WorldWideScience

Sample records for carbon gas dynamics

  1. Dynamic Simulation of Carbonate Fuel Cell-Gas Turbine Hybrid Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, R.A. (U. of California, Irvine, CA); Brouwer, J. (U. of California, Irvine, CA); Liese, E.A.; Gemmen, R.S.

    2006-04-01

    Hybrid fuel cell/gas turbine systems provide an efficient means of producing electricity from fossil fuels with ultra low emissions. However, there are many significant challenges involved in integrating the fuel cell with the gas turbine and other components of this type of system. The fuel cell and the gas turbine must maintain efficient operation and electricity production while protecting equipment during perturbations that may occur when the system is connected to the utility grid or in stand-alone mode. This paper presents recent dynamic simulation results from two laboratories focused on developing tools to aid in the design and dynamic analyses of hybrid fuel cell systems. The simulation results present the response of a carbonate fuel cell/gas turbine, or molten carbonate fuel cell/gas turbine, (MCFC/GT) hybrid system to a load demand perturbation. Initial results suggest that creative control strategies will be needed to ensure a flexible system with wide turndown and robust dynamic operation.

  2. The Contribution of Highly Productive but Leaky Wetlands to the Carbon and Greenhouse Gas Dynamics of sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Matthew; Kansiime, Frank; Jones, Michael

    2016-04-01

    The tropical wetlands of East Africa represent hotspots of carbon and greenhouse gas (GHG) exchange the dynamics of which vary across the site, landscape and regional scale. The wetlands of the Nile headwaters including Lake Victoria, the world's largest tropical lake, are dominated by the emergent macrophyte sedge Cyperus papyrus L. (papyrus), which under favourable environmental conditions has been shown to exhibit high rates of photosynthetic carbon dioxide assimilation (≥40 μmol CO2 m-2 s-1); high rates of net primary productivity (≥50 g DM m-2 d-1); and the accumulation of significant peat deposits resulting in carbon stocks (≥640 t C ha-1) that exceed similar estimates from tropical rainforests, often considered to be the primary land based reserve of carbon. However, while these wetlands represent significant carbon pools, they are inherently "leaky" systems due to the lateral loss of particulate and dissolved carbon and this has implications for riverine carbon and GHG emissions which have been shown to increase with wetland extent and upland biomass. This paper utilises a range of empirical and published information to report on the eco-physiological controls on carbon, water and GHG exchange in papyrus dominated wetlands and considers the contribution of these highly productive wetlands to the GHG dynamics of the inland waters of East Africa, and in particular the Lake Victoria basin and the headwaters of the river Nile.

  3. Development of a dynamic simulator for a natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) power plant with post-combustion carbon capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liese, E.; Zitney, S.

    2012-01-01

    The AVESTAR Center located at the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory and West Virginia University is a world-class research and training environment dedicated to using dynamic process simulation as a tool for advancing the safe, efficient and reliable operation of clean energy plants with CO{sub 2} capture. The AVESTAR Center was launched with a high-fidelity dynamic simulator for an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plant with pre-combustion carbon capture. The IGCC dynamic simulator offers full-scope Operator Training Simulator (OTS) Human Machine Interface (HMI) graphics for realistic, real-time control room operation and is integrated with a 3D virtual Immersive Training Simulator (ITS), thus allowing joint control room and field operator training. The IGCC OTS/ITS solution combines a “gasification with CO{sub 2} capture” process simulator with a “combined cycle” power simulator into a single high-performance dynamic simulation framework. This presentation will describe progress on the development of a natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) dynamic simulator based on the syngas-fired combined cycle portion of AVESTAR’s IGCC dynamic simulator. The 574 MW gross NGCC power plant design consisting of two advanced F-class gas turbines, two heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs), and a steam turbine in a multi-shaft 2x2x1 configuration will be reviewed. Plans for integrating a post-combustion carbon capture system will also be discussed.

  4. Carbonate Chemistry Dynamics in an Area of Active Gas Seepage: the Hudson Canyon, US Atlantic Margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Tigreros Kodovska, F.; Kessler, J. D.; Leonte, M.; Chepigin, A.; Kellermann, M. Y.; Arrington, E. C.; Valentine, D. L.

    2015-12-01

    The fate of oceanic methane and its impact on the global climate has been of particular interest to the global community. The potential for vast amounts of methane to be emitted from the seafloor into the atmosphere due to gas hydrate decomposition has been under scientific evaluation. However, despite the great extent of these geological reservoirs, much of the methane released from the seafloor in deep ocean environments does not reach the atmosphere. Once dissolved in ocean water, the emitted methane can be microbially converted to either carbon dioxide or assimilated to biomass. Here, we will present results from a research cruise to the Hudson Canyon, northern US Atlantic Margin, where we investigated changes in ocean water carbonate chemistry induced by the oxidation of methane released from gas seeps. We will be presenting high precision pH data as well as methane and DIC concentrations, natural stable isotopes, and methane oxidation rates collected inside and adjacent to the Hudson Canyon in the summer of 2014.

  5. Fundamentals of gas dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Babu, V

    2014-01-01

    Fundamentals of Gas Dynamics, Second Edition isa comprehensively updated new edition and now includes a chapter on the gas dynamics of steam. It covers the fundamental concepts and governing equations of different flows, and includes end of chapter exercises based on the practical applications. A number of useful tables on the thermodynamic properties of steam are also included.Fundamentals of Gas Dynamics, Second Edition begins with an introduction to compressible and incompressible flows before covering the fundamentals of one dimensional flows and normal shock wav

  6. High enthalpy gas dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Rathakrishnan, Ethirajan

    2014-01-01

    This is an introductory level textbook which explains the elements of high temperature and high-speed gas dynamics. written in a clear and easy to follow style, the author covers all the latest developments in the field including basic thermodynamic principles, compressible flow regimes and waves propagation in one volume covers theoretical modeling of High Enthalpy Flows, with particular focus on problems in internal and external gas-dynamic flows, of interest in the fields of rockets propulsion and hypersonic aerodynamics High enthalpy gas dynamics is a compulsory course for aerospace engine

  7. Gas Dynamics Equations: Computation

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Gui-Qiang G

    2012-01-01

    Shock waves, vorticity waves, and entropy waves are fundamental discontinuity waves in nature and arise in supersonic or transonic gas flow, or from a very sudden release (explosion) of chemical, nuclear, electrical, radiation, or mechanical energy in a limited space. Tracking these discontinuities and their interactions, especially when and where new waves arise and interact in the motion of gases, is one of the main motivations for numerical computation for the gas dynamics equations. In this paper, we discuss some historic and recent developments, as well as mathematical challenges, in designing and formulating efficient numerical methods and algorithms to compute weak entropy solutions for the Euler equations for gas dynamics.

  8. Dynamic measurement of mercury adsorption and oxidation on activated carbon in simulated cement kiln flue gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Yuanjing; Jensen, Anker Degn; Windelin, Christian

    2012-01-01

    elemental mercury shows that when HCl is present with either SO2 or NOx the mercury measurement after the converter is unstable and lower than the elemental mercury inlet level. The conclusion is that red brass chips cannot fully reduce oxidized mercury to elemental mercury when simulated cement kiln gas...

  9. Sustainable bioenergy feedstock production systems: Integrating carbon dynamics, erosion, water quality, and greenhouse gas production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emission is one of several rationales for developing renewable biomass energy. Unfortunately, there are few studies reporting direct impacts of harvesting biomass feedstocks on GHG, especially effects on nitrous oxide (N2O) flux. Overzealous biomass harvest may accelera...

  10. EVALUATION OF DYNAMIC CARACTERISTICS OF GAS COOLER OF THE CARBON DIOXIDE HEAT PUMP ÎN THE TRANSCRITICAL CYCLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sit M.L.

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic characteristics of heat pump gas cooler obtained by means of the solution of the dynamics equations in partial derivatives are examined. Control system of the heat pump used for the heating of the heating–system water, supplied from CHP to the district heating system is examined. Possibility of PID-controller with gain scheduling utilization with the coefficients changing depending on gas cooler mode of operation for temperature disturbances compensation of direct heating–system water is shown.

  11. Implications of agricultural encroachment on the carbon and greenhouse gas dynamics in tropical African wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Matthew; Kansiime, Frank; Jones, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Cyperus papyrus L. (papyrus) wetlands dominate the permanently inundated wetlands of tropical East Africa and support the livelihoods of millions of people in rural sub-Saharan Africa through the provision of multiple ecosystem services such as the supply of drinking water, fish protein, building materials and biofuels. These wetlands are also extremely important in local and regional scale biogeochemical cycles due to their extensive spatial distribution, high rates of photosynthetic carbon dioxide (CO2) assimilation, long-term carbon (C) sequestration in the form of peat and the control of water loss through evapotranspiration. However, these wetlands are facing significant anthropogenic pressures due to the increasing demand for agricultural land where the papyrus plants are removed and replaced with subsistence crops such as cocoyam (Colocasia esculenta). Eddy covariance measurements were made on an undisturbed papyrus wetland and a cocoyam dominated wetland on the Ugandan shoreline of Lake Victoria to better understand the impacts of agricultural encroachment on the C sequestration potential of these wetlands. Peak rates of net photosynthetic CO2 assimilation at the papyrus wetland were over 40 μmol CO2 m-2 s-1, even under increasing vapour pressure deficit (≥2 kPa), while maximum rates of assimilation at the cocoyam site were 28 μmol CO2 m-2 s-1. Annual rates of papyrus net primary productivity (NPP) were amongst the highest recorded for wetland systems globally (3.09 kg C m-2 yr-1) and the continual regeneration of the papyrus plants, due to an absence of pronounced seasonal climatic variability, can lead to significant C accumulation in the above and belowground biomass (≥88 t C ha-1). Where these wetlands remain inundated and anaerobic conditions prevail, significant detrital and peat deposits can form further increasing the combined C sink capacity of these ecosystems to over 700 t C ha-1. The C sink strength of these wetlands is however offset by

  12. Elements of gas dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Liepmann, H W

    2001-01-01

    The increasing importance of concepts from compressible fluid flow theory for aeronautical applications makes the republication of this first-rate text particularly timely. Intended mainly for aeronautics students, the text will also be helpful to practicing engineers and scientists who work on problems involving the aerodynamics of compressible fluids. Covering the general principles of gas dynamics to provide a working understanding of the essentials of gas flow, the contents of this book form the foundation for a study of the specialized literature and should give the necessary background

  13. Detection of gas atoms with carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arash, B.; Wang, Q.

    2013-01-01

    Owning to their unparalleled sensitivity resolution, nanomechanical resonators have excellent capabilities in design of nano-sensors for gas detection. The current challenge is to develop new designs of the resonators for differentiating distinct gas atoms with a recognizably high sensitivity. In this work, the characteristics of impulse wave propagation in carbon nanotube-based sensors are investigated using molecular dynamics simulations to provide a new method for detection of noble gases. A sensitivity index based on wave velocity shifts in a single-walled carbon nanotube, induced by surrounding gas atoms, is defined to explore the efficiency of the nano-sensor. The simulation results indicate that the nano-sensor is able to differentiate distinct noble gases at the same environmental temperature and pressure. The inertia and the strengthening effects by the gases on wave characteristics of carbon nanotubes are particularly discussed, and a continuum mechanics shell model is developed to interpret the effects.

  14. Carbon nanomaterials for gas adsorption

    CERN Document Server

    Terranova, Maria Letizia

    2012-01-01

    Research in adsorption of gases by carbon nanomaterials has experienced considerable growth in recent years, with increasing interest for practical applications. Many research groups are now producing or using such materials for gas adsorption, storage, purification, and sensing. This book provides a selected overview of some of the most interesting scientific results regarding the outstanding properties of carbon nanomaterials for gas adsorption and of interest both for basic research and technological applications. Topics receiving special attention in this book include storage of H, purific

  15. Quasi-gas dynamic equations

    CERN Document Server

    Elizarova, Tatiana G

    2009-01-01

    This book presents two interconnected mathematical models generalizing the Navier-Stokes system. The models, called the quasi-gas-dynamic and quasi-hydrodynamic equations, are then used as the basis of numerical methods solving gas- and fluid-dynamic problems.

  16. Gas-phase chemical dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weston, R.E. Jr.; Sears, T.J.; Preses, J.M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Research in this program is directed towards the spectroscopy of small free radicals and reactive molecules and the state-to-state dynamics of gas phase collision, energy transfer, and photodissociation phenomena. Work on several systems is summarized here.

  17. Effect of gas channel height on gas flow and gas diffusion in a molten carbonate fuel cell stack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Haruhiko; Nakagaki, Takao; Hori, Michio

    An investigation is made of the relationships between the gas channel height, the gas-flow characteristics, and the gas-diffusion characteristics in a plate heat-exchanger type molten carbonate fuel cell stack. Effects of the gas channel height on the uniformity and pressure loss of the gas flow are evaluated by numerical analysis using a computational fluid dynamics code. The effects of the gas channel height on the distribution of the reactive gas concentration in the direction perpendicular to the channel flow are evaluated by an analytical solution of the two-dimensional concentration transport equation. Considering the results for uniformity and pressure loss of the gas flow, and for distribution of the reactive gas concentration, the appropriate gas channel height in the molten carbonate fuel cell stack is investigated.

  18. Fluid dynamics [and gas compressors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurz, Rainer [Solar Turbines Inc. (United States)

    2002-02-01

    The author examines the use of computational fluid dynamics in the development of gas compressors. The background to CFD is explained including modelling the geometry and the effects of turbulence. A typical design process is briefly explained and its limitations discussed. (UK)

  19. Carbon ion pump for removal of carbon dioxide from combustion gas and other gas mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aines, Roger D.; Bourcier, William L.

    2014-08-19

    A novel method and system of separating carbon dioxide from flue gas is introduced. Instead of relying on large temperature or pressure changes to remove carbon dioxide from a solvent used to absorb it from flue gas, the ion pump method, as disclosed herein, dramatically increases the concentration of dissolved carbonate ion in solution. This increases the overlying vapor pressure of carbon dioxide gas, permitting carbon dioxide to be removed from the downstream side of the ion pump as a pure gas. The ion pumping may be obtained from reverse osmosis, electrodialysis, thermal desalination methods, or an ion pump system having an oscillating flow in synchronization with an induced electric field.

  20. Carbon ion pump for removal of carbon dioxide from combustion gas and other gas mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aines, Roger D.; Bourcier, William L.

    2010-11-09

    A novel method and system of separating carbon dioxide from flue gas is introduced. Instead of relying on large temperature or pressure changes to remove carbon dioxide from a solvent used to absorb it from flue gas, the ion pump method, as disclosed herein, dramatically increases the concentration of dissolved carbonate ion in solution. This increases the overlying vapor pressure of carbon dioxide gas, permitting carbon dioxide to be removed from the downstream side of the ion pump as a pure gas. The ion pumping may be obtained from reverse osmosis, electrodialysis, thermal desalination methods, or an ion pump system having an oscillating flow in synchronization with an induced electric field.

  1. Dynamics models of soil organic carbon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANGLi-xia; PANJian-jun

    2003-01-01

    As the largest pool of terrestrial organic carbon, soils interact strongly with atmosphere composition, climate, and land change. Soil organic carbon dynamics in ecosystem plays a great role in global carbon cycle and global change. With development of mathematical models that simulate changes in soil organic carbon, there have been considerable advances in understanding soil organic carbon dynamics. This paper mainly reviewed the composition of soil organic matter and its influenced factors, and recommended some soil organic matter models worldwide. Based on the analyses of the developed results at home and abroad, it is suggested that future soil organic matter models should be developed toward based-process models, and not always empirical ones. The models are able to reveal their interaction between soil carbon systems, climate and land cover by technique and methods of GIS (Geographical Information System) and RS (Remote Sensing). These models should be developed at a global scale, in dynamically describing the spatial and temporal changes of soil organic matter cycle. Meanwhile, the further researches on models should be strengthen for providing theory basis and foundation in making policy of green house gas emission in China.

  2. Carbon Nanotube Gas Sensor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Sensing gas molecules is critical to environmental monitoring, control of chemical processes, space missions as well as agricultural and medical applications....

  3. Gas Composition Sensing Using Carbon Nanotube Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Meyyappan, Meyya

    2012-01-01

    This innovation is a lightweight, small sensor for inert gases that consumes a relatively small amount of power and provides measurements that are as accurate as conventional approaches. The sensing approach is based on generating an electrical discharge and measuring the specific gas breakdown voltage associated with each gas present in a sample. An array of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in a substrate is connected to a variable-pulse voltage source. The CNT tips are spaced appropriately from the second electrode maintained at a constant voltage. A sequence of voltage pulses is applied and a pulse discharge breakdown threshold voltage is estimated for one or more gas components, from an analysis of the current-voltage characteristics. Each estimated pulse discharge breakdown threshold voltage is compared with known threshold voltages for candidate gas components to estimate whether at least one candidate gas component is present in the gas. The procedure can be repeated at higher pulse voltages to estimate a pulse discharge breakdown threshold voltage for a second component present in the gas. The CNTs in the gas sensor have a sharp (low radius of curvature) tip; they are preferably multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) or carbon nanofibers (CNFs), to generate high-strength electrical fields adjacent to the tips for breakdown of the gas components with lower voltage application and generation of high current. The sensor system can provide a high-sensitivity, low-power-consumption tool that is very specific for identification of one or more gas components. The sensor can be multiplexed to measure current from multiple CNT arrays for simultaneous detection of several gas components.

  4. Gas turbine combustion performance test of hydrogen and carbon monoxide synthetic gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min Chul Lee; Seok Bin Seo; Jae Hwa Chung; Si Moon Kim; Yong Jin Joo; Dal Hong Ahn [Korea Electric Power Corporation, Daejeon (Republic of Korea). Green Growth Laboratory

    2010-07-15

    The development of coal IGCC (Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle) technology has made it possible to exploit electricity generated from coal at a low cost. Furthermore, IGCC is a pre-requisite for the development of CCS (Carbon Capture and Storage) technology and hydrogen generated from coal. To achieve the need to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions, Korea's 300 MW IGCC RDD&D (Research Development, Demonstration and Dissemination) project was launched in December 2006 under the leadership of the Korea Electric Power Corporation (KEPCO), with the support of the Korea Ministry of Knowledge Economy. When a new fuel is adapted to a gas turbine (such as syngas for IGCC), it is necessary to study the gas turbine combustion characteristics of the fuel, because gas turbines are very sensitive to its physical and chemical properties. This experimental study was conducted by investigating the combustion performance of synthetic gas, which is composed chiefly of hydrogen and carbon monoxide. The results of a test on synthetic gas combustion performance were compared with the results of methane combustion, which is a major component of natural gas. The results of the combustion test of both gases were examined in terms of the turbine's inlet temperature, combustion dynamics, emission characteristics, and flame structure. From the results of this experimental study, we were able to understand the combustion characteristics of synthetic gas and anticipate the problems when synthetic gas rather than natural gas is fuelled to a gas turbine. 21 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  5. 21 CFR 868.1400 - Carbon dioxide gas analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Carbon dioxide gas analyzer. 868.1400 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1400 Carbon dioxide gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A carbon dioxide gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of carbon...

  6. Determination of Physical Properties of Carbon Materials by Results of Ablative Experiments Con-ducted in the Jets of Gas Dynamic Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Gorsky

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The process of hypersonic vehicles’ movement in the dense layers of the atmosphere is accompanied by the considerable combustion of heat shield, which effects on the aerodynamic, mass-inertial and centering characteristics of the product.For correct calculation of model's movement parameters it is necessary:* Using the theoretical and computation methods for determining ablative characteristics of heat-protective materials;* Taking into account all the basic physical and chemical processes, involved in their ablation, using the above mentioned methods;* Testing these techniques in the wide range of experimental data. This physic-mathematical model of carbon materials (CM aerothermochemical destruction is based on using the following:* Arrhenius equations to calculate carbon kinetic oxidation;* Langmuir-Knudsen formula to calculate the velocity of non-equilibrium carbon’s sublimation;* Carbon erosion law represented as a unique dependence of this process velocity on the gas pressure on the wall.Mathematical description of all major processes included in this formulation of the problem, contains a number of "free" parameters that can be determined only on the basis of comparison of theoretical and experimental data according to total ablation characteristics of these materials.This comparison was performed in the article applicable to the tests conditions of modern CM in the stream of electric arc plant and in combustion products of liquid-propellant rocket engines.As the result, the data of kinetic of carbon oxidation by atomic oxygen at sublimation mode of material ablation were obtained for the first time. Carbon erosion law under high pressure was established for the first time.The new approach to processing of ablation experiments is enunciated. Using this approach allows to turn this experiments for CM from comparative tests into the tests to determine ablation properties of thermal protection. Moreover, it enables us also to use the

  7. Gas Dynamics in Galaxy Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCourt, Michael Kingsley, Jr.

    Galaxy clusters are the most massive structures in the universe and, in the hierarchical pattern of cosmological structure formation, the largest objects in the universe form last. Galaxy clusters are thus interesting objects for a number of reasons. Three examples relevant to this thesis are: 1. Constraining the properties of dark energy: Due to the hierarchical nature of structure formation, the largest objects in the universe form last. The cluster mass function is thus sensitive to the entire expansion history of the universe and can be used to constrain the properties of dark energy. This constraint complements others derived from the CMB or from Type Ia supernovae and provides an important, independent confirmation of such methods. In particular, clusters provide detailed information about the equation of state parameter w because they sample a large redshift range z ˜ 0 - 1. 2. Probing galaxy formation: Clusters contain the most massive galaxies in the uni- verse, and the most massive black holes; because clusters form so late, we can still witness the assembly of these objects in the nearby universe. Clusters thus provide a more detailed view of galaxy formation than is possible in studies of lower-mass ob- jects. An important example comes from x-ray studies of clusters, which unexpectedly found that star formation in massive galaxies in clusters is closely correlated with the properties of the hot, virialized gas in their halos. This correlation persists despite the enormous separation in temperature, in dynamical time-scales, and in length-scales between the virialized gas in the halo and the star-forming regions in the galaxy. This remains a challenge to interpret theoretically. 3. Developing our knowledge of dilute plasmas: The masses and sizes of galaxy clusters imply that the plasma which permeates them is both very hot (˜ 108 K) and very dilute (˜ 10 -2 cm-3). This plasma is collisional enough to be considered a fluid, but collisionless enough to

  8. Methods for Gas Sensing with Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaul, Anupama B. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Methods for gas sensing with single-walled carbon nanotubes are described. The methods comprise biasing at least one carbon nanotube and exposing to a gas environment to detect variation in temperature as an electrical response.

  9. Activated Carbon Fibers For Gas Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL; Contescu, Cristian I [ORNL; Gallego, Nidia C [ORNL

    2017-01-01

    The advantages of Activated Carbon Fibers (ACF) over Granular Activated Carbon (GAC) are reviewed and their relationship to ACF structure and texture are discussed. These advantages make ACF very attractive for gas storage applications. Both adsorbed natural gas (ANG) and hydrogen gas adsorption performance are discussed. The predicted and actual structure and performance of lignin-derived ACF is reviewed. The manufacture and performance of ACF derived monolith for potential automotive natural gas (NG) storage applications is reported Future trends for ACF for gas storage are considered to be positive. The recent improvements in NG extraction coupled with the widespread availability of NG wells means a relatively inexpensive and abundant NG supply in the foreseeable future. This has rekindled interest in NG powered vehicles. The advantages and benefit of ANG compared to compressed NG offer the promise of accelerated use of ANG as a commuter vehicle fuel. It is to be hoped the current cost hurdle of ACF can be overcome opening ANG applications that take advantage of the favorable properties of ACF versus GAC. Lastly, suggestions are made regarding the direction of future work.

  10. A Comprehensive Review of Gas Sensors Using Carbon Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min Il; Lee, Young-Seak

    2016-05-01

    In recent years, interest in carbon materials for use in gas sensors has increased. Carbon materials have unique electrical, optical and mechanical properties, making these materials very interesting. In this review, the properties of carbon materials are first introduced. Surface modification for carbon materials, fabrication for gas sensors, and the gas-sensing conditions and mechanisms according to the different types of carbon materials are chiefly described. In particular, this review focuses on the enhancement of the gas-sensing properties of carbon materials depending on the modification methods used and its mechanism.

  11. 气体透过碳膜的非平衡动力学模拟研究%Non-equilibrium Molecular Dynamics Simulation on Pure Gas Permeability Through Carbon Membranes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王淑梅; 于养信; 高光华

    2006-01-01

    The permeation of various pure gas (H2, He, Ne, CH4 and Ar) through carbon membranes is investigated using a dual control volume grand canonical molecular dynamics method. A two-dimensional slit pore is employed instead of the one-dimensional pore. Compared with the experiments, simulation results show that the improvement of pore model is very necessary. The effects of membrane thickness, pore width and temperature on gas permeance and ideal separation factor are also discussed. Results show that gas permeates through membrane according to Knudsen diffusion in large pore, while Knudsen diffusion is accompanied by molecular sieving in small pore. Moreover, methane is easily adsorbed on the membrane surface due to strong attractive interactions of membrane and shows higher permeance than that of Knudsen flow. In addition, it is noted that when membrane thickness is thin enough the permeance of gas does not decrease with the increase of membrane thickness due to the strong adsorption until membrane resistance becomes dominant.

  12. The dynamic response of carbon fiber-filled polymer composites

    OpenAIRE

    Patterson B.; Orler E.B.; Furmanski J.; Rigg P.A.; Scharff R.J.; Stahl D.B.; Sheffield S.A.; Gustavsen R.L.; Dattelbaum D.M.; Coe J.D.

    2012-01-01

    The dynamic (shock) responses of two carbon fiber-filled polymer composites have been quantified using gas gun-driven plate impact experimentation. The first composite is a filament-wound, highly unidirectional carbon fiber-filled epoxy with a high degree of porosity. The second composite is a chopped carbon fiber- and graphite-filled phenolic resin with little-to-no porosity. Hugoniot data are presented for the carbon fiber-epoxy (CE) composite to 18.6 GPa in the through-thickness direction,...

  13. Dynamics of Rarefied Gas and Molecular Gas Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-08-25

    No 4, 1970. 15. A. I. Tolstoys . Aerodynamic characteristics of the cooled spherical blunting in hypersonic flow of the weakly-rarefied gas. Izv. of the...0000 0000 6727 367 7305 3574 6742 6646 005 6743 6750 6631 673a leo gags ggca aego’a& 6647 016 6650 7501 7610 6731 log 7305 357 6742? 665o goo 6631

  14. Enriching blast furnace gas by removing carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chongmin; Sun, Zhimin; Chen, Shuwen; Wang, Baohai

    2013-12-01

    Blast furnace gas (BF gas) produced in the iron making process is an essential energy resource for a steel making work. As compared with coke oven gas, the caloric value of BF gas is too low to be used alone as fuel in hot stove because of its high concentrations of carbon dioxide and nitrogen. If the carbon dioxide in BF gas could be captured efficiently, it would meet the increasing need of high caloric BF gas, and develop methods to reusing and/or recycling the separated carbon dioxide further. Focused on this, investigations were done with simple evaluation on possible methods of removing carbon dioxide from BF gas and basic experiments on carbon dioxide capture by chemical absorption. The experimental results showed that in 100 minutes, the maximum absorbed doses of carbon dioxide reached 20 g/100 g with ionic liquid as absorbent.

  15. Carbon-Nanotube-Based Chemical Gas Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaul, Arunpama B.

    2010-01-01

    Conventional thermal conductivity gauges (e.g. Pirani gauges) lend themselves to applications such as leak detectors, or in gas chromatographs for identifying various gas species. However, these conventional gauges are physically large, operate at high power, and have a slow response time. A single-walled carbon-nanotube (SWNT)-based chemical sensing gauge relies on differences in thermal conductance of the respective gases surrounding the CNT as it is voltage-biased, as a means for chemical identification. Such a sensor provides benefits of significantly reduced size and compactness, fast response time, low-power operation, and inexpensive manufacturing since it can be batch-fabricated using Si integrated-circuit (IC) process technology.

  16. Carbon dioxide and methane dynamics in Russian tundra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Paul Torbjörn; Kiepe, Isabell; Herbst, Mathias

    interactions and the annual carbon dynamics. Here we present eddy correlation measurements of CO2 and CH4 exchange during the period from early spring to late autumn, covering the full growing season, i.e., mid June to mid September. We present preliminary seasonal budgets of carbon, greenhouse gas exchange......, and discuss possible implications of climatic change on this lowland tundra ecosystem. This study have been conducted as a part of the CARBO-North project (2006-2010), a project within the EU 6th framework programme, aiming at quantifying the carbon budget in Northern Russia across temporal and spatial scales....

  17. The gas dynamics of explosions

    CERN Document Server

    Lee,\tJohn H S

    2016-01-01

    Explosions, and the non-steady shock propagation associated with them, continue to interest researchers working in different fields of physics and engineering (such as astrophysics and fusion). Based on the author's course in shock dynamics, this book describes the various analytical methods developed to determine non-steady shock propagation. These methods offer a simple alternative to the direct numerical integration of the Euler equations and offer a better insight into the physics of the problem. Professor Lee presents the subject systematically and in a style that is accessible to graduate students and researchers working in shock dynamics, combustion, high-speed aerodynamics, propulsion and related topics.

  18. Introduction to Reactive Gas Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Brun, Raymond

    2009-01-01

    In high energy gas flows, at high velocities and high temperatures, physical and chemical processes such as molecular vibrational excitation, dissociation, ionisation or various reactions take place and deeply influence the structure of the flows. The characteristic times of these processes have the same order of magnitude as aerodynamic characteristic times, so that these reactive media are generally in thermodynamic and chemical non-equilibrium. This book presents a generalintroductory study of these media. In the first part their fundamental statistical aspects are described, starting from

  19. Gas dissolution in antibubble dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheid, Benoit; Zawala, Jan; Dorbolo, Stéphane

    2014-11-01

    Antibubbles are ephemeral objects. Their lifetime is driven by the slow drainage of the air shell from the bottom to the top of the antibubble under the action of the hydrostatic pressure. We show in this work that this argument is only valid if the water used to make the surfactant mixture is saturated in air. Otherwise, two paths are used by the air that conducts to the thinning and the eventual collapse of the air shell: the drainage from the bottom to the top of the antibubble and the dissolution of the air by the liquid. Using degassed water dramatically shortens the lifetime of the antibubbles, as observed experimentally and rationalised by time-dependent simulations. Consequently, the antibubble lifetime is not only correlated to physical and chemical properties of the air-liquid interface but also to the gas content of the liquid. We also show that pure gas dissolution does not depend on the antibubble radius, a behaviour that allows to rationalise unexplained experimental data found in the literature. We thank the F.R.S.-FNRS for financial support.

  20. Experimental study on dynamic gas adsorption

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qin Yueping; Wang Yaru; Yang Xiaobin; Liu Wei; Luo Wei

    2012-01-01

    In order to predict the actual adsorption amount as gas adsorption reaches the equilibrium,this research designed a dynamic gas adsorption experiment under constant temperature and pressure,and also studied the isopiestic adsorption characteristics of coal samples with same quality but different sizes.Through the experiment,the study found the adsorption-time changing relationships under different pressures of four different size samples.After regression analysis,we obtained the functional relationship between adsorption and time.According to this,the research resulted in the actual adsorption amount when gas adsorption reaches the equilibrium.In addition,the current study obtained the relationship between adsorption and pressure as well as the effect of the coal size to the adsorption rate.These results have great theoretical and practical significance for the prediction of gas amount in coal seam and gas adsorption process.

  1. Simulation of natural gas production from submarine gas hydrate deposits combined with carbon dioxide storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janicki, Georg; Schlüter, Stefan; Hennig, Torsten; Deerberg, Görge

    2013-04-01

    The recovery of methane from gas hydrate layers that have been detected in several submarine sediments and permafrost regions around the world so far is considered to be a promising measure to overcome future shortages in natural gas as fuel or raw material for chemical syntheses. Being aware that natural gas resources that can be exploited with conventional technologies are limited, research is going on to open up new sources and develop technologies to produce methane and other energy carriers. Thus various research programs have started since the early 1990s in Japan, USA, Canada, South Korea, India, China and Germany to investigate hydrate deposits and develop technologies to destabilize the hydrates and obtain the pure gas. In recent years, intensive research has focussed on the capture and storage of carbon dioxide from combustion processes to reduce climate change. While different natural or manmade reservoirs like deep aquifers, exhausted oil and gas deposits or other geological formations are considered to store gaseous or liquid carbon dioxide, the storage of carbon dioxide as hydrate in former methane hydrate fields is another promising alternative. Due to beneficial stability conditions, methane recovery may be well combined with CO2 storage in form of hydrates. This has been shown in several laboratory tests and simulations - technical field tests are still in preparation. Within the scope of the German research project »SUGAR«, different technological approaches are evaluated and compared by means of dynamic system simulations and analysis. Detailed mathematical models for the most relevant chemical and physical effects are developed. The basic mechanisms of gas hydrate formation/dissociation and heat and mass transport in porous media are considered and implemented into simulation programs like CMG STARS and COMSOL Multiphysics. New simulations based on field data have been carried out. The studies focus on the evaluation of the gas production

  2. A dynamic leaf gas-exchange strategy is conserved in woody plants under changing ambient CO2: evidence from carbon isotope discrimination in paleo and CO2 enrichment studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rising atmospheric [CO2], ca, is expected to affect stomatal regulation of leaf gas-exchange of woody plants, thus influencing energy fluxes as well as carbon (C), water and nutrient cycling of forests. Researchers have reported that stomata regulate leaf gas-exchange around &ldq...

  3. Multigrid for steady gas dynamics problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hemker, P.W.; Koren, B.; Lioen, W.M.; Nool, M.; van der Maarel, H.T.M.; Hafez, M.; Oshima, K.

    1995-01-01

    This paper consists of two parts. In the first part we give a review of a good multigrid method for solving the steady Euler equations of gas dynamics on a locally refined mesh. The method is selfadaptive and makes use of unstructured grids that can be considered as parts of a nested sequence of str

  4. Gas dynamics in strong centrifugal fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogovalov, S.V.; Kislov, V.A.; Tronin, I.V. [National research nuclear university “MEPhI”, Kashirskoje shosse, 31,115409, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-03-10

    Dynamics of waves generated by scopes in gas centrifuges (GC) for isotope separation is considered. The centrifugal acceleration in the GC reaches values of the order of 106g. The centrifugal and Coriolis forces modify essentially the conventional sound waves. Three families of the waves with different polarisation and dispersion exist in these conditions. Dynamics of the flow in the model GC Iguasu is investigated numerically. Comparison of the results of the numerical modelling of the wave dynamics with the analytical predictions is performed. New phenomena of the resonances in the GC is found. The resonances occur for the waves polarized along the rotational axis having the smallest dumping due to the viscosity.

  5. Fatal carbon monoxide intoxication after acetylene gas welding of pipes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonsson, Ann-Beth; Christensson, Bengt; Berge, Johan; Sjögren, Bengt

    2013-06-01

    Acetylene gas welding of district heating pipes can result in exposure to high concentrations of carbon monoxide. A fatal case due to intoxication is described. Measurements of carbon monoxide revealed high levels when gas welding a pipe with closed ends. This fatality and these measurements highlight a new hazard, which must be promptly prevented.

  6. Greenhouse gas flux dynamics in wetlands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silvola, J.; Alm, J.; Saarnio, S. [Joensuu Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Biology; Martikainen, P.J. [National Public Health Inst., Kuopio (Finland). Dept. of Environmental Microbiology

    1996-12-31

    Two important greenhouse gases, CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4}, are closely connected to the carbon cycling of wetlands. Although virgin wetlands are mostly carbon accumulating ecosystems, major proportion of the CO{sub 2} bound annually in photosynthesis is released back to the atmosphere. Main portion of the carbon cycling in wetlands is quite fast while a small proportion of carbon diffusing from soil is released from organic matter, which may be ten thousand years old. Methane is formed in the anaerobic layers of wetlands, from where it is released gradually to the atmosphere. The decomposition in anaerobic conditions is very slow, which means that usually only a few percent of the annual carbon cycling takes place as methane. Research on CO{sub 2} fluxes of different virgin and managed peatlands was the main topic of this project during the first phase of SILMU. The measurements were made during two seasons in varying conditions in c. 30 study sites. In the second phase of SILMU the research topics were the spatial and temporal variation of CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} fluxes, the relationships between vegetation and gas fluxes as well as carbon balance studies in wetlands at some intensive sites

  7. CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David A. Green; Thomas Nelson; Brian S. Turk; Paul Box; Weijiong Li; Raghubir P. Gupta

    2005-07-01

    This report describes research conducted between April 1, 2005 and June 30, 2005 on the use of dry regenerable sorbents for removal of carbon dioxide from flue gas from coal combustion and synthesis gas from coal gasification. Supported sodium carbonate sorbents removed up to 76% of the carbon dioxide from simulated flue gas in a downflow cocurrent flow reactor system, with an approximate 15 second gas-solid contact time. This reaction proceeds at temperatures as low as 25 C. Lithium silicate sorbents remove carbon dioxide from high temperature simulated flue gas and simulated synthesis gas. Both sorbent types can be thermally regenerated and reused. The lithium silicate sorbent was tested in a thermogravimetric analyzer and in a 1-in quartz reactor at atmospheric pressure; tests were also conducted at elevated pressure in a 2-in diameter high temperature high pressure reactor system. The lithium sorbent reacts rapidly with carbon dioxide in flue gas at 350-500 C to absorb about 10% of the sorbent weight, then continues to react at a lower rate. The sorbent can be essentially completely regenerated at temperatures above 600 C and reused. In atmospheric pressure tests with synthesis gas of 10% initial carbon dioxide content, the sorbent removed over 90% of the carbon dioxide. An economic analysis of a downflow absorption process for removal of carbon dioxide from flue gas with a supported sodium carbonate sorbent suggests that a 90% efficient carbon dioxide capture system installed at a 500 MW{sub e} generating plant would have an incremental capital cost of $35 million ($91/kWe, assuming 20 percent for contingencies) and an operating cost of $0.0046/kWh. Assuming capital costs of $1,000/kW for a 500 MWe plant the capital cost of the down flow absorption process represents a less than 10% increase, thus meeting DOE goals as set forth in its Carbon Sequestration Technology Roadmap and Program Plan.

  8. RIVERINE INORGANIC CARBON DYNAMICS: OVERVIEW AND PERSPECTIVE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO Guan-rong; GAO Quan-zhou

    2006-01-01

    Inorganic carbon, the great part of the riverine carbon exported to the ocean, plays an important role in the global carbon cycle and ultimately impacts the coupled carbon-climate system. An overview was made on both methods and results of the riverine inorganic carbon researches. In addition to routine in situ survey, measurement and calculation,the direct precipitation method and the gas evolution technique were commonly used to analyze dissolved inorganic carbon in natural water samples. Soil CO2, carbonate minerals and atmospheric CO2 incorporated into riverine inorganic carbon pool via different means, with bicarbonate ion being the dominant component. The concentration of inorganic carbon, the composition of carbon isotopes (δ13C and △14C), and their temporal or spatial variations in the streams were controlled by carbon input, output and changes of carbon biogeochemistry within the riverine system. More accurate flux estimation, better understanding of different influential processes, and quantitative determination of various inputs or outputs need to be well researched in future.

  9. DYNAMICS OF RELATIVISTIC FLUID FOR COMPRESSIBLE GAS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    In this paper the relativistic fluid dynamics for compressible gas is studied.We show that the strict convexity of the negative thermodynamical entropy preserves invariant under the Lorentz transformation if and only if the local speed of sound in this gas is strictly less than that of light in the vacuum.A symmetric form for the equations of relativistic hydrodynamics is presented,and thus the local classical solutions to these equations can be deduced.At last,the non-relativistic limits of these local cla...

  10. Investigation on shock waves stability in relativistic gas dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Blokhin

    1993-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper is devoted to investigation of the linearized mixed problem of shock waves stability in relativistic gas dynamics. The problem of symmetrization of relativistic gas dynamics equations is also discussed.

  11. Integrating plant carbon dynamics with mutualism ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pringle, Elizabeth G

    2016-04-01

    Plants reward microbial and animal mutualists with carbohydrates to obtain nutrients, defense, pollination, and dispersal. Under a fixed carbon budget, plants must allocate carbon to their mutualists at the expense of allocation to growth, reproduction, or storage. Such carbon trade-offs are indirectly expressed when a plant exhibits reduced growth or fecundity in the presence of its mutualist. Because carbon regulates the costs of all plant mutualisms, carbon dynamics are a common platform for integrating these costs in the face of ecological complexity and context dependence. The ecophysiology of whole-plant carbon allocation could thus elucidate the ecology and evolution of plant mutualisms. If mutualisms are costly to plants, then they must be important but frequently underestimated sinks in the terrestrial carbon cycle.

  12. Simulation research on carbon dioxide as cushion gas in gas underground reservoirs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAN Yu-fei; LIN Tao

    2009-01-01

    Aimed at the problem of mixing working gas and cushion gas in carbon sequestration technology, the feasibility of using cation dioxide as the cushion gas in reservoirs is discussed firstly. At the usual condition of reservoirs, carbon dioxide is a kind of supercritieal fluid with high condensability, high viscosity and high density. Secondly, this article studies the laws of formation and development of mixing zone by numerical simulation and analyses the impact on mixing zone brought by different injection modes and rational ratios of cushion gas in reservoirs. It is proposed that the appropriate injection ratio of cushion gas is 20% - 30%. Using carbon dioxide as cushion gas in gas reservoirs is able to make the running of natural gas reservoirs economical and efficient.

  13. Universal dynamics in a Unitary Bose Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klauss, Catherine; Xie, Xin; D'Incao, Jose; Jin, Deborah; Cornell, Eric

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the dynamics of a unitary Bose gas with an 85 Rb BEC, specifically to determine whether the dynamics scale universally with density. We find that the initial density affects both the (i) projection of the strongly interacting many-body wave-function onto the Feshbach dimer state when the system is rapidly ramped to a weakly interacting value of the scattering length a and (ii) the overall decay rate to deeper bound states. We will present data on both measurements across two orders of magnitude in density, and will discuss how the data illustrate the competing roles of universality and Efimov physics.

  14. Modelling Seasonal Carbon Dynamics on Fen Peatlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giebels, Michael; Beyer, Madlen; Augustin, Jürgen; Roppel, Mario; Juszczak, Radoszlav; Serba, Tomasz

    2010-05-01

    In Germany more than 99 % of fens have lost their carbon and nutrient sink function due to heavy drainage and agricultural land use especially during the last decades and thus resulted in compression and heavy peat loss (CHARMAN 2002; JOOSTEN & CLARKE 2002; SUCCOW & JOOSTEN 2001; AUGUSTIN et al. 1996; KUNTZE 1993). Therefore fen peatlands play an important part (4-5 %) in the national anthropogenic trace gas budget. But only a small part of drained and agricultural used fens in NE Germany can be restored. Knowledge of the influence of land use to trace gas exchange is important for mitigation of the climate impact of the anthropogenic peatland use. We study carbon exchanges between soil and atmosphere on several fen peatland use areas at different sites in NE-Germany. Our research covers peatlands of supposed strongly climate forcing land use (cornfield and intensive pasture) and of probably less forcing, alternative types (meadow and extensive pasture) as well as rewetted (formerly drained) areas and near-natural sites like a low-degraded fen and a wetted alder woodland. We measured trace gas fluxes with manual and automatic chambers in periodic routines since spring 2007. The used chamber technique bases on DROESLER (2005). In total we now do research at 22 sites situated in 5 different locations covering agricultural, varying states of rewetted and near-natural treatments. We present results of at least 2 years of measurements on our site of varying types of agricultural land use. There we found significant differences in the annual carbon balances depending on the genesis of the observed sites and the seasonal dynamics. Annual balances were constructed by applying single respiration and photosynthesis CO2 models for each measurement campaign. These models were based on LLOYD-TAYLOR (1994) and Michaelis-Menten-Kinetics respectively. Crosswise comparison of different site treatments combined with the seasonal environmental observations give good hints for the

  15. Carbon dioxide removal in gas treating processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lidal, H.

    1992-06-01

    The main contribution of this work is the development of a simple and reliable modelling technique on carbon dioxide removal describing the vapor-liquid equilibria of CO{sub 2} in aqueous alkanolamine solutions. By making use of measured pH data, the author has circumvented the problem of estimating interaction parameters, activity coefficients, and equilibrium constants in the prediction of vapor-liquid equilibria. The applicability of the model is best demonstrated on the tertiary amine system using MDEA. For this system, the VLE is accurately represented for temperatures in the range 25 to 140{sup o}C, for CO{sub 2} loadings from 0.001 to 1 mol/mol, and for amine molarities usually encountered in acid gas treating processes. The absorption of CO{sub 2} into solutions containing the sterically hindered amine AMP, is also well described by the model. The equilibrium of CO{sub 2} in mixed solvents containing a glycol (TEG,DEG) and an alkonolamine (MEA,DEA) has been measured at temperatures encountered in the absorption units. An equilibrium model has been developed for the CO{sub 2}/TEG/MEA system for estimation of CO{sub 2} partial pressures, covering loadings and temperatures for both absorption and desorption conditions. An important spin-off of the work described is that two new experimental set-ups have been designed and built. 154 refs., 38 figs., 22 tabs.

  16. THE VACUUM IN NONISENTROPIC GAS DYNAMICS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Geng Chen; Robin Young

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the vacuum in noniscntropic gas dynamics in one space variable,with the most general equation of states allowed by thermodynamics. Wc recall physical constraints on the equations of state and give explicit and easily checkable conditions under which vacuums occur in the solution of the Riemanu problem.We then present a class of models for which the Riemann problen admits unique global solutions without vacuums.

  17. Simulation of Gas-Surface Dynamical Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-07-01

    Brenig, Z. Phys. B 36, 81 (1979). [39] J. Böheim and W. Brenig, Z. Phys. B 41, 243 (1981). [40] G. B. Arfken and H. J. Weber, Mathematical Methods for...excitation of the substrate have to be taken into account. In this lecture, the quantum and classical methods required for the simulation of gas-surface...well-defined conditions [2]. In this chapter, I will briefly review the theoretical methods necessary to determine the dynamics of processes at surfaces

  18. Generalized Gas Dynamic Equations for Microflows

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Kun

    2008-01-01

    n an early approach, we proposed a kinetic model with multiple translational temperature [K. Xu, H. Liu and J. Jiang, Phys. Fluids {\\bf 19}, 016101 (2007)], to simulate non-equilibrium flows. In this paper, instead of using three temperatures in $x-$, $y-$, and $z$-directions, we are going to further define the translational temperature as a second-order symmetric tensor. Based on a multiple stage BGK-type collision model and the Chapman-Enskog expansion, the corresponding macroscopic gas dynamics equations in three-dimensional space will be derived. The zeroth-order expansion gives the 10 moment closure equations of Levermore [C.D. Levermore, J. Stat. Phys {\\bf 83}, pp.1021 (1996)]. To the 1st-order expansion, the derived gas dynamic equations can be considered as a regularization of Levermore's 10 moments equations. The new gas dynamic equations have the same structure as the Navier-Stokes equations, but the stress strain relationship in the Navier-Stokes equations is replaced by an algebraic equation with ...

  19. Chemical looping integration with a carbon dioxide gas purification unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrus, Jr., Herbert E.; Jukkola, Glen D.; Thibeault, Paul R.; Liljedahl, Gregory N.

    2017-01-24

    A chemical looping system that contains an oxidizer and a reducer is in fluid communication with a gas purification unit. The gas purification unit has at least one compressor, at least one dryer; and at least one distillation purification system; where the gas purification unit is operative to separate carbon dioxide from other contaminants present in the flue gas stream; and where the gas purification unit is operative to recycle the contaminants to the chemical looping system in the form of a vent gas that provides lift for reactants in the reducer.

  20. Isothermal evaporation of ethanol in a dynamic gas atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milev, Adriyan S; Wilson, Michael A; Kannangara, G S Kamali; Feng, Hai; Newman, Phillip A

    2012-01-12

    Optimization of evaporation and pyrolysis conditions for ethanol are important in carbon nanotube (CNT) synthesis. The activation enthalpy (ΔH(‡)), the activation entropy (ΔS(‡)), and the free energy barrier (ΔG(‡)) to evaporation have been determined by measuring the molar coefficient of evaporation, k(evap), at nine different temperatures (30-70 °C) and four gas flow rates (25-200 mL/min) using nitrogen and argon as carrier gases. At 70 °C in argon, the effect of the gas flow rate on k(evap) and ΔG(‡) is small. However, this is not true at temperatures as low as 30 °C, where the increase of the gas flow rate from 25 to 200 mL/min results in a nearly 6 times increase of k(evap) and decrease of ΔG(‡) by ~5 kJ/mol. Therefore, at 30 °C, the effect of the gas flow rate on the ethanol evaporation rate is attributed to interactions of ethanol with argon molecules. This is supported by simultaneous infrared spectroscopic analysis of the evolved vapors, which demonstrates the presence of different amounts of linear and cyclic hydrogen bonded ethanol aggregates. While the amount of these aggregates at 30 °C depends upon the gas flow rate, no such dependence was observed during evaporation at 70 °C. When the evaporation was carried out in nitrogen, ΔG(‡) was almost independent of the evaporation temperature (30-70 °C) and the gas flow rate (25-200 mL/min). Thus the evaporation of ethanol in a dynamic gas atmosphere at different temperatures may go via different mechanisms depending on the nature of the carrier gas.

  1. Geometric dynamical observables in rare gas crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casetti, L. [Scuola Normale Superiore, Piazza dei Cavalieri 7, 56126 Pisa (Italy); Macchi, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica della Materia (INFM), Unita di Firenze, Largo Enrico Fermi 2, 50125 Firenze (Italy)

    1997-03-01

    We present a detailed description of how a differential geometric approach to Hamiltonian dynamics can be used for determining the existence of a crossover between different dynamical regimes in a realistic system, a model of a rare gas solid. Such a geometric approach allows us to locate the energy threshold between weakly and strongly chaotic regimes, and to estimate the largest Lyapunov exponent. We show how standard methods of classical statistical mechanics, i.e., Monte Carlo simulations, can be used for our computational purposes. Finally we consider a Lennard-Jones crystal modeling solid xenon. The value of the energy threshold turns out to be in excellent agreement with the numerical estimate based on the crossover between slow and fast relaxation to equilibrium obtained in a previous work by molecular dynamics simulations. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  2. Geometric dynamical observables in rare gas crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Casetti, L; Casetti, Lapo; Macchi, Alessandro

    1996-01-01

    We present a detailed description of how a differential geometric approach to Hamiltonian dynamics can be used for determining the existence of a crossover between different dynamical regimes in a realistic system, a model of a rare gas solid. Such a geometric approach allows to locate the energy threshold between weakly and strongly chaotic regimes, and to estimate the largest Lyapunov exponent. We show how standard mehods of classical statistical mechanics, i.e. Monte Carlo simulations, can be used for our computational purposes. Finally we consider a Lennard Jones crystal modeling solid Xenon. The value of the energy threshold turns out to be in excellent agreement with the numerical estimate based on the crossover between slow and fast relaxation to equilibrium obtained in a previous work by molecular dynamics simulations.

  3. Non-isothermal compositional gas flow during carbon dioxide storage and enhanced gas recovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Ashok; Böettcher, N.; Wang, W.;

    2011-01-01

    In this work we present the conceptual modeling and the numerical scheme for carbon dioxide storage into nearly depleted gas reservoirs for enhanced gas recovery reasons. For this we develop non-isothermal compositional gas flow model. We used a combined monolithic / staggered coupling scheme to ...

  4. Impact of biochar application on nitrogen nutrition of rice, greenhouse-gas emissions and soil organic carbon dynamics in two paddy soils of China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Zubin; Xu, Yanping; Liu, Gang; Liu, Qi; Zhu, Jianguo; Tu, Cong; Amonette, James E.; Cadisch, Georg; Yong, Jean W.; Hu, Shuijin

    2013-09-01

    Two field microcosm experiments and 15N labeling techniques were used to investigate the first-year effects of biochar addition on rice N nutrition and GHG emissions in an Inceptisol and an Ultisol. Biochar N bioavailability and effect of biochar on fertilizer nitrogen-use efficiency (NUE) were studied by 15N-enriched wheat biochar (7.8803 atom% 15N) and fertilizer urea (5 atom% 15N) (Experiment I). Corn biochar and corn stalks were applied at 12 Mg ha-1 to study their effects on GHG emissions (Experiment II). Biochar had no significant impact on rice production and less than 2% of the biochar N was available to plants in the first season. Biochar addition increased soil C and N contents and decreased urea NUE.. Seasonal cumulative CH4 emissions with biochar were similar to the controls, but significantly lower than the local practice of straw amendment. Soil emissions of N2O with biochar amendment were similar to the control in the acidic Ultisol, but significantly higher in the slightly alkaline Inceptisol. Carbon-balance calculations found no major losses of biochar-C. Low bio-availability of biochar N did not make a significant impact on rice production or N nutrition during the first year.. Replacement of straw amendments with biochar could decrease CH4 emissions and increase SOC stocks.

  5. Use of carbon dioxide in underground natural gas storage processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagy Stanislaw

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of use of carbon dioxide in gas storage processes is presented. The model of mixing process between CO2 and methane in porous media is given. The process of injection of carbon dioxide into a lower part of storage near the water –gas contact is modeled. The example of changes in the mixing zone is presented and discussed.

  6. Carbon dioxide capture and use: organic synthesis using carbon dioxide from exhaust gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seung Hyo; Kim, Kwang Hee; Hong, Soon Hyeok

    2014-01-13

    A carbon capture and use (CCU) strategy was applied to organic synthesis. Carbon dioxide (CO2) captured directly from exhaust gas was used for organic transformations as efficiently as hyper-pure CO2 gas from a commercial source, even for highly air- and moisture-sensitive reactions. The CO2 capturing aqueous ethanolamine solution could be recycled continuously without any diminished reaction efficiency.

  7. Carbothermal Reduction of Quartz with Carbon from Natural Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fei; Tangstad, Merete

    2017-04-01

    Carbothermal reaction between quartz and two different carbons originating from natural gas were investigated in this paper. One of two carbons is the commercial carbon black produced from natural gas in a medium thermal production process. The other carbon is obtained from natural gas cracking at 1273 K (1000 °C) deposited directly on the quartz pellet. At the 1923 K (1650 °C) and CO atmosphere, the impact of carbon content, pellet structure, gas transfer, and heating rate are investigated in a thermo-gravimetric furnace. The reaction process can be divided into two steps: an initial SiC-producing step followed by a SiO-producing step. Higher carbon content and increased gas transfer improves the reaction rate of SiC-producing step, while the thicker carbon coating in carbon-deposited pellet hinders reaction rate. Better gas transfer of sample holder improves reaction rate but causes more SiO loss. Heating rate has almost no influence on reaction. Mass balance analysis shows that mole ratios between SiO2, free carbon, and SiC in the SiC-producing step and SiO-producing step in CO and Ar fit the reaction SiO2(s) + 3 C(s) = SiC(s) + 2 CO(g). SiC-particle and SiC-coating formation process in mixed pellet and carbon-deposited pellet are proposed. SiC whiskers formed in the voids of these two types of pellets.

  8. Carbothermal Reduction of Quartz with Carbon from Natural Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fei; Tangstad, Merete

    2017-01-01

    Carbothermal reaction between quartz and two different carbons originating from natural gas were investigated in this paper. One of two carbons is the commercial carbon black produced from natural gas in a medium thermal production process. The other carbon is obtained from natural gas cracking at 1273 K (1000 °C) deposited directly on the quartz pellet. At the 1923 K (1650 °C) and CO atmosphere, the impact of carbon content, pellet structure, gas transfer, and heating rate are investigated in a thermo-gravimetric furnace. The reaction process can be divided into two steps: an initial SiC-producing step followed by a SiO-producing step. Higher carbon content and increased gas transfer improves the reaction rate of SiC-producing step, while the thicker carbon coating in carbon-deposited pellet hinders reaction rate. Better gas transfer of sample holder improves reaction rate but causes more SiO loss. Heating rate has almost no influence on reaction. Mass balance analysis shows that mole ratios between SiO2, free carbon, and SiC in the SiC-producing step and SiO-producing step in CO and Ar fit the reaction SiO2(s) + 3 C(s) = SiC(s) + 2 CO(g). SiC-particle and SiC-coating formation process in mixed pellet and carbon-deposited pellet are proposed. SiC whiskers formed in the voids of these two types of pellets.

  9. Non-isothermal compositional gas flow during carbon dioxide storage and enhanced gas recovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Ashok; Böettcher, N.; Wang, W.

    2011-01-01

    In this work we present the conceptual modeling and the numerical scheme for carbon dioxide storage into nearly depleted gas reservoirs for enhanced gas recovery reasons. For this we develop non-isothermal compositional gas flow model. We used a combined monolithic / staggered coupling scheme to ......-Robinson equations of state, to determine the density of the real gas mixture along with an empirically extended ideal gas equation. A real behavior of mixture is accounted by using energy and distance parameters.......In this work we present the conceptual modeling and the numerical scheme for carbon dioxide storage into nearly depleted gas reservoirs for enhanced gas recovery reasons. For this we develop non-isothermal compositional gas flow model. We used a combined monolithic / staggered coupling scheme...

  10. Large-Scale Integrated Carbon Nanotube Gas Sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Joondong

    2012-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) is a promising one-dimensional nanostructure for various nanoscale electronics. Additionally, nanostructures would provide a significant large surface area at a fixed volume, which is an advantage for high-responsive gas sensors. However, the difficulty in fabrication processes limits the CNT gas sensors for the large-scale production. We review the viable scheme for large-area application including the CNT gas sensor fabrication and reaction mechanism with a practical d...

  11. Deforestation in Amazonia impacts riverine carbon dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langerwisch, Fanny; Walz, Ariane; Rammig, Anja; Tietjen, Britta; Thonicke, Kirsten; Cramer, Wolfgang

    2016-12-01

    Fluxes of organic and inorganic carbon within the Amazon basin are considerably controlled by annual flooding, which triggers the export of terrigenous organic material to the river and ultimately to the Atlantic Ocean. The amount of carbon imported to the river and the further conversion, transport and export of it depend on temperature, atmospheric CO2, terrestrial productivity and carbon storage, as well as discharge. Both terrestrial productivity and discharge are influenced by climate and land use change. The coupled LPJmL and RivCM model system (Langerwisch et al., 2016) has been applied to assess the combined impacts of climate and land use change on the Amazon riverine carbon dynamics. Vegetation dynamics (in LPJmL) as well as export and conversion of terrigenous carbon to and within the river (RivCM) are included. The model system has been applied for the years 1901 to 2099 under two deforestation scenarios and with climate forcing of three SRES emission scenarios, each for five climate models. We find that high deforestation (business-as-usual scenario) will strongly decrease (locally by up to 90 %) riverine particulate and dissolved organic carbon amount until the end of the current century. At the same time, increase in discharge leaves net carbon transport during the first decades of the century roughly unchanged only if a sufficient area is still forested. After 2050 the amount of transported carbon will decrease drastically. In contrast to that, increased temperature and atmospheric CO2 concentration determine the amount of riverine inorganic carbon stored in the Amazon basin. Higher atmospheric CO2 concentrations increase riverine inorganic carbon amount by up to 20 % (SRES A2). The changes in riverine carbon fluxes have direct effects on carbon export, either to the atmosphere via outgassing or to the Atlantic Ocean via discharge. The outgassed carbon will increase slightly in the Amazon basin, but can be regionally reduced by up to 60 % due to

  12. Dynamical properties of the Lorentz gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, K. C.; Ranganathan, S.; Egelstaff, P. A.; Soper, A. K.

    1987-07-01

    A Lorentz gas interacting with a Lennard-Jones (LJ) potential and obeying classical equations of motion has been simulated by the molecular-dynamics method. A system of 255 Ar particles and one H2 molecule at a reduced Ar density 0.413 and temperature 2.475 is simplified by allowing the ``argon'' to have infinite mass, and the hydrogen molecule interacts with Ar atoms via the LJ potential. The simulated incoherent dynamic structure factor Ss(Q,ω) for the hydrogen molecule, which is corrected for the rotational states, is found to be in reasonable agreement with the experimental data of Egelstaff et al. (unpublished). One-parameter phenomenological model calculations are also compared to these data.

  13. Dynamic structure of dense krypton gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egelstaff, P. A.; Salacuse, J. J.; Schommers, W.; Ram, J.

    1984-07-01

    We have made molecular-dynamics computer simulations of dense krypton gas (10.6×1027 atoms/m3 and 296 K) using reasonably realistic pair potentials. Comparisons are made with the recent experimental data[P. A. Egelstaff et al., Phys. Rev. A 27, 1106 (1983)] for the dynamic structure factor S(q,ω) over the range 0.4

  14. Single and Mixed Gas Adsorption Equilibria of Carbon Dioxide/Methane on Activated Carbon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Vaart, R.; van der Vaart, Rick; Huiskes, Cindy; Bosch, H.; Reith, T.

    2000-01-01

    Single gas adsorption isotherms of methane and carbon dioxide on micro-porous Norit RB1 activated carbon were determined in a gravimetric analyser in the temperature range of 292 to 349 K and pressures to 0.8 Mpa. Furthermore binary isotherms of carbon dioxide and methane mixtures were determined at

  15. Organic Carbon Dynamics in Glacier Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, J.; Sharp, M.; Klassen, J.; Foght, J.; Turner, R.

    2004-12-01

    The biogeochemical cycling of organic carbon (OC) has important implications for aquatic system ecology because the abundance and molecular characteristics of OC influence contaminant transport and bioavailability, and determine its suitability as a substrate for microbial metabolism. There have been few studies of OC cycling in glacier systems, and questions remain regarding the abundance, provenance, and biogeochemical transformations of OC in these environments. To address these questions, the abundance and molecular characteristics of OC is investigated in three glacier systems. These systems are characterized by different thermal and hydrological regimes and have different potential OC sources. John Evans Glacier is a polythermal glacier in arctic Canada. Outre Glacier is a temperate glacier in the Coast Mountains of British Columbia, Canada. Victoria Upper Glacier is a cold-based glacier in the McMurdo Dry Valleys of Antarctica. To provide an indication of the extent to which glacier system OC dynamics are microbially mediated, microbial culturing and identification is performed and organic acid abundance and speciation is determined. Where possible, samples of supraglacial runoff, glacier ice and basal ice and subglacial meltwater were collected. The dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration in each sample was measured by combustion/non-dispersive infrared gas analysis. Emission and synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy were used to characterize the molecular properties of the DOC from each environment. When possible, microbial culturing and identification was performed and organic acid identification and quantification was measured by ion chromatography. DOC exists in detectable quantities (0.06-46.6 ppm) in all of the glacier systems that were investigated. The molecular characteristics of DOC vary between glaciers, between environments at the same glacier, and over time within a single environment. Viable microbes are recoverable in significant (ca

  16. Gas-dynamic Variable Relation on Opposite Sides of the Gas-dynamic Discontinuity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Viktorovich Bulat

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study is to study the conditions of dynamic compatibility on gas-dynamic discontinuities written in the form of a generalized adiabat. We have considered the basic concepts of the gas-dynamic discontinuity theory, the ratios permitting to calculate pressure shocks. Recommendations for rational problem definition and methods of solution of the typical computational problems are given. The dependences for calculation of parameters behind the shock according to the known parameters of a stream and the shock intensity recorded for the first time with the help of a generalized adiabatic line are considered. Substituting in these relations equations of adiabatic line of Laplace-Poisson, Rankine-Hugoniot and Chapman-Jouget, you can calculate the parameters behind, accordingly: simple waves, shockwaves and detonation waves. There are given in friendly graphic form the dependence on the Mach number of incoming flow and gas adiabatic index of the most relevant parameters of shocks: maximum intensity, stream deviation angle on the shock, critical angle of the stream deviation, shock angle according to the critical angle of a the stream deviation. The work can be recommended to the experts, engineers and scientists working in the field of aerospace engineering, metallurgy and metal hardening, for usage of control technologies for hypersonic currents containing gas-dynamic discontinuity.

  17. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Formaldehyde Adsorption and Diffusion in Single-Wall Carbon Nanotube

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pin Lv; Zhenan Tang; Jun Yu; Yanbing Xue

    2006-01-01

    For gas sensor application, adsorption and diffusion of formaldehyde gas in single-wall carbon nanotube were investigated by using molecular dynamics simulation. The conformations of formaldehyde molecule adsorbed in carbon nanotube were optimized according to principle of minimum energy. The axis of conformatiot is parallel to the axis of carbon nanotube and about 0.3 nm~0.4 nm away from carbon nanotube wall. The conformation, which is different from that of the formaldehyde molecule in the gas-phase, rotates around carbon nanotube axis. The adsorption energy and diffusivity of formaldehyde molecule in single-wall carbon nanotube is of-56.2 kJ/mol and of 0.2× 10-4 cm2/s, respectively.

  18. Gas Dynamics as a Tool for Description of Nondeterministic Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rylov, Yuri A.

