WorldWideScience

Sample records for carbon fiber composites

  1. Carbonized asphaltene-based carbon-carbon fiber composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohnert, George; Lula, James; Bowen, III, Daniel E.

    2016-12-27

    A method of making a carbon binder-reinforced carbon fiber composite is provided using carbonized asphaltenes as the carbon binder. Combinations of carbon fiber and asphaltenes are also provided, along with the resulting composites and articles of manufacture.

  2. Carbon composites composites with carbon fibers, nanofibers, and nanotubes

    CERN Document Server

    Chung, Deborah D L

    2017-01-01

    Carbon Composites: Composites with Carbon Fibers, Nanofibers, and Nanotubes, Second Edition, provides the reader with information on a wide range of carbon fiber composites, including polymer-matrix, metal-matrix, carbon-matrix, ceramic-matrix and cement-matrix composites. In contrast to other books on composites, this work emphasizes materials rather than mechanics. This emphasis reflects the key role of materials science and engineering in the development of composite materials. The applications focus of the book covers both the developing range of structural applications for carbon fiber composites, including military and civil aircraft, automobiles and construction, and non-structural applications, including electromagnetic shielding, sensing/monitoring, vibration damping, energy storage, energy generation, and deicing. In addition to these new application areas, new material in this updated edition includes coverage of cement-matrix composites, carbon nanofibers, carbon matrix precursors, fiber surface ...

  3. Carbon fiber content measurement in composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiushi

    Carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRPs) have been widely used in various structural applications in industries such as aerospace and automotive because of their high specific stiffness and specific strength. Their mechanical properties are strongly influenced by the carbon fiber content in the composites. Measurement of the carbon fiber content in CFRPs is essential for product quality control and process optimization. In this work, a novel carbonization-in-nitrogen method (CIN) is developed to characterize the fiber content in carbon fiber reinforced thermoset and thermoplastic composites. In this method, a carbon fiber composite sample is carbonized in a nitrogen environment at elevated temperatures, alongside a neat resin sample. The carbon fibers are protected from oxidization while the resin (the neat resin and the resin matrix in the composite sample) is carbonized under the nitrogen environment. The residue of the carbonized neat resin sample is used to calibrate the resin carbonization rate and calculate the amount of the resin matrix in the composite sample. The new method has been validated on several thermoset and thermoplastic resin systems and found to yield an accurate measurement of fiber content in carbon fiber polymer composites. In order to further understand the thermal degradation behavior of the high temperature thermoplastic polymer during the carbonization process, the mechanism and the kinetic model of thermal degradation behavior of carbon fiber reinforced poly (phenylene sulfide) (CPPS) are studied using thermogravimetry analysis (TGA). The CPPS is subjected to TGA in an air and nitrogen atmosphere at heating rates from 5 to 40°C min--1. The TGA curves obtained in air are different from those in nitrogen. This demonstrates that weight loss occurs in a single stage in nitrogen but in two stages in air. To elucidate this difference, thermal decomposition kinetics is analyzed by applying the Kissinger, Flynn-Wall-Ozawa, Coat-Redfern and

  4. Fiber-Matrix Interphase Development in Carbon/Carbon Composites

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rellick, G

    1998-01-01

    In carbon/carbon (C/C) composites-i.e., a composite in which a carbon matrix is reinforced with carbon fiber when the matrix is derived from a thermosetting resin, we always observe a distinct, highly graphitizable, and well-oriented...

  5. Carbon fiber reinforcements for sheet molding composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozcan, Soydan; Paulauskas, Felix L.

    2017-11-14

    A method of processing a carbon fiber tow includes the steps of providing a carbon fiber tow made of a plurality of carbon filaments, depositing a sizing composition at spaced-apart sizing sites along a length of the tow, leaving unsized interstitial regions of the tow, and cross-cutting the tow into a plurality of segments. Each segment includes at least a portion of one of the sizing sites and at least a portion of at least one of the unsized regions of the tow, the unsized region including and end portion of the segment.

  6. Carbon Fiber Composite Materials for Automotive Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norris, Jr., Robert E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Mainka, Hendrik [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-06-01

    Volkswagen (VW) is internationally recognized for quantity and quality of world-wide vehicle production and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is internationally recognized in materials research and development. With automotive production ramping up in the recently constructed VW Group of America facility in Chattanooga, Tennessee, ORNL and VW initiated discussions in 2012 concerning opportunities for collaboration around ORNL’s carbon fiber and composites programs. ORNL is conducting an internationally recognized program to develop and implement lower cost carbon fibers and composites for automotive and other “energy missions” for the US Department of Energy. Significant effort is ongoing in selecting, developing, and evaluating alternative precursors, developing and demonstrating advanced conversion techniques, and developing and tailoring surface treatment, sizings, and formatting fiber for specific composite matrices and end-use applications. ORNL already had North America’s most comprehensive suite of tools for carbon fiber research and development and established a semiproduction demonstration line referred to as the Carbon Fiber Technology Facility (CFTF) to facilitate implementation of low cost carbon fiber (LCCF) approaches in early 2013. ORNL and VW agreed to collaborate in a formal Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (NFE-12-03992) specifically focused on evaluating applicability of low cost carbon fiber products for potential vehicle components. The goal of the work outlined in this report was to develop and qualify uses for carbon fiber-reinforced structures in connection with civilian ground transportation. Significant progress was achieved in evaluating and understanding lignin-based precursor materials; however, availability of carbon fiber converted from lignin precursor combined with logistical issues associated with the Visa limitations for the VW participant resulted in significantly shortening of the collaboration

  7. CARBON FIBER COMPOSITES IN HIGH VOLUME

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, Charles David [ORNL; Das, Sujit [ORNL; Jeon, Dr. Saeil [Volvo Trucks North America

    2014-01-01

    Vehicle lightweighting represents one of several design approaches that automotive and heavy truck manufacturers are currently evaluating to improve fuel economy, lower emissions, and improve freight efficiency (tons-miles per gallon of fuel). With changes in fuel efficiency and environmental regulations in the area of transportation, the next decade will likely see considerable vehicle lightweighting throughout the ground transportation industry. Greater use of carbon fiber composites and light metals is a key component of that strategy. This paper examines the competition between candidate materials for lightweighting of heavy vehicles and passenger cars. A 53-component, 25 % mass reduction, body-in-white cost analysis is presented for each material class, highlighting the potential cost penalty for each kilogram of mass reduction and then comparing the various material options. Lastly, as the cost of carbon fiber is a major component of the elevated cost of carbon fiber composites, a brief look at the factors that influence that cost is presented.

  8. FIBER ORIENTATION IN INJECTION MOLDED LONG CARBON FIBER THERMOPLASTIC COMPOSITES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jin; Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Mathur, Raj N.; Sharma, Bhisham; Sangid, Michael D.; Costa, Franco; Jin, Xiaoshi; Tucker III, Charles L.; Fifield, Leonard S.

    2015-03-23

    A set of edge-gated and center-gated plaques were injection molded with long carbon fiber-reinforced thermoplastic composites, and the fiber orientation was measured at different locations of the plaques. Autodesk Simulation Moldflow Insight (ASMI) software was used to simulate the injection molding of these plaques and to predict the fiber orientation, using the anisotropic rotary diffusion and the reduced strain closure models. The phenomenological parameters of the orientation models were carefully identified by fitting to the measured orientation data. The fiber orientation predictions show very good agreement with the experimental data.

  9. Hybrid Composites Based on Carbon Fiber/Carbon Nanofilament Reinforcement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehran Tehrani

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanofilament and nanotubes (CNTs have shown promise for enhancing the mechanical properties of fiber-reinforced composites (FRPs and imparting multi-functionalities to them. While direct mixing of carbon nanofilaments with the polymer matrix in FRPs has several drawbacks, a high volume of uniform nanofilaments can be directly grown on fiber surfaces prior to composite fabrication. This study demonstrates the ability to create carbon nanofilaments on the surface of carbon fibers employing a synthesis method, graphitic structures by design (GSD, in which carbon structures are grown from fuel mixtures using nickel particles as the catalyst. The synthesis technique is proven feasible to grow nanofilament structures—from ethylene mixtures at 550 °C—on commercial polyacrylonitrile (PAN-based carbon fibers. Raman spectroscopy and electron microscopy were employed to characterize the surface-grown carbon species. For comparison purposes, a catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD technique was also utilized to grow multiwall CNTs (MWCNTs on carbon fiber yarns. The mechanical characterization showed that composites using the GSD-grown carbon nanofilaments outperform those using the CCVD-grown CNTs in terms of stiffness and tensile strength. The results suggest that further optimization of the GSD growth time, patterning and thermal shield coating of the carbon fibers is required to fully materialize the potential benefits of the GSD technique.

  10. Hybrid Composites Based on Carbon Fiber/Carbon Nanofilament Reinforcement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tehrani, Mehran; Yari Boroujeni, Ayoub; Luhrs, Claudia; Phillips, Jonathan; Al-Haik, Marwan S

    2014-05-28

    Carbon nanofilament and nanotubes (CNTs) have shown promise for enhancing the mechanical properties of fiber-reinforced composites (FRPs) and imparting multi-functionalities to them. While direct mixing of carbon nanofilaments with the polymer matrix in FRPs has several drawbacks, a high volume of uniform nanofilaments can be directly grown on fiber surfaces prior to composite fabrication. This study demonstrates the ability to create carbon nanofilaments on the surface of carbon fibers employing a synthesis method, graphitic structures by design (GSD), in which carbon structures are grown from fuel mixtures using nickel particles as the catalyst. The synthesis technique is proven feasible to grow nanofilament structures-from ethylene mixtures at 550 °C-on commercial polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based carbon fibers. Raman spectroscopy and electron microscopy were employed to characterize the surface-grown carbon species. For comparison purposes, a catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD) technique was also utilized to grow multiwall CNTs (MWCNTs) on carbon fiber yarns. The mechanical characterization showed that composites using the GSD-grown carbon nanofilaments outperform those using the CCVD-grown CNTs in terms of stiffness and tensile strength. The results suggest that further optimization of the GSD growth time, patterning and thermal shield coating of the carbon fibers is required to fully materialize the potential benefits of the GSD technique.

  11. Hybrid Composites Based on Carbon Fiber/Carbon Nanofilament Reinforcement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tehrani, Mehran; Yari Boroujeni, Ayoub; Luhrs, Claudia; Phillips, Jonathan; Al-Haik, Marwan S.

    2014-01-01

    Carbon nanofilament and nanotubes (CNTs) have shown promise for enhancing the mechanical properties of fiber-reinforced composites (FRPs) and imparting multi-functionalities to them. While direct mixing of carbon nanofilaments with the polymer matrix in FRPs has several drawbacks, a high volume of uniform nanofilaments can be directly grown on fiber surfaces prior to composite fabrication. This study demonstrates the ability to create carbon nanofilaments on the surface of carbon fibers employing a synthesis method, graphitic structures by design (GSD), in which carbon structures are grown from fuel mixtures using nickel particles as the catalyst. The synthesis technique is proven feasible to grow nanofilament structures—from ethylene mixtures at 550 °C—on commercial polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based carbon fibers. Raman spectroscopy and electron microscopy were employed to characterize the surface-grown carbon species. For comparison purposes, a catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD) technique was also utilized to grow multiwall CNTs (MWCNTs) on carbon fiber yarns. The mechanical characterization showed that composites using the GSD-grown carbon nanofilaments outperform those using the CCVD-grown CNTs in terms of stiffness and tensile strength. The results suggest that further optimization of the GSD growth time, patterning and thermal shield coating of the carbon fibers is required to fully materialize the potential benefits of the GSD technique. PMID:28788671

  12. Carbon Fiber Foam Composites and Methods for Making the Same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leseman, Zayd Chad (Inventor); Atwater, Mark Andrew (Inventor); Phillips, Jonathan (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Exemplary embodiments provide methods and apparatus of forming fibrous carbon foams (FCFs). In one embodiment, FCFs can be formed by flowing a fuel rich gas mixture over a catalytic material and components to be encapsulated in a mold to form composite carbon fibers, each composite carbon fiber having a carbon phase grown to encapsulate the component in situ. The composite carbon fibers can be intertwined with one another to form FCFs having a geometry according to the mold.

  13. Multifunctional Hybrid Carbon Nanotube/Carbon Fiber Polymer Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jin Ho; Cano, Roberto J.; Ratcliffe, James G.; Luong, Hoa; Grimsley, Brian W.; Siochi, Emilie J.

    2016-01-01

    For aircraft primary structures, carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites possess many advantages over conventional aluminum alloys due to their light weight, higher strengthand stiffness-to-weight ratio, and low life-cycle maintenance costs. However, the relatively low electrical and thermal conductivities of CFRP composites fail to provide structural safety in certain operational conditions such as lightning strikes. Despite several attempts to solve these issues with the addition of carbon nanotubes (CNT) into polymer matrices, and/or by interleaving CNT sheets between conventional carbon fiber (CF) composite layers, there are still interfacial problems that exist between CNTs (or CF) and the resin. In this study, hybrid CNT/CF polymer composites were fabricated by interleaving layers of CNT sheets with Hexcel® IM7/8852 prepreg. Resin concentrations from 1 wt% to 50 wt% were used to infuse the CNT sheets prior to composite fabrication. The interlaminar properties of the resulting hybrid composites were characterized by mode I and II fracture toughness testing (double cantilever beam and end-notched flexure test). Fractographical analysis was performed to study the effect of resin concentration. In addition, multi-directional physical properties like thermal conductivity of the orthotropic hybrid polymer composite were evaluated. Interleaving CNT sheets significantly improved the in-plane (axial and perpendicular direction of CF alignment) thermal conductivity of the hybrid composite laminates by 50 - 400%.

  14. Hansen solubility parameters for a carbon fiber/epoxy composite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Launay, Helene; Hansen, Charles M.; Almdal, Kristoffer

    2007-01-01

    In this study, the physical affinity between an epoxy matrix and oxidized, unsized carbon fibers has been evaluated using Hansen solubility (cohesion) parameters (HSP). A strong physical compatibility has been shown, since their respective HSP are close. The use of a glassy carbon substrate...... as a model for unsized carbon fiber has been demonstrated as appropriate for the study of interactions between the materials in composite carbon fiber-epoxy systems. The HSP of glassy carbon are similar to those of carbon fibers and epoxy matrix. (C) 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  15. Evaluation of Mechanical Property of Carbon Fiber/Polypropylene Composite According to Carbon Fiber Surface Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Song Hee; Oh, Hyun Ju; Kim, Seong Su

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the mechanical properties of a carbon fiber/polypropylene composite were evaluated according to the carbon fiber surface treatment. Carbon fiber surface treatments such as silane coupling agents and plasma treatment were performed to enhance the interfacial strength between carbon fibers and polypropylene. The treated carbon fiber surface was characterized by XP S, Sem, and single-filament tensile test. The interlaminar shear strength (Ilks) of the composite with respect to the surface treatment was determined by a short beam shear test. The test results showed that the Ilks of the plasma-treated specimen increased with the treatment time. The Ilks of the specimen treated with a silane coupling agent after plasma treatment increased by 48.7% compared to that of the untreated specimen

  16. Radiation processing for PTFE composite reinforced with carbon fiber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akihiro Oshima; Akira Udagawa; Yousuke Morita

    1999-01-01

    The present work is an attempt to evaluate the performance of crosslinked PTFE as a polymer matrix for carbon fiber-reinforced composite materials. The carbon fiber-reinforced PTFE pre-composite, which is laminated with PTFE fine powder, is crosslinked by electron beam irradiation. Mechanical and frictional properties of the crosslinked PTFE composite obtained are higher than those of PTFE resin. The crosslinked PTFE composite with high mechanical and radiation resistant performance is obtained by radiation crosslinking process

  17. Radiation processing for carbon fiber-reinforced polytetrafluoroethylene composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oshima, Akihiro; Udagawa, Akira; Morita, Yousuke

    2001-01-01

    The present work is an attempt to evaluate the performance of the fiber composites with crosslinked polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) as a polymer matrix by radiation. The uni-directional carbon fiber-reinforced composites were fabricated with PTFE fine powder impregnation method and then crosslinked by electron beams irradiation under selective conditions. The carbon fiber-reinforced crosslinked PTFE composites show good mechanical properties compared with crosslinked PTFE. The radiation resistance of crosslinked PTFE composites is improved more than that of crosslinked resin without fiber. (author)

  18. Carbon Fiber Reinforced Carbon Composite Valve for an Internal Combustion Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivers, H. Kevin (Inventor); Ransone, Philip O. (Inventor); Northam, G. Burton (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A carbon fiber reinforced carbon composite valve for internal combustion engines and the like formed of continuous carbon fibers throughout the valve's stem and head is disclosed. The valve includes braided carbon fiber material over axially aligned unidirectional carbon fibers forming a valve stem; the braided and unidirectional carbon fibers being broomed out at one end of the valve stem forming the shape of the valve head; the valve-shaped structure being densified and rigidized with a matrix of carbon containing discontinuous carbon fibers: and the finished valve being treated to resist oxidation. Also disclosed is a carbon matrix plug containing continuous and discontinuous carbon fibers and forming a net-shape valve head acting as a mandrel over which the unidirectional and braided carbon fibers are formed according to textile processes. Also disclosed are various preform valves and processes for making finished and preform carbon fiber reinforced carbon composite valves.

  19. Preparation and characterization of carbon nanotube-hybridized carbon fiber to reinforce epoxy composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An, Feng; Lu, Chunxiang; Li, Yonghong; Guo, Jinhai; Lu, Xiaoxuan; Lu, Huibin; He, Shuqing; Yang, Yu

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: → CNTs were uniformly grown onto the carbon fibers. → No obvious mechanical properties of carbon fiber were observed after CNT growth. → The IFSS of multiscale epoxy composite was measured by single fiber pull-out tests. → Observing fractography of composite, the fracture modes of CNTs were discussed. -- Abstract: The multiscale carbon nanotube-hybridized carbon fiber was prepared by a newly developed aerosol-assisted chemical vapour deposition. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscope were carried out to characterize this multiscale material. Compared with the original carbon fibers, the fabrication of this hybrid fiber resulted in an almost threefold increase of BET surface area to reach 2.22 m 2 /g. Meanwhile, there was a slight degradation of fiber tensile strength within 10%, while the fiber modulus was not significantly affected. The interfacial shearing strength of a carbon fiber-reinforced polymer composite with carbon nanotube-hybridized carbon fiber and an epoxy matrix was determined from the single fiber pull-out tests of microdroplet composite. Due to an efficient increase of load transfer at the fiber/matrix interfaces, the interracial shear strength of composite reinforced by carbon nanotube-hybridized carbon fiber is almost 94% higher than that of one reinforced by the original carbon fiber. Based on the fractured morphologies of the composites, the interfacial reinforcing mechanisms were discussed through proposing different types of carbon nanotube fracture modes along with fiber pulling out from epoxy composites.

  20. Carbon fiber/SiC composite for reduced activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noda, T.; Araki, H.; Abe, F.; Okada, M.

    1991-01-01

    A carbon fiber/SiC composite fabricated by a chemical vapor infiltration process at 1173-1623 K was studied to develop a low-activation material. A high-purity composite was obtained with the total amount of impurities less than 0.02 wt%. The microstructure and the mechanical properties using a bend test were examined. A composite with woven carbon yarn showed both high strength and toughness. Further, the induced activity of the material was evaluated by calculations simulating fusion neutron irradiation. The carbon fiber/SiC composite shows an excellent low-activation behavior. (orig.)

  1. Carbon and glass hierarchical fibers: Influence of carbon nanotubes on tensile, flexural and impact properties of short fiber reinforced composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahmanian, S.; Thean, K.S.; Suraya, A.R.; Shazed, M.A.; Mohd Salleh, M.A.; Yusoff, H.M.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Dense CNT were grown on carbon fiber and glass fiber by use of floating catalyst CVD method. ► CNT showed different growing mechanism on carbon and glass fiber. ► Short fiber-CNT-composites showed enhanced mechanical properties. ► CNT coating enhanced fiber–matrix interaction and acted as additional reinforcement. -- Abstract: Dense carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were grown uniformly on the surface of carbon fibers and glass fibers to create hierarchical fibers by use of floating catalyst chemical vapor deposition. Morphologies of the CNTs were investigated using scanning electronic microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). Larger diameter dimension and distinct growing mechanism of nanotubes on glass fiber were revealed. Short carbon and glass fiber reinforced polypropylene composites were fabricated using the hierarchical fibers and compared with composites made using neat fibers. Tensile, flexural and impact properties of the composites were measured, which showed evident enhancement in all mechanical properties compared to neat short fiber composites. SEM micrographs of composite fracture surface demonstrated improved adhesion between CNT-coated fiber and the matrix. The enhanced mechanical properties of short fiber composites was attributed to the synergistic effects of CNTs in improving fiber–matrix interfacial properties as well as the CNTs acting as supplemental reinforcement in short fiber-composites.

  2. Puncture-Healing Thermoplastic Resin Carbon-Fiber Reinforced Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Keith L. (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Grimsley, Brian W. (Inventor); Cano, Roberto J. (Inventor); Czabaj, Michael W. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    A composite comprising a combination of a self-healing polymer matrix and a carbon fiber reinforcement is described. In one embodiment, the matrix is a polybutadiene graft copolymer matrix, such as polybutadiene graft copolymer comprising poly(butadiene)-graft-poly(methyl acrylate-co-acrylonitrile). A method of fabricating the composite is also described, comprising the steps of manufacturing a pre-impregnated unidirectional carbon fiber preform by wetting a plurality of carbon fibers with a solution, the solution comprising a self-healing polymer and a solvent, and curing the preform. A method of repairing a structure made from the composite of the invention is described. A novel prepreg material used to manufacture the composite of the invention is described.

  3. Puncture-Healing Thermoplastic Resin Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Keith L. (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Grimsley, Brian W. (Inventor); Cano, Roberto J. (Inventor); Czabaj, Michael W. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A composite comprising a combination of a self-healing polymer matrix and a carbon fiber reinforcement is described. In one embodiment, the matrix is a polybutadiene graft copolymer matrix, such as polybutadiene graft copolymer comprising poly(butadiene)-graft-poly(methyl acrylate-co-acrylonitrile). A method of fabricating the composite is also described, comprising the steps of manufacturing a pre-impregnated unidirectional carbon fiber preform by wetting a plurality of carbon fibers with a solution, the solution comprising a self-healing polymer and a solvent, and curing the preform. A method of repairing a structure made from the composite of the invention is described. A novel prepreg material used to manufacture the composite of the invention is described.

  4. The dynamic response of carbon fiber-filled polymer composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dattelbaum, D. M.; Gustavsen, R. L.; Sheffield, S. A.; Stahl, D. B.; Scharff, R. J.; Rigg, P. A.; Furmanski, J.; Orler, E. B.; Patterson, B.; Coe, J. D.

    2012-08-01

    The dynamic (shock) responses of two carbon fiber-filled polymer composites have been quantified using gas gun-driven plate impact experimentation. The first composite is a filament-wound, highly unidirectional carbon fiber-filled epoxy with a high degree of porosity. The second composite is a chopped carbon fiber- and graphite-filled phenolic resin with little-to-no porosity. Hugoniot data are presented for the carbon fiber-epoxy (CE) composite to 18.6 GPa in the through-thickness direction, in which the shock propagates normal to the fibers. The data are best represented by a linear Rankine-Hugoniot fit: Us = 2.87 + 1.17 ×up(ρ0 = 1.536g/cm3). The shock wave structures were found to be highly heterogeneous, both due to the anisotropic nature of the fiber-epoxy microstructure, and the high degree of void volume. Plate impact experiments were also performed on a carbon fiber-filled phenolic (CP) composite to much higher shock input pressures, exceeding the reactants-to-products transition common to polymers. The CP was found to be stiffer than the filament-wound CE in the unreacted Hugoniot regime, and transformed to products near the shock-driven reaction threshold on the principal Hugoniot previously shown for the phenolic binder itself. [19] On-going research is focused on interrogating the direction-dependent dyanamic response and dynamic failure strength (spall) for the CE composite in the TT and 0∘ (fiber) directions.

  5. The dynamic response of carbon fiber-filled polymer composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patterson B.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic (shock responses of two carbon fiber-filled polymer composites have been quantified using gas gun-driven plate impact experimentation. The first composite is a filament-wound, highly unidirectional carbon fiber-filled epoxy with a high degree of porosity. The second composite is a chopped carbon fiber- and graphite-filled phenolic resin with little-to-no porosity. Hugoniot data are presented for the carbon fiber-epoxy (CE composite to 18.6 GPa in the through-thickness direction, in which the shock propagates normal to the fibers. The data are best represented by a linear Rankine-Hugoniot fit: Us = 2.87 + 1.17 ×up(ρ0 = 1.536g/cm3. The shock wave structures were found to be highly heterogeneous, both due to the anisotropic nature of the fiber-epoxy microstructure, and the high degree of void volume. Plate impact experiments were also performed on a carbon fiber-filled phenolic (CP composite to much higher shock input pressures, exceeding the reactants-to-products transition common to polymers. The CP was found to be stiffer than the filament-wound CE in the unreacted Hugoniot regime, and transformed to products near the shock-driven reaction threshold on the principal Hugoniot previously shown for the phenolic binder itself. [19] On-going research is focused on interrogating the direction-dependent dyanamic response and dynamic failure strength (spall for the CE composite in the TT and 0∘ (fiber directions.

  6. Multiscale modeling of PVDF matrix carbon fiber composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greminger, Michael; Haghiashtiani, Ghazaleh

    2017-06-01

    Self-sensing carbon fiber reinforced composites have the potential to enable structural health monitoring that is inherent to the composite material rather than requiring external or embedded sensors. It has been demonstrated that a self-sensing carbon fiber reinforced polymer composite can be created by using the piezoelectric polymer polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) as the matrix material and using a Kevlar layer to separate two carbon fiber layers. In this configuration, the electrically conductive carbon fiber layers act as electrodes and the Kevlar layer acts as a dielectric to prevent the electrical shorting of the carbon fiber layers. This composite material has been characterized experimentally for its effective d 33 and d 31 piezoelectric coefficients. However, for design purposes, it is desirable to obtain a predictive model of the effective piezoelectric coefficients for the final smart composite material. Also, the inverse problem can be solved to determine the degree of polarization obtained in the PVDF material during polarization by comparing the effective d 33 and d 31 values obtained in experiment to those predicted by the finite element model. In this study, a multiscale micromechanics and coupled piezoelectric-mechanical finite element modeling approach is introduced to predict the mechanical and piezoelectric performance of a plain weave carbon fiber reinforced PVDF composite. The modeling results show good agreement with the experimental results for the mechanical and electrical properties of the composite. In addition, the degree of polarization of the PVDF component of the composite is predicted using this multiscale modeling approach and shows that there is opportunity to drastically improve the smart composite’s performance by improving the polarization procedure.

  7. Energy Absorption in Chopped Carbon Fiber Compression Molded Composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starbuck, J.M.

    2001-01-01

    In passenger vehicles the ability to absorb energy due to impact and be survivable for the occupant is called the ''crashworthiness'' of the structure. To identify and quantify the energy absorbing mechanisms in candidate automotive composite materials, test methodologies were developed for conducting progressive crush tests on composite plate specimens. The test method development and experimental set-up focused on isolating the damage modes associated with the frond formation that occurs in dynamic testing of composite tubes. Quasi-static progressive crush tests were performed on composite plates manufactured from chopped carbon fiber with an epoxy resin system using compression molding techniques. The carbon fiber was Toray T700 and the epoxy resin was YLA RS-35. The effect of various material and test parameters on energy absorption was evaluated by varying the following parameters during testing: fiber volume fraction, fiber length, fiber tow size, specimen width, profile radius, and profile constraint condition. It was demonstrated during testing that the use of a roller constraint directed the crushing process and the load deflection curves were similar to progressive crushing of tubes. Of all the parameters evaluated, the fiber length appeared to be the most critical material parameter, with shorter fibers having a higher specific energy absorption than longer fibers. The combination of material parameters that yielded the highest energy absorbing material was identified

  8. Carbon fiber composite characterization in adverse thermal environments.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez-Vasquez, Sylvia; Brown, Alexander L.; Hubbard, Joshua A.; Ramirez, Ciro J.; Dodd, Amanda B.

    2011-05-01

    The behavior of carbon fiber aircraft composites was studied in adverse thermal environments. The effects of resin composition and fiber orientation were measured in two test configurations: 102 by 127 millimeter (mm) test coupons were irradiated at approximately 22.5 kW/m{sup 2} to measure thermal response, and 102 by 254 mm test coupons were irradiated at approximately 30.7 kW/m{sup 2} to characterize piloted flame spread in the vertically upward direction. Carbon-fiber composite materials with epoxy and bismaleimide resins, and uni-directional and woven fiber orientations, were tested. Bismaleimide samples produced less smoke, and were more resistant to flame spread, as expected for high temperature thermoset resins with characteristically lower heat release rates. All materials lost approximately 20-25% of their mass regardless of resin type, fiber orientation, or test configuration. Woven fiber composites displayed localized smoke jetting whereas uni-directional composites developed cracks parallel to the fibers from which smoke and flames emanated. Swelling and delamination were observed with volumetric expansion on the order of 100% to 200%. The purpose of this work was to provide validation data for SNL's foundational thermal and combustion modeling capabilities.

  9. Plasma exposure tests of a carbon fiber/epoxy composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, T.; Rome, J.

    1988-07-01

    An experiment was conducted to test the exposure of a vacuum chamber made of a carbon fiber/epoxy composite to a plasma environment. In previous tests this material(CE 339, made by Ferro Corp.) has shown good vacuum properties and has also demonstrated the capability to withstand high energy electron beams in tests at the Naval Research Laboratory. Based on these promising results, the Torsatron Group at Auburn University conducted plasma exposure tests on a section of carbon fiber/epoxy composite pipe furnished by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. 1 ref, 2 figs

  10. Intermittent sizing on carbon fiber for composite application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norris, Jr, Robert E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Paulauskas, Felix L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ozcan, Soydan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Xiong, Fue [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Grappe, Hippolyte A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-08-01

    Intermittent sizing is a technique designed to improve the bonding of carbon fiber to a resin when manufacturing composite parts. The purpose of this technique is to improve Sheet Molding Composites (SMC) made of non-continuous carbon fibers while using regular material. At the end of the project, tests showed that improved mechanical properties have been achieved using this technique compared to conventional process. Mechanical properties have been improved by 110% for the peak tensile stress and by 60% for the modulus at the laboratory scale. In this project, Continental Structural Plastics and ORNL have worked to demonstrate the scalability and viability of commercialization of this technique.

  11. Electron beam irradiation effects on carbon fiber reinforced PEEK composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasuga, Tsuneo; Hagiwara, Miyuki; Odajima, Tosikazu; Sakai, Hideo; Nakakura, Toshiyuki; Masutani, Masahiro.

    1987-03-01

    Carbon fiber(CF) reinforced composites, using polyarylether-sulfone (PES) or polyarylether-ether-ketone (PEEK) as matrix material, were prepared and their electron beam irradiation effects were studied on the basis of changes in mechanical and dynamic viscoelastic properties and observation of fracture surfaces. The flexural strength of PES-CF composite decreased to 70 % of the initial strength after the irradiation of 3 MGy and 40 % after 15 MGy. The change in the profile of stress-strain (S-S) curves and fractographic observation by electron microscopy indicated that this composite irradiated with over 3 MGy was fractured by delamination caused by to the degradation of matrix polymer. The mechanical properties of PEEK-CF composite were scarcely decreased even after irradiated up to 180 MGy and this composite showed very high radiation resistance. The change in the profile of S-S curves and fractographic observation showed that this composite fractured due to destruction of fiber in the dose range less than 180 MGy, indicating that PEEK was excellent matrix material used in high radiation field. PEEK-PES-CF composite which was composed of the carbon fibers coated with PES solution showed less radiation resistance compared with PEEK-CF composite; the flexural strength decreased to 85 % of the initial value after the irradiation with 90 MGy. It was revealed from the changes in the profile of S-S curve that the specimen irradiated over 120 MGy was fractured due to not only fiber destruction but delamination. Deterioration mechanism of PEEK-PES-CF composite was studied by dynamic viscoelastic measurements in connection with the damage on matrix-fiber interface. It was suggested that the deterioration in mechanical properties of this composite was caused by the degradation of PES that coated on the surface of the carbon fibers. (author)

  12. Enhanced thermal conductivity of carbon fiber/phenolic resin composites by the introduction of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y. A.; Kamio, S.; Tajiri, T.; Hayashi, T.; Song, S. M.; Endo, M.; Terrones, M.; Dresselhaus, M. S.

    2007-02-01

    The authors report a significant enhancement in the thermal conductivity of a conventional carbon fiber/phenolic resin composite system when adding highly crystalline multiwalled carbon nanotubes. They demonstrate that 7wt% of carbon nanotubes dispersed homogeneously in a phenolic resin acted as an effective thermal bridge between adjacent carbon fibers and resulted in an enhancement of the thermal conductivity (e.g., from 250to393W/mK). These results indicate that highly crystalline carbon nanotubes can be used as a multifunctional filler to enhance simultaneously the mechanical and thermal properties of the carbon fiber/phenolic resin composites.

  13. Tensile Properties of Polyimide Composites Incorporating Carbon Nanotubes-Grafted and Polyimide-Coated Carbon Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naito, Kimiyoshi

    2014-09-01

    The tensile properties and fracture behavior of polyimide composite bundles incorporating carbon nanotubes-grafted (CNT-grafted) and polyimide-coated (PI-coated) high-tensile-strength polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based (T1000GB), and high-modulus pitch-based (K13D) carbon fibers were investigated. The CNT were grown on the surface of the carbon fibers by chemical vapor deposition. The pyromellitic dianhydride/4,4'-oxydianiline PI nanolayer coating was deposited on the surface of the carbon fiber by high-temperature vapor deposition polymerization. The results clearly demonstrate that CNT grafting and PI coating were effective for improving the Weibull modulus of T1000GB PAN-based and K13D pitch-based carbon fiber bundle composites. In addition, the average tensile strength of the PI-coated T1000GB carbon fiber bundle composites was also higher than that of the as-received carbon fiber bundle composites, while the average tensile strength of the CNT-grafted T1000GB, K13D, and the PI-coated K13D carbon fiber bundle composites was similar to that of the as-received carbon fiber bundle composites.

  14. Multiscale carbon nanotube-carbon fiber reinforcement for advanced epoxy composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekyarova, E; Thostenson, E T; Yu, A; Kim, H; Gao, J; Tang, J; Hahn, H T; Chou, T-W; Itkis, M E; Haddon, R C

    2007-03-27

    We report an approach to the development of advanced structural composites based on engineered multiscale carbon nanotube-carbon fiber reinforcement. Electrophoresis was utilized for the selective deposition of multi- and single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on woven carbon fabric. The CNT-coated carbon fabric panels were subsequently infiltrated with epoxy resin using vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) to fabricate multiscale hybrid composites in which the nanotubes were completely integrated into the fiber bundles and reinforced the matrix-rich regions. The carbon nanotube/carbon fabric/epoxy composites showed approximately 30% enhancement of the interlaminar shear strength as compared to that of carbon fiber/epoxy composites without carbon nanotubes and demonstrate significantly improved out-of-plane electrical conductivity.

  15. Mechanical characterization of epoxy composite with multiscale reinforcements: Carbon nanotubes and short carbon fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahmanian, S.; Suraya, A.R.; Shazed, M.A.; Zahari, R.; Zainudin, E.S.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Multiscale composite was prepared by incorporation of carbon nanotubes and fibers. • Carbon nanotubes were also grown on short carbon fibers to enhance stress transfer. • Significant improvements were achieved in mechanical properties of composites. • Synergic effect of carbon nanotubes and fibers was demonstrated. - Abstract: Carbon nanotubes (CNT) and short carbon fibers were incorporated into an epoxy matrix to fabricate a high performance multiscale composite. To improve the stress transfer between epoxy and carbon fibers, CNT were also grown on fibers through chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method to produce CNT grown short carbon fibers (CSCF). Mechanical characterization of composites was performed to investigate the synergy effects of CNT and CSCF in the epoxy matrix. The multiscale composites revealed significant improvement in elastic and storage modulus, strength as well as impact resistance in comparison to CNT–epoxy or CSCF–epoxy composites. An optimum content of CNT was found which provided the maximum stiffness and strength. The synergic reinforcing effects of combined fillers were analyzed on the fracture surface of composites through optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM)

  16. Process Optimization of Bismaleimide (BMI) Resin Infused Carbon Fiber Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrlich, Joshua W.; Tate, LaNetra C.; Cox, Sarah B.; Taylor, Brian J.; Wright, M. Clara; Faughnan, Patrick D.; Batterson, Lawrence M.; Caraccio, Anne J.; Sampson, Jeffery W.

    2013-01-01

    Engineers today are presented with the opportunity to design and build the next generation of space vehicles out of the lightest, strongest, and most durable materials available. Composites offer excellent structural characteristics and outstanding reliability in many forms that will be utilized in future aerospace applications including the Commercial Crew and Cargo Program and the Orion space capsule. NASA's Composites for Exploration (CoEx) project researches the various methods of manufacturing composite materials of different fiber characteristics while using proven infusion methods of different resin compositions. Development and testing on these different material combinations will provide engineers the opportunity to produce optimal material compounds for multidisciplinary applications. Through the CoEx project, engineers pursue the opportunity to research and develop repair patch procedures for damaged spacecraft. Working in conjunction with Raptor Resins Inc., NASA engineers are utilizing high flow liquid infusion molding practices to manufacture high-temperature composite parts comprised of intermediate modulus 7 (IM7) carbon fiber material. IM7 is a continuous, high-tensile strength composite with outstanding structural qualities such as high shear strength, tensile strength and modulus as well as excellent corrosion, creep, and fatigue resistance. IM7 carbon fiber, combined with existing thermoset and thermoplastic resin systems, can provide improvements in material strength reinforcement and deformation-resistant properties for high-temperature applications. Void analysis of the different layups of the IM7 material discovered the largest total void composition within the [ +45 , 90 , 90 , -45 ] composite panel. Tensile and compressional testing proved the highest mechanical strength was found in the [0 4] layup. This paper further investigates the infusion procedure of a low-cost/high-performance BMI resin into an IM7 carbon fiber material and the

  17. Mechanical Reinforcement of Epoxy Composites with Carbon Fibers and HDPE

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, R.; Chang, Q.; Huang, X.; Li, J.

    2018-01-01

    Silanized carbon fibers (CFs) and a high-density polyethylene with amino terminal groups (HDPE) were introduced into epoxy resins to fabricate high-performance composites. A. mechanical characterization of the composites was performed to investigate the effect of CFs in cured epoxy/HDPE systems. The composites revealed a noticeable improvement in the tensile strength, elongation at break, flexural strength, and impact strength in comparison with those of neat epoxy and cured epoxy/HDPE systems. SEM micrographs showed that the toughening effect could be explained by yield deformations, phase separation, and microcracking.

  18. Prestressed Carbon Fiber Composite Overwrapped Gun Tube

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Littlefield, Andrew; Hyland, Edward

    2006-01-01

    .... Using composite materials not only directly removes weight from the gun tube but, by better balancing the tube, allows the use of smaller drive systems, thus further enhancing the system weight loss...

  19. Carbon Fiber Reinforced Carbon Composite Rotary Valve for an Internal Combustion Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northam, G.Burton (Inventor); Ransone, Philip O. (Inventor); Rivers, H. Kevin (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced carbon composite rotary sleeve, and disc valves for internal combustion engines and the like are disclosed. The valves are formed from knitted or braided or wrap-locked carbon fiber shapes. Also disclosed are valves fabricated from woven carbon fibers and from molded carbon matrix material. The valves of the present invention with their very low coefficient of thermal expansion and excellent thermal and self-lubrication properties do not present the sealing and lubrication problems that have prevented rotary sleeve and disc valves from operating efficiently and reliably in the past. Also disclosed are a sealing tang to further improve sealing capabilities and anti-oxidation treatments.

  20. Carbon Fiber Reinforced Carbon Composites Rotary Valves for Internal Combustion Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northam, G. Burton (Inventor); Ransone, Philip O. (Inventor); Rivers, H. Kevin (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced carbon composite rotary, sleeve, and disc valves for internal combustion engines and the like are disclosed. The valves are formed from knitted or braided or warp-locked carbon fiber shapes. Also disclosed are valves fabricated from woven carbon fibers and from molded carbon matrix material. The valves of the present invention with their very low coefficient of thermal expansion and excellent thermal and self-lubrication properties, do not present the sealing and lubrication problems that have prevented rotary, sleeve, and disc valves from operating efficiently and reliably in the past. Also disclosed are a sealing tang to further improve sealing capabilities and anti-oxidation treatments.

  1. Global Carbon Fiber Composites Supply Chain Competitiveness Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sujit Das, Josh Warren, Devin West, Susan M. Schexnayder

    2016-05-01

    This analysis identifies key opportunities in the carbon fiber supply chain where resources and investments can help advance the clean energy economy. The report focuses on four application areas — wind energy, aerospace, automotive, and pressure vessels — that top the list of industries using carbon fiber and carbon fiber reinforced polymers. For each of the four application areas, the report addresses the supply and demand trends within that sector, supply chain, and costs of carbon fiber and components.

  2. Carbon fiber/carbon nanotube reinforced hierarchical composites: Effect of CNT distribution on shearing strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, H. W.; Mishnaevsky, Leon; Yi, H. Y.

    2016-01-01

    The strength and fracture behavior of carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites with carbon nanotube (CNT) secondary reinforcement are investigated experimentally and numerically. Short Beam Shearing tests have been carried out, with SEM observations of the damage evolution in the composites. 3D...... CNT nanoreinforcement into the matrix and/or the sizing of carbon fiber/reinforced composites ensures strong increase of the composite strength. The effect of secondary CNTs reinforcement is strongest when some small addition of CNTs in the polymer matrix is complemented by the fiber sizing with high...... multiscale computational (FE) models of the carbon/polymer composite with varied CNT distributions have been developed and employed to study the effect of the secondary CNT reinforcement, its distribution and content on the strength and fracture behavior of the composites. It is shown that adding secondary...

  3. Mechanical properties of carbon fiber/cellulose composite papers modified by hot-melting fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunzhou Shi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Carbon fiber (CF/cellulose (CLS composite papers were prepared by papermaking techniques and hot-melting fibers were used for modification. The mechanical properties of the obtained composite papers with different CF, CLS and hot-melting fiber ratios were studied and further discussed. It is observed that, for both CF/CLS composite papers and those modified by hot-melting fibers, the normal stress firstly increases and then declines with the addition of carbon fibers. The results also show that with the addition of hot-melting fibers, the modified papers exhibit enhanced mechanical performance compared to CF/CLS composite papers. Through SEM characterization, it is confirmed that the improvement of mechanical properties attributes to the reinforcement of adhesive binding at the fiber overlap nodes. Also, through four-probe method, the resistivity and the electrical performance of the modified and unmodified papers were characterized and the result shows that the hot-melting fiber modification brings no harm to the electrical properties.

  4. Fracture morphology of carbon fiber reinforced plastic composite laminates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinod Srinivasa

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP composites have been extensively used in fabrication of primary structures for aerospace, automobile and other engineering applications. With continuous and widespread use of these composites in several advanced technology, the frequency of failures is likely to increase. Therefore, to establish the reasons for failures, the fracture modes should be understood thoroughly and unambiguously. In this paper, CFRP composite have been tested in tension, compression and flexural loadings; and microscopic study with the aid of Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM has been performed on failed (fractured composite surfaces to identify the principle features of failure. Efforts have been made in correlating the fracture surface characteristics to the failure mode. The micro-mechanics analysis of failure serves as a useful guide in selecting constituent materials and designing composites from the failure behavior point of view. Also, the local failure initiation results obtained here has been reliably extended to global failure prediction.

  5. Cohesive zone model of carbon nanotube-coated carbon fiber/polyester composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agnihotri, Prabhat Kamal; Kar, Kamal K; Basu, Sumit

    2012-01-01

    It has been previously reported that the average properties of carbon nanotube-coated carbon fiber/polyester multiscale composites critically depend on the length and density of nanotubes on the fiber surface. In this paper the effect of nanotube length and density on the interfacial properties of the carbon nanotube-coated carbon fiber–polymer interface has been studied using shear lag and a cohesive zone model. The latter model incorporates frictional sliding after complete debonding between the fiber and matrix and has been developed to quantify the effect of nanotube coating on various interfacial characterizing parameters. Our numerical results indicate that fibers with an optimal coverage and length of nanotubes significantly increase the interfacial strength and friction between the fiber and polymer. However, they also embrittle the interface compared with bare fibers. (paper)

  6. Thermal conductivity, electrical conductivity and specific heat of copper-carbon fiber composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuniya, Keiichi; Arakawa, Hideo; Kanai, Tsuneyuki; Chiba, Akio

    1988-01-01

    A new material of copper/carbon fiber composite is developed which retains the properties of copper, i.e., its excellent electrical and thermal conductivity, and the property of carbon, i.e., a small thermal expansion coefficient. These properties of the composite are adjustable within a certain range by changing the volume and/or the orientation of the carbon fibers. The effects of carbon fiber volume and arrangement changes on the thermal and electrical conductivity, and specific heat of the composite are studied. Results obtained are as follows: the thermal and electrical conductivity of the composite decrease as the volume of the carbon fiber increases, and were influenced by the fiber orientation. The results are predictable from a careful application of the rule of mixtures for composites. The specific heat of the composite was dependent, not on fiber orientation, but on fiber volume. In the thermal fatigue tests, no degradation in the electrical conductivity of this composite was observed.

  7. Effect of carbon nanotubes upon emissions from cutting and sanding carbon fiber-epoxy composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heitbrink, William A.; Lo, Li-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are being incorporated into structural composites to enhance material strength. During fabrication or repair activities, machining nanocomposites may release CNTs into the workplace air. An experimental study was conducted to evaluate the emissions generated by cutting and sanding on three types of epoxy-composite panels: Panel A containing graphite fibers, Panel B containing graphite fibers and carbon-based mat, and Panel C containing graphite fibers, carbon-based mat, and multi-walled CNTs. Aerosol sampling was conducted with direct-reading instruments, and filter samples were collected for measuring elemental carbon (EC) and fiber concentrations. Our study results showed that cutting Panel C with a band saw did not generate detectable emissions of fibers inspected by transmission electron microscopy but did increase the particle mass, number, and EC emission concentrations by 20–80 % compared to Panels A and B. Sanding operation performed on two Panel C resulted in fiber emission rates of 1.9 × 10 8 and 2.8 × 10 6 fibers per second (f/s), while no free aerosol fibers were detected from sanding Panels A and B containing no CNTs. These free CNT fibers may be a health concern. However, the analysis of particle and EC concentrations from these same samples cannot clearly indicate the presence of CNTs, because extraneous aerosol generation from machining the composite epoxy material increased the mass concentrations of the EC

  8. RADIATION EFFECTS ON EPOXY/CARBON FIBER COMPOSITE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, E; Eric Skidmore, E

    2008-12-12

    The Department of Energy Savannah River Site vitrifies nuclear waste incident to defense programs through its Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The piping in the DWPF seal pot jumper configuration must withstand the stresses during an unlikely but potential deflagration event, and maintain its safety function for a 20-year service life. Carbon fiber-reinforced epoxy composites (CFR) were proposed for protection and reinforcement of piping during such an event. The proposed CFR materials have been ASME-approved (Section XI, Code Case N-589-1) for post-construction maintenance and is DOT-compliant per 49CFR 192 and 195. The proposed carbon fiber/epoxy composite reinforcement system was originally developed for pipeline rehabilitation and post-construction maintenance in petrochemical, refineries, DOT applications and other industries. The effects of ionizing radiation on polymers and organic materials have been studied for many years. The majority of available data are based on traditional exposures to gamma irradiation at high dose rates ({approx}10,000 Gy/hr) allowing high total dose within reasonable test periods and general comparison of different materials exposed at such conditions. However, studies in recent years have shown that degradation of many polymers are sensitive to dose rate, with more severe degradation often observed at similar or even lower total doses when exposed to lower dose rates. This behavior has been primarily attributed to diffusion-limited oxidation which is minimized during very high dose rate exposures. Most test standards for accelerated aging and nuclear qualification of components acknowledge these limitations. The results of testing to determine the radiation resistance and microstructural effects of gamma irradiation exposure on a bisphenol-A based epoxy matrix composite reinforced with carbon fibers are presented. This work provides a foundation for a more extensive evaluation of dose rate effects on advanced epoxy

  9. Influence of carbon nanotubes coatings onto carbon fiber by oxidative treatments combined with electrophoretic deposition on interfacial properties of carbon fiber composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng, Chao; Jiang, Jianjun; Liu, Fa; Fang, Liangchao; Wang, Junbiao; Li, Dejia; Wu, Jianjun

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Carbon nanotube/carbon fiber hybrid fiber was proposed by the treatment with hydrogen peroxide and concentrated nitric acid combined with electrophoretic deposition process. - Highlights: • Carbon nanotube coated carbon fiber was prepared by two methods. • Uniform and dense CNTs network formed by oxidative treatments combined with EPD. • Pretreatment of the CF is beneficial to EPD of CNTs on carbon fiber surface. • CNTs enhanced the surface activity and wettability of carbon fibers. • CNTs have contributed to the interfacial properties of composite. - Abstract: To improve the interfacial performance of carbon fiber (CF) and epoxy resin, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) coatings were utilized to achieve this purpose through coating onto CF by the treatment with hydrogen peroxide and concentrated nitric acid combined with electrophoretic deposition (EPD) process. The influence of electrophoretically deposited CNTs coatings on the surface properties of CFs were investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectrometer, atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and dynamic contact angle analysis. The results indicated that the deposition of carbon nanotubes introduced some polar groups to carbon fiber surfaces, enhanced surface roughness and changed surface morphologies of carbon fibers. Surface wettability of carbon fibers may be significantly improved by increasing surface free energy of the fibers due to the deposition of CNTs. The thickness and density of the coatings increases with the introduction of pretreatment of the CF during the EPD process. Short beam shear test was performed to examine the effect of carbon fiber functionalization on mechanical properties of the carbon fiber/epoxy resin composites. The interfacial adhesion of CNTs/CF reinforced epoxy composites showed obvious enhancement of interlaminar shear strength by 60.2% and scanning electron microscope photographs showed that the failure mode of composites was changed

  10. New generation fiber reinforced polymer composites incorporating carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliman, Eslam

    The last five decades observed an increasing use of fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composites as alternative construction materials for aerospace and infrastructure. The high specific strength of FRP attracted its use as non-corrosive reinforcement. However, FRP materials were characterized with a relatively low ductility and low shear strength compared with steel reinforcement. On the other hand, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been introduced in the last decade as a material with minimal defect that is capable of increasing the mechanical properties of polymer matrices. This dissertation reports experimental investigations on the use of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) to produce a new generation of FRP composites. The experiments showed significant improvements in the flexure properties of the nanocomposite when functionalized MWCNTs were used. In addition, MWCNTs were used to produce FRP composites in order to examine static, dynamic, and creep behavior. The MWCNTs improved the off-axis tension, off-axis flexure, FRP lap shear joint responses. In addition, they reduced the creep of FRP-concrete interface, enhanced the fracture toughness, and altered the impact resistance significantly. In general, the MWCNTs are found to affect the behaviour of the FRP composites when matrix failure dominates the behaviour. The improvement in the mechanical response with the addition of low contents of MWCNTs would benefit many industrial and military applications such as strengthening structures using FRP composites, composite pipelines, aircrafts, and armoured vehicles.

  11. Carbon Fiber Reinforced, Zero CME Composites, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Technical Abstract: This project proposes to develop moisture insensitive, high performance, carbon fiber laminates for future missions. Current space-qualified...

  12. Bonded carbon or ceramic fiber composite filter vent for radioactive waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brassell, Gilbert W.; Brugger, Ronald P.

    1985-02-19

    Carbon bonded carbon fiber composites as well as ceramic or carbon bonded ceramic fiber composites are very useful as filters which can separate particulate matter from gas streams entraining the same. These filters have particular application to the filtering of radioactive particles, e.g., they can act as vents for containers of radioactive waste material.

  13. 21 CFR 878.3500 - Polytetrafluoroethylene with carbon fibers composite implant material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... composite implant material. 878.3500 Section 878.3500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... Prosthetic Devices § 878.3500 Polytetrafluoroethylene with carbon fibers composite implant material. (a) Identification. A polytetrafluoroethylene with carbon fibers composite implant material is a porous device...

  14. RC T beams strengthened to shear with carbon fiber composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Spagnolo JR

    Full Text Available This paper presents the experimental data of the behavior of reinforced concrete beams strengthened to shear with carbon fiber composites. The tests were composed of eight T beams, b w=15 cm, h=40 cm, flange width 40 cm, flange height 8 cm, and length 300 cm, divided into two series with the same longitudinal steel reinforcement and a reference beam without strengthening in each series. The beams had two types of arrangement of internal steel stirrups. The test variables were the internal and external geometric ratio of the transverse reinforcement and the mechanical ratio of carbon fiber composites stirrups. All the beams were loaded at two points. The strengthened beams were submitted to a preloading and the strengthening was applied to the cracked beam. All the beams were designed in order to guarantee shear failure, and the ultimate load of the strengthened beams was 36% to 54% greater than the reference beams. The Cracking Sliding Model applied to the strengthened beams was evaluated and showed good agreement with the experimental results.

  15. Effect of surface modification on carbon fiber and its reinforced phenolic matrix composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Hua; Wang Chengguo; Zhang Shan; Lin Xue

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We used very simple and effective modification method to treat PAN-based carbon fiber by liquid oxidation and coupling agent. ► Carbon fiber surface functional groups were analyzed by LRS and XPS. ► Proper treatment of carbon fiber can prove an effective way to increase composite's performance. ► Carbon fiber surface modifications by oxidation and APS could strengthen fiber activity and enlarge surface area as well as its roughness. - Abstract: In this work, polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based carbon fiber were chemically modified with H 2 SO 4 , KClO 3 and silane coupling agent (γ-aminopropyltriethoxysilane, APS), and carbon fiber reinforced phenolic matrix composites were prepared. The structural and surface characteristics of the carbon fiber were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), laser Raman scattering (LRS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Single fiber mechanical properties, specific surface area, composite impact properties and interfacial shear strength (ILSS) were researched to indicate the effects of surface modification on fibers and the interaction between modified fiber surface and phenolic matrix. The results showed that carbon fiber surface modification by oxidation and APS can strengthen fiber surface chemical activity and enlarge the fiber surface area as well as its roughness. When carbon fiber (CF) is oxidized treatment, the oxygen content as well as the O/C ratio will be obviously increased. Oxygen functional groups increase with oxidation time increasing. Carbon fiber treated with APS will make C-O-R content increase and O-C=O content decrease due to surface reaction. Proper treatment of carbon fiber with acid and silane coupling agent prove an effective way to increase the interfacial adhesion and improve the mechanical and outdoor performance of the resulting fiber/resin composites.

  16. Mechanical properties of carbon fiber composites for applications in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hana, P.; Inneman, A.; Daniel, V.; Sieger, L.; Petru, M.

    2015-01-01

    This article describes method of measurement mechanical properties of carbon fiber composites in space. New material structures are specifically designed for use on space satellites. Composite structures will be exposed to cosmic radiation in Earth orbit on board of a '2U CubeSat' satellite. Piezoelectric ceramic sensors are used for detection mechanical vibrations of composite test strip. A great deal of attention is paid to signal processing using 8-bit microcontroler. Fast Fourier Transformation is used. Fundamental harmonic frequencies and damping from on-board measurements will serve as the input data for terrestrial data processing. The other step of elaboration data is creation of the physical model for evaluating mechanical properties of Carbon composite - Piezoelectric ceramic system. Evaluation of anisotropic mechanical properties of piezoelectric ceramics is an interesting secondary outcome of the investigation. Extreme changes in temperature and the effect of cosmic rays will affect the mechanical properties and durability of the material used for the external construction of satellites. Comparative terrestrial measurements will be performed.

  17. Chemical recycling of carbon fibers reinforced epoxy resin composites in oxygen in supercritical water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, Yongping; Wang, Zhi; Feng, Liqun

    2010-01-01

    The carbon fibers in carbon fibers reinforced epoxy resin composites were recovered in oxygen in supercritical water at 30 ± 1 MPa and 440 ± 10 o C. The microstructure of the recovered carbon fibers was observed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atom force microscopy (AFM). The results revealed that the clean carbon fibers were recovered and had higher tensile strength relative to the virgin carbon fibers when the decomposition rate was above 85 wt.%, although the recovered carbon fibers have clean surface, the epoxy resin on the surface of the recovered carbon fibers was readily observed. As the decomposition rate increased to above 96 wt.%, no epoxy resin was observed on the surface of the carbon fibers and the oxidation of the recovered carbon fibers was readily measured by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis. The carbon fibers were ideally recovered and have original strength when the decomposition rates were between 94 and 97 wt.%. This study clearly showed the oxygen in supercritical water is a promising way for recycling the carbon fibers in carbon fibers reinforced resin composites.

  18. Vibration monitoring of carbon fiber composites by multiple fiber optic sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivero, Massimo; Perrone, Guido; Vallan, Alberto; Chen, Wei; Tosi, Daniele

    2014-05-01

    This work presents the comparison between the fiber Bragg grating technology and a vibration-measurement technique based on the detection of polarization rotation (polarimetric sensor) in a standard optical fiber, applied to the dynamic structural monitoring of carbon reinforced composites for the automotive industry. A carbon reinforced composite test plate in a 4-layer configuration was equipped with fiber Bragg gratings and polarimetric fiber sensors, then it was mechanically stressed by static and dynamic loads while monitoring the sensors response. The fiber Bragg grating setup exhibited 1.15+/-0.0016 pm/kg static load response and reproduced dynamic excitation with 0.1% frequency uncertainty, while the polarimetric sensing system exhibited a sensitivity of 1.74+/-0.001 mV/kg and reproduced the dynamic excitation with 0.5% frequency uncertainty. It is shown that the polarimetric sensor technology represents a cheap yet efficient alternative to the fiber Bragg grating sensors in the case of vibration-monitoring of small structures at high frequency.

  19. Effect of anodic surface treatment on PAN-based carbon fiber and its relationship to the fracture toughness of the carbon fiber-reinforced polymer composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarraf, Hamid; Skarpova, Ludmila

    2008-01-01

    The effect of anodic surface treatment on the polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based carbon fibers surface properties and the mechanical behavior of the resulting carbon fiber-polymer composites has been studied in terms of the contact angle measurements of fibers and the fracture toughness of composites...

  20. Multifunctional Flexible Composites Based on Continuous Carbon Nanotube Fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-28

    different amounts of CNTs [23]. We wrap the graphene fiber with highly aligned CNT film (Fig. 14a). After the hybrid fibers were densified with ethanol ...multifunctional composites fibers [28] and accessing of large polymer chains to enhance fiber mechanical properties [29]. 2.14 Electromechanical...emitters, solid-phase microextraction and catalysis . Different from graphene- based aerogels (GBAs) and membranes (GBMs), GBFs have demonstrated

  1. Mechanical Properties of Domestic T700 Grade Carbon Fibers/QY9611 BMI Matrix Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Guoli

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The morphologies,surface energies and surface chemical properties of the domestic T700 grade carbon fiber and the T700S carbon fiber were characterized by using scanning electronic microscopy (SEM, inverse gas chromatography(IGC and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPSrespectively.The mechanical properties of the two carbon fibers/QY9611 composites were also discussed. The results indicate that the surface properties of carbon fibers have an important influence on the interfacial properties of composites. The interfacial properties of domestic T700 grade carbon fibers/QY9611 composite at room temperature/dry conditions are superior to T700S/QY9611 composite. The toughness of domestic T700 grade carbon fibers/QY9611composite is outstanding as well. The value of CAI has reached the level of foreign advanced composite IM7/5250-4. After hydrothermal treatment,the interfacial strength of domestic T700 grade carbon fibers/QY9611 composite is equal to that of T700S/QY9611 composite. It shows that domestic T700 grade carbon fibers/QY9611 composite has good hydrothermal-resistant properties.

  2. Preparation of carbon fiber unsaturated sizing agent for enhancing interfacial strength of carbon fiber/vinyl ester resin composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Weiwei; Cai, Yemeng; Liu, Wenbo; Yang, Fan; Jiang, Long; Jiao, Weicheng; Wang, Rongguo

    2018-05-01

    The practical application of carbon fiber (CF) reinforced vinyl ester resin (VE) composite was hampered seriously by the poor interfacial adhesion property. In this work, a novel unsaturated sizing agent was designed and prepared to improve the interfacial strength by covalently bonding CF with VE matrix. The main component of the sizing agent, N-(4‧4-diaminodiphenyl methane)-2-hydroxypropyl methacrylate (DMHM), was synthesized and confirmed by FTIR and NMR. XPS results of sized carbon fiber (SCF) showed that DMHM has adhered to desized fiber surface and reacted with some active functional groups on the surface. The SCF was characterized by high surface roughness and surface energy (especially the polar component), which means better wettability by VE. As a result, the interface shear strength and interlaminar shear strength of SCF/VE composite were enhanced by 96.56% and 66.07% respectively compared with CF/VE composite, benefited mainly from the strong and tough interphase.

  3. Global Carbon Fiber Composites. Supply Chain Competitiveness Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Sujit [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Warren, Joshua A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); West, Devin [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Schexnayder, Susan M. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study is to identify key opportunities in the carbon fiber (CF) supply chain where resources and investments can help advance the clean energy economy. The report focuses on four application areas—wind energy, aerospace, automotive, and pressure vessels—that top the list of industries using CF and carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRP) and are particularly relevant to the mission of U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (DOE EERE). For each of the four application areas, the report addresses the supply and demand trends within that sector, supply chain, and costs of carbon fiber and components.

  4. Interfacial studies on the O3 modified carbon fiber-reinforced polyamide 6 composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, J.

    2008-01-01

    In this work, O 3 modification method was used for the surface treatment of polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based carbon fiber. The surface characteristics of carbon fibers were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The interfacial properties of carbon fiber-reinforced polyamide 6 (CF/PA6) composites were investigated by means of the single fiber pull-out tests. As a result, it was found that IFSS values of the composites with O 3 treated carbon fiber are increased by 60% compared to that without treatment. XPS results show that O 3 treatment increases the amount of carboxyl groups on carbon fiber surface, thus the interfacial adhesion between carbon fiber and PA6 matrix is effectively promoted

  5. Influence of fiber orientation on the inherent acoustic nonlinearity in carbon fiber reinforced composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrapani, Sunil Kishore; Barnard, Daniel J; Dayal, Vinay

    2015-02-01

    This paper presents the study of non-classical nonlinear response of fiber-reinforced composites. Nonlinear elastic wave methods such as nonlinear resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (NRUS) and nonlinear wave modulation spectroscopy have been used earlier to detect damages in several materials. It was observed that applying these techniques to composites materials becomes difficult due to the significant inherent baseline nonlinearity. Understanding the non-classical nonlinear nature of the composites plays a vital role in implementing nonlinear acoustic techniques for material characterization as well as qualitative nondestructive testing of composites. Since fiber reinforced composites are orthotropic in nature, the baseline response variation with fiber orientation is very important. This work explores the nature of the inherent nonlinearity by performing nonlinear resonant spectroscopy (NRS) in intact unidirectional carbon/epoxy samples with different fiber orientations with respect to major axis of the sample. Factors such as frequency shifts, modal damping ratio, and higher harmonics were analyzed to explore the non-classical nonlinear nature of these materials. Conclusions were drawn based on the experimental observations.

