WorldWideScience

Sample records for carbon fiber composite

  1. Nanotube composite carbon fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, R.; Jacques, D.; Rao, A. M.; Rantell, T.; Derbyshire, F.; Chen, Y.; Chen, J.; Haddon, R. C.

    1999-08-01

    Single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were dispersed in isotropic petroleum pitch matrices to form nanotube composite carbon fibers with enhanced mechanical and electrical properties. We find that the tensile strength, modulus, and electrical conductivity of a pitch composite fiber with 5 wt % loading of purified SWNTs are enhanced by ˜90%, ˜150%, and 340% respectively, as compared to the corresponding values in unmodified isotropic pitch fibers. These results serve to highlight the potential that exits for developing a spectrum of material properties through the selection of the matrix, nanotube dispersion, alignment, and interfacial bonding.

  2. Carbon Fiber Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    HyComp(R), Inc. development a line of high temperature carbon fiber composite products to solve wear problems in the harsh environment of steel and aluminum mills. WearComp(R), self-lubricating composite wear liners and bushings, combines carbon graphite fibers with a polyimide binder. The binder, in conjunction with the fibers, provides the slippery surface, one that demands no lubrication, yet wears at a very slow rate. WearComp(R) typically lasts six to ten times longer than aluminum bronze. Unlike bronze, WearComp polishes the same surface and imparts a self-lube film for years of service. It is designed for continuous operation at temperatures of 550 degrees Fahrenheit and can operate under high compressive loads.

  3. Fiber Length and Orientation in Long Carbon Fiber Thermoplastic Composites

    OpenAIRE

    Hanhan, Imad; Sullivan, Connor; Sharma, Bhisham; Sangid, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Carbon fiber composites have become popular in aerospace applications because of their lightweight yet strong material properties. The injection molding process can be used to produce discontinuous fiber composites using less time and resources than traditional methods, thereby broadening carbon fiber composites’ applications in different industries. Utilization of longer fibers offers more load carrying capability and superior strength properties for injected molded composites. Since the fib...

  4. Carbon fiber composite molecular sieves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burchell, T.D.; Rogers, M.R.; Williams, A.M.

    1996-06-01

    The removal of CO{sub 2} is of significance in several energy applications. The combustion of fossil fuels, such as coal or natural gas, releases large volumes of CO{sub 2} to the environment. Several options exist to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions, including substitution of nuclear power for fossil fuels, increasing the efficiency of fossil plants and capturing the CO{sub 2} prior to emission to the environment. All of these techniques have the attractive feature of limiting the amount of CO{sub 2} emitted to the atmosphere, but each has economic, technical, or societal limitations. In the production of natural gas, the feed stream from the well frequently contains contaminants and diluents which must be removed before the gas can enter the pipeline distribution system. Notable amongst these diluent gasses is CO{sub 2}, which has no calorific value. Currently, the pipeline specification calls for <2 mol % CO{sub 2} in the gas. Gas separation is thus a relevant technology in the field of energy production. A novel separation system based on a parametric swing process has been developed that utilizes the unique combination of properties exhibited by our carbon fiber composite molecular sieve (CFCMS).

  5. Carbon fiber content measurement in composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiushi

    Carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRPs) have been widely used in various structural applications in industries such as aerospace and automotive because of their high specific stiffness and specific strength. Their mechanical properties are strongly influenced by the carbon fiber content in the composites. Measurement of the carbon fiber content in CFRPs is essential for product quality control and process optimization. In this work, a novel carbonization-in-nitrogen method (CIN) is developed to characterize the fiber content in carbon fiber reinforced thermoset and thermoplastic composites. In this method, a carbon fiber composite sample is carbonized in a nitrogen environment at elevated temperatures, alongside a neat resin sample. The carbon fibers are protected from oxidization while the resin (the neat resin and the resin matrix in the composite sample) is carbonized under the nitrogen environment. The residue of the carbonized neat resin sample is used to calibrate the resin carbonization rate and calculate the amount of the resin matrix in the composite sample. The new method has been validated on several thermoset and thermoplastic resin systems and found to yield an accurate measurement of fiber content in carbon fiber polymer composites. In order to further understand the thermal degradation behavior of the high temperature thermoplastic polymer during the carbonization process, the mechanism and the kinetic model of thermal degradation behavior of carbon fiber reinforced poly (phenylene sulfide) (CPPS) are studied using thermogravimetry analysis (TGA). The CPPS is subjected to TGA in an air and nitrogen atmosphere at heating rates from 5 to 40°C min--1. The TGA curves obtained in air are different from those in nitrogen. This demonstrates that weight loss occurs in a single stage in nitrogen but in two stages in air. To elucidate this difference, thermal decomposition kinetics is analyzed by applying the Kissinger, Flynn-Wall-Ozawa, Coat-Redfern and

  6. Carbon Fiber Composite Monoliths as Catalyst Supports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contescu, Cristian I [ORNL; Gallego, Nidia C [ORNL; Pickel, Joseph M [ORNL; Blom, Douglas Allen [ORNL; Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL

    2006-01-01

    Carbon fiber composite monoliths are rigid bodies that can be activated to a large surface area, have tunable porosity, and proven performance in gas separation and storage. They are ideal as catalyst supports in applications where a rigid support, with open structure and easy fluid access is desired. We developed a procedure for depositing a dispersed nanoparticulate phase of molybdenum carbide (Mo2C) on carbon composite monoliths in the concentration range of 3 to 15 wt% Mo. The composition and morphology of this phase was characterized using X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy, and a mechanism was suggested for its formation. Molybdenum carbide is known for its catalytic properties that resemble those of platinum group metals, but at a lower cost. The materials obtained are expected to demonstrate catalytic activity in a series of hydrocarbon reactions involving hydrogen transfer. This project demonstrates the potential of carbon fiber composite monoliths as catalyst supports.

  7. Carbon Fiber Composite Monoliths for Catalyst Supports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contescu, Cristian I [ORNL; Gallego, Nidia C [ORNL; Pickel, Joseph M [ORNL; Blom, Douglas Allen [ORNL; Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL

    2006-01-01

    Carbon fiber composite monoliths are rigid bodies that can be activated to a large surface area, have tunable porosity, and proven performance in gas separation and storage. They are ideal as catalyst supports in applications where a rigid support, with open structure and easy fluid access is desired. We developed a procedure for depositing a dispersed nanoparticulate phase of molybdenum carbide (Mo2C) on carbon composite monoliths in the concentration range of 3 to 15 wt% Mo. The composition and morphology of this phase was characterized using X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy, and a mechanism was suggested for its formation. Molybdenum carbide is known for its catalytic properties that resemble those of platinum group metals, but at a lower cost. The materials obtained are expected to demonstrate catalytic activity in a series of hydrocarbon reactions involving hydrogen transfer. This project demonstrates the potential of carbon fiber composite monoliths as catalyst supports.

  8. CARBON FIBER COMPOSITES IN HIGH VOLUME

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, Charles David [ORNL; Das, Sujit [ORNL; Jeon, Dr. Saeil [Volvo Trucks North America

    2014-01-01

    Vehicle lightweighting represents one of several design approaches that automotive and heavy truck manufacturers are currently evaluating to improve fuel economy, lower emissions, and improve freight efficiency (tons-miles per gallon of fuel). With changes in fuel efficiency and environmental regulations in the area of transportation, the next decade will likely see considerable vehicle lightweighting throughout the ground transportation industry. Greater use of carbon fiber composites and light metals is a key component of that strategy. This paper examines the competition between candidate materials for lightweighting of heavy vehicles and passenger cars. A 53-component, 25 % mass reduction, body-in-white cost analysis is presented for each material class, highlighting the potential cost penalty for each kilogram of mass reduction and then comparing the various material options. Lastly, as the cost of carbon fiber is a major component of the elevated cost of carbon fiber composites, a brief look at the factors that influence that cost is presented.

  9. Carbon storage potential in natural fiber composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The environmental performance of hemp based natural fiber mat thermoplastic (NMT) has been evaluated in this study by quantifying carbon storage potential and CO2 emissions and comparing the results with commercially available glass fiber composites. Non-woven mats of hemp fiber and polypropylene matrix were used to make NMT samples by film-stacking method without using any binder aid. The results showed that hemp based NMT have compatible or even better strength properties as compared to conventional flax based thermoplastics. A value of 63 MPa for flexural strength is achieved at 64% fiber content by weight. Similarly, impact energy values (84-154 J/m) are also promising. The carbon sequestration and storage by hemp crop through photosynthesis is estimated by quantifying dry biomass of fibers based on one metric ton of NMT. A value of 325 kg carbon per metric ton of hemp based composite is estimated which can be stored by the product during its useful life. An extra 22% carbon storage can be achieved by increasing the compression ratio by 13% while maintaining same flexural strength. Further, net carbon sequestration by industrial hemp crop is estimated as 0.67 ton/h/year, which is compatible to all USA urban trees and very close to naturally, regenerated forests. A comparative life cycle analysis focused on non-renewable energy consumption of natural and glass fiber composites shows that a net saving of 50 000 MJ (3 ton CO2 emissions) per ton of thermoplastic can be achieved by replacing 30% glass fiber reinforcement with 65% hemp fiber. It is further estimated that 3.07 million ton CO2 emissions (4.3% of total USA industrial emissions) and 1.19 million m3 crude oil (1.0% of total Canadian oil consumption) can be saved by substituting 50% fiber glass plastics with natural fiber composites in North American auto applications. However, to compete with glass fiber effectively, further research is needed to improve natural fiber processing, interfacial bonding and

  10. FIBER ORIENTATION IN INJECTION MOLDED LONG CARBON FIBER THERMOPLASTIC COMPOSITES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jin; Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Mathur, Raj N.; Sharma, Bhisham; Sangid, Michael D.; Costa, Franco; Jin, Xiaoshi; Tucker III, Charles L.; Fifield, Leonard S.

    2015-03-23

    A set of edge-gated and center-gated plaques were injection molded with long carbon fiber-reinforced thermoplastic composites, and the fiber orientation was measured at different locations of the plaques. Autodesk Simulation Moldflow Insight (ASMI) software was used to simulate the injection molding of these plaques and to predict the fiber orientation, using the anisotropic rotary diffusion and the reduced strain closure models. The phenomenological parameters of the orientation models were carefully identified by fitting to the measured orientation data. The fiber orientation predictions show very good agreement with the experimental data.

  11. Hybrid Composites Based on Carbon Fiber/Carbon Nanofilament Reinforcement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehran Tehrani

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanofilament and nanotubes (CNTs have shown promise for enhancing the mechanical properties of fiber-reinforced composites (FRPs and imparting multi-functionalities to them. While direct mixing of carbon nanofilaments with the polymer matrix in FRPs has several drawbacks, a high volume of uniform nanofilaments can be directly grown on fiber surfaces prior to composite fabrication. This study demonstrates the ability to create carbon nanofilaments on the surface of carbon fibers employing a synthesis method, graphitic structures by design (GSD, in which carbon structures are grown from fuel mixtures using nickel particles as the catalyst. The synthesis technique is proven feasible to grow nanofilament structures—from ethylene mixtures at 550 °C—on commercial polyacrylonitrile (PAN-based carbon fibers. Raman spectroscopy and electron microscopy were employed to characterize the surface-grown carbon species. For comparison purposes, a catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD technique was also utilized to grow multiwall CNTs (MWCNTs on carbon fiber yarns. The mechanical characterization showed that composites using the GSD-grown carbon nanofilaments outperform those using the CCVD-grown CNTs in terms of stiffness and tensile strength. The results suggest that further optimization of the GSD growth time, patterning and thermal shield coating of the carbon fibers is required to fully materialize the potential benefits of the GSD technique.

  12. Quasi-Carbon Fibers and the Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    @@The aim of this report is to study the properties of quasi-carbon fibers (QCF) prepared from the PAN fiber precursor by pyrolysis at a temperature between 400℃ and 1200℃. The resistivity of QCF with different heat-treated temperature (HTT) was investigated by a Hall-35 testing system,and the flexural properties of the result composites (QCFC) are also discussed. In addition, the scanning electronic microscope (SEM) was utilized to observe the surface morphology of QCF and the fracture section of QCFC obtained from flexural testing.

  13. Carbon fiber composite molecular sieves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burchell, T.D.; Rogers, M.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-12-01

    Monolithic adsorbents based on isotropic pitch fibers have been developed jointly by ORNL and the University of Kentucky, Center for Applied Energy Research. The monoliths are attractive for gas separation and storage applications because of their unique combination of physical properties and microporous structure. Currently at ORNL the monoliths are produced in billets that are 10 cm in diameter and 25 cm in length. The monolithic adsorbent material is being considered for guard bed applications on a natural gas (NG) powered device. In order for the material to be successful in this application, one must attain a uniform activation to modest micropore volumes throughout the large monoliths currently being produced. Here the authors report the results of a study directed toward attaining uniform activation in these billets.

  14. Carbon Fiber Foam Composites and Methods for Making the Same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leseman, Zayd Chad (Inventor); Atwater, Mark Andrew (Inventor); Phillips, Jonathan (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Exemplary embodiments provide methods and apparatus of forming fibrous carbon foams (FCFs). In one embodiment, FCFs can be formed by flowing a fuel rich gas mixture over a catalytic material and components to be encapsulated in a mold to form composite carbon fibers, each composite carbon fiber having a carbon phase grown to encapsulate the component in situ. The composite carbon fibers can be intertwined with one another to form FCFs having a geometry according to the mold.

  15. RADIATION EFFECTS ON EPOXY CARBON FIBER COMPOSITE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, E

    2008-05-30

    Carbon fiber-reinforced bisphenol-A epoxy matrix composite was evaluated for gamma radiation resistance. The composite was exposed to total gamma doses of 50, 100, and 200 Mrad. Irradiated and baseline samples were tested for tensile strength, hardness and evaluated using FTIR (Fourier transform infrared) spectroscopy and DSC (differential scanning calorimetry) for structural changes. Scanning electron microscopy was used to evaluate microstructural behavior. Mechanical testing of the composite bars revealed no apparent change in modulus, strain to failure, or fracture strength after exposures. However, testing of only the epoxy matrix revealed changes in hardness, thermal properties, and FTIR results with increasing gamma irradiation. The results suggest the epoxy within the composite can be affected by exposure to gamma irradiation.

  16. CARBONIZED STARCH MICROCELLULAR FOAM-CELLULOSE FIBER COMPOSITE STRUCTURES

    OpenAIRE

    Andrew R. Rutledge; Richard A. Venditti; Joel J. Pawlak; Sameer Patel; Janderson L. Cibils

    2008-01-01

    The production of microporous carbon foams from renewable starch microcellular foam-fiber (SMCF-Fiber) composites is described. Carbon foams are used in applications such as thermal insulation, battery electrodes, filters, fuel cells, and medical devices. SMCF-Fiber compos-ites were created from an aquagel. The water in the aquagel was exchanged with ethanol and then dried and carbonized. Higher amylose content starches and fiber contents of up to 4% improved the processability of the foam. ...

  17. Carbon Fiber Reinforced, Zero CME Composites Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Technical Abstract: This project proposes to develop moisture insensitive, high performance, carbon fiber laminates for future missions. Current space-qualified...

  18. The dynamic response of carbon fiber-filled polymer composites

    OpenAIRE

    Patterson B.; Orler E.B.; Furmanski J.; Rigg P.A.; Scharff R.J.; Stahl D.B.; Sheffield S.A.; Gustavsen R.L.; Dattelbaum D.M.; Coe J.D.

    2012-01-01

    The dynamic (shock) responses of two carbon fiber-filled polymer composites have been quantified using gas gun-driven plate impact experimentation. The first composite is a filament-wound, highly unidirectional carbon fiber-filled epoxy with a high degree of porosity. The second composite is a chopped carbon fiber- and graphite-filled phenolic resin with little-to-no porosity. Hugoniot data are presented for the carbon fiber-epoxy (CE) composite to 18.6 GPa in the through-thickness direction,...

  19. Multifunctional Hybrid Carbon Nanotube/Carbon Fiber Polymer Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jin Ho; Cano, Roberto J.; Ratcliffe, James G.; Luong, Hoa; Grimsley, Brian W.; Siochi, Emilie J.

    2016-01-01

    For aircraft primary structures, carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites possess many advantages over conventional aluminum alloys due to their light weight, higher strengthand stiffness-to-weight ratio, and low life-cycle maintenance costs. However, the relatively low electrical and thermal conductivities of CFRP composites fail to provide structural safety in certain operational conditions such as lightning strikes. Despite several attempts to solve these issues with the addition of carbon nanotubes (CNT) into polymer matrices, and/or by interleaving CNT sheets between conventional carbon fiber (CF) composite layers, there are still interfacial problems that exist between CNTs (or CF) and the resin. In this study, hybrid CNT/CF polymer composites were fabricated by interleaving layers of CNT sheets with Hexcel® IM7/8852 prepreg. Resin concentrations from 1 wt% to 50 wt% were used to infuse the CNT sheets prior to composite fabrication. The interlaminar properties of the resulting hybrid composites were characterized by mode I and II fracture toughness testing (double cantilever beam and end-notched flexure test). Fractographical analysis was performed to study the effect of resin concentration. In addition, multi-directional physical properties like thermal conductivity of the orthotropic hybrid polymer composite were evaluated. Interleaving CNT sheets significantly improved the in-plane (axial and perpendicular direction of CF alignment) thermal conductivity of the hybrid composite laminates by 50 - 400%.

  20. Hansen solubility parameters for a carbon fiber/epoxy composite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Launay, Helene; Hansen, Charles M.; Almdal, Kristoffer

    2007-01-01

    as a model for unsized carbon fiber has been demonstrated as appropriate for the study of interactions between the materials in composite carbon fiber-epoxy systems. The HSP of glassy carbon are similar to those of carbon fibers and epoxy matrix. (C) 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.......In this study, the physical affinity between an epoxy matrix and oxidized, unsized carbon fibers has been evaluated using Hansen solubility (cohesion) parameters (HSP). A strong physical compatibility has been shown, since their respective HSP are close. The use of a glassy carbon substrate...

  1. Mechanical properties of carbon fiber composites for environmental applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrews, R.; Grulke, E. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Activated carbon fiber composites show great promise as fixed-bed catalytic reactors for use in environmental applications such as flue gas clean-up and ground water decontamination. A novel manufacturing process produces low density composites from chopped carbon fibers and binders. These composites have high permeability, can be activated to have high surface area, and have many potential environmental applications. This paper reports the mechanical and flow properties of these low density composites. Three point flexural strength tests were used to measure composite yield strength and flexural moduli. Composites containing over 10 pph binder had an adequate yield strength of about 200 psi at activations up to 40% weight loss. The composites were anisotropic, having along-fiber to cross-fiber yield strength ratios between 1.2 and 2.0. The friction factor for flow through the composites can be correlated using the fiber Reynolds number, and is affected by the composite bulk density.

  2. Carbon Fiber Reinforced Carbon Composite Valve for an Internal Combustion Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivers, H. Kevin (Inventor); Ransone, Philip O. (Inventor); Northam, G. Burton (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A carbon fiber reinforced carbon composite valve for internal combustion engines and the like formed of continuous carbon fibers throughout the valve's stem and head is disclosed. The valve includes braided carbon fiber material over axially aligned unidirectional carbon fibers forming a valve stem; the braided and unidirectional carbon fibers being broomed out at one end of the valve stem forming the shape of the valve head; the valve-shaped structure being densified and rigidized with a matrix of carbon containing discontinuous carbon fibers: and the finished valve being treated to resist oxidation. Also disclosed is a carbon matrix plug containing continuous and discontinuous carbon fibers and forming a net-shape valve head acting as a mandrel over which the unidirectional and braided carbon fibers are formed according to textile processes. Also disclosed are various preform valves and processes for making finished and preform carbon fiber reinforced carbon composite valves.

  3. Preparation and characterization of carbon nanotube-hybridized carbon fiber to reinforce epoxy composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → CNTs were uniformly grown onto the carbon fibers. → No obvious mechanical properties of carbon fiber were observed after CNT growth. → The IFSS of multiscale epoxy composite was measured by single fiber pull-out tests. → Observing fractography of composite, the fracture modes of CNTs were discussed. -- Abstract: The multiscale carbon nanotube-hybridized carbon fiber was prepared by a newly developed aerosol-assisted chemical vapour deposition. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscope were carried out to characterize this multiscale material. Compared with the original carbon fibers, the fabrication of this hybrid fiber resulted in an almost threefold increase of BET surface area to reach 2.22 m2/g. Meanwhile, there was a slight degradation of fiber tensile strength within 10%, while the fiber modulus was not significantly affected. The interfacial shearing strength of a carbon fiber-reinforced polymer composite with carbon nanotube-hybridized carbon fiber and an epoxy matrix was determined from the single fiber pull-out tests of microdroplet composite. Due to an efficient increase of load transfer at the fiber/matrix interfaces, the interracial shear strength of composite reinforced by carbon nanotube-hybridized carbon fiber is almost 94% higher than that of one reinforced by the original carbon fiber. Based on the fractured morphologies of the composites, the interfacial reinforcing mechanisms were discussed through proposing different types of carbon nanotube fracture modes along with fiber pulling out from epoxy composites.

  4. Carbon fiber reinforced thermoplastic composites for future automotive applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, K.

    2016-05-01

    After a brief introduction to polymer composite properties and markets, the state of the art activities in the field of manufacturing of advanced composites for automotive applications are elucidated. These include (a) long fiber reinforced thermoplastics (LFT) for secondary automotive components, and (b) continuous carbon fiber reinforced thermosetting composites for car body applications. It is followed by future possibilities of carbon fiber reinforced thermoplastic composites for e.g. (i) crash elements, (ii) racing car seats, and (iii) production and recycling of automotive fenders.

  5. Mechanical properties of carbon fiber composites for environmental applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrews, R.; Grulke, E.; Kimber, G. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Activated carbon fiber composites show great promise as fixed-bed catalytic reactors for use in environmental applications such as flue gas clean-up and ground water decontamination. A novel manufacturing process produces low density composites from chopped carbon fibers and binders. These composites have high permeability, can be activated to have high surface area, and have many potential environmental applications. This paper reports the mechanical and flow properties of these low density composites. Three point flexural strength tests were used to measure composite yield strength and flexural moduli. Composites containing over 10 pph binder had an adequate yield strength of about 200 psi at activations up to 40% weight loss. The composites were anisotropic, having along-fiber to cross-fiber yield strength ratios between 1.2 and 2.0. The pressure drop of air through the composites correlated with the gas velocity, and showed a dependence on sample density.

  6. Carbon-fiber composite molecular sieves for gas separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jagtoyen, M.; Derbyshire, F.; Kimber, G.; Fei, Y.Q. [Univ. of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research, Lexington, KY (United States)

    1995-08-01

    The progress of research in the development of novel, rigid, monolithic adsorbent carbon fiber composites is described. Carbon fiber composites are produced at ORNL and activated at the CAER using steam or CO{sub 2} under different conditions, with the aims of producing a uniform degree of activation through the material, and of closely controlling pore structure and adsorptive properties The principal focus of the work to date has been to produce materials with narrow porosity for use in gas separations.

  7. Carbon and glass hierarchical fibers: Influence of carbon nanotubes on tensile, flexural and impact properties of short fiber reinforced composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Dense CNT were grown on carbon fiber and glass fiber by use of floating catalyst CVD method. ► CNT showed different growing mechanism on carbon and glass fiber. ► Short fiber-CNT-composites showed enhanced mechanical properties. ► CNT coating enhanced fiber–matrix interaction and acted as additional reinforcement. -- Abstract: Dense carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were grown uniformly on the surface of carbon fibers and glass fibers to create hierarchical fibers by use of floating catalyst chemical vapor deposition. Morphologies of the CNTs were investigated using scanning electronic microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). Larger diameter dimension and distinct growing mechanism of nanotubes on glass fiber were revealed. Short carbon and glass fiber reinforced polypropylene composites were fabricated using the hierarchical fibers and compared with composites made using neat fibers. Tensile, flexural and impact properties of the composites were measured, which showed evident enhancement in all mechanical properties compared to neat short fiber composites. SEM micrographs of composite fracture surface demonstrated improved adhesion between CNT-coated fiber and the matrix. The enhanced mechanical properties of short fiber composites was attributed to the synergistic effects of CNTs in improving fiber–matrix interfacial properties as well as the CNTs acting as supplemental reinforcement in short fiber-composites.

  8. Aligning carbon fibers in micro-extruded composite ink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Chaitanya G.

    Direct write processes include a wide range of additive manufacturing techniques with the ability to fabricate structures directly onto planar and non-planar surfaces. Most additive manufacturing techniques use unreinforced polymers to produce parts. By adding carbon fiber as a reinforcing material, properties such as mechanical strength, electrical conductivity, and thermal conductivity can be enhanced. Carbon fibers can be long and continuous, or short and discontinuous. The strength of carbon fiber composite parts is greatly increased when the fibers are preferentially aligned. This research focuses on increasing the strength of additively manufactured parts reinforced using discontinuous carbon fibers that have been aligned during the micro extrusion process. A design of experiments (DOE) approach was used to identify significant process parameters affecting fiber alignment. Factors such as the length of carbon fibers, nozzle diameter, fiber loading fraction, air pressure, translational speed and standoff distance were considered. A two dimensional Fast Fourier Transform (2D FFT) was used to quantify the degree of fiber alignment in the extruded composite inks. ImageJ software supported by an oval profile plugin was used with micrographs of printed samples to obtain the carbon fiber alignment values. The optimal value for the factors was derived by identifying the significant main and interaction effects. Based on the results of the DOE, tensile test samples were printed with fibers aligned parallel and perpendicular to the tensile axis. A standard test method for tensile properties of plastic revealed that the extruded parts with fibers aligned along the tensile axis were better in tensile strength and modulus.

  9. Polyacrylonitrile/carbon nanotube composite fibers: Reinforcement efficiency and carbonization studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Han Gi

    Polyacrylonitrile (PAN)/carbon nanotube (CNT) composite fibers were made using various processing methods such as conventional solution spinning, gel spinning, and bi-component gel spinning. The detailed characterization exhibited that the smaller and longer CNT will reinforce polymer matrix mostly in tensile strength and modulus, respectively. Gel spinning combined with CNT also showed the promising potential of PAN/CNT composite fiber as precursor fiber of the next generation carbon fiber. High resolution transmission electron microscopy showed the highly ordered PAN crystal layer on the CNT, which attributed to the enhanced physical properties. The subsequent carbonization study revealed that carbonized PAN/CNT fibers have at least 50% higher tensile strength and modulus as compared to those of carbonized PAN fibers. Electrical conductivity of CNT containing carbon fiber was also 50% higher than that of carbonized PAN fiber. In order to have carbon fiber with high tensile strength, the smaller diameter precursor fiber is preferable. Bi-component gel spinning produced 1-2 mum precursor fiber, resulting in ˜1 mum carbon fiber. The tensile strength of the carbonized bi-component fiber (islands fibers) is as high as 6 GPa with tensile modulus of ˜500 GPa. Further processing optimization may lead to the next generation carbon fiber.

  10. Puncture-Healing Thermoplastic Resin Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Keith L. (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Grimsley, Brian W. (Inventor); Cano, Roberto J. (Inventor); Czabaj, Michael W. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A composite comprising a combination of a self-healing polymer matrix and a carbon fiber reinforcement is described. In one embodiment, the matrix is a polybutadiene graft copolymer matrix, such as polybutadiene graft copolymer comprising poly(butadiene)-graft-poly(methyl acrylate-co-acrylonitrile). A method of fabricating the composite is also described, comprising the steps of manufacturing a pre-impregnated unidirectional carbon fiber preform by wetting a plurality of carbon fibers with a solution, the solution comprising a self-healing polymer and a solvent, and curing the preform. A method of repairing a structure made from the composite of the invention is described. A novel prepreg material used to manufacture the composite of the invention is described.

  11. The dynamic response of carbon fiber-filled polymer composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patterson B.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic (shock responses of two carbon fiber-filled polymer composites have been quantified using gas gun-driven plate impact experimentation. The first composite is a filament-wound, highly unidirectional carbon fiber-filled epoxy with a high degree of porosity. The second composite is a chopped carbon fiber- and graphite-filled phenolic resin with little-to-no porosity. Hugoniot data are presented for the carbon fiber-epoxy (CE composite to 18.6 GPa in the through-thickness direction, in which the shock propagates normal to the fibers. The data are best represented by a linear Rankine-Hugoniot fit: Us = 2.87 + 1.17 ×up(ρ0 = 1.536g/cm3. The shock wave structures were found to be highly heterogeneous, both due to the anisotropic nature of the fiber-epoxy microstructure, and the high degree of void volume. Plate impact experiments were also performed on a carbon fiber-filled phenolic (CP composite to much higher shock input pressures, exceeding the reactants-to-products transition common to polymers. The CP was found to be stiffer than the filament-wound CE in the unreacted Hugoniot regime, and transformed to products near the shock-driven reaction threshold on the principal Hugoniot previously shown for the phenolic binder itself. [19] On-going research is focused on interrogating the direction-dependent dyanamic response and dynamic failure strength (spall for the CE composite in the TT and 0∘ (fiber directions.

  12. Evaluation of carbon fiber composites modified by in situ incorporation of carbon nanofibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Navarro de Miranda

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Nano-carbon materials, such as carbon nanotubes and carbon nanofibers, are being thought to be used as multifunctional reinforcement in composites. The growing of carbon nanofiber at the carbon fiber/epoxy interface results in composites having better electrical properties than conventional carbon fiber/epoxy composites. In this work, carbon nanofibers were grown in situ over the surface of a carbon fiber fabric by chemical vapor deposition. Specimens of carbon fiber/nanofiber/epoxy (CF/CNF/epoxy composites were molded and electrical conductivity was measured. Also, the CF/CNF/epoxy composites were tested under flexure and interlaminar shear. The results showed an overall reduction in mechanical properties as a function of added nanofiber, although electrical conductivity increased up to 74% with the addition of nanofibers. Thus CF/CNF/epoxy composites can be used as electrical dissipation discharge materials.

  13. Carbon-fiber composite molecular sieves for gas separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jagtoyen, M.; Derbyshire, F. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

    1996-08-01

    This report describes continuing work on the activation and characterization of formed carbon fiber composites. The composites are produced at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and activated at the Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER) using steam, CO{sub 2}, or O{sub 2} at different conditions of temperature and time, and with different furnace configurations. The general aims of the project are to produce uniformly activated samples with controlled pore structures for specialist applications such as gas separation and water treatment. In previous work the authors reported that composites produced from isotropic pitch fibers weighing up to 25g can be uniformly activated through the appropriate choice of reaction conditions and furnace configurations. They have now succeeded in uniformly activating composites of dimensions up to 12 x 7 x 6 cm, or up to about 166 gram - a scale-up factor of about six. Part of the work has involved the installation of a new furnace that can accommodate larger composites. Efforts were made to achieve uniform activation in both steam and CO{sub 2}. The authors have also succeeded in producing materials with very uniform and narrow pore size distributions by using a novel method involving low temperature oxygen chemisorption in combination with heat treatment in N{sub 2} at high temperatures. Work has also started on the activation of PAN based carbon fibers and fiber composites with the aim of producing composites with wide pore structures for use as catalyst supports. So far activation of the PAN fiber composites supplied by ORNL has been difficult which is attributed to the low reactivity of the PAN fibers. As a result, studies are now being made of the activation of the PAN fibers to investigate the optimum carbonization and activation conditions for PAN based fibers.

  14. Fiber optic ultrasound transducers with carbon/PDMS composite coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosse, Charles A.; Colchester, Richard J.; Bhachu, Davinder S.; Zhang, Edward Z.; Papakonstantinou, Ioannis; Desjardins, Adrien E.

    2014-03-01

    Novel ultrasound transducers were created with a composite of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) that was dip coated onto the end faces of optical fibers. The CNTs were functionalized with oleylamine to allow for their dissolution in xylene, a solvent of PDMS. Ultrasound pulses were generated by illuminating the composite coating with pulsed laser light. At distances of 2 to 16 mm from the end faces, ultrasound pressures ranged from 0.81 to 0.07 MPa and from 0.27 to 0.03 MPa with 105 and 200 μm core fibers, respectively. Using an optical fiber hydrophone positioned adjacent to the coated 200 µm core optical fiber, ultrasound reflectance measurements were obtained from the outer surface of a sheep heart ventricle. The results of this study suggest that ultrasound transducers that comprise optical fibers with CNT-PDMS composite coatings may be suitable for miniature medical imaging probes.

  15. Carbon fiber composite characterization in adverse thermal environments.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez-Vasquez, Sylvia; Brown, Alexander L.; Hubbard, Joshua A.; Ramirez, Ciro J.; Dodd, Amanda B.

    2011-05-01

    The behavior of carbon fiber aircraft composites was studied in adverse thermal environments. The effects of resin composition and fiber orientation were measured in two test configurations: 102 by 127 millimeter (mm) test coupons were irradiated at approximately 22.5 kW/m{sup 2} to measure thermal response, and 102 by 254 mm test coupons were irradiated at approximately 30.7 kW/m{sup 2} to characterize piloted flame spread in the vertically upward direction. Carbon-fiber composite materials with epoxy and bismaleimide resins, and uni-directional and woven fiber orientations, were tested. Bismaleimide samples produced less smoke, and were more resistant to flame spread, as expected for high temperature thermoset resins with characteristically lower heat release rates. All materials lost approximately 20-25% of their mass regardless of resin type, fiber orientation, or test configuration. Woven fiber composites displayed localized smoke jetting whereas uni-directional composites developed cracks parallel to the fibers from which smoke and flames emanated. Swelling and delamination were observed with volumetric expansion on the order of 100% to 200%. The purpose of this work was to provide validation data for SNL's foundational thermal and combustion modeling capabilities.

  16. Interfacial Properties Modification of Carbon Fiber/ Polyarylacetylene Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Hong-jun; MA Chong-qi; KUANG Nai-hang; LUAN Shi-lin

    2007-01-01

    This work was dedicated to performing surface oxidation and coating treatments on carbon fibers (CF) and investigating the changes of fiber surface properties after these treatments, including surface composition, relative volume of functional groups, and surface topography with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atom force microscopy (AFM) technology. The results show that,after oxidation treatments, interfacial properties between CF and non-polar polyarylacetylene (PAA) resin are remarkably modified by removing weak surface layers and increasing fiber surface roughness. Coating treatment by high char phenolic resin solution after oxidation makes interface of CF/PAA composites to be upgraded and the interfacial properties further bettered.

