WorldWideScience

Sample records for carbon film deposition

  1. Hard Carbon Films Deposited under Various Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, M.-K.; Chen, S.-C.; Wu, T. C.; Lee, Sanboh

    1998-03-01

    Using a carbon target ablated with an XeCl-excimer laser under various gas atmospheres at different pressures, hard carbon was deposited on silicon, iron and tungsten carbide substrates. The hardness, friction coefficient, and wear rate of the film against steel are better than pure substrate material, respectively, so that it has potential to be used as a protective coating for micromechanical elements. The influences of gas pressure, gas atmosphere, and power density of laser irradiation on the thermal stability of film were analyzed by means of Raman-spectroscope, time-of-flight method, and optical emission spectrum. It was found that the film deposited under higher pressure has less diamond-like character. The film deposited under rest gas or argon atmosphere was very unstable and looked like a little graphite-like character. The film deposited at high vacuum (10-5 mbar rest gas) was the most stable and looked like the most diamond-like character. The film deposited at higher power density was more diamond-like than that at lower power density.

  2. Coaxial carbon plasma gun deposition of amorphous carbon films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sater, D. M.; Gulino, D. A.; Rutledge, S. K.

    1984-01-01

    A unique plasma gun employing coaxial carbon electrodes was used in an attempt to deposit thin films of amorphous diamond-like carbon. A number of different structural, compositional, and electrical characterization techniques were used to characterize these films. These included scanning electron microscopy, scanning transmission electron microscopy, X ray diffraction and absorption, spectrographic analysis, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and selected area electron diffraction. Optical absorption and electrical resistivity measurements were also performed. The films were determined to be primarily amorphous, with poor adhesion to fused silica substrates. Many inclusions of particulates were found to be present as well. Analysis of these particulates revealed the presence of trace impurities, such as Fe and Cu, which were also found in the graphite electrode material. The electrodes were the source of these impurities. No evidence of diamond-like crystallite structure was found in any of the film samples. Details of the apparatus, experimental procedure, and film characteristics are presented.

  3. Properties of electrophoretically deposited single wall carbon nanotube films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Junyoung; Jalali, Maryam; Campbell, Stephen A., E-mail: campb001@umn.edu

    2015-08-31

    This paper describes techniques for rapidly producing a carbon nanotube thin film by electrophoretic deposition at room temperature and determines the film mass density and electrical/mechanical properties of such films. The mechanism of electrophoretic deposition of thin layers is explained with experimental data. Also, film thickness is measured as a function of time, electrical field and suspension concentration. We use Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy to determine the film mass density. Films created in this manner have a resistivity of 2.14 × 10{sup −3} Ω·cm, a mass density that varies with thickness from 0.12 to 0.54 g/cm{sup 3}, and a Young's modulus between 4.72 and 5.67 GPa. The latter was found to be independent of thickness from 77 to 134 nm. We also report on fabricating free-standing films by removing the metal seed layer under the CNT film, and selectively etching a sacrificial layer. This method could be extended to flexible photovoltaic devices or high frequency RF MEMS devices. - Highlights: • We explain the electrophoretic deposition process and mechanism of thin SWCNT film deposition. • Characterization of the SWCNT film properties including density, resistivity, transmittance, and Young's modulus. • The film density and resistivity are found to be a function of the film thickness. • Techniques developed to create free standing layers of SW-CNTs for flexible electronics and mechanical actuators.

  4. Sputtering deposition and characterization of ultrathin amorphous carbon films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wei

    1999-11-01

    This dissertation focuses on experimental investigations of ultrathin, ultrasmooth amorphous carbon (a-C) films deposited on Si(100) substrates by radio frequency (RF) sputtering and characterization of the nanomechanical and nanotribological properties and thermal stability of the films. Ultrathin a-C films of thickness 5--100 nm and typical root-mean-square roughness of 0.15--1 nm were deposited on ultrasmooth Si(100) substrates using pure argon as the sputtering gas. A low-pressure RF argon discharge model was used to analyze the plasma parameters in the film growth environment. These plasma parameters correlate the deposition conditions with the film growth processes. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and surface force microscopy (SFM) were used to characterize the nanomechanical and nanotribological properties of the a-C films. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to investigate the compositions and microstructures of the films. Sputter-etching measurements of the a-C films by energetic argon ion bombardment were used to study the surface binding energy of carbon atoms in a-C films deposited under different conditions. The dependence of film properties on deposition conditions was studied, and relations between nanomechanical and nanotribological properties were discussed in terms of a modified deformation index. The deformation and nanotribology mechanisms of the a-C films were compared with those of other films, such as TiC and Cr films (both 100 nm thick), and bulk Si(100). Reactive RF sputtering of nitrogenated amorphous carbon (a-CNx) films was investigated by introducing nitrogen into the a-C films during film growth by using an argon-nitrogen gas mixture as the sputtering gas. The alloying effect of nitrogen on the film growth and properties, such as hardness and surface energy, was studied and interpreted in terms of the changes in the plasma environment induced due to differences in the composition of the sputtering gas mixture. The thermal

  5. Pulsed laser deposition of carbon nanotube and polystyrene-carbon nanotube composite thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stramel, A. A.; Gupta, M. C.; Lee, H. R.; Yu, J.; Edwards, W. C.

    2010-12-01

    In this work, we report on the fabrication of carbon nanotube thin films via pulsed laser deposition using a pulsed, diode pumped, Tm:Ho:LuLF laser with 2 μm wavelength. The thin films were deposited on silicon substrates using pure carbon nanotube targets and polystyrene-carbon nanotube composite targets. Raman spectra, scanning electron micrographs, and transmission electron micrographs show that carbon nanotubes are present in the deposited thin films, and that the pulsed laser deposition process causes minimal degradation to the quality of the nanotubes when using pure carbon nanotube targets.

  6. Hardness and stress of amorphous carbon film deposited by glow discharge and ion beam assisting deposition

    CERN Document Server

    Marques, F C

    2000-01-01

    The hardness and stress of amorphous carbon films prepared by glow discharge and by ion beam assisting deposition are investigated. Relatively hard and almost stress free amorphous carbon films were deposited by the glow discharge technique. On the other hand, by using the ion beam assisting deposition, hard films were also obtained with a stress of the same order of those found in tetrahedral amorphous carbon films. A structural analysis indicates that all films are composed of a sp sup 2 -rich network. These results contradict the currently accepted concept that both stress and hardness are only related to the concentration of sp sup 3 sites. Furthermore, the same results also indicate that the sp sup 2 sites may also contribute to the hardness of the films.

  7. Raman spectra of amorphous carbon films deposited by SWP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Junqi; Liu, Weiguo; Hang, Lingxia; Su, Junhong; Fan, Huiqing

    2010-10-01

    Amorphous carbon film is one of the most important anti-reflection protective films coated on infrared optical components. In this paper, hydrogen-free amorphous carbon films were deposited by new type surface-wave-sustained plasma (SWP) source with a graphite target at various experiment parameters. The laser Raman spectroscopy at wavelength of 514 nm was used to investigate the structure and bonding of these carbon films. The results showed consanguineous correlations between the intensity ratio ID/IG and the experiment parameters such as microwave power, target voltage and gas pressure applied to the SWP source. Raman spectra proved the structure of these carbon films prepared by SWP technique is typical diamond-like carbon (DLC). The analysis on G peak position and intensity ratio ID/IG indicated that Raman shifts moves to low wavenumber and ID/IG decreases with the increasing of microwave power from 150 W to 330 W. These results means the formation of sp3 bond prefers higher microwave power. DLC films prepared at target voltage of -200 V have higher sp3 content than that of -350 V, moreover, an increase of gas pressure during experiments yields higher sp3 content at the microwave power below 270 W, whereas the change of sp3 content is slight with the various conditions when microwave power exceeds 270 W.

  8. Dual ion beam deposition of carbon films with diamondlike properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirtich, M. J.; Swec, D. M.; Angus, J. C.

    1984-01-01

    A single and dual ion beam system was used to generate amorphous carbon films with diamond like properties. A methane/argon mixture at a molar ratio of 0.28 was ionized in the low pressure discharge chamber of a 30-cm-diameter ion source. A second ion source, 8 cm in diameter was used to direct a beam of 600 eV Argon ions on the substrates (fused silica or silicon) while the deposition from the 30-cm ion source was taking place. Nuclear reaction and combustion analysis indicate H/C ratios for the films to be 1.00. This high value of H/C, it is felt, allowed the films to have good transmittance. The films were impervious to reagents which dissolve graphitic and polymeric carbon structures. Although the measured density of the films was approximately 1.8 gm/cu cm, a value lower than diamond, the films exhibited other properties that were relatively close to diamond. These films were compared with diamondlike films generated by sputtering a graphite target.

  9. Plasma-enhanced Deposition of Nano-Structured Carbon Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Qiaoqin (杨巧勤); Xiao Chijin (肖持进); A. Hirose

    2005-01-01

    By pre-treating substrate with different methods and patterning the catalyst, selective and patterned growth of diamond and graphitic nano-structured carbon films have been realized through DC Plasma-Enhanced Hot Filament Chemical Vapor Deposition (PE-HFCVD).Through two-step processing in an HFCVD reactor, novel nano-structured composite diamond films containing a nanocrystalline diamond layer on the top of a nanocone diamond layer have been synthesized. Well-aligned carbon nanotubes, diamond and graphitic carbon nanocones with controllable alignment orientations have been synthesized by using PE-HFCVD. The orientation of the nanostructures can be controlled by adjusting the working pressure. In a Microwave Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (MW-PECVD) reactor, high-quality diamond films have been synthesized at low temperatures (310 ℃~550 ℃) without adding oxygen or halogen gas in a newly developed processing technique. In this process, carbon source originates from graphite etching, instead of hydrocarbon. The lowest growth temperature for the growth of nanocrystalline diamond films with a reasonable growth rate without addition of oxygen or halogen is 260 ℃.

  10. Methods of Boron-carbon Deposited Film Removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airapetov, A.; Terentiev, V.; Voituk, A.; Zakharov, A.

    Boron carbide was proposed as a material for in-situ renewable protecting coating for tungsten tiles of the ITER divertor. It is necessary to develop a method of gasification of boron-carbon film which deposits during B4C sputtering. In this paper the results of the first stage investigation of gasification methods of boron-carbon films are presented. Two gasification methods of films are investigated: interaction with the ozone-oxygen mixture and irradiation in plasma with the working gas composed of oxygen, ethanol, and, in some cases, helium. The gasification rate in the ozone-oxygen mixture at 250 °C for B/C films with different B/C ratio and carbon fiber composite (CFC), was measured. For B/C films the gasification rate decreased with increasing B/C ratio (from 45 nm/h at B/C=0.7 to 4 nm/h at B/C=2.1; for CFC - 15 μm/h). Films gasification rates were measured under ion irradiation from ethanol-oxygen-helium plasma at different temperatures, with different ion energies and different gas mixtures. The maximum obtained removal rate was near 230 nm/h in case of ethanol-oxygen plasma and at 150°C of the sample temperature.

  11. High conductivity transparent carbon nanotube films deposited from superacid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hecht, David S; Lee, Roland; Hu Liangbing [Unidym Incorporated, 1244 Reamwood Drive, Sunnyvale, CA 94089 (United States); Heintz, Amy M; Moore, Bryon; Cucksey, Chad; Risser, Steven, E-mail: dhecht@gmail.com [Battelle, 505 King Avenue, Columbus, OH 43201 (United States)

    2011-02-18

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were deposited from a chlorosulfonic superacid solution onto PET substrates by a filtration/transfer method. The sheet resistance and transmission (at 550 nm) of the films were 60 {Omega}/sq and 90.9% respectively, which corresponds to a DC conductivity of 12 825 S cm{sup -1} and a DC/optical conductivity ratio of 64.1. This is the highest DC conductivity reported for CNT thin films to date, and attributed to both the high quality of the CNT material and the exfoliation/doping by the superacid. This work demonstrates that CNT transparent films have not reached the conductivity limit; continued improvements will enable these films to be used as the transparent electrode for applications in solid state lighting, LCD displays, touch panels, and photovoltaics.

  12. High conductivity transparent carbon nanotube films deposited from superacid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecht, David S; Heintz, Amy M; Lee, Roland; Hu, Liangbing; Moore, Bryon; Cucksey, Chad; Risser, Steven

    2011-02-18

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were deposited from a chlorosulfonic superacid solution onto PET substrates by a filtration/transfer method. The sheet resistance and transmission (at 550 nm) of the films were 60 Ω/sq and 90.9% respectively, which corresponds to a DC conductivity of 12,825 S cm(-1) and a DC/optical conductivity ratio of 64.1. This is the highest DC conductivity reported for CNT thin films to date, and attributed to both the high quality of the CNT material and the exfoliation/doping by the superacid. This work demonstrates that CNT transparent films have not reached the conductivity limit; continued improvements will enable these films to be used as the transparent electrode for applications in solid state lighting, LCD displays, touch panels, and photovoltaics.

  13. Plasma deposited diamond-like carbon films for large neutralarrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, I.G.; Blakely, E.A.; Bjornstad, K.A.; Galvin, J.E.; Monteiro, O.R.; Sangyuenyongpipat, S.

    2004-07-15

    To understand how large systems of neurons communicate, we need to develop methods for growing patterned networks of large numbers of neurons. We have found that diamond-like carbon thin films formed by energetic deposition from a filtered vacuum arc carbon plasma can serve as ''neuron friendly'' substrates for the growth of large neural arrays. Lithographic masks can be used to form patterns of diamond-like carbon, and regions of selective neuronal attachment can form patterned neural arrays. In the work described here, we used glass microscope slides as substrates on which diamond-like carbon was deposited. PC-12 rat neurons were then cultured on the treated substrates and cell growth monitored. Neuron growth showed excellent contrast, with prolific growth on the treated surfaces and very low growth on the untreated surfaces. Here we describe the vacuum arc plasma deposition technique employed, and summarize results demonstrating that the approach can be used to form large patterns of neurons.

  14. Deposition of carbon nitride films for space application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Yu-Dong; Xu Chao; Wang Yi; Zhang Fu-Jia

    2006-01-01

    Carbon nitride thin films were prepared by electron-beam evaporation assisted with nitrogen ion bombardment and TiN/CNx composite films were by unbalanced dc magnetron sputtering, respectively. It was found that the sputtered films were better than the evaporated films in hardness and adhesion. The experiments of atomic oxygen action, cold welding, friction and wearing were emphasized, and the results proved that the sputtered TiN/CNx composite films were suitable for space application.

  15. Filtered pulsed cathodic arc deposition of fullerene-like carbon and carbon nitride films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Mark D.; Czigány, Zsolt; Broitman, Esteban; Näslund, Lars-Åke; Hultman, Lars; Rosen, Johanna

    2014-04-01

    Carbon and carbon nitride films (CNx, 0 ≤ x ≤ 0.26) were deposited by filtered pulsed cathodic arc and were investigated using transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. A "fullerene-like" (FL) structure of ordered graphitic planes, similar to that of magnetron sputtered FL-CNx films, was observed in films deposited at 175 °C and above, with N2 pressures of 0 and 0.5 mTorr. Higher substrate temperatures and significant nitrogen incorporation are required to produce similar FL structure by sputtering, which may, at least in part, be explained by the high ion charge states and ion energies characteristic of arc deposition. A gradual transition from majority sp3-hybridized films to sp2 films was observed with increasing substrate temperature. High elastic recovery, an attractive characteristic mechanical property of FL-CNx films, is evident in arc-deposited films both with and without nitrogen content, and both with and without FL structure.

  16. Filtered pulsed cathodic arc deposition of fullerene-like carbon and carbon nitride films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tucker, Mark D., E-mail: martu@ifm.liu.se; Broitman, Esteban; Näslund, Lars-Åke; Hultman, Lars; Rosen, Johanna [Thin Film Physics Division, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (IFM), Linköping University, SE-58183 Linköping (Sweden); Czigány, Zsolt [Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Science, RCNS, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary)

    2014-04-14

    Carbon and carbon nitride films (CN{sub x}, 0 ≤ x ≤ 0.26) were deposited by filtered pulsed cathodic arc and were investigated using transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. A “fullerene-like” (FL) structure of ordered graphitic planes, similar to that of magnetron sputtered FL-CN{sub x} films, was observed in films deposited at 175 °C and above, with N{sub 2} pressures of 0 and 0.5 mTorr. Higher substrate temperatures and significant nitrogen incorporation are required to produce similar FL structure by sputtering, which may, at least in part, be explained by the high ion charge states and ion energies characteristic of arc deposition. A gradual transition from majority sp{sup 3}-hybridized films to sp{sup 2} films was observed with increasing substrate temperature. High elastic recovery, an attractive characteristic mechanical property of FL-CN{sub x} films, is evident in arc-deposited films both with and without nitrogen content, and both with and without FL structure.

  17. Aligned carbon nanotube, graphene and graphite oxide thin films via substrate-directed rapid interfacial deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Arcy, Julio M; Tran, Henry D; Stieg, Adam Z; Gimzewski, James K; Kaner, Richard B

    2012-05-21

    A procedure for depositing thin films of carbon nanostructures is described that overcomes the limitations typically associated with solution based methods. Transparent and conductively continuous carbon coatings can be grown on virtually any type of substrate within seconds. Interfacial surface tension gradients result in directional fluid flow and film spreading at the water/oil interface. Transparent films of carbon nanostructures are produced including aligned ropes of single-walled carbon nanotubes and assemblies of single sheets of chemically converted graphene and graphite oxide. Process scale-up, layer-by-layer deposition, and a simple method for coating non-activated hydrophobic surfaces are demonstrated.

  18. Nanostructured silicon carbon thin films grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coscia, U. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Napoli “Federico II” Complesso Universitario MSA, via Cinthia, 80126 Napoli (Italy); CNISM Unita' di Napoli, Complesso Universitario MSA, via Cinthia, 80126 Napoli (Italy); Ambrosone, G., E-mail: ambrosone@na.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Napoli “Federico II” Complesso Universitario MSA, via Cinthia, 80126 Napoli (Italy); SPIN-CNR, Complesso Universitario MSA, via Cinthia, 80126 Napoli (Italy); Basa, D.K. [Department of Physics, Utkal University, Bhubaneswar 751004 (India); Rigato, V. [INFN Laboratori Nazionali Legnaro, 35020 Legnaro (Padova) (Italy); Ferrero, S.; Virga, A. [Dipartimento di Scienza Applicata e Tecnologia, Politecnico di Torino, C.so Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy)

    2013-09-30

    Nanostructured silicon carbon thin films, composed of Si nanocrystallites embedded in hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbon matrix, have been prepared by varying rf power in ultra high vacuum plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition system using silane and methane gas mixtures diluted in hydrogen. In this paper we have studied the compositional, structural and electrical properties of these films as a function of rf power. It is shown that with increasing rf power the atomic densities of carbon and hydrogen increase while the atomic density of silicon decreases, resulting in a reduction in the mass density. Further, it is demonstrated that carbon is incorporated into amorphous matrix and it is mainly bonded to silicon. The study has also revealed that the crystalline volume fraction decreases with increase in rf power and that the films deposited with low rf power have a size distribution of large and small crystallites while the films deposited with relatively high power have only small crystallites. Finally, the enhanced transport properties of the nanostructured silicon carbon films, as compared to amorphous counterpart, have been attributed to the presence of Si nanocrystallites. - Highlights: • The mass density of silicon carbon films decreases from 2.3 to 2 g/cm{sup 3}. • Carbon is incorporated in the amorphous phase and it is mainly bonded to silicon. • Nanostructured silicon carbon films are deposited at rf power > 40 W. • Si nanocrystallites in amorphous silicon carbon enhance the electrical properties.

  19. Influence of bias on properties of carbon films deposited by MCECR plasma sputtering method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Chang-long; DIAO Dong-feng; S.Miyake; T.Matsumoto

    2004-01-01

    The mirror-confinement-type electron cyclotron resonance(MCECR) plasma source has high plasma density and high electron temperature. It is quite useful in many plasma processing, and has been used for etching and thin-film deposition. The carbon films with 40 nm thickness were deposited by MCECR plasma sputtering method on Si, and the influence of substrate bias on the properties of carbon films was studied. The bonding structure of the film was analyzed by the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy(XPS), the tribological properties were measured by the pin-on-disk(POD) tribometer, the nanohardness of the films was measured by the nanoindenter, and the deposition speed and the refractive index were measured by the ellipse meter. The better substrate bias was obtained, and the better properties of carbon films were obtained.

  20. Ultrathin diamond-like carbon films deposited by filtered carbon vacuum arcs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anders, Andre; Fong, Walton; Kulkarni, Ashok; Ryan, Francis W.; Bhatia, C. Singh

    2001-07-13

    Ultrathin (< 5 nm) hard carbon films are of great interest to the magnetic storage industry as the areal density approaches 100 Gbit/in{sup 2}. These films are used as overcoats to protect the magnetic layers on disk media and the active elements of the read-write slider. Tetrahedral amorphous carbon films can be produced by filtered cathodic arc deposition, but the films will only be accepted by the storage industry only if the ''macroparticle'' issue has been solved. Better plasma filters have been developed over recent years. Emphasis is put on the promising twist filter system - a compact, open structure that operates with pulsed arcs and high magnetic field. Based on corrosion tests it is shown that the macroparticle reduction by the twist filter is satisfactory for this demanding application, while plasma throughput is very high. Ultrathin hard carbon films have been synthesized using S-filter and twist filter systems. Film properties such as hardness, elastic modulus, wear, and corrosion resistance have been tested.

  1. Carbon film deposition from high velocity rarefied flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebrov, A.K., E-mail: rebrov@itp.nsc.ru; Emelyanov, A.A.; Yudin, I.B.

    2015-01-30

    The presented study is based on the idea of the activation of a gas-precursor high velocity flow by hot wire. The wire forms the channel for flow before expansion to substrate. The construction allows change of the specific flow rate, velocity, composition and temperature of a gas mixture by studying the film synthesis in conditions from free molecular to continuum flow at velocities from hundreds to thousands of m/s. At a high pressure, the film has typical and unusual hexagonal incorporations for diamond tetragonal particles. Raman spectrum with the pronounced diamond peak is typical for diamond-like film. X-ray diffraction points in the presence of lonsdaleite. Conditions of deposition were simulated by Monte Carlo method. Collisions with hot surfaces and chemical transformations were taken into consideration as well.

  2. Nanostructured Diamond-Like Carbon Films Grown by Off-Axis Pulsed Laser Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong Shan Yap

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured diamond-like carbon (DLC films instead of the ultrasmooth film were obtained by pulsed laser ablation of pyrolytic graphite. Deposition was performed at room temperature in vacuum with substrates placed at off-axis position. The configuration utilized high density plasma plume arriving at low effective angle for the formation of nanostructured DLC. Nanostructures with maximum size of 50 nm were deposited as compared to the ultrasmooth DLC films obtained in a conventional deposition. The Raman spectra of the films confirmed that the films were diamond-like/amorphous in nature. Although grown at an angle, ion energy of >35 eV was obtained at the off-axis position. This was proposed to be responsible for subplantation growth of sp3 hybridized carbon. The condensation of energetic clusters and oblique angle deposition correspondingly gave rise to the formation of nanostructured DLC in this study.

  3. Composition and Microstructure of Magnetron Sputtering Deposited Ti-containing Amorphous Carbon Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Ti-containing carbon films were deposited by using magnetron sputtering deposition. The composition and microstructure of the carbon films were characterized in detail by combining the techniques of Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). It is found that carbon films contain Ti 18 at pct; after Ti incorporation, the films consist of titanium carbide; C1s peak appears at 283.4 eV and it could be divided into 283.29 and 284.55 eV, representing sp2 and sp3, respectively, and sp2 is superior to sp3. This Ti-containing film with dominating sp2 bonds is nanocomposites with nanocrystalline TiC clusters embedded in an amorphous carbon matrix, which could be proved by XRD and TEM.

  4. Interposition fixing structure of TiO2 film deposited on activated carbon fibers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Ping-feng; LUAN Yong; DAI Xue-gang

    2006-01-01

    The immobilized photocatalyst, TiO2 film supported on activated carbon fibers (TiO2/ACFs) prepared with molecular adsorption-deposition (MAD), exhibits high stability in cyclic photodegradation runs. The interposition fixing structure between TiO2 film and carbon fiber was investigated by means of SEM-EDX, XRD, XPS and FTIR, and a model was proposed to explain this structure. With SEM examination of carbon fiber surface after removing the deposited TiO2 film, a residual TiO2 super-thin film was found to exist still. By determining surface groups on ACFs, titanium sulfate (Ti2(SO4)3) in burnt remainders of the TiO2/ACFs was thought to be formed with an interfacial reaction between TiO2 film and carbon fibers. These provide some evidence of firm attachment of TiO2 film to carbon fiber surface. In the consideration of characteristics of the MAD, the deposition mechanism of TiO2 film on ACFs was proposed, and the interposition fixing structure was inferred to intercrossedly form between TiO2 film and ACFs' surface. This structure leaded to firm attachment and high stability of the TiO2 film.

  5. Microstructure and tribological performance of diamond-like carbon films deposited on hydrogenated rubber

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pal, J.P. van der; Martinez Martinez, Diego; Pei, Y.T.; Rudolf, P.; Hosson, J.Th.M. De

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, the microstructure and tribological performance of diamond-like carbon (DLC) films prepared by plasma chemical vapor deposition on hydrogenated nitrile butadiene rubbers (HNBR) are studied. Different negative variations of temperature during film growth were selected by proper changes

  6. Deposition and characterization of hydrogenated diamond-like carbon thin films on rubber seals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pei, Y.T.; Bui, X.L.; Hosson, J.Th.M. De

    2010-01-01

    Thin films of hydrogenated diamond-like carbon (DLC) have been deposited on hydrogenated nitrile butadiene rubber (HNBR) for reduction of friction and enhancement of wear resistance of dynamic rubber seals. The wax removal and pre-deposition plasma treatment of HNBR substrates are proven to be cruci

  7. Amorphous carbon film deposition on inner surface of tubes using atmospheric pressure pulsed filamentary plasma source

    CERN Document Server

    Pothiraja, Ramasamy; Awakowicz, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Uniform amorphous carbon film is deposited on the inner surface of quartz tube having the inner diameter of 6 mm and the outer diameter of 8 mm. A pulsed filamentary plasma source is used for the deposition. Long plasma filaments (~ 140 mm) as a positive discharge are generated inside the tube in argon with methane admixture. FTIR-ATR, XRD, SEM, LSM and XPS analyses give the conclusion that deposited film is amorphous composed of non-hydrogenated sp2 carbon and hydrogenated sp3 carbon. Plasma is characterized using optical emission spectroscopy, voltage-current measurement, microphotography and numerical simulation. On the basis of observed plasma parameters, the kinetics of the film deposition process is discussed.

  8. Deposition of diamond like carbon films by using a single ion gun with varying beam source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Jin-qiu; Chen Zhu-ping

    2001-01-01

    Diamond like carbon films have been successfully deposited on the steel substrate, by using a single ion gun with varying beam source. The films may appear blue, yellow and transparent in color, which was found related to contaminants from the sample holder and could be avoided. The thickness of the films ranges from tens up to 200 nanometers, and the hardness is in the range 20 to 30 GPa. Raman analytical results reveal the films are in amorphous structure. The effects of different beam source on the films structure are further discussed.

  9. Molecular dynamics simulation of the deposition process of hydrogenated diamond-like carbon (DLC) films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG YuJun; DONG GuangNeng; MAO JunHong; XIE YouBai

    2008-01-01

    The deposition process of hydrogenated diamond-like carbon (DLC) film greatly affects its frictional properties. In this study, CH3 radicals are selected as source species to deposit hydrogenated DLC films for molecular dynamics simulation. The growth and structural properties of hydrogenated DLC films are investigated and elucidated in detail. By comparison and statistical analysis, the authors find that the ratio of carbon to hydrogen in the films generally shows a monotonously increasing trend with the increase of impact energy. Carbon atoms are more reactive during deposition and more liable to bond with substrate atoms than hydrogen atoms. In addition, there exists a peak value of the number of hydrogen atoms deposited in hydrogenated DLC films. The trends of the variation are opposite on the two sides of this peak point, and itbecomes stable when impact energy is greater than 80 eV. The average relative density also indicates a rising trend along with the increment of impact energy, while it does not reach the saturation value until impact energy comes to 50 eV. The hydrogen content in source species is a key factor to determine the hydrogen content in hydrogenated DLC films. When the hydrogen content in source species is high, the hydrogen content in hydrogenated DLC films is accordingly high.

  10. Optical and Electrical Properties Evolution of Diamond-Like Carbon Thin Films with Deposition Temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Xu-Li; LI Qing-Shan; KONG Xiang-He

    2009-01-01

    Optical and electrical properties of diamond-like carbon (DLC) films deposited by pulsed laser ablation of graphite target at different substrate temperatures are reported. By varying the deposition temperature from 400 to 25℃, the film optical transparency and electrical resistivity increase severely. Most importantly, the transparency and resistivity properties of the DLC films can be tailored to approaching diamond by adjusting the deposition temperature, which is critical to many applications. DLC films deposited at low temperatures show excellent optical transmittance and high resistivity. Over the same temperature regime an increase of the spa bonded C content is observed using visible Raman spectroscopy, which is responsible for the enhanced transparency and resistivity properties.

  11. Tilting of carbon encapsulated metallic nanocolumns in carbon-nickel nanocomposite films by ion beam assisted deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krause, Matthias [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, PF-510119, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Technische Universitaet Dresden, D-01062 Dresden (Germany); Muecklich, Arndt; Zschornak, Matthias; Wintz, Sebastian; Gemming, Sibylle; Abrasonis, Gintautas [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, PF-510119, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Oates, Thomas W. H. [Leibniz-Institut fuer Analytische Wissenschaft, ISAS e.V., Albert-Einstein-Str. 9, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Luis Endrino, Jose [Surfaces and Coatings Department, Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, c/Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Baehtz, Carsten; Shalimov, Artem [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, PF-510119, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Rossendorf Beamline, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, F-38043 Grenoble (France)

    2012-07-30

    The influence of assisting low-energy ({approx}50-100 eV) ion irradiation effects on the morphology of C:Ni ({approx}15 at. %) nanocomposite films during ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD) is investigated. It is shown that IBAD promotes the columnar growth of carbon encapsulated metallic nanoparticles. The momentum transfer from assisting ions results in tilting of the columns in relation to the growing film surface. Complex secondary structures are obtained, in which a significant part of the columns grows under local epitaxy via the junction of sequentially deposited thin film fractions. The influence of such anisotropic film morphology on the optical properties is highlighted.

  12. Pyrolyzed thin film carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Yu-Chong (Inventor); Liger, Matthieu (Inventor); Harder, Theodore (Inventor); Konishi, Satoshi (Inventor); Miserendino, Scott (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method of making carbon thin films comprises depositing a catalyst on a substrate, depositing a hydrocarbon in contact with the catalyst and pyrolyzing the hydrocarbon. A method of controlling a carbon thin film density comprises etching a cavity into a substrate, depositing a hydrocarbon into the cavity, and pyrolyzing the hydrocarbon while in the cavity to form a carbon thin film. Controlling a carbon thin film density is achieved by changing the volume of the cavity. Methods of making carbon containing patterned structures are also provided. Carbon thin films and carbon containing patterned structures can be used in NEMS, MEMS, liquid chromatography, and sensor devices.

  13. Preparation of Diamond-like Carbon Films on the Surface of Ti Alloy by Electro-deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fenglei SHEN; Hongwei WANG; Dijiang WEN

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, diamond-like carbon (DLC) fi[ms were deposited on Ti alloy by electro-deposition. DLC films were brown and composed of the compact grains whose diameter was about 400 nm. Examined by XPS, the main composition of the films was carbon. In the Raman spectrum, there were a broad peak at 1350 cm-1 and a broad peak at 1600 cm-1, which indicated that the films were DLC films.

  14. Optical and mechanical properties of diamond like carbon films deposited by microwave ECR plasma CVD

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S B Singh; M Pandey; N Chand; A Biswas; D Bhattacharya; S Dash; A K Tyagi; R M Dey; S K Kulkarni; D S Patil

    2008-10-01

    Diamond like carbon (DLC) films were deposited on Si (111) substrates by microwave electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma chemical vapour deposition (CVD) process using plasma of argon and methane gases. During deposition, a d.c. self-bias was applied to the substrates by application of 13.56 MHz rf power. DLC films deposited at three different bias voltages (–60 V, –100 V and –150 V) were characterized by FTIR, Raman spectroscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry to study the variation in the bonding and optical properties of the deposited coatings with process parameters. The mechanical properties such as hardness and elastic modulus were measured by load depth sensing indentation technique. The DLC film deposited at –100 V bias exhibit high hardness (∼ 19 GPa), high elastic modulus (∼ 160 GPa) and high refractive index (∼ 2.16–2.26) as compared to films deposited at –60 V and –150 V substrate bias. This study clearly shows the significance of substrate bias in controlling the optical and mechanical properties of DLC films.

  15. Nanocomposite tantalum-carbon-based films deposited by femtosecond pulsed laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benchikh, N. [Laboratoire Traitement du Signal et Instrumentation, UMR 5516, Universite J. Monnet, 10 rue Barrouin, 42000 Saint-Etienne (France); Garrelie, F. [Laboratoire Traitement du Signal et Instrumentation, UMR 5516, Universite J. Monnet, 10 rue Barrouin, 42000 Saint-Etienne (France); Wolski, K. [Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines de Saint-Etienne, Centre SMS - URA CNRS 5146, 158 cours Fauriel, 42023 Saint-Etienne, Cedex 02 (France); Donnet, C. [Laboratoire Traitement du Signal et Instrumentation, UMR 5516, Universite J. Monnet, 10 rue Barrouin, 42000 Saint-Etienne (France)]. E-mail: Christophe.Donnet@univ-st-etienne.fr; Fillit, R.Y. [Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines de Saint-Etienne, Centre SMS - URA CNRS 5146, 158 cours Fauriel, 42023 Saint-Etienne, Cedex 02 (France); Rogemond, F. [Laboratoire Traitement du Signal et Instrumentation, UMR 5516, Universite J. Monnet, 10 rue Barrouin, 42000 Saint-Etienne (France); Subtil, J.L. [Laboratoire Traitement du Signal et Instrumentation, UMR 5516, Universite J. Monnet, 10 rue Barrouin, 42000 Saint-Etienne (France); Rouzaud, J.N. [Laboratoire de Geologie de l' Ecole Normale Superieure de Paris 24, rue Lhomond 75231-Paris Cedex 5 (France); Laval, J.Y. [Laboratoire de Physique du Solide, UPR5 CNRS-ESPCI, 10 rue Vauquelin 75231-Paris Cedex 05 (France)

    2006-01-03

    Nanostructured coatings of metal (tantalum) containing diamond-like carbon (a-C:Ta) have been prepared by femtosecond pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The films, containing 15 at.% tantalum, have been deposited by ablating sequentially graphite and metallic tantalum in vacuum conditions with an amplified Ti:sapphire laser. The coatings have been investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, grazing angle X-ray diffraction, energy filtered transmission electron microscopy, scanning and high resolution transmission electron microscopies. Evidence of metallic {alpha}-Ta and {beta}-Ta particles (diameter in the 100 nm range) and smaller quasi-amorphous tantalum clusters embedded in the carbonaceous matrix have been shown. A thin tantalum carbide interface between the carbon matrix and the top surface of the tantalum nodules has also been identified. The ability of femtosecond pulsed laser deposition to synthetize nanocomposite carbon-based films and to control their nanostructure is discussed.

  16. Field emission from carbon films deposited by VHF CVD on difference substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abramov, A A; Andronov, A N; Felter, T E; Ioffe, A F; Kosarev, A I; Shotov, M V; Vinogradov, A J

    1999-04-01

    As previously demonstrated, non-diamond carbon (NDC) films deposited at low temperatures 200-300 C on silicon tips reduced the threshold of field emission. In this paper we will present the results of the study of field emission from flat NDC films prepared by VHF CVD. Emission measurements were performed in a diode configuration at approximately 10{sup {minus}10} Torr. NDC films were deposited on ceramic and on c-Si substrates sputter coated with layers of Ti, Cu, Ni and Pt. The back contact material influences the emission characteristics but not as a direct correlation to work function. A model of field emission from metal-NDC film structures will be discussed.

  17. Multi-Directional Growth of Aligned Carbon Nanotubes Over Catalyst Film Prepared by Atomic Layer Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Kai

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The structure of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs severely depends on the properties of pre-prepared catalyst films. Aiming for the preparation of precisely controlled catalyst film, atomic layer deposition (ALD was employed to deposit uniform Fe2O3 film for the growth of CNT arrays on planar substrate surfaces as well as the curved ones. Iron acetylacetonate and ozone were introduced into the reactor alternately as precursors to realize the formation of catalyst films. By varying the deposition cycles, uniform and smooth Fe2O3 catalyst films with different thicknesses were obtained on Si/SiO2 substrate, which supported the growth of highly oriented few-walled CNT arrays. Utilizing the advantage of ALD process in coating non-planar surfaces, uniform catalyst films can also be successfully deposited onto quartz fibers. Aligned few-walled CNTs can be grafted on the quartz fibers, and they self-organized into a leaf-shaped structure due to the curved surface morphology. The growth of aligned CNTs on non-planar surfaces holds promise in constructing hierarchical CNT architectures in future.

  18. Adhesion improvement of hydrogenated diamond-like carbon thin films by pre-deposition plasma treatment of rubber substrate

    OpenAIRE

    Bui, X. L.; Pei, Y.T.; Mulder, E.D.G.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.

    2009-01-01

    For reduction of friction and enhancement of wear resistance of dynamic rubber seals, thin films of hydrogenated diamond-like carbon (DLC) have been deposited on hydrogenated nitrile butadiene rubber (HNBR) via magnetron-enhanced plasma chemical vapor deposition (ME-PCVD). Pre-deposition plasma treatment of HNBR substrate is proved to be crucial for the improvement of film performance due to enhanced interfacial adhesion. The columnar structure and the crack network formed during deposition e...

  19. Structure and phase composition of deposited tantalum-carbon films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuleushev, Yu. Zh.; Volodin, V. N.; Zhakanbaev, E. A.; Alimzhan, B.

    2016-08-01

    Ion plasma sputtering and the subsequent codeposition of ultrafine tantalum and carbon particles were used to prepare coatings with 4.6-71.5 at % C. Structural studies of the coatings showed the existence of carbon solid solutions in β Ta at carbon contents to 4.6 at %, carbon solid solutions in α Ta at carbon contents of 4.6-10.3 at %, and direct synthesis of TaC at carbon contents of 44.7-71.5 at %. During heat treatments to 700°C, the substantial concentration widening of regions of the existence of Ta2C and TaC was found. The lattice parameters of hexagonal Ta2C and fcc TaC carbides were determined for composition ranges of the existence of phases during heating to 700°C. Upon heating above 600°C, the progressive transition of quasiamorphous Ta2C carbide into the crystalline Ta2C carbide was found to take place. The possibility of applying the direct synthesis of TaC carbide in engineering was noted.

  20. Dual-ion-beam deposition of carbon films with diamond-like properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirtich, M. J.; Swec, D. M.; Angus, J. C.

    1985-01-01

    A single and dual ion beam system was used to generate amorphous carbon films with diamond like properties. A methane/argon mixture at a molar ratio of 0.28 was ionized in the low pressure discharge chamber of a 30-cm-diameter ion source. A second ion source, 8 cm in diameter was used to direct a beam of 600 eV Argon ions on the substrates (fused silica or silicon) while the deposition from the 30-cm ion source was taking place. Nuclear reaction and combustion analysis indicate H/C ratios for the films to be 1.00. This high value of H/C, it is felt, allowed the films to have good transmittance. The films were impervious to reagents which dissolve graphitic and polymeric carbon structures. Although the measured density of the films was approximately 1.8 gm/cu cm, a value lower than diamond, the films exhibited other properties that were relatively close to diamond. These films were compared with diamond like films generated by sputtering a graphite target.

  1. Synthesis and Characteristics of Diamond-like Carbon Films Deposited on Quartz Substrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄卫东; 丁鼎; 詹如娟

    2004-01-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films are deposited on quartz substrate using pure CH4 in the surface wave plasma equipment. A direct current negative bias up to -90 V is applied to the substrate to investigate the bias effect on the film characteristics. Deposited films are characterized by Raman spectroscopy, infrared (IR) and ultraviolet-visible absorption techniques.There are two broad Raman peaks around 1340 cm-1 and 1600 cm-1 and the first one has a greater sp3 component with an increased bias. Infrared spectroscopy has three sp3 C-H modes at 2852 cm-1, 2926 cm- 1 and 2962 cm-1, respectively and also shows an intensity increase with the negative bias. Optical band gap is calculated from the ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy and the increased values with negative bias and deposition time are obtained. After a thermal anneal at about 500 ℃ for an hour to the film deposited under the bias of-90 V, we get an almost unchanged Raman spectrum and a peak intensity-reduced IR signal, which indicates a reduced H-content in the film. Meanwhile the optical band gap changed from 0.85 eV to 1.5 eV.

  2. Diamond-Like Carbon Film Deposition Using DC Ion Source with Cold Hollow Cathode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. F. Shevchenko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon diamond-like thin films on a silicon substrate were deposited by direct reactive ion beam method with an ion source based on Penning direct-current discharge system with cold hollow cathode. Deposition was performed under various conditions. The pressure (12–200 mPa and the plasma-forming gas composition consisting of different organic compounds and hydrogen (C3H8, CH4, Si(CH32Cl2, H2, the voltage of accelerating gap in the range 0.5–5 kV, and the substrate temperature in the range 20–850°C were varied. Synthesized films were researched using nanoindentation, Raman, and FTIR spectroscopy methods. Analysis of the experimental results was made in accordance with a developed model describing processes of growth of the amorphous and crystalline carbon materials.

  3. Characterization of hydrogenated and deuterated thin carbon films deposited by magnetron sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pantelica, D., E-mail: pantel@nipne.ro [Horia Hulubei National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH), P.O.B. MG-6, 30 Reactorului St., RO 077125 Magurele (Romania); Ionescu, P.; Petrascu, H. [Horia Hulubei National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH), P.O.B. MG-6, 30 Reactorului St., RO 077125 Magurele (Romania); Nita, C.R. [Horia Hulubei National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH), P.O.B. MG-6, 30 Reactorului St., RO 077125 Magurele (Romania); University Politehnica of Bucharest, RO 060042 Bucharest (Romania); Matei, E.; Rasoga, O. [National Institute for Materials Physics, 105 Atomistilor Str., RO 077125 Magurele-Bucharest (Romania); Acsente, T.; Dinescu, G. [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 409 Atomistilor Str., RO 077125 Magurele-Bucharest (Romania)

    2014-07-15

    Thin films of C layers were deposited by radiofrequency magnetron sputtering on silicon substrates using three gaseous atmospheres: pure Ar, Ar + H{sub 2} and Ar + D{sub 2} mixtures. Scanning Electron Microscopy investigations showed that addition of D{sub 2} or H{sub 2} to main sputtering gas (Ar) leads to the enhancement of the deposition rate while the layer morphology remained columnar. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy measurements revealed the presence of D–C or H–C chemical bonds in the samples. Ion beam analysis measurements performed by simultaneous recording of the recoiled H and D ions, and of backscattered {sup 4}He confirmed the incorporation of hydrogen and deuterium in the deposited carbon thin films.

  4. Microstructure and tribological performance of diamond-like carbon films deposited on hydrogenated rubber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pal, J.P. van der [Materials Innovation Institute M2i, Department of Applied Physics, University of Groningen, Nijenborgh 4, 9747 AG Groningen (Netherlands); Martinez-Martinez, D., E-mail: d.martinez.martinez@rug.nl [Materials Innovation Institute M2i, Department of Applied Physics, University of Groningen, Nijenborgh 4, 9747 AG Groningen (Netherlands); Pei, Y.T., E-mail: y.pei@rug.nl [Materials Innovation Institute M2i, Department of Applied Physics, University of Groningen, Nijenborgh 4, 9747 AG Groningen (Netherlands); Rudolf, P. [Zernike Institute for Advanced Materials, University of Groningen, Nijenborgh 4, 9747 AG Groningen (Netherlands); De Hosson, J.Th.M. [Materials Innovation Institute M2i, Department of Applied Physics, University of Groningen, Nijenborgh 4, 9747 AG Groningen (Netherlands)

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, the microstructure and tribological performance of diamond-like carbon (DLC) films prepared by plasma chemical vapor deposition on hydrogenated nitrile butadiene rubbers (HNBR) are studied. Different negative variations of temperature during film growth were selected by proper changes of the bias voltage. Raman measurements show a similar bonding regardless of the voltages used. A columnar growth and a tile-like microstructure of the DLC films were identified by scanning electron microscopy. Patch sizes can be correlated with the deposition conditions. The coefficient of friction (CoF) of DLC film coated HNBR was found to be much lower than that of the unprotected rubber, and more reduced for the DLC films with smaller patch sizes, which is explained by a better flexibility and conformity of the film during testing. In one of the samples, unexpected low CoF was observed, which was attributed to a modification of the mechanical properties of the rubber during the plasma treatment at high voltage. This issue was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, which indicated a modification of the cross linking in the rubber. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bias voltage does not vary the chemical bonding and surface morphology of films. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Film structure is patched, whose size depends on the etching and deposition voltages. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The frictional behavior can be correlated with the patch size of the films. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Surface analysis showed that rubber x-linking is modified by etching at high voltage. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Modification of rubber x-linking leads to a different frictional behavior.

  5. Near-surface hydrogen depletion of diamond-like carbon films produced by direct ion deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markwitz, Andreas, E-mail: A.Markwitz@gns.cri.nz [GNS Science, Lower Hutt (New Zealand); The MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology (New Zealand); Gupta, Prasanth [GNS Science, Lower Hutt (New Zealand); The MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology (New Zealand); Mohr, Berit [GNS Science, Lower Hutt (New Zealand); Hübner, René [Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (Germany); Leveneur, Jerome; Zondervan, Albert [GNS Science, Lower Hutt (New Zealand); Becker, Hans-Werner [RUBION, Ruhr-University Bochum (Germany)

    2016-03-15

    Amorphous atomically flat diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings were produced by direct ion deposition using a system based on a Penning ion source, butane precursor gas and post acceleration. Hydrogen depth profiles of the DLC coatings were measured with the 15N R-NRA method using the resonant nuclear reaction {sup 1}H({sup 15}N, αγ){sup 12}C (E{sub res} = 6.385 MeV). The films produced at 3.0–10.5 kV acceleration voltage show two main effects. First, compared to average elemental composition of the film, the near-surface region is hydrogen depleted. The increase of the hydrogen concentration by 3% from the near-surface region towards the bulk is attributed to a growth model which favours the formation of sp{sup 2} hybridised carbon rich films in the film formation zone. Secondly, the depth at which the maximum hydrogen concentration is measured increases with acceleration voltage and is proportional to the penetration depth of protons produced by the ion source from the precursor gas. The observed effects are explained by a deposition process that takes into account the contributions of ion species, hydrogen effusion and preferential displacement of atoms during direct ion deposition.

  6. Adhesion improvement of hydrogenated diamond-like carbon thin films by pre-deposition plasma treatment of rubber substrate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bui, X.L.; Pei, Y.T.; Mulder, E.D.G.; Hosson, J.Th.M. De

    2009-01-01

    For reduction of friction and enhancement of wear resistance of dynamic rubber seals, thin films of hydrogenated diamond-like carbon (DLC) have been deposited on hydrogenated nitrile butadiene rubber (HNBR) via magnetron-enhanced plasma chemical vapor deposition (ME-PCVD). Pre-deposition plasma trea

  7. Diamond-like carbon films deposited on three-dimensional shape substrate model by liquid electrochemical technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Y.Y. [Institute of Nano-photonics, School of Physics and Materials Engineering, Dalian Nationalities University, 116600 Dalian (China); Zhang, G.F. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, 116024, Dalian China (China); Zhao, Y.; Liu, D.D. [Institute of Nano-photonics, School of Physics and Materials Engineering, Dalian Nationalities University, 116600 Dalian (China); Cong, Y., E-mail: congyan@ciomp.ac.cn [Institute of Nano-photonics, School of Physics and Materials Engineering, Dalian Nationalities University, 116600 Dalian (China); Buck, V. [Thin Film Technology Group, Faculty of Physics, University Duisburg-Essen and CeNIDE, 47057 Duisburg (Germany)

    2015-09-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films were deposited on three-dimensional (3D) shape substrate model by electrolysis of 2-propanol solution at low temperature (60 °C). This 3D shape model was composed of a horizontally aligned stainless steel wafer and vertically aligned stainless steel rods. Morphology and microstructure of the films were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Raman spectroscopy, respectively. The results suggested there were only differences in film uniformity and thickness for two kinds of samples. The hydrogenated amorphous carbon films deposited on horizontally aligned substrate were smooth and homogeneous. And the film thickness of DLC films gained on the vertical substrates decreased along vertical direction. It is believed that bubble formation could enhance nucleation on the wetted capillary area. This experiment shows that deposition of DLC films by liquid phase deposition on 3D shape conductive substrates is possible. - Highlights: • DLC film is expected to be deposited on complex surface/shape substrate. • DLC film is deposited on 3D shape substrate by liquid electrochemical method. • Horizontal substrate is covered by smooth and homogeneous DLC films. • Film thickness decreases along vertical direction due to boiling effect.

  8. Deodorisation effect of diamond-like carbon/titanium dioxide multilayer thin films deposited onto polypropylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozeki, K., E-mail: ozeki@mx.ibaraki.ac.jp [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Ibaraki University, 4-12-1, Nakanarusawa, Hitachi, Ibaraki 316-8511 (Japan); Frontier Research Center for Applied Atomic Sciences, 162-1 Shirakata, Toukai, Ibaraki 319-1106 (Japan); Hirakuri, K.K. [Applied Systems Engineering, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Denki University, Ishizaka, Hatoyama, Hiki, Saitama 350-0394 (Japan); Masuzawa, T. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Ibaraki University, 4-12-1, Nakanarusawa, Hitachi, Ibaraki 316-8511 (Japan)

    2011-04-15

    Many types of plastic containers have been used for the storage of food. In the present study, diamond-like carbon (DLC)/titanium oxide (TiO{sub 2}) multilayer thin films were deposited on polypropylene (PP) to prevent flavour retention and to remove flavour in plastic containers. For the flavour removal test, two types of multilayer films were prepared, DLC/TiO{sub 2} films and DLC/TiO{sub 2}/DLC films. The residual gas concentration of acetaldehyde, ethylene, and turmeric compounds in bottle including the DLC/TiO{sub 2}-coated and the DLC/TiO{sub 2}/DLC-coated PP plates were measured after UV radiation, and the amount of adsorbed compounds to the plates was determined. The percentages of residual gas for acetaldehyde, ethylene, and turmeric with the DLC/TiO{sub 2} coated plates were 0.8%, 65.2% and 75.0% after 40 h of UV radiation, respectively. For the DLC/TiO{sub 2}/DLC film, the percentages of residual gas for acetaldehyde, ethylene and turmeric decreased to 34.9%, 76.0% and 85.3% after 40 h of UV radiation, respectively. The DLC/TiO{sub 2}/DLC film had a photocatalytic effect even though the TiO{sub 2} film was covered with the DLC film.

  9. Structural, electrical, and optical properties of diamondlike carbon films deposited by dc magnetron sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broitman, E.; Lindquist, O. P. A.; Hellgren, N.; Hultman, L.; Holloway, B. C.

    2003-11-01

    The electrical and optical properties of diamondlike carbon films deposited by direct current magnetron sputtering on Si substrates at room temperature have been measured as a function of the ion energy (Eion) and ion-to-carbon flux (Jion/JC). The results show that, in the ranges of 5 eV<=Eion<=85 eV and 1.1<=Jion/JC<=6.8, the presence of defective graphite formed by subplanted C and Ar atoms, voids, and the surface roughness, are the dominant influences on the resistivity and optical absorption.

  10. Friction properties of amorphous carbon ultrathin films deposited by filtered cathodic vacuum arc and radio-frequency sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matlak, J.; Komvopoulos, K., E-mail: kyriakos@me.berkeley.edu

    2015-03-31

    The friction properties of ultrathin films of amorphous carbon (a-C) deposited on Si(100) substrates by filtered cathodic vacuum arc and radio-frequency sputtering were investigated by surface force microscopy. Deposition parameters yielding a-C films with high sp{sup 3} content were used to deposit films of thickness between 5 and 35 nm. The coefficient of friction of both types of a-C films was measured with a 1-μm-radius conical diamond tip and normal loads in the range of 20–640 μN. The results show a strong dependence of the friction properties on the surface roughness, thickness, and structure of the a-C films, which are influenced by the intricacies of the deposition method. The dependence of the coefficient of friction on normal load and the dominance of adhesion and plowing friction mechanisms are interpreted in terms of the through-thickness variation of carbon atom hybridization of the a-C films. - Highlights: • Comparison of nanoscale friction properties of ultrathin amorphous carbon films. • Friction dependence on film roughness, thickness, and structure (hybridization). • Effect of through-thickness changes in carbon atom hybridization on film friction. • Explanation of film friction trends in terms of competing friction mechanisms.

  11. Controlled fluoridation of amorphous carbon films deposited at reactive plasma conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoffe Alexander

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A study of the correlations between plasma parameters, gas ratios, and deposited amorphous carbon film properties is presented. The injection of a C4F8/Ar/N2 mixture of gases was successfully used in an inductively coupled plasma system for the preparation of amorphous carbon films with different fluoride doping at room-temperature, using silicon as a substrate. This coating was formed at low-pressure and low-energy using an inductively coupled plasma process. A strong dependence between the ratios of gases during deposition and the composition of the substrate compounds was shown. The values of ratios between Ar (or Ar+N2 and C4F8 - 1:1 and between N2 and Ar - 1:2 in the N2/Ar/C4F8 mixture were found as the best for low fluoridated coatings. In addition, an example of improving the etch-passivation in the Bosch procedure was described. Scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectroscopy options, X-ray diffraction, and X-ray reflectivity were used for quantitative analysis of the deposited films.

  12. Diamondlike carbon deposition on plastic films by plasma source ion implantation

    CERN Document Server

    Tanaka, T; Shinohara, M; Takagi, T

    2002-01-01

    Application of pulsed high negative voltage (approx 10 mu s pulse width, 300-900 pulses per second) to a substrate is found to induce discharge, thereby increasing ion current with an inductively coupled plasma source. This plasma source ion beam implantation (PSII) technique is investigated for the pretreatment and deposition of diamond-like carbon (DLC) thin layer on polyethylene terepthalate (PET) film. Pretreatment of PET with N sub 2 and Ar plasma is expected to provide added barrier effects when coupled with DLC deposition, with possible application to fabrication of PET beverage bottles. PSII treatment using N sub 2 and Ar in separate stages is found to change the color of the PET film, effectively increasing near-ultraviolet absorption. The effects of this pretreatment on the chemical bonding of C, H, and O are examined by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). DLC thin film was successfully deposited on the PET film. The surface of the DLC thin layer is observed to be smooth by scanning electron mic...

  13. The multilayered structure of ultrathin amorphous carbon films synthesized by filtered cathodic vacuum arc deposition

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Na

    2013-08-01

    The structure of ultrathin amorphous carbon (a-C) films synthesized by filtered cathodic vacuum arc (FCVA) deposition was investigated by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Results of the plasmon excitation energy shift and through-thickness elemental concentration show a multilayered a-C film structure comprising an interface layer consisting of C, Si, and, possibly, SiC, a buffer layer with continuously increasing sp 3 fraction, a relatively thicker layer (bulk film) of constant sp 3 content, and an ultrathin surface layer rich in sp 2 hybridization. A detailed study of the C K-edge spectrum indicates that the buffer layer between the interface layer and the bulk film is due to the partial backscattering of C+ ions interacting with the heavy atoms of the silicon substrate. The results of this study provide insight into the minimum thickness of a-C films deposited by FCVA under optimum substrate bias conditions. Copyright © 2013 Materials Research Society.

  14. Structural and mechanical properties of diamond-like carbon films deposited by direct current magnetron sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broitman, E.; Hellgren, N.; Czigány, Zs.; Twesten, R. D.; Luning, J.; Petrov, I.; Hultman, L.; Holloway, B. C.

    2003-07-01

    The microstructure, morphology, and mechanical properties of diamond-like carbon (DLC) films deposited by direct current magnetron sputtering were investigated for microelectromechanical systems applications. Film properties were found to vary markedly with the ion energy (Eion) and ion-to-carbon flux ratio (Jion/JC). Cross-sectional high-resolution transmission electron microscopy revealed an amorphous microstructure. However, the presence of nanometer-sized domains at Eion~85 eV was detected. Film stresses, σ, which were compressive in all cases, ranged from 0.5 to 3.5 GPa and depended on the flux ratio as well as ion energy. The hardness (H), Young's moduli (ɛ), and elastic recovery (R) increased with Eion to maximum values of H=27 GPa, ɛ=250 GPa, and R=68% at Eion=85 eV and Jion/JC=4.4. However, near edge x-ray absorption fine structure and electron energy-loss spectrum analysis showed that the sp2/sp3 content of the films does not change with Eion or Jion/JC. The measured change in mechanical properties without a corresponding change in sp2/sp3 ratio is not consistent with any previously published models. We suggest that, in the ranges 5 eV <=Eion<=85 eV and 1.1 <=Jion/JC<=6.8, the presence of defective graphite formed by subplanted C and Ar atoms has the dominant influence on the mechanical properties of DLC films.

  15. Incidence Angle Effect of Energetic Carbon Ions on Deposition Rate, Topography, and Structure of Ultrathin Amorphous Carbon Films Deposited by Filtered Cathodic Vacuum Arc

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, N.

    2012-07-01

    The effect of the incidence angle of energetic carbon ions on the thickness, topography, and structure of ultrathin amorphous carbon (a-C) films synthesized by filtered cathodic vacuum arc (FCVA) was examined in the context of numerical and experimental results. The thickness of a-C films deposited at different incidence angles was investigated in the light of Monte Carlo simulations, and the calculated depth profiles were compared with those obtained from high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The topography and structure of the a-C films were studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), respectively. The film thickness decreased with the increase of the incidence angle, while the surface roughness increased and the content of tetrahedral carbon hybridization (sp 3) decreased significantly with the increase of the incidence angle above 45° , measured from the surface normal. TEM, AFM, and XPS results indicate that the smoothest and thinnest a-C films with the highest content of sp 3 carbon bonding were produced for an incidence angle of 45°. The findings of this study have direct implications in ultrahigh-density magnetic recording, where ultrathin and smooth a-C films with high sp 3 contents are of critical importance. © 2012 IEEE.

  16. Protolytic carbon film technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renschler, C.L.; White, C.A.

    1996-04-01

    This paper presents a technique for the deposition of polyacrylonitrile (PAN) on virtually any surface allowing carbon film formation with only the caveat that the substrate must withstand carbonization temperatures of at least 600 degrees centigrade. The influence of processing conditions upon the structure and properties of the carbonized film is discussed. Electrical conductivity, microstructure, and morphology control are also described.

  17. Co-sputter deposited nickel-copper bimetallic nanoalloy embedded carbon films for electrocatalytic biomarker detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiba, Shunsuke; Kato, Dai; Kamata, Tomoyuki; Niwa, Osamu

    2016-06-01

    -mannitol, which should be detected with a low detection limit in urine samples for the diagnosis of severe intestinal diseases. With a Ni/Cu ratio of around 64/36, the electrocatalytic current per metal area was 3.4 times larger than that of an alloy film electrode with a similar composition (~70/30). This improved electrocatalytic activity realized higher stability (n = 60, relative standard deviation (RSD): 4.6%) than the alloy film (RSD: 32.2%) as demonstrated by continuous measurements of d-mannitol. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: The concept of UBM co-sputtering for fabricating nanoalloy embedded carbon films. HRTEM images of the NiNP and Ni32Cu68 nanoalloy embedded carbon films. The experimental conditions for sputter deposition, HRTEM, HAADF-STEM, STEM-EDS measurements and continuous flow injection analysis. XPS analysis of the nanoalloy embedded carbon film. Repeated CVs of both the nanoalloy embedded carbon film and the alloy film. Amperometric detection of d-mannitol in the presence of chloride ions. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr02287a

  18. Optical properties of plasma deposited amorphous carbon nitride films on polymer substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohamed, S.H., E-mail: abo_95@yahoo.co [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Sohag University, 82524 Sohag (Egypt); El-Hossary, F.M. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Sohag University, 82524 Sohag (Egypt); Gamal, G.A.; Kahlid, M.M. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, South Valley University, 83523 Qena (Egypt)

    2010-01-01

    Amorphous carbon nitride thin films were deposited on polymer substrates using radio frequency (rf) plasma in a mixture of nitrogen (N{sub 2}) and acetylene (C{sub 2}H{sub 2}) gasses. The samples were prepared at different rf plasma power (350, 400, 450, 500, and 550 W), at constant plasma exposure time of 10 min, and constant N{sub 2}/C{sub 2}H{sub 2} ratio of 50%. The crystal structure and surface morphology of the prepared samples were examined using X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy analysis, respectively. The absence of the carbon nitride diffraction peaks confirms the amorphous nature of these films. The root mean square roughness of the films increased from 3.77 to 25.22 nm as the power increased from 350 to 550 W. The thickness and the deposition rate were found to increase with increasing plasma power. Over the whole studied wavelength range, from 200 to 2500 nm, the transmittance decreased with increasing plasma power. A shift in the onset of absorption towards higher wavelengths with increasing plasma power, indicating a decrease in the optical band gap, has been observed. The refractive index values were found to decrease while the extinction coefficient increased with increasing plasma power.

  19. Synthesis of Ag-doped hydrogenated carbon thin films by a hybrid PVD–PECVD deposition process

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Majji Venkatesh; Sukru Taktak; Efstathios I Meletis

    2014-12-01

    Silver-doped hydrogenated amorphous carbon (Ag-DLC) films were deposited on Si substrates using a hybrid plasma vapour deposition–plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PVD–PECVD) process combining Ag target magnetron sputtering and PECVD in an Ar–CH4 plasma. Processing parameters (working pressure, CH4/Ar ratio and magnetron current) were varied to obtain good deposition rate and a wide variety of Ag films. Structure and bonding environment of the films were obtained from transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy studies. Variation of processing parameters was found to produce Ag-doped amorphous carbon or diamond-like carbon (DLC) films with a range of characteristics with CH4/Ar ratio exercising a dominant effect. It was pointed out that Ag concentration and deposition rate of the film increased with the increase in d.c. magnetron current. At higher Ar concentration in plasma, Ag content increased whereas deposition rate of the film decreased. FTIR study showed that the films contained a significant amount of hydrogen and, as a result of an increase in the Ag content in the hydrogenated DLC film, $sp^{2}$ bond content also increased. The TEM cross sectional studies revealed that crystalline Ag particles were formed with a size in the range of 2–4 nm throughout an amorphous DLC matrix.

  20. ZnO thin films on single carbon fibres fabricated by Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krämer, André; Engel, Sebastian; Sangiorgi, Nicola; Sanson, Alessandra; Bartolomé, Jose F.; Gräf, Stephan; Müller, Frank A.

    2017-03-01

    Single carbon fibres were 360° coated with zinc oxide (ZnO) thin films by pulsed laser deposition using a Q-switched CO2 laser with a pulse duration τ ≈ 300 ns, a wavelength λ = 10.59 μm, a repetition frequency frep = 800 Hz and a peak power Ppeak = 15 kW in combination with a 3-step-deposition technique. In a first set of experiments, the deposition process was optimised by investigating the crystallinity of ZnO films on silicon and polished stainless steel substrates. Here, the influence of the substrate temperature and of the oxygen partial pressure of the background gas were characterised by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analyses. ZnO coated carbon fibres and conductive glass sheets were used to prepare photo anodes for dye-sensitised solar cells in order to investigate their suitability for energy conversion devices. To obtain a deeper insight of the electronic behaviour at the interface between ZnO and substrate I-V measurements were performed.

  1. Deposition and characterization of carbon nanotubes (CNTS) based films for sensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dissanayake, Amila C.