  6. Physical Characterization and Steam Chemical Reactivity of Carbon Fiber Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderl, Robert Andrew; Pawelko, Robert James; Smolik, Galen Richard

    2001-05-01

    This report documents experiments and analyses that have been done at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) to measure the steam chemical reactivity of two types of carbon fiber composites, NS31 and NB31, proposed for use at the divertor strike points in an ITER-like tokamak. These materials are 3D CFCs constituted by a NOVOLTEX preform and densified by pyrocarbon infiltration and heat treatment. NS31 differs from NB31 in that the final infiltration was done with liquid silicon to reduce the porosity and enhance the thermal conductivity of the CFC. Our approach in this work was twofold: (1) physical characterization measurements of the specimens and (2) measurements of the chemical reactivity of specimens exposed to steam.

  7. Physical Characterization and Steam Chemical Reactivity of Carbon Fiber Composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderl, Robert Andrew; Pawelko, Robert James; Smolik, Galen Richard

    2001-01-01

    This report documents experiments and analyses that have been done at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) to measure the steam chemical reactivity of two types of carbon fiber composites, NS31 and NB31, proposed for use at the divertor strike points in an ITER-like tokamak. These materials are 3D CFCs constituted by a NOVOLTEX preform and densified by pyrocarbon infiltration and heat treatment. NS31 differs from NB31 in that the final infiltration was done with liquid silicon to reduce the porosity and enhance the thermal conductivity of the CFC. Our approach in this work was twofold: (1) physical characterization measurements of the specimens and (2) measurements of the chemical reactivity of specimens exposed to steam

  8. Carbon fiber composites application in ITER plasma facing components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barabash, V.; Federici, G.; Matera, R.; Akiba, M.; Nakamura, K.; Bonal, J.P.; Pacher, H.D.; Roedig, M.; Vieider, G.; Wu, C.H.

    1998-01-01

    Carbon fiber composites (CFCs) are one of the candidate armour materials for the plasma facing components of the international thermonuclear experimental reactor (ITER). For the present reference design, CFC has been selected as armour for the divertor target near the plasma strike point mainly because of unique resistance to high normal and off-normal heat loads. It does not melt under disruptions and might have higher erosion lifetime in comparison with other possible armour materials. Issues related to CFC application in ITER are described in this paper. They include erosion lifetime, tritium codeposition with eroded material and possible methods for the removal of the codeposited layers, neutron irradiation effect, development of joining technologies with heat sink materials, and thermomechanical performance. The status of the development of new advanced CFCs for ITER application is also described. Finally, the remaining R and D needs are critically discussed. (orig.)

  9. Carbon fiber composites application in ITER plasma facing components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barabash, V.; Akiba, M.; Bonal, J. P.; Federici, G.; Matera, R.; Nakamura, K.; Pacher, H. D.; Rödig, M.; Vieider, G.; Wu, C. H.

    1998-10-01

    Carbon Fiber Composites (CFCs) are one of the candidate armour materials for the plasma facing components of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). For the present reference design, CFC has been selected as armour for the divertor target near the plasma strike point mainly because of unique resistance to high normal and off-normal heat loads. It does not melt under disruptions and might have higher erosion lifetime in comparison with other possible armour materials. Issues related to CFC application in ITER are described in this paper. They include erosion lifetime, tritium codeposition with eroded material and possible methods for the removal of the codeposited layers, neutron irradiation effect, development of joining technologies with heat sink materials, and thermomechanical performance. The status of the development of new advanced CFCs for ITER application is also described. Finally, the remaining R&D needs are critically discussed.

  10. Global Carbon Fiber Composites Supply Chain Competitiveness Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Sujit [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Warren, Josh [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); West, Devin [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Schexnayder, Susan M. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2016-05-01

    This study identifies key opportunities in the carbon fiber supply chain where the United States Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy resources and investments can help the United States achieve or maintain a competitive advantage. The report focuses on four application areas--wind energy, aerospace, automotive, and pressure vessels--that top the list of industries using carbon fiber and carbon fiber reinforced polymers and are also particularly relevant to EERE's mission. For each of the four application areas, the report addresses the supply and demand trends within that sector, supply chain, and costs of carbon fiber and components, all contributing to a competitiveness assessment that addresses the United States' role in future industry growth. This report was prepared by researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the University of Tennessee for the Clean Energy Manufacturing Analysis Center.

  11. The effect of fiber oxidation on the friction and wear behaviors of short-cut carbon fiber/polyimide composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Pitch-based short-cut carbon fibers were treated by HNO3 oxidation, thereafter the treated (CFN and untreated carbon fibers (CF were incorporated into polyimide (PI matrix to form composites. The carbon fibers before and after treatment were examined by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS and scanning electron microscope (SEM. The friction and wear behaviors of PI composites sliding against GCr15 steel rings were evaluated on an M-2000 model ring-on-block test rig, which revealed that small incorporation of carbon fibers can decrease the friction coefficient and improve the wear resistance of PI composites, and that the reinforcement effect of treated carbon fibers was better than that of the untreated ones. It was found that the optimum content of carbon fibers is 15 wt% when a thin and continuous transfer film was formed on the counterpart surface during the friction process. With further increasing content of carbon fibers, the friction coefficient increased and the wear resistance reduced owing to the drop out of carbon fibers from PI matrix. Besides, the friction coefficient of the PI composites decreased and the wear resistance improved with increasing load, while for the pure PI, its wear resistance decreased drastically owing to the micro-melting and mechanical deterioration caused by friction heat under a higher load.

  12. Mechanical Properties of Low-Density SiC-Coated Carbon-Bonded Carbon Fiber Composites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ahmed, A. S.; Chlup, Zdeněk; Dlouhý, Ivo; Rawlings, R. D.; Boccaccini, A. R.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 2 (2012), s. 401-412 ISSN 1546-542X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/09/1821 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : SiC coating * Carbon bonded * Carbon Fiber Composites * Fracture Toughness Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 1.153, year: 2012

  13. Conduction noise absorption by fiber-reinforced epoxy composites with carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ok Hyoung; Kim, Sung-Soo; Lim, Yun-Soo

    2011-01-01

    Nearly all electronic equipment is susceptible to malfunction as a result of electromagnetic interference. In this study, glass fiber, and carbon fiber as a type reinforcement and epoxy as a matrix material were used to fabricate composite materials. In an attempt to increase the conduction noise absorption, carbon nanotubes were grown on the surface of glass fibers and carbon fibers. A microstrip line with characteristic impedance of 50 Ω in connection with network analyzer was used to measure the conduction noise absorption. In comparing a glass fiber/epoxy composite with a GF-CNT/Ep composite, it was demonstrated that the CNTs significantly influence the noise absorption property mainly due to increase in electric conductivity. In the carbon fiber composites, however, the effectiveness of CNTs on the degree of electric conductivity is negligible, resulting in a small change in reflection and transmission of an electromagnetic wave. - Research Highlights: → In this study, glass fiber and carbon fiber as a type reinforcement and epoxy as a matrix material were used to fabricate composite materials. In an attempt to increase the conduction noise absorption, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were grown on the surface of glass fibers and carbon fibers. A microstrip line with characteristic impedance of 50 Ω in connection with network analyzer was used to measure the conduction noise absorption. → In comparing a glass fiber/epoxy composite with a GF-CNT/Ep composite, it was demonstrated that the CNTs significantly influence the noise absorption property mainly due to increase in electric conductivity. In the carbon fiber composites, however, the effectiveness of CNTs on the degree of electric conductivity is negligible, resulting in a small change in reflection and transmission of an electromagnetic wave.

  14. Flexural properties of polyethylene, glass and carbon fiber-reinforced resin composites for prosthetic frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruo, Yukinori; Nishigawa, Goro; Irie, Masao; Yoshihara, Kumiko; Minagi, Shogo

    2015-01-01

    High flexural properties are needed for fixed partial denture or implant prosthesis to resist susceptibility to failures caused by occlusal overload. The aim of this investigation was to clarify the effects of four different kinds of fibers on the flexural properties of fiber-reinforced composites. Polyethylene fiber, glass fiber and two types of carbon fibers were used for reinforcement. Seven groups of specimens, 2 × 2 × 25 mm, were prepared (n = 10 per group). Four groups of resin composite specimens were reinforced with polyethylene, glass or one type of carbon fiber. The remaining three groups served as controls, with each group comprising one brand of resin composite without any fiber. After 24-h water storage in 37°C distilled water, the flexural properties of each specimen were examined with static three-point flexural test at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Compared to the control without any fiber, glass and carbon fibers significantly increased the flexural strength (p glass fiber (p glass fibers (p > 0.05). Fibers could, therefore, improve the flexural properties of resin composite and carbon fibers in longitudinal form yielded the better effects for reinforcement.

  15. Processing of thermo-structural carbon-fiber reinforced carbon composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Cláudio Pardini

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The present work describes the processes used to obtain thermostructural Carbon/Carbon composites. The processing of these materials begins with the definition of the architecture of the carbon fiber reinforcement, in the form of stacked plies or in the form of fabrics or multidirectional reinforcement. Incorporating fiber reinforcement into the carbon matrix, by filling the voids and interstices, leads to the densification of the material and a continuous increase in density. There are two principal processing routes for obtaining these materials: liquid phase processing and gas phase processing. In both cases, thermal processes lead to the formation of a carbon matrix with specific properties related to their precursor. These processes also differ in terms of yield. With liquid phase impregnation the yield is around 45 per cent, while gas phase processing yields around 15 per cent.

  16. Hybrid Carbon Fibers/Carbon Nanotubes Structures for Next Generation Polymeric Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Al-Haik

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Pitch-based carbon fibers are commonly used to produce polymeric carbon fiber structural composites. Several investigations have reported different methods for dispersing and subsequently aligning carbon nanotubes (CNTs as a filler to reinforce polymer matrix. The significant difficulty in dispersing CNTs suggested the controlled-growth of CNTs on surfaces where they are needed. Here we compare between two techniques for depositing the catalyst iron used toward growing CNTs on pitch-based carbon fiber surfaces. Electrochemical deposition of iron using pulse voltametry is compared to DC magnetron iron sputtering. Carbon nanostructures growth was performed using a thermal CVD system. Characterization for comparison between both techniques was compared via SEM, TEM, and Raman spectroscopy analysis. It is shown that while both techniques were successful to grow CNTs on the carbon fiber surfaces, iron sputtering technique was capable of producing more uniform distribution of iron catalyst and thus multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs compared to MWCNTs grown using the electrochemical deposition of iron.

  17. Electromagnetic absorber composite made of carbon fibers loaded epoxy foam for anechoic chamber application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Méjean, Chloé; Pometcu, Laura; Benzerga, Ratiba; Sharaiha, Ala; Le Paven-Thivet, Claire; Badard, Mathieu; Pouliguen, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Carbon fibers loaded epoxy foam composites are proposed as microwave absorbers. • Dielectric properties (ε′, tanδ) of composites increase with carbon fibers content and length. • S 11 coefficient of a pyramidal prototype was characterized in anechoic chamber. • Epoxy prototype shows better absorption performance than commercial absorber. • S 11 of the prototype is lower than −30 dB (4–18 GHz) at normal and oblique incidences. - Abstract: This paper presents a new electromagnetic absorbing material developed from carbon fibers loaded epoxy foam for an application in anechoic chamber. The composite was developed in order to replace the currently used pyramidal absorbers made of carbon particles loaded polyurethane foam. Epoxy-composites filled with different weight percentages (from 0 wt.% to 4 wt.%) and length (1 and 3 mm) of carbon fibers were achieved. After an optimization of the dispersion of carbon fibers in composite materials, the dielectric properties of the composites were measured using a coaxial-probe in the frequency range 4–18 GHz. Results have shown that the complex permittivity of the composites increases with the amount of charge and also with the length of the carbon fibers. Absorption performance of a prototype prepared with a low concentration (0.5 wt.%) of carbon fibers was measured in an anechoic chamber: it shows a mean gain of 10 dB compared to a commercial absorber.

  18. Electromagnetic absorber composite made of carbon fibers loaded epoxy foam for anechoic chamber application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Méjean, Chloé; Pometcu, Laura [Institut d’Electronique et de Télécommunications de Rennes, 18 rue Henri Wallon, 22000 Saint-Brieuc (France); Benzerga, Ratiba, E-mail: ratiba.benzerga@univ-rennes1.fr [Institut d’Electronique et de Télécommunications de Rennes, 18 rue Henri Wallon, 22000 Saint-Brieuc (France); Sharaiha, Ala; Le Paven-Thivet, Claire; Badard, Mathieu [Institut d’Electronique et de Télécommunications de Rennes, 18 rue Henri Wallon, 22000 Saint-Brieuc (France); Pouliguen, Philippe [Département Recherche et Innovation Scientifique de la Direction Générale de l’Armement, 7-9 rue des Mathurins, 92221 Bagneux (France)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • Carbon fibers loaded epoxy foam composites are proposed as microwave absorbers. • Dielectric properties (ε′, tanδ) of composites increase with carbon fibers content and length. • S{sub 11} coefficient of a pyramidal prototype was characterized in anechoic chamber. • Epoxy prototype shows better absorption performance than commercial absorber. • S{sub 11} of the prototype is lower than −30 dB (4–18 GHz) at normal and oblique incidences. - Abstract: This paper presents a new electromagnetic absorbing material developed from carbon fibers loaded epoxy foam for an application in anechoic chamber. The composite was developed in order to replace the currently used pyramidal absorbers made of carbon particles loaded polyurethane foam. Epoxy-composites filled with different weight percentages (from 0 wt.% to 4 wt.%) and length (1 and 3 mm) of carbon fibers were achieved. After an optimization of the dispersion of carbon fibers in composite materials, the dielectric properties of the composites were measured using a coaxial-probe in the frequency range 4–18 GHz. Results have shown that the complex permittivity of the composites increases with the amount of charge and also with the length of the carbon fibers. Absorption performance of a prototype prepared with a low concentration (0.5 wt.%) of carbon fibers was measured in an anechoic chamber: it shows a mean gain of 10 dB compared to a commercial absorber.

  19. Enrichment of ventilation air methane (VAM) with carbon fiber composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Jun-Seok; Su, Shi; Yu, Xin Xiang

    2014-05-20

    Treatment of ventilation air methane (VAM) with cost-effective technologies has been an ongoing challenge due to its high volumetric flow rate with low and variable methane concentrations. In this work, honeycomb monolithic carbon fiber composites were developed and employed to capture VAM with a large-scale test unit at various conditions such as VAM concentration, ventilation air (VA) flow rate, temperature, and purging fluids. Regardless of inlet VAM concentrations, methane was captured at almost 100%. To regenerate the composites, the initial vacuum swing followed by combined temperature and vacuum swing adsorption (TVSA) was applied. It was found that initial vacuum swing is a control step for the final methane concentration having 5 or 11 times the VAM enrichment by one-step adsorption, which is, to our knowledge, the best performance achieved in VAM enrichment technologies worldwide. Five-time enriched VAM can be utilized as a principle fuel for lean burn turbine. Also, it can be further enriched by second step adsorption to more than 25% which then can be used for commercially available gas engines. In this way, the final product can be out of the methane explosive range (5-15%).

  20. UV-cured adhesives for carbon fiber composite applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hsiao-Chun

    Carbon fiber composite materials are increasingly used in automobile, marine, and aerospace industries due to their unique properties, including high strength, high stiffness and low weight. However, due to their brittle characteristic, these structures are prone to physical damage, such as a bird strike or impact damage. Once the structure is damaged, it is important to have fast and reliable temporary repair until the permanent repair or replacement can take place. In this dissertation, UV-based adhesives were used to provide a bonding strength for temporary repair. Adhesively bonded patch repair is an efficient and effective method for temporary repair. In this study, precured patches (hard patches) and dry fabric patches with laminating resins (soft patches) were performed. UV-based epoxy adhesives were applied to both patch repair systems. For precured patch repair, the bonding strengths were investigated under different surface treatments for bonding area and different adhesives thicknesses. The shear stresses of different UV exposure times and curing times were tested. Besides, the large patch repair was investigated as well. For soft patch repair, the hand wet lay-up was applied due to high viscosity of UV resins. A modified single lap shear testing (ASTM D5868) was applied to determine the shear stress. The large patches used fiber glass instead of carbon fiber to prove the possibility of repair with UV epoxy resin by hand wet lay-up process. The hand lay-up procedure was applied and assisted by vacuum pressure to eliminate the air bubbles and consolidate the patches. To enhance the bonding strength and effective soft patch repair, vacuum assisted resin transferring molding (VaRTM) is the better option. However, only low viscosity resins can be operated by VaRTM. Hence, new UV-based adhesives were formulated. The new UV-based adhesives included photoinitiator (PI), epoxy and different solvents. Solvents were used to compound the photoinitiator into epoxy

  1. Plasma-grafting polymerization on carbon fibers and its effect on their composite properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huanxia; Li, Wei

    2015-11-01

    Interfacial adhesion between matrix and fibers plays a crucial role in controlling the performance of composites. Carbon fibers have the major constraint of chemical interness and hence have limited adhesion with the matrix. Surface treatment of fibers is the best solution to this problem. In this work, carbon fibers were activated by plasma and grafting polymerization. The grafting ratio of polymerization was obtained by acid-base titration. The chemical and physical changes induced by the treatments on carbon fiber surface was examined using contact angle measurements, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy-attenuated total reflectance (FTIR-ATR) technique. The interfacial adhesion of CF/EP (carbon fiber/epoxy) composites were analyzed by a single fiber composite (SFC) for filament fragmentation test. Experimental results show that the grafting rate was not only the function of the plasma-treat time but also the concentration of the grafting polymerization. The oxygen-containing groups (such as Csbnd O, Cdbnd O, and Osbnd Cdbnd O) and the interfacial shear strength (IFSS) of the plasma-grafting carbon fiber increased more significantly than the carbon fiber without plasma treatment grafted with MAH. This demonstrates that the surfaces of the carbon fiber samples are more active, hydrophilic, and rough after plasma-grafting treatments using a DBD operating in ambient argon mixture with oxygen. With DBD (dielectric barrier discharges) operating in ambient argon mixture with oxygen, the more active, hydrophilic, and rough surface was obtained by the plasma-grafting treatments.

  2. Experimental Research on Tensile Process of Carbon Fiber Composite Materials Basing on Acoustic Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanlei; Wang, Bing; Li, Weizhong; Yu, Bing; Xia, Fuyong

    With the extensive application of carbon fiber composite materials in the region of high-pressure vessel and aerospace, the related material damage mechanism analysis and integrality detecting is also massively being carried out which is more complex than the sole material. Acoustic emission technique can monitor the tensile process of carbon fiber composite laminate. And the acoustic emission signals by tensile specimens of different winding angles were investigated. Different angles in specimen's layers of carbon fiber had different mechanical properties and failure mechanisms. The results show that there were different signal characteristics from carbon fiber in different stages. Analysis on experimental data showed that acoustic emission testing technique can determine the process of different internal activities in carbon fiber composite laminate.

  3. Fabrication and characterization of poly(vinyl alcohol/carbon nanotube melt-spinning composites fiber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiqian Yang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A composite fiber based on carbon nanotube (CNT and poly(vinyl alcohol (PVA was prepared by melt-spinning. Structural features and the mechanical performances of the PVA/CNT composite fiber were investigated as a function of draw condition. Initial moduli and tensile strengths of the drawn composite fibers are much higher than those of undrawn composite fiber. It is identified from XRD and 2D XRD that the composite fiber exhibits enhanced crystallinity and orientation degree with increasing the draw ratio. Accordingly, finger-like pores distributed along the axial direction homogeneous on the melt-spinning PVA fiber surface. After dry and hot-drawn, the hydrophobicity of PVA/CNT composites fiber decreased gradually.

  4. Research on mechanical properties of carbon fiber /polyamide reinforced PP composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xinghui; Yu, Qiang; Liu, Lixia; Ji, Wenhua; Yang, Li; Fan, Dongli

    2017-10-01

    The polyamide composites reinforced by carbon fiber/polypropylene are produced by injection molding processing. The flow abilities and mechanical properties of the CF/PA/PP composite materials are studied by the fusion index instrument and the universal testing machine. The results show that with the content of carbon fiber/polyamide increase, the impact breaking strength and the tensile property of the composite materials increase, which is instructive to the actual injection production of polypropylene products.

  5. Process Optimization of Bismaleimide (BMI) Resin Infused Carbon Fiber Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrlich, Joshua W.; Tate, LaNetra C.; Cox, Sarah B.; Taylor, Brian J.; Wright, M. Clara; Caraccio, Anne J.; Sampson, Jeffery W.

    2013-01-01

    Bismaleimide (BMI) resins are an attractive new addition to world-wide composite applications. This type of thermosetting polyimide provides several unique characteristics such as excellent physical property retention at elevated temperatures and in wet environments, constant electrical properties over a vast array of temperature settings, and nonflammability properties as well. This makes BMI a popular choice in advance composites and electronics applications [I]. Bismaleimide-2 (BMI-2) resin was used to infuse intermediate modulus 7 (IM7) based carbon fiber. Two panel configurations consisting of 4 plies with [+45deg, 90deg]2 and [0deg]4 orientations were fabricated. For tensile testing, a [90deg]4 configuration was tested by rotating the [0deg]4 configirration to lie orthogonal with the load direction of the test fixture. Curing of the BMI-2/IM7 system utilized an optimal infusion process which focused on the integration of the manufacturer-recommended ramp rates,. hold times, and cure temperatures. Completion of the cure cycle for the BMI-2/IM7 composite yielded a product with multiple surface voids determined through visual and metallographic observation. Although the curing cycle was the same for the three panellayups, the surface voids that remained within the material post-cure were different in abundance, shape, and size. For tensile testing, the [0deg]4 layup had a 19.9% and 21.7% greater average tensile strain performance compared to the [90deg]4 and [+45deg, 90deg, 90deg,-45degg] layups, respectively, at failure. For tensile stress performance, the [0deg]4 layup had a 5.8% and 34.0% greater average performance% than the [90deg]4 and [+45deg, 90deg, 90deg,-45deg] layups.

  6. Properties of Multifunctional Hybrid Carbon Nanotube/Carbon Fiber Polymer Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano, Roberto J.; Kang, Jin Ho; Grimsley, Brian W.; Ratcliffe, James G.; Siochi, Emilie J.

    2016-01-01

    For aircraft primary structures, carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites possess many advantages over conventional aluminum alloys due to their light weight, higher strength- and stiffness-to-weight ratios, and low life-cycle maintenance costs. However, the relatively low electrical and thermal conductivities of CFRP composites fail to provide structural safety in certain operational conditions such as lightning strikes. Carbon nanotubes (CNT) offer the potential to enhance the multi-functionality of composites with improved thermal and electrical conductivity. In this study, hybrid CNT/carbon fiber (CF) polymer composites were fabricated by interleaving layers of CNT sheets with Hexcel® IM7/8852 prepreg. Resin concentrations from 1 wt% to 50 wt% were used to infuse the CNT sheets prior to composite fabrication. The interlaminar properties of the resulting hybrid composites were characterized by mode I and II fracture toughness testing. Fractographical analysis was performed to study the effect of resin concentration. In addition, multi-directional physical properties like thermal conductivity of the orthotropic hybrid polymer composite were evaluated.

  7. Optimization of interfacial properties of carbon fiber/epoxy composites via a modified polyacrylate emulsion sizing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, Xiaomin; Zhu, Bo; Cai, Xun; Liu, Jianjun; Qiao, Kun; Yu, Junwei

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • An improved interfacial adhesion in CF/EP composite by FSMPA sizing was put forward. • Sized CFs featured promotions of wettability, chemical activity and mechanical property. • A sizing mechanism containing chemical interaction and physical absorption was proposed. - Abstract: The adhesion behavior of epoxy resin to carbon fibers has always been a challenge, on account of the inertness of carbon fibers and the lack of reactive functional groups. In this work, a modified polyacrylate sizing agent was prepared to modify the interface between the carbon fiber and the epoxy matrix. The surface characteristics of carbon fibers were investigated to determine chemical composition, morphology, wettability, interfacial phase analysis and interfacial adhesion. Sized carbon fibers featured improved wettability and a slightly decreased surface roughness due to the coverage of a smooth sizing layer, compared with the unsized ones. Moreover, the content of surface activated carbon atoms increased from 12.65% to 24.70% and the interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) of carbon fiber/epoxy composites raised by 14.2%, indicating a significant improvement of chemical activity and mechanical property. SEM images of the fractured surface of composites further proved that a gradient interfacial structure with increased thicknesses was formed due to the transition role of the sizing. Based on these results, a sizing mechanism consisting of chemical interaction bonding and physical force absorption was proposed, which provides an efficient and feasible method to solve the poor adhesion between carbon fiber and epoxy matrix.

  8. Optimization of interfacial properties of carbon fiber/epoxy composites via a modified polyacrylate emulsion sizing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Xiaomin [Key Laboratory for Liquid-Solid Structural Evolution and Processing of Materials (Ministry of Education), Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Carbon Fiber Engineering Research Center, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Zhu, Bo, E-mail: zhubo@sdu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Liquid-Solid Structural Evolution and Processing of Materials (Ministry of Education), Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Carbon Fiber Engineering Research Center, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Cai, Xun, E-mail: caixunzh@sdu.edu.cn [School of Computer Science and Technology, Shandong University, Jinan 250101 (China); Liu, Jianjun [Key Laboratory for Liquid-Solid Structural Evolution and Processing of Materials (Ministry of Education), Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Carbon Fiber Engineering Research Center, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Qiao, Kun [Carbon Fiber Engineering Research Center, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Yu, Junwei [Key Laboratory for Liquid-Solid Structural Evolution and Processing of Materials (Ministry of Education), Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Carbon Fiber Engineering Research Center, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China)

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • An improved interfacial adhesion in CF/EP composite by FSMPA sizing was put forward. • Sized CFs featured promotions of wettability, chemical activity and mechanical property. • A sizing mechanism containing chemical interaction and physical absorption was proposed. - Abstract: The adhesion behavior of epoxy resin to carbon fibers has always been a challenge, on account of the inertness of carbon fibers and the lack of reactive functional groups. In this work, a modified polyacrylate sizing agent was prepared to modify the interface between the carbon fiber and the epoxy matrix. The surface characteristics of carbon fibers were investigated to determine chemical composition, morphology, wettability, interfacial phase analysis and interfacial adhesion. Sized carbon fibers featured improved wettability and a slightly decreased surface roughness due to the coverage of a smooth sizing layer, compared with the unsized ones. Moreover, the content of surface activated carbon atoms increased from 12.65% to 24.70% and the interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) of carbon fiber/epoxy composites raised by 14.2%, indicating a significant improvement of chemical activity and mechanical property. SEM images of the fractured surface of composites further proved that a gradient interfacial structure with increased thicknesses was formed due to the transition role of the sizing. Based on these results, a sizing mechanism consisting of chemical interaction bonding and physical force absorption was proposed, which provides an efficient and feasible method to solve the poor adhesion between carbon fiber and epoxy matrix.

  9. Environmental effects on the hybrid glass fiber/carbon fiber composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Yun-I.

    2009-12-01

    Fiber reinforced polymer composites (FRPCs) have been widely used to replace conventional metals due to the high specific strength, fatigue resistance, and light weight. In the power distribution industry, an advanced composites rod has been developed to replace conventional steel cable as the load-bearing core of overhead conductors. Such conductors, called aluminum conductor composite core (ACCC) significantly increases the transmitting efficiency of existing power grid system without extensive rebuilding expenses, while meeting future demand for electricity. In general, the service life of such overhead conductors is required to be at least 30 years. Therefore, the long-term endurance of the composite core in various environments must be well-understood. Accelerated aging by hygrothermal exposure was conducted to determine the effect of moisture on the glass fiber (GF)/carbon fiber (CF) hybrid composites. The influence of water immersion and humid air exposure on mechanical properties is investigated. Results indicated that immersion in water is the most severe environment for such hybrid GF/CF composites, and results in greater saturation and degradation of properties. When immersed directly in water, the hybrid GF/CF composites exhibit a moisture uptake behavior that is more complex than composite materials reinforced with only one type of fiber. The unusual diffusion behavior is attributed to a higher packing density of fibers at the annular GF/CF interface, which acts as a temporary moisture barrier. Moisture uptake leads to the mechanical and thermal degradation of such hybrid GF/CF composites. Findings presented here indicate that the degradation is a function of exposure temperature, time, and moisture uptake level. Results also indicate that such hybrid GF/CF composites recover short beam shear (SBS) strength and glass transition temperature (Tg) values comparable to pre-aged samples after removal of the absorbed moisture. In the hygrothermal environment

  10. Carbon Fiber Reinforced Carbon-Al-Cu Composite for Friction Material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Lihui; Luo, Ruiying; Ma, Denghao

    2018-03-31

    A carbon/carbon-Al-Cu composite reinforced with carbon fiber 2.5D-polyacrylonitrile-based preforms was fabricated using the pressureless infiltration technique. The Al-Cu alloy liquids were successfully infiltrated into the C/C composites at high temperature and under vacuum. The mechanical and metallographic properties, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) of the C/C-Al-Cu composites were analyzed. The results showed that the bending property of the C/C-Al-Cu composites was 189 MPa, whereas that of the pure carbon slide material was only 85 MPa. The compressive strength of C/C-Al-Cu was 213 MPa, whereas that of the pure carbon slide material was only 102 MPa. The resistivity of C/C-Al-Cu was only 1.94 μΩm, which was lower than that of the pure carbon slide material (29.5 μΩm). This finding can be attributed to the "network conduction" structure. Excellent wettability was observed between Al and the carbon matrix at high temperature due to the existence of Al₄C₃. The friction coefficients of the C/C, C/C-Al-Cu, and pure carbon slide composites were 0.152, 0.175, and 0.121, respectively. The wear rate of the C/C-Al-Cu composites reached a minimum value of 2.56 × 10 -7 mm³/Nm. The C/C-Al-Cu composite can be appropriately used as railway current collectors for locomotives.

  11. Evaluation of ionic liquid epoxy carbon fiber composites in a cryogenic environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyne, Christopher T.; Henry, Christopher R.; Kaukler, William F.; Grugel, R. N.

    2018-03-01

    A novel ionic liquid epoxy (ILE) was used to fabricate carbon fiber composite discs which were then subjected to biaxial strain testing in liquid nitrogen. The ILE composite showed a greater strain-to-failure at cryogenic temperatures when compared to a commercial epoxy. This result is likely an effect, as shown in micrographs, of the strong ILE bonding with the carbon fibers as well as it exhibiting plastic deformation at the fracture surface.

  12. Carbon aerogel composites prepared by ambient drying and using oxidized polyacrylonitrile fibers as reinforcements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Junzong; Zhang, Changrui; Feng, Jian; Jiang, Yonggang; Zhao, Nan

    2011-12-01

    Carbon fiber-reinforced carbon aerogel composites (C/CAs) for thermal insulators were prepared by copyrolysis of resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) aerogels reinforced by oxidized polyacrylonitrile (PAN) fiber felts. The RF aerogel composites were obtained by impregnating PAN fiber felts with RF sols, then aging, ethanol exchanging, and drying at ambient pressure. Upon carbonization, the PAN fibers shrink with the RF aerogels, thus reducing the difference of shrinkage rates between the fiber reinforcements and the aerogel matrices, and resulting in C/CAs without any obvious cracks. The three point bend strength of the C/CAs is 7.1 ± 1.7 MPa, and the thermal conductivity is 0.328 W m(-1) K(-1) at 300 °C in air. These composites can be used as high-temperature thermal insulators (in inert atmospheres or vacuum) or supports for phase change materials in thermal protection system. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  13. Electrospun carbon nanofibers for improved electrical conductivity of fiber reinforced composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alarifi, Ibrahim M.; Alharbi, Abdulaziz; Khan, Waseem S.; Asmatulu, Ramazan

    2015-04-01

    Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) was dissolved in dimethylformamide (DMF), and then electrospun to generate nanofibers using various electrospinning conditions, such as pump speeds, DC voltages and tip-to-collector distances. The produced nanofibers were oxidized at 270 °C for 1 hr, and then carbonized at 850 °C in an argon gas for additional 1 hr. The resultant carbonized PAN nanofibers were placed on top of the pre-preg carbon fiber composites as top layers prior to the vacuum oven curing following the pre-preg composite curing procedures. The major purpose of this study is to determine if the carbonized nanofibers on the fiber reinforced composites can detect the structural defects on the composite, which may be useful for the structural health monitoring (SHM) of the composites. Scanning electron microscopy images showed that the electrospun PAN fibers were well integrated on the pre-preg composites. Electrical conductivity studies under various tensile loads revealed that nanoscale carbon fibers on the fiber reinforced composites detected small changes of loads by changing the resistance values. Electrically conductive composite manufacturing can have huge benefits over the conventional composites primarily used for the military and civilian aircraft and wind turbine blades.

  14. Performance of carbon fiber reinforced rubber composite armour against shaped charge jet penetration

    OpenAIRE

    Yue Lian-yong; Li Wei; Zu Xu-dong; Huang Zheng-xiang; Gao Zhen-yu

    2016-01-01

    Natural rubber is reinforced with carbon fiber; the protective performances of the carbonfiber reinforced rubber composite armour to shaped charge jet have been studied based on the depth of penetration experiments. The craters on the witness blocks, the nature rubber based composite plates’ deformation and the Scanning Electron Microscopy for the hybrid fiber reinforced rubber plate also is analyzed. The results showed that the composite armour can affect the stability of the jet and made pa...

  15. Vapor Grown Carbon Fiber/Polydicyclopentadiene Composites: Shapeable Pastes to Make Composite Tooling and Plasma Erosion-Resistant Parts

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pittman, Charles

    2002-01-01

    .... In addition to dicyclopentadiene, other liquid resins, including phenolic, epoxies and vinyl esters were also blended with these nanofibers and then cured to form organic matrix carbon fiber composites. When the wt...

  16. Prospects in using carbon-carbon composite materials based on viscose carbon fibers for the space technology needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potapov, A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Due to the unique combination of low density, high mechanical strength under elevated temperatures, high resistance to thermal shock loads and ablation resistance, carbon-carbon composite materials (CCCM) are widely used for manufacturing of highly thermally loaded structural components. The important scientific and technical difficulty is to increase and stabilize CCCM properties, reduce cost and leads to searching for new raw materials and engineering solutions. The article describes the prospects of replacing carbon fiber fills based on PAN-precursors which are traditionally used for producing CCCM by carbon fillers on the basis of viscose raw material; shows the advantages of using viscose-based carbon fibers when forming products of complex shape as well as the possibility of obtaining products with high functional characteristics. The creation of CCCM of layered reinforcement structure, in which carbon fabric layers interleave with layers of discontinuous carbon fibers, enabled to increase the overall density of carbon composites, to ensure sufficiently high level of mechanical characteristics and resistance to ablation

  17. Wet spinning of PVA composite fibers with a large fraction of multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dengpan Lai

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available PVA composites fibers with a large fraction of multi-walled carbon nanotubes modified by both covalent and non-covalent functionalization were produced by a wet-spinning process. Model XQ-1 tensile tester, thermogravimetric analysis, scanning electron microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and wide-angle X-ray diffraction were used to characterize the properties of PVA/MWNT composite fibers. The TGA results suggested that MWNTs content in composite fibers were ranged from 5.3 wt% to 27.6 wt%. The mechanical properties of PVA/MWNT composite fibers were obviously superior to pure PVA fiber. The Young׳s modulus of composite fibers enhanced with increasing the content of MWNTs, and it rised gradually from 6.7 GPa for the pure PVA fiber to 12.8 GPa for the composite fibers with 27.6 wt% MWNTs. Meanwhile, the tensile strength increased gradually from 0.39 GPa for the pure PVA fiber to 0.74 GPa for the composite fibers with 14.4 wt% MWNTs. Nevertheless, the tensile strength of the composite fibers decreased as the MWNTs content up to 27.6 wt%. SEM results indicated that the MWNTs homogeneously dispersed in the composite fibers, however some agglomerates also existed when the content of MWNTs reached 27.6 wt%. DSC results proved strong interfacial interaction between MWNTs and PVA chain, which benefited composite fibers in the efficient stress-transfer. WXAD characterization showed that the orientation of PVA molecules declined from 94.1% to 90.9% with the increasing of MWNTs content. The good dispersibility of MWNTs throughout PVA matrix and efficient stress-transfer between MWNTs and PVA matrix may contributed to significant enhancement in the mechanical properties.

  18. Hybrid carbon/glass fiber composites: Micromechanical analysis of structure–damage resistance relationships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mishnaevsky, Leon; Dai, Gaoming

    2014-01-01

    A computational study of the effect of microstructure of hybrid carbon/glass fiber composites on their strength is presented. Unit cells with hundreds of randomly located and misaligned fibers of various properties and arrangements are subject to tensile and compression loading, and the evolution...

  19. Performance of carbon fiber reinforced rubber composite armour against shaped charge jet penetration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Lian-yong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural rubber is reinforced with carbon fiber; the protective performances of the carbonfiber reinforced rubber composite armour to shaped charge jet have been studied based on the depth of penetration experiments. The craters on the witness blocks, the nature rubber based composite plates’ deformation and the Scanning Electron Microscopy for the hybrid fiber reinforced rubber plate also is analyzed. The results showed that the composite armour can affect the stability of the jet and made part of the jet fracture. The carbon fiber reinforced rubber composite armour has good defence ablity especially when the nature rubber plate hybrid 15% volume percentage carbonfiber and the obliquity angle is 68°. The hybrid fiber reinforced rubber composite armour can be used as a new kind of light protective armour.

  20. Effects of fiber length on mechanical properties and fracture behavior of short carbon fiber reinforced geopolymer matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Tiesong; Jia Dechang; He Peigang; Wang Meirong; Liang Defu

    2008-01-01

    A kind of sheet-like carbon fiber preform was developed using short fibers (2, 7 and 12 mm, respectively) as starting materials and used to strengthen a geopolymer. Mechanical properties, fracture behavior, microstructure and toughening mechanisms of the as-prepared composites were investigated by three-point bending test, optical microscope and scanning electron microscopy. The results show that the short carbon fibers disperse uniformly in geopolymer matrix. The C f /geopolymer composites exhibit apparently improved mechanical properties and an obvious noncatastrophic failure behavior. The composite reinforced by the carbon fibers of 7 mm in length shows a maximum flexural strength as well as the highest work of facture, which are nearly 5 times and more than 2 orders higher than that of the geopolymer matrix, respectively. The predominant strengthening and toughening mechanisms are attributed to the apparent fiber bridging and pulling-out effect based on the weak fiber/matrix interface as well as the sheet-like carbon fiber preform

  1. Activation and micropore structure determination of activated carbon-fiber composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jagtoyen, M.; Derbyshire, F.; Kimber, G. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Research

    1997-09-05

    Rigid, high surface area activated carbon fiber composites have been produced with high permeabilities for environmental applications in gas and water purification. These novel monolithic adsorbents can be produced in single pieces to a given size and shape. The project involves a collaboration between the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER), University of Kentucky. The carbon fiber composites are produced at the ORNL and activated at the CAER using different methods, with the aims of producing a uniform degree of activation, and of closely controlling pore structure and adsorptive properties. The main focus of the present work has been to find a satisfactory means to uniformly activate large samples of carbon fiber composites and produce controlled pore structures. Several environmental applications have been explored for the activated carbon fiber composites. One of these was to evaluate the activated composites for the separation of CH{sub 4}-CO{sub 2} mixtures, and an apparatus was constructed specifically for this purpose. The composites were further evaluated in the cyclic recovery of volatile organics. The activated carbon fiber composites have also been tested for possible water treatment applications by studying the adsorption of sodium pentachlorophenolate, PCP.

  2. Effect of different dispersants in compressive strength of carbon fiber cementitious composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lestari, Yulinda; Bahri, Saiful; Sugiarti, Eni; Ramadhan, Gilang; Akbar, Ari Yustisia; Martides, Erie; Khaerudini, Deni S.

    2013-09-01

    Carbon Fiber Cementitious Composites (CFCC) is one of the most important materials in smart concrete applications. CFCC should be able to have the piezoresistivity properties where its resistivity changes when there is applied a stress/strain. It must also have the compressive strength qualification. One of the important additives in carbon fiber cementitious composites is dispersant. Dispersion of carbon fiber is one of the key problems in fabricating piezoresistive carbon fiber cementitious composites. In this research, the uses of dispersants are methylcellulose, mixture of defoamer and methylcellulose and superplasticizer based polycarboxylate. The preparation of composite samples is similar as in the mortar technique according to the ASTM C 109/109M standard. The additives material are PAN type carbon fibers, methylcellulose, defoamer and superplasticizer (as water reducer and dispersant). The experimental testing conducts the compressive strength and resistivity at various curing time, i.e. 3, 7 and 28 days. The results obtained that the highest compressive strength value in is for the mortar using superplasticizer based polycarboxylate dispersant. This also shown that the distribution of carbon fiber with superplasticizer is more effective, since not reacting with the cementitious material which was different from the methylcellulose that creates the cement hydration reaction. The research also found that the CFCC require the proper water cement ratio otherwise the compressive strength becomes lower.

  3. Three-Phase Carbon Fiber Amine Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes Epoxy Composite: Processing, Characterisation, and Multiscale Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper discusses the key issues of carbon nanotube (CNT dispersion and effect of functionalisation on the mechanical properties of multiscale carbon epoxy composites. In this study, CNTs were added in epoxy matrix and further reinforced with carbon fibres. Predetermined amounts of optimally amine functionalised CNTs were dispersed in epoxy matrix, and unidirectional carbon fiber laminates were produced. The effect of the presence of CNTs (1.0 wt% in the resin was reflected by pronounced increase in Young’s modulus, inter-laminar shear strength, and flexural modulus by 51.46%, 39.62%, and 38.04%, respectively. However, 1.5 wt% CNT loading in epoxy resin decreased the overall properties of the three-phase composites. A combination of Halpin-Tsai equations and micromechanics modeling approach was also used to evaluate the mechanical properties of multiscale composites and the differences between the predicted and experimental values are reported. These multiscale composites are likely to be used for potential missile and aerospace structural applications.

  4. Interlaminar improvement of carbon fiber/epoxy composites via depositing mixture of carbon nanotubes and sizing agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Cuiqin [Beijing Key Laboratory of Electrochemical Process and Technology for Materials, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Wang, Julin, E-mail: julinwang@126.com [Beijing Key Laboratory of Electrochemical Process and Technology for Materials, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Zhang, Tao [Beijing Institute of Ancient Architecture, Beijing 100050 (China)

    2014-12-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • COOH-CNTs can react with sizing agent, and the optimum reaction ratio was 1:20. • Carbon fibers were dipped into the mixture bath of CNTs and sizing agent. • SEM results indicate that fibers surfaces were coated with CNTs and sizing agent. • ILSS was increased by 67.01% for the composites after the mixture coating process. • Single fibers tensile strength was maintained after the deposited process. - Abstract: The effects of deposition to carbon fibers surfaces with mixture of functionalized multi-walled carbon fibers (MWCNTs) and sizing agent were investigated. Relationships between CNTs and sizing agent were studied with Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Ubbelohde viscometer. The results revealed that CNTs could react with sizing agent at 120 °C, and optimal reaction occurs when mass ratio was about 1:20. Then, carbon fibers were immersed in mixed aqueous suspension of CNTs and sizing agent with the above ratio dispersed by ultrasonication. According to scanning electron microscope (SEM) observations, fibers surfaces were coated with CNTs and sizing agent. The static contact angle tests indicated wetting performance between fibers and epoxy resin were improved after deposited procedures. Interlaminar shear strength was increased by 67.01% for fibers/epoxy resin composites after mixture deposited process. Moreover, the tensile strength of single fibers after depositing showed a slightly increase compared with that of fibers without depositing layer.

  5. Interlaminar improvement of carbon fiber/epoxy composites via depositing mixture of carbon nanotubes and sizing agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, Cuiqin; Wang, Julin; Zhang, Tao

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • COOH-CNTs can react with sizing agent, and the optimum reaction ratio was 1:20. • Carbon fibers were dipped into the mixture bath of CNTs and sizing agent. • SEM results indicate that fibers surfaces were coated with CNTs and sizing agent. • ILSS was increased by 67.01% for the composites after the mixture coating process. • Single fibers tensile strength was maintained after the deposited process. - Abstract: The effects of deposition to carbon fibers surfaces with mixture of functionalized multi-walled carbon fibers (MWCNTs) and sizing agent were investigated. Relationships between CNTs and sizing agent were studied with Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Ubbelohde viscometer. The results revealed that CNTs could react with sizing agent at 120 °C, and optimal reaction occurs when mass ratio was about 1:20. Then, carbon fibers were immersed in mixed aqueous suspension of CNTs and sizing agent with the above ratio dispersed by ultrasonication. According to scanning electron microscope (SEM) observations, fibers surfaces were coated with CNTs and sizing agent. The static contact angle tests indicated wetting performance between fibers and epoxy resin were improved after deposited procedures. Interlaminar shear strength was increased by 67.01% for fibers/epoxy resin composites after mixture deposited process. Moreover, the tensile strength of single fibers after depositing showed a slightly increase compared with that of fibers without depositing layer

  6. Circuit models for Salisbury screens made from unidirectional carbon fiber composite sandwich structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Elliot J.; Lenzing, Erik H.; Narayanan, Ram M.

    2016-05-01

    Carbon fiber composite materials have many useful structural material properties. The electromagnetic perfor- mance of these materials is of great interest for future applications. The work presented in this paper deals with the construction of Salisbury screen microwave absorbers made from unidirectional carbon fiber composite sand- wich structures. Specifically, absorbers centered at 7.25 GHz and 12.56 GHz are investigated. Circuit models are created to match the measured performance of the carbon fiber Salisbury screens using a genetic algorithm to extract lumped element circuit values. The screens presented in this paper utilize unidirectional carbon fiber sheets in place of the resistive sheet utilized in the classic Salisbury screen. The theory, models, prototypes, and measurements of these absorbers are discussed.

  7. Preparation and Characterizations of Composite Material Based on Carbon Fiber and Two Thermoset Resins

    OpenAIRE

    Fouda Hany; Guo Lin; Elsharkawy Karim

    2017-01-01

    In the present investigation, we used two types of thermoset resins (epoxy resin and phenol formaldehyde resin) with carbon fiber (CF) to produce composite materials. CF/epoxy resin composite and CF/phenolformaldhyde resin composite were fabricated and compared between their mechanical properties as compression, tension and flexural. it was found that mechanical properties of CF/epoxy composite higher than mechanical properties of CF/phenolformaldhyde resin composite such as flexural strength...

  8. Electroadsorption desalination with carbon nanotube/PAN-based carbon fiber felt composites as electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Zhou, Junbo

    2014-01-01

    The chemical vapor deposition method is used to prepare CNT (carbon nanotube)/PCF (PAN-based carbon fiber felt) composite electrodes in this paper, with the surface morphology of CNT/PCF composites and electroadsorption desalination performance being studied. Results show such electrode materials with three-dimensional network nanostructures having a larger specific surface area and narrower micropore distribution, with a huge number of reactive groups covering the surface. Compared with PCF electrodes, CNT/PCF can allow for a higher adsorption and desorption rate but lower energy consumption; meanwhile, under the condition of the same voltage change, the CNT/PCF electrodes are provided with a better desalination effect. The study also found that the higher the original concentration of the solution, the greater the adsorption capacity and the lower the adsorption rate. At the same time, the higher the solution's pH, the better the desalting; the smaller the ions' radius, the greater the amount of adsorption.

  9. Fiber Strength Utilization in Carbon/Carbon Composites: Part 2. Extended Studies With Pitch- and PAN-Based Fibers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zaldivar, R

    1998-01-01

    ...) composites as a function of heat treatment temperature (HTT) have been extended beyond the original group of DuPont pitch-based E-series fibers to include additional pitch and PAN-based fibers...

  10. Acoustic Research on the Damage Mechanism of Carbon Fiber Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bing; Liu, Yanlei; Sheng, Shuiping

    This thesis involves the study about different processes including the tensile fracture, inter-layer tear or avulsion, as well as the interlaminar shear or split regarding carbon fiber composite materials with the aid of acoustic emission technique. Also, various acoustic emission signals that are released by composite samples in the process of fracture are analyzed. As is indicated by the test results, different acoustic emissive signals that are released by carbon fiber layers in various stages of damage and fracture bear different characteristics. Acoustic detection can effectively monitor the whole stage of elastic deformation, the damage development, and even the accumulation process while figuring out in an efficient manner about the internal activities of the composites, plus the diverse types of damages. In addition, its fabulous application value lies in its relevant structural evaluation as well as the evaluation of integrity with regard to carbon fiber composite.

  11. Possibilities to improve electromagnetic shielding of plaster composites adding carbon fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samková, A.; Kulhavý, P.; Pechočiaková, M.

    2017-10-01

    This paper studies size of electromagnetic shielding in plaster composites, using different volume fractions of carbon fibers. Conventional types of plaster, which are normally used in construction (i.e. cement, lime, gypsum and lime cement) were the main parts of the created composites The carbon microfibers with a length of 8 mm were added as reinforcing and simultaneously shielding element into plaster samples. The tested samples were created at three different volume fractions of the fibres and also into the base plaster for possibilities of their comparison. The results of carried measurement show that the electromagnetic shielding in the plaster composite grows with increasing fiber content in the tested ratio almost linearly.

  12. Neutron irradiation studies on low density pan fiber based carbon/carbon composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venugopalan, Ramani; Sathiyamoorthy, D.; Acharya, R.; Tyagi, A. K.

    2010-09-01

    Carbon has been extensively used in nuclear reactors and there has been growing interest to develop carbon-based materials for high-temperature nuclear and fusion reactors. Carbon-carbon composite materials as against conventional graphite material are now being looked into as the promising materials for the high temperature reactor due their ability to have high thermal conductivity and high thermal resistance. Research on the development of such materials and their irradiation stability studies are scant. In the present investigations carbon-carbon composite has been developed using polyacrylonitrile (PAN) fiber. Two samples denoted as Sample-1 and Sample-2 have been prepared by impregnation using phenolic resin at pressure of 30 bar for time duration 10 h and 20 h respectively, and they have been irradiated by neutrons. The samples were irradiated in a flux of 10 12 n/cm 2/s at temperature of 40 °C. The fluence was 2.52 × 10 16 n/cm 2. These samples have been characterized by XRD and Raman spectroscopy before and after neutron irradiation. DSC studies have also been carried out to quantify the stored energy release behavior due to irradiation. The XRD analysis of the irradiated and unirradiated samples indicates that the irradiated samples show the tendency to get ordered structure, which was inferred from the Raman spectroscopy. The stored energy with respect to the fluence level was obtained from the DSC. The stored energy from these carbon composites is very less compared to irradiated graphite under ambient conditions.

  13. Carbon nanotube-based structural health monitoring for fiber reinforced composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hao; Liu, Kan; Mardirossian, Aris; Heider, Dirk; Thostenson, Erik

    2017-04-01

    In fiber reinforced composite materials, the modes of damage accumulation, ranging from microlevel to macro-level (matrix cracks development, fiber breakage, fiber-matrix de-bonding, delamination, etc.), are complex and hard to be detected through conventional non-destructive evaluation methods. Therefore, in order to assure the outstanding structural performance and high durability of the composites, there has been an urgent need for the design and fabrication smart composites with self-damage sensing capabilities. In recent years, the macroscopic forms of carbon nanotube materials have been maturely investigated, which provides the opportunity for structural health monitoring based on the carbon nanotubes that are integrated in the inter-laminar areas of advanced fiber composites. Here in this research, advanced fiber composites embedded with laminated carbon nanotube layers are manufactured for damage detection due to the relevant spatial electrical property changes once damage occurs. The mechanical-electrical coupling response is recorded and analyzed during impact test. The design and manufacturing of integrating the carbon nanotubes intensely affect the detecting sensitivity and repeatability of the integrated multifunctional sensors. The ultimate goal of the reported work is to develop a novel structural health monitoring method with the capability of reporting information on the damage state in a real-time way.

  14. MECHANICAL AND THERMO–MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF BI-DIRECTIONAL AND SHORT CARBON FIBER REINFORCED EPOXY COMPOSITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. AGARWAL

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper based on bidirectional and short carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composites reports the effect of fiber loading on physical, mechanical and thermo-mechanical properties respectively. The five different fiber loading, i.e., 10wt. %, 20wt. %, 30wt. %, 40wt. % and 50wt. % were taken for evaluating the above said properties. The physical and mechanical properties, i.e., hardness, tensile strength, flexural strength, inter-laminar shear strength and impact strength are determined to represent the behaviour of composite structures with that of fiber loading. Thermo-mechanical properties of the material are measured with the help of Dynamic Mechanical Analyser to measure the damping capacity of the material that is used to reduce the vibrations. The effect of storage modulus, loss modulus and tan delta with temperature are determined. Finally, Cole–Cole analysis is performed on both bidirectional and short carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composites to distinguish the material properties of either homogeneous or heterogeneous materials. The results show that with the increase in fiber loading the mechanical properties of bidirectional carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composites increases as compared to short carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composites except in case of hardness, short carbon fiber reinforced composites shows better results. Similarly, as far as Loss modulus, storage modulus is concerned bidirectional carbon fiber shows better damping behaviour than short carbon fiber reinforced composites.

  15. Liquid composite molding-processing and characterization of fiber-reinforced composites modified with carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeiler, R.; Khalid, U.; Kuttner, C.; Kothmann, M.; Dijkstra, D. J.; Fery, A.; Altstädt, V.

    2014-05-01

    The increasing demand in fiber-reinforced plastics (FRPs) necessitates economic processing of high quality, like the vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) process. FRPs exhibit excellent in-plane properties but weaknesses in off-plane direction. The addition of nanofillers into the resinous matrix phase embodies a promising approach due to benefits of the nano-scaled size of the filler, especially its high surface and interface areas. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are preferable candidates for resin modification in regard of their excellent mechanical properties and high aspect ratios. However, especially the high aspect ratios give rise to withholding or filtering by fibrous fabrics during the impregnation process, i.e. length dependent withholding of tubes (short tubes pass through the fabric, while long tubes are restrained) and a decrease in the local CNT content in the laminate along the flow path can occur. In this study, hybrid composites containing endless glass fiber reinforcement and surface functionalized CNTs dispersed in the matrix phase were produced by VARTM. New methodologies for the quantification of the filtering of CNTs were developed and applied to test laminates. As a first step, a method to analyze the CNT length distribution before and after injection was established for thermosetting composites to characterize length dependent withholding of nanotubes. The used glass fiber fabric showed no perceptible length dependent retaining of CNTs. Afterward, the resulting test laminates were examined by Raman spectroscopy and compared to reference samples of known CNT content. This Raman based technique was developed further to assess the quality of the impregnation process and to quantitatively follow the local CNT content along the injection flow in cured composites. A local decline in CNT content of approx. 20% was observed. These methodologies allow for the quality control of the filler content and size-distribution in CNT based hybrid

  16. Chemically modified carbon fibers and their applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ermolenko, I.N.; Lyubliner, I.P.; Gulko, N.V.

    1990-01-01

    This book gives a comprehensive review about chemically modified carbon fibers (e.g. by incorporation of other elements) and is structured as follows: 1. Types of carbon fibers, 2. Structure of carbon fibers, 3. Properties of carbon fibers, 4. The cellulose carbonization process, 5. Formation of element-carbon fiber materials, 6. Surface modification of carbon fibers, and 7. Applications of carbon fibers (e.g. adsorbents, catalysts, constituents of composites). (MM)

  17. Curing agent for polyepoxides and epoxy resins and composites cured therewith. [preventing carbon fiber release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafini, T. T.; Delvigs, P.; Vannucci, R. D. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A curing for a polyepoxide is described which contains a divalent aryl radical such as phenylene a tetravalent aryl radical such as a tetravalent benzene radical. An epoxide is cured by admixture with the curing agent. The cured epoxy product retains the usual properties of cured epoxides and, in addition, has a higher char residue after burning, on the order of 45% by weight. The higher char residue is of value in preventing release to the atmosphere of carbon fibers from carbon fiber-epoxy resin composites in the event of burning of the composite.

  18. Durability-Based Design Properties of Reference Crossply Carbon-Fiber Composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corum, J.M.

    2001-04-16

    This report provides recommended durability-based design properties and criteria for a crossply carbon-fiber composite for possible automotive structural applications. Although the composite utilized aerospace-grade carbon-fiber reinforcement, it was made by a rapid-molding process suitable for high-volume automotive use. The material is the first in a planned progression of candidate composites to be characterized as part of an Oak Ridge National Laboratory project entitled Durability of Carbon-Fiber Composites. The overall goal of the project, which is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Advanced Automotive Technologies and is closely coordinated with the Advanced Composites Consortium, is to develop durability-driven design data and criteria to assure the long-term integrity of carbon-fiber-based composite systems for automotive structural applications. The composite addressed in this report is a ({+-}45{degree})3S crossply consisting of continuous Thornel T300 fibers in a Baydur 420 IMR urethane matrix. This composite is highly anisotropic with two dominant fiber orientations--0/90{degree} and {+-}45{degree}. Properties and models were developed for both orientations. This document is in two parts. Part 1 provides design data and correlations, while Part 2 provides the underlying experimental data and models. The durability issues addressed include the effects of short-time, cyclic, and sustained loadings; temperature; fluid environments; and low-energy impacts (e.g., tool drops and kickups of roadway debris) on deformation, strength, and stiffness. Guidance for design analysis, time-independent and time-dependent allowable stresses, rules for cyclic loadings, and damage-tolerance design guidance are provided.

  19. Mechanical Properties of Graphene Nanoplatelet Carbon Fiber Epoxy Hybrid Composites: Multiscale Modeling and Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadden, Cameron M.; Klimek-McDonald, Danielle R.; Pineda, Evan J.; King, Julie A.; Reichanadter, Alex M.; Miskioglu, Ibrahim; Gowtham, S.; Odegard, Gregory M.

    2015-01-01

    Because of the relatively high specific mechanical properties of carbon fiber/epoxy composite materials, they are often used as structural components in aerospace applications. Graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs) can be added to the epoxy matrix to improve the overall mechanical properties of the composite. The resulting GNP/carbon fiber/epoxy hybrid composites have been studied using multiscale modeling to determine the influence of GNP volume fraction, epoxy crosslink density, and GNP dispersion on the mechanical performance. The hierarchical multiscale modeling approach developed herein includes Molecular Dynamics (MD) and micromechanical modeling, and it is validated with experimental testing of the same hybrid composite material system. The results indicate that the multiscale modeling approach is accurate and provides physical insight into the composite mechanical behavior. Also, the results quantify the substantial impact of GNP volume fraction and dispersion on the transverse mechanical properties of the hybrid composite, while the effect on the axial properties is shown to be insignificant.

  20. Mechanical Properties of Graphene Nanoplatelet/Carbon Fiber/Epoxy Hybrid Composites: Multiscale Modeling and Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadden, C. M.; Klimek-McDonald, D. R.; Pineda, E. J.; King, J. A.; Reichanadter, A. M.; Miskioglu, I.; Gowtham, S.; Odegard, G. M.

    2015-01-01

    Because of the relatively high specific mechanical properties of carbon fiber/epoxy composite materials, they are often used as structural components in aerospace applications. Graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs) can be added to the epoxy matrix to improve the overall mechanical properties of the composite. The resulting GNP/carbon fiber/epoxy hybrid composites have been studied using multiscale modeling to determine the influence of GNP volume fraction, epoxy crosslink density, and GNP dispersion on the mechanical performance. The hierarchical multiscale modeling approach developed herein includes Molecular Dynamics (MD) and micromechanical modeling, and it is validated with experimental testing of the same hybrid composite material system. The results indicate that the multiscale modeling approach is accurate and provides physical insight into the composite mechanical behavior. Also, the results quantify the substantial impact of GNP volume fraction and dispersion on the transverse mechanical properties of the hybrid composite, while the effect on the axial properties is shown to be insignificant.

  1. The effect of exfoliated graphite on carbon fiber reinforced composites for cryogenic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Adam Michael

    It is desirable to lighten cryogenic fuel tanks through the use of composites for the development of a reusable single stage launch vehicle. Conventional composites fall victim to microcracking due to the cyclic loading and temperature change experienced during launch and re-entry conditions. Also, the strength of a composite is generally limited by the properties of the matrix. The introduction of the nanoplatelet, exfoliated graphite or graphene, to the matrix shows promise of increasing both the microcracking resistivity and the mechanical characteristics. Several carbon fiber composite plates were manufactured with varying concentrations of graphene and tested under both room and cryogenic conditions to characterize graphene's effect on the composite. Results from tensile and fracture testing indicate that the ideal concentration of graphene in our carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites for cryogenic applications is 0.08% mass graphene.

  2. Modeling the Tensile Strength of Carbon Fiber - Reinforced Ceramic - Matrix Composites Under Multiple Fatigue Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Longbiao

    2016-06-01

    An analytical method has been developed to investigate the effect of interface wear on the tensile strength of carbon fiber - reinforced ceramic - matrix composites (CMCs) under multiple fatigue loading. The Budiansky - Hutchinson - Evans shear - lag model was used to describe the micro stress field of the damaged composite considering fibers failure and the difference existed in the new and original interface debonded region. The statistical matrix multicracking model and fracture mechanics interface debonding criterion were used to determine the matrix crack spacing and interface debonded length. The interface shear stress degradation model and fibers strength degradation model have been adopted to analyze the interface wear effect on the tensile strength of the composite subjected to multiple fatigue loading. Under tensile loading, the fibers failure probabilities were determined by combining the interface wear model and fibers failure model based on the assumption that the fiber strength is subjected to two - parameter Weibull distribution and the loads carried by broken and intact fibers satisfy the Global Load Sharing criterion. The composite can no longer support the applied load when the total loads supported by broken and intact fibers approach its maximum value. The conditions of a single matrix crack and matrix multicrackings for tensile strength corresponding to multiple fatigue peak stress levels and different cycle number have been analyzed.

