processing time.

  19. Effect of calcium and phosphorus ion implantation on the corrosion resistance and biocompatibility of titanium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupa, D; Baszkiewicz, J; Kozubowski, J A; Lewandowska-Szumieł, M; Barcz, A; Sobczak, J W; Biliński, A; Rajchel, A

    2004-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the corrosion resistance and biocompatibility of titanium after surface modification by the ion implantation of calcium or phosphorus or calcium + phosphorus. Calcium and phosphorus ions were implanted in a dose of 10(17) ions/cm(2). The ion beam energy was 25 keV. The microstructure of the implanted layers was examined by TEM. The chemical composition of the surface layers was determined by XPS and SIMS. The corrosion resistance was examined by electrochemical methods in a simulated body fluid (SBF) at a temperature of 37 degrees C. The biocompatibility was evaluated in vitro. As shown by TEM results, the surface layers formed during calcium, phosphorus and calcium + phosphorus implantation were amorphous. The results of the electrochemical examinations (Stern's method) indicate that the calcium, phosphorus and calcium + phosphorus implantation into the surface of titanium increases its corrosion resistance in stationary conditions after short- and long-term exposures in SBF. Potentiodynamic tests show that the calcium-implanted samples undergo pitting corrosion during anodic polarisation. The breakdown potentials measured are high (2.5 to 3 V). The good biocompatibility of all the investigated materials was confirmed under the specific conditions of the applied examination, although, in the case of calcium implanted titanium it was not as good as that of non-implanted titanium.

  20. SELECTIVE NEURITE OUTGROWTH ON SILVER NEGATIVE ION (Ag-)-IMPLANTED POLYSTYRENE SURFACES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hiroko Sato; Hiroshi Tsuji; Hitoshi Sasaki; Shinichi Ikemura; Yasuhito Gotoh; Junzo Ishikawa; Sei-ichi Nishimoto

    2004-01-01

    The negative ion implantation technique was applied to modify polymer surfaces of culture dishes for neuronal cells, PC12h. The silver negative ion (Ag-)-implantation was carried out at an ion energy of 20 keV and a dose of 3 ×1015 ions/cm2 with non-treated polystyrene (NTPS), tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS), and collagen-coated TCPS-Iwaki (CCPS). Ag--implanted surfaces of Ag/NTPS, Ag/TCPS, and Ag/CCPS were studied with respect to contact angle and/or chemical composition. The numerical values of contact angles on Ag/NTPS and Ag/TCPS were similar within experimental error, indicating the resemblance in their hydrophobicity and hydrophilicity. The PC12h cells, however, were attached only to the Ag--implanted region of NTPS, but not to the non-implanted NTPS region. Moreover, the neurite outgrowth was also observed to extend specifically along the Ag--implanted region of NTPS but not on the non-implanted NTPS region,although neurites extended towards all directions on collagen-coated TCPS as a control surface. There was no remarkable difference in neurite outgrowth among Ag--implanted regions of TCPS and CCPS. Thus Ag/NTPS region was affirmed to promote highly selective attachment, growth, and differentiation of PC 12h cells, although its mechanism is still unknown.

  1. Evidence of phase transitions in monoclinic zirconium implanted by low energy Bi and O ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The following topics were dealt with: PWR fuel element cladding materials, monoclinic-cubic phase transformation evidence following Bi and O ion implantation in zirconium, phase studies using XRD and Raman spectroscopy, damage profile

  2. Surface properties of nitrogen-ion-implanted TiNi shape memory alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    X-ray diffraction (XRD), auger electron spectroscopy (AES), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to characterize the surface properties of the N+-ion-implanted TiNi alloy.There is a high nitrogen content region at the outermost surface of the N+-ion-implanted TiNi alloy.The detected nitrogen exists mainly in the form of TiN.Small amounts of Ti3O5 and TiO2 also exist on the surface of the N+-ion-implanted TiNi sample.The modified layer of the N+-ion-implanted sample can work as an obstacle layer of the nickel's dissolution, which obstructs Ni dissolving from the TiNi surface effectively.

  3. CHARACTERIZATION OF PRECIPITATES IN CUBIC SILICON CARBIDE IMPLANTED WITH 25Mg+ IONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Weilin; Spurgeon, Steven R.; Liu, Jia; Edwards, Danny J.; Schreiber, Daniel K.; Henager, Charles H.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Wang, Yongqiang

    2016-09-26

    The aim of this study is to characterize precipitates in Mg+ ion implanted and high-temperature annealed cubic silicon carbide using scanning transmission electron microscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy and atom probe tomography.

  4. Lateral spread of implanted ion distributions in 6H-SiC: simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morvan, E.; Flores, D.; Vellvehi, M.; Rebollo, J. [Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Madrid (Spain). Centro Nacional de Microelectronica; Mestres, N. [Inst. de Ciencia de Materials (CSIC), Bellaterra (Spain); Pascual, J. [Dept. de Fisica, Univ. Autonoma de Barcelona (Spain)

    1999-07-30

    In this paper, Monte Carlo simulation, using improved models for electronic stopping and 3D damage accumulation has been carried out to calculate the lateral distribution of ions implanted into 6H-SiC crystal. Two dimensional concentration contour plots are used to show the lateral spread of implanted Al{sup +} ions at mask edges. It appears that channeling strongly influences the shape of lateral distributions due to the capture of random implanted ions by axial channels lying parallel to the (0001) surface of 6H-SiC which appears alternatively every 30 around the left angle 0001 right angle axis, according to the symmetry of the 6H-SiC crystal. This phenomenon, if confirmed by SIMS 2D profiling, could have important consequences on the behavior of ion implanted lateral junctions of SiC devices. (orig.)

  5. Graphitic carbon in a nanostructured titanium oxycarbide thin film to improve implant osseointegration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanoni, R., E-mail: robertino.zanoni@uniroma1.it [Dipartimento di Chimica, Università di Roma ‘La Sapienza’ p.le Aldo Moro 5, 00185 Rome (Italy); Ioannidu, C.A.; Mazzola, L.; Politi, L. [Dipartimento di Scienze Biochimiche, Università di Roma ‘La Sapienza’, p.le Aldo Moro 5, 00185 Rome (Italy); Misiano, C. [Romana Film Sottili, Anzio, Rome (Italy); Longo, G. [Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Viale Regina Elena 299, 00161 Rome (Italy); Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, SB IPSB LPMV, BSP 409 (Cubotron UNIL), R.te de la Sorge, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Falconieri, M. [ENEA, Unità Tecnica Applicazioni delle Radiazioni, via Anguillarese 301, 00123 Rome (Italy); Scandurra, R. [Dipartimento di Scienze Biochimiche, Università di Roma ‘La Sapienza’, p.le Aldo Moro 5, 00185 Rome (Italy)

    2015-01-01

    A nanostructured coating layer on titanium implants, able to improve their integration into bones and to protect against the harsh conditions of body fluids, was obtained by Ion Plating Plasma Assisted, a method suitable for industrial applications. A titanium carbide target was attached under vacuum to a magnetron sputtering source powered with a direct current in the 500–1100 W range, and a 100 W radio frequency was applied to the sample holder. The samples produced at 900 W gave the best biological response in terms of overexpression of some genes of proteins involved in bone turnover. We report the characterization of a reference and of an implant sample, both obtained at 900 W. Different micro/nanoscopic techniques evidenced the morphology of the substrates, and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy was used to disclose the surface composition. The layer is a 500 nm thick hard nanostructure, composed of 60% graphitic carbon clustered with 15% TiC and 25% Ti oxides. - Highlights: • Nanostructured TiC protective layers were produced on Ti samples for prostheses. • Ion Plating Plasma-Assisted Deposition from TiC targets was used on Ti samples. • A model of the surface layer has been drawn from XPS, Raman, AFM, FIB/SEM, TEM. • The layer is mainly composed of graphitic carbon in addition to TiC and Ti oxides.

  6. Dopants Ion Current Effect On The Semiconductor Electrical Properties Of Implanted

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurement of the electrical properties of Silicon semiconductor Boron atom implanted has been done. The Boron ion was implanted in a Silicon wafer at the constant voltage of 60 kV. By using an ion implant or of 90 keV at the room temperature. The ion current varied between 20 to 60 μA for constant duration of implantation and for duration of implantation varied from 5 to 45 minutes at constant ion current. Sample of the results of implantation were annealed at temperature of 650oC for 30 minutes in heater tube streamed with Nitrogen gas. Then the resistivity of the sample was measured using a Four Point Probe, the capacitance was measured using an LCR-meter and breakdown voltage was determined by the characteristic of I-V. from the measurement, the optimum electrical properties is obtained at current of dopants ion of 40 μA and for duration of implantation of 5 minutes or dopants 5,952 x 1015 cm-2 (ρs = 322Ω/sq, ρ = 0,816 Ω cm, C/A = 227,6559 pF.cm-2, VB = 26,6 volt)

  7. Pulsed ion sheath dynamics in a cylindrical bore for inner surface grid-enhanced plasma source ion implantation

    CERN Document Server

    Wang Jiu Li; Fan Song Hua; Yang Wu Bao; Yang Size

    2002-01-01

    Based on authors' recently proposed grid-enhanced plasma source ion implantation (GEPSII) technique for inner surface modification of materials with cylindrical geometry, the authors present the corresponding theoretical studies of the temporal evolution of the plasma ion sheath between the grid electrode and the target in a cylindrical bore. Typical results such as the ion sheath evolution, time-dependent ion density and time-integrated ion energy distribution at the target are calculated by solving Poisson's equation coupled with fluid equations for collisionless ions and Boltzmann assumption for electrons using finite difference methods. The calculated results can further verify the feasibility and superiority of this new technique

  8. Deformation characteristics of the near-surface layers of zirconia ceramics implanted with aluminum ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghyngazov, S. A.; Vasiliev, I. P.; Frangulyan, T. S.; Chernyavski, A. V.

    2015-10-01

    The effect of ion treatment on the phase composition and mechanical properties of the near-surface layers of zirconium ceramic composition 97 ZrO2-3Y2O3 (mol%) was studied. Irradiation of the samples was carried out by accelerated ions of aluminum with using vacuum-arc source Mevva 5-Ru. Ion beam had the following parameters: the energy of the accelerated ions E = 78 keV, the pulse current density Ji = 4mA / cm2, current pulse duration equal τ = 250 mcs, pulse repetition frequency f = 5 Hz. Exposure doses (fluence) were 1016 и 1017 ion/cm2. The depth distribution implanted ions was studied by SIMS method. It is shown that the maximum projected range of the implanted ions is equal to 250 nm. Near-surface layers were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) at fixed glancing incidence angle. It is shown that implantation of aluminum ions into the ceramics does not lead to a change in the phase composition of the near-surface layer. The influence of implanted ions on mechanical properties of ceramic near-surface layers was studied by the method of dynamic nanoindentation using small loads on the indenter P=300 mN. It is shown that in ion- implanted ceramic layer the processes of material recovery in the deformed region in the unloading mode proceeds with higher efficiency as compared with the initial material state. The deformation characteristics of samples before and after ion treatment have been determined from interpretation of the resulting P-h curves within the loading and unloading sections by the technique proposed by Oliver and Pharr. It was found that implantation of aluminum ions in the near-surface layer of zirconia ceramics increases nanohardness and reduces the Young's modulus.

  9. Bioeffects of Low Energy Ion Beam Implantation: DNA Damage, Mutation and Gene Transter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Mingli; YU Zengliang

    2007-01-01

    Low-energy ion beam implantation(10~200 keV)has been proved to have a wide range of biological effects and is broadly used in the breeding of crops and micro-organisms.To understand its mechanisms better and facilitate its applications,the developments in the bioeffects of low energy ion beam implantation in the past twenty years are summarized in this paper.

  10. Direction-dependent RBS channelling studies in ion implanted LiNbO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendler, E.; Becker, G.; Rensberg, J.; Schmidt, E.; Wolf, S.; Wesch, W.

    2016-07-01

    Damage formation in ion implanted LiNbO3 was studied by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) along various directions of the LiNbO3 crystal. From the results obtained it can be unambiguously concluded that Nb atoms being displaced during ion implantation preferably occupy the free octahedron sites of the LiNbO3 lattice structure and most likely also form NbLi antisite defects.

  11. Channel waveguides formed by ion implantation of 20 mol% Ge-doped silica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The implantation of 20% Ge-doped silica with MeV Si or Ge ions has been used to produce singlemode channel waveguides. The germanosilicate film was grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition. For implantation with either Si or Ge ions, the attenuation loss was measured as 0.15-0.25dB/cm at 1300nm and 1.5-1.8dB/cm at 1550nm. (UK)

  12. Effects of implantation temperature and thermal annealing on the Ga{sup +} ion beam induced optical contrast formation in a-SiC:H

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsvetkova, T., E-mail: tania_tsvetkova@yahoo.co.uk [Institute of Solid State Physics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 72 Tzarigradsko Chaussee, 1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); University of Exeter, College of Engineering, Mathematics and Physical Sciences, Harrison Building, North Park Rd, Exeter EX4 4QF (United Kingdom); Wright, C.D. [University of Exeter, College of Engineering, Mathematics and Physical Sciences, Harrison Building, North Park Rd, Exeter EX4 4QF (United Kingdom); Kitova, S. [Institute of Optical Materials and Technologies, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 109 Acad. G. Bontchev St., 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria); Bischoff, L. [Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, P.O. Box 51 01 19, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Zuk, J. [Institute of Physics, Maria Curie-Sklodovska University, Pl. M.Curie-Sklodovskiej 1, 20-031 Lublin (Poland)

    2013-07-15

    The effects of implantation temperature and post-implantation thermal annealing on the Ga{sup +} ion beam induced optical contrast formation in hydrogenated silicon–carbon alloy films have been studied. As a result of the implantation a well-expressed “darkening” effect (i.e. absorption edge shift to the longer-wavelength/lower-photon-energy region) has been registered. It is accompanied by a remarkable increase of the absorption coefficient up to 2 orders of magnitude in the measured photon energy range (1.5–3.1 eV). The optical contrast thus obtained (between implanted and unimplanted regions of the film material) has been made use of in the form of optical pattern formation by computer-operated Ga{sup +}-focused ion beam. Possible applications of this effect in the area of submicron lithography and high-density optical data storage have been suggested with regard to the most widely spread focused micro-beam systems based on Ga{sup +} liquid metal ion sources. The fact that Ga has a very low melting point (T{sub m} = 29.8 °C) and an unusual feature of volume contraction on melting are factors which favour Ga incorporation upon ion-implantation as dispersed clusters, or small nanoparticles. It has been previously noted that Ga precipitation into nanoparticles can vary dramatically (in terms of particle size) with Ga concentration and small changes in surface implant temperature, thus affecting the optical properties of the target. The precise role of implantation temperature effects, i.e. the target temperature during Ga{sup +} ion irradiation, on the optical contrast obtainable, has been therefore a key part of this study. Appropriate post-implantation annealing treatments were also studied, since these are expected to offer further benefits in reducing the required ion dose and enhancing contrast, thus increasing the cost-effectiveness of the bit-writing method.

  13. Tunnel oxide passivated contacts formed by ion implantation for applications in silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichel, Christian; Feldmann, Frank; Müller, Ralph; Reedy, Robert C.; Lee, Benjamin G.; Young, David L.; Stradins, Paul; Hermle, Martin; Glunz, Stefan W.

    2015-11-01

    Passivated contacts (poly-Si/SiOx/c-Si) doped by shallow ion implantation are an appealing technology for high efficiency silicon solar cells, especially for interdigitated back contact (IBC) solar cells where a masked ion implantation facilitates their fabrication. This paper presents a study on tunnel oxide passivated contacts formed by low-energy ion implantation into amorphous silicon (a-Si) layers and examines the influence of the ion species (P, B, or BF2), the ion implantation dose (5 × 1014 cm-2 to 1 × 1016 cm-2), and the subsequent high-temperature anneal (800 °C or 900 °C) on the passivation quality and junction characteristics using double-sided contacted silicon solar cells. Excellent passivation quality is achieved for n-type passivated contacts by P implantations into either intrinsic (undoped) or in-situ B-doped a-Si layers with implied open-circuit voltages (iVoc) of 725 and 720 mV, respectively. For p-type passivated contacts, BF2 implantations into intrinsic a-Si yield well passivated contacts and allow for iVoc of 690 mV, whereas implanted B gives poor passivation with iVoc of only 640 mV. While solar cells featuring in-situ B-doped selective hole contacts and selective electron contacts with P implanted into intrinsic a-Si layers achieved Voc of 690 mV and fill factor (FF) of 79.1%, selective hole contacts realized by BF2 implantation into intrinsic a-Si suffer from drastically reduced FF which is caused by a non-Ohmic Schottky contact. Finally, implanting P into in-situ B-doped a-Si layers for the purpose of overcompensation (counterdoping) allowed for solar cells with Voc of 680 mV and FF of 80.4%, providing a simplified and promising fabrication process for IBC solar cells featuring passivated contacts.

  14. Balancing incident heat and ion flow for process optimization in plasma based ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plasma based ion implantation at elevated temperatures is a technology often used to obtain thick surface layers of several μm by thermally activated diffusion, e.g. nitrogen in steel, titanium or aluminium. By lowering the pulse voltage at constant temperature, the current density can be increased at a constant heat flow. However, an upper limit is given by the ratio of the diffusion rate transporting the implanted ions from the surface towards the bulk and the sputter yield. This sputtering of the surface dominates for very high current densities and limits the maximum achievable layer thickness. Different maximum current densities were found for the four investigated systems - nitrogen in different steel grades, aluminium and titanium, as well as oxygen in titanium - reflecting the varying diffusivities. Additional requirements, besides the maximum current density, as a conformal treatment for complex objects containing small holes or trenches, as well as short heating times, can be solved most effectively by pulsed voltages in the range of 2-5 kV and an additional heating of the sample. The problem of a sample cooling time of several hours after the treatment is recognized. A partial solution would be to increase the gas pressure during the cooling phase for a more effective heat dissipation. (author)

  15. Shadow Effect and Its Revisal in Grid-Enhanced Plasma Source with Ion Implantation Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Gu-Ling; WANG Jiu-Li; LIU Yuan-Fu; LI Xue-Ming; WU Xing-Fang; FAN Song-Hua; LIU Chi-Zi; YANG Si-Ze

    2004-01-01

    @@ The implanting voltage, gas pressure and the grid electrode radius are the key parameters influencing the surface grid shadow effect that has been observed in our grid-enhanced plasma source ion implantation experiment. To reduce the shadow effect and obtain a corresponding better implantation uniformity of sample surfaces, we need to use lower implanting voltage, higher gas pressure and smaller grid radius. Furthermore, we apply an axial magnetic field to increase the plasma density inside the tube and to mix the plasma outside the grid, so that the shadow effect of sample surfaces can be weakened.

  16. Preparation and characterization of room-temperature ferromagnetism GaMnN based on ion implantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Jiqing(王基庆); CHEN; Pingping; (陈平平); LI; Zhifeng; (李志锋); GUO; Xuguang; (郭旭光); H.; Makino; T.; Yao; CHEN; Hong; (陈弘); HUANG; Qi; (黄绮); ZHOU; Junming; (周均铭); LU; Wei; (陆卫)

    2003-01-01

    This paper reports the fabrication of GaMnN ferromagnetic semiconductor on GaN substrate by high-dose Mn ion implantation. Both the structural and optical properties for Mn+-implanted GaN material were studied by X-ray diffraction, Raman scattering and photoluminescence. The results reveal that the implanted manganese incorporates on Ga site and GaMnN ternary phase is formed in the substrate. The magnetic behavior has been characterized by superconducting quantum interference device. The material shows room-temperature ferromagnetism. The temperature-dependent magnetization indicates different mechanism for ferromagnetism in Mn+-implanted GaN.

