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Sample records for carbon fixed bed

  1. Carbon dioxide hydrate formation in a fixed-bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, S.; Lang, X. [South China Univ. of Technology, Guangzhou (China). Key Laboratory of Enhanced Heat Transfer and Energy Conservation; Wang, Y.; Liang, D. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou (China). Guangzhou Inst. of Energy Conversion and Guangzhou Center of Natural Gas Hydrate; Sun, X.; Jurcik, B. [Air Liquide Laboratories, Tsukuba (Japan)

    2008-07-01

    Gas hydrates are thermodynamically stable at high pressures and near the freezing temperature of pure water. Methane hydrates occur naturally in sediments in the deep oceans and permafrost regions and constitute an extensive hydrocarbon reservoir. Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) hydrates are of interest as a medium for marine sequestration of anthropogenic carbon dioxide. Sequestering CO{sub 2} as hydrate has potential advantages over most methods proposed for marine CO{sub 2} sequestration. Because this technique requires a shallower depth of injection when compared with other ocean sequestration methods, the costs of CO{sub 2} hydrate sequestration may be lower. Many studies have successfully used different continuous reactor designs to produce CO{sub 2} hydrates in both laboratory and field settings. This paper discussed a study that involved the design and construction of a fixed-bed reactor for simulation of hydrate formation system. Water, river sands and carbon dioxide were used to simulate the seep kind of hydrate formation. Carbon dioxide gas was distributed as small bubbles to enter from the bottom of the fixed-bed reactor. The paper discussed the experimental data and presented a diagram of the gas hydrate reactor system. The morphology as well as the reaction characters of CO{sub 2} hydrate was presented in detail. The results were discussed in terms of experimental phenomena and hydrate formation rate. A mathematical model was proposed for describing the process. 17 refs., 7 figs.

  2. Post-combustion CO2 capture with activated carbons using fixed bed adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Mesfer, Mohammed K.; Danish, Mohd; Fahmy, Yasser M.; Rashid, Md. Mamoon

    2018-03-01

    In the current work, the capturing of carbon dioxide from flue gases of post combustion emission using fixed bed adsorption has been carried out. Two grades of commercial activated carbon (sorbent-1 and sorbent-2) were used as adsorbent. Feed consisting of CO2 and N2 mixture was used for carrying out the adsorption. The influence of bed temperature, feed rate, equilibrium partial pressure and initial % CO2 in feed were considered for analyzing adsorption-desorption process. It was found that the total adsorption-desorption cycle time decreases with increased column temperature and feed rates. The time required to achieve the condition of bed saturation decreases with increased bed temperature and feed rates. The amount of CO2 adsorbed/Kg of the adsorbent declines with increased bed temperature with in studied range for sorbent-1 and sorbent-2. It was suggested that the adsorption capacity of the both the sorbents increases with increased partial pressure of the gas.

  3. Fixed-bed column adsorption of methyl blue using carbon derived ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Axle Wood Carbon (AWC) was used to study the removal of Methyl Blue (MB) from its aqueous solution in a fixed-bed column adsorption system. The adsorbent (AWC) was characterized using SEM and pHPZC. SEM revealed the surface morphology and from the pHPZC determination, it was found that at pH of 8.21 the ...

  4. Adsorption of ciprofloxacin and norfloxacin from aqueous solution onto granular activated carbon in fixed bed column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darweesh, Teeba M; Ahmed, Muthanna J

    2017-04-01

    Carbonization of Phoenix dactylifera L stones followed by microwave K 2 CO 3 activation was adopted for preparation of granular activated carbon (KAC). High yield and favorable pore characteristics in terms of surface area and pore volume were reported for KAC as follows: 44%, 852m 2 /g, and 0.671cm 3 /g, respectively. The application of KAC as adsorbent for attraction of ciprofloxacin (CIP) and norfloxacin (NOR) was investigated using fixed bed systems. The effect of flow rate (0.5-1.5ml/min), bed height (15-25cm), and initial drug concentration (75-225mg/l) on the behavior of breakthrough curves was explained. The fixed bed analysis showed the better correlation of breakthrough data by both Thomas and Yoon-Nelson models. Inlet drug concentration was of greatest effect on breakthrough data compared to other fixed bed variables. Experimental and calculated breakthrough data were obtained for CIP and NOR adsorption on KAC, thus being important for design of fixed bed column. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. HgCl{sub 2} sorption on lignite activated carbon: Analysis of fixed-bed results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mibeck, Blaise A.F.; Olson, Edwin S.; Miller, Stanley J. [University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center, 15 North 23rd Street, Stop 9018, Grand Forks, ND 58202-9018 (United States)

    2009-11-15

    Factors that influence kinetic reactivity and equilibrium between elemental mercury, carbon, and flue gas components have been the focus of numerous studies. This study pertains to recent bench-scale fixed-bed tests in which activated carbon was exposed to HgCl{sub 2} in a flue gas composition typical of an unscrubbed eastern bituminous coal. Results are discussed in light of a refined binding site model based on the zigzag carbene structures recently proposed for electronic states at the edges of the carbon graphene layers. (author)

  6. Continuous synthesis of methanol: heterogeneous hydrogenation of ethylene carbonate over Cu/HMS catalysts in a fixed bed reactor system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Cui, Yuanyuan; Wen, Chao; Wang, Bin; Dai, Wei-Lin

    2015-09-18

    Continuous fixed-bed catalytic hydrogenation of ethylene carbonate (EC) to methanol and ethylene glycol (EG), an emerging synthetic process of methanol via indirect conversion of CO2, was successfully performed over Cu/HMS catalysts prepared by the ammonia evaporation (AE) method. The catalysts possessed superb performance with a conversion of 100% and a selectivity to methanol of 74%.

  7. Solid diffusion control of the adsorption of basic dyes onto granular activated carbon and natural zeolite in fixed bed columns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. MARINKOVSKI

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption of basic dyes from aqueous solutions onto granular activated carbon and natural zeolite was studied using a fixed bed column. The design procedures for fixed bed adsorption columns were investigated for two basic dyes Maxilon Goldgelb GL EC 400 % (MG-400 and Maxilon Schwarz FBL-01 300 % (MS-300. A computer program based on the solid diffusion control model has been developed. The model parameters: solid diffusion coefficient, DS, axial dispersion coefficient, DL and external mass transfer coefficient, kf for all the investigated systems were estimated by means of a best fit approach.

  8. Activated Carbon Adsorption Characteristics of Multi-component Volatile Organic compounds in a Fixed Bed Adsorption Bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Jong Hoon; Rhee, Young Woo [Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sihyun [Korea Institute of Energy Research, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    This study aims to examine absorption characteristics of toluene, isopropyl alcohol (IPA), ethyl acetate (EA), and ternary-compounds, all of which are widely used in industrial processes, by means of four types of commercial activated carbon substances. It turned out that among the three types of volatile organic compounds, the breakthrough point of activated carbon and that of IPA, whose affinity was the lowest, were the lowest, and then that of EA and that of toluene in the order. With the breakthrough point of IPA, which was the shortest, as the standard, changes in the breakthrough points of unary-compounds, binary-compounds, and ternary-compounds were examined. As a result, it turned out that the larger the number of elements, the lower the breakthrough point. This resulted from competitive adsorption, that is, substitution of substances with a low level of affinity with those with a high level of affinity. Hence, the adsorption of toluene-IPA-EA and ternary-compounds require a design of the activated carbon bed based on the breakthrough of IPA, and in the design of activated carbon beds in actual industries as well, a substance whose level of affinity is the lowest needs to be the standard.

  9. Performance of the fixed-bed of granular activated carbon for the removal of pesticides from water supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Alcione Aparecida de Almeida; Ruiz, Giselle Louise de Oliveira; Nonato, Thyara Campos Martins; Müller, Laura Cecilia; Sens, Maurício Luiz

    2018-02-26

    The application of a fixed bed adsorption column of granular activated carbon (FBAC-GAC), in the removal of carbaryl, methomyl and carbofuran at a concentration of 25 μg L -1 for each carbamate, from the public water supply was investigated. For the determination of the presence of pesticides in the water supply, the analytical technique of high-performance liquid chromatography with post-column derivatization was used. Under conditions of constant diffusivity, the FBAC-GAC was saturated after 196 h of operation on a pilot scale. The exhaust rate of the granular activated carbon (GAC) in the FBAC-GAC until the point of saturation was 0.02 kg GAC m -3 of treated water. By comparing a rapid small-scale column test and FBAC-GAC, it was confirmed that the predominant intraparticle diffusivity in the adsorption column was constant diffusivity. Based on the results obtained on a pilot scale, it was possible to estimate the values to be applied in the FBAC-GAC (full scale) to remove the pesticides, which are particle size with an average diameter of 1.5 mm GAC; relationship between the internal diameter of the column and the average diameter of GAC ≥50 in order to avoid preferential flow near the adsorption column wall; surface application rate 240 m 3  m -2  d -1 and an empty bed contact time of 3 min. BV: bed volume; CD: constant diffusivity; EBCT: empty bed contact time; FBAC-GAC: fixed bed adsorption column of granular activated carbon; GAC: granular activated carbon; MPV: maximum permitted values; NOM: natural organic matter; PD: proportional diffusivity; pH PCZ : pH of the zero charge point; SAR: surface application rate; RSSCT: rapid small-scale column test; WTCS: water treated conventional system.

  10. Batch and fixed-bed adsorption of tartrazine azo-dye onto activated carbon prepared from apricot stones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albroomi, H. I.; Elsayed, M. A.; Baraka, A.; Abdelmaged, M. A.

    2017-07-01

    This work describes the potential of utilizing prepared activated carbon from apricot stones as an efficient adsorbent material for tartrazine (TZ) azo-dye removal in a batch and dynamic adsorption system. The results revealed that activated carbons with well-developed surface area (774 m2/g) and pore volume (1.26 cm3/g) can be manufactured from apricot stones by H3PO4 activation. In batch experiments, effects of the parameters such as initial dye concentration and temperature on the removal of the dye were studied. Equilibrium was achieved in 120 min. Adsorption capacity was found to be dependent on the initial concentration of dye solution, and maximum adsorption was found to be 76 mg/g at 100 mg/L of TZ. The adsorption capacity at equilibrium ( q e) increased from 22.6 to 76 mg/g with an increase in the initial dye concentrations from 25 to 100 mg/L. The thermodynamic parameters such as change in free energy (Δ G 0), enthalpy (Δ H 0) and entropy (Δ S 0) were determined and the positive value of (Δ H) 78.1 (K J mol-1) revealed that adsorption efficiency increased with an increase in the process temperature. In fixed-bed column experiments, the effect of selected operating parameters such as bed depth, flow rate and initial dye concentration on the adsorption capacity was evaluated. Increase in bed height of adsorption columns leads to an extension of breakthrough point as well as the exhaustion time of adsorbent. However, the maximum adsorption capacities decrease with increases of flow rate. The breakthrough data fitted well to bed depth service time and Thomas models with high coefficient of determination, R 2 ≥ 94.

  11. Pre-combustion capture of carbon dioxide in a fixed bed reactor using the clathrate hydrate process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babu, Ponnivalavan; Kumar, Rajnish; Linga, Praveen

    2013-01-01

    Hydrate based gas separation (HBGS) process with silica sand and silica gel as contact medium was employed to capture CO 2 from fuel gas mixture. Gas uptake measurement at three different pressures (7.5, 8.5 and 9.0 MPa) and 274.15 K were conducted for hydrate formation kinetics and overall conversion of water to hydrate, rate of hydrate formation were determined. Water conversion of up to 36% was achieved with silica sand bed compared to 13% conversion in the silica gel bed. Effect of driving force on the rate of hydrate formation and gas consumption was significant in silica sand bed whereas it was found to be insignificant in silica gel bed. Hydrate dissociation experiments by thermal stimulation (at constant pressure) alone and a combination of depressurization and thermal stimulation were carried out for complete recovery of the hydrated gas. A driving force of 23 K was found to be sufficient to recover all the hydrated gas within 1 h. This study indicates that silica sand can be an effective porous media for separation of CO 2 from fuel gas when compared to silica gel. - Highlights: ► The clathrate process for pre-combustion capture of carbon dioxide in a novel fixed bed reactor is presented. ► Performance of two contact media (silica gel and silica sand) was investigated. ► Water to hydrate conversion was higher in a silica sand column. ► A pressure reduction and thermal stimulation approach is presented for a complete recovery of the hydrated gas

  12. Supercritical extraction of pupunha (Guilielma speciosa oil in a fixed bed using carbon dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Araújo M.E.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The pupunha (Guilielma speciosa is the fruit of a palm tree typical of the Brazilian Northern region, whose stem is used as a source of heart of palm. The fruit, which is about 65% pulp, is a source of oil and carotenes. In the present work, an analysis of the kinetics of supercritical extraction of oil from the pupunha pulp is presented. Carbon dioxide was used as solvent. The extractions were carried out at 25 MPa and 323 K and 30 MPa and 318 K. The chemical composition of the extracts in terms of fatty acids was determined by gas chromatography. The amount of oleic acid, a saturated fatty acid, in the CO2 extracts was larger than that in the extract obtained with hexane. The overall extraction curves were modeled using the single-parameter model proposed in the literature to describe the desorption of toluene from activated coal.

  13. Process Optimization for Ethyl Ester Production in Fixed Bed Reactor Using Calcium Oxide Impregnated Palm Shell Activated Carbon (CaO/PSAC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Buasri

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available : The continuous production of ethyl ester was studied by using a steady-state fixed bed reactor (FBR. Transesterification of palm stearin (PS and waste cooking palm oil (WCPO with ethanol in the presence of calcium oxide impregnated palm shell activated carbon (CaO/PSAC solid catalyst was investigated. This work was determined the optimum conditions for the production of ethyl ester from PS and WCPO in order to obtain fatty acid ethyl ester (FAEE with the highest yield. The effects of reaction variables such as residence time, ethanol/oil molar ratio, reaction temperature, catalyst bed height and reusability of catalyst in a reactor system on the yield of biodiesel were considered. The optimum conditions were the residence time 2-3 h, ethanol/oil molar ratio 16-20, reaction temperature at 800C, and catalyst bed height 300 mm which yielded 89.46% and 83.32% of the PS and WCPO conversion, respectively. CaO/PSAC could be used repeatedly for 4 times without any activation treatment and no obvious activity loss was observed. It has potential for industrial application in the transesterification of triglyceride (TG. The fuel properties of biodiesel were determined. Keywords: biodiesel, calcium oxide, ethyl ester, fixed bed reactor, palm shell activated carbon

  14. BATCH AND FIXED BED ADSORPTION STUDIES OF LEAD (II CATIONS FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS ONTO GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON DERIVED FROM MANGOSTANA GARCINIA SHELL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaira Zaman Chowdhury,

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The feasibility of granular activated carbon (GAC derived from Mangostene (Mangostana garcinia fruit shell to remove lead, Pb2+ cations was investigated in batch and fixed bed sorption systems. Batch experiments were carried out to study equilibrium isotherms, kinetics, and thermodynamics by using an initial lead (Pb2+ ions concentration of 50 to 100 mg/L at pH 5.5. Equilibrium data were fitted using Langmuir, Freundlich, and Temkin linear equation models at temperatures 30°C, 50°C, and 70°C. Langmuir maximum monolayer sorption capacity was 25.00 mg/g at 30°C. The experimental data were best represented by pseudo-second-order and Elovich models. The sorption process was found to be feasible, endothermic, and spontaneous. In column experiments, the effects of initial cation concentration (50 mg/L, 70 mg/L, and 100 mg/L, bed height (4.5 cm and 3 cm, and flow rate (1 mL/min and 3 mL/min on the breakthrough characteristics were evaluated. Breakthrough curves were further analyzed by using Thomas and Yoon Nelson models to study column dynamics. The column was regenerated and reused consecutively for four cycles. The result demonstrated that the prepared activated carbon was suitable for removal of Pb2+ from synthetic aqueous solution using batch, as well as fixed bed sorption systems.

  15. Mathematical Modelling of Catalytic Fixed-Bed Reactor for Carbon Dioxide Reforming of Methane over Rh/Al2O3 Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    New Pei Yee

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available A one-dimensional mathematical model was developed to simulate the performance of catalytic fixed bedreactor for carbon dioxide reforming of methane over Rh/Al2O3 catalyst at atmospheric pressure. The reactionsinvolved in the system are carbon dioxide reforming of methane (CORM and reverse water gas shiftreaction (RWGS. The profiles of CH4 and CO2 conversions, CO and H2 yields, molar flow rate and molefraction of all species as well as reactor temperature along the axial bed of catalyst were simulated. In addition,the effects of different reactor temperature on the reactor performance were also studied. The modelscan also be applied to analyze the performances of lab-scale micro reactor as well as pilot-plant scale reactorwith certain modifications and model verification with experimental data. © 2008 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved.[Received: 20 August 2008; Accepted: 25 September 2008][How to Cite: N.A.S. Amin, I. Istadi, N.P. Yee. (2008. Mathematical Modelling of Catalytic Fixed-Bed Reactor for Carbon Dioxide Reforming of Methane over Rh/Al2O3 Catalyst. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering and Catalysis, 3 (1-3: 21-29. doi:10.9767/bcrec.3.1-3.19.21-29

  16. Batch and fixed bed adsorption of levofloxacin on granular activated carbon from date (Phoenix dactylifera L.) stones by KOH chemical activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darweesh, Teeba M; Ahmed, Muthanna J

    2017-03-01

    Granular activated carbon (KAC) was prepared from abundant Phoenix dactylifera L. stones by microwave- assisted KOH activation. The characteristics of KAC were tested by pore analyses, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transforms infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The adsorption behavior of levofloxacin (LEV) antibiotic on KAC with surface area of 817m 2 /g and pore volume of 0.638cm 3 /g were analyzed using batch and fixed bed systems. The equilibrium data collected by batch experiments were well fitted with Langmuir compared to Freundlich and Temkin isotherms. The effect of flow rate (0.5-1.5ml/min), bed height (15-25cm), and initial LEV concentration (75-225mg/l) on the behavior of breakthrough curves was explained. The fixed bed analysis showed the better correlation of breakthrough data by both Thomas and Yoon-Nelson models. High LEV adsorption capacity of 100.3mg/g was reported on KAC, thus being an efficient adsorbent for antibiotic pollutants to protect ecological systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Bed retained products in swept fixed bed (SFB) coal hydropyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mastral, A.M.; Perez-Surio, M.J. [CSIC, Zaragosa (Spain). Inst. de Carboquimica

    1997-12-31

    The hydropyrolysis of a low rank coal in a swept fixed bed (SFB) reactor is carried out by fixing the hydrogen pressure (40 kg/cm{sup 2}), the hydrogen flow (2 l/min) and the residence time (10 min) at increasing temperatures (400 C, 500 C and 600 C) and coal bed heights (h, 1.5h, 2h, 2.5h and 3h). It is shown that the percentages of tars and char directly depend on the coal bed height and that there is not only a quantitative dependence, but also the height of the coal bed is very important and plays a relevant role on the nature of the conversion products. (orig.)

  18. Preparation of a carbon molecular sieve and application to separation of N2, O2 and CO2 in a fixed bed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soares J.L.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The emission of CO2 from power plants that burn fossil fuels is the major cause of the accumulation of CO2 in the atmosphere. The separation of CO2 from CO2/air mixtures can play a key role in alleviating this problem. This separation can be carried out by using suitable adsorbents, such as carbon molecular sieves. In this work, a CMS was prepared by deposition of polyfurfuryl alcohol polymer on activated carbon. After deposition of the polymer, the material was carbonized at 800masculineC for 2 hours. This material was used to separate O2/N2 mixtures and CO2 in a fixed bed at room temperature. Experimental breakthrough curves obtained were fitted to theoretical models in order to establish the main mechanisms of mass transfer. The breakthrough curves showed that it is possible to separate O2, N2 and CO2. The shape of the breakthrough curves was not influenced by the total flow, indicating that the gas contact for the gas mixture was good. The experimental data were fitted to theoretical models and it was established that the main mechanism of mass transfer was intraparticle diffusion.

  19. STUDY OF HYDRODYNAMICS IN FIXED BED OF COMPOSITE GRANULAR MATERIALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stelian Petrescu

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aims at the experimental determination of pressure drop and friction factor at gas flow through fixed beds of granular silica gel, alumina and activated carbon, and establishment of an equation containing a modified friction factor Fm to calculate pressure drop. In order to calculate the modified friction factor, an equation was suggested.The experimental values for pressure drop and friction factor were determined using spherical grains of silica gel, cylindrical grains of alumina and silica gel, alumina and activated carbon impregnated with calcium chloride. By means of the suggested equation, the values of pressure drop in fixed bed were calculated and compared with the experimental values. A good agreement between the predicted and experimental data is noticed.

  20. Removal and Recovery of Organic Vapor Emissions by Fixed-Bed Activated Carbon Fiber Adsorber-Cryogenic Condenser

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hay, K

    1998-01-01

    ... them. This project evaluated the ability of an activated carbon fiber cloth (ACFC) adsorption, electrothermal desorption, cryogenic-condensation system to remove 10 cu cm/min containing 1000 ppmv of methyl ethyl ketone (MEK...

  1. Reaction of Hydrogen Chloride Gas with Sodium Carbonate and Its Deep Removal in a Fixed-Bed Reactor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hartman, Miloslav; Svoboda, Karel; Pohořelý, Michael; Šyc, Michal; Chen, Po-Ch.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 49 (2014), s. 19145-19158 ISSN 0888-5885 R&D Projects: GA ČR GC14-09692J Grant - others:NSC(TW) 102WBS0300011 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : hot fuel gas purification * hydrogen chloride gas * active sodium carbonate Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 2.587, year: 2014

  2. Fixed bed gasification of solid biomass fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haavisto, I [Condens Oy, Haemeenlinna (Finland)

    1997-12-31

    Fixed bed biomass gasifiers are feasible in the effect range of 100 kW -10 MW. Co-current gasification is available only up to 1 MW for technical reasons. Counter-current gasifiers have been used in Finland and Sweden for 10 years in gasification heating plants, which are a combination of a gasifier and an oil boiler. The plants have proved to have a wide control range, flexible and uncomplicated unmanned operation and an excellent reliability. Counter-current gasifiers can be applied for new heating plants or for converting existing oil and natural gas boilers into using solid fuels. There is a new process development underway, aiming at motor use of the producer gas. The development work involves a new, more flexible cocurrent gasifier and a cleaning step for the counter-current producer gas. (orig.)

  3. Fixed bed gasification of solid biomass fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haavisto, I. [Condens Oy, Haemeenlinna (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    Fixed bed biomass gasifiers are feasible in the effect range of 100 kW -10 MW. Co-current gasification is available only up to 1 MW for technical reasons. Counter-current gasifiers have been used in Finland and Sweden for 10 years in gasification heating plants, which are a combination of a gasifier and an oil boiler. The plants have proved to have a wide control range, flexible and uncomplicated unmanned operation and an excellent reliability. Counter-current gasifiers can be applied for new heating plants or for converting existing oil and natural gas boilers into using solid fuels. There is a new process development underway, aiming at motor use of the producer gas. The development work involves a new, more flexible cocurrent gasifier and a cleaning step for the counter-current producer gas. (orig.)

  4. Fixed-bed column studies of total organic carbon removal from industrial wastewater by use of diatomite decorated with polyethylenimine-functionalized pyroxene nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hethnawi, Afif; Manasrah, Abdallah D; Vitale, Gerardo; Nassar, Nashaat N

    2018-03-01

    In this study, a fixed-bed column adsorption process was employed to remove organic pollutants from a real industrial wastewater effluent using polyethylenimine-functionalized pyroxene nanoparticles (PEI-PY) embedded into Diatomite at very low mass percentage. Various dynamic parameters (e.g., inlet concentration, inlet flow rate, bed height, and PEI-nanoparticle concentration in Diatomite, (%nps)) were investigated to determine the breakthrough behavior. The obtained breakthrough curves were fit with a convection-dispersion model to determine the characteristic parameters based on mass transfer phenomena. The axial dispersion coefficient (D L ) and group of dimensionless numbers; including Renold number (Re), Schmidt number (Sc), and Sherwood number (Sh) were all determined and correlated by Wilson-Geankoplis correlation that was used to estimate the external film diffusion coefficients (Kc) at 0.0015 < Re<55. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The fixed bed nuclear reactor concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahin, S.; Sefidvash, F.

    2007-01-01

    The core of a water moderated Fixed Bed Nuclear Reactor (FBNR), possessing, for instance, an electrical power of 40 MW, consists of 1.35 million fuel pellets (9.5 t) with a diameter of 1.5 cm each. The low enriched uranium fuel is made of TRISO type microspheres used in the HTGR, embedded in a graphite matrix and cladded by a shell of 1 mm SiC. Under any thinkable operational condition the fuel temperature will be below 400 C whereas its stability limit is at about 1600 C. The first characteristic of the FBNR is, therefore, its robust fuel under relatively 'cold' operating conditions and - due to the outer SiC - shell layer - the freedom from any hydrogen production. To operate the reactor the fuel pellets are pumped by a flow of water from below into the core regions where they form a stable fixed bed of about 4 cubic meter and become critical for energy production heating the outlet water to about 330 C (at 160 bar) which feeds a steam generator. The new safety feature is now the following: In case of any abnormity (e.g. external power failure, overheating etc.) the circulating pump stops and - due to gravity - the fuel pellets fall automatically out of the core region into a helical 'fuel chamber' underneath the core where their decay heat is transferred passively by natural circulation to a water tank housing the fuel chamber. The safety principle, applied here, is: The loss of an active component (circulating pump) induces a self-controlled, passively working shut-down manoeuvre accompanied by a foolproof decay heat removal without any emergency power system or any human interaction. The fuel chamber is sealed and is transported as the only reactor component to and from the reactor site. There is no possibility to irradiate fertile fuel, too. For a long-life core (larger than a 10 years cycle time) the fuel can either be poisoned by gadolinium-oxide or by a piston type core limiter adjusting the height and controlling thereby the number of the fuel pellets in

  6. Continuous Fixed-Bed Column Study and Adsorption Modeling: Removal of Lead Ion from Aqueous Solution by Charcoal Originated from Chemical Carbonization of Rubber Wood Sawdust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swarup Biswas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency of chemically carbonized rubber wood sawdust for the removal of lead ion from the aqueous stream was investigated by column process. Chemically carbonized rubber wood sawdust was prepared by treating the sawdust with H2SO4 and HNO3. Maximum removal of lead ion in column process was found as 38.56 mg/g. The effects of operating parameters such as flow rate, bed depth, concentration, and pH were studied in column mode. Experimental data confirmed that the adsorption capacity increased with the increasing inlet concentration and bed depth and decreased with increasing flow rate. Thomas, Yoon-Nelson, and Adams-Bohart models were used to analyze the column experimental data and the relationship between operating parameters. Chemically carbonized rubber wood sawdust was characterized by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Scanning electron microscope was also utilized for morphological analysis of the adsorbent. Furthermore X-ray fluorescence spectrum analysis and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy were also used for the confirmation of lead adsorption process.

  7. Fixed-bed Reactor Dynamics and Control - A Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, S. B.

    1986-01-01

    The industrial diversity of fixed bed reactors offers a challenging and relevant set of control problems. These intricate problems arise due to the rather complex dynamics of fixed bed reactors and to the complexity of actual reactor configurations. Many of these control problems are nonlinear...... and multi-variable. During the last decade fixed bed reactor control strategies have been proposed and investigated experimentally. This paper reviews research on these complex control problems with an emphasis upon solutions which have been demon-strated to work in the laboratory and hold promise...

  8. Numerical modeling of straw combustion in a fixed bed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Haosheng; Jensen, Anker; Glarborg, Peter

    2005-01-01

    . The straw combustion processes include moisture evaporation, straw pyrolysis, gas combustion, and char combustion. The model provides detailed information of the structure of the ignition flame front. Simulated gas species concentrations at the bed surface, ignition flame front rate, and bed temperature......Straw is being used as main renewable energy source in grate boilers in Denmark. For optimizing operating conditions and design parameters, a one-dimensional unsteady heterogeneous mathematical model has been developed and experiments have been carried out for straw combustion in a fixed bed...... are in good agreement with measurements at different operating conditions such as primary air-flow rate, pre-heating of the primary air, oxygen concentration, moisture content in straw, and bulk density of the straw in the fixed bed. A parametric study indicates that the effective heat conductivity, straw...

  9. Nonlinear dynamics and control of a recycle fixed bed reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Recke, Bodil; Jørgensen, Sten Bay

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is twofold. Primarily to describe the dynamic behaviour that can be observed in a fixed bed reactor with recycle of unconverted reactant. Secondly to describe the possibilities of model reduction in order to facilitate control design. Reactant recycle has been shown...... to introduce periodic solution to the fixed bed reactor, a phenomenon which is not seen for the system without the recycle, at least not within the Peclet number range investigated in the present work. The possibility of model reduction by the methods of modal decomposition, and by characteristics...

  10. Thermal Analysis of Fluidized Bed and Fixed Bed Latent Heat Thermal Storage System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beemkumar, N.; Karthikeyan, A.; Shiva Keshava Reddy, Kota; Rajesh, Kona; Anderson, A.

    2017-05-01

    Thermal energy storage technology is essential because its stores available energy at low cost. Objective of the work is to store the thermal energy in a most efficient method. This work is deal with thermal analysis of fluidized bed and fixed bed latent heat thermal storage (LHTS) system with different encapsulation materials (aluminium, brass and copper). D-Mannitol has been used as phase change material (PCM). Encapsulation material which is in orbicular shape with 4 inch diameter and 2 mm thickness orbicular shaped product is used. Therminol-66 is used as a heat transfer fluid (HTF). Arrangement of encapsulation material is done in two ways namely fluidized bed and fixed bed thermal storage system. Comparison was made between the performance of fixed bed and fluidized bed with different encapsulation material. It is observed that from the economical point of view aluminium in fluidized bed LHTS System has highest efficiency than copper and brass. The thermal energy storage system can be analyzed with fixed bed by varying mass flow rate of oil paves a way to find effective heat energy transfer.

  11. Physical-Mathematical Model for Fixed-Bed Solid Fuel Gasification Process Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slyusarskiy Konstantin V.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Phycial-mathmatical model for fixed-bed coal gasification process simulation is proposed. The heterogeneous carbon oxidation chemical reactions were simulated via Arrhenius equation while homogeneous reactions in gas phase were calculated using Gibbs free energy minimization procedure. The syngas component concentration field and fuel conversion distribution as well as syngas final temperature and composition were defined for fixed bed gasification of T-grade coal of Kuznetskiy deposit. The optimal fuel residence time and gasifyer specific productivity were defined. The prevail reactions in oxidizing and reduction zones together with its height were defined.

  12. Particle Distribution in a Fixed Bed Down Draft Wood Gasifier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hindsgaul, Claus

    2005-01-01

    Char particle samples were collected from six distances above the grate in a fixed bed of a down draft biomass gasifier. Each sample was separated into twelve size fractions by screening through standard sieves in order to determine the local particle size distribution. The ash contents of each...

  13. Dimensioning of aerated submerged fixed bed biofilm reactors ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The description of a biofilm mathematical model application for dimensioning an aerated fixed bed biofilm reactor (ASFBBR) for petrochemical wastewater polishing is presented. A simple one-dimensional model of biofilm, developed by P Harremöes, was chosen for this purpose. The model was calibrated and verified ...

  14. Comparative study between fluidized bed and fixed bed reactors in methane reforming with CO2 and O2 to produce syngas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jing Qiangshan; Lou Hui; Mo Liuye; Zheng Xiaoming

    2006-01-01

    Reforming of methane with carbon dioxide and oxygen was investigated over Ni/MgO-SiO 2 catalysts using fixed bed and fluidized bed reactors. The conversions of CH 4 and CO 2 in a fluidized bed reactor were close to thermodynamic equilibrium. The activity and stability of the catalyst in the fixed bed reactor were lower than that in the fluidized bed reactor due to carbon deposition and nickel sintering. TGA and TEM techniques were used to characterize the spent catalysts. The results showed that a lot of whisker carbon was found on the catalyst in the rear of the fixed bed reactor, and no deposited carbon was observed on the catalysts in the fluidized bed reactor after reaction. It is suggested that this phenomenon is related to a permanent circulation of catalyst particles between the oxygen rich and oxygen free zones. That is, fluidization of the catalysts in the fluidized bed reactor favors inhibiting deposited carbon and thermal uniformity in the reactor

  15. Method for the combustion of a gas, in fixed bed, with an oxidized solid and associated installation

    OpenAIRE

    Abanades García, Juan Carlos; Fernández García, José Ramón

    2014-01-01

    [EN] The present invention pertains to the field of the generation of energy from combustible gases, incorporating the capture of carbon dioxide for use or permanent storage and, specifically relates to cyclical methods of gas combustion with oxidized solids (chemical looping processes), in fixed bed, for solving the problem of controlling temperature in the combustion of gaseous fuels in fixed beds of metal oxides operating at high pressures, and also the associated installation.

  16. Adsorption of aromatic amino acids in a fixed bed column

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cremasco M.A.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Phenylalanine (Phe and tyrosine (Tyr are two of the twenty amino acids in proteins; they are classified as aromatic amino acids, because both have a benzene ring in their structures. These amino acids are important in the synthesis of several biologically active amines, such as beta-endorphin, a neurotransmitter. Amino acids can be separated by ion-exchange chromatography. In this case, it is important that fixed-bed adsorber design adequately predict the breakthrough curve. This work presents a mathematical model for both fluid and porous phases. In the solution proposed for this model the liquid-phase concentration inside the particles is solved analytically and is related to the liquid-phase concentration in the bed using Duhamel's theorem. The solution for liquid-phase concentration in the bed is then solved numerically instead of analytically. The basic mass transfer parameters are from the literature. The results from the model are compared with those obtained experimentally using Phe and Tyr diluted in aqueous solutions in a fixed bed of PVP (poly-4-vinylpyridine resin.

  17. Anaerobic treatment of winery wastewater in fixed bed reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesh, Rangaraj; Rajinikanth, Rajagopal; Thanikal, Joseph V; Ramanujam, Ramamoorty Alwar; Torrijos, Michel

    2010-06-01

    The treatment of winery wastewater in three upflow anaerobic fixed-bed reactors (S9, S30 and S40) with low density floating supports of varying size and specific surface area was investigated. A maximum OLR of 42 g/l day with 80 +/- 0.5% removal efficiency was attained in S9, which had supports with the highest specific surface area. It was found that the efficiency of the reactors increased with decrease in size and increase in specific surface area of the support media. Total biomass accumulation in the reactors was also found to vary as a function of specific surface area and size of the support medium. The Stover-Kincannon kinetic model predicted satisfactorily the performance of the reactors. The maximum removal rate constant (U(max)) was 161.3, 99.0 and 77.5 g/l day and the saturation value constant (K(B)) was 162.0, 99.5 and 78.0 g/l day for S9, S30 and S40, respectively. Due to their higher biomass retention potential, the supports used in this study offer great promise as media in anaerobic fixed bed reactors. Anaerobic fixed-bed reactors with these supports can be applied as high-rate systems for the treatment of large volumes of wastewaters typically containing readily biodegradable organics, such as the winery wastewater.

  18. Adsorption and oxidation of SO₂in a fixed-bed reactor using activated carbon produced from oxytetracycline bacterial residue and impregnated with copper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Baohua; Yu, Lei; Song, Hanning; Li, Yaqi; Zhang, Peng; Guo, Bin; Duan, Erhong

    2015-02-01

    The SO₂removal ability (including adsorption and oxidation ability) of activated carbon produced from oxytetracycline bacterial residue and impregnated with copper was investigated. The activated carbon produced from oxytetracycline bacterial residue and modified with copper was characterized by x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive spectroscopy. The effects of the catalysts, SO₂concentration, weight hourly space velocity, and temperature on the SO₂adsorption and oxidation activity were evaluated. Activated carbon produced from oxytetracycline bacterial residue and used as catalyst supports for copper oxide catalysts provided high catalytic activity for the adsorbing and oxidizing of SO₂from flue gases.

  19. Carbon Bed Mercury Emissions Control For Mixed Waste Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soelberg, Nick; Enneking, Joe

    2010-01-01

    Mercury has had various uses in nuclear fuel reprocessing and other nuclear processes, and so is often present in radioactive and mixed (both radioactive and hazardous according to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act) wastes. Depending on regulatory requirements, the mercury in the off-gas must be controlled with sometimes very high efficiencies. Compliance to the Hazardous Waste Combustor (HWC) Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) standards can require off-gas mercury removal efficiencies up to 99.999% for thermally treating some mixed waste streams. Several test programs have demonstrated this level of off-gas mercury control using fixed beds of granular sulfur-impregnated activated carbon. Other results of these tests include: (a) The depth of the mercury control mass transfer zone was less than 15-30 cm for the operating conditions of these tests, (b) MERSORB(reg s ign) carbon can sorb Hg up to 19 wt% of the carbon mass, and (c) the spent carbon retained almost all (98-99.99%) of the Hg; but when even a small fraction of the total Hg dissolves, the spent carbon can fail the TCLP test when the spent carbon contains high Hg concentrations. Localized areas in a carbon bed that become heated through heat of adsorption, to temperatures where oxidation occurs, are referred to as 'bed hot spots.' Carbon bed hot spots must be avoided in processes that treat radioactive and mixed waste. Key to carbon bed hot spot mitigation are (a) designing for sufficient gas velocity, for avoiding gas flow maldistribution, and for sufficient but not excessive bed depth, (b) monitoring and control of inlet gas flowrate, temperature, and composition, (c) monitoring and control of in-bed and bed outlet gas temperatures, and (d) most important, monitoring of bed outlet CO concentrations. An increase of CO levels in the off-gas downstream of the carbon bed to levels about 50-100 ppm higher than the inlet CO concentration indicate CO formation in the bed, caused by carbon bed

  20. Passive cooling of a fixed bed nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petry, V.J.; Bortoli, A.L. de; Sefidwash, F.

    2005-01-01

    Small nuclear reactors without the need for on-site refuelling have greater simplicity, better compliance with passive safety systems, and are more adequate for countries with small electric grids and limited investment capabilities. Here the passive cooling characteristic of the fixed bed nuclear reactor (FBNR), that is being developed under the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinated Research Project, is studied. A mathematical model is developed to calculate the temperature distribution in the fuel chamber of the reactor. The results demonstrate the passive cooling of this nuclear reactor concept. (authors)

  1. PERKEMBANGAN BIOFILM NITRIFIKASI DI FIXED BED REACTOR PADA SALINITAS TINGGI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudarno

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Development of nitrification biomass that is growing attached on carried material was examined by measuring its ammonium or nitrit oxidation rates. Porous ceramic rings (36 pieces were put into the fixed bed reactor (FBR . The fixed bed reactor that was operated continuously for more than 500 day was continued to be operated at a HRT of 1 day, a DO of above 5 mg L-1 and pH of 8. Ammonia concentration in the feeding was 50 mg NH4+-N L-1. At days 1, 5, 12, 20, 33 and 50, six porous ceramic rings were taken out and then ammonia and nitrite removal rate by biofilm in the ceramic rings was separately measured. The measurement of rates was done in small cylindrical glass reactors with initial concentration of ammonia and nitrite was 10 mg N L-1. Until 50 days of incubation AORs were always higher than NORs. Additionally, ammonia oxidizers attach or grow faster in the porous ceramic material than nitrite oxidizers.

  2. Post-treatment of Fly Ash by Ozone in a Fixed Bed Reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kim Hougaard; Melia, M. C.; Jensen, Anker Degn

    2009-01-01

    to be fast. A kinetic model has been formulated, describing the passivation of carbon, and it includes the stoichiometry of the ozone consumption (0.8 mol of O-3/kg of C) and an ineffective ozone loss caused by catalytic decomposition. The simulated results correlated well with the experimental data....... prevents the AEA to be adsorbed. In the present work, two fly ashes have been ozonated in a fixed bed reactor and the results showed that ozonation is a potential post-treatment method that can lower the AEA requirements of a fly ash up to 6 times. The kinetics of the carbon oxidation by ozone was found...

  3. Optimization of annatto (Bixa orellana L. drying in fixed bed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faria L.J.G.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The drying of annatto seeds (Bixa orellana L., red piave cultivate, was studied in a fixed bed dryer. The best conditions were estimated to minimize the loss of coloring and to obtain final moisture of the seeds in appropriate levels to its conservation and maintenance of quality. The quantification of the influence of entrance variables in the final contents of bixin and moisture seeds and the identification of the optimal point was performed through the techniques of factorial design, response surfaces methodology, canonical analysis and desirability function. It was verified that the final moisture of the seeds may be estimated by a second-order polynomial model and that the final content of bixin is only significantly influenced by the time of drying being described properly by a linear model, for the seeds used in this study.

  4. Fixed (slow moving) bed updraft gasification of agricultural residues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vigouroux, Rolando Zanzi [Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Technology], E-mail: rolando@ket.kth.se; Escalona, Ronoldy Faxas [University of Oriente, Santiago de Cuba (Cuba). Fac. of Mechanical Engineering], E-mail: faxas@fim.uo.edu.cu

    2009-07-01

    Birch, in form of pellets has been gasified in updraft fixed-bed gasifier using air as oxidation agent. The main objectives were to study the effect of the treatment conditions on the distribution of the products and the composition of product gas. The influence of the air flow rates on the composition of the producer gas has been studied. The amount of the biomass used in the experiments was varied between 1 and 4 kg and the flow rate of the air was varied from 1.1 to 2.6 m3/h. Increased airflow rates favored higher temperatures. Excessively high airflow rates resulted in fast consumption of the biomass and it also favored combustion over gasification and thus formation of lower amounts of combustible products. High airflow rates caused also higher yields of tars, due to the shorter residence time of the tar-rich gas in the gasifier and thus unfavorable conditions for tar cracking. (author)

  5. A FIXED BED SORPTION SYSTEM FOR DEFLUORIDATION OF GROUND WATER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayoob Sulaiman

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The presence of excess fluoride in ground water has become a global threat with as many as 200 million people affected in more than 35 countries in all the continents. Of late, there have been significant advances in the knowledge base regarding the effects of excess fluoride on human health. As a result, defluoridation of ground water is regarded as one of the key areas of attention among the universal water community triggering global research. This study describes the sorptive responses of a newly developed adsorbent, alumina cement granules (ALC, in its real-life application in fixed beds, for removing fluoride from the ground waters of a rural Indian village. ALC exhibited almost consistent scavenging capacity at various bed depths in column studies with an enhanced adsorption potential of 0.818 mg/g at a flow rate of 4 ml/min. The Thomas model was examined to describe the sorption process. The process design parameters of the column were obtained by linear regression of the model. In all the conditions examined, the Thomas model could consistently predict its characteristic parameters and describe the breakthrough sorption profiles in the whole range of sorption process.

  6. Sustainability and the Fixed Bed Nuclear Reactor (FBNR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhang Sefidvash

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Sustainability as a multifaceted and holistic concept is analyzed. Sustainability involves human relationship with elements such as natural environment, economy, power, governance, education and technology with the ultimate purpose of carrying forward an ever-advancing civilization. The Fixed Bed Nuclear Reactor (FBNR is an innovative, small, simple in design, inherently safe, non-proliferating, and environmentally friendly concept that its deployment can generate energy in a sustainable manner contributing to the prosperity of humanity. The development of FBNR will provide electricity as well as desalinated water through a simple but advanced technology for the developing, as well as developed countries. FBNR is environmentally friendly due to its inherent safety and the convenience of using its spent fuel as the source of radiation for irradiation purposes in agriculture, industry, and medicine. Politically, if a ping pong game brought peace between China and USA, a program of development of FBNR supported by the peace loving international community can become a more mature means to bring peace among certain apparently hostile nations who crave sustainable energy, desalinated water and simple advanced technology.

  7. Nitrification in moving bed and fixed bed biofilters treating effluent water from a large commercial outdoor rainbow trout RAS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suhr, Karin; Pedersen, Per Bovbjerg

    2010-01-01

    The nitrification performance of two fixed bed (FB) biofilters and two moving bed (MB) biofilters was evaluated. They received the same cold (8 degrees C) influent water from a commercial outdoor RAS facility producing rainbow trout (average density 32 kg m(-3)). The filters were constructed as f...

  8. Heat Transfer in a Fixed Biomass Char Bed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjellerup, Jan Søren; Henriksen, Ulrik Birk; Glarborg, P.

    2002-01-01

    A thermal conductivity model based on the Yagi and Kunii model together with a bed model was developed to describe the thermal conductivity of a straw char bed. The bed model describes the relationship between the distance between particles and the external porosity. To verify the model, thermal ...

  9. Modeling and Experimental Studies of Mercury Oxidation and Adsorption in a Fixed-Bed Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buitrago, Paula A.; Morrill, Mike; Lighty, JoAnn S.; Silcox, Geoffrey D.

    2009-06-15

    This report presents experimental and modeling mercury oxidation and adsorption data. Fixed-bed and single-particle models of mercury adsorption were developed. The experimental data were obtained with two reactors: a 300-W, methane-fired, tubular, quartz-lined reactor for studying homogeneous oxidation reactions and a fixed-bed reactor, also of quartz, for studying heterogeneous reactions. The latter was attached to the exit of the former to provide realistic combustion gases. The fixed-bed reactor contained one gram of coconut-shell carbon and remained at a temperature of 150°C. All methane, air, SO2, and halogen species were introduced through the burner to produce a radical pool representative of real combustion systems. A Tekran 2537A Analyzer coupled with a wet conditioning system provided speciated mercury concentrations. At 150°C and in the absence of HCl or HBr, the mercury uptake was about 20%. The addition of 50 ppm HCl caused complete capture of all elemental and oxidized mercury species. In the absence of halogens, SO2 increased the mercury adsorption efficiency to up to 30 percent. The extent of adsorption decreased with increasing SO2 concentration when halogens were present. Increasing the HCl concentration to 100 ppm lessened the effect of SO2. The fixed-bed model incorporates Langmuir adsorption kinetics and was developed to predict adsorption of elemental mercury and the effect of multiple flue gas components. This model neglects intraparticle diffusional resistances and is only applicable to pulverized carbon sorbents. It roughly describes experimental data from the literature. The current version includes the ability to account for competitive adsorption between mercury, SO2, and NO2. The single particle model simulates in-flight sorbent capture of elemental mercury. This model was developed to include Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms, rate equations, sorbent feed rate, and

  10. Fluid flow with heat transfer in a fix-bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasparetto, C.A.

    1982-01-01

    Tests with two different fluids, water and air, flowing in a bed with irregular particles of silica were done. The bed was confined inside a tube, which was heated by an external jacket. The bed is characterized by permeability and porosity. The tests showed a wall effect face to the relation between the tube diameter and the medium dimension of the particles. The results are presented as a relation between Nusselt number / Peclet number. (E.G.) [pt

  11. Arsenic removal in a sulfidogenic fixed-bed column bioreactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altun, Muslum, E-mail: muslumaltun@hotmail.com [Hacettepe University, Department of Chemistry, Beytepe, Ankara (Turkey); Sahinkaya, Erkan [Istanbul Medeniyet University, Bioengineering Department, Goztepe, Istanbul (Turkey); Durukan, Ilknur; Bektas, Sema [Hacettepe University, Department of Chemistry, Beytepe, Ankara (Turkey); Komnitsas, Kostas [Technical University of Crete, Department of Mineral Resources Engineering, Chania (Greece)

    2014-03-01

    Highlights: • Sulfidogenic treatment of As-containing AMD was investigated. • High rate simultaneous removal of As and Fe was achieved. • As was removed without adding alkalinity or adjusting pH. • As and Fe removal mechanisms were elucidated. - Abstract: In the present study, the bioremoval of arsenic from synthetic acidic wastewater containing arsenate (As{sup 5+}) (0.5–20 mg/L), ferrous iron (Fe{sup 2+}) (100–200 mg/L) and sulfate (2000 mg/L) was investigated in an ethanol fed (780–1560 mg/L chemical oxygen demand (COD)) anaerobic up-flow fixed bed column bioreactor at constant hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 9.6 h. Arsenic removal efficiency was low and averaged 8% in case iron was not supplemented to the synthetic wastewater. Neutral to slightly alkaline pH and high sulfide concentration in the bioreactor retarded the precipitation of arsenic. Addition of 100 mg/L Fe{sup 2+} increased arsenic removal efficiency to 63%. Further increase of influent Fe{sup 2+} concentration to 200 mg/L improved arsenic removal to 85%. Decrease of influent COD concentration to its half, 780 mg/L, resulted in further increase of As removal to 96% when Fe{sup 2+} and As{sup 5+} concentrations remained at 200 mg/L and 20 mg/L, respectively. As a result of the sulfidogenic activity in the bioreactor the effluent pH and alkalinity concentration averaged 7.4 ± 0.2 and 1736 ± 239 mg CaCO{sub 3}/L respectively. Electron flow from ethanol to sulfate averaged 72 ± 10%. X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analyses were carried out to identify the nature of the precipitate generated by sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) activity. Precipitation of arsenic in the form of As{sub 2}S{sub 3} (orpiment) and co-precipitation with ferrous sulfide (FeS), pyrite (FeS{sub 2}) or arsenopyrite (FeAsS) were the main arsenic removal mechanisms.

  12. Dynamic modeling of fixed-bed adsorption of flue gas using a variable mass transfer model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jehun; Lee, Jae W.

    2016-01-01

    This study introduces a dynamic mass transfer model for the fixed-bed adsorption of a flue gas. The derivation of the variable mass transfer coefficient is based on pore diffusion theory and it is a function of effective porosity, temperature, and pressure as well as the adsorbate composition. Adsorption experiments were done at four different pressures (1.8, 5, 10 and 20 bars) and three different temperatures (30, 50 and 70 .deg. C) with zeolite 13X as the adsorbent. To explain the equilibrium adsorption capacity, the Langmuir-Freundlich isotherm model was adopted, and the parameters of the isotherm equation were fitted to the experimental data for a wide range of pressures and temperatures. Then, dynamic simulations were performed using the system equations for material and energy balance with the equilibrium adsorption isotherm data. The optimal mass transfer and heat transfer coefficients were determined after iterative calculations. As a result, the dynamic variable mass transfer model can estimate the adsorption rate for a wide range of concentrations and precisely simulate the fixed-bed adsorption process of a flue gas mixture of carbon dioxide and nitrogen.

  13. Enhanced removal of sulfonamide antibiotics by KOH-activated anthracite coal: Batch and fixed-bed studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuo, Linzi; Ai, Jing; Fu, Heyun; Chen, Wei; Zheng, Shourong; Xu, Zhaoyi; Zhu, Dongqiang

    2016-01-01

    The presence of sulfonamide antibiotics in aquatic environments poses potential risks to human health and ecosystems. In the present study, a highly porous activated carbon was prepared by KOH activation of an anthracite coal (Anth-KOH), and its adsorption properties toward two sulfonamides (sulfamethoxazole and sulfapyridine) and three smaller-sized monoaromatics (phenol, 4-nitrophenol and 1,3-dinitrobenzene) were examined in both batch and fixed-bed adsorption experiments to probe the interplay between adsorbate molecular size and adsorbent pore structure. A commercial powder microporous activated carbon (PAC) and a commercial mesoporous carbon (CMK-3) possessing distinct pore properties were included as comparative adsorbents. Among the three adsorbents Anth-KOH exhibited the largest adsorption capacities for all test adsorbates (especially the two sulfonamides) in both batch mode and fixed-bed mode. After being normalized by the adsorbent surface area, the batch adsorption isotherms of sulfonamides on PAC and Anth-KOH were displaced upward relative to the isotherms on CMK-3, likely due to the micropore-filling effect facilitated by the microporosity of adsorbents. In the fixed-bed mode, the surface area-normalized adsorption capacities of Anth-KOH for sulfonamides were close to that of CMK-3, and higher than that of PAC. The irregular, closed micropores of PAC might impede the diffusion of the relatively large-sized sulfonamide molecules and in turn led to lowered fixed-bed adsorption capacities. The overall superior adsorption of sulfonamides on Anth-KOH can be attributed to its large specific surface area (2514 m"2/g), high pore volume (1.23 cm"3/g) and large micropore sizes (centered at 2.0 nm). These findings imply that KOH-activated anthracite coal is a promising adsorbent for the removal of sulfonamide antibiotics from aqueous solution. - Highlights: • A high efficiency adsorbent for sulfonamide removal is prepared from anthracite. • Effects of

  14. Heat Transfer in a Fixed Bed of Straw Char

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjellerup, Jan Søren; Henriksen, Ulrik Birk; Jensen, Anker

    2003-01-01

    A model for the thermal conductivity of a straw char bed has been developed. The model extends the work of Yagi and Kunii to describe heat transfer in a bed of cylinders, using a relationship between the interparticle distance and the external porosity. To verify the model, thermal conductivity...... the experimental uncertainty over the range of conditions investigated. The heat transfer model was used in a parametric study to evaluate the effect of gas flow rate, particle diameter, porosity, and temperature on the thermal conductivity in a straw char bed....... experiments were performed on shredded and un-shredded straw char samples, varying particle size, bed packing (loose or dense), and temperature. Predictions with the model, using the measured external porosity and particle diameter as input parameters, are in agreement with measurements within...

  15. Avoiding Carbon Bed Hot Spots in Thermal Process Off-Gas Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soelberg, Nick; Enneking, Joe

    2011-01-01

    Mercury has had various uses in nuclear fuel reprocessing and other nuclear processes, and so is often present in radioactive and mixed (radioactive and hazardous) wastes. Test programs performed in recent years have shown that mercury in off-gas streams from processes that treat radioactive wastes can be controlled using fixed beds of activated sulfur-impregnated carbon, to levels low enough to comply with air emission regulations such as the Hazardous Waste Combustor (HWC) Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) standards. Carbon bed hot spots or fires have occurred several times during these tests, and also during a remediation of tanks that contained mixed waste. Hot spots occur when localized areas in a carbon bed become heated to temperatures where oxidation occurs. This heating typically occurs due to heat of absorption of gas species onto the carbon, but it can also be caused through external means such as external heaters used to heat the carbon bed vessel. Hot spots, if not promptly mitigated, can grow into bed fires. Carbon bed hot spots and fires must be avoided in processes that treat radioactive and mixed waste. Hot spots are detected by (a) monitoring in-bed and bed outlet gas temperatures, and (b) more important, monitoring of bed outlet gas CO concentrations. Hot spots are mitigated by (a) designing for appropriate in-bed gas velocity, for avoiding gas flow maldistribution, and for sufficient but not excessive bed depth, (b) appropriate monitoring and control of gas and bed temperatures and compositions, and (c) prompt implementation of corrective actions if bed hot spots are detected. Corrective actions must be implemented quickly if bed hot spots are detected, using a graded approach and sequence starting with corrective actions that are simple, quick, cause the least impact to the process, and are easiest to recover from.

  16. Dynamic transition between fixed- and mobile-bed: mathematical and numerical aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zugliani, Daniel; Pasqualini, Matteo; Rosatti, Giorgio

    2017-04-01

    Free-surface flows with high sediment transport (as debris flow or hyper-concentrated flow) are composed by a mixture of fluid and solid phase, usually water and sediment. When these flows propagate over loose beds, particles constituting the mixture of water and sediments strongly interact with the ones forming the bed, leading to erosion or deposition. However, there are lots of other situations when the mixture flows over rigid bedrocks or over artificially paved transects, so there is no mass exchange between bed and mixture. The two situations are usually referred to as, respectively, mobile- and fixed-bed conditions. From a mathematical point of view, the systems of Partial Differential Equations (PDEs) that describe these flows derive from mass and momentum balance of both phases, but, the two resulting PDEs systems are different. The main difference concerns the concentration: in the mobile-bed condition, the concentration is linked to the local flow conditions by means of a suitable rheological relation, while in the fixed-bed case, the concentration is an unknown of the problem. It is quite common that a free surface flow with high sediment transport, in its path, encounters both conditions. In the recent work of Rosatti & Zugliani 2015, the mathematical and numerical description of the transition between fixed- and mobile-bed was successfully resolved, for the case of low sediment transport phenomena, by the introduction of a suitable erodibility variable and satisfactory results were obtained. The main disadvantage of the approach is related to the erodibility variable, that changes in space, based on bed characteristics, but remains constant in time. However, the nature of the bed can change dynamically as result of deposition over fixed bed or high erosion over mobile bed. With this work, we extend the applicability of the mentioned approach to the more complex PDEs describing the hyper-concentrated flow. Moreover, we introduce a strategy that allows

  17. Complex nonlinear behaviour of a fixed bed reactor with reactant recycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Recke, Bodil; Jørgensen, Sten Bay

    1999-01-01

    The fixed bed reactor with reactant recycle investigated in this paper can exhibit periodic solutions. These solutions bifurcate from the steady state in a Hopf bifurcation. The Hopf bifurcation encountered at the lowest value of the inlet concentration turns the steady state unstable and marks......,that the dynamic behaviour of a fixed bed reactor with reactant recycle is much more complex than previously reported....

  18. Study of Pressure Drop in Fixed Bed Reactor Using a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD Code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soroush Ahmadi

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Pressure drops of water and critical steam flowing in the fixed bed of mono-sized spheres are studied using SolidWorks 2017 Flow Simulation CFD code. The effects of the type of bed formation, flow velocity, density, and pebble size are evaluated. A new equation is concluded from the data, which is able to estimate pressure drop of a packed bed for high particle Reynolds number, from 15,000 to 1,000,000.

  19. Methanol steam-reforming in a catalytic fixed bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duesterwald, H G; Hoehlein, B; Kraut, H; Meusinger, J; Peters, R [Research Centre Juelich (KFA) (Germany). Inst. of Energy Process Engineering; Stimming, U [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Inst. fuer Festkoerperphysik und Techn. Phys.

    1997-12-01

    Designing an appropriate methanol steam reformer requires detailed knowledge about the processes within such a reactor. Thus, the axial temperature and concentration gradients and catalyst ageing were investigated. It was found that for a fresh catalyst load, the catalyst located in the reactor entrance was most active during the experiment. The activity of this part of the catalyst bed decreased after some time of operation due to ageing. With further operation, the most active zone moved through the catalyst bed. From the results concerning hydrogen production and catalyst degradation, the necessary amount of catalyst for a mobile PEMFC-system can be estimated. (orig.)

  20. Enhanced removal of sulfonamide antibiotics by KOH-activated anthracite coal: Batch and fixed-bed studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Linzi; Ai, Jing; Fu, Heyun; Chen, Wei; Zheng, Shourong; Xu, Zhaoyi; Zhu, Dongqiang

    2016-04-01

    The presence of sulfonamide antibiotics in aquatic environments poses potential risks to human health and ecosystems. In the present study, a highly porous activated carbon was prepared by KOH activation of an anthracite coal (Anth-KOH), and its adsorption properties toward two sulfonamides (sulfamethoxazole and sulfapyridine) and three smaller-sized monoaromatics (phenol, 4-nitrophenol and 1,3-dinitrobenzene) were examined in both batch and fixed-bed adsorption experiments to probe the interplay between adsorbate molecular size and adsorbent pore structure. A commercial powder microporous activated carbon (PAC) and a commercial mesoporous carbon (CMK-3) possessing distinct pore properties were included as comparative adsorbents. Among the three adsorbents Anth-KOH exhibited the largest adsorption capacities for all test adsorbates (especially the two sulfonamides) in both batch mode and fixed-bed mode. After being normalized by the adsorbent surface area, the batch adsorption isotherms of sulfonamides on PAC and Anth-KOH were displaced upward relative to the isotherms on CMK-3, likely due to the micropore-filling effect facilitated by the microporosity of adsorbents. In the fixed-bed mode, the surface area-normalized adsorption capacities of Anth-KOH for sulfonamides were close to that of CMK-3, and higher than that of PAC. The irregular, closed micropores of PAC might impede the diffusion of the relatively large-sized sulfonamide molecules and in turn led to lowered fixed-bed adsorption capacities. The overall superior adsorption of sulfonamides on Anth-KOH can be attributed to its large specific surface area (2514 m(2)/g), high pore volume (1.23 cm(3)/g) and large micropore sizes (centered at 2.0 nm). These findings imply that KOH-activated anthracite coal is a promising adsorbent for the removal of sulfonamide antibiotics from aqueous solution. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Theory and measurements of electrophoretic effects in monolith, fixed-bed, and fluidized-bed plasma reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morin, T.J.

    1989-01-01

    Pressure gradients and secondary flow fields generated by the passage of electrical current in a d.c. gas discharge or gas laser are topics of longstanding interest in the gaseous electronics literature. These hydrodynamic effects of space charge fields and charged particle density gradients have been principally exploited in the development of gas separation and purification processes. In recent characterization studies of fixed-bed and fluidized-bed plasma reactors several anomalous flow features have been observed. These reactors involve the contacting of a high-frequency, resonantly-sustained, disperse gas discharge with granular solids in a fixed or fluidized bed. Anomalies in the measured pressure drops and fluidization velocities have motivated the development of an appropriate theoretical approach to, and some additional experimental investigations of electrophoretic effects in disperse gas discharges. In this paper, a theory which includes the effects of space charge and diffusion is used to estimate the electric field and charged particle density profiles. These profiles are then used to calculate velocity fields and gas flow rates for monolith, fixed-bed, and fluidized-bed reactors. These results are used to rationalize measurements of gas flow rates and axial pressure gradients in high-frequency disperse gas discharges with and without an additional d.c. axial electric field

  2. Numerical modelling of biomass combustion: Solid conversion processes in a fixed bed furnace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, Md. Rezwanul; Naser, Jamal

    2017-06-01

    Increasing demand for energy and rising concerns over global warming has urged the use of renewable energy sources to carry a sustainable development of the world. Bio mass is a renewable energy which has become an important fuel to produce thermal energy or electricity. It is an eco-friendly source of energy as it reduces carbon dioxide emissions. Combustion of solid biomass is a complex phenomenon due to its large varieties and physical structures. Among various systems, fixed bed combustion is the most commonly used technique for thermal conversion of solid biomass. But inadequate knowledge on complex solid conversion processes has limited the development of such combustion system. Numerical modelling of this combustion system has some advantages over experimental analysis. Many important system parameters (e.g. temperature, density, solid fraction) can be estimated inside the entire domain under different working conditions. In this work, a complete numerical model is used for solid conversion processes of biomass combustion in a fixed bed furnace. The combustion system is divided in to solid and gas phase. This model includes several sub models to characterize the solid phase of the combustion with several variables. User defined subroutines are used to introduce solid phase variables in commercial CFD code. Gas phase of combustion is resolved using built-in module of CFD code. Heat transfer model is modified to predict the temperature of solid and gas phases with special radiation heat transfer solution for considering the high absorptivity of the medium. Considering all solid conversion processes the solid phase variables are evaluated. Results obtained are discussed with reference from an experimental burner.

  3. Simultaneous nitrification-denitrification and phosphorus removal in a fixed bed sequencing batch reactor (FBSBR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahimi, Yousef; Torabian, Ali; Mehrdadi, Naser; Shahmoradi, Behzad

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Sludge production in FSBR reactor is 20-30% less than SBR reactor. → FSBR reactor showed more nutrient removal rate than SBR reactor. → FSBR reactor showed less VSS/TSS ratio than SBR reactor. - Abstract: Biological nutrient removal (BNR) was investigated in a fixed bed sequencing batch reactor (FBSBR) in which instead of activated sludge polypropylene carriers were used. The FBSBR performance on carbon and nitrogen removal at different loading rates was significant. COD, TN, and phosphorus removal efficiencies were at range of 90-96%, 60-88%, and 76-90% respectively while these values at SBR reactor were 85-95%, 38-60%, and 20-79% respectively. These results show that the simultaneous nitrification-denitrification (SND) is significantly higher than conventional SBR reactor. The higher total phosphorus (TP) removal in FBSBR correlates with oxygen gradient in biofilm layer. The influence of fixed media on biomass production yield was assessed by monitoring the MLSS concentrations versus COD removal for both reactors and results revealed that the sludge production yield (Y obs ) is significantly less in FBSBR reactors compared with SBR reactor. The FBSBR was more efficient in SND and phosphorus removal. Moreover, it produced less excess sludge but higher in nutrient content and stabilization ratio (less VSS/TSS ratio).

  4. Simultaneous nitrification-denitrification and phosphorus removal in a fixed bed sequencing batch reactor (FBSBR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahimi, Yousef, E-mail: you.rahimi@gmail.com [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Graduate Faculty of Environment, University of Tehran, No. 25 Qods St., Enghelab Ave, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Torabian, Ali, E-mail: atorabi@ut.ac.ir [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Graduate Faculty of Environment, University of Tehran, No. 25 Qods St., Enghelab Ave, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mehrdadi, Naser, E-mail: mehrdadi@ut.ac.ir [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Graduate Faculty of Environment, University of Tehran, No. 25 Qods St., Enghelab Ave, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shahmoradi, Behzad, E-mail: bshahmorady@gmail.com [Department of Environmental Science, University of Mysore, MGM-06 Mysore (India)

    2011-01-30

    Research highlights: {yields} Sludge production in FSBR reactor is 20-30% less than SBR reactor. {yields} FSBR reactor showed more nutrient removal rate than SBR reactor. {yields} FSBR reactor showed less VSS/TSS ratio than SBR reactor. - Abstract: Biological nutrient removal (BNR) was investigated in a fixed bed sequencing batch reactor (FBSBR) in which instead of activated sludge polypropylene carriers were used. The FBSBR performance on carbon and nitrogen removal at different loading rates was significant. COD, TN, and phosphorus removal efficiencies were at range of 90-96%, 60-88%, and 76-90% respectively while these values at SBR reactor were 85-95%, 38-60%, and 20-79% respectively. These results show that the simultaneous nitrification-denitrification (SND) is significantly higher than conventional SBR reactor. The higher total phosphorus (TP) removal in FBSBR correlates with oxygen gradient in biofilm layer. The influence of fixed media on biomass production yield was assessed by monitoring the MLSS concentrations versus COD removal for both reactors and results revealed that the sludge production yield (Y{sub obs}) is significantly less in FBSBR reactors compared with SBR reactor. The FBSBR was more efficient in SND and phosphorus removal. Moreover, it produced less excess sludge but higher in nutrient content and stabilization ratio (less VSS/TSS ratio).

  5. Carbon bed mercury emissions control for mixed waste treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soelberg, Nick; Enneking, Joe

    2010-11-01

    Mercury has various uses in nuclear fuel reprocessing and other nuclear processes, and so it is often present in radioactive and mixed (radioactive and hazardous) wastes. Compliance with air emission regulations such as the Hazardous Waste Combustor (HWC) Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) standards can require off-gas mercury removal efficiencies up to 99.999% for thermally treating some mixed waste streams. Test programs have demonstrated this level of off-gas mercury control using fixed beds of granular sulfur-impregnated activated carbon. Other results of these tests include (1) the depth of the mercury control mass transfer zone was less than 15-30 cm for the operating conditions of these tests; (2) MERSORB carbon can sorb mercury up to 19 wt % of the carbon mass; and (3) the spent carbon retained almost all (98.3-99.99%) of the mercury during Toxicity Characteristic Leachability Procedure (TCLP) tests, but when even a small fraction of the total mercury dissolves, the spent carbon can fail the TCLP test when the spent carbon contains high mercury concentrations.

  6. Chemical-looping combustion in a reverse-flow fixed bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Lu; Bollas, George M.

    2016-01-01

    A reverse-flow fixed bed reactor concept for CLC (chemical-looping combustion) is explored. The limitations of conventional fixed bed reactors, as applied to CLC, are overcome by reversing the gas flow direction periodically to enhance the mixing characteristics of the bed, thus improving oxygen carrier utilization and energy efficiency with respect to power generation. The reverse-flow reactor is simulated by a dusty-gas model and compared with an equivalent fixed bed reactor without flow reversal. Dynamic optimization is used to calculate conditions at which each reactor operates at maximum energy efficiency. Several cases studies illustrate the benefits of reverse-flow operation for the CLC with CuO and NiO oxygen carriers and methane and syngas fuels. The results show that periodic reversal of the flow during reduction improves the contact between the fuel and unconverted oxygen carrier, enabling the system to suppress unwanted catalytic reactions and axial temperature and conversion gradients. The operational scheme presented reduces the fluctuations of temperature during oxidation and increases the high-temperature heat produced by the process. CLC in a reverse-flow reactor has the potential to achieve higher energy efficiency than conventional fixed bed CLC reactors, when integrated with a downstream gas turbine of a combined cycle power plant. - Highlights: • Reverse-flow fixed bed CLC reactors for combined cycle power systems. • Dynamic optimization tunes operation of batch and transient CLC systems. • The reverse-flow CLC system provides stable turbine-ready gas stream. • Reverse-flow CLC fixed bed reactor has superior CO 2 capture and thermal efficiency.

  7. Co-pyrolysis of rice straw and polypropylene using fixed-bed pyrolyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izzatie, N. I.; Basha, M. H.; Uemura, Y.; Mazlan, M. A.; Hashim, M. S. M.; Amin, N. A. M.; Hamid, M. F.

    2016-11-01

    The present work encompasses the impact of temperature (450, 500, 550, 600 °C) on the properties of pyrolysis oil and on other product yield for the co-pyrolysis of Polypropylene (PP) plastics and rice straw. Co-pyrolysis of PP plastic and rice straw were conducted in a fixed-bed drop type pyrolyzer under an inert condition to attain maximum oil yield. Physically, the pyrolysis oil is dark-brown in colour with free flowing and has a strong acrid smell. Copyrolysis between these typically obtained in maximum pyrolysis oil yields up to 69% by ratio 1:1 at a maximum temperature of 550 °C. From the maximum yield of pyrolysis oil, characterization of pyrolysis product and effect of biomass type of the composition were evaluated. Pyrolysis oil contains a high water content of 66.137 wt.%. Furfural, 2- methylnaphthalene, tetrahydrofuran (THF), toluene and acetaldehyde were the major organic compounds found in pyrolysis oil of rice straw mixed with PP. Bio-char collected from co-pyrolysis of rice straw mixed with PP plastic has high calorific value of 21.190 kJ/g and also carbon content with 59.02 wt.% and could contribute to high heating value. The non-condensable gases consist of hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and methane as the major gas components.

  8. FIXED-BED COLUMN ADSORPTION OF METHYL BLUE USING ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    userpc

    Axle Wood Carbon (AWC) was used to study the removal of Methyl Blue (MB) from ... height, initial methyl blue (MB) concentration, .... colour from blue to dark purple- .... Environ. Earth Sci. 13; 1–13. Yagub, M. T., Sen, T. K., Afroze, S., and Ang,.