  3. Effects of carbon fiber surface characteristics on interfacial bonding of epoxy resin composite subjected to hygrothermal treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Min; Liu, Hongxin; Gu, Yizhuo; Li, Yanxia; Zhang, Zuoguang

    2014-01-01

    The changes of interfacial bonding of three types of carbon fibers/epoxy resin composite as well as their corresponding desized carbon fiber composites subjecting to hygrothermal conditions were investigated by means of single fiber fragmentation test. The interfacial fracture energy was obtained to evaluate the interfacial bonding before and after boiling water aging. The surface characteristics of the studied carbon fiber were characterized using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The effects of activated carbon atoms and silicon element at carbon fiber surface on the interfacial hygrothermal resistance were further discussed. The results show that the three carbon fiber composites with the same resin matrix possess different hygrothermal resistances of interface and the interfacial fracture energy after water aging can not recovery to the level of raw dry sample (irreversible changes) for the carbon fiber composites containing silicon. Furthermore, the activated carbon atoms have little impact on the interfacial hygrothermal resistance. The irreversible variations of interfacial bonding and the differences among different carbon fiber composites are attributed to the silicon element on the carbon fiber bodies, which might result in hydrolyzation in boiling water treatment and degrade interfacial hygrothermal resistance.

  4. Surface modification of carbon fibers and its effect on the fiber–matrix interaction of UHMWPE based composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chukov, D.I.; Stepashkin, A.A.; Gorshenkov, M.V.; Tcherdyntsev, V.V.; Kaloshkin, S.D.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Both chemical and thermal treatments of UKN 5000 carbon fibers allow one to obtain well-developed surface. • The changes of structure and properties of VMN-4 fibers after both thermal and chemical oxidation are insignificant due to more perfect initial structure of these fibers. • The oxidative treatment of carbon fibers allows one to improve the interfacial interaction in the UHMWPE-based composites. • The oxidative treatment of the fibers allows one to a triple increase of Young’s modulus of the modified fibers reinforced UHMWPE composites. -- Abstract: The PAN-based carbon fibers (CF) were subjected to thermal and chemical oxidation under various conditions. The variation in the surface morphology of carbon fibers after surface treatment was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It was found that the tensile strength of carbon fibers changed after surface modification. The interaction between the fibers and the matrix OF ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) was characterized by the Young modulus of produced composites. It was shown that the Young modulus of composites reinforced with modified carbon fibers was significantly higher than that of composites reinforced with non-modified fibers

  5. Method for imparting improved surface properties to carbon fibers and composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueno, S.; Kamata, H.

    1984-01-01

    The invention provides a means for solving the problem of poor affinity between the surface of carbon fibers and a synthetic resin in a resin-based composite material reinforced with the carbon fibers. The method comprises subjecting the surface of the carbon fibers in advance to exposure to low temperature plasma in a low pressure atomosphere of an inorganic gas generated by applying an electric voltage between electrodes. It was unexpectedly discovered that the discharge voltage between the electrodes is very critical and satisfactory results can be obtained when the peak-to-peak value of the discharge voltage between electrodes is 4000 volts or higher. The composition of the atmospheric inorganic gas is also important and the gas is preferably oxygen gas or a gaseous mixture containing at least 10% by volume of oxygen

  6. Hybrid Carbon-Glass Fiber/Toughened Epoxy Thick Composite Joints Subject to Drop-Weight and Ballistic Impacts

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Liaw, Benjamin; Delale, Feridun

    2007-01-01

    .... The main objectives of this project are (1) to conduct tensile, drop-weight impact and ballistic impact tests of monolithic S2 glass fiber/toughened epoxy composites and hybrid carbon-S2 glass fiber/toughened epoxy composites, (2...

  7. Thermal Protection of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Composites by Ceramic Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baljinder Kandola

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The thermal barrier efficiency of two types of ceramic particle, glass flakes and aluminum titanate, dispersed on the surface of carbon-fiber epoxy composites, has been evaluated using a cone calorimeter at 35 and 50 kW/m2, in addition to temperature gradients through the samples’ thicknesses, measured by inserting thermocouples on the exposed and back surfaces during the cone tests. Two techniques of dispersing ceramic particles on the surface have been employed, one where particles were dispersed on semi-cured laminate and the other where their dispersion in a phenolic resin was applied on the laminate surface, using the same method as used previously for glass fiber composites. The morphology and durability of the coatings to water absorption, peeling, impact and flexural tension were also studied and compared with those previously reported for glass-fiber epoxy composites. With both methods, uniform coatings could be achieved, which were durable to peeling or water absorption with a minimal adverse effect on the mechanical properties of composites. While all these properties were comparable to those previously observed for glass fiber composites, the ceramic particles have seen to be more effective on this less flammable, carbon fiber composite substrate.

  8. Alignment of carbon nanotubes and reinforcing effects in nylon-6 polymer composite fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangari, Vijaya K.; Yousuf, Mohammed; Jeelani, Shaik; Pulikkathara, Merlyn X.; Khabashesku, Valery N.

    2008-06-01

    Alignment of pristine carbon nanotubes (P-CNTs) and fluorinated carbon nanotubes (F-CNTs) in nylon-6 polymer composite fibers (PCFs) has been achieved using a single-screw extrusion method. CNTs have been used as filler reinforcements to enhance the mechanical and thermal properties of nylon-6 composite fibers. The composites were fabricated by dry mixing nylon-6 polymer powder with the CNTs as the first step, then followed by the melt extrusion process of fiber materials in a single-screw extruder. The extruded fibers were stretched to their maxima and stabilized using a godet set-up. Finally, fibers were wound on a Wayne filament winder machine and tested for their tensile and thermal properties. The tests have shown a remarkable change in mechanical and thermal properties of nylon-6 polymer fibers with the addition of 0.5 wt% F-CNTs and 1.0 wt% of P-CNTs. To draw a comparison between the improvements achieved, the same process has been repeated with neat nylon-6 polymer. As a result, tensile strength has been increased by 230% for PCFs made with 0.5% F-CNTs and 1% P-CNTs as additives. These fibers have been further characterized by DSC, Raman spectroscopy and SEM which confirm the alignment of CNTs and interfacial bonding to nylon-6 polymer matrix.

  9. Microstructure and mechanical properties of CVI carbon fiber/SiC composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noda, T.; Araki, H.; Abe, F.; Okada, M.

    1992-01-01

    Microstructures and mechanical properties of carbon fiber/SiC composites prepared with chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) were examined to optimize the process conditions such as reactant and infiltration temperature. Ethyl-trichloro-silane (ETS) and methyl-trichloro-silane (MTS) were used as a source of SiC. CVI was conducted for 108 ks at maximum under a pressure of 13.3 kPa at 1273-1573 K. The composite with a density higher than 80% was obtained at 1373-1423 K and 1423-1374 K from ETS and MTS, respectively. The main matrix formed was β SiC for both reactants. However, silicon also deposited in SiC matrix for MTS. Preferential wettability of SiC to the carbon fiber was observed, and graphite was detected in the interface between the matrix and the carbon fiber by TEM. Mechanical properties were evaluated by bend tests at room temperature. High strength of around 800 MPa was obtained for the composites if the thickness of the surface coated layer was less than 50 μm. Apparent fracture thoughness of the present carbon fiber/SiC composite was 6-10 MPa m 1/2 at room temperature. (orig.)

  10. Bisphenyl-Polymer/Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced Composite Compared to Titanium Alloy Bone Implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Richard C

    2011-05-03

    Aerospace/aeronautical thermoset bisphenyl-polymer/carbon-fiber-reinforced composites are considered as new advanced materials to replace metal bone implants. In addition to well-recognized nonpolar chemistry with related bisphenol-polymer estrogenic factors, carbon-fiber-reinforced composites can offer densities and electrical conductivity/resistivity properties close to bone with strengths much higher than metals on a per-weight basis. In vivo bone-marrow tests with Sprague-Dawley rats revealed far-reaching significant osseoconductivity increases from bisphenyl-polymer/carbon-fiber composites when compared to state-of-the-art titanium-6-4 alloy controls. Midtibial percent bone area measured from the implant surface increased when comparing the titanium alloy to the polymer composite from 10.5% to 41.6% at 0.8 mm, P < 10 -4 , and 19.3% to 77.7% at 0.1 mm, P < 10 -8 . Carbon-fiber fragments planned to occur in the test designs, instead of producing an inflammation, stimulated bone formation and increased bone integration to the implant. In addition, low-thermal polymer processing allows incorporation of minerals and pharmaceuticals for future major tissue-engineering potential.

  11. Bisphenyl-Polymer/Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced Composite Compared to Titanium Alloy Bone Implant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard C. Petersen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aerospace/aeronautical thermoset bisphenyl-polymer/carbon-fiber-reinforced composites are considered as new advanced materials to replace metal bone implants. In addition to well-recognized nonpolar chemistry with related bisphenol-polymer estrogenic factors, carbon-fiber-reinforced composites can offer densities and electrical conductivity/resistivity properties close to bone with strengths much higher than metals on a per-weight basis. In vivo bone-marrow tests with Sprague-Dawley rats revealed far-reaching significant osseoconductivity increases from bisphenyl-polymer/carbon-fiber composites when compared to state-of-the-art titanium-6-4 alloy controls. Midtibial percent bone area measured from the implant surface increased when comparing the titanium alloy to the polymer composite from 10.5% to 41.6% at 0.8 mm, P<10−4, and 19.3% to 77.7% at 0.1 mm, P<10−8. Carbon-fiber fragments planned to occur in the test designs, instead of producing an inflammation, stimulated bone formation and increased bone integration to the implant. In addition, low-thermal polymer processing allows incorporation of minerals and pharmaceuticals for future major tissue-engineering potential.

  12. Extracting Information from Conventional AE Features for Fatigue Onset Damage Detection in Carbon Fiber Composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Unnthorsson, Runar; Pontoppidan, Niels Henrik Bohl; Jonsson, Magnus Thor

    2005-01-01

    We have analyzed simple data fusion and preprocessing methods on Acoustic Emission measurements of prosthetic feet made of carbon fiber reinforced composites. This paper presents the initial research steps; aiming at reducing the time spent on the fatigue test. With a simple single feature...

  13. Sterilization Decomposition Evaluation of Composite Materials based on Carbon Fibers for use in Medicine

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sedláček, R.; Suchý, Tomáš; Balík, Karel; Sochor, M.; Sucharda, Zbyněk

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 14, 109-111 (2011), s. 9-11 ISSN 1429-7248 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/10/1457 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30460519 Keywords : composite material * sterilization decomposition * carbon fibers Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics http://www.biomat.krakow.pl/english/journal/editorial.html

  14. Electromagnetic shielding of epoxy resin composites containing carbon fibers coated with polyaniline base

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Paligová, M.; Vilčáková, J.; Sáha, P.; Křesálek, V.; Stejskal, Jaroslav; Quadrat, Otakar

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 335, 3-4 (2004), s. 421-429 ISSN 0378-4371 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KSK4050111 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4050913 Keywords : polymer composites * short carbon fibers * polyaniline base Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 1.369, year: 2004

  15. Electroadsorption Desalination with Carbon Nanotube/PAN-Based Carbon Fiber Felt Composites as Electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The chemical vapor deposition method is used to prepare CNT (carbon nanotube/PCF (PAN-based carbon fiber felt composite electrodes in this paper, with the surface morphology of CNT/PCF composites and electroadsorption desalination performance being studied. Results show such electrode materials with three-dimensional network nanostructures having a larger specific surface area and narrower micropore distribution, with a huge number of reactive groups covering the surface. Compared with PCF electrodes, CNT/PCF can allow for a higher adsorption and desorption rate but lower energy consumption; meanwhile, under the condition of the same voltage change, the CNT/PCF electrodes are provided with a better desalination effect. The study also found that the higher the original concentration of the solution, the greater the adsorption capacity and the lower the adsorption rate. At the same time, the higher the solution’s pH, the better the desalting; the smaller the ions’ radius, the greater the amount of adsorption.

  16. Electroadsorption Desalination with Carbon Nanotube/PAN-Based Carbon Fiber Felt Composites as Electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Zhou, Junbo

    2014-01-01

    The chemical vapor deposition method is used to prepare CNT (carbon nanotube)/PCF (PAN-based carbon fiber felt) composite electrodes in this paper, with the surface morphology of CNT/PCF composites and electroadsorption desalination performance being studied. Results show such electrode materials with three-dimensional network nanostructures having a larger specific surface area and narrower micropore distribution, with a huge number of reactive groups covering the surface. Compared with PCF electrodes, CNT/PCF can allow for a higher adsorption and desorption rate but lower energy consumption; meanwhile, under the condition of the same voltage change, the CNT/PCF electrodes are provided with a better desalination effect. The study also found that the higher the original concentration of the solution, the greater the adsorption capacity and the lower the adsorption rate. At the same time, the higher the solution's pH, the better the desalting; the smaller the ions' radius, the greater the amount of adsorption. PMID:24963504

  17. 3D-Printing of Meso-structurally Ordered Carbon Fiber/Polymer Composites with Unprecedented Orthotropic Physical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewicki, James P.; Rodriguez, Jennifer N.; Zhu, Cheng; Worsley, Marcus A.; Wu, Amanda S.; Kanarska, Yuliya; Horn, John D.; Duoss, Eric B.; Ortega, Jason M.; Elmer, William; Hensleigh, Ryan; Fellini, Ryan A.; King, Michael J.

    2017-03-01

    Here we report the first example of a class of additively manufactured carbon fiber reinforced composite (AMCFRC) materials which have been achieved through the use of a latent thermal cured aromatic thermoset resin system, through an adaptation of direct ink writing (DIW) 3D-printing technology. We have developed a means of printing high performance thermoset carbon fiber composites, which allow the fiber component of a resin and carbon fiber fluid to be aligned in three dimensions via controlled micro-extrusion and subsequently cured into complex geometries. Characterization of our composite systems clearly show that we achieved a high order of fiber alignment within the composite microstructure, which in turn allows these materials to outperform equivalently filled randomly oriented carbon fiber and polymer composites. Furthermore, our AM carbon fiber composite systems exhibit highly orthotropic mechanical and electrical responses as a direct result of the alignment of carbon fiber bundles in the microscale which we predict will ultimately lead to the design of truly tailorable carbon fiber/polymer hybrid materials having locally programmable complex electrical, thermal and mechanical response.

  18. Studying Impact Damage on Carbon-Fiber Reinforced Aircraft Composite Panels with Sonicir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiaoyan; Zhao, Xinyue; Zhang, Ding; He, Qi; Song, Yuyang; Lubowicki, Anthony; Newaz, Golam.; Favro, Lawrence D.; Thomas, Robert L.

    2011-06-01

    Composites are becoming more important materials in commercial aircraft structures such as the fuselage and wings with the new B787 Dreamliner from Boeing which has the target to utilize 50% by weight of composite materials. Carbon-fiber reinforced composites are the material of choice in aircraft structures. This is due to their light weight and high strength (high strength-to-weight ratio), high specific stiffness, tailorability of properties, design flexibility etc. Especially, by reducing the aircraft's body weight by using such lighter structures, the cost of fuel can be greatly reduced with the high jet fuel price for commercial airlines. However, these composites are prone to impact damage and the damage may occur without any observable sign on the surface, yet resulting in delaminations and disbonds that may occur well within the layers. We are studying the impact problem with carbon-fiber reinforced composite panels and developing SonicIR for this application as a fast and wide-area NDE technology. In this paper, we present our results in studying composite structures including carbon-fiber reinforced composite materials, and preliminary quantitative studies on delamination type defect depth identification in the panels.

  19. Studying impact damage on carbon-fiber reinforced aircraft composite panels with sonicir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Xiaoyan; Zhang Ding; He Qi; Song Yuyang; Lubowicki, Anthony; Zhao Xinyue; Newaz, Golam.; Favro, Lawrence D.; Thomas, Robert L.

    2011-01-01

    Composites are becoming more important materials in commercial aircraft structures such as the fuselage and wings with the new B787 Dreamliner from Boeing which has the target to utilize 50% by weight of composite materials. Carbon-fiber reinforced composites are the material of choice in aircraft structures. This is due to their light weight and high strength (high strength-to-weight ratio), high specific stiffness, tailorability of properties, design flexibility etc. Especially, by reducing the aircraft's body weight by using such lighter structures, the cost of fuel can be greatly reduced with the high jet fuel price for commercial airlines. However, these composites are prone to impact damage and the damage may occur without any observable sign on the surface, yet resulting in delaminations and disbonds that may occur well within the layers. We are studying the impact problem with carbon-fiber reinforced composite panels and developing SonicIR for this application as a fast and wide-area NDE technology. In this paper, we present our results in studying composite structures including carbon-fiber reinforced composite materials, and preliminary quantitative studies on delamination type defect depth identification in the panels.

  20. Experimental and numerical study of the electrical anisotropy in unidirectional carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J. B.; Hwang, T. K.; Kim, H. G.; Doh, Y. D.

    2007-02-01

    In this paper, unidirectional CFRP composites are considered as an electrical percolation system, which consists of electrically conductive carbon fibers and electrically nonconductive epoxy resin. Due to the contact behavior of the carbon fibers, CFRP has electrical conductivity in the width direction. Resistance measurements using the DC four-probe and the DC six-probe methods are conducted for the unidirectional CFRP specimens with different fiber volume fractions, i.e. different contact conditions. On the basis of the electrical anisotropy level obtained, the correlation between the measured anisotropy and the electrical ineffective length δec, over which a broken fiber recovers its current carrying capacity and a key parameter in electromechanical modeling of CFRP, is shown experimentally. The empirical relationship between the electrical anisotropy and δec obtained is also reviewed using a numerical calculation method based on the electric circuit theory of Kirchhoff's rule and the Monte Carlo simulation technique.

  1. Toughening of carbon fiber-reinforced epoxy polymer composites via copolymers and graphene nano-platelets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downey, Markus A.

    Carbon fiber-reinforced epoxy composites currently play a significant role in many different industries. Due to their high cross-link density, aromatic epoxy polymers used as the matrix in composite materials are very strong and stiff however they lack toughness. This dissertation investigates three areas of the carbon fiber-reinforced composite, which have the potential to increase toughness: the carbon fiber surface; the fiber/matrix interphase; and the matrix material. Approaches to improving each area are presented which lead to enhancing the overall composite toughness without reducing other composite mechanical properties. The toughening of the base matrix material, DGEBA/mPDA, was accomplished by two methods: first, using low concentrations of aliphatic copolymers to enhance energy absorption and second by adding graphene nano-platelets (GnP) to act as crack deflection agents. 1wt% copolymer concentration was determined to substantially increase the notched Izod impact strength without reducing other static-mechanical properties. Toughening of DGEBA/mPDA using 3wt% GnP was found to be dependent on the aspect ratio of GnP and treatment of GnP with tetraethylenepentamine (TEPA). GnP C750 enhanced flexural properties but not fracture toughness because the small aspect ratio cannot effectively deflect cracks. TEPA-grafting enhanced GnP/matrix bonding. Larger aspect ratio GnP M5 and M25 showed significant increases in fracture toughness due to better crack deflection but also decreased flexural strength based on limited GnP/matrix bonding. TEPA-grafting mitigated some of the flexural strength reductions for GnP M5, due to enhanced GnP/matrix adhesion. In the high-fiber volume fraction composite, the fiber/matrix bonding was enhanced with UV-ozone surface treatment by reducing a weak fiber surface boundary layer and increasing the concentration of reactive oxygen groups on the fiber surface. Further increases in Mode I fracture toughness were seen with the

  2. Fracture Toughness of Carbon Fiber Composites Containing Various Fiber Sizings and a Puncture Self-Healing Thermoplastic Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano, Roberto J.; Grimsley, Brian W.; Ratcliffe, James G.; Gordon, Keith L.; Smith, Joseph G.; Siochi, Emilie J.

    2015-01-01

    Ongoing efforts at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) have resulted in the identification of several commercially available thermoplastic resin systems which self-heal after ballistic impact and through penetration. One of these resins, polybutylene graft copolymer (PBg), was selected as a matrix for processing with unsized carbon fibers to fabricate reinforced composites for further evaluation. During process development, data from thermo-physical analyses was utilized to determine a processing cycle to fabricate laminate panels, which were analyzed by photo microscopy and acid digestion. The process cycle was further optimized based on these results to fabricate panels for mechanical property characterization. The results of the processing development effort of this composite material, as well as the results of the mechanical property characterization, indicated that bonding between the fiber and PBg was not adequate. Therefore, three sizings were investigated in this work to assess their potential to improve fiber/matrix bonding compared to previously tested unsized IM7 fiber. Unidirectional prepreg was made at NASA LaRC from three sized carbon fibers and utilized to fabricate test coupons that were tested in double cantilever beam configurations to determine GIc fracture toughness.

  3. Tribo-performance of epoxy hybrid composites reinforced with carbon fibers and potassium titanate whiskers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresha, B.; Harshavardhan, B.; Ravishankar, R.

    2018-04-01

    The present investigation deals with the fabrication and characterization of epoxy reinforced with bidirectional carbon fiber mat (CF/Ep) and filled with 2.5, 5 and 7.5 wt% potassium titanate whiskers (PTw) composites. The effect of PTw loading on hardness, tensile properties and dry sliding wear behaviour of CF/Ep composite were carefully investigated in expectation of providing valuable information for the application of hybrid CF/Ep composites. Results indicated that the incorporation of PTw actually improved the hardness, tensile strength and tensile modulus of CF/Ep composites. Meanwhile, the specific wear rate of CF/Ep filled by 5 wt % PTw reached to 6.3× 10-14 m3/N-m, which is 41% lower than that of CF/Ep composite at the same dry sliding condition. It also seen that the fiber and filler worked synergistically to enhance the wear resistance. Further, for all composites the friction coefficient increases with increase in load and sliding velocity. However, PTw reinforced CF/Ep exhibited considerably higher coefficient of friction compared to unfilled ones, while PTw filler loading of 5 wt% was effective in reducing the specific wear rate of CF/Ep composite. The carbon fiber carried the applied load between the contact surfaces and protected the epoxy from severe abrasion of the counterface. At the same time, the exposed PTw out of the epoxy matrix around the fiber inhibited the direct scraping between the fiber and counterface so that the fibers could be less directly impacted during the subsequent wear process and they were protected from severe damage.

  4. Carbon fiber epoxy composites for both strengthening and health monitoring of structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvado, Rita; Lopes, Catarina; Szojda, Leszek; Araújo, Pedro; Gorski, Marcin; Velez, Fernando José; Castro-Gomes, João; Krzywon, Rafal

    2015-05-06

    This paper presents a study of the electrical and mechanical behavior of several continuous carbon fibers epoxy composites for both strengthening and monitoring of structures. In these composites, the arrangement of fibers was deliberately diversified to test and understand the ability of the composites for self-sensing low strains. Composites with different arrangements of fibers and textile weaves, mainly unidirectional continuous carbon reinforced composites, were tested at the dynamometer. A two-probe method was considered to measure the relative electrical resistance of these composites during loading. The measured relative electrical resistance includes volume and contact electrical resistances. For all tested specimens, it increases with an increase in tensile strain, at low strain values. This is explained by the improved alignment of fibers and resulting reduction of the number of possible contacts between fibers during loading, increasing as a consequence the contact electrical resistance of the composite. Laboratory tests on strengthening of structural elements were also performed, making hand-made composites by the "wet process", which is commonly used in civil engineering for the strengthening of all types of structures in-situ. Results show that the woven epoxy composite, used for strengthening of concrete elements is also able to sense low deformations, below 1%. Moreover, results clearly show that this textile sensor also improves the mechanical work of the strengthened structural elements, increasing their bearing capacity. Finally, the set of obtained results supports the concept of a textile fabric capable of both structural upgrade and self-monitoring of structures, especially large structures of difficult access and needing constant, sometimes very expensive, health monitoring.

  5. Carbon Fiber Epoxy Composites for Both Strengthening and Health Monitoring of Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Salvado

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study of the electrical and mechanical behavior of several continuous carbon fibers epoxy composites for both strengthening and monitoring of structures. In these composites, the arrangement of fibers was deliberately diversified to test and understand the ability of the composites for self-sensing low strains. Composites with different arrangements of fibers and textile weaves, mainly unidirectional continuous carbon reinforced composites, were tested at the dynamometer. A two-probe method was considered to measure the relative electrical resistance of these composites during loading. The measured relative electrical resistance includes volume and contact electrical resistances. For all tested specimens, it increases with an increase in tensile strain, at low strain values. This is explained by the improved alignment of fibers and resulting reduction of the number of possible contacts between fibers during loading, increasing as a consequence the contact electrical resistance of the composite. Laboratory tests on strengthening of structural elements were also performed, making hand-made composites by the “wet process”, which is commonly used in civil engineering for the strengthening of all types of structures in-situ. Results show that the woven epoxy composite, used for strengthening of concrete elements is also able to sense low deformations, below 1%. Moreover, results clearly show that this textile sensor also improves the mechanical work of the strengthened structural elements, increasing their bearing capacity. Finally, the set of obtained results supports the concept of a textile fabric capable of both structural upgrade and self-monitoring of structures, especially large structures of difficult access and needing constant, sometimes very expensive, health monitoring.

  6. Torsional Failure of Carbon Fiber Composite Plates Versus Stainless Steel Plates for Comminuted Distal Fibula Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, William K; Morris, Randal P; Ward, Adam J; Carayannopoulos, Nikoletta L; Panchbhavi, Vinod K

    2016-05-01

    Carbon fiber composite implants are gaining popularity in orthopedics, but with few independent studies of their failure characteristics under supra-physiologic loads. The objective of this cadaveric study was to compare torsional failure properties of bridge plating a comminuted distal fibula fracture with carbon fiber polyetheretherketone (PEEK) composite and stainless steel one-third tubular plates. Comminuted fractures were simulated in 12 matched pairs of fresh-frozen human fibulas with 2-mm osteotomies located 3 cm proximal to the tibiotalar joint. Each fibula pair was randomized for fixation and implanted with carbon fiber and stainless steel 5-hole one-third tubular plates. The constructs were loaded in external rotation at a rate of 1-degree/sec until failure with a materials testing system. Torsional stiffness and mode of failure, as well as displacement, torque, and energy absorption for the first instance of failure and peak failure, were determined. Statistical analysis was performed with paired t tests and chi-square. There were no significant differences among the 12 pairs for torsional stiffness, first failure torque, peak failure displacement, peak failure torque, or peak failure energy. Stainless steel plates exhibited significantly higher displacement (P fibula fracture fixation model, carbon fiber implants exhibited multiple pre-peak failures at significantly lower angles than the first failure for the stainless steel implants, with some delamination of composite layers and brittle catastrophic failure rather than plastic deformation. The torsional failure properties of carbon fiber composite one-third tubular plates determined in this independent study provide novel in vitro data for this alternative implant material. © The Author(s) 2016.

  7. Preparation and Characterizations of Composite Material Based on Carbon Fiber and Two Thermoset Resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fouda Hany

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present investigation, we used two types of thermoset resins (epoxy resin and phenol formaldehyde resin with carbon fiber (CF to produce composite materials. CF/epoxy resin composite and CF/phenolformaldhyde resin composite were fabricated and compared between their mechanical properties as compression, tension and flexural. it was found that mechanical properties of CF/epoxy composite higher than mechanical properties of CF/phenolformaldhyde resin composite such as flexural strength of CF/epoxy resin composite increased by 30 % than flexural strength of CF/phenolformaldhyde resin composite, tensile strength of CF/epoxy resin composite increased by 11.4 % than flexural strength of CF/phenolformaldhyde resin and axial compression strength of CF/epoxy resin composite increased by 14.5 % than flexural strength of CF/phenolformaldhyde resin.

  8. Static and Dynamic Mechanical Properties of Graphene Oxide-Incorporated Woven Carbon Fiber/Epoxy Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adak, Nitai Chandra; Chhetri, Suman; Kim, Nam Hoon; Murmu, Naresh Chandra; Samanta, Pranab; Kuila, Tapas

    2018-01-01

    This study investigates the synergistic effects of graphene oxide (GO) on the woven carbon fiber (CF)-reinforced epoxy composites. The GO nanofiller was incorporated into the epoxy resin with variations in the content, and the CF/epoxy composites were manufactured using a vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding process and then cured at 70 and 120 °C. An analysis of the mechanical properties of the GO (0.2 wt.%)/CF/epoxy composites showed an improvement in the tensile strength, Young's modulus, toughness, flexural strength and flexural modulus by 34, 20, 83, 55 and 31%, respectively, when compared to the CF/epoxy composite. The dynamic mechanical analysis of the composites exhibited an enhancement of 56, 114 and 22% in the storage modulus, loss modulus and damping capacity (tanδ), respectively, at its glass transition temperature. The fiber-matrix interaction was studied using a Cole-Cole plot analysis.

  9. Electrolytic deposition of PZT on carbon fibers for fabricating multifunctional composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Y; Shaffer, J W; Sodano, H A

    2010-01-01

    Piezoelectric fiber composites (PFCs) have been developed in order to overcome the fragile nature of monolithic piezoelectric materials by embedding piezoceramic inclusions into a polymer matrix. The flexible nature of the polymer matrix protects the piezoelectric fiber from damage or fracture under mechanical loading and allows the composites to be easily conformed to curved surfaces for use in many applications. Although PFCs have many useful properties, they still suffer from several drawbacks, namely the required separate electrodes make it impossible to embed the composites into the host structure, and the relatively low tensile modulus of the piezoelectric inclusion means that it contributes little to structural properties. To resolve the inadequacies of current PFCs, a novel active structural fiber (ASF) was developed that can be embedded into a composite structure to perform sensing and actuation, and provide load bearing functionality. The concept and feasibility of this ASF has been validated by coating a silicon carbide (SiC) fiber with a barium titanate (BaTiO 3 ) shell using electrophoresis deposition techniques. However, lead based ceramics react with SiC fiber during high temperature sintering and thus the use of these highly coupled piezoceramics requires alternative deposition approaches. This paper will introduce a new ASF fabricated by coating a single carbon fiber with a concentric PZT (PbZr 0.52 Ti 0.48 O 3 ) shell using electrolytic deposition (ELD). ELD quickly and uniformly coats the fiber and, since the PZT precursor has a low crystallization temperature, the carbon fiber is not exposed to high sintering temperatures which typically degrade the in-plane material properties of the fiber and composite. Carbon fiber has been widely used in industry and studied in academia due to its excellent mechanical properties, while PZT has been extensively used for sensing or actuation because of its high piezoelectric coupling. Crystal structures of the

  10. Carbon/graphite composite material study. Appendix C: NASA studies on modification of carbon/graphite fibers and alternative materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    The feasibility of modifying resin matrix composites to reduce the potential of electrical shorting from fire released fiber was explored. The effort included modifications to or coatings for graphite fibers, alternative fibers, modifications to matrix materials, and hybrid composites. The objectives included reduction of the conductivity of the graphite fiber, char formation to reduce fiber release, glass formation to prevent fiber release, catalysis to assure fiber consumption in a fire, and replacement of the graphite fibers with nonconductive fibers of similar mechanical potential.

  11. Carbon fiber based composites stress analysis. Experimental and computer comparative studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobek, M.; Baier, A.; Buchacz, A.; Grabowski, Ł.; Majzner, M.

    2015-11-01

    Composite materials used nowadays for the production of composites are the result of advanced research. This allows assuming that they are among the most elaborate tech products of our century. That fact is evidenced by the widespread use of them in the most demanding industries like aerospace and space industry. But the heterogeneous materials and their advantages have been known to mankind in ancient times and they have been used by nature for millions of years. Among the fibers used in the industry most commonly used are nylon, polyester, polypropylene, boron, metal, glass, carbon and aramid. Thanks to their physical properties last three fiber types deserve special attention. High strength to weight ratio allow the use of many industrial solutions. Composites based on carbon and glass fibers are widely used in the automotive. Aramid fibers ideal for the fashion industry where the fabric made from the fibers used to produce the protective clothing. In the paper presented issues of stress analysis of composite materials have been presented. The components of composite materials and principles of composition have been discussed. Particular attention was paid to the epoxy resins and the fabrics made from carbon fibers. The article also includes basic information about strain measurements performed on with a resistance strain gauge method. For the purpose of the laboratory tests a series of carbon - epoxy composite samples were made. For this purpose plain carbon textile was used with a weight of 200 g/mm2 and epoxy resin LG730. During laboratory strain tests described in the paper Tenmex's delta type strain gauge rosettes were used. They were arranged in specific locations on the surface of the samples. Data acquisition preceded using HBM measurement equipment, which included measuring amplifier and measuring head. Data acquisition was performed using the Easy Catman. In order to verify the results of laboratory tests numerical studies were carried out in a

  12. Enhanced mechanical properties of polyacrylonitrile/multiwall carbon nanotube composite fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisenberger, M C; Grulke, E A; Jacques, D; Rantell, T; Andrews, R

    2003-12-01

    The use of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) as a reinforcing phase in a polyacrylonitrile (PAN) fiber matrix was investigated with the goal of producing a PAN-derived carbon/MWNT composite fiber with enhanced physical properties. MWNTs were dispersed in a PAN/DMAc (dimethylacetamide) solution and spun into composite fibers containing up to 5 wt.% MWNTs, with the use of a lab-scale dry-jet wet spinline. The spinning process resulted in alignment of the MWNTs parallel with the fiber axis. Three types of chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-derived, high-purity MWNTs were used: as produced, graphitized (heat treated to 2800 degrees C), and NaCN-treated (chemically treated to attach CN groups to the nanotube surface). Tensile tests were performed to measure yield stress/strain, initial modulus, break stress/strain, and energy to yield and energy to break. Significant mechanical property increases were recorded for the composite fibers compared with the control samples with no MWNT reinforcement: break strength +31%, initial modulus +36%, yield strength +46%, energy to yield +80%, and energy to break +83%.

  13. Application of copper-carbon fiber composites to power semiconductor devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuniya, Keiichi; Arakawa, Hideo; Sakaue, Tadashi; Minorikawa, Hitoshi; Akeyama, Kenji; Sakamoto, Tatsuji

    1988-01-01

    Copper-carbon composite electrodes are used in a series of power semiconductor devices, i.e., resin molded diodes, button-type diodes, stud-type diodes, power modules, and integrated circuit igniter modules. The properties of these power semiconductor devices compare favorably with those conventional devices using Mo or W electrodes. In thermal fatigue tests, no degradation in the electrical and mechanical characteristics of these devices are observed. The new composite electrode with carbon fibers satisfies all of the major requirements for the electrodes in power semiconductor devices.

  14. Polymer-derived ceramic composite fibers with aligned pristine multiwalled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Sourangsu; Zou, Jianhua; Liu, Jianhua; Xu, Chengying; An, Linan; Zhai, Lei

    2010-04-01

    Polymer-derived ceramic fibers with aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are fabricated through the electrospinning of polyaluminasilazane solutions with well-dispersed MWCNTs followed by pyrolysis. Poly(3-hexylthiophene)-b-poly (poly (ethylene glycol) methyl ether acrylate) (P3HT-b-PPEGA), a conjugated block copolymer compatible with polyaluminasilazane, is used to functionalize MWCNT surfaces with PPEGA, providing a noninvasive approach to disperse carbon nanotubes in polyaluminasilazane chloroform solutions. The electrospinning of the MWCNT/polyaluminasilazane solutions generates polymer fibers with aligned MWCNTs where MWCNTs are oriented along the electrospun jet by a sink flow. The subsequent pyrolysis of the obtained composite fibers produces ceramic fibers with aligned MWCNTs. The study of the effect of polymer and CNT concentration on the fiber structures shows that the fiber size increases with the increment of polymer concentration, whereas higher CNT content in the polymer solutions leads to thinner fibers attributable to the increased conductivity. Both the SEM and TEM characterization of the polymer and ceramic fibers demonstrates the uniform orientation of CNTs along the fibers, suggesting excellent dispersion of CNTs and efficient CNT alignment via the electrospinning. The electrical conductivity of a ceramic fibers with 1.2% aligned MWCNTs is measured to be 1.58 x 10(-6) S/cm, which is more than 500 times higher than that of bulk ceramic (3.43 x 10(-9) S/cm). Such an approach provides a versatile method to disperse CNTs in preceramic polymer solutions and offers a new approach to integrate aligned CNTs in ceramics.

  15. Designing of epoxy composites reinforced with carbon nanotubes grown carbon fiber fabric for improved electromagnetic interference shielding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. P. Singh

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In this letter, we report preparation of strongly anchored multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs carbon fiber (CF fabric preforms. These preforms were reinforced in epoxy resin to make multi scale composites for microwave absorption in the X-band (8.2-12.4GHz. The incorporation of MWCNTs on the carbon fabric produced a significant enhancement in the electromagnetic interference shielding effectiveness (EMI-SE from −29.4 dB for CF/epoxy-composite to −51.1 dB for CF-MWCNT/epoxy multiscale composites of 2 mm thickness. In addition to enhanced EMI-SE, interlaminar shear strength improved from 23 MPa for CF/epoxy-composites to 50 MPa for multiscale composites indicating their usefulness for making structurally strong microwave shields.

  16. Hybrid welding of carbon-fiber reinforced epoxy based composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lionetto, Francesca; De Nicolas Morillas, M.; Pappadà, Silvio; Buccoliero, Giuseppe; Fernandez Villegas, I.; Maffezzoli, Alfonso

    2018-01-01

    The approach for joining thermosetting matrix composites (TSCs) proposed in this study is based on the use of a low melting co-cured thermoplastic film, added as a last ply in the stacking sequence of the composite laminate. During curing, the thermoplastic film partially penetrates in the first

  17. Smart carbon nanotube/fiber and PVA fiber-reinforced composites for stress sensing and chloride ion detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoheneder, Joshua

    Fiber reinforced composites (FRC) with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) fibers and carbon nanofibers (CNF) had an excellent flexural strength in excess of 18.5 MPa compared to reference samples of 15.8 MPa. It was found that the developed, depending on applied stress and exposure to chloride solutions, composites exhibit some electrical conductivity, from 4.20×10 -4 (Ω-1m-1 to 4.13×10 -4 Ω-1m-1. These dependences can be characterized by piezioresistive and chemoresistive coefficients demonstrating that the material possesses self-sensing capabilities. The sensitivity to stain and chloride solutions can be enhanced by incorporating small amounts of carbon nanofibers (CNF) or carbon nanotube (CNT) into composite structure. Conducted research has demonstrated a strong dependency of electrical properties of composite on crack formation in moist environments. The developed procedure is scalable for industrial application in concrete structures that require nondestructive stress monitoring, integrity under high service loads and stability in harsh environments.

  18. Characterization of a New Fully Recycled Carbon Fiber Reinforced Composite Subjected to High Strain Rate Tension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meftah, H.; Tamboura, S.; Fitoussi, J.; BenDaly, H.; Tcharkhtchi, A.

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study is the complete physicochemical characterization and strain rate effect multi-scale analysis of a new fully recycled carbon fiber reinforced composites for automotive crash application. Two composites made of 20% wt short recycled carbon fibers (CF) are obtained by injection molding. The morphology and the degree of dispersion of CF in the matrixes were examined using a new ultrasonic method and SEM. High strain tensile behavior up to 100 s-1 is investigated. In order to avoid perturbation due to inertial effect and wave propagation, the specimen geometry was optimized. The elastic properties appear to be insensitive to the strain rate. However, a high strain rate effect on the local visco-plasticity of the matrix and fiber/matrix interface visco-damageable behavior is emphasized. The predominant damage mechanisms evolve from generalized matrix local ductility at low strain rate regime to fiber/matrix interface debonding and fibers pull-out at high strain rate regime.

  19. Carbon fiber counting. [aircraft structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pride, R. A.

    1980-01-01

    A method was developed for characterizing the number and lengths of carbon fibers accidentally released by the burning of composite portions of civil aircraft structure in a jet fuel fire after an accident. Representative samplings of carbon fibers collected on transparent sticky film were counted from photographic enlargements with a computer aided technique which also provided fiber lengths.

  20. Carbon fiber polymer-matrix structural composites for electrical-resistance-based sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Daojun

    This dissertation has advanced the science and technology of electrical-resistance-based sensing of strain/stress and damage using continuous carbon fiber epoxy-matrix composites, which are widely used for aircraft structures. In particular, it has extended the technology of self-sensing of carbon fiber polymer-matrix composites from uniaxial longitudinal loading and flexural loading to uniaxial through-thickness loading and has extended the technology from structural composite self-sensing to the use of the composite (specifically a one-lamina composite) as an attached sensor. Through-thickness compression is encountered in the joining of composite components by fastening. Uniaxial through-thickness compression results in strain-induced reversible decreases in the through-thickness and longitudinal volume resistivities, due to increase in the fiber-fiber contact in the through-thickness direction, and minor-damage-induced irreversible changes in these resistivities. The Poisson effect plays a minor role. The effects in the longitudinal resistivity are small compared to those in the through-thickness direction, but longitudinal resistance measurement is more amenable to practical implementation in structures than through-thickness resistance measurement. The irreversible effects are associated with an increase in the through-thickness resistivity and a decrease in the longitudinal resistivity. The through-thickness gage factor is up to 5.1 and decreases with increasing compressive strain above 0.2%. The reversible fractional change in through-thickness resistivity per through-thickness strain is up to 4.0 and decreases with increasing compressive strain. The irreversible fractional change in through-thickness resistivity per unit through-thickness strain is around -1.1 and is independent of the strain. The sensing is feasible by measuring the resistance away from the stressed region, though the effectiveness is less than that at the stressed region. A one

  1. Studies on Carbon-Fly Ash Composites with Chopped PANOX Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh V. Patel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemical analysis and morphological studies of fly ash reveals the complex chemical constituents present as spherical particles with diameter of less than 25 μm. The constituents of fly ash are silica, alumina, iron oxide, titanium dioxide, calcium and magnesium oxide, and other trace elements. The use of thermosetting as well thermoplastic polymer matrix has been made by several workers to develop polymer matrix fly ash particulate composites by using the hard and abrasive properties of fly ash and lightweight of polymers. Such composites have poor mechanical strength, fracture toughness, and thermal stability. To overcome these shortcomings, in carbonaceous matrix, the carbon fibers were added as additional reinforcement along with the fly ash. The composites were developed with two different methods known as Dry method and Wet method. The processing parameters such as temperature and pressure were optimized in establishing the carbon matrix. Physical, thermal, and mechanical characteristics were studied. The microstructures of composites show good compatibility between fly ash and fibers with the carbon matrix. These composites have higher strength, thermal stability, and toughness as compared to polymer matrix fly ash particulate composites.

  2. Rheological Behavior of Composites Based on Carbon Fibers Recycled from Aircraft Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcaníková, Lucie; Hausnerová, Berenika; Kitano, Takeshi

    2009-07-01

    Rheological investigation of composite materials prepared from the recycled aircraft waste materials based on thermoset (epoxy/resin) matrix and long carbon fibers (CF) is presented with the aim of their utilization in consumer industry applications. The carbon fibers recovered via thermal process of pyrolysis were cut into about 150 μm length and melt mixed with thermoplastic matrices based on polypropylene (PP) and polyamide 6 (PA) and various modifiers—ethylene-ethyl acrylate-maleic anhydride (E-EA-MAH), polypropylene grafted maleic anhydride (PP-g-MA) and poly(styrene)-block-poly(ethylene-co-but-1-ene)-block-poly(styrene) (SEBS). Rheological, electrical, mechanical, thermal and morphological results revealed the composites of recycled CF and PP/PP-g-MA as well as PA/E-EA-MAH to be the most promising candidates for new applications.

  3. Improved interfacial adhesion in carbon fiber/polyether sulfone composites through an organic solvent-free polyamic acid sizing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, Haojie; Zhang, Shouchun; Lu, Chunxiang; He, Shuqing; An, Feng

    2013-01-01

    An organic solvent-free polyamic acid (PAA) nanoemulsion was obtained by direct ionization of the solid PAA in deionized water, with the average particle size of 261 nm and Zeta potential of −55.1 mV, and used as a carbon fiber sizing to improve the interfacial adhesion between the carbon fiber and polyether sulfone (PES). The surface characteristics of PAA coated carbon fibers were investigated using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and dynamic contact angle measurement. The results demonstrated that a continuous and uniform PAA sizing layer was formed on the surface of carbon fibers, and the surface energy of carbon fibers increased from 42.91 to 54.55 mN/m after sizing treatment. The single fiber pull-out testing was also performed, which showed the increased interfacial shear strength (IFSS) of carbon fiber/PES composites from 33.6 to 49.7 MPa by 47.9%. The major reasons for the improved interfacial adhesion were the increased van der Waals forces between the PES matrix and sizing layer as well as the chemical bonding between the sizing layer and carbon fiber surface. Furthermore, the PAA sizing also presented a positive effect on the interfacial adhesion of carbon fiber/PES composites under hydrothermal condition.

  4. Titanium Implant Osseointegration Problems with Alternate Solutions Using Epoxy/Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced Composite

    OpenAIRE

    Petersen, Richard C.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the article is to present recent developments in material research with bisphenyl-polymer/carbon-fiber-reinforced composite that have produced highly influential results toward improving upon current titanium bone implant clinical osseointegration success. Titanium is now the standard intra-oral tooth root/bone implant material with biocompatible interface relationships that confer potential osseointegration. Titanium produces a TiO2 oxide surface layer reactively that can provide ...

  5. Production and characterization of composite material based on ablative phenolic resin and carbon fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srebrenkoska, Vineta

    2002-01-01

    The optimisation of technology for production of moulding compound based on short carbon fibers and ablative phenolic resin is carried out. The characterisation of the starting raw materials is performed and moulding compounds With different fiber/matrix ratios and different fiber lengths are prepared. From the different samples, mouldings are produced by thermal compression. All physical, mechanical and thermal properties of the composites are tested. From the obtained results the optimal fiber/matrix ratio, for high temperature moulding compounds production are determined. Also, in order to meet the request for high thermal and mechanics properties of the composite, optimization is carded out on the moulding process itself. The optimization is fulfilled by a planned experiment. The full factorial experimental design is applied in which the following parameters are varied: fiber length, temperature and time of the press cycle. Regression equations for the influence of the parameters to the impact resistance, compression strength, flexural strength and the modulus of elasticity of the molding, are obtained. The obtained mechanical properties of the composite rate this material for potential application in the automotive, leisure, military and other industries.(Author)

  6. Hydrogen bonds, interfacial stiffness moduli, and the interlaminar shear strength of carbon fiber-epoxy matrix composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John H. Cantrell

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The chemical treatment of carbon fibers used in carbon fiber-epoxy matrix composites greatly affects the fraction of hydrogen bonds (H-bonds formed at the fiber-matrix interface. The H-bonds are major contributors to the fiber-matrix interfacial shear strength and play a direct role in the interlaminar shear strength (ILSS of the composite. The H-bond contributions τ to the ILSS and magnitudes KN of the fiber-matrix interfacial stiffness moduli of seven carbon fiber-epoxy matrix composites, subjected to different fiber surface treatments, are calculated from the Morse potential for the interactions of hydroxyl and carboxyl acid groups formed on the carbon fiber surfaces with epoxy receptors. The τ calculations range from 7.7 MPa to 18.4 MPa in magnitude, depending on fiber treatment. The KN calculations fall in the range (2.01 – 4.67 ×1017 N m−3. The average ratio KN/|τ| is calculated to be (2.59 ± 0.043 × 1010 m−1 for the seven composites, suggesting a nearly linear connection between ILSS and H-bonding at the fiber-matrix interfaces. The linear connection indicates that τ may be assessable nondestructively from measurements of KN via a technique such as angle beam ultrasonic spectroscopy.

  7. Evaluation of the Potential Health Hazards Associated with the Machining of Carbon Fiber Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    RESOLU11ON TESI CF-i NAII(IN , LUP I&NA U 10 CV) OIICEILE CUP1 EVALUATION OF THE POTENTIAL HEALTH HAZARDS ASSOCIATED WITH THE MACHINING OF CARBON FIBER...tailored to a wide variety of applications through variations in their chemistry (4). ,,. II. HEALTH AND SAFETY HAZARDS Carbon Fibers Carbon fibers are...considered biologically inert, as evidenced by their introduction into the human body as surgical implants. It is not the chemistry of carbon fibers

  8. Experimental Characterization Of The Interaction Between Carbon Fiber Composite Prepregs During The Preforming Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Weizhao; Zhang, Zixuan; Lu, Jie; Wang, Q Jane; Su, Xuming; Zeng, Danielle; Mirdamadi, Mansour; Cao, Jian

    2016-04-06

    Carbon fiber composites have received growing attention because of their high performance. One economic method to manufacturing the composite parts is the sequence of forming followed by the compression molding process. In this sequence, the preforming procedure forms the prepreg, which is the composite with the uncured resin, to the product geometry while the molding process cures the resin. Slip between different prepreg layers is observed in the preforming step and this paper reports a method to characterize the properties of the interaction between different prepreg layers, which is critical to predictive modeling and design optimization. An experimental setup was established to evaluate the interactions at various industrial production conditions. The experimental results were analyzed for an in-depth understanding about how the temperature, the relative sliding speed, and the fiber orientation affect the tangential interaction between two prepreg layers. The interaction factors measured from these experiments will be implemented in the computational preforming program.

  9. Recent advances in electron-beam curing of carbon fiber-reinforced composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coqueret, Xavier; Krzeminski, Mickael; Ponsaud, Philippe; Defoort, Brigitte

    2009-07-01

    Cross-linking polymerization initiated by high-energy radiation is a very attractive technique for the fabrication of high-performance composite materials. The method offers many advantages compared to conventional energy- and time-consuming thermal curing processes. Free radical and cationic poly-addition chemistries have been investigated in some details by various research groups along the previous years. A high degree of control over curing kinetics and material properties can be exerted by adjusting the composition of matrix precursors as well as by acting on process parameters. However, the comparison with state-of-the-art thermally cured composites revealed the lower transverse mechanical properties of radiation-cured composites and the higher brittleness of the radiation-cured matrix. Improving fiber-matrix adhesion and upgrading polymer network toughness are thus two major challenges in this area. We have investigated several points related to these issues, and particularly the reduction of the matrix shrinkage on curing, the wettability of carbon fibers, the design of fiber-matrix interface and the use of thermoplastic toughening agents. Significant improvements were achieved on transverse strain at break by applying original surface treatments on the fibers so as to induce covalent coupling with the matrix. A drastic enhancement of the K IC value exceeding 2 MPa m 1/2 was also obtained for acrylate-based matrices toughened with high T g thermoplastics.

  10. X-ray-cured carbon-fiber composites for vehicle use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herer, Arnold; Galloway, Richard A.; Cleland, Marshall R.; Berejka, Anthony J.; Montoney, Daniel; Dispenza, Dan; Driscoll, Mark

    2009-07-01

    Carbon-fiber-reinforced composites were cured in molds using X-rays derived from a high-energy, high-current electron beam. X-rays could penetrate the mold walls as well as the fiber reinforcements and polymerize a matrix system. Matrix materials made from modified epoxy-acrylates were tailored to suitably low viscosity so that fiber wetting and adhesion could be attained. Techniques similar to vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) and conventional vacuum bagging of wet lay-ups were used. Inexpensive reinforced polyester molds were used to fabricate vehicle fenders. Moderately low-dose X-ray exposure was sufficient to attain functional properties, such as resistance to heat distortion at temperatures as high as 180 °C. The matrix system contained an impact additive which imparted toughness to the cured articles. "Class A" high gloss surfaces were achieved. Thermo-analytical techniques were used on small-sized samples of X-ray-cured matrix materials to facilitate selection of a system for use in making prototypes of vehicle components. X-rays-penetrated metal pieces that were placed within layers of carbon-fiber twill, which were cured and bonded into a structure that could be mechanically attached without concern over fracturing the composite. X-ray curing is a low temperature process that eliminates residual internal stresses which are imparted by conventional thermo-chemical curing processes.

  11. Effects of surface treating methods of high-strength carbon fibers on interfacial properties of epoxy resin matrix composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Quansheng; Gu, Yizhuo; Li, Min; Wang, Shaokai; Zhang, Zuoguang

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Effects of surface treating on T700 grade high strength carbon fiber were discussed. • The fiber surface roughness, surface energy and chemical properties are analyzed. • The surface treating significantly affect the properties of carbon fiber. • The composite with electrolysis and sizing-fiber has the highest mechanical properties. - Abstract: This paper aims to study the effects of surface treating methods, including electrolysis of anodic oxidation, sizing and heat treatment at 200 °C, on physical and chemical properties of T700 grade high-strength carbon fiber GQ4522. The fiber surface roughness, surface energy and chemical properties were analyzed for different treated carbon fibers, using atom force microscopy, contact angle, Fourier transformed infrared and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. The results show that the adopted surface treating methods significantly affect surface roughness, surface energy and active chemical groups of the studied carbon fibers. Electrolysis and sizing can increase the roughness, surface energy and chemical groups on surface, while heat treatment leads to decreases in surface energy and chemical groups due to chemical reaction of sizing. Then, unidirectional epoxy 5228 matrix composite laminates were prepared using different treated GQ4522 fibers, and interlaminar shear strength and flexural property were measured. It is revealed that the composite using electrolysis and sizing-fiber has the strongest interfacial bonding strength, indicating the important roles of the two treating processes on interfacial adhesion. Moreover, the composite using heat-treating fiber has lower mechanical properties, which is attributed to the decrease of chemical bonding between fiber surface and matrix after high temperature treatment of fiber.

  12. Validation of Material Models For Automotive Carbon Fiber Composite Structures Via Physical And Crash Testing (VMM Composites Project)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coppola, Anthony [General Motors Company, Flint, MI (United States); Faruque, Omar [Ford Motor Company, Dearborn, MI (United States); Truskin, James F [FCA US LLC, Auburn Hills, MI (United States); Board, Derek [Ford Motor Company, Dearborn, MI (United States); Jones, Martin [Ford Motor Company, Dearborn, MI (United States); Tao, Jian [FCA US LLC, Auburn Hills, MI (United States); Chen, Yijung [Ford Motor Company, Dearborn, MI (United States); Mehta, Manish [M-Tech International LLC, Dubai (United Arab Emirates)

    2017-09-27

    As automotive fuel economy requirements increase, the push for reducing overall vehicle weight will likely include the consideration of materials that have not previously been part of mainstream vehicle design and manufacturing, including carbon fiber composites. Vehicle manufacturers currently rely on computer-aided engineering (CAE) methods as part of the design and development process, so going forward, the ability to accurately and predictably model carbon fiber composites will be necessary. If composites are to be used for structural components, this need applies to both, crash and quasi-static modeling. This final report covers the results of a five-year, $6.89M, 50% cost-shared research project between Department of Energy (DOE) and the US Advanced Materials Partnership (USAMP) under Cooperative Agreement DE-EE-0005661 known as “Validation of Material Models for Automotive Carbon Fiber Composite Structures Via Physical and Crash Testing (VMM).” The objective of the VMM Composites Project was to validate and assess the ability of physics-based material models to predict crash performance of automotive primary load-carrying carbon fiber composite structures. Simulation material models that were evaluated included micro-mechanics based meso-scale models developed by the University of Michigan (UM) and micro-plane models by Northwestern University (NWU) under previous collaborations with the DOE and Automotive Composites Consortium/USAMP, as well as five commercial crash codes: LS-DYNA, RADIOSS, VPS/PAM-CRASH, Abaqus, and GENOA-MCQ. CAE predictions obtained from seven organizations were compared with experimental results from quasi-static testing and dynamic crash testing of a thermoset carbon fiber composite front-bumper and crush-can (FBCC) system gathered under multiple loading conditions. This FBCC design was developed to demonstrate progressive crush, virtual simulation, tooling, fabrication, assembly, non-destructive evaluation and crash testing

  13. An integrated computational materials engineering method for woven carbon fiber composites preforming process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weizhao; Ren, Huaqing; Wang, Zequn; Liu, Wing K.; Chen, Wei; Zeng, Danielle; Su, Xuming; Cao, Jian

    2016-10-01

    An integrated computational materials engineering method is proposed in this paper for analyzing the design and preforming process of woven carbon fiber composites. The goal is to reduce the cost and time needed for the mass production of structural composites. It integrates the simulation methods from the micro-scale to the macro-scale to capture the behavior of the composite material in the preforming process. In this way, the time consuming and high cost physical experiments and prototypes in the development of the manufacturing process can be circumvented. This method contains three parts: the micro-scale representative volume element (RVE) simulation to characterize the material; the metamodeling algorithm to generate the constitutive equations; and the macro-scale preforming simulation to predict the behavior of the composite material during forming. The results show the potential of this approach as a guidance to the design of composite materials and its manufacturing process.

  14. An Integrated Computational Materials Engineering Method for Woven Carbon Fiber Composites Preforming Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Weizhao; Ren, Huaqing; Wang, Zequn; Liu, Wing K.; Chen, Wei; Zeng, Danielle; Su, Xuming; Cao, Jian

    2016-10-19

    An integrated computational materials engineering method is proposed in this paper for analyzing the design and preforming process of woven carbon fiber composites. The goal is to reduce the cost and time needed for the mass production of structural composites. It integrates the simulation methods from the micro-scale to the macro-scale to capture the behavior of the composite material in the preforming process. In this way, the time consuming and high cost physical experiments and prototypes in the development of the manufacturing process can be circumvented. This method contains three parts: the micro-scale representative volume element (RVE) simulation to characterize the material; the metamodeling algorithm to generate the constitutive equations; and the macro-scale preforming simulation to predict the behavior of the composite material during forming. The results show the potential of this approach as a guidance to the design of composite materials and its manufacturing process.

  15. Finite element analysis of drilling in carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phadnis, V. A.; Roy, A.; Silberschmidt, V. V.

    2012-08-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced polymer composite (CFRP) laminates are attractive for many applications in the aerospace industry especially as aircraft structural components due to their superior properties. Usually drilling is an important final machining process for components made of composite laminates. In drilling of CFRP, it is an imperative task to determine the maximum critical thrust forces that trigger inter-laminar and intra-laminar damage modes owing to highly anisotropic fibrous media; and negotiate integrity of composite structures. In this paper, a 3D finite element (FE) model of drilling in CFRP composite laminate is developed, which accurately takes into account the dynamic characteristics involved in the process along with the accurate geometrical considerations. A user defined material model is developed to account for accurate though thickness response of composite laminates. The average critical thrust forces and torques obtained using FE analysis, for a set of machining parameters are found to be in good agreement with the experimental results from literature.

  16. Poly(borosiloxanes as precursors for carbon fiber ceramic matrix composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Luiz Siqueira

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Ceramic matrix composites (CMCs, constituted of a silicon boron oxycarbide (SiBCO matrix and unidirectional carbon fiber rods as a reinforcement phase, were prepared by pyrolysis of carbon fiber rods wrapped in polysiloxane (PS or poly(borosiloxane (PBS matrices. The preparation of the polymeric precursors involved hydrolysis/condensation reactions of alkoxysilanes in the presence and absence of boric acid, with B/Si atomic ratios of 0.2 and 0.5. Infrared spectra of PBS showed evidence of Si-O-B bonds at 880 cm-1, due to the incorporation of the crosslinker trigonal units of BO3 in the polymeric network. X ray diffraction analyses exhibited an amorphous character of the resulting polymer-derived ceramics obtained by pyrolysis up to 1000 °C under inert atmosphere. The C/SiBCO composites showed better thermal stability than the C/SiOC materials. In addition, good adhesion between the carbon fiber and the ceramic phase was observed by SEM microscopy

  17. Formation of interfacial network structure via photo-crosslinking in carbon fiber/epoxy composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. H. Deng

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A series of diblock copolymers (poly(n-butylacrylate-co-poly(2-hydroxyethyl acrylate-b-poly(glycidyl methacrylate ((PnBA-co-PHEA-b-PGMA, containing a random copolymer block PnBA-co-PHEA, were successfully synthesized by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP. After being chemically grafted onto carbon fibers, the photosensitive methacrylic groups were introduced into the random copolymer, giving a series of copolymers (poly(n-butylacrylate-co-poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl acrylate-b-poly(glycidyl methacrylate((PnBA-co-PMEA-b-PGMA. Dynamic mechanical analysis indicated that the random copolymer block after ultraviolet (UV irradiation was a lightly crosslinked polymer and acted as an elastomer, forming a photo-crosslinked network structure at the interface of carbon fiber/epoxy composites. Microbond test showed that such an interfacial network structure greatly improved the cohesive strength and effectively controlled the deformation ability of the flexible interlayer. Furthermore, three kinds of interfacial network structures, i physical crosslinking by H-bonds, ii chemical crosslinking by photopolymerization, and iii interpenetrating crosslinked network by photopolymerization and epoxy curing reaction were received in carbon fiber/epoxy composite, depending on the various preparation processes.

  18. High performance natural rubber composites with a hierarchical reinforcement structure of carbon nanotube modified natural fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tzounis, Lazaros; Debnath, Subhas; Rooj, Sandip; Fischer, Dieter; Mäder, Edith; Das, Amit; Stamm, Manfred; Heinrich, Gert

    2014-01-01

    A simple and facile method for depositing multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) onto the surface of naturally occurring short jute fibers (JFs) is reported. Hierarchical multi-scale structures were formed with CNT-networks uniformly distributed and fully covering the JFs (JF–CNT), as depicted by the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) micrographs. The impact of these hybrid fillers on the mechanical properties of a natural rubber (NR) matrix was systematically investigated. Pristine JFs were cut initially to an average length of 2.0 mm and exposed to an alkali treatment (a-JFs) to remove impurities existing in the raw jute. MWCNTs were treated under mild acidic conditions to generate carboxylic acid moieties. Afterward, MWCNTs were dispersed in an aqueous media and short a-JFs were allowed to react with them. Raman spectroscopy confirmed the chemical interaction between CNTs and JFs. The JF–CNT exposed quite hydrophobic behavior as revealed by the water contact angle measurements, improving the wettability of the non-polar NR. Consequently, the composite interfacial adhesion strength was significantly enhanced while a micro-scale “mechanical interlocking” mechanism was observed from the interphase-section transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images. SEM analysis of the composite fracture surfaces demonstrated the interfacial strength of NR/a-JF and NR/JF–CNT composites, at different fiber loadings. It can be presumed that the CNT-coating effectively compatibillized the composite structure acting as a macromolecular coupling agent. A detailed analysis of stress-strain and dynamic mechanical spectra confirmed the high mechanical performance of the hierarchical composites, consisting mainly of materials arising from natural resources. - Highlights: • Natural rubber (NR) composites reinforced with CNT-modified short jute fibers. • MWCNTs deposited to the surface of jute fibers via non-covalent interactions. • Hierarchical reinforcement structure with

  19. Surface and interface properties of carbon fiber composites under cyclical aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Xinying; Wang, Rongguo; Liu, Wenbo; Jiang, Long

    2011-10-01

    Carbon fiber-reinforced BMI composites have been subjected to combination accelerated aging comprising a hygrothermal process, a thermal-oxidative process, and a freezing process in order to simulate their responses under complicated service environments. This cyclical condition, including the freezing process, has not been investigated by other researchers so far. The effects of this combination accelerated aging on the mechanical properties have been characterized by FTIR, SEM/EDXA, XRD, and moisture-uptake determination. The results indicated that combination accelerated aging had great effects on the mechanical properties of the composite, the network structure of the BMI matrix, and the moisture uptake by the composite. After a third cycle of accelerated aging, moisture reached the center layer of the composite and as a result led to an obvious decrease in ILSS due to deterioration of the carbon fiber-BMI interface. Sufficient moisture absorption on the composite surface made the network structure of the BMI matrix more open, which facilitated stress relaxation and the creation of micro-cracks, with a consequent obvious decrease in flexural strength. With increasing number of combined-action accelerated aging cycles, ever more moisture was absorbed during each hygrothermal process due to the plasticizing effect of water, and micro-cracks propagated as a result of internal stresses caused by the hygrothermal process, the thermal-oxidative process, and the freezing process of each cycle. XRD analysis indicated that moisture penetrated through the amorphous region of the BMI matrix.