    2016-05-01

    Classical gas dynamic equations describe mean motion of stochastic gas molecules. The reason of this stochasticity is in teraction (collisions) between molecules. The wave function is the way to describe the gas dynamic equations Rylov (J. Math. Phys. 40 256-278 1999). If a gas molecules interact via some force field κ l , the gas dynamic equations have the form of the Klein-Gordon equation provided they are written in terms of the wave function. Among two possible approaches: (i) quantum mechanics (QM) as axiomatic conception and (ii) QM as a kind of gas dynamics the second approach is more preferable, because in the first approach the wave function looks as a strange axiomatic object, whereas in the second approach the wave function is a natural way of the gas dynamics description. Besides the second approach admits one to obtain a more complete description of stochastic particles.

  19. The Measurement of Landfill Gas Emissions with the Orbiting Carbon Observatory and CarbonSAT Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigil, S. A.; Bovensmann, H.

    2010-12-01

    Landfill gas is a significant contributor to anthropogenic emissions of CH4 and CO2. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has estimated the total U.S. 2007 emissions of the CH4 component of landfill gas at 132.9 Tg CO2 Equivalent. This compares to total CH4 emission from all US sources in 2007 at 585.3 Tg CO2 Equivalent. Worldwide CH4 emissions from landfill gas have been estimated at 668 Tg CO2 Equivalent. Satellite remote sensing can also be used to characterize landfill gas emissions. The NASA Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO-2) and the proposed CarbonSAT (University of Bremen) satellites are particularly suited for this purpose. The Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO) was designed to provided high spatial resolution ( developed countries. In general, landfills in the developed countries have landfill gas control system ground based landfill gas monitoring systems. These ground-based measurements can be used to calibrate OCO-2 and CarbonSAT landfill gas measurements. OCO-2 and CarbonSAT can be used to measure landfill emissions from the large landfills and open dumps of the emerging megacities in the developing world where accurate ground measurements are not available. For example Mexico City generates 26,000 MT of municipal solid waste that is disposed of in two uncontrolled landfills. Similar conditions exist in Asia, Latin America, and Africa. Satellite based measurements of these landfill gas emissions could help prioritize greenhouse gas remediation projects for these countries.

  20. Almacenamiento de gas natural en carbones activados

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Lozano-Castelló

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Los carbones activados (CAs presentan unas de las porosidades y áreas superficiales más elevadas conocidas en sólidos, lo que les confiere una capacidad de adsorción excepcional.

  1. Palladium-nanoparticle-coated carbon nanotube gas sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Maeum; Jung, Daewoong; Lee, Gil S.

    2014-08-01

    Flexible hydrogen gas sensors were fabricated using multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) decorated with Pd nanoparticles for the detection of H2 gas at room temperature. A comparative gas-sensing study was carried out on both the Pd-nanoparticles-decorated and undecorated MWCNT sheets in order to examine the effect of Pd nanoparticles on the gas-sensing performances at room temperature. Experimental results showed that the MWCNTs/Pd sensor exhibited fast response and recovery as well as high sensitivity compared with the pure MWCNT sensor. The improved sensing properties of this sensor were attributed to the spillover effect of Pd nanoparticles and the highly conductive MWCNT sheet.

  2. Adsorption and Gas Separation of Molecules by Carbon Nanohorns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatica, Silvina M; Nekhai, Anton; Scrivener, Adam

    2016-05-19

    In this paper, we report the results of Monte Carlo simulations of the adsorption of neon, argon, methane and carbon dioxide in carbon nanohorns. We model the nanohorns as an array of carbon cones and obtained adsorption isotherms and isosteric heats. The main sites of adsorption are inside the cones and in the interstices between three cones. We also calculated the selectivity of carbon dioxide/methane, finding that nanohorns are a suitable substrate for gas separation. Our simulations are compared to available experimental data.

  3. Slurried solid media for simultaneous water purification and carbon dioxide removal from gas mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aines, Roger D.; Bourcier, William L.; Viani, Brian

    2013-01-29

    A slurried solid media for simultaneous water purification and carbon dioxide removal from gas mixtures includes the steps of dissolving the gas mixture and carbon dioxide in water providing a gas, carbon dioxide, water mixture; adding a porous solid media to the gas, carbon dioxide, water mixture forming a slurry of gas, carbon dioxide, water, and porous solid media; heating the slurry of gas, carbon dioxide, water, and porous solid media producing steam; and cooling the steam to produce purified water and carbon dioxide.

  4. Slurried solid media for simultaneous water purification and carbon dioxide removal from gas mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aines, Roger D.; Bourcier, William L.; Viani, Brian

    2013-01-29

    A slurried solid media for simultaneous water purification and carbon dioxide removal from gas mixtures includes the steps of dissolving the gas mixture and carbon dioxide in water providing a gas, carbon dioxide, water mixture; adding a porous solid media to the gas, carbon dioxide, water mixture forming a slurry of gas, carbon dioxide, water, and porous solid media; heating the slurry of gas, carbon dioxide, water, and porous solid media producing steam; and cooling the steam to produce purified water and carbon dioxide.

  5. Iterated upwind schemes for gas dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolarkiewicz, Piotr K.; Szmelter, Joanna

    2009-01-01

    A class of high-resolution schemes established in integration of anelastic equations is extended to fully compressible flows, and documented for unsteady (and steady) problems through a span of Mach numbers from zero to supersonic. The schemes stem from iterated upwind technology of the multidimensional positive definite advection transport algorithm (MPDATA). The derived algorithms employ standard and modified forms of the equations of gas dynamics for conservation of mass, momentum and either total or internal energy as well as potential temperature. Numerical examples from elementary wave propagation, through computational aerodynamics benchmarks, to atmospheric small- and large-amplitude acoustics with intricate wave-flow interactions verify the approach for both structured and unstructured meshes, and demonstrate its flexibility and robustness.

  6. Synchronized flux limiting for gas dynamics variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohmann, Christoph; Kuzmin, Dmitri

    2016-12-01

    This work addresses the design of failsafe flux limiters for systems of conserved quantities and derived variables in numerical schemes for the equations of gas dynamics. Building on Zalesak's multidimensional flux-corrected transport (FCT) algorithm, we construct a new positivity-preserving limiter for the density, total energy, and pressure. The bounds for the underlying inequality constraints are designed to enforce local maximum principles in regions of strong density variations and become less restrictive in smooth regions. The proposed approach leads to closed-form expressions for the synchronized correction factors without the need to solve inequality-constrained optimization problems. A numerical study is performed for the compressible Euler equations discretized using a finite element based FCT scheme.

  7. Gas bubble dynamics in soft materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solano-Altamirano, J M; Malcolm, John D; Goldman, Saul

    2015-01-01

    Epstein and Plesset's seminal work on the rate of gas bubble dissolution and growth in a simple liquid is generalized to render it applicable to a gas bubble embedded in a soft elastic solid. Both the underlying diffusion equation and the expression for the gas bubble pressure were modified to allow for the non-zero shear modulus of the medium. The extension of the diffusion equation results in a trivial shift (by an additive constant) in the value of the diffusion coefficient, and does not change the form of the rate equations. But the use of a generalized Young-Laplace equation for the bubble pressure resulted in significant differences on the dynamics of bubble dissolution and growth, relative to an inviscid liquid medium. Depending on whether the salient parameters (solute concentration, initial bubble radius, surface tension, and shear modulus) lead to bubble growth or dissolution, the effect of allowing for a non-zero shear modulus in the generalized Young-Laplace equation is to speed up the rate of bubble growth, or to reduce the rate of bubble dissolution, respectively. The relation to previous work on visco-elastic materials is discussed, as is the connection of this work to the problem of Decompression Sickness (specifically, "the bends"). Examples of tissues to which our expressions can be applied are provided. Also, a new phenomenon is predicted whereby, for some parameter values, a bubble can be metastable and persist for long times, or it may grow, when embedded in a homogeneous under-saturated soft elastic medium.

  8. Carbon-fiber composite molecular sieves for gas separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jagtoyen, M.; Derbyshire, F.; Kimber, G.; Fei, Y.Q. [Univ. of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research, Lexington, KY (United States)

    1995-08-01

    The progress of research in the development of novel, rigid, monolithic adsorbent carbon fiber composites is described. Carbon fiber composites are produced at ORNL and activated at the CAER using steam or CO{sub 2} under different conditions, with the aims of producing a uniform degree of activation through the material, and of closely controlling pore structure and adsorptive properties The principal focus of the work to date has been to produce materials with narrow porosity for use in gas separations.

  9. Carbon dynamics in topsoil and subsoil along a cultivated toposequence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chirinda, Ngoni; Elsgaard, Lars; Thomsen, Ingrid Kaag

    2014-01-01

    SOC dynamics in topsoil (5 cm) and subsoil horizons (40 and 80 cm) at shoulderslope and footslope positions in a toposequence in a Danish winter wheat field. In addition, SOC was quantified for 20-cm depth intervals to 100 cm depths. Over a 1 year period, gas samples for carbon dioxide (CO2......Topography-induced spatial heterogeneity influences soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks and microbial degradation (respiration) both in topsoil and subsoil compartments. However, the interaction between topographic position and soil horizons has rarely been assessed. This study aimed to investigate......) and oxygen (O2) analyses were collected from seven different soil depths (5 to 80 cm) at the shoulder- and footslope positions. Soil surface CO2 fluxes were measured over a shorter period (January to June 2012). Soil samples from 5 and 40 cm depths were incubated at 5 to 34 °C to determine the temperature...

  10. Device for separation of vortex gas-dynamic energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leontiev, A. I.; Burtsev, S. A.

    2015-10-01

    A device for separation of vortex gas-dynamic energy, which combines the mechanism of separation of vortex energy used in the Ranque-Hilsch tubes and the mechanism of separation of gas-dynamic energy, is proposed for supersonic flows. A method of calculation of this device is developed. A comparison is made that showed that, when working with natural gas, the cooling depth of half of the mass flow rate proves to be 1.3 times higher than that for the vortex tube and three times higher than that for the device for separation of the gas-dynamic energy.

  11. Key factors of combustion from kinetics to gas dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Rubtsov, Nikolai M

    2017-01-01

    This book summarizes the main advances in the mechanisms of combustion processes. It focuses on the analysis of kinetic mechanisms of gas combustion processes and experimental investigation into the interrelation of kinetics and gas dynamics in gas combustion. The book is complimentary to the one previously published, The Modes of Gaseous Combustion.

  12. Characteristics of carbonate gas pool and multistage gas pool formation history of Hetianhe gas field, Tarim Basin, Northwest China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Hetianhe is a big carbonate gas field which is found and demonstrated in the period of "Chinese National Ninth 5-Year Plan". The proved reserve of Hetianhe gas field is over 600×108 m3. Its main producing layers are Carboniferous bioclastic limestone and Ordovician carbonate composed of buried hill. The former is stratified gas pool with water around its side, and the latter is massive gas pool with water in its bottom. The gases in the gas pools belong to dry gases with normal temperature and pressure systems. Based on the correlation of gas and source rock, the gases are mainly generated from Cambrian source rocks. According to the researches on source rock and structure evolution, and the observations on the thin section to reservoir bitumen and the studies on homogenization temperature of fluid inclusions, the gas pool has been identified and divided into three formation periods. The first is Late Caledonian when the oil generated from the Cambrian source rocks and migrated along faults, as a form of liquid facies into Ordovician carbonate reservoir and accumulated there. After that, the crust uplifted, the oil reservoir had been destroyed. The second is Late Hercynian when condensate gases generated from the Cambrian source rocks and migrated into Ordovician reservoir, as a form of liquid facies. Since the fractures had reached P strata, so the trap might have a real poor preservation condition, and the large-scale gas pool formation had not happened. The third gas reservoir formation period occurred in Himalaya. The fractures on both sides of Hetianhe gas field developed violently under the forces of compression, and thus the present fault horst formed. The dry gases generated from Cambrian source rocks and migrated upwards as the form of gas facies into Ordovician and Carboniferous reservoirs, and the large gas pool as discovered at present was formed finally.

  13. A dynamic leaf gas-exchange strategy is conserved in woody plants under changing ambient CO2: evidence from carbon isotope discrimination in paleo and CO2 enrichment studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voelker, Steven L.; Brooks, J. Renée; Meinzer, Frederick C.; Anderson, Rebecca D.; Bader, Martin K.-F.; Battipaglia, Giovanna; Becklin, Katie M.; Beerling, David; Bert, Didier; Betancourt, Julio L.; Dawson, Todd E.; Domec, Jean-Christophe; Guyette, Richard P.; Körner, Christian; Leavitt, Steven W.; Linder, Sune; Marshall, John D.; Mildner, Manuel; Ogée, Jérôme; Panyushkina, Irina P.; Plumpton, Heather J.; Pregitzer, Kurt S.; Saurer, Matthias; Smith, Andrew R.; Siegwolf, Rolf T.W.; Stambaugh, Michael C.; Talhelm, Alan F.; Tardif, Jacques C.; Van De Water, Peter K.; Ward, Joy K.; Wingate, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Rising atmospheric [CO2], ca, is expected to affect stomatal regulation of leaf gas-exchange of woody plants, thus influencing energy fluxes as well as carbon (C), water, and nutrient cycling of forests. Researchers have proposed various strategies for stomatal regulation of leaf gas-exchange that include maintaining a constant leaf internal [CO2], ci, a constant drawdown in CO2(ca − ci), and a constant ci/ca. These strategies can result in drastically different consequences for leaf gas-exchange. The accuracy of Earth systems models depends in part on assumptions about generalizable patterns in leaf gas-exchange responses to varying ca. The concept of optimal stomatal behavior, exemplified by woody plants shifting along a continuum of these strategies, provides a unifying framework for understanding leaf gas-exchange responses to ca. To assess leaf gas-exchange regulation strategies, we analyzed patterns in ci inferred from studies reporting C stable isotope ratios (δ13C) or photosynthetic discrimination (∆) in woody angiosperms and gymnosperms that grew across a range of ca spanning at least 100 ppm. Our results suggest that much of the ca-induced changes in ci/ca occurred across ca spanning 200 to 400 ppm. These patterns imply that ca − ci will eventually approach a constant level at high ca because assimilation rates will reach a maximum and stomatal conductance of each species should be constrained to some minimum level. These analyses are not consistent with canalization toward any single strategy, particularly maintaining a constant ci. Rather, the results are consistent with the existence of a broadly conserved pattern of stomatal optimization in woody angiosperms and gymnosperms. This results in trees being profligate water users at low ca, when additional water loss is small for each unit of C gain, and increasingly water-conservative at high ca, when photosystems are saturated and water loss is large for each unit C gain.

  14. Carbon dynamics of river corridors and the effects of human alterations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohl, Ellen; Hall, Robert O.; Lininger, Katherine B; Sutfin, Nicholas A.; Walters, David

    2017-01-01

    Research in stream metabolism, gas exchange, and sediment dynamics indicates that rivers are an active component of the global carbon cycle and that river form and process can influence partitioning of terrestrially derived carbon among the atmosphere, geosphere, and ocean. Here we develop a conceptual model of carbon dynamics (inputs, outputs, and storage of organic carbon) within a river corridor, which includes the active channel and the riparian zone. The exchange of carbon from the channel to the riparian zone represents potential for storage of transported carbon not included in the “active pipe” model of organic carbon (OC) dynamics in freshwater systems. The active pipe model recognizes that river processes influence carbon dynamics, but focuses on CO2 emissions from the channel and eventual delivery to the ocean. We also review how human activities directly and indirectly alter carbon dynamics within river corridors. We propose that dams create the most significant alteration of carbon dynamics within a channel, but that alteration of riparian zones, including the reduction of lateral connectivity between the channel and riparian zone, constitutes the most substantial change of carbon dynamics in river corridors. We argue that the morphology and processes of a river corridor regulate the ability to store, transform, and transport OC, and that people are pervasive modifiers of river morphology and processes. The net effect of most human activities, with the notable exception of reservoir construction, appears to be that of reducing the ability of river corridors to store OC within biota and sediment, which effectively converts river corridors to OC sources rather than OC sinks. We conclude by summarizing knowledge gaps in OC dynamics and the implications of our findings for managing OC dynamics within river corridors.

  15. The effects of carbon tax on the Oregon economy and state greenhouse gas emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, A. L.; Butenhoff, C. L.; Renfro, J.; Liu, J.

    2014-12-01

    Of the numerous mechanisms to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions on statewide, regional or national scales in the United States, a tax on carbon is perhaps one of the simplest. By taxing emissions directly, the costs of carbon emissions are incorporated into decision-making processes of market actors including consumers, energy suppliers and policy makers. A carbon tax also internalizes the social costs of climate impacts. In structuring carbon tax revenues to reduce corporate and personal income taxes, the negative incentives created by distortionary income taxes can be reduced or offset entirely. In 2008, the first carbon tax in North America across economic sectors was implemented in British Columbia through such a revenue-neutral program. In this work, we investigate the economic and environmental effects of a carbon tax in the state of Oregon with the goal of informing the state legislature, stakeholders and the public. The study investigates 70 different economic sectors in the Oregon economy and six geographical regions of the state. The economic model is built upon the Carbon Tax Analysis Model (C-TAM) to provide price changes in fuel with data from: the Energy Information Agency National Energy Modeling System (EIA-NEMS) Pacific Region Module which provides Oregon-specific energy forecasts; and fuel price increases imposed at different carbon fees based on fuel-specific carbon content and current and projected regional-specific electricity fuel mixes. CTAM output is incorporated into the Regional Economic Model (REMI) which is used to dynamically forecast economic impacts by region and industry sector including: economic output, employment, wages, fiscal effects and equity. Based on changes in economic output and fuel demand, we further project changes in greenhouse gas emissions resulting from economic activity and calculate revenue generated through a carbon fee. Here, we present results of this modeling effort under different scenarios of carbon fee and

  16. Carbon Dioxide Capture from Flue Gas Using Dry, Regenerable Sorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David A. Green; Thomas O. Nelson; Brian S. Turk; Paul D. Box Raghubir P. Gupta

    2006-09-30

    This report describes research conducted between July 1, 2006 and September 30, 2006 on the use of dry regenerable sorbents for removal of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from coal combustion flue gas. Modifications to the integrated absorber/ sorbent regenerator/ sorbent cooler system were made to improve sorbent flow consistency and measurement reliability. Operation of the screw conveyor regenerator to achieve a sorbent temperature of at least 120 C at the regenerator outlet is necessary for satisfactory carbon dioxide capture efficiencies in succeeding absorption cycles. Carbon dioxide capture economics in new power plants can be improved by incorporating increased capacity boilers, efficient flue gas desulfurization systems and provisions for withdrawal of sorbent regeneration steam in the design.

  17. Strategy implications of world gas market dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Global trends – past and future – of world natural gas consumption, production, reserves, and prices are highlighted here analyzing the BP Statistical Review of World Energy 2011, the BP Energy Outlook 2011, and the latest natural gas data from the world’s major energy agencies. Growing demand and declining gas-reserve- replacement ratios support market model predictions of rising natural gas prices.

  18. Thermochemically Driven Gas-Dynamic Fracturing (TDGF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael Goodwin

    2008-12-31

    This report concerns efforts to increase oil well productivity and efficiency via a method of heating the oil-bearing rock of the well, a technique known as Thermochemical Gas-Dynamic Fracturing (TGDF). The technique uses either a chemical reaction or a combustion event to raise the temperature of the rock of the well, thereby increasing oil velocity, and oil pumping rate. Such technology has shown promise for future application to both older wellheads and also new sites. The need for such technologies in the oil extraction field, along with the merits of the TGDF technology is examined in Chapter 1. The theoretical basis underpinning applications of TGDF is explained in Chapter 2. It is shown that productivity of depleted well can be increased by one order of magnitude after heating a reservoir region of radius 15-20 m around the well by 100 degrees 1-2 times per year. Two variants of thermal stimulation are considered: uniform heating and optimal temperature distribution in the formation region around the perforation zone. It is demonstrated that the well productivity attained by using equal amounts of thermal energy is higher by a factor of 3 to 4 in the case of optimal temperature distribution as compared to uniform distribution. Following this theoretical basis, two practical approaches to applying TDGF are considered. Chapter 3 looks at the use of chemical intiators to raise the rock temperature in the well via an exothermic chemical reaction. The requirements for such a delivery device are discussed, and several novel fuel-oxidizing mixtures (FOM) are investigated in conditions simulating those at oil-extracting depths. Such FOM mixtures, particularly ones containing nitric acid and a chemical initiator, are shown to dramatically increase the temperature of the oil-bearing rock, and thus the productivity of the well. Such tests are substantiated by preliminary fieldwork in Russian oil fields. A second, more cost effective approach to TGDF is considered in

  19. Stable Isotope Measurements of Carbon Dioxide, Methane, and Hydrogen Sulfide Gas Using Frequency Modulation Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak-Lovato, K.

    2014-12-01

    Seepage from enhanced oil recovery, carbon storage, and natural gas sites can emit trace gases such as carbon dioxide, methane, and hydrogen sulfide. Trace gas emission at these locations demonstrate unique light stable isotope signatures that provide information to enable source identification of the material. Light stable isotope detection through surface monitoring, offers the ability to distinguish between trace gases emitted from sources such as, biological (fertilizers and wastes), mineral (coal or seams), or liquid organic systems (oil and gas reservoirs). To make light stable isotope measurements, we employ the ultra-sensitive technique, frequency modulation spectroscopy (FMS). FMS is an absorption technique with sensitivity enhancements approximately 100-1000x more than standard absorption spectroscopy with the advantage of providing stable isotope signature information. We have developed an integrated in situ (point source) system that measures carbon dioxide, methane and hydrogen sulfide with isotopic resolution and enhanced sensitivity. The in situ instrument involves the continuous collection of air and records the stable isotope ratio for the gas being detected. We have included in-line flask collection points to obtain gas samples for validation of isotopic concentrations using our in-house isotope ratio mass spectroscopy (IRMS). We present calibration curves for each species addressed above to demonstrate the sensitivity and accuracy of the system. We also show field deployment data demonstrating the capabilities of the system in making live dynamic measurements from an active source.

  20. Calculation of hydrocarbon-in-place in gas and gas-condensate reservoirs - Carbon dioxide sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Mahendra K.

    2012-01-01

    The Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (Public Law 110-140) authorized the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to conduct a national assessment of geologic storage resources for carbon dioxide (CO2), requiring estimation of hydrocarbon-in-place volumes and formation volume factors for all the oil, gas, and gas-condensate reservoirs within the U.S. sedimentary basins. The procedures to calculate in-place volumes for oil and gas reservoirs have already been presented by Verma and Bird (2005) to help with the USGS assessment of the undiscovered resources in the National Petroleum Reserve, Alaska, but there is no straightforward procedure available for calculating in-place volumes for gas-condensate reservoirs for the carbon sequestration project. The objective of the present study is to propose a simple procedure for calculating the hydrocarbon-in-place volume of a condensate reservoir to help estimate the hydrocarbon pore volume for potential CO2 sequestration.

  1. The dynamic response of carbon fiber-filled polymer composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patterson B.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic (shock responses of two carbon fiber-filled polymer composites have been quantified using gas gun-driven plate impact experimentation. The first composite is a filament-wound, highly unidirectional carbon fiber-filled epoxy with a high degree of porosity. The second composite is a chopped carbon fiber- and graphite-filled phenolic resin with little-to-no porosity. Hugoniot data are presented for the carbon fiber-epoxy (CE composite to 18.6 GPa in the through-thickness direction, in which the shock propagates normal to the fibers. The data are best represented by a linear Rankine-Hugoniot fit: Us = 2.87 + 1.17 ×up(ρ0 = 1.536g/cm3. The shock wave structures were found to be highly heterogeneous, both due to the anisotropic nature of the fiber-epoxy microstructure, and the high degree of void volume. Plate impact experiments were also performed on a carbon fiber-filled phenolic (CP composite to much higher shock input pressures, exceeding the reactants-to-products transition common to polymers. The CP was found to be stiffer than the filament-wound CE in the unreacted Hugoniot regime, and transformed to products near the shock-driven reaction threshold on the principal Hugoniot previously shown for the phenolic binder itself. [19] On-going research is focused on interrogating the direction-dependent dyanamic response and dynamic failure strength (spall for the CE composite in the TT and 0∘ (fiber directions.

  2. The dynamic response of carbon fiber-filled polymer composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dattelbaum, D. M.; Gustavsen, R. L.; Sheffield, S. A.; Stahl, D. B.; Scharff, R. J.; Rigg, P. A.; Furmanski, J.; Orler, E. B.; Patterson, B.; Coe, J. D.

    2012-08-01

    The dynamic (shock) responses of two carbon fiber-filled polymer composites have been quantified using gas gun-driven plate impact experimentation. The first composite is a filament-wound, highly unidirectional carbon fiber-filled epoxy with a high degree of porosity. The second composite is a chopped carbon fiber- and graphite-filled phenolic resin with little-to-no porosity. Hugoniot data are presented for the carbon fiber-epoxy (CE) composite to 18.6 GPa in the through-thickness direction, in which the shock propagates normal to the fibers. The data are best represented by a linear Rankine-Hugoniot fit: Us = 2.87 + 1.17 ×up(ρ0 = 1.536g/cm3). The shock wave structures were found to be highly heterogeneous, both due to the anisotropic nature of the fiber-epoxy microstructure, and the high degree of void volume. Plate impact experiments were also performed on a carbon fiber-filled phenolic (CP) composite to much higher shock input pressures, exceeding the reactants-to-products transition common to polymers. The CP was found to be stiffer than the filament-wound CE in the unreacted Hugoniot regime, and transformed to products near the shock-driven reaction threshold on the principal Hugoniot previously shown for the phenolic binder itself. [19] On-going research is focused on interrogating the direction-dependent dyanamic response and dynamic failure strength (spall) for the CE composite in the TT and 0∘ (fiber) directions.

  3. Capturing carbon dioxide as a polymer from natural gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Chih-Chau; Tour, Josiah J; Kittrell, Carter; Espinal, Laura; Alemany, Lawrence B; Tour, James M

    2014-06-03

    Natural gas is considered the cleanest and recently the most abundant fossil fuel source, yet when it is extracted from wells, it often contains 10-20 mol% carbon dioxide (20-40 wt%), which is generally vented to the atmosphere. Efforts are underway to contain this carbon dioxide at the well-head using inexpensive and non-corrosive methods. Here we report nucleophilic porous carbons are synthesized from simple and inexpensive carbon-sulphur and carbon-nitrogen precursors. Infrared, Raman and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance signatures substantiate carbon dioxide fixation by polymerization in the carbon channels to form poly(CO2) under much lower pressures than previously required. This growing chemisorbed sulphur- or nitrogen-atom-initiated poly(CO2) chain further displaces physisorbed hydrocarbon, providing a continuous carbon dioxide selectivity. Once returned to ambient conditions, the poly(CO2) spontaneously depolymerizes, leading to a sorbent that can be easily regenerated without the thermal energy input that is required for traditional sorbents.

  4. [Flue gas desulfurization by a novel biomass activated carbon].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jie-Ling; Tang, Zheng-Guang; Chen, Jie; Jiang, Wen-Ju; Jiang, Xia

    2013-04-01

    A novel biomass columnar activated carbon was prepared from walnut shell and pyrolusite was added as a catalyst. The activated carbon prepared was used for flue gas desulphurization in a fixed-bed reactor with 16 g of activated carbon. The impact of operating parameters such as SO2 inlet concentration, space velocity, bed temperature, moisture content and O2 concentration on the desulfurization efficiency of activated carbon was investigated. The results showed that both the breakthrough sulfur capacity and breakthrough time of activated carbon decreased with the increase of SO2 inlet concentration within the range of 0.1% -0.3%. The breakthrough sulfur capacity deceased with the increase of space velocity, with optimal space velocity of 600 h(-1). The optimal bed temperature was 80 degrees C, and the desulfurization efficiency can be reduced if the temperature continue to increase. The presence of moisture and oxygen greatly promoted the adsorption of SO2 onto the activated carbon. The best moisture content was 10%. When the oxygen concentrations were between 10% and 13%, the desulfurization performance of activated carbon was the highest. Under the optimal operating conditions, the sulfur capacity of activated carbon was 252 mg x g(-1), and the breakthrough time was up to 26 h when the SO2 inlet concentration was 0.2%.

  5. Capturing carbon dioxide as a polymer from natural gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Chih-Chau; Tour, Josiah J.; Kittrell, Carter; Espinal, Laura; Alemany, Lawrence B.; Tour, James M.

    2014-06-01

    Natural gas is considered the cleanest and recently the most abundant fossil fuel source, yet when it is extracted from wells, it often contains 10-20 mol% carbon dioxide (20-40 wt%), which is generally vented to the atmosphere. Efforts are underway to contain this carbon dioxide at the well-head using inexpensive and non-corrosive methods. Here we report nucleophilic porous carbons are synthesized from simple and inexpensive carbon-sulphur and carbon-nitrogen precursors. Infrared, Raman and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance signatures substantiate carbon dioxide fixation by polymerization in the carbon channels to form poly(CO2) under much lower pressures than previously required. This growing chemisorbed sulphur- or nitrogen-atom-initiated poly(CO2) chain further displaces physisorbed hydrocarbon, providing a continuous carbon dioxide selectivity. Once returned to ambient conditions, the poly(CO2) spontaneously depolymerizes, leading to a sorbent that can be easily regenerated without the thermal energy input that is required for traditional sorbents.

  6. Gas-solid carbonation as a possible source of carbonates in cold planetary environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garenne, A.; Montes-Hernandez, G.; Beck, P.; Schmitt, B.; Brissaud, O.; Pommerol, A.

    2013-02-01

    Carbonates are abundant sedimentary minerals at the surface and sub-surface of the Earth and they have been proposed as tracers of liquid water in extraterrestrial environments. Their formation mechanism is since generally associated with aqueous alteration processes. Recently, carbonate minerals have been discovered on Mars' surface by different orbitals or rover missions. In particular, the phoenix mission has measured from 1% to 5% of calcium carbonate (calcite type) within the soil (Smith et al., 2009). These occurrences have been reported in area where the relative humidity is significantly high (Boynton et al., 2009). The small concentration of carbonates suggests an alternative process on mineral grain surfaces (as suggested by Shaheen et al., 2010) than carbonation in aqueous conditions. Such an observation could rather point toward a possible formation mechanism by dust-gas reaction under current Martian conditions. To understand the mechanism of carbonate formation under conditions relevant to current Martian atmosphere and surface, we designed an experimental setup consisting of an infrared microscope coupled to a cryogenic reaction cell (IR-CryoCell setup). Three different mineral precursors of carbonates (Ca and Mg hydroxides, and a hydrated Ca silicate formed from Ca2SiO4), low temperature (from -10 to +30 °C), and reduced CO2 pressure (from 100 to 2000 mbar) were utilized to investigate the mechanism of gas-solid carbonation at mineral surfaces. These mineral materials are crucial precursors to form Ca and Mg carbonates in humid environments (0%carbonation process for Ca hydroxide and hydrated Ca silicate. Conversely, only a moderate carbonation is observed for the Mg hydroxide. These results suggest that gas-solid carbonation process or carbonate formation at the dust-water ice-CO2 interfaces could be a currently active Mars' surface

  7. The computer simulation of 3d gas dynamics in a gas centrifuge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borman, V. D.; Bogovalov, S. V.; Borisevich, V. D.; Tronin, I. V.; Tronin, V. N.

    2016-09-01

    We argue on the basis of the results of 2D analysis of the gas flow in gas centrifuges that a reliable calculation of the circulation of the gas and gas content in the gas centrifuge is possible only in frameworks of 3D numerical simulation of gas dynamics in the gas centrifuge (hereafter GC). The group from National research nuclear university, MEPhI, has created a computer code for 3D simulation of the gas flow in GC. The results of the computer simulations of the gas flows in GC are presented. A model Iguassu centrifuge is explored for the simulations. A nonaxisymmetric gas flow is produced due to interaction of the hypersonic rotating flow with the scoops for extraction of the product and waste flows from the GC. The scoops produce shock waves penetrating into a working camera of the GC and form spiral waves there.

  8. Cryotherapy gas--to use nitrous oxide or carbon dioxide?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiti, H; Cheyne, M F; Hobbs, G; Jeraj, H A

    1999-02-01

    Cryotherapy is regularly used in our clinic for treating genital warts. Nitrous oxide was used as the cryogenic gas. Following a health and safety review it was decided to monitor the nitrous oxide levels in the treatment room under different conditions. The Occupational Exposure Standard for nitrous oxide is 100 parts per million (PPM) (8-h time weighted average) and an indicative short-term exposure limit of 300 PPM (15-min reference period). High levels of gas were detected, especially when the exhaust was not vented to the outside. Venting of the gas to the outside could also present a hazard to adjacent areas. The situation was considered to be unacceptable and carbon dioxide was proposed as an alternative. The Occupational Exposure Standard for carbon dioxide is 5000 PPM (8-h time weighted average) and a short-term limit of 15,000 PPM (15-min reference period). Carbon dioxide levels were found to be within the Occupational Exposure Standard. There is no noticeable difference in the cryogenic efficacy of the 2 gases. Carbon dioxide is, therefore, a safer alternative. It also offers significant savings when compared with nitrous oxide.

  9. Molecular and carbon isotopic compositions of gas inclusions of deep carbonate rocks in the Tarim Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Shixin; WANG Xianbin; MENG Zifang; LI Yuan; Paul Farrimond; LI Liwu; DUAN Yi

    2004-01-01

    Gaseous components of gas inclusions in deep carbonate rocks (>5700 m) from the Tacan 1 well were analyzed by online mass spectrometry by means of either the stepwise heating technique or vacuum electromagnetism crushing. The carbon isotopic compositions of gases released by vacuum electromagnetism crushing were also measured. Although the molecular compositions of gas inclusions show differences between the two methods, the overall characteristics are that gas inclusions mainly contain CO2, whilst hydrocarbon gases, such as CH4, C2H6 and C3H8, are less abundant. The content of CO is higher in the stepwise heating experiment than that in the method of vacuum electromagnetism crushing, and there are only minor amounts of N2, H2 and O2 in gas inclusions. Methane δ13C values of gas inclusions in Lower Ordovician and Upper Cambrian rocks (from 5713.7 to 6422 m; -52‰-63‰) are similar to those of bacterial methane, but their chemical compositions do not exhibit the dry character in comparison with biogenic gases. These characteristics of deep gas inclusions may be related to the migration fractionation. Some deep natural gases with light carbon isotopic characteristics in the Tazhong Uplift may have a similar origin. The δ13C1 values of gas inclusions in Lower Cambrian rocks (7117-7124 m) are heavier (-39‰), consistent with highly mature natural gases. Carbon isotopic compositions of CO2 in the gas inclusions of deep carbonate rocks are similar (from -4‰ to -13‰) to those of deep natural gases, indicating predominantly an inorganic origin.

  10. 3D modeling of gas/water distribution in water-bearing carbonate gas reservoirs: the Longwangmiao gas field, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Chenghua; Li, ChaoChun; Ma, Zhonggao

    2016-10-01

    A water-bearing carbonate gas reservoir is an important natural gas resource being developed worldwide. Due to the long-term water/rock/gas interaction during geological evolution, complex gas/water distribution has formed under the superposed effect of sedimentary facies, reservoir space facies and gravity difference of fluid facies. In view of these challenges, on the basis of the conventional three-stage modeling method, this paper presents a modelling method controlled by four-stage facies to develop 3D model of a water-bearing carbonate gas reservoir. Key to this method is the reservoir property modelling controlled by two-stage facies, and the fluid property modelling controlled by another two-stage facies. The prerequisite of this method is a reliable database obtained from solid geological investigation. On the basis of illustrating the principles of the modelling method controlled by four-stage facies, this paper further implements systematically modeling of the heterogeneous gas/water distribution of the Longwangmiao carbonate formation in the Moxi-Gaoshiti area, Sichuan basin, China.

  11. Low pressure storage of natural gas on activated carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegrzyn, J.; Wiesmann, H.; Lee, T.

    The introduction of natural gas to the transportation energy sector offers the possibility of displacing imported oil with an indigenous fuel. The barrier to the acceptance of natural gas vehicles (NGV) is the limited driving range due to the technical difficulties of on-board storage of a gaseous fuel. In spite of this barrier, compressed natural gas (CNG) vehicles are today being successfully introduced into the market place. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate an adsorbent natural gas (ANG) storage system as a viable alternative to CNG storage. It can be argued that low pressure ANG has reached near parity with CNG, since the storage capacity of CNG (2400 psi) is rated at 190 V/V, while low pressure ANG (500 psi) has reached storage capacities of 180 V/V in the laboratory. A program, which extends laboratory results to a full-scale vehicle test, is necessary before ANG technology will receive widespread acceptance. The objective of this program is to field test a 150 V/V ANG vehicle in FY 1994. As a start towards this goal, carbon adsorbents have been screened by Brookhaven for their potential use in a natural gas storage system. This paper reports on one such carbon, trade name Maxsorb, manufactured by Kansai Coke under an Amoco license.

  12. Carbon Nanotubes as Active Components for Gas Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-De Zhang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The unique structure of carbon nanotubes endows them with fantastic physical and chemical characteristics. Carbon nanotubes have been widely studied due to their potential applications in many fields including conductive and high-strength composites, energy storage and energy conversion devices, sensors, field emission displays and radiation sources, hydrogen storage media, and nanometer-sized semiconductor devices, probes, and quantum wires. Some of these applications have been realized in products, while others show great potentials. The development of carbon nanotubes-based sensors has attracted intensive interest in the last several years because of their excellent sensing properties such as high selectivity and prompt response. Carbon nanotube-based gas sensors are summarized in this paper. Sensors based on single-walled, multiwalled, and well-aligned carbon nanotubes arrays are introduced. Modification of carbon nanotubes with functional groups, metals, oxides, polymers, or doping carbon nanotubes with other elements to enhance the response and selectivity of the sensors is also discussed.

  13. Synthesis of hydrogen gas by thermal decomposition of methane gas with carbon sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, A R [Escuela de Quimica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Central de Venezuela, Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Manrique, C M [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales, GPUSB, Universidad Simon BolIvar, Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Castell, R; Ruiz, J [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Simon BolIvar, Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)

    2008-10-15

    Hydrogen gas synthesis by the thermal decomposition of methane gas in a non-transferred arc thermal plasma reactor is studied. A thermodynamic study was carried out obtaining free energy minimization plots for the C-H-N and C-H-N-Si systems by using the CSIRO thermo package. Nitrogen gas was used as an ionizing gas and metallic silicon fine powder was injected to promote the in fly silicon carbide nucleation. The effect of current intensity on the thermal decomposition of methane was studied. The degree of methane gas decomposition was in the range 84-97%. The fine solid product collected was characterized using the XRD and MEB-EDAX methods. Elemental carbon particles as well as silicon carbide particles in the nanometric range were identified by the last technique.

  14. Novel gas sensors based on carbon nanotube networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sayago, I; Aleixandre, M; Horrillo, M C; Fernandez, M J; Gutierrez, J [Laboratorio de Sensores IFA-CSIC, Serrano 144, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Terrado, E; Lafuente, E; Maser, W K; Benito, A M; Martinez, M T; Munoz, E [Instituto de CarboquImica CSIC, Miguel Luesma Castan 4, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Urriolabeitia, E P; Navarro, R [Departamento de Quimica Inorganica, ICMA (Universidad de Zaragoza-CSIC), 50009 Zaragoza (Spain)], E-mail: sayago@ifa.cetef.csic.es, E-mail: edgar@icb.csic.es

    2008-08-15

    Novel resistive gas sensors based on single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) networks as the active sensing element nave been investigated for gas detection. SWNTs networks were fabricated by airbrushing on alumina substrates. As-produced- and Pd-decorated SWNT materials were used as sensitive layers for the detection of NO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}, respectively. The studied sensors provided good response to NO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} as well as excellent selectivities to interfering gases.

  15. Sustainable catalyst supports for carbon dioxide gas adsorbent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazlee, M. N.

    2016-07-01

    The adsorption of carbon dioxide (CO2) become the prime attention nowadays due to the fact that increasing CO2 emissions has been identified as a contributor to global climate change. Major sources of CO2 emissions are thermoelectric power plants and industrial plants which account for approximately 45% of global CO2 emissions. Therefore, it is an urgent need to develop an efficient CO2 reduction technology such as carbon capture and storage (CCS) that can reduce CO2 emissions particularly from the energy sector. A lot of sustainable catalyst supports have been developed particularly for CO2 gas adsorbent applications.

  16. A carbon monoxide gas sensor using oxygen plasma modified carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Weiyun; Fam, Derrick Wen Hui; Yin, Zongyou; Sun, Ting; Tan, Hui Teng; Liu, Weiling; Iing Yoong Tok, Alfred; Boey, Yin Chiang Freddy; Zhang, Hua; Hng, Huey Hoon; Yan, Qingyu

    2012-10-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is a highly toxic gas that can be commonly found in many places. However, it is not easily detected by human olfaction due to its colorless and odorless nature. Therefore, highly sensitive sensors need to be developed for this purpose. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have an immense potential in gas sensing. However, CNT-based gas sensors for sensing CO are seldom reported due to the lack of reactivity between CO and CNTs. In this work, O2 plasma modified CNT was used to fabricate a CNT gas sensor. The plasma treated CNTs showed selectively towards CO, with the capability of sensing low concentrations of CO (5 ppm) at room temperature, while the pristine CNTs showed no response. UV spectra and oxygen reduction reaction provided evidence that the difference in sensing property was due to the elimination of metallic CNTs and enhancement of the oxygen reduction property.

  17. Strategy implications of world gas market dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijermars, R.

    2011-01-01

    Global trends – past and future – of world natural gas consumption, production, reserves, and prices are highlighted here analyzing the BP Statistical Review of World Energy 2011, the BP Energy Outlook 2011, and the latest natural gas data from the world’s major energy agencies. Growing demand and d

  18. Strategy implications of world gas market dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijermars, R.

    2011-01-01

    Global trends – past and future – of world natural gas consumption, production, reserves, and prices are highlighted here analyzing the BP Statistical Review of World Energy 2011, the BP Energy Outlook 2011, and the latest natural gas data from the world’s major energy agencies. Growing demand and d

  19. Numerical simulation of carbon dioxide removal from natural gas using supersonic nozzles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wenjuan; Cao, Xuewen; Yang, Wen; Jin, Xuetang

    2017-03-01

    Supersonic separation is a technology potentially applicable to natural gas decarbonation process. Preliminary research on the performance of supersonic nozzle in the removal of carbon dioxide from natural gas is presented in this study. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) technique is used to simulate the flow behavior inside the supersonic nozzle. The CFD model is validated successfully by comparing its results to the data borrowed from the literature. The results indicate that the liquefaction of carbon dioxide can be achieved in the properly designed nozzle. Shock wave occurs in the divergent section of the nozzle with the increase of the back pressure, destroying the liquefaction process. In the supersonic separator, the shock wave should be kept outside of the nozzle.

  20. Black Carbon Emissions from Associated Natural Gas Flaring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyant, Cheryl L; Shepson, Paul B; Subramanian, R; Cambaliza, Maria O L; Heimburger, Alexie; McCabe, David; Baum, Ellen; Stirm, Brian H; Bond, Tami C

    2016-02-16

    Approximately 150 billion cubic meters (BCM) of natural gas is flared and vented in the world annually, emitting greenhouse gases and other pollutants with no energy benefit. About 7 BCM per year is flared in the United States, and half is from North Dakota alone. There are few emission measurements from associated gas flares and limited black carbon (BC) emission factors have been previously reported from the field. Emission plumes from 26 individual flares in the Bakken formation in North Dakota were sampled. Methane, carbon dioxide, and BC were measured simultaneously, allowing the calculation of BC mass emission factors using the carbon balance method. Particle optical absorption was measured using a three-wavelength particle soot absorption photometer (PSAP) and BC particle number and mass concentrations were measured with a single particle soot photometer. The BC emission factors varied over 2 orders of magnitude, with an average and uncertainty range of 0.14 ± 0.12 g/kg hydrocarbons in associated gas and a median of 0.07 g/kg which represents a lower bound on these measurements. An estimation of the BC emission factor derived from PSAP absorption provides an upper bound at 3.1 g/kg. These results are lower than previous estimations and laboratory measurements. The BC mass absorption cross section was 16 ± 12 m(2)/g BC at 530 nm. The average absorption Ångström exponent was 1.2 ± 0.8, suggesting that most of the light absorbing aerosol measured was black carbon and the contribution of light absorbing organic carbon was small.

  1. Field Measurements of Black Carbon Yields from Gas Flaring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Bradley M; Johnson, Matthew R

    2017-02-07

    Black carbon (BC) emissions from gas flaring in the oil and gas industry are postulated to have critical impacts on climate and public health, but actual emission rates remain poorly characterized. This paper presents in situ field measurements of BC emission rates and flare gas volume-specific BC yields for a diverse range of flares. Measurements were performed during a series of field campaigns in Mexico and Ecuador using the sky-LOSA optical measurement technique, in concert with comprehensive Monte Carlo-based uncertainty analyses. Parallel on-site measurements of flare gas flow rate and composition were successfully performed at a subset of locations enabling direct measurements of fuel-specific BC yields from flares under field conditions. Quantified BC emission rates from individual flares spanned more than 4 orders of magnitude (up to 53.7 g/s). In addition, emissions during one notable ∼24-h flaring event (during which the plume transmissivity dropped to zero) would have been even larger than this maximum rate, which was measured as this event was ending. This highlights the likely importance of superemitters to global emission inventories. Flare gas volume-specific BC yields were shown to be strongly correlated with flare gas heating value. A newly derived correlation fitting current field data and previous lab data suggests that, in the context of recent studies investigating transport of flare-generated BC in the Arctic and globally, impacts of flaring in the energy industry may in fact be underestimated.

  2. A Review of Carbon Nanotubes-Based Gas Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Wang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Gas sensors have attracted intensive research interest due to the demand of sensitive, fast response, and stable sensors for industry, environmental monitoring, biomedicine, and so forth. The development of nanotechnology has created huge potential to build highly sensitive, low cost, portable sensors with low power consumption. The extremely high surface-to-volume ratio and hollow structure of nanomaterials is ideal for the adsorption of gas molecules. Particularly, the advent of carbon nanotubes (CNTs has fuelled the inventions of gas sensors that exploit CNTs' unique geometry, morphology, and material properties. Upon exposure to certain gases, the changes in CNTs' properties can be detected by various methods. Therefore, CNTs-based gas sensors and their mechanisms have been widely studied recently. In this paper, a broad but yet in-depth survey of current CNTs-based gas sensing technology is presented. Both experimental works and theoretical simulations are reviewed. The design, fabrication, and the sensing mechanisms of the CNTs-based gas sensors are discussed. The challenges and perspectives of the research are also addressed in this review.

  3. Accelerating Gas Adsorption on 3D Percolating Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Wen, Chenyu; Zhang, Youwei; Wu, Dongping; Zhang, Shi-Li; Qiu, Zhi-Jun

    2016-02-01

    In the field of electronic gas sensing, low-dimensional semiconductors such as single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) can offer high detection sensitivity owing to their unprecedentedly large surface-to-volume ratio. The sensitivity and responsivity can further improve by increasing their areal density. Here, an accelerated gas adsorption is demonstrated by exploiting volumetric effects via dispersion of SWCNTs into a percolating three-dimensional (3D) network in a semiconducting polymer. The resultant semiconducting composite film is evaluated as a sensing membrane in field effect transistor (FET) sensors. In order to attain reproducible characteristics of the FET sensors, a pulsed-gate-bias measurement technique is adopted to eliminate current hysteresis and drift of sensing baseline. The rate of gas adsorption follows the Langmuir-type isotherm as a function of gas concentration and scales with film thickness. This rate is up to 5 times higher in the composite than only with an SWCNT network in the transistor channel, which in turn results in a 7-fold shorter time constant of adsorption with the composite. The description of gas adsorption developed in the present work is generic for all semiconductors and the demonstrated composite with 3D percolating SWCNTs dispersed in functional polymer represents a promising new type of material for advanced gas sensors.

  4. Gas dynamic lasers. Citations from the NTIS data base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrigan, B.

    1980-07-01

    The citations cover research on kinetic and energy transfer processes, design, optics, nozzles, and performance of gas and chemical lasers relying on gas dynamic effects for lasing enhancement. Diffusion and flow studies specifically applicable to such lasers are also included. This updated bibliography contains 253 citations, 6 of which are new entries to the previous edition.

  5. Gas-liquid reactor/separator : dynamics and operability characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ranade, V.V.; Kuipers, J.A.M.; Versteeg, G.F.

    1999-01-01

    A comprehensive mathematical model is developed to simulate gas-liquid reactor in which both, reactants as well as products enter or leave the reactor in gas phase while the reactions take place in liquid phase. A case of first-order reaction (isothermal) was investigated in detail using the dynamic

  6. Microbial carbon recycling: an underestimated process controlling soil carbon dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basler, A.; Dippold, M.; Helfrich, M.; Dyckmans, J.

    2015-07-01

    The mean residence times (MRT) of different compound classes of soil organic matter (SOM) do not match their inherent recalcitrance to decomposition. One reason for this is the stabilisation within the soil matrix, but recycling, i.e. the reuse of "old" organic material to form new biomass may also play a role as it uncouples the residence times of organic matter from the lifetime of discrete molecules in soil. We analysed soil sugar dynamics in a natural 30 years old labelling experiment after a~wheat-maize vegetation change to determine the extent of recycling and stabilisation in plant and microbial derived sugars: while plant derived sugars are only affected by stabilisation processes, microbial sugars may be subject to both, stabilisation and recycling. To disentangle the dynamics of soil sugars, we separated different density fractions (free particulate organic matter (fPOM), light occluded particulate organic matter (≤1.6 g cm-3; oPOM1.6), dense occluded particulate organic matter (≤2 g cm-3; oPOM2) and mineral-associated organic matter (>2 g cm-3; Mineral)) of a~silty loam under long term wheat and maize cultivation. The isotopic signature of sugars was measured by high pressure liquid chromatography coupled to isotope ratio mass spectrometry (HPLC/IRMS), after hydrolysis with 4 M Trifluoroacetic acid (TFA). While apparent mean residence times (MRT) of sugars were comparable to total organic carbon in the bulk soil and mineral fraction, the apparent MRT of sugars in the oPOM fractions were considerably lower than those of the total carbon of these fractions. This indicates that oPOM formation was fuelled by microbial activity feeding on new plant input. In the bulk soil, mean residence times of the mainly plant derived xylose (xyl) were significantly lower than those of mainly microbial derived sugars like galactose (gal), rhamnose (rha), fucose (fuc), indicating that recycling of organic matter is an important factor regulating organic matter dynamics

  7. A dynamic mathematical model for packed columns in carbon capture plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaspar, Jozsef; Jørgensen, John Bagterp; Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present a dynamic mathematical model for the absorption and desorption columns in a carbon capture plant. Carbon capture plants must be operated in synchronization with the operation of thermal power plants. Dynamic and flexible operation of the carbon capture plant is important...... simulation using monoethanolamine (MEA) and piperazine (PZ) as solvent. MEA is considered as the base-case solvent in the carbon capture business. The effect of changes in the flue gas flow rate and changes in the available steam are investigated to determine their influence on the performance of the capture...... process. The response of the model is shown in terms of capture efficiency and purity of the CO2 product stream. The model is aimed for rigorous dynamic simulation in the context of optimization and control strategy development....

  8. Carbon Molecular Sieve Membrane (CMSM) for Industrial Gas Separation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Kean; Haraya Kenji

    2003-01-01

    Membrane separation is an environmental benign technology for 21st century, and is developing quickly to replace the conventional distillation process. Carbon molecular sieve membrane (CMSM) was synthesized through the controlled pyrolysis of polyimide films. The CMSM is symmetric in structure and presents strong sieving effect towards gas molecules of slightly different diameters. The microstructure of CMSM was manipulated through the thermal treatment program and further modified through activation vapor/chemical depositions. It is demonstrated that CMSM can be synthesized/modified for specific gas mixtures, such as O2/N2, CO2/CH4, C3H6/C3H8, and ect. The pore size distribution, relationship between the permeance & selectivity on CMSM for the separation of some gas pairs was also investigated.

  9. Novel carbon dioxide gas sensor based on infrared absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guangjun; Lui, Junfang; Yuan, Mei

    2000-08-01

    The feasibility of sensing carbon dioxide with a IR single- beam optical structure is studied, and a novel carbon dioxide gas sensor based on IR absorption is achieved. Applying the Lambert-Beer law and some key techniques such as current stabilization for IR source, using a high-quality IR detector, and data compensation for the influences of ambience temperature and atmosphere total pressure, the sensor can measure carbon dioxide with high precision and efficiency. The mathematical models for providing temperature and pressure compensation for the sensor are established. Moreover the solutions to the models are proposed. Both the models and the solutions to the models are verified via experiments. The sensor possesses the advantages of small volume, light weight, low power consumption, and high reliability. Therefore it can be used in many associated fields, such as environmental protection, processing control, chemical analysis, medical diagnosis, and space environmental and control systems.

  10. Effects of Gas Dynamics on Rapidly Collapsing Bubbles

    CERN Document Server

    Bauman, Spenser

    2013-01-01

    The dynamics of rapidly collapsing bubbles are of great interest due to the high degree of energy focusing that occurs withing the bubble. Molecular dynamics provides a way to model the interior of the bubble and couple the gas dynamics with the equations governing the bubble wall. While much theoretical work has been done to understand how a bubble will respond to an external force, the internal dynamics of the gas system are usually simplified greatly in such treatments. This paper shows how the gas system dynamics affect bubble collapse and illustrates what effects various modeling assumptions can have on the motion of the bubble wall. In addition, we present a method of adaptively partitioning space to improve the performance of collision intersection calculations when using an energy dependent collision cross section.

  11. Rapid quantification of dimethyl methylphosphonate from activated carbon particles by static headspace gas chromatography mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Brendan L; Billingsley, Brit G; Logue, Brian A

    2013-06-01

    Activated carbon (AC) particles are utilized as an adsorbent for binding hazardous vapors in protective equipment. The binding affinity and utilization of these AC particles should be known to ensure effective and efficient use. Therefore, a simple and effective method was developed for the quantification of the chemical warfare agent simulant, dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP), from AC particles. Static headspace gas chromatography mass-spectrometry with internal standard, DMMP-d6, was used to perform the analysis. The method produced a linear dynamic range of 2.48-620g DMMP/kg carbon and a detection limit of 1.24g DMMP/kg carbon. Furthermore, the method produced a coefficient of variation of less than 16% for all intra- and inter-assay analyses. The method provided a simple and effective procedure for quantifying DMMP from AC particles and was applied to the analysis of a DMMP-exposed AC protective respirator filter.

  12. The modeling of carbon isotope kinetics and its application to the evaluation of natural gas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xianqing LI; Xianming XIAO; Yongchun TANG; Hui TIAN; Qiang ZHOU; Yunfeng YANG; Peng DONG; Yan WANG; Zhihong SONG

    2008-01-01

    The modeling of carbon isotope kinetics of natural gas is an issue driving pioneering research in the oil and gas geochemistry in China and internationally.Combined with the sedimentary burial history and basin geothermal history,the modeling of carbon isotope kinetics provides a new and effective means for the determination of the origin and accumulation history of natural gas pools.In this paper,we introduce the modeling of carbon isotope kinetics of natural gas formation and its applications to the assessment of natural gas maturity,the determination of the gas source,the history of gas accumulation,and the oil-gas ratio.It is shown that this approach is of great value for these applications.The carbon isotopic characteristics of natural gas are not only affected by the gas source and maturity of the source rock,but also are related to the accumulation condition and geothermal gradient in a basin.There are obvious differences in the characteristics of carbon isotope ratios between instantaneous gas and cumulative gas.Different basins have different kinetic models of carbon isotope fractionation,which depends on the gas source condition,the accumulation history and the sedimentary-tectonic history.Since the origin of natural gas in the superimposed basin in China is very complicated,and the natural gas pool is characterized by multiphase and variable gas-sources,this paper may provide a new perspective on the study and evaluation of natural gas.

  13. Gas-solid carbonation as a current alternative origin for carbonates in Martian regolith

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garenne, A.; Montes-Hernandez, G.; Beck, P.; Schmitt, B.; Brissaud, O.

    2011-12-01

    Carbonates are abundant sedimentary minerals at the surface and sub-surface of Earth and they have been proposed as tracers of liquid water in extraterrestrial environments (e.g. at Mars surface). Its formation mechanism is since generally associated with aqueous alteration processes. Recently, carbonates minerals have been discovered on Mars surface by different orbital or rovers missions. In particular, the phoenix mission has measured from 1 to 5% of calcium carbonate (calcite type). These occurrences have been reported in area were the relative humidity is significantly high (Boynton et al., 2009). The small concentration of carbonates suggests an alternative process than carbonation in aqueous conditions. Such an observation might rather point toward a possible formation mechanism by dust-gas reaction under current Martian conditions. For this reason, in the present study, we designed an experimental setup consisting of an infrared microscope coupled to a cryogenic reaction cell (IR-CryoCell setup) in order to investigate the gas-solid carbonation of three different mineral precursors for carbonates (Ca and Mg hydroxides, and a hydrated Ca silicate formed from Ca2SiO4) at low temperature (from -10 to 25°C) and at reduced CO2 pressure (from 100 to 1000 mbar). These mineral materials are crucial precursors to form respective Ca and Mg carbonates in humid environments (0 < relative humidity < 100%) at dust-CO2 or dust-water ice-CO2 interfaces. The results have revealed a significant and fast carbonation process for Ca hydroxide and hydrated Ca silicate. Conversely, slight carbonation process was observed for Mg hydroxide. These results suggest that gas-solid carbonation process or carbonate formation at the dust-water ice-CO2 interfaces could be a currently active Mars surface process. We note that the carbonation process at low temperature (<0°C) described in the present study could also have important implications on the dust-water ice-CO2 interactions in

  14. Excited State Dynamics in Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Yoshiyuki

    2004-03-01

    Carbon nanotube, one of the most promising materials for nano-technology, still suffers from its imperfection in crystalline structure that will make performance of nanotube behind theoretical limit. From the first-principles simulations, I propose efficient methods to overcome the imperfection. I show that photo-induced ion dynamics can (1) identify defects in nanotubes, (2) stabilize defected nanotubes, and (3) purify contaminated nanotubes. All of these methods can be alternative to conventional heat treatments and will be important techniques for realizing nanotube-devices. Ion dynamics under electronic excitation has been simulated with use of the computer code FPSEID (First-Principles Simulation tool for Electron Ion Dynamics) [1], which combines the time-dependent density functional method [2] to classical molecular dynamics. This very challenging approach is time-consuming but can automatically treat the level alternation of differently occupied states, and can observe initiation of non-adiabatic decay of excitation. The time-dependent Kohn-Sham equation has been solved by using the Suzuki-Trotter split operator method [3], which is a numerically stable method being suitable for plane wave basis, non-local pseudopotentials, and parallel computing. This work has been done in collaboration with Prof. Angel Rubio, Prof. David Tomanek, Dr. Savas Berber and Mina Yoon. Most of present calculations have been done by using the SX5 Vector-Parallel system in the NEC Fuchu-plant, and the Earth Simulator in Yokohama Japan. [1] O. Sugino and Y. Miyamoto, Phys. Rev. B59, 2579 (1999); ibid, B66 089901(E) (2001) [2] E. Runge and E. K. U. Gross, Phys. Rev. Lett. 52, 997 (1984). [3] M. Suzuki, J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 61, L3015 (1992).

  15. Probing the Gas-Phase Dynamics of Graphene Chemical Vapour Deposition using in-situ UV Absorption Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shivayogimath, Abhay; Mackenzie, David; Luo, Birong

    2017-01-01

    of multilayer nucleation when backstreaming is suppressed. These results point to an important and previously undescribed mechanism for multilayer nucleation, wherein higher-order gas-phase carbon species play an integral role. Our work highlights the importance of gas-phase dynamics in understanding......The processes governing multilayer nucleation in the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) of graphene are important for obtaining high-quality monolayer sheets, but remain poorly understood. Here we show that higher-order carbon species in the gas-phase play a major role in multilayer nucleation...

  16. Gas Price Formation, Structure and Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davoust, R.

    2008-07-01

    Our study, focused on gas prices in importing economies, describes wholesale prices and retail prices, their evolution for the last one or two decades, the economic mechanisms of price formation. While an international market for oil has developed thanks to moderate storage and transportation charges, these costs are much higher in the case of natural gas, which involves that this energy is still traded inside continental markets. There are three regional gas markets around the world: North America (the United States, importing mainly from Canada and Mexico), Europe (importing mainly from Russia, Algeria and Norway) and Asia (Japan, Korea, Taiwan, China and India, importing mainly from Indonesia, Malaysia and Australia). A market for gas has also developed in South America, but it will not be covered by our paper. In Europe and the US, due to large domestic resources and strong grids, natural gas is purchased mostly through pipelines. In Northeast Asia, there is a lack of such infrastructures, so imported gas takes mainly the form of Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG), shipped on maritime tankers. Currently, the LNG market is divided into two zones: the Atlantic Basin (Europe and US) and the Pacific Basin (Asia and the Western Coast of America). For the past few years, the Middle East and Africa have tended to be crucial suppliers for both LNG zones. Gas price formation varies deeply between regional markets, depending on several structural factors (regulation, contracting practises, existence of a spot market, liquidity, share of imports). Empirically, the degree of market opening (which corresponds to the seniority in the liberalization process) seems to be the primary determinant of pricing patterns. North America has the most liberalized and well-performing natural gas industry in the world. Gas pricing is highly competitive and is based on supply/demand balances. Spot and futures markets are developed. The British gas sector is also deregulated and thus follows a

  17. Carbon cycle dynamics during recent interglacials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Kleinen

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Trends in the atmospheric concentration of CO2 during three recent interglacials, the Holocene, the Eemian and Marine Isotope Stage (MIS 11, are investigated using an Earth system Model of Intermediate Complexity, which we extended with modules to dynamically determine two slow carbon cycle processes – peat accumulation and shallow-water CaCO3 sedimentation (coral reef formation. For all three interglacials, model simulations considering peat accumulation and shallow water CaCO3 sedimentation substantially improve the agreement between model results and ice core CO2 reconstructions in comparison to a carbon cycle setup neglecting these processes. This enables us to model the trends in atmospheric CO2, with modelled trends similar to the ice core data, forcing the model only with orbital and sea level changes. During the Holocene, anthropogenic CO2 emissions are required to match the observed rise in atmospheric CO2 after 3 ka BP, but are not relevant before this time. Therefore our model experiments show for the first time how the CO2 evolution during the Holocene and two recent interglacials can be explained consistently using an identical model setup.

  18. Exciton Dynamics in Semiconducting Carbon Nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, Matt [University of California, Berkeley; Chmeliov, Javgenij [Vilnius University, Lithuania; Ma, Yingzhong [ORNL; Shinohara, Nori [Nagoya University, Japan; Green, Alexander A. [Northwestern University, Evanston; Hersam, Mark C. [Northwestern University, Evanston; Valkunas, Leonas [Vilnius University, Lithuania; Fleming, Graham [University of California, Berkeley

    2010-01-01

    We report femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopic study on the (6, 5) single-walled carbon nanotubes and the (7, 5) inner tubes of a dominant double-walled carbon nanotube species. We found that the dynamics of exciton relaxation probed at the first transition-allowed state (E11) of a given tube type exhibits a markedly slower decay when the second transition-allowed state (E22) is excited than that measured by exciting its first transition-allowed state (E11). A linear intensity dependence of the maximal amplitude of the transient absorption signal is found for the E22 excitation, whereas the corresponding amplitude scales linearly with the square root of the E11 excitation intensity. Theoretical modeling of these experimental findings was performed by developing a continuum model and a stochastic model with explicit consideration of the annihilation of coherent excitons. Our detailed numerical simulations show that both models can reproduce reasonably well the initial portion of decay kinetics measured upon the E22 and E11 excitation of the chosen tube species, but the stochastic model gives qualitatively better agreement with the intensity dependence observed experimentally than those obtained with the continuum model.

  19. Reducing water usage with rotary regenerative gas/gas heat exchangers in natural gas-fired power plants with post-combustion carbon capture

    OpenAIRE

    Herraiz, Laura; Hogg, Dougal; Cooper, Jim; Gibbins, Jon; Lucquiaud, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    It is possible to greatly mitigate the increase of water usage associated with the addition of carbon capture to fossil fuel power generation. This article presents a first-of-a-kind feasibility study of a series of technology options with rotary regenerative gas/gas heat exchangers for the management of the water balance around post-combustion carbon capture process integrated with Combined Cycle Gas Turbine (CCGT) plants with and without exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). Hybrid cooling confi...