  17. CARBONIZED STARCH MICROCELLULAR FOAM-CELLULOSE FIBER COMPOSITE STRUCTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew R. Rutledge

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The production of microporous carbon foams from renewable starch microcellular foam-fiber (SMCF-Fiber composites is described. Carbon foams are used in applications such as thermal insulation, battery electrodes, filters, fuel cells, and medical devices. SMCF-Fiber compos-ites were created from an aquagel. The water in the aquagel was exchanged with ethanol and then dried and carbonized. Higher amylose content starches and fiber contents of up to 4% improved the processability of the foam. The SMCF structure revealed agglomerates of swollen starch granules connected by a web of starch with pores in the 50-200 nanometer range. Heating the SMCF-fiber in a nitrogen atmosphere to temperatures between 350-700˚C produced carbon foams with a three-dimensional closed cell foam structure with cell diameters around 50 microns and pore walls around 1-3 microns. The stress versus strain compression data for carbonized samples displayed a linear elastic region and a plateau indicative of brittle crushing, typical of an elastic-brittle foam. The carbon foam products from these renew-able precursors are promising carbon structures with moderate strength and low density.

  18. Tensile Properties of Polyimide Composites Incorporating Carbon Nanotubes-Grafted and Polyimide-Coated Carbon Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naito, Kimiyoshi

    2014-09-01

    The tensile properties and fracture behavior of polyimide composite bundles incorporating carbon nanotubes-grafted (CNT-grafted) and polyimide-coated (PI-coated) high-tensile-strength polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based (T1000GB), and high-modulus pitch-based (K13D) carbon fibers were investigated. The CNT were grown on the surface of the carbon fibers by chemical vapor deposition. The pyromellitic dianhydride/4,4'-oxydianiline PI nanolayer coating was deposited on the surface of the carbon fiber by high-temperature vapor deposition polymerization. The results clearly demonstrate that CNT grafting and PI coating were effective for improving the Weibull modulus of T1000GB PAN-based and K13D pitch-based carbon fiber bundle composites. In addition, the average tensile strength of the PI-coated T1000GB carbon fiber bundle composites was also higher than that of the as-received carbon fiber bundle composites, while the average tensile strength of the CNT-grafted T1000GB, K13D, and the PI-coated K13D carbon fiber bundle composites was similar to that of the as-received carbon fiber bundle composites.

  19. Use of Carbon Fiber Composite Molecular Sieves for Air Separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, Frederick S [ORNL; Contescu, Cristian I [ORNL; Gallego, Nidia C [ORNL; Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL

    2005-09-01

    A novel adsorbent material, 'carbon fiber composite molecular sieve' (CFCMS), has been developed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Its features include high surface area, large pore volume, and a rigid, permeable carbon structure that exhibits significant electrical conductivity. The unique combination of high adsorptive capacity, permeability, good mechanical properties, and electrical conductivity represents an enabling technology for the development of novel gas separation and purification systems. In this context, it is proposed that a fast-cycle air separation process that exploits a kinetic separation of oxygen and nitrogen should be possible using a CFCMS material coupled with electrical swing adsorption (ESA). The adsorption of O{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, and CO{sub 2} on activated carbon fibers was investigated using static and dynamic techniques. Molecular sieving effects in the activated carbon fiber were highlighted by the adsorption of CO{sub 2}, a more sensitive probe molecule for the presence of microporosity in adsorbents. The kinetic studies revealed that O2 was more rapidly adsorbed on the carbon fiber than N{sub 2}, and with higher uptake under equilibrium conditions, providing the fiber contained a high proportion of very narrow micropores. The work indicated that CFCMS is capable of separating O{sub 2} and N{sub 2} from air on the basis of the different diffusion rates of the two molecules in the micropore network of the activated carbon fibers comprising the composite material. In response to recent enquires from several potential users of CFCMS materials, attention has been given to the development of a viable continuous process for the commercial production of CFCMS material. As part of this effort, work was implemented on characterizing the performance of lignin-based activated carbon fiber, a potentially lower cost fiber than the pitch-based fibers used for CFCMS production to date. Similarly, to address engineering issues

  20. Smart Behavior of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Cement-based Composite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The electrical characteristics of cement-based material can be remarkably improved by the addition of short carbon fibers.Carbon fiber reinforced cement composite (CFRC) is an intrinsically smart material that can sense not only the stress andstrain, but also the temperature. In this paper, variations of electrical resistivity with external applied load, and relationof thermoelectric force and temperature were investigated. Test results indicated that the electrical signal is related to theincrease in the material volume resistivity during crack generation or propagation and the decrease in the resistivity duringcrack closure. Moreover, it was found that the fiber addition increased the linearity and reversibility of the Seebeck effect inthe cement-based materials. The change of electrical characteristics reflects large amount of information of inner damage andtemperature differential of composite, which can be used for stress-strain or thermal self-monitoring by embedding it in theconcrete structures.

  1. Multiscale carbon nanotube-carbon fiber reinforcement for advanced epoxy composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekyarova, E; Thostenson, E T; Yu, A; Kim, H; Gao, J; Tang, J; Hahn, H T; Chou, T-W; Itkis, M E; Haddon, R C

    2007-03-27

    We report an approach to the development of advanced structural composites based on engineered multiscale carbon nanotube-carbon fiber reinforcement. Electrophoresis was utilized for the selective deposition of multi- and single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on woven carbon fabric. The CNT-coated carbon fabric panels were subsequently infiltrated with epoxy resin using vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) to fabricate multiscale hybrid composites in which the nanotubes were completely integrated into the fiber bundles and reinforced the matrix-rich regions. The carbon nanotube/carbon fabric/epoxy composites showed approximately 30% enhancement of the interlaminar shear strength as compared to that of carbon fiber/epoxy composites without carbon nanotubes and demonstrate significantly improved out-of-plane electrical conductivity. PMID:17326671

  2. Mechanical characterization of epoxy composite with multiscale reinforcements: Carbon nanotubes and short carbon fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Multiscale composite was prepared by incorporation of carbon nanotubes and fibers. • Carbon nanotubes were also grown on short carbon fibers to enhance stress transfer. • Significant improvements were achieved in mechanical properties of composites. • Synergic effect of carbon nanotubes and fibers was demonstrated. - Abstract: Carbon nanotubes (CNT) and short carbon fibers were incorporated into an epoxy matrix to fabricate a high performance multiscale composite. To improve the stress transfer between epoxy and carbon fibers, CNT were also grown on fibers through chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method to produce CNT grown short carbon fibers (CSCF). Mechanical characterization of composites was performed to investigate the synergy effects of CNT and CSCF in the epoxy matrix. The multiscale composites revealed significant improvement in elastic and storage modulus, strength as well as impact resistance in comparison to CNT–epoxy or CSCF–epoxy composites. An optimum content of CNT was found which provided the maximum stiffness and strength. The synergic reinforcing effects of combined fillers were analyzed on the fracture surface of composites through optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM)

  3. Rapid Fabrication of Carbide Matrix/Carbon Fiber Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Brian E.; Bernander, Robert E.

    2007-01-01

    Composites of zirconium carbide matrix material reinforced with carbon fibers can be fabricated relatively rapidly in a process that includes a melt infiltration step. Heretofore, these and other ceramic matrix composites have been made in a chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) process that takes months. The finished products of the CVI process are highly porous and cannot withstand temperatures above 3,000 F (approx.1,600 C). In contrast, the melt-infiltration-based process takes only a few days, and the composite products are more nearly fully dense and have withstood temperatures as high as 4,350 F (approx.2,400 C) in a highly oxidizing thrust chamber environment. Moreover, because the melt- infiltration-based process takes much less time, the finished products are expected to cost much less. Fabrication begins with the preparation of a carbon fiber preform that, typically, is of the size and shape of a part to be fabricated. By use of low-temperature ultraviolet-enhanced chemical vapor deposition, the carbon fibers in the preform are coated with one or more interfacial material(s), which could include oxides. The interfacial material helps to protect the fibers against chemical attack during the remainder of the fabrication process and against oxidation during subsequent use; it also enables slippage between the fibers and the matrix material, thereby helping to deflect cracks and distribute loads. Once the fibers have been coated with the interfacial material, the fiber preform is further infiltrated with a controlled amount of additional carbon, which serves as a reactant for the formation of the carbide matrix material. The next step is melt infiltration. The preform is exposed to molten zirconium, which wicks into the preform, drawn by capillary action. The molten metal fills most of the interstices of the preform and reacts with the added carbon to form the zirconium carbide matrix material. The zirconium does not react with the underlying fibers because they

  4. Activation and micropore structure of carbon-fiber composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jagtoyen, M.; Derbyshire, F.; Kimber, G. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Research

    1997-12-01

    Rigid, high surface area activated carbon fiber composites have been produced with high permeabilities for environmental applications in gas and water purification. The project involves a collaboration between the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER), University of Kentucky. The main focus of recent work has been to find a satisfactory means to uniformly activate large samples of carbon fiber composites to produce controlled pore structures. Processes have been developed using activation in steam and CO{sub 2}, and a less conventional method involving oxygen chemisorption and subsequent heat treatment. Another objective has been to explore applications for the activated composites in environmental applications related to fossil energy production.

  5. Real time sensing of structural glass fiber reinforced composites by using embedded PVA - carbon nanotube fibers

    OpenAIRE

    Marioli-Riga Z.; Bartholome C.; Alexopoulos N.; Poulin P.

    2010-01-01

    Polyvinyl alcohol - carbon nanotube (PVA-CNT) fibers had been embedded to glass fiber reinforced polymers (GFRP) for the structural health monitoring of the composite material. The addition of the conductive PVA-CNT fiber to the nonconductive GFRP material aimed to enhance its sensing ability by means of the electrical resistance measurement method. The test specimen’s response to mechanical load and the in situ PVA-CNT fiber’s electrical resistance measurements were correlated for sens...

  6. Damage-tolerant composite materials produced by stitching carbon fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dow, Marvin B.; Smith, Donald L.

    1989-01-01

    NASA-Langley has undertaken the investigation of composite damage-tolerance enhancement and fabrication economies-maximization via reinforcement-stitching, in combination with resin transfer molding. Attention is given to results obtained by an experimental evaluation of composites tailored for damage tolerance by stitching layers of dry carbon-fiber fabric with closely-spaced threads, in order to furnish through-the-thickness reinforcement. Various stitching patterns and thread materials have been evaluated, using flat-plate specimens; blade-stiffened structural elements have been fabricated and tested. The results presented indicate that stitched laminates furnish damage tolerance performance comparable to that of more expensive, toughened-matrix composites.

  7. Hybrid Matrices Layer of Carbon Fiber Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. B. Balu Naik

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Polymeric composites have gone through a level of maturity beyond the laboratory stage with the development of all composite aircraft structures. Yet the basic understanding of the material used in its primary structure has not been extensively investigated. Although this may be attributed in part to the proprietary nature of the system, we believe that it is because of lack of specific tools required for its analysis.Specifically, micromechanical models always assume an evenly distributed homogeneous matrix while lamination theory assumes constant stress through the laminate thickness. Specifically, this work focuses on the development of model systems that can be studied without concerns of proprietary and/or export control requirements. Consequently, the amount of toughness improvement must be balanced between interlaminar and intralaminar fracture toughness. Finally, this work has demonstrated that even though the multilayer structured laminates provide Mode II interlaminar fracture toughness improvements, their mechanical testing behavior is extremely different than conventional composite structures.

  8. Carbon Fiber Reinforced Carbon Composites Rotary Valves for Internal Combustion Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northam, G. Burton (Inventor); Ransone, Philip O. (Inventor); Rivers, H. Kevin (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced carbon composite rotary, sleeve, and disc valves for internal combustion engines and the like are disclosed. The valves are formed from knitted or braided or warp-locked carbon fiber shapes. Also disclosed are valves fabricated from woven carbon fibers and from molded carbon matrix material. The valves of the present invention with their very low coefficient of thermal expansion and excellent thermal and self-lubrication properties, do not present the sealing and lubrication problems that have prevented rotary, sleeve, and disc valves from operating efficiently and reliably in the past. Also disclosed are a sealing tang to further improve sealing capabilities and anti-oxidation treatments.

  9. Carbon Fiber Reinforced Carbon Composite Rotary Valve for an Internal Combustion Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northam, G.Burton (Inventor); Ransone, Philip O. (Inventor); Rivers, H. Kevin (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced carbon composite rotary sleeve, and disc valves for internal combustion engines and the like are disclosed. The valves are formed from knitted or braided or wrap-locked carbon fiber shapes. Also disclosed are valves fabricated from woven carbon fibers and from molded carbon matrix material. The valves of the present invention with their very low coefficient of thermal expansion and excellent thermal and self-lubrication properties do not present the sealing and lubrication problems that have prevented rotary sleeve and disc valves from operating efficiently and reliably in the past. Also disclosed are a sealing tang to further improve sealing capabilities and anti-oxidation treatments.

  10. STUDY OF DEPENDENCE OF POLYETHYLENE AND CARBON FIBERS COMPOSITES PROPERNIES ON SURFACE CHARACTERISTICS OF FIBER AND TYPE OF SAMPLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petukhova E. S.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available PE2NT11 and chopped carbon fibers and PE2NT11 and modified carbon fibers composites were investigated. It was shown that the mechanical properties depend on the surface characteristics of fibers. It was found that laboratory and tube samples have some difference in mechanical properties that connected with specific distribution of fibers in samples

  11. STUDY OF DEPENDENCE OF POLYETHYLENE AND CARBON FIBERS COMPOSITES PROPERNIES ON SURFACE CHARACTERISTICS OF FIBER AND TYPE OF SAMPLES

    OpenAIRE

    Petukhova E. S.

    2015-01-01

    PE2NT11 and chopped carbon fibers and PE2NT11 and modified carbon fibers composites were investigated. It was shown that the mechanical properties depend on the surface characteristics of fibers. It was found that laboratory and tube samples have some difference in mechanical properties that connected with specific distribution of fibers in samples

  12. Mechanical properties of carbon fiber/cellulose composite papers modified by hot-melting fibers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yunzhou Shi; Biao Wang

    2014-01-01

    Carbon fiber (CF)/cellulose (CLS) composite papers were prepared by papermaking techniques and hot-melting fibers were used for modi-fication. The mechanical properties of the obtained composite papers with different CF, CLS and hot-melting fiber ratios were studied and further discussed. It is observed that, for both CF/CLS composite papers and those modified by hot-melting fibers, the normal stress firstly increases and then declines with the addition of carbon fibers. The results also show that with the addition of hot-melting fibers, the modified papers exhibit enhanced mechanical performance compared to CF/CLS composite papers. Through SEM characterization, it is confirmed that the improvement of mechanical properties attributes to the reinforcement of adhesive binding at the fiber overlap nodes. Also, through four-probe method, the resistivity and the electrical performance of the modified and unmodified papers were characterized and the result shows that the hot-melting fiber modification brings no harm to the electrical properties.

  13. Mechanical properties of carbon fiber/cellulose composite papers modified by hot-melting fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunzhou Shi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Carbon fiber (CF/cellulose (CLS composite papers were prepared by papermaking techniques and hot-melting fibers were used for modification. The mechanical properties of the obtained composite papers with different CF, CLS and hot-melting fiber ratios were studied and further discussed. It is observed that, for both CF/CLS composite papers and those modified by hot-melting fibers, the normal stress firstly increases and then declines with the addition of carbon fibers. The results also show that with the addition of hot-melting fibers, the modified papers exhibit enhanced mechanical performance compared to CF/CLS composite papers. Through SEM characterization, it is confirmed that the improvement of mechanical properties attributes to the reinforcement of adhesive binding at the fiber overlap nodes. Also, through four-probe method, the resistivity and the electrical performance of the modified and unmodified papers were characterized and the result shows that the hot-melting fiber modification brings no harm to the electrical properties.

  14. Fracture morphology of carbon fiber reinforced plastic composite laminates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinod Srinivasa

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP composites have been extensively used in fabrication of primary structures for aerospace, automobile and other engineering applications. With continuous and widespread use of these composites in several advanced technology, the frequency of failures is likely to increase. Therefore, to establish the reasons for failures, the fracture modes should be understood thoroughly and unambiguously. In this paper, CFRP composite have been tested in tension, compression and flexural loadings; and microscopic study with the aid of Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM has been performed on failed (fractured composite surfaces to identify the principle features of failure. Efforts have been made in correlating the fracture surface characteristics to the failure mode. The micro-mechanics analysis of failure serves as a useful guide in selecting constituent materials and designing composites from the failure behavior point of view. Also, the local failure initiation results obtained here has been reliably extended to global failure prediction.

  15. Carbon fiber/carbon nanotube reinforced hierarchical composites: Effect of CNT distribution on shearing strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, H. W.; Mishnaevsky, Leon; Yi, H. Y.;

    2016-01-01

    The strength and fracture behavior of carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites with carbon nanotube (CNT) secondary reinforcement are investigated experimentally and numerically. Short Beam Shearing tests have been carried out, with SEM observations of the damage evolution in the composites. 3D...

  16. Cohesive zone model of carbon nanotube-coated carbon fiber/polyester composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been previously reported that the average properties of carbon nanotube-coated carbon fiber/polyester multiscale composites critically depend on the length and density of nanotubes on the fiber surface. In this paper the effect of nanotube length and density on the interfacial properties of the carbon nanotube-coated carbon fiber–polymer interface has been studied using shear lag and a cohesive zone model. The latter model incorporates frictional sliding after complete debonding between the fiber and matrix and has been developed to quantify the effect of nanotube coating on various interfacial characterizing parameters. Our numerical results indicate that fibers with an optimal coverage and length of nanotubes significantly increase the interfacial strength and friction between the fiber and polymer. However, they also embrittle the interface compared with bare fibers. (paper)

  17. Thermal conductivity, electrical conductivity and specific heat of copper-carbon fiber composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuniya, Keiichi; Arakawa, Hideo; Kanai, Tsuneyuki; Chiba, Akio

    1988-01-01

    A new material of copper/carbon fiber composite is developed which retains the properties of copper, i.e., its excellent electrical and thermal conductivity, and the property of carbon, i.e., a small thermal expansion coefficient. These properties of the composite are adjustable within a certain range by changing the volume and/or the orientation of the carbon fibers. The effects of carbon fiber volume and arrangement changes on the thermal and electrical conductivity, and specific heat of the composite are studied. Results obtained are as follows: the thermal and electrical conductivity of the composite decrease as the volume of the carbon fiber increases, and were influenced by the fiber orientation. The results are predictable from a careful application of the rule of mixtures for composites. The specific heat of the composite was dependent, not on fiber orientation, but on fiber volume. In the thermal fatigue tests, no degradation in the electrical conductivity of this composite was observed.

  18. Real time sensing of structural glass fiber reinforced composites by using embedded PVA - carbon nanotube fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marioli-Riga Z.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Polyvinyl alcohol - carbon nanotube (PVA-CNT fibers had been embedded to glass fiber reinforced polymers (GFRP for the structural health monitoring of the composite material. The addition of the conductive PVA-CNT fiber to the nonconductive GFRP material aimed to enhance its sensing ability by means of the electrical resistance measurement method. The test specimen’s response to mechanical load and the in situ PVA-CNT fiber’s electrical resistance measurements were correlated for sensing and damage monitoring purposes. The embedded PVA-CNT fiber worked as a sensor in GFRP coupons in tensile loadings. Sensing ability of the PVA-CNT fibers was also demonstrated on an integral composite structure. PVA-CNT fiber near the fracture area of the structure recorded very high values when essential damage occurred to the structure. A finite element model of the same structure was developed to predict axial strains at locations of the integral composite structure where the fibers were embedded. The predicted FEA strains were correlated with the experimental measurements from the PVA-CNT fibers. Calculated and experimental values were in good agreement, thus enabling PVA-CNT fibers to be used as strain sensors.

  19. Effect of carbon nanotubes upon emissions from cutting and sanding carbon fiber-epoxy composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are being incorporated into structural composites to enhance material strength. During fabrication or repair activities, machining nanocomposites may release CNTs into the workplace air. An experimental study was conducted to evaluate the emissions generated by cutting and sanding on three types of epoxy-composite panels: Panel A containing graphite fibers, Panel B containing graphite fibers and carbon-based mat, and Panel C containing graphite fibers, carbon-based mat, and multi-walled CNTs. Aerosol sampling was conducted with direct-reading instruments, and filter samples were collected for measuring elemental carbon (EC) and fiber concentrations. Our study results showed that cutting Panel C with a band saw did not generate detectable emissions of fibers inspected by transmission electron microscopy but did increase the particle mass, number, and EC emission concentrations by 20–80 % compared to Panels A and B. Sanding operation performed on two Panel C resulted in fiber emission rates of 1.9 × 108 and 2.8 × 106 fibers per second (f/s), while no free aerosol fibers were detected from sanding Panels A and B containing no CNTs. These free CNT fibers may be a health concern. However, the analysis of particle and EC concentrations from these same samples cannot clearly indicate the presence of CNTs, because extraneous aerosol generation from machining the composite epoxy material increased the mass concentrations of the EC

  20. Effect of carbon nanotubes upon emissions from cutting and sanding carbon fiber-epoxy composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heitbrink, William A. [LMK OSH Consulting LLC (United States); Lo, Li-Ming, E-mail: LLo@cdc.gov [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Division of Applied Research and Technology, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are being incorporated into structural composites to enhance material strength. During fabrication or repair activities, machining nanocomposites may release CNTs into the workplace air. An experimental study was conducted to evaluate the emissions generated by cutting and sanding on three types of epoxy-composite panels: Panel A containing graphite fibers, Panel B containing graphite fibers and carbon-based mat, and Panel C containing graphite fibers, carbon-based mat, and multi-walled CNTs. Aerosol sampling was conducted with direct-reading instruments, and filter samples were collected for measuring elemental carbon (EC) and fiber concentrations. Our study results showed that cutting Panel C with a band saw did not generate detectable emissions of fibers inspected by transmission electron microscopy but did increase the particle mass, number, and EC emission concentrations by 20–80 % compared to Panels A and B. Sanding operation performed on two Panel C resulted in fiber emission rates of 1.9 × 10{sup 8} and 2.8 × 10{sup 6} fibers per second (f/s), while no free aerosol fibers were detected from sanding Panels A and B containing no CNTs. These free CNT fibers may be a health concern. However, the analysis of particle and EC concentrations from these same samples cannot clearly indicate the presence of CNTs, because extraneous aerosol generation from machining the composite epoxy material increased the mass concentrations of the EC.

  1. The effect of bromination of carbon fibers on the coefficient of thermal expansion of graphite fiber-epoxy composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworske, D. A.; Maciag, C.

    1987-01-01

    To examine the effect of bromination of carbon fibers on the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of carbon fiber epoxy composites, several pristine and brominated carbon fiber-epoxy composite samples were subjected to thermomechanical analysis. The CTE's of these samples were measured in the uniaxial and transverse directions. The CTE was dominated by the fibers in the uniaxial direction, while it was dominated by the matrix in the transverse directions. Bromination had no effect on the CTE of any of the composites. In addition, the CTE of fiber tow was measured in the absence of a polymer matrix, using an extension probe. The results from this technique were inconclusive.

  2. Increasing the Tensile Property of Unidirectional Carbon/Carbon Composites by Grafting Carbon Nanotubes onto Carbon Fibers by Electrophoretic Deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiang Song; Kezhi Li; Hejun Li; Qiangang Fu

    2013-01-01

    Although in-situ growing carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on carbon fibers could greatly increase the matrix-dominated mechanical properties of carbon/carbon composites (C/Cs),it always decreased the tensile strength of carbon fibers.In this work,CNTs were introduced into unidirectional carbon fiber (CF) preforms by electrophoretic deposition (EPD) and they were used to reinforce C/Cs.Effects of the content of CNTs introduced by EPD on tensile property of unidirectional C/Cs were investigated.Results demonstrated that EPD could be used as a simple and efficient method to fabricate carbon nanotube reinforced C/Cs (CNT-C/Cs) with excellent tensile strength,which pays a meaningful way to maximize the global performance of CNT-C/Cs.

  3. Deuterium trapping in carbon fiber composites exposed to D plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Airapetov, A. [Plasma Physics Department, Moscow Engineering and Physics Institute, Kashirskoe Shosse 31, Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation); Begrambekov, L., E-mail: lbb@plasma.mephi.r [Plasma Physics Department, Moscow Engineering and Physics Institute, Kashirskoe Shosse 31, Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation); Brosset, C.; Gunn, J.P.; Grisolia, C. [Association EURATOM-CEA, CEA/DSM/DRFC Cadarache, 13108 St. Paul lez Durance (France); Kuzmin, A. [Plasma Physics Department, Moscow Engineering and Physics Institute, Kashirskoe Shosse 31, Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation); Loarer, T.; Lipa, M.; Monier-Garbet, P. [Association EURATOM-CEA, CEA/DSM/DRFC Cadarache, 13108 St. Paul lez Durance (France); Shigin, P. [Plasma Physics Department, Moscow Engineering and Physics Institute, Kashirskoe Shosse 31, Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation); Tsitrone, E. [Association EURATOM-CEA, CEA/DSM/DRFC Cadarache, 13108 St. Paul lez Durance (France); Zakharov, A. [Plasma Physics Department, Moscow Engineering and Physics Institute, Kashirskoe Shosse 31, Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation)

    2009-06-15

    Deuterium trapping in carbon fiber composite N11 and pyrolitic graphite PG99 irradiated with plasma ions and electrons was examined with thermal desorption spectrometry. It has been found that the deuterium trapping takes place even at ion and electron energies of about 10 eV. For equal ion fluences, the deuterium retention and probability of CD{sub 4} formation are higher for ion irradiation at lower ion flux. Peculiarities of the deuterium retention and CD{sub 4} formation are explained; driving forces and mechanisms of the D trapping are discussed.

  4. Laser ultrasound technology for fault detection on carbon fiber composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyrkammer, Robert; Reitinger, Bernhard; Grün, Hubert; Sekelja, Jakov; Burgholzer, Peter

    2014-05-01

    The marching in of carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRPs) to mass production in the aeronautic and automotive industry requires reliable quality assurance methods. Laser ultrasound (LUS) is a promising nondestructive testing technique for sample inspection. The benefits compared to conventional ultrasound (US) testing are couplant free measurements and an easy access to complex shapes due to remote optical excitation and detection. Here the potential of LUS is present on composite test panels with relevant testing scenarios for industry. The results are evaluated in comparison to conventional ultrasound used in the aeronautic industry.

  5. A small-scale test for fiber release from carbon composites. [pyrolysis and impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilwee, W. J., Jr.; Fish, R. H.

    1980-01-01

    A test method was developed to determine relative fiber loss from pyrolyzed composites with different resins and fiber construction. Eleven composites consisting of woven and unwoven carbon fiber reinforcement and different resins were subjected to the burn and impact test device. The composites made with undirectional tape had higher fiber loss than those with woven fabric. Also, the fiber loss was inversely proportional to the char yield of the resin.

  6. 21 CFR 878.3500 - Polytetrafluoroethylene with carbon fibers composite implant material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Prosthetic Devices § 878.3500 Polytetrafluoroethylene with carbon fibers composite implant material. (a) Identification. A polytetrafluoroethylene with carbon fibers composite implant material is a porous device... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Polytetrafluoroethylene with carbon...

  7. Vibration monitoring of carbon fiber composites by multiple fiber optic sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivero, Massimo; Perrone, Guido; Vallan, Alberto; Chen, Wei; Tosi, Daniele

    2014-05-01

    This work presents the comparison between the fiber Bragg grating technology and a vibration-measurement technique based on the detection of polarization rotation (polarimetric sensor) in a standard optical fiber, applied to the dynamic structural monitoring of carbon reinforced composites for the automotive industry. A carbon reinforced composite test plate in a 4-layer configuration was equipped with fiber Bragg gratings and polarimetric fiber sensors, then it was mechanically stressed by static and dynamic loads while monitoring the sensors response. The fiber Bragg grating setup exhibited 1.15+/-0.0016 pm/kg static load response and reproduced dynamic excitation with 0.1% frequency uncertainty, while the polarimetric sensing system exhibited a sensitivity of 1.74+/-0.001 mV/kg and reproduced the dynamic excitation with 0.5% frequency uncertainty. It is shown that the polarimetric sensor technology represents a cheap yet efficient alternative to the fiber Bragg grating sensors in the case of vibration-monitoring of small structures at high frequency.

  8. Compression Molding of Chemical/Thermal Resistant Composite Materials Using Wastes of Glass Fiber Reinforced PTFE and Carbon Fiber

    OpenAIRE

    Kimura, Teruo||木村, 照夫||キムラ, テルオ

    2013-01-01

    This report proposed the compression molding method of chemical/thermal resistant composite materials reinforced by the carbon fiber extracted from CFRP waste and the waste of glass fiber coated by PTFE. The FEP resin was used for the matrix material. The contents of carbon fiber and FEP resin were varied in the experiments, and the machanical properties of composite materials were discussed in detail. As a result, the bending strength and modulus increased with increasing the content of carb...

  9. Global Carbon Fiber Composites. Supply Chain Competitiveness Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Sujit [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Warren, Joshua A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); West, Devin [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Schexnayder, Susan M. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study is to identify key opportunities in the carbon fiber (CF) supply chain where resources and investments can help advance the clean energy economy. The report focuses on four application areas—wind energy, aerospace, automotive, and pressure vessels—that top the list of industries using CF and carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRP) and are particularly relevant to the mission of U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (DOE EERE). For each of the four application areas, the report addresses the supply and demand trends within that sector, supply chain, and costs of carbon fiber and components.

  10. Influence of carbon nanotubes coatings onto carbon fiber by oxidative treatments combined with electrophoretic deposition on interfacial properties of carbon fiber composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Chao; Jiang, Jianjun; Liu, Fa; Fang, Liangchao; Wang, Junbiao; Li, Dejia; Wu, Jianjun

    2015-12-01

    To improve the interfacial performance of carbon fiber (CF) and epoxy resin, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) coatings were utilized to achieve this purpose through coating onto CF by the treatment with hydrogen peroxide and concentrated nitric acid combined with electrophoretic deposition (EPD) process. The influence of electrophoretically deposited CNTs coatings on the surface properties of CFs were investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectrometer, atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and dynamic contact angle analysis. The results indicated that the deposition of carbon nanotubes introduced some polar groups to carbon fiber surfaces, enhanced surface roughness and changed surface morphologies of carbon fibers. Surface wettability of carbon fibers may be significantly improved by increasing surface free energy of the fibers due to the deposition of CNTs. The thickness and density of the coatings increases with the introduction of pretreatment of the CF during the EPD process. Short beam shear test was performed to examine the effect of carbon fiber functionalization on mechanical properties of the carbon fiber/epoxy resin composites. The interfacial adhesion of CNTs/CF reinforced epoxy composites showed obvious enhancement of interlaminar shear strength by 60.2% and scanning electron microscope photographs showed that the failure mode of composites was changed after the carbon fibers were coated with CNTs.

  11. Hybrid carbon fiber/carbon nanotube composites for structural damping applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were grown on the surface of carbon fibers utilizing a relatively low temperature synthesis technique; graphitic structures by design (GSD). To probe the effects of the synthesis protocols on the mechanical properties, other samples with surface grown CNTs were prepared using catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD). The woven graphite fabrics were thermally shielded with a thin film of SiO2 and CNTs were grown on top of this film. Raman spectroscopy and electron microscopy revealed the grown species to be multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). The damping performance of the hybrid CNT–carbon fiber-reinforced epoxy composite was examined using dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). Mechanical testing confirmed that the degradations in the strength and stiffness as a result of the GSD process are far less than those encountered through using the CCVD technique and yet are negligible compared to the reference samples. The DMA results indicated that, despite the minimal degradation in the storage modulus, the loss tangent (damping) for the hybrid composites utilizing GSD-grown MWCNTs improved by 56% compared to the reference samples (based on raw carbon fibers with no surface treatment or surface grown carbon nanotubes) over the frequency range 1–60 Hz. These results indicated that the energy dissipation in the GSD-grown MWCNTs composite can be primarily attributed to the frictional sliding at the nanotube/epoxy interface and to a lesser extent to the stiff thermal shielding SiO2 film on the fiber/matrix interface. (paper)

  12. Physical Characterization and Steam Chemical Reactivity of Carbon Fiber Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderl, Robert Andrew; Pawelko, Robert James; Smolik, Galen Richard

    2001-05-01

    This report documents experiments and analyses that have been done at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) to measure the steam chemical reactivity of two types of carbon fiber composites, NS31 and NB31, proposed for use at the divertor strike points in an ITER-like tokamak. These materials are 3D CFCs constituted by a NOVOLTEX preform and densified by pyrocarbon infiltration and heat treatment. NS31 differs from NB31 in that the final infiltration was done with liquid silicon to reduce the porosity and enhance the thermal conductivity of the CFC. Our approach in this work was twofold: (1) physical characterization measurements of the specimens and (2) measurements of the chemical reactivity of specimens exposed to steam.

  13. Global Carbon Fiber Composites Supply Chain Competitiveness Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das. Sujit; Warren, Josh; West, Devin; Schexnayder, Susan M.

    2016-05-11

    This study identifies key opportunities in the carbon fiber supply chain where the United States Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy resources and investments can help the United States achieve or maintain a competitive advantage. The report focuses on four application areas--wind energy, aerospace, automotive, and pressure vessels--that top the list of industries using carbon fiber and carbon fiber reinforced polymers and are also particularly relevant to EERE's mission. For each of the four application areas, the report addresses the supply and demand trends within that sector, supply chain, and costs of carbon fiber and components, all contributing to a competitiveness assessment that addresses the United States' role in future industry growth. This report was prepared by researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the University of Tennessee for the Clean Energy Manufacturing Analysis Center.