  20. A graphite-coated carbon fiber epoxy composite bipolar plate for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ha Na; Lim, Jun Woo; Suh, Jung Do; Lee, Dai Gil

    A PEMFC (polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell or proton exchange membrane fuel cell) stack is composed of GDLs (gas diffusion layers), MEAs (membrane electrode assemblies), and bipolar plates. One of the important functions of bipolar plates is to collect and conduct the current from cell to cell, which requires low electrical bulk and interfacial resistances. For a carbon fiber epoxy composite bipolar plate, the interfacial resistance is usually much larger than the bulk resistance due to the resin-rich layer on the composite surface. In this study, a thin graphite layer is coated on the carbon/epoxy composite bipolar plate to decrease the interfacial contact resistance between the bipolar plate and the GDL. The total electrical resistance in the through-thickness direction of the bipolar plate is measured with respect to the thickness of the graphite coating layer, and the ratio of the bulk resistance to the interfacial contact resistance is estimated using the measured data. From the experiment, it is found that the graphite coating on the carbon/epoxy composite bipolar plate has 10% and 4% of the total electrical and interfacial contact resistances of the conventional carbon/epoxy composite bipolar plate, respectively, when the graphite coating thickness is 50 μm.

  1. A comprehensive study of woven carbon fiber-reinforced nylon 6 composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillay, Selvum

    Liquid molding of thermoset composites has become very popular in all industry sectors, including aerospace, automotive, mass transit, and sporting goods, but the cost of materials and processing has limited the use to high-end applications. Thermoplastic composites are relatively cheap; however, the use has been limited to components with short fiber reinforcing. The high melt viscosity and short processing window precludes their use in the liquid molding of large structures and applications with continuous fiber reinforcement. The current research addresses the processing parameters, methodology, and limitations of vacuum assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) of carbon fabric-reinforced, thermoplastic polyamide 6 (PA6). The material used is casting grade PA6. The process developed for using VARTM to produce carbon fabric-reinforced PA6 composites is explained in detail. The effects of infusion temperature and flow distance on the fiber weight fraction and crystallinity of the PA6 resin are presented. The degree of conversion from monomer to polymer was determined. Microscopic studies to show the wet-out of the fibers at the filament level are also presented. Tensile, flexural, short beam shear strength (SBSS), and low-velocity impact test results are presented and compared to a equivalent thermoset matrix composite. The rubber toughened epoxy system (SC-15) was chosen for the comparative study because the system has been especially developed to overcome the brittle nature of epoxy composites. The environmental effects of moisture and ultraviolet (UV) radiation on the carbon/nylon 6 composite were investigated. The samples were immersed in boiling water for 100 hr, and mechanical tests were conducted. Results showed that moisture causes plasticization of the matrix and attacks the fiber matrix interface. This leads to deterioration of the mechanical properties. The samples were also exposed to UV for up to 600 hr, and post exposure tests were conducted. The

  2. [Recent development of research on the biotribology of carbon fiber reinforced poly ether ether ketone composites].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yan; Pan, Yusong

    2014-12-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced poly ether ether ketone (CF/PEEK) composite possesses excellent biocompatible, biomechanical and bioribological properties. It is one of the most promising implant materials for artificial joint. Many factors influence the bioribological properties of CF/PEEK composites. In this paper, the authors reviewed on the biotribology research progress of CF/PEEK composites. The influences of various factors such as lubricant, reinforcement surface modification, functional particles, friction counterpart and friction motion modes on the bio-tribological properties of CF/PEEK composites are discussed. Based on the recent research, the authors suggest that the further research should be focused on the synergistic effect of multiple factors on the wear and lubrication mechanism of CF/PEEK.

  3. Flexural strength and tribological properties of rare earth treated short carbon fiber/polyimide composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the influence of carbon fiber (CF surface treatment on the flexural strength and tribological properties of the short-cut CF/polyimide (PI composites, pitch-based short-cut CF were treated by rare earth. The CF before and after treatment was examined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS and by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The flexural strength of the specimens was determined in a three-point test machine. The friction and wear behaviors of PI composites sliding against GCr15 steel rings were evaluated on an M-2000 model ring-on-block test rig. The results show that the surface of the treated CF became rougher and there formed lots of active groups after rare earth treatment. The flexural strength of PI composites with rare earth treated CF was improved. The friction coefficient and wear rate of PI composites with rare earth treated CF were lower than that with untreated CF.

  4. The concept of a novel hybrid smart composite reinforced with radially aligned zigzag carbon nanotubes on piezoelectric fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ray, M C

    2010-01-01

    A new hybrid piezoelectric composite (HPZC) reinforced with zigzag single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and piezoelectric fibers is proposed. The novel constructional feature of this composite is that the uniformly aligned CNTs are radially grown on the surface of piezoelectric fibers. A micromechanics model is derived to estimate the effective piezoelectric and elastic properties. It is found that the effective piezoelectric coefficient e 31 of the proposed HPZC, which accounts for the in-plane actuation, is significantly higher than that of the existing 1-3 piezoelectric composite without reinforcement with carbon nanotubes and the previously reported hybrid piezoelectric composite (Ray and Batra 2009 ASME J. Appl. Mech. 76 034503)

  5. Effect of Thermally Reduced Graphene Oxide on Mechanical Properties of Woven Carbon Fiber/Epoxy Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitai Chandra Adak

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Thermally reduced graphene oxide (TRGO was incorporated as a reinforcing filler in the epoxy resin to investigate the effect on the mechanical properties of carbon fiber (CF/epoxy composites. At first, the epoxy matrix was modified by adding different wt % of TRGO from 0.05 to 0.4 wt % followed by the preparation of TRGO/CF/epoxy composites througha vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding process. The prepared TRGO was characterized by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman Spectroscopy and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM techniques. It was observed that the wrinkled structure of synthesized TRGO may be helpful to interlock with the epoxy resin and CF.The inter-laminar shear strength, in-plane fracture toughness and impact strength increased by ~67%, 62% and 93% at 0.2 wt % of TRGO loading in the CF/epoxy composites as compared to the CF reinforced epoxy. The mechanical properties of the hybrid composites decreased beyond the 0.2 wt % of TRGO incorporation in the epoxy resin. The fracture surfaces of the hybrid composites were studied by FE-SEM image analysis to investigate the synergistic effect of TRGO in the CF/epoxy composite. This study suggested that TRGO could be used asgood nanofiller to resist the matrix and fiber fracture.

  6. Titanium Implant Osseointegration Problems with Alternate Solutions Using Epoxy/Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard C. Petersen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article is to present recent developments in material research with bisphenyl-polymer/carbon-fiber-reinforced composite that have produced highly influential results toward improving upon current titanium bone implant clinical osseointegration success. Titanium is now the standard intra-oral tooth root/bone implant material with biocompatible interface relationships that confer potential osseointegration. Titanium produces a TiO2 oxide surface layer reactively that can provide chemical bonding through various electron interactions as a possible explanation for biocompatibility. Nevertheless, titanium alloy implants produce corrosion particles and fail by mechanisms generally related to surface interaction on bone to promote an inflammation with fibrous aseptic loosening or infection that can require implant removal. Further, lowered oxygen concentrations from poor vasculature at a foreign metal surface interface promote a build-up of host-cell-related electrons as free radicals and proton acid that can encourage infection and inflammation to greatly influence implant failure. To provide improved osseointegration many different coating processes and alternate polymer matrix composite (PMC solutions have been considered that supply new designing potential to possibly overcome problems with titanium bone implants. Now for important consideration, PMCs have decisive biofunctional fabrication possibilities while maintaining mechanical properties from addition of high-strengthening varied fiber-reinforcement and complex fillers/additives to include hydroxyapatite or antimicrobial incorporation through thermoset polymers that cure at low temperatures. Topics/issues reviewed in this manuscript include titanium corrosion, implant infection, coatings and the new epoxy/carbon-fiber implant results discussing osseointegration with biocompatibility related to nonpolar molecular attractions with secondary bonding, carbon fiber in vivo

  7. Titanium Implant Osseointegration Problems with Alternate Solutions Using Epoxy/Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced Composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Richard C

    2014-12-01

    The aim of the article is to present recent developments in material research with bisphenyl-polymer/carbon-fiber-reinforced composite that have produced highly influential results toward improving upon current titanium bone implant clinical osseointegration success. Titanium is now the standard intra-oral tooth root/bone implant material with biocompatible interface relationships that confer potential osseointegration. Titanium produces a TiO 2 oxide surface layer reactively that can provide chemical bonding through various electron interactions as a possible explanation for biocompatibility. Nevertheless, titanium alloy implants produce corrosion particles and fail by mechanisms generally related to surface interaction on bone to promote an inflammation with fibrous aseptic loosening or infection that can require implant removal. Further, lowered oxygen concentrations from poor vasculature at a foreign metal surface interface promote a build-up of host-cell-related electrons as free radicals and proton acid that can encourage infection and inflammation to greatly influence implant failure. To provide improved osseointegration many different coating processes and alternate polymer matrix composite (PMC) solutions have been considered that supply new designing potential to possibly overcome problems with titanium bone implants. Now for important consideration, PMCs have decisive biofunctional fabrication possibilities while maintaining mechanical properties from addition of high-strengthening varied fiber-reinforcement and complex fillers/additives to include hydroxyapatite or antimicrobial incorporation through thermoset polymers that cure at low temperatures. Topics/issues reviewed in this manuscript include titanium corrosion, implant infection, coatings and the new epoxy/carbon-fiber implant results discussing osseointegration with biocompatibility related to nonpolar molecular attractions with secondary bonding, carbon fiber in vivo properties, electrical

  8. Multifunctional curing agents and their use in improving strength of composites containing carbon fibers embedded in a polymeric matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vautard, Frederic; Ozcan, Soydan

    2017-04-11

    A functionalized carbon fiber having covalently bound on its surface a sizing agent containing epoxy groups, at least some of which are engaged in covalent bonds with crosslinking molecules, wherein each of said crosslinking molecules possesses at least two epoxy-reactive groups and at least one free functional group reactive with functional groups of a polymer matrix in which the carbon fiber is to be incorporated, wherein at least a portion of said crosslinking molecules are engaged, via at least two of their epoxy-reactive groups, in crosslinking bonds between at least two epoxy groups of the sizing agent. Composites comprised of these functionalized carbon fibers embedded in a polymeric matrix are also described. Methods for producing the functionalized carbon fibers and composites thereof are also described.

  9. Effects of surface treating methods of high-strength carbon fibers on interfacial properties of epoxy resin matrix composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Quansheng; Gu, Yizhuo; Li, Min; Wang, Shaokai; Zhang, Zuoguang

    2016-08-01

    This paper aims to study the effects of surface treating methods, including electrolysis of anodic oxidation, sizing and heat treatment at 200 °C, on physical and chemical properties of T700 grade high-strength carbon fiber GQ4522. The fiber surface roughness, surface energy and chemical properties were analyzed for different treated carbon fibers, using atom force microscopy, contact angle, Fourier transformed infrared and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. The results show that the adopted surface treating methods significantly affect surface roughness, surface energy and active chemical groups of the studied carbon fibers. Electrolysis and sizing can increase the roughness, surface energy and chemical groups on surface, while heat treatment leads to decreases in surface energy and chemical groups due to chemical reaction of sizing. Then, unidirectional epoxy 5228 matrix composite laminates were prepared using different treated GQ4522 fibers, and interlaminar shear strength and flexural property were measured. It is revealed that the composite using electrolysis and sizing-fiber has the strongest interfacial bonding strength, indicating the important roles of the two treating processes on interfacial adhesion. Moreover, the composite using heat-treating fiber has lower mechanical properties, which is attributed to the decrease of chemical bonding between fiber surface and matrix after high temperature treatment of fiber.

  10. Preparation of silicon carbide/carbon fiber composites through high-temperature spark plasma sintering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsan Ghasali

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This study discusses the potentials of spark plasma sintering (SPS integrated with high temperature process that can enable sintering of SiC/Cf composites without any sintering aids. The random distribution of carbon fibers was obtained through mixing composite components in ethanol by using a shaker mill for 10 min. The corresponding sintering process was carried out at 1900 and 2200 °C with 50 MPa pressure applied at maximum temperature. The results showed that 89 ± 0.9 and 97 ± 0.8% of the theoretical density can be obtained for sintering temperatures of 1900 and 2200 °C, respectively. The densification curves were plotted to monitor sintering behavior with punch displacement changes. The appropriate bonding between SiC particles and carbon fibers was detected using FE-SEM for sample which was sintered at 2200 °C. The clear maximum in hardness (2992 ± 33 Vickers, bending strength (427 ± 26 MPa and fracture toughness (4.2 ± 0.3 MPa m1/2 were identified for sample sintered at 2200 °C. XRD investigations supposed that SiC and carbon were the only crystalline phases in both sintered samples.

  11. Multifunctional fiber reinforced polymer composites using carbon and boron nitride nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashrafi, Behnam; Jakubinek, Michael B.; Martinez-Rubi, Yadienka; Rahmat, Meysam; Djokic, Drazen; Laqua, Kurtis; Park, Daesun; Kim, Keun-Su; Simard, Benoit; Yousefpour, Ali

    2017-12-01

    Recent progress in nanotechnology has made several nano-based materials available with the potential to address limitations of conventional fiber reinforced polymer composites, particularly in reference to multifunctional structures. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are the most prevalent case and offer amazing properties at the individual nanotube level. There are already a few high-profile examples of the use of CNTs in space structures to provide added electrical conductivity for static dissipation and electromagnetic shielding. Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs), which are structurally analogous to CNTs, also present a range of attractive properties. Like the more widely explored CNTs, individual BNNTs display remarkable mechanical properties and high thermal conductivity but with contrasting functional attributes including substantially higher thermal stability, high electrical insulation, polarizability, high neutron absorption and transparency to visible light. This presents the potential of employing either or both BNNTs and CNTs to achieve a range of lightweight, functional composites for space structures. Here we present the case for application of BNNTs, in addition to CNTs, in space structures and describe recent advances in BNNT production at the National Research Council Canada (NRC) that have, for the first time, provided sufficiently large quantities to enable commercialization of high-quality BNNTs and accelerate development of chemistry, composites and applications based on BNNTs. Early demonstrations showing the fabrication and limited structural testing of polymer matrix composites, including glass fiber-reinforced composite panels containing BNNTs will be discussed.

  12. A fractal image analysis methodology for heat damage inspection in carbon fiber reinforced composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haridas, Aswin; Crivoi, Alexandru; Prabhathan, P.; Chan, Kelvin; Murukeshan, V. M.

    2017-06-01

    The use of carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite materials in the aerospace industry have far improved the load carrying properties and the design flexibility of aircraft structures. A high strength to weight ratio, low thermal conductivity, and a low thermal expansion coefficient gives it an edge for applications demanding stringent loading conditions. Specifically, this paper focuses on the behavior of CFRP composites under stringent thermal loads. The properties of composites are largely affected by external thermal loads, especially when the loads are beyond the glass temperature, Tg, of the composite. Beyond this, the composites are subject to prominent changes in mechanical and thermal properties which may further lead to material decomposition. Furthermore, thermal damage formation being chaotic, a strict dimension cannot be associated with the formed damage. In this context, this paper focuses on comparing multiple speckle image analysis algorithms to effectively characterize the formed thermal damages on the CFRP specimen. This would provide us with a fast method for quantifying the extent of heat damage in carbon composites, thus reducing the required time for inspection. The image analysis methods used for the comparison include fractal dimensional analysis of the formed speckle pattern and analysis of number and size of various connecting elements in the binary image.

  13. Mechanical properties of neat polymer matrix materials and their unidirectional carbon fiber-reinforced composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Richard S.; Adams, Donald F.

    1988-01-01

    The mechanical properties of two neat resin systems for use in carbon fiber epoxy composites were characterized. This included tensile and shear stiffness and strengths, coefficients of thermal and moisture expansion, and fracture toughness. Tests were conducted on specimens in the dry and moisture-saturated states, at temperatures of 23, 82 and 121 C. The neat resins tested were American Cyanamid 1806 and Union Carbide ERX-4901B(MPDA). Results were compared to previously tested neat resins. Four unidirectional carbon fiber reinforced composites were mechanically characterized. Axial and transverse tension and in-plane shear strengths and stiffness were measured, as well as transverse coefficients of thermal and moisture expansion. Tests were conducted on dry specimens only at 23 and 100 C. The materials tested were AS4/3502, AS6/5245-C, T300/BP907, and C6000/1806 unidirectional composites. Scanning electron microscopic examination of fracture surfaces was performed to permit the correlation of observed failure modes with the environmental test conditions.

  14. Experimental determinations of the eigenmodes for composite bars made with carbon and Kevlar-carbon fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miriţoiu, C. M.; Stănescu, M. M.; Burada, C. O.; Bolcu, D.; Roşca, V.

    2015-11-01

    For modal identification, the single-point excitation method has been widely used in modal tests and it consists in applying a force in a given point and recording the vibratory structure response in all interest points, including the excitation point. There will be presented the experimental recordings for the studied bars (with Kevlar-carbon or carbon fibers), the frequency response function in Cartesian and polar coordinates. By using the frequency response functions we determine the eigenparameters for each bar. We present the final panel of the eigenmodes (with the damping factors, eigenfrequencies and critical damping) for each considered bar. Using the eigenfrequency of the first determined eigenmode, the bars stiffness has been determined. The presented bars can be used in practical engineering for: car or bus body parts, planes body parts, bullet-proof vests, reinforcements for sandwich beams, and so on.

  15. Nondestructive Evaluation of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composites Using Reflective Terahertz Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Zhang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Terahertz (THz time-domain spectroscopy (TDS imaging is considered a nondestructive evaluation method for composite materials used for examining various defects of carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP composites and fire-retardant coatings in the reflective imaging modality. We demonstrate that hidden defects simulated by Teflon artificial inserts are imaged clearly in the perpendicular polarization mode. The THz TDS technique is also used to measure the thickness of thin fire-retardant coatings on CFRP composites with a typical accuracy of about 10 micrometers. In addition, coating debonding is successfully imaged based on the time-delay difference of the time-domain waveforms between closely adhered and debonded sample locations.

  16. Nondestructive Evaluation of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composites Using Reflective Terahertz Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin; Li, Wei; Cui, Hong-Liang; Shi, Changcheng; Han, Xiaohui; Ma, Yuting; Chen, Jiandong; Chang, Tianying; Wei, Dongshan; Zhang, Yumin; Zhou, Yufeng

    2016-01-01

    Terahertz (THz) time-domain spectroscopy (TDS) imaging is considered a nondestructive evaluation method for composite materials used for examining various defects of carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites and fire-retardant coatings in the reflective imaging modality. We demonstrate that hidden defects simulated by Teflon artificial inserts are imaged clearly in the perpendicular polarization mode. The THz TDS technique is also used to measure the thickness of thin fire-retardant coatings on CFRP composites with a typical accuracy of about 10 micrometers. In addition, coating debonding is successfully imaged based on the time-delay difference of the time-domain waveforms between closely adhered and debonded sample locations. PMID:27314352

  17. Nondestructive evaluation of defects in carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Andrew C. Y.; Goh, Henry K. H.; Lin, Karen K.; Liew, W. H.

    2017-04-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites are increasingly used in aerospace applications due to its superior mechanical properties and reduced weight. Adhesive bonding is commonly used to join the composite parts since it is capable of joining incompatible or dissimilar components. However, insufficient adhesive or contamination in the adhesive bonds might occur and pose as threats to the integrity of the plane during service. It is thus important to look for suitable nondestructive testing (NDT) techniques to detect and characterize the sub-surface defects within the CFRP composites. Some of the common NDT techniques include ultrasonic techniques and thermography. In this work, we report the use of the abovementioned techniques for improved interpretation of the results.

  18. Low Temperature Mechanical Testing of Carbon-Fiber/Epoxy-Resin Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nettles, Alan T.; Biss, Emily J.

    1996-01-01

    The use of cryogenic fuels (liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen) in current space transportation vehicles, in combination with the proposed use of composite materials in such applications, requires an understanding of how such materials behave at cryogenic temperatures. In this investigation, tensile intralaminar shear tests were performed at room, dry ice, and liquid nitrogen temperatures to evaluate the effect of temperature on the mechanical response of the IM7/8551-7 carbon-fiber/epoxy-resin system. Quasi-isotropic lay-ups were also tested to represent a more realistic lay-up. It was found that the matrix became both increasingly resistant to microcracking and stiffer with decreasing temperature. A marginal increase in matrix shear strength with decreasing temperature was also observed. Temperature did not appear to affect the integrity of the fiber-matrix bond.

  19. Bench Scale Thin Film Composite Hollow Fiber Membranes for Post-Combustion Carbon Dioxide Capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glaser, Paul [General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, NY (United States); Bhandari, Dhaval [General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, NY (United States); Narang, Kristi [General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, NY (United States); McCloskey, Pat [General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, NY (United States); Singh, Surinder [General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, NY (United States); Ananthasayanam, Balajee [General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, NY (United States); Howson, Paul [General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, NY (United States); Lee, Julia [General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, NY (United States); Wroczynski, Ron [General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, NY (United States); Stewart, Frederick [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Orme, Christopher [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Klaehn, John [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); McNally, Joshua [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Rownaghi, Ali [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Lu, Liu [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Koros, William [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Goizueta, Roberto [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Sethi, Vijay [Western Research Inst., Laramie, WY (United States)

    2015-04-01

    GE Global Research, Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech), and Western Research Institute (WRI) proposed to develop high performance thin film polymer composite hollow fiber membranes and advanced processes for economical post-combustion carbon dioxide (CO2) capture from pulverized coal flue gas at temperatures typical of existing flue gas cleanup processes. The project sought to develop and then optimize new gas separations membrane systems at the bench scale, including tuning the properties of a novel polyphosphazene polymer in a coating solution and fabricating highly engineered porous hollow fiber supports. The project also sought to define the processes needed to coat the fiber support to manufacture composite hollow fiber membranes with high performance, ultra-thin separation layers. Physical, chemical, and mechanical stability of the materials (individual and composite) towards coal flue gas components was considered via exposure and performance tests. Preliminary design, technoeconomic, and economic feasibility analyses were conducted to evaluate the overall performance and impact of the process on the cost of electricity (COE) for a coal-fired plant including capture technologies. At the onset of the project, Membranes based on coupling a novel selective material polyphosphazene with an engineered hollow fiber support was found to have the potential to capture greater than 90% of the CO2 in flue gas with less than 35% increase in COE, which would achieve the DOE-targeted performance criteria. While lab-scale results for the polyphosphazene materials were very promising, and the material was incorporated into hollow-fiber modules, difficulties were encountered relating to the performance of these membrane systems over time. Performance, as measured by both flux of and selectivity for CO2 over other flue gas constituents was found to deteriorate over time, suggesting a system that was

  20. Modeling of Failure for Analysis of Triaxial Braided Carbon Fiber Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Littell, Justin D.; Binienda, Wieslaw K.

    2010-01-01

    In the development of advanced aircraft-engine fan cases and containment systems, composite materials are beginning to be used due to their low weight and high strength. The design of these structures must include the capability of withstanding impact loads from a released fan blade. Relatively complex triaxially braided fiber architectures have been found to yield the best performance for the fan cases. To properly work with and design these structures, robust analytical tools are required that can be used in the design process. A new analytical approach models triaxially braided carbon fiber composite materials within the environment of a transient dynamic finite-element code, specifically the commercially available transient dynamic finite-element code LS-DYNA. The geometry of the braided composites is approximated by a series of parallel laminated composites. The composite is modeled by using shell finite elements. The material property data are computed by examining test data from static tests on braided composites, where optical strain measurement techniques are used to examine the local strain variations within the material. These local strain data from the braided composite tests are used along with a judicious application of composite micromechanics- based methods to compute the stiffness properties of an equivalent unidirectional laminated composite required for the shell elements. The local strain data from the braided composite tests are also applied to back out strength and failure properties of the equivalent unidirectional composite. The properties utilized are geared towards the application of a continuum damage mechanics-based composite constitutive model available within LS-DYNA. The developed model can be applied to conduct impact simulations of structures composed of triaxially braided composites. The advantage of this technology is that it facilitates the analysis of the deformation and damage response of a triaxially braided polymer matrix

  1. Hybrid Carbon-Glass Fiber/Toughened Epoxy Thick Composite Joints Subject to Drop-Weight and Ballistic Impacts

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Liaw, Benjamin; Delale, Feridun

    2007-01-01

    ... No. DAAD19-02-R-0010 to conduct research on hybrid carbon-S2 glass fiber/toughened epoxy thick-section, hybrid interwoven composite joints subject to drop-weight and ballistic impacts. Dr. Basavaraju B. Raju of U.S...

  2. Investigation of Structural Properties of Carbon-Epoxy Composites Using Embedded Fiber-Optic Bragg Gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osei, Albert J.

    2003-01-01

    coupled into the optical fiber sensor, a reflection peak will be obtained centered around a wavelength called Bragg-wavelength. The Bragg-wavelength depends on the refractive index and the period of the grating, which both change due to mechanical and thermal strain applied to the sensor. The shift in the Bragg-wavelength is directly proportional to the strain. Researchers at NASA MSFC are currently developing techniques for using FBGs for monitoring the integrity of advanced structural materials expected to become the mainstay of the current and future generation space structures. Since carbon-epoxy composites are the materials of choice for the current space structures, the initial study is concentrated on this type of composite. The goals of this activity are to use embedded FBG sensors for measuring strain and temperature of composite structures, and to investigate the effects of various parameters such as composite fiber orientation with respect to the optical sensor, unidirectional fiber composite, fabrication process etc., on the optical performance of the sensor. This paper describes an experiment to demonstrate the use of an embedded FBG for measuring strain in a composite material. The performance of the fiber optic sensor is determined by direct comparison with results from more conventional instrumentation.

  3. Flexural Properties of E Glass and TR50S Carbon Fiber Reinforced Epoxy Hybrid Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Chensong; Sudarisman; Davies, Ian J.

    2013-01-01

    A study on the flexural properties of E glass and TR50S carbon fiber reinforced hybrid composites is presented in this paper. Specimens were made by the hand lay-up process in an intra-ply configuration with varying degrees of glass fibers added to the surface of a carbon laminate. These specimens were then tested in the three-point bend configuration in accordance with ASTM D790-07 at three span-to-depth ratios: 16, 32, and 64. The failure modes were examined under an optical microscope. The flexural behavior was also simulated by finite element analysis, and the flexural modulus, flexural strength, and strain to failure were calculated. It is shown that although span-to-depth ratio shows an influence on the stress-strain relationship, it has no effect on the failure mode. The majority of specimens failed by either in-plane or out-of-plane local buckling followed by kinking and splitting at the compressive GFRP side and matrix cracking combined with fiber breakage at the CFRP tensile face. It is shown that positive hybrid effects exist for the flexural strengths of most of the hybrid configurations. The hybrid effect is noted to be more obvious when the hybrid ratio is small, which may be attributed to the relative position of the GFRP layer(s) with respect to the neutral plane. In contrast to this, flexural modulus seems to obey the rule of mixtures equation.

  4. Viscoelastic characterization of carbon fiber-epoxy composites by creep and creep rupture tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farina, Luis Claudio

    2009-01-01

    One of the main requirements for the use of fiber-reinforced polymer matrix composites in structural applications is the evaluation of their behavior during service life. The warranties of the integrity of these structural components demand a study of the time dependent behavior of these materials due to viscoelastic response of the polymeric matrix and of the countless possibilities of design configurations. In the present study, creep and creep rupture test in stress were performed in specimens of unidirectional carbon fiber-reinforced epoxy composites with fibers orientations of 60 degree and 90 degree, at temperatures of 25 and 70 degree C. The aim is the viscoelastic characterization of the material through the creep curves to some levels of constant tension during periods of 1000 h, the attainment of the creep rupture envelope by the creep rupture curves and the determination of the transition of the linear for non-linear behavior through isochronous curves. In addition, comparisons of creep compliance curves with a viscoelastic behavior prediction model based on Schapery equation were also performed. For the test, a modification was verified in the behavior of the material, regarding the resistance, stiffness and deformation, demonstrating that these properties were affected for the time and tension level, especially in work temperature above the ambient. The prediction model was capable to represent the creep behavior, however the determination of the equations terms should be considered, besides the variation of these with the applied tension and the elapsed time of test. (author)

  5. Distinct positive temperature coefficient effect of polymer-carbon fiber composites evaluated in terms of polymer absorption on fiber surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xi; Zheng, Shaodi; Zheng, Xiaofang; Liu, Zhengying; Yang, Wei; Yang, Mingbo

    2016-03-21

    In this article, the positive temperature coefficient (PTC) effect was studied for high-density polyethylene (HDPE)/carbon fiber (CF) composites. All of the samples showed a significant PTC effect during the heating processes without a negative temperature coefficient (NTC) effect, even at a temperature much higher than the melting point of the polymer matrix. An ever-increasing PTC intensity with increasing thermal cycles was observed in our study that had never been reported in previous research. The absence of a NTC effect resulted from the increased binding force between the matrix and fillers that contributed to the very special structure of CF surface. We incorporated thermal expansion theory and quantum tunneling effects to explain PTC effect. From the SEM micrographs for the HDPE/CF composites before and after the different thermal cycles, we found that the surface of CF was covered with a layer of polymer which resulted in a change in the gap length between CF and HDPE and its distribution. We believed that the gap change induced by polymer absorption on the fiber surface had a great effect on the PTC effect.

  6. Optical fiber ultrasound transmitter with electrospun carbon nanotube-polymer composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poduval, Radhika K.; Noimark, Sacha; Colchester, Richard J.; Macdonald, Thomas J.; Parkin, Ivan P.; Desjardins, Adrien E.; Papakonstantinou, Ioannis

    2017-05-01

    All-optical ultrasound transducers are promising for imaging applications in minimally invasive surgery. In these devices, ultrasound is transmitted and received through laser modulation, and they can be readily miniaturized using optical fibers for light delivery. Here, we report optical ultrasound transmitters fabricated by electrospinning an absorbing polymer composite directly onto the end-face of optical fibers. The composite coating consisting of an aqueous dispersion of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in polyvinyl alcohol was directly electrospun onto the cleaved surface of a multimode optical fiber and subsequently dip-coated with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). This formed a uniform nanofibrous absorbing mesh over the optical fiber end-face wherein the constituent MWCNTs were aligned preferentially along individual nanofibers. Infiltration of the PDMS through this nanofibrous mesh onto the underlying substrate was observed and the resulting composites exhibited high optical absorption (>97%). Thickness control from 2.3 μm to 41.4 μm was obtained by varying the electrospinning time. Under laser excitation with 11 μJ pulse energy, ultrasound pressures of 1.59 MPa were achieved at 1.5 mm from the coatings. On comparing the electrospun ultrasound transmitters with a dip-coated reference fabricated using the same constituent materials and possessing identical optical absorption, a five-fold increase in the generated pressure and wider bandwidth was observed. The electrospun transmitters exhibited high optical absorption, good elastomer infiltration, and ultrasound generation capability in the range of pressures used for clinical pulse-echo imaging. All-optical ultrasound probes with such transmitters fabricated by electrospinning could be well-suited for incorporation into catheters and needles for diagnostics and therapeutic applications.

  7. Optical fiber ultrasound transmitter with electrospun carbon nanotube-polymer composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poduval, Radhika K; Noimark, Sacha; Colchester, Richard J; Macdonald, Thomas J; Parkin, Ivan P; Desjardins, Adrien E; Papakonstantinou, Ioannis

    2017-05-29

    All-optical ultrasound transducers are promising for imaging applications in minimally invasive surgery. In these devices, ultrasound is transmitted and received through laser modulation, and they can be readily miniaturized using optical fibers for light delivery. Here, we report optical ultrasound transmitters fabricated by electrospinning an absorbing polymer composite directly onto the end-face of optical fibers. The composite coating consisting of an aqueous dispersion of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in polyvinyl alcohol was directly electrospun onto the cleaved surface of a multimode optical fiber and subsequently dip-coated with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). This formed a uniform nanofibrous absorbing mesh over the optical fiber end-face wherein the constituent MWCNTs were aligned preferentially along individual nanofibers. Infiltration of the PDMS through this nanofibrous mesh onto the underlying substrate was observed and the resulting composites exhibited high optical absorption (>97%). Thickness control from 2.3  μ m to 41.4  μ m was obtained by varying the electrospinning time. Under laser excitation with 11  μ J pulse energy, ultrasound pressures of 1.59 MPa were achieved at 1.5 mm from the coatings. On comparing the electrospun ultrasound transmitters with a dip-coated reference fabricated using the same constituent materials and possessing identical optical absorption, a five-fold increase in the generated pressure and wider bandwidth was observed. The electrospun transmitters exhibited high optical absorption, good elastomer infiltration, and ultrasound generation capability in the range of pressures used for clinical pulse-echo imaging. All-optical ultrasound probes with such transmitters fabricated by electrospinning could be well-suited for incorporation into catheters and needles for diagnostics and therapeutic applications.

  8. Effect of the surface roughness on interfacial properties of carbon fibers reinforced epoxy resin composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Wei; Gu Aijuan; Liang Guozheng; Yuan Li

    2011-01-01

    The effect of the surface roughness on interfacial properties of carbon fibers (CFs) reinforced epoxy (EP) resin composite is studied. Aqueous ammonia was applied to modify the surfaces of CFs. The morphologies and chemical compositions of original CFs and treated CFs (a-CFs) were characterized by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). Compared with the smooth surface of original CF, the surface of a-CF has bigger roughness; moreover, the roughness increases with the increase of the treating time. On the other hand, no obvious change in chemical composition takes place, indicating that the treating mechanism of CFs by aqueous ammonia is to physically change the morphologies rather than chemical compositions. In order to investigate the effect of surface roughness on the interfacial properties of CF/EP composites, the wettability and Interfacial Shear Strength (IFSS) were measured. Results show that with the increase of the roughness, the wettabilities of CFs against both water and ethylene glycol improves; in addition, the IFSS value of composites also increases. These attractive phenomena prove that the surface roughness of CFs can effectively overcome the poor interfacial adhesions between CFs and organic matrix, and thus make it possible to fabricate advanced composites based on CFs.

  9. Polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes/carbon nanotube/carbon fiber multiscale composite: Influence of a novel hierarchical reinforcement on the interfacial properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, R.L.; Wang, C.G.; Liu, L.; Cui, H.Z.; Gao, B.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Formation a novel hierarchical reinforcing carbon fiber through co-grafting carbon nanotube and polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes. • These CNTs and POSS grafted on the carbon fiber, significantly increase the interfacial adhesion strength. • The investigation can prove an effective way to increase the interfacial adhesion and improve the mechanical performance of the fiber/resin composites on the desired application. - Abstract: A novel hierarchical reinforcing carbon fiber through co-grafting carbon nanotube (CNTs) and polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POSS) was prepared in this paper. The structure and surface characteristics of the grafted carbon fiber were investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), thermogravimetry (TG) and scanning electron microscope (SEM), respectively. The surface energy and the functional groups of the carbon fiber surface were increased obviously after modification. The ILSS results showed that there was a remarkable improvement in the interfacial properties of the new hybrid CF–CNTs–POSS composites. The investigation can prove an effective way to increase the interfacial adhesion and improve the mechanical performance of the fiber/resin composites on the desired application.

  10. Comparative Characterization of Multiscale Carbon Fiber Composite with Long and Short MWCNTs at Higher Weight Fractions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Zimmer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There are documented advantages to using carbon nanotubes (CNTs in composites for various property enhancements. However, to date, only limited studies have been conducted on using of longer CNTs over 1 mm in length. This study used long multiwalled carbon nanotubes (LMWCNTs and their longer extended networks to test multiple properties in thermal conductivity, electrical conductivity, mechanical strength, and modulus and then compared these properties to those of shorter multi-walled carbon nanotubes (SMWCNTs. For carbon fiber-reinforced composites, the longer graphite paths from LMWCNTs in the matrix were expected to improve all properties. The longer networks were expected to allow for more undisturbed phonon transportation to improve thermal conductivity. This in turn relates to improved electrical conductivity and better mechanical properties. However, results have shown that the LMWCNTs do not improve or decrease thermal conductivity, whereas the shorter MWCNTs provide mixed results. LMWCNTs did show improvements in electrical, mechanical, and physical properties, but compared to shorter MWCNTs, the results in other certain properties varied. This perplexing outcome resides in the functioning of the networks made by both the LMWCNTs and shorter MWCNTs.

  11. Shaped fiber composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinnan, Mark K.; Roach, Dennis P.

    2017-12-05

    A composite article is disclosed that has non-circular fibers embedded in a polymer matrix. The composite article has improved damage tolerance, toughness, bending, and impact resistance compared to composites having traditional round fibers.

  12. Fabricating and strengthening the carbon nanotube/copper composite fibers with high strength and high electrical conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Baoshuai; Guo, Enyu; Xue, Xiang; Zhao, Zhiyong; Li, Tiejun; Xu, Yanjin; Luo, Liangshun; Hou, Hongliang

    2018-05-01

    Combining the excellent properties of carbon nanotube (CNT) and copper, CNT/Cu composite fibers were fabricated by physical vapor deposition (PVD) and rolling treatment. Dense and continuous copper film (∼2 μm) was coated on the surface of the CNT fibers by PVD, and rolling treatment was adopt to strengthen the CNT/Cu composite fibers. After the rolling treatment, the defects between the Cu grains and the CNT bundles were eliminated, and the structure of both the copper film and the core CNT fibers were optimized. The rolled CNT/Cu composite fibers possess high tensile effective strength (1.01 ± 0.13 GPa) and high electrical conductivity ((2.6 ± 0.3) × 107 S/m), and thus, this material may become a promising wire material.

  13. Radiation resistance of the carbon fiber reinforced composite material with PEEK as the matrix resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasuga, Tsuneo; Seguchi, Tadao; Sakai, Hideo; Nakakura, Toshiyuki; Masutani, Masahiro.

    1987-01-01

    In the fast breeder reactor etc. the structural materials are exposed to various environment, i.e., repeated high and low temperature, stress, etc. Irradiation effect (electron radiation) in the mechanical characteristic at low and high temperature has been studied in the PEEK-CF, polyarylether · ether · ketone - carbon fiber composite. Following are the results. (1) Radiation resistance of PEEK-CF is higher than that of PEEK-PES-CF, PEEK - polyethersulfone surface treated CF composite. In PEEK-PES-CF, PES is deteriorated by irradiation so the adhesive power lowers. (2) In the unirradiated PEEK-CF, its mechanical characteristic decreases beyond 140 deg C. With increase of the radiation dose, however, the characteristic rises. (3) Mechanical characteristic of PEEK-CF thus little drops by the heat treatment after the irradiation. (Mori, K.)

  14. Vertically aligned TiO2 nanorods-woven carbon fiber for reinforcement of both mechanical and anti-wear properties in resin composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Jie; Zhang, Chao; Luo, Dan; Cui, Yali; Li, Hejun; Lu, Zhaoqing; Huang, Jianfeng

    2018-03-01

    A series of TiO2 nanorods were successfully grown on woven carbon fiber by hydrothermal method to reinforce the resin composite. The TiO2 nanorods improved the mechanical interlocking among woven carbon fibers and resin matrix, resulting in better fibers/resin interfacial bonding. Compared with desized-woven carbon fiber, the uniform TiO2 nanorods array resulted in an improvement of 84.3% and 73.9% in the tensile and flexural strength of the composite. However, the disorderly TiO2 nanorods on woven carbon fiber leaded to an insignificant promotion of the mechanical strength. The enhanced performance of well-proportioned TiO2 nanorods-woven carbon fiber was also reflected in the nearly 56% decrease of wear rate, comparing to traditional woven carbon fiber reinforced composite.

  15. Electromagnetic wave absorption properties of cement based composites using helical carbon fibers as absorbent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Shuai; Wang, Jing; Wang, Wufeng; Hou, Guoyan; Li, Bin; Shui, Zhonghe; Ji, Zhijiang

    2018-02-01

    In order to develop a cement based composites with high electromagnetic (EM) wave absorbing performance, helical carbon fibers (HCFs) were added into the cement matrix as an absorbent. The reflection loss (RL) of the prepared HCFs/cement based composites was studied by arched testing method in the frequency ranges of 1–8 GHz and 8–18 GHz. The results show that the EM wave absorption properties of the cement based composites can be evidently enhanced by the addition of HCFs. The composites with 1.5% HCFs exhibits optimum EM wave absorption performance in the frequency range of 1–8 GHz. However, in 8–18 GHz frequency range, the EM wave absorption performance of the cement composites with 1% HCFs is much better than others. The RL values of the prepared HCFs/cement based composites are less than ‑5 dB in the whole testing frequency regions, which can be attributed to the strong dielectric loss ability and unique chiral structure of HCFs.

  16. Anisotropic Dielectric Properties of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composites during Microwave Curing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Linglin; Li, Yingguang; Zhou, Jing

    2018-01-01

    Microwave cuing technology is a promising alternative to conventional autoclave curing technology in high efficient and energy saving processing of polymer composites. Dielectric properties of composites are key parameters related to the energy conversion efficiency during the microwave curing process. However, existing methods of dielectric measurement cannot be applied to the microwave curing process. This paper presented an offline test method to solve this problem. Firstly, a kinetics model of the polymer composites under microwave curing was established based on differential scanning calorimetry to describe the whole curing process. Then several specially designed samples of different feature cure degrees were prepared and used to reflect the dielectric properties of the composite during microwave curing. It was demonstrated to be a feasible plan for both test accuracy and efficiency through extensive experimental research. Based on this method, the anisotropic complex permittivity of a carbon fiber/epoxy composite during microwave curing was accurately determined. Statistical results indicated that both the dielectric constant and dielectric loss of the composite increased at the initial curing stage, peaked at the maximum reaction rate point and decreased finally during the microwave curing process. Corresponding mechanism has also been systematically investigated in this work.

  17. Round Robin Tests to Determine Fiber Content of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Thermoplastic Composites by Combustion and Thermogravimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Funabashi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To propose methods to determine the fiber content of carbon fiber-reinforced plastics (CFRP for the International Organization for Standardization, the fiber contents of CFRP with polyamide-6 were measured using a combustion method based on ISO 14127 and a thermogravimetry method based on the modified ISO 9924-3 under a round robin test managed by the Polymer Subcommittee of the Industrial Technology Cooperative Promotion Committee in Japan. In the combustion method, the fiber contents of the CFRTP (~0.3 g were determined by the mass of carbon fiber remaining after burning (ISO 14127. The fiber contents in weight of the CFRTP with 8, 9, or 10 plies were determined to be 55.720%, 61.088%, or 65.326%, respectively, by 17 research institutes. In the thermogravimetry method, the fiber contents of the CFRTP (~10 mg were determined by the mass of carbon fiber remaining after heating it to 600°C in nitrogen gas using thermogravimetry apparatus (modified ISO 9924-3. The fiber contents of the CFRTP with 8, 9, or 10 plies were determined to be 56.908%, 61.579%, or 64.819%, respectively, by 8 research institutes. It was confirmed that thermogravimetry method was as accurate as the combustion method based on ISO 14127.

  18. Effect of impregnation pressure and time on the porosity, structure and properties of polyacrylonitrile-fiber based carbon composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venugopalan, Ramani; Roy, Mainak; Thomas, Susy; Patra, A. K.; Sathiyamoorthy, D.; Tyagi, A. K.

    2013-02-01

    Carbon-carbon composites may find applications in critical parts of advanced nuclear reactors. A series of carbon-carbon composites were prepared using polyacrylonitrile (PAN) based carbon fibers. The materials were densified by impregnating two-dimensional (2D) preforms with liquid phenol formaldehyde resin at different pressures and for different periods of time and then carbonizing those by slowly heating at 1000 °C. Effects of the processing parameters on the structure of the composites were extensively studied. The study showed conclusively that open porosity decreased with increasing impregnation pressure, whereas impregnation time had lesser effect. Matrix-resin bonding also improved at higher pressure. d002 spacing decreased and ordering along c-axis increased with concomitant increase in sp2-carbon fraction at higher impregnation pressures. The fiber reinforced composites exhibited short range ordering of carbon atoms and satisfied structural conditions (d002 values) of amorphous carbon according to the turbostratic model for non-graphitic carbon materials. The composites had pellet-density of ˜85% of the theoretical value, low thermal expansion and negligible neutron-poisoning. They maintained structural integrity and retained disordered nature even on heat-treatment at ca. 1800 °C.

  19. Aspects regarding the tribological evaluation of sintered composites obtained from mixture of copper with carbon fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caliman, R.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents a study of the tribological properties of sintered composite materials made from combination of copper with short carbon fibers. Sintered composite materials are more effective if refer to specific properties per unit volume compared to conventional isotropic materials. Potential advantages of copper - carbon composite materials are: high resistance to breakage and high value ratios strength/density; resistance to high temperatures; low density and high resistance to wear; low or high friction coefficient. The sintered composite materials used in this research work are obtained combining different percentages of copper with short carbon fibres with iron and lead in order to investigate the variation of the friction behaviour. Varying the percentage of copper from 92,2% to 97,6% and the percentage of short carbon fibres from 7,8% to 2,4%, five different composite materials are obtained and tested. Friction tests are carried out, at room temperature, in dry conditions, on a pin-on-disc machine. The friction coefficient was measured using abrasive discs made from steel 4340 having the average hardness of 40 HRC, and sliding velocity of 0,6 m/sec. The main objective of this research work it was to identify a combination of materials with improved friction behaviour. The experimental results revealed that the force applied on the specimen during the tests, is playing a very important role regarding friction coefficient and also the wearing speed. Graphite particles are conveyed consistently inside the net, enhancing scraped spot safety and voltage drop over normal composite material. The static tests demonstrated that this new kind of sintered composite material has preferable electrical execution over previous brush material in the same conditions, and the element tests demonstrated that the temperature climb is not enormous when the brush with this new composite material is exchanged on with huge current and the surface scraped spot is littler amid

  20. Dry Process for Manufacturing Hybridized Boron Fiber/Carbon Fiber Thermoplastic Composite Materials from a Solution Coated Precursor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belvin, Harry L. (Inventor); Cano, Roberto J. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    An apparatus for producing a hybrid boron reinforced polymer matrix composite from precursor tape and a linear array of boron fibers. The boron fibers are applied onto the precursor tapes and the precursor tape processed within a processing component having an impregnation bar assembly. After passing through variable-dimension forming nip-rollers, the precursor tape with the boron fibers becomes a hybrid boron reinforced polymer matrix composite. A driving mechanism is used to pulled the precursor tape through the method and a take-up spool is used to collect the formed hybrid boron reinforced polymer matrix composite.

  1. Improvement of Interaction in a Composite Structure by Using a Sol-Gel Functional Coating on Carbon Fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczurek, Anna; Barcikowski, Michał; Leluk, Karol; Babiarczuk, Bartosz; Kaleta, Jerzy; Krzak, Justyna

    2017-08-25

    The modification of carbon fibers for improving adhesion between fibers and an epoxy resin in composite materials has become the focus of attention. In this work the carbon fiber coating process has been devised in a way preventing the stiffening and clumping of fibers. To improve interactions between coated fibers and a resin in composites, four types of silica coatings with different organic functional groups (3-aminopropyl-coating 1, 3-mercaptopropyl-coating 2, 2-(3,4-epoxycyclohexyl) ethyl-coating 3, methyl-coating 4) were obtained. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used to distinguish the changes of a carbon fibers surface after coating deposition. The thickness of the obtained coatings, including the diversity of thickness, was determined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The increase in surface free energy (SFE) of modified fibers, including the distinction between the polar and dispersive parts, was examined by wettability measurements using a tensometric test. The developed coating preparation process allowed to cover fibers separately with nanoscale silica layers, which changed their morphology. The introduction of organic functional groups resulted in surface free energy changes, especially an increase in specific polar surface energy components.

  2. Predictive Engineering Tools for Injection-Molded Long-Carbon-Fiber Thermoplastic Composites. Topical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Fifield, Leonard S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wang, Jin [Autodesk, Inc., Ithaca, NY (United States); Costa, Franco [Autodesk, Inc., Ithaca, NY (United States); Lambert, Gregory [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Baird, Donald G. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Sharma, Bhisham A. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); Kijewski, Seth A. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); Sangid, Michael D. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); Gandhi, Umesh N. [Toyota Research Inst. North America, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Wollan, Eric J. [PlastiComp, Inc., Winona, MN (United States); Roland, Dale [PlastiComp, Inc., Winona, MN (United States); Mori, Steven [Magna Exteriors and Interiors Corporation, Aurora, ON (Canada); Tucker, III, Charles L. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States)

    2016-06-01

    This project aimed to integrate, optimize, and validate the fiber orientation and length distribution models previously developed and implemented in the Autodesk® Simulation Moldflow® Insight (ASMI) software package for injection-molded long-carbon-fiber (LCF) thermoplastic composite structures. The project was organized into two phases. Phase 1 demonstrated the ability of the advanced ASMI package to predict fiber orientation and length distributions in LCF/polypropylene (PP) and LCF/polyamide-6, 6 (PA66) plaques within 15% of experimental results. Phase 2 validated the advanced ASMI package by predicting fiber orientation and length distributions within 15% of experimental results for a complex three-dimensional (3D) Toyota automotive part injection-molded from LCF/PP and LCF/PA66 materials. Work under Phase 2 also included estimate of weight savings and cost impacts for a vehicle system using ASMI and structural analyses of the complex part. The present report summarizes the completion of Phases 1 and 2 work activities and accomplishments achieved by the team comprising Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Purdue University (Purdue); Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Autodesk, Inc. (Autodesk); PlastiComp, Inc. (PlastiComp); Toyota Research Institute North America (Toyota); Magna Exteriors and Interiors Corp. (Magna); and University of Illinois. Figure 1 illustrates the technical approach adopted in this project that progressed from compounding LCF/PP and LCF/PA66 materials, to process model improvement and implementation, to molding and modeling LCF/PP and LCF/PA66 plaques. The lessons learned from the plaque study and the successful validation of improved process models for fiber orientation and length distributions for these plaques enabled the project to go to Phase 2 to mold, model, and optimize the 3D complex part.

  3. Numerical Investigation of Delamination in Drilling of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Wenliang; Chen, Yan; Yang, Haojun; Wang, Hua; Yao, Qiwei

    2018-03-01

    Drilling of carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) is a challenging task in modern manufacturing sector and machining induced delamination is one of the major problems affecting assembly precision. In this work, a new three-dimensional (3D) finite element model is developed to study the chip formation and entrance delamination in drilling of CFRP composites on the microscopic level. Fiber phase, matrix phase and equivalent homogeneous phase in the multi-phase model have different constitutive behaviors, respectively. A comparative drilling test, in which the cement carbide drill and unidirectional CFRP laminate are employed, is conducted to validate the proposedmodel in terms of the delamination and the similar changing trend is obtained. Microscopic mechanism of entrance delamination together with the chip formation process at four special fiber cutting angles (0°, 45°, 90° and 135°) is investigated. Moreover, the peeling force is also predicted. The results show that the delamination occurrence and the chip formation are both strongly dependent on the fiber cutting angle. The length of entrance delamination rises with increasing fiber cutting angles. Negligible delamination at 0° is attributed to the compression by the minor flank face. For 45° and 90°, the delamination resulted from the mode III fracture. At 135°, serious delamination which is driven by the mode I and III fractures is more inclined to occur and the peeling force reaches its maximum. Such numerical models can help understand the mechanism of hole entrance delamination further and provide guidance for the damage-free drilling of CFRP.

  4. Experimental investigation on thermal ablation of carbon-fiber/epoxy composite irradiated by continuous wave laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Minbo; Ma, Zhiliang; Chen, Linzhu; Lin, Xinwei; Zhou, Menglian

    2015-05-01

    The tests of carbon-fiber/epoxy composite laminates, subjected to a tangential gas-flow and 1070 nm continuous wave laser are carried out to acquire the ablation laws of samples on the conditions of different gas-flow. Simultaneously, considered the images from camera of large dynamic range, the damage laws of samples are also obtained for various laser power densities. Experimental results reveal that, without airflow on sample surface, the smoke caused by laser heating can be quickly on fire which causes a burn damage on the surface of samples so that the mass loss is most of all. However, the tangential airflow can remove away the smoke which has a weakening effect on the energy of incidence laser. So the ablation depth has an obvious increase in laser irradiation area. Unlike airflow, nitrogen flow can obviously restrain oxidation ablation on surface so that the ablation damage in laser irradiation area is relatively not severe. On the other hand, as laser power density increases, the mass loss of samples continues to rise but isn't proportional. And the ablation heat with the increase of power density shows a complex change. Below power density of 390 W/cm2, the mass loss mainly depends on the pyrolysis of epoxy while the ablation heat has a gradual decrease. Along with power density increasing but less than 1330 W/cm2 , the oxidation ablation of carbon fibers will be a leading factor and the ablation heat shows a little increase. Above power density of 1330 W/cm2 , the carbon fibers turn up the phenomenon of sublimation. What's more, airflow removed effects will be enhanced in high temperature. In this case, the ablation heat again has a trend of decrease.

  5. Damage Tolerance Enhancement of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composites by Nanoreinforcement of Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenner, Joel Stewart

    Nanocomposites are a relatively new class of materials which incorporate exotic, engineered nanoparticles to achieve superior material properties. Because of their extremely small size and well-ordered structure, many nanoparticles possess properties that exceed those offered by a wide range of other known materials, making them attractive candidates for novel materials engineering development. Their small size is also an impediment to their practical use, as they typically cannot be employed by themselves to realize those properties in large structures. Furthermore, nanoparticles typically possess strong self-affinity, rendering them difficult to disperse uniformly into a composite. However, contemporary research has shown that, if well-dispersed, nanoparticles have great capacity to improve the mechanical properties of composites, especially damage tolerance, in the form of fracture toughness, fatigue life, and impact damage mitigation. This research focuses on the development, manufacturing, and testing of hybrid micro/nanocomposites comprised of woven carbon fibers with a carbon nanotube reinforced epoxy matrix. Material processing consisted of dispersant-and-sonication based methods to disperse nanotubes into the matrix, and a vacuum-assisted wet lay-up process to prepare the hybrid composite laminates. Various damage tolerance properties of the hybrid composite were examined, including static strength, fracture toughness, fatigue life, fatigue crack growth rate, and impact damage behavior, and compared with similarly-processed reference material produced without nanoreinforcement. Significant improvements were obtained in interlaminar shear strength (15%), Mode-I fracture toughness (180%), shear fatigue life (order of magnitude), Mode-I fatigue crack growth rate (factor of 2), and effective impact damage toughness (40%). Observations by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and ultrasonic imaging showed significant differences in failure behavior

  6. Composite carbon foam electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Steven T.; Pekala, Richard W.; Kaschmitter, James L.

    1997-01-01

    Carbon aerogels used as a binder for granularized materials, including other forms of carbon and metal additives, are cast onto carbon or metal fiber substrates to form composite carbon thin film sheets. The thin film sheets are utilized in electrochemical energy storage applications, such as electrochemical double layer capacitors (aerocapacitors), lithium based battery insertion electrodes, fuel cell electrodes, and electrocapacitive deionization electrodes. The composite carbon foam may be formed by prior known processes, but with the solid particles being added during the liquid phase of the process, i.e. prior to gelation. The other forms of carbon may include carbon microspheres, carbon powder, carbon aerogel powder or particles, graphite carbons. Metal and/or carbon fibers may be added for increased conductivity. The choice of materials and fibers will depend on the electrolyte used and the relative trade off of system resistivty and power to system energy.

  7. Durability-Based Design Criteria for a Quasi-Isotropic Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced Thermoplastic Automotive Composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naus, Dan J [ORNL; Corum, James [ORNL; Klett, Lynn B [ORNL; Davenport, Mike [ORNL; Battiste, Rick [ORNL; Simpson, Jr., William A [ORNL

    2006-04-01

    This report provides recommended durability-based design properties and criteria for a quais-isotropic carbon-fiber thermoplastic composite for possible automotive structural applications. The composite consisted of a PolyPhenylene Sulfide (PPS) thermoplastic matrix (Fortron's PPS - Ticona 0214B1 powder) reinforced with 16 plies of carbon-fiber unidirectional tape, [0?/90?/+45?/-45?]2S. The carbon fiber was Hexcel AS-4C and was present in a fiber volume of 53% (60%, by weight). The overall goal of the project, which is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Freedom Car and Vehicle Technologies and is closely coordinated with the Advanced Composites Consortium, is to develop durability-driven design data and criteria to assure the long-term integrity of carbon-fiber-based composite systems for automotive structural applications. This document is in two parts. Part 1 provides design data and correlations, while Part 2 provides the underlying experimental data and models. The durability issues addressed include the effects of short-time, cyclic, and sustained loadings; temperature; fluid environments; and low-energy impacts (e.g., tool drops and kickups of roadway debris) on deformation, strength, and stiffness. Guidance for design analysis, time-independent and time-dependent allowable stresses, rules for cyclic loadings, and damage-tolerance design guidance are provided.

  8. Design aid for shear strengthening of reinforced concrete T-joints using carbon fiber reinforced plastic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gergely, Ioan

    The research presented in the present work focuses on the shear strengthening of beam column joints using carbon fiber composites, a material considered in seismic retrofit in recent years more than any other new material. These composites, or fiber reinforced polymers, offer huge advantages over structural steel reinforced concrete or timber. A few of these advantages are the superior resistance to corrosion, high stiffness to weight and strength to weight ratios, and the ability to control the material's behavior by selecting the orientation of the fibers. The design and field application research on reinforced concrete cap beam-column joints includes analytical investigations using pushover analysis; design of carbon fiber layout, experimental tests and field applications. Several beam column joints have been tested recently with design variables as the type of composite system, fiber orientation and the width of carbon fiber sheets. The surface preparation has been found to be critical for the bond between concrete and composite material, which is the most important factor in joint shear strengthening. The final goal of this thesis is to develop design aids for retrofitting reinforced concrete beam column joints. Two bridge bents were tested on the Interstate-15 corridor. One bent was tested in the as-is condition. Carbon fiber reinforced plastic composite sheets were used to externally reinforce the second bridge bent. By applying the composite, the displacement ductility has been doubled, and the bent overall lateral load capacity has been increased as well. The finite element model (using DRAIN-2DX) was calibrated to model the actual stiffness of the supports. The results were similar to the experimental findings.

  9. Kinetic Theory of Fracture Strength in Prediction of Fatigue Lifetime of Epoxy/Carbon Fiber Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Molaee

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Extensive use of polymer composite materials in many industries has created needs for theoretical modeling tools and the ability to predict the behavior of these materials, namely their fatigue life. Fatigue life is a complex course and depends on material properties, environmental and operational conditions and some other parameters. This work presents an analytical method, based on kinetic logics which are able to predict the lifetime fracture strength and fatigue behavior analysis of carbon fiber-reinforced epoxy composites. The kinetic strength analyzes the mechanical behavior of material based on its molecular properties. Ring-shaped composite samples were used for empirical study of the model. The rings were obtained from the pipes fabricated by the filament winding method. Samples were subjected to cyclic fatigue testing under different strain conditions and evaluated the changes in the structure of composites by FTIR analysis and TGA. The data obtained from the FTIR tests were evaluated in order to propose a theoretical model. The results obtained in this investigation showed that the kinetic models can be as an alternative to the classical mechanical models which usually require expensive testing procedures along with complex calculation tasks. The kinetic model presented here can be used only for the composite samples fabricated according to the procedure described in this study, because they fracture in the transverse direction caused by failure of the matrix. Therefore, prediction of the fatigue lifetime using the developed models only needs to achieve the bond energy and activated volume by performing a few simple tests.

  10. Transformation of the released asbestos, carbon fibers and carbon nanotubes from composite materials and the changes of their potential health impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Schlagenhauf, Lukas; Setyan, Ari

    2017-02-20

    Composite materials with fibrous reinforcement often provide superior mechanical, thermal, electrical and optical properties than the matrix. Asbestos, carbon fibers and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been widely used in composites with profound impacts not only on technology and economy but also on human health and environment. A large number of studies have been dedicated to the release of fibrous particles from composites. Here we focus on the transformation of the fibrous fillers after their release, especially the change of the properties essential for the health impacts. Asbestos fibers exist in a large number of products and the end-of-the-life treatment of asbestos-containing materials poses potential risks. Thermal treatment can transform asbestos to non-hazardous phase which provides opportunities of safe disposal of asbestos-containing materials by incineration, but challenges still exist. Carbon fibers with diameters in the range of 5-10 μm are not considered to be respirable, however, during the release process from composites, the carbon fibers may be split along the fiber axis, generating smaller and respirable fibers. CNTs may be exposed on the surface of the composites or released as free standing fibers, which have lengths shorter than the original ones. CNTs have high thermal stability and may be exposed after thermal treatment of the composites and still keep their structural integrity. Due to the transformation of the fibrous fillers during the release process, their toxicity may be significantly different from the virgin fibers, which should be taken into account in the risk assessment of fiber-containing composites.

  11. Manipulating microstructures and electrical properties of carbon fiber/reduced graphene oxide/nickel composite textiles with electrochemical deposition techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Wei-Liang; Zhao, Quan-Liang; Shi, Fei

    2017-04-01

    Since graphene and their composites play significant roles in the catalysts, energy storage, electronics and other fields, where electron transport is highly critical, here, we introduce reduced graphene oxide (RGO) interfaces in the carbon fiber (CF) networks for preparing a novel lightweight carbon fiber/reduced graphene oxide/nickel (CF-RGO-Ni) composite textile. Upon the charaterizations on the microscopic morphologies, electrical and magnetic properties, and density, the presence of RGO nanosheets and nickel nanoparticles would substantially influence the related physical properties in the resulting composite textiles. Furthermore, the key parameters, including RGO loading, deposition time, current density and annealing temperature of carbon matrices, have been studied to understand their effects on the electrochemical deposition of nickel nanoparticles. Implication of the results suggests that the RGO interface is a unique medium for essentially promoting the electrochemical deposition kinetics and active sites for growing nickel nanoparticles, which indicates a universal approach for preparing advanced lightweight composites with the presence of graphene naonstructures.