    The advent of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) has opened up lot of novel applications because of their unique electrical and mechanical properties. CNTs are well known material for its exceptional electrical, mechanical, optical, thermal and chemical properties. A single-wall nanotube (SWNT) can be either semiconducting, metallic or semi-metallic, based on its chirality and diameter. SWNTs can be used in transistor device as active channels due to high electron mobility (~10000 cm2/(V s), electrical interconnects, nano-scale circuits, field-emission displays, light-emitting devices and thermal heat sinks due to low resistivity, high current density (~109A cm-2 ) and high thermal conductivity (~3500 W m-1). Further, their high Young's modulus and fracture stress is suitable for various sensing applications such as strain/pressure and use in chemical/biological sensors. This work mainly involves the deposition of CNT-based films following two different methods via a conventional microwave chemical vapor deposition (MWCVD) and spinning CNT-composites, and explored the possibility of using CNT-based films in strain gauge applications. Deposited films are characterized and analyzed for their structure, microstructure, composition and electrical properties. Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS), X-ray Reflectivity (XRR), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), X-ray Diffraction (XRD), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and electrical impedance measurement techniques are used to characterize the films prepared by both the above mentioned methods. The synthesis/deposition process is improved based on the observed films properties. A carbon nanotube forest grown on the Si (100) substrate with Ni as a catalyst using CVD system shows an amorphous nature due to loss of catalytic activity of Ni nano-islands. XPS and RBS data show Ni nano-particles diffused into the Si substrate and surface layer of Ni particles turns out to nickel silicide. The

  2. INFLUENCE OF THE SILICON INTERLAYER ON DIAMOND-LIKE CARBON FILMS DEPOSITED ON GLASS SUBSTRATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deiler Antonio Lima Oliveira

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Diamond-like carbon (DLC films as a hard protective coating have achieved great success in a diversity of technological applications. However, adhesion of DLC films to substrates can restrict their applications. The influence of a silicon interlayer in order to improve DLC adhesion on glass substrates was investigated. Amorphous silicon interlayer and DLC films were deposited using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition from silane and methane, respectively. The bonding structure, transmittance, refraction index, and adherence of the films were also evaluated regarding the thickness of the silicon interlayer. Raman scattering spectroscopy did not show any substantial difference in DLC structure due to the interlayer thickness of the silicon. Optical measurements showed a sharp decrease of transmittance in the ultra-violet region caused by the fundamental absorption of the light. In addition, the absorption edge of transmittance shifted toward longer wavelength side in the ultra-violet region as the thickness of the silicon interlayer increased. The tribological results showed an increase of DLC adherence as the silicon interlayer increased, which was characterized by less cracks around the grooves.

  3. Fabrication of ZnO nanoparticles-embedded hydrogenated diamond-like carbon films by electrochemical deposition technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Pei-Zeng; Li Rui-Shan; Pan Xiao-Jun; Xie Er-Qing

    2013-01-01

    ZnO nanoparticles-embedded hydrogenated diamond-like carbon (ZnO-DLC) films have been prepared by electrochemical deposition in ambient conditions.The morphology,composition,and microstructure of the films have been investigated.The results show that the resultant films are hydrogenated diamond-like carbon films embedded with ZnO nanoparticles in wurtzite structure,and the content and size of the ZnO nanoparticles increase with increasing deposition voltage,which are confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS),Raman,and transmission electron microscope (TEM).Furthermore,a possible mechanism used to describe the growth process of ZnO-DLC films by electrochemical deposition is also discussed.

  4. Continuous production of carbon nanotubes and diamond films by swirled floating catalyst chemical vapour deposition method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.E. Iyuke

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Various techniques for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes (CNTs are being developed to meet an increasing demand as a result of their versatile applications. Swirled floating catalyst chemical vapour deposition (SFCCVD is one of these techniques. This method was used to synthesise CNTs on a continuous basis using acetylene gas as a carbon source, ferrocene dissolved in xylene as a catalyst precursor, and both hydrogen and argon as carrier gases. Transmission electron microscopy analyses revealed that a mixture of single and multi-wall carbon nanotubes and other carbon nanomaterials were produced within the pyrolytic temperature range of 900–1 100°C and acetylene flow rate range of 118–370 ml min–1. Image comparison of raw and purified products showed that low contents of iron particles and amorphous carbon were contained in the synthesised carbon nanotubes. Diamond films were produced at high ferrocene concentration, hydrogen flow rate and pyrolysis temperatures, while carbon nanoballs were formed and attached to the surface of theCNTs at low ferrocene content and low pyrolysis temperature.

  5. Characterization of amorphous hydrogenated carbon films deposited by MFPUMST at different ratios of mixed gases

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Haiyang Dai; Changyong Zhan; Hui Jiang; Ningkang Huang

    2012-12-01

    Amorphous hydrogenated carbon films (-C:H) on -type (100) silicon wafers were prepared with a middle frequency pulsed unbalanced magnetron sputtering technique (MFPUMST) at different ratios of methane–argon gases. The band characteristics, mechanical properties as well as refractive index were measured by Raman spectra, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), nano-indentation tests and spectroscopic ellipsometry. It is found that the 3 fraction increases with increasing Ar concentration in the range of 17–50%, and then decreases when Ar concentration exceeds 50%. The nano-indentation tests reveal that nano-hardness and elastic modulus of the films increase with increasing Ar concentration in the range of 17–50%, while decreases with increasing Ar concentration from 50% to 86%. The variations in the nano-hardness and the elastic modulus could be interpreted due to different 3 fractions in the prepared -C:H films. The variation of refractive index with wavelength have the same tendency for the -C:H films prepared at different Ar concentrations, they decrease with increasing wavelength from 600 to 1700 nm. For certain wavelengths within 600–1700 nm, refractive index has the highest value at the Ar concentration of 50%, and it is smaller at the Ar concentration of 86% than at 17%. The results given above indicate that ratio of mixed gases has a strong influence on bonding configuration and properties of -C:H films during deposition. The related mechanism is discussed in this paper.

  6. Deposition of calcium carbonate films by a polymer-induced liquid-precursor (PILP) process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gower, Laurie B.; Odom, Damian J.

    2000-03-01

    A polypeptide additive has been used to transform the solution crystallization of calcium carbonate to a solidification process of a liquid-phase mineral precursor. In situ observations reveal that polyaspartate induces liquid-liquid phase separation of droplets of a mineral precursor. The droplets deposit on the substrate and coalesce to form a coating, which then solidifies into calcitic tablets and films. Transition bars form during the amorphous to crystalline transition, leading to sectorization of calcite tablets, and the defect textures and crystal morphologies are atypical of solution grown crystals. The formation of nonequilibrium crystal morphologies using an acidic polypeptide may have implications in the field of biomineralization, and the environmentally friendly aspects of this polymer-induced liquid-precursor (PILP) process may offer new techniques for aqueous-based processing of ceramic films, coatings, and particulates.

  7. Deposition of Diamond-Like carbon Films by High-Intensity Pulsed Ion Beam Ablation at Various Substrate Temperatures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梅显秀; 刘振民; 马腾才; 董闯

    2003-01-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films have been deposited on to Si substrates at substrate temperatures from 25℃to 400 ℃ by a high-intensity pulsed-ion-beam (HIPIB) ablation deposition technique. The formation of DLC is confirmed by Raman spectroscopy. According to an x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis, the concentration of spa carbon in the films is about 40% when the substrate temperature is below 300 ℃. With increasing substrate temperature from 25 ℃ to 400 ℃, the concentration of sp3 carbon decreases from 43% to 8%. In other words,sp3 carbon is graphitized into sp2 carbon when the substrate temperature is above 300 ℃. The results of xray diffraction and atomic force microscopy show that, with increasing the substrate temperature, the surface roughness and the friction coefficient increase, and the microhardness and the residual stress of the films decrease.

  8. Investigation of superfast deposition of metal oxide and Diamond-Like Carbon thin films by nanosecond Ytterbium (Yb+) fiber laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serbezov, V.; Sotirov, S.; Benkhouja, K.; Zawadzka, A.; Sahraoui, B.

    2013-11-01

    Metal oxide (MOx, M: titanium, magnesium) and Diamond-Like Carbon (DLC) thin films were synthesized by Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) at room temperature and low vacuum of 2 Pa for MOx and vacuum of 4 × 10-3 Pa for DLC films. A fiber based Ytterbium (Yb+) laser operating in the nanosecond regime at a repetition rate of 20 kHz was used as an ablation source. Dense and smooth thin films with a thickness from 120 to 360 nm and an area of up to 10 cm2 were deposited on glass and stainless steel substrates at high growth rates up to 2 nm/s for a laser intensity of 10-12 J/cm2. The thin films synthesis was compared for two fiber laser modes of operation, at a repetition rate of 20 kHz and with an additional modulation at 1 kHz. The morphology, chemical composition and structure of the obtained thin films were evaluated using optical microscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDX) and Raman spectroscopy. The morphology of the MOx thin films and the deposition rate strongly depend on the fiber laser mode of operation. Very smooth surfaces were obtained for the metal oxide thin films deposited at lower deposition rates in the modulation mode at 1 kHz. The effect of the substrate on the DLC film structure was studied. The films deposited on dielectric substrates were identified as typical tetrahedral (ta-C) DLC with high sp3 content. DLC films on metal substrates were found typical a-C amorphous carbon films with mixing sp2/sp3 bonds.

  9. Structural, nanomechanical and variable range hopping conduction behavior of nanocrystalline carbon thin films deposited by the ambient environment assisted filtered cathodic jet carbon arc technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panwar, O.S., E-mail: ospanwar@mail.nplindia.ernet.in [Polymorphic Carbon Thin Films Group, Physics of Energy Harvesting Division, CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K. S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi - 110 012 (India); Rawal, Ishpal; Tripathi, R.K. [Polymorphic Carbon Thin Films Group, Physics of Energy Harvesting Division, CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K. S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi - 110 012 (India); Srivastava, A.K. [Electron and Ion Microscopy, Sophisticated and Analytical Instruments, CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K. S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi - 110 012 (India); Kumar, Mahesh [Ultrafast Opto-Electronics and Tetrahertz Photonics Group, CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K. S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi - 110 012 (India)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • Nanocrystalline carbon thin films are grown by filtered cathodic jet carbon arc process. • Effect of gaseous environment on the properties of carbon films has been studied. • The structural and nanomechanical properties of carbon thin films have been studied. • The VRH conduction behavior in nanocrystalline carbon thin films has been studied. - Abstract: This paper reports the deposition and characterization of nanocrystalline carbon thin films by filtered cathodic jet carbon arc technique assisted with three different gaseous environments of helium, nitrogen and hydrogen. All the films are nanocrystalline in nature as observed from the high resolution transmission electron microscopic (HRTEM) measurements, which suggests that the nanocrystallites of size ∼10–50 nm are embedded though out the amorphous matrix. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic studies suggest that the film deposited under the nitrogen gaseous environment has the highest sp{sup 3}/sp{sup 2} ratio accompanied with the highest hardness of ∼18.34 GPa observed from the nanoindentation technique. The film deposited under the helium gaseous environment has the highest ratio of the area under the Raman D peak to G peak (A{sub D}/A{sub G}) and the highest conductivity (∼2.23 S/cm) at room temperature, whereas, the film deposited under the hydrogen environment has the lowest conductivity value (2.27 × 10{sup −7} S/cm). The temperature dependent dc conduction behavior of all the nanocrystalline carbon thin films has been analyzed in the light of Mott’s variable range hopping (VRH) conduction mechanism and observed that all the films obey three dimension VRH conduction mechanism for the charge transport.

  10. Diamond-like carbon films synthesized on bearing steel surface by plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Hong-xi; TANG Bao-yin; WANG Lang-ping; WANG Xiao-feng; YU Yong-hao; SUN Tao; HU Li-guo

    2004-01-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films were synthesized by plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (PIIID) on 9Cr18 bearing steel surface. Influences of working gas pressure and pulse width of the bias voltage on properties of the thin film were investigated. The chemical compositions of the as-deposited films were characterized by Raman spectroscopy. The micro-hardness, friction and wear behavior, corrosion resistance of the samples were evaluated, respectively. Compared with uncoated substrates, micro-hardness results reveal that the maximum is increased by 88.7%. In addition, the friction coefficient decreases to about 0.1, and the corrosion resistance of treated coupons surface are improved significantly.

  11. Influence of thin film nickel pretreatment on catalytic thermal chemical vapor deposition of carbon nanofibers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tiggelaar, R.M.; Thakur, D.B.; Nair, H.; Lefferts, L.; Seshan, K.; Gardeniers, J.G.E.

    2013-01-01

    Nickel and other metal nanoparticles are known to be active as catalysts in the synthesis of carbon nanofibers. In this paper we investigate how dewetting and break-up of nickel thin films depends on film thickness, film–substrate interaction and pretreatment conditions. This is evaluated for films

  12. Carbon Superatom Thin Films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canning, A. [Cray Research, PSE, EPFL, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Canning, A.; Galli, G. [Institut Romand de Recherche Numerique en Physique des Materiaux (IRRMA), IN-Ecublens, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Kim, J. [Department of Physics, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

    1997-06-01

    We report on quantum molecular dynamics simulations of C{sub 28} deposition on a semiconducting surface. Our results show that under certain deposition conditions C{sub 28} {close_quote}s act as building blocks on a nanometer scale to form a thin film of nearly defect-free molecules. The C{sub 28} {close_quote}s behave as carbon superatoms, with the majority of them being threefold or fourfold coordinated, similar to carbon atoms in amorphous systems. The microscopic structure of the deposited film supports recent suggestions about the stability of a new form of carbon, the hyperdiamond solid. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  13. Structural and mechanical properties of amorphous carbon films deposited by the dual plasma technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yaohui Wang; Xu Zhang; Xianying Wu; Huixing Zhang; Xiaoji Zhang

    2008-01-01

    Direct current metal filtered cathodic vacuum are (FCVA) and acetylene gas (C2H2) were wielded to synthesize Ti-containing amorphous carbon films on Si (100). The influence of substrate bias voltage and acetylene gas on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the films were investigated. The results show that the phase of TiC in the (111) preferential crystallo-graphic orientation exists in the film, and rite main existing pattern of carbon is sp2. With increasing the acetylene flow rate, the con-tents of Ti and TiC phase of the film gradually reduce; however, the thickness of the film increases. When the substrate bias voltage reaches -600 V, the internal stress of the film reaches 1.6 GPa. The micro-hardness and elastic modulus of the film can reach 33.9 and 237.6 GPa, respectively, and the friction coefficient of the film is 0.25.

  14. Intertwisted fibrillar diamond-like carbon films prepared by electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨武保; 王久丽; 张谷令; 范松华; 刘赤子; 杨思泽

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, the structures, optical and mechanical properties of diamond-like carbon films are studied, which are prepared by a self-fabricated electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasma chemical vapour deposition method at room temperature in the ambient gases of mixed acetylene and nitrogen. The morphology and microstructure of the processed film are characterized by the atomic force microscope image, Raman spectra and middle Fourier transform infrared transmittance spectra, which reveal that there is an intertwisted fibrillar diamond-like structure in the film and the film is mainly composed of sp3 CH, sp3 C-C, sp2 C=C, C=N and C60. The film micro-hardness and bulk modulus are measured by a nano-indenter and the refractive constant and deposition rate are also calculated.

  15. Investigation on single walled carbon nanotube thin films deposited by Langmuir Blodgett method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vishalli,, E-mail: vishalli-2008@yahoo.com; Dharamvir, Keya [Department of Physics, Panjab University, Chandigarh (India); Kaur, Ramneek; Raina, K. K. [Materials Research Laboratory, School of Physics and Materials Science, Thapar University, Patiala (India)

    2015-05-15

    Langmuir Blodgett is a technique to deposit a homogeneous film with a fine control over thickness and molecular organization. Thin films of functionalized SWCNTs have been prepared by Langmuir Blodgett method. The good surface spreading properties of SWCNTs at air/water interface are indicated by surface pressure-area isotherm and the monolayer formed on water surface is transferred onto the quartz substrate by vertical dipping. A multilayer film is thus obtained in a layer by layer manner. The film is characterized by Atomic Force Microscope (AFM), UV-Vis-NIR spectroscopy and FTIR.AFM shows the surface morphology of the deposited film. UV-Vis-NIR spectroscopy shows the characteristic peaks of semiconducting SWCNTs. The uniformity of LB film can be used further in understanding the optical and electrical behavior of these materials.

  16. Synthesis of thin films in boron-carbon-nitrogen ternary system by microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukreja, Ratandeep Singh

    The Boron Carbon Nitorgen (B-C-N) ternary system includes materials with exceptional properties such as wide band gap, excellent thermal conductivity, high bulk modulus, extreme hardness and transparency in the optical and UV range that find application in most fields ranging from micro-electronics, bio-sensors, and cutting tools to materials for space age technology. Interesting materials that belong to the B-C-N ternary system include Carbon nano-tubes, Boron Carbide, Boron Carbon Nitride (B-CN), hexagonal Boron Nitride ( h-BN), cubic Boron Nitride (c-BN), Diamond and beta Carbon Nitride (beta-C3N4). Synthesis of these materials requires precisely controlled and energetically favorable conditions. Chemical vapor deposition is widely used technique for deposition of thin films of ceramics, metals and metal-organic compounds. Microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MPECVD) is especially interesting because of its ability to deposit materials that are meta-stable under the deposition conditions, for e.g. diamond. In the present study, attempt has been made to synthesize beta-carbon nitride (beta-C3N4) and cubic-Boron Nitride (c-BN) thin films by MPECVD. Also included is the investigation of dependence of residual stress and thermal conductivity of the diamond thin films, deposited by MPECVD, on substrate pre-treatment and deposition temperature. Si incorporated CNx thin films are synthesized and characterized while attempting to deposit beta-C3N4 thin films on Si substrates using Methane (CH4), Nitrogen (N2), and Hydrogen (H2). It is shown that the composition and morphology of Si incorporated CNx thin film can be tailored by controlling the sequence of introduction of the precursor gases in the plasma chamber. Greater than 100mum size hexagonal crystals of N-Si-C are deposited when Nitrogen precursor is introduced first while agglomerates of nano-meter range graphitic needles of C-Si-N are deposited when Carbon precursor is introduced first in the

  17. The effect of substrate bias on titanium carbide/amorphous carbon nanocomposite films deposited by filtered cathodic vacuum arc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xu, E-mail: zhangxu@bnu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Material Modification of Ministry of Education, College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University (China); Liang, Hong [Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Material Modification of Ministry of Education, College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University (China); Wu, Zhenglong [Analytical and Testing Center, Beijing Normal University (China); Wu, Xiangying; Zhang, Huixing [Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Material Modification of Ministry of Education, College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University (China)

    2013-07-15

    The titanium carbide/amorphous carbon nanocomposite films have been deposited on silicon substrate by filtered cathodic vacuum arc (FCVA) technology, the effects of substrate bias on composition, structures and mechanical properties of the films are studied by scanning electron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and nano-indentation. The results show that the Ti content, deposition rate and hardness at first increase and then decrease with increasing the substrate bias. Maximum hardness of the titanium carbide/amorphous carbon nanocomposite film is 51 Gpa prepared at −400 V. The hardness enhancement may be attributed to the compressive stress and the fraction of crystalline TiC phase due to ion bombardment.

  18. Effect of acetylene flow rate on morphology and structure of carbon nanotube thick films grown by thermal chemical vapor deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Zhangyi; SUN Zhuo; GUO Pingsheng; CHEN Yiwei

    2007-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) films were grown on nickel foil substrates by thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) with acetylene and hydrogen as the precursors. The morphology and structure of CNTs depending on the acetylene flow rate were characterized by a scanning electron microscope (SEM),a transmission electron microscope (TEM) and a Raman spectrometer,respectively.The effect of acetylene flow rate on the morphology and structure of CNT films was investigated.By increasing the acetylene flow rate from 10 to 90 sccm (standard cubic centimeter perminute),the yield and the diameter of CNTs increase.Also, the defects and amorphous phase in CNT films increase with increasing acetylene flow rate.

  19. Thermal effects on structure and photoluminescence properties of diamond-like carbon films prepared by pulsed laser deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Da; LI Qing-shan; WANG Jing-jing; ZHENG Xue-gang

    2006-01-01

    Un-hydrogenated Diamond-like Carbon (DLC) films were prepared by pulsed laser deposition technique at different substrate temperature.The Raman spectra,the absorption and the photoluminescence spectra were measured.The dependence of structure and photoluminescence properties on deposition temperature were studied in detail.The experimental results indicate that the sp2 sites form small clusters that consist of both olefinic chains and aromatic ring groups within the sp3 matrix.With raising deposition temperature,the optical band gaps increase from 1.87 to 2.85 eV.The main band of photoluminescence centered at around 700nm shifts to short wavelength,and the intensity of this band increases.The photoluminescence can be attributed to carrier localization within an increasing sp2 clusters.It was clarified that the DLC films are ordered with increasing deposition temperature.

  20. Physical properties of ultrafast deposited micro- and nanothickness amorphous hydrogenated carbon films for medical devices and prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaharia, T; Sullivan, I L; Saied, S O; Bosch, R C; Bijker, M D

    2007-02-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous carbon films with diamond-like structures have been formed on different substrates at very low energies and temperatures by a plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) process employing acetylene as the precursor gas. The plasma source was of a cascaded arc type with argon as the carrier gas. The films grown at very high deposition rates were found to have a practical thickness limit of approximately 1.5 microm, above which delamination from the substrate occurred. Deposition on silicon (100), glass, and plastic substrates has been studied and the films characterized in terms of sp3 content, roughness, hardness, adhesion, and optical properties. Deposition rates of up to 20 nm/s have been achieved at substrate temperatures below 100 degrees C. A typical sp3 content of 60-75 per cent in the films was determined by X-ray-generated Auger electron spectroscopy (XAES). The hardness, reduced modulus, and adhesion of the films were measured using a MicroMaterials NanoTest indenter/scratch tester. Hardness was found to vary from 4 to 13 GPa depending on the admixed acetylene flow and substrate temperature. The adhesion of the film to the substrate was significantly influenced by the substrate temperature and whether an in situ d.c. cleaning was employed prior to the deposition process. The hydrogen content in the film was measured by a combination of the Fourier transformation infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and Rutherford backscattering (RBS) techniques. From the results it is concluded that the films formed by the process described here are ideal for the coating of long-term implantable medical devices, such as prostheses, stents, invasive probes, catheters, biosensors, etc. The properties reported in this publication are comparable with good-quality films deposited by other PECVD methods. The advantages of these films are the low ion energy and temperature of deposition, ensuring that no damage is done to sensitive substrates, very high

  1. Effect of substrate bias in nitrogen incorporated amorphous carbon films with embedded nanoparticles deposited by filtered cathodic jet carbon arc technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panwar, O.S., E-mail: ospanwar@mail.nplindia.ernet.in [Amorphous and Microcrystalline Silicon Solar Cell Group, Physics of Energy Harvesting Division, National Physical Laboratory (C.S.I.R.), Dr. K.S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi-110012 (India); Kumar, Sushil; Ishpal,; Srivastava, A.K.; Chouksey, Abhilasha; Tripathi, R.K.; Basu, A. [Amorphous and Microcrystalline Silicon Solar Cell Group, Physics of Energy Harvesting Division, National Physical Laboratory (C.S.I.R.), Dr. K.S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi-110012 (India)

    2012-02-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer a-C: N films having nanoparticles were deposited by filtered cathodic jet carbon arc (FCJCA) technique. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of negative substrate bias on the properties of a-C: N films embedded with nanoparticles have been studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The properties of a-C: N films deposited by FCJCA technique have been compared with ta-C: N films deposited by FCVA process. - Abstract: The properties of nitrogen incorporated amorphous carbon (a-C: N) films with embedded nanoparticles, deposited using a filtered cathodic jet carbon arc technique, are reported. X-ray diffraction, high resolution transmission electron microscope and Raman spectroscopy measurements reveal an amorphous structure, but on closer examination the presence of clusters of nanocarbon single crystals with d-spacing close to diamond cubic-phase have also been identified. The effect of substrate bias on the microstructure, conductivity, activation energy, optical band gap, optical constants, residual stress, hardness, elastic modulus, plastic index parameter, percentage elastic recovery and density of states of a-C: N films have been studied and the properties obtained are found to depend on the substrate bias.

  2. Amorphous silicon carbon films prepared by hybrid plasma enhanced chemical vapor/sputtering deposition system: Effects of r.f. power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rashid, Nur Maisarah Abdul, E-mail: nurmaisarahrashid@gmail.com [Low Dimensional Materials Research Centre, Department of Physics, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Ritikos, Richard; Othman, Maisara; Khanis, Noor Hamizah; Gani, Siti Meriam Ab. [Low Dimensional Materials Research Centre, Department of Physics, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Muhamad, Muhamad Rasat [Chancellery Office, Multimedia University, Jalan Multimedia, 63100 Cyberjaya, Selangor (Malaysia); Rahman, Saadah Abdul, E-mail: saadah@um.edu.my [Low Dimensional Materials Research Centre, Department of Physics, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Chancellery Office, Multimedia University, Jalan Multimedia, 63100 Cyberjaya, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2013-02-01

    Silicon carbon films were deposited using a hybrid radio frequency (r.f.) plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD)/sputtering deposition system at different r.f. powers. This deposition system combines the advantages of r.f. PECVD and sputtering techniques for the deposition of silicon carbon films with the added advantage of eliminating the use of highly toxic silane gas in the deposition process. Silicon (Si) atoms were sputtered from a pure amorphous silicon (a-Si) target by argon (Ar) ions and carbon (C) atoms were incorporated into the film from C based growth radicals generated through the discharge of methane (CH{sub 4}) gas. The effects of r.f. powers of 60, 80, 100, 120 and 150 W applied during the deposition process on the structural and optical properties of the films were investigated. Raman spectroscopic studies showed that the silicon carbon films contain amorphous silicon carbide (SiC) and amorphous carbon (a-C) phases. The r.f. power showed significant influence on the C incorporation in the film structure. The a-C phases became more ordered in films with high C incorporation in the film structure. These films also produced high photoluminescence emission intensity at around 600 nm wavelength as a result of quantum confinement effects from the presence of sp{sup 2} C clusters embedded in the a-SiC and a-C phases in the films. - Highlights: ► Effects of radio frequency (r.f.) power on silicon carbon (SiC) films were studied. ► Hybrid plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition/sputtering technique was used. ► r.f. power influences C incorporation in the film structure. ► High C incorporation results in higher ordering of the amorphous C phase. ► These films produced high photoluminescence emission intensity.

  3. Studies of diamond-like carbon (DLC) films deposited on stainless steel substrate with Si/SiC intermediate layers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Jing; Liu Gui-Chang; Wang Li-Da; Deng Xin-Lü; Xu Jun

    2008-01-01

    In this work, diamond-like carbon (DLC) films were deposited on stainless steel substrates with Si/SiC intermediate layers by combining plasma enhanced sputtering physical vapour deposition (PEUMS-PVD) and microwave electron cyclotron resonance plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (MW-ECRPECVD) techniques. The influence of substrate negative self-bias voltage and Si target power on the structure and nano-mechanical behaviour of the DLC films were investigated by Raman spectroscopy, nano-indentation, and the film structural morphology by atomic force microscopy (AFM). With the increase of deposition bias voltage, the G band shifted to higher wave-number and the integrated intensity ratio ID/IG increased. We considered these as evidences for the development of graphitization in the films. As the substrate negative self-bias voltage increased, particle bombardment function was enhanced and thesp3-bond carbon density reducing, resulted in the peak values of hardness (H) and elastic modulus (E). Silicon addition promoted the formation of sp3 bonding and reduced the hardness. The incorporated Si atoms substituted sp2- bond carbon atoms in ring structures, which promoted the formation of sp3-bond. The structural transition from C-C to C-Si bonds resulted in relaxation of the residual stress which led to the decrease of internal stress and hardness. The results of AFM indicated that the films was dense and homogeneous, the roughness of the films was decreased due to the increase of substrate negative self-bias voltage and the Si target power.

  4. Biomimetic thin film deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieke, P. C.; Campbell, A. A.; Tarasevich, B. J.; Fryxell, G. E.; Bentjen, S. B.

    1991-04-01

    Surfaces derivatized with organic functional groups were used to promote the deposition of thin films of inorganic minerals. These derivatized surfaces were designed to mimic the nucleation proteins that control mineral deposition during formation of bone, shell, and other hard tissues in living organisms. By the use of derivatized substrates control was obtained over the phase of mineral deposited, the orientation of the crystal lattice and the location of deposition. These features are of considerable importance in many technically important thin films, coatings, and composite materials. Methods of derivatizing surfaces are considered and examples of controlled mineral deposition are presented.

  5. Optical and morphological properties of porous diamond-like-carbon films deposited by magnetron sputtering

    OpenAIRE

    Baroni, M. P. M. A.; Conceição, M. Ventura; Rosa, R. R.; Persson, C.; Arwin, H.; Silva Jr., E.F. da; Roman, L.S.; Nakamura, O.; I. Pepe; Silva, A. Ferreira da

    2006-01-01

    RESTRITO Porous diamond-like-carbon (PDLC) thin films obtained on silicon substrate by DC low energy magnetron sputtering have been investigated by photoluminescence, transmission and reflection spectroscopy, photoacoustic and spectroscopic ellipsometry. The absorption features observed for these films show similarities with those of porous silicon (PS) as well as in the performed gradient structural pattern classification of the SFM porosity, by means of the computational GPA-flyby enviro...

  6. Fluorine and boron co-doped diamond-like carbon films deposited by pulsed glow discharge plasma immersion ion processing

    CERN Document Server

    He, X M; Peters, A M; Taylor, B; Nastasi, M

    2002-01-01

    Fluorine (F) and boron (B) co-doped diamond-like carbon (FB-DLC) films were prepared on different substrates by the plasma immersion ion processing (PIIP) technique. A pulse glow discharge plasma was used for the PIIP deposition and was produced at a pressure of 1.33 Pa from acetylene (C sub 2 H sub 2), diborane (B sub 2 H sub 6), and hexafluoroethane (C sub 2 F sub 6) gas. Films of FB-DLC were deposited with different chemical compositions by varying the flow ratios of the C sub 2 H sub 2 , B sub 2 H sub 6 , and C sub 2 F sub 6 source gases. The incorporation of B sub 2 H sub 6 and C sub 2 F sub 6 into PIIP deposited DLC resulted in the formation of F-C and B-C hybridized bonding structures. The levels of the F and B concentrations effected the chemical bonding and the physical properties as was evident from the changes observed in density, hardness, stress, friction coefficient, and contact angle of water on films. Compared to B-doped or F-doped DLC films, the F and B co-doping of DLC during PIIP deposition...

  7. Effect of acetic acid on electrochemical deposition of carbon-nitride thin film

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Electrochemical deposition method was employed to prepare CNx thin film from methanol-urea solution,and it was shown that adding a little acetic acid in the solution significantly affected the deposition process.After optimizing the experiment conditions,we obtained polycrystalline grains with sizes of about 3―7μm on the faces of single crystal silicon.X-ray diffraction spectrua indicate that the grains are mainly composed of cubic phase mixed with a small amount of β and α phases.

  8. Effect of high substrate bias and hydrogen and nitrogen incorporation on filtered cathodic vacuum arc deposited tetrahedral amorphous carbon films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panwar, O.S. [Plasma Processed Materials Group, National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K.S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi-110 012 (India)], E-mail: ospanwar@mail.nplindia.ernet.in; Khan, Mohd. Alim [Plasma Processed Materials Group, National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K.S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi-110 012 (India); Kumar, Mahesh; Shivaprasad, S.M. [Surface Physics and Nanostructures Group, National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K.S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi-110 012 (India); Satyanarayana, B.S. [MIT Innovation Centre and Electronics and Communication Department, Manipal Institute of Technology, Manipal-579104 (India); Dixit, P.N. [Plasma Processed Materials Group, National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K.S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi-110 012 (India); Bhattacharyya, R. [Emeritus Scientist, National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi-110012 (India); Khan, M.Y. [Department of Physics, Jamia Millia Islamia, Central University, New Delhi-110025 (India)

    2008-02-29

    The application of a sufficiently high negative substrate bias, during the growth of tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C), is usually associated with low sp{sup 3} bonding configuration and stressed films. However, in an effort to understand and utilize the higher pseudo thermo dynamical conditions during the film growth, at high negative substrate bias (- 300 V), reported here is a study on ta-C films grown under different hydrogen and nitrogen concentration. As grown ta-C films were studied under different negative substrate bias conditions. The variation of the sp{sup 3} content and sp{sup 3}/sp{sup 2} ratio in the ta-C films exhibits a trend similar to those reported in literature, with a subtle variation in this report being the substrate bias voltage, which was observed to be around - 200 V, for obtaining the highest sp{sup 3} (80%) bonding and sp{sup 3}/sp{sup 2} (3.95) ratio. The hydrogen and nitrogen incorporated ta-C films studied, at a bias of - 300 V, show an increase in sp{sup 3} (87-91%) bonding and sp{sup 3}/sp{sup 2} (7-10) ratio in the range of studies reported. The inference is drawn on the basis of the set of data obtained from measurements carried out using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray induced Auger electron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy of as grown and hydrogen and nitrogen incorporated ta-C films deposited using an S bend filtered cathodic vacuum arc system. The study indicates the possibility of further tailoring ta-C film properties and also extending capabilities of the cathodic arc system for developing carbon based films for electronics and tribological applications.

  9. Stress relief patterns of hydrogenated amorphous carbon films grown by dc-pulse plasma chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi; Wang, Chengbing; Wang, Zhou; Zhang, Junyan; He, Deyan

    2008-12-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous carbon films were prepared on Si (1 0 0) substrates by dc-pulse plasma chemical vapor deposition. The nature of the deposited films was characterized by Raman spectra and the stress relief patterns were observed by scanning electron microscope. Besides the well-known sinusoidal type and flower type patterns, etc., two different stress relief patterns, ring type and peg-top shape with exiguous tine on the top, were observed. The ring type in this paper was a clear ridge-cracked buckle and unusual. Two competing buckle delamination morphologies ring and sinusoidal buckling coexist. The ridge-cracked buckle in ring type was narrower than the sinusoidal buckling. Meanwhile peg-top shape with exiguous tine on the top in this paper was unusual. These different patterns supported the approach in which the stress relief forms have been analyzed using the theory of plate buckling.

  10. Structural properties and surface wettability of Cu-containing diamond-like carbon films prepared by a hybrid linear ion beam deposition technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Peng; Sun, Lili; Li, Xiaowei [Key Laboratory of Marine Materials and Related Technologies, Zhejiang Key Laboratory of Marine Materials and Protective Technologies, Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo 315201 (China); Xu, Sheng [Gao Hong Coating Technology Co., Ltd, Huzhou 313000 (China); Ke, Peiling [Key Laboratory of Marine Materials and Related Technologies, Zhejiang Key Laboratory of Marine Materials and Protective Technologies, Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo 315201 (China); Wang, Aiying, E-mail: aywang@nimte.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Marine Materials and Related Technologies, Zhejiang Key Laboratory of Marine Materials and Protective Technologies, Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo 315201 (China)

    2015-06-01

    Cu-containing diamond-like carbon (Cu-DLC) films were deposited on Si/glass substrate by a hybrid ion beam deposition system. The Cu concentration (0.1–39.7 at.%) in the film was controlled by varying the sputtering current. The microstructure and composition of Cu-DLC films were investigated systematically. The surface topography, roughness and surface wettability of the films were also studied. Results indicated that with increasing the Cu concentration, the water contact angle of the films changed from 66.8° for pure carbon film to more than 104.4° for Cu-DLC films with Cu concentration larger than 24.4 at.%. In the hydrophilic region, the polar surface energy decreased from 30.54 mJ/m{sup 2} for pure carbon film to 2.48 mJ/m{sup 2} for the film with Cu 7.0 at.%. - Highlights: • Cu-containing diamond-like carbon (DLC) films were deposited by a hybrid ion beam system. • Cu-containing DLC films exhibited a wide range of water contact angle. • The water contact angles vary with the surface energies and surface roughness.

  11. Biomimetic thin film deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rieke, P.R.; Graff, G.E.; Campbell, A.A.; Bunker, B.C.; Baskaran, S.; Song, L.; Tarasevich, B.J.; Fryxell, G.E.

    1995-09-01

    Biological mineral deposition for the formation of bone, mollusk shell and other hard tissues provides materials scientists with illustrative materials processing strategies. This presentation will review the key features of biomineralization and how these features can be of technical importance. We have adapted existing knowledge of biomineralization to develop a unique method of depositing inorganic thin films and coating. Our approach to thin film deposition is to modify substrate surfaces to imitate the proteins found in nature that are responsible for controlling mineral deposition. These biomimetic surfaces control the nucleation and growth of the mineral from a supersaturated aqueous solution. This has many processing advantages including simple processing equipment, environmentally benign reagents, uniform coating of highly complex shapes, and enhanced adherence of coating. Many different types of metal oxide, hydroxide, sulfide and phosphate materials with useful mechanical, optical, electronic and biomedical properties can be deposited.

  12. Characteristics of diamond – like carbon(DLC film deposited by PACVD process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Lukaszkowicz

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Diamond – like carbon (DLC film is promising materials for many technical and engineering applications. DLC films are used in many different industries for example: in medicine, in electronics, in optics and the automotive industry. They have excellent tribological properties (low friction coefficient, chemical inertness and high mechanical hardness. This paper provides an analysis of the microstructure, mechanical and tribological properties of DLC films. In the study of the coating used several surface sensitive techniques and methods, i.e. High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM, Raman spectroscopy and tribological tests like ball-on-disc. HRTEM investigation shows an amorphous character of DLC layer. In sliding dry friction conditions the friction coefficient for the investigated elements is set in the range between 0.02-0.03. The investigated coating reveals high wear resistance. The coating demonstrated a good adhesion to the substrate.

  13. Debris reduction for copper and diamond-like carbon thin films produced by magnetically guided pulsed laser deposition

    CERN Document Server

    Tsui, Y Y; Vick, D; Fedosejevs, R

    2002-01-01

    The effectiveness of debris reduction using magnetically guided pulsed laser deposition (MGPLD) is reported here. KrF laser pulses (248 nm) of 100 mJ energy were focused to intensities of 6x10 sup 9 W/cm sup 2 onto the surface of a copper or a carbon source target and a magnetic field of 0.3 T as used to steer the plasma around a curved arc of 0.5 m length to the deposition substrate. Debris counts were compared for films produced by the MGPLD and conventional PLD (nonguided) techniques. A significant reduction in particulates of size greater than 0.1 mu m was achieved using MGPLD. For the copper films, particulate count was reduced from 150 000 particles/cm sup 2 /nm to 50 particulates/cm sup 2 /nm and for diamond-like carbon thin films particulate count was reduced from 25 000 particles/cm sup 2 /nm to 1200 particles/cm sup 2 /nm.

  14. Electrochemical Behaviour of Sputtering Deposited DLC Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Erjia; ZENG A,LIU L X

    2003-01-01

    Diamondlike carbon (DLC) films were deposited via magnetron sputtering process. The energetic ion bombardment on the surface of growing film is one of the major parameters that control the atom mobility on the film surface and further the physical and chemical characteristics of the films. In this study, the energy of carbon ions was monitored by changing sputtering power density, and its effect on the electrochemical performance of the films was investigated. For the deposition at a higher sputtering power density, a higher sp3 content in the DLC films was achieved with denser structure and increased film-substrate adhesion. The impedance at the interface of Si substrate/sulfuric acid solution was significantly enhanced, and at the same time higher film resistance, lower capacitance, higher breakdown potential and longer breakdown time were observed, which were related to the significant sp3 content of the DLC films.

  15. Removal of carbon deposited film and hydrogen retention control by low temperature H–C–N reactive plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, A., E-mail: me121030@ec.t.kanazawa-u.ac.jp [Kanazawa University, Kanazawa, Ishikawa (Japan); Takai, Y.; Uesugi, Y.; Tanaka, Y.; Ishijima, T. [Kanazawa University, Kanazawa, Ishikawa (Japan); Masuzaki, S. [NIFS, Toki, Gifu (Japan)

    2013-07-15

    Control of tritium retention and its removal from the first wall of future fusion devices are the most crucial issues for safety and effective use of the fuel. Nitrogen injection into edge plasmas has been considered and tested as an effective method for suppression of carbon dust growth and reduction of hydrogen isotope inventory. In this paper we have investigated scavenger effects of nitrogen injected into H{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} plasmas using a small helical device where low density (n{sub e} ∼ 10{sup 16} m{sup −3}) and low temperature (T{sub e} = 5–10 eV) hydrogen plasmas are generated in steady state condition like remote plasmas in fusion devices. It is shown from the comparison of the carbon film deposition and particle growth between those with and without N{sub 2} injection that the chemical erosion effects of nitrogen gas on the carbon film and particle growth strongly depends on the surface temperature. With increasing the surface temperature higher than ∼400 K, the nitrogen chemical erosion significantly works to reduce the hydrocarbon deposition.

  16. Synthesis and characterization of thin films of nitrided amorphous carbon deposited by laser ablation; Sintesis y caracterizacion de peliculas delgadas de carbono amorfo nitrurado, depositadas por ablacion laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebollo P, B

    2001-07-01

    The objective of this work is the synthesis and characterization of thin films of amorphous carbon (a-C) and thin films of nitrided amorphous carbon (a-C-N) using the laser ablation technique for their deposit. For this purpose, the physical properties of the obtained films were studied as function of diverse parameters of deposit such as: nitrogen pressure, power density, substrate temperature and substrate-target distance. For the characterization of the properties of the deposited thin films the following techniques were used: a) Raman spectroscopy which has demonstrated being a sensitive technique to the sp{sup 2} and sp{sup 3} bonds content, b) Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy which allows to know semi-quantitatively way the presence of the elements which make up the deposited films, c) Spectrophotometry, for obtaining the absorption spectra and subsequently the optical energy gap of the deposited material, d) Ellipsometry for determining the refraction index, e) Scanning Electron Microscopy for studying the surface morphology of thin films and, f) Profilemetry, which allows the determination the thickness of the deposited thin films. (Author)

  17. Electrochemical Behaviour of Sputtering Deposited DLC Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIUErjia; ZENGA; LIULX

    2003-01-01

    Diamondlike carbon (DLC) films were deposited via magnetron sputtering process. The energetic ion hombardment on the surface of growing film is one of the major parameters that control the atom mobility on the flirt1 surface and further the physical and chemical characteristics of the films. In this study, the energy of carbon ions was monitored by changing sputtering powerdensity, and its effect on the electrochemical performance of the films was investigated. For the deposition at a higher sputtering power density, a higher sp3 content in the DLC films was achieved with denser structure and increased film-substrate adhesion. The impedance at the interface of Si substrate/sulfufic acid solution was significantly enhanced, and at the same time higher film resistance, lower capacitance, higher breakdown potential and longer breakdown time were observed, which were related to the significant sp3 content of the DLC films.

  18. Time-Resolved Observation of Deposition Process of Ultrananocrystalline Diamond/Hydrogenated Amorphous Carbon Composite Films in Pulsed Laser Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Hanada

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Optical emission spectroscopy was used to study pulsed laser ablation of graphite in a hydrogen atmosphere wherein ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD/hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H composite films were grown on heated substrates. Time-resolved photographs of a plume that expanded from a laser-irradiation spot toward a substrate were taken using a high-speed ICCD camera equipped with narrow-bandpass filters. While the emissions from C atoms and C2 dimers lasted above the laser-irradiation spot on the target, the emission from C+ ions lasted above the substrate surface for approximately 7 microseconds, although the emission lifetime of species is generally approximately 10 nanoseconds. This implies that C+ ions actively collided with each other above the substrate surface for such a long time. We believe that the keys to UNCD growth in PLD are the supply of highly energetic carbon species at a high density to the substrate and existence of atomic hydrogen during the growth.

  19. Carbon films embedded by nickel nanoparticles: The effect of deposition time on Berthelot-type hopping conduction parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalouji, Vali; Asareh, Nastaran; Hashemizadeh, Seyed Ali; Solaymani, Shahram

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, the electrical conductivity of carbon films embedded by nickel nanoparticles at different deposition times 50, 90, 180 and 600 s over a temperature range from 50 to 500 K was studied. The conductivity data in the temperature range T > 300 K shows the extended state conduction mechanism. The tunneling through a thermally vibrating barrier in the temperature range 50-150 K is described by the Berthelot-type conduction mechanism. It can be seen that the films deposited at 180 s have maximum conductivity and the Berthelot temperature is about 53.5 K. Due to the vibrations of Ni ions in the tetrahedral, sites the extents of the carrier wave function are lower than in the octahedral complexes sites which have maximum values of about 2.16 × 10^{-7} cm and 1.85 × 10^{-7} cm in the octahedral-metal stretching vibrations and intrinsic stretching vibrations of the metal ions at the tetrahedral site, respectively. On the other hand, the average distance between the sites in both vibrations at 180 s deposition modes have minimum values of 2.02 × 10^{-7} cm and 1.72 × 10^{-7} cm.

  20. Tribological properties and thermal stability of hydrogenated, silicon/nitrogen-coincorporated diamond-like carbon films prepared by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakazawa, Hideki; Okuno, Saori; Magara, Kohei; Nakamura, Kazuki; Miura, Soushi; Enta, Yoshiharu

    2016-12-01

    We have deposited hydrogenated, silicon/nitrogen-incorporated diamond-like carbon (Si-N-DLC) films by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition using hexamethyldisilazane [((CH3)3Si)2NH; HMDS] as the Si and N source, and compared the tribological performance and thermal stability of the Si-N-DLC films with those of hydrogenated, Si-incorporated DLC (Si-DLC) films prepared using dimethylsilane [SiH2(CH3)2] as the Si source. The deposited films were annealed at 723-873 K in air atmosphere. The friction coefficients of hydrogenated DLC films after annealing significantly increased at the initial stages of friction tests. On the other hand, the friction coefficients of the Si-N-DLC films deposited at an HMDS flow ratio [HMDS/(HMDS+CH4)] of 2.27% remained low after the annealing even at 873 K. We found that the wear rate of the Si-N-DLC film deposited at 2.27% and -1000 V remained almost unchanged after the annealing at 873 K, whereas that of the Si-DLC film with a similar Si fraction deposited at -1000 V significantly increased after the annealing at 773 K.

  1. A low-temperature synthesis of electrochemical active Pt nanoparticles and thin films by atomic layer deposition on Si(111) and glassy carbon surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Rui [Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Han, Lihao [Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Photovoltaic Materials and Devices (PVMD) Laboratory, Delft University of Technology, P.O. Box 5031, GA Delft 2600 (Netherlands); Huang, Zhuangqun; Ferrer, Ivonne M. [Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Division of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, 210 Noyes Laboratory 127-72, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Smets, Arno H.M.; Zeman, Miro [Photovoltaic Materials and Devices (PVMD) Laboratory, Delft University of Technology, P.O. Box 5031, GA Delft 2600 (Netherlands); Brunschwig, Bruce S., E-mail: bsb@caltech.edu [Beckman Institute, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Lewis, Nathan S., E-mail: nslewis@caltech.edu [Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Beckman Institute, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Division of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, 210 Noyes Laboratory 127-72, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Kavli Nanoscience Institute, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) was used to deposit nanoparticles and thin films of Pt onto etched p-type Si(111) wafers and glassy carbon discs. Using precursors of MeCpPtMe{sub 3} and ozone and a temperature window of 200–300 °C, the growth rate was 80–110 pm/cycle. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to analyze the composition, structure, morphology, and thickness of the ALD-grown Pt nanoparticle films. The catalytic activity of the ALD-grown Pt for the hydrogen evolution reaction was shown to be equivalent to that of e-beam evaporated Pt on glassy carbon electrode. - Highlights: • Pure Pt films were grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD) using MeCpPtMe3 and ozone. • ALD-grown Pt thin films had high growth rates of 110 pm/cycle. • ALD-grown Pt films were electrocatalytic for hydrogen evolution from water. • Electrocatalytic activity of the ALD Pt films was equivalent to e-beam deposited Pt. • No carbon species were detected in the ALD-grown Pt films.

  2. A Novel Reactive Gas Source and Its Application to Carbon Nanotube Film Deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Nan; CHEN Han-Yuan; QIAN Sheng-Fa

    2005-01-01

    @@ Generally, gaseous discharge at pressure higher than 10 kPa will collapse to filamentary form or streamer, which will produce a non-uniform treatment on the sample surface. Thus, atmospheric pressure glow discharge (APGD) is developed. However the realization of the APGD is not obvious, it needs special conditions. We propose a new concept to solve the non-uniformity problem. By using a grid electrode and putting the sample downstream of the discharge plasma, the streamers, instead of striking on sample surface, will strike on the grid, and the neutral active species produced in the discharge diffuse out to reach the sample surface uniformly. Finally, a carbon nanotube (CNT) film was produced to test this new concept.

  3. Deposit of thin films of nitrided amorphous carbon using the laser ablation technique; Deposito de peliculas delgadas de carbono amorfo nitrurado utilizando la tecnica de ablacion laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebollo, P.B.; Escobar A, L.; Camps C, E. [Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, C.P. 52045 Salazar, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Haro P, E.; Camacho L, M.A. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana Iztapalapa (Mexico); Muhl S, S. [Instituto de Investigacion en Materiales, UNAM (Mexico)

    2000-07-01

    It is reported the synthesis and characterization of thin films of amorphous carbon (a-C) nitrided, deposited by laser ablation in a nitrogen atmosphere at pressures which are from 4.5 x 10 {sup -4} Torr until 7.5 x 10 {sup -2} Torr. The structural properties of the films are studied by Raman spectroscopy obtaining similar spectra at the reported for carbon films type diamond. The study of behavior of the energy gap and the ratio nitrogen/carbon (N/C) in the films, shows that the energy gap is reduced when the nitrogen incorporation is increased. It is showed that the refraction index of the thin films diminish as nitrogen pressure is increased, indicating the formation of graphitic material. (Author)

  4. Structural characteristics of copper/hydrogenated amorphous carbon composite films prepared by microwave plasma-assisted deposition processes from methane-argon and acetylene-argon gas mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiery, F.; Pauleau, Y.; Grob, J.J.; Babonneau, D

    2004-11-01

    Copper/hydrogenated amorphous carbon (Cu/a-C:H) composite films have been deposited on silicon substrates by a hybrid technique combining microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition and sputter-deposition from methane-argon and acetylene-argon gas mixtures. The major objective of this work was to investigate the effect of the carbon gas precursor on the structural characteristics of Cu/a-C:H composite films deposited at ambient temperature. The major characteristics of CH{sub 4}-argon and C{sub 2}H{sub 2}-argon plasmas were analyzed by Langmuir probe measurements. The composition of films was determined by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, energy recoil detection analyses and nuclear reaction analyses. The carbon content in the films was observed to vary in the range 20-77 at.% and 7.5-99 at.% as the CH{sub 4} and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} concentrations in the gas phase increased from 10 to 100%, respectively. The atom number ratio H/C in the films was scattered approximately 0.4 whatever the carbon gas precursor used. The crystallographic structure and the size of copper crystallites incorporated in the a-C were determined by X-ray diffraction techniques. The copper crystallite size decreased from 20 nm in pure copper films to less than 5 nm in Cu/a-C:H films containing more than 40 at.% of carbon. Grazing incidence small angle X-ray scattering measurements were performed to investigate the size distribution and distance of copper crystallites as functions of the deposition parameters. The structural characteristics of copper crystallites were dependent on the hydrocarbon gas precursor used. The crystallite size and the width of the size distribution were homogeneous in films deposited from CH{sub 4}. Copper crystallites with an anisotropic shape were found in films deposited from C{sub 2}H{sub 2}. The major radicals formed in the plasma and condensed on the surface of growing films, namely CH and C{sub 2}H radicals for films produced from CH{sub 4} and C

  5. The effect of deposition energy of energetic atoms on the growth and structure of ultrathin amorphous carbon films studied by molecular dynamics simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, N

    2014-05-16

    The growth and structure of ultrathin amorphous carbon films was investigated by molecular dynamics simulations. The second-generation reactive-empirical-bond-order potential was used to model atomic interactions. Films with different structures were simulated by varying the deposition energy of carbon atoms in the range of 1-120 eV. Intrinsic film characteristics (e.g. density and internal stress) were determined after the system reached equilibrium. Short- and intermediate-range carbon atom ordering is examined in the context of atomic hybridization and ring connectivity simulation results. It is shown that relatively high deposition energy (i.e., 80 eV) yields a multilayer film structure consisting of an intermixing layer, bulk film and surface layer, consistent with the classical subplantation model. The highest film density (3.3 g cm-3), sp3 fraction (∼43%), and intermediate-range carbon atom ordering correspond to a deposition energy of ∼80 eV, which is in good agreement with experimental findings. © 2014 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  6. Dry-Deposited Transparent Carbon Nanotube Film as Front Electrode in Colloidal Quantum Dot Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoliang; Aitola, Kerttu; Hägglund, Carl; Kaskela, Antti; Johansson, Malin B; Sveinbjörnsson, Kári; Kauppinen, Esko I; Johansson, Erik M J

    2017-01-20

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) show great potential as an alternative material for front electrodes in photovoltaic applications, especially for flexible devices. In this work, a press-transferred transparent SWCNT film was utilized as front electrode for colloidal quantum dot solar cells (CQDSCs). The solar cells were fabricated on both glass and flexible substrates, and maximum power conversion efficiencies of 5.5 and 5.6 %, respectively, were achieved, which corresponds to 90 and 92 % of an indium-doped tin oxide (ITO)-based device (6.1 %). The SWCNTs are therefore a very good alternative to the ITO-based electrodes especially for flexible solar cells. The optical electric field distribution and optical losses within the devices were simulated theoretically and the results agree with the experimental results. With the optical simulations that were performed it may also be possible to enhance the photovoltaic performance of SWCNT-based solar cells even further by optimizing the device configuration or by using additional optical active layers, thus reducing light reflection of the device and increasing light absorption in the quantum dot layer.

  7. The Role of Ambient Gas and Pressure on the Structuring of Hard Diamond-Like Carbon Films Synthesized by Pulsed Laser Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei C. Popescu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Hard carbon thin films were synthesized on Si (100 and quartz substrates by the Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD technique in vacuum or methane ambient to study their suitability for applications requiring high mechanical resistance. The deposited films’ surface morphology was investigated by scanning electron microscopy, crystalline status by X-ray diffraction, packing and density by X-ray reflectivity, chemical bonding by Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, adherence by “pull-out” measurements and mechanical properties by nanoindentation tests. Films synthesized in vacuum were a-C DLC type, while films synthesized in methane were categorized as a-C:H. The majority of PLD films consisted of two layers: one low density layer towards the surface and a higher density layer in contact with the substrate. The deposition gas pressure played a crucial role on films thickness, component layers thickness ratio, structure and mechanical properties. The films were smooth, amorphous and composed of a mixture of sp3-sp2 carbon, with sp3 content ranging between 50% and 90%. The thickness and density of the two constituent layers of a film directly determined its mechanical properties.

  8. Effect of boron incorporation on the structure and electrical properties of diamond-like carbon films deposited by femtosecond and nanosecond pulsed laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikora, A. [Laboratoire Hubert Curien, UMR 5516 CNRS, Universite Jean Monnet, 18 Rue Pr. Benoit Lauras, 42000 Saint-Etienne (France); Bourgeois, O. [Institut Neel, UPR 2940 CNRS, 25 Avenue des Martyrs, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Sanchez-Lopez, J.C. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Sevilla, Avda. Americo Vespucio, 49 41092 Sevilla (Spain); Rouzaud, J.-N. [Laboratoire de Geologie, UMR 8538 CNRS, Ecole Normale Superieure, 45 Rue d' Ulm, 75230 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Rojas, T.C. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Sevilla, Avda. Americo Vespucio, 49 41092 Sevilla (Spain); Loir, A.-S. [Laboratoire Hubert Curien, UMR 5516 CNRS, Universite Jean Monnet, 18 Rue Pr. Benoit Lauras, 42000 Saint-Etienne (France); Garden, J.-L. [Institut Neel, UPR 2940 CNRS, 25 Avenue des Martyrs, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Garrelie, F. [Laboratoire Hubert Curien, UMR 5516 CNRS, Universite Jean Monnet, 18 Rue Pr. Benoit Lauras, 42000 Saint-Etienne (France); Donnet, C., E-mail: christophe.donnet@univ-st-etienne.f [Laboratoire Hubert Curien, UMR 5516 CNRS, Universite Jean Monnet, 18 Rue Pr. Benoit Lauras, 42000 Saint-Etienne (France)

    2009-12-31

    The influence of the incorporation of boron in diamond-like carbon (DLC) films on the microstructure of the coatings has been investigated. The boron-containing DLC films (a-C:B) have been deposited by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) at room temperature in high vacuum conditions, by ablating graphite and boron targets either with a femtosecond pulsed laser (800 nm, 150 fs, fs-DLC) or with a nanosecond pulsed laser (248 nm, 20 ns, ns-DLC). Alternative ablation of the graphite and boron targets has been carried out to deposit the a-C:B films. The film structure and composition have been highlighted by coupling Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy, Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy and High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy. Using the B K-edge, EELS characterization reveals the boron effect on the carbon bonding. Moreover, the plasmon energy reveals a tendency of graphitization associated to the boron doping. Pure boron particles have been characterized by HRTEM and reveal that those particles are amorphous or crystallized. The nanostructures of the boron-doped ns-DLC and the boron-doped fs-DLC are thus compared. In particular, the incorporation of boron in the DLC matrix is highlighted, depending on the laser used for deposition. Electrical measurements show that some of these films have potentialities to be used in low temperature thermometry, considering their conductivity and temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR) estimated within the temperature range 160-300 K.

  9. Near-Edge X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure of Ultrananocrystalline Diamond/Hydrogenated Amorphous Carbon Films Prepared by Pulsed Laser Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinya Ohmagari

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The atomic bonding configuration of ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD/hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H films prepared by pulsed laser ablation of graphite in a hydrogen atmosphere was examined by near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy. The measured spectra were decomposed with simple component spectra, and they were analyzed in detail. As compared to the a-C:H films deposited at room substrate-temperature, the UNCD/a-C:H and nonhydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C films deposited at a substrate-temperature of 550∘C exhibited enhanced ∗ and ∗C≡C peaks. At the elevated substrate-temperature, the ∗ and ∗C≡C bonds formation is enhanced while the ∗C–H and ∗C–C bonds formation is suppressed. The UNCD/a-C:H film showed a larger ∗C–C peak than the a-C film deposited at the same elevated substrate-temperature in vacuum. We believe that the intense ∗C–C peak is evidently responsible for UNCD crystallites existence in the film.

  10. Thin Film Deposition Techniques (PVD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbeiss, E.

    The most interesting materials for spin electronic devices are thin films of magnetic transition metals and magnetic perovskites, mainly the doped La-manganites [1] as well as several oxides and metals for passivating and contacting the magnetic films. The most suitable methods for the preparation of such films are the physical vapor deposition methods (PVD). Therefore this report will be restricted to these deposition methods.

  11. Study of Fluorine Addition Influence in the Dielectric Constant of Diamond-Like Carbon Thin Film Deposited by Reactive Sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trippe, S. C.; Mansano, R. D.

    The hydrogenated amorphous carbon films (a-C:H) or DLC (Diamond-Like Carbon) films are well known for exhibiting high electrical resistivity, low dielectric constant, high mechanical hardness, low friction coefficient, low superficial roughness and also for being inert. In this paper, we produced fluorinated DLC films (a-C:F), and studied the effect of adding CF4 on the above-mentioned properties of DLC films. These films were produced by a reactive RF magnetron sputtering system using a target of pure carbon in stable graphite allotrope. We performed measurements of electrical characteristic curves of capacitance as a function of applied tension (C-V) and current as a function of the applied tension (I-V). We showed the dielectric constant (k) and the resistivity (ρ) as functions of the CF4 concentration. On films with 65% CF4, we found that k = 2.7, and on films with 70% CF4, ρ = 12.3 × 1011 Ω cm. The value of the electrical breakdown field to films with 70% CF4 is 5.3 × 106 V/cm.

  12. Optical Properties of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotube Films Deposited on Si/SiO2 Wafers

    OpenAIRE

    Soetedjo, Hariyadi; Mora, Maria F.; Garcia, Carlos D.

    2010-01-01

    The paper describes a set of simple experiments performed to develop an optical model to describe Si/SiO2 substrates coated with two transparent films of carbon nanotubes. The final goal is to use such optical model to investigate the interaction of proteins with carbon nanotubes. Experiments were performed to assess light reflection as a function of the wavelength or angle of incidence using two substrates (same material, different amounts) composed of oxidized carbon nanotubes. The experime...

  13. Carbon thin films deposited by the magnetron sputtering technique using cobalt, copper and nickel as buffer-layers; Filmes finos de carbono depositados por meio da tecnica de magnetron sputtering usando cobalto, cobre e niquel como buffer-layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa e Silva, Danilo Lopes

    2015-11-01

    In this work, carbon thin films were produced by the magnetron sputtering technique using single crystal substrates of alumina c-plane (0001) and Si (111) and Si (100) substrates, employing Co, Ni and Cu as intermediate films (buffer-layers). The depositions were conducted in three stages, first with cobalt buffer-layers where only after the production of a large number of samples, the depositions using cooper buffer-layers were carried out on Si substrates. Then, depositions were performed with nickel buffer layers using single-crystal alumina substrates. The crystallinity of the carbon films was evaluated by using the technique of Raman spectroscopy and, then, by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The morphological characterization of the films was performed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM and FEG-SEM) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The XRD peaks related to the carbon films were observed only in the results of the samples with cobalt and nickel buffer-layers. The Raman spectroscopy showed that the carbon films with the best degree of crystallinity were the ones produced with Si (111) substrates, for the Cu buffers, and sapphire substrates for the Ni and Co buffers, where the latter resulted in a sample with the best crystallinity of all the ones produced in this work. It was observed that the cobalt has low recovering over the alumina substrates when compared to the nickel. Sorption tests of Ce ions by the carbon films were conducted in two samples and it was observed that the sorption did not occur probably because of the low crystallinity of the carbon films in both samples. (author)

  14. Variable temperature semiconductor film deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaonan; Sheldon, Peter

    1998-01-01

    A method of depositing a semiconductor material on a substrate. The method sequentially comprises (a) providing the semiconductor material in a depositable state such as a vapor for deposition on the substrate; (b) depositing the semiconductor material on the substrate while heating the substrate to a first temperature sufficient to cause the semiconductor material to form a first film layer having a first grain size; (c) continually depositing the semiconductor material on the substrate while cooling the substrate to a second temperature sufficient to cause the semiconductor material to form a second film layer deposited on the first film layer and having a second grain size smaller than the first grain size; and (d) raising the substrate temperature, while either continuing or not continuing to deposit semiconductor material to form a third film layer, to thereby anneal the film layers into a single layer having favorable efficiency characteristics in photovoltaic applications. A preferred semiconductor material is cadmium telluride deposited on a glass/tin oxide substrate already having thereon a film layer of cadmium sulfide.

  15. Anodic Stripping Voltametry at Mercury Film Deposited on Ultrasmall Carbon Ring Electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-11-05

    a b. OFFICE OF NAVAL RESEARCH o GRANT or CONTRACT N00014-90-J-1161 R & T Code 4133030 Technical Report No. 001 Anodic Stripping Voltametry at Mercury...13 REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED lNovember 5,_ _90 Technical 4 TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Anodic Stripping Voltametry at Mercury Film...where high scan rate cyclic vrhrnm-try is possilble. In fact, scan rates above one million V s - ’ have been demonstrated [8]. n cnf i s, t low scan

  16. films using atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chervinskii, Semen; Matikainen, Antti; Dergachev, Alexey; Lipovskii, Andrey A.; Honkanen, Seppo

    2014-08-01

    We fabricated self-assembled silver nanoisland films using a recently developed technique based on out-diffusion of silver from an ion-exchanged glass substrate in reducing atmosphere. We demonstrate that the position of the surface plasmon resonance of the films depends on the conditions of the film growth. The resonance can be gradually shifted up to 100 nm towards longer wavelengths by using atomic layer deposition of titania, from 3 to 100 nm in thickness, upon the film. Examination of the nanoisland films in surface-enhanced Raman spectrometry showed that, in spite of a drop of the surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) signal after the titania spacer deposition, the Raman signal can be observed with spacers up to 7 nm in thickness. Denser nanoisland films show slower decay of the SERS signal with the increase in spacer thickness.