  20. Fluid Dynamics of Carbon Dioxide Disposal into Saline Aquifers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, Julio Enrique

    2003-12-18

    Injection of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) into saline aquifers has been proposed as a means to reduce greenhouse gas emissions (geological carbon sequestration). Large-scale injection of CO{sub 2} will induce a variety of coupled physical and chemical processes, including multiphase fluid flow, fluid pressurization and changes in effective stress, solute transport, and chemical reactions between fluids and formation minerals. This work addresses some of these issues with special emphasis given to the physics of fluid flow in brine formations. An investigation of the thermophysical properties of pure carbon dioxide, water and aqueous solutions of CO{sub 2} and NaCl has been conducted. As a result, accurate representations and models for predicting the overall thermophysical behavior of the system CO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O-NaCl are proposed and incorporated into the numerical simulator TOUGH2/ECO{sub 2}. The basic problem of CO{sub 2} injection into a radially symmetric brine aquifer is used to validate the results of TOUGH2/ECO2. The numerical simulator has been applied to more complex flow problem including the CO{sub 2} injection project at the Sleipner Vest Field in the Norwegian sector of the North Sea and the evaluation of fluid flow dynamics effects of CO{sub 2} injection into aquifers. Numerical simulation results show that the transport at Sleipner is dominated by buoyancy effects and that shale layers control vertical migration of CO{sub 2}. These results are in good qualitative agreement with time lapse surveys performed at the site. High-resolution numerical simulation experiments have been conducted to study the onset of instabilities (viscous fingering) during injection of CO{sub 2} into saline aquifers. The injection process can be classified as immiscible displacement of an aqueous phase by a less dense and less viscous gas phase. Under disposal conditions (supercritical CO{sub 2}) the viscosity of carbon dioxide can be less than the viscosity of the aqueous

  1. Carbon Dioxide Capture from Flue Gas Using Dry Regenerable Sorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas Nelson; David Green; Paul Box; Raghubir Gupta; Gennar Henningsen

    2007-06-30

    Regenerable sorbents based on sodium carbonate (Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}) can be used to separate carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from coal-fired power plant flue gas. Upon thermal regeneration and condensation of water vapor, CO{sub 2} is released in a concentrated form that is suitable for reuse or sequestration. During the research project described in this report, the technical feasibility and economic viability of a thermal-swing CO{sub 2} separation process based on dry, regenerable, carbonate sorbents was confirmed. This process was designated as RTI's Dry Carbonate Process. RTI tested the Dry Carbonate Process through various research phases including thermogravimetric analysis (TGA); bench-scale fixed-bed, bench-scale fluidized-bed, bench-scale co-current downflow reactor testing; pilot-scale entrained-bed testing; and bench-scale demonstration testing with actual coal-fired flue gas. All phases of testing showed the feasibility of the process to capture greater than 90% of the CO{sub 2} present in coal-fired flue gas. Attrition-resistant sorbents were developed, and these sorbents were found to retain their CO{sub 2} removal activity through multiple cycles of adsorption and regeneration. The sodium carbonate-based sorbents developed by RTI react with CO{sub 2} and water vapor at temperatures below 80 C to form sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) and/or Wegscheider's salt. This reaction is reversed at temperatures greater than 120 C to release an equimolar mixture of CO{sub 2} and water vapor. After condensation of the water, a pure CO{sub 2} stream can be obtained. TGA testing showed that the Na{sub 2}CO3 sorbents react irreversibly with sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and hydrogen chloride (HCl) (at the operating conditions for this process). Trace levels of these contaminants are expected to be present in desulfurized flue gas. The sorbents did not collect detectable quantities of mercury (Hg). A process was designed for the Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-based sorbent that

  2. Ablation plume dynamics in a background gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amoruso, Salvatore; Schou, Jørgen; Lunney, James G.

    2010-01-01

    The expansion of a plume in a background gas of pressure comparable to that used in pulsed laser deposition (PLD) has been analyzed in terms of the model of Predtechensky and Mayorov (PM). This approach gives a relatively clear and simple description of the essential hydrodynamics during the expa...

  3. Carbon-Carbon Composites as Recuperator Material for Direct Gas Brayton Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RA Wolf

    2006-07-19

    Of the numerous energy conversion options available for a space nuclear power plant (SNPP), one that shows promise in attaining reliable operation and high efficiency is the direct gas Brayton (GB) system. In order to increase efficiency, the GB system incorporates a recuperator that accounts for nearly half the weight of the energy conversion system (ECS). Therefore, development of a recuperator that is lighter and provides better performance than current heat exchangers could prove to be advantageous. The feasibility of a carbon-carbon (C/C) composite recuperator core has been assessed and a mass savings of 60% and volume penalty of 20% were projected. The excellent thermal properties, high-temperature capabilities, and low density of carbon-carbon materials make them attractive in the GB system, but development issues such as material compatibility with other structural materials in the system, such as refractory metals and superalloys, permeability, corrosion, joining, and fabrication must be addressed.

  4. CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Raghubir Gupta; Alejandro Lopez-Ortiz

    2001-01-01

    Four grades of sodium bicarbonate and two grades of trona were characterized in terms of particle size distribution, surface area, pore size distribution, and attrition. Surface area and pore size distribution determinations were conducted after calcination of the materials. The sorbent materials were subjected to thermogravimetric testing to determine comparative rates and extent of calcination (in inert gas) and sorption (in a simulated coal combustion flue gas mixture). Selected materials were exposed to five calcination/sorption cycles and showed no decrease in either sorption capacity or sorption rate. Process simulations were conducted involving different heat recovery schemes. The process is thermodynamically feasible. The sodium-based materials appear to have suitable physical properties for use as regenerable sorbents and, based on thermogravimetric testing, are likely to have sorption and calcination rates that are rapid enough to be of interest in full-scale carbon sequestration processes.

  5. A heterogeneous model for gas transport in carbon molecular sieves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, L P; Yuan, Y X; Farooq, S; Bhatia, S K

    2005-01-18

    A dual resistance model with distribution of either barrier or pore diffusional activation energy is proposed in this work for gas transport in carbon molecular sieve (CMS) micropores. This is a novel approach in which the equilibrium is homogeneous, but the kinetics is heterogeneous. The model seems to provide a possible explanation for the concentration dependence of the thermodynamically corrected barrier and pore diffusion coefficients observed in previous studies from this laboratory on gas diffusion in CMS. The energy distribution is assumed to follow the gamma distribution function. It is shown that the energy distribution model can fully capture the behavior described by the empirical model established in earlier studies to account for the concentration dependence of thermodynamically corrected barrier and pore diffusion coefficients. A methodology is proposed for extracting energy distribution parameters, and it is further shown that the extracted energy distribution parameters can effectively predict integral uptake and column breakthrough profiles over a wide range of operating pressures.

  6. Genesis of Marine Carbonate Natural Gas in the Northeastern Sichuan Basin, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Qu; TENGER; MENG Qingqiang; QIN Jianzhong; JIANG Qigui; ZHENG Lunju

    2008-01-01

    Sichuan Basin is one of the structurally stable and gas-rich basins, being regarded as one of China's important natural gas industry bases. Puguang and Jiannan gas fields, located in the eastern Sichuan Basin are two large fields with gas derived from Permian and Lower Triassic marine carbonate. The genesis of marine carbonate natural gas was examined using carbon isotope composition and hydrocarbon components of natural gas samples from the eastern and western Sichuan Basin, and compared with that of acidolysis gas derived from marine source rock in the eastern Sichuan Basin. It is concluded that the natural gas in the marine carbonate reservoir originated from pyrolysis of the earlier crude oil and light-oil, and then mixed with kerogen pyrolysis gas of the Permian and Lower Silurian source rock.

  7. Dynamic analysis of the urban-based low-carbon policy using system dynamics: Focused on housing and green space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Taehoon; Kim, Jimin; Koo, Choongwan; Jeong, Kwangbok

    2015-02-01

    To systematically manage the energy consumption of existing buildings, the government has to enforce greenhouse gas reduction policies. However, most of the policies are not properly executed because they do not consider various factors from the urban level perspective. Therefore, this study aimed to conduct a dynamic analysis of an urban-based low-carbon policy using system dynamics, with a specific focus on housing and green space. This study was conducted in the following steps: (i) establishing the variables of urban-based greenhouse gases (GHGs) emissions; (ii) creating a stock/flow diagram of urban-based GHGs emissions; (iii) conducting an information analysis using the system dynamics; and (iv) proposing the urban-based low-carbon policy. If a combined energy policy that uses the housing sector (30%) and the green space sector (30%) at the same time is implemented, 2020 CO2 emissions will be 7.23 million tons (i.e., 30.48% below 2020 business-as-usual), achieving the national carbon emissions reduction target (26.9%). The results of this study could contribute to managing and improving the fundamentals of the urban-based low-carbon policies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

  8. An introduction to finite volumes for gas dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Dubois, François

    2011-01-01

    We propose an elementary introduction to the finite volume method in the context of gas dynamics conservation laws. Our approach is founded on the advection equation, the exact integration of the associated Cauchy problem, and the so-called upwind scheme in one space dimension. It is then extended in three directions: hyperbolic linear systems and particularily the system of acoustics, gas dynamics with the help of the Roe matrix and two space dimensions by following the approach proposed by Van Leer. A special emphasis on boundary conditions is proposed all along the text.

  9. Spin dynamics in a two-dimensional quantum gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Poul Lindholm; Gajdacz, Miroslav; Deuretzbacher, Frank

    2014-01-01

    We have investigated spin dynamics in a two-dimensional quantum gas. Through spin-changing collisions, two clouds with opposite spin orientations are spontaneously created in a Bose-Einstein condensate. After ballistic expansion, both clouds acquire ring-shaped density distributions with superimp......We have investigated spin dynamics in a two-dimensional quantum gas. Through spin-changing collisions, two clouds with opposite spin orientations are spontaneously created in a Bose-Einstein condensate. After ballistic expansion, both clouds acquire ring-shaped density distributions...

  10. Origin and distribution of carbon dioxide gas pools in eastern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戴春森; 宋岩; 孙岩

    1995-01-01

    Carbon dioxide gas pools occur widely in the basins of eastern China.CO2 gas-bearing bedsare from the Teritary to Ordovician,and reservoirs are sandstone,carbonates and volcanics.The gases fromthese gas pools contain CO2 of 62.86 ‰—99.55 ‰.In the Mesozoic-Cenozoic extensional basins,such asSongliao,Bohai Bay,Subei,Sanshui and Zhujingkou,the δ13CCO2values of CO2 gas pools range from-2.65‰to-8.83‰,mainly from-3.5‰ to-6.0‰,3He/4He ratios are 2.65Ra to 4.96Ra.The regression equa-tion of CO2 content and helium isotope ratio is CO2(%)=61.3852+7.9745R/Ra,correlation coefficient r is0.9430,CO2 is mainly mantle-derived and magmatic origin.δ13CCO2value of CO2 gas from Well X inYinggehai Basin is-3.80‰.3He/4He ratio is 0.07Ra,CO2 is metamorphic origin.Mantle-derived and magmaticCO2 gases are discharged from the cross areas of northeastern trending and northwestern trending faults inthese Mesozoic-Cenozoic extensional basins,in the shallow level,the CO2 gases migrate and accumulate alongnortheastern trending extensional faults.The activity of the Neogene to Quaternary northwestern trendingtectonic-magmatism zones in eastern China is another important discharge event for mantle-derived andmagmatic gases,which have great contribution to the CO2 gas pools in this area.Metamorphic CO2 in theYinggehai Basin is released by the dynamic metamorphism of shear fractures.

  11. Synthesis of carbon nanotubes by plasma-enhanced CVD process: gas phase study of synthesis conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Guláš, Michal; Cojocaru, Costel Sorin; Fleaca, Claudiu; Farhat, Samir; Veis, Pavel; Le Normand, Francois

    2008-01-01

    International audience; To support experimental investigations, a model based on ChemkinTM software was used to simulate gas phase and surface chemistry during plasma-enhanced catalytic CVD of carbon nanotubes. According to these calculations, gas phase composition, etching process and growth rates are calculated. The role of several carbon species, hydrocarbon molecules and ions in the growth mechanism of carbon nanotubes is presented in this study. Study of different conditions of gas phase ...

  12. Synthesis of carbon nanbotubes by plasma-enhanced CVD process: gas phase study of synthesis conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guláš, M.; Cojocaru, C. S.; Fleaca, C. T.; Farhat, S.; Veis, P.; Le Normand, F.

    2008-09-01

    To support experimental investigations, a model based on Chemkin^TM software was used to simulate gas phase and surface chemistry during plasma-enhanced catalytic CVD of carbon nanotubes. According to these calculations, gas phase composition, etching process and growth rates are calculated. The role of several carbon species, hydrocarbon molecules and ions in the growth mechanism of carbon nanotubes is presented in this study. Study of different conditions of gas phase activation sources and pressure is performed.

  13. Instrumentation of dynamic gas pulse loading system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohaupt, H.

    1992-04-14

    The overall goal of this work is to further develop and field test a system of stimulating oil and gas wells, which increases the effective radius of the well bore so that more oil can flow into it, by recording pressure during the gas generation phase in real time so that fractures can be induced more predictably in the producing formation. Task 1: Complete the laboratory studies currently underway with the prototype model of the instrumentation currently being studied. Task 2: Perform field tests of the model in the Taft/Bakersfield area, utilizing operations closest to the engineers working on the project, and optimize the unit for various conditions encountered there. Task 3: Perform field test of the model in DGPL jobs which are scheduled in the mid-continent area, and optimize the unit for downhole conditions encountered there. Task 4: Analyze and summarize the results achieved during the complete test series, documenting the steps for usage of downhole instrumentation in the field, and compile data specifying use of the technology by others. Task 5: Prepare final report for DOE, and include also a report on the field tests completed. Describe and estimate the probability of the technology being commercialized and in what time span. The project has made substantial technical progress, though we are running about a month behind schedule. Expenditures are in line with the schedule. Increased widespread interest in the use of DGPL stimulation has kept us very busy. The computer modeling and test instrumentation developed under this program is already being applied to commercial operations.

  14. Thermal/Pyrolysis Gas Flow Analysis of Carbon Phenolic Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, J. Louie

    2001-01-01

    Provided in this study are predicted in-depth temperature and pyrolysis gas pressure distributions for carbon phenolic materials that are externally heated with a laser source. Governing equations, numerical techniques and comparisons to measured temperature data are also presented. Surface thermochemical conditions were determined using the Aerotherm Chemical Equilibrium (ACE) program. Surface heating simulation used facility calibrated radiative and convective flux levels. Temperatures and pyrolysis gas pressures are predicted using an upgraded form of the SINDA/CMA program that was developed by NASA during the Solid Propulsion Integrity Program (SPIP). Multispecie mass balance, tracking of condensable vapors, high heat rate kinetics, real gas compressibility and reduced mixture viscosity's have been added to the algorithm. In general, surface and in-depth temperature comparisons are very good. Specie partial pressures calculations show that a saturated water-vapor mixture is the main contributor to peak in-depth total pressure. Further, for most of the cases studied, the water-vapor mixture is driven near the critical point and is believed to significantly increase the local heat capacity of the composite material. This phenomenon if not accounted for in analysis models may lead to an over prediction in temperature response in charring regions of the material.

  15. Terrestrial carbon storage dynamics: Chasing a moving target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Y.; Shi, Z.; Jiang, L.; Xia, J.; Wang, Y.; Kc, M.; Liang, J.; Lu, X.; Niu, S.; Ahlström, A.; Hararuk, O.; Hastings, A.; Hoffman, F. M.; Medlyn, B. E.; Rasmussen, M.; Smith, M. J.; Todd-Brown, K. E.; Wang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Terrestrial ecosystems have been estimated to absorb roughly 30% of anthropogenic CO2 emissions. Past studies have identified myriad drivers of terrestrial carbon storage changes, such as fire, climate change, and land use changes. Those drivers influence the carbon storage change via diverse mechanisms, which have not been unified into a general theory so as to identify what control the direction and rate of terrestrial carbon storage dynamics. Here we propose a theoretical framework to quantitatively determine the response of terrestrial carbon storage to different exogenous drivers. With a combination of conceptual reasoning, mathematical analysis, and numeric experiments, we demonstrated that the maximal capacity of an ecosystem to store carbon is time-dependent and equals carbon input (i.e., net primary production, NPP) multiplying by residence time. The capacity is a moving target toward which carbon storage approaches (i.e., the direction of carbon storage change) but usually does not attain. The difference between the capacity and the carbon storage at a given time t is the unrealized carbon storage potential. The rate of the storage change is proportional to the magnitude of the unrealized potential. We also demonstrated that a parameter space of NPP, residence time, and carbon storage potential can well characterize carbon storage dynamics quantified at six sites ranging from tropical forests to tundra and simulated by two versions (carbon-only and coupled carbon-nitrogen) of the Australian Community Atmosphere-Biosphere Land Ecosystem (CABLE) Model under three climate change scenarios (CO2 rising only, climate warming only, and RCP8.5). Overall this study reveals the unified mechanism unerlying terrestrial carbon storage dynamics to guide transient traceability analysis of global land models and synthesis of empirical studies.

  16. Carbon and Noble Gas Isotope Banks in Two-Phase Flow: Changes in Gas Composition During Migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathaye, K.; Larson, T.; Hesse, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    In conjunction with the rise of unconventional oil and gas production, there has been a recent rise in interest in noble gas and carbon isotope changes that can occur during the migration of natural gas. Natural gas geochemistry studies use bulk hydrocarbon composition, carbon isotopes, and noble gas isotopes to determine the migration history of gases from source to reservoir, and to trace fugitive gas leaks from reservoirs to shallow groundwater. We present theoretical and experimental work, which helps to explain trends observed in gas composition in various migration scenarios. Noble gases are used as tracers for subsurface fluid flow due to distinct initial compositions in air-saturated water and natural gases. Numerous field studies have observed enrichments and depletions of noble gases after gas-water interaction. A theoretical two-phase gas displacement model shows that differences in noble gas solubility will cause volatile gas components will become enriched at the front of gas plumes, leaving the surrounding residual water stripped of dissolved gases. Changes in hydrocarbon gas composition are controlled by gas solubility in both formation water and residual oil. In addition to model results, we present results from a series of two-phase flow experiments. These results demonstrate the formation of a noble gas isotope banks ahead of a main CO2 gas plume. Additionally, we show that migrating hydrocarbon gas plumes can sweep biogenic methane from groundwater, significantly altering the isotope ratio of the gas itself. Results from multicomponent, two-phase flow experiments qualitatively agree with the theoretical model, and previous field studies. These experimentally verified models for gas composition changes can be used to aid source identification of subsurface gases.

  17. Dynamical Evolution of Modified Chaplygin Gas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Ming-Hui; WU Ya-Bo; HE Jing

    2008-01-01

    Based our previous work [Mod.Phys.Lett.A 22 (2007) 783,Gen.Relat.Grav.39 (2007) 653],some properties of modified Chaplygin gas (MCG) as a dark energy model continue to be studied mainly in two aspects: one is the change rates of the energy density and energy transfer,and the other is the evolution of the growth index.It is pointed that the density of dark energy undergoes the change from decrease to increase no matter whether the interaction between dark energy and dark matter exists or not,but the corresponding transformation points are different from each other.Furthermore,it is stressed that the MCG model even supports the existence of interaction between dark energy and dark matter,and the energy of transfer flows from dark energy to dark matter.The evolution of the interaction term with an ansatz 3Hc2p is discussed with the MCG model.Moreover,the evolution of the growth index f in the MCG model without interaction is illustrated,from which we find that the evolutionary trajectory of f overlaps with that of the ACDM model when α> 0.7 and its theoretical value f≈0.566 given by us at z=0.15 is consistent with the observations.

  18. Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics: High Resolution Spectroscopy and Collision Dynamics of Transient Species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall,G.E.; Sears, T.J.

    2009-04-03

    This research is carried out as part of the Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics program in the Chemistry Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory. High-resolution spectroscopy, augmented by theoretical and computational methods, is used to investigate the structure and collision dynamics of chemical intermediates in the elementary gas-phase reactions involved in combustion chemistry. Applications and methods development are equally important experimental components of this work.

  19. The Mexican energy sector: integrated dynamic analysis of the natural gas/refining system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes-Regueiro, Francisco; Leach, Matthew [Imperial Coll. of Science, Technology and Medicine, TH Huxley School of the Environment, London (United Kingdom); Ruth, Matthias [Maryland Univ., School of Public Affairs, College Park, MA (United States)

    2002-07-01

    Environmental regulations in Mexico could dramatically increase demand for natural gas in the following years. This increase could lead to gas price shocks and a counter-intuitive increase in carbon emissions. The effect would be accentuated if Mexico lacks the funds required to carry on with investments in gas development and processing capacity. With the use of a dynamic computer model, this study addresses responses of the Mexican oil and gas industries to perturbations such as: changes in regulatory and environmental policies; changes in institutional arrangements such as those arising from market liberalization; and lack of availability of investment funds. The study also assesses how regulatory policies can be designed to minimize the economic inefficiencies arising from the business cycle disruptions that some perturbations may cause. In addition, this study investigates how investment responses will shape the Mexican energy sector in the future, particularly with respect to both the relative importance of different fuels for power generation and heating purposes and the nature of competition in the Mexican natural gas market. Furthermore, this study explores the direct consequences of these responses on the level of carbon emissions. (Author)

  20. Deforestation in Amazonia impacts riverine carbon dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Langerwisch

    2016-12-01

    find that high deforestation (business-as-usual scenario will strongly decrease (locally by up to 90 % riverine particulate and dissolved organic carbon amount until the end of the current century. At the same time, increase in discharge leaves net carbon transport during the first decades of the century roughly unchanged only if a sufficient area is still forested. After 2050 the amount of transported carbon will decrease drastically. In contrast to that, increased temperature and atmospheric CO2 concentration determine the amount of riverine inorganic carbon stored in the Amazon basin. Higher atmospheric CO2 concentrations increase riverine inorganic carbon amount by up to 20 % (SRES A2. The changes in riverine carbon fluxes have direct effects on carbon export, either to the atmosphere via outgassing or to the Atlantic Ocean via discharge. The outgassed carbon will increase slightly in the Amazon basin, but can be regionally reduced by up to 60 % due to deforestation. The discharge of organic carbon to the ocean will be reduced by about 40 % under the most severe deforestation and climate change scenario. These changes would have local and regional consequences on the carbon balance and habitat characteristics in the Amazon basin itself as well as in the adjacent Atlantic Ocean.

  1. SHIELD: Neutral Gas Kinematics and Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    McNichols, Andrew T; Nims, Elise; Cannon, John M; Adams, Elizabeth A K; Bernstein-Cooper, Elijah Z; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Haynes, Martha P; Józsa, Gyula I G; McQuinn, Kristen B W; Salzer, John J; Skillman, Evan D; Warren, Steven R; Dolphin, Andrew; Elson, E C; Haurberg, Nathalie; Ott, Jürgen; Saintonge, Amelie; Cave, Ian; Hagen, Cedric; Huang, Shan; Janowiecki, Steven; Marshall, Melissa V; Thomann, Clara M; Van Sistine, Angela

    2016-01-01

    We present kinematic analyses of the 12 galaxies in the "Survey of HI in Extremely Low-mass Dwarfs" (SHIELD). We use multi-configuration interferometric observations of the HI 21cm emission line from the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) to produce image cubes at a variety of spatial and spectral resolutions. Both two- and three-dimensional fitting techniques are employed in an attempt to derive inclination-corrected rotation curves for each galaxy. In most cases, the comparable magnitudes of velocity dispersion and projected rotation result in degeneracies that prohibit unambiguous circular velocity solutions. We thus make spatially resolved position-velocity cuts, corrected for inclination using the stellar components, to estimate the circular rotation velocities. We find circular velocities <30 km/s for the entire survey population. Baryonic masses are calculated using single-dish HI fluxes from Arecibo and stellar masses derived from HST and Spitzer imaging. Comparison is made with total dynamical ...

  2. Learning dynamics and robustness of vector quantization and neural gas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witoelar, Aree; Biehl, Michael; Ghosh, Anarta; Hammer, Barbara

    Various alternatives have been developed to improve the winner-takes-all (WTA) mechanism in vector quantization, including the neural gas (NG). However, the behavior of these algorithms including their learning dynamics, robustness with respect to initialization, asymptotic results. etc. has only

  3. Landscape Disturbance History and Belowground Carbon Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin-Spiotta, E.; Smith, A. P.; Atkinson, E. E.; Chaopricha, N. T.

    2014-12-01

    Earth system models vary in their predictions of carbon (C) uptake and release by the terrestrial biosphere, partly due to great uncertainties in the response of soils, one of the largest C reservoirs. The world's soils play a major role in the exchange of greenhouse gases with the atmosphere, in sustaining primary production, and in providing food security. Despite this, the sensitivity of soils to disturbance is highly uncertain. One reason for this is geographic variability in the importance of different mechanisms regulating soil C turnover. Most of our understanding of factors influencing soil organic C dynamics comes from research in temperate soils, despite the major role of tropical soils in the global C cycle. Even in the tropics, the diversity of soil environments is grossly underrepresented in the literature. This has important implications for predictions of soil C change across latitudes. We discuss results from the response of soil C pools and microbial communities to land use legacies on two contrasting tropical soil environments. Uncertainties in the response of soil C to disturbance also stem from a historic focus on shallow depths and the assumption that deep soil C is unreactive to landscape change. Growing evidence indicates that soil C pools in deep mineral horizons can be sensitive to changes in land cover and climate. This realization highlights the need to reassess the source of soil C at depth and the processes contributing to its stabilization. We discuss results from the interaction between multiple disturbances: drought, fire and erosion, on the accumulation of soil C at depths beyond those typically included in regional or global inventories. Our data show that deep soil C can be reactive and be a potential source of C if reconnected to the atmosphere. A deeper, mechanistic appreciation for a landscape's history of disturbance is critical for predicting feedbacks between the terrestrial biosphere and the climate system.

  4. Dynamics of a massive piston in an ideal gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chernov, N I [University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama (United States); Lebowitz, J L [Rutgers, State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Sinai, Yakov G [L.D. Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2002-12-31

    This survey is a study of a dynamical system consisting of a massive piston in a cubic container of large size L filled with an ideal gas. The piston has mass M{approx}L{sup 2} and undergoes elastic collisions with N{approx}L{sup 3} non-interacting gas particles of mass m=1. It is found that under suitable initial conditions there is a scaling regime with time and space scaled by L in which the motion of the piston and the one-particle distribution of the gas satisfy autonomous coupled equations (hydrodynamic equations) such that in the limit L{yields}{infinity} the mechanical trajectory of the piston converges in probability to the solution of the hydrodynamic equations for a certain period of time. There is also a heuristic discussion of the dynamics of the system on longer intervals of time.

  5. Merger Signatures in the Dynamics of Star-forming Gas

    CERN Document Server

    Hung, Chao-Ling; Smith, Howard A; Ashby, Matthew L N; Lanz, Lauranne; Martínez-Galarza, Juan R; Sanders, D B; Zezas, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Spatially resolved kinematics have been used to determine the dynamical status of star-forming galaxies with ambiguous morphologies, and constrain the importance of galaxy interactions during the assembly of galaxies. However, measuring the importance of interactions or galaxy merger rates requires knowledge of the systematics in kinematic diagnostics and the visible time with merger indicators. We analyze the dynamics of star-forming gas in a set of binary merger hydrodynamic simulations with stellar mass ratios of 1:1 and 1:4. We find that the evolution of kinematic asymmetries traced by star-forming gas mirrors morphological asymmetries derived from mock optical images, in which both merger indicators show the largest deviation from isolated disks during strong interaction phases. Based on a series of simulations with various initial disk orientations, orbital parameters, gas fractions, and mass ratios, we find that the merger signatures are visible for ~0.2-0.4 Gyr with kinematic merger indicators but can...

  6. Growth dynamics and gas transport mechanism of nanobubbles in graphene liquid cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dongha; Park, Jong Bo; Kim, Yong-Jin; Kim, Sang Jin; Kang, Jin Hyoun; Lee, Bora; Cho, Sung-Pyo; Hong, Byung Hee; Novoselov, Konstantin S.

    2015-02-01

    Formation, evolution and vanishing of bubbles are common phenomena in nature, which can be easily observed in boiling or falling water, carbonated drinks, gas-forming electrochemical reactions and so on. However, the morphology and the growth dynamics of the bubbles at nanoscale have not been fully investigated owing to the lack of proper imaging tools that can visualize nanoscale objects in the liquid phase. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that the nanobubbles in water encapsulated by graphene membrane can be visualized by in-situ ultra-high vacuum transmission electron microscopy. Our microscopic results indicate two distinct growth mechanisms of merging nanobubbles and the existence of a critical radius of nanobubbles that determines the unusually long stability of nanobubbles. Interestingly, the gas transport through ultrathin water membranes at nanobubble interface is free from dissolution, which is clearly different from conventional gas transport that includes condensation, transmission and evaporation.

  7. Growth dynamics and gas transport mechanism of nanobubbles in graphene liquid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dongha; Park, Jong Bo; Kim, Yong-Jin; Kim, Sang Jin; Kang, Jin Hyoun; Lee, Bora; Cho, Sung-Pyo; Hong, Byung Hee; Novoselov, Konstantin S

    2015-02-02

    Formation, evolution and vanishing of bubbles are common phenomena in nature, which can be easily observed in boiling or falling water, carbonated drinks, gas-forming electrochemical reactions and so on. However, the morphology and the growth dynamics of the bubbles at nanoscale have not been fully investigated owing to the lack of proper imaging tools that can visualize nanoscale objects in the liquid phase. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that the nanobubbles in water encapsulated by graphene membrane can be visualized by in-situ ultra-high vacuum transmission electron microscopy. Our microscopic results indicate two distinct growth mechanisms of merging nanobubbles and the existence of a critical radius of nanobubbles that determines the unusually long stability of nanobubbles. Interestingly, the gas transport through ultrathin water membranes at nanobubble interface is free from dissolution, which is clearly different from conventional gas transport that includes condensation, transmission and evaporation.

  8. Static and dynamic modelling of gas turbines in advanced cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustafsson, Jan-Olof

    1998-12-01

    Gas turbines have been in operation for at least 50 years. The engine is used for propulsion of aircraft and high speed ships. It is used for power production in remote locations and for peak load and emergency situations. Gas turbines have been used in combined cycles for 20 to 30 years. Highly efficient power plants based on gas turbines are a competitive option for the power industry today. The thermal efficiency of the simple cycle gas turbine has increased due to higher turbine inlet temperatures and improved compressor and expander designs. Equally important are the improved cycles in which the gas turbine operates. One example is the combined cycle that uses steam for turbine cooling. Steam is extracted from the bottoming cycle, then used as airfoil coolant in a closed loop and returned to the bottoming cycle. The Evaporative Gas Turbine (EvGT), also known as the Humid Air Turbine (HAT), is another advanced cycle. A mixture of air and water vapour is used as working media. Air from the compressor outlet is humidified and then preheated in a recuperator prior to combustion. The static and dynamic performance is changed when the gas turbine is introduced in an evaporative cycle. The cycle is gaining in popularity, but so far it has not been demonstrated. A Swedish joint program to develop the cycle has been in operation since 1993. As part of the program, a small pilot plant is being erected at the Lund Institute of Technology (LTH). The plant is based on a 600 kW gas turbine, and demonstration of the EvGT cycle started autumn 1998 and will continue, in the present phase, for one year. This thesis presents static and dynamic models for traditional gas turbine components, such as, the compressor, combustor, expander and recuperator. A static model for the humidifier is presented, based on common knowledge for atmospheric humidification. All models were developed for the pilot plant at LTH with the objective to support evaluation of the process and individual

  9. Introduction to special issue on carbon and landscape dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madej, Mary Ann; Wohl, Ellen E.

    2016-01-01

    In October, 2013, at the Geological Society of America annual meeting, a theme session focused on carbon and landscape dynamics.  That event led to interest in producing a special issue in ESPL compiling papers on this subject.  The 13 papers collected for this special issue reflect the diversity of recent geomorphic research, across a range of climatic and geomorphic settings, addressing some aspect of carbon dynamics.

  10. Dynamic determination reserves of the underground gas storage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭羽非

    2004-01-01

    One of the key problems in the use of underground gas storage is frequent leakage. It can lead to the actual gas storage amount being less than that accounted for. Combining numerical simulation and parameter auto fit, this paper ascertains the dynamic variation of the pressure in the storage reservoir, adjusts the actual injecting and producing gas to fit the accounted pressure with the tested pressure, obtains the gas leakage of the storage, and then determines the difference between accounted amount and leakage amount. The result is the actual reserves of the storage. The simulation result shows that the method presented can provide a theoretic foundation for estimating the leakage amount, thereby ensuring the actual reserves, searching the leakage route,and reducing leakage by adjusting the storage method.

  11. Deviation of Carbon Dioxide-Water Gas-Liquid Balance from Thermodynamic Equilibrium in Turbulence I:Experiment and Correlation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhenzhen; QIAN Zhi; XU Lianbin; WU Caiyan; GUO Kai

    2013-01-01

    The carbon dioxide-water system was used to investigate the flowing gas-liquid metastable state.The experiment was carried out in a constant volume vessel with a horizontal circulation pipe and a peristaltic pump forced CO2 saturated water to flow.The temperature and pressure were recorded.The results showed that some CO2 escaped from the water in the flow process and the pressure increased,indicating that the gas-liquid equilibrium was broken.The amount of escaped CO2 varied with flow speed and reached a limit in a few minutes,entitled dynamic equilibrium.Temperature and liquid movement played the same important role in breaking the phase equilibrium.Under the experimental conditions,the ratio of the excessive carbon dioxide in the gas phase to its thermodynamic equilibrium amount in the liquid could achieve 15%.

  12. Zinc Oxide-Multi Walled Carbon Nanotubes Nanocomposites for Carbon Monoxide Gas Sensor Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alharbi, Najlaa D; Ansari, M Shahnawaze; Salah, Numan; Khayyat, Suzan A; Khan, Zishan H

    2016-01-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO)/multi walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) composites based sensors with different ZnO concentrations were fabricated to improve carbon monoxide (CO) gas sensing properties in comparison to the sensors based on bare MWCNTs. To study the structure, morphology and elemental composition of the resultant products, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) were carried out. It has been observed that as the concentration of ZnO is increased more and more ZnO nanoparticles in the form of nodes get attached to MWCNTs resulting the reduction in average diameter of MWCNTs. The typical response of ZnO/MWCNTs composites based gas sensors for different CO concentrations (40, 100, 140 and 200 ppm) was studied by using very advanced sensing setup attached to I-V measurement system. Different sensing parameters such as: resistive response, sensitivity and response time were estimated at room temperature for all the fabricated sensors. The results indicated that the sensor based on nanocomposite which has 30 mg ZnO dispersed on 20 mg MWCNTs showing highest sensitivity and fastest response. All the sensors showed response times ranging from 8 to 23 seconds. The sensing mechanism behind the sensors based on ZnO/MWCNTs nanocomposites for CO gas at room temperature is also discussed in the present report.

  13. Shale gas plays, Neuquén Basin, Argentina: chemostratigraphy and mud gas carbon isotopes insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor Adolfo Ostera

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: In order to enhance the knowledge of shale objectives from Vaca Muerta and Los Molles Formations in the Neuquén Basin, Argentina, chemostratigraphic and mud gas carbon isotope analyses were performed in two wells from Agua del Cajón and Salitral oilfields (ADC-1016 and NqSa-1148. Geochemical data show restricted levels in both cases to perforate and produce. In ADC-1016 well, Lower Los Molles Formation looks like the most suitable play to be produced. At El Salitral oilfield (NqSa-1148, the best remarkable Vaca Muerta-Quintuco objectives are associated with authigenic elements, in limited horizons. Enhancement of the Quintuco reservoir by deep circulating fluids (thermobaric reservoir is suggested. Carbon isotope analysis reveals complex processes that affected the gas composition. Addition of microbial methane, biodegradation of ethane-propane and mixing of gases has been recognized. Isotope reversals and presumed water reforming of hydrocarbons have been registered associated with overpressure for Lower Los Molles Formation in the ADC-1016 well, which is pointed out as the most promising shale play in the area. Vaca Muerta gases at Agua del Cajon ADC- 1016 well are associated with the homonymous source. El Salitral 1148 well shows that primary isotope composition in gases from Vaca Muerta shale play and Quintuco reservoir could be associated with a Lower Los Molles source, an aloctonous charge related with the main structures of the area.

  14. A Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Network Gas Sensing Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I-Ju Teng

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this research was to develop a chemical gas sensing device based on single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT networks. The SWCNT networks are synthesized on Al2O3-deposted SiO2/Si substrates with 10 nm-thick Fe as the catalyst precursor layer using microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD. The development of interconnected SWCNT networks can be exploited to recognize the identities of different chemical gases by the strength of their particular surface adsorptive and desorptive responses to various types of chemical vapors. The physical responses on the surface of the SWCNT networks cause superficial changes in the electric charge that can be converted into electronic signals for identification. In this study, we tested NO2 and NH3 vapors at ppm levels at room temperature with our self-made gas sensing device, which was able to obtain responses to sensitivity changes with a concentration of 10 ppm for NO2 and 24 ppm for NH3.

  15. Zinc oxide nanowires on carbon microfiber as flexible gas sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonezzer, M.; Lacerda, R. G.

    2012-03-01

    In the past years, zinc oxide nanowires (ZnO NWs) have been proven to be an excellent material for gas sensors. In this work, we used ZnO nanowires in a novel architecture integrated on a carbon microfiber (μC) textile. This innovative design permits us to obtain mechanical flexibility, while the absence of any lithographic technique allows a large-area and low-cost fabrication of gas sensors. The performances of the devices are investigated for both oxidizing and reducing gases. The nano-on-micro structure of the sensor provides a high surface-to-volume ratio, leading to a fast and intense response for both oxygen (O2) and hydrogen (H2) gases. The sensor response has an optimum temperature condition at 280 °C with a response value of 10 for oxygen and 11 for hydrogen. The limit of detection (LoD) has been found to be 2 and 4 ppm for oxygen and hydrogen, respectively. Additionally, the sensor response and recovery time is small being less than 10 s for both O2 and H2.

  16. Beyond pressureless gas dynamics : Quadrature-based velocity moment models

    CERN Document Server

    Chalons, Christophe; Massot, Marc

    2010-01-01

    Following the seminal work of F. Bouchut on zero pressure gas dynamics which has been extensively used for gas particle-flows, the present contribution investigates quadrature-based velocity moments models for kinetic equations in the framework of the infinite Knudsen number limit, that is, for dilute clouds of small particles where the collision or coalescence probability asymptotically approaches zero. Such models define a hierarchy based on the number of moments and associated quadrature nodes, the first level of which leads to pressureless gas dynamics. We focus in particular on the four moment model where the flux closure is provided by a two-node quadrature in the velocity phase space and provide the right framework for studying both smooth and singular solutions. The link with both the kinetic underlying equation as well as with zero pressure gas dynamics is provided and we define the notion of measure solutions as well as the mathematical structure of the resulting system of four PDEs. We exhibit a fa...

  17. Carbon-fiber composite molecular sieves for gas separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jagtoyen, M.; Derbyshire, F. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

    1996-08-01

    This report describes continuing work on the activation and characterization of formed carbon fiber composites. The composites are produced at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and activated at the Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER) using steam, CO{sub 2}, or O{sub 2} at different conditions of temperature and time, and with different furnace configurations. The general aims of the project are to produce uniformly activated samples with controlled pore structures for specialist applications such as gas separation and water treatment. In previous work the authors reported that composites produced from isotropic pitch fibers weighing up to 25g can be uniformly activated through the appropriate choice of reaction conditions and furnace configurations. They have now succeeded in uniformly activating composites of dimensions up to 12 x 7 x 6 cm, or up to about 166 gram - a scale-up factor of about six. Part of the work has involved the installation of a new furnace that can accommodate larger composites. Efforts were made to achieve uniform activation in both steam and CO{sub 2}. The authors have also succeeded in producing materials with very uniform and narrow pore size distributions by using a novel method involving low temperature oxygen chemisorption in combination with heat treatment in N{sub 2} at high temperatures. Work has also started on the activation of PAN based carbon fibers and fiber composites with the aim of producing composites with wide pore structures for use as catalyst supports. So far activation of the PAN fiber composites supplied by ORNL has been difficult which is attributed to the low reactivity of the PAN fibers. As a result, studies are now being made of the activation of the PAN fibers to investigate the optimum carbonization and activation conditions for PAN based fibers.

  18. Thermo-Gas Dynamics of Hydrogen Combustion and Explosion

    CERN Document Server

    Gelfand, Boris E; Medvedev, Sergey P; Khomik, Sergey V

    2012-01-01

    The potential of hydrogen as an important future energy source has generated fresh interest in the study of hydrogenous gas mixtures. Indeed, both its high caloricity and reactivity are unique properties, the latter underscoring safety considerations when handling such mixtures.   The present monograph is devoted to the various aspects of hydrogen combustion and explosion processes. In addition to theoretical and phenomenological considerations, this work also collates the results of many experiments from less well known sources. The text reviews the literature in this respect, thereby providing valuable information about the thermo-gas-dynamical parameters of combustion processes for selected experimental settings in a range of scientific and industrial applications.

  19. GAS PHASE MOLECULAR DYNAMICS: HIGH-RESOLUTION SPECTROSCOPIC PROBES OF CHEMICAL DYNAMICS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HALL, G.E.

    2006-05-30

    This research is carried out as part of the Gas Phase Molecular Dynamics group program in the Chemistry Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory. High-resolution spectroscopic tools are developed and applied to problems in chemical dynamics. Recent topics have included the state-resolved studies of collision-induced electronic energy transfer, dynamics of barrierless unimolecular reactions, and the kinetics and spectroscopy of transient species.

  20. Hydrogen-enriched natural gas; Bridge to an ultra low carbon world

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samuel, Joshua; Oliver, Mike

    2010-09-15

    Natural gas is recognized as an important part of the solution to climate change, as it has the smallest carbon footprint among fossil fuels and can be used with high efficiency. This alone is not enough. Supplementing natural gas with hydrogen creating hydrogen-enriched natural gas (HENG), where the hydrogen comes from a low- or zero-carbon energy source. HENG, the subject of this paper, can leverage existing natural gas infrastructure to reduce CO2 and NOx, improve the efficiency of end-use equipment, and lower the overall carbon intensity of energy consumption.

  1. Dynamic simulation of the carbon-in-pulp and carbon-in-leach processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. R. P. de Andrade Lima

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Carbon-in-leach and carbon-in-pulp are continuous processes that use activated carbon in a cascade of large agitated tanks, which have been widely used to recover or concentrate precious metals in gold extraction plants. In the carbon-in-pulp process adsorption occurs after the leaching cascade section of the plant, and in the carbon-in-leach process leaching and adsorption occur simultaneously. In both processes the activated carbon is moved from one tank to another in countercurrent with the ore pulp until the recovery of the loaded carbon in the first tank. This paper presents a dynamic model that describes, with minor changes, the carbon-in-leach, the carbon-in-pulp, and the gold leaching processes. The model is numerically solved and calibrated with experimental data from a plant and used to perform a study of the effect of the activated carbon transfer strategy on the performance of the adsorption section of the plant. Based on the calculated values of the gold loss in the liquid and of the gold recovered in the loaded activated carbon that leaves the circuit, the results indicate that strategies in which a significant amount of activated carbon is held in the first tank and the contact time between the carbon and the pulp is longer are the best carbon transfer strategies for these processes.

  2. Applications for activated carbons from waste tires: Natural gas storage and air pollution control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, T.A.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Rood, M.J.

    1996-01-01

    Natural gas storage for natural gas vehicles and the separation and removal of gaseous contaminants from gas streams represent two emerging applications for carbon adsorbents. A possible precursor for such adsorbents is waste tires. In this study, activated carbon has been developed from waste tires and tested for its methane storage capacity and SO2 removal from a simulated flue-gas. Tire-derived carbons exhibit methane adsorption capacities (g/g) within 10% of a relatively expensive commercial activated carbon; however, their methane storage capacities (Vm/Vs) are almost 60% lower. The unactivated tire char exhibits SO2 adsorption kinetics similar to a commercial carbon used for flue-gas clean-up. Copyright ?? 1996 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  3. Trapping of xenon gas in closed inner spaces of carbon nanomaterials for stable gas storage under high-vacuum condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Keita; Yasuda, Hidehiro

    2017-01-01

    Xe gas can be trapped in the closed inner spaces of glassy carbon derived from C60 fullerene by thermal coalescence of C60 in Xe atmosphere and in cap-opened carbon nanotubes (CNTs) covered with an ionic liquid by soaking Xe-adsorbing CNTs in an ionic liquid. The trapped Xe gas is detected by energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry using a spectrometer mounted on an analytical transmission electron microscope. The closed inner spaces store gas molecules even under high-vacuum condition (˜10-5 Pa).

  4. Novel Application of Carbonate Fuel Cell for Capturing Carbon Dioxide from Flue Gas Streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jolly, Stephen; Ghezel-Ayagh, Hossein; Willman, Carl; Patel, Dilip; DiNitto, M.; Marina, Olga A.; Pederson, Larry R.; Steen, William A.

    2015-09-30

    To address concerns about climate change resulting from emission of CO2 by coal-fueled power plants, FuelCell Energy, Inc. has developed the Combined Electric Power and Carbon-dioxide Separation (CEPACS) system concept. The CEPACS system utilizes Electrochemical Membrane (ECM) technology derived from the Company’s Direct FuelCell® products. The system separates the CO2 from the flue gas of other plants and produces electric power using a supplementary fuel. FCE is currently evaluating the use of ECM to cost effectively separate CO2 from the flue gas of Pulverized Coal (PC) power plants under a U.S. Department of Energy contract. The overarching objective of the project is to verify that the ECM can achieve at least 90% CO2 capture from the flue gas with no more than 35% increase in the cost of electricity. The project activities include: 1) laboratory scale operational and performance tests of a membrane assembly, 2) performance tests of the membrane to evaluate the effects of impurities present in the coal plant flue gas, in collaboration with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 3) techno-economic analysis for an ECM-based CO2 capture system applied to a 550 MW existing PC plant, in partnership with URS Corporation, and 4) bench scale (11.7 m2 area) testing of an ECM-based CO2 separation and purification system.

  5. Dynamic safety assessment of natural gas stations using Bayesian network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarei, Esmaeil; Azadeh, Ali; Khakzad, Nima; Aliabadi, Mostafa Mirzaei; Mohammadfam, Iraj

    2017-01-05

    Pipelines are one of the most popular and effective ways of transporting hazardous materials, especially natural gas. However, the rapid development of gas pipelines and stations in urban areas has introduced a serious threat to public safety and assets. Although different methods have been developed for risk analysis of gas transportation systems, a comprehensive methodology for risk analysis is still lacking, especially in natural gas stations. The present work is aimed at developing a dynamic and comprehensive quantitative risk analysis (DCQRA) approach for accident scenario and risk modeling of natural gas stations. In this approach, a FMEA is used for hazard analysis while a Bow-tie diagram and Bayesian network are employed to model the worst-case accident scenario and to assess the risks. The results have indicated that the failure of the regulator system was the worst-case accident scenario with the human error as the most contributing factor. Thus, in risk management plan of natural gas stations, priority should be given to the most probable root events and main contribution factors, which have identified in the present study, in order to reduce the occurrence probability of the accident scenarios and thus alleviate the risks.

  6. Discharge effects on gas flow dynamics in a plasma jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xian, Yu Bin; Hasnain Qaisrani, M.; Yue, Yuan Fu; Lu, Xin Pei

    2016-10-01

    Plasma is used as a flow visualization method to display the gas flow of a plasma jet. Using this method, it is found that a discharge in a plasma jet promotes the transition of the gas flow to turbulence. A discharge at intermediate frequency (˜6 kHz in this paper) has a stronger influence on the gas flow than that at lower or higher frequencies. Also, a higher discharge voltage enhances the transition of the gas flow to turbulence. Analysis reveals that pressure modulation induced both by the periodically directed movement of ionized helium and Ohmic heating on the gas flow plays an important role in inducing the transition of the helium flow regime. In addition, since the modulations induced by the high- and low-frequency discharges are determined by the frequency-selective effect, only intermediate-frequency (˜6 kHz) discharges effectively cause the helium flow transition from the laminar to the turbulent flow. Moreover, a discharge with a higher applied voltage makes a stronger impact on the helium flow because it generates stronger modulations. These conclusions are useful in designing cold plasma jets and plasma torches. Moreover, the relationship between the discharge parameters and the gas flow dynamics is a useful reference on active flow control with plasma actuators.

  7. Particle-Gas Dynamics with Athena: Method and Convergence

    CERN Document Server

    Bai, Xue-Ning

    2010-01-01

    The Athena MHD code has been extended to integrates the motion of particles coupled with the gas via aerodynamic drag, in order to study the dynamics of gas and solids in protoplanetary disks and the formation of planetesimals. Our particle-gas hybrid scheme is based on a second order predictor-corrector method. Careful treatment of the momentum feedback on the gas guarantees exact conservation. The hybrid scheme is stable and convergent in most regimes relevant to protoplanetary disks. We describe a semi-implicit integrator generalized from the leap-frog approach. In the absence of drag force, it preserves the geometric properties of a particle orbit. We also present a fully-implicit integrator that is unconditionally stable for all regimes of particle-gas coupling. Using our hybrid code, we study the numerical convergence of the non-linear saturated state of the streaming instability. We find that gas flow properties are well converged with modest grid resolution (128 cells per pressure length ${\\eta}r$ for...

  8. The origin of the hot metal-poor gas in NGC 1291 - Testing the hypothesis of gas dynamics as the cause of the gas heating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perez, [No Value; Freeman, K

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we test the idea that the low-metallicity hot gas in the centre of NGC 1291 is heated via a dynamical process. In this scenario, the gas from the outer gas-rich ring loses energy through bar-driven shocks and falls to the centre. Heating of the gas to X-ray temperatures comes from the

  9. The origin of the hot metal-poor gas in NGC 1291 - Testing the hypothesis of gas dynamics as the cause of the gas heating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perez, [No Value; Freeman, K

    In this paper we test the idea that the low-metallicity hot gas in the centre of NGC 1291 is heated via a dynamical process. In this scenario, the gas from the outer gas-rich ring loses energy through bar-driven shocks and falls to the centre. Heating of the gas to X-ray temperatures comes from the

  10. A Game-Dynamic Model of Gas Transportation Routes and Its Application to the Turkish Gas Market [Updated November 2003

    OpenAIRE

    Klaassen, G.; Matrosov, I.; Roehrl, R.A.; A.M. Tarasyev

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to study an optimal structure of a system of international gas pipelines competing for a gas market. We develop a game-dynamic model of the operation of several interacting gas pipeline projects with project owners acting as players in the game. The model treats the projects' commercialization times major players' controls. Current quantities of gas supply are modeled as approximations of Nash equilibrium points in instantaneous "gas supply games", in which each p...

  11. Microbial community dynamics in soil aggregates shape biogeochemical gas fluxes from soil profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Ali; Or, Dani

    2016-04-01

    Microbial communities inhabiting soil aggregates dynamically adjust their activity and composition in response to variations in hydration and other external conditions. These rapid dynamics shape signatures of biogeochemical activity and gas fluxes emitted from soil profiles. Mechanistic models of microbial processes in unsaturated aggregate pore networks revealed dynamic interplay between oxic and anoxic microsites that are jointly shaped by hydration and by aerobic and anaerobic microbial communities. The spatial extent of anoxic niches (hotspots) flicker in time (hot moments) and support significant anaerobic microbial activity even in aerated soil profiles. We employed an individual-based model for microbial community life in soil aggregate assemblies represented by 3-D angular pore networks with profiles of water, carbon, and oxygen that vary with soil depth as boundary conditions. The study integrates microbial activity within aggregates of different sizes and soil depth to obtain biogeochemical fluxes over the soil profile. The results quantify impacts of dynamic shifts in microbial community composition on CO2 and N2O production rates in soil profiles in good agreement with experimental data. Aggregate size distribution and the shape of resource profiles in a soil determine how hydration dynamics shape denitrification and carbon utilization rates. Results from the mechanistic model for microbial activity in aggregates of different sizes were used to derive parameters for analytical representation of soil biogeochemical processes across large scales of interest for hydrological and climate models.

  12. Modeling of neutral gas dynamics in high-density plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canupp, Patrick Wellington

    This thesis describes a physical model of chemically reactive neutral gas flow and discusses numerical solutions of this model for the flow in an inductively coupled plasma etch reactor. To obtain these solutions, this research develops an efficient, implicit numerical method. As a result of the enhanced numerical stability of the scheme, large time steps advance the solution from initial conditions to a final steady state in fewer iterations and with less computational expense than simpler explicit methods. This method would incorporate suitably as a module in currently existing large scale plasma simulation tools. In order to demonstrate the accuracy of the numerical technique, this thesis presents results from two simulations of flows that possess theoretical solutions. The first case is the inviscid flow of a gas through a converging nozzle. A comparison of the numerical solution to isentropic flow theory shows that the numerical technique capably captures the essential flow features of this environment. The second case is the Couette flow of a gas between two parallel plates. The simulation results compare well with the exact solution for this flow. After establishing the accuracy of the numerical technique, this thesis discusses results for the flow of chemically reactive gases in a chlorine plasma etch reactor. This research examines the influence of the plasma on the neutral gas and the dynamics exhibited by the neutral gas in the reactor. This research finds that the neutral gas temperature strongly depends on the rate at which inelastic, electron-impact dissociation reactions occur and on atomic chlorine wall recombination rates. Additionally, the neutral gas Aow in the reactor includes a significant mass flux of etch product from the wafer surface. Resolution of these effects is useful for neutral gas simulation. Finally, this thesis demonstrates that continuum fluid models provide reasonable accuracy for these low pressure reactor flows due to the fact

  13. Robust Design of SAW Gas Sensors by Taguchi Dynamic Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsun-Heng Tsai

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper adopts Taguchi’s signal-to-noise ratio analysis to optimize the dynamic characteristics of a SAW gas sensor system whose output response is linearly related to the input signal. The goal of the present dynamic characteristics study is to increase the sensitivity of the measurement system while simultaneously reducing its variability. A time- and cost-efficient finite element analysis method is utilized to investigate the effects of the deposited mass upon the resonant frequency output of the SAW biosensor. The results show that the proposed methodology not only reduces the design cost but also promotes the performance of the sensors.

  14. Robust Design of SAW Gas Sensors by Taguchi Dynamic Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Hsun-Heng; Wu, Der Ho; Chiang, Ting-Lung; Chen, Hsin Hua

    2009-01-01

    This paper adopts Taguchi's signal-to-noise ratio analysis to optimize the dynamic characteristics of a SAW gas sensor system whose output response is linearly related to the input signal. The goal of the present dynamic characteristics study is to increase the sensitivity of the measurement system while simultaneously reducing its variability. A time- and cost-efficient finite element analysis method is utilized to investigate the effects of the deposited mass upon the resonant frequency output of the SAW biosensor. The results show that the proposed methodology not only reduces the design cost but also promotes the performance of the sensors.

  15. Carbon Formation and Metal Dusting in Hot-Gas Cleanup Systems of Coal Gasifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tortorelli, Peter F.; Judkins, Roddie R.; DeVan, Jackson H.; Wright, Ian G.

    1995-12-31

    There are several possible materials/systems degradation modes that result from gasification environments with appreciable carbon activities. These processes, which are not necessarily mutually exclusive, include carbon deposition, carburization, metal dusting, and CO disintegration of refractories. Carbon formation on solid surfaces occurs by deposition from gases in which the carbon activity (a sub C) exceeds unity. The presence of a carbon layer CO can directly affect gasifier performance by restricting gas flow, particularly in the hot gas filter, creating debris (that may be deposited elsewhere in the system or that may cause erosive damage of downstream components), and/or changing the catalytic activity of surfaces.

  16. Natural gas adsorption on biomass derived activated carbons: A mini review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamza Usman D.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Activated carbon materials are good candidates for natural gas storage due excellent textural properties that are easy to enhance and modify. Natural gas is much cleaner fuel than coal and other petroleum derivatives. Storage of natural gas on porous sorbents at lower pressure is safer and cheaper compared to compressed and liquefied natural gas. This article reviews some works conducted on natural gas storage on biomass based activated carbon materials. Methane storage capacities and deliveries of the various sorbents were given. The effect of factors such as surface area, pore characteristic, heat of adsorption, packing density on the natural gas storage capacity on the activated carbons are discussed. Challenges, improvements and future directions of natural gas storage on porous carbonaceous materials are highlighted.

  17. A Paradigm for Modeling and Computation of Gas Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Kun

    2016-01-01

    In the continuum flow regime, the Navier-Stokes equations are usually used for the description of gas dynamics. On the other hand, the Boltzmann equation is applied for the rarefied gas dynamics. Both equations are constructed from modeling flow physics in different scales. Fortunately, due to the distinct separation of scales, i.e., the hydrodynamic and kinetic ones, both Navier-Stokes equations and the Boltzmann equation are valid in their respectable domains. However, in real physical application, there may not have such a distinctive scale separation. For example, around a hypersonic flying vehicle, the flow physics at different regions may correspond to different regimes, where the local Knudsen number can be changed in several order of magnitudes. With a variation of modeling scale, theoretically a continuous governing equation from kinetic Boltzmann equation to the hydrodynamic Navier-Stokes equations should exist. However, due to the difficulties of a direct modeling of flow physics in the scale betwe...

  18. High temperature gas dynamics an introduction for physicists and engineers

    CERN Document Server

    Bose, Tarit K

    2014-01-01

    High Temperature Gas Dynamics is a primer for scientists, engineers, and students who would like to have a basic understanding of the physics and the behavior of high-temperature gases. It is a valuable tool for astrophysicists as well. The first chapters treat the basic principles of quantum and statistical mechanics and how to derive thermophysical properties from them. Special topics are included that are rarely found in other textbooks, such as the thermophysical and transport properties of multi-temperature gases and a novel method to compute radiative transfer. Furthermore, collision processes between different particles are discussed. Separate chapters deal with the production of high-temperature gases and with electrical emission in plasmas, as well as related diagnostic techniques.This new edition adds over 100 pages and includes the following updates: several sections on radiative properties of high temperature gases and various radiation models, a section on shocks in magneto-gas-dynamics, a sectio...

  19. Hierarchy carbon paper for the gas diffusion layer of proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Chunyu; Wang, Baorong; Cheng, Xinqun

    This communication described the fabrication of a hierarchy carbon paper, and its application to the gas diffusion layer (GDL) of proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells. The carbon paper was fabricated by growing carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on carbon fibers via covalently assembling metal nanocatalysts. Surface morphology observation revealed a highly uniform distribution of hydrophobic materials within the carbon paper. The contact angle to water of this carbon paper was not only very large but also particularly even. Polarization measurements verified that the hierarchy carbon paper facilitated the self-humidifying of PEM fuel cells, which could be mainly attributed to its higher hydrophobic property as diagnosed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS).

  20. Evaluation of Methods for the Determination of Black Carbon Emissions from an Aircraft Gas Turbine Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    The emissions from aircraft gas turbine engines consist of nanometer size black carbon (BC) particles plus gas-phase sulfur and organic compounds which undergo gas-to-particle conversion downstream of the engine as the plume cools and dilutes. In this study, four BC measurement ...

  1. Dense and diffuse gas in dynamically active clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Garrod, R T; Rawlings, J M C

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the chemical and observational implications of repetitive transient dense core formation in molecular clouds. We allow a transient density fluctuation to form and disperse over a period of 1 Myr, tracing its chemical evolution. We then allow the same gas immediately to undergo further such formation and dispersion cycles. The chemistry of the dense gas in subsequent cycles is similar to that of the first, and a limit cycle is reached quickly (2 - 3 cycles). Enhancement of hydrocarbon abundances during a specific period of evolution is the strongest indicator of previous dynamical history. The molecular content of the diffuse background gas in the molecular cloud is expected to be strongly enhanced by the core formation and dispersion process. Such enhancement may remain for as long as 0.5 Myr. The frequency of repetitive core formation should strongly determine the level of background molecular enhancement. We also convolve the emission from a synthesised dark cloud, comprised of ensembles of t...

  2. Effects of superficial gas velocity on process dynamics in bioreactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, T. T.; Kumar, B.

    2014-06-01

    Present work analyzes the flow hydrodynamics and mass transfer mechanisms in double Rushton and CD-6 impeller on wide range (0.0075-0.25 m/s) of superficial gas velocity ( v g) in a gas-liquid phase bioreactor by employing computational fluid dynamics (CFD) technique. The volume averaged velocity magnitude and dissipation rate are found higher with increasing superficial gas velocity. Higher relative power draw ( P g/ P 0) is predicted in CD-6 than the Rushton impeller but no significant difference in volume averaged mass transfer coefficient ( k L a) observed between these two types of impeller. The ratio of power draw with mass transfer coefficient has been found higher in CD-6 impeller (25-50 %) than the Rushton impeller.

  3. Merger Signatures in the Dynamics of Star-forming Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Chao-Ling; Hayward, Christopher C.; Smith, Howard A.; Ashby, Matthew L. N.; Lanz, Lauranne; Martínez-Galarza, Juan R.; Sanders, D. B.; Zezas, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The recent advent of integral field spectrographs and millimeter interferometers has revealed the internal dynamics of many hundreds of star-forming galaxies. Spatially resolved kinematics have been used to determine the dynamical status of star-forming galaxies with ambiguous morphologies, and constrain the importance of galaxy interactions during the assembly of galaxies. However, measuring the importance of interactions or galaxy merger rates requires knowledge of the systematics in kinematic diagnostics and the visible time with merger indicators. We analyze the dynamics of star-forming gas in a set of binary merger hydrodynamic simulations with stellar mass ratios of 1:1 and 1:4. We find that the evolution of kinematic asymmetries traced by star-forming gas mirrors morphological asymmetries derived from mock optical images, in which both merger indicators show the largest deviation from isolated disks during strong interaction phases. Based on a series of simulations with various initial disk orientations, orbital parameters, gas fractions, and mass ratios, we find that the merger signatures are visible for ˜0.2-0.4 Gyr with kinematic merger indicators but can be approximately twice as long for equal-mass mergers of massive gas-rich disk galaxies designed to be analogs of z ˜ 2-3 submillimeter galaxies. Merger signatures are most apparent after the second passage and before the black holes coalescence, but in some cases they persist up to several hundred Myr after coalescence. About 20%-60% of the simulated galaxies are not identified as mergers during the strong interaction phase, implying that galaxies undergoing violent merging process do not necessarily exhibit highly asymmetric kinematics in their star-forming gas. The lack of identifiable merger signatures in this population can lead to an underestimation of merger abundances in star-forming galaxies, and including them in samples of star-forming disks may bias the measurements of disk properties such

  4. kinetics of the coupled gas-iron reactions involving silicon and carbon

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    1985-09-01

    Sep 1, 1985 ... and a gas phase consisting carbon monoxide, silicon monoxide and carbon dioxide. ... limited by oxygen in the metal boundary layer at the slag- ... the furnace into the reaction chamber the carbon monoxide acting as both a ...

  5. Extraction and evaluation of gas-flow-dependent features from dynamic measurements of gas sensors array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinowski, Paweł; Woźniak, Łukasz; Jasiński, Grzegorz; Jasiński, Piotr

    2016-11-01

    Gas analyzers based on gas sensors are the devices which enable recognition of various kinds of volatile compounds. They have continuously been developed and investigated for over three decades, however there are still limitations which slow down the implementation of those devices in many applications. For example, the main drawbacks are the lack of selectivity, sensitivity and long term stability of those devices caused by the drift of utilized sensors. This implies the necessity of investigations not only in the field of development of gas sensors construction, but also the development of measurement procedures or methods of analysis of sensor responses which compensate the limitations of sensors devices. One of the fields of investigations covers the dynamic measurements of sensors or sensor-arrays response with the utilization of flow modulation techniques. Different gas delivery patterns enable the possibility of extraction of unique features which improves the stability and selectivity of gas detecting systems. In this article three utilized flow modulation techniques are presented, together with the proposition of the evaluation method of their usefulness and robustness in environmental pollutants detecting systems. The results of dynamic measurements of an commercially available TGS sensor array in the presence of nitrogen dioxide and ammonia are shown.

  6. Gas dynamics an introduction with examples from astrophysics and geophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Achterberg, Abraham

    2016-01-01

    This book lays the foundations of gas- and fluid dynamics. The basic equations are developed from first principles, building on the (assumed) knowledge of Classical Mechanics. This leads to the discussion of the mathematical properties of flows, conservation laws, perturbation analysis, waves and shocks. Most of the discussion centers on ideal (frictionless) fluids and gases. Viscous flows are discussed when considering flows around obstacles and shocks. Many of the examples used to illustrate various processes come from astrophysics and geophysical phenomena.

  7. Isotopic composition of carbon and oxygen of carbonates of oil and gas-bearing deposits of Western Siberia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golyshev, S.I.; Cherepnin, A.V.; Rozhnev, A.N.