  12. Fabrication of silicon-carbide continuous fiber reinforced carbon (SiC/C) composites using hot press process and the effects of fiber forms on the strength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Tong-Shik; Okura, Akimitsu

    1988-01-01

    Silicon-carbide continuous fiber reinforced carbon (SiC/C) composites was fabricated using a simple hot press process. Three forms of SiC fiber reinforcement, that is, cloth, mat and unidirectional long fibers (UD fibers) were employed. Fine pulverized coke mixed with carbonaceous bulk mesophase (BM) was used as matrix. In this process, SiC fibers were laminated alternately with the matrix admixture in a die, and then heated to 600deg C under a pressure of 49 MPa. The results were as follows: (1) The maximum strengths of the composites were the greatest for the UD fiber reinforcements at 121.5 MPa while the cloth and mat reinforcements showed appreciably lower strengths. (2) After secondary heat treatments at 800deg C to 1500deg C, the composite reinforced with UD fibers showed excellent strengths above 106 MPa which were greater than that of an as-fabricated commercial C/C composite. The strengths of the composites reinforced with cloth and mat, however, were significantly reduced by the heat treatments. (author)

  13. Flame Retardancy Effects of Graphene Nanoplatelet/Carbon Nanotube Hybrid Membranes on Carbon Fiber Reinforced Epoxy Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongxian Zhuo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotube/graphene nanoplatelet (MWCNT/GNP hybrid membranes with lower liquid permeability and better barrier effect compared to MWCNT membranes were successfully synthesized by vacuum filtering. Their morphologies, water permeability, and pore structures were characterized by a scanning electron microscope (SEM and nitrogen adsorption isotherms. Furthermore, MWCNT/GNP membranes were used to improve the flame retardancy of carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP composites, and the influence of weight percentage of GNPs on the permeability and flame retardancy of MWCNT/GNP membranes was systematically investigated. Results show that incorporation of MWCNT/GNP membranes on CFRP composite plates can remarkably improve the flame retardancy of CFRP composites. Specifically, the incorporation of hierarchical MWCNT/GNP membrane with 7.5 wt% of GNP displays a 35% reduction in the peak heat release rate (PHRR for a CFRP composite plate with the epoxy as matrix and a 11% reduction in PHRR compared with the incorporation of MWCNT membrane only. A synergistic flame retarding mechanism is suggested to be attributed to these results, which includes controlling the pore size and penetrative network structure.

  14. Enhanced interfacial properties of carbon fiber composites via aryl diazonium reaction “on water”

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yuwei [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); College of Materials Science and Engineering, Qiqihar University, Qiqihar 161006 (China); Meng, Linghui [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Fan, Liquan [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); College of Materials Science and Engineering, Qiqihar University, Qiqihar 161006 (China); Ma, Lichun; Qi, Meiwei; Yu, Jiali [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Huang, Yudong, E-mail: ydhuang.hit1@yahoo.com.cn [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Carbon fibers are grafted with phenyl amine group via aryl diazonium reaction. • Interfacial shear strength of the carbon fibers increases by 73%. • Tensile strength of the carbon fibers does not decrease distinctly. • Using water as the reaction medium can avoid pollution from organic solvents. • Grafting via aryl diazonium reaction in one step can improve modification efficiency. - Abstract: Polyacrylonitrile-based carbon fibers were functionalized with phenyl amine group via aryl diazonium reaction “on water” to improve their interfacial bonding with resin matrix. Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy were employed to characterize ordered degree, functional groups, chemical states and morphology of carbon fiber surface, respectively. The results showed that phenyl amine groups were grafted on the fiber surface successfully. Mechanical property test results indicated that the aryl diazonium reaction in this paper could improve the interfacial shear strength by 73%, while the tensile strength was down very slightly. Hence aryl diazonium reaction “on water” could be a facile green platform to functionalize carbon fibers for many interesting applications.

  15. Enhanced interfacial properties of carbon fiber composites via aryl diazonium reaction “on water”

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yuwei; Meng, Linghui; Fan, Liquan; Ma, Lichun; Qi, Meiwei; Yu, Jiali; Huang, Yudong

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Carbon fibers are grafted with phenyl amine group via aryl diazonium reaction. • Interfacial shear strength of the carbon fibers increases by 73%. • Tensile strength of the carbon fibers does not decrease distinctly. • Using water as the reaction medium can avoid pollution from organic solvents. • Grafting via aryl diazonium reaction in one step can improve modification efficiency. - Abstract: Polyacrylonitrile-based carbon fibers were functionalized with phenyl amine group via aryl diazonium reaction “on water” to improve their interfacial bonding with resin matrix. Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy were employed to characterize ordered degree, functional groups, chemical states and morphology of carbon fiber surface, respectively. The results showed that phenyl amine groups were grafted on the fiber surface successfully. Mechanical property test results indicated that the aryl diazonium reaction in this paper could improve the interfacial shear strength by 73%, while the tensile strength was down very slightly. Hence aryl diazonium reaction “on water” could be a facile green platform to functionalize carbon fibers for many interesting applications

  16. Effect of impregnation pressure and time on the porosity, structure and properties of polyacrylonitrile-fiber based carbon composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venugopalan, Ramani; Roy, Mainak; Thomas, Susy; Patra, A.K.; Sathiyamoorthy, D.; Tyagi, A.K.

    2013-01-01

    Carbon–carbon composites may find applications in critical parts of advanced nuclear reactors. A series of carbon–carbon composites were prepared using polyacrylonitrile (PAN) based carbon fibers. The materials were densified by impregnating two-dimensional (2D) preforms with liquid phenol formaldehyde resin at different pressures and for different periods of time and then carbonizing those by slowly heating at 1000 °C. Effects of the processing parameters on the structure of the composites were extensively studied. The study showed conclusively that open porosity decreased with increasing impregnation pressure, whereas impregnation time had lesser effect. Matrix–resin bonding also improved at higher pressure. d 002 spacing decreased and ordering along c-axis increased with concomitant increase in sp 2 -carbon fraction at higher impregnation pressures. The fiber reinforced composites exhibited short range ordering of carbon atoms and satisfied structural conditions (d 002 values) of amorphous carbon according to the turbostratic model for non-graphitic carbon materials. The composites had pellet-density of ∼85% of the theoretical value, low thermal expansion and negligible neutron-poisoning. They maintained structural integrity and retained disordered nature even on heat-treatment at ca. 1800 °C

  17. Properties Variation of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Composite for Marine Current Turbine in Seawater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Jing

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Turbine blade which are generally made of composite is a core device among components of tidal current power generator that converts the flow of tidal current into a turning force. Recent years, damages of composite turbine blades have been reported due to reasons like seawater degradation, lake of strength, manufacture etc. In this paper, water absorption, tensile, bending, longitudinal transverse shearing properties of carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CRP composite which would be applied to fabricate the marine current turbine blade has been investigated. Furthermore, the variations of properties with seawater immersion period were studied. The results indicated that the water absorption increased almost linearly at the beginning of immersion and then became stable. Tensile strength of specimen tended to decrease firstly and then recovered slightly. However, the longitudinal transverse shearing strength showed reverse variation trend comparing to tensile strength. And the bending property of specimens was depressed significantly. The properties variations in seawater shall be referenced to design and fabrication of composite marine current turbine blade.

  18. Electrical impedance spectroscopy for measuring the impedance response of carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer composite laminates

    KAUST Repository

    Almuhammadi, Khaled

    2017-02-16

    Techniques that monitor the change in the electrical properties of materials are promising for both non-destructive testing and structural health monitoring of carbon-fiber-reinforced polymers (CFRPs). However, achieving reliable monitoring using these techniques requires an in-depth understanding of the impedance response of these materials when subjected to an alternating electrical excitation, information that is only partially available in the literature. In this work, we investigate the electrical impedance spectroscopy response at various frequencies of laminates chosen to be representative of classical layups employed in composite structures. We clarify the relationship between the frequency of the electrical current, the conductivity of the surface ply and the probing depth for different CFRP configurations for more efficient electrical signal-based inspections. We also investigate the effect of the amplitude of the input signal.

  19. Thermo-oxidative degradation assessment in quasi-isotropic carbon fiber/epoxy composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daily, Connor; Barnard, Dan J.; Jones, Roger W.; McClelland, John F.; Bowler, Nicola

    2015-03-01

    Components made from polymer matrix composites (PMCs) are finding increasing use in armored vehicles for the purpose of weight savings and fuel efficiency. Often times, these PMC components are installed next to engines, or in other high-temperature environments within the vehicle. The present work investigates the change in surface chemistry and its correlation with changes in the interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) due to accelerated thermo-oxidative aging of a quasi-isotropic carbon fiber reinforced epoxy laminate. Samples are aged isothermally at various temperatures whose selection is guided by degradation steps revealed by thermo-gravimetric analysis. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) photoacoustic spectroscopy is utilized to identify the chemical changes due to aging, and compression-test results reveal a non-linear decrease in ILSS with increasing aging temperature. A correlation between the FTIR and ILSS data sets suggests that nondestructive FTIR techniques may be used for assessing ILSS of PMCs.

  20. Experiment and simulation study on unidirectional carbon fiber composite component under dynamic 3 point bending loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Guowei; Sun, Qingping; Zeng, Danielle; Li, Dayong; Su, Xuming

    2018-04-10

    In current work, unidirectional (UD) carbon fiber composite hatsection component with two different layups are studied under dynamic 3 point bending loading. The experiments are performed at various impact velocities, and the effects of impactor velocity and layup on acceleration histories are compared. A macro model is established with LS-Dyna for more detailed study. The simulation results show that the delamination plays an important role during dynamic 3 point bending test. Based on the analysis with high speed camera, the sidewall of hatsection shows significant buckling rather than failure. Without considering the delamination, current material model cannot capture the post failure phenomenon correctly. The sidewall delamination is modeled by assumption of larger failure strain together with slim parameters, and the simulation results of different impact velocities and layups match the experimental results reasonable well.

  1. Segmenting delaminations in carbon fiber reinforced polymer composite CT using convolutional neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammons, Daniel; Winfree, William P.; Burke, Eric; Ji, Shuiwang

    2016-02-01

    Nondestructive evaluation (NDE) utilizes a variety of techniques to inspect various materials for defects without causing changes to the material. X-ray computed tomography (CT) produces large volumes of three dimensional image data. Using the task of identifying delaminations in carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite CT, this work shows that it is possible to automate the analysis of these large volumes of CT data using a machine learning model known as a convolutional neural network (CNN). Further, tests on simulated data sets show that with a robust set of experimental data, it may be possible to go beyond just identification and instead accurately characterize the size and shape of the delaminations with CNNs.

  2. Grafting methyl acrylic onto carbon fiber via Diels-Alder reaction for excellent mechanical and tribological properties of phenolic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Jie; Duan, Xiao; Luo, Lan; Zhang, Chao; Qi, Ying; Li, Hejun; Feng, Yongqiang; Huang, Jianfeng

    2018-03-01

    Carbon fibers (CFs) were grafted with methyl acrylic via Diels-Alder reaction at the different oil bath temperature effectively creating a carboxyl functionalized surface. The effect of grafting temperature on the surface morphology and functional groups of carbon fibers were investigated by FTIR, Raman spectroscopy, XPS and SEM respectively. The results showed that the optimal grafting temperature was 80 °C, and the relative surface coverage by carboxylic acid groups increased from an initial 5.16% up to 19.30% significantly improved the chemical activity without damaging the skin and core region of the carbon fibers. Mechanical property tests indicated that the shear and tensile strength of the sample with the grafting temperature of 80 °C (CFRP-3) increased obviously by 90.3% and 78.7%, respectively, compared with the pristine carbon fibers reinforced composite. Further, the sample CFRP-3 exhibited higher and more stable friction coefficient and improved wear resistance, while the wear rate decreased 52.7%, from 10.8 × 10-6 to 5.1 × 10-6 mm3/N m. The present work shows that grafting methyl acrylic via Diels-Alder reaction could be a highly efficient and facile method to functionalize carbon fibers for advanced composites.

  3. Post-tensioned carbon fiber composite cable (CFCC), Little Pond Bridge, Route 302, Fryeburg, Maine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    Corrosion of reinforcing steel in concrete has been a constant and expensive maintenance problem which : is exacerbated by Maines coastal environment, harsh winters, and the use of chlorides on the roads and : bridges. Carbon fiber products are in...

  4. Micro-Mechanical Analysis About Kink Band in Carbon Fiber/Epoxy Composites Under Longitudinal Compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mi; Guan, Zhidong; Wang, Xiaodong; Du, Shanyi

    2017-10-01

    Kink band is a typical phenomenon for composites under longitudinal compression. In this paper, theoretical analysis and finite element simulation were conducted to analyze kink angle as well as compressive strength of composites. Kink angle was considered to be an important character throughout longitudinal compression process. Three factors including plastic matrix, initial fiber misalignment and rotation due to loading were considered for theoretical analysis. Besides, the relationship between kink angle and fiber volume fraction was improved and optimized by theoretical derivation. In addition, finite element models considering fiber stochastic strength and Drucker-Prager constitutive model for matrix were conducted in ABAQUS to analyze kink band formation process, which corresponded with the experimental results. Through simulation, the loading and failure procedure can be evidently divided into three stages: elastic stage, softening stage, and fiber break stage. It also shows that kink band is a result of fiber misalignment and plastic matrix. Different values of initial fiber misalignment angle, wavelength and fiber volume fraction were considered to explore the effects on compressive strength and kink angle. Results show that compressive strength increases with the decreasing of initial fiber misalignment angle, the decreasing of initial fiber misalignment wavelength and the increasing of fiber volume fraction, while kink angle decreases in these situations. Orthogonal array in statistics was also built to distinguish the effect degree of these factors. It indicates that initial fiber misalignment angle has the largest impact on compressive strength and kink angle.

  5. Modeling elastic and thermal properties of 2.5D carbon fiber and carbon/SiC hybrid matrix composites by homogenization method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Claudio Pardini

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Advanced carbon fiber hybrid carbon-ceramic matrix composites are realizing their potential in many thermostructural components for aerospace vehicles. This work presents ab-initio predictions of elastic constants and thermal properties for 2.5D carbon fiber reinforced carbon-silicon carbide hybrid matrix composites, by using the homogenization technique. The homogenization technique takes properties of individual components of the composites (fiber and matrix and characteristics of the geometrical architecture of the preform to perform calculations. Ab-initio modeling of mechanical and thermal properties is very attractive, especially during the material development stage, when larger samples may be prohibitively expensive or impossible to fabricate. Modeling is also useful when bigger samples would be prohibitively expensive or impractical. Thermostructural composites made of 2.5D preforms are easy to manufacture in relation to 3D preforms. Besides, 2.5D preforms are also resistant to thermo cycling and have high resistance to crack propagation in relation to ply stacked composites such as unidirectional (1D and bidirectional (2D structures. The calculations were performed by setting an overall carbon fiber volume fraction at 40, 45 and 50 for a 2D stacked composite, and volume fraction in Z-direction of 2, 4 and 6.

  6. Aerogel to simulate delamination and porosity defects in carbon-fiber reinforced polymer composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juarez, Peter; Leckey, Cara A. C.

    2018-04-01

    Representative defect standards are essential for the validation and calibration of new and existing inspection techniques. However, commonly used methods of simulating delaminations in carbon-fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites do not accurately represent the behavior of the real-world defects for several widely-used NDE techniques. For instance, it is common practice to create a delamination standard by inserting Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) in between ply layers. However, PTFE can transmit more ultrasonic energy than actual delaminations, leading to an unrealistic representation of the defect inspection. PTFE can also deform/wrinkle during the curing process and has a thermal effusivity two orders of magnitude higher than air (almost equal to that of a CFRP). It is therefore not effective in simulating a delamination for thermography. Currently there is also no standard practice for producing or representing a known porosity in composites. This paper presents a novel method of creating delamination and porosity standards using aerogel. Insertion of thin sheets of solid aerogel between ply layers during layup is shown to produce air-gap-like delaminations creating realistic ultrasonic and thermographic inspection responses. Furthermore, it is shown that depositing controlled amounts of aerogel powder can represent porosity. Micrograph data verifies the structural integrity of the aerogel through the composite curing process. This paper presents data from multiple NDE methods, including X-ray computed tomography, immersion ultrasound, and flash thermography to the effectiveness of aerogel as a delamination and porosity simulant.

  7. Effects of Styrene-Acrylic Sizing on the Mechanical Properties of Carbon Fiber Thermoplastic Towpregs and Their Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Bowman

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Thermoplastic towpregs are convenient and scalable raw materials for the fabrication of continuous fiber-reinforced thermoplastic matrix composites. In this paper, the potential to employ epoxy and styrene-acrylic sizing agents was evaluated for the making of carbon fiber thermoplastic towpregs via a powder-coating method. The protective effects and thermal stability of these sizing agents were investigated by single fiber tensile test and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC measurement. The results indicate that the epoxy sizing agent provides better protection to carbon fibers, but it cannot be used for thermoplastic towpreg processing due to its poor chemical stability at high temperature. The bending rigidity of the tows and towpregs with two styrene-acrylic sizing agents was measured by cantilever and Kawabata methods. The styrene-acrylic sized towpregs show low torque values, and are suitable for further processing, such as weaving, preforming, and winding. Finally, composite panels were fabricated directly from the towpregs by hot compression molding. Both of the composite panels show superior flexural strength (>400 MPa, flexural modulus (>63 GPa, and interlaminar shear strength (>27 MPa, indicating the applicability of these two styrene-acrylic sizing agents for carbon fiber thermoplastic towpregs.

  8. Enhanced interfacial properties of carbon fiber composites via aryl diazonium reaction “on water”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuwei; Meng, Linghui; Fan, Liquan; Ma, Lichun; Qi, Meiwei; Yu, Jiali; Huang, Yudong

    2014-10-01

    Polyacrylonitrile-based carbon fibers were functionalized with phenyl amine group via aryl diazonium reaction "on water" to improve their interfacial bonding with resin matrix. Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy were employed to characterize ordered degree, functional groups, chemical states and morphology of carbon fiber surface, respectively. The results showed that phenyl amine groups were grafted on the fiber surface successfully. Mechanical property test results indicated that the aryl diazonium reaction in this paper could improve the interfacial shear strength by 73%, while the tensile strength was down very slightly. Hence aryl diazonium reaction "on water" could be a facile green platform to functionalize carbon fibers for many interesting applications.

  9. Effect of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes on the Mechanical Properties of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Polyamide-6/Polypropylene Composites for Lightweight Automotive Parts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huu-Duc Nguyen-Tran

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The development of lightweight automotive parts is an important issue for improving the efficiency of vehicles. Polymer composites have been widely applied to reduce weight and improve mechanical properties by mixing polymers with carbon fibers, glass fibers, and carbon nanotubes. Polypropylene (PP has been added to carbon fiber-reinforced nylon-6 (CF/PA6 composite to achieve further weight reduction and water resistance. However, the mechanical properties were reduced by the addition of PP. In this research, multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTs were added to compensate for the reduced mechanical properties experienced when adding PP. Tensile testing and bending tests were carried out to evaluate the mechanical properties. A small amount of CNTs improved the mechanical properties of carbon fiber-reinforced PA6/PP composites. For example, the density of CF/PA6 was reduced from 1.214 to 1.131 g/cm3 (6.8% by adding 30 wt % PP, and the tensile strength of 30 wt % PP composite was improved from 168 to 173 MPa (3.0% by adding 0.5 wt % CNTs with small increase of density (1.135 g/cm3. The developed composite will be widely used for lightweight automotive parts with improved mechanical properties.

  10. Effect of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes on the Mechanical Properties of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Polyamide-6/Polypropylene Composites for Lightweight Automotive Parts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen-Tran, Huu-Duc; Hoang, Van-Tho; Do, Van-Ta; Chun, Doo-Man; Yum, Young-Jin

    2018-03-15

    The development of lightweight automotive parts is an important issue for improving the efficiency of vehicles. Polymer composites have been widely applied to reduce weight and improve mechanical properties by mixing polymers with carbon fibers, glass fibers, and carbon nanotubes. Polypropylene (PP) has been added to carbon fiber-reinforced nylon-6 (CF/PA6) composite to achieve further weight reduction and water resistance. However, the mechanical properties were reduced by the addition of PP. In this research, multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were added to compensate for the reduced mechanical properties experienced when adding PP. Tensile testing and bending tests were carried out to evaluate the mechanical properties. A small amount of CNTs improved the mechanical properties of carbon fiber-reinforced PA6/PP composites. For example, the density of CF/PA6 was reduced from 1.214 to 1.131 g/cm³ (6.8%) by adding 30 wt % PP, and the tensile strength of 30 wt % PP composite was improved from 168 to 173 MPa (3.0%) by adding 0.5 wt % CNTs with small increase of density (1.135 g/cm³). The developed composite will be widely used for lightweight automotive parts with improved mechanical properties.

  11. Meso-modeling of Carbon Fiber Composite for Crash Safety Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Shih-Po; Chen, Yijung; Zeng, Danielle; Su, Xuming

    2017-04-06

    In the conventional approach, the material properties for crash safety simulations are typically obtained from standard coupon tests, where the test results only provide single layer material properties used in crash simulations. However, the lay-up effects for the failure behaviors of the real structure were not considered in numerical simulations. Hence, there was discrepancy between the crash simulations and experimental tests. Consequently, an intermediate stage is required for accurate predictions. Some component tests are required to correlate the material models in the intermediate stage. In this paper, a Mazda Tube under high-impact velocity is chosen as an example for the crash safety analysis. The tube consists of 24 layers of uni-directional (UD) carbon fiber composite materials, in which 4 layers are perpendicular to, while the other layers are parallel to the impact direction. An LS-DYNA meso-model was constructed with orthotropic material models counting for the single-layer material behaviors. Between layers, a node-based tie-break contact was used for modeling the delamination of the composite material. Since fiber directions are not single-oriented, the lay-up effects could be an important effect. From the first numerical trial, premature material failure occurred due to the use of material parameters obtained directly from the coupon tests. Some parametric studies were conducted to identify the cause of the numerical instability. The finding is that the material failure strength used in the numerical model needs to be enlarged to stabilize the numerical model. Some hypothesis was made to provide the foundation for enlarging the failure strength and the corresponding experiments will be conducted to validate the hypothesis.

  12. Acoustic characterization of void distributions across carbon-fiber composite layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayong, Rostand B.; Smith, Robert A.; Pinfield, Valerie J.

    2016-02-01

    Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) composites are often used as aircraft structural components, mostly due to their superior mechanical properties. In order to improve the efficiency of these structures, it is important to detect and characterize any defects occurring during the manufacturing process, removing the need to mitigate the risk of defects through increased thicknesses of structure. Such defects include porosity, which is well-known to reduce the mechanical performance of composite structures, particularly the inter-laminar shear strength. Previous work by the authors has considered the determination of porosity distributions in a fiber-metal laminate structure [1]. This paper investigates the use of wave-propagation modeling to invert the ultrasonic response and characterize the void distribution within the plies of a CFRP structure. Finite Element (FE) simulations are used to simulate the ultrasonic response of a porous composite laminate to a typical transducer signal. This simulated response is then applied as input data to an inversion method to calculate the distribution of porosity across the layers. The inversion method is a multi-dimensional optimization utilizing an analytical model based on a normal-incidence plane-wave recursive method and appropriate mixture rules to estimate the acoustical properties of the structure, including the effects of plies and porosity. The effect of porosity is defined through an effective wave-number obtained from a scattering model description. Although a single-scattering approach is applied in this initial study, the limitations of the method in terms of the considered porous layer, percentage porosity and void radius are discussed in relation to single- and multiple-scattering methods. A comparison between the properties of the modeled structure and the void distribution obtained from the inversion is discussed. This work supports the general study of the use of ultrasound methods with inversion to

  13. Vapor Grown Carbon Fiber/Polydicyclopentadiene Composites: Shapeable Pastes to Make Composite Tooling and Plasma Erosion-Resistant Parts

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pittman, Charles

    2002-01-01

    Vapor grown carbon nanofibers (VGCF) with 60-250nm diameters and 10 to 80 micrometers lengths were blended with the nonpolar organic monomer, dicyclopentadiene, to create liquid dispersions or pastes (based on the wt% fiber used...

  14. Failure Modes of a Unidirectional Ultra-High-Modulus Carbon-Fiber/Carbon-Matrix Composite

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zaldivar, R

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this study was to observe the effects of various microstructural features on the in situ, room-temperature tensile fracture behavior of an ultra-high-modulus, unidirectional carbon/carbon (C/C...

  15. Application of sandwich honeycomb carbon/glass fiber-honeycomb composite in the floor component of electric car

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukmaji, I. C.; Wijang, W. R.; Andri, S.; Bambang, K.; Teguh, T.

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays composite is a superior material used in automotive component due to its outstanding mechanical behavior. The sandwich polypropylene honeycomb core with carbon/glass fiber composite skin (SHCG) as based material in a floor component of electric car application is investigated in the present research. In sandwich structure form, it can absorb noise better compare with the conventional material [1]. Also in present paper, Finite Element Analysis (FEA) of SHCG as based material for floor component of the electric car is analyzed. The composite sandwich is contained with a layer uniform carbon fiber and mixing non-uniform carbon-glass fiber in upper and lower skin. Between skins of SHCG are core polypropylene honeycomb that it have good flexibility to form following dies profile. The variables of volume fraction ratio of carbon/glass fiber in SHCG skin are 20/80%, 30/70%, and 50/50%. The specimen of SHCG is tested using the universal testing machine by three points bending method refers to ASTM C393 and ASTM C365. The cross point between tensile strength to the volume fraction the mixing carbon/glass line and ratio cost line are the searched material with good mechanical performance and reasonable cost. The point is 30/70 volume fraction of carbon/glass fiber. The result of the testing experiment is become input properties of model structure sandwich in FEA simulation. FEA simulation approach is conducted to find critical strength and factor of complex safety geometry against varied distributed passenger loads of a floor component the electric car. The passenger loads variable are 80, 100, 150, 200, 250 and 300 kg.

  16. Processing and Damage Tolerance of Continuous Carbon Fiber Composites Containing Puncture Self-Healing Thermoplastic Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimsley, Brian W.; Gordon, Keith L.; Czabaj, Michael W.; Cano, Roberto J.; Siochi, Emilie J.

    2012-01-01

    Research at NASA Langley Research Center (NASA LaRC) has identified several commercially available thermoplastic polymers that self-heal after ballistic impact and through-penetration. One of these resins, polybutadiene graft copolymer (PB(sub g)), was processed with unsized IM7 carbon fibers to fabricate reinforced composite material for further evaluation. Temperature dependent characteristics, such as the degradation point, glass transition (T(sub g)), and viscosity of the PBg polymer were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and dynamic parallel plate rheology. The PBg resin was processed into approximately equal to 22.0 cm wide unidirectional prepreg tape in the NASA LaRC Advanced Composites Processing Research Laboratory. Data from polymer thermal characterization guided the determination of a processing cycle used to fabricate quasi-isotropic 32-ply laminate panels in various dimensions up to 30.5cm x 30.5cm in a vacuum press. The consolidation quality of these panels was analyzed by optical microscopy and acid digestion. The process cycle was further optimized based on these results and quasi-isotropic, [45/0/-45/90]4S, 15.24cm x 15.24cm laminate panels were fabricated for mechanical property characterization. The compression strength after impact (CAI) of the IM7/pBG composites was measured both before and after an elevated temperature and pressure healing cycle. The results of the processing development effort of this composite material as well as the results of the mechanical property characterization are presented in this paper.

  17. Studies on Enhancing Transverse Thermal Conductivity Carbon/Carbon Composites

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Manocha, Lalit M; Manocha, Satish M; Roy, Ajit

    2007-01-01

    .... These composites are prepared with wide range of reinforcing fibers, high strength carbon fibers to high modulus prepared from PAN, Pitch as well as CVD carbon fibers and carbonaceous material...

  18. Effect of air-oxidation on the thermal diffusivity of the nuclear grade 2-dimensional carbon fiber reinforced carbon/carbon composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sogabe, Toshiaki; Ishihara, Masahiro; Baba, Shin-ichi; Tachibana, Yukio; Yamaji, Masatoshi; Iyoku, Tatsuo; Hoshiya, Taiji

    2003-01-01

    2D-C/C composite is one of the promising materials as a next-generation core material in gas-cooled reactors. Effect of air-oxidation on the thermal diffusivity of the 2D-C/C composite was investigated in this study. Tested composite consists of 6K plain-woven fabrics with PAN-based carbon fiber and graphite matrix. Final heat-treatment of around 3073 K was applied to the composite. The C/C composite specimens for measurement of thermal diffusivity were oxidized from 1 to 11% weight loss in air at 823 K. Oxidation loss of the composite preferentially occurred at matrix part near the fiber bundles, and then occurred at fiber bundles. This composite exhibited large anisotropy in thermal diffusivity, higher value for parallel to lamina direction and lower value for perpendicular, e.g. thermal diffusivity of 1.1 cm 2 /s for parallel to lamina and 0.2 cm 2 /s for perpendicular at room temperature. Thermal diffusivity at room temperature declined 10∼20% for parallel to lamina direction and 5∼9% for that of perpendicular within 11% weight loss by oxidation. Thermal diffusivity tended to decrease gradually as the increase of oxidation loss in parallel to lamina, however, it decreased in the beginning of oxidation pretty much and not so changed by further oxidation loss in perpendicular to lamina. The different behavior due to air-oxidation on the thermal diffusivity in two directions was discussed from the fiber and/or matrix texture changes due to air-oxidation. Change in thermal conductivity under oxidation condition was also estimated from the obtained thermal diffusivity. (author)

  19. Strengthening Interface Transition Layer of Carbon Fiber/Epoxy Composites with CNTs and Its Effect on Interfacial Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YAO Hong-wei

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The sizing treatments were used to introduce carbon nanotubes (CNTs to carbon fiber (CF surfaces for fabrication of CF/CNTs/epoxy multi-scale composites. Comparing with the base composites without CNTs, interlaminar shear strength (ILSS and flexural strength of the modified composites were increased by 13.54% and 12.88%, respectively. Force modulation atomic force microscope and linear scanning system of scanning electron microscope were carried out to analyze the microstructure of composite interface. The results indicate that a transition layer reinforced by CNTs is constructed between fiber and epoxy (EP matrix, which has certain thickness and exhibits gradient distribution of modulus and carbon element content. The composites containing CNTs are sonicated before curing to disperse CNTs in the surrounding resin. As a result, the interface transition layer is weakened and the ILSS and flexural strength of prepared composites decrease by 7.33% and 5.34%, respectively. Therefore, the significant role of the interface transition layer in improving the interfacial performance of composites is evidenced again at another perspective.

  20. Digitally focused array ultrasonic testing technique for carbon fiber composite structures

    OpenAIRE

    Salchak, Yana Alekseevna; Zhvyrblya, Vadim Yurievich; Sednev, Dmitry Andreevich; Lider, Andrey Markovich

    2016-01-01

    Composite fiber reinforced polymers are highly promising structures. At present, they are widely used in different areas such as aeronautics and nuclear industries. There is a great number of advantages of composite structures such as design flexibility, low cost per cubic inch, resistance to corrosion, lower material costs, lighter weight and improved productivity. However, composites degradation may be caused by different mechanisms such as overload, impact, overheating, creep and fatigue. ...

  1. Synthesis of Plate-Like Nanoalumina and Its Effect on Gas Permeability of Carbon Fiber Epoxy Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghadamali Karimi Khozani

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In recent years considerable efforts have been made to develop gas impermeable polymer systems. Compared with metal system counterparts they have advantages such as low density and production costs. The most important challenge in development of impermeable polymer systems is to reduce their gas permeability by proper selection of system composition and process conditions. In this work, nanoparticles were initially synthesized using Al (NO33•9H2O and sodium dodecyl sulfate as a structure-directing agent via hydrothermal method and a plate-like structure was characterized by FESEM and EDAX analyses. In the second step, epoxy/plate-like nanoalumina nanocomposites and epoxy-carbon fiber composites containing 1, 2.5, and 5 wt% nanoalumina were prepared. The effect of nanoparticle loading level on permeability of nitrogen, argon, and carbon dioxide in epoxy/plate-like nanoalumina nanocomposites was investigated. It was observed that the permeability of epoxy/plate-like nanoalumina nanocomposites toward nitrogen, argon, and carbon dioxide gases reduced 83%, 74%, and 50%, respectively. It was deduced that the permeability reduction was clearly associated with the diameter of gas molecules. Generally speaking, the results showed that the incorporation of plate-like nanoalumina particles significantly reduced the gas permeability. Also, carbon dioxide gas permeability of carbon fiber epoxy composites containing plate-like nanoalumina was investigated to show the effect of ingredients on the gas permeability of the system. The results indicated that carbon dioxide gas permeability of epoxy carbon fiber composite containing 5 wt% of plate-like nanoalumina was totally reduced 84%.

  2. Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fareed, Ali [Honeywell Advanced Composites Inc. (HACI), Newark, DE (United States); Craig, Phillip A. [Honeywell Advanced Composites Inc. (HACI), Newark, DE (United States)

    2002-09-01

    Fiber-reinforced ceramic composites demonstrate the high-temperature stability of ceramics--with an increased fracture toughness resulting from the fiber reinforcement of the composite. The material optimization performed under the continuous fiber ceramic composites (CFCC) included a series of systematic optimizations. The overall goals were to define the processing window, to increase the robustinous of the process, to increase process yield while reducing costs, and to define the complexity of parts that could be fabricated.

  3. An integrated computational framework for simulating the failure response of carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadian, Hossein; Liang, Bowen; Soghrati, Soheil

    2017-12-01

    A new computational framework is introduced for the automated finite element (FE) modeling of fiber reinforced composites and simulating their micromechanical behavior. The proposed methodology relies on a new microstructure reconstruction algorithm that implements the centroidal Voronoi tessellation (CVT) to generate an initial uniform distribution of fibers with desired volume fraction and size distribution in a repeating unit cell of the composite. The genetic algorithm (GA) is then employed to optimize locations of fibers such that they replicate the target spatial arrangement. We also use a non-iterative mesh generation algorithm, named conforming to interface structured adaptive mesh refinement (CISAMR), to create FE models of the CFRPC. The CVT-GA-CISAMR framework is then employed to investigate the appropriate size of the composite's representative volume element. We also study the strength and failure mechanisms in the CFRPC subject to varying uniaxial and mixed-mode loadings.

  4. Polyacrylonitrile/Carbon Nanotube Composite: Precursor for Next Generation Carbon Fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-23

    2 The reinforcement efficiency of CNT is calculated by ( ) ( ) CNTf PANfYMYM w wControlComposite ⋅− (YM: Young’s...reinforcement efficiency of CNT is calculated by ( ) ( ) CNTf PANfYMYM w wControlComposite ⋅− (YM: Young’s modulus (N/tex), fw: Weight fraction

  5. Bootstrap Method for Detecting Damage in Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic Using a Macro Fiber Composite Sensor

    OpenAIRE

    DJANSENA, Alradix; 田中, 宏明; 工藤, 亮

    2015-01-01

    CFRP has been used in aircraft structures for decades. Although CFRP is light, its laminationis its main weakness. We have developed a new method to increase the probability of detectingdelamination in carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) by narrowing the confidence interval ofthe changes in natural frequency. The changes in the natural frequency in delaminated CFRPare tiny compared with measurement errors. We use the bootstrap method, a statisticaltechnique that increases the estimation ac...

  6. Deformation behavior of FRP-metal composites locally reinforced with carbon fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholze, M.; Kolonko, A.; Lindner, T.; Lampke, T.; Helbig, F.

    2016-03-01

    This study investigates variations of hybrid laminates, consisting of one aluminum sheet and a unidirectional glass fiber (GF) reinforced polyamide 6 (PA6) basic structure with partial carbon fiber (CF) reinforcement. To create these heterogeneous FRP laminates, it is necessary to design and produce semi-finished textile-based products. Moreover, a warp knitting machine in conjunction with a warp thread offset unit was used to generate bionic inspired compounds. By the variation of stacking prior to the consolidation process of the hybrid laminate, an oriented CF reinforcement at the top and middle layer of the FRP is realized. In both cases the GFRP layer prevents contact between the aluminum and carbon fibers. In so doing, the high strength of carbon fibers can be transferred to the hybrid laminate in load directions with an active prevention of contact corrosion. The interface strength between thermoplastic and metal component was improved by a thermal spray coating on the aluminum sheet. Because of the high surface roughness and porosity, mechanical interlock was used to provide high interface strength without bonding agents between both components. The resulting mechanical properties of the hybrid laminates are evaluated by three point bending tests in different load directions. The effect of local fiber orientation and layer positioning on failure and deformation mechanism is additionally investigated by digital image correlation (DIC).

  7. An electrical-heating and self-sensing shape memory polymer composite incorporated with carbon fiber felt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong, Xiaobo; Leng, Jinsong; Liu, Liwu; Liu, Yanju

    2016-01-01

    Shape memory polymers (SMPs) have the ability to adjust their stiffness, lock a temporary shape, and recover the permanent shape upon imposing an appropriate stimulus. They have found their way into the field of morphing structures. The electrically Joule resistive heating of the conductive composite can be a desirable stimulus to activate the shape memory effect of SMPs without external heating equipment. Electro-induced SMP composites incorporated with carbon fiber felt (CFF) were explored in this work. The CFF is an excellent conductive filler which can easily spread throughout the composite. It has a huge advantage in terms of low cost, simple manufacturing process, and uniform and tunable temperature distribution while heating. A continuous and compact conductive network made of carbon fibers and the overlap joints among them was observed from the microscopy images, and this network contributes to the high conductive properties of the CFF/SMP composites. The CFF/SMP composites can be electrical-heated rapidly and uniformly, and its’ shape recovery effect can be actuated by the electrical resistance Joule heating of the CFF without an external heater. The CFF/SMP composite get higher modulus and higher strength than the pure SMP without losing any strain recovery property. The high dependence of temperature and strain on the electrical resistance also make the composite a good self-sensing material. In general, the CFF/SMP composite shows great prospects as a potential material for the future morphing structures. (paper)

  8. In-situ change and repairing method of armour tile made of carbon fiber composite material in divertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiyama, Shintaro.

    1994-01-01

    A joint portion of a damaged armour tile of a carbon fiber composite material and a divertor substrate is locally heated spontaneously to re-melt the soldering. Then, the damaged tile is removed and the portion where the tile is removed is heated again to melt the soldering, then a tile for exchange is joined. Alternatively, a thermosetting type adhesive is coated on the surface of the damaged armour tile made of carbon fiber composite material on the divertor, and a tile for repairing is adhered thereon then the joint surface is locally heated to cure the adhesive. For local heating, for example, high frequency heating or dielectric heating is used. It is preferably conducted by remote handling by using robot arms under vacuum in an vacuum vessel of the thermonuclear device. The operations of the heating and pressurization for the joint surface are preferably repeated for several times. (N.H.)

  9. Carbon fiber-reinforced cyanate ester/nano-ZrW2O8 composites with tailored thermal expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badrinarayanan, Prashanth; Rogalski, Mark K; Kessler, Michael R

    2012-02-01

    Fiber-reinforced composites are widely used in the design and fabrication of a variety of high performance aerospace components. The mismatch in coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) between the high CTE polymer matrix and low CTE fiber reinforcements in such composite systems can lead to dimensional instability and deterioration of material lifetimes due to development of residual thermal stresses. The magnitude of thermally induced residual stresses in fiber-reinforced composite systems can be minimized by replacement of conventional polymer matrices with a low CTE, polymer nanocomposite matrix. Zirconium tungstate (ZrW(2)O(8)) is a unique ceramic material that exhibits isotropic negative thermal expansion and has excellent potential as a filler for development of low CTE polymer nanocomposites. In this paper, we report the fabrication and thermal characterization of novel, multiscale, macro-nano hybrid composite laminates comprising bisphenol E cyanate ester (BECy)/ZrW(2)O(8) nanocomposite matrices reinforced with unidirectional carbon fibers. The results reveal that incorporation of nanoparticles facilitates a reduction in CTE of the composite systems, which in turn results in a reduction in panel warpage and curvature after the cure because of mitigation of thermally induced residual stresses.

  10. Initial study of new bio-based epoxy in carbon fiber reinforced composite panel manufactured by vacuum assisted resin transfer moulding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafiezal, M. R. M.; Abdan, Khalina; Azaman, M. D.; Abidin Z., Z.; Hanafee, Z. M.

    2017-09-01

    This research paper is about carbon fiber reinforced composite panels with novel bio-based epoxy derived from Malaysian crude Jatropha oil (Epoxidized Jatropha Oil) which is mixed with synthetic epoxy as matrix. Its manufacturability performances were then verified by tensile test, flexural test and burnt off test. Two composite panels (fiber carbon with 100 wt. % of synthetic epoxy and fiber carbon with 18 wt. % bio-epoxy blend with synthetic epoxy) were fabricated by vacuum assisted resin transfer moulding. Samples were cut according to respective ASTM dimensioning and were tested. It was found that the new composite panel performed well in manufacturability aspect with fiber volume fraction achieved was around 40 - 45%. Although its tensile and flexural performances are a bit lower but comparable, we could conclude that the novel bio-epoxy as matrix in fiber carbon reinforcement could be fabricated by using this process for further research.

  11. Coating Carbon Fibers With Platinum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effinger, Michael R.; Duncan, Peter; Coupland, Duncan; Rigali, Mark J.

    2007-01-01

    A process for coating carbon fibers with platinum has been developed. The process may also be adaptable to coating carbon fibers with other noble and refractory metals, including rhenium and iridium. The coated carbon fibers would be used as ingredients of matrix/fiber composite materials that would resist oxidation at high temperatures. The metal coats would contribute to oxidation resistance by keeping atmospheric oxygen away from fibers when cracks form in the matrices. Other processes that have been used to coat carbon fibers with metals have significant disadvantages: Metal-vapor deposition processes yield coats that are nonuniform along both the lengths and the circumferences of the fibers. The electrical resistivities of carbon fibers are too high to be compatible with electrolytic processes. Metal/organic vapor deposition entails the use of expensive starting materials, it may be necessary to use a furnace, and the starting materials and/or materials generated in the process may be hazardous. The present process does not have these disadvantages. It yields uniform, nonporous coats and is relatively inexpensive. The process can be summarized as one of pretreatment followed by electroless deposition. The process consists of the following steps: The surfaces of the fiber are activated by deposition of palladium crystallites from a solution. The surface-activated fibers are immersed in a solution that contains platinum. A reducing agent is used to supply electrons to effect a chemical reduction in situ. The chemical reduction displaces the platinum from the solution. The displaced platinum becomes deposited on the fibers. Each platinum atom that has been deposited acts as a catalytic site for the deposition of another platinum atom. Hence, the deposition process can also be characterized as autocatalytic. The thickness of the deposited metal can be tailored via the duration of immersion and the chemical activity of the solution.

  12. Effect of carbon and glass fiber posts on the flexural strength and modulus of elasticity of a composite resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Jefferson Ricardo; de Oliveira, Jonas Alves; do Valle, Accacio Lins; Zogheib, Lucas Villaca; Ferreira, Paulo Martins; Bastos, Luiz Gustavo Cavalcanti

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of prefabricated fiber posts on the flexural strength and modulus of elasticity of a composite resin. Thirty bar-shaped specimens measuring 25 x 2.0 x 2.0 mm were made, containing posts that were 1.3 mm in diameter and 20 mm long. Each group contained 10 specimens: Group 1, resin without post; Group 2, resin with carbon fiber post; Group 3, resin with glass fiber post. The samples were immersed in water at 37 degrees C until the three-point loading test was performed at a speed of 1.0 mm/minute. The results were statistically analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's test (P = 0.05). Both fiber posts were similar in strength and both were stronger than the control. Group 3 obtained a higher mean modulus of elasticity than Groups 1 and 2, which were similar. The results of this study demonstrated that the presence of a fiber post significantly raised flexural strength values and the glass fiber post significantly increased the modulus of elasticity of the evaluated composite resin.

  13. Crystalline morphology of the matrix of PEEK-carbon fiber aromatic polymer composites. I. Assessment of crystallinity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blundell, D.J.; Chalmers, J.M.; Mackenzie, M.W.; Gaskin, W.F.

    1985-01-01

    The crystallinity of the polyetheretherketone (PEEK) matrix polymer in the Aromatic Polymer Composite APC-2 has been estimated using a combination of techniques based on wide angle x-ray diffraction and infrared reflection spectroscopy. Crystallinity varies systematically with cooling rate and annealing time over the range 20 to 40%. The occurrence of oriented crystal growth of the PEEK relative to the carbon fiber can be monitored by x-ray diffraction. 8 references, 10 figures, 1 table

  14. Studies on Preparation and Characterization of Aluminum Nitride-Coated Carbon Fibers and Thermal Conductivity of Epoxy Matrix Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyeon-Hye Kim

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In this work; the effects of an aluminum nitride (AlN ceramic coating on the thermal conductivity of carbon fiber-reinforced composites were studied. AlN were synthesized by a wet-thermal treatment (WTT method in the presence of copper catalysts. The WTT method was carried out in a horizontal tube furnace at above 1500 °C under an ammonia (NH3 gas atmosphere balanced by a nitrogen using aluminum chloride as a precursor. Copper catalysts pre-doped enhance the interfacial bonding of the AlN with the carbon fiber surfaces. They also help to introduce AlN bonds by interrupting aluminum oxide (Al2O3 formation in combination with oxygen. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM; Transmission electron microscopy (TEM; and X-ray diffraction (XRD were used to analyze the carbon fiber surfaces and structures at each step (copper-coating step and AlN formation step. In conclusion; we have demonstrated a synthesis route for preparing an AlN coating on the carbon fiber surfaces in the presence of a metallic catalyst.

  15. Gel spinning of PVA composite fibers with high content of multi-walled carbon nanotubes and graphene oxide hybrids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Yizhe; Lai, Dengpan; Zou, Liming; Ling, Xinlong; Lu, Hongwei; Xu, Yongjing

    2015-01-01

    In this report, poly (vinyl alcohol) (PVA) composite fibers with high content of multi-walled carbon nanotubes and graphene oxide (MWCNTs-GO) hybrids were prepared by gel spinning, and were characterized by TGA, DSC, SEM, XL-2 yarn strength tester and electrical conductivity measurement. The total content of MWCNTs-GO hybrids in the PVA composite fibers, which is up to 25 wt%, was confirmed by TGA analysis. The DSC measurement shows that the melting and crystallization peaks decreased after the addition of nano-fillers. This is due to the reason that the motion of PVA chains is completely confined by strong hydrogen bonding interaction between PVA and nano-fillers. After the addtion of GO, the dispersibility of MWCNTs in composite fibers improved slightly. And the tensile strength and Young's modulus increased by 38% and 67%, respectively. This is caused by the increased hydrogen bonding interaction and synergistic effect through hybridization of MWCNTs and GO. More significantly, the electrical conductivity of PVA/MWCNTs/GO composite fibers enhanced by three orders of magnitude with the addition of GO. (paper)

  16. Estimation of Wear Behavior of Polyphenylene Sulphide Composites Reinforced with Glass/Carbon Fibers, Graphite and Polytetrafluoroethylene, by Pin-on-disc Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A.C. Besnea

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Wear behavior of polyphenylene sulphide composites was investigated according to load and test speed. Two types of materials were studied: first, with 40 wt% glass fiber, and second, with 10 wt% carbon fiber, 10 wt% graphite and 10 wt%. Tribological tests were performed on the universal tribometer UMT-2, using a pin-on-disc device. The friction coefficient and wear rate for the composites were analyzed. As a result of experimental tests, it was established that polymer composite with polyphenylene sulphide matrix, carbon fibers, graphite and polytetrafluorethylene exhibit good wear behavior under operating conditions.

  17. Carbon fiber reinforced thermoplastic composites from acrylic polymer matrices: Interfacial adhesion and physical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Kishi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Acrylic polymers have high potential as matrix polymers for carbon fiber reinforced thermoplastic polymers (CFRTP due to their superior mechanical properties and the fact that they can be fabricated at relatively low temperatures. We focused on improving the interfacial adhesion between carbon fibers (CFs and acrylic polymers using several functional monomers for co-polymerization with methyl methacrylate (MMA. The copolymerized acrylic matrices showed good adhesion to the CF surfaces. In particular, an acrylic copolymer with acrylamide (AAm showed high interfacial adhesive strength with CFs compared to pure PMMA, and a hydroxyethyl acrylamide (HEAA copolymer containing both amide and hydroxyl groups showed high flexural strength of the CFRTP. A 3 mol% HEAA-copolymerized CFRTP achieved a flexural strength almost twice that of pure PMMA matrix CFRTP, and equivalent to that of an epoxy matrix CFRP.

  18. Modal analysis of additive manufactured carbon fiber reinforced polymer composite: Experiment and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasnoveikin, V. A.; Druzhinin, N. V.; Rubtsov, V. E.; Filippov, A. V.; Tarasov, S. Yu.

    2017-12-01

    Additive manufacturing is a promising process to develop the multicomponent polymer-matrix composites. The carbon-reinforced versions of such composites possess a low weight and a high specific strength. Here we present the results of studies of numerical and experimental modal analyses of a framework structure made of a composite material by both aforementioned approaches. The numerical test results and those obtained from the laser Doppler vibrometry show the good agreement for several oscillation modes.

  19. Preparation and Performance of Resin-based Fe Nanoparticles/Carbon Fibers Microwave Absorbing Composite Plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHOU Yuan-liang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A series of Fe NPs/CFs/ER nanocomposite plates were prepared by using Fe nanoparticles as microwave absorbent, the surface modification of as-prepared Fe nanoparticles was carried out by using silane coupling agents (KH-550, carbon fibers were used to enhance the reflection of electromagnetic waves inside and mechanical properties. The results show that microwave absorption of nanocomposite plates increases with increasing of mass percentage of Fe nanoparticles and carbon fibers,their gradient concentration results in resonance phenomena in specific frequency region.The microwave absorption property is anisotropic, the properties of at the vertical direction of carbon fibers towards incident wave are better than the parallel case, the minimum reflectivity peak value of the nanocomposites with 30%(mass fraction, the same as below of Fe NPs and 5.52% of CFs reaches -26.8dB at 4.9GHz with the matching thickness of 4.56mm.CFs can maintain the bending properties of nanocomposites effectively, the bending strength of the nanocomposite with 30% Fe NPs is just lower than that with 0% Fe NPs by 5.81%.

  20. Effect of chemical etching on the Cu/Ni metallization of poly (ether ether ketone)/carbon fiber composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Lizhi; Liu Bin; Song Jianjing; Shan Dan; Yang Dean

    2011-01-01

    Poly(ether ether ketone)/carbon fiber composites (PEEK/Cf) were chemical etched by Cr 2 O 3 /H 2 SO 4 solution, electroless plated with copper and then electroplated with nickel. The effects of chemical etching time and temperature on the adhesive strength between PEEK/Cf and Cu/Ni layers were studied by thermal shock method. The electrical resistance of some samples was measured. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to analyze the surface composition and functional groups. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was performed to observe the surface morphology of the composite, the chemical etched sample, the plated sample and the peeled metal layer. The results indicated that C=O bond increased after chemical etching. With the increasing of etching temperature and time, more and more cracks and partially exposed carbon fibers appeared at the surface of PEEK/Cf composites, and the adhesive strength increased consequently. When the composites were etched at 60 deg. C for 25 min and at 70-80 deg. C for more than 15 min, the Cu/Ni metallization layer could withstand four thermal shock cycles without bubbling, and the electrical resistivity of the metal layer of these samples increased with the increasing of etching temperature and time.

  1. Effect of chemical etching on the Cu/Ni metallization of poly (ether ether ketone)/carbon fiber composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Lizhi; Liu Bin [Tianjin Medical College, Tianjin 300222 (China); Song Jianjing; Shan Dan [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Yang Dean, E-mail: dayang@tju.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2011-02-15

    Poly(ether ether ketone)/carbon fiber composites (PEEK/Cf) were chemical etched by Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}/H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solution, electroless plated with copper and then electroplated with nickel. The effects of chemical etching time and temperature on the adhesive strength between PEEK/Cf and Cu/Ni layers were studied by thermal shock method. The electrical resistance of some samples was measured. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to analyze the surface composition and functional groups. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was performed to observe the surface morphology of the composite, the chemical etched sample, the plated sample and the peeled metal layer. The results indicated that C=O bond increased after chemical etching. With the increasing of etching temperature and time, more and more cracks and partially exposed carbon fibers appeared at the surface of PEEK/Cf composites, and the adhesive strength increased consequently. When the composites were etched at 60 deg. C for 25 min and at 70-80 deg. C for more than 15 min, the Cu/Ni metallization layer could withstand four thermal shock cycles without bubbling, and the electrical resistivity of the metal layer of these samples increased with the increasing of etching temperature and time.

  2. Low Cost Carbon Fiber From Renewable Resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compere, A.L.

    2001-01-01

    The Department of Energy Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles has shown that, by lowering overall weight, the use of carbon fiber composites could dramatically decrease domestic vehicle fuel consumption. For the automotive industry to benefit from carbon fiber technology, fiber production will need to be substantially increased and fiber price decreased to$7/kg. To achieve this cost objective, alternate precursors to pitch and polyacrylonitrile (PAN) are being investigated as possible carbon fiber feedstocks. Additionally, sufficient fiber to provide 10 to 100 kg for each of the 13 million cars and light trucks produced annually in the U.S. will require an increase of 5 to 50-fold in worldwide carbon fiber production. High-volume, renewable or recycled materials, including lignin, cellulosic fibers, routinely recycled petrochemical fibers, and blends of these components, appear attractive because the cost of these materials is inherently both low and insensitive to changes in petroleum price. Current studies have shown that a number of recycled and renewable polymers can be incorporated into melt-spun fibers attractive as carbon fiber feedstocks. Highly extrudable lignin blends have attractive yields and can be readily carbonized and graphitized. Examination of the physical structure and properties of carbonized and graphitized fibers indicates the feasibility of use in transportation composite applications

  3. Low-loss saturable absorbers based on tapered fibers embedded in carbon nanotube/polymer composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amos Martinez

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of low-dimensional materials has opened new opportunities in the fabrication of compact nonlinear photonic devices. Single-walled carbon nanotubes were among the first of those materials to attract the attention of the photonics community owing to their high third order susceptibility, broadband operation, and ultrafast response. Saturable absorption, in particular, has become a widespread application for nanotubes in the mode-locking of a fiber laser where they are used as nonlinear passive amplitude modulators to initiate pulsed operation. Numerous approaches have been proposed for the integration of nanotubes in fiber systems; these can be divided into those that rely on direct interaction (where the nanotubes are sandwiched between fiber connectors and those that rely on lateral interaction with the evanescence field of the propagating wave. Tapered fibers, in particular, offer excellent flexibility to adjust the nonlinearity of nanotube-based devices but suffer from high losses (typically exceeding 50% and poor saturable to non-saturable absorption ratios (typically above 1:5. In this paper, we propose a method to fabricate carbon nanotube saturable absorbers with controllable saturation power, low-losses (as low as 15%, and large saturable to non-saturable loss ratios approaching 1:1. This is achieved by optimizing the procedure of embedding tapered fibers in low-refractive index polymers. In addition, this study sheds light in the operation of these devices, highlighting a trade-off between losses and saturation power and providing guidelines for the design of saturable absorbers according to their application.

  4. Low-loss saturable absorbers based on tapered fibers embedded in carbon nanotube/polymer composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Amos; Al Araimi, Mohammed; Dmitriev, Artemiy; Lutsyk, Petro; Li, Shen; Mou, Chengbo; Rozhin, Alexey; Sumetsky, Misha; Turitsyn, Sergei

    2017-12-01

    The emergence of low-dimensional materials has opened new opportunities in the fabrication of compact nonlinear photonic devices. Single-walled carbon nanotubes were among the first of those materials to attract the attention of the photonics community owing to their high third order susceptibility, broadband operation, and ultrafast response. Saturable absorption, in particular, has become a widespread application for nanotubes in the mode-locking of a fiber laser where they are used as nonlinear passive amplitude modulators to initiate pulsed operation. Numerous approaches have been proposed for the integration of nanotubes in fiber systems; these can be divided into those that rely on direct interaction (where the nanotubes are sandwiched between fiber connectors) and those that rely on lateral interaction with the evanescence field of the propagating wave. Tapered fibers, in particular, offer excellent flexibility to adjust the nonlinearity of nanotube-based devices but suffer from high losses (typically exceeding 50%) and poor saturable to non-saturable absorption ratios (typically above 1:5). In this paper, we propose a method to fabricate carbon nanotube saturable absorbers with controllable saturation power, low-losses (as low as 15%), and large saturable to non-saturable loss ratios approaching 1:1. This is achieved by optimizing the procedure of embedding tapered fibers in low-refractive index polymers. In addition, this study sheds light in the operation of these devices, highlighting a trade-off between losses and saturation power and providing guidelines for the design of saturable absorbers according to their application.

  5. Scalable Fabrication of Natural-Fiber Reinforced Composites with Electromagnetic Interference Shielding Properties by Incorporating Powdered Activated Carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changlei Xia

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Kenaf fiber—polyester composites incorporated with powdered activated carbon (PAC were prepared using the vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM process. The product demonstrates the electromagnetic interference (EMI shielding function. The kenaf fibers were retted in a pressured reactor to remove the lignin and extractives in the fiber. The PAC was loaded into the freshly retted fibers in water. The PAC loading effectiveness was determined using the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET specific surface area analysis. A higher BET value was obtained with a higher PAC loading. The transmission energies of the composites were measured by exposing the samples to the irradiation of electromagnetic waves with a variable frequency from 8 GHz to 12 GHz. As the PAC content increased from 0% to 10.0%, 20.5% and 28.9%, the EMI shielding effectiveness increased from 41.4% to 76.0%, 87.9% and 93.0%, respectively. Additionally, the EMI absorption increased from 21.2% to 31.7%, 44.7% and 64.0%, respectively. The ratio of EMI absorption/shielding of the composite at 28.9% of PAC loading was increased significantly by 37.1% as compared with the control sample. It was indicated that the incorporation of PAC into the composites was very effective for absorbing electromagnetic waves, which resulted in a decrease in secondary electromagnetic pollution.

  6. Characterization of Potential Exposures to Nanoparticles and Fibers during Manufacturing and Recycling of Carbon Nanotube Reinforced Polypropylene Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonruksa, Pongsit; Bello, Dhimiter; Zhang, Jinde; Isaacs, Jacqueline A; Mead, Joey L; Woskie, Susan R

    2016-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) polymer composites are widely used as raw materials in multiple industries because of their excellent properties. This expansion, however, is accompanied by realistic concerns over potential release of CNTs and associated nanoparticles during the manufacturing, recycling, use, and disposal of CNT composite products. Such data continue to be limited, especially with regards to post-processing of CNT-enabled products, recycling and handling of nanowaste, and end-of-life disposal. This study investigated for the first time airborne nanoparticle and fibers exposures during injection molding and recycling of CNT polypropylene composites (CNT-PP) relative to that of PP. Exposure characterization focused on source emissions during loading, melting, molding, grinding, and recycling of scrap material over 20 cycles and included real-time characterization of total particle number concentration and size distribution, nanoparticle and fiber morphology, and fiber concentrations near the operator. Total airborne nanoparticle concentration emitted during loading, melting, molding, and grinding of CNT-PP had geometric mean ranging from 1.2 × 10(3) to 4.3 × 10(5) particles cm(-3), with the highest exposures being up to 2.9 and 300.7 times above the background for injection molding and grinding, respectively. Most of these emissions were similar to PP synthesis. Melting and molding of CNT-PP and PP produced exclusively nanoparticles. Grinding of CNT-PP but not PP generated larger particles with encapsulated CNTs, particles with CNT extrusions, and respirable fiber (up to 0.2 fibers cm(-3)). No free CNTs were found in any of the processes. The number of recycling runs had no significant impact on exposures. Further research into the chemical composition of the emitted nanoparticles is warranted. In the meanwhile, exposure controls should be instituted during processing and recycling of CNT-PP. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf

  7. Micromechanics model for predicting anisotropic electrical conductivity of carbon fiber composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider, Mohammad Faisal; Haider, Md. Mushfique; Yasmeen, Farzana

    2016-07-01

    Heterogeneous materials, such as composites consist of clearly distinguishable constituents (or phases) that show different electrical properties. Multifunctional composites have anisotropic electrical properties that can be tailored for a particular application. The effective anisotropic electrical conductivity of composites is strongly affected by many parameters including volume fractions, distributions, and orientations of constituents. Given the electrical properties of the constituents, one important goal of micromechanics of materials consists of predicting electrical response of the heterogeneous material on the basis of the geometries and properties of the individual phases, a task known as homogenization. The benefit of homogenization is that the behavior of a heterogeneous material can be determined without resorting or testing it. Furthermore, continuum micromechanics can predict the full multi-axial properties and responses of inhomogeneous materials, which are anisotropic in nature. Effective electrical conductivity estimation is performed by using classical micromechanics techniques (composite cylinder assemblage method) that investigates the effect of the fiber/matrix electrical properties and their volume fractions on the micro scale composite response. The composite cylinder assemblage method (CCM) is an analytical theory that is based on the assumption that composites are in a state of periodic structure. The CCM was developed to extend capabilities variable fiber shape/array availability with same volume fraction, interphase analysis, etc. The CCM is a continuum-based micromechanics model that provides closed form expressions for upper level length scales such as macro-scale composite responses in terms of the properties, shapes, orientations and constituent distributions at lower length levels such as the micro-scale.

  8. Nondestructive evaluation of braided carbon fiber composites with artificial defect using HTS-SQUID gradiometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinyama, Y.; Yamaji, T.; Hatsukade, Y.; Takai, Y.; Aly-Hassan, M.S.; Nakai, A.; Hamada, H.; Tanaka, S.

    2011-01-01

    We applied a current-injection-based NDE method using a HTS-SQUID gradiometer to a braided CFRP with artificial cracks. Current distributions in the braided CFRP were estimated from measured field gradient distributions. A small crack, in which a few carbon-fiber bundles were cut, was well detected from the current distributions. A cross-section of the CFRP showed that a density of the bundles at edges is higher than the other part. The experimental results demonstrated the capability of the method to detect sub-mm cracks. Braided carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRPs) are one of multifunctional materials with superior properties such as mechanical strength to normal CFRPs since the braided CFRPs have continuous fiber bundles. In this paper, we applied the current-injection-based nondestructive evaluation (NDE) method using a HTS-SQUID gradiometer to the braided CFRP for the detection of the breakage of the bundles. We prepared planar braided CFRP samples with and without artificial cracks of 1 and 2 mm lengths, and measured the current density distribution above the samples using the NDE method. In the measurement results, not only a few completely-cut bundles but also the additional partially-cut bundles were detected from decrease in the measured current density along the cut bundle around the cracks. From these results, we showed that it is possible to inspect a few partially-cut bundles in the braided CFRPs by the NDE method.