  14. Global Carbon Fiber Composites Supply Chain Competitiveness Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Sujit [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Warren, Josh [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); West, Devin [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Schexnayder, Susan M. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2016-05-01

    This study identifies key opportunities in the carbon fiber supply chain where the United States Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy resources and investments can help the United States achieve or maintain a competitive advantage. The report focuses on four application areas--wind energy, aerospace, automotive, and pressure vessels--that top the list of industries using carbon fiber and carbon fiber reinforced polymers and are also particularly relevant to EERE's mission. For each of the four application areas, the report addresses the supply and demand trends within that sector, supply chain, and costs of carbon fiber and components, all contributing to a competitiveness assessment that addresses the United States' role in future industry growth. This report was prepared by researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the University of Tennessee for the Clean Energy Manufacturing Analysis Center.

  15. Multifunctional structural supercapacitor composites based on carbon aerogel modified high performance carbon fiber fabric.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Hui; Kucernak, Anthony R; Greenhalgh, Emile S; Bismarck, Alexander; Shaffer, Milo S P

    2013-07-10

    A novel multifunctional material has been designed to provide excellent mechanical properties while possessing a high electrochemical surface area suitable for electrochemical energy storage: structural carbon fiber fabrics are embedded in a continuous network of carbon aerogel (CAG) to form a coherent but porous monolith. The CAG-modification process was found to be scalable and to be compatible with a range of carbon fiber fabrics with different surface properties. The incorporation of CAG significantly increased the surface area of carbon fiber fabrics, and hence the electrochemical performance, by around 100-fold, resulting in a CAG-normalized specific electrode capacitance of around 62 F g(-1), determined by cyclic voltammetry in an aqueous electrolyte. Using an ionic liquid (IL) electrolyte, the estimated energy density increased from 0.003 to 1 Wh kg(-1), after introducing the CAG into the carbon fiber fabric. 'Proof-of-concept' multifunctional structural supercapacitor devices were fabricated using an IL-modified solid-state polymer electrolyte as a multifunctional matrix to provide both ionic transport and physical support for the primary fibers. Two CAG-impregnated carbon fabrics were sandwiched around an insulating separator to form a functioning structural electrochemical double layer capacitor composite. The CAG-modification not only improved the electrochemical surface area, but also reinforced the polymer matrix surrounding the primary fibers, leading to dramatic improvements in the matrix-dominated composite properties. Increases in in-plane shear strength and modulus, of up to 4.5-fold, were observed, demonstrating that CAG-modified structural carbon fiber fabrics have promise in both pure structural and multifunctional energy storage applications.

  16. A New Fiber Preform with Nanocarbon Binder for Manufacturing Carbon Fiber Reinforced Composite by Liquid Molding Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seong, Dong Gi; Ha, Jong Rok; Lee, Jea Uk; Lee, Wonoh; Kim, Byung Sun

    2015-11-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced composite has been a good candidate of lightweight structural component in the automotive industry. As fast production speed is essential to apply the composite materials for the mass production area such as automotive components, the high speed liquid composite molding processes have been developed. Fast resin injection through the fiber preform by high pressure is required to improve the production speed, but it often results in undesirable deformations of the fiber preform which causes defectives in size and properties of the final composite products. In order to prevent the undesirable deformation and improve the stability of preform shape, polymer type binder materials are used. More stable fiber preform can be obtained by increasing the amount of binder material, but it disturbs the resin impregnation through the fiber preform. In this study, carbon nanomaterials such as graphene oxide were embedded on the surface of carbon fiber by electrophoretic deposition method in order to improve the shape stability of fiber preform and interfacial bonding between polymer and the reinforcing fiber. Effects of the modified reinforcing fiber were investigated in two respects. One is to increase the binding energy between fiber tows, and the other is to increase the interfacial bonding between polymer matrix and fiber surface. The effects were analyzed by measuring the binding force of fiber preform and interlaminar shear strength of the composite. This study also investigated the high speed liquid molding process of the composite materials composed of polymer matrix and the carbon fiber preforms embedded by carbon nanomaterials. Process parameter such as permeability of fiber preform was measured to investigate the effect of nanoscale surface modification on the macroscale processing condition for composite manufacturing. PMID:26726642

  17. A New Fiber Preform with Nanocarbon Binder for Manufacturing Carbon Fiber Reinforced Composite by Liquid Molding Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seong, Dong Gi; Ha, Jong Rok; Lee, Jea Uk; Lee, Wonoh; Kim, Byung Sun

    2015-11-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced composite has been a good candidate of lightweight structural component in the automotive industry. As fast production speed is essential to apply the composite materials for the mass production area such as automotive components, the high speed liquid composite molding processes have been developed. Fast resin injection through the fiber preform by high pressure is required to improve the production speed, but it often results in undesirable deformations of the fiber preform which causes defectives in size and properties of the final composite products. In order to prevent the undesirable deformation and improve the stability of preform shape, polymer type binder materials are used. More stable fiber preform can be obtained by increasing the amount of binder material, but it disturbs the resin impregnation through the fiber preform. In this study, carbon nanomaterials such as graphene oxide were embedded on the surface of carbon fiber by electrophoretic deposition method in order to improve the shape stability of fiber preform and interfacial bonding between polymer and the reinforcing fiber. Effects of the modified reinforcing fiber were investigated in two respects. One is to increase the binding energy between fiber tows, and the other is to increase the interfacial bonding between polymer matrix and fiber surface. The effects were analyzed by measuring the binding force of fiber preform and interlaminar shear strength of the composite. This study also investigated the high speed liquid molding process of the composite materials composed of polymer matrix and the carbon fiber preforms embedded by carbon nanomaterials. Process parameter such as permeability of fiber preform was measured to investigate the effect of nanoscale surface modification on the macroscale processing condition for composite manufacturing.

  18. Thermal and electrical conductivities of carbon fibers and carbon nanotubes incorporated polyurethanes composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Single filler polyurethane composites with carbon fibers (CFs) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) were prepared by melt mixing methods and its thermal as well as electrical resistivity characteristics were investigated. The influences of fillers and mixing methods on thermal and electrical conductivity of CF/- and MWNT/polyurethane composites were investigated and the result shows that the addition of carbon fillers improved the thermal conductivity of the polyurethane composites. Higher filler concentration results in better thermal conductivity because better formation of thermally conductive networks along polymer matrix to ensure the thermal was conducted through the matrix and the network along the polymer composites. The presence of carbon additives improves the electrical resistivity of the materials as well. The present study revealed the potential of carbon as agent for better thermal and electrical conductivities and their properties depend strongly on the dispersion and distribution of the fillers in the polymer matrix. (author)

  19. Interfacial Microstructure and Enhanced Mechanical Properties of Carbon Fiber Composites Caused by Growing Generation 1-4 Dendritic Poly(amidoamine) on a Fiber Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Bo; Zhang, Ruliang; Gao, Fucheng; He, Maoshuai; Wang, Chengguo; Liu, Lei; Zhao, Lifen; Cui, Hongzhi

    2016-08-23

    In an attempt to improve the mechanical properties of carbon fiber composites, propagation of poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimers by in situ polymerization on a carbon fiber surface was performed. During polymerization processes, PAMAM was grafted on carbon fiber by repeated Michael addition and amidation reactions. The changes in surface microstructure and the chemical composition of carbon fibers before and after modification were investigated by atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. All the results indicated that PAMAM was successfully grown on the carbon fiber surface. Such propagation could significantly increase the surface roughness and introduce sufficient polar groups onto the carbon fiber surface, enhancing the surface wettability of carbon fiber. The fractured surface of carbon fiber-reinforced composites showed a great enhancement of interfacial adhesion. Compared with those of desized fiber composites, the interlaminar shear strength and interfacial shear strength of PAMAM/fiber-reinforced composites showed increases of 55.49 and 110.94%, respectively.

  20. TECHNICAL NOTE: Design and development of electromagnetic absorbers with carbon fiber composites and matching dielectric layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neo, C. P.; Varadan, V. K.

    2001-10-01

    Radar absorbing materials are designed and developed with carbon fibers and suitable matching layers. Complex permittivities of carbon fiber composite are predicted on the basis that the modulus of permittivity obeys a logarithmic law of mixtures and the dielectric loss tangents are related through a linear law of mixtures. Linear regression analysis performed on the data points provides the constants which are used to predict the effective permittivities of carbon fiber composite at different frequencies. Using the free space measurement system, complex permittivities of the lossy dielectric at different frequencies are obtained. These complex permittivities are used to predict the reflectivity of a thin lossy dielectric layer on carbon fiber composite substrate. The predicted results agree quite well with the measured data. It is interesting to note that the thin lossy dielectric layer, about 0.03 mm thick, has helped to reduce the reflectivity of the 5.2 mm thick carbon fiber composite considerably.

  1. Activation and Micropore Structure Determination of Activated Carbon-Fiber Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jagtoyen, M.; Derbyshire, F.

    1999-04-23

    Previous work focused on the production of carbon fiber composites and subsequently activating them to induce adsorbent properties. One problem related to this approach is the difficulty of uniformly activating large composites. In order to overcome this problem, composites have been made from pre-activated fibers. The loss of surface area upon forming the composites after activation of the fibers was investigated. The electrical resistivity and strength of these composites were compared to those made by activation after forming. It was found that the surface area is reduced by about 35% by forming the composite from pre-activated fibers. However, the properties of the activated sample are very uniform: the variation in surface area is less than {+-}0.5%. So, although the surface area is somewhat reduced, it is believed that making composites from pre-activated fibers could be useful in applications where the BET surface area is not required to be very high. The strength of the composites produced from pre-activated fibers is lower than for composites activated after forming when the carbon burnoff is below 45%. For higher burnoffs, the strength of composites made with pre-activated fibers is as good or better. In both cases, there is a dramatic decrease in strength when the fiber:binder ratio is reduced below 4:1. The electrical resistivity is slightly higher for composites made from pre-activated fibers than for composites that are activated after forming, other parameters being constant (P-200 fibers, similar carbon burnoffs). For both types of composite the resistivity was also found to increase with carbon burnoff. This is attributed to breakage of the fiber causing shorter conductive paths. The electrical resistivity also increases when the binder content is lowered, which suggests that there are fewer solid contact points between the fibers.

  2. Processing of thermo-structural carbon-fiber reinforced carbon composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Cláudio Pardini

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The present work describes the processes used to obtain thermostructural Carbon/Carbon composites. The processing of these materials begins with the definition of the architecture of the carbon fiber reinforcement, in the form of stacked plies or in the form of fabrics or multidirectional reinforcement. Incorporating fiber reinforcement into the carbon matrix, by filling the voids and interstices, leads to the densification of the material and a continuous increase in density. There are two principal processing routes for obtaining these materials: liquid phase processing and gas phase processing. In both cases, thermal processes lead to the formation of a carbon matrix with specific properties related to their precursor. These processes also differ in terms of yield. With liquid phase impregnation the yield is around 45 per cent, while gas phase processing yields around 15 per cent.

  3. Hybrid Carbon Fibers/Carbon Nanotubes Structures for Next Generation Polymeric Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Al-Haik

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Pitch-based carbon fibers are commonly used to produce polymeric carbon fiber structural composites. Several investigations have reported different methods for dispersing and subsequently aligning carbon nanotubes (CNTs as a filler to reinforce polymer matrix. The significant difficulty in dispersing CNTs suggested the controlled-growth of CNTs on surfaces where they are needed. Here we compare between two techniques for depositing the catalyst iron used toward growing CNTs on pitch-based carbon fiber surfaces. Electrochemical deposition of iron using pulse voltametry is compared to DC magnetron iron sputtering. Carbon nanostructures growth was performed using a thermal CVD system. Characterization for comparison between both techniques was compared via SEM, TEM, and Raman spectroscopy analysis. It is shown that while both techniques were successful to grow CNTs on the carbon fiber surfaces, iron sputtering technique was capable of producing more uniform distribution of iron catalyst and thus multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs compared to MWCNTs grown using the electrochemical deposition of iron.

  4. Enrichment of ventilation air methane (VAM) with carbon fiber composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Jun-Seok; Su, Shi; Yu, Xin Xiang

    2014-05-20

    Treatment of ventilation air methane (VAM) with cost-effective technologies has been an ongoing challenge due to its high volumetric flow rate with low and variable methane concentrations. In this work, honeycomb monolithic carbon fiber composites were developed and employed to capture VAM with a large-scale test unit at various conditions such as VAM concentration, ventilation air (VA) flow rate, temperature, and purging fluids. Regardless of inlet VAM concentrations, methane was captured at almost 100%. To regenerate the composites, the initial vacuum swing followed by combined temperature and vacuum swing adsorption (TVSA) was applied. It was found that initial vacuum swing is a control step for the final methane concentration having 5 or 11 times the VAM enrichment by one-step adsorption, which is, to our knowledge, the best performance achieved in VAM enrichment technologies worldwide. Five-time enriched VAM can be utilized as a principle fuel for lean burn turbine. Also, it can be further enriched by second step adsorption to more than 25% which then can be used for commercially available gas engines. In this way, the final product can be out of the methane explosive range (5-15%). PMID:24787090

  5. Piezoresistivity in Carbon Fiber Reinforced Cement Based Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bing CHEN; Keru WU; Wu YAO

    2004-01-01

    The resu lts of some i nteresti ng investigation on the piezoresistivity of ca rbon fi ber reinforced cement based com posites (CFRC) are presented with the prospect of developing a new nondestructive testing method to assess the integrity of the composite. The addition of short carbon fibers to cement-based mortar or concrete improves the structural performance and at the same time significantly decreases the bulk electrical resistivity. This makes CFRC responsive to the smart behavior by measuring the resistance change with uniaxial pressure. The piezoresistivity of CFRC under different stress was studied, at the same time the damage occurring inner specimens was detected by acoustic emission as well. Test results show that there exists a marking pressure dependence of the conductivity in CFRC, in which the so-called negative pressure coefficient of resistive (NPCR) and positive pressure coefficient of resistive (PPCR) are observed under low and high pressure. Under constant pressures, time-dependent resistivity is an outstanding characteristic for the composites, which is defined as resistance creep. The breakdown and rebuild-up process of conductive network under pressure may be responsible for the pressure dependence of resistivity.

  6. UV-cured adhesives for carbon fiber composite applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hsiao-Chun

    Carbon fiber composite materials are increasingly used in automobile, marine, and aerospace industries due to their unique properties, including high strength, high stiffness and low weight. However, due to their brittle characteristic, these structures are prone to physical damage, such as a bird strike or impact damage. Once the structure is damaged, it is important to have fast and reliable temporary repair until the permanent repair or replacement can take place. In this dissertation, UV-based adhesives were used to provide a bonding strength for temporary repair. Adhesively bonded patch repair is an efficient and effective method for temporary repair. In this study, precured patches (hard patches) and dry fabric patches with laminating resins (soft patches) were performed. UV-based epoxy adhesives were applied to both patch repair systems. For precured patch repair, the bonding strengths were investigated under different surface treatments for bonding area and different adhesives thicknesses. The shear stresses of different UV exposure times and curing times were tested. Besides, the large patch repair was investigated as well. For soft patch repair, the hand wet lay-up was applied due to high viscosity of UV resins. A modified single lap shear testing (ASTM D5868) was applied to determine the shear stress. The large patches used fiber glass instead of carbon fiber to prove the possibility of repair with UV epoxy resin by hand wet lay-up process. The hand lay-up procedure was applied and assisted by vacuum pressure to eliminate the air bubbles and consolidate the patches. To enhance the bonding strength and effective soft patch repair, vacuum assisted resin transferring molding (VaRTM) is the better option. However, only low viscosity resins can be operated by VaRTM. Hence, new UV-based adhesives were formulated. The new UV-based adhesives included photoinitiator (PI), epoxy and different solvents. Solvents were used to compound the photoinitiator into epoxy

  7. Effect of electropolymer sizing of carbon fiber on mechanical properties of phenolic resin composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jin; FAN Qun; CHEN Zhen-hua; HUANG Kai-bing; CHENG Ying-liang

    2006-01-01

    Carbon fiber/phenolic resin composites were reinforced by the carbon fiber sized with the polymer films of phenol,m-phenylenediamine or acrylic acid,which was electropolymerized by cyclic voltammetry or chronopotentiometry. The contact angles of the sized carbon fibers with deionized water and diiodomethane were measured by the wicking method based on the modified Washburn equation,to show the effects of the different electropolymer film on the surface free energy of the carbon fiber after sizing by the electropolymerization. Compared with the unsized carbon fiber,which has 85.6°of contact angle of water,52.2° of contact angle of diiodomethane,and 33.1 mJ/m2 of surface free energy with 29.3 mJ/m2 of dispersive components (γL) and 3.8 mJ/m2 of polar components (γsp),respectively. It is found that the electropolymer sized carbon fiber tends to reduce the surface energy due to the decrease of dispersive γL with the increase of the polymer film on the surface of the carbon fiber that plays an important role in improving the mechanical properties of carbon/phenolic resin composites. Compared with the phenolic resin composites reinforced by the unsized carbon fiber,the impact,flexural and interlaminar shear strength of the phenolic resin composites were improved by 44 %,68% and 87% when reinforced with the carbon fiber sized by the electropolymer of m-phenylenediamine,66%,100%,and 112% by the electropolymer of phenol,and 20%,80 %,100% by the electropolymer of acrylic acid. The results indicate the skills of electropolymerization may provide a feasible method for the sizing of carbon fiber in a composite system,so as to improve the interfacial performance between the reinforce materials and the matrix and to increase the mechanical properties of the composites.

  8. Isothermal and hygrothermal agings of hybrid glass fiber/carbon fiber composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barjasteh, Ehsan

    New applications of fiber-reinforced polymer composites (FRPCs) are arising in non-traditional sectors of industry, such as civil infrastructure, automotive, and power distribution. For example, composites are being used in place of steel to support high-voltage overhead conductors. In this application, conductive strands of aluminum are wrapped around a solid composite rod comprised of unidirectional carbon and glass fibers in an epoxy matrix, which is commercially called ACCC conductor. Composite-core conductors such as these are expected to eventually replace conventional steel-reinforced conductors because of the reduced sag at high temperatures, lower weight, higher ampacity, and reduced line losses. Despite the considerable advantages in mechanical performance, long-term durability of composite conductors is a major concern, as overhead conductors are expected to retain properties (with minimal maintenance) over a service life that spans multiple decades. These concerns stem from the uncertain effects of long-term environmental exposure, which includes temperature, moisture, radiation, and aggressive chemicals, all of which can be exacerbated by cyclic loads. In general, the mechanical and physical properties of polymer composites are adversely affected by such environmental factors. Consequently, the ability to forecast changes in material properties as a function of environmental exposure, particularly bulk mechanical properties, which are affected by the integrity of fiber-matrix interfaces, is required to design for extended service lives. Polymer composites are susceptible to oxidative degradation at high temperatures approaching but not quite reaching the glass transition temperature ( Tg). Although the fibers are stable at such temperatures, the matrix and especially the fiber-matrix interface can undergo degradation that affects the physical and mechanical properties of the structure over time. Therefore, as a first step, the thermal aging of an

  9. Studies of the Surface Treatment and Sizing of Carbon Fiber Surfaces on the Mechanical Properties of Composites Containing Carbon Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, Peter M. A.; Lease, Kevin B.; Locke, James E.; Tomblin, John S.; Wang, Youqi

    1996-01-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced composites are materials where carbon fibers are used to reinforce a matrix to produce a light and strong material with important applications in the aerospace industry. There are many aspects of the preparation of these materials that would benefit from a study which combines the research of groups involved in the production, testing and analysis of these materials, and studies of the basic surface chemistry involved. This final reports presents the results of a project that has developed a collaboration between groups in all three of the major research universities in the State of Kansas, and promises to lead to a collaborative program that covers the major aspects of composite development and application. Sherwood has provided initial fiber surface treatment and sizing together with fiber and composite surface analysis; Lease, Tomblin and Wang have worked together toward the goal of preparing pre-preg and fabrication of laminated panels; Locke has developed computational models to evaluate the effect of surface treatment (and chemistry) on mechanical properties; Lease, Tomblin and Wang have worked together to perform all necessary mechanical testing. The research has been focused on materials that would benefit the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) program. The group has visited Dr. Howard Maars and his colleagues at NASA Langley, and has focused their studies on the NASA requirements discussed in this meeting. An important development, requested by NASA scientists, has been the acquisition and study of K3B as a matrix material for the composites. The project has led to the successful acquisition and surface analysis of K3B, together with the successful deposition of this material onto surface oxidized carbon fibers. Mechanical testing, modelling and the construction of composite preparation equipment has been achieved during the grant period.

  10. Process Optimization of Bismaleimide (BMI) Resin Infused Carbon Fiber Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrlich, Joshua W.; Tate, LaNetra C.; Cox, Sarah B.; Taylor, Brian J.; Wright, M. Clara; Caraccio, Anne J.; Sampson, Jeffery W.

    2013-01-01

    Bismaleimide (BMI) resins are an attractive new addition to world-wide composite applications. This type of thermosetting polyimide provides several unique characteristics such as excellent physical property retention at elevated temperatures and in wet environments, constant electrical properties over a vast array of temperature settings, and nonflammability properties as well. This makes BMI a popular choice in advance composites and electronics applications [I]. Bismaleimide-2 (BMI-2) resin was used to infuse intermediate modulus 7 (IM7) based carbon fiber. Two panel configurations consisting of 4 plies with [+45deg, 90deg]2 and [0deg]4 orientations were fabricated. For tensile testing, a [90deg]4 configuration was tested by rotating the [0deg]4 configirration to lie orthogonal with the load direction of the test fixture. Curing of the BMI-2/IM7 system utilized an optimal infusion process which focused on the integration of the manufacturer-recommended ramp rates,. hold times, and cure temperatures. Completion of the cure cycle for the BMI-2/IM7 composite yielded a product with multiple surface voids determined through visual and metallographic observation. Although the curing cycle was the same for the three panellayups, the surface voids that remained within the material post-cure were different in abundance, shape, and size. For tensile testing, the [0deg]4 layup had a 19.9% and 21.7% greater average tensile strain performance compared to the [90deg]4 and [+45deg, 90deg, 90deg,-45degg] layups, respectively, at failure. For tensile stress performance, the [0deg]4 layup had a 5.8% and 34.0% greater average performance% than the [90deg]4 and [+45deg, 90deg, 90deg,-45deg] layups.

  11. Properties of Multifunctional Hybrid Carbon Nanotube/Carbon Fiber Polymer Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano, Roberto J.; Kang, Jin Ho; Grimsley, Brian W.; Ratcliffe, James G.; Siochi, Emilie J.

    2016-01-01

    For aircraft primary structures, carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites possess many advantages over conventional aluminum alloys due to their light weight, higher strength- and stiffness-to-weight ratios, and low life-cycle maintenance costs. However, the relatively low electrical and thermal conductivities of CFRP composites fail to provide structural safety in certain operational conditions such as lightning strikes. Carbon nanotubes (CNT) offer the potential to enhance the multi-functionality of composites with improved thermal and electrical conductivity. In this study, hybrid CNT/carbon fiber (CF) polymer composites were fabricated by interleaving layers of CNT sheets with Hexcel® IM7/8852 prepreg. Resin concentrations from 1 wt% to 50 wt% were used to infuse the CNT sheets prior to composite fabrication. The interlaminar properties of the resulting hybrid composites were characterized by mode I and II fracture toughness testing. Fractographical analysis was performed to study the effect of resin concentration. In addition, multi-directional physical properties like thermal conductivity of the orthotropic hybrid polymer composite were evaluated.

  12. Numerical and Experimental Investigations on Deep Drawing of G1151 Carbon Fiber Woven Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gherissi, A.; Abbassi, F.; Ammar, A.; Zghal, A.

    2016-06-01

    This study proposes to simulate the deep drawing on carbon woven composites in order to reduce the manufacturing cost and waste of composite material during the stamping process, The multi-scale anisotropic approach of woven composite was used to develop a finite element model for simulating the orientation of fibers accurately and predicting the deformation of composite during mechanical tests and forming process. The proposed experimental investigation for bias test and hemispherical deep drawing process is investigated in the G1151 Interlock. The mechanical properties of carbon fiber have great influence on the deformation of carbon fiber composites. In this study, shear angle-displacement curves and shear load-shear angle curves were obtained from a bias extension test. Deep drawing experiments and simulation were conducted, and the shear load-displacement curves under different forming depths and shear angle-displacement curves were obtained. The results showed that the compression and shear between fibers bundles were the main deformation mechanism of carbon fiber woven composite, as well as the maximum shear angle for the composites with G1151 woven fiber was 58°. In addition, during the drawing process, it has been found that the forming depth has a significant influence on the drawing force. It increases rapidly with the increasing of forming depth. In this approach the suitable forming depth deep drawing of the sheet carbon fiber woven composite was approximately 45 mm.

  13. Electrical Resistance Behavior of Vinylester Composites Filled with Glass-carbon Hybrid Fibers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jun; ZHANG Lianmeng; XU Renxin; DUAN Huajun; YANG Xiaoli; WANG Xiang

    2009-01-01

    Vinylester (bismethacryloxy derivative of a bisphenol-A type EP resin, VE) composites with glass-carbon hybrid fibers (CF-GF) weight fraction of 50%, were prepared by the compress molding method. The distribution of carbon fiber in the hybrids was observed by stereomicroscope. The electrical resistance behavior of the composites filled with different carbon fiber (CF) weight contents (0.5% to 20%) was studied. The experimental results show that the electrical resistance behaviors of CF-GF/VE composites are different with those of CF/VE composites because carbon fibers' conducting networks are broken by the glass fibers in the CF-GF/VE composites. The carbon fibers distribute uniformly in the networks of glass fibers (GF) like single silk and form the semi-continuous conducting networks. Composite filled with GF-CF hybrid has a higher percolation threshold than that filled with pure CF. At that time, the resistivity of CF-GF/VE composites varies little with the temperature increasing. The temperature coefficient of resistivity in GF-CF/VE composite is less than 317 ppm and the variation of the resistivity after ten thermal cycles from 20 ℃to 240 ℃ is less than 1.96%.

  14. Rate dependent response and failure of a ductile epoxy and carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Eric N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rae, Philip J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dattelbaum, Dana M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stahl, David B [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    An extensive characterization suite has been performed on the response and failure of a ductile epoxy 55A and uniaxial carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composite of IM7 fibers in 55A resin from the quasistatic to shock regime. The quasistatic and intermediate strain rate response, including elastic modulus, yield and failure have are characterized by quasistatic, SHPB, and DMA measurements as a function of fiber orientation and temperature. The high strain rate shock effect of fiber orientation in the composite and response of the pure resin are presented for plate impact experiments. It has previously been shown that at lower impact velocities the shock velocity is strongly dependent on fiber orientation but at higher impact velocity the in-plane and through thickness Hugoniots converge. The current results are compared with previous studies of the shock response of carbon fiber composites with more conventional brittle epoxy matrices. The spall response of the composite is measured and compared with quasistatic fracture toughness measurements.

  15. Environmental effects on the hybrid glass fiber/carbon fiber composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Yun-I.

    2009-12-01

    Fiber reinforced polymer composites (FRPCs) have been widely used to replace conventional metals due to the high specific strength, fatigue resistance, and light weight. In the power distribution industry, an advanced composites rod has been developed to replace conventional steel cable as the load-bearing core of overhead conductors. Such conductors, called aluminum conductor composite core (ACCC) significantly increases the transmitting efficiency of existing power grid system without extensive rebuilding expenses, while meeting future demand for electricity. In general, the service life of such overhead conductors is required to be at least 30 years. Therefore, the long-term endurance of the composite core in various environments must be well-understood. Accelerated aging by hygrothermal exposure was conducted to determine the effect of moisture on the glass fiber (GF)/carbon fiber (CF) hybrid composites. The influence of water immersion and humid air exposure on mechanical properties is investigated. Results indicated that immersion in water is the most severe environment for such hybrid GF/CF composites, and results in greater saturation and degradation of properties. When immersed directly in water, the hybrid GF/CF composites exhibit a moisture uptake behavior that is more complex than composite materials reinforced with only one type of fiber. The unusual diffusion behavior is attributed to a higher packing density of fibers at the annular GF/CF interface, which acts as a temporary moisture barrier. Moisture uptake leads to the mechanical and thermal degradation of such hybrid GF/CF composites. Findings presented here indicate that the degradation is a function of exposure temperature, time, and moisture uptake level. Results also indicate that such hybrid GF/CF composites recover short beam shear (SBS) strength and glass transition temperature (Tg) values comparable to pre-aged samples after removal of the absorbed moisture. In the hygrothermal environment

  16. Surface and sub-surface degradation of unidirectional carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composites under dry and wet reciprocating sliding

    OpenAIRE

    Dhieb, H.; Buijnsters, J.G.; Eddoumy, F.; Vázquez, Luis; Celis, J. P.

    2013-01-01

    The role of water on the sub-surface degradation of unidirectional carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composite is examined. The correlation between the debonding of carbon fibers at the fiber-epoxy interface, and the wear behavior of the carbon fiber composite are discussed based on an in-depth analysis of the worn surfaces. We demonstrate that a reciprocating sliding performed along an anti-parallel direction to the fiber orientation under dry conditions results in a large degradation by debondi...

  17. Shockwave response of two carbon fiber-polymer composites to 50 GPa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dattelbaum, Dana M.; Coe, Joshua D.; Rigg, Paulo A.; Scharff, R. Jason; Gammel, J. Tinka

    2014-11-01

    Shock compression of two molded, carbon fiber-filled polymer composites was performed in gas gun-driven plate impact experiments at impact velocities up to ≈5 km/s. Hugoniot states for both composites were obtained from chopped carbon fibers, bound by either phenolic or cyanate ester polymeric resins. Their dynamic responses were similar, although the 10 wt. % difference of carbon fill produced measureable divergence in shock compressibility. The chopped carbon fibers in the polymer matrix led to moderately anisotropic shocks, particularly when compared with the more commonly encountered filament-wound carbon fiber-epoxy composites. A discontinuity, or cusp, was observed in the principal Hugoniot of both materials near 25 GPa. We attribute the accompanying volume collapse to shock-driven chemical decomposition above this condition. Inert and reacted products equations of state were used to capture the response of the two materials below and above the cusp.

  18. Electromagnetic Interference Shielding Properties of Electroless Nickel-coated Carbon Fiber Paper Reinforced Epoxy Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Wei; WANG Jun; WANG Tao; WANG Junpeng; XU Renxin; YANG Xiaoli

    2014-01-01

    Carbon fibers (CFs) were coated with a nickel-phosphorus (Ni-P) film using an electroless plating process. The morphology, elemental composition and phases in the coating layer of the CFs were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), respectively. Wet paper-making method was used to prepare nickle coated carbon fiber paper (NCFP). Vacuum assisted infusion molding process (VAIMP) was employed to manufacture the NCFP reinforced epoxy composites, and carbon fiber paper (CFP) reinforced epoxy composites were also produced as a comparison. Electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding properties of the composites were measured in the 3.22-4.9 GHz frequency range using waveguide method. Both NCFP and CFP reinforced epoxy composites of 0.5 mm thickness exhibited high EMI shielding effectiveness (SE) at 8wt%fiber content, 35 dB and 30 dB, respectively, and reflection was the dominant shielding mechanism.

  19. The friction and wear properties of Polypropylene composite filled with carbon fiber and Polyamide 6

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Jian; Kao-Walter, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    Carbon fiber composites were prepared in order to study the influence of fillers (polyamide 6; PA6) on the tensile and tribological properties of polypropylene (PP) composites. Tensile fracture mechanism was discussed based on the tensile testresults. Tribological tests were conducted on a Mobile Remote Handler-3 (MRH-3) friction and wear tester using a block-on-ring arrangement. It was observed that the carbon fiber (CF) played a main role in the tensile-resistant and wear-resistant properti...

  20. Repairable Woven Carbon Fiber Composites with Full Recyclability Enabled by Malleable Polyimine Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taynton, Philip; Ni, Huagang; Zhu, Chengpu; Yu, Kai; Loob, Samuel; Jin, Yinghua; Qi, H Jerry; Zhang, Wei

    2016-04-20

    Carbon-fiber reinforced composites are prepared using catalyst-free malleable polyimine networks as binders. An energy neutral closed-loop recycling process has been developed, enabling recovery of 100% of the imine components and carbon fibers in their original form. Polyimine films made using >21% recycled content exhibit no loss of mechanical performance, therefore indicating all of the thermoset composite material can be recycled and reused for the same purpose.

  1. Interfacial enhancement of carbon fiber composites by generation 1–3 dendritic hexamethylenetetramine functionalization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A new chemical grafting method for carbon fibers was proposed. • The oxidation system adopts K2S2O8 and AgNO3. • The interfacial shear strength (IFSS) of carbon fiber increased by 61%, and the interfacial adhesion increased with dendritic generation number. • The tensile strength of carbon fiber does not decrease distinctly. • The treatment conditions are mild and convenient. - Abstract: PAN-based carbon fibers (CF) were functionalized with generation (n) 1–3 dendritic hexamethylenetetramine (HMTA) (denoted as CF-Gn-HMTA, n = 1, 2 and 3) in an attempt to improve the interfacial properties between carbon fibers and epoxy matrix. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), dynamic contact angle analysis (DCA), interfacial shear strength (IFSS) and single fiber tensile testing were carried out to investigate the functionalization process of carbon fibers and the interfacial properties of the composites. Experimental results showed that generation (n) 1–3 dendritic hexamethylenetetramine was grafted uniformly on the fiber surface through the chemical reaction, and then it increased significantly the fiber surface polarity and roughness. The surface energy and IFSS of carbon fibers increased obviously after the graft CF-G3-HMTA, by 147.6% and 81%, respectively. Generation (n) 1–3 dendritic hexamethylenetetramine enhanced effectively the interfacial adhesion of the composites by improving resin wettability, increasing chemical bonding and mechanical interlocking, and the interfacial adhesion increased with dendritic generation number. Moreover, the grafting of generation (n) 1–3 dendritic hexamethylenetetramine on the carbon fiber surface improved the fiber tensile strength, which is beneficial to the in-plane properties of the resulting composites

  2. Research on the melt impregnation of continuous carbon fiber reinforced nylon 66 composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, M. Y.; Li, C. X.; Xue, P.; Chen, K.; Chen, T. H.

    2016-07-01

    Impregnation mold of continuous carbon fiber reinforced thermoplastic composites was designed and built in the article. Based on the theory of fluid mechanics and Darcy's law, a model of the melt impregnation was also established. The influences of fiber bundle width and impregnation pins’ diameter on the impregnation degree were studied by numerical simulation. Continuous carbon fiber reinforced nylon 66 composites were prepared. The effects of coated angle and impregnation mold temperature on the mechanical properties of the composites were also described.The agreement between the experimental data and prediction by the model was found to be satisfactory.