  9. A batch and fixed bed column study for fluorescein removal using chitosan modified by epichlorohydrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, P M O; Francisco, J E; Cajé, J C M; Cassella, R J; Pacheco, W F

    2018-01-02

    This study evaluates the feasibility of commercial chitosan (CQ) and modified chitosan (MQ) by epichlorohydrin to be used as a solid phase to remove fluorescein (FSC) from aqueous solutions by two different approaches: in batch and on a fixed column bed. For the batch study, all parameters that influence sorption capacity were evaluated, such as: pH, mass, ionic strength, temperature and time of contact. In the optimized condition, 75% removal was obtained for FSC using CQ, while the modification allowed an increase up to 99%, as well as an increase in the stability of the polymer. In the fixed column bed study, the influence of all the parameters was evaluated through breakthrough curves, and the thermodynamics parameters of each approach were obtained. The results of these studies demonstrate that the modification with epichlorohydrin enhanced the sorptive properties (from 35% to 95% in fixed bed experiments) and the polymer stability (making it insoluble), making it suitable to be used in wastewater treatment.

  10. Exchange between the stagnant and flowing zone in gas-flowing solids-fixed bed contactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALEKSANDAR P. DUDUKOVIC

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available In countercurrent gas – flowing solids – fixed bed contactors, a fraction of the flowing solids is in motion (dynamic holdup, while the other fraction is resting on the fixed bed elements. In this study it was experimentally proved that the stagnant zone should not be considered as a dead part of the column, but that there is a dynamic exchange between these two portions of flowing solids particles. Combining a mathematical model with tracer experiments, the rate of exchange was determined and it was shown that only a small part (ca. 20 % of the stagnant region should be considered as a dead one.

  11. Distribution of volatile sulphur containing products during fixed bed pyrolysis and gasification of coals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furimsky, E.

    1991-08-01

    Various coals were used to study the evolution of H{sub 2}S COS, and SO{sub 2} in a fixed bed reactor. For all types of coal, most of H{sub 2}S and SO{sub 2} were released during the devolatilization stage. COS was formed only during the gasification stage in the presence of CO{sub 2}.

  12. STUDY OF GAS SEPARATION PROCESS BY DYNAMIC ADSORPTION IN FIXED BED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan Solomon

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available An experimental study of mass transfer at gas separation by dynamic adsorption in fixed bed of impregnated silica gel is presented in this work. By means of a mathematical model based on constants and coefficient easy to evaluate, the distributions of adsorbate concentration in gas and solid phases were determined as a function of time and throughout the height of the fixed bed, under isothermal conditions.With this aim, water vapors from air were adsorbed in a fixed bed of impregnated silica gel. The values of the volumetric mass transfer coefficient, Kv, were determined experimentally at several values of air superficial velocity, an air relative humidity of 69�20at 38 °C. The influence of the gas flow velocity and initial water concentration in adsorbent on the distribution of water concentration in both phases was established as a function of time and throughout the height of the fixed bed. The results obtained allow one to determination of the local adsorption rate.

  13. Performance of a sisal fibre fixed-bed anaerobic digester for biogas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A single stage anaerobic digester employing a sisal fibre waste fixed bed was studied for biogas production from sisal pulp waste. The fibre was colonized by microorganisms involved in biogas production. The sisal pulp waste to be digested was fed from the top and was sprinkled intermittently with recirculating leachate ...

  14. Parameters estimation for amino acids adsorption in a fixed bed by moment analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Cremasco

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Equilibrium constant and mass transfer parameters are needed for the study of amino acid separation in any process involving adsorption in fixed beds. The adsorption constants, effective diffusion coefficients, and axial dispersion coefficients for two amino acids, L-phenylalanine (Phe and L-tyrosine (Tyr, are determined from a series of pulse tests in a fixed bed packed with PVP (poly-4-vinylpyridine resin. Total bed voidage at different flow rates is estimated from NaCl pulse test data. The effective pore diffusivities of Phe, Tyr, and NaCl are estimated from moment analysis of pulse data. A detailed rate model is then solved numerically and adsorption constants, effective diffusion coefficients, axial dispersion coefficients are determined by moment analysis and compared with the pulse data. The advantage of this method is that the effective intraparticle diffusivities can be determined without the influence of extracolumn dispersion or intracolumn axial dispersion effects.

  15. Adsorptive removal of heavy metals from water using sodium titanate nanofibres loaded onto GAC in fixed-bed columns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sounthararajah, D P; Loganathan, P; Kandasamy, J; Vigneswaran, S

    2015-04-28

    Heavy metals are serious pollutants in aquatic environments. A study was undertaken to remove Cu, Cd, Ni, Pb and Zn individually (single metal system) and together (mixed metals system) from water by adsorption onto a sodium titanate nanofibrous material. Langmuir adsorption capacities (mg/g) at 10(-3)M NaNO3 ionic strength in the single metal system were 60, 83, 115 and 149 for Ni, Zn, Cu, and Cd, respectively, at pH 6.5 and 250 for Pb at pH 4.0. In the mixed metals system they decreased at high metals concentrations. In column experiments with 4% titanate material and 96% granular activated carbon (w/w) mixture at pH 5.0, the metals breakthrough times and adsorption capacities (for both single and mixed metals systems) decreased in the order Pb>Cd, Cu>Zn>Ni within 266 bed volumes. The amounts adsorbed were up to 82 times higher depending on the metal in the granular activated carbon+titanate column than in the granular activated carbon column. The study showed that the titanate material has high potential for removing heavy metals from polluted water when used with granular activated carbon at a very low proportion in fixed-bed columns. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Modeling and Experimental Studies of Mercury Oxidation and Adsorption in a Fixed-Bed and Entrained-Flow Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buitrago, Paula A. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Morrill, Mike [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Lighty, JoAnn S. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Silcox, Geoffrey D. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2009-06-01

    This report presents experimental and modeling mercury oxidation and adsorption data. Fixed-bed and single-particle models of mercury adsorption were developed. The experimental data were obtained with two reactors: a 300-W, methane-fired, tubular, quartz-lined reactor for studying homogeneous oxidation reactions and a fixed-bed reactor, also of quartz, for studying heterogeneous reactions. The latter was attached to the exit of the former to provide realistic combustion gases. The fixed-bed reactor contained one gram of coconut-shell carbon and remained at a temperature of 150°C. All methane, air, SO2, and halogen species were introduced through the burner to produce a radical pool representative of real combustion systems. A Tekran 2537A Analyzer coupled with a wet conditioning system provided speciated mercury concentrations. At 150°C and in the absence of HCl or HBr, the mercury uptake was about 20%. The addition of 50 ppm HCl caused complete capture of all elemental and oxidized mercury species. In the absence of halogens, SO2 increased the mercury adsorption efficiency to up to 30 percent. The extent of adsorption decreased with increasing SO2 concentration when halogens were present. Increasing the HCl concentration to 100 ppm lessened the effect of SO2. The fixed-bed model incorporates Langmuir adsorption kinetics and was developed to predict adsorption of elemental mercury and the effect of multiple flue gas components. This model neglects intraparticle diffusional resistances and is only applicable to pulverized carbon sorbents. It roughly describes experimental data from the literature. The current version includes the ability to account for competitive adsorption between mercury, SO2, and NO2. The single particle model simulates in-flight sorbent capture of elemental mercury. This model was developed to include Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms, rate equations, sorbent feed rate, and

  17. Drying kinetics characteristic of Indonesia lignite coal (IBC) using lab scale fixed bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, TaeJin; Jeon, DoMan; Namkung, Hueon; Jang, DongHa; Jeon, Youngshin; Kim, Hyungtaek [Ajou Univ., Suwon (Korea, Republic of). Div. of Energy Systems Research

    2013-07-01

    Recent instability of energy market arouse a lot of interest about coal which has a tremendous amount of proven coal reserves worldwide. South Korea hold the second rank by importing 80 million tons of coal in 2007 following by Japan. Among various coals, there is disused coal. It's called Low Rank Coal (LRC). Drying process has to be preceded before being utilized as power plant. In this study, drying kinetics of LRC is induced by using a fixed bed reactor. The drying kinetics was deduced from particle size, the inlet gas temperature, the drying time, the gas velocity, and the L/D ratio. The consideration on Reynold's number was taken for correction of gas velocity, particle size, and the L/D ratio was taken for correction packing height of coal. It can be found that active drying of free water and phase boundary reaction is suitable mechanism through the fixed bed reactor experiments.

  18. The influence of bamboo-packed configuration to mixing characteristics in a fixed-bed reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detalina, M.; Pradanawati, S. A.; Widyarani; Mamat; Nilawati, D.; Sintawardani, N.

    2018-03-01

    Fixed-bed reactors are commonly used as bioreactors for various applications, including chemicals production and organic wastewater treatment. Bioreactors are fixed with packing materials for attaching microorganisms. Packing materials should have high surface area and enable sufficient fluid flow in the reactor. Natural materials e.g. rocks and fibres are often used as packing materials. Commercially, packing materials are also produced from polymer with the advantage of customizable shapes. The objective of this research was to study the mixing pattern in a packed-bed reactor using bamboo as packing material. Bamboo was selected for its pipe-like and porous form, as well as its abundant availability in Indonesia. The cut bamboo sticks were installed in a reactor in different configurations namely vertical, horizontal, and random. Textile dye was used as a tracer. Our results show that the vertical configuration gave the least liquid resistant flow. Yet, the random configuration was the best configuration during mixing process.

  19. Empirical correlations for axial dispersion coefficient and Peclet number in fixed-bed columns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastegar, Seyed Omid; Gu, Tingyue

    2017-03-24

    In this work, a new correlation for the axial dispersion coefficient was obtained using experimental data in the literature for axial dispersion in fixed-bed columns packed with particles. The Chung and Wen correlation, the De Ligny correlation are two popular empirical correlations. However, the former lacks the molecular diffusion term and the latter does not consider bed voidage. The new axial dispersion coefficient correlation in this work was based on additional experimental data in the literature by considering both molecular diffusion and bed voidage. It is more comprehensive and accurate. The Peclet number correlation from the new axial dispersion coefficient correlation on the average leads to 12% lower Peclet number values compared to the values from the Chung and Wen correlation, and in many cases much smaller than those from the De Ligny correlation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Computer-aided modeling framework – a generic modeling template for catalytic membrane fixed bed reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fedorova, Marina; Sin, Gürkan; Gani, Rafiqul

    2013-01-01

    and users to generate and test models systematically, efficiently and reliably. In this way, development of products and processes can be faster, cheaper and very efficient. In this contribution, as part of the framework a generic modeling template for the systematic derivation of problem specific catalytic...... membrane fixed bed models is developed. The application of the modeling template is highlighted with a case study related to the modeling of a catalytic membrane reactor coupling dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene with hydrogenation of nitrobenzene....

  1. Fixed bed adsorption of hexavalent chromium onto natural zeolite from air stream

    OpenAIRE

    F. Golbabaei; E. Rahmanzadeh; G. R. Moussavi; A. Faghihi zarandi; M. R. Baneshi

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Chromium (VI) is a known human carcinogenic agent which is used in numerous industrial processes such as electroplating, welding, textile, cement and steel fabrication. The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of natural zeolite on the fixed bed adsorption of Cr (VI) from air stream. . Material and Method: In this experimental study, chromium mists were generated by a nebulizer (3A model, Italy). Performance of natural zeolite in the Cr (VI) adsorption and ...

  2. ELECTRODEPOSITION OF COPPER IONS ON FIXED BED ELECTRODES: KINETIC AND HYDRODYNAMIC STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.A.M. Ruotolo

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available The kinetic and hydrodynamic behaviour of a fixed-bed electrochemical reactor was studied in terms of current efficiency (CE and energy efficiency (EE. In the kinetic experiments the effects of fixed bed thickness (L, current density (i and initial concentration of copper (C0 were studied. In the hydrodynamic experiments the permeability (k of the electrode and the coefficient for inertial forces (c were also studied as functions of the applied current density. At low current densities and bed thicknesses greater than 1.0 cm, negative CE and EE were observed as a consequence of the dissolution of the porous matrix. At high current densities low CE and EE were observed and a powdery deposit was formed on the surface of the particles. From the results of the kinetic study bed thickness and the range of current densities employed in the hydrodynamic experiments were chosen. In these experiments the electrodeposition process continued until the whole electrode had been clogged and no more electrolyte could pass through it. The relationship between pressure drop and flow rate was well described by the Forchheimer equation. It was observed that the reduction in porosity due to copper electrodeposition causes the flow rate to decrease because of the decrease in electrode permeability, but it had no influence on current efficiency.

  3. Uptake of Cd(II Using Natural Zeolite: Batch and Continuous Fixed-Bed Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luna M. LMarashdeh

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Uptake of Cd(II ions by natural phillipsite tuff was investigated both in shake-flask and fixed-bed columns. Equilibrium uptake, qe, was found to best fit Langmuir adsorption isotherm with a maximum value of 25.78 mg/g. Percent removal of Cd ions was close to 100% from initial metal ion concentrations in the range 50 - 75 mg/L at 5.0 g zeolite/L. Also, qe was found to vary exponentially with zeolite dose. Break points as high as 350 minutes were obtained from bed treatment at favorable conditions of a low solution flow rate and high bed depth. In batch experiments, equilibrium pH increased to < 8.0 excluding chemical precipitation as part of the removal while in fixed-beds the final pH exceeded 9.0. It is suggested that a sieve action of zeolite porous structure plays a role as an uptake mechanism in addition to the ion exchange.

  4. Homogeneity of Continuum Model of an Unsteady State Fixed Bed Reactor for Lean CH4 Oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subagjo

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the homogeneity of the continuum model of a fixed bed reactor operated in steady state and unsteady state systems for lean CH4 oxidation is investigated. The steady-state fixed bed reactor system was operated under once-through direction, while the unsteady-state fixed bed reactor system was operated under flow reversal. The governing equations consisting of mass and energy balances were solved using the FlexPDE software package, version 6. The model selection is indispensable for an effective calculation since the simulation of a reverse flow reactor is time-consuming. The homogeneous and heterogeneous models for steady state operation gave similar conversions and temperature profiles, with a deviation of 0.12 to 0.14%. For reverse flow operation, the deviations of the continuum models of thepseudo-homogeneous and heterogeneous models were in the range of 25-65%. It is suggested that pseudo-homogeneous models can be applied to steady state systems, whereas heterogeneous models have to be applied to unsteady state systems.

  5. Characteristic Studies of Micron Zinc Particle Hydrolysis in a Fixed Bed Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lv Ming

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Zinc fuel is considered as a kind of promising energy sources for marine propeller. As one of the key steps for zinc marine energy power system, zinc hydrolysis process had been studied experimentally in a fixed bed reactor. In this study, we focus on the characteristics of micron zinc particle hydrolysis. The experimental results suggested that the steam inner diffusion is the controlling step of accumulative zinc particles hydrolysis reaction at a relative lower temperature and a relative higher water partial pressure. In other conditions, the chemical reaction kinetics was the controlling step. And two kinds of chemical reaction kinetics appeared in experiments: the surface reaction and the gas-gas reaction. The latter one occurs usually for larger zinc particles and high reaction temperature. Temperature seems to be one of the most important parameters for the dividing of different reaction mechanisms. Several parameters of the hydrolysis process including heating rate, water partial pressure, the particle size and temperature were also studied in this paper. Results show that the initial reaction temperature of zinc hydrolysis in fixed bed is about 410°C. And the initial reaction temperature increases as the heating rate increases and as the water partial pressure decreases. The total hydrogen yield increases as the heating rate decreases, as the water partial pressure increases, as the zinc particle size decreases, and as the reaction temperature increases. A hydrogen yield of more than 81.5% was obtained in the fixed bed experiments.

  6. Cadmium removal by bioclastic granules (Lithothamnium calcareum): batch and fixed-bed column systems sorption studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veneu, Diego Macedo; Schneider, Claudio Luiz; de Mello Monte, Marisa Bezerra; Cunha, Osvaldo Galvão Caldas; Yokoyama, Lídia

    2017-06-19

    The potential of Bioclastic Granules - BG (calcium-carbonate-based material) using the algae Lithothamnium calcareum as sorbent for the removal of Cd(II) from aqueous solutions by sorption was evaluated through batch and continuous systems tests using a fixed-bed column. Sorption process variables, in particular pH (2-7), particle size (<38-300 μm), initial BG concentration (0.1-1.0 g L -1 ), initial Cd(II) concentrations (5-400 mg L -1 ) and contact time (5-240 min), were evaluated. Adsorption isotherm profiles of Cd(II) per BG were similar to an L-type, or Langmuir type, with the adsorption forming a monolayer of approximately 0.61 μm, with a q max of 188.74 mg g -1 and k L of 0.710 L mg -1 . Thomas's model considers that sorption is not limited to a chemical reaction but is controlled by mass transfer at the interface. In the present study, the obtained value of k Th was 0.895 mL h -1  mg -1 , reaching a sorption capacity q o of 124.4 mg g -1 . For the Yoon-Nelson model, it was possible to obtain two important parameters to describe the behavior of the column, the rate constant (k YN ), obtaining a value of 0.09 h -1 and an τ of 82.12 h corresponding to the time required for sorption to occur of 50% of the solute in the rupture curve. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy analyses coupled to the X-ray dispersive energy system (SEM/EDS) of the BG after the Cd(II) ion sorption tests evidenced the formation of crystals with the prevalence of a new mineral phase (otavite).

  7. Comparison of the Effects of Fluidized-Bed and Fixed-Bed Reactors in Microwave-Assisted Catalytic Decomposition of TCE by Hydrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili Ren

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Trichloroethylene (TCE decomposition by hydrogen with microwave heating under different reaction systems was investigated. The activities of a series of catalysts for microwave-assisted TCE hydrodechlorination were tested through the fixed-bed and the fluidized-bed reactor systems. This study found that the different reaction system is suitable for different catalyst type. And there is an interactive relationship between the catalyst type and the reaction bed type.

  8. Factors affecting biological reduction of CO{sub 2} into CH{sub 4} using a hydrogenotrophic methanogen in a fixed bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Hyung; Pak, Daewon [Seoul National University of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Won Seok [Korea District Heating Corp, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Biological conversion of CO{sub 2} was examined in a fixed bed reactor inoculated with anaerobic mixed culture to investigate influencing factors, the type of packing material and the composition of the feeding gas mixture. During the operation of the fixed bed reactor by feeding the gas mixture (80% H{sub 2} and 20% CO{sub 2} based on volume basis), the volumetric CO{sub 2} conversion rate was higher in the fixed bed reactor packed with sponge due to its large surface area and high mass transfer from gas to liquid phase compared with PS ball. Carbon dioxide loaded into the fixed bed reactor was not completely converted because some of H{sub 2} was used for biomass growth. When a mole ratio of H{sub 2} to CO{sub 2} in the feeding gas mixture increased from 4 to 5, CO{sub 2} was completely converted into CH{sub 4}. The packing material with large surface area is effective in treating gaseous substrate such as CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}. H{sub 2}, electron donor, should be providing more than required according to stoichiometry because some of it is used for biomass growth.

  9. 1 - Aromatization of n-hexane and natural gasoline over ZSM-5 zeolite, 2- Wet catalytic oxidation of phenol on fixed bed of active carbon; 1 - Aromatisation de n-hexane et d'essence sur zeolithe ZSM-5, 2 - Oxydation catalytique en voie humide du phenol sur charbon actif

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suwanprasop, S.

    2005-04-15

    I - The production of aromatic hydrocarbons from n-hexane and natural gasoline over Pd loaded ZSM-5 zeolite in a tubular reactor was achieved under the suitable conditions at 400 deg. C, and 0.4 ml/min reactant feeding rate, employing ZSM-5 (0.5% Pd content) as a catalyst. Under these conditions, n-hexane and natural gasoline conversions were found to be 99.7% and 94.3%, respectively (with respective aromatic selectivity of 92.3% and 92.6%). II - Wet catalytic air oxidation of phenol over a commercial active carbon was studied in a three phase fixed bed reactor under mild temperature and oxygen partial pressure. Exit phenol concentration, COD, and intermediates were analysed. Oxidation of phenol was significantly improved when increasing operating temperature, oxygen partial pressure, and liquid space time, while up or down flow modes had only marginal effect. A complete model involving intrinsic kinetics and all mass transfer limitations gave convenient reactor simulation. (author)

  10. Calibration and verification of models of organic carbon removal kinetics in Aerated Submerged Fixed-Bed Biofilm Reactors (ASFBBR): a case study of wastewater from an oil-refinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trojanowicz, Karol; Wójcik, Włodzimierz

    2011-01-01

    The article presents a case-study on the calibration and verification of mathematical models of organic carbon removal kinetics in biofilm. The chosen Harremöes and Wanner & Reichert models were calibrated with a set of model parameters obtained both during dedicated studies conducted at pilot- and lab-scales for petrochemical wastewater conditions and from the literature. Next, the models were successfully verified through studies carried out utilizing a pilot ASFBBR type bioreactor installed in an oil-refinery wastewater treatment plant. During verification the pilot biofilm reactor worked under varying surface organic loading rates (SOL), dissolved oxygen concentrations and temperatures. The verification proved that the models can be applied in practice to petrochemical wastewater treatment engineering for e.g. biofilm bioreactor dimensioning.

  11. Temperature profile in a fix-bed reactor and with cylindrical geometry by the method of orthogonal collocation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basta, C.

    1982-01-01

    Using the method of orthogonal colocation the boundary problem for a fix bed with cylindrical geometry was solved. The axial disposal term was despicable and the results were compared with those the explicit finite difference method. (E.G.) [pt

  12. Mathematical simulation of hazardous ion retention from radioactive waste in fixed bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohsah, M.A.; Gohneim, M.M.; Othman, S.H.; El-Anadouli, B.E.

    2007-01-01

    Reactor design for fluid-solid, noncatalytic reaction depends on the prediction of the performance of the reactor kinetically. The most mathematical models used to handle fixed bed reactor in which the solid bed constitute one of the reactants, while a second reactant is in the fluid phase are complex and difficult to handle. A new mathematical model which easier to handle has been developed to describe the system under investigation. The model was examined theoretically and experimentally. A column backed with chelating cloth filter to separate radionuclide form radioactive waste solution is used as a practical application for the model. Comparison of the model predictions with the experimental results gives satisfactory agreement at most of the process stages

  13. Forest management for fixing and sequestering carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marland, G.; Dale, V.; Graham, R.; Luxmoore, R.; Marland, S.; McLaughlin, S.; Norby, R.; Post, W.M.; Tschaplinski, T.; Tuskan, J.; Wright, L.

    1993-01-01

    The concept of planting trees as part of a strategy to confront the possibility of global climate change is now widely accepted. As trees grow they remove CO 2 from the atmosphere and thus slow the atmospheric build-up of CO 2 , an important greenhouse gas. Within the global-climate-change context, there are two fundamental problems with managing trees to store carbon. First, the magnitude of fossil-fuel related emissions of CO 2 is so large, 6 billion metric tons of carbon per year that it takes very large areas of tree planting to make a significant impact. Second, as trees mature their rate of growth, and hence rate of net carbon uptake, declines. lie large demand on land area suggests that there is a limit to the fraction of total CO 2 emissions that we might reasonably expect to offset with growing trees. The ultimate maturation of forests suggests that there is a limit on the length of time over which offsets are feasible and that we need to ask what to do as the rate of C uptake declines. Acknowledging a that the availability of land will constrain the ability of tree planting to offset industrial emissions of CO 2 , we consider how the land which is available can be used most effectively. This report speculates on how much land might be available for a forest management strategy motivated (at least partially) by concerns about climate change, but our principal focus is on how a given land area can be best used to minimize net emissions of CO 2 and how much might be achieved on a unit of land. We do not suggest that carbon management should be the principal criteria for land management, but we discuss the implications if it were. Confronting global and local changes in climate will be one of many objectives in land management and we explore for the most effective strategy for pursuing this objective

  14. Design Strategy for CO2 Adsorption from Ambient Air Using a Supported Amine Based Sorbent in a Fixed Bed Reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yu, Qian; Brilman, D. W.F.

    In this work, a fixed bed reactor is evaluated for CO2 capture from ambient air using an amine based ion exchange resin. Using adsorption experiments, the effect of superficial velocity and bed length on process economics is investigated. It is shown that the optimal conditions are found at an

  15. Discussion on 'Solar detoxification of fuel-contaminated groundwater using fixed-bed photocatalysts'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrell, Joseph B.

    1997-03-15

    In a discussion of the 1997 paper by J. C. Crittenden et al. on the solar detoxification of fuel-contaminated groundwater using fixed-bed photocatalysts, the writer indicates a number of problems with the interpretation of the data and invites the authors to speculate on the reaction mechanism in the photocatalytic destruction of BTEX compounds in groundwater. In reply, Crittenden points out that it is not easy to speculate on the reaction mechanism because there are many compounds other than BTEX compounds contained in the water matrix, as well as many unknown compounds and by-products.

  16. Fixed-bed gasifier and cleanup system engineering summary report through Test Run No. 100

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pater, K. Jr.; Headley, L.; Kovach, J.; Stopek, D.

    1984-06-01

    The state-of-the-art of high-pressure, fixed-bed gasification has been advanced by the many refinements developed over the last 5 years. A novel full-flow gas cleanup system has been installed and tested to clean coal-derived gases. This report summarizes the results of tests conducted on the gasifier and cleanup system from its inception through 1982. Selected process summary data are presented along with results from complementary programs in the areas of environmental research, process simulation, analytical methods development, and component testing. 20 references, 32 figures, 42 tables.

  17. Degradation of whey in an anaerobic fixed bed (AnFB) reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Handajani, Marisa

    2004-01-01

    An Anaerobic Fixed Bed (AnFB) reactor was run as an upflow anaerobic reactor with an arrangement of supporting material for growth of a biofilm. The supporting material was made from Liapor-clay-polyethylene sinter lamellas (Herding Co., Amberg). The AnFB reactor was used for treating high concentrations of whey-containing wastewater. Optimal operating conditions for whey treatment at a concentration of COD in the influent of around 50 g whey·l-1 were found for a hydraulic retention ...

  18. Hydrodynamic characteristics of a two-phase gas-liquid flow upward through a fixed bed of spherical particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VELIZAR D. STANKOVIC

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of an electrochemically generated gas phase on the hydrodynamic characteristics of a three-phase system has been examined. The two-phase fluid, (gas-liquid, in which the liquid phase is the continuous one, flows through a packed bed with glass spheres. The influence of the liquid velocity was examined, as well as the gas velocity and particle diameter on the pressure drop through the fixed bed. It was found that with increasing liquid velocity (wl = 0.0162–0.03 m/s, the relative pressure drop decreases through the fixed bed. With increasing current density, the pressure drop increases, since greater gas quantities stay behind in the fixed bed. Besides, it was found that with decreasing diameter of the glass particles, the relative pressure drop also decreases. The relationship betweeen the experimentally obtained friction factor and the Reynolds number was established.

  19. Remediation of trichloroethylene by bio-precipitated and encapsulated palladium nanoparticles in a fixed bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennebel, Tom; Verhagen, Pieter; Simoen, Henri; De Gusseme, Bart; Vlaeminck, Siegfried E; Boon, Nico; Verstraete, Willy

    2009-08-01

    Trichloroethylene is a toxic and recalcitrant groundwater pollutant. Palladium nanoparticles bio-precipitated on Shewanella oneidensis were encapsulated in polyurethane, polyacrylamide, alginate, silica or coated on zeolites. The reactivity of these bio-Pd beads and zeolites was tested in batch experiments and trichloroethylene dechlorination followed first order reaction kinetics. The calculated k-values of the encapsulated catalysts were a factor of six lower compared to non-encapsulated bio-Pd. Bio-Pd, used as a catalyst, was able to dechlorinate 100 mgL(-1) trichloroethylene within a time period of 1h. The main reaction product was ethane; yet small levels of chlorinated intermediates were detected. Subsequently polyurethane cubes empowered with bio-Pd were implemented in a fixed bed reactor for the treatment of water containing trichloroethylene. The influent recycle configuration resulted in a cumulative removal of 98% after 22 h. The same reactor in a flow through configuration achieved removal rates up to 1059 mg trichloroethylene g Pd(-1)d(-1). This work showed that fixed bed reactors with bio-Pd polyurethane cubes can be instrumental for remediation of water contaminated with trichloroethylene.

  20. A Photocatalytic Active Adsorbent for Gas Cleaning in a Fixed Bed Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Pucher

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Efficient photocatalysis for gas cleaning purposes requires a large accessible, illuminated active surface in a simple and compact reactor. Conventional concepts use powdered catalysts, which are nontransparent. Hence a uniform distribution of light is difficult to be attained. Our approach is based on a coarse granular, UV-A light transparent, and highly porous adsorbent that can be used in a simple fixed bed reactor. A novel sol-gel process with rapid micro mixing is used to coat a porous silica substrate with TiO2-based nanoparticles. The resulting material posses a high adsorption capacity and a photocatalytic activity under UV-A illumination (PCAA = photocatalytic active adsorbent. Its photocatalytic performance was studied on the oxidation of trichloroethylene (TCE in a fixed bed reactor setup in continuous and discontinuous operation modes. Continuous operation resulted in a higher conversion rate due to less slip while discontinuous operation is superior for a total oxidation to CO2 due to a user-defined longer residence time.

  1. High temperature CO2 capture using calcium oxide sorbent in a fixed-bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dou Binlin; Song Yongchen; Liu Yingguang; Feng Cong

    2010-01-01

    The gas-solid reaction and breakthrough curve of CO 2 capture using calcium oxide sorbent at high temperature in a fixed-bed reactor are of great importance, and being influenced by a number of factors makes the characterization and prediction of these a difficult problem. In this study, the operating parameters on reaction between solid sorbent and CO 2 gas at high temperature were investigated. The results of the breakthrough curves showed that calcium oxide sorbent in the fixed-bed reactor was capable of reducing the CO 2 level to near zero level with the steam of 10 vol%, and the sorbent in CaO mixed with MgO of 40 wt% had extremely low capacity for CO 2 capture at 550 deg. C. Calcium oxide sorbent after reaction can be easily regenerated at 900 deg. C by pure N 2 flow. The experimental data were analyzed by shrinking core model, and the results showed reaction rates of both fresh and regeneration sorbents with CO 2 were controlled by a combination of the surface chemical reaction and diffusion of product layer.

  2. Determination of the enzyme reaction rate in a differential fixed-bed reactor: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baruque Filho E.A.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The reaction rate of starch hydrolysis catalyzed by a glucoamylase covalently bound to chitin particles was measured in a Differential Fixed-Bed Reactor (DFBR. Under selected test conditions the initial reaction rate may represent biocatalyst activity. Some aspects which influence measurement of the initial reaction rate of an immobilized enzyme were studied: the amount of desorbed enzyme and its hydrolytic activity, the extent of pore blockage of the biocatalyst caused by substrate solution impurities and the internal and external diffusional mass transfer effects. The results showed that the enzyme glucoamylase was firmly bound to the support, as indicated by the very low amount of desorbed protein found in the recirculating liquid. Although this protein was very active, its contribution to the overall reaction rate was negligible. It was observed that the biocatalyst pores were susceptible to being blocked by the impurities of the starch solution. This latter effect was accumulative, increasing with the number of sequential experiments carried out. When the substrate solution was filtered before use, very reliable determinations of immobilized enzyme reaction rates could be performed in the DFBR. External and internal diffusional resistences usually play a significant role in fixed-bed reactors. However, for the experimental system studied, internal mass transfer effects were not significant, and it was possible to select an operational condition (recirculation flow rate value that minimized the external diffusional limitations.

  3. 46 CFR 169.565 - Fixed carbon dioxide system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fixed carbon dioxide system. 169.565 Section 169.565 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS... cylinder storage area must be properly ventilated and the temperature inside must not exceed 130 °F. (g...

  4. Pyrolysis of the lignocellulose fermentation residue by fixed-bed micro reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Ze; Lin, Weigang; Song, Wenli; Wu, Xuexing

    2012-01-01

    Thermal gravimetric (TG) analysis was conducted to compare the fundamental pyrolytic behaviors between the lignocellulose fermentation residue (LFR) and three other biomass raw materials. It was found that the TG weight loss curve of LFR appeared very close to the curve of acidified alkaline lignin (AAL), but different to the material of dried distillers grains with solubles (DDGS, also a fermentation residue but obtained from liquor producing process). Pyrolysis of LFR by fixed-bed micro reactor in the range of 430 °C–700 °C was carried out. It was found that the liquid yield had a maximum value at the pyrolytic temperature of 475 °C. The oil phase of the liquid was mainly composed of phenols, and the content of dimethyl phenol and fatty acids decreased with increasing pyrolytic temperature. In the aqueous liquid, besides the most abundant phenol derivatives, small acids and nitrogen containing compounds appeared more. -- Highlights: ► The tense of the paper has been revised. ► The description of the experimental procedure was kept in past tense. ► The expression of ‘fixed bed’ was changed to ‘fixed-bed’.

  5. Carbon Sequestration in Olivine and Basalt Powder Packed Beds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Wei; Wells, Rachel K; Giammar, Daniel E

    2017-02-21

    Fractures and pores in basalt could provide substantial pore volume and surface area of reactive minerals for carbonate mineral formation in geologic carbon sequestration. In many fractures solute transport will be limited to diffusion, and opposing chemical gradients that form as a result of concentration differences can lead to spatial distribution of silicate mineral dissolution and carbonate mineral precipitation. Glass tubes packed with grains of olivine or basalt with different grain sizes and compositions were used to explore the identity and spatial distribution of carbonate minerals that form in dead-end one-dimensional diffusion-limited zones that are connected to a larger reservoir of water in equilibrium with 100 bar CO 2 at 100 °C. Magnesite formed in experiments with olivine, and Mg- and Ca-bearing siderite formed in experiments with flood basalt. The spatial distribution of carbonates varied between powder packed beds with different powder sizes. Packed beds of basalt powder with large specific surface areas sequestered more carbon per unit basalt mass than powder with low surface area. The spatial location and extent of carbonate mineral formation can influence the overall ability of fractured basalt to sequester carbon.

  6. Co-pyrolysis of rice straw and Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET) using a fixed bed drop type pyrolyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izzatie, N. I.; Basha, M. H.; Uemura, Y.; Hashim, M. S. M.; Amin, N. A. M.; Hamid, M. F.

    2017-10-01

    In this work, co-pyrolysis of rice straw and polyethylene terephthalate (PET) was carried out at different temperatures (450,500,550, and 600°C) at ratio 1:1 by using fixed bed drop-type pyrolyzer. The purpose of this work is to determine the effect of pyrolysis temperature on the product yield. As the temperature increased, the pyrolysis oil increased until it reaches certain high temperature (600°C), the pyrolysis oil decreased as of more NCG were produced. The temperature 550°C is considered as the optimum pyrolysis temperature since it produced the highest amount of pyrolysis oil with 36 wt.%. In pyrolysis oil, the calorific value (13.98kJ/g) was low because of the presence of high water content (52.46 wt.%). Main chemicals group from pyrolysis oil were an aldehyde, ketones, acids, aromatics, and phenol and all compound have abundant of hydrogen and carbon were identified. Co-pyrolysis of rice straw and PET produced a higher amount of carbon oxides and recycling back the NCG could increase liquid and char yields.

  7. Hydropyrolysis of extracted Euphorbia rigida in a well-swept fixed-bed tubular reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gercel, H.F.; Putun, A.E.; Putun, E.

    2002-05-01

    Tubular reactor fixed-bed hydropyrolysis experiments have been conducted on a sample of extracted Euphorbia rigida to determine the possibility of being a potential source of renewable fuels and chemical feedstock. The effects of hydropyrolysis temperature and heating rate on the hydropyrolysis yields and chemical compositions have been investigated. The maximum bio-oil yield of 39.8 wt% was obtained in H{sub 2} atmosphere at a hydrogen pressure of 150 bar, a hydrogen flow rate of 5 dm{sup 3} min{sup -} {sup 1}, a hydropyrolysis temperature of 550{sup o}C, and a heating rate of 100{sup o}C min{sup -1}. Then this bio-oil was characterized by elemental analysis and {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques. (author)

  8. Fixed-bed hydrogen pyrolysis of rapeseed: product yields and compositions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onay, O.; Kockar, O.M.; Gaines, A.F.; Snape, C.E.

    2006-01-01

    The fixed-bed hydro pyrolysis tests have been conducted on a sample of rapeseed to investigate the effect of hydro pyrolysis on the yields and chemical structures of bio-oils, with a view to improving overall product quality. A ammonium dioxydithiomolybdenate catalyst has been used in some tests to further increase conversion. The maximum bio-oil yield of 84% was obtained in hydrogen atmosphere (with catalyst) at hydrogen pressure of 15 MPa, hydrogen flow rate of 10 dm 3 min -1 , hydro pyrolysis temperature of 520 degree C, and heating rate of 5 o Cmin -1 . Then this bio-oil was characterized by elemental analysis and some spectroscopic and chromatographic techniques. And finally, this bio-oil yield and chemical composition compared with oil obtained from fast pyrolysis condition

  9. Transient Effects in Fischer-Tropsch Reactor with a Fixed Bed of Catalyst Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Derevich

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on analysis of small temperature disturbances in the Fischer-Tropsch reactor with a fixed bed of catalyst particles various scenarios of thermal instability were investigated. There are two possible scenarios of thermal instability of the reactor. First, thermal explosion may occur due to growth of temperature disturbances inside a catalytic granule. Second scenario connected with loss of thermal stability as a result of an initial increase in temperature in the reactor volume. The boundaries of thermal stability of the reactor were estimated by solving the eigenvalue problems for spherical catalyst particles and cylindrical reactor. Processes of diffusional resistance inside the catalytic granule and heat transfer from wall of the reactor tube are taken into account. Estimation of thermal stability area is compared with the results of numerical simulation of behavior of temperature and concentration of synthesis gas.

  10. Sintering study in vertical fixed bed reactor for synthetic aggregate production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quaresma, D.S.; Neves, A.S.S.; Melo, A.O.; Pereira, L.F.S.; Bezerra, P.T.S.; Macedo, E.N.; Souza, J.A.S.

    2017-01-01

    The synthetic aggregates are being employed in civil construction for the reduction of mineral extraction activities. Within this context, the recycling of industrial waste is the basis of the majority of processes to reduce the exploitation of mineral resources. In this work the sintering in a vertical fixed bed reactor for synthetic aggregate production using 20% pellets and 80% charcoal was studied. The pellets were prepared from a mixture containing clay, charcoal and fly ash. Two experiments varying the speed of air sucking were carried out. The material produced was analyzed by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, measures of their ceramic properties, and particle size analysis. The results showed that the solid-state reactions, during the sintering process, were efficient and the produced material was classified as coarse lightweight aggregate. The process is interesting for the sintering of aggregates, and can be controlled by composition, particle size, temperature gradient and gaseous flow. (author)

  11. Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulations of Gas-Phase Radial Dispersion in Fixed Beds with Wall Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony G. Dixon

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The effective medium approach to radial fixed bed dispersion models, in which radial dispersion of mass is superimposed on axial plug flow, is based on a constant effective dispersion coefficient, DT. For packed beds of a small tube-to-particle diameter ratio (N, the experimentally-observed decrease in this parameter near the tube wall is accounted for by a lumped resistance located at the tube wall, the wall mass transfer coefficient km. This work presents validated computational fluid dynamics (CFD simulations to obtain detailed radial velocity and concentration profiles for eight different computer-generated packed tubes of spheres in the range 5.04 ≤ N ≤ 9.3 and over a range of flow rates 87 ≤ Re ≤ 870 where Re is based on superficial velocity and the particle diameter dp. Initial runs with pure air gave axial velocity profiles vz(r averaged over the length of the packing. Then, simulations with the tube wall coated with methane yielded radial concentration profiles. A model with only DT could not describe the radial concentration profiles. The two-parameter model with DT and km agreed better with the bed-center concentration profiles, but not with the sharp decreases in concentration close to the tube wall. A three-parameter model based on classical two-layer mixing length theory, with a wall-function for the decrease in transverse radial convective transport in the near-wall region, showed greatly improved ability to reproduce the near-wall concentration profiles.

  12. Thermal activation and characterization of clay aiming their use as sorbent in fixed bed columns to remove cadmium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, M.M. da; Rodrigues, M.G.F.; Silva, M.L.P.; Kleinübing, S.J.; Silva, M.G.C.

    2011-01-01

    In this work we studied the removal of cadmium in a synthetic wastewater using clay of Pernambuco - Brazil, in systems of fixed bed column. Clay was thermally activated at 500 °C. The materials were characterized using X-ray Fluorescence (XRF), X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and nitrogen adsorption (BET method). For tests in fixed bed column, we applied a factorial design 2"2 and found that increasing the flow adversely affects the process of removing cadmium concentration while acting positively. The studies showed these materials as promising for the removal of Cd"2"+ ions in synthetic wastewater containing low levels of this metal. (author)

  13. Flow of power-law fluids in fixed beds of cylinders or spheres

    KAUST Repository

    Singh, John P.

    2012-10-29

    An ensemble average of the equations of motion for a Newtonian fluid over particle configurations in a dilute fixed bed of spheres or cylinders yields Brinkman\\'s equations of motion, where the disturbance velocity produced by a test particle is influenced by the Newtonian fluid stress and a body force representing the linear drag on the surrounding particles. We consider a similar analysis for a power-law fluid where the stress τ is related to the rate of strain e by τ = 2m en-1e, where m and n are constants. In this case, the ensemble-averaged momentum equation includes a body force resulting from the nonlinear drag exerted on the surrounding particles, a power-law stress associated with the disturbance velocity of the test particle, and a stress term that is linear with respect to the test particle\\'s disturbance velocity. The latter term results from the interaction of the test particle\\'s velocity disturbance with the random straining motions produced by the neighbouring particles and is important only in shear-thickening fluids where the velocity disturbances of the particles are long-ranged. The solutions to these equations using scaling analyses for dilute beds and numerical simulations using the finite element method are presented. We show that the drag force acting on a particle in a fixed bed can be written as a function of a particle-concentration-dependent length scale at which the fluid velocity disturbance produced by a particle is modified by hydrodynamic interactions with its neighbours. This is also true of the drag on a particle in a periodic array where the length scale is the lattice spacing. The effects of particle interactions on the drag in dilute arrays (periodic or random) of cylinders and spheres in shear-thickening fluids is dramatic, where it arrests the algebraic growth of the disturbance velocity with radial position when n≥ 1 for cylinders and n≥ 2 for spheres. For concentrated random arrays of particles, we adopt an

  14. SNS Central Helium Liquefier spare Carbon Bed installation and commissioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Degraff, Brian D. [ORNL; Howell, Matthew P. [ORNL; Kim, Sang-Ho [ORNL; Neustadt, Thomas S. [ORNL

    2017-07-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) Central Helium Liquefier (CHL) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been without major operations downtime since operations were started back in 2006. This system utilizes a vessel filled with activated carbon as the final major component to remove oil vapor from the compressed helium circuit prior to insertion into the system's cryogenic cold box. The need for a spare carbon bed at SNS due to the variability of carbon media lifetime calculation to adsorption efficiency will be discussed. The fabrication, installation and commissioning of this spare carbon vessel will be presented. The novel plan for connecting the spare carbon vessel piping to the existing infrastructure will be presented.

  15. Developing a molecular platform for potential carbon dioxide fixing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Mette; Jørgensen, Mikkel; Krebs, Frederik C

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an attempt to develop a new system for fixing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. The proposed molecular system has been designed to have the capacity to spontaneously bind CO2 from the atmosphere with high affinity. The molecular system is furthermore designed to have...... the ability to liberate CO2 at a later stage in the process, i.e., in a separate compartment. The liberated CO2 presents a carbon neutral way of obtaining pure CO2. The proposed molecular system is based on a small stable organic molecule that potentially have two forms: one without bound CO2 and one...

  16. Fluidized bed reactor for working up carbon coated particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marschollek, M.; Simon, W.; Walter, C.

    1981-01-01

    A fluidized bed reactor is described for working up carbon coated particles, particularly nuclear fuel particles or fertile material particles consisting essentially of a cylindrical portion connected to a conical portion. Gas supply pipes, gas distribution space and gas distribution heads are provided within the conical reactor lower portion, the gas distribution members being arranged in at least two superimposed planes and distributed symmetrically over the cross-section of the reactor

  17. Evaluating Design Parameters for Breakthrough Curve Analysis and Kinetics of Fixed Bed Columns for Cu(II Cations Using Lignocellulosic Wastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaira Zaman Chowdhury

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A continuous adsorption study for removal of Cu(II cations from wastewater using a fixed-bed column was conducted. A granular carbonaceous activated adsorbent produced by carbonization of the outer rind, or exocarp, of mangostene fruit shell was used for column packing. The effects of feed flow rate, influent cation concentration, and bed depth on the breakthrough curve were investigated at pH 5.5. Experimental analysis confirmed that the breakthrough curves were dependent on flow rate, initial concentration of Cu(II cations, and bed height related to the amount of activated carbon used for column packing. Thomas, Yoon–Nelson, and Adams–Bohart models were applied to analyze the breakthrough curves at different conditions. Linear regression analysis of experimental data demonstrated that Thomas and Yoon–Nelson models were appropriate to explain the breakthrough curve, while the Adams–Bohart model was only applicable to predict the initial part of the dynamic process. It was concluded that the column packed with fruit rind based activated carbon can be used to treat Cu(II-enriched wastewater.

  18. Temperature prediction in a coal fired boiler with a fixed bed by fuzzy logic based on numerical solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biyikoglu, A.; Akcayol, M.A.; Oezdemir, V.; Sivrioglu, M.

    2005-01-01

    In this study, steady state combustion in boilers with a fixed bed has been investigated. Temperature distributions in the combustion chamber of a coal fired boiler with a fixed bed are predicted using fuzzy logic based on data obtained from the numerical solution method for various coal and air feeding rates. The numerical solution method and the discretization of the governing equations of two dimensional turbulent flow in the combustion chamber and one dimensional coal combustion in the fixed bed are explained. Control Volume and Finite Difference Methods are used in the discretization of the equations in the combustion chamber and in the fixed bed, respectively. Results are presented as contours within the solution domain and compared with numerical ones. Comparison of the results shows that the difference between the numerical solution and fuzzy logic prediction throughout the computational domain is less than 1.5%. The statistical coefficient of multiple determinations for the investigated cases is about 0.9993 to 0.9998. This accuracy degree is acceptable in predicting the temperature values. So, it can be concluded that fuzzy logic provides a feasible method for defining the system properties

  19. Adsorptive Removal of Trichloroethylene in Water by Crop Residue Biochars Pyrolyzed at Contrasting Temperatures: Continuous Fixed-Bed Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Biochar (BC has attracted great attention as an alternative sorbent to activated carbon (AC. Objective of this study was to determine trichloroethylene (TCE removal by soybean stover BC pyrolyzed at 300 (BC300 and 700°C (BC700 in continuous fixed-bed column. Columns packed with BC300, BC700, and AC reached breakthrough time in 1.1, 27.0, and 50.7 h, respectively. BC700 had higher TCE adsorption capacity than BC300 due to its higher surface area, nonpolarity, and aromaticity. The sorption capacities of AC (774.0 mg g−1 and BC700 (515.1 mg g−1 were 21.6 and 14.4 times higher than that of BC300 (35.9 mg g−1. The lower desorption rate of TCE from BC300 than BC700 and AC may be attributed to the strong binding/partition of TCE to the noncarbonized part of BC. Thomas model also adequately described the adsorption data indicating interphase mass transfer. Overall, AC showed best efficiency for removing TCE from water in column experiments. However, although sorption and desorption capabilities of BC700 were a little lower than AC, it is still a good alternative for AC to remove organic contaminants such as TCE from water due to its cost-effectiveness.

  20. Fixed bed column study for Cu (II) removal from aqueous solution using water hyacinth (Eichornia crassipes) biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhimathi, R; Ramesh, S T; Yadu, Anubhav; Bharathi, K S

    2013-07-01

    This paper reports the results of the study on the performance of low-cost biosorbent water hyacinth (WH) in removing Cu (II) from aqueous solution. The adsorbent material adopted was found to be an efficient media for the removal of Cu (II) in continuous mode using fixed bed column. The column studies were conducted with 10 mg/L metal solution with a flow rate of 10 mL/min with different bed depths such as 10, 20 and 30 cm. The column design parameters like adsorption rate constant, adsorption capacity and minimum bed depth were calculated. It was found that, the adsorption capacity of copper ions by water hyacinth increased by increasing the bed depth and the contact time.

  1. Biofilm development in fixed bed biofilm reactors: experiments and simple models for engineering design purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szilágyi, N; Kovács, R; Kenyeres, I; Csikor, Zs

    2013-01-01

    Biofilm development in a fixed bed biofilm reactor system performing municipal wastewater treatment was monitored aiming at accumulating colonization and maximum biofilm mass data usable in engineering practice for process design purposes. Initially a 6 month experimental period was selected for investigations where the biofilm formation and the performance of the reactors were monitored. The results were analyzed by two methods: for simple, steady-state process design purposes the maximum biofilm mass on carriers versus influent load and a time constant of the biofilm growth were determined, whereas for design approaches using dynamic models a simple biofilm mass prediction model including attachment and detachment mechanisms was selected and fitted to the experimental data. According to a detailed statistical analysis, the collected data have not allowed us to determine both the time constant of biofilm growth and the maximum biofilm mass on carriers at the same time. The observed maximum biofilm mass could be determined with a reasonable error and ranged between 438 gTS/m(2) carrier surface and 843 gTS/m(2), depending on influent load, and hydrodynamic conditions. The parallel analysis of the attachment-detachment model showed that the experimental data set allowed us to determine the attachment rate coefficient which was in the range of 0.05-0.4 m d(-1) depending on influent load and hydrodynamic conditions.

  2. CFD Simulation of Dimethyl Ether Synthesis from Methanol in an Adiabatic Fixed-bed Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Golshadi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A computational fluid dynamic (CFD study of methanol (MeOH to dimethyl ether (DME process in an adiabatic fixed-bed reactor is presented. One of the methods of industrial DME production is the catalytic dehydration of MeOH. Kinetic model was derived based on Bercic rate. The parameters of this equation for a specific catalyst were tuned by solving a one-dimensional homogenous model using MATLAB optimization module. A two-dimensional CFD simulation of the reaction is demonstrated and considered as numerical experiments. A sensitivity analysis was run in order to find the effect of temperature, pressure, and WHSV on the reactor performance. Good agreement was achieved between bench experimental data and the model. The results show that the maximum conversion of reaction (about 85.03% is obtained at WHSV=10 h-1 and T=563.15 K, whereas the inlet temperature has a greater effect on methanol conversion. Moreover, the effect of water in inlet feed on methanol conversion is quantitatively studied. It was concluded that the results obtained from CFD analysis give precise guidelines for further studies on the optimization of reactor performance.

  3. Modeling of convective drying kinetics of Pistachio kernels in a fixed bed drying system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balbay Asım

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Drying kinetics of Pistachio kernels (PKs with initial moisture content of 32.4% (w.b was investigated as a function of drying conditions in a fixed bed drying system. The drying experiments were carried out at different temperatures of drying air (40, 60 and 80°C and air velocities (0.05, 0.075 and 0.1 m/s. Several experiments were performed in terms of mass of PKs (15g and 30g using a constant air velocity of 0.075 m/s. The fit quality of models was evaluated using the determination coefficient (R2, sum square error (SSE and root mean square error (RMSE. Among the selected models, the Midilli et al model was found to be the best models for describing the drying behavior of PKs. The activation energies were calculated as 29.2 kJ/mol and effective diffusivity values were calculated between 1.38 and 4.94x10-10 m2/s depending on air temperatures.

  4. Efficient expansion of mesenchymal stromal cells in a disposable fixed bed culture system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizukami, Amanda; Orellana, Maristela D; Caruso, Sâmia R; de Lima Prata, Karen; Covas, Dimas T; Swiech, Kamilla

    2013-01-01

    The need for efficient and reliable technologies for clinical-scale expansion of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) has led to the use of disposable bioreactors and culture systems. Here, we evaluate the expansion of cord blood-derived MSC in a disposable fixed bed culture system. Starting from an initial cell density of 6.0 × 10(7) cells, after 7 days of culture, it was possible to produce of 4.2(±0.8) × 10(8) cells, which represents a fold increase of 7.0 (±1.4). After enzymatic retrieval from Fibra-Cell disks, the cells were able to maintain their potential for differentiation into adipocytes and osteocytes and were positive for many markers common to MSC (CD73, CD90, and CD105). The results obtained in this study demonstrate that MSC can be efficiently expanded in the culture system. This novel approach presents several advantages over the current expansion systems, based on culture flasks or microcarrier-based spinner flasks and represents a key element for MSC cellular therapy according to GMP compliant clinical-scale production system. Copyright © 2013 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  5. Formation of N{sub 2} during the fixed-bed pyrolysis of coals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Zhiheng; Ohtsuka, Yasuo [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan); Furimsky, E. [Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    1995-12-31

    Research on the fate of the nitrogen in coal during pyrolysis has attracted increased attention, since it is related with the NO{sub x} and N{sub 2}O emissions during subsequent combustion. It has been reported that coal nitrogen is initially released as tar, which is then converted to HCN and NH{sub 3} through secondary decomposition reactions. However, little attention to N{sub 2} has been paid so far. We have recently found that N{sub 2} is the dominant product in slow heating rate pyrolysis of a subbituminous coal, and that the finely dispersed iron catalyst promotes drastically the formation of N{sub 2} from a brown coal. If coal nitrogen can be removed efficiently as N{sub 2} during pyrolysis, this method would contribute to the reduction of the NO{sub x} and N{sub 2}O emissions, since such pollutants originate mostly from coal nitrogen. Therefore the present study aims at making clear the influence of coal type, pyrolysis conditions, demineralization, and iron catalyst on the formation of N{sub 2} during the fix-bed pyrolysis of several coals with different ranks.

  6. Synthesis of biodiesel from waste cooking oil using immobilized lipase in fixed bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Yingming [School of Environment and Urban Construction, Wuhan University of Science and Engineering, Wuhan 430073 (China); Guangzhou Institute of Energy Conversion, Chinese Academy of Science, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Xiao Bo [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Chang Jie [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 (China)], E-mail: changjie@scut.edu.cn; Fu Yan [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 (China); Lv Pengmei; Wang Xuewei [Guangzhou Institute of Energy Conversion, Chinese Academy of Science, Guangzhou 510640 (China)

    2009-03-15

    Waste cooking oil (WCO) is the residue from the kitchen, restaurants, food factories and even human and animal waste which not only harm people's health but also causes environmental pollution. The production of biodiesel from waste cooking oil to partially substitute petroleum diesel is one of the measures for solving the twin problems of environment pollution and energy shortage. In this project, synthesis of biodiesel was catalyzed by immobilized Candida lipase in a three-step fixed bed reactor. The reaction solution was a mixture of WCO, water, methanol and solvent (hexane). The main product was biodiesel consisted of fatty acid methyl ester (FAME), of which methyl oleate was the main component. Effects of lipase, solvent, water, and temperature and flow of the reaction mixture on the synthesis of biodiesel were analyzed. The results indicate that a 91.08% of FAME can be achieved in the end product under optimum conditions. Most of the chemical and physical characters of the biodiesel were superior to the standards for 0 diesel (GB/T 19147) and biodiesel (DIN V51606 and ASTM D-6751)

  7. Synthesis of biodiesel from waste cooking oil using immobilized lipase in fixed bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yingming [School of Environment and Urban Construction, Wuhan University of Science and Engineering, Wuhan 430073 (China)]|[Guangzhou Institute of Energy Conversion, Chinese Academy of Science, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Xiao, Bo [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Chang, Jie; Fu, Yan [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 (China); Lv, Pengmei; Wang, Xuewei [Guangzhou Institute of Energy Conversion, Chinese Academy of Science, Guangzhou 510640 (China)

    2009-03-15

    Waste cooking oil (WCO) is the residue from the kitchen, restaurants, food factories and even human and animal waste which not only harm people's health but also causes environmental pollution. The production of biodiesel from waste cooking oil to partially substitute petroleum diesel is one of the measures for solving the twin problems of environment pollution and energy shortage. In this project, synthesis of biodiesel was catalyzed by immobilized Candida lipase in a three-step fixed bed reactor. The reaction solution was a mixture of WCO, water, methanol and solvent (hexane). The main product was biodiesel consisted of fatty acid methyl ester (FAME), of which methyl oleate was the main component. Effects of lipase, solvent, water, and temperature and flow of the reaction mixture on the synthesis of biodiesel were analyzed. The results indicate that a 91.08% of FAME can be achieved in the end product under optimum conditions. Most of the chemical and physical characters of the biodiesel were superior to the standards for 0diesel (GB/T 19147) and biodiesel (DIN V51606 and ASTM D-6751). (author)

  8. Synthesis of biodiesel from waste cooking oil using immobilized lipase in fixed bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yingming; Xiao Bo; Chang Jie; Fu Yan; Lv Pengmei; Wang Xuewei

    2009-01-01

    Waste cooking oil (WCO) is the residue from the kitchen, restaurants, food factories and even human and animal waste which not only harm people's health but also causes environmental pollution. The production of biodiesel from waste cooking oil to partially substitute petroleum diesel is one of the measures for solving the twin problems of environment pollution and energy shortage. In this project, synthesis of biodiesel was catalyzed by immobilized Candida lipase in a three-step fixed bed reactor. The reaction solution was a mixture of WCO, water, methanol and solvent (hexane). The main product was biodiesel consisted of fatty acid methyl ester (FAME), of which methyl oleate was the main component. Effects of lipase, solvent, water, and temperature and flow of the reaction mixture on the synthesis of biodiesel were analyzed. The results indicate that a 91.08% of FAME can be achieved in the end product under optimum conditions. Most of the chemical and physical characters of the biodiesel were superior to the standards for 0 diesel (GB/T 19147) and biodiesel (DIN V51606 and ASTM D-6751)

  9. Extraction of uranium from sea water with the granular composite adsorbent by using the fixed bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katoh, Shunsaku; Sakane, Kohji; Hirotsu, Takahiro; Fujii, Ayako; Kitamura, Takao

    1981-01-01

    To clarify the technical problems existing in the extraction process of uranium from sea water, uranium was extracted from natural sea water, with the granulated C-Ti-OH composite adsorbent. The adsorption of uranium from sea water was carried out by using the fixed bed that had been designed in our laboratory. The uranium recovery from the sea water was 13.9% in the adsorption process of 56 d. The adsorbed uranium was eluted from the adsorbent with 0.5 N NaHCO 3 -0.5N Na 2 CO 3 soln. at 70 0 C. The elution recovery was 97.4% for 35 h. The uranium contained in the eluate was concentrated twenty times as much as in the anion exchange process, and then 100 times in the solvent extraction process with oxine-chloroform and TOA-kerosene. About 0.7 g of yellow cake was prepared from natural sea water, and it was identified to be pure 2UO 2 .NH 3 .3H 2 O by X-ray diffraction method and X-ray fluorometry. (author)

  10. Passive deca-heat removal in the fixed bed nuclear reactor (FBNR) - 15551

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solano Diaz, E.C.; Luna Aguilera, G.M.; Santos, R.A.; Vaca, D.E.

    2015-01-01

    The Fixed Bed Nuclear Reactor (FBNR) is a Generation IV small reactor concept, where the spherical elements contain Triso-type microspheres with UO 2 , which serves as nuclear fuel. In the event that adverse operation conditions occur, the water pump is automatically shut off and the fuel pebbles fall back by gravity into the fuel chamber. Since the FBNR relies on passive security systems, the removal of the decay heat in the fuel chamber is achieved by contact with quiescent water. In the present paper, a mathematical simulation of the passive cooling of the system was conducted in SOLIDWORKS so as to obtain a temperature profile in the body during the decay heat removal process. Homogenization techniques were employed to smooth out spatial variations across the multiphase system and to derive expression for the effective thermophysical properties that are valid through the macroscopic entry (the chamber). The simulation showed that the chamber's temperature rose from 573 K to its maximum temperature, 1234 K, in the first hour. Afterwards, the temperature fluctuated, but stayed under 552 K. Since the temperature of the system was always kept under the value of the safety parameter (1200 C. degrees) the simulation confirmed that an effective passive cooling of the fuel chamber is indeed feasible. (authors)

  11. CFD analysis of hot spot formation through a fixed bed reactor of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Aligolzadeh

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the interesting methods for conversion of synthesis gas to heavy hydrocarbons is Fischer–Tropsch process. The process has some bottlenecks, such as hot spot formation and low degree of conversion. In this work, computational fluid dynamics technique was used to simulate conversion of synthetic gas and product distribution. Also, hot spot formation in the catalytic fixed-bed reactor was investigated in several runs. Simulation results indicated that hot spot formation occurred more likely in the early and middle part of reactor due to high reaction rates. Based on the simulation results, the temperature of hot spots increased with increase in the inlet temperature as well as pressure. Among the many CFD runs conducted, it is found that the optimal temperature and pressure for Fischer–Tropsch synthesis are 565 K and 20 bar, respectively. As it seems that the reactor shall work very well under optimal conditions, the reaction rates and catalyst duration would simultaneously be maximum .

  12. Co-pyrolysis of corn cob and waste cooking oil in a fixed bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guanyi; Liu, Cong; Ma, Wenchao; Zhang, Xiaoxiong; Li, Yanbin; Yan, Beibei; Zhou, Weihong

    2014-08-01

    Corn cob (CC) and waste cooking oil (WCO) were co-pyrolyzed in a fixed bed. The effects of various temperatures of 500 °C, 550 °C, 600 °C and CC/WCO mass ratios of 1:0, 1:0.1, 1:0.5, 1:1 and 0:1 were investigated, respectively. Results show that co-pyrolysis of CC/WCO produce more liquid and less bio-char than pyrolysis of CC individually. Bio-oil and bio-char yields were found to be largely dependent on temperature and CC/WCO ratios. GC/MS of bio-oil show it consists of different classes and amounts of organic compounds other than that from CC pyrolysis. Temperature of 550 °C and CC/WCO ratio of 1:1 seem to be the optimum considering high bio-oil yields (68.6 wt.%) and good bio-oil properties (HHV of 32.78 MJ/kg). In this case, bio-char of 24.96 MJ/kg appears attractive as a renewable source, while gas with LHV of 16.06 MJ/Nm(3) can be directly used in boilers as fuel. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Artificial neural network modelling approach for a biomass gasification process in fixed bed gasifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikulandrić, Robert; Lončar, Dražen; Böhning, Dorith; Böhme, Rene; Beckmann, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • 2 Different equilibrium models are developed and their performance is analysed. • Neural network prediction models for 2 different fixed bed gasifier types are developed. • The influence of different input parameters on neural network model performance is analysed. • Methodology for neural network model development for different gasifier types is described. • Neural network models are verified for various operating conditions based on measured data. - Abstract: The number of the small and middle-scale biomass gasification combined heat and power plants as well as syngas production plants has been significantly increased in the last decade mostly due to extensive incentives. However, existing issues regarding syngas quality, process efficiency, emissions and environmental standards are preventing biomass gasification technology to become more economically viable. To encounter these issues, special attention is given to the development of mathematical models which can be used for a process analysis or plant control purposes. The presented paper analyses possibilities of neural networks to predict process parameters with high speed and accuracy. After a related literature review and measurement data analysis, different modelling approaches for the process parameter prediction that can be used for an on-line process control were developed and their performance were analysed. Neural network models showed good capability to predict biomass gasification process parameters with reasonable accuracy and speed. Measurement data for the model development, verification and performance analysis were derived from biomass gasification plant operated by Technical University Dresden

  14. DAILY BUDGETS OF PHOTOSYNTHETICALLY FIXED CARBON IN SYMBIOTIC ZOANTHIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steen, R Grant; Muscatine, L

    1984-10-01

    We tested the hypothesis that some zoanthids are able to meet a portion of their daily respiratory carbon requirement with photosynthetic carbon from symbiotic algal cells (= zooxanthellae). A daily budget was constructed for carbon (C) photosynthetically fixed by zooxanthellae of the Bermuda zoanthids Zoanthus sociatus and Palythoa variabilis. Zooxanthellae have an average net photosynthetic C fixation of 7.48 and 15.56 µgC·polyp -1 ·day -1 for Z. sociatus and P. variabilis respectively. The C-specific growth rate (µ c ) was 0.215·day -1 for Z. sociatus and 0.152·day -1 for P. variabilis. The specific growth rate (µ) of zooxanthellae in the zoanthids was measured to be 0.011 and 0.017·day -1 for Z. sociatus and P. variabilis zooxanthellae respectively. Z. sociatus zooxanthellae translocated 95.1% of the C assimilated in photosynthesis, while P. variabilis zooxanthellae translocated 88.8% of their fixed C. As the animal tissue of a polyp of Z. sociatus required 14.75 µgC·day -1 for respiration, and one of P. variabiis required 105.54 µgC·day -1 , the contribution of zooxanthellae to animal respiration (CZAR) was 48.2% for Z. sociatus and 13.1% for P. variabilis.

  15. Near-Bed Turbulent Kinetic Energy Budget Under a Large-Scale Plunging Breaking Wave Over a Fixed Bar

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Zanden, Joep; van der A, Dominic A.; Cáceres, Iván.; Hurther, David; McLelland, Stuart J.; Ribberink, Jan S.; O'Donoghue, Tom

    2018-02-01

    Hydrodynamics under regular plunging breaking waves over a fixed breaker bar were studied in a large-scale wave flume. A previous paper reported on the outer flow hydrodynamics; the present paper focuses on the turbulence dynamics near the bed (up to 0.10 m from the bed). Velocities were measured with high spatial and temporal resolution using a two component laser Doppler anemometer. The results show that even at close distance from the bed (1 mm), the turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) increases by a factor five between the shoaling, and breaking regions because of invasion of wave breaking turbulence. The sign and phase behavior of the time-dependent Reynolds shear stresses at elevations up to approximately 0.02 m from the bed (roughly twice the elevation of the boundary layer overshoot) are mainly controlled by local bed-shear-generated turbulence, but at higher elevations Reynolds stresses are controlled by wave breaking turbulence. The measurements are subsequently analyzed to investigate the TKE budget at wave-averaged and intrawave time scales. Horizontal and vertical turbulence advection, production, and dissipation are the major terms. A two-dimensional wave-averaged circulation drives advection of wave breaking turbulence through the near-bed layer, resulting in a net downward influx in the bar trough region, followed by seaward advection along the bar's shoreward slope, and an upward outflux above the bar crest. The strongly nonuniform flow across the bar combined with the presence of anisotropic turbulence enhances turbulent production rates near the bed.

  16. Coupling membrane pervaporation with a fixed-bed reactor for enhanced esterification of oleic acid with ethanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Ying; Lv, Enmin; Ma, Lingling; Lu, Jie; Chen, Kexun; Ding, Jincheng

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The reactor coupling membrane pervaporation with a fixed-bed reactor was studied. • The factors effecting the esterification of oleic acid were investigated. • NaA zeolite membrane was used for dehydration in the coupled reactor. - Abstract: Process intensification through membrane pervaporation (PV) integrated with a fixed-bed reactor could be successfully applied to the esterification of oleic acid and ethanol, which is a crucial step in the biodiesel synthesis using waste oil and grease as resource. The properties of the NaA zeolite membrane such as structure, formulation and separation were investigated by scanning electronic microscopy–energy dispersive spectrometry (SEM–EDS), X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and PV dehydration. Results showed that the NaA zeolite membrane had good separating property for removing water from the organics mixture. The operating conditions were optimized as the ethanol to oleic acid molar ratio of 15:1, feedstock flow rate of 1.0 ml/min, reaction temperature of 80.0 °C and catalyst bed height of 132 mm. The final conversion of oleic acid increased from 84.23% to 87.18% by PV using the NaA zeolite membrane at 24.0 h of operation. The membrane showed good PV performance after used for eight successive runs in the PV-assisted esterification. The resin exhibited a much high catalytic activity and operation stability after used for 100 h in the consecutive single pass fixed-bed esterification.

  17. Esterification of oleic acid in a three-phase, fixed-bed reactor packed with a cation exchange resin catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Sung Mo; Kimura, Hiroko; Kusakabe, Katsuki

    2011-01-01

    Esterification of oleic acid was performed in a three-phase fixed-bed reactor with a cation exchange resin catalyst (Amberlyst-15) at high temperature, which was varied from 80 to 120 °C. The fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) yields in the fixed-bed reactor were increased with increases in the reaction temperature, methanol flow rate and bed height. Moreover, the FAME yields were higher than those obtained using a batch reactor due to an equilibrium shift toward the product that resulted from continuous evaporation of the produced water. In addition, there was no catalyst deactivation during the esterification of oleic acid. However, addition of sunflower oil to the oleic acid reduced the FAME yield obtained from simultaneous esterification and transesterification. The FAME yield was 97.5% at a reaction temperature of 100 °C in the fixed-bed with a height of 5 cm when the methanol and oleic acid feed rates were 8.6 and 9.0 mL/h, respectively. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Feasibility analysis of As(III) removal in a continuous flow fixed bed system by modified calcined bauxite (MCB)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhakat, P.B.; Gupta, A.K.; Ayoob, S.

    2007-01-01

    This study examine the feasibility of As(III) removal from aqueous environment by an adsorbent, modified calcined bauxite (MCB) in a continuous flow fixed bed system. MCB exhibited excellent adsorption capacity of 520.2 mg/L (0.39 mg/g) with an adsorption rate constant 0.7658 L/mg h for an influent As(III) concentration of 1 mg/L. In a 2 cm diameter continuous flow fixed MCB bed, a depth of only 1.765 cm was found necessary to produce effluent As(III) concentration of 0.01 mg/L, from an influent of 1 mg/L at a flow rate of 8 mL/min. Also, bed heights of 10, 20, and 30 cm could treat 427.85, 473.88 and 489.17 bed volumes of water, respectively, to breakthrough. A reduction in adsorption capacity of MCB was observed with increase in flow rates. The theoretical service times evaluated from bed depth service time (BDST) approach for different flow rates and influent As(III) concentrations had shown good correlation with the corresponding experimental values. The theoretical breakthrough curve developed from constantly mixed batch reactor (CMBR) isotherm data also correlated well with experimental breakthrough curve

  19. Graphitization kinetics of fluidized-bed pyrolytic carbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beatty, R.L.

    1975-08-01

    Graphitization of 12 fluidized-bed pyrocarbons was studied as a function of heat-treatment time and temperature (1350 to 3000 0 C) to investigate the effect of initial microstructure on the graphitization process. The term ''graphitization'' is defined to include any thermally induced structural change, whether or not any layer stacking order is attained. A broad range of CVD microstructures was prepared at temperatures from 1150 to 1900 0 C and various propylene and methane concentrations. The twelve carbons spanned a wide range of graphitizabilities, primarily as a function of deposition temperature. Hydrocarbon concentration was of much less importance except for deposition at 1900 0 C. Hydrogen content of the as-deposited carbons decreased with increasing temperature of deposition, and initial graphitization behavior of the low-temperature carbons appeared to be related to hydrogen content and evolution. Rates of change in the parameters varied widely throughout the range of heat-treatment times (HTt) and temperatures (HTT) for the different carbons showing differences between the more graphitizable or ''soft'' carbons from the nongraphitizing or ''hard'' carbons. ΔH for nongraphitizing carbons was 175 +- 15 kcal below 1950 0 C, 240 +- 35 kcal at 1950 to 2700 0 C, and 330 +- 20 kcal above 2700 0 C. For graphitizing carbons deposited at 1150 0 C, values near 245 kcal were obtained from anti chi data for the HTT range 1350 to 1650 0 C, while densification data yielded values of about 160 kcal in the same range. The behaviors observed for graphitizable carbons above 2000 0 C are consistent with literature. Different kinetic behaviors below 2000 0 C were shown to be due to different initial microstructures as well as to different parameters measured. (U.S.)