  9. UV-Assisted 3D Printing of Glass and Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Dual-Cure Polymer Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Invernizzi, Marta; Natale, Gabriele; Levi, Marinella; Turri, Stefano; Griffini, Gianmarco

    2016-07-16

    Glass (GFR) and carbon fiber-reinforced (CFR) dual-cure polymer composites fabricated by UV-assisted three-dimensional (UV-3D) printing are presented. The resin material combines an acrylic-based photocurable resin with a low temperature (140 °C) thermally-curable resin system based on bisphenol A diglycidyl ether as base component, an aliphatic anhydride (hexahydro-4-methylphthalic anhydride) as hardener and (2,4,6,-tris(dimethylaminomethyl)phenol) as catalyst. A thorough rheological characterization of these formulations allowed us to define their 3D printability window. UV-3D printed macrostructures were successfully demonstrated, giving a clear indication of their potential use in real-life structural applications. Differential scanning calorimetry and dynamic mechanical analysis highlighted the good thermal stability and mechanical properties of the printed parts. In addition, uniaxial tensile tests were used to assess the fiber reinforcing effect on the UV-3D printed objects. Finally, an initial study was conducted on the use of a sizing treatment on carbon fibers to improve the fiber/matrix interfacial adhesion, giving preliminary indications on the potential of this approach to improve the mechanical properties of the 3D printed CFR components.

  10. UV-Assisted 3D Printing of Glass and Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Dual-Cure Polymer Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Invernizzi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Glass (GFR and carbon fiber-reinforced (CFR dual-cure polymer composites fabricated by UV-assisted three-dimensional (UV-3D printing are presented. The resin material combines an acrylic-based photocurable resin with a low temperature (140 °C thermally-curable resin system based on bisphenol A diglycidyl ether as base component, an aliphatic anhydride (hexahydro-4-methylphthalic anhydride as hardener and (2,4,6,-tris(dimethylaminomethylphenol as catalyst. A thorough rheological characterization of these formulations allowed us to define their 3D printability window. UV-3D printed macrostructures were successfully demonstrated, giving a clear indication of their potential use in real-life structural applications. Differential scanning calorimetry and dynamic mechanical analysis highlighted the good thermal stability and mechanical properties of the printed parts. In addition, uniaxial tensile tests were used to assess the fiber reinforcing effect on the UV-3D printed objects. Finally, an initial study was conducted on the use of a sizing treatment on carbon fibers to improve the fiber/matrix interfacial adhesion, giving preliminary indications on the potential of this approach to improve the mechanical properties of the 3D printed CFR components.

  11. Fabrication and Characterization of Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube (MWCNT) and Ni-Coated Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube (Ni-MWCNT) Repair Patches for Carbon Fiber Reinforced Composite Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Brienne; Caraccio, Anne; Tate, LaNetra; Jackson, Dionne

    2011-01-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)/epoxy and nickel-coated multi-walled carbon nanotube (Ni-MWCNT)/epoxy systems were fabricated into carbon fiber composite repair patches via vacuum resin infusion. Two 4 ply patches were manufactured with fiber orientations of [90/ 90/ 4590] and [0/90/ +45/ -45]. Prior to resin infusion, the MWCNT/Epoxy system and NiMWCNT/ epoxy systems were optimized for dispersion quality. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical microscopy (OM) were used to determine the presence ofcarbon nanotubes and assess dispersion quality. Decomposition temperatures were determined via thermogravametric analysis (TGA). SEM and TGA were also used to evaluate the composite repair patches.

  12. Fabrication and Properties of Carbon Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaosong Huang

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the research and development activities conducted over the past few decades on carbon fibers. The two most important precursors in the carbon fiber industry are polyacrylonitrile (PAN and mesophase pitch (MP. The structure and composition of the precursor affect the properties of the resultant carbon fibers significantly. Although the essential processes for carbon fiber production are similar, different precursors require different processing conditions in order to achieve improved performance. The research efforts on process optimization are discussed in this review. The review also attempts to cover the research on other precursor materials developed mainly for the purpose of cost reduction.

  13. Fabrication and Properties of Carbon Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaosong

    2009-01-01

    This paper reviews the research and development activities conducted over the past few decades on carbon fibers. The two most important precursors in the carbon fiber industry are polyacrylonitrile (PAN) and mesophase pitch (MP). The structure and composition of the precursor affect the properties of the resultant carbon fibers significantly. Although the essential processes for carbon fiber production are similar, different precursors require different processing conditions in order to achieve improved performance. The research efforts on process optimization are discussed in this review. The review also attempts to cover the research on other precursor materials developed mainly for the purpose of cost reduction.

  14. Electrical Resistance Based Damage Modeling of Multifunctional Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Robert James

    In the current thesis, the 4-probe electrical resistance of carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites is utilized as a metric for sensing low-velocity impact damage. A robust method has been developed for recovering the directionally dependent electrical resistivities using an experimental line-type 4-probe resistance method. Next, the concept of effective conducting thickness was uniquely applied in the development of a brand new point-type 4-probe method for applications with electrically anisotropic materials. An extensive experimental study was completed to characterize the 4-probe electrical resistance of CFRP specimens using both the traditional line-type and new point-type methods. Leveraging the concept of effective conducting thickness, a novel method was developed for building 4-probe electrical finite element (FE) models in COMSOL. The electrical models were validated against experimental resistance measurements and the FE models demonstrated predictive capabilities when applied to CFRP specimens with varying thickness and layup. These new models demonstrated a significant improvement in accuracy compared to previous literature and could provide a framework for future advancements in FE modeling of electrically anisotropic materials. FE models were then developed in ABAQUS for evaluating the influence of prescribed localized damage on the 4-probe resistance. Experimental data was compiled on the impact response of various CFRP laminates, and was used in the development of quasi- static FE models for predicting presence of impact-induced delamination. The simulation-based delamination predictions were then integrated into the electrical FE models for the purpose of studying the influence of realistic damage patterns on electrical resistance. When the size of the delamination damage was moderate compared to the electrode spacing, the electrical resistance increased by less than 1% due to the delamination damage. However, for a specimen with large

  15. Carbon nano fibers reinforced composites origami inspired mechanical metamaterials with passive and active properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kshad, Mohamed Ali E.; D'Hondt, Clement; Naguib, Hani E.

    2017-10-01

    Core panels used for compression or impact damping are designed to dissipate energy and to reduce the transferred force and energy. They are designed to have high strain and deformation with low density. The geometrical configuration of such cores plays a significant role in redistributing the applied forces to dampen the compression and impact energy. Origami structures are renowned for affording large macroscopic deformation which can be employed for force redistribution and energy damping. The material selection for the fabrication of origami structures affects the core capacity to withstand compression and impact loads. Polymers are characterized by their high compression and impact resistance; the drawback of polymers is the low stiffness and elastic moduli compared with metallic materials. This work is focused on the study of the effect of Carbon Nano Fibers (CNF) on the global mechanical properties of the origami panel cores made of polymeric blends. The base matrix materials used were Polylactic Acid (PLA) and Thermoplastic Polyurethane (TPU) blends, and the percentages of the PLA/TPU were 100/0, 20/80, 65/35, 50/50, 20/80, and 0/100 as a percentage of weight. The weight percentages of CNF added to the polymeric blends were 1%, 3%, and 5%. This paper deals with the fabrication process of the polymeric reinforced blends and the origami cores, in order to predict the best fabrication conditions. The dynamic scanning calorimetry and the dynamic mechanical analyzer were used to test the reinforced blended base material for thermomechanical and viscoelastic properties. The origami core samples were fabricated using per-molded geometrical features and then tested for compression and impact properties. The results of the study were compared with previous published results which showed that there is considerable enhancement in the mechanical properties of the origami cores compared with the pure blended polymeric origami cores. The active properties of the origami

  16. Coating of Carbon Fiber with Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxane (POSS to Enhance Mechanical Properties and Durability of Carbon/Vinyl Ester Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mujib Khan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Our continuing quest to improve the performance of polymer composites under moist and saltwater environments has gained momentum in recent years with the reinforcement of inorganic nanoparticles into the polymer. The key to mitigate degradation of composites under such environments is to maintain the integrity of the fiber/matrix (F/M interface. In this study, the F/M interface of carbon/vinyl ester composites has been modified by coating the carbon fiber with polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS. POSS is a nanostructured inorganic-organic hybrid particle with a cubic structure having silicon atoms at the core and linked to oxygen atoms. The advantage of using POSS is that the silicon atoms can be linked to a substituent that can be almost any chemical group known in organic chemistry. Cubic silica cores are ‘hard particles’ and are about 0.53 nm in diameter. The peripheral organic unit is a sphere of about 1–3 nm in diameter. Further, cubic structure of POSS remains intact during the polymerization process and therefore with appropriate functional groups, if installed on the fiber surface, would provide a stable and strong F/M interface. Two POSS systems with two different functional groups; namely, octaisobutyl and trisilanolphenyl have been investigated. A set of chemical and mechanical procedures has been developed to coat carbon fibers with POSS, and to fabricate layered composites with vinyl ester resin. Interlaminar shear and low velocity impact tests have indicated around 17–38% improvement in mechanical properties with respect to control samples made without the POSS coating. Saltwater and hygrothermal tests at various environmental conditions have revealed that coating with POSS reduces water absorption by 20–30% and retains the composite properties.

  17. Composite fiber networks mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picu, Catalin; Shahsavari, Ali

    2014-03-01

    Random fiber networks are present in many soft biological and engineering materials. In most cases, these networks are composite, in the sense that they are constructed from multiple fiber types. In this work we develop elements of a theoretical understanding of the elasticity of these structures. To this end, we consider systems made from a softer base and varying fractions of stiff fibers and investigate the effect of various system parameters on the overall behavior. The small strain elasticity depends strongly on the presence of a small concentration of stiff fibers for some types of base networks, but is essentially insensitive to these additions for other types. The way in which the stiff fibers are cross-linked to the soft fibers and to themselves is also important. These issues will be discussed within a framework general enough to make the conclusions relevant for diverse applications.

  18. Design of a Carbon Fiber Composite Grid Structure for the GLAST Spacecraft Using a Novel Manufacturing Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hicks, M

    2004-04-12

    The Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope is an orbital observatory being planned as a joint DOE/NASA mission. The primary support of the instrument requires a grid structure which is very stiff, strong, light-weight, and thermally conductive. A carbon fiber composite grid design using a novel manufacture technique is proposed which meets or exceeds an aluminum design in all performance criteria and is economically competitive as well. Finite element analysis, confirmed by testing of a sample grid, is used to examine trade-offs for the materials and layups. Based on these analyses, recommendations are given for a viable design.

  19. Mechanical and Vibration Testing of Carbon Fiber Composite Material with Embedded Piezoelectric Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Kirsten P.; Lerch, Bradley A.; Wilmoth, Nathan G.; Kray, Nicholas; Gemeinhardt, Gregory

    2012-01-01

    Piezoelectric materials have been proposed as a means of decreasing turbomachinery blade vibration either through a passive damping scheme, or as part of an active vibration control system. For polymer matrix fiber composite (PMFC) blades, the piezoelectric elements could be embedded within the blade material, protecting the brittle piezoceramic material from the airflow and from debris. Before implementation of a piezoelectric element within a PMFC blade, the effect on PMFC mechanical properties needs to be understood. This study attempts to determine how the inclusion of a packaged piezoelectric patch affects the material properties of the PMFC. Composite specimens with embedded piezoelectric patches were tested in four-point bending, short beam shear, and flatwise tension configurations. Results show that the embedded piezoelectric material does decrease the strength of the composite material, especially in flatwise tension, attributable to failure at the interface or within the piezoelectric element itself. In addition, the sensing properties of the post-cured embedded piezoelectric materials were tested, and performed as expected. The piezoelectric materials include a non-flexible patch incorporating solid piezoceramic material, and two flexible patch types incorporating piezoelectric fibers. The piezoceramic material used in these patches was Navy Type-II PZT.

  20. Forming of carbon fiber reinforced thermoplastic composite tubes - Experimental and numerical approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maron, Bernhard; Garthaus, Christian; Lenz, Florian; Hornig, Andreas; Hübner, Michael; Gude, Maik

    2016-10-01

    Continuous-reinforced thermoplastic composites are of growing importance for series production of lightweight components in manifold industrial areas. Novel manufacturing technologies allow the production of hollow semi-finished products that are post formed to enhance functionality. To maximize efficiency in the development process of such components it is necessary to map the forming processes numerically using Finite Elements(FE)-methods. The aim is to perform feasibility studies at an early stage, reduce development time by virtual process optimization and to generate a detailed understanding of the post formed fiber architecture for further structural-mechanical analysis.

  1. Surface analyses of carbon fibers produced from polyacrylonitrile fibers at low carbonization temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagliostro, D. E.

    1983-01-01

    A process for producing carbon fibers from polyacrylonitrile at low carbonization temperatures was studied. The bulk and surface properties of fibers obtained after reaction with benzoic acid, air and carbonizing in nitrogen or a dilute acetylene atmosphere are discussed. All fiber products had different surface and internal compositions. Samples produced at temperatures up to 950 C and carbonized in nitrogen contained substantial quantities of nitrogen and oxygen at the surface. During carbonization, the surface nitrogen converted into two new forms, possibly nitrile and an azo or a new carbon-nitrogen bond. Samples carbonized in acetylene contained a carbon-rich surface stable to oxidation.

  2. Physical-Mechanical Properties of a Fiber-Reinforced Composite Based on an ELUR-P Carbon Tape and XT-118 Binder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paimushin, V. N.; Kholmogorov, S. A.

    2018-03-01

    A series of tests to identify the physical-mechanical properties of a unidirectional carbon-fiber-reinforced composite based on an ELUR-P carbon fibers and an XT-118 epoxy binder were performed. The form of the stress-strain diagrams of specimens loaded in tension in the longitudinal, transverse, and ±45° directions and in compression in the longitudinal and ±45° directions were examined. Tensile diagrams were also determined for the XT-118 binder alone. The relation between the tangential shear modulus and shear strains of the composite was highly nonlinear from the very beginning of loading and depended on the loading type. Such a nonlinear response of the carbon-fiber-reinforced composite in shear cannot be the result of plastic deformation of binder, but can be explained only by structural changes caused by the inner buckling instability of the composite at micro- and mesolevels..

  3. The correlation of layer waviness defect on compression strength of carbon fiber composite material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Z.M.

    2005-01-01

    As advanced composite materials having superior physical and mechanical properties are being developed, optimization of their production process is eagerly being sought. One of the most common defects in production of structural composites is layer waviness. Layer waviness is more pronounced in thick section flat and cylindrical laminates that are extensively used in missile casings. Submersibles and space platforms. Layer waviness undulates the entire layer of a multidirectional laminate in through-the-thickness direction leading to gross deterioration of its compression strength. This research investigates the influence of multiple layer waviness in a double nest formation on the compression strength of a composite laminate. Different wave fractions of wavy 0 degree layer were fabricated in IM/855 1- 7 carbon- epoxy composite laminate on a steel mold using single step fabrication procedure. The laminate was cured on a heated press according to specific curing cycle. Static compression testing was performed using short block compression fixture on an universal testing machine. The purpose of these tests was to determine the effects of multiple layer wave regions on the compression strength of composite laminate. The experimental and analytical results revealed that up to about 35% fraction of wavy 0 degree layers. The reduction in compression strength of composite laminate was constant after fraction of wavy 0 degree layers exceeded 35%. This analysis indicated that the percentage of 0 degree wavy layer may be used to estimate the reduction in compression strength of a composite laminate under restricted conditions. (author)

  4. Interfacial Properties of Bamboo Fiber-Reinforced High-Density Polyethylene Composites by Different Methods for Adding Nano Calcium Carbonate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuicui Wang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The focus of this study was to observe the effect of nano calcium carbonate (CaCO3 modification methods on bamboo fiber (BF used in BF-reinforced high-density polyethylene (HDPE composites manufactured by extrusion molding. Two methods were used to introduce the nano CaCO3 into the BF for modification; the first was blending modification (BM and the second was impregnation modification (IM. In order to determine the effects of the modification methods, the water absorption, surface free energy and interfacial properties of the unmodified composites were compared to those of the composites made from the two modification methods. The results revealed that the percentage increase in the weight of the composite treated by nano CaCO3 decreased and that of the IMBF/HDPE composite was the lowest over the seven months of time. The results obtained by the acid-base model according to the Lewis and Owens-Wendt- Rabel-Kaelble (OWRK equations indicated that the surface energy of the composites was between 40 and 50 mJ/m2. When compared to the control sample, the maximum storage modulus (E′max of the BMBF/HDPE and IMBF/HDPE composites increased 1.43- and 1.53-fold, respectively. The values of the phase-to-phase interaction parameter B and the k value of the modified composites were higher than those of the unmodified composites, while the apparent activation energy Ea and interface parameter A were lower in the modified composites. It can be concluded that nano CaCO3 had an effect on the interfacial properties of BF-reinforced HDPE composites, and the interface bonding between IMBF and HDPE was greatest among the composites.

  5. Cold spray of metal-polymer composite coatings onto carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP)

    OpenAIRE

    Bortolussi, Vincent; Borit, François; Chesnaud, Anthony; Jeandin, Michel; Faessel, Matthieu; Figliuzzi, Bruno; Willot, François; Roche, K.; Surdon, G.

    2016-01-01

    International audience; The growing use of Polymer-Matrix Composite (PMC) materials within transport industry raises new security concerns, especially those due to lightning. To protect these electrically insulating materials, conductive coatings can be applied. Due to the high level of required properties, cold spray is believed to be an effective way to achieve these coatings. Recent studies showed that obstacles remained to be overcome when cold spraying metallic particles onto Carbon Fibe...

  6. Polyacrylonitrile-based carbonized fibers and metal-carbonized fiber nanocomposites for thermal transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochanda, Fredrick; Atkinson, Ariel; Fey, Edmond O; Andala, Dickson; Jones, Wayne E

    2010-12-01

    This work examines the fabrication and thermal analysis of metal-carbon composite fibers prepared via an electrospinning process. The metal-carbon composite fibers of silver, copper, gold, and nickel were prepared by electrospinning of a composite solution of polyacrylonitrile (PAN) and metal precursor followed by heat treatment in air, nitrogen to 1000 degrees C and in 6% H2, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and Scanning thermal microscopy (SThM) were applied to characterize the metal-carbon fibers. TEM analysis showed a relatively uniform, contact-free distribution of the nanoparticles on the surface of the carbon fibers with size range of 3 nm-10 nm. Thermal analysis data showed an enhancement in the thermal conductivity of the nanomaterials when compared with the model PAN-based carbonized fibers. This was attributed to the incorporation of metal nanoparticles in the fiber matrix and on the surface.

  7. Deformation behavior of carbon-fiber reinforced shape-memory-polymer composites used for deployable structures (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Xin; Liu, Liwu; Li, Fengfeng; Pan, Chengtong; Liu, Yanju; Leng, Jinsong

    2017-04-01

    Shape memory polymers (SMPs) are a new type of smart material, they perform large reversible deformation with a certain external stimulus (e.g., heat and electricity). The properties (e.g., stiffness, strength and other mechanically static or quasi-static load-bearing capacity) are primarily considered for conventional resin-based composite materials which are mainly used for structural materials. By contrast, the mechanical actuating performance with finite deformation is considered for the shape memory polymers and their composites which can be used for both structural materials and functional materials. For shape memory polymers and their composites, the performance of active deformation is expected to further promote the development in smart active deformation structures, such as deployable space structures and morphing wing aircraft. The shape memory polymer composites (SMPCs) are also one type of High Strain Composite (HSC). The space deployable structures based on carbon fiber reinforced shape memory polymer composites (SMPCs) show great prospects. Considering the problems that SMPCs are difficult to meet the practical applications in space deployable structures in the recent ten years, this paper aims to research the mechanics of deformation, actuation and failure of SMPCs. In the overall view of the shape memory polymer material's nonlinearity (nonlinearity and stress softening in the process of pre-deformation and recovery, relaxation in storage process, irreversible deformation), by the multiple verifications among theory, finite element and experiments, one obtains the deformation and actuation mechanism for the process of "pre-deformation, energy storage and actuation" and its non-fracture constraint domain. Then, the parameters of SMPCs will be optimized. Theoretical analysis is realized by the strain energy function, additionally considering the interaction strain energy between the fiber and the matrix. For the common resin-based or soft

  8. Design of Electrically Conductive Structural Composites by Modulating Aligned CVD-Grown Carbon Nanotube Length on Glass Fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Delong; Fan, Benhui; Zhao, Hang; Lu, Xiaoxin; Yang, Minhao; Liu, Yu; Bai, Jinbo

    2017-01-25

    Function-integration in glass fiber (GF) reinforced polymer composites is highly desired for developing lightweight structures and devices with improved performance and structural health monitoring. In this study, homogeneously aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) shell was in situ grafted on GF by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). It was demonstrated that the CNT shell thickness and weight fraction can be modulated by controlling the CVD conditions. The obtained hierarchical CNTs-GF/epoxy composites show highly improved electrical conductivity and thermo-mechanical and flexural properties. The composite through-plane and in-plane electrical conductivities increase from a quasi-isolator value to ∼3.5 and 100 S/m, respectively, when the weight fraction of CNTs grafted on GF fabric varies from 0% to 7%, respectively. Meanwhile, the composite storage modulus and flexural modulus and strength improve as high as 12%, 21%, and 26%, respectively, with 100% retention of the glass transition temperature. The reinforcing mechanisms are investigated by analyzing the composite microstructure and the interfacial adhesion and wetting properties of CNTs-GF hybrids. Moreover, the specific damage-related resistance variation characteristics could be employed to in situ monitor the structural health state of the composites. The outstanding electrical and structural properties of the CNTs-GF composites were due to the specific interfacial and interphase structures created by homogeneously grafting aligned CNTs on each GF of the fabric.

  9. Microstructure and mechanical properties of carbon fiber reinforced ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    68

    Microstructure and mechanical properties of carbon fiber reinforced alumina composites fabricated from sol. CHAOYANG FAN, QINGSONG MA* and KUANHONG ZENG. Science and Technology on Advanced Ceramic Fibers &Composites Laboratory, National University of Defense Technology,. Changsha 410073, PR ...

  10. Assessment of cumulative damage by using ultrasonic C-scan on carbon fiber/epoxy composites under thermal cycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Yutaka Shiino

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, structural composites manufactured by carbon fiber/epoxy laminates have been employed in large scale in aircraft industries. These structures require high strength under severe temperature changes of -56° until 80 °C. Regarding this scenario, the aim of this research was to reproduce thermal stress in the laminate plate developed by temperature changes and tracking possible cumulative damages on the laminate using ultrasonic C-scan inspection. The evaluation was based on attenuation signals and the C-scan map of the composite plate. The carbon fiber/epoxy plain weave laminate underwent temperatures of -60° to 80 °C, kept during 10 minutes and repeated for 1000, 2000, 3000 and 4000 times. After 1000 cycles, the specimens were inspected by C-scanning. A few changes in the laminate were observed using the inspection methodology only in specimens cycled 3000 times, or so. According to the found results, the used temperature range did not present enough conditions to cumulative damage in this type of laminate, which is in agreement with the macro - and micromechanical theory.

  11. Role of multiwalled carbon nanotube in interlaminar shear strength of epoxy/glass fiber/multi walled carbon nanotube hybrid composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan Chandrasekaran, Vasan Churchill

    2011-12-01

    The motivation of this thesis is to investigate the role of multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) in enhancing the interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) of hybrid composites. The objective of this thesis is to understand the relationships between processing history, material variability, matrix properties, glass fiber/matrix interface properties and their correlations with interlaminar shear strength of hybrid composites. The interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) of hybrid composites made from glass fiber and multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) modified epoxy is compared with that for unmodified epoxy/glass fiber composites (control). By combining the techniques of high speed mechanical stirring and ultrasonic agitation, 0.5% MWCNT by weight were dispersed in epoxy to prepare a suspension. Composites were manufactured by both injection double vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (IDVARTM) and the flow flooding chamber (FFC) methods. Compression shear tests (CST) were conducted on the manufactured samples to determine the ILSS. The effect of processing history and batch-to-batch variability of materials---glass fiber preform, resin and carbon nanotubes---on the ILSS of samples made by both techniques was investigated. Statistical comparison of the measured ILSS values for hybrid composites with the control specimens clearly show that hybrid composites made by the FFC process resulted in significant ILSS enhancement relative to the control and the IDVARTM specimens. After it was established that the FFC process improved the ILSS, the effect of functionalizing the nanotubes was explored. Multi walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) were oxidized by acid treatment and heated with triethylene tetra amine (TETA) to obtain amino functionalized MWCNTs (f-MWCNT). Hybrid composites with f-MWCNTs were manufactured using FFC technique and control samples were fabricated using the same E-Glass fiber mat and unmodified epoxy resin subjected to the same processing history. CST results show

  12. The influence of double nested layer waviness on compression strength of carbon fiber composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Z.M.

    1997-01-01

    As advanced composite materials having superior physical and mechanical properties are being developed, optimization of their production processes in eagerly being sought. One of the most common defect in production of structural composites is layer waviness. Layer waviness is more pronounced in thick section flat and cylindrical laminates that are extensively used in missile casings, submersibles and space platforms. Layer waviness undulates the entire layers of a multidirectional laminate in through-the-thickness direction leading to gross deterioration of its compression strength. This research investigates the influence of multiple layer waviness in a double nest formation on the compression strength of a composite laminate. Different wave fractions of wave 0 degree centigrade layer fabricated in IM/85510-7 carbon - epoxy composite laminate on a steel mold using single step fabrication procedure. The laminate was cured on a heated press according to specific curing cycle. Static compression testing was performed using NASA short block compression fixture on an MTS servo Hydraulic machine. The purpose of these tests was to determine the effects of multiple layer wave regions on the compression strength of composite laminate. The experimental and analytical results revealed that up to about 35% fraction of wave 0 degree layer exceeded 35%. This analysis indicated that the percentage of 0 degree wavy layer may be used to estimate the reduction in compression strength of a composite laminate under restricted conditions. (author)

  13. Boron nitride converted carbon fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseas, Michael; Mickelson, William; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2016-04-05

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to boron nitride converted carbon fiber. In one aspect, a method may include the operations of providing boron oxide and carbon fiber, heating the boron oxide to melt the boron oxide and heating the carbon fiber, mixing a nitrogen-containing gas with boron oxide vapor from molten boron oxide, and converting at least a portion of the carbon fiber to boron nitride.

  14. Patterned functional carbon fibers from polyethylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunt, Marcus A [ORNL; Saito, Tomonori [ORNL; Brown, Rebecca H [ORNL; Kumbhar, Amar S [University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; Naskar, Amit K [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Patterned, continuous carbon fibers with controlled surface geometry were produced from a novel melt-processible carbon precursor. This portends the use of a unique technique to produce such technologically innovative fibers in large volume for important applications. The novelties of this technique include ease of designing and fabricating fibers with customized surface contour, the ability to manipulate filament diameter from submicron scale to a couple of orders of magnitude larger scale, and the amenable porosity gradient across the carbon wall by diffusion controlled functionalization of precursor. The geometry of fiber cross-section was tailored by using bicomponent melt-spinning with shaped dies and controlling the melt-processing of the precursor polymer. Circular, trilobal, gear-shaped hollow fibers, and solid star-shaped carbon fibers of 0.5 - 20 um diameters, either in self-assembled bundle form, or non-bonded loose filament form, were produced by carbonizing functionalized-polyethylene fibers. Prior to carbonization, melt-spun fibers were converted to a char-forming mass by optimizing the sulfonation on polyethylene macromolecules. The fibers exhibited distinctly ordered carbon morphologies at the outside skin compared to the inner surface or fiber core. Such order in carbon microstructure can be further tuned by altering processing parameters. Partially sulfonated polyethylene-derived hollow carbon fibers exhibit 2-10 fold surface area (50-500 m2/g) compared to the solid fibers (10-25 m2/g) with pore sizes closer to the inside diameter of the filaments larger than the sizes on the outer layer. These specially functionalized carbon fibers hold promise for extraordinary performance improvements when used, for example, as composite reinforcements, catalyst support media, membranes for gas separation, CO2 sorbents, and active electrodes and current collectors for energy storage applications.

  15. Damage tolerance and assessment of unidirectional carbon fiber composites: An experimental and numerical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Mark David

    Composites are beginning to be used in a variety of different applications throughout industry. However, certification and damage tolerance is a growing concern in many aerospace and marine applications. Although compression-after-impact have been studied thoroughly, determining a damage tolerance methodology that accurately characterizes the failure of composites has not been established. An experimental investigation was performed to study the effect of stacking sequence, low-velocity impact response, and residual strength due to compression and fatigue. Digital Image Correlation (DIC) captured the strains and deformation of the plate due to compression. Computational investigations integrated non-destructive techniques (C-Scan, X-Ray) to determine the extent of the damage created by the manufacturing process and impact to accurately create a representative of the pre-existing damage. Fiber/matrix cracking, delamination growth, buckling, as well as other failures mechanisms occur in compression-after-impact laminated specimens examined experimentally. The results from this study provide knowledge of the compression after impact strength of plates, and a basis for validation of detailed modeling of progressive failure from impact damaged composites.

  16. Review of natural fiber composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohan, T.; Tushar, B.; T, Mahesha G.

    2018-02-01

    Development of new alternative materials to the existing traditional metals, alloys and synthetic materials is the new buzz in recent research activities at the academic and industrial level taking place all over the world. Earning carbon credits by minimizing the atmospheric pollution is getting an increase in attention by industries. One small step to conserve the atmosphere around us is to use natural resources in making fully bio degradable or partially bio degradable composite materials. Such prepared alternative materials can find applications in interior housing, automotive, marine, domestic, and other applications. Composites made by using appropriate natural fibers as reinforcements is a possibility that ensures such a reality as they can be well received in multiple disciplines of engineering. Results published from various research activities illustrates that natural fiber composites can successfully be adapted for non-structural, moderate load bearing indoor applications. Further, the few deficiencies in the natural fibers can be overcome by subjecting them to morphological changes by various physical or chemical treatment methods. The overall objective of this paper is to provide a comprehensive overview of the property profiles of Natural Fiber Composites.

  17. Continuous carbon nanotube reinforced composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ci, L; Suhr, J; Pushparaj, V; Zhang, X; Ajayan, P M

    2008-09-01

    Carbon nanotubes are considered short fibers, and polymer composites with nanotube fillers are always analogues of random, short fiber composites. The real structural carbon fiber composites, on the other hand, always contain carbon fiber reinforcements where fibers run continuously through the composite matrix. With the recent optimization in aligned nanotube growth, samples of nanotubes in macroscopic lengths have become available, and this allows the creation of composites that are similar to the continuous fiber composites with individual nanotubes running continuously through the composite body. This allows the proper utilization of the extreme high modulus and strength predicted for nanotubes in structural composites. Here, we fabricate such continuous nanotube polymer composites with continuous nanotube reinforcements and report that under compressive loadings, the nanotube composites can generate more than an order of magnitude improvement in the longitudinal modulus (up to 3,300%) as well as damping capability (up to 2,100%). It is also observed that composites with a random distribution of nanotubes of same length and similar filler fraction provide three times less effective reinforcement in composites.

  18. Damage Evaluation and Analysis of Composite Pressure Vessels Using Fiber Bragg Gratings to Determine Structural Health

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kunzler, Marley; Udd, Eric; Kreger, Stephen; Johnson, Mont; Henrie, Vaughn

    2005-01-01

    .... Using fiber Bragg gratings embedded into the weave structure of carbon fiber epoxy composites allow the capability to monitor these composites during manufacture, cure, general aging, and damage...

  19. Carbon Fiber Composites of Pure Polypropylene and Maleated Polypropylene Blends Obtained from Injection and Compression Moulding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Pérez-Rocha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A comparative study of the mechanical performance of PP and PP/PP-g-MAH blends reinforced with carbon fibre (CF obtained by two different moulding techniques is presented. Three filler contents were used for fabricating the composites: 1, 3, and 5 pph (parts per hundred. The crystallisation behaviour of the composites was studied by differential scanning calorimetry. Morphological and structural features of these samples were observed by atomic field microscopy and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, respectively. Mechanical properties of the injection and compression moulded composites were evaluated by means of tensile and impact resistance tests. The fracture surface of the impacted samples was observed by scanning electron microscopy. The processing method had a noticeable effect on the results obtained in these tests. Young’s modulus was enhanced up to 147% when adding 5 pph CF to a PP matrix when processed by compression moulding. Addition of PP-g-MAH and CF had a favourable effect on the tensile and impact strength properties in most samples; these composites showed improved performance as the filler content was increased.

  20. Effects of electron irradiation in space environment on thermal and mechanical properties of carbon fiber/bismaleimide composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Qi, E-mail: yuqi1027@126.com [Liaoning Key Laboratory of Advanced Polymer Matrix Composites and Faculty of Aerospace Engineering, Shenyang Aerospace University, Shenyang 110136 (China); Chen, Ping, E-mail: chenping_898@126.com [Liaoning Key Laboratory of Advanced Polymer Matrix Composites and Faculty of Aerospace Engineering, Shenyang Aerospace University, Shenyang 110136 (China); State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals and School of Chemical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Gao, Yu; Ma, Keming; Lu, Chun; Xiong, Xuhai [Liaoning Key Laboratory of Advanced Polymer Matrix Composites and Faculty of Aerospace Engineering, Shenyang Aerospace University, Shenyang 110136 (China)

    2014-10-01

    Highlights: •Electron irradiation decreased the storage modulus finally. •T{sub g} decreased first and then increased and finally decreased. •The thermal stability was reduced and then improved and finally decreased. •The changing trend of flexural strength and ILSS are consistent. -- Abstract: The effects of electron irradiation in simulated space environment on thermal and mechanical properties of high performance carbon fiber/bismaleimide composites were investigated. The dynamic mechanical properties of the composites exposed to different fluences of electron irradiation were evaluated by Dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). Thermogravimetric analysis was applied to investigate the changes in thermal stability of the resin matrix after exposure to electron irradiation. The changes in mechanical properties of the composites were evaluated by flexural strength and interlaminar shear strength (ILSS). The results indicated that electron irradiation in high vacuum had an impact on thermal and mechanical properties of CF/BMI composites, which depends on irradiation fluence. At lower irradiation fluences less than 5 × 10{sup 15} cm{sup −2}, the dynamic storage modulus, cross-linking degree, thermal stability and mechanical properties that were determined by a competing effect between chain scission and cross-linking process, decreased firstly and then increased. While at higher fluences beyond 5 × 10{sup 15} cm{sup −2}, the chain scission process was dominant and thus led to the degradation in thermal and mechanical properties of the composites.

  1. Enhanced electromagnetic interference shielding properties of carbon fiber veil/Fe3O4 nanoparticles/epoxy multiscale composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Bin; Wu, Qilei; Su, Xiaogang

    2017-12-01

    The multiscale approach has been adapted to enhance the electromagnetic interference shielding properties of carbon fiber (CF) veil epoxy-based composites. The Fe3O4 nanoparticles (NPs) were homogeneously dispersed in the epoxy matrix after surface modification by using silane coupling agent. The CF veil/Fe3O4 NPs/epoxy multiscale composites were manufactured by impregnating the CF veils with Fe3O4 NPs/epoxy mixture to prepare prepreg followed by vacuum bagging process. The electromagnetic interference shielding properties combined with the complex permittivity and complex permeability of the composites were investigated in the X-band (8.2–12.4 GHz) range. The total shielding effectiveness (SET) increases with increasing Fe3O4 NPs loadings and the maximum SET is 51.5 dB at low thickness of 1 mm. The incorporation of Fe3O4 NPs into the composites enhances the complex permittivity and complex permeability thus enhancing the electromagnetic wave absorption capability. The increased SET dominated by absorption loss SEA is attributed to the enhanced magnetic loss and dielectric loss generated by Fe3O4 NPs and multilayer construction of the composites. The microwave conductivity increases and the skin depth decreases with increasing Fe3O4 NPs loadings.

  2. Use of Modal Acoustic Emission to Monitor Damage Progression in Carbon Fiber/Epoxy and Implications for Composite Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, J. M.; Nichols, C. T.; Wentzel, D. J.; Saulsberry R. L.

    2010-01-01

    Broad-band modal acoustic emission (AE) data was used to characterize micromechanical damage progression in uniaxial IM7 and T1000 carbon fiber-epoxy tows and an IM7 composite overwrapped pressure vessel (COPV) subjected to an intermittent load hold tensile stress profile known to activate the Felicity ratio (FR). Damage progression was followed by inspecting the Fast Fourier Transforms (FFTs) associated with acoustic emission events. FFT analysis revealed the occurrence of cooperative micromechanical damage events in a frequency range between 100 kHz and 1 MHz. Evidence was found for the existence of a universal damage parameter, referred to here as the critical Felicity ratio, or Felicity ratio at rupture (FR*), which had a value close to 0.96 for the tows and the COPV tested. The implications of using FR* to predict failure in carbon/epoxy composite materials and related composite components such as COPVs are discussed. Trends in the FFT data are also discussed; namely, the difference between the low and high energy events, the difference between early and late-life events, comparison of IM7 and T1000 damage progression, and lastly, the similarity of events occurring at the onset of significant acoustic emission used to calculate the FR.

  3. Use of Modal Acoustic Emission to Monitor Damage Progression in Carbon Fiber/Epoxy Tows and Implications for Composite Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, Jess M.; Saulsberry, Regor L.; Nichols, Charles T.; Wentzel, Daniel J.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the use of Modal Acoustic Emission to monitor damage progression to carbon fiber/epoxy tows. There is a risk for catastrophic failure of composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs) due to burst-before-leak (BBL) stress rupture (SR) failure of carbon-epoxy (C/Ep) COPVs. A lack of quantitative nondestructive evaluation (NDE) is causing problems in current and future spacecraft designs. It is therefore important to develop and demonstrate critical NDE that can be implemented during stages of the design process since the observed rupture can occur with little of no advanced warning. Therefore a program was required to develop quantitative acoustic emission (AE) procedures specific to C/Ep overwraps, but which also have utility for monitoring damage accumulation in composite structure in general, and to lay the groundwork for establishing critical thresholds for accumulated damage in composite structures, such as COPVs, so that precautionary or preemptive engineering steps can be implemented to minimize of obviate the risk of catastrophic failure. A computed Felicity Ratio (FR) coupled with fast Fourier Transform (FFT) frequency analysis shows promise as an analytical pass/fail criterion. The FR analysis and waveform and FFT analysis are reviewed

  4. Evaluation of contact resistance between carbon fiber/epoxy composite laminate and printed silver electrode for damage monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Eun Beom; Kim, Hak Sung [Dept. of Mechanical Convergence Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Takahashi, Kosuke [Dept. of Mechanical Sciences and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    An addressable conducting network (ACN) makes it possible to monitor the condition of a structure using the electrical resistance between electrodes on the surface of a carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) structure. To improve the damage detection reliability of the ACN, the contact resistances between the electrodes and CFRP laminates needs to be minimized. In this study, silver nanoparticle electrodes were fabricated via printed electronics techniques on a CFRP composite. The contact resistance between the silver electrodes and CFRP were measured with respect to various fabrication conditions such as the sintering temperature of the silver nano-ink and the surface roughness of the CFRP laminates. The interfaces between the silver electrode and carbon fibers were observed using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Based on this study, it was found that the lowest contact resistance of 0.3664Ω could be achieved when the sintering temperature of the silver nano-ink and surface roughness were 120 degree C and 0.230 a, respectively.

  5. Rheological Behavior of Amino-Functionalized Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube/Polyacrylonitrile Concentrated Solutions and Crystal Structure of Composite Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hailong Zhang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The rheological behavior of amino-functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (amino-CNTs/polyacrylonitrile (PAN concentrated solutions in the dimethyl sulphoxide solvent and the effects of the amino-CNTs on the PAN precursor fibers by wet-spinning method were investigated. The amino-CNT/PAN concentrated solutions prepared by in situ solution polymerization with homogeneous dispersion of amino-CNTs have higher complex viscosity, storage modulus and loss modulus as compared to the control PAN concentrated solutions containing 22% PAN polymer by mass. The composite fibers with amino-CNTs of 1 wt % have lower degree of crystallization, crystal size and crystal region orientation compared to the control PAN precursor fibers. However, the amino-CNT/PAN composite fibers with diameter of about 10.5 μm exhibit higher mechanical properties than the control PAN precursor fibers with diameter of about 8.0 μm. Differential scanning calorimetry analysis demonstrated that the cyclization reaction in composite fibers have broad exothermic temperature range and low exothermic rate. These results indicate that the addition of amino-CNTs into PAN precursor fibers is beneficial to controlling the process of thermal stabilization and obtaining the higher performance of composite fibers.

  6. Structures and Performance of Graphene/Polyimide Composite Graphite Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Na

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Dry-wet spinning process was used to gain graphene oxide/polyimide composite fibers, then graphene/polyimide composite carbon and graphite fibers were obtained through carbonized and graphitized. Different graphene oxide contents of the composite carbon and graphite fibers were measured by thermal gravimetric analysis, Raman, mechanical properties, electrical properties,SEM and so on. The results show that when the GO content is 0.3%(mass fraction,the same below, the thermal property of the graphene oxide/polyimide composite fibers is the best. The mechanical and electrical properties are obriously improved by the addition of GO, graphitization degree also increases. When the composite carbon fibers are treated at 2800℃, GO content increases to 2.0%, the thermal conductivity of the composite graphite fibers reaches 435.57W·m-1·K-1 and cross-section structures of carbon fibers are more compact.

  7. Controllable synthesis of Fe2O3-carbon fiber composites via a facile sol-gel route as anode materials for lithium ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Changbing; Chen, Sihao; Li, Zhen

    2018-01-01

    The Fe2O3-carbon fiber composites were prepared by a facile sol-gel method. The uniform distribution of Fe2O3 grains on the surface of carbon fibers was confirmed by field emission scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The impact of the Fe2O3 content in composite materials on electrochemical performance was also investigated in this study. The results show that the capacity degradation during cycling is associated with the content of Fe2O3 in composite materials. Comparative study of three composite samples with different Fe2O3 contents revealed that the best electrochemical performance with good cycling stability, high reversible capacity and improved rate capability was exhibited by the Fe2O3@carbon fiber sample. Even after 150 cycles at a constant current density of 50 mA g-1, a high reversible discharge capacity of 634 mAh g-1 can be achieved, which is comparable to its theoretical value (607 mAh g-1). More importantly, the one-dimensional nanofibrous structure can be well preserved even after a long-time charge/discharge process over to 50 cycles, which demonstrates the structural robustness of the composite materials. The morphological robustness and excellent electrochemical performance of the Fe2O3@carbon fiber hybrid show its promise as an anode material for high-performance lithium-ion batteries (LIBs).

  8. Method of carbonizing polyacrylonitrile fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagliostro, D. E.; Lerner, N. R. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    This invention relates to a method of carbonizing polyacrylonitrile fibers by exposing the fibers at an elevated temperature to an oxidizing atmosphere; then exposing the oxidized fibers to an atmosphere of an inert gas such as nitrogen containing a carbonaceous material such as acetylene. The fibers are preferably treated with an organic compound, for example benzoic acid, before the exposure to an oxidizing atmosphere. The invention also relates to the resulting fibers. The treated fibers have enhanced tensile strength.

  9. Carbon fiber electrometer for dosimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piltingsrud, H.V.

    1976-01-01

    An electrometer for conventional pocket radiation dosimeters is disclosed in which the moving element of the electrometer is a carbon fiber. The fiber is spun from polyacrylonitrile homopolymer yarn and has a diameter of approximately 7 microns before carbonization. The polyacrylonitrile homopolymer fiber is conventionally preoxidized at approximately 270 0 C before conventional carbonization at approximately 1200 0 C. The resulting working fiber has a round cross sectional diameter of approximately 4 microns and a modulus of elasticity of approximately 15,000,000 psi. The fiber is mounted in a conventionally loop shaped electrometer frame by crimping the ends of the fiber into tabs on the frame. 2 claims, 5 figures

  10. Microstructural Analysis and Wear Performance of Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced SiC Composite for Brake Pads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byeong-Choon, Goo; In-Sik, Cho

    2017-06-26

    Carbon-fiber-reinforced silicon carbide (C/C-SiC) composite is widely used as a friction material owing to its good performance, even though it is more expensive than metallic materials. The light C/C-SiC composite is an ideal candidate for weight reduction of frictional parts. In this study, the friction and wear behavior of C/C-SiC composite was assessed using a ball-on-disk friction tester under dry reciprocating sliding conditions at different temperatures of 25, 100, and 200 °C. The disk specimens were made of C/C-SiC composite, while the mating counterpart pins were made of bearing steel. The microstructure and wear track of the specimens were characterized using a scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Raman spectroscopy. The microstructural analysis of the wear track revealed that the wear mechanism was abrasive. The friction coefficient and wear behavior of the specimens was dependent on the temperature, where the friction coefficients and wear rate increased with increasing temperature.

  11. Using maleic anhydride functionalized graphene oxide for improving the interfacial properties of carbon fiber/BMI composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Li

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Maleic anhydride functionalized graphene oxide (MAH-GO was synthesized and then introduced into carbon fiber (CF reinforced bismaleimide (BMI composites, with the aim of improving the interfacial adhesion strength between CF and BMI resin. Various characterization techniques including Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR, X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA demonstrated that the maleic anhydride has been successfully grafted onto the GO surfaces. The study showed that the interlaminar shear strength (ILSS and flexural properties of CF/BMI composites were all improved by the incorporation of GO and MAH-GO, and the MAH-GO showed the substantially improved effect due to the strong interaction between the MAH-GO and the resin matrix. The maximum increment of the ILSS, flexural strength and flexural modulus of composites were 24.4, 28.7 and 49.7%, respectively. Scanning electron microscope (SEM photographs of the fracture surfaces revealed that the interfacial bonding between CF and resin matrix was significantly strengthened by the addition of MAH-GO. The results suggest that this feasible method may be an ideal substitute for the traditional method in the interfacial modification of composites.

  12. Impact of Cutting Forces and Chip Microstructure in High Speed Machining of Carbon Fiber – Epoxy Composite Tube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy Y. Allwin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Carbon fiber reinforced polymeric (CFRP composite materials are widely used in aerospace, automobile and biomedical industries due to their high strength to weight ratio, corrosion resistance and durability. High speed machining (HSM of CFRP material is needed to study the impact of cutting parameters on cutting forces and chip microstructure which offer vital inputs to the machinability and deformation characteristics of the material. In this work, the orthogonal machining of CFRP was conducted by varying the cutting parameters such as cutting speed and feed rate at high cutting speed/feed rate ranges up to 346 m/min/ 0.446 mm/rev. The impact of the cutting parameters on cutting forces (principal cutting, feed and thrust forces and chip microstructure were analyzed. A significant impact on thrust forces and chip segmentation pattern was seen at higher feed rates and low cutting speeds.

  13. Research of plating aluminum and aluminum foil on internal surface of carbon fiber composite material centrifuge rotor drum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Xiuqi; Dong Jinping; Dai Xingjian

    2014-01-01

    In order to improve the corrosion resistance, thermal conductivity and sealability of the internal surface of carbon fiber/epoxy composite material centrifuge rotor drum, magnetron sputtering aluminum and pasting an aluminum foil on the inner wall of the drum are adopted to realize the aim. By means of XRD, SEM/EDS and OM, the surface topography of aluminum coated (thickness of 5 μm and 12 μm) and aluminum foil (12 μm) are observed and analyzed; the cohesion of between aluminum coated (or aluminum foil) and substrate material (CFRP) is measured by scratching experiment, direct drawing experiment, and shear test. Besides, the ultra-high-speed rotation experiment of CFRP ring is carried out to analyze stress and strain of coated aluminum (or aluminum foil) which is adhered on the ring. The results showed aluminum foil pasted on inner surface do better performance than magnetron sputtering aluminum on CFRP centrifuge rotor drum. (authors)

  14. Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes/carbon fiber paper composite to support Pt nanoparticles for direct methanol fuel cell application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Yi, Xi-bin; Liu, Shuo; Fan, Hui-Li; Ju, Wei; Wang, Qi-Chun; Ma, Jie

    2017-03-01

    Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) grown on carbon fiber paper (CFP) by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition is introduced as a catalyst support material for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). Well dispersed Pt nanoparticles on VACNTs surface are prepared by impregnation-reduction method. The VACNTs on CFP possess well-maintained alignment, large surface area and good electrical conductivity, which leading to the formation of Pt particles with a smaller size and enhance the Pt utilization rate. The structure and nature of resulting Pt/VACNTs/CFP catalysts for methanol oxidation are investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). With the aid of VACNTs, well-dispersed Pt catalysts enable the reversibly rapid redox kinetic since electron transport efficiently passes through a one-dimensional pathway, which leads to enhance the catalytic activity and Pt utilization rate. Compared with the Pt/XC-72/CFP electrode, the electrochemical measurements results display that the Pt/VACNTs/CFP catalyst shows much higher electrocatalytic activity and better stability for methanol oxidation. In addition, the oxidation current from 200 to 1200 s decayed more slowly for the Pt/VACNTs/CFP than that of the Pt/XC-72/CFP catalysts, indicating less accumulation of adsorbed CO species. All those results imply that the Pt/VACNTs/CFP has a great potential for applications in DMFCs.

  15. Dynamic mechanical analysis and high strain-rate energy absorption characteristics of vertically aligned carbon nanotube reinforced woven fiber-glass composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    The dynamic mechanical behavior and energy absorption characteristics of nano-enhanced functionally graded composites, consisting of 3 layers of vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VACNT) forests grown on woven fiber-glass (FG) layer and embedded within 10 layers of woven FG, with polyester (PE) and...

  16. Natural Fiber Composites: A Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westman, Matthew P.; Fifield, Leonard S.; Simmons, Kevin L.; Laddha, Sachin; Kafentzis, Tyler A.

    2010-03-07

    The need for renewable fiber reinforced composites has never been as prevalent as it currently is. Natural fibers offer both cost savings and a reduction in density when compared to glass fibers. Though the strength of natural fibers is not as great as glass, the specific properties are comparable. Currently natural fiber composites have two issues that need to be addressed: resin compatibility and water absorption. The following preliminary research has investigated the use of Kenaf, Hibiscus cannabinus, as a possible glass replacement in fiber reinforced composites.

  17. Matrix structure evolution and thermo-mechanical properties of carbon fiber-reinforced Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiC-C castable composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xiangcheng, E-mail: lixiangcheng@wust.edu.cn; Li, Yaxiong; Chen, Liufang; Zhu, Boquan, E-mail: zbqref@263.net

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Carbon fibers are formed in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiC-C castable composites under the action of nano Ni. • Starting growth temperature is 900 °C and growth mechanism agrees with V–S model. • The high temperature strength of composites can be increased by above 40%. • The thermal shock resistance can be enhanced by above 20%. - Abstract: The spalling and corrosion during the thermal cycles are the main causes of the damages observed in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiC-C castable composites that are used in molten-iron system. Using the catalyst of nano Ni and ball pitch in the matrix, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiC-C castable composites were prepared with the anti-oxidant addition of silicon. The results indicate that the high temperature of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiC-C castable composites can be increased by above 42%, and the thermal shock resistance can be enhanced by above 20% because the ball pitch is carbonized and releases C{sub x}H{sub y} vapor, which can be pyrolized to carbon atoms and subsequently deposited into carbon fibers under the catalyst action. The starting temperature of carbon fiber growth is approximately 900 °C, and their diameter and aspect ratio can increase with the rising temperature. The in-situ generation of carbon fibers in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiC-C castable composites can significantly improve the fibers’ thermo-mechanical properties.

  18. Fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth with different heights of crown ferrule restored with prefabricated carbon fiber post and composite resin core by intermittent loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Jonas Alves; Pereira, Jefferson Ricardo; Lins do Valle, Accácio; Zogheib, Lucas Villaça

    2008-11-01

    This study evaluated the fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with prefabricated carbon fiber posts and varying quantities of coronal dentin. Sixty freshly extracted upper canines were randomly divided into groups of 10 teeth each. The specimens were exposed to 250,000 cycles in a controlled chewing simulator. All intact specimens were subjected to a static load (N) in a universal testing machine at 45 degrees to the long axis. Data were analyzed by 1-way analysis of variance and Tukey test (alpha = .05). Significant differences (P carbon fiber post and composite resin core.

  19. Interfacial adhesion improvement in carbon fiber/carbon nanotube reinforced hybrid composites by the application of a reactive hybrid resin initiated by gamma irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szebényi, G.; Faragó, D.; Lámfalusi, Cs.; Göbl, R.

    2018-04-01

    Interfacial adhesion is a key factor in composite materials. The effective co-working of the reinforcing materials and matrix is essential for the proper load transfer between them, and to achieve the desired reinforcing effect. In case of nanocomposites, especially carbon nanotube (CNT) reinforced nanocomposites the adhesion between the CNTs and the polymer matrix is poor. To improve the interfacial adhesion and exploit the reinforcing effect of these nanoparticles a two step curable epoxy (EP)/vinylester (VE) hybrid resin system was developed where the EP is cured using hardener in the first step, during the composite production, and in the second step the curing of the VE is initiated by gamma irradiation, which also activates the reinforcing materials and the cured matrix component. A total of six carbon fiber reinforced composite systems were compared with neat epoxy and EP/VE hybrid matrices with and without chemical initiator and MWCNT nano-reinforcement. The effect of gamma irradiation was investigated at four absorbed dose levels. According to our three point bending and interlaminar shear test results the adhesion has improved between all constituents of the composite system. It was demonstrated that gamma irradiation has beneficial effect on the static mechanical, especially interlaminar properties of both micro- and nanocomposites in terms of modulus, strength and interlaminar shear strength.

  20. Infiltrated carbon foam composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Rick D. (Inventor); Danford, Harry E. (Inventor); Plucinski, Janusz W. (Inventor); Merriman, Douglas J. (Inventor); Blacker, Jesse M. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    An infiltrated carbon foam composite and method for making the composite is described. The infiltrated carbon foam composite may include a carbonized carbon aerogel in cells of a carbon foam body and a resin is infiltrated into the carbon foam body filling the cells of the carbon foam body and spaces around the carbonized carbon aerogel. The infiltrated carbon foam composites may be useful for mid-density ablative thermal protection systems.

  1. Synergetic effect between adsorption and photodegradation on nanostructured TiO{sub 2}/activated carbon fiber felt porous composites for toluene removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Min; Lu, Bin; Ke, Qin-Fei; Guo, Ya-Jun; Guo, Ya-Ping, E-mail: ypguo@shnu.edu.cn

    2017-07-05

    Highlights: • Nanostructured TiO{sub 2}/activated carbon fiber felt porous composites are prepared. • Nanostructures TiO{sub 2} particles on fibers are constructed by nanocrystals. • They have synergetic adsorption-photocatalytic activities for toluene removal. • The adsorption efficiency reaches 98% at toluene concentrations <1150 ppm. • Carbon fibers can hinder the recombination of electron-hole pairs on TiO{sub 2}. - Abstract: The low quantum efficiency and limited adsorption efficiency of TiO{sub 2} makes it only fit for the removal of VOCs with low concentrations. Herein, we for the first time fabricated nanostructured TiO{sub 2}/activated carbon fiber felt (TiO{sub 2}/ACFF) porous composites by the in situ deposition of TiO{sub 2} microspheres on the carbon fibers in ACFF. Interestingly, the TiO{sub 2} microspheres exhibit hierarchical nanostructures constructed by nanocrystals as building blocks. The TiO{sub 2}/ACFF porous composites possess excellent adsorption and photodegradation properties for toluene because of the synergetic effects between the nanostructured TiO{sub 2} and ACFF. The adsorption efficiencies of the TiO{sub 2}/ACFF porous composites reach approximately 98% at the toluene concentration (<1150 ppm) and approximately 77% even at the high concentration of 6900 ppm. Moreover, the ACFF in the TiO{sub 2}/ACFF porous composites significantly enhances photocatalytic property for toluene by hindering the recombination of electron-hole pairs, reducing the TiO{sub 2} band gap energy (E{sub g}) to 2.95 eV and accelerating toluene adsorption. At the toluene concentrations of 230 ppm and 460 ppm, the photocatalytic oxidation efficiency of toluene into CO{sub 2} arrives at 100% and 81.5%, respectively. Therefore, the TiO{sub 2}/ACFF porous composites with synergetic adsorption and photocatalytic activities have great potentials for toluene removal.

  2. In Situ Tomography of Microcracking in Cross Ply Carbon Fiber Composites with Pre-existing Debonding Damage

    KAUST Repository

    Traudes, Daniel

    2012-07-01

    Carbon fiber based composites are an essential material in weight-critical applications such as in the aerospace industry. However, these materials are susceptible to damage such as matrix microcracking and fiber/matrix debonding (diffuse damage), which occurs at stresses much lower than the failure stress. A T700/M21 [0/90]s laminate was tensile loaded to introduce diffuse damage and prepared for a study on the initiation of transverse microcracks. The material was tensile loaded in a [+45/-45]s orientation to induce diffuse damage. A diffuse damage indicator was developed by measuring the decrease in shear stiffness. Samples with diffuse damage levels of 0, 0.05, 0.10, 0.15, 0.20, and 0.25 were prepared to be tensile tested in a [0/90]s orientation to induce microcracks. A successful development of the microcracking test procedure was performed. The edge of the material was studied with optical microscopy and x-ray to establish the structure of the fiber bundle geometry when undamaged. A sample containing microcracks was treated with diiodomethane dye penetrant, which successfully highlighted microcracks during x-ray imaging. The application time was not sufficient to produce consistent x-ray images over time, so a 45 minute soak time was recommended instead. The same damaged sample was subjected to a tomographic scan without a dye penetrant and while unloaded. Transverse microcracks were successfully identified from the data, although the results were not clean enough and likely omitted some smaller microcracks. Results are expected to be cleaner if performed during tensile testing. Future tensile testing will quantify the induced crack density of samples containing various degrees of initial diffuse damage, either using x-rays with a dye penetrant or using x-ray microtomography.

  3. Fiber Breakage Model for Carbon Composite Stress Rupture Phenomenon: Theoretical Development and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Phoenix, S. Leigh; Grimes-Ledesma, Lorie

    2010-01-01

    Stress rupture failure of Carbon Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPVs) is of serious concern to Science Mission and Constellation programs since there are a number of COPVs on board space vehicles with stored gases under high pressure for long durations of time. It has become customary to establish the reliability of these vessels using the so called classic models. The classical models are based on Weibull statistics fitted to observed stress rupture data. These stochastic models cannot account for any additional damage due to the complex pressure-time histories characteristic of COPVs being supplied for NASA missions. In particular, it is suspected that the effects of proof test could significantly reduce the stress rupture lifetime of COPVs. The focus of this paper is to present an analytical appraisal of a model that incorporates damage due to proof test. The model examined in the current paper is based on physical mechanisms such as micromechanics based load sharing concepts coupled with creep rupture and Weibull statistics. For example, the classic model cannot accommodate for damage due to proof testing which every flight vessel undergoes. The paper compares current model to the classic model with a number of examples. In addition, several applications of the model to current ISS and Constellation program issues are also examined.

  4. A simulated RTM process for fabricating polyimide (AMB-21) carbon fiber composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avva, V. Sarma; Sadler, Robert L.; Thomas, Shanon

    1995-01-01

    An experimental polyimide matrix, AMB-21 - supplied by NASA/LeRC, was especially formulated to be non-carcinogenic. It was also expected to be amenable to a Resin Transfer Molding Process (RTM). AMB-21 is a solid at room temperature and must be heated to a very high temperature to obtain a fluid state. However, even after heating it to a realistic high temperature, it was found to be too viscous for use in a RTM process. As a result, a promising approach was experimented leading to the introduction of the resin into a solvent solution in order to obtain a viscosity suitable for RTM. A mixture of methanol and tetrahydroferone was found to be a suitable solvent mixture. The matrix solution was introduced into carbon-fiber preform using two techniques: (1) injection of matrix into a Resin Transfer Mold after positioning the preform into the 'mold cavity', and (2) infiltration of matrix into the preform using the 'autoclave through-the-thickness transfer process'. After completing the resin transfer (infiltration) process, the 'filled' preform was heated to 300 F for one hour to reduce the solvent content. The temperature was then increased to 400 F under a vacuum to complete the solvent evaporation and to remove volatile products of the polyimide imidization. The impregnated preform was removed from the mold and press-cured at 200 psi and 600 FF for two hours. The resulting panel was found to be of reasonably good quality. This observation was based on the results obtained from short beam shear strength (700-8000 psi) tests and microscopic examination of the cross-section indicating a very low level of porosity. Further, the flash around the molded panels from the compression molding was free of porosity indicating the removal of volatiles, solvents, and other imidization products. Based on these studies, a new RTM mold containing a diaphragm capable of applying 200 psi at 600 F has been designed and constructed with the expectation that it will allow the

  5. The Investigation of Acoustic Properties of Carbon Fiber-Polyester Composites and Comparing the Results with Poplar, Walnut and Beech Wood Specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir soheil Pirayeshfar

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, regarding the high capability of polymeric composites as a substitute of the wood in musical instruments, the acoustic properties of carbon fiber-polyester composites, such as elastic modulus, acoustic coefficient, acoustic coefficient efficiency etc, were investigated using free longitudinal and flexural vibration non-destructive tests and forced vibration non-destructive test. For better understanding, three wooden samples of poplar, walnut and beech trees (frequently used in the manufacturing of musical instruments were chosen and analyzed. Comparing the results showed that the resultant composites had essential acoustic and vibrational properties higher than those of wood samples. Ultrasonic velocity and elastic modulus in longitudinal direction of carbon composites were approximately 11300 m/s and 130GPa, respectively. Besides, the damping results of carbon composites are magnificent and far better than those of the wood specimens.

  6. Effect of Environment on Stress-Rupture Behavior of a Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Silicon Carbide (C/SiC) Ceramic Matrix Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrilli, Michael J.; Opila, Elizabeth J.; Calomino, Anthony; Kiser, J. Douglas

    2002-01-01

    Stress-rupture tests were conducted in air, vacuum, and steam-containing environments to identify the failure modes and degradation mechanisms of a carbon fiber-reinforced silicon carbide (C/SiC) composite at two temperatures, 600 and 1200 C. Stress-rupture lives in air and steam containing environments (50 - 80% steam with argon) are similar for a composite stress of 69 MPa at 1200 C. Lives of specimens tested in a 20% steam/argon environment were about twice as long. For tests conducted at 600 C, composite life in 20% steam/argon was 20 times longer than life in air. Thermogravimetric analysis of the carbon fibers was conducted under similar conditions to the stress-rupture tests. The oxidation rate of the fibers in the various environments correlated with the composite stress-rupture lives. Examination of the failed specimens indicated that oxidation of the carbon fibers was the primary damage mode for specimens tested in air and steam environments at both temperatures.