    1981-01-01

    There is measured the isotopic composition of carbon and oxygen in 129 samples of carbonates and carbonate cements of oil and gas-bearing Paleozoic and Mezozoic deposits of Western Siberia. The isotopic composition of samples of marine deposits varies from -1.2 to +6.1% for carbon and from 19.8 to 29.1% for oxygen and has a mean isotopic composition of 1.9 to 24.8%. Catagenetic processes lead to lightening of the isotopic composition of secondary carbonate on the average by 5% for carbon and 9% for oxygen. The most intense lightening of isotopic composition is observed in samples disposed near oil and gas deposits.

  8. FIR line profiles as probes of warm gas dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betz, A. L.; Boreiko, R. T.

    1995-01-01

    Measurements of the shapes, velocities, and intensities of FIR lines all help to probe the dynamics, physical associations, and excitation conditions of warm gas in molecular clouds. With this in mind, we have observed the J=9-8, 12-11,14-13, and 16-15 lines of (12)CO and the 158 micron line of C II in a number of positions in 4 selected clouds. The data were obtained with a laser heterodyne spectrometer aboard NASA's Kuiper Airborne Observatory. Line measurements at 0.6 km/s resolution allow us to resolve the profiles completely, and thereby to distinguish between UV-and shock-heating mechanisms for the high-excitation gas. For CO, the high-J linewidths lie in the range of 4-20 km/s (FWHM), similar to those observed for low-J (J less than 4) transitions in these sources. This correspondence suggests that the hotter gas (T = 200-600 K) is dynamically linked to the quiescent gas component, perhaps by association with the UV-heated peripheries of the numerous cloud clumps. Much of the C II emission is thought to emanate from these cloud peripheries, but the line profiles generally do not match those seen in CO. None of the observed sources show any evidence in high-J (12)CO emission for shock-excitation (i.e., linewidths greater than 30 km/s).

  9. Universal Loss Dynamics in a Unitary Bose Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eismann, Ulrich; Khaykovich, Lev; Laurent, Sébastien; Ferrier-Barbut, Igor; Rem, Benno S.; Grier, Andrew T.; Delehaye, Marion; Chevy, Frédéric; Salomon, Christophe; Ha, Li-Chung; Chin, Cheng

    2016-04-01

    The low-temperature unitary Bose gas is a fundamental paradigm in few-body and many-body physics, attracting wide theoretical and experimental interest. Here, we present experiments performed with unitary 133Cs and 7Li atoms in two different setups, which enable quantitative comparison of the three-body recombination rate in the low-temperature domain. We develop a theoretical model that describes the dynamic competition between two-body evaporation and three-body recombination in a harmonically trapped unitary atomic gas above the condensation temperature. We identify a universal "magic" trap depth where, within some parameter range, evaporative cooling is balanced by recombination heating and the gas temperature stays constant. Our model is developed for the usual three-dimensional evaporation regime as well as the two-dimensional evaporation case, and it fully supports our experimental findings. Combined 133Cs and 7Li experimental data allow investigations of loss dynamics over 2 orders of magnitude in temperature and 4 orders of magnitude in three-body loss rate. We confirm the 1 /T2 temperature universality law. In particular, we measure, for the first time, the Efimov inelasticity parameter η*=0.098 (7 ) for the 47.8-G d -wave Feshbach resonance in 133Cs. Our result supports the universal loss dynamics of trapped unitary Bose gases up to a single parameter η*.

  10. Life cycle carbon footprint of shale gas: review of evidence and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Christopher L; Clavin, Christopher

    2012-06-05

    The recent increase in the production of natural gas from shale deposits has significantly changed energy outlooks in both the US and world. Shale gas may have important climate benefits if it displaces more carbon-intensive oil or coal, but recent attention has discussed the potential for upstream methane emissions to counteract this reduced combustion greenhouse gas emissions. We examine six recent studies to produce a Monte Carlo uncertainty analysis of the carbon footprint of both shale and conventional natural gas production. The results show that the most likely upstream carbon footprints of these types of natural gas production are largely similar, with overlapping 95% uncertainty ranges of 11.0-21.0 g CO(2)e/MJ(LHV) for shale gas and 12.4-19.5 g CO(2)e/MJ(LHV) for conventional gas. However, because this upstream footprint represents less than 25% of the total carbon footprint of gas, the efficiency of producing heat, electricity, transportation services, or other function is of equal or greater importance when identifying emission reduction opportunities. Better data are needed to reduce the uncertainty in natural gas's carbon footprint, but understanding system-level climate impacts of shale gas, through shifts in national and global energy markets, may be more important and requires more detailed energy and economic systems assessments.

  11. Model-based dynamic control and optimization of gas networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofsten, Kai

    2001-07-01

    This work contributes to the research on control, optimization and simulation of gas transmission systems to support the dispatch personnel at gas control centres for the decision makings in the daily operation of the natural gas transportation systems. Different control and optimization strategies have been studied. The focus is on the operation of long distance natural gas transportation systems. Stationary optimization in conjunction with linear model predictive control using state space models is proposed for supply security, the control of quality parameters and minimization of transportation costs for networks offering transportation services. The result from the stationary optimization together with a reformulation of a simplified fluid flow model formulates a linear dynamic optimization model. This model is used in a finite time control and state constrained linear model predictive controller. The deviation from the control and the state reference determined from the stationary optimization is penalized quadratically. Because of the time varying status of infrastructure, the control space is also generally time varying. When the average load is expected to change considerably, a new stationary optimization is performed, giving a new state and control reference together with a new dynamic model that is used for both optimization and state estimation. Another proposed control strategy is a control and output constrained nonlinear model predictive controller for the operation of gas transmission systems. Here, the objective is also the security of the supply, quality control and minimization of transportation costs. An output vector is defined, which together with a control vector are both penalized quadratically from their respective references in the objective function. The nonlinear model predictive controller can be combined with a stationary optimization. At each sampling instant, a non convex nonlinear programming problem is solved giving a local minimum

  12. Preparation of activated carbon from waste plastics polyethylene terephthalate as adsorbent in natural gas storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuliusman; Nasruddin; Sanal, A.; Bernama, A.; Haris, F.; Ramadhan, I. T.

    2017-02-01

    The main problem is the process of natural gas storage and distribution, because in normal conditions of natural gas in the gas phase causes the storage capacity be small and efficient to use. The technology is commonly used Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) and Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG). The weakness of this technology safety level is low because the requirement for high-pressure CNG (250 bar) and LNG requires a low temperature (-161°C). It takes innovation in the storage of natural gas using the technology ANG (Adsorbed Natural Gas) with activated carbon as an adsorbent, causing natural gas can be stored in a low pressure of about 34.5. In this research, preparation of activated carbon using waste plastic polyethylene terephthalate (PET). PET plastic waste is a good raw material for making activated carbon because of its availability and the price is a lot cheaper. Besides plastic PET has the appropriate characteristics as activated carbon raw material required for the storage of natural gas because the material is hard and has a high carbon content of about 62.5% wt. The process of making activated carbon done is carbonized at a temperature of 400 ° C and physical activation using CO2 gas at a temperature of 975 ° C. The parameters varied in the activation process is the flow rate of carbon dioxide and activation time. The results obtained in the carbonization process yield of 21.47%, while the yield on the activation process by 62%. At the optimum process conditions, the CO2 flow rate of 200 ml/min and the activation time of 240 minutes, the value % burn off amounted to 86.69% and a surface area of 1591.72 m2/g.

  13. Performance assessment of natural gas and biogas fueled molten carbonate fuel cells in carbon capture configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barelli, Linda; Bidini, Gianni; Campanari, Stefano; Discepoli, Gabriele; Spinelli, Maurizio

    2016-07-01

    The ability of MCFCs as carbon dioxide concentrator is an alternative solution among the carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies to reduce the CO2 emission of an existing plant, providing energy instead of implying penalties. Moreover, the fuel flexibility exhibited by MCFCs increases the interest on such a solution. This paper provides the performance characterization of MCFCs operated in CCS configuration and fed with either natural gas or biogas. Experimental results are referred to a base CCS unit constituted by a MCFC stack fed from a reformer and integrated with an oxycombustor. A comparative analysis is carried out to evaluate the effect of fuel composition on energy efficiency and CO2 capture performance. A higher CO2 removal ability is revealed for the natural feeding case, bringing to a significant reduction in MCFC total area (-11.5%) and to an increase in produced net power (+13%). Moreover, the separated CO2 results in 89% (natural gas) and 86.5% (biogas) of the CO2 globally delivered by the CCS base unit. Further investigation will be carried out to provide a comprehensive assessment of the different solutions eco-efficiency considering also the biogas source and availability.

  14. Carbon monoxide measurement by gas chromatography; Mesure du monoxyde de carbone par chromatographie en phase gazeuse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gros, V.; Sarda-Esteve, R.; Bonsang, B.; Ramonet, M.

    1998-09-01

    Although carbon monoxide (CO) is present in trace quantities in the atmosphere (0.1 ppm -or parts per million in volume- on average), the study of this gas is important. Indeed, its impact on human can be dangerous at high level of concentration on the hand and it constitutes one of the main precursor of ozone in presence of concentration on the one hand and it constitutes one of the main precursor of ozone in presence of other pollutants on the other hand. Finally, CO affects the levels of several important greenhouse gases, through its reaction with hydroxyl radicals (OH). CO is measured in the atmosphere since the mid 60's by various methods. Among them, gas chromatography has the advantage to combine a low detection limit with a high precision. This report details the improvements made on the measurement analyser which allowed to perform automatic CO measurements in remote areas with low mixing ratios of carbon monoxide. This report describes some quality tests and the results of various applications. (authors)

  15. The effect of gas double-dynamic on mass distribution in solid-state fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hong-Zhang; Zhao, Zhi-Min; Li, Hong-Qiang

    2014-05-10

    The mass distribution regularity in substrate of solid-state fermentation (SSF) has rarely been reported due to the heterogeneity of solid medium and the lack of suitable instrument and method, which limited the comprehensive analysis and enhancement of the SSF performance. In this work, the distributions of water, biomass, and fermentation product in different medium depths of SSF were determined using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and the developed models. Based on the mass distribution regularity, the effects of gas double-dynamic on heat transfer, microbial growth and metabolism, and product distribution gradient were systematically investigated. Results indicated that the maximum temperature of substrate and the maximum carbon dioxide evolution rate (CER) were 39.5°C and 2.48mg/(hg) under static aeration solid-state fermentation (SASSF) and 33.9°C and 5.38mg/(hg) under gas double-dynamic solid-state fermentation (GDSSF), respectively, with the environmental temperature for fermentation of 30±1°C. The fermentation production (cellulase activity) ratios of the upper, middle, and lower levels were 1:0.90:0.78 at seventh day under SASSF and 1:0.95:0.89 at fifth day under GDSSF. Therefore, combined with NIRS analysis, gas double-dynamic could effectively strengthen the solid-state fermentation performance due to the enhancement of heat transfer, the stimulation of microbial metabolism and the increase of the homogeneity of fermentation products.

  16. Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics: High Resolution Spectroscopy and Collision Dynamics of Transient Species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, G.E.

    2011-05-31

    This research is carried out as part of the Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics program in the Chemistry Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Chemical intermediates in the elementary gas-phase reactions involved in combustion chemistry are investigated by high resolution spectroscopic tools. Production, reaction, and energy transfer processes are investigated by transient, double resonance, polarization and saturation spectroscopies, with an emphasis on technique development and connection with theory, as well as specific molecular properties.

  17. Carbon dioxide capture strategies from flue gas using microalgae: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Daniya M; Mechery, Jerry; Paulose, Sylas V

    2016-09-01

    Global warming and pollution are the twin crises experienced globally. Biological offset of these crises are gaining importance because of its zero waste production and the ability of the organisms to thrive under extreme or polluted condition. In this context, this review highlights the recent developments in carbon dioxide (CO2) capture from flue gas using microalgae and finding the best microalgal remediation strategy through contrast and comparison of different strategies. Different flue gas microalgal remediation strategies discussed are as follows: (i) Flue gas to CO2 gas segregation using adsorbents for microalgal mitigation, (ii) CO2 separation from flue gas using absorbents and later regeneration for microalgal mitigation, (iii) Flue gas to liquid conversion for direct microalgal mitigation, and (iv) direct flue gas mitigation using microalgae. This work also studies the economic feasibility of microalgal production. The study discloses that the direct convening of flue gas with high carbon dioxide content, into microalgal system is cost-effective.

  18. Optimization of carbon dioxide supply in raceway reactors: Influence of carbon dioxide molar fraction and gas flow rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte-Santos, T; Mendoza-Martín, J L; Acién Fernández, F G; Molina, E; Vieira-Costa, J A; Heaven, S

    2016-07-01

    Influence of CO2 composition and gas flow rate to control pH in a pilot-scale raceway producing Scenedesmus sp. was studied. Light and temperature determined the biomass productivity whereas neither the CO2 molar fraction nor the gas flow rate used influenced it; because pH was always controlled and carbon limitation did not take place. The CO2 molar fraction and the gas flow rate influenced carbon loss in the system. At low CO2 molar fraction (2-6%) or gas flow rate (75-100l·min(-1)) the carbon efficiency in the sump was higher than 95%, 85% of the injected carbon being transformed into biomass. Conversely, at high CO2 molar fraction (14%) or gas flow rate (150l·min(-1)) the carbon efficiency in the sump was lower than 67%, 32% of the carbon being fixed as biomass. Analysis here reported allows the pH control to be optimized and production costs to be reduced by optimizing CO2 efficiency.

  19. Gas sorption properties of zwitterion-functionalized carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surapathi, Anil; Chen, Hang-yan; Marand, Eva; Karl Johnson, J.; Sedlakova, Zdenka

    2013-02-01

    We have functionalized carbon nanotubes with carboxylic acid and zwitterion groups. We have evaluated the effect of functionalization by measuring the sorption of CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and N{sub 2} at 35°C for pressures up to 10 bar. Zwitterion functionalized nanotubes were found to be highly hygroscopic. Thermal gravimetric analysis indicates that water can be desorbed at about 200°C. The adsorption of gases in zwitterion functionalized nanotubes is dramatically reduced compared with nanotubes functionalized with carboxylic acid groups. The presence of water on the zwitterion functionalized nanotube reduces the sorption even further. Molecular simulations show that three or more zwitterion groups per tube entrance are required to significantly reduce the flux of CO{sub 2} into the tubes. Simulations also show that gas phase water is rapidly sorbed into the zwitterion functionalized nanotubes, both increasing the free energy barrier to CO{sub 2} entering the tube and also lowering the equilibrium adsorption through competitive adsorption.

  20. A dynamic process model of a natural gas combined cycle -- Model development with startup and shutdown simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liese, Eric [U.S. DOE; Zitney, Stephen E. [U.S. DOE

    2013-01-01

    Research in dynamic process simulation for integrated gasification combined cycles (IGCC) with carbon capture has been ongoing at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), culminating in a full operator training simulator (OTS) and immersive training simulator (ITS) for use in both operator training and research. A derivative work of the IGCC dynamic simulator has been a modification of the combined cycle section to more closely represent a typical natural gas fired combined cycle (NGCC). This paper describes the NGCC dynamic process model and highlights some of the simulator’s current capabilities through a particular startup and shutdown scenario.

  1. Rare gas-benzene-rare gas interactions: structural properties and dynamic behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albertí, Margarita

    2010-02-18

    In the present work, some static and dynamic properties of trimers containing one benzene molecule and two rare gas atoms are investigated. These trimers can be formed in two different configurations, one in which the two rare gas atoms are placed in opposite sides of the benzene plane, (1|1), and the other in which the two atoms are placed on the same side, (2|0). The (1|1) configuration is more stable than the (2|0), and both minima are connected by small energy barriers. Accordingly, molecular dynamics simulations show frequent (2|0) (1|1) interconversions, even at low temperatures. The time spent in each configuration has been related to the abundance of isomers. It has been found that at temperatures just below the dissociation, when interconversions are quite frequent, the relative abundance of (2|0) is always higher than that of (1|1), independently of the nature of the two rare gases.

  2. Dynamical heterogeneity in a glass-forming ideal gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charbonneau, Patrick; Das, Chinmay; Frenkel, Daan

    2008-07-01

    We conduct a numerical study of the dynamical behavior of a system of three-dimensional "crosses," particles that consist of three mutually perpendicular line segments of length sigma rigidly joined at their midpoints. In an earlier study [W. van Ketel, Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 135703 (2005)] we showed that this model has the structural properties of an ideal gas, yet the dynamical properties of a strong glass former. In the present paper we report an extensive study of the dynamical heterogeneities that appear in this system in the regime where glassy behavior sets in. On the one hand, we find that the propensity of a particle to diffuse is determined by the structure of its local environment. The local density around mobile particles is significantly less than the average density, but there is little clustering of mobile particles, and the clusters observed tend to be small. On the other hand, dynamical susceptibility results indicate that a large dynamical length scale develops even at moderate densities. This suggests that propensity and other mobility measures are an incomplete measure of the dynamical length scales in this system.

  3. Comparative carbon cycle dynamics of the present and last interglacial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brovkin, Victor; Brücher, Tim; Kleinen, Thomas; Zaehle, Sönke; Joos, Fortunat; Roth, Raphael; Spahni, Renato; Schmitt, Jochen; Fischer, Hubertus; Leuenberger, Markus; Stone, Emma J.; Ridgwell, Andy; Chappellaz, Jérôme; Kehrwald, Natalie; Barbante, Carlo; Blunier, Thomas; Dahl Jensen, Dorthe

    2016-04-01

    Changes in temperature and carbon dioxide during glacial cycles recorded in Antarctic ice cores are tightly coupled. However, this relationship does not hold for interglacials. While climate cooled towards the end of both the last (Eemian) and present (Holocene) interglacials, CO2 remained stable during the Eemian while rising in the Holocene. We identify and review twelve biogeochemical mechanisms of terrestrial (vegetation dynamics and CO2 fertilization, land use, wildfire, accumulation of peat, changes in permafrost carbon, subaerial volcanic outgassing) and marine origin (changes in sea surface temperature, carbonate compensation to deglaciation and terrestrial biosphere regrowth, shallow-water carbonate sedimentation, changes in the soft tissue pump, and methane hydrates), which potentially may have contributed to the CO2 dynamics during interglacials but which remain not well quantified. We use three Earth System Models (ESMs) of intermediate complexity to compare effects of selected mechanisms on the interglacial CO2 and δ13CO2 changes, focusing on those with substantial potential impacts: namely carbonate sedimentation in shallow waters, peat growth, and (in the case of the Holocene) human land use. A set of specified carbon cycle forcings could qualitatively explain atmospheric CO2 dynamics from 8 ka BP to the pre-industrial. However, when applied to Eemian boundary conditions from 126 to 115 ka BP, the same set of forcings led to disagreement with the observed direction of CO2 changes after 122 ka BP. This failure to simulate late-Eemian CO2 dynamics could be a result of the imposed forcings such as prescribed CaCO3 accumulation and/or an incorrect response of simulated terrestrial carbon to the surface cooling at the end of the interglacial. These experiments also reveal that key natural processes of interglacial CO2 dynamics - shallow water CaCO3 accumulation, peat and permafrost carbon dynamics - are not well represented in the current ESMs. Global

  4. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Laser Powered Carbon Nanotube Gears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Globus, Al; Han, Jie; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Dynamics of laser powered carbon nanotube gears is investigated by molecular dynamics simulations with Brenner's hydrocarbon potential. We find that when the frequency of the laser electric field is much less than the intrinsic frequency of the carbon nanotube, the tube exhibits an oscillatory pendulam behavior. However, a unidirectional rotation of the gear with oscillating frequency is observed under conditions of resonance between the laser field and intrinsic gear frequencies. The operating conditions for stable rotations of the nanotube gears, powered by laser electric fields are explored, in these simulations.

  5. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Laser Powered Carbon Nanotube Gears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Globus, Al; Han, Jie; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Dynamics of laser powered carbon nanotube gears is investigated by molecular dynamics simulations with Brenner's hydrocarbon potential. We find that when the frequency of the laser electric field is much less than the intrinsic frequency of the carbon nanotube, the tube exhibits an oscillatory pendulam behavior. However, a unidirectional rotation of the gear with oscillating frequency is observed under conditions of resonance between the laser field and intrinsic gear frequencies. The operating conditions for stable rotations of the nanotube gears, powered by laser electric fields are explored, in these simulations.

  6. Interaction of collagen with carbon nanotube: a molecular dynamics investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalakrishnan, R; Subramanian, V

    2011-02-01

    In variety of biological applications carbon nano materials interact with different biological macromolecules, such as proteins, carbohydrates and nucleic acids. In this study carbon nanotube (CNT) has been used as the model for carbon nanomaterials. Since, collagen is a large protein; model collagen like peptide (CPs) has been used to understand the interaction between CNT and collagen. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation showed that the hydrophobic-hydrophobic interaction of the CNT-CPs play a crucial role in attracting the CPs towards the CNT. No structural aberrations occured in collagen upon interaction with CNT and hence CNT can be employed in the tissue engineering applications.

  7. Carbon dynamics of contrasting agricultural practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghee, Claire; Hallett, Paul; Neilson, Roy; Robinson, David; Paterson, Eric

    2013-04-01

    Application of organic amendments can improve soil quality and provide crop nutrients. To optimise these agricultural benefits from organic applications, the capacity of microbe-driven nutrient and carbon cycling must be understood and exploited. Consideration is therefore required of the complex interactions between the rhizosphere, microbial biomass and organic amendment. We hypothesise that the labile C present in root exudates of plants increases the mineralisation of organic matter in soil, constituting a mechanism to promote nutrient acquisition. This mechanism is known as the 'priming effect', but is poorly understood in the context of agricultural carbon and nutrient management. Field data from the Centre of Sustainable Cropping (CSC) research platform (Dundee, Scotland, UK) are utilised to build an understanding of soil C and N fluxes between contrasting agricultural practices. The field site uses a split-plot design to compare (i) compost amended soils with reduced tillage and chemical inputs and (ii) conventionally managed soils, reflective of current UK commercial arable practice. Significant differences (p= microbial biomass (SMB), total organic carbon (TOC) and mineral nitrogen. Investigation into the priming effect within compost amended soils was subsequently undertaken under laboratory conditions. Stable isotope analysis and measurements of soil biotic parameters were used to quantify priming resulting from Spring Barley (Hordeum vulgare cv. Optic) cultivation for (i) unamended and (ii) municipal compost incorporated soils. Compost treatments comprised amendments of 25, 50 and 150 t/Ha and planted soils were compared with unplanted controls. Soil mesocosms were maintained under controlled environmental conditions within labelling chambers supplied continuously with 13C-depleted CO2. Throughout a 41-day incubation period, soil CO2 efflux and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) was collected for quantification and 13C analysis. Following the incubation

  8. Carbonization in polyacrylonitrile (PAN) based carbon fibers studied by ReaxFF molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Biswajit; Schatz, George C

    2012-04-19

    The carbonization mechanism in polyacrylonitrile (PAN) based carbon nanofibers is studied using ReaxFF molecular dynamics simulations. Simulations are performed at two carbonization temperatures, 2500 and 2800 K, and also at two densities, 1.6 and 2.1 g/cm(3), that are relevant to the experimental carbonization conditions. The results are analyzed by examining the evolution of species with time, including carbon-only ring structures and gaseous species. Formation mechanisms are proposed for species like N(2), H(2), NH(3), and HCN and five-, six-, and seven-membered carbon-only rings, along with polycyclic structures. Interestingly, the formation of five-membered rings follows N(2) formation and usually occurs as a precursor to six-membered rings. Elimination mechanisms for the gaseous molecules are found that are in agreement with previously proposed mechanisms; however, alternative mechanisms are also proposed.

  9. Origin and Dynamical Support of Ionized Gas in Galaxy Bulges

    CERN Document Server

    Ho, Luis C

    2009-01-01

    We combine ionized gas ([N II] 6583) and stellar central velocity dispersions for a sample of 345 galaxies, with and without active galactic nuclei (AGNs), to study the dynamical state of the nuclear gas and its physical origin. The gas dispersions strongly correlate with the stellar dispersions over the velocity range of 30-350 km/s such that sigma_g/sigma_* ~ 0.6-1.4, with an average value of 0.80. These results are independent of Hubble type (for galaxies from E to Sbc), presence or absence of a bar, or local galaxy environment. For galaxies of type Sc and later and that have sigma_* < 40 km/s, the gas seems to have a minimum threshold of sigma_g ~ 30 km/s, such that sigma_g/sigma_* always exceeds 1. Within the sample of AGNs, sigma_g/sigma_* increases with nuclear luminosity or Eddington ratio, a possible manifestation of AGN feedback associated with accretion disk winds or outflows. This extra source of nongravitational line broadening should be removed when trying to use sigma_g to estimate sigma_*. ...

  10. Nitrogen and carbon interactions in controlling terrestrial greenhouse gas fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ineson, Phil; Toet, Sylvia; Christiansen, Jesper

    2016-04-01

    The increased input of N to terrestrial systems may have profound impacts on net greenhouse gas (GHGs) fluxes and, consequently, our future climate; however, fully capturing and quantifying these interactions under field conditions urgently requires new, more efficient, measurement approaches. We have recently developed and deployed a novel system for the automation of terrestrial GHG flux measurements at the chamber and plot scales, using the approach of 'flying' a single measurement chamber to multiple points in an experimental field arena. As an example of the value of this approach, we shall describe the results from a field experiment investigating the interactions between increasing inorganic nitrogen (N) and carbon (C) additions on net ecosystem exchanges of N2O, CH4 and CO2, enabling the simultaneous application of 25 treatments, replicated five times in a fully replicated block field design. We will describe how the ability to deliver automated GHG flux measurements, highly replicated in space and time, has revealed hitherto unreported findings on N and C interactions in field soil. In our experiments we found insignificant N2O fluxes from bare field soil, even at very high inorganic N addition rates, but the interactive addition of even small amounts of available C resulted in very large and rapid N2O fluxes. The SkyGas experimental system enabled investigation of the underlying interacting response surfaces on the fluxes of the major soil-derived GHGs (CO2, CH4 and N2O) to increasing N and C inputs, and revealed unexpected interactions. In addition to these results we will also discuss some of the technical problems which have been overcome in developing these 'flying' systems and the potential of the systems for automatically screening the impacts of large numbers of treatments on GHG fluxes, and other ecosystem responses, under field conditions. We describe here technological advances that can facilitate the development of more robust GHG mitigation

  11. Carbon Nanotube- and Carbon Fiber-Reinforcement of Ethylene-Octene Copolymer Membranes for Gas and Vapor Separation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuzana Sedláková

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gas and vapor transport properties were studied in mixed matrix membranes containing elastomeric ethylene-octene copolymer (EOC or poly(ethylene-co-octene with three types of carbon fillers: virgin or oxidized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs and carbon fibers (CFs. Helium, hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen, methane, and carbon dioxide were used for gas permeation rate measurements. Vapor transport properties were studied for the aliphatic hydrocarbon (hexane, aromatic compound (toluene, alcohol (ethanol, as well as water for the representative samples. The mechanical properties and homogeneity of samples was checked by stress-strain tests. The addition of virgin CNTs and CFs improve mechanical properties. Gas permeability of EOC lies between that of the more permeable PDMS and the less permeable semi-crystalline polyethylene and polypropylene. Organic vapors are more permeable than permanent gases in the composite membranes, with toluene and hexane permeabilities being about two orders of magnitude higher than permanent gas permeability. The results of the carbon-filled membranes offer perspectives for application in gas/vapor separation with improved mechanical resistance.

  12. Carbon soundings: greenhouse gas emissions of the UK music industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottrill, C.; Liverman, D.; Boykoff, M.

    2010-01-01

    Over the past decade, questions regarding how to reduce human contributions to climate change have become more commonplace and non-nation state actors—such as businesses, non-government organizations, celebrities—have increasingly become involved in climate change mitigation and adaptation initiatives. For these dynamic and rapidly expanding spaces, this letter provides an accounting of the methods and findings from a 2007 assessment of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the UK music industry. The study estimates that overall GHG emissions associated with the UK music market are approximately 540 000 t CO2e per annum. Music recording and publishing accounted for 26% of these emissions (138 000 t CO2e per annum), while three-quarters (74%) derived from activities associated with live music performances (400 000 t CO2e per annum). These results have prompted a group of music industry business leaders to design campaigns to reduce the GHG emissions of their supply chains. The study has also provided a basis for ongoing in-depth research on CD packaging, audience travel, and artist touring as well as the development of a voluntary accreditation scheme for reducing GHG emissions from activities of the UK music industry.

  13. Carbon soundings: greenhouse gas emissions of the UK music industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bottrill, C [Centre for Environmental Strategy, School of Engineering (D3), University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Liverman, D [Institute of the Environment, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Boykoff, M, E-mail: c.bottrill@surrey.ac.u, E-mail: liverman@u.arizona.ed, E-mail: boykoff@colorado.ed [CIRES Center for Science and Technology Policy, Environmental Studies and Geography, University of Colorado - Boulder, 1333 Grandview Ave, Campus Box 488, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States)

    2010-01-15

    Over the past decade, questions regarding how to reduce human contributions to climate change have become more commonplace and non-nation state actors-such as businesses, non-government organizations, celebrities-have increasingly become involved in climate change mitigation and adaptation initiatives. For these dynamic and rapidly expanding spaces, this letter provides an accounting of the methods and findings from a 2007 assessment of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the UK music industry. The study estimates that overall GHG emissions associated with the UK music market are approximately 540 000 t CO{sub 2}e per annum. Music recording and publishing accounted for 26% of these emissions (138 000 t CO{sub 2}e per annum), while three-quarters (74%) derived from activities associated with live music performances (400 000 t CO{sub 2}e per annum). These results have prompted a group of music industry business leaders to design campaigns to reduce the GHG emissions of their supply chains. The study has also provided a basis for ongoing in-depth research on CD packaging, audience travel, and artist touring as well as the development of a voluntary accreditation scheme for reducing GHG emissions from activities of the UK music industry.

  14. Soil carbon dynamics in cropland and rangeland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, R

    2002-01-01

    Most soils in the Midwestern USA have lost 30 to 50% of their original pool, or 25 to 40 Mg C/ha, upon conversion from natural to agricultural ecosystems. About 60 to 70% of the C thus depleted can be resequestered through adoption of recommended soil and crop management practices. These practices include conversion from plow till to no till, frequent use of winter cover crops in the rotation cycle, elimination of summer fallow, integrated nutrient management along with liberal use of biosolids and biological nitrogen fixation, precision farming to minimize losses and enhance fertilizer use efficiency, and use of improved varieties with ability to produce large root biomass with high content of lignin and suberin. The gross rate of soil organic carbon (SOC) sequestration ranges from 500 to 800 kg/ha/year in cold and humid regions and 100 to 300 kg/ha/year in dry and warm regions. The rate of SOC sequestration can be measured with procedures that are cost effective and credible at soil pedon level, landscape level, regional or national scale. In addition to SOC, there is also a large potential to sequester soil inorganic carbon (SIC) in arid and semi-arid regions. Soil C sequestration has numerous ancillary benefits. It is truly a win-win situation: extremely cost-effective, and a bridge to the future until alternative energy options take effect.

  15. Response of electrochemical oxygen sensors to inert gas-air and carbon dioxide-air mixtures: measurements and mathematical modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, P T; Gant, S E; Dowker, K P; Batt, R

    2011-02-15

    Electrochemical oxygen gas sensors are widely used for monitoring the state of inertisation of flammable atmospheres and to warn of asphyxiation risks. It is well established but not widely known by users of such oxygen sensors that the response of the sensor is affected by the nature of the diluent gas responsible for the decrease in ambient oxygen concentration. The present work investigates the response of electrochemical sensors, with either acid or alkaline electrolytes, to gas mixtures comprising air with enhanced levels of nitrogen, carbon dioxide, argon or helium. The measurements indicate that both types of sensors over-read the oxygen concentrations when atmospheres contain high levels of helium. Sensors with alkaline electrolytes are also shown to underestimate the severity of the hazard in atmospheres containing high levels of carbon dioxide. This deviation is greater for alkaline electrolyte sensors compared to acid electrolyte sensors. A Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model is developed to predict the response of an alkaline electrolyte, electrochemical gas sensor. Differences between predicted and measured sensor responses are less than 10% in relative terms for nearly all of the gas mixtures tested, and in many cases less than 5%. Extending the model to simulate responses of sensors with acid electrolytes would be straightforward.

  16. IDENTIFICATION OF DYNAMIC CHARACTERISTICS OF AIRCRAFT GAS TEMPERATURE SENSORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. F. Sabitov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The estimation of dynamic behavior of aircraft gas temperature sensors (GTS has to be done only in certified air installations and be based on recorded experimental transient response in accordance with the departmental standard. Experimental transient response has hindrances of different nature and can influence the accuracy of identification of dynamic behaviour of GTS. We suggested a new method to increase the accuracy of identification of dynamic behavior of GTS. The method is based on the use of amplitude spectrum of signal composed of experimental transient response. Shaped signal is an impulse decaying signal satisfying a Dirichlet condition and Fourier transform can apply to it to get amplitude spectrum. We worked out the relation between amplitude spectrum of shaped signals and time constant of dynamic behaviour for three mathematical models of GTS. The research showed that the information about dynamic behaviour of standard aircraft GTS is located in LF part of amplitude spectrum in the range of 0 to 1 rad/s and to 3 rad/s. The study revealed that hindrance in the transient response at frequency higher than 3 rad/s did not influence the accuracy of results if to use LF part of amplitude spectrum for the identification of dynamic behaviour of GTS. The amplitude spectrum of shaped signal can be estimated by measuring equipment like LF spectrum analyzer or calculated by software package with the function of fast Fourier transform. The value of time constant of certain mathematical model of GTS can be realized with the help of regression analysis or the use of embedded resources of different data processing systems. Thus, the method gives an opportunity to increase the accuracy of identification of dynamic behavior of GTS. 

  17. Membrane loop process for separating carbon dioxide for use in gaseous form from flue gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wijmans, Johannes G; Baker, Richard W; Merkel, Timothy C

    2016-09-06

    The invention is a process involving membrane-based gas separation for separating and recovering carbon dioxide emissions from combustion processes in partially concentrated form, and then transporting the carbon dioxide and using or storing it in a confined manner without concentrating it to high purity. The process of the invention involves building up the concentration of carbon dioxide in a gas flow loop between the combustion step and a membrane separation step. A portion of the carbon dioxide-enriched gas can then be withdrawn from this loop and transported, without the need to liquefy the gas or otherwise create a high-purity stream, to a destination where it is used or confined, preferably in an environmentally benign manner.

  18. Strong Entropy for System of Isentropic Gas Dynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we study three special families of strong entropy-entropy flux pairs (η/O, qO), (η/±, q±),represented by different kernels, of the isentropic gas dynamics system with the adiabatic exponent γ∈ (3, ∞).Through the perturbation technique through the perturbation technique, we proved, we proved the H-1 com-pactncss of ηit+qix, i=1, 2, 3 with respect to the perturbation solutions given by the Cauchy problem (6) and (7), where (ηi, qi) are suitable linear combinations of (ηO, qO), (η±, q±).

  19. Causes and prevention of corrosion in carbon steel natural gas coolers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotwica, D.J.; Minevski, L. [BetzDearborn, The Woodlands, TX (United States)

    1998-12-31

    Two case histories in which high pressure natural gas coolers had failed due to the presence of carbon dioxide are reviewed. CO{sub 2} along with CO and H{sub 2}S are acid gases usually present in natural gas feeds. Carbonic acid can form in aqueous condensate, lowering the pH and locally corroding mild steel tube metal. Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) can occur in tubing containing residual tensile stresses from welding or manufacturing. Bicarbonates and carbonates concentrated in condensate from CO{sub 2} and CO present in natural gas are required to produce SCC. Cathodic depolarizers such as oxygen in conjunction with the presence of carbonic acid will increase the corrosion rate of mild steel. Oxygen also increases the susceptibility of mild steel to carbonate SCC.

  20. Driven-dissipative dynamics of a strongly interacting Rydberg gas

    CERN Document Server

    Glaetzle, A W; Zhao, B; Pupillo, G; Zoller, P

    2012-01-01

    We study the non-equilibrium many-body dynamics of a cold gas of ground state alkali atoms weakly admixed by Rydberg states with laser light. On a timescale shorter than the lifetime of the dressed states, effective dipole-dipole or van der Waals interactions between atoms can lead to the formation of strongly correlated phases, such as atomic crystals. Using a semiclassical approach, we study the long-time dynamics where decoherence and dissipative processes due to spontaneous emission and blackbody radiation dominate, leading to heating and melting of atomic crystals as well as particle losses. These effects can be substantially mitigated by performing active laser cooling in the presence of atomic dressing.

  1. Theoretical Studies of Gas Phase Elementary and Carbon Nanostructure Growth Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-19

    DOI: 10.1021/ct1000268. 26. A. J. Midey, T. M. Miller, A. A. Viggiano, N. C. Bera, S. Maeda, and K. Morokuma, Chemistry of VX Surrogates and Ion...THEORETICAL STUDIES OF GAS PHASE ELEMENTARY AND CARBON NANOSTRUCTURE GROWTH REACTIONS KEIJI MOROKUMA EMORY UNIVERSITY 09/19/2013 Final Report...Z39.18 30-09-2013 Final Performance Report 1 July 2010 - 30 June 2013 Theoretical Studies of Gas Phase Elementary and Carbon Nanostructure Growth

  2. Model-based dynamic control and optimization of gas networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofsten, Kai

    2001-07-01

    This work contributes to the research on control, optimization and simulation of gas transmission systems to support the dispatch personnel at gas control centres for the decision makings in the daily operation of the natural gas transportation systems. Different control and optimization strategies have been studied. The focus is on the operation of long distance natural gas transportation systems. Stationary optimization in conjunction with linear model predictive control using state space models is proposed for supply security, the control of quality parameters and minimization of transportation costs for networks offering transportation services. The result from the stationary optimization together with a reformulation of a simplified fluid flow model formulates a linear dynamic optimization model. This model is used in a finite time control and state constrained linear model predictive controller. The deviation from the control and the state reference determined from the stationary optimization is penalized quadratically. Because of the time varying status of infrastructure, the control space is also generally time varying. When the average load is expected to change considerably, a new stationary optimization is performed, giving a new state and control reference together with a new dynamic model that is used for both optimization and state estimation. Another proposed control strategy is a control and output constrained nonlinear model predictive controller for the operation of gas transmission systems. Here, the objective is also the security of the supply, quality control and minimization of transportation costs. An output vector is defined, which together with a control vector are both penalized quadratically from their respective references in the objective function. The nonlinear model predictive controller can be combined with a stationary optimization. At each sampling instant, a non convex nonlinear programming problem is solved giving a local minimum

  3. Dynamic modeling of fixed-bed adsorption of flue gas using a variable mass transfer model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jehun; Lee, Jae W. [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    This study introduces a dynamic mass transfer model for the fixed-bed adsorption of a flue gas. The derivation of the variable mass transfer coefficient is based on pore diffusion theory and it is a function of effective porosity, temperature, and pressure as well as the adsorbate composition. Adsorption experiments were done at four different pressures (1.8, 5, 10 and 20 bars) and three different temperatures (30, 50 and 70 .deg. C) with zeolite 13X as the adsorbent. To explain the equilibrium adsorption capacity, the Langmuir-Freundlich isotherm model was adopted, and the parameters of the isotherm equation were fitted to the experimental data for a wide range of pressures and temperatures. Then, dynamic simulations were performed using the system equations for material and energy balance with the equilibrium adsorption isotherm data. The optimal mass transfer and heat transfer coefficients were determined after iterative calculations. As a result, the dynamic variable mass transfer model can estimate the adsorption rate for a wide range of concentrations and precisely simulate the fixed-bed adsorption process of a flue gas mixture of carbon dioxide and nitrogen.

  4. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Carbon Nanotubes in Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, J. H.; Jaffe, R.; Halicioglu, T.; Koumoutsakos, P.

    2000-01-01

    We study the hydrophobic/hydrophilic behavior of carbon nanotubes using molecular dynamics simulations. The energetics of the carbon-water interface are mainly dispersive but in the present study augmented with a carbon quadrupole term acting on the charge sites of the water. The simulations indicate that this contribution is negligible in terms of modifying the structural properties of water at the interface. Simulations of two carbon nanotubes in water display a wetting and drying of the interface between the nanotubes depending on their initial spacing. Thus, initial tube spacings of 7 and 8 A resulted in a drying of the interface whereas spacing of > 9 A remain wet during the course of the simulation. Finally, we present a novel particle-particle-particle-mesh algorithm for long range potentials which allows for general (curvilinear) meshes and "black-box" fast solvers by adopting an influence matrix technique.

  5. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Carbon Nanotubes in Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, J. H.; Jaffe, R.; Halicioglu, T.; Koumoutsakos, P.

    2000-01-01

    We study the hydrophobic/hydrophilic behavior of carbon nanotubes using molecular dynamics simulations. The energetics of the carbon-water interface are mainly dispersive but in the present study augmented with a carbon quadrupole term acting on the charge sites of the water. The simulations indicate that this contribution is negligible in terms of modifying the structural properties of water at the interface. Simulations of two carbon nanotubes in water display a wetting and drying of the interface between the nanotubes depending on their initial spacing. Thus, initial tube spacings of 7 and 8 A resulted in a drying of the interface whereas spacing of > 9 A remain wet during the course of the simulation. Finally, we present a novel particle-particle-particle-mesh algorithm for long range potentials which allows for general (curvilinear) meshes and "black-box" fast solvers by adopting an influence matrix technique.

  6. Study on the threshold value of organic enrichment of carbonate as gas source rocks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE Haitao; LU Shuangfang; ZHONG Ningning; WANG Bo

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, calculations have been performed about gas quantity of generation, adsorption, dissolving in oil, dissolving in water, diffusion of unit area carbonate rocks at different geologic conditions in the Tarim basin. According to the material balance principle, the corresponding organic carbon content when gas started expelling from source rocks with separate phases has been worked out. We regard it as the theoretical threshold value (TOCmin) of gas source rocks under the same geologic condition. Based on the simulating calculation, a fact has been discovered that TOCmin decreases with the increasing source rocks thickness, decreases at the beginning and then increases with the increasing maturity and decreases with the better type of organic matter. TOCmin evaluation table of carbonate gas source rocks in the Tarim basin has been established. Investigations indicate that the TOCmin of carbonate gas source rocks varies greatly with the differences of geologic conditions, and gas source rocks cannot be evaluated with a unified TOC threshold value. And we also establish a preliminary evaluation table of TOC industrial threshold value, TOCgy, of carbonate gas source rocks in the Tarim basin.

  7. Dynamic and transfert of carbon in Loire catchment using carbon isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coularis, Cindy; Fontugne, Michel; Tisnérat-Laborde, Nadine; Pastor, Lucie; Siclet, Françoise

    2014-05-01

    Rivers have a major role in carbon transfer between continent and ocean. The organic matter exported from land represents a major source of DOC and POC in oceans. The composition and reactivity of this matter will influence its behavior and fate within the coastal areas and continental shelf. It is thus important to characterize the exported matter and its temporal variability. Stable carbon isotope ratios (d13C) and 14C activity can provide unique information on carbon sources, turnover and exchange processes. We present here a study of the carbon cycle in the Loire River and its major tributaries by combining carbon isotopes measurements and classical biogeochemical parameters (DOC, POC, DIC, pH, Temperature, Alkalinity, pH, chlorophyll …). Three campaigns were performed in April, July and October 2013. The changes in 14C signature due to the controlled liquid release of five nuclear power plants are used to get additional information on the carbon dynamics within the river. First results show a conservative behavior of the organic carbon concentrations contrary to the inorganic carbon all along the Loire River. However, the reactivity of the organic matter varies with rivers catchments and seasons. An inventory of the distribution of the different carbon phases within the Loire River and its tributaries is presented.

  8. Biomass-based palm shell activated carbon and palm shell carbon molecular sieve as gas separation adsorbents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethupathi, Sumathi; Bashir, Mohammed Jk; Akbar, Zinatizadeh Ali; Mohamed, Abdul Rahman

    2015-04-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass has been widely recognised as a potential low-cost source for the production of high added value materials and proved to be a good precursor for the production of activated carbons. One of such valuable biomasses used for the production of activated carbons is palm shell. Palm shell (endocarp) is an abundant by-product produced from the palm oil industries throughout tropical countries. Palm shell activated carbon and palm shell carbon molecular sieve has been widely applied in various environmental pollution control technologies, mainly owing to its high adsorption performance, well-developed porosity and low cost, leading to potential applications in gas-phase separation using adsorption processes. This mini-review represents a comprehensive overview of the palm shell activated carbon and palm shell carbon molecular sieve preparation method, physicochemical properties and feasibility of palm shell activated carbon and palm shell carbon molecular sieve in gas separation processes. Some of the limitations are outlined and suggestions for future improvements are pointed out.

  9. Gas dynamics in Massive Dense Cores in Cygnus-X

    CERN Document Server

    Csengeri, T; Schneider, N; Motte, F; Dib, S

    2010-01-01

    We study the kinematic properties of dense gas surrounding massive protostars recognized by Bontemps et a. (2010) in a sample of five Massive Dense Cores in Cygnus-X. We investigate whether turbulent support plays a major role in stabilizing the core against fragmentation into Jeans-mass objects or alternatively, the observed kinematics could indicate a high level of dynamics. We present IRAM 30m single-dish (HCO+ and H13CO+) and IRAM PdBI high angular-resolution observations of dense gas tracers (H13CO+ and H13CN) to reveal the kinematics of molecular gas at scales from 0.03 to 0.1 pc. Radiative transfer modeling shows that H13CO+ is depleted within the envelopes of massive protostars and traces the bulk of material surrounding the protostars rather than their inner envelopes. H13CN shows a better correspondence with the peak of the continuum emission, possibly due to abundance anomalies and specific chemistry in the close vicinity of massive protostars. Analyzing the line-widths we show that the observed li...

  10. Dynamical Friction in a Gas: The Subsonic Case

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Aaron T

    2011-01-01

    We study the force of dynamical friction acting on a gravitating point mass that travels through an extended, isothermal gas. This force is well established in the hypersonic limit, but remains less understood in the subsonic regime. Using perturbation theory, we analyze the changes in gas velocity and density far from the mass. We show analytically that the steady-state friction force is Mdot*V, where Mdot is the mass accretion rate onto an object moving at speed V. It follows that the speed of an object experiencing no other forces declines as the inverse square of its mass. Using a modified version of the classic Bondi-Hoyle interpolation formula for Mdot as a function of V, we derive an analytic expression for the friction force. This expression also holds when mass accretion is thwarted, e.g. by a wind, as long as the wind-cloud interaction is sufficiently confined spatially. Our result should find application in a number of astrophysical settings, such as the motion of galaxies through intracluster gas.

  11. Characteristics of Photoacoustic Spectroscopy Detection for Carbon Monoxide Gas Based on DFB Diode Laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Weigen; PENG Xiaojuan; LIU Bingjie; SUN Caixin

    2012-01-01

    The dissolved gas analysis is one of the most effective and convenient methods to diagnose the early discharge faults of transformers. When the fault involves the solid insulation, oil-paper insulation cracks and releases carbon monoxide (CO) gas. Therefore, the detection of CO can forecast the potential inner faults of oil-filled transformers.

  12. Catalyst functionalized buffer sorbent pebbles for rapid separation of carbon dioxide from gas mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aines, Roger D.

    2013-03-12

    A method for separating CO.sub.2 from gas mixtures uses a slurried media impregnated with buffer compounds and coating the solid media with a catalyst or enzyme that promotes the transformation of CO.sub.2 to carbonic acid. Buffer sorbent pebbles with a catalyst or enzyme coating are provided for rapid separation of CO.sub.2 from gas mixtures.

  13. Catalyst functionalized buffer sorbent pebbles for rapid separation of carbon dioxide from gas mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aines, Roger D

    2015-03-31

    A method for separating CO.sub.2 from gas mixtures uses a slurried media impregnated with buffer compounds and coating the solid media with a catalyst or enzyme that promotes the transformation of CO.sub.2 to carbonic acid. Buffer sorbent pebbles with a catalyst or enzyme coating are provided for rapid separation of CO.sub.2 from gas mixtures.

  14. The influence of adsorption capacity on enhanced gas absorption in activated carbon slurries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holstvoogd, R.D.; Swaaij, van W.P.M.

    1990-01-01

    The enhanced absorption of gases in aqueous activated carbbon slurries of fine particles is studied with a non-steady-state absorption model, taking into account the finite adsorption capacity of the carbon particles. It has been found that, for the different gas/activated carbon slurry systems stud

  15. Natural Gas, Wind and Nuclear Options for Generating Electricity in a Carbon Constrained World

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooten, van G.C.

    2012-01-01

    A linear programming model is used to examine the impact of carbon taxes on the optimal generation mix in the Alberta electrical system. The model permits decommissioning of generating assets with high carbon dioxide emissions and investment in new gas-fired, wind and, in some scenarios, nuclear

  16. Natural Gas, Wind and Nuclear Options for Generating Electricity in a Carbon Constrained World

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooten, van G.C.

    2012-01-01

    A linear programming model is used to examine the impact of carbon taxes on the optimal generation mix in the Alberta electrical system. The model permits decommissioning of generating assets with high carbon dioxide emissions and investment in new gas-fired, wind and, in some scenarios, nuclear cap

  17. Preparation of carbon nanoparticles by plasma arc discharge under fluidized dynamic equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, F.; Sun, D. L.; Hong, R. Y.; Kumar, M. R.

    2016-06-01

    Continuous preparation of carbon nanoparticles by dielectric barrier discharge (DBD)-induced non-thermal plasma arc discharge with large spacing in a modified fluidized bed is presented. Discharge arc is generated via the inducement of DBD which provides conductive media in order to realize a large spacing arc discharge. Three kinds of flow conditions defined as full circulation, fluidized dynamic equilibrium, and full collection are determined by the relationship of critical fluidized velocity and the real gas velocity after some modification of the fluidized bed. Movement model of carbon nanoparticles has been proposed to illustrate the flow conditions. A visualized and comprehensive refinement of aggregating processes has been exhibited and proved by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Simplified equivalent electrical conductive model of the arc discharge system is successful to generally and perspicuously figure out the discharge process which is impeded by the generated carbon nanoparticles. Effects of flow conditions and flow ratio of carrier gas/carbon source on morphology and yield of nanoparticles have been analyzed by morphology observation and yield calculation along with modeling the process.

  18. Set-Up and Validation of a Dynamic Solid/Gas Bioreactor

    KAUST Repository

    Lloyd-Randol, Jennifer D.

    2012-05-01

    The limited availability of fossil resourses mandates the development of new energy vectors, which is one of the Grand Challenges of the 21st Century [1]. Biocatalytic energy conversion is a promising solution to meet the increased energy demand of industrialized societies. Applications of biocatalysis in the gas-phase are so far limited to production of fine chemicals and pharmaceuticals. However, this technology has the potential for large scale biocatalytic applications [2], e.g. for the formation of novel energy carriers. The so-called solid/gas biocatalysis is defined as the application of a biocatalyst immobilized on solid-phase support acting on gaseous substrates [3]. This process combines the advantages of bio-catalysis (green chemistry, mild reaction conditions, high specicity & selectivity) and heterogeneous dynamic gas-phase processes (low diffusion limitation, high conversion, simple scale-up). This work presents the modifications of a PID Microactivity Reference reactor in order to make it suitable for solid/gas biocatalysis. The reactor design requirements are based on previously published laboratory scale solid/gas systems with a feed of saturated vapors [4]. These vapors are produced in saturation flasks, which were designed and optimized during this project. Other modifications included relocation of the gas mixing chamber, redesigning the location and heating mechanism for the reactor tube, and heating of the outlet gas line. The modified reactor system was verified based on the Candida antarctica lipase B catalyzed transesterication of ethyl acetate with 1-hexanol to hexyl acetate and ethanol and results were compared to liquid-phase model reactions. Products were analyzed on line by a gas chromatograph with a flame ionization detector. C. antarc- tica physisorbed on silica particles produced a 50% conversion of hexanol at 40 C in the gas-phase. A commercial immobilized lipase from Iris Biotech produced 99% and 97% conversions of hexanol in

  19. Carbon dioxide and methane emission dynamics in central London (UK)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfter, Carole; Nemitz, Eiko; Barlow, Janet F.; Wood, Curtis R.

    2013-04-01

    London, with a population of 8.2 million, is the largest city in Europe. It is heavily built-up (typically 8% vegetation cover within the central boroughs) and boasts some of the busiest arteries in Europe despite efforts to reduce traffic in the city centre with the introduction of a congestion charging scheme in 2007. We report on two substantial pollution monitoring efforts in the heart of London between October 2006 and present. Fluxes of carbon dioxide (CO2) and water (H2O) were measured continuously by eddy-covariance in central London from October 2006 until May 2008 from a 190 m telecommunication tower (BT tower; 51° 31' 17.4'' N 0° 8' 20.04'' W). The eddy-covariance system consisted of a Gill R3-50 ultrasonic anemometer operated at 20 Hz and a LI-COR 6262 infrared gas analyser. Air was sampled 0.3 m below the sensor head of the ultrasonic anemometer - which was itself mounted on a 3 m mast to the top of a 15 m lattice tower situated on the roof of the tower (instrument head at 190 m above street level) - and pulled down 45 m of 12.7 mm OD Teflon tubing. In addition, meteorological variables (temperature, relative humidity, pressure, precipitation, wind speed and direction) were also measured with a multi-sensor (Weather Transmitter WXT510, Vaisala). Eddy-covariance measurements at the BT tower location were reinstated in July 2011 and include methane (CH4), CO2 and H2O concentrations measured by a Picarro fast methane analyser (G2301-f). CO2 emissions were found to be mainly controlled by fossil fuel combustion (e.g. traffic, commercial and domestic heating). Diurnal averages of CO2 fluxes were found to be highly correlated to traffic. However changes in heating-related natural gas consumption and, to a lesser extent, photosynthetic activity in two large city centre green spaces (Hyde Park and Regent's Park) explained the seasonal variability. Annual estimates of net exchange of CO2 obtained by eddy-covariance agreed well with up-scaled data from the UK

  20. Characterisation of porous carbon electrode materials used in proton exchange membrane fuel cells via gas adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt-Smith, M. J.; Rigby, S. P.; Ralph, T. R.; Walsh, F. C.

    Porous carbon materials are typically used in both the substrate (typically carbon paper) and the electrocatalyst supports (often platinised carbon) within proton exchange membrane fuel cells. Gravimetric nitrogen adsorption has been studied at a carbon paper substrate, two different Pt-loaded carbon paper electrodes and three particulate carbon blacks. N 2 BET surface areas and surface fractal dimensions were determined using the fractal BET and Frenkel-Halsey-Hill models for all but one of the materials studied. The fractal dimensions of the carbon blacks obtained from gas adsorption were compared with those obtained independently by small angle X-ray scattering and showed good agreement. Density functional theory was used to characterise one of the carbon blacks, as the standard BET model was not applicable.

  1. Carbon and hydrogen isotopic composition and generation pathway of biogenic gas in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Ping; WANG Xiaofeng; XU Yin; SHI Baoguang; XU Yongchang

    2009-01-01

    The carbon and hydrogen isotopic composition of biogenic gas is of great importance for the study of its generation pathway and reservoiring characteristics. In this paper, the formation pathways and reservoiring characteristics of biogenic gas reservoirs in China are described in terms of the carbon and hydrogen isotopic compositions of 31 gas samples from 10 biogenic gas reservoirs. The study shows that the hydrogen isotopic compositions of these biogenic gas reservoirs can be divided into three intervals:δDCH4>-200‰,-250‰<δDCH4<-200‰ and δDCH4<-250‰. The forerunners believed that the main generation pathway of biogenic gas under the condition of continental fresh water is acetic fermentation. Our research results showed that the generation pathway of biogenic gas under the condition of marine facies is typical CO2- reduction, the biogenic gas has heavy hydrogen isotopic composition: its δDCH4 values are higher than -200‰; that the biogenic gas under the condition of continental facies also was generated by the same way, but its hydrogen isotopic composition is lighter than that of biogenetic gas generated under typical marine facies condition: -250‰<δDCH4<-200‰, the δDCH4 values may be related to the salinity of the water medium in ancient lakes. From the relevant data of the Qaidam Basin, it can be seen that the hydrogen isotopic composition of biogenic methane has the same variation trend with increasing salinity of water medium. There are biogenic gas reservoirs formed in transitional regions under the condition of continental facies. These gas reservoirs resulted from both CO2- reduction and acetic fermentation, the formation of which may be related to the non-variant salinity of ancient water medium and the relatively high geothermal gradient, as is the case encountered in the Baoshan Basin. The biogenic gas generating in these regions has light hydrogen isotopic composition: δDCH4<-250‰, and relatively heavy carbon isotopic

  2. Analysis of carbon dioxide emission of gas fuelled cogeneration plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordin, Adzuieen; Amin, M.; Majid, A.

    2013-12-01

    Gas turbines are widely used for power generation. In cogeneration system, the gas turbine generates electricity and the exhaust heat from the gas turbine is used to generate steam or chilled water. Besides enhancing the efficiency of the system, the process assists in reducing the emission of CO2 to the environment. This study analyzes the amount of CO2 emission by Universiti Teknologi Petronas gas fuelled cogeneration system using energy balance equations. The results indicate that the cogeneration system reduces the CO2 emission to the environment by 60%. This finding could encourage the power plant owners to install heat recovery systems to their respective plants.

  3. CAPTURING EXHAUST CO2 GAS USING MOLTEN CARBONATE FUEL CELLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prateek Dhawan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Carbon dioxide is considered as one of the major contenders when the question of greenhouse effect arises. So for any industry or power plant it is of utmost importance to follow certain increasingly stringent environment protection rules and laws. So it is significant to keep eye on any possible methods to reduce carbon dioxide emissions in an efficient way. This paper reviews the available literature so as to try to provide an insight of the possibility of using Molten Carbonate Fuel Cells (MCFCs as the carbon capturing and segregating devices and the various factors that affect the performance of MCFCs during the process of CO2 capture.

  4. Microbial Diversity Indexes Can Explain Soil Carbon Dynamics as a Function of Carbon Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maron, Pierre-Alain; Menasseri-Aubry, Safya; Sarr, Amadou; Lévêque, Jean; Mathieu, Olivier; Jolivet, Claudy; Leterme, Philippe; Viaud, Valérie

    2016-01-01

    Mathematical models do not explicitly represent the influence of soil microbial diversity on soil organic carbon (SOC) dynamics despite recent evidence of relationships between them. The objective of the present study was to statistically investigate relationships between bacterial and fungal diversity indexes (richness, evenness, Shannon index, inverse Simpson index) and decomposition of different pools of soil organic carbon by measuring dynamics of CO2 emissions under controlled conditions. To this end, 20 soils from two different land uses (cropland and grassland) were incubated with or without incorporation of 13C-labelled wheat-straw residue. 13C-labelling allowed us to study residue mineralisation, basal respiration and the priming effect independently. An innovative data-mining approach was applied, based on generalized additive models and a predictive criterion. Results showed that microbial diversity indexes can be good covariates to integrate in SOC dynamics models, depending on the C source and the processes considered (native soil organic carbon vs. fresh wheat residue). Specifically, microbial diversity indexes were good candidates to help explain mineralisation of native soil organic carbon, while priming effect processes seemed to be explained much more by microbial composition, and no microbial diversity indexes were found associated with residue mineralisation. Investigation of relationships between diversity and mineralisation showed that higher diversity, as measured by the microbial diversity indexes, seemed to be related to decreased CO2 emissions in the control soil. We suggest that this relationship can be explained by an increase in carbon yield assimilation as microbial diversity increases. Thus, the parameter for carbon yield assimilation in mathematical models could be calculated as a function of microbial diversity indexes. Nonetheless, given limitations of the methods used, these observations should be considered with caution and

  5. Effect of Gas Phase Transport in Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell (I)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, C.G.; Lim, H.C. [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1999-07-01

    The mass transfer effect in gas phase of molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) has not been profoundly studied. We have tried to investigate it with disturbance of reactant gas flow. An inert gas was added into anode and cathode reactant gas streams, and the resulting voltage shifts were analyzed. The disturbance of reactant gas was carried out at different reactant and inert gas flow rates, and current density. The results express that the anode performance is profoundly influenced by mass transfer in gas phase while the cathode is not. Moreover, the quantitative analysis of mass transfer effect in gas phase was available by means of the inert gas disturbance. The method led to the separate analyses of mass transfer effect in cell. The effects of mass transfer in gas channel and porous electrode regions were measured by changing gas channel depth and electrode thickness. It was found that mass transfer resistance in anode takes place mainly in porous electrode. Meanwhile the voltage shifts in cathode represented both gas and liquid phase mass transfer effect separately. It was also found that the mass transfer resistance in gas phase is insignificant in cathode compared with that in anode. The voltage shift values, which mean mass transfer resistance in liquid phase, depended on oxidant gas composition. It implies that the cathode reaction in MCFC would be an O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} mixed diffusion control process. (author). 11 refs., 5 figs.

  6. Dynamic topography and the Cenozoic carbonate compensation depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, S. M.; Moucha, R.; Raymo, M. E.; Derry, L. A.

    2015-12-01

    The carbonate compensation depth (CCD), the ocean depth at which the calcium carbonate accumulation rate goes to zero, can provide valuable insight into climatic and weathering conditions over the Cenozoic. The paleoposition of the CCD can be inferred from sediment core data. As the carbonate accumulation rate decreases linearly with depth between the lysocline and CCD, the CCD can be calculated using a linear regression on multiple sediment cores with known carbonate accumulation rates and paleodepths. It is therefore vital to have well-constrained estimates of paleodepths. Paleodepths are typically calculated using models of thermal subsidence and sediment loading and compaction. However, viscous convection-related stresses in the mantle can warp the ocean floor by hundreds of meters over broad regions and can also vary significantly over millions of years. This contribution to paleobathymetry, termed dynamic topography, can be calculated by modeling mantle flow backwards in time. Herein, we demonstrate the effect dynamic topography has on the inference of the late Cenozoic CCD with an example from the equatorial Pacific, considering sites from IODP Expeditions 320/321. The equatorial Pacific, given its large size and high productivity, is closely tied to the global carbon cycle. Accordingly, long-term changes in the equatorial Pacific CCD can be considered to reflect global changes in weathering fluxes and the carbon cycle, in addition to more regional changes in productivity and thermohaline circulation. We find that, when the dynamic topography contribution to bathymetry is accounted for, the equatorial Pacific CCD is calculated to be appreciably shallower at 30 Ma than previous estimates would suggest, implying a greater deepening of the Pacific CCD over the late Cenozoic.

  7. Multi-objective optimisation in carbon monoxide gas management at TRONOX KXN Sands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stadler, Johan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Carbon monoxide (CO is a by-product of the ilmenite smelting process from which titania slag and pig iron are produced. Prior to this project, the CO at Tronox KZN Sands in South Africa was burnt to get rid of it, producing carbon dioxide (CO2. At this plant, unprocessed materials are pre-heated using methane gas from an external supplier. The price of methane gas has increased significantly; and so this research considers the possibility of recycling CO gas and using it as an energy source to reduce methane gas demand. It is not possible to eliminate the methane gas consumption completely due to the energy demand fluctuation, and sub-plants have been assigned either CO gas or methane gas over time. Switching the gas supply between CO and methane gas involves production downtime to purge supply lines. Minimising the loss of production time while maximising the use of CO arose as a multi-objective optimisation problem (MOP with seven decision variables, and computer simulation was used to evaluate scenarios. We applied computer simulation and the multi-objective optimisation cross-entropy method (MOO CEM to find good solutions while evaluating the minimum number of scenarios. The proposals in this paper, which are in the process of being implemented, could save the company operational expenditure while reducing the carbon footprint of the smelter.

  8. Effects of carbon substrate lability on carbon mineralization dynamics of tropical peat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauhiainen, Jyrki; Silvennoinen, Hanna; Könönen, Mari; Limin, Suwido; Vasander, Harri

    2016-04-01

    Extensive draining at tropical ombrotrophic peatlands in Southeast Asia has made them global 'hot spots' for greenhouse gas emissions. Management practises and fires have led to changed substrate status, which affects microbial processes. Here, we present the first data on how management practises affect carbon (C) mineralization processes at these soils. We compared the carbon mineralization potentials of pristine forest soils to those of drained fire affected soils at various depths, with and without additional labile substrates (glucose, glutamate and NO3-N) and in oxic and anoxic conditions by dedicated ex situ experiments. Carbon mineralization (CO2 and CH4 production) rates were higher in the pristine site peat, which contains more labile carbon due to higher input via vegetation. Production rates decreased with depth together with decreasing availability of labile carbon. Consequently, the increase in production rates after labile substrate addition was relatively modest from pristine site as compared to the managed site and from the top layers as compared to deeper layers. Methanogenesis had little importance in total carbon mineralization. Adding labile C and N enhanced heterotrophic CO2 production more than the sole addition of N. Surprisingly, oxygen availability was not an ultimate requirement for substantial CO2 production rates, but anoxic respiration yielded comparable rates, especially at the pristine soils. Flooding of these sites will therefore reduce, but not completely cease, peat carbon loss. Reintroduced substantial vegetation and fertilization in degraded peatlands can enrich recalcitrant peat with simple C and N compounds and thus increase microbiological activity.