  20. Porous filtering media comparison through wet and dry sampling of fixed bed gasification products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allesina, G.; Pedrazzi, S.; Montermini, L.; Giorgini, L.; Bortolani, G.; Tartarini, P.

    2014-11-01

    The syngas produced by fixed bed gasifiers contains high quantities of particulate and tars. This issue, together with its high temperature, avoids its direct exploitation without a proper cleaning and cooling process. In fact, when the syngas produced by gasification is used in an Internal Combustion engine (IC), the higher the content of tars and particulate, the higher the risk to damage the engine is. If these compounds are not properly removed, the engine may fail to run. A way to avoid engine fails is to intensify the maintenance schedule, but these stops will reduce the system profitability. From a clean syngas does not only follow higher performance of the generator, but also less pollutants in the atmosphere. When is not possible to work on the gasification reactions, the filter plays the most important role in the engine safeguard process. This work is aimed at developing and comparing different porous filters for biomass gasifiers power plants. A drum filter was developed and tested filling it with different filtering media available on the market. As a starting point, the filter was implemented in a Power Pallet 10 kW gasifier produced by the California-based company "ALL Power Labs". The original filter was replaced with different porous biomasses, such as woodchips and corn cobs. Finally, a synthetic zeolites medium was tested and compared with the biological media previously used. The Tar Sampling Protocol (TSP) and a modified "dry" method using the Silica Gel material were applied to evaluate the tars, particulate and water amount in the syngas after the filtration process. Advantages and disadvantages of every filtering media chosen were reported and discussed.

  1. Fast pyrolysis of hardwood residues using a fixed bed drop-type pyrolyzer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazlan, Mohammad Amir Firdaus; Uemura, Yoshimitsu; Osman, Noridah B.; Yusup, Suzana

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Pyrolysis of rubber and Meranti wood was conducted by using a drop-type pyrolyzer. • As temperature increase, char yield decrease, but bio-oil and gas yield increase. • Maximum pyrolysis temperature for pyrolysis of RWS is 550 °C and 600 °C for MWS. • Calorific value of bio-char is very high and potential to be used as a solid fuel. • CO and CO 2 are the major gas components in the non-condensable gases by-product. - Abstract: In this research, rubber wood sawdust (RWS) and Meranti wood sawdust (MWS) were pyrolyzed in a fixed bed drop-type pyrolyzer under an inert condition. The first part of the study is to determine the influence of pyrolysis temperature (450, 500, 550, 600, 650 °C) on the yield of pyrolysis products. Pyrolysis of these different residues generate an almost identical maximum amount of bio-oil close to 33 wt.%, but at different maximum temperature (550 °C for pyrolysis of RWS and 600 °C for pyrolysis of MWS). To evaluate the effect of biomass type on the composition and characterization of pyrolysis products, the second part involves the analyses of pyrolysis products from the maximum pyrolysis temperature. Acetic acid, tetrahydrofuran, and benzene were the main bio-oil components. The bio-oil contained high percentage of oxygen and hydrogen, indicating high water content in the bio-oil. High amount of water in bio-oil significantly reduced its calorific value. Under extensive heating, particle size of the bio-char from SEM images decreased due to breakage and shrinkage mechanisms. The major components of non-condensable gases were CO and CO 2

  2. Adsorptive control of water in esterification with immobilized enzymes: II. fixed-bed reactor behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mensah, P; Gainer, J L; Carta, G

    1998-11-20

    Experimental and theoretical studies are conducted to understand the dynamic behavior of a continuous-flow fixed-bed reactor in which an esterification is catalyzed by an immobilized enzyme in an organic solvent medium. The experimental system consists of a commercial immobilized lipase preparation known as Lipozyme as the biocatalyst, with propionic acid and isoamyl alcohol (dissolved in hexane) as the reaction substrates. A complex dynamic behavior is observed experimentally as a result of the simultaneous occurrence of reaction and adsorption phenomena. Both propionic acid and water are adsorbed by the biocatalyst resulting in lower reaction rates. In addition, an excessive accumulation of water in the reactor leads to a rapid irreversible inactivation of the enzyme. A model based on previously-obtained adsorption isotherms and kinetic expressions, as well as on adsorption rate measurements obtained in this work, is used to predict the concentration and thermodynamic activity of water along the reactor length. The model successfully predicts the dynamic behavior of the reactor and shows that a maximum thermodynamic activity of water occurs at a point at some distance from the reactor entrance. A cation exchange resin in sodium form, packed in the reactor as a selective water adsorbent together with the catalyst particles, is shown to be an effective means for preventing an excessive accumulation of water formed in the reaction. Its use results in longer cycle times and greater productivity. As predicted by the model, the experimental results show that the water adsorbed on the catalyst and on the ion exchange resin can be removed with isoamyl alcohol with no apparent loss in enzyme activity. Copyright 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  3. Models comparative study for heat storage in fixed beds; Estudo comparativo de modelos para armazenamento de calor em leitos fixos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuginski, Junior, Rubens

    1991-07-01

    This work presents comparative results of a numerical investigation of four possible models for the prediction of thermal performance of fixed bed storage units and their thermal design. These models includes Schumann's model, the radial dispersion model, a model that include both axial heat conduction in the fluid phase and admits thermal gradient in the solids particles and finally a two dimensional single phase model. For each of these models a computer code was written and tested to evaluate the computing time of same data and analyze any other computational problems. The tests of thermal performance included particle size, porosity, particle material, flow rate, inlet temperature and heat losses form tank walls and extremities. Dynamics behaviour of the storage units due to transient variation in either flow rate or inlet temperature was also investigated. The results presented include temperature gradients, pressure drop and heat storage. The results obtained are very useful for analysis and design of fixed bed storage units. (author)

  4. Fixed bed sorption of phosphorus from wastewater using iron oxide-based media derived from acid mine drainage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibrell, Philip L.; Tucker, T.W.

    2012-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) releases to the environment have been implicated in the eutrophication of important water bodies worldwide. Current technology for the removal of P from wastewaters consists of treatment with aluminum (Al) or iron (Fe) salts, but is expensive. The neutralization of acid mine drainage (AMD) generates sludge rich in Fe and Al oxides that has hitherto been considered a waste product, but these sludges could serve as an economical adsorption media for the removal of P from wastewaters. Therefore, we have evaluated an AMD-derived media as a sorbent for P in fixed bed sorption systems. The homogenous surface diffusion model (HSDM) was used to analyze fixed bed test data and to determine the value of related sorption parameters. The surface diffusion modulus Ed was found to be a useful predictor of sorption kinetics. Values of Ed treatment costs while at the same time ameliorating the impacts of P contamination.

  5. Sorptive Removal of Cesium and Cobalt Ions in a Fixed bed Column Using Lewatit S100 Cation Exchange Resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Naggar, M.R.; Ibrahim, H.A.; El-Kamash, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    The sorptive removal of cesium and cobalt ions from aqueous solutions in a fixed bed column packed with Lewatit S100® cation exchange resin has been investigated. A preliminary batch studies were performed to estimate the effect of pH and contact time on the sorption process. Results indicated that Cs + and Co 2+ could be efficiently removed using Lewatit S100® at a ph range of 4-7 with more affinity towards Cs than Co 2+ . Kinetic models have been applied to the sorption rate data and the relevant parameters were determined. The obtained results indicated that the sorption of both Cs + and Co 2+ on Lewatit S100 followed pseudo second-order rather than pseudo first-order or Morris-Webber model. Fixed bed experiments were conducted at a constant initial concentration of 100 mg/l whereas the effect of bed depth (3, 4.5 and 6 cm) and volumetric flow rate (3 and 5 ml/min.) on the breakthrough characteristics of the fixed bed sorption systems were determined. The experimental sorption data were fitted to the well-established column models namely; Thomas and BDST models to compute the different model parameters. The higher column sorption capacities were obtained at bed depth of 3 cm with a flow rate of 3 ml/min., for both Cs + and Co 2+ . The BDST model appeared to describe experimental results better than Thomas model. Results indicate that Lewatit S100® is an efficient material for the removal of cesium and cobalt ions from aqueous solutions.

  6. NUMERICAL SOLUTION OF STEADY STATE DISPERSION FLOW MODEL FOR LACTOSE-LACTASE HYDROLYSIS WITH DIFFERENT KINETICS IN FIXED BED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OLAOSEBIKAN ABIDOYE OLAFADEHAN

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A detailed computational procedure for evaluating lactose hydrolysis with immobilized enzyme in a packed bed tubular reactor under dispersion flow conditions is presented. The dispersion flow model for lactose hydrolysis using different kinetics, taking cognizance of external mass transfer resistances, was solved by the method of orthogonal collocation. The reliability of model simulations was tested using experimental data from a laboratory packed bed column, where the -galactosidase of Kluyveromyces fragilis was immobilized on spherical chitosan beads. Comparison of the simulated results with experimental exit conversion shows that the dispersion flow model and using Michaelis-Menten kinetics with competitive product (galactose inhibition are appropriate to interpret the experimental results and simulate the process of lactose hydrolysis in a fixed bed.

  7. Carbonaceous materials in petrochemical wastewater before and after treatment in an aerated submerged fixed-bed biofilm reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Trojanowicz Karol; Wojcik Wlodzimierz

    2016-01-01

    Results of the studies for determining fractions of organic contaminants in a pretreated petrochemical wastewater flowing into a pilot Aerated Submerged Fixed-Bed Biofilm Reactor (ASFBBR) are presented and discussed. The method of chemical oxygen demand (COD) fractionation consisted of physical tests and biological assays. It was found that the main part of the total COD in the petrochemical, pretreated wastewater was soluble organic substance with average value of 57.6%. The fractions of par...

  8. Fixed bed sorption of phosphorus from wastewater using iron oxide-based media derived from acid mine drainage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibrell, Philip L.; Tucker, T.W.

    2012-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) releases to the environment have been implicated in the eutrophication of important water bodies worldwide. Current technology for the removal of P from wastewaters consists of treatment with aluminum (Al) or iron (Fe) salts, but is expensive. The neutralization of acid mine drainage (AMD) generates sludge rich in Fe and Al oxides that has hitherto been considered a waste product, but these sludges could serve as an economical adsorption media for the removal of P from wastewaters. Therefore, we have evaluated an AMD-derived media as a sorbent for P in fixed bed sorption systems. The homogenous surface diffusion model (HSDM) was used to analyze fixed bed test data and to determine the value of related sorption parameters. The surface diffusion modulus Ed was found to be a useful predictor of sorption kinetics. Values of Ed < 0.2 were associated with early breakthrough of P, while more desirable S-shaped breakthrough curves resulted when 0.2 < Ed < 0.5. Computer simulations of the fixed bed process with the HSDM confirmed that if Ed was known, the shape of the breakthrough curve could be calculated. The surface diffusion coefficient D s was a critical factor in the calculation of Ed and could be estimated based on the sorption test conditions such as media characteristics, and influent flow rate and concentration. Optimal test results were obtained with a relatively small media particle size (average particle radius 0.028 cm) and resulted in 96 % removal of P from the influent over 46 days of continuous operation. These results indicate that fixed bed sorption of P would be a feasible option for the utilization of AMD residues, thus helping to decrease AMD treatment costs while at the same time ameliorating the impacts of P contamination.

  9. Media arrangement impacts cell growth in anaerobic fixed-bed reactors treating sugarcane vinasse: Structured vs. randomic biomass immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Aquino, Samuel; Fuess, Lucas Tadeu; Pires, Eduardo Cleto

    2017-07-01

    This study reports on the application of an innovative structured-bed reactor (FVR) as an alternative to conventional packed-bed reactors (PBRs) to treat high-strength solid-rich wastewaters. Using the FVR prevents solids from accumulating within the fixed-bed, while maintaining the advantages of the biomass immobilization. The long-term operation (330days) of a FVR and a PBR applied to sugarcane vinasse under increasing organic loads (2.4-18.0kgCODm -3 day -1 ) was assessed, focusing on the impacts of the different media arrangements over the production and retention of biomass. Much higher organic matter degradation rates, as well as long-term operational stability and high conversion efficiencies (>80%) confirmed that the FVR performed better than the PBR. Despite the equivalent operating conditions, the biomass growth yield was different in both reactors, i.e., 0.095gVSSg -1 COD (FVR) and 0.066gVSSg -1 COD (PBR), indicating a clear control of the media arrangement over the biomass production in fixed-bed reactors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Adiabatic Fixed-Bed Gasification of Colombian Coffee Husk Using Air-Steam Blends for Partial Oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Bonilla

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasing energy consumption, mostly supplied by fossil fuels, has motivated the research and development of alternative fuel technologies to decrease the humanity’s dependence on fossil fuels, which leads to pollution of natural sources. Small-scale biomass gasification, using air-steam blends for partial oxidation, is a good alternative since biomass is a neutral carbon feedstock for sustainable energy generation. This research presents results obtained from an experimental study on coffee husk (CH gasification, using air-steam blends for partial oxidation in a 10 kW fixed-bed gasifier. Parametric studies on equivalence ratio (ER (1.53 < ER < 6.11 and steam-fuel (SF ratio (0.23 < SF < 0.89 were carried out. The results show that increasing both SF and ER results in a syngas rich in CH4 and H2 but poor in CO. Also, decreased SF and ER decrease the peak temperature (Tpeak at the gasifier combustion zone. The syngas high heating value (HHV ranged from 3112 kJ/SATPm3 to 5085 kJ/SATPm3 and its maximum value was obtained at SF = 0.87 and ER = 4.09. The dry basis molar concentrations of the species, produced under those operating conditions (1.53 < ER < 6.11 and 0.23 < SF < 0.89, were between 1.12 and 4.1% for CH4, between 7.77 and 13.49% for CO, and between 7.54 and 19.07% for H2. Other species were in trace amount.

  11. Treatment of petroleum refinery wastewater containing heavily polluting substances in an aerobic submerged fixed-bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vendramel, S; Bassin, J P; Dezotti, M; Sant'Anna, G L

    2015-01-01

    Petroleum refineries produce large amount of wastewaters, which often contain a wide range of different compounds. Some of these constituents may be recalcitrant and therefore difficult to be treated biologically. This study evaluated the capability of an aerobic submerged fixed-bed reactor (ASFBR) containing a corrugated PVC support material for biofilm attachment to treat a complex and high-strength organic wastewater coming from a petroleum refinery. The reactor operation was divided into five experimental runs which lasted more than 250 days. During the reactor operation, the applied volumetric organic load was varied within the range of 0.5-2.4 kgCOD.m(-3).d(-1). Despite the inherent fluctuations on the characteristics of the complex wastewater and the slight decrease in the reactor performance when the influent organic load was increased, the ASFBR showed good stability and allowed to reach chemical oxygen demand, dissolved organic carbon and total suspended solids removals up to 91%, 90% and 92%, respectively. Appreciable ammonium removal was obtained (around 90%). Some challenging aspects of reactor operation such as biofilm quantification and important biofilm constituents (e.g. polysaccharides (PS) and proteins (PT)) were also addressed in this work. Average PS/volatile attached solids (VAS) and PT/VAS ratios were around 6% and 50%, respectively. The support material promoted biofilm attachment without appreciable loss of solids and allowed long-term operation without clogging. Microscopic observations of the microbial community revealed great diversity of higher organisms, such as protozoa and rotifers, suggesting that toxic compounds found in the wastewater were possibly removed in the biofilm.

  12. An investigation of the physical and chemical changes occuring in a Fischer-Tropsch fixed bed catalyst during hydrocarbon synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duvenhage, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    Deactivation studies: making use of fixed bed reactors, wet chemical analysis, surface area, pore volume determinations and X-ray diffraction spectrometry, scanning electron microscope spectrometry and secondary ion mass spectrometry techniques; were performed on a low temperature iron Fischer-Tropsch catalyst. It was revealed that this catalyst is mainly deactivated by sulphur poisoning, oxidation of the catalytic reactive phases, sintering of the iron crystallites and to a lesser extent deactivation through fouling of the catalytic surface by carbonaceous deposits. It was found that the top entry section of the catalyst bed deactivated relatively fast, the bottom exit section also deactivated, but not as fast as the top section. The central portion of the catalyst bed was least affected. Sulphur contaminants in the feed gas, even though present in only minute quantities, results in a loss of catalyst performance of the top section of the catalyst bed, while water, produced as a product from the Fischer-Tropsch reaction, oxidized and sintered the catalyst over the bottom section of the catalyst bed. 88 figs., 7 tabs., 224 refs

  13. Emergence of traveling wave endothermic reaction in a catalytic fixed bed under microwave heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerasev, Alexander P.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a new phenomenon in a packed bed catalytic reactor under microwave heating - traveling wave (moving reaction zones) endothermic chemical reaction. A two-phase model is developed to simulate the nonlinear dynamic behavior of the packed bed catalytic reactor with an irreversible first-order chemical reaction. The absorbed microwave power was obtained from Lambert's law. The structure of traveling wave endothermic chemical reaction was explored. The effects of the gas velocity and microwave power on performance of the packed bed catalytic reactor were presented. Finally, the effects of the change in the location of the microwave source at the packed bed reactor was demonstrated. - Highlights: • A new phenomenon - traveling waves of endothermic reaction - is predicted. • The physical and mathematical model of a packed bed catalytic reactor under microwave heating is presented. • The structure of the traveling waves is explored. • The configuration of heating the packed bed reactor via microwave plays a key role.

  14. Fluidized bed reactor for processing particles coated with carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marschollek, M.; Simon, W.; Walter, C.

    1978-01-01

    The carbon coating of production returns of these particles first has to be removed before the heavy metal core released can be reprocessed. For reasons of criticality, removal of burnt-up particles downwards must be possible in the fluidized bed reactor even if the reactor diameter is greater than 800 mm, and the material temperatures must not exceed 650 0 C. It consists of an upper cylindrical and a lower conical part, where, according to the invention, the gas distributor heads in the conical part are situated in several planes above one another for the fluidisation and combustion gas and where they are evently distributed over the reactor crossection, so that an even flow profile is achieved over the reactor cross section. (HP) [de

  15. Batch and continuous (fixed-bed column) biosorption of crystal violet by Artocarpus heterophyllus (jackfruit) leaf powder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Papita Das; Chakraborty, Sagnik; Chowdhury, Shamik

    2012-04-01

    In this study, batch and fixed-bed column experiments were performed to investigate the biosorption potential of Artocarpus heterophyllus (jackfruit) leaf powder (JLP) to remove crystal violet (CV) from aqueous solutions. Batch biosorption studies were carried out as a function of solution pH, contact time, initial dye concentration and temperature. The biosorption equilibrium data showed excellent fit to the Langmuir isotherm model with maximum monolayer biosorption capacity of 43.39 mg g(-1) at pH 7.0, initial dye concentration=50 mg L(-1), temperature=293 K and contact time=120 min. According to Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) isotherm model, biosorption of CV by JLP was chemisorption. The biosorption kinetics followed the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Thermodynamic analysis revealed that biosorption of CV from aqueous solution by JLP was a spontaneous and exothermic process. In order to ascertain the practical applicability of the biosorbent, fixed-bed column studies were also performed. The breakthrough time increased with increasing bed height and decreased with increasing flow rate. The Thomas model as well as the BDST model showed good agreement with the experimental results at all the process parameters studied. It can be concluded that JLP is a promising biosorbent for removal of CV from aqueous solutions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Study of the obtainment of Mo_2C by gas-solid reaction in a fixed and rotary bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo, C.P.B. de; Souza, C.P. de; Souto, M.V.M.; Barbosa, C.M.; Frota, A.V.V.M.

    2016-01-01

    Carbides' synthesis via gas-solid reaction overcomes many of the difficulties found in other processes, requiring lower temperatures and reaction times than traditional metallurgic routes, for example. In carbides' synthesis in fixed bed reactors (FB) the solid precursor is permeated by the reducing/carburizing gas stream forming a packed bed without mobility. The use of a rotary kiln reactor (RK) adds a mixing character to this process, changing its fluid-particle dynamics. In this work ammonium molybdate was subjected to carbo-reduction reaction (CH4 / H2) in both reactors under the same gas flow (15L / h) and temperature (660 ° C) for 180 minutes. Complete conversion was observed Mo2C (dp = 18.9nm modal particles sizes' distribution) in the fixed bed reactor. In the RK reactor this conversion was only partial (∼ 40%) and Mo2C and MoO3 (34nm dp = bimodal) could be observed on the produced XRD pattern. Partial conversion was attributed to the need to use higher solids loading in the reactor CR (50% higher) to avoid solids to centrifuge. (author)

  17. A green strategy for desorption of trihalomethanes adsorbed by humin and reuse of the fixed bed column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, G C; Romão, L P C; Santos, M C; Costa, A S; Alexandre, M R

    2012-03-30

    The objective of the present work was to develop a thermal desorption method for the removal of trihalomethanes (THM) adsorbed by humin, followed by multiple recycling of the fixed bed column in order to avoid excessive consumption of materials and reduce operating costs. The results obtained for adsorption on a fixed bed column confirmed the effectiveness of humin as an adsorbent, extracting between 45.9% and 90.1% of the total THM (TTHM). In none of the tests was the column fully saturated after 10h. Experiments involving thermal desorption were used to evaluate the potential of the technique for column regeneration. The adsorptive capacity of the humin bed increased significantly (p<0.05) between the first and fifth desorption cycle, by 18.9%, 18.1%, 24.2%, 20.2% and 24.2% for CHBr(3), CHBr(2)Cl, CHBrCl(2), CHCl(3) and TTHM, respectively. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Fixed-bed biosorption of cadmium using immobilized Scenedesmus obliquus CNW-N cells on loofa (Luffa cylindrica) sponge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bor-Yann; Chen, Chun-Yen; Guo, Wan-Qian; Chang, Hao-Wei; Chen, Wen-Ming; Lee, Duu-Jong; Huang, Chieh-Chen; Ren, Nan-Qi; Chang, Jo-Shu

    2014-05-01

    A continuous fixed-bed biosorption process was established for cadmium (Cd) removal by Scenedesmus obliquus CNW-N (isolated from southern Taiwan) cells immobilized onto loofa sponge. This immobilized-cell biosorption process allows better recovery and reusability of the microalgal biomass. The growth of microalgae on the matrix support with appropriate nutrient supplementation could enhance the overall metal removal activity. Major operating parameters (e.g., feeding flow rate, cycle number of medium replacement, and particle diameter of the sponge) were studied for treatability evaluation. The most promising cell growth on the sponge support was obtained at a flow rate of 0.284 bed volume (BV)/min, sponge particle diameter of 1 cm, and with one cycle of medium replacement. The performance of fixed-bed biosorption (adsorption capacity of 38.4 mg, breakthrough time at 15.5 h) was achieved at a flow rate of 5 ml/min with an influent concentration of 7.5 mg Cd/l. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The influence of transport phenomena on the fluidized bed combustion of a single carbon particle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, W.; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria

    1990-01-01

    The burning rate and temperature of the carbon particles are known to affect the efficiency of a fluidized bed combustor, and also the emission levels of undesired noxious components. The main results of an extensive study on the fluidized bed combustion behaviour of a single carbon particle [1] are

  20. Partial oxidation of Raffinate II and other mixtures of n-Butane and n-Butenes to maleic anhydride in a fixed-bed reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Brandstädter, Willi Michael

    2008-01-01

    The utilisation of the C4 streams of steamcrackers by converting raffinate II to maleic anhydride was studied. The oxidation reactions were investigated in a laboratory-scale fixed-bed reactor to determine reaction kinetics. The effects of pore diffusional resistance were investigated and explained. A two-dimensional pseudo-homogeneous reactor model was used for the simulation of a production-scale fixed-bed reactor. A flow scheme of the reactor section including a recycle was proposed.

  1. Fixed-bed column study for hexavalent chromium removal and recovery by short-chain polyaniline synthesized on jute fiber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Potsangbam Albino [Department of Civil Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Assam 781039 (India); Chakraborty, Saswati [Department of Civil Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Assam 781039 (India)], E-mail: saswati@iitg.ernet.in

    2009-03-15

    Fixed-bed column studies were conducted to evaluate performance of a short-chain polymer, polyaniline, synthesized on the surface of jute fiber (PANI-jute) for the removal of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] in aqueous environment. Influent pH, column bed depth, influent Cr(VI) concentrations and influent flow rate were variable parameters for the present study. Optimum pH for total chromium removal was observed as 3 by electrostatic attraction of acid chromate ion (HCrO{sub 4}{sup -}) with protonated amine group (NH{sub 3}{sup +}) of PANI-jute. With increase in column bed depth from 40 to 60 cm, total chromium uptake by PANI-jute increased from 4.14 to 4.66 mg/g with subsequent increase in throughput volume from 9.84 to 12.6 L at exhaustion point. The data obtained for total chromium removal were well described by BDST equation till 10% breakthrough. Adsorption rate constant and dynamic bed capacity at 10% breakthrough were observed as 0.01 L/mg h and 1069.46 mg/L, respectively. Adsorbed total chromium was recovered back from PANI-jute as non-toxic Cr(III) after ignition with more than 97% reduction in weight, minimizing the problem of solid waste disposal.

  2. Use of rice husk for the removal of methylene blue in fixed-bed columns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yurany A. Villada-Villada

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This work shows the use of rice husk in the removal of cationic dye methylene blue on continuous system. A factorial design 23 with center points and random distribution was implemented to evaluate the correlation of the experimental factors in the adsorption process. The considered variables were pH, particle size, salt presence, flow rate, dye initial concentration, and bed depth. The samples were analyzed in defined time intervals. The amount of removed dye was quantified by UV spectroscopy - Visible. Adams-Bohart, Thomas and BDST (Bed-depht/service time analysis models were used to predict the breakthrough curves using non-linear regression and establish the characteristic parameters of the process. It was found that the transference of dye toward the adsorbent is favored by a basic pH, a small particle size, low flow rate and dye concentration, and high bed depth. The design of experiments established that the initial dye concentration and the bed depth were the most significant factors. Regarding the models, the Thomas provided the best fit to describe the breakthrough curves in experimental conditions and Adams-Bohart was found suitable for dynamic behavior limited to the initial part. Finally, BDST model exhibited a good correlation and allowed to establish that bed depth is a determinant factor for scaling process.

  3. Biosorption of cobalt(II) with sunflower biomass from aqueous solutions in a fixed bed column and neural networks modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguz, Ensar; Ersoy, Muhammed

    2014-01-01

    The effects of inlet cobalt(II) concentration (20-60 ppm), feed flow rate (8-19 ml/min) and bed height (5-15 cm), initial solution pH (3-5) and particle size (0.25shells of sunflower biomass was found to be 1.82 m(2)/g. A relationship between the predicted results of the ANN model and experimental data was conducted. The ANN model yielded determination coefficient of (R(2) 0.972), standard deviation ratio (0.166), mean absolute error (0.0158) and root mean square error (0.0141). The results indicated that the shells of the sunflower biomass is a suitable biosorbent for the uptake of cobalt(II) in fixed bed columns. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Mathematical Modeling and Simulation of the Dehydrogenation of Ethyl Benzene to Form Styrene Using Steady-State Fixed Bed Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaidon M. Shakoor

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In this research, two models are developed to simulate the steady state fixed bed reactor used for styrene production by ethylbenzene dehydrogenation. The first is one-dimensional model, considered axial gradient only while the second is two-dimensional model considered axial and radial gradients for same variables.The developed mathematical models consisted of nonlinear simultaneous equations in multiple dependent variables. A complete description of the reactor bed involves partial, ordinary differential and algebraic equations (PDEs, ODEs and AEs describing the temperatures, concentrations and pressure drop across the reactor was given. The model equations are solved by finite differences method. The reactor models were coded with Mat lab 6.5 program and various numerical techniques were used to obtain the desired solution.The simulation data for both models were validated with industrial reactor results with a very good concordance.

  5. Scaled-up electrochemical reactor with a fixed bed three-dimensional cathode for electro-Fenton process: Application to the treatment of bisphenol A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chmayssem, Ayman; Taha, Samir; Hauchard, Didier

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we report on the development of an open undivided electrochemical reactor with a compact fixed bed of glassy carbon pellets as three-dimensional cathode for the application of electro-Fenton process. Bisphenol A (BPA) was chosen as model molecule in order to improve its efficiency to the treatment of persistent pollutants. The study of the BPA removal efficiency in function of the applied current intensity was investigated in order to determine the limiting current of O 2 reduction (optimal conditions of H 2 O 2 production at flow rate of 0.36 m 3 .h −1 ) which was 0.8 A (0.5 A/100 g of glassy carbon pellets). Many parameters have been carried out using this electro-Fenton reactor namely degradation kinetics, influence of anodic reactions on DSA, effect of initial pollutant concentration. In the optimal current condition, the global production rate of H 2 O 2 and ·OH was investigated. The yield of electro-Fenton reaction (conversion of H 2 O 2 to ·OH) was very high (> 90%). The absolute rate of BPA degradation was determined as 4.3 × 10 9 M −1 s −1 . COD, TOC and BOD 5 measurements indicated that only few minutes of treatment by electro-Fenton process were needed to eliminate BPA for dilute solutions (10 and 25 mg.L −1 ). In this case, the biodegradability of the treated solutions occurred rapidly. For higher concentration levels, an efficient removal of BPA appeared for treatment time higher than 1 hour and more than 90 minutes were necessary to obtain the biodegradability of BPA solutions. In optimum conditions, the scale-up of the electrochemical reactor applied to electro-Fenton process was suggested and depended on the concentration level of the pollutant. The operating parameters of the scaled-up reactor might be deduced from the new section of each fixed bed exposed to the flow, from values of liquid flow velocity and from the corresponding limiting current density obtained with the reactor at laboratory scale. The compact fixed bed

  6. Experimental and theoretical studies on hydrogenation of olefins in multiphase fixed bed reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Battsengel, B.; Datsevitch, L.; Jess, A. [Bayreuth Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2003-07-01

    Multi phase reactors like trickle bed systems are frequently used for gas-liquid reactions. In general, they have complex mass and heat transfer characteristics; scale-up is therefore difficult. The present work focuses on the role of mass transfer on the effective reaction rate, taking catalytic octene hydrogenation as a model reaction. The reaction rate in a trickle bed reactor is by a factor of about 20 smaller than (theoretically) in the absence of any mass transfer limitations. Based on the experimental results, the so-called pre-saturation concept is presented, where only the liquid saturated with hydrogen is fed into the reactor. The effective reaction rate in this two phase system (liquid and solid cat.) is equal or even higher than in a trickle bed reactor. Scale-up problems do not occur, and the pre-saturation concept has also other advantages (lower energy consumption), as discussed in detail in this paper. (orig.)

  7. A model for complex flows of soft glassy materials with application to flows through fixed fiber beds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarkar, Arijit; Koch, Donald L., E-mail: dlk15@cornell.edu [School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Cornell University, 120 Olin Hall, Ithaca, New York 14853-5201 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    The soft glassy rheology (SGR) model has successfully described the time dependent simple shear rheology of a broad class of complex fluids including foams, concentrated emulsions, colloidal glasses, and solvent-free nanoparticle-organic hybrid materials (NOHMs). The model considers a distribution of mesoscopic fluid elements that hop from trap to trap at a rate which is enhanced by the work done to strain the fluid element. While an SGR fluid has a broad exponential distribution of trap energies, the rheology of NOHMs is better described by a narrower energy distribution and we consider both types of trap energy distributions in this study. We introduce a tensorial version of these models with a hopping rate that depends on the orientation of the element relative to the mean stress field, allowing a range of relative strengths of the extensional and simple shear responses of the fluid. As an application of these models we consider the flow of a soft glassy material through a dilute fixed bed of fibers. The dilute fixed bed exhibits a range of local linear flows which alternate in a chaotic manner with time in a Lagrangian reference frame. It is amenable to an analytical treatment and has been used to characterize the strong flow response of many complex fluids including fiber suspensions, dilute polymer solutions and emulsions. We show that the accumulated strain in the fluid elements has an abrupt nonlinear growth at a Deborah number of order one in a manner similar to that observed for polymer solutions. The exponential dependence of the hopping rate on strain leads to a fluid element deformation that grows logarithmically with Deborah number at high Deborah numbers. SGR fluids having a broad range of trap energies flowing through fixed beds can exhibit a range of rheological behaviors at small Deborah numbers ranging from a yield stress, to a power law response and finally to Newtonian behavior.

  8. A model for complex flows of soft glassy materials with application to flows through fixed fiber beds

    KAUST Repository

    Sarkar, Arijit; Koch, Donald L.

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 The Society of Rheology. The soft glassy rheology (SGR) model has successfully described the time dependent simple shear rheology of a broad class of complex fluids including foams, concentrated emulsions, colloidal glasses, and solvent-free nanoparticle-organic hybrid materials (NOHMs). The model considers a distribution of mesoscopic fluid elements that hop from trap to trap at a rate which is enhanced by the work done to strain the fluid element. While an SGR fluid has a broad exponential distribution of trap energies, the rheology of NOHMs is better described by a narrower energy distribution and we consider both types of trap energy distributions in this study. We introduce a tensorial version of these models with a hopping rate that depends on the orientation of the element relative to the mean stress field, allowing a range of relative strengths of the extensional and simple shear responses of the fluid. As an application of these models we consider the flow of a soft glassy material through a dilute fixed bed of fibers. The dilute fixed bed exhibits a range of local linear flows which alternate in a chaotic manner with time in a Lagrangian reference frame. It is amenable to an analytical treatment and has been used to characterize the strong flow response of many complex fluids including fiber suspensions, dilute polymer solutions and emulsions. We show that the accumulated strain in the fluid elements has an abrupt nonlinear growth at a Deborah number of order one in a manner similar to that observed for polymer solutions. The exponential dependence of the hopping rate on strain leads to a fluid element deformation that grows logarithmically with Deborah number at high Deborah numbers. SGR fluids having a broad range of trap energies flowing through fixed beds can exhibit a range of rheological behaviors at small Deborah numbers ranging from a yield stress, to a power law response and finally to Newtonian behavior.

  9. A model for complex flows of soft glassy materials with application to flows through fixed fiber beds

    KAUST Repository

    Sarkar, Arijit

    2015-11-01

    © 2015 The Society of Rheology. The soft glassy rheology (SGR) model has successfully described the time dependent simple shear rheology of a broad class of complex fluids including foams, concentrated emulsions, colloidal glasses, and solvent-free nanoparticle-organic hybrid materials (NOHMs). The model considers a distribution of mesoscopic fluid elements that hop from trap to trap at a rate which is enhanced by the work done to strain the fluid element. While an SGR fluid has a broad exponential distribution of trap energies, the rheology of NOHMs is better described by a narrower energy distribution and we consider both types of trap energy distributions in this study. We introduce a tensorial version of these models with a hopping rate that depends on the orientation of the element relative to the mean stress field, allowing a range of relative strengths of the extensional and simple shear responses of the fluid. As an application of these models we consider the flow of a soft glassy material through a dilute fixed bed of fibers. The dilute fixed bed exhibits a range of local linear flows which alternate in a chaotic manner with time in a Lagrangian reference frame. It is amenable to an analytical treatment and has been used to characterize the strong flow response of many complex fluids including fiber suspensions, dilute polymer solutions and emulsions. We show that the accumulated strain in the fluid elements has an abrupt nonlinear growth at a Deborah number of order one in a manner similar to that observed for polymer solutions. The exponential dependence of the hopping rate on strain leads to a fluid element deformation that grows logarithmically with Deborah number at high Deborah numbers. SGR fluids having a broad range of trap energies flowing through fixed beds can exhibit a range of rheological behaviors at small Deborah numbers ranging from a yield stress, to a power law response and finally to Newtonian behavior.

  10. Cow bones char as a green sorbent for fluorides removal from aqueous solutions: batch and fixed-bed studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigri, Elbert M; Cechinel, Maria Alice P; Mayer, Diego A; Mazur, Luciana P; Loureiro, José M; Rocha, Sônia D F; Vilar, Vítor J P

    2017-01-01

    Cow bone char was investigated as sorbent for the defluoridation of aqueous solutions. The cow bone char was characterized in terms of its morphology, chemical composition, and functional groups present on the bone char surface using different analytical techniques: SEM, EDS, N 2 -BET method, and FTIR. Batch equilibrium studies were performed for the bone chars prepared using different procedures. The highest sorption capacities for fluoride were obtained for the acid washed (q = 6.2 ± 0.5 mg/g) and Al-doped (q = 6.4 ± 0.3 mg/g) bone chars. Langmuir and Freundlich models fitted well the equilibrium sorption data. Fluoride removal rate in batch system is fast in the first 5 h, decreasing after this time until achieving equilibrium due to pore diffusion. The presence of carbonate and bicarbonate ions in the aqueous solution contributes to a decrease of the fluoride sorption capacity of the bone char by 79 and 31 %, respectively. Regeneration of the F-loaded bone char using 0.5 M NaOH solution leads to a sorption capacity for fluoride of 3.1 mg/g in the second loading cycle. Fluoride breakthrough curve obtained in a fixed-bed column presents an asymmetrical S-shaped form, with a slow approach of C/C 0  → 1.0 due to pore diffusion phenomena. Considering the guideline value for drinking water of 1.5 mg F - /L, as recommended by World Health Organization, the service cycle for fluoride removal was of 71.0 h ([F - ] feed  ∼ 9 mg/L; flow rate = 1 mL/min; m sorbent  = 12.6 g). A mass transfer model considering the pore diffusion was able to satisfactorily describe the experimental data obtained in batch and continuous systems.

  11. Breakthrough analysis for water disinfection using silver nanoparticles coated resin beads in fixed-bed column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mthombeni, Nomcebo H.; Mpenyana-Monyatsi, Lizzy; Onyango, Maurice S.; Momba, Maggie N.B.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Performance of silver nanoparticles coated resin in water disinfection is presented. ► Sigmoidal models are used to describe breakthrough curves. ► The performance of the media in water disinfection is affected by process variables. ► Test with environmental water shows the media is effective in water disinfection. - Abstract: This study demonstrates the use of silver nanoparticles coated resin beads in deactivating microbes in drinking water in a column filtration system. The coated resin beads are characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infra-red (FT-IR), scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) to confirm the functional groups, morphology and the presence of silver nanoparticles on the surface of the resin. The performance of the coated resin is evaluated as a function of bed mass, initial bacterial concentration and flow rate using Escherichia coli as model microbial contaminant in water. The survival curves of E. coli are expressed as breakthrough curves (BTCs), which are modeled using sigmoidal regression equations to obtain relevant rate parameters. The number of bed volumes processed at breakthrough point and capacity of the bed are used as performance indicators. Results show that performance increases with a decrease in initial bacterial concentration, an increase in flow rate and an increase in bed mass.

  12. Fixed-bed column study for 90Sr removal from solution by sunflower straw

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ai Lian; Luo Xuegang; Lin Xiaoyan; Li Wenming

    2014-01-01

    This paper deals with removal of strontium ions from solution by sunflower straw. Metal sorption performance of the packed column was assessed under variable operating conditions, such as, bed depths, flow rates and initial influent strontium concentration. It was found that the breakthrough time and the depletion time were extended with increase of bed heights but obviously shortened with increase of influent concentration and flow rates, respectively. The equilibrium uptake (q e(exp) ) of sunflower straw increased with increase in initial influent strontium concentration and flow rates but decreased with increase in bed depth, respectively. The data in regard to the effect of bed depths were fitted well to the Bohrat-Adams model. The saturated column was successfully regenerated by 0.1 mol/L hydrogen chloride solution and sunflower straw could be reused in strontium removal. The results indicated that the column could efficiently remove strontium ions from real industrial effluents, and hence the sunflower straw is a good candidate for commercial application. (authors)

  13. Wastewater treatment with submerged fixed bed biofilm reactor systems--design rules, operating experiences and ongoing developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlegel, S; Koeser, H

    2007-01-01

    Wastewater treatment systems using bio-films that grow attached to a support media are an alternative to the widely used suspended growth activated sludge process. Different fixed growth biofilm reactors are commercially used for the treatment of municipal as well as industrial wastewater. In this paper a fairly new fixed growth biofilm system, the submerged fixed bed biofilm reactor (SFBBR), is discussed. SFBBRs are based on aerated submerged fixed open structured plastic media for the support of the biofilm. They are generally operated without sludge recirculation in order to avoid clogging of the support media and problems with the control of the biofilm. Reactor and process design considerations for these reactors are reviewed. Measures to ensure the development and maintenance of an active biofilm are examined. SFBBRs have been applied successfully to small wastewater treatment plants where complete nitrification but no high degree of denitrification is necessary. For the pre-treatment of industrial wastewater the use of SFBBRs is advantageous, especially in cases of wastewater with high organic loading or high content of compounds with low biodegradability. Performance data from exemplary commercial plants are given. Ongoing research and development efforts aim at achieving a high simultaneous total nitrogen (TN) removal of aerated SFBBRs and at improving the efficiency of TN removal in anoxic SFBBRs.

  14. CARBON FIXING CAPACITY OF AMAZONIAN SOILS IN RELATION TO ITS DEGRADATION CONDITIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Clara Patricia Peña Venegas; Edmundo Rafael Mendoza Olmos; Carlos Hernando Rodríguez León; Gladys Inés Cardona Vanegas; Bernardo Eusebio Betancurt Parra; Maolenmarx Tatiana Garzón Gómez

    2015-01-01

    Amazonian deforestation and transformation alert about their effects worldwide. One concern is the increase of the Carbon (C) levels emitted. Previous works have estimated the fixed C in Amazon forests without including the C stored in soils. Within soil, the organic carbon molecules are highly sensitive to degradation, affecting the natural capacity of soils to fix and store C. The present study evaluates the impact of degradation in the natural capacity of Amazon soils to fix C. Thirty five...

  15. Pyrolysis of Jatropha curcas pressed cake for bio-oil production in a fixed-bed system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jourabchi, Seyed Amirmostafa; Gan, Suyin; Ng, Hoon Kiat

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The pyrolysis of Jatropha curcas waste in a fixed-bed rig was studied. • Yield, calorific value, water content and acidity of bio-oil were compared. • Empirical correlations for bio-oil yield and specifications were developed. • Optimisation of bio-oil production based on combined specifications was achieved. - Abstract: This study investigated the effects of pyrolysis parameters on the yield and quality of bio-oil from Jatropha curcas pressed cake. This biomass was pyrolysed in a fixed-bed reactor over a temperature range of 573.15 K to 1073.15 K and a nitrogen linear speed range of 7.8 × 10 −5 m/s to 6.7 × 10 −2 m/s. The heating rate and biomass grain size were 50 K/min and <2 mm, respectively. The bio-oils were tested for the gross calorific value, water content and acidity. The pyrolysis process was simulated using Thermo-Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) and Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC) for mass and energy balances analyses. Empirical correlations between the bio-oil specifications and pyrolysis parameters were developed using linear and nonlinear multiple regression methods for process optimisation. At optimum pyrolysis conditions, above 50% of the waste is converted to bio-oil with less than 30% water content, a gross calorific value of 15.12 MJ/kg and a pH of 6.77

  16. Design and optimization of a fixed - bed reactor for hydrogen production via bio-ethanol steam reforming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maria A Goula; Olga A Bereketidou; Costas G Economopoulos; Olga A Bereketidou; Costas G Economopoulos

    2006-01-01

    Global climate changes caused by CO 2 emissions are currently debated around the world. Renewable sources of energy are being sought as alternatives to replace fossil fuels. Hydrogen is theoretically the best fuel, environmentally friendly and its combustion reaction leads only to the production of water. Bio-ethanol has been proven to be effective in the production of hydrogen via steam reforming reaction. In this research the steam reforming reaction of bio-ethanol is studied at low temperatures over 15,3 % Ni/La 2 O 3 catalyst. The reaction and kinetic analysis takes place in a fixed - bed reactor in 130 - 250 C in atmospheric pressure. This study lays emphasis on the design and the optimization of the fixed - bed reactor, including the total volume of the reactor, the number and length of the tubes and the degree of ethanol conversion. Finally, it is represented an approach of the total cost of the reactor, according to the design characteristics and the materials that can be used for its construction. (authors)

  17. Effect of hydraulic retention time on hydrodynamic behavior of anaerobic-aerobic fixed bed reactor treating cattle slaughterhouse effluent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daiane Cristina de Freitas

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The study of the hydrodynamic behavior in reactors provides characteristics of the flow regime and its anomalies that can reduce biological processes efficiency due to the decrease of the useful volume and the hydraulic retention time required for the performance of microbial activity. In this study, the hydrodynamic behavior of an anaerobic-aerobic fixed bed reactor, operated with HRT (hydraulic retention time of 24, 18 and 12 hours, was evaluated in the treatment of raw cattle slaughterhouse wastewater. Polyurethane foam and expanded clay were used as support media for biomass immobilization. Experimental data of pulse type stimulus-response assays were performed with eosin Y and bromophenol blue, and adjusted to the single-parameter theoretical models of dispersion and N-continuous stirred tank reactors in series (N-CSTR. N-CSTR model presented the best adjustment for the HRT and tracers evaluated. RDT (residence time distribution curves obtained with N-CSTR model in the assays with bromophenol blue resulted in better adjustment compared to the eosin Y. The predominant flow regime in AAFBR (anaerobic aerobic fixed bed reactor is the N-CSTR in series, as well as the existence of preferential paths and hydraulic short-circuiting.

  18. Fixed-bed adsorption separation of xylene isomers over sio2/silicallite-1 core-shell adsorbents

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Easir A.

    2013-12-29

    SiO2/Silicalite-1 core-shell material has been demonstrated as potential shape selective adsorbent in gas phase separation of p-xylene from a mixture of p/o-xylene isomers. The core-shell composite comprised of large silica core and thin polycrystalline silicalite-1 shell which was synthesized via a self-assembly of silicalite-1 nanocrystals on core silica surface followed by a secondary seeded growth method. The core materials, SiO2 used in this study has mesoporosity with an average pore diameter of 60Å and hence offers no shape selectivity for xylene isomers. However, the shell, silicalite-1 contains rigid pore structures and preferentially adsorbs p-xylene from their isomers mixtures. A series of adsorption fixed bed breakthrough adsorption/desorption experiment was performed to obtain the equilibrium isotherms and adsorption isotherm parameters of xylene isomers. The equilibrium isotherms of xylene isomers follow the Langmuir\\'s model. A chromatographic adsorption model has been used to describe the fixed-bed breakthrough profiles of xylene isomers. The model has successfully predicted the responses of the binary mixtures of p/o-xylene isomers. The SiO2/silicalite-1 core-shell adsorbents have shown para-selectivity as high as 15. © Bangladesh Uni. of Engg. & Tech.

  19. Elemental mercury vapor capture by powdered activated carbon in a fluidized bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabrizio Scala; Riccardo Chirone; Amedeo Lancia [Istituto di Ricerche sulla Combustione - CNR, Napoli (Italy)

    2011-06-15

    A bubbling fluidized bed of inert material was used to increase the activated carbon residence time in the reaction zone and to improve its performance for mercury vapor capture. Elemental mercury capture experiments were conducted at 100{sup o}C in a purposely designed 65 mm ID lab-scale pyrex reactor, that could be operated both in the fluidized bed and in the entrained bed configurations. Commercial powdered activated carbon was pneumatically injected in the reactor and mercury concentration at the outlet was monitored continuously. Experiments were carried out at different inert particle sizes, bed masses, fluidization velocities and carbon feed rates. Experimental results showed that the presence of a bubbling fluidized bed led to an increase of the mercury capture efficiency and, in turn, of the activated carbon utilization. This was explained by the enhanced activated carbon loading and gas-solid contact time that establishes in the reaction zone, because of the large surface area available for activated carbon adhesion/deposition in the fluidized bed. Transient mercury concentration profiles at the bed outlet during the runs were used to discriminate between the controlling phenomena in the process. Experimental data have been analyzed in the light of a phenomenological framework that takes into account the presence of both free and adhered carbon in the reactor as well as mercury saturation of the adsorbent. 14 refs., 7 figs.

  20. Modeling and Performance of Waste Tires as Media in Fixed Bed Sequence Batch Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Derakhshan

    2016-12-01

    Results: The maximum removal efficiencies of dissolved chemical oxygen demand for FBSBR and SBR reactors were 98.3 % and 97.9 %, respectively. In addition, Stover-Kincannon model provided a very suitable fitness (R2   > 0.99 for loading the bioreactor FBSBR. Conclusion: According to the results, not only waste tires can be reused, but also these wastes can be employed as a proper biological bed in wastewater refineries to improve their efficiency.

  1. Ozo-Dyes mixture degradation in a fixed bed biofilm reactor packed with volcanic porous rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contreras-Blancas, E.; Cobos-Vasconcelos, D. de los; Juarez-Ramirez, C.; Poggi-Varaldo, H. M.; Ruiz-Ordaz, N.; Galindez-Mayer, J.

    2009-01-01

    Textile industries discharge great amounts of dyes and dyeing-process auxiliaries, which pollute streams and water bodies. Several dyes, especially the ones containing the azo group, can cause harmful effects to different organisms including humans. Through bacterial and mammalian tests, azo dyes or their derived aromatic amines have shown cell genotoxicity. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the effect of air flow rate on azo-dyes mixture biodegradation by a microbial community immobilized in a packed bed reactor. (Author)

  2. Ozo-Dyes mixture degradation in a fixed bed biofilm reactor packed with volcanic porous rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contreras-Blancas, E.; Cobos-Vasconcelos, D. de los; Juarez-Ramirez, C.; Poggi-Varaldo, H. M.; Ruiz-Ordaz, N.; Galindez-Mayer, J.

    2009-07-01

    Textile industries discharge great amounts of dyes and dyeing-process auxiliaries, which pollute streams and water bodies. Several dyes, especially the ones containing the azo group, can cause harmful effects to different organisms including humans. Through bacterial and mammalian tests, azo dyes or their derived aromatic amines have shown cell genotoxicity. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the effect of air flow rate on azo-dyes mixture biodegradation by a microbial community immobilized in a packed bed reactor. (Author)

  3. Adsorption of phosphate from aqueous solutions and sewage using zirconium loaded okara (ZLO): Fixed-bed column study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, T.A.H.; Ngo, H.H.; Guo, W.S.; Pham, T.Q.; Li, F.M.; Nguyen, T.V.; Bui, X.T.

    2015-01-01

    This study explores the potential of removing phosphorus from aqueous solutions and sewage by Zr(IV)-loaded okara (ZLO) in the fixed-bed column. Soybean residue (okara) was impregnated with 0.25 M Zr(IV) solution to prepare active binding sites for phosphate. The effect of several factors, including flow rate, bed height, initial phosphorus concentration, pH and adsorbent particle size on the performance of ZLO was examined. The maximum dynamic adsorption capacity of ZLO for phosphorus was estimated to be 16.43 mg/g. Breakthrough curve modeling indicated that Adams–Bohart model and Thomas model fitted the experimental data better than Yoon–Nelson model. After treatment with ZLO packed bed column, the effluent could meet the discharge standard for phosphorus in Australia. Successful desorption and regeneration were achieved with 0.2 NaOH and 0.1 HCl, respectively. The results prove that ZLO can be used as a promising phosphorus adsorbent in the dynamic adsorption system. - Highlights: • Dynamic adsorption of P from water and wastewater by Zr(IV)-loaded okara was tested. • Effects of column design parameters on the adsorption performance were investigated. • The dynamic adsorption capacity of Zr(IV)-loaded okara for P was reasonably high. • The spent column was effectively regenerated with 0.2 M NaOH followed by 0.1 M HCl. • Zr(IV)-loaded okara column was efficient in eliminating P from municipal sewage

  4. Optimal oxygen feeding policy to maximize the production of Maleic anhydride in unsteady state fixed bed catalytic reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Ali

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The effect of different oxygen feeding scenarios in a fixed bed reactor for the production of Maleic anhydride (MA is studied. Two reactor configurations were examined. In the first configuration, a cross flow reactor (CFR with 4 discrete feeding points is considered. Another configuration is the conventional packed-bed reactor (PBR with a single feed. Nonlinear Model Predictive Controller (NLMPC was used as optimal controller to operate the CFR in dynamic mode and to optimize the multiple feed dosages in order to enhance the MA yield. The simulation results indicated that different combinations of the four feed ratios can operate the reactor at the best value for the yield provided the first feeding point is kept as low as possible. For the packed bed reactor configuration, a single oxygen feed is considered and is optimized transiently by NLMPC. The simulation outcomes showed that the reactor performance in terms of the produced MA mole fraction can also be enhanced to the same magnitude obtained by CFR configuration. This improvement requires decreasing the oxygen ratio in the reactor single feed by 70%.

  5. Adsorption of phosphate from aqueous solutions and sewage using zirconium loaded okara (ZLO): Fixed-bed column study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, T.A.H. [Centre for Technology in Water and Wastewater, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Technology, Sydney (UTS), 15 Broadway, Ultimo, NSW 2007 (Australia); Ngo, H.H., E-mail: ngohuuhao121@gmail.com [Centre for Technology in Water and Wastewater, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Technology, Sydney (UTS), 15 Broadway, Ultimo, NSW 2007 (Australia); Guo, W.S. [Centre for Technology in Water and Wastewater, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Technology, Sydney (UTS), 15 Broadway, Ultimo, NSW 2007 (Australia); Pham, T.Q. [Faculty of Geography, University of Science, Vietnam National University, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Li, F.M. [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266100 (China); Nguyen, T.V. [Centre for Technology in Water and Wastewater, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Technology, Sydney (UTS), 15 Broadway, Ultimo, NSW 2007 (Australia); Bui, X.T. [Environmental Engineering and Management Research Group, Ton Duc Thang University, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam); Faculty of Environment and Natural Resources, Ho Chi Minh City University of Technology-Vietnam National University, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam)

    2015-08-01

    This study explores the potential of removing phosphorus from aqueous solutions and sewage by Zr(IV)-loaded okara (ZLO) in the fixed-bed column. Soybean residue (okara) was impregnated with 0.25 M Zr(IV) solution to prepare active binding sites for phosphate. The effect of several factors, including flow rate, bed height, initial phosphorus concentration, pH and adsorbent particle size on the performance of ZLO was examined. The maximum dynamic adsorption capacity of ZLO for phosphorus was estimated to be 16.43 mg/g. Breakthrough curve modeling indicated that Adams–Bohart model and Thomas model fitted the experimental data better than Yoon–Nelson model. After treatment with ZLO packed bed column, the effluent could meet the discharge standard for phosphorus in Australia. Successful desorption and regeneration were achieved with 0.2 NaOH and 0.1 HCl, respectively. The results prove that ZLO can be used as a promising phosphorus adsorbent in the dynamic adsorption system. - Highlights: • Dynamic adsorption of P from water and wastewater by Zr(IV)-loaded okara was tested. • Effects of column design parameters on the adsorption performance were investigated. • The dynamic adsorption capacity of Zr(IV)-loaded okara for P was reasonably high. • The spent column was effectively regenerated with 0.2 M NaOH followed by 0.1 M HCl. • Zr(IV)-loaded okara column was efficient in eliminating P from municipal sewage.

  6. Development of a computer program for the simulation of one-dimensional fixed- and moving-bed reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartner, P.

    1996-11-01

    Chemical reactors with a flow through a bed of solid particles are of great importance in the processing industry. Modern computational tools allow for an improved characterization of the complex facts in such reactors leading to new opportunities of optimizing the reactor operation and environmental effects. This thesis is concerned with the development of the one-dimensional simulation software REASIM. The program covers the effects within a reacting bed and is designed for fixed and moving beds. To describe the reactor the balances for energy, momentum and mass are solved. The drying of the particles, pyrolysis and chemical gas-solid and gas-gas reactions are considered. For the description of the chemical gas-solid reactions a particle model for porous solids is developed. The calculation of mass transfer and of chemical reactions is strictly separated. All parameters necessary for the model can be measured in the laboratory. The model equations form a system of partial differential equations. This system is transformed to a set of ordinary differential equations. It is found that the best discretization method is the method of finite differences with the upwind-scheme for situations where convection is strong. The program has a modular structure making it is easy to replace parts of the program by new, improved modules if they become available. (author)

  7. Continuous adsorption of Pb(II) and methylene blue by engineered graphite oxide coated sand in fixed-bed column

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Ji-Lai, E-mail: jilaigong@gmail.com [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control, Ministry of Education, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Zhang, Yong-Liang; Jiang, Yan [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control, Ministry of Education, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Zeng, Guang-Ming, E-mail: zgming@hnu.edu.cn [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control, Ministry of Education, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Cui, Zhi-Hui; Liu, Ke; Deng, Can-Hui; Niu, Qiu-Ya; Deng, Jiu-Hua [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control, Ministry of Education, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Huan, Shuang-Yan [State Key Laboratory for Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China)

    2015-03-01

    Highlights: • GO-sand was prepared by coating GO on the surface of sand. • Pb(II) and MB were efficiently removed by GO-sand filter in column. • The removal of MB was enhanced with the presence of Pb(II). • GO-sand is low-cost and convenient for its application as packed bed filter. - Abstract: The mixture of several effluents, caused by the improper handling and management of effluents, generated multi-component wastewater containing both metals and dyes, leading to the complicated treatment process. In this study, a continuous adsorption of Pb(II) and methylene blue (MB) has been studied in single and binary solutions by using graphite oxide coated sand (GO-sand) as an adsorbent in a fixed-bed column. GO-sand was analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy before and after analyte adsorption. Compared with sand filter, adsorption quantity and capacity for Pb(II) and MB by GO-sand filter were greatly increased. In Pb(II) and MB single solutions, the experimental parameters were investigated in detail including initial concentration, flow rate, bed depth and pH. Exhaustion time decreased with increasing initial concentration and flow rate, and increased with increasing bed depth and pH. In the Pb(II)-MB binary solution, exhaustion time significantly decreased for Pb(II) adsorption, but increased for MB adsorption. The reason was explained that the more favorable adsorption for MB onto the surface of GO-sand than that for Pb(II), which was derived from π–π interaction between MB and GO on sand surface in packed filter. The Yoon–Nelson model was applied at different concentration of Pb(II) and MB to predict the breakthrough curves. The experimental data were well fit with the model indicating that it was suitable for this column design.

  8. Effects of Temperature and Residence Time on the Emissions of PIC and Fine Particles during Fixed Bed Combustion of Conifer Stemwood Pellets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boman, Christoffer; Lindmark, Fredrik; Oehman, Marcus; Nordin, Anders [Umeaa Univ. (Sweden). Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry; Pettersson, Esbjoern [Energy Technology Centre, Piteaa (Sweden); Westerholm, Roger [Stockholm Univ., Arrhenius Laboratory (Sweden). Dept. of Analytical Chemistry

    2006-07-15

    The use of wood fuel Pellets has proved to be well suited for the small-scale market enabling controlled and efficient combustion with low emission of products of incomplete combustion (PIC). Still a potential for further emission reduction exists and a thorough understanding of the influence of combustion conditions on the emission characteristics of air pollutants like PAH and particulate matter (PM) is important. The objective was to determine the effects of temperature and residence time on the emission performance and characteristics with focus on hydrocarbons and PM during combustion of conifer stemwood Pellets in a laboratory fixed bed reactor (<5 kW). Temperature and residence time after the bed section were varied according to statistical experimental designs (650-970 deg C and 0.5-3.5 s) with the emission responses; CO, organic gaseous carbon, NO, 20 VOC compounds, 43 PAH compounds, PM{sub tot}, fine particle mass/count median diameter (MMD and CMD) and number concentration. Temperature was negatively correlated with the emissions of all studied PIC with limited effects of residence time. The PM{sub tot} emissions of 15-20 mg/MJ was in all cases dominated by fine (<1 {mu}m) particles of K, Na, S, Cl, C, O and Zn. Increased residence time resulted in increased fine particle sizes (i.e. MMD and CMD) and decreased number concentrations. The importance of high temperature (>850 deg C) in the bed zone with intensive, air rich and well mixed isothermal conditions for 0.5-1.0 s in the post combustion zone was illustrated for wood Pellets combustion with almost a total depletion of all studied PIC. The results emphasize the need for further verification studies and technology development work.

  9. Treatment of waste gas from the breather vent of a vertical fixed roof p-xylene storage tank by a trickle-bed air biofilter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shenteng; Lu, Chungsying; Hsu, Shihchieh; Lai, How-Tsan; Shang, Wen-Lin; Chuang, Yeong-Song; Cho, Chi-Huang; Chen, Sheng-Han

    2011-01-01

    This study applied a pilot-scale trickle-bed air biofilter (TBAB) system for treating waste gas emitted from the breather vent of a vertical fixed roof storage tank containing p-xylene (p-X) liquid. The volatile organic compound (VOC) concentration of the waste gas was related to ambient temperature as well as solar radiation, peaking at above 6300 ppmv of p-X and 25000 ppmv of total hydrocarbons during the hours of 8 AM to 3 PM. When the activated carbon adsorber was employed as a VOC buffer, the peak waste gas VOC concentration was significantly reduced resulting in a stably and efficiently performing TBAB system. The pressure drop appeared to be low, reflecting that the TBAB system could be employed in the prolonged operation with a low running penalty. These advantages suggest that the TBAB system is a cost-effective treatment technology for VOC emission from a fixed roof storage tank. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Oxidation of SO{sub 2} in a trickle bed reactor packed with activated carbon at low liquid flow rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suyadal, Y.; Oguz, H. [Ankara Univ. (Turkey). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2000-07-01

    In this study, the oxidation of SO{sub 2} on activated carbon (AcC) by using distilled water and air was carried out in a laboratory scale trickle bed reactor (TBR). Distilled water and air containing 1.7% (v/v) SO{sub 2} were fed co-currently downward through a fixed bed of AcC particles in a range of 1-7 cm{sup 3}/s and 10-27 cm{sup 3}/s, respectively. H{sub 2}SO{sub 3}/H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solutions were the products obtained in the liqiuid phase. Steady-state experiments were performed in a column of 0.15 m packing height and 0.047 m column diameter at 20 C and atmospheric pressure. (orig.)

  11. TiO2-photocatalyzed As(III) oxidation in a fixed-bed, flow-through reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Megan A; Hering, Janet G

    2006-07-01

    Compliance with the U.S. drinking water standard for arsenic (As) of 10 microg L(-1) is required in January 2006. This will necessitate implementation of treatment technologies for As removal by thousands of water suppliers. Although a variety of such technologies is available, most require preoxidation of As(III) to As(V) for efficient performance. Previous batch studies with illuminated TiO2 slurries have demonstrated that TiO2-photocatalyzed AS(III) oxidation occurs rapidly. This study examined reaction efficiency in a flow-through, fixed-bed reactor that provides a better model for treatment in practice. Glass beads were coated with mixed P25/sol gel TiO2 and employed in an upflow reactor irradiated from above. The reactor residence time, influent As(III) concentration, number of TiO2 coatings on the beads, solution matrix, and light source were varied to characterize this reaction and determine its feasibility for water treatment. Repeated usage of the same beads in multiple experiments or extended use was found to affect effluent As(V) concentrations but not the steady-state effluent As(III) concentration, which suggests that As(III) oxidation at the TiO2 surface undergoes dynamic sorption equilibration. Catalyst poisoning was not observed either from As(V) or from competitively adsorbing anions, although the higher steady-state effluent As(III) concentrations in synthetic groundwater compared to 5 mM NaNO3 indicated that competitive sorbates in the matrix partially hinder the reaction. A reactive transport model with rate constants proportional to incident light at each bead layer fit the experimental data well despite simplifying assumptions. TiO2-photocatalyzed oxidation of As(III) was also effective under natural sunlight. Limitations to the efficiency of As(III) oxidation in the fixed-bed reactor were attributable to constraints of the reactor geometry, which could be overcome by improved design. The fixed-bed TiO2 reactor offers an environmentally

  12. Chromate (CrO2-4) Reduction in Groundwaters by Using Reductive Bacteria in Fixed-Bed Bioreactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battaglia-Brunet, F.; Foucher, S.; Morin, D.; Ignatiadis, I.

    2004-01-01

    A biological method for the reduction Cr(VI), using sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB), was tested in 2-L then 20-L fixed-bed reactors, with H 2 as a low-cost and clean substrate. The systems were inoculated with Desulfomicrobium norvegicum, that proved to be particularly efficient for direct Cr(VI) enzymatic reduction. The bacterial reduction was efficient when some SO 2- 4 was provided in the feeding, in order to allow their growth and to combine the direct enzymatic reduction to the indirect chemical reduction by dissolved H 2 S. The Cr(VI)/SO 2- 4 , ratio in the influent was adjusted in order to avoid excess sulphide production. A real polluted groundwater and an industrial electroplating effluent were treated in the 20-L pilot plant

  13. Effect of small-scale biomass gasification at the state of refractory lining the fixed bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janša, Jan, E-mail: jan.jansa@vsb.cz; Peer, Vaclav, E-mail: vaclav.peer@vsb.cz; Pavloková, Petra, E-mail: petra.pavlokova@vsb.cz [VŠB – Technical University of Ostrava, Energy Research Center, 708 33 Ostrava (Czech Republic)

    2016-06-30

    The article deals with the influence of biomass gasification on the condition of the refractory lining of a fixed bed reactor. The refractory lining of the gasifier is one part of the device, which significantly affects the operational reliability and durability. After removing the refractory lining of the gasifier from the experimental reactor, there was done an assessment how gasification of different kinds of biomass reflected on its condition in terms of the main factors affecting its life. Gasification of biomass is reflected on the lining, especially through sticking at the bottom of the reactor. Measures for prolonging the life of lining consist in the reduction of temperature in the reactor, in this case, in order to avoid ash fusion biomass which it is difficult for this type of gasifier.

  14. A kinetic study of gaseous potassium capture by coal minerals in a high temperature fixed-bed reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Yuanjing; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Jensen, Anker Degn

    2008-01-01

    The reactions between gaseous potassium chloride and coal minerals were investigated in a lab-scale high temperature fixed-bed reactor using single sorbent pellets. The applied coal minerals included kaolin, mullite, silica, alumina, bituminous coal ash, and lignite coal ash that were formed...... into long cylindrical pellets. Kaolin and bituminous coal ash that both have significant amounts of Si and Al show superior potassium capture characteristics. Experimental results show that capture of potassium by kaolin is independent of the gas oxygen content. Kaolin releases water and forms metakaolin...... when heated at temperatures above 450°C. The amounts of potassium captured by metakaolin pellet decreases with increasing reaction temperature in the range of 900-1300°C and increases again with further increasing the temperature up to 1500°C. There is no reaction of pre-made mullite with KCl...

  15. Evaluation of Two Biosorbents in the Removal of Metal Ions in Aqueous Using a Pilot Scale Fixed-bed System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre Gadelha Oliveira

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present work was to investigate the adsorption of toxic metal ions copper, nickel and zinc from aqueous solutions using low cost natural biomass (sugar cane bagasse and green coconut fiber in pilot scale fixed-bed system. The Hydraulic retention time (HRT was 229 minutes and the lowest adsorbent usage rate (AUR found was 0.10 g.L-1 for copper using green coconut fibers. The highest values of adsorption capacities founded were 1.417 and 2.772 mg.g-1 of Cu(II ions for sugarcane bagasse and green coconut fibers, respectively. The results showed that both sugarcane bagasse and green coconut fiber presented potential in the removal of metal ions copper, nickel and zinc ions from aqueous solution and the possible use in wastewater treatment station.

  16. Characterization, morphology and composition of biofilm and precipitates from a sulphate-reducing fixed-bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remoundaki, Emmanouela; Kousi, Pavlina; Joulian, Catherine; Battaglia-Brunet, Fabienne; Hatzikioseyian, Artin; Tsezos, Marios

    2008-01-01

    The characteristics of the biofilm and the solids formed during the operation of a sulphate-reducing fixed-bed reactor, fed with a moderately acidic synthetic effluent containing zinc and iron, are presented. A diverse population of δ-Proteobacteria SRB, affiliated to four distinct genera, colonized the system. The morphology, mineralogy and surface chemistry of the precipitates were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX). The XRD patterns observed are characteristic of amorphous solid phases. Peaks corresponding to crystalline iron sulphide, marcasite, sphalerite and wurtzite were also identified. SEM-EDX results confirm the predominance of amorphous phases appearing as a cloudy haze. EDX spectra of spots on the surface of these amorphous phases reveal the predominance of iron, zinc and sulphur indicating the formation of iron and zinc sulphides. The predominance of these amorphous phases and the formation of very fine particles, during the operation of the SRB column, are in agreement and can be explained by the formation pathways of metal sulphides at ambient temperature, alkaline pH and reducing conditions. Solids are precipitated either as (i) amorphous phases deposited on the bed material, as well as on surface of crystals, e.g. Mg 3 (PO 4 ) 2 and (ii) as rod-shaped solids characterized by a rough hazy surface, indicating the encapsulation of bacterial cells by amorphous metal sulphides

  17. Numerical and experimental studies on effects of moisture content on combustion characteristics of simulated municipal solid wastes in a fixed bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Rui; Ismail, Tamer M.; Ren, Xiaohan; Abd El-Salam, M.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The effects of moisture content on the burning process of MSW are investigated. • A two-dimensional mathematical model was built to simulate the combustion process. • Temperature distributions, process rates, gas species were measured and simulated. • The The conversion ratio of C/CO and N/NO in MSW are inverse to moisture content. - Abstract: In order to reveal the features of the combustion process in the porous bed of a waste incinerator, a two-dimensional unsteady state model and experimental study were employed to investigate the combustion process in a fixed bed of municipal solid waste (MSW) on the combustion process in a fixed bed reactor. Conservation equations of the waste bed were implemented to describe the incineration process. The gas phase turbulence was modeled using the k–ε turbulent model and the particle phase was modeled using the kinetic theory of granular flow. The rate of moisture evaporation, devolatilization rate, and char burnout was calculated according to the waste property characters. The simulation results were then compared with experimental data for different moisture content of MSW, which shows that the incineration process of waste in the fixed bed is reasonably simulated. The simulation results of solid temperature, gas species and process rate in the bed are accordant with experimental data. Due to the high moisture content of fuel, moisture evaporation consumes a vast amount of heat, and the evaporation takes up most of the combustion time (about 2/3 of the whole combustion process). The whole bed combustion process reduces greatly as MSW moisture content increases. The experimental and simulation results provide direction for design and optimization of the fixed bed of MSW

  18. Numerical and experimental studies on effects of moisture content on combustion characteristics of simulated municipal solid wastes in a fixed bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Rui, E-mail: Sunsr@hit.edu.cn [School of Energy Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, 92, West Dazhi Street, Harbin 150001 (China); Ismail, Tamer M., E-mail: temoil@aucegypt.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Suez Canal University, Ismailia (Egypt); Ren, Xiaohan [School of Energy Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, 92, West Dazhi Street, Harbin 150001 (China); Abd El-Salam, M. [Department of Basic Science, Cairo University, Giza (Egypt)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • The effects of moisture content on the burning process of MSW are investigated. • A two-dimensional mathematical model was built to simulate the combustion process. • Temperature distributions, process rates, gas species were measured and simulated. • The The conversion ratio of C/CO and N/NO in MSW are inverse to moisture content. - Abstract: In order to reveal the features of the combustion process in the porous bed of a waste incinerator, a two-dimensional unsteady state model and experimental study were employed to investigate the combustion process in a fixed bed of municipal solid waste (MSW) on the combustion process in a fixed bed reactor. Conservation equations of the waste bed were implemented to describe the incineration process. The gas phase turbulence was modeled using the k–ε turbulent model and the particle phase was modeled using the kinetic theory of granular flow. The rate of moisture evaporation, devolatilization rate, and char burnout was calculated according to the waste property characters. The simulation results were then compared with experimental data for different moisture content of MSW, which shows that the incineration process of waste in the fixed bed is reasonably simulated. The simulation results of solid temperature, gas species and process rate in the bed are accordant with experimental data. Due to the high moisture content of fuel, moisture evaporation consumes a vast amount of heat, and the evaporation takes up most of the combustion time (about 2/3 of the whole combustion process). The whole bed combustion process reduces greatly as MSW moisture content increases. The experimental and simulation results provide direction for design and optimization of the fixed bed of MSW.