  17. Effect of Magnetic Field on the Deposition of Transparent Diamond-Like Carbon ( DLC ) Films by RF-PCVD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU Hui-jun; ZhU Xia-gao; LIN Song-sheng; YUAN Zhen-hai; DAI Da-huang

    2004-01-01

    In order to deposit transparent and hard DLC films, magnetic field was introduced to enhance the plasma density of radiofrequency plasma chemical vapor deposition (RF-PCVD). In this paper, the configuration and computation of external magnetic field B are introduced. The restriction effect of magnetic field B on the charged particles and the effect of magnetic field B on the primary parameters-nonindependent power Pf and self-bias Uz were also studied. The mechanism of how magnetic field B affects self-bias Uz was analyzed.

  18. Microstructure and property of diamond-like carbon films with Al and Cr co-doping deposited using a hybrid beams system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Wei; Liu, Jingmao; Geng, Dongsen; Guo, Peng; Zheng, Jun; Wang, Qimin

    2016-12-01

    DLC films with weak carbide former Al and carbide former Cr co-doping (Al:Cr-DLC) were deposited by a hybrid beams system comprising an anode-layer linear ion beam source (LIS) and high power impulse magnetron sputtering using a gas mixture of C2H2 and Ar as the precursor. The doped Al and Cr contents were controlled via adjusting the C2H2 fraction in the gas mixture. The composition, microstructure, compressive stress, mechanical properties and tribological behaviors of the Al:Cr-DLC films were researched carefully using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, stress-tester, nanoindentation and ball-on-plate tribometer as function of the C2H2 fraction. The results show that the Al and Cr contents in the films increased continuously as the C2H2 fraction decreased. The doped Cr atoms preferred to bond with the carbon while the Al atoms mainly existed in metallic state. Structure modulation with alternate multilayer consisted of Al-poor DLC layer and Al-rich DLC layer was found in the films. Those periodic Al-rich DLC layers can effectively release the residual stress of the films. On the other hand, the formation of the carbide component due to Cr incorporation can help to increase the film hardness. Accordingly, the residual stress of the DLC films can be reduced without sacrificing the film hardness though co-doping Al and Cr atoms. Furthermore, it was found that the periodic Al-rich layer can greatly improve the elastic resilience of the DLC films and thus decreases the film friction coefficient and wear rate significantly. However, the existence of the carbide component would cause abrasive wear and thus deteriorate the wear performance of the films.

  19. Nanofriction properties of molecular deposition films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王强斌; 高芒来; 张嗣伟

    2000-01-01

    The nanofriction properties of Au substrate and monolayer molecular deposition film and multilayer molecular deposition films on Au substrate and the molecular deposition films modified with alkyl-terminal molecule have been investigated by using an atomic force microscope. It is concluded that ( i ) the deposition of molecular deposition films on Au substrate and the modification of alkyl-terminal molecule to the molecular deposition films can reduce the frictional force; (ii) the molecular deposition films with the same terminal exhibit similar nanofriction properties, which has nothing to do with the molecular chain-length and the layer number; (iii) the unstable nanofriction properties of molecular deposition films are contributed to the active terminal of the molecular deposition film, which can be eliminated by decorating the active molecular deposition film with alkyl-terminal molecule, moreover, the decoration of alkyl-terminal molecule can lower the frictional force conspicuously; (iv) the relat

  20. Structural and Physical Characteristics of Ultrananocrystalline Diamond/Hydrogenated Amorphous Carbon Composite Films Deposited Using a Coaxial Arc Plasma Gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshitake, Tsuyoshi; Nakagawa, You; Nagano, Akira; Ohtani, Ryota; Setoyama, Hiroyuki; Kobayashi, Eiichi; Sumitani, Kazushi; Agawa, Yoshiaki; Nagayama, Kunihito

    2010-01-01

    Ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD)/hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) films were formed without initial nucleation using a coaxial arc plasma gun. The UNCD crystallite diameters estimated from the X-ray diffraction peaks were approximately 2 nm. The Fourier transform infrared absorption spectrum exhibited an intense sp3-CH peak that might originate from the grain boundaries between UNCD crystallites whose dangling bonds are terminated with hydrogen atoms. A narrow sp3 peak in the photoemission spectrum implied that the film comprises a large number of UNCD crystallites. Large optical absorption coefficients at photon energies larger than 3 eV that might be due to the grain boundaries are specific to the UNCD/a-C:H films.

  1. Intrinsic stress analysis of sputtered carbon film

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liqin Liu; Zhanshan Wang; Jingtao Zhu; Zhong Zhang; Moyan Tan; Qiushi Huang; Rui Chen; Jing Xu; Lingyan Chen

    2008-01-01

    Intrinsic stresses of carbon films deposited by direct current (DC) magnetron sputtering were investigated.The bombardments of energetic particles during the growth of films were considered to be the main reason for compressive intrinsic stresses.The values of intrinsic stresses were determined by measuring the radius of curvature of substrates before and after film deposition.By varying argon pressure and target-substrate distance,energies of neutral carbon atoms impinging on the growing films were optimized to control the intrinsic stresses level.The stress evolution in carbon films as a function of film thickness was investigated and a void-related stress relief mechanism was proposed to interpret this evolution.

  2. Ultrahard carbon nanocomposite films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SIEGAL,MICHAEL P.; TALLANT,DAVID R.; PROVENCIO,PAULA P.; OVERMYER,DONALD L.; SIMPSON,REGINA L.; MARTINEZ-MIRANDA,L.J.

    2000-01-27

    Modest thermal annealing to 600 C of diamondlike amorphous-carbon (a-C) films grown at room temperature results in the formation of carbon nanocomposites with hardness similar to diamond. These nanocomposite films consist of nanometer-sized regions of high density a-C embedded in an a-C matrix with a reduced density of 5--10%. The authors report on the evolution of density and bonding topologies as a function of annealing temperature. Despite a decrease in density, film hardness actually increases {approximately} 15% due to the development of the nanocomposite structure.

  3. Ultrahard carbon nanocomposite films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegal, M. P. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1421 (United States); Tallant, D. R. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1421 (United States); Provencio, P. N. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1421 (United States); Overmyer, D. L. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1421 (United States); Simpson, R. L. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1421 (United States); Martinez-Miranda, L. J. [Department of Materials and Nuclear Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

    2000-05-22

    Modest thermal annealing to 600 degree sign C of diamondlike amorphous-carbon (a-C) films grown at room temperature results in the formation of carbon nanocomposites with hardness similar to diamond. These nanocomposite films consist of nanometer-sized regions of high density a-C embedded in an a-C matrix with a reduced density of 5%-10%. We report on the evolution of density and bonding topologies as a function of annealing temperature. Despite a decrease in density, film hardness actually increases {approx}15% due to the development of the nanocomposite structure. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  4. Growth of carbon nanofiber coatings on nickel thin films on fused silica by catalytic thermal chemical vapor deposition: On the use of titanium, titanium–tungsten and tantalum as adhesion layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thakur, D.B.; Tiggelaar, R.M.; Gardeniers, J.G.E.; Lefferts, L.; Seshan, K.

    2009-01-01

    Coatings of carbon nanofiber (CNF) layers were synthesized on fused silica substrates using a catalytic thermal chemical vapor deposition process (C-TCVD). The effects of various adhesion layers–titanium, titanium–tungsten and tantalum–under the nickel thin film on the attachment of carbon nanofiber

  5. Synthesis of Vertically-Aligned Carbon Nanotubes from Langmuir-Blodgett Films Deposited Fe Nanoparticles on Al2O3/Al/SiO2/Si Substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagiwa, Shota; Kanasugi, Osamu; Nakamura, Kentaro; Kushida, Masahito

    2016-04-01

    In order to apply vertically-aligned carbon nanotubes (VA-CNTs) to a new Pt supporting material of polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC), number density and outer diameter of CNTs must be controlled independently. So, we employed Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) technique for depositing CNT growth catalysts. A Fe nanoparticle (NP) was used as a CNT growth catalyst. In this study, we tried to thicken VA-CNT carpet height and inhibit thermal aggregation of Fe NPs by using Al2O3/Al/SiO2/Si substrate. Fe NP LB films were deposited on three typed of substrates, SiO2/Si, as-deposited Al2O3/Al/SiO2/Si and annealed Al2O3/Al/SiO2/Si at 923 K in Ar atmosphere of 16 Pa. It is known that Al2O3/Al catalyzes hydrocarbon reforming, inhibits thermal aggregation of CNT growth catalysts and reduces CNT growth catalysts. It was found that annealed Al2O3/Al/SiO2/Si exerted three effects more strongly than as-deposited Al2O3/Al/SiO2/Si. VA-CNTs were synthesized from Fe NPs-C16 LB films by thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. As a result, at the distance between two nearest CNTs 28 nm or less, VA-CNT carpet height on annealed Al2O3/Al/SiO2/Si was about twice and ten times thicker than that on SiO2/Si and that on as-deposited Al2O3/Al/SiO2/Si, respectively. Moreover, distribution of CNT outer diameter on annealed Al2O3/Al/SiO2/Si was inhibited compared to that on SiO2/Si. These results suggest that since thermal aggregation of Fe NPs is inhibited, catalyst activity increases and distribution of Fe NP size is inhibited.

  6. Nanostructural characterization of amorphous diamondlike carbon films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SIEGAL,MICHAEL P.; TALLANT,DAVID R.; MARTINEZ-MIRANDA,L.J.; BARBOUR,J. CHARLES; SIMPSON,REGINA L.; OVERMYER,DONALD L.

    2000-01-27

    Nanostructural characterization of amorphous diamondlike carbon (a-C) films grown on silicon using pulsed-laser deposition (PLD) is correlated to both growth energetic and film thickness. Raman spectroscopy and x-ray reflectivity probe both the topological nature of 3- and 4-fold coordinated carbon atom bonding and the topographical clustering of their distributions within a given film. In general, increasing the energetic of PLD growth results in films becoming more ``diamondlike'', i.e. increasing mass density and decreasing optical absorbance. However, these same properties decrease appreciably with thickness. The topology of carbon atom bonding is different for material near the substrate interface compared to material within the bulk portion of an a-C film. A simple model balancing the energy of residual stress and the free energies of resulting carbon topologies is proposed to provide an explanation of the evolution of topographical bonding clusters in a growing a-C film.

  7. Time-Resolved Spectroscopic Observation of Deposition Processes of Ultrananocrystalline Diamond/Amorphous Carbon Composite Films by Using a Coaxial Arc Plasma Gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanada, Kenji; Yoshitake, Tsuyoshi; Nishiyama, Takashi; Nagayama, Kunihito

    2010-08-01

    The deposition of ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD)/amorphous carbon composite films using a coaxial arc plasma gun in vacuum and, for comparison, in a 53.3 Pa hydrogen atmosphere was spectroscopically observed using a high-speed camera equipped with narrow-band-pass filters. UNCD crystallites with diameters of approximately 1.6 nm were formed even in vacuum. These extremely small crystallites imply that the formation is predominantly due to nucleation without the subsequent growth. Even in vacuum, emissions from C+ ions, C atoms, and C2 dimers lasted for approximately 100 µs, although the emission lifetimes of these species are generally 10 ns. We consider that the nucleation is due to the supersaturated environment containing excited carbon species with large number densities.

  8. Deposition of amorphous carbon-silver composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Zarco, O. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito Exterior s/n, Ciudad Universitaria. 04510, Mexico D. F. Mexico (Mexico); Rodil, S.E., E-mail: ser42@iim.unam.m [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito Exterior s/n, Ciudad Universitaria. 04510, Mexico D. F. Mexico (Mexico); Camacho-Lopez, M.A. [Facultad de Quimica, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Tollocan s/n, esq. Paseo Colon, Toluca, Estado de Mexico, 50110 (Mexico)

    2009-12-31

    Composites of amorphous carbon films and silver were deposited by co-sputtering, where the target (10 cm diameter) was of pure graphite with small inclusion of pure silver (less than 1 cm{sup 2}). The films were deposited under different powers, from 40 to 250 W, and different target-substrate distances. The substrate was earthed and rotated in order to obtain a uniform distribution of the silver content. The addition of the Ag piece into the target increased the deposition rate of the carbon films, which could be related to the higher sputter yield of the silver, but there seems to be also a contribution from a larger emission of secondary electrons from the Ag that enhances the plasma and therefore the sputtering process becomes more efficient. Scanning electron micrographs acquired using backscattered electrons showed that the silver was segregated from the carbon matrix, forming nanoparticles or larger clusters as the power was increased. The X-ray diffraction pattern showed that the silver was crystalline and the carbon matrix remained amorphous, although for certain conditions a peak attributed to fullerene-like structures was obtained. Finally, we used Raman spectroscopy to understand the bonding characteristics of the carbon-silver composites, finding that there are variations in the D/G ratio, which can be correlated to the observed structure and X-ray diffraction results.

  9. Piezoresistive effect in carbon nanotube films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The piezoresistive effect of the pristine carbon nanotube (CNT) films has been studied. Carbon nanotubes were synthesized by hot filament chemical vapor deposition. The piezoresistive effect in the pristine CNT films was studied by a three-point bending test. The gauge factor for the pristine CNT films under 500 microstrains was found to be at least 65 at room temperature, and increased with temperature, exceeding that of polycrystalline silicon (30) at 35℃. The origin of the piezoresistivity in CNT films may be ascribed to a pressure-induced change in the band gap and the defects.

  10. VUV-light-induced deposited silica films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Christopher K.; Pedraza, Anthony J.; Benson, Roberto S.; Park, Jae-Won

    1998-05-01

    A novel technique to deposit dielectric films at room temperature is described. The deposition of the silica takes place inside a cylindrical glass chamber where a silent discharge is generated between two electrodes connected to a high voltage, high frequency AC source. The chamber contains two parallel glass tubes where the electrodes are located and is filled with argon or xenon at a pressure of 100 mbar. Under these conditions, it has been shown that high intensity VUV light is generated peaking at 126 nm for argon and at 172 nm for xenon. This VUV radiation seems to produce photoablation of the glass tubes that surround the electrodes. Upon operation of the lamp, polyimide, polypropylene and silicon wafer substrates lying at the bottom of the vessel became coated with silica. The films, identified using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), revealed that the silica is oxygen-deficient with a composition of SiO x where x is between 1.7 and 1.8. The deposition rate on silicon wafers was measured by ellipsometry. When Xe gas is used the deposition rate is much lower than when Ar is used. This result is consistent with a photoablation process since the energy of the photons generated in Ar peaks at 10 eV while those generated in Xe peaks at 7 eV. These energy values should be compared with the O-Si bond strength energy that is 8.3 eV. The morphology and structure of the films were examined by scanning and transmission electron microscopies. Deposition of carbonaceous films occurred when the glass tubes containing the electrodes were coated with carbon.

  11. Chemical bonding structural analysis of nitrogen-doped ultrananocrystalline diamond/hydrogenated amorphous carbon composite films prepared by coaxial arc plasma deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gima, Hiroki; Zkria, Abdelrahman; Katamune, Yūki; Ohtani, Ryota; Koizumi, Satoshi; Yoshitake, Tsuyoshi

    2017-01-01

    Nitrogen-doped ultra-nanocrystalline diamond/hydrogenated amorphous carbon composite films prepared in hydrogen and nitrogen mixed-gas atmospheres by coaxial arc plasma deposition with graphite targets were studied electrically and chemical-bonding-structurally. The electrical conductivity was increased by nitrogen doping, accompanied by the production of n-type conduction. From X-ray photoemission, near-edge X-ray absorption fine-structure, hydrogen forward-scattering, and Fourier transform infrared spectral results, it is expected that hydrogen atoms that terminate diamond grain boundaries will be partially replaced by nitrogen atoms and, consequently, π C–N and C=N bonds that easily generate free electrons will be formed at grain boundaries.

  12. Buckling instability in amorphous carbon films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, X. D.; Narumi, K.; Naramoto, H.

    2007-06-01

    In this paper, we report the buckling instability in amorphous carbon films on mirror-polished sapphire (0001) wafers deposited by ion beam assisted deposition at various growth temperatures. For the films deposited at 150 °C, many interesting stress relief patterns are found, which include networks, blisters, sinusoidal patterns with π-shape, and highly ordered sinusoidal waves on a large scale. Starting at irregular buckling in the centre, the latter propagate towards the outer buckling region. The maximum length of these ordered patterns reaches 396 µm with a height of ~500 nm and a wavelength of ~8.2 µm. However, the length decreases dramatically to 70 µm as the deposition temperature is increased to 550 °C. The delamination of the film appears instead of sinusoidal waves with a further increase of the deposition temperature. This experimental observation is correlated with the theoretic work of Crosby (1999 Phys. Rev. E 59 R2542).

  13. A Comparative Study of Three Different Chemical Vapor Deposition Techniques of Carbon Nanotube Growth on Diamond Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betty T. Quinton

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper compares between the methods of growing carbon nanotubes (CNTs on diamond substrates and evaluates the quality of the CNTs and the interfacial strength. One potential application for these materials is a heat sink/spreader for high-power electronic devices. The CNTs and diamond substrates have a significantly higher specific thermal conductivity than traditional heat sink/spreader materials making them good replacement candidates. Only limited research has been performed on these CNT/diamond structures and their suitability of different growth methods. This study investigates three potential chemical vapor deposition (CVD techniques for growing CNTs on diamond: thermal CVD (T-CVD, microwave plasma-enhanced CVD (MPE-CVD, and floating catalyst thermal CVD (FCT-CVD. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM were used to analyze the morphology and topology of the CNTs. Raman spectroscopy was used to assess the quality of the CNTs by determining the ID/IG peak intensity ratios. Additionally, the CNT/diamond samples were sonicated for qualitative comparisons of the durability of the CNT forests. T-CVD provided the largest diameter tubes, with catalysts residing mainly at the CNT/diamond interface. The MPE-CVD process yielded non uniform defective CNTs, and FCT-CVD resulted in the smallest diameter CNTs with catalyst particles imbedded throughout the length of the nanotubes.

  14. Piezoresistive Sensors Based on Carbon Nanotube Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L(U) Jian-wei; WANG Wan-lu; LIAO Ke-jun; WANG Yong-tian; LIU CHang-lin; Zeng Qing-gao

    2005-01-01

    Piezoresistive effect of carbon nanotube films was investigated by a three-point bending test.Carbon nanotubes were synthesized by hot filament chemical vapor deposition.The experimental results showed that the carbon nanotubes have a striking piezoresistive effect.The relative resistance was changed from 0 to 10.5×10-2 and 3.25×10-2 for doped and undoped films respectively at room temperature when the microstrain under stress from 0 to 500. The gauge factors for doped and undoped carbon nanotube films under 500 microstrain were about 220 and 67 at room temperature, respectively, exceeding that of polycrystalline silicon (30) at 35℃.The origin of the resistance changes in the films may be attributed to a strain-induced change in the band gap for the doped tubes and the defects for the undoped tubes.

  15. Pulsed laser deposition: Prospects for commercial deposition of epitaxial films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muenchausen, R.E.

    1999-03-01

    Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) is a physical vapor deposition (PVD) technique for the deposition of thin films. The vapor source is induced by the flash evaporation that occurs when a laser pulse of sufficient intensity (about 100 MW/cm{sup 2}) is absorbed by a target. In this paper the author briefly defines pulsed laser deposition, current applications, research directed at gaining a better understanding of the pulsed laser deposition process, and suggests some future directions to enable commercial applications.

  16. Dual Ion Beam Deposition Of Diamond Films On Optical Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutchman, Arnold H.; Partyka, Robert J.; Lewis, J. C.

    1990-01-01

    Diamond film deposition processes are of great interest because of their potential use for the formation of both protective as well as anti-reflective coatings on the surfaces of optical elements. Conventional plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition diamond coating processes are not ideal for use on optical components because of the high processing temperatures required, and difficulties faced in nucleating films on most optical substrate materials. A unique dual ion beam deposition technique has been developed which now makes possible deposition of diamond films on a wide variety of optical elements. The new DIOND process operates at temperatures below 150 aegrees Farenheit, and has been used to nucleate and grow both diamondlike carbon and diamond films on a wide variety of optical :taterials including borosilicate glass, quartz glass, plastic, ZnS, ZnSe, Si, and Ge.

  17. Energetic deposition of thin metal films

    CERN Document Server

    Al-Busaidy, M S K

    2001-01-01

    deposited films. The primary aim of this thesis was to study the physical effect of energetic deposition metal thin films. The secondary aim is to enhance the quality of the films produced to a desired quality. Grazing incidence X-ray reflectivity (GIXR) measurements from a high-energy synchrotron radiation source were carried out to study and characterise the samples. Optical Profilers Interferometery, Atomic Force Microscope (AFM), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), Medium energy ion spectroscopy (MEIS), and the Electron microscope studies were the other main structural characterisation tools used. AI/Fe trilayers, as well as multilayers were deposited using a Nordico planar D.C. magnetron deposition system at different voltage biases and pressures. The films were calibrated and investigated. The relation between energetic deposition variation and structural properties was intensely researched. Energetic deposition refers to the method in which the deposited species possess higher kinetic energy and impact ...

  18. A Comparative Study of Three Different Chemical Vapor Deposition Techniques of Carbon Nanotube Growth on Diamond Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    1187–1194, 2010. [28] L. T. Sun, J. L. Gong , Z. Y. Zhu et al., “Nanocrystalline diamond from carbon nanotubes,” Applied Physics Letters, vol. 84, no. 15...pp. 759–760, 1994. [33] G. Zhang, P. Qi , X. Wang et al., “Hydrogenation and hydro- carbonation and etching of single-walled carbon nanotubes,” Journal

  19. The fabrication of vertically aligned and periodically distributed carbon nanotube bundles and periodically porous carbon nanotube films through a combination of laser interference ablation and metal-catalyzed chemical vapor deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Dajun; Lin, Wei; Guo, Rui; Wong, C P; Das, Suman

    2012-06-01

    Scalable fabrication of carbon nanotube (CNT) bundles is essential to future advances in several applications. Here, we report on the development of a simple, two-step method for fabricating vertically aligned and periodically distributed CNT bundles and periodically porous CNT films at the sub-micron scale. The method involves laser interference ablation (LIA) of an iron film followed by CNT growth via iron-catalyzed chemical vapor deposition. CNT bundles with square widths ranging from 0.5 to 1.5 µm in width, and 50-200 µm in length, are grown atop the patterned catalyst over areas spanning 8 cm(2). The CNT bundles exhibit a high degree of control over square width, orientation, uniformity, and periodicity. This simple scalable method of producing well-placed and oriented CNT bundles demonstrates a high application potential for wafer-scale integration of CNT structures into various device applications, including IC interconnects, field emitters, sensors, batteries, and optoelectronics, etc.

  20. Regression Analysis of the Effect of Bias Voltage on Nano- and Macrotribological Properties of Diamond-Like Carbon Films Deposited by a Filtered Cathodic Vacuum Arc Ion-Plating Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shojiro Miyake

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Diamond-like carbon (DLC films are deposited by bend filtered cathodic vacuum arc (FCVA technique with DC and pulsed bias voltage. The effects of varying bias voltage on nanoindentation and nanowear properties were evaluated by atomic force microscopy. DLC films deposited with DC bias voltage of −50 V exhibited the greatest hardness at approximately 50 GPa, a low modulus of dissipation, low elastic modulus to nanoindentation hardness ratio, and high nanowear resistance. Nanoindentation hardness was positively correlated with the Raman peak ratio Id/Ig, whereas wear depth was negatively correlated with this ratio. These nanotribological properties highly depend on the films’ nanostructures. The tribological properties of the FCVA-DLC films were also investigated using a ball-on-disk test. The average friction coefficient of DLC films deposited with DC bias voltage was lower than that of DLC films deposited with pulse bias voltage. The friction coefficient calculated from the ball-on-disk test was correlated with the nanoindentation hardness in dry conditions. However, under boundary lubrication conditions, the friction coefficient and specific wear rate had little correlation with nanoindentation hardness, and wear behavior seemed to be influenced by other factors such as adhesion strength between the film and substrate.

  1. Thin Film & Deposition Systems (Windows)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Coating Lab: Contains chambers for growing thin film window coatings. Plasma Applications Coating Lab: Contains chambers for growing thin film window coatings. Solar...

  2. Single-layer nano-carbon film, diamond film, and diamond/nano-carbon composite film field emission performance comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoping; Wang, Jinye; Wang, Lijun

    2016-05-01

    A series of single-layer nano-carbon (SNC) films, diamond films, and diamond/nano-carbon (D/NC) composite films have been prepared on the highly doped silicon substrate by using microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition techniques. The films were characterised by scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and field emission I-V measurements. The experimental results indicated that the field emission maximum current density of D/NC composite films is 11.8-17.8 times that of diamond films. And the field emission current density of D/NC composite films is 2.9-5 times that of SNC films at an electric field of 3.0 V/μm. At the same time, the D/NC composite film exhibits the advantage of improved reproducibility and long term stability (both of the nano-carbon film within the D/NC composite cathode and the SNC cathode were prepared under the same experimental conditions). And for the D/NC composite sample, a high current density of 10 mA/cm2 at an electric field of 3.0 V/μm was obtained. Diamond layer can effectively improve the field emission characteristics of nano-carbon film. The reason may be due to the diamond film acts as the electron acceleration layer.

  3. Control of crystallite size in diamond film chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Mark B.; Johnson, Linda F.; Klemm, Karl A.

    1992-12-01

    In depositing an adhering, continuous, polycrystalline diamond film of optical or semiconductor quality on a substrate, as by forming on the substrate a layer of a refractory nitride interlayer and depositing diamond on the interlayer without mechanical treatment or seeding of the substrate or the interlayer, the substrate is heated in a vacuum chamber containing a microwave activated mixture of hydrogen and a gas including carbon, and the size of deposited diamond crystallites and their rate of deposition selectively varied by a bias voltage applied to the substrate.

  4. Preparation and Thermal Characterization of Diamond-Like Carbon Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAI Su-Yuan; TANG Zhen-An; HUANG Zheng-Xing; Yu Jun; WANG Jing; LIU Gui-Chang

    2009-01-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films are prepared on silicon substrates by microwave electron cyclotron resonance plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Raman spectroscopy indicates that the films have an amorphous structure and typical characteristics. The topographies of the films are presented by AFM images. Effective thermal conductivities of the films are measured using a nanosecond pulsed photothermal reflectance method. The results show that thermal conductivity is dominated by the microstructure of the films.

  5. Protection of elastomers with DLC film : deposition, characterization and performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martinez Martinez, Diego

    2017-01-01

    Elastomers are materials which suffer from strong wear and cause high friction losses when subjected to dynamic contact, leading quite often to failure of the components in devices. In this Thesis, the protection of elastomers by the deposition of carbon-based films (DLC) is studied. To accomplish t

  6. Flexible protective diamond-like carbon film on rubber

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pei, Y.T.; Bui, X.L.; Hosson, J.Th.M. De

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we report an experimental approach to deposit flexible diamond-like carbon (DLC) films on rubber via self-segmentation. By making use of the substantial thermal mismatch between the DLC film and rubber substrate a dense network of cracks forms in the DLC film, contributing to its flexi

  7. DEPOSITION CARBON NANOSTRUCTURES BY SURFATRON GENERATED DISCHARGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Davydova

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanostructures were deposited by surface wave discharge using various Ar/CH4/ CO2 gas mixture ratios. The morphology was controlled by adjusting of gas concentration and was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Also, the influence of the low temperature plasma treatment and process time on the wettability of the diamond films has been studied. The results indicate that for hydrogen termination of diamond surface indicate that the temperature as low as 400°C and treatment time of 15 min is sufficient to attain the p-type surface conductivity of diamond.

  8. On the nature of the coefficient of friction of diamond-like carbon films deposited on rubber

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martinez-Martinez, D.; van der Pal, J. P.; Schenkel, M.; Shaha, K. P.; Pei, Y. T.; De Hosson, J. Th M.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, the nature of the coefficient of friction (CoF) of diamond-like carbon (DLC)-protected rubbers is studied. The relative importance of the viscoelastic and adhesive contributions to the overall friction is evaluated experimentally by modifying the contact load and the adhesive strength

  9. Tribological Properties of DLC Film Prepared by C + Ion Beam-assisted Deposition (IBAD)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    C + ion beam-assisted deposition was utilized to prepare deposit diamond-like carbon (DLC) film.With the help of a series of experiments such as Raman spectroscopy, FT- IR spectroscopy, AFM and nanoindentation, the DLC film has been recognized as hydrogenated DLC film and its tribological properties have been evaluated.The ball-on-disc testing results show that the hardness and the tribological properties of the DLC film produced by C + ion beam-assisted deposition are improved significandy.DLC film produced by C+ ion beam-assisted deposition is positive to have a prosperous tribological application in the near future.

  10. Liquid phase deposition of electrochromic thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richardson, Thomas J.; Rubin, Michael D.

    2000-08-18

    Thin films of titanium, zirconium and nickel oxides were deposited on conductive SnO2:F glass substrates by immersion in aqueous solutions. The films are transparent, conformal, of uniform thickness and appearance, and adhere strongly to the substrates. On electrochemical cycling, TiO2, mixed TiO2-ZrO2, and NiOx films exhibited stable electrochromism with high coloration efficiencies. These nickel oxide films were particularly stable compared with films prepared by other non-vacuum techniques. The method is simple, inexpensive, energy efficient, and readily scalable to larger substrates.

  11. Perovskite Thin Films via Atomic Layer Deposition

    KAUST Repository

    Sutherland, Brandon R.

    2014-10-30

    © 2014 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA. (Graph Presented) A new method to deposit perovskite thin films that benefit from the thickness control and conformality of atomic layer deposition (ALD) is detailed. A seed layer of ALD PbS is place-exchanged with PbI2 and subsequently CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite. These films show promising optical properties, with gain coefficients of 3200 ± 830 cm-1.

  12. Perovskite thin films via atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Brandon R; Hoogland, Sjoerd; Adachi, Michael M; Kanjanaboos, Pongsakorn; Wong, Chris T O; McDowell, Jeffrey J; Xu, Jixian; Voznyy, Oleksandr; Ning, Zhijun; Houtepen, Arjan J; Sargent, Edward H

    2015-01-01

    A new method to deposit perovskite thin films that benefit from the thickness control and conformality of atomic layer deposition (ALD) is detailed. A seed layer of ALD PbS is place-exchanged with PbI2 and subsequently CH3 NH3 PbI3 perovskite. These films show promising optical properties, with gain coefficients of 3200 ± 830 cm(-1) .

  13. Characterization of Thin Films Deposited with Precursor Ferrocene by Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO Kailun; ZHENG Jianwan; LIU Zuli; JIA Lihui

    2007-01-01

    In this paper,the characterization of thin films,deposited with the precursor ferrocene(FcH)by the plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition(PECVD)technique,was investigated.The films were measured by Scanning Electronic Microscopy(SEM),Atomic Force Microscopy(AFM),Electron Spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis(ESCA),and superconducting Quantum Interference Device(SQUID).It was observed that the film's layer is homogeneous in thickness and has a dense morphology without cracks.The surface roughness is about 36 nm.From the results of ESCA,it can be inferred that the film mainly contains the compound FeOOH,and carbon is combined with oxygen in different forms under different supply-powers.The hysteresis loops indicate that the film is of soft magnetism.

  14. Thin films of hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) obtained through chemical vapor deposition assisted by plasma; Peliculas delgadas de carbono amorfo hidrogenado (a-C:H) obtenidas mediante deposito quimico de vapores asistido por plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mejia H, J.A.; Camps C, E.E.; Escobar A, L.; Romero H, S.; Chirino O, S. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Muhl S, S. [IIM-UNAM, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2004-07-01

    Films of hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) were deposited using one source of microwave plasma with magnetic field (type ECR), using mixtures of H{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} in relationship of 80/20 and 95/05 as precursory gases, with work pressures of 4X10{sup -4} to 6x10{sup -4} Torr and an incident power of the discharge of microwaves with a constant value of 400 W. It was analyzed the influence among the properties of the films, as the deposit rate, the composition and the bonding types, and the deposit conditions, such as the flow rates of the precursory gases and the polarization voltage of the sample holders. (Author)

  15. Ultraviolet laser deposition of graphene thin films without catalytic layers

    KAUST Repository

    Sarath Kumar, S. R.

    2013-01-09

    In this letter, the formation of nanostructured graphene by ultraviolet laser ablation of a highly ordered pyrolytic graphite target under optimized conditions is demonstrated, without a catalytic layer, and a model for the growth process is proposed. Previously, graphene film deposition by low-energy laser (2.3 eV) was explained by photo-thermal models, which implied that graphene films cannot be deposited by laser energies higher than the C-C bond energy in highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (3.7 eV). Here, we show that nanostructured graphene films can in fact be deposited using ultraviolet laser (5 eV) directly over different substrates, without a catalytic layer. The formation of graphene is explained by bond-breaking assisted by photoelectronic excitation leading to formation of carbon clusters at the target and annealing out of defects at the substrate.

  16. Structural morphology of amorphous conducting carbon film

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P N Vishwakarma; V Prasad; S V Subramanyam; V Ganesan

    2005-10-01

    Amorphous conducting carbon films deposited over quartz substrates were analysed using X-ray diffraction and AFM technique. X-ray diffraction data reveal disorder and roughness in the plane of graphene sheet as compared to that of graphite. This roughness increases with decrease in preparation temperature. The AFM data shows surface roughness of carbon films depending on preparation temperatures. The surface roughness increases with decrease in preparation temperature. Also some nucleating islands were seen on the samples prepared at 900°C, which are not present on the films prepared at 700°C. Detailed analysis of these islands reveals distorted graphitic lattice arrangement. So we believe these islands to be nucleating graphitic. Power spectrum density (PSD) analysis of the carbon surface indicates a transition from the nonlinear growth mode to linear surface-diffusion dominated growth mode resulting in a relatively smoother surface as one moves from low preparation temperature to high preparation temperature. The amorphous carbon films deposited over a rough quartz substrate reveal nucleating diamond like structures. The density of these nucleating diamond like structures was found to be independent of substrate temperature (700–900°C).

  17. Antimicrobial Properties of Diamond-Like Carbon/Silver Nanocomposite Thin Films Deposited on Textiles: Towards Smart Bandages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadas Juknius

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In the current work, a new antibacterial bandage was proposed where diamond-like carbon with silver nanoparticle (DLC:Ag-coated synthetic silk tissue was used as a building block. The DLC:Ag structure, the dimensions of nanoparticles, the silver concentration and the silver ion release were studied systematically employing scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and atomic absorption spectroscopy, respectively. Antimicrobial properties were investigated using microbiological tests (disk diffusion method and spread-plate technique. The DLC:Ag layer was stabilized on the surface of the bandage using a thin layer of medical grade gelatin and cellulose. Four different strains of Staphylococcus aureus extracted from humans’ and animals’ infected wounds were used. It is demonstrated that the efficiency of the Ag+ ion release to the aqueous media can be increased by further RF oxygen plasma etching of the nanocomposite. It was obtained that the best antibacterial properties were demonstrated by the plasma-processed DLC:Ag layer having a 3.12 at % Ag surface concentration with the dominating linear dimensions of nanoparticles being 23.7 nm. An extra protective layer made from cellulose and gelatin with agar contributed to the accumulation and efficient release of silver ions to the aqueous media, increasing bandage antimicrobial efficiency up to 50% as compared to the single DLC:Ag layer on textile.

  18. Large-Scale Graphene Film Deposition for Monolithic Device Fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-shurman, Khaled

    and on the silicon-based substrate. Large- area bilayer graphene film was formed on silicon based platform. COMSOL Multiphysics was used to investigate the CVD graphene growth on Ni films. Factors affecting CVD graphene synthesis include carbon solubility in Ni, growth time, growth temperature, as well as Ni film thickness. COMSOL model uses transport of diluted species, heat transfer in Ni thin film as well as deformed geometry module. In this particular research, the number of simulated graphene layers on Ni film was compared with experimental data. Also, the effect of many CVD parameters on graphene film fabrication is stated. In conclusion, a novel method for direct large-scale graphene film fabrication on silicon based platform at low temperature was achieved using hot-filament chemical vapor deposition.

  19. Pulsed laser deposition of tantalum pentoxide film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J.-Y.; Boyd, I. W.

    We report thin tantalum pentoxide (Ta2O5) films grown on quartz and silicon substrates by the pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique employing a Nd:YAG laser (wavelength λ=532 nm) in various O2 gas environments. The effect of oxygen pressure, substrate temperature, and annealing under UV irradiation using a 172-nm excimer lamp on the properties of the grown films has been studied. The optical properties determined by UV spectrophotometry were also found to be a sensitive function of oxygen pressure in the chamber. At an O2 pressure of 0.2 mbar and deposition temperatures between 400 and 500 °C, the refractive index of the films was around 2.18 which is very close to the bulk Ta2O5 value of 2.2, and an optical transmittance around 90% in the visible region of the spectrum was obtained. X-ray diffraction measurements showed that the as-deposited films were amorphous at temperatures below 500 °C and possessed an orthorhombic (β-Ta2O5) crystal structure at temperatures above 600 °C. The most significant result of the present study was that oxygen pressure could be used to control the composition and modulate optical band gap of the films. It was also found that UV annealing can significantly improve the optical and electrical properties of the films deposited at low oxygen pressures (<0.1 mbar).

  20. Cadmium Sulfide Thin Films Deposited onto MWCNT/Polysulfone Substrates by Chemical Bath Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Moreno

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cadmium sulfide (CdS thin films were deposited by chemical bath deposition (CBD onto polymeric composites with electric field-aligned multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs. MWCNT/polysulfone composites were prepared by dispersing low concentrations of MWCNTs within dissolved polysulfone (PSF. An alternating current electric field was “in situ” applied to align the MWCNTs within the dissolved polymer along the field direction until the solvent was evaporated. 80 μm thick solid MWCNT/PSF composites with an electrical conductivity 13 orders of magnitude higher than the conductivity of the neat PSF were obtained. The MWCNT/PSF composites were subsequently used as flexible substrates for the deposition of CdS thin films by CBD. Transparent and adherent CdS thin films with an average thickness of 475 nm were obtained. The values of the energy band gap, average grain size, rms roughness, crystalline structure, and preferential orientation of the CdS films deposited onto the polymeric substrate were very similar to the corresponding values of the CdS deposited onto glass (conventional substrate. These results show that the MWCNT/PSF composites with electric field-tailored MWCNTs represent a suitable option to be used as flexible conducting substrate for CdS thin films, which represents an important step towards the developing of flexible systems for photovoltaic applications.

  1. Iron films deposited on porous alumina substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Yasuhiro; Tanabe, Kenichi; Nishida, Naoki; Kobayashi, Yoshio

    2016-12-01

    Iron films were deposited on porous alumina substrates using an arc plasma gun. The pore sizes (120 - 250 nm) of the substrates were controlled by changing the temperature during the anodic oxidation of aluminum plates. Iron atoms penetrated into pores with diameters of less than 160 nm, and were stabilized by forming γ-Fe, whereas α-Fe was produced as a flat plane covering the pores. For porous alumina substrates with pore sizes larger than 200 nm, the deposited iron films contained many defects and the resulting α-Fe had smaller hyperfine magnetic fields. In addition, only a very small amount of γ-Fe was obtained. It was demonstrated that the composition and structure of an iron film can be affected by the surface morphology of the porous alumina substrate on which the film is grown.

  2. Laser deposition of bimetallic island films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucherik, A. O.; Arakelyan, S. M.; Kutrovskaya, S. V.; Osipov, A. V.; Istratov, A. V.; Vartanyan, T. A.; Itina, T. E.

    2016-08-01

    In this work the results of a bimetallic Au-Ag structure deposition from the colloidal system by nanosecond laser radiation are presented. The formation of the extended arrays of gold and silver nanoparticles with controlled morphology is examined. We report the results of formation bimetallic islands films with various electrical and optical properties. The changes in the optical properties of the obtained thin films are found to depend on their morphology.

  3. Physical Vapor Deposition of Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahan, John E.

    2000-01-01

    A unified treatment of the theories, data, and technologies underlying physical vapor deposition methods With electronic, optical, and magnetic coating technologies increasingly dominating manufacturing in the high-tech industries, there is a growing need for expertise in physical vapor deposition of thin films. This important new work provides researchers and engineers in this field with the information they need to tackle thin film processes in the real world. Presenting a cohesive, thoroughly developed treatment of both fundamental and applied topics, Physical Vapor Deposition of Thin Films incorporates many critical results from across the literature as it imparts a working knowledge of a variety of present-day techniques. Numerous worked examples, extensive references, and more than 100 illustrations and photographs accompany coverage of: * Thermal evaporation, sputtering, and pulsed laser deposition techniques * Key theories and phenomena, including the kinetic theory of gases, adsorption and condensation, high-vacuum pumping dynamics, and sputtering discharges * Trends in sputter yield data and a new simplified collisional model of sputter yield for pure element targets * Quantitative models for film deposition rate, thickness profiles, and thermalization of the sputtered beam

  4. DLC Films Deposited by the DC PACVD Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Palamarchuk

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available DLC (Diamond-Like Carbon coatings have been suggested as protective surface layers against wear. However hard DLC coatings, especially those of greater thickness, have poor adhesion to substrates. We have used several ways to increase the adhesion of DLC coatings prepared by the PACVD (Plasma Assisted Chemical Vapour Deposition method on steel substrates. One of these is the DC PACVD method for preparing DLC films.

  5. DLC Films Deposited by the DC PACVD Method

    OpenAIRE

    D. Palamarchuk; M. Zoriy; J. Gurovič; F. Černý; S. Konvičková; I. Hüttel

    2003-01-01

    DLC (Diamond-Like Carbon) coatings have been suggested as protective surface layers against wear. However hard DLC coatings, especially those of greater thickness, have poor adhesion to substrates. We have used several ways to increase the adhesion of DLC coatings prepared by the PACVD (Plasma Assisted Chemical Vapour Deposition) method on steel substrates. One of these is the DC PACVD method for preparing DLC films.

  6. Laser-assisted deposition of thin C60 films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Jørgen; Canulescu, Stela; Fæster, Søren

    . However, organic materials are usually not well suited for direct laser irradiation, since the organic molecules may suffer from fragmentation by the laser light. We have, therefore, explored the possible fragmentation of organic molecules by attempting to produce thin films of C60 which is a strongly...... bound carbon molecule with a well-defined mass (M = 720 amu) and therefore a good, organic test molecule. C60 fullerene thin films of average thickness of more than 100 nm was produced in vacuum by matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE). A 355 nm Nd:YAG laser was directed onto a frozen target...... of the matrix material, anisole, with a concentration of 0.67 wt% C60. At laser fluences below 1.5 J/cm2, a dominant fraction of the film molecules are C60 transferred to the substrate without any fragmentation. High-resolution SEM images of MAPLE deposited films reveal large circular features on the surface...

  7. Deposition of biopolymer films on micromechanical sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Stephan Sylvest; Gammelgaard, Lene; Jensen, Marie P.

    2011-01-01

    The influence of various parameters on the spray-coating of thin films of poly(l-lactide) (PLLA) was investigated. The optimized processing conditions were used for deposition of the biodegradable polymer on arrays of SU-8 microcantilevers. The resonance frequency of the cantilevers before and af...

  8. A versatile new method for synthesis and deposition of doped, visible light-activated TiO2 thin films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    In, Su-il; Kean, A.H.; Orlov, A.;

    2009-01-01

    A flexible and widely applicable method allows the deposition of carbon-doped visible light-activated photocatalytic TiO2 thin films on a variety of substrates.......A flexible and widely applicable method allows the deposition of carbon-doped visible light-activated photocatalytic TiO2 thin films on a variety of substrates....

  9. Pulsed laser deposition of nanostructured Ag films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donnelly, Tony [School of Physics, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Doggett, Brendan [School of Physics, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Lunney, James G. [School of Physics, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland)]. E-mail: jlunney@tcd.ie

    2006-04-30

    Ultra-thin (0.5-5 nm) films of Ag have been prepared by pulsed laser deposition in vacuum using a 26 ns KrF excimer laser at 1 J cm{sup -2}. The deposition was controlled using a Langmuir ion probe and a quartz crystal thickness monitor. Transmission electron microscopy showed that the films are not continuous, but are structured on nanometer size scales. Optical absorption spectra showed the expected surface plasmon resonance feature, which shifted to longer wavelength and increased in strength as the equivalent film thickness was increased. It is shown that Maxwell Garnett effective medium theory can be used to calculate the main features of optical absorption spectra.

  10. Studies to Enhance Superconductivity in Thin Film Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Benjamin; Brunke, Lyle; Burke, Jack; Vier, David; Steckl, Andrew; Haugan, Timothy

    2012-02-01

    With research in the area of superconductivity growing, it is no surprise that new efforts are being made to induce superconductivity or increase transition temperatures (Tc) in carbon given its many allotropic forms. Promising results have been published for boron doping in diamond films, and phosphorus doping in highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) films show hints of superconductivity.. Following these examples in the literature, we have begun studies to explore superconductivity in thin film carbon samples doped with different elements. Carbon thin films are prepared by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) on amorphous SiO2/Si and single-crystal substrates. Doping is achieved by depositing from (C1-xMx) single-targets with M = B4C and BN, and also by ion implantation into pure-carbon films. Previous research had indicated that Boron in HOPG did not elicit superconducting properties, but we aim to explore that also in thin film carbon and see if there needs to be a higher doping in the sample if trends were able to be seen in diamond films. Higher onset temperatures, Tc , and current densities, Jc, are hoped to be achieved with doping of the thin film carbon with different elements.

  11. Influence of the diameter of single-walled carbon nanotube bundles on the optoelectronic performance of dry-deposited thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustonen, Kimmo; Susi, Toma; Kaskela, Antti; Laiho, Patrik; Tian, Ying; Nasibulin, Albert G; Kauppinen, Esko I

    2012-01-01

    The optoelectronic performance of thin films of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) was studied with respect to the properties of both individual nanotubes and their bundles. The SWCNTs were synthesized in a hot wire generator aerosol reactor, collected by gas filtration and dry-transferred onto various substrates. By thus completely avoiding liquid dispersion steps, we were able to avoid any artifacts from residual surfactants or sonication. We found that bundle lengths determined the thin-film performance, as would be expected for highly resistive bundle-bundle junctions. However, we found no evidence that contact resistances were affected by the bundle diameters, although they did play a secondary role by simply affecting the absorption. The individual SWCNT diameters and their graphitization level as gauged by the Raman D band intensity did not show any clear correlation with the overall performance.

  12. Influence of the diameter of single-walled carbon nanotube bundles on the optoelectronic performance of dry-deposited thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimmo Mustonen

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The optoelectronic performance of thin films of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs was studied with respect to the properties of both individual nanotubes and their bundles. The SWCNTs were synthesized in a hot wire generator aerosol reactor, collected by gas filtration and dry-transferred onto various substrates. By thus completely avoiding liquid dispersion steps, we were able to avoid any artifacts from residual surfactants or sonication. We found that bundle lengths determined the thin-film performance, as would be expected for highly resistive bundle–bundle junctions. However, we found no evidence that contact resistances were affected by the bundle diameters, although they did play a secondary role by simply affecting the absorption. The individual SWCNT diameters and their graphitization level as gauged by the Raman D band intensity did not show any clear correlation with the overall performance.

  13. Potentiostatic Deposition and Characterization of Cuprous Oxide Thin Films

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Electrodeposition technique was employed to deposit cuprous oxide Cu2O thin films. In this work, Cu2O thin films have been grown on fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO) transparent conducting glass as a substrate by potentiostatic deposition of cupric acetate. The effect of deposition time on the morphologies, crystalline, and optical quality of Cu2O thin films was investigated.

  14. Silicon carbide and other films and method of deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehregany, Mehran (Inventor); Zorman, Christian A. (Inventor); Fu, Xiao-An (Inventor); Dunning, Jeremy (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A method of depositing a ceramic film, particularly a silicon carbide film, on a substrate is disclosed in which the residual stress, residual stress gradient, and resistivity are controlled. Also disclosed are substrates having a deposited film with these controlled properties and devices, particularly MEMS and NEMS devices, having substrates with films having these properties.

  15. Pulsed laser deposition of ferroelectric thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Somnath; McKnight, Steven H.; Sengupta, Louise C.

    1997-05-01

    It has been shown that in bulk ceramic form, the barium to strontium ratio in barium strontium titanium oxide (Ba1- xSrxTiO3, BSTO) affects the voltage tunability and electronic dissipation factor in an inverse fashion; increasing the strontium content reduces the dissipation factor at the expense of lower voltage tunability. However, the oxide composites of BSTO developed at the Army Research Laboratory still maintain low electronic loss factors for all compositions examined. The intent of this study is to determine whether such effects can be observed in the thin film form of the oxide composites. The pulsed laser deposition (PLD) method has been used to deposit the thin films. The different compositions of the compound (with 1 wt% of the oxide additive) chosen were: Ba0.3Sr0.7TiO3, Ba0.4Sr0.6TiO3, Ba0.5Sr0.5TiO3, Ba0.6Sr0.4TiO3, and Ba0.7Sr0.3TiO3. The electronic properties investigated in this study were the dielectric constant and the voltage tunability. The morphology of the thin films were examined using the atomic force microscopy. Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy was also utilized for optical characterization of the thin films. The electronic and optical properties of the thin films and the bulk ceramics were compared. The results of these investigations are discussed.

  16. Preparation of flat carbon support films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koning, RI; Oostergetel, GT; Brisson, A

    2003-01-01

    Wrinkling of carbon support films is known to limit the resolution of electron microscopy images of protein two-dimensional crystals. The origin of carbon wrinkling during preparation of the support films was investigated by reflected light microscopy. We observed that carbon films go through severa

  17. Deposition and characterization of CuInS2 thin films deposited over copper thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Titu; Kumar, K. Rajeev; Kartha, C. Sudha; Vijayakumar, K. P.

    2015-06-01

    Simple, cost effective and versatile spray pyrolysis method is effectively combined with vacuum evaporation for the deposition of CuIns2 thin films for photovoltaic applications. In the present study In2s3 was spray deposited over vacuum evaporated Cu thin films and Cu was allowed to diffuse in to the In2S3 layer to form CuInS2. To analyse the dependence of precursor volume on the formation of CuInS2 films structural, electrical and morphological analzes are carried out. Successful deposition of CuInS2thin films with good crystallinity and morphology with considerably low resistivity is reported in this paper.

  18. Flexible diamond-like carbon films on rubber : On the origin of self-acting segmentation and film flexibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pei, Y.T.; Bui, X.L.; Pal, J.P. van der; Martinez-Martinez, D.; Zhou, X.B.; Hosson, J.Th.M. De

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports an experimental approach to deposit flexible diamond-like carbon (DLC) films on hydrogenated nitrile butadiene rubber (HNBR) with plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition and an analytical model to describe the self-segmentation mechanism of the DLC films. By making use of the su

  19. A new carbon structure in annealed film coatings of the carbon-lead system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volodin, V. N.; Tuleushev, Yu. Zh.; Zhakanbaev, E. A.; Tsai, K. V.; Rofman, O. V.

    2017-01-01

    Carbon-lead solid solutions coexisting with amorphous carbon have been obtained for the first time in a film coating deposited by ion-plasma sputtering. During subsequent vacuum annealing of carbon-lead films containing more than 68.5 at % Pb, this element almost completely evaporates to leave an amorphous carbon coating on a substrate. During annealing at 1100°C, this amorphous carbon crystallizes into a new hexagonal lattice with unit cell parameters a = 0.7603 nm and c = 0.8168 nm. Characteristic X-ray diffraction data for the identification of this phase are determined.

  20. Synthesis of Aligned Carbon Nanotubes by Thermal Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Gang; ZHOU Ming; MA Weiwei; CAI Lan

    2009-01-01

    Single crystal silicon was found to be very beneficial to the growth of aligned carbon nanotubes by chemical vapor deposition with C2H2 as carbon source. A thin film of Ni served as catalyst was deposited on the Si substrate by the K575X Peltier Cooled High Resolution Sputter Coater before growth. The growth properties of carbon nanotubes were studied as a function of the Ni catalyst layer thickness. The diameter, growth rate and areal density of the carbon nanotubes were controlled by the initial thickness of the catalyst layer. Steric hindrance between nanotubes forces them to grow in well-aligned manner at an initial stage of growth. Transmission electron microscope analysis revealed that nanotubes grew by a tip growth mechanism.

  1. Electrical conditioning of diamond-like carbon films for the formation of coated field emission cathodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenenko, M.; Okrepka, G.; Yilmazoglu, O.; Hartnagel, H. L.; Pavlidis, D.

    2010-11-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films deposited on different substrates by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition were investigated. Bonding states and film quality were characterized by FT-IR spectroscopy. The influence of the power of plasma and the deposition time on the sp2/sp3 ratio as well as the concentration of CHn bonds was studied. The influence of sp2/sp3 ratio on the formation process of conducting channels in diamond-like carbon films as a result of electrical breakdown was determined. Reproducible increase of diamond-like carbon film conductivity, with initial sp2/sp3 ratio larger than 0.16, was observed after electrical breakdown.

  2. Deposition and Tribological Properties of Sulfur-Doped DLC Films Deposited by PBII Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nutthanun Moolsradoo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Sulfur-doped diamond-like carbon films (S-DLC fabricated from C2H2 and SF6 mixtures were used to study the effects of sulfur content and negative pulse bias voltage on the deposition and tribological properties of films prepared by plasma-based ion implantation (PBII. The structure and relative concentration of the films were analyzed by Raman spectroscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy. Hardness and elastic modulus of films were measured by nanoindentation hardness testing. Tribological characteristics of films were performed using a ball-on-disk friction tester. The results indicate that with the increasing sulfur content, the hardness and elastic modulus decrease. Additionally, by changing the negative pulse bias voltage from 0 kV to −5 kV, the hardness and elastic modulus increase, while the friction coefficient and specific wear rate tends to decrease. Moreover, at a negative pulse bias voltage of −5 kV and flow-rate ratio of 1 : 2, there is considerable improvement in friction coefficient of 0.05 under ambient air is due to the formation of a transfer films on the interface. The decrease in the friction coefficient of films doped with 4.9 at.% sulfur is greater under high vacuum (0.03 than under ambient air (>0.1.

  3. Angular magnetoresistance in semiconducting undoped amorphous carbon thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sagar, Rizwan Ur Rehman; Saleemi, Awais Siddique; Zhang, Xiaozhong, E-mail: xzzhang@tsinghua.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Advanced Materials (MOE), School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, People' s Republic of China and Beijing National Center for Electron Microscopy, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2015-05-07

    Thin films of undoped amorphous carbon thin film were fabricated by using Chemical Vapor Deposition and their structure was investigated by using High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy and Raman Spectroscopy. Angular magnetoresistance (MR) has been observed for the first time in these undoped amorphous carbon thin films in temperature range of 2 ∼ 40 K. The maximum magnitude of angular MR was in the range of 9.5% ∼ 1.5% in 2 ∼ 40 K. The origin of this angular MR was also discussed.

  4. Substrate heating measurements in pulsed ion beam film deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, J.C.; Davis, H.A.; Rej, D.J.; Waganaar, W.J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Tallant, D.R. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States). Materials Science and Engineering Dept.; Thompson, M.O. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-05-01

    Diamond-like Carbon (DLC) films have been deposited at Los Alamos National Laboratory by pulsed ion beam ablation of graphite targets. The targets were illuminated by an intense beam of hydrogen, carbon, and oxygen ions at a fluence of 15-45 J/cm{sup 2}. Ion energies were on the order of 350 keV, with beam current rising to 35 kA over a 400 ns ion current pulse. Raman spectra of the deposited films indicate an increasing ratio of sp{sup 3} to sp{sup 2} bonding as the substrate is moved further away from the target and further off the target normal. Using a thin film platinum resistor at varying positions, we have measured the heating of the substrate surface due to the kinetic energy and heat of condensation of the ablated material. This information is used to determine if substrate heating is responsible for the lack of DLC in positions close to the target and near the target normal. Latest data and analysis will be presented.

  5. ENHANCING ADHESION OF TETRAHEDRAL AMORPHOUS CARBON FILMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Yuqing; Lin Yi; Wang Xiaoyan; Wang Yanwu; Wei Xinyu

    2005-01-01

    Objective The high energy ion bombardment technique is applied to enhancing the adhesion of the tetrahedral amorphous carbon (TAC) films deposited by the filtered cathode vacuum arc (FCVA). Methods The abrasion method, scratch method, heating and shaking method as well as boiling salt solution method is used to test the adhesion of the TAC films on various material substrates. Results The test results show that the adhesion is increased as the ion bombardment energy increases. However, if the bombardment energy were over the corresponding optimum value, the adhesion would be enhanced very slowly for the harder material substrates and drops quickly, for the softer ones. Conclusion The optimum values of the ion bombardment energy are larger for the harder materials than that for the softer ones.

  6. Thin films deposited by femtosecond pulsed laser ablation of tungsten carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bonis, A.; Teghil, R.; Santagata, A.; Galasso, A.; Rau, J. V.

    2012-09-01

    Ultra-short Pulsed Laser Deposition has been applied to the production of thin films from a tungsten carbide target. The gaseous phase obtained by the laser ablation shows a very weak primary plume, in contrast with a very strong secondary one. The deposited films, investigated by Scanning Electron Microscopy, Atomic Force Microscopy, X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy and X-Ray Diffraction, present a mixture of WC and other phases with lower carbon content. All films are amorphous, independently from the substrate temperature. The characteristics of the deposits have been explained in terms of thermal evaporation and cooling rate of molten particles ejected from the target.

  7. AFM Study on Reliability of Nanoscale DLC Films Deposited by ECR-MPCVD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Shou-xing; ZHU Shi-gen; DING Jian-ning

    2004-01-01

    Nanoindentation, scratch and wear tests based on an atomic force microscope (AFM) were carried out to study the reliability of diamond-like carbon (DLC) films, deposited by electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (ECR-MPCVD). The predictors for film reliability were given to investigate the resistance of DLC films to indent, scratch, and wear. Experimental results showed that the films at 64.9nm and 12.07nm exhibited better reliability than thin one at 2.78nm, 4.48nm. In addition, the reliability strength of films above 12.07nm went stable, and the films showed good performance of anti-indentation, anti-scratch and anti-wear. Finally, size effect of nanoscale monolayer film was introduced to explain the reliability of nanoscale DLC films.

  8. Piezoresistive Effect of Doped carbon Nanotube/Cellulose Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王万录; 廖克俊; 李勇; 王永田

    2003-01-01

    The strain-induced resistance changes in iodine-doped and undoped carbon nanotube films were investigated by a three-point bending test. Carbon nanotubes were fabricated by hot filament chemical vapour deposition. The experimental results showed that there has a striking piezoresistive effect in carbon nanotube films. The gauge factor for I-doped and undoped carbon nanotube films under 500 microstrain was about 125 and 65 respectively at room temperature, exceeding that of polycrystalline silicon (30) at 35℃. The origin of the piezoresistivity in the films may be ascribed to a strain-induced change in the band gap for the doped tubes and to the intertube contact resistance for the undoped tubes.

  9. Influence of dc bias on amorphous carbon deposited by pulse laser ablation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Amorphous carbon films were deposited on single-crystalline silicon and K9 glass by pulse laser ablation using different negative substrate bias. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to observe morphology of the surface. Thickness and refractive index of the film deposited on K9 glass were measured by ellipsometry. Micro-hardness of films was measured relatively to single crystal silicon. All films deposited on silicon were analyzed by Raman spectra. All spectra were deconvoluted to three peaks. Line-width ratios varied similarly with bias voltage when the laser energy was kept invariant.

  10. Stress in and texture of PVD deposited metal nitride films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Machunze, R.

    2010-01-01

    Thin metal nitride films deposited by Physical Vapor Deposition (PVD) are used amongst many other applications as wear protective coatings in tool industry or as diffusion barriers in integrated circuit technology. Typically these films exhibit a residual in-plane stress when deposited onto rigid su

  11. Strontium-Doped Lanthanum Manganite Films Prepared by Magnetic Deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Menon, Mohan; Larsen, Casper; Andersen, Kjeld Bøhm

    2009-01-01

    Deposition of La0.85Sr0.15MnO3 (LSM) films from suspensions using a magnetic field was found to be a cheap and quick technique. Ninety weight percent of the particles present in the suspensions were deposited within the first minute of the deposition, and the thickness of the film varied linearly...

  12. Ti-doped hydrogenated diamond like carbon coating deposited by hybrid physical vapor deposition and plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Na Rae; Sle Jun, Yee; Moon, Kyoung Il; Sunyong Lee, Caroline

    2017-03-01

    Diamond-like carbon films containing titanium and hydrogen (Ti-doped DLC:H) were synthesized using a hybrid technique based on physical vapor deposition (PVD) and plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The film was deposited under a mixture of argon (Ar) and acetylene gas (C2H2). The amount of Ti in the Ti-doped DLC:H film was controlled by varying the DC power of the Ti sputtering target ranging from 0 to 240 W. The composition, microstructure, mechanical and chemical properties of Ti-doped DLC:H films with varying Ti concentrations, were investigated using Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), nano indentation, a ball-on-disk tribometer, a four-point probe system and dynamic anodic testing. As a result, the optimum composition of Ti in Ti-doped DLC:H film using our hybrid method was found to be a Ti content of 18 at. %, having superior electrical conductivity and high corrosion resistance, suitable for bipolar plates. Its hardness value was measured to be 25.6 GPa with a low friction factor.

  13. CdTe Films Deposited by Closed-space Sublimation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    CdTe films are prepared by closed-space sublimation technology. Dependence of film crystalline on substrate materials and substrate temperature is investigated. It is found that films exhibit higher crystallinity at substrate temperature higher than 400℃. And the CdTe films deposited on CdS films with higher crystallinity have bigger crystallite and higher uniformity. Treatment with CdCl2 methanol solution promotes the crystallite growth of CdTe films during annealing.

  14. Low temperature temporal and spatial atomic layer deposition of TiO{sub 2} films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aghaee, Morteza, E-mail: m.aghaee@tue.nl; Maydannik, Philipp S. [ASTRaL Group, Laboratory of Green Chemistry, Lappeenranta University of Technology, Sammonkatu 12, 50130 Mikkeli (Finland); Johansson, Petri; Kuusipalo, Jurkka [Paper Converting and Packaging Technology, Tampere University of Technology, P.O. Box 541, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland); Creatore, Mariadriana [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Homola, Tomáš; Cameron, David C. [R& D Center for Low-Cost Plasma and Nanotechnology Surface Modification, Masaryk University, Kotlářská 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2015-07-15

    Titanium dioxide films were grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD) using titanium tetraisopropoxide as a titanium precursor and water, ozone, or oxygen plasma as coreactants. Low temperatures (80–120 °C) were used to grow moisture barrier TiO{sub 2} films on polyethylene naphthalate. The maximum growth per cycle for water, ozone, and oxygen plasma processes were 0.33, 0.12, and 0.56 Å/cycle, respectively. X-ray photoelectron spectrometry was used to evaluate the chemical composition of the layers and the origin of the carbon contamination was studied by deconvoluting carbon C1s peaks. In plasma-assisted ALD, the film properties were dependent on the energy dose supplied by the plasma. TiO{sub 2} films were also successfully deposited by using a spatial ALD (SALD) system based on the results from the temporal ALD. Similar properties were measured compared to the temporal ALD deposited TiO{sub 2}, but the deposition time could be reduced using SALD. The TiO{sub 2} films deposited by plasma-assisted ALD showed better moisture barrier properties than the layers deposited by thermal processes. Water vapor transmission rate values lower than 5 × 10{sup −4} g day{sup −1} m{sup −2} (38 °C and 90% RH) was measured for 20 nm of TiO{sub 2} film deposited by plasma-assisted ALD.