  9. Gas and pressure effects on the synthesis of amorphous carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Tingkai; LIU Yongning; ZHU Jiewu

    2004-01-01

    The effects of gas, pressure and temperature on the production of amorphous carbon nanotubes were investigated using an arc discharging furnace at controlled temperature. Co/Ni alloy powder was used as catalyst.The discharge current was 80 A and voltage was 32 V. The optimal parameters were obtained: 600℃ temperature, hydrogen gas and 500 torr pressure. The productivity and purity of amorphous carbon nanotubes are 6.5 gram per hour and 80%, respectively. The diameter of the amorphous carbon nanotubes is about 7-20 nm.

  10. Structure and Dynamics of Water at Carbon-Based Interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi Martí

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Water structure and dynamics are affected by the presence of a nearby interface. Here, first we review recent results by molecular dynamics simulations about the effect of different carbon-based materials, including armchair carbon nanotubes and a variety of graphene sheets—flat and with corrugation—on water structure and dynamics. We discuss the calculations of binding energies, hydrogen bond distributions, water’s diffusion coefficients and their relation with surface’s geometries at different thermodynamical conditions. Next, we present new results of the crystallization and dynamics of water in a rigid graphene sieve. In particular, we show that the diffusion of water confined between parallel walls depends on the plate distance in a non-monotonic way and is related to the water structuring, crystallization, re-melting and evaporation for decreasing inter-plate distance. Our results could be relevant in those applications where water is in contact with nanostructured carbon materials at ambient or cryogenic temperatures, as in man-made superhydrophobic materials or filtration membranes, or in techniques that take advantage of hydrated graphene interfaces, as in aqueous electron cryomicroscopy for the analysis of proteins adsorbed on graphene.

  11. Molecular dynamics analysis on impact behavior of carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seifoori, Sajjad, E-mail: sajjad.seifoori@vru.ac.ir

    2015-01-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We present an analytical solution of impact based on two degree of freedom model. • The accuracy is verified by Molecular dynamics simulations. • The effects of the small-size effects on the dynamic deflections are investigated. • The relative motion is also accounted that is due to local indentation. - Abstract: Dynamic analysis of impact of a nanoparticle on carbon nanotubes is investigated based on two degree of freedom model. The accuracy and stability of the present methods are verified by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The effect of different types of boundary condition on the maximum dynamic deflections is studied for zigzag and armchair SWCNTs with various aspect ratios (length/diameter). Besides, the influences of velocity of impactor on the dynamic deflections are studied. It is shown that the dynamic behavior on the armchair and zigzag single-walled carbon nanotubes are almost similar. Finally, by making use of the above MD simulation and theoretical results some insight has been obtained about the dynamic characteristics of the impact problems of nanobeam structures. Nonlocal Timoshenko beam models TBT2 should be employed for an accurate prediction of the dynamic deflection rather than nonlocal Euler–Bernoulli beam models EBT2 which ignores the effects of transverse shear deformation and rotary inertia that is especially significant for short beams. The results from nonlocal EBT2 and TBT2 models demonstrated good agreement with MD simulation. The EBT2 and TBT2 models also account for the relative motion between the nanoparticle and the nanobeam that is due to local indentation as can be seen in MD simulation.

  12. Investigation of Integrated Subsurface Processing of Landfill Gas and Carbon Sequestration, Johnson County, Kansas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. David Newell; Timothy R. Carr

    2007-03-31

    The Johnson County Landfill in Shawnee, KS is operated by Deffenbaugh Industries and serves much of metropolitan Kansas City. Refuse, which is dumped in large plastic-underlined trash cells covering several acres, is covered over with shale shortly after burial. The landfill waste, once it fills the cell, is then drilled by Kansas City LFG, so that the gas generated by anaerobic decomposition of the refuse can be harvested. Production of raw landfill gas from the Johnson County landfill comes from 150 wells. Daily production is approximately 2.2 to 2.5 mmcf, of which approximately 50% is methane and 50% is carbon dioxide and NMVOCs (non-methane volatile organic compounds). Heating value is approximately 550 BTU/scf. A upgrading plant, utilizing an amine process, rejects the carbon dioxide and NMVOCs, and upgrades the gas to pipeline quality (i.e., nominally a heating value >950 BTU/scf). The gas is sold to a pipeline adjacent to the landfill. With coal-bearing strata underlying the landfill, and carbon dioxide a major effluent gas derived from the upgrading process, the Johnson County Landfill is potentially an ideal setting to study the feasibility of injecting the effluent gas in the coals for both enhanced coalbed methane recovery and carbon sequestration. To these ends, coals below the landfill were cored and then were analyzed for their thickness and sorbed gas content, which ranged up to 79 scf/ton. Assuming 1 1/2 square miles of land (960 acres) at the Johnson County Landfill can be utilized for coalbed and shale gas recovery, the total amount of in-place gas calculates to 946,200 mcf, or 946.2 mmcf, or 0.95 bcf (i.e., 985.6 mcf/acre X 960 acres). Assuming that carbon dioxide can be imbibed by the coals and shales on a 2:1 ratio compared to the gas that was originally present, then 1682 to 1720 days (4.6 to 4.7 years) of landfill carbon dioxide production can be sequestered by the coals and shales immediately under the landfill. Three coal--the Bevier

  13. Carbon Nanotubes as Active Components for Gas Sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Wei-De Zhang; Wen-Hui Zhang

    2009-01-01

    The unique structure of carbon nanotubes endows them with fantastic physical and chemical characteristics. Carbon nanotubes have been widely studied due to their potential applications in many fields including conductive and high-strength composites, energy storage and energy conversion devices, sensors, field emission displays and radiation...

  14. Insights into soil carbon dynamics across climatic gradients from carbon-pool specific radiocarbon analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Voort, Tessa Sophia; Hagedorn, Frank; McIntyre, Cameron; Zell, Claudia; Eglinton, Timothy Ian

    2017-04-01

    Soil carbon constitutes the largest terrestrial reservoir of organic carbon, and therefore understanding the mechanisms and drivers of carbon stabilization is crucial, especially in the framework of climate change. The understanding of the dependence of soil organic turnover in specific carbon pools as related to e.g. climate, soil texture and mineralogy is limited. In this framework, radiocarbon constitutes a uniquely powerful tool that help to unravel carbon dynamics from decadal to millennial timescales. This project combines bulk and pool-specific radiocarbon analyses in the top and deep soil on a wide range of forested soils that span a large climatic gradient (MAT 1.3-9.2°C, MAP 600 to 2100 mm m-2y-1). These well-studies sites are part of the Long-Term Forest Ecosystem Research (LWF) program of the Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape research (WSL). This study aims to combine the insights gained from bulk and pool-specific turnover to environmental conditions and molecular composition of soil carbon. The pools investigated span the mineral-associated (occluded and heavy fractions from density fractionation) and potentially water-soluble (free light fractions from density fractionation and water extractable organic carbon) organic carbon fractions. Pool-specific radiocarbon work is augmented by the measurement of abundance of compounds such as alkanes, fatty acids and lignin phenols on a subset of samples. Initial results show disparate patterns depending on soil type and in particular soil texture, which could be indicative of various stabilization mechanisms in different soils. Overall, this study provides new insights into the controls of soil organic matter dynamics as related to environmental conditions, in particular in specific sub-pools of carbon.

  15. The Evaluation System Design of GIS-Based Oil and Gas Resources Carbon Emission Database Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wenju; Bi, Jiantao; Wang, Xingxing; Zhu, Zuojia; Pang, Wenqi

    2014-03-01

    Due to the importance of research on carbon budgets in natural processes, it is critical to be able to effectively manage and process all types of data in order to get measure carbon emissions. For this purpose, data produced in oil and gas exploration and natural processes are the focus of this research. Various tools are used including Oracle11g for data storage, Arc Engine combined with Microsoft Visual C# among others including C++ and the Database Storage Management Platform with GIS software functions. The IPCC algorithms are the most important reference, combine this with actual events, a new calculation model about oil and gas resources carbon emission was constructed. This model will analyze and predict the amount of carbon emissions in the oil and gas production in the future. Putting the new calculation model into the Database Storage Management Platform, an Intelligent Prediction Database Platform contained the new calculation model was established.

  16. Electron and phonon properties and gas storage in carbon honeycomb

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Yan; Zhong, Chengyong; Zhang, Zhongwei; Xie, Yuee; Zhang, Shengbai

    2016-01-01

    A new kind of three-dimensional carbon allotropes, termed carbon honeycomb (CHC), has recently been synthesized [PRL 116, 055501 (2016)]. Based on the experimental results, a family of graphene networks are constructed, and their electronic and phonon properties are calculated by using first principles methods. All networks are porous metal with two types of electron transport channels along the honeycomb axis and they are isolated from each other: one type of channels is originated from the orbital interactions of the carbon zigzag chains and is topologically protected, while the other type of channels is from the straight lines of the carbon atoms that link the zigzag chains and is topologically trivial. The velocity of the electrons can reach ~106 m/s. Phonon transport in these allotropes is strongly anisotropic, and the thermal conductivities can be very low when compared with graphite by at least a factor of 15. Our calculations further indicate that these porous carbon networks possess high storage capa...

  17. Carbon dioxide stripping in aquaculture -- part II: development of gas transfer models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colt, John; Watten, Barnaby; Pfeiffer, Tim

    2012-01-01

    The basic mass transfer equation for gases such as oxygen and carbon dioxide can be derived from integration of the driving force equation. Because of the physical characteristics of the gas transfer processes, slightly different models are used for aerators tested under the non steady-state procedures, than for packed columns, or weirs. It is suggested that the standard condition for carbon dioxide should be 20 °C, 1 atm, CCO2=20 mg/kg, and XCO2=0.000285. The selection of the standard condition for carbon dioxide based on a fixed mole fraction ensures that standardized carbon dioxide transfer rates will be comparable even though the value of C*CO2 in the atmosphere is increasing with time. The computation of mass transfer for carbon dioxide is complicated by the impact of water depth and gas phase enrichment on the saturation concentration within the unit, although the importance of either factor depends strongly on the specific type of aerator. For some types of aerators, the most accurate gas phase model remains to be determined for carbon dioxide. The assumption that carbon dioxide can be treated as a non-reactive gas in packed columns may apply for cold acidic waters but not for warm alkaline waters.

  18. Northern peatland carbon stocks and dynamics: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. C. Yu

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Peatlands contain a large belowground carbon (C stock in the biosphere, and their dynamics have important implications for the global carbon cycle. However, there are still large uncertainties in C stock estimates and poor understanding of C dynamics across timescales. Here I review different approaches and associated uncertainties of C stock estimates in the literature, and on the basis of the literature review my best estimate of C stocks and uncertainty is 500 ± 100 (approximate range gigatons of C (Gt C in northern peatlands. The greatest source of uncertainty for all the approaches is the lack or insufficient representation of data, including depth, bulk density and carbon accumulation data, especially from the world's large peatlands. Several ways to improve estimates of peat carbon stocks are also discussed in this paper, including the estimates of C stocks by regions and further utilizations of widely available basal peat ages.

    Changes in peatland carbon stocks over time, estimated using Sphagnum (peat moss spore data and down-core peat accumulation records, show different patterns during the Holocene, and I argue that spore-based approach underestimates the abundance of peatlands in their early histories. Considering long-term peat decomposition using peat accumulation data allows estimates of net carbon sequestration rates by peatlands, or net (ecosystem carbon balance (NECB, which indicates more than half of peat carbon (> 270 Gt C was sequestrated before 7000 yr ago during the Holocene. Contemporary carbon flux studies at 5 peatland sites show much larger NECB during the last decade (32 ± 7.8 (S.E. g C m−2 yr–1 than during the last 7000 yr (∼ 11 g C m−2 yr–1, as modeled from peat records across northern peatlands. This discrepancy highlights the urgent need for carbon accumulation data and process understanding, especially at decadal and centennial timescales

  19. Carbon gas production under different electron acceptors in a freshwater marsh soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodla, Syam K; Wang, Jim J; Delaune, Ronald D; Breitenbeck, Gary

    2009-07-01

    Dynamics of carbon (C) gas emission from wetlands influence global C cycling. In many freshwater systems such as Louisiana freshwater marsh, soil contents of NO3(-) and SO4(2-) have increased due to nutrient loading and saltwater intrusion. This could affect C mineralization and the emission of the major greenhouse gases carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4). In this investigation, a laboratory microcosm study was carried out to elucidate the effects of NO(3)(-) and SO4(2-) on CO2 and CH4 production from a freshwater marsh soil located in the Barataria Basin of Louisiana coast, which has been subjected to the Mississippi River diversion and seawater intrusion. Composite soil samples were collected from top 50 cm marsh profile, treated with different levels of NO3(-) (0, 3.2 and 5mM) or SO4(2-) (0, 2, and 5mM) concentrations, and incubated for 214d under anaerobic conditions. The results showed that the presence of NO3(-) (especially at 3.2mM) significantly decreased CO2 productions whereas SO4(2-) did not. On the other hand, both NO(3)(-) and SO4(2-) treatments decreased CH4 production but the NO3(-) almost completely inhibited CH4 production (>99%) whereas the SO4(2-) treatments reduced CH4 production by 78-90%. The overall C mineralization rate constant under the NO3(-) presence was also low. In addition, the results revealed that a large proportion (95%) of anaerobic carbon mineralization in the untreated freshwater soil was unexplained by the reduction of any of the measured major electron acceptors.

  20. Carbon dynamics in highly heterotrophic subarctic thaw ponds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Roiha

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Global warming has accelerated the formation of permafrost thaw ponds in several subarctic and arctic regions. These ponds are net heterotrophic as evidenced by their greenhouse gas (GHG supersaturation levels (CO2 and CH4, and generally receive large terrestrial carbon inputs from the thawing and eroding permafrost. We measured seasonal and vertical variations in the concentration and type of dissolved organic matter (DOM in five subarctic thaw (thermokarst ponds in northern Quebec, and explored how environmental gradients influenced heterotrophic and phototrophic biomass and productivity. Late winter DOM had low aromaticity indicating reduced inputs of terrestrial carbon, while the high concentration of dissolved organic carbon (DOC suggests that some production of non-chromophoric dissolved compounds by the microbial food web took place under the ice cover. Summer DOM had a strong terrestrial signature, but was also characterized with significant inputs of algal-derived carbon, especially at the pond surface. During late winter, bacterial production was low (maximum of 0.8 mg C m−3 d−1 and was largely based on free-living bacterioplankton (58 %. Bacterial production in summer was high (up to 58 mg C m−3 d−1, dominated by particle-attached bacteria (67 %, and strongly correlated to the amount of terrestrial carbon. Primary production was restricted to summer surface waters due to strong light limitation deeper in the water column or in winter. The phototrophic biomass was equal to the heterotrophic biomass, but as the algae were mostly composed of mixotrophic species, most probably they used bacteria rather than solar energy in such shaded ponds. According to the δ13C analyses, non-algal carbon supported 51 % of winter and 37 % of summer biomass of the phantom midge larvae, Chaoborus sp., that are at the top of the trophic chain. Our results point to a strong heterotrophic energy pathway in these thaw pond ecosystems, where

  1. Developing low-cost carbon-based sorbents for Hg capture from flue gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perry, R.; Lakatos, J.; Snape, C.E.; Sun, C. [University of Nottingham, Nottingham (United Kingdom). Nottingham Fuel and Energy Centre

    2005-07-01

    To help reduce the cost of Hg capture from flue gas a number of low-cost carbons are being investigated, including activated tyre char and PFA carbon, in conjunction with some of the pre-treatments that have been found to be effective for commercial actived carbons. Experimental conditions for screening the sorbents have been selected to determine breakthrough capacities rapidly. The unactivated carbons have low breakthrough capacities under the test conditions employed (around 0.1 mg g{sup -1}) but these improve upon steam activation (around 0.25 mg g{sup -1}) but are still lower than those of non-impregnated commercial activated carbons (around 0.4-0.7 mg g{sup -1}), due to their lower surface areas. Comparable improvements to the commercial carbons have been achieved for impregnation treatments, including sulfur and bromine. However, certain gasification chars do have much higher breakthrough capacities than commercial carbons used for flue gas injection. Manganese oxide impregnation with low concentration is particularly effective for the activated and unactivated carbons giving breakthrough capacities comparable to the commercial carbons. Pointers for further increasing breakthrough and equilibrium capacities for carbon-based sorbents are discussed. 7 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  2. Dynamic replacement and loss of soil carbon on eroding cropland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harden, J.W.; Sharpe, J.M.; Parton, W.J.; Ojima, D.S.; Fries, T.L.; Huntington, T.G.; Dabney, S.M.

    1999-01-01

    Links between erosion/sedimentation history and soil carbon cycling were examined in a highly erosive setting in Mississippi loess soils. We sampled soils on (relatively) undisturbed and cropped hillslopes and measured C, N, 14C, and CO2 flux to characterize carbon storage and dynamics and to parameterize Century and spreadsheet 14C models for different erosion and tillage histories. For this site, where 100 years of intensive cotton cropping were followed by fertilization and contour plowing, there was an initial and dramatic decline in soil carbon content from 1870 to 1950, followed by a dramatic increase in soil carbon. Soil erosion amplifies C loss and recovery: About 100% of the original, prehistoric soil carbon was likely lost over 127 years of intensive land use, but about 30% of that carbon was replaced after 1950. The eroded cropland was therefore a local sink for CO2 since the 1950s. However, a net CO2 sink requires a full accounting of eroded carbon, which in turn requires that decomposition rates in lower slopes or wetlands be reduced to about 20% of the upland value. As a result, erosion may induce unaccounted sinks or sources of CO2, depending on the fate of eroded carbon and its protection from decomposition. For erosion rates typical of the United States, the sink terms may be large enough (1 Gt yr-1, back-of-the-envelope) to warrant a careful accounting of site management, cropping, and fertilization histories, as well as burial rates, for a more meaningful global assessment.

  3. Application of Conductive Carbon Nanotube Fibers and Composites: Gas Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    doses of DMMP (29). They also improved the sensitivity of their sensor by applying a 100 nm coating of an acidic strong hydrogen-bonding...films of SWNT on substrates of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) (21). This work is highly relevant from a composite standpoint to ours. They filter out...ZrO2 Gas Resistance 0.5 ppm (30) 2003 Novak DMMP, Hexanes, Xylenes , H2O SWNT -- Gas Resistance -- (29) 2008 Wang DMMP, VOC SWNT HFIP-PT, P3HT Gas

  4. Current-induced dynamics in carbon atomic contacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Jing Tao; Gunst, Tue; Brandbyge, Mads

    2011-01-01

    voltage, which can be used to explore current-induced vibrational instabilities due the NC/BP forces. Furthermore, using tight-binding and the Brenner potential we illustrate how Langevin-type molecular-dynamics calculations including the Joule heating effect for the carbon-chain systems can be performed...... of molecular-scale contacts. Systems based on molecules bridging electrically gated graphene electrodes may offer an interesting test-bed for these effects. Results: We employ a semi-classical Langevin approach in combination with DFT calculations to study the current-induced vibrational dynamics of an atomic...... carbon chain connecting electrically gated graphene electrodes. This illustrates how the device stability can be predicted solely from the modes obtained from the Langevin equation, including the current-induced forces. We point out that the gate offers control of the current, independent of the bias...

  5. Continuous determination of bath carbon content on 150 t BOF by off-gas analyzer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhigang Hu; Ping He; Mingxiang Tan; Liu Liu

    2003-01-01

    The first imported off-gas analysis system on 150 t BOF at Benxi Plates Co. Ltd. is presented and the continuous determination of bath carbon content has been studied. The comparison between the whole-course carbon integral model and the end-point carbon prediction model has been made. The results show that the regular change of CO, CO2 and N2 content in the off-gas during blowing plays an important role in judging the smelting end-point of converter; the cubic curve fitting model has a higher hit rate over 95% for the heats whose end-point carbon content is lower than 0.10% with a precision of ±0.02% and has a large error for the heats whose end-point carbon content is more than 0.15%.

  6. Selective Recovery of Radioactive Carbon Dioxide Released from Nuclear Off-gas by Adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munakata, Kenzo; Koga, Akinori

    Off gases produced in the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel contain various radioactive gases and emission of these gases to the environment must be suppressed as low as possible. 14C with a long half-life, which is mainly released as the form of carbon dioxide, is one of such gaseous radioactive materials. One of the measures to capture radioactive gases from the off-gas is the utilization of adsorption technique. In this work, the adsorption behavior of carbon dioxide on various adsorbents was studied. It was found that a MS4A (Molecular Sieve 4A) adsorbent is more suitable for selective recovery of carbon dioxide. Thus, more detailed adsorption characteristics of carbon dioxide were studied for a MS4A adsorbent. Moreover, the authors investigated the influence of coexistent water vapor, which is also contained in the off-gas, on the adsorption behavior of carbon dioxide.

  7. Ni supported on activated carbon as catalyst for flue gas desulfurization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    A series of Ni supported on activated carbon are prepared by excessive impregnation and the desulfurization activity is investigated. It has been shown that the activated carbon-supported Ni is an efficient solid catalyst for flue gas desulfurization. The activated carbon treated by HNO3 exhibits high desulfurization activity, and different amounts of loaded-Ni on activated carbon significantly influence the desulfurization activity. The catalysts are studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results of XRD and XPS indicate that the activated carbon treated by HNO3 can increase oxygen-containing functional groups. Ni on activated carbon after calcination at 800 °C shows major Ni phase and minor NiO phase, and with increasing Ni content on activated carbon, Ni phase increases and affects the desulfurization activity of the catalyst, which proves that Ni is the main active phase.

  8. A paradigm for modeling and computation of gas dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kun; Liu, Chang

    2017-02-01

    In the continuum flow regime, the Navier-Stokes (NS) equations are usually used for the description of gas dynamics. On the other hand, the Boltzmann equation is applied for the rarefied flow. These two equations are based on distinguishable modeling scales for flow physics. Fortunately, due to the scale separation, i.e., the hydrodynamic and kinetic ones, both the Navier-Stokes equations and the Boltzmann equation are applicable in their respective domains. However, in real science and engineering applications, they may not have such a distinctive scale separation. For example, around a hypersonic flying vehicle, the flow physics at different regions may correspond to different regimes, where the local Knudsen number can be changed significantly in several orders of magnitude. With a variation of flow physics, theoretically a continuous governing equation from the kinetic Boltzmann modeling to the hydrodynamic Navier-Stokes dynamics should be used for its efficient description. However, due to the difficulties of a direct modeling of flow physics in the scale between the kinetic and hydrodynamic ones, there is basically no reliable theory or valid governing equations to cover the whole transition regime, except resolving flow physics always down to the mean free path scale, such as the direct Boltzmann solver and the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method. In fact, it is an unresolved problem about the exact scale for the validity of the NS equations, especially in the small Reynolds number cases. The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is usually based on the numerical solution of partial differential equations (PDEs), and it targets on the recovering of the exact solution of the PDEs as mesh size and time step converging to zero. This methodology can be hardly applied to solve the multiple scale problem efficiently because there is no such a complete PDE for flow physics through a continuous variation of scales. For the non-equilibrium flow study, the direct

  9. Irradiation of carbon nanotubes with carbon projectiles: A molecular dynamics study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denton, Cristian D. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Universidad de Alicante, 03080 Alicante (Spain); Heredia-Avalos, Santiago; Moreno-Marin, Juan Carlos [Departamento de Fisica, Ingenieria de Sistemas y Teoria de la Senal, Universidad de Alicante, 03080 Alicante (Spain)

    2013-04-15

    The irradiation of carbon based nanostructures with ions and electrons has been shown to be an appropriate tool to tailor their properties. The defects induced in the nanostructures during irradiation are able to modify their mechanical and electronic properties. Here we simulate the irradiation of carbon nanotubes with carbon ions using a molecular dynamics code. We use the Tersoff potential joined smoothly to the Universal Ziegler-Biersack-Littmark potential at short distances. We study the number of defects produced after irradiation with a single carbon ion finding a saturation with its energy at {proportional_to} 3 keV. We observe, after continuum irradiation with low energy ions, the formation of bumps in the irradiated region. For larger energy ions we find that the diameter of the nanotube shrinks as shown in previous works. (copyright 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  10. Dynamic behavior of multirobot systems using lattice gas automata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stantz, Keith M.; Cameron, Stewart M.; Robinett, Rush D., III; Trahan, Michael W.; Wagner, John S.

    1999-07-01

    Recent attention has been given to the deployment of an adaptable sensor array realized by multi-robotic systems (or swarms). Our group has been studying the collective, autonomous behavior of these such systems and their applications in the area of remote-sensing and emerging threats. To accomplish such tasks, an interdisciplinary research effort at Sandia National Laboratories are conducting tests in the fields of sensor technology, robotics, and multi- agents architectures. Our goal is to coordinate a constellation of point sensors using unmanned robotic vehicles (e.g., RATLERs, Robotic All-Terrain Lunar Exploration Rover- class vehicles) that optimizes spatial coverage and multivariate signal analysis. An overall design methodology evolves complex collective behaviors realized through local interaction (kinetic) physics and artificial intelligence. Learning objectives incorporate real-time operational responses to environmental changes. This paper focuses on our recent work understanding the dynamics of many-body systems according to the physics-based hydrodynamic model of lattice gas automata. Three design features are investigated. One, for single-speed robots, a hexagonal nearest-neighbor interaction topology is necessary to preserve standard hydrodynamic flow. Two, adaptability, defined by the swarm's rate of deformation, can be controlled through the hydrodynamic viscosity term, which, in turn, is defined by the local robotic interaction rules. Three, due to the inherent nonlinearity of the dynamical equations describing large ensembles, stability criteria ensuring convergence to equilibrium states is developed by scaling information flow rates relative to a swarm's hydrodynamic flow rate. An initial test case simulates a swarm of twenty-five robots maneuvering past an obstacle while following a moving target. A genetic algorithm optimizes applied nearest-neighbor forces in each of five spatial regions distributed over the simulation domain. Armed with

  11. Nonlinear dynamics of soliton gas with application to "freak waves"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shurgalina, Ekaterina

    2017-04-01

    So-called "integrable soliton turbulence" attracts much attention of scientific community nowadays. We study features of soliton interactions in the following integrable systems: Korteweg - de Vries equation (KdV), modified Korteweg - de Vries equation (mKdV) and Gardner equations. The polarity of interacted solitons dramatically influences on the process of soliton interaction. Thus if solitons have the same polarity the maximum of the wave field decreases during the process of nonlinear interactions as well statistical moments (skewness and kurtosis). In this case there is no abnormally large wave formation and this scenario is possible for all considered equation. Completely different results can be obtained for a soliton gas consisted of solitons with different polarities: such interactions lead to an increase of resulting impulse and kurtosis. Tails of distribution functions can grow significantly. Abnormally large waves (freak waves) appear in such solitonic fields. Such situations are possible just in case of mKdV and Gardner equations which admit the existence of bipolar solitons. New effect of changing a defect's moving direction in soliton lattices and soliton gas is found in the present study. Manifestation of this effect is possible as the result of negative phase shift of small soliton in the moment of nonlinear interaction with large solitons. It is shown that the effect of negative velocity is the same for KdV and mKdV equations and it can be found from the kinematic assumption without applying the kinetic theory. Averaged dynamics of the "smallest" soliton (defect) in a soliton gas, consisting of solitons with random amplitudes is investigated. The averaged criterion of velocity sign change confirmed by numerical simulation is obtained.

  12. Numerical Simulation and Analysis of Migration Law of Gas Mixture Using Carbon Dioxide as Cushion Gas in Underground Gas Storage Reservoir

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ChuanKai Niu; YuFei Tan

    2014-01-01

    One of the major technical challenges in using carbon dioxide ( CO2 ) as part of the cushion gas of the underground gas storage reservoir ( UGSR) is the mixture of CO2 and natural gas. To decrease the mixing extent and manage the migration of the mixed zone, an understanding of the mechanism of CO2 and natural gas mixing and the diffusion of the mixed gas in aquifer is necessary. In this paper, a numerical model based on the three dimensional gas-water two-phase flow theory and gas diffusion theory is developed to understand this mechanism. This model is validated by the actual operational data in Dazhangtuo UGSR in Tianjin City, China. Using the validated model, the mixed characteristic of CO2 and natural gas and the migration mechanism of the mixed zone in an underground porous reservoir is further studied. Particularly, the impacts of the following factors on the migration mechanism are studied:the ratio of CO2 injection, the reservoir porosity and the initial operating pressure. Based on the results, the optimal CO2 injection ratio and an optimal control strategy to manage the migration of the mixed zone are obtained. These results provide technical guides for using CO2 as cushion gas for UGSR in real projects.

  13. Simulated impacts of insect defoliation on forest carbon dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medvigy, D.; Clark, K. L.; Skowronski, N. S.; Schäfer, K. V. R.

    2012-12-01

    Many temperate and boreal forests are subject to insect epidemics. In the eastern US, over 41 million meters squared of tree basal area are thought to be at risk of gypsy moth defoliation. However, the decadal-to-century scale implications of defoliation events for ecosystem carbon dynamics are not well understood. In this study, the effects of defoliation intensity, periodicity and spatial pattern on the carbon cycle are investigated in a set of idealized model simulations. A mechanistic terrestrial biosphere model, ecosystem demography model 2, is driven with observations from a xeric oak-pine forest located in the New Jersey Pine Barrens. Simulations indicate that net ecosystem productivity (equal to photosynthesis minus respiration) decreases linearly with increasing defoliation intensity. However, because of interactions between defoliation and drought effects, aboveground biomass exhibits a nonlinear decrease with increasing defoliation intensity. The ecosystem responds strongly with both reduced productivity and biomass loss when defoliation periodicity varies from 5 to 15 yr, but exhibits a relatively weak response when defoliation periodicity varies from 15 to 60 yr. Simulations of spatially heterogeneous defoliation resulted in markedly smaller carbon stocks than simulations with spatially homogeneous defoliation. These results show that gypsy moth defoliation has a large effect on oak-pine forest biomass dynamics, functioning and its capacity to act as a carbon sink.

  14. Models for grains and gas ejection dynamics from a silo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yixian; Aussillous, Pascale; Ruyer, Pierre; Iusti/Gep Team; Semia/Limar Team

    2015-11-01

    In the hypothetical conditions of a reactivity initiated accident in a nuclear power plant, some of the fuel rods could break. If fuel fragmentation occurs, hot fuel particles and pressurized gas could interact with the surrounding fluid. The violence of this interaction depends on the discharge rate toward the fluid. In the present work, we study the discharge dynamics and identify the parameters governing this flow. In this paper, we focus on the experimental study of the discharge of a silo composed of spherical glass beads, with an orifice either lateral or at the bottom, with or without air flow. The measured parameters are the mass flow rate and the pressure along the silo, whereas the controlled parameters are the size of particles, the size of orifices, and the flow rate of air. For the case without air flow we found that the flow rate of particles ejected from the bottom orifice is 3 times greater than from the lateral orifice. For the case of a lateral orifice, when the form of the orifice is rectangular with width W and height D, we identify two regimes which depend on the ratio of width to height W / D . For the case with air flow, we found that the flow rate increases with the air flow. A simple physical model is proposed to describe the grains and gas ejection.

  15. Multi-symplectic, Lagrangian, one-dimensional gas dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, G. M.

    2015-05-01

    The equations of Lagrangian, ideal, one-dimensional, compressible gas dynamics are written in a multi-symplectic form using the Lagrangian mass coordinate m and time t as independent variables, and in which the Eulerian position of the fluid element x = x(m, t) is one of the dependent variables. This approach differs from the Eulerian, multi-symplectic approach using Clebsch variables. Lagrangian constraints are used to specify equations for xm, xt, and St consistent with the Lagrangian map, where S is the entropy of the gas. We require St = 0 corresponding to advection of the entropy S with the flow. We show that the Lagrangian Hamiltonian equations are related to the de Donder-Weyl multi-momentum formulation. The pullback conservation laws and the symplecticity conservation laws are discussed. The pullback conservation laws correspond to invariance of the action with respect to translations in time (energy conservation) and translations in m in Noether's theorem. The conservation law due to m-translation invariance gives rise to a novel nonlocal conservation law involving the Clebsch variable r used to impose ∂S(m, t)/∂t = 0. Translation invariance with respect to x in Noether's theorem is associated with momentum conservation. We obtain the Cartan-Poincaré form for the system, and use it to obtain a closed ideal of two-forms representing the equation system.

  16. Dynamic-structure-factor measurements on a model Lorentz gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egelstaff, P. A.; Eder, O. J.; Glaser, W.; Polo, J.; Renker, B.; Soper, A. K.

    1990-02-01

    A model system for the Lorentz gas can be made [Eder, Chen, and Egelstaff, Proc. Phys. Soc. London 89, 833 (1966); McPherson and Egelstaff, Can. J. Phys. 58, 289 (1980)] by mixing small quantities of hydrogen with an argon host. For neutron-scattering experiments the large H-to-Ar cross section ratio (~200) makes the argon relatively invisible. Dynamic-structure-factor [S(Q,ω) for H2] measurements at room temperature have been made on this system using the IN4 spectrometer at the Institute Laue Langevin, Grenoble, France. Argon densities between 1.9 and 10.5 atoms/nm3 were used for 0.4gas host at densities of 4 and 10.5 atoms/nm3; helium is relatively invisible also compared to hydrogen. These experiments are described, and some examples of the results are presented to show the qualitative effects observed. The principle observation is a pronounced narrowing of S(Q,ω) as a function of ω as the argon density is increased. This effect is large at low Q and decreases with increasing Q, and also decreases substantially when helium is used in place of argon. In addition, the shape of S(Q,ω) is more complex than can be accommodated within a simple model, but slightly less complicated than a computer simulation so showing the significance of multiple-collision processes.

  17. Centrifugal separation of liquid carbon dioxide from natural gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batalović Veselin B.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural gas is becoming more and more a commodity in the global energy consumption. New technologies like the conversion from gas to liquid, contribute to this. But more than 16 % of the currently known global gas reserves cannot be produced due to severe CO2 and/or H2S contamination: (CO2 > 10% and H2S> 5%. The traditional technology of amine treatment is not able to economically remove these contaminants. The objective of this article is to investigate the possibilities of centrifugal separation to resolve the problem. After analyzing the existing situation, in the centrifugal separation of natural gas, some innovations in separators design and theory are suggested. The aim of the presented theoretical considerations is that the complex theory of separation to adapt to the needs of engineers engaged on the design, development and operation of these devices. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 33001

  18. Activated Carbon Prepared in a Novel Gas Fired Static Bed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael O. Mensah

    2015-12-02

    Dec 2, 2015 ... The reactor is fabricated using stainless steel plates of 4 mm ... is introduced into the reaction chamber. The ... reaction of carbon with the activating agent. A number ..... organic liquids, characterisation of the organic fraction of.

  19. Natural Gas Based Electricity Production and Low Carbon Technology Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concerns regarding air quality, global climate change, and the national energy security impacts of the intensive use of fossil fuels and their environmental impacts in the power generation sector have raised interest in alternative low carbon electricity generation technology and...

  20. Natural Gas Based Electricity Production and Low Carbon Technology Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concerns regarding air quality, global climate change, and the national energy security impacts of the intensive use of fossil fuels and their environmental impacts in the power generation sector have raised interest in alternative low carbon electricity generation technology and...

  1. Optimization of Carbon Nanotubes for Nitrogen Gas Adsorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fereydoun Ashrafi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nano-tubes are one of the most significant achievements of nano-technology with important applications in the design of electronic nano-devices. The study of their properties is therefore important. Here the density functional theory (DFT of electron and the Hartree-Fock (HF method are utilized to study the adsorption of nitrogen molecules on the surface of (4, 4 and (5, 0 carbon nano-tubes. The electronic structure, single point and dipole moment of both nitrogen and carbon nuclei are thoroughly studied. The computational results, which includes, indicate that rich adsorption patterns may result from the interaction of nitrogen with the carbon nano tubes sometimes C-N bounds are formed via breaking C-C bounds and sometimes a carbon atom in the nano-tube is replaced with a nitrogen atom. Sometimes nitrogen atoms are attracted to a C-C bound. In summary, the optimized adsorption rates are calculated. Gaussian 98 software has been used to carry out quantum chemistry calculations. Keywords: Density functional theory, Hartree-Fock, carbon nano tube, Gaussian 98 software. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs are one of the most significant achievements of nano-technology because of his important applications in the design of electronic nano-devices. The study of their properties is therefore important. In this investigation the Density Functional Theory (DFT of electron and the Hartree-Fock (HF method are utilized to study the adsorption of nitrogen molecules on the surface of (4, 4 and (5, 0 carbon nanotubes. The electronic structure, single point and dipole moment of both nitrogen and carbon nuclei are thoroughly studied. The computational results, which includes, indicate that rich adsorption patterns m ay result from the interaction of nitrogen with the carbon nanotubes. Sometimes C-N bounds are formed via breaking C-C bounds and sometimes a carbon atom in the nanotube is replaced by a nitrogen atom. Sometimes nitrogen atoms are attracted to a C-C bound

  2. Gas enhanced magnetic resonance angiography of the cerebrum using carbon dioxide and oxygen - preliminary results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mads Møller; Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov; Ohlhues, Anders

    and the meninges may obscure the signal from the arteries of interest. It is known that oxygen enhances the T1-weighted signal and that carbon dioxide increases the arterial blood flow. This paper presents preliminary results of gas enhanced MRA using combinations of atmospheric air, O2 and CO2. Subjects...... as a response to the added CO2 (gas II). Free oxygen (gas III) enhanced the MRA blood signal but invoked a slight decrease in the volume flow. Discussion/conclusion Inhaling gas mixture during MRA examination containing CO2 and O2 increased the cerebral MRA signal. These preliminary results indicate...

  3. Avoiding Carbon Bed Hot Spots in Thermal Process Off-Gas Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nick Soelberg; Joe Enneking

    2011-05-01

    Mercury has had various uses in nuclear fuel reprocessing and other nuclear processes, and so is often present in radioactive and mixed (radioactive and hazardous) wastes. Test programs performed in recent years have shown that mercury in off-gas streams from processes that treat radioactive wastes can be controlled using fixed beds of activated sulfur-impregnated carbon, to levels low enough to comply with air emission regulations such as the Hazardous Waste Combustor (HWC) Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) standards. Carbon bed hot spots or fires have occurred several times during these tests, and also during a remediation of tanks that contained mixed waste. Hot spots occur when localized areas in a carbon bed become heated to temperatures where oxidation occurs. This heating typically occurs due to heat of absoption of gas species onto the carbon, but it can also be caused through external means such as external heaters used to heat the carbon bed vessel. Hot spots, if not promptly mitigated, can grow into bed fires. Carbon bed hot spots and fires must be avoided in processes that treat radioactive and mixed waste. Hot spots are detected by (a) monitoring in-bed and bed outlet gas temperatures, and (b) more important, monitoring of bed outlet gas CO concentrations. Hot spots are mitigated by (a) designing for appropriate in-bed gas velocity, for avoiding gas flow maldistribution, and for sufficient but not excessive bed depth, (b) appropriate monitoring and control of gas and bed temperatures and compositions, and (c) prompt implementation of corrective actions if bed hot spots are detected. Corrective actions must be implemented quickly if bed hot spots are detected, using a graded approach and sequence starting with corrective actions that are simple, quick, cause the least impact to the process, and are easiest to recover from.

  4. Avoiding Carbon Bed Hot Spots in Thermal Process Off-Gas Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nick Soelberg; Joe Enneking

    2011-05-01

    Mercury has had various uses in nuclear fuel reprocessing and other nuclear processes, and so is often present in radioactive and mixed (radioactive and hazardous) wastes. Test programs performed in recent years have shown that mercury in off-gas streams from processes that treat radioactive wastes can be controlled using fixed beds of activated sulfur-impregnated carbon, to levels low enough to comply with air emission regulations such as the Hazardous Waste Combustor (HWC) Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) standards. Carbon bed hot spots or fires have occurred several times during these tests, and also during a remediation of tanks that contained mixed waste. Hot spots occur when localized areas in a carbon bed become heated to temperatures where oxidation occurs. This heating typically occurs due to heat of absoption of gas species onto the carbon, but it can also be caused through external means such as external heaters used to heat the carbon bed vessel. Hot spots, if not promptly mitigated, can grow into bed fires. Carbon bed hot spots and fires must be avoided in processes that treat radioactive and mixed waste. Hot spots are detected by (a) monitoring in-bed and bed outlet gas temperatures, and (b) more important, monitoring of bed outlet gas CO concentrations. Hot spots are mitigated by (a) designing for appropriate in-bed gas velocity, for avoiding gas flow maldistribution, and for sufficient but not excessive bed depth, (b) appropriate monitoring and control of gas and bed temperatures and compositions, and (c) prompt implementation of corrective actions if bed hot spots are detected. Corrective actions must be implemented quickly if bed hot spots are detected, using a graded approach and sequence starting with corrective actions that are simple, quick, cause the least impact to the process, and are easiest to recover from.

  5. High temperature hydrogen sulfide adsorption on activated carbon - I. Effects of gas composition and metal addition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cal, M.P.; Strickler, B.W.; Lizzio, A.A.

    2000-01-01

    Various types of activated carbon sorbents were evaluated for their ability to remove H2S from a simulated coal gas stream at a temperature of 550 ??C. The ability of activated carbon to remove H2S at elevated temperature was examined as a function of carbon surface chemistry (oxidation, thermal desorption, and metal addition), and gas composition. A sorbent prepared by steam activation, HNO3 oxidation and impregnated with Zn, and tested in a gas stream containing 0.5% H2S, 50% CO2 and 49.5% N2, had the greatest H2S adsorption capacity. Addition of H2, CO, and H2O to the inlet gas stream reduced H2S breakthrough time and H2S adsorption capacity. A Zn impregnated activated carbon, when tested using a simulated coal gas containing 0.5% H2S, 49.5% N2, 13% H2, 8.5% H2O, 21% CO, and 7.5% CO2, had a breakthrough time of 75 min, which was less than 25 percent of the length of breakthrough for screening experiments performed with a simplified gas mixture of 0.5% H2S, 50% CO2, and 49.5% N2.

  6. Electron and phonon properties and gas storage in carbon honeycombs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yan; Chen, Yuanping; Zhong, Chengyong; Zhang, Zhongwei; Xie, Yuee; Zhang, Shengbai

    2016-06-01

    A new kind of three-dimensional carbon allotrope, termed carbon honeycomb (CHC), has recently been synthesized [PRL 116, 055501 (2016)]. Based on the experimental results, a family of graphene networks has been constructed, and their electronic and phonon properties are studied by various theoretical approaches. All networks are porous metals with two types of electron transport channels along the honeycomb axis and they are isolated from each other: one type of channel originates from the orbital interactions of the carbon zigzag chains and is topologically protected, while the other type of channel is from the straight lines of the carbon atoms that link the zigzag chains and is topologically trivial. The velocity of the electrons can reach ~106 m s-1. Phonon transport in these allotropes is strongly anisotropic, and the thermal conductivities can be very low when compared with graphite by at least a factor of 15. Our calculations further indicate that these porous carbon networks possess high storage capacity for gaseous atoms and molecules in agreement with the experiments.A new kind of three-dimensional carbon allotrope, termed carbon honeycomb (CHC), has recently been synthesized [PRL 116, 055501 (2016)]. Based on the experimental results, a family of graphene networks has been constructed, and their electronic and phonon properties are studied by various theoretical approaches. All networks are porous metals with two types of electron transport channels along the honeycomb axis and they are isolated from each other: one type of channel originates from the orbital interactions of the carbon zigzag chains and is topologically protected, while the other type of channel is from the straight lines of the carbon atoms that link the zigzag chains and is topologically trivial. The velocity of the electrons can reach ~106 m s-1. Phonon transport in these allotropes is strongly anisotropic, and the thermal conductivities can be very low when compared with graphite by

  7. Toward estimation of origin of methane at ancient seeps — Carbon isotopes of seep carbonates, lipid biomarkers, and adsorbed gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyajima, Yusuke; Watanabe, Yumiko; Ijiri, Akira; Goto, Akiko; Jenkins, Robert; Hasegawa, Takashi; Sakai, Saburo; Matsumoto, Ryo

    2017-04-01

    values lower than -50‰ . Acid dissolution of the Miocene to Pliocene carbonates released methane with δ13C values mostly around or higher than -50‰ , which conflicts with the estimation based on biomarkers. Moreover, the Pleistocene and modern samples released only trace amounts of methane. It is thus highly possible that the extracted methane was mostly adsorbed on the carbonates within zones of thermogenic generation of hydrocarbons during burial. In conclusion, we can roughly estimate origins of methane at ancient seeps based on δ13C values of carbonates and biomarkers. However, in order to directly analyze methane contained in ancient seepage fluids, exploration of gas or fluid inclusions trapped within carbonate crystals is necessary.

  8. Carbon dynamics in highly heterotrophic subarctic thaw ponds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roiha, T.; Laurion, I.; Rautio, M.

    2015-12-01

    Global warming has accelerated the formation of permafrost thaw ponds in several subarctic and arctic regions. These ponds are net heterotrophic as evidenced by their greenhouse gas (GHG) supersaturation levels (CO2 and CH4), and generally receive large terrestrial carbon inputs from the thawing and eroding permafrost. We measured seasonal and vertical variations in the concentration and type of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in five subarctic thaw (thermokarst) ponds in northern Quebec, and explored how environmental gradients influenced heterotrophic and phototrophic biomass and productivity. Late winter DOM had low aromaticity indicating reduced inputs of terrestrial carbon, while the high concentration of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) suggests that some production of non-chromophoric dissolved compounds by the microbial food web took place under the ice cover. Summer DOM had a strong terrestrial signature, but was also characterized with significant inputs of algal-derived carbon, especially at the pond surface. During late winter, bacterial production was low (maximum of 0.8 mg C m-3 d-1) and was largely based on free-living bacterioplankton (58 %). Bacterial production in summer was high (up to 58 mg C m-3 d-1), dominated by particle-attached bacteria (67 %), and strongly correlated with the amount of terrestrial carbon. Primary production was restricted to summer surface waters due to strong light limitation deeper in the water column or in winter. The phototrophic biomass was equal to the heterotrophic biomass, but as the algae were mostly composed of mixotrophic species, most probably they used bacteria rather than solar energy in such shaded ponds. Our results point to a strong heterotrophic energy pathway in these thaw pond ecosystems, where bacterioplankton dominates the production of new carbon biomass in both summer and winter.

  9. Dynamics of exciplex formation in rare gas media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rojas-Lorenzo, German, E-mail: grojas37@gmail.com [Departamento de Fisica General y Matematicas, Instituto Superior de Tecnologias y Ciencias Aplicadas, La Habana (Cuba)] [Instituto de Fisica Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Serrano 123, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Rubayo-Soneira, Jesus [Departamento de Fisica General y Matematicas, Instituto Superior de Tecnologias y Ciencias Aplicadas, La Habana (Cuba); Alberti, Sebastian Fernandez [Centro de Estudios e Investigaciones, Universidad Nacional de Quilmes, Roque Saenz Pena 180, Bernal B1876BXD (Argentina)

    2009-07-30

    A hopping-surface algorithm has been used to simulate the dynamics induced in rare gas matrices due to the photoexcitation ({sup 1}S{sub 0} {yields} {sup 3}P{sub 1}) of atomic mercury embedded in them. Especially, the study of the dynamics of an exciplex formation in a model system consisting of solid xenon doped with atomic mercury. The process starts upon the photoexcitation of the Hg atom to its {sup 3}P{sub 1} electronic excited state. Diatomics-in-Molecule approach has been used for constructing the adiabatic potential surfaces. In all trajectories we show that a triatomic Xe-Hg{sup *}-Xe complex is formed, but in two conformations: bent and linear. The mechanisms leading to the formation of one or the other are identified. Mainly, are noted the thermal fluctuations of the Hg impurity and the shape of the potential surfaces. Furthermore, we show that non-radiative intrastate relaxation occurs via a conical intersection between the excited state surfaces. The simulated spectra are in very good agreement with the experimental data.

  10. Computer simulation of some dynamical properties of the Lorentz gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joslin, C. G.; Egelstaff, P. A.

    1989-07-01

    We carried out molecular dynamics simulations of a Lorentz gas, consisting of a lone hydrogen molecule moving in a sea of stationary argon atoms. A Lennard-Jones form was assumed for the H2-Ar potential. The calculations were performed at a reduced temperature K * = kT/ɛH 2-Ar = 4.64 and at reduced densities ρ *= ρ Arσ{Ar/3} in the range 0.074-0.414. The placement of Ar atoms was assumed to be random rather than dictated by equilibrium considerations. We followed the trajectories of many H2 molecules, each of which is assigned in turn a velocity given by the Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution at the temperature of the simulation. Solving the equations of motion classically, we obtained the translational part of the incoherent dynamic structure factor for the H2 molecule, S tr( q, ω). This was convoluted with the rotational structure factor S rot( q, ω) calculated assuming unhindered rotation to obtain the total structure factor S( q, ω). Our results agree well with experimental data on this function obtained by Egelstaff et al. At the highest density ( ρ *=0.414) we studied the dependence of S( q, ω) on system size (number of Ar atoms), number of H2 molecules for which trajectories are generated, and the length of time over which these trajectories are followed.

  11. Modelling of gas-liquid reactors - stability and dynamic behaviour of gas-liquid mass transfer accompanied by irreversible reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elk, E.P. van; Borman, P.C.; Kuipers, J.A.M.; Versteeg, G.F.

    1999-01-01

    The dynamic behaviour and stability of single-phase reacting systems has been investigated thoroughly in the past and design rules for stable operation are available from literature. The dynamic behaviour of gas-liquid processes is considerably more complex and has received relatively little attenti

  12. Process for separating carbon dioxide from flue gas using sweep-based membrane separation and absorption steps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijmans, Johannes G.; Baker, Richard W.; Merkel, Timothy C.

    2012-08-21

    A gas separation process for treating flue gases from combustion processes, and combustion processes including such gas separation. The invention involves routing a first portion of the flue gas stream to be treated to an absorption-based carbon dioxide capture step, while simultaneously flowing a second portion of the flue gas across the feed side of a membrane, flowing a sweep gas stream, usually air, across the permeate side, then passing the permeate/sweep gas to the combustor.

  13. Discharge dynamics and plasma density recovery by on/off switches of additional gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyo-Chang, E-mail: lhc@kriss.re.kr [Center for Vacuum Technology, Korea Research Institute of Standard and Science, Daejeon 305-340 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Electrical Engineering, Hanyang University, 222 Wangsimni-ro, Seongdong-gu, Seoul 04763 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Deuk-Chul [Plasma Technology Research Center, Nation Fusion Research Institute, Gunsan 573-540 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, SeungJu; Kang, Hyun-Ju; Kim, Yu-Sin; Chung, Chin-Wook, E-mail: joykang@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Electrical Engineering, Hanyang University, 222 Wangsimni-ro, Seongdong-gu, Seoul 04763 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Measurement of the plasma density is investigated to study plasma dynamics by adding reactive gas (O{sub 2}) or rare gas (He) in Ar plasmas. When the O{sub 2} or He gas is added, plasma density is suddenly decreased, while the plasma density recovers slowly with gas off. It is found that the recovery time is strongly dependent on the gas flow rate, and it can be explained by effect of gas residence time. When the He gas is off in the Ar plasma, the plasma density is overshot compared to the case of the O{sub 2} gas pulsing due to enhanced ionizations by metastable atoms. Analysis and calculation for correlation between the plasma density dynamics and the gas pulsing are also presented in detail.

  14. Reversible Storage of Hydrogen and Natural Gas in Nanospace-Engineered Activated Carbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanos, Jimmy; Beckner, Matt; Rash, Tyler; Yu, Ping; Suppes, Galen; Pfeifer, Peter

    2012-02-01

    An overview is given of the development of advanced nanoporous carbons as storage materials for natural gas (methane) and molecular hydrogen in on-board fuel tanks for next-generation clean automobiles. High specific surface areas, porosities, and sub-nm/supra-nm pore volumes are quantitatively selected by controlling the degree of carbon consumption and metallic potassium intercalation into the carbon lattice during the activation process. Tunable bimodal pore-size distributions of sub-nm and supra-nm pores are established by subcritical nitrogen adsorption. Optimal pore structures for gravimetric and volumetric gas storage, respectively, are presented. Methane and hydrogen adsorption isotherms up to 250 bar on monolithic and powdered activated carbons are reported and validated, using several gravimetric and volumetric instruments. Current best gravimetric and volumetric storage capacities are: 256 g CH4/kg carbon and 132 g CH4/liter carbon at 293 K and 35 bar; 26, 44, and 107 g H2/kg carbon at 303, 194, and 77 K respectively and 100 bar. Adsorbed film density, specific surface area, and binding energy are analyzed separately using the Clausius-Clapeyron equation, Langmuir model, and lattice gas models.

  15. Calculations of Gas-liquid Equilibrium in Wellbore with High Carbon dioxide Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiaming; Wu, Xiaodong; Wang, Bo; Liu, Kai; Gao, Yue

    2014-05-01

    Carbon dioxide injection not only enhances the oil recovery dramatically, but also it will reduce the greenhouse effect, therefore, Carbon dioxide injection technique is applied extensively. During the process of carbon dioxide displacement, when carbon dioxide breaks though into oil production wells, carbon dioxide content will impacts the phase state and physical properties of the mixed liquor in the wellbore, as a result, it will affect the calculation of temperature and pressure in oil production wells. Applying the conventional black-oil model to calculate the phase state of the miscible fluids is unacceptable. To tackle the problem, this paper uses the gas-liquid flash theory and component model to program software, so that the phase state (gas, liquid or gas-liquid) and physical properties of the mixed liquor (including hydrogen sulfide, carbon dioxide and hydrocarbon) under initial conditions is calculated, moreover, the impact of carbon dioxide content on the physical properties(mainly including density, viscosity, specific heat at const pressure, surface tension, etc) of mixed liquor in oil production wells is analyzed in this paper. The comparison of the results shows that this model can meet the engineering needs with high accuracy.

  16. Evaluation criteria for gas source rocks of marine carbonate in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhaoyun; ZHAO Wenzhi; WANG Yunpeng

    2005-01-01

    Hydrocarbon generating and expulsion simulation experiments are carried out using samples artifically matched between the acid-dissolved residue of relatively low-maturity limestone and the original sample. This work makes up for the insufficiency of source rock samples with high abundance of organic matters and low maturity in China. The organic carbon content of the 10 prepared samples varies between 0.15 % and 0.74 %. Pyrolysis data and simulation experiment results of hydrocarbon generating and expulsion, which were obtained by a high-temperature and high-pressure open system, indicate that the lower limit of organic carbon content for marine carbonate rock to generate and expel hydrocarbons is 0.23 %-0.31%. In combination with the numerical analysis of organic carbon in marine carbonate rocks from Tarim Basin, Sichuan Basin, Ordos Basin and North China, as well as the contribution of these gas source rocks to the discovered gas pools, we think that the organic carbon criterion for carbonate gas source rocks should be 0.3%.

  17. Nanophase Carbonates on Mars: Does Evolved Gas Analysis of Nanophase Carbonates Reveal a Large Organic Carbon Budget in Near-Surface Martian Materials?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, P. Douglas, Jr.; Niles, Paul B.; Ming, Douglas W.; Sutter, Brad; Eigenbrode, Jen

    2015-01-01

    Evolved Gas Analysis (EGA), which involves heating a sample and monitoring the gases released, has been performed on Mars by the Viking gas chromatography/mass spectrometry instruments, the Thermal and Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA) on the Phoenix lander, and the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument on the Mars Science Laboratory. All of these instruments detected CO2 released during sample analysis at abundances of approx. 0.1 to 5 wt% assuming a carbonate source. The source of the CO2 can be constrained by evaluating the temperature of the gas release, a capability of both the TEGA and SAM instruments. The samples analyzed by SAM show that the majority of the CO2 is released below 400C, much lower than traditional carbonate decomposition temperatures which can be as low as 400C for some siderites, with magnesites and calcites decomposing at even higher temperatures. In addition to mineralogy, decomposition temperature can depend on particle size (among other factors). If carbonates formed on Mars under low temperature and relative humidity conditions, the resulting small particle size (nanophase) carbonates could have low decomposition temperatures. We have found that calcite can be synthesized by exposing CaO to water vapor and CO2 and that the resulting mineral has an EGA peak of approx. 550C for CO2, which is about 200C lower than for other calcites. Work is ongoing to produce Fe and Mg-bearing carbonates using the same process. Current results suggest that nanophase calcium carbonates cannot explain the CO2 released from martian samples. If the decomposition temperatures of Mg and Fe-bearing nanophase carbonates are not significantly lower than 400C, other candidate sources include oxalates and carboxylated organic molecules. If present, the abundance of organic carbon in these samples could be greater than 0.1 wt % (1000s of ppm), a signficant departure from the paradigm of the organic-poor Mars based on Viking results.

  18. Nanophase Carbonates on Mars: Does Evolved Gas Analysis of Nanophase Carbonates Reveal a Large Organic Carbon Budget in Near-surface Martian Materials?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, P. D., Jr.; Ming, D. W.; Sutter, B.; Niles, P. B.; Eigenbrode, J. L.

    2015-12-01

    Evolved Gas Analysis (EGA), which involves heating a sample and monitoring the gases released, has been performed on Mars by the Viking gas chromatography/mass spectrometry instruments, the Thermal and Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA) on the Phoenix lander, and the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument on the Mars Science Laboratory. All of these instruments detected CO2 released during sample analysis at abundances of ~0.1 to 5 wt% assuming a carbonate source. The source of the CO2 can be constrained by evaluating the temperature of the gas release, a capability of both the TEGA and SAM instruments. The samples analyzed by SAM show that the majority of the CO2is released below 400 °C, much lower than traditional carbonate decomposition temperatures which can be as low as 400 °C for some siderites, with magnesites and calcites decomposing at even higher temperatures. In addition to mineralogy, decomposition temperature can depend on particle size (among other factors). If carbonates formed on Mars under low temperature and relative humidity conditions, the resulting small particle size (nanophase) carbonates could have low decomposition temperatures. We have found that calcite can be synthesized by exposing CaO to water vapor and CO2 and that the resulting mineral has an EGA peak of ~550 °C for CO2, which is about 200 °C lower than for other calcites. Work is ongoing to produce Fe and Mg-bearing carbonates using the same process. Current results suggest that nanophase calcium carbonates cannot explain the CO2 released from martian samples. If the decomposition temperatures of Mg and Fe-bearing nanophase carbonates are not significantly lower than 400 °C, other candidate sources include oxalates and carboxylated organic molecules. If present, the abundance of organic carbon in these samples could be > 0.1 wt % (1000s of ppm), a signficant departure from the paradigm of the organic-poor Mars based on Viking results.

  19. Distributed Dynamic Price Mechanism in The New Gas Chain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alkano, Desti; Scherpen, Jacquelien M.A.

    2012-01-01

    In the near future, the Dutch gas distribution is changing due to the decline of domestic gas production and the increase of renewable gas from a share of 0.1% to 8 - 12% and 15 - 20% in 2020 and 2030, respectively [1]. The renewable gas are mainly produced by farmers. Hence, they can be both produc

  20. Dynamic headspace gas chromatography of volatile compounds in milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbach, G

    1987-08-28

    A method is described for investigating volatile compounds in milk. The volatiles are removed from milk by a stream of helium swept at 100 ml/min over the surface of the milk at 70 degrees C. They are trapped on 40 mg of NIOSH charcoal and then desorbed by heat and re-trapped on the front of a chromatographic column of Tenax-GC coated with 1% OV-275, the column being maintained at room temperature during trapping. An amount of 40 mg NIOSH charcoal under these conditions traps over 90% of the total quantity of the lowest boiling compounds swept from the milk, such as acetaldehyde and ethanol, and retains 100% of the total quantity of acetone, propanol and higher boiling compounds from the gas stream. The volume of milk and its temperature affect the ratios of volatiles collected and these factors are useful in increasing the proportion of a volatile of particular interest. The addition of potassium carbonate increases the yield of volatiles from 100 ml aqueous phase but not from 10 ml.

  1. Dynamics of maize carbon contribution to soil organic carbon in association with soil type and fertility level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Jiubo; Li, Hui; Li, Shuangyi; An, Tingting; Farmer, John; Fu, Shifeng; Wang, Jingkuan

    2015-01-01

    Soil type and fertility level influence straw carbon dynamics in the agroecosystems. However, there is a limited understanding of the dynamic processes of straw-derived and soil-derived carbon and the influence of the addition of straw carbon on soil-derived organic carbon in different soils associated with different fertility levels. In this study, we applied the in-situ carborundum tube method and 13C-labeled maize straw (with and without maize straw) at two cropland (Phaeozem and Luvisol soils) experimental sites in northeast China to quantify the dynamics of maize-derived and soil-derived carbon in soils associated with high and low fertility, and to examine how the addition of maize carbon influences soil-derived organic carbon and the interactions of soil type and fertility level with maize-derived and soil-derived carbon. We found that, on average, the contributions of maize-derived carbon to total organic carbon in maize-soil systems during the experimental period were differentiated among low fertility Luvisol (from 62.82% to 42.90), high fertility Luvisol (from 53.15% to 30.00%), low fertility Phaeozem (from 58.69% to 36.29%) and high fertility Phaeozem (from 41.06% to 16.60%). Furthermore, the addition of maize carbon significantly decreased the remaining soil-derived organic carbon in low and high fertility Luvisols and low fertility Phaeozem before two months. However, the increasing differences in soil-derived organic carbon between both soils with and without maize straw after two months suggested that maize-derived carbon was incorporated into soil-derived organic carbon, thereby potentially offsetting the loss of soil-derived organic carbon. These results suggested that Phaeozem and high fertility level soils would fix more maize carbon over time and thus were more beneficial for protecting soil-derived organic carbon from maize carbon decomposition.

  2. Current-induced dynamics in carbon atomic contacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-Tao Lü

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The effect of electric current on the motion of atoms still poses many questions, and several mechanisms are at play. Recently there has been focus on the importance of the current-induced nonconservative forces (NC and Berry-phase derived forces (BP with respect to the stability of molecular-scale contacts. Systems based on molecules bridging electrically gated graphene electrodes may offer an interesting test-bed for these effects.Results: We employ a semi-classical Langevin approach in combination with DFT calculations to study the current-induced vibrational dynamics of an atomic carbon chain connecting electrically gated graphene electrodes. This illustrates how the device stability can be predicted solely from the modes obtained from the Langevin equation, including the current-induced forces. We point out that the gate offers control of the current, independent of the bias voltage, which can be used to explore current-induced vibrational instabilities due the NC/BP forces. Furthermore, using tight-binding and the Brenner potential we illustrate how Langevin-type molecular-dynamics calculations including the Joule heating effect for the carbon-chain systems can be performed. Molecular dynamics including current-induced forces enables an energy redistribution mechanism among the modes, mediated by anharmonic interactions, which is found to be vital in the description of the electrical heating.Conclusion: We have developed a semiclassical Langevin equation approach that can be used to explore current-induced dynamics and instabilities. We find instabilities at experimentally relevant bias and gate voltages for the carbon-chain system.

  3. 'GAIM' - Gas-addition, impedance-matched arc driver. [shock tube gas dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dannenberg, R. E.

    1980-01-01

    A conceptual view for a GAIM energy/driver system to maximize shock-tube performance through efficient interfacing of the energy source with the gas dynamics of the arc driver is presented. Electrical and arc-chamber requirements are evaluated utilizing two new computer codes. One code calculates the shock wave generated for a selected time rate and magnitude of arc-energy input; the other computes the values of external circuit elements required to produce the selected energy input, with the driver represented as the load element of the electrical discharge circuit. Results indicate that the energy-storage capability and the driver arrangement needed to produce the highest shock Mach number can be achieved by means of driver gas addition and by impedance matching (GAIM). Design criteria are presented for arc energy requirements necessary to produce given shock-wave speeds. Shock velocities as high as the 70 km/sec required for simulating Jovian entry now seem possible in shock-tube operation. Practical implementation of a GAIM system is discussed.

  4. Thermal and Evolved Gas Analysis of "Nanophase" Carbonates: Implications for Thermal and Evolved Gas Analysis on Mars Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauer, Howard V., Jr.; Archer, P. D., Jr.; Sutter, B.; Niles, P. B.; Ming, Douglas W.

    2012-01-01

    Data collected by the Mars Phoenix Lander's Thermal and Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA) suggested the presence of calcium-rich carbonates as indicated by a high temperature CO2 release while a low temperature (approx.400-680 C) CO2 release suggested possible Mg- and/or Fe-carbonates [1,2]. Interpretations of the data collected by Mars remote instruments is done by comparing the mission data to a database on the thermal properties of well-characterized Martian analog materials collected under reduced and Earth ambient pressures [3,4]. We are proposing that "nano-phase" carbonates may also be contributing to the low temperature CO2 release. The objectives of this paper is to (1) characterize the thermal and evolved gas proper-ties of carbonates of varying particle size, (2) evaluate the CO2 releases from CO2 treated CaO samples and (3) examine the secondary CO2 release from reheated calcite of varying particle size.