  7. Carbon/carbon composite materials; Les composites carbone/carbone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thebault, J.; Orly, P. [Societe Nationale d' Etude et de Construction de Moteurs d' Aviation (SNECMA), 33 - Le Haillan (France)

    2006-03-15

    Carbon/carbon composites are singular materials from their components, their manufacturing process as well as their characteristics. This paper gives a global overview of these particularities and applications which make them now daily used composites. (authors)

  8. Chitosan surface modified electrospun poly(ε-caprolactone)/carbon nanotube composite fibers with enhanced mechanical, cell proliferation and antibacterial properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Siyu; Li, Yumei; Zhao, Rui; Jin, Toufeng; Zhang, Li; Li, Xiang

    2017-11-01

    The surface modification is one of the most effective methods to improve the bioactivity and cell affinity effect of electrospun poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) fibers. In the present study, chitosan (CS), a cationic polysaccharide, was used to modify the surface of electrospun PCL fibers. To obtain strong interaction between CS and PCL fibers, negatively charged PCL fibers were prepared by the incorporation of acid-treated carbon nanotubes (CNTs) into the fibers. In this way, the positively charged chitosan could be immobilized onto the surface of PCL fibers tightly by the electrostatic attraction. Besides, the incorporation of CNTs could significantly improve the mechanical strength of electrospun PCL fibers even after the CS modification, which guaranteed their usability in practical applications. The CS modification could effectively improve the wettability and bioactivity of electrospun PCL fibers. Cultivation of L929 fibroblast cells on the obtained fibers and the antibacterial activity were both evaluated to discuss the influence of chitosan modification. The results indicated that this modification could enhance the cell proliferation and antibacterial ability in comparison to the non-modified groups. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. The effects of neutron irradiation on the structure of carbon-carbon composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burchell, T.D.; Eatherly, W.P.; Hollenberg, G. W.; Slagle, O.D.; Watson, R.D.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper irradiation behavior of carbon fibers and carbon-carbon composites are discussed in terms on simple microstructural models. Previous data are discussed in terms of these models. New data are presented for the irradiation-induced dimensional changes of selected carbon-carbon composites. The influence of fiber precursor on carbon- carbon irradiation performance is discussed

  10. Quantitative analysis of mechanical and electrostatic properties of poly(lactic) acid fibers and poly(lactic) acid—carbon nanotube composites using atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iqbal, Qais; Bernstein, Peter; Zhu, Yazhe; Rahamim, Joseph; Cebe, Peggy; Staii, Cristian

    2015-01-01

    We use atomic force microscopy (AFM) to perform a systematic quantitative characterization of the elastic modulus and dielectric constant of poly(L-lactic acid) electrospun nanofibers (PLLA), as well as composites of PLLA fibers with 1.0 wt% embedded multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs–PLLA). The elastic moduli are measured in the fiber skin region via AFM nanoindentation, and the dielectric constants are determined by measuring the phase shifts obtained via electrostatic force microscopy (EFM). We find that the average value for the elastic modulus for PLLA fibers is (9.8 ± 0.9) GPa, which is a factor of 2 larger than the measured average elastic modulus for MWCNT–PLLA composites (4.1 ± 0.7) GPa. We also use EFM to measure dielectric constants for both types of fibers. These measurements show that the dielectric constants of the MWCNT–PLLA fibers are significantly larger than the corresponding values obtained for PLLA fiber. This result is consistent with the higher polarizability of the MWCNT–PLLA composites. The measurement methods presented are general, and can be applied to determine the mechanical and electrical properties of other polymers and polymer nanocomposites. (paper)

  11. Effect of Lamina Thickness of Prepreg on the Surface Accuracy of Carbon Fiber Composite Space Mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhiyong; Tang, Zhanwen; Xie, Yongjie; Shi, Hanqiao; Zhang, Boming; Guo, Hongjun

    2018-02-01

    Composite space mirror can completely replicate the high-precision surface of mould by replication process, but the actual surface accuracy of the replication composite mirror always decreases. Lamina thickness of prepreg affects the layers and layup sequence of composite space mirror, and which would affect surface accuracy of space mirror. In our research, two groups of contrasting cases through finite element analyses (FEA) and comparative experiments were studied; the effect of different lamina thicknesses of prepreg and corresponding lay-up sequences was focused as well. We describe a special analysis model, validated process and result analysis. The simulated and measured surface figures both get the same conclusion. Reducing lamina thickness of prepreg used in replicating composite space mirror is propitious to optimal design of layup sequence for fabricating composite mirror, and could improve its surface accuracy.

  12. The Effects of Fiber Orientation and Adhesives on Tensile Properties of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer Matrix Composite with Embedded Nickel-Titanium Shape Memory Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quade, Derek J.; Jana, Sadhan C.; Morscher, Gregory N.; Kannan, Manigandan; McCorkle, Linda S.

    2017-01-01

    Nickel-titanium (NiTi) shape memory alloy (SMA) sections were embedded within carbon fiber reinforced polymer matrix composite (CFRPPMC) laminates and their tensile properties were evaluated with simultaneous monitoring of modal acoustic emissions. The test specimens were fabricated in three different layup configurations and two different thin film adhesives were applied to bond the SMA with the PMC. A trio of acoustic sensors were attached to the specimens during tensile testing to monitor the modal acoustic emission (AE) as the materials experienced mechanical failure. The values of ultimate tensile strengths, strains, and moduli were obtained. Cumulative AE energy of events and specimen failure location were determined. In conjunction, optical and scanning electron microscopy techniques were used to examine the break areas of the specimens. The analysis of AE data revealed failure locations within the specimens which were validated from the microscopic images. The placement of 90 deg plies in the outer ply gave the strongest acoustic signals during break as well as the cleanest break of the samples tested. Overlapping 0 deg ply layers surrounding the SMA was found to be the best scenario to prevent failure of the specimen itself.

  13. Improved conductivity of carbon-nano-fiber (CNF)/polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandra, Sarita; Kalra, G. S.; Pushkar, Vinay K.; Gill, Fateh Singh, E-mail: drfatehs@gmail.com [Graphic Era University, Bell Road, Clement Town, Dehradun (India); Panwar, Variz [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Gwangju Institute of Science Technology (GIST), Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Gupta, Himanshu; Pal, Pankaj K.; Pathak, Trilok K.; Purohit, L. P. [Gurukul Kangri University, Haridwar-249404 (India)

    2016-05-23

    A series of CNF/PTFE composite loaded with different weight % of CNFs as 0.01, 0.02, 0.03, 0.05, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 into PTFE is fabricated. In this work, the 5wt% heat-treated CNFs were used as filler in PTFE. Current-voltage (I-V) study of the samples confirmed the samples as conducting composite. In scanning electron microscope (SEM) study, the conducting CNFs channels were observed from upper surface to inside throughout the polymer matrix. A sintered composite of 5 wt% loading of CNFs showed an improved conductivity and SEM image exhibited a good binding of CNFs into PTFE.

  14. Application of carbon fiber composite minielectrodes for measurement of kinetic constants of nitric oxide decay in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoping; El-Sherbiny, Gamal A; Collard, Eric; Huang, Xin; Follmer, Douglas; El-Mahdy, Mohamed; Zweier, Jay L

    2010-12-15

    Carbon fiber microelectrodes and carbon fiber composite minielectrodes (CFM/CFCM) have been generally used for measurements of nitric oxide (NO) concentration in chemical and biological systems. The response time of a CFM/CFCM is usually from milliseconds to seconds depending on the electrode size, the thickness of coating layers on the electrode, and NO diffusion coefficients of the coating layers. As a result, the time course of recoded current changes (I-t curves) by the CFM/CFCM may be different from the actual time course of NO concentration changes (c-t curves) if the half-life of NO decay is close to or shorter than the response time of the electrode used. This adds complexity to the process for determining rate constants of NO decay kinetics from the recorded current curves (I-t curves). By computer simulations based on a mathematical model, an approximation method was developed for determining rate constants of NO decay from the recorded current curves. This method was first tested and valuated using a commercial CFCM in several simple reaction systems with known rate constants. The response time of the CFCM was measured as 4.7±0.7 s (n=5). The determined rate constants of NO volatilization and NO autoxidation in our measurement system at 37 °C are (1.9±0.1)×10(-3) s(-1) (n=4) and (2.0±0.3)×10(3) M(-1) s(-1) (n=7), which are close to the reported rate constants. The method was then applied to determine the rate of NO decay in blood samples from control and smoking exposed mice. It was observed that the NO decay rate in the smoking group is >20% higher than that in control group, and the increased NO decay rate in the smoking group was reversed by 10 μM diphenyleneiodonium chloride (DPI), an inhibitor of flavin enzymes such as leukocyte NADPH oxidase. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Parametric study of guided ultrasonic wave propagation in carbon-fiber composite plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, N. A.; Kamarudin, M. A.; Jurimi, M. H. F. M.; Murat, B. I. S.

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this work is to study the guided ultrasonic wave (GUW) behaviour in composite plates using 3D Finite Element Analysis (FEA). Two types of composite models are chosen: plates with and without damage. The damage is modelled as a circular-shaped delamination inside the plate, representing one kind of low-velocity impact damage. Parameters such as excitation frequency, monitoring directivity, plate thickness, delamination size and shape were used to investigate the influence of these parameters on the GUW propagation and scattering behaviour. The models were constructed and coded in Matlab platform, while the simulations were performed in ABAQUS Explicit. From the results, the received signals have shown a strong dependency on the parameters. Significant scattering from the models with delamination were also observed, which indicates the possibility of using GUW for rapid non-destructive monitoring of composite panels and structures.

  16. Lightning Strike Ablation Damage Characteristic Analysis for Carbon Fiber/Epoxy Composite Laminate with Fastener

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, J. J.; Li, S. L.; Yao, X. L.; Chang, F.; Li, L. K.; Zhang, X. H.

    2016-08-01

    In order to analyze the lightning strike ablation damage characteristic of composite laminate with fastener, based on the energy-balance relationship in lightning strike, mathematical analysis model of ablation damage of composite laminate with fastener was constructed. According to the model, an effective three dimensional thermal-electrical coupling analysis finite element model of composite laminate with fastener suffered from lightning current was established based on ABAQUS, and lightning strike ablation damage characteristic was analyzed. Analytical results reveal that lightning current could conduct through the thickness direction of the laminate due to the existence of metallic fastener, and then distribute to all layers, finally conducted in-the-plane of each layer, conductive ability of different layup orientations depend on potential distribution and in-the-plane electrical conductivity along potential gradient declining direction; different potential boundaries correspond to different potential distribution in each layer, and result in conductive ability of different layup orientations was changed, then caused different lightning strike ablation damage distribution. According to the investigation in this paper, we can recognize the lightning strike ablation damage characteristic of composite laminate with fastener qualitatively.

  17. Carbon Fiber from Biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milbrandt, Anelia [Clean Energy Manufacturing Analysis Center, Godlen, CO (United States); Booth, Samuel [Clean Energy Manufacturing Analysis Center, Godlen, CO (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Carbon fiber (CF), known also as graphite fiber, is a lightweight, strong, and flexible material used in both structural (load-bearing) and non-structural applications (e.g., thermal insulation). The high cost of precursors (the starting material used to make CF, which comes predominately from fossil sources) and manufacturing have kept CF a niche market with applications limited mostly to high-performance structural materials (e.g., aerospace). Alternative precursors to reduce CF cost and dependence on fossil sources have been investigated over the years, including biomass-derived precursors such as rayon, lignin, glycerol, and lignocellulosic sugars. The purpose of this study is to provide a comprehensive overview of CF precursors from biomass and their market potential. We examine the potential CF production from these precursors, the state of technology and applications, and the production cost (when data are available). We discuss their advantages and limitations. We also discuss the physical properties of biomass-based CF, and we compare them to those of polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based CF. We also discuss manufacturing and end-product considerations for bio-based CF, as well as considerations for plant siting and biomass feedstock logistics, feedstock competition, and risk mitigation strategies. The main contribution of this study is that it provides detailed technical and market information about each bio-based CF precursor in one document while other studies focus on one precursor at a time or a particular topic (e.g., processing). Thus, this publication allows for a comprehensive view of the CF potential from all biomass sources and serves as a reference for both novice and experienced professionals interested in CF production from alternative sources.

  18. Supersonic Retropulsion Surface Preparation of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Epoxy Composites for Adhesive Bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmieri, Frank L.; Belcher, Marcus A.; Wohl, Christopher J.; Blohowiak, Kay Y.; Connell, John W.

    2013-01-01

    Surface preparation is widely recognized as a key step to producing robust and predictable bonds in a precise and reproducible manner. Standard surface preparation techniques, including grit blasting, manual abrasion, and peel ply, can lack precision and reproducibility, which can lead to variation in surface properties and subsequent bonding performance. The use of a laser to ablate composite surface resin can provide an efficient, precise, and reproducible means of preparing composite surfaces for adhesive bonding. Advantages include elimination of physical waste (i.e., grit media and sacrificial peel ply layers that ultimately require disposal), reduction in process variability due to increased precision (e.g. increased reproducibility), and automation of surface preparation, all of which improve reliability and process control. This paper describes a Nd:YAG laser surface preparation technique for composite substrates and the mechanical performance and failure modes of bonded laminates thus prepared. Additionally, bonded specimens were aged in a hot, wet environment for approximately one year and subsequently mechanically tested. The results of a one year hygrothermal aging study will be presented.

  19. Active Structural Fibers for Multifunctional Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-31

    thickness from ~500nm to 20mm •Other perovskite compositions can be synthesized 2q Henry A Sodano – AFOSR Mech. of Multifunctional and...films Henry A Sodano – AFOSR Mech. of Multifunctional and Microsystems Review – July 31, 2012 ZnO Growth on Carbon Fibers • Solution based growth

  20. Coating for gasifiable carbon-graphite fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper-Tervet, Jan (Inventor); Dowler, Warren L. (Inventor); Yen, Shiao-Ping S. (Inventor); Mueller, William A. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A thin, uniform, firmly adherent coating of metal gasification catalyst is applied to a carbon-graphite fiber by first coating the fiber with a film-forming polymer containing functional moieties capable of reaction with the catalytic metal ions. Multivalent metal cations such as calcium cross-link the polymer such as a polyacrylic acid to insolubilize the film by forming catalytic metal macro-salt links between adjacent polymer chains. The coated fibers are used as reinforcement for resin composites and will gasify upon combustion without evolving conductive airborne fragments.

  1. Macroscopic Crosslinked Neat Carbon Nanotube Materials and CNT/Carbon Fiber Hybrid Composites: Supermolecular Structure and New Failure Mode Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    plain weave fabric with an areal density of 190 g/m2 was purchased from Textile Products, Inc. (Anahiem, USA). A single layer of carbon fabric was...with the specimen dimension of 5×1 cm2. The two ends of the sample were polished and electrodes were connected using silver paste for better...Packed Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes and Their Application as Super-Capacitor Electrodes . Nat. Mater. 2006, 5 (12), 987–994. (60) Hermans, P. H

  2. Electrospun Fibers for Composites Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    composite density using Archimedes principle (table 3), enabled by a balance equipped with both a standard-weighing pan as well as a weighing cradle...Electrospun Fibers for Composites Applications by Joshua A. Orlicki, Joshua Steele, André A. Williams, George R. Martin, Eugene Napadensky...Proving Ground, MD 21005-5069 ARL-TR-6800 February 2014 Electrospun Fibers for Composites Applications Joshua A. Orlicki and Eugene

  3. Predictive Engineering Tools for Injection-Molded Long-Carbon-Fiber Thermoplastic Composites - Second FY 2015 Quarterly Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Fifield, Leonard S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kijewski, Seth A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Sangid, Michael D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wang, Jin [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Costa, Franco [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Tucker, III, Charles L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Mathur, Raj N. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Gandhi, Umesh N. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Mori, Steven [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-05-19

    During the second quarter of FY 2015, the following technical progress has been made toward project milestones: 1) Autodesk reviewed 3D fiber orientation distribution (FOD) comparisons and provided support on improving accuracy. 2) Autodesk reviewed fiber length distribution (FLD) data comparisons and provided suggestions, assisted PNNL in FOD and FLD parameter settings optimization, and advised PNNL on appropriate through thickness thermal conductivity for improved frozen layer effect on FOD predictions. Autodesk also participated in project review meetings including preparations and discussions towards passing the go/no-go decision point. 3) Autodesk implemented an improved FOD inlet profile specification method through the part thickness for 3D meshes and provided an updated ASMI research version to PNNL. 4) The University of Illinois (Prof. C.L. Tucker) provided Autodesk with ideas to improve fiber orientation modeling 5) Purdue University re-measured fiber orientation for the fast-fill 50wt% LCF/PA66 edge-gated plaque, and delivered the fiber orientation data for this plaque at the selected locations (named A, B, and C, Figure 1) to PNNL. Purdue also re-measured fiber orientation for locations A on the fast-fill 30wt% LCF/PP and 50wt% LCF/PA66 center-gated plaques, which exhibited anomalous fiber orientation behavior. 6) Purdue University conducted fiber length measurements and delivered the length data to PNNL for the purge materials (slow-fill 30wt% LCF/PP and 30wt% LCF/PA66 purge materials) and PlastiComp plaques selected on the go/no-go list for fiber length model validation (i.e., slow-fill edge-gated 30wt% LCF/PP and 30wt% LCF/PA66 plaques, Locations A, B, and C). 7) PNNL developed a method to recover intact carbon fibers from LCF/PA66 materials. Isolated fibers were shipped to Purdue for length distribution analysis. 8) PNNL completed ASMI mid-plane analyses for all the PlastiComp plaques defined on the go/no-go list for fiber orientation (FO) model

  4. Construction of three-dimensional graphene interfaces into carbon fiber textiles for increasing deposition of nickel nanoparticles: flexible hierarchical magnetic textile composites for strong electromagnetic shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Xing-Ming; Liu, Lin; Li, Hai-Bing; Wang, Chan-Yuan; Xie, Qing; Zhao, Quan-Liang; Bi, Song; Hou, Zhi-Ling

    2017-01-01

    Since manipulating electromagnetic waves with electromagnetic active materials for environmental and electric engineering is a significant task, here a novel prototype is reported by introducing reduced graphene oxide (RGO) interfaces in carbon fiber (CF) networks for a hierarchical carbon fiber/reduced graphene oxide/nickel (CF-RGO-Ni) composite textile. Upon charaterizations of the microscopic morphologies, electrical and magnetic properties, the presence of three-dimensional RGO interfaces and bifunctional nickel nanoparticles substantially influences the related physical properties in the resulting hierarchical composite textiles. Eletromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding performance suggests that the hierarchical composite textiles hold a strong shielding effectiveness greater than 61 dB, showing greater advantages than conventional polymeric and foamy shielding composites. As a polymer-free lightweight structure, flexible CF-RGO-Ni composites of all electromagnetic active components offer unique understanding of the multi-scale and multiple mechanisms in electromagnetic energy consumption. Such a novel prototype of shielding structures along with convenient technology highlight a strategy to achieve high-performance EMI shielding, coupled with a universal approach for preparing advanced lightweight composites with graphene interfaces.

  5. Carbon Fiber Technology Facility (CFTF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Functionally within the MDF, ORNL operates DOE’s unique Carbon Fiber Technology Facility (CFTF)—a 42,000 ft2 innovative technology facility and works with leading...

  6. Carbon fiber reinforced asphalt concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jahromi, Saeed G.

    2008-01-01

    Fibers are often used in the manufacture of other materials. For many years, they have been utilized extensively in numerous applications in civil engineering. Fiber-reinforcement refers to incorporating materials with desired properties within some other materials lacking those properties. Use of fibers is not a new phenomenon, as the technique of fiber-reinforced bitumen began early as 1950. In all industrialized countries today, nearly all concretes used in construction are reinforced. A multitude of fibers and fiber materials are being introduced in the market regularly. The present paper presents characteristics and properties of carbon fiber-reinforced asphalt mixtures, which improve the performance of pavements. To evaluate the effect of fiber contents on bituminous mixtures, laboratory investigations were carried out on the samples with and without fibers. During the course of this study, various tests were undertaken, applying Marshall Test indirect tensile test, creep test and resistance to fatigue cracking by using repeated load indirect tensile test. Carbon fiber exhibited consistency in results and as such it was observed that the addition of fiber does affect the properties of bituminous mixtures, i.e. an increase in its stability and decrease in the flow value as well as an increase in voids in the mix. Results indicate that fibers have the potential to resist structural distress in pavement, in the wake of growing traffic loads and thus improve fatigue by increasing resistance to cracks or permanent deformation. On the whole, the results show that the addition of carbon fiber will improve some of the mechanical properties like fatigue and deformation in the flexible pavement. (author)

  7. Capacitor with a composite carbon foam electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Steven T.; Pekala, Richard W.; Kaschmitter, James L.

    1999-01-01

    Carbon aerogels used as a binder for granularized materials, including other forms of carbon and metal additives, are cast onto carbon or metal fiber substrates to form composite carbon thin film sheets. The thin film sheets are utilized in electrochemical energy storage applications, such as electrochemical double layer capacitors (aerocapacitors), lithium based battery insertion electrodes, fuel cell electrodes, and electrocapacitive deionization electrodes. The composite carbon foam may be formed by prior known processes, but with the solid partides being added during the liquid phase of the process, i.e. prior to gelation. The other forms of carbon may include carbon microspheres, carbon powder, carbon aerogel powder or particles, graphite carbons. Metal and/or carbon fibers may be added for increased conductivity. The choice of materials and fibers will depend on the electrolyte used and the relative trade off of system resistivity and power to system energy.

  8. Feasibility of Carbon Fiber/PEEK Composites for Cryogenic Fuel Tank Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, K.; Doyle, A.; O Bradaigh, C. M.; Jaredson, D.

    2012-07-01

    This paper investigates the feasibility of CF/PEEK composites for manufacture of cryogenic fuel tanks for Next Generation Space Launchers. The material considered is CF/PEEK tape from Suprem SA and the proposed manufacturing process for the fuel tank is Automated Tape Placement. Material characterization was carried out on test laminates manufactured in an autoclave and also by Automated Tape Placement with in-situ consolidation. The results of the two processes were compared to establish if there is any knock down in properties for the automated tape placement process. A permeability test rig was setup with a helium leak detector and the effect of thermal cycling on the permeability properties of CF/PEEK was measured. A 1/10th scale demonstrator was designed and manufactured consisting of a cylinder manufactured by automated tape placement and an upper dome manufactured by autoclave processing. The assembly was achieved by Amorphous Interlayer Bonding with PEI.

  9. Experimental and Numerical Study of the Interfacial Shear Strength in Carbon Fiber/Epoxy Resin Composite under Thermal Loads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongxiao Wang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the influence mechanism of temperature on the interfacial shear strength (IFSS between carbon fiber (CF and epoxy resin (EP matrices under various thermal loads using experimental and numerical simulation methods. To evaluate the change in IFSS as a function of the increase in temperature, a microbond test was performed under controlled temperature environment from 23°C to 150°C. The experimental results showed that IFSS values of CF/EP reduce significantly when the temperature reaches near glass transition temperature. To interpret the effect of thermal loads on IFSS, a thermal-mechanical coupling finite element model was used to simulate the process of fiber pull-out from EP. The results revealed that temperature dependence of IFSS is linked to modulus of the matrix as well as to the coefficients of thermal expansion of the fiber and matrix.

  10. Thermal expansion of carbon-carbonic composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukina, Eh.Yu.; Kolesnikov, S.A.; Pechik, V.K.

    1977-01-01

    Carbon-carbon composites present a high anisotropy of thermal expansion; along the fibers, the anisotropy is a function mainly of the thermal expansion of the fibers, and at right angle to the predominant orientation of the fibers, of the thermal expansion of the binder. The value of the volumetric coefficient of thermal expansion of carbon-carbon composites is lower than that of polycrystalline graphites. The binder the nearest to the fibers in value of the thermal expansion is pyrocarbon. The carbon fibers and the composites based on the latter irreversibly change their dimensions when heated to temperature above that of their formation. The coefficient of thermal expansion of composites based on finely divided fibers increases with the density of binding, but the anisotropy of thermal expansion then diminishes; the coefficient of thermal expansion of composites based on the continuous carbon fibers increases with the angle between the direction of fibers and that of the measurement, the value of the coefficient varying from negative values characteristic of highly oriented carbon materials to a value of (7-8) x 10 -6 degree -1

  11. Effect of heat treatment on carbon fiber surface properties and fibers/epoxy interfacial adhesion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai Zhishuang; Zhang Baoyan; Shi Fenghui; Li Min; Zhang Zuoguang; Gu Yizhuo

    2011-01-01

    Carbon fiber surface properties are likely to change during the molding process of carbon fiber reinforced matrix composite, and these changes could affect the infiltration and adhesion between carbon fiber and resin. T300B fiber was heat treated referring to the curing process of high-performance carbon fiber reinforced epoxy matrix composites. By means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), activated carbon atoms can be detected, which are defined as the carbon atoms conjunction with oxygen and nitrogen. Surface chemistry analysis shows that the content of activated carbon atoms on treated carbon fiber surface, especially those connect with the hydroxyl decreases with the increasing heat treatment temperature. Inverse gas chromatography (IGC) analysis reveals that the dispersive surface energy γ S d increases and the polar surface energy γ S sp decreases as the heat treatment temperature increases to 200. Contact angle between carbon fiber and epoxy E51 resin, which is studied by dynamic contact angle test (DCAT) increases with the increasing heat treatment temperature, indicating the worse wettability comparing with the untreated fiber. Moreover, micro-droplet test shows that the interfacial shear strength (IFSS) of the treated carbon fiber/epoxy is lower than that of the untreated T300B fiber which is attributed to the decrement of the content of reactive functional groups including hydrogen group and epoxy group.

  12. Orientation-dependent tensile deformation and damage of a T700 carbon fiber/epoxy composite: A synchrotron-based study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bie, B. X.; Huang, J. Y.; Fan, D.; Sun, T.; Fezzaa, K.; Xiao, X. H.; Qi, M. L.; Luo, S. N.

    2017-09-01

    Uniaxial tensile experiments are conducted on a T700 carbon fiber/epoxy composite along various offaxis angles. Stressestrain curves are measured along with strain fields mapped via synchrotron x-ray digital image correlation, as well as computerized tomography. Elastic modulus and tensile strength decrease with increasing off-axis angles, while fracture strain exhibits a nonmonotonic trend as a combined result of tensile strength decrease and fracture mode transition. At high off-axis angles, strain field mapping demonstrates distinct tensile and shear strain localizations and deformation bands approximately along the fiber directions, while deformation is mainly achieved via continuous growth of tensile strain at low off-axis angles. Roughness of fracture planes decreases exponentially as the off-axis angle increases. The stressestrain curves, strain fields, tomography and fractographs show consistent features, and reveal a fracture mode transition from mainly tension (fiber fracture) to in-plane shear (interface debonding).

  13. The Preparation of Carbon Nanotube/MnO2 Composite Fiber and Its Application to Flexible Micro-Supercapacitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, L.; Xie, J.; Shao, Z.; Yang, F.; Li, L.; Chen, Ch.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, flexible electronic devices pursued for potential applications. The design and the fabrication of a novel flexible nano architecture by coating electrical conductive MWCNT fiber with ultrathin films of MnO 2 to achieve high specific capacitance, for micro-super capacitors electrode applications, are demonstrated here. The MWCNT/MnO 2 composite fiber electrode was prepared by the electrochemical deposition which was carried out through using two different methods: cyclic voltammetry and potentiostatic methods. The cyclic voltammetry method can get “crumpled paper ball” morphology MnO 2 which has bigger specific capacitances than that achieved by potentiostatic method. The flexible micro-super capacitor was fabricated by twisting two aligned MWCNT fibers and showed an area specific capacitance of 2.43 mF/cm 2 . The flexible micro-super capacitors also enable promising applications in various fields

  14. Structural investigation of carbon/carbon composites by neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prem, Manfred; Krexner, Gerhard; Peterlik, Herwig

    2006-01-01

    Carbon/carbon (C/C) composite material was investigated by means of small-angle as well as wide-angle elastic neutron scattering. The C/C-composites were built up from bi-directionally woven fabrics from PAN-based carbon fibers. Pre-impregnation with phenolic resin was followed by pressure curing and carbonization at 1000 deg. C and a final heat treatment at either 1800 or 2400 deg. C. Measurements of the samples were performed in orientations arranging the carbon fibers, respectively, parallel and perpendicular to the incoming beam. Structural features of the fibers as well as the inherently existing pores are presented and the influence of the heat treatment is discussed. The results are compared to earlier X-ray investigations of carbon fibers and C/C-composites

  15. Processing and Characterization of Needled Carbon Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    are found in the literature of needled/felted carbon-carbon (C/C) composites for high temperature applications such as ablative aerospace heat shields...carbon fibers themselves. Reductions in tensile strength of up to 25% for stitched carbon/ epoxy composites have been reported, as have drops in elastic...laminate plane. Previous work with needled glass/ epoxy composites has shown a 270% improvement in Mode I interlaminar fracture toughness when needled

  16. A facile one-pot fabrication of polyphosphazene microsphere/carbon fiber hybrid reinforcement and its effect on the interfacial adhesion of epoxy composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xiang [Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Robotics and Intelligent Manufacturing Equipment Technology, Ningbo Institute of Material Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Science, Ningbo 315201 (China); School of Mechanical and Electronic Engineering, Ningbo Dahongying University, Ningbo 315175 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Xu, Haibing, E-mail: xuhaibing@nimte.ac.cn [Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Robotics and Intelligent Manufacturing Equipment Technology, Ningbo Institute of Material Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Science, Ningbo 315201 (China); Liu, Dong; Yan, Chun [Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Robotics and Intelligent Manufacturing Equipment Technology, Ningbo Institute of Material Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Science, Ningbo 315201 (China); Zhu, Yingdan, E-mail: y.zhu@nimte.ac.cn [Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Robotics and Intelligent Manufacturing Equipment Technology, Ningbo Institute of Material Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Science, Ningbo 315201 (China)

    2017-07-15

    Graphical abstract: Carbon fiber was successfully functionalized with a layer of coating and poly(cyclotriphosphazene-co-4,4′-sulfonyldiphonel) microspheres (PZSMS) by in situ polymerization. The enhancement of surface roughness can improve obviously the interfacial properties through providing more contact points and increasing mechanical interlocking between carbon fiber and epoxy matrix. Moreover, the cyclomatrix-type polyphosphazene coating and PZSMS distributed on the fibers surface can heal the surface defects to some extent and assist in holding back or absorbing excessive stress, resulting in the improvement of tensile strength. - Highlights: • Polyphosphazene microspheres/CF hybrid reinforcements were prepared via a novel and facile one-pot in situ polymerization. • Plenty of poly(cyclotriphosphazene-co-4,4′-sulfonyldiphonel) microspheres were introduced onto the CF surfaces. • The multi-scale hybrid CF reinforcement enhanced the interfacial adhesion of CF/epoxy composites obviously. • The tensile strength of multi-scale hybrid CF also showed an obvious increase. - Abstract: Introducing nanoscale reinforcements into the interface between carbon fiber (CF) and resin is an effective approach to improve the interfacial adhesion of CF composites. In this paper, a facile one-pot polymerization process provides a rapid and efficient method for preparing polyphosphazene microspheres/CF hybrid reinforcement using hexachlorocyclotriphosphazene (HCCP) and bis(4-hydroxyphenyl) sulfone (BPS) as monomers. By the in situ polymerization modification, HCCP and BPS were successfully cross-linked and deposited on the CF surface. Scanning electron microscope and atomic force microscopy images show that poly(cyclotriphosphazene-co-4,4′-sulfonyldiphonel) microspheres were introduced onto the CF surfaces and the surface roughness of fibers is enhanced obviously. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirm that the

  17. Polishing and coating carbon fiber-reinforced carbon composites with a carbon-titanium layer enhances adhesion and growth of osteoblast-like MG63 cells and vascular smooth muscle cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacáková, L; Starý, V; Kofronová, O; Lisá, V

    2001-03-15

    Carbon fiber-reinforced carbon composites (CFRC) are considered to be promising materials for orthopedic and dental surgery. Their mechanical properties can be tailored to be similar to those of bone, and their chemical composition (close to pure carbon) promises that they will be tolerated well by the surrounding tissue. In this study, CFRC composites were fabricated from phenolic resin and unidirectionally oriented Torayca carbon fibers by carbonization (1000 degrees C) and graphitization (2500 degrees C). The material then was cut with a diamond saw into sheets of 8 x 10 x 3 mm, and the upper surface was polished by colloidal SiO2 and/or covered with a carbon-titanium (C:Ti) layer (3.3 microm) using the plasma-enhanced physical vapor deposition method. Three different kinds of modified samples were prepared: polished only, covered only, and polished + covered. Untreated samples served as a control. The surface roughness of these samples, measured by a Talysurf profilometer, decreased significantly after polishing but usually did not decrease after coating with a C:Ti layer. On all three modified surfaces, human osteoblast-like cells of the MG63 line and rat vascular smooth muscle cells (both cultured in a Dulbecco's minimum essential medium with 10% fetal bovine serum) adhered at higher numbers (by 21-87% on day 1 after seeding) and exhibited a shorter population doubling time (by 13-40%). On day 4 after seeding, these cells attained higher population densities (by 61-378%), volume (by 18-37%), and protein content (by 16-120%). These results were more pronounced in VSMC than in MG63 cells and in both groups of C:Ti-covered samples than in the polished only samples. The release of carbon particles from the CFRC composites was significantly decreased--by 8 times in the polished only, 24 times in the covered only, and 42 times in the polished + covered samples. These results show that both polishing and carbon-titanium covering significantly improve the

  18. Study on effects of E-glass fiber hybrid composites enhanced with multi-walled carbon nanotubes under tensile load using full factorial design of experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musthak, Md.; Madhavi, M.; Ahsanullah, F. M.

    2017-08-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT's) are attracting scientific and industrial interest by virtue of their outstanding characteristics. The present research problem deals with the fabrication and characterization of E-glass fiber composites enhanced by carbon nanotubes. In the present study, three factors with two levels are considered. Hence, the design is called 23 full factorial design of experiment. The process parameters considered for the present problem are weight of multi-walled carbon nanotubes, process to disperse nano-particles in resin, and orientation of woven fabric. In addition, their levels considered for the experiment are higher level (+1) and lower level (-1). Fabrication of E-glass fiber composites was carried out according to design, and the specimens were prepared with respect to the ASTM standards D3039-76 and tensile testing was performed. The results show that the nano-particulated composite plate can be manufactured by considering lower level nano-particles stirred with probe sonicator and plied-up with hybrid orientation.

  19. Carbon fiber reinforced PEEK Optima--a composite material biomechanical properties and wear/debris characteristics of CF-PEEK composites for orthopedic trauma implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Ely L; Rath, Ehud; Shlaifer, Amir; Chechik, Ofir; Maman, Eran; Salai, Moshe

    2013-01-01

    The advantageous properties of carbon fiber reinforced polyetheretherketone (CF-PEEK) composites for use as orthopedic implants include similar modulus to bone and ability to withstand prolonged fatigue strain. The CF-PEEK tibial nail, dynamic compression plate, proximal humeral plate and distal radius volar plate were compared biomechanically (by four-point bending, static torsion of the nail, and bending fatigue) and for wear/debris (by amount of the debris generated at the connection between the CF-PEEK plate and titanium alloy screws) to commercially available devices. Four-point bending stress of the tibial nail and dynamic and distal radius plates yielded characteristics similar to other commercially available devices. The distal volar plate bending structural stiffness of the CF-PEEK distal volar plate was 0.542 Nm2 versus 0.376 Nm2 for the DePuy's DVR anatomic volar plate. The PHILOS proximal humeral internal locking system stainless steel plate was much stronger (6.48 Nm2) than the CF-PEEK proximal humeral plate (1.1 Nm2). Tibial nail static torsion testing showed similar properties to other tested nails (Fixion, Zimmer and Synthes). All tested CF-PEEK devices underwent one million fatigue cycles without failure. Wear test showed a lower volume of generated particles in comparison to the common implants in use today. Thus, these tested implants were similar to commercially used devices and can be recommended for use as implants in orthopedic surgery. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Improvement of solid-phase microextraction efficiency by the application of a carbon-nanotubes-based ternary microextraction fiber composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadiazar, Sirwan; Fallahpour, Nastaran; Roostaie, Ali; Ebrahimi, Bahram

    2017-09-01

    In this study, a novel technique is proposed for preparation of an efficient and unbreakable metal-wire-supported solid-phase microextraction fiber. A sol-gel film was deposited on electrophoretically deposited carbon nanotubes on a stainless-steel wire. The applicability of the fiber was evaluated through the extraction of some aromatic pollutants as model compounds from the headspace of aqueous samples in combination with gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. The parameters affecting the structure and extraction efficiency of the fiber (including the type of solvent, time, and potential for electrophoretic deposition) and the parameters affecting the extraction efficiency (such as coating type, salt content, extraction temperature, and time) were investigated. The results showed that the film thickness will be increased by increasing the potential and time duration. Finally, the characterization of the deposited film was accomplished by scanning electron microscopy and thermogravimetric analysis. After the optimization of the extraction parameters, the limit of detection of less than 20 pg/mL was achieved, and the calibration curves were all linear (r 2  ≥ 0.9737), in the range from 50 to 500 pg/mL. The solid-phase microextraction fiber has a high mechanical strength; good stability and long service life, making it potentially applicable in the extraction of trace polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from aqueous samples. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Effects of Fiber Coating Composition on Mechanical Behavior of Silicon Carbide Fiber-Reinforced Celsian Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Elderidge, Jeffrey I.

    1998-01-01

    Celsian matrix composites reinforced with Hi-Nicalon fibers, precoated with a dual layer of BN/SiC by chemical vapor deposition in two separate batches, were fabricated. Mechanical properties of the composites were measured in three-point flexure. Despite supposedly identical processing, the composite panels fabricated with fibers coated in two batches exhibited substantially different mechanical behavior. The first matrix cracking stresses (sigma(sub mc)) of the composites reinforced with fibers coated in batch 1 and batch 2 were 436 and 122 MPa, respectively. This large difference in sigma(sub mc) was attributed to differences in fiber sliding stresses(tau(sub friction)), 121.2+/-48.7 and 10.4+/-3.1 MPa, respectively, for the two composites as determined by the fiber push-in method. Such a large difference in values of tau(sub friction) for the two composites was found to be due to the difference in the compositions of the interface coatings. Scanning Auger microprobe analysis revealed the presence of carbon layers between the fiber and BN, and also between the BN and SiC coatings in the composite showing lower tau(sub friction). This resulted in lower sigma(sub mc) in agreement with the ACK theory. The ultimate strengths of the two composites, 904 and 759 MPa, depended mainly on the fiber volume fraction and were not significantly effected by tau(sub friction) values, as expected. The poor reproducibility of the fiber coating composition between the two batches was judged to be the primary source of the large differences in performance of the two composites.

  2. Wood versus plant fibers: Similarities and differences in composite applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Bo; Gamstedt, E. Kristofer

    2013-01-01

    -negligible porosity content, and finally, the moisture sensitivity of the composites. The performance of wood and plant fiber composites is compared to the synthetic glass and carbon fibers conventionally used for composites, and advantages and disadvantages of the different fibers are discussed. © 2013 Bo Madsen......The work on cellulose fiber composites is typically strictly divided into two separated research fields depending on the fiber origin, that is, from wood and from annual plants, representing the two different industries of forest and agriculture, respectively. The present paper evaluates...... in parallel wood fibers and plant fibers to highlight their similarities and differences regarding their use as reinforcement in composites and to enable mutual transfer of knowledge and technology between the two research fields. The paper gives an introduction to the morphology, chemistry...

  3. Plasma polymerized thin coating as a protective layer of carbon nanotubes grafted on carbon fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Einig, A; Magga, Y; Bai, J B; Rumeau, P; Desrousseaux, S

    2013-01-01

    Nanoparticles addition is widely studied to improve properties of carbon fiber reinforced composites. Here, hybrid carbon fiber results from grafting of carbon nanotubes (CNT) by Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) on the carbon fiber for mechanical reinforcement and conductive properties. Both tows and woven fabrics made of the hybrid fibers are added to the matrix for composite processing. However handling hybrid fibers may induce unwilling health risk due to eventual CNT release and a protective layer is required. A thin coating layer is deposited homogeneously by low pressure plasma polymerization of an organic monomer without modifying the morphology and the organization of grafted CNTs. The polymeric layer effect on the electrical behavior of hybrid fiber is assessed by conductivity measurements. Its influence on the mechanical properties is also studied regarding the interface adhesion between fiber and matrix. The protective role of layer is demonstrated by means of friction constraints applied to the hybrid fiber.

  4. Stress wave propagation in thin long-fiber carbon/epoxy composite panel. Numerical and experimental solutions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kroupa, Tomáš; Červ, Jan; Valeš, František

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 1, č. 1 (2007), s. 127-136 ISSN 1802-680X. [Computational Mechanics 2007. Hrad Nečtiny, 05.11.2007-07.11.2007] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA200760611 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : FRP composite * carbon-epoxy * orthotropic material Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics

  5. Energy dissipation and high-strain rate dynamic response of E-glass fiber composites with anchored carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study explores the mechanical properties of an E-glass fabric composite reinforced with anchored multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The CNTs were grown on the E-glass fabric using a floating catalyst chemical vapor deposition procedure. The E-glass fabric with attached CNTs was then incorpor...

  6. Laboratory evaluation of airborne particulate control treatments for simulated aircraft crash recovery operations involving carbon fiber composite materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreri, Matthew; Slagley, Jeremy; Felker, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    This study compared four treatment protocols to reduce airborne composite fiber particulates during simulated aircraft crash recovery operations. Four different treatments were applied to determine effectiveness in reducing airborne composite fiber particulates as compared to a "no treatment" protocol. Both "gold standard" gravimetric methods and real-time instruments were used to describe mass per volume concentration, particle size distribution, and surface area. The treatment protocols were applying water, wetted water, wax, or aqueous film-forming foam (AFFF) to both burnt and intact tickets of aircraft composite skin panels. The tickets were then cut using a small high-speed rotary tool to simulate crash recovery operations. Aerosol test chamber. None. Airborne particulate control treatments. Measures included concentration units of milligrams per cubic meter of air, particle size distribution as described by both count median diameter and mass median diameter and geometric standard deviation of particles in micrometers, and surface area concentration in units of square micrometers per cubic centimeter. Finally, a Monte Carlo simulation was run on the particle size distribution results. Comparison was made via one-way analysis of variance. A significant difference (pcrash recovery operations should include a treatment of the debris with water or wetted water. The resulting increase in particle size will make respiratory protection more effective in protecting the response crews.

  7. Thermal Properties of Hybrid Carbon Nanotube/Carbon Fiber Polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jin Ho; Cano, Roberto J.; Luong, Hoa; Ratcliffe, James G.; Grimsley, Brian W.; Siochi, Emilie J.

    2016-01-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites possess many advantages for aircraft structures over conventional aluminum alloys: light weight, higher strength- and stiffness-to-weight ratio, and low life-cycle maintenance costs. However, the relatively low thermal and electrical conductivities of CFRP composites are deficient in providing structural safety under certain operational conditions such as lightning strikes. One possible solution to these issues is to interleave carbon nanotube (CNT) sheets between conventional carbon fiber (CF) composite layers. However, the thermal and electrical properties of the orthotropic hybrid CNT/CF composites have not been fully understood. In this study, hybrid CNT/CF polymer composites were fabricated by interleaving layers of CNT sheets with Hexcel (Registered Trademark) IM7/8852 prepreg. The CNT sheets were infused with a 5% solution of a compatible epoxy resin prior to composite fabrication. Orthotropic thermal and electrical conductivities of the hybrid polymer composites were evaluated. The interleaved CNT sheets improved the in-plane thermal conductivity of the hybrid composite laminates by about 400% and the electrical conductivity by about 3 orders of magnitude.

  8. The improvement of the hygrothermal and mechanical properties of bismaleimide and K3B/IM7 carbon-fiber composites through a systematic study of the interphase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilenski, Mark Stewart

    Advanced aircraft travel at speeds in excess of mach 2 result in external skin temperatures ranging from {-}60sp°C to +190sp°C with extreme heating and cooling rates in the presence of moisture. This combination of environments presents a challenge to current materials. IM7 carbon fiber composites made with either bismaleimide (a thermoset) or K3B (a thermoplastic polyimide) resin are being considered for this use. The overall objective of this research was to develop a greater understanding of both the macroscopic response of these materials to hygrothermal and thermal spike environments, as well as the molecular level interactions which affect the ability of the resins to bond to the fiber. Hygrothermal testing of BMI/IM7 composites showed that resin properties are reduced by the presence of moisture while composite properties are virtually unaffected. Exposure of composites to a relatively small number of thermal spikes between room temperature and 250sp°C was shown to have little effect on BMI/IM7 composites, but causes excessive blistering of wet K3B/IM7 composites. A macroscopic microcracking phenomenon is observed in cross-ply laminates of the BMI/IM7 system. This was shown to be due to the generation of thermal residual stresses formed during cool down from a "stress-free temperature." Both finite element and analytical models were utilized to analyze the causes of this microcracking with a focus on methods for minimizing the resultant stresses. Several methods with potential were identified and suggestions for future work are made. Microscopically, tests of the bond strength between both the BMI and K3B resins with the unsized IM7 fiber indicated that the adhesion was low. Experimentation on the BMI/IM7 system was able to identify that the only active adhesion promoting mechanism was mechanical interlocking and not chemical bonds between functionalities on the fiber surface and the resin. Various methods for improving the adhesion in the BMI/IM7 system

  9. Wood versus Plant Fibers: Similarities and Differences in Composite Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Madsen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The work on cellulose fiber composites is typically strictly divided into two separated research fields depending on the fiber origin, that is, from wood and from annual plants, representing the two different industries of forest and agriculture, respectively. The present paper evaluates in parallel wood fibers and plant fibers to highlight their similarities and differences regarding their use as reinforcement in composites and to enable mutual transfer of knowledge and technology between the two research fields. The paper gives an introduction to the morphology, chemistry, and ultrastructure of the fibers, the modeling of the mechanical properties of the fibers, the fiber preforms available for manufacturing of composites, the typical mechanical properties of the composites, the modeling of the mechanical properties with focus on composites having a random fiber orientation and a non-negligible porosity content, and finally, the moisture sensitivity of the composites. The performance of wood and plant fiber composites is compared to the synthetic glass and carbon fibers conventionally used for composites, and advantages and disadvantages of the different fibers are discussed.

  10. Interfacial enhancement of carbon fiber composites by growing TiO2 nanowires onto amine-based functionalized carbon fiber surface in supercritical water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Lichun; Li, Nan; Wu, Guangshun; Song, Guojun; Li, Xiaoru; Han, Ping; Wang, Gang; Huang, Yudong

    2018-03-01

    A novel amine-based functionalization method was developed to improve the interfacial adhesion between TiO2 NWs and CFs in supercritical water. The microstructure, morphology and mechanical properties of CFs were investigated. It was found that introducing hexamethylenetetramine (HMTA) dendrimers and branched polyethyleneimine (PEI) on CF could increase significantly the adhesion strength between CF and TiO2 NWs and their interfacial shear strength with epoxy resin, and the order is CF-PEI-TiO2 NWs > CF-HMTA-TiO2 NWs > CF-COOH-TiO2 NWs > CF-TiO2 NW. Meanwhile, the reinforcing mechanisms and interfacial failure modes have also been discussed. We believe that these effective methods may provide theoretical foundation for the preparation of high performance composite materials.

  11. Aluminum-carbon composite electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farahmandi, C.J.; Dispennette, J.M.

    1998-07-07

    A high performance double layer capacitor having an electric double layer formed in the interface between activated carbon and an electrolyte is disclosed. The high performance double layer capacitor includes a pair of aluminum impregnated carbon composite electrodes having an evenly distributed and continuous path of aluminum impregnated within an activated carbon fiber preform saturated with a high performance electrolytic solution. The high performance double layer capacitor is capable of delivering at least 5 Wh/kg of useful energy at power ratings of at least 600 W/kg. 3 figs.

  12. Aluminum-carbon composite electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farahmandi, C. Joseph; Dispennette, John M.

    1998-07-07

    A high performance double layer capacitor having an electric double layer formed in the interface between activated carbon and an electrolyte is disclosed. The high performance double layer capacitor includes a pair of aluminum impregnated carbon composite electrodes having an evenly distributed and continuous path of aluminum impregnated within an activated carbon fiber preform saturated with a high performance electrolytic solution. The high performance double layer capacitor is capable of delivering at least 5 Wh/kg of useful energy at power ratings of at least 600 W/kg.

  13. Methods of making carbon fiber from asphaltenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohnert, George; Bowen, III, Daniel E.

    2017-02-28

    Making carbon fiber from asphaltenes obtained through heavy oil upgrading. In more detail, carbon fiber is made from asphaltenes obtained from heavy oil feedstocks undergoing upgrading in a continuous coking reactor.

  14. [In vivo evaluation of carbon fiber posts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, V; Lugliè, P F; Chessa, G

    2002-05-01

    The use of carbon fiber posts allows morpho-functional restoration of endodontically treated teeth with an assembly of materials of a modulus of elasticity similar to that of dentin. The study clinically evaluated the percentage of survival of dental elements treated and reconstructed with endocanal carbon fiber posts. At the Dentistry Clinic of the University of Sassari 60 dental elements were selected from 46 subjects. The teeth, which had been treated endodontically with success for at least six months, were classified by parameters taken from the international literature and reconstructed using Tech 2000 carbon fiber posts and adhesive resinous systems recommended by the post manufacturer. The success rate was 98.4%. Almost half (49%) of the samples were single-rooted elements, 37.4% of the posts were 1.2 mm in diameter; in 78.3% the opposing contact was with a natural tooth; 100% of the elements had a type A dental structure. Third generation posts are a valid alternative to metallic posts and improve the prognosis of the treated element. The carbon fiber posts fixed with the composite, forming a single unit with the dental element, thus improving mid-term RESULTS. The technique is easy to use under clinical conditions and can be performed in a single session. So far, the method has provided promising clinical results, as this study demonstrated.

  15. Predictive Engineering Tools for Injection-Molded Long-Carbon-Fiber Thermoplastic Composites - FY 2014 First Quarterly Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Sanborn, Scott E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Simmons, Kevin L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Mathur, Raj N. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Sangid, Michael D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Jin, Xiaoshi [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Costa, Franco [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Gandhi, Umesh N. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Mori, Steven [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Tucker, III, Charles L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-02-19

    The CRADA between PNNL, Autodesk, Toyota and Magna has been effective since October 28th, 2013. The whole team including CRADA and subcontract partners kicked off the project technically on November 1st, 2013. This report describes work performed during the first quarter of FY 2014. The following technical progresses have been made toward project milestones: 1) The project kickoff meeting was organized at PlastiComp, Inc. in Winona on November 13th, 2013 involving all the project partners. During this meeting the research plan and Gantt chart were discussed and refined. The coordination of the research activities among the partners was also discussed to ensure that the deliverables and timeline will be met. 2) Autodesk delivered a research version of ASMI to PNNL for process modeling using this tool under the project. PNNL installed this research version on a PNNL computer and tested it. Currently, PNNL is using ASMI to prepare the models for PlastiComp plaques. 3) PlastiComp has compounded long carbon-fiber reinforced polypropylene and polyamide 6,6 compounds for rheological and thermal characterization tests by the Autodesk laboratories in Melbourne, Australia. 4) Initial mold flow analysis was carried out by PlastiComp to confirm that the 3D complex part selected by Toyota as a representative automotive part is moldable. 5) Toyota, Magna, PlastiComp and PNNL finalized the planning for molding the Toyota 3D complex part. 6) Purdue University worked with PNNL to update and specify the test matrix for characterization of fiber length/orientation. 7) Purdue University developed tools to automate the data collection and analysis of fiber length and orientation measurements. 8) Purdue University designed and specified equipment to replace the need for equipment using the technology established by the University of Leeds at General Motors.

  16. Influence of Thin-Film Adhesives in Pullout Tests Between Nickel-Titanium Shape Memory Alloy and Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quade, Derek J.; Jana, Sadhan; McCorkle, Linda S.

    2018-01-01

    Strips of nickel-titanium (NiTi) shape memory alloy (SMA) and carbon fiber-reinforced polymer matrix composite (PMC) were bonded together using multiple thin film adhesives and their mechanical strengths were evaluated under pullout test configuration. Tensile and lap shear tests were conducted to confirm the deformation of SMAs at room temperature and to evaluate the adhesive strength between the NiTi strips and the PMC. Optical and scanning electron microscopy techniques were used to examine the interfacial bonding after failure. Simple equations on composite tensile elongation were used to fit the experimental data on tensile properties. ABAQUS models were generated to show the effects of enhanced bond strength and the distribution of stress in SMA and PMC. The results revealed that the addition of thin film adhesives increased the average adhesive strength between SMA and PMC while halting the room temperature shape memory effect within the pullout specimen.

  17. High fiber-low matrix composites: kenaf fiber/polypropylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand R. Sanadi; J.F. Hunt; D.F. Caulfield; G. Kovacsvolgyi; B. Destree

    2002-01-01

    Considerable interest has been generated in the use of lignocellulosic fibers and wastes (both agricultural and wood based) as fillers and reinforcements in thermoplastics. In general, present technologies limit fiber loading in thermoplastics to about 60 percent by weight of fiber. To produce high fiber content composites for commercial use while maintaining adequate...

  18. Hybrid fiber and nanopowder reinforced composites for wind turbine blades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikoloz M. Chikhradze

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of an investigation into the production of wind turbine blades manufactured using polymer composites reinforced by hybrid (carbon, basalt, glass fibers and strengthened by various nanopowders (oxides, carbides, borides are presented. The hybrid fiber-reinforced composites (HFRC were manufactured with prepreg technology by molding pre-saturated epoxy-strengthened matrix-reinforced fabric. Performance of the manufactured composites was estimated with values of the coefficient of operating condition (COC at a moderate and elevated temperature.

  19. Mechanical properties of high performance carbon fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, K.J.

    1984-01-01

    Carbon fibers often show a variation in axial preferred orientation across the fiber diameter which leads to a modulus gradient and residual stress. Theoretical equations of the residual stresses in radial, hoop and longitudinal directions were derived from linear elasticity based on a perfect onion skin model. The high hoop compressive stress in the surface causes a flute-like structure in the fiber surface, and the radial stress within the fiber will induce microcracks within the fiber. Another model, based on parallel springs, was used to estimate the magnitude of the longitudinal stress which shows very good fit with the experimental data. The modulus gradient and residual strain in carbon fibers were measured by successively electrochemically milling away the fiber surface. Electrochemical etching was found to remove the carbon fiber surface very uniformly in contrast with air and wet oxidation. The moduli of most carbon fibers decreased after the outer layer of the fibers were removed. In general, type I carbon fibers with a skin/core heterogeneous structure show higher modulus gradient than those of type II and type A carbon fibers. Axial compressive residual stresses were very high for some higher modulus carbon fibers. SEM studies of the tensilely fracture surface of the single filament show, in general, type I carbon fiber failure initiates from interior voids while type II and type A fail by surface flaws

  20. Cylindrical Piezoelectric Fiber Composite Actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Sidney G.; Shams, Qamar A.; Fox, Robert L.

    2008-01-01

    The use of piezoelectric devices has become widespread since Pierre and Jacques Curie discovered the piezoelectric effect in 1880. Examples of current applications of piezoelectric devices include ultrasonic transducers, micro-positioning devices, buzzers, strain sensors, and clocks. The invention of such lightweight, relatively inexpensive piezoceramic-fiber-composite actuators as macro fiber composite (MFC) actuators has made it possible to obtain strains and displacements greater than those that could be generated by prior actuators based on monolithic piezoceramic sheet materials. MFC actuators are flat, flexible actuators designed for bonding to structures to apply or detect strains. Bonding multiple layers of MFC actuators together could increase force capability, but not strain or displacement capability. Cylindrical piezoelectric fiber composite (CPFC) actuators have been invented as alternatives to MFC actuators for applications in which greater forces and/or strains or displacements may be required. In essence, a CPFC actuator is an MFC or other piezoceramic fiber composite actuator fabricated in a cylindrical instead of its conventional flat shape. Cylindrical is used here in the general sense, encompassing shapes that can have circular, elliptical, rectangular or other cross-sectional shapes in the planes perpendicular to their longitudinal axes.

  1. Design and fabrication of carbon fibers with needle-like nano-HA coating to reinforce granular nano-HA composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xudong; Zhao, Xueni; Zhang, Li; Wang, Wanying; Zhang, Jing; He, Fuzhen; Yang, Jianjun

    2017-08-01

    Carbon fibers (CFs) with needle-like nano-hydroxyapatite (nHA) coating were first used as reinforcing materials named nHA-CFs to improve the mechanical properties of pure HA. A powder mixture containing nHA-CFs and granular nano-HA (gHA) was directly sintered by hot pressing at appropriate sintering pressure and temperature. A three-phase nHA-CFs/gHA composite was designed, fabricated, and used as an artificial bone. Results show that the bending strengths of the nHA-CFs/gHA composite are approximately 41.1% and 59.2% higher than those of CFs/gHA composite and pure HA, respectively. The possible reinforcing mechanism of nHA-CFs in the composite is also proposed at the end. When nHA-CFs are applied for preparation of nHA-CFs/gHA composites, the internal stress on its phase boundary with gHA matrix generated during cooling of sintered is significantly reduced due to the presence of the nHA coatings. It infers that nHA coatings on CFs might act as a bridge to control the forming of interfacial gaps between the gHA matrix and the CFs effectively. Our work provides additional insights into the feasibility of nHA-CFs/gHA composites as load-bearing implant materials in clinical applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. A New Approach Toward the Understanding of Oxidation of Carbon/Carbon Composites

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thrower, Peter

    1996-01-01

    In some recent work, we found that carbon carbon composites made with porous, high- surface-area fibers and liquid matrix precursors were more resistant to oxidation that comparable composites made...

  3. COAL DERIVED MATRIX PITCHES FOR CARBON-CARBON COMPOSITE MANUFACTURE/PRODUCTION OF FIBERS AND COMPOSITES FROM COAL-BASED PRECURSORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter G. Stansberry; John W. Zondlo

    2001-07-01

    The Consortium for premium Carbon Products from Coal, with funding from the US Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory continue with the development of innovative technologies that will allow coal or coal-derived feedstocks to be used in the production of value-added carbon materials. In addition to supporting eleven independent projects during budget period 3, three meetings were held at two separate locations for the membership. The first was held at Nemacolin Woodlands Resort on May 15-16, 2000. This was followed by two meetings at Penn State, a tutorial on August 11, 2000 and a technical progress meeting on October 26-27.

  4. The Tensile Behavior of High-Strength Carbon Fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langston, Tye

    2016-08-01

    Carbon fibers exhibit exceptional properties such as high stiffness and specific strength, making them excellent reinforcements for composite materials. However, it is difficult to directly measure their tensile properties and estimates are often obtained by tensioning fiber bundles or composites. While these macro scale tests are informative for composite design, their results differ from that of direct testing of individual fibers. Furthermore, carbon filament strength also depends on other variables, including the test length, actual fiber diameter, and material flaw distribution. Single fiber tensile testing was performed on high-strength carbon fibers to determine the load and strain at failure. Scanning electron microscopy was also conducted to evaluate the fiber surface morphology and precisely measure each fiber's diameter. Fiber strength was found to depend on the test gage length and in an effort to better understand the overall expected performance of these fibers at various lengths, statistical weak link scaling was performed. In addition, the true Young's modulus was also determined by taking the system compliance into account. It was found that all properties (tensile strength, strain to failure, and Young's modulus) matched very well with the manufacturers' reported values at 20 mm gage lengths, but deviated significantly at other lengths.

  5. Magneto-carbonization method for production of carbon fiber, and high performance carbon fibers made thereby

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naskar, Amit K.; Ozcan, Soydan; Eberle, Claude C.; Abdallah, Mohamed Gabr; Mackiewicz, Ludtka Gail; Ludtka, Gerard Michael; Paulauskas, Felix Leonard; Rivard, John Daniel Kennedy

    2017-08-08

    Method for the preparation of carbon fiber from fiber precursor, wherein the fiber precursor is subjected to a magnetic field of at least 3 Tesla during a carbonization process. The carbonization process is generally conducted at a temperature of at least 400.degree. C. and less than 2200.degree. C., wherein, in particular embodiments, the carbonization process includes a low temperature carbonization step conducted at a temperature of at least or above 400.degree. C. or 500.degree. C. and less than or up to 1000.degree. C., 1100.degree. C., or 1200.degree. C., followed by a high temperature carbonization step conducted at a temperature of at least or above 1200.degree. C. In particular embodiments, particularly in the case of a polyacrylonitrile (PAN) fiber precursor, the resulting carbon fiber may possess a minimum tensile strength of at least 600 ksi, a tensile modulus of at least 30 Msi, and an ultimate elongation of at least 1.5%.

  6. Carbon nanotube fiber spun from wetted ribbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yuntian T; Arendt, Paul; Zhang, Xiefei; Li, Qingwen; Fu, Lei; Zheng, Lianxi

    2014-04-29

    A fiber of carbon nanotubes was prepared by a wet-spinning method involving drawing carbon nanotubes away from a substantially aligned, supported array of carbon nanotubes to form a ribbon, wetting the ribbon with a liquid, and spinning a fiber from the wetted ribbon. The liquid can be a polymer solution and after forming the fiber, the polymer can be cured. The resulting fiber has a higher tensile strength and higher conductivity compared to dry-spun fibers and to wet-spun fibers prepared by other methods.

  7. Diclofenac degradation by heterogeneous photocatalysis with Fe3O4/Ti x O y /activated carbon fiber composite synthesized by ultrasound irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Valencia, E. I.; Paredes-Carrera, S. P.; Sánchez-Ochoa, J. C.; Flores-Valle, S. O.; Avendaño-Gómez, J. R.

    2017-11-01

    In this work, a photocatalytic system to degrade diclofenac was developed using a composite Fe3O4/Ti x O y on an activated carbon fiber. Diclofenac is widely used as an anti-inflammatory compound worldwide and it is constantly being added as waste in the environment (Heberer 2002 J. Hydrol. 266 175-89), exceeding the permissible maximum concentration in the wastewater (GEO-3 2002 Programa de las Naciones Unidas para el Medio Ambiente; Golet et al 2003 Environ. Sci. Technol. 37 3243-9 Oviedo et al 2010 Environ. Toxicol. Pharmacol. 29 9-43 Le-Minh et al 2010 Water Res. 44 4295-323 Legrini et al 1993 Chem. Rev. 1093 671-98). The composite was synthesized by sol-gel technique with and without ultrasound irradiation (Singh and Nakate 2014 J. Nanopart. 2014 326747). The solids were deposited by ultrasound irradiation on active carbon fiber in order to optimize the diclofenac degradation. The solids were characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD), nitrogen physisorption (BET), and scanning electron microscopy with EDS microanalysis (SEM-EDS). The crystal size was calculated with the Debye-Scherrer equation, and the band gap values by the diffuse reflectance method. The evaluation process was studied by UV-vis spectroscopy (Rizzoa et al 2009 Water Res. 43 979-88). It was found that in this synthesis method (ultrasound), textural properties such as porosity, specific surface area and morphology depend on the ultrasound irradiation. The proposed system, Fe3O4/titanium oxide hydrate showed better degradation profile than TiO2 anatase phase; the increase of diclofenac degradation was attributed to the textural properties of the composite, it avoids the filtering process since the separation can be achieved by magnetizing and/or decantation.

  8. Carbon fibers from SRC pitch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greskovich, Eugene J.; Givens, Edwin N.

    1981-01-01

    This invention relates to an improved method of manufacturing carbon fibers from a coal derived pitch. The improvement resides in the use of a solvent refined coal which has been hydrotreated and subjected to solvent extraction whereby the hetero atom content in the resulting product is less than 4.0% by weight and the softening point is between about 100.degree.-250.degree. F.