  15. Carbon Nanotubes for Thin Film Transistor: Fabrication, Properties, and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yucui Wu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We review the present status of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs for their production and purification technologies, as well as the fabrication and properties of single-walled carbon nanotube thin film transistors (SWCNT-TFTs. The most popular SWCNT growth method is chemical vapor deposition (CVD, including plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD, floating catalyst chemical vapor deposition (FCCVD, and thermal CVD. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs used to fabricate thin film transistors are sorted by electrical breakdown, density gradient ultracentrifugation, or gel-based separation. The technologies of applying CNT random networks to work as the channels of SWCNT-TFTs are also reviewed. Excellent work from global researchers has been benchmarked and analyzed. The unique properties of SWCNT-TFTs have been reviewed. Besides, the promising applications of SWCNT-TFTs have been explored. Finally, the key issues to be solved in future have been summarized.

  16. Thickness dependence of electrical properties of PZT films deposited on metal substrates by laser-assisted aerosol deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, S; Tsuda, H; Akedo, J

    2008-05-01

    Dependence of electrical properties-dielectric, ferroelectric, and piezoelectric properties-on film thickness was studied for lead-zirconate titanate (PZT) thick films directly deposited onto stainless-steel (SUS) substrates in actuator devices by using a carbon dioxide (CO(2) ), laser assisted aerosol deposition technique. Optical spectroscopic analysis data and laser irradiation experiments revealed that absorption at a given wavelength by the film increased with increasing film thickness. Dielectric constant epsilon, remanent polarization value P(r), and coercive field strength E(c) of PZT films directly deposited onto a SUS-based piezoelectric actuator substrate annealed by CO(2) laser irradiation at 850 degrees C improved with increasing film thickness, and for films thicker than 25 microm, epsilon 800, P(r) 40 microC/cm(2), and E(c) 45 kV/cm. In contrast, the displacement of the SUS-based actuator with the laser-annealed PZT thick film decreased with increasing film thickness.

  17. Atmospheric Plasma Deposition of Diamond-like Carbon Coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ladwig, Angela

    2008-01-23

    material that may be treated. The deposition of DLC at atmospheric pressure has been demonstrated by several researchers. Izake, et al [53] and Novikov and Dymont [54] have demonstrated an electrochemical process that is carried out with organic compounds such as methanol and acetylene dissolved in ammonia. This process requires that the substrates be immersed in the liquid [53-54]. The atmospheric pressure deposition of DLC was also demonstrated by Kulik, et al. utilizing a plasma torch. However, this process requires operating temperatures in excess of 800 oC [55]. In this report, we investigate the deposition of diamond-like carbon films using a low temperature, atmospheric pressure plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) process. The films were characterized by solid-state carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance (13C NMR) and found to have a ratio of sp2 to sp3 carbon of 43 to 57%. The films were also tested for adhesion, coefficient of friction, and dielectric strength.

  18. Films Composed Of Diamond And Diamondlike Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shing, Yuh-Han

    1995-01-01

    Proposed films composed of diamond and diamondlike carbon useful as wear-resistant and self-lubricating protective and tribological coats at extreme temperatures and in corrosive and oxidizing environments. Films have wide variety of industrial applications.

  19. MgB{sub 2} thin films by hybrid physical-chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xi, X.X. [Department of Physics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)]|[Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)]. E-mail: xxx4@psu.edu; Pogrebnyakov, A.V. [Department of Physics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)]|[Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Xu, S.Y.; Chen, K.; Cui, Y.; Maertz, E.C. [Department of Physics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Zhuang, C.G. [Department of Physics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)]|[Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)]|[Department of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Li, Qi [Department of Physics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Lamborn, D.R. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Redwing, J.M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)]|[Department of Chemical Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Liu, Z.K.; Soukiassian, A.; Schlom, D.G.; Weng, X.J.; Dickey, E.C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Chen, Y.B.; Tian, W.; Pan, X.Q. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Cybart, S.A. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Dynes, R.C. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2007-06-01

    Hybrid physical-chemical vapor deposition (HPCVD) has been the most effective technique for depositing MgB{sub 2} thin films. It generates high magnesium vapor pressures and provides a clean environment for the growth of high purity MgB{sub 2} films. The epitaxial pure MgB{sub 2} films grown by HPCVD show higher-than-bulk T {sub c} due to tensile strain in the films. The HPCVD films are the cleanest MgB{sub 2} materials reported, allowing basic research, such as on magnetoresistance, that reveals the two-band nature of MgB{sub 2}. The carbon-alloyed HPCVD films demonstrate record-high H {sub c2} values promising for high magnetic field applications. The HPCVD films and multilayers have enabled the fabrication of high quality MgB{sub 2} Josephson junctions.

  20. Study of relationship between structure and transmittance of diamond-like carbon (DLC) films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, the transparent hard diamond-like carbon (DLC) films were deposited on glass substrate by magnetic confined radio-frequency plasma chemical vapor deposition. The structure of films was studied by Raman spectra and X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS), the transmittance of films by Spectrophotometer. The mechanism of the influence of films structure on transmittance of the films was discussed. The results show that the thickness of films was lower than 100nm, and the transmittance was over 90% in 380-780 nm region. Discussion in theory on the influence of film structure on transmittance was correspondence to experiment results.

  1. Pulsed laser deposition and characterization of Alnico5 magnetic films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butt, M.Z., E-mail: mzbutt49@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, GC University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Ali, Dilawar [Department of Physics, GC University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Ahmad, Fayyaz [Department of Physics, University of Engineering and Technology, Lahore 54890 (Pakistan); Magnetophotonics Research Laboratory, Department of Physics, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-01

    Alnico5 films were deposited by pulsed laser deposition on glass substrate at room temperature under a vacuum ∼10{sup −3} Torr in the absence and in the presence of 500 Oe external transverse magnetic field applied on the plasma plume during film deposition. For this purpose, Nd:YAG laser was employed to ablate the Alnico5 target. The ablated material was deposited on glass substrate placed at a distance of 2 cm from the target. The structural and magnetic properties of the film were analyzed by X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscope, and vibrating sample magnetometer. X-ray diffraction patterns showed that the Alnico5 films were amorphous in nature. Atomic force microscopy revealed that the Alnico5 film deposited in absence of external magnetic field has larger root-mean-square roughness value (60.2 nm) than the magnetically deposited film (42.9 nm). Vibrating sample magnetometer measurements showed that the in-plane saturation magnetization of Alnico5 film deposited in the presence of external magnetic field increases by 32% as compared to that for the film deposited in the absence of external magnetic field. However, the out-of-plane saturation magnetization was almost independent of the external magnetic field. In magnetically deposited film, there is in-plane anisotropy parallel to the applied external magnetic field.

  2. Self-organized formation of metal-carbon nanostructures by hyperthermal ion deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hannstein, I.K.

    2006-04-26

    The quasi-simultaneous deposition of mass-selected hyperthermal carbon and metal ions results in a variety of interesting film morphologies, depending on the metal used and the deposition conditions. The observed features are of the order of a few nanometres and are therefore interesting for future potential applications in the various fields of nanotechnology. The present study focuses on the structural analysis of amorphous carbon films containing either copper, silver, gold, or iron using amongst others Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy, High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy, and Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy. The film morphologies found are as follows: copper-containing films consist of copper nanoclusters with sizes ranging from about 3 to 9 nm uniformly distributed throughout the amorphous carbon matrix. The cluster size hereby rises with the copper content of the films. The silver containing films decompose into a pure amorphous carbon film with silver agglomerates at the surface. Both, the gold- and the iron-containing films show a multilayer structure of metal-rich layers with higher cluster density separated by metal-depleted amorphous carbon layers. The layer distances are of the order of up to 15 nm in the case of gold-carbon films and 7 nm in the case of iron-carbon films. The formation of theses different structures cannot be treated in the context of conventional self-organization mechanisms basing upon thermal diffusion and equilibrium thermodynamics. Instead, an ion-induced atomic transport, sputtering effects, and the stability of small metal clusters were taken into account in order to model the structure formation processes. A similar multilayer morphology was recently also reported in the literature for metal-carbon films grown by magnetron sputtering techniques. In order to investigate, whether the mechanisms are the same as in the case of the ion beam deposited films described above, first experiments were conducted

  3. Pulsed laser deposition of silicon dioxide thin films with silicone targets for fabricating waveguide devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okoshi, Masayuki; Kuramatsu, Masaaki; Inoue, Narumi

    2002-06-01

    Silicon dioxide (SiO2) thin films were deposited at room temperature by 193-nm ArF excimer laser ablation of silicone in oxygen atmosphere. Only the side chains of the target were photo-dissociated during ablation to deposit Si-O bonds on a substrate in high laser fluence at about 10 J/cm2. Oxygen gas worked to oxidize the Si-O bonds ejected from the target to from SiO2 thin films at the gas pressure of 4.4 X 10-2 Torr, in addition to reducing the isolated carbon mixed into the films. We also found that the deposited rate could control refractive index of the films. The refractive index of the film deposited at 0.05 nm/pulse is greater than that of the film at 0.1 nm/pulse. Thus, a 0.2-micrometers thick SiO2 cladding film deposited at 0.1 nm/pulse was firstly formed on the whole surface of a 100- micrometers -thick polyester film, and then a 0.6 micrometers -thick SiO2 core film at 0.05 nm/pulse was fabricated in a line on the sample. The sample functioned as a waveguide device for a 633-nm line of He-Ne laser.

  4. The mechanical properties of thin alumina film deposited by metal-organic chemical vapour deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haanappel, V.A.C.; Gellings, P.J.; Vendel, van de D.; Metselaar, H.S.C.; Corbach, van H.D.; Fransen, T.

    1995-01-01

    Amorphous alumina films were deposited by metal-organic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD) on stainless steel, type AISI 304. The MOCVD experiments were performed in nitrogen at low and atmospheric pressures. The effects of deposition temperature, growth rate and film thickness on the mechanical pro

  5. Wettability of Nafion and Nafion/Vulcan carbon composite films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoan; Feng, Fangxia; Zhang, Ke; Ye, Siyu; Kwok, Daniel Y; Birss, Viola

    2012-04-24

    The wettability of the Pt/carbon/Nafion catalyst layer in proton exchange membrane fuel cells is critical to their performance and durability, especially the cathode, as water is needed for the transport of protons to the active sites and is also involved in deleterious Pt nanoparticle dissolution and carbon corrosion. Therefore, the focus of this work has been on the first-time use of the water droplet impacting method to determine the wettability of 100% Nafion films, as a benchmark, and then of Vulcan carbon (VC)/Nafion composite films, both deposited by spin-coating in the Pt-free state. Pure Nafion films, shown by SEM analysis to have a nanochanneled structure, are initially hydrophobic but become hydrophilic as the water droplet spreads, likely due to reorientation of the sulfonic acid groups toward water. The wettability of VC/Nafion composite films depends significantly on the VC/Nafion mass ratios, even though Nafion is believed to be preferentially oriented (sulfonate groups toward VC) in all cases. At low VC contents, a significant water droplet contact angle hysteresis is seen, similar to pure Nafion films, while at higher VC contents (>30%), the films become hydrophobic, also exhibiting superhydrophobicity, with surface roughness playing a significant role. At >80% VC, the surfaces become wettable again as there is insufficient Nafion loading present to fully cover the carbon surface, allowing the calculation of the Nafion:carbon ratio required for a full coverage of carbon by Nafion.

  6. Deposition of Aluminium Oxide Films by Pulsed Reactive Sputtering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xinhui MAO; Bingchu CAI; Maosong WU; Guoping CHEN

    2003-01-01

    Pulsed reactive sputtering is a novel process used to deposit some compound films, which are not deposited by traditional D.C. reactive sputtering easily. In this paper some experimental results about the deposition of Al oxide films by pulsed reactive sputtering are presented. The hysteresis phenomenon of the sputtering voltage and deposition rate with the change of oxygen flow during sputtering process are discussed.

  7. Room-Temperature Deposition of NbN Superconducting Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakoor, S.; Lamb, J. L.; Thakoor, A. P.; Khanna, S. K.

    1986-01-01

    Films with high superconducting transition temperatures deposited by reactive magnetron sputtering. Since deposition process does not involve significantly high substrate temperatures, employed to deposit counter electrode in superconductor/insulator/superconductor junction without causing any thermal or mechanical degradation of underlying delicate tunneling barrier. Substrates for room-temperature deposition of NbN polymeric or coated with photoresist, making films accessible to conventional lithographic patterning techniques. Further refinements in deposition technique yield films with smaller transition widths, Tc of which might approach predicted value of 18 K.

  8. Photoelectrochemical activity of liquid phase deposited TiO2 film for degradation of benzotriazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yaobin; Yang, Changzhu; Zhu, Lihua; Zhang, Jingdong

    2010-03-15

    TiO(2) film deposited on glassy carbon electrode surface was prepared via the liquid phase deposition (LPD). The deposited TiO(2) film before and after calcination was characterized with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Based on the high photoelectrochemical activity of calcined LPD TiO(2) film, the photoelectrocatalytic degradation of benzotriazole (BTA) was investigated. Compared with the electrochemical oxidation process, direct photolysis or photocatalysis for treatment of BTA, a synergetic photoelectrocatalytic degradation effect was observed using the LPD TiO(2) film-coated electrode. Various factors influencing the photoelectrocatalytic degradation of BTA such as film calcination, applied bias potential, pH value, supporting electrolyte concentration and initial concentration of BTA were investigated. The COD removal for BTA solution was analyzed to evaluate the mineralization of the PEC process. Based on the degradation experimental results, a possible photoelectrocatalytic degradation mechanism for BTA was proposed.

  9. Photoelectrochemical activity of liquid phase deposited TiO{sub 2} film for degradation of benzotriazole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding Yaobin [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Luoyu Road 1037, Wuhan 430074 (China); Yang Changzhu [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Zhu Lihua [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Luoyu Road 1037, Wuhan 430074 (China); Zhang Jingdong, E-mail: zhangjd@mail.hust.edu.cn [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Luoyu Road 1037, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2010-03-15

    TiO{sub 2} film deposited on glassy carbon electrode surface was prepared via the liquid phase deposition (LPD). The deposited TiO{sub 2} film before and after calcination was characterized with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Based on the high photoelectrochemical activity of calcined LPD TiO{sub 2} film, the photoelectrocatalytic degradation of benzotriazole (BTA) was investigated. Compared with the electrochemical oxidation process, direct photolysis or photocatalysis for treatment of BTA, a synergetic photoelectrocatalytic degradation effect was observed using the LPD TiO{sub 2} film-coated electrode. Various factors influencing the photoelectrocatalytic degradation of BTA such as film calcination, applied bias potential, pH value, supporting electrolyte concentration and initial concentration of BTA were investigated. The COD removal for BTA solution was analyzed to evaluate the mineralization of the PEC process. Based on the degradation experimental results, a possible photoelectrocatalytic degradation mechanism for BTA was proposed.

  10. Deposition of electrochromic tungsten oxide thin films by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henley, W.B.; Sacks, G.J. [Univ. of South Florida, Tampa, FL (United States). Center of Microelectronics

    1997-03-01

    Use of plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) for electrochromic WO{sub 3} film deposition is investigated. Oxygen, hydrogen, and tungsten hexafluoride were used as source gases. Reactant gas flow was investigated to determine the effect on film characteristics. High quality optical films were obtained at deposition rates on the order of 100 {angstrom}/s. Higher deposition rates were attainable but film quality and optical coherence degraded. Atomic emission spectroscopy (AES), was used to provide an in situ assessment of the plasma deposition chemistry. Through AES, it is shown that the hydrogen gas flow is essential to the deposition of the WO{sub 3} film. Oxygen gas flow and tungsten hexafluoride gas flow must be approximately equal for high quality films.

  11. Synthesis and characterization of boron incorporated diamond-like carbon thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, L.L. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, 57 Campus Drive, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5A9 (Canada); Yang, Q., E-mail: qiaoqin.yang@usask.ca [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, 57 Campus Drive, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5A9 (Canada); Tang, Y.; Yang, L.; Zhang, C. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, 57 Campus Drive, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5A9 (Canada); Hu, Y.; Cui, X. [Canadian Light Source Inc., 101 Perimeter Road, Saskatoon, SK S7N 0X4 (Canada)

    2015-08-31

    Boron incorporated diamond-like carbon (B-DLC) (up to 8 wt.% boron) thin films were synthesized on silicon wafers using biased target ion beam deposition technique, where diamond-like carbon (DLC) was deposited by ion beam deposition and boron (B) was simultaneously incorporated by biased target sputtering of a boron carbide (B{sub 4}C) target under different conditions. Pure DLC films and B–C films were also synthesized by ion beam deposition and biased target sputtering of B{sub 4}C under similar conditions, respectively, as reference samples. The microstructure and mechanical properties of the synthesized films have been characterized by various technologies. It has been found that B exists in different states in B-DLC, including carbon-rich and B-rich boron carbides, boron suboxide and boron oxide, and the oxidation of B probably occurs during the film deposition. The incorporation of B into DLC leads to the increase of sp{sup 3} bonded carbon in the films, the increase of both film hardness and elastic modulus, and the decrease of both surface roughness and friction coefficient. Furthermore, the content of sp{sup 3} bonded carbon, film hardness and elastic modulus increase, and the film surface roughness and friction coefficient decrease with the increase of B-rich carbide in the B-DLC films. - Highlights: • Biased target ion beam deposition technique is promising to produce high quality DLC based thin films; • Boron exists in different states in B-DLC thin films; • The incorporation of B to DLC with different levels leads to improved film properties; • The fraction of sp{sup 3} bonded C in B-DLC thin films increase with the increase of B-rich carbide content in the films.

  12. Functional porphyrin thin films deposited by matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cristescu, R., E-mail: rodica.cristescu@inflpr.ro [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Lasers Department, P.O. Box MG-36, Atomistilor 409, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Popescu, C.; Popescu, A.C.; Mihailescu, I.N. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Lasers Department, P.O. Box MG-36, Atomistilor 409, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Ciucu, A.A. [Univeristy of Bucharest, Chemistry Department, Bucharest (Romania); Andronie, A.; Iordache, S.; Stamatin, I. [University of Bucharest, 3 Nano-SAE Research Center, P.O. Box MG-38, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Fagadar-Cosma, E. [Institute of Chemistry Timisoara of Romanian Academy, Department of Organic Chemistry, 300223 Timisoara (Romania); Chrisey, D.B. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, School of Engineering, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Troy 12180-3590, NY (United States)

    2010-05-25

    We report the first successful deposition of functionalized and nanostructured Zn(II)- and Co(II)-metalloporphyrin thin films by matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation onto silicon wafers, quartz plates and screen-printed electrodes. The deposited nanostructures have been characterized by Raman spectrometry and cyclic voltammetry. The novelty of our contribution consists of the evaluation of the sensitivity of the MAPLE-deposited Zn(II)- and Co(II)-metalloporphyrin thin films on screen-printed carbon nanotube electrodes when challenged with dopamine.

  13. Characterization of copper selenide thin films deposited by chemical bath deposition technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mamun; Islam, A. B. M. O.

    2004-11-01

    A low-cost chemical bath deposition (CBD) technique has been used for the preparation of Cu2-xSe thin films onto glass substrates and deposited films were characterized by X-ray diffractometry (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and UV-vis spectrophotometry. Good quality thin films of smooth surface of copper selenide thin films were deposited using sodium selenosulfate as a source of selenide ions. The structural and optical behaviour of the films are discussed in the light of the observed data.

  14. In situ electron spectroscopic identification of carbon species deposited by laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samano, E.C.; Gamietea, A.; Cota, L. [IFUNAM, Ensenada (Mexico). Lab. de Ensenada; Soto, G. [IFUNAM, Ensenada (Mexico). Lab. de Ensenada]|[Centro de Investigacion Cientifica y de Educacion Superior de Ensenada (Mexico). Programa de Posgrado en Fisica de Materiales

    1997-05-01

    Thin carbon films were grown on Si (111) substrates by ablating a graphite target utilizing an excimer pulsed laser in a UHV Riber {copyright} LDM-32 system. Two kinds of films were produced, a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) type and a diamond-like carbon (DLC) type. A relationship of the films microstructure with laser power density and substrate conditions was observed. The HOPG films were homogeneous but the DLC films were heterogeneous, as shown by micrographs. The thin films are monitored and analyzed in situ during the first stages of the deposition process. The monitoring was done by RHEED and the characterization by several surface spectroscopic techniques, AES, XPS and EELS. The formation of a SiC interface was observed for both films due to the reaction of the first carbon species with the substrate surface.

  15. Controlled Deposition and Alignment of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smits, Jan M. (Inventor); Wincheski, Russell A. (Inventor); Patry, JoAnne L. (Inventor); Watkins, Anthony Neal (Inventor); Jordan, Jeffrey D. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A carbon nanotube (CNT) attraction material is deposited on a substrate in the gap region between two electrodes on the substrate. An electric potential is applied to the two electrodes. The CNT attraction material is wetted with a solution defined by a carrier liquid having carbon nanotubes (CNTs) suspended therein. A portion of the CNTs align with the electric field and adhere to the CNT attraction material. The carrier liquid and any CNTs not adhered to the CNT attraction material are then removed.

  16. Optical characterization of sputtered carbon films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ager, J.W. III.

    1992-05-01

    Spattered carbon films are widely used as protective overcoats for thin film disk media. Raman spectroscopy is nondestructive and relatively rapid and is well suited for the characterization of carbon films. Specific features in the Raman spectra are empirically correlated with the rates of specific types of mechanical wear for both hydrogenated and unhydrogenated films. This observation is interpreted in terms of a random covalent network, in which the mechanical performance of the film is determined by the nature of the bonding that links sp{sup 2}-bonded domains.

  17. Air-stable conversion of separated carbon nanotube thin-film transistors from p-type to n-type using atomic layer deposition of high-κ oxide and its application in CMOS logic circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jialu; Wang, Chuan; Fu, Yue; Che, Yuchi; Zhou, Chongwu

    2011-04-26

    Due to extraordinary electrical properties, preseparated, high purity semiconducting carbon nanotubes hold great potential for thin-film transistors (TFTs) and integrated circuit applications. One of the main challenges it still faces is the fabrication of air-stable n-type nanotube TFTs with industry-compatible techniques. Here in this paper, we report a novel and highly reliable method of converting the as-made p-type TFTs using preseparated semiconducting nanotubes into air-stable n-type transistors by adding a high-κ oxide passivation layer using atomic layer deposition (ALD). The n-type devices exhibit symmetric electrical performance compared with the p-type devices in terms of on-current, on/off ratio, and device mobility. Various factors affecting the conversion process, including ALD temperature, metal contact material, and channel length, have also been systematically studied by a series of designed experiments. A complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) inverter with rail-to-rail output, symmetric input/output behavior, and large noise margin has been further demonstrated. The excellent performance gives us the feasibility of cascading multiple stages of logic blocks and larger scale integration. Our approach can serve as the critical foundation for future nanotube-based thin-film macroelectronics.

  18. Atmospheric deposition of organic carbon via precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iavorivska, Lidiia; Boyer, Elizabeth W.; DeWalle, David R.

    2016-12-01

    Atmospheric deposition is the major pathway for removal of organic carbon (OC) from the atmosphere, affecting both atmospheric and landscape processes. Transfers of OC from the atmosphere to land occur as wet deposition (via precipitation) and as dry deposition (via surface settling of particles and gases). Despite current understanding of the significance of organic carbon inputs with precipitation to carbon budgets, transfers of organic matter between the atmosphere and land are not explicitly included in most carbon cycle models due to limited data, highlighting the need for further information. Studies regarding the abundance of OC in precipitation are relatively sparse, in part due to the fact that concentrations of organics in precipitation and their associated rates of atmospheric deposition are not routinely measured as a part of major deposition monitoring networks. Here, we provide a new data synthesis from 83 contemporary studies published in the peer reviewed literature where organic matter in precipitation was measured around the world. We compiled data regarding the concentrations of organic carbon in precipitation and associated rates of atmospheric deposition of organic carbon. We calculated summary statistics in a common set of units, providing insights into the magnitude and regional variability of OC in precipitation. A land to ocean gradient is evident in OC concentrations, with marine sites generally showing lower values than continental sites. Our synthesis highlights gaps in the data and challenges for data intercomparison. There is a need to concentrate sampling efforts in areas where anthropogenic OC emissions are on the rise (Asia, South America), as well as in remote sites suggesting background conditions, especially in Southern Hemisphere. It is also important to acquire more data for marine rainwater at various distances from the coast in order to assess a magnitude of carbon transfer between the land and the ocean. Our integration of

  19. Synthesis and characterization of well-aligned carbon nitrogen nanotubes by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Well-aligned carbon nitrogen nanotube films have been synthesized successfully on mesoporous silica substrates by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MWPCVD) method. Studies on their morphology, structure, and composition by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), respectively, indicate that these nanotubes consist of linearly polymerized carbon nitrogen nanobells, and the nitrogen atoms have been doped into carbon netweork to form a new structure C1-xNx (x=0.16±0.01). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results of the samples further demonstrate that carbon bonds covalently with nitrogen in all the carbon nitrogen nanotube films.

  20. ZnO thin films prepared by pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsoutsouva, M.G. [Laboratory of Physical Metallurgy, National Technical University of Athens, Zografos, 15780 Athens (Greece); Panagopoulos, C.N., E-mail: chpanag@metal.ntua.gr [Laboratory of Physical Metallurgy, National Technical University of Athens, Zografos, 15780 Athens (Greece); Papadimitriou, D. [National Technical University of Athens, Department of Physics, GR-15780 Athens (Greece); Fasaki, I.; Kompitsas, M. [Theor. and Phys./Chem. Institute, National Hellenic Research Foundation, 48 Vas. Konstantinou Ave., 11635 Athens (Greece)

    2011-04-15

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) thin films were deposited on soda lime glass substrates by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) in an oxygen-reactive atmosphere. The structural, optical, and electrical properties of the as-prepared thin films were studied in dependence of substrate temperature and oxygen pressure. High quality polycrystalline ZnO films with hexagonal wurtzite structure were deposited at substrate temperatures of 100 and 300 deg. C. The RMS roughness of the deposited oxide films was found to be in the range 2-9 nm and was only slightly dependent on substrate temperature and oxygen pressure. Electrical measurements indicated a decrease of film resistivity with the increase of substrate temperature and the decrease of oxygen pressure. The ZnO films exhibited high transmittance of 90% and their energy band gap and thickness were in the range 3.26-3.30 eV and 256-627 nm, respectively.

  1. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy on nanostructured carbon electrodes grown by supersonic cluster beam deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bettini, Luca Giacomo; Bardizza, Giorgio; Podesta, Alessandro; Milani, Paolo; Piseri, Paolo, E-mail: piseri@mi.infn.it [Universita degli Studi di Milano, Dipartimento di Fisica and CIMaINa (Italy)

    2013-02-15

    Nanostructured porous films of carbon with density of about 0.5 g/cm{sup 3} and 200 nm thickness were deposited at room temperature by supersonic cluster beam deposition (SCBD) from carbon clusters formed in the gas phase. Carbon film surface topography, determined by atomic force microscopy, reveals a surface roughness of 16 nm and a granular morphology arising from the low kinetic energy ballistic deposition regime. The material is characterized by a highly disordered carbon structure with predominant sp2 hybridization as evidenced by Raman spectroscopy. The interface properties of nanostructured carbon electrodes were investigated by cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy employing KOH 1 M solution as aqueous electrolyte. An increase of the double layer capacitance is observed when the electrodes are heat treated in air or when a nanostructured nickel layer deposited by SCBD on top of a sputter deposited film of the same metal is employed as a current collector instead of a plain metallic film. This enhancement is consistent with an improved charge injection in the active material and is ascribed to the modification of the electrical contact at the interface between the carbon and the metal current collector. Specific capacitance values up to 120 F/g have been measured for the electrodes with nanostructured metal/carbon interface.

  2. Ion Beam Assisted Deposition Of Optical Thin Films - Recent Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNally, J. J.; Al-Jumaily, G. A.; Wilson, S. R.; McNeil, J. R.

    1985-11-01

    We have examined the properties of dielectric (Ti02, Si02, -Al203, Ta205 and Hf02) films deposited using ion-assisted deposition (IAD). The films were characterized using an angularly resolved scatterometer, spectrophotometer and Raman spectroscopy. A reduction in optical scatter, especially that due to low spatial frequencies, is observed for films deposited with simultaneous ion bombardment. Higher values of refractive index are obtained for films deposited using IAD. Raman spectra indicate a crystalline phase change in TiO2 films is induced by bombardment of samples with 02 ions during deposition. Other experimental data and the effects of the induced phase transition on the optical properties of TiO2 will be discussed.

  3. Influence of deposition time on the properties of chemical bath deposited manganese sulfide thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuar Kassim

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Manganese sulfide thin films were chemically deposited from an aqueous solution containing manganese sulfate, sodium thiosulfate and sodium tartrate. The influence of deposition time (2, 3, 6 and 8 days on the properties of thin films was investigated. The structure and surface morphology of the thin films were studied by X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy, respectively. In addition, in order to investigate the optical properties of the thin films, the UV-visible spectrophotometry was used. The XRD results indicated that the deposited MnS2 thin films exhibited a polycrystalline cubic structure. The number of MnS2 peaks on the XRD patterns initially increased from three to six peaks and then decreased to five peaks, as the deposition time was increased from 2 to 8 days. From the AFM measurements, the film thickness and surface roughness were found to be dependent on the deposition time.

  4. Bismuth thin films obtained by pulsed laser deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Teresa; Arronte, Miguel; Rodriguez, Eugenio; Ponce, Luis; Alonso, J. C.; Garcia, C.; Fernandez, M.; Haro, E.

    1999-07-01

    In the present work Bi thin films were obtained by Pulsed Laser Deposition, using Nd:YAG lasers. The films were characterized by optical microscopy. Raman spectroscopy and X-rays diffraction. It was accomplished the real time spectral emission characterization of the plasma generated during the laser evaporation process. Highly oriented thin films were obtained.

  5. Selective growth of diamond by hot filament CVD using patterned carbon film as mask

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Zhoutong; YANG Shumin; LI Qintao; ZHU Dezhang; GONG Jinlong

    2008-01-01

    Selected-area deposition (SAD) of diamond films was achieved on silicon substrates with carbon film mask by hot filament chemical vapor deposition. Needle tip scraped lines were used to grow diamond films. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) investigation demonstrates that highly selective and sharp edged diamond films were produced. The results also demonstrate that the proper substrate temperature is very important for diamond selective growth in this deposition process. Since the enhancement of diamond growth was not observed on the needle tip scraped area of Si wafer with diamond powder scratching, the selective growth was considered to be closely correlated to silicon carbide formed during carbon film deposition and the residual carbon in the scraped area.

  6. STUDY OF RAY IRRADIATION ON DIAMOND-LIKE CARBON FILMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    G.A.Liu; T.M.Wang; E.Q.Xie

    2002-01-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films have been deposited on glass substrates using radio-frequency (rf) plasma deposition method, γ-ray, ultraviolet (UV) ray were used toirradiate the DLC films. Raman spectroscopy and infrared (IR) spectroscopy were usedto characterize the changing characteristics of SP3 C-H bond and hydrogen content inthe films due to the irradiations. The results show that, the damage degrees induced bythe UV ray on the SP3 C-H bonds are much stronger than that by the γ-ray. When theirradiation dose of γ-ray reaches 10× 104Gy, the SP3 C-H bond reduces about 50% innumber. The square electrical resistance of the films is reduced due to the irradiationof UV ray and this is caused by severe oxidation of the films. By using the results onoptical gap of the films and the fully constrained network theory, the hydrogen contentin the as-deposited films is estimated to be 10-25at.%.

  7. Chemical Vapor Deposition of GeSbTe Thin Films for Next-Generation Phase Change Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machida, Hideaki; Hamada, Seichi; Horiike, Takafumi; Ishikawa, Masato; Ogura, Atsushi; Ohshita, Yoshio; Ohba, Takayuki

    2010-05-01

    In this paper, we describe chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of GeSbTe (GST) films for fabricating phase change memory. A low-carbon-impurity GST film was deposited by CVD. Film composition and structure varied significantly depending on deposition temperature and pressure. The tendency of composition variation on a TiN substrate was the same as that on a SiO2 substrate. Finally, flat Ge2Sb2Te5 thin films were obtained below 300 °C using tert-butylgermanium, triisopropylantimony and diisopropyltellurium as precursors.

  8. Improvement of orthodontic friction by coating archwire with carbon nitride film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei Songbo [State Key Laboratory of Tribology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Shao Tianmin, E-mail: shaotm@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Tribology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Ding Peng [Department of Orthodontics, Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology, Beijing 100081 (China)

    2011-10-01

    In order to reduce frictional resistance between archwire and bracket during orthodontic tooth movement, carbon nitride (CNx) thin films were deposited on the surface of archwires with ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD). The energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS) analysis showed that the CNx film was successfully deposited on the surface of the orthodontic wires. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis suggested that the deposited CNx film was sp{sup 2} carbon dominated structures, and diversiform bonds (N-C, N{identical_to}C, et al.) coexisted in the film. The friction tests indicated that the CNx film significantly reduced the wire-bracket friction both in ambient air and in artificial saliva. The sp{sup 2}C rich structure of the CNx film as well as its protection function for the archwire was responsible for the low friction of the wire-bracket sliding system.

  9. Deposition of copper selenide thin films and nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yunxiang; Afzaal, Mohammad; Malik, Mohammad A.; O'Brien, Paul

    2006-12-01

    A new method is reported for the growth of copper selenide thin films and nanoparticles using copper acetylacetonate and trioctylphosphine selenide. Aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposition experiments lead to successful deposition of tetragonal Cu 2Se films. In contrast, hexadecylamine capped nanoparticles are composed of cubic Cu 2-xSe. The deposited materials are optically and structurally characterized. The results of this comprehensive study are described and discussed.

  10. Nitrogen-incorporated ultrananocrystalline diamond and multi-layer-graphene-like hybrid carbon films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzeng, Yonhua; Yeh, Shoupu; Fang, Wei Cheng; Chu, Yuehchieh

    2014-03-01

    Nitrogen-incorporated ultrananocrystalline diamond (N-UNCD) and multi-layer-graphene-like hybrid carbon films have been synthesized by microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MPECVD) on oxidized silicon which is pre-seeded with diamond nanoparticles. MPECVD of N-UNCD on nanodiamond seeds produces a base layer, from which carbon structures nucleate and grow perpendicularly to form standing carbon platelets. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy and Raman scattering measurements reveal that these carbon platelets are comprised of ultrananocrystalline diamond embedded in multilayer-graphene-like carbon structures. The hybrid carbon films are of low electrical resistivity. UNCD grains in the N-UNCD base layer and the hybrid carbon platelets serve as high-density diamond nuclei for the deposition of an electrically insulating UNCD film on it. Biocompatible carbon-based heaters made of low-resistivity hybrid carbon heaters encapsulated by insulating UNCD for possible electrosurgical applications have been demonstrated.

  11. Effects of deposition time in chemically deposited ZnS films in acidic solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haddad, H.; Chelouche, A., E-mail: azeddinechelouche@gmail.com; Talantikite, D.; Merzouk, H.; Boudjouan, F.; Djouadi, D.

    2015-08-31

    We report an experimental study on the synthesis and characterization of zinc sulfide (ZnS) single layer thin films deposited on glass substrates by chemical bath deposition technique in acidic solution. The effect of deposition time on the microstructure, surface morphology, optical absorption, transmittance, and photoluminescence (PL) was investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), UV-Vis–NIR spectrophotometry and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. The results showed that the samples exhibit wurtzite structure and their crystal quality is improved by increasing deposition time. The latter, was found to affect the morphology of the thin films as showed by SEM micrographs. The optical measurements revealed a high transparency in the visible range and a dependence of absorption edge and band gap on deposition time. The room temperature PL spectra indicated that all ZnS grown thin films emit a UV and blue light, while the band intensities are found to be dependent on deposition times. - Highlights: • Single layer ZnS thin films were deposited by CBD in acidic solution at 95 °C. • The effect of deposition time was investigated. • Coexistence of ZnS and ZnO hexagonal structures for time deposition below 2 h • Thicker ZnS films were achieved after monolayer deposition for 5 h. • The highest UV-blue emission observed in thin film deposited at 5 h.

  12. Chemical vapor deposition fabrication and characterization of silica-coated carbon fiber ultramicroelectrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, G; Giolando, D M; Kirchhoff, J R

    1995-08-01

    Carbon fiber disk ultramicroelectrodes (UMEs) with well-defined geometries were prepared by chemical vapor deposition techniques. Transparent silica films with thicknesses from 1 to 600 microns were deposited on the cylindrical length of 5 and 10 microns carbon fibers from a SiCl4, H2, and O2 ternary precursor system at 850-1150 degrees C or sequential deposition from Si(OEt)4 as a single source precursor at 700 degrees C followed by the SiCl4, H2, and O2 precursor system. Film thickness, film adhesion to the fiber substrate, and the overall dimensions of the silica-coated carbon fiber were studied and found to be a function of the precursor system, precursor concentrations, fiber diameter, deposition time, and fiber temperature. The silica films were found to be free of microcracks and characterized by a quality seal between the carbon fiber and the coating. As a result, the silica-coated disk UME exhibits an excellent electrochemical response without the need to use an epoxy sealant at the electrode tip. Furthermore, the deposition of hard and inert ceramic materials imparts durability to fragile carbon fibers and facilitates the handling of UMEs in microenvironments. Finally, the advantage of concentric deposition about the fibers to produce a disk UME in the center of an insulating plane was used to examine the effect of the thickness of the insulating coating on the limiting current response.

  13. Spatial atomic layer deposition of zinc oxide thin films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Illiberi, A.; Roozeboom, F.; Poodt, P.W.G.

    2012-01-01

    Zinc oxide thin films have been deposited at high growth rates (up to ~1 nm/s) by spatial atomic layer deposition technique at atmospheric pressure. Water has been used as oxidant for diethylzinc (DEZ) at deposition temperatures between 75 and 250 °C. The electrical, structural (crystallinity and mo

  14. Facile fabrication of boron nitride nanosheets-amorphous carbon hybrid film for optoelectronic applications

    KAUST Repository

    Wan, Shanhong

    2015-01-01

    A novel boron nitride nanosheets (BNNSs)-amorphous carbon (a-C) hybrid film has been deposited successfully on silicon substrates by simultaneous electrochemical deposition, and showed a good integrity of this B-C-N composite film by the interfacial bonding. This synthesis can potentially provide the facile control of the B-C-N composite film for the potential optoelectronic devices. This journal is

  15. Infrared analysis of thin films amorphous, hydrogenated carbon on silicon

    CERN Document Server

    Jacob, W; Schwarz-Selinger, T

    2000-01-01

    The infrared analysis of thin films on a thick substrate is discussed using the example of plasma-deposited, amorphous, hydrogenated carbon layers (a-C:H) on silicon substrates. The framework for the optical analysis of thin films is presented. The main characteristic of thin film optics is the occurrence of interference effects due to the coherent superposition of light multiply reflected at the various internal and external interfaces of the optical system. These interference effects lead to a sinusoidal variation of the transmitted and reflected intensity. As a consequence, the Lambert-Beer law is not applicable for the determination of the absorption coefficient of thin films. Furthermore, observable changes of the transmission and reflection spectra occur in the vicinity of strong absorption bands due to the Kramers-Kronig relation. For a sound data evaluation these effects have to be included in the analysis. To be able to extract the full information contained in a measured optical thin film spectrum, ...

  16. Amorphous carbon buffer layers for separating free gallium nitride films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altakhov, A. S.; Gorbunov, R. I.; Kasharina, L. A.; Latyshev, F. E.; Tarala, V. A.; Shreter, Yu. G.

    2016-11-01

    The possibility of using amorphous diamond-like carbon (DLC) films for self-separation of gallium nitride (GaN) layers grown by hydride vapor-phase epitaxy has been analyzed. DLC films have been synthesized by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition under low pressure on sapphire (Al2O3) substrates with a (0001) crystallographic orientation. The samples have been studied by the methods of Raman scattering and X-ray diffraction analysis. It is shown that thin DLC films affect only slightly the processes of nucleation and growth of gallium nitride films. Notably, the strength of the "GaN film-Al2O3" substrate interface decreases, which facilitates separation of the GaN layers.

  17. Low temperature CVD growth of ultrathin carbon films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Yang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate the low temperature, large area growth of ultrathin carbon films by chemical vapor deposition under atmospheric pressure on various substrates. In particularly, uniform and continuous carbon films with the thickness of 2-5 nm were successfully grown at a temperature as low as 500 oC on copper foils, as well as glass substrates coated with a 100 nm thick copper layer. The characterizations revealed that the low-temperature-grown carbon films consist on few short, curved graphene layers and thin amorphous carbon films. Particularly, the low-temperature grown samples exhibited over 90% transmittance at a wavelength range of 400-750 nm and comparable sheet resistance in contrast with the 1000oC-grown one. This low-temperature growth method may offer a facile way to directly prepare visible ultrathin carbon films on various substrate surfaces that are compatible with temperatures (500-600oC used in several device processing technologies.

  18. SnS thin films deposited by chemical bath deposition, dip coating and SILAR techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaki, Sunil H.; Chaudhary, Mahesh D.; Deshpande, M. P.

    2016-05-01

    The SnS thin films were synthesized by chemical bath deposition (CBD), dip coating and successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) techniques. In them, the CBD thin films were deposited at two temperatures: ambient and 70 °C. The energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (EDAX), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical spectroscopy techniques were used to characterize the thin films. The electrical transport properties studies on the as-deposited thin films were done by measuring the I-V characteristics, DC electrical resistivity variation with temperature and the room temperature Hall effect. The obtained results are deliberated in this paper.

  19. Resonant infrared pulsed laser deposition of thin biodegradable polymer films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bubb, D.M.; Toftmann, B.; Haglund Jr., R.F.

    2002-01-01

    Thin films of the biodegradable polymer poly(DL-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) were deposited using resonant infrared pulsed laser deposition (RIR-PLD). The output of a free-electron laser was focused onto a solid target of the polymer, and the films were deposited using 2.90 (resonant with O-H str...... absorbance spectrum of the films is nearly identical with that of the native polymer, the average molecular weight of the films is a little less than half that of the starting material. Potential strategies for defeating this mass change are discussed.......Thin films of the biodegradable polymer poly(DL-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) were deposited using resonant infrared pulsed laser deposition (RIR-PLD). The output of a free-electron laser was focused onto a solid target of the polymer, and the films were deposited using 2.90 (resonant with O......-H stretch) and 3.40 (C-H) mum light at macropulse fluences of 7.8 and 6.7 J/cm(2), respectively. Under these conditions, a 0.5-mum thick film can be grown in less than 5 min. Film structure was determined from infrared absorbance measurements and gel permeation chromatography (GPC). While the infrared...

  20. Crystalline Indium Sulphide thin film by photo accelerated deposition technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhanya, A. C.; Preetha, K. C.; Deepa, K.; Remadevi, T. L.

    2015-02-01

    Indium sulfide thin films deserve special attention because of its potential application as buffer layers in CIGS based solar cells. Highly transparent indium sulfide (InS) thin films were prepared using a novel method called photo accelerated chemical deposition (PCD). Ultraviolet source of 150 W was used to irradiate the solution. Compared to all other chemical methods, PCD scores its advantage for its low cost, flexible substrate and capable of large area of deposition. Reports on deposition of high quality InS thin films at room temperature are very rare in literature. The precursor solution was initially heated to 90°C for ten minutes and then deposition was carried out at room temperature for two hours. The appearance of the film changed from lemon yellow to bright yellow as the deposition time increased. The sample was characterized for its structural and optical properties. XRD profile showed the polycrystalline behavior of the film with mixed phases having crystallite size of 17 nm. The surface morphology of the films exhibited uniformly distributed honey comb like structures. The film appeared to be smooth and the value of extinction coefficient was negligible. Optical measurements showed that the film has more than 80% transmission in the visible region. The direct band gap energy was 2.47eV. This method is highly suitable for the synthesis of crystalline and transparent indium sulfide thin films and can be used for various photo voltaic applications.

  1. Nanocrystalline Diamond Films Deposited by Electron Assisted Hot Filament Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Nanocrystalline diamond films were deposited on polished Si wafer surface with electron assisted hot filament chemical vapor deposition at 1 kPa gas pressure, the deposited films were characterized and observed by Raman spectrum, X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy and semiconductor characterization system. The results show that when 8 A bias current is applied for 5 h, the surface roughness decreases to 28.5 nm. After 6 and 8 A bias current are applied for 1 h, and the nanocrystalline films deposition continue for 4 h with 0 A bias current at 1 kPa gas pressure. The nanocrystalline diamond films with 0.5×109 and 1×1010 Ω·cm resistivity respectively are obtained. It is demonstrated that electron bombardment plays an important role of nucleation to deposit diamond films with smooth surface and high resistivity.

  2. Plasma polymers deposited in atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharges: Influence of process parameters on film properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fricke, Katja, E-mail: k.fricke@inp-greifswald.de [Leibniz Institute for Plasma Science and Technology e.V. (INP Greifswald), Felix-Hausdorff-Str. 2, 17489 Greifswald (Germany); Girard-Lauriault, Pierre-Luc [Plasma Processing Laboratory, Department of Chemical Engineering, McGill University, 3610 rue University, Montreal, QC H3A 0C5 (Canada); Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter [Leibniz Institute for Plasma Science and Technology e.V. (INP Greifswald), Felix-Hausdorff-Str. 2, 17489 Greifswald (Germany); Wertheimer, Michael R. [Department of Engineering Physics, École Polytechnique de Montréal, Box 6079, Station Centre-Ville, Montreal, QC H3C 3A7 (Canada)

    2016-03-31

    We present results on the deposition of plasma polymer (PP) films in a dielectric barrier discharge system fed with mixtures of argon or nitrogen carrier gas plus different hydrocarbon precursors, where the latter possess different carbon-to-hydrogen ratios: CH{sub 4} < C{sub 2}H{sub 6} < C{sub 2}H{sub 4} = C{sub 3}H{sub 6} < C{sub 2}H{sub 2}. The influence of precursor gas mixture and flow rate, excitation frequency, and absorbed power on PP film compositions and properties has been investigated. The discharge was characterized by electrical measurements, while the chemical compositions and structures of coatings were analysed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, total combustion, and elastic recoil detection analyses, the latter two for determining carbon-to-hydrogen ratios. Scanning electron microscopy was used to study the coatings' morphology, and profilometry for evaluating deposition rates. - Highlights: • Atmospheric pressure DBD is used to deposit organic hydrocarbon films. • High deposition rates can be achieved by varying the power and/or gas mixture ratio. • Process parameters affect the films' surface chemical composition and morphology. • Deposited films are not soluble in aqueous environment. • No delamination of coatings produced from argon plasma.

  3. Carbon nanotube based transparent conductive thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, X; Rajamani, R; Stelson, K A; Cui, T

    2006-07-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) based optically transparent and electrically conductive thin films are fabricated on plastic substrates in this study. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are chemically treated with a mixture of concentrated sulfuric acid and nitric acid before being dispersed in aqueous surfactant-contained solutions. SWNT thin films are prepared from the stable SWNT solutions using wet coating techniques. The 100 nm thick SWNT thin film exhibits a surface resistivity of 6 kohms/square nanometer with an average transmittance of 88% on the visible light range, which is three times better than the films prepared from the high purity as-received SWNTs.

  4. 等离子体刻蚀并沉积类金刚石膜制备超疏水木材%Fabrication of superhydrophobic wood by plasma etching and deposition of diamond-like carbon films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    解林坤; 王洪艳; 代沁伶; 杜官本

    2016-01-01

    This study presents the fabrication of superhydrophobic wood of Acer saccharum Marsh. using a combination of O2 plasma etching and plasma deposition of a thin hydrophilic diamond⁃like carbon ( DLC) coating in order to impart wood with controlled wetting properties. The effect of O2 plasma etching on roughness was investigated using the scanning electron microscopy ( SEM) and laser scanning confocal microscope ( LSCM) profilometry. The wetting behavior was de⁃termined by the static water contact angle measurement. Furthermore, the morphology, thickness of deposited films, ele⁃ment composition and their chemical bonding information of the wood surfaces before and after the treatment were also examined with SEM, the ellipsometer and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy ( XPS) . The results showed that the wood surfaces of the average roughness, root mean square roughness and peak⁃to⁃valley roughness increased with longer etching time within 30 min. However, the wood surface roughness decreased slightly after the prolonged etching time of 45 min. The static water contact angles of the wood surface increased firstly and then decreased with the increase of etch⁃ing time and attained a maximum value for 157�2° with 30 min etching and after depositing DLC film for 1�5 min, but the static water contact angle of the wood surface etched for 45 min and after depositing DLC film for the same time was 152�3° . The static water contact angles decreased gradually with an increase in deposition times if the wood surfaces were subjected to the same time etching. From the data of the deposition thickness, the deposition rate of DLC films was calculated, which was constant (51�7±4�5) nm/min over the deposition times investigated. The content of oxygen ele⁃ment reduced obviously and the diamond⁃like characteristic peaks of sp2-C and sp3-C presented after the wood surfaces deposited with the DLC film coating.%为使木材表面具备疏水性能,采用等离

  5. Iridium thin films deposited via pulsed laser deposition for future applications as transition-edge sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galeazzi, M. E-mail: galeazzi@physics.miami.edu; Chen, C.; Cohn, J.L.; Gundersen, J.O

    2004-03-11

    The University of Miami has recently started developing and studying high-resolution microcalorimeters operating near 100 mK for X-ray and particle physics and astrophysics. These detectors will be based on Transition Edge Sensors technology fabricated using iridium thin films deposited via the Pulsed Laser Deposition technique. We report here the preliminary result of the room temperature characterization of the Ir thin films, and an overview of future plans to use the films as transition edge sensors.

  6. The irradiation studies on diamond-like carbon films

    CERN Document Server

    LiuGuIang; Xie Er Qin

    2002-01-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films have been deposited on glass substrates using radio-frequency (r.f.) plasma deposition method. gamma-ray, ultraviolet (UV) ray and neutron beam were used to irradiate the DLC films. Raman spectroscopy and infrared (IR) spectroscopy were used to characterize the changing characteristics of SP sup 3 C-H bond and hydrogen content in the films due to the irradiations. It showed that, the damage degrees of the gamma-ray, UV ray and neutron beam on the SP sup 3 C-H bonds are different. Among them, the damage of gamma-ray on the SP sup 3 C-H bond is the weakest. When the irradiation dose of gamma-ray reaches 10x10 sup 4 Gy, the SP sup 3 C-H bond reduces about 50% in number. The square resistance of the films is reduced due to the irradiation of UV ray and this is caused by severe oxidation of the films. Compared with that of the as-deposited one, the IR transmittance of the films irradiated by both gamma-ray and neutron beam is increased to some extent. By using the results on optical...

  7. Energetic deposition of carbon in a cathodic vacuum arc with a biased mesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moafi, A.; Lau, D. W. M.; Sadek, A. Z.; Partridge, J. G.; McKenzie, D. R.; McCulloch, D. G.

    2011-04-01

    Carbon films were deposited in a filtered cathodic vacuum arc with a bias potential applied to a conducting mesh mounted in the plasma stream between the source and the substrate. We determined the stress and microstructural properties of the resulting carbon films and compared the results with those obtained using direct substrate bias with no mesh. Since the relationship between deposition energy and the stress, sp2 fraction and density of carbon are well known, measuring these film properties enabled us to investigate the effect of the mesh on the energy and composition of the depositing flux. When a mesh was used, the film stress showed a monotonic decrease for negative mesh bias voltages greater than 400V, even though the floating potential of the substrate did not vary. We explain this result by the neutralization of some ions when they are near to or passing through the negatively biased mesh. The microstructure of the films showed a change from amorphous to glassy carbonlike with increasing bias. Potential applications for this method include the deposition of carbon films with controlled stress on low conductivity substrates to form rectifying or ohmic contacts.

  8. Graphene diamond-like carbon films heterostructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Fang; Afandi, Abdulkareem; Jackman, Richard B., E-mail: r.jackman@ucl.ac.uk [London Centre for Nanotechnology, Electronic and Electrical Engineering Department, University College London, 17-19 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AH (United Kingdom)

    2015-03-09

    A limitation to the potential use of graphene as an electronic material is the lack of control over the 2D materials properties once it is deposited on a supporting substrate. Here, the use of Diamond-like Carbon (DLC) interlayers between the substrate and the graphene is shown to offer the prospect of overcoming this problem. The DLC films used here, more properly known as a-C:H with ∼25% hydrogen content, have been terminated with N or F moieties prior to graphene deposition. It is found that nitrogen terminations lead to an optical band gap shrinkage in the DLC, whilst fluorine groups reduce the DLC's surface energy. CVD monolayer graphene subsequently transferred to DLC, N terminated DLC, and F terminated DLC has then been studied with AFM, Raman and XPS analysis, and correlated with Hall effect measurements that give an insight into the heterostructures electrical properties. The results show that different terminations strongly affect the electronic properties of the graphene heterostructures. G-F-DLC samples were p-type and displayed considerably higher mobility than the other heterostructures, whilst G-N-DLC samples supported higher carrier densities, being almost metallic in character. Since it would be possible to locally pattern the distribution of these differing surface terminations, this work offers the prospect for 2D lateral control of the electronic properties of graphene layers for device applications.

  9. Graphene diamond-like carbon films heterostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Fang; Afandi, Abdulkareem; Jackman, Richard B.

    2015-03-01

    A limitation to the potential use of graphene as an electronic material is the lack of control over the 2D materials properties once it is deposited on a supporting substrate. Here, the use of Diamond-like Carbon (DLC) interlayers between the substrate and the graphene is shown to offer the prospect of overcoming this problem. The DLC films used here, more properly known as a-C:H with ˜25% hydrogen content, have been terminated with N or F moieties prior to graphene deposition. It is found that nitrogen terminations lead to an optical band gap shrinkage in the DLC, whilst fluorine groups reduce the DLC's surface energy. CVD monolayer graphene subsequently transferred to DLC, N terminated DLC, and F terminated DLC has then been studied with AFM, Raman and XPS analysis, and correlated with Hall effect measurements that give an insight into the heterostructures electrical properties. The results show that different terminations strongly affect the electronic properties of the graphene heterostructures. G-F-DLC samples were p-type and displayed considerably higher mobility than the other heterostructures, whilst G-N-DLC samples supported higher carrier densities, being almost metallic in character. Since it would be possible to locally pattern the distribution of these differing surface terminations, this work offers the prospect for 2D lateral control of the electronic properties of graphene layers for device applications.

  10. Study on re-sputtering during CN{sub x} film deposition through spectroscopic diagnostics of plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Peipei; Yang, Xu; Li, Hui; Cai, Hua [Department of Optical Science and Engineering, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Sun, Jian; Xu, Ning [Department of Optical Science and Engineering, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Shanghai Engineering Research Center of Ultra-Precision Optical Manufacturing, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Wu, Jiada, E-mail: jdwu@fudan.edu.cn [Department of Optical Science and Engineering, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Shanghai Engineering Research Center of Ultra-Precision Optical Manufacturing, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Engineering Research Center of Advanced Lighting Technology, Ministry of Education, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China)

    2015-10-15

    A nitrogen-carbon plasma was generated during the deposition of carbon nitride (CN{sub x}) thin films by pulsed laser ablation of a graphite target in a discharge nitrogen plasma, and the optical emission of the generated nitrogen-carbon plasma was measured for the diagnostics of the plasma and the characterization of the process of CN{sub x} film deposition. The nitrogen-carbon plasma was recognized to contain various species including nitrogen molecules and molecular ions excited in the ambient N{sub 2} gas, carbon atoms and atomic ions ablated from the graphite target and CN radicals. The temporal evolution and spatial distribution of the CN emission and their dependence on the substrate bias voltage show two groups of CN radicals flying in opposite directions. One represents the CN radicals formed as the products of the reactions occurring in the nitrogen-carbon plasma, revealing the reactive deposition of CN{sub x} film due to the reactive expansion of the ablation carbon plasma in the discharge nitrogen plasma and the effective formation of gaseous CN radicals as precursors for CN{sub x} film growth. The other one represents the CN radicals re-sputtered from the growing CN{sub x} film by energetic plasma species, evidencing the re-sputtering of the growing film accompanying film growth. And, the re-sputtering presents ion-induced sputtering features.

  11. [FTIR spectroscopic studies of inner stress on boron carbon nitride thin films].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-Xin; Zheng, Ya-Ru; Song, Zhe; Feng, Ke-Cheng; Zhao, Yong-Nian

    2008-07-01

    Boron carbon nitride thin films were deposited by radio frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering technique using a 50 mm-diameter composite target consisting of h-BN and graphite in an Ar-N2 gas mixture. The composite target was composed of two semi disks: one of h-BN and the other one of graphite. The distance between the target and the substrate was kept at 50 mm. The chamber base pressure was below 5 x 10(-4) Pa. During the deposition, the mixture of Ar (80%) and N2 (20%) was injected into the vacuum chamber and the total pressure was 1.3 Pa. The films were grown on silicon substrates at different deposition parameters, including sputtering power of 80-130 W, deposition temperature of 300-500 degrees C and deposition time of 1-4 h. The chemical bonding state of the samples was characterized by Fourier transform infrared absorption spectroscopy (FTIR). The results suggested that all of the films deposited at these deposition parameters are atomic-level hybrids composed of B, C and N atoms. Besides BN and carbons bonds, the boron carbide and carbon nitride bonds were formed in the BCN thin films. And the deposition parameters have important influences on the growth and inner stress of BCN thin films. That is the higher the sputtering power, the larger the inner stress; the higher or lower the deposition temperature, the larger the inner stress; the longer the deposition time, the larger the inner stress. So changing deposition parameters properly is a feasible method to relax the inner stress between the films and substrate. In the conditions of changing one parameter each time, the optimum deposition parameters to prepare BCN thin films with lower inner stress were obtained: sputtering power of 80 W, deposition temperature of 400 degrees C and deposition time of 2 h.

  12. Atomic force microscopic characterization of films grown by inverse pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egerhazi, L. [Department of Optics and Quantum Electronics, University of Szeged, P.O. Box 406, H-6701 Szeged (Hungary); Geretovszky, Zs. [Department of Optics and Quantum Electronics, University of Szeged, P.O. Box 406, H-6701 Szeged (Hungary); Csako, T. [Department of Optics and Quantum Electronics, University of Szeged, P.O. Box 406, H-6701 Szeged (Hungary); Szoerenyi, T. [Research Group on Laser Physics of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, University of Szeged, P.O. Box 406, H-6701 Szeged (Hungary)]. E-mail: t.szorenyi@physx.u-szeged.hu

    2006-04-30

    Carbon nitride films have been deposited by KrF excimer laser ablation of a rotating graphite target in 5 Pa nitrogen ambient in an inverse pulsed laser deposition configuration, where the backward motion of the ablated species is utilised for film growth on substrates lying in the target plane. Topometric AFM scans of the films, exhibiting elliptical thickness distribution, have been recorded along the axes of symmetry of the deposition area. High resolution AFM scans revealed the existence of disk-like, or somewhat elongated rice-like features of 5-10 nm average thickness and {approx}100 nm largest dimension, densely packed over the whole, approximately 14 x 10 cm{sup 2} deposition area. The RMS roughness of the film decreased from 9 nm near to the laser spot down to 2 nm in the outer regions. Even the highest RMS value obtained for IPLD films was less than half of the typical, 25 nm roughness measured on simultaneously deposited PLD films.

  13. Nanoindentation and AFM studies of PECVD DLC and reactively sputtered Ti containing carbon films

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Pauschitz; J Schalko; T Koch; C Eisenmenger-Sittner; S Kvasnica; Manish Roy

    2003-10-01

    Amorphous carbon film, also known as DLC film, is a promising material for tribological application. It is noted that properties relevant to tribological application change significantly depending on the method of preparation of these films. These properties are also altered by the composition of the films. In view of this, the objective of the present work is to compare the nanoindentation and atomic force microscopy (AFM) study of diamond like carbon (DLC) film obtained by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) with the Ti containing amorphous carbon (Ti/-C : H) film obtained by unbalanced magnetron sputter deposition (UMSD). Towards that purpose, DLC and Ti/-C : H films are deposited on silicon substrate by PECVD and UMSD processes, respectively. The microstructural features and the mechanical properties of these films are evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), nanoindentation and by AFM. The results show that the PECVD DLC film has a higher elastic modulus, hardness and roughness than the UMSD Ti/-C : H film. It also has a lower pull off force than Ti containing amorphous carbon film.

  14. Fabrication of periodical surface structures by picosecond laser irradiation of carbon thin films: transformation of amorphous carbon in nanographite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, C.; Dorcioman, G.; Bita, B.; Besleaga, C.; Zgura, I.; Himcinschi, C.; Popescu, A. C.

    2016-12-01

    Thin films of carbon were synthesized by ns pulsed laser deposition in vacuum on silicon substrates, starting from graphite targets. Further on, the films were irradiated with a picosecond laser source emitting in visible at 532 nm. After tuning of laser parameters, we obtained a film surface covered by laser induced periodical surface structures (LIPSS). They were investigated by optical, scanning electron and atomic force microscopy. It was observed that changing the irradiation angle influences the LIPSS covered area. At high magnification it was revealed that the LIPSS pattern was quite complex, being composed of other small LIPSS islands, interconnected by bridges of nanoparticles. Raman spectra for the non-irradiated carbon films were typical for a-C type of diamond-like carbon, while the LIPSS spectra were characteristic to nano-graphite. The pristine carbon film was hydrophilic, while the LIPSS covered film surface was hydrophobic.

  15. atomic layer deposition of amorphous niobium carbide-based thin film superconductors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prolier, T.; Klug, J. A.; Elam, J. W.; Claus, H.; Becker, N. G.; Pellin, M. J. (Materials Science Division)

    2011-01-01

    Niobium carbide thin films were synthesized by atomic layer deposition (ALD) using trimethylaluminum (TMA), NbF{sub 5}, and NbCl{sub 5} precursors. In situ quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) measurements performed at 200 and 290 C revealed controlled, linear deposition with a high growth rate of 5.7 and 4.5 {angstrom}/cycle, respectively. The chemical composition, growth rate, structure, and electronic properties of the films were studied over the deposition temperature range 125-350 C. Varying amounts of impurities, including amorphous carbon (a-C), AlF{sub 3}, NbF{sub x}, and NbCl{sub x}, were found in all samples. A strong growth temperature dependence of film composition, growth rate, and room temperature DC resistivity was observed. Increasing film density, decreasing total impurity concentration, and decreasing resistivity were observed as a function of increasing deposition temperature for films grown with either NbF{sub 5} or NbCl{sub 5}. Superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometry measurements down to 1.2 K revealed a superconducting transition at T{sub c} = 1.8 K in a 75 nm thick film grown at 350 C with TMA and NbF{sub 5}. The superconducting critical temperature could be increased up to 3.8 K with additional use of NH{sub 3} during ALD film growth.

  16. Atomic layer deposition of amorphous niobium carbide-based thin film superconductors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klug, J. A.; Prolier, T.; Elam, J. W.; Becker, N. G.; Pellin, M. J. (Energy Systems); ( HEP); ( MSD); (Illinois Inst. Tech.)

    2011-01-01

    Niobium carbide thin films were synthesized by atomic layer deposition (ALD) using trimethylaluminum (TMA), NbF{sub 5}, and NbCl{sub 5} precursors. In situ quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) measurements performed at 200 and 290 C revealed controlled, linear deposition with a high growth rate of 5.7 and 4.5 {angstrom}/cycle, respectively. The chemical composition, growth rate, structure, and electronic properties of the films were studied over the deposition temperature range 125-350 C. Varying amounts of impurities, including amorphous carbon (a-C), AlF{sub 3}, NbF{sub x}, and NbCl{sub x}, were found in all samples. A strong growth temperature dependence of film composition, growth rate, and room temperature DC resistivity was observed. Increasing film density, decreasing total impurity concentration, and decreasing resistivity were observed as a function of increasing deposition temperature for films grown with either NbF{sub 5} or NbCl{sub 5}. Superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometry measurements down to 1.2 K revealed a superconducting transition at T{sub c} = 1.8 K in a 75 nm thick film grown at 350 C with TMA and NbF{sub 5}. The superconducting critical temperature could be increased up to 3.8 K with additional use of NH{sub 3} during ALD film growth.