  19. Solar detoxification of fuel-contaminated groundwater using fixed-bed photocatalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crittenden, J. C. [Michigan Technological University, Houghton, Michigan (United States); Zhang, Y.; Hand, D. W.; Perram, D. L.; Marchand, E. G.

    1996-05-15

    A field test of a solar photocatalytic process for detoxification of water was conducted at Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida, where benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX) compounds were found in the fuel-contaminated groundwater. Platinized titanium dioxide supported on silica gel is packed in tubular photoreactors and used for single-pass operations. Catalyst fouling, destruction inhibition, and water pretreatment are investigated in addition to BTEX destruction. Ionic species were found to be primarily responsible for photocatalyst fouling and destruction inhibition. A simple pretreatment unit was developed for removing turbidity, adding oxidant, and ionic species. By using pretreatment, the reactor system operated efficiently, and no loss in catalyst photoactivity was found during the month-long test. On a rainy day, BTEX compounds of a total influent concentration of more than 2 mg/L were destroyed within 6.5 minutes of empty-bed contact time. Test results with various flow rates, reactor diameters, influent concentrations, solar irradiances, and weather conditions confirm the application potential of the process.

  20. Solar detoxification of fuel-contaminated groundwater using fixed-bed photocatalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crittenden, J.C.; Zhang, Y.; Hand, D.W.; Perram, D.L.; Marchand, E.G.

    1996-01-01

    A field test of a solar photocatalytic process for detoxification of water was conducted at Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida, where benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX) compounds were found in the fuel-contaminated groundwater. Platinized titanium dioxide supported on silica gel is packed in tubular photoreactors and used for single-pass operations. Catalyst fouling, destruction inhibition, and water pretreatment are investigated in addition to BTEX destruction. Ionic species were found to be primarily responsible for photocatalyst fouling and destruction inhibition. A simple pretreatment unit was developed for removing turbidity, adding oxidant, and ionic species. By using pretreatment, the reactor system operated efficiently, and no loss in catalyst photoactivity was found during the month-long test. On a rainy day, BTEX compounds of a total influent concentration of more than 2 mg/L were destroyed within 6.5 minutes of empty-bed contact time. Test results with various flow rates, reactor diameters, influent concentrations, solar irradiances, and weather conditions confirm the application potential of the process

  1. Synthesis of carbon nanotubes using fluidized bed technology

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Swartbooi, AM

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available virgin plastics as well as a carbonaceous gas using fluidized bed technology. Current investigations are underway to test various factors involved with the CNT growth and production. An understanding of these factors and their interactions could provide...

  2. Carbon accounting and cost estimation in forestry projects using CO2Fix V.3

    OpenAIRE

    Groen, T.A.; Nabuurs, G.J.; Schelhaas, M.J.

    2006-01-01

    Carbon and financial accounting of projects in the Land Use, Land-Use Change and Forestry sector is a topic of hot debate. Large uncertainty remains concerning the carbon dynamics, the way they should be accounted and the cost efficiency of the projects. Part of the uncertainty can be alleviated by standardisation and transparency of reporting methods. For this reason we further developed CO2FIX, a forest ecosystem carbon model, with modules for carbon and financial accounting. The model is a...

  3. REMOVING AGGRESSIVE CARBON DIOXIDE FROM WATER USING MELAPHYRE BED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Maria Michel

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The experiment was based on filtration of the highly aggressive water through the melaphyre bed. The quartz bed was non-reactive reference material. The aim of this work was to determine the ability of the melaphyre to remove aggressive CO2 during the chemical reaction. It was noted that a decrease of acidity of the filtrate in comparison to the feed and an increase of its alkalinity and pH. It was calculated that until the moment of exhaustion of the de-acidifying properties of the melaphyre, maximum amount of bound CO2 added to the water was 29.7 g CO2/L of the bed, and maximum amount of the aggressive CO2 removed from the water was 33.3 g CO2/L of the bed. Regarding very high content of the aggressive CO2 (116 mg/L average in the feed only 28.76% of this component was subject to transformation into bound and affiliated CO2 in the filtrate. For the melaphyre bed the CO2 loss from the experiment system following from desorption was 7.80% of the total load of CO2 added with the feed. On the quartz bed the loss was slightly lower 4.56%.

  4. Coefficient of solid-gas heat transfer in particle fixed bed; Coeficiente de transferencia de calor gas-solido em leito fixo de particulas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes Filho, Francisco

    1991-03-01

    The work presents a study on heat transfer between gas and solid phases for fixed beds in the absence of mass transfer and chemical reactions. Mathematical models presented in the literature were analyzed concerning to the assumptions made on axial dispersion in the fluid phase and interparticle thermal conductivity. Heat transfer coefficients and their dependency on flow conditions, particles and packed bed characteristics were experimentally determined through the solution of the previous mathematical models. Pressure drop behaviour for the packed beds used for the heat transfer study was also included. (author) 32 refs., 12 figs.

  5. Breakthrough of toluene vapours in granular activated carbon filled packed bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohan, N.; Kannan, G.K.; Upendra, S.; Subha, R.; Kumar, N.S.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this research was to determine the toluene removal efficiency and breakthrough time using commercially available coconut shell-based granular activated carbon in packed bed reactor. To study the effect of toluene removal and break point time of the granular activated carbon (GAC), the parameters studied were bed lengths (2, 3, and 4 cm), concentrations (5, 10, and 15 mg l -1 ) and flow rates (20, 40, and 60 ml/min). The maximum percentage removal of 90% was achieved and the maximum carbon capacity for 5 mg l -1 of toluene, 60 ml/min flow rate and 3 cm bed length shows 607.14 mg/g. The results of dynamic adsorption in a packed bed were consistent with those of equilibrium adsorption by gravimetric method. The breakthrough time and quantity shows that GAC with appropriate surface area can be utilized for air cleaning filters. The result shows that the physisorption plays main role in toluene removal.

  6. Lipase production by solid-state fermentation in fixed-bed bioreactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa d'Avila Costa Cavalcanti

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, packed bed bioreactors were employed with the aim of increasing productivity and scaling up of lipase production using Penicillium simplicissimum in solid-state fermentation. The influence of temperature and air flow rate on enzyme production was evaluated employing statistical experimental design, and an empirical model was adjusted to the experimental data. It was shown that higher lipase activities could be achieved at lower temperatures and higher air flow rates. The maximum lipase activity (26.4 U/g was obtained at the temperature of 27°C and air flow rate of 0.8 L/min.O fungo Penicillium simplicissimum se mostrou, em trabalhos anteriores, um ótimo produtor de lipase por fermentação no estado sólido, quando cultivado em biorreatores do tipo bandeja, utilizando a torta de babaçu como meio de cultura. Com o objetivo de aumentar a produtividade e possibilitar uma ampliação de escala, foi investigado, no presente trabalho, o emprego de biorreatores de leito fixo com aeração forçada. Os biorreatores utilizados tinham 4 cm de diâmetro interno e 14 cm de altura útil. Empregando-se planejamento estatístico de experimentos como ferramenta, foram avaliadas as influências da temperatura e da vazão de ar sobre a produção de lipase nestes biorreatores. Os resultados obtidos permitiram ajustar um modelo empírico, o qual indicou que maiores atividades lipásicas são alcançadas para temperaturas mais baixas e vazões de ar mais altas. A atividade lipásica máxima (26,4 U/g foi obtida para temperatura de 27°C e vazão de ar de 0,8 L/min.

  7. Performance of an anaerobic, static bed, fixed film bioreactor for chlorinated solvent treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorah, Michelle M.; Walker, Charles; Graves, Duane

    2015-01-01

    Anaerobic, fixed film, bioreactors bioaugmented with a dechlorinating microbial consortium were evaluated as a potential technology for cost effective, sustainable, and reliable treatment of mixed chlorinated ethanes and ethenes in groundwater from a large groundwater recovery system. Bench- and pilot-scale testing at about 3 and 13,500 L, respectively, demonstrated that total chlorinated solvent removal to less than the permitted discharge limit of 100 μg/L. Various planned and unexpected upsets, interruptions, and changes demonstrated the robustness and reliability of the bioreactor system, which handled the operational variations with no observable change in performance. Key operating parameters included an adequately long hydraulic retention time for the surface area, a constant supply of electron donor, pH control with a buffer to minimize pH variance, an oxidation reduction potential of approximately −200 millivolts or lower, and a well-adapted biomass capable of degrading the full suite of chlorinated solvents in the groundwater. Results indicated that the current discharge criteria can be met using a bioreactor technology that is less complex and has less downtime than the sorption based technology currently being used to treat the groundwater.

  8. Fixed-bed studies of the interactions between mercury and coal combustion fly ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunham, Grant E.; DeWall, Raymond A. [Energy and Environmental Research Center, 15 North 23rd Street, Grand Forks, ND 58203 (United States); Senior, Constance L. [Reaction Engineering International, 77 West 200 South, Suite 210, Salt Lake City, UT 84101 (United States)

    2003-08-15

    Sixteen different fly ash samples, generated from both pilot-scale and full-scale combustion systems, were exposed to a simulated flue gas containing either elemental mercury or HgCl{sub 2} in a bench-scale reactor system at the Energy and Environmental Research Center to evaluate the interactions and determine the effects of temperature, mercury species, and ash type on adsorption of mercury and oxidation of elemental mercury. The fly ash samples were characterized for surface area, loss on ignition, and forms of iron in the ash. While many of the ash samples oxidized elemental mercury, not all of the samples that oxidized mercury also captured elemental mercury. However, no capture of elemental mercury was observed without accompanying oxidation. Generally, oxidation of elemental mercury increased with increasing amount of magnetite in the ash. However, one high-carbon subbituminous ash with no magnetite showed considerable mercury oxidation that may have been due to unburned carbon. Surface area as well as the nature of the surface appeared to be important for oxidation and adsorption of elemental mercury. The capacity of the ash samples for HgCl{sub 2} was similar to that for elemental mercury. There was a good correlation between the capacity for HgCl{sub 2} and the surface area; capacity decreased with increasing temperature.

  9. Carbon coated (carbonous) catalyst in ebullated bed reactor for production of oxygenated chemicals from syngas/CO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peizheng Zhou

    2002-01-01

    This report summarizes the work completed under DOE's Support of Advanced Fuel Research program, Contract No. DE-FG26-99FT40681. The contract period was October 2000 through September 2002. This R and D program investigated the modification of the mechanical strength of catalyst extrudates using Hydrocarbon Technologies, Inc. (HTI) carbon-coated catalyst technology so that the ebullated bed technology can be utilized to produce valuable oxygenated chemicals from syngas/CO 2 efficiently and economically. Exothermic chemical reactions benefit from the temperature control and freedom from catalyst fouling provided by the ebullated bed reactor technology. The carbon-coated extrudates prepared using these procedures had sufficient attrition resistance and surface area for use in ebullated bed operation. The low cost of carbon coating makes the carbon-coated catalysts highly competitive in the market of catalyst extrudates

  10. Fluidized bed electrodes with high carbon loading for water desalination by capacitive deionization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doornbusch, G.J.; Dykstra, J.E.; Biesheuvel, P.M.; Suss, M.E.

    2016-01-01

    The use of carbon flow electrodes has significantly impacted electrochemical energy storage and capacitive deionization (CDI), but device performance is limited as these electrodes cannot surpass ∼20 wt% carbon while maintaining flowability. We here introduce flowable fluidized bed electrodes

  11. Carbon capture from coal fired power plant using pressurized fluid bed technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Dennis; Christensen, Tor

    2010-09-15

    This presentation will discuss the use of a pressurized fluid bed boiler system and specialized carbon capture system to burn coal and generagte clean electricity. The paper will present the existing boiler and carbon capture technology and present economics, thermal performance and emissions reduction for a 100Mw module.

  12. Effect of air-assisted backwashing on the performance of an anaerobic fixed-bed bioreactor that simultaneously removes nitrate and arsenic from drinking water sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyaya, Giridhar; Clancy, Tara M; Snyder, Kathryn V; Brown, Jess; Hayes, Kim F; Raskin, Lutgarde

    2012-03-15

    Contaminant removal from drinking water sources under reducing conditions conducive for the growth of denitrifying, arsenate reducing, and sulfate reducing microbes using a fixed-bed bioreactor may require oxygen-free gas (e.g., N2 gas) during backwashing. However, the use of air-assisted backwashing has practical advantages, including simpler operation, improved safety, and lower cost. A study was conducted to evaluate whether replacing N2 gas with air during backwashing would impact performance in a nitrate and arsenic removing anaerobic bioreactor system that consisted of two biologically active carbon reactors in series. Gas-assisted backwashing, comprised of 2 min of gas injection to fluidize the bed and dislodge biomass and solid phase products, was performed in the first reactor (reactor A) every two days. The second reactor (reactor B) was subjected to N2 gas-assisted backwashing every 3-4 months. Complete removal of 50 mg/L NO3- was achieved in reactor A before and after the switch from N2-assisted backwashing (NAB) to air-assisted backwashing (AAB). Substantial sulfate removal was achieved with both backwashing strategies. Prolonged practice of AAB (more than two months), however, diminished sulfate reduction in reactor B somewhat. Arsenic removal in reactor A was impacted slightly by long-term use of AAB, but arsenic removals achieved by the entire system during NAB and AAB periods were not significantly different (p>0.05) and arsenic concentrations were reduced from approximately 200 μg/L to below 20 μg/L. These results indicate that AAB can be implemented in anaerobic nitrate and arsenic removal systems. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Cultivation and Differentiation of Encapsulated hMSC-TERT in a Disposable Small-Scale Syringe-Like Fixed Bed Reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weber, Christian; Pohl, Sebastian; Pörtner, Ralf

    2007-01-01

    The use of commercially available plastic syringes is introduced as disposable small-scale fixed bed bioreactors for the cultivation of implantable therapeutic cell systems on the basis of an alginate-encapsulated human mesenchymal stem cell line. The system introduced is fitted with a noninvasiv...

  14. Structural characterisation of pretreated solids from flow-through liquid hot water treatment of sugarcane bagasse in a fixed-bed reactor

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Reddy, P

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Untreated sugarcane bagasse and sugarcane bagasse pretreated with flow-through liquid hot water (LHW) treatment (170-207°C and 204-250 ml/min) in a fixed-bed reactor have been structurally characterised. Field emission gun scanning electron...

  15. Design of adiabatic fixed-bed reactors for the partial oxidation of methane to synthesis gas. Application to production of methanol and hydrogen-for-fuel-cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smet, de C.R.H.; Croon, de M.H.J.M.; Berger, R.J.; Marin, G.B.M.M.; Schouten, J.C.

    2001-01-01

    Adiabatic fixed-bed reactors for the catalytic partial oxidn. (CPO) of methane to synthesis gas were designed at conditions suitable for the prodn. of methanol and hydrogen-for-fuel-cells. A steady-state, one-dimensional heterogeneous reactor model was applied in the simulations. Intra-particle

  16. Absorption of CO2 and H2S in Aqueous Alkanolamine Solutions using a Fixed-Bed Reactor with Cocurrent Downflow Operation in the Pulsing Flow Regime

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versteeg, G.F.; Swaaij, W.P.M. van

    1988-01-01

    Absorption rates of H2S and CO2 in several aqueous alkanolamines in a cocurrent downflow fixed-bed reactor operated in the pulse flow regime have been measured in order to obtain information on the potential selectivity and on the mass transfer parameters. From these experiments it can be concluded

  17. ADSORPTION OF MANGANESE FROM ACID MINE DRAINAGE EFFLUENTS USING BONE CHAR: CONTINUOUS FIXED BED COLUMN AND BATCH DESORPTION STUDIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. C. Sicupira

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available AbstractIn the present study, continuous fixed bed column runs were carried out in an attempt to evaluate the feasibility of using bone char for the removal of manganese from acid mine drainage (AMD. Tests using a laboratory solution of pure manganese at typical concentration levels were also performed for comparison purposes. The following operating variables were evaluated: column height, flow rate, and initial pH. Significant variations in resistance to the mass transfer of manganese into the bone char were identified using the Thomas model. A significant effect of the bed height could only be observed in tests using the laboratory solution. No significant change in the breakthrough volume could be observed with different flow rates. By increasing the initial pH from 2.96 to 5.50, the breakthrough volume was also increased. The maximum manganese loading capacity in continuous tests using bone char for AMD effluents was 6.03 mg g-1, as compared to 26.74 mg g-1 when using the laboratory solution. The present study also performed desorption tests, using solutions of HCl, H2SO4, and water, aimed at the reuse of the adsorbent; however, no promising results were obtained due to low desorption levels associated with a relatively high mass loss. Despite the desorption results, the removal of manganese from AMD effluents using bone char as an adsorbent is technically feasible and attends to environmental legislation. It is interesting to note that the use of bone char for manganese removal may avoid the need for pH corrections of effluents after treatment. Moreover, bone char can also serve to remove fluoride ions and other metals, thus representing an interesting alternative material for the treatment of AMD effluents.

  18. Fixing a carbon price will not be enough

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dron, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    As some argue that defining a unique price for carbon price would be efficient and even sufficient to have our societies move towards sustainability, the author discusses this point of view and shows that it needs to be nuanced even if, for example, measures regarding the automotive industry resulted in the production of always less emitting vehicles. As the ETS market is collapsing when current and expected climatic hazards are keeping on increasing, she outlines that carbon price does not reflect the reality of faced challenges. Other examples are mentioned, for example taxing of pesticides in France which did not reduce their usage. She discusses what a price should be or reflect

  19. Electrochemical treatment of water containing Microcystis aeruginosa in a fixed bed reactor with three-dimensional conductive diamond anodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mascia, Michele; Monasterio, Sara; Vacca, Annalisa; Palmas, Simonetta

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Inactivation of M. aeruginosa was achieved by electrolysis with BDD anodes. • A fixed bed reactor with 3-D electrodes was tested in batch and continuous mode. • The kinetics of the process was determined from batch experiments. • A mathematical model of the process was implemented and validated. • The model was used to predict the system behaviour under different conditions. - Abstract: An electrochemical treatment was investigated to remove Microcystis aeruginosa from water. A fixed bed reactor in flow was tested, which was equipped with electrodes constituted by stacks of grids electrically connected in parallel, with the electric field parallel to the fluid flow. Conductive diamond were used as anodes, platinised Ti as cathode. Electrolyses were performed in continuous and in batch recirculated mode with flow rates corresponding to Re from 10 to 160, current densities in the range 10–60 A m −2 and Cl − concentrations up to 600 g m −3 . The absorbance of chlorophyll-a pigment and the concentration of products and by-products of electrolysis were measured. In continuous experiments without algae in the inlet stream, total oxidants concentrations as equivalent Cl 2 , of about 0.7 g Cl 2 m −3 were measured; the maximum values were obtained at Re = 10 and i = 25 A m −2 , with values strongly dependent on the concentration of Cl − . The highest algae inactivation was obtained under the operative conditions of maximum generation of oxidants; in the presence of microalgae the oxidants concentrations were generally below the detection limit. Results indicated that most of the bulk oxidants electrogenerated is constituted by active chlorine. The prevailing mechanism of M. aeruginosa inactivation is the disinfection by bulk oxidants. The experimental data were quantitatively interpreted through a simple plug flow model, in which the axial dispersion accounts for the non-ideal flow behaviour of the system; the model was successfully

  20. Electrochemical treatment of water containing Microcystis aeruginosa in a fixed bed reactor with three-dimensional conductive diamond anodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mascia, Michele, E-mail: michele.mascia@unica.it; Monasterio, Sara; Vacca, Annalisa; Palmas, Simonetta

    2016-12-05

    Highlights: • Inactivation of M. aeruginosa was achieved by electrolysis with BDD anodes. • A fixed bed reactor with 3-D electrodes was tested in batch and continuous mode. • The kinetics of the process was determined from batch experiments. • A mathematical model of the process was implemented and validated. • The model was used to predict the system behaviour under different conditions. - Abstract: An electrochemical treatment was investigated to remove Microcystis aeruginosa from water. A fixed bed reactor in flow was tested, which was equipped with electrodes constituted by stacks of grids electrically connected in parallel, with the electric field parallel to the fluid flow. Conductive diamond were used as anodes, platinised Ti as cathode. Electrolyses were performed in continuous and in batch recirculated mode with flow rates corresponding to Re from 10 to 160, current densities in the range 10–60 A m{sup −2} and Cl{sup −} concentrations up to 600 g m{sup −3}. The absorbance of chlorophyll-a pigment and the concentration of products and by-products of electrolysis were measured. In continuous experiments without algae in the inlet stream, total oxidants concentrations as equivalent Cl{sub 2}, of about 0.7 g Cl{sub 2} m{sup −3} were measured; the maximum values were obtained at Re = 10 and i = 25 A m{sup −2}, with values strongly dependent on the concentration of Cl{sup −}. The highest algae inactivation was obtained under the operative conditions of maximum generation of oxidants; in the presence of microalgae the oxidants concentrations were generally below the detection limit. Results indicated that most of the bulk oxidants electrogenerated is constituted by active chlorine. The prevailing mechanism of M. aeruginosa inactivation is the disinfection by bulk oxidants. The experimental data were quantitatively interpreted through a simple plug flow model, in which the axial dispersion accounts for the non-ideal flow behaviour of the

  1. A comprehensive small and pilot-scale fixed-bed reactor approach for testing Fischer–Tropsch catalyst activity and performance on a BTL route

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piyapong Hunpinyo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Ruthenium (Ru-based catalysts were prepared by the sol–gel technique for biomass-to-liquid (BTL operation and had their performance tested under different conditions. The catalytic study was carried out in two steps using a simple and reliable method. In the first step, the effects of reaction temperatures and inlet H2/CO molar feed ratios obtained from biomass gasification were investigated on the catalyst performance. A set of experimental results obtained in a laboratory fixed bed reactor was described and summarized. Moreover, a simplified Langmuir–Hinshelwood–Hougen–Watson (LHHW kinetic model was proposed with two promising models, where the surface decomposition of carbon monoxide was assumed as the rate determining step (RDS. In the second step, a FT pilot plant was conducted to validate the catalyst performance, especially the conversion efficiency, heat and mass transfer effects, and system controllability. The results indicated that our catalyst performances under mild conditions were not significantly different in many regards from those previously reported for a severe condition, as especially Ru-based catalyst can be performed to vary over a wide range of conditions to yield specific liquid productivity. The results in terms of the hydrocarbon product distribution obtained from the pilot scale operations were similar with that obtained from the related lab scale experiments.

  2. Pyrolysis of waste animal fats in a fixed-bed reactor: Production and characterization of bio-oil and bio-char

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben Hassen-Trabelsi, A., E-mail: aidabenhassen@yahoo.fr [Centre de Recherche et de Technologies de l’Energie (CRTEn), Technopôle Borj-Cédria, B.P 95, 2050, Hammam Lif (Tunisia); Kraiem, T. [Centre de Recherche et de Technologies de l’Energie (CRTEn), Technopôle Borj-Cédria, B.P 95, 2050, Hammam Lif (Tunisia); Département de Géologie, Université de Tunis, 2092, Tunis (Tunisia); Naoui, S. [Centre de Recherche et de Technologies de l’Energie (CRTEn), Technopôle Borj-Cédria, B.P 95, 2050, Hammam Lif (Tunisia); Belayouni, H. [Département de Géologie, Université de Tunis, 2092, Tunis (Tunisia)

    2014-01-15

    Highlights: • Produced bio-fuels (bio-oil and bio-char) from some animal fatty wastes. • Investigated the effects of main parameters on pyrolysis products distribution. • Determined the suitable conditions for the production of the maximum of bio-oil. • Characterized bio-oils and bio-chars obtained from several animal fatty wastes. - Abstract: Several animal (lamb, poultry and swine) fatty wastes were pyrolyzed under nitrogen, in a laboratory scale fixed-bed reactor and the main products (liquid bio-oil, solid bio-char and syngas) were obtained. The purpose of this study is to produce and characterize bio-oil and bio-char obtained from pyrolysis of animal fatty wastes. The maximum production of bio-oil was achieved at a pyrolysis temperature of 500 °C and a heating rate of 5 °C/min. The chemical (GC–MS analyses) and spectroscopic analyses (FTIR analyses) of bio-oil showed that it is a complex mixture consisting of different classes of organic compounds, i.e., hydrocarbons (alkanes, alkenes, cyclic compounds…etc.), carboxylic acids, aldehydes, ketones, esters,…etc. According to fuel properties, produced bio-oils showed good properties, suitable for its use as an engine fuel or as a potential source for synthetic fuels and chemical feedstock. Obtained bio-chars had low carbon content and high ash content which make them unattractive for as renewable source energy.

  3. Batch desorption studies and multiple sorption-regeneration cycles in a fixed-bed column for Cd(II) elimination by protonated Sargassum muticum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lodeiro, P.; Herrero, R.; Sastre de Vicente, M.E.

    2006-01-01

    The protonated alga Sargassum muticum was employed in batch desorption studies to find the most appropriate eluting agent for Cd(II)-laden biomass regeneration. Eleven types of eluting solutions at different concentrations were tested, finding elution efficiencies higher than 90% for most of the desorbents studied. Total organic carbon and biomass weight loss measurements were made. The reusability of the protonated alga was also studied using a fixed-bed column. Eleven consecutive sorption-regeneration cycles at a flow rate of 10 mL min -1 were carried out for the removal of 50 mg L -1 Cd(II) solution. A 0.1 M HNO 3 solution was employed as desorbing agent. The column was operated during 605 h for sorption and 66 h for desorption, equivalent to a continuous use during 28 days, with no apparent loss of sorption performance. In these cycles, no diminution of the breakthrough time was found; although, a relative loss of sorption capacity, regarding the found in the first cycle, was observed. The slope of the breakthrough curves experiments a gradual increase reaching its maximum value for the last cycle tested (40% greater than for the first one). The maximum Cd(II) concentration elution peak was achieved in 5 min or less, and the metal effluent concentration was always lower than 0.9 mg L -1 after 1 h of elution. The maximum concentration factor was determined to be between 55 and 109

  4. In-situ catalytic upgrading of biomass pyrolysis vapor: Co-feeding with methanol in a multi-zone fixed bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asadieraghi, Masoud; Wan Daud, Wan Mohd Ashri

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Aromatics yield improved with increasing H/C eff ratio of the feed. • HZSM-5 catalyst was an effective catalyst for in-situ bio-oil upgrading. • Biomass/methanol co-feeding attenuated the coke formation. • Methanol co-feeding enhanced the bio-oil quality. - Abstract: The in-situ catalytic upgrading of the biomass pyrolysis vapor and its mixture with methanol were conducted in a fixed bed multi-zone reactor. The steps were comprised; thermally converting the biomass in the pyrolysis reactor, passing its vapor in contact with the HZSM-5 zeolite catalyst in the presence of methanol vapor, and transformation of the resulting upgraded pyrolysis vapor into the liquid product. The biomass pyrolysis and catalytic pyrolysis vapor upgrading were performed at 500 °C. The highly valuable chemicals production was a function of the hydrogen to carbon effective ratio (H/C eff ) of the feed. This ratio was regulated by changing the relative amount of biomass and methanol. More aromatic hydrocarbons (50.02 wt.%) and less coke deposition on the catalyst (1.3 wt.%) were yielded from the biomass, when methanol was co-fed to the catalytic pyrolysis process (H/C eff = 1.35). In this contribution, the deposited coke on the catalyst was profoundly investigated. The coke, with high contents of oxo-aromatics and aromatic compounds, was generated by polymerization of biomass lignin derived components activated by catalyst acid sites

  5. Pyrolysis of waste animal fats in a fixed-bed reactor: Production and characterization of bio-oil and bio-char

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben Hassen-Trabelsi, A.; Kraiem, T.; Naoui, S.; Belayouni, H.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Produced bio-fuels (bio-oil and bio-char) from some animal fatty wastes. • Investigated the effects of main parameters on pyrolysis products distribution. • Determined the suitable conditions for the production of the maximum of bio-oil. • Characterized bio-oils and bio-chars obtained from several animal fatty wastes. - Abstract: Several animal (lamb, poultry and swine) fatty wastes were pyrolyzed under nitrogen, in a laboratory scale fixed-bed reactor and the main products (liquid bio-oil, solid bio-char and syngas) were obtained. The purpose of this study is to produce and characterize bio-oil and bio-char obtained from pyrolysis of animal fatty wastes. The maximum production of bio-oil was achieved at a pyrolysis temperature of 500 °C and a heating rate of 5 °C/min. The chemical (GC–MS analyses) and spectroscopic analyses (FTIR analyses) of bio-oil showed that it is a complex mixture consisting of different classes of organic compounds, i.e., hydrocarbons (alkanes, alkenes, cyclic compounds…etc.), carboxylic acids, aldehydes, ketones, esters,…etc. According to fuel properties, produced bio-oils showed good properties, suitable for its use as an engine fuel or as a potential source for synthetic fuels and chemical feedstock. Obtained bio-chars had low carbon content and high ash content which make them unattractive for as renewable source energy

  6. Trickle bed reactor for the oxidation of phenol over active carbon catalyst

    OpenAIRE

    Gabbiye, Nigus; Font Capafons, Josep; Fortuny Sanromá, Agustín; Bengoa, Christophe José; Fabregat Llangotera, Azael; Stüber, Frank Erich

    2009-01-01

    The catalytic wet air oxidation of phenol using activated carbon has been performed in a laboratory trickle bed reactor over a wide range of operating variables (PO2, T, FL and Cph,o) and hydrodynamic conditions. The influence of different start-up procedures (saturation of activated carbon) has also been tested. Further improvement of activity and stability has been checked for by using dynamic TBR operation concept or impregnated Fe/carbon catalyst. The results obtained confi...

  7. Modeling carbon sequestration in afforestation, agroforestry and forest management projects: the CO2FIX V.2 approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Masera, O.R.; Garza-Caligaris, J.F.; Kanninen, M.; Karjalainen, T.; Liski, J.; Nabuurs, G.J.; Pussinen, A.; Jong de, B.H.J.; Mohren, G.M.J.

    2003-01-01

    The paper describes the Version 2 of the CO2FIX (CO2FIX V.2) model, a user-friendly tool for dynamically estimating the carbon sequestration potential of forest management, agroforesty and afforestation projects. CO2FIX V.2 is a multi-cohort ecosystem-level model based on carbon accounting of forest

  8. Simultaneous production of laccase and decolouration of the diazo dye Reactive Black 5 in a fixed-bed bioreactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enayatzamir, Kheirghadam [Department of Chemical Engineering, Rovira i Virgili University, Av. Paisos Catalans 26, 43007 Tarragona (Spain); Department of Soil Science Engineering, University of Tehran, Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Alikhani, Hossein A. [Department of Soil Science Engineering, University of Tehran, Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rodriguez Couto, Susana [Department of Chemical Engineering, Rovira i Virgili University, Av. Paisos Catalans 26, 43007 Tarragona (Spain)], E-mail: susana.rodriguez@urv.cat

    2009-05-15

    In this paper the production of laccase and the decolouration of the recalcitrant diazo dye Reactive Black 5 (RB5) by the white-rot fungus Trametes pubescens immobilised on stainless steel sponges in a fixed-bed reactor were studied. Laccase production was increased by 10-fold in the presence of RB5 and reached a maximum value of 1025 U/l. Enhanced laccase production in the presence of RB5 in this fungus is an added advantage during biodegradation of RB5-containing effluents. The decolouration of RB5 was due to two processes: dye adsorption onto the fungal mycelium and dye degradation by the laccase enzymes produced by the fungus. RB5 decolouration was performed during four successive batches obtaining high decolouration percentages (74%, 43% and 52% in 24 h for the first, third and four batch, respectively) without addition of redox mediators. Also, the in vitro decolouration of RB5 by the concentrated culture extract, containing mainly laccase, produced in the above bioreactor was studied. The decolouration percentages obtained were considerably lower (around 20% in 24 h) than that attained with the whole culture.

  9. Carbonaceous materials in petrochemical wastewater before and after treatment in an aerated submerged fixed-bed biofilm reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trojanowicz Karol

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Results of the studies for determining fractions of organic contaminants in a pretreated petrochemical wastewater flowing into a pilot Aerated Submerged Fixed-Bed Biofilm Reactor (ASFBBR are presented and discussed. The method of chemical oxygen demand (COD fractionation consisted of physical tests and biological assays. It was found that the main part of the total COD in the petrochemical, pretreated wastewater was soluble organic substance with average value of 57.6%. The fractions of particulate and colloidal organic matter were found to be 31.8% and 10.6%, respectively. About 40% of COD in the influent was determined as readily biodegradable COD. The inert fraction of the soluble organic matter in the petrochemical wastewater constituted about 60% of the influent colloidal and soluble COD. Determination of degree of hydrolysis (DH of the colloidal fraction of COD was also included in the paper. The estimated value of DH was about 62%. Values of the assayed COD fractions were compared with the same parameters obtained for municipal wastewater by other authors.

  10. On the effect of cross sectional shape on incipient motion and deposition of sediments in fixed bed channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safari Mir-Jafar-Sadegh

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The condition of incipient motion and deposition are of the essential issues for the study of sediment transport. This phenomenon is of great importance to hydraulic engineers for designing sewers, drainage, as well as other rigid boundary channels. This is a study carried out with the objectives of describing the effect of cross-sectional shape on incipient motion and deposition of particles in rigid boundary channels. In this research work, the experimental data given by Loveless (1992 and Mohammadi (2005 are used. On the basis of the critical velocity approach, a new incipient motion equation for a V-shaped bottom channel and incipient deposition of sediment particles equations for rigid boundary channels having circular, rectangular, and U-shaped cross sections are obtained. New equations were compared to the other incipient motion equations. The result shows that the cross-sectional shape is an important factor for defining the minimum velocity for no-deposit particles. This study also distinguishes incipient motion of particles from incipient deposition for particles. The results may be useful for designing fixed bed channels with a limited deposition condition.

  11. Simultaneous production of laccase and decolouration of the diazo dye Reactive Black 5 in a fixed-bed bioreactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enayatzamir, Kheirghadam; Alikhani, Hossein A.; Rodriguez Couto, Susana

    2009-01-01

    In this paper the production of laccase and the decolouration of the recalcitrant diazo dye Reactive Black 5 (RB5) by the white-rot fungus Trametes pubescens immobilised on stainless steel sponges in a fixed-bed reactor were studied. Laccase production was increased by 10-fold in the presence of RB5 and reached a maximum value of 1025 U/l. Enhanced laccase production in the presence of RB5 in this fungus is an added advantage during biodegradation of RB5-containing effluents. The decolouration of RB5 was due to two processes: dye adsorption onto the fungal mycelium and dye degradation by the laccase enzymes produced by the fungus. RB5 decolouration was performed during four successive batches obtaining high decolouration percentages (74%, 43% and 52% in 24 h for the first, third and four batch, respectively) without addition of redox mediators. Also, the in vitro decolouration of RB5 by the concentrated culture extract, containing mainly laccase, produced in the above bioreactor was studied. The decolouration percentages obtained were considerably lower (around 20% in 24 h) than that attained with the whole culture

  12. Comparative study on pyrolysis of lignocellulosic and algal biomass using a thermogravimetric and a fixed-bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ting; Tahmasebi, Arash; Yu, Jianglong

    2015-01-01

    Pyrolysis characteristics of four algal and lignocellulosic biomass samples were studied by using a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) and a fixed-bed reactor. The effects of pyrolysis temperature and biomass type on the yield and composition of pyrolysis products were investigated. The average activation energy for pyrolysis of biomass samples by FWO and KAS methods in this study were in the range of 211.09-291.19kJ/mol. CO2 was the main gas component in the early stage of pyrolysis, whereas H2 and CH4 concentrations increased with increasing pyrolysis temperature. Bio-oil from Chlorellavulgaris showed higher content of nitrogen containing compounds compared to lignocellulosic biomass. The concentration of aromatic organic compounds such as phenol and its derivatives were increased with increasing pyrolysis temperature up to 700°C. FTIR analysis results showed that with increasing pyrolysis temperature, the concentration of OH, CH, CO, OCH3, and CO functional groups in char decreased sharply. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Anaerobic degradation of landfill leachate using an upflow anaerobic fixed-bed reactor with microbial sulfate reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben Dhia Thabet, Olfa; Bouallagui, Hassib; Cayol, Jean-luc; Ollivier, Bernard; Fardeau, Marie-Laure; Hamdi, Moktar

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluated the anaerobic degradation of landfill leachate and sulfate reduction as a function of COD/(SO 4 2- ) ratio in an upflow anaerobic fixed-bed reactor. The reactor, which was inoculated with a mixed consortium, was operated under a constant hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 5 days. We investigated the effect of COD/(SO 4 2- ) ratio variation on the sulfate reduction efficiency, hydrogen sulfide production, chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal, conductivity, and pH variation. The best reactor performance, with significant sulfate reduction efficiency and COD removal efficiency of 91% and 87%, respectively, was reached under a COD/(SO 4 2- ) ratio of 1.17. Under these conditions, microscopic analysis showed the abundance of vibrios and rod-shaped bacterial cells. Two anaerobic bacteria were isolated from the reactor sludge. Phylogenetic studies performed on these strains identified strain A1 as affiliated to Clostridium genus and strain H1 as a new species of sulfate-reducing bacteria affiliated to the Desulfovibrio genus. The closest phylogenetic relative of strain H1 was Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, at 96% similarity for partial 16S RNA gene sequence data. Physiological and metabolic characterization was performed for this strain.

  14. Carbon Shale Combustion in the Fluidized Bed Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olek Małgorzata

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to present the possibilities of coal shale combustion in furnaces with bubbling fluidized bed. Coal shale can be autothermally combusted in the fluidized bed, despite the low calorie value and high ash content of fuel. Established concentrations of CO (500 ppm and VOC (30 mg/m3 have indicated a high conversion degree of combustible material during combustion process. Average concentrations of SO2 and NOx in the flue gas were higher than this received from the combustion of high quality hard coal, 600 ppm and 500 ppm, respectively. Optional reduction of SO2 and NOx emission may require the installation of flue gas desulphurization and de-NOx systems.

  15. Feasibility analysis of color removal from textile dyeing wastewater in a fixed-bed column system by surfactant-modified zeolite (SMZ)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozdemir, Ozgur; Turan, Mustafa; Turan, Abdullah Zahid; Faki, Aysegul; Engin, Ahmet Baki

    2009-01-01

    In this study, the ability of surfactant-modified zeolite (SMZ) to remove color from real textile wastewater was investigated. Tests were performed in a fixed-bed column reactor and the surface of natural zeolite was modified with a quaternary amine surfactant hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (HTAB). The zeolite bed that was modified at 1 g L -1 HTAB concentration and HTAB flow rate of 0.015 L min -1 showed good performance in removing color. Effects of wastewater color intensity, flow rates and bed heights were also studied. Wastewater was diluted several times in the ratios of 25%, 50% and 75% in order to assess the influence of wastewater strength. The breakthrough curves of the original and diluted wastewaters are dispersed due to the fact that breakthrough came late at lower color intensities and saturation of the bed appeared faster at higher color intensities. The column had a 3-cm diameter and four different bed heights of 12.5, 25, 37.5 and 50 cm, which treated 5.25, 19.50, 35.25 and 51 L original textile wastewater, respectively, at the breakthrough time at a flow rate of 0.025 L min -1 . The theoretical service times evaluated from bed depth service time (BDST) approach for different column variables. The calculated and theoretical values of the exchange zone height were found with a difference of 27%. The various design parameters obtained from fixed-bed experimental studies showed good correlation with corresponding theoretical values, under different bed heights. The regeneration of the SMZ was also evaluated using a solution consisting of 30 g L -1 NaCl and 1.5 g L -1 NaOH at pH 12 and temperature 30 o C. Twice-regenerated SMZ showed the best performance compared with the others while first- and thrice-regenerated perform lower than the original SMZ.

  16. Newly-fixed carbon preferentially flows through starch in the unicellular alga Rhodella

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroen, W.K.; Ramus, J.S.

    1989-01-01

    Cells of the unicellular red alga Rhodella reticulata produce copious amounts of anionic extracellular polysaccharides. Previous experiments, comparing growing and non-growing cells, showed little difference in the pattern of initial 14 C partitioning, with a high percentage of label in starch. Short labelling periods, followed by chasing in unlabelled medium, showed rapid movement of carbon through the starch pool within the first 6 hrs, with an accompanying increase in both the protein and mucilage fractions. The overall pattern of carbon metabolism appears fixed throughout growth of the cells, with total carbon input changing with changing growth phase. As starch is extrachloroplastic in the red algae, input of fixed carbon directly into the starch pool may serve as a routing mechanism to direct subsequent carbon metabolism within the cell

  17. Techno-economic analysis of sorption-enhanced steam methane reforming in a fixed bed reactor network integrated with fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diglio, Giuseppe; Hanak, Dawid P.; Bareschino, Piero; Mancusi, Erasmo; Pepe, Francesco; Montagnaro, Fabio; Manovic, Vasilije

    2017-10-01

    Sorption-enhanced steam methane reforming (SE-SMR) is a promising alternative for H2 production with inherent CO2 capture. This study evaluates the techno-economic performance of SE-SMR in a network of fixed beds and its integration with a solid oxide fuel cell (SE-SMR-SOFC) for power generation. The analysis revealed that both proposed systems are characterised by better economic performance than the reference systems. In particular, for SE-SMR the levelised cost of hydrogen is 1.6 €ṡkg-1 and the cost of CO2 avoided is 29.9 €ṡtCO2-1 (2.4 €ṡkg-1 and 50 €ṡtCO2-1, respectively, for SMR with CO2 capture) while for SE-SMR-SOFC the levelised cost of electricity is 0.078 €ṡkWh-1 and the cost of CO2 avoided is 36.9 €ṡtCO2-1 (0.080 €ṡkWh-1 and 80 €ṡtCO2-1, respectively, for natural gas-fired power plant with carbon capture). The sensitivity analysis showed that the specific cost of fuel and the capital cost of fuel cell mainly affect the economic performance of SE-SMR and SE-SMR-SOFC, respectively. The daily revenue of the SE-SMR-SOFC system is higher than that of the natural gas-fired power plant if the difference between the carbon tax and the CO2 transport and storage cost is > 6 €ṡtCO2-1.

  18. CO-FIRING COAL: FEEDLOT AND LITTER BIOMASS (CFB AND CLB) FUELS IN PULVERIZED FUEL AND FIXED BED BURNERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalyan Annamalai; John Sweeten; Saqib Mukhtar; Ben Thein; Gengsheng Wei; Soyuz Priyadarsan; Senthil Arumugam; Kevin Heflin

    2003-08-28

    Intensive animal feeding operations create large amounts of animal waste that must be safely disposed of in order to avoid environmental degradation. Cattle feedlots and chicken houses are two examples. In feedlots, cattle are confined to small pens and fed a high calorie grain-diet diet in preparation for slaughter. In chicken houses, thousands of chickens are kept in close proximity. In both of these operations, millions of tons of manure are produced every year. The manure could be used as a fuel by mixing it with coal in a 90:10 blend and firing it in an existing coal suspension fired combustion systems. This technique is known as co-firing, and the high temperatures produced by the coal will allow the biomass to be completely combusted. Reburn is a process where a small percentage of fuel called reburn fuel is injected above the NO{sub x} producing, conventional coal fired burners in order to reduce NO{sub x}. The manure could also be used as reburn fuel for reducing NO{sub x} in coal fired plants. An alternate approach of using animal waste is to adopt the gasification process using a fixed bed gasifier and then use the gases for firing in gas turbine combustors. In this report, the cattle manure is referred to as feedlot biomass (FB) and chicken manure as litter biomass (LB). The report generates data on FB and LB fuel characteristics. Co-firing, reburn, and gasification tests of coal, FB, LB, coal: FB blends, and coal: LB blends and modeling on cofiring, reburn systems and economics of use of FB and LB have also been conducted. The biomass fuels are higher in ash, lower in heat content, higher in moisture, and higher in nitrogen and sulfur (which can cause air pollution) compared to coal. Small-scale cofiring experiments revealed that the biomass blends can be successfully fired, and NO{sub x} emissions will be similar to or lower than pollutant emissions when firing coal. Further experiments showed that biomass is twice or more effective than coal when

  19. Morphological study of biomass during the start-up period of a fixed-bed anaerobic reactor treating domestic sewage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudio Antonio Andrade Lima

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available This work focused on a morphological study of the microorganisms attached to polyurethane foam matrices in a horizontal-flow anaerobic immobilized biomass (HAIB reactor treating domestic sewage. The experiments consisted of monitoring the biomass colonization process of foam matrices in terms of the amount of retained biomass and the morphological characteristics of the cells attached to the support during the start-up period. Non-fluorescent rods and cocci were found to predominate in the process of attachment to the polyurethane foam surface. From the 10th week of operation onwards, an increase was observed in the morphological diversity, mainly due to rods, cocci, and Methanosaeta-like archaeal cells. Hydrodynamic problems, such as bed clogging and channeling occurred in the fixed-bed reactor, mainly due to the production of extracellular polymeric substances and their accumulation in the interstices of the bed causing a gradual deterioration of its performance, which eventually led to the system's collapse. These results demonstrated the importance and usefulness of monitoring the dynamics of the formation of biofilm during the start-up period of HAIB reactors, since it allowed the identification of operational problems.Este trabalho apresenta um estudo morfológico de microrganismos aderidos à espuma de poliuretano em reator anaeróbio horizontal de leito fixo (RAHLF, aplicado ao tratamento de esgoto sanitário. O processo de colonização do suporte pela biomassa anaeróbia e as características morfológicas das células aderidas foram monitorados durante o período de partida do reator. Bacilos e cocos não fluorescentes foram predominantes no processo de aderência direta à espuma de poliuretano. Aumento na diversidade biológica foi observado a partir da 10ª semana de operação do reator, com predominância de bacilos, cocos e arqueas metanogênicas semelhantes a Methanosaeta. Problemas hidrodinâmicos, tais como formação de

  20. Electrochemical treatment of water containing Microcystis aeruginosa in a fixed bed reactor with three-dimensional conductive diamond anodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascia, Michele; Monasterio, Sara; Vacca, Annalisa; Palmas, Simonetta

    2016-12-05

    An electrochemical treatment was investigated to remove Microcystis aeruginosa from water. A fixed bed reactor in flow was tested, which was equipped with electrodes constituted by stacks of grids electrically connected in parallel, with the electric field parallel to the fluid flow. Conductive diamond were used as anodes, platinised Ti as cathode. Electrolyses were performed in continuous and in batch recirculated mode with flow rates corresponding to Re from 10 to 160, current densities in the range 10-60Am(-2) and Cl(-) concentrations up to 600gm(-3). The absorbance of chlorophyll-a pigment and the concentration of products and by-products of electrolysis were measured. In continuous experiments without algae in the inlet stream, total oxidants concentrations as equivalent Cl2, of about 0.7gCl2m(-3) were measured; the maximum values were obtained at Re=10 and i=25Am(-2), with values strongly dependent on the concentration of Cl(-). The highest algae inactivation was obtained under the operative conditions of maximum generation of oxidants; in the presence of microalgae the oxidants concentrations were generally below the detection limit. Results indicated that most of the bulk oxidants electrogenerated is constituted by active chlorine. The prevailing mechanism of M. aeruginosa inactivation is the disinfection by bulk oxidants. The experimental data were quantitatively interpreted through a simple plug flow model, in which the axial dispersion accounts for the non-ideal flow behaviour of the system; the model was successfully used to simulate the performances of the reactor in the single-stack configuration used for the experiments and in multi-stack configurations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Thin-film fixed-bed reactor for solar photocatalytic inactivation of Aeromonas hydrophila: influence of water quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan Sadia J

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Controlling fish disease is one of the major concerns in contemporary aquaculture. The use of antibiotics or chemical disinfection cannot provide a healthy aquaculture system without residual effects. Water quality is also important in determining the success or failure of fish production. Several solar photocatalytic reactors have been used to treat drinking water or waste water without leaving chemical residues. This study has investigated the impact of several key aspects of water quality on the inactivation of the pathogenic bacterium Aeromonas hydrophila using a pilot-scale thin-film fixed-bed reactor (TFFBR system. Results The level of inactivation of Aeromonas hydrophila ATCC 35654 was determined using a TFFBR with a photocatalytic area of 0.47 m2 under the influence of various water quality variables (pH, conductivity, turbidity and colour under high solar irradiance conditions (980–1100 W m-2, at a flow rate of 4.8 L h-1 through the reactor. Bacterial enumeration were obtained through conventional plate count using trypticase soy agar media, cultured in conventional aerobic conditions to detect healthy cells and under ROS-neutralised conditions to detect both healthy and sub-lethally injured (oxygen-sensitive cells. The results showed that turbidity has a major influence on solar photocatalytic inactivation of A. hydrophila. Humic acids appear to decrease TiO2 effectiveness under full sunlight and reduce microbial inactivation. pH in the range 7–9 and salinity both have no major effect on the extent of photoinactivation or sub-lethal injury. Conclusions This study demonstrates the effectiveness of the TFFBR in the inactivation of Aeromonas hydrophila under the influence of several water quality variables at high solar irradiance, providing an opportunity for the application of solar photocatalysis in aquaculture systems, as long as turbidity remains low.

  2. Industrial Scale Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes Via Fluidized Bed Chemical Vapor Deposition: A Senior Design Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, York R.; Fuchs, Alan; Meyyappan, M.

    2010-01-01

    Senior year chemical engineering students designed a process to produce 10 000 tonnes per annum of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) and also conducted bench-top experiments to synthesize SWNTs via fluidized bed chemical vapor deposition techniques. This was an excellent pedagogical experience because it related to the type of real world design…

  3. Biomass gasification in fixed bed type down draft: theoretical and experimental aspects; Gasificacao de biomassa em leito fixo tipo concorrente: aspectos teoricos e experimentais

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, Juan Daniel; Andrade, Rubenildo Vieira; Lora, Electo Eduardo Silva [Universidade Federal de Itajuba (UNIFEI), MG (Brazil). Inst. de Engenharia Mecanica. Nucleo de Excelencia em Geracao Termeletrica e Distribuida

    2008-07-01

    Actually are recognizing the advantages of biomass in reducing dependence on fossil fuels and significant reduction in emissions of greenhouse effect gases such as Co2. Also are known the different conversion of biomass routes for their use or exploitation, such as thermochemical process (gasification, pyrolysis and combustion), the biological process (fermentation and transesterification) and the physical process (densification, reducing grain and mechanical pressing). In this sense, the gasification is regarded as the most promising mechanism to obtain a homogeneous gaseous fuel with sufficient quality in the small scale distributed generation. This work presents some aspects of biomass gasification in fixed bed, as well as some preliminary results in the evaluation and operation of fixed bed down draft gasifier with double stage air supply of the NEST, identifying the adequate air supply quantity (equivalence ratio in the range of 0,35 to 0,45) for obtaining a fuel gas with lower heating value around 4 MJ/N m3. (author)

  4. Dimensioning of aerated submerged fixed bed biofilm reactors based on a mathematical biofilm model applied to petrochemical wastewater - the link between theory and practice

    OpenAIRE

    Trojanowicz, Karol; Wójcik, Wtodzimierz

    2014-01-01

    The description of a biofilm mathematical model application for dimensioning an aerated fixed bed biofilm reactor (ASFBBR) for petrochemical wastewater polishing is presented. A simple one-dimensional model of biofilm, developed by P Harremöes, was chosen for this purpose. The model was calibrated and verified under conditions of oil-refinery effluent. The results of ASFBBR dimensioning on the basis of the biofilm model were compared with the bioreactor dimensions determined by application of...

  5. Single-stage anaerobic treatment of non-settled slaughterhouse waste water using a fixed-bed reactor. Einstufige anaerobe Behandlung von nicht abgesetztem Schlachthofabwasser in einem Festbettreaktor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tritt, W.P. (Bundesforschungsanstalt fuer Landwirtschaft, Braunschweig (Germany). Inst. fuer Technologie); Meyer-Jacob, H.

    1992-01-01

    Along with the determination of the degree of acidification during an intermediate storage of the crude slaughterhouse wastewater and deriving a single-stage or two-stage process, the start-up behaviour of the fixed-bed reactor, its degradation rates in upflow and downflow operation is descirbed. With regard to a subsequent biological denitrification the COD/N ratio of anaerobically treated wastewater is given. (orig.).

  6. Experimental studies of the influence of fuel properties and operational conditions on stoking when combusting fuels in a fixed-bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arias, Fabiana; Kolb, T.; Seifert, H.; Gehrmann, Hans-Joachim [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany). Inst. for Technical Chemistry (ITC)

    2013-09-01

    Besides from knowledge about pollutant emission, knowledge of the combustion behavior of fuels plays a major role in the operation and optimization of combustion plants for waste and biomass. If the fuel is exchanged partly or completely in existing or newly designed grate-type combustion plants, adaptation of technical parameters is usually based on purely empirical studies. In the KLEAA fixed-bed reactor of KIT, Institute for Technical Chemistry (ITC), quantitative data on the combustion behavior can be determined from experimental investigations on the laboratory scale. Based on the characteristics obtained, the combustion behavior on a continuous grate can be estimated, This estimation is based on the assumption that no back mixing of the fuel occurs on the grate. Depending on the type of grate, however, stoking and back mixing play an important role. To improve the quality of the characteristics determined in KLEAA and enhance their transferability to the continuous process, it is necessary to determine the influence of fuel properties and operation conditions on stoking. Work is aimed at further developing the characteristics model taking into account a stoking factor describing the combustion behavior of a non-stoked fixed bed compared to a stoked fixed bed. The main task is to make a systematic study of the major parameters influencing stoking (e.g. stroke length, stroke frequency, geometry of the stoking unit, and fuel properties) in a fixed-bed reactor. The results shall be presented in the form of a semi-empirical equation. It is recommended to first study a model fuel, whose fuel properties are defined exactly and can be adjusted variably. Then, a stoking factor shall be derived from the studies. Possibly, a dimension analysis may be helpful. Finally, the results obtained are to be verified for residue-derived fuel. (orig.)

  7. Axial Changes of Catalyst Structure and Temperature in a Fixed-Bed Microreactor During Noble Metal Catalysed Partial Oxidation of Methane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hannemann, S.; Grunwaldt, Jan-Dierk; Kimmerle, B.

    2009-01-01

    The catalytic partial oxidation of methane (CPO) over flame-made 2.5%Rh-2.5%Pt/Al2O3 and 2.5%Rh/Al2O3 in 6%CH4/3%O-2/He shows the potential of in situ studies using miniaturized fixed-bed reactors, the importance of spatially resolved studies and its combination with infrared thermography and on-...

  8. Modelling the transition between fixed and mobile bed conditions in two-phase free-surface flows: The Composite Riemann Problem and its numerical solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosatti, Giorgio; Zugliani, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    In a two-phase free-surface flow, the transition from a mobile-bed condition to a fixed-bed one (and vice versa) occurs at a sharp interface across which the relevant system of partial differential equations changes abruptly. This leads to the possibility of conceiving a new type of Riemann Problem (RP), which we have called Composite Riemann Problem (CRP), where not only the initial constant values of the variables but also the system of equations change from left to right of a discontinuity. In this paper, we present a strategy for solving a CRP by reducing it to a standard RP of a single, composite system of equations. This can be obtained by combining the two original systems by means of a suitable weighting function, namely the erodibility variable, and the introduction of an appropriate differential equation for this quantity. In this way, the CRP problem can be analyzed theoretically with standard methods, and the features of the solutions can be clearly identified. In particular, a stationary contact wave is able to correctly describe the sharp transition between mobile- and fixed-bed conditions. A finite volume scheme based on the Multiple Averages Generalized Roe approach (Rosatti and Begnudelli (2013) [22]) was used to numerically solve the fixed-mobile CRP. Several test cases demonstrate the effectiveness, exact well balanceness and high accuracy of the scheme when applied to problems that fall within the physical range of applicability of the relevant mathematical model.

  9. A Hybrid Mineral Battery: Energy Storage and Dissolution Behavior of CuFeS2 in a Fixed Bed Flow Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deen, Kashif Mairaj; Asselin, Edouard

    2018-05-09

    The development of a hybrid system capable of storing energy and the additional benefit of Cu extraction is discussed in this work. A fixed bed flow cell (FBFC) was used in which a composite negative electrode containing CuFeS 2 (80 wt %) and carbon black (20 wt %) in graphite felt was separated from a positive (graphite felt) electrode by a proton-exchange membrane. The anolyte (0.2 m H 2 SO 4 ) and catholyte (0.5 m Fe 2+ in 0.2 m H 2 SO 4 with or without 0.1 m Cu 2+ ) were circulated in the cell. The electrochemical activity of the Fe 2+ /Fe 3+ redox couple over graphite felt significantly improved after the addition of Cu 2+ in the catholyte. Ultimately, in the CuFeS 2 ∥Fe 2+ /Cu 2+ (CFeCu) FBFC system, the specific capacity increased continuously to 26.4 mAh g -1 in 500 galvanostatic charge-discharge (GCD) cycles, compared to the CuFeS 2 ∥Fe 2+ (CFe) system (13.9 mAh g -1 ). Interestingly, the specific discharge energy gradually increased to 3.6 Wh kg -1 in 500 GCD cycles for the CFeCu system compared to 3.29 Wh kg -1 for the CFe system in 150 cycles. In addition to energy storage, 10.75 % Cu was also extracted from the mineral, which is an important feature of the CFeCu system as it would allow Cu extraction and recovery through hydrometallurgical methods. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. CFD study on the supercritical carbon dioxide cooled pebble bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Dali, E-mail: ydlmitd@outlook.com; Peng, Minjun; Wang, Zhongyi

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • An innovation concept of supercritical carbon dioxide cooled pebble bed reactor is proposed. • Body-centered cuboid (BCCa) arrangement is adopted for the pebbles. • S-CO{sub 2} would be a good candidate coolant for using in pebble bed reactor. - Abstract: The thermal hydraulic study of using supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO{sub 2}), a superior fluid state brayton cycle medium, in pebble bed type nuclear reactor is assessed through computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methodology. Preliminary concept design of this S-CO{sub 2} cooled pebble bed reactor (PBR) is implemented by the well-known KTA heat transfer correlation and Ergun pressure drop equation. Eddy viscosity transport turbulence model is adopted and verified by KTA calculated results. Distributions of the temperature, velocity, pressure and Nusselt (Nu) number of the coolant near the surface of the middle spherical fuel element are obtained and analyzed. The conclusion of the assessment is that S-CO{sub 2} would be a good candidate coolant for using in pebble bed reactor due primarily to its good heat transfer characteristic and large mass density, which could lead to achieve lower pressure drop and higher power density.

  11. Sulfate Adsorption on Iron Nanocomposites on Graphene Oxide and Activated Carbon Beds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rezvan Birooni

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study is an experimental investigation of sulfate removal efficiency using iron nanocomposites on graphene oxide and activated carbon beds. The graphene oxide used was synthesized according to the Hummer method during which process graphene oxide and activated carbon were added. The effects of various parameters including adsorbent content, pH, and contact time on adsorption were investigated. Furthermore, the data were subjected to kinetic studies. Results revealed that the highest absorption rates of 84% and 62% were achieved for iron on the graphene oxide and activated carbon beds, respectively, when 0.06 g of the adsorbent was used at pH =11 over a contact time of 9 hours. It was also found that the kinetic pseudo-second-order model best fit the data. Finally, the results indicated that the two environmentally-friendly adsorbents have a good potential for removing sulfate from aqueous solutions.

  12. Thin-film fixed-bed reactor (TFFBR for solar photocatalytic inactivation of aquaculture pathogen Aeromonas hydrophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan Sadia J

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Outbreaks of infectious diseases by microbial pathogens can cause substantial losses of stock in aquaculture systems. There are several ways to eliminate these pathogens including the use of antibiotics, biocides and conventional disinfectants, but these leave undesirable chemical residues. Conversely, using sunlight for disinfection has the advantage of leaving no chemical residue and is particularly suited to countries with sunny climates. Titanium dioxide (TiO2 is a photocatalyst that increases the effectiveness of solar disinfection. In recent years, several different types of solar photocatalytic reactors coated with TiO2 have been developed for waste water and drinking water treatment. In this study a thin-film fixed-bed reactor (TFFBR, designed as a sloping flat plate reactor coated with P25 DEGUSSA TiO2, was used. Results The level of inactivation of the aquaculture pathogen Aeromonas hydrophila ATCC 35654 was determined after travelling across the TFFBR under various natural sunlight conditions (300-1200 W m-2, at 3 different flow rates (4.8, 8.4 and 16.8 L h-1. Bacterial numbers were determined by conventional plate counting using selective agar media, cultured (i under conventional aerobic conditions to detect healthy cells and (ii under conditions designed to neutralise reactive oxygen species (agar medium supplemented with the peroxide scavenger sodium pyruvate at 0.05% w/v, incubated under anaerobic conditions, to detect both healthy and sub-lethally injured (oxygen-sensitive cells. The results clearly demonstrate that high sunlight intensities (≥ 600 W m-2 and low flow rates (4.8 L h-1 provided optimum conditions for inactivation of A. hydrophila ATCC 3564, with greater overall inactivation and fewer sub-lethally injured cells than at low sunlight intensities or high flow rates. Low sunlight intensities resulted in reduced overall inactivation and greater sub-lethal injury at all flow rates. Conclusions This

  13. Modeling of carbon sequestration in coal-beds: A variable saturated simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Guoxiang; Smirnov, Andrei V.

    2008-01-01

    Storage of carbon dioxide in deep coal seams is a profitable method to reduce the concentration of green house gases in the atmosphere while the methane as a byproduct can be extracted during carbon dioxide injection into the coal seam. In this procedure, the key element is to keep carbon dioxide in the coal seam without escaping for a long term. It is depended on many factors such as properties of coal basin, fracture state, phase equilibrium, etc., especially the porosity, permeability and saturation of the coal seam. In this paper, a variable saturation model was developed to predict the capacity of carbon dioxide sequestration and coal-bed methane recovery. This variable saturation model can be used to track the saturation variability with the partial pressures change caused by carbon dioxide injection. Saturation variability is a key factor to predict the capacity of carbon dioxide storage and methane recovery. Based on this variable saturation model, a set of related variables including capillary pressure, relative permeability, porosity, coupled adsorption model, concentration and temperature equations were solved. From results of the simulation, historical data agree with the variable saturation model as well as the adsorption model constructed by Langmuir equations. The Appalachian basin, as an example, modeled the carbon dioxide sequestration in this paper. The results of the study and the developed models can provide the projections for the CO 2 sequestration and methane recovery in coal-beds within different regional specifics

  14. Carburization in fluidized bed of carbon-graphite materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murav' ev, V I

    1977-01-01

    A study has been made of the diffusion saturation with carbon of the surface of titanium alloy VT1-1, molybdenum and 08KP steel with respect to the type of carbographitic materials, methods of pseudoliquefaction and heating in the temperature interval 800 to 1100/sup 0/ deg C. Used as the carburizing materials have been charcoal, acetylene black, charcoal carburizer, graphitized particles, pyrobenzene. The maximum carburizing effect is shown to be possessed by charcoal, the minimum effect - by acetylene black. Carburization in the pseudoliquid layer is 5 to 7 times as intensive as in the case of gas cementation and in a solid carburizer. No oxidation of the materials and hydrogenation of titanium has been observed in the temperature interval under study.

  15. Synthesis and characterization of organic–inorganic core–shell structure nanocomposite and application for Zn ions removal from aqueous solution in a fixed-bed column

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghasemi, Shokoofeh [Faculty of Chemical, Gas and Petroleum Engineering, Semnan University, Semnan 35131-19111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghorbani, Mohsen, E-mail: M.ghorbani@nit.ac.ir [Faculty of Chemical Engineering, Babol University of Technology, P.O. Box 484, Babol (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghazi, Mohsen Mehdipour [Faculty of Chemical, Gas and Petroleum Engineering, Semnan University, Semnan 35131-19111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-12-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles were prepared in one step using ultrasonic radiation and coated by polyrhodanine. • Nanocomposite synthesized with core average diameter of 15 nm and polyrhodanine as shell with thickness of 1.5 nm • Application of products was investigated to separate zinc ions from aqueous solution in a fixed-bed column. • The Adams–Bohart, BDST, Thomas and Yoon–Nelson models used to predict model parameters. • The models were nearly in good agreement with the experimental data. - Abstract: An organic–inorganic core/shell structure, γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/polyrhodanine nanocomposite with γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticle as core with average diameter of 15 nm and polyrhodanine as shell with thickness of 1.5 nm, has been synthesized via chemical oxidation polymerization and applied for adsorption of Zn ions from aqueous solution in a fixed-bed column. The properties of nanocomposite were characterized with transmission electron microscope (TEM), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The performance of the column was assessed under variable bed heights (10, 15 and 20 cm) and influent Zn concentrations (50, 100 and 150 ppm) at a constant flow rate (0.5 mL/min). The results demonstrated that the breakthrough curves are S-shaped and the breakthrough time increases with increasing bed height and decreases with increasing influent concentration. Moreover, the dynamics of the adsorption process were evaluated by using Adams–Bohart, bed depth service time (BDST), Thomas and Yoon–Nelson kinetic models. The models were nearly in good agreement with the experimental data.

  16. The behavior of xenon dynamic adsorption on granular activated carbon packed bed adsorber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chongyang Zhou; Shujuan Feng; Guoqing Zhou; Yuren Jin; Junfu Liang; Jingming Xu

    2011-01-01

    In order to retard radioxenon release into the atmosphere from nuclear power station or to sensitively monitor its concentration to ensure environmental and human safety, it is necessary to know the behavior of xenon dynamic adsorption on granular activated carbon pack bed adsorber. The quantities, including the dynamic adsorption coefficient (k d ), the amount of xenon adsorbed (q), the length of mass transfer zone (L MTZ ) and the length of the unused bed (LUB), used to describe the adsorption behavior, were sorted out and calculated. The factors, including xenon concentrations, pressures and temperatures, to affect these quantities were investigated. The results show that: (1) The values of k d and q decrease with increasing temperatures, but increase with increasing pressures, (2) The values of L MTZ and LUB increase with increasing temperatures or pressures, but are independent of concentrations. Knowledge of these quantities is very helpful for packed bed adsorber operation. (author)

  17. 3D numerical model of the spherical particle saltation in a channel with a rough fixed bed

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lukerchenko, Nikolay; Piatsevich, Siarhei; Chára, Zdeněk; Vlasák, Pavel

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 2 (2009), s. 100-112 ISSN 0042-790X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA103/06/1487 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20600510 Keywords : 3D Saltation Model * Bed-Load Transport * Particle-Bed Collision * Particle Rotation * Particle Lateral Dispersion Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 1.000, year: 2009

  18. An overview of CFD modelling of small-scale fixed-bed biomass pellet boilers with preliminary results from a simplified approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaney, Joel; Liu Hao; Li Jinxing

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Overview of the overall approach of modelling fixed-bed biomass boilers in CFD. ► Bed sub-models of moisture evaporation, devolatisation and char combustion reviewed. ► A method of embedding a combustion model in discrete fuel zones within the CFD is suggested. ► Includes sample of preliminary results for a 50 kW pellet boiler. ► Clear physical trends predicted. - Abstract: The increasing global energy demand and mounting pressures for CO 2 mitigation call for increased efficient utilization of biomass, particularly for heating domestic and commercial buildings. The authors of the present paper are investigating the optimization of the combustion performance and NO x emissions of a 50 kW biomass pellet boiler fabricated by a UK manufacturer. The boiler has a number of adjustable parameters including the ratio of air flow split between the primary and secondary supplies, the orientation, height, direction and number of the secondary inlets. The optimization of these parameters provides opportunities to improve both the combustion efficiency and NO x emissions. When used carefully in conjunction with experiments, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modelling is a useful tool for rapidly and at minimum cost examining the combustion performance and emissions from a boiler with multiple variable parameters. However, modelling combustion and emissions of a small-scale biomass pellet boiler is not trivial and appropriate fixed-bed models that can be coupled with the CFD code are required. This paper reviews previous approaches specifically relevant to simulating fixed-bed biomass boilers. In the first part it considers approaches to modelling the heterogeneous solid phase and coupling this with the gas phase. The essential components of the sub-models are then overviewed. Importantly, for the optimization process a model is required that has a good balance between accuracy in predicting physical trends, with low computational run time. Finally, a

  19. A study on purification of Kr and Xe from He carrier gas in HTGR by fixed bed adsorption%吸附法净化高温气冷堆He载气中Kr、Xe的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    廖翠萍; 郑振宏; 施福恩; 周大森

    2001-01-01

    用椰子壳活性炭吸附剂固定床吸附法去除高温气冷堆He载气中Kr、Xe杂质。获得了Kr、Xe在椰子壳活性炭上的动吸附规律。考察了吸附温度、浓度、流速及床高等因素对保护作用时间、完全饱和时间、吸附容量的影响,获得最佳运行参数。结果表明:采用椰子壳活性炭可以除去高温气冷堆He载气中Kr、Xe等有害杂质,满足净化系统的要求。%The purification of krypton and xenon from the helium carrier gas of high temperature gas-cooled reactor by fixed bed activate carbon adsorption is studied.Experimental data at different adsorptive temperature,concentration,flow rate and bed depth are obtained from isothermal adsorption tests in order to examine the effects of these parameters on adsorption dynamic and for the optimal parameters selection of adsorption process.The results show that krypton and xenon from the helium carrier gas in HTGR can be eliminated by the coconut putamina activated carbon to meet the demands of purification system.

  20. Carbon Accounting and Cost Estimation in Forestry Projects Using CO2Fix V.3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groen, T.; Nabuurs, G.J.; Schelhaas, M.J.