  3. Electrospun carbon nanofibers for improved electrical conductivity of fiber reinforced composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alarifi, Ibrahim M.; Alharbi, Abdulaziz; Khan, Waseem S.; Asmatulu, Ramazan

    2015-04-01

    Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) was dissolved in dimethylformamide (DMF), and then electrospun to generate nanofibers using various electrospinning conditions, such as pump speeds, DC voltages and tip-to-collector distances. The produced nanofibers were oxidized at 270 °C for 1 hr, and then carbonized at 850 °C in an argon gas for additional 1 hr. The resultant carbonized PAN nanofibers were placed on top of the pre-preg carbon fiber composites as top layers prior to the vacuum oven curing following the pre-preg composite curing procedures. The major purpose of this study is to determine if the carbonized nanofibers on the fiber reinforced composites can detect the structural defects on the composite, which may be useful for the structural health monitoring (SHM) of the composites. Scanning electron microscopy images showed that the electrospun PAN fibers were well integrated on the pre-preg composites. Electrical conductivity studies under various tensile loads revealed that nanoscale carbon fibers on the fiber reinforced composites detected small changes of loads by changing the resistance values. Electrically conductive composite manufacturing can have huge benefits over the conventional composites primarily used for the military and civilian aircraft and wind turbine blades.

  4. Wet spinning of PVA composite fibers with a large fraction of multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dengpan Lai

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available PVA composites fibers with a large fraction of multi-walled carbon nanotubes modified by both covalent and non-covalent functionalization were produced by a wet-spinning process. Model XQ-1 tensile tester, thermogravimetric analysis, scanning electron microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and wide-angle X-ray diffraction were used to characterize the properties of PVA/MWNT composite fibers. The TGA results suggested that MWNTs content in composite fibers were ranged from 5.3 wt% to 27.6 wt%. The mechanical properties of PVA/MWNT composite fibers were obviously superior to pure PVA fiber. The Young׳s modulus of composite fibers enhanced with increasing the content of MWNTs, and it rised gradually from 6.7 GPa for the pure PVA fiber to 12.8 GPa for the composite fibers with 27.6 wt% MWNTs. Meanwhile, the tensile strength increased gradually from 0.39 GPa for the pure PVA fiber to 0.74 GPa for the composite fibers with 14.4 wt% MWNTs. Nevertheless, the tensile strength of the composite fibers decreased as the MWNTs content up to 27.6 wt%. SEM results indicated that the MWNTs homogeneously dispersed in the composite fibers, however some agglomerates also existed when the content of MWNTs reached 27.6 wt%. DSC results proved strong interfacial interaction between MWNTs and PVA chain, which benefited composite fibers in the efficient stress-transfer. WXAD characterization showed that the orientation of PVA molecules declined from 94.1% to 90.9% with the increasing of MWNTs content. The good dispersibility of MWNTs throughout PVA matrix and efficient stress-transfer between MWNTs and PVA matrix may contributed to significant enhancement in the mechanical properties.

  5. Effects of EB irradiation on stress-strain curves for carbon fiber reinforced composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, H.; Yamada, K.; Mizutani, A.; Uchida, N.; Tanaka, K.; Nishi, Yoshitake

    2004-02-01

    In order to evaluate influence of electron beam (EB) irradiation on elasticity and stress- strain curve of composite materials reinforced by carbon fiber (CF), carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) and carbon fiber reinforced graphite (C/C) were treated by EB irradiation of 0.3 MGy. Since the EB strengthening was mainly dominated by the ductility enhancements of carbon fiber and matrix of epoxy resin, EB irradiation enlarged fracture stress and enhanced fracture strain of CFRP. Furthermore, EB irradiation slightly enhanced bending elasticity of CFRP and largely enhanced the initial spring constant related to elasticity of C/C coil. Although the elasticity enhancement of carbon fibers did not largely contribute that of CFRP, that of treated graphite matrix in C/C mainly caused the C/C coil elasticity enhancement by EB irradiation. Such a new treatment is a dream-worthy technology for structural materials to be applied in the fields of future engineering.

  6. Hybrid carbon/glass fiber composites: Micromechanical analysis of structure–damage resistance relationships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mishnaevsky, Leon; Dai, Gaoming

    2014-01-01

    A computational study of the effect of microstructure of hybrid carbon/glass fiber composites on their strength is presented. Unit cells with hundreds of randomly located and misaligned fibers of various properties and arrangements are subject to tensile and compression loading, and the evolution...

  7. Study on the Mechanical Properties of Carbon Nanotube/Polyacrylonitrile Composite Fibers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李建梅; 王彪; 张玉梅; 王华平; 杨崇倡

    2003-01-01

    The method of preparing the multi-walled carbon nanotubes(MWNTs)-polyacrylonitrile (PAN) composite fibers is described and the effects of draw ratio on the mechanical properties of CNT/PAN fibers have also been discussed.The results show that the degrees of MWNTs dispersion in the polymer matrix have much effect on the mechanical properties.

  8. Performance of carbon fiber reinforced rubber composite armour against shaped charge jet penetration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Lian-yong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural rubber is reinforced with carbon fiber; the protective performances of the carbonfiber reinforced rubber composite armour to shaped charge jet have been studied based on the depth of penetration experiments. The craters on the witness blocks, the nature rubber based composite plates’ deformation and the Scanning Electron Microscopy for the hybrid fiber reinforced rubber plate also is analyzed. The results showed that the composite armour can affect the stability of the jet and made part of the jet fracture. The carbon fiber reinforced rubber composite armour has good defence ablity especially when the nature rubber plate hybrid 15% volume percentage carbonfiber and the obliquity angle is 68°. The hybrid fiber reinforced rubber composite armour can be used as a new kind of light protective armour.

  9. Prospects in using carbon-carbon composite materials based on viscose carbon fibers for the space technology needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to the unique combination of low density, high mechanical strength under elevated temperatures, high resistance to thermal shock loads and ablation resistance, carbon-carbon composite materials (CCCM) are widely used for manufacturing of highly thermally loaded structural components. The important scientific and technical difficulty is to increase and stabilize CCCM properties, reduce cost and leads to searching for new raw materials and engineering solutions. The article describes the prospects of replacing carbon fiber fills based on PAN-precursors which are traditionally used for producing CCCM by carbon fillers on the basis of viscose raw material; shows the advantages of using viscose-based carbon fibers when forming products of complex shape as well as the possibility of obtaining products with high functional characteristics. The creation of CCCM of layered reinforcement structure, in which carbon fabric layers interleave with layers of discontinuous carbon fibers, enabled to increase the overall density of carbon composites, to ensure sufficiently high level of mechanical characteristics and resistance to ablation

  10. Complementary methods for nondestructive testing of composite materials reinforced with carbon woven fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steigmann, R.; Iftimie, N.; Sturm, R.; Vizureanu, P.; Savin, A.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents complementary methods used in nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of composite materials reinforced with carbon woven fibers as two electromagnetic methods using sensor with orthogonal coils and sensor with metamaterials lens as well as ultrasound phased array method and Fiber Bragg gratings embedded instead of a carbon fiber for better health monitoring. The samples were impacted with low energy in order to study delamination influence. The electromagnetic behavior of composite was simulated by finite- difference time-domain (FDTD) software, showing a very good concordance with electromagnetic nondestructive evaluation tests.

  11. Interlaminar improvement of carbon fiber/epoxy composites via depositing mixture of carbon nanotubes and sizing agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Cuiqin [Beijing Key Laboratory of Electrochemical Process and Technology for Materials, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Wang, Julin, E-mail: julinwang@126.com [Beijing Key Laboratory of Electrochemical Process and Technology for Materials, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Zhang, Tao [Beijing Institute of Ancient Architecture, Beijing 100050 (China)

    2014-12-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • COOH-CNTs can react with sizing agent, and the optimum reaction ratio was 1:20. • Carbon fibers were dipped into the mixture bath of CNTs and sizing agent. • SEM results indicate that fibers surfaces were coated with CNTs and sizing agent. • ILSS was increased by 67.01% for the composites after the mixture coating process. • Single fibers tensile strength was maintained after the deposited process. - Abstract: The effects of deposition to carbon fibers surfaces with mixture of functionalized multi-walled carbon fibers (MWCNTs) and sizing agent were investigated. Relationships between CNTs and sizing agent were studied with Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Ubbelohde viscometer. The results revealed that CNTs could react with sizing agent at 120 °C, and optimal reaction occurs when mass ratio was about 1:20. Then, carbon fibers were immersed in mixed aqueous suspension of CNTs and sizing agent with the above ratio dispersed by ultrasonication. According to scanning electron microscope (SEM) observations, fibers surfaces were coated with CNTs and sizing agent. The static contact angle tests indicated wetting performance between fibers and epoxy resin were improved after deposited procedures. Interlaminar shear strength was increased by 67.01% for fibers/epoxy resin composites after mixture deposited process. Moreover, the tensile strength of single fibers after depositing showed a slightly increase compared with that of fibers without depositing layer.

  12. Self-Sensing Properties of Alkali Activated Blast Furnace Slag (BFS Composites Reinforced with Carbon Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Garcés

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, several researchers have shown the good performance of alkali activated slag cement and concretes. Besides their good mechanical properties and durability, this type of cement is a good alternative to Portland cements if sustainability is considered. Moreover, multifunctional cement composites have been developed in the last decades for their functional applications (self-sensing, EMI shielding, self-heating, etc.. In this study, the strain and damage sensing possible application of carbon fiber reinforced alkali activated slag pastes has been evaluated. Cement pastes with 0, 0.29 and 0.58 vol % carbon fiber addition were prepared. Both carbon fiber dosages showed sensing properties. For strain sensing, function gage factors of up to 661 were calculated for compressive cycles. Furthermore, all composites with carbon fibers suffered a sudden increase in their resistivity when internal damages began, prior to any external signal of damage. Hence, this material may be suitable as strain or damage sensor.

  13. Circuit models for Salisbury screens made from unidirectional carbon fiber composite sandwich structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Elliot J.; Lenzing, Erik H.; Narayanan, Ram M.

    2016-05-01

    Carbon fiber composite materials have many useful structural material properties. The electromagnetic perfor- mance of these materials is of great interest for future applications. The work presented in this paper deals with the construction of Salisbury screen microwave absorbers made from unidirectional carbon fiber composite sand- wich structures. Specifically, absorbers centered at 7.25 GHz and 12.56 GHz are investigated. Circuit models are created to match the measured performance of the carbon fiber Salisbury screens using a genetic algorithm to extract lumped element circuit values. The screens presented in this paper utilize unidirectional carbon fiber sheets in place of the resistive sheet utilized in the classic Salisbury screen. The theory, models, prototypes, and measurements of these absorbers are discussed.

  14. Three-Phase Carbon Fiber Amine Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes Epoxy Composite: Processing, Characterisation, and Multiscale Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper discusses the key issues of carbon nanotube (CNT dispersion and effect of functionalisation on the mechanical properties of multiscale carbon epoxy composites. In this study, CNTs were added in epoxy matrix and further reinforced with carbon fibres. Predetermined amounts of optimally amine functionalised CNTs were dispersed in epoxy matrix, and unidirectional carbon fiber laminates were produced. The effect of the presence of CNTs (1.0 wt% in the resin was reflected by pronounced increase in Young’s modulus, inter-laminar shear strength, and flexural modulus by 51.46%, 39.62%, and 38.04%, respectively. However, 1.5 wt% CNT loading in epoxy resin decreased the overall properties of the three-phase composites. A combination of Halpin-Tsai equations and micromechanics modeling approach was also used to evaluate the mechanical properties of multiscale composites and the differences between the predicted and experimental values are reported. These multiscale composites are likely to be used for potential missile and aerospace structural applications.

  15. NDT and SHM of Carbon Fiber Composites using Linear Drive MWM-Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washabaugh, Andrew; Martin, Christopher; Lyons, Robert; Grundy, David; Goldfine, Neil; Russell, Richard; Wincheski, Russell

    2012-01-01

    Carbon fiber composites are used in a wide range of structural applications due to their excellent specific strength and stiffness. However, the anisotropic mechanical and electrical properties associated with the fibers within each composite layer present challenges, and opportunities, for Nondestructive Testing (NDT) methods used to characterize and assess the structure condition. This includes composite condition after manufacture (such as fiber orientation and density, porosity, delamination, and bond strength) and during usage (such as damage from impact, fiber breakage, thermal exposure or applied stress). Ultrasonic and thermographic methods can address some of these challenges, but eddy current methods provide an alternative method for composite structures that contain a conducting material, such as carbon fibers or a metallic liner. This presentation reviews recent advances in the development of eddy current sensors and arrays for carbon fiber composite NDT and Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) applications. The focus is on eddy current sensor constructs with linear drive windings, such as MWM -Arrays, that induce currents primarily within the linear fibers of the composite. By combining this type of sensor construct with micromechanical models that relate composite constituent properties to measurable sensor responses, insight is obtained into the volumetric distribution of electrical properties within the composite and the associated manufacturing, damage, or strain conditions. With knowledge of the fiber layup, this MWM-Array technology is able to detect damage and strain/stress as a function of depth and fiber orientation. This work has been funded by NASA, NA V AIR and the Army for applications ranging from composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs) to aircraft structures and rotorcraft blades. This presentation will specifically present background on the MWM-Array technology, results from the micromechanical modeling effort, and results from

  16. Rheological behavior of composites based on carbon fibers recycled from aircraft waste

    OpenAIRE

    Marcaníková, Lucie; Hausnerová, Berenika; Kitano, Takeshi

    2009-01-01

    Rheological investigation of composite materials prepared from the recycled aircraft waste materials based on thermoset (epoxy/resin) matrix and long carbon fibers (CF) is presented with the aim of their utilization in consumer industry applications. The carbon fibers recovered via thermal process of pyrolysis were cut into about 150 pm length and melt mixed with thermoplastic matrices based on polypropylene (PP) and polyamide 6 (PA) and various modifiers - ethylene-ethyl acrylate-maleic anhy...

  17. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY ON PEK-C MODIFIED EPOXIES AND THE CARBON FIBER COMPOSITES FOR AEROSPACE APPLICATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The morphological structure of various epoxies toughened with a special amorphous thermoplastic PEK-C and their carbon fiber composites were studied by using SEM. For both cases, phase separation and inversion took place to form fine epoxy-rich globules dispersing in the PEK-C matrix, in which the epoxy-rich phase had the absolutely higher volume fraction. The phase structure and the interfacial properties were also studied by means of FTIR, DSC, and DMTA as well. An accompanying mechanical determination revealed that an improved toughness was achieved both in the blend casts and in the carbon fiber composites. A composite structural model was hence suggested.

  18. Determination of Water Diffusion Coefficients and Dynamics in Adhesive/ Carbon Fiber Reinforced Epoxy Resin Composite Joints

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Chao; WANG Zhi; WANG Jing; SU Tao

    2007-01-01

    To determinate the water diffusion coefficients and dynamics in adhesive/carbon fiber reinforced epoxy resin composite joints, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis(EDX) is used to establish the content change of oxygen in the adhesive in adhesive/carbon fiber reinforced epoxy resin composite joints. As water is made up of oxygen and hydrogen, the water diffusion coefficients and dynamics in adhesive/carbon fiber reinforced epoxy resin composite joints can be obtained from the change in the content of oxygen in the adhesive during humidity aging, via EDX analysis. The authors have calculated the water diffusion coefficients and dynamics in the adhesive/carbon fiber reinforced epoxy resin composite joints with the aid of both energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and elemental analysis. The determined results with EDX analysis are almost the same as those determined with elemental analysis and the results also show that the durability of the adhesive/carbon fiber reinforced epoxy resin composite joints subjected to silane coupling agent treatment is better than those subjected to sand paper burnishing treatment and chemical oxidation treatment.

  19. Friction Behaviour of Polymeric Composite Materials Mixed with Carbon Fibers Having Different Orientations Layout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caliman, R.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a study of the friction properties of polymeric composite materials reinforced with unidirectional carbon fibers having different stratified structure. So, the composites are complex and versatile materials but their behaviour in practice is not fully studied. For instance, these polymeric composite materials mixed with carbon fibers after being investigated in terms of wear, did not elucidate the effect of fiber orientation on wear properties. Is therefore necessary to investigate the effect of carbon fibers orientation on the friction-wear properties of the reinforced composite materials tested to abrasive and adhesive friction. Research work has been done with unidirectional composite materials having overlap 18 successive layers made from a polymeric resine and 60% of carbon fibers. The stratified structure was obtained by compressing multiple pre-impregnated strips, positioned manually. During this experimental work, three types of test samples were investigated: parallel, normal and anti-parallel, taking in consideration the carbon fibre orientation with respect to the sliding direction. The friction coefficient is computed function to the friction load and loading value. Also, the specific wear rate was calculated according to: the mass loss, density, the normal contact surface, the sliding distance and load rating.

  20. RTA-treated carbon fiber/copper core/shell hybrid for thermally conductive composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Seunggun; Park, Bo-In; Park, Cheolmin; Hong, Soon Man; Han, Tae Hee; Koo, Chong Min

    2014-05-28

    In this paper, we demonstrate a facile route to produce epoxy/carbon fiber composites providing continuous heat conduction pathway of Cu with a high degree of crystal perfection via electroplating, followed by rapid thermal annealing (RTA) treatment and compression molding. Copper shells on carbon fibers were coated through electroplating method and post-treated via RTA technique to reduce the degree of imperfection in the Cu crystal. The epoxy/Cu-plated carbon fiber composites with Cu shell of 12.0 vol % prepared via simple compression molding, revealed 18 times larger thermal conductivity (47.2 W m(-1) K(-1)) in parallel direction and 6 times larger thermal conductivity (3.9 W m(-1) K(-1)) in perpendicular direction than epoxy/carbon fiber composite. Our novel composites with RTA-treated carbon fiber/Cu core/shell hybrid showed heat conduction behavior of an excellent polymeric composite thermal conductor with continuous heat conduction pathway, comparable to theoretical values obtained from Hatta and Taya model. PMID:24758290

  1. Woven Glass Fiber Composites with Aligned Carbon Nanotube Sheet Interlayers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hardik Bhanushali

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This investigation describes the design, fabrication, and testing of woven glass fiber reinforced epoxy matrix laminates with aligned CNT sheets integrated between plies in order to improve the matrix dominated through thickness properties such as the interlaminar fracture toughness at ply interfaces. Using aligned CNT sheets allows for a concentration of millimeter long CNTs at the most likely point of laminate failure. Mode I and Mode II interlaminar fracture toughness of various CNT modified samples were investigated using double cantilever beam (DCB and end notched flexure (ENF experiments, respectively. Short beam strength (SBS and in-plane tensile properties of the CNT modified samples were also investigated. Moderate improvement was observed in Mode I and Mode II fracture toughness at crack initiation when aligned CNT sheets with a basis weight of 0.354 g/m2 were used to modify the ply interface. No compromise in the in-plane mechanical properties of the laminate was observed and very little improvement was observed in the shear related short beam strength of the CNT modified laminates as compared to the control samples. Integration of aligned CNT sheets into the composite laminate imparted in-plane and through thickness electrical properties into the nonconductive glass fiber reinforced epoxy composite laminates.

  2. A novel surface modification of carbon fiber for high-performance thermoplastic polyurethane composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Yizhen; Liu, Yuan; Wang, Xinling; Yang, Bin

    2016-09-01

    Properties of carbon fiber (CF) reinforced composites depend largely on the interfacial bonding strength between fiber and the matrix. In the present work, CF was grafted by 4,4‧-diphenylmethane diisocyanate (MDI) molecules after electrochemical oxidation treatment. The existence of functional groups introduced to the fiber surface and the changes of surface roughness were confirmed by FTIR, AFM, XPS, SEM and Raman spectroscopy. To evaluate the possible applications of this surface modification of carbon fiber, we examined the mechanical properties as well as the friction and wear performance of pristine CF and MDI-CF reinforced thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) composites with 5-30 wt.% fiber contents, and found that the mechanical properties of TPU composites were all significantly improved. It is remarkable that when fiber content was 30 wt.%, the tensile strength of TPU/MDI-CF was increased by 99.3%, which was greater than TPU/CF (53.2%), and the friction loss of TPU/MDI-CF was decreased by 49.09%. The results of DMA and SEM analysis indicated the positive effects of MDI modification on the interfacial bonding between fibers and matrix. We believed that this simple and effective method could be used to the development of surface modified carbon fiber for high-performance TPU.

  3. Toughness and Hot/Wet Properties of a Novel Modified BMI/Carbon Fiber Composite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The toughness and hot/wet properties of a novel modified bismaleimide (BMI) 5428/carbon fiber composite was investigated. Results indicate that the prepared BMI/T700 composite owns high toughness, excellent hot/wet properties and mechanical properties. The compression strength after impact (CAl) of 5428/T700 composite is 260 MPa, and the results of hot/wet test show that the long-term service temperature of 5428/T700 composite can maintain at 170°C.

  4. pH and electrical actuation of single walled carbon nanotube/chitosan composite fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozarkar, Sukrut; Jassal, Manjeet; Agrawal, Ashwini K.

    2008-10-01

    In the present study, an attempt has been made to utilize the pH responsive nature of chitosan to produce fibers which can respond to an applied electric voltage. Single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have been used for reinforcing the chitosan fibers. But the SWCNTs are associated with their own challenges of aggregation which have been solved in this study by suitable functionalization. Electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy was used to investigate the dispersions. The functionalized SWCNTs showed improved dispersion in chitosan. The SWCNT/chitosan composite fibers were successfully solution spun and heat-set to give stable fibers of 50 ± 2 µm. The composite fibers exhibited a significant increase in the mechanical properties. The tenacity of the composite fibers reinforced with functionalized SWCNTs increased from 96 to 226 MPa with an increase in SWCNT content from 0 to 0.2 wt%. The strong interaction of carboxylic functional groups of functionalized SWCNTs with the chitosan matrix may be responsible for the improved dispersion and considerable enhancement of the mechanical properties. Further, the stability of the fibers towards the pH switching environment has also been investigated, along with the response to an applied electric voltage. Composite fibers prepared using 0.1 wt% of functionalized carbon nanotubes were observed to exhibit a stable response with high magnitude of strain and high strain rate.

  5. Influence of Carbon & Glass Fiber Reinforcements on Flexural Strength of Epoxy Matrix Polymer Hybrid Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.D. Jagannatha

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid composite materials are more attracted by the engineers because of their properties like stiffness and high specific strength which leads to the potential application in the area of aerospace, marine and automobile sectors. In the present investigation, the flexural strength and flexural modulus of carbon and glass fibers reinforced epoxy hybrid composites were studied. The vacuum bagging technique was adopted for the fabrication of polymer hybrid composite materials. The hardness, flexural strength and flexural modulus of the hybrid composites were determined as per ASTM standards. The hardness, flexural strength and flexural modulus were improved as the fiber reinforcement contents increased in the epoxy matrix material.

  6. MECHANICAL AND THERMO–MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF BI-DIRECTIONAL AND SHORT CARBON FIBER REINFORCED EPOXY COMPOSITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. AGARWAL

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper based on bidirectional and short carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composites reports the effect of fiber loading on physical, mechanical and thermo-mechanical properties respectively. The five different fiber loading, i.e., 10wt. %, 20wt. %, 30wt. %, 40wt. % and 50wt. % were taken for evaluating the above said properties. The physical and mechanical properties, i.e., hardness, tensile strength, flexural strength, inter-laminar shear strength and impact strength are determined to represent the behaviour of composite structures with that of fiber loading. Thermo-mechanical properties of the material are measured with the help of Dynamic Mechanical Analyser to measure the damping capacity of the material that is used to reduce the vibrations. The effect of storage modulus, loss modulus and tan delta with temperature are determined. Finally, Cole–Cole analysis is performed on both bidirectional and short carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composites to distinguish the material properties of either homogeneous or heterogeneous materials. The results show that with the increase in fiber loading the mechanical properties of bidirectional carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composites increases as compared to short carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composites except in case of hardness, short carbon fiber reinforced composites shows better results. Similarly, as far as Loss modulus, storage modulus is concerned bidirectional carbon fiber shows better damping behaviour than short carbon fiber reinforced composites.

  7. Liquid composite molding-processing and characterization of fiber-reinforced composites modified with carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeiler, R.; Khalid, U.; Kuttner, C.; Kothmann, M.; Dijkstra, D. J.; Fery, A.; Altstädt, V.

    2014-05-01

    The increasing demand in fiber-reinforced plastics (FRPs) necessitates economic processing of high quality, like the vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) process. FRPs exhibit excellent in-plane properties but weaknesses in off-plane direction. The addition of nanofillers into the resinous matrix phase embodies a promising approach due to benefits of the nano-scaled size of the filler, especially its high surface and interface areas. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are preferable candidates for resin modification in regard of their excellent mechanical properties and high aspect ratios. However, especially the high aspect ratios give rise to withholding or filtering by fibrous fabrics during the impregnation process, i.e. length dependent withholding of tubes (short tubes pass through the fabric, while long tubes are restrained) and a decrease in the local CNT content in the laminate along the flow path can occur. In this study, hybrid composites containing endless glass fiber reinforcement and surface functionalized CNTs dispersed in the matrix phase were produced by VARTM. New methodologies for the quantification of the filtering of CNTs were developed and applied to test laminates. As a first step, a method to analyze the CNT length distribution before and after injection was established for thermosetting composites to characterize length dependent withholding of nanotubes. The used glass fiber fabric showed no perceptible length dependent retaining of CNTs. Afterward, the resulting test laminates were examined by Raman spectroscopy and compared to reference samples of known CNT content. This Raman based technique was developed further to assess the quality of the impregnation process and to quantitatively follow the local CNT content along the injection flow in cured composites. A local decline in CNT content of approx. 20% was observed. These methodologies allow for the quality control of the filler content and size-distribution in CNT based hybrid

  8. Properties of glass/carbon fiber reinforced epoxy hybrid polymer composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, R. H.; Sevkani, V. R.; Patel, B. R.; Patel, V. B.

    2016-05-01

    Composite Materials are well known for their tailor-made properties. For the fabrication of composites different types of reinforcements are used for different applications. Sometimes for a particular application, one type of reinforcement may not fulfill the requirements. Therefore, more than one type of reinforcements may be used. Thus, the idea of hybrid composites arises. Hybrid composites are made by joining two or more different reinforcements with suitable matrix system. It helps to improve the properties of composite materials. In the present work glass/carbon fiber reinforcement have been used with a matrix triglycidyl ether of tris(m-hydroxy phenyl) phosphate epoxy resin using amine curing agent. Different physical and mechanical properties of the glass, carbon and glass/carbon fiber reinforced polymeric systems have been found out.

  9. Optimization of interfacial microstructure and mechanical properties of carbon fiber/epoxy composites via carbon nanotube sizing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Hongwei; Sui, Xianhang; Zhao, Zhongbo; Xu, Zhiwei; Chen, Lei, E-mail: chenlei@tjpu.edu.cn; Deng, Hui; Liu, Ya; Qian, Xiaoming, E-mail: qianxiaoming@tjpu.edu.cn

    2015-08-30

    Highlights: • Multiple sizing treatments were used to modify the surface of carbon fiber with carbon nanotubes. • The distribution state of carbon nanotubes in interface had a great effect on the performance of carbon fiber composites. • Interfacial microstructure changes brought by sizing treatment were detected by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and atomic force microscope. • Gradient interphase composed of carbon nanotubes and epoxy was favorable to improve the mechanical properties of carbon composites. - Abstract: Repetitious sizing treatment was used to modify the carbon fiber (CF) surface with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) for improving interfacial properties of CF/epoxy composites. Interlaminar shear and flexural results showed that mechanical properties of composites were significantly depended on the dispersion state and contents of CNTs in interfacial regions. Increases of 13.45% in interlaminar shear strength and 20.31% in flexural strength were achieved in quintuple sized-CF/epoxy composites, whereas excessive CNTs led to decrease of interfacial performance due to defects induced by agglomerated CNTs. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and force modulation atomic force microscope were used to detect the structure of interfacial phase and results indicated that gradient interfacial structure with various thicknesses was formed due to CNT incorporation. This means that such a simple and efficient method to improve interfacial performance of composites via regulating the fiber–matrix interphase structure was developed and showed great commercial application potential.

  10. Durability-Based Design Properties of Reference Crossply Carbon-Fiber Composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corum, J.M.

    2001-04-16

    This report provides recommended durability-based design properties and criteria for a crossply carbon-fiber composite for possible automotive structural applications. Although the composite utilized aerospace-grade carbon-fiber reinforcement, it was made by a rapid-molding process suitable for high-volume automotive use. The material is the first in a planned progression of candidate composites to be characterized as part of an Oak Ridge National Laboratory project entitled Durability of Carbon-Fiber Composites. The overall goal of the project, which is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Advanced Automotive Technologies and is closely coordinated with the Advanced Composites Consortium, is to develop durability-driven design data and criteria to assure the long-term integrity of carbon-fiber-based composite systems for automotive structural applications. The composite addressed in this report is a ({+-}45{degree})3S crossply consisting of continuous Thornel T300 fibers in a Baydur 420 IMR urethane matrix. This composite is highly anisotropic with two dominant fiber orientations--0/90{degree} and {+-}45{degree}. Properties and models were developed for both orientations. This document is in two parts. Part 1 provides design data and correlations, while Part 2 provides the underlying experimental data and models. The durability issues addressed include the effects of short-time, cyclic, and sustained loadings; temperature; fluid environments; and low-energy impacts (e.g., tool drops and kickups of roadway debris) on deformation, strength, and stiffness. Guidance for design analysis, time-independent and time-dependent allowable stresses, rules for cyclic loadings, and damage-tolerance design guidance are provided.

  11. Mechanical Properties of Graphene Nanoplatelet/Carbon Fiber/Epoxy Hybrid Composites: Multiscale Modeling and Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadden, C. M.; Klimek-McDonald, D. R.; Pineda, E. J.; King, J. A.; Reichanadter, A. M.; Miskioglu, I.; Gowtham, S.; Odegard, G. M.

    2015-01-01

    Because of the relatively high specific mechanical properties of carbon fiber/epoxy composite materials, they are often used as structural components in aerospace applications. Graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs) can be added to the epoxy matrix to improve the overall mechanical properties of the composite. The resulting GNP/carbon fiber/epoxy hybrid composites have been studied using multiscale modeling to determine the influence of GNP volume fraction, epoxy crosslink density, and GNP dispersion on the mechanical performance. The hierarchical multiscale modeling approach developed herein includes Molecular Dynamics (MD) and micromechanical modeling, and it is validated with experimental testing of the same hybrid composite material system. The results indicate that the multiscale modeling approach is accurate and provides physical insight into the composite mechanical behavior. Also, the results quantify the substantial impact of GNP volume fraction and dispersion on the transverse mechanical properties of the hybrid composite, while the effect on the axial properties is shown to be insignificant.

  12. Mechanical Properties of Graphene Nanoplatelet Carbon Fiber Epoxy Hybrid Composites: Multiscale Modeling and Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadden, Cameron M.; Klimek-McDonald, Danielle R.; Pineda, Evan J.; King, Julie A.; Reichanadter, Alex M.; Miskioglu, Ibrahim; Gowtham, S.; Odegard, Gregory M.

    2015-01-01

    Because of the relatively high specific mechanical properties of carbon fiber/epoxy composite materials, they are often used as structural components in aerospace applications. Graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs) can be added to the epoxy matrix to improve the overall mechanical properties of the composite. The resulting GNP/carbon fiber/epoxy hybrid composites have been studied using multiscale modeling to determine the influence of GNP volume fraction, epoxy crosslink density, and GNP dispersion on the mechanical performance. The hierarchical multiscale modeling approach developed herein includes Molecular Dynamics (MD) and micromechanical modeling, and it is validated with experimental testing of the same hybrid composite material system. The results indicate that the multiscale modeling approach is accurate and provides physical insight into the composite mechanical behavior. Also, the results quantify the substantial impact of GNP volume fraction and dispersion on the transverse mechanical properties of the hybrid composite, while the effect on the axial properties is shown to be insignificant.

  13. Effect of Sizing on the Interfacial Shear Strength of Carbon Fiber/Epoxy Resin Monofilament Composite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Yusong; ZHAO Yan; LI Ye; DONG Qi; CHEN Da

    2014-01-01

    The single fiber fragmentation test (SFFT) was used to measure the interfacial shear strength (IFSS) of sized and unsized CF800/epoxy resin monofilament composite in order to evaluate the effect of sizing respectively. Besides, the interfacial reinforcing mechanism was explored by analyzing the surface morphology of the carbon fibers, the wettability between the carbon fibers and the epoxy resin, and the chemical characteristics of the fiber surface. Moreover, the effect of sizing on heat and humidity resistance of interface was investigated by aging test. The results show that sizing improves IFSS of CF800/epoxy resin monofilament composite by 59% through increasing the functional groups containing oxygen and through enhancing wettability, while after sizing the heat and humidity resistance of interface is decreased.

  14. Investigating the acoustical properties of carbon fiber-, glass fiber-, and hemp fiber-reinforced polyester composites

    OpenAIRE

    Jalili, Mohammad Mehdi; Mousavi, Seyyed Yahya; Pirayeshfar, Amir Soheil

    2015-01-01

    Wood is one of the main materials used for making musical instruments due to its outstanding acoustical properties. Despite such unique properties, its inferior mechanical properties, moisture sensitivity, and time- and cost-consuming procedure for making instruments in comparison with other materials (e.g., composites) are always considered as its disadvantages in making musical instruments. In this study, the acoustic parameters of three different polyester composites separately reinforced ...