  17. Modelling and optimization of film thickness variation for plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddell, Ewan; Gibson, Des; Lin, Li; Fu, Xiuhua

    2011-09-01

    This paper describes a method for modelling film thickness variation across the deposition area within plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) processes. The model enables identification and optimization of film thickness uniformity sensitivities to electrode configuration, temperature, deposition system design and gas flow distribution. PECVD deposition utilizes a co-planar 300mm diameter electrodes with separate RF power matching to each electrode. The system has capability to adjust electrode separation and electrode temperature as parameters to optimize uniformity. Vacuum is achieved using dry pumping with real time control of butterfly valve position for active pressure control. Comparison between theory and experiment is provided for PECVD of diamond-like-carbon (DLC) deposition onto flat and curved substrate geometries. The process utilizes butane reactive feedstock with an argon carrier gas. Radiofrequency plasma is used. Deposited film thickness sensitivities to electrode geometry, plasma power density, pressure and gas flow distribution are demonstrated. Use of modelling to optimise film thickness uniformity is demonstrated. Results show DLC uniformity of 0.30% over a 200 mm flat zone diameter within overall electrode diameter of 300mm. Thickness uniformity of 0.75% is demonstrated over a 200mm diameter for a non-conformal substrate geometry. Use of the modelling method for PECVD using metal-organic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD) feedstock is demonstrated, specifically for deposition of silica films using metal-organic tetraethoxy-silane. Excellent agreement between experimental and theory is demonstrated for conformal and non-conformal geometries. The model is used to explore scalability of PECVD processes and trade-off against film thickness uniformity. Application to MEMS, optical coatings and thin film photovoltaics is discussed.

  18. Atomic layer deposition of cobalt carbide films and their magnetic properties using propanol as a reducing agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarr, Mouhamadou; Bahlawane, Naoufal; Arl, Didier; Dossot, Manuel; McRae, Edward; Lenoble, Damien

    2016-08-01

    The investigation of highly conformal thin films using Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) is driven by a variety of applications in modern technologies. In particular, the emergence of 3D memory device architectures requires conformal materials with tuneable magnetic properties. Here, nanocomposites of carbon, cobalt and cobalt carbide are deposited by ALD using cobalt acetylacetonate with propanol as a reducing agent. Films were grown by varying the ALD deposition parameters including deposition temperature and propanol exposure time. The morphology, the chemical composition and the crystalline structure of the cobalt carbide film were investigated. Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM) measurements revealed magnetic hysteresis loops with a coercivity reaching 500 Oe and a maximal saturation magnetization of 0.9 T with a grain size less than 15 nm. Magnetic properties are shown to be tuneable by adjusting the deposition parameters that significantly affect the microstructure and the composition of the deposited films.

  19. Mechanism and prediction of failure of diamond films deposited on various substrates by HFCVD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Ling-ping; SUN Xin-yuan; LI Shao-lu; LI De-yi; CHEN Xiao-hua

    2004-01-01

    Diamond films were deposited on the WC-Co cemented carbide and Si3N4 ceramic cutting tool substrates by hot-filament-assisted chemical vapour deposition. The adherence property of diamond films was estimated using the critical load (Pcr) in the indentation test. The adhesive strength of diamond films is related to the intermediate layer between the film and the substrate. Poor adhesion of diamond films to polished cemented carbide substrate is owing to the formation of graphite phase in the interface. The adhesion of diamond films deposited on acid etched cemented carbide substrate is improved, and the peeling-off of the films often happens in the loosen layer of WC particles where the cobalt element is nearly removed. The diamond films' adhesion to cemented carbide substrate whose surface layer is decarbonizated is strengthened dramatically because WC phase forms by reaction between the deposited carbon and tungsten in the surface layer of substrates during the deposition of diamond, which results in chemical combination in the film-substrate interface. The adhesion of diamond films to silicon nitride substrate is the firmest due to the formation of chemical combination of the SiC intermediate layer in the interfaces. In the piston-turning application, the diamond-coated Si3N4 ceramic and the cemented carbide cutting tools usually fail in the form of collapsing of edge and cracking or flaking respectively. They have no built-up edge(BUE) as long as coating is intact.As it wears through, BUE develops and the cutting force on it increases 1 - 3 times than that prior to failure. This can predict the failure of diamond-coated cutting tools.

  20. Preparation of composite electroheat carbon film

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIA Jin-tong; TU Chuan-jun; LI Yan; HU Li-min; DENG Jiu-hua

    2005-01-01

    A kind of conductive and heating unit, which can reach a high surface electroheat temperature at a low voltage, was developed in view of the traditional electroheat coating which has a low surface electroheat temperature and an insufficient heat resistance of its binder. The coating molded electroheat carbon film(CMECF) was prepared by carbonizing the coating which was prepared by adding modified resin into flake graphite and carbon fiber, coating molded onto the surface of the heat resisting matrix after dried, while the hot pressing molded electroheat thick carbon film(HPMETCF) was prepared by carbonizing the bodies whose powders were hot pressing molded directly.The surface and inner microstructure of the carbon film was characterized and analyzed by SEM and DSC/TG, while electroheat property was tested by voltage-current volume resistivity tester and electrical parameter tester. The results show that, close-packed carbon network configuration is formed within the composite electroheat carbon film film after anti-oxidizable treatment reaches a higher surface electroheat temperature than that of the existing electroheat coatings at a low voltage, and has excellent electroheat property, high thermal efficiency as well as stable physicochemical property. It is found that, at room temperature(19± 2 ℃) and 22 V for 5 min, the surface electroheat temperature of the self-produced CMECF (mfiller/mresin = 1. 8/1) reaches 112 ℃ while HPMETCF (mfiller/mresin = 3. 6/1) reaches 265 ℃.

  1. Stability increase of fuel clad with zirconium oxynitride thin film by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jee, Seung Hyun [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Yonsei University, 134 Sinchon Dong, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Materials Research and Education Center, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Auburn University, 275 Wilmore Labs, AL 36849-5341 (United States); Kim, Jun Hwan; Baek, Jong Hyuk [Recycled Fuel Development Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, P.O. Box 105, Yuseong, Daejeon, 305-600 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong-Joo [Materials Research and Education Center, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Auburn University, 275 Wilmore Labs, AL 36849-5341 (United States); Kang, Seong Sik [Regulatory Research Division, Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, 19, Guseong-Dong, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon, 305-338 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Young Soo, E-mail: yoonys@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Yonsei University, 134 Sinchon Dong, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-01

    A zirconium oxynitride (ZON) thin film was deposited onto HT9 steel as a cladding material by a metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) in order to prevent a fuel-clad chemical interaction (FCCI) between a U-10 wt% Zr metal fuel and a clad material. X-ray diffraction spectrums indicated that the mixture of structures of zirconium nitride, oxide and carbide in the MOCVD grown ZON thin films. Also, typical equiaxial grain structures were found in plane and cross sectional images of the as-deposited ZON thin films with a thickness range of 250-500 nm. A depth profile using auger electron microscopy revealed that carbon and oxygen atoms were decreased in the ZON thin film deposited with hydrogen gas flow. Diffusion couple tests at 800 Degree-Sign C for 25 hours showed that the as-deposited ZON thin films had low carbon and oxygen content, confirmed by the Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy, which showed a barrier behavior for FCCI between the metal fuel and the clad. This result suggested that ZON thin film cladding by MOCVD, even with the thickness below the micro-meter level, has a high possibility as an effective FCCI barrier. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zirconium oxynitride (ZON) deposited by metal organic chemical vapor deposition. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Prevention of fuel cladding chemical interaction (FCCI) investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interfusion reduced by between metal fuel (U-10 wt% Zr) and a HT9 cladding material. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hydrogenation of the ZON during growth improved the FCCI barrier performance.

  2. Chemical bath ZnSe thin films: deposition and characterisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokhande, C. D.; Patil, P. S.; Ennaoui, A.; Tributsch, H.

    1998-01-01

    The zinc selenide (ZnSe) thin films have been deposited by a simple and inexpensive chemical bath deposition (CBD) method. The selenourea was used as a selenide ion source. The ZnSe films have been characterised by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDAX), Rutherford back scattering (RBS), and optical absorption. The as-deposited ZnSe films on various substrates are found to be amorphous and contain O2 and N2 in addition to Zn and Se. The optical band gap of the film is estimated to be 2.9 eV. The films are photoactive as evidenced by time resolved microwave conductivity (TRMC).

  3. Rocky Mountain Carbonate Spring Deposit development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainey, Dustin Kyle

    Relict Holocene carbonate spring deposits containing diverse biotic and abiotic depositional textures are present at Fall Creek cold sulphur springs, Alberta, Fairmont Hot Springs, British Columbia, and Hot Creek cold springs, British Columbia. The relict deposits are formed mainly of low-magnesium crystalline calcite contained in laterally continuous strata. Paleo-flow regimes were characterized by extensive sheet flow that increased the surface area of spring water exposed to the atmosphere. Calcite precipitated inorganically from spring water that attained CaCO3 supersaturation through agitation-induced CO2 degassing that was facilitated by elevated flow rates and a large surface area as spring water flowed down-slope. Thus, the deposits contain only minor amounts of detrital, mechanically deposited, and biogenic carbonate. Evaporation was only a minor contributor to CaCO3 supersaturation, mainly in quiescent environments. Photosynthetic CO2 removal did not measurably contribute to CaCO3 supersaturation. Calcite crystals precipitated in biotic facies formed from low to moderately supersaturated spring water, whereas abiotic dendrite crystals formed rapidly from highly supersaturated spring water. Calcite passively nucleated on cyanobacteria, bryophytes and macrophytes, and was probably facilitated by cyanobacterial extracellular polymeric substances. Cyanobacterial filaments and stromatolites are integral parts of all three deposits, whereas bryophytes were restricted to the Fall Creek and Hot Creek deposits. Diagenetic microbial degradation of crystalline calcite was common to all three deposits, but recrystallization was limited to the Fall Creek deposit. The amount and location of calcite precipitation relative to the vents was controlled by the concentrations of Ca2+ and HCO3- in solution, and discharge volume fluctuations. Spring water with high [Ca2+] and [HCO 3-] precipitated large amounts of calcite proximal to the vents (e.g. Fairmont), whereas spring

  4. Removal of Ozone by Carbon Nanotubes/Quartz Fiber Film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shen; Nie, Jingqi; Wei, Fei; Yang, Xudong

    2016-09-01

    Ozone is recognized as a harmful gaseous pollutant, which can lead to severe human health problems. In this study, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were tested as a new approach for ozone removal. The CNTs/quartz fiber film was fabricated through growth of CNTs upon pure quartz fiber using chemical vapor deposition method. Ozone conversion efficiency of the CNTs/quartz fiber film was tested for 10 h and compared with that of quartz film, activated carbon (AC), and a potassium iodide (KI) solution under the same conditions. The pressure resistance of these materials under different airflow rates was also measured. The results showed that the CNTs/quartz fiber film had better ozone conversion efficiency but also higher pressure resistance than AC and the KI solution of the same weight. The ozone removal performance of the CNTs/quartz fiber film was comparable with AC at 20 times more weight. The CNTs played a dominant role in ozone removal by the CNTs/quartz fiber film. Its high ozone conversion efficiency, lightweight and free-standing properties make the CNTs/quartz fiber film applicable to ozone removal. Further investigation should be focused on reducing pressure resistance and studying the CNT mechanism for removing ozone.

  5. Surface treatment effect on Si (111) substrate for carbon deposition using DC unbalanced magnetron sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aji, A. S., E-mail: aji.ravazes70@gmail.com; Sahdan, M. F.; Hendra, I. B.; Dinari, P.; Darma, Y. [Quantum Semiconductor and Devices Lab., Physics of Material Electronics Research Division, Department of Physics, Institut Teknologi Bandung (Indonesia)

    2015-04-16

    In this work, we studied the effect of HF treatment in silicon (111) substrate surface for depositing thin layer carbon. We performed the deposition of carbon by using DC Unbalanced Magnetron Sputtering with carbon pallet (5% Fe) as target. From SEM characterization results it can be concluded that the carbon layer on HF treated substrate is more uniform than on substrate without treated. Carbon deposition rate is higher as confirmed by AFM results if the silicon substrate is treated by HF solution. EDAX characterization results tell that silicon (111) substrate with HF treatment have more carbon fraction than substrate without treatment. These results confirmed that HF treatment on silicon Si (111) substrates could enhance the carbon deposition by using DC sputtering. Afterward, the carbon atomic arrangement on silicon (111) surface is studied by performing thermal annealing process to 900 °C. From Raman spectroscopy results, thin film carbon is not changing until 600 °C thermal budged. But, when temperature increase to 900 °C, thin film carbon is starting to diffuse to silicon (111) substrates.

  6. ZnS thin film deposited with chemical bath deposition process directed by different stirring speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y.; Dang, X. Y.; Jin, J.; Yu, T.; Li, B. Z.; He, Q.; Li, F. Y.; Sun, Y.

    2010-09-01

    In this combined film thickness, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction and optical properties study, we explore the effects of different stirring speeds on the growth and optical properties of ZnS film deposited by CBD method. From the disclosed changes of thickness of ZnS film, we conclude that film thickness is independent of the stirring speeds in the heterogeneous process (deposition time less than 40 min), but increases with the stirring speeds and/or deposition time increasing in the homogeneous process. Grazing incident X-ray diffraction (GIXRD) and the study of optical properties disclosed that the ZnS films grown with different stirring speeds show partially crystallized film and exhibit good transmittance (70-88% in the visible region), but the stirring speeds cannot give much effects on the structure and optical properties in the homogeneous process.

  7. Nitrogen incorporation in sputter deposited molybdenum nitride thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stöber, Laura, E-mail: laura.stoeber@tuwien.ac.at; Patocka, Florian, E-mail: florian.patocka@tuwien.ac.at; Schneider, Michael, E-mail: michael.schneider@tuwien.ac.at; Schmid, Ulrich, E-mail: ulrich.e366.schmid@tuwien.ac.at [Institute of Sensor and Actuator Systems, TU Wien, Gußhausstraße 27-29, A-1040 Vienna (Austria); Konrath, Jens Peter, E-mail: jenspeter.konrath@infineon.com; Haberl, Verena, E-mail: verena.haberl@infineon.com [Infineon Technologies Austria AG, Siemensstraße 2, 9500 Villach (Austria)

    2016-03-15

    In this paper, the authors report on the high temperature performance of sputter deposited molybdenum (Mo) and molybdenum nitride (Mo{sub 2}N) thin films. Various argon and nitrogen gas compositions are applied for thin film synthetization, and the amount of nitrogen incorporation is determined by Auger measurements. Furthermore, effusion measurements identifying the binding conditions of the nitrogen in the thin film are performed up to 1000 °C. These results are in excellent agreement with film stress and scanning electron microscope analyses, both indicating stable film properties up to annealing temperatures of 500 °C.

  8. Continuous wave infrared laser deposition of organic thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaginuma, Seiichiro [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Yamaguchi, Jun [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Haemori, Masamitsu [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Itaka, Kenji [Department of Advanced Materials Science, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, Univesity of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8568 (Japan); Matsumoto, Yuji [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Kondo, Michio [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Koinuma, Hideomi [Department of Advanced Materials Science, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, Univesity of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8568 (Japan)

    2007-04-15

    We developed a continuous-wave infrared laser molecular beam epitaxy (CW-IR-LMBE) optimized for the fabrication of organic semiconductor films. The crystal quality of these organic thin films deposited by CW-IR-LMBE was substantially the same as those deposited by thermal evaporation. Due to the possibility of quick switching of evaporation sources, CW-IR-LMBE is especially advantageous for rapid screening of composition, thickness, and fabrication parameters in materials and device optimization based on combinatorial technology.

  9. Oxidation of fluorinated amorphous carbon (a-CF(x)) films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Yang; Broitman, Esteban; Gellman, Andrew J

    2010-01-19

    Amorphous fluorinated carbon (a-CF(x)) films have a variety of potential technological applications. In most such applications these films are exposed to air and undergo partial surface oxidation. X-ray photoemission spectroscopy has been used to study the oxidation of fresh a-CF(x) films deposited by magnetron sputtering. The oxygen sticking coefficient measured by exposure to low pressures (<10(-3) Torr) of oxygen at room temperature is on the order of S approximately 10(-6), indicating that the surfaces of these films are relatively inert to oxidation when compared with most metals. The X-ray photoemission spectra indicate that the initial stages of oxygen exposure (<10(7) langmuirs) result in the preferential oxidation of the carbon atoms with zero or one fluorine atom, perhaps because these carbon atoms are more likely to be found in configurations with unsaturated double bonds and radicals than carbon atoms with two or three fluorine atoms. Exposure of the a-CF(x) film to atmospheric pressures of air (effective exposure of 10(12) langmuirs to O(2)) results in lower levels of oxygen uptake than the low pressure exposures (<10(7) langmuirs). It is suggested that this is the result of oxidative etching of the most reactive carbon atoms, leaving a relatively inert surface. Finally, low pressure exposures to air result in the adsorption of both nitrogen and oxygen onto the surface. Some of the nitrogen adsorbed on the surface at low pressures is in a reversibly adsorbed state in the sense that subsequent exposure to low pressures of O(2) results in the displacement of nitrogen by oxygen. Similarly, when an a-CF(x) film oxidized in pure O(2) is exposed to low pressures of air, some of the adsorbed oxygen is displaced by nitrogen. It is suggested that these forms of nitrogen and oxygen are bound to free radical sites in the film.

  10. Electrophoretic Deposition of Carbon Nanotubes on 3-Amino-Propyl-Triethoxysilane (APTES Surface Functionalized Silicon Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theda Daniels-Race

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Fabrication of uniform thin coatings of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs by electrophoretic deposition (EPD on semiconductor (silicon substrates with 3-aminopropyl-triethoxysilane (APTES surface functionalization has been studied extensively in this report. The gradual deposition and eventual film formation of the carbon nanotubes (CNTs is greatly assisted by the Coulombic force of attraction existing between the positively charged –NH2 surface groups of APTES and the acid treated, negatively charged nanotubes migrating towards the deposition surfaces. The remarkable deposition characteristics of the CNT coatings by EPD in comparison to the dip coating method and the influence of isopropyl (IPA-based CNT suspension in the fabricated film quality has also been revealed in this study. The effect of varying APTES concentration (5%–100% on the Raman spectroscopy and thickness of the deposited CNT film has been discussed in details, as well. The deposition approach has eliminated the need of metal deposition in the electrophoretic deposition approach and, therefore, establishes a cost-effective, fast and entirely room temperature-based fabrication strategy of CNT thin films for a wide range of next generation electronic applications.

  11. Thin film zinc oxide deposited by CVD and PVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamelmann, Frank U.

    2016-10-01

    Zinc oxide is known as a mineral since 1810, but it came to scientific interest after its optoelectronic properties found to be tuneable by p-type doping. Since the late 1980’s the number of publications increased exponentially. All thin film deposition technologies, including sol-gel and spray pyrolysis, are able to produce ZnO films. However, for outstanding properties and specific doping, only chemical vapor deposition and physical vapor deposition have shown so far satisfying results in terms of high conductivity and high transparency. In this paper the different possibilities for doping will be discussed, some important applications of doped ZnO thin films will be presented. The deposition technologies used for industrial applications are shown in this paper. Especially sputtering of aluminium doped Zinc Oxide (ZnO:Al or AZO) and LPCVD of boron doped Zinc Oxide (ZnO:B or BZO) are used for the commercial production of transparent conductive oxide films on glass used for thin film photovoltaic cells. For this special application the typical process development for large area deposition is presented, with the important trade-off between optical properties (transparency and ability for light scattering) and electrical properties (conductivity). Also, the long term stability of doped ZnO films is important for applications, humidity in the ambient is often the reason for degradation of the films. The differences between the mentioned materials are presented.

  12. Characterization of polymer thin films obtained by pulsed laser deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palla-Papavlu, A.; Dinca, V.; Ion, V.; Moldovan, A.; Mitu, B.; Luculescu, C.; Dinescu, M.

    2011-04-01

    The development of laser techniques for the deposition of polymer and biomaterial thin films on solid surfaces in a controlled manner has attracted great attention during the last few years. Here we report the deposition of thin polymer films, namely Polyepichlorhydrin by pulsed laser deposition. Polyepichlorhydrin polymer was deposited on flat substrate (i.e. silicon) using an NdYAG laser (266 nm, 5 ns pulse duration and 10 Hz repetition rate). The obtained thin films have been characterized by atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry. It was found that for laser fluences up to 1.5 J/cm 2 the chemical structure of the deposited polyepichlorhydrin polymer thin layers resembles to the native polymer, whilst by increasing the laser fluence above 1.5 J/cm 2 the polyepichlorohydrin films present deviations from the bulk polymer. Morphological investigations (atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy) reveal continuous polyepichlorhydrin thin films for a relatively narrow range of fluences (1-1.5 J/cm 2). The wavelength dependence of the refractive index and extinction coefficient was determined by ellipsometry studies which lead to new insights about the material. The obtained results indicate that pulsed laser deposition method is potentially useful for the fabrication of polymer thin films to be used in applications including electronics, microsensor or bioengineering industries.

  13. Anisotropies in magnetron sputtered carbon nitride thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellgren, Niklas; Johansson, Mats P.; Broitman, Esteban; Hultman, Lars; Sundgren, Jan-Eric

    2001-04-01

    Carbon nitride CNx (0⩽x⩽0.35) thin films, deposited by reactive dc magnetron sputtering in Ar/N2 discharges have been studied with respect to microstructure using electron microscopy, and elastic modulus using nanoindentation and surface acoustic wave analyses. For growth temperature of 100 °C, the films were amorphous, and with an isotropic Young's modulus of ˜170-200 GPa essentially unaffected by the nitrogen fraction. The films grown at elevated temperatures (350-550 °C) show anisotropic mechanical properties due to a textured microstructure with standing basal planes, as observed from measuring the Young's modulus in different directions. The modulus measured in the plane of the film was ˜60-80 GPa, while in the vertical direction the modulus increased considerably from ˜25 to ˜200 GPa as the nitrogen content was increased above ˜15 at. %.

  14. Nanostructured molybdenum carbide thin films obtained by femtosecond pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teghil, Roberto; De Bonis, Angela [Dipartimento di Chimica ' ' A.M. Tamburro' ' , Universita della Basilicata, Potenza (Italy); IMIP-U.O.S. di Potenza, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Tito (Italy); Galasso, Agostino; Sansone, Maria [Dipartimento di Chimica ' ' A.M. Tamburro' ' , Universita della Basilicata, Potenza (Italy); Rau, Julietta V. [ISM, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Rome (Italy); Santagata, Antonio [IMIP-U.O.S. di Potenza, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Tito (Italy)

    2012-12-15

    The films obtained by ultra-short pulsed laser deposition of a target of molybdenum carbide, at different substrate temperatures, have been characterized by different techniques, including scanning electron microscopy, micro-Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results indicate that the films are formed by a large number of particles with nanometric dimensions and are composed mainly of Mo{sub 2}C. The presence of an excess of carbon, found in the films, is probably due the presence of a certain amount of graphite in the target (copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  15. Stress development during deposition of CNx thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broitman, E.; Zheng, W. T.; Sjöström, H.; Ivanov, I.; Greene, J. E.; Sundgren, J.-E.

    1998-05-01

    We have investigated the influence of deposition parameters on stress generation in CNx (0.3films deposited onto Si(001) substrates by reactive magnetron sputtering of C in pure N2 discharges. Film stress, σ, which in all cases is compressive, decreases with an increase in the N2 pressure, PN2, due to structural changes induced by the pressure-dependent variation in the average energy of particles bombarding the film during deposition. The film stress σ is also a function of the film growth temperature, Ts, and exhibits a maximum value of ˜5 GPa at 350 °C. Under these conditions, the films have a distorted microstructure consisting of a three-dimensional, primarily sp2 bonded, network. In contrast, films deposited at Ts<200 °C with a low stress are amorphous. At 350 °Cfilms grown at 350 °C exhibit the highest hardness and elasticity.

  16. Properties of a-C:H:Si thin films deposited by middle-frequency magnetron sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Jinlong, E-mail: golden_dragon@126.com [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Processing and Recycling of Nonferrous Metals, Lanzhou University of Technology, Lanzhou 730050 (China); School of Science, Lanzhou University of Technology, Lanzhou 730050 (China); Wang, Yubao; Du, Jinfang; Yang, Hua [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Processing and Recycling of Nonferrous Metals, Lanzhou University of Technology, Lanzhou 730050 (China); Hao, Junying, E-mail: jyhao@licp.cas.cn [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2016-08-30

    Highlights: • The a-C:H:Si films were deposited by magnetron sputtering Si target in argon and methane gas mixture atmosphere. • The growth of a-C:H:Si films is classified into three modes with increasing of methane flow rate. • The a-C:H:Si films at moderate methane flow rate exhibit low stress, high hardness and superior tribological properties. - Abstract: The silicon doped hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H:Si) films were prepared on silicon substrates by middle-frequency magnetron sputtering silicon target in an argon and methane gas mixture atmosphere. The deposition rate, chemical composition, structure, surface properties, stress, hardness and tribological properties in the ambient air of the films were systemically investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscope (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), nanoindentation and tribological tester. The results show that doped silicon content in the films is controlled in the wide range from 39.7 at.% to 0.2 at.% by various methane gas flow rate, and methane flow rate affects not only the silicon content but also its chemical bonding structure in the films due to the transformation of sputtering modes. Meanwhile, the sp{sup 3} carbon component in the films linearly increases with increasing of methane flow rate. The film deposited at moderate methane flow rate of 40–60 sccm exhibits the very smooth surface (RMS roughness 0.4 nm), low stress (0.42 GPa), high hardness (21.1 GPa), as well as low friction coefficient (0.038) and wear rate (1.6 × 10{sup −7} mm{sup 3}/Nm). The superior tribological performance of the films could be attributed to the formation and integral covering of the transfer materials on the sliding surface and their high hardness.

  17. Pulsed laser deposition and characterisation of thin superconducting films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morone, A. [CNR, zona industriale di Tito Scalo, Potenza (Italy). Istituto per i Materiali Speciali

    1996-09-01

    Same concepts on pulsed laser deposition of thin films will be discussed and same examples of high transition temperature (HTc) BiSrCaCuO (BISCO) and low transition temperature NbN/MgO/NbN multilayers will be presented. X-ray and others characterizations of these films will be reported and discussed. Electrical properties of superconducting thin films will be realized as a function of structural and morphological aspect.

  18. Characterization of CdTe Films Deposited at Various Bath Temperatures and Concentrations Using Electrophoretic Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zulkarnain Zainal

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available CdTe film was deposited using the electrophoretic deposition technique onto an ITO glass at various bath temperatures. Four batch film compositions were used by mixing 1 to 4 wt% concentration of CdTe powder with 10 mL of a solution of methanol and toluene. X-ray Diffraction analysis showed that the films exhibited polycrystalline nature of zinc-blende structure with the (111 orientation as the most prominent peak. From the Atomic Force Microscopy, the thickness and surface roughness of the CdTe film increased with the increase of CdTe concentration. The optical energy band gap of film decreased with the increase of CdTe concentration, and with the increase of isothermal bath temperature. The film thickness increased with respect to the increase of CdTe concentration and bath temperature, and following, the numerical expression for the film thickness with respect to these two variables has been established.

  19. Characterization of CdTe films deposited at various bath temperatures and concentrations using electrophoretic deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daud, Mohd Norizam Md; Zakaria, Azmi; Jafari, Atefeh; Ghazali, Mohd Sabri Mohd; Abdullah, Wan Rafizah Wan; Zainal, Zulkarnain

    2012-01-01

    CdTe film was deposited using the electrophoretic deposition technique onto an ITO glass at various bath temperatures. Four batch film compositions were used by mixing 1 to 4 wt% concentration of CdTe powder with 10 mL of a solution of methanol and toluene. X-ray Diffraction analysis showed that the films exhibited polycrystalline nature of zinc-blende structure with the (111) orientation as the most prominent peak. From the Atomic Force Microscopy, the thickness and surface roughness of the CdTe film increased with the increase of CdTe concentration. The optical energy band gap of film decreased with the increase of CdTe concentration, and with the increase of isothermal bath temperature. The film thickness increased with respect to the increase of CdTe concentration and bath temperature, and following, the numerical expression for the film thickness with respect to these two variables has been established.

  20. Iron nanoparticles embedded in carbon films: structural and optical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashayekhi, Fatemeh; Shafiekhani, Azizollah; Sebt, Seyed Ali

    2016-06-01

    In the present work amorphous hydrogenated carbon films with sputtered iron nanoparticles (Fe NPs @ a-C:H) were deposited by co-deposition of RF-sputtering and RF-plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition methods using acetylene gas and iron target on quartz and silicon substrates. Samples were prepared in different initial pressures and during constant deposition time. The crystalline structure of Fe NPs @ a-C:H was studied using X-ray diffraction and selected area electron diffraction patterns. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis presents that increasing the initial pressure decreases the atomic ratio of Fe/C and the sp3-hybridized carbon content in prepared samples. The transmission electron microscope image shows the encapsulated Fe NPs in carbon films. The optical properties and localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of samples were studied using UV-visible spectrophotometry, which is shown that increasing of Fe content decreases the intensity of LSPR peak and increases the optical band gap.

  1. Ag films grown by remote plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition on different substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amusan, Akinwumi A., E-mail: akinwumi.amusan@ovgu.de; Kalkofen, Bodo; Burte, Edmund P. [Institute of Micro and Sensor Systems, Otto-von-Guericke University, Universitätsplatz 2, 39106 Magdeburg (Germany); Gargouri, Hassan; Wandel, Klaus; Pinnow, Cay [SENTECH Instruments GmbH, Schwarzschildstraße 2, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Lisker, Marco [IHP, Im Technologiepark 25, 15236 Frankfurt (Oder) (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    Silver (Ag) layers were deposited by remote plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition (PALD) using Ag(fod)(PEt{sub 3}) (fod = 2,2-dimethyl-6,6,7,7,8,8,8-heptafluorooctane-3,5-dionato) as precursor and hydrogen plasma on silicon substrate covered with thin films of SiO{sub 2}, TiN, Ti/TiN, Co, Ni, and W at different deposition temperatures from 70  to 200 °C. The deposited silver films were analyzed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, four point probe measurement, ellipsometric measurement, x-ray fluorescence (XRF), and x-ray diffraction (XRD). XPS revealed pure Ag with carbon and oxygen contamination close to the detection limit after 30 s argon sputtering for depositions made at 120 and 200 °C substrate temperatures. However, an oxygen contamination was detected in the Ag film deposited at 70 °C after 12 s argon sputtering. A resistivity of 5.7 × 10{sup −6} Ω cm was obtained for approximately 97 nm Ag film on SiO{sub 2}/Si substrate. The thickness was determined from the SEM cross section on the SiO{sub 2}/Si substrate and also compared with XRF measurements. Polycrystalline cubic Ag reflections were identified from XRD for PALD Ag films deposited at 120 and 200 °C. Compared to W surface, where poor adhesion of the films was found, Co, Ni, TiN, Ti/TiN and SiO{sub 2} surfaces had better adhesion for silver films as revealed by SEM, TEM, and AFM images.

  2. Deposition of SiOx barrier films by O2/TMDSO RF-PECVD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Mei-Li; Fu Ya-Bo; Chen Qiang; Ge Yuan-Jing

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports that the SiOx barrier films are deposited on polyethylene terephthalate substrate by plasmaenhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) for the application of transparent barrier packaging. The variations of O2/Tetramethyldisiloxane (TMDSO) ratio and input power in radio frequency (RF) plasma are carried out to optimize barrier properties of the SiOx coated film. The properties of the coatings are characterized by Fourier transform infrared,water wpour transmission rate (WVTR), oxygen transmission rate (OTR), and atomic force microscopy analysers. It is found that the O2/TMDSO ratio exceeding 2:1 and the input power over 200 W yield SiOx films with low carbon contents which can be good to the barrier (WVTR and OTR) properties of the SiOx coatings. Also, the film properties not only depend on oxygen concentration of the inlet gas mixtures and input power, but also relate to the surface morphology of the coating.

  3. Vacuum deposition of stoichiometric crystalline PbS films: The effect of sulfurizing environment during deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, B. P.; Kumar, R.; Kumar, A.; Tyagi, R. C.

    2015-10-01

    Thin film of lead sulfide (PbS) was deposited onto highly cleaned glass and quartz substrates using a vacuum thermal evaporation technique. The effect of the sulfurizing environment on the growth and properties of vacuum-deposited PbS thin film was studied. The ambient sulfurizing environment was created by thermal decomposition of thiourea inside the vacuum chamber during deposition to maintain the stoichiometry and quality of the PbS film. The sulfurizing gas H2S, produced in the thermal decomposition of the solid sulfur containing thiourea readily combines with the cations (Pb2+) without leaving any anions (S2-) at the substrates and also has not produced any excess of sulfur at the substrates. The deposited film was characterized by optical spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction patterns, scanning electron micrographs with energy dispersive analysis of x-rays, and atomic force micrographs. The physical characterization of the deposited PbS film revealed that the surface of film grown in the sulfurizing environment improved and contained more stoichiometric sulfur in comparison to film deposited without the sulfurizing environment.

  4. Stoichiometry controlled oxide thin film growth by pulsed laser deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenen, Rik; Smit, Jasper; Orsel, Kasper; Vailionis, Arturas; Bastiaens, Bert; Huijben, Mark; Boller, Klaus; Rijnders, Guus; Koster, Gertjan

    2015-01-01

    The oxidation of species in the plasma plume during pulsed laser deposition controls both the stoichiometry as well as the growth kinetics of the deposited SrTiO3 thin films, instead of the commonly assumed mass distribution in the plasma plume and the kinetic energy of the arriving species. It was

  5. Ubiquitous pentacene monolayer on metals deposited onto pentacene films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeckel, B; Sambur, J B; Parkinson, B A

    2007-11-01

    Photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS and UPS) was used to study the deposition of metal layers (Ag, Cu, and Au) onto pentacene films. Very low work functions were measured (PhiAg = 3.91 eV, PhiCu = 3.93 eV, and PhiAu = 4.3 eV) for all of the metals, in agreement with results from the literature. The intensities of the C 1s core-level signals from pentacene that were monitored during stepwise metal deposition leveled off at a value of about 30% of a thick pentacene film. This C 1s intensity is comparable to that of one monolayer of pentacene deposited onto the respective metal. The valence band spectra of metals deposited onto pentacene and spectra collected for pentacene deposited onto bare metal surfaces are very similar. These findings lead to the conclusion that approximately one monolayer of pentacene is always present on top of the freshly deposited metal film, which explains the very low work function of the metals when they are deposited onto organic films. We expect similar behavior with other nonreactive metals deposited onto stable organic layers.

  6. Self-terminating growth of platinum films by electrochemical deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yihua; Gokcen, Dincer; Bertocci, Ugo; Moffat, Thomas P

    2012-12-07

    A self-terminating rapid electrodeposition process for controlled growth of platinum (Pt) monolayer films from a K(2)PtCl(4)-NaCl electrolyte has been developed that is tantamount to wet atomic layer deposition. Despite the deposition overpotential being in excess of 1 volt, Pt deposition was quenched at potentials just negative of proton reduction by an alteration of the double-layer structure induced by a saturated surface coverage of underpotential deposited H (H(upd)). The surface was reactivated for further Pt deposition by stepping the potential to more positive values, where H(upd) is oxidized and fresh sites for the adsorption of PtCl(4)(2-) become available. Periodic pulsing of the potential enables sequential deposition of two-dimensional Pt layers to fabricate films of desired thickness, relevant to a range of advanced technologies.

  7. Thin films deposited by femtosecond pulsed laser ablation of tungsten carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Bonis, A. [Dipartimento di Chimica ' A.M. Tamburro' , Universita della Basilicata, Via dell' Ateneo Lucano 10, 85100 Potenza (Italy); Consorzio Interuniversitario Nazionale per la Scienza e Tecnologia dei Materiali - INSTM, Via G. Giusti 9, 00121 Florence (Italy); Teghil, R., E-mail: roberto.teghil@unibas.it [Dipartimento di Chimica ' A.M. Tamburro' , Universita della Basilicata, Via dell' Ateneo Lucano 10, 85100 Potenza (Italy); Consorzio Interuniversitario Nazionale per la Scienza e Tecnologia dei Materiali - INSTM, Via G. Giusti 9, 00121 Florence (Italy); Santagata, A. [Istituto Metodologie Inorganiche e Plasmi, CNR, Unita di Potenza, via S. Loja, 85050 Tito Scalo PZ (Italy); Galasso, A. [Dipartimento di Chimica ' A.M. Tamburro' , Universita della Basilicata, Via dell' Ateneo Lucano 10, 85100 Potenza (Italy); Rau, J.V. [Istituto di Struttura della Materia, CNR, Via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, 00133 Rome (Italy)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We have deposited amorphous tungsten carbide films by ultra-short PLD. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In the films different W-C phases are present. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The films are formed mainly by particles with nanometric size. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We propose that the particles are directly ejected from the target. - Abstract: Ultra-short Pulsed Laser Deposition has been applied to the production of thin films from a tungsten carbide target. The gaseous phase obtained by the laser ablation shows a very weak primary plume, in contrast with a very strong secondary one. The deposited films, investigated by Scanning Electron Microscopy, Atomic Force Microscopy, X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy and X-Ray Diffraction, present a mixture of WC and other phases with lower carbon content. All films are amorphous, independently from the substrate temperature. The characteristics of the deposits have been explained in terms of thermal evaporation and cooling rate of molten particles ejected from the target.

  8. Microstructure Changes of Ti-Al-C Films Deposited by Filtered Cathodic Vacuum Arc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianjuan Pang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanocomposite Ti-Al-C films were deposited by filtered cathodic vacuum arc (FCVA at different CH4 flows. The deposited films were characterized in terms of elemental and phase compositions, chemical bonds, and texture as a function of CH4 flow rate by XRD, XPS, HRTEM, Raman spectroscopy, and IR spectroscopy. The results show that the TiC grain size decreases from 4.2 to 2.9 nm as the CH4 flow rate increases from 30 to 80 sccm. The analysis of XPS, HRTEM, and Raman spectroscopy shows that the microstructure of deposited films turns from a TiC dominant TiC-C film to a carbon network dominant TiAl-doped a-C film structure as the CH4 flow increases from 30 sccm to 80 sccm. IR spectroscopy shows that most of the hydrogen atoms in the deposited films are bonded to the sp3-hybridized C atoms. All the composition and microstructure change can be explained by considering the plasma conditions and the effect of CH4 flow.

  9. Deposition and Characterization of Molybdenum Thin Film Using Direct Current Magnetron and Atomic Force Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhtade Mustafa Aqil

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, pure molybdenum (Mo thin film has been deposited on blank Si substrate by DC magnetron sputtering technique. The deposition condition for all samples has not been changed except for the deposition time in order to study the influence of time on the thickness and surface morphology of molybdenum thin film. The surface profiler has been used to measure the surface thickness. Atomic force microscopy technique was employed to investigate the roughness and grain structure of Mo thin film. The thickness and grain of molybdenum thin film layer has been found to increase with respect to time, while the surface roughness decreases. The average roughness, root mean square roughness, surface skewness, and surface kurtosis parameters are used to analyze the surface morphology of Mo thin film. Smooth surface has been observed. From grain analysis, a uniform grain distribution along the surface has been found. The obtained results allowed us to decide the optimal time to deposit molybdenum thin film layer of 20–100 nm thickness and subsequently patterned as electrodes (source/drain in carbon nanotube-channel transistor.

  10. Thin-film organic photonics molecular layer deposition and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Yoshimura, Tetsuzo

    2011-01-01

    Among the many atomic/molecular assembling techniques used to develop artificial materials, molecular layer deposition (MLD) continues to receive special attention as the next-generation growth technique for organic thin-film materials used in photonics and electronics. Thin-Film Organic Photonics: Molecular Layer Deposition and Applications describes how photonic/electronic properties of thin films can be improved through MLD, which enables precise control of atomic and molecular arrangements to construct a wire network that achieves ""three-dimensional growth"". MLD facilitates dot-by-dot--o

  11. Characterization of Si:O:C:H films fabricated using electron emission enhanced chemical vapour deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durrant, Steven F. [Laboratorio de Plasmas Tecnologicos, Campus Experimental de Sorocaba, Universidade Estadual Paulista-UNESP, Avenida Tres de Marco, 511, Alto da Boa Vista, 18087-180, Soracaba, SP (Brazil)], E-mail: steve@sorocaba.unesp.br; Rouxinol, Francisco P.M.; Gelamo, Rogerio V. [Instituto de Fisica Gleb Wataghin, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, 13083-970, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Trasferetti, B. Claudio [Present address: Superintendencia Regional da Policia Federal em Sao Paulo, Setor Tecnico-Cientifico, Rua Hugo d' Antola 95/10o Andar, Lapa de Baixo, 05038-090 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Davanzo, C.U. [Instituto de Quimica, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, 13083-970, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Bica de Moraes, Mario A. [Instituto de Fisica Gleb Wataghin, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, 13083-970, Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2008-01-15

    Silicon-based polymers and oxides may be formed when vapours of oxygen-containing organosilicone compounds are exposed to energetic electrons drawn from a hot filament by a bias potential applied to a second electrode in a controlled atmosphere in a vacuum chamber. As little deposition occurs in the absence of the bias potential, electron impact fragmentation is the key mechanism in film fabrication using electron-emission enhanced chemical vapour deposition (EEECVD). The feasibility of depositing amorphous hydrogenated carbon films also containing silicon from plasmas of tetramethylsilane or hexamethyldisiloxane has already been shown. In this work, we report the deposition of diverse films from plasmas of tetraethoxysilane (TEOS)-argon mixtures and the characterization of the materials obtained. The effects of changes in the substrate holder bias (V{sub S}) and of the proportion of TEOS in the mixture (X{sub T}) on the chemical structure of the films are examined by infrared-reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS) at near-normal and oblique incidence using unpolarised and p-polarised, light, respectively. The latter is particularly useful in detecting vibrational modes not observed when using conventional near-normal incidence. Elemental analyses of the film were carried out by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), which was also useful in complementary structural investigations. In addition, the dependencies of the deposition rate on V{sub S} and X{sub T} are presented.

  12. Growth of nanocrystalline silicon carbide thin films by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, S W; Moon, J Y; Ahn, S S; Kim, H Y; Shin, D H

    1999-01-01

    Nanocrystalline silicon carbide thin films have been deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) using SiH sub 4 , CH sub 4 , and H sub 2 gases. The effects of gas mixing ratio (CH sub 4 /SiH sub 4), deposition temperature, and RF power on the film properties have been studied. The growth rate, refractive index, and the optical energy gap depends critically on the growth conditions. The dependence of the growth rate on the gas flow ratio is quite different from the results obtained for the growth using C sub 2 H sub 2 gas instead of CH sub 4. As the deposition temperature is increased from 300 .deg. C to 600 .deg. C, hydrogen and carbon content in the film decreases and as a result the optical gap decreases. At the deposition temperature of 600 .deg. C and RF power of 150 W, the film structure si nanocrystalline, As the result of the nanocrystallization the dark conductivity is greatly improved. The nanocrystalline silicon carbide thin films may be used for large area optoelectronic devices...

  13. Fate of Organic Carbon Deposited in Reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntington, T. G.; Rhoton, F. E.; Bennett, S. J.; Hudnall, W. H.

    2002-05-01

    Sedimentation of soil organic carbon (SOC) eroded from uplands and deposited in reservoirs could be an important mechanism for carbon sequestration provided that it is conserved during transport and burial and that uplands are not experiencing net loss. There are uncertainties in both these assumptions and gaining a better understanding of these processes is a key objective of ongoing carbon-cycle investigations. The U.S. Geological Survey, the U. S. Department of Agriculture, and Louisiana State University Agricultural Center are collaborating on an investigation of soils and sediments in the Yalobusha River Basin in Mississippi. Sediment cores were collected from upland soils and from Grenada Lake, a flood control reservoir, in the basin. Suspended sediments have been collected from the Yalobusha River and one of its tributaries upstream of the lake. We are measuring carbon mineralization potential in conjunction with carbon and nitrogen concentrations, 13C, mineralogy, and texture on sediments and upland soils to determine whether eroding SOC is conserved or oxidized during transport and burial. Differences in mineralization potential and other chemical and physical properties are used to infer net changes in the original eroding SOC. Autochthonous production of SOC within reservoirs could replace labile SOC oxidized during transport and burial thereby masking losses due to oxidation. Autochthonous sources can be evaluated by chemical and physical characterization of the sediments. Stable carbon isotope (13C) geochemistry provides a tool for distinguishing the two primary sources of organic carbon incorporated in lake sediments because allochthonous SOC from the surrounding watershed is, in general, less depleted in stable 13C than autochthonous SOC produced in the lake by aquatic organisms such as macrophytes and phytoplankton. The integration of the 13C signature recorded in the organic fraction of the lake sediments with total organic carbon, C/N ratio

  14. Chemical vapor deposition reactor. [providing uniform film thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chern, S. S.; Maserjian, J. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An improved chemical vapor deposition reactor is characterized by a vapor deposition chamber configured to substantially eliminate non-uniformities in films deposited on substrates by control of gas flow and removing gas phase reaction materials from the chamber. Uniformity in the thickness of films is produced by having reactive gases injected through multiple jets which are placed at uniformally distributed locations. Gas phase reaction materials are removed through an exhaust chimney which is positioned above the centrally located, heated pad or platform on which substrates are placed. A baffle is situated above the heated platform below the mouth of the chimney to prevent downdraft dispersion and scattering of gas phase reactant materials.

  15. Aluminosilicate glass thin films elaborated by pulsed laser deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlier, Thibault; Saitzek, Sébastien; Méar, François O.; Blach, Jean-François; Ferri, Anthony; Huvé, Marielle; Montagne, Lionel

    2017-03-01

    In the present work, we report the elaboration of aluminosilicate glass thin films by Pulsed Laser Deposition at various temperatures deposition. The amorphous nature of glass thin films was highlighted by Grazing Incidence X-Ray Diffraction and no nanocristallites were observed in the glassy matrix. Chemical analysis, obtained with X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy and Time of Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy, showed a good transfer and homogeneous elementary distribution with of chemical species from the target to the film a. Structural studies performed by Infrared Spectroscopy showed that the substrate temperature plays an important role on the bonding configuration of the layers. A slight shift of Si-O modes to larger wavenumber was observed with the synthesis temperature, assigned to a more strained sub-oxide network. Finally, optical properties of thins film measured by Spectroscopic Ellipsometry are similar to those of the bulk aluminosilicate glass, which indicate a good deposition of aluminosilicate bulk glass.

  16. Aerosol deposition of (Cu,Ti) substituted bismuth vanadate films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Exner, Jörg, E-mail: Functional.Materials@Uni-Bayreuth.de [University of Bayreuth, Department of Functional Materials, Universitätsstraße 30, 95440 Bayreuth (Germany); Fuierer, Paul [Materials and Metallurgical Engineering Department, New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Moos, Ralf [University of Bayreuth, Department of Functional Materials, Universitätsstraße 30, 95440 Bayreuth (Germany)

    2014-12-31

    Bismuth vanadate, Bi{sub 4}V{sub 2}O{sub 11}, and related compounds with various metal (Me) substitutions, Bi{sub 4}(Me{sub x}V{sub 1−x}){sub 2}O{sub 11−δ}, show some of the highest ionic conductivities among the known solid oxide electrolytes. Films of Cu and Ti substituted bismuth vanadate were prepared by an aerosol deposition method, a spray coating process also described as room temperature impact consolidation. Resultant films, several microns in thickness, were dense with good adhesion to the substrate. Scanning electron microscopy and high temperature X-ray diffraction were used to monitor the effects of temperature on the structure and microstructure of the film. The particle size remained nano-scale while microstrain decreased rapidly up to 500 °C, above which coarsening and texturing increased rapidly. Impedance measurements of films deposited on inter-digital electrodes revealed an annealing effect on the ionic conductivity, with the conductivity exceeding that of a screen printed film, and approaching that of bulk ceramic. - Highlights: • Cu and Ti doped bismuth vanadate films were prepared by aerosol deposition (AD). • Dense 3–5 μm thick films were deposited on alumina, silicon and gold electrodes. • Annealing of the AD-layer increases the conductivity by 1.5 orders of magnitude. • Effect of temperature on structure and microstructure was investigated.

  17. Deposition of antimony telluride thin film by ECALE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO; Xianhui; YANG; Junyou; ZHU; Wen; HOU; Jie; BAO; Siqian; FAN; Xi'an; DUAN; Xingkai

    2006-01-01

    The process of Sb2Te3 thin film growth on the Pt substrate by electrochemical atomic layer epitaxy (ECALE) was studied. Cyclic voltammetric scanning was performed to analyze the electrochemical behavior of Te and Sb on the Pt substrate. Sb2Te3 film was formed using an automated flow deposition system by alternately depositing Te and Sb atomic layers for 400 circles. The deposited Sb2Te3 films were characterized by XRD, EDX, FTIR and FESEM observation. Sb2Te3 compound structure was confirmed by XRD pattern and agreed well with the results of EDX quantitative analysis and coulometric analysis. FESEM micrographs showed that the deposit was composed of fine nano particles with size of about 20 nm. FESEM image of the cross section showed that the deposited films were very smooth and dense with thickness of about 190 nm. The optical band gap of the deposited Sb2Te3 film was determined as 0.42 eV by FTIR spectroscopy, and it was blue shifted in comparison with that of the bulk Sb2Te3 single crystal due to its nanocrystalline microstructure.

  18. UV laser deposition of metal films by photogenerated free radicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, R. K.; Mantei, T. D.

    1986-01-01

    A novel photochemical method for liquid-phase deposition of metal films is described. In the liquid phase deposition scheme, a metal containing compound and a metal-metal bonded carbonyl complex are dissolved together in a polar solvent and the mixture is irradiated using a UV laser. The optical arrangement consists of a HeCd laser which provides 7 mW of power at a wavelength of 325 nm in the TEM(OO) mode. The beam is attenuated and may be expanded to a diameter of 5-20 mm. Experiments with photochemical deposition of silver films onto glass and quartz substrates are described in detail. Mass spectrometric analysis of deposited silver films indicated a deposition rate of about 1 A/s at incident power levels of 0.01 W/sq cm. UV laser-induced copper and palladium films have also been obtained. A black and white photograph showing the silver Van Der Pauw pattern of a solution-deposited film is provided.

  19. Plasma and Laser-Enhanced Deposition of Powders and Thin Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Moses

    The objective of this thesis has been the development of novel plasma and laser based techniques for the deposition and characterization of thin films and nano-scale powders. The different energy sources utilized for excitation and break -down of reactive species prior to deposition include an RF plasma discharge, an excimer laser and a CO _2 laser. Nanometer-scale (10-20 nm) powders and thin films of aluminum nitride (AlN) have been successfully deposited in a glow discharge by reacting trimethylaluminum and ammonia. Macroquantities (~800 mg/hr) of powder have been collected at the centers of two vortices around which the reactant gases swirl. Powders of AlN have large surface areas (85 m^2/g) and are free from oxygen contamination. Diamond-like-carbon (DLC) films have been deposited from ternary mixtures of butadiene, argon and hydrogen. DLC films have been etched in O _2 and CF_4/O _2 plasmas. The etching behavior was correlated with the deposition feed gas composition by combining the etch rate, bias voltage during deposition and the deposition rate into a new non-dimensional number. Two new processes for depositing copper films have been developed. The first technique involves the hydrogen plasma reduction of copper formate films and the second technique involves the reactive excimer laser ablation of copper formate. Particle forming plasmas have been characterized by measuring the light scattering intensity during the deposition of silicon nitride from silane/ammonia plasmas. Both spatial variations and transients during the plasma start -up and shut-off steps have been measured. The ultraviolet (vacuum ultraviolet and extreme ultraviolet) reflectance characteristics of AlN, DLC and SiC thin films has been measured. AlN and SiC films exhibit a relatively high (~20-40%) reflectance in the different regions of the ultraviolet spectrum. An improved algorithm has been developed for estimating thin film parameters such as thickness, refractive index, band-gap, and

  20. Nanodiamond films deposited at moderate temperature on pure titanium substrate pretreated by ultrasonic scratching in diamond powder suspension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Syed Jawid Askari; Fanxiu Lv; Akhtar Farid; Fengying Wang; Qi He; Zuyuan Zhou

    2006-01-01

    Nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) film deposition on pure titanium and Ti alloys is extraordinarily difficult because of the high diffusion coefficient of carbon in Ti, the large mismatch in their thermal expansion coefficients, the complex nature of the interlayer formed during diamond deposition, and the difficulty to achieve very high nucleation density. In this investigation, NCD films were successfully deposited on pure Ti substrate by using a novel substrate pretreatment of ultrasonic scratching in a diamond powder-ethanol suspension and by a two-step process at moderate temperature. It was shown that by scratching with a 30-μm diamond suspension for 1 h, followed by a 10-h diamond deposition, a continuous NCD film was obtained with an average grain size of about 200 nm. Detailed experimental results on the preparation, characterization, and successful deposition of the NCD films on Ti were discussed.

  1. Microreactor-Assisted Solution Deposition for Compound Semiconductor Thin Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Ho Choi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available State-of-the-art techniques for the fabrication of compound semiconductors are mostly vacuum-based physical vapor or chemical vapor deposition processes. These vacuum-based techniques typically operate at high temperatures and normally require higher capital costs. Solution-based techniques offer opportunities to fabricate compound semiconductors at lower temperatures and lower capital costs. Among many solution-based deposition processes, chemical bath deposition is an attractive technique for depositing semiconductor films, owing to its low temperature, low cost and large area deposition capability. Chemical bath deposition processes are mainly performed using batch reactors, where all reactants are fed into the reactor simultaneously and products are removed after the processing is finished. Consequently, reaction selectivity is difficult, which can lead to unwanted secondary reactions. Microreactor-assisted solution deposition processes can overcome this limitation by producing short-life molecular intermediates used for heterogeneous thin film synthesis and quenching the reaction prior to homogeneous reactions. In this paper, we present progress in the synthesis and deposition of semiconductor thin films with a focus on CdS using microreactor-assisted solution deposition and provide an overview of its prospect for scale-up.

  2. Chemical Structure of Carbon Nitride Films Prepared by MW-ECR Plasma Enhanced Magnetron Sputtering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUJun,GAOPeng; DINGWan-yu; LIXin; DENGXin-lu; DONGChuang

    2004-01-01

    Amorphous carbon nitride thin films were prepared by plasma-enhanced DC magnetron sputtering using twinned microwave electron cyclotron resonance plasma sources. Chemical structure of deposited films was investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier transtorm infrared spectroscopy. The results indicate that the deposition rate is strongly affected by direct current bias, and the films are mainly composed of a single amorphous carbon nitride phase with N/C ratio close to C3N4, and the bonding is predominantly of C-N type.

  3. Sputter deposited Terfenol-D thin films for multiferroic applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. P. Mohanchandra

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we study the sputter deposition and crystallization process to produce high quality Terfenol-D thin film (100 nm with surface roughness below 1.5 nm. The Terfenol-D thin film was produced using DC magnetron sputtering technique with various sputtering parameters and two different crystallization methods, i.e. substrate heating and post-annealing. Several characterization techniques including WDS, XRD, TEM, AFM, SQUID and MOKE were used to determine the physical and magnetic properties of the Terfenol-D films. TEM studies reveal that the film deposited on the heated substrate has large grains grown along the film thickness producing undesirable surface roughness while the film crystallized by post-annealing method shows uniformly distributed small grains producing a smooth surface. The Terfenol-D film was also deposited onto (011 cut PMN-PT single crystal substrate. With the application of an electric field the film exhibited a 1553 Oe change in coercivity with an estimated saturation magnetostriction of λs = 910 x 10−6.

  4. Sputter deposited Terfenol-D thin films for multiferroic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanchandra, K. P.; Prikhodko, S. V.; Wetzlar, K. P.; Sun, W. Y.; Nordeen, P.; Carman, G. P.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we study the sputter deposition and crystallization process to produce high quality Terfenol-D thin film (100 nm) with surface roughness below 1.5 nm. The Terfenol-D thin film was produced using DC magnetron sputtering technique with various sputtering parameters and two different crystallization methods, i.e. substrate heating and post-annealing. Several characterization techniques including WDS, XRD, TEM, AFM, SQUID and MOKE were used to determine the physical and magnetic properties of the Terfenol-D films. TEM studies reveal that the film deposited on the heated substrate has large grains grown along the film thickness producing undesirable surface roughness while the film crystallized by post-annealing method shows uniformly distributed small grains producing a smooth surface. The Terfenol-D film was also deposited onto (011) cut PMN-PT single crystal substrate. With the application of an electric field the film exhibited a 1553 Oe change in coercivity with an estimated saturation magnetostriction of λs = 910 x 10-6.

  5. New Method of Depositing the Nanostructured Amorphous Carbon for Carbon Based Solar Cell Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Fadzilah

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured amorphous carbon (a-C solar cells were successfully deposited via a self-designed aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposition (AACVD. The fabricated solar cell with the configuration of Au/p-C/n-Si/Au achieved efficiency ( of % for device deposited at 500°C, % for 450°C, and % for 400°C. Photoresponse characteristic was highlighted under illumination (AM 1.5 illuminations: 100 mW/cm2, 25°C, where conductivity increased when the sample was being hit by light. Transmittance spectrum exhibits a large transmittance value (85% and absorption coefficient value of  cm−1 at the visible range from 390 to 790 nm. The nanostructured a-C thin film deposited at higher temperature possesses lower transmittance due to higher absorption as a result of the higher content of sp2-bonded carbon atoms. From Tauc’s plot, optical band gap ( was determined, and decreased as deposition temperature increased (1.2 eV, 1.0 eV, 0.7 eV. On the other hand, FESEM images exhibited a nanostructured sized a-C with the particle size less than 100 nm. To the best of our knowledge, the presence of nanostructured particle of a-C by a self-prepared AACVD has not frequently been reported.

  6. Defect control in room temperature deposited cadmium sulfide thin films by pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez-Como, N. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX, 75080 (United States); Martinez-Landeros, V. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX, 75080 (United States); Centro de Investigación en Materiales Avanzados, Monterrey, Nuevo Leon, 66600, México (Mexico); Mejia, I. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX, 75080 (United States); Aguirre-Tostado, F.S. [Centro de Investigación en Materiales Avanzados, Monterrey, Nuevo Leon, 66600, México (Mexico); Nascimento, C.D.; Azevedo, G. de M; Krug, C. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, 91509-900 (Brazil); Quevedo-Lopez, M.A., E-mail: mquevedo@utdallas.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX, 75080 (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The control of defects in cadmium sulfide thin films and its impact on the resulting CdS optical and electrical characteristics are studied. Sulfur vacancies and cadmium interstitial concentrations in the CdS films are controlled using the ambient pressure during pulsed laser deposition. CdS film resistivities ranging from 10{sup −1} to 10{sup 4} Ω-cm are achieved. Hall Effect measurements show that the carrier concentration ranges from 10{sup 19} to 10{sup 13} cm{sup −3} and is responsible for the observed resistivity variation. Hall mobility varies from 2 to 12 cm{sup 2}/V-s for the same pressure regime. Although the energy bandgap remains unaffected (∼ 2.42 eV), the optical transmittance is reduced due to the increase of defects in the CdS films. Rutherford back scattering spectroscopy shows the dependence of the CdS films stoichiometry with deposition pressure. The presence of CdS defects is attributed to more energetic species reaching the substrate, inducing surface damage in the CdS films during pulsed laser deposition. - Highlights: • CdS thin films deposited by pulsed laser deposition at room temperature. • The optical, electrical and structural properties were evaluated. • Carrier concentration ranged from 10{sup 19} to 10{sup 13} cm{sup −3}. • The chemical composition was studied by Rutherford back scattering. • The density of sulfur vacancies and cadmium interstitial was varied.

  7. Methane Flow Rate Effects On The Optical Properties of Amorphous Silicon Carbon (a-SiC:H Films Deposited By DC Sputtering Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosari Saleh

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated the refractive index (n and the optical absorption coeffi cient (α from refl ection and transmission measurements on hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbon (a-SiC:H fi lms. The a-SiC:H fi lms were prepared by dc sputtering method using silicon target in argon and methane gas mixtures. The refractive index (n decreases as the methane fl ow rate increase. The optical absorption coeffi cient (α shifts to higher energy with increasing methane fl ow rate. At higher methane fl ow rate, the fi lms tend to be more disorder and have wider optical gap. The relation of the optical properties and the disorder amorphous network with the compositional properties will be discussed.

  8. Preparation and Characterization of Nano-Structured SiO2 Thin Films on Carbon Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rong Chun XIONG; Dong Zhou YAN; Gang WEI

    2003-01-01

    Nano-structured SiO2 thin films were prepared on the surface of carbon steel for the first time by LPD. The compositions of the films were analyzed by XPS, and the surface morphology of the thin films were observed by AFM. The thin films were constituted by compact particles of SiO2, and there was no Fe in the films. In the process of film forming, the SiO2 colloid particles were deposited or absorbed directly onto the surface of carbon steel substrates that were activated by acid solution containing inhibitor, and corrosion of the substrates was avoided. The nano-structured SiO2 thin films that were prepared had excellent protective efficiency to the carbon steel.

  9. Electrochemical and Antimicrobial Properties of Diamondlike Carbon-Metal Composite Films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MORRISON, M. L.; BUCHANAN, R. A.; LIAW, P. K.; BERRY, C. J.; BRIGMON, R.; RIESTER, L.; JIN, C.; NARAYAN, R. J.

    2005-05-11

    Implants containing antimicrobial metals may reduce morbidity, mortality, and healthcare costs associated with medical device-related infections. We have deposited diamondlike carbon-silver (DLC-Ag), diamondlike carbon-platinum (DLC-Pt), and diamondlike carbon-silver-platinum (DLC-AgPt) thin films using a multicomponent target pulsed laser deposition process. Transmission electron microscopy of the DLC-silver and DLC-platinum composite films revealed that the silver and platinum self-assemble into nanoparticle arrays within the diamondlike carbon matrix. The diamondlike carbon-silver film possesses hardness and Young's modulus values of 37 GPa and 331 GPa, respectively. The diamondlike carbon-metal composite films exhibited passive behavior at open-circuit potentials. Low corrosion rates were observed during testing in a phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) electrolyte. In addition, the diamondlike carbon-metal composite films were found to be immune to localized corrosion below 1000 mV (SCE). DLC-silver-platinum films demonstrated exceptional antimicrobial properties against Staphylococcus bacteria. It is believed that a galvanic couple forms between platinum and silver, which accelerates silver ion release and provides more robust antimicrobial activity. Diamondlike carbon-silver-platinum films may provide unique biological functionalities and improved lifetimes for cardiovascular, orthopaedic, biosensor, and implantable microelectromechanical systems.

  10. High-quality AlN films grown on chemical vapor-deposited graphene films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Bin-Hao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the growth of high-quality AlN films on graphene. The graphene films were synthesized by CVD and then transferred onto silicon substrates. Epitaxial aluminum nitride films were deposited by DC magnetron sputtering on both graphene as an intermediate layer and silicon as a substrate. The structural characteristics of the AlN films and graphene were investigated. Highly c-axis-oriented AlN crystal structures are investigated based on the XRDpatterns observations.

  11. Carbon films produced from ionic liquid carbon precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Sheng; Luo, Huimin; Lee, Je Seung

    2013-11-05

    The invention is directed to a method for producing a film of porous carbon, the method comprising carbonizing a film of an ionic liquid, wherein the ionic liquid has the general formula (X.sup.+a).sub.x(Y.sup.-b).sub.y, wherein the variables a and b are, independently, non-zero integers, and the subscript variables x and y are, independently, non-zero integers, such that ax=by, and at least one of X.sup.+ and Y.sup.- possesses at least one carbon-nitrogen unsaturated bond. The invention is also directed to a composition comprising a porous carbon film possessing a nitrogen content of at least 10 atom %.