  17. Influences of Low Energy Ion Implantation on Properties of Polyaniline/Si Heterojunction Solar Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Chang-jiang; ZHENG Jian-bang; LI En-pu

    2005-01-01

    Ion implantation may favorably modify the properties ofpolyaniline/Si heterojunction solar cells fabricated by the electrochemical method. Influences of the implantation on the absorption spectrum and the thermal stability were discussed and output properties were measured. The results show that the absorption spectrum of the polyaniline films modified by ion implantation is much wider; its pyrolytic temperature increases by 40℃, and the polyaniline/Si cell efficiency increases 18 and 3 times under the illumination of 10.92 and 37.2 W/m2, respectively.

  18. Production yield of rare-earth ions implanted into an optical crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kornher, Thomas, E-mail: t.kornher@physik.uni-stuttgart.de; Xia, Kangwei; Kolesov, Roman; Reuter, Rolf; Villa, Bruno; Wrachtrup, Jörg [3. Physikalisches Institut, Universität Stuttgart, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Kukharchyk, Nadezhda; Wieck, Andreas D. [Angewandte Festkörperphysik, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, 44780 Bochum (Germany); Siyushev, Petr [Universität Ulm, Institut für Quantenoptik, 89081 Ulm (Germany); Stöhr, Rainer [3. Physikalisches Institut, Universität Stuttgart, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Institute for Quantum Computing, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada); Schreck, Matthias [Experimentalphysik IV, Universität Augsburg, 86159 Augsburg (Germany); Becker, Hans-Werner [RUBION, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, 44780 Bochum (Germany)

    2016-02-01

    Rare-earth (RE) ions doped into desired locations of optical crystals might enable a range of novel integrated photonic devices for quantum applications. With this aim, we have investigated the production yield of cerium and praseodymium by means of ion implantation. As a measure, the collected fluorescence intensity from both implanted samples and single centers was used. With a tailored annealing procedure for cerium, a yield up to 53% was estimated. Praseodymium yield amounts up to 91%. Such high implantation yield indicates a feasibility of creation of nanopatterned rare-earth doping and suggests strong potential of RE species for on-chip photonic devices.

  19. Measurement of lattice damage caused by ion-implantation doping of semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunsperger, R. G.; Wolf, E. D.; Shifrin, G. A.; Marsh, O. J.; Jamba, D. M.

    1971-01-01

    Discussion of two new techniques used to measure the lattice damage produced in GaAs by the implantation of 60 keV cadmium ions. In the first method, optical reflection spectra of the ion-implanted samples were measured in the wavelength range from 2000 to 4600 A. The decrease in reflectivity resulting from ion-implantation was used to determine the relative amount of lattice damage as a function of ion dose. The second technique employed the scanning electron microscope. Patterns very similar in appearance to Kikuchi electron diffraction patterns are obtained when the secondary and/or backscattered electron intensity is displayed as a function of the angle of incidence of the electron beam on a single crystal surface. The results of measurements made by both methods are compared with each other and with data obtained by the method of measuring lattice damage by Rutherford scattering of 1 MeV helium ions.

  20. Radiation damage of UO2 implanted with 100 MeV iodine ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In connection with the ''rim effect'', a microstructural change, of the light water reactor fuels irradiated up to high burn-ups, the radiation damage of UO2 implanted with 100 MeV iodine ions was studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction analysis. SEM observation revealed that as-fabricated pores had diminished with a melting-like morphology change at the ion-implanted surface, which can be ascribed to the large energy deposition by incident ions at the surface. The lattice parameter change for the implanted specimens increased to a maximum value of about 0.35% with increasing ion dose up to 1020 ions m-2. Broadening of the X-ray diffraction peaks was also observed at increased doses, which could be attributed to the lattice distortion and/or decrease in the crystallite size. ((orig.))

  1. Radiation damage of UO[sub 2] implanted with 100 MeV iodine ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, Kimio (Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki-ken 319-11 (Japan)); Kikuchi, Hironobu (Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki-ken 319-11 (Japan)); Fukuda, Kousaku (Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki-ken 319-11 (Japan))

    1994-10-01

    In connection with the rim effect'', a microstructural change, of the light water reactor fuels irradiated up to high burn-ups, the radiation damage of UO[sub 2] implanted with 100 MeV iodine ions was studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction analysis. SEM observation revealed that as-fabricated pores had diminished with a melting-like morphology change at the ion-implanted surface, which can be ascribed to the large energy deposition by incident ions at the surface. The lattice parameter change for the implanted specimens increased to a maximum value of about 0.35% with increasing ion dose up to 10[sup 20] ions m[sup -2]. Broadening of the X-ray diffraction peaks was also observed at increased doses, which could be attributed to the lattice distortion and/or decrease in the crystallite size. ((orig.))

  2. 2D-ACAR Studies on Swift Heavy Ion Si-Implanted GaAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivaji, K.; Selvakumar, S.

    Material properties modification by high energy heavy ion implantation is a prospective technology leading to many device fabrications. This technique induces defects and hence the physical properties of the materials are modified. The effects of swift heavy ion implantation induced defects by 120 MeV 28+Si ion implantation and doping in SI-GaAs are presented from the electron momentum distribution (EMD) of vacancy-type defects studied by two-dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation (2D-ACAR). The positron trapping due to the influence of high-energy Si- implantation in GaAs (n-type) is compared with the corresponding spectra of SI- GaAs and with Si-doped (n-type) GaAs. The EMD of the implanted sample shows a distinct increased isotropic distribution with a characteristic transform of its structure as evident from the low momentum region compared to the pristine sample. The characteristics of defects created by Si doping and by 120 MeV 28+Si ion implantation of undoped semi-insulating (SI) GaAS are discussed. These results indicate the nature of positron trapping in open volume defects such as vacancy clusters created by implantation.

  3. Plasma modification of medical implants by carbon coatings depositions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Grabarczyk

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The main goal was to work out the technology of deposition of carbon layers onto surface of medical implants made of the AISI316L medical steel. So far the results of carried investigations have proved that layers synthesized in RF PACVD process noticeably improve the biotolerance of the medical steel. Positive experimental results concerning the implementation of carbon layers conducted in the Institute of Materials Science and Engineering of the Technical University of Lodz were the basis for attempt of industrial application of the worked out technology.Design/methodology/approach: Carbon layers were manufactured using radio frequency plasma RF PACVD method. The technology was worked out for the surfaces of the intramedullary nails. The investigations were carried out in order to compare obtained synthesis results with the layers deposited under the laboratory conditions. In this work the following are presented: the surface topography investigation, results of nanohardness and adhesion measurements as well as the raman spectra. Medical examination results were presented in our earlier publications. In the description of obtained investigation results are also presented the preliminary results of the medical treatment effects with the use of intramedullary nails covered with the carbon layer.Findings: Carbon layers manufactured onto intramedullary nails presented good mechanical properties. Applied synthesis parameters made it possible to manufacture uniform film onto whole implant surface. Thickness of the layer was varied in the range of 200 – 400 nm, however total modification area contained 3.5 micrometers. Nails covered with the carbon layer positively passed the tests and were admitted into medical trade turnover. Positive medical treatment results were observed especially in case of patients with affirmed allergies onto alloying components contained in medical steels like chromium and nickel.Research limitations

  4. Sources and transport systems for low energy extreme of ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hershcovitch, A.; Batalin, V.A.; Bugaev, A.S.; Gushenets, V.I.; Alexeyenko, O.; Gurkova, E.; Johnson, B.M.; Kolomiets, A.A.; Kropachev, G.N.; Kuibeda, R.P.; Kulevoy, T.V.; Masunov, E.S.; Oks, E.M.; Pershin, V.I.; Polozov, S.M.; Poole, H.J.; Seleznev, D.N.; Storozhenko, P.A.; Vizir, A.; Svarovski, A.Ya.; Yakushin, P.; Yushkov, G.Yu.

    2010-06-06

    For the past seven years a joint research and development effort focusing on the design of steady state, intense ion sources has been in progress with the ultimate goal being to meet the two, energy extreme range needs of mega-electron-volt and 100's of electron-volt ion implanters. However, since the last Fortier is low energy ion implantation, focus of the endeavor has shifted to low energy ion implantation. For boron cluster source development, we started with molecular ions of decaborane (B{sub 10}H{sub 14}), octadecaborane (B{sub 18}H{sub 22}), and presently our focus is on carborane (C{sub 2}B{sub 10}H{sub 12}) ions developing methods for mitigating graphite deposition. Simultaneously, we are developing a pure boron ion source (without a working gas) that can form the basis for a novel, more efficient, plasma immersion source. Our Calutron-Berna ion source was converted into a universal source capable of switching between generating molecular phosphorous P{sub 4}{sup +}, high charge state ions, as well as other types of ions. Additionally, we have developed transport systems capable of transporting a very large variety of ion species, and simulations of a novel gasless/plasmaless ion beam deceleration method were also performed.

  5. Single ion implantation for single donor devices using Geiger mode detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielejec, E.; Seamons, J. A.; Carroll, M. S.

    2010-02-01

    Electronic devices that are designed to use the properties of single atoms such as donors or defects have become a reality with recent demonstrations of donor spectroscopy, single photon emission sources, and magnetic imaging using defect centers in diamond. Ion implantation, an industry standard for atom placement in materials, requires augmentation for single ion capability including a method for detecting a single ion arrival. Integrating single ion detection techniques with the single donor device construction region allows single ion arrival to be assured. Improving detector sensitivity is linked to improving control over the straggle of the ion as well as providing more flexibility in lay-out integration with the active region of the single donor device construction zone by allowing ion sensing at potentially greater distances. Using a remotely located passively gated single ion Geiger mode avalanche diode (SIGMA) detector we have demonstrated 100% detection efficiency at a distance of >75 µm from the center of the collecting junction. This detection efficiency is achieved with sensitivity to ~600 or fewer electron-hole pairs produced by the implanted ion. Ion detectors with this sensitivity and integrated with a thin dielectric, for example a 5 nm gate oxide, using low energy Sb implantation would have an end of range straggle of 98% for counting one and only one ion for a false count probability of 10-4 at an average ion number per gated window of 0.015.

  6. Microstructure and antibacterial property of stainless steel implanted by Cu ions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Bo-fan; NI Hong-wei; XIONG Ping-yuan; XIONG Juan; DAN Zhi-gang

    2004-01-01

    Copper ions were implanted into AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel by metal vapor vacuum are (MEVVA) with 60 - 100 keV energy and a dose range (0.2 - 5.0) × 1017 cm-2. Then Cu-implanted stainless steel was treated by a special antibacterial treatment. Antibacterial rates of Cu-implanted stainless steel, Cu-implanted stainless steel with special antibacterial treatment and un-implanted stainless steel were obtained by agar plate method. Phase composition in the implanted layer was analyzed by glancing X-ray diffraction (GXRD). Microstructure of antibacterial stainless steel was observed with transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and changes of the bacterium appearance after 24 h antibacterial action on the surface of un-implanted and Cu-implanted stainless steel with antibacterial treatment were observed with bio-TEM respectively. The results show that stainless steel obtains antibacterial property against E. coli when the Cu ions dose approaches to the saturated one. A suitable amount of Cu-rich phase uniformly disperses on the surface of Cu-implanted stainless steel that is treated by the special antibacterial treatment. The Cu-rich phase naked on the surface has a function of damage to pericellular membrane and cell wall,the pericellular membrane is thickened and the karyon degraded, and finally, bacteria die. Cu-rich phase naked on the surface endows stainless steel with best antibacterial property.

  7. Synergistic effects of iodine and silver ions co-implanted in 6H-SiC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhudzai, R. J.; Malherbe, J. B.; Hlatshwayo, T. T.; van der Berg, N. G.; Devaraj, A.; Zhu, Z.; Nandasiri, M.

    2015-12-01

    Motivated by the aim of understanding the release of fission products through the SiC coating of fuel kernels in modern high temperature nuclear reactors, a fundamental investigation is conducted to understand the synergistic effects of implanted silver (Ag) and iodine (I) in 6H-SiC. The implantation of the individual species, as well as the co-implantation of 360 keV ions of I and Ag at room temperature in 6H-SiC and their subsequent annealing behaviour has been investigated by Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS), Atom Probe Tomography (APT) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). SIMS and APT measurements indicated the presence of Ag in the co-implanted samples after annealing at 1500 °C for 30 h in sharp contrast to the samples implanted with Ag only. In samples implanted with Ag only, complete loss of the implanted Ag was observed. However, for I only implanted samples, some iodine was retained. APT of annealed co-implanted 6H-SiC showed clear spatial association of Ag and I clusters in SiC, which can be attributed to the observed I assisted retention of Ag after annealing. Such detailed studies will be necessary to identify the fundamental mechanism of fission products migration through SiC coatings.

  8. Suppression of ion-implantation induced porosity in germanium by a silicon dioxide capping layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Tuan T.; Alkhaldi, Huda S.; Gandhi, Hemi H.; Pastor, David; Huston, Larissa Q.; Wong-Leung, Jennifer; Aziz, Michael J.; Williams, J. S.

    2016-08-01

    Ion implantation with high ion fluences is indispensable for successful use of germanium (Ge) in the next generation of electronic and photonic devices. However, Ge readily becomes porous after a moderate fluence implant ( ˜1 ×1015 ion cm-2 ) at room temperature, and for heavy ion species such as tin (Sn), holding the target at liquid nitrogen (LN2) temperature suppresses porosity formation only up to a fluence of 2 ×1016 ion cm-2 . We show, using stylus profilometry and electron microscopy, that a nanometer scale capping layer of silicon dioxide significantly suppresses the development of the porous structure in Ge during a S n - implant at a fluence of 4.5 ×1016 ion cm-2 at LN2 temperature. The significant loss of the implanted species through sputtering is also suppressed. The effectiveness of the capping layer in preventing porosity, as well as suppressing sputter removal of Ge, permits the attainment of an implanted Sn concentration in Ge of ˜15 at.% , which is about 2.5 times the maximum value previously attained. The crystallinity of the Ge-Sn layer following pulsed-laser-melting induced solidification is also greatly improved compared with that of uncapped material, thus opening up potential applications of the Ge-Sn alloy as a direct bandgap material fabricated by an ion beam synthesis technique.

  9. Programme and abstracts of the seventh International Conference on Ion Implantation and other Applications of Ions and Electrons (ION 2008)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conference is organized on the biennial basis by the Institute of Physics, Maria Curie-Sklodowska University, Lublin in cooperation with the Wroclaw University of Technology and Technical University of Lublin. This biennial conferences has created a unique opportunity for scientists from Eastern and Western Europe together with their Polish colleagues, to discuss in a most agreeable environment, some of the fundamental questions in their field and develop new perspectives through the mutual exchange of ideas. ION 2008 has been focused mainly on ion implantation, a powerful tool for the modification of the subsurface layers of solid materials. Although the technique has been in use in the electronic industry for a few decades, there still remain many phenomena involved in the implantation process that are not well understood and are of considerable interest, for both fundamental science and also for new developments in applied materials science. One can highlight, in particular, mechanisms of ion energy loss in the bombarded material, creation of radiation defects, the formation of latent tracks, and many other phenomena that researchers are now intensively investigating. An improved understanding of such processes is essential for the effective application of analytical techniques like RBS, ERD, SIMS, PIPE and others

  10. FRACTAL PATTERN GROWTH OF METAL ATOM CLUSTERS IN ION IMPLANTED POLYMERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG TONG-HE; WU YU-GUANG; SANG HAI-BO; ZHOU GU

    2001-01-01

    The fractal and multi-fractal patterns of metal atoms are observed in the surface layer and cross section of a metal ion implanted polymer using TEM and SEM for the first time. The surface structure in the metal ion implanted polyethylene terephthalane (PET) is the random fractal. Certain average quantities of the random geometric patterns contain self-similarity. Some growth origins appeared in the fractal pattern which has a dimension of 1.67. The network structure of the fractal patterns is formed in cross section, having a fractal dimension of 1.87. So it can be seen that the fractal pattern is three-dimensional space fractal. We also find the collision cascade fractal in the cross section of implanted nylon, which is similar to the collision cascade pattern in transverse view calculated by the TRIM computer program. Finally, the mechanism for the formation and growth of the fractal patterns during ion implantation is discussed.

  11. The influence of ion implantation on the corrosion behaviour of iron in acid solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of ion implantation on the aqueous corrosion of pure iron in 1N H2SO4 was studied. The iron was bombarded with 5 x 1015 to 1017 ions.cm-2 of Ne, Ar, Cu, Pb and Au. The current density-potential curves of the implanted samples were measured and compared with that of untreated pure iron. Ne+ and Cu+ bombardments lead to a slightly higher corrosion rate in comparison with untreated iron. Pb+ depressed the corrosion rate by orders of magnitude. Au+ enhanced it by a factor of more than ten. The effect is attributed to a reduction or an increase of the activity of the electrode surface with respect to the cathodic hydrogen evolution reaction, i.e. the ion implantation influences strongly the exchange current density of the hydrogen evolution reaction. A marked influence of the implantation on the anodic behaviour of the corroding metal could also be observed. (author)

  12. Electrical and optical switching properties of ion implanted VO{sub 2} thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heckman, Emily M., E-mail: emily.heckman@wpafb.af.mi [Air Force Research Laboratory, Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio 45433 (United States); General Dynamics Information Technology, Dayton, Ohio 45430 (United States); Gonzalez, Leonel P. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio 45433 (United States); General Dynamics Information Technology, Dayton, Ohio 45430 (United States); Guha, Shekhar [Air Force Research Laboratory, Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio 45433 (United States); Barnes, Jacob O.; Carpenter, Amelia [Air Force Research Laboratory, Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio 45433 (United States); General Dynamics Information Technology, Dayton, Ohio 45430 (United States)

    2009-11-02

    The metal-insulator transition in vanadium dioxide thin films implanted with O{sup +} ions was studied. Ion implantation lowered the metal-insulator transition temperature of the VO{sub 2} films by 12 {sup o}C compared to the unimplanted ones, as measured both optically and electrically. The lowering of the transition temperature was accomplished without significantly reducing the mid-wave infrared optical transmission in the insulating state for wavelengths > 4.3 {mu}m. Raman spectroscopy was used to examine changes to the crystalline structure of the implanted films. The Raman spectra indicate that ion implantation effects are not annealed out for temperatures up to 120 {sup o}C.

  13. Formation of Wear Resistant Steel Surfaces by Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) is a versatile and fast method for implanting energetic ions into large and complex shaped three-dimensional objects where the ions are accelerated by applying negative high voltage pulses to a substrate immersed in a plasma. As the line-of-sight restrictions of conventional implanters are circumvented, it results in a fast and cost-effective technology. Implantation of nitrogen at 30 - 40 keV at moderate temperatures of 200 - 400 deg. C into steel circumvents the diminishing thermal nitrogen activation encountered, e.g., in plasma nitriding in this temperature regime, thus enabling nitriding of additional steel grades. Nitride formation and improvement of the mechanical properties after PIII are presented for several steel grades, including AISI 316Ti (food industry), AISI D2 (used for bending tools) and AISI 1095 (with applications in the textile industry)

  14. Improvement of tribological behavior of a Ti-Al-V alloy by nitrogen ion implantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yanzhang; ZU Xiaotao; QIU Shaoyu; HUANG Xinquan

    2006-01-01

    The tribological properties especially wear and hardness of a Ti-Al-V alloy with nitrogen implantation (energy 60 keV) were investigated. The implantation was carried out at fluences range from 1×1016 to 4×1017 ions/cm2. Glancing angle X-ray diffraction (GAXRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses were performed to obtain surface characterization of the implanted sample. The unimplanted and implanted samples were also annealed at 600 ℃ in order to understand the influence of annealing on the tribological properties of Ti-Al-V. The hardness shows significant improvement at the higher fluence. After annealing at 600 ℃, the friction coefficient exhibits a relative decrease for the nitrogen-implanted samples. In addition, the wear rates of the implanted samples exhibits a great decrease after annealing at 600 ℃. Nature of the surface and reason for the variation and improvement in wear resistance were discussed in detail.