  15. Modeling the Tensile Strength of Carbon Fiber - Reinforced Ceramic - Matrix Composites Under Multiple Fatigue Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Longbiao

    2016-06-01

    An analytical method has been developed to investigate the effect of interface wear on the tensile strength of carbon fiber - reinforced ceramic - matrix composites (CMCs) under multiple fatigue loading. The Budiansky - Hutchinson - Evans shear - lag model was used to describe the micro stress field of the damaged composite considering fibers failure and the difference existed in the new and original interface debonded region. The statistical matrix multicracking model and fracture mechanics interface debonding criterion were used to determine the matrix crack spacing and interface debonded length. The interface shear stress degradation model and fibers strength degradation model have been adopted to analyze the interface wear effect on the tensile strength of the composite subjected to multiple fatigue loading. Under tensile loading, the fibers failure probabilities were determined by combining the interface wear model and fibers failure model based on the assumption that the fiber strength is subjected to two - parameter Weibull distribution and the loads carried by broken and intact fibers satisfy the Global Load Sharing criterion. The composite can no longer support the applied load when the total loads supported by broken and intact fibers approach its maximum value. The conditions of a single matrix crack and matrix multicrackings for tensile strength corresponding to multiple fatigue peak stress levels and different cycle number have been analyzed.

  16. Mechanism of Functional Responses to Loading of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Cement-based Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Cuixiang; LI Zhuoqiu; SONG Xianhui; LU Yong

    2008-01-01

    Single fiber pull-out testing was conducted to study the origin of the functional responses to loading of carbon fiber reinforced cement-based composites.The variation of electrical resistance with the bonding force on the fiber-matrix interface was measured.Single fiber electromechanical testing was also conducted by measuring the electrical resistance under static tension.Comparison of the results shows that the resistance increasing during single fiber pull-out is mainly due to the changes at the interface.The conduction mechanism of the composite can be explained by the tunneling model.The interfacial stress causes the deformation of interfacial structure and the interfacial debonding.which have influences on the tunneling effect and result in the change of resistance.

  17. Surface modification of carbon fibers and its effect on the fiber–matrix interaction of UHMWPE based composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chukov, D.I., E-mail: dil_chukov@yahoo.com; Stepashkin, A.A.; Gorshenkov, M.V.; Tcherdyntsev, V.V.; Kaloshkin, S.D.

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • Both chemical and thermal treatments of UKN 5000 carbon fibers allow one to obtain well-developed surface. • The changes of structure and properties of VMN-4 fibers after both thermal and chemical oxidation are insignificant due to more perfect initial structure of these fibers. • The oxidative treatment of carbon fibers allows one to improve the interfacial interaction in the UHMWPE-based composites. • The oxidative treatment of the fibers allows one to a triple increase of Young’s modulus of the modified fibers reinforced UHMWPE composites. -- Abstract: The PAN-based carbon fibers (CF) were subjected to thermal and chemical oxidation under various conditions. The variation in the surface morphology of carbon fibers after surface treatment was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It was found that the tensile strength of carbon fibers changed after surface modification. The interaction between the fibers and the matrix OF ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) was characterized by the Young modulus of produced composites. It was shown that the Young modulus of composites reinforced with modified carbon fibers was significantly higher than that of composites reinforced with non-modified fibers.

  18. Effects of carbon fiber surface characteristics on interfacial bonding of epoxy resin composite subjected to hygrothermal treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Liu, Hongxin; Gu, Yizhuo; Li, Yanxia; Zhang, Zuoguang

    2014-01-01

    The changes of interfacial bonding of three types of carbon fibers/epoxy resin composite as well as their corresponding desized carbon fiber composites subjecting to hygrothermal conditions were investigated by means of single fiber fragmentation test. The interfacial fracture energy was obtained to evaluate the interfacial bonding before and after boiling water aging. The surface characteristics of the studied carbon fiber were characterized using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The effects of activated carbon atoms and silicon element at carbon fiber surface on the interfacial hygrothermal resistance were further discussed. The results show that the three carbon fiber composites with the same resin matrix possess different hygrothermal resistances of interface and the interfacial fracture energy after water aging can not recovery to the level of raw dry sample (irreversible changes) for the carbon fiber composites containing silicon. Furthermore, the activated carbon atoms have little impact on the interfacial hygrothermal resistance. The irreversible variations of interfacial bonding and the differences among different carbon fiber composites are attributed to the silicon element on the carbon fiber bodies, which might result in hydrolyzation in boiling water treatment and degrade interfacial hygrothermal resistance.

  19. Multi-walled Carbon Nano tubes/ Polyetherimide Composite Hollow Fibers for Gas Separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Composite hollow fibers were prepared by incorporating 1 wt % of multi walled carbon nano tubes (MWCNTs) within polyether imide (PEI) polymer matrix. Surfactant modification using non-ionic surfactant, Triton X100 was conducted to improve the dispersion of nano tubes in the polymer matrix during the preparation of polymer dope. The morphological structure and mechanical properties of the resulting composite hollow fibers were characterized. This study demonstrated the role of Triton X100 in facilitating the synergetic effects of MWCNTs and PEI where the resulting composite membrane is anticipated to have potential application in membrane based gas separation. (author)

  20. Preparation and characterization of aligned carbon nanotubes/polylactic acid composite fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong Yuxia; Yuan Jie [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 201804 (China); Qiu Jun, E-mail: qiujun@tongji.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 201804 (China); Key Laboratory of Advanced Civil Engineering Materials of Education of Ministry, Shanghai 201804 (China)

    2012-07-01

    Aligned functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes/polylactic acid (MWNTs-PCL/PLA) composite fibers were successfully prepared by electrospinning processing. The MWNTs bonded with the polycaprolactone chains exhibited excellent uniform dispersion in PLA solution by comparing with the acid-functionalized MWNTs and amino-functionalized MWNTs. Optical microscopy was used to study the aligned degree of the fibers and to investigate the influences of the electrodes distance on the alignment and structure of the fibers, and results showed that the best quality of aligned fibers with dense structure and high aligned degree were obtained at an electrodes distance of 3 cm. Moreover, the MWNTs embedded inside the MWNTs-PCL/PLA fibers displayed well orientation along the axes of the fibers, which was demonstrated by field emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy.

  1. Alignment of carbon nanotubes and reinforcing effects in nylon-6 polymer composite fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alignment of pristine carbon nanotubes (P-CNTs) and fluorinated carbon nanotubes (F-CNTs) in nylon-6 polymer composite fibers (PCFs) has been achieved using a single-screw extrusion method. CNTs have been used as filler reinforcements to enhance the mechanical and thermal properties of nylon-6 composite fibers. The composites were fabricated by dry mixing nylon-6 polymer powder with the CNTs as the first step, then followed by the melt extrusion process of fiber materials in a single-screw extruder. The extruded fibers were stretched to their maxima and stabilized using a godet set-up. Finally, fibers were wound on a Wayne filament winder machine and tested for their tensile and thermal properties. The tests have shown a remarkable change in mechanical and thermal properties of nylon-6 polymer fibers with the addition of 0.5 wt% F-CNTs and 1.0 wt% of P-CNTs. To draw a comparison between the improvements achieved, the same process has been repeated with neat nylon-6 polymer. As a result, tensile strength has been increased by 230% for PCFs made with 0.5% F-CNTs and 1% P-CNTs as additives. These fibers have been further characterized by DSC, Raman spectroscopy and SEM which confirm the alignment of CNTs and interfacial bonding to nylon-6 polymer matrix

  2. Alignment of carbon nanotubes and reinforcing effects in nylon-6 polymer composite fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangari, Vijaya K; Yousuf, Mohammed; Jeelani, Shaik; Pulikkathara, Merlyn X; Khabashesku, Valery N

    2008-06-18

    Alignment of pristine carbon nanotubes (P-CNTs) and fluorinated carbon nanotubes (F-CNTs) in nylon-6 polymer composite fibers (PCFs) has been achieved using a single-screw extrusion method. CNTs have been used as filler reinforcements to enhance the mechanical and thermal properties of nylon-6 composite fibers. The composites were fabricated by dry mixing nylon-6 polymer powder with the CNTs as the first step, then followed by the melt extrusion process of fiber materials in a single-screw extruder. The extruded fibers were stretched to their maxima and stabilized using a godet set-up. Finally, fibers were wound on a Wayne filament winder machine and tested for their tensile and thermal properties. The tests have shown a remarkable change in mechanical and thermal properties of nylon-6 polymer fibers with the addition of 0.5 wt% F-CNTs and 1.0 wt% of P-CNTs. To draw a comparison between the improvements achieved, the same process has been repeated with neat nylon-6 polymer. As a result, tensile strength has been increased by 230% for PCFs made with 0.5% F-CNTs and 1% P-CNTs as additives. These fibers have been further characterized by DSC, Raman spectroscopy and SEM which confirm the alignment of CNTs and interfacial bonding to nylon-6 polymer matrix. PMID:21825828

  3. Surface Characterization of Carbon Fiber Polymer Composites and Aluminum Alloys After Laser Interference Structuring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabau, Adrian S.; Greer, Clayton M.; Chen, Jian; Warren, Charles D.; Daniel, Claus

    2016-07-01

    The increasing use of carbon fiber-reinforced polymer matrix composites (CFPC) and aluminum alloys as lightweight materials in the automotive and aerospace industries demands enhanced surface preparation and control of surface morphology prior to joining. In this study, surfaces of both composite and aluminum were prepared for joining using an Nd:YAG laser in a two-beam interference setup, enabling the (1) structuring of the AL 5182 surface, (2) removal of the resin layer on top of carbon fibers, and (3) structuring of the carbon fibers. CFPC specimens of T700S carbon fiber, Prepreg—T83 epoxy, 5 ply thick, 0°/90° plaques were used. The effects of laser fluence, scanning speed, and number of shots-per-spot were investigated on the removal rate of the resin without an excessive damage of the fibers. Optical micrographs, 3D imaging, and scanning electron microscope imaging were used to study the effect of the laser processing on the surface morphology. It was found that an effective resin ablation and a low density of broken fibers for CFPC specimens was attained using laser fluences of 1-2 J/cm2 and number of 2-4 pulses per spot. A relatively large area of periodic line structures due to energy interference were formed on the aluminum surface at laser fluences of 12 J/cm2 and number of 4-6 pulses per spot.

  4. Effect of Rare Earths on Tribological Properties of Carbon Fibers Reinforced PTFE Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shangguan Qianqian; Cheng Xianhua

    2007-01-01

    Carbon fibers (CF) were surface treated with air-oxidation and rare earths (RE), respectively. The effect of RE surface treatment on tensile strength and tribological properties of CF reinforced polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) composites was investigated. Experimental results revealed that RE was superior to air oxidation in improving the tensile strength, elongation, and the tensile modulus of CF reinforced PTFE (CF/PTFE) composite. Compared to the untreated and air-oxidated CF/PTFE composite, the RE treated composite had the lowest friction coefficient and specific wear rate under a given applied load and reciprocating sliding frequency. The RE treatment effectively improved the interfacial adhesion between CF and PTFE. With strong interfacial coupling, the carbon fibers carried most of the load, and direct contact and adhesion between PTFE and the counterpart were reduced, accordingly the friction and wear properties of the composite were improved.

  5. Aspects regarding wearing behaviour in case of aluminium composite materials reinforced with carbon fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caliman, R.

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a study regarding wear comportment of sintered composite materials obtained by mixture of aluminium with short carbon fibers. The necessity to satisfying more and more the specific functions during design of high performance structures leads to perform multi-materials such as reinforced composite parts. The wear tests were made on three different orientations of fibers on a standard machine of tribology, pin disk type. Counter-disk was made of cast iron with a superficial hardness of 92 HB. The wear rate and friction coefficient decreased exponentially with time of friction and reached a stationary value. This behaviour was attributed to the development of a lubricating film on the friction surface. To conduct this work was performed measurements on samples from the Al matrix composites and carbon fiber 43%, wear mechanism was investigated by scanning electron microscopy. In addition to fiber orientation, the tribological behaviour of metal matrix composites reinforced with fiber is influenced by the interfacial reaction of fiber-matrix. The characteristics and the dimensions of the interface depend on the cycle of temperature and time at which the material has been subjected during the manufacturing process and thereafter.

  6. Size Classification of Chopped Carbon Fibers in the Composite Materials Manufacturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А.S. Dovbysh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Information synthesis of the learning decision support system for automation of the chopped carbon fibers size control used for the matrix filling within the manufacturing of composite materials based on polytetrafluoroethylene is considered. To improve the reliability of recognition learning algorithm with the optimization of the precision control is proposed.

  7. Size Classification of Chopped Carbon Fibers in the Composite Materials Manufacturing

    OpenAIRE

    А.S. Dovbysh; А.F. Budnik; N.І. Andriienko

    2010-01-01

    Information synthesis of the learning decision support system for automation of the chopped carbon fibers size control used for the matrix filling within the manufacturing of composite materials based on polytetrafluoroethylene is considered. To improve the reliability of recognition learning algorithm with the optimization of the precision control is proposed.

  8. Extracting Information from Conventional AE Features for Fatigue Onset Damage Detection in Carbon Fiber Composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Unnthorsson, Runar; Pontoppidan, Niels Henrik Bohl; Jonsson, Magnus Thor

    2005-01-01

    We have analyzed simple data fusion and preprocessing methods on Acoustic Emission measurements of prosthetic feet made of carbon fiber reinforced composites. This paper presents the initial research steps; aiming at reducing the time spent on the fatigue test. With a simple single feature...

  9. Bisphenyl-Polymer/Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced Composite Compared to Titanium Alloy Bone Implant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard C. Petersen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aerospace/aeronautical thermoset bisphenyl-polymer/carbon-fiber-reinforced composites are considered as new advanced materials to replace metal bone implants. In addition to well-recognized nonpolar chemistry with related bisphenol-polymer estrogenic factors, carbon-fiber-reinforced composites can offer densities and electrical conductivity/resistivity properties close to bone with strengths much higher than metals on a per-weight basis. In vivo bone-marrow tests with Sprague-Dawley rats revealed far-reaching significant osseoconductivity increases from bisphenyl-polymer/carbon-fiber composites when compared to state-of-the-art titanium-6-4 alloy controls. Midtibial percent bone area measured from the implant surface increased when comparing the titanium alloy to the polymer composite from 10.5% to 41.6% at 0.8 mm, P<10−4, and 19.3% to 77.7% at 0.1 mm, P<10−8. Carbon-fiber fragments planned to occur in the test designs, instead of producing an inflammation, stimulated bone formation and increased bone integration to the implant. In addition, low-thermal polymer processing allows incorporation of minerals and pharmaceuticals for future major tissue-engineering potential.

  10. Iosipesco shear resistance in composites of carbon and glass fiber with epoxi resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanderlei O. Gonçalves

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of the present work was the determination of the shear modulus (G12 and the maximum shear strength (ô12 using the Iosipescu Shear Test. Tests were carried out on two types of composites, carbon fiber/epoxy and glass fiber/epoxy, used in the aerospace industry, and also a molded epoxy resin matrix. The results indicate the effective contribution of fiber reinforcements to the shear strength (ô12 and shear modulus (G12 compared to the no reinforcement polymer matrix.

  11. Electroadsorption Desalination with Carbon Nanotube/PAN-Based Carbon Fiber Felt Composites as Electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The chemical vapor deposition method is used to prepare CNT (carbon nanotube/PCF (PAN-based carbon fiber felt composite electrodes in this paper, with the surface morphology of CNT/PCF composites and electroadsorption desalination performance being studied. Results show such electrode materials with three-dimensional network nanostructures having a larger specific surface area and narrower micropore distribution, with a huge number of reactive groups covering the surface. Compared with PCF electrodes, CNT/PCF can allow for a higher adsorption and desorption rate but lower energy consumption; meanwhile, under the condition of the same voltage change, the CNT/PCF electrodes are provided with a better desalination effect. The study also found that the higher the original concentration of the solution, the greater the adsorption capacity and the lower the adsorption rate. At the same time, the higher the solution’s pH, the better the desalting; the smaller the ions’ radius, the greater the amount of adsorption.

  12. Hierarchical composite structures prepared by electrophoretic deposition of carbon nanotubes onto glass fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Qi; Rider, Andrew N; Thostenson, Erik T

    2013-03-01

    Carbon nanotube/glass fiber hierarchical composite structures have been produced using an electrophoretic deposition (EPD) approach for integrating the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) into unidirectional E-glass fabric, followed by infusion of an epoxy polymer matrix. The resulting composites show a hierarchical structure, where the structural glass fibers, which have diameters in micrometer range, are coated with CNTs having diameters around 10-20 nm. The stable aqueous dispersions of CNTs were produced using a novel ozonolysis and ultrasonication technique that results in dispersion and functionalization in a single step. Ozone-oxidized CNTs were then chemically reacted with a polyethyleneimine (PEI) dendrimer to enable cathodic EPD and promote adhesion between the CNTs and the glass-fiber substrate. Deposition onto the fabric was accomplished by placing the fabric in front of the cathode and applying a direct current (DC) field. Microscopic characterization shows the integration of CNTs throughout the thickness of the glass fabric, where individual fibers are coated with CNTs and a thin film of CNTs also forms on the fabric surfaces. Within the composite, networks of CNTs span between adjacent fibers, and the resulting composites exhibit good electrical conductivity and considerable increases in the interlaminar shear strength, relative to fiber composites without integrated CNTs. Mechanical, chemical and morphological characterization of the coated fiber surfaces reveal interface/interphase modification resulting from the coating is responsible for the improved mechanical and electrical properties. The CNT-coated glass-fiber laminates also exhibited clear changes in electrical resistance as a function of applied shear strain and enables self-sensing of the transition between elastic and plastic load regions. PMID:23379418

  13. Effect of epoxy resin properties on the mechanical properties of carbon fiber/epoxy resin composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Hong-Wei; Gao, Feng [Taiyuan Univ. of Technology (China). College of Materials Science and Engineering; Taiyuan Univ. of Technology (China). Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials; Li, Kai-Xi [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Taiyuan, Shanxi (China). Key Laboratory of Carbon Materials

    2013-09-15

    Three kinds of epoxy resins, i.e. tetraglycidyl diaminodiphenyl methane (AG80), difunctional diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A (E51) and novolac type epoxy resin (F46) were selected as matrices for carbon fiber/epoxy composites. The objective of this work is to study the mechanical properties of fiber/epoxy composites by using these three kinds of epoxy resins with different physical and chemical performance. The results show that the composites fabricated with AG80 present the best stiffness and the composites prepared with E5 1have the best toughness. The stiffness and toughness of the composites prepared with F46 are middle values located between those for AG80/epoxy and E51/epoxy composites. Thus, the mixed epoxy resin is a promising approach for industrial production. (orig.)

  14. In situ crack growth observation and fracture behavior of short carbon fiber reinforced geopolymer matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The crack initiation and propagation of short carbon fiber reinforced geopolymer matrix composites (Cf/geopolymer composites) during bending test were observed in situ by environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM). Lots of micro cracks initiate, and then propagate on the side of the beam sample with the increase of the bending load. A nearly elastic response of load-displacement curve and significant deformation of the composites are observed at the initial stages. The propagation of the micro cracks ceases, and these cracks tend to close to some extent while the main crack forms. The fiber bridging effect in the micro and main cracks effectively keeps the composites integrity and makes the composites exhibit a non-catastrophic fracture behavior. A simple mode for the damage behavior of the composites during the bending test is discussed.

  15. Injection Molding of Polystyrene Matrix Composites Filled with Vapor Grown Carbon Fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enomoto, Kazuki; Yasuhara, Toshiyuki; Ohtake, Naoto; Kato, Kazunori

    Vapor grown carbon fiber (VGCF) is a kind of carbon nanotube (CNT), which has outstanding properties such as high mechanical strength and high electrical conductivity. In this study, injection molding properties of polystyrene (PS) filled with VGCF and evaluation of mechanical and electrical properties are discussed in comparison with composites in which conventional carbon fillers were filled. As a result, volume resistivity of VGCF/PS composites dropped significantly between VGCF concentration of 3 and 4vol.%. Resistivity of the composites filled with VGCF was 1.2×102Ω·cm when VGCF concentration was 11.6vol.%. The resistivity was significantly lower than that of composites which were filled with conventional carbon fillers. The elastic modulus slightly increases with increasing VGCF concentration, whereas the tensile strength slightly decreases in the VGCF concentration in the range from 0 to 12vol.%.

  16. PREDICTION OF MODE Ⅰ CRACK PROPAGATION DIRECTION IN CARBON-FIBER REINFORCED COMPOSITE PLATE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张少琴; 杨维阳

    2004-01-01

    A newly developed Z fracture criterion for the composite materials was introduced,the new concepts of in-plane average strain,in-plane dilatational strain energy density factor and reciprocal characteristic function were presented.Many experimental results show that the Z fracture criterion can be well used to predict the crack propagating direction for mode Ⅰ crack in carbon-fiber reinforced composite laminates.

  17. Fracture Toughness of Carbon Fiber Composites Containing Various Fiber Sizings and a Puncture Self-Healing Thermoplastic Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano, Roberto J.; Grimsley, Brian W.; Ratcliffe, James G.; Gordon, Keith L.; Smith, Joseph G.; Siochi, Emilie J.

    2015-01-01

    Ongoing efforts at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) have resulted in the identification of several commercially available thermoplastic resin systems which self-heal after ballistic impact and through penetration. One of these resins, polybutylene graft copolymer (PBg), was selected as a matrix for processing with unsized carbon fibers to fabricate reinforced composites for further evaluation. During process development, data from thermo-physical analyses was utilized to determine a processing cycle to fabricate laminate panels, which were analyzed by photo microscopy and acid digestion. The process cycle was further optimized based on these results to fabricate panels for mechanical property characterization. The results of the processing development effort of this composite material, as well as the results of the mechanical property characterization, indicated that bonding between the fiber and PBg was not adequate. Therefore, three sizings were investigated in this work to assess their potential to improve fiber/matrix bonding compared to previously tested unsized IM7 fiber. Unidirectional prepreg was made at NASA LaRC from three sized carbon fibers and utilized to fabricate test coupons that were tested in double cantilever beam configurations to determine GIc fracture toughness.

  18. Carbon Fiber Epoxy Composites for Both Strengthening and Health Monitoring of Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Salvado

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study of the electrical and mechanical behavior of several continuous carbon fibers epoxy composites for both strengthening and monitoring of structures. In these composites, the arrangement of fibers was deliberately diversified to test and understand the ability of the composites for self-sensing low strains. Composites with different arrangements of fibers and textile weaves, mainly unidirectional continuous carbon reinforced composites, were tested at the dynamometer. A two-probe method was considered to measure the relative electrical resistance of these composites during loading. The measured relative electrical resistance includes volume and contact electrical resistances. For all tested specimens, it increases with an increase in tensile strain, at low strain values. This is explained by the improved alignment of fibers and resulting reduction of the number of possible contacts between fibers during loading, increasing as a consequence the contact electrical resistance of the composite. Laboratory tests on strengthening of structural elements were also performed, making hand-made composites by the “wet process”, which is commonly used in civil engineering for the strengthening of all types of structures in-situ. Results show that the woven epoxy composite, used for strengthening of concrete elements is also able to sense low deformations, below 1%. Moreover, results clearly show that this textile sensor also improves the mechanical work of the strengthened structural elements, increasing their bearing capacity. Finally, the set of obtained results supports the concept of a textile fabric capable of both structural upgrade and self-monitoring of structures, especially large structures of difficult access and needing constant, sometimes very expensive, health monitoring.

  19. Carbon fiber epoxy composites for both strengthening and health monitoring of structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvado, Rita; Lopes, Catarina; Szojda, Leszek; Araújo, Pedro; Gorski, Marcin; Velez, Fernando José; Castro-Gomes, João; Krzywon, Rafal

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a study of the electrical and mechanical behavior of several continuous carbon fibers epoxy composites for both strengthening and monitoring of structures. In these composites, the arrangement of fibers was deliberately diversified to test and understand the ability of the composites for self-sensing low strains. Composites with different arrangements of fibers and textile weaves, mainly unidirectional continuous carbon reinforced composites, were tested at the dynamometer. A two-probe method was considered to measure the relative electrical resistance of these composites during loading. The measured relative electrical resistance includes volume and contact electrical resistances. For all tested specimens, it increases with an increase in tensile strain, at low strain values. This is explained by the improved alignment of fibers and resulting reduction of the number of possible contacts between fibers during loading, increasing as a consequence the contact electrical resistance of the composite. Laboratory tests on strengthening of structural elements were also performed, making hand-made composites by the "wet process", which is commonly used in civil engineering for the strengthening of all types of structures in-situ. Results show that the woven epoxy composite, used for strengthening of concrete elements is also able to sense low deformations, below 1%. Moreover, results clearly show that this textile sensor also improves the mechanical work of the strengthened structural elements, increasing their bearing capacity. Finally, the set of obtained results supports the concept of a textile fabric capable of both structural upgrade and self-monitoring of structures, especially large structures of difficult access and needing constant, sometimes very expensive, health monitoring. PMID:25954955

  20. Validation of the numerical model of single-layer composites reinforced with carbon fiber and aramid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sava, Mihaela; Hadǎr, Anton; Pǎrǎuşanu, Ioan; Petrescu, Horia-Alexandru; Baciu, Florin; Marinel, Stǎnescu Marius

    2016-06-01

    In this work we studied the experimental validation of the model and finite element analysis for a single layer of composite materials reinforced with carbon (denoted as C), aramid (K) and carbon-aramid (C-K) fibers. In the literature there are not many details about the differences that arise between transversal and longitudinal characteristics of composite materials reinforced with fabric, compared to those with unidirectional fibers. In order to achieve carbon and aramid composites we used twill fabric and for carbon-aramid plain fabric, as shown in Figure 1. In order to observe the static behavior of the considered specimens, numerical simulations were carried out in addition to the experimental determination of the characteristics of these materials. Layered composites are obviously the most widespread formula for getting advanced composite structures. It allows a unique variety of material and structural combinations leading to optimal design in a wide range of applications [1,2]. To design and verify the material composites it is necessary to know the basic mechanical constants of the materials. Almost all the layered composites consider that the every layer is an orthotropic material, so there are nine independent constants of material corresponding to the three principal directions: Young modulus E1, E2 and E3, shear modulus G12, G23 and G13, and major poison ratios ν12, ν23, ν13. Experimental determinations were performed using traction tests and strain gauges. For each of the three above mentioned materials, five samples were manufactured.

  1. Carbon/graphite composite material study. Appendix C: NASA studies on modification of carbon/graphite fibers and alternative materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    The feasibility of modifying resin matrix composites to reduce the potential of electrical shorting from fire released fiber was explored. The effort included modifications to or coatings for graphite fibers, alternative fibers, modifications to matrix materials, and hybrid composites. The objectives included reduction of the conductivity of the graphite fiber, char formation to reduce fiber release, glass formation to prevent fiber release, catalysis to assure fiber consumption in a fire, and replacement of the graphite fibers with nonconductive fibers of similar mechanical potential.

  2. Composite material based on an ablative phenolic resin and carbon fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DIMKO DIMESKI

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a technological procedure for the production of a molding compound based on short carbon fibers and an ablative phenol–formaldehyde resin for high temperature application was optimized. The starting raw materials were characterized and molding compounds with different fiber/matrix ratios and different fiber lengths were obtained. From the different laboratory samples, molded parts were made by thermocompression. The basic mechanical and thermal properties of the composites were determined. From the obtained results, the optimal fiber/matrix ratio was determined for a production of molding compound for high temperature application. The molding process of the composite material was optimized and all the parameters for good mechanical properties and high thermal stability of the composite were obtained. Optimization of the composite molding process was performed by the application of a numerical method for a planned experiment, i.e., a full three-factorial experimental design with variance of all three parameters (fiber length, temperature and time of the press cycle on two levels. The obtained mechanical properties (flexural strength: 247 MPa, modulus: 27.6 GPa, impact resistance: 110 (for test moldings 10 mm´10 mm and 91 kJ/m2 (for test moldings 15 mm´15 mm justified the application of this composite material in the automotive, leisure, military and other industries where high temperature resistance and high mechanical strength is required.

  3. Carbon fiber based composites stress analysis. Experimental and computer comparative studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobek, M.; Baier, A.; Buchacz, A.; Grabowski, Ł.; Majzner, M.

    2015-11-01

    Composite materials used nowadays for the production of composites are the result of advanced research. This allows assuming that they are among the most elaborate tech products of our century. That fact is evidenced by the widespread use of them in the most demanding industries like aerospace and space industry. But the heterogeneous materials and their advantages have been known to mankind in ancient times and they have been used by nature for millions of years. Among the fibers used in the industry most commonly used are nylon, polyester, polypropylene, boron, metal, glass, carbon and aramid. Thanks to their physical properties last three fiber types deserve special attention. High strength to weight ratio allow the use of many industrial solutions. Composites based on carbon and glass fibers are widely used in the automotive. Aramid fibers ideal for the fashion industry where the fabric made from the fibers used to produce the protective clothing. In the paper presented issues of stress analysis of composite materials have been presented. The components of composite materials and principles of composition have been discussed. Particular attention was paid to the epoxy resins and the fabrics made from carbon fibers. The article also includes basic information about strain measurements performed on with a resistance strain gauge method. For the purpose of the laboratory tests a series of carbon - epoxy composite samples were made. For this purpose plain carbon textile was used with a weight of 200 g/mm2 and epoxy resin LG730. During laboratory strain tests described in the paper Tenmex's delta type strain gauge rosettes were used. They were arranged in specific locations on the surface of the samples. Data acquisition preceded using HBM measurement equipment, which included measuring amplifier and measuring head. Data acquisition was performed using the Easy Catman. In order to verify the results of laboratory tests numerical studies were carried out in a

  4. Designing of epoxy composites reinforced with carbon nanotubes grown carbon fiber fabric for improved electromagnetic interference shielding

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, B. P.; Veena Choudhary; Parveen Saini; Mathur, R.B.

    2012-01-01

    In this letter, we report preparation of strongly anchored multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) carbon fiber (CF) fabric preforms. These preforms were reinforced in epoxy resin to make multi scale composites for microwave absorption in the X-band (8.2-12.4GHz). The incorporation of MWCNTs on the carbon fabric produced a significant enhancement in the electromagnetic interference shielding effectiveness (EMI-SE) from −29.4 dB for CF/epoxy-composite to −51.1 dB for CF-MWCNT/epoxy multiscale comp...

  5. Woven Glass Fiber Composites with Aligned Carbon Nanotube Sheet Interlayers

    OpenAIRE

    Hardik Bhanushali; Philip D. Bradford

    2016-01-01

    This investigation describes the design, fabrication, and testing of woven glass fiber reinforced epoxy matrix laminates with aligned CNT sheets integrated between plies in order to improve the matrix dominated through thickness properties such as the interlaminar fracture toughness at ply interfaces. Using aligned CNT sheets allows for a concentration of millimeter long CNTs at the most likely point of laminate failure. Mode I and Mode II interlaminar fracture toughness of various CNT modifi...

  6. Ablation Property of Ceramics/Carbon Fibers/Resin Novel Super-hybrid Composite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun QIU; Xiaoming CAO; Chong TIAN; Jinsong ZHANG

    2005-01-01

    A novel super-hybrid composite (NSHC) is prepared with three-dimension reticulated SiC ceramic (3DRC), high performance carbon fibers and modified phenolic resin (BPR) in this paper. Ablation performance of super-hybrid composite is studied. The results show that the NSHC has less linear ablation rate compared with pure BPR and CF/BPR composite, for example, its linear ablation rate is 50% of CF/BPR at the same fiber content. Mass ablation rate of the NSHC is slightly lower than that of pure BPR and CF/BPR composite because of their difference in the density. Scanning electron microscopic analysis indicates that 3DRC can increase anti-erosion capacity of materials because its special reticulated structure can control the deformation of materials and strengthen the stability of integral structure.

  7. RADAR ABSORPTION PROPERTY AND MECHANISM OF CARBON FIBER AND CARBON FIBER COMPOSITES%炭纤维及其复合材料的吸波性能和吸波机理

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵东林; 沈曾民; 迟伟东

    2001-01-01

    炭纤维和炭纤维复合材料在隐身技术中已经得到了广泛应用。通过分析连续炭纤维、短切炭纤维、螺旋形炭纤维、异形截面炭纤维、掺杂改性炭纤维及其复合材料的微波电磁特性和吸波性能,探讨了以上几种炭纤维的吸波机理,其中螺旋形炭纤维和异形截面炭纤维是最有发展前景的两种吸波炭纤维。%Carbon fiber and carbon fiber composites are widely used in stealth technology. Microwave permittivities and permeabilities and radar absorption properties of continuous carbon fiber, shot carbon fibers, coiled carbon fibers, non-circular carbon fibers, modified carbon fibers and carbon fiber composites were discussed. The radar absorption mechanisms of these carbon fibers and carbon fiber composites were analyzed. The coiled carbon fibers and non-circular carbon fibers are two kinds of the most promising candidates for radar absorbing material.

  8. Designing of epoxy composites reinforced with carbon nanotubes grown carbon fiber fabric for improved electromagnetic interference shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, B. P.; Choudhary, Veena; Saini, Parveen; Mathur, R. B.

    2012-06-01

    In this letter, we report preparation of strongly anchored multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) carbon fiber (CF) fabric preforms. These preforms were reinforced in epoxy resin to make multi scale composites for microwave absorption in the X-band (8.2-12.4GHz). The incorporation of MWCNTs on the carbon fabric produced a significant enhancement in the electromagnetic interference shielding effectiveness (EMI-SE) from -29.4 dB for CF/epoxy-composite to -51.1 dB for CF-MWCNT/epoxy multiscale composites of 2 mm thickness. In addition to enhanced EMI-SE, interlaminar shear strength improved from 23 MPa for CF/epoxy-composites to 50 MPa for multiscale composites indicating their usefulness for making structurally strong microwave shields.

  9. Designing of epoxy composites reinforced with carbon nanotubes grown carbon fiber fabric for improved electromagnetic interference shielding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. P. Singh

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In this letter, we report preparation of strongly anchored multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs carbon fiber (CF fabric preforms. These preforms were reinforced in epoxy resin to make multi scale composites for microwave absorption in the X-band (8.2-12.4GHz. The incorporation of MWCNTs on the carbon fabric produced a significant enhancement in the electromagnetic interference shielding effectiveness (EMI-SE from −29.4 dB for CF/epoxy-composite to −51.1 dB for CF-MWCNT/epoxy multiscale composites of 2 mm thickness. In addition to enhanced EMI-SE, interlaminar shear strength improved from 23 MPa for CF/epoxy-composites to 50 MPa for multiscale composites indicating their usefulness for making structurally strong microwave shields.