    2006-01-01

    Carbon and financial accounting of projects in the Land Use, Land-Use Change and Forestry sector is a topic of hot debate. Large uncertainty remains concerning the carbon dynamics, the way they should be accounted and the cost efficiency of the projects. Part of the uncertainty can be alleviated by standardisation and transparency of reporting methods. For this reason we further developed CO2FIX, a forest ecosystem carbon model, with modules for carbon and financial accounting. The model is applied to four cases: (1) Joint implementation afforestation project in Romania, (2) Forest management project in Central Europe, (3) Reduced impact logging possibly under the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) in the future, and (4) Afforestation with native species under the Clean Development Mechanism. The results show the wide applicability of CO2FIX, from degrading grasslands as baseline cases to multiple cohort forest ecosystems. Also the results show that Forest Management in the European case can generate considerable amounts of carbon emission reductions. Further, the results show that although reduced impact logging is not yet an allowed option under the Clean Development Mechanism, it shows promising results in that it is (1) very cost effective, (2) seems to be able to generate intermediate amounts of credits and (3) seems to us as a project type that is not prone to leakage issues. These results are yet another indication to seriously consider reduced impact logging as an eligible measure under the CDM

  1. CO-FIRING COAL, FEEDLOT, AND LITTER BIOMASS (CFB AND LFB) FUELS IN PULVERIZED FUEL AND FIXED BED BURNERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalyan Annamalai; John Sweeten; Saqib Mukhtar; Ben Thien; Gengsheng Wei; Soyuz Priyadarsan

    2002-01-01

    result as the levels of N are higher in the biomass fuel than in coal. Further experiments showed that biomass is twice or more effective than coal when used in a reburning process to reduce NO(sub x) emissions. Since crushing costs of biomass fuels may be prohibitive, stoker firing may be cost effective; in order simulate such a firing, future work will investigate the performance of a gasifier when fired with larger sized coal and biomass. It will be a fixed bed gasifier, and will evaluate blends, coal, and biomass. Computer simulations were performed using the PCGC-2 code supplied by BYU and modified by A and M with three mixture fractions for handling animal based biomass fuels in order to include an improved moisture model for handling wet fuels and phosphorus oxidation. Finally the results of the economic analysis show that considerable savings can be achieved with the use of biomass. In the case of higher ash and moisture biomass, the fuel cost savings will be reduced, due to increased transportation costs. A spreadsheet program was created to analyze the fuel savings for a variety of different moisture levels, ash levels, and power plant operating parameters

  2. CO-FIRING COAL, FEEDLOT, AND LITTER BIOMASS (CFB AND LFB) FUELS IN PULVERIZED FUEL AND FIXED BED BURNERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalyan Annamalai; John Sweeten; Saqib Mukhtar; Ben Thien; Gengsheng Wei; Soyuz Priyadarsan

    2002-01-15

    result as the levels of N are higher in the biomass fuel than in coal. Further experiments showed that biomass is twice or more effective than coal when used in a reburning process to reduce NO{sub x} emissions. Since crushing costs of biomass fuels may be prohibitive, stoker firing may be cost effective; in order simulate such a firing, future work will investigate the performance of a gasifier when fired with larger sized coal and biomass. It will be a fixed bed gasifier, and will evaluate blends, coal, and biomass. Computer simulations were performed using the PCGC-2 code supplied by BYU and modified by A&M with three mixture fractions for handling animal based biomass fuels in order to include an improved moisture model for handling wet fuels and phosphorus oxidation. Finally the results of the economic analysis show that considerable savings can be achieved with the use of biomass. In the case of higher ash and moisture biomass, the fuel cost savings will be reduced, due to increased transportation costs. A spreadsheet program was created to analyze the fuel savings for a variety of different moisture levels, ash levels, and power plant operating parameters.

  3. CARBON FIXING CAPACITY OF AMAZONIAN SOILS IN RELATION TO ITS DEGRADATION CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Patricia Peña Venegas

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Amazonian deforestation and transformation alert about their effects worldwide. One concern is the increase of the Carbon (C levels emitted. Previous works have estimated the fixed C in Amazon forests without including the C stored in soils. Within soil, the organic carbon molecules are highly sensitive to degradation, affecting the natural capacity of soils to fix and store C. The present study evaluates the impact of degradation in the natural capacity of Amazon soils to fix C. Thirty five farms with different typology were selected in Caquetá department which hold the highest deforestation and soil degradation rates in the Colombian Amazon. Soil samples were taken from natural forest relicts, cropping areas and introduced pastures of the farms, in locations with high, intermediate and low soil degradation. Aerial biomass was estimated in pastures with different level of soil degradation. Changes in the labile C stock were estimated from the soil organic carbon and the microbial biomass using substrate induced respiration. Results showed that the main C pool is in the natural forest relicts and the crops of the farms, independently from the size or type of farm sampled. The hills with higher intervention showed the lowest soil C fixation capacities. The soil C fixation capacity was related with changes in the soil microbial composition where conserved soils store preferentially C as fungal biomass while degraded soils store C as bacterial biomass. These estimations contribute to establish the cost of sustainability and soil degradation in the Colombian Amazon.

  4. Effect of process parameters on removal and recovery of Cd(II) and Cu(II) from electroplating wastewater by fixed-bed column of nano-dimensional titanium (IV) oxide agglomerates

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Debnath, S

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Removal performances of Cd(II) and Cu(II) from water was investigated using agglomerated nanoparticle of hydrous titanium(IV) oxide (NTO) packed fixed bed. The parameters varied were the bed depth, flow rate and feed solution concentrations...

  5. Discussion of the applicability of overdammed fixed-bed reactors in nitrification processes; Beitrag zum Einsatz von ueberstauten Festbettreaktoren zur Nitrifikation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guenter, H.O.

    1996-12-31

    The investigation aimed at developing a dimensioning method for overdammed fixed bed nitrification reactors with plug flow which takes account of the reactor height. Further, information was to be obtained for assessing sudden loads and for comparing energy consumption with the data of conventional activated sludge plants. (orig./SR) [Deutsch] Ziel dieser Arbeit ist es, fuer ueberstaute, pfropfendurchstroemte Festbettreaktoren zur Nitrifikation einen Bemessungsansatz aufzustellen, welcher den Einfluss der Reaktorhoehe mit beruecksichtigt. Ferner sollten Erkenntnisse zur Beurteilung von Stossbelastungen sowie zum Energiebedarf im Vergleich zu herkoemmlichen Belebungsanlagen gewonnen werden. (orig./SR)

  6. Propene and l-octene hydroformylation with silica-supported, ionic liquid-phase (SILP) Rh-phosphine catalysts in continuous fixed-bed mode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisager, Anders; Eriksen, Kim Michael; Wasserscheid, Peter

    2003-01-01

    - and liquid-phase hydroformylation of propene and 1-octene, exhibiting TOFs up to 88 h(-1) for SILP Rh-2 catalysts, while only low selectivities up to 74% n-aldehyde (n/iso ratio of 2.8) were obtained. This is the first example of continuous fixed-bed liquid-phase hydroformylation using SILP catalysts.......Supported ionic liquid-phase (SILP) catalysts were made by immobilizing Rh-monophosphine complexes of bis(m-phenylguanidinium) phenylphosphine 1 and NORBOS 2 ligands in 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate, [BMIM] [PF6], on a silica support. The catalysts were active in continuous gas...

  7. Chromium(VI) removal from water using fixed bed column of polypyrrole/Fe3O4 nanocomposite

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Bhaumik, M

    2013-06-07

    Full Text Available on the adsorption characteristics of adsorbent was explored at pH 2. Experimental results confirmed that the breakthrough curves were dependent on bed mass, initial Cr(VI) concentration and flow rate. Three kinetic models; Yoon–Nelson, Thomas, Bohart–Adams were...

  8. Synthesis of zeolites coal ash in surfactant modified in application and removal of orange 8 acid solution: study in batch, fixed bed column and evaluation ecotoxicological

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magdalena, Carina Pitwak

    2015-01-01

    In this study, synthesized zeolitic material from coal ash and modified cationic surfactant was used for removing the acid dye Orange 8 (AL8) by adsorption process using moving bed and fixed-bed column. The raw material and adsorbents were characterized by different techniques, such as X-ray diffraction, X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, among others. The adsorption of AL8 was performed by moving bed in order to optimize the results when they are launched in a fixed bed. The effects of adsorption on zeolite AL8 were compared: (1) Effect of counterions Br - and Cl - surfactant used in the modification of the zeolite; (2) effect of type of coal ash used as raw material in the synthesis of zeolites (fly and bottom). The following adsorbents were used in the study: fly and bottom zeolite modified by surfactant hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (ZLMS-Br-Br and ZPMS-Br) and fly zeolite modified by surfactant hexadecyltrimethylammonium chloride (ZLMS-Cl). The pseudo-second-order kinetic described the adsorption of the dye on all adsorbents. The equilibrium time was reached 40, 60 and 120 min for ZLMS-Br, ZLMS-Cl and ZPMS-Br, respectively. The adsorption equilibrium was analyzed by the equations of the models of linear and nonlinear isotherms of Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin and Dubinin- Radushkevivh (DR) and the criterion of best fit was evaluated using the error functions.The DR model was adjusted better to the experimental data for the system AL8 / ZLMS-Br, the Freundlich model for AL8 / ZLMS-Cl and Langmuir for AL8 / ZPMS. According to the Langmuir maximum adsorption capacity was 4.67, 1.48 and 1.38 mg g -1 for ZLMS-Br, ZLMS-Cl and ZPMS-Br, in order. In studies employing fixed bed columns, the effects of inlet concentration (20- 30 mg L -1 ), flow rate (4.0 -5.3 mL min -1 ) and the bed height (5, 5 - 6.5 cm) above the breakthrough curves characteristics in the adsorption system were determined. The Adams-Bohart, Thomas, Yoon-Nelson models were applied to experimental

  9. Carbon nanotubes shynthesis in fluidized bed reactor equipped with a cyclone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setyopratomo, P.; Sudibandriyo, M.; Wulan, P. P. D. K.

    2018-03-01

    This work aimed to observe the performance of a fluidized bed reactor which was equipped with a cyclone in the synthesis of carbon nanotubes (CNT) by chemical vapor deposition. Liquefied petroleum gas with a constant volumetric flow rate of 1940 cm3/minutes was fed to the reactor as a carbon source, while a combination of metal components of Fe-Co-Mo supported on MgO was used as catalyst. The CNT synthesis was carried out at a reaction temperature which was maintained at around 800 – 850 °C for 1 hour. The CNT yield was decreased sharply when the catalyst feed was increased. The carbon efficiency is directly proportional to the mass of catalyst fed. It was found from the experiment that the mass of as-grown CNT increased in proportion to the increase of the catalyst mass fed. A sharp increase of the mass percentage of carbon nanotubes entrainment happened when the catalyst feed was raised from 3 to 7 grams. Agglomerates of carbon nanotubes have been formed. The agglomerates composed of mutually entangled carbon nanotubes which have an outer diameter range 8 – 14 nm and an inner diameter range 4 – 10 nm, which confirmed that the multi-walled carbon nanotubes were formed in this synthesis. It was found that the mesopores dominate the pore structure of the CNT product and contribute more than 90 % of the total pore volume.

  10. Interactions among Carbon Dioxide, Heat, and Chemical Lures in Attracting the Bed Bug, Cimex lectularius L. (Hemiptera: Cimicidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narinderpal Singh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Commercial bed bug (Cimex lectularius L. monitors incorporating carbon dioxide (CO2, heat, and chemical lures are being used for detecting bed bugs; however, there are few reported studies on the effectiveness of chemical lures in bed bug monitors and the interactions among chemical lure, CO2, and heat. We screened 12 chemicals for their attraction to bed bugs and evaluated interactions among chemical lures, CO2, and heat. The chemical lure mixture consisting of nonanal, 1-octen-3-ol, spearmint oil, and coriander Egyptian oil was found to be most attractive to bed bugs and significantly increased the trap catches in laboratory bioassays. Adding this chemical lure mixture when CO2 was present increased the trap catches compared with traps baited with CO2 alone, whereas adding heat did not significantly increase trap catches when CO2 was present. Results suggest a combination of chemical lure and CO2 is essential for designing effective bed bug monitors.

  11. Application of response surface methodology and semi-mechanistic model to optimize fluoride removal using crushed concrete in a fixed-bed column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Bon-Wun; Lee, Chang-Gu; Park, Seong-Jik

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the removal of fluoride from aqueous solutions by using crushed concrete fines as a filter medium under varying conditions of pH 3-7, flow rate of 0.3-0.7 mL/min, and filter depth of 10-20 cm. The performance of fixed-bed columns was evaluated on the basis of the removal ratio (Re), uptake capacity (qe), degree of sorbent used (DoSU), and sorbent usage rate (SUR) obtained from breakthrough curves (BTCs). Three widely used semi-mechanistic models, that is, Bohart-Adams, Thomas, and Yoon-Nelson models, were applied to simulate the BTCs and to derive the design parameters. The Box-Behnken design of response surface methodology (RSM) was used to elucidate the individual and interactive effects of the three operational parameters on the column performance and to optimize these parameters. The results demonstrated that pH is the most important factor in the performance of fluoride removal by a fixed-bed column. The flow rate had a significant negative influence on Re and DoSU, and the effect of filter depth was observed only in the regression model for DoSU. Statistical analysis indicated that the model attained from the RSM study is suitable for describing the semi-mechanistic model parameters.

  12. Removal of furan and phenolic compounds from simulated biomass hydrolysates by batch adsorption and continuous fixed-bed column adsorption methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Cheol; Park, Sunkyu

    2016-09-01

    It has been proposed to remove all potential inhibitors and sulfuric acid in biomass hydrolysates generated from dilute-acid pretreatment of biomass, based on three steps of sugar purification process. This study focused on its first step in which furan and phenolic compounds were selectively removed from the simulated hydrolysates using activated charcoal. Batch adsorption experiments demonstrated that the affinity of activated charcoal for each component was highest in the order of vanillic acid, 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, furfural, acetic acid, sulfuric acid, and xylose. The affinity of activated charcoal for furan and phenolic compounds proved to be significantly higher than that of the other three components. Four separation strategies were conducted with a combination of batch adsorption and continuous fixed-bed column adsorption methods. It was observed that xylose loss was negligible with near complete removal of furan and phenolic compounds, when at least one fixed-bed column adsorption was implemented in the strategy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Numerical investigation of flow and heat transfer in a novel configuration multi-tubular fixed bed reactor for propylene to acrolein process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Bin; Hao, Li; Zhang, Luhong; Sun, Yongli; Xiao, Xiaoming

    2015-01-01

    In the present contribution, a numerical study of fluid flow and heat transfer performance in a pilot-scale multi-tubular fixed bed reactor for propylene to acrolein oxidation reaction is presented using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) method. Firstly, a two-dimensional CFD model is developed to simulate flow behaviors, catalytic oxidation reaction, heat and mass transfer adopting porous medium model on tube side to achieve the temperature distribution and investigate the effect of operation parameters on hot spot temperature. Secondly, based on the conclusions of tube-side, a novel configuration multi-tubular fixed-bed reactor comprising 790 tubes design with disk-and-doughnut baffles is proposed by comparing with segmental baffles reactor and their performance of fluid flow and heat transfer is analyzed to ensure the uniformity condition using molten salt as heat carrier medium on shell-side by three-dimensional CFD method. The results reveal that comprehensive performance of the reactor with disk-and-doughnut baffles is better than that of with segmental baffles. Finally, the effects of operating conditions to control the hot spots are investigated. The results show that the flow velocity range about 0.65 m/s is applicable and the co-current cooling system flow direction is better than counter-current flow to control the hottest temperature.

  14. Determination of the Removal Efficiency of Linear Alkyl Benzene Sulphonate Acids (LAS in Fixed Bed Aeration Tank and Conventional Activated Sludge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asghar Ebrahimi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Linear Alkyl Benzene Sulphonate Acids (LAS are one of the anionic surfactants that are produced and used in large quantities in different countries and find their way into the natural environment through sewer systems. These compounds may potentially cause environmental hazards in such surface waters as rivers. It is, therefore, necessary to remove as much of these compounds as possible by biological processes in wastewater treatment plants. For this purpose, four parallel biological reactors were constructed that used the conventional activated sludge and aeration tanks with fixed bed on the bench scale in order to evaluate the removal efficiency of LAS. The reactors were operated under conditions similar to domestic wastewater treatment plants. Parameters of interest were measured according to standard methods and ANOVA and T-test were used for the statistical analysis of the data. The results showed that aeration tanks with fixed beds yielded higher values of LAS and COD removal and air consumption compared to the conventional activated sludge system. It was shown that the two systems studied achieved LAS removal efficiencies of 96% and 94% for an influent LAS concentration of 5 mg/L. Further, it was found that the effluents from both systems satisfied water quality standards for discharge into surface waters (

  15. Study of process parameters for reducing ammonium uranyl carbonate to uranium dioxide in fluidized bed furnace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leitao Junior, C.B.

    1992-01-01

    This work consists of studying the process parameters of AUC (ammonium uranyl carbonate) to U O 2 (uranium dioxide) reduction, with good physical and chemical characteristics, in fluidized bed. Initially, it was performed U O 2 cold fluidization experiments with an acrylic column. Afterward, it was done AUC to U O 2 reduction experiments, in which the process parameters influence in the granulometry, specific surface area, porosity and fluoride amount on the U O 2 powder produced were studied. As a last step, it was done compacting and sintering tests of U O 2 pellets in order to appreciate the U O 2 powder performance, obtained by fluidized bed, in the fuel pellets fabrication. (author)

  16. Thermal-hydraulic study of fixed bed nuclear reactor (FBNR), in FCC, BCC and pseudo-random configurations of the core through CFD method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luna, M.; Chavez, I.; Cajas, D.; Santos, R.

    2015-01-01

    The study of thermal-hydraulic performance of a fixed bed nuclear reactor (FBNR) core and the effect of the porosity was studied by the CFD method with 'SolidWorks' software. The representative sections of three different packed beds arrangements were analyzed: face-centered cubic (FCC), body-centered cubic (BCC), and a pseudo-random, with values of porosity of 0.28, 0.33 and 0.53 respectively. The minimum coolant flow required to avoid the phase change for each one of the configurations was determined. The results show that the heat transfer rate increases when the porosity value decreases, and consequently the minimum coolant flow in each configuration. The results of minimum coolant flow were: 728.51 kg/s for the FCC structure, 372.72 kg/s for the BCC, and 304.96 kg/s for the pseudo-random. Meanwhile, the heat transfer coefficients in each packed bed were 6480 W/m 2 *K, 3718 W/m 2 *K and 3042 W/m 2 *K respectively. Finally the pressure drop was calculated, and the results were 0.588 MPa for FCC configuration, 0.033 MPa for BCC and 0.017 MPa for the pseudo-random one. This means that with a higher porosity, the fluid can circulate easier because there are fewer obstacles to cross, so there are fewer energy losses. (authors)

  17. Observations of the vertical structure of turbulent oscillatory boundary layers above fixed roughness beds using a prototype wideband coherent Doppler profiler: 1. The oscillatory component of the flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, Alex E.; Zedel, Len; Cheel, Richard; Dillon, Jeremy

    2012-03-01

    Results are presented from an experimental investigation of rough turbulent oscillatory boundary layers using a prototype wideband bistatic coherent Doppler profiler. The profiler operates in the 1.2 MHz to 2.3 MHz frequency band and uses software-defined radio technologies for digital control of the frequency content and shape of the transmit pulse and for digital complex demodulation of the received signals. Velocity profiles are obtained at sub-millimeter range resolution and 100 Hz profiling rates (each profile being an ensemble average of 10 pulse pairs). The measurements were carried out above beds of fixed sand or gravel particles, with median grain diameters of 0.37 mm and 3.9 mm, respectively, oscillating sinusoidally at a 10 s period through excursions of 0.75 m to 1.5 m. The resulting vertical profiles of horizontal velocity magnitude and phase, with the vertical axis scaled by ℓ = κu∗m/ω, are comparable to similarly scaled profiles obtained using laser Doppler anemometry by Sleath (1987) and Jensen (1988). A key objective of the comparisons between the previous experiments and those reported here was to establish how close to the bed reliable velocity measurements can be made with the sonar. This minimum distance above the bed is estimated to be 5 ± 1 mm, a value approaching the 3 to 4 mm limit set by the path of least time.

  18. Design, fabrication and initial evaluation of an upflow fixed-bed adsorption column for lead (Pb2+) using Carica papaya seeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piquero, Ronald E.

    2005-03-01

    The study is about the adsorption pf lead (Pb 2+ ) using Carica papaya as biosorbent in an upflow continuous fixed-bed adsorption column. A column was designed and fabricated which was used in the experiment. It aimed to determine the effect of flowrates in the adsorption mechanism of the biosorbent. Three flowrates were used in the experiment: 100 mL/min, 150 mL/min, and 200 mL/min. A solution of 100 ppm of unbuffered lead was allowed to pass through a bed of biosorbent that has a length of 15 cm and the amount of lead ions was measured using flame atomic absorption spectroscopy in terms of residual concentration of lead in the outlet stream. The result showed that the 100 mL/min flowrate had the lowest amount of residual concentration measured compared to the 150 mL/min and 200 mL/min. This means that the 100 mL/min had the most lead ions adsorbed. Statistical test like the one-factor anova and t-test were also done in the research. Anova result showed that the flowrate has significant effect in the adsorption of lead ions of the biosorbent while the t-test results showed that the 100 ml/min is the most effective flowrate wherein the bed had adsorbed the most amounts of ions. (Author)

  19. Carbon K-shell photoionization of fixed-in-space C2H4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osipov, T.; Belkacem, A.; Schoeffler, M.; Weber, Th.; Prior, M. H.; Stener, M.; Schmidt, L.; Doerner, R.; Landers, A.; Cocke, C. L.

    2010-01-01

    Measurements of the photoelectron angular distributions in the body-fixed frame (MFPAD) have been carried out for 290- to 320-eV photons (just above the carbon K-shell ionization threshold) on C 2 H 4 using an approach based on cold-target recoil-ion momentum spectroscopy (COLTRIMS). The results are compared with a theoretical calculation and excellent agreement is found. A direct verification of the 'f-wave shape resonance' is accomplished by obtaining the complex amplitude of the l=3 partial wave, which shows a peak in its absolute value and a relative phase change of π as the energy is scanned across the resonance.

  20. Mathematical modeling of the adsorption/desorption characteristics of anthocyanins from muscadine (Vitis rotundifolia cv. Noble) juice pomace on Amberlite FPX66 resin in a fixed bed column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzdevenes, Chad G; Gao, Chi; Sandhu, Amandeep K; Yagiz, Yavuz; Gu, Liwei

    2018-03-24

    Muscadine grape pomace, a by-product of juicing and wine-making, contains significant amounts of anthocyanin 3,5-diglucosides, known to be beneficial to human health. The objective of this research was to use mathematical modeling to investigate the adsorption/desorption characteristics of these anthocyanins from muscadine grape pomace on Amberlite FPX66 resin in a fixed bed column. Anthocyanins were extracted using hot water and ultrasound, and the extracts were loaded onto a resin column at five bed depths (5, 6, 8, 10 and 12 cm) using three flow rates (4, 6 and 8 mL min -1 ). It was found that adsorption on the column fitted the bed depth service time (BDST) model and the empty bed residence time (EBRT) model. Desorption was achieved by eluting the column using ethanol at four concentrations (25, 40, 55 and 70% v/v) and could be described with an empirical sigmoid model. The breakthrough curves of anthocyanins fitted the BDST model for all three flow rates with R 2 values of 0.983, 0.992 and 0.984 respectively. The EBRT model was successfully employed to find the operating lines, which allow for column scale-up while still achieving similar results to those found in a laboratory operation. Desorption with 40% (v/v) ethanol achieved the highest recovery rate of anthocyanins at 79.6%. The mathematical models established in this study can be used in designing a pilot/industrial- scale column for the separation and concentration of anthocyanins from muscadine juice pomace. © 2018 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2018 Society of Chemical Industry.

  1. Development of a reduction process of ammonium uranyl carbonate to uranium dioxide in a fluidized bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, R.P.; Riella, H.G.

    1990-07-01

    Laboratory development of ammonium uranyl carbonate (AUC) reduction to uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) using fluidized bed furnace technique is described. The reaction is carried out at 500-550 0 C using hydrogen, liberated from cracking of ammonia, as a reducing agent. As the AUC used is obtained from uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) it contains considerable amount of fluoride (approx. 500μg/g) as contaminant. The presence of fluoride leads to high corrosion rates and hence the fluoride concentration is reduced by pyrohydrolisis of UO 2 . Physical and Chemical properties of the final product (UO 2 ) obtained were characterized. (author) [pt

  2. Development of fluidized-bed furnace for thermal treatment of ammonium uranyl carbonate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, U C; Anuradha, M; Meena, R [Nuclear Fuel Complex, Hyderabad (India)

    1994-06-01

    At present the ammonium uranyl carbonate (AUC) route is developed at a scale of 10 kg/day of UO{sub 2}. This UO{sub 2} is directly compactible and sinterable to densities of 10.55-10.65 gm/cc. The equipment developed include precipitation tank with filtration and methanol washing and fluidized bed furnaces for thermal treatment of AUC and U{sub 3}O{sub 8}. During the design and development of these furnaces many experiments were conducted to study fluidization of AUC powder. In this paper the findings of these studies are presented. (author). 3 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Development of ammonium uranyl carbonate reduction to uranium dioxide using fluidized bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, R.P.; Riella, H.G.

    1988-01-01

    Laboratory development of Ammonium Uranyl Carbonate (AUC) reduction to uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) using fluidized bed furnace technique is described. The reaction is carried out at 500-550 0 C using hydrogen, liberated from cracking of ammonia, as a reducing agent. As the AUC used is obtained from uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) it contains considerable amounts of fluoride ( - 500μgF - /gTCAU) as contaminant. The presence of fluoride leads to high corrosion rates and hence the fluoride concentrations is reduced by pyrohydrolisis of UO 2 . Physical and Chemical proterties of the final product (UO 2 ) obtained were characterized. (author) [pt

  4. Transformation of carbon tetrachloride in an anaerobic packed-bed reactor without addition of another electron donor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Best, JH; Hunneman, P; Doddema, HJ; Janssen, DB; Harder, W; Doddema, Hans J.

    1999-01-01

    Carbon tetrachloride (52 mu M) was biodegraded for more than 72% in an anaerobic packed-bed reactor without addition of an external electron donor. The chloride mass balance demonstrated that all carbon tetrachloride transformed was completely dechlorinated. Chloroform and dichloromethane were

  5. Transformation of carbon tetrachloride in an anaerobic packed-bed reactor without addition of another electron donor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Best, J.H. de; Hunneman, P.; Doddema, H.J.; Janssen, D.B.; Harder, W.

    1999-01-01

    Carbon tetrachloride (52 μM) was biodegraded for more than 72% in an anaerobic packed-bed reactor without addition of an external electron donor. The chloride mass balance demonstrated that all carbon tetrachloride transformed was completely dechlorinated. Chloroform and dichloromethane were

  6. Influence of aging on the retention of elemental radioiodine by deep bed carbon filters under accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deuber, H.

    1985-01-01

    No significant difference was found in the retention of I-131 loaded as I 2 , by various impregnated activated carbons that had been aged in the containment exhaust air of a pressurized water reactor over a period of 12 months. In all the cases, the I-131 passing through deep beds of carbon was in a nonelemental form. It was concluded that a minimum retention of 99.99%, as required by new guidelines for certain accident filters, can be equally well achieved with various carbons in deep beds

  7. Evolutionary and geologic consequences of organic carbon fixing in the primitive anoxic ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, W. B. N.; Wilde, P.

    1983-03-01

    Steps leading to development of the modern photic-based marine food web are postulated as the result of modifications of the environment, enhanced by the activity of Archean sulfur chemoautotrophs. Such organisms (Anoxium) evolved in an anoxic ocean prior to 3.9 × 109 yr ago at Archean analogs of modern oceanic hydrothermal vents. At this time geothermal energy was more readily available to organisms than photic energy, given atmospheric conditions at the surface similar to Venus, where intensity is low and only middle and red visible wavelengths penetrate the cloudy CO2-rich atmosphere. Competition for the reduced sulfur developed due to oxidation and loss of sulfur to sediments. Consequently, evolutionary advantage shifted to Anoxium isolates that could use alternate energy sources such as light to supplement the diminished supplies of reduced sulfur. Initially, photo-sulfur organisms evolved similar to modern purple bacteria that absorb in the red visible spectra. Subsequent carbon fixing and oxidation improved both the quantity and range of light reaching the ocean surface. This permitted absorption in the blue visible range so that water splitting was now feasible, releasing free oxygen and accelerating oxidation. Eventually, reducing environments became restricted, completing the shift in the principal marine carbon-fixing activity from anoxic chemoautotrophic to aerobic photosynthetic organisms.

  8. Fumaric acid: an overlooked form of fixed carbon in Arabidopsis and other plant species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chia, D.W.; Yoder, T.J.; Reiter, W.D.; Gibson, S.I.

    2000-01-01

    Photoassimilates are used by plants for production of energy, as carbon skeletons and in transport of fixed carbon between different plant organs. Many studies have been devoted to characterizing the factors that. regulate photoassimilate concentrations in different plant species. Most studies examining photoassimilate concentrations in C(sub 3) plants have focused on analyzing starch and soluble sugars. However, work presented here demonstrates that a number of C(sub 3) plants, including the popular model organism Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh., and agriculturally important plants, such as soybean[Glycine ma (L.) Merr.], contain significant quantities of furnaric acid. In fact, furnaric acid can accumulate to levels of several mg per g fresh weight in A-abidopsis leaves, often exceeding starch and soluble sugar levels. Furnaric acid is a component of the tricarboxylic acid cycle and, like starch and soluble sugars, can be metabolized to yield energy and carbon skeletons for production of other compounds. Fumaric acid concentrations increase with plant age and light intensity in Arabidopsis leaves. Arabidopsis phloem exudates contain significant quantities of fumaric acid, raising the possibility that fumaric acid may function in carbon transport

  9. Fumaric acid: an overlooked form of fixed carbon in Arabidopsis and other plant species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chia, D.W.; Yoder, T.J.; Reiter, W.D.; Gibson, S.I.

    2000-10-01

    Photoassimilates are used by plants for production of energy, as carbon skeletons and in transport of fixed carbon between different plant organs. Many studies have been devoted to characterizing the factors that. regulate photoassimilate concentrations in different plant species. Most studies examining photoassimilate concentrations in C{sub 3} plants have focused on analyzing starch and soluble sugars. However, work presented here demonstrates that a number of C{sub 3} plants, including the popular model organism Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh., and agriculturally important plants, such as soybean [Glycine ma (L.) Merr.], contain significant quantities of furnaric acid. In fact, furnaric acid can accumulate to levels of several mg per g fresh weight in A-abidopsis leaves, often exceeding starch and soluble sugar levels. Furnaric acid is a component of the tricarboxylic acid cycle and, like starch and soluble sugars, can be metabolized to yield energy and carbon skeletons for production of other compounds. Fumaric acid concentrations increase with plant age and light intensity in Arabidopsis leaves. Arabidopsis phloem exudates contain significant quantities of fumaric acid, raising the possibility that fumaric acid may function in carbon transport.

  10. Carbon conversion predictor for fluidized bed gasification of biomass fuels - from TGA measurements to char gasification particle model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konttinen, J.T. [University of Jyvaeskylae, Department of Chemistry, Renewable Energy Programme, POB 35, Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Moilanen, A. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, POB 1000, Espoo (Finland); Martini, N. de; Hupa, M. [Abo Akademi University, Process Chemistry Centre, Combustion and Materials Chemistry, Turku (Finland)

    2012-09-15

    When a solid fuel particle is injected into a hot fluidized bed, the reactivity of fuel char in gasification reactions (between char carbon and steam and CO{sub 2}) plays a significant role for reaching a good carbon conversion. In this paper, the gasification reactivity data of some solid waste recovered fuels (SRF) obtained from thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) experiments is presented. Gas mixtures (H{sub 2}O, H{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, CO), were used in the experiments to find the inhibitive effects of CO and H{sub 2}. Average char gasification reactivity values are determined from the TGA results. Kinetic parameters for char carbon gasification reactivity correlations are determined from this data. The Uniform Conversion model is used to account for the change of gasification reaction rate as function of carbon conversion. Some discrepancies, due to complicated ash-carbon interactions, are subjects of further research. In the carbon conversion predictor, laboratory measured reactivity numbers are converted into carbon conversion numbers in a real-scale fluidized bed gasifier. The predictor is a relatively simple and transparent tool for the comparison of the gasification reactivity of different fuels in fluidized bed gasification. The residence times for solid fuels in fluidized bed gasifiers are simulated. Simulations against some pilot-scale results show reasonable agreement. (orig.)

  11. Phenols removal using ozonation-adsorption with granular activated carbon (GAC) in rotating packed bed reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamah, E. F.; Leonita, S.; Bismo, S.

    2018-01-01

    Synthetic wastewater containing phenols was treated using combination method of ozonation-adsorption with GAC (Granular Activated Carbon) in a packed bed rotating reactor. Ozone reacts quickly with phenol and activated carbon increases the oxidation process by producing hydroxyl radicals. Performance parameters evaluated are phenol removal percentage, the quantity of hydroxyl radical formed, changes in pH and ozone utilization, dissolved ozone concentration and ozone concentration in off gas. The performance of the combination method was compared with single ozonation and single adsorption. The influence of GAC dose and initial pH of phenols were evaluated in ozonation-adsorption method. The results show that ozonation-adsorption method generates more OH radicals than a single ozonation. Quantity of OH radical formation increases with increasing pH and quantity of the GAC. The combination method prove better performance in removing phenols. At the same operation condition, ozonation-adsorption method is capable of removing of 78.62% phenols as compared with single ozonation (53.15%) and single adsorption (36.67%). The increasing percentage of phenol removal in ozonation-adsorption method is proportional to the addition of GAC dose, solution pH, and packed bed rotator speed. Maximum percentage of phenol removal is obtained under alkaline conditions (pH 10) and 125 g of GAC

  12. Sintering study in vertical fixed bed reactor for synthetic aggregate production; Estudo da sinterizacao em reator vertical de leito fixo para producao de agregado sintetico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quaresma, D.S.; Neves, A.S.S.; Melo, A.O.; Pereira, L.F.S.; Bezerra, P.T.S.; Macedo, E.N.; Souza, J.A.S., E-mail: danysq@gmail.com [Universidade Federal do Para (UFPA), Belem, PA (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia Quimica

    2017-04-15

    The synthetic aggregates are being employed in civil construction for the reduction of mineral extraction activities. Within this context, the recycling of industrial waste is the basis of the majority of processes to reduce the exploitation of mineral resources. In this work the sintering in a vertical fixed bed reactor for synthetic aggregate production using 20% pellets and 80% charcoal was studied. The pellets were prepared from a mixture containing clay, charcoal and fly ash. Two experiments varying the speed of air sucking were carried out. The material produced was analyzed by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, measures of their ceramic properties, and particle size analysis. The results showed that the solid-state reactions, during the sintering process, were efficient and the produced material was classified as coarse lightweight aggregate. The process is interesting for the sintering of aggregates, and can be controlled by composition, particle size, temperature gradient and gaseous flow. (author)

  13. Systematic staging design applied to the fixed-bed reactor series for methanol and one-step methanol/dimethyl ether synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manenti, Flavio; Leon-Garzon, Andres R.; Ravaghi-Ardebili, Zohreh; Pirola, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    This work investigates possible design advances in the series of fixed-bed reactors for methanol and dimethyl ether synthesis. Specifically, the systematic staging design proposed by Hillestad [1] is applied to the water-cooled and gas-cooled series of reactors of Lurgi's technology. The procedure leads to new design and operating conditions with respect to the current best industrial practice, with relevant benefits in terms of process yield, energy saving, and net income. The overall mathematical model for the process simulation and optimization is reported in the work together with dedicated sensitivity analysis studies. - Highlights: • Systematic staging design is applied to methanol and methanol/DME synthesis. • New configurations for the synthesis reactor network are proposed and assessed. • Comparison with the industrial best practice is provided. • Energy-process optimization is performed to improve the overall yield of the process

  14. Neural fuzzy modelization of copper removal from water by biosorption in fixed-bed columns using olive stone and pinion shell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calero, M; Iáñez-Rodríguez, I; Pérez, A; Martín-Lara, M A; Blázquez, G

    2018-03-01

    Continuous copper biosorption in fixed-bed column by olive stone and pinion shell was studied. The effect of three operational parameters was analyzed: feed flow rate (2-6 ml/min), inlet copper concentration (40-100 mg/L) and bed-height (4.4-13.4 cm). Artificial Neural-Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS) was used in order to optimize the percentage of copper removal and the retention capacity in the column. The highest percentage of copper retained was achieved at 2 ml/min, 40 mg/L and 4.4 cm. However, the optimum biosorption capacity was obtained at 6 ml/min, 100 mg/L and 13.4 cm. Finally, breakthrough curves were simulated with mathematical traditional models and ANFIS model. The calculated results obtained with each model were compared with experimental data. The best results were given by ANFIS modelling that predicted copper biosorption with high accuracy. Breakthrough curves surfaces, which enable the visualization of the behavior of the system in different process conditions, were represented. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. In situ magnetic resonance measurement of conversion, hydrodynamics and mass transfer during single- and two-phase flow in fixed-bed reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladden, L F; Alexander, P; Britton, M M; Mantle, M D; Sederman, A J; Yuen, E H L

    2003-01-01

    In recent years there has been increasing interest in applying magnetic resonance (MR) techniques in areas of engineering and chemical technology. The science that underpins many of these applications is the physics and chemistry of transport and reaction processes in porous materials. Key to the exploitation of MR methods will be our ability to demonstrate that MR yields information that cannot be obtained using conventional measurement techniques in engineering research. This article describes two case studies that highlight the power of MR to give new insights to chemical engineers. First, we demonstrate the application of MR techniques to explore both mass transfer and chemical conversion in situ within a fixed bed of catalyst, and we then use these data to identify the rate-controlling step of the chemical conversion. Second, we implement a rapid imaging technique to study the stability of the gas-liquid distribution in the low- and high-interaction two-phase flow regimes in a trickle-bed reactor.

  16. FUZZY INFERENCE SYSTEM MODELING FOR BED ACTIVE CARBON RE-GENERATION PROCESS (CO2 GAS FACTORY CASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Febriana

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Bed active carbon is one of the most important materials that had great impact in determining level of impurities in production of CO2 gas. In this particular factory case, there is unavailability of standard duration time of heating and cooling and steam flow rate for the re-generation process of bed active carbon. The paper discusses the fuzzy inference system for modeling of re-generation process of bed active carbon to find the optimum setting parameter. The fuzzy inference system was build using real historical daily processing data. After validation process, surface plot analysis was performed to find the optimum setting. The result of re-generation parameter setting is 9-10 hours of heating process, 4.66-5.32 hours of cooling process, and 1500-2500 kg/hr of steam flow rate.

  17. Numerical Simulation of Fixed-Bed Catalytic Reforming Reactors: Hydrodynamics / Chemical Kinetics Coupling Simulation numérique des réacteurs de reformage catalytique en lit fixe : couplage hydrodynamique-cinétique chimique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferschneider G.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Fixed bed reactors with a single fluid phase are widely used in the refining or petrochemical industries for reaction processes catalysed by a solid phase. The design criteria for industrial reactors are relatively well known. However, they rely on a one-dimensional writing and on the separate resolution of the equation of conservation of mass and energy, and of momentum. Thus, with complex geometries, the influence of hydrodynamics on the effectiveness of the catalyst bed cannot be taken into account. The calculation method proposed is based on the multi-dimensional writing and the simultaneous resolution of the local conservation equations. The example discussed concerns fixed-bed catalytic reactors. These reactors are distinguished by their annular geometry and the radial circulation of the feedstock. The flow is assumed to be axisymmetric. The reaction process is reflected by a simplified kinetic mechanism involving ten chemical species. Calculation of the hydrodynamic (mean velocities, pressure, thermal and mass fields (concentration of each species serves to identify the influence of internal components in two industrial reactor geometries. The map of the quantity of coke formed and deposited on the catalyst, calculated by the model, reveals potential areas of poor operation. Les réacteurs à lit fixe avec une seule phase fluide sont largement utilisés dans l'industrie du raffinage et de la pétrochimie, pour mettre en oeuvre un processus réactionnel catalysé par une phase solide. Les règles de conception des réacteurs industriels sont relativement bien connues. Cependant, elles reposent sur l'écriture monodimensionnelle et la résolution séparée, d'une part, des équations de conservation de la masse et de l'énergie et d'autre part, de la quantité de mouvement. Ainsi dans le cas de géométries complexes, l'influence de l'hydrodynamique sur l'efficacité du lit catalytique ne peut être prise en compte. La méthode de calcul

  18. Capturing Lithium from Wastewater Using a Fixed Bed Packed with 3-D MnO2 Ion Cages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xubiao; Zhang, Kai; Luo, Jinming; Luo, Shenglian; Crittenden, John

    2016-12-06

    3-D MnO 2 ion cages (CMO) were fabricated and shown to have a high capacity for lithium removal from wastewater. CMO had a maximum Li(I) adsorption capacity of 56.87 mg/g, which is 1.38 times greater than the highest reported value (41.36 mg/g). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicated that the stability of the -Mn-O-Mn-O- skeleton played an essential role in Li adsorption. The lattice clearance had a high charge density, forming a strong electrostatic field. The Dubinin-Ashtakhov (DA) site energy distribution model based on Polanyi theory described the linear increase of Li adsorption capacity (Q 0 ) with increasing temperature (Q 0 = k 3 × E m + d 3 = k 3 × (a × T) + d 3 ). Furthermore, the pore diffusion model (PDM) accurately predicted the lithium breakthrough (R 2 ≈ 0.99). The maximum number of bed volumes (BVs) treated was 1374, 1972, and 2493 for 200 μg/L at 20, 30, and 40 °C, respectively. Higher temperatures increased the number of BVs that may be treated, which implies that CMO will be useful in treating industrial Li(I) wastewater in regions with different climates (e.g., Northern or Southern China).

  19. Thermal activation and characterization of clay aiming their use as sorbent in fixed bed columns to remove cadmium; Ativacao termica e caracterizacao da argila visando sua utilizacao como adsorvente em colunas de leito fixo para a remocao de cadmio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, M.M. da; Rodrigues, M.G.F. [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), PB (Brazil); Silva, M.L.P. [Universidade Federal Rural do Semi-Arido (UFERSA), RN (Brazil); Kleinübing, S.J.; Silva, M.G.C., E-mail: marciliomaximo@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    In this work we studied the removal of cadmium in a synthetic wastewater using clay of Pernambuco - Brazil, in systems of fixed bed column. Clay was thermally activated at 500 °C. The materials were characterized using X-ray Fluorescence (XRF), X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and nitrogen adsorption (BET method). For tests in fixed bed column, we applied a factorial design 2{sup 2} and found that increasing the flow adversely affects the process of removing cadmium concentration while acting positively. The studies showed these materials as promising for the removal of Cd{sup 2+} ions in synthetic wastewater containing low levels of this metal. (author)

  20. Design, scale-up, Six Sigma in processing different feedstocks in a fixed bed downdraft biomass gasifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boravelli, Sai Chandra Teja

    This thesis mainly focuses on design and process development of a downdraft biomass gasification processes. The objective is to develop a gasifier and process of gasification for a continuous steady state process. A lab scale downdraft gasifier was designed to develop the process and obtain optimum operating procedure. Sustainable and dependable sources such as biomass are potential sources of renewable energy and have a reasonable motivation to be used in developing a small scale energy production plant for countries such as Canada where wood stocks are more reliable sources than fossil fuels. This thesis addresses the process of thermal conversion of biomass gasification process in a downdraft reactor. Downdraft biomass gasifiers are relatively cheap and easy to operate because of their design. We constructed a simple biomass gasifier to study the steady state process for different sizes of the reactor. The experimental part of this investigation look at how operating conditions such as feed rate, air flow, the length of the bed, the vibration of the reactor, height and density of syngas flame in combustion flare changes for different sizes of the reactor. These experimental results also compare the trends of tar, char and syngas production for wood pellets in a steady state process. This study also includes biomass gasification process for different wood feedstocks. It compares how shape, size and moisture content of different feedstocks makes a difference in operating conditions for the gasification process. For this, Six Sigma DMAIC techniques were used to analyze and understand how each feedstock makes a significant impact on the process.

  1. Seawater Carbonate Chemistry of Deep-sea Coral Beds off the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, J.; Shamberger, K.; Roark, E. B.; Miller, K.; Baco-Taylor, A.

    2016-02-01

    Many species of deep-sea octocorals produce calcium carbonate (CaCO3) skeletons and form coral beds that support diverse ecosystems crucial to fisheries. The geochemistry of deep-sea coral skeletons can provide valuable paleoceanographic information on ocean circulation and nutrient cycling. Deep-sea corals in the older bottom waters of the Pacific are naturally exposed to higher carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations and lower pH than in the Atlantic where much of the previous deep-sea coral work has occurred. Therefore, some Pacific deep-sea corals may live and calcify in waters that are corrosive to their skeletons, but there have been few current seawater carbonate chemistry measurements of the waters surrounding deep-sea coral beds to assess this. The input of anthropogenic atmospheric CO2 known as ocean acidification (OA) lowers ocean pH and causes an expansion of these corrosive waters. Seawater carbonate chemistry must be characterized before accurate predictions can be made for the effects of OA on these important ecosystems. Total Alkalinity (TA) and Dissolved Inorganic Carbon (DIC) samples were collected in the fall of 2014 and 2015 from the surface to 1450 m depth off the Northwestern Hawaiian Island chain where deep-sea octocorals are found. The partial pressure of CO2 increased and pH, calcite saturation state (Ωca) and aragonite saturation state (Ωar) decreased with increasing latitude and depth. Notably, waters were undersaturated with respect to calcite and aragonite (Ωca and Ωar less than 1) below 800 m and 500 m, respectively. Therefore, deep-sea corals below these depths must calcify in waters that are thermodynamically favorable for CaCO3 dissolution. How deep-sea octocorals cope with such adverse seawater chemistry is critical to understanding future effects of OA. It is not known whether OA is currently negatively impacting deep-sea octocorals, but their naturally acidified environments could make them particularly susceptible to OA.

  2. Conversion of ammonium uranyl carbonate to UO2 in a fluidized bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Jun; Qiu Lufu; Zhong Xing; Xu Heqing

    1989-11-01

    The conversion of AUC (Ammonium Uranyl Carbonate) to UO 2 was studied in a fluidized bed of 60 mm inner diameter based on the thermodynamics and kinetics data of decomposition-reduction of AUC. The influence of the reaction temperature, composition of fluidization gas and fluidization velocity on conversion were investigated by using N 2 , Ar and circulation gas (mixing gas of H 2 and CO obtained from the exhaust gas of the decomposition of AUC by catalyst crack-conversion) as the fluidization gas. The throughput is up to the high levels (3.32 kg(wet)/h·L) by using circulation gas or mixing of circulation gas and Ar (< 21%) as the fluidization gas when the reaction temperature exceeds 570 deg C

  3. The bacterial carbon-fixing organelle is formed by shell envelopment of preassembled cargo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna H Chen

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria play a significant role in the global carbon cycle. In Synechococcuselongatus, the carbon-fixing enzyme ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO is concentrated into polyhedral, proteinaceous compartments called carboxysomes.Using live cell fluorescence microscopy, we show that carboxysomes are first detected as small seeds of RuBisCO that colocalize with existing carboxysomes. These seeds contain little or no shell protein, but increase in RuBisCO content over several hours, during which time they are exposed to the solvent. The maturing seed is then enclosed by shell proteins, a rapid process that seals RuBisCO from the cytosol to establish a distinct, solvent-protected microenvironment that is oxidizing relative to the cytosol. These closure events can be spatially and temporally coincident with the appearance of a nascent daughter RuBisCO seed.Carboxysomes assemble in a stepwise fashion, inside-to-outside, revealing that cargo is the principle organizer of this compartment's biogenesis. Our observations of the spatial relationship of seeds to previously formed carboxysomes lead us to propose a model for carboxysome replication via sequential fission, polymerization, and encapsulation of their internal cargo.

  4. Process integration for biological sulfate reduction in a carbon monoxide fed packed bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Manoj; Sinharoy, Arindam; Pakshirajan, Kannan

    2018-05-09

    This study examined immobilized anaerobic biomass for sulfate reduction using carbon monoxide (CO) as the sole carbon source under batch and continuous fed conditions. The immobilized bacteria with beads made of 10% polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) showed best results in terms of sulfate reduction (84 ± 3.52%) and CO utilization (98 ± 1.67%). The effect of hydraulic retention time (HRT), sulfate loading rate and CO loading rate on sulfate and CO removal was investigated employing a 1L packed bed bioreactor containing the immobilized biomass. At 48, 24 and 12 h HRT, the sulfate removal was 94.42 ± 0.15%, 89.75 ± 0.47% and 61.08 ± 0.34%, respectively, along with a CO utilization of more than 90%. The analysis of variance (ANOVA) of the results obtained showed that only the initial CO concentration significantly affected the sulfate reduction process. The reactor effluent sulfate concentrations were 27.41 ± 0.44, 59.16 ± 1.08, 315.83 ± 7.33 mg/L for 250, 500 and 1000 mg/L of influent sulfate concentrations respectively, under the optimum operating conditions. The sulfate reduction rates matched well with low inlet sulfate loading rates, indicating stable performance of the bioreactor system. Overall, this study yielded very high sulfate reduction efficiency by the immobilized anaerobic biomass under high CO loading condition using the packed bed reactor system. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Accelerated carbonation of steelmaking slags in a high-gravity rotating packed bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, E-E; Pan, Shu-Yuan; Chen, Yi-Hung; Tan, Chung-Sung; Chiang, Pen-Chi

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The carbonation conversion in a RPB was higher than that in traditional reactors. ► The optimum conditions were operated at 750 rpm and 65 °C for 30 min. ► The product on BOF slag was identified as crystallized calcite based on SEM and XRD. ► The diffusivity ranged from 10 −7 to 10 −6 cm 2 s −1 based on the shrinking core model. - Abstract: Carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) sequestration using the accelerated carbonation of basic oxygen furnace (BOF) slag in a high-gravity rotating packed bed (RPB) under various operational conditions was investigated. The effects of reaction time, reaction temperature, rotation speed and slurry flow rate on the CO 2 sequestration process were evaluated. The samples of reacted slurry were analyzed quantitatively using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) and qualitatively using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The sequestration experiments were performed at a liquid-to-solid ratio of 20:1 with a flow rate of 2.5 L min −1 of a pure CO 2 stream under atmospheric temperature and pressure. The results show that a maximum conversion of BOF slag was 93.5% at a reaction time of 30 min and a rotation speed of 750 rpm at 65 °C. The experimental data were utilized to determine the rate-limiting mechanism based on the shrinking core model (SCM), which was validated by the observations of SEM and TEM. Accelerated carbonation in a RPB was confirmed to be a viable method due to its higher mass-transfer rate.

  6. Autotrophic denitrification of synthetic nitrate-contaminated groundwater in up-flow fixed-bed bioreactor by pumice as porous media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Tourang1

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Background: Increasing nitrate concentrations in groundwater resources is considered a common environmental and public health problem worldwide. In this research, an autotrophic up-flow bioreactor with pumice as media was used to study the effects of the sulfur-to-nitrogen (S/N ratio and empty bed contact time (EBCT on nitrate removal efficiency and byproducts. Methods: Experiments were carried out in a 3.47 L up-flow, fixed-bed reactor with 3 sampling ports. To evaluate the overall impact of S/N ratio and EBCT on the performance of the bioreactor, several phases with different S/N ratios and EBCTs were applied. Results: At a constant S/N ratio of 3.85 g/g, as EBCT decreased from 24 hours to 2 hours, the nitrate removal efficiency decreased from 98% to 64%. On the other hand, at the desired EBCT of 4 hr, as S/N ratio decreased from 3.85 to 1.51 g/g, nitrate removal efficiency was reduced from 85% to 32%. Changing the EBCT and S/N ratio also affected the effluent nitrite and sulfate concentrations as byproducts. At the S/N ratio of 3.85 g/g and EBCT of 24 hours, effluent nitrite and sulfate concentrations were 0.1 mg NO2--N/L and 463 mg SO4 2-/L, respectively. Decreasing the S/N ratio to 1.51 g/g and the EBCT to 4 hours caused drastic changes in effluent nitrite and sulfate concentrations. Conclusion: The results indicated that the autotrophic denitrification with thiosulfate as electron donor and pumice as media was feasible and applicable for nitrate contaminated groundwater.

  7. Thermophilic two-phase anaerobic digestion using an innovative fixed-bed reactor for enhanced organic matter removal and bioenergy recovery from sugarcane vinasse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuess, Lucas Tadeu; Kiyuna, Luma Sayuri Mazine; Ferraz, Antônio Djalma Nunes; Persinoti, Gabriela Felix

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • An innovative fixed-film anaerobic reactor was applied to sugarcane vinasse. • Stable operation was observed for OLRs as high as 30 kg COD m"−"3 day"−"1. • Propionate buildup did not impact the stability of the structured-bed reactor. • Enhanced bioenergy recovery was estimated from biodigestion with phase separation. • Energy extraction was over 20% higher compared to single-phase systems. - Abstract: This study considered the application of anaerobic digestion (AD) with phase separation combined with the use of an anaerobic structured-bed reactor (ASTBR) as the methanogenic phase for the treatment of sugarcane vinasse, a high-strength wastewater resulting from ethanol production. Two combined thermophilic acidogenic-methanogenic systems formed by one single acidogenic reactor followed by two methanogenic reactors operated in parallel were compared, namely, a conventional UASB reactor and an upflow ASTBR reactor. Increasing organic loading rate (OLR) conditions (15–30 kg COD m"−"3 d"−"1) were applied to the methanogenic reactors. The results highlighted the feasibility of applying the ASTBR to vinasse, indicating a global COD removal higher than 80%. The ASTBR exhibited a stable long-term operation (240 days), even for OLR values as high as 30 kg COD m"−"3 d"−"1. The application of similar conditions to the UASB reactor indicated severe performance losses, leading to the accumulation of acids for every increase in the OLR. An energetic potential of 181.5 MJ for each cubic meter of vinasse was estimated from both hydrogen and methane. The provision of bicarbonate alkalinity proved to be a key factor in obtaining stable performance, offsetting the limitations of relatively low hydraulic retention times (<24 h).

  8. Corn stalks char from fast pyrolysis as precursor material for preparation of activated carbon in fluidized bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiqi; Wu, Jingli; He, Tao; Wu, Jinhu

    2014-09-01

    Corn stalks char from fast pyrolysis was activated by physical and chemical activation process in a fluidized bed reactor. The structure and morphology of the carbons were characterized by N2 adsorption and SEM. Effects of activation time and activation agents on the structure of activation carbon were investigated. The physically activated carbons with CO2 have BET specific surface area up to 880 m(2)/g, and exhibit microporous structure. The chemically activated carbons with H3PO4 have BET specific surface area up to 600 m(2)/g, and exhibit mesoporous structure. The surface morphology shows that physically activated carbons exhibit fibrous like structure in nature with long ridges, resembling parallel lines. Whereas chemically activated carbons have cross-interconnected smooth open pores without the fibrous like structure. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of bacterial lipase on anaerobic co-digestion of slaughterhouse wastewater and grease in batch condition and continuous fixed-bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Affes, Maha; Aloui, Fathi; Hadrich, Fatma; Loukil, Slim; Sayadi, Sami

    2017-10-10

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of bacterial lipase on biogas production of anaerobic co-digestion of slaughterhouse wastewater (SHWW) and hydrolyzed grease (HG). A neutrophilic Staphylococcus xylosus strain exhibiting lipolytic activity was used to perform microbial hydrolysis pretreatment of poultry slaughterhouse lipid rich waste. Optimum proportion of hydrolyzed grease was evaluated by determining biochemical methane potential. A high biogas production was observed in batch containing a mixture of slaughterhouse composed of 75% SHWW and 25% hydrolyzed grease leading to a biogas yield of 0.6 L/g COD introduced. Fixed bed reactor (FBR) results confirmed that the proportion of 25% of hydrolyzed grease gives the optimum condition for the digester performance. Biogas production was significantly high until an organic loading rate (OLR) of 2 g COD/L. d. This study indicates that the use of biological pre-treatment and FBR for the co-digestion of SHWW and hydrolyzed grease is feasible and effective.

  10. Validation of the catalytic properties of Cu-Os/13X using single fixed bed reactor in selective catalytic reduction of NO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Kwang Seok; Woo, Seong Ihl

    2007-01-01

    Catalytic decomposition of NO over Cu-Os/13X has been carried out in a tubular fixed bed reactor at atmospheric pressure and the results were compared with literature data performed by high-throughput screening (HTS). The activity and durability of Cu-Os/13X prepared by conventional ion-exchange method have been investigated in the presence of H 2 O and SO 2 . It was found that Cu-Os/13X prepared by ion-exchange shows a high activity in a wide temperature range in selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO with C 3 H 6 compared to Cu/13X, proving the existence of more NO adsorption site on Cu-Os/13X. However, Cu-Os/13X exhibited low activity in the presence of water, and was quite different from the result reported in literature. SO 2 resistance is also low and does not recover its original activity when the SO 2 was blocked in the feed gas stream. This result suggested that catalytic activity between combinatorial screening and conventional testing should be compared to confirm the validity of high-throughput screening

  11. Formation of N2 in the fixed-bed pyrolysis of low rank coals and the mechanisms; Koteisho netsubunkai ni okeru teitankatan kara no N2 no sisei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Z.; Otsuka, Y. [Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan). Institute for Chemical Reaction Science

    1996-10-28

    In order to establish coal NOx preventive measures, discussions were given on formation of N2 in the fixed-bed pyrolysis of low rank coals and the mechanisms thereof. Chinese ZN coal and German RB coal were used for the discussions. Both coals do not produce N2 at 600{degree}C, and the main product is volatile nitrogen. Conversion into N2 does not depend on heating rates, but increases linearly with increasing temperature, and reaches 65% to 70% at 1200{degree}C. In contrast, char nitrogen decreases linearly with the temperature. More specifically, these phenomena suggest that the char nitrogen or its precursor is the major supply source of N2. When mineral substances are removed by using hydrochloric acid, their catalytic action is lost, and conversion into N2 decreases remarkably. Iron existing in ion-exchanged condition in low-rank coal is reduced and finely diffused into metallic iron particles. The particles react with heterocyclic nitrogen compounds and turn into iron nitride. A solid phase reaction mechanism may be conceived, in which N2 is produced due to decomposition of the iron nitride. 5 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Pyrolysis of oil palm mesocarp fiber and palm frond in a slow-heating fixed-bed reactor: A comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabir, G; Mohd Din, A T; Hameed, B H

    2017-10-01

    Oil palm mesocarp fiber (OPMF) and palm frond (PF) were respectively devolatilized by pyrolysis to OPMF-oil and PF-oil bio-oils and biochars, OPMF-char and PF-char in a slow-heating fixed-bed reactor. In particular, the OPMF-oil and PF-oil were produced to a maximum yield of 48wt% and 47wt% bio-oils at 550°C and 600°C, respectively. The high heating values (HHVs) of OPMF-oil and PF-oil were respectively found to be 23MJ/kg and 21MJ/kg, whereas 24.84MJ/kg and 24.15MJ/kg were for the corresponding biochar. The HHVs of the bio-oils and biochars are associated with low O/C ratios to be higher than those of the corresponding biomass. The Fourier transform infrared spectra and peak area ratios highlighted the effect of pyrolysis temperatures on the bio-oil compositions. The bio-oils are pervaded with numerous oxygenated carbonyl and aromatic compounds as suitable feedstocks for renewable fuels and chemicals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The effects of fixed-bed drying on the yield and composition of essential oil from long pepper (Piper hispidinervium C. DC leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. P. Braga

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Piper hispidinervium C.DC (Piperaceae is popularly known as long pepper. It grows in degraded areas of natural fields in the state of Acre, Brazil. Its leaves are 3 to 4 % essential oil rich in safrole, within the range of 90 to 94 %. In the chemical industry, safrole is an important raw material, mainly due to two of its derivatives: heliotropin, which is widely used as a fragrance and flavoring agent, and piperonyl butoxide (PBO, a vital ingredient of pyrethroid insecticides. Natural pyrethrum in particular would not be an economical insecticide without the synergistic effect of PBO; therefore, its industrial future is linked to the continued availability of PBO. As a fragrance, safrole has many applications in household products such as floor waxes, polishes, soaps, detergents and cleaning agents. In this work, leaves were dried in a fixed-bed dryer using different drying-air temperatures (35, 40, 45, 50, 55 and 60 ºC and drying times (900, 2700 and 3600 seconds. Essential oil was extracted by cohobation (meaning that the condensed water that comes out of the flask is recycled from both raw and dried leaves. The essential oil yield and safrole content are susceptible to rapid loss of moisture by Piper hispidinervium C. DC leaves. It was observed that the essential oil yield increased twice after the drying process. However, safrole content decreased about 20 percent when temperature was above 50 ºC and drying times were more than 2700 minutes.

  14. Adsorption in a Fixed-Bed Column and Stability of the Antibiotic Oxytetracycline Supported on Zn(II)-[2-Methylimidazolate] Frameworks in Aqueous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anceski Bataglion, Giovana; Nogueira Eberlin, Marcos; Machado Ronconi, Célia

    2015-01-01

    A metal-organic framework, Zn-[2-methylimidazolate] frameworks (ZIF-8), was used as adsorbent material to remove different concentrations of oxytetracycline (OTC) antibiotic in a fixed-bed column. The OTC was studied at concentrations of 10, 25 and 40 mg L-1. At 40 mg L-1, the breakthrough point was reached after approximately 10 minutes, while at 10 and 25 mg L-1 this point was reached in about 30 minutes. The highest removal rate of 60% for the 10 mg L-1 concentration was reached after 200 minutes. The highest adsorption capacity (28.3 mg g-1) was attained for 25 mg L-1 of OTC. After the adsorption process, a band shift was observed in the UV-Vis spectrum of the eluate. Additional studies were carried out to determine the cause of this band shift, involving a mass spectrometry (MS) analysis of the supernatant liquid during the process. This investigation revealed that the main route of adsorption consisted of the coordination of OTC with the metallic zinc centers of ZIF-8. The materials were characterized by thermal analysis (TA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), and infrared spectroscopy (IR) before and after adsorption, confirming the presence of OTC in the ZIF-8 and the latter’s structural stability after the adsorption process. PMID:26057121

  15. Adsorption in a Fixed-Bed Column and Stability of the Antibiotic Oxytetracycline Supported on Zn(II-[2-Methylimidazolate] Frameworks in Aqueous Media.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janine dos Santos Ferreira da Silva

    Full Text Available A metal-organic framework, Zn-[2-methylimidazolate] frameworks (ZIF-8, was used as adsorbent material to remove different concentrations of oxytetracycline (OTC antibiotic in a fixed-bed column. The OTC was studied at concentrations of 10, 25 and 40 mg L(-1. At 40 mg L(-1, the breakthrough point was reached after approximately 10 minutes, while at 10 and 25 mg L(-1 this point was reached in about 30 minutes. The highest removal rate of 60% for the 10 mg L(-1 concentration was reached after 200 minutes. The highest adsorption capacity (28.3 mg g(-1 was attained for 25 mg L(-1 of OTC. After the adsorption process, a band shift was observed in the UV-Vis spectrum of the eluate. Additional studies were carried out to determine the cause of this band shift, involving a mass spectrometry (MS analysis of the supernatant liquid during the process. This investigation revealed that the main route of adsorption consisted of the coordination of OTC with the metallic zinc centers of ZIF-8. The materials were characterized by thermal analysis (TA, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD, and infrared spectroscopy (IR before and after adsorption, confirming the presence of OTC in the ZIF-8 and the latter's structural stability after the adsorption process.

  16. Demand-driven biogas production from sugar beet silage in a novel fixed bed disc reactor under mesophilic and thermophilic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terboven, Christiane; Ramm, Patrice; Herrmann, Christiane

    2017-10-01

    A newly developed fixed bed disc reactor (FBDR) which combines biofilm formation on biofilm carriers and reactor agitation in one single system was assessed for its applicability to demand-driven biogas production by variable feeding of sugar beet silage. Five different feeding patterns were studied at an organic loading of 4g VS L -1 d -1 under mesophilic and thermophilic conditions. High methane yields of 449-462L N kg VS were reached. Feeding variable punctual loadings caused immediate response with 1.2- to 3.5-fold increase in biogas production rates within 15min. Although variable feeding did not induce process instability, a temporary decrease in pH-value and methane concentration below 40% occurred. Thermophilic temperature was advantageous as it resulted in a more rapid, higher methane production and less pronounced decrease in methane content after feeding. The FBDR was demonstrated to be well-suited for flexible biogas production, but further research and comparison with traditional reactor systems are required. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Optimization of the pyrolysis process of empty fruit bunch (EFB) in a fixed-bed reactor through a central composite design (CCD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Alina Rahayu; Hamzah, Zainab; Daud, Mohamed Zulkali Mohamed

    2014-07-01

    The production of crude palm oil from the processing of palm fresh fruit bunches in the palm oil mills in Malaysia hs resulted in a huge quantity of empty fruit bunch (EFB) accumulated. The EFB was used as a feedstock in the pyrolysis process using a fixed-bed reactor in the present study. The optimization of process parameters such as pyrolysis temperature (factor A), biomass particle size (factor B) and holding time (factor C) were investigated through Central Composite Design (CCD) using Stat-Ease Design Expert software version 7 with bio-oil yield considered as the response. Twenty experimental runs were conducted. The results were completely analyzed by Analysis of Variance (ANOVA). The model was statistically significant. All factors studied were significant with p-values oil from EFB pyrolysis process. A quadratic model equation was developed and employed to predict the highest theoretical bio-oil yield. The maximum bio-oil yield of 46.2 % was achieved at pyrolysis temperature of 442.15 °C using the EFB particle size of 866 μm which corresponded to the EFB particle size in the range of 710-1000 μm and holding time of 483 seconds.

  18. Optimization of the pyrolysis process of empty fruit bunch (EFB) in a fixed-bed reactor through a central composite design (CCD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, Alina Rahayu; Hamzah, Zainab; Daud, Mohamed Zulkali Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    The production of crude palm oil from the processing of palm fresh fruit bunches in the palm oil mills in Malaysia hs resulted in a huge quantity of empty fruit bunch (EFB) accumulated. The EFB was used as a feedstock in the pyrolysis process using a fixed-bed reactor in the present study. The optimization of process parameters such as pyrolysis temperature (factor A), biomass particle size (factor B) and holding time (factor C) were investigated through Central Composite Design (CCD) using Stat-Ease Design Expert software version 7 with bio-oil yield considered as the response. Twenty experimental runs were conducted. The results were completely analyzed by Analysis of Variance (ANOVA). The model was statistically significant. All factors studied were significant with p-values 2 was 0.9564 which indicated that the selected factors and its levels showed high correlation to the production of bio-oil from EFB pyrolysis process. A quadratic model equation was developed and employed to predict the highest theoretical bio-oil yield. The maximum bio-oil yield of 46.2 % was achieved at pyrolysis temperature of 442.15 °C using the EFB particle size of 866 μm which corresponded to the EFB particle size in the range of 710–1000 μm and holding time of 483 seconds

  19. A hybrid treatment of ozonation with limestone adsorption processes for the removal of Fe2+ in groundwater: Fixed bed column study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbar, Nor Azliza; Aziz, Hamidi Abdul; Adlan, Mohd Nordin

    2017-10-01

    During pumping of groundwater to the surface, the reaction between dissolved iron (Fe2+) and oxygen causes oxidation to ferric iron (Fe3+), thereby increasing the concentration of Fe2+. In this research, the potential application of ozonation with limestone adsorption to remove Fe2+ from groundwater was investigated through batch ozonation and fixed-bed-column studies. Groundwater samples were collected from a University Science Malaysia tube well (initial concentration of Fe2+, Co=1.563 mg/L). The effect of varying ozone dosages (10, 12.5, 15, 17.5, 20, 22.5, and 25 g/Nm3) was analyzed to determine the optimum ozone dosage for treatment. The characteristics of the column data and breakthrough curve were analyzed and predicted using mathematical models, such as Adam Bohart, Thomas, and Yoon-Nelson models. The data fitted well to the Thomas and Yoon-Nelson models, with correlation coefficient r2>0.93, but not to the Adam Bohart (r2=0.47). The total Fe2+ removed was 72% (final concentration of Fe2+, Ct=0.426 mg/L) at the maximum dosage of 25 g/Nm3 through ozonation only. However, the efficiency of Fe2+ removal was increased up to 99.5% (Ct=0.008 mg/L) when the hybrid treatment of ozonation with limestone adsorption was applied in this study. Thus, this integrated treatment was considerably more effective in removing Fe2+ than single ozonation treatment.

  20. Bisphenol A removal by a Pseudomonas aeruginosa immobilized on granular activated carbon and operating in a fluidized bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mita, Luigi; Grumiro, Laura; Rossi, Sergio; Bianco, Carmen; Defez, Roberto; Gallo, Pasquale; Mita, Damiano Gustavo; Diano, Nadia

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A fluidized bed reactor, filled with a Pseudomonas aeruginosa immobilized on GAC, has been used for BPA removal. • BPA removal resulted from a biological activated carbon (BAC) process. • Equations describing the results have been indicated. • BPA removal was analyzed as a function of time and biofilm reuse. - Abstract: Serratia rubidiae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli K12 have been studied for their ability of Bisphenol A removal from aqueous systems and biofilm formation on activated granule carbon. Mathematical equations for biodegradation process have been elaborated and discussed. P. aeruginosa was found the best strain to be employed in the process of Bisphenol A removal. The yield in BPA removal of a P. aeruginosa biofilm grown on GAC and operating in a fluidized bed reactor has been evaluated. The results confirm the usefulness in using biological activated carbon (BAC process) to remove phenol compounds from aqueous systems

  1. Bisphenol A removal by a Pseudomonas aeruginosa immobilized on granular activated carbon and operating in a fluidized bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mita, Luigi [National Laboratory on Endocrine Disruptors, National Institute of Biostructures and Biosystems (INBB), Via P. Castellino, 111, 80131 Naples (Italy); Institute of Genetic and Biophysics “ABT”, Via P. Castellino, 111, 80131 Naples Italy (Italy); Grumiro, Laura [National Laboratory on Endocrine Disruptors, National Institute of Biostructures and Biosystems (INBB), Via P. Castellino, 111, 80131 Naples (Italy); Rossi, Sergio [Institute of Genetic and Biophysics “ABT”, Via P. Castellino, 111, 80131 Naples Italy (Italy); Bianco, Carmen; Defez, Roberto [Institute of Biosciences and BioResources, Via P. Castellino, 111, 80131 Naples (Italy); Gallo, Pasquale [Dipartimento di Chimica, Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale del Mezzogiorno, Via della Salute 2, 80055 Portici, Naples (Italy); Mita, Damiano Gustavo, E-mail: mita@igb.cnr.it [National Laboratory on Endocrine Disruptors, National Institute of Biostructures and Biosystems (INBB), Via P. Castellino, 111, 80131 Naples (Italy); Institute of Genetic and Biophysics “ABT”, Via P. Castellino, 111, 80131 Naples Italy (Italy); Diano, Nadia [National Laboratory on Endocrine Disruptors, National Institute of Biostructures and Biosystems (INBB), Via P. Castellino, 111, 80131 Naples (Italy); Department of Experimental Medicine, Second University of Naples, Via S.M. di Costantinopoli, 16, 80138 Naples Italy (Italy)

    2015-06-30

    Highlights: • A fluidized bed reactor, filled with a Pseudomonas aeruginosa immobilized on GAC, has been used for BPA removal. • BPA removal resulted from a biological activated carbon (BAC) process. • Equations describing the results have been indicated. • BPA removal was analyzed as a function of time and biofilm reuse. - Abstract: Serratia rubidiae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli K12 have been studied for their ability of Bisphenol A removal from aqueous systems and biofilm formation on activated granule carbon. Mathematical equations for biodegradation process have been elaborated and discussed. P. aeruginosa was found the best strain to be employed in the process of Bisphenol A removal. The yield in BPA removal of a P. aeruginosa biofilm grown on GAC and operating in a fluidized bed reactor has been evaluated. The results confirm the usefulness in using biological activated carbon (BAC process) to remove phenol compounds from aqueous systems.