  15. Application of micro beam PIXE to detection of titanium ion release from dental and orthopaedic implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the past two decades the utilization of dental and orthopaedic implants in reconstructive surgery has been spread widely. Most of these implants are inserted in the corrosive environment of the human body for long periods of time. The level of dissolution, release, and transport of metal ions as a result of corrosion of these materials are not fully known at present. We report the results of application of micro ion beam PIXE spectroscopy to detect release of titanium from titanium and titanium alloy implants inserted in the tibiae of rabbits for three months. It was found that titanium ions could be detected in the surrounding tissues, with high precision, as a gradient from the implant surface and in higher amounts in the bone tissue as compared with the soft tissues. It is concluded that application of micro ion beam PIXE spectroscopy for detection of metal ion release, and distribution of the released material around the implants with high special resolution and accuracy may be used to further investigate the mechanism of metal release, and the relation between surface micromorphology and corrosion resistance of the implant materials. (author)

  16. Carbon Mineralization Using Phosphate and Silicate Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokturk, H.

    2013-12-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) reduction from combustion of fossil fuels has become an urgent concern for the society due to marked increase in weather related natural disasters and other negative consequences of global warming. CO2 is a highly stable molecule which does not readily interact with other neutral molecules. However it is more responsive to ions due to charge versus quadrupole interaction [1-2]. Ions can be created by dissolving a salt in water and then aerosolizing the solution. This approach gives CO2 molecules a chance to interact with the hydrated salt ions over the large surface area of the aerosol. Ion containing aerosols exist in nature, an example being sea spray particles generated by breaking waves. Such particles contain singly and doubly charged salt ions including Na+, Cl-, Mg++ and SO4--. Depending on the proximity of CO2 to the ion, interaction energy can be significantly higher than the thermal energy of the aerosol. For example, an interaction energy of 0.6 eV is obtained with the sulfate (SO4--) ion when CO2 is the nearest neighbor [2]. In this research interaction between CO2 and ions which carry higher charges are investigated. The molecules selected for the study are triply charged phosphate (PO4---) ions and quadruply charged silicate (SiO4----) ions. Examples of salts which contain such molecules are potassium phosphate (K3PO4) and sodium orthosilicate (Na4SiO4). The research has been carried out with first principle quantum mechanical calculations using the Density Functional Theory method with B3LYP functional and Pople type basis sets augmented with polarization and diffuse functions. Atomic models consist of the selected ions surrounded by water and CO2 molecules. Similar to the results obtained with singly and doubly charged ions [1-2], phosphate and silicate ions attract CO2 molecules. Energy of interaction between the ion and CO2 is 1.6 eV for the phosphate ion and 3.3 eV for the silicate ion. Hence one can expect that the selected

  17. Experimental lumbar spine fusion with novel tantalum-coated carbon fiber implant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Haisheng; Zou, Xuenong; Woo, Charlotte;

    2007-01-01

    Implants of carbon fiber composite have been widely used in orthopedic and spinal surgeries. However, studies using carbon fiber-reinforced cages demonstrate frequent appearance of fibrous layer interposed between the implant and the surrounding bone. The aim of the present study was to test the ...

  18. Pulsed Ion Sheath Dynamics in a Cylindrical Bore for Inner Surface Grid-Enhanced Plasma Source Ion Implantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王久丽; 张谷令; 范松华; 杨武保; 杨思泽

    2002-01-01

    Based on our recently proposed grid-enhanced plasma source ion implantation (GEPSII) technique for innersurface modification of materials with cylindrical geometry, we present the corresponding theoretical studiesof the temporal evolution of the plasma ion sheath between the grid electrode and the target in a cylindricalbore. Typical results such as the ion sheath evolution, time-dependent ion density and time-integrated ion energydistribution at the target are calculated by solving Poisson's equation coupled with fluid equations for collisionlessions and Boltzmann assumption for electrons using finite difference methods. The calculated results can furtherverify the feasibility and superiority of this new technique.

  19. Indications of Carbon Ion Therapy at CNAO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orecchia, Roberto; Rossi, Sandro; Fossati, Piero

    2009-03-01

    CNAO will be a dual center capable of providing therapeutic beams of protons and carbon ions with maximum energy of 400 MeV/u. At the beginning, it will be equipped with three treatment rooms with fixed horizontal and vertical beam lines. In a subsequent phase, two more rooms with a rotating gantry are foreseen. An active spot scanning dose delivery system will be employed. Initially, 80% of the treatments will be carried out with carbon ions. All patients will be treated within clinical trials to assess carbon ion indications with an evidence-based methodology. Seven disease-specific working groups have been developed: lung tumors, liver tumors, sarcomas, head and neck tumors, central nervous system lesions, eye tumors and pediatric tumors. The last two groups will be treated mainly with protons. In the first phase, CNAO will focus on head and neck cancers, treating inoperable, residual or recurrent malignant salivary gland tumors, mucosal melanoma, adenocarcinoma and unfavorably located SCC (nasal and paranasal sinuses). Carbon ions will be employed as a boost in the treatment of locally advanced, poor prognosis, SCC of the hypopharynx and tongue base. Bone and soft tissue sarcomas of the extremity will be treated with a limb-sparing approach, and trunk sarcomas will be treated with exclusive or post-operative irradiation. Skull base tumors (chordoma and chondrosarcoma), recurrent or malignant meningioma and glial tumors will be treated with carbon ions. After sufficient expertise has been gained in coping with organ motion, CNAO will start treating thoracic and abdominal targets. HCC will be treated in inoperable patients with one or more lesions that can be included in a single CTV. Early stage NSCLC will be treated. In the second phase, two more groups on gynecological malignancies and digestive tumors (esophageal cancer, rectal cancer, pancreatic cancer) will be created.

  20. Quantitative secondary ion mass spectrometric analysis of secondary ion polarity in GaN films implanted with oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashiguchi, Minako; Sakaguchi, Isao; Adachi, Yutaka; Ohashi, Naoki

    2016-10-01

    Quantitative analyses of N and O ions in GaN thin films implanted with oxygen ions (16O+) were conducted by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). Positive (CsM+) and negative secondary ions extracted by Cs+ primary ion bombardment were analyzed for oxygen quantitative analysis. The oxygen depth profiles were obtained using two types of primary ion beams: a Gaussian-type beam and a broad spot beam. The oxygen peak concentrations in GaN samples were from 3.2 × 1019 to 7.0 × 1021 atoms/cm3. The depth profiles show equivalent depth resolutions in the two analyses. The intensity of negative oxygen ions was approximately two orders of magnitude higher than that of positive ions. In contrast, the O/N intensity ratio measured using CsM+ molecular ions was close to the calculated atomic density ratio, indicating that the SIMS depth profiling using CsM+ ions is much more effective for the measurements of O and N ions in heavy O-implanted GaN than that using negative ions.

  1. The Development and Evolution of Ion Implanters in the Semiconductor Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, Dave G.

    2008-11-01

    By the end of the 1960's, the development of ion beam systems for isotope separation and materials research had reached the stage at which knowledge bases in the areas of ion beam formation and transport and the physics of atomic collisions in solids made it practical to consider the use of ion implantation as a means of modifying the near surface properties of solid materials. The beam currents and energies available made the technique particularly compatible with the doping requirements of the silicon devices being produced at that time. However, incorporation of the technique into a high volume manufacturing environment required the immediate development of new target handling facilities and improvements in machine reliability. While the manner in which ion implanters have evolved over the past forty years has continued to be dictated by the changing demands of the silicon processing industry, the dramatic reduction in transistor size and the increase in integrated circuit complexity have had significant implications for the qualities of the ion beams themselves, particularly in high current, ultra-low energy applications. Since the first commercial implanters were introduced, highly developed medium current, high current and high energy machines have evolved. In the medium current and high energy sectors, well understood ion optical principles have enabled ingenious and highly effective beam formation and transport systems to be designed. As these machines evolved, extensive studies of the implanted material using ion beam based techniques such as Rutherford backscattering and channelling provided a growing understanding of the fundamental radiation damage and annealing processes that are inevitably associated with the implantation process. For high current machines, particularly those operating in the so-called eV implantation range, beam formation and transport processes become considerably more complex and established ion optical design principles must be

  2. InGaAsP/InP Double Quantum Well Intermixing Induced by Phosphorus Ion Implantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jie; ZHAO Jie; WANG Yong-chen; HAN De-jun

    2005-01-01

    A quantum well intermixing(QWI) investigation on double quantum well(DQW) structure with two different emitting wavelength caused by phosphorus ion implantation and following rapid thermal annealing (RTA) was carried out by means of photoluminescence(PL). The ion implantation was performed at the energy of 120 kev with the dose ranging from 1 × 1011 cm-2 to 1× 1014 cm-2. The RTA was performed at the temperature of 700 ℃ for 30 s under pure nitrogen protection. The PL measurement implied that the band gap blue-shift from the upper well increases with the ion dose faster than that from lower well and the PL peaks from both QWs remained well separated under the lower dose implantation(~1×1011 cm-2 ) indicating that the implant vacancy distribution affects the QWI. When the ion dose is over ~ 1 × 1012 cm-2 , the band gap blue-shift from both wells increases with the ion dose and finally the two peaks merge together as one peak indicating the ion implantation caused a total intermixing of both quantum wells.

  3. Impact of Ion Implantation on Licorice (Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch) Growth and Antioxidant Activity Under Drought Stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low energy ion beams are known to have stimulation effects on plant generation and to improve plants' intrinsic quality. In the present study, the growth and physiological index of licorice implanted with 0, 8, 10, 12 and 14x (2.6x1015) ions/cm2 were investigated under well-watered and drought-stress conditions. The results showed that a proper dose of ion implantation was particularly efficient in stimulating the licorice growth and improving the plant biomass significantly in both the well-watered and drought-stress conditions. The physiological results of licorice measured by leaf water potential, lipid oxidation, soluble protein and antioxidant system showed a significant correlation between ion implantation and water regime except for leaf water potential. Therefore, the study indicated that ion implantation can enhance licorice's drought tolerance by increasing the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and DPPH (1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl) radical scavenging ability to lower oxidative damage to lipids in plants. Ion beam implantation, therefore, provides an alternative method to enhance licorice drought tolerance

  4. Influence of ion source configuration and its operation parameters on the target sputtering and implantation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalnov, K V; Kukhta, V R; Uemura, K; Ito, Y

    2012-06-01

    In the work, investigation of the features and operation regimes of sputter enhanced ion-plasma source are presented. The source is based on the target sputtering with the dense plasma formed in the crossed electric and magnetic fields. It allows operation with noble or reactive gases at low pressure discharge regimes, and, the resulting ion beam is the mixture of ions from the working gas and sputtering target. Any conductive material, such as metals, alloys, or compounds, can be used as the sputtering target. Effectiveness of target sputtering process with the plasma was investigated dependently on the gun geometry, plasma parameters, and the target bias voltage. With the applied accelerating voltage from 0 to 20 kV, the source can be operated in regimes of thin film deposition, ion-beam mixing, and ion implantation. Multi-component ion beam implantation was applied to α-Fe, which leads to the surface hardness increasing from 2 GPa in the initial condition up to 3.5 GPa in case of combined N(2)-C implantation. Projected range of the implanted elements is up to 20 nm with the implantation energy 20 keV that was obtained with XPS depth profiling. PMID:22755619

  5. Impact of Ion Implantation on Licorice ( Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch ) Growth and Antioxidant Activity Under Drought Stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jingnan; TONG Liping; SHEN Tongwei; LI Jie; WU Lijun; YU Zengliang

    2007-01-01

    Low energy ion beams are known to have stimulation effects on plant generation and to improve plants' intrinsic quality. In the present study, the growth and physiological index of licorice implanted with 0, 8, 10, 12 and 14× (2.6×l015) ions/cm2 were investigated under well-watered and drought-stress conditions. The results showed that a proper dose of ion implantation was particularly efficient in stimulating the licorice growth and improving the plant biomass significantly in both the well-watered and drought-stress conditions. The physiological results of licorice measured by leaf water potential, lipid oxidation, soluble protein and antioxidant system showed a significant correlation between ion implantation and water regime except for leaf water potential. Therefore, the study indicated that ion implantation can enhance licorice's drought tolerance by increasing the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and DPPH (l,l-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl) radical scavenging ability to lower oxidative damage to lipids in plants. Ion beam implantation, therefore, provides an alternative method to enhance licorice drought tolerance.

  6. Impact of Ion Implantation on Licorice (Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch) Growth and Antioxidant Activity Under Drought Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jingnan; Tong, Liping; Shen, Tongwei; Li, Jie; Wu, Lijun; Yu, Zengliang

    2007-06-01

    Low energy ion beams are known to have stimulation effects on plant generation and to improve plants' intrinsic quality. In the present study, the growth and physiological index of licorice implanted with 0, 8, 10, 12 and 14× (2.6×1015) ions/cm2 were investigated under well-watered and drought-stress conditions. The results showed that a proper dose of ion implantation was particularly efficient in stimulating the licorice growth and improving the plant biomass significantly in both the well-watered and drought-stress conditions. The physiological results of licorice measured by leaf water potential, lipid oxidation, soluble protein and antioxidant system showed a significant correlation between ion implantation and water regime except for leaf water potential. Therefore, the study indicated that ion implantation can enhance licorice's drought tolerance by increasing the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and DPPH (1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl) radical scavenging ability to lower oxidative damage to lipids in plants. Ion beam implantation, therefore, provides an alternative method to enhance licorice drought tolerance.

  7. Evolution of deep-level centers in p-type silicon following ion implantation at 85 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In situ deep-level transient spectroscopy measurements have been carried out on p-type silicon following MeV He, Si, and Ge ion implantation at 85 K. Deep levels corresponding to intrinsic and impurity-related point defects are only detected after annealing at temperatures above 200 K. In addition to divacancies, interstitial carbon, and a carbon endash oxygen complex, the formation of another defect, denoted as K2, has been observed during annealing at 200 endash 230 K in epitaxial wafers, and at 200 endash 300 K in Czochralski grown material. The energy level of the K2 defect is located 0.36 eV above the valence band, which is very close to a previously observed level of the carbon endash oxygen pair. The relative concentration of this defect is ∼10 times higher in samples implanted with Ge than in those implanted with He. Due to its formation temperature, equal concentration in epitaxial and Czochralski grown wafers, and absence in n-type samples, the K2 trap has been tentatively identified as a vacancy-related complex which probably contains boron. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  8. Investigation of Donor and Acceptor Ion Implantation in AlN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osinsky, Andrei [Agnitron Technology Inc., Eden Prairie, MN (United States)

    2015-09-16

    AlGaN alloys with high Al composition and AlN based electronic devices are attractive for high voltage, high temperature applications, including microwave power sources, power switches and communication systems. AlN is of particular interest because of its wide bandgap of ~6.1eV which is ideal for power electronic device applications in extreme environments which requires high dose ion implantation. One of the major challenges that need to be addressed to achieve full utilization of AlN for opto and microelectronic applications is the development of a doping strategy for both donors and acceptors. Ion implantation is a particularly attractive approach since it allows for selected-area doping of semiconductors due to its high spatial and dose control and its high throughput capability. Active layers in the semiconductor are created by implanting a dopant species followed by very high temperature annealing to reduce defects and thereby activate the dopants. Recovery of implant damage in AlN requires excessively high temperature. In this SBIR program we began the investigation by simulation of ion beam implantation profiles for Mg, Ge and Si in AlN over wide dose and energy ranges. Si and Ge are implanted to achieve the n-type doping, Mg is investigated as a p-type doping. The simulation of implantation profiles were performed in collaboration between NRL and Agnitron using a commercial software known as Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter (SRIM). The simulation results were then used as the basis for ion implantation of AlN samples. The implanted samples were annealed by an innovative technique under different conditions and evaluated along the way. Raman spectroscopy and XRD were used to determine the crystal quality of the implanted samples, demonstrating the effectiveness of annealing in removing implant induced damage. Additionally, SIMS was used to verify that a nearly uniform doping profile was achieved near the sample surface. The electrical characteristics

  9. Estimation of diffusion coefficient by photoemission electron microscopy in ion-implanted nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have fabricated parallel stripes of nanostructures in an n-type Si substrate by implanting 30 keV Ga+ ions from a focused ion beam (FIB) source. Two sets of implantation were carried out. In one case, during implantation the substrate was held at room temperature and in the other case at 400 deg. C. Photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM) was carried out on these samples. The implanted parallel stripes, each with a nominal dimension of 4000 nm x 100 nm, appear as bright regions in the PEEM image. Line scans of the intensities from the PEEM image were recorded along and across these stripes. The intensity profile at the edges of a line scan is broader for the implantation carried out at 400 deg. C compared to room temperature. From the analysis of this intensity profile, the lateral diffusion coefficient of Ga in silicon was estimated assuming that the PEEM intensity is proportional to Ga concentration. The diffusion coefficient at 400 deg. C has been estimated to be ∼1.3 x 10-15 m2/s. Across the stripes an asymmetric diffusion profile has been observed, which has been related to the sequence of implantation of these stripes and the associated defect distribution due to lateral straggling of the implanted ions.

  10. A study of the structural and magnetic properties of ZnO implanted by Gd ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The structural and magnetic properties of ZnO (0 0 0 1) single crystals implanted with 200 keV Gd ions up to a fluence of 5 × 1015 cm−2 and subsequently annealed at 800 °C in various atmospheres were studied. The chemical composition and concentration depth profiles of ion-implanted layers were characterised by Rutherford Back-Scattering spectrometry (RBS) and compared to SRIM simulations. The as-implanted Gd depth profiles were found to be broader than those simulated by SRIM, but the projected range coincided well with that simulated. After annealing at 800 °C, the depth profiles became narrower. The structural changes in the layers modified by ion implantation and subsequent annealing were characterised by RBS channelling. The annealing led to partial recrystallisation and a decrease in the number of Gd atoms situated in substitutional positions. Raman spectroscopy showed that the point defects in Zn and O vacancies had been created by implantation and that these defects are most effectively cured after annealing in oxygen atmosphere. AFM analysis was used to determine the surface-morphology changes after the implantation and annealing procedures. The as-implanted samples exhibited ferromagnetism persisting up to room temperature. The annealing procedure led to paramagnetic behaviour, probably caused by the formation of gadolinium clusters

  11. A study of the structural and magnetic properties of ZnO implanted by Gd ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macková, A., E-mail: mackova@ujf.cas.cz [Nuclear Physics Institute, The Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, v. v. i., 250 68 Rez (Czech Republic); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, J.E. Purkinje University, 400 96 Usti nad Labem (Czech Republic); Malinský, P. [Nuclear Physics Institute, The Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, v. v. i., 250 68 Rez (Czech Republic); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, J.E. Purkinje University, 400 96 Usti nad Labem (Czech Republic); Sofer, Z.; Šimek, P.; Sedmidubský, D. [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Institute of Chemical Technology, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic); Mikulics, M. [Peter Grünberg Institut (PGI-9), Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Jülich-Aachen Research Alliance, JARA, Fundamentals of Future Information Technology, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Wilhelm, R.A. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Technische Universität Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany)

    2014-08-01

    The structural and magnetic properties of ZnO (0 0 0 1) single crystals implanted with 200 keV Gd ions up to a fluence of 5 × 10{sup 15} cm{sup −2} and subsequently annealed at 800 °C in various atmospheres were studied. The chemical composition and concentration depth profiles of ion-implanted layers were characterised by Rutherford Back-Scattering spectrometry (RBS) and compared to SRIM simulations. The as-implanted Gd depth profiles were found to be broader than those simulated by SRIM, but the projected range coincided well with that simulated. After annealing at 800 °C, the depth profiles became narrower. The structural changes in the layers modified by ion implantation and subsequent annealing were characterised by RBS channelling. The annealing led to partial recrystallisation and a decrease in the number of Gd atoms situated in substitutional positions. Raman spectroscopy showed that the point defects in Zn and O vacancies had been created by implantation and that these defects are most effectively cured after annealing in oxygen atmosphere. AFM analysis was used to determine the surface-morphology changes after the implantation and annealing procedures. The as-implanted samples exhibited ferromagnetism persisting up to room temperature. The annealing procedure led to paramagnetic behaviour, probably caused by the formation of gadolinium clusters.