  10. Effect of rare earths surface treatment on tribological properties of carbon fibers reinforced PTFE composite under oil-lubricated condition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHANGGUAN Qianqian; CHENG Xianhua

    2008-01-01

    The effect of rare earths (RE) surface treatment of carbon fibers (CF) on tribological properties of CF reinforced polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) composites under oil-lubricated condition was investigated. Experimental results revealed that RE treated CF reinforced PTFE (CF/PTFE) composite had the lowest friction coefficient and wear under various applied loads and sliding speeds compared with untreated and air-oxidated composites. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) study of carbon fiber surface showed that, after RE treatment, oxygen concentration increased obviously, and the amount of oxygen-containing groups on CF surfaces were largely increased. The increase in the amount of oxygen-containing groups enhanced interfacial adhesion between CF and PTFE matrix. With strong interfacial adhesion of the composite, stress could be effectively transmitted to carbon fibers;carbon fibers were strongly bonded with PTFE matrix, and large scale rubbing-off of PTFE be prevented, therefore, tribological properties of the composite was improved.

  11. Thermal oxidation induced degradation of carbon fiber reinforced composites and carbon nanotube sheet enhanced fiber/matrix interface for high temperature aerospace structural applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Mohammad Hamidul

    Recent increase in the use of carbon fiber reinforced polymer matrix composite, especially for high temperature applications in aerospace primary and secondary structures along with wind energy and automotive industries, have generated new challenges to predict its failure mechanisms and service life. This dissertation reports the experimental study of a unidirectional carbon fiber reinforced bismaleimide (BMI) composites (CFRC), an excellent candidate for high temperature aerospace components, undergoing thermal oxidation at 260 °C in air for over 3000 hours. The key focus of the work is to investigate the mechanical properties of the carbon fiber BMI composite subjected to thermal aging in three key aspects - first, studying its bulk flexural properties (in macro scale), second, characterizing the crack propagation along the fiber direction, representing the interfacial bonding strength between fiber and matrix (in micro scale), and third, introducing nano-structured materials to modify the interface (in nano scale) between the carbon fiber and BMI resin and mechanical characterization to study its influence on mitigating the aging effect. Under the first category, weight loss and flexural properties have been monitored as the oxidation propagates through the fiber/matrix interface. Dynamic mechanical analysis and micro-computed tomography analysis have been performed to analyze the aging effects. In the second category, the long-term effects of thermal oxidation on the delamination (between the composite plies) and debonding (between fiber and matrix) type fracture toughness have been characterized by preparing two distinct types of double cantilever beam specimens. Digital image correlation has been used to determine the deformation field and strain distribution around the crack propagation path. Finally the resin system and the fiber/matrix interface have been modified using nanomaterials to mitigate the degradations caused by oxidation. Nanoclay modified

  12. Durability-Based Design Criteria for a Quasi-Isotropic Carbon-Fiber Automotive Composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corum, J.M.

    2002-04-17

    This report provides recommended durability-based design properties and criteria for a quasi-isotropic carbon-fiber composite for possible automotive structural applications. The composite, which was made by a rapid molding process suitable for high-volume automotive applications, consisted of continuous Thornel T300 fibers (6K tow) in a Baydur 420 IMR urethane matrix. The reinforcement was in the form of four {+-}45{sup o} stitch-bonded mats in the following layup: [0/90{sup o}/{+-}45{sup o}]{sub S}. This material is the second in a progression of three candidate thermoset composites to be characterized and modeled as part of an Oak Ridge National Laboratory project entitled Durability of Carbon-Fiber Composites. The overall goal of the project, which is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Advanced Automotive Technologies and is closely coordinated with the industry Automotive Composites Consortium, is to develop durability-driven design data and criteria to assure the long-term integrity of carbon-fiber-based composite systems for large automotive structural components. This document is in two parts. Part I provides the design criteria, and Part 2 provides the underlying experimental data and models. The durability issues addressed include the effects on deformation, strength, and stiffness of cyclic and sustained loads, operating temperature, automotive fluid environments, and low-energy impacts (e.g., tool drops and kickups of roadway debris). Guidance is provided for design analysis, time-dependent allowable stresses, rules for cyclic loadings, and damage tolerance design guidance, including the effects of holes. Chapter 6 provides a brief summary of the design criteria.

  13. Studies on Carbon-Fly Ash Composites with Chopped PANOX Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh V. Patel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemical analysis and morphological studies of fly ash reveals the complex chemical constituents present as spherical particles with diameter of less than 25 μm. The constituents of fly ash are silica, alumina, iron oxide, titanium dioxide, calcium and magnesium oxide, and other trace elements. The use of thermosetting as well thermoplastic polymer matrix has been made by several workers to develop polymer matrix fly ash particulate composites by using the hard and abrasive properties of fly ash and lightweight of polymers. Such composites have poor mechanical strength, fracture toughness, and thermal stability. To overcome these shortcomings, in carbonaceous matrix, the carbon fibers were added as additional reinforcement along with the fly ash. The composites were developed with two different methods known as Dry method and Wet method. The processing parameters such as temperature and pressure were optimized in establishing the carbon matrix. Physical, thermal, and mechanical characteristics were studied. The microstructures of composites show good compatibility between fly ash and fibers with the carbon matrix. These composites have higher strength, thermal stability, and toughness as compared to polymer matrix fly ash particulate composites.

  14. Production and characterization of composite material based on ablative phenolic resin and carbon fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The optimisation of technology for production of moulding compound based on short carbon fibers and ablative phenolic resin is carried out. The characterisation of the starting raw materials is performed and moulding compounds With different fiber/matrix ratios and different fiber lengths are prepared. From the different samples, mouldings are produced by thermal compression. All physical, mechanical and thermal properties of the composites are tested. From the obtained results the optimal fiber/matrix ratio, for high temperature moulding compounds production are determined. Also, in order to meet the request for high thermal and mechanics properties of the composite, optimization is carded out on the moulding process itself. The optimization is fulfilled by a planned experiment. The full factorial experimental design is applied in which the following parameters are varied: fiber length, temperature and time of the press cycle. Regression equations for the influence of the parameters to the impact resistance, compression strength, flexural strength and the modulus of elasticity of the molding, are obtained. The obtained mechanical properties of the composite rate this material for potential application in the automotive, leisure, military and other industries.(Author)

  15. Hydrogen bonds, interfacial stiffness moduli, and the interlaminar shear strength of carbon fiber-epoxy matrix composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John H. Cantrell

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The chemical treatment of carbon fibers used in carbon fiber-epoxy matrix composites greatly affects the fraction of hydrogen bonds (H-bonds formed at the fiber-matrix interface. The H-bonds are major contributors to the fiber-matrix interfacial shear strength and play a direct role in the interlaminar shear strength (ILSS of the composite. The H-bond contributions τ to the ILSS and magnitudes KN of the fiber-matrix interfacial stiffness moduli of seven carbon fiber-epoxy matrix composites, subjected to different fiber surface treatments, are calculated from the Morse potential for the interactions of hydroxyl and carboxyl acid groups formed on the carbon fiber surfaces with epoxy receptors. The τ calculations range from 7.7 MPa to 18.4 MPa in magnitude, depending on fiber treatment. The KN calculations fall in the range (2.01 – 4.67 ×1017 N m−3. The average ratio KN/|τ| is calculated to be (2.59 ± 0.043 × 1010 m−1 for the seven composites, suggesting a nearly linear connection between ILSS and H-bonding at the fiber-matrix interfaces. The linear connection indicates that τ may be assessable nondestructively from measurements of KN via a technique such as angle beam ultrasonic spectroscopy.

  16. Hydrogen bonds, interfacial stiffness moduli, and the interlaminar shear strength of carbon fiber-epoxy matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantrell, John H., E-mail: john.h.cantrell@nasa.gov [Research Directorate, NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia 23681 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    The chemical treatment of carbon fibers used in carbon fiber-epoxy matrix composites greatly affects the fraction of hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) formed at the fiber-matrix interface. The H-bonds are major contributors to the fiber-matrix interfacial shear strength and play a direct role in the interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) of the composite. The H-bond contributions τ to the ILSS and magnitudes K{sub N} of the fiber-matrix interfacial stiffness moduli of seven carbon fiber-epoxy matrix composites, subjected to different fiber surface treatments, are calculated from the Morse potential for the interactions of hydroxyl and carboxyl acid groups formed on the carbon fiber surfaces with epoxy receptors. The τ calculations range from 7.7 MPa to 18.4 MPa in magnitude, depending on fiber treatment. The K{sub N} calculations fall in the range (2.01 – 4.67) ×10{sup 17} N m{sup −3}. The average ratio K{sub N}/|τ| is calculated to be (2.59 ± 0.043) × 10{sup 10} m{sup −1} for the seven composites, suggesting a nearly linear connection between ILSS and H-bonding at the fiber-matrix interfaces. The linear connection indicates that τ may be assessable nondestructively from measurements of K{sub N} via a technique such as angle beam ultrasonic spectroscopy.

  17. High thermal conductivity phase change composite with percolating carbon fiber network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A phase change composite with a percolating network of carbon fiber was developed. • The composites were prepared by the melt-dispersion and hot-press methods. • The composites prepared by the hot-press had a percolating network of carbon fiber just using 20 vol% of it. • The composites with the percolating network had high thermal conductivity. • The phase change material particles with high packing ratio accelerated percolation. - Abstract: Latent heat storage (LHS) using phase change materials (PCM) is a promising technology for the effective use of solar and industrial exhaust heat. However, the heat transfer rate of an LHS system is severely limited by the low thermal conductivity of the PCM. Therefore, this paper describes the development of a high thermal conductivity phase change composite (PCC) with a percolating network of a high thermal conductivity filler. The relationship between the effective thermal conductivity of the PCC and the network structure of the filler was investigated. The PCC were prepared by the conventional melt-dispersion (MD) method and a novel hot-press (HP) method. Erythritol (melting point: 118 °C, thermal conductivity: 0.73 W m−1 K−1) was used as the PCM, and carbon fiber (thermal conductivity: 900 W m−1 K−1 in the fiber direction) was used as the high thermal conductivity filler. The effective thermal conductivity of the PCC was measured by the laser flash method and the network structures were observed by energy dispersive spectroscopy using a scanning electron microscope. As a result, we observed that the percolating filler network in the PCC could be easily formed by the HP method, presenting a higher thermal conductivity with less filler additive than the PCC fabricated by the MD method. Additionally, we found that PCM raw materials with a high packing ratio accelerated the formation of the percolating filler network

  18. Effect of Water Absorption on the Impact Properties of Carbon Fiber/ Epoxy Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Xiao-jun; ZHANG Qi

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, the effects of test temperatures and time on the impact damage behavior of unidirectional carbon fiber reinforced epoxy resin composites, immersed in pure water, on a pendulum impact tester, was studied. The results show that immersion in liquids has a significant effect on the impact resistance of the unidirectional composite material. It is obvious that after immersion, the mass of the material increases. The fracture initiation forces as well as the fracture initiation energy decrease as the immersion time lengthens. Moreover, the higher the temperature and the longer the time are, the more the crack propagation energy and the ductility index will be. Immersion makes the fracture mode change from the dominant fiber fracture into dominant delamination. All in all, immersion decreases the impact resistance of the composites and causes the fracture mode to change.

  19. The effects of volume percent and aspect ratio of carbon fiber on fracture toughness of reinforced aluminum matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon fiber reinforced aluminum matrix composites are used as advanced materials in aerospace and electronic industries. In order to investigate role of aspect ratio of carbon fiber on fracture toughness of aluminum matrix composite, the composite was produced using stir casting. Al-8.5%Si-5%Mg selected as a matrix. The samples were prepared with three volume fractions (1, 2 and 3) and three aspect ratios (300, 500 and 800). Three-point bending test was performed on the specimens to evaluate the fracture toughness of the materials. The results showed that the fracture toughness of composites depends on both fiber volume fraction and aspect ratio. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was employed to elucidate the fracture behavior and crack deflection of composites. The study also, showed that the toughening mechanism depends strongly on fiber volume fraction, aspect ratio and the degree of wetting between fiber and matrix

  20. Recent advances in electron-beam curing of carbon fiber-reinforced composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coqueret, Xavier; Krzeminski, Mickael; Ponsaud, Philippe; Defoort, Brigitte

    2009-07-01

    Cross-linking polymerization initiated by high-energy radiation is a very attractive technique for the fabrication of high-performance composite materials. The method offers many advantages compared to conventional energy- and time-consuming thermal curing processes. Free radical and cationic poly-addition chemistries have been investigated in some details by various research groups along the previous years. A high degree of control over curing kinetics and material properties can be exerted by adjusting the composition of matrix precursors as well as by acting on process parameters. However, the comparison with state-of-the-art thermally cured composites revealed the lower transverse mechanical properties of radiation-cured composites and the higher brittleness of the radiation-cured matrix. Improving fiber-matrix adhesion and upgrading polymer network toughness are thus two major challenges in this area. We have investigated several points related to these issues, and particularly the reduction of the matrix shrinkage on curing, the wettability of carbon fibers, the design of fiber-matrix interface and the use of thermoplastic toughening agents. Significant improvements were achieved on transverse strain at break by applying original surface treatments on the fibers so as to induce covalent coupling with the matrix. A drastic enhancement of the K IC value exceeding 2 MPa m 1/2 was also obtained for acrylate-based matrices toughened with high T g thermoplastics.

  1. Evaluation of Tribological Performance of PTFE Composite Filled with Rare Earths Treated Carbon Fibers under Water-Lubricated Condition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Carbon fibers (CFs) were surface treated with air-oxidation, rare earths (RE) after air-oxidation, and rare earths, respectively. Erichsen test was conducted to study the interfacial adhesion of PTFE composites filled with carbon fibers treated with different treatment methods. Tribological properties of the PTFE composites, sliding against GCrl5 steel under water-lubricated condition, were investigated on a reciprocating ball-on-disk UMT-2MT tribometer. The worn surfaces of the composites were examined using scanning electron microscopy. Experimental results reveal that RE treatment is superior to air oxidation in promoting tribological properties of CF reinforced PTFE (CF/PTFE) composite. The friction and wear properties of PTFE composite filled with RE treated CF are the best of the PTFE composites. RE treatment is more effective than air oxidation to improve the tribological properties of CF/PTFE composite owing to the effective improvement of interfacial adhesion between carbon fibers and PTFE matrix.

  2. Development of manufacturing process for large-diameter composite monofilaments by pyrolysis of resin-impregnated carbon-fiber bundles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, W. G.; Pinoli, P. C.; Vidoz, A. E.

    1972-01-01

    Large diameter, carbon-carbon composite, monofilaments were produced from the pyrolysis of organic precursor resins reinforced with high-strenght carbon fibers. The mechanical properties were measured before and after pyrolysis and the results were correlated with the properties of the constituents. The composite resulting from the combination of Thornel 75 and GW-173 resin precursor produced the highest tensile strength. The importance of matching strain-to-failure of fibers and matrix to obtain all the potential reinforcement of fibers is discussed. Methods are described to reduce, within the carbonaceous matrix, pyrolysis flaws which tend to reduce the composite strength. Preliminary studies are described which demonstrated the feasibility of fiber-matrix copyrolysis to alleviate matrix cracking and provide an improved matrix-fiber interfacial bonding.

  3. Advanced Carbon Fiber Nears Broad Automotive Use

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    General Motors and Teijin Limited, a leader in the carbon fiber and composites industry, will co-develop advanced carbon fiber composite technologies for potential high-volume use globally in GM cars, trucks and crossovers.

  4. Finite element analysis of drilling in carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon fiber reinforced polymer composite (CFRP) laminates are attractive for many applications in the aerospace industry especially as aircraft structural components due to their superior properties. Usually drilling is an important final machining process for components made of composite laminates. In drilling of CFRP, it is an imperative task to determine the maximum critical thrust forces that trigger inter-laminar and intra-laminar damage modes owing to highly anisotropic fibrous media; and negotiate integrity of composite structures. In this paper, a 3D finite element (FE) model of drilling in CFRP composite laminate is developed, which accurately takes into account the dynamic characteristics involved in the process along with the accurate geometrical considerations. A user defined material model is developed to account for accurate though thickness response of composite laminates. The average critical thrust forces and torques obtained using FE analysis, for a set of machining parameters are found to be in good agreement with the experimental results from literature.

  5. Finite element analysis of drilling in carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phadnis, V. A.; Roy, A.; Silberschmidt, V. V.

    2012-08-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced polymer composite (CFRP) laminates are attractive for many applications in the aerospace industry especially as aircraft structural components due to their superior properties. Usually drilling is an important final machining process for components made of composite laminates. In drilling of CFRP, it is an imperative task to determine the maximum critical thrust forces that trigger inter-laminar and intra-laminar damage modes owing to highly anisotropic fibrous media; and negotiate integrity of composite structures. In this paper, a 3D finite element (FE) model of drilling in CFRP composite laminate is developed, which accurately takes into account the dynamic characteristics involved in the process along with the accurate geometrical considerations. A user defined material model is developed to account for accurate though thickness response of composite laminates. The average critical thrust forces and torques obtained using FE analysis, for a set of machining parameters are found to be in good agreement with the experimental results from literature.

  6. Preparation and characterization of silicon nitride (Si−N)-coated carbon fibers and their effects on thermal properties in composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyeon-Hye [R& D Division, Korea Institute of Carbon Convergence Technology, Jeonju 561-844 (Korea, Republic of); Nano& Advanced Materials Engineering, Jeonju University, Jeonju 560-759 (Korea, Republic of); Han, Woong [R& D Division, Korea Institute of Carbon Convergence Technology, Jeonju 561-844 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hae-seong [Nano& Advanced Materials Engineering, Jeonju University, Jeonju 560-759 (Korea, Republic of); Min, Byung-Gak [Department of Polymer Science & Engineering, Korea National University of Transportation, Chungju 380-702 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Byung-Joo, E-mail: ap2-kbj@hanmail.net [R& D Division, Korea Institute of Carbon Convergence Technology, Jeonju 561-844 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Graphical abstract: We report preparation and characterization of silicon nitride (Si−N)-coated carbon fibers and their effects on thermal properties in composites. Thermally composites showed enhanced thermal conductivity increasing from up to 59% by the thermal network. - Highlights: • A new method of Si−N coating on carbon fibers was reported. • Silane layer were successfully converted to Si−N layer on carbon fiber surface. • Si−N formation was confirmed by FT-IR, XPS, and EDX. • Thermal conductivity of Si−N coated CF composites were enhanced to 0.59 W/mK. - Abstract: This study investigates the effect of silicon nitride (Si−N)-coated carbon fibers on the thermal conductivity of carbon-fiber-reinforced epoxy composite. The surface properties of the Si−N-coated carbon fibers (SiNCFs) were observe using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and the thermal stability was analyzed using thermogravimetric analysis. SiNCFs were fabricated through the wet thermal treatment of carbon fibers (Step 1: silane finishing of the carbon fibers; Step 2: high-temperature thermal treatment in a N{sub 2}/NH{sub 3} environment). As a result, the Si−N belt was exhibited by SEM. The average thickness of the belt were 450–500 nm. The composition of Si−N was the mixture of Si−N, Si−O, and C−Si−N as confirmed by XPS. Thermal residue of the SiNCFs in air was enhanced from 3% to 50%. Thermal conductivity of the composites increased from 0.35 to 0.59 W/mK after Si−N coating on carbon surfaces.

  7. High-Performance Carbon Nanotube/Polymer Composite Fiber from Layer-by-Layer Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Min Le; Chen, Yun; Zhang, Liang; Zhan, Hang; Qiang, Lei; Wang, Jian Nong

    2016-03-01

    So far, preparation of high-performance carbon nanotube (CNT)/polymer composites still faces big challenges mainly due to the limited control of CNT dispersion, fraction, and alignment in polymers. Here, a new "layer-by-layer deposition" method is put forward for preparing CNT/polymer composite fibers using poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) as an exemplary polymer. This is based on the continuous production of a hollow cylindrical CNT assembly from a high temperature reactor and its shrinking by a PVA-containing solution and deposition on a removable substrate wire. The in situ mixing of the two composite components at the molecular level allows CNTs to disperse and PVA to infiltrate into the fiber efficiently. As a result, remarkable effects of the CNT reinforcement on the PVA matrix are observed, including a strength improvement from ∼50 to 1255 MPa and electrical conductivity from ∼0 to 1948 S cm(-1). The new method offers good controllability of CNT dispersion and fraction in the polymer matrix, variability for making composite fibers using different polymers, and suitability for scaled up production. This study thus provides a new research direction for preparing CNT-reinforced composites and future performance maximization. PMID:26959406

  8. Boron-doped MnO{sub 2}/carbon fiber composite electrode for supercapacitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chi, Hong Zhong, E-mail: hzchi@hdu.edu.cn [College of Materials and Environmental Engineering, Hangzhou Dianzi University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Zhu, Hongjie [College of Materials and Environmental Engineering, Hangzhou Dianzi University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Gao, Linhui [Center of Materials Engineering, Zhejiang Sci-Tech University, Hangzhou 310018 (China)

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • Interstitial ion in MnO{sub 2} lattice. • Porous film composed by interlocking worm-like nanostructure. • Boron-doped birnessite-type MnO{sub 2}/carbon fiber composite electrode. • Enhanced capacitive properties through nonmetal element doping. - Abstract: The boron-doped MnO{sub 2}/carbon fiber composite electrode has been prepared via in situ redox reaction between potassium permanganate and carbon fibers in the presence of boric acid. The addition of boron as dopant results in the increase of growth-rate of MnO{sub 2} crystal and the formation of worm-like nanostructure. Based on the analysis of binding energy, element boron incorporates into the MnO{sub 2} lattice through interstitial mode. The doped electrode with porous framework is beneficial to pseudocapacitive reaction and surface charge storage, leading to higher specific capacitance and superior rate capability. After experienced 1000 cycles, the boron-doped MnO{sub 2} still retain a higher specific capacitance by about 80% of its initial value. The fall in capacitance is blamed to be the combination of the formation of soluble Mn{sup 2+} and the absence of active site on the outer surface.

  9. Shear Properties of Carbon Fiber/Phenolic Resin Composites Heat Treated at High Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Homero Paula Silva

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Carbon fiber/phenolic resin composites have long been used as ablative materials in rocketry. Ablation is a complex multiscale problem where radiative and convective heating leads to the pyrolysis of phenolic resin matrix, resulting in the formation of a porous insulation char as thermal protection. This study investigates the shear properties evolution during the heat treatment of a carbon fiber/phenolic resin nozzle extension entrance (exit cone which is part of an integrated nozzle of launching and sounding vehicles, developed at the Instituto de Aeronáutica e Espaço (SP, Brazil. Specimens of the material (carbon fiber/phenolic resin composite were subjected to heat treatment at 500, 1,000, 1,500 and 2,000°C, and measurements of shear strength and shear modulus were performed using the Iosipescu mode. Experimental data were compared with the results obtained theoretically. Also, morphological analysis was accomplished by optical microscopy and the observation of fractured surfaces, by scanning electron microscopy. Significant morphological changes in the microstructure after heat treatments were observed. The lowest value for shear strength obtained experimentally was 4.05 MPa, which is greater than the ultimate value obtained analytically (2.35 MPa, fulfilling its structural function during the propulsion time.

  10. Piezoresistivity of Carbon Fiber Graphite Cement-based Composites with CCCW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Xiaoming; FANG Dong; SUN Mingqing; LI Zhuoqiu

    2011-01-01

    The electrical conductivity and piezoresistivity of carbon fiber graphite cement-matrix composites(CFGCC) with carbon fiber content(l% by the weight of cement), graphite powder contents (0%-50% by the weight of cement) and CCCW(cementitious capillary crystalline waterproofing materials, 4% by the weight of cement) were studied. The experimental results showed that the relationship between the resistivity of CFGCC and the concentration of graphite powders had typical features of percolation phenomena. The percolation threshold was about 20%. A clear piezoresistive effect was observed in CFGCC with 1 wt% of carbon fibers, 20wt% or 30wt% of graphite powders under uniaxial compressive tests, indicating that this type of smart composites was a promising candidate for strain sensing. The measured gage factor (defined as the fractional change in resistance per unit strain) of CFGCC with graphite content of 20wt% and 30wt% were 37 and 22, respectively. With the addition of CCCW, the mechanical properties of CFGCC were improved, which benefited CFGCC piezoresistivity of stability.

  11. Formation of interfacial network structure via photo-crosslinking in carbon fiber/epoxy composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. H. Deng

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A series of diblock copolymers (poly(n-butylacrylate-co-poly(2-hydroxyethyl acrylate-b-poly(glycidyl methacrylate ((PnBA-co-PHEA-b-PGMA, containing a random copolymer block PnBA-co-PHEA, were successfully synthesized by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP. After being chemically grafted onto carbon fibers, the photosensitive methacrylic groups were introduced into the random copolymer, giving a series of copolymers (poly(n-butylacrylate-co-poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl acrylate-b-poly(glycidyl methacrylate((PnBA-co-PMEA-b-PGMA. Dynamic mechanical analysis indicated that the random copolymer block after ultraviolet (UV irradiation was a lightly crosslinked polymer and acted as an elastomer, forming a photo-crosslinked network structure at the interface of carbon fiber/epoxy composites. Microbond test showed that such an interfacial network structure greatly improved the cohesive strength and effectively controlled the deformation ability of the flexible interlayer. Furthermore, three kinds of interfacial network structures, i physical crosslinking by H-bonds, ii chemical crosslinking by photopolymerization, and iii interpenetrating crosslinked network by photopolymerization and epoxy curing reaction were received in carbon fiber/epoxy composite, depending on the various preparation processes.

  12. High performance natural rubber composites with a hierarchical reinforcement structure of carbon nanotube modified natural fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple and facile method for depositing multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) onto the surface of naturally occurring short jute fibers (JFs) is reported. Hierarchical multi-scale structures were formed with CNT-networks uniformly distributed and fully covering the JFs (JF–CNT), as depicted by the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) micrographs. The impact of these hybrid fillers on the mechanical properties of a natural rubber (NR) matrix was systematically investigated. Pristine JFs were cut initially to an average length of 2.0 mm and exposed to an alkali treatment (a-JFs) to remove impurities existing in the raw jute. MWCNTs were treated under mild acidic conditions to generate carboxylic acid moieties. Afterward, MWCNTs were dispersed in an aqueous media and short a-JFs were allowed to react with them. Raman spectroscopy confirmed the chemical interaction between CNTs and JFs. The JF–CNT exposed quite hydrophobic behavior as revealed by the water contact angle measurements, improving the wettability of the non-polar NR. Consequently, the composite interfacial adhesion strength was significantly enhanced while a micro-scale “mechanical interlocking” mechanism was observed from the interphase-section transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images. SEM analysis of the composite fracture surfaces demonstrated the interfacial strength of NR/a-JF and NR/JF–CNT composites, at different fiber loadings. It can be presumed that the CNT-coating effectively compatibillized the composite structure acting as a macromolecular coupling agent. A detailed analysis of stress-strain and dynamic mechanical spectra confirmed the high mechanical performance of the hierarchical composites, consisting mainly of materials arising from natural resources. - Highlights: • Natural rubber (NR) composites reinforced with CNT-modified short jute fibers. • MWCNTs deposited to the surface of jute fibers via non-covalent interactions. • Hierarchical reinforcement structure with

  13. A Modeling Technique and Representation of Failure in the Analysis of Triaxial Braided Carbon Fiber Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littell, Justin D.; Binienda, Wieslaw K.; Goldberg, Robert K.; Roberts, Gary D.

    2008-01-01

    Quasi-static tests have been performed on triaxially braided carbon fiber composite materials with large unit cell sizes. The effects of different fibers and matrix materials on the failure mode were investigated. Simulations of the tests have been performed using the transient dynamic finite element code, LS-DYNA. However, the wide range of failure modes observed for the triaxial braided carbon fiber composites during tests could not be simulated using composite material models currently available within LS-DYNA. A macroscopic approach has been developed that provides better simulation of the material response in these materials. This approach uses full-field optical measurement techniques to measure local failures during quasi-static testing. Information from these experiments is then used along with the current material models available in LS-DYNA to simulate the influence of the braided architecture on the failure process. This method uses two-dimensional shell elements with integration points through the thickness of the elements to represent the different layers of braid along with a new analytical method for the import of material stiffness and failure data directly. The present method is being used to examine the effect of material properties on the failure process. The experimental approaches used to obtain the required data will be described, and preliminary results of the numerical analysis will be presented.

  14. Activated carbon fibers/poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid composite scaffolds: Preparation and characterizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present work is a first trial to introduce activated carbon fibers (ACF) with high adsorption capacity into poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA), resulting in a novel kind of scaffolds for tissue engineering applications. ACF, prepared via high-temperature processing of carbon fibers, are considered to possess bioactivity and biocompatibility. The ACF/PLGA composite scaffolds are prepared by solvent casting/particulate leaching method. Increments in both pore quantity and quality over the surface of ACF as well as a robust combination between ACF and PLGA matrix are observed via scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The high adsorption capacity of ACF is confirmed by methylene blue solution absorbency test. The surfaces of ACF are affiliated with many hydrophilic groups and characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Furthermore, the SEM images show that cells possess a favorable spreading morphology on the ACF/PLGA scaffolds. Besides, vivo experiments are also carried out to evaluate the histocompatibility of the composite scaffolds. The results show that ACF have the potential to become one of the most promising materials in biological fields. - Highlights: • ACF with strong adsorption capacity and porous structure for enhanced surface area • The incorporation of ACF promoting the porosity of composite scaffolds • The composite scaffolds having no side effect on cell adhesion and proliferation • The composite scaffolds presenting good biocompatibility in vivo

  15. Activated carbon fibers/poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid composite scaffolds: Preparation and characterizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Yanni [State Key Laboratory for Modification of Chemical Fibers and Polymer Materials, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China); College of Materials Science and Engineering, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China); Han, Hao [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China); Bayer Material Science China Co., Ltd, Shanghai 200120 (China); Quan, Haiyu; Zang, Yongju; Wang, Ning; Ren, Guizhi [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China); Xing, Melcolm [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Department of Biochemistry and Genetics, Faculty of Medicine P.I., Manitoba Institute of Child Health, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); Wu, Qilin, E-mail: wql@dhu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Modification of Chemical Fibers and Polymer Materials, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China); College of Materials Science and Engineering, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China)

    2014-10-01

    The present work is a first trial to introduce activated carbon fibers (ACF) with high adsorption capacity into poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA), resulting in a novel kind of scaffolds for tissue engineering applications. ACF, prepared via high-temperature processing of carbon fibers, are considered to possess bioactivity and biocompatibility. The ACF/PLGA composite scaffolds are prepared by solvent casting/particulate leaching method. Increments in both pore quantity and quality over the surface of ACF as well as a robust combination between ACF and PLGA matrix are observed via scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The high adsorption capacity of ACF is confirmed by methylene blue solution absorbency test. The surfaces of ACF are affiliated with many hydrophilic groups and characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Furthermore, the SEM images show that cells possess a favorable spreading morphology on the ACF/PLGA scaffolds. Besides, vivo experiments are also carried out to evaluate the histocompatibility of the composite scaffolds. The results show that ACF have the potential to become one of the most promising materials in biological fields. - Highlights: • ACF with strong adsorption capacity and porous structure for enhanced surface area • The incorporation of ACF promoting the porosity of composite scaffolds • The composite scaffolds having no side effect on cell adhesion and proliferation • The composite scaffolds presenting good biocompatibility in vivo.

  16. Comparative Study of Fiber Bragg Gratings and Fiber Polarimetric Sensors for Structural Health Monitoring of Carbon Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Olivero

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A comparative study is presented between Bragg grating (FBG and polarimetric sensors (PS, two of the most promising fiber optic sensing techniques for the structural health monitoring of smart materials based on carbon fiber composites. The paper describes the realization of a test plate equipped with both types of sensors and reports the characterization under static and dynamic conditions, highlighting pros and cons of both technologies. The FBG setup achieves 1.15 ± 0.0016 pm/kg static load response and reproduces dynamic excitation with 0.1% frequency uncertainty; the PS system exhibits a sensitivity of 1.74 ± 0.001 mV/kg and reproduces dynamic excitation with 0.5% frequency uncertainty. It is shown that the PS technology is a good and cheap alternative to FBG for vibration-monitoring of small structures at high frequency.

  17. Coating of Carbon Fiber with Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxane (POSS) to Enhance Mechanical Properties and Durability of Carbon/Vinyl Ester Composites

    OpenAIRE

    Mujib Khan; Mahesh Hosur; Hassan Mahfuz; Richard Granata; Felicia Powell

    2011-01-01

    Our continuing quest to improve the performance of polymer composites under moist and saltwater environments has gained momentum in recent years with the reinforcement of inorganic nanoparticles into the polymer. The key to mitigate degradation of composites under such environments is to maintain the integrity of the fiber/matrix (F/M) interface. In this study, the F/M interface of carbon/vinyl ester composites has been modified by coating the carbon fiber with polyhedral oligomeric silsesqui...

  18. Dynamic tensile response of a carbon-fiber-reinforced LCP composite and its temperature sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Victor P. W.; Yuan, J.; Lim, C. T.

    2001-06-01

    The tensile mechanical behavior of a short carbon fiber filled liquid crystalline polymer (LCP) composite, Vectra A230, was examined under static extension and dynamic loading at three temperatures. Dynamic tension was applied using a pendulum-type tensile spilt Hopkinson bar device. Specimens fabricated according to both the mould flow and transverse directions were tested. The stress-strain curves at various strain rates and temperatures were determined and found to be sensitive to strain rate as well as temperature for both types of specimens. With reference to the properties of pure LCP, mechanical anisotropy and fiber reinforcement effects were characterized and are discussed. Failed specimens were observed suing an optical microscope. Deformation and failure mechanisms in the microstructure of the LCP composite were studied to understand the effects of strain rate and temperature on material strength and failure strain.