  2. SU-F-T-208: An Efficient Planning Approach to Posterior Fossa Tumor Bed Boosts Using Proton Pencil Beam Scanning in Fixed-Beam Room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ju, N; Chen, C; Gans, S; Hug, E; Cahlon, O; Chon, B; Tsai, H; Sine, K; Mah, D; Wolden, S; Yeh, B

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: A fixed-beam room could be underutilized in a multi-room proton center. We investigated the use of proton pencil beam scanning (PBS) on a fixed-beam as an alternative for posterior fossa tumor bed (PF-TB) boost treatments which were usually treating on a gantry with uniform scanning. Methods: Five patients were treated with craniospinal irradiation (CSI, 23.4 or 36.0 Gy(RBE)) followed by a PF-TB boost to 54 Gy(RBE) with proton beams. Three PF-TB boost plans were generated for each patient: (1) a uniform scanning (US) gantry plan with 4–7 posterior fields shaped with apertures and compensators (2) a PBS plan using bi-lateral and vertex fields with a 3-mm planning organ-at-risk volume (PRV) expansion around the brainstem and (3) PBS fields using same beam arrangement but replacing the PRV with robust optimization considering a 3-mm setup uncertainty. Results: A concave 54-Gy(RBE) isodose line surrounding the brainstem could be achieved using all three techniques. The mean V95% of the PTV was 99.7% (range: 97.6% to 100%) while the V100% of the PTV ranged from 56.3% to 93.1% depending on the involvement of the brainstem with the PTV. The mean doses received by 0.05 cm"3 of the brainstem were effectively identical: 54.0 Gy(RBE), 53.4 Gy(RBE) and 53.3 Gy(RBE) for US, PBS optimized with PRV, and PBS optimized with robustness plans respectively. The cochlea mean dose increased by 23% of the prescribed boost dose in average from the bi-lateral fields used in the PBS plan. Planning time for the PBS plan with PRV was 5–10 times less than the US plan and the robustly optimized PBS plan. Conclusion: We have demonstrated that a fixed-beam with PBS can deliver a dose distribution comparable to a gantry plan using uniform scanning. Planning time can be reduced substantially using a PRV around the brainstem instead of robust optimization.

  3. SU-F-T-208: An Efficient Planning Approach to Posterior Fossa Tumor Bed Boosts Using Proton Pencil Beam Scanning in Fixed-Beam Room

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ju, N; Chen, C; Gans, S; Hug, E; Cahlon, O; Chon, B; Tsai, H; Sine, K; Mah, D [Procure Treatment Center, Somerset, New Jersey (United States); Wolden, S [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Yeh, B [Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, NY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: A fixed-beam room could be underutilized in a multi-room proton center. We investigated the use of proton pencil beam scanning (PBS) on a fixed-beam as an alternative for posterior fossa tumor bed (PF-TB) boost treatments which were usually treating on a gantry with uniform scanning. Methods: Five patients were treated with craniospinal irradiation (CSI, 23.4 or 36.0 Gy(RBE)) followed by a PF-TB boost to 54 Gy(RBE) with proton beams. Three PF-TB boost plans were generated for each patient: (1) a uniform scanning (US) gantry plan with 4–7 posterior fields shaped with apertures and compensators (2) a PBS plan using bi-lateral and vertex fields with a 3-mm planning organ-at-risk volume (PRV) expansion around the brainstem and (3) PBS fields using same beam arrangement but replacing the PRV with robust optimization considering a 3-mm setup uncertainty. Results: A concave 54-Gy(RBE) isodose line surrounding the brainstem could be achieved using all three techniques. The mean V95% of the PTV was 99.7% (range: 97.6% to 100%) while the V100% of the PTV ranged from 56.3% to 93.1% depending on the involvement of the brainstem with the PTV. The mean doses received by 0.05 cm{sup 3} of the brainstem were effectively identical: 54.0 Gy(RBE), 53.4 Gy(RBE) and 53.3 Gy(RBE) for US, PBS optimized with PRV, and PBS optimized with robustness plans respectively. The cochlea mean dose increased by 23% of the prescribed boost dose in average from the bi-lateral fields used in the PBS plan. Planning time for the PBS plan with PRV was 5–10 times less than the US plan and the robustly optimized PBS plan. Conclusion: We have demonstrated that a fixed-beam with PBS can deliver a dose distribution comparable to a gantry plan using uniform scanning. Planning time can be reduced substantially using a PRV around the brainstem instead of robust optimization.

  4. Contribution of carbon fixed by Rubisco and PEPC to phloem export in the Crassulacean acid metabolism plant Kalanchoe daigremontiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Birgit; Wanek, Wolfgang; Postl, Wolfgang; Richter, Andreas

    2010-03-01

    Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plants exhibit a complex interplay between CO(2) fixation by phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) and ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase oxygenase (Rubisco), and carbon demand for CAM maintenance and growth. This study investigated the flux of carbon from PEPC and direct Rubisco fixation to different leaf carbon pools and to phloem sap over the diurnal cycle. Concentrations and carbon isotope compositions of starch, soluble sugars, and organic acids were determined in leaves and phloem exudates of Kalanchoë daigremontiana Hamet et Perr., and related to CO(2) fixation by PEPC and Rubisco. Three types of leaf carbon pools could be distinguished. (i) Starch and malate pools were dominant and showed a pattern of reciprocal mobilization and accumulation (85/54 and 13/48 mg C g(-1) DW, respective, at the beginning/end of phase I). The carbon isotope composition of these pools was compatible with predominant PEPC fixation (delta(13)C values of -13 and -11 per thousand for starch and malate compared to -11 per thousand of PEPC fixed carbon). (ii) Isotopic composition (-17 per thousand and -14 per thousand) and concentration of glucose and fructose (2 and 3 mg C g(-1) DW, respectively) were not affected by diurnal metabolism, suggesting a low turnover. (iii) Sucrose (1-3 mg C g(-1) DW), in contrast, exhibited large diurnal changes in delta(13)C values (from -17 per thousand in the evening to -12 per thousand in the morning), which were not matched by net changes in sucrose concentration. This suggests a high sucrose turnover, fed by nocturnal starch degradation and direct Rubisco fixation during the day. A detailed dissection of the carbon fixation and mobilization pattern in K. daigremontiana revealed that direct fixation of Rubisco during the light accounted for 30% of phloem sucrose, but only 15% of fixed carbon, indicating that carbon from direct Rubisco fixation was preferentially used for leaf export.

  5. Study on carbon-fixing,oxygen-releasing,temperature-reducing and humidity-increasing effects of evergreen plants in south highway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIU Minmin

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Li-6400 portable photosynthesis system,was used to test the diurnal variations of photosynthetic rate and stomatal conductance of evergreen plants in Southern Highway,and to calculate their ability of absorbing carbon dioxide and releasing oxygen and to calculate the transpiring water volume and absorbing heat quantity of plants.Results showed that Euonymus fortunei Hand-Mazz,Hedera helix.Aucuba eriobotryaefolia had better carbon-fixing and oxygen-releasing effects,while Photinia serrulata,Trachycarpus fortunei,Radix Ophiopogonis had worse carbon-fixing and oxygen-releasing effects.Radix Ophiopogonis,Photinia glabra,Euonymus fortunei Hand.-Mazz had higher cooling and humidification ability,while Photinia serrulata,Trachycarpus fortunei did not act as well as them.Euonymus fortunei Hand.-Mazz and Hedera helix had higher leaf chlorophyll in per unit mass,values are 12.91、10.34、9.93 mg·g-1.Radix Ophiopogonis、Cinnamomum camphora(Linn. Presl and Trachycarpus fortunei had lower leaf chlorophyll in per unit mass,value is 3.55、2.67、2.06 mg·g-1.Releasing oxygen,fixing carbon,net assimilation and chlorophyll content has good correlation(P<0.05.

  6. Phenolic Wastewater Treatment using Activated Carbon in a Three Phase Fluidized-Bed Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pornsiri Tongprem

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Phenolic wastewater treatment was investigated using activated carbon in a lab scale three phase fluidized-bed reactor. The reactor with effective volume of 272 ml, 300 mm in height and 40 mm in diameter was made from transparent acrylic that allowed to observe the phenomena occurring inside. Phenol 10 mg/l and air were used as representative agents that were continuously fed to the reactor at a constant flow rate of 1 and 2 l/min with co-current and up-flow, respectively. Comparison of the phenolic adsorption under five different conditions: (a fresh Acs, (b 1st reused Acs, (c fresh Fe/Acs, (d 1st reused Fe/Acs, and (e 2nd reused Fe/Acs, have been carried out. The phenolic wastewater was re-circulated through the reactor and its concentration was measured with respect to time. The experimental adsorption results revealed that both fresh Acs and Fe/Acs gave the better results than reused Acs and reused Fe/Acs, respectively. The adsorption in all cases of Acs and Fe/Acs would follow Pseudo-second order kinetic.

  7. Synergetic effect of sewage sludge and biomass co-pyrolysis: A combined study in thermogravimetric analyzer and a fixed bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Xuebin; Deng, Shuanghui; Tan, Houzhang; Adeosun, Adewale; Vujanović, Milan; Yang, Fuxin; Duić, Neven

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The synergetic effect of sewage sludge and wheat straw co-pyrolysis was studied. • The mass balance measurement of gas, tar, and char was performed. • The synergetic effect shows strongest under a certain biomass addition ratio around 60%. • The required heat of co-pyrolysis is significantly reduced. - Abstract: Much attention has been given to the valuable products from the pyrolysis of sewage sludge. In this study, the pyrolysis of sewage sludge, biomass (wheat straw) and their mixtures in different proportions were carried out in a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) and fixed-bed reactor. The effects of pyrolysis temperature and percentage of wheat straw in wheat straw–sewage sludge mixtures on product distributions in terms of gas, liquid and char and the gas composition were investigated. Results indicate that there is a significantly synergetic effect during the co-pyrolysis processes of sewage sludge and wheat straw, accelerating the pyrolysis reactions. The synergetic effect resulted in an increase in gas and liquid yields but a decrease in char yield. The gas composition and the synergetic effect degree are strongly affected by the wheat straw proportions, and the strongest synergetic effect of sewage sludge and wheat straw co-pyrolysis appears at the biomass proportion of 60 wt.%. With an increase of temperature, the gas yield from the pyrolysis of sewage sludge increased but the liquid and char yields decreased. Moreover, the required heat of co-pyrolysis is significantly reduced compared with the pyrolysis of sewage sludge and wheat straw pyrolysis alone, because of the exothermic reactions between the ash components in two fuel samples.

  8. Vapor-phase elemental mercury adsorption by Ca(OH){sub 2} impregnated with MnO{sub 2} and Ag in fixed-bed system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Y.J. Wang; Y.F. Duan; Z.J. Huang; S.L. Meng; L.G. Yang; C.S. Zhao [Southeast University, Nanjing (China). School of Energy and Environment

    2010-05-15

    The ability of three sorbents (untreated Ca(OH){sub 2}, MnO{sub 2}-impregnated Ca(OH){sub 2} and Ag-impregnated Ca(OH){sub 2}) removing the elemental mercury had been studied using a laboratory-scale fixed-bed reactor at 80{sup o}C under simulated fuel gas conditions. The adsorption performance of the three sorbents was compared by mercury removal efficiency and adsorption capacity. The effect of acid gases such as HCl and SO{sub 2} on the mercury removal was investigated and presented in this article. The results showed that the mercury removal by Ca(OH){sub 2} was mainly controlled by physical mechanisms. In the case of Ca(OH){sub 2}, the presence of both SO{sub 2} and HCl promoted the Hg{sup 0} removal, and compared HCl with SO{sub 2}, HCl had a higher mercury removal than SO{sub 2}. Ca(OH){sub 2} impregnated with MnO{sub 2} had a slightly higher mercury removal than the original Ca(OH){sub 2}, but it was beneficial for mercury speciation. The presence of both SO{sub 2} and HCl promotes the Hg0 removal greatly, which was adsorbed by Ca(OH){sub 2} impregnated with MnO{sub 2}. The Ca(OH){sub 2} impregnated with MnO{sub 2} adsorbed more than 50% total Hg due to the occurrence of chemisorptions. The mercury removal by Ca(OH){sub 2} impregnated with Ag was the highest. This may be because mercury integrated with silver easily that could produce silver amalgam alloy.

  9. Optimization of the pyrolysis process of empty fruit bunch (EFB) in a fixed-bed reactor through a central composite design (CCD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohamed, Alina Rahayu; Hamzah, Zainab; Daud, Mohamed Zulkali Mohamed [School of Bioprocess Engineering, Jejawi Complex of Academics (3), UniMAP, 02600 Arau Perlis (Malaysia)

    2014-07-10

    The production of crude palm oil from the processing of palm fresh fruit bunches in the palm oil mills in Malaysia hs resulted in a huge quantity of empty fruit bunch (EFB) accumulated. The EFB was used as a feedstock in the pyrolysis process using a fixed-bed reactor in the present study. The optimization of process parameters such as pyrolysis temperature (factor A), biomass particle size (factor B) and holding time (factor C) were investigated through Central Composite Design (CCD) using Stat-Ease Design Expert software version 7 with bio-oil yield considered as the response. Twenty experimental runs were conducted. The results were completely analyzed by Analysis of Variance (ANOVA). The model was statistically significant. All factors studied were significant with p-values < 0.05. The pyrolysis temperature (factor A) was considered as the most significant parameter because its F-value of 116.29 was the highest. The value of R{sup 2} was 0.9564 which indicated that the selected factors and its levels showed high correlation to the production of bio-oil from EFB pyrolysis process. A quadratic model equation was developed and employed to predict the highest theoretical bio-oil yield. The maximum bio-oil yield of 46.2 % was achieved at pyrolysis temperature of 442.15 °C using the EFB particle size of 866 μm which corresponded to the EFB particle size in the range of 710–1000 μm and holding time of 483 seconds.

  10. Bisphenol A removal by a Pseudomonas aeruginosa immobilized on granular activated carbon and operating in a fluidized bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mita, Luigi; Grumiro, Laura; Rossi, Sergio; Bianco, Carmen; Defez, Roberto; Gallo, Pasquale; Mita, Damiano Gustavo; Diano, Nadia

    2015-06-30

    Serratia rubidiae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli K12 have been studied for their ability of Bisphenol A removal from aqueous systems and biofilm formation on activated granule carbon. Mathematical equations for biodegradation process have been elaborated and discussed. P. aeruginosa was found the best strain to be employed in the process of Bisphenol A removal. The yield in BPA removal of a P. aeruginosa biofilm grown on GAC and operating in a fluidized bed reactor has been evaluated. The results confirm the usefulness in using biological activated carbon (BAC process) to remove phenol compounds from aqueous systems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. CATALYTIC WET PEROXIDE OXIDATION OF HYDROQUINONE WITH Co(II)/ACTIVE CARBON CATALYST LOADED IN STATIC BED

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Catalysts based on Co(II) supported on active carbon were prepared and loaded in static bed. The hydroquinone would be degraded completely after treated by Catalytic wet peroxide oxidation method with Co(II)/active carbon catalyst. After activate treatment, the active carbon was immerged in cobaltous nitrate solution, then put into a drying oven, Co(II) could be loaded on the micro-surface of carbon. Taking the static bed as the equipment, the absorption of active carbon and catalysis of Co(II) was used to reduce activation energy of hydroquinone. Thus hydroquinone could be drastically degraded and the effluent can be drained under the standard. Referring to Fenton reaction mechanism, experiment had been done to study the heterogeneous catalyzed oxidation mechanism of Co(II). The degradation rate of hydroquinone effluent could be achieved to 92% when treated in four columns at H2O2 concentration 10%, reaction temperature 40℃ , pH 5 and reaction time 2.5h.

  12. Agglomeration mechanism in biomass fluidized bed combustion – Reaction between potassium carbonate and silica sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anicic, Bozidar; Lin, Weigang; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    2018-01-01

    Agglomeration is one of the operational problems in fluidized bed combustion of biomass, which is caused by interaction between bed materials (e.g. silica sand) and the biomass ash with a high content of potassium species. However, the contribution of different potassium species to agglomeration ...

  13. ANALYSIS OF TRICKLE BED AND PACKED BUBBLE COLUMN BIOREACTORS FOR COMBINED CARBON OXIDATION AND NITRIFICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iliuta I.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Biological removal of nitrogen and carbon by combined nitrification-oxidation in gas-liquid trickle-bed reactors (TBRs and packed bubble columns (PBCs was analyzed theoretically using a transient two-dimensional model. The model describes TBR and PBC performances at steady state as well as their transient response to a pulse or step increase in inlet methanol and NH4+-nitrogen concentrations. The hydrodynamic parameters were determined from residence time distribution measurements, using an imperfect pulse method for time-domain analysis of nonideal pulse tracer response. A transient diffusion model of the tracer in the porous particle coupled with the piston-dispersion-exchange model was used to interpret the residence time distribution curves obtained. Gas-liquid mass transfer parameters were determined by a stationary method based on the least-squares fit of the calculated concentration profiles in gas phase to the experimental values. Analysis of steady-state performances showed that under like operating conditions, the TBR outperforms the PBC in terms of conversions. A pulse change in the inlet methanol or NH4+-nitrogen concentration causes a negligible transient change in the outlet methanol concentration and a negligible or high transient change in the outlet NH4+-nitrogen concentration. A step change in the inlet methanol concentration causes the negligible transient change in the methanol outlet concentration and a relatively important transient change in the NH4+-nitrogen outlet concentration. A step increase in the NH4+-nitrogen inlet concentration induces a drastic transient change in the NH4+-nitrogen outlet concentration but a negligible transient change in the methanol outlet concentration.

  14. In-situ catalytic upgrading of biomass pyrolysis vapor: Using a cascade system of various catalysts in a multi-zone fixed bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asadieraghi, Masoud; Wan Daud, Wan Mohd Ashri

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A cascade system of different catalysts exhibited the best performance to produce high quality bio-oil. • Meso-HZSM-5, Ga (1 wt.%)/meso-HZSM-5 and Cu (5 wt.%)/SiO 2 were employed in a cascade system. • The incorporation of the appropriate gallium amount to meso-HZSM-5 enhanced the aromatics selectivity. • Meso-HZSM-5 indicated a very good activity in bio-oil upgrading. - Abstract: The in-situ catalytic upgrading of palm kernel shell (PKS) fast pyrolysis vapors was performed over each individual meso-H-ZSM-5, Ga/meso-HZSM-5 and Cu/SiO 2 catalyst or a cascade system of them in a multi-zone fixed bed reactor. The effects of mesoporosity creation into the parent H-ZSM-5 catalyst and also gallium incorporation into mesoporous H-ZSM-5 on the produced bio-oil chemical composition and distribution were studied. Key upgrading reactions for different oxygenated compounds in pyrolysis oil (small oxygenates, lignin derived and sugar derived components), including aldol condensation, alkylation, hydrogenation, aromatization, and deoxygenation were discussed. The catalysts were characterized using SEM, XRF, XRD, N 2 adsorption and NH 3 -TPD methods. Furthermore, the produced bio-oils (catalytic and non-catalytic) were analyzed using GC–MS, FTIR, CHNS/O elemental analyzer and Karl Fischer titration. Production of the upgraded bio-oil with lower content of oxygenated compound was the main objective of this investigation. Among different catalysts, meso-H-ZSM-5 zeolite demonstrated a very good activity in aromatization and deoxygenation during the upgrading of pyrolytic vapors, although it decreased the bio-oil yield (32.6 wt.%). The gallium incorporation into the meso-HZSM-5 zeolite increased the bio-oil yield from 32.6 wt.% (meso-HZSM-5) to 35.8 wt.% (using 1.0 wt.% Ga). Furthermore, the aromatics selectivity was enhanced when the appropriate amount of gallium (1.0 wt.%) was introduced. A cascade system of various catalysts comprising meso-HZSM-5, Ga (1

  15. Effects of deposition conditions on the properties of pyrolytic carbon deposited in a fluidized bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowden, Richard Andrew; Hunn, John D.; Nunn, Stephen D.; Kercher, Andrew K.; Price, Jeffery R.; Jellison, Gerald Earle Jr.

    2005-01-01

    deposition of pyrolytic carbon in a fluidized bed graphically depict the relationships between processing parameters and coating properties. The additional figures present optical, scanning electron microscopy, and other images to highlight microstructural details. For the study, only two parameters (factors), coating gas fraction and deposition temperature, were varied. The plots reveal obvious trends and links between factors and responses. The dominant relationships determined by this study for this range of coating conditions are: (1) rate is dependent upon coating gas fraction or in other terms, reactant concentration; (2) density is controlled by deposition temperature; (3) efficiency is influenced by both CGF and temperature; (4) anisotropy is affect by CGF and temperature, however, the relationship is more complex than for other properties; (5) permeability is dependent upon deposition temperature (thus density); and (6) open porosity is affect by CGF thus is influenced by coating rate. The response plots can be used as 'maps' for the deposition process and are thus valuable for selecting coating conditions necessary to produce desired combinations of properties. The information is useful in predicting the effects of changes to processing on properties and is beneficial in optimizing the process and product properties. Although the study was limited to only two parameters, the information provides a foundation from which other aspects of the coating process can be more easily investigated.

  16. Carbon accounting and cost estimation in forestry projects using CO2Fix V.3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen, T.A.; Nabuurs, G.J.; Schelhaas, M.J.

    2006-01-01

    Carbon and financial accounting of projects in the Land Use, Land-Use Change and Forestry sector is a topic of hot debate. Large uncertainty remains concerning the carbon dynamics, the way they should be accounted and the cost efficiency of the projects. Part of the uncertainty can be alleviated by

  17. Continuous adsorption and biotransformation of micropollutants by granular activated carbon-bound laccase in a packed-bed enzyme reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Luong N; Hai, Faisal I; Dosseto, Anthony; Richardson, Christopher; Price, William E; Nghiem, Long D

    2016-06-01

    Laccase was immobilized on granular activated carbon (GAC) and the resulting GAC-bound laccase was used to degrade four micropollutants in a packed-bed column. Compared to the free enzyme, the immobilized laccase showed high residual activities over a broad range of pH and temperature. The GAC-bound laccase efficiently removed four micropollutants, namely, sulfamethoxazole, carbamazepine, diclofenac and bisphenol A, commonly detected in raw wastewater and wastewater-impacted water sources. Mass balance analysis showed that these micropollutants were enzymatically degraded following adsorption onto GAC. Higher degradation efficiency of micropollutants by the immobilized compared to free laccase was possibly due to better electron transfer between laccase and substrate molecules once they have adsorbed onto the GAC surface. Results here highlight the complementary effects of adsorption and enzymatic degradation on micropollutant removal by GAC-bound laccase. Indeed laccase-immobilized GAC outperformed regular GAC during continuous operation of packed-bed columns over two months (a throughput of 12,000 bed volumes). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Numerical simulation of coupled binary gas-solid interaction during carbon dioxide sequestration in a coal bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Qiyan; Zhou Lai; Chen Zhongwei; Liu Jishan

    2008-01-01

    Complicated coupled binary gas-solid interaction arises during carbon dioxide sequestration in a coal seam, which combines effects of CO 2 -CH 4 counter adsorption, CO 2 -CH 4 counter diffusion, binary gas flow and coal bed deformation. Through solving a set of coupled field governing equations, a novel full coupled Finite Element (FE) model was established by COMSOL Multiphysics. The new FE model was applied to the quantification of coal porous pressure, coal permeability, gas composition fraction and coal displacement when CO 2 was injected in a CH 4 saturated coal bed. Numerical results demonstrate that CH 4 is swept by the injected CO 2 accompanied by coal volumetric deformation. Compared to the single CH 4 in situ, CH 4 -CO 2 counter-diffusion induced coal swelling can make more compensation for coal shrinkage due to effective stress. Competing influences between the effective stress and the CH 4 -CO 2 counter-diffusion induced volume change governs the evolution of porous pressure and permeability, which is controlled by the porous pressure correspondingly. This achievement extends our ability to understand the coupled multi-physics of the CO 2 geological sequestration and CO 2 enhanced coal bed methane recovery under field conditions. (authors)

  19. Alternating electric field fluidized bed disinfection performance with different types of granular activated carbon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Racyte, J.; Yntema, D.R.; Kazlauskaite, L.; DuBois, A.; Bruning, H.; Rijnaarts, H.H.M.

    2014-01-01

    The removal of pathogens from effluents is important to promote the reuse of these water resources and safeguarding human health, especially in water scarce areas worldwide. Previously a proof-of-principle of a method for water disinfection consisting of fluidized bed electrodes (FBE) with RX3 EXTRA

  20. Irrigation management and phosphorus addition alter the abundance of carbon dioxide-fixing autotrophs in phosphorus-limited paddy soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaohong; Ge, Tida; Yan, Wende; Zhou, Juan; Wei, Xiaomeng; Chen, Liang; Chen, Xiangbi; Nannipieri, Paolo; Wu, Jinshui

    2017-12-01

    In this study, we assessed the interactive effects of phosphorus (P) application and irrigation methods on the abundances of marker genes (cbbL, cbbM, accA and aclB) of CO2-fixing autotrophs. We conducted rice-microcosm experiments using a P-limited paddy soil, with and without the addition of P fertiliser (P-treated-pot (P) versus control pot (CK)), and using two irrigation methods, namely alternate wetting and drying (AWD) and continuous flooding (CF). The abundances of bacterial 16S rRNA, archaeal 16S rRNA, cbbL, cbbM, accA and aclB genes in the rhizosphere soil (RS) and bulk soil (BS) were quantified. The application of P significantly altered the soil properties and stimulated the abundances of Bacteria, Archaea and CO2-fixation genes under CF treatment, but negatively influenced the abundances of Bacteria and marker genes of CO2-fixing autotrophs in BS soils under AWD treatment. The response of CO2-fixing autotrophs to P fertiliser depended on the irrigation management method. The redundancy analysis revealed that 54% of the variation in the functional marker gene abundances could be explained by the irrigation method, P fertiliser and the Olsen-P content; however, the rhizosphere effect did not have any significant influence. P fertiliser application under CF was more beneficial in improving the abundance of CO2-fixing autotrophs compared to the AWD treatment; thus, it is an ideal irrigation management method to increase soil carbon fixation. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Alcoholic fermentation process and methane formation unit with biomass in fixed bed; Processo de fermentacao alcoolica e fermentador de metanizacao com biomassa em leito fixo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camilleri, Claude [Societe Generale de Techniques Nouvelles (France)

    1986-01-01

    The pollution, measured from Biochemical Oxygen Demand, is constituted primary of organic carbon. The pollution abatement is made traditionally by thr reduction of this carbon by an aerobic way. Were made some tries in order to recover this carbon as an energy source and the methane formation process arises like the most attractive alternative 2 figs.

  2. Studies of biomass devolatilization rates in fixed and fluidized beds; Estudo das taxas de devolatilizacao de biomassa em leito fixo e leito fluidizado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, C G; Peel, B R [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia Mecanica; Santos, F.J. dos [UNESP, Rio Claro, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica

    1991-12-31

    Devolatilization time of biomass is studied in this work. In a laboratory scale fluidized bed and in a tubular furnace, samples of eucalyptus, peroba and bagasse were burned. Volatile matter burnout time were determined by visual observations (author). 7 refs., 4 figs., 7 tabs.

  3. Organic Acids: The Pools of Fixed Carbon Involved in Redox Regulation and Energy Balance in Higher Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abir U Igamberdiev

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Organic acids are synthesized in plants as a result of the incomplete oxidation of photosynthetic products and represent the stored pools of fixed carbon accumulated due to different transient times of conversion of carbon compounds in metabolic pathways. When redox level in the cell increases, e.g., in conditions of active photosynthesis, the tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle in mitochondria is transformed to a partial cycle supplying citrate for the synthesis of 2-oxoglutarate and glutamate (citrate valve, while malate is accumulated and participates in the redox balance in different cell compartments (via malate valve. This results in malate and citrate frequently being the most accumulated acids in plants. However, the intensity of reactions linked to the conversion of these compounds can cause preferential accumulation of other organic acids, e.g., fumarate or isocitrate, in higher concentrations than malate and citrate. The secondary reactions, associated with the central metabolic pathways, in particularly with the TCA cycle, result in accumulation of other organic acids that are derived from the intermediates of the cycle. They form the additional pools of fixed carbon and stabilize the TCA cycle. Trans-aconitate is formed from citrate or cis-aconitate, accumulation of hydroxycitrate can be linked to metabolism of 2-oxoglutarate, while 4-hydroxy-2-oxoglutarate can be formed from pyruvate and glyoxylate. Glyoxylate, a product of either glycolate oxidase or isocitrate lyase, can be converted to oxalate. Malonate is accumulated at high concentrations in legume plants. Organic acids play a role in plants in providing redox equilibrium, supporting ionic gradients on membranes, and acidification of the extracellular medium.

  4. Reversing climate change how carbon removals can resolve climate change and fix the economy

    CERN Document Server

    Chichilnisky, Graciela

    2018-01-01

    The Kyoto Protocol capped the emissions of the main emitters, the industrialized countries, one by one. It also created an innovative financial mechanism, the Carbon Market and its Clean Development Mechanism (CDM), which allows developing nations to receive carbon credits when they reduce their emissions below their baselines. The carbon market, an economic system that created a price for carbon for the first time, is now used in four continents, is promoted by the World Bank, and is recommended even by leading oil and gas companies. However, one critical problem for the future of the Kyoto Protocol is the continuing impasse between the rich and the poor nations. Who should reduce emissions — the rich or the poor countries? This book is about the 21st session of the Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), or COP21, held from 30 November to 11 December 2015 in Paris, which brought together around 40,000 participants in total — with delegates repre...

  5. The relative contribution of methanotrophs to microbial communities and carbon cycling in soil overlying a coal-bed methane seep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Christopher T.; Slater, Gregory F.; Dias, Robert F.; Carr, Stephanie A.; Reddy, Christopher M.; Schmidt, Raleigh; Mandernack, Kevin W.

    2013-01-01

    Seepage of coal-bed methane (CBM) through soils is a potential source of atmospheric CH4 and also a likely source of ancient (i.e. 14C-dead) carbon to soil microbial communities. Natural abundance 13C and 14C compositions of bacterial membrane phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) and soil gas CO2 and CH4 were used to assess the incorporation of CBM-derived carbon into methanotrophs and other members of the soil microbial community. Concentrations of type I and type II methanotroph PLFA biomarkers (16:1ω8c and 18:1ω8c, respectively) were elevated in CBM-impacted soils compared with a control site. Comparison of PLFA and 16s rDNA data suggested type I and II methanotroph populations were well estimated and overestimated by their PLFA biomarkers, respectively. The δ13C values of PLFAs common in type I and II methanotrophs were as negative as −67‰ and consistent with the assimilation of CBM. PLFAs more indicative of nonmethanotrophic bacteria had δ13C values that were intermediate indicating assimilation of both plant- and CBM-derived carbon. Δ14C values of select PLFAs (−351 to −936‰) indicated similar patterns of CBM assimilation by methanotrophs and nonmethanotrophs and were used to estimate that 35–91% of carbon assimilated by nonmethanotrophs was derived from CBM depending on time of sampling and soil depth.

  6. Promoting effect of active carbons on methanol dehydrogenation on sodium carbonate - hydrogen spillover

    OpenAIRE

    Su, S.; Prairie, M.; Renken, A.

    1993-01-01

    Methanol dehydrogenation to formaldehyde was conducted in a fixed-bed flow reactor with sodium carbonate catalyst mixed with active carbons or transition metals. The additives promoted the reaction rate at 880-970 K without modifying formaldehyde selectivity. This effect increases with increasing carbon content in the carbon-carbonate mixture. Activation energy of methanol conversion is the same for the mixture and the carbonate alone. Temperature-programmed desorption experiments showed that...

  7. Carbonation of Mg(OH){sub 2} in a pressurised fluidised bed for CO{sub 2} sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fagerlund, J.

    2012-07-01

    To date, a number of methods to accelerate natural weathering or in other words increase the CO{sub 2} uptake rate of various minerals have been suggested; commonly this is known as mineral carbonation or CO{sub 2} mineralisation. A brief literature review of recently published articles in this field is presented, showing that the interest in mineral carbonation is increasing. However, it should be noted that mineral carbonation is only one option in a larger portfolio of various carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) alternatives. Unlike many other options, the CO{sub 2} mineralisation option considered in this thesis is largely founded on the possibility to utilise the exothermic nature of magnesium carbonation and based on this notion, it has been divided into three steps. The first two steps are energy demanding, while the third step is energy 'negative', and in theory, the source of the energy required in the first two steps. Unfortunately, however, the energy demanded by the first two steps, Mg extraction and Mg(OH){sub 2} production, is (currently) much higher than what could be generated by the subsequent Mg(OH){sub 2} carbonation step. Nevertheless, opportunities to reduce the energy intensity of the process in question are still being investigated, and while an energy-neutral carbonation process might be difficult to achieve, energy requirements can still be rendered industrially acceptable (and comparable to or even better than for other CCS methods). The main focus of this thesis lies with the third step, Mg(OH){sub 2} carbonation, which is performed using a pressurised fluidised bed (PFB). The elevated CO{sub 2} pressure conditions (typically approx 20 bar) allow for the carbonation reaction to take place at higher temperatures (typically approx 500 deg C) than otherwise due to thermodynamic constraints on carbonate stability. The increase in reaction rate as a function of temperature follows the Arrhenius equation of exponential increase

  8. Eelgrass Blue Carbon-Quantification of Carbon Stocks and Sequestration Rates in Zostera Marina Beds in the Salish Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, M. D.; Rybczyk, J.; Poppe, K.; Johnson, C.; Kaminsky, M.; Lanphear, M.

    2017-12-01

    Seagrass meadows provide more than habitat, biodiversity support, wave abatement, and water quality improvement; they help mitigate climate change by taking up and storing (sequestering) carbon (C), reportedly at rates only surpassed worldwide by salt marsh and mangrove ecosystems. Now that their climate mitigation capacity has earned seagrass ecosystems a place in the Verified Carbon Standard voluntary greenhouse gas program, accurate ecosystem carbon accounting is essential. Though seagrasses vary in carbon storage and accumulation greatly across species and geography, the bulk of data included in calculating global averages involves tropical and subtropical seagrasses. We know little regarding carbon stocks nor sequestration rates for eelgrass (Zostera marina) meadows in the Pacific Northwest. The intent of our study was to quantify carbon stocks and sequestration rates in the central Salish Sea of Washington State. We gathered sediment cores over three bays, as close to 1 m in depth as possible, both on foot and while scuba diving. We measured bulk density, carbon concentration, carbon stock, grain size, and carbon accumulation rate with depth. Results from our study show lower estimated Corg concentration (mean = 0.39% C, SE=0.01, range=0.11-1.75, SE=0.01), Corg stock (mean=24.46 Mg ha-1, SE=0.00, range=16.31-49.99.70), and C sequestration rates (mean=33.96 g m-2yr-1, range=11.4-49.5) than those reported in published studies from most other locations. Zostera marina is highly productive, yet does not seem to have the capacity to store C in its sediments like seagrasses in warmer climes. These data have implications in carbon market trading, when determining appropriate seagrass restoration site dimensions to offset emissions from transportation, industry, and seagrass habitat disturbance. Awareness of lower rates could prevent underestimating the area appropriate for mitigation or restoration.

  9. Single and multi-component adsorption of salicylic acid, clofibric acid, carbamazepine and caffeine from water onto transition metal modified and partially calcined inorganic-organic pillared clay fixed beds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera-Lafaurie, Wilman A; Román, Félix R; Hernández-Maldonado, Arturo J

    2015-01-23

    Fixed-beds of transition metal (Co(2+), Ni(2+) or Cu(2+)) inorganic-organic pillared clays (IOCs) were prepared to study single- and multi-component non-equilibrium adsorption of a set of pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCPs: salicylic acid, clofibric acid, carbamazepine and caffeine) from water. Adsorption capacities for single components revealed that the copper(II) IOCs have better affinity toward salicylic and clofibric acid. However, multi-component adsorption tests showed a considerable decrease in adsorption capacity for the acids and an unusual selectivity toward carbamazepine depending on the transition metal. This was attributed to a combination of competition between PPCPs for adsorption sites, adsorbate-adsorbate interactions, and plausible pore blocking caused by carbamazepine. The cobalt(II) IOC bed that was partially calcined to fractionate the surfactant moiety showcased the best selectivity toward caffeine, even during multi-component adsorption. This was due to a combination of a mildly hydrophobic surface and interaction between the PPCP and cobalt(II). In general, the tests suggest that these IOCs may be a potential solution for the removal of PPCPs if employed in a layered-bed configuration, to take care of families of adsorbates in a sequence that would produce sharpened concentration wavefronts. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Change in carrier type in high-k gate carbon nanotube field-effect transistors by interface fixed charges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriyama, N; Ohno, Y; Kitamura, T; Kishimoto, S; Mizutani, T

    2010-01-01

    We study the phenomenon of change in carrier type in carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNFETs) caused by the atomic layer deposition (ALD) of a HfO 2 gate insulator. When a HfO 2 layer is deposited on a CNFET, the type of carrier changes from p-type to n-type. The so-obtained n-type device has good performance and stability in air. The conductivity of such a device with a channel length of 0.7 μm is 11% of the quantum conductance 4e 2 /h. The contact resistance for electron current is estimated to be 14 kΩ. The n-type conduction of this CNFET is maintained for more than 100 days. The change in carrier type is attributed to positive fixed charges introduced at the interface between the HfO 2 and SiO 2 layers. We also propose a novel technique to control the type of conduction by utilizing interface fixed charges; this technique is compatible with Si CMOS process technology.

  11. Séparation par coalescence en lit fixe d'une phase aqueuse émulsionnée dans une phase organique Fixed-Bed Coalescence to Separate an Emulsified Aqueous Phase in an Organic Phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calteau J. P.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Cette publication étudie la séparation de l'eau émulsionnée dans un kérosène par passage à travers un milieu granulaire. Les propriétés physico-chimiques du matériau coalesceur (nature et état de surface sont considérées. L'efficacité de séparation est étudiée en fonction ; - de la mouillabilité; - de la granulométrie; - de l'état de surface du matériau ; - de la vitesse de passage de l'émulsion; - de la hauteur de lit. L'analyse qualitative et quantitative de la rétention de l'eau dans le lit permet de mieux comprendre les mécanismes de coalescence. This article examines the séparation of emulsified water in kerosene by passing it through a granular medium. The physico-chemical properties of the coolescing material, i. e. nature and surface state, are considered. Separation efficiency is analyzed as a fonction of : - wettability; - grain size ; - surface state of the material ; - emulsion pass-through rate; - height of the bed. A qualitative and quantitative analysis of water retention in the bed gives a better understanding of the coalescence mechanisms.

  12. Optimization of an integrated sponge--granular activated carbon fluidized bed bioreactor as pretreatment to microfiltration in wastewater reuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, W; Ngo, H H; Guo, W S; Listowski, A; Cullum, P

    2012-06-01

    A specific integrated fluidized bed bioreactor (iFBBR) was optimized in terms of organic loading rate (OLR), hydraulic retention time (HRT) and frequency of new sustainable flocculant (NSBF) addition for primary treated sewage effluent (PTSE) treatment. It was observed that iFBBR achieved the best performance with the operating conditions of 4 times/day NSBF addition, HRT of 90 min and OLR of 8.64 kg COD/day m(3). The removal efficiencies were found to be more than 93% of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), 61% of total nitrogen (T-N) and 60% of total phosphorus (T-P). iFBBR as pretreatment of submerged microfiltration (SMF) is successful in increasing the critical flux and reducing the membrane fouling. NSBF-iFBBR-SMF hybrid system led to very high organic removal efficiency with an average DOC removal of 97% from synthetic PTSE. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Fast-solving thermally thick model of biomass particles embedded in a CFD code for the simulation of fixed-bed burners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gómez, M.A.; Porteiro, J.; Patiño, D.; Míguez, J.L.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A thermally thick treatment is used to simulate of fuel the thermal conversion of solid biomass. • A dynamic subgrid scale is used to model the advance of reactive fronts inside the particle. • Efficient solution algorithms are applied to calculate the temperatures and volume of the internal layers. • Several tests were simulated and compared with experimental data. - Abstract: The thermally thick treatment of fuel particles during the thermal conversion of solid biomass is required to consider the internal gradients of temperature and composition and the overlapping of the existing biomass combustion stages. Due to the implied mixture of scales, the balance between model resolution and computational efficiency is an important limitation in the simulation of beds with large numbers of particles. In this study, a subgrid-scale model is applied to consider the intraparticle gradients, the interactions with other particles and the gas phase using a Euler–Euler CFD framework. Numerical heat transfer and mass conservation equations are formulated on a subparticle scale to obtain a system of linear equations that can be used to resolve the temperature and position of the reacting front inside the characteristic particle of each cell. To simulate the entire system, this modelling is combined with other submodels of the gas phase, the bed reaction and the interactions. The performance of the new model is tested using published experimental results for the particle and the bed. Similar temperatures are obtained in the particle-alone tests. Although the mass consumption rates tend to be underpredicted during the drying stage, they are subsequently compensated. In addition, an experimental batch-loaded pellet burner was simulated and tested with different air mass fluxes, in which the experimental ignition rates and temperatures are employed to compare the thermally thick model with the thermally thin model that was previously developed by the authors

  14. Sulphation and carbonation properties of hydrated sorbents from a fluidized bed CO{sub 2} looping cycle reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasilije Manovic; Edward J. Anthony; Dennis Y. Lu [CANMET Energy Technology Centre-Ottawa, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2008-10-15

    Sulphation and carbonation have been performed on hydrated spent residues from a 75 kW{sub th} dual fluidized bed combustion (FBC) pilot plant operating as a CO{sub 2} looping cycle unit. The sulphation and carbonation tests were done in an atmospheric pressure thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA), with the sulphation performed using synthetic flue gas (0.45% SO{sub 2}, 3% O{sub 2}, 15% CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2} balance). Additional tests were carried out in a tube furnace (TF) with a higher SO{sub 2} concentration (1%) and conversions were determined by quantitative X-ray diffraction (QXRD) analyses. The morphology of the sulphated samples from the TF was examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Sulphation tests were performed at 850{sup o}C for 150 min and carbonation tests at 750{sup o}C, 10 cycles for 15 min (7.5 min calcination + 7.5 min carbonation). Sulphation conversions obtained for the hydrated samples depended on sample type: in the TGA, they were 75-85% (higher values were obtained for samples from the carbonator); and in the TF, values around 90% and 70% for sample from carbonator and calciner, respectively, were achieved, in comparison to the 40% conversion seen with the original sample. The SEM analyses showed significant residual porosity that can increase total conversion with longer sulphation time. The carbonation tests showed a smaller influence of the sample type and typical conversions after 10 cycles were 50% - about 10% higher than that for the original sample. The influence of hydration duration, in the range of 15-60 min, is not apparent, indicating that samples are ready for use for either SO{sub 2} retention, or further CO{sub 2} capture after at most 15 min using saturated steam. The present results show that, upon hydration, spent residues from FBC CO{sub 2} capture cycles are good sorbents for both SO{sub 2} retention and additional CO{sub 2} capture. 33 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Effect of granular activated carbon concentration on the content of organic matter and salt, influencing E. coli activity and survival in fluidized bed disinfection reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Racyte, J.; Langenhoff, A.A.M.; Ribeiro, A.F.M.M.R.; Paulitsch-Fuchs, A.H.; Bruning, H.; Rijnaarts, H.

    2014-01-01

    Granular activated carbon (GAC) is used in water treatment systems, typically to remove pollutants such as natural organic matter, volatile organic compounds, chlorine, taste, and odor. GAC is also used as a key component of a new technology that combines a fluidized bed reactor with radio frequency

  16. Removal of a wide range of emerging pollutants from wastewater treatment plant discharges by micro-grain activated carbon in fluidized bed as tertiary treatment at large pilot scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mailler, R., E-mail: romain.mailler@siaap.fr [LEESU (UMR MA 102, Université Paris-Est, AgroParisTech), Université Paris-Est Créteil, 61 avenue du Général de Gaulle, 94010 Créteil Cedex (France); Gasperi, J., E-mail: gasperi@u-pec.fr [LEESU (UMR MA 102, Université Paris-Est, AgroParisTech), Université Paris-Est Créteil, 61 avenue du Général de Gaulle, 94010 Créteil Cedex (France); Coquet, Y. [SAUR, Direction de la Recherche et du Développement, 1 rue Antoine Lavoisier, 78064 Guyancourt (France); Buleté, A.; Vulliet, E. [Université de Lyon, Institut des Sciences Analytiques, UMR5280 CNRS, Université Lyon 1, ENS-Lyon, 5 rue de la Doua, 69100 Villeurbanne (France); Deshayes, S. [LEESU (UMR MA 102, Université Paris-Est, AgroParisTech), Université Paris-Est Créteil, 61 avenue du Général de Gaulle, 94010 Créteil Cedex (France); LCPP (Laboratoire Central de la Préfecture de Police), 39 bis rue de Dantzig, 75015 Paris (France); Zedek, S. [LEESU (UMR MA 102, Université Paris-Est, AgroParisTech), Université Paris-Est Créteil, 61 avenue du Général de Gaulle, 94010 Créteil Cedex (France); and others

    2016-01-15

    Among the solutions to reduce micropollutant discharges into the aquatic environment, activated carbon adsorption is a promising technique and a large scale pilot has been tested at the Seine Centre (240,000 m{sup 3}/d — Paris, France) wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). While most of available works studied fixed bed or contact reactors with a separated separation step, this study assesses a new type of tertiary treatment based on a fluidized bed containing a high mass of activated carbon, continuously renewed. For the first time in the literature, micro-grain activated carbon (μGAC) was studied. The aims were (1) to determine the performances of fluidized bed operating with μCAG on both emerging micropollutants and conventional wastewater quality parameters, and (2) to compare its efficiency and applicability to wastewater to former results obtained with PAC. Thus, conventional wastewater quality parameters (n = 11), pharmaceuticals and hormones (PPHs; n = 62) and other emerging pollutants (n = 57) have been monitored in μGAC configuration during 13 campaigns. A significant correlation has been established between dissolved organic carbon (DOC), PPHs and UV absorbance at 254 nm (UV-254) removals. This confirms that UV-254 could be used as a tertiary treatment performance indicator to monitor the process. This parameter allowed identifying that the removals of UV-254 and DOC reach a plateau from a μGAC retention time (SRT) of 90–100 days. The μGAC configuration substantially improves the overall quality of the WWTP discharges by reducing biological (38–45%) and chemical oxygen demands (21–48%), DOC (13–44%) and UV-254 (22–48%). In addition, total suspended solids (TSS) are retained by the μGAC bed and a biological activity (nitratation) leads to a total elimination of NO{sub 2}{sup −}. For micropollutants, PPHs have a good affinity for μGAC and high (> 60%) or very high (> 80%) removals are observed for most of the quantified compounds (n = 22

  17. Removal of a wide range of emerging pollutants from wastewater treatment plant discharges by micro-grain activated carbon in fluidized bed as tertiary treatment at large pilot scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mailler, R.; Gasperi, J.; Coquet, Y.; Buleté, A.; Vulliet, E.; Deshayes, S.; Zedek, S.

    2016-01-01

    Among the solutions to reduce micropollutant discharges into the aquatic environment, activated carbon adsorption is a promising technique and a large scale pilot has been tested at the Seine Centre (240,000 m"3/d — Paris, France) wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). While most of available works studied fixed bed or contact reactors with a separated separation step, this study assesses a new type of tertiary treatment based on a fluidized bed containing a high mass of activated carbon, continuously renewed. For the first time in the literature, micro-grain activated carbon (μGAC) was studied. The aims were (1) to determine the performances of fluidized bed operating with μCAG on both emerging micropollutants and conventional wastewater quality parameters, and (2) to compare its efficiency and applicability to wastewater to former results obtained with PAC. Thus, conventional wastewater quality parameters (n = 11), pharmaceuticals and hormones (PPHs; n = 62) and other emerging pollutants (n = 57) have been monitored in μGAC configuration during 13 campaigns. A significant correlation has been established between dissolved organic carbon (DOC), PPHs and UV absorbance at 254 nm (UV-254) removals. This confirms that UV-254 could be used as a tertiary treatment performance indicator to monitor the process. This parameter allowed identifying that the removals of UV-254 and DOC reach a plateau from a μGAC retention time (SRT) of 90–100 days. The μGAC configuration substantially improves the overall quality of the WWTP discharges by reducing biological (38–45%) and chemical oxygen demands (21–48%), DOC (13–44%) and UV-254 (22–48%). In addition, total suspended solids (TSS) are retained by the μGAC bed and a biological activity (nitratation) leads to a total elimination of NO_2"−. For micropollutants, PPHs have a good affinity for μGAC and high (> 60%) or very high (> 80%) removals are observed for most of the quantified compounds (n = 22/32), i

  18. Prediction of supercritical carbon dioxide drying of food products in packed beds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Almeida-Rivera, C.; Khalloufi, S.; Bongers, P.M.M.

    2010-01-01

    Drying assisted by supercritical carbon dioxide is foreseen to become a promising technology for sensitive food products. In this contribution, a mathematical model is derived to describe the changes in water concentration in both a solid food matrix and a fluid carrier during drying. Finite

  19. Amino-functionalized mesoporous MCM-41 silica as an efficient adsorbent for water treatment: batch and fixed-bed column adsorption of the nitrate anion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi-Gatkash, Mehdi; Younesi, Habibollah; Shahbazi, Afsaneh; Heidari, Ava

    2017-07-01

    In the present study, amino-functionalized Mobil Composite Material No. 41 (MCM-41) was used as an adsorbent to remove nitrate anions from aqueous solutions. Mono-, di- and tri-amino functioned silicas (N-MCM-41, NN-MCM-41 and NNN-MCM-41) were prepared by post-synthesis grafting method. The samples were characterized by means of X-ray powder diffraction, FTIR spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, scanning electron microscopy and nitrogen adsorption-desorption. The effects of pH, initial concentration of anions, and adsorbent loading were examined in batch adsorption system. Results of adsorption experiments showed that the adsorption capacity increased with increasing adsorbent loading and initial anion concentration. It was found that the Langmuir mathematical model indicated better fit to the experimental data than the Freundlich. According to the constants of the Langmuir equation, the maximum adsorption capacity for nitrate anion by N-MCM-41, NN-MCM-41 and NNN-MCM-41 was found to be 31.68, 38.58 and 36.81 mg/g, respectively. The adsorption kinetics were investigated with pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order model. Adsorption followed the pseudo-second-order rate kinetics. The coefficients of determination for pseudo-second-order kinetic model are >0.99. For continuous adsorption experiments, NNN-MCM-41 adsorbent was used for the removal of nitrate anion from solutions. Breakthrough curves were investigated at different bed heights, flow rates and initial nitrate anion concentrations. The Thomas and Yan models were utilized to calculate the kinetic parameters and to predict the breakthrough curves of different bed height. Results from this study illustrated the potential utility of these adsorbents for nitrate removal from water solution.

  20. Nitrate removal from water using denitrifier-bacteria immobilized on activated carbon at fluidized-bed reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    hatam Godini

    2012-09-01

    Results: The experimental results demonstrated that the over 94% of NO3-N was removed in the 2-3 h retention time, almost no NO2-N accumulated in treated water when the concentration of NO3-N was around 50-100 mg/L in influent. Under the experimental conditions, drinking water quality was achieved at a nitrogen loading lower than 2.4 kgNO3-N•m-3•day-1 with an influent COD/N ratio of 3 if ethanol was used as the carbon source. The denitrification rate increased up to a maximal value of 3.45 kgNO3-N•m-3•day-1 with increasing nitrogen loading rate (4.8 kgNO3-N•m-3•day-1. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that GAC offers favorable attachment sites for bacteria on the surfaces of GAC for Nitrate removal and denitrification of water was carried out in a fluidized bed reactor (FBR using Activated carbon-immobilized cell beads as support carriers.

  1. Evaluation of an integrated sponge--granular activated carbon fluidized bed bioreactor for treating primary treated sewage effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, W; Ngo, H H; Guo, W S; Listowski, A; Cullum, P

    2011-05-01

    An integrated fluidized bed bioreactor (iFBBR) was designed to incorporate an aerobic sponge FBBR (ASB-FBBR) into an anoxic granular activated carbon FBBR (GAC-FBBR). This iFBBR was operated with and without adding a new starch based flocculant (NSBF) to treat synthetic primary treated sewage effluent (PTSE). The NSBF contains starch based cationic flocculants and trace nutrients. The results indicate that the iFBBR with NSBF addition could remove more than 93% dissolved organic carbon (DOC), 61% total nitrogen (T-N) and 60% total phosphorus (T-P) at just a very short hydraulic retention time of 50 min. The optimum frequency of adding NSBF to the iFFBR is four times per day. As a pretreatment to microfiltration, the iFFBR could increase 5L/m(2)h of critical flux thus reducing the membrane fouling. In addition, better microbial activity was also observed with high DO consumption (>66%) and specific oxygen uptake rate (>35 mg O(2)/g VSS h). Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Abundance and diversity of CO2-fixing bacteria in grassland soils close to natural carbon dioxide springs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Videmsek, Urska; Hagn, Alexandra; Suhadolc, Marjetka; Radl, Viviane; Knicker, Heike; Schloter, Michael; Vodnik, Dominik

    2009-07-01

    Gaseous conditions at natural CO2 springs (mofettes) affect many processes in these unique ecosystems. While the response of plants to extreme and fluctuating CO2 concentrations ([CO2]) is relatively well documented, little is known on microbial life in mofette soil. Therefore, it was the aim of this study to investigate the abundance and diversity of CO2-fixing bacteria in grassland soils in different distances to a natural carbon dioxide spring. Samples of the same soil type were collected from the Stavesinci mofette, a natural CO2 spring which is known for very pure CO2 emissions, at different distances from the CO2 releasing vents, at locations that clearly differed in soil CO2 efflux (from 12.5 to over 200 micromol CO2 m(-2) s(-1) yearly average). Bulk and rhizospheric soil samples were included into analyses. The microbial response was followed by a molecular analysis of cbbL genes, encoding for the large subunit of RubisCO, a carboxylase which is of crucial importance for C assimilation in chemolitoautotrophic microbes. In all samples analyzed, the "red-like" type of cbbL genes could be detected. In contrast, the "green-like" type of cbbL could not be measured by the applied technique. Surprisingly, a reduction of "red-like" cbbL genes copies was observed in bulk soil and rhizosphere samples from the sites with the highest CO2 concentrations. Furthermore, the diversity pattern of "red-like" cbbL genes changed depending on the CO(2) regime. This indicates that only a part of the autotrophic CO2-fixing microbes could adapt to the very high CO2 concentrations and adverse life conditions that are governed by mofette gaseous regime.

  3. Mathematic modelling of a fixed-bed gasifier as component of a plant for decentral biomass utilisation; Mathematische Modellierung eines Festbettvergasers als Bestandteil einer Anlage zur dezentralen Nutzung von Biomasse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Funk, G.; Krumm, W. [Siegen Univ. (Gesamthochschule) (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Energie- und Umweltverfahrenstechnik

    2000-07-01

    This paper presents a two-dimensional nonstationary model that describes processes taking place during gasification in a fixed bed. For didactic purposes the process is split up into and described in terms of the partial models ''chemical reaction'', ''drying'', ''heat transfer'' and ''mass flow''. [German] Es wird ein zweidimensionales, instationaeres Modell zur Beschreibung der Vorgaenge bei der Vergasung im Festbett vorgestellt. Dabei werden zylinderfoermige Reaktoren betrachtet. Zur Beschreibung wird der Gesamtvorgang in die Teilmodelle 'chemische Reaktion', 'Trocknung', 'Waermeuebertragung' und 'Massefluss' unterteilt. Die einzelnen Teilmodelle werden vorgestellt. (orig.)

  4. Adaptation to the KMT Fixed Biomass on Moving Bed process in the waste water treatment plant in Tafalla and Olite, Navarra, Spain; Adaptacion al proceso KMT de Biomasa Fija sobre Lecho Movil en la EDAR de Tafalla y Olite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortacans, J. A.; Rodrigo, J. C.; Garcia Gamuza, J.

    2001-07-01

    This article describes the remodeling carried out on the Tafalla and Olite waste water treatment plant in 2000to enable it to cope with a larger flow and load without having to construct new treatment lines. This was made possible by adapting the existing conventional active sludge process to the KMT Fixed Biomass on Moving Bed process. The article also shows how the final two-stage design was verified by means of pilot plant trials. These experiments tested the technical viability of installing a first high-load reactor prior to the existing primary decantation as a way of dealing with the seasonal effluents from the wine-cellars in the region and of obtaining partial nitrification in the last biological tank of the second stage during the rest of the year. (Author) 7 refs.

  5. Evaluation of polymeric materials packed in fixed bed column for oil water remediation; Avaliacao de materiais polimericos empacotados em colunas de leito fixo para a remediacao de aguas oleosas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Queiros, Yure G.C.; Barros, Cintia Chagas; Oliveira, Roberta S.; Marques, Luiz R.S.; Cunha, Luciana; Lucas, Elizabete F. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Macromoleculas Eloisa Mano], e-mail: yuregomes@ima.ufrj.br, e-mail: elucas@ima.ufrj.br

    2007-07-01

    Polymeric resins are being tried as an alternative material for treating oily waters from the petroleum industry, which have already been treated by conventional methods. The objective of this work has been to evaluate the purification degree of synthetic oily waters when treated in fixed bed columns packed with polymeric resins made up of hydrophilic and lipophilic moieties. The analysis used for characterizing the total grease and oil content (TOG) was fluorimetry. Starting oily waters of average TOG 50 ppm were prepared. Data obtained from eluted waters did not outweigh 10% of the TOG values of starting solutions in some blends of resins with a pretty good mechanical stability under the increase of pressure. Organoclay material showed a good retention performance, but has presented a mechanical instability too, compromising its use for larger amounts of wastewater. (author)

  6. Pyrolysis of soybean oil with H-ZSM5 (Proton-exchange of Zeolite Socony Mobil 5) and MCM41 (Mobil Composition of Matter No. 41) catalysts in a fixed-bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngo, Thanh-An; Kim, Jinsoo; Kim, Sun Kuk; Kim, Seung-Soo

    2010-01-01

    Soybean oil was pyrolyzed with various catalysts in a fixed-bed reactor under nitrogen flow at 420 and 450 o C. The H-ZSM5 catalysts (molar ratio SiO 2 /Al 2 O 3 = 28, 40, and 180) and 2 wt% (Ga, Al or Cu) impregnated MCM41 catalysts were used in order to investigate the effect of catalysts during the pyrolysis process. The gas products in all experiments were mainly methane, ethane and propylene. The liquid products in the presence of H-ZSM5 catalysts were mainly aromatic components while those with metal/MCM41 catalysts were a mixture of alkanes, alkenes, alkadienes, aromatic and carboxylic acids. The highest coke yield of 4.4 wt% was obtained with Ga/MCM41 catalyst at the pyrolysis temperature of 420 o C. The effect of catalysts on product yield and composition was systematically investigated.

  7. Effect of Amount of Carbon on the Reduction Efficiency of Iron Ore-Coal Composite Pellets in Multi-layer Bed Rotary Hearth Furnace (RHF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Srinibash; Roy, Gour Gopal

    2016-08-01

    The effect of carbon-to-hematite molar ratio has been studied on the reduction efficiency of iron ore-coal composite pellet reduced at 1523 K (1250 °C) for 20 minutes in a laboratory scale multi-layer bed rotary hearth furnace (RHF). Reduced pellets have been characterized through weight loss measurement, estimation of porosity, shrinkage, qualitative and quantitative phase analysis by XRD. Performance parameters such as the degree of reduction, metallization, carbon efficiency, productivity, and compressive strength have been calculated to compare the process efficacy at different carbon levels in the pellets. Pellets with optimum carbon-to-hematite ratio (C/Fe2O3 molar ratio = 1.66) that is much below the stoichiometric carbon required for direct reduction of hematite yielded maximum reduction, better carbon utilization, and productivity for all three layers. Top layer exhibited maximum reduction at comparatively lower carbon level (C/Fe2O3 molar ratio 2.33). Correlation between degree of reduction and metallization indicated non-isothermal kinetics influenced by heat and mass transfer in multi-layer bed RHF. Compressive strength of the partially reduced pellet with optimum carbon content (C/Fe2O3 molar ratio = 1.66) showed that they could be potentially used as an alternate feed in a blast furnace or any other smelting reactor.

  8. Treatment of sludge containing nitro-aromatic compounds in reed-bed mesocosms – Water, BOD, carbon and nutrient removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gustavsson, L.; Engwall, M.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► It is necessary to improve existing and develop new sludge management techniques. ► One method is dewatering and biodegradation of compounds in constructed wetlands. ► The result showed high reduction of all tested parameters after treatment. ► Plants improve degradation and Phragmites australis is tolerant to xenobiotics. ► The amount of sludge could be reduced by 50–70%. - Abstract: Since the mid-1970s, Sweden has been depositing 1 million ton d.w sludge/year, produced at waste water treatment plants. Due to recent legislation this practice is no longer a viable method of waste management. It is necessary to improve existing and develop new sludge management techniques and one promising alternative is the dewatering and treatment of sludge in constructed wetlands. The aim of this study was to follow reduction of organic carbon, BOD and nutrients in an industrial sludge containing nitro-aromatic compounds passing through constructed small-scale wetlands, and to investigate any toxic effect such as growth inhibition of the common reed Phragmites australis. The result showed high reduction of all tested parameters in all the outgoing water samples, which shows that constructed wetlands are suitable for carbon and nutrient removal. The results also showed that P. australis is tolerant to xenobiotics and did not appear to be affected by the toxic compounds in the sludge. The sludge residual on the top of the beds contained low levels of organic carbon and is considered non-organic and could therefore be landfilled. Using this type of secondary treatment method, the amount of sludge could be reduced by 50–70%, mainly by dewatering and biodegradation of organic compounds.

  9. Temperature effects on biohydrogen production in a granular sludge bed induced by activated carbon carriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kuo-Shing [Department of Safety Health and Environmental Engineering, Chung tai Institute of Health Sciences and Technology, Taichung (China); Lin, Ping-Jei [Department of Chemical Engineering, Feng Chia University, Taichung (China); Chang, Jo-Shu [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan (China)

    2006-03-15

    Temperature effects on H{sub 2} production performance of a novel carrier-induced granular sludge bed (CIGSB) reactor were investigated. Using sucrose-based synthetic wastewater as the feed, the CIGSB system was operated at 30-45 {sup 0}C to identify the optimal working temperature. It was found that H{sub 2} production was the most efficient at 40 {sup 0}C, especially when it was operated at a low hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 0.5h. The overall maximal hydrogen production rate and yield were 7.66l/h/l and 3.88mol H{sub 2}/mol sucrose, respectively, both of them occurred at 40 {sup 0}C. The biomass content tended to decrease as the temperature was increased, suggesting that granular sludge formation may be inhibited at high temperatures. However, increasing temperature gave better specific H{sub 2} production rate, signifying that the average cellular activity for H{sub 2} production may be enhanced as the temperature was increased. The H{sub 2} yield and gas phase H{sub 2} content did not vary considerably regardless of changes in temperature and HRT. This reflects that the CIGSB was a relatively stable H{sub 2}-producing system. The major soluble products from hydrogen fermentation were butyric acid and acetic acid, accounting for 46+-3% and 28+-2% of total soluble microbial products (SMP), respectively. Thus, the dominant H{sub 2} producers in the mixed culture belonged to acidogenic bacteria that underwent butyrate-type fermentation. (author)

  10. Continuous biosorption of Pb/Cu and Pb/Cd in fixed-bed column using algae Gelidium and granulated agar extraction algal waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilar, Vítor J P; Loureiro, José M; Botelho, Cidália M S; Boaventura, Rui A R

    2008-06-15

    Continuous metal ions biosorption from Pb/Cu and Pb/Cd solutions onto seaweed Gelidium sesquipedale and a composite material prepared from an industrial algal waste was performed in a packed bed column. A binary Langmuir equation describes well the equilibrium data and indicates a good adsorption capacity. In the sorption process, Cd and Cu break through the column faster than Pb due to its lower affinity for the biosorbent. An overshoot in the outlet Cd concentration was observed and explained by competitive adsorption between Pb and Cd, whereby the higher Pb affinity for the biosorbent displaces bound Cd ions. A small overshoot happens for Cu adsorption in the presence of Pb ions. Desorption using 0.1 M HNO3 as eluant, was 100% effective. A mass transfer model for the adsorption and desorption processes, considering an external and intraparticle film resistance, adequately simulates the column performance. A binary Langmuir equation was used to describe equilibrium for the saturation process and a mass action law for the desorption process. Elution process is defined as an ion exchange mechanism, between protons and metal ions.

  11. Continuous biosorption of Pb/Cu and Pb/Cd in fixed-bed column using algae Gelidium and granulated agar extraction algal waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilar, Vitor J.P. [LSRE-Laboratory of Separation and Reaction Engineering, Departamento de Engenharia Quimica, Faculdade de Engenharia da Universidade do Porto, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal)], E-mail: vilar@fe.up.pt; Loureiro, Jose M. [LSRE-Laboratory of Separation and Reaction Engineering, Departamento de Engenharia Quimica, Faculdade de Engenharia da Universidade do Porto, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal)], E-mail: loureiro@fe.up.pt; Botelho, Cidalia M.S. [LSRE-Laboratory of Separation and Reaction Engineering, Departamento de Engenharia Quimica, Faculdade de Engenharia da Universidade do Porto, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal)], E-mail: cbotelho@fe.up.pt; Boaventura, Rui A.R. [LSRE-Laboratory of Separation and Reaction Engineering, Departamento de Engenharia Quimica, Faculdade de Engenharia da Universidade do Porto, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal)], E-mail: bventura@fe.up.pt

    2008-06-15

    Continuous metal ions biosorption from Pb/Cu and Pb/Cd solutions onto seaweed Gelidium sesquipedale and a composite material prepared from an industrial algal waste was performed in a packed bed column. A binary Langmuir equation describes well the equilibrium data and indicates a good adsorption capacity. In the sorption process, Cd and Cu break through the column faster than Pb due to its lower affinity for the biosorbent. An overshoot in the outlet Cd concentration was observed and explained by competitive adsorption between Pb and Cd, whereby the higher Pb affinity for the biosorbent displaces bound Cd ions. A small overshoot happens for Cu adsorption in the presence of Pb ions. Desorption using 0.1 M HNO{sub 3} as eluant, was 100% effective. A mass transfer model for the adsorption and desorption processes, considering an external and intraparticle film resistance, adequately simulates the column performance. A binary Langmuir equation was used to describe equilibrium for the saturation process and a mass action law for the desorption process. Elution process is defined as an ion exchange mechanism, between protons and metal ions.

  12. Fixed-bed column study for the removal of cadmium (II) and nickel (II) ions from aqueous solutions using peat and mollusk shells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Chenxi [Civil Engineering Department, Queen' s University, 58 University Avenue, Kingston, Ontario, K7L 3N6 (Canada); Champagne, Pascale, E-mail: champagne@civil.queensu.ca [Civil Engineering Department, Queen' s University, 58 University Avenue, Kingston, Ontario, K7L 3N6 (Canada)

    2009-11-15

    The study was conducted to examine the effectiveness of 4.0-4.75 mm crushed shells and Sphagnum peat moss as low-cost natural adsorbent filter materials for the removal of cadmium and nickel ions from binary aqueous solutions. The effects of column depth and flow rate on effluent metal breakthrough, metal removal and pH were investigated as a function of throughput volume (TPV). Metal removal efficiencies and adsorption capacities for each of the columns were estimated to identify the better filter material and operational conditions for the treatment of cadmium and nickel. During the column testing, a flow rate of 1.5 mL/min (surface loading of 27.5 cm{sup 3}/cm{sup 2} day) and bed depth of 15 cm were found to represent the better operational conditions, where 47.9% and 42.7% cadmium and nickel cumulative removals were obtained under these operational conditions, respectively. The results will be valuable in the development of a mixed-media adsorption system for the treatment of metal-rich wastewaters such as municipal landfill leachate.

  13. Continuous biosorption of Pb/Cu and Pb/Cd in fixed-bed column using algae Gelidium and granulated agar extraction algal waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilar, Vitor J.P.; Loureiro, Jose M.; Botelho, Cidalia M.S.; Boaventura, Rui A.R.