  9. Storing Fluorine In Graphitelike Carbon Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Ching-Cheh

    1995-01-01

    Fluorine stored in graphite or graphitelike carbon fibers for later release and/or use in chemical reactions. Storage in carbon fibers eliminates difficulty and risk of using high-pressure tanks and pipes to hold corrosive gas. Storage in carbon fibers makes fluorine more readily accessible than does storage as constituent of metal fluoride. Carbon fibers heated to release stored fluorine, which draws away to vessel where reacts with material to be fluorinated, possibly at temperature other than release temperature. Alternatively, material to be fluorinated mixed or otherwise placed in contact with fibers and entire mass heated to or beyond release temperature.

  10. Neutron scattering investigation of carbon/carbon composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prem, M.; Krexner, G.; Peterlik, H.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Carbon/Carbon (C/C) composites, built up from bi-directionally woven fabrics from PAN based carbon fibers, pre-impregnated with phenolic resin followed by pressure curing and carbonization at 1000 o C and a final heat treatment at either 1800 o C or 2400 o C, were investigated by means of small-angle as well as wideangle elastic neutron scattering. Sample orientations arranging the carbon fibers parallel and perpendicular to the incoming beam were examined. Structural features of the composites, i.e. of the fibers as well as the inherently existing pores, are presented and the influence of the heat treatment on the structural properties is discussed. (author)

  11. Mechanical property evaluation of natural fiber coir composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harish, S.; Michael, D. Peter; Bensely, A.; Lal, D. Mohan; Rajadurai, A.

    2009-01-01

    The fiber which serves as a reinforcement in reinforced plastics may be synthetic or natural. Past studies show that only artificial fibers such as glass, carbon etc., have been used in fiber-reinforced plastics. Although glass and other synthetic fiber-reinforced plastics possess high specific strength, their fields of application are very limited because of their inherent higher cost of production. In this connection, an investigation has been carried out to make use of coir, a natural fiber abundantly available in India. Natural fibers are not only strong and lightweight but also relatively very cheap. In the present work, coir composites are developed and their mechanical properties are evaluated. Scanning electron micrographs obtained from fractured surfaces were used for a qualitative evaluation of the interfacial properties of coir/epoxy and compared with glass fiber/epoxy. These results indicate that coir can be used as a potential reinforcing material for making low load bearing thermoplastic composites

  12. Predictive engineering tools for injection-molded long-carbon-fiber thermoplastic composites - FY 2015 third quarterly report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Fifield, Leonard S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Mori, Steven [MAGNA Exteriors and Interiors Corp. Aurora, ON (Canada); Gandhi, Umesh N. [Toyota Research Institute North America, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Wang, Jin [Autodesk, Inc., Ithaca, NY (United States); Costa, Franco [Autodesk, Inc., Ithaca, NY (United States); Wollan, Eric J. [PlastiComp, Inc., Winona, MN (United States); Tucker, III, Charles L. [Univ. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL (United States)

    2015-07-01

    During the third quarter of FY 2015, the following technical progress has been made toward project milestones: 1) Magna oversaw the tool build and prepared the molding plan for the complex part of Phase II. 2) PlastiComp hosted a visit by Magna and Toyota on April 23rd to finalize the molding scope and schedule. The plan for molding trials including selection of molding parameters for both LFT and D-LFT for the U-shape complex part was established. 3) Toyota shipped the U-shape complex part tool to Magna on May 28th, 2015. 4) Plasticomp provided 30wt% LCF/PP and 30wt% LCF/PA66 compounded pellets to Magna for molding the complex part. 5) Magna performed preliminary molding trials on June 2nd, 2015 to validate wall thickness, fill profile, tool temperature and shot size requirements for the complex part. 6) Magna performed the first complex part run on June 16th and 17th, 2015 at Magna’s Composite Centre of Excellence in Concord, ON, Canada. Dale Roland of Plasticomp, and Umesh Gandhi of Toyota also attended the molding. 7) Magna discussed and finalized the plan with PNNL and the team for cutting samples from molded parts at selected locations for fiber orientation and length measurements. 8) Magna provided the computer-aided design (CAD) files of the complex parts with and without ribs to PNNL and Autodesk to build the corresponding ASMI models for injection molding simulations. Magna also provided the actual parameters used. 9) Plasticomp’s provided knowledge and experience of molding LCF materials essential to the successful molding of the parts including optimization of fill speed, tool temperatures, and plasticizing conditions for the 30wt% LCF/PP and 30wt% LCF/PA66 materials in both rib and non-rib versions. 10) Magna molded additional parts for evaluation of mechanical property testing including torsional stiffness on June 29th and 30th, 2015 at Magna’s Composite Center of Excellence. 11) Toyota began preparation for the torsion test of the specimens

  13. Lignocellulosic fiber reinforced rubber composites

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Jacob John, Maya

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available polymerization reaction using Zieglar-Natta- hetergenous catalyst. The important components of NR are given in Table I. Lignocellulosic Fiber Reinforced Rubber Composites -253- Figure 1. Structure of natural rubber NR has a very uniform.... Grafting a second polymer onto the NR backbone Grafting is mostly carried out using vinyl monomers like methyl methacrylate (MMA) and styrene. The commercial available grafted copolymer of NR with poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) is Heveaplus MG...

  14. Carbon Nanotube (CNT) and Carbon Fiber Reinforced SiC Optical Components, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — M Cubed has developed and patented technology to make carbon fiber reinforced SiC composites and components. In addition, the feasibility of doubling the toughness...

  15. Design and construction of the structure of the DEMONSTRATOR of the CALIFA detector for R3B-FAIR using carbon-fiber composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casarejos E.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we describe the DEMONSTRATOR structures and active units (PETALs developed for the detector CALIFA of the experiment R3B - FAIR. The design is based in the CALIFA BARREL mechanical solutions, but adapted to the characteristics of the PETALs, namely in what concerns the load distribution during setup and service. The R&D program defined the materials and procedures for both producing the pieces of carbon fiber (CF composites as well as the mounting of the bundles to make an alveolar structure. The procedures also include a quality control program to ensure the dimensional properties of the CF assemblies. We are also developing the use of tomographic imaging analysis for this quality program, that will be of mayor interest in the construction of the future CALIFA CF-structure.

  16. Paper-based energy-storage devices comprising carbon fiber-reinforced polypyrrole-cladophora nanocellulose composite electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Razaq, Aamir; Sjoedin, Martin; Stroemme, Maria; Mihranyan, Albert [Nanotechnology and Functional Materials, Department of Engineering Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden); Department of Chemistry, Angstroem Laboratory, Uppsala (Sweden); Nyholm, Leif [Department of Chemistry, Angstroem Laboratory, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2012-04-15

    Composites of polypyrrole (PPy) and Cladophora nanocellulose, reinforced with 8 {mu}m-thick chopped carbon filaments, can be used as electrode materials to obtain paper-based energy-storage devices with unprecedented performance at high charge and discharge rates. Charge capacities of more than 200 C g{sup -1} (PPy) are obtained for paper-based electrodes at potential scan rates as high as 500 mV s{sup -1}, whereas cell capacitances of {proportional_to}60-70 F g{sup -1} (PPy) are reached for symmetric supercapacitor cells with capacitances up to 3.0 F (i.e.,0.48 F cm{sup -2}) when charged to 0.6 V using current densities as high as 31 A g{sup -1} based on the PPy weight (i.e., 99 mA cm{sup -2}). Energy and power densities of 1.75 Wh kg{sup -1} and 2.7 kW kg{sup -1}, respectively, are obtained when normalized with respect to twice the PPy weight of the smaller electrode. No loss in cell capacitance is seen during charging/discharging at 7.7 A g{sup -1} (PPy) over 1500 cycles. It is proposed that the nonelectroactive carbon filaments decrease the contact resistances and the resistance of the reduced PPy composite. The present straightforward approach represents significant progress in the development of low-cost and environmentally friendly paper-based energy-storage devices for high-power applications. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  17. Modification of carbon fiber surfaces via grafting with Meldrum's acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuiqin, Fang; Jinxian, Wu; Julin, Wang; Tao, Zhang

    2015-11-01

    The mechanism of Meldrum's acid modifying carbon fiber surfaces was investigated in this work. The existing carbonyl groups of carbon fibers were grafted with Meldrum's acid to create carboxylic functionalized surfaces. The surface functionalization effect was detected with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscope (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The XPS results showed that the relative content of carboxylic groups on carbon fiber surfaces was increased from initial 1.41% to 7.84%, however, that of carbonyl groups was decreased from 23.11% to 13.28% after grafting reaction. The SEM, AFM and TGA results indicated that the surfaces of carbon fibers neither etched nor generated coating. The tensile strength of carbon fibers was preserved after grafting reaction according to single fiber tensile strength tests. The fibers were well combined with matrix and the maximal interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) of carbon fiber/epoxy resin composites was sharply increased approximately 74% after functionalization. The effects of acetic acid and sonication on the degree of the surface functionalization were also studied.

  18. Mechanical properties and tribological behaviour of silicon carbide/carbon nano fibers nano composites; Propiedades mecanicas y tribologicas de materiales nanoestructurados de carburo de silicio/nanofibras de carbono

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borrell, A.; Torrecillas, R.; Rocha, V. G.; Fernandez, A.; Bonache, V.; Salvador, M. D.

    2011-07-01

    The development of new ceramic/carbon nano structured materials is a very interesting option from the point of view of the automotive and aerospace industries. Its low density, high mechanical strength, high oxidation resistance and excellent friction behavior allows the use of these composites as functional materials. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of carbon nano fibers (CNFs) on the mechanical and tribological behavior of silicon carbide/CNFs nano composite obtained by spark plasma sintering technique. The tribological study was carried out in a ball-on-disk apparatus under dry sliding conditions (dry friction) and a fixed load of 15 N. The friction coefficient and wear rate were measured for each composite. Scanning electron microscope was used to analyze wear surface formed. The results show simultaneous improvement of wear behavior and mechanical properties of ceramic materials by incorporating of carbon nano fibers. (Author) 23 refs.

  19. Machinability of drilling T700/LT-03A carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) composite laminates using candle stick drill and multi-facet drill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cheng-Dong; Qiu, Kun-Xian; Chen, Ming; Cai, Xiao-Jiang

    2015-03-01

    Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic (CFRP) composite laminates are widely used in aerospace and aircraft structural components due to their superior properties. However, they are regarded as difficult-to-cut materials because of bad surface quality and low productivity. Drilling is the most common hole making process for CFRP composite laminates and drilling induced delamination damage usually occurs severely at the exit side of drilling holes, which strongly deteriorate holes quality. In this work, the candle stick drill and multi-facet drill are employed to evaluate the machinability of drilling T700/LT-03A CFRP composite laminates in terms of thrust force, delamination, holes diameter and holes surface roughness. S/N ratio is used to characterize the thrust force while an ellipse-shaped delamination model is established to quantitatively analyze the delamination. The best combination of drilling parameters are determined by full consideration of S/N ratios of thrust force and the delamination. The results indicate that candle stick drill will induce the unexpected ellipse-shaped delamination even at its best drilling parameters of spindle speed of 10,000 rpm and feed rate of 0.004 mm/tooth. However, the multi-facet drill cutting at the relative lower feed rate of 0.004 mm/tooth and lower spindle speed of 6000 rpm can effectively prevent the delamination. Comprehensively, holes quality obtained by multi-facet drill is much more superior to those obtained by candle stick drill.

  20. Fiber-reinforced composites materials, manufacturing, and design

    CERN Document Server

    Mallick, P K

    2007-01-01

    The newly expanded and revised edition of Fiber-Reinforced Composites: Materials, Manufacturing, and Design presents the most up-to-date resource available on state-of-the-art composite materials. This book is unique in that it not only offers a current analysis of mechanics and properties, but also examines the latest advances in test methods, applications, manufacturing processes, and design aspects involving composites. This third edition presents thorough coverage of newly developed materials including nanocomposites. It also adds more emphasis on underlying theories, practical methods, and problem-solving skills employed in real-world applications of composite materials. Each chapter contains new examples drawn from diverse applications and additional problems to reinforce the practical relevance of key concepts. New in The Third Edition: Contains new sections on material substitution, cost analysis, nano- and natural fibers, fiber architecture, and carbon-carbon composites Provides a new chapter on poly...

  1. Comparison of sizing effect of T700 grade carbon fiber on interfacial properties of fiber/BMI and fiber/epoxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Lirui; Li Min; Wu Qing; Dai Zhishuang; Gu Yizhuo; Li Yanxia; Zhang Zuoguang

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Carbon fiber sizings can react itself and with resin at high temperature. ► Sizings improve IFSS of carbon fiber/epoxy, but reduce that of BMI matrix. ► IFSS of carbon fiber/epoxy is larger than corresponding carbon fiber/BMI. ► Partially desized carbon fiber shows the effect of polymeric sizing component. ► The results are helpful for optimizing sizing agent of carbon fiber composites. - Abstract: This paper aims to study impact of sizing agents on interfacial properties of two T700 grade high strength carbon fibers with bismaleimide (BMI) and epoxy (EP) resin matrix. The fiber surface roughness and chemical properties are analyzed for sized, desized, and partially desized carbon fibers, using atom force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), respectively. FTIR analysis indicates that the sizing agents are chemically reactive, and they can react with BMI and EP at high temperatures. The micro-droplet tests exhibit that the desized carbon fibers have lower interfacial strengths with EP than the sized fibers, however, for BMI matrix, opposite trend is revealed. This is consistent with the chemical reactions of the sizing agents with the EP and BMI resins, in which sufficient reactions are observed for the sizing/EP mixture, while only partial reactions are probed for the sizing/BMI mixture. Interestingly, un-extracted epoxy type sizing particles are observed on partially desized carbon fiber surface, which significantly improves the interfacial adhesion with EP matrix.

  2. Predictive Engineering Tools for Injection-Molded Long-Carbon-Fiber Thermoplastic Composites - FY 2016 First Quarterly Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Fifield, Leonard S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lambert, Gregory [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Baird, Donald G. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Wang, Jin [Autodesk, Inc, Ithaca, NY (United States); Costa, Franco [Autodesk, Inc, Ithaca, NY (United States); Tucker, III, Charles L. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Gandhi, Umesh N. [Toyota Research Inst. North America, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Mori, Steven [MAGNA Exteriors and Interiors Corp., Aurora, ON (Canada); Wollan, Eric J. [PlastiComp, Inc., Winona, MN (United States); Roland, Dale [PlastiComp, Inc., Winona, MN (United States)

    2016-01-31

    During the first quarter of FY 2016, the following technical progress has been made toward project milestones: 1) Virginia Tech completed fiber orientation (FO) measurements for the samples taken at Locations A, B, C and D (Figure 1) from the 30wt% LCF/PP and 30wt% LCF/PA66 ribbed and non-ribbed complex parts using Virginia Tech’s established procedure. Virginia Tech delivered to PNNL all the measured fiber orientation data for validating ASMI fiber orientation predictions. 2)Virginia Tech performed fiber length distribution (FLD) measurements for the samples taken at Locations A, B, C and D from these complex parts using Virginia Tech’s established procedure. Virginia also re-assessed previous data and measured fiber length distributions in the corresponding nozzle purging materials and delivered to PNNL all the measured length data for validating ASMI fiber length predictions. 3)Based on measured fiber orientation data, Autodesk identified the parameters of the anisotropic rotary diffusion reduced strain closure (ARD-RSC) model [1] and provided PNNL with the values of these parameters that were used in ASMI analyses of the complex parts. 4) Magna provided Virginia Tech with additional samples cut out from the 30wt% LCF/PP and 30wt% LCF/PA66 ribbed parts (Figure 1) for fiber length and orientation measurements. 5) In discussion with Autodesk, PNNL performed 3D ASMI analyses of the 30wt% LCF/PP and 30wt% LCF/PA66 ribbed and non-ribbed complex parts to predict fiber orientations and length distributions in these parts. The issues observed through the analyses regarding fiber orientation distributions profiles and abnormal length distributions were reported to Autodesk. Autodesk is working to resolve these issues. 6) PNNL completed 3D ASMI analyses of the complex parts and compared predicted fiber orientation results at Locations A, B, and C on the non-ribbed parts, and at Locations A, B, C and D on the ribbed parts with the corresponding measured data. PNNL also

  3. Influence of Addition of Thermoplastic Elastomer on Mechanical and Tribological Properties of Vapor-Grown-Carbon-Fiber Filled Polybutylene Terephthalate Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naito, Takahito; Nishitani, Yosuke; Sekiguchi, Isamu; Ishii, Chiharu; Kitano, Takeshi

    In order to develop the new high-performance tribomaterials for mechanical and electrical micro-devices, the influence of adding thermoplastic elastomer (TPE) on the mechanical and tribological properties of vapor-grown-carbon-fiber (VGCF) filled polybutylene telephthalate (PBT) composites (VGCF/PBT) was investigated. In this study, three types of functionalized TPE based on styrene butadiene elastomer: epoxy group grafted SBS (SBS-EP), hydroxyl group grafted SEEPS (SEEPS-OH) and amine group grafted SBBS (SBBS-NH2) were added with PBT and VGCF/PBT composites. These composites were compounded with a twin screw extruder and injection-molded, and their morphology, tensile, impact and tribological properties were evaluated. The internal structure of the ternary composites (VGCF/PBT/TPE) was changed by the addition of TPE and VGCF. Moreover, the size of dispersed TPE particles changed with the types of functionalized TPE. The influence of the addition of TPE on the mechanical and tribological properties of VGCF/PBT was differed from each property item. Izod impact properties and wear resistance were remarkably improved with the addition of various functionalized TPE, however, the tensile properties and frictional coefficient were slightly changed by the addition. From the relation between various properties and internal structure of these ternary composites, it was found that the tensile elongation at break, izod impact strength and specific wear rate correlate closely with the size of dispersed TPE particles. It follows from these results that it may be possible to develop the new tribomaterials with sufficient balances of mechanical and tribological properties for micro-devices.

  4. Carbon nanotube fiber terahertz polarizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zubair, Ahmed [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Tsentalovich, Dmitri E.; Young, Colin C. [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Heimbeck, Martin S. [Charles M. Bowden Laboratory, Aviation & Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center (AMRDEC), Redstone Arsenal, Alabama 35898 (United States); Everitt, Henry O. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Charles M. Bowden Laboratory, Aviation & Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center (AMRDEC), Redstone Arsenal, Alabama 35898 (United States); Pasquali, Matteo [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Department of Materials Science and NanoEngineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Kono, Junichiro, E-mail: kono@rice.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Department of Materials Science and NanoEngineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States)

    2016-04-04

    Conventional, commercially available terahertz (THz) polarizers are made of uniformly and precisely spaced metallic wires. They are fragile and expensive, with performance characteristics highly reliant on wire diameters and spacings. Here, we report a simple and highly error-tolerant method for fabricating a freestanding THz polarizer with nearly ideal performance, reliant on the intrinsically one-dimensional character of conduction electrons in well-aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The polarizer was constructed on a mechanical frame over which we manually wound acid-doped CNT fibers with ultrahigh electrical conductivity. We demonstrated that the polarizer has an extinction ratio of ∼−30 dB with a low insertion loss (<0.5 dB) throughout a frequency range of 0.2–1.1 THz. In addition, we used a THz ellipsometer to measure the Müller matrix of the CNT-fiber polarizer and found comparable attenuation to a commercial metallic wire-grid polarizer. Furthermore, based on the classical theory of light transmission through an array of metallic wires, we demonstrated the most striking difference between the CNT-fiber and metallic wire-grid polarizers: the latter fails to work in the zero-spacing limit, where it acts as a simple mirror, while the former continues to work as an excellent polarizer even in that limit due to the one-dimensional conductivity of individual CNTs.

  5. Predictive Engineering Tools for Injection-Molded Long-Carbon-Fiber Thermoplastic Composites - FY 2015 First Quarterly Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Fifield, Leonard S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kijewski, Seth A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Sangid, Michael D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wang, Jin [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Jin, Xiaoshi [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Costa, Franco [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Tucker, III, Charles L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Mathur, Raj N. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Gandhi, Umesh N. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Mori, Steven [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-01-29

    During the first quarter of FY 2015, the following technical progress has been made toward project milestones: 1) Autodesk delivered a new research version of ASMI to PNNL. This version includes the improved 3D fiber orientation solver, and the reduced order model (ROM) for fiber length distribution using the proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) implemented in the mid-plane, dual-domain and 3D solvers. 2) Autodesk coordinated a conference paper with PNNL reporting ASMI mid-plane fiber orientation predictions compared with the measured data for two PlastiComp plaques. This paper was accepted for presentation at the 2015 Society for Plastics Engineers (SPE) ANTEC conference. 3) The University of Illinois (Prof. Tucker) assisted team members from Purdue with fiber orientation measurement techniques, including interpretation of off-axis cross sections. 4) The University of Illinois assisted Autodesk team members with software implementation of the POD approach for fiber length modeling, and with fiber orientation modeling. 5) The University of Illinois co-authored in the SPE ANTEC paper, participated with the team in discussions of plaque data and model results, and participated in the definition of go/no-go experiments and data. 6) Purdue University (Purdue) conducted fiber orientation measurements for 3 PlastiComp plaques: fast-fill 30wt% LCF/PP center-gated, fast-fill 50wt% LCF/PA66 edge-gated and fast-fill 50wt% LCF/PA66 center-gated plaques, and delivered the fiber orientation data for these plaques at the selected locations (named A, B, and C) to PNNL. However, the data for the fast-fill 50wt% LCF/PA66 edge-gated plaque exhibited unusual variations and could not be used for the model validation. Purdue will re-measure fiber orientation for this plaque. 7) Based on discussions with the University of Illinois Purdue explained the ambiguity in the measurements of the fiber orientation components. 8) PNNL discussed with team members to establish a go/no-go decision

  6. Interlaminar and ductile characteristics of carbon fibers-reinforced plastics produced by nanoscaled electroless nickel plating on carbon fiber surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Soo-Jin; Jang, Yu-Sin; Rhee, Kyong-Yop

    2002-01-15

    In this work, a new method based on nanoscaled Ni-P alloy coating on carbon fiber surfaces is proposed for the improvement of interfacial properties between fibers and epoxy matrix in a composite system. Fiber surfaces and the mechanical interfacial properties of composites were characterized by atomic absorption spectrophotometer (AAS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectrometry (XPS), interlaminar shear strength (ILSS), and impact strength. Experimental results showed that the O(1s)/C(1s) ratio or Ni and P amounts had been increased as the electroless nickel plating proceeded; the ILSS had also been slightly improved. The impact properties were significantly improved in the presence of Ni-P alloy on carbon fiber surfaces, increasing the ductility of the composites. This was probably due to the effect of substituted Ni-P alloy, leading to an increase of the resistance to the deformation and the crack initiation of the epoxy system.

  7. Tribology of natural fiber polymer composites

    CERN Document Server

    Chand, N

    2008-01-01

    Environmental concerns are driving demand for bio-degradable materials such as plant-based natural fiber reinforced polymer composites. These composites are fast replacing conventional materials in many applications, especially in automobiles, where tribology (friction, lubrication and wear) is important. This book covers the availability and processing of natural fiber polymer composites and their structural, thermal, mechanical and, in particular, tribological properties.Chapter 1 discusses sources of natural fibers, their extraction and surface modification. It also reviews the ther

  8. Textile composites based on natural fibers

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Li, Yan

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available . studied the fracture toughness of natural fibers reinforced castor oil polyurethane composites by conducting compact tension test [40]. Short sisal fiber, coconut fiber and sisal fabrics were used to make the composites. Alkaline was selected to treat... very high extensibility. A strain value of 164% was observed for the neat Ecoflex. Upon ramie textile reinforcement in Ecoflex, high strength and high stiffness composite material could be resulted. Sorption behavior of water, naphthenic oil...

  9. Interactions between the glass fiber coating and oxidized carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ku-Herrera, J.J., E-mail: jesuskuh@live.com.mx [Centro de Investigación Científica de Yucatán A.C., Unidad de Materiales, Calle 43 No.130, Col. Chuburná de Hidalgo. C.P., 97200 Mérida, Yucatán (Mexico); Avilés, F., E-mail: faviles@cicy.mx [Centro de Investigación Científica de Yucatán A.C., Unidad de Materiales, Calle 43 No.130, Col. Chuburná de Hidalgo. C.P., 97200 Mérida, Yucatán (Mexico); Nistal, A. [Instituto de Cerámica y Vidrio (ICV-CSIC), Kelsen 5, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Cauich-Rodríguez, J.V. [Centro de Investigación Científica de Yucatán A.C., Unidad de Materiales, Calle 43 No.130, Col. Chuburná de Hidalgo. C.P., 97200 Mérida, Yucatán (Mexico); Rubio, F.; Rubio, J. [Instituto de Cerámica y Vidrio (ICV-CSIC), Kelsen 5, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Bartolo-Pérez, P. [Departamento de Física Aplicada, Cinvestav, Unidad Mérida, C.P., 97310 Mérida, Yucatán (Mexico)

    2015-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Oxidized multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were deposited onto E-glass fibers. • The role of the fiber coating on the deposition of MWCNTs on the fibers is studied. • A rather homogeneous deposition of MWCNTs is achieved if the coating is maintained. • Multiple oxygen-containing groups were found in the analysis of the fiber coating. • Evidence of chemical interaction between MWCNTs and the fiber coating was found. - Abstract: Chemically oxidized multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were deposited onto commercial E-glass fibers using a dipping procedure assisted by ultrasonic dispersion. In order to investigate the role of the fiber coating (known as “sizing”), MWCNTs were deposited on the surface of as-received E-glass fibers preserving the proprietary coating as well as onto glass fibers which had the coating deliberately removed. Scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy were used to assess the distribution of MWCNTs onto the fibers. A rather homogeneous coverage with high density of MWCNTs onto the glass fibers is achieved when the fiber coating is maintained. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analyses of the chemical composition of the glass fiber coating suggest that such coating is a complex mixture with multiple oxygen-containing functional groups such as hydroxyl, carbonyl and epoxy. FTIR and XPS of MWCNTs over the glass fibers and of a mixture of MWCNTs and fiber coating provided evidence that the hydroxyl and carboxyl groups of the oxidized MWCNTs react with the oxygen-containing functional groups of the glass fiber coating, forming hydrogen bonding and through epoxy ring opening. Hydrogen bonding and ester formation between the functional groups of the MWCNTs and the silane contained in the coating are also possible.

  10. Core-shell N-doped active carbon fiber@graphene composites for aqueous symmetric supercapacitors with high-energy and high-power density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Qinxing; Bao, Rongrong; Xie, Chao; Zheng, Anran; Wu, Shihua; Zhang, Yufeng; Zhang, Renwei; Zhao, Peng

    2016-06-01

    Graphene wrapped nitrogen-doped active carbon fibers (ACF@GR) of a core-shell structure were successfully prepared by a simple dip-coating method using natural silk as template. Compared to pure silk active carbon, the as-prepared ACF@GR composites exhibit high specific surface area in a range of 1628-2035 m2 g-1, as well as superior energy storage capability, an extremely high single-electrode capacitance of 552.8 F g-1 was achieved at a current density of 0.1 A g-1 in 6 M KOH aqueous electrolyte. The assembled aqueous symmetric supercapacitors are capable of deliver both high energy density and high power density, for instance, 17.1 Wh kg-1 at a power density of 50.0 W kg-1, and 12.2 Wh kg-1 at 4.7 kW kg-1 with a retention rate of 71.3% for ACF@GR1-based supercapacitor.

  11. Predictive Engineering Tools for Injection-molded Long-Carbon-Fiber Thermoplastic Composites - FY 2014 Third Quarterly Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Sanborn, Scott E.; Mathur, Raj N.; Sharma, Bhisham; Sangid, Michael D.; Wang, Jin; Jin, Xiaoshi; Costa, Franco; Gandhi, Umesh N.; Mori, Steven; Tucker III, Charles L.

    2014-08-15

    This report describes the technical progresses made during the third quarter of FY 2014: 1) Autodesk introduced the options for fiber inlet condition to the 3D solver. These options are already available in the mid-plane/dual domain solver. 2) Autodesk improved the accuracy of 3D fiber orientation calculation around the gate. 3) Autodesk received consultant services from Prof. C.L. Tucker at the University of Illinois on the implementation of the reduced order model for fiber length, and discussed with Prof. Tucker the methods to reduce memory usage. 4) PlastiComp delivered to PNNL center-gated and edge-fan-gated 20-wt% to 30-wt% LCF/PP and LCF/PA66 (7”x7”x1/8”) plaques molded by the in-line direct injection molding (D-LFT) process. 5) PlastiComp molded ASTM tensile, flexural and impact bars under the same D-LFT processing conditions used for plaques for Certification of Assessment and ascertaining the resultant mechanical properties. 6) Purdue developed a new polishing routine, utilizing the automated polishing machine, to reduce fiber damage during surface preparation. 7) Purdue used a marker-based watershed segmentation routine, in conjunction with a hysteresis thresholding technique, for fiber segmentation during fiber orientation measurement. 8) Purdue validated Purdue’s fiber orientation measurement method using the previous fiber orientation data obtained from the Leeds machine and manually measured data by the University of Illinois. 9) PNNL conducted ASMI mid-plane analyses for a 30wt% LCF/PP plaque and compared the predicted fiber orientations with the measured data provided by Purdue University at the selected locations on this plaque. 10) PNNL put together the DOE 2014 Annual Merit Review (AMR) presentation with the team and presented it at the AMR meetings on June 17, 2014. 11) PNNL built ASMI dual domain models for the Toyota complex part and commenced mold filling analyses of the complex part with different wall thicknesses in order to

  12. The Study on the Mechanical Properties of Multi-walled Carbon Nanotube/Polypropylene Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssefi, Mostafa; Safaie, Banafsheh

    2018-01-01

    Polypropylene (PP) is an important semicrystalline polymer with various applications. Polypropylene fibers containing 1 wt% of multi-walled carbon nanotube was spun using a conventional melt spinning apparatus. The produced fibers were drawn with varying levels of draw ratio. The mechanical properties of the composites were studied. Tensile strength and modulus of the composite fibers were increased with the increase in draw ratio. Molecular orientation and helical content of the composite fibers were increased after drawing. To conclude, tensile properties and molecular orientation of the composite fibers were higher than those of neat polypropylene fibers with the same draw ratio.

  13. Characterization of electrospun lignin based carbon fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poursorkhabi, Vida; Mohanty, Amar; Misra, Manjusri

    2015-05-01

    The production of lignin fibers has been studied in order to replace the need for petroleum based precursors for carbon fiber production. In addition to its positive environmental effects, it also benefits the economics of the industries which cannot take advantage of carbon fiber properties because of their high price. A large amount of lignin is annually produced as the byproduct of paper and growing cellulosic ethanol industry. Therefore, finding high value applications for this low cost, highly available material is getting more attention. Lignin is a biopolymer making about 15 - 30 % of the plant cell walls and has a high carbon yield upon carbonization. However, its processing is challenging due to its low molecular weight and also variations based on its origin and the method of separation from cellulose. In this study, alkali solutions of organosolv lignin with less than 1 wt/v% of poly (ethylene oxide) and two types of lignin (hardwood and softwood) were electrospun followed by carbonization. Different heating programs for carbonization were tested. The carbonized fibers had a smooth surface with an average diameter of less than 5 µm and the diameter could be controlled by the carbonization process and lignin type. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to study morphology of the fibers before and after carbonization. Thermal conductivity of a sample with amorphous carbon was 2.31 W/m.K. The electrospun lignin carbon fibers potentially have a large range of application such as in energy storage devices and water or gas purification systems.

  14. Electrical conductivity of short carbon fibers and carbon black-reinforced chloroprene rubber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoshniat, A. R.; MirAli, M.; Hemmati, M.; Afshar Taromi, F.; Katbab, A.

    2002-01-01

    Elastomers and plastics are intrinsically insulating materials, but by addition of some conductive particles such as conductive carbon black, carbon fibers and metals, they can change to conductive form. Conductivity of these composites are due to formation of the lattices of conductive filler particles in polymer chains. In this report, conductivity of chloroprene rubber filled with carbon black and carbon fibers as a function of temperature and pressure are studied. Electrical conductivity of chloroprene in a function of temperature and pressure are studied. Electrical conductivity of chloroprene in the presence of carbon black with proper mixing conditions increases to the conductivity level of semiconductors and even in the presence of carbon fibers it increases to the level of a conductor material. Meanwhile, the sensitivity of this compound to heat and pressure rises. Thus these composites have found various applications in the manufacture of heat and pressure sensitive sensors

  15. Predictive Engineering Tools for Injection-Molded Long-Carbon-Fiber Thermoplastic Composites - Fourth FY 2015 Quarterly Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Fifield, Leonard S.; Wollan, Eric J.; Roland, Dale; Gandhi, Umesh N.; Mori, Steven; Lambert, Gregory; Baird, Donald G.; Wang, Jin; Costa, Franco; Tucker III, Charles L.

    2015-11-13

    During the last quarter of FY 2015, the following technical progress has been made toward project milestones: 1) PlastiComp used the PlastiComp direct in-line (D-LFT) Pushtrusion system to injection mold 40 30wt% LCF/PP parts with ribs, 40 30wt% LCF/PP parts without ribs, 10 30wt% LCF/PA66 parts with ribs, and 35 30wt% LCF/PA66 parts without ribs. In addition, purge materials from the injection molding nozzle were obtained for fiber length analysis, and molding parameters were sent to PNNL for process modeling. 2) Magna cut samples at four selected locations (named A, B, C and D) from the non-ribbed Magna-molded parts based on a plan discussed with PNNL and the team and shipped these samples to Virginia Tech for fiber orientation and length measurements. 3) Virginia Tech started fiber orientation and length measurements for the samples taken from the complex parts using Virginia Tech’s established procedure. 4) PNNL and Autodesk built ASMI models for the complex parts with and without ribs, reviewed process datasheets and performed preliminary analyses of these complex parts using the actual molding parameters received from Magna and PlastiComp to compare predicted to experimental mold filling patterns. 5) Autodesk assisted PNNL in developing the workflow to use Moldflow fiber orientation and length results in ABAQUS® simulations. 6) Autodesk advised the team on the practicality and difficulty of material viscosity characterization from the D-LFT process. 7) PNNL developed a procedure to import fiber orientation and length results from a 3D ASMI analysis to a 3D ABAQUS® model for structural analyses of the complex part for later weight reduction study. 8) In discussion with PNNL and Magna, Toyota developed mechanical test setups and built fixtures for three-point bending and torsion tests of the complex parts. 9) Toyota built a finite element model for the complex parts subjected to torsion loading. 10) PNNL built the 3D ABAQUS® model of the complex ribbed

  16. Predictive Engineering Tools for Injection-Molded Long-Carbon-Fiber Thermoplastic Composites - FY 2014 Fourth Quarterly Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Fifield, Leonard S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Mathur, Raj N. [PlastiComp, Inc., Winona, MN (United States); Kijewski, Seth A. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); Sangid, Michael D. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); Wang, Jin [Autodesk, Inc., Ithaca, NY (United States); Jin, Xiaoshi [Autodesk, Inc., Ithaca, NY (United States); Costa, Franco [Autodesk, Inc., Ithaca, NY (United States); Gandhi, Umesh N. [MAGNA Exteriors and Interiors Corp, Aurora, ON (Canada); Mori, Steven [Univ. of Illinois, Champaign, IL (United States); Tucker, III, Charles L.

    2014-09-30

    During the last quarter of FY 2014, the following technical progress has been made toward project milestones: 1) Autodesk, Inc. (Autodesk) has implemented a new fiber length distribution (FLD) model based on an unbreakable length assumption with Reduced Order Modeling (ROM) by the Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) approach in the mid-plane, dual-domain and 3D solvers. 2) Autodesk improved the ASMI 3D solver for fiber orientation prediction using the anisotropic rotary diffusion (ARD) – reduced strain closure (RSC) model. 3) Autodesk received consultant services from Prof. C.L. Tucker at the University of Illinois on numerical simulation of fiber orientation and fiber length. 4) PlastiComp, Inc. (PlastiComp) suggested to Purdue University a procedure for fiber separation using an inert-gas atmosphere in the burn-off furnace. 5) Purdue University (Purdue) hosted a face-to-face project review meeting at Purdue University on August 6-7, 2014. 6) Purdue conducted fiber orientation measurements for 3 PlastiComp plaques: fast-fill 30wt% LCF/PP edged-gated, slow-fill 50wt% LCF/PP edge-gated, and slow-fill 50wt% LCF/PP center-gated plaques, and delivered the orientation data for these plaques at the selected locations (named A, B, and C) to PNNL. 7) PNNL conducted ASMI mid-plane analyses for the above PlastiComp plaques and compared the predicted fiber orientations with the measured data provided by Purdue at Locations A, B, and C on these plaques. 8) PNNL planned the project review meeting (August 6-7, 2014) with Purdue. 9) PNNL performed ASMI analyses for the Toyota complex parts with and without ribs, having different wall thicknesses, and using the PlastiComp 50wt% LCF/PP, 50wt% LCF/PA66, 30wt% LCF/PP, and 30wt% LCF/PA66 materials to provide guidance for tool design and modifications needed for molding these parts. 10) Magna Exteriors and Interiors Corp. (Magna) molded plaques from the 50% LCF/PP and 50% LCF/PA66 materials received from Plasticomp in order to

  17. Mace-like hierarchical MoS2/NiCo2S4 composites supported by carbon fiber paper: An efficient electrocatalyst for the hydrogen evolution reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lan; Wang, Tao; Zhang, Long; Sun, Yunjin; Xu, Kewei; Dai, Zhengfei; Ma, Fei

    2018-02-01

    The rational design and preparation of earth-abundant, stable and efficient electrocatalysts for hydrogen production is currently the subject in extensive scientific and technological researches toward the future of a clean-energy society. Herein, a mace-like MoS2/NiCo2S4 hierarchical structure is designed and synthesized on carbon fiber paper via a facile hydrothermal method, and evaluated as electrocatalyst for hydrogen evolution reaction. In the MoS2/NiCo2S4/carbon fiber paper hierarchical structures, MoS2 nanosheets are dispersively distributed on the surface of NiCo2S4 nanowires, which provides an enlarged surface area, abundant interfaces and catalytic active sites. As for hydrogen evolution reaction, such MoS2/NiCo2S4/carbon fiber paper heterostructures give rise to a hydrogen evolution reaction catalytic current density of 10 mA cm-2 with a lower overpotential of 139 mV and a smaller Tafel slope of 37 mV·dec-1 than those of MoS2/carbon fiber paper and NiCo2S4/carbon fiber paper counterparts, exhibiting a prominent electrocatalytic performance. Moreover, the electrocatalytic properties change little after 5000 CV cycles and continual electrolysis for 12 h without obvious decay, respectively, demonstrating high durability and stability. The excellent hydrogen evolution reaction performances endow the hierarchical configuration MoS2/NiCo2S4/carbon fiber paper with promising alternative in HER and other related renewable energy fields.

  18. Compositional and weave pattern analyses of glass fibers in dental polymer fiber composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallittu, P K

    1998-09-01

    This study compared weave patterns and glass compositions of five glass fiber materials found in commercial fiber-reinforced dental composites. A scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to investigate the woven structure of five glass fiber products, and an energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometer (SEM/EDS) was used to determine the elemental composition of these glass fibers in the bulk and at the surface of the fiber. Five fibers of each product were analyzed. The fiber products were either unidirectional rovings or bidirectional weaves. More precisely, the woven structures were linen weave, twill weave, or twill weave ribbon. SEM/EDS analysis revealed that the composition of the glass fibers was typical for E (electrical)-glass fibers with one exception. One product intended for use in fixed prosthodontics included unidirectional fibers with a composition consistent with a modified high-tensile-strength R-glass. Boron oxide found on the surface of glass fibers would likely contribute to an increased potential for corrosion of fiber-reinforced composite. The predominant fiber composition in these products is E-glass. Because the degree of hydrolytic stability of polymer-fiber composites over time may lead to material failure in permanent restorations, this property should be investigated further.

  19. Composition of carbonization residues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hupfer; Leonhardt

    1943-11-27

    This report compared the composition of samples from Wesseling and Leuna. In each case the sample was a residue from carbonization of the residues from hydrogenation of the brown coal processed at the plant. The composition was given in terms of volatile components, fixed carbon, ash, water, carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, volatile sulfur, and total sulfur. The result of carbonization was given in terms of (ash and) coke, tar, water, gas and losses, and bitumen. The composition of the ash was given in terms of silicon dioxide, ferric oxide, aluminum oxide, calcium oxide, magnesium oxide, potassium and sodium oxides, sulfur trioxide, phosphorus pentoxide, chlorine, and titanium oxide. The most important difference between the properties of the two samples was that the residue from Wesseling only contained 4% oil, whereas that from Leuna had about 26% oil. Taking into account the total amount of residue processed yearly, the report noted that better carbonization at Leuna could save 20,000 metric tons/year of oil. Some other comparisons of data included about 33% volatiles at Leuna vs. about 22% at Wesseling, about 5 1/2% sulfur at Leuna vs. about 6 1/2% at Leuna, but about 57% ash for both. Composition of the ash differed quite a bit between the two. 1 table.

  20. Method for rapid fabrication of fiber preforms and structural composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klett, James W.; Burchell, Timothy D.; Bailey, Jeffrey L.

    1998-01-01

    A densified carbon matrix carbon fiber composite preform is made by vacuum molding an aqueous slurry of carbon fibers and carbonizable organic powder to form a molded part. The molded part is dried in an oven at 50.degree. C. for 14 hours and hot pressed at 2000 psi at 400.degree. C. for 3 hours. The hot pressed part is carbonized at 650.degree. C. under nitrogen for 3 hours and graphitized at 2400.degree. C. to form a graphitic structure in the matrix of the densified carbon matrix carbon fiber composite preform. The densified preform has a density greater than 1.1 g/cc.

  1. Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer with Shredded Fibers: Quasi-Isotropic Material Properties and Antenna Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald Artner

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP laminate, with the top layer consisting of shredded fibers, is proposed and manufactured. The shredded fibers are aligned randomly on the surface to achieve a more isotropic conductivity, as is desired in antenna applications. Moreover, fiber shreds can be recycled from carbon fiber composites. Conductivity, permittivity, and permeability are obtained with the Nicolson-Ross-Weir method from material samples measured inside rectangular waveguides in the frequency range of 4 to 6 GHz. The decrease in material anisotropy results in negligible influence on antennas. This is shown by measuring the proposed CFRP as ground plane material for both a narrowband wire monopole antenna for 5.9 GHz and an ultrawideband conical monopole antenna for 1–10 GHz. For comparison, all measurements are repeated with a twill-weave CFRP.

  2. Self-healing in single and multiple fiber(s reinforced polymer composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woldesenbet E.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available You Polymer composites have been attractive medium to introduce the autonomic healing concept into modern day engineering materials. To date, there has been significant research in self-healing polymeric materials including several studies specifically in fiber reinforced polymers. Even though several methods have been suggested in autonomic healing materials, the concept of repair by bleeding of enclosed functional agents has garnered wide attention by the scientific community. A self-healing fiber reinforced polymer composite has been developed. Tensile tests are carried out on specimens that are fabricated by using the following components: hollow and solid glass fibers, healing agent, catalysts, multi-walled carbon nanotubes, and a polymer resin matrix. The test results have demonstrated that single fiber polymer composites and multiple fiber reinforced polymer matrix composites with healing agents and catalysts have provided 90.7% and 76.55% restoration of the original tensile strength, respectively. Incorporation of functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes in the healing medium of the single fiber polymer composite has provided additional efficiency. Healing is found to be localized, allowing multiple healing in the presence of several cracks.

  3. Fiber composite materials: A survey of fiber matrix interface mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamis, C. C.

    1973-01-01

    Report is described which discusses mechanism of load transfer from matrix to fiber through interface and effects of interface on composite structural integrity. Theoretical considerations are supplemented with experimental data. General trends and significant points are illustrated graphically.

  4. Carbon nano tubes embedded in polymer nano fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dror, Y.; Kedem, S.; Khalfin, R.L.; Paz, Y.; Cohenl, Y.; Salalha, Y.; Yarin, A.L.; Zussman, A.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text: The electro spinning process was used successfully to embed Multi-walled carbon nano tubes (MWCNTs) and single-walled carbon nano tubes (SWCNTs) in a matrix of poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) forming composite nano fibers. Initial dispersion of SWCNTs in water was achieved by the use of an amphphilic alternating copolymer of styrene and sodium maleate. MWNT dispersion was achieved by ionic and nonionic surfactants. The distribution and conformation of the nano tubes in the nano fibers were studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Oxygen plasma etching was used to expose the nano tubes within the nano fibers to facilitate direct observation. Nano tube alignment within the nano fibers was shown to depend strongly on the quality of the initial dispersions. Well-dispersed and separated nano tubes were embedded in a straight and aligned form while entangled non-separated nano tubes were incorporated as dense aggregates. X-ray diffraction demonstrated a high degree of orientation of the PEO crystals in the electro spun nano fibers with embedded SWCNTs, whereas incorporation of MVCNTs had a detrimental effect on the polymer orientation. Composite polymer nano fibers containing dispersed phases of nanometric TiO 2 particles and MWCNTs were also prepared electro spinning. In this case, the polymer matrix was poly(acrylonitrile) (PAN). The morphology and possible applications of these composite nano fibers will be discussed

  5. Nanoporous metal-carbon composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Worsley, Marcus A.; Satcher, Joe; Kucheyev, Sergei; Charnvanichborikarn, Supakit; Colvin, Jeffrey; Felter, Thomas; Kim, Sangil; Merrill, Matthew; Orme, Christine

    2017-12-19

    Described here is a metal-carbon composite, comprising (a) a porous three-dimensional scaffold comprising one or more of carbon nanotubes, graphene and graphene oxide, and (b) metal nanoparticles disposed on said porous scaffold, wherein the metal-carbon composite has a density of 1 g/cm.sup.3 or less, and wherein the metal nanoparticles account for 1 wt. % or more of the metal-carbon composite. Also described are methods for making the metal-carbon composite.

  6. In-Situ Nondestructive Evaluation of Kevlar(Registered Trademark)and Carbon Fiber Reinforced Composite Micromechanics for Improved Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel Health Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, Jess; Saulsberry, Regor

    2012-01-01

    NASA has been faced with recertification and life extension issues for epoxy-impregnated Kevlar 49 (K/Ep) and carbon (C/Ep) composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs) used in various systems on the Space Shuttle and International Space Station, respectively. Each COPV has varying criticality, damage and repair histories, time at pressure, and pressure cycles. COPVs are of particular concern due to the insidious and catastrophic burst-before-leak failure mode caused by stress rupture (SR) of the composite overwrap. SR life has been defined [1] as the minimum time during which the composite maintains structural integrity considering the combined effects of stress level(s), time at stress level(s), and associated environment. SR has none of the features of predictability associated with metal pressure vessels, such as crack geometry, growth rate and size, or other features that lend themselves to nondestructive evaluation (NDE). In essence, the variability or surprise factor associated with SR cannot be eliminated. C/Ep COPVs are also susceptible to impact damage that can lead to reduced burst pressure even when the amount of damage to the COPV is below the visual detection threshold [2], thus necessitating implementation of a mechanical damage control plan [1]. Last, COPVs can also fail prematurely due to material or design noncompliance. In each case (SR, impact or noncompliance), out-of-family behavior is expected leading to a higher probability of failure at a given stress, hence, greater uncertainty in performance. For these reasons, NASA has been actively engaged in research to develop NDE methods that can be used during post-manufacture qualification, in-service inspection, and in-situ structural health monitoring. Acoustic emission (AE) is one of the more promising NDE techniques for detecting and monitoring, in real-time, the strain energy release and corresponding stress-wave propagation produced by actively growing flaws and defects in composite

  7. Lightning Strike Ablation Damage Influence Factors Analysis of Carbon Fiber/Epoxy Composite Based on Coupled Electrical-Thermal Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, J. J.; Chang, F.; Li, S. L.; Yao, X. L.; Sun, J. R.; Xiao, Y.

    2017-10-01

    According to the mathematical analysis model constructed on the basis of energy-balance relationship in lightning strike, and accompany with the simplified calculation strategy of composite resin pyrolysis degree dependent electrical conductivity, an effective three dimensional thermal-electrical coupling analysis finite element model of composite laminate suffered from lightning current was established based on ABAQUS, to elucidate the effects of lighting current waveform parameters and thermal/electrical properties of composite laminate on the extent of ablation damage. Simulated predictions agree well with the composite lightning strike directed effect experimental data, illustrating the potential accuracy of the constructed model. The analytical results revealed that extent of composite lightning strike ablation damage can be characterized by action integral validly, there exist remarkable power function relationships between action integral and visual damage area, projected damage area, maximum damage depth and damage volume of ablation damage, and enhancing the electrical conductivity and specific heat of composite, ablation damage will be descended obviously, power function relationships also exist between electrical conductivity, specific heat and ablation damage, however, the impact of thermal conductivity on the extent of ablation damage is not notable. The conclusions obtained provide some guidance for composite anti-lightning strike structure-function integration design.

  8. Sustainable Energy Solutions Task 4.1 Intelligent Manufacturing of Hybrid Carbon-Glass Fiber-Reinforced Composite Wind Turbine Blades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Twomey, Janet M. [Wichita State Univ., KS (United States)

    2010-04-30

    In this subtask, the manufacturability of hybrid carbon-glass fiber-reinforced composite wind turbine blades using Vacuum-Assisted Resin Transfer Molding (VARTM) was investigated. The objective of this investigation was to study the VARTM process and its parameters to manufacture cost-effective wind turbine blades with no defects (mainly eliminate dry spots and reduce manufacturing time). A 2.5-dimensional model and a 3-dimensional model were developed to simulate mold filling and part curing under different conditions. These conditions included isothermal and non-isothermal filling, curing of the part during and after filling, and placement of injection gates at different locations. Results from this investigation reveal that the process can be simulated and also that manufacturing parameters can be optimized to eliminate dry spot formation and reduce the manufacturing time. Using computer-based models is a cost-effective way to simulate manufacturing of wind turbine blades. The approach taken herein allows the design of the wind blade manufacturing processes without physically running trial-and-error experiments that are expensive and time-consuming; especially for larger blades needed for more demanding environmental conditions. This will benefit the wind energy industry by reducing initial design and manufacturing costs which can later be passed down to consumers and consequently make the wind energy industry more competitive.

  9. An Experimental Study on Non-Compression X-Bracing Systems Using Carbon Fiber Composite Cable for Seismic Strengthening of RC Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Seok Lee

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Cross-bracing (X-bracing is one of the most popular methods of seismic retrofitting, and has been shown to significantly increase the structural stiffness and strength of buildings. Conventional steel X-bracing methods typically exhibit brittle failure at the connection between the brace and the building, or buckling failure of the braces. This study investigated the structural properties of a new type of non-compression X-bracing system using carbon fiber composite cable (CFCC. This non-compression X-bracing system uses CFCC bracing and bolt connections between structural members and the terminal fixer of the CFCC, instead of conventional steel bracing. The aim is to overcome the brittle and buckling failures that can occur at the connection and bracings with conventional steel X-bracing methods. We carried out cyclic loading tests, and the maximum load carrying capacity and deformation were investigated, as well as hysteresis in the lateral load–drift relations. The test results revealed that the CFCC X-bracing system installed in reinforced concrete frames enhanced the strength markedly, and buckling failure of the bracing was not observed.

  10. Development of carbon/carbon composites for nuclear reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venugopalan, Ramani; Sathiyamoorthy, D.; Tyagi, A.K.

    2012-01-01

    Carbon and carbon fiber reinforced materials are promising materials for use in nuclear reactors, due to their excellent thermal and mechanical properties. In the present studies, experiments were carried out to prepare carbon-carbon(C/C) composites using non-graphitizing precursors such as polyacrylonitrile (PAN) fiber and phenolic resin matrix. A typical sample of C/C composite at 40 vol% of PAN fibre showed to be amorphous. These fibers have been used to make a 2-D preform and phenol formaldehyde resin was impregnated, cured and carbonized to form the matrix. Impregnation was carried out under different conditions, and its effect was studied by XRD, Raman spectroscopy and XPS. The C/C composite samples have been irradiated by neutrons at neutron flux of 1x10 12 n/cm 2 /s with varying fluences at 40℃. The stored energy is very less about 23.4 J/g and 43.3 J/g as compared to irradiated graphite. The composites were coated with silicon carbide (SiC) for improved oxidation resistance by chemical vapor deposition technique. (author)

  11. Method for the preparation of carbon fiber from polyolefin fiber precursor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naskar, Amit Kumar; Hunt, Marcus Andrew; Saito, Tomonori

    2017-11-28

    Methods for the preparation of carbon fiber from polyolefin fiber precursor, wherein the polyolefin fiber precursor is partially sulfonated and then carbonized to produce carbon fiber. Methods for producing hollow carbon fibers, wherein the hollow core is circular- or complex-shaped, are also described. Methods for producing carbon fibers possessing a circular- or complex-shaped outer surface, which may be solid or hollow, are also described.

  12. Gel Spun PAN/CNT Based Carbon Fibers with Honey-Comb Cross-Section

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-13

    include nano composite fibers with thermal conductivity in the range of 2 – 15 W/m/k. Details of the unpublished work of the honey -comb fiber are...GEL SPUN PAN/CNT BASED CARBON FIBERS WITH HONEY - COMB CROSS-SECTION SATISH KUMAR GEORGIA TECH RESEARCH CORPORATION 11/13/2013 Final Report...TABLE of CONTENTS Content Page Executive Summary 1-2 Low Density carbon fibers with honey -comb structure 3-15

  13. Homogenization of long fiber reinforced composites including fiber bending effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulios, Konstantinos; Niordson, Christian Frithiof

    2016-01-01

    of the reinforcing fibers is captured by higher order strain terms, resulting in an accurate representation of the micro-mechanical behavior of the composite. Numerical examples show that the accuracy of the proposed model is very close to a non-homogenized finite-element model with an explicit discretization......This paper presents a homogenization method, which accounts for intrinsic size effects related to the fiber diameter in long fiber reinforced composite materials with two independent constitutive models for the matrix and fiber materials. A new choice of internal kinematic variables allows...... to maintain the kinematics of the two material phases independent from the assumed constitutive models, so that stress-deformation relationships, can be expressed in the framework of hyper-elasticity and hyper-elastoplasticity for the fiber and the matrix materials respectively. The bending stiffness...

  14. Three-dimensional printing of continuous-fiber composites by in-nozzle impregnation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuzaki, Ryosuke; Ueda, Masahito; Namiki, Masaki; Jeong, Tae-Kun; Asahara, Hirosuke; Horiguchi, Keisuke; Nakamura, Taishi; Todoroki, Akira; Hirano, Yoshiyasu

    2016-03-01

    We have developed a method for the three-dimensional (3D) printing of continuous fiber-reinforced thermoplastics based on fused-deposition modeling. The technique enables direct 3D fabrication without the use of molds and may become the standard next-generation composite fabrication methodology. A thermoplastic filament and continuous fibers were separately supplied to the 3D printer and the fibers were impregnated with the filament within the heated nozzle of the printer immediately before printing. Polylactic acid was used as the matrix while carbon fibers, or twisted yarns of natural jute fibers, were used as the reinforcements. The thermoplastics reinforced with unidirectional jute fibers were examples of plant-sourced composites; those reinforced with unidirectional carbon fiber showed mechanical properties superior to those of both the jute-reinforced and unreinforced thermoplastics. Continuous fiber reinforcement improved the tensile strength of the printed composites relative to the values shown by conventional 3D-printed polymer-based composites.

  15. Large-diameter carbon-composite monofilaments. [production method and characteristics of carbon composite monofilaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, W. G.; Pinoli, P. C.; Karlak, R. F.

    1974-01-01

    Large-diameter carbon composite monofilaments with high strength and high modulus were produced by pregging multifiber carbon bundles with suitable organic resins and pyrolysing them together. Two approaches were developed to increase the utilization of fiber tensile strength by minimizing stress concentration defects induced by dissimilar shrinkage during pyrolysis. These were matrix modification to improve char yield and strain-to-failure and fiber-matrix copyrolysis to alleviate matrix cracking. Highest tensile strength and modulus were obtained by heat treatments to 2873 K to match fiber and matrix strain-to-failure and develop maximum monofilament tensile-strength and elastic modulus.

  16. Polypropylene matrix composites reinforced with coconut fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Virginia Gelfuso

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Polypropylene matrix composites reinforced with treated coconut fibers were produced. Fibers chemically treated (alkalization-CCUV samples or mechanically treated (ultrasonic shockwave-CMUV samples were dried using UV radiation. The goal was to combine low cost and eco-friendly treatments to improve fiber-matrix adhesion. Composite samples containing up to 20 vol. (% of untreated and treated coconut fibers were taken from boxes fabricated by injection molding. Water absorption and mechanical properties were investigated according to ASTM D570-98 and ASTM D638-03, respectively. Electrical characterizations were carried out to identify applications of these composites in the electrical sector. NBR 10296-Electrical Tracking Standard (specific to industry applications and conductivity measurements were obtained applying 5 kV DC to the samples. CMUV samples containing 5 vol. (% fiber presented superior tensile strength values (σ~28 MPa compared to the untreated fibers composite (σ~22 MPa or alkali treatment (σ~24 MPa. However, CMUV composites containing 10 vol. (% fiber presented best results for the electrical tracking test and electrical resistivity (3 × 10(7 Ω.m. The results suggest that composites reinforced with mechanically treated coconut fibers are suitable for electrical applications.

  17. Evaluation of Nanomaterial Approaches to Damping in Epoxy Resin and Carbon Fiber/Epoxy Composite Structures by Dynamic Mechanical Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, G.; Heimann, Paula J.; Scheiman, Daniel A.; Duffy, Kirsten P.; Johnston, J. Chris; Roberts, Gary D.

    2013-01-01

    Vibration mitigation in composite structures has been demonstrated through widely varying methods which include both active and passive damping. Recently, nanomaterials have been investigated as a viable approach to composite vibration damping due to the large surface available to generate energy dissipation through friction. This work evaluates the influence of dispersed nanoparticles on the damping ratio of an epoxy matrix. Limited benefit was observed through dispersion methods, however nanoparticle application as a coating resulting in up to a three-fold increase in damping.

  18. Synthesis of Y2O3-ZrO2-SiO2 composite coatings on carbon fiber reinforced resin matrix composite by an electro-plasma process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuping; Lin, Xiang; Chen, Weiwei; Cheng, Huanwu; Wang, Lu

    2016-05-01

    In the present paper the Y2O3-ZrO2-SiO2 composite coating was successfully synthesized on carbon fiber reinforced resin matrix composite by an electro-plasma process. The deposition process, microstructures and oxidation resistance of the coatings with different SiO2 concentrations were systematically investigated. A relatively dense microstructure was observed for the Y2O3-ZrO2-SiO2 composite coating with the SiO2 concentration above 5 g/L. The coating exhibited very good oxidation resistance at 1273 K with the mass loss rate as low as ∼30 wt.%, compared to 100 wt.% of the substrate. The formation of the ceramic composites was discussed in detail based on the electrochemical mechanism and the deposition dynamics in order to explain the effect of the plasma discharge. We believe that the electro-plasma process will find wide applications in preparing ceramics and coatings in industries.

  19. High performance carbon-carbon composites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Carbon-carbon composites rank first among ceramic composite materials with a spectrum of properties and applications in various sectors. These composites are made of fibres in various directions and carbonaceous polymers and hydrocarbons as matrix precursors. Their density and properties depend on the type and ...

  20. Effect of surface roughness on osteogenesis in vitro and osseointegration in vivo of carbon fiber-reinforced polyetheretherketone–nanohydroxyapatite composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deng Y

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Yi Deng,1,2 Xiaochen Liu,2 Anxiu Xu,3 Lixin Wang,4 Zuyuan Luo,2 Yunfei Zheng,1 Feng Deng,3 Jie Wei,5 Zhihui Tang,1 Shicheng Wei1–3 12nd Dental Center, Laboratory of Interdisciplinary Studies, School and Hospital of Stomatology, 2Center for Biomedical Materials and Tissue Engineering, Academy for Advanced Interdisciplinary Studies, Peking University, Beijing, 3Chongqing Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases and Biomedical Sciences, Chongqing Medical University, 4Department of Stomatology, Beijing Shijitan Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, 5Key Laboratory for Ultrafine Materials of Ministry of Education, and Engineering Research Center for Biomedical Materials of Ministry of Education, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China Abstract: As United States Food and Drug Administration-approved implantable material, carbon fiber-reinforced polyetheretherketone (CFRPEEK possesses an adjustable elastic modulus similar to cortical bone and is a prime candidate to replace surgical metallic implants. The bioinertness and inferior osteogenic properties of CFRPEEK, however, limit its clinical application as orthopedic/dental implants. In this study, CFRPEEK–nanohydroxyapatite ternary composites (PEEK/n-HA/CF with variable surface roughness have been successfully fabricated. The effect of surface roughness on their in vitro cellular responses of osteoblast-like MG-63 cells (attachment, proliferation, apoptosis, and differentiation and in vivo osseointegration is evaluated. The results show that the hydrophilicity and the amount of Ca ions on the surface are significantly improved as the surface roughness of composite increases. In cell culture tests, the results reveal that the cell proliferation rate and the extent of osteogenic differentiation of cells are a function of the size of surface roughness. The composite with moderate surface roughness significantly increases cell attachment

  1. Carbon fiber on polyimide ultra-microelectrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillis, Winthrop F.; Lissandrello, Charles A.; Shen, Jun; Pearre, Ben W.; Mertiri, Alket; Deku, Felix; Cogan, Stuart; Holinski, Bradley J.; Chew, Daniel J.; White, Alice E.; Otchy, Timothy M.; Gardner, Timothy J.

    2018-02-01

    Objective. Most preparations for making neural recordings degrade over time and eventually fail due to insertion trauma and reactive tissue response. The magnitudes of these responses are thought to be related to the electrode size (specifically, the cross-sectional area), the relative stiffness of the electrode, and the degree of tissue tolerance for the material. Flexible carbon fiber ultra-microelectrodes have a much smaller cross-section than traditional electrodes and low tissue reactivity, and thus may enable improved longevity of neural recordings in the central and peripheral nervous systems. Only two carbon fiber array designs have been described previously, each with limited channel densities due to limitations of the fabrication processes or interconnect strategies. Here, we describe a method for assembling carbon fiber electrodes on a flexible polyimide substrate that is expected to facilitate the construction of high-density recording and stimulating arrays. Approach. Individual carbon fibers were aligned using an alignment tool that was 3D-printed with sub-micron resolution using direct laser writing. Indium deposition on the carbon fibers, followed by low-temperature microsoldering, provided a robust and reliable method of electrical connection to the polyimide interconnect. Main results. Spontaneous multiunit activity and stimulation-evoked compound responses with SNR  >10 and  >120, respectively, were recorded from a small (125 µm) peripheral nerve. We also improved the typic