  5. Gas flaring and resultant air pollution: A review focusing on black carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fawole, Olusegun G; Cai, X-M; MacKenzie, A R

    2016-09-01

    Gas flaring is a prominent source of VOCs, CO, CO2, SO2, PAH, NOX and soot (black carbon), all of which are important pollutants which interact, directly and indirectly, in the Earth's climatic processes. Globally, over 130 billion cubic metres of gas are flared annually. We review the contribution of gas flaring to air pollution on local, regional and global scales, with special emphasis on black carbon (BC, "soot"). The temporal and spatial characteristics of gas flaring distinguishes it from mobile combustion sources (transport), while the open-flame nature of gas flaring distinguishes it from industrial point-sources; the high temperature, flame control, and spatial compactness distinguishes gas flaring from both biomass burning and domestic fuel-use. All of these distinguishing factors influence the quantity and characteristics of BC production from gas flaring, so that it is important to consider this source separately in emissions inventories and environmental field studies. Estimate of the yield of pollutants from gas flaring have, to date, paid little or no attention to the emission of BC with the assumption often being made that flaring produces a smokeless flame. In gas flares, soot yield is known to depend on a number of factors, and there is a need to develop emission estimates and modelling frameworks that take these factors into consideration. Hence, emission inventories, especially of the soot yield from gas flaring should give adequate consideration to the variation of fuel gas composition, and to combustion characteristics, which are strong determinants of the nature and quantity of pollutants emitted. The buoyant nature of gas flaring plume, often at temperatures in the range of 2000 K, coupled with the height of the stack enables some of the pollutants to escape further into the free troposphere aiding their long-range transport, which is often not well-captured by model studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Influence of carrier gas flow rate on carbon nanotubes growth by TCVD with Cu catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.A. Khorrami

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs were grown on copper catalyst by thermal chemical vapor deposition (TCVD using H2 and N2 as carrier gases. CNTs with different morphologies were observed using different carrier gas flow rates. The influence of carrier gas flow rates on the structure of carbon nanotubes was compared. Catalyst nanolayer was sputtered on mirror polished silicon wafers. The catalyst film thickness was determined by using the Rutherford Back Scattering (RBS technique. Ethanol as carbon source has been used. The surface morphology and nanostructure were studied by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM, Raman Spectroscopy, Tunneling Electron Microscopy (TEM and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM. Results indicated that the amounts of deposited carbon decrease with increasing flow rates. These results showed that CNTs’ length decreased with increasing flow rates. Results suggest that Cu nanolayer is suitable as catalyst due to the fact that CNTs are monotonous.

  7. Low Carbon Technology Options for the Natural Gas Electricity Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ultimate goal of this task is to perform environmental and economic analysis of natural gas based power production technologies (different routes) to investigate and evaluate strategies for reducing emissions from the power sector. It is a broad research area. Initially, the...

  8. Low Carbon Technology Options for the Natural Gas Electricity Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ultimate goal of this task is to perform environmental and economic analysis of natural gas based power production technologies (different routes) to investigate and evaluate strategies for reducing emissions from the power sector. It is a broad research area. Initially, the...

  9. Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Depleted Oil/Gas Fields: Evaluation of Gas Microseepage and Carbon Dioxide Fate at Rangely, Colorado USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klusman, R. W.

    2002-12-01

    Large-scale CO2 dioxide injection for purposes of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) has been operational at Rangely, Colorado since 1986. The Rangely field serves as an onshore prototype for CO2 sequestration in depleted fields by production of a valuable commodity which partially offsets infrastructure costs. The injection is at pressures considerably above hydrostatic pressure, enhancing the possibility for migration of buoyant gases toward the surface. Methane and CO2 were measured in shallow soil gas, deep soil gas, and as fluxes into the atmosphere in both winter and summer seasons. There were large seasonal variations in surface biological noise. The direct measurement of CH4 flux to the atmosphere gave an estimate of 400 metric tonnes per year over the 78 km2 area, and carbon dioxide flux was between 170 and 3800 metric tonnes per year. Both stable carbon isotopes and carbon-14 were used in constructing these estimates. Computer modeling of the unsaturated zone migration, and of methanotrophic oxidation rates suggests a large portion of the CH4 is oxidized in the summer, and at a much lower rate in the winter. However, deep-sourced CH4 makes a larger contribution to the atmosphere than CO2, in terms of GWP. The 23+ million tonnes of carbon dioxide that have been injected at Rangely are largely stored as dissolved CO2 and a lesser amount as bicarbonate. Scaling problems, as a result of acid gas dissolution of carbonate cement, and subsequent precipitation of CaSO4 will be an increasing problem as the system matures. Evidence for mineral sequestration was not found in the scales. Ultimate injector and field capacities will be determined by mineral precipitation in the formation as it affects porosity and permeability.

  10. Carbon dynamics after forest harvest in Central Siberia: the ZOTTO footprint area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panov, Alexey; Zrazhevskaya, Galina; Shibistova, Olga; Onuchin, Alexander; Heimann, Martin

    2013-04-01

    Temperate and boreal forests of the Northern Hemisphere have been recognized as important carbon sinks. Accurate calculation of forest carbon budget and estimation of the temporal variations of forest net carbon fluxes are important topics to elucidate the ''missing sink'' question and follow up the changing carbon dynamics in forests. In the frame of the ongoing Russian-German partner project the Zotino Tall Tower Observatory (ZOTTO; www.zottoproject.org) a unique international research platform for large-scale climatic observations is operational about 20 km west of the Yenisei river (60.8°N; 89.35°E). The data of the ongoing greenhouse gas and aerosol measurements at the tall tower are used in atmospheric inversions studies to infer the distribution of carbon sinks and sources over the whole Northern Eurasia. The tall tower footprint area estimates of carbon stocks and fluxes are highly demanded for bottom-up validation of inversion estimates. The ZOTTO site lies in a vast region of forests and wetlands, still relatively undisturbed by anthropogenic influences, but a moderate human impact on vegetation, represented mainly by logging activities, becomes essential. Therefore, accurate estimates of carbon pools in vegetation and soil following harvesting are essential to inversion studies for ZOTTO and critical to predictions of both local ecosystem sustainability and global C exchange with the atmosphere. We present our investigation of carbon dynamics after forest harvest in the tall tower footprint area (~1000 km2). The changes in C pools and annual sequestration were quantified among several clear-cut lichen pine (Pinus sylvestris Lamb.) stands representing various stages of secondary succession with a "space-for-time substitution" technique. When viewed as a chronosequence, these stands represent snapshots showing how the effects of logging may propagate through time. The study concluded that ecosystems during the first 15 yrs after forest harvest become C

  11. A global gas flaring black carbon emission rate dataset from 1994 to 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kan; Fu, Joshua S.

    2016-11-01

    Global flaring of associated petroleum gas is a potential emission source of particulate matters (PM) and could be notable in some specific regions that are in urgent need of mitigation. PM emitted from gas flaring is mainly in the form of black carbon (BC), which is a strong short-lived climate forcer. However, BC from gas flaring has been neglected in most global/regional emission inventories and is rarely considered in climate modeling. Here we present a global gas flaring BC emission rate dataset for the period 1994-2012 in a machine-readable format. We develop a region-dependent gas flaring BC emission factor database based on the chemical compositions of associated petroleum gas at various oil fields. Gas flaring BC emission rates are estimated using this emission factor database and flaring volumes retrieved from satellite imagery. Evaluation using a chemical transport model suggests that consideration of gas flaring emissions can improve model performance. This dataset will benefit and inform a broad range of research topics, e.g., carbon budget, air quality/climate modeling, and environmental/human exposure.

  12. Microsensor measurements of hydrogen gas dynamics in cyanobacterial microbial mats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Michael; Revsbech, Niels P; Kühl, Michael

    2015-01-01

    We used a novel amperometric microsensor for measuring hydrogen gas production and consumption at high spatio-temporal resolution in cyanobacterial biofilms and mats dominated by non-heterocystous filamentous cyanobacteria (Microcoleus chtonoplastes and Oscillatoria sp.). The new microsensor is based on the use of an organic electrolyte and a stable internal reference system and can be equipped with a chemical sulfide trap in the measuring tip; it exhibits very stable and sulfide-insensitive measuring signals and a high sensitivity (1.5-5 pA per μmol L(-1) H2). Hydrogen gas measurements were done in combination with microsensor measurements of scalar irradiance, O2, pH, and H2S and showed a pronounced H2 accumulation (of up to 8-10% H2 saturation) within the upper mm of cyanobacterial mats after onset of darkness and O2 depletion. The peak concentration of H2 increased with the irradiance level prior to darkening. After an initial build-up over the first 1-2 h in darkness, H2 was depleted over several hours due to efflux to the overlaying water, and due to biogeochemical processes in the uppermost oxic layers and the anoxic layers of the mats. Depletion could be prevented by addition of molybdate pointing to sulfate reduction as a major sink for H2. Immediately after onset of illumination, a short burst of presumably photo-produced H2 due to direct biophotolysis was observed in the illuminated but anoxic mat layers. As soon as O2 from photosynthesis started to accumulate, the H2 was consumed rapidly and production ceased. Our data give detailed insights into the microscale distribution and dynamics of H2 in cyanobacterial biofilms and mats, and further support that cyanobacterial H2 production can play a significant role in fueling anaerobic processes like e.g., sulfate reduction or anoxygenic photosynthesis in microbial mats.

  13. Microsensor Measurements of Hydrogen Gas Dynamics in Cyanobacterial Microbial Mats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eNielsen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We used a novel amperometric microsensor for measuring hydrogen gas production and consumption at high spatio-temporal resolution in cyanobacterial biofilms and mats dominated by non-heterocystous filamentous cyanobacteria (Microcoleus chtonoplastes and Oscillatoria spp.. The new microsensor is based on the use of an organic electrolyte and a stable internal reference system and can be equipped with a chemical sulfide trap in the measuring tip; it exhibits very stable and sulfide-insensitive measuring signals and a high sensitivity (1.5-5 pA per µmol L-1 H2. Hydrogen gas measurements were done in combination with microsensor measurements of scalar irradiance, O2, pH, and H2S and showed a pronounced H2 accumulation (of up to 8-10% H2 saturation within the upper mm of cyanobacterial mats after onset of darkness and O2 depletion. The peak concentration of H2 increased with the irradiance level prior to darkening. After an initial build-up over the first 1-2 hours in darkness, H2 was depleted over several hours due to efflux to the overlaying water, and due to biogeochemical processes in the uppermost oxic layers and the anoxic layers of the mats. Depletion could be prevented by addition of molybdate pointing to sulfate reduction as a major sink for H2. Immediately after onset of illumination, a short burst of presumably photo-produced H2 due to direct photobiolysis was observed in the illuminated but anoxic mat layers. As soon as O2 from photosynthesis started to accumulate, the H2 was consumed rapidly and production ceased. Our data give detailed insights into the microscale distribution and dynamics of H2 in cyanobacterial biofilms and mats, and further support that cyanobacterial H2 production can play a significant role in fueling anaerobic processes like e.g. sulfate reduction or anoxygenic photosynthesis in microbial mats.

  14. Nanohybrid TiO2/carbon black sensor for NO2 gas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-Jen Liou; Hong-Ming Lin

    2007-01-01

    A nanohybrid sensor of nanosized TiO2-coated carbon black particles, prepared by sol-gel technology for the detection of NO2 gas, has been developed. The response of the electric resistance of the hybrid sensor to NO2 concentration is investigated, showing that the sensitivity of the hybrid sensor is raised as certain ratio of the TiO2 content in the sensor. Easy and cheap to fabricate, the hybrid TiO2/carbon black promises to be a practical sensor for detecting NO2 gas.

  15. Carbon nanomaterial Formation on Fresh-Reduced Iron by Converted Natural Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebesnyi, A.; Kotov, V.; Sviatenko, A.; Filonenko, D.; Khovavko, A.; Bondarenko, B.

    2017-02-01

    The mechanism of carbon nanomaterial formation at moderate temperatures while processing fresh-reduced iron by products of air conversion of natural gas is considered. It is shown that under given conditions, the size and the shape of the resulting carbon are dependent on the temperature and the size of microscopic iron grains formed during reduction. These iron grains are the catalyzer of the reaction of carbon monoxide disproportionation. It is concluded that the formation of a nucleus of the new carbon phase occurs at the contact boundaries of neighboring grains of newly reduced iron with the subsequent formation in these places of ring-shaped carbon cuffs. Nanotubes are forming as a result of further carbon crystallization, and separation of iron particles from the main mass is occurring, i.e., there is a fragmentation of the substance of the catalyst. According to the results of laboratory studies, the optimum temperature of carbon nanotube formation in the environment of converted gas is 600-650 °C. The evidence of the hypothesis that the mechanism of the reaction of carbon monoxide disproportionation flows through the intermediate stage of iron oxides formation is given.

  16. Novel carbons from Illinois coal for natural gas storage. Technical report, March 1--May 31, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rostam-Abadi, M.; Sun, Jian; Lizzio, A.A.

    1995-12-31

    Goal is to develop a technology for producing microengineered adsorbent carbons from Illinois coal and to evaluate their potential application for storing natural gas for use in emerging low pressure, natural gas vehicles (NGVs). Focus is to design and engineer adsorbents that meet or exceed performance and cost targets established for low-pressure natural gas storage materials. Potentially, about two million tons adsorbent could be consumed in NGVs by year 2000. If successful, the results could lead to use of Illinois coal in a market that could exceed 6 million tons per year. Activated carbon samples were prepared from IBC-106 coal by controlling both the preoxidation temperature and time, and the devolatilization temperature in order to eliminate coal caking. A 4.6 cc pressurized vessel was constructed to measure the Vm/Vs methane adsorption capacity (volume of stored methane at STP per volume storage container). Several IBC-106 derived activated carbons showed methane adsorption capacities comparable to that of a 1000 m{sup 2}/g commercial activated carbon. Results indicated that surface area and micropore volume of activated carbons are important for natural gas storage. Work is in progress to synthesize samples from IBC-106 coal with optimum pore diameter for methane adsorption.

  17. Carbon dioxide emission in hydrogen production technology from coke oven gas with life cycle approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burmistrz Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of Carbon Footprint (CF for technology of hydrogen production from cleaned coke oven gas was performed. On the basis of real data and simulation calculations of the production process of hydrogen from coke gas, emission indicators of carbon dioxide (CF were calculated. These indicators are associated with net production of electricity and thermal energy and direct emission of carbon dioxide throughout a whole product life cycle. Product life cycle includes: coal extraction and its transportation to a coking plant, the process of coking coal, purification and reforming of coke oven gas, carbon capture and storage. The values were related to 1 Mg of coking blend and to 1 Mg of the hydrogen produced. The calculation is based on the configuration of hydrogen production from coke oven gas for coking technology available on a commercial scale that uses a technology of coke dry quenching (CDQ. The calculations were made using ChemCAD v.6.0.2 simulator for a steady state of technological process. The analysis of carbon footprint was conducted in accordance with the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA.

  18. Forest carbon accounting methods and the consequences of forest bioenergy for national greenhouse gas emissions inventories

    OpenAIRE

    McKechnie, Jon; Colombo, Steve; Heather L. MacLean

    2014-01-01

    While bioenergy plays a key role in strategies for increasing renewable energy deployment, studies assessing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from forest bioenergy systems have identified a potential trade-off of the system with forest carbon stocks. Of particular importance to national GHG inventories is how trade-offs between forest carbon stocks and bioenergy production are accounted for within the Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Use (AFOLU) sector under current and future international...

  19. Root carbon reserve dynamics in aspen seedlings: does simulated drought induce reserve limitation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvez, David A; Landhäusser, S M; Tyree, M T

    2011-03-01

    In a greenhouse study we quantified the gradual change of gas exchange, water relations and root reserves of aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) seedlings growing over a 3-month period of severe water stress. The aim of the study was to quantify the complex interrelationship between growth, water and gas exchange, and root carbon (C) dynamics. Various growth, gas exchange and water relations variables in combination with root reserves were measured periodically on seedlings that had been exposed to a continuous drought treatment over a 12-week period and compared with well-watered seedlings. Although gas exchange and water relations parameters significantly decreased over the drought period in aspen seedlings, root reserves did not mirror this trend. During the course of the experiment roots of aspen seedlings growing under severe water stress showed a two orders of magnitude increase in sugar and starch content, and roots of these seedlings contained more starch relative to sugar than those in non-droughted seedlings. Drought resulted in a switch from growth to root reserves storage which indicates a close interrelationship between growth and physiological variables and the accumulation of root carbohydrate reserves. Although a severe 3-month drought period created physiological symptoms of C limitation, there was no indication of a depletion of root C reserve in aspen seedlings.

  20. Carbon balance and greenhouse gas emissions of subarctic lowland palsa mires related to permafrost degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiegler, Christian; Lindroth, Anders; Christensen, Torben R.; Johansson, Margareta

    2014-05-01

    The Torneträsk area in northern subarctic Sweden is particularly vulnerable to any further climate change since it is located on the 0-degree isotherm. Within the next decades a projected ongoing climate warming and increase in snow cover will most likely lead to the disappearance of lowland permafrost in this region, affecting greenhouse gas emissions, surface energy fluxes and vegetation cover. A previous study from the Torneträsk area has resulted in extensive data on the effects of permafrost degradation on surface energy balance. In this study we focus on the effects of different stages of permafrost degradation on carbon balance and emission of greenhouse gases. The study area covers several mires with similar local topographic conditions along an east-west oriented transect. Due to a strong climatic gradient, with maritime climate in the west and a more continental climate in the east, active layer thickness and permafrost temperatures generally increase from east to west while permafrost thickness decreases. In recent years permafrost has completely disappeared at the westernmost study site while at the other investigated locations the peat plateaus show varying stages of degradation. For our measurements we use both mobile and stationary energy balance and eddy covariance towers. Data has been collected during the growing season in 2013 by measuring flux densities of carbon dioxide and water vapour and all components of the surface energy budget, i.e. net radiation, turbulent fluxes of sensible and latent heat as well as ground heat fluxes. In addition, we measure active layer thickness and both soil moisture and soil temperature at various depths. In this study we aim to (A) investigate and better understand the effects of permafrost degradation on the CO2 dynamics in subarctic palsa mires, (B) assess variation in terrestrial CO2 and water vapour flux with changes in vegetation cover and soil moisture, (C) determine possible meteorological and

  1. Growth dynamics of carbon-metal particles and nanotubes synthesized by CO2 laser vaporization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokai, F.; Takahashi, K.; Yudasaka, M.; Iijima, S.

    To study the growth of carbon-Co/Ni particles and single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) by 20 ms CO2 laser-pulse irradiation of a graphite-Co/Ni (1.2 at.%) target in an Ar gas atmosphere (600 Torr), we used emission imaging spectroscopy and shadowgraphy with a temporal resolution of 1.67 ms. Wavelength-selected emission images showed that C2 emission was strong in the region close to the target (within 2 cm), while for the same region the blackbody radiation from the large clusters or particles increased with increasing distance from the target. Shadowgraph images showed that the viscous flow of carbon and metal species formed a mushroom or a turbulent cloud spreading slowly into the Ar atmosphere, indicating that particles and SWNTs continued to grow as the ejected material cooled. In addition, emission imaging spectroscopy at 1200 °C showed that C2 and hot clusters and particles with higher emission intensities were distributed over much wider areas. We discuss the growth dynamics of the particles and SWNTs through the interaction of the ambient Ar with the carbon and metal species released from the target by the laser pulse.

  2. Golden age of gas and its impact on the world energy, the global carbon cycle and climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tereshin, A. G.; Klimenko, A. V.; Klimenko, V. V.

    2015-05-01

    Global and regional resource and environmental problems of production and use of unconventional gas (UG) are studied. Estimations for world and national reserves of various kinds of UG are presented. The dynamics of the gas share in total energy consumption and thermal power generation around the world is analyzed. Projections of the world production of conventional gas and UG are proposed. Variations in carbon dioxide concentration in the atmosphere and the corresponding changes in average global air temperature are calculated for various scenarios suggesting unconventional gas substitution of different energy sources. The possible consequences of expected climate changes for Russia's power industry are analyzed. It is shown that, despite the uncertainty in the estimates of the economic and environmental consequences of shale gas (SG) production, its use, according to the available resource estimates, can make it possible to solve global and regional problems associated with energy (import substitution) and environment protection (replacing the less clean coal fuel). However, the development of the huge global resources of this type of fuel can have a significant effect on the chemical and thermal radiative balance of the Earth's atmosphere, and it must be noted that the climatic effect of carbon dioxide emissions from the UG combustion greatly exceeds the consequences of methane leakage during its production. In order to sustain the stability of the global climate system, the development of the world's large UG resources must be accompanied by an equivalent reduction in the use of coal. This is the only way for UG to become a safe energy bridge to the future, able to keep the climate system at the threshold of critical values. Direct effects of possible climatic changes on the territory of Russia for the domestic energy complex are estimated as more positive than adverse, mainly due to lower energy costs for space heating.

  3. Gas enhanced magnetic resonance angiography of the cerebrum using carbon dioxide and oxygen - preliminary results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mads Møller; Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov; Ohlhues, Anders

    compared. Results The TOF series showed an increase in MRA signal and vessel conspicuousness, when adding CO2 to air (gas I vs. gas II) and an additional increase was seen on MRA when adding O2 to CO2 (gas II vs. gas III). The increase in MRA signal was present on both volunteers. The volume flow increased...... and the meninges may obscure the signal from the arteries of interest. It is known that oxygen enhances the T1-weighted signal and that carbon dioxide increases the arterial blood flow. This paper presents preliminary results of gas enhanced MRA using combinations of atmospheric air, O2 and CO2. Subjects...... and Methods Two healthy volunteers were scanned during inhalation of three different gas mixtures: Gas I (air), Gas II (5% CO2, 21 % O2, 74 % N2), Gas III (5% CO2, 95% O2). For each gas mixture a time of flight (TOF) series on the cerebral arteries was performed. Following each TOF series an ECG-gated phase...

  4. Using Carbon Dioxide to Enhance Recovery of Methane from Gas Hydrate Reservoirs: Final Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGrail, B. Peter; Schaef, Herbert T.; White, Mark D.; Zhu, Tao; Kulkarni, Abhijeet S.; Hunter, Robert B.; Patil, Shirish L.; Owen, Antionette T.; Martin, P F.

    2007-09-01

    Carbon dioxide sequestration coupled with hydrocarbon resource recovery is often economically attractive. Use of CO2 for enhanced recovery of oil, conventional natural gas, and coal-bed methane are in various stages of common practice. In this report, we discuss a new technique utilizing CO2 for enhanced recovery of an unconventional but potentially very important source of natural gas, gas hydrate. We have focused our attention on the Alaska North Slope where approximately 640 Tcf of natural gas reserves in the form of gas hydrate have been identified. Alaska is also unique in that potential future CO2 sources are nearby, and petroleum infrastructure exists or is being planned that could bring the produced gas to market or for use locally. The EGHR (Enhanced Gas Hydrate Recovery) concept takes advantage of the physical and thermodynamic properties of mixtures in the H2O-CO2 system combined with controlled multiphase flow, heat, and mass transport processes in hydrate-bearing porous media. A chemical-free method is used to deliver a LCO2-Lw microemulsion into the gas hydrate bearing porous medium. The microemulsion is injected at a temperature higher than the stability point of methane hydrate, which upon contacting the methane hydrate decomposes its crystalline lattice and releases the enclathrated gas. Small scale column experiments show injection of the emulsion into a CH4 hydrate rich sand results in the release of CH4 gas and the formation of CO2 hydrate

  5. Global investigation of the nonlinear dynamics of carbon nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Tiantian

    2016-11-17

    Understanding the complex nonlinear dynamics of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is essential to enable utilization of these structures in devices and practical applications. We present in this work an investigation of the global nonlinear dynamics of a slacked CNT when actuated by large electrostatic and electrodynamic excitations. The coexistence of several attractors is observed. The CNT is modeled as an Euler–Bernoulli beam. A reduced-order model based on the Galerkin method is developed and utilized to simulate the static and dynamic responses. Critical computational challenges are posed due to the complicated form of the electrostatic force, which describes the interaction between the upper electrode, consisting of the cylindrically shaped CNT, and the lower electrode. Toward this, we approximate the electrostatic force using the Padé expansion. We explore the dynamics near the primary and superharmonic resonances. The nanostructure exhibits several attractors with different characteristics. To achieve deep insight and describe the complexity and richness of the behavior, we analyze the nonlinear response from an attractor-basins point of view. The competition of attractors is highlighted. Compactness and/or fractality of their basins are discussed. Both the effects of varying the excitation frequency and amplitude are examined up to the dynamic pull-in instability.

  6. Optimizing Natural Gas Networks through Dynamic Manifold Theory and a Decentralized Algorithm: Belgium Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Caleb; Winfrey, Leigh

    2014-10-01

    Natural Gas is a major energy source in Europe, yet political instabilities have the potential to disrupt access and supply. Energy resilience is an increasingly essential construct and begins with transmission network design. This study proposes a new way of thinking about modelling natural gas flow. Rather than relying on classical economic models, this problem is cast into a time-dependent Hamiltonian dynamics discussion. Traditional Natural Gas constraints, including inelastic demand and maximum/minimum pipe flows, are portrayed as energy functions and built into the dynamics of each pipe flow. Doing so allows the constraints to be built into the dynamics of each pipeline. As time progresses in the model, natural gas flow rates find the minimum energy, thus the optimal gas flow rates. The most important result of this study is using dynamical principles to ensure the output of natural gas at demand nodes remains constant, which is important for country to country natural gas transmission. Another important step in this study is building the dynamics of each flow in a decentralized algorithm format. Decentralized regulation has solved congestion problems for internet data flow, traffic flow, epidemiology, and as demonstrated in this study can solve the problem of Natural Gas congestion. A mathematical description is provided for how decentralized regulation leads to globally optimized network flow. Furthermore, the dynamical principles and decentralized algorithm are applied to a case study of the Fluxys Belgium Natural Gas Network.

  7. Satellite observation of particulate organic carbon dynamics in ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Particulate organic carbon (POC) plays an important role in coastal carbon cycling and the formation of hypoxia. Yet, coastal POC dynamics are often poorly understood due to a lack of long-term POC observations and the complexity of coastal hydrodynamic and biogeochemical processes that influence POC sources and sinks. Using field observations and satellite ocean color products, we developed a nw multiple regression algorithm to estimate POC on the Louisiana Continental Shelf (LCS) from satellite observations. The algorithm had reliable performance with mean relative error (MRE) of ?40% and root mean square error (RMSE) of ?50% for MODIS and SeaWiFS images for POC ranging between ?80 and ?1200 mg m23, and showed similar performance for a large estuary (Mobile Bay). Substantial spatiotemporal variability in the satellite-derived POC was observed on the LCS, with high POC found on the inner shelf (satellite data with carefully developed algorithms can greatly increase

  8. Phonon Scattering Dynamics of Thermophoretic Motion in Carbon Nanotube Oscillators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Matukumilli V D; Bhattacharya, Baidurya

    2016-04-13

    Using phonon wave packet molecular dynamics simulations, we find that anomalous longitudinal acoustic (LA) mode phonon scattering in low to moderate energy ranges is responsible for initiating thermophoretic motion in carbon nanotube oscillators. The repeated scattering of a single mode LA phonon wave packet near the ends of the inner nanotube provides a net unbalanced force that, if large enough, initiates thermophoresis. By applying a coherent phonon pulse on the outer tube, which generalizes the single mode phonon wave packet, we are able to achieve thermophoresis in a carbon nanotube oscillator. We also find the nature of the unbalanced force on end-atoms to be qualitatively similar to that under an imposed thermal gradient. The thermodiffusion coefficient obtained for a range of thermal gradients and core lengths suggest that LA phonon scattering is the dominant mechanism for thermophoresis in longer cores, whereas for shorter cores, it is the highly diffusive mechanism that provides the effective force.

  9. Reactor for producing a carbon monoxide and hydrogen containing gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abraamov, E.; Achmatov, I.; Berger, F.

    1982-08-10

    The reactor for the production of CO and H/sub 2/ containing gases by means of a partial oxidation of powdery or liquid high ash fuels in a carburation fluid including free oxygen, at high temperatures and increased pressure, includes a pressure vessel enclosing a gas-tight housing whereby an interspace is formed between the inner wall of the vessel and the outer surface of the housing. Within the housing is arranged a cooling wall enclosing the reaction chamber proper. The cooling wall includes a coil of cooling pipes embedded in a mass of refractory material such as silicium carbide. The pipes are partially supported on web sections projecting from the inner surface of the housing into the refractory lining. The web sections prevent propagation of leaking hot gas from the reaction chamber along the inner surface of the housing.

  10. Algal biomass production and carbon fixation from flue gas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ling; ZHU Jing

    2016-01-01

    Algal biofuel has established as one of renewable energy. In this study, Nannochloropsis salina was cultured to test feasibility of biomass production and CO2 fixation from flue gas. Firstly, cultivation was conducted under different light intensity. Results showed that the highest dry biomass of 1.25±0.061 g/L was achieved at light intensity of 10klux, while the highest total lipids was 33.677±1.9% at light intensity of 15klux. The effect of mercury on algae growth was also investigated, the algae growth was serious limited at the presence of mercury, and there was no any difference at the range of 10-50 ug/m3. These results provide useful information for algal biomass production and CO2 fixation from flue gas.

  11. Impact of 40 years poplar cultivation on soil carbon stocks and greenhouse gas fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Ferré

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Within the JRC Kyoto Experiment in the Regional Park and UN-Biosphere Reserve "Parco Ticino" (North-Italy, near Pavia, the soil carbon stocks and fluxes of CO2, N2O, and CH4 were measured in a poplar plantation in comparison with a natural mesohygrophilous deciduous forest nearby, which represents the pristine land cover of the area. Soil fluxes were measured using the static and dynamic closed chamber techniques for CH4 N2O, and CO2, respectively. We made further a pedological study to relate the spatial variability found with soil parameters.

    Annual emission fluxes of N2O and CO2 and deposition fluxes of CH4 were calculated for the year 2003 for the poplar plantation and compared to those measured at the natural forest site. N2O emissions at the poplar plantation were 0.15$plusmn;0.1 g N2O m-2 y-1 and the difference to the emissions at the natural forest of 0.07±0.06 g N2O m-2 y-1 are partly due to a period of high emissions after the flooding of the site at the end of 2002. CH4 consumption at the natural forest was twice as large as at the poplar plantation. In comparison to the relict forest, carbon stocks in the soil under the poplar plantation were depleted by 61% of surface (10 cm carbon and by 25% down the profile under tillage (45 cm. Soil respiration rates were not significant different at both sites with 1608±1053 and 2200±791 g CO2 m-2 y-1 at the poplar plantation and natural forest, respectively, indicating that soil organic carbon is much more stable in the natural forest. In terms of the greenhouse gas budget, the non-CO2 gases contributed minor to the overall soil balance with only 0.9% (N2O and -0.3% (CH4 of CO2-eq emissions in the

  12. Activated carbon from vetiver roots: gas and liquid adsorption studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspard, S; Altenor, S; Dawson, E A; Barnes, P A; Ouensanga, A

    2007-06-01

    Large quantities of lignocellulosic residues result from the industrial production of essential oil from vetiver grass (Vetiveria zizanioides) roots. These residues could be used for the production of activated carbon. The yield of char obtained after vetiver roots pyrolysis follows an equation recently developed [A. Ouensanga, L. Largitte, M.A. Arsene, The dependence of char yield on the amounts of components in precursors for pyrolysed tropical fruit stones and seeds, Micropor. Mesopor. Mater. 59 (2003) 85-91]. The N(2) adsorption isotherm follows either the Freundlich law K(F)P(alpha) which is the small alpha equation limit of a Weibull shaped isotherm or the classical BET isotherm. The surface area of the activated carbons are determined using the BET method. The K(F) value is proportional to the BET surface area. The alpha value increases slightly when the burn-off increases and also when there is a clear increase in the micropore distribution width.

  13. Activated carbon treatment of municipal solid waste incineration flue gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shengyong; Ji, Ya; Buekens, Alfons; Ma, Zengyi; Jin, Yuqi; Li, Xiaodong; Yan, Jianhua

    2013-02-01

    Activated carbon injection is widely used to control dioxins and mercury emissions. Surprisingly little attention has been paid to its modelling. This paper proposes an expansion of the classical Everaerts-Baeyens model, introducing the expression of fraction of free adsorption sites, f (s), and asserting the significant contribution of fly ash to dioxins removal. Moreover, the model monitors dioxins partitioning between vapour and particulate phase, as well as removal efficiency for each congener separately. The effects of the principal parameters affecting adsorption are analysed according to a semi-analytical, semi-empirical model. These parameters include temperature, contact time during entrained-flow, characteristics (grain-size, pore structure, specific surface area) and dosage of activated carbon, lignite cokes or mineral adsorbent, fly ash characteristics and concentration, and type of incinerator plant.

  14. Efficient adsorption of super greenhouse gas (tetrafluoromethane) in carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalczyk, Piotr; Holyst, Robert

    2008-04-15

    Light membranes composed of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) can serve as efficient nanoscale vessels for encapsulation of tetrafluoromethane at 300 K and operating external pressure of 1 bar. We use grand canonical Monte Carlo simulation for modeling of CF4 encapsulation at 300 K and pressures up to 2 bar. We find that the amount of adsorbed CF4 strongly depends on the pore size in nanotubes; at 1 bar the most efficient nanotubes for volumetric storage have size R = 0.68 nm. This size corresponds to the (10,10) armchair nanotubes produced nowadays in large quantities. For mass storage (i.e., weight %) the most efficient nanotubes have size R = 1.02 nm corresponding to (15,15) armchair nanotubes. They are better adsorbents than currently used activated carbons and zeolites, reaching approximately equal to 2.4 mol kg(-1) of CF4, whereas, the best activated carbon Carbosieve G molecular sieve can adsorb 1.7 mol kg(-1) of CF4 at 300 K and 1 bar. We demonstrate that the high enthalpy of adsorption cannot be used as an only measure of storage efficiency. The optimal balance between the binding energy (i.e., enthalpy of adsorption) and space available for the accommodation of molecules (i.e., presence of inaccessible pore volume) is a key for encapsulation of van der Walls molecules. Our systematic computational study gives the clear direction in the timely problem of control emission of CF4 and other perfluorocarbons into atmosphere.

  15. Impact of gas products around the anode on the performance of a direct carbon fuel cell using a carbon/carbonate slurry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Hirotatsu; Umehara, Daisuke; Hanamura, Katsunori

    2016-10-01

    This paper investigates the impact of gas products around the anode on cell performance via an in situ observation. In a direct carbon fuel cell used this study, the anode is inserted into the carbon/carbonate slurry. The current-voltage (I-V) curves are measured before and after a long discharge in the constant current discharge mode. An in situ observation shows that the anode is almost completely covered by gas bubbles when the voltage becomes nearly 0 V in the constant current discharge at 40 mA/cm2; this indicates that gas products such as CO2 prevent the carbon particles and ions from reaching the anode. Meanwhile, the long discharge at 20 mA/cm2 is achieved for 30 min, even though the anode is covered by the CO2 bubbles at 15 min. The I-V curves at 1 min after the termination of the long discharge at 20 mA/cm2 are lower than those prior to the long discharge. The overpotential significantly increases at higher current densities, where mass transport becomes the limiting process. The cell performance is significantly influenced by the gas products around the anode.

  16. Nonlinear dynamics of a soliton gas: Modified Korteweg-de Vries equation framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shurgalina, E. G.; Pelinovsky, E. N.

    2016-05-01

    Dynamics of random multi-soliton fields within the framework of the modified Korteweg-de Vries equation is considered. Statistical characteristics of a soliton gas (distribution functions and moments) are calculated. It is demonstrated that the results sufficiently depend on the soliton gas properties, i.e., whether it is unipolar or bipolar. It is shown that the properties of a unipolar gas are qualitatively similar to the properties of a KdV gas [Dutykh and Pelinovsky (2014) [1

  17. Fast Dynamical Evolution of Hadron Resonance Gas via Hagedorn States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beitel, M.; Gallmeister, K.; Greiner, C.

    2017-01-01

    Hagedorn states (HS) are a tool to model the hadronization process which occurs in the phase transition region between the quark gluon plasma (QGP) and the hadron resonance gas (HRG). These states are believed to appear near the Hagedorn temperature TH which in our understanding equals the critical temperature Tc . A covariantly formulated bootstrap equation is solved to generate the zoo of these particles characterized baryon number B, strangeness S and electric charge Q. These hadron-like resonances are characterized by being very massive and by not being limited to quantum numbers of known hadrons. All hadronic properties like masses, spectral functions etc. are taken from the hadronic transport model Ultra Relativistic Quantum Molecular Dynamics (UrQMD). Decay chains of single Hagedorn states provide a well description of experimentally observed multiplicity ratios of strange and multi-strange particles as the Ξ0- and the Ω‑-baryon. In addition, the final energy spectra of resulting hadrons show a thermal-like distribution with the characteristic Hagedorn temperature TH . Box calculations including these Hagedorn states are performed. Indeed, the time scales leading to equilibration of the system are drastically reduced down to 2. . . 5 fm/c.

  18. Dynamics of a lattice gas system of three species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuanshi; Wu, Hong; Liang, Junhao

    2016-10-01

    This paper considers a mutualism system of three species in which each species provides resource for the next one in a one-directional loop, while there exists spatial competition among them. The system is characterized by a lattice gas model and the cases of obligate mutualisms, obligate-facultative mutualisms and facultative mutualisms are considered. Using dynamical systems theory, it is shown that (i) the mutualisms can lead to coexistence of species; (ii) A weak mutualism or an extremely strong mutualism will result in extinction of species, while even the superior facultative species will be driven into extinction by its over-strong mutualism on the next one; (iii) Initial population density plays a role in the coexistence of species. It is also shown that when there exists weak mutualism, an obligate species can survive by providing more benefit to the next one, and the inferior facultative species will not be driven into extinction if it can strengthen its mutualism on the next species. Moreover, Hopf bifurcation, saddle-node bifurcation and bifurcation of heteroclinic cycles are shown in the system. Projection method is extended to exhibit bistability in the three-dimensional model: when saddle-node bifurcation occurs, stable manifold of the saddle-node point divides intR+3 into two basins of attraction of two equilibria. Furthermore, Lyapunov method is applied to exhibit unstability of heteroclinic cycles. Numerical simulations confirm and extend our results.

  19. Low-Carbon Fuel and Chemical Production by Anaerobic Gas Fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniell, James; Nagaraju, Shilpa; Burton, Freya; Köpke, Michael; Simpson, Séan Dennis

    World energy demand is expected to increase by up to 40% by 2035. Over this period, the global population is also expected to increase by a billion people. A challenge facing the global community is not only to increase the supply of fuel, but also to minimize fossil carbon emissions to safeguard the environment, at the same time as ensuring that food production and supply is not detrimentally impacted. Gas fermentation is a rapidly maturing technology which allows low carbon fuel and commodity chemical synthesis. Unlike traditional biofuel technologies, gas fermentation avoids the use of sugars, relying instead on gas streams rich in carbon monoxide and/or hydrogen and carbon dioxide as sources of carbon and energy for product synthesis by specialized bacteria collectively known as acetogens. Thus, gas fermentation enables access to a diverse array of novel, large volume, and globally available feedstocks including industrial waste gases and syngas produced, for example, via the gasification of municipal waste and biomass. Through the efforts of academic labs and early stage ventures, process scale-up challenges have been surmounted through the development of specialized bioreactors. Furthermore, tools for the genetic improvement of the acetogenic bacteria have been reported, paving the way for the production of a spectrum of ever-more valuable products via this process. As a result of these developments, interest in gas fermentation among both researchers and legislators has grown significantly in the past 5 years to the point that this approach is now considered amongst the mainstream of emerging technology solutions for near-term low-carbon fuel and chemical synthesis.

  20. The electrothermal feasibility of carbon microcoil heaters for cold/hot gas microthrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, K. L.; Eriksson, A. B.; Thorslund, R.; Köhler, J.; Boman, M.; Stenmark, L.

    2006-07-01

    With the miniaturization of spacecraft the need for efficient, accurate and low-weight attitude control systems is becoming evident. To this end, the cold/hot gas microthruster system of this paper incorporates carbon microcoils—deposited via laser-induced chemical vapor deposition—for heating the propellant gas (nitrogen) before the nozzle inlet. By increasing the temperature of the propellant gas for such a system, the specific impulse (Isp) of the microthruster will increase. The benefits of a higher Isp are lower propellant mass, higher thrust and shorter burning times. Therefore, the feasibility of achieving this increase with the carbon microcoils is investigated. The carbon microcoils have been characterized experimentally with respect to their electrothermal performance, i.e. resistance, temperature, parasitic heat losses and degradation in ambient. The resulting heat losses from the heater and the heated gas have been estimated through a combination of experiments, numerical simulation and approximate analytical expressions. At high powers, degradation of the carbon material leads to coil failure in ambient where trace oxygen was present. Thus, the next generation of carbon microcoils to be tested will have a protective coating to extend their lifetime. Theoretical modeling showed that an increase in the propellant gas temperature from 300 to 1200 K and a corresponding two-fold increase in the Isp can be achieved if 1.0 W of power is supplied to each coil in a three-coil thruster. These simulation results show that if the coils are capable of dissipating 1 W of heat at 1700 K coil temperature, the doubling of the Isp may be achieved. Comparing to the electrothermal characterization results we find that the carbon coils can survive at 1700 K if protected, and that they can be expected to reach 1700 K at power below 1 W.

  1. Lupus disks with faint CO isotopologues: low gas/dust or high carbon depletion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miotello, A.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Williams, J. P.; Ansdell, M.; Guidi, G.; Hogerheijde, M.; Manara, C. F.; Tazzari, M.; Testi, L.; van der Marel, N.; van Terwisga, S.

    2017-03-01

    Context. An era has started in which gas and dust can be observed independently in protoplanetary disks, thanks to the recent surveys with the Atacama Large Millimeter/sub-millimeter Array (ALMA). The first near-complete high-resolution disk survey in both dust and gas in a single star-forming region has been carried out in Lupus, finding surprisingly low gas-to-dust ratios. Aims: The goal of this work is to fully exploit CO isotopologue observations in Lupus, comparing them with physical-chemical model results, in order to obtain gas masses for a large number of disks and compare gas and dust properties. Methods: We have employed the grid of physical-chemical models presented previously to analyze continuum and CO isotopologue (13CO J = 3-2 and C18O J = 3-2) observations of Lupus disks, including isotope-selective processes and freeze-out. We also employed the ALMA 13CO-only detections to calculate disk gas masses for a total of 34 sources, which expands the sample of 10 disks reported earlier, where C18O was also detected. Results: We confirm that overall gas-masses are very low, often lower than 1MJ, when volatile carbon is not depleted. Accordingly, global gas-to-dust ratios are much lower than the expected interstellar-medium value of 100, which is predominantly between 1 and 10. Low CO-based gas masses and gas-to-dust ratios may indicate rapid loss of gas, or alternatively chemical evolution, for example, through sequestering of carbon from CO to more complex molecules, or carbon locked up in larger bodies. Conclusions: Current ALMA observations of 13CO and continuum emission cannot distinguish between these two hypotheses. We have simulated both scenarios, but chemical model results do not allow us to rule out one of the two, pointing to the need to calibrate CO-based masses with other tracers. Assuming that all Lupus disks have evolved mainly as a result of viscous processes over the past few Myr, the previously observed correlation between the current mass

  2. Carbon dioxide gas sensor derived from a 547-hole microstructured polymer optical fiber preform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Wang, Lili

    2010-10-01

    In this Letter, we report a carbon dioxide gas sensor having 547 pieces of thin-film modified capillaries, which are derived from a microstructured polymer optical fiber preform. Compared with the conventional absorption-based sensor, the monolithic polymer capillary waveguide arrays have better sensitivity, because the huge sensing surfaces, composed of 547 pieces of dye-indicator-doped porous ethyl cellulose layers, interact directly with the gas molecules. As far as we know, a gas sensor based on multichannel capillary waveguide arrays has not been reported before.

  3. Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide with Enhanced Gas Recovery-CaseStudy Altmark, North German Basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebscher, Dorothee; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2005-10-12

    Geologic carbon dioxide storage is one strategy for reducingCO2 emissions into the atmosphere. Depleted natural gas reservoirs are anobvious target for CO2 storage due to their proven record of gascontainment. Germany has both large industrial sources of CO2 anddepleting gas reservoirs. The purpose of this report is to describe theanalysis and modeling performed to investigate the feasibility ofinjecting CO2 into nearly depleted gas reservoirs in the Altmark area inNorth Germany for geologic CO2 storage with enhanced gasrecovery.

  4. Effect of Varying Inert Gas and Acetylene Concentration on the Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afrin, Rahat; Abbas, Syed Mustansar; Shah, Nazar Abbas; Mustafa, Muhammad Farooq; Ali, Zulfiqar; Ahmad, Nisar

    2016-03-01

    The multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with small diameter and high purity were achieved by chemical vapor deposition technique using silicon substrate. The introduction of specific concentration of inert gas with hydrocarbon played a key role in controlling morphology and diameter of MWCNTs. Nickel mixed ferrite nanoparticles were used as a catalyst for the growth of MWCNTs. Growth parameters like concentration of hydrocarbon source and inert gas flow, composition of catalyst particles and growth temperature were studied. In this work smaller diameter and twisted MWCNTs were formed by dilution of acetylene with argon gas. Electrical properties suggest a semimetallic behavior of synthesized MWCNTs.

  5. Efficient boron-carbon-nitrogen nanotube formation via combined laser-gas flow levitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitney, R Roy; Jordan, Kevin; Smith, Michael W

    2015-03-24

    A process for producing boron nitride nanotubes and/or boron-carbon-nitrogen nanotubes of the general formula B.sub.xC.sub.yN.sub.z. The process utilizes a combination of laser light and nitrogen gas flow to support a boron ball target during heating of the boron ball target and production of a boron vapor plume which reacts with nitrogen or nitrogen and carbon to produce boron nitride nanotubes and/or boron-carbon-nitrogen nanotubes of the general formula B.sub.xC.sub.yN.sub.z.

  6. Efficient Boron-Carbon-Nitrogen Nanotube Formation Via Combined Laser-Gas Flow Levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, R. Roy (Inventor); Jordan, Kevin (Inventor); Smith, Michael W. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A process for producing boron nitride nanotubes and/or boron-carbon-nitrogen nanotubes of the general formula BxCyNz. The process utilizes a combination of laser light and nitrogen gas flow to support a boron ball target during heating of the boron ball target and production of a boron vapor plume which reacts with nitrogen or nitrogen and carbon to produce boron nitride nanotubes and/or boron-carbon-nitrogen nanotubes of the general formula BxCyNz.

  7. Gas properties of winter lake ice in Northern Sweden: implication for carbon gas release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Boereboom

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes gas composition, total gas content and bubbles characteristics in winter lake ice for four adjacent lakes in a discontinuous permafrost area. Our gas mixing ratios for O2, N2, CO2, and CH4 suggest that gas exchange occurs between the bubbles and the water before entrapment in the ice. Comparison between lakes enabled us to identify 2 major "bubbling events" shown to be related to a regional drop of atmospheric pressure. Further comparison demonstrates that winter lake gas content is strongly dependent on hydrological connections: according to their closed/open status with regards to water exchange, lakes build up more or less greenhouse gases (GHG in their water and ice cover during the winter, and release it during spring melt. These discrepancies between lakes need to be taken into account when establishing a budget for permafrost regions. Our analysis allows us to present a new classification of bubbles, according to their gas properties. Our methane emission budgets (from 6.52 10−5 to 12.7 mg CH4 m−2 d−1 at 4 different lakes for the three months of winter ice cover is complementary to other budget estimates, as our approach encompasses inter- and intra-lake variability.

    Most available studies on boreal lakes have focused on quantifying GHG emissions from sediment by means of various systems collecting gases at the lake surface, and this mainly during the summer "open water" period. Only few of these have looked at the gas enclosed in the winter ice-cover itself. Our approach enables us to integrate, for the first time, the history of winter gas emission for this type of lakes.

  8. A Molecular Dynamics Study on the Confinement of Carbon Dioxide Molecules in Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazor, Meagan; Rende, Deniz; Baysal, Nihat; Ozisik, Rahmi

    2012-02-01

    The influence of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration on global warming is considered as one of the primary environmental issues of the past two decades. The main source of CO2 emission is human activity, such as the use of fossil fuels in transportation and industrial plants. Following the release of Kyoto Protocol in 1997, effective ways of controlling CO2 emissions received much attention. As a result, various materials such as activated carbon, zeolites, and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were investigated for their CO2 adsorbing properties. CNTs were reported to have CO2 adsorption capability twice that of activated carbon, hence they received the most attention. In the current study, single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were used as one dimensional nanoporous materials and their CO2 adsorption capacity was analyzed with Molecular Dynamics simulations. Results indicated that SWNTs are excellent CO2 adsorbers and their effectiveness increase at low CO2 concentrations. In addition, we showed that by varying temperature, CO2 can be removed from the SWNTs, providing a simple method to reuse SWNTs.

  9. Dipolar dissociation dynamics in electron collisions with carbon monoxide

    CERN Document Server

    Chakraborty, Dipayan; Nandi, Dhananjay

    2016-01-01

    Dipolar dissociation processes in the electron collisions with carbon monoxide have been studied using time of flight (TOF) mass spectroscopy in combination with the highly differential velocity slice imaging (VSI) technique. Probing ion-pair states both positive and/or negative ions may be detected. The ion yield curve of negative ions provides the threshold energy for the ion-pair production. On the other hand, the kinetic energy distributions and angular distributions of the fragment anion provide detailed dynamics of the dipolar dissociation process. Two ion-pair states have been identified based on angular distribution measurements using VSI technique.

  10. Low Power, Wide Dynamic Range Carbon Nanotube Vacuum Gauges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaul, Anupama B.; Manohara, Harish M.

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation presents carbon nanotube vacuum pressure sensor gauges that operate at low power and exhibit a wide-dynamic range based on microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technology. The fabrication facility, and the formation process are shown. Pressure sensitivity was found to increase rapidly as the bias power was increased. In addition, by etching part of the thermal SiO2 beneath the tubes and minimizing heat conduction through the substrate, pressure sensitivity was extended toward lower pressures. Results are compared to a conventional thin film meander resistor, which was fabricated and whose pressure response was also measured for comparative purposes.

  11. Carbon dynamics of intensively managed forest along a full rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreaux, V.; Bosc, A.; Bonnefond, J.; Burlett, R.; Lamaud, E.; Sartore, M.; Trichet, P.; Chipeaux, C.; Lambrot, C.; Kowalski, A. S.; Loustau, D.

    2012-12-01

    Temperate and tropical forests are increasingly exploited for wood and biomass extraction and only one third of forest area was considered as primary in the recent FRA in 2010. Management practices affect the soil-forest-atmosphere continuum through various effects on soil and surface properties. They result ultimately in either positive or negative changes in the biomass and soil carbon pools but, if any, few datasets or modeling tools are available for quantifying their impacts on the net carbon balance of forest stands. To analyse these effects, the net half-hourly fluxes of CO2, water vapour and heat exchanges were monitored for 23 years in two closed stands of maritime pines in southwestern France. Carbon content of the aboveground biomass was measured annually and soil pools 10-early in the younger stand and 5-yearly in the mature stand. For analysing the data collected and disentangling the climate and management effects, we used the three components process-based model GRAECO+ (Loustau et al. this session) linking a 3D radiative transfer and photosynthesis model, MAESTRA, a soil carbon model adapted from ROTH-C and a plant growth model. Eddy flux data were processed, gapfilled and partitioned using the methodological recommendations (Aubinet et al. 2000, Adv. Eco. Res:30, 114-173, Falge et al. 2001, Agr. For. Meteo. : 107, 43-69, Reichstein et al. 2005, Glob. Change Biol., 11:1424-1439). Analysis of the sequence showed that, whether by an increased sensitivity to soil drought compared to the pines or by a rapid re-colonization of the inter-row after understorey removal and plowing, the weeded vegetation contributed to create specific intra-annual dynamics of the fluxes and therefore, controls the dynamics of carbon balance of the stand. After three growing seasons, the stand was already a carbon sink, but the impact of thinning and weeded vegetation removal at the age of 5-year brought the balance to almost neutral. We interpret this change as the combined

  12. Can Switching from Coal to Shale Gas Bring Net Carbon Reductions to China?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yue; Edwards, Ryan; Tong, Fan; Mauzerall, Denise L

    2017-02-21

    To increase energy security and reduce emissions of air pollutants and CO2 from coal use, China is attempting to duplicate the rapid development of shale gas that has taken place in the United States. This work builds a framework to estimate the lifecycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from China's shale gas system and compares them with GHG emissions from coal used in the power, residential, and industrial sectors. We find the mean lifecycle carbon footprint of shale gas is about 30-50% lower than that of coal in all sectors under both 20 year and 100 year global warming potentials (GWP20 and GWP100). However, primarily due to large uncertainties in methane leakage, the upper bound estimate of the lifecycle carbon footprint of shale gas in China could be approximately 15-60% higher than that of coal across sectors under GWP20. To ensure net GHG emission reductions when switching from coal to shale gas, we estimate the breakeven methane leakage rates to be approximately 6.0%, 7.7%, and 4.2% in the power, residential, and industrial sectors, respectively, under GWP20. We find shale gas in China has a good chance of delivering air quality and climate cobenefits, particularly when used in the residential sector, with proper methane leakage control.

  13. Fire, Carbon, and Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Aquatic Ecosystems in the Yukon-Kuskokwim River Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schade, J. D.; Kuhn, M. A.; Mann, P. J.; Holmes, R. M.; Natali, S.; Ludwig, S.; Wagner, S.

    2016-12-01

    Northern latitudes are experiencing rapid changes in climate that are profoundly altering permafrost-dominated ecosystems. Increased permafrost thaw and fire frequency and severity are changing the structure and function of these ecosystems in ways likely to alter greenhouse gas (GHG) emission, leading to feedbacks on climate that may accelerate warming. Our objective was to investigate changes in GHG emissions and carbon and nitrogen dynamics in aquatic ecosystems in response to recent fires in the Yukon-Kuskokwim river delta in western Alaska. In summer 2015, more area in the YK Delta burned then in the previous 74 years combined (726 km2 in 2015 vs. 477 km2 during 1940-2014). In June of 2016, we sampled water and dissolved gases from a variety of aquatic ecosystems, including small upland ponds and wetlands and streams lower in the landscape, in recently burned and control sites near the Kuka Creek 2015 burn scar in the Yukon Delta National Wildlife Refuge. We measured a range of physical parameters, including water temperature, conductivity, dissolved oxygen, and pH. We also estimated fluxes of CO2 and CH4 from surface waters using a floating chamber connected to a Los Gatos Ultraportable gas analyzer. Water samples were analyzed for dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and total dissolved nitrogen (TDN). Results show reduced DOC concentrations in small upland ponds in burned sites and evidence for loss of DOC downslope in control sites. In contrast, TDN concentration was higher in streams draining burned sites, suggesting fire mobilized N in soils, which was then transported to downslope ecosystems. Furthermore, fire generally increased pH, particularly in small ponds. Finally, we observed 3-4 fold higher CO2 and CH4 fluxes from aquatic ecosystems in burned sites as compared with control sites. We hypothesize that this is due to increased thaw depth and increased pH, which combine to increase resource availability and release methane-producing microbes from the

  14. Model Establishment for Simulating Soil Organic Carbon Dynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Yao; LIU Shi-liang; SHEN Qi-rong; ZONG Liang-gang

    2002-01-01

    Assuming that decomposition of organic matter in soils follows the first-order kinetics reaction,a computer model was developed to simulate soil organic matter dynamics. Organic matter in soils is divided up into two parts that include incorporated organic carbon from crop residues or other organic fertilizer and soil intrinsic carbon. The incorporated organic carbon was assumed to consist of two components, labile-C and resistant-C. The model was represented by a differential equation of dCi/dt = Ki× fT × fw × fs × Ci ( i = l,r, S ) and an integral equation of Cit = Cio × EXP ( Ki X fT X fw X fs X t ). Effect of soil parameters of temperature, moisture and texture on the decomposition was functioned by the fT, fw and fs, respectively.Data from laboratory incubation experiments were used to determine the first-order decay rate Ki and the fraction of labile-C of crop residues by employing a nonlinear method. The values of K for the components of labile-C and resistant-C and the soil intrinsic carbon were evaluated to be 0. 025,0. 080 × 10-2 and 0. 065 ×10-3d-1, respectively. The labile-C fraction of wheat straw, wheat roots, rice straw and rice roots were0.50, 0.25, 0.40 and 0.20, respectively. These values are related to the initial residue carbon-to-nitrogen ratio ( C/N) and lignin content.

  15. Prediction onset and dynamic behaviour of liquid loading gas wells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belfroid, S.P.C.; Schiferli, W.; Alberts, G.J.N.; Veeken, C.A.M.; Biezen, E.

    2008-01-01

    As reservoir pressures decrease in maturing gas wells, liquid drop-out forms an increasing restriction on gas production. Even though virtually all of the world's gas wells are either at risk of or suffering from liquid loading, the modeling of liquid loading behavior is still quite immature and the

  16. Development and comparisons of efficient gas-cultivation systems for anaerobic carbon monoxide-utilizing microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Jack; Todd French, W; Hernandez, Rafael; Easterling, Emily; Zappi, Mark; Morrison, Christine; Licha, Margarita; Brown, Lewis R

    2008-02-01

    We describe a system for the cultivation of gaseous substrate utilizing microorganisms that overcomes some of the limitations of fixed volume culture vessels and the costs associated with sparging. Cali-5-Bond gas-sampling bag was used as the culture vessel. The bags contain approximately six times more mass of CO than the 40 mL vials at 1 atm of pressure and performed equally to the 40 mL vials in terms of their ability to maintain the composition of the gas over extended incubation times. Experiments using Clostridium ljungdahlii and CO as the sole carbon and energy source in both the gas sampling bag cultivation system and the traditional vial system demonstrated that this culture had a 15x increase in optical density in 24 h of incubation. The gas-sampling bags offer a viable alternative to gas sparging while overcoming the limitations of fixed volume culture vessels.

  17. Carbon film coating on gas diffusion layer for proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jui-Hsiang; Chen, Wei-Hung; Su, Shih-Hsuan; Liao, Yuan-Kai; Ko, Tse-Hao

    This study discusses a novel process to increase the performance of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC). In order to improve the electrical conductivity and reduce the surface indentation of the carbon fibers, we modified the carbon fibers with pitch-based carbon materials (mesophase pitch and coal tar pitch). Compared with the gas diffusion backing (GDB), GDB-A240 and GDB-MP have 32% and 33% higher current densities at 0.5 V, respectively. Self-made carbon paper with the addition of a micro-porous layer (MPL) (GDL-A240 and GDL-MP) show improved performance compared with GDB-A240 and GDB-MP. The current densities of GDL-A240 and GDL-MP at 0.5 V increased by 37% and 31% compared with GDL, respectively. This study combines these two effects (carbon film and MPL coating) to promote high current density in a PEMFC.

  18. Carbon formation and metal dusting in hot-gas cleanup systems of coal gasifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Judkins, R.R.; Tortorelli, P.F.; Judkins, R.R.; DeVan, J.H.; Wright, I.G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Metals and Ceramics Div.

    1995-11-01

    The product gas resulting from the partial oxidation of Carboniferous materials in a gasifier is typically characterized by high carbon and sulfur, but low oxygen, activities and, consequently, severe degradation of the structural and functional materials can occur. The objective of this task was to establish the potential risks of carbon deposition and metal dusting in advanced coal gasification processes by examining the current state of knowledge regarding these phenomena, making appropriate thermochemical calculations for representative coal gasifiers, and addressing possible mitigation methods. The paper discusses carbon activities, iron-based phase stabilities, steam injection, conditions that influence kinetics of carbon deposition, and influence of system operating parameters on carbon deposition and metal dusting.

  19. Carbon nanocomposite sorbent and methods of using the same for separation of one or more materials from a gas stream

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, Edwin S.; Pavlish, John Henry

    2017-05-30

    The present invention relates to carbon nanocomposite sorbents. The present invention provides carbon nanocomposite sorbents, methods for making the same, and methods for separation of a pollutant from a gas that includes that pollutant. Various embodiments provide a method for reducing the mercury content of a mercury-containing gas.

  20. The greenhouse gas balance of the oil palm industry in Colombia: a preliminary analysis. I. Carbon sequestration and carbon offsets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian E Henson

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Colombia is currently the world’s fifth largest producer of palm oil and the largest producer in South and Central America. It has substantial areas of land that could be used for additional oil palm production and there is considerable scope for increasing yields of existing planted areas. Much of the vegetation on land suitable for conversion to oil palm has a low biomass, and so establishing oil palm plantations on such land should lead to an increase in carbon stock, thereby counteracting greenhouse gas (GHG emissions responsible for global warming. The first part of this study examines changes in carbon stock in Colombia resulting from expansion of oil palm cultivation together with factors (offsets that act to minimize carbon emissions. The results are subsequently used to construct a net GHG balance

  1. Gas Sensors Based on Coated and Doped Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Meyyappan, Meyya

    2008-01-01

    Efforts are underway to develop inexpensive, low-power electronic sensors, based on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), for measuring part-per-million and part-per-billion of selected gases (small molecules) at room temperature. Chemically unmodified SWCNTs are mostly unresponsive to typical gases that one might wish to detect. However, the electrical resistances of SWCNTs can be made to vary with concentrations of gases of interest by coating or doping the SWCNTs with suitable materials. Accordingly, the basic idea of the present development efforts is to incorporate thus-treated SWCNTs into electronic devices that measure their electrical resistances.

  2. Planar gas chromatography column on aluminum plate with multi-walled carbon nanotubes as stationary phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platonov, I. A.; Platonov, V. I.; Pavelyev, V. S.

    2016-04-01

    The high selectivity of the adsorption layer for low-boiling alkanes is shown, the separation factor (α) couple iso-butane / butane is 1.9 at a column temperature of 50 °C.The paper presents sorption and selective properties of planar gas chromatography column on aluminum plate with multi-walled carbon nanotubes as the stationary phase.

  3. Economic and Environmental Assessment of Natural Gas Plants with Carbon Capture and Storage (NGCC-CCS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The CO2 intensity of electricity produced by state-of-the-art natural gas combined-cycle turbines (NGCC) isapproximately one-third that of the U.S. fleet of existing coal plants. Compared to new nuclear plants and coal plantswith integrated carbon capture, NGCC has a lower invest...

  4. Greenhouse gas and carbon profile of the U.S. forest products industry value chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linda S. Heath; Van Maltby; Reid Miner; Kenneth E. Skog; James E. Smith; Jay Unwin; Brad Upton

    2010-01-01

    A greenhouse gas and carbon accounting profile was developed for the U.S. forest products industry value chain for 1990 and 2004-2005 by examining net atmospheric fluxes of CO2 and other greenhouse gases (GHGs) using a variety of methods and data sources. Major GHG emission sources include direct and indirect (from purchased electricity...

  5. Modeling nanoscale gas sensors under realistic conditions: Computational screening of metal-doped carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    García Lastra, Juan Maria; Mowbray, Duncan; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2010-01-01

    We use computational screening to systematically investigate the use of transition-metal-doped carbon nanotubes for chemical-gas sensing. For a set of relevant target molecules (CO, NH3, and H2S) and the main components of air (N2, O2, and H2O), we calculate the binding energy and change...

  6. Dynamic performance of power generation systems for off-shore oil and gas platforms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pierobon, Leonardo; Breuhaus, Peter; Haglind, Fredrik

    2014-01-01

    On off-shore oil and gas platforms two or more gas turbines typically support the electrical demand on site by operating as a stand-alone (island) power system. As reliability and availability are major concerns during operation, the dynamic performance of the power generation system becomes...... a crucial aspect for stable operation and prevention of unwanted shut down in case of disturbances in the local grid. This paper aims at developing and validating a dynamic model of the gas turbine-based power generation system installed on the Draugen off-shore oil and gas platform (located in the North...... Sea, Norway). The dynamic model of the SGT-500 gas turbine includes dynamic equations for the combustion chamber and for the high pressure, low pressure and turbine shafts. The low and high pressure compressors are modeled by using quasi steady-state conditions by scaling the maps of axial compressors...