  19. [Recent development of research on the biotribology of carbon fiber reinforced poly ether ether ketone composites].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yan; Pan, Yusong

    2014-12-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced poly ether ether ketone (CF/PEEK) composite possesses excellent biocompatible, biomechanical and bioribological properties. It is one of the most promising implant materials for artificial joint. Many factors influence the bioribological properties of CF/PEEK composites. In this paper, the authors reviewed on the biotribology research progress of CF/PEEK composites. The influences of various factors such as lubricant, reinforcement surface modification, functional particles, friction counterpart and friction motion modes on the bio-tribological properties of CF/PEEK composites are discussed. Based on the recent research, the authors suggest that the further research should be focused on the synergistic effect of multiple factors on the wear and lubrication mechanism of CF/PEEK. PMID:25868268

  20. Effect of particle size and distribution of the sizing agent on the carbon fibers surface and interfacial shear strength (IFSS) of its composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, R.L. [Open Project of State Key Laboratory Breeding Base for Mining Disaster Prevention and Control, Shandong University of Science and Technology (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University of Science and Technology, 266590 Qingdao (China); Liu, Y. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University of Science and Technology, 266590 Qingdao (China); Huang, Y.D., E-mail: rlzhit@126.com [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, State Key laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment Department of Applied Chemistry, Harbin Institute of Technology, 150001 Harbin (China); Liu, L. [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, State Key laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment Department of Applied Chemistry, Harbin Institute of Technology, 150001 Harbin (China)

    2013-12-15

    Effect of particle size and distribution of the sizing agent on the performance of carbon fiber and carbon fiber composites has been investigated. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to characterize carbon fiber surface topographies. At the same time, the single fiber strength and Weibull distribution were also studied in order to investigate the effect of coatings on the fibers. The interfacial shear strength and hygrothermal aging of the carbon fiber/epoxy resin composites were also measured. The results indicated that the particle size and distribution is important for improving the surface of carbon fibers and its composites performance. Different particle size and distribution of sizing agent has different contribution to the wetting performance of carbon fibers. The fibers sized with P-2 had higher value of IFSS and better hygrothermal aging resistant properties.

  1. The concept of a novel hybrid smart composite reinforced with radially aligned zigzag carbon nanotubes on piezoelectric fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, M. C.

    2010-03-01

    A new hybrid piezoelectric composite (HPZC) reinforced with zigzag single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and piezoelectric fibers is proposed. The novel constructional feature of this composite is that the uniformly aligned CNTs are radially grown on the surface of piezoelectric fibers. A micromechanics model is derived to estimate the effective piezoelectric and elastic properties. It is found that the effective piezoelectric coefficient e31 of the proposed HPZC, which accounts for the in-plane actuation, is significantly higher than that of the existing 1-3 piezoelectric composite without reinforcement with carbon nanotubes and the previously reported hybrid piezoelectric composite (Ray and Batra 2009 ASME J. Appl. Mech. 76 034503).

  2. Influence of Interleaved Films on the Mechanical Properties of Carbon Fiber Fabric/Polypropylene Thermoplastic Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Won Kim

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A laminated composite was produced using a thermoplastic prepreg by inserting an interleaved film with the same type of matrix as the prepreg during the lay-up process to improve the low interlaminar properties, which is a known weakness of laminated composites. Carbon fiber fabric (CFF and polypropylene (PP were used to manufacture the thermoplastic prepregs. Eight prepregs were used to produce the laminated composites. Interleaved films with different thicknesses were inserted into each prepreg. The physical properties of the composite, such as thickness, density, fiber volume fraction (Vf, and void content (Vc, were examined. The tensile strength, flexural strength, interlaminar shear strength (ILSS, impact property, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM were used to characterize the mechanical properties. Compared to the composite without any inserted interleaved film, as the thickness of the inserted interleaved resin film was increased, Vc decreased by 51.45%. At the same time, however, the tensile strength decreased by 8.75%. Flexural strength increased by 3.79% and flexural modulus decreased by 15.02%. Interlaminar shear strength increased by 11.05% and impact strength increased by 15.38%. Fracture toughness of the laminated composite was improved due to insertion of interleaved film.

  3. Thermo-physical Properties of Continuous Carbon Fiber Reinforced Copper Matrix Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹金华; 黄俊波; 陈先有

    2007-01-01

    Continuous carbon fiber reinforced copper matrix composites with 70%(volume fraction)of carbon fibers prepared by squeeze casting technique have been used for investigation of the coefficient of thermal expansion(CTE)and thermal conductivity.Thermo-physical properties have been measured in both, longitudinal and transversal directions to the fiber orientation.The results showed that Cf/Cu composites may be a suitable candidate for heat sinks because of its good thermo-physical properties e.g.the low CTE(4.18×10-6/K)in longitudinal orientation and(14.98×10-6/K)in transversal orientation at the range of 20-50℃,a good thermal conductivity(87.2 W/m·K)in longitudinal orientation and(58.2 W/m·K)in transversal orientation.Measured CTE and thermal conductivity values are compared with those predicted by several well-known models.Eshelby model gave better results for prediction of the CTE and thermal conductivity of the unidirectional composites.

  4. The Smart Behavior of Cement-based Composite Containing Carbon Fibers under Three-point-bending Load

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Bing; WU Keru; YAO Wu

    2005-01-01

    The influences of the fiber volume fraction on the electrical conductivity and the fraction change of electrical resistance under three-point- bending test were discussed. It is found that the relationship between the electrical conductivity of composites and the fiber volume fraction can be explained by the percolation theory and the change of electrical resistance of specimens reflects to the process of loading. The sensitivity and the response of the change of electrical resistance to the load for specimens with different fiber volume fractions are quite different,which provide an important guide for the manufacture of conductive and intrinsically smart carbon fiber composite.

  5. Titanium Implant Osseointegration Problems with Alternate Solutions Using Epoxy/Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard C. Petersen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article is to present recent developments in material research with bisphenyl-polymer/carbon-fiber-reinforced composite that have produced highly influential results toward improving upon current titanium bone implant clinical osseointegration success. Titanium is now the standard intra-oral tooth root/bone implant material with biocompatible interface relationships that confer potential osseointegration. Titanium produces a TiO2 oxide surface layer reactively that can provide chemical bonding through various electron interactions as a possible explanation for biocompatibility. Nevertheless, titanium alloy implants produce corrosion particles and fail by mechanisms generally related to surface interaction on bone to promote an inflammation with fibrous aseptic loosening or infection that can require implant removal. Further, lowered oxygen concentrations from poor vasculature at a foreign metal surface interface promote a build-up of host-cell-related electrons as free radicals and proton acid that can encourage infection and inflammation to greatly influence implant failure. To provide improved osseointegration many different coating processes and alternate polymer matrix composite (PMC solutions have been considered that supply new designing potential to possibly overcome problems with titanium bone implants. Now for important consideration, PMCs have decisive biofunctional fabrication possibilities while maintaining mechanical properties from addition of high-strengthening varied fiber-reinforcement and complex fillers/additives to include hydroxyapatite or antimicrobial incorporation through thermoset polymers that cure at low temperatures. Topics/issues reviewed in this manuscript include titanium corrosion, implant infection, coatings and the new epoxy/carbon-fiber implant results discussing osseointegration with biocompatibility related to nonpolar molecular attractions with secondary bonding, carbon fiber in vivo

  6. Scalable Fabrication of Natural-Fiber Reinforced Composites with Electromagnetic Interference Shielding Properties by Incorporating Powdered Activated Carbon

    OpenAIRE

    Changlei Xia; Shifeng Zhang; Han Ren; Sheldon Q. Shi; Hualiang Zhang; Liping Cai; Jianzhang Li

    2015-01-01

    Kenaf fiber—polyester composites incorporated with powdered activated carbon (PAC) were prepared using the vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) process. The product demonstrates the electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding function. The kenaf fibers were retted in a pressured reactor to remove the lignin and extractives in the fiber. The PAC was loaded into the freshly retted fibers in water. The PAC loading effectiveness was determined using the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) spe...

  7. MECHANICAL AND THERMO–MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF BI-DIRECTIONAL AND SHORT CARBON FIBER REINFORCED EPOXY COMPOSITES

    OpenAIRE

    Agarwal, G; A. Patnaik; Sharma, R. K.

    2014-01-01

    This paper based on bidirectional and short carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composites reports the effect of fiber loading on physical, mechanical and thermo-mechanical properties respectively. The five different fiber loading, i.e., 10wt. %, 20wt. %, 30wt. %, 40wt. % and 50wt. % were taken for evaluating the above said properties. The physical and mechanical properties, i.e., hardness, tensile strength, flexural strength, inter-laminar shear strength and impact strength are determined to re...

  8. Electrical resistance stability of high content carbon fiber reinforced cement composite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Zai-fu; TANG Zu-quan; LI Zhuo-qiu; QIAN Jue-shi

    2005-01-01

    The influences of curing time, the content of free evaporable water in cement paste, environmental temperature, and alternative heating and cooling on the electrical resistance of high content carbon fiber reinforced cement (CFRC) paste are studied by experiments with specimens of Portland cement 42.5 with 10 mm PAN-based carbon fiber and methylcellulose. Experimental results indicate that the electrical resistance of CFRC increases relatively by 24% within a hydration time of 90 d and almost keeps constant after 14 d, changes hardly with the mass loss of free evaporable water in the concrete dried at 50℃C, increases relatively by 4% when ambient temperature decreases from 15℃ to-20℃, and decreases relatively by 13% with temperature increasing by 88℃. It is suggested that the electric resistance of the CFRC is stable, which is testified by the stable power output obtained by electrifying the CFRC slab with a given voltage. This implies that such kind of high content carbon fiber reinforced cement composite is potentially a desirable electrothermal material for airfield runways and road surfaces deicing.

  9. Carbon-Coated-Nylon-Fiber-Reinforced Cement Composites as an Intrinsically Smart Concrete for Damage Assessment during Dynamic Loading

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhenjun ZHOU; Zhiguo XIAO; Wei PAN; Zhipeng XIE; Xixian LUO; Lei JIN

    2003-01-01

    Concrete containing short carbon-coated-nylon fibers (0.4~2.0 vol. pct) exhibited quasi-ductile response by developing a large damage zone prior to fracture localization. In the damage zone, the material was microcracked but continued to local strain-harden. The carbon-coated-nylon-fiber-reinforced concrete composites (NFRC) were found to be an intrinsically smart concrete that could sense elastic and inelastic deformation, as well as fracture. The fibers served to bridge the cracks and the carbon coating gave the conduction path. The signal provided came from the change in electrical resistance, which was reversible for elastic deformation and irreversible for inelastic deformation and fracture. The resistance decrease was due to the reduction of surface touch resistance between fiber and matrix and the crack closure. The resistance irreversible increase resulted from the crack opening and breakage of the carbon coating on nylon fiber.

  10. Enhanced microwave shielding and mechanical properties of multiwall carbon nanotubes anchored carbon fiber felt reinforced epoxy multiscale composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, B. P.; Bharadwaj, Preetam; Choudhary, Veena; Mathur, R. B.

    2014-04-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were grown on carbon fiber (CF) felt by chemical vapor deposition that resulted into strongly anchored carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on the CF surface. These multiscale preforms were used as the reinforcement in epoxy resin to develop multi scale CF felt-MWCNT/epoxy composites. The flexural strength (FS) and the flexural modulus (FM) of the composites were found to increase with increasing amount of CNTs grown on CF felt surface. FS improved by 37 %, i.e. 119 MPa compared to 87 MPa for CF felt/epoxy composites prepared under identical conditions. The FM also improved by 153 %, i.e. 15.7 GPa compared to 6.2 GPa for the CF/epoxy composites. The incorporation of MWCNTs on the CF felt produced a significant change in the electromagnetic interference shielding of these composites which improved from -21 to -27 dB for CF felt-MWCNT/epoxy multiscale composites in the Ku band (12.4-18 GHz) and indicates the usefulness of these strong composites for microwave shielding.

  11. Effects of surface treating methods of high-strength carbon fibers on interfacial properties of epoxy resin matrix composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Quansheng; Gu, Yizhuo; Li, Min; Wang, Shaokai; Zhang, Zuoguang

    2016-08-01

    This paper aims to study the effects of surface treating methods, including electrolysis of anodic oxidation, sizing and heat treatment at 200 °C, on physical and chemical properties of T700 grade high-strength carbon fiber GQ4522. The fiber surface roughness, surface energy and chemical properties were analyzed for different treated carbon fibers, using atom force microscopy, contact angle, Fourier transformed infrared and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. The results show that the adopted surface treating methods significantly affect surface roughness, surface energy and active chemical groups of the studied carbon fibers. Electrolysis and sizing can increase the roughness, surface energy and chemical groups on surface, while heat treatment leads to decreases in surface energy and chemical groups due to chemical reaction of sizing. Then, unidirectional epoxy 5228 matrix composite laminates were prepared using different treated GQ4522 fibers, and interlaminar shear strength and flexural property were measured. It is revealed that the composite using electrolysis and sizing-fiber has the strongest interfacial bonding strength, indicating the important roles of the two treating processes on interfacial adhesion. Moreover, the composite using heat-treating fiber has lower mechanical properties, which is attributed to the decrease of chemical bonding between fiber surface and matrix after high temperature treatment of fiber.

  12. Polypropylene/Graphene and Polypropylene/Carbon Fiber Conductive Composites: Mechanical, Crystallization and Electromagnetic Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Lin Huang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to examine the properties of composites that different carbon materials with different measurements can reinforce. Using a melt compounding method, this study combines polypropylene (PP and graphene nano-sheets (GNs or carbon fiber (CF to make PP/GNs and PP/CF conductive composites, respectively. The DSC results and optical microscopic observation show that both GNs and CF enable PP to crystalize at a high temperature. The tensile modulus of PP/GNs and PP/CF conductive composites remarkably increases as a result of the increasing content of conductive fillers. The tensile strength of the PP/GNs conductive composites is inversely proportional to the loading level of GNs. Containing 20 wt% of GNs, the PP/GNs conductive composites have an optimal conductivity of 0.36 S/m and an optimal EMI SE of 13 dB. PP/CF conductive composites have an optimal conductivity of 10−6 S/m when composed of no less than 3 wt% of CF, and an optimal EMI SE of 25 dB when composed of 20 wt% of CF.

  13. Mechanical properties of neat polymer matrix materials and their unidirectional carbon fiber-reinforced composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Richard S.; Adams, Donald F.

    1988-01-01

    The mechanical properties of two neat resin systems for use in carbon fiber epoxy composites were characterized. This included tensile and shear stiffness and strengths, coefficients of thermal and moisture expansion, and fracture toughness. Tests were conducted on specimens in the dry and moisture-saturated states, at temperatures of 23, 82 and 121 C. The neat resins tested were American Cyanamid 1806 and Union Carbide ERX-4901B(MPDA). Results were compared to previously tested neat resins. Four unidirectional carbon fiber reinforced composites were mechanically characterized. Axial and transverse tension and in-plane shear strengths and stiffness were measured, as well as transverse coefficients of thermal and moisture expansion. Tests were conducted on dry specimens only at 23 and 100 C. The materials tested were AS4/3502, AS6/5245-C, T300/BP907, and C6000/1806 unidirectional composites. Scanning electron microscopic examination of fracture surfaces was performed to permit the correlation of observed failure modes with the environmental test conditions.

  14. Injection repair of carbon fiber/bismaleimide composite panels with bisphenol E cyanate ester resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thunga, Mahendra [Ames Laboratory; Bauer, Amy [Iowa State University; Obusek, Kristine [Fleet Readiness Center East; Meilunas, Ray [Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division; Akinc, Mufit [Ames Laboratory; Kessler, Michael R [Ames Laboratory

    2014-08-01

    Resin injection of bisphenol E cyanate ester, a low viscosity resin that cures into a high temperature thermoset polymer, is investigated as a reliable repair method to restore strength and stiffness in delaminated carbon fiber/bismaleimide composites used in aircraft panels. The influence of temperature on the viscosity of the uncured resin was measured to optimize the injection conditions for high resin infiltration into the delaminations. The repair efficiency of the resin was evaluated by varying the panel thickness and the method by which the delamination damage was created in the composite specimens. Ultrasonic scanning (C-scan), flash thermography images, and cross-section analysis of repaired panels revealed excellent resin infiltration into the damaged region. Evaluation of mechanical repair efficiency using both bending stiffness and in-plain compressive strength of the composite panels as the repair metrics showed values exceeding 100%.

  15. Nondestructive Evaluation of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composites Using Reflective Terahertz Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin; Li, Wei; Cui, Hong-Liang; Shi, Changcheng; Han, Xiaohui; Ma, Yuting; Chen, Jiandong; Chang, Tianying; Wei, Dongshan; Zhang, Yumin; Zhou, Yufeng

    2016-01-01

    Terahertz (THz) time-domain spectroscopy (TDS) imaging is considered a nondestructive evaluation method for composite materials used for examining various defects of carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites and fire-retardant coatings in the reflective imaging modality. We demonstrate that hidden defects simulated by Teflon artificial inserts are imaged clearly in the perpendicular polarization mode. The THz TDS technique is also used to measure the thickness of thin fire-retardant coatings on CFRP composites with a typical accuracy of about 10 micrometers. In addition, coating debonding is successfully imaged based on the time-delay difference of the time-domain waveforms between closely adhered and debonded sample locations. PMID:27314352

  16. Nondestructive Evaluation of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composites Using Reflective Terahertz Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Zhang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Terahertz (THz time-domain spectroscopy (TDS imaging is considered a nondestructive evaluation method for composite materials used for examining various defects of carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP composites and fire-retardant coatings in the reflective imaging modality. We demonstrate that hidden defects simulated by Teflon artificial inserts are imaged clearly in the perpendicular polarization mode. The THz TDS technique is also used to measure the thickness of thin fire-retardant coatings on CFRP composites with a typical accuracy of about 10 micrometers. In addition, coating debonding is successfully imaged based on the time-delay difference of the time-domain waveforms between closely adhered and debonded sample locations.

  17. Low Temperature Mechanical Testing of Carbon-Fiber/Epoxy-Resin Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nettles, Alan T.; Biss, Emily J.

    1996-01-01

    The use of cryogenic fuels (liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen) in current space transportation vehicles, in combination with the proposed use of composite materials in such applications, requires an understanding of how such materials behave at cryogenic temperatures. In this investigation, tensile intralaminar shear tests were performed at room, dry ice, and liquid nitrogen temperatures to evaluate the effect of temperature on the mechanical response of the IM7/8551-7 carbon-fiber/epoxy-resin system. Quasi-isotropic lay-ups were also tested to represent a more realistic lay-up. It was found that the matrix became both increasingly resistant to microcracking and stiffer with decreasing temperature. A marginal increase in matrix shear strength with decreasing temperature was also observed. Temperature did not appear to affect the integrity of the fiber-matrix bond.

  18. Bench Scale Thin Film Composite Hollow Fiber Membranes for Post-Combustion Carbon Dioxide Capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glaser, Paul [General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, NY (United States); Bhandari, Dhaval [General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, NY (United States); Narang, Kristi [General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, NY (United States); McCloskey, Pat [General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, NY (United States); Singh, Surinder [General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, NY (United States); Ananthasayanam, Balajee [General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, NY (United States); Howson, Paul [General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, NY (United States); Lee, Julia [General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, NY (United States); Wroczynski, Ron [General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, NY (United States); Stewart, Frederick [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Orme, Christopher [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Klaehn, John [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); McNally, Joshua [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Rownaghi, Ali [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Lu, Liu [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Koros, William [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Goizueta, Roberto [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Sethi, Vijay [Western Research Inst., Laramie, WY (United States)

    2015-04-01

    GE Global Research, Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech), and Western Research Institute (WRI) proposed to develop high performance thin film polymer composite hollow fiber membranes and advanced processes for economical post-combustion carbon dioxide (CO2) capture from pulverized coal flue gas at temperatures typical of existing flue gas cleanup processes. The project sought to develop and then optimize new gas separations membrane systems at the bench scale, including tuning the properties of a novel polyphosphazene polymer in a coating solution and fabricating highly engineered porous hollow fiber supports. The project also sought to define the processes needed to coat the fiber support to manufacture composite hollow fiber membranes with high performance, ultra-thin separation layers. Physical, chemical, and mechanical stability of the materials (individual and composite) towards coal flue gas components was considered via exposure and performance tests. Preliminary design, technoeconomic, and economic feasibility analyses were conducted to evaluate the overall performance and impact of the process on the cost of electricity (COE) for a coal-fired plant including capture technologies. At the onset of the project, Membranes based on coupling a novel selective material polyphosphazene with an engineered hollow fiber support was found to have the potential to capture greater than 90% of the CO2 in flue gas with less than 35% increase in COE, which would achieve the DOE-targeted performance criteria. While lab-scale results for the polyphosphazene materials were very promising, and the material was incorporated into hollow-fiber modules, difficulties were encountered relating to the performance of these membrane systems over time. Performance, as measured by both flux of and selectivity for CO2 over other flue gas constituents was found to deteriorate over time, suggesting a system that was

  19. Wear and transfer characteristics of carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites under water lubrication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIA Jun-hong; CHEN Jian-min; ZHOU Hui-di; CHEN Lei

    2004-01-01

    The tribological characteristics of carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites under distilled-water-lubricated-sliding and dry-sliding against stainless steel were comparatively investigated. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was utilized to examine composite microstructures and modes of failure. The typical chemical states of elements of the transfer film on the stainless steel were examined with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Wear testing and SEM analysis show that all the composites hold the lowered friction coefficient and show much better wear resistance under water lubricated sliding against stainless steel than those under dry sliding. The wear of composites is characterized by plastic deformation, scuffing, micro cracking, and spalling under both dry-sliding and water lubricated conditions. Plastic deformation, scuffing, micro cracking, and spalling, however, are significantly abated under water-lubricated condition. XPS analysis conforms that none of the materials produces transfer films on the stainless steel counterface with the type familiar from dry sliding, and the transfer of composites onto the counterpart ring surface is significantly hindered while the oxidation of the stainless steel is speeded under water lubrication. The composites hinder transfer onto the steel surface and the boundary lubricating action of water accounts for the much smaller wear rate under water lubrication compared with that under dry sliding. The easier transfer of the composite onto the counterpart steel surface accounts for the larger wear rate of the polymer composite under dry sliding.

  20. Modeling of Failure for Analysis of Triaxial Braided Carbon Fiber Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Littell, Justin D.; Binienda, Wieslaw K.

    2010-01-01

    In the development of advanced aircraft-engine fan cases and containment systems, composite materials are beginning to be used due to their low weight and high strength. The design of these structures must include the capability of withstanding impact loads from a released fan blade. Relatively complex triaxially braided fiber architectures have been found to yield the best performance for the fan cases. To properly work with and design these structures, robust analytical tools are required that can be used in the design process. A new analytical approach models triaxially braided carbon fiber composite materials within the environment of a transient dynamic finite-element code, specifically the commercially available transient dynamic finite-element code LS-DYNA. The geometry of the braided composites is approximated by a series of parallel laminated composites. The composite is modeled by using shell finite elements. The material property data are computed by examining test data from static tests on braided composites, where optical strain measurement techniques are used to examine the local strain variations within the material. These local strain data from the braided composite tests are used along with a judicious application of composite micromechanics- based methods to compute the stiffness properties of an equivalent unidirectional laminated composite required for the shell elements. The local strain data from the braided composite tests are also applied to back out strength and failure properties of the equivalent unidirectional composite. The properties utilized are geared towards the application of a continuum damage mechanics-based composite constitutive model available within LS-DYNA. The developed model can be applied to conduct impact simulations of structures composed of triaxially braided composites. The advantage of this technology is that it facilitates the analysis of the deformation and damage response of a triaxially braided polymer matrix

  1. Experimental determinations of the eigenmodes for composite bars made with carbon and Kevlar-carbon fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miriţoiu, C. M.; Stănescu, M. M.; Burada, C. O.; Bolcu, D.; Roşca, V.

    2015-11-01

    For modal identification, the single-point excitation method has been widely used in modal tests and it consists in applying a force in a given point and recording the vibratory structure response in all interest points, including the excitation point. There will be presented the experimental recordings for the studied bars (with Kevlar-carbon or carbon fibers), the frequency response function in Cartesian and polar coordinates. By using the frequency response functions we determine the eigenparameters for each bar. We present the final panel of the eigenmodes (with the damping factors, eigenfrequencies and critical damping) for each considered bar. Using the eigenfrequency of the first determined eigenmode, the bars stiffness has been determined. The presented bars can be used in practical engineering for: car or bus body parts, planes body parts, bullet-proof vests, reinforcements for sandwich beams, and so on.

  2. Flexural Properties of E Glass and TR50S Carbon Fiber Reinforced Epoxy Hybrid Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Chensong; Sudarisman; Davies, Ian J.

    2013-01-01

    A study on the flexural properties of E glass and TR50S carbon fiber reinforced hybrid composites is presented in this paper. Specimens were made by the hand lay-up process in an intra-ply configuration with varying degrees of glass fibers added to the surface of a carbon laminate. These specimens were then tested in the three-point bend configuration in accordance with ASTM D790-07 at three span-to-depth ratios: 16, 32, and 64. The failure modes were examined under an optical microscope. The flexural behavior was also simulated by finite element analysis, and the flexural modulus, flexural strength, and strain to failure were calculated. It is shown that although span-to-depth ratio shows an influence on the stress-strain relationship, it has no effect on the failure mode. The majority of specimens failed by either in-plane or out-of-plane local buckling followed by kinking and splitting at the compressive GFRP side and matrix cracking combined with fiber breakage at the CFRP tensile face. It is shown that positive hybrid effects exist for the flexural strengths of most of the hybrid configurations. The hybrid effect is noted to be more obvious when the hybrid ratio is small, which may be attributed to the relative position of the GFRP layer(s) with respect to the neutral plane. In contrast to this, flexural modulus seems to obey the rule of mixtures equation.

  3. Effect of chemical vapor infiltration treatment on the wave-absorbing performance of carbon fiber/cement composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Short carbon fibers were treated at high temperatures around 1100℃ through chemical vapor infiltration technology.A thinner layer ofpyrocarbon was deposited on the fiber surface.The dispersion of carbon fibers in a cement matrix and the mechanical properties of carbon fiber/cement composites were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and other tests.The reflectivity of electromagnetic waves by the composites was measured in the frequency range of 8.0-18 GHz for different carbon fiber contents of 0.2wt%,0.4wt%,0.6wt% ,and 1.0wt%.The results show that the reflectivity tends to increase with the increase of fiber content above 0.4wt%.The minimum reflectivity is -19.3 dB and the composites exhibit wave-absorbing performances.After pyrocarbon is deposited on the fiber,all the reflectivity data are far greater.They are all above -10 dB and display mainly wave-reflecting performances.

  4. Viscoelastic characterization of carbon fiber-epoxy composites by creep and creep rupture tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the main requirements for the use of fiber-reinforced polymer matrix composites in structural applications is the evaluation of their behavior during service life. The warranties of the integrity of these structural components demand a study of the time dependent behavior of these materials due to viscoelastic response of the polymeric matrix and of the countless possibilities of design configurations. In the present study, creep and creep rupture test in stress were performed in specimens of unidirectional carbon fiber-reinforced epoxy composites with fibers orientations of 60 degree and 90 degree, at temperatures of 25 and 70 degree C. The aim is the viscoelastic characterization of the material through the creep curves to some levels of constant tension during periods of 1000 h, the attainment of the creep rupture envelope by the creep rupture curves and the determination of the transition of the linear for non-linear behavior through isochronous curves. In addition, comparisons of creep compliance curves with a viscoelastic behavior prediction model based on Schapery equation were also performed. For the test, a modification was verified in the behavior of the material, regarding the resistance, stiffness and deformation, demonstrating that these properties were affected for the time and tension level, especially in work temperature above the ambient. The prediction model was capable to represent the creep behavior, however the determination of the equations terms should be considered, besides the variation of these with the applied tension and the elapsed time of test. (author)

  5. Moisture absorption and hygrothermal aging in a bismaleimide resin and its carbon fiber composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Li-Rong

    Moisture absorption and hygrothermal aging in a commercial bismaleimide (BMI) resin (Cytec 5250-4 RTM) and its carbon fiber composites were systematically studied in this work. The neat resin displays a distinct two-stage absorption behavior, with an initial fast diffusion followed by a gradual increase in weight gain over an extended timescale. The true equilibrium uptake was not reached after two years. The second-stage diffusion is associated with moisture enhanced structural relaxation in the resin. Since water is a good plasticizer, it significantly decreases the glass transition temperature and enhances segmental mobility. Hence, the resin network can slowly relax in response to the swelling stresses created by absorbed moisture, resulting in additional uptake. As the resin is deep in the glassy state, the relaxation process is much slower than diffusion. Therefore, the first stage and second stage are diffusion and relaxation controlled, respectively. A simple mathematical model has been developed to describe this absorption behavior. Though a phenomenological model, this two-stage model can be quantitatively correlated with relaxation theories in the glassy stage. The general application of this model has also been demonstrated. Cyclic absorption experiments indicate that the structural relaxation is irreversible upon desorption. The material response under cyclic absorption conditions is solely determined by the absorption cycles, not the desorption cycles. This phenomenon is consistent with the plasticizing effect of water. Two types of reinforcements are used in the composites, namely, uni-weave and woven fabrics. The diffusivity and water uptake level of the composites are compared with those of the flash in an attempt to deduce the interface effect. In the case of the uni-weave composite, which is essentially a uni-directional fiber composite, the composite diffusivity and uptake level can be predicted from those of the neat resin and the fiber volume

  6. Effect of the surface roughness on interfacial properties of carbon fibers reinforced epoxy resin composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song Wei [College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215123 (China); Gu Aijuan, E-mail: ajgu@suda.edu.cn [College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215123 (China); Liang Guozheng, E-mail: lgzheng@suda.edu.cn [College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215123 (China); Yuan Li [College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215123 (China)

    2011-02-15

    The effect of the surface roughness on interfacial properties of carbon fibers (CFs) reinforced epoxy (EP) resin composite is studied. Aqueous ammonia was applied to modify the surfaces of CFs. The morphologies and chemical compositions of original CFs and treated CFs (a-CFs) were characterized by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). Compared with the smooth surface of original CF, the surface of a-CF has bigger roughness; moreover, the roughness increases with the increase of the treating time. On the other hand, no obvious change in chemical composition takes place, indicating that the treating mechanism of CFs by aqueous ammonia is to physically change the morphologies rather than chemical compositions. In order to investigate the effect of surface roughness on the interfacial properties of CF/EP composites, the wettability and Interfacial Shear Strength (IFSS) were measured. Results show that with the increase of the roughness, the wettabilities of CFs against both water and ethylene glycol improves; in addition, the IFSS value of composites also increases. These attractive phenomena prove that the surface roughness of CFs can effectively overcome the poor interfacial adhesions between CFs and organic matrix, and thus make it possible to fabricate advanced composites based on CFs.

  7. Recycling high-performance carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites using sub-critical and supercritical water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Chase C.

    Carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) are composite materials that consist of carbon fibers embedded in a polymer matrix, a combination that yields materials with properties exceeding the individual properties of each component. CFRP have several advantages over metals: they offer superior strength to weight ratios and superior resistance to corrosion and chemical attack. These advantages, along with continuing improvement in manufacturing processes, have resulted in rapid growth in the number of CFRP products and applications especially in the aerospace/aviation, wind energy, automotive, and sporting goods industries. Due to theses well-documented benefits and advancements in manufacturing capabilities, CFRP will continue to replace traditional materials of construction throughout several industries. However, some of the same properties that make CFRP outstanding materials also pose a major problem once these materials reach the end of service life. They become difficult to recycle. With composite consumption in North America growing by almost 5 times the rate of the US GDP in 2012, this lack of recyclability is a growing concern. As consumption increases, more waste will inevitably be generated. Current composite recycling technologies include mechanical recycling, thermal processing, and chemical processing. The major challenge of CFRP recycling is the ability to recover materials of high-value and preserve their properties. To this end, the most suitable technology is chemical processing, where the polymer matrix can be broken down and removed from the fiber, with limited damage to the fibers. This can be achieved using high concentration acids, but such a process is undesirable due to the toxicity of such materials. A viable alternative to acid is water in the sub-critical and supercritical region. Under these conditions, the behavior of this abundant and most environmentally friendly solvent resembles that of an organic compound, facilitating the breakdown

  8. Activated carbon fibers/poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid composite scaffolds: preparation and characterizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yanni; Han, Hao; Quan, Haiyu; Zang, Yongju; Wang, Ning; Ren, Guizhi; Xing, Melcolm; Wu, Qilin

    2014-10-01

    The present work is a first trial to introduce activated carbon fibers (ACF) with high adsorption capacity into poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA), resulting in a novel kind of scaffolds for tissue engineering applications. ACF, prepared via high-temperature processing of carbon fibers, are considered to possess bioactivity and biocompatibility. The ACF/PLGA composite scaffolds are prepared by solvent casting/particulate leaching method. Increments in both pore quantity and quality over the surface of ACF as well as a robust combination between ACF and PLGA matrix are observed via scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The high adsorption capacity of ACF is confirmed by methylene blue solution absorbency test. The surfaces of ACF are affiliated with many hydrophilic groups and characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Furthermore, the SEM images show that cells possess a favorable spreading morphology on the ACF/PLGA scaffolds. Besides, vivo experiments are also carried out to evaluate the histocompatibility of the composite scaffolds. The results show that ACF have the potential to become one of the most promising materials in biological fields.

  9. Design and analysis of automotive carbon fiber composite bumper beam based on finite element analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tie Wang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this article, the most important part of the automotive front bumper system, namely, the bumper beam, is studied by changing the material and thickness to improve the crashworthiness performance in low-velocity impact. According to the low-speed standard of automotives stated in E.C.E. United Nations Agreement, Regulation no. 42, the low-velocity impact simulation based on finite element analysis is carried out. Lightweight is the main purpose of this article. First, the bumper beam analysis is accomplished for carbon fiber composite and steel material to analyze their deformation, weight, impact force, energy absorption, and the acceleration of the impactor. As a consequence, the bumper beam made by carbon fiber composite achieves better impact behavior. Second, on the purpose of lightweight, the bumper beams of different thickness including 5.4, 6, 6.6, and 7.2 mm are investigated. The results show that the 5.4 mm bumper beam is the best selection without sacrificing the impact performance. Third, according to the stress distribution, the thickness distribution of the bumper beam is changed to get better lightweight results. It is indicated that the weight of the improved bumper beam is further reduced and the impact performance is not weakened.