  12. Effect of Different Catalyst Deposition Technique on Aligned Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes Grown by Thermal Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Shuaib Mohamed Saheed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper reported the investigation of the substrate preparation technique involving deposition of iron catalyst by electron beam evaporation and ferrocene vaporization in order to produce vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes array needed for fabrication of tailored devices. Prior to the growth at 700°C in ethylene, silicon dioxide coated silicon substrate was prepared by depositing alumina followed by iron using two different methods as described earlier. Characterization analysis revealed that aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes array of 107.9 µm thickness grown by thermal chemical vapor deposition technique can only be achieved for the sample with iron deposited using ferrocene vaporization. The thick layer of partially oxidized iron film can prevent the deactivation of catalyst and thus is able to sustain the growth. It also increases the rate of permeation of the hydrocarbon gas into the catalyst particles and prevents agglomeration at the growth temperature. Combination of alumina-iron layer provides an efficient growth of high density multiwalled carbon nanotubes array with the steady growth rate of 3.6 µm per minute for the first 12 minutes and dropped by half after 40 minutes. Thicker and uniform iron catalyst film obtained from ferrocene vaporization is attributed to the multidirectional deposition of particles in the gaseous form.

  13. Modification of rubber surface with hydrogenated diamond-like carbon thin films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pei, Y. T.; Bui, X. L.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.; Laudon, M; Romanowicz, B

    2009-01-01

    Thin films of hydrogenated diamond-like carbon (DLC) have been deposited on hydrogenated nitrile butadiene rubber (HNBR) for reduction of friction and enhancement of wear resistance of dynamic rubber seals, by sputtering graphite targets in C(2)H(2)/Ar plasma. The wax removal and pre-deposition plas

  14. Structural Characterization of Carbon Nanomaterial Film In Situ Synthesized on Various Bulk Metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Y. Xu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanofiber films were prepared via a simple chemical vapor deposition (CVD method on various bulk metal substrates including bulk 316 L stainless steel, pure cobalt, and pure nickel treated by surface mechanical attrition treatment (SMAT. The microstructures of the carbon nanomaterial film were studied by SEM, TEM, XRD, and Raman spectroscopy. In this paper, bulk metallic materials treated by SMAT served as substrates as well as catalysts for carbon nanomaterial film formation. The results indicate that the carbon nanofiber films are formed concerning the catalytic effects of the refined metallic particles during CVD on the surface of SMAT-treated bulk metal substrates. However, distinguished morphologies of carbon nanomaterial film are displayed in the case of the diverse bulk metal substrates.

  15. Kinetic study on hot-wire-assisted atomic layer deposition of nickel thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Guangjie, E-mail: ygjhzh@dpe.mm.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Shimizu, Hideharu; Momose, Takeshi; Shimogaki, Yukihiro [Department of Materials Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2014-01-15

    High-purity Ni films were deposited using hot-wire-assisted atomic layer deposition (HW-ALD) at deposition temperatures of 175, 250, and 350 °C. Negligible amount of nitrogen or carbon contamination was detected, even though the authors used NH{sub 2} radical as the reducing agent and nickelocene as the precursor. NH{sub 2} radicals were generated by the thermal decomposition of NH{sub 3} with the assist of HW and used to reduce the adsorbed metal growth precursors. To understand and improve the deposition process, the kinetics of HW-ALD were analyzed using a Langmuir-type model. Unlike remote-plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition, HW-ALD does not lead to plasma-induced damage. This is a significant advantage, because the authors can supply sufficient NH{sub 2} radicals to deposit high-purity metallic films by adjusting the distance between the hot wire and the substrate. NH{sub 2} radicals have a short lifetime, and it was important to use a short distance between the radical generation site and substrate. Furthermore, the impurity content of the nickel films was independent of the deposition temperature, which is evidence of the temperature-independent nature of the NH{sub 2} radical flux and the reactivity of the NH{sub 2} radicals.

  16. Photoluminescence of amorphous carbon films fabricated by layer-by-layer hydrogen plasma chemical annealing method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐骏; 黄晓辉; 李伟; 王立; 陈坤基

    2002-01-01

    A method in which nanometre-thick film deposition was alternated with hydrogen plasma annealing (layer-by-layermethod) was applied to fabricate hydrogenated amorphous carbon films in a conventional plasma-enhanced chemicalvapour deposition system. It was found that the hydrogen plasma treatment could decrease the hydrogen concentrationin the films and change the sp2/sp3 ratio to some extent by chemical etching. Blue photoluminescence was observed atroom temperature, as a result of the reduction of sp2 clusters in the films.

  17. Structural and magnetic studies of thin Fe57 films formed by ion beam assisted deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyadov, N. M.; Bazarov, V. V.; Vagizov, F. G.; Vakhitov, I. R.; Dulov, E. N.; Kashapov, R. N.; Noskov, A. I.; Khaibullin, R. I.; Shustov, V. A.; Faizrakhmanov, I. A.

    2016-08-01

    Thin Fe57 films with the thickness of 120 nm have been prepared on glass substrates by using the ion-beam-assisted deposition technique. X-ray diffraction, electron microdiffraction and Mössbauer spectroscopy studies have shown that as-deposited films are in a stressful nanostructured state containing the nanoscaled inclusions of α-phase iron with the size of ∼10 nm. Room temperature in-plane and out-of-plane magnetization measurements confirmed the presence of the magnetic α-phase in the iron film and indicated the strong effect of residual stresses on magnetic properties of the film as well. Subsequent thermal annealing of iron films in vacuum at the temperature of 450 °C stimulates the growth of α-phase Fe crystallites with the size of up to 20 nm. However, electron microdiffraction and Mössbauer spectroscopic data have shown the partial oxidation and carbonization of the iron film during annealing. The stress disappeared after annealing of the film. The magnetic behaviour of the annealed samples was characterized by the magnetic hysteresis loop with the coercive field of ∼10 mT and the saturation magnetization decreased slightly in comparison with the α-phase Fe magnetization due to small oxidation of the film.

  18. Deposition of the platinum crystals on the carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A new technique and the affecting factors for depositing platinum on the carbon nanotubes were investigated. The results show that the deposited platinum crystals in the atmosphere of hydrogen or nitrogen have a small size and a homogeneous distribution on the surface of the carbon nanotubes. The pretreatment would decrease the platinum particles on the carbon nanotubes significantly.

  19. Growth of tantalum pentoxide film by pulsed laser deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun-Ying; Fang, Qi; Boyd, Ian W.

    1999-01-01

    Thin films of Ta 2O 5 have been deposited on quartz and silicon substrates by 532-nm (Nd:YAG) pulsed laser deposition (PLD) in various O 2 gas environments. The influence of the deposition parameters, such as oxygen pressure, substrate temperature and annealing under UV irradiation using a 172-nm excimer lamp, on the properties of the grown films, has been studied. The refractive index of the films increases with increasing pressure of O 2. X-ray diffraction measurements show that the as-deposited films are amorphous at temperatures below 500°C and possess orthorhombic (β-Ta 2O 5) crystal structure at temperatures above 600°C. The optical properties determined by UV spectrophotometry also strongly depend on the deposition parameters. At O 2 pressures above 0.15 mbar, the refractive index of the films was about 2.12 which is close to the bulk Ta 2O 5 value of 2.2. Optical transmittance around 85% in the visible region of the spectrum was obtained at an oxygen pressure of 0.2 mbar.

  20. Pulsed laser deposition of niobium nitride thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farha, Ashraf Hassan, E-mail: ahass006@odu.edu; Elsayed-Ali, Hani E., E-mail: helsayed@odu.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA 23529 (United States); Applied Research Center, Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Ain Shams University, Cairo 11566 (Egypt); Ufuktepe, Yüksel, E-mail: ufuk@cu.edu.tr [Department of Physics, University of Cukurova, 01330 Adana (Turkey); Myneni, Ganapati, E-mail: rao@jlab.org [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, Virginia 23606 (United States)

    2015-12-04

    Niobium nitride (NbN{sub x}) films were grown on Nb and Si(100) substrates using pulsed laser deposition. NbN{sub x} films were deposited on Nb substrates using PLD with a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (λ = 1064 nm, ∼40 ns pulse width, and 10 Hz repetition rate) at different laser fluences, nitrogen background pressures and deposition substrate temperatures. When all the fabrication parameters are fixed, except for the laser fluence, the surface roughness, nitrogen content, and grain size increase with increasing laser fluence. Increasing nitrogen background pressure leads to a change in the phase structure of the NbN{sub x} films from mixed β-Nb{sub 2}N and cubic δ-NbN phases to single hexagonal β-Nb{sub 2}N. The substrate temperature affects the preferred orientation of the crystal structure. The structural and electronic, properties of NbN{sub x} deposited on Si(100) were also investigated. The NbN{sub x} films exhibited a cubic δ-NbN with a strong (111) orientation. A correlation between surface morphology, electronic, and superconducting properties was found. The observations establish guidelines for adjusting the deposition parameters to achieve the desired NbN{sub x} film morphology and phase.

  1. Nanotribological performance of fullerene-like carbon nitride films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flores-Ruiz, Francisco Javier; Enriquez-Flores, Christian Ivan [Centro de Investigación y Estudios Avanzados (CINVESTAV) IPN, Unidad Querétaro, Lib. Norponiente 2000, Real de Juriquilla, C.P. 76230, Querétaro, Qro., México (Mexico); Chiñas-Castillo, Fernando, E-mail: fernandochinas@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Instituto Tecnológico de Oaxaca, Oaxaca, Oax. Calz. Tecnológico No. 125, CP. 68030, Oaxaca, Oax. (Mexico); Espinoza-Beltrán, Francisco Javier [Centro de Investigación y Estudios Avanzados (CINVESTAV) IPN, Unidad Querétaro, Lib. Norponiente 2000, Real de Juriquilla, C.P. 76230, Querétaro, Qro., México (Mexico)

    2014-09-30

    Highlights: • Fullerene-like CNx samples show an elastic recovery of 92.5% and 94.5% while amorphous CNx samples had only 75% elastic recovery. • Fullerene-like CNx films show an increment of 34.86% and 50.57% in fractions of C 1s and N 1s. • Fullerene-like CNx samples show a lower friction coefficient compared to amorphous CNx samples. • Friction reduction characteristics of fullerene-like CNx films are strongly related to the increase of sp{sup 3} CN bonds. - Abstract: Fullerene-like carbon nitride films exhibit high elastic modulus and low friction coefficient. In this study, thin CNx films were deposited on silicon substrate by DC magnetron sputtering and the tribological behavior at nanoscale was evaluated using an atomic force microscope. Results show that CNx films with fullerene-like structure have a friction coefficient (CoF ∼ 0.009–0.022) that is lower than amorphous CNx films (CoF ∼ 0.028–0.032). Analysis of specimens characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy shows that films with fullerene-like structure have a higher number of sp{sup 3} CN bonds and exhibit the best mechanical properties with high values of elastic modulus (E > 180 GPa) and hardness (H > 20 GPa). The elastic recovery determined on specimens with a fullerene-like CNx structure was of 95% while specimens of amorphous CNx structure had only 75% elastic recovery.

  2. Films of Carbon Nanomaterials for Transparent Conductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Wei

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The demand for transparent conductors is expected to grow rapidly as electronic devices, such as touch screens, displays, solid state lighting and photovoltaics become ubiquitous in our lives. Doped metal oxides, especially indium tin oxide, are the commonly used materials for transparent conductors. As there are some drawbacks to this class of materials, exploration of alternative materials has been conducted. There is an interest in films of carbon nanomaterials such as, carbon nanotubes and graphene as they exhibit outstanding properties. This article reviews the synthesis and assembly of these films and their post-treatment. These processes determine the film performance and understanding of this platform will be useful for future work to improve the film performance.

  3. Epitaxial yttrium iron garnet films grown by pulsed laser deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorsey, P. C.; Bushnell, S. E.; Seed, R. G.; Vittoria, C.

    1993-07-01

    Epitaxial Y3Fe5O12 (YIG) films have been grown by the pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique on (111) gadolinium gallium garnet substrates. The effect of substrate temperature and oxygen partial pressure on the structure, composition, and magnetic properties of the films was investigated and compared to liquid phase epitaxy YIG films. The results demonstrated that epitaxial YIG films could be prepared under a wide range of deposition conditions, but narrow linewidth (ΔH≂1 Oe) films were producible only at low oxygen partial pressures (O2temperatures (Ts≳800 °C). Since the linewidth of single-crystal YIG is dominated by surface and volume defects and/or impurities, the narrow linewidth indicated that PLD is a viable technique for producing high-quality ferrite films for microwave device applications. In addition, under all deposition conditions (50-1000 mTorr and 700-850 °C) there is a uniaxial axis perpendicular to the film plane. However, at low oxygen pressure the uniaxial anisotropy energy constant Ku is negative while at high oxygen pressure Ku is positive.

  4. CdS films deposited by chemical bath under rotation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliva-Aviles, A.I., E-mail: aoliva@mda.cinvestav.mx [Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados Unidad Merida, Departamento de Fisica Aplicada. A.P. 73-Cordemex, 97310 Merida, Yucatan (Mexico); Patino, R.; Oliva, A.I. [Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados Unidad Merida, Departamento de Fisica Aplicada. A.P. 73-Cordemex, 97310 Merida, Yucatan (Mexico)

    2010-08-01

    Cadmium sulfide (CdS) films were deposited on rotating substrates by the chemical bath technique. The effects of the rotation speed on the morphological, optical, and structural properties of the films were discussed. A rotating substrate-holder was fabricated such that substrates can be taken out from the bath during the deposition. CdS films were deposited at different deposition times (10, 20, 30, 40 and 50 min) onto Corning glass substrates at different rotation velocities (150, 300, 450, and 600 rpm) during chemical deposition. The chemical bath was composed by CdCl{sub 2}, KOH, NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3} and CS(NH{sub 2}){sub 2} as chemical reagents and heated at 75 deg. C. The results show no critical effects on the band gap energy and the surface roughness of the CdS films when the rotation speed changes. However, a linear increase on the deposition rate with the rotation energy was observed, meanwhile the stoichiometry was strongly affected by the rotation speed, resulting a better 1:1 Cd/S ratio as speed increases. Rotation effects may be of interest in industrial production of CdTe/CdS solar cells.

  5. Deposition of Cadmium Sulphide Thin Films by Photochemical Deposition and Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.L. Pushpalatha

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Deposition of cadmium sulphide (CdS thin films on glass substrates in acidic medium by photochemical deposition (PCD and studies by several characterizations are presented. The structural characterization of the thin films was carried out by XRD. The elemental composition of the thin films was carried out by EDAX. The optical properties have been studied in the wavelength range 200-900 nm and the optical transition has been found to be direct and allowed. The morphological properties are studied by AFM and electrical properties are studied by four probe technique.

  6. Characterization of CdTe Films Deposited at Various Bath Temperatures and Concentrations Using Electrophoretic Deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Zulkarnain Zainal; Mohd Norizam Md Daud; Azmi Zakaria; Mohd Sabri Mohd Ghazali; Atefeh Jafari; Wan Rafizah Wan Abdullah

    2012-01-01

    CdTe film was deposited using the electrophoretic deposition technique onto an ITO glass at various bath temperatures. Four batch film compositions were used by mixing 1 to 4 wt% concentration of CdTe powder with 10 mL of a solution of methanol and toluene. X-ray Diffraction analysis showed that the films exhibited polycrystalline nature of zinc-blende structure with the (111) orientation as the most prominent peak. From the Atomic Force Microscopy, the thickness and surface roughness of the ...

  7. Electroless Ni-B deposition from an emulsified supercritical carbon dioxide bath

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hung-Yu; Chung, Sung-Ting; Chuang, Yan-Chi [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chung Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Tsai, Wen-Ta, E-mail: wttsai@mail.ncku.edu.t [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chung Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China)

    2010-10-01

    The electroless deposition of boron-containing Ni (EN-B) film from a supercritical carbon dioxide (sc-CO{sub 2}) bath was introduced. The deposition rate in sc-CO{sub 2} bath was one order of magnitude lower than that at ambient pressure without the presence of sc-CO{sub 2}. A more uniform chemical composition of the EN-B film could be obtained if it was deposited in the sc-CO{sub 2} bath. X-ray diffraction analyses revealed that the as-deposited film was amorphous in nature, despite of the deposition condition. Deposition defects such as cracks and voids could be avoided if the deposition was conducted in the sc-CO{sub 2} bath. Crystallization and boride precipitation were found after heat treatment at 400 {sup o}C for 1 h. The EN-B film deposited from the sc-CO{sub 2} bath had a higher hardness as compared with that of the normal EN-B coating. A substantial increase in hardness was obtained due to boride precipitation.

  8. Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Deposition on Model Environmental Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deposition of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) on model environmental surfaces was investigated using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D). Deposition behaviors of MWNTs on positively and negatively charged surfaces were in good agreement with Der...

  9. Electrophoretic deposition of poly[3-(3-N,N-diethylaminopropoxy)thiophene] and composite films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Kangmin [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario, L8S 4L7 (Canada); Imin, Patigul; Adronov, Alex [Department of Chemistry, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario, L8S 4L7 (Canada); Zhitomirsky, Igor, E-mail: zhitom@mcmaster.ca [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario, L8S 4L7 (Canada)

    2011-01-01

    Poly[3-(3-N,N-diethylaminopropoxy)thiophene] (PDAOT) was prepared by oxidative polymerization and investigated by ultraviolet (UV), Raman and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopies. Protonated PDAOT was dissolved in water or ethanol/water mixtures and deposited by cathodic electrophoretic deposition (EPD) on conductive substrates. Film thickness was varied in the range of 0-5 {mu}m by controlling the deposition voltage and deposition time. PDAOT was found to form strong supramolecular interactions with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), allowing the formation of stable and concentrated nanotube dispersions, which were used for the formation of composite PDAOT-SWNT films by EPD. Furthermore, introduction of ZnO particles to the PDAOT solutions also allowed the formation of PDAOT-ZnO composite films by EPD. The composition of the films was varied by changing the concentration of SWNTs and ZnO in the suspensions. The dispersion of ZnO particles was improved using protonated dopamine (DA) as a dispersant. The deposits were studied by X-ray analysis (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), differential thermal analysis (DTA), X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  10. Optical Properties of Pyrolytic Carbon Films Versus Graphite and Graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dovbeshko, Galyna I; Romanyuk, Volodymyr R; Pidgirnyi, Denys V; Cherepanov, Vsevolod V; Andreev, Eugene O; Levin, Vadim M; Kuzhir, Polina P; Kaplas, Tommi; Svirko, Yuri P

    2015-12-01

    We report a comparative study of optical properties of 5-20 nm thick pyrolytic carbon (PyC) films, graphite, and graphene. The complex dielectric permittivity of PyC is obtained by measuring polarization-sensitive reflectance and transmittance spectra of the PyC films deposited on silica substrate. The Lorentz-Drude model describes well the general features of the optical properties of PyC from 360 to 1100 nm. By comparing the obtained results with literature data for graphene and highly ordered pyrolytic graphite, we found that in the visible spectral range, the effective dielectric permittivity of the ultrathin PyC films are comparable with those of graphite and graphene.

  11. Aspects of thin film deposition on granulates by physical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eder, Andreas; Schmid, Gerwin H. S.; Mahr, Harald; Eisenmenger-Sittner, Christoph

    2016-11-01

    Thin film and coating technology has entered fields which may show significant deviations from classical coating applications where films are deposited on plane, sometimes large substrates. Often surfaces of small and irregularly shaped bodies have to be improved in respect to electrical, thermal or mechanical properties. Film deposition and characterization on such small substrates is not a trivial task. This specially holds for methods based on Physical Vapor Deposition (PVD) processes such as sputter deposition and its ion- and plasma assisted varieties. Due to their line of sight nature a key issue for homogenous films is efficient intermixing. If this problem is mastered, another task is the prediction and determination of the film thickness on single particles as well as on large scale ensembles thereof. In this work a mechanism capable of uniformly coating up to 1000 cm3 of granulate with particle sizes ranging from approx. 10 μm to 150 μm by magnetron sputtering is thoroughly described. A method for predicting the average film thickness on the particles is presented and tested for several differently shaped objects like microspheres, irregular grains of sinter powder or micro diamonds. For assessing the film thickness on single particles as well as on particle ensembles several complementary methods based on optics, X-ray analysis and gravimetry are employed. Their respective merits and limitations are discussed. Finally an outlook on adapting the described technology for surface modification by plasma based reactive and non-reactive processes is given.

  12. Deposition of Cu seed layer film by supercritical fluid deposition for advanced interconnects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Bin; Zhao Ming-Tao; Zhang Yan-Fei; Yang Jun-He

    2013-01-01

    The deposition of a Cu seed layer film is investigated by supercritical fluid deposition (SCFD) using H2 as a reducing agent for Bis(2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-3,5-heptanedionato) copper in supercritical CO2 (scCO2).The effects of deposition temperature,precursor,and H2 concentration are investigated to optimize Cu deposition.Continuous metallic Cu films are deposited on Ru substrates at 190 ℃ when a 0.002 mol/L Cu precursor is introduced with 0.75 mol/L H2.A Cu precursor concentration higher than 0.002 mol/L is found to have negative effects on the surface qualities of Cu films.For a H2concentration above 0.56 mol/L,the root-mean-square (RMS) roughness of a Cu film decreases as the H2 concentration increases.Finally,a 20-nm thick Cu film with a smooth surface,which is required as a seed layer in advanced interconnects,is successfully deposited at a high H2 concentration (0.75 mol/L).

  13. Atomic layer deposition of cobalt carbide films and their magnetic properties using propanol as a reducing agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarr, Mouhamadou, E-mail: sarrtapha44@yahoo.fr [Luxembourg Instituteof Science and Technology, 41, rue du Brill, L-4422 Belvaux (Luxembourg); Bahlawane, Naoufal; Arl, Didier [Luxembourg Instituteof Science and Technology, 41, rue du Brill, L-4422 Belvaux (Luxembourg); Dossot, Manuel [Laboratory of Physical Chemistry and Microbiology for the Environment, UMR 7564 CNRS-Université de Lorraine, 405 rue de Vandoeuvre, 54601 Villers-lès-Nancy (France); McRae, Edward [Institut Jean Lamour, UMR 7198CNRS-Université de Lorraine, FST, BP 70239, 54506 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy (France); Lenoble, Damien, E-mail: damien.lenoble@list.lu [Luxembourg Instituteof Science and Technology, 41, rue du Brill, L-4422 Belvaux (Luxembourg)

    2016-08-30

    Highlights: • Conformal carbon-Co-carbide thin films. • Chemically growth carbone-Co-carbide composite. • Tuneable magnetic properties. - Abstract: The investigation of highly conformal thin films using Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) is driven by a variety of applications in modern technologies. In particular, the emergence of 3D memory device architectures requires conformal materials with tuneable magnetic properties. Here, nanocomposites of carbon, cobalt and cobalt carbide are deposited by ALD using cobalt acetylacetonate with propanol as a reducing agent. Films were grown by varying the ALD deposition parameters including deposition temperature and propanol exposure time. The morphology, the chemical composition and the crystalline structure of the cobalt carbide film were investigated. Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM) measurements revealed magnetic hysteresis loops with a coercivity reaching 500 Oe and a maximal saturation magnetization of 0.9 T with a grain size less than 15 nm. Magnetic properties are shown to be tuneable by adjusting the deposition parameters that significantly affect the microstructure and the composition of the deposited films.

  14. Characterization and Electrochemical Properties of Oxygenated Amorphous Carbon (a-C) Films

    OpenAIRE

    Palomäki, Tommi; Wester, Niklas; Johansson, Leena-Sisko; Laitinen, Mikko; Jiang, Hua; Arstila, Kai; Sajavaara, Timo; Han, Jeon G.; Koskinen, Jari; Laurila, Tomi

    2016-01-01

    Amorphous carbon (a-C) films with varying oxygen content were deposited by closed-field unbalanced magnetron sputtering with the aim to understand the effect of oxygen on the structural and physical properties of the films and subsequently correlate these changes with electrochemical properties. The a-C films were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, helium-ion microscopy, atomic force microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and time-of-flight elastic re...

  15. Remarkable enhancement of the electrical conductivity of carbon nanostructured thin films after compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgakilas, Vasilios; Koutsioukis, Apostolos; Petr, Martin; Tucek, Jiri; Zboril, Radek

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we demonstrate a significant improvement in the electrical conductivity of carbon nanostructured thin films, composed of graphene nanosheets and multiwalled carbon nanotubes, by compression/polishing. It is shown that the sheet resistance of compressed thin films of carbon nanostructures and hybrids is remarkably decreased in comparison with that of as-deposited films. The number of the interconnections, the distance between the nanostructures as well as their orientation are highly altered by the compression favoring the electrical conductivity of the compressed samples.

  16. Potentiality of the composite fulleren based carbon films as the stripper foils for tandem accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Vasin, A V; Rusavsky, A V; Totsky, Y I; Vishnevski, I N

    2001-01-01

    The problem of the radiation resistance of the carbon stripper foils is considered. The short review of the experimental data available in literature and original experimental results of the are presented. In the paper discussed is the possibility of composite fulleren based carbon films to be used for preparation of the stripper foils. Some technological methods for preparation of composite fulleren based carbon films are proposed. Raman scattering and atom force microscopy were used for investigation of the fulleren and composite films deposited by evaporation of the C sub 6 sub 0 fulleren powder.

  17. Electromagnetic characteristics of carbon nanotube film materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Wei

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotube (CNT possesses remarkable electrical conductivity, which shows great potential for the application as electromagnetic shielding material. This paper aims to characterize the electromagnetic parameters of a high CNT loading film by using waveguide method. The effects of layer number of CNT laminate, CNT alignment and resin impregnation on the electromagnetic characteristics were analyzed. It is shown that CNT film exhibits anisotropic electromagnetic characteristic. Pristine CNT film shows higher real part of complex permittivity, conductivity and shielding effectiveness when the polarized direction of incident wave is perpendicular to the winding direction of CNT film. For the CNT film laminates, complex permittivity increases with increasing layer number, and correspondingly, shielding effectiveness decreases. The five-layer CNT film shows extraordinary shielding performance with shielding effectiveness ranging from 67 dB to 78 dB in X-band. Stretching process induces the alignment of CNTs. When aligned direction of CNTs is parallel to the electric field, CNT film shows negative permittivity and higher conductivity. Moreover, resin impregnation into CNT film leads to the decrease of conductivity and shielding effectiveness. This research will contribute to the structural design for the application of CNT film as electromagnetic shielding materials.

  18. Shallow bath chemical deposition of CdS thin film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lo, Y.S. [Department of Molecule Science and Engineering, National Taipei University of Science and Technology, Taipei, 10617, Taiwan (China); Choubey, R.K. [Department of Applied Physics, Birla Institute of Technology, Mesra, Ranchi, 835 215 (India); Department of Chemical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, 10617, Taiwan (China); Yu, W.C. [Department of Molecule Science and Engineering, National Taipei University of Science and Technology, Taipei, 10617, Taiwan (China); Hsu, W.T. [Green Energy and Environmental Research Laboratory, Industrial Technology Research Institute, Hsin-Chu, Taiwan (China); Lan, C.W., E-mail: cwlan@ntu.edu.tw [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, 10617, Taiwan (China)

    2011-10-31

    Cadmium sulfide thin film was grown by shallow chemical bath deposition technique. This technique used a highly conducted hot plate to heat the substrate, while using a shallow bath for higher thermal gradients. As a result, large area uniformity could be achieved and the homogeneous nucleation was suppressed. More importantly, the solution used was greatly reduced, which is crucial for cost reduction in practice. The effects of temperature and shaking on the growth kinetics and film properties were investigated. The reaction activation energy was obtained to be 0.84 eV, and was not affected much by shaking indicating that the deposition is essentially reaction controlled. Furthermore, the films deposited at low or high temperature conditions had better photoconductivity.

  19. Cobalt Xanthate Thin Film with Chemical Bath Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İ. A. Kariper

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cobalt xanthate thin films (CXTFs were successfully deposited by chemical bath deposition, onto amorphous glass substrates, as well as on p- and n-silicon, indium tin oxide, and poly(methyl methacrylate. The structure of the films was analyzed by far-infrared spectrum (FIR, mid-infrared (MIR spectrum, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. These films were investigated from their structural, optical, and electrical properties point of view. Electrical properties were measured using four-point method, whereas optical properties were investigated via UV-VIS spectroscopic technique. Uniform distribution of grains was clearly observed from the photographs taken by scanning electron microscope (SEM. The transmittance was about 70–80% (4 hours, 50°C. The optical band gap of the CXTF was graphically estimated to be 3.99–4.02 eV. The resistivity of the films was calculated as 22.47–75.91 Ω·cm on commercial glass depending on film thickness and 44.90–73.10 Ω ·cm on the other substrates. It has been observed that the relative resistivity changed with film thickness. The MIR and FIR spectra of the films were in agreement with the literature analogues. The expected peaks of cobalt xanthate were observed in NMR analysis on glass. The films were dipped in chloroform as organic solvent and were analyzed by NMR.

  20. Structural and nanomechanical properties of nanocrystalline carbon thin films for photodetection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rawal, Ishpal [Department of Physics, Kirorimal College, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India); Panwar, Omvir Singh, E-mail: ospanwar@mail.nplindia.ernet.in; Tripathi, Ravi Kant; Chockalingam, Sreekumar [Polymorphic Carbon Thin Films Group, Physics of Energy Harvesting Division, CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K. S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi 110012 (India); Srivastava, Avanish Kumar [Electron and Ion Microscopy, Sophisticated and Analytical Instruments, CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K. S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi 110012 (India); Kumar, Mahesh [Ultrafast Optoelectronics and Tetrahertz Photonics Group, CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K. S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi 110012 (India)

    2015-05-15

    This paper reports the effect of helium gas pressure upon the structural, nanomechanical, and photoconductive properties of nanocrystalline carbon thin (NCT) films deposited by the filtered cathodic jet carbon arc technique. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy images confirm the nanocrystalline nature of the deposited films with different crystallite sizes (3–7 nm). The chemical structure of the deposited films is further analyzed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy, which suggest that the deposited films change from graphitelike to diamondlike, increasing in sp{sup 3} content, with a minor change in the dilution of the inert gas (helium). The graphitic character is regained upon higher dilution of the helium gas, whereupon the films exhibit an increase in sp{sup 2} content. The nanomechanical measurements show that the film deposited at a helium partial pressure of 2.2 × 10{sup −4} has the highest value of hardness (37.39 GPa) and elastic modulus (320.50 GPa). At a light intensity of 100 mW/cm{sup 2}, the NCT films deposited at 2.2 × 10{sup −4} and 0.1 mbar partial pressures of helium gas exhibit good photoresponses of 2.2% and 3.6%, respectively.

  1. Microwave annealing effects on ZnO films deposited by atomic layer deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Shirui; Dong Yabin; Yu Mingyan; Guo Xiaolong; Xu Xinwei; Jing Yupeng; Xia Yang

    2014-01-01

    Zinc oxide thin films deposited on glass substrate at 150 ℃ by atomic layer deposition were annealed by the microwave method at temperatures below 500 ℃.The microwave annealing effects on the structural and luminescent properties of ZnO films have been investigated by X-ray diffraction and photoluminescence.The results show that the MWA process can increase the crystal quality of ZnO thin films with a lower annealing temperature than RTA and relatively decrease the green luminescence of ZnO films.The observed changes have demonstrated that MWA is a viable technique for improving the crystalline quality of ZnO thin film on glass.

  2. New ion-assisted filtered cathodic arc deposition (IFCAD) technology for producing advanced thin films on temperature-sensitive substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, Michael L.

    1999-10-01

    An innovative Ion-Assisted Filtered Cathodic Arc Deposition (IFCAD) system has been developed for low temperature production of thin-film coatings. The IFCAD system employs electro-magnetic and mechanical filtering techniques to remove unwanted macroparticles and neutral atoms from the plasma stream. Therefore, only ions within a defined energy range arrive at the substrate surface, depositing thin-films with excellent mechanical and optical properties. Ion- Assisted-Deposition is coupled with Filtered Cathodic Arc technology to enhance and modify the arc deposited thin- films. Using an advanced computer controlled plasma beam scanning system, high quality, large area, uniform IFCAD multi-layer film structures are attained. Amorphous Diamond- Like-Carbon films (up to 85% sp3 bonded carbon; and micro- hardness greater than 50 GPa) have been deposited in multi- layer thin-film combinations with other IFCAD source materials (such as: Al2O3) for optical and tribological applications. Rutile TiO2 (refractive index of 2.8 at 500 nm) has been deposited with this technology for advanced optical filter applications. The new IFCAD technology has been included in development programs, such as: plastic and glass lens coatings for optical systems; wear resistant coatings on various metal substrates, ultra smooth, durable, surface hydrophobic coatings for aircraft windows; EUV coatings for space instrumentation; transparent conductive coatings; and UV protective coatings for solar cell concentrator plastic Fresnel lens elements for space power.

  3. Silicon and aluminum doping effects on the microstructure and properties of polymeric amorphous carbon films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xiaoqiang, E-mail: lxq_suse@sina.com [Material Corrosion and Protection Key Laboratory of Sichuan province, Sichuan University of Science and Engineering, Zigong 643000 (China); Hao, Junying, E-mail: jyhao@licp.cas.cn [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Xie, Yuntao [Material Corrosion and Protection Key Laboratory of Sichuan province, Sichuan University of Science and Engineering, Zigong 643000 (China)

    2016-08-30

    Highlights: • Evolution of nanostructure and properties of the polymeric amorphous carbon films were firstly studied. • Si doping enhanced polymerization of the hydrocarbon chains and Al doping resulted in increase in the ordered carbon clusters of polymeric amorphous carbon films. • Soft polymeric amorphous carbon films exhibited an unconventional frictional behaviors with a superior wear resistance. • The mechanical and vacuum tribological properties of the polymeric amorphous carbon films were significantly improved by Si and Al co-doping. - Abstract: Polymeric amorphous carbon films were prepared by radio frequency (R.F. 13.56 MHz) magnetron sputtering deposition. The microstructure evolution of the deposited polymeric films induced by silicon (Si) and aluminum(Al) doping were scrutinized through infrared spectroscopy, multi-wavelength Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The comparative results show that Si doping can enhance polymerization and Al doping results in an increase in the ordered carbon clusters. Si and Al co-doping into polymeric films leads to the formation of an unusual dual nanostructure consisting of cross-linked polymer-like hydrocarbon chains and fullerene-like carbon clusters. The super-high elasticity and super-low friction coefficients (<0.002) under a high vacuum were obtained through Si and Al co-doping into the films. Unconventionally, the co-doped polymeric films exhibited a superior wear resistance even though they were very soft. The relationship between the microstructure and properties of the polymeric amorphous carbon films with different elements doping are also discussed in detail.

  4. Spray pyrolysis deposition of indium sulphide thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otto, K.; Katerski, A.; Mere, A.; Volobujeva, O.; Krunks, M., E-mail: malle@staff.ttu.e

    2011-03-01

    In{sub 2}S{sub 3} thin films were grown by the chemical spray pyrolysis (CSP) method using the pneumatic spray set-up and compressed air as a carrier gas. Aqueous solutions containing InCl{sub 3} and SC(NH{sub 2}){sub 2} at a molar ratio of In/S = 1/3 and 1/6 were deposited onto preheated glass sheets at substrate temperatures T{sub s} = 205-410 {sup o}C. The obtained films were characterised by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM,) optical transmission spectra, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). According to XRD, thin films deposited at T{sub s} = 205-365 {sup o}C were composed of the (0 0 12) orientated tetragonal {beta}-In{sub 2}S{sub 3} phase independent of the In/S ratio in the spray solution. Depositions performed at T{sub s} = 410 {sup o}C led to the formation of the In{sub 2}O{sub 3} phase, preferably when the 1/3 solution was sprayed. Post-deposition annealing in air indicated that oxidation of the sulphide phase has a minor role in the formation of In{sub 2}O{sub 3} at temperatures up to 450 {sup o}C. In{sub 2}S{sub 3} films grown at T{sub s} below 365 {sup o}C exhibited transparency over 70% in the visible spectral region and E{sub g} of 2.90-2.96 eV for direct and 2.15-2.30 eV for indirect transitions, respectively. Film thickness and chlorine content decreased with increasing deposition temperatures. The XPS study revealed that the In/S ratio in the spray solution had a significant influence on the content of oxygen (Me-O, BE = 530.0 eV) in the In{sub 2}S{sub 3} films deposited in the temperature range of 205-365 {sup o}C. Both XPS and EDS studies confirmed that oxygen content in the films deposited using the solution with the In/S ratio of 1/6 was substantially lower than in the films deposited with the In/S ratio of 1/3.

  5. Glancing angle deposition of thin films engineering the nanoscale

    CERN Document Server

    Hawkeye, Matthew M; Brett, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    This book provides a highly practical treatment of GLAD technology, gathering existing procedures, methodologies, and experimental designs into a single, cohesive volume which will be useful both as a ready reference for those in the field and as a definitive guide for those entering it. It covers: History and development of GLAD techniquesProperties and Characterization of GLAD fabricated filmsDesign and engineering of optical GLAD films including fabrication and testingPost-deposition processing and integrationDeposition systems for GLAD fabrication Also includes a patent survey of relevant literature and a survey of GLAD's wide range of material properties and diverse applications.

  6. Study of indium tin oxide thin films deposited on acrylics substrates by Ion beam assisted deposition technique

    OpenAIRE

    Meng Lijian; Liang Erjun; Gao Jinsong; Teixeira, Vasco M. P.; Santos, M. P. dos

    2009-01-01

    Indium tin oxide (ITO) thin films have been deposited onto acrylics (PMMA) substrates by ion beam assisted deposition technique at different oxygen flows. The structural, optical and electrical properties of the deposited films have been characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmittance, FTIR, ellipometry and Hall effect measurements. The optical constants of the deposited films have been calculated by fitting the ellipsometric spectra. The effects of the oxygen flow on the properties of the ...

  7. Microwave Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition of Diamond Films on Silicon From Ethanol and Hydrogen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马志斌; 汪建华; 王传新; 满卫东

    2003-01-01

    Diamond films with very smooth surface and good optical quality have been deposited onto silicon substrate using microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) from a gas mixture of ethanol and hydrogen at a low substrate temperature of 450 ℃. The effects of the substrate temperature on the diamond nucleation and the morphology of the diamond film have been investigated and observed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The microstructure and the phase of the film have been characterized using Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The diamond nucleation density significantly decreases with the increasing of the substrate temperature. There are only sparse nuclei when the substrate temperature is higher than 800 ℃ although the ethanol concentration in hydrogen is very high. That the characteristic diamond peak in the Raman spectrum of a diamond film prepared at a low substrate temperature of 450 ℃ extends into broadband indicates that the film is of nanophase. No graphite peak appeared in the XRD pattern confirms that the film is mainly composed of SP3 carbon. The diamond peak in the XRD pattern also broadens due to the nanocrystalline of the film.

  8. Fabrication and characterization of vacuum deposited fluorescein thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jalkanen, Pasi, E-mail: pasi.jalkanen@gmail.co [University of Jyvaeskylae, Department of Physics, Nanoscience center (NSC), P.O. Box 35, FI-40014 Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Kulju, Sampo, E-mail: sampo.j.kulju@jyu.f [University of Jyvaeskylae, Department of Physics, Nanoscience center (NSC), P.O. Box 35, FI-40014 Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Arutyunov, Konstantin, E-mail: konstantin.arutyunov@jyu.f [University of Jyvaeskylae, Department of Physics, Nanoscience center (NSC), P.O. Box 35, FI-40014 Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Antila, Liisa, E-mail: liisa.j.antila@jyu.f [University of Jyvaeskylae, Department of Chemistry, Nanoscience center (NSC) P.O. Box 35, FI-40014 Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Myllyperkioe, Pasi, E-mail: pasi.myllyperkio@jyu.f [University of Jyvaeskylae, Department of Chemistry, Nanoscience center (NSC) P.O. Box 35, FI-40014 Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Ihalainen, Teemu, E-mail: teemu.o.ihalainen@jyu.f [University of Jyvaeskylae, Department of Biology, Nanoscience center (NSC), P.O. Box 35, FI-40014 Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Kaeaeriaeinen, Tommi, E-mail: tommi.kaariainen@lut.f [Lappeenranta University of Technology, ASTRal, P.O. Box 181, FI-50101 Mikkeli (Finland); Kaeaeriaeinen, Marja-Leena, E-mail: marja-leena.kaariainen@lut.f [Lappeenranta University of Technology, ASTRal, P.O. Box 181, FI-50101 Mikkeli (Finland); Korppi-Tommola, Jouko, E-mail: jouko.korppi-tommola@jyu.f [University of Jyvaeskylae, Department of Biology, Nanoscience center (NSC), P.O. Box 35, FI-40014 Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    2011-03-31

    Simple vacuum evaporation technique for deposition of dyes on various solid surfaces has been developed. The method is compatible with conventional solvent-free nanofabrication processing enabling fabrication of nanoscale optoelectronic devices. Thin films of fluorescein were deposited on glass, fluorine-tin-oxide (FTO) coated glass with and without atomically layer deposited (ALD) nanocrystalline 20 nm thick anatase TiO{sub 2} coating. Surface topology, absorption and emission spectra of the films depend on their thickness and the material of supporting substrate. On a smooth glass surface the dye initially forms islands before merging into a uniform layer after 5 to 10 monolayers. On FTO covered glass the absorption spectra are similar to fluorescein solution in ethanol. Absorption spectra on ALD-TiO{sub 2} is red shifted compared to the film deposited on bare FTO. The corresponding emission spectra at {lambda} = 458 nm excitation show various thickness and substrate dependent features, while the emission of films deposited on TiO{sub 2} is quenched due to the effective electron transfer to the semiconductor conduction band.

  9. Microwave plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition of ultra-nanocrystalline diamond films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wen-Shin

    Microwave plasma assisted ultra-nanocrystalline diamond film deposition was investigated using hydrogen deficient, carbon containing argon plasma chemistries with MSU-developed microwave plasma reactors. Ultra-nanocrystalline diamond film deposition on mechanically scratched silicon wafers was experimentally explored over the following input variables: (1) pressure: 60--240Torr, (2) total gas flow rate: 101--642 sccm, (3) input microwave power 732--1518W, (4) substrate temperature: 500°C--770°C, (5) deposition time: 2--48 hours, and (6) N2 impurities 5--2500 ppm. H2 concentrations were less than 9%, while CH 4 concentration was 0.17--1.85%. It was desired to grow films uniformly over 3″ diameter substrates and to minimize the grain size. Large, uniform, intense, and greenish-white discharges were sustained in contact with three inch silicon substrates over a 60--240 Torr pressure regime. At a given operating pressure, film uniformity was controlled by adjusting substrate holder geometry, substrate position, input microwave power, gas chemistries, and total gas flow rates. Film ultra-nanocrystallinity and smoothness required high purity deposition conditions. Uniform ultra-nanocrystalline films were synthesized in low leak-rate system with crystal sizes ranging from 3--30 nm. Films with 11--50 nm RMS roughness and respective thickness values of 1--23 mum were synthesized over 3″ wafers under a wide range of different deposition conditions. Film RMS roughness 7 nm was synthesized with thickness of 430 nm. Film uniformities of almost 100% were achieved over three inch silicon wafers. UV Raman and XRD characterization results indicated the presence of diamond in the synthesized films. Optical Emission Spectroscopy measurements showed that the discharge gas temperature was in excess of 2000 K. The synthesized films are uniformly smooth and the as grown ultra-nanocrystalline diamond can be used for a high frequency SAW device substrate material. IR measurements

  10. Simultaneous growth of diamond and nanostructured graphite thin films by hot-filament chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, M.; Ürgen, M.

    2012-01-01

    Diamond and graphite films on silicon wafer were simultaneously synthesized at 850 °C without any additional catalyst. The synthesis was achieved in hot-filament chemical vapor deposition reactor by changing distance among filaments in traditional gas mixture. The inter-wire distance for diamond and graphite deposition was kept 5 and 15 mm, whereas kept constant from the substrate. The Raman spectroscopic analyses show that film deposited at 5 mm is good quality diamond and at 15 mm is nanostructured graphite and respective growths confirm by scanning auger electron microscopy. The scanning electron microscope results exhibit that black soot graphite is composed of needle-like nanostructures, whereas diamond with pyramidal featured structure. Transformation of diamond into graphite mainly attributes lacking in atomic hydrogen. The present study develops new trend in the field of carbon based coatings, where single substrate incorporate dual application can be utilized.

  11. Properties of Diamond-Like Carbon Films Synthesized by Dual-Target Unbalanced Magnetron Sputtering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Cui; LI Guo-Qing; GOU Wei; MU Zong-Xin; ZHANG Cheng-Wu

    2004-01-01

    @@ Smooth, dense and uniform diamond-like carbon films (DLC films) for industrial applications have successfully been prepared by dual-target unbalanced magnetron sputtering and the DLC characteristics of the films are confirmed by Raman spectra. It is found that the sputtering current of target plays an important role in the DLC film deposition. Deposition rate of 3.5μm/h is obtained by using the sputtering current of 30 A. The friction coefficient of the films is 0.2-0.225 measured by using a pin-on-disc microtribometer. The structure of the films tends to have a growth of sp3 bonds content at high sputtering current. The compressive residual stress in the films increases with the increasing sputtering current of the target.

  12. Platinum containing amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H/Pt) thin films as selective solar absorbers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lan, Yung-Hsiang; Brahma, Sanjaya [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Tzeng, Y.H. [Department of Electrical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Ting, Jyh-Ming, E-mail: jting@mail.ncku.edu.tw [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Research Center for Energy Technology and Strategy, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China)

    2014-10-15

    We have investigated a double-cermet structured thin film in which an a-C:H thin film was used as an anti-reflective (AR) layer and two platinum-containing amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H/Pt) thin films were used as the double cermet layers. A reactive co-sputter deposition method was used to prepare both the anti-reflective and cermet layers. Effects of the target power and heat treatment were studied. The obtained films were characterized using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The optical absorptance and emittance of the as deposited and annealed films were determined using UV–vis-NIR spectroscopy. We show that the optical absorptance of the resulting double-cermet structured thin film is as high as 96% and remains to be 91% after heat treatment at 400 °C, indicating the thermal stability of the film.

  13. Characterisation of DLC films deposited using titanium isopropoxide (TIPOT) at different flow rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Said, R; Ali, N; Ghumman, C A A; Teodoro, O M N D; Ahmed, W

    2009-07-01

    In recent years, there has been growing interest in the search for advanced biomaterials for biomedical applications, such as human implants and surgical cutting tools. It is known that both carbon and titanium exhibit good biocompatibility and have been used as implants in the human body. It is highly desirable to deposit biocompatible thin films onto a range of components in order to impart biocompatibility and to minimise wear in implants. Diamond like carbon (DLC) is a good candidate material for achieving biocompatibility and low wear rates. In this study, thin films of diamond-like-carbon DLC were deposited onto stainless steel (316) substrates using C2H2, argon and titanium isopropoxide (TIPOT) precursors. Argon was used to generate the plasma in the plasma enhanced vapour deposition (PECVD) system. A critical coating feature governing the performance of the component during service is film thickness. The as-grown films were in the thickness range 90-100 nm and were found to be dependent on TIPOT flow rate. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to characterise the surface roughness of the samples. As the flow rate of TIPOT increased the average roughness was found to increase in conjunction with the film thickness. Raman spectroscopy was used to investigate the chemical structure of amorphous carbon matrix. Surface tension values were calculated using contact angle measurements. In general, the trend of the surface tension results exhibited an opposite trend to that of the contact angle. The elemental composition of the samples was characterised using a VG ToF SIMS (IX23LS) instrument and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Surprisingly, SIMS and XPS results showed that the DLC samples did not show evidence of titanium since no peaks representing to titanium appeared on the SIMS/XPS spectra.

  14. The Effect of Deposition Time on Textured Magnesium Diboride Thick Films Fabricated by Electrophoretic Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. G. Mutia

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available MgB2 powders suspended in ethanol were electrophoretically deposited on high-purity molybdenum substrates having dimensions of 1 x 0.3 x 0.01 cm. The said substrate was set as the cathode and was placed 0.5 cm away from a graphite rod anode. A current density of ~0.02 mA/cm2 and a voltage of 600 V were applied. The effect of deposition time was studied by varying it as follows: 15 s, 30 s, 1 min, and 2 min. Heat treatment at 950 oC for 3 h was done after deposition. MgB2 thick films were successfully fabricated for the deposition carried out for 2 min. Deposition times less than 2 min resulted in insufficient deposited powder; hence formation of MgB2 was not facilitated. Films deposited at 15 and 30 s have good surface characteristics, wherein no microcracks were present. X-ray diffraction and surface image analysis reveal that the deposited films have a preferred orientation along the (10l direction.

  15. Composite TiO2-Carbon nano films with enhanced photocatalytic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakarov, Dinko; Sellappan, Raja

    2011-03-01

    Composite TiO2-carbon thin films prepared by physical vapor deposition techniques on fused silica substrates show enhanced photocatalytic activity, as compared to pure TiO2 films of similar thickness, towards decomposition of methanol to CO2 and water. Raman and XRD measurements confirm that annealed TiO2 films exhibit anatase structure while the carbon layer becomes graphitic. Characteristic for the composite films is an enhanced optical absorption in the visible range. The presence of the carbon film causes a shift of the TiO2 absorption edge and modifies its grain size to be smaller. The observed enhancement is attributed to synergy effects at the carbon-TiO2 interface, resulting in smaller crystallite size and anisotropic charge carrier transport, which in turn reduces their recombination probability. Supported by N-INNER through the Solar Hydrogen project (P30938-1 Solväte).

  16. Preparation and tribological properties of DLC/Ti film by pulsed laser arc deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Zhen-Yu; Lu Xin-Chun; Luo Jian-Bin; Shao Tian-Min; Qing Tao; Zhang Chen-Hui

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports that DLC (diamond like carbon)/Ti and DLC films were prepared by using pulsed laser arc deposition. R-ray diffraction, Auger electron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, nanoindenter, spectroscopic ellipsometer, surface profiler and micro-tribometer were employed to study the structure and tribological properties of DLC/Ti and DLC films. The results show that DLC/Ti film, with I(D)/I(G) 0.28 and corresponding to 76% sp3 content calculated by Raman spectroscopy, uniform chemical composition along depth direction, 98 at% content of carbon, hardness 8.2 GPa and Young's modulus 110.5 GPa, compressive stress 6.579 GPa, thickness 46 nm,coefficient of friction 0.08, and critical load 95mN, exhibits excellent mechanical and tribological properties.

  17. Morphological Study Of Palladium Thin Films Deposited By Sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salcedo, K L; Rodriguez, C A [Grupo Plasma Laser y Aplicaciones, Ingenieria Fisica, Universidad Tecnologica de Pereira (Colombia); Perez, F A [WNANO, West Virginia University (United States); Riascos, H [Grupo Plasma Laser y Aplicaciones, Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Tecnologica de Pereira (Colombia)

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a morphological analysis of thin films of palladium (Pd) deposited on a substrate of sapphire (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) at a constant pressure of 3.5 mbar at different substrate temperatures (473 K, 523 K and 573 K). The films were morphologically characterized by means of an Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM); finding a relation between the roughness and the temperature. A morphological analysis of the samples through AFM was carried out and the roughness was measured by simulating the X-ray reflectivity curve using GenX software. A direct relation between the experimental and simulation data of the Palladium thin films was found.

  18. Alternating deposition films of a polymer and dendrimers bearing diphenylanthracene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Jing; WANG Liyan; GAO Jian; YU Xi; WANG Zhiqiang

    2005-01-01

    Two generations of carboxyl-terminated poly (aryl ether) dendrimers bearing 9,10-diphenylanthracene cores are designed and synthesized. Alternating deposition of two dendrimers and poly(4-vinylpyridine) is studied with UV-Vis spectroscopy, FT-IR spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. Experimental results indicate that this method to introduce chromophore into multilayer film can effectively prevent desorption of dye molecule. Moreover, it is found that dendrimer can inhibit the aggregation of fluorophore in film using fluorescence spectroscopy. Increase of dendrimer's generation can enhance fluorescence intensity of each fluorophore. This provides a new approach to design luminescent thin film.

  19. Oxide films: low-temperature deposition and crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sangmoon; Herman, Gregory S.; Keszler, Douglas A.

    2003-10-01

    Thin films of CeO 2 and (Ce,Sm)O 2 have been prepared by using the SILAR method of deposition in conjunction with hydrothermal and high-temperature annealing. Low-temperature, low-pressure hydrothermal annealing of amorphous Mn:Zn 2GeO 4 films has lead to the growth of grains having edge lengths near 1 μm. Thick films of crystalline Zn 2SiO 4 exhibiting limited cracking have been prepared by a doctor-blade method also in conjunction with hydrothermal dehydration and annealing.

  20. Impact toughness of tungsten films deposited on martensite stainless steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Ning-kang; YANG Bin; WANG De-zhi

    2005-01-01

    Tungsten films were deposited on stainless steel Charpy specimens by magnetron sputtering followed by electron beam heat treatment. Charpy impact tests and scanning electron microscopy were used to investigate the ductile-brittle transition behavior of the specimens. With decreasing test temperature the fracture mode was transformed from ductile to brittle for both kinds of specimens with and without W films. The data of the crack initiation energy, crack propagation energy, impact absorbing energy, fracture time and deflection as well as the fracture morphologies at test temperature of -70 ℃ show that W films can improve the impact toughness of stainless steel.

  1. Influence of deposited CNTs on the surface of carbon fiber by ultrasonically assisted electrophoretic deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, J. J.; Liu, F.; Deng, C.; Fang, L. C.; Li, D. J.

    2015-07-01

    The surface property of carbon fiber directly affects the interface performance between carbon fiber and matrix. To improve the surface property of carbon fiber, we proposed a simple method to prepare carbon nanotubes /carbon fiber hybrid fiber via ultrasonically assisted electrophoretic deposition (EPD). Surface morphologies and surface functional group of carbon fibers were examined by atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR), respectively. The results show that the deposition of carbon nanotubes changed the surface morphologies of carbon fibers and introduced polar groups (C=O and C-O) to carbon fiber surface. Comparing the results with EPD-only, ultrasonically assisted EPD increased the uniformity of carbon nanotubes coatings whereas only sparse and not uniformly deposition formed without ultrasonic.

  2. Characterization of thiol-functionalised silica films deposited on electrode surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Cesarino

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Thiol-functionalised silica films were deposited on various electrode surfaces (gold, platinum, glassy carbon by spin-coating sol-gel mixtures in the presence of a surfactant template. Film formation occurred by evaporation induced self-assembly (EISA involving the hydrolysis and (cocondensation of silane and organosilane precursors on the electrode surface. The characterization of such material was performed by IR spectroscopy, thermogravimetry (TG, elemental analysis (EA, atomic force microscopy (AFM, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and cyclic voltammetry (CV.

  3. 99.996 %{sup 12}C films isotopically enriched and deposited in situ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dwyer, K. J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20740 (United States); National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899-8423 (United States); Pomeroy, J. M.; Simons, D. S. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899-8423 (United States)

    2013-06-24

    Ionizing natural abundance carbon dioxide gas, we extract and mass select the ions, depositing thin films isotopically enriched to 99.9961(4) %{sup 12}C as measured by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). In solid state quantum information, coherence times of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in {sup 12}C enriched diamond exceeding milliseconds demonstrate the viability of NV centers as qubits, motivating improved isotopic enrichment. NV centers in diamond are particularly attractive qubit candidates due to the optical accessibility of the spin states. We present SIMS analysis and cross-sectional scanning electron microscopy of {sup 12}C enriched thin film samples grown with this method.

  4. Deposition and characterisation of epitaxial oxide thin films for SOFCs

    KAUST Repository

    Santiso, José

    2010-10-24

    This paper reviews the recent advances in the use of thin films, mostly epitaxial, for fundamental studies of materials for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) applications. These studies include the influence of film microstructure, crystal orientation and strain in oxide ionic conducting materials used as electrolytes, such as fluorites, and in mixed ionic and electronic conducting materials used as electrodes, typically oxides with perovskite or perovskite-related layered structures. The recent effort towards the enhancement of the electrochemical performance of SOFC materials through the deposition of artificial film heterostructures is also presented. These thin films have been engineered at a nanoscale level, such as the case of epitaxial multilayers or nanocomposite cermet materials. The recent progress in the implementation of thin films in SOFC devices is also reported. © 2010 Springer-Verlag.

  5. Polyelectrolyte Coacervates Deposited as High Gas Barrier Thin Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haile, Merid; Sarwar, Owais; Henderson, Robert; Smith, Ryan; Grunlan, Jaime C

    2017-01-01

    Multilayer coatings consisting of oppositely charged polyelectrolytes have proven to be extraordinarily effective oxygen barriers but require many processing steps to fabricate. In an effort to prepare high oxygen barrier thin films more quickly, a polyelectrolyte complex coacervate composed of polyethylenimine and polyacrylic acid is prepared. The coacervate fluid is applied as a thin film using a rod coating process. With humidity and thermal post-treatment, a 2 µm thin film reduces the oxygen transmission rate of 0.127 mm poly(ethylene terephthalate) by two orders of magnitude, rivalling conventional oxygen barrier technologies. These films are fabricated in ambient conditions using low-cost, water-based solutions, providing a tremendous opportunity for single-step deposition of polymeric high barrier thin films.

  6. Deposition of ZnO Films on Freestanding CVD Thick Diamond Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Jian; BAI Yi-Zhen; YANG Tian-Peng; XU Yi-Bin; WANG Xin-Sheng; DU Guo-Tong; WU Han-Hua

    2006-01-01

    @@ For ZnO/diamond structured surface acoustic wave (SAW) filters, performance is sensitively dependent on the quality of the ZnO films. In this paper, we prepare highly-oriented and fine grained polycrystalline ZnO thin films with excellent surface smoothness on the smooth nucleation surfaces of freestanding CVD diamond films by metal organic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD). The properties of the ZnO films are characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and photoluminescence (PL) spectrum. The influences of the deposition conditions on the quality of ZnO films are discussed briefly. ZnO/freestanding thick-diamond-film layered SAW devices with high response frequencies are expected to be developed.

  7. Hybrid Graphene and Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Films for Enhanced Phase-Change Heat Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Han; Yun, Hyung Duk; Kwon, Soon-Yong; Bang, In Cheol

    2016-02-10

    Nucleate boiling is an effective heat transfer method in power generation systems and cooling devices. In this letter, hybrid graphene/single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT), graphene, and SWCNT films deposited on indium tin oxide (ITO) surfaces were fabricated to investigate the enhancement of nucleate boiling phenomena described by the critical heat flux and heat transfer coefficient. The graphene films were grown on Cu foils and transferred to ITO surfaces. Furthermore, SWCNTs were deposited on the graphene layer to fabricate hybrid graphene/SWCNT films. We determined that the hybrid graphene/SWCNT film deposited on an ITO surface is the most effective heat transfer surface in pool boiling because of the interconnected network of carbon structures.

  8. Environmentally stable sputter-deposited thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharp, D.J.

    1978-03-01

    Accelerated corrosion data are presented for the titanium-silver and chrome-gold thin film metallization systems presently used at Sandia Laboratories. Improvements in corrosion, hence reliability, as a result of interposing a thin intermediate layer of either platinum or palladium are shown. Potentiometric measurements showing the alteration of corrosion potential with the use of palladium for the titanium-silver system are also presented.

  9. CHEMICALLY DEPOSITED SILVER FILM USED AS A SERS-ACTIVE OVER COATING LAYER FOR POLYMER FILM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-ning Liu; Gi Xue; Yun Lu; Jun Zhang; Fen-ting Li; Chen-chen Xue; Stephen Z.D. Cheng

    2001-01-01

    When colloidal silver particles were chemically deposited onto polymer film as an over-coating layer, surfaceenhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectra could be collected for the surface analysis. SERS measurements of liquid crystal film were successfully performed without disturbing the surface morphology.

  10. Carbon Nanotube Thin-Film Antennas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puchades, Ivan; Rossi, Jamie E; Cress, Cory D; Naglich, Eric; Landi, Brian J

    2016-08-17

    Multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) and single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) dipole antennas have been successfully designed, fabricated, and tested. Antennas of varying lengths were fabricated using flexible bulk MWCNT sheet material and evaluated to confirm the validity of a full-wave antenna design equation. The ∼20× improvement in electrical conductivity provided by chemically doped SWCNT thin films over MWCNT sheets presents an opportunity for the fabrication of thin-film antennas, leading to potentially simplified system integration and optical transparency. The resonance characteristics of a fabricated chlorosulfonic acid-doped SWCNT thin-film antenna demonstrate the feasibility of the technology and indicate that when the sheet resistance of the thin film is >40 ohm/sq no power is absorbed by the antenna and that a sheet resistance of antenna. The dependence of the return loss performance on the SWCNT sheet resistance is consistent with unbalanced metal, metal oxide, and other CNT-based thin-film antennas, and it provides a framework for which other thin-film antennas can be designed.

  11. Iron, nitrogen and silicon doped diamond like carbon (DLC) thin films: A comparative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ray, Sekhar C., E-mail: Raysc@unisa.ac.za [Department of Physics, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, University of South Africa, Private Bag X6, Florida, 1710, Science Campus, Christiaan de Wet and Pioneer Avenue, Florida Park, Johannesburg (South Africa); Pong, W.F. [Department of Physics, Tamkang University, Tamsui 251, New Taipei City, Taiwan (China); Papakonstantinou, P. [Nanotechnology and Integrated Bio-Engineering Centre, University of Ulster, Shore Road, Newtownabbey BT37 0QB (United Kingdom)

    2016-07-01

    The X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), valence band photoemission (VB-PES) and Raman spectroscopy results show that the incorporation of nitrogen in pulsed laser deposited diamond like carbon (DLC) thin films, reverts the sp{sup 3} network to sp{sup 2} as evidenced by an increase of the sp{sup 2} cluster and I{sub D}/I{sub G} ratio in C K-edge XANES and Raman spectra respectively which reduces the hardness/Young's modulus into the film network. Si-doped DLC film deposited in a plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition process reduces the sp{sup 2} cluster and I{sub D}/I{sub G} ratio that causes the decrease of hardness/Young's modulus of the film structure. The Fe-doped DLC films deposited by dip coating technique increase the hardness/Young's modulus with an increase of sp{sup 3}-content in DLC film structure. - Highlights: • Fe, N and Si doped DLC films deposited by dip, PLD and PECVD methods respectively • DLC:Fe thin films have higher hardness/Young's modulus than DLC:N(:Si) thin films. • sp{sup 3} and sp{sup 2} contents are estimated from C K-edge XANES and VB-PES measurements.

  12. Electronic Power System Application of Diamond-Like Carbon Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Richard L. C.; Kosai, H.; Fries-Carr, S.; Weimer, J.; Freeman, M.; Schwarze, G. E.

    2003-01-01

    A prototype manufacturing technology for producing high volume efficiency and high energy density diamond-like carbon (DLC) capacitors has been developed. Unique dual ion-beam deposition and web-handling systems have been designed and constructed to deposit high quality DLC films simultaneously on both sides of capacitor grade aluminum foil and aluminum-coated polymer films. An optimized process, using inductively coupled RF ion sources, has been used to synthesize electrically robust DLC films. DLC films are amorphous and highly flexible, making them suitable for the production of wound capacitors. DLC capacitors are reliable and stable over a wide range of AC frequencies from 20 Hz to 1 MHz, and over a temperature range from .500 C to 3000 C. The compact DLC capacitors offer at least a 50% decrease in weight and volume and a greater than 50% increase in temperature handling capability over equal value capacitors built with existing technologies. The DLC capacitors will be suitable for high temperature, high voltage, pulsed power and filter applications.