    2008-01-01

    Continuous metal ions biosorption from Pb/Cu and Pb/Cd solutions onto seaweed Gelidium sesquipedale and a composite material prepared from an industrial algal waste was performed in a packed bed column. A binary Langmuir equation describes well the equilibrium data and indicates a good adsorption capacity. In the sorption process, Cd and Cu break through the column faster than Pb due to its lower affinity for the biosorbent. An overshoot in the outlet Cd concentration was observed and explained by competitive adsorption between Pb and Cd, whereby the higher Pb affinity for the biosorbent displaces bound Cd ions. A small overshoot happens for Cu adsorption in the presence of Pb ions. Desorption using 0.1 M HNO 3 as eluant, was 100% effective. A mass transfer model for the adsorption and desorption processes, considering an external and intraparticle film resistance, adequately simulates the column performance. A binary Langmuir equation was used to describe equilibrium for the saturation process and a mass action law for the desorption process. Elution process is defined as an ion exchange mechanism, between protons and metal ions

  14. Methanation of CO2 on Ni/Al2O3 in a Structured Fixed-Bed Reactor—A Scale-Up Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Türks

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Due to the ongoing change of energy supply, the availability of a reliable high-capacity storage technology becomes increasingly important. While conventional large-scale facilities are either limited in capacity respective supply time or their extension potential is little (e.g., pumped storage power stations, decentralized units could contribute to energy transition. The concepts of PtX (power-to-X storage technologies and in particular PtG (power-to-gas aim at fixation of electric power in chemical compounds. CO2 hydrogenation (methanation is the foundation of the PtG idea as H2 (via electrolysis and CO2 are easily accessible. Methane produced in this way, often called substitute natural gas (SNG, is a promising solution since it can be stored in the existing gas grid, tanks or underground cavern storages. Methanation is characterized by a strong exothermic heat of reaction which has to be handled safely. This work aims at getting rid of extreme temperature hot-spots in a tube reactor by configuring the catalyst bed structure. Proof of concept studies began with a small tube reactor (V = 12.5 cm3 with a commercial 18 wt % Ni/Al2O3 catalyst. Later, a double-jacket tube reactor was built (V = 452 cm3, reaching a production rate of 50 L/h SNG. The proposed approach not only improves the heat management and process safety, but also increases the specific productivity and stability of the catalyst remarkably.

  15. Fixed-bed column study for the removal of cadmium (II) and nickel (II) ions from aqueous solutions using peat and mollusk shells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Chenxi; Champagne, Pascale

    2009-01-01

    The study was conducted to examine the effectiveness of 4.0-4.75 mm crushed shells and Sphagnum peat moss as low-cost natural adsorbent filter materials for the removal of cadmium and nickel ions from binary aqueous solutions. The effects of column depth and flow rate on effluent metal breakthrough, metal removal and pH were investigated as a function of throughput volume (TPV). Metal removal efficiencies and adsorption capacities for each of the columns were estimated to identify the better filter material and operational conditions for the treatment of cadmium and nickel. During the column testing, a flow rate of 1.5 mL/min (surface loading of 27.5 cm 3 /cm 2 day) and bed depth of 15 cm were found to represent the better operational conditions, where 47.9% and 42.7% cadmium and nickel cumulative removals were obtained under these operational conditions, respectively. The results will be valuable in the development of a mixed-media adsorption system for the treatment of metal-rich wastewaters such as municipal landfill leachate.

  16. The fate of recently fixed carbon after drought release: towards unravelling C storage regulation in Tilia platyphyllos and Pinus sylvestris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galiano, Lucía; Timofeeva, Galina; Saurer, Matthias; Siegwolf, Rolf; Martínez-Vilalta, Jordi; Hommel, Robert; Gessler, Arthur

    2017-09-01

    Carbon reserves are important for maintaining tree function during and after stress. Increasing tree mortality driven by drought globally has renewed the interest in how plants regulate allocation of recently fixed C to reserve formation. Three-year-old seedlings of two species (Tilia platyphyllos and Pinus sylvestris) were exposed to two intensities of experimental drought during ~10 weeks, and 13 C pulse labelling was subsequently applied with rewetting. Tracking the 13 C label across different organs and C compounds (soluble sugars, starch, myo-inositol, lipids and cellulose), together with the monitoring of gas exchange and C mass balances over time, allowed for the identification of variations in C allocation priorities and tree C balances that are associated with drought effects and subsequent drought release. The results demonstrate that soluble sugars accumulated in P. sylvestris under drought conditions independently of growth trends; thus, non-structural carbohydrates (NSC) formation cannot be simply considered a passive overflow process in this species. Once drought ceased, C allocation to storage was still prioritized at the expense of growth, which suggested the presence of 'drought memory effects', possibly to ensure future growth and survival. On the contrary, NSC and growth dynamics in T. platyphyllos were consistent with a passive (overflow) view of NSC formation. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Exposure of commuters to carbon monoxide in Mexico City II. Comparison of in-vehicle and fixed-site concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Bremauntz, A A; Ashmore, M R

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to compare measurements of carbon monoxide taken concurrently inside vehicles and at fixed-site monitoring stations (FSMs), in order to assess if the FSM stations can be used to estimate commuters' exposure to this pollutant. During the study period ambient CO concentrations were very high. Five selected stations reported concentrations in excess of the Mexican (13 ppm) and United States (9 ppm) 8-hour standards for CO. Since, for all modes of transportation, the in-vehicle concentrations were always larger than the concurrent ambient concentrations, the differences between them were always positive and the ratios were always greater than one. Average, in-vehicle/ambient ratios for each mode of transportation were: automobile, 5.2; minivan, 5.2; minibus, 4.3; bus, 3.1; trolleybus 3.0; and metro, 2.2. A series of simple regression models with a moderate predictive power (R2 = 0.47 to 0.71) were developed for metro, bus, minibus, and automobile commuters. The models include the FSM measurements and also, depending on the mode of transportation, other variables, such as vehicular speed, the route of travel, and the wind speed. In the future, the models should be validated in two ways to determine their predictive power. First, they should be verified against additional samples taken under similar conditions; and second, their applications under different conditions should be explored through sampling during a different season of the year or on other commuting routes.

  18. Upgrade of deep bed filtration with activated carbon dosage for compact micropollutant removal from wastewater in technical scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löwenberg, Jonas; Zenker, Armin; Krahnstöver, Thérèse; Boehler, Marc; Baggenstos, Martin; Koch, Gerhard; Wintgens, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    The removal of micropollutants from drinking and wastewater by powdered activated carbon (PAC) adsorption has received considerable attention in research over the past decade with various separation options having been investigated. With Switzerland as the first country in the world having adopted a new legislation, which forces about 100 wastewater treatment plants to be upgraded for the removal of organic micropollutants from municipal wastewater, the topic has reached practical relevance. In this study, the process combination of powdered activated carbon (PAC) adsorption and deep bed filtration (DBF) for advanced municipal wastewater treatment was investigated over an extended period exceeding one year of operation in technical scale. The study aimed to determine optimum process conditions to achieve sufficient micropollutant removal in agreement with the new Swiss Water Ordinance under most economic process design. It was shown that the addition of PAC and Fe(3+) as combined coagulation and flocculation agent improved effluent water quality with respect to dissolved organic pollutants as well as total suspended solids (TSS), turbidity and PO4-P concentration in comparison to a DBF operated without the addition of PAC and Fe(3+). Sufficient micropollutant (MP) removal of around 80% was achieved at PAC dosages of 10 mg/L revealing that PAC retained in the filter bed maintained considerable adsorption capacity. In the investigated process combination the contact reactor serves for adsorption as well as for flocculation and allowed for small hydraulic retention times of minimum 10 min while maintaining sufficient MP removal. The flocculation of two different PAC types was shown to be fully concluded after 10-15 min, which determined the flocculation reactor size while both PAC types proved suitable for the application in combination with DBF and showed no significant differences in MP removal. Finally, the capping of PAC dosage during rain water periods, which

  19. Removal of cesium from aluminum decladding wastes generated in irradiated target processing using a fixed-bed column of resorcinol-formaldehyde resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunson, R.R.; Williams, D.F.; Bond, W.D.; Benker, D.E.; Chattin, F.R.; Collins, E.D.

    1994-09-01

    The removal of cesium (Cs) from a low-level liquid waste (LLLW) with a cation-exchange column was demonstrated using a resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) resin. The RF resin was developed at the Westinghouse Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) and is highly specific for the removal of Cs from an alkaline waste of high sodium content. It was determined that the RF resin would be suitable for removing Cs, the largest gamma radiation contributor, from the LLLW generated at the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Presently, the disposal of the LLLW is limited due to the amount of Cs contained in the waste. Cesium removal from the waste solution offers immediate benefits by conserving valuable tank space and would allow cask shipments of the treated waste should the present Laboratory pipelines become unavailable in the future. Preliminary laboratory tests of the RF resins, supplied from two different sources, were used to design a full-scale cation-exchange column for the removal of Cs from a Mark 42 SRL fuel element dejacketing waste solution. The in-cell tests reproduced the preliminary bench-scale test results. The initial Cs breakthrough range was 85--92 column volumes (CV). The resin capacity for Cs was found to be ∼0.35 meq per gram of resin. A 1.5-liter resin bed loaded a combined ∼1,300 Ci of 134 Cs and 137 Cs. A distribution coefficient of ∼110 CV was determined, based on a 50% Cs breakthrough point. The kinetics of the system was studied by examining the rate parameters; however, it was decided that several more tests would be necessary to define the mass transfer characteristics of the system

  20. Evaluation of an activated carbon packed bed for the adsorption of phenols from petroleum refinery wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Naas, Muftah H; Alhaija, Manal A; Al-Zuhair, Sulaiman

    2017-03-01

    The performance of an adsorption column packed with granular activated carbon was evaluated for the removal of phenols from refinery wastewater. The effects of phenol feed concentration (80-182 mg/l), feed flow rate (5-20 ml/min), and activated carbon packing mass (5-15 g) on the breakthrough characteristics of the adsorption system were determined. The continuous adsorption process was simulated using batch data and the parameters for a new empirical model were determined. Different dynamic models such as Adams-Bohart, Wolborsko, Thomas, and Yoon-Nelson models were also fitted to the experimental data for the sake of comparison. The empirical, Yoon-Nelson and Thomas models showed a high degree of fitting at different operation conditions, with the empirical model giving the best fit based on the Akaike information criterion (AIC). At an initial phenol concentration of 175 mg/l, packing mass of 10 g, a flow rate of 10 ml/min and a temperature of 25 °C, the SSE of the new empirical and Thomas models were identical (248.35) and very close to that of the Yoon-Nelson model (259.49). The values were significantly lower than that of the Adams-Bohart model, which was determined to be 19,358.48. The superiority of the new empirical model and the Thomas model was also confirmed from the values of the R 2 and AIC, which were 0.99 and 38.3, respectively, compared to 0.92 and 86.2 for Adams-Bohart model.

  1. More about the Ordovician–Silurian transition beds at Mirny Creek, Omulev Mountains, NE Russia: carbon isotopes and conodonts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitri Kaljo

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Profound environmental and biodiversity changes take place in the Ordovician–Silurian boundary interval. The Mirny Creek and Neznakomka River bank sections discussed in this paper expose the upper Katian–lower Rhuddanian part of the boundary beds. The succession consists of carbonate rocks, partly with bioherms, alternating with argillaceous and siltstone packages that are well dated by graptolites. Microfossils are rare, especially in the Hirnantian, but conodonts provide some useful markers just below and above the Hirnantian stage boundaries. The Hirnantian δ13C trend in the Mirny Creek section is the stratigraphically longest described so far and it has a highly specific shape. The trend commenced at the first appearance datum of Normalograptus extraordinarius or slightly below this level. The main peak occurs near the middle of the N. persculptus Biozone. Samples from the Neznakomka River suggest a somewhat wider peak interval than at Mirny Creek. Detailed comparison of the Mirny and Stirnas (Latvia δ13C curves shows a general similarity despite great specific features of both trends. Correlation of the δ13C trends from China, Baltica and North America with that at Mirny Creek reveals a great variety of shapes of the carbon isotope curve. However, its rising limb commenced, if represented, everywhere close to the beginning of the N. extraordinarius Biozone or in terms of the Baltic succession, at the bottom of the Porkuni Regional Stage. Most likely a general shape of the HICE trend is pyramidal, which is peaking in the early N. persculptus Biochrone. Differences in the values and shape of an actual curve at different localities depend on local environmental conditions, sometimes modifying the global signal rather strongly.

  2. High pressure adsorption isotherms of nitrogen onto granular activated carbon for a single bed pressure swing adsorption refrigeration system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palodkar, Avinash V.; Anupam, Kumar; Roy, Zunipa; Saha, B. B.; Halder, G. N.

    2017-10-01

    Adsorption characteristics of nitrogen onto granular activated carbon for the wide range of temperature (303-323 K) and pressure (0.2027-2.0265 MPa) have been reported for a single bed pressure swing adsorption refrigeration system. The experimental data were fitted to Langmuir, Dubinin-Astakhov and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) isotherms. The Langmuir and D-R isotherm models were found appropriate in correlating experimental adsorption data with an average relative error of ±2.0541% and ±0.6659% respectively. The isosteric heat of adsorption data were estimated as a function of surface coverage of nitrogen and temperature using D-R isotherm. The heat of adsorption was observed to decrease from 12.65 to 6.98 kJ.mol-1 with an increase in surface concentration at 303 K and it followed the same pattern for other temperatures. It was found that an increase in temperature enhances the magnitude of the heat of adsorption.

  3. The removal of multi-Curie amounts of radon from a confined space by absorption on carbon beds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grumski, J.T.; Harmer, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    Two silos, designated as K-65, at the Feed Materials Production Center, Fernald, Ohio, contain from 1600 to 3800 curies of radium dispersed in sludges from the early days of uranium ore processing. Above the sludge bed in each silo, the confined air space has been found to contain up to 37 curies of radon in equilibrium with the radium-bearing material below. Preparations are now being made for treatment, stabilization, and disposal of these sludges. In this connection, it is necessary to open access ports occasionally to the atmosphere. To minimize releases of radon and to provide a significant reduction in personnel exposure, a radon adsorption system was designed and installed. It operates by pulling air from one side of the silo head-space, drawing it through calcium sulfate drying columns, then through activated carbon absorbers, and finally discharging it back into the opposite side of the silo. The circulation of the air is continued until the desired reduction in radon is achieved. Field experience with this system proved its effectiveness and established that it could be re-used after the initial charge of absorbed radon had decayed. It is believed that this is the largest scale application of adsorption of radon ever attempted

  4. Second generation pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) research and development, Phase 2 --- Task 4, carbonizer testing. Volume 2, Data reconciliation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Froehlich, R.; Robertson, A.; Vanhook, J.; Goyal, A.; Rehmat, A.; Newby, R.

    1994-11-01

    During the period beginning November 1991 and ending September 1992, a series of tests were conducted at Foster Wheeler Development Corporation in a fluidized-bed coal carbonizer to determine its performance characteristics. The carbonizer was operated for 533 hours in a jetting fluidized-bed configuration during which 36 set points (steady-state periods) were achieved. Extensive data were collected on the feed and product stream compositions, heating values, temperatures, and flow rates. With these data, elemental and energy balances were computed to evaluate and confirm accuracy of the data. The carbonizer data were not as self-consistent as could be desired (balance closure imperfection). A software package developed by Science Ventures, Inc., of California, called BALAID, was used to reconcile the carbonizer data; the details of the reconciliation have been given in Volume 1 of this report. The reconciled data for the carbonizer were rigorously analyzed, correlations were developed, and the model was updated accordingly. The model was then used in simulating each of the 36 steady-state periods achieved in the pilot plant. The details are given in this Volume one. This Volume 2 provides details of the carbonizer data reconciliation.

  5. Combination of granular activated carbon adsorption and deep-bed filtration as a single advanced wastewater treatment step for organic micropollutant and phosphorus removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altmann, Johannes; Rehfeld, Daniel; Träder, Kai; Sperlich, Alexander; Jekel, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Adsorption onto granular activated carbon (GAC) is an established technology in water and advanced wastewater treatment for the removal of organic substances from the liquid phase. Besides adsorption, the removal of particulate matter by filtration and biodegradation of organic substances in GAC contactors has frequently been reported. The application of GAC as both adsorbent for organic micropollutant (OMP) removal and filter medium for solids retention in tertiary wastewater filtration represents an energy- and space saving option, but has rarely been considered because high dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and suspended solids concentrations in the influent of the GAC adsorber put a significant burden on this integrated treatment step and might result in frequent backwashing and unsatisfactory filtration efficiency. This pilot-scale study investigates the combination of GAC adsorption and deep-bed filtration with coagulation as a single advanced treatment step for simultaneous removal of OMPs and phosphorus from secondary effluent. GAC was assessed as upper filter layer in dual-media downflow filtration and as mono-media upflow filter with regard to filtration performance and OMP removal. Both filtration concepts effectively removed suspended solids and phosphorus, achieving effluent concentrations of 0.1 mg/L TP and 1 mg/L TSS, respectively. Analysis of grain size distribution and head loss within the filter bed showed that considerable head loss occurred in the topmost filter layer in downflow filtration, indicating that most particles do not penetrate deeply into the filter bed. Upflow filtration exhibited substantially lower head loss and effective utilization of the whole filter bed. Well-adsorbing OMPs (e.g. benzotriazole, carbamazepine) were removed by >80% up to throughputs of 8000-10,000 bed volumes (BV), whereas weakly to medium adsorbing OMPs (e.g. primidone, sulfamethoxazole) showed removals activated carbon (PAC) to deep-bed filtration as a direct

  6. 7 CFR 2902.15 - Bedding, bed linens, and towels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... PROCUREMENT Designated Items § 2902.15 Bedding, bed linens, and towels. (a) Definition. (1) Bedding is that... minimum biobased content is 12 percent and shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in..., and silk are not qualifying biobased feedstocks for the purpose of determining the biobased content of...

  7. Valorization of algal waste via pyrolysis in a fixed-bed reactor: Production and characterization of bio-oil and bio-char.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboulkas, A; Hammani, H; El Achaby, M; Bilal, E; Barakat, A; El Harfi, K

    2017-11-01

    The aim of the present work is to develop processes for the production of bio-oil and bio-char from algae waste using the pyrolysis at controlled conditions. The pyrolysis was carried out at different temperatures 400-600°C and different heating rates 5-50°C/min. The algal waste, bio-oil and bio-char were successfully characterized using Elemental analysis, Chemical composition, TGA, FTIR, 1 H NMR, GC-MS and SEM. At a temperature of 500°C and a heating rate of 10°C/min, the maximum yield of bio-oil and bio-char was found to be 24.10 and 44.01wt%, respectively, which was found to be strongly influenced by the temperature variation, and weakly affected by the heating rate variation. Results show that the bio-oil cannot be used as bio-fuel, but can be used as a source of value-added chemicals. On the other hand, the bio-char is a promising candidate for solid fuel applications and for the production of carbon materials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparison of biomass from integrated fixed-film activated sludge (IFAS), moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) and membrane bioreactor (MBR) treating recalcitrant organics: Importance of attached biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chunkai; Shi, Yijing; Xue, Jinkai; Zhang, Yanyan; Gamal El-Din, Mohamed; Liu, Yang

    2017-03-15

    This study compared microbial characteristics and oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) treatment performance of five types of microbial biomass (MBBR-biofilm, IFAS-biofilm, IFAS-floc, MBR-aerobic-floc, and MBR-anoxic-floc) cultivated from three types of bioreactors (MBBR, IFAS, and MBR) in batch experiments. Chemical oxygen demand (COD), ammonium, acid extractable fraction (AEF), and naphthenic acids (NAs) removals efficiencies were distinctly different between suspended and attached bacterial aggregates and between aerobic and anoxic suspended flocs. MBR-aerobic-floc and MBR-anoxic-floc demonstrated COD removal efficiencies higher than microbial aggregates obtained from MBBR and IFAS, MBBR and IFAS biofilm had higher AEF removal efficiencies than those obtained using flocs. MBBR-biofilm demonstrated the most efficient NAs removal from OSPW. NAs degradation efficiency was highly dependent on the carbon number and NA cyclization number according to UPLC/HRMS analysis. Mono- and di-oxidized NAs were the dominant oxy-NA species in OSPW samples. Microbial analysis with quantitative polymerase chain reaction (q-PCR) indicated that the bacterial 16S rRNA gene abundance was significantly higher in the batch bioreactors with suspended flocs than in those with biofilm, the NSR gene abundance in the MBR-anoxic bioreactor was significantly lower than that in aerobic batch bioreactors, and denitrifiers were more abundant in the suspended phase of the activated sludge flocs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Recovery of Seamount Precious Coral Beds From Heavy Trawling Disturbance with Links to Carbonate Chemistry Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roark, E. B.; Baco-Taylor, A.; Morgan, N. B.; Shamberger, K.; Miller, K.; Brooks, J.

    2016-12-01

    Increasing anthropogenic impacts in the deep sea make studies of resilience and recovery time critical, with deep-sea hard-substrate habitats and large-scale disturbances having received little attention. Seamount hard-substrate habitats in particular are thought to have low resilience due to the slow growth rates and recruitment limitations of key structure-forming taxa. Seamounts of the far Northwestern Hawaiian Islands and Emperor Chain have had some of the heaviest trawl impacts in the world, from both fish and precious coral fisheries, and include sites that are still trawled and recovering ones that have been protected since establishment of the EEZ in 1977. To test the hypothesis of low resilience we compare these impacted seamounts to untrawled sites. We used the AUV Sentry in 2014 and 2015 to image nine features (three per "treatment") and analyze for substrate and visible megafauna. Sites in the "still trawled" treatment were characterized by extensive areas of bare substrate with abundant trawl scars. Sites in the "recovering" and "never trawled" locations had abundant megafauna in hard substrate areas. Initial comparisons of transects at 700m depth for three sites indicate that Yuryaku in the "still trawled" treatment had lower diversity and abundance of megafauna compared to the "recovering" and "never trawled" locations with a dominance of sea urchins. The "recovering" and "never trawled" sites were dominated by cnidarians, fishes, and echinoderms, but differed in dominant species, diversity, abundances and occurrence of dead coral skeletons. These preliminary results suggest that the recovering sites have not returned to a pre-impact community type in the 38 years since they were trawled. The megafauna distribution, in particular that of deep-sea corals, was compared to environmental water column variables at the study sites across the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands. Deep-sea corals with calcium carbonate skeletons were found living below the

  10. Bed Bugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prevent, identify, and treat bed bug infestations using EPA’s step-by-step guides, based on IPM principles. Find pesticides approved for bed bug control, check out the information clearinghouse, and dispel bed bug myths.

  11. Volatile organic compound adsorption in a gas-solid fluidized bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Y L; Yan, R; Tsen, L T S; Yong, L C; Liu, M; Liang, D T

    2004-01-01

    Fluidization finds many process applications in the areas of catalytic reactions, drying, coating, combustion, gasification and microbial culturing. This work aims to compare the dynamic adsorption characteristics and adsorption rates in a bubbling fluidized bed and a fixed bed at the same gas flow-rate, gas residence time and bed height. Adsorption with 520 ppm methanol and 489 ppm isobutane by the ZSM-5 zeolite of different particle size in the two beds enabled the differentiation of the adsorption characteristics and rates due to bed type, intraparticle mass transfer and adsorbate-adsorbent interaction. Adsorption of isobutane by the more commonly used activated carbon provided the comparison of adsorption between the two adsorbent types. With the same gas residence time of 0.79 seconds in both the bubbling bed and fixed bed of the same bed size of 40 mm diameter and 48 mm height, the experimental results showed a higher rate of adsorption in the bubbling bed as compared to the fixed bed. Intraparticle mass transfer and adsorbent-adsorbate interaction played significant roles in affecting the rate of adsorption, with intraparticle mass transfer being more dominant. The bubbling bed was observed to have a steeper decline in adsorption rate with respect to increasing outlet concentration compared to the fixed bed. The adsorption capacities of zeolite for the adsorbates studied were comparatively similar in both beds; fluidizing, and using smaller particles in the bubbling bed did not increase the adsorption capacity of the ZSM-5 zeolite. The adsorption capacity of activated carbon for isobutane was much higher than the ZSM-5 zeolite for isobutane, although at a lower adsorption rate. Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopy was used as an analytical tool for the quantification of gas concentration. Calibration was done using a series of standards prepared by in situ dilution with nitrogen gas, based on the ideal gas law and relating partial pressure to gas

  12. Pre-treatment processes of Azolla filiculoides to remove Pb(II), Cd(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) from aqueous solution in the batch and fixed-bed reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosravi, Morteza; Rakhshaee, Roohan; Ganji, Masuod Taghi

    2005-12-09

    Intact and treated biomass can remove heavy metals from water and wastewater. This study examined the ability of the activated, semi-intact and inactivated Azolla filiculoides (a small water fern) to remove Pb(2+), Cd(2+), Ni(2+) and Zn(2+) from the aqueous solution. The maximum uptake capacities of these metal ions using the activated Azolla filiculoides by NaOH at pH 10.5 +/- 0.2 and then CaCl(2)/MgCl(2)/NaCl with total concentration of 2 M (2:1:1 mole ratio) in the separate batch reactors were obtained about 271, 111, 71 and 60 mg/g (dry Azolla), respectively. The obtained capacities of maximum adsorption for these kinds of the pre-treated Azolla in the fixed-bed reactors (N(o)) were also very close to the values obtained for the batch reactors (Q(max)). On the other hand, it was shown that HCl, CH(3)OH, C(2)H(5)OH, FeCl(2), SrCl(2), BaCl(2) and AlCl(3) in the pre-treatment processes decreased the ability of Azolla to remove the heavy metals in comparison to the semi-intact Azolla, considerably. The kinetic studies showed that the heavy metals uptake by the activated Azolla was done more rapid than those for the semi-intact Azolla.

  13. Fungi solubilisation of low rank coal: performances of stirred tank, fluidised bed and packed bed reactors

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Oboirien, BO

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Coal biosolubilisation was investigated in stirred tank reactor, fluidised bed and fixed bed bioreactors with a view to highlight the advantages and shortcomings of each of these reactor configurations. The stirred aerated bioreactor and fluidised...

  14. Estimativa das propriedades térmicas efetivas de grãos em um secador de leito fixo Estimation of effective grain thermal properties in a fixed bed dryer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Fregolente

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available A secagem de grãos em leito fixo é um processo complexo, ocorrendo simultaneamente a transferência de calor e de massa, dificultando a estimativa dos parâmetros térmicos efetivos, pois estes podem sofrer variações significativas no decorrer da secagem em função de alterações no teor de umidade. Neste trabalho, este problema foi contornado estimando-se os parâmetros térmicos efetivos no final da secagem, quando o teor de umidade dos grãos que compõem o leito alcança valores de equilíbrio, deixando de existir a transferência de massa, persistindo apenas a transferência de calor em regime permanente. Nestas condições, o leito possui um teor de umidade constante e a estimativa dos parâmetros térmicos efetivos pode ser efetuada a partir do ajuste de um modelo pseudo-homogêneo bidimensional estático à várias medidas de temperatura no leito de grãos no final da secagem. Os resultados indicam que a estratégia utilizada para estimativa da condutividade térmica efetiva radial e do coeficiente efetivo de transferência de calor parede-leito foi adequada. Além do que, constatou-se que dentre os grãos estudados - soja, feijão, milho e trigo - a soja apresenta os menores valores de condutividade efetiva radial, enquanto o trigo apresenta o maior valor do coeficiente de transferência de calor parede-leito.Fixed bed grain drying is a complex process, where mass and heat transfer occur simultaneously, complicating the estimation of the effective thermal parameters, because they can go through significant variations along the drying process, due to moisture content variations. In this work, this problem was avoided by estimating the effective thermal parameters at the end of the drying process, when the grain moisture content reaches equilibrium, and mass transfer stops, persisting only the steady state heat transfer. In these conditions, the bed has a constant moisture content and the estimation of the effective thermal

  15. Lagrangian Approach to Study Catalytic Fluidized Bed Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madi, Hossein; Hossein Madi Team; Marcelo Kaufman Rechulski Collaboration; Christian Ludwig Collaboration; Tilman Schildhauer Collaboration

    2013-03-01

    Lagrangian approach of fluidized bed reactors is a method, which simulates the movement of catalyst particles (caused by the fluidization) by changing the gas composition around them. Application of such an investigation is in the analysis of the state of catalysts and surface reactions under quasi-operando conditions. The hydrodynamics of catalyst particles within a fluidized bed reactor was studied to improve a Lagrangian approach. A fluidized bed methanation employed in the production of Synthetic Natural Gas from wood was chosen as the case study. The Lagrangian perspective was modified and improved to include different particle circulation patterns, which were investigated through this study. Experiments were designed to evaluate the concepts of the model. The results indicate that the setup is able to perform the designed experiments and a good agreement between the simulation and the experimental results were observed. It has been shown that fluidized bed reactors, as opposed to fixed beds, can be used to avoid the deactivation of the methanation catalyst due to carbon deposits. Carbon deposition on the catalysts tested with the Lagrangian approach was investigated by temperature programmed oxidation (TPO) analysis of ex-situ catalyst samples. This investigation was done to identify the effects of particles velocity and their circulation patterns on the amount and type of deposited carbon on the catalyst surface. Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne(EPFL), Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI)

  16. Seal evaluation and confinement screening criteria for beneficial carbon dioxide storage with enhanced coal bed methane recovery in the Pocahontas Basin, Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, R.P.; Eriksson, K.A.; Ripepi, N.; Eble, C.; Greb, S.F.

    2012-01-01

    The geological storage of carbon dioxide in Appalachian basin coal seams is one possible sink for sequestration of greenhouse gases, with the added benefit of enhanced-coal bed methane (ECBM) recovery. The Pocahontas Basin (part of the central Appalachian Basin) of southwestern Virginia is a major coal bed methane (CBM) province with production mostly from coal beds in the Lower Pennsylvanian Pocahontas and New River formations. As part of the Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership's Phase II research program, a CO 2-injection demonstration well was installed into Lower Pennsylvanian coal bed-methane producing strata in southwest Virginia. Samples of siliciclastic lithologies above coal beds in this Oakwood Field well, and from several other cores in the Nora Field were taken to establish a baseline of the basic confinement properties of overlying strata to test seal competency at local and regional scales.Strata above CBM-producing coal beds in the Pocahontas and New River formations consist of dark-gray shales; silty gray shales; heterolithic siltstones, sandstones, and shales; lithic sandstones, and quartzose sandstones. Standard measurements of porosity, permeability and petrography were used to evaluate potential leakage hazards and any possible secondary storage potential for typical lithologies. Both lithic- and quartz-rich sandstones exhibit only minor porosity, with generally low permeability (Member. Analyses of 1500 geophysical logs in southwest Virginia indicate that this unit is moderately thick (>50ft, 15m), laterally continuous (>3000km 2), and a homogenous shale, which coarsens upward into siltstone and sandstone, or is truncated by sandstone. Calculations from two mercury injection capillary porosimetry tests of the shale indicate that a displacement entry pressure of 207psi (1427kPa) would generate an estimated seal capacity of 1365ft (416m) of CO 2 before buoyant leakage. Scanning electron microscopy indicates a microfabric of narrow

  17. Pilot Scale Production of Activated Carbon Spheres Using Fluidized Bed Reactor and Its Evaluation for the Removal of Hexavalent Chromium from Aqueous Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Nagesh Kumar; Sathe, Manisha

    2017-12-01

    Large scale production of activated carbon is need of ongoing research due to its excellent adsorption capacity for removal of heavy metals from contaminated solutions. In the present study, polymeric precursor polystyrene beads [Brunauer Emmett Teller (BET) surface area, 46 m2/g; carbon content, 40.64%; crushing strength, 0.32 kg/sphere] were used to produce a new variant of activated carbon, Activated Carbon Spheres (ACS) in a pilot scale fluidized bed reactor. ACS were prepared by carbonization of polymeric precursor at 850 °C followed by activation of resultant material with steam. Prepared ACS were characterized using scanning electron microscope, CHNS analyzer, thermogravimetric analyzer, surface area analyzer and crushing strength tester. The produced ACS have 1009 m2/g BET surface area, 0.89 cm3/g total pore volume, 92.32% carbon content and 1.1 kg/sphere crushing strength with less than 1% of moisture and ash content. The ACS were also evaluated for its potential to remove hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] from contaminated solutions. The chromium removal is observed to be 99.1% at initial concentration 50 mg/l, pH 2, ACS dose 1 g/l, contact time 2 h, agitation 120 rpm and temperature 30 °C. Thus ACS can be used as an adsorbent material for the removal of Cr(VI) from contaminated solutions.

  18. Treatment of azo dye-containing wastewater by a Fenton-like process in a continuous packed-bed reactor filled with activated carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mesquita, Isabel; Matos, Luis C. [Chemical Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, University of Porto, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal); Duarte, Filipa [Chemical Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, University of Porto, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal); LEPAE - Laboratory for Process, Environmental and Energy Engineering, Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Porto, Porto (Portugal); Maldonado-Hodar, F.J. [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, University of Granada, Av. Fuentenueva, 18071 Granada (Spain); Mendes, Adelio [Chemical Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, University of Porto, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal); LEPAE - Laboratory for Process, Environmental and Energy Engineering, Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Porto, Porto (Portugal); Madeira, Luis M., E-mail: mmadeira@fe.up.pt [Chemical Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, University of Porto, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal); LEPAE - Laboratory for Process, Environmental and Energy Engineering, Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Porto, Porto (Portugal)

    2012-10-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oxidation with the Fenton's reagent was carried out in a packed-bed reactor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The packed-bed was filled with iron-impregnated activated carbon. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The increment of temperature increases the Chicago Sky Blue removal and mineralization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The values of iron leaching were below 0.4 ppm in the outlet effluent. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It was possible to reach a dye conversion of 88% in steady-state. - Abstract: In this work, oxidation with a Fenton-like process of a dye solution was carried out in a packed-bed reactor. Activated carbon Norit RX 3 Extra was impregnated with ferrous sulfate and used as catalyst (7 wt.% of iron). The effect of the main operating conditions in the Chicago Sky Blue (CSB) degradation was analyzed. It was found that the increase in temperature leads to a higher removal of the dye and an increased mineralization. However, it also increases the iron leaching, but the values observed were below 0.4 ppm (thus, far below European Union limits). It was possible to reach, at steady-state, a dye conversion of 88%, with a total organic carbon (TOC) removal of ca. 47%, being the reactor operated at 50 Degree-Sign C, pH 3, W{sub cat}/Q = 4.1 g min mL{sup -1} (W{sub cat} is the mass of catalyst and Q the total feed flow rate) and a H{sub 2}O{sub 2} feed concentration of 2.25 mM (for a CSB feed concentration of 0.012 mM). The same performance was reached in three consecutive cycles.

  19. Cyclic process for producing methane from carbon monoxide with heat removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Albert C.; Yang, Chang-lee

    1982-01-01

    Carbon monoxide-containing gas streams are converted to methane by a cyclic, essentially two-step process in which said carbon monoxide is disproportionated to form carbon dioxide and active surface carbon deposited on the surface of a catalyst, and said carbon is reacted with steam to form product methane and by-product carbon dioxide. The exothermic heat of reaction generated in each step is effectively removed during each complete cycle so as to avoid a build up of heat from cycle-to-cycle, with particularly advantageous techniques being employed for fixed bed, tubular and fluidized bed reactor operations.

  20. Effects of the reduction of the hydraulic retention time to 1.5 days at constant organic loading in CSTR, ASBR, and fixed-bed reactors – Performance and methanogenic community composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, Thomas; Ziganshin, Ayrat M.; Nikolausz, Marcell; Scholwin, Frank; Nelles, Michael; Kleinsteuber, Sabine; Pröter, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    The hydraulic retention time (HRT) is one of the key parameters in biogas processes and often it is postulated that a minimum HRT of 10–25 days is obligatory in continuous stirred tank reactors (CSTR) to prevent a washout of slow growing methanogens. In this study the effects of the reduction of the HRT from 6 to 1.5 days on performance and methanogenic community composition in different systems with and without immobilization operated with simulated thin stillage (STS) at mesophilic conditions and constant organic loading rates (OLR) of 10 g L −1 d −1 of volatile solids were investigated. With the reduction of the HRT process instability was first observed in the anaerobic sequencing batch reactor (ASBR) (at HRT of 3 days) followed by the CSTR (at HRT of 2 days). The fixed bed reactor (FBR) was stable until the end of the experiment, but the reduction of the HRT to 1.5 days caused a decrease of the specific biogas production to about 450 L kg −1 of VS compared to about 600 L kg −1 of VS at HRTs of 4–5 days. Methanoculleus and Methanosarcina were the dominant genera under stable process conditions in the CSTR and the ASBR and members of Methanosaeta and Methanospirillum were only present at HRT of 4 days and lower. In the effluent of the FBR Methanosarcina spp. were not detected and Methanosaeta spp. were more abundant then in the other reactors. - Highlights: • A CSTR was operated at high OLR of 10 (g L −1  d −1  VS) and low HRT of 3 days. • Exceeding washout of methanogenic archaea did not take place. • pH and nutrient concentrations influenced the reproduction rate more than HRT. • Methanoculleus and Methanosarcina were the dominant genera in the CSTR

  1. Metal Carbon Eutectics to Extend the Use of the Fixed-Point Technique in Precision IR Thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battuello, M.; Girard, F.; Florio, M.

    2008-06-01

    The high-temperature extension of the fixed-point technique for primary calibration of precision infrared (IR) thermometers was investigated both through mathematical simulations and laboratory investigations. Simulations were performed with Co C (1,324°C) and Pd C (1, 492°C) eutectic fixed points, and a precision IR thermometer was calibrated from the In point (156.5985°C) up to the Co C point. Mathematical simulations suggested the possibility of directly deriving the transition temperature of the Co C and Pd C points by extrapolating the calibration derived from fixed-point measurements from In to the Cu point. Both temperatures, as a result of the low uncertainty associated with the In Cu calibration and the high number of fixed points involved in the calibration process, can be derived with an uncertainty of 0.11°C for Co C and 0.18°C for Pd C. A transition temperature of 1,324.3°C for Co C was determined from the experimental verification, a value higher than, but compatible with, the one proposed by the thermometry community for inclusion as a secondary reference point for ITS-90 dissemination, i.e., 1,324.0°C.

  2. Experimental Evaluation Use of Semifluidized Bed Adsorber for the Treatment of P-chlorophenol and O-cresol in Wastewater using Activated Carbon as Adsorbent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saad Hanash Ammar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the present work the performance of semifluidized bed adsorber was evaluated for removal of phenolic compound from wastewater using commercial activated carbon as adsorbent. P-chlorophenol (4-Chlorophenol and o-cresol (2-methylphenol was selected as a phenolic compound for that purpose. The phenols percent removal, in term of breakthrough curves were studied as affected by hydrodynamics limitations which include minimum and maximum semifluidization velocities and packed bed formation in the column by varying various parameters such as inlet liquid superficial velocity (from Uminsf to 8Uminsf m/s, and retaining grid (sometimes referred to as adsorbent loading to initial static bed height ratio (from 3-4.5. Inlet phenols concentration (50-400 mg/l and initial pH of the liquid solutions feed (from 4 to 10 were also studied. The experimental semifluidized adsorber unit was designed and constructed in Chem. Eng. labs at Al-Nahrain University (consisted of a QVF glass tube 2.54 cm inside diameter, and 70cm length. The results showed that the initial percent removal of phenolic compounds (P-chlorophenol and o-cresol decrease with increasing the superficial liquid velocity while the time required reaching equilibrium state decreased. Also it slightly affected with the increase in the retaining grid height and the time required to reach the equilibrium value decreased.

  3. Calcium oxide/carbon dioxide reactivity in a packed bed reactor of a chemical heat pump for high-temperature gas reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Yukitaka; Yamada, Mitsuteru; Kanie, Toshihiro; Yoshizawa, Yoshio

    2001-01-01

    The thermal performance of a chemical heat pump that uses a calcium oxide/carbon dioxide reaction system was discussed as a heat storage system for utilizing heat output from high temperature gas reactors (HTGR). Calcium oxide/carbon dioxide reactivity for the heat pump was measured using a packed bed reactor containing 1.0 kg of reactant. The reactor was capable of storing heat at 900 deg. C by decarbonation of calcium carbonate and generating up to 997 deg. C by carbonation of calcium oxide. The amount of stored heat in the reactor was 800-900 kJ kg -1 . The output temperature of the reactor could be controlled by regulating the carbonation pressure. The thermal storage performance of the reactor was superior to that of conventional sensible heat storage systems. A heat pump using this CaO/CO 2 reactor is expected to contribute to thermal load leveling and to realize highly efficient utilization of HTGR output due to the high heat storage density and high-quality temperature output of the heat pump

  4. Revue des aspects hydrodynamiques des réacteurs catalytiques gaz-liquide-solide à lit fixe arrosé Hydrodynamics of Gas-Liquid-Solid Trickle-Bed Reactors: a Critical Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attou A.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Bien que les aspects hydrodynamiques soient d'une importance primordiale lors de la conception et du fonctionnement d'un réacteur gaz-liquide-solide à lit fixe arrosé, les méthodes de calcul prédictif proposées sont restées fort rudimentaires. La plupart des études portant sur ce sujet ont été menées dans des conditions quasi atmosphériques alors que les réacteurs industriels fonctionnent à des pressions élevées. C'est seulement récemment que quelques résultats expérimentaux ont été obtenus à des hautes pressions, et des corrélations ont été proposées dans ces conditions pour prédire la transition entre les régimes ruisselant et pulsé, la perte de pression et le taux de rétention de liquide. L'objectif de cet article est double. D'une part, une synthèse y est présentée ; elle fait état des connaissances acquises sur les divers aspects hydrodynamiques du réacteur triphasique à lit fixe, incluant les récents développements réalisés à hautes pressions. D'autre part, les modèles et les corrélations actuels de transitions de régimes, de la perte de pression et du taux de rétention de liquide sont soumis à une analyse critique en confrontant leurs prédictions à l'ensemble des données expérimentales obtenues pour un large intervalle de la pression de fonctionnement du réacteur. Des conclusions objectives ont pu être tirées concernant les aptitudes des corrélations et des modèles actuels à être utilisées pour les calculs de conception des réacteurs triphasiques à lit fixe industriels. Malheureusement, il apparaît qu'aucun modèle de transitions entre les régimes ruisselant et pulsé n'est satisfaisant. Seule la corrélation empirique de Larachi et al. (1993 s'avère être jusqu'à présent la méthode la plus précise pour prédire la position de la frontière entre les régimes ruisselant et pulsé dans un large domaine de la pression de fonctionnement. Par ailleurs, aucune corr

  5. Effect of nutrient enrichment on the source and composition of sediment organic carbon in tropical seagrass beds in the South China Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Songlin; Jiang, Zhijian; Zhang, Jingping; Wu, Yunchao; Lian, Zhonglian; Huang, Xiaoping

    2016-09-15

    To assess the effect of nutrient enrichment on the source and composition of sediment organic carbon (SOC) beneath Thalassia hemprichii and Enhalus acoroides in tropical seagrass beds, Xincun Bay, South China Sea, intertidal sediment, primary producers, and seawater samples were collected. No significant differences on sediment δ(13)C, SOC, and microbial biomass carbon (MBC) were observed between T. hemprichii and E. acoroides. SOC was mainly of autochthonous origin, while the contribution of seagrass to SOC was less than that of suspended particulate organic matter, macroalgae and epiphytes. High nutrient concentrations contributed substantially to SOC of seagrass, macroalgae, and epiphytes. The SOC, MBC, and MBC/SOC ratio in the nearest transect to fish farming were the highest. This suggested a more labile composition of SOC and shorter turnover times in higher nutrient regions. Therefore, the research indicates that nutrient enrichment could enhance plant-derived contributions to SOC and microbial use efficiency. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Rotary Bed Reactor for Chemical-Looping Combustion with Carbon Capture. Part 1: Reactor Design and Model Development

    KAUST Repository

    Zhao, Zhenlong; Chen, Tianjiao; Ghoniem, Ahmed F.

    2013-01-01

    Chemical-looping combustion (CLC) is a novel and promising technology for power generation with inherent CO2 capture. Currently, almost all of the research has been focused on developing CLC-based interconnected fluidized-bed reactors. In this two

  7. Aerial and underwater carbon metabolism of a Zostera noltii seagrass bed in the Banc d'Arguin, Mauritania

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clavier, Jacques; Chauvaud, Laurent; Carlier, Antoine; Amice, Erwan; van der Geest, Matthijs; Labrosse, Pierre; Diagne, Ahmed; Hilya, Christian

    Community respiration and primary production were measured in a dense intertidal Zostera noltii bed on the Banc d’Arguin, Mauritania (West Africa) under aerial and submerged conditions. Metabolism was studied in situ in dark and transparent benthic chambers. CO2 fluxes in the air were measured over

  8. Biofilm Fixed Film Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipesh Das

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The work reviewed here was published between 2008 and 2010 and describes research that involved aerobic and anoxic biofilm treatment of water pollutants. Biofilm denitrification systems are covered when appropriate. References catalogued here are divided on the basis of fundamental research area or reactor types. Fundamental research into biofilms is presented in two sections, Biofilm Measurement and Characterization and Growth and Modeling. The reactor types covered are: trickling filters, rotating biological contactors, fluidized bed bioreactors, submerged bed biofilm reactors, biological granular activated carbon, membrane bioreactors, and immobilized cell reactors. Innovative reactors, not easily classified, are then presented, followed by a section on biofilms on sand, soil and sediment.

  9. Fixed Points

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 5; Issue 5. Fixed Points - From Russia with Love - A Primer of Fixed Point Theory. A K Vijaykumar. Book Review Volume 5 Issue 5 May 2000 pp 101-102. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  10. Environmental Benefit Assessment for the Carbonation Process of Petroleum Coke Fly Ash in a Rotating Packed Bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Si-Lu; Pan, Shu-Yuan; Li, Ye-Mei; Chiang, Pen-Chi

    2017-09-19

    A high-gravity carbonation process was deployed at a petrochemical plant using petroleum coke fly ash and blowdown wastewater to simultaneously mineralized CO 2 and remove nitrogen oxides and particulate matters from the flue gas. With a high-gravity carbonation process, the CO 2 removal efficiency was found to be 95.6%, corresponding to a capture capacity of 600 kg CO 2 per day, at a gas flow rate of 1.47 m 3 /min under ambient temperature and pressure. Moreover, the removal efficiency of nitrogen oxides and particulate matters was 99.1% and 83.2%, respectively. After carbonation, the reacted fly ash was further utilized as supplementary cementitious materials in the blended cement mortar. The results indicated that cement with carbonated fly ash exhibited superior compressive strength (38.1 ± 2.5 MPa at 28 days in 5% substitution ratio) compared to the cement with fresh fly ash. Furthermore, the environmental benefits for the high-gravity carbonation process using fly ash were critically assessed. The energy consumption of the entire high-gravity carbonation ranged from 80 to 169 kWh/t-CO 2 (0.29-0.61 GJ/t-CO 2 ). Compared with the scenarios of business-as-usual and conventional carbon capture and storage plant, the economic benefit from the high-gravity carbonation process was approximately 90 and 74 USD per ton of CO 2 fixation, respectively.

  11. THE EFFECT OF ACTIVATED CARBON SURFACE MOISTURE ON LOW TEMPERATURE MERCURY ADSORPTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Experiments with elemental mercury (Hg0) adsorption by activated carbons were performed using a bench-scale fixed-bed reactor at room temperature (27 degrees C) to determine the role of surface moisture in capturing Hg0. A bituminous-coal-based activated carbon (BPL) and an activ...

  12. The effects of extreme rainfall events on carbon release from Biological Soil Crusts covered soil in fixed sand dunes in the Tengger Desert, northern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yang; Li, Xinrong; Pan, Yanxia; Hui, Rong

    2016-04-01

    How soil cover types and extreme rainfall event influence carbon (C) release in temperate desert ecosystems has largely been unexplored. We assessed the effects of extreme rainfall (quantity and intensity) events on the carbon release from soils covered by different types of biological soil crusts (BSCs) in fixed sand dunes in the Tengger Desert, Shapotou regionof northern China. We removed intact crusts down to 10 cm and measured them in PVC mesocosms. A Li-6400-09 Soil Chamber was used to measure the respiration rates of the BSCs immediately after the rainfall stopped, and continued until the respiration rates of the BSCs returned to the pre-rainfall basal rate. Our results showed that almost immediately after extreme rainfall events the respiration rates of algae crust and mixed crust were significantly inhibited, but moss crust was not significantly affected. The respiration rates of algae crust, mixed crust, and moss crust in extreme rainfall quantity and intensity events were, respectively, 0.12 and 0.41 μmolCO2/(m2•s), 0.10 and 0.45 μmolCO2/(m2•s), 0.83 and 1.69 μmolCO2/(m2•s). Our study indicated that moss crust in the advanced succession stage can well adapt to extreme rainfall events in the short term. Keywords: carbon release; extreme rainfall events; biological soil crust

  13. 3D Numerical Study of Multiphase Counter-Current Flow within a Packed Bed for Post Combustion Carbon Dioxide Capture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yang

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The hydrodynamics within counter-current flow packed beds is of vital importance to provide insight into the design and operational parameters that may impact reactor and reaction efficiencies in processes used for post combustion CO2 capture. However, the multiphase counter-current flows in random packing used in these processes are complicated to visualize. Hence, this work aimed at developing a computational fluid dynamics (CFD model to study more precisely the complex details of flow inside a packed bed. The simulation results clearly demonstrated the development of, and changes in, liquid distributions, wetted areas, and film thickness under various gas and liquid flow rates. An increase in values of the We number led to a more uniform liquid distribution, and the flow patterns changed from droplet flow to film flow and trickle flow as the We number was increased. In contrast, an increase in gas flow rate had no significant effect on the wetted areas and liquid holdup. It was also determined that the number of liquid inlets affected flow behavior, and the liquid surface tension had an insignificant influence on pressure drop or liquid holdup; however, lower surface tension provided a larger wetted area and a thinner film. An experimental study, performed to enable comparisons between experimentally measured pressure drops and simulation-determined pressure drops, showed close correspondence and similar trends between the experimental data and the simulation data; hence, it was concluded that the simulation model was validated and could reasonably predict flow dynamics within a counter-current flow packed bed.

  14. Application of a fluidized bed reactor charged with aragonite for control of alkalinity, pH and carbon dioxide in marine recirculating aquaculture systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul S Wills, PhD; Pfeiffer, Timothy; Baptiste, Richard; Watten, Barnaby J.

    2016-01-01

    Control of alkalinity, dissolved carbon dioxide (dCO2), and pH are critical in marine recirculating aquaculture systems (RAS) in order to maintain health and maximize growth. A small-scale prototype aragonite sand filled fluidized bed reactor was tested under varying conditions of alkalinity and dCO2 to develop and model the response of dCO2 across the reactor. A large-scale reactor was then incorporated into an operating marine recirculating aquaculture system to observe the reactor as the system moved toward equilibrium. The relationship between alkalinity dCO2, and pH across the reactor are described by multiple regression equations. The change in dCO2 across the small-scale reactor indicated a strong likelihood that an equilibrium alkalinity would be maintained by using a fluidized bed aragonite reactor. The large-scale reactor verified this observation and established equilibrium at an alkalinity of approximately 135 mg/L as CaCO3, dCO2 of 9 mg/L, and a pH of 7.0 within 4 days that was stable during a 14 day test period. The fluidized bed aragonite reactor has the potential to simplify alkalinity and pH control, and aid in dCO2 control in RAS design and operation. Aragonite sand, purchased in bulk, is less expensive than sodium bicarbonate and could reduce overall operating production costs.

  15. Fix 40!

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2008-01-01

    Ansambel Fix peab 13. detsembril Tallinnas Saku Suurhallis oma 40. sünnipäeva. Kontserdi erikülaline on ansambel Apelsin, kaastegevad Jassi Zahharov ja HaleBopp Singers. Õhtut juhib Tarmo Leinatamm

  16. A novel continuous process for synthesis of carbon nanotubes using iron floating catalyst and MgO particles for CVD of methane in a fluidized bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maghsoodi, Sarah; Khodadadi, Abasali [Catalysis and Nanostructured Materials Research Laboratory, School of Chemical Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mortazavi, Yadollah, E-mail: mortazav@ut.ac.ir [Nanoelectronics Centre of Excellence, University of Tehran, POB 11365-4563, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-02-15

    A novel continuous process is used for production of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of methane on iron floating catalyst in situ deposited on MgO in a fluidized bed reactor. In the hot zone of the reactor, sublimed ferrocene vapors were contacted with MgO powder fluidized by methane feed to produce Fe/MgO catalyst in situ. An annular tube was used to enhance the ferrocene and MgO contacting efficiency. Multi-wall as well as single-wall CNTs was grown on the Fe/MgO catalyst while falling down the reactor. The CNTs were continuously collected at the bottom of the reactor, only when MgO powder was used. The annular tube enhanced the contacting efficiency and improved both the quality and quantity of CNTs. The SEM and TEM micrographs of the products reveal that the CNTs are mostly entangled bundles with diameters of about 10-20 nm. Raman spectra show that the CNTs have low amount of amorphous/defected carbon with I{sub G}/I{sub D} ratios as high as 10.2 for synthesis at 900 deg. C. The RBM Raman peaks indicate formation of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) of 1.0-1.2 nm diameter.

  17. Study of the obtainment of Mo{sub 2}C by gas-solid reaction in a fixed and rotary bed reactor; Estudo da obtencao de Mo{sub 2}C por reacao gas-solido em reator de leito fixo e rotativo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, C.P.B. de; Souza, C.P. de; Souto, M.V.M.; Barbosa, C.M.; Frota, A.V.V.M., E-mail: cpbaraujo@gmail.com [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    Carbides' synthesis via gas-solid reaction overcomes many of the difficulties found in other processes, requiring lower temperatures and reaction times than traditional metallurgic routes, for example. In carbides' synthesis in fixed bed reactors (FB) the solid precursor is permeated by the reducing/carburizing gas stream forming a packed bed without mobility. The use of a rotary kiln reactor (RK) adds a mixing character to this process, changing its fluid-particle dynamics. In this work ammonium molybdate was subjected to carbo-reduction reaction (CH4 / H2) in both reactors under the same gas flow (15L / h) and temperature (660 ° C) for 180 minutes. Complete conversion was observed Mo2C (dp = 18.9nm modal particles sizes' distribution) in the fixed bed reactor. In the RK reactor this conversion was only partial (∼ 40%) and Mo2C and MoO3 (34nm dp = bimodal) could be observed on the produced XRD pattern. Partial conversion was attributed to the need to use higher solids loading in the reactor CR (50% higher) to avoid solids to centrifuge. (author)

  18. The effect of ocean acidification on carbon storage and sequestration in seagrass beds; a global and UK context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrard, Samantha L; Beaumont, Nicola J

    2014-09-15

    Ocean acidification will have many negative consequences for marine organisms and ecosystems, leading to a decline in many ecosystem services provided by the marine environment. This study reviews the effect of ocean acidification (OA) on seagrasses, assessing how this may affect their capacity to sequester carbon in the future and providing an economic valuation of these changes. If ocean acidification leads to a significant increase in above- and below-ground biomass, the capacity of seagrass to sequester carbon will be significantly increased. The associated value of this increase in sequestration capacity is approximately £500 and 600 billion globally between 2010 and 2100. A proportionally similar increase in carbon sequestration value was found for the UK. This study highlights one of the few positive stories for ocean acidification and underlines that sustainable management of seagrasses is critical to avoid their continued degradation and loss of carbon sequestration capacity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Dissolved oxygen control in a coupled fluidized bed system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, R.M.; Melcer, H.

    1988-01-01

    The biological fluidized bed process is a modification of more conventional fixed film processes, such as the trickling filter, in which wastewater is passed upward through a bed of granular support medium, typically sand, at a sufficient velocity to expand or fluidize the medium. The granular medium provides a large surface area for the establishment of a biological film. The fluidized bed process was selected to investigate the treatment of coking plant wastewaters in view of the significant advantages offered in terms of reduced reactor volumes that result from the high biomass concentration maintained on the support medium. The technical feasibility of treating coal distillation condensates was evaluated during a 3-year study at Environment Canada's Wastewater Technology Centre (WTC). The feed to the pilot scale test system consisted of effluent from fixed and free leg ammonia stills at the by-product coke plant of Dofasco Inc. in Hamilton, Ontario. The pilot plant consisted of two fluidized bed reactors in series, coupled to provide carbon oxidation, nitrification and denitrification in the predenitrification operating mode. The anoxic denitrification reactor was 115 mm in diameter and the oxygenic nitrification reactor, 290 mm in diameter. The bed heights and reactor volumes were adjustable by relocation of the position of the sand/biomass wasting valve. The experimental objective of this research was to determine those operating conditions required to maintain stable nitrification and complete denitrification under both steady state and dynamic operating conditions. Details regarding operating, sampling and analytic procedures have been presented elsewhere. A specific operating problem existed relating to the control of the dissolved oxygen concentration in the oxygenic fluidized bed reactor, the solution of which forms the basis of the paper

  20. EXTENDED ALKYLATE PRODUCTION ACTIVITY DURING FIXED-BED SUPERCRITICAL 1-BUTENE/ISOBUTANE ALKYLATION ON SOLID ACID CATALYSTS USING CARBON DIOXIDE AS DILUENT. (R824729)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  1. Biological processing of carbon dioxide. ; Photosynthetic function of plants, and carbon dioxide fixing function of marine organisms. Nisanka tanso no seibutsuteki shori. ; Shokubutsu no kogosei kino to kaiyo seibutsu no nisanka tanso kotei kino

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirai, M [National Research Inst. for Pollution and Resources, Tsukuba (Japan)

    1991-02-15

    This paper describes photosynthetic function of plants, and CO {sub 2} fixing function of marine organisms. Among the photosythetic reaction systems, the C {sub 3} type reaction carries out CO {sub 2} fixation using the Calvin cycle, and takes out the carbon dioxide out of the system through enzymatic reactions of 3-phosphoglycerate {yields} fructose-6-phosphate. The C {sub 4} type reaction has a special cycle to supply CO {sub 2} to the Calvin cycle, i. e. C {sub 4} dicarboxylic acid cycle. The CAM type reaction enables the photosynthetic type to be converted according to variations in the growing environment. The majority of the surace agricultural crops are from C {sub 3} plants, of which yield may be increased when grown in a high CO {sub 2} atmosphere. On the one hand, gene engineering may make possible breeding of plants having high CO {sub 2} fixing capability. In the area of marine organisms, lime algae growing in clusters around coral reefs form and deposit CaCO {sub 3}. Reef creating corals have symbiotically in their stomach layer brown algae having photosynthetic function to build CaCO {sub 3} skeleton. The corals calcify algae quickly and in a large quantity, hence play an important role in fixing underwater CO {sub 2}. 2 tabs.

  2. Contribution of Bicarbonate Assimilation to Carbon Pool Dynamics in the Deep Mediterranean Sea and Cultivation of Actively Nitrifying and CO2-Fixing Bathypelagic Prokaryotic Consortia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Cono, Violetta; Ruggeri, Gioachino; Azzaro, Maurizio; Crisafi, Francesca; Decembrini, Franco; Denaro, Renata; La Spada, Gina; Maimone, Giovanna; Monticelli, Luis S; Smedile, Francesco; Giuliano, Laura; Yakimov, Michail M

    2018-01-01

    Covering two-thirds of our planet, the global deep ocean plays a central role in supporting life on Earth. Among other processes, this biggest ecosystem buffers the rise of atmospheric CO 2 . Despite carbon sequestration in the deep ocean has been known for a long time, microbial activity in the meso- and bathypelagic realm via the " assimilation of bicarbonate in the dark " (ABD) has only recently been described in more details. Based on recent findings, this process seems primarily the result of chemosynthetic and anaplerotic reactions driven by different groups of deep-sea prokaryoplankton. We quantified bicarbonate assimilation in relation to total prokaryotic abundance, prokaryotic heterotrophic production and respiration in the meso- and bathypelagic Mediterranean Sea. The measured ABD values, ranging from 133 to 370 μg C m -3 d -1 , were among the highest ones reported worldwide for similar depths, likely due to the elevated temperature of the deep Mediterranean Sea (13-14°C also at abyssal depths). Integrated over the dark water column (≥200 m depth), bicarbonate assimilation in the deep-sea ranged from 396 to 873 mg C m -2 d -1 . This quantity of produced de novo organic carbon amounts to about 85-424% of the phytoplankton primary production and covers up to 62% of deep-sea prokaryotic total carbon demand. Hence, the ABD process in the meso- and bathypelagic Mediterranean Sea might substantially contribute to the inorganic and organic pool and significantly sustain the deep-sea microbial food web. To elucidate the ABD key-players, we established three actively nitrifying and CO 2 -fixing prokaryotic enrichments. Consortia were characterized by the co-occurrence of chemolithoautotrophic Thaumarchaeota and chemoheterotrophic proteobacteria. One of the enrichments, originated from Ionian bathypelagic waters (3,000 m depth) and supplemented with low concentrations of ammonia, was dominated by the Thaumarchaeota "low-ammonia-concentration" deep-sea ecotype

  3. The Hydrodynamic Characteristics of Cocurrent Downflow and Cocurrent Upflow Gas-Liquid-Solid Catalytic Fixed Bed Reactors: the Effect of Pressure Les caractéristiques hydrodynamiques des réacteurs gaz-liquide-solide à lit de catalyseur fixe à écoulement cocourant montant et descendant : l'influence de la pression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wild G.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available While most catalytic fixed bed gas-liquid reactors of the petrol industry work at quite high pressures, the academic scientific work in this field concerned itself almost exclusively with the domain of approximatively atmospheric pressures. The authors present the results of some years of experimental investigations on the hydrodynamic characteristics of trickle bed reactors and lately of cocurrent upflow reactors. During the last years, results were also obtained under pressures up to 8 MPa. The measurements were made in a small scale cold flow equipment (diameter 23 mm. Different aqueous and organic more or less viscous, eventually coalescence inhibiting liquids, four gases and a number of non porous more or less wettable particles were used. The liquid holdup was determined in all cases by measuring liquid phase residence time distribution by different tracers. The following conclusions may be drawn:(a In the high interaction regime, it is the inertia of the gas and the liquid phases which is the main cause of the dissipation of mechanical energy. In this regime, results obtained in cocurrent upflow and downflow are approximately equal. (b Most correlations of literature are unable to predict the effect of pressure on the pressure drop or the liquid holdup. (c The gas viscosity has no influence on the hydrodynamics. It is therefore possible to simulate for example hydrogen under high pressure conditions by another gas of the same density (at a much lower pressures. A critical evaluation of the correlations and/or models of literature is presented, concerning their ability to represent the different characteristics as a function of pressure. Tandis que la plupart des réacteurs industriels gaz-liquide à lit de catalyseur fixe fonctionnent à assez hautes pressions, les travaux scientifiques académiques sont, dans ce domaine, presque exclusivement consacrés aux pressions avoisinant la pression atmosphérique. Les auteurs présentent les r

  4. Effect of nutrient enrichment on the source and composition of sediment organic carbon in tropical seagrass beds in the South China Sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Songlin; Jiang, Zhijian; Zhang, Jingping; Wu, Yunchao; Lian, Zhonglian; Huang, Xiaoping

    2016-01-01

    To assess the effect of nutrient enrichment on the source and composition of sediment organic carbon (SOC) beneath Thalassia hemprichii and Enhalus acoroides in tropical seagrass beds, Xincun Bay, South China Sea, intertidal sediment, primary producers, and seawater samples were collected. No significant differences on sediment δ 13 C, SOC, and microbial biomass carbon (MBC) were observed between T. hemprichii and E. acoroides. SOC was mainly of autochthonous origin, while the contribution of seagrass to SOC was less than that of suspended particulate organic matter, macroalgae and epiphytes. High nutrient concentrations contributed substantially to SOC of seagrass, macroalgae, and epiphytes. The SOC, MBC, and MBC/SOC ratio in the nearest transect to fish farming were the highest. This suggested a more labile composition of SOC and shorter turnover times in higher nutrient regions. Therefore, the research indicates that nutrient enrichment could enhance plant-derived contributions to SOC and microbial use efficiency. - Highlights: • Response of sources and composition of SOC to nutrient enrichment was observed. • Similar SOC sources and composition were observed in the two seagrass communities. • Nutrient enrichment enhanced seagrass and macroalgae and epiphytes contribution to SOC. • High nutrient concentration stimulated the MBC and the MBC/SOC ratio.

  5. Effect of various drying bed on thermodynamic characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Motevali

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study thermodynamic parameter and energy consumption in drying of two plant dill and mint in three bed drying including fix, semi fix and fluid with using a hot air drying was investigated. Experimental was conducted in three bed drying including fix, semi fix and fluid and four levels temperature (30, 40, 50 and 60 °C. Maximum energy consumption in dill drying at 40 °C and fluid bed to be 16.41 MJ and minimum energy consumption at 30 °C and fix bed to be 2.77 MJ. Also minimum energy consumption in mint drying at 60 °C and fix bed to be 3.64 MJ and maximum energy consumption at 40 °C and fluid bed to be 28.65 MJ. The highest energy, drying and thermal efficiency for both mint and dill was achieved at 60 °C on the fixed bed, whereas the lowest efficiency was at 40 °C and on the fluidized bed. Also the highest power and specific heat consumption for both mint and dill was achieved at 40 °C on the fluid bed, whereas the lowest efficiency was at 30 °C and on the fluidized bed.

  6. High-purity metal-carbon eutectic systems as thermometric fixed points in the range from 1000 K to 3500 K; Des systemes eutectiques metal-carbone de grande purete comme points fixes de temperature dans l'intervalle 1000-3500 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloembergen, P.; Yamada, Y.; Sasajima, N.; Yamamoto, N. [National Metrology Institute of Japan (NMIJ), AIST, Tsukuba (Japan); Torizuka, S.; Yoshida, N. [National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Tsukuba (Japan)

    2004-12-01

    A survey will be given of metal-carbon (M-C) and metal carbide-carbon (MC-C) systems presently in development for applications in thermometry in the range from 1000 K to about 3500 K. The advantages of these systems as fixed points at high temperatures as compared to systems relying on pure metals will be elucidated. Purification of the components making up the M-C or MC-C systems is a prerequisite to their implementation as reference fixed points in thermometry, requiring a high level of reproducibility of the eutectic temperature. To set an example a study on the effect of impurities on the eutectic transition of Fe-C is included in the survey. Experimentally obtained melting curves are compared with the curves calculated on the basis of a thermodynamic model, which includes the impurities in question as components. The calculations of the melting curves are based upon: (1) the Equilibrium solidification model and (2) the Scheil-Gulliver solidification model, which handle the effects of the impurities on the transition process in such a way that they may be assumed to set lower and upper boundaries to the associated melting ranges, respectively. We will conclude pointing out fields of common interest to materials science and thermometry within the realm of ultra-pure materials. (authors)

  7. Rotary Bed Reactor for Chemical-Looping Combustion with Carbon Capture. Part 1: Reactor Design and Model Development

    KAUST Repository

    Zhao, Zhenlong

    2013-01-17

    Chemical-looping combustion (CLC) is a novel and promising technology for power generation with inherent CO2 capture. Currently, almost all of the research has been focused on developing CLC-based interconnected fluidized-bed reactors. In this two-part series, a new rotary reactor concept for gas-fueled CLC is proposed and analyzed. In part 1, the detailed configuration of the rotary reactor is described. In the reactor, a solid wheel rotates between the fuel and air streams at the reactor inlet and exit. Two purging sectors are used to avoid the mixing between the fuel stream and the air stream. The rotary wheel consists of a large number of channels with copper oxide coated on the inner surface of the channels. The support material is boron nitride, which has high specific heat and thermal conductivity. Gas flows through the reactor at elevated pressure, and it is heated to a high temperature by fuel combustion. Typical design parameters for a thermal capacity of 1 MW have been proposed, and a simplified model is developed to predict the performances of the reactor. The potential drawbacks of the rotary reactor are also discussed. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  8. Synthesis of zeolites coal ash in surfactant modified in application and removal of orange 8 acid solution: study in batch, fixed bed column and evaluation ecotoxicological; Sintese de zeolitas de cinzas de carvao modificada por surfactante e aplicacao na remocao de acido laranja 8 de solucao aquosa: estudo em leito movel, coluna de leito fixo e avaliacao ecotoxicologica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magdalena, Carina Pitwak

    2015-09-01

    In this study, synthesized zeolitic material from coal ash and modified cationic surfactant was used for removing the acid dye Orange 8 (AL8) by adsorption process using moving bed and fixed-bed column. The raw material and adsorbents were characterized by different techniques, such as X-ray diffraction, X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, among others. The adsorption of AL8 was performed by moving bed in order to optimize the results when they are launched in a fixed bed. The effects of adsorption on zeolite AL8 were compared: (1) Effect of counterions Br{sup -} and Cl{sup -} surfactant used in the modification of the zeolite; (2) effect of type of coal ash used as raw material in the synthesis of zeolites (fly and bottom). The following adsorbents were used in the study: fly and bottom zeolite modified by surfactant hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (ZLMS-Br-Br and ZPMS-Br) and fly zeolite modified by surfactant hexadecyltrimethylammonium chloride (ZLMS-Cl). The pseudo-second-order kinetic described the adsorption of the dye on all adsorbents. The equilibrium time was reached 40, 60 and 120 min for ZLMS-Br, ZLMS-Cl and ZPMS-Br, respectively. The adsorption equilibrium was analyzed by the equations of the models of linear and nonlinear isotherms of Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin and Dubinin- Radushkevivh (DR) and the criterion of best fit was evaluated using the error functions.The DR model was adjusted better to the experimental data for the system AL8 / ZLMS-Br, the Freundlich model for AL8 / ZLMS-Cl and Langmuir for AL8 / ZPMS. According to the Langmuir maximum adsorption capacity was 4.67, 1.48 and 1.38 mg g{sup -1} for ZLMS-Br, ZLMS-Cl and ZPMS-Br, in order. In studies employing fixed bed columns, the effects of inlet concentration (20- 30 mg L{sup -1}), flow rate (4.0 -5.3 mL min{sup -1}) and the bed height (5, 5 - 6.5 cm) above the breakthrough curves characteristics in the adsorption system were determined. The Adams-Bohart, Thomas, Yoon-Nelson models were

  9. Performance comparison of a silica gel-water and activated carbon-methanol two beds adsorption chillers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szelągowski Adam

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is to compare the efficiency of adsorption refrigerating equipment working with different working pairs. Adsorption cooling devices can operate with a relatively low temperature of heat sources while consuming only a small amount of electricity for the operation of auxiliary equipment. Refrigerants used in adsorption devices are substances that do not have a negative impact on the environment. All that makes that adsorption refrigeration seems to be a good solution for utilizing renewable and waste heat sources for cold production. To carry out the experiment the adsorption cooling device has been developed and researched in Institute of Heat Engineering at Warsaw University of Technology. The test bench consisted of two cylindrical adsorbers, condenser, evaporator, oil heater and two oil coolers. In order to perform the correct action it has been developed and implemented special control algorithm device, allowed to keep the temperature in the evaporator at a preset level. The unit tested for two sorption pairs: activated carbon – methanol, and silica gel – water. For activated carbon - methanol working pair it was obtained energy efficiency rating (EER equals to 0.14 and specific cooling power (SPC of 16 W/kg. For silica gel - water EER of refrigeration unit was 0.25 and SPC was equal to 208 W/kg.