  12. Laser interferometry for study of nonlocal response of pptically-transparent ion-implanted polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We demonstrated that the laser interferometry can be applied to inspect the nonlocal response of optically-transparent ion-implanted polymers, in particular polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). Ion-modified material in 100 nm thick layer on the surface of a plane-parallel PMMA plate implanted with silicon ions (Si+) at an energy of 50 keV and fluence of 3.2×1015 Si+/cm2, was studied. The thermal nonlinearity of the material in the ultrathin ion-modified layer was induced by cw laser irradiation at a relatively low intensity in a localized region. The in-plane laser-induced thermo optic effect in the near(sub)surface layer of Si+-implanted PMMA was probed by interferometric imaging. PACS codes: 42.25.Gy, 61.72.uf, 78.20.Ci, 78.68.+m

  13. Depth distribution and diffusion behavior of implanted Bi+ ions into KTiOPO4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KTiOPO4 samples were implanted by Bi+ ions with energies from 100 to 350 keV in increments of 50 keV. The depth distribution and diffusion behavior of implanted Bi+ into KTiOPO4 were investigated by normal and oblique incidence Rutherford backscattering. The results show that the maximum difference between experimental and calculated values of the mean projected range is less than 22%; the experimental range straggling somewhat deviates from the prediction by TRIM'98. After annealing, the redistributions of implanted Bi+ ions in KTiOPO4 do not obey Fick's law, and there is a segregation process to the surface for 700 deg. C annealing. After 800 deg. C annealing for 30 min, most of the segregated Bi+ ions had evaporated, and the distribution of the remaining Bi+ ions became flat

  14. Study of structural modifications induced by ion implantation in austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion implantation in steels, although largely used to improve the properties of use, involves structural modifications of the surface layer, which remain still prone to controversies. Within this context, various elements (N, Ar, Cr, Mo, Ag, Xe and Pb) were implanted (with energies varying from 28 to 280 keV) in a 316LVM austenitic stainless steel. The implanted layer has a thickness limited to 80 nm and a maximum implanted element concentration lower than 10 % at. The analysis of the implanted layer by grazing incidence X ray diffraction highlights deformations of austenite lines, appearance of ferrite and amorphization of the layer. Ferritic phase which appears at the grain boundaries, whatever the implanted element, is formed above a given 'threshold' of energy (produced of fluency by the energy of an ion). The formation of ferrite as well as the amorphization of the implanted layer depends only on energy. In order to understand the deformations of austenite diffraction lines, a simulation model of these lines was elaborated. The model correctly describes the observed deformations (broadening, shift, splitting) with the assumption that the expansion of the austenitic lattice is due to the presence of implanted element and is proportional to the element concentration through a coefficient k'. This coefficient only depends on the element and varies linearly with its radius. (author)

  15. Thermal annealing of waveguides formed by ion implantation of silica-on-si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Buried channel waveguides were fabricated by ion implantation of PECVD-grown silica-on-Si. Post-implantation annealing was observed to have a significant influence on waveguide loss as measured at both 1.3 and 1.55 nm. Waveguide loss decreased abruptly from an as-implanted value of ∼1 dB/cm to ∼0.15 dB/cm following a 500 deg C/1 hr annealing cycle. However, annealing at greater temperatures (600 deg C) yielded a loss value comparable to the as implanted result (∼1dB/cm). This paper will address the factors that potentially influenced the observed loss behaviour which included thermally-induced changes to density and refractive index, precipitation of the implanted ions (Si) and mode profile spreading and subsequent interaction with the waveguide surface. Using surface profilometry and variable-energy positron spectroscopy, no significant density or structural changes were observed over the temperature range of 400-600deg C. The refractive index exhibited comparable behaviour as measured with prism coupling. The potential influence of precipitation was determined by comparing Si implantation with dual Si and O implantation, the latter with a dose ratio of 1:2. In addition, waveguides were also fabricated as a function of implantation energy to characterise the influence of the surface proximity

  16. Nanostructure and Properties of Corrosion Resistance in C+Ti Multi-Ion-Implanted Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张通和; 吴瑜光; 刘安东; 张旭; 王晓妍

    2003-01-01

    The corrosion and pitting corrosion resistance of C+ Ti dual and C+Ti+C ternary implanted H13 steel were studied by using a multi-sweep cyclic voltammetry and a scanning electron microscope. The effects of phase formation on corrosion and pitting corrosion resistance were explored. The x-ray diffraction analysis shows that the nanometer-sized precipitate phases consist of compounds of Fe2 Ti, TiC, Fe2C and Fe3 C in dual implanted layer and even in ternary implanted layer. The passivation layer consists of these nanometer phases. It has been found that the corrosion and pitting corrosion resistance of dual and ternary implanted H13 steel are improved extremely. The corrosion resistance of ternary implanted layer is better than that of dual implantations and is enhanced with the increasing ion dose. When the ion dose of Ti is 6 × 1017/cm2 in the ternary implantation sample, the anodic peak current density is 95 times less than that of the H13 steel. The pitting corrosion potential of dual and ternary implantation samples is in the range from 55mV to 160mV which is much higher than that of the H13 steel. The phases against the corrosion and pitting corrosion are nanometer silkiness phases.

  17. Germanium ion implantation to Improve Crystallinity during Solid Phase Epitaxy and the effect of AMU Contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, K. S.; Yoo, D. H.; Son, G. H.; Lee, C. H.; Noh, J. H.; Han, J. J.; Yu, Y. S.; Hyung, Y. W.; Yang, J. K.; Song, D. G.; Lim, T. J.; Kim, Y. K.; Lee, S. C.; Lee, H. D.; Moon, J. T.

    2006-11-01

    Germanium ion implantation was investigated for crystallinity enhancement during solid phase epitaxial regrowth (SPE) using high current implantation equipment. Electron back-scatter diffraction(EBSD) measurement showed numerical increase of 19 percent of signal, which might be due to pre-amorphization effect on silicon layer deposited by LPCVD process with germanium ion implantation. On the other hand, electrical property such as off-leakage current of NMOS transistor degraded in specific regions of wafers, which implied non-uniform distribution of donor-type impurities into channel area. It was confirmed that arsenic atoms were incorporated into silicon layer during germanium ion implantation. Since the equipment for germanium pre-amorphization implantation(PAI) was using several source gases such as BF3 and AsH3, atomic mass unit(AMU) contamination during PAI of germanium with AMU 74 caused the incorporation of arsenic with AMU 75 which resided in arc-chamber and other parts of the equipment. It was effective to use germanium isotope of AMU 72 to suppress AMU contamination, however it led serious reduction of productivity because of decrease in beam current by 30 percent as known to be difference in isotope abundance. It was effective to use enriched germanium source gas with AMU 72 in order to improve productivity. Spatial distribution of arsenic impurities in wafers was closely related to hardware configuration of ion implantation equipment.

  18. Preparation of phosphorus-containing silica glass microspheres for radiotherapy of cancer by ion implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawashita, M; Miyaji, F; Kokubo, T; Suzuki, Y; Kajiyama, K

    1999-08-01

    A chemically durable glass microsphere containing a large amount of phosphorus is useful for in situ irradiation of cancers, since they can be activated to be a beta-emitter with a half-life of 14.3 d by neutron bombardment. When the activated microspheres are injected to the tumors, they can irradiate the tumors directly with beta-rays without irradiating neighboring normal tissues. In the present study, P+ ion was implanted into silica glass microspheres of 25 microm in average diameter at 50 keV with nominal doses of 2.5 x 10(16) and 3.35 x 10(1)6 cm(-2). The glass microspheres were put into a stainless container and the container was continuously shaken during the ion implantation so that P+ ion was implanted into them uniformly. The implanted phosphorus was localized in deep regions of the glass microsphere with the maximum concentration at about 50 nm depth without distributing up to the surface even for a nominal dose of 3.35 x 10(16) cm(-2). Both samples released phosphorus and silicon into water at 95 degrees C for 7 d. On the basis of the previous study on P+-implanted silica glass plates, the silica glass microspheres containing more phosphorus which is desired for actual treatment could be obtained, without losing high chemical durability, if P+ ion would be implanted at higher energy than 50 keV to be localized in deeper region.

  19. The biomedical properties of polyethylene terephthalate surface modified by silver ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Jin [Key Laboratory for Advanced Technologies of Materials of Ministry of Education, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610031 (China); Li Jianxin [Key Laboratory for Advanced Technologies of Materials of Ministry of Education, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610031 (China); Shen Liru [Southwestern Institute of Physics, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041 (China); Ling Ren [Key Laboratory for Advanced Technologies of Materials of Ministry of Education, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610031 (China); Xu Zejin [Southwestern Institute of Physics, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041 (China); Zhao Ansha [Key Laboratory for Advanced Technologies of Materials of Ministry of Education, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610031 (China); Leng Yongxiang [Key Laboratory for Advanced Technologies of Materials of Ministry of Education, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610031 (China); Huang Nan [Key Laboratory for Advanced Technologies of Materials of Ministry of Education, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610031 (China)]. E-mail: nhuang@263.net

    2007-04-15

    Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) film is modified by Ag ion implantation with a fluence 1 x 10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2}. The results of X-Ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) indicate that silver has been successfully implanted into the surface of PET. The PET samples modified by silver ion implantation have significantly bactericidal property. The capacity of the staphylococcus epidermidis (SE) adhered on the Ag{sup +} implanted PET surface is 5.3 x 10{sup 6} CFU/ml, but the capacity of the SE adhered on the untreated PET film is 2.23 x 10{sup 7} CFU/ml. The thromboembolic property is evaluated by in vitro platelet adhesion test, and there is not statistically difference between the untreated PET and the Ag{sup +} implanted PET for the number of adhered and activated platelets. The PET implanted by silver ion has not acute toxicity to endothelial cell (EC) which was evaluated by the release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) test.

  20. Amorphization of ZnSe by ion implantation at low temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Jahn, S G; Restle, M; Ronning, C R; Quintel, H; Bharuth-Ram, K

    1995-01-01

    Radioactive Cd and Se ions were implanted into high-resistivity ZnSe single crystals around 60 K and 300 K. Their lattice sites were determined by measuring the channelling and blocking effects of the emitted conversion electrons or positrons directly after implantation and after annealing at different temperatures up to 600 K. Implantation doses were in the range of 3$\\times 10^{12}$ - 3$\\times10^{13}$/cm$^2$. The experimental results of this emission channelling technique yield a high substitutional fraction of the implanted ions directly after implantation at room temperature. At 60 K the substitutional fraction of implanted ions is highly sensitive to the ion dose. Above a critical dose of around 1.4$\\times10^{13}$ Cd/cm$^2$ or 2.1$\\times10^{13}$ Se/cm$^2$ the substitutional fraction completely disappears indicating an amorphous surrounding of the probe atom. Damage recovery was observed below room temperature and at an annealing temperature around 500 K. A quantitative analysis of measured channelling yi...

  1. Carbon-based ion and molecular channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sint, Kyaw; Wang, Boyang; Kral, Petr

    2008-03-01

    We design ion and molecular channels based on layered carboneous materials, with chemically-functionalized pore entrances. Our molecular dynamics simulations demonstrate that these ultra-narrow pores, with diameters around 1 nm, are highly selective to the charges and sizes of the passing (Na^+ and Cl^-) ions and short alkanes. We demonstrate that the molecular flows through these pores can be easily controlled by electrical and mechanical means. These artificial pores could be integrated in fluidic nanodevices and lab-on-a-chip techniques with numerous potential applications. [1] Kyaw Sint, Boyang Wang and Petr Kral, submitted. [2] Boyang Wang and Petr Kral, JACS 128, 15984 (2006).

  2. Sidewall penetration of dislocations in ion-implanted bipolar transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phosphorus-doped emitters have been formed by either conventional diffusion or implantation, anneal, and drive-in processes. Transmission electron microscopy and measurements of transistor characteristics were made to evaluate the two processes. Comparison of structures with similar dislocation densities indicated that the dislocations in the implanted structures penetrated the emitter-base sidewall, whereas the dislocations in the diffused structure were confined to the emitter region. The transistor with extended dislocations exhibited high leakage current and excess popcorn noise generating

  3. The fabrication of metal silicide nanodot arrays using localized ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Jin; Kim, Tae-Gon; Min, Byung-Kwon; Lee, Sang Jo, E-mail: bkmin@yonsei.ac.kr [School of Mechanical Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-12-03

    We propose a process for fabricating nanodot arrays with a pitch size of less than 25 nm. The process consists of localized ion implantation in a metal thin film on a Si wafer using a focused ion beam (FIB), followed by chemical etching. This process utilizes the etching resistivity changes of the ion beam irradiated region that result from metal silicide formation by ion implantation. To control the nanodot diameter, a threshold ion dose model is proposed using the Gaussian distribution of the ion beam intensities. The process is verified by fabricating nanodots with various diameters. The mechanism of etching resistivity is investigated via x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES).

  4. Fractal pattern growth in Ti-implanted steel with high ion flux

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang Ton Ghe; Liu An Dong

    2002-01-01

    The author report on the formation of metal nano-metre phase and fractal patterns in steel using metal vapour vacuum arc source ion implantation with high ion flux. The dense nano-metre phases are cylindrical and well dispersed in the Ti-implanted layer with an ion flux up to 50 mu A/cm sup 2. The collision fractal pattern is formed in Ti-implanted steel with an ion flux of 25 mu A/cm sup 2 and the disconnected fractal pattern is observed with an ion flux of 50 mu A/cm sup 2. The average density of nano-metre phases decreases from 1.2 x 10 sup 1 sup 1 /cm sup 2 to 6.5 x 10 sup 1 sup 0 /cm sup 2 as the ion flux increases from 25 mu A/cm sup 2 to 50 mu A/cm sup 2. Fractal pattern growth is in remarkable agreement with Sander's diffusion-limited aggregation model. The alloy clusters have diffused and aggregated in chains forming branches to grow a beautiful tree during Ti implantation with an ion flux ranging from 75 mu A/cm sup 2 to 85 mu A/cm sup 2. The authors discuss the model of fractal pattern growth durin...

  5. Microstructure characterization and optical properties of sapphire after helium ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The (0 0 0 1) sapphire samples are irradiated with 60 keV helium ions at the fluences of 5 × 1016, 1 × 1017and 5 × 1017 ions/cm2 at room temperature. After implantation, two broad absorption bands at 320–460 and 480–700 nm are observed and their intensities increase with the increasing ion fluence. The grazing incidence X-ray diffraction results indicate that the {0 0 0 1} diffraction peaks of sapphire decrease and broaden due to the disorientation of the generated crystallites after ion irradiation. The microstructure evolution is examined by the scanning and transmission electron microscopes. The surface becomes rough because of the aggregation of helium bubbles and migration towards the surface. There is a lattice expansion up to ∼4.5% in the implanted area and the lattice distortion measured from dispersion of (1 1 0) diffraction is ∼4.6°. Such strain of crystal lattice is rather large and leads to contrast fluctuation at scale of 1–2 nm (the bubble size). The laser induced damage threshold (LIDT) is investigated to understand the effect of helium ion beam irradiation on the laser damage resistance of sapphire components and the results show that the LIDT decreases from 5.4 to 2.5 J/cm2 due to the absorptive color centers, helium bubbles and defects induced by helium ion implantation. The laser damage morphologies of samples before and after ion implantation are also presented

  6. Microstructure characterization and optical properties of sapphire after helium ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Mian; Yang, Liang; Shen, Huahai; Liu, Wei; Xiang, Xia; Zheng, Wanguo; Guo, Decheng; Huang, Jin; Sun, Kai; Yuan, Xiaodong

    2015-06-01

    The (0 0 0 1) sapphire samples are irradiated with 60 keV helium ions at the fluences of 5 × 1016, 1 × 1017and 5 × 1017 ions/cm2 at room temperature. After implantation, two broad absorption bands at 320-460 and 480-700 nm are observed and their intensities increase with the increasing ion fluence. The grazing incidence X-ray diffraction results indicate that the {0 0 0 1} diffraction peaks of sapphire decrease and broaden due to the disorientation of the generated crystallites after ion irradiation. The microstructure evolution is examined by the scanning and transmission electron microscopes. The surface becomes rough because of the aggregation of helium bubbles and migration towards the surface. There is a lattice expansion up to ∼4.5% in the implanted area and the lattice distortion measured from dispersion of (1 1 0) diffraction is ∼4.6°. Such strain of crystal lattice is rather large and leads to contrast fluctuation at scale of 1-2 nm (the bubble size). The laser induced damage threshold (LIDT) is investigated to understand the effect of helium ion beam irradiation on the laser damage resistance of sapphire components and the results show that the LIDT decreases from 5.4 to 2.5 J/cm2 due to the absorptive color centers, helium bubbles and defects induced by helium ion implantation. The laser damage morphologies of samples before and after ion implantation are also presented.

  7. Plasma immersion ion implantation for the efficient surface modification of medical materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper reports on a new method of plasma immersion ion implantation for the surface modification of medical materials using the example of nickel-titanium (NiTi) alloys much used for manufacturing medical implants. The chemical composition and surface properties of NiTi alloys doped with silicon by conventional ion implantation and by the proposed plasma immersion method are compared. It is shown that the new plasma immersion method is more efficient than conventional ion beam treatment and provides Si implantation into NiTi surface layers through a depth of a hundred nanometers at low bias voltages (400 V) and temperatures (≤150°C) of the substrate. The research results suggest that the chemical composition and surface properties of materials required for medicine, e.g., NiTi alloys, can be successfully attained through modification by the proposed method of plasma immersion ion implantation and by other methods based on the proposed vacuum equipment without using any conventional ion beam treatment

  8. Corrosion resistance and blood compatibility of lanthanum ion implanted pure iron by MEVVA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pure iron is a potential material applying for coronary artery stents based on its biocorrodible and nontoxic properties. However, the degradation characteristics of pure iron in vivo could reduce the mechanical stability of iron stents prematurely. The purpose of this work was to implant the lanthanum ion into pure iron specimens by metal vapor vacuum arc (MEVVA) source at an extracted voltage of 40 kV to improve its corrosion resistance and biocompatibility. The implanted fluence was up to 5 x 1017 ions/cm2. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to characterize the chemical state and depth profiles of La, Fe and O elements. The results showed lanthanum existed in the +3 oxidation state in the surface layer, most of the oxygen combined with lanthanum and form a layer of oxides. The lanthanum ion implantation layer could effectively hold back iron ions into the immersed solution and obviously improved the corrosion resistance of pure iron in simulated body fluids (SBF) solution by the electrochemical measurements and static immersion tests. The systematic evaluation of blood compatibility, including in vitro platelets adhesion, prothrombin time (PT), thrombin time (TT), indicated that the number of platelets adhesion, activation, aggregation and pseudopodium on the surface of the La-implanted samples were remarkably decreased compared with pure iron and 316L stainless steel, the PT and TT were almost the same as the original plasma. It was obviously showed that lanthanum ion implantation could effectively improve the corrosion resistance and blood compatibility of pure iron.