  13. Effects of Implant Copper Layer on Diamond Film Deposition on Cemented Carbides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The deposition of high-quality diamond films and their adhesion on cemented carbides are strongly influenced by the catalytic effect of cobalt under typical deposition conditions.Decreasing Co content on the surface of the cemented carbide is often used for the diamond filmdeposition. But the leaching of Co from the WC-Co substrate leading to a mechanical weak surface often causes a poor adhesion. In this paper we adopted an implant copper layer preparedby vaporization to improve the mechanical properties of the Co-leached substrate. The diamondfilms were grown by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition from CH4 :H2 gas mixture. Thecross section and the morphology of the diamond film were characterized by scanning electronmicroscopy (SEM). The non-diamond content in the film was analyzed by Raman spectroscopy.The effects of pretreatment on the concentrations of Co and Cu near the interfacial region wereexamined by energy dispersive spectrum (EDS) equipped with SEM. The adhesion of the diamondon the substrate was evaluated with a Rockwell-type hardness tester. The results indicate that thediamond films prepared with implant copper layer have a good adhesion to the cemented carbidesubstrate due to the recovery of the mechanical properties of the Co-depleted substrate after thecopper implantation and the formation of less amorphous carbon between the substrate and thediamond film.

  14. Fundamental Mechanisms of Roughening and Smoothing During Thin Film Deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Headrick, Randall [Univ. of Vermont, Burlington, VT (United States)

    2016-03-18

    In this research program, we have explored the fundamental limits for thin film deposition in both crystalline and amorphous (i.e. non-crystalline) materials systems. For vacuum-based physical deposition processes such as sputter deposition, the background gas pressure of the inert gas (usually argon) used as the process gas has been found to be a key variable. Both a roughness transition and stress transition as a function of pressure have been linked to a common mechanism involving collisions of energetic particles from the deposition source with the process inert gas. As energetic particles collide with gas molecules in the deposition process they lose their energy rapidly if the pressure (and background gas density) is above a critical value. Both roughness and stress limit important properties of thin films for applications. In the area of epitaxial growth we have also discovered a related effect; there is a critical pressure below which highly crystalline layers grow in a layer-by-layer mode. This effect is also though to be due to energetic particle thermalization and scattering. Several other important effects such as the observation of coalescence dominated growth has been observed. This mode can be likened to the behavior of two-dimensional water droplets on the hood of a car during a rain storm; as the droplets grow and touch each other they tend to coalesce rapidly into new larger circular puddles, and this process proceeds exponentially as larger puddles overtake smaller ones and also merge with other large puddles. This discovery will enable more accurate simulations and modeling of epitaxial growth processes. We have also observed that epitaxial films undergo a roughening transition as a function of thickness, which is attributed to strain induced by the crystalline lattice mismatch with the substrate crystal. In addition, we have studied another physical deposition process called pulsed laser deposition. It differs from sputter deposition due to the

  15. Amorphous hydrogenated carbon films treated by SF{sub 6} plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marins, N M S; Mota, R P; Santos, D C R; Honda, R Y; Kayama, M E; Kostov, K G; Algatti, M A [Laboratorio de Plasma, Faculdade de Engenharia, UNESP, Av. Dr. Ariberto Pereira da Cunha-333, 12516-410, Guaratingueta, SP (Brazil); Cruz, N C; Rangel, E C, E-mail: nazir@feg.unesp.b [Laboratorio de Plasmas Tecnologicos, Unidade Diferenciada Sorocaba/Ipero, UNESP, Av. Tres de Marco-511, 18085-180, Sorocaba, SP (Brazil)

    2009-05-01

    This work was performed to verify the chemical structure, mechanical and hydrophilic properties of amorphous hydrogenated carbon films prepared by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition, using acetylene/argon mixture as monomer. Films were prepared in a cylindrical quartz reactor, fed by 13.56 MHz radiofrequency. The films were grown during 5 min, for power varying from 25 to 125 W at a fixed pressure of 9.5 Pa. After deposition, all samples were treated by SF{sub 6} plasma with the aim of changing their hydrophilic character. Film chemical structure investigated by Raman spectroscopy, revealed the increase of sp{sup 3} hybridized carbon bonds as the plasma power increases. Hardness measurements performed by the nanoindentation technique showed an improvement from 5 GPa to 14 GPa following the increase discharge power. The untreated films presented a hydrophilic character, which slightly diminished after SF{sub 6} plasma treatment.

  16. Synthesis and characterization of well-aligned carbon nitrogen nanotubes by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马旭村; 徐贵昌; 王恩哥

    2000-01-01

    Well-aligned carbon nitrogen nanotube films have been synthesized successfully on meso-porous silica substrates by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MWPCVD) method. Studies on their morphology, structure, and composition by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), respectively, indicate that these nanotubes consist of linearly polymerized carbon nitrogen nanobells, and the nitrogen atoms have been doped into carbon netweork to form a new structure C1-xNx( x = 0.16±0.01). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results of the samples further demonstrate that carbon bonds cova-lently with nitrogen in all the carbon nitrogen nanotube films.

  17. Chemical Vapor Deposition of Aluminum Oxide Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vohs, Jason K.; Bentz, Amy; Eleamos, Krystal; Poole, John; Fahlman, Bradley D.

    2010-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is a process routinely used to produce thin films of materials via decomposition of volatile precursor molecules. Unfortunately, the equipment required for a conventional CVD experiment is not practical or affordable for many undergraduate chemistry laboratories, especially at smaller institutions. In an effort to…

  18. Surface properties of diamond-like carbon films prepared by CVD and PVD methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Dong-Ping; Liu Yan-Hong; Chen Bao-Xiang

    2006-01-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films have been deposited using three different techniques: (a) electron cyclotron resonance-plasma source ion implantation, (b) low-pressure dielectric barrier discharge, (c) filtered-pulsed cathodic arc discharge. The surface and mechanical properties of these films are compared using atomic force microscopebased tests. The experimental results show that hydrogenated DLC films are covered with soft surface layers enriched with hydrogen and sp3 hybridized carbon while the soft surface layers of tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) films have graphite-like structure. The formation of soft surface layers can be associated with the surface diffusion and growth induced by the low-energy deposition process. For typical CVD methods, the atomic hydrogen in the plasmas can contribute to the formation of hydrogen and sp3 hybridized carbon enriched surface layers. The high-energy ion implantation causes the rearrangement of atoms beneath the surface layer and leads to an increase in film density. The ta-C films can be deposited using the medium energy carbon ions in the highly-ionized plasma.

  19. Deposition and characterization of titanium dioxide and hafnium dioxide thin films for high dielectric applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Meeyoung

    The industry's demand for higher integrated circuit density and performance has forced the gate dielectric layer thickness to decrease rapidly. The use of conventional SiO2 films as gate oxide is reaching its limit due to the rapid increase in tunneling current. Therefore, a need for a high dielectric material to produce large oxide capacitance and low leakage current has emerged. Metal-oxides such as titanium dioxide (TiO2) and hafnium dioxide (HfO2) are attractive candidates for gate dielectrics due to their electrical and physical properties suitable for high dielectric applications. MOCVD of TiO2 using titanium isopropoxide (TTIP) precursor on p-type Si(100) has been studied. Insertion of a TiO x buffer layer, formed by depositing metallic Ti followed by oxidation, at the TiO2/Si interface has reduced the carbon contamination in the TiO2 film. Elemental Ti films, analyzed by in-situ AES, were found to grow according to Stranski-Krastanov mode on Si(100). Carbon-free, stoichiometric TiO2 films were successfully produced on Si(100) without any parasitic SiO2 layers at the TiO 2/Si interface. Electron-beam deposition of HfO2 films on Si(100) has also been investigated in this work. HfO2 films are formed by depositing elemental Hf on Si(100) and then oxidizing it either in O2 or O 3. XPS results reveal that with oxidation Hf(4f) peak shifts +3.45eV with 02 and +3.65eV with O3 oxidation. LEED and AFM studies show that the initially ordered crystalline Hf becomes disordered after oxidation. The thermodynamic stability of HfO2 films on Si has been studied using a unique test-bed structure of Hf/O3/Si. Post-Oxidation of Layer Deposition (POLD) has been employed to produce HfO2 films with a desired thickness. XPS results indicate that stoichiometric HfO 2 films were successfully produced using the POLD process. The investigation of the growth and thin film properties of TiO 2 and HfO2 using oxygen and ozone has laid a foundation for the application of these metal

  20. Silicon Nitride Film Deposition by Photochemical Vapor Deposition Using an Argon Excimer Lamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maezono, Yoshinari; Toshikawa, Kiyohiko; Kurosawa, Kou; Amari, Kouichi; Ishimura, Sou; Katto, Masahito; Yokotani, Atsushi

    2007-06-01

    In this paper, we report the deposition of silicon nitride (SiNx) films for the production of semiconductor devices and flat panel displays, by chemical vapor deposition with vacuum ultraviolet excimer lamps (VUV-CVD) using SiH4 and NH3 as raw materials. An Ar2* excimer lamp (λ=126 nm, hν=9.8 eV) with a high photon energy was used to directly excite and dissociate SiH4 through a photochemical reaction. SiNx films were successfully formed at a low temperature of 100 °C with the Ar2* excimer lamp. Although the Si-rich films were obtained using an Ar2* lamp, they showed a quality almost similar to that of films obtained by conventional plasma-CVD at 400 °C.

  1. Low resistance polycrystalline diamond thin films deposited by hot filament chemical vapour deposition

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mahtab Ullah; Ejaz Ahmed; Abdelbary Elhissi; Waqar Ahmed

    2014-05-01

    Polycrystalline diamond thin films with outgrowing diamond (OGD) grains were deposited onto silicon wafers using a hydrocarbon gas (CH4) highly diluted with H2 at low pressure in a hot filament chemical vapour deposition (HFCVD) reactor with a range of gas flow rates. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and SEM showed polycrystalline diamond structure with a random orientation. Polycrystalline diamond films with various textures were grown and (111) facets were dominant with sharp grain boundaries. Outgrowth was observed in flowerish character at high gas flow rates. Isolated single crystals with little openings appeared at various stages at low gas flow rates. Thus, changing gas flow rates had a beneficial influence on the grain size, growth rate and electrical resistivity. CVD diamond films gave an excellent performance for medium film thickness with relatively low electrical resistivity and making them potentially useful in many industrial applications.

  2. Characteristics of atomic layer deposition grown HfO{sub 2} films after exposure to plasma treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Y.W. [Kookje Electric Korea Co. LTD, 4-2 Chaam-Dong, Chonan-Si, Chungcheongnam-Do (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: ywkim@kekorea.co.kr; Roh, Y. [School of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Ji-Beom [School of Information and Communication Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: jibyoo@skku.ac.kr; Kim, Hyoungsub [School of Information and Communication Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-01-22

    Ultra thin HfO{sub 2} films were grown by the atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique using tetrakismethylethylaminohafnium (Hf[N(CH){sub 3}(C{sub 2}H{sub 5})]{sub 4}) and ozone (O{sub 3}) as the precursors and subsequently exposed to various plasma conditions, i.e., CCP (capacitively coupled plasma) and MMT (modified magnetron typed plasma) in N{sub 2} or N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} ambient. The conventional CCP treatment was not effective in removing the carbon impurities, which were incorporated during the ALD process, from the HfO{sub 2} films. However, according to the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements, the MMT treated films exhibited a significant reduction in their carbon contents and the efficient incorporation of nitrogen atoms. Although the incorporated nitrogen was easily released during the post-thermal annealing of the MMT treated samples, it was more effective than the CCP treatment in removing the film impurities. Consequently, the MMT treated samples exhibited excellent electrical properties as compared to the as-deposited HfO{sub 2} films, including negligible hysteresis (flatband voltage shift), a low leakage current, and the reduced equivalent oxide thickness of the gate stack. In conclusion, MMT post treatment is more effective than conventional CCP treatment in improving the electrical properties of high-k films by reducing the carbon contamination and densifying the as-deposited defective films.

  3. YBCO thin film evaporation on as-deposited silver film on MgO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azoulay, J.

    1999-11-01

    YBa 2Cu 3O 7- δ (YBCO) thin film was evaporated on as-deposited Ag buffer layer on MgO substrate. A simple, inexpensive vacuum system equipped with one resistively heated source was used. The subsequent heat treatment was carried out under low oxygen partial pressure at a relatively low temperature and short dwelling time. The films thus obtained were characterized for electrical properties using DC four-probe electrical measurements and inspected for structural properties and chemical composition by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It is shown that YBCO thin film can grow on as-deposited thin silver layer on MgO substrate.

  4. Ellipsometry and XPS comparative studies of thermal and plasma enhanced atomic layer deposited Al2O3-films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeberle, Jörg; Henkel, Karsten; Gargouri, Hassan; Naumann, Franziska; Gruska, Bernd; Arens, Michael; Tallarida, Massimo; Schmeißer, Dieter

    2013-01-01

    We report on results on the preparation of thin (<100 nm) aluminum oxide (Al2O3) films on silicon substrates using thermal atomic layer deposition (T-ALD) and plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition (PE-ALD) in the SENTECH SI ALD LL system. The T-ALD Al2O3 layers were deposited at 200 °C, for the PE-ALD films we varied the substrate temperature range between room temperature (rt) and 200 °C. We show data from spectroscopic ellipsometry (thickness, refractive index, growth rate) over 4" wafers and correlate them to X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results. The 200 °C T-ALD and PE-ALD processes yield films with similar refractive indices and with oxygen to aluminum elemental ratios very close to the stoichiometric value of 1.5. However, in both also fragments of the precursor are integrated into the film. The PE-ALD films show an increased growth rate and lower carbon contaminations. Reducing the deposition temperature down to rt leads to a higher content of carbon and CH-species. We also find a decrease of the refractive index and of the oxygen to aluminum elemental ratio as well as an increase of the growth rate whereas the homogeneity of the film growth is not influenced significantly. Initial state energy shifts in all PE-ALD samples are observed which we attribute to a net negative charge within the films.

  5. Ellipsometry and XPS comparative studies of thermal and plasma enhanced atomic layer deposited Al2O3-films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörg Haeberle

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We report on results on the preparation of thin (2O3 films on silicon substrates using thermal atomic layer deposition (T-ALD and plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition (PE-ALD in the SENTECH SI ALD LL system. The T-ALD Al2O3 layers were deposited at 200 °C, for the PE-ALD films we varied the substrate temperature range between room temperature (rt and 200 °C. We show data from spectroscopic ellipsometry (thickness, refractive index, growth rate over 4” wafers and correlate them to X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS results. The 200 °C T-ALD and PE-ALD processes yield films with similar refractive indices and with oxygen to aluminum elemental ratios very close to the stoichiometric value of 1.5. However, in both also fragments of the precursor are integrated into the film. The PE-ALD films show an increased growth rate and lower carbon contaminations. Reducing the deposition temperature down to rt leads to a higher content of carbon and CH-species. We also find a decrease of the refractive index and of the oxygen to aluminum elemental ratio as well as an increase of the growth rate whereas the homogeneity of the film growth is not influenced significantly. Initial state energy shifts in all PE-ALD samples are observed which we attribute to a net negative charge within the films.

  6. Structural and optical properties of tellurite thin film glasses deposited by pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munoz-Martin, D.; Fernandez-Navarro, J.M. [Laser Processing Group, Instituto de Optica (CSIC), Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Gonzalo, J., E-mail: j.gonzalo@io.cfmac.csic.es [Laser Processing Group, Instituto de Optica (CSIC), Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Jose, G.; Jha, A. [Institute for Materials Research, University of Leeds, Clarendon Road, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Fierro, J.L.G. [Instituto de Catalisis y Petroleoquimica (CSIC), Marie Curie s/n, 28049 Cantoblanco (Spain); Domingo, C. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia (CSIC), Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Garcia-Lopez, J. [Centro Nacional de Aceleradores, P. Tecnologico ' Cartuja 93' , 41092 Sevilla (Spain)

    2011-10-31

    Tellurite (TeO{sub 2}-TiO{sub 2}-Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}) thin film glasses have been produced by pulsed laser deposition at room temperature at laser energy densities in the range of 0.8-1.5 J/cm{sup 2} and oxygen pressures in the range of 3-11 Pa. The oxygen concentration in the films increases with laser energy density to reach values very close to that of the bulk glass at 1.5 J/cm{sup 2}, while films prepared at 1.5 J/cm{sup 2} and pressures above 5 Pa show oxygen concentration in excess of 10% comparing to the glass. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy shows the presence of elementary Te in films deposited at O{sub 2} pressures {<=} 5 Pa that is not detected at higher pressures, while analysis of Raman spectra of the samples suggests a progressive substitution of TeO{sub 3} trigonal pyramids by TeO{sub 4} trigonal bipyramids in the films when increasing their oxygen content. Spectroscopic ellipsometry analysis combined with Cauchy and effective medium modeling demonstrates the influence of these compositional and structural modifications on the optical response of the films. Since the oxygen content determines their optical response through the structural modifications induced in the films, those can be effectively controlled by tuning the deposition conditions, and films having large n (2.08) and reduced k (< 10{sup -4}) at 1.5 {mu}m have been produced using the optimum deposition conditions.

  7. Directed vapor deposition of lithium manganese oxide films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Sang-Wan

    Electron beam evaporation and sputtering techniques are used to fabricate multilayered thin film structures. However, these techniques suffer several drawbacks resulting from (i) the complex chemistries of the lithiated oxide layers used for the cathode and electrolyte, (ii) the need for precise microstructure control in systems with many metastable phases, and (iii) the low deposition rate and poor material utilization efficiency, which slows the application of this energy storage approach. This dissertation has investigated the use of a novel electron-beam directed vapor deposition (EB-DVD) method for the synthesis of thin film batteries. The dissertation focuses upon the cathode layer of a representative Li-ion thin film battery system and investigates in detail the deposition of lithium manganese oxide films. Many phases with offering various electrochemical performance exist in the Li-Mn-O system and the thesis also investigates the use of processing conditions to control the structure and composition of these cathode layers. In the EB-DVD approach, a high voltage electron beam is used to evaporate a source material in the throat of a nozzle that forms a coaxial transonic gas jet around the vapor. The gas jet entrains and transports the vapor to a substrate where the deposition occurs. Directed simulation of Monte Carlo (DSMC) methods indicated that the vapor plume could be matched to a substrate diameter, and the deposition rate (and vapor utilization efficiency) therefore controlled by adjusting the pressure ratio up and downstream of the nozzle opening in the deposition chamber, and by varying the gas jet density and speed. The highest deposition rates were obtained with a high pressure ratio and the gas jet density. These observations are found to be consistent with the experimental results. Deposition rates up to 16 nm/s could be achieved using the most effective gas entrainment conditions identified by DSMC calculation. This was about a factor of ten

  8. Structural, chemical and nanomechanical investigations of SiC/polymeric a-C:H films deposited by reactive RF unbalanced magnetron sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomastik, C.; Lackner, J. M.; Pauschitz, A.; Roy, M.

    2016-03-01

    Amorphous carbon (or diamond-like carbon, DLC) films have shown a number of important properties usable for a wide range of applications for very thin coatings with low friction and good wear resistance. DLC films alloyed with (semi-)metals show some improved properties and can be deposited by various methods. Among those, the widely used magnetron sputtering of carbon targets is known to increase the number of defects in the films. Therefore, in this paper an alternative approach of depositing silicon-carbide-containing polymeric hydrogenated DLC films using unbalanced magnetron sputtering was investigated. The influence of the C2H2 precursor concentration in the deposition chamber on the chemical and structural properties of the deposited films was investigated by Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and elastic recoil detection analysis. Roughness, mechanical properties and scratch response of the films were evaluated with the help of atomic force microscopy and nanoindentation. The Raman spectra revealed a strong correlation of the film structure with the C2H2 concentration during deposition. A higher C2H2 flow rate results in an increase in SiC content and decrease in hydrogen content in the film. This in turn increases hardness and elastic modulus and decreases the ratio H/E and H3/E2. The highest scratch resistance is exhibited by the film with the highest hardness, and the film having the highest overall sp3 bond content shows the highest elastic recovery during scratching.

  9. Effective conductivity of chemically deposited ZnO thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robles, M. [Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Morelos (UAEM), Cuernavaca (Mexico). Fac. de Ciencias; Tagueena-Martinez, J. [IIM-UNAM, Temixco, Morelos (Mexico). Lab. de Energia Solar; Del Rio, J.A. [IIM-UNAM, Temixco, Morelos (Mexico). Lab. de Energia Solar

    1997-01-30

    Chemically deposited thin films have multiple applications. However, as a result of their complex structure, their physical properties are very difficult to predict. In this paper, we use an effective medium approach to model these heterogeneous systems. We extend Thorpe`s formula for the effective electrical conductivity of elliptical holes randomly distributed in a matrix to a system composed of conducting ellipses in a conducting matrix. This extension is used to calculate the effective electrical conductivity of polycrystalline chemically deposited ZnO thin films. We compare experimental results obtained by two different deposition methods: spray pyrolysis and successive ion layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) reported here. We select the elliptical geometric parameters from microstructural data. Good agreement between the experimental measurements and our calculation is obtained. In addition, we present a new proof of the reciprocity theorem used to derive the theoretical relation. (orig.)

  10. Flame spray pyrolysis synthesis and aerosol deposition of nanoparticle films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tricoli, Antonio; Elmøe, Tobias Dokkedal

    2012-01-01

    (>100 nm) fractal‐like structures with low diffusivity. As a result, thermophoresis was confirmed as the dominant nanoparticle deposition mechanism down to small (≈40 K) temperature differences (ΔT) between the aerosol and the substrate surface. For moderate‐high ΔT (>120 K), thermal equilibrium......The assembly of nanoparticle films by flame spray pyrolysis (FSP) synthesis and deposition on temperature‐controlled substrates (323–723 K) was investigated for several application‐relevant conditions. An exemplary SnO2 nanoparticle aerosol was generated by FSP and its properties (e.g., particle...... size distribution), and deposition dynamics were studied in details aiming to a simple correlation between process settings and film growth rate. At high precursor concentrations (0.05–0.5·mol/L), typically used for FSP synthesis, the nanoparticles agglomerated rapidly in the aerosol leading to large...

  11. Deposition of thermal and hot-wire chemical vapor deposition copper thin films on patterned substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadimitropoulos, G; Davazoglou, D

    2011-09-01

    In this work we study the hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) of copper films on blanket and patterned substrates at high filament temperatures. A vertical chemical vapor deposition reactor was used in which the chemical reactions were assisted by a tungsten filament heated at 650 degrees C. Hexafluoroacetylacetonate Cu(I) trimethylvinylsilane (CupraSelect) vapors were used, directly injected into the reactor with the aid of a liquid injection system using N2 as carrier gas. Copper thin films grown also by thermal and hot-wire CVD. The substrates used were oxidized silicon wafers on which trenches with dimensions of the order of 500 nm were formed and subsequently covered with LPCVD W. HWCVD copper thin films grown at filament temperature of 650 degrees C showed higher growth rates compared to the thermally ones. They also exhibited higher resistivities than thermal and HWCVD films grown at lower filament temperatures. Thermally grown Cu films have very uniform deposition leading to full coverage of the patterned substrates while the HWCVD films exhibited a tendency to vertical growth, thereby creating gaps and incomplete step coverage.

  12. Modeling and simulation of NiO dissolution and Ni deposition in molten carbonate fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Suk Woo; Choi, Hyung-Joon; Lim, Tae Hoon [Korea Institute of Science & Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    Dissolution of NiO cathode into the electrolyte matrix is an important phenomena limiting the lifetime of molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC). The dissolved nickel diffuses into the matrix and is reduced by dissolved hydrogen leading to the formation of metallic nickel films in the pores of the matrix. The growth of Ni films in the electrolyte matrix during the continuous cell operation results eventually in shorting between cathode and anode. Various mathematical and empirical models have been developed to describe the NiO dissolution and Ni deposition processes, and these models have some success in estimating the lifetime of MCFC by correlating the amount of Ni deposited in the matrix with shorting time. Since the exact mechanism of Ni deposition was not well understood, deposition reaction was assumed to be very fast in most of the models and the Ni deposition region was limited around a point in the matrix. In fact, formation of Ni films takes place in a rather broad region in the matrix, the location and thickness of the film depending on operating conditions as well as matrix properties. In this study, we assumed simple reaction kinetics for Ni deposition and developed a mathematical model to get the distribution of nickel in the matrix.

  13. Electrochemical preparation and electrochemical behavior of polypyrrole/carbon nanotube composite films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue-tong ZHANG; Wen-hui SONG

    2009-01-01

    Polypyirole/multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT) composite fihns were electrochemically depos-ited in the presence of an ionic surfactant, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), acting as both supporting electrolyte and dispersant. The effects of the surfactant and the MWNT concentrations on the structure at the resulting composite films were investigated. The electrochemical behavior of the resulting polypyrrole/MWNT composite film was investigated aS well bv cyclic voltammogram. The effect of the additional alternating electric field applied during the constant direct potential electrochemical deposition on the morphology and electrochemical behavior of the resulting composite film was also investigated in this study.

  14. Molecular dynamics simulation of the formation of sp3 hybridized bonds in hydrogenated diamondlike carbon deposition processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Yasuo; Horiguchi, Seishi; Hamaguchi, Satoshi

    2010-04-01

    The formation process of sp3 hybridized carbon networks (i.e., diamondlike structures) in hydrogenated diamondlike carbon (DLC) films has been studied with the use of molecular-dynamics simulations. The processes simulated in this study are injections of hydrocarbon (CH3 and CH) beams into amorphous carbon (a-C) substrates. It has been shown that diamondlike sp3 structures are formed predominantly at a subsurface level when the beam energy is relatively high, as in the "subplantation" process for hydrogen-free DLC deposition. However, for hydrogenated DLC deposition, the presence of abundant hydrogen at subsurface levels, together with thermal spikes caused by energetic ion injections, substantially enhances the formation of carbon-to-carbon sp3 bonds. Therefore, the sp3 bond formation process for hydrogenated DLC films essentially differs from that for hydrogen-free DLC films.

  15. Sputter deposition of transition-metal carbide films — A critical review from a chemical perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansson, Ulf, E-mail: ulf.jansson@kemi.uu.se [Department of Chemistry, Ångström, Uppsala Universitet (Sweden); Lewin, Erik [Laboratory for Nanoscale Materials Science, Empa (Switzerland); Department of Chemistry, Ångström, Uppsala Universitet (Sweden)

    2013-06-01

    Thin films based on transition-metal carbides exhibit many interesting physical and chemical properties making them attractive for a variety of applications. The most widely used method to produce metal carbide films with specific properties at reduced deposition temperatures is sputter deposition. A large number of papers in this field have been published during the last decades, showing that large variations in structure and properties can be obtained. This review will summarise the literature on sputter-deposited carbide films based on chemical aspects of the various elements in the films. By considering the chemical affinities (primarily towards carbon) and structural preferences of different elements, it is possible to understand trends in structure of binary transition-metal carbides and the ternary materials based on these carbides. These trends in chemical affinity and structure will also directly affect the growth process during sputter deposition. A fundamental chemical perspective of the transition-metal carbides and their alloying elements is essential to obtain control of the material structure (from the atomic level), and thereby its properties and performance. This review covers a wide range of materials: binary transition-metal carbides and their nanocomposites with amorphous carbon; the effect of alloying carbide-based materials with a third element (mainly elements from groups 3 through 14); as well as the amorphous binary and ternary materials from these elements deposited under specific conditions or at certain compositional ranges. Furthermore, the review will also emphasise important aspects regarding materials characterisation which may affect the interpretation of data such as beam-induced crystallisation and sputter-damage during surface analysis.

  16. Direct Deposition of Bamboo-Like Carbon Nanotubes on Copper Substrates by Sulfur-Assisted HFCVD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Lakshmi Katar

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Films of bamboo-like carbon nanotubes (BCNTs were grown directly on copper substrates by sulfur-assisted hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD. The effects of substrate temperature and growth time over the BCNT structure were investigated. The films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, Raman spectroscopy (RS, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, and electron field emission (EFE studies. SEM and Raman characterization indicate a transition from the growth of microcrystalline diamond to the growth of a dense entangled network of carbon nanotubes or fibers as the substrate temperature is increased from 400 to 900°C that is accounted for by the base growth model. TEM images show that the nanotubes have regular arrays of nanocavities. These BCNTs show good electron field emission properties as other carbon films.

  17. Annealing dependence of residual stress and optical properties of TiO2 thin film deposited by different deposition methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsi-Chao; Lee, Kuan-Shiang; Lee, Cheng-Chung

    2008-05-01

    Titanium oxide (TiO(2)) thin films were prepared by different deposition methods. The methods were E-gun evaporation with ion-assisted deposition (IAD), radio-frequency (RF) ion-beam sputtering, and direct current (DC) magnetron sputtering. Residual stress was released after annealing the films deposited by RF ion-beam or DC magnetron sputtering but not evaporation, and the extinction coefficient varied significantly. The surface roughness of the evaporated films exceeded that of both sputtered films. At the annealing temperature of 300 degrees C, anatase crystallization occurred in evaporated film but not in the RF ion-beam or DC magnetron-sputtered films. TiO(2) films deposited by sputtering were generally more stable during annealing than those deposited by evaporation.

  18. Vacuum deposition onto webs, films and foils

    CERN Document Server

    Bishop, Charles A

    2011-01-01

    Roll-to-roll vacuum deposition is the technology that applies an even coating to a flexible material that can be held on a roll and provides a much faster and cheaper method of bulk coating than deposition onto single pieces or non-flexible surfaces, such as glass. This technology has been used in industrial-scale applications for some time, including a wide range of metalized packaging (e.g. snack packets). Its potential as a high-speed, scalable process has seen an increasing range of new products emerging that employ this cost-effective technology: solar energy products are moving from rigid panels onto flexible substrates, which are cheaper and more versatile; in a similar way, electronic circuit 'boards' can be produced on a flexible polymer, creating a new range of 'flexible electronics' products; and, flexible displays are another area of new technology in vacuum coating, with flexible display panels and light sources emerging. Charles Bishop has written this book to meet the need he identified, as a t...

  19. Enhanced Bactericidal Activity of Silver Thin Films Deposited via Aerosol-Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Ponja, S. D.; Sehmi, S. K.; Allan, E.; MacRobert, A. J.; Parkin, I. P.; Carmalt, C. J.

    2015-01-01

    Silver thin films were deposited on SiO2-barrier-coated float glass, fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) glass, Activ glass, and TiO2-coated float glass via AACVD using silver nitrate at 350 °C. The films were annealed at 600 °C and analyzed by X-ray powder diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, UV/vis/near-IR spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. All the films were crystalline, and the silver was present in its elemental form and of nanometer dimension. The antibacterial activit...

  20. Reactive sputtering deposition of SiO2 thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IVAN RADOVIC

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available SiO2 layers were deposited in a UHV chamber by 1 keV Ar+ ion sputtering from a high purity silicon target, using different values of the oxygen partial pressure (5×10-6–2×10-4 mbar and of the ion beam current on the target (1.67–6.85 mA. The argon partial pressure during operation of the ion gun was 1×10-3 mbar. The substrate temperature was held at 550 °C and the films were deposited to a thickness of 12.5–150 nm, at a rate from 0.0018–0.035 nm s-1. Structural characterization of the deposited thin films was performed by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS analysis. Reactive sputtering was proved to be efficient for the deposition of silica at 550 °C, an oxygen partial pressure of 2×10-4 mbar (ion beam current on the target of 5 mA or, at a lower deposition rate, ion beam current of 1.67 mA and an oxygen partial pressure of 6×10-5 mbar. One aspect of these investigations was to study the consumption of oxygen from the gas cylinder, which was found to be lower for higher deposition rates.

  1. Deposition of a-C:H films on inner surface of high-aspect-ratio microchannel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Yuki; Choi, Junho

    2016-08-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) films were prepared on inner surface of 100-μm-width microchannel by using a bipolar-type plasma based ion implantation and deposition. The microchannel was fabricated using a silicon plate, and two kinds of microchannels were prepared, namely, with a bottom layer (open at one end) and without a bottom layer (open at both ends). The distribution of thickness and hardness of films was evaluated by SEM and nanoindentation measurements, respectively, and the microstructures of films were evaluated by Raman spectroscopy. Furthermore, the behavior of ions and radicals was analyzed simultaneously by combining the calculation methods of Particle-In-Cell/Monte Carlo Collision and Direct Simulation Monte Carlo to investigate the coating mechanism for the microchannel. It was found that the film thickness decreased as the depth of the coating position increased in the microchannels where it is open at one end. The uniformity of the film thickness improved by increasing the negative pulse voltage because ions can arrive at the deeper part of the microchannel. In addition, the hardness increased as the depth of the coating position increased. This is because the radicals do not arrive at the deeper part of the microchannel, and the incident proportion of ions relative to that of radicals increases, resulting in a high hardness due to the amorphization of the film. The opening area of the microchannel where the aspect ratio is very small, radicals dominate the incident flux, whereas ions prevail over radicals above an aspect ratio of about 7.5. On the other hand, in the microchannels that are open at both ends, there were great improvements in uniformity of the film thickness, hardness, and the film structure. The a-C:H films were successfully deposited on the entire inner surface of a microchannel with an aspect ratio of 20.

  2. Thin film deposition using rarefied gas jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Sahadev, , Dr.

    2017-01-01

    The rarefied gas jet of aluminium is studied at Mach number Ma =(U_j /√{ kbTj / m }) in the range .01 mass and diameter, and kb is the Boltzmann constant. An important finding is that the capture width (cross-section of the gas jet deposited on the substrate) is symmetric around the centerline of the substrate, and decreases with increased Mach number due to an increase in the momentum of the gas molecules. DSMC simulation results reveals that at low Knudsen number ((Kn =0.01); shorter mean free paths), the atoms experience more collisions, which direct them toward the substrate. However, the atoms also move with lower momentum at low Mach number ,which allows scattering collisions to rapidly direct the atoms to the substrate.

  3. Obtenção de filmes espessos de seleneto de cobre sobre carbono vítreo, ouro, titânio e cobre Obtaining copper selenide thick films on vitreous carbon, gold, titanium and copper

    OpenAIRE

    Adriano César Rabelo; Tatiane Moraes Arantes; Otávio Luiz Bottecchia

    2007-01-01

    Copper selenide (berzelianite) films were prepared on the title substrates using the chemical bath deposition technique (CBD). Film composition was determined by energy dispersion of x-rays. The kinetics of film growth is parabolic and film adherence limits the film thickness. On titanium, copper selenide forms islands that do not completely cover the surface, unless the substrate is prepared with a tin oxide layer; film composition also depends on the titanium oxide layer. On vitreous carbon...

  4. Laser cleaning of pulsed laser deposited rhodium films for fusion diagnostic mirrors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uccello, A., E-mail: andrea.uccello@mail.polimi.it [Dipartimento di Energia, Politecnico di Milano, Milan (Italy); Maffini, A., E-mail: alessandro.maffini@mail.polimi.it [Dipartimento di Energia, Politecnico di Milano, Milan (Italy); Dellasega, D., E-mail: david.dellasega@polimi.it [Dipartimento di Energia, Politecnico di Milano, Milan (Italy); Istituto di Fisica del Plasma, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, EURATOM-ENEA-CNR Association, Milan (Italy); Passoni, M., E-mail: matteo.passoni@polimi.it [Dipartimento di Energia, Politecnico di Milano, Milan (Italy); Istituto di Fisica del Plasma, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, EURATOM-ENEA-CNR Association, Milan (Italy)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► Pulsed laser deposition is exploited to produce Rh films for first mirrors. ► Pulsed laser deposition is exploited to produce tokamak-like C contaminants. ► Rh laser damage threshold has been evaluated for infrared pulses. ► Laser cleaning of C contaminated Rh films gives promising results. -- Abstract: In this paper an experimental investigation on the laser cleaning process of rhodium films, potentially candidates to be used as tokamak first mirrors (FMs), from redeposited carbon contaminants is presented. A relevant issue that lowers mirror's performance during tokamak operations is the redeposition of sputtered material from the first wall on their surface. Among all the possible techniques, laser cleaning, in which a train of laser pulses is launched to the surface that has to be treated, is a method to potentially mitigate this problem. The same laser system (Q-switched Nd:YAG laser with a fundamental wavelength of 1064-nm and 7-ns pulses) has been employed with three aims: (i) production by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) of Rh film mirrors, (ii) production by PLD of C deposits with controlled morphology, and (iii) investigation of the laser cleaning method onto C contaminated Rh samples. The evaluation of Rh films laser damage threshold, as a function of fluence and number of pulses, is discussed. Then, the C/Rh films have been cleaned by the laser beam. The exposed zones have been characterized by visual inspection and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), showing promising results.

  5. Electrolytically deposited Cadmium Selenide Films for Photovoltaic Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palaiologopoulou M. D.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available CdSe films were electrodeposited on pure nickel substrates. The nickel substrate was polished to a mirror finish by Al2O3 paste, etched in 10% HCl solution for 40 s and rinsed thoroughly by de-ionized water. The deposition bath contained solutions with excessive Cd2+ (0.2M from CdSO4 and small amounts of SeO2 (1x10-3 M. The pH of the bath was adjusted to a value of 2.2 at RT by adding 10% H2SO4. The bath was first thermostated at the required temperature, which varied from 55°C to 65°C. Plating was accomplished at deposition potential 1000 mV (vs. Hg/Hg2SO4. The films formed had a uniform thickness and it was found to be approximately 2.0 μm thick (for 20 min electrodeposition process. The produced CdSe films were characterized by X-Ray diffraction and SEM. The induced semiconductor doping effect by thermal annealing in pure dry nitrogen gas was also investigated. Gold contacts were placed on top of the CdSe films, either by evaporation, or mechanically. Depending on the deposition parameters the electrical characteristics of the Ni/CdSe/Au structures may exhibit rectification properties. The optical excitation of the structure was investigated for various CdSe thicknesses.

  6. Chemical bath deposition and characterization of Cu2O-CuxS thin films

    OpenAIRE

    EYA, D. D. O.

    2010-01-01

    Cu2O-CuxS thin films have been deposited on glass substrate by chemical bath deposition technique. The films were obtained by depositing Copper Sulphide (CuxS) on Copper (I) Oxide (Cu2O) and then Cu2O on CuxS. The peak solar transmittance across the thin films were found to be

  7. Flexible Carbon Nanotube Films for High Performance Strain Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olfa Kanoun

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Compared with traditional conductive fillers, carbon nanotubes (CNTs have unique advantages, i.e., excellent mechanical properties, high electrical conductivity and thermal stability. Nanocomposites as piezoresistive films provide an interesting approach for the realization of large area strain sensors with high sensitivity and low manufacturing costs. A polymer-based nanocomposite with carbon nanomaterials as conductive filler can be deposited on a flexible substrate of choice and this leads to mechanically flexible layers. Such sensors allow the strain measurement for both integral measurement on a certain surface and local measurement at a certain position depending on the sensor geometry. Strain sensors based on carbon nanostructures can overcome several limitations of conventional strain sensors, e.g., sensitivity, adjustable measurement range and integral measurement on big surfaces. The novel technology allows realizing strain sensors which can be easily integrated even as buried layers in material systems. In this review paper, we discuss the dependence of strain sensitivity on different experimental parameters such as composition of the carbon nanomaterial/polymer layer, type of polymer, fabrication process and processing parameters. The insights about the relationship between film parameters and electromechanical properties can be used to improve the design and fabrication of CNT strain sensors.

  8. Nanosized graphene crystallite induced strong magnetism in pure carbon films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; Zhang, Xi; Diao, Dongfeng

    2015-03-14

    We report strong magnetism in pure carbon films grown by electron irradiation assisted physical vapor deposition in electron cyclotron resonance plasma. The development of graphene nanocrystallites in the amorphous film matrix, and the dependence of the magnetic behavior on amorphous, nanocrystallite and graphite-like structures were investigated. Results were that the amorphous structure shows weak paramagnetism, graphene nanocrystallites lead to strong magnetization, and graphite-like structures corresponded with a lower magnetization. At a room temperature of 300 K, the highest saturation magnetization of 0.37 emu g(-1) was found in the nanosized graphene nanocrystallite structure. The origin of strong magnetism in nanocrystallites was ascribed to the spin magnetic moment at the graphene layer edges.

  9. Production of selective membranes using plasma deposited nanochanneled thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Amorim Motta Carvalho

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The hydrolization of thin films obtained by tetraethoxysilane plasma polymerization results in the formation of a nanochanneled silicone like structure that could be useful for the production of selective membranes. Therefore, the aim of this work is to test the permeation properties of hydrolyzed thin films. The films were tested for: 1 permeation of polar organic compounds and/or water in gaseous phase and 2 permeation of salt in liquid phase. The efficiency of permeation was tested using a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM technique in gas phase and conductimetric analysis (CA in liquid phase. The substrates used were: silicon for characterization of the deposited films, piezoelectric quartz crystals for tests of selective membranes and cellophane paper for tests of permeation. QCM analysis showed that the nanochannels allow the adsorption and/or permeation of polar organic compounds, such as acetone and 2-propanol, and water. CA showed that the films allow salt permeation after an inhibition time needed for hydrolysis of the organic radicals within the film. Due to their characteristics, the films can be used for grains protection against microorganism proliferation during storage without preventing germination.

  10. Growth and microstructure properties of microcrystalline silicon films deposited using jet-ICPCVD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zuo Zewen; Guan Wentian; Xin Yu; Lü Jin; Wang Junzhuan; Pu Lin; Shi Yi; Zheng Youdou

    2011-01-01

    Microcrystalline silicon films were deposited at a high rate and low temperature using jet-type inductively coupled plasma chemical vapor deposition (jet-ICPCVD).An investigation into the deposition rate and microstructure properties of the deposited films showed that a high deposition rate of over 20 nm/s can be achieved while maintaining reasonable material quality.The deposition rate can be controlled by regulating the generation rate and transport of film growth precursors.The film with high crystallinity deposited at low temperature could principally result from hydrogen-induced chemical annealing.

  11. Polymer-assisted deposition of metal-oxide films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Q X; McCleskey, T M; Burrell, A K; Lin, Y; Collis, G E; Wang, H; Li, A D Q; Foltyn, S R

    2004-08-01

    Metal oxides are emerging as important materials for their versatile properties such as high-temperature superconductivity, ferroelectricity, ferromagnetism, piezoelectricity and semiconductivity. Metal-oxide films are conventionally grown by physical and chemical vapour deposition. However, the high cost of necessary equipment and restriction of coatings on a relatively small area have limited their potential applications. Chemical-solution depositions such as sol-gel are more cost-effective, but many metal oxides cannot be deposited and the control of stoichiometry is not always possible owing to differences in chemical reactivity among the metals. Here we report a novel process to grow metal-oxide films in large areas at low cost using polymer-assisted deposition (PAD), where the polymer controls the viscosity and binds metal ions, resulting in a homogeneous distribution of metal precursors in the solution and the formation of uniform metal-organic films. The latter feature makes it possible to grow simple and complex crack-free epitaxial metal-oxides.

  12. Plasmonic Properties of Nanostructured Diamond Like Carbon/Silver Nanocomposite Films with Nanohole Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šarūnas MEŠKINIS

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Plasmonic properties of the diamond like carbon nanocomposite films with embedded silver nanoparticles with patterned nanohole arrays were analyzed in this study. The films were deposited by unbalanced reactive magnetron sputtering of silver target. Nanopatterning of the films was performed by combining electron beam nanolithography and ion beam etching techniques. Modeling of plasmonic properties was done using the classical Maxwell-Garnett theory. Modeling data and experimental results were in good accordance. Formation of the nanohole pattern in diamond like carbon films doped with silver resulted in decreased intensity of the surface plasmon resonance absorbance peak. No new absorbance or transmittance peaks were observed after the nanopattering. It was explained by extraordinary transmission effect in nanostructured DLC : Ag film films due to plasmon polariton resonance inside of the nanoholes.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.22.4.13193

  13. Liposomes as drug deposits in multilayered polymer films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynge, Martin E; Laursen, Marie Baekgaard; Hosta-Rigau, Leticia; Jensen, Bettina E B; Ogaki, Ryosuke; Smith, Anton A A; Zelikin, Alexander N; Städler, Brigitte

    2013-04-24

    The ex vivo growth of implantable hepatic or cardiac tissue remains a challenge and novel approaches are highly sought after. We report an approach to use liposomes embedded within multilayered films as drug deposits to deliver active cargo to adherent cells. We verify and characterize the assembly of poly(l-lysine) (PLL)/alginate, PLL/poly(l-glutamic acid), PLL/poly(methacrylic acid) (PMA), and PLL/cholesterol-modified PMA (PMAc) films, and assess the myoblast and hepatocyte adhesion to these coatings using different numbers of polyelectrolyte layers. The assembly of liposome-containing multilayered coatings is monitored by QCM-D, and the films are visualized using microscopy. The myoblast and hepatocyte adhesion to these films using PLL/PMAc or poly(styrenesulfonate) (PSS)/poly(allyl amine hydrochloride) (PAH) as capping layers is evaluated. Finally, the uptake of fluorescent lipids from the surface by these cells is demonstrated and compared. The activity of this liposome-containing coating is confirmed for both cell lines by trapping the small cytotoxic compound thiocoraline within the liposomes. It is shown that the biological response depends on the number of capping layers, and is different for the two cell lines when the compound is delivered from the surface, while it is similar when administered from solution. Taken together, we demonstrate the potential of liposomes as drug deposits in multilayered films for surface-mediated drug delivery.

  14. Tribological and thermal stability study of nanoporous amorphous boron carbide films prepared by pulsed plasma chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liza, Shahira; Ohtake, Naoto; Akasaka, Hiroki; Munoz-Guijosa, Juan M.

    2015-06-01

    In this work, the thermal stability and the oxidation and tribological behavior of nanoporous a-BC:H films are studied and compared with those in conventional diamond-like carbon (DLC) films. a-BC:H films were deposited by pulsed plasma chemical vapor deposition using B(CH3)3 gas as the boron source. A DLC interlayer was used to prevent the a-BC:H film delamination produced by oxidation. Thermal stability of a-BC:H films, with no delamination signs after annealing at 500 °C for 1 h, is better than that of the DLC films, which completely disappeared under the same conditions. Tribological test results indicate that the a-BC:H films, even with lower nanoindentation hardness than the DLC films, show an excellent boundary oil lubricated behavior, with lower friction coefficient and reduce the wear rate of counter materials than those on the DLC film. The good materials properties such as low modulus of elasticity and the formation of micropores from the original nanopores during boundary regimes explain this better performance. Results show that porous a-BC:H films may be an alternative for segmented DLC films in applications where severe tribological conditions and complex shapes exist, so surface patterning is unfeasible.

  15. Ultraviolet optical properties of aluminum fluoride thin films deposited by atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennessy, John, E-mail: john.j.hennessy@jpl.nasa.gov; Jewell, April D.; Balasubramanian, Kunjithapatham; Nikzad, Shouleh [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, California 91109 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Aluminum fluoride (AlF{sub 3}) is a low refractive index material with promising optical applications for ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths. An atomic layer deposition process using trimethylaluminum and anhydrous hydrogen fluoride has been developed for the deposition of AlF{sub 3} at substrate temperatures between 100 and 200 °C. This low temperature process has resulted in thin films with UV-optical properties that have been characterized by ellipsometric and reflection/transmission measurements at wavelengths down to 200 nm. The optical loss for 93 nm thick films deposited at 100 °C was measured to be less than 0.2% from visible wavelengths down to 200 nm, and additional microstructural characterization demonstrates that the films are amorphous with moderate tensile stress of 42–105 MPa as deposited on silicon substrates. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis shows no signature of residual aluminum oxide components making these films good candidates for a variety of applications at even shorter UV wavelengths.

  16. Synthesis, deposition and characterization of ferroelectric films for electrooptic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunaboylu, Bahadir

    The use of integrable ferroelectric electro-optic thin films is a revolutionary approach in the development of high-speed, low-voltage and high-contrast ratio integrated electro-optic spatial light modulators (SLM) for free-space optoelectronic interconnects. Thin films offer improved performance over bulk ferroelectric (FE) materials because of their lower modulator capacitance and operation at high speeds with low switching energies. Integration of ferroelectric thin films with silicon technology will also impact both the uncooled infrared sensor and dynamic and nonvolatile memory technologies. Ferroelectrics such as lead lanthanum zirconate titanate (PLZT) and patassium tantalate niobate (KTN) present great potential for SLMs due to their large electro-optic (EO) effect in the bulk form. The development of thin-film SLMs require electro-optic films of high optical quality with good dielectric and EO properties. High quality thin films of PLZT and KTN were deposited using RF magnetron sputtering on r-plane sapphire substrates which offer integration capability with semiconductor devices. PLZT films with extremely large peak dielectric constant, 2800 at the Curie temperature of 180sp°C, were achieved with remarkably low dissipation loss factor dielectric frequency dispersion was determined to be very small up to 1 Mhz. Also, the absorption of the light in the films was very low. A giant effective quadratic electrooptic effect was demonstrated in PLZT films. These results represent a huge leap forward for the FE-SLM technology with respect to the goal of fully integrated thin film electrooptic light modulators. Microstructural development and phase transformation kinetics in PLZT films were also analyzed for the first time and are presented here. Energy required for the formation of desirable perovskite phase was determined to be 322 kJ/mol. Single-phase PLZT films with larger average grain size showed higher dielectric constants and better EO properties as

  17. Poly-para-xylylene thin films: A study of the deposition chemistry, kinetics, film properties, and film stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortin, Jeffrey Bernard

    Poly-para-xylylene, or parylene, thin films are chemically vapor deposited (CVD), conformal, pin-hole free polymeric thin films. They have found many industrial uses since there invention in 1947 and continue to find new applications in micro-electronics, biotechnology, and micro-electro-mechanical systems. In this study the deposition chemistry, deposition kinetics, film properties, and film stability were investigated. A differentially pumped quadrupole mass spectrometer was used to analyze the vapor species present during the CVD process. The identity of dimer contamination and its impact on the CVD process and film properties was studied. The quantitative conversion of dimer to monomer was investigated and it was found that conversion begins at around 385°C and by 565°C 100% conversion is obtained. The kinetics of the CVD process was analyzed for a range of substrate temperatures and chamber pressures. A new kinetic model based on a two-step adsorption was developed and fit the kinetic data well. This model should be appropriate for use with all parylene family polymers. Many of the properties of the films deposited in this study were analyzed. This includes a detailed study of surface morphology using atomic force microscopy which shows the interface width increases as a power law of film thickness. Other properties analyzed were the thermal stability, electrical properties, index of refraction, birefringence, hardness, and elastic modulus. The effect of ultraviolet (UV) radiation of lambda ≥ 250 nm on the thermal stability, electrical, and optical properties of thin parylene films was studied. The thermal stability and electrical properties of UV treated films were seen to deteriorate as the radiation dose increased. The stability of parylene thin films receiving plasma etching was analyzed. The dielectric constant, dissipation factor, and leakage current of plasma etched thin parylene films were investigated and found to be stable for the range of

  18. Deposition and consolidation of porous ceramic films for membrane separation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elmøe, Tobias Dokkedal; Tricoli, Antonio; Johannessen, Tue

    The deposition of porous ceramic films for membrane separation can be done by several processes such as thermophoresis [1], dip-coating [2] and spray pyrolysis [3]. Here we present a high-speed method, in which ceramic nano-particles form a porous film by filtration on top of a porous ceramic...... substrate [4]. Ceramic nano-particles are generated in a flame, using either a premixed (gas) flame, in which a metal-oxide precursor is evaporated in an N2 stream, which is combusted with methane and air, or using a flame spray pyrolysis, in which a liquid metal-oxide precursor is sprayed through a nozzle...

  19. Structural and Optical Properties of Chemical Bath Deposited Silver Oxide Thin Films: Role of Deposition Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. C. Nwanya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Silver oxide thin films were deposited on glass substrates at a temperature of 50°C by chemical bath deposition technique under different deposition times using pure AgNO3 precursor and triethanolamine as the complexing agent. The chemical analysis based on EDX technique shows the presence of Ag and O at the appropriate energy levels. The morphological features obtained from SEM showed that the AgxO structures varied as the deposition time changes. The X-ray diffraction showed the peaks of Ag2O and AgO in the structure. The direct band gap and the refractive index increased as the deposition time increased and was in the range of 1.64–1.95 eV and 1.02–2.07, respectively. The values of the band gap and refractive index obtained indicate possible applications in photovoltaic and photothermal systems.

  20. Electrophoretic deposition and constrained sintering of strontium titanate thick films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amaral, Luís; Vilarinho, Paula M., E-mail: paula.vilarinho@ua.pt; Senos, Ana M.R.

    2015-01-15

    Thick films of functional oxides are currently substituting counterparts bulk ceramics, as in the case of low loss dielectrics. For SrTiO{sub 3} (ST) based compositions it is demonstrated that electrophoretic deposition (EPD), using acetone as a suspension media with iodine addition, is a suitable technology to fabricate 12 μm thick films. The microstructural analysis of the films sintered at 1500 °C shows that highly densified microstructures can be obtained and, by slightly varying the Sr/Ti stoichiometry in the powder composition, increased densification and grain size and enlargement of the distribution with decreasing Sr/Ti ratio can be observed. In spite of the high densification of the films, it is also demonstrated that due to the constraint imposed by the substrate a smaller grain size is observed in thick films as compared to equivalent bulk ceramics. In addition, a preferential vertical pore orientation is observed in ST thick films. These results may have broad implications if one considers that the dielectric losses and dielectric tunability is affected by pore orientation, since it affects the electric field distribution. - Highlights: • Nonstoichiometry effect on microstructure of constrained sintered thick films and bulk is similar. • Increased densification and grain size and enlargement of distribution with decreasing Sr/Ti ratio. • Independent of Sr/Ti ratio smaller grain size for thick films compared to ceramics. • Preferential vertical pore orientation for constrained sintering of thick films. • Anisotropic porosity as tailoring factor to engineer permittivity and tunability.

  1. The structural characterisation of HWCVD-deposited nanocrystalline silicon films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bibhu P. Swain

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si films were deposited by hot-wire chemical vapour deposition (HWCVD in the presence of varying H2 concentrations and their structural and interfacial character investigated by X-ray diffraction, small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS and Raman spectroscopy. The crystalline fraction was around 30–50% and the nc-Si crystallite size was in the range 20–35 nm. The SAXS results were analysed by Guinier plot, scaling factor, and correlation distance. The nc-Si grains displayed a mass fractal appearance, and the interfacial inhomogeneity distance was ~2 nm.

  2. Growth Model for Pulsed-Laser Deposited Perovskite Oxide Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xu; FEI Yi-Yan; ZHU Xiang-Dong; Lu Hui-Bin; YANG Guo-Zhen

    2008-01-01

    We present a multi-level growth model that yields some of the key features of perovskite oxide film growth as observed in the reflection high energy electron diffraction(RHEED)and ellipsometry studies.The model describes the effect of deposition,temperature,intra-layer transport,interlayer transport and Ostwald ripening on the morphology of a growth surface in terms of the distribution of terraces and step edges during and after deposition.The numerical results of the model coincide well with the experimental observation.

  3. Designed nanostructured pt film for electrocatalytic activities by underpotential deposition combined chemical replacement techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Minghua; Jin, Yongdong; Jiang, Heqing; Sun, Xuping; Chen, Hongjun; Liu, Baifeng; Wang, Erkang; Dong, Shaojun

    2005-08-18

    Multiple-deposited Pt overlayer modified Pt nanoparticle (MD-Pt overlayer/PtNPs) films were deliberately constructed on glassy carbon electrodes through alternately multiple underpotential deposition (UPD) of Ag followed redox replacement reaction by Pt (II) cations. The linear and regular growth of the films characterized by cyclic voltammetry was observed. Atomic force spectroscopy (AFM) provides the surface morphology of the nanostructured Pt films. Rotating disk electrode (RDE) voltammetry and rotating ring-disk electrode (RRDE) voltammetry demonstrate that the MD-Pt overlayer/PtNPs films can catalyze an almost four-electron reduction of O(2) to H(2)O in air-saturated 0.1 M H(2)SO(4). Thus-prepared Pt films behave as novel nanostructured electrocatalysts for dioxygen reduction and hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) with enhanced electrocatalytic activities, in terms of both reduction peak potential and peak current, when compared to that of the bulk polycrystalline Pt electrode. Additionally, it is noted that after multiple replacement cycles, the electrocatalytic activities improved remarkably, although the increased amount of Pt is very low in comparison to that of pre-modified PtNPs due to the intrinsic feature of the UPD-redox replacement technique. In other words, the electrocatalytic activities could be improved markedly without using very much Pt by the technique of tailoring the catalytic surface. These features may provide an interesting way to produce Pt catalysts with a reliable catalytic performance as well as a reduction in cost.

  4. Kinetics of diamond-like film growth using filament-assisted chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorsuch, G.; Jin, Y.; Ingle, N.K.; Mountziaris, T.J.; Yu, W.Y.; Petrou, A. [State Univ. of New York, Buffalo, NY (United States)

    1995-08-01

    A detailed kinetic model of diamond-like film growth from methane diluted in hydrogen using low-pressure, filament-assisted chemical vapor deposition (FACVD) has been developed. The model includes both gas-phase and surface reactions. The surface kinetics include adsorption of CH{sub 3}{center_dot} and H{center_dot}, abstraction reactions by gas phase radicals, desorption, and two pathways for diamond (sp{sup 3}) and graphitic carbon (sp{sup 2}) growth. It is postulated that adsorbed CH{sub 2}{center_dot} species are the major film precursors. The proposed kinetic model was incorporated into a transport model describing flow, heat and mass transfer in stagnation flow FACVD reactors. Diamond-like films were deposited on preceded Si substrates in such a reactor as a pressure of 26 Torr, inlet gas composition ranging from 0.5% to 1.5% methane in hydrogen and substrate temperatures ranging from 600 to 950 C. The best films were obtained at low methane concentrations and substrate temperature of 700 C. The films were characterized using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Raman spectroscopy. Observations from their experiments and growth rates, compositions and stable species distributions in the gas phase. It is the first complete model of FACVD that includes gas-phase and surface kinetics coupled with transport phenomena.

  5. Swift heavy ion irradiation of metal containing tetrahedral amorphous carbon films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karaseov, P.A., E-mail: platon.karaseov@spbstu.ru [Peter the Great St. Petersburg Polytechnic University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Protopopova, V.S. [Aalto University, Espoo (Finland); Karabeshkin, K.V.; Shubina, E.N.; Mishin, M.V. [Peter the Great St. Petersburg Polytechnic University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Koskinen, J. [Aalto University, Espoo (Finland); Mohapatra, S. [Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University, New Delhi (India); Tripathi, A. [Inter University Accelerator Center, New Delhi (India); Avasthi, D.K. [Amity University, Noida 201313, Uttar Pradesh (India); Titov, A.I. [Peter the Great St. Petersburg Polytechnic University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2016-07-15

    Highlights: • ta-C films with Ni and Cu doping were grown using dual cathode filtered vacuum arc deposition. • Conductive channels were found in the films by C-AFM after irradiation with 100 MeV Ag ions. • SEM contrast found after irradiation strongly depends on kind of metal impurity in the film. • Different chemical effect of Ni and Cu on transformation of carbon matrix under irradiation was revealed. - Abstract: Thin carbon films were grown at room temperature on (0 0 1) n-Si substrate using dual cathode filtered vacuum arc deposition system. Graphite was used as a source of carbon atoms and separate metallic electrode was simultaneously utilized to introduce Ni or Cu atoms. Films were irradiated by 100 MeV Ag{sup 7+} ions to fluences in the range 1 × 10{sup 10}–3 × 10{sup 11} cm{sup −2}. Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, Raman scattering, scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy in conductive mode were used to investigate film properties and structure change under irradiation. Some conductive channels having metallic conductivity type were found in the films. Number of such channels is less than number of impinged ions. Presence of Ni and Cu atoms increases conductivity of those conductive channels. Fluence dependence of all properties studied suggests different mechanisms of swift heavy ion irradiation-induced transformation of carbon matrix due to different chemical effect of nickel and copper atoms.

  6. Characterization of superconducting magnesium-diboride films on glassy carbon and sapphire substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, E.; Zavala, E. P. [Instituto de Fisica, UNAM, Apartado Postal 20-364, 01000 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Rocha, M. F. [Escuela Superior de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica, IPN, Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Jergel, M.; Falcony, C. [Departamento de Fisica, CINVESTAV-IPN, Apartado postal 14-740, 07000 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2008-02-15

    IBA methods were applied to measure elemental depth profiles of precursors and superconducting MgB{sub 2} thin films deposited on glassy carbon (Good Fellows) and sapphire (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) substrates. For each type of substrates we obtained a pair of samples i.e. one amorphous precursor and one superconducting film which were then characterized. A 3{sup H}e{sup +} beam was used to bombard both, precursors and superconducting films in order to obtain the samples elemental composition profiles. The zero resistance T{sub co} and the middle of transition T{sub cm} values were 26.0 K and 29.7 K for the MgB{sub 2} film deposited on glassy carbon substrate. In the case of sapphire substrate the T{sub co} and T{sub cm} values were 25.0 K and 27.9 K, respectively. (Author)

  7. Nanoparticle formation and thin film deposition in aniline containing plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattyn, Cedric; Dias, Ana; Hussain, Shahzad; Strunskus, Thomas; Stefanovic, Ilija; Boulmer-Leborgne, Chantal; Lecas, Thomas; Kovacevic, Eva; Berndt, Johannes

    2016-09-01

    This contribution deals with plasma based polymerization processes in mixtures of argon and aniline. The investigations are performed in a capacitively coupled RF discharge (in pulsed and continuous mode) and concern both the observed formation of nanoparticles in the plasma volume and the deposition of films. The latter process was used for the deposition of ultra-thin layers on different kind of nanocarbon materials (nanotubes and free standing graphene). The analysis of the plasma and the plasma chemistry (by means of mass spectroscopy and in-situ FTIR spectroscopy) is accompanied by several ex-situ diagnostics of the obtained materials which include NEXAFS and XPS measurements as well as Raman spectroscopy and electron microscopy. The decisive point of the investigations concern the preservation of the original monomer structure during the plasma polymerization processes and the stability of the thin films on the different substrates.

  8. Reactive pulsed laser deposition of gold nitride thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caricato, A.P. [University of Salento, Department of Physics, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Fernandez, M. [University of Salento, Department of Physics, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Leggieri, G. [University of Salento, Department of Physics, 73100 Lecce (Italy)]. E-mail: leggieri@le.infn.it; Luches, A. [University of Salento, Department of Physics, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Martino, M. [University of Salento, Department of Physics, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Romano, F. [University of Salento, Department of Physics, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Tunno, T. [University of Salento, Department of Physics, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Valerini, D. [University of Salento, Department of Physics, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Verdyan, A. [Science Department, Holon Academic Institute of Technology, Holon 58102 (Israel); Soifer, Y.M. [Science Department, Holon Academic Institute of Technology, Holon 58102 (Israel); Azoulay, J. [Science Department, Holon Academic Institute of Technology, Holon 58102 (Israel); Meda, L. [IGD Polimeri Europa S.p.A, Novara (Italy)

    2007-07-31

    We report on the growth and characterization of gold nitride thin films on Si <1 0 0> substrates at room temperature by reactive pulsed laser ablation. A pure (99.95%) Au target was ablated with KrF excimer laser pulses in nitrogen containing atmosphere (N{sub 2} or NH{sub 3}). The gas ambient pressure was varied in the range 0.1-100 Pa. The morphology of the films was studied by using optical, scanning electron and atomic force microscopy, evidencing compact films with RMS roughness in the range 3.6-35.1 nm, depending on the deposition pressure. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and energy dispersion spectroscopy (EDS) were used to detect the nitrogen concentration into the films. The EDS nitrogen peak does not decrease in intensity after 2 h annealing at 250 deg. C. Film resistivity was measured using a four-point probe and resulted in the (4-20) x 10{sup -8} {omega} m range, depending on the ambient pressure, to be compared with the value 2.6 x 10{sup -8} {omega} m of a pure gold film. Indentation and scratch measurements gave microhardness values of 2-3 GPa and the Young's modulus close to 100 GPa. X-ray photoemission spectra clearly showed the N 1s peak around 400 eV and displaced with respect to N{sub 2} phase. All these measurements point to the formation of the gold nitride phase.

  9. Reactive pulsed laser deposition of gold nitride thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caricato, A. P.; Fernàndez, M.; Leggieri, G.; Luches, A.; Martino, M.; Romano, F.; Tunno, T.; Valerini, D.; Verdyan, A.; Soifer, Y. M.; Azoulay, J.; Meda, L.