  10. Evaluation of methods for characterizing the melting curves of a high temperature cobalt-carbon fixed point to define and determine its melting temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, David; Machin, Graham

    2012-06-01

    The future mise en pratique for the realization of the kelvin will be founded on the melting temperatures of particular metal-carbon eutectic alloys as thermodynamic temperature references. However, at the moment there is no consensus on what should be taken as the melting temperature. An ideal melting or freezing curve should be a completely flat plateau at a specific temperature. Any departure from the ideal is due to shortcomings in the realization and should be accommodated within the uncertainty budget. However, for the proposed alloy-based fixed points, melting takes place over typically some hundreds of millikelvins. Including the entire melting range within the uncertainties would lead to an unnecessarily pessimistic view of the utility of these as reference standards. Therefore, detailed analysis of the shape of the melting curve is needed to give a value associated with some identifiable aspect of the phase transition. A range of approaches are or could be used; some purely practical, determining the point of inflection (POI) of the melting curve, some attempting to extrapolate to the liquidus temperature just at the end of melting, and a method that claims to give the liquidus temperature and an impurity correction based on the analytical Scheil model of solidification that has not previously been applied to eutectic melting. The different methods have been applied to cobalt-carbon melting curves that were obtained under conditions for which the Scheil model might be valid. In the light of the findings of this study it is recommended that the POI continue to be used as a pragmatic measure of temperature but where required a specified limits approach should be used to define and determine the melting temperature.

  11. Characteristics of charcoal fines obtained by rapid pyrolysis process of elephant grass in fluidized bed in different operation conditions; Caracteristicas dos finos de carvao vegetal obtido pelo processo de pirolise rapida de capim elefante em leito fluidizado em diferentes condicoes de operacao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mesa Perez, Juan Miguel; Cortez, Luis Augusto Barbosa [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Campinas, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Engenharia Agricola; Gomez, Edgardo Olivares; Rocha, Jose Dilcio [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Campinas, SP (Brazil). Nucleo Interdisciplinar de Planejamento Energetico

    2004-07-01

    This paper presents a study about the effect of excess air and the inert fixed bed height upon the characteristics of fine charcoal particles and the main reactor parameters. The pyrolysis process is considered as a method to concentrate carbon in fine charcoal particles and a method to reduce oxygen content in the biomass.The study concludes that the operation point which gives the highest percentage if carbon fine charcoal particles and reduces the most the oxygen in biomass corresponds to a fixed bed height of 207 mm and excess air of 8%. (author)

  12. Contribution of Bicarbonate Assimilation to Carbon Pool Dynamics in the Deep Mediterranean Sea and Cultivation of Actively Nitrifying and CO2-Fixing Bathypelagic Prokaryotic Consortia

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Cono, Violetta; Ruggeri, Gioachino; Azzaro, Maurizio; Crisafi, Francesca; Decembrini, Franco; Denaro, Renata; La Spada, Gina; Maimone, Giovanna; Monticelli, Luis S.; Smedile, Francesco; Giuliano, Laura; Yakimov, Michail M.

    2018-01-01

    Covering two-thirds of our planet, the global deep ocean plays a central role in supporting life on Earth. Among other processes, this biggest ecosystem buffers the rise of atmospheric CO2. Despite carbon sequestration in the deep ocean has been known for a long time, microbial activity in the meso- and bathypelagic realm via the “assimilation of bicarbonate in the dark” (ABD) has only recently been described in more details. Based on recent findings, this process seems primarily the result of chemosynthetic and anaplerotic reactions driven by different groups of deep-sea prokaryoplankton. We quantified bicarbonate assimilation in relation to total prokaryotic abundance, prokaryotic heterotrophic production and respiration in the meso- and bathypelagic Mediterranean Sea. The measured ABD values, ranging from 133 to 370 μg C m−3 d−1, were among the highest ones reported worldwide for similar depths, likely due to the elevated temperature of the deep Mediterranean Sea (13–14°C also at abyssal depths). Integrated over the dark water column (≥200 m depth), bicarbonate assimilation in the deep-sea ranged from 396 to 873 mg C m−2 d−1. This quantity of produced de novo organic carbon amounts to about 85–424% of the phytoplankton primary production and covers up to 62% of deep-sea prokaryotic total carbon demand. Hence, the ABD process in the meso- and bathypelagic Mediterranean Sea might substantially contribute to the inorganic and organic pool and significantly sustain the deep-sea microbial food web. To elucidate the ABD key-players, we established three actively nitrifying and CO2-fixing prokaryotic enrichments. Consortia were characterized by the co-occurrence of chemolithoautotrophic Thaumarchaeota and chemoheterotrophic proteobacteria. One of the enrichments, originated from Ionian bathypelagic waters (3,000 m depth) and supplemented with low concentrations of ammonia, was dominated by the Thaumarchaeota “low-ammonia-concentration” deep

  13. Developing low-cost carbon-based sorbents for Hg capture from flue gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ron Perry; Janos Lakatos; Colin E. Snape; Cheng-gong Sun [University of Nottingham (United Kingdom). UK Nottingham Fuel and Energy Centre, School of Chemical, Environmental and Mining Engineering

    2005-07-01

    To help reduce the cost of Hg capture, a number of low-cost carbons are being investigated, including tyre char, PFA carbons and gasification residues. This contribution reports the breakthrough capacities in fixed-bed screening tests for these materials in relation to those for commercial active carbons, including Norit FGD and the extent to which breakthrough capacities can be improved by MnO{sub 2} impregnation. 7 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Effect of granular activated carbon addition on the effluent properties and fouling potentials of membrane-coupled expanded granular sludge bed process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, An; Liang, Heng; Qu, Fangshu; Bai, Langming; Li, Guibai; Ngo, Huu Hao; Guo, Wenshan

    2014-11-01

    To mitigate membrane fouling of membrane-coupled anaerobic process, granular activated carbon (GAC: 50 g/L) was added into an expanded granular sludge bed (EGSB). A short-term ultrafiltration test was investigated for analyzing membrane fouling potential and underlying fouling mechanisms. The results showed that adding GAC into the EGSB not only improved the COD removal efficiency, but also alleviated membrane fouling efficiently because GAC could help to reduce soluble microbial products, polysaccharides and proteins by 26.8%, 27.8% and 24.7%, respectively, compared with the control system. Furthermore, excitation emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence spectroscopy analysis revealed that GAC addition mainly reduced tryptophan protein-like, aromatic protein-like and fulvic-like substances. In addition, the resistance distribution analysis demonstrated that adding GAC primarily decreased the cake layer resistance by 53.5%. The classic filtration mode analysis showed that cake filtration was the major fouling mechanism for membrane-coupled EGSB process regardless of the GAC addition. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Rotary Bed Reactor for Chemical-Looping Combustion with Carbon Capture. Part 2: Base Case and Sensitivity Analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Zhao, Zhenlong

    2013-01-17

    Part 1 (10.1021/ef3014103) of this series describes a new rotary reactor for gas-fueled chemical-looping combustion (CLC), in which, a solid wheel with microchannels rotates between the reducing and oxidizing streams. The oxygen carrier (OC) coated on the surfaces of the channels periodically adsorbs oxygen from air and releases it to oxidize the fuel. A one-dimensional model is also developed in part 1 (10.1021/ef3014103). This paper presents the simulation results based on the base-case design parameters. The results indicate that both the fuel conversion efficiency and the carbon separation efficiency are close to unity. Because of the relatively low reduction rate of copper oxide, fuel conversion occurs gradually from the inlet to the exit. A total of 99.9% of the fuel is converted within 75% of the channel, leading to 25% redundant length near the exit, to ensure robustness. In the air sector, the OC is rapidly regenerated while consuming a large amount of oxygen from air. Velocity fluctuations are observed during the transition between sectors because of the complete reactions of OCs. The gas temperature increases monotonically from 823 to 1315 K, which is mainly determined by the solid temperature, whose variations with time are limited within 20 K. The overall energy in the solid phase is balanced between the reaction heat release, conduction, and convective cooling. In the sensitivity analysis, important input parameters are identified and varied around their base-case values. The resulting changes in the model-predicted performance revealed that the most important parameters are the reduction kinetics, the operating pressure, and the feed stream temperatures. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  16. Fixed-film processes. Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canziani, R.

    1999-01-01

    Recently, full scale fixed-film or mixed suspended and fixed biomass bioreactors have been applied in many wastewater treatments plants. These process no longer depend on biomass settle ability and can be used to improve the performance of existing plants as required by more stringent discharge permit limits, especially for nutrients and suspended solid. Also, processes may work at high rates making it possible to build small footprint installations. Fixed-film process include trickling filter, moving bed reactors fluidized bed reactors. In the first part, the theoretical base governing fixed-film processes are briefly outlined with some simple examples of calculations underlining the main differences with conventional activated sludge processes [it

  17. Fixed-film processes. Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canziani, R.

    1999-01-01

    Recently, full scale fixed-film or mixed suspended have been applied in many wastewater treatments plants. These processes no longer depend on biomass settle ability and can be used to improve the performance of existing plants as required by more stringent discharge permit limits, especially for nutrients suspended solids. Also, processes may work at high rates making is possible to build small footprint installations. Fixed-film processes include trickling filters (and combined suspended and fixed-films processes), rotating biological contactors, biological aerated submerged, filters moving bed reactors, fluidized bed reactors. In the first part, the theoretical based governing fixed-film processes are briefly outlined, with some simple examples of calculations, underlining the main differences with conventional activate sludge processes. In the second part, the most common types of reactors are reviewed [it

  18. Carbonization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennebutte, H G; Goutal, E

    1921-07-04

    Materials such as coal, peat, or schist are subjected to a rising temperature in successive stages in apparatus in which the distillation products are withdrawn at each stage. For example in a three-stage process, the acid products of the first or low-temperature stage are fixed in a suitable reagent, the basic products from a second or higher-temperature stage are absorbed in an acid reagent, hydrocarbons being retained by solvents, while the third are subjected to a pyrogenation process carried out in a closed vessel. Wherein the material is subjected in stages to a rising temperature, the gasified products being withdrawn at each stage, and are prevented as far as possible from mixing with the carbonized products.

  19. Application of an aerobic fixed bed bioreactor for treatment of petroleum refinery wastewaters; Aplicacao de um bio-reator aerobio de leito fixo para tratamento de efluentes do refino de petroleo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vendramel, Simone M.; Dezzotti, Marcia; Sant' Anna Junior, Geraldo L. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE). Programa de Engenharia Quimica

    2004-07-01

    The motivation of this work was to investigate a biological treatment system, which requires low installation area and presents high flexibility. Thus, a laboratory scale aerated submerged fixed-film bioreactor was applied to the treatment of a petroleum refinery wastewater and its performance was monitored. The reactor was continuously operated during 260 days and submitted to different organic loadings in the range of 0.5 to 2.4 kgCOD.m{sup -3}.d{sup -1}. The following removal efficiencies were attained: COD (75 - 91%), TSS and TVS (60 - 92%) and DOC (56 - 91%) and turbidity (71 - 95%). The reactor presented a high level of mixing and showed to be stable when submitted to different hydraulic and organic loadings. Loss of biofilm was negligible and medium clogging problems were not observed. The support medium (PVC plates) showed to be very adequate for microbial adhesion and growth, resulting in stable bioreactor operation. (author)

  20. Aquifer configuration and geostructural links control the groundwater quality in thin-bedded carbonate-siliciclastic alternations of the Hainich CZE, central Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohlhepp, Bernd; Lehmann, Robert; Seeber, Paul; Küsel, Kirsten; Trumbore, Susan E.; Totsche, Kai U.

    2017-12-01

    The quality of near-surface groundwater reservoirs is controlled, but also threatened, by manifold surface-subsurface interactions. Vulnerability studies typically evaluate the variable interplay of surface factors (land management, infiltration patterns) and subsurface factors (hydrostratigraphy, flow properties) in a thorough way, but disregard the resulting groundwater quality. Conversely, hydrogeochemical case studies that address the chemical evolution of groundwater often lack a comprehensive analysis of the structural buildup. In this study, we aim to reconstruct the actual spatial groundwater quality pattern from a synoptic analysis of the hydrostratigraphy, lithostratigraphy, pedology and land use in the Hainich Critical Zone Exploratory (Hainich CZE). This CZE represents a widely distributed yet scarcely described setting of thin-bedded mixed carbonate-siliciclastic strata in hillslope terrains. At the eastern Hainich low-mountain hillslope, bedrock is mainly formed by alternated marine sedimentary rocks of the Upper Muschelkalk (Middle Triassic) that partly host productive groundwater resources. Spatial patterns of the groundwater quality of a 5.4 km long well transect are derived by principal component analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis. Aquifer stratigraphy and geostructural links were deduced from lithological drill core analysis, mineralogical analysis, geophysical borehole logs and mapping data. Maps of preferential recharge zones and recharge potential were deduced from digital (soil) mapping, soil survey data and field measurements of soil hydraulic conductivities (Ks). By attributing spatially variable surface and subsurface conditions, we were able to reconstruct groundwater quality clusters that reflect the type of land management in their preferential recharge areas, aquifer hydraulic conditions and cross-formational exchange via caprock sinkholes or ascending flow. Generally, the aquifer configuration (spatial arrangement of strata

  1. A two-stage fixed-bed reactor for direct hydrotreatment of volatiles from the hydropyrolysis of biomass: effect of catalyst temperature, pressure and catalyst ageing time on product characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pindoria, R.V.; Megaritis, A.; Herod, A.A.; Kandiyoti, R. [Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Chemical Technology

    1998-12-01

    This investigation involved the hydropyrolysis of biomass (eucalyptus globulus) and the immediate catalytic hydrocracking of pyrolytic oils in the second stage of the reactor. The effects of temperature, pressure and the catalyst ageing time on the final product tar have been studied using the catalyst Zeolite H-ZSM5. The catalytically hydrocracked tar/oil products were characterised and compared with the hydropyrolysis product from the first stage of the reactor to determine the effect of catalytic hydrocracking. The carbon deposition on the catalyst has been examined using thermogravimetric analysis. The tar yields after catalytic hydrocracking decreased with increasing pressure and temperature of the cracking stage. The tar yields at 10 bar pressure were greater than those at 40 bar pressure. The fresh zeolite catalyst trapped more than 40% of the product from the hydropyrolysis stage and TGA evidence indicated that this was not as carbon deposition but as volatiles trapped in the zeolite matrix. Reuse of the catalyst resulted in little more uptake of volatiles; however, extended use of the catalyst did not result in increased yields of liquid products but in increased production of light volatiles or gas. The H-ZSM5 catalyst appeared to act as a more active cracking catalyst rather than to promote hydrogenation or deoxygenation of the liquids produced in the hydropyrolysis stage. Characterisation of the liquids by SEC and UV fluorescence indicated that structural changes were relatively minor despite the significant changes in yields of liquids with process conditions. Available reaction routes do not appear to allow specific deoxygenation pathways to predominate without disintegration of parent molecules to lighter volatiles, under the conditions used here. 41 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. High quality bio-oil from catalytic flash pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass over alumina-supported sodium carbonate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ali Imran, A.; Bramer, Eduard A.; Seshan, Kulathuiyer; Brem, Gerrit

    2014-01-01

    Performance of a novel alumina-supported sodium carbonate catalyst was studied to produce a valuable bio-oil from catalytic flash pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass. Post treatment of biomass pyrolysis vapor was investigated in a catalyst fixed bed reactor at the downstream of the pyrolysis

  3. A two-parameter preliminary optimization study for a fluidized-bed boiler through a comprehensive mathematical simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabi, Jose A.; Souza-Santos, Marcio L. de [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia Mecanica. Dept. de Energia]. E-mails: jrabi@fem.unicamp.br; dss@fem.unicamp.br

    2000-07-01

    Modeling and simulation of fluidized-bed equipment have demonstrated their importance as a tool for design and optimization of industrial equipment. Accordingly, this work carries on an optimization study of a fluidized-bed boiler with the aid of a comprehensive mathematical simulator. The configuration data of the boiler are based on a particular Babcock and Wilcox Co. (USA) test unit. Due to their importance, the number of tubes in the bed section and the air excess are chosen as the parameters upon which the optimization study is based. On their turn, the fixed-carbon conversion factor and the boiler efficiency are chosen as two distinct optimization objectives. The results from both preliminary searches are compared. The present work is intended to be just a study on possible routes for future optimization of larger boilers. Nonetheless, the present discussion might give some insight on the equipment behavior. (author)

  4. Achievement report of projects in fiscal 2000 for measures on technologies to fix and utilize effectively carbon dioxide. Development of program system technologies to fix and utilize effectively carbon dioxide - researches on key technologies (Developing technology to fix carbon dioxide electrochemically); 2000 nendo program hoshiki nisanka tanso koteika yuko riyo gijutsu kaihatsu (kiban gijutsu kenkyu) seika hokokusho (kokaiyo). Nisanka tanso no denki kagakuteki koteika gijutsu no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    With an objective to prevent global warming, research and development has been made on a carbon dioxide fixation technology using electrochemical means. This paper summarizes the achievements in fiscal 2000. In the research of a technology to return carbon dioxide to hydrocarbon such as methane electrochemically utilizing the high concentration carbon dioxide-methanol system, basic studies were performed on electrolytic reduction of CO2 using a methanol solvent system, and experimental studies were executed on high-speed reduction of carbon dioxide using gas diffusion electrodes. In the basic property experiment on diamond electrodes, high carbon dioxide reduction activity was obtained by having copper carried in the diamond electrode. In the CO2 electrolytic reduction experiment on three-phase interface using a copper net electrode, CO, ethylene, and methane were produced, while the electrode has retained the activity for an extended period of time, and the CO2 conversion rate reached about 66%. In structuring an electrochemical carbon dioxide fixation system, specifications for the CO2 electrolytic reduction equipment were determined, design, manufacturing, and electrode materials were selected, supporting electrolytes were discussed, and the entire system flow and liquid resistance were discussed. (NEDO)

  5. Evaluation of SO{sub 2} oxidation and fly ash filtration by an activated carbon fluidized-bed reactor: The effects of acid modification, copper addition and operating condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jui-Yeh Rau; Hui-Hsin Tseng; Bo-Chin Chiang; Ming-Yen Wey; Min-Der Lin [National Chung Hsing University, Taichung (Taiwan). Department of Environmental Engineering

    2010-03-15

    It is expected that the simultaneous removal of acid gases and particles from flue gas, using a single process and at the same temperature, will become an economical, and thus, desirable option. Accordingly, this study investigates the potential for the utilization of a fluidized-bed adsorbent/catalyst reactor for the simultaneous removal of SO{sub 2} and fly ash from simulated flue gas. The operating conditions for the evaluation include: (1) different pre-treatments of the adsorbent/catalyst, (2) the operating parameters of adsorption/filtration and (3) the effects of simultaneous adsorption/filtration through the fluidized-bed reactor. Based on the experimental data gathered, the Broensted acid sites were formed on the surface of activated carbon (AC) support materials after modification with nitric or sulfuric acid and it acted as anchor. This characteristic accounts for the promotion of the effects of dispersion and adsorption of the adsorbent/catalyst. Moreover, the addition of copper facilitated the oxygen transfer of SO{sub 2} to the carbon matrix. The concentration of SO{sub 2} removed by the fluidized-bed adsorbent/catalyst reactor decreased from 17.9 to 14.2 mg SO{sub 2}/g of adsorbent after exposure to a high concentration of fly ash. Therefore, an acid-pre-treatment of the adsorbent/catalyst is required to hasten the removal of SO{sub 2} in the simulated flue gas. Our result shows that the acidic groups may facilitate the adsorbent/catalyst removal of SO{sub 2} when there exist high concentrations of fly ash in the flue gas. 50 refs., 11 figs., 4 tabs.

  6. The use of coal mining wastes in building road beds; Utilizacion de los Esteriles del Carbon como Materiales para Capas de Firmes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-31

    This project was aimed at carrying out a study in order to determine the nature and characteristics of coal mining wastes for its possible use in building road beds and to establish the acceptance, implementation and quality control criteria, which can be included in the Spanish General Technical Standard of Road and Bridges Works (PG-3). With that aim, six types of coal mining wastes were selected out of an inventory and several tests were conducted and following the results, the most appropriate coal mining wastes, the acceptance limits and the quality control tests to be applied to the materials obtained from coal mining wastes to road beds were established. A grinding and classification plant was designed in order to obtain the necessary granular materials for conducting real scale compaction tests in road stages. Several types of coal mining wastes were tested: red, black, treated (in the above mentioned plant) untreated, with different bed thickness and runs in the compactors. Likewise, laboratory tests were carried out on black and red coal mining wastes by adding binder materials. The results proved that coal mining wastes can be used as granular material for building different road beds, such as bound with cement, gravel-emulsion or on their own. As a result of this study 53,000 tons of black coal mining wastes mixed with 6% of cement as binder were used for building a 5 km stage of the Highway Oviedo-Mieres, as well as 16,000 tons of red coal mining wastes in the Ujo-Caborana road, which is still being used in the works carried out a present. (Author)

  7. Energetic, ecologic and fluid-dynamic analysis of a fluidized bed gasifier operating with sugar cane bagasse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diniz Filho, Paulo Tasso; Silveira, Jose Luz; Tuna, Celso Eduardo; Lamas, Wendell de Queiroz

    2013-01-01

    This work aims to study the thermodynamic, ecological and fluid-dynamic aspects of a circulating fluidized bed gasifier using sugar cane bagasse as biomass, in order to estimate a model of its normal operation. In the initial stage was analysed the composition of biomass selected (sugar cane bagasse) and its lower heating value (LHV) was calculated. The energy balance of the gasifier was done, being the volumetric flow of air, synthesis gas and biomass estimated. Also the power produced by this gasifier was theoretically estimated. Then the circulating fluidized bed gasifier was designed for operation with approximately 100 kg/h of processed biomass. Cross-sectional area of the reactor, feeder size, diameter of the exit zone of the gases and minimum height of the expanded bed were selected. Some bed gasifier hydrodynamic factors were also studied. The minimum fluidization velocity, fluidization terminal velocity, and average fluidizing velocity were calculated, in order to understand the fluid-dynamic behaviour of gasification of this fuel. It was obtained a theoretical model that can support a possible prototype of circulating fluidized bed gasifier biomass. Finally, there were studied the ecological aspects of the gasifier, through an overall methodology. Ecological efficiencies were estimated for two scenarios: first considering the carbon cycle and thereafter disregarding the carbon cycle. In both cases, it can be proved the ecological viability of the project. -- Highlights: • we develop a methodology to size a fluidized bed gasifier. • we validate this methodology comparing to a fixed bed gasifier values. • we aggregate ecological efficiency to this methodology

  8. An adsorption of carbon dioxide on activated carbon controlled by temperature swing adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomas, Korinek; Karel, Frana

    2017-09-01

    This work deals with a method of capturing carbon dioxide (CO2) in indoor air. Temperature Swing Adsorption (TSA) on solid adsorbent was chosen for CO2 capture. Commercial activated carbon (AC) in form of extruded pellets was used as a solid adsorbent. There was constructed a simple device to testing effectiveness of CO2 capture in a fixed bed with AC. The TSA cycle was also simulated using the open-source software OpenFOAM. There was a good agreement between results obtained from numerical simulations and experimental data for adsorption process.

  9. Investigation on the chemically fixing technique of carbon dioxide utilizing solar energy; Taiyo energy riyo ni yoru nisanka tanso no kagakuteki koteika gijutsu ni kansuru chosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-03-01

    This report describes the results of effective fixing technique of CO2 by utilizing solar energy. First of all, the investigation was directed to the technique for synthesizing ethylene, hydrocarbons and alcohol by electrochemical reduction of CO2. The power required for this process is supplied by photovoltaic power generation. Development of excellent electrode catalyst is needed because the reduction of CO2 requires a high overvoltage. It is desirable to enhance the selectivity of the reaction for specific material and improve the transport process in the electrolytic cell. Next, designing of material and reaction of photocatalysts using semiconductor electrode and semiconductor particulate was examined. A semiconductor electrode made of FeS2 is inexpensive and has a high ability of collecting solar light. In the category of photocatalysis system, a photocatalytic system in which semiconductor particles are embedded in vesicle and a photpocatalyst based on potassium niobate are noteworthy. As biosystem, the method of reducing CO2 by calcareous algae which simultaneously advances fixing and calcification of CO2 by photosynthesis is noteworthy. 129 refs., 45 figs., 20 tabs.

  10. Fluidized-bed firing of washery wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubin, Yu M; Gavrik, M V

    1978-01-01

    Tailings containing SiO2 (56.76%), A12O3 (25.63%), Fe2O3 (10.22%) plus CaO, MgO and SOat3 were fluidized at 1.7-2.0 m/s. This gives a uniform pressure of 6 kg-f/m2 at bed heights of 100 mm, though this is higher in the upper layers where the fine material tends to concentrate. The resistance of the bed is directly proportional to its height. Minimum oxygen, maximum carbon dioxide and maximum temperature are found in the section 250-300 mm above the grid (bed height 500 mm); in the upper zone of the bed, some decrease in temperature and carbon dioxide, and increase in oxygen are associated with the ingress of air through the discharge chute. Waste heat should be utilised to help to cover costs of desulphurising stack gases.

  11. Circulating fluidized bed reformer-regenerator system for hydrogen production from methane. Paper no. IGEC-1-092

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, P.; Elnashaie, S.S.E.H.

    2005-01-01

    Steam reforming is presently the principal route for large-scale hydrogen production from natural gas. This paper proposes a novel concept of a reactor-regenerator type circulating fluidized bed (Prasad and Elnashaie, 2002) for efficient production of hydrogen. Carbon is optimally allowed to form on the catalyst in the reactor section through methane cracking and Boudouard coking reactions, and the deactivated catalyst is regenerated in the regenerator by burning off the carbon. This concept of carbon formation and burning cannot be used in a fixed bed configuration but is possible in the proposed novel Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB) configuration, which employs a reactor-regenerator type of configuration. Allowing both carbon formation and steam reforming to occur simultaneously by introducing steam as part of the feed, gives more than 3 moles hydrogen per mole of methane at almost zero energy consumption. The steam can be fed as water at room temperature, and the hot catalyst returning from the regenerator can be used to vaporize it into steam. This route is the most efficient from both hydrogen yield and energy consumption points of view. This CFB configuration exhibits the bifurcation behavior and the present paper reports an investigation of its static bifurcation characteristics through a rigorous mathematical model. (author)

  12. Wood Combustion Behaviour in a Fixed Bed Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokit, Ernie Mat; Aziz, Azhar Abdul; Ghazali, Normah Mohd

    2010-06-01

    Waste wood is used as feedstock for Universiti Teknologi Malaysia's newly-developed two-stage incinerator system. The research goals are to optimize the operation of the thermal system to the primary chamber, to improve its combustion efficiency and to minimize its pollutants formation. The combustion process is evaluated with the variation of fuel's moisture content. For optimum operating condition, where the gasification efficiency is 95.53%, the moisture content of the fuel is best set at 17%; giving outlet operating temperature of 550°C and exhaust gas concentrations with 1213 ppm of CO, 6% of CO2 and 14% of O2 respectively. In line to the experimental work, a computational fluid dynamics software, Fluent is used to simulate the performance of the primary chamber. Here the predicted optimum gasification efficiency stands at 95.49% with CO, CO2 and O2 concentrations as 1301 ppm, 6.5% and 13.5% respectively.

  13. Direct Fixed-Bed Biological Perchlorate Destruction Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-01

    FXB effluent 1/2 hours Nitrate Depth wise sample ports 1/week On-site: In-line Hach NITRATAX nitrate probe daily using a Hach DR 890 colorimeter ...tank effluent 3/week On-site: Hach DR 890 Colorimeter TTHMs DBPFP5 tests 10 total DBPFP tests MWH HAA5 DBPFP tests 10 total DBPFP tests MWH FXB... Colorimeter FXB feed Daily 2 FXB effluent Daily Post-FXB effluent Daily pH Chlorine contact tank effluent Daily On-site: Hach pH probe Temperature

  14. Treatment of Mixed Wastes via Fixed Bed Gasification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1998-10-28

    This report outlines the details of research performed under USDOE Cooperative Agreement DE-FC21-96MC33258 to evaluate the ChemChar hazardous waste system for the destruction of mixed wastes, defined as those that contain both RCRA-regulated haz- ardous constituents and radionuclides. The ChemChar gasification system uses a granular carbonaceous char matrix to immobilize wastes and feed them into the gasifier. In the gasifier wastes are subjected to high temperature reducing conditions, which destroy the organic constituents and immobilize radionuclides on the regenerated char. Only about 10 percent of the char is consumed on each pass through the gasifier, and the regenerated char can be used to treat additional wastes. When tested on a 4-inch diameter scale with a continuous feed unit as part of this research, the ChemChar gasification system was found to be effective in destroying RCRA surrogate organic wastes (chlorobenzene, dichloroben- zene, and napht.halene) while retaining on the char RCRA heavy metals (chromium, nickel, lead, and cadmium) as well as a fission product surrogate (cesium) and a plutonium surrogate (cerium). No generation of harmful byproducts was observed. This report describes the design and testing of the ChemChar gasification system and gives the operating procedures to be followed in using the system safely and effectively for mixed waste treatment.

  15. Improvement of Combustion Characteristics in Fluidized Bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, H.S.; El Sourougy, M.R.; Faik, M.

    2009-01-01

    The present investigation is directed towards the experimental study of the effect of a new design of the bed temperature on the overall thermal efficiency and heat transfer by conduction, convection and radiation in gaseous fuel-fluidized bed combustion system. The experiments are performed on a water-cooled fluidized bed model furnace with cylindrical cross-section of 0.25 m diameter and its height is 0.60 m. the fluidising medium used is sand particles with average diameter 1.5 mm. The bed temperature is varied between 700 degree C and 1100 degree C. Measurements f carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide and oxygen concentrations are carried out by using water-cooled sampling probe, and infrared and paramagnetic analyzers. The results obtained show that the bed temperature, the total heat transfer to the wall and the bed combustion efficiency increase with the decrease of the air-fuel ratio. It is also found that 91% of the total heat transfer is in the fluidising part of the bed and most of this heat is transferred by convection from hot sand particles to the wall. Two empirical formulae for the calculation of the wall heat transfer coefficient and the particle convective heat transfer coefficient are proposed. A verification of the proposed empirical formulae is made by comparing the calculated values with the experimental results.

  16. Itegrated Test and Evaluation of a 4-Bed Molecular Sieve (4BMS) Carbon Dioxide Removtal System (CDRA), Mechanical Compressor Engineering Development Unit (EDU), and Sabitier Engineering Development Unit (EDU)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, James C.; Campbell, Melissa; Murdoch, Karen; Miller, Lee A.; Jeng, Frank

    2005-01-01

    Currently on the International Space Station s (ISS) U.S. Segment, carbon dioxide (CO2) scrubbed from the cabin by a 4-Bed Molecular Sieve (4BMS) Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) is vented overboard as a waste product. Likewise, the product hydrogen (H2) that will be generated by the Oxygen Generation Assembly (OGA) planned for installation will also be vented. A flight experiment has been proposed that will take the waste CO2 removed from the cabin, and via the catalytic Sabatier process, reduce it with waste H2 to generate water and methane. The water produced may provide cost and logistics savings for ISS by reducing the amount of water periodically re-supplied to orbit. To make this concept viable, a mechanical piston compressor and accumulator were developed for collecting and storing the CO2 from the CDRA. The compressor, accumulator and Sabatier system would be packaged together as one unit and referred to as the Carbon Dioxide Reduction Assembly (CRA). Testing was required to evaluate the performance of a 4BMS CDRA, compressor, accumulator, and Sabatier performance along with their operating rules when integrated together. This had been numerically modeled and simulated; however, testing was necessary to verify the results from the engineering analyses. Testing also allowed a better understanding of the practical inefficiencies and control issues involved in a fully integrated system versus the theoretical ideals in the model. This paper presents and discusses the results of an integrated engineering development unit test.

  17. The Fate and Transport of the SiO2 Nanoparticles in a Granular Activated Carbon Bed and Their Impact on the Removal of VOCs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adsorption isotherm, adsorption kinetics and column breakthrough experiments evaluating trichloroethylene (TCE) adsorption onto granular activated carbon (GAC) were conducted in the presence and absence of silica nanoparticles (SiO2 NPs). Zeta potential of the SiO

  18. Practice Hospital Bed Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Practice Hospital Bed Safety Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... It depends on the complexity of the bed." Safety Tips CDRH offers the following safety tips for ...

  19. Bed Bugs and Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bed bugs have long been a pest – feeding on blood, causing itchy bites and generally irritating their human hosts. They are successful hitchhikers, and can move from an infested site to furniture, bedding, baggage, boxes, and clothing.

  20. Kinetic study of the ethene oxidation by oxygen in the presence of carbon dioxide and steam over Pt/Rh/CeO2/g-Al2O3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nibbelke, R.H.; Kreijveld, R.J.M.; Hoebink, J.H.B.J.; Marin, G.B.M.M.; Kruse, N.

    1998-01-01

    The oxidation of ethene by oxygen in the presence of steam and carbon dioxide over a commercially available Pt/Rh/CeO2/¿-Al2O3 three-way automotive catalyst was studied. Experiments were carried out in a fixed-bed micro reactor under intrinsic conditions, i.e. in the absence of external and internal

  1. Updated Performance Evaluation of the ISS Water Processor Multifiltration Beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Elizabeth M.; Carter, Layne; Carpenter, Joyce; Orozco, Nicole; Weir, Natalee; Wilson, Mark

    2014-01-01

    The ISS Water Processor Assembly (WPA) produces potable water from a waste stream containing humidity condensate and urine distillate. The primary treatment process is achieved in the Multifiltration Beds, which include adsorbent media and ion exchange resin for the removal of dissolved organic and inorganic contaminants. Two Multifiltration Beds (MF Beds) were replaced on ISS in July 2010 after initial indication of inorganic breakthrough of the first bed and an increasing Total Organic Carbon (TOC) trend in the product water. The first bed was sampled and analyzed Sept 2011 through March 2012. The second MF Bed was sampled and analyzed June 2012 through August 2012. The water resident in the both beds was analyzed for various parameters to evaluate adsorbent loading, performance of the ion exchange resin, microbial activity, and generation of leachates from the ion exchange resin. Portions of the adsorbent media and ion exchange resin were sampled and subsequently desorbed to identify the primary contaminants removed at various points in the bed in addition to microbial analysis. Analysis of the second bed will be compared to results from the first bed to provide a comprehensive overview of how the Multifiltration Beds function on orbit. New data from the second bed supplements the analysis of the first bed (previously reported) and gives a more complete picture of breakthrough compounds, resin breakdown products, microbial activity, and difficult to remove compounds. The results of these investigations and implications to the operation of the WPA on ISS are documented in this paper.

  2. Molecular indicators for palaeoenvironmental change in a Messinian evaporitic sequence (Vena del Gesso, Italy). II: High-resolution variations in abundances and 13C contents of free and sulphur-bound carbon skeletons in a single marl bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenig, F.; Damste, J. S.; Frewin, N. L.; Hayes, J. M.; De Leeuw, J. W.

    1995-01-01

    The extractable organic matter of 10 immature samples from a marl bed of one evaporitic cycle of the Vena del Gesso sediments (Gessoso-solfifera Fm., Messinian, Italy) was analyzed quantitatively for free hydrocarbons and organic sulphur compounds. Nickel boride was used as a desulphurizing agent to recover sulphur-bound lipids from the polar and asphaltene fractions. Carbon isotopic compositions (delta vs PDB) of free hydrocarbons and of S-bound hydrocarbons were also measured. Relationships between these carbon skeletons, precursor biolipids, and the organisms producing them could then be examined. Concentrations of S-bound lipids and free hydrocarbons and their delta values were plotted vs depth in the marl bed and the profiles were interpreted in terms of variations in source organisms, 13 C contents of the carbon source, and environmentally induced changes in isotopic fractionation. The overall range of delta values measured was 24.7%, from -11.6% for a component derived from green sulphur bacteria (Chlorobiaceae) to -36.3% for a lipid derived from purple sulphur bacteria (Chromatiaceae). Deconvolution of mixtures of components deriving from multiple sources (green and purple sulphur bacteria, coccolithophorids, microalgae and higher plants) was sometimes possible because both quantitative and isotopic data were available and because either the free or S-bound pool sometimes appeared to contain material from a single source. Several free n-alkanes and S-bound lipids appeared to be specific products of upper-water-column primary producers (i.e. algae and cyanobacteria). Others derived from anaerobic photoautotrophs and from heterotrophic protozoa (ciliates), which apparently fed partly on Chlorobiaceae. Four groups of n-alkanes produced by algae or cyanobacteria were also recognized based on systematic variations of abundance and isotopic composition with depth. For hydrocarbons probably derived from microalgae, isotopic variations are well correlated with

  3. Testing of a new mining system performance at narrow coal bed; Ensayo de un sistema de arranque con cepillo mediante accionamiento hidraulico para capas estrechas de carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1999-09-01

    This researching project had the aim of: Testing a new mining system performance at narrow coal bed, which uses plough equipment with hydraulic driving devices. Minimising driving power group size to avoid problems regarding with the wall mining-heading transition, decreasing the needed room to house it and thus, simplifying wall mining edge support. The expected goals were: Take advantage of hydraulic driving devices to obtain a good efficiency with a variable and discontinuous load, but without loosing the electric driving devices advantages, consisting on increase driving torque, being the engine blocked Lengthen the mechanical equipment life (chains, driving sprockets, etc) Reach an economic production rate Researching project was developed in El Bierzo basin (leon, Spain), in Grupo Ampliacion, a mining group belonged to Viloria Hnos, S. A. (Author)

  4. Degree of functionalization and stability of fluorine groups fixed to carbon nanotubes and graphite nanoplates by CF{sub 4} microwave plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdelkader-Fernández, V.K.; Morales-Lara, F. [Departamento de Química Inorgánica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Granada, 18071 Granada (Spain); Melguizo, M.; García-Gallarín, C.; López-Garzón, R.; Godino-Salido, M.L. [Departamento de Química Inorgánica y Orgánica, Facultad de Ciencias Experimentales, Universidad de Jaén, 23071 Jaén (Spain); López-Garzón, F.J., E-mail: flopez@ugr.es [Departamento de Química Inorgánica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Granada, 18071 Granada (Spain); Domingo-García, M.; Pérez-Mendoza, M.J. [Departamento de Química Inorgánica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Granada, 18071 Granada (Spain)

    2015-12-01

    Highlights: • The surface area of GNPs and MWCNTs determines the degree of fluorination by plasma. • Fluorine is bound to carbon atoms in up to eight chemical environments. • The stability of the fluorine groups varies in a wide range of temperature. • The electronic properties of MWCNTs are changed as a consequence of fluorination. • The textural characteristics of the materials are not changed after fluorination. - Abstract: The fluorination of graphite nanoplates (GNPs) and multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) by CF{sub 4} cold plasma is reported. The aim is to analyze the influence of the textural characteristics in the degree of fluorination and in the thermal stability of the fluorine groups. We have used thermal programmed desorption which clearly discriminates the nature of the desorbing species and their stability. The degree of fluorination of both materials is similar up to 20 min of treatment and then it decreases in GNPs at longer treatments. Nevertheless, the fluorine content in MWCNTs keeps increasing after 45 min. This different evolution of the fluorination degree with the time is related to the surface areas. The fluorine bonding is produced not only in defects and irregularities but also on the external graphene sheets of both materials, and it results in up to eight different chemical environments having different thermal stabilities from 150 °C up to temperatures higher than 900 °C. The fluorination increases the electronic states near the Fermi level of the nanotubes whereas it does not affect the electronic properties of graphite nanoplates. It is shown that no intercalation compounds are formed and that the textural characteristics of the materials remain unchanged after fluorination.

  5. Secondary electron emission from a thin carbon foil induced by H+, He2+ and Li3+ at fixed velocity of 1 MeV/u

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, H.; Sorai, K.; Amano, S.; Ishii, K.; Kaneko, T.

    2013-01-01

    The statistical distributions of the number of forward- and backward-emitted secondary electrons (SE’s) from a thin carbon foil have been measured simultaneously in coincidence with foil-transmitted H + , He 2+ and Li 3+ ions of 1 MeV/u in order to examine the forward–backward correlation of the SE emission (refer to as ‘FB correlation’ hereafter). With these projectiles, we have also measured the energy spectrum of SEs emitted from another carbon foil of similar thickness in the direction around 0° with respect to the incident beams. From the emission statistics data, it is found that both of the inclusive forward and backward SE yields divided by the square of the projectile atomic number (Z p ) decrease with increasing Z p . This trend is qualitatively consistent with previous works by other authors. On the other hand, it has been certified from the energy spectra that the yields of binary electron scale well with Z p 2 . As for the FB correlation, the forward- or backward-emitted SE yield decreases gradually with increasing the number of SEs emitted in the opposite directions. This so-called ‘negative FB correlation’ appears to be pronounced for He 2+ and Li 3+ ions compared with that for H + ions. Since low energy internal SEs do not contribute to the FB correlation, the observed Z p -dependent FB correlation seems to be consistent with the well Z p 2 -scaled production of high energy internal SEs and the decrease of the inclusive forward and backward SE yields with respect to this scaling

  6. Packed-Bed Reactor Study of NETL Sample 196c for the Removal of Carbon Dioxide from Simulated Flue Gas Mixture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, James S.; Hammache, Sonia; Gray, McMahan L.; Fauth Daniel J.; Pennline, Henry W.

    2012-04-24

    An amine-based solid sorbent process to remove CO2 from flue gas has been investigated. The sorbent consists of polyethylenimine (PEI) immobilized onto silica (SiO2) support. Experiments were conducted in a packed-bed reactor and exit gas composition was monitored using mass spectrometry. The effects of feed gas composition (CO2 and H2O), temperature, and simulated steam regeneration were examined for both the silica support as well as the PEI-based sorbent. The artifact of the empty reactor was also quantified. Sorbent CO2 capacity loading was compared to thermogravimetric (TGA) results to further characterize adsorption isotherms and better define CO2 working capacity. Sorbent stability was monitored by periodically repeating baseline conditions throughout the parametric testing and replacing with fresh sorbent as needed. The concept of the Basic Immobilized Amine Sorbent (BIAS) Process using this sorbent within a system where sorbent continuously flows between the absorber and regenerator was introduced. The basic tenet is to manipulate or control the level of moisture on the sorbent as it travels around the sorbent circulation path between absorption and regeneration stages to minimize its effect on regeneration heat duty.

  7. Impacts of backwashing on granular activated carbon filters for advanced wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Joshua; Ruhl, Aki Sebastian; Jekel, Martin

    2015-12-15

    The use of granular activated carbon (GAC) in fixed bed filters is a promising option for the removal of organic micropollutants (OMP) from wastewater treatment plant effluents. Frequent backwashing of the filter bed is inevitable, but its effect on potential filter stratification is not well understood yet and thus has been evaluated in the present study for two commercial GAC products. Backwashing of GAC filters was simulated with 10 or 100 filter bed expansions of 20 or 100% at backwash velocities of 12 and 40 m/h, respectively. Five vertical fractions were extracted and revealed a vertical stratification according to grain sizes and material densities. Sieve analyses indicated increasing grain sizes towards the bottom for one GAC while grain sizes of the other GAC were more homogeneously distributed throughout the filter bed. The apparent densities of the top sections were significantly lower than that of the bottom sections of both products. Comparative long term fixed bed adsorption experiments with the top and bottom sections of the stratified GAC showed remarkable differences in breakthrough curves of dissolved organic carbon, UV light absorption at 254 nm wavelength (UVA254) and OMP. GAC from the upper section showed constantly better removal efficiencies than GAC from the bottom section, especially for weakly adsorbing OMP such as sulfamethoxazole. Furthermore correlations between UVA254 reductions and OMP removals were found. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Biossorção de níquel e cromo de um efluente de galvanoplastia utilizando alga marinha pré-tratada em coluna = Biosorption of nickel and chromium from a galvanization effluent using seaweed pre-treated on a fixed-bed column

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia Teresinha Veit

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho teve por objetivo o estudo da biossorção dos íons cromo e níquel presentes no efluente do processo de uma indústria de galvanoplastia, utilizando como biossorvente a biomassa de alga marinha pré-tratada Sargassum filipendula. As condições deoperação da coluna foram: massa de biossorvente de 8 g, pH do efluente de alimentação 3,85, temperatura de 30ºC, vazão de 6 mL min.-1 e concentrações iniciais de alimentação (cromo+níquel de 7,12 e 3,66 meq L-1. Foi empregado um modelo matemático para representar a dinâmica da biossorção em coluna de leito fixo. O modelo da isotermamulticomponente de Langmuir (qm= 2,78 meq g-1, bCr = 0,85 L meq-1, bNi = 0,08 L meq-1 foi utilizado para representar os dados de equilíbrio da coluna e para simular a dinâmica de biossorção dos íons. Os resultados da simulação demonstraram que o modelo matemáticoempregado foi capaz de descrever satisfatoriamente a complexa dinâmica de biossorção dos íons presentes no efluente.This work investigated the biosorption of chromium (III and nickel (II present in the effluent of a galvanoplasty plant using the pre-treated biomass of Sargassum filipendula seaweed. The column operation conditions were 8 g of biosorbent mass, 3.85 pH for the feed effluent, 30ºC temperature, 6 mL min.-1 flow rate, 7.12 meq L-1 initial chromium concentration and 3.66 meq L-1 initialnickel concentration. A mathematical model was used to represent the dynamics of biosorption of the metals in a fixed-bed column. The Langmuir multicomponent isotherm model (qm = 2.78 meq g-1, bCr = 0.85 L meq-1, bNi = 0.08 L meq-1 was used to represent the equilibrium data of the column and to simulate the biosorption dynamics of the ions. The simulation results showed that the mathematical model described satisfactory the complex binary biosorption of chromium and nickel in the effluent.

  9. Fluid-bed combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunt, G.; Schoebotham, N.

    1981-02-01

    In Energy Equipment Company's two-stage fluidized bed system, partial combustion in a fluidized bed is followed by burn-off of the generated gases above the bed. The system can be retrofitted to existing boilers, and can burn small, high ash coal efficiently. It has advantages when used as a hot gas generator for process drying. Tests on a boiler at a Cadbury Schweppes plant are reported.

  10. Report of the results of the fiscal 1997 regional consortium R and D project. Regional consortium field / Development of technology to treat aquatic environment by using microorganisms fixed on carbon fabrics (abbreviation: carbon/aquatic environment project) (first fiscal year); 1997 nendo chiiki consortium kenkyu kaihatsu jigyo. Chiiki consortium bun`ya / tanso sen`i nansoshiki eno biseibutsu kochaku gensho wo riyoshita mizukankyo seibi gijutsu no kaihatsu (ryakusho: tanso mizu kankyo project) daiichi nendo seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    Out of the development of technology to arrange the aquatic environment using phenomena of microorganism fixation on carbon fiber soft textures, the paper stated the fiscal 1997 result. On carbon fibers in a state of swaying in water, microorganisms in water fix in an amazingly large quantity. A catalog was compiled of 58 kinds of carbon fabrics trially woven and knitted. When carbon fiber is used as activated sludge carrier, activity of microorganism lasts more than one year. Only a little amount of surplus sludge is generated. The fixed microorganisms are more active in case of carbon fiber than in case of nylon and polyester fibers. Fiber texture models of carbon fiber fixing activated sludge groups were proposed. By pump operation, the water flow inside/outside microorganism groups is being accelerated. Several new strains of bacillus carboniphilus were isolated/identified from soil and marsh. To grasp relationships of characteristics among three elements such as the state of aquatic environment, fiber, and microorganism group, the experiment was prepared. Preliminary work is conducted to derive a simple equation for facility design, and experimental directions to obtain design conditions were proposed. 6 refs., 166 figs., 47 tabs.

  11. Fluidised bed combustion system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKenzie, E.C.

    1976-01-01

    Fluidized bed combustion systems that facilitates the maintenance of the depth of the bed are described. A discharge pipe projects upwardly into the bed so that bed material can flow into its upper end and escape downwardly. The end of the pipe is surrounded by an enclosure and air is discharged into the enclosure so that material will enter the pipe from within the enclosure and have been cooled in the enclosure by the air discharged into it. The walls of the enclosure may themselves be cooled

  12. Fuel rod fixing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christiansen, D.W.

    1982-01-01

    This is a reusable system for fixing a nuclear reactor fuel rod to a support. An interlock cap is fixed to the fuel rod and an interlock strip is fixed to the support. The interlock cap has two opposed fingers, which are shaped so that a base is formed with a body part. The interlock strip has an extension, which is shaped so that this is rigidly fixed to the body part of the base. The fingers of the interlock cap are elastic in bending. To fix it, the interlock cap is pushed longitudinally on to the interlock strip, which causes the extension to bend the fingers open in order to engage with the body part of the base. To remove it, the procedure is reversed. (orig.) [de

  13. Modeling N2O Reduction and Decomposition in a Circulating Fluidized bed Boiler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsson, Jan Erik; Åmand, Lars-Erik; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    1996-01-01

    The N2O concentration was measured in a circulating fluidized bed boiler of commercial size. Kinetics for N2O reduction by char and catalytic reduction and decomposition over bed material from the combustor were determined in a laboratory fixed bed reactor. The destruction rate of N2O in the comb......The N2O concentration was measured in a circulating fluidized bed boiler of commercial size. Kinetics for N2O reduction by char and catalytic reduction and decomposition over bed material from the combustor were determined in a laboratory fixed bed reactor. The destruction rate of N2O...... in the combustion chamber and the cyclone was calculated taking three mechanisms into account: Reduction by char, catalytic decomposition over bed material and thermal decomposition. The calculated destruction rate was in good agreement with the measured destruction of N2O injected at different levels in the boiler...

  14. Effects of combustion temperature on air emissions and support fuel consumption in full scale fluidized bed sludge incineration: with particular focus on nitrogen oxides and total organic carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löschau, Margit

    2018-04-01

    This article describes a pilot test at a sewage sludge incineration plant and shows its results considering the impacts of reducing the minimum combustion temperature from 850°C to 800°C. The lowering leads to an actual reduction of the average combustion temperature by 25 K and a significant reduction in the fuel oil consumption for support firing. The test shall be used for providing evidence that the changed combustion conditions do not result in higher air pollutant emissions. The analysis focusses on the effects of the combustion temperature on nitrogen oxides (NO x ) and total organic carbon emissions. The evaluation of all continuously monitored emissions shows reduced emission levels compared to the previous years, especially for NO x .

  15. Fluidized bed incinerator development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziegler, D.L.; Johnson, A.J.

    1976-01-01

    A fluidized bed incinerator is being developed for burning rad contaminated solid and liquid waste materials. In situ neutralization of acid gases by the bed material, catalytic afterburning, and gas filtration are used to produce a clean flue gas without the use of aqueous scrubbing

  16. Breakthrough Curve Analysis for Column Dynamics Sorption of Mn(II Ions from Wastewater by Using Mangostana garcinia Peel-Based Granular-Activated Carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Z. Chowdhury

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The potential of granular-activated carbon (GAC derived from agrowaste of Mangostene (Mangostana garcinia fruit peel was investigated in batch and fixed bed system as a replacement of current expensive methods for treating wastewater contaminated by manganese, Mn(II cations. Batch equilibrium data was analyzed by Langmuir, Freundlich, and Temkin isotherm models at different temperatures. The effect of inlet metal ion concentration (50 mg/L, 70 mg/L, and 100 mg/L, feed flow rate (1 mL/min and 3 mL/min, and activated carbon bed height (4.5 cm and 3 cm on the breakthrough characteristics of the fixed bed sorption system were determined. The adsorption data were fitted with well-established column models, namely, Thomas, Yoon-Nelson, and Adams-Bohart. The results were best-fitted with Thomas and Yoon-Nelson models rather than Adams-Bohart model for all conditions. The column had been regenerated and reused consecutively for five cycles. The results demonstrated that the prepared activated carbon was suitable for removal of Mn(II ions from wastewater using batch as well as fixed bed sorption system.

  17. Modeling the supercritical desorption of orange essential oil from a silica-gel bed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva E.A.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important byproducts of the orange juice industry is the oil phase. This is a mixture of terpenes, alcohols, and aldehydes, dissolved in approximately 96% limonene. To satisfactorily use oil phase as an ingredient in the food and cosmetics industries separation of the limonene is required. One possibility is to use a fixed bed of silica gel to remove the light or aroma compounds from the limonene. The aroma substances are then extracted from the bed of silica gel using supercritical carbon dioxide. This work deals with the modeling of the desorption step of the process using mass balance equations coupled with the Langmuir equilibrium isotherm. Data taken from the literature for the overall extraction curves were used together with empirical correlations to calculate the concentration profile of solute in the supercritical phase at the bed outlet. The system of equations was solved by the finite volume technique. The overall extraction curves calculated were in good agreement with the experimental ones.

  18. Wave Driven Fluid-Sediment Interactions over Rippled Beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Diane; Nichols, Claire

    2008-11-01

    Empirical investigations relating vortex shedding over rippled beds to oscillatory flows date back to Darwin in 1883. Observations of the shedding induced by oscillating forcing over fixed beds have shown vortical structures to reach maximum strength at 90 degrees when the horizontal velocity is largest. The objective of this effort is to examine the vortex generation and ejection over movable rippled beds in a full-scale, free surface wave environment. Observations of the two-dimensional time-varying velocity field over a movable sediment bed were obtained with a submersible Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) system in two wave flumes. One wave flume was full scale and had a natural sand bed and the other flume had an artificial sediment bed with a specific gravity of 1.6. Full scale observations over an irregularly rippled bed show that the vortices generated during offshore directed flow over the steeper bed form slope were regularly ejected into the water column and were consistent with conceptual models of the oscillatory flow over a backward facing step. The results also show that vortices remain coherent during ejection when the background flow stalls (i.e. both the velocity and acceleration temporarily approach zero). These results offer new insight into fluid sediment interaction over rippled beds.

  19. Fixed automated spray technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-19

    This research project evaluated the construction and performance of Boschungs Fixed Automated : Spray Technology (FAST) system. The FAST system automatically sprays de-icing material on : the bridge when icing conditions are about to occur. The FA...

  20. Fixed mobile convergence handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Ahson, Syed A

    2010-01-01

    From basic concepts to future directions, this handbook provides technical information on all aspects of fixed-mobile convergence (FMC). The book examines such topics as integrated management architecture, business trends and strategic implications for service providers, personal area networks, mobile controlled handover methods, SIP-based session mobility, and supervisory and notification aggregator service. Case studies are used to illustrate technical and systematic implementation of unified and rationalized internet access by fixed-mobile network convergence. The text examines the technolo

  1. A review of activated carbon technologies for reducing MSW incinerator emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, M.J.

    1991-01-01

    Though activated carbon is, by no means, a newcomer to the pollution control field, having been used as a water purifier and more recently demonstrated as a flue gas cleaner on power plants, it is now attracting considerable attention in Europe as a means to reduce further the quantity of toxic organic and metal emissions from new and existing municipal waste combustors. Since activated carbon is a potentially important future emissions control technology for MWCs in the US, particularly for removal of mercury and dioxin, this paper discusses the impetus which has motivated the experimentation with various activated carbon technologies which is now taking place, will describe how some of the activated carbon systems (e.g., post-emissions control fixed carbon bed and injection of carbon with scrubber reagent) being tested now function and where they fit in existing pollution control trains, and will present available performance data and emissions reductions actually achieved for each system

  2. Effect of bed particles to combustion of gases in fluidized bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raiko, R.; Wallen, V.; Etelaeaho, R.; Correia, S. [Tampere Univ. of Technology (Finland). Energy and Process Engineering

    1997-10-01

    The objective of this project was to obtain experimental data on effects of sand particles to the combustion of gases. The effect of the surface area of the particles was tested using different sized particles. The fluidized bed reactor used in these experiments was a stainless-steel tube with an internal diameter of 42 mm surrounded by an electric heater. The test rig was built in the Laboratory of Energy and Process Engineering at Tampere University of Technology. In order to elucidate the possible changes of particle surface, microscopic and porosimetric studies were conducted with both fresh bed particles and used bed particles. These measurements indicate that carbon monoxide significantly reacts with oxygen in the particulate or emulsion phase of a fluidized bed, if the residence time is long enough. The reaction rate depends mainly on temperature, air coefficient, residence time and particle size of the solids. It seems that the combustion enhances if the average particle size increases. Whether this is caused by increased free path length or reduced specific surface area of the bed is yet unknown. The first might be more probable cause because the majority of reactions often took place in the freeboard right above the bed. It was clear that the bed hindered proper combustion in several cases. (orig.)

  3. Thermal enhancement cartridge heater modified (TECH Mod) tritium hydride bed development, Part 1 - Design and fabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, J.E.; Estochen, E.G. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC (United States)

    2015-03-15

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) tritium facilities have used first generation (Gen1) LaNi{sub 4.25}Al{sub 0.75} (LANA0.75) metal hydride storage beds for tritium absorption, storage, and desorption. The Gen1 design utilizes hot and cold nitrogen supplies to thermally cycle these beds. Second and third generation (Gen2 and Gen3) storage bed designs include heat conducting foam and divider plates to spatially fix the hydride within the bed. For thermal cycling, the Gen2 and Gen3 beds utilize internal electric heaters and glovebox atmosphere flow over the bed inside the bed external jacket for cooling. The currently installed Gen1 beds require replacement due to tritium aging effects on the LANA0.75 material, and cannot be replaced with Gen2 or Gen3 beds due to different designs of these beds. At the end of service life, Gen1 bed desorption efficiencies are limited by the upper temperature of hot nitrogen supply. To increase end-of-life desorption efficiency, the Gen1 bed design was modified, and a Thermal Enhancement Cartridge Heater Modified (TECH Mod) bed was developed. Internal electric cartridge heaters in the new design to improve end-of-life desorption, and also permit in-bed tritium accountability (IBA) calibration measurements to be made without the use of process tritium. Additional enhancements implemented into the TECH Mod design are also discussed. (authors)

  4. Bed Bugs FAQs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Europe. Bed bugs have been found in five-star hotels and resorts and their presence is not ... Health – Division of Parasitic Diseases Email Recommend Tweet YouTube Instagram Listen Watch RSS ABOUT About CDC Jobs ...

  5. Bed Bug Information Clearinghouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Its purpose is to help states, communities, and consumers in efforts to prevent and control bed bug infestations. Currently includes only reviewed material from federal/state/local government agencies, extension services, and universities.

  6. Particle fuel bed tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horn, F.L.; Powell, J.R.; Savino, J.M.

    1985-01-01

    Gas-cooled reactors, using packed beds of small diameter coated fuel particles have been proposed for compact, high-power systems. The particulate fuel used in the tests was 800 microns in diameter, consisting of a thoria kernel coated with 200 microns of pyrocarbon. Typically, the bed of fuel particles was contained in a ceramic cylinder with porous metallic frits at each end. A dc voltage was applied to the metallic frits and the resulting electric current heated the bed. Heat was removed by passing coolant (helium or hydrogen) through the bed. Candidate frit materials, rhenium, nickel, zirconium carbide, and zirconium oxide were unaffected, while tungsten and tungsten-rhenium lost weight and strength. Zirconium-carbide particles were tested at 2000 K in H 2 for 12 hours with no visible reaction or weight loss

  7. Fluidized bed selective pyrolysis of coal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Jer Y.; Cha, Chang Y.; Merriam, Norman W.

    1992-01-01

    The present invention discloses a process for the pyrolysis of coal which comprises the effective utilization of two zonal inclined fluidized beds, where said zones can be selectively controlled as to temperature and heating rate. The first zonal inclined fluidized bed serves as a dryer for crushed coal and additionally is controlled to selectively pyrolyze said coal producing substantially carbon dioxide for recycle use. The second zonal inclined fluidized bed further pyrolyzes the coal to gaseous, liquid and char products under controlled temperature and heating rate zones designed to economically integrate the product mix. The gas and liquid products are recovered from the gaseous effluent stream while the char which remains can be further treated or utilized in a subsequent process step.

  8. Modelling of N2O Reduction in a Circulating Fluidized Bed Boiler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsson, Jan Erik; Åmand, Lars Erik; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    1996-01-01

    The addition of limestone for sulphur retention in Fluidized Bed Combustion (FBC) has been observed to influence the emission of N2O, and in many cases a lower emission was observed. The catalytic activity of a Danish limestone (Stevns Chalk) for decomposition of N2O in a laboratory fixed bed qua...

  9. Application of semifluidized bed bioreactor as novel bioreactor ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The conventional bioreactors such as pond digester, anaerobic filtration, up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB), up-flow anaerobic sludge fixed-film (UASFF), continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR), anaerobic contact digestion and fluidized bed, used over the past decades are largely operated anaerobically. They have ...

  10. The thermal conductivity of beds of spheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McElroy, D.L.; Weaver, F.J.; Shapiro, M.; Longest, A.W.; Yarbrough, D.W.

    1987-01-01

    The thermal conductivities (k) of beds of solid and hollow microspheres were measured using two radial heat flow techniques. One technique provided k-data at 300 K for beds with the void spaces between particles filled with argon, nitrogen, or helium from 5 kPa to 30 MPa. The other technique provided k-data with air at atmospheric pressure from 300 to 1000 K. The 300 K technique was used to study bed systems with high k-values that can be varied by changing the gas type and gas pressure. Such systems can be used to control the operating temperature of an irradiation capsule. The systems studied included beds of 500 μm dia solid Al 2 O 3 , the same Al 2 O 3 spheres mixed with spheres of silica--alumina or with SiC shards, carbon spheres, and nickel spheres. Both techniques were used to determine the k-value of beds of hollow spheres with solid shells of Al 2 O 3 , Al 2 O 3 /center dot/7 w/o Cr 2 O 3 , and partially stabilized ZrO 2 . The hollow microspheres had diameters from 2100 to 3500 μm and wall thicknesses from 80 to 160 μm. 12 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs

  11. Least fixed points revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.W. de Bakker (Jaco)

    1975-01-01

    textabstractParameter mechanisms for recursive procedures are investigated. Contrary to the view of Manna et al., it is argued that both call-by-value and call-by-name mechanisms yield the least fixed points of the functionals determined by the bodies of the procedures concerned. These functionals

  12. Characterizing fixed points

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjo Zlobec

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available A set of sufficient conditions which guarantee the existence of a point x⋆ such that f(x⋆ = x⋆ is called a "fixed point theorem". Many such theorems are named after well-known mathematicians and economists. Fixed point theorems are among most useful ones in applied mathematics, especially in economics and game theory. Particularly important theorem in these areas is Kakutani's fixed point theorem which ensures existence of fixed point for point-to-set mappings, e.g., [2, 3, 4]. John Nash developed and applied Kakutani's ideas to prove the existence of (what became known as "Nash equilibrium" for finite games with mixed strategies for any number of players. This work earned him a Nobel Prize in Economics that he shared with two mathematicians. Nash's life was dramatized in the movie "Beautiful Mind" in 2001. In this paper, we approach the system f(x = x differently. Instead of studying existence of its solutions our objective is to determine conditions which are both necessary and sufficient that an arbitrary point x⋆ is a fixed point, i.e., that it satisfies f(x⋆ = x⋆. The existence of solutions for continuous function f of the single variable is easy to establish using the Intermediate Value Theorem of Calculus. However, characterizing fixed points x⋆, i.e., providing answers to the question of finding both necessary and sufficient conditions for an arbitrary given x⋆ to satisfy f(x⋆ = x⋆, is not simple even for functions of the single variable. It is possible that constructive answers do not exist. Our objective is to find them. Our work may require some less familiar tools. One of these might be the "quadratic envelope characterization of zero-derivative point" recalled in the next section. The results are taken from the author's current research project "Studying the Essence of Fixed Points". They are believed to be original. The author has received several feedbacks on the preliminary report and on parts of the project

  13. Pebble-bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lohnert, G.; Mueller-Frank, U.; Heil, J.

    1976-01-01

    A pebble-bed nuclear reactor of large power rating comprises a container having a funnel-shaped bottom forming a pebble run-out having a centrally positioned outlet. A bed of downwardly-flowing substantially spherical nuclear fuel pebbles is positioned in the container and forms a reactive nuclear core maintained by feeding unused pebbles to the bed's top surface while used or burned-out pebbles run out and discharge through the outlet. A substantially conical body with its apex pointing upwardly and its periphery spaced from the periphery of the container spreads the bottom of the bed outwardly to provide an annular flow down the funnel-shaped bottom forming the runout, to the discharge outlet. This provides a largely constant downward velocity of the spheres throughout the diameter of the bed throughout a substantial portion of the down travel, so that all spheres reach about the same burned-out condition when they leave the core, after a single pass through the core area

  14. Fluidised bed heat exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliott, D.E.; Healey, E.M.; Roberts, A.G.

    1974-01-01

    Problems that have arisen during the initial stages of development of fluidised bed boilers in which heat transfer surfaces are immersed in fluidised solids are discussed. The very high heat transfer coefficients that are obtained under these conditions can be exploited to reduce the total heat transfer surface to a fraction of that in normal boilers. However, with the high heat flux levels involved, tube stressing becomes more important and it is advantageous to use smaller diameter tubes. One of the initial problems was that the pumping power absorbed by the fluidised bed appeared to be high. The relative influence of the fluidising velocity (and the corresponding bed area), tube diameter, tube spacing, heat transfer coefficient and bed temperature on pumping power and overall cost was determined. This showed the importance of close tube packing and research was undertaken to see if this would adversely affect the heat transfer coefficient. Pressure operation also reduces the pumping power. Fouling and corrosion tests in beds burning coal suggest that higher temperatures could be reached reliably and cost studies show that, provided the better refractory metals are used, the cost of achieving higher temperatures is not unduly high. It now remains to demonstrate at large scale that the proposed systems are viable and that the methods incorporated to overcome start up and part lead running problems are satisfactory. The promising role of these heat transfer techniques in other applications is briefly discussed

  15. Characterization of ashes from a 100 kWth pilot-scale circulating fluidized bed with oxy-fuel combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Y.H.; Wang, C.B.; Tan, Y.W.; Jia, L.F.; Anthony, E.J. [Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2011-09-15

    Oxy-fuel combustion experiments have been carried out on an oxygen-fired 100 kW(th) mini-circulating fluidized bed combustion (CFBC) facility. Coal and petroleum coke were used as fuel together with different limestones (and fixed Ca:S molar ratios) premixed with the fuel, for in situ SO{sub 2} capture. The bed ash (BA) and fly ash (FA) samples produced from this unit were collected and characterized to obtain physical and chemical properties of the ash samples. The characterization methods used included X-ray fluorescence (XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD), char carbon and free lime analysis, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and surface analysis. The main purpose of this work is to characterize the CFBC ashes from oxy-fuel firing to obtain a better understanding of the combustion process, and to identify any significant differences from the ash generated by a conventional air-fired CFBC. The primary difference in the sulfur capture mechanism between atmospheric air-fired and oxy-fuel FBC, at typical FBC temperatures (similar to 850{sup o}C), is that, in the air-fired case the limestone sorbents calcine, whereas the partial pressure of CO{sub 2} in oxy-fuel FBC is high enough to prevent calcination, and hence the sulfation process should mimic that seen in pressurized FBC (PFBC). Here, the char carbon content in the fly ash was much higher than that in the bed ash, and was also high by comparison with ash obtained from conventional commercial air-firing CFBC units. In addition, measurements of the free lime content in the bed and fly ash showed that the unreacted Ca sorbent was present primarily as CaCO{sub 3}, indicating that sulfur capture in the oxy-fuel combustor occurred via direct sulfation.

  16. in Spouted Bed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bronislaw Buczek

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Samples of active coke, fresh and spent after cleaning flue gases from communal waste incinerators, were investigated. The outer layers of both coke particles were separately removed by comminution in a spouted bed. The samples of both active cokes were analysed by means of densities, mercury porosimetry, and adsorption technique. Remaining cores were examined to determine the degree of consumption of coke by the sorption of hazardous emissions (SO2, HCl, and heavy metals through its bed. Differences in contamination levels within the porous structure of the particles were estimated. The study demonstrated the effectiveness of commercial active coke in the cleaning of flue gases.

  17. The Safety of Hospital Beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gervais, Pierre; Pooler, Charlotte; Merryweather, Andrew; Doig, Alexa K.; Bloswick, Donald

    2015-01-01

    To explore the safety of the standard and the low hospital bed, we report on a microanalysis of 15 patients’ ability to ingress, move about the bed, and egress. The 15 participants were purposefully selected with various disabilities. Bed conditions were randomized with side rails up or down and one low bed with side rails down. We explored the patients’ use of the side rails, bed height, ability to lift their legs onto the mattress, and ability to turn, egress, and walk back to the chair. The standard bed was too high for some participants, both for ingress and egress. Side rails were used by most participants when entering, turning in bed, and exiting. We recommend that side rails be reconsidered as a means to facilitate in-bed movement, ingress, and egress. Furthermore, single deck height settings for all patients are not optimal. Low beds as a safety measure must be re-evaluated. PMID:28462302

  18. Vilified and Fixed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Thessa; Westberg, Lysa

    , and imbalances of power between scholars and journalists on one side, and fans on the other are not rare occurrences. An analysis of a number of recent news articles, scholarly works, and websites, shows how the attempt of fixing fandom still prevails. Like Said's view on how the Orient is treated, fandom...... and tween website", 'Teen' managed to outrage fans. It took days and hundreds of comments, tweets, and mails to the publishers, before the article was taken down. Vilification in scholarly works and the media may have significantly lessened in recent years. Still, misunderstandings, applied exoticism...... is similarly exotisised, incorporated, and fixed. Scholars explain how to become better fans, attempting authority over fandom by applying rules to a culture, which already has their own. This, the notion of the 'better fan', devalues the existing discourses, rules, and traditions within fandom. The expert...

  19. Inclined fluidized bed system for drying fine coal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Chang Y.; Merriam, Norman W.; Boysen, John E.

    1992-02-11

    Coal is processed in an inclined fluidized bed dryer operated in a plug-flow manner with zonal temperature and composition control, and an inert fluidizing gas, such as carbon dioxide or combustion gas. Recycled carbon dioxide, which is used for drying, pyrolysis, quenching, and cooling, is produced by partial decarboxylation of the coal. The coal is heated sufficiently to mobilize coal tar by further pyrolysis, which seals micropores upon quenching. Further cooling with carbon dioxide enhances stabilization.

  20. Vapor mercury uptake with sulphur impregnated active carbons derived using sulphur dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tong, S.; Methta, H.; Ahmed, I.; Morris, E.; Fuentes de Maria, L.; Jia, C.Q.

    2008-01-01

    Active carbon adsorption is the primary technology used for removal of vapour mercury from flue gases in coal-fired power plants, municipal solid waste combustors, and other sources. It can be carried out using two different processes, notably injection of powder active carbon into flue gas streams upstream of the particulate collection devices, and filtration with a granular active carbon fixed bed downstream of the flue gas desulphurization units and/or particulate collectors. This paper presented an investigation of vapour mercury uptake performance of laboratory-made sulphur impregnated active carbons (SIACs) using a fixed bed reactor in a temperature range of 25 to 200 degrees Celsius. The materials and methods as well as the properties of activated carbons studied were presented. The experimental set-up was also described. The paper discussed the effects of initial concentration, the flow rate, the loading amount of SIACs, temperature, and the sulphur impregnation on the mercury uptake performance. The study showed that SIACs produced with sulphur dioxide exhibited a more complicated behaviour when temperature was varied, implying a mixed adsorption mechanism. 10 refs., 3 tabs., 8 figs