  9. Monitoring of ion implantation in microelectronics production environment using multi-channel reflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebersbach, Peter; Urbanowicz, Adam M.; Likhachev, Dmitry; Hartig, Carsten

    2016-03-01

    Optical metrology techniques such as ellipsometry and reflectometry are very powerful for routine process monitoring and control in the modern semiconductor manufacturing industry. However, both methods rely on optical modeling therefore, the optical properties of all materials in the stack need to be characterized a priori or determined during characterization. Some processes such as ion implantation and subsequent annealing produce slight variations in material properties within wafer, wafer-to-wafer, and lot-to-lot; such variation can degrade the dimensional measurement accuracy for both unpatterned optical measurements as well as patterned (2D and 3D) scatterometry measurements. These variations can be accounted for if the optical model of the structure under investigation allows one to extract not just dimensional but also material information already residing within the optical spectra. This paper focuses on modeling of ion implanted and annealed poly Si stacks typically used in high-k technology. Monitoring of ion implantation is often a blind spot in mass production due to capability issues and other limitations of common methods. Typically, the ion implantation dose can be controlled by research-grade ellipsometers with extended infrared range. We demonstrate that multi-channel spectroscopic reflectometry can also be used for ion implant monitoring in the mass-production environment. Our findings are applicable across all technology nodes.

  10. Plasma immersion ion implantation for the efficient surface modification of medical materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slabodchikov, Vladimir A., E-mail: dipis1991@mail.ru; Borisov, Dmitry P., E-mail: borengin@mail.ru; Kuznetsov, Vladimir M., E-mail: kuznetsov@rec.tsu.ru [National Research Tomsk State University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-27

    The paper reports on a new method of plasma immersion ion implantation for the surface modification of medical materials using the example of nickel-titanium (NiTi) alloys much used for manufacturing medical implants. The chemical composition and surface properties of NiTi alloys doped with silicon by conventional ion implantation and by the proposed plasma immersion method are compared. It is shown that the new plasma immersion method is more efficient than conventional ion beam treatment and provides Si implantation into NiTi surface layers through a depth of a hundred nanometers at low bias voltages (400 V) and temperatures (≤150°C) of the substrate. The research results suggest that the chemical composition and surface properties of materials required for medicine, e.g., NiTi alloys, can be successfully attained through modification by the proposed method of plasma immersion ion implantation and by other methods based on the proposed vacuum equipment without using any conventional ion beam treatment.

  11. A study of temperature effect on Ta+N ion-implanted hardalloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Hard alloy were implanted with a dual-ion of nitrogen and tantalum at temperature of 100 ℃ and 400 ℃ at a dose of 8× 1017 ions cm-2 .Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) was used to determine the nitrogen and tantalum concentration profiles. Microhardness measurements were performed to evaluate the improvements in surface property. The thickness of implanted layers increased by about an order of magnitude when the temperature was elevated from 100 ℃ to 400 ℃. A higher surface hardness was also obtained in the higher temperature implantation. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) image showed distinct microstructural changes, and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis showed the presence of nitrides of tantalum and tungsten on the surface implanted.

  12. A transmission electron microscopy investigation of sulfide nanocrystals formed by ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion implantation was used to form compound semiconductor nanocrystal precipitates of ZnS, CdS, and PbS in both glass and crystalline matrices. The precipitate microstructures and size distributions were investigated by cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy techniques. Several unusual features were observed, including strongly depth-dependent size variations of the ZnS precipitates and central void features in the CdS nanocrystals. The morphology and crystal structure of the nanocrystal precipitates could be controlled by selection of the host material. The size distribution and microstructural complexity were significantly reduced by implanting a low concentration of ions into a noncrystalline host, and by using multi-energy implants to give a flat concentration profile of the implanted elements. (c) 1999 Materials Research Society

  13. Corrosion behaviour of ion implanted aluminium alloy in 0.1 M NaCl electrolyte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, J.W.; Evans, P.J. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia); Sood, D.K. [Royal Melbourne Inst. of Tech., VIC (Australia)

    1993-12-31

    Aluminum and its alloys are widely used in industry because of their light weight, high strength and good corrosion resistance which is due to the formation of a protective oxide layer. However, under saline conditions such as those encountered in marine environments, this group of metals are vulnerable to localised degradation in the form of pitting corrosion. This type of corrosion involves the adsorption of an anion, such as chlorine, at the oxide solution interface. Ion implantation of metal ions has been shown to improve the corrosion resistance of a variety of materials. This effect occurs : when the implanted species reduces anion adsorption thereby decreasing the corrosion rate. In this paper we report on the pitting behavior of Ti implanted 2011 Al alloy in dilute sodium chloride solution. The Ti implanted surfaces exhibited an increased pitting potential and a reduced oxygen uptake. 5 refs., 3 figs.

  14. Surface engineering of a Zr-based bulk metallic glass with low energy Ar- or Ca-ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Lu; Zhu, Chao [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-2100 (United States); Muntele, Claudiu I. [Center for Irradiation Materials, Alabama A and M University, P. O. Box 1447, Normal, AL 35762 (United States); Zhang, Tao [Key Laboratory of Aerospace Materials and Performance (Ministry of Education), School of Materials Science and Engineering, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Liaw, Peter K. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-2100 (United States); He, Wei, E-mail: whe5@utk.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-2100 (United States); Department of Mechanical, Aerospace and Biomedical Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-2210 (United States)

    2015-02-01

    In the present study, low energy ion implantation was employed to engineer the surface of a Zr-based bulk metallic glass (BMG), aiming at improving the biocompatibility and imparting bioactivity to the surface. Ca- or Ar-ions were implanted at 10 or 50 keV at a fluence of 8 × 10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2} to (Zr{sub 0.55}Al{sub 0.10}Ni{sub 0.05}Cu{sub 0.30}){sub 99}Y{sub 1} (at.%) BMG. The effects of ion implantation on material properties and subsequent cellular responses were investigated. Both Ar- and Ca-ion implantations were suggested to induce atom displacements on the surfaces according to the Monte-Carlo simulation. The change of atomic environment of Zr in the surface regions as implied by the alteration in X-ray absorption measurements at Zr K-edge. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed that the ion implantation process has modified the surface chemical compositions and indicated the presence of Ca after Ca-ion implantation. The surface nanohardness has been enhanced by implantation of either ion species, with Ca-ion implantation showing more prominent effect. The BMG surfaces were altered to be more hydrophobic after ion implantation, which can be attributed to the reduced amount of hydroxyl groups on the implanted surfaces. Higher numbers of adherent cells were found on Ar- and Ca-ion implanted samples, while more pronounced cell adhesion was observed on Ca-ion implanted substrates. The low energy ion implantation resulted in concurrent modifications in atomic structure, nanohardness, surface chemistry, hydrophobicity, and cell behavior on the surface of the Zr-based BMG, which were proposed to be mutually correlated with each other. - Highlights: • Low energy ion implantation of a Zr-based BMG for bone implant applications • Concurrent modifications in surface structure and properties after irradiation • Promoted adhesion of bone-forming cells after Ar- or Ca-ion implantation.

  15. Corrosion behavior of low energy, high temperature nitrogen ion-implanted AISI 304 stainless steel

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Ghorannevis; A Shokouhy; M M Larijani; S H Haji Hosseini; M Yari; A Anvari; M Gholipur Shahraki; A H Sari; M R Hantehzadeh

    2007-01-01

    This work presents the results of a low-energy nitrogen ion implantation of AISI 304 type stainless steel (SS) at a moderate temperature of about 500° C. The nitrogen ions are extracted from a Kauffman-type ion source at an energy of 30 keV, and ion current density of 100 A cm-2. Nitrogen ion concentration of 6 × 1017, 8 × 1017 and 1018 ions cm-2, were selected for our study. The X-ray diffraction results show the formation of CrN polycrystalline phase after nitrogen bombardment and a change of crystallinity due to the change in nitrogen ion concentration. The secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) results show the formation of CrN phases too. Corrosion test has shown that corrosion resistance is enhanced by increasing nitrogen ion concentration.

  16. Mg ion implantation on SLA-treated titanium surface and its effects on the behavior of mesenchymal stem cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Beom-Su; Kim, Jin Seong; Park, Young Min; Choi, Bo-Young; Lee, Jun

    2013-04-01

    Magnesium (Mg) is one of the most important ions associated with bone osseointegration. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cellular effects of Mg implantation in titanium (Ti) surfaces treated with sand blast using large grit and acid etching (SLA). Mg ions were implanted into the surface via vacuum arc source ion implantation. The surface morphology, chemical properties, and the amount of Mg ion release were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS), and inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometer (ICP-OES). Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were used to evaluate cellular parameters such as proliferation, cytotoxicity, and adhesion morphology by MTS assay, live/dead assay, and SEM. Furthermore, osteoblast differentiation was determined on the basis of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and the degree of calcium accumulation. In the Mg ion-implanted disk, 2.3×10(16) ions/cm(2) was retained. However, after Mg ion implantation, the surface morphology did not change. Implanted Mg ions were rapidly released during the first 7 days in vitro. The MTS assay, live/dead assay, and SEM demonstrated increased cell attachment and growth on the Mg ion-implanted surface. In particular, Mg ion implantation increased the initial cell adhesion, and in an osteoblast differentiation assay, ALP activity and calcium accumulation. These findings suggest that Mg ion implantation using the plasma source ion implantation (PSII) technique may be useful for SLA-treated Ti dental implants to improve their osseointegration capacity.

  17. Capacitance of High-Voltage Coaxial Cable in Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) is an excellent technique for the surface modification of complex-shaped components. Owing to pulsed operation mode of the high voltage and large slew rate, the capacitance on the high-voltage coaxial cable can be detrimental to the processand cannot be ignored. In fact, a significant portion of the rise-time/fall-time of the implantation voltage pulse and big initial current can be attributed to the coaxial cable.

  18. Reactions of carbon cluster ions stored in an RF trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reactions of carbon cluster ions with O2 were studied by using an RF ion trap in which cluster ions of specific size produced by laser ablation could be stored selectively. Reaction rate constants for positive and negative carbon cluster ions were estimated. In the case of the positive cluster ions, these were consistent with the previous experimental results using FTMS. Negative carbon cluster ions C-n (n=4-8) were much less reactive than positive cluster ions. The CnO- products were seen only in n=4 and 6. (orig.)

  19. Treatment planning system for carbon ion radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koyama-Ito, Hiroko [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    2002-06-01

    This paper describes the treatment planning (TP) and its peripheral system for carbon ion therapy that has been developed and in clinical use in recent two years at our institution. A new treatment planning system which is FOCUS customized to our irradiation system will be launched in clinical use soon. A new DICOM based PACS has been developed and in use. Now MRI, PET images are ready to be utilized for patient definition with image fusion functionality of radiotherapy TP. We implemented the exchange functionality of TP data specified by RTOG 3D QA Center in FOCUS, Pinnacle3 and heavy ion TP. Target volume and normal structure contours and dose distributions are exchangeable. A database system of carbon ion therapy dedicated to analysis of therapy data has been designed and implemented. All accessible planning data and treatment records of more than 1000 patients treated for seven and half years have been archived. The system has a DICOM RT sever and a database for miscellaneous text data. Limited numbers of private attributes were introduced for ion therapy specific objects. On-line as well as manual registration along with edit functionalities is prepared. Standard web browser is used to search and retrieve information. A DICOM RT viewer has been developed to view and retrieve RT images, dose distributions and structure set. These system described above are all designed to conform to the up-to-date standards of radiation therapy so as to be bases of the future development of the therapy at our institution. (author)

  20. Clinical advantages of carbon-ion radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujii, Hirohiko; Kamada, Tadashi; Baba, Masayuki; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Kato, Hirotoshi; Kato, Shingo; Yamada, Shigeru; Yasuda, Shigeo; Yanagi, Takeshi; Kato, Hiroyuki; Hara, Ryusuke; Yamamoto, Naotaka; Mizoe, Junetsu

    2008-07-01

    Carbon-ion radiotherapy (C-ion RT) possesses physical and biological advantages. It was started at NIRS in 1994 using the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC); since then more than 50 protocol studies have been conducted on almost 4000 patients with a variety of tumors. Clinical experiences have demonstrated that C-ion RT is effective in such regions as the head and neck, skull base, lung, liver, prostate, bone and soft tissues, and pelvic recurrence of rectal cancer, as well as for histological types including adenocarcinoma, adenoid cystic carcinoma, malignant melanoma and various types of sarcomas, against which photon therapy could be less effective. Furthermore, when compared with photon and proton RT, a significant reduction of overall treatment time and fractions has been accomplished without enhancing toxicities. Currently, the number of irradiation sessions per patient averages 13 fractions spread over approximately three weeks. This means that in a carbon therapy facility a larger number of patients than is possible with other modalities can be treated over the same period of time.

  1. Application of Coaxial Ion Gun for Film Generation and Ion Implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takatsu, Mikio; Asai, Tomohiko; Kurumi, Satoshi; Suzuki, Kaoru; Hirose, Hideharu; Masutani, Shigeyuki

    A magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG) is here utilized for deposition on high-melting-point metals. MCPGs have hitherto been studied mostly in the context of nuclear fusion research, for particle and magnetic helicity injection and spheromak formation. During spheromak formation, the electrode materials are ionized and mixed into the plasmoid. In this study, this ablation process by gun-current sputtering is enhanced for metallic thin-film generation. In the proposed system geometry, only ionized materials are electromagnetically accelerated by the self-Lorentz force, with ionized operating gas as a magnetized thermal plasmoid, contributing to the thin-film deposition. This reduces the impurity and non-uniformity of the deposited thin-film. Furthermore, as the ions are accelerated in a parallel direction to the injection axis, vertical implantation of the ions into the substrate surface is achieved. To test a potential application of the developed system, experiments were conducted involving the formation of a buffer layer on hard ceramics, for use in dental materials.

  2. ESR studies of high-energy phosphorus-ion implanted synthetic diamond crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isoya, J. [University of Library and Information Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Kanda, H.; Morita, Y.; Ohshima, T.

    1997-03-01

    Phosphorus is among potential n-type dopants in diamond. High pressure synthetic diamond crystals of type IIa implanted with high energy (9-18 MeV) phosphorus ions have been studied by using electron spin resonance (ESR) technique. The intensity and the linewidth of the ESR signal attributed to the dangling bond of the amorphous phase varied with the implantation dose, suggesting the nature of the amorphization varies with the dose. The ESR signals of point defects have been observed in the low dose as-implanted crystals and in the high dose crystals annealed at high temperature and at high pressure. (author)

  3. Optical and electrical studies of ZnO thin films heavily implanted with silver ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thin films of zinc oxide (ZnO) with the thickness of 200 nm have been deposited on quartz substrates by using ion-beam sputtering technique. Then Ag+ ions with the energy of 30 keV have been implanted into as-deposited ZnO films to the fluences in the range of (0.25-1.00)×1017 ions/cm2 to form ZnO:Ag composite layers with different concentrations of the silver impurity. The analysis of the microstructure has shown that the thickness of the ZnO film decreases, and the Ag dopant concentration tends to the saturation with increasing Ag implantation fluence. The ZnO:Ag composite layers reveal the optical selective absorption at the wavelength of the surface plasmon resonance that is typical for silver nanoparticles dispersed in the ZnO matrix. The red shift of the plasmon resonance peak from 480 to 500 nm is observed with the increase in the implantation fluence to 0.75×1017 Ag ions/cm2. Then the absorption peak position starts the backward motion, and the absorption intensity decreases with the subsequent increase in the implantation fluence. The non-monotonic dependence of the absorption peak position on the implantation fluence has been analyzed within of Maxwell Garnet theory and taking into account the strong sputtering of ZnO films during implantation. The ZnO:Ag composite layers exhibit the p-type conductivity indicating that a part of Ag+ ions is in the form of acceptor impurities implanted into the ZnO lattice

  4. RTV silicone rubber surface modification for cell biocompatibility by negative-ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Chenlong; Wang, Guangfu; Chu, Yingjie; Xu, Ya; Qiu, Menglin; Xu, Mi

    2016-03-01

    A negative cluster ion implantation system was built on the injector of a GIC4117 tandem accelerator. Next, the system was used to study the surface modification of room temperature vulcanization silicone rubber (RTV SR) for cell biocompatibility. The water contact angle was observed to decrease from 117.6° to 99.3° as the C1- implantation dose was increased to 1 × 1016 ions/cm2, and the effects of C1-, C2- and O1- implantation result in only small differences in the water contact angle at 3 × 1015 ions/cm2. These findings indicate that the hydrophilicity of RTV SR improves as the dose is increased and that the radiation effect has a greater influence than the doping effect on the hydrophilicity. There are two factors influence hydrophilicity of RTV: (1) based on the XPS and ATR-FTIR results, it can be inferred that ion implantation breaks the hydrophobic functional groups (Sisbnd CH3, Sisbnd Osbnd Si, Csbnd H) of RTV SR and generates hydrophilic functional groups (sbnd COOH, sbnd OH, Sisbnd (O)x (x = 3,4)). (2) SEM reveals that the implanted surface of RTV SR appears the micro roughness such as cracks and wrinkles. The hydrophilicity should be reduced due to the lotus effect (Zhou Rui et al., 2009). These two factors cancel each other out and make the C-implantation sample becomes more hydrophilic in general terms. Finally, cell culture demonstrates that negative ion-implantation is an effective method to improve the cell biocompatibility of RTV SR.

  5. Blistering in alloy Ti–6Al–4V from H+ ion implantation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B K Singh; V Singh

    2010-04-01

    The effect of H+ ion implantation on surface morphology of the titanium alloy, Ti–6Al–4V, was studied, following H+ ion implantation of 150 keV and 250 keV energy to fluence of 2.6 × 1018 cm-2 and 2.5 × 1019 cm-2, respectively at ambient temperature. No detectable change was observed in surface features of either of the above specimen immediately after the implantation. However, vein like features (VLF) were observed to appear on the surface of the sample, implanted at 150 keV to a fluence of 2.6 × 1018 cm-2, following natural ageing at room temperature for 150 days. Subsequent annealing of the above naturally aged sample, at 423 K for 150 min under vacuum (10-3 torr), led to development of a macroblister. In sharp contrast in the other sample, implanted by H+ ions of higher energy (250 keV) to higher fluence of 2.5 × 1019 cm-2, neither there was any effect of natural ageing following the implantation nor that of subsequent annealing at 423 K and ageing on its surface morphology.