    2007-07-01

    We report on the growth and characterization of gold nitride thin films on Si substrates at room temperature by reactive pulsed laser ablation. A pure (99.95%) Au target was ablated with KrF excimer laser pulses in nitrogen containing atmosphere (N 2 or NH 3). The gas ambient pressure was varied in the range 0.1-100 Pa. The morphology of the films was studied by using optical, scanning electron and atomic force microscopy, evidencing compact films with RMS roughness in the range 3.6-35.1 nm, depending on the deposition pressure. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and energy dispersion spectroscopy (EDS) were used to detect the nitrogen concentration into the films. The EDS nitrogen peak does not decrease in intensity after 2 h annealing at 250 °C. Film resistivity was measured using a four-point probe and resulted in the (4-20) × 10 -8 Ω m range, depending on the ambient pressure, to be compared with the value 2.6 × 10 -8 Ω m of a pure gold film. Indentation and scratch measurements gave microhardness values of 2-3 GPa and the Young's modulus close to 100 GPa. X-ray photoemission spectra clearly showed the N 1s peak around 400 eV and displaced with respect to N 2 phase. All these measurements point to the formation of the gold nitride phase.

  10. Diamond like carbon coatings deposited by microwave plasma CVD: XPS and ellipsometric studies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R M Dey; M Pandey; D Bhattacharyya; D S Patil; S K Kulkarni

    2007-12-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films were deposited by microwave assisted chemical vapour deposition system using d.c. bias voltage ranging from –100 V to –300 V. These films were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and spectroscopic ellipsometry techniques for estimating 3/2 ratio. The 3/2 ratio obtained by XPS is found to have an opposite trend to that obtained by spectroscopic ellipsometry. These results are explained using sub-plantation picture of DLC growth. Our results clearly indicate that the film is composed of two different layers, having entirely different properties in terms of void percentage and 3/2 ratio. The upper layer is relatively thinner as compared to the bottom layer.

  11. A Low-Stress, Elastic, and Improved Hardness Hydrogenated Amorphous Carbon Film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of hydrogenated amorphous carbon films with fullerene-like microstructure was investigated with a different proportion of hydrogen supply in deposition. The results showed at hydrogen flow rate of 50 sccm, the deposited films showed a lower compressive stress (lower 48.6%, higher elastic recovery (higher 19.6%, near elastic recovery rate 90%, and higher hardness (higher 7.4% compared with the films deposited without hydrogen introduction. Structural analysis showed that the films with relatively high sp2 content and low bonded hydrogen content possessed high hardness, elastic recovery rate, and low compressive stress. It was attributed to the curved graphite microstructure, which can form three-dimensional covalently bonded network.

  12. Nanostructured zinc oxide thin film by simple vapor transport deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athma, P. V.; Martinez, Arturo I.; Johns, N.; Safeera, T. A.; Reshmi, R.; Anila, E. I.

    2015-09-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures find applications in optoelectronic devices, photo voltaic displays and sensors. In this work zinc oxide nanostructures in different forms like nanorods, tripods and tetrapods have been synthesized by thermal evaporation of zinc metal and subsequent deposition on a glass substrate by vapor transport in the presence of oxygen. It is a comparatively simpler and environment friendly technique for the preparation of thin films. The structure, morphology and optical properties of the synthesized nanostructured thin film were characterized in detail by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and photoluminescence (PL). The film exhibited bluish white emission with Commission International d'Eclairage (CIE) coordinates x = 0.22, y = 0.31.

  13. Chemical vapor deposition of amorphous ruthenium-phosphorus alloy films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin Jinhong [Texas Materials Institute, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78750 (United States); Waheed, Abdul [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Winkenwerder, Wyatt A. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Kim, Hyun-Woo [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Agapiou, Kyriacos [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Jones, Richard A. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Hwang, Gyeong S. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Ekerdt, John G. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)]. E-mail: ekerdt@che.utexas.edu

    2007-05-07

    Chemical vapor deposition growth of amorphous ruthenium-phosphorus films on SiO{sub 2} containing {approx} 15% phosphorus is reported. cis-Ruthenium(II)dihydridotetrakis-(trimethylphosphine), cis-RuH{sub 2}(PMe{sub 3}){sub 4} (Me = CH{sub 3}) was used at growth temperatures ranging from 525 to 575 K. Both Ru and P are zero-valent. The films are metastable, becoming increasingly more polycrystalline upon annealing to 775 and 975 K. Surface studies illustrate that demethylation is quite efficient near 560 K. Precursor adsorption at 135 K or 210 K and heating reveal the precursor undergoes a complex decomposition process in which the hydride and trimethylphosphine ligands are lost at temperatures as low at 280 K. Phosphorus and its manner of incorporation appear responsible for the amorphous-like character. Molecular dynamics simulations are presented to suggest the local structure in the films and the causes for phosphorus stabilizing the amorphous phase.

  14. EPD-deposited ZnO thin films: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verde, M.

    2014-07-01

    ZnO-based materials and specifically ZnO films with tailored morphology have been subjected to extensive research in the past few years due to their high potential for multiple prospective applications, mainly in electronics. Electrophoretic Deposition (EPD) constitutes an economical, eco friendly, low energy consuming and easily scalable alternative to the high energy consuming evaporative techniques which are commonly used for the obtaining of these ZnO films. For its application, however, the use of stable, well dispersed suspensions is a necessary requirement, and thus a thorough study of their colloidal chemistry is essential. In this work the main contributions to the study of colloidal chemistry of ZnO nanoparticle suspensions and their shaping into ZnO films by EPD are summarized. (Author)

  15. Magnetic Phases of Sputter Deposited Thin-Film Erbium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, J. D. S.; Cooper, J. F. K.; Satchell, N.; Kinane, C. J.; Curran, P. J.; Bending, S. J.; Langridge, S.; Heyderman, L. J.; Burnell, G.

    2016-12-01

    We present a detailed structural and magnetic characterization of sputter deposited thin film erbium, determined by x-ray diffraction, transport measurements, magnetometry and neutron diffraction. This provides information on the onset and change of the magnetic state as a function of temperature and applied magnetic field. Many of the features of bulk material are reproduced. Also of interest is the identification of a conical magnetic state which repeats with a wavevector parallel to the c axis τc = 4/17 in units of the reciprocal lattice parameter c*, which is a state not observed in any other thin film or bulk measurements. The data from the various techniques are combined to construct magnetic field, temperature (H, T)–phase diagrams for the 200 nm-thick Er sample that serves as a foundation for future exploitation of this complex magnetic thin film system.

  16. Electrochemical deposition of conductive and adhesive polypyrrole-dopamine films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Semin; Jang, Lindy K.; Park, Hyun S.; Lee, Jae Young

    2016-07-01

    Electrode surfaces have been widely modified with electrically conductive polymers, including polypyrrole (PPY), to improve the performance of electrodes. To utilize conductive polymers for electrode modification, strong adhesion between the polymer films and electrode substrates should be ensured with high electrical/electrochemical activities. In this study, PPY films were electrochemically polymerized on electrodes (e.g., indium tin oxide (ITO)) with dopamine as a bio-inspired adhesive molecule. Efficient and fast PPY electrodeposition with dopamine (PDA/PPY) was found; the resultant PDA/PPY films exhibited greatly increased adhesion strengths of up to 3.7 ± 0.8 MPa and the modified electrodes had electrochemical impedances two to three orders of magnitude lower than that of an unmodified electrode. This electrochemical deposition of adhesive and conductive PDA/PPY offers a facile and versatile electrode modification for various applications, such as biosensors and batteries.

  17. Supercritical fluid molecular spray film deposition and powder formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Richard D.

    1986-01-01

    Solid films are deposited, or fine powders formed, by dissolving a solid material into a supercritical fluid solution at an elevated pressure and then rapidly expanding the solution through a short orifice into a region of relatively low pressure. This produces a molecular spray which is directed against a substrate to deposit a solid thin film thereon, or discharged into a collection chamber to collect a fine powder. Upon expansion and supersonic interaction with background gases in the low pressure region, any clusters of solvent are broken up and the solvent is vaporized and pumped away. Solute concentration in the solution is varied primarily by varying solution pressure to determine, together with flow rate, the rate of deposition and to control in part whether a film or powder is produced and the granularity of each. Solvent clustering and solute nucleation are controlled by manipulating the rate of expansion of the solution and the pressure of the lower pressure region. Solution and low pressure region temperatures are also controlled.

  18. Superconducting niobium nitride films deposited by unbalanced magnetron sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olaya, J.J. [Departamento de Ingenieria Mecanica y Mecatronica, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Ciudad Universitaria, Carrera 30 Numero 45-03, Bogota (Colombia); Huerta, L. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito exterior s/n, CU Coyoacan, Mexico D.F. 04510 (Mexico); Rodil, S.E. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito exterior s/n, CU Coyoacan, Mexico D.F. 04510 (Mexico)], E-mail: ser42@iim.unam.mx; Escamilla, R. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito exterior s/n, CU Coyoacan, Mexico D.F. 04510 (Mexico)

    2008-10-01

    Niobium nitride (NbN) thin films were deposited under different configurations of the magnetic field using a magnetron sputtering system. The magnetic field configuration varied from balanced to unbalanced leading to different growth conditions and film properties. The aim of the paper was to identify correlations between deposition conditions, film properties and the electrical properties, specially the superconductive critical temperature (T{sub C}). The results suggested that there is a critical deposition condition, having an optimum ion-atom arrival ratio that promotes a well ordered and textured nanocrystalline structure (cubic phase) with the minimum residual stress and only under this condition a high critical temperature (16K) was obtained. Lower T{sub C} values around 12K were obtained for the NbN samples having a lower degree of structural perfection and texture, and a larger fraction of intergranular voids. On the other hand, analysis of valence-band spectra showed that the contribution of the Nb 4d states remained essentially constant while the higher T{sub C} was correlated to a higher contribution of the N 2p states.

  19. Structural and electrical properties of electric field assisted spray deposited pea structured ZnO film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Neha; Swami, Sanjay Kumar; Dutta, Viresh

    2016-05-01

    Spray deposition of ZnO film was carried out. The uneven growth of ZnO nanostructures is resulted for spray deposited ZnO film. Application of DC voltage (1000V) during spray deposition provides formation of pea like structures with uniform coverage over the substrate. Electric field assisted spray deposition provides increased crystallinity with reduced resistivity and improved mobility of the ZnO film as compared to spray deposited ZnO film without electric field. This with large area deposition makes the process more efficient than other techniques.

  20. Atomic layer deposition of nanolaminate oxide films on Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallarida, M.; Weisheit, M.; Kolanek, K.; Michling, M.; Engelmann, H. J.; Schmeisser, D.

    2011-11-01

    Among the methods for depositing thin films, atomic layer deposition is unique for its capability of growing conformal thin films of compounds with a control of composition and thickness at the atomic level. The conformal growth of thin films can be of particular interest for covering nanostructures since it assures the homogeneous growth of the ALD film in all directions, independent of the position of the sample with respect to the incoming precursor flow. Here we describe the technique for growing the HfO2/Al2O3 bilayer on Si substrate and our in situ approach for its investigation by means of synchrotron radiation photoemission. In particular, we study the interface interactions between the two oxides for various thickness compositions ranging from 0.4 to 2.7 nm. We find that the ALD of HfO2 on Si induces the increase of the interfacial SiO2 layer, and a change in the band bending of Si. On the contrary, the ALD of Al2O3 on HfO2 shows negligible interaction between layers as the binding energies of Hf4f, Si2p, and O1s core level peaks and the valence band maximum of HfO2 do not change and the interfacial SiO2 does not increase.

  1. Luminescent Nanocrystalline Silicon Carbide Thin Film Deposited by Helicon Wave Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Wan-bing; YU Wei; WU Li-ping; CUI Shuang-kui; FU Guang-sheng

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon carbide (SiC) thin films were deposited on the single-crystal silicon substrate using the helicon wave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (HW-PECVD) technique. The influences of magnetic field and hydrogen dilution ratio on the structures of SiC thin film were investigated with the atomic force microscopy (AFM), the Fourier transform infrared absorption (FTIR) and the transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results indicate that the high plasma activity of the helicon wave mode proves to be a key factor to grow crystalline SiC thin films at a relative low substrate temperature. Also, the decrease in the grain sizes from the level of microcrystalline to that of nanocrystalline can be achieved by increasing the hydrogen dilution ratios. Transmission electron microscopy measurements reveal that the size of most nanocrystals in the film deposited under the higher hydrogen dilution ratios is smaller than the doubled Bohr radius of 3C-SiC (approximately 5.4 nm), and the light emission measurements also show a strong blue photoluminescence at the room temperature, which is considered to be caused by the quantum confinement effect of small-sized SiC nanocrystals.

  2. High Energy Radial Deposition of Diamond-Like Carbon Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konrad Suschke

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Diamond-like carbon (DLC coatings were deposited with a new direct ion deposition system using a novel 360 degree ion source operating at acceleration voltage between 4 and 8 kV. Cross-sectional TEM images show that the coatings have a three layered structure which originates from changes in the deposition parameters taking into account ion source condition, ion current density, deposition angles, ion sputtering and ion source movement. Varying structural growth conditions can be achieved by tailoring the deposition parameters. The coatings show good promise for industrial use due to their high hardness, low friction and excellent adhesion to the surface of the samples.

  3. Continuous Preparation of Copper/Carbon Nanotube Composite Films and Application in Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiao Gang; Le Wu, Min; Wang, Xiao Xia; Zhong, Xin Hua; Zhao, Ke; Wang, Jian Nong

    2016-02-08

    Realizing the continuous and large scale preparation of particle/carbon nanotube (CNT) composites with enhanced functionalities, and broad applications in energy conversion, harvesting, and storage systems, remains as a big challenge. Here, we report a scalable strategy to continuously prepare particle/CNT composite films in which particles are confined by CNT films. This is achieved by the continuous condensation and deposition of a cylindrical assembly of CNTs on a paper strip and the in situ incorporation of particles during the layer-by-layer deposition process. A Cu/CNT composite film is prepared as an example; such a film exhibits very high power conversion efficiency when it is used as a counter electrode in a solar cell, compared with previous materials under otherwise identical conditions. The proposed method can be extended to other CNT-based composite films with excellent functionalities for wide applications.

  4. Effect of Substrate Bias on Microstructure and Properties of Tetrahedral Amorphous Carbon Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiaqi ZHU; Jiecai HAN; Songhe MENG; Qiang LI; Manlin TAN

    2003-01-01

    The microstructure and properties of tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) films deposited by the filtered cathodic vacuum arc technology has been investigated by visible Raman spectroscopy, AFM and Nano-indentor. The Raman spectra have been fitted with a s

  5. Nanodiamond embedded ta-C composite film by pulsed filtered vacuum arc deposition from a single target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Ajai; Etula, Jarkko; Ge, Yanling; Liu, Xuwen; Koskinen, Jari

    2016-11-01

    Detonation Nanodiamonds (DNDs) are known to have sp3 core, sp2 shell, small size (few nm) and are gaining importance as multi-functional nanoparticles. Diverse methods have been used to form composites, containing detonation nanodiamonds (DNDs) embedded in conductive and dielectric matrices for various applications. Here we show a method, wherein DND-ta-C composite film, consisting of DNDs embedded in ta-C matrix have been co-deposited from the same cathode by pulsed filtered cathodic vacuum arc method. Transmission Electron Microscope analysis of these films revel the presence of DNDs embedded in the matrix of amorphous carbon. Raman spectroscopy indicates that the presence of DNDs does not adversely affect the sp3 content of DND-ta-C composite film compared to ta-C film of same thickness. Nanoindentation and nanowear tests indicate that DND-ta-C composite films possess improved mechanical properties in comparison to ta-C films of similar thickness.

  6. Scaling in film growth by pulsed laser deposition and modulated beam deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Bub

    2011-04-01

    The scalings in film growth by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) and modulated beam deposition (MBD) were investigated by Monte Carlo simulations. In PLD, an atomic pulse beam with a period t(0) were deposited instantaneously on a substrate, whereas in MBD, adatoms were deposited during a short time interval t(1) (0≤t(1)≤t(0)) within each period. If t(1)=0, MBD will be identical to PLD and, if t(1)=t(0), MBD will become usual molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Specifically, logarithmic scaling was investigated for the nucleation density reported for PLD, and the scaling of island density was studied regarding the growth for 0MBE growth was observed as t(1) increased. The phase diagram was also presented.

  7. P-type thin films transistors with solution-deposited lead sulfide films as semiconductor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrillo-Castillo, A.; Salas-Villasenor, A.; Mejia, I. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Texas at Dallas. 800 West Campbell Rd, Richardson, TX 75083 (United States); Aguirre-Tostado, S. [Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados, S. C. Alianza Norte 202, Parque de Investigacion e Innovacion Tecnologica, Apodaca, Nuevo Leon, C.P. 666000 (Mexico); Gnade, B.E. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas. 800 West Campbell Rd, Richardson, TX 75083 (United States); Quevedo-Lopez, M.A., E-mail: mxq071000@utdallas.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas. 800 West Campbell Rd, Richardson, TX 75083 (United States)

    2012-01-31

    In this paper we demonstrate p-type thin film transistors fabricated with lead sulfide (PbS) as semiconductor deposited by chemical bath deposition methods. Crystallinity and morphology of the resulting PbS films were characterized using X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Devices were fabricated using photolithographic processes in a bottom gate configuration with Au as source and drain top contacts. Field effect mobility for as-fabricated devices was {approx} 0.09 cm{sup 2} V{sup -1} s{sup -1} whereas the mobility for devices annealed at 150 Degree-Sign C/h in forming gas increased up to {approx} 0.14 cm{sup 2} V{sup -1} s{sup -1}. Besides the thermal annealing, the entire fabrications process was maintained below 100 Degree-Sign C. The electrical performance of the PbS-thin film transistors was studied before and after the 150 Degree-Sign C anneal as well as a function of the PbS active layer thicknesses. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thin film transistors with PbS as semiconductor deposited by chemical bath deposition. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Photolithography-based thin film transistors with PbS films at low temperatures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electron mobility for anneal-PbS devices of {approx} 0.14 cm{sup 2} V{sup -1} s{sup -1}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Highest mobility reported in thin film transistors with PbS as the semiconductor.

  8. The Effects of Two Thick Film Deposition Methods on Tin Dioxide Gas Sensor Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Bakrania, Smitesh D.; Margaret S. Wooldridge

    2009-01-01

    This work demonstrates the variability in performance between SnO2 thick film gas sensors prepared using two types of film deposition methods. SnO2 powders were deposited on sensor platforms with and without the use of binders. Three commonly utilized binder recipes were investigated, and a new binder-less deposition procedure was developed and characterized. The binder recipes yielded sensors with poor film uniformity and poor structural integrity, compared to the binder-less deposition meth...

  9. A statistical mechanics model of carbon nanotube macro-films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Carbon nanotube macro-films are two-dimensional films with micrometer thickness and centimeter by centimeter in-plane dimension.These carbon nanotube macroscopic assemblies have attracted significant attention from the material and mechanics communities recently because they can be easily handled and tailored to meet specific engineering needs.This paper reports the experimental methods on the preparation and characterization of single-walled carbon nanotube macro-films,and a statistical mechanics model on ...

  10. Atomic layer deposition ultrathin film origami using focused ion beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supekar, O. D.; Brown, J. J.; Eigenfeld, N. T.; Gertsch, J. C.; Bright, V. M.

    2016-12-01

    Focused ion beam (FIB) micromachining is a powerful tool for maskless lithography and in recent years FIB has been explored as a tool for strain engineering. Ion beam induced deformation can be utilized as a means for folding freestanding thin films into complex 3D structures. FIB of high energy gallium (Ga+) ions induces stress by generation of dislocations and ion implantation within material layers, which create creases or folds upon mechanical relaxation enabled by motion of the material layers. One limitation on such processing is the ability to fabricate flat freestanding thin film structures. This capability is limited by the residual stresses formed during processing and fabrication of the films, which can result in initial curvature and deformation of films upon release from a sacrificial fabrication layer. This paper demonstrates folding in freestanding ultrathin films (1:1000) by ion-induced stress relaxation. The ultrathin flat structures are fabricated using atomic layer deposition on sacrificial polyimide. We have demonstrated vertical folding with 30 keV Ga+ ions in structures with lateral dimensions varying from 10 to 50 μm.

  11. Swift heavy ion irradiation of metal containing tetrahedral amorphous carbon films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaseov, P. A.; Protopopova, V. S.; Karabeshkin, K. V.; Shubina, E. N.; Mishin, M. V.; Koskinen, J.; Mohapatra, S.; Tripathi, A.; Avasthi, D. K.; Titov, A. I.

    2016-07-01

    Thin carbon films were grown at room temperature on (0 0 1) n-Si substrate using dual cathode filtered vacuum arc deposition system. Graphite was used as a source of carbon atoms and separate metallic electrode was simultaneously utilized to introduce Ni or Cu atoms. Films were irradiated by 100 MeV Ag7+ ions to fluences in the range 1 × 1010-3 × 1011 cm-2. Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, Raman scattering, scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy in conductive mode were used to investigate film properties and structure change under irradiation. Some conductive channels having metallic conductivity type were found in the films. Number of such channels is less than number of impinged ions. Presence of Ni and Cu atoms increases conductivity of those conductive channels. Fluence dependence of all properties studied suggests different mechanisms of swift heavy ion irradiation-induced transformation of carbon matrix due to different chemical effect of nickel and copper atoms.

  12. Alignment of muscle precursor cells on the vertical edges of thick carbon nanotube films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Ian; Gestmann, Ingo; Wright, Andrew C

    2013-10-01

    The development of scaffolds and templates is an essential aspect of tissue engineering. We show that thick (>0.5 mm) vertically aligned carbon nanotube films, made by chemical vapour deposition, can be used as biocompatible substrates for the directional alignment of mouse muscle cells where the cells grow on the exposed sides of the films. Ultra high resolution scanning electron microscopy reveals that the films themselves consist mostly of small diameter (10 nm) multi-wall carbon nanotubes of wavy morphology with some single wall carbon nanotubes. Our findings show that for this alignment to occur the nanotubes must be in pristine condition. Mechanical wiping of the films to create directional alignment is detrimental to directional bioactivity. Larger areas for study have been formed from a composite of multiply stacked narrow strips of nanotubes wipe-transferred onto elastomer supports. These composite substrates appear to show a useful degree of alignment of the cells.

  13. Low-energy electron irradiation induced top-surface nanocrystallization of amorphous carbon film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Cheng [Institute of Nanosurface Science and Engineering (INSE), Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China); Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Devices and Systems of Ministry of Education and Guangdong Province, College of Optoelectronic Engineering, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China); Fan, Xue, E-mail: fanx@szu.edu.cn [Institute of Nanosurface Science and Engineering (INSE), Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China); Diao, Dongfeng, E-mail: dfdiao@szu.edu.cn [Institute of Nanosurface Science and Engineering (INSE), Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China)

    2016-10-30

    Graphical abstract: Low-energy electron irradiation was proposed to nanocrystallize the top-surface of the as-deposited amorphous carbon film, and sp{sup 2} nanocrystallites formed in the film top-surface within 4 nm thickness. Display Omitted - Abstract: We report a low-energy electron irradiation method to nanocrystallize the top-surface of amorphous carbon film in electron cyclotron resonance plasma system. The nanostructure evolution of the carbon film as a function of electron irradiation density and time was examined by transmission electron microscope (TEM) and Raman spectroscopy. The results showed that the electron irradiation gave rise to the formation of sp{sup 2} nanocrystallites in the film top-surface within 4 nm thickness. The formation of sp{sup 2} nanocrystallite was ascribed to the inelastic electron scattering in the top-surface of carbon film. The frictional property of low-energy electron irradiated film was measured by a pin-on-disk tribometer. The sp{sup 2} nanocrystallized top-surface induced a lower friction coefficient than that of the original pure amorphous film. This method enables a convenient nanocrystallization of amorphous surface.

  14. Resonant Infrared Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Deposition of Polymers: Improving the Morphology of As-Deposited Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubb, Daniel; Papantonakis, Michael; Collins, Brian; Brookes, Elijah; Wood, Joshua; Gurudas, Ullas

    2008-03-01

    Resonant infrared matrix assisted pulsed laser deposition has been used to deposit thin films of PMMA, a widely used industrial polymer. This technique is similar to conventional pulsed laser deposition, except that the polymer to be deposited is dissolved in a solvent and the solution is frozen before ablation in a vacuum chamber. The laser wavelength is absorbed by a vibrational band in the frozen matrix. The polymer lands on the substrate to form a film, while the solvent is pumped away. Our preliminary results show that the surface roughness of the as-deposited films depends strongly on the differential solubility radius, as defined by Hansen solubility parameters of the solvent and the solubility radius of the polymer. Our results will be compared with computational and experimental studies of the same polymer using a KrF (248 nm) laser. The ejection mechanism will be discussed as well as the implications of these results for the deposition of smooth high quality films.

  15. Pulsed laser deposition of fluoride glass thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganser, Dimitri; Gottmann, Jens; Mackens, Uwe; Weichmann, Ulrich

    2010-11-01

    The development of integrated waveguide lasers for different applications such as marking, illumination or medical technology has become highly desirable. Diode pumped planar waveguide lasers emitting in the green visible spectral range, e.g. thin films from praseodymium doped fluorozirconate glass matrix (called ZBLAN, owing to the main components ZrF 4, BaF 2, LaF 3, AlF 3 and NaF) as the active material pumped by a blue laser diode, have aroused great interest. In this work we have investigated the deposition of Pr:ZBLAN thin films using pulsed laser radiation of λ = 193 and λ = 248 nm. The deposition has been carried out on MgF 2 single crystal substrates in a vacuum chamber by varying both processing gas pressure and energy fluence. The existence of an absorption line at 210 nm in Pr:ZBLAN leads to absorption and radiative relaxation of the absorbed laser energy of λ = 193 nm preventing the evaporation of target material. The deposited thin films consist of solidified and molten droplets and irregular particulates only. Furthermore, X-ray radiation has been applied to fluoride glass targets to enhance the absorption in the UV spectral region and to investigate the deposition of X-ray treated targets applying laser radiation of λ = 248 nm. It has been shown that induced F-centres near the target surface are not thermally stable and can be easily ablated. Therefore, λ = 248 nm is not suitable for evaporation of Pr:ZBLAN.

  16. Pulsed laser deposition of fluoride glass thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganser, Dimitri, E-mail: dimitri.ganser@llt.rwth-aachen.de [Chair for Laser Technology LLT, RWTH Aachen University, Steinbachstr. 15, D-52074 Aachen (Germany); Gottmann, Jens [Chair for Laser Technology LLT, RWTH Aachen University, Steinbachstr. 15, D-52074 Aachen (Germany); Mackens, Uwe; Weichmann, Ulrich [Philips Research Laboratories, Weisshausstrasse 2, D-52066 Aachen (Germany)

    2010-11-15

    The development of integrated waveguide lasers for different applications such as marking, illumination or medical technology has become highly desirable. Diode pumped planar waveguide lasers emitting in the green visible spectral range, e.g. thin films from praseodymium doped fluorozirconate glass matrix (called ZBLAN, owing to the main components ZrF{sub 4}, BaF{sub 2}, LaF{sub 3}, AlF{sub 3} and NaF) as the active material pumped by a blue laser diode, have aroused great interest. In this work we have investigated the deposition of Pr:ZBLAN thin films using pulsed laser radiation of {lambda} = 193 and {lambda} = 248 nm. The deposition has been carried out on MgF{sub 2} single crystal substrates in a vacuum chamber by varying both processing gas pressure and energy fluence. The existence of an absorption line at 210 nm in Pr:ZBLAN leads to absorption and radiative relaxation of the absorbed laser energy of {lambda} = 193 nm preventing the evaporation of target material. The deposited thin films consist of solidified and molten droplets and irregular particulates only. Furthermore, X-ray radiation has been applied to fluoride glass targets to enhance the absorption in the UV spectral region and to investigate the deposition of X-ray treated targets applying laser radiation of {lambda} 248 nm. It has been shown that induced F-centres near the target surface are not thermally stable and can be easily ablated. Therefore, {lambda} = 248 nm is not suitable for evaporation of Pr:ZBLAN.

  17. Thermal Conductivity of Carbon Nanotube Composite Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Quoc; Cruden, Brett A.; Cassell, Alan M.; Walker, Megan D.; Koehne, Jessica E.; Meyyappan, M.; Li, Jun; Yang, Cary Y.

    2004-01-01

    State-of-the-art ICs for microprocessors routinely dissipate power densities on the order of 50 W/sq cm. This large power is due to the localized heating of ICs operating at high frequencies, and must be managed for future high-frequency microelectronic applications. Our approach involves finding new and efficient thermally conductive materials. Exploiting carbon nanotube (CNT) films and composites for their superior axial thermal conductance properties has the potential for such an application requiring efficient heat transfer. In this work, we present thermal contact resistance measurement results for CNT and CNT-Cu composite films. It is shown that Cu-filled CNT arrays enhance thermal conductance when compared to as-grown CNT arrays. Furthermore, the CNT-Cu composite material provides a mechanically robust alternative to current IC packaging technology.

  18. Gas Permeation, Mechanical Behavior and Cytocompatibility of Ultrathin Pure and Doped Diamond-Like Carbon and Silicon Oxide Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juergen M. Lackner

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Protective ultra-thin barrier films gather increasing economic interest for controlling permeation and diffusion from the biological surrounding in implanted sensor and electronic devices in future medicine. Thus, the aim of this work was a benchmarking of the mechanical oxygen permeation barrier, cytocompatibility, and microbiological properties of inorganic ~25 nm thin films, deposited by vacuum deposition techniques on 50 µm thin polyetheretherketone (PEEK foils. Plasma-activated chemical vapor deposition (direct deposition from an ion source was applied to deposit pure and nitrogen doped diamond-like carbon films, while physical vapor deposition (magnetron sputtering in pulsed DC mode was used for the formation of silicon as well as titanium doped diamond-like carbon films. Silicon oxide films were deposited by radio frequency magnetron sputtering. The results indicate a strong influence of nanoporosity on the oxygen transmission rate for all coating types, while the low content of microporosity (particulates, etc. is shown to be of lesser importance. Due to the low thickness of the foil substrates, being easily bent, the toughness as a measure of tendency to film fracture together with the elasticity index of the thin films influence the oxygen barrier. All investigated coatings are non-pyrogenic, cause no cytotoxic effects and do not influence bacterial growth.

  19. KINETICS OF DEPOSITION OF METAL IONS TO ACTIVATED CARBON FIBERS (ACFs) WITH FLUIDIZATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The diffusion and mass transfer, reaction, integration and growth processes of the metalions on the activated carbon fibers (ACFs) are discussed. Based on the diffusion film theory, thediiffusion and the integration model are developed to describe the deposition processes of metal ionsfrom the solution to ACFs in the fiuidized beds. The model of heat transfer of this process isestablished to expound the important role-played in deposition processes by the influence of thereaction heat released at ACFs surface and the non-uniform temperature distribution caused byhydrodynamics.

  20. Nano-structural Modification of Amorphous Carbon Thin Films by Low-energy Electron Beam Irradiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    EijiIwamura; MasanoriYamaguchi

    2004-01-01

    A new approach using a low-energy electron beam radiation system was investigated to synthesize carbon hybrid structures in amorphous carbon thin films. Two types of amorphous carbon films, which were 15at% iron containing film and with column/inter-column structures, were deposited onto Si substrates by a sputtering technique and subsequently exposed to an electron shower of which the energy and dose rate were much smaller compared to an intense electron beam used in a transmission electron microscopy. As a result of the low-energy and low-dose electron irradiation process, graphitic structures formed in amorphous matrix at a relatively low temperature up to 450 K. Hybrid carbon thin films containing onion-like structures in an amorphous carbon matrix were synthesized by dynamic structural modification of iron containing amorphous carbon thin films. It was found that the graphitization progressed more in the electron irradiation than in annealing at 773K, and it was attributed to thermal and catalytic effects which are strongly related to grain growth of metal clusters. On the other hand, a reversal of TEM image contrast was observed in a-C films with column/inter-column structures. It is presumed that preferable graphitization occurred in the inter-column regions induced by electron irradiation.

  1. Nano-structural Modification of Amorphous Carbon Thin Films by Low-energy Electron Beam Irradiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eiji Iwamura; Masanori Yamaguchi

    2004-01-01

    A new approach using a low-energy electron beam radiation system was investigated to synthesize carbon hybrid structures in amorphous carbon thin films. Two types of amorphous carbon films, which were 15at% iron containing film and with column/inter-column structures, were deposited onto Si substrates by a sputtering technique and subsequently exposed to an electron shower of which the energy and dose rate were much smaller compared to an intense electron beam used in a transmission electron microscopy. As a result of the low-energy and low-dose electron irradiation process,graphitic structures formed in amorphous matrix at a relatively low temperature up to 450 K. Hybrid carbon thin films containing onion-like structures in an amorphous carbon matrix were synthesized by dynamic structural modification of iron containing amorphous carbon thin films. It was found that the graphitization progressed more in the electron irradiation than in annealing at 773K, and it was attributed to thermal and catalytic effects which are strongly related to grain growth of metal clusters. On the other hand, a reversal of TEM image contrast was observed in a-C films with column/inter-column structures. It is presumed that preferable graphitization occurred in the inter-column regions induced by electron irradiation.

  2. Cathodic stripping voltammetry of trace Mn(II) at carbon film electrodes

    OpenAIRE

    Filipe, Olga M. S.; Brett,Christopher M.A.

    2003-01-01

    A sensitive voltammetric method is presented for the determination of tract levels of Mn (II) using carbon film electrodes fabricated from carbon resistors of 2 [Omega]. Determination of manganese was made by square wave cathodic stripping voltammetry (CSV), with deposition of manganese as manganese dioxide. Chronoamperometric experiments were made to study MnO2 nucleation and growth. As a result, it was found to be necessary to perform electrode conditioning at a more positive potential to i...

  3. Direct current magnetron sputter-deposited ZnO thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoon, Jian-Wei [Faculty of Engineering, Multimedia University, Persiaran Multimedia, 63100 Cyberjaya, Selangor (Malaysia); Chan, Kah-Yoong, E-mail: kychan@mmu.edu.my [Faculty of Engineering, Multimedia University, Persiaran Multimedia, 63100 Cyberjaya, Selangor (Malaysia); Krishnasamy, Jegenathan; Tou, Teck-Yong [Faculty of Engineering, Multimedia University, Persiaran Multimedia, 63100 Cyberjaya, Selangor (Malaysia); Knipp, Dietmar [School of Engineering and Science, Jacobs University Bremen, 28759 Bremen (Germany)

    2011-01-15

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) is a very promising electronic material for emerging transparent large-area electronic applications including thin-film sensors, transistors and solar cells. We fabricated ZnO thin films by employing direct current (DC) magnetron sputtering deposition technique. ZnO films with different thicknesses ranging from 150 nm to 750 nm were deposited on glass substrates. The deposition pressure and the substrate temperature were varied from 12 mTorr to 25 mTorr, and from room temperature to 450 deg. C, respectively. The influence of the film thickness, deposition pressure and the substrate temperature on structural and optical properties of the ZnO films was investigated using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectrometer. The experimental results reveal that the film thickness, deposition pressure and the substrate temperature play significant role in the structural formation and the optical properties of the deposited ZnO thin films.

  4. Effects of deposition parameters on the properties of VO2 thin films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Lixia; LI Jianping; GAO Xiaoguang; HE Xiuli

    2006-01-01

    The vanadium oxide thin films are deposited for microbolometers by radio frequency reactive sputtering method at room temperature. The effects of the oxygen partial pressure on the deposition rate, electrical properties and compositions of the films are discussed. The as-deposited VOx thin films with x value of nearly 2 are deposited by adjusting the oxygen partial pressure. After oxidation annealing of these films in air, the VO2 films with high temperature coefficients of resistivity (about - 49%/℃ ) and low resistivity can be obtained. The square resistances of the films are in the range of 100 kΩ/squ-300 kΩ/squ. All films are deposited at room temperature and annealed at 400℃, in which the compatibility between VOx deposition process and MEMS (micro electromechanical systems) is greatly improved.

  5. Induced Recrystallization of CdTe Thin Films Deposited by Close-Spaced Sublimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moutinho, H. R.; Dhere, R. G.; Al-Jassim, M. M.; Levi, D. H.; Kazmerski, L. L. (National Renewable Energy Laboratory); Mayo, B. (Southern University and A& M College, Baton Rouge, LA)

    1998-10-26

    We have deposited CdTe thin films by close-spaced sublimation at two different temperature ranges. The films deposited at the lower temperature partially recrystallized after CdCl2 treatment at 350 C and completely recrystallized after the same treatment at 400 C. The films deposited at higher temperature did not recrystallize at these two temperatures. These results confirmed that the mechanisms responsible for changes in physical properties of CdTe films treated with CdCl2 are recrystallization and grain growth, and provided an alternative method to deposit CSS films using lower temperatures.

  6. Induced recrystallization of CdTe thin films deposited by close-spaced sublimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moutinho, H. R.; Dhere, R. G.; Al-Jassim, M. M.; Mayo, B.; Levi, D. H.; Kazmerski, L. L.

    1999-03-01

    We have deposited CdTe thin films by close-spaced sublimation at two different temperature ranges. The films deposited at the lower temperature partially recrystallized after CdCl2 treatment at 350 °C and completely recrystallized after the same treatment at 400 °C. The films deposited at higher temperature did not recrystallize at these two temperatures. These results confirmed that the mechanisms responsible for changes in physical properties of CdTe films treated with CdCl2 are recrystallization and grain growth, and provided an alternative method to deposit CSS films using lower temperatures.

  7. Induced Recrystallization of CdTe Thin Films Deposited by Close-Spaced Sublimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moutinho, H. R.; Dhere, R. G.; Al-Jassim, M. M.; Levi, D. H.; Kazmerski, L. L. (National Renewable Energy Laboratory); Mayo, B. (Southern University and A& M College, LA)

    1998-10-29

    We have deposited CdTe thin films by close-spaced sublimation at two different temperature ranges. The films deposited at the lower temperature partially recrystallized after CdCl{sub 2} treatment at 350 C and completely recrystallized after the same treatment at 400 C. The films deposited at higher temperature did not recrystallize at these two temperatures. These results confirmed that the mechanisms responsible for changes in physical properties of CdTe films treated with CdCl{sub 2} are recrystallization and grain growth, and provided an alternative method to deposit CSS films using lower temperatures.

  8. Atomistic study of deposition process of Al thin film on Cu substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao Yongzhi, E-mail: yzcaohit@gmail.com [Center for Precision Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin (China); Zhang Junjie; Sun Tao; Yan Yongda; Yu Fuli [Center for Precision Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin (China)

    2010-08-01

    In this paper we report molecular dynamics based atomistic simulations of deposition process of Al atoms onto Cu substrate and following nanoindentation process on that nanostructured material. Effects of incident energy on the morphology of deposited thin film and mechanical property of this nanostructured material are emphasized. The results reveal that the morphology of growing film is layer-by-layer-like at incident energy of 0.1-10 eV. The epitaxy mode of film growth is observed at incident energy below 1 eV, but film-mixing mode commences when incident energy increase to 10 eV accompanying with increased disorder of film structure, which improves quality of deposited thin film. Following indentation studies indicate deposited thin films pose lower stiffness than single crystal Al due to considerable amount of defects existed in them, but Cu substrate is strengthened by the interface generated from lattice mismatch between deposited Al thin film and Cu substrate.

  9. High efficiency organic-electrolyte DSSC based on hydrothermally deposited titanium carbide-carbon counter electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towannang, Madsakorn; Kumlangwan, Pantiwa; Maiaugree, Wasan; Ratchaphonsaenwong, Kunthaya; Harnchana, Viyada; Jarenboon, Wirat; Pimanpang, Samuk; Amornkitbamrung, Vittaya

    2015-07-01

    Pt-free TiC based electrodes were hydrothermally deposited onto FTO/glass substrates and used as dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) counter electrodes. A promising efficiency of 3.07% was obtained from the annealed hydrothermal TiC DSSCs based on a disulfide/thiolate electrolyte. A pronounced improvement in performance of 3.59% was achieved by compositing TiC with carbon, compared to that of a Pt DSSC, 3.84%. TEM analysis detected that the TiC particle surfaces were coated by thin carbon layer (7 nm). The SAED pattern and Raman spectrum of TiC-carbon films suggested that the carbon layer was composed of amorphous and graphite carbon. The formation of graphite on the TiC nanoparticles plays a crucial role in enhancing the film's reduction current to 10.12 mA/cm2 and in reducing the film impedance to 237.63 Ω, resulting in a high efficiency of the TiC-carbon DSSC. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  10. Characterization of amorphous and nanocomposite Nb–Si–C thin films deposited by DC magnetron sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nedfors, Nils, E-mail: nils.nedfors@kemi.uu.se [Department of Chemistry, The Ångström Laboratory, Uppsala University, SE-751 21 Uppsala (Sweden); Tengstrand, Olof [Thin Film Physics Division, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (IFM), Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping (Sweden); Flink, Axel [Thin Film Physics Division, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (IFM), Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping (Sweden); Impact Coatings AB, Westmansgatan 29, SE-582-16 Linköping (Sweden); Eklund, Per; Hultman, Lars [Thin Film Physics Division, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (IFM), Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping (Sweden); Jansson, Ulf [Department of Chemistry, The Ångström Laboratory, Uppsala University, SE-751 21 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2013-10-31

    Two series of Nb–Si–C thin films of different composition have been deposited using DC magnetron sputtering. In the first series the carbon content was kept at about 55 at.% while the Si/Nb ratio was varied and in the second series the C/Nb ratio was varied instead while the Si content was kept at about 45 at.%. The microstructure is strongly dependent on Si content and Nb–Si–C films containing more than 25 at.% Si exhibit an amorphous structure as determined by X-ray diffraction. Transmission electron microscopy, however, induces crystallisation during analysis, thus obstructing a more detailed analysis of the amorphous structure. X-ray photo-electron spectroscopy suggests that the amorphous films consist of a mixture of chemical bonds such as Nb–Si, Nb–C, and Si–C. The addition of Si results in a hardness decrease from 22 GPa for the binary Nb–C film to 18 – 19 GPa for the Si-containing films, while film resistivity increases from 211 μΩcm to 3215 μΩcm. Comparison with recently published results on DC magnetron sputtered Zr–Si–C films, deposited in the same system using the same Ar-plasma pressure, bias, and a slightly lower substrate temperature (300 °C instead of 350 °C), shows that hardness is primarily dependent on the amount of Si–C bonds rather than type of transition metal. The reduced elastic modulus on the other hand shows a dependency on the type of transition metal for the films. These trends for the mechanical properties suggest that high wear resistant (high H/E and H{sup 3}/E{sup 2} ratio) Me–Si–C films can be achieved by appropriate choice of film composition and transition metal. - Highlights: • Si reduces crystallinity, amorphous structure for films containing > 25 at.% Si. • Electron beam induced crystallization during transmission electron microscopy. • Hardness and resistivity are primarily dependent on the relative amount of C–Si bonds.

  11. Microstructural characterization of Ti-C-N thin films prepared by reactive crossed beam pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escobar-Alarcon, L., E-mail: luis.escobar@inin.gob.mx [Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Apdo. Postal 18-1027, Mexico DF 11801 (Mexico); Medina, V.; Camps, Enrique; Romero, S. [Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Apdo. Postal 18-1027, Mexico DF 11801 (Mexico); Fernandez, M. [Departamento de Aceleradores, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Apdo. Postal 18-1027, Mexico DF 11801 (Mexico); Solis-Casados, D. [Centro Conjunto de Investigacion en Quimica Sustentable, Facultad de Quimica UAEMex, km. 14.5 carr. Toluca-Atlacomulco (Mexico)

    2011-08-15

    In this work, Raman spectroscopy has been used to characterize Ti-C-N thin films in order to obtain information about the microstructure of the deposited materials, and in particular to study the effects due to the carbon incorporation into the TiN lattice. Ti-C-N thin films were prepared using a crossed plasma configuration in which the ablation of two different targets, titanium and carbon, in a reactive atmosphere was performed. With this configuration, the carbon content in the films was varied in an easy way from 5.0 at% to 40.0 at%. Thin film composition was determined from Non-Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy (NRBS) measurements. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-Ray diffraction measurements were also carried out in order to characterize the films in more detail, with this being used to give support to the interpretation of the Raman spectra. The Raman results revealed that at lower carbon concentrations a solid solution Ti(C, N) is formed, whilst at higher carbon concentrations a nanocomposite, consisting of nanocrystalline TiCN and TiC immersed in an amorphous carbon matrix is obtained.

  12. Controlled Mechanical Cracking of Metal Films Deposited on Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Polywka

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Stretchable large area electronics conform to arbitrarily-shaped 3D surfaces and enables comfortable contact to the human skin and other biological tissue. There are approaches allowing for large area thin films to be stretched by tens of percent without cracking. The approach presented here does not prevent cracking, rather it aims to precisely control the crack positions and their orientation. For this purpose, the polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS is hardened by exposure to ultraviolet radiation (172 nm through an exposure mask. Only well-defined patterns are kept untreated. With these soft islands cracks at the hardened surface can be controlled in terms of starting position, direction and end position. This approach is first investigated at the hardened PDMS surface itself. It is then applied to conductive silver films deposited from the liquid phase. It is found that statistical (uncontrolled cracking of the silver films can be avoided at strain below 35%. This enables metal interconnects to be integrated into stretchable networks. The combination of controlled cracks with wrinkling enables interconnects that are stretchable in arbitrary and changing directions. The deposition and patterning does not involve vacuum processing, photolithography, or solvents.

  13. Electroless deposition, post annealing and characterization of nickel films on silicon

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Subir Sabharwal; Siddharth Palit; R B Tokas; A K Poswal; Sangeeta

    2008-10-01

    Electroless deposition of nickel (EN) films on -type silicon has been investigated under different process conditions. The interface between the film and substrate has been characterized for electrical properties by probing the contact resistances. X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy have been performed to obtain information about the structural and morphological details of the films. As a comparative study, nickel films have also been sputter deposited on silicon substrates. An as-deposited electroless film is observed to form non-ohmic contact while in a sputtered film prepared without the application of substrate heating, the formation of metal–insulating–semiconductor type junction is seen.

  14. Pulsed laser deposition growth of FeSb2 films for thermoelectric applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Ye; Canulescu, Stela; Sun, Peijie;

    2011-01-01

    FeSb2 films were produced in a low-pressure Ar environment by pulsed laser deposition at 355 nm. The influence of growth parameters such as substrate temperature, Ar pressure and deposition time on the growth of FeSb2 films was studied. Nearly phase-pure FeSb2 films with thicknesses of 100–400 nm...

  15. Pulsed laser deposition of permanent magnetic Nd2Fe14B thin films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurtsen, A.J.M.; Kools, J.C.S.; Wit, L.; Lodder, J.C.

    1996-01-01

    Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) is applied to deposit thin (thickness typically 100 nm) films of Nd2Fe14B. It is shown that films can be grown which have the desired composition and phase. Nd2Fe14B grows with the c-axis along the film normal on 110 Al2O3 single crystal substrates covered with a Ta lay

  16. Pure and Sn-doped ZnO films produced by pulsed laser deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmelund, E.; Schou, Jørgen; Tougaard, S.;

    2002-01-01

    A new technique, metronome doping, has been used for doping of films during pulsed laser deposition (PLD). This technique makes it possible to dope continuously during film growth with different concentrations of a dopant in one deposition sequence. Films of pure and doped ZnO have been produced...

  17. Anodic deposition of colloidal iridium oxide thin films from hexahydroxyiridate(IV) solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yixin; Vargas-Barbosa, Nella M; Hernandez-Pagan, Emil A; Mallouk, Thomas E

    2011-07-18

    A facile, in-situ deposition route to stable iridium oxide (IrO(x)·nH(2)O) nanoparticle thin films from [Ir(OH)(6)](2-) solutions is reported. The [Ir(OH)(6)](2-) solution, made by alkaline hydrolysis of [IrCl(6)](2-), is colorless and stable near neutral pH, and forms blue IrO(x)·nH(2)O nanoparticle suspensions once it is adjusted to acidic or basic conditions. IrO(x)·nH(2)O nanoparticle thin films are grown anodically on glassy carbon, fluorine-doped tin oxide, and gold electrodes by electrolyzing [Ir(OH)(6)](2-) solutions at +1.0-1.3 V versus Ag/AgCl. The thickness of the IrO(x)·nH(2)O films can be controlled by varying the concentration of [Ir(OH)(6)](2-) , the deposition potential, and/or the deposition time. These thin films are stable between pH 1 and 13 and have the lowest overpotential (η) for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) of any yet reported. Near neutral pH, the Tafel slope for the OER at a IrO(x)·nH(2)O film/Au rotating disk electrode was 37-39 mV per decade. The exchange current density for the OER was 4-8 × 10(-10) A cm(-2) at a 4 mC cm(-2) coverage of electroactive Ir.

  18. Deposition of highly (111)-oriented PZT thin films by using metal organic chemical deposition

    CERN Document Server

    Bu, K H; Choi, D K; Seong, W K; Kim, J D

    1999-01-01

    Lead zirconate titanate (PZT) thin films have been grown on Pt/Ta/SiNx/Si substrates by using metal organic chemical vapor deposition with Pb(C sub 2 H sub 5) sub 4 , Zr(O-t-C sub 4 H sub 9) sub 4 , and Ti(O-i-C sub 3 H sub 7) sub 4 as source materials and O sub 2 as an oxidizing gas. The Zr fraction in the thin films was controlled by varying the flow rate of the Zr source material. The crystal structure and the electrical properties were investigated as functions of the composition. X-ray diffraction analysis showed that at a certain range of Zr fraction, highly (111)-oriented PZT thin films with no pyrochlore phases were deposited. On the other hand, at low Zr fractions, there were peaks from Pb-oxide phases. At high Zr fractions, peaks from pyrochlore phase were seen. The films also showed good electrical properties, such as a high dielectric constant of more than 1200 and a low coercive voltage of 1.35 V.

  19. Properties of HfAlO film deposited by plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Duo [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Shanghai Institute of Micro-system and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changning Road 865, Shanghai 200050 (China); Cheng, Xinhong, E-mail: xh_cheng@mail.sim.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Shanghai Institute of Micro-system and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changning Road 865, Shanghai 200050 (China); Jia, Tingting; Zheng, Li; Xu, Dawei; Wang, Zhongjian; Xia, Chao; Yu, Yuehui [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Shanghai Institute of Micro-system and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changning Road 865, Shanghai 200050 (China)

    2013-07-15

    Plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) method can reduce film growing temperature, and allow in situ plasma treatment. In this work, HfAlO and HfO{sub 2} films were deposited with PEALD at 160 °C. Microstructure analysis showed that both films were amorphous after rapid thermal annealing (RTA) treatment, and HfAlO sample showed better interfacial structure than HfO{sub 2}. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) spectra indicated that main component of the interfacial layer of HfAlO sample was Hf–Si–O and Al–Si–O bonds, the valence band offset value between the HfAlO film and Si substrate was calculated to be 2.5 eV. The dominant leakage current mechanism of the samples was Schottky emission at a low electric field (<1.4 MV/cm), and Poole–Frenkel emission mechanism at a higher electric field (>1.4 MV/cm). The equivalent oxide thicknesses (EOT) of the HfAlO samples were 1.0 nm and 1.3 nm, respectively. The density of interface states between dielectric and substrate were calculated to be 1.2 × 10{sup 12} eV{sup −1}cm{sup −2} and 1.3 × 10{sup 12} eV{sup −1}cm{sup −2}, respectively. In comparison with HfO{sub 2} film, HfAlO film has good interfacial structure and electrical performance.

  20. Deposition and tribological behaviour of sputtered carbon hard coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, S.; Camino, D.; Jones, A.H.S.; Teer, D.G. [Teer Coatings Ltd., Hartlebury (United Kingdom)

    2000-02-21

    The exceptional tribological properties of low deposition temperature sputtered carbon coatings (Graphit-iC coatings) have been recently reported. This paper describes the latest development of these coatings and particularly how, by an optimisation of the deposition parameters, it has been possible to obtain relative soft to very hard coatings with extremely low specific wear rates. The coatings have been deposited in a closed field unbalanced magnetron sputter ion plating (CFUBMSIP) installation. By applying the appropriate conditions of deposition, carbon coatings with hardness from 1500 to 4000 HV can be routinely deposited. Preliminary analytical results are presented in order to characterise such hard coatings: high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis are some of the different techniques used for this work. Finally, a number of the applications are reported with tribological test results. (orig.)

  1. Plasma reactor for deposition of carbon nanowalls at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrov, Zh; Mitev, D.; Kiss'ovski, Zh

    2016-10-01

    In this study a novel plasma reactor for deposition of carbon nanowalls at atmospheric pressure is constructed and characterized. A low power microwave discharge is used as a plasma source and working gas of Ar/H2/CH4 gas mixture. The substrate is heated by plasma flame and its temperature is in the range 600-700 C. The chemical composition of the plasma and the gas mixture effect on the concentration of the various particles in the plasma is investigated by optical emission spectroscopy. The emission spectrum of the plasma jet in Ar/H2/CH4 mixture shows the presence of carbon (Swan band) and an intensive line of CH (388 nm), which are necessary species for deposition of carbon nanostructures. Additional voltage in the range from -20 V to -100 V is applied in order to ensure the vertical growth of graphene walls. Results of deposited carbon nanostructures on metal substrate are shown.

  2. Simulation of polyatomic discharges for thin film deposition processes in low-pressure plasma reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bera, Kallol

    Comprehensive multi-dimensional self-consistent numerical fluid models for radio-frequency capacitively and inductively coupled methane discharges were developed to predict diamond-like-carbon thin film deposition/etching rate on the wafer. A numerical model of glow discharge provides insight on the physical phenomena in the discharge leading to better understanding and design of the reactor. The developed discharge models included detailed discharge physics, gas-phase chemistry and surface chemistry modeling. To understand the basic discharge phenomena, one- dimensional radio frequency capacitively coupled Ar plasma was simulated using a fluid model. The model was modified for methane plasma to predict the profiles of the plasma variables. The model was then extended to two- dimensional cylindrical coordinates to capture the effects of asymmetry of the reactor on the plasma variables. The necessary dc bias for the discharge was predicted such that the cycle-averaged current to the powered electrode was zero. A discharge chemistry model was also developed to predict various radical and neutral densities in the plasma, and their fluxes to the cathode. The species fluxes are used to predict film deposition rate and the properties of the deposited film. The model predictions of plasma density, self-generated de bias, cathode current and plasma potential compared well with the experimental results. A high density plasma with inductive coupling at low pressure was also considered. Separate rf bias and dc bias are applied to the substrate holder to modulate the ion energy. The present model simulates electron, ion and neutral transport, including detailed discharge and surface chemistry. The model has been implemented for methane discharge to obtain deposition/etching of thin carbon film on the wafer. To the author's knowledge, this is the first attempt to simulate capacitively and inductively coupled plasmas self-consistently for a depositing gas under the operating

  3. Superior tribological properties of an amorphous carbon film with a graphite-like structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Yong-Jun; Li Hong-Xuan; Ji Li; Liu Xiao-Hong; Wu Yan-Xia; Zhou Hui-Di; Chen Jian-Min

    2012-01-01

    Amorphous carbon films with high sp2 concentrations are deposited by unbalanced magnetron sputtering with a narrow range of substrate bias voltage. Field emission scanning electron microscopes (FESEMs),high resolution transmission electron microscopes (HRTEMs),atomic force microscopes (AFMs),the Raman spectrometers,nanoindentation,and tribometers are subsequently used to characterize the microstructures and the properties of the resulting films.It is found that the present films are dominated by the sp2 sites.However,the films demonstrate a moderate hardness together with a low internal stress.The high hardness of the deposited film originates from the crosslinking of the sp2 clusters by the sp3 sites.The presence of the graphite-like clusters in the film structure may be responsible for the low internal stress.What is more important is that the resulting films show excellent tribological properties with high load capacity and excellent wear resistance in humid atmospheres.The relationship between the microstructure determined by the deposition condition and the film characteristic is discussed in detail.

  4. Metalorganic chemical vapor deposition of Ti-O-C-N thin films using TBOT as a promising precursor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fouad, O.A., E-mail: oafouad@yahoo.com [Central Metallurgical Research and Development Institute (CMRDI), P.O. Box 87, Helwan 11421, Helwan (Egypt); Geioushy, R.A.; El-Sheikh, S.M. [Central Metallurgical Research and Development Institute (CMRDI), P.O. Box 87, Helwan 11421, Helwan (Egypt); Khedr, M.H. [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Beni-Suef University, Beni-Suef (Egypt); Ibrahim, I.A. [Central Metallurgical Research and Development Institute (CMRDI), P.O. Box 87, Helwan 11421, Helwan (Egypt)

    2011-05-19

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: > Novel precursor (TBOT) has been used for synthesis of from Ti(O,C,N) thin films via APCVD process. > TiO{sub 2} and TiC compounds deposition were thermodynamically favored as products of metalorganic precursor decomposition in presence of H{sub 2} gas at temperature >500 deg. C. > TiO{sub 2} deposited in the form of spherical-like shape particles, TiC deposited in the form of fiber-like shape structures. > High hardness value was obtained for Ti-O-C-N films at 750 deg. C ({approx}425 HV{sub 50}) due to the formation of stoichiometric TiN phase. - Abstract: Ti-O, Ti-O-C and Ti-O-C-N thin films have been synthesized successfully via metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) technique. Tetrabutyl orthotitanate (TBOT) is used as a precursor in presence of Ar, H{sub 2}, and N{sub 2} as process gases. By controlling deposition temperature and type of process gases, it was possible to control the composition of the deposited films. The deposited films are composed mainly of Ti and O when H{sub 2} is used as a process gas in the temperature range 350-500 deg. C. As the temperature increased up to 600 deg. C, thin films containing anatase (TiO{sub 2}) and titanium carbide (TiC) phases are deposited and confirmed by XRD and EDX analyses. As the temperature increased to 750 deg. C, a transformation from anatase to rutile phase (TiO{sub 2}) is started and clearly observed from XRD patterns. Titanium nitride (Ti{sub 2}N and TiN) phase in addition to TiO{sub 2} and TiC phases are formed at 600-1000 deg. C in presence of nitrogen as a process gas. SEM images for all investigated film samples showed that the films are deposited mainly in the form of spherical particles ranged from few nano- to micrometer in size with some additional special features regardless the type of the process gas. Films containing carbon and nitrogen show higher hardness than that containing only oxygen. The obtained results may help in better

  5. Facile fabrication of robust superhydrophobic multilayered film based on bioinspired poly(dopamine)-modified carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin-lei; Ren, Ke-feng; Chang, Hao; Zhang, Shi-miao; Jin, Lie-jiang; Ji, Jian

    2014-02-21

    Thin organic films containing carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have received increasing attention in many fields. In this study, a robust thin superhydrophobic film has been created by using layer-by-layer assembly of the carbon nanotubes wrapped by poly(dopamine) (CNT@PDA) and poly(ethyleneimine) (PEI). UV-vis spectroscopy, ellipsometry, and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) measurements confirmed that the sequential deposition of PEI and CNT@PDA resulted in a linear growth of the (PEI-CNT@PDA) film. This thin film contained as much as 77 wt% CNTs. Moreover, a very stable and flexible free-standing (PEI-CNT@PDA) film could be obtained by employing cellulose acetate (CA) as a sacrificial layer. The film could even withstand ultrasonication in saturated SDS aqueous solution for 30 min. SEM observations indicated that the ultrathin film consisted of nanoscale interpenetrating networks of entangled CNTs and exhibited a very rough surface morphology. The (PEI-CNT@PDA) film turned superhydrophobic after being coated with a low-surface-energy compound. The superhydrophobic films showed excellent resistance against the adhesion of both platelets and Escherichia coli (E. coli). The (PEI-CNT@PDA) films and the proposed methodology may find applications in the area of medical devices to reduce device-associated thrombosis and infection.

  6. Study of Nanocrystalline Diamond Film Deposited Rapidly by 500 W Excimer Laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Hongyan; SHEN Jiajing; YANG Guilong

    2000-01-01

    High quality nanocrystalline diamond film deposited rapidly by an XeCl excimer laser operated at high laser power (500 W) and repetition rate (300~500 Hz) is presented. A high deposition rate, 250 nm/thousand pulses, was obtained. The effects of laser energy fluence and repetition rate on the deposition of diamond film were investigated.

  7. Properties of alumina films by atmospheric pressure metal-organic chemical vapour deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haanappel, V.A.C.; Corbach, van H.D.; Fransen, T.; Gellings, P.J.

    1994-01-01

    Thin alumina films were deposited at low temperatures (290–420°C) on stainless steel, type AISI 304. The deposition process was carried out in nitrogen by metal-organic chemical vapour deposition using aluminum tri-sec-butoxide. The film properties including the protection of the underlying substrat

  8. The spatial thickness distribution of metal films produced by large area pulsed laser deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pryds, Nini; Schou, Jørgen; Linderoth, Søren

    2007-01-01

    Thin films of metals have been deposited in the large-area Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) Facility at Riso National Laboratory. Thin films of Ag and Ni were deposited with laser pulses from an excimer laser at 248 nm with a rectangular beam spot at a fluence of 10 J/cm(2) on glass substrates of 12...

  9. Fabrication of Diamond-like Carbon Films by Ion Assisted Middle Frequency Unbalanced Magnetron Sputtering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yi-chen; SUN Shao-ni; ZHOU Yi; MA Sheng-ge; BA De-chun

    2006-01-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films are deposited by the Hall ion source assisted by the mid-frequency unbalanced magnetron sputtering technique. The effects of the substrate voltage bias, the substrate temperature, the Hall discharging current and the argon/nitrogen ratio on the DLC film's performance were studied. The experimental results show that the film's surface roughness, the hardness and the Young's modulus increase firstly and then decrease with the bias voltage incrementally increases. Also when the substrate temperature rises, the surface roughness of the film varies slightly, but its hardness and Young's modulus firstly increase followed by a sharp decrease when the temperature surpassing 120 ℃. With the Hall discharging current incrementally rising, the hardness and Young's modulus of the film decrease and the surface roughness of the film on 316L stainless steel firstly decreased and then remains constant.

  10. Irradiation Effect of γ Rays on Diamond-Like Carbon Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Diamond-like carbon films, prepared by RF glow discharge on glasssubstrates, were irradiated by γ rays. The as-deposited and irradiated films were characterized by Raman spectroscopy, electrical resistivity, and infrared transmittance. It is shown that the irradiation of the γ rays can lead to the breaking of SP3C-H and SP2C-H bonds, slight increasing of SP3C-C bonds, and induced hydrogen recombination with H2 molecules, subsequently diffusing to the surface of the films. When the γ rays irradiation dose reached 10×104 Gy, the numbers of SP3C-H bonds was decreased by about 50%, the resistivity of irradiated DLC films was increased, and the diamond-like character of the films became more obvious. The structure of DLC films was modified when irradiated by γ rays. The irradiation mechanisms are briefly discussed.

  11. Phase change properties of Ti-Sb-Te thin films deposited by thermal atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Sannian; Shen, Lanlan; Song, Zhitang; Yao, Dongning; Guo, Tianqi; Li, Le; Liu, Bo; Wu, Liangcai; Cheng, Yan; Ding, Yuqiang; Feng, Songlin

    2016-10-01

    Phase change random access memory (PCM) appears to be the strongest candidate for next-generation high density nonvolatile memory. The fabrication of ultrahigh density PCM depends heavily on the thin film growth technique for the phase changing chalcogenide material. In this study, TiSb2Te4 (TST) thin films were deposited by thermal atomic layer deposition (ALD) method using TiCl4, SbCl3, (Et3Si)2Te as precursors. The threshold voltage for the cell based on thermal ALD-deposited TST is about 2.0 V, which is much lower than that (3.5 V) of the device based on PVD-deposited Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST) with the identical cell architecture. Tests of TST-based PCM cells have demonstrated a fast switching rate of 100 ns. Furthermore, because of the lower melting point and thermal conductivities of TST materials, TST-based PCM cells exhibit 19% reduction of pulse voltages for Reset operation compared with GST-based PCM cells. These results show that thermal ALD is an attractive method for the preparation of phase change materials.

  12. Plasma deposition of diamond-like carbon and fluorinated amorphous carbon<