  7. NONLINEAR DYNAMICS OF CARBON NANOTUBES UNDER LARGE ELECTROSTATIC FORCE

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Tiantian

    2015-06-01

    Because of the inherent nonlinearities involving the behavior of CNTs when excited by electrostatic forces, modeling and simulating their behavior is challenging. The complicated form of the electrostatic force describing the interaction of their cylindrical shape, forming upper electrodes, to lower electrodes poises serious computational challenges. This presents an obstacle against applying and using several nonlinear dynamics tools typically used to analyze the behavior of complicated nonlinear systems undergoing large motion, such as shooting, continuation, and integrity analysis techniques. This works presents an attempt to resolve this issue. We present an investigation of the nonlinear dynamics of carbon nanotubes when actuated by large electrostatic forces. We study expanding the complicated form of the electrostatic force into enough number of terms of the Taylor series. Then, we utilize this form along with an Euler-Bernoulli beam model to study for the first time the dynamic behavior of CNTs when excited by large electrostatic force. The geometric nonlinearity and the nonlinear electrostatic force are considered. An efficient reduced-order model (ROM) based on the Galerkin method is developed and utilized to simulate the static and dynamic responses of the CNTs. Several results are generated demonstrating softening and hardening behavior of the CNTs near their primary and secondary resonances. The effects of the DC and AC voltage loads on the behavior have been studied. The impacts of the initial slack level and CNT diameter are also demonstrated.

  8. Authigenic carbonates related to gas seepage structures in the sea of Okhotsk NE offshore Sakhalin : results from the Chaos project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krylov, A.; Hachikubo, A.; Minami, H.; Nunokawa, Y.; Shoji, H. [Kitami Inst. of Technology, Kitami (Japan); Logvina, E.; Mazurenko, L.; Matveeva, T. [VNIIOkeangeologia, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Obzhirov, A. [V.I. Il' ichev Pacific Oceanological Inst. of FEB RAS, Vladivostok (Russian Federation); Jin, Y.K. [Korea Polar Research Inst., Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-07-01

    The Derugin Basin in Russia contains large deposits of gas hydrates. This paper presented isotopic and mineralogical analyses of authigenic carbonates from gas hydrate seepage structures in the Derugin Basin. Carbonate samples were taken from 20 sites located in 17 seepage structures in the basin. The mineralogy and isotope geochemistry of the authigenic carbonates were then compared in order to illustrate the processes associated with gas seepage to the seafloor, and to characterize the precipitation of authigenic carbonates at different seeps. Samples were analyzed using X-ray diffraction analyses. Results of the study demonstrated the existence of 4 different morphological types of carbonates comprised mainly of magnesium (Mg) calcite. Carbonates were poorly consolidated and fragile during the initial stage of carbonate concretion formation. In later stages, the carbonates became denser with a dendritic, or elongated shape, or rounded with subangular dense concretions. The final type was a tubicolous carbonate formed by the substitution of Polychaeta worms or burrows. The carbonates were light due to the presence of carbon from microbial methane. A mathematical model of the carbon-enriched samples was used to characterize carbonate precipitation caused by methanogenesis. A comparison between the model and samples obtained during field tests showed that the calculated equilibrium of the carbonates corresponded with the measured values. It was concluded that the basic mechanism of carbonate formation within the seepage structures was anaerobic methane oxidation via sulfate reduction. 22 refs., 2 figs.

  9. [Monitoring the flux of carbon dioxide gas with tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xue-Mei; Liu, Jian-Guo; Zhang, Yu-Jun; Zeng, Zong-Yong; He, Ying; Cui, Yi-Ben; Chen, Yin; Tian, Yong-Zhi; Zhang, Liang

    2011-01-01

    The greenhouse effect exacerbated by the increase of Carbon-containing gases is the more important causes of the climate change, It is very meaningful to the large-scale flux of carbon dioxide detection for the estimate the contributions of the main greenhouse gases in the atmosphere of various errestrial eco-systems. Tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) is a highly sensitive, highly selective and fast time response trace gas detection technique. In the present paper, the authors used a DFB laser was used as the light source, and by employing wavelength modulation method, and measuring the second harmonic signal of one absorption line near 1.573 microm of carbon dioxide molecule, the authors built a system for online monitoring of carbon dioxide concentration within the optical path of more than 700 meters at different heights. Combined with Alonzo Mourning -Obukhov length and characteristic velocity detected by large aperture scintillometer, the flux of carbon dioxide gas within one day calculated by the formula is within--1.5-2.5, breaking through the phenomenon of only providing the flux of trace gases near the ground at present, makking the measurement of trace gas fluxes within a large area possible.

  10. Direct gas-solid carbonation kinetics of steel slag and the contribution to in situ sequestration of flue gas CO(2) in steel-making plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Sicong; Jiang, Jianguo; Chen, Xuejing; Yan, Feng; Li, Kaimin

    2013-12-01

    Direct gas-solid carbonation of steel slag under various operational conditions was investigated to determine the sequestration of the flue gas CO2 . X-ray diffraction analysis of steel slag revealed the existence of portlandite, which provided a maximum theoretical CO2 sequestration potential of 159.4 kg CO 2 tslag (-1) as calculated by the reference intensity ratio method. The carbonation reaction occurred through a fast kinetically controlled stage with an activation energy of 21.29 kJ mol(-1) , followed by 10(3) orders of magnitude slower diffusion-controlled stage with an activation energy of 49.54 kJ mol(-1) , which could be represented by a first-order reaction kinetic equation and the Ginstling equation, respectively. Temperature, CO2 concentration, and the presence of SO2 impacted on the carbonation conversion of steel slag through their direct and definite influence on the rate constants. Temperature was the most important factor influencing the direct gas-solid carbonation of steel slag in terms of both the carbonation conversion and reaction rate. CO2 concentration had a definite influence on the carbonation rate during the kinetically controlled stage, and the presence of SO2 at typical flue gas concentrations enhanced the direct gas-solid carbonation of steel slag. Carbonation conversions between 49.5 % and 55.5 % were achieved in a typical flue gas at 600 °C, with the maximum CO2 sequestration amount generating 88.5 kg CO 2 tslag (-1) . Direct gas-solid carbonation of steel slag showed a rapid CO2 sequestration rate, high CO2 sequestration amounts, low raw-material costs, and a large potential for waste heat utilization, which is promising for in situ carbon capture and sequestration in the steel industry.

  11. Successional changes in vegetation and carbon dynamics during boreal mire development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leppaelae, M.

    2012-07-01

    Succession is a compositional change of species and other ecosystem characteristics over time. Mire development, i.e., long-term mire succession is basically driven by an increase in peat layer height, promoting changes in hydrology, vegetation and nutrient status of a particular mire. Due to this, ecosystem processes, such as production and loss of carbon due to decomposition (i.e. carbon gas functions), change with increasing successional mire stage. An adequate method for studying the changes in ecosystem C functions is to measure CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} fluxes between the ecosystem and atmosphere. Succession and carbon dynamics of boreal pristine mires have been much studied. However the link between these phenomena is largely unknown. Further, if and how the C gas functions of mires change during mire succession it is rather poorly understood. The main objective of this thesis was to study how ecosystem functions, measured as CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} exchange, change during mire development. The study also aims to explore the drivers of succession in mire development, i.e., mire succession. Successional mire C dynamics were studied along an eight-kilometer-long successional sequence of primary paludified mires located in the land uplift coast of the Bothnian Bay. Due to the short distance between sites, they all have been under the same climatic control for most of their development. The gradual replacement of plant species with different photosynthetic potential, phenology and assimilating green area resulted in lower-level and temporal variation of CO{sub 2} exchange patterns at the later successional stages. Similar to this, CH{sub 4} also had the lowest interannual variation in the later stages. In general, CH{sub 4} emissions increased with mire age even though this trend did not emerge during the rainy season. Further, this study showed that the wintertime C function pattern was related to the C pattern during the previous summer confirming the important

  12. Particle-Gas Dynamics and Primitive Meteorite Parent Bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuzzi, J. N.; Dobrovolskis, A. R.; Champney, J. M.; Hogan, R. M.

    1993-07-01

    A major obstacle to understanding the accretion of primitive meteorite parent bodies has been the lack of a credible theoretical framework for the environment in which the earliest accretion occurs. Chondrules and inclusions in primitive meteorites are in the millimeter-centimeter size range and the earliest aggregates of these objects must have been in the centimeter-meter size range. For these sizes, particle-gas dynamics are difficult to model: the particles are neither micron-sized and firmly anchored to the gas, nor kilometer-sized planetesimals already fully decoupled from the gas. Significant feedback and strong coupling between the gas and particle phases must be dealt with in this intermediate size range [1]. We have previously reported preliminary results concerning the stage of planetary formation during which the particulate material has grown into centimeter-to-meter sized primordial aggregates [2]. During this stage, particles are able to settle toward the midplane into a layer of mass density comparable to or much greater than that of the gas. We now report more mature results [3]. Our numerical models rely on the Reynolds averaged NavierStokes equations for the gas and particles, and are fully viscous, turbulent, and compressible. Our turbulence modeling uses a Prandtl local shear parametrization, validated by laboratory experiments. We have developed a new model for particle diffusivity (in turbulence) involving the particle Schmidt number, which is a function of particle size and density. We have modeled a cool, quiescent nebula at 1 AU (280K) and 10 AU (90K), and a possible FU Orionis or early high temperature stage (1000K) at 1 AU. Our main results include: (a) rapid accretion of planetesimals by gravitationally unstable fragmentation on an orbital timescale (the "Goldreich-Ward instability") is unlikely to occur until objects have already accreted by some other process to the mass of the largest known meteorite samples, if at all [4]; (b) from

  13. Economic Growth And Carbon Emission: A Dynamic Panel Data Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim BAKIRTAS

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between carbon dioxide emission (CO2 and economic growth is one of the crucial topics in environmental economics. This study is aimed to investigatethat problem. In this study, depending on the theory of Environmental Kuznets Curves (EKC, the impact of income in carbon dioxide emission has measured for 34 OECD and5 BRICS countries with using Dynamic Panel Data Analysis. In this regard OECD countries are classified by income groups due to the average per capita income rate ofOECD to solve the homogeneity problem among OECD countries. On the other hand EKC hypothesis analysed by short and long run income elasticity which will be using foran evident that a country reduces CO2 emissions with the income increase in this study. According to the findings of the study, % 36 of the country sample coherent with theEKC hypothesis. The main encouragement for testing this relationship between economic growth and CO2 emission is leading politicians to reconsider the environmental impactswhich are arising from income increase when they are taking a decision to maximizes the economic growth.Keywords: EKC; OECD; Dynamic Panel Data

  14. Satellite observation of particulate organic carbon dynamics in ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Particulate organic carbon (POC) plays an important role in coastal carbon cycling and the formation of hypoxia. Yet, coastal POC dynamics are often poorly understood due to a lack of long-term POC observations and the complexity of coastal hydrodynamic and biogeochemical processes that influence POC sources and sinks. Using field observations and satellite ocean color products, we developed a nw multiple regression algorithm to estimate POC on the Louisiana Continental Shelf (LCS) from satellite observations. The algorithm had reliable performance with mean relative error (MRE) of ?40% and root mean square error (RMSE) of ?50% for MODIS and SeaWiFS images for POC ranging between ?80 and ?1200 mg m23, and showed similar performance for a large estuary (Mobile Bay). Substantial spatiotemporal variability in the satellite-derived POC was observed on the LCS, with high POC found on the inner shelf (<10 m depth) and lower POC on the middle (10–50 m depth) and outer shelf (50–200 m depth), and with high POC found in winter (January–March) and lower POC in summer to fall (August–October). Correlation analysis between long-term POC time series and several potential influencing factors indicated that river discharge played a dominant role in POC dynamics on the LCS, while wind and surface currents also affected POC spatial patterns on short time scales. This study adds another example where satellite data with carefully developed algorithms can greatly increase

  15. Modelling of tetrahydrofuran promoted gas hydrate systems for carbon dioxide capture processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herslund, Peter Jørgensen; Thomsen, Kaj; Abildskov, Jens

    2014-01-01

    accurate descriptions of both fluid- and hydrate phase equilibria in the studied system and its subsystems. The developed model is applied to simulate two simplified, gas hydrate-based processes for post-combustion carbon dioxide capture from power station flue gases. The first process, an unpromoted...... hydrate process, operates isothermally at a temperature of 280. K. Applying three consecutive hydrate formation/dissociation stages (three-stage capture process), a carbon dioxide-rich product (97. mol%) is finally delivered at a temperature of 280. K and a pressure of 3.65. MPa. The minimum pressure...... requirement of the first stage is estimated to be 24.9. MPa, corresponding to the incipient hydrate dissociation pressure at 280. K for the considered flue gas. A second simulated carbon dioxide capture process uses tetrahydrofuran as a thermodynamic promoter to reduce the pressure requirements. By doing so...

  16. Automatic carbon dioxide-methane gas sensor based on the solubility of gases in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadena-Pereda, Raúl O; Rivera-Muñoz, Eric M; Herrera-Ruiz, Gilberto; Gomez-Melendez, Domingo J; Anaya-Rivera, Ely K

    2012-01-01

    Biogas methane content is a relevant variable in anaerobic digestion processing where knowledge of process kinetics or an early indicator of digester failure is needed. The contribution of this work is the development of a novel, simple and low cost automatic carbon dioxide-methane gas sensor based on the solubility of gases in water as the precursor of a sensor for biogas quality monitoring. The device described in this work was used for determining the composition of binary mixtures, such as carbon dioxide-methane, in the range of 0-100%. The design and implementation of a digital signal processor and control system into a low-cost Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) platform has permitted the successful application of data acquisition, data distribution and digital data processing, making the construction of a standalone carbon dioxide-methane gas sensor possible.

  17. Automatic Carbon Dioxide-Methane Gas Sensor Based on the Solubility of Gases in Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl O. Cadena-Pereda

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Biogas methane content is a relevant variable in anaerobic digestion processing where knowledge of process kinetics or an early indicator of digester failure is needed. The contribution of this work is the development of a novel, simple and low cost automatic carbon dioxide-methane gas sensor based on the solubility of gases in water as the precursor of a sensor for biogas quality monitoring. The device described in this work was used for determining the composition of binary mixtures, such as carbon dioxide-methane, in the range of 0–100%. The design and implementation of a digital signal processor and control system into a low-cost Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA platform has permitted the successful application of data acquisition, data distribution and digital data processing, making the construction of a standalone carbon dioxide-methane gas sensor possible.

  18. Carbon Co-Deposition During Gas Reduction of Water-Atomized Fe-Cr-Mo Powder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali B.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The water atomization of iron powder with a composition of Fe-3Cr-0.5Mo (wt.% at 1600°C and 150 bar creates an oxide layer, which in this study was reduced using a mixture of methane (CH4 and argon (Ar gas. The lowest oxygen content was achieved with a 100 cc/min flow rate of CH4, but this also resulted in a co-deposition of carbon due to the cracking of CH4. This carbon can be used directly to create high-quality, sinter hardenable steel, thereby eliminating the need for an additional mixing step prior to sintering. An exponential relationship was found to exist between the CH4 gas flow rate and carbon content of the powder, meaning that its composition can be easily controlled to suit a variety of different applications.

  19. Molecular dynamics analysis on buckling of defective carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulathunga, D D T K; Ang, K K; Reddy, J N

    2010-09-01

    Owing to their remarkable mechanical properties, carbon nanotubes have been employed in many diverse areas of applications. However, similar to any of the many man-made materials used today, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are also susceptible to various kinds of defects. Understanding the effect of defects on the mechanical properties and behavior of CNTs is essential in the design of nanotube-based devices and composites. It has been found in various past studies that these defects can considerably affect the tensile strength and fracture of CNTs. Comprehensive studies on the effect of defects on the buckling and vibration of nanotubes is however lacking in the literature. In this paper, the effects of various configurations of atomic vacancy defects, on axial buckling of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), in different thermal environments, is investigated using molecular dynamics simulations (MDS), based on a COMPASS force field. Our findings revealed that even a single missing atom can cause a significant reduction in the critical buckling strain and load of SWCNTs. In general, increasing the number of missing atoms, asymmetry of vacancy configurations and asymmetric distribution of vacancy clusters seemed to lead to higher deterioration in buckling properties. Further, SWCNTs with a single vacancy cluster, compared to SWCNTs with two or more vacancy clusters having the same number of missing atoms, appeared to cause higher deterioration of buckling properties. However, exceptions from the above mentioned trends could be expected due to chemical instabilities of defects. Temperature appeared to have less effect on defective CNTs compared to pristine CNTs.

  20. Molecular dynamics analysis on buckling of defective carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulathunga, D D T K; Ang, K K [Department of Civil Engineering, National University of Singapore (Singapore); Reddy, J N, E-mail: cveangkk@nus.edu.s [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843-3123 (United States)

    2010-09-01

    Owing to their remarkable mechanical properties, carbon nanotubes have been employed in many diverse areas of applications. However, similar to any of the many man-made materials used today, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are also susceptible to various kinds of defects. Understanding the effect of defects on the mechanical properties and behavior of CNTs is essential in the design of nanotube-based devices and composites. It has been found in various past studies that these defects can considerably affect the tensile strength and fracture of CNTs. Comprehensive studies on the effect of defects on the buckling and vibration of nanotubes is however lacking in the literature. In this paper, the effects of various configurations of atomic vacancy defects, on axial buckling of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), in different thermal environments, is investigated using molecular dynamics simulations (MDS), based on a COMPASS force field. Our findings revealed that even a single missing atom can cause a significant reduction in the critical buckling strain and load of SWCNTs. In general, increasing the number of missing atoms, asymmetry of vacancy configurations and asymmetric distribution of vacancy clusters seemed to lead to higher deterioration in buckling properties. Further, SWCNTs with a single vacancy cluster, compared to SWCNTs with two or more vacancy clusters having the same number of missing atoms, appeared to cause higher deterioration of buckling properties. However, exceptions from the above mentioned trends could be expected due to chemical instabilities of defects. Temperature appeared to have less effect on defective CNTs compared to pristine CNTs.

  1. Use of eutectic mixtures for preparation of monolithic carbons with CO₂-adsorption and gas-separation capabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Salas, N; Jardim, E O; Silvestre-Albero, A; Gutiérrez, M C; Ferrer, M L; Rodríguez-Reinoso, F; Silvestre-Albero, J; del Monte, F

    2014-10-21

    With global warming becoming one of the main problems our society is facing nowadays, there is an urgent demand to develop materials suitable for CO2 storage as well as for gas separation. Within this context, hierarchical porous structures are of great interest for in-flow applications because of the desirable combination of an extensive internal reactive surface along narrow nanopores with facile molecular transport through broad "highways" leading to and from these pores. Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) have been recently used in the synthesis of carbon monoliths exhibiting a bicontinuous porous structure composed of continuous macroporous channels and a continuous carbon network that contains a certain microporosity and provides considerable surface area. In this work, we have prepared two DESs for the preparation of two hierarchical carbon monoliths with different compositions (e.g., either nitrogen-doped or not) and structure. It is worth noting that DESs played a capital role in the synthesis of hierarchical carbon monoliths not only promoting the spinodal decomposition that governs the formation of the bicontinuous porous structure but also providing the precursors required to tailor the composition and the molecular sieve structure of the resulting carbons. We have studied the performance of these two carbons for CO2, N2, and CH4 adsorption in both monolithic and powdered form. We have also studied the selective adsorption of CO2 versus CH4 in equilibrium and dynamic conditions. We found that these materials combined a high CO2-sorption capacity besides an excellent CO2/N2 and CO2/CH4 selectivity and, interestingly, this performance was preserved when processed in both monolithic and powdered form.

  2. Major research approaches to solve gas-dynamic problems in Donbass coal mines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuzyara, V.I.; Agaphonov, A.V. [Makeyevka State Safety in Mine Research Institute, Makeyevka (Ukraine)

    1997-12-31

    The number of gas-dynamic events per million tons of coal mined remains great though coal output from underground coal mines in Donetsk basin has dropped. This dictates enhanced research efforts to solve the following gas-dynamic problems: sudden coal, rock and gas outbursts, sudden coal, rock and gas outbursts, sudden squeezing, falls (coal spillage) sudden methane inrushes from the bottom, and bumps. New approaches to solve these problems have been based on modern concepts and ideas of natural mechanisms of the events. Current and future research needs are discussed. 7 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Seasonal Trace Gas Dynamics on Minerotrophic Fen Peatlands in NE-Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giebels, Michael; Beyer, Madlen; Augustin, Jürgen; Minke, Merten; Juszczak, Radoszlav; Serba, Tomasz

    2010-05-01

    In Germany more than 99 % of fens have lost their carbon and nutrient sink function due to heavy drainage and agricultural land use especially during the last decades and thus resulted in compression and heavy peat loss (CHARMAN 2002; JOOSTEN & CLARKE 2002; SUCCOW & JOOSTEN 2001; AUGUSTIN et al. 1996; KUNTZE 1993). Therefore fen peatlands play an important part (4-5 %) in the national anthropogenic trace gas budget. But only a small part of drained and agricultural used fens in NE Germany can be restored. Knowledge of the influence of land use to trace gas exchange is important for mitigation of the climate impact of the anthropogenic peatland use. We study carbon exchanges of several fen peatland use areas between soil and atmosphere at different sites in NE-Germany. Our research covers peatlands of supposed strongly climate forcing land use (cornfield and intensive pasture) and of probably less forcing, alternative types (meadow and extensive pasture) as well as rewetted (formerly drained) areas and near-natural sites like a low-degraded fen and a wetted alder woodland. We measured trace gas fluxes with manual and automatic chambers in periodic routines since spring 2007. The used chamber technique bases on DROESLER (2005). In total we now do research at 22 sites situated in 5 different locations covering agricultural, varying states of rewetted and near-natural treatments. We present results of at least 2 years of measurements and show significant differences in their annual trace gas balances depending on the genesis of the observed sites and the seasonal dynamics. Crosswise comparison of different site treatments combined with the seasonal environmental observations give good hints for the identification of main flux driving parameters. That is that a reduced intensity in land use as a supposed mitigating treatment did not show the expected effect, though a normal meadow treatment surprisingly resulted in the lowest balances in both years. For implementing a

  4. Terahertz Time Domain Gas-phase Spectroscopy of Carbon Monoxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilcullen, Patrick; Hartley, I. D.; Jensen, E. T.; Reid, M.

    2015-04-01

    Free induction decay signals emitted from Carbon Monoxide (CO) excited by sub-picosecond pulses of Terahertz (THz) radiation are directly measured in the time domain and compared to model calculations using a linear dispersion model to good agreement. Best fitting techniques of the data using the model allow the self-pressure broadening of CO to be measured across a range of absolute pressures, and the rotational constant to be determined. We find B V = 5.770 ± 0.003 × 1010 Hz in agreement with previous measurements. A partial pressure limit of detection for CO of 7900 ppm is estimated at atmosphere through extrapolating the calculated commensurate echo peaks down to low pressures with respect to the RMS noise floor of our THz time domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) apparatus, which implies a limit of detection in the range of 40 ppm for commercial THz-TDS systems.

  5. Hybrid membranes for selective carbon dioxide separation from fuel gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Luebke; Christina Myers; Henry Pennline [United States Department of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). National Energy Technology Laboratory

    2006-10-15

    The potential of hybrid membranes as a CO{sub 2} capture technology for integrated gasification combined cycle applications was evaluated. Commercial {gamma}-alumina supports were modified with a variety of trichlorosilanes intended to enhance the surface adsorption of CO{sub 2}. The resulting hybrids were characterized using X-ray photoelectric spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and tested for performance in the separation of He and CO{sub 2}. The silanization temperature was determined to be important because membranes fabricated at 273 K had substantially different performance properties than those fabricated at room temperature. Specifically, the permeances of membranes modified with alkyltrichlorosilanes at reduced temperatures were 1-2 orders of magnitude higher than those of membranes fabricated at room temperature, and the selectivities of these low-temperature silanized membranes were relatively similar to those expected from Knudsen diffusion. Supports modified with silanes containing one of a variety of functionalities were tested for CO{sub 2}/He selectivity. Membranes modified with 2-acetoxyethyl, 2-carbomethoxyethyl, and 3-aminopropyl groups exhibited CO{sub 2} selectivity, with the highest values approaching 7 for 2-carbomethoxyethyl-silated membranes at 50{sup o}C. Temperature dependences resulted in selectivity maxima for the 2-acetoxyethyl and 2-carbomethoxyethyl membranes. Mixed-gas selectivities were slightly higher than pure-gas selectivities because of a decrease in He permeance with a relatively minor reduction in CO{sub 2} permeance. Transport in the selective membranes is believed to occur by a combination of activated and solution diffusion for He and a combination of activated and surface diffusion for CO{sub 2}. 25 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Gas structure and dynamics towards bipolar infrared bubble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jin-Long; Yu, Naiping; Zhang, Chuan-Peng; Liu, Xiao-Lan

    2017-09-01

    We present multi-wavelength analysis for four bipolar bubbles (G045.386-0.726, G049.998-0.125, G050.489+0.993, and G051.610-0.357) to probe the structure and dynamics of their surrounding gas. The 12CO J=1-0, 13CO J=1-0 and C18O J=1-0 observations are made with the Purple Mountain Observation (PMO) 13.7 m radio telescope. For the four bipolar bubbles, the bright 8.0 μm emission shows the bipolar structure. Each bipolar bubble is associated with an H ii region. From CO observations we find that G045.386-0.726 is composed of two bubbles with different distances, not a bipolar bubble. Each of G049.998-0.125 and G051.610-0.357 is associated with a filament. The filaments in CO emission divide G049.998-0.125 and G051.610-0.357 into two lobes. We suggest that the exciting stars of both G049.998-0.125 and G051.610-0.357 form in a sheet-like structure clouds. Furthermore, G050.489+0.993 is associated with a clump, which shows a triangle-like shape with a steep integrated intensity gradient towards the two lobes of G050.489+0.993. We suggest that the two lobes of G050.489+0.993 have simultaneously expanded into the clump.

  7. Gas Dynamic Spray Technology Demonstration Project Management. Joint Test Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Pattie

    2011-01-01

    The standard practice for protecting metallic substrates in atmospheric environments is the use of an applied coating system. Current coating systems used across AFSPC and NASA contain volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and hazardous air pollutants (HAPs). These coatings are sUbject to environmental regulations at the Federal and State levels that limit their usage. In addition, these coatings often cannot withstand the high temperatures and exhaust that may be experienced by Air Force Space Command (AFSPC) and NASA structures. In response to these concerns, AFSPC and NASA have approved the use of thermal spray coatings (TSCs). Thermal spray coatings are extremely durable and environmentally friendly coating alternatives, but utilize large cumbersome equipment for application that make the coatings difficult and time consuming to repair. Other concerns include difficulties coating complex geometries and the cost of equipment, training, and materials. Gas Dynamic Spray (GOS) technology (also known as Cold Spray) was evaluated as a smaller, more maneuverable repair method as well as for areas where thermal spray techniques are not as effective. The technology can result in reduced maintenance and thus reduced hazardous materials/wastes associated with current processes. Thermal spray and GOS coatings also have no VOCs and are environmentally preferable coatings. The primary objective of this effort was to demonstrate GDS technology as a repair method for TSCs. The aim was that successful completion of this project would result in approval of GDS technology as a repair method for TSCs at AFSPC and NASA installations to improve corrosion protection at critical systems, facilitate easier maintenance activity, extend maintenance cycles, eliminate flight hardware contamination, and reduce the amount of hazardous waste generated.

  8. Carbon Disclosures: Comparability, the Carbon Disclosure Project and the Greenhouse Gas Protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Andrew

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Corporate carbon disclosures have become increasingly commonplace and are often presented as a useful voluntary mechanism for internal and external decision making. The production of the data is said to assistcorporations position themselves strategically in terms of the carbon risks and opportunities they may face. External to the firm, carbon disclosures hold the promise of assisting capital allocation decisions that are ‘carbon responsible’. It is claimed that the process of disclosure can sensitise the market to globalenvironmental problems such as climate change. In order to consider these claims, the broad purpose of this paper is to question whether the voluntary information that is produced can live up to its expectations and provide a meaningful basis for climate change related decision making. To that end, this exploratory studyexamines the carbon disclosures of Australasian mining companies over three years in compliance with a voluntary carbon disclosure regime – the Carbon Disclosure Project (CDP – and assesses those disclosureswith respect to comparability, an important criterion for information usefulness.

  9. Pulse-induced nonequilibrium dynamics of acetylene inside carbon nanotube studied by an ab initio approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Yoshiyuki; Zhang, Hong; Rubio, Angel

    2012-06-05

    Nanoscale molecular confinement substantially modifies the functionality and electronic properties of encapsulated molecules. Many works have approached this problem from the perspective of quantifying ground-state molecular changes, but little is known about the nonequilibrium dynamics of encapsulated molecular system. In this letter, we report an analysis of the nonequilibrium dynamics of acetylene (C(2)H(2)) inside a semiconducting carbon nanotube (CNT). An ultrashort high-intense laser pulse (2 fs width and 10(15) W/cm(2) intensity) brings the systems out of equilibrium. This process is modeled by comprehensive first-principles time-dependent density-functional simulations. When encapsulated, acetylene dimer, unlike a single acetylene molecule, exhibits correlated vibrational dynamics (C-C bond rotation and H-C-C bending) that is markedly different from the dynamics observed in the gas phase. This result highlights the role of CNT in modulating the optical electric field within the tube. At longer simulation timescales (> 20 fs) in the largest-diameter tube studied here [CNT(14,0)], we observe synchronized rotation about the C-C axes in the dimer and ultimately ejection of one of the four hydrogen atoms. Our results illustrate the richness of photochemical phenomena in confined geometries.

  10. Molecular-dynamic studies of carbon-water-carbon composite nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Jian; Ji, Baohua; Feng, Xi-Qiao; Gao, Huajian

    2006-11-01

    We recently reported the discovery via molecular-dynamic simulations that single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with different diameters, lengths, and chiralities can coaxially self-assemble into multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in water via the spontaneous insertion of smaller tubes into larger ones. Here, we extend that study to investigate the various water structures formed between two selected SWCNTs after such coaxial assembly. Depending on the tube geometry, typical water structures, besides the bulk phase, include a one-dimensional (1D) ordered water chain inside the smaller tube, a uniform or nonuniform water shell between the two tubes, and a "boundary layer" of water near the exterior wall of the larger tube. It was found that a concentric water shell consisting of up to three layers of water molecules can form between the two SWCNTs, which leads to a class of carbon-water-carbon composite nanotubes. Analysis of the potential energy of the SWCNT-water system indicated that the composite nanotubes are stabilized by both the tube-tube and tube-water van der Waals interactions. Geometrically confined between the two SWCNTs, water mono- and bilayers are found to be stable, highly condensed, and ordered, although the average number of hydrogen bonds per water molecule is reduced. In contrast, a water trilayer between the two CNTs can be easily disrupted by thermal fluctuations.

  11. In Silico Determination of Gas Permeabilities by Non-Equilibrium Molecular Dynamics: CO2 and He through PIM-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendrik Frentrup

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We study the permeation dynamics of helium and carbon dioxide through an atomistically detailed model of a polymer of intrinsic microporosity, PIM-1, via non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD simulations. This work presents the first explicit molecular modeling of gas permeation through a high free-volume polymer sample, and it demonstrates how permeability and solubility can be obtained coherently from a single simulation. Solubilities in particular can be obtained to a very high degree of confidence and within experimental inaccuracies. Furthermore, the simulations make it possible to obtain very specific information on the diffusion dynamics of penetrant molecules and yield detailed maps of gas occupancy, which are akin to a digital tomographic scan of the polymer network. In addition to determining permeability and solubility directly from NEMD simulations, the results shed light on the permeation mechanism of the penetrant gases, suggesting that the relative openness of the microporous topology promotes the anomalous diffusion of penetrant gases, which entails a deviation from the pore hopping mechanism usually observed in gas diffusion in polymers.

  12. Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis of Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae W.; Kim, Nam H.; Suh, Kune Y. [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seung O. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    The supercritical carbon dioxide (SCO{sub 2}) gas turbine Brayton cycle has been not only adopted in the secondary loop of the Generation IV nuclear energy systems but also planned to be installed in the high efficiency power conversion cycles of the nuclear fusion reactors. The potential beneficiaries include the Korea Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (KALIMER), the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) as well as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). The reason for these welcomed applications is that the cycle can achieve the overall energy conversion efficiency as high as 45%. The SCO{sub 2} turbine efficiency is one of the major parameters affecting the overall Brayton cycle efficiency. Thus, optimal turbine design determines the economics of the Generation IV as well as the future nuclear fission and fusion energy industry. Seoul National University has recently been working on the SCO{sub 2} based Modular Optimized Brayton Integral System (MOBIS). MOBIS includes the Gas Advanced Turbine Operation Study (GATOS), the Loop Operating Brayton Optimization Study (LOBOS), the Nonsteady Operation Multidimensional Online Simulator (NOMOS), and the Turbine Advanced Compressor Operation Study (TACOS). This paper presents results from GATOS.

  13. Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis of Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae W.; Kim, Nam H.; Suh, Kune Y. [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seung O. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-07-01

    The supercritical carbon dioxide (SCO{sub 2}) gas turbine Brayton cycle has been not only adopted in the secondary loop of the Generation IV nuclear energy systems but also planned to be installed in the high efficiency power conversion cycles of the nuclear fusion reactors. The potential beneficiaries include the Korea Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (KALIMER), Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) and International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). The reason for these welcomed applications is that the cycle can achieve the overall energy conversion efficiency as high as 45%. The SCO{sub 2} turbine efficiency is one of the major parameters affecting the overall Brayton cycle efficiency. Thus, optimal turbine design determines the economics of the Generation IV as well as the future nuclear fission and fusion energy industry. Seoul National University has recently been working on the SCO{sub 2} based Modular Optimized Brayton Integral System (MOBIS). MOBIS includes the Gas Advanced Turbine Operation Study (GATOS), the Loop Operating Brayton Optimization Study (LOBOS), the Nonsteady Operation Multidimensional Online Simulator (NOMOS), and the Turbine Advanced Compressor Operation Study (TACOS). This paper presents first results from GATOS.

  14. Hydroquinone and quinone-grafted porous carbons for highly selective CO2 capture from flue gases and natural gas upgrading

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, J.; Krishna, R.; Yang, J.; Deng, S.

    2015-01-01

    Hydroquinone and quinone functional groups were grafted onto a hierarchical porous carbon framework via the Friedel-Crafts reaction to develop more efficient adsorbents for the selective capture and removal of carbon dioxide from flue gases and natural gas. The oxygen-doped porous carbons were

  15. TSR versus non-TSR processes and their impact on gas geochemistry and carbon stable isotopes in Carboniferous, Permian and Lower Triassic marine carbonate gas reservoirs in the Eastern Sichuan Basin, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Q. Y.; Worden, R. H.; Jin, Z. J.; Liu, W. H.; Li, J.; Gao, B.; Zhang, D. W.; Hu, A. P.; Yang, C.

    2013-01-01

    The Palaeozoic and lowermost Mesozoic marine carbonate reservoirs of the Sichuan Basin in China contain variably sour and very dry gas. The source of the gas in the Carboniferous, Permian and Lower Triassic reservoirs is not known for certain and it has proved difficult to discriminate and differentiate the effects of thermal cracking- and TSR-related processes for these gases. Sixty-three gas samples were collected and analysed for their composition and carbon stable isotope values. The gases are all typically very dry (alkane gases being >97.5% methane), with low (cracking of sapropelic kerogen-derived oil and primary gas and is highly mature. Carboniferous (and non-sour Triassic and Permian) gas has unusual carbon isotopes with methane and propane being isotopically heavier than ethane (a reversal of typical low- to moderate-maturity patterns). The gas in the non-sour Triassic and Permian reservoirs has the same geochemical and isotopic characteristics (and therefore the same source) as the Carboniferous gas. TSR in the deepest Triassic reservoirs altered the gas composition reaching 100% dryness in the deepest, most sour reservoirs showing that ethane and propane react faster than methane during TSR. Ethane evolves to heavier carbon isotope values than methane during TSR leading to removal of the reversed alkane gas isotope trend found in the Carboniferous and non-sour Triassic and Permian reservoirs. However, methane was directly involved in TSR as shown by the progressive increase in its carbon isotope ratio as gas souring proceeded. CO2 increased in concentration as gas souring proceeded, but typical CO2 carbon isotope ratios in sour gases remained about -4‰ V-PDB showing that it was not solely derived from the oxidation of alkanes. Instead CO2 may partly result from reaction of sour gas with carbonate reservoir minerals, such as Fe-rich dolomite or calcite, resulting in pyrite growth as well as CO2-generation.

  16. Study of Thermal Activated CO2 Extraction Processes from Carbonate Apatites Using Gas Chromatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.N. Kuznetsov

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The study of carbonate in the structure of carbonate-containing apatites (CCA is an actual problem due to the similarity of such systems to natural apatites of mammalian bone tissue. The search of the optimal synthesis procedures was also carried out in order to obtain carbonate apatites with the highest rate of carbonate ions incorporation into the apatite structure. The analysis of carbonate-group temperature behavior in apatites of various origin helps to understand their structural and functional roles in biologically relevant apatite materials. The thermal extraction and accumulation of CO2 from biogenic and geological apatites is also of interest for the further carbon isotope analysis with accelerating mass-spectrometry. X-ray diffraction analysis, infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy as well as self-proposed gas chromatography method with thermo-programmed probe extraction were used for carbonate temperature behavior study. This new method allows determining CO2 concentration released from CCA during annealing. The defined changes in carbonate apatite structure depending on synthesis procedure were observed.

  17. The Implications of Growing Bioenergy Crops on Water Resources, Carbon and Nitrogen Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, A. K.; Song, Y.; Kheshgi, H. S.; Landuyt, W.

    2015-12-01

    The bioenergy crops, Corn, Miscanthus and switchgrass have a potential to meet future energy demands in the US and mitigate climate change by partially replacing fossil fuels. However, the large-scale cultivation of these bioenergy crops may also impact climate change through changes in albedo, evapotranspiration (ET), and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Whether these climate effects will mitigate or exacerbate climate change in the short and long terms is uncertain. The uncertainties come from our incomplete understanding of the effects of expanded bioenergy crop production on terrestrial water and energy balance, carbon and nitrogen dynamics, and their interactions. This study aims to understand the implications of growing large scale bioenergy crops on water resources, carbon and nitrogen dynamics in the United States using a data- modeling framework (ISAM) that we developed. Our study indicates that both Miscanthus and Cave-in-Rock switchgrass can attain high and stable yield over parts of the Midwest, however, this high production is attained at the cost of increased soil water loss as compared to current natural vegetation. Alamo switchgrass can attain high and stable yield in the southern US without significant influence on soil water quantity.

  18. Adsorbed natural gas storage with activated carbons made from Illinois coals and scrap tires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jielun; Brady, T.A.; Rood, M.J.; Lehmann, C.M.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Lizzio, A.A.

    1997-01-01

    Activated carbons for natural gas storage were produced from Illinois bituminous coals (IBC-102 and IBC-106) and scrap tires by physical activation with steam or CO2 and by chemical activation with KOH, H3PO4, or ZnCl2. The products were characterized for N2-BET area, micropore volume, bulk density, pore size distribution, and volumetric methane storage capacity (Vm/Vs). Vm/Vs values for Illinois coal-derived carbons ranged from 54 to 83 cm3/cm3, which are 35-55% of a target value of 150 cm3/cm3. Both granular and pelletized carbons made with preoxidized Illinois coal gave higher micropore volumes and larger Vm/Vs values than those made without preoxidation. This confirmed that preoxidation is a desirable step in the production of carbons from caking materials. Pelletization of preoxidized IBC-106 coal, followed by steam activation, resulted in the highest Vm/Vs value. With roughly the same micropore volume, pelletization alone increased Vm/Vs of coal carbon by 10%. Tire-derived carbons had Vm/Vs values ranging from 44 to 53 cm3/cm3, lower than those of coal carbons due to their lower bulk densities. Pelletization of the tire carbons increased bulk density up to 160%. However, this increase was offset by a decrease in micropore volume of the pelletized materials, presumably due to the pellet binder. As a result, Vm/Vs values were about the same for granular and pelletized tire carbons. Compared with coal carbons, tire carbons had a higher percentage of mesopores and macropores.

  19. Priming alters soil carbon dynamics during forest succession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Na; Xu, Xingliang; Wang, Juan; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2017-04-01

    The mechanisms underlying soil carbon (C) dynamics during forest succession remain challenged. We examined priming of soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition along a vegetation succession: grassland, young and old-growth forests. Soil C was primed much more strongly in young secondary forest than in grassland or old-growth forest. Priming resulted in large C losses (negative net C balance) in young-forest soil, whereas C stocks increased in grassland and old-growth forest. Microbial composition assessed by phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) and utilization of easily available organics (13C-PLFA) indicate that fungi were responsible for priming in young-forest soils. Consequently, labile C inputs released by litter decomposition and root exudation determine microbial functional groups that decompose SOM during forest succession. These findings provide novel insights into connections between SOM dynamics and stabilization with microbial functioning during forest succession and show that priming is an important mechanism for contrasting soil C dynamics in young and old-growth forests.

  20. Carbon dioxide recovery from gas-fired power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, Ricardo Salgado; Barbosa, Joao Roberto [Centro Tecnico Aeroespacial, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Inst. Tecnologico de Aeronautica. Dept. de Energia]. E-mails: martinsr@epenergy.com; barbosa@mec.ita.br; Prado, Eduardo Lanari [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States). Jones Graduate School of Business]. E-mail: pradoe@epenergy.com; Vieira, Adriana de Moura [Instituto Brasileiro de Mercado de Capitais (IBMEC), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Financas]. E-mail: vieiraa@epenergy.com

    2000-07-01

    Since 1996 the Brazilian electric sector has undergone a major restructuring. The aim of such change is to reduce the State's participation in the sector, and to induce the growth of private investments. In particular, this event created several opportunities for thermal power plant projects, leading to competition at the generation level. In this scenario of increased competition, the power plant efficiency becomes a key element for determining the feasibility and profitability of the project. Moreover, the utilization of the plant's own effluents as feedstock or as a source of additional revenue will impact positively in its economics. As an example, long term additional revenues could be created by the sale of CO{sub 2} extracted from the combustion products of thermal power plants. The production of CO{sub 2} also contributes to mitigate the environmental impacts of the power plant project by significantly reducing its airborne emissions. This paper shows how a gas-fired power plant can extract and utilize CO{sub 2} to generate additional revenue, contributing to a more competitive power plant. (author)

  1. Integrating Natural Gas Hydrates in the Global Carbon Cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Archer; Bruce Buffett

    2011-12-31

    We produced a two-dimensional geological time- and basin-scale model of the sedimentary margin in passive and active settings, for the simulation of the deep sedimentary methane cycle including hydrate formation. Simulation of geochemical data required development of parameterizations for bubble transport in the sediment column, and for the impact of the heterogeneity in the sediment pore fluid flow field, which represent new directions in modeling methane hydrates. The model is somewhat less sensitive to changes in ocean temperature than our previous 1-D model, due to the different methane transport mechanisms in the two codes (pore fluid flow vs. bubble migration). The model is very sensitive to reasonable changes in organic carbon deposition through geologic time, and to details of how the bubbles migrate, in particular how efficiently they are trapped as they rise through undersaturated or oxidizing chemical conditions and the hydrate stability zone. The active margin configuration reproduces the elevated hydrate saturations observed in accretionary wedges such as the Cascadia Margin, but predicts a decrease in the methane inventory per meter of coastline relative to a comparable passive margin case, and a decrease in the hydrate inventory with an increase in the plate subduction rate.

  2. Dynamic gas slippage: A unique dual-mechanism approach to the flow of gas in tight formations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ertekin; King, G.R.; Schwerer, F.C.

    1983-10-01

    A mathematical formulation, applicable to both numerical simulation and transient well analysis, describing the flow of gas in very tight (k < 0.1 md) porous media has been developed. Unique to this formulation is the dual-mechanism transport of gas. In this formulation gas is assumed to be traveling under the influence of two fields: a concentration field and a pressure field. Transport through the concentration field is a Knudsen flow process and is modeled with Fick's Law of diffusion. Transport through the pressure field is a laminar process and is modeled with Darcy's law (inertial-turbulent effects are ignored). The combination of these two flow mechanisms rigorously yields a composition, pressure and saturation dependent slippage factor. The pressure dependence arises from treating the gas as a real gas. The dynamic slippage derived from this formulation is found to be most applicable in reservoirs with permeabilities less than or equal to 0.01 md. The results from this study indicate that in reservoirs of this type, differences between recoveries after ten years of production using the dynamic slip described in this paper and constant slip approaches were as great as 10% depending on the initial gas saturation. If an economic production rate is considered, differences as great as 30 can be expected.

  3. Multi-walled Carbon Nanotube Film Sensor for Ethanol Gas Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongzhi Zhang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs film-based sensor on the substrate of printed circuit board (PCB with interdigital electrodes (IDE were fabricated using layer-by-layer self-assembly, and the electrical properties of MWNTs film sensor were investigated through establishing models involved with number of self-assembled layers and IDE finger gap, and also its ethanol gas-sensing properties with varying gas concentration are characterized at room temperature.Through comparing with the thermal evaporation method, the experiment results shown that the layer-by-layer self-assembled MWNTs film sensor have a faster response and more sensitive resistance change when exposed to ethanol gas, indicated a prospective application for ethanol gas detection with high performance and low-cost.

  4. Modeling and parametric analysis of hollow fiber membrane system for carbon capture from multicomponent flue gas

    KAUST Repository

    Khalilpour, Rajab

    2011-08-12

    The modeling and optimal design/operation of gas membranes for postcombustion carbon capture (PCC) is presented. A systematic methodology is presented for analysis of membrane systems considering multicomponent flue gas with CO 2 as target component. Simplifying assumptions is avoided by namely multicomponent flue gas represented by CO 2/N 2 binary mixture or considering the co/countercurrent flow pattern of hollow-fiber membrane system as mixed flow. Optimal regions of flue gas pressures and membrane area were found within which a technoeconomical process system design could be carried out. High selectivity was found to not necessarily have notable impact on PCC membrane performance, rather, a medium selectivity combined with medium or high permeance could be more advantageous. © 2011 American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE).

  5. Growth of single wall carbon nanotubes using PECVD technique: An efficient chemiresistor gas sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lone, Mohd Yaseen; Kumar, Avshish; Husain, Samina; Zulfequar, M.; Harsh; Husain, Mushahid

    2017-03-01

    In this work, the uniform and vertically aligned single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have been grown on Iron (Fe) deposited Silicon (Si) substrate by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) technique at very low temperature of 550 °C. The as-grown samples of SWCNTS were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM), high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) and Raman spectrometer. SWCNT based chemiresistor gas sensing device was fabricated by making the proper gold contacts on the as-grown SWCNTs. The electrical conductance and sensor response of grown SWCNTs have been investigated. The fabricated SWCNT sensor was exposed to ammonia (NH3) gas at 200 ppm in a self assembled apparatus. The sensor response was measured at room temperature which was discussed in terms of adsorption of NH3 gas molecules on the surface of SWCNTs. The achieved results are used to develope a miniaturized gas sensor device for monitoring and control of environment pollutants.

  6. Single-walled carbon nanotubes as stationary phase in gas chromatographic separation and determination of argon, carbon dioxide and hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safavi, Afsaneh; Maleki, Norooz; Doroodmand, Mohammad Mahdi

    2010-08-24

    A chromatographic technique is introduced based on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) as stationary phase for separation of Ar, CO(2) and H(2) at parts per million (ppm) levels. The efficiency of SWCNTs was compared with solid materials such as molecular sieve, charcoal, multi-walled carbon nanotubes and carbon nanofibers. The morphology of SWCNTs was optimized for maximum adsorption of H(2), CO(2) and Ar and minimum adsorption of gases such as N(2), O(2), CO and H(2)O vapour. To control temperature of the gas chromatography column, peltier cooler was used. Mixtures of Ar, CO(2) and H(2) were separated according to column temperature program. Relative standard deviation for nine replicate analyses of 0.2 mL H(2) containing 10 microL of each Ar or CO(2) was 2.5% for Ar, 2.8% for CO(2) and 3.6% for H(2). The interfering effects of CO, and O(2) were investigated. Working ranges were evaluated as 40-600 ppm for Ar, 30-850 ppm for CO(2) and 10-1200 ppm for H(2). Significant sensitivity, small relative standard deviation (RSD) and acceptable limit of detection (LOD) were obtained for each analyte, showing capability of SWCNTs for gas separation and determination processes. Finally, the method was used to evaluate the contents of CO(2) in air sample.

  7. Utilization of compressed natural gas for the production of carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kim-Yang Lee; Wei-Ming Yeoh; Siang-Piao Chai; Abdul Rahman Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    The present work aims at utilizing compressed natural gas (CNG) as carbon source for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) over CoO-MoO/Al2O3 catalyst via catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD) method.The as-produced carbonaceous product was characterized by thermal gravimetric analyzer (TGA),scanning electron microscopy (SEM),transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Raman spectroscopy.The experimental finding shows that CNTs were successfully produced from CNG while carbon nanofibers (CNFs) were formed as the side products.In addition,the catalytic activity and lifetime were found sustained and prolonged,as compared with using high purity methane as carbon source.The present study suggests an alternative route which can effectively produce CNTs and CNFs using low cost CNG.

  8. Synthesis and Magnetic Properties of Ni and Carbon Coated Ni by Levitational Gas Condensation (LGC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Rang Uhm

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The nickel (Ni, and carbon coated nickel (Ni@C nanoparticles were synthesized by levitaional gas condensation (LGC methods using a micron powder feeding (MPF system. Both metal and carbon coated metal nano powders include a magnetic ordered phase. The synthesis by LGC yields spherical particles with a large coercivity. The abnormal initial magnetization curve for Ni indicates a non-collinear magnetic structure between the core and surface layer of the particles. The carbon coated particles had a core structure diameter at and below 10 nm and were covered by 2-3 nm thin carbon layers. The hysteresis loop of the as-prepared Ni@Cs materials with unsaturated magnetization shows a superparamagnetic state at room temperature.

  9. Iron-carbon nanocomposite obtained by laser-induced gas-phase reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumitrache, Florian V.; Morjan, Ion G.; Alexandrescu, Rodica; Rand, B.; Ciupina, Victor; Prodan, G.; Voicu, Ion N.; Sandu, Ioan C.; Soare, I.; Ploscaru, M.; Fleaca, C.; Brydson, R.; Vasile, Eugen

    2003-07-01

    Iron-carbon composite nanopowders have been synthesized by the CO2 laser pyrolysis of gas-phase reactants. The experimental device allows for a very low reaction time and a rapid freezing that creates nanoscale-condensed particles. Iron pentacarbonyl and ethylene-acetylene mixtures were used as iron and carbon precursors. In a two-steps experiment, the reaction products may present themselves as iron-based nanoparticles dispersed in a carbon matrix. By a careful control of experimental parameters and radiation geometries we demonstrate the feasibility of an efficient and well-controlled, single-step technique for the production of iron-based nano-cores embedded in carbon layers. Highly dispersed nanoparticles, narrow size distributions and particles with about 4.5 - 6 nm mean diameters were obtained. Electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy were used in order to analyze the structure and composition of the obtained nanopowders as well as their Soxhlet residue.

  10. Fluid dynamics of gas-liquid bubble columns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delnoij, E.

    1999-01-01

    Gas-liquid bubble columns are used extensively in the process industries. The gas-liquid twophase flow prevailing in this type of process equipment is extremely complex, inherently unsteady and dominated by phenomena with widely varying time- and length-scales. it is for this reason that many

  11. [Study of remote sensing the flux of carbon dioxide gas with tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xue-mei; Liu, Jian-guo; Zhang, Yu-jun; Lu, Yi-huai; Zeng, Zong-yong; He, Ying; Cui, Yi-ben; Tian, Yong-zhi; Tian, Lin

    2011-03-01

    Tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) technique is a new method to detect trace gas qualitatively or quantificationally based on the scan characteristic of the diode laser to obtain the absorption spectra in the characteristic absorption region. TDLAS is a highly sensitive, highly selective and fast time response trace gas detection technique. In the present paper, a DFB laser at room temperature was used as the light source, wavelength modulation method was employed, and the second harmonic signal of one absorption line near 1.578 microm of carbon dioxide molecule was measured. A system was built for online monitoring of carbon dioxide concentration within the optical path of more than 700 meters at different heights. Combined with Alonzo Mourning-Obukhov length and characteristic velocity detected by large aperture scintillometer, the flux of carbon dioxide gas calculated by the experiential formula is within -60-60 mg x m(-2) x s(-1). The comparison of the datea detected by TDLAS system and the eddy covariance showed that the change of the data detected by TDLAS had a similar trend to that detected by the eddy covariance, and the best results can be produced by this method, breaking through the phenomenon of only providing the flux of trace gases near the ground at present, and making the measurement of trace gas fluxes within a large area possible.

  12. Impact of individual acid flue gas components on mercury capture by heat-treated activated carbon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-ming ZHENG; Jin-song ZHOU; Zhong-yang LUO; Ke-fa CEN

    2012-01-01

    Elemental mercury capture on heat-treated activated carbon (TAC) was studied using a laboratory-scale fixed bed reactor.The capability of TAC to perform Hg0 capture under both N2 and baseline gas atmospheres was studied and the effects of common acid gas constituents were evaluated individually to avoid complications resulting from the coexistence of multiple components.The results suggest that surface functional groups (SFGs) on activated carbon (AC) are vital to Hg0 capture in the absence of acid gases.Meanwhile,the presence of acid gas components coupled with defective graphitic lattices on TAC plays an important role in effective Hg0 capture.The presence of HCl,NO2,and NO individually in basic gases markedly enhances Hg0 capture on TAC due to the heterogeneous oxidation of Hg0 on acidic sites created on the carbon surface and catalysis by the defective graphitic lattices on TAC.Similarly,the presence of SO2 improves Hg0 capture by about 20%.This improvement likely results from the deposition of sulfur groups on the AC surface and oxidation of the elemental mercury by SO2 due to catalysis on the carbon surface.Furthermore,O2 exhibits a synergistic effect on Hg0 oxidation and capture when acid gases are present in the flue gases.

  13. Occupational poisoning by carbon monoxide aboard a gas carrier. Report on 8 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, David; Loddé, Brice; Jegaden, Dominique; Bronstein, Jean-Ariel; Pougnet, Richard; Bell, S; Dewitte, Jean-Dominique

    2010-01-01

    - To determine the accidental factors and the clinical symptoms in eight cases of occupational poisoning of port workers by carbon monoxide. - To consider the primary prevention of this serious pathology occurring at work. - To analyze the circumstances of the exposure to carbon monoxide in the employees in the naval repair sector. - To indicate the systemic failures causing this accidental poisoning, the means for early diagnosis and appropriate treatment, and to discuss the prevention of such accidents. The poisoning occurred in eight mechanics and electricians working without any protective means in a gas carrier tank in dry dock. The employees, unaware of carbon monoxide exposure, stayed for 45 minutes in an atmosphere polluted with carbon monoxide concentrations of over 500 ppm. The main complaints were of headache, muscular weakness, and drowsiness. No post-interval syndrome was found three weeks after poisoning. The levels of carboxyhaemoglobin varied from 1.8 to 31.2%. Early normal pressure oxygen therapy reduced the symptoms. No delayed syndrome was found three weeks after poisoning. The inclusion of poisonous gas in gas-free certification, adherence to maritime harbour regulations, greater respect for working instructions in hazardous environments, and the use of detectors appropriate to the conditions for each ship would avoid exposure and decrease the risk of poisoning.

  14. Dynamics of soil nitrogen and carbon accumulation for 61 years after agricultural abandonment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knops, J.M.H.; Tilman, D.

    2000-01-01

    The authors used two independent methods to determine the dynamics of soil carbon and nitrogen following abandonment of agricultural fields on a Minnesota sand plain. First, they used a chronosequence of 19 fields abandoned from 1927 to 1982 to infer soil carbon and nitrogen dynamics. Second, they directly observed dynamics of carbon and nitrogen over a 12-yr period in 1900 permanent plots in these fields. These observed dynamics were used in a differential equation model to predict soil carbon and nitrogen dynamics. The two methods yielded similar results. Resampling the 1,900 plots showed that the rates of accumulation of nitrogen and carbon over 12 yr depended on ambient carbon and nitrogen levels in the soil, with rates of accumulation declining at higher carbon and nitrogen levels. A dynamic model fitted to the observed rates of change predicted logistic dynamics for nitrogen and carbon accumulation. On average, agricultural practices resulted in a 75% loss of soil nitrogen and an 89% loss of soil carbon at the time of abandonment. Recovery to 95% of the preagricultural levels is predicted the soil carbon, nitrogen, and carbon:nitrogen ratio patterns observed in the chronosequence of old fields, suggesting that the chronosequence may be indicative of actual changes in soil carbon and nitrogen. Their results suggest that the rate of carbon accumulation was controlled by the rate of nitrogen accumulation, which in turn depended on atmospheric nitrogen deposition and symbiotic nitrogen fixation by legumes. Their data support the hypothesis that these abandoned fields initially retain essentially all nitrogen and have a closed nitrogen cycle. Multiple regression suggests that vegetation composition had a significant influence on the rates of accumulation of both nitrogen and carbon; legumes increased these rates, and C{sub 3} grasses and forbs decreased them. C{sub 4} grasses increased the C:N ratio of the soil organic matter and thereby increased the rate of

  15. Dynamic properties of combustion instability in a lean premixed gas-turbine combustor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotoda, Hiroshi; Nikimoto, Hiroyuki; Miyano, Takaya; Tachibana, Shigeru

    2011-03-01

    We experimentally investigate the dynamic behavior of the combustion instability in a lean premixed gas-turbine combustor from the viewpoint of nonlinear dynamics. A nonlinear time series analysis in combination with a surrogate data method clearly reveals that as the equivalence ratio increases, the dynamic behavior of the combustion instability undergoes a significant transition from stochastic fluctuation to periodic oscillation through low-dimensional chaotic oscillation. We also show that a nonlinear forecasting method is useful for predicting the short-term dynamic behavior of the combustion instability in a lean premixed gas-turbine combustor, which has not been addressed in the fields of combustion science and physics.

  16. Application of gas diffusion biocathode in microbial electrosynthesis from carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajracharya, Suman; Vanbroekhoven, Karolien; Buisman, Cees J N; Pant, Deepak; Strik, David P B T B

    2016-11-01

    Microbial catalysis of carbon dioxide (CO2) reduction to multi-carbon compounds at the cathode is a highly attractive application of microbial electrosynthesis (MES). The microbes reduce CO2 by either taking the electrons or reducing the equivalents produced at the cathode. While using gaseous CO2 as the carbon source, the biological reduction process depends on the dissolution and mass transfer of CO2 in the electrolyte. In order to deal with this issue, a gas diffusion electrode (GDE) was investigated by feeding CO2 through the GDE into the MES reactor for its reduction at the biocathode. A combination of the catalyst layer (porous activated carbon and Teflon binder) and the hydrophobic gas diffusion layer (GDL) creates a three-phase interface at the electrode. So, CO2 and reducing equivalents will be available to the biocatalyst on the cathode surface. An enriched inoculum consisting of acetogenic bacteria, prepared from an anaerobic sludge, was used as a biocatalyst. The cathode potential was maintained at -1.1 V vs Ag/AgCl to facilitate direct and/or hydrogen-mediated CO2 reduction. Bioelectrochemical CO2 reduction mainly produced acetate but also extended the products to ethanol and butyrate. Average acetate production rates of 32 and 61 mg/L/day, respectively, with 20 and 80 % CO2 gas mixture feed were achieved with 10 cm(2) of GDE. The maximum acetate production rate remained 238 mg/L/day for 20 % CO2 gas mixture. In conclusion, a gas diffusion biocathode supported bioelectrochemical CO2 reduction with enhanced mass transfer rate at continuous supply of gaseous CO2. Graphical abstract ᅟ.

  17. Investigation of the gas-solid Joule-Thomson effect for argon-, nitrogen-, and carbon dioxide-carbon powder aerosol systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rybolt, T.R.; Pierotti, R.A.

    1984-05-24

    An apparatus was constructed to disperse a fine powder in a flowing gas and measure the thermal changes associated with a pressure drop across a glass orifice. The gas-solid Joule-Thomson effect was examined for 12 different gas-solids systems at a temperature of 302 K, a downstream pressure of 120 kPa, pressure drops across the orifice from 5 to 45 kPa, flow rates from 2 to 14 mmol/s, and aerosol concentrations from 0 to 16 g of powder/mol of gas. The gaseous component included either argon, nitrogen, or carbon dioxide and the particulate component included either Mexican Graphite (26 m/sup 2//g), Nuchar S-C (903 m/sup 2//g), Nuchar S-A (1661 m/sup 2//g), or Super Sorb (3169 m/sup 2//g) carbon powder. A significant enhancement of the Joule-Thomson cooling effect was found for gas-porous carbon systems relative to a pure gas. The dependence of the magnitude of this effect on the gas-gas and gas-solid interactions was predicted from a virial equation of state based on statistical thermodynamic considerations. Gas-solid virial coefficients and their temperature derivatives were used in conjunction with the theoretical model as modified by heat-transport effects to assess the reliability of theory in predicting the experimentally determined gas-solid Joule-Thomson coefficients.

  18. Carbon and nitrogen dynamics and greenhouse gases emissions in constructed wetlands: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahangir, M. M. R.; Fenton, O.; Gill, L.; Müller, C.; Johnston, P.; Richards, K. G.

    2014-07-01

    The nitrogen (N) removal efficiency of constructed wetlands (CWs) is very inconsistent and does not alone explain if the removed species are reduced by physical attenuation or if they are transformed to other reactive forms (pollution swapping). There are many pathways for the removed N to remain in the system: accumulation in the sediments, leaching to groundwater (nitrate-NO3- and ammonium-NH4+), emission to atmosphere via nitrous oxide- N2O and ammonia and/or conversion to N2 gas and adsorption to sediments. The kinetics of these pathways/processes varies with CWs management and therefore needs to be studied quantitatively for the sustainable use of CWs. For example, the quality of groundwater underlying CWs with regards to the reactive N (Nr) species is largely unknown. Equally, there is a dearth of information on the extent of Nr accumulation in soils and discharge to surface waters and air. Moreover, CWs are rich in dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and produce substantial amounts of CO2 and CH4. These dissolved carbon (C) species drain out to ground and surface waters and emit to the atmosphere. The dynamics of dissolved N2O, CO2 and CH4 in CWs is a key "missing piece" in our understanding of global greenhouse gas budgets. In this review we provide an overview of the current knowledge and discussion about the dynamics of C and N in CWs and their likely impacts on aquatic and atmospheric environments. We suggest that the fate of various N species in CWs and their surface emissions and subsurface drainage fluxes need to be evaluated in a holistic way to better understand their potential for pollution swapping. Research on the process based N removal and balancing the end products into reactive and benign forms are critical to assess environmental impacts of CWs. Thus we strongly suggest that in situ N transformation and fate of the transformation products with regards to pollution swapping requires further detailed examination.

  19. Coastal vegetation invasion increases greenhouse gas emission from wetland soils but also increases soil carbon accumulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yaping [Key Laboratory of the Ministry of Education for Coastal and Wetland Ecosystem, College of the Environment and Ecology, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361102, Fujian (China); Chen, Guangcheng [Third Institute of Oceanography, State Oceanic Administration, Xiamen 361005, Fujian (China); Ye, Yong, E-mail: yeyong.xmu@gmail.com [Key Laboratory of the Ministry of Education for Coastal and Wetland Ecosystem, College of the Environment and Ecology, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361102, Fujian (China)

    2015-09-01

    Soil properties and soil–atmosphere fluxes of CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O from four coastal wetlands were studied throughout the year, namely, native Kandelia obovata mangrove forest vs. exotic Sonneratia apetala mangrove forest, and native Cyperus malaccensis salt marsh vs. exotic Spartina alterniflora salt marsh. Soils of the four wetlands were all net sources of greenhouse gases while Sonneratia forest contributed the most with a total soil–atmosphere CO{sub 2}-equivalent flux of 137.27 mg CO{sub 2} m{sup −2} h{sup −1}, which is 69.23%, 99.75% and 44.56% higher than that of Kandelia, Cyperus and Spartina, respectively. The high underground biomass and distinctive root structure of Sonneratia might be responsible for its high greenhouse gas emission from the soil. Soils in Spartina marsh emitted the second largest amount of total greenhouse gases but it ranked first in emitting trace greenhouse gases. Annual average CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O fluxes from Spartina soil were 13.77 and 1.14 μmol m{sup −2} h{sup −1}, respectively, which are 2.08 and 1.46 times that of Kandelia, 1.03 and 1.15 times of Sonneratia, and 1.74 and 1.02 times of Cyperus, respectively. Spartina has longer growing season and higher productivity than native marshes which might increase greenhouse gas emission in cold seasons. Exotic wetland soils had higher carbon stock as compared to their respective native counterparts but their carbon stocks were offset by a larger proportion because of their higher greenhouse gas emissions. Annual total soil–atmosphere fluxes of greenhouse gases reduced soil carbon burial benefits by 8.1%, 9.5%, 6.4% and 7.2% for Kandelia, Sonneratia, Cyperus and Spartina, respectively, which narrowed down the gaps in net soil carbon stock between native and exotic wetlands. The results indicated that the invasion of exotic wetland plants might convert local coastal soils into a considerable atmospheric source of greenhouse gases although they at the

  20. Hydrogen Oxidation on Gas Diffusion Electrodes for Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cells in the Presence of Carbon Monoxide and Oxygen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gang, Xiao; Li, Qingfeng; Hjuler, Hans Aage

    1995-01-01

    Hydrogen oxidation has been studied on a carbon-supported platinum gas diffusion electrode in a phosphoric acidelectrolyte in the presence of carbon monoxide and oxygen in the feed gas. The poisoning effect of carbon monoxide presentin the feed gas was measured in the temperature range from 80...... to 150°C. It was found that throughout the temperaturerange, the potential loss due to the CO poisoning can be reduced to a great extent by the injection of small amounts ofgaseous oxygen into the hydrogen gas containing carbon monoxide. By adding 5 volume percent (v/o) oxygen, an almost......CO-free performance can be obtained for carbon monoxide concentrations up to 0.5 v/o CO at 130°C, 0.2 v/o CO at 100°C,and 0.1 v/o CO at 80°C, respectively....