  6. Optical properties of self-ion-implanted Si(100) studied by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microstructural and optical properties of self-ion-implanted Si(100) have been studied using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and spectroscopic ellipsometry. The Si+ ions are implanted at 150 keV with fluences ranging from 2x1014 to 2x1015cm-2. The AFM image indicates that the Si(100) surface is shiny flat before and after Si+-ion implantation (rms roughness of ∼0.3 nm). An effective-medium approximation and a linear regression analysis suggest that the ion-implanted surface can be explained by a physical mixture of microcrystalline (μc-) and amorphous silicon (a-Si). It has been shown that the complex dielectric function ε(E) of μc-Si differs appreciably from that of c-Si, especially in the vicinity of the sharp critical-point features. This difference in ε(E) can be successfully explained by increasing the broadening value at each critical point. The volume fraction of a-Si is found to be simply expressed as fa=([Si+]/A)α, where [Si+] is the ion fluence in cm-2, A (=1.4x1015cm-2) is an amorphization-threshold fluence, and α(=1.42) is an amorphization-rate factor of the Si+ ions. [copyright] 2001 American Institute of Physics

  7. Method for Providing Semiconductors Having Self-Aligned Ion Implant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neudeck, Philip G. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A method is disclosed that provides a self-aligned nitrogen-implant particularly suited for a Junction Field Effect Transistor (JFET) semiconductor device preferably comprised of a silicon carbide (SiC). This self-aligned nitrogen-implant allows for the realization of durable and stable electrical functionality of high temperature transistors such as JFETs. The method implements the self-aligned nitrogen-implant having predetermined dimensions, at a particular step in the fabrication process, so that the SiC junction field effect transistors are capable of being electrically operating continuously at 500.degree. C. for over 10,000 hours in an air ambient with less than a 10% change in operational transistor parameters.

  8. Studies on the physiologic effects of ion implantation on rice seed of single and twin seedlings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dry rice seeds of single and twin seedlings were treated by ion implantation. These seeds have differences as compared with control seeds in respect to the physilogic effects. The germination percentage and the survival seedling rate were lower than the check, but higher than those for γ-roy treated seeds. Ultra weak bioluminescence value of dry seeds treated by ion implantation was higher than that of the check, lower than that of seeds treated by γ-ray. The results also show that seeds treated by ion implantation possess a lower percentage of twin seedling than the comparisons do. It is worthy mentioning that there are more twin seedlings possessed independent two-mesocotyls which is a very meaningful apomictic material in rice selecting

  9. Non-Contact Measurement of Thermal Diffusivity in Ion-Implanted Nuclear Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, F; Mason, D R; Eliason, J K; Maznev, A A; Nelson, K A; Dudarev, S L

    2015-11-03

    Knowledge of mechanical and physical property evolution due to irradiation damage is essential for the development of future fission and fusion reactors. Ion-irradiation provides an excellent proxy for studying irradiation damage, allowing high damage doses without sample activation. Limited ion-penetration-depth means that only few-micron-thick damaged layers are produced. Substantial effort has been devoted to probing the mechanical properties of these thin implanted layers. Yet, whilst key to reactor design, their thermal transport properties remain largely unexplored due to a lack of suitable measurement techniques. Here we demonstrate non-contact thermal diffusivity measurements in ion-implanted tungsten for nuclear fusion armour. Alloying with transmutation elements and the interaction of retained gas with implantation-induced defects both lead to dramatic reductions in thermal diffusivity. These changes are well captured by our modelling approaches. Our observations have important implications for the design of future fusion power plants.

  10. Behaviour of radiation defects under the influence of mechanical strain in ion-implanted silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suprun-Belevich, Yu.; Palmetshofer, L.

    1997-05-01

    The interactions between radiation defects and internal mechanical strain in ion-implanted semiconductor crystals have been investigated by means of Hall-effect measurements, deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) and X-ray diffraction. The mechanical strain had been intentionally introduced into silicon crystals by 320 keV Ge-ion implantation (10 15-3 × 10 16 cm -2) and subsequent annealing. The samples were then subjected to H + - or Si +-ion bombardment for the introduction of radiation defects. Both Hall-effect and DLTS measurements showed a decrease of the defect production rate in a wide dose interval and accelerated annealing of the radiation defects in strained samples compared to unstrained reference samples. The reduction of the defect concentration during implantation and annealing under the influence of strain is supposed to be connected with an energy transfer from the elastic mechanical strain field to the defects.

  11. Retardation of surface corrosion of biodegradable magnesium-based materials by aluminum ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Guosong; Xu Ruizhen; Feng Kai; Wu Shuilin; Wu Zhengwei [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Sun Guangyong; Zheng Gang; Li Guangyao [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Design and Manufacturing for Vehicle Body, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Chu, Paul K., E-mail: paul.chu@cityu.edu.hk [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

    2012-07-15

    Aluminum ion implantation is employed to modify pure Mg as well as AZ31 and AZ91 magnesium alloys and their surface degradation behavior in simulated body fluids is studied. Polarization tests performed in conjunction with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) reveal that the surface corrosion resistance after Al ion implantation is improved appreciably. This enhancement can be attributed to the formation of a gradient surface structure with a gradual transition from an Al-rich oxide layer to Al-rich metal layer. Compared to the high Al-content magnesium alloy (AZ91), a larger reduction in the degradation rate is achieved from pure magnesium and AZ31. Our results reveal that the surface corrosion resistance of Mg alloys with no or low Al content can be improved by Al ion implantation.

  12. Effects of Ag + and Au 3+ ion implantation of lithium niobate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amolo, G. O.; Comins, J. D.; Naidoo, S. R.; Connell, S. H.; Witcomb, M. J.; Derry, T. E.

    2006-09-01

    The optical effects of implantation of lithium niobate crystals with 100 keV Ag + and 8 MeV Au 3+ ions with fluences of 1 × 10 17 ions/cm 2 have been investigated. Metal nanoparticle formation has been studied as a function of annealing temperature, and the resulting optical extinction curves have been simulated by the Mie theory in the small particle limit. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has provided direct evidence for the MNP sizes allowing comparison with the calculated results. A TEM study of an X-cut sample implanted with Ag + ions show that the implanted region is partially amorphised. The differences in the temperature of Au colloid development in X- and Y-cut faces of the lithium niobate crystal are attributed to restoration of crystallinity as a result of annealing.

  13. Homo-epitaxial diamond film growth on ion implanted diamond substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiser, P.S.; Prawer, S.; Nugent, K.W.; Bettiol, A.A.; Kostidis, L.I.; Jamieson, D.N. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1996-12-31

    The nucleation of CVD diamond is a complicated process, governed by many interrelated parameters. In the present work we attempt to elucidate the effect of strain on the growth of a homo-epitaxial CVD diamond. We have employed laterally confined high dose (MeV) Helium ion implantation to produce surface swelling of the substrate. The strain is enhanced by the lateral confinement of the implanted region to squares of 100 x 100 {mu}m{sup 2}. After ion implantation, micro-Raman spectroscopy was employed to map the surface strain. The substrates were then inserted into a CVD reactor and a CVD diamond film was grown upon them. Since the strained regions were laterally confined, it was then possible to monitor the effect of strain on diamond nucleation. The substrates were also analysed using Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy (RBS), Proton induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) and Ion Beam induced Luminescence (IBIL). 7 refs., 5 figs.

  14. Non-Contact Measurement of Thermal Diffusivity in Ion-Implanted Nuclear Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, F; Mason, D R; Eliason, J K; Maznev, A A; Nelson, K A; Dudarev, S L

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of mechanical and physical property evolution due to irradiation damage is essential for the development of future fission and fusion reactors. Ion-irradiation provides an excellent proxy for studying irradiation damage, allowing high damage doses without sample activation. Limited ion-penetration-depth means that only few-micron-thick damaged layers are produced. Substantial effort has been devoted to probing the mechanical properties of these thin implanted layers. Yet, whilst key to reactor design, their thermal transport properties remain largely unexplored due to a lack of suitable measurement techniques. Here we demonstrate non-contact thermal diffusivity measurements in ion-implanted tungsten for nuclear fusion armour. Alloying with transmutation elements and the interaction of retained gas with implantation-induced defects both lead to dramatic reductions in thermal diffusivity. These changes are well captured by our modelling approaches. Our observations have important implications for the design of future fusion power plants. PMID:26527099

  15. Carbon-carbon composites for orthopedic prosthesis and implants. CRADA final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burchell, T D; Klett, J W; Strizak, J P [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Baker, C [FMI, Biddeford, ME (United States)

    1998-01-21

    The prosthetic implant market is extensive. For example, because of arthritic degeneration of hip and knee cartilage and osteoporotic fractures of the hip, over 200,000 total joint replacements (TJRs) are performed in the United States each year. Current TJR devices are typically metallic (stainless steel, cobalt, or titanium alloy) and are fixed in the bone with polymethylacrylate (PMMA) cement. Carbon-carbon composite materials offer several distinct advantages over metals for TJR prosthesis. Their mechanical properties can be tailored to match more closely the mechanical properties of human bone, and the composite may have up to 25% porosity, the size and distribution of which may be controlled through processing. The porous nature of carbon-carbon composites will allow for the ingrowth of bone, achieving biological fixation, and eliminating the need for PMMA cement fixation.

  16. Irradiation influence on Mylar and Makrofol induced by argon ions in a plasma immersion ion implantation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassan, A. [Accelerators & Ion Sources Department, Nuclear Research Center, Atomic Energy Authority, P.O. 13759, Cairo (Egypt); El-Saftawy, A.A., E-mail: aama1978@yahoo.com [Accelerators & Ion Sources Department, Nuclear Research Center, Atomic Energy Authority, P.O. 13759, Cairo (Egypt); Aal, S.A. Abd El [Central Lab. for Elemental & Isotopic Analysis, Nuclear Research Center, Atomic Energy Authority, P.O. 13759, Cairo (Egypt); Ghazaly, M. El [Physiology Department, College of Medicine, Taif University, P.O. 888, Taif (Saudi Arabia); Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Zagazig University, P.O. 44519, Zagazig (Egypt)

    2015-08-30

    Highlights: • A home-built plasma immersion ion implantation system was tested in modifying surfaces. • Wettability modifications within the energy range 10 keV implantation are not investigated elsewhere, up to our knowledge. • The wettability of Mylar and Makrofol surface was enhanced by the dual effect of ion implantation and plasma treatment. • The improved wettability was found to depend on both surface roughness and chemistry. • The adhesive bonding and surface energy of the polymers are improved. - Abstract: Mylar and Makrofol polycarbonate polymers were irradiated by Ar ions in a plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) system. The surface wettability of both polymers was investigated by employing the contact angle method. The measured contact angles were found to depend on the surface layer properties. Good wetting surfaces were found to depend not only on surface roughness but also on its chemistry that analyzed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Surfaces topography and roughness was investigated and correlated to their surface energy which studied with the aid of acid-base model for evaluating the improvement of surface wettability after irradiation. PIII improves polymers surface properties efficiently in a controllable way.

  17. Decrease in work function of transparent conducting ZnO tin films by phosphorus ion implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Gi-Seok; Hong, Sang-Jin; Park, Jong-Woon; Choi, Bum-Ho; Lee, Jong-Ho; Shin, Dong-Chan

    2008-09-01

    To confirm the possibility of engineering the work function of ZnO thin films, we have implanted phosphorus ions into ZnO thin films deposited by radio-frequency magnetron sputtering. The fabricated films show n-type characteristics. It is shown that the electrical and optical properties of those thin films vary depending sensitively on the ion dose and rapid thermal annealing time. Compared to as-deposited ZnO films, the work-function of phosphorus ion-implanted ZnO thin films is observed to be lower and decreases with increasing ion doses. It is likely that the zinc or oxygen vacancies are firstly filled with the implanted phosphorus ions. With further increased ions, free electrons are generated as Zn2+ sites are replaced by those ions or interstitial phosphorus ions increase at the lattice sites, the fermi level by which approaches the conduction band and thus the work function decreases. Those films exhibit the optical transmittance higher than 85% within the visible wavelength range (up to 800 nm).

  18. Study of Nickel Ion Release in Simulated Body Fluid from C+-IMPLANTED Nickel Titanium Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafique, Muhammad Ahsan; Murtaza, G.; Saadat, Shahzad; Zaheer, Zeeshan; Shahnawaz, Muhammad; Uddin, Muhammad K. H.; Ahmad, Riaz

    2016-05-01

    Nickel ion release from NiTi shape memory alloy is an issue for biomedical applications. This study was planned to study the effect of C+ implantation on nickel ion release and affinity of calcium phosphate precipitation on NiTi alloy. Four annealed samples are chosen for the present study; three samples with oxidation layer and the fourth without oxidation layer. X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectra reveal amorphization with ion implantation. Proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) result shows insignificant increase in Ni release in simulated body fluid (SBF) and calcium phosphate precipitation up to 8×1013ions/cm2. Then Nickel contents show a sharp increase for greater ion doses. Corrosion potential decreases by increasing the dose but all the samples passivate after the same interval of time and at the same level of VSCE in ringer lactate solution. Hardness of samples initially increases at greater rate (up to 8×1013ions/cm2) and then increases with lesser rate. It is found that 8×1013ions/cm2 (≈1014) is a safer limit of implantation on NiTi alloy, this limit gives us lesser ion release, better hardness and reasonable hydroxyapatite incubation affinity.

  19. Grain size effect on yield strength of titanium alloy implanted with aluminum ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents a transmission electron microscopy (TEM) study of the microstructure and phase state of commercially pure titanium VT1-0 implanted by aluminum ions. This study has been carried out before and after the ion implantation for different grain size, i.e. 0.3 µm (ultra-fine grain condition), 1.5 µm (fine grain condition), and 17 µm (polycrystalline condition). This paper presents details of calculations and analysis of strength components of the yield stress. It is shown that the ion implantation results in a considerable hardening of the entire thickness of the implanted layer in the both grain types. The grain size has, however, a different effect on the yield stress. So, both before and after the ion implantation, the increase of the grain size leads to the decrease of the alloy hardening. Thus, hardening in ultra-fine and fine grain alloys increased by four times, while in polycrystalline alloy it increased by over six times

  20. Synthesis of tantalum nitride diffusion barriers for Cu metal by plasma immersion ion implantation

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, M; Kumar, D; George, P J; Paul, A K

    2002-01-01

    A Tantalum nitride diffusion barrier layer for copper metal was synthesized by Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation technique (PIII). Effect of nitrogen dose in Ta layer was investigated in improving its diffusion barrier properties. Silicon wafers coated with Ta were implanted with nitrogen at two different doses viz. 10$^{15}$ions/cm$^2$ and 10$^{17}$ions/cm$^2$ corresponding to low and high dose regime. High dose of implanted nitrogen ions in the film render it to become Ta(N), Thereafter a copper (Cu) layer was deposited on the samples to produce Cu/Ta(N)/Si structure. To evaluate the barrier properties of Ta(N) these samples were annealed up to 700$^\\circ$C for 30 minutes. Sheet resistance, X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) measurements were carried out to investigate the effect of annealing. Low dose implanted Ta layer does not show any change in its diffusion barrier properties, while high dose implanted layer stops the diffusion of Cu metal through it at annealing temperature...

  1. Molecule modification andmass deposition induced bythe implantation of lowenergy Fe+ ion beamsinto amino acids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Fe+ ion beams with the energy of 110 keV were implanted into films of L(+)-cysteine (HSCH2CH(NH2)COOH). One of the single crystals grown in hydrochloric acid solution with the implanted samples through slow evaporation was structurally characterized by the X-ray crystallography. The crystal is monoclinic, space group C2, with a = 1.8534(4) nm, b = 0.5234(1) nm, c = 0.7212(1) nm, β= 103.72°, V = 0.67965(3) nm3, Z = 4, F(000) = 144.0, Dclac = 1.763 g@cm-3, μ(MoKα) = 1.06 mm-1, T = 293(2) K. R = 0.0379, wR = 0.0835 for 660 observed reflections (I > 2σ(I)). The structural formula of the crystal compound is (CH2CH(NH2)NO2)ClFe (Mr = 180.38 u). Products of heavy ion beam irradiation were purified and it was directly confirmed that the implanted Fe+ ions had been deposited in the novel molecules. The same doses of Fe+ ion beams of the same energy were implanted into films of L(+)-cysteine hydrochloride monohydrate. FTIR spectroscopy of the implanted samples proved that some of the original molecules were seriously damaged and significant modifications were induced.

  2. Peculiarities and application perspectives of metal-ion implants in glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazzoldi, P.; Gonella, F. [Padua Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica; Arnold, G.W. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Battaglin, G. [Venice Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Chimica Fisica; Bertoncello, R. [Padua Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Chimica Inorganica, Metallorganica e Analitica

    1993-12-31

    Ion implantation in insulators causes modifications in the refractive-index as a result of radiation damage, phase separation, or compound formation. As a consequence, light waveguides may be formed with interesting applications in the field of optoelectronics. Recently implantation of metals ions (e.g. silver, copper, gold, lead,...) showed the possibility of small radii colloidal particles formation, in a thin surface layer of the glass substrate. These particles exhibit an electron plasmon resonance which depends on the optical constants of the implanted metal and on the refractive-index of the glass host. The non-linear optical properties of such colloids, in particular the enhancement of optical Kerr susceptibility, suggest that the, ion implantation technique may play an important role for the production of all-optical switching devices. In this paper an analysis of the state-of-the-art of the research in this field will be presented in the framework of ion implantation in glass physics and chemistry.

  3. Charging and discharging in ion implanted dielectric films used for capacitive radio frequency microelectromechanical systems switch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) capacitor structure was used to investigate the dielectric charging and discharging in the capacitive radio frequency microelectromechanical switches. The insulator in MIS structure is silicon nitride films (SiN), which were deposited by either low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) or plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) processes. Phosphorus or boron ions were implanted into dielectric layer in order to introduce impurity energy levels into the band gap of SiN. The relaxation processes of the injected charges in SiN were changed due to the ion implantation, which led to the change in relaxation time of the trapped charges. In our experiments, the space charges were introduced by stressing the sample electrically with dc biasing. The effects of implantation process on charge accumulation and dissipation in the dielectric are studied by capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurement qualitatively and quantitatively. The experimental results show that the charging and discharging behavior of the ion implanted silicon nitride films deposited by LPCVD is quite different from the one deposited by PECVD. The charge accumulation in the dielectric film can be reduced by ion implantation with proper dielectric deposition method.

  4. Evaluation of the ion implantation process for production of solar cells from silicon sheet materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitzer, M. B.

    1983-01-01

    The objective of this program is the investigation and evaluation of the capabilities of the ion implantation process for the production of photovoltaic cells from a variety of present-day, state-of-the-art, low-cost silicon sheet materials. Task 1 of the program concerns application of ion implantation and furnace annealing to fabrication of cells made from dendritic web silicon. Task 2 comprises the application of ion implantation and pulsed electron beam annealing (PEBA) to cells made from SEMIX, SILSO, heat-exchanger-method (HEM), edge-defined film-fed growth (EFG) and Czochralski (CZ) silicon. The goals of Task 1 comprise an investigation of implantation and anneal processes applied to dendritic web. A further goal is the evaluation of surface passivation and back surface reflector formation. In this way, processes yielding the very highest efficiency can be evaluated. Task 2 seeks to evaluate the use of PEBA for various sheet materials. A comparison of PEBA to thermal annealing will be made for a variety of ion implantation processes.

  5. Grain size effect on yield strength of titanium alloy implanted with aluminum ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popova, Natalya, E-mail: natalya-popova-44@mail.ru [Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building, 2, Solyanaya Sq., 634003, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science, SB RAS, 2/4, Akademicheskii Ave., 634021, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Nikonenko, Elena, E-mail: vilatomsk@mail.ru [Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building, 2, Solyanaya Sq., 634003, Tomsk (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30, Lenin Str., 634050, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Yurev, Ivan, E-mail: yiywork@mail.ru [Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building, 2, Solyanaya Sq., 634003, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Kalashnikov, Mark, E-mail: kmp1980@mail.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science, SB RAS, 2/4, Akademicheskii Ave., 634021, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Kurzina, Irina, E-mail: kurzina99@mail.ru [National Research Tomsk State University, 36, Lenin Str., 634050, Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-15

    The paper presents a transmission electron microscopy (TEM) study of the microstructure and phase state of commercially pure titanium VT1-0 implanted by aluminum ions. This study has been carried out before and after the ion implantation for different grain size, i.e. 0.3 µm (ultra-fine grain condition), 1.5 µm (fine grain condition), and 17 µm (polycrystalline condition). This paper presents details of calculations and analysis of strength components of the yield stress. It is shown that the ion implantation results in a considerable hardening of the entire thickness of the implanted layer in the both grain types. The grain size has, however, a different effect on the yield stress. So, both before and after the ion implantation, the increase of the grain size leads to the decrease of the alloy hardening. Thus, hardening in ultra-fine and fine grain alloys increased by four times, while in polycrystalline alloy it increased by over six times.

  6. Carbon offers advantages as implant material in human body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, J.

    1969-01-01

    Because of such characteristics as high strength and long-term biocompatability, aerospace carbonaceous materials may be used as surgical implants to correct pathological conditions in the body resulting from disease or injury. Examples of possible medical uses include bone replacement, implantation splints and circulatory bypass implants.

  7. Effect of Nitrogen Ion Implantation on the Structure and Corrosion Resistance of Equiatomic NiTi Shape Memory Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUA Yingjie; WANG Chongtai; MENG Changgong; YANG Dazhi

    2006-01-01

    To protect the surface of NiTi from corrosion, an ion implantation method was proposed. In the present work, a surface oxidized sample was implanted with nitrogen at energy of 100 keV. The corrosion resistance property was examined by the anodic polarization method in a simulated body fluid (SBF) at a temperature of 37 ℃ and contrasted to non-implanted NiTi samples. The composition and structure of the implanted layers were investigated by XPS. The experimental results from the electrochemical measurements provide an evidence that the nitrogen ion-implantation increases the corrosion resistance of NiTi shape memory alloy.

  8. Depth concentrations of deuterium ions implanted into some pure metals and alloys

    OpenAIRE

    Didyk, A. Yu.; R. Wiśniewski; Kitowski, K.; Kulikauskas, V.; Wilczynska, T.; Shiryaev, A. A.; Zubavichus, Ya. V.

    2011-01-01

    Pure metals (Cu, Ti, Zr, V, Pd) and diluted Pd-alloys (Pd-Ag, Pd-Pt, Pd-Ru, Pd-Rh) were implanted by 25 keV deuterium ions at fluences in the range (1.2{\\div}2.3)x1022 D+/m2. The post-treatment depth distributions of deuterium ions were measured 10 days and three months after the implantation using Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis (ERDA) and Rutherford Backscattering (RBS). Comparison of the obtained results allowed to make conclusions about relative stability of deuterium and hydrogen gases...

  9. Copper nanoparticles synthesized in polymers by ion implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Popok, Vladimir; Nuzhdin, Vladimir; Valeev, Valerij;

    2015-01-01

    as optical transmission spectroscopy. It is found that copper nanoparticles nucleation and growth are strongly fluence dependent as well as they are affected by the polymer properties, in particular, by radiation stability yielding different nanostructures for the implanted PI and PMMA. Shallow synthesized...

  10. Sapphire planar waveguides fabricated by H+ ion beam implantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laversenne, L.; Crunteanu, A.; Hoffmann, P.; Pollnau, M.; Moretti, P.; Mugnier, J.

    2003-01-01

    1.1-MeV proton-implanted sapphire waveguides are investigated for the first time. Optical measurements show that the planar waveguides support low-order transverse-mode propagation with good guiding properties without the need to anneal the samples.

  11. Tunnel oxide passivated contacts formed by ion implantation for applications in silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichel, Christian, E-mail: christian.reichel@ise.fraunhofer.de [Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems (ISE), Heidenhofstrasse 2, 79110 Freiburg (Germany); National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), 15013 Denver West Parkway, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States); Feldmann, Frank; Müller, Ralph; Hermle, Martin; Glunz, Stefan W. [Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems (ISE), Heidenhofstrasse 2, 79110 Freiburg (Germany); Reedy, Robert C.; Lee, Benjamin G.; Young, David L.; Stradins, Paul [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), 15013 Denver West Parkway, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States)

    2015-11-28

    Passivated contacts (poly-Si/SiO{sub x}/c-Si) doped by shallow ion implantation are an appealing technology for high efficiency silicon solar cells, especially for interdigitated back contact (IBC) solar cells where a masked ion implantation facilitates their fabrication. This paper presents a study on tunnel oxide passivated contacts formed by low-energy ion implantation into amorphous silicon (a-Si) layers and examines the influence of the ion species (P, B, or BF{sub 2}), the ion implantation dose (5 × 10{sup 14 }cm{sup −2} to 1 × 10{sup 16 }cm{sup −2}), and the subsequent high-temperature anneal (800 °C or 900 °C) on the passivation quality and junction characteristics using double-sided contacted silicon solar cells. Excellent passivation quality is achieved for n-type passivated contacts by P implantations into either intrinsic (undoped) or in-situ B-doped a-Si layers with implied open-circuit voltages (iV{sub oc}) of 725 and 720 mV, respectively. For p-type passivated contacts, BF{sub 2} implantations into intrinsic a-Si yield well passivated contacts and allow for iV{sub oc} of 690 mV, whereas implanted B gives poor passivation with iV{sub oc} of only 640 mV. While solar cells featuring in-situ B-doped selective hole contacts and selective electron contacts with P implanted into intrinsic a-Si layers achieved V{sub oc} of 690 mV and fill factor (FF) of 79.1%, selective hole contacts realized by BF{sub 2} implantation into intrinsic a-Si suffer from drastically reduced FF which is caused by a non-Ohmic Schottky contact. Finally, implanting P into in-situ B-doped a-Si layers for the purpose of overcompensation (counterdoping) allowed for solar cells with V{sub oc} of 680 mV and FF of 80.4%, providing a simplified and promising fabrication process for IBC solar cells featuring passivated contacts.

  12. Tunnel oxide passivated contacts formed by ion implantation for applications in silicon solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Passivated contacts (poly-Si/SiOx/c-Si) doped by shallow ion implantation are an appealing technology for high efficiency silicon solar cells, especially for interdigitated back contact (IBC) solar cells where a masked ion implantation facilitates their fabrication. This paper presents a study on tunnel oxide passivated contacts formed by low-energy ion implantation into amorphous silicon (a-Si) layers and examines the influence of the ion species (P, B, or BF2), the ion implantation dose (5 × 1014 cm−2 to 1 × 1016 cm−2), and the subsequent high-temperature anneal (800 °C or 900 °C) on the passivation quality and junction characteristics using double-sided contacted silicon solar cells. Excellent passivation quality is achieved for n-type passivated contacts by P implantations into either intrinsic (undoped) or in-situ B-doped a-Si layers with implied open-circuit voltages (iVoc) of 725 and 720 mV, respectively. For p-type passivated contacts, BF2 implantations into intrinsic a-Si yield well passivated contacts and allow for iVoc of 690 mV, whereas implanted B gives poor passivation with iVoc of only 640 mV. While solar cells featuring in-situ B-doped selective hole contacts and selective electron contacts with P implanted into intrinsic a-Si layers achieved Voc of 690 mV and fill factor (FF) of 79.1%, selective hole contacts realized by BF2 implantation into intrinsic a-Si suffer from drastically reduced FF which is caused by a non-Ohmic Schottky contact. Finally, implanting P into in-situ B-doped a-Si layers for the purpose of overcompensation (counterdoping) allowed for solar cells with Voc of 680 mV and FF of 80.4%, providing a simplified and promising fabrication process for IBC solar cells featuring passivated contacts

  13. Modification of WC-Co Hard Metal by Ion Implantation with Ti+, AI+, N+, C+ and B+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WC/Co hard metal was implanted by Ti+, AI+, N+, C+, and B+ ions at a dose of 5x 1017 ions/cm2 at different energies ranging from 50 keV to 200 keV. The implanted layers were investigated by means of nano indentation, calotte measurements, SEM, X-ray diffraction XRD, tribometer and EDX. The maximum implanted zone was about 0.13 μm. The hardness of WC-Co was increased by a factor of 140% after its implantation by Ti, AI, and N and increased by a factor of 170 % after implantation by Ti+, AI+, C+, N+ and B+ ions as compared to the original value. Also friction coefficient of WC/Co was improved after ion implantation.

  14. The microstructure, mechanical and tribological properties of TiN coatings after Nb and C ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, Nb and C ions are co-implanted into the TiN coatings, deposited by magnetic filter arc ion plating (MFAIP), using a metal vacuum vapor arc (MEVVA) ion source implantor with doses of 1 × 1017 and 5 × 1017 ions/cm2. The microstructure and chemical compositions of the TiN coatings implanted with Nb and C ions have been investigated by means of glancing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Meanwhile, the mechanical and tribological properties of the TiN coatings have been studied by nano-indentation test and SRV friction and wear tester. The results show that the hardness and plastic deformation resistance of TiN coatings increased remarkably after ion implantation due to the energetic Nb and C ions bombardment and the formation of NbN and TiC phase. Nb ion implantation can effectively improve the wear resistance of the TiN coatings and the Nb + C dual ion implantation shows a better wear behavior due to a carbonaceous layer formed in the implanted zone of the TiN coatings after C ion implantation.

  15. The microstructure, mechanical and tribological properties of TiN coatings after Nb and C ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Bin; Tao, Ye, E-mail: ttaoye@163.com; Hu, Zhijie

    2013-11-01

    In this study, Nb and C ions are co-implanted into the TiN coatings, deposited by magnetic filter arc ion plating (MFAIP), using a metal vacuum vapor arc (MEVVA) ion source implantor with doses of 1 × 10{sup 17} and 5 × 10{sup 17} ions/cm{sup 2}. The microstructure and chemical compositions of the TiN coatings implanted with Nb and C ions have been investigated by means of glancing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Meanwhile, the mechanical and tribological properties of the TiN coatings have been studied by nano-indentation test and SRV friction and wear tester. The results show that the hardness and plastic deformation resistance of TiN coatings increased remarkably after ion implantation due to the energetic Nb and C ions bombardment and the formation of NbN and TiC phase. Nb ion implantation can effectively improve the wear resistance of the TiN coatings and the Nb + C dual ion implantation shows a better wear behavior due to a carbonaceous layer formed in the implanted zone of the TiN coatings after C ion implantation.

  16. Transport properties of modulation-doped structures grown by molecular beam epitaxy after focused ion beam implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modulation-doped structures are grown by molecular beam epitaxy after focused ion beam writing. The growth and implantation chambers are connected in a high vacuum to minimize the effect of growth interruption. The electron channel is drastically depleted by the buried Be+ implanted region, but only slightly depleted by the buried Au+ and Au2+ implanted regions. This is because Be+ implantation forms a p-type material, while Au+ or Au2+ implantation leaves damage only in the n-type material. Be+ implantation is therefore used to fabricate 0.1 μm-wide wires with electron mobility of 2.1x105 cm2/Vs. (author)

  17. Rare earth ion implantation and optical activation in nitride semiconductors for multicolor emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to understand the behavior of nitride semiconductors when submitted to ion implantation, we have used 300 keV europium at fluences from 1012 to above 1017 ions cm−2. Subsequently, Rutherford backscattering (RBS), x-ray diffraction (XRD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to investigate the evolution of damage. The optical properties were investigated prior to and after annealing. It was found that the behavior of the three compounds (AlN, GaN InN) under ion implantation is rather different: whereas InN breaks down at very low fluences (∼1012 ions cm−2), the damage formation mechanisms are similar in AlN and GaN. In both compounds, extended defects such as stacking faults play a critical role. However, they exhibit different stability, as a consequence, GaN transforms to nanocrystalline state from the surface at a fluence of around 2.5 × 1015 ions cm−2, whereas AlN undergoes a chemical amorphization starting at the projected range (Rp), when implanted to extremely high Eu fluences >1017 ionscm−2. As for the optical activation, the formation of highly stable extended defects in these compounds constitutes a real challenge for the annealing of heavily doped layers, and it was noticed that for a substantial optical activation, the implantation fluences should be kept low (<1015 Eu at cm−2). (invited article)

  18. Experimental study of dropwise condensation on plasma-ion implanted stainless steel tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bani Kananeh, A.; Rausch, M.H.; Froeba, A.P.; Leipertz, A. [Lehrstuhl fuer Technische Thermodynamik (LTT), Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Am Weichselgarten 8, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany)

    2006-12-15

    Plasma-ion implantation was used to achieve stable dropwise condensation of saturated steam on stainless steel tubes. For the investigation of the efficiency of plasma-ion implantation regarding the condensation process a condenser was constructed in order to measure the heat flux density q-dot and the heat transfer coefficient h{sub c} for the condensation of steam on the outside surface of a single horizontal tube. For tubes implanted with a nitrogen ion dose of 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2}, the heat transfer coefficient h{sub c} was found to be larger, by a factor of 3.2, in comparison to values theoretically calculated by the corrected Nusselt film theory. The heat flux density q-dot and the heat transfer coefficient h{sub c} were found to increase with increasing ion dose and steam pressure. The heat transfer coefficient decreases with increasing surface subcooling as it has been found in former work for dropwise condensation on ion implanted vertical plates. (author)

  19. The air oxidation behavior of lanthanum ion implanted zirconium at 500 deg. C

    CERN Document Server

    Peng, D Q; Chen, X W; Zhou, Q G

    2003-01-01

    The beneficial effect of lanthanum ion implantation on the oxidation behavior of zirconium at 500 deg. C has been studied. Zirconium specimens were implanted by lanthanum ions using a MEVVA source at energy of 40 keV with a fluence range from 1x10 sup 1 sup 6 to 1x10 sup 1 sup 7 ions/cm sup 2 at maximum temperature of 130 deg. C, The weight gain curves were measured after being oxidized in air at 500 deg. C for 100 min, which showed that a significant improvement was achieved in the oxidation behavior of zirconium ion implanted with lanthanum compared with that of the as-received zirconium. The valence of the oxides in the scale was analyzed by X-ray photoemission spectroscopy; and then the depth distributions of the elements in the surface of the samples were obtained by Auger electron spectroscopy. Glancing angle X-ray diffraction at 0.3 deg. incident angles was employed to examine the modification of its phase transformation because of the lanthanum ion implantation in the oxide films. It was obviously fou...

  20. The temperature and dose dependency of helium reemission ratio from helium-ion-implanted aluminium samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been observed that blisters and flakes appear on a metal surface implanted He ions above a specific ion dose called the critical dose. At the appearance of the blister and flake, He gas responsible for them is released. There are many reports on the gas reemission with these deformations but there are few reports about it below the critical dose. In this report, temperature and dose dependencies of He reemission from He-ion-implanted Al samples have been studied. After He ions of 20 keV are implanted in Al samples, the samples are heated in vacuum at 400, 450, 475, and 500 deg C with holding time of 0.5, 1, and 2 hours. The numbers of He atoms remaining in the sample are measured by a He atom measurement system. The reemission ratios of the samples prepared at the given temperature and holding time have been obtained from comparison of the numbers of He ions implanted in the samples with the numbers of He atoms measured by the He atom measurement system. The reemission ratio rises with increasing temperature and holding time, and achieved at ∼ 90 % with 500 deg C and 2 hours holding time. On dose dependency of the reemission ratio, it is constant up to 7 x 1014 He atoms and it increases rapidly above it. (author)

  1. Effect of Chemical Doping and Ion Implantation on Conductivity of Poly(p-phenylene vinylene) Derivatives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Bao-ming; WU Hong-cai; LIU Xiao-zeng; LI Xiao-qi; GAO Chao

    2005-01-01

    The surface conductivity of poly [2-methoxy-5-(3 '-methyl)butoxy]-p-phenylene vinylene (PMOMBOPV) films doped with FeCl3 and H2 SO4 by chemical method and implanted by N+ ions was studied and the comparison of environmental stability of conductive behavior was also investigated. The energy and dose of N+ions were in the rang 15~35 kev and 3. 8× 1015 ~9. 6× 1016 ions/cm2, respectively. The conductivity of PMOMBOPV film was enhanced remarkably with the increases of the energy and dose of N+ ions. For example, the conductivity of PMOMBOPV film was 3.2 × 10-2 S/cm when ion implantation was performed with an energy of 35 kev at a dose of 9. 6 × 1016 ions/cm2 , which was almost seven orders of magnitude higher than that of film unimplanted. The environmental stability of conductive behavior for ionimplanted film was much better than that of chemical doped films. Moreover, the conductive activation energy of ion-implanted films was measured to be about 0.17 eV.

  2. Low-temperature positron annihilation study of B+-ion implanted PMMA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Temperature dependent positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) measurements in the range of 50-300 K are carried out to study positronium formation in 40 keV B+-ion implanted polymethylmethacrylate(B:PMMA) with two ion doses of 3.13·1015 and 3.75·1016 ions/cm2. The investigated samples show the various temperature trends of ortho-positronium (o-Ps) lifetime τ3 and intensity I3 in PMMA before and after ion implantation. Two transitions in the vicinity of ∼150 and ∼250 K, ascribed to γ and β transitions, respectively, are observed in the PMMA and B:PMMA samples in consistent with reference data for pristine sample. The obtained results are compared with room temperature PALS study of PMMA with different molecular weight (Mw) which known from literature. It is found that B+-ion implantation leads to decreasing Mw in PMMA at lower ion dose. At higher ion dose the local destruction of polymeric structure follows to broadening of lifetime distribution (hole size distribution)

  3. Improving low-energy boron/nitrogen ion implantation in graphene by ion bombardment at oblique angles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Zhitong; Zhang, Lin; Liu, Ling

    2016-04-01

    Ion implantation is a widely adopted approach to structurally modify graphene and tune its electrical properties for a variety of applications. Further development of the approach requires a fundamental understanding of the mechanisms that govern the ion bombardment process as well as establishment of key relationships between the controlling parameters and the dominant physics. Here, using molecular dynamics simulations with adaptive bond order calculations, we demonstrate that boron and nitrogen ion bombardment at oblique angles (particularly at 70°) can improve both the productivity and quality of perfect substitution by over 25%. We accomplished this by systematically analyzing the effects of the incident angle and ion energy in determining the probabilities of six distinct types of physics that may occur in an ion bombardment event, including reflection, absorption, substitution, single vacancy, double vacancy, and transmission. By analyzing the atomic trajectories from 576 000 simulations, we identified three single vacancy creation mechanisms and four double vacancy creation mechanisms, and quantified their probability distributions in the angle-energy space. These findings further open the door for improved control of ion implantation towards a wide range of applications of graphene.Ion implantation is a widely adopted approach to structurally modify graphene and tune its electrical properties for a variety of applications. Further development of the approach requires a fundamental understanding of the mechanisms that govern the ion bombardment process as well as establishment of key relationships between the controlling parameters and the dominant physics. Here, using molecular dynamics simulations with adaptive bond order calculations, we demonstrate that boron and nitrogen ion bombardment at oblique angles (particularly at 70°) can improve both the productivity and quality of perfect substitution by over 25%. We accomplished this by systematically

  4. Formation of color centers optical waveguide in LN crystal by implanting it with 3 MeV oxygen ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Optical waveguide was fabricated by implanting 3 MeV oxygen ions of 5×1014 and 1.5×1015 ions/cm2 into congruent lithium niobate (LN) crystals and annealing them at 200℃-500℃. Optical spectrum was used to investigation defects in the optical waveguide. The results revealed the reduction of Li ions in the implanted LN crystals. The absorption of LN crystal increased with the dose of oxygen ion. This showed that the color centers were formed increasingly with the oxygen ion dose. The color centers and defects affecting the optical absorption include oxygen vacancy, exciton, interstitial atoms and electrons captured by Nb ions occupying the Li ion site. The color centers and defects caused increase of the absorption in the implanted the LN crystals. The annealing temperature seemed to have little effect on reduction of color centers. The optical waveguide of the implanted LN crystal exhibits high temperature stability. (authors)

  5. Influence of Cu ion implantation on the microstructure and cathodoluminescence of ZnS nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, L. Y.; Zhang, D.; Liu, B. Y.