  1. Stable isotopes of carbon dioxide in soil gas over massive sulfide mineralization at Crandon, Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpers, C.N.; Dettman, D.L.; Lohmann, K.C.; Brabec, D.

    1990-01-01

    Stable isotope ratios of oxygen and carbon were determined for CO2 in soil gas in the vicinity of the massive sulfide deposit at Crandon, Wisconsin with the objective of determining the source of anomalously high CO2 concentrations detected previously by McCarthy et al. (1986). Values of ??13C in soil gas CO2 from depths between 0.5 and 1.0 m were found to range from -12.68??? to -20.03??? (PDB). Organic carbon from the uppermost meter of soil has ??13C between -24.1 and -25.8??? (PDB), indicating derivation from plant species with the C3 (Calvin) type of photosynthetic pathway. Microbial decomposition of the organic carbon and root respiration from C3 and C4 (Hatch-Slack) plants, together with atmospheric CO2 are the likely sources of carbon in soil gas CO2. Values of ??18O in soil-gas CO2 range from 32 to 38??? (SMOW). These ??18O values are intermediate between that calculated for CO2 gas in isotopic equilibrium with local groundwaters and that for atmospheric CO2. The ??18O data indicate that atmospheric CO2 has been incorporated by mixing or diffusion. Any CO2 generated by microbial oxidation of organic matter has equilibrated its oxygen isotopes with the local groundwaters. The isotopic composition of soil-gas CO2 taken from directly above the massive sulfide deposit was not distinguishable from that of background samples taken 1 to 2 km away. No enrichment of the ??13C value of soil-gas CO2 was observed, contrary to what would be expected if the anomalous CO2 were derived from the dissolution of Proterozoic marine limestone country rock or of Paleozoic limestone clasts in glacial till. Therefore, it is inferred that root respiration and decay of C3 plant material were responsible for most CO2 generation both in the vicinity of the massive sulfide and in the "background" area, on the occasion of our sampling. Interpretation of our data is complicated by the effects of rainfall, which significantly reduced the magnitude of the CO2 anomaly. Therefore, we cannot

  2. Thermokarst dynamics and soil organic matter characteristics controlling initial carbon release from permafrost soils in the Siberian Yedoma region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weiss, Niels; Blok, Daan; Elberling, Bo;

    2016-01-01

    This study relates soil organic matter (SOM) characteristics to initial soil incubation carbon release from upper permafrost samples in Yedoma region soils of northeastern Siberia, Russia. Carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) content, carbon to nitrogen ratios (C:N), δ13C and δ15N values show clear trends...... that correspond with SOM age and degree of decomposition. Incubation results indicate that older and more decomposed soil material shows higher C respiration rates per unit incubated C than younger and less decomposed samples with higher C content. This is important as undecomposed material is often assumed...... to be more reactive upon thawing. Large stocks of SOM and their potential decomposability, in combination with complex landscape dynamics that include one or more events of Holocene thaw in most of the landscape, are of consequence for potential greenhouse gas release from permafrost soils in the Yedoma...

  3. Permafrost carbon-climate feedback is sensitive to deep soil carbon decomposability but not deep soil nitrogen dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koven, Charles D; Lawrence, David M; Riley, William J

    2015-03-24

    Permafrost soils contain enormous amounts of organic carbon whose stability is contingent on remaining frozen. With future warming, these soils may release carbon to the atmosphere and act as a positive feedback to climate change. Significant uncertainty remains on the postthaw carbon dynamics of permafrost-affected ecosystems, in particular since most of the carbon resides at depth where decomposition dynamics may differ from surface soils, and since nitrogen mineralized by decomposition may enhance plant growth. Here we show, using a carbon-nitrogen model that includes permafrost processes forced in an unmitigated warming scenario, that the future carbon balance of the permafrost region is highly sensitive to the decomposability of deeper carbon, with the net balance ranging from 21 Pg C to 164 Pg C losses by 2300. Increased soil nitrogen mineralization reduces nutrient limitations, but the impact of deep nitrogen on the carbon budget is small due to enhanced nitrogen availability from warming surface soils and seasonal asynchrony between deeper nitrogen availability and plant nitrogen demands. Although nitrogen dynamics are highly uncertain, the future carbon balance of this region is projected to hinge more on the rate and extent of permafrost thaw and soil decomposition than on enhanced nitrogen availability for vegetation growth resulting from permafrost thaw.

  4. Joint Test Plan for Gas Dynamic Spray Technology Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Pattie

    2008-01-01

    Air Force Space Command (AFSPC) and NASA have similar missions, facilities, and structures located in similar harsh environments. Both are responsible for a number of facilities/structures with metallic structural and non-structural components in highly and moderately corrosive environments. Regardless of the corrosivity of the environment, all metals require periodic maintenance activity to guard against the insidious effects of corrosion and thus ensure that structures meet or exceed design or performance life. The standard practice for protecting metallic substrates in atmospheric environments is the use of an applied coating system. Current coating systems used across AFSPC and NASA contain volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and hazardous air pollutants (HAPs). These coatings are subject to environmental regulations at the Federal and State levels that limit their usage. In addition, these coatings often cannot withstand the high temperatures and exhaust that may be experienced by AFSPC and NASA structures. In response to these concerns, AFSPC and NASA have approved the use of thermal spray coatings (TSCs). Thermal spray coatings are extremely durable and environmentally friendly coating alternatives, but utilize large cumbersome equipment for application that make the coatings difficult and time consuming to repair. Other concerns include difficulties coating complex geometries and the cost of equipment, training, and materials. Gas Dynamic Spray (GDS) technology (also known as Cold Spray) will be evaluated as a smaller, more maneuverable repair method as well as for areas where thermal spray techniques are not as effective. The technology can result in reduced maintenance and thus reduced hazardous materials/wastes associated with current processes. Thermal spray and GDS coatings also have no VOCs and are environmentally preferable coatings. To achieve a condition suitable for the application of a coating system, including GDS coatings, the substrate must

  5. An investigation into computer simulation of the dynamic response of a gas turbine engine

    OpenAIRE

    Hendricks, Todd B

    1997-01-01

    Transient performance of gas turbines has a strong bearing on output and component life. For this reason, several articles have been written on the dynamic simulation of gas turbine systems in electrical generation, cogeneration, and marine applications. These models provide a basis for this present work. This paper describes a mathematical and computer model that was developed to investigate the dynamic response of a simple (no reheat, regeneration, or other auxiliary equipment) single-shaft...

  6. Galactic evolution. I - Single-zone models. [encompassing stellar evolution and gas-star dynamic theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuan, T. X.; Hart, M. H.; Ostriker, J. P.

    1975-01-01

    The two basic approaches of physical theory required to calculate the evolution of a galactic system are considered, taking into account stellar evolution theory and the dynamics of a gas-star system. Attention is given to intrinsic (stellar) physics, extrinsic (dynamical) physics, and computations concerning the fractionation of an initial mass of gas into stars. The characteristics of a 'standard' model and its variants are discussed along with the results obtained with the aid of these models.

  7. Formation of the geometrically controlled carbon coils by manipulating the additive gas (SF6) flow rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Young-Chul; Kim, Sung-Hoon

    2012-07-01

    Carbon coils could be synthesized using C2H2/H2 as source gases and SF6 as an incorporated additive gas under the thermal chemical vapor deposition system. The nickel catalyst layer deposition and then hydrogen plasma pretreatment were performed prior to the carbon coils deposition reaction. The flow rate and the injection time of SF6 varied according to the different reaction processes. Geometries of carbon coils developed from embryos to nanosized coils with increasing SF, flow rate from 5 to 35 sccm under the short SF6 flow injection time (5 minutes) condition. The gradual development of carbon coils geometries from nanosized to microsized types could be observed with increasing SF6 flow rate under the full time (90 minutes) SF6 flow injection condition. The flow rate of SF6 for the coil-type geometry formation should be more than or at least equal to the flow rate of carbon source gas (C2H2). A longer injection time of SF6 flow would increase the size of coils diameters from nanometer to micrometer.

  8. Land use change and carbon stock dynamics in Sub-Saharan Africa - Case study of Western Africa - Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieco, E.; Chiti, T.; Valentini, R.

    2012-04-01

    Among different regions of the world, Africa and particularly sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) has contributed less than any other to the greenhouse gas emissions, but it is also the region most vulnerable and the least well equipped to the consequences. In SSA the role of land use change in controlling CO2 emissions may be more critical than in any other regions and perhaps the most uncertain component of the global carbon cycle. The most typical example of incomplete estimates will arise from the lack of reliable data for carbon pools. Three factors account for much of the rest of the uncertainty: (1) initial stocks of carbon in ecosystems affected by land-use change, (2) per hectare changes in carbon stocks in response to different types of land-use change, and (3) legacy effects; that is, the time it takes for carbon stocks to equilibrate following a change in land use. Considering the source of uncertainty and the lack of field data for SSA, the study has been located in Ghana (Jomoro district, Western Region) where forest is the only source of wood for domestic uses and deforestation annual rate was 2.2% for the period 2005-2010. This study analyze the above mentioned gaps by assessing: 1) initial carbon stocks (tropical rain forest), 2) per hectare changes in carbon stocks as consequence of deforestation followed by six different main land uses [tree plantations (rubber, coconut, cocoa, oil palm, mixed plantations) and a secondary forest], 3) dynamics of soil carbon stocks through the time considering chronosequences. When accounting changes in carbon stocks in the UNFCCC framework, it is required to consider 5 carbon pools that are: aboveground biomass, belowground biomass, litter, dead wood and soil. Within REDD+ mechanism it is clear that only aboveground pool has to be always considered, belowground biomass is recommended and the others are facultative. Evidence from official UNFCCC reports suggests that only a very small fraction of developing countries

  9. Carbon dioxide fixation in green plants; Shokubutsu no tansan gas kotei ni kansuru kiso kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onishi, S. [Kansai Electric Power Co. Inc., Osaka (Japan); Kiyota, M. [University of Osaka Prefecture, Osaka (Japan); Nishimura, M. [Kansai Tech Co., Osaka (Japan)

    1997-09-30

    Concerning the effects of carbon dioxide whose level of concentration is on the rise, the short-term effect that works on the amount of exchanged gas and the long-term effect that works on the growth of green plants are studied by use of several kinds of green plants. Changes in the carbon dioxide absorption rate (photosynthetic rate) in saplings in the wake of a rise in carbon dioxide concentration are studied, and it is found that a rise in carbon dioxide concentration results in an increase in the photosynthetic rate and that the rate rises with an increase in the intensity of light. The effect of temperature is stronger when concentration is higher, with the temperature suitable for photosynthesis moving toward the high-temperature side. Growth is investigated of seedlings of Acacia mangium two years after transplantation, and then it is found that seedlings in the 1000ppm carbon dioxide section are greater by 20% in height and by 30% in trunk diameter than those in the 350ppm carbon dioxide section. In addition, the total dry matter weight is heavier by 82%. As for dry matter accumulation, there are noticeable amounts in the branches, trunks, and roots, while there is but a 15% increase in the leaf area. Leaves fall early in the high carbon dioxide environment, and this is supposedly the cause for a slowdown in the rate of the increase of photosynthesis. 6 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Thermal Transport in Carbon Nanotubes using Molecular Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Andrew; Khatun, Mahfuza

    2011-10-01

    We will present results of thermal transport phenomena in Carbon Nanotube (CNT) structures. CNTs have many interesting physical properties, and have the potential for device applications. Specifically, CNTs are robust materials with high thermal conductance and excellent electrical conduction properties. A review of electrical and thermal conduction of the structures will be discussed. The research requires analytical analysis as well as simulation. The major thrust of this study is the usage of the molecular dynamics (MD) simulator, LAMMPS (Large-scale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator). A significant investigation using the LAMMPS code is conducted on the existing Beowulf Computing Cluster at BSU. NanoHUB, an open online resource to the entire nanotechnology community developed by the researchers of Purdue University, is used for further supplementary resources. Results will include the time-dependence of temperature, kinetic energy, potential energy, heat flux correlation, and heat conduction.

  11. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Water Confined in Carbon Nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yan; YUAN Hong-Jun

    2007-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are performed for water conGned in carbon nanotubes with various diameters (11.0-13.8 A). The simulations under an isobaric pressure (one atmosphere) by lowering temperatures from 300K to 190 K are carried out. Water molecules within variously sized tubes tend to transform from disorder to order with different configurations (four-water-molecule ring, six-water-molecule ring and seven-water-molecule ring) at phase transition temperatures, which may be lowered by the increasing tube radius. It is also found that the configurations of water in (10, 10) tube are not unique (seven-molecule ring and seven-molecule ring plus water chain).

  12. Optical properties and electron dynamics in carbon nanodots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Xiaoming; Huang, Shujuan; Conibeer, Gavin; Shrestha, Santosh; Yu, Pyng; Toh, Yon-Rui; Tang, Jau

    2013-12-01

    Carbon nanodots (CNDs) have emerged as fascinating materials with exceptional electronic and optical properties, and thus they offer promising applications in photonics, photovoltaics and photocatalysis. Herein we study the optical properties and electron dynamics in CNDs using steady state and time-resolved spectroscopy. The photoluminescence (PL) is determined to originate from both core and surface. The massive surface fluorophores result in a broad spectral fluorescence. In addition to various synthesis techniques, it is demonstrated that the PL of CNDs can be extended from the blue to the near infrared by thermal assisted growth. Directional electron transfer was observed as fast as femtosecond in CND-graphene oxide nanocomposites from CND into graphene oxide. These results suggest CNDs can be promising in many applications.

  13. Dynamic simulation of a direct carbonate fuel cell power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernest, J.B. [Fluor Daniel, Inc., Irvine, CA (United States); Ghezel-Ayagh, H.; Kush, A.K. [Fuel Cell Engineering, Danbury, CT (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Fuel Cell Engineering Corporation (FCE) is commercializing a 2.85 MW Direct carbonate Fuel Cell (DFC) power plant. The commercialization sequence has already progressed through construction and operation of the first commercial-scale DFC power plant on a U.S. electric utility, the 2 MW Santa Clara Demonstration Project (SCDP), and the completion of the early phases of a Commercial Plant design. A 400 kW fuel cell stack Test Facility is being built at Energy Research Corporation (ERC), FCE`s parent company, which will be capable of testing commercial-sized fuel cell stacks in an integrated plant configuration. Fluor Daniel, Inc. provided engineering, procurement, and construction services for SCDP and has jointly developed the Commercial Plant design with FCE, focusing on the balance-of-plant (BOP) equipment outside of the fuel cell modules. This paper provides a brief orientation to the dynamic simulation of a fuel cell power plant and the benefits offered.

  14. Molecular interpretation of nonclassical gas dynamics of dense vapors under the van der Waals model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Colonna, P.; Guardone, A.

    2006-01-01

    The van der Waals polytropic gas model is used to investigate the role of attractive and repulsive intermolecular forces and the influence of molecular complexity on the possible nonclassical gas dynamic behavior of vapors near the liquid-vapor saturation curve. The decrease of the sound speed upon

  15. Molecular interpretation of nonclassical gas dynamics of dense vapors under the van der Waals model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Colonna, P.; Guardone, A.

    2006-01-01

    The van der Waals polytropic gas model is used to investigate the role of attractive and repulsive intermolecular forces and the influence of molecular complexity on the possible nonclassical gas dynamic behavior of vapors near the liquid-vapor saturation curve. The decrease of the sound speed upon

  16. Gas sensing properties of branched carbon nanotube-based structures using a novel low voltage emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darbari, S; Azimi, S; Abdi, Y; Mohajerzadeh, S

    2012-11-01

    Branched carbon nanostructures have been successfully grown on interdigital comb-like structures for a gas sensing application. Field emission scanning electron microscopy has been utilized to investigate the morphology and structure of the grown nanostructures at different stages of growth process. Tunneling current of the fabricated sensor has been measured when a monotonically increasing voltage is applied between the electrodes. The effect of exposure to three different gases on the measured current has been studied. A data processing on the measured current voltage characteristics results in the evolution of various peaks at distinct voltages which depends on the type of the gas.

  17. Breakdown voltage reduction by field emission in multi-walled carbon nanotubes based ionization gas sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saheed, M. Shuaib M.; Muti Mohamed, Norani; Arif Burhanudin, Zainal, E-mail: zainabh@petronas.com.my [Centre of Innovative Nanostructures and Nanodevices, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Bandar Seri Iskandar, 31750 Tronoh, Perak (Malaysia)

    2014-03-24

    Ionization gas sensors using vertically aligned multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) are demonstrated. The sharp tips of the nanotubes generate large non-uniform electric fields at relatively low applied voltage. The enhancement of the electric field results in field emission of electrons that dominates the breakdown mechanism in gas sensor with gap spacing below 14 μm. More than 90% reduction in breakdown voltage is observed for sensors with MWCNT and 7 μm gap spacing. Transition of breakdown mechanism, dominated by avalanche electrons to field emission electrons, as decreasing gap spacing is also observed and discussed.

  18. Raman imaging of millimeter-long carbon nanotubes grown by a gas flow method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kihara, Katsuya; Ishitani, Akihiro; Koyama, Tomohiro; Fukasawa, Mamoru; Inaba, Takumi; Shimizu, Maki; Homma, Yoshikazu

    2017-02-01

    Growing long carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is an important prerequisite for practical applications of CNTs. Although gas-flow-guided chemical vapor deposition can be used to produce millimeter-long CNTs, little is known regarding the associated growth mechanism. In the present work, Raman imaging was employed to characterize individual CNTs grown by the gas flow method, and Raman images of a CNT over 1.6 mm long were obtained. Two radial breathing modes were observed and the associated Raman images exhibited exactly identical distributions, indicating that the long CNT most likely had a double-walled structure, in which the CNT diameter was uniform along the whole length.

  19. Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube-Doped Tungsten Oxide Thin Films for Hydrogen Gas Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    In this work we have fabricated hydrogen gas sensors based on undoped and 1 wt% multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)-doped tungsten oxide (WO3) thin films by means of the powder mixing and electron beam (E-beam) evaporation technique. Hydrogen sensing properties of the thin films have been investigated at different operating temperatures and gas concentrations ranging from 100 ppm to 50,000 ppm. The results indicate that the MWCNT-doped WO3 thin film exhibits high sensitivity and selectivity ...

  20. Determination of free nitrogen in carbon steels by inert gas fusion method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabakov, Ya. I.; Grigorovich, K. V.; Mansurova, E. R.

    2016-07-01

    The possibility to use hot extraction (thermal extraction in a carrier-gas flow) for fractional analysis of nitrogen in carbon steels is shown for cord and reinforcing-bar steels. A rapid procedure is developed for an analysis of free nitrogen in carbon steels. The validity of the analytical procedure is confirmed by high-temperature hydrogen extraction. The data obtained by the two methods correlate well with each other. A sample preparation procedure is developed for the determination of the content of dissolved nitrogen.

  1. New amines for the reversible absorption of carbon dioxide from gas mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michele Aresta; Angela Dibenedetto [University of Bari, Bari (Italy). Department of Chemistry and METEA Research Center

    2003-07-01

    This paper discusses the use of new amines as a medium for the capture of CO{sub 2} from a gas mixture. The study was carried out comparing the absorption of carbon dioxide by two alkyl-di-amines with that of amines used so far at industrial level, namely mono-ethanolamine (MEA). A known mono silyl-alkyl-amine was also studied for comparison. The absorption of carbon dioxide was studied at different temperatures, in water solution, in organic solvents and using the neat amine. Several cycles of absorption/desorption were carried out. Xerogel solidified amines were also used. 12 refs., 6 figs.

  2. Static versus dynamic fracturing in shallow carbonate fault zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fondriest, Michele; Doan, Mai-Linh; Aben, Frans; Fusseis, Florian; Mitchell, Thomas M.; Voorn, Maarten; Secco, Michele; Di Toro, Giulio

    2017-03-01

    Moderate to large earthquakes often nucleate within and propagate through carbonates in the shallow crust. The occurrence of thick belts of low-strain fault-related breccias is relatively common within carbonate damage zones and was generally interpreted in relation to the quasi-static growth of faults. Here we report the occurrence of hundreds of meters thick belts of intensely fragmented dolostones along a major transpressive fault zone in the Italian Southern Alps. These fault rocks have been shattered in-situ with negligible shear strain accumulation. The conditions of in-situ shattering were investigated by deforming the host dolostones in uniaxial compression both under quasi-static (strain rate ∼10-5 s-1) and dynamic (strain rate > 50 s-1) loading. Dolostones deformed up to failure under low-strain rate were affected by single to multiple discrete extensional fractures sub-parallel to the loading direction. Dolostones deformed under high-strain rate were shattered above a strain rate threshold of ∼ 120 s-1 and peak stresses on average larger than the uniaxial compressive strength of the rock, whereas they were split in few fragments or remained macroscopically intact at lower strain rates. Fracture networks were investigated in three dimensions showing that low- and high-strain rate damage patterns (fracture intensity, aperture, orientation) were significantly different, with the latter being similar to that of natural in-situ shattered dolostones (i.e., comparable fragment size distributions). In-situ shattered dolostones were thus interpreted as the result of high energy dynamic fragmentation (dissipated strain energies >1.8 MJ/m3) similarly to pulverized rocks in crystalline lithologies. Given their seismic origin, the presence of in-situ shattered dolostones can be used in earthquake hazard studies as evidence of the propagation of seismic ruptures at shallow depths.

  3. Carbon dioxide gas in hydrocarbon pools as a geochemical indicator of tapering traps (as in West Siberian fields)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sidorenkov, A.T.

    1983-01-01

    Principal sources of carbon dioxide gas in oil pools of Western Siberia are carbonates, present in the makeup of the layer-collector horizons. All the hydrocarbon pools complicated by lithologic screens are characterized by increased concentrations of carbon dioxide in the gases dissolved in the oils. With a carbon dioxide content of more than 1 vol%, the probability of identifying the screen in the pools of Western Siberia is close to 100%.

  4. Carbon dioxide gas in hydrocarbon pools as a geochemical indicator of tapering traps (as in West Siberian fields)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sidorenkov, A.T.

    1980-07-01

    Principal sources of carbon dioxide gas in oil pools of Western Siberia are carbonates, present in the makeup of the layer-collector horizons. All the hydrocarbon pools complicated by lithologic screens are characterized by increased concentrations of carbon dioxide in the gases dissolved in the oils. With a carbon dioxide content of more than 1 vol %, the probability of identifying the screen in the pools of Western Sibeia is close to 100%.

  5. Threshold Dynamics in Soil Carbon Storage for Bioenergy Crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, D.; Quijano, J.; Kumar, P.; Chaoka, S.; Bernacchi, C.

    2014-12-01

    Due to increasing demands for bioenergy, a considerable amount of land in the Midwestern United States could be devoted to the cultivation of second-generation bioenergy crops, such as switchgrass and miscanthus. In this study, we attempt to explore and analyze how different amounts of above-ground biomass returned to the soil at harvest affect the below-ground dynamics of carbon and nitrogen as a comparative study between miscanthus, swichgrass, and corn-corn-soybean rotation. The simulation results show that there is a threshold effect in the amount of above-ground litter input in the soil after harvest that will reach a critical organic matter C:N ratio in the soil, triggering a reduction of the soil microbial population, with significant consequences in other microbe-related processes such as decomposition and mineralization. These thresholds are approximately 25% and 15% of above-ground biomass for switchgrass and miscanthus, respectively. However, we do not observe such threshold effects for corn-corn-soybean rotation. These results suggest that values above these thresholds could result in a significant reduction of decomposition and mineralization, which in turn would enhance the sequestration of atmospheric carbon dioxide in the topsoil and reduce inorganic nitrogen losses when compared with a corn-corn-soybean rotation.

  6. Carbon and Nitrogen dynamics in deciduous and broad leaf trees under drought stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Jobin; Schaub, Marcus; Arend, Matthias; Saurer, Matthias; siegwolf, Rolf; Weiler, Markus; Gessler, Arthur

    2017-04-01

    Climate change is projected to lead to an increased frequency and duration of severe drought events in future. Already within the last twenty years, however, drought stress related forest mortality has been increasing across the globe. Tree and forest die off events have multiple adverse effects on ecosystem functioning and might convert previous carbon sinks to act as carbon sources instead and can thus intensify the effect of climate change and global warming. Current predictions of forest's functioning under drought and thus forest mortality under future climatic conditions are constrained by a still incomplete picture of the trees' physiological reactions that allows some trees to survive drought periods while others succumb. Concerning the effects of drought on the carbon balance and on tree hydraulics our picture is getting more complete, but still interactions between abiotic factors and pest and diseases as well as the interaction between carbon and nutrient balances as factors affecting drought induced mortality are not well understood. Reduced carbon allocation from shoots to roots might cause a lack of energy for root nutrient uptake and to a shortage of carbon skeletons for nitrogen assimilation and thus to an impaired nutrient status of trees. To tackle these points, we have performed a drought stress experiment with six different plant species, 3 broad leaf (maple, beech and oak) and 3 deciduous (pine, fir and spruce). Potted two-year-old seedlings were kept inside a greenhouse for 5 months and 3 levels of drought stress (no stress (control), intermediate and intensive drought stress) were applied by controlling water supply. Gas exchange measurements were performed periodically to monitor photosynthesis, transpiration, stomatal conductance. At the pinnacle of drought stress, we applied isotopic pulse labelling: On the one hand we exposed trees to 13CO2 to investigate on carbon dynamics and the allocation of new assimilates within the plant. Moreover

  7. Plasma and laser kinetics and field emission from carbon nanotube fibers for an Advanced Noble Gas Laser (ANGL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Paul J.; Lockwood, Nathaniel P.; Lange, Matthew A.; Hostutler, David A.; Guild, Eric M.; Guy, Matthew R.; McCord, John E.; Pitz, Greg A.

    2016-03-01

    A metastable argon laser operating at 912 nm has been demonstrated by optically pumping with a pulsed titanium sapphire laser to investigate the temporal dynamics of an Advanced Noble Gas Laser (ANGL). Metastable argon concentrations on the order of 1011 cm-3 were maintained with the use of a radio frequency (RF) capacitively coupled discharge. The end-pumped laser produced output powers under 2 mW of average power with pulse lengths on the order of 100 ns. A comparison between empirical results and a four level laser model using longitudinally average pump and inter-cavity intensities is made. An alternative, highly-efficient method of argon metastable production for ANGL was explored using carbon nanotube (CNT) fibers.

  8. Determination of total carbon dioxide in beer and soft drinks by gas diffusion and flow injection analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljunggren, Esbjörn; Karlberg, Bo

    1995-01-01

    A gas diffusion FIA method for determination of total CO2 in beer and in soft drinks is described. The composition of the acceptor stream for diffused carbon dioxide is critical. Bromocresol purple has been selecled among a large number of tested pH indicators and if the detection is made at a wavelength of 430 nm, stable baseline conditions and positive deflections of the resulting FIA peaks are obtained. The selected indicator is combined with a linear pH buffer. A simple and practical graphical method for determining a suitable starting pH of the acceptor stream, as well as the expected dynamic range and the linearity of the calibration graph, is presented. PMID:18925022

  9. The role of the C2 gas in the emergence of C60 from the condensing carbon vapour

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmad, Shoaib; Tasneem, Afshan

    2016-01-01

    A model has been developed that illustrates the emergence of C60 from the condensing carbon vapor. It is shown to depend upon the decreasing heats of formation for larger cages, exponentially increasing number of isomers for fullerenes that are larger than C60, large cages buckling induced by the pentagon-related protrusions that initiate fragmentation, the structural instability induces fragmentation that shrinks large cages and an evolving gas of C2 that is crucial to the whole process. The model describes a mechanism for the provision and presence of plenty of C2 during the formation and fragmentation processes. The bottom-up formations of large cages followed by the top-down cage shrinkage are shown to be stable, dynamical processes that lead to the C60 dominated fullerene ensemble.

  10. SOFIA Observations of S106: Dynamics of the Warm Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, R.; Schneider, N.; Stutzki, J.; Gusten, R.; Graf, U. U.; Hartogh, P.; Guan, X.; Staguhn, J. G.; Benford, D. J.

    2012-01-01

    Context The H II region/PDR/molecular cloud complex S106 is excited by a single O-star. The full extent of the warm and dense gas close to the star has not been mapped in spectrally resolved high-J CO or [C II] lines, so the kinematics of the warm. partially ionized gas, are unknown. Whether the prominent dark lane bisecting the hourglass-shaped nebula is due solely to the shadow cast by a small disk around the exciting star or also to extinction in high column foreground gas was an open question until now. Aims. To disentangle the morphology and kinematics of warm neutral and ionized gas close to the star, study their relation to the bulk of the molecular gas. and to investigate the nature of the dark lane. Methods. We use the heterodyne receiver GREAT on board SOFIA to observe velocity resolved spectral lines of [C II] and CO 11 yields 10 in comparison with so far unpublished submm continuum data at 350 micron (8HARC-Il) and complementary molecular line data. Results. The high angular and spectral resolution observations show a very complex morphology and kinematics of the inner S106 region, with many different components at different excitation conditions contributing to the observed emission. The [C II] lines are found to be bright and very broad. tracing high velocity gas close to the interface of molecular cloud and H II region. CO 11 yields 10 emission is more confined.. both spatially and in velocity, to the immediate surroundings of S 106 IR showing the presence of warm, high density (clumpy) gas. Our high angular resolution submm continuum observations rule out the scenario where the dark lane separating the two lobes is due solely to the shadow cast by a small disk close to the star. The lane is clearly seen also as warm, high column density gas at the boundary of the molecular cloud and H II region.

  11. Dynamics of warm Chaplygin gas inflationary models with quartic potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jawad, Abdul; Rani, Shamaila [COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Department of Mathematics, Lahore (Pakistan); Butt, Sadaf [Lahore Leads University, Department of Mathematics, Lahore (Pakistan); Kinnaird College for Women, Department of Mathematics, Lahore (Pakistan)

    2016-05-15

    Warm inflationary universe models in the context of the generalized Chaplygin gas, the modified Chaplygin gas, and the generalized cosmic Chaplygin gas are being studied. The dissipative coefficient of the form Γ ∝ T, and the weak and the strong dissipative regimes are being considered. We use the quartic potential, (λ{sub *}φ{sup 4})/(4), which is ruled out by current data in cold inflation but in our models by analysis it is seen to be in agreement with the WMAP9 and the latest Planck data. In these scenarios, the power spectrum, the spectral index, and the tensor-to-scalar ratio are being examined in the slow-roll approximation. We show the dependence of the tensor-scalar ratio r on the spectral index n{sub s} and observe that the range of the tensor-scalar ratio is r < 0.05 in the generalized Chaplygin gas, r < 0.15 in the modified Chaplygin gas, and r < 0.12 in the generalized cosmic Chaplygin gas models. Our results are in agreement with recent observational data like WMAP9 and the latest Planck data. (orig.)

  12. High-density carbon ablator ignition path with low-density gas-filled rugby hohlraum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amendt, Peter; Ho, Darwin D.; Jones, Ogden S.

    2015-04-01

    A recent low gas-fill density (0.6 mg/cc 4He) cylindrical hohlraum experiment on the National Ignition Facility has shown high laser-coupling efficiency (>96%), reduced phenomenological laser drive corrections, and improved high-density carbon capsule implosion symmetry [Jones et al., Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 59(15), 66 (2014)]. In this Letter, an ignition design using a large rugby-shaped hohlraum [Amendt et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 112703 (2014)] for high energetics efficiency and symmetry control with the same low gas-fill density (0.6 mg/cc 4He) is developed as a potentially robust platform for demonstrating thermonuclear burn. The companion high-density carbon capsule for this hohlraum design is driven by an adiabat-shaped [Betti et al., Phys. Plasmas 9, 2277 (2002)] 4-shock drive profile for robust high gain (>10) 1-D ignition performance and large margin to 2-D perturbation growth.

  13. High-density carbon ablator ignition path with low-density gas-filled rugby hohlraum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amendt, Peter; Ho, Darwin D.; Jones, Ogden S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    A recent low gas-fill density (0.6 mg/cc {sup 4}He) cylindrical hohlraum experiment on the National Ignition Facility has shown high laser-coupling efficiency (>96%), reduced phenomenological laser drive corrections, and improved high-density carbon capsule implosion symmetry [Jones et al., Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 59(15), 66 (2014)]. In this Letter, an ignition design using a large rugby-shaped hohlraum [Amendt et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 112703 (2014)] for high energetics efficiency and symmetry control with the same low gas-fill density (0.6 mg/cc {sup 4}He) is developed as a potentially robust platform for demonstrating thermonuclear burn. The companion high-density carbon capsule for this hohlraum design is driven by an adiabat-shaped [Betti et al., Phys. Plasmas 9, 2277 (2002)] 4-shock drive profile for robust high gain (>10) 1-D ignition performance and large margin to 2-D perturbation growth.

  14. Reduction of CO2 emissions from road transport in cities impact of dynamic route guidance system on greenhouse gas emission

    CERN Document Server

    Markiewicz, Michal

    2017-01-01

    Michal Markiewicz presents the outcomes of his research regarding the influence of dynamic route guidance system on overall emission of carbon dioxide from road transport in rural areas. Sustainable transportation in smart cities is a big challenge of our time, but before electric vehicles replace vehicles that burn fossil fuels we have to think about traffic optimization methods that reduce the amount of greenhouse gas emissions. Contents Comparison of Travel Time Measurements Using Floating Car Data and Intelligent Infrastructure Integration of Cellular Automata Traffic Simulator with CO2 Emission Model Impact of Dynamic Route Guidance System on CO2 Emission Naxos Vehicular Traffic Simulator Target Groups Lecturers and students of computer science, transportation and logistics Traffic engineers The Author Dr. Michal Markiewicz defended his PhD thesis in computer science at the University of Bremen,TZI Technologie-Zentrum Informatik und Informationstechnik, Germany. Currently, he is working on commercializat...

  15. Radial Heat Transfer Dynamics in Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Mohamed; Kim, Taejin

    2006-05-01

    The dynamics of radial heat transfer in zigzag and armchair double wall carbon nanotubes (DWCNT) have been examined using molecular dynamic (MD) simulations with the goal of understanding the role of radial phonon modes in heat transfer. The MD model uses Tersof-Brenner potential for bonded C-C interactions within each shell and non-bended van der Wall interaction between inner and outer shells. The simulation procedure involves, (1) quenching the DWNT to 0 K, (2) minimization of the potential energy and (3) raising the temperature of the outer shell to the desired steady state temperature while maintaining the inner tube at 0.1 K. The heat baths are removed from the outer and inner shell and their energies are examined. The energies of inner and outer exhibit an out of phase oscillatory behavior due the exchange of the energies between the two shells. The energy of the inner tube shows a weak gradual increase due to the temperature gradient. The beat frequencies determined from the Fourier transform of the energy oscillations of the inner and outer nanotubes were found to be in the tera Herz range. We will also discuss the temperature and length dependence of oscillatory energy exchange between the nanotube shells.

  16. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Carbon Nanotube Based Gears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jie; Globus, Al; Jaffe, Richard; Deardorff, Glenn; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    We used molecular dynamics to investigate the properties and design space of molecular gears fashioned from carbon nanotubes with teeth added via a benzyne reaction known to occur with C60. A modified, parallelized version of Brenner's potential was used to model interatomic forces within each molecule. A Leonard-Jones 6-12 potential was used for forces between molecules. One gear was powered by forcing the atoms near the end of the buckytube to rotate, and a second gear was allowed.to rotate by keeping the atoms near the end of its buckytube on a cylinder. The meshing aromatic gear teeth transfer angular momentum from the powered gear to the driven gear. A number of gear and gear/shaft configurations were simulated. Cases in vacuum and with an inert atmosphere were examined. In an extension to molecular dynamics technology, some simulations used a thermostat on the atmosphere while the hydrocarbon gear's temperature was allowed to fluctuate. This models cooling the gears with an atmosphere. Results suggest that these gears can operate at up to 50-100 gigahertz in a vacuum or inert atmosphere at room temperature. The failure mode involves tooth slip, not bond breaking, so failed gears can be returned to operation by lowering temperature and/or rotation rate. Videos and atomic trajectory files in xyz format are presented.

  17. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Carbon Nanotube Based Gears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jie; Globus, Al; Jaffe, Richard; Deardorff, Glenn; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    We used molecular dynamics to investigate the properties and design space of molecular gears fashioned from carbon nanotubes with teeth added via a benzyne reaction known to occur with C60. A modified, parallelized version of Brenner's potential was used to model interatomic forces within each molecule. A Leonard-Jones 6-12 potential was used for forces between molecules. One gear was powered by forcing the atoms near the end of the buckytube to rotate, and a second gear was allowed.to rotate by keeping the atoms near the end of its buckytube on a cylinder. The meshing aromatic gear teeth transfer angular momentum from the powered gear to the driven gear. A number of gear and gear/shaft configurations were simulated. Cases in vacuum and with an inert atmosphere were examined. In an extension to molecular dynamics technology, some simulations used a thermostat on the atmosphere while the hydrocarbon gear's temperature was allowed to fluctuate. This models cooling the gears with an atmosphere. Results suggest that these gears can operate at up to 50-100 gigahertz in a vacuum or inert atmosphere at room temperature. The failure mode involves tooth slip, not bond breaking, so failed gears can be returned to operation by lowering temperature and/or rotation rate. Videos and atomic trajectory files in xyz format are presented.

  18. Measurement of dynamic gas disengagement profile by using an analog output level gauge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkilineni, S.; Koelle, M.; Xu, H.

    The dynamic gas disengagement profile was measured in a 0.14 m diameter and 3.66 m high plexiglas column by using an analog output gauge, which was connected to a data acquisition system. This analog output gauge is a high accuracy continuous measurement level gauge. It is made up of a wave guide, a float, a motion or stress sensing device and a probe housing. The fluid level at any gas velocity is obtained by using the data acquisition system. The dynamic gas disengagement profile produced one slope in the bubble flow and two slopes in the churn turbulent flow representing unimodal and bimodal distributions of bubbles.

  19. Automatic Carbon Dioxide-Methane Gas Sensor Based on the Solubility of Gases in Water

    OpenAIRE

    Cadena-Pereda, Raúl O.; Anaya-Rivera, Ely K.; Gilberto Herrera-Ruiz; Eric M. Rivera-Muñoz; Gomez-Melendez, Domingo J.

    2012-01-01

    Biogas methane content is a relevant variable in anaerobic digestion processing where knowledge of process kinetics or an early indicator of digester failure is needed. The contribution of this work is the development of a novel, simple and low cost automatic carbon dioxide-methane gas sensor based on the solubility of gases in water as the precursor of a sensor for biogas quality monitoring. The device described in this work was used for determining the composition of binary mixtures, such a...

  20. Effect of ferroalloy gas purification rate on kinetics of red mud carbonization

    OpenAIRE

    Кириченко, Олексій Геннадійович

    2013-01-01

    The process of iron carburization by CO-containing gases of ferroalloy furnaces using as catalyst materials red mud from alumina production.Red mud from alumina production and waste gases ferroalloy furnaces after appropriate training are quite suitable for the decomposition reaction of carbon monoxide. Ferroalloy gas sulfur compounds have toxic effect on the catalytic ability of the red mud. The most effective absorber catalyst poisons in the experiments was a solution of potassium permangan...

  1. Highly integrated CO2 capture and conversion: Direct synthesis of cyclic carbonates from industrial flue gas

    KAUST Repository

    Barthel, Alexander

    2016-02-08

    Robust and selective catalytic systems based on early transition metal halides (Y, Sc, Zr) and organic nucleophiles were found able to quantitatively capture CO2 from diluted streams via formation of hemicarbonate species and to convert it to cyclic organic carbonates under ambient conditions. This observation was exploited in the direct and selective chemical fixation of flue gas CO2 collected from an industrial exhaust, affording high degrees of CO2 capture and conversion.

  2. Efficient utilization of greenhouse gas in a gas-to-liquids process combined with carbon dioxide reforming of methane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Kyoung-Su; Bae, Jong Wook; Woo, Kwang-Jae; Jun, Ki-Won

    2010-02-15

    A process model for a gas-to-liquids (GTL) process mainly producing Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthetic oils has been developed to assess the effects of reforming methods, recycle ratio of unreacted syngas mixture on the process efficiency and the greenhouse gas (GHG) emission. The reforming unit of our study is composed of both steam reforming of methane (SRM) and carbon dioxide reforming of methane (CDR) to form syngas, which gives composition flexibility, reduction in GHG emission, and higher cost-competitiveness. With recycling, it is found that zero emission of CO(2) from the process can be realized and the required amount of natural gas (NG) can be significantly reduced. This GTL process model has been built by using Aspen Plus software, and it is mainly composed of a feeding unit, a reforming unit, an FT synthesis unit, several separation units and a recycling unit. The composition flexibility of the syngas mixture due to the two different types of reforming reactions raises an issue that in order to attain the optimized feed composition of FT synthesis the amount of flow rate of each component in the fresh feed mixture should be determined considering the effects of the recycle and its split ratio. In the FT synthesis unit, the 15 representative reactions for the chain growth and water gas shift on the cobalt-based catalyst are considered. After FT synthesis, the unreacted syngas mixture is recycled to the reforming unit or the FT synthesis unit or both to enhance process efficiency. The effect of the split ratio, the recycle flow rate to the FT reactor over the recycle flow rate to the reforming unit, on the efficiency of the process was also investigated. This work shows that greater recycle to the reforming unit is less effective than that to the FT synthesis unit from the standpoint of the net heat efficiency of the process, since the reforming reactions are greatly endothermic and greater recycle to the reformer requires more energy.

  3. Disentangling the drivers of coarse woody debris behavior and carbon gas emissions during fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Weiwei; van der Werf, Guido R.; van Logtestijn, Richard S. P.; van Hal, Jurgen R.; Cornelissen, Johannes H. C.

    2016-04-01

    The turnover of coarse woody debris, a key terrestrial carbon pool, plays fundamental roles in global carbon cycling. Biological decomposition and fire are two main fates for dead wood turnover. Compared to slow decomposition, fire rapidly transfers organic carbon from the earth surface to the atmosphere. Both a-biotic environmental factors and biotic wood properties determine coarse wood combustion and thereby its carbon gas emissions during fire. Moisture is a key inhibitory environmental factor for fire. The properties of dead wood strongly affect how it burns either directly or indirectly through interacting with moisture. Coarse wood properties vary between plant species and between various decay stages. Moreover, if we put a piece of dead wood in the context of a forest fuel bed, the soil and wood contact might also greatly affect their fire behavior. Using controlled laboratory burns, we disentangled the effects of all these driving factors: tree species (one gymnosperms needle-leaf species, three angiosperms broad-leaf species), wood decay stages (freshly dead, middle decayed, very strongly decayed), moisture content (air-dried, 30% moisture content in mass), and soil-wood contact (on versus 3cm above the ground surface) on dead wood flammability and carbon gas efflux (CO2 and CO released in grams) during fire. Wood density was measured for all coarse wood samples used in our experiment. We found that compared to other drivers, wood decay stages have predominant positive effects on coarse wood combustion (for wood mass burned, R2=0.72 when air-dried and R2=0.52 at 30% moisture content) and associated carbon gas emissions (for CO2andCO (g) released, R2=0.55 when air-dried and R2=0.42 at 30% moisture content) during fire. Thus, wood decay accelerates wood combustion and its CO2 and CO emissions during fire, which can be mainly attributed to the decreasing wood density (for wood mass burned, R2=0.91 when air-dried and R2=0.63 at 30% moisture content) as wood

  4. Carbon nanotubes as nanodelivery systems an insight through molecular dynamics simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Lim, Melvin Choon Giap

    2013-01-01

    This book showcases the application of carbon nanotubes as nanodelivery systems for copper atoms, using molecular dynamics simulations as a means of investigation. The nanodelivery system of the carbon nanotube presents the possible usage of the carbon structure in many areas in the future. This book is comprehensive and informative, and serves as a guide for any reader who wishes to perform a molecular dynamics simulation of his own and to conduct an analytical study of a molecular system.

  5. Self-assembly of single-walled carbon nanotubes into multiwalled carbon nanotubes in water: molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Jian; Ji, Baohua; Feng, Xi-Qiao; Gao, Huajian

    2006-03-01

    We report discoveries from a series of molecular dynamics simulations that single-walled carbon nanotubes, with different diameters, lengths, and chiralities, can coaxially self-assemble into multiwalled carbon nanotubes in water via spontaneous insertion of smaller tubes into larger ones. The assembly process is tube-size-dependent, and the driving force is primarily the intertube van der Waals interactions. The simulations also suggest that a multiwalled carbon nanotube may be separated into single-walled carbon nanotubes under appropriate solvent conditions. This study suggests possible bottom-up self-assembly routes for the fabrication of novel nanodevices and systems.

  6. Powerful greenhouse gas nitrous oxide adsorption onto intrinsic and Pd doped Single walled carbon nanotube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoosefian, Mehdi

    2017-01-01

    Density functional studies on the adsorption behavior of nitrous oxide (N2O) onto intrinsic carbon nanotube (CNT) and Pd-doped (5,5) single-walled carbon nanotube (Pd-CNT) have been reported. Introduction of Pd dopant facilitates in adsorption of N2O on the otherwise inert nanotube as observed from the adsorption energies and global reactivity descriptor values. Among three adsorption features of N2O onto CNT, the horizontal adsorption with Eads = -0.16 eV exhibits higher adsorption energy. On the other hand the Pd-CNT exhibit strong affinity toward gas molecule and would cause a huge increase in N2O adsorption energies. Chemical and electronic properties of CNT and Pd-CNT in the absence and presence of N2O were investigated. Adsorption of N2O gas molecule would affect the electronic conductance of Pd-CNT that can serve as a signal of gas sensors and the increased energy gaps demonstrate the formation of more stable systems. The atoms in molecules (AIM) theory and the natural bond orbital (NBO) calculations were performed to get more details about the nature and charge transfers in intermolecular interactions within adsorption process. As a final point, the density of states (DOSs) calculations was achieved to confirm previous results. According to our results, intrinsic CNT cannot act as a suitable adsorbent while Pd-CNT can be introduced as novel detectable complex for designing high sensitive, fast response and high efficient carbon nanotube based gas sensor to detect N2O gas as an air pollutant. Our results could provide helpful information for the design and fabrication of the N2O sensors.

  7. Development of textile-reinforced carbon fibre aluminium composites manufactured with gas pressure infiltration methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Hufenbach

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of his paper is to show potential of textile-reinforced carbon fibre aluminium composite with advantage of the lightweight construction of structural components subjected to thermo-mechanical stress.Design/methodology/approach: The manufacture of specimens of the carbon fibre-reinforced aluminium was realised with the aid of an advanced differential gas pressure infiltration technique, which was developed at ILK, TU Dresden.Findings: The gas pressure infiltration technology enables to fabricate complex carbon aluminium composites with fibre or textile reinforcement using moulds of graphite, but in future development the optimization of infiltration process is required. The load-adapted combination of 3D reinforced semi-finished fibre products (textile preforms made from carbon fibres (CF with aluminium light metal alloys (Al offers a considerable lightweight construction potential, which up to now has not been exploited.Research limitations/implications: Gas pressure infiltration technology enables to fabricate complex carbon aluminium composites with fibre or textile reinforcement using precision moulds of graphite, but in future development the optimization of infiltration process is required.Practical implications: Load-adapted CF/Al-MMC, due to the relatively high stiffness and strength of the metal matrix, allow the introduction of extremely high forces, thereby enabling a much better exploitation of the existing lightweight construction potential of this material in comparison to other composite materials.Originality/value: Constantly rising demands on extremely stressed lightweight structures, particularly in traffic engineering as well as in machine building and plant engineering, increasingly require the use of endless fibre-reinforced composite materials which, due to their selectively adaptable characteristics profiles, are clearly superior to conventional monolithic materials.

  8. Study of Biodiesel Emissions and Carbon Mitigation in Gas Turbine Combustor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Alalim Altaher

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The energy security and reduction of carbon emissions have accelerated the R&D of the alternative fuels in the transport, heating and power generation sectors in last decade. The heating and power generation sectors are two of the major contributors to carbon dioxide emissions, which are due to the combustion of petroleum fuels. A gas turbine combustor test rig was used to study the combustion and emission characteristics of waste cooking oil methyl ester (WME biodiesel. A 140mm diameter atmospheric pressure premixed combustion test rig was used at 600K inlet air temperature and Mach number 0.017. The tests were conducted using pure WME and blend with kerosene. The central fuel injection was used for liquid fuels and wall injection was used for NG (Natural Gas. The exhaust samples for smoke and gaseous emissions (NOx, UHC, CO and CO₂ have been analysed on dry basis and corrected to 15% O₂ over range of different fuel rate. The results showed that the biodiesel had lower CO, UHC emissions and higher NOx emissions than the kerosene. The blend B20 had lowest NOx emissions comparing with pure biodiesel (B100 and B50. The optimum conditions for WME with lowest emissions were identified. The carbon dioxide emissions per 100 megawatts of heat generated for each fuel were calculated. The relative carbon emissions and mitigations by biodiesel were compared. The results can be used to estimate pollutant emissions and carbon reductions by biodiesel in power generation industry and other sectors where gas turbine engines are used.

  9. Endohedral nitrogen storage in carbon fullerene structures: Physisorption to chemisorption transition with increasing gas pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barajas-Barraza, R. E.; Guirado-López, R. A.

    2009-06-01

    We present extensive pseudopotential density functional theory (DFT) calculations in order to analyze the structural properties and chemical reactivity of nitrogen molecules confined in spheroidal (C82) and tubelike (C110) carbon fullerene structures. For a small number of encapsulated nitrogens, the N2 species exist in a nonbonded state within the cavities and form well defined molecular conformations such as linear chains, zigzag arrays, as well as both spheroidal and tubular configurations. However, with increasing the number of stored molecules, the interaction among the confined nitrogens as well as between the N2 species and the fullerene wall is not always mainly repulsive. Actually, at high densities of the encapsulated gas, we found both adsorption of N2 to the inner carbon surface together with the formation of (N2)m molecular clusters. Total energy DFT calculations reveal that the shape of the interaction potential of a test molecule moving within the carbon cavities strongly varies with the number and proximity of the coadsorbed N2 from being purely repulsive to having short-range attractive contributions close to the inner wall. In particular, the latter are always found when a group of closely spaced nitrogens is located near the carbon cage (a fact that will naturally occur at high densities of the encapsulated gas), inducing the formation of covalent bonds between the N2 and the fullerene network. Interestingly, in some cases, the previous nitrogen adsorption to the inner surface is reversible by reducing the gas pressure. The calculated average density of states of our considered carbon compounds reveals the appearance of well defined features that clearly reflect the occurring structural changes and modifications in the adsorption properties in the systems. Our results clearly underline the crucial role played by confinement effects on the reactivity of our endohedral compounds, define this kind of materials as nonideal nanocontainers for high

  10. Influence of carbonation under oxy-fuel combustion flue gas on the leachability of heavy metals in MSWI fly ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Peng; Xiong, Zhuo; Tian, Chong; Li, Hailong; Zhao, Yongchun; Zhang, Junying; Zheng, Chuguang

    2017-09-01

    Due to the high cost of pure CO2, carbonation of MSWI fly ash has not been fully developed. It is essential to select a kind of reaction gas with rich CO2 instead of pure CO2. The CO2 uptake and leaching toxicity of heavy metals in three typical types of municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) fly ash were investigated with simulated oxy-fuel combustion flue gas under different reaction temperatures, which was compared with both pure CO2 and simulated air combustion flue gas. The CO2 uptake under simulated oxy-fuel combustion flue gas were similar to that of pure CO2. The leaching concentration of heavy metals in all MSWI fly ash samples, especially in ash from Changzhou, China (CZ), decreased after carbonation. Specifically, the leached Pb concentration of the CZ MSWI fly ash decreased 92% under oxy-fuel combustion flue gas, 95% under pure CO2 atmosphere and 84% under the air combustion flue gas. After carbonation, the leaching concentration of Pb was below the Chinese legal limit. The leaching concentration of Zn from CZ sample decreased 69% under oxy-fuel combustion flue gas, which of Cu, As, Cr and Hg decreased 25%, 33%, 11% and 21%, respectively. In the other two samples of Xuzhou, China (XZ) and Wuhan, China (WH), the leaching characteristics of heavy metals were similar to the CZ sample. The speciation of heavy metals was largely changed from the exchangeable to carbonated fraction because of the carbonation reaction under simulated oxy-fuel combustion flue gas. After carbonation reaction, most of heavy metals bound in carbonates became more stable and leached less. Therefore, oxy-fuel combustion flue gas could be a low-cost source for carbonation of MSWI fly ash. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Impact of Argon gas on optical and electrical properties of Carbon thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Usman, Arslan, E-mail: arslan.usman@gmail.com [Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Lahore (Pakistan); Rafique, M.S. [Department of Physics, University of Engineering & Technology, Lahore 54890 (Pakistan); Shaukat, S.F. [Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Lahore (Pakistan); Siraj, Khurram [Department of Physics, University of Engineering & Technology, Lahore 54890 (Pakistan); Ashfaq, Afshan [Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Oncology Lahore (INMOL), 54000 Pakistan (Pakistan); Anjum, Safia [Department of Physics, Lahore College for Women University (Pakistan); Imran, Muhammad; Sattar, Abdul [Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Lahore (Pakistan)

    2016-12-15

    Nanostructured thin films of carbon were synthesized and investigated for their electrical, optical, structural and surface properties. Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) technique was used for the preparation of these films under Argon gas environment. A KrF Laser (λ=248 nm) was used as source of ablation and plasma formation. It was observed that the carbon ions and the background gas environment has deep impact on the morphology as well as on the microstructure of the films. Time of Flight (TOF) method was used to determine the energies of the ablated carbon ions. The morphology of film surfaces deposited at various argon pressure was analysed using an atomic force microscope. The Raman spectroscopic measurement reveal that there is shift in phase from sp{sup 3} to sp{sup 2} and a decrease in FWHM of G band, which is a clear indication of enhanced graphitic clusters. The electrical resistivity was also reduced from 85.3×10{sup −1} to 2.57×10{sup −1} Ω-cm. There is an exponential decrease in band gap E{sub g} of the deposited films from 1.99 to 1.37 eV as a function of argon gas pressure.

  12. Impact of Argon gas on optical and electrical properties of Carbon thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usman, Arslan; Rafique, M. S.; Shaukat, S. F.; Siraj, Khurram; Ashfaq, Afshan; Anjum, Safia; Imran, Muhammad; Sattar, Abdul

    2016-12-01

    Nanostructured thin films of carbon were synthesized and investigated for their electrical, optical, structural and surface properties. Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) technique was used for the preparation of these films under Argon gas environment. A KrF Laser (λ=248 nm) was used as source of ablation and plasma formation. It was observed that the carbon ions and the background gas environment has deep impact on the morphology as well as on the microstructure of the films. Time of Flight (TOF) method was used to determine the energies of the ablated carbon ions. The morphology of film surfaces deposited at various argon pressure was analysed using an atomic force microscope. The Raman spectroscopic measurement reveal that there is shift in phase from sp3 to sp2 and a decrease in FWHM of G band, which is a clear indication of enhanced graphitic clusters. The electrical resistivity was also reduced from 85.3×10-1 to 2.57×10-1 Ω-cm. There is an exponential decrease in band gap Eg of the deposited films from 1.99 to 1.37 eV as a function of argon gas pressure.

  13. Lattice gas dynamics: application to driven vortices in two dimensional superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotcheva, Violeta; Wang, Albert T J; Teitel, S

    2004-06-18

    A continuous time Monte Carlo lattice gas dynamics is developed to model driven steady states of vortices in two dimensional superconducting networks. Dramatic differences are found when compared to a simpler Metropolis dynamics. Subtle finite size effects are found at low temperature, with a moving smectic that becomes unstable to an anisotropic liquid on sufficiently large length scales.

  14. Direct simulation of liquid water dynamics in the gas channel of a polymer electrolyte fuel cell

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qin, C.; Rensink, D.; Hassanizadeh, S.M.; Fell, S.

    2012-01-01

    For better water management in gas channels (GCs) of polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs), a profound understanding of the liquid water dynamics is needed. In this study, we propose a novel geometrical setup to conduct a series of direct simulations of the liquid water dynamics in a GC. The conduc

  15. Colonic insufflation with carbon monoxide gas inhibits the development of intestinal inflammation in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takagi Tomohisa

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is complex, and an effective therapeutic strategy has yet to be established. Recently, carbon monoxide (CO has been reported to be capable of reducing inflammation by multiple mechanisms. In this study, we evaluated the role of colonic CO insufflation in acute colitis induced by trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS in rats. Methods Acute colitis was induced with TNBS in male Wistar rats. Following TNBS administration, the animals were treated daily with 200 ppm of intrarectal CO gas. The distal colon was removed to evaluate various parameters of inflammation, including thiobarbituric acid (TBA-reactive substances, tissue-associated myeloperoxidase (MPO activity, and the expression of cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant (CINC-1 in colonic mucosa 7 days after TNBS administration. Results The administration of TNBS induced ulceration with surrounding edematous swelling in the colon. In rats treated with CO gas, the colonic ulcer area was smaller than that of air-treated rats 7 days after TNBS administration. The wet colon weight was significantly increased in the TNBS-induced colitis group, which was markedly abrogated by colonic insufflation with CO gas. The increase of MPO activity, TBA-reactive substances, and CINC-1 expression in colonic mucosa were also significantly inhibited by colonic insufflation with CO gas. Conclusions Colonic insufflation with CO gas significantly ameliorated TNBS-induced colitis in rats. Clinical application of CO gas to improve colonic inflammatory conditions such as IBD might be useful.

  16. Greenhouse gas emission accounting and management of low-carbon community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Dan; Su, Meirong; Yang, Jin; Chen, Bin

    2012-01-01

    As the major source of greenhouse gas (GHG) emission, cities have been under tremendous pressure of energy conservation and emission reduction for decades. Community is the main unit of urban housing, public facilities, transportation, and other properties of city's land use. The construction of low-carbon community is an important pathway to realize carbon emission mitigation in the context of rapid urbanization. Therefore, an efficient carbon accounting framework should be proposed for CO₂ emissions mitigation at a subcity level. Based on life-cycle analysis (LCA), a three-tier accounting framework for the carbon emissions of the community is put forward, including emissions from direct fossil fuel combustion, purchased energy (electricity, heat, and water), and supply chain emissions embodied in the consumption of goods. By compiling a detailed CO₂ emission inventory, the magnitude of carbon emissions and the mitigation potential in a typical high-quality community in Beijing are quantified within the accounting framework proposed. Results show that emissions from supply chain emissions embodied in the consumption of goods cannot be ignored. Specific suggestions are also provided for the urban decision makers to achieve the optimal resource allocation and further promotion of low-carbon communities.

  17. Greenhouse Gas Emission Accounting and Management of Low-Carbon Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Song

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available As the major source of greenhouse gas (GHG emission, cities have been under tremendous pressure of energy conservation and emission reduction for decades. Community is the main unit of urban housing, public facilities, transportation, and other properties of city's land use. The construction of low-carbon community is an important pathway to realize carbon emission mitigation in the context of rapid urbanization. Therefore, an efficient carbon accounting framework should be proposed for CO2 emissions mitigation at a subcity level. Based on life-cycle analysis (LCA, a three-tier accounting framework for the carbon emissions of the community is put forward, including emissions from direct fossil fuel combustion, purchased energy (electricity, heat, and water, and supply chain emissions embodied in the consumption of goods. By compiling a detailed CO2 emission inventory, the magnitude of carbon emissions and the mitigation potential in a typical high-quality community in Beijing are quantified within the accounting framework proposed. Results show that emissions from supply chain emissions embodied in the consumption of goods cannot be ignored. Specific suggestions are also provided for the urban decision makers to achieve the optimal resource allocation and further promotion of low-carbon communities.

  18. Seasonal Carbon Dynamics on Selected Fen Peatland Sites in NE-Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giebels, Michael; Beyer, Madlen; Augustin, Jürgen; Minke, Merten; Juszczak, Radoszlav; Serba, Tomasz

    2010-05-01

    In Germany more than 99 % of fens have lost their carbon and nutrient sink function due to heavy drainage and agricultural land use especially during the last decades and thus resulted in compression and heavy peat loss (CHARMAN 2002; JOOSTEN & CLARKE 2002; SUCCOW & JOOSTEN 2001; AUGUSTIN et al. 1996; KUNTZE 1993). Therefore fen peatlands play an important part (4-5 %) in the national anthropogenic trace gas budget. But only a small part of drained and agricultural used fens in NE Germany can be restored. Knowledge of the influence of land use to trace gas exchange is important for mitigation of the climate impact of the anthropogenic peatland use. We study carbon exchanges of several fen peatland use areas between soil and atmosphere at different sites in NE-Germany. Our research covers peatlands of supposed strongly climate forcing land use (cornfield and intensive pasture) and of probably less forcing, alternative types (meadow and extensive pasture) as well as rewetted (formerly drained) areas and near-natural sites like a low-degraded fen and a wetted alder woodland. We measured trace gas fluxes with manual and automatic chambers in periodic routines since spring 2007. The used chamber technique bases on DROESLER (2005). In total we now do research at 22 sites situated in 5 different locations covering agricultural, varying states of rewetted and near-natural treatments. We present results of at least 2 years of measurements and show significant differences in their annual carbon balances depending on the genesis of the observed sites and the seasonal dynamics. Crosswise comparison of different site treatments combined with the seasonal environmental observations give good hints for the identification of main flux driving parameters. That is that a reduced intensity in land use as a supposed mitigating treatment did not show the expected effect, though a normal meadow treatment surprisingly resulted in the lowest CO2 balances in both years. For implementing a

  19. Effects of shielding gas composition on arc profile and molten pool dynamics in gas metal arc welding of steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L. L.; Lu, F. G.; Wang, H. P.; Murphy, A. B.; Tang, X. H.

    2014-11-01

    In gas metal arc welding, gases of different compositions are used to produce an arc plasma, which heats and melts the workpiece. They also protect the workpiece from the influence of the air during the welding process. This paper models gas metal arc welding (GMAW) processes using an in-house simulation code. It investigates the effects of the gas composition on the temperature distribution in the arc and on the molten pool dynamics in gas metal arc welding of steels. Pure argon, pure CO2 and different mixtures of argon and CO2 are considered in the study. The model is validated by comparing the calculated weld profiles with physical weld measurements. The numerical calculations reveal that gas composition greatly affects the arc temperature profile, heat transfer to the workpiece, and consequently the weld dimension. As the CO2 content in the shielding gas increases, a more constricted arc plasma with higher energy density is generated as a result of the increased current density in the arc centre and increased Lorentz force. The calculation also shows that the heat transferred from the arc to the workpiece increases with increasing CO2 content, resulting in a wider and deeper weld pool and decreased reinforcement height.

  20. Atmospheric radon, CO2 and CH4 dynamics in an Australian coal seam gas field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tait, D. R.; Santos, I. R.; Maher, D. T.

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric radon (222Rn), carbon dioxide (CO2), and methane concentrations (CH4) as well as carbon stable isotope ratios (δ13C) were used to gain insight into atmospheric chemistry within an Australian coal seam gas (CSG) field (Surat Basin, Tara region, Queensland). A˜3 fold increase in maximum 222Rn concentration was observed inside the gas field compared to outside of it. There was a significant relationship between maximum and average 222Rn concentrations and the number of gas wells within a 2 km to 4 km radius of the sampling sites (n = 5 stations; p gas field related to point sources (well heads, pipelines, etc.) and diffse soil sources due to changes in the soil structural and hydrological characteristics. A rapid qualitative assessment of CH4 and CO2 concentration, and carbon isotopes using a mobile cavity ring-down spectrometer system showed a widespread enrichment of both CH4 and CO2 within the production gas field. Concentrations of CH4 and CO2 were as high as 6.89 ppm and 541 ppm respectively compared average concentrations of 1.78 ppm (CH4) and 388 ppm (CO2) outside the gas field. The δ13C values showed distinct differences between areas inside and outside the production field with the δ13C value of the CH4 source within the field matching that of the methane in the CSG.