    2016-07-01

    The microstructure and optical properties of as-synthesized and Cu ion implanted ZnS nanostructures with branched edges are studied by using high-resolution transmission electron microscope (TEM) and spatially-resolved cathodoluminescence measurement. Obvious crystalline deterioration has been observed in Cu-doped ZnS nanostructures due to the invasion of Cu ions into ZnS lattice. It was found that the optical emissions of ZnS nanostructures can be selectively modified through the control of Cu ion dose and subsequent heat treatment. An increase of Cu dopant content will lead to an apparent red-shift of the intrinsic band-gap emission in the UV range and the broadening of defect-related emission in visible range. The influences of Cu ion implantation on the microstructure and related optical properties were discussed.

  6. On the influence of current density on radiation damage concentration after ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation damage after noble gas implantation in silicon was measured by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry combined with channeling. With growing current density an excessive radiation damage was observed in spite of a constant irradiation dose. It can be shown that this effect is caused by overlapping of the defect clouds produced by single ions. During ion implantation at room temperature an in situ annealing takes place as a consequence of the diffusion of mobile point defects within a given relaxation time. If the defect cloud of a single ion is disturbed by a subsequent event occurring in the vicinity, the annealing process is interrupted. For all types of ion used relaxation times of the order of 1 fs were determined

  7. Diffusion of nitrogen and phase transformations in subsurface region of monocrystalline molybdenum after ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of the study of structural features and annealing process kinetics in monocrystalline molybdenum subsurface layers after ion implantation of nitrogen ions are presented. It has been established by X-ray diffraction analysis that a coarse-grained tetragonal β-Mo2N phase is formed as a result of ion implantation. The dynamics of change of subsurface nitrogen concentration was examined by Auger spectroscopy and by secondary ions mass-spectrometry. Diffusion constant of nitrogen was estimated by the time of appearance of nitrogen concentration maximum on the sample surfaces. The main particularity of the obtained diffusion constants are their low values which are less than the constants of nitrogen bulk diffusion in a molybdenum-nitrogen solid solution by 6-7 orders of magnitude

  8. The damaging effects of nitrogen ion beam implantation on upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) pollen grains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu Yanjie [College of Agronomy, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing Jiangsu 210095 (China); Wu Lijun; Wu Yuejin [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Wang Qingya [College of Life Science, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210095 (China); Tang Canming [College of Agronomy, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing Jiangsu 210095 (China)], E-mail: tang20@jlonline.com

    2008-09-15

    With the aim to study the effects of an ion beam on plant cells, upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) cultivar 'Sumian 22' pollen grains were irradiated in vacuum (7.8 x 10{sup -3} Pa) by low-energy nitrogen ions with an energy of 20 keV at various fluences ranging from 0.26 x 10{sup 16} to 0.78 x 10{sup 16} N{sup +}/cm{sup 2}. The irradiation effects on pollen grains were tested, considering the ultrastructural changes in the exine and interior walls of pollen grains, their germination rate, the growth speed of the pollen tubes in the style, fertilization and boll development after the pistils were pollinated by the pollen grains which had been implanted with nitrogen ions. Nitrogen ions entered the pollen grains by etching and penetrating the exine and interior walls and destroying cell structures. A greater percentage of the pollen grains were destroyed as the fluence of N{sup +} ions increased. Obviously, the nitrogen ion beam penetrated the exine and interior walls of the pollen grains and produced holes of different sizes. As the ion fluence increased, the amount and the density of pollen grain inclusions decreased and the size of the lacuna and starch granules increased. Pollen grain germination rates decreased with increasing ion fluence. The number of pollen tubes in the style declined with increased ion implantation into pollen grains, but the growth speed of the tubes did not change. All of the pollen tubes reached the end of the style at 13 h after pollination. This result was consistent with that of the control. Also, the weight and the diameter of the ovary decreased and shortened with increased ion beam implantation fluence. No evident change in the fecundation time of the ovule was observed. These results indicate that nitrogen ions can enter pollen grains and cause a series of biological changes in pollen grains of upland cotton.

  9. The damaging effects of nitrogen ion beam implantation on upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) pollen grains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the aim to study the effects of an ion beam on plant cells, upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) cultivar 'Sumian 22' pollen grains were irradiated in vacuum (7.8 x 10-3 Pa) by low-energy nitrogen ions with an energy of 20 keV at various fluences ranging from 0.26 x 1016 to 0.78 x 1016 N+/cm2. The irradiation effects on pollen grains were tested, considering the ultrastructural changes in the exine and interior walls of pollen grains, their germination rate, the growth speed of the pollen tubes in the style, fertilization and boll development after the pistils were pollinated by the pollen grains which had been implanted with nitrogen ions. Nitrogen ions entered the pollen grains by etching and penetrating the exine and interior walls and destroying cell structures. A greater percentage of the pollen grains were destroyed as the fluence of N+ ions increased. Obviously, the nitrogen ion beam penetrated the exine and interior walls of the pollen grains and produced holes of different sizes. As the ion fluence increased, the amount and the density of pollen grain inclusions decreased and the size of the lacuna and starch granules increased. Pollen grain germination rates decreased with increasing ion fluence. The number of pollen tubes in the style declined with increased ion implantation into pollen grains, but the growth speed of the tubes did not change. All of the pollen tubes reached the end of the style at 13 h after pollination. This result was consistent with that of the control. Also, the weight and the diameter of the ovary decreased and shortened with increased ion beam implantation fluence. No evident change in the fecundation time of the ovule was observed. These results indicate that nitrogen ions can enter pollen grains and cause a series of biological changes in pollen grains of upland cotton

  10. The damaging effects of nitrogen ion beam implantation on upland cotton ( Gossypium hirsutum L.) pollen grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yanjie; Wu, Lijun; Wu, Yuejin; Wang, Qingya; Tang, Canming

    2008-09-01

    With the aim to study the effects of an ion beam on plant cells, upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) cultivar "Sumian 22" pollen grains were irradiated in vacuum (7.8 × 10-3 Pa) by low-energy nitrogen ions with an energy of 20 keV at various fluences ranging from 0.26 × 1016 to 0.78 × 1016 N+/cm2. The irradiation effects on pollen grains were tested, considering the ultrastructural changes in the exine and interior walls of pollen grains, their germination rate, the growth speed of the pollen tubes in the style, fertilization and boll development after the pistils were pollinated by the pollen grains which had been implanted with nitrogen ions. Nitrogen ions entered the pollen grains by etching and penetrating the exine and interior walls and destroying cell structures. A greater percentage of the pollen grains were destroyed as the fluence of N+ ions increased. Obviously, the nitrogen ion beam penetrated the exine and interior walls of the pollen grains and produced holes of different sizes. As the ion fluence increased, the amount and the density of pollen grain inclusions decreased and the size of the lacuna and starch granules increased. Pollen grain germination rates decreased with increasing ion fluence. The number of pollen tubes in the style declined with increased ion implantation into pollen grains, but the growth speed of the tubes did not change. All of the pollen tubes reached the end of the style at 13 h after pollination. This result was consistent with that of the control. Also, the weight and the diameter of the ovary decreased and shortened with increased ion beam implantation fluence. No evident change in the fecundation time of the ovule was observed. These results indicate that nitrogen ions can enter pollen grains and cause a series of biological changes in pollen grains of upland cotton.

  11. Magnetic-ion-doped silicon nanostructures fabricated by ion implantation and electron beam annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Fang, E-mail: v.fang@gns.cri.nz [National Isotope Centre, GNS Science, 30 Gracefield Road, Lower Hutt (New Zealand); Johnson, Peter B. [National Isotope Centre, GNS Science, 30 Gracefield Road, Lower Hutt (New Zealand); Kennedy, John; Markwitz, Andreas [National Isotope Centre, GNS Science, 30 Gracefield Road, Lower Hutt (New Zealand); The MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology, Wellington (New Zealand)

    2013-07-15

    Magnetic-ion-doped Si nanostructures (nanowhiskers) were fabricated by a two-step process on Si (1 0 0) substrates. The substrates were implanted with 7 keV Fe{sup +} to a fluence (F) in the range 1 × 10{sup 13}–4 × 10{sup 15} Fe{sup +} cm{sup −2} prior to electron beam annealing (EBA) for 15 s at a maximum temperature, T, in the range 600–1100 °C. The two-step process was found to produce nanowhiskers at higher surface densities than those produced by applying EBA alone. With increase in Fe{sup +} fluence there is a striking increase in the surface density of the Si nanowhiskers, together with a decrease in the average height. For example, for T = 1000 °C, the density and average height are respectively 12 μm{sup −2} and 8.8 nm for F = 1 × 10{sup 13} Fe{sup +} cm{sup −2}, and 82 μm{sup −2} and 3.1 nm for F = 4 × 10{sup 15} Fe{sup +} cm{sup −2}. The results are compared with those from a three-step process in which the nanowhiskers are pre-formed in a prior EBA treatment. The two-step process is found to be superior for producing high densities with height distributions having lower fractional spreads. The mechanism of the nucleation and growth of nanowhiskers in the final EBA step is discussed. Selected results are presented to show the possibility of controlling the density and average height of Si nanowhiskers doped with magnetic ions for spin-dependent enhanced field emission.

  12. Magnetic-ion-doped silicon nanostructures fabricated by ion implantation and electron beam annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Fang; Johnson, Peter B.; Kennedy, John; Markwitz, Andreas

    2013-07-01

    Magnetic-ion-doped Si nanostructures (nanowhiskers) were fabricated by a two-step process on Si (1 0 0) substrates. The substrates were implanted with 7 keV Fe+ to a fluence (F) in the range 1 × 1013-4 × 1015 Fe+ cm-2 prior to electron beam annealing (EBA) for 15 s at a maximum temperature, T, in the range 600-1100 °C. The two-step process was found to produce nanowhiskers at higher surface densities than those produced by applying EBA alone. With increase in Fe+ fluence there is a striking increase in the surface density of the Si nanowhiskers, together with a decrease in the average height. For example, for T = 1000 °C, the density and average height are respectively 12 μm-2 and 8.8 nm for F = 1 × 1013 Fe+ cm-2, and 82 μm-2 and 3.1 nm for F = 4 × 1015 Fe+ cm-2. The results are compared with those from a three-step process in which the nanowhiskers are pre-formed in a prior EBA treatment. The two-step process is found to be superior for producing high densities with height distributions having lower fractional spreads. The mechanism of the nucleation and growth of nanowhiskers in the final EBA step is discussed. Selected results are presented to show the possibility of controlling the density and average height of Si nanowhiskers doped with magnetic ions for spin-dependent enhanced field emission.

  13. The structural and optical properties of metal ion-implanted GaN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macková, A.; Malinský, P.; Sofer, Z.; Šimek, P.; Sedmidubský, D.; Veselý, M.; Böttger, R.

    2016-03-01

    The practical development of novel optoelectronic materials with appropriate optical properties is strongly connected to the structural properties of the prepared doped structures. We present GaN layers oriented along the (0 0 0 1) crystallographic direction that have been grown by low-pressure metal-organic vapour-phase epitaxy (MOVPE) on sapphire substrates implanted with 200 keV Co+, Fe+ and Ni+ ions. The structural properties of the ion-implanted layers have been characterised by RBS-channelling and Raman spectroscopy to obtain a comprehensive insight into the structural modification of implanted GaN layers and to study the subsequent influence of annealing on crystalline-matrix recovery. Photoluminescence was measured to control the desired optical properties. The post-implantation annealing induced the structural recovery of the modified GaN layer depending on the introduced disorder level, e.g. depending on the ion implantation fluence, which was followed by structural characterisation and by the study of the surface morphology by AFM.

  14. Embedded Ge nanocrystals in SiO2 synthesized by ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    200 nm thick SiO2 layers grown on Si substrates were implanted with 150 keV Ge ions at three different fluences. As-implanted samples were characterized with time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry to obtain depth profiles and concentration of Ge ions. As-implanted samples were annealed at 950 °C for 30 min. Crystalline quality of pristine, as-implanted, and annealed samples was investigated using Raman scattering measurements and the results were compared. Crystalline structure of as-implanted and annealed samples of embedded Ge into SiO2 matrix was studied using x-ray diffraction. No secondary phase or alloy formation of Ge was detected with x-ray diffraction or Raman measurements. Scanning transmission electron microscope measurements were done to get the nanocrystal size and localized information. The results confirmed that fluence dependent Ge nanocrystals of different sizes are formed in the annealed samples. It is also observed that Ge is slowly diffusing deeper into the substrate with annealing

  15. Antibacterial TiO2Coating Incorporating Silver Nanoparticles by Micro arc Oxidation and Ion Implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Infection associated with titanium implants remains the most common serious complication in hard tissue replacement surgery. Since such postoperative infections are usually difficult to cure, it is critical to find optimal strategies for preventing infections. In this study, TiO2 coating incorporating silver (Ag) nanoparticles were fabricated on pure titanium by micro arc oxidation and ion implantation. The antibacterial activity was evaluated by exposing the specimens to Staphylococcus aureus and comparing the reaction of the pathogens to Ti-MAO-Ag with Ti-MAO controls. Ti-MAO-Ag clearly inhibited bacterial colonization more than the control specimen. The coating’s antibacterial ability was enhanced by increasing the dose of silver ion implantation, and Ti-MAO-Ag 20.0 had the best antibacterial ability. In addition, cytocompatibility was assessed by culturing cell colonies on the specimens. The cells grew well on both specimens. These findings indicate that surface modification by means of this process combining MAO and silver ion implantation is useful in providing antibacterial activity and exhibits cytocompatibility with titanium implants

  16. Embedded Ge nanocrystals in SiO{sub 2} synthesized by ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baranwal, V., E-mail: vikasphy@gmail.com; Pandey, Avinash C. [Nanotechnology Application Centre, University of Allahabad, Allahabad 211 002 (India); Gerlach, J. W.; Lotnyk, A.; Rauschenbach, B. [Leibniz-Institut für Oberflächenmodifizierung, Permoserstraße 15, D-04318 Leipzig (Germany); Karl, H. [Institut für Physik, Universität Augsburg, D-86135 Augsburg (Germany); Ojha, S.; Avasthi, D. K.; Kanjilal, D. [Inter University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110067 (India)

    2015-10-07

    200 nm thick SiO{sub 2} layers grown on Si substrates were implanted with 150 keV Ge ions at three different fluences. As-implanted samples were characterized with time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry to obtain depth profiles and concentration of Ge ions. As-implanted samples were annealed at 950 °C for 30 min. Crystalline quality of pristine, as-implanted, and annealed samples was investigated using Raman scattering measurements and the results were compared. Crystalline structure of as-implanted and annealed samples of embedded Ge into SiO{sub 2} matrix was studied using x-ray diffraction. No secondary phase or alloy formation of Ge was detected with x-ray diffraction or Raman measurements. Scanning transmission electron microscope measurements were done to get the nanocrystal size and localized information. The results confirmed that fluence dependent Ge nanocrystals of different sizes are formed in the annealed samples. It is also observed that Ge is slowly diffusing deeper into the substrate with annealing.

  17. Surface modification of TiO2 coatings by Zn ion implantation for improving antibacterial activities

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Xiaobing Zhao; Jiashen Yang; Jing You

    2016-02-01

    TiO$_2$ coating has been widely applied in orthopaedic and dental implants owing to its excellent mechanical and biological properties. However, one of the biggest complications of TiO$_2$ coating is implant-associated infections. The aim of this work is to improve the antibacterial activity of plasma-sprayed TiO$_2$ coatings by plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) using zinc (Zn) ions. Results indicate that the as-sprayed TiO$_2$ coating is mainly composed of rutile phase. Zn-PIII modification does not change the phase compositions and the surface morphologies of TiO$_2$ coatings, while change their hydrophilicity. Zn-implanted TiO$_2$ coatings can inhibit the growth of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and Escherichia coli (E. coli), and the ability to inhibit S. aureus is greater than that to E. coli. Zn ion release and reactive oxygen species may be attributed to improving the antibacterial activity of TiO$_2$ coating. Therefore, Zn-PIII TiO$_2$ coatings on titanium suggest promising candidates for orthopaedic and dental implants.

  18. Lattice sites of ion-implanted Cu atoms in diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioactive 67Cu atoms were accelerated to 60 keV at the online isotope separator ISOLDE at CERN, and implanted into a type IIa natural diamond sample to a dose of 2x1012 cm-2. The channeling of β--particles and conversion electrons emitted in the decay of 67Cu and 67Zn*, respectively, were monitored about the three major axial directions with a two-dimensional position-sensitive detector. The electron emission channeling data were collected from the room-temperature-implanted sample and after annealing at 1200 K. The observed channeling patterns were fitted with simulations based on the many beam formalism of electron motion through a crystal lattice. In the as-implanted sample, 25% of the Cu atoms were located a mean, isotropic displacement of 0.25(5) A from substitutional sites, and the remainder, fR=75%, at sites that gave an isotropic emission yield. Annealing at 1200 K results in enhanced axial and planar channeling effects. The fits to the data yield either a fraction f1=45(5)% of Cu atoms located 0.24(4) A from substitutional sites and fR=57%, or a fraction f1=10(2)% at substitutional sites, a fraction f2=50(5)% at mean isotropic displacement of 0.5 A from substitutional sites, and a 'random' fraction fR=40%

  19. Lattice sites of ion implanted Cu atoms in diamond

    CERN Document Server

    Bharuth-Ram, K; Correia, J G

    2003-01-01

    Radioactive $^{67}$Cu atoms were accelerated to 60 keV at the online isotope separator ISOLDE at CERN, and implanted into a type IIa natural diamond sample to a dose of 2 $\\times 10^{12}$ cm$^{-2}$. The channeling of $\\beta^{-}$-particles and conversion electrons emitted in the decay of $^{67}$Cu and $^{67}$Zn*, respectively, were monitored about the three major axial directions with a two dimensional position-sensitive detector. The electron emission channeling data were collected from the room temperature implanted sample and after annealing at 1200$^\\circ$ K. The observed channeling patterns were fitted with simulations based on the many beam formalism of electron motion through a crystal lattice. In the as-implanted sample, 25% of the Cu atoms were located a mean, isotropic displacement of 0.25(5) from substitutional sites, and the remainder, fR=75%, at sites that gave an isotropic emission yield. Annealing at 1200$^\\circ$ K results in enhanced axial and planar channeling effects. The fits to the data yie...

  20. Carbonate Ion Effects on Coccolith Carbon and Oxygen Isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziveri, P.; Probert, I.; Stoll, H. M.

    2006-12-01

    conclusively distinguished whether C is taken up only as CO2 by passive diffusion or also by active transport of CO2 or HCO^{3-} . In reality, the patterns of stable isotopic variations in coccoliths may provide more constraints for unraveling the cellular C transport and the calcification mechanisms. We will present latest findings on these issues, both from culture experiments and sediment traps located in the Bay of Bengal. Coccolith species separated from these sediment traps also show evidence of carbonate ion effects.