  10. Investigations on damage resistance of carbon fiber composite panels toughened using veils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhu Lingang

    2013-01-01

    This research focused on how to improve damage resistance of carbon fiber laminates.It was carried out at Cranfield University Composites Centre,Milton Keynes,UK as an MSc by research thesis project.A series of low-cost composite laminates,with or without novel veils provided by Tenax,was manufactured using current aircraft carbon fiber preforms via vacuum infusion (Ⅵ) molding in this research.All the investigations on damage resistance of these panels were carried out according to the British Standard (BS ISO 18353:2009).Initial damage was induced using a falling weight apparatus mounting a 16mm hemispherical tip.C-scan and Micrograph were employed to reveal damage characteristics.Finally,both compression after impact (CAI) and plain compression strength were experimented.The behaviors of these panels,including damage size,damage construction,residual compression strength,and compression strength reduction,were utilized to investigate how and to what extent the veils affected the damage resistance.The results show that using veils is an efficient method of improving the damage resistance of the laminates studied.Maximum 32% increase in residual compression strength is achieved via veils accompanying with 7% increase in cost.

  11. A Tow-Level Progressive Damage for Simulating Carbon-Fiber Textile Composites: Interim Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zywicz, E.

    2000-07-01

    A numerical approach to model the elasto-plastic and tensile damage response of tri-axially braided carbon-fiber polymeric-matrix composites is developed. It is micromechanically based and consists of a simplified unit cell geometry, a plane-stress tow-level constitutive relationship, a one-dimensional undulation constitutive law, and a non-traditional shell element integration rule. The braided composite lamina is idealized as periodic in the plane, and a simplified three-layer representative volume (RV) is assembled from axial and braider tows and pure resin regions. The constituents in each layer are homogenized with an iso-strain assumption in the fiber-direction and an iso-stress condition in the other directions. In the upper and lower layers, the fiber-direction strain is additively decomposed into an undulation and a tow portion. A finite-deformation tow model predicts the plane-stress tow response and is coupled to the undulation constitutive relationship. The overall braid model is implemented in DYNA3D and works with traditional shell elements. The finite-deformation tow constitutive relationship is derived from the fiber elasticity and the isotropic elasto-plastic power-law hardening matrix response using a thermodynamic framework and simple homogenization assumptions. The model replicates tensile damage evolution, in a smeared sense, parallel and perpendicular to the fiber axis and is regularized to yield mesh independent results. The tow-level model demonstrates reasonable agreement, prior to damage, with detailed three-dimensional FE (finite element) elasto-plastic simulations of aligned, periodically arranged, uni-directional composites. The 3-layer braid model response is compared with predictions obtained from detailed micromechanical simulations of the braid's unit cell in uni-axial extension, shear, and flexure for three braid angles. The elastic properties show good agreement as does the non-linear response for loadings dominated by the

  12. High-cycle Fatigue Life Extension of Glass Fiber/Polymer Composites with Carbon Nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christopher S Grimmer; C K H Dharan

    2009-01-01

    The present work shows that the addition of small volume fractions of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to the matrix results in a significant increase in the high-cycle fatigue life. It is proposed that carbon nanotubes tend to inhibit the formation of large cracks by nucleating nano-scale damage zones. In addition, the contribution to energy absorption from the fracture of nanotubes bridging across nano-scale cracks and from nanotube pull-out from the matrix are mechanisms that can improve the fatigue life. An energy-based model was proposed to estimate the additional strain energy absorbed in fatigue. The distributed nanotubes in the matrix appear to both distribute damage as well as inhibit damage propagation resulting in an overall improvement in the fatigue strength of glass fiber composites.

  13. Comparative Characterization of Multiscale Carbon Fiber Composite with Long and Short MWCNTs at Higher Weight Fractions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Zimmer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There are documented advantages to using carbon nanotubes (CNTs in composites for various property enhancements. However, to date, only limited studies have been conducted on using of longer CNTs over 1 mm in length. This study used long multiwalled carbon nanotubes (LMWCNTs and their longer extended networks to test multiple properties in thermal conductivity, electrical conductivity, mechanical strength, and modulus and then compared these properties to those of shorter multi-walled carbon nanotubes (SMWCNTs. For carbon fiber-reinforced composites, the longer graphite paths from LMWCNTs in the matrix were expected to improve all properties. The longer networks were expected to allow for more undisturbed phonon transportation to improve thermal conductivity. This in turn relates to improved electrical conductivity and better mechanical properties. However, results have shown that the LMWCNTs do not improve or decrease thermal conductivity, whereas the shorter MWCNTs provide mixed results. LMWCNTs did show improvements in electrical, mechanical, and physical properties, but compared to shorter MWCNTs, the results in other certain properties varied. This perplexing outcome resides in the functioning of the networks made by both the LMWCNTs and shorter MWCNTs.

  14. Damage threshold study of sonic IR imaging on carbon-fiber reinforced laminated composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiaoyan; He, Qi; Zhang, Ding; Ashbaugh, Mike; Favro, Lawrence D.; Newaz, Golam; Thomas, Robert L.

    2013-01-01

    Sonic Infrared Imaging, as a young NDE technology, has drawn a lot of attentions due to it's fast, wide-area evaluation capability, and due to its broad applications in different materials such as metal/metal alloy, composites and detection of various types of defects: surface, subsurface, cracks, delaminations/disbonds. Sonic IR Imaging combines pulsed ultrasound excitation and infrared imaging to detect defects in materials. The sound pulse causes rubbing due to non-unison motion between faces of defects, and infrared sensors image the temperature map over the target to identify defects. However, concerns have also been brought up about possible damages which might occur at the contact spots between the ultrasound transducer from the external excitation source and the target materials. In this paper, we present our results from a series of systematically designed experiments on carbon-fiber reinforced laminated composite panels to address the concerns.

  15. Theoretical Estimation of Thermal Effects in Drilling of Woven Carbon Fiber Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Díaz-Álvarez

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRPs composites are extensively used in structural applications due to their attractive properties. Although the components are usually made near net shape, machining processes are needed to achieve dimensional tolerance and assembly requirements. Drilling is a common operation required for further mechanical joining of the components. CFRPs are vulnerable to processing induced damage; mainly delamination, fiber pull-out, and thermal degradation, drilling induced defects being one of the main causes of component rejection during manufacturing processes. Despite the importance of analyzing thermal phenomena involved in the machining of composites, only few authors have focused their attention on this problem, most of them using an experimental approach. The temperature at the workpiece could affect surface quality of the component and its measurement during processing is difficult. The estimation of the amount of heat generated during drilling is important; however, numerical modeling of drilling processes involves a high computational cost. This paper presents a combined approach to thermal analysis of composite drilling, using both an analytical estimation of heat generated during drilling and numerical modeling for heat propagation. Promising results for indirect detection of risk of thermal damage, through the measurement of thrust force and cutting torque, are obtained.

  16. Dry Process for Manufacturing Hybridized Boron Fiber/Carbon Fiber Thermoplastic Composite Materials from a Solution Coated Precursor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belvin, Harry L. (Inventor); Cano, Roberto J. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    An apparatus for producing a hybrid boron reinforced polymer matrix composite from precursor tape and a linear array of boron fibers. The boron fibers are applied onto the precursor tapes and the precursor tape processed within a processing component having an impregnation bar assembly. After passing through variable-dimension forming nip-rollers, the precursor tape with the boron fibers becomes a hybrid boron reinforced polymer matrix composite. A driving mechanism is used to pulled the precursor tape through the method and a take-up spool is used to collect the formed hybrid boron reinforced polymer matrix composite.

  17. Aspects regarding the tribological evaluation of sintered composites obtained from mixture of copper with carbon fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caliman, R.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents a study of the tribological properties of sintered composite materials made from combination of copper with short carbon fibers. Sintered composite materials are more effective if refer to specific properties per unit volume compared to conventional isotropic materials. Potential advantages of copper - carbon composite materials are: high resistance to breakage and high value ratios strength/density; resistance to high temperatures; low density and high resistance to wear; low or high friction coefficient. The sintered composite materials used in this research work are obtained combining different percentages of copper with short carbon fibres with iron and lead in order to investigate the variation of the friction behaviour. Varying the percentage of copper from 92,2% to 97,6% and the percentage of short carbon fibres from 7,8% to 2,4%, five different composite materials are obtained and tested. Friction tests are carried out, at room temperature, in dry conditions, on a pin-on-disc machine. The friction coefficient was measured using abrasive discs made from steel 4340 having the average hardness of 40 HRC, and sliding velocity of 0,6 m/sec. The main objective of this research work it was to identify a combination of materials with improved friction behaviour. The experimental results revealed that the force applied on the specimen during the tests, is playing a very important role regarding friction coefficient and also the wearing speed. Graphite particles are conveyed consistently inside the net, enhancing scraped spot safety and voltage drop over normal composite material. The static tests demonstrated that this new kind of sintered composite material has preferable electrical execution over previous brush material in the same conditions, and the element tests demonstrated that the temperature climb is not enormous when the brush with this new composite material is exchanged on with huge current and the surface scraped spot is littler amid

  18. Effect of impregnation pressure and time on the porosity, structure and properties of polyacrylonitrile-fiber based carbon composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venugopalan, Ramani; Roy, Mainak; Thomas, Susy; Patra, A. K.; Sathiyamoorthy, D.; Tyagi, A. K.

    2013-02-01

    Carbon-carbon composites may find applications in critical parts of advanced nuclear reactors. A series of carbon-carbon composites were prepared using polyacrylonitrile (PAN) based carbon fibers. The materials were densified by impregnating two-dimensional (2D) preforms with liquid phenol formaldehyde resin at different pressures and for different periods of time and then carbonizing those by slowly heating at 1000 °C. Effects of the processing parameters on the structure of the composites were extensively studied. The study showed conclusively that open porosity decreased with increasing impregnation pressure, whereas impregnation time had lesser effect. Matrix-resin bonding also improved at higher pressure. d002 spacing decreased and ordering along c-axis increased with concomitant increase in sp2-carbon fraction at higher impregnation pressures. The fiber reinforced composites exhibited short range ordering of carbon atoms and satisfied structural conditions (d002 values) of amorphous carbon according to the turbostratic model for non-graphitic carbon materials. The composites had pellet-density of ˜85% of the theoretical value, low thermal expansion and negligible neutron-poisoning. They maintained structural integrity and retained disordered nature even on heat-treatment at ca. 1800 °C.

  19. Damage Tolerance Enhancement of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composites by Nanoreinforcement of Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenner, Joel Stewart

    Nanocomposites are a relatively new class of materials which incorporate exotic, engineered nanoparticles to achieve superior material properties. Because of their extremely small size and well-ordered structure, many nanoparticles possess properties that exceed those offered by a wide range of other known materials, making them attractive candidates for novel materials engineering development. Their small size is also an impediment to their practical use, as they typically cannot be employed by themselves to realize those properties in large structures. Furthermore, nanoparticles typically possess strong self-affinity, rendering them difficult to disperse uniformly into a composite. However, contemporary research has shown that, if well-dispersed, nanoparticles have great capacity to improve the mechanical properties of composites, especially damage tolerance, in the form of fracture toughness, fatigue life, and impact damage mitigation. This research focuses on the development, manufacturing, and testing of hybrid micro/nanocomposites comprised of woven carbon fibers with a carbon nanotube reinforced epoxy matrix. Material processing consisted of dispersant-and-sonication based methods to disperse nanotubes into the matrix, and a vacuum-assisted wet lay-up process to prepare the hybrid composite laminates. Various damage tolerance properties of the hybrid composite were examined, including static strength, fracture toughness, fatigue life, fatigue crack growth rate, and impact damage behavior, and compared with similarly-processed reference material produced without nanoreinforcement. Significant improvements were obtained in interlaminar shear strength (15%), Mode-I fracture toughness (180%), shear fatigue life (order of magnitude), Mode-I fatigue crack growth rate (factor of 2), and effective impact damage toughness (40%). Observations by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and ultrasonic imaging showed significant differences in failure behavior

  20. Study the Effect of Carbon Fiber Volume Fraction and their Orientations on the Thermal Conductivity of the Polymer Composite Materials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Sellab Hamza

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of fiber volume fraction of the carbon fiber on the thermal conductivity of the polymer composite material was studied. Different percentages of carbon fibers were used (5%, 10%, 15%, 20%, and 25%. Specimens were made in two groups for unsaturated polyester as a matrix and carbon fibers, first group has parallel arrangement of fibers and the second group has perpendicular arrangement of fibers on the thermal flow, Lee's disk method was used for testing the specimens. This study showed that the values of the of thermal conductivity of the specimens when the fibers arranged in parallel direction was higher than that when the fibers arranged in the perpendicular direction The results indicated that the thermal conductivity increases with the increasing the fiber volume fraction. Minimum value was (0.64 W/m.?C for parallel arrangement and (0.1715 W/m.?C for perpendicular arrangement at (Vf = 5% .Maximum value for parallel and perpendicular were (2.65 W/m. ?C and (0.215 W/m.?C at (Vf = 25% respectively.

  1. Evolution of the composition and structure of PAN carbon fiber during preoxidation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI; Xiaojia; LUO; Qianhua; ZHU; Yijun; WANG; Haizhou

    2001-01-01

    Using scanning electronic microscope, X-ray diffraction analysis, PYR-GCMS and IR etc., we studied the evolving process of the composition and structure of PAN carbon fiber during preoxidation. In the initial stage of preoxidation, PAN filament tows disappear and become semi-thaw. At first, reactions happen between the copolymers and esters disappear. The molecules annularly crosslink and the index of cyclation slowly increases. It is easy to fix the structure and form defects during the initial and the medium stages, which are most reactive. More traction is advised in these stages to minimize the structural deficiencies. In the medium stage of preoxidation, the fiber was reshaped into new sheet stacks and gradually changed to sheet sectors, and this structure tends to be stable in the final stage. Induced by acid and ester copolymer, PAN fiber forms a very stable cycle structure in the final stage. Besides, monomer, dimmer and trimer obviously decrease. In the final stage of the preoxidation, there exists only the fragment of -CN, and it also disappears at last. The index of cyclation rises with the process of preoxidation and the structural shape stabilizes.

  2. Mechanical properties of a carbon fiber reinforced self-healing multilayered matrix composite at elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Chengyu, E-mail: cyzhang@nwpu.edu.cn [National Key Laboratory of Thermostructure Composite Materials, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072 (China); Qiao Shengru; Yan Kefei; Liu Yongsheng; Wu Qi; Han Dong; Li Mei [National Key Laboratory of Thermostructure Composite Materials, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072 (China)

    2011-03-25

    Research highlights: {yields} The tensile, interlaminar shear and in-plane shear strengths exhibited a significant dependency on the temperature. {yields} The debonding of the interface between the different layers in the matrix can arrest and deflect the cracks in the multilayered matrix. {yields} The thermal residual stress and the volume shrinkage caused by the crystallization of the boron-containing phase can contribute to the variation of strength with temperature. - Abstract: The mechanical properties of a two dimensional carbon fiber reinforced multilayered ceramic matrix composite (C/Si-B-C) were investigated at elevated temperatures. The fracture surfaces were examined by a scanning electron microscope. The results show that the tensile strength and failure strain of the C/Si-B-C increase with increase in temperatures up to 1273 K, then decrease at temperature of above 1273 K. However, the tensile modulus keeps constant in the investigated temperature range. The reduced nonlinear region and short pullout length of fibers suggest a strong interfacial strength between the fibers and the matrix. The interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) and the in-plane shear strength (IPSS) present the similar tendency to the tensile strength. IPSS is about three times of ILSS regardless of temperature. The variation of strength with temperature can be explained by thermal residual stress and crystallization of B{sub 4}C in the multilayered matrix.

  3. Design aid for shear strengthening of reinforced concrete T-joints using carbon fiber reinforced plastic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gergely, Ioan

    The research presented in the present work focuses on the shear strengthening of beam column joints using carbon fiber composites, a material considered in seismic retrofit in recent years more than any other new material. These composites, or fiber reinforced polymers, offer huge advantages over structural steel reinforced concrete or timber. A few of these advantages are the superior resistance to corrosion, high stiffness to weight and strength to weight ratios, and the ability to control the material's behavior by selecting the orientation of the fibers. The design and field application research on reinforced concrete cap beam-column joints includes analytical investigations using pushover analysis; design of carbon fiber layout, experimental tests and field applications. Several beam column joints have been tested recently with design variables as the type of composite system, fiber orientation and the width of carbon fiber sheets. The surface preparation has been found to be critical for the bond between concrete and composite material, which is the most important factor in joint shear strengthening. The final goal of this thesis is to develop design aids for retrofitting reinforced concrete beam column joints. Two bridge bents were tested on the Interstate-15 corridor. One bent was tested in the as-is condition. Carbon fiber reinforced plastic composite sheets were used to externally reinforce the second bridge bent. By applying the composite, the displacement ductility has been doubled, and the bent overall lateral load capacity has been increased as well. The finite element model (using DRAIN-2DX) was calibrated to model the actual stiffness of the supports. The results were similar to the experimental findings.

  4. Durability-Based Design Criteria for a Quasi-Isotropic Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced Thermoplastic Automotive Composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naus, Dan J [ORNL; Corum, James [ORNL; Klett, Lynn B [ORNL; Davenport, Mike [ORNL; Battiste, Rick [ORNL; Simpson, Jr., William A [ORNL

    2006-04-01

    This report provides recommended durability-based design properties and criteria for a quais-isotropic carbon-fiber thermoplastic composite for possible automotive structural applications. The composite consisted of a PolyPhenylene Sulfide (PPS) thermoplastic matrix (Fortron's PPS - Ticona 0214B1 powder) reinforced with 16 plies of carbon-fiber unidirectional tape, [0?/90?/+45?/-45?]2S. The carbon fiber was Hexcel AS-4C and was present in a fiber volume of 53% (60%, by weight). The overall goal of the project, which is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Freedom Car and Vehicle Technologies and is closely coordinated with the Advanced Composites Consortium, is to develop durability-driven design data and criteria to assure the long-term integrity of carbon-fiber-based composite systems for automotive structural applications. This document is in two parts. Part 1 provides design data and correlations, while Part 2 provides the underlying experimental data and models. The durability issues addressed include the effects of short-time, cyclic, and sustained loadings; temperature; fluid environments; and low-energy impacts (e.g., tool drops and kickups of roadway debris) on deformation, strength, and stiffness. Guidance for design analysis, time-independent and time-dependent allowable stresses, rules for cyclic loadings, and damage-tolerance design guidance are provided.

  5. [Research on the extracorporeal cytocompatibility of a composite of HA, carbon fiber and polyetheretherket-one].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xueyong; Deng, Chunbo; Liu, Jiquan; Li, Jianjun; Sui, Guoxin

    2011-12-01

    The present research was to study the biocompatibility of a composite of hydroxyapatite (HA), carbon fiber (CF) and polyetheretherket-one (PEEK) by co-culturing with the osteoblasts in vitro. Cell relative growth (RGR) was used as a quantitative assessment for cytotoxicity of the biomaterials by CCK-8. The proliferation index of the co-cultured cells and ALP activity was measured to study the effect of PEEK-HA-CF composites. Morphological properties of the osteoblast cells in vitro were observed by scanning electro-microscopy (SEM). The PEEK-HA-CF materials have no cytotoxicity to osteoblasts. The proliferation index of PEEK-HA-CF was higher than that of Ti alloy group, but these was no significant difference compared to that of control group. The ALP activity was the highest on PEEK-HA-CF composites surface after 7 days. The osteoblast cells co-cultured with the PEEK-HA-CF composite were adhered well to the biomaterial as observed under the SEM. The results suggested that the PEEK-HA-CF composites had good biocompatibility in vitro and might be a novel orthopedic implanted material.

  6. Continuous Processing of Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube-Studded Carbon Fiber Tapes for Enhanced Through-Thickness Thermal Diffusivity Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craddock, John D; Qian, Dali; Lester, Catherine; Matthews, JohnJ; Mansfield, J Patrick W; Foedinger, Richard; Weisenberger, Matthew C

    2015-09-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites offer advantages over traditional metallic structures, particularly specific strength and stiffness, but at much reduced thermal conductivity. Moreover, fiber-to-fiber heat conduction in the composite transverse directions is significantly lower. When these structures contain electronics (heat generators), shortfalls in heat transport can be problematic. Here we report the achievement of a continuous, reel-to-reel process for growing short multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) on the surfaces of spread-tow carbon fiber tapes. These tapes were subsequently prepregged with an epoxy matrix, and laid up into multi-ply laminate panels, cured and tested for through-thickness thermal diffusivity. The results showed up to a 57% increase in through thickness thermal diffusivity compared to the baseline composite with no MWCNT. PMID:26716256

  7. Interface property improvement of the composite reinforced by radiation grafted carbon fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation processing is a high efficient, energy-saving and environment-friendly technology, and has been widely used to modify material interfaces. In this paper, simultaneous γ-ray radiation graft copolymerization was used to improve surface property of carbon fibers (CF) with phenolic aldehyde/ethyl alcohol solutions of different concentrations. The CF samples treated with the solutions were irradiated by 60Co γ-rays to 30 kGy at a dose rate of 4.8 kGy/h. The grafted samples were characterized with atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). And interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) of the composite reinforced by the grafted CFs was compared to the control (composites reinforced by the virgin CFs). The AFM measurement revealed obvious morphology changes of the grafted CF. The XPS spectra showed that the oxygen/carbon ratio and quantity of oxygen functional groups were enhanced efficiently by the radiation graft copolymerization. And interfacial performance of the composite reinforced by the grafted CFs was enhanced significantly. (authors)

  8. Design and Manufacturing of a Composite Lattice Structure Reinforced by Continuous Carbon Fibers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Hualin; YANG Wei; WANG Bin; YAN Yong; FU Qiang; FANG Daining; ZHUANG Zhuo

    2006-01-01

    New techniques have been developed to make materials with a periodic three-dimensional lattice structure. The high stiffness per unit weight and multifunction of such lattice structures make them attractive for use in aeronautic and astronautic structures. In this paper, epoxy-soaked continuous carbon fibres were first introduced to make lattice composite structures, which maximize the specific load carrying capacity. A micromechanical analysis of several designs, each corresponding to a different manufacturing route, was carried out, in order to find the optimized lattice structure with maximum specific stiffness. An intertwining method was chosen and developed as the best route to make lattice composite materials reinforced by carbon fibers. A sandwich-weaved sample with a three-dimensional intertwined lattice structure core was found to be best. The manufacturing of such a composite lattice material was outlined. In addition to a high shear strength of the core and the integral manufacturing method, the lattice sandwich structure is expected to possess better mechanical capability.

  9. Modeling the Effect of Oxidation on Tensile Strength of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Ceramic-Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longbiao, Li

    2015-12-01

    An analytical method has been developed to investigate the effect of oxidation on the tensile strength of carbon fiber - reinforced ceramic - matrix composites (CMCs). The Budiansky - Hutchinson - Evans shear - lag model was used to describe the micro stress field of the damaged composite considering fibers failure. The statistical matrix multicracking model and fracture mechanics interface debonding criterion were used to determine the matrix crack spacing and interface debonded length. The fiber strength degradation model and oxidation region propagation model have been adopted to analyze the oxidation effect on tensile strength of the composite, which is controlled by diffusion of oxygen gas through matrix cracks. Under tensile loading, the fibers failure probabilities were determined by combining oxidation model and fiber statistical failure model based on the assumption that fiber strength is subjected to two-parameter Weibull distribution and the loads carried by broken and intact fibers statisfy the global load sharing criterion. The composite can no longer support the applied load when the total loads supported by broken and intact fibers approach its maximum value. The conditions of a single matrix crack and matrix multicrackings for tensile strength considering oxidation time and temperature have been analyzed.

  10. Grafting of a functionalized side-chain liquid crystal polymer on carbon fiber surfaces: Novel coupling agents for fiber/polymer matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Bonheur, V.; Stupp, S.I. (Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States))

    1993-09-01

    The authors studied covalent grafting to functionalized carbon fibers of a specially designed liquid crystalline monomer and its corresponding side-chain liquid crystalline polymer containing pendant chemical functions on their mesogenic groups. From a materials point of view these liquid crystalline compounds could act as coupling agents at fiber/polymer matrix interfaces, offering a mechanism to control composite properties not only through bonding but also through their [open quotes]spontaneous[close quotes] molecular orientation in interfacial regions. The grafting methodology for both monomer and polymer to fiber surfaces involved esterification through carbodiimide chemistry in solution. Carboxylic acid groups found on functionalized carbon fiber surfaces were esterified to phenolic functions in the side chains of the experimental polymer. Following grafting procedures the fibers were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and by contact angle measurements. SEM micrographs of fibers grafted with polymer revealed the presence of strongly attached polymeric material on the graphitic surface after rigorous extraction with polymer solvent. Contact angle measurements and polar/dispersive free energy analysis indicated also a smaller polar component of the surface free energy of fibers possibly due to the hydrophobic polymer backbone grafted on the carbon surfaces. On the basis of results, it is concluded that the esterification reaction grafted the polyphenolic liquid-crystal polymer on graphite fiber surfaces. 24 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. Influence of locational states of submicron fibers added into matrix on mechanical properties of plain-woven Carbon Fiber Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumamoto, Soichiro; Okubo, Kazuya; Fujii, Toru

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to show the influence of locational states of submicron fibers added into epoxy matrix on mechanical properties of modified plane-woven carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP). To change the locational states of submicron fibers, two kinds of fabrication processes were applied in preparing specimen by hand lay-up method. Submicron fibers were simply added into epoxy resin with ethanol after they were stirred by a dispersion process using homogenizer to be located far from the interface between reinforcement and matrix. In contrast, submicron fibers were attached onto the carbon fibers by injecting from a spray nozzle accompanying with ethanol to be located near the interface, after they were tentatively contained in ethanol. The plain-woven CFRP plates were fabricated by hand lay-up method and cured at 80 degree-C for 1 hour and then at 150 degree-C for 3 hours. After curing, the plain-woven CFRP plates were cut into the dimension of specimen. Tensile shear strength and Mode-II fracture toughness of CFRP were determined by tensile lap-shear test and End-notched flexure(ENF) test, respectively. When submicron fibers were located far from the interface between carbon fibers and epoxy resin, tensile shear strength and Mode-II fracture toughness of CFRP were improved 30% and 18% compared with those of unmodified case. The improvement ratio in modified case was rather low (about few percentages) in the case where submicron fibers were located near the interface. The result suggested that crack propagation should be prevented when submicron fibers were existed far from the interface due to the effective stress state around the crack tip.

  12. Influence of locational states of submicron fibers added into matrix on mechanical properties of plain-woven Carbon Fiber Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumamoto Soichiro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to show the influence of locational states of submicron fibers added into epoxy matrix on mechanical properties of modified plane-woven carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP. To change the locational states of submicron fibers, two kinds of fabrication processes were applied in preparing specimen by hand lay-up method. Submicron fibers were simply added into epoxy resin with ethanol after they were stirred by a dispersion process using homogenizer to be located far from the interface between reinforcement and matrix. In contrast, submicron fibers were attached onto the carbon fibers by injecting from a spray nozzle accompanying with ethanol to be located near the interface, after they were tentatively contained in ethanol. The plain-woven CFRP plates were fabricated by hand lay-up method and cured at 80 degree-C for 1 hour and then at 150 degree-C for 3 hours. After curing, the plain-woven CFRP plates were cut into the dimension of specimen. Tensile shear strength and Mode-II fracture toughness of CFRP were determined by tensile lap-shear test and End-notched flexure(ENF test, respectively. When submicron fibers were located far from the interface between carbon fibers and epoxy resin, tensile shear strength and Mode-II fracture toughness of CFRP were improved 30% and 18% compared with those of unmodified case. The improvement ratio in modified case was rather low (about few percentages in the case where submicron fibers were located near the interface. The result suggested that crack propagation should be prevented when submicron fibers were existed far from the interface due to the effective stress state around the crack tip.

  13. Properties Variation of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Composite for Marine Current Turbine in Seawater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Jing

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Turbine blade which are generally made of composite is a core device among components of tidal current power generator that converts the flow of tidal current into a turning force. Recent years, damages of composite turbine blades have been reported due to reasons like seawater degradation, lake of strength, manufacture etc. In this paper, water absorption, tensile, bending, longitudinal transverse shearing properties of carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CRP composite which would be applied to fabricate the marine current turbine blade has been investigated. Furthermore, the variations of properties with seawater immersion period were studied. The results indicated that the water absorption increased almost linearly at the beginning of immersion and then became stable. Tensile strength of specimen tended to decrease firstly and then recovered slightly. However, the longitudinal transverse shearing strength showed reverse variation trend comparing to tensile strength. And the bending property of specimens was depressed significantly. The properties variations in seawater shall be referenced to design and fabrication of composite marine current turbine blade.

  14. Effect of impregnation pressure and time on the porosity, structure and properties of polyacrylonitrile-fiber based carbon composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venugopalan, Ramani, E-mail: rvg@barc.gov.in [Powder Metallurgy Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Roy, Mainak, E-mail: mainak73@barc.gov.in [Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Thomas, Susy [High Pressure Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Patra, A.K. [Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Sathiyamoorthy, D. [Powder Metallurgy Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Tyagi, A.K. [Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2013-02-15

    Carbon–carbon composites may find applications in critical parts of advanced nuclear reactors. A series of carbon–carbon composites were prepared using polyacrylonitrile (PAN) based carbon fibers. The materials were densified by impregnating two-dimensional (2D) preforms with liquid phenol formaldehyde resin at different pressures and for different periods of time and then carbonizing those by slowly heating at 1000 °C. Effects of the processing parameters on the structure of the composites were extensively studied. The study showed conclusively that open porosity decreased with increasing impregnation pressure, whereas impregnation time had lesser effect. Matrix–resin bonding also improved at higher pressure. d{sub 002} spacing decreased and ordering along c-axis increased with concomitant increase in sp{sup 2}-carbon fraction at higher impregnation pressures. The fiber reinforced composites exhibited short range ordering of carbon atoms and satisfied structural conditions (d{sub 002} values) of amorphous carbon according to the turbostratic model for non-graphitic carbon materials. The composites had pellet-density of ∼85% of the theoretical value, low thermal expansion and negligible neutron-poisoning. They maintained structural integrity and retained disordered nature even on heat-treatment at ca. 1800 °C.

  15. Flame Retardancy Effects of Graphene Nanoplatelet/Carbon Nanotube Hybrid Membranes on Carbon Fiber Reinforced Epoxy Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongxian Zhuo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotube/graphene nanoplatelet (MWCNT/GNP hybrid membranes with lower liquid permeability and better barrier effect compared to MWCNT membranes were successfully synthesized by vacuum filtering. Their morphologies, water permeability, and pore structures were characterized by a scanning electron microscope (SEM and nitrogen adsorption isotherms. Furthermore, MWCNT/GNP membranes were used to improve the flame retardancy of carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP composites, and the influence of weight percentage of GNPs on the permeability and flame retardancy of MWCNT/GNP membranes was systematically investigated. Results show that incorporation of MWCNT/GNP membranes on CFRP composite plates can remarkably improve the flame retardancy of CFRP composites. Specifically, the incorporation of hierarchical MWCNT/GNP membrane with 7.5 wt% of GNP displays a 35% reduction in the peak heat release rate (PHRR for a CFRP composite plate with the epoxy as matrix and a 11% reduction in PHRR compared with the incorporation of MWCNT membrane only. A synergistic flame retarding mechanism is suggested to be attributed to these results, which includes controlling the pore size and penetrative network structure.

  16. Electrical Resistance and Microstructure of Latex Modified Carbon Fiber Reinforced Cement Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Jian; CHENG Feng; YUAN Hudie

    2012-01-01

    The electrical resistance,flexural strength,and microstructure of carbon fiber reinforced cement composites (CFRC) were improved greatly by adding water-redispersible latex powder.The electrical resistance of CFRC was investigated by two-probe method.The input range of CFRC based strain sensors was therefore increased,whereas electrical resistance was increased and remained in the perfect range of CFRC sensors.The analysis of scanning electron microscopy indicated that elastic latex bridges and a latex layer existed among the interspaces of the adjacent cement hydration products which were responsible for the enhancement of the flexural strength and electrical resistance.The formation mechanism of the elastic latex bridges was also discussed in detail.The continuous moving of two opposite interfaces of the latex solution-air along the interspaces of the adjacent hydrated crystals or colloids was attributed to the formation of the elastic latex bridges.

  17. Segmenting delaminations in carbon fiber reinforced polymer composite CT using convolutional neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammons, Daniel; Winfree, William P.; Burke, Eric; Ji, Shuiwang

    2016-02-01

    Nondestructive evaluation (NDE) utilizes a variety of techniques to inspect various materials for defects without causing changes to the material. X-ray computed tomography (CT) produces large volumes of three dimensional image data. Using the task of identifying delaminations in carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite CT, this work shows that it is possible to automate the analysis of these large volumes of CT data using a machine learning model known as a convolutional neural network (CNN). Further, tests on simulated data sets show that with a robust set of experimental data, it may be possible to go beyond just identification and instead accurately characterize the size and shape of the delaminations with CNNs.

  18. Fracture analysis for pressure pipe wrapped with carbon-fiber reinforced composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A coupled FEM/EFG numerical method is introduced to calculate the stress intensity factors (SIF) along the crack front of a cracked pressure pipe line wrapped with carbon-fiber reinforced composite material (CFRC). Two types of crack shape, traverse through-wall crack and surface ellipse crack are considered respectively, based on which the effect of the CFRC sleeve length to the Stress Intensity Factors is numerically investigated. It shows that using the algorithm presented in this paper, the stress intensity factors of 3D component can be calculated effectively, and the SIF of the cracked pressure pipe line repaired with CFRC decrease obviously, compared to the original cracked pipe without any repair. Better repair efficiency is obtained with the increase of the sleeve length, but when the length is increased to a certain value, the length increasing of the sleeve contributes little to the decrease of the SIF, therefore to the repair efficiency. (authors)

  19. High-resolution Brillouin analysis in a carbon-fiber-composite unmanned aerial vehicle model wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Yonatan; London, Yosef; Preter, Eyal; Antman, Yair; Shlomi, Orel; Silbiger, Maayan; Adler, Gadi; Zadok, Avi

    2016-05-01

    Standard optical fibers are successfully embedded within a model wing of an unmanned aerial vehicle, constructed of carbon fiber and epoxy, during its production. Time-gated Brillouin optical correlation domain analysis along the embedded optical fibers is performed with a spatial resolution of 4 cm. Tests were carried out using a portable measurement setup prototype. The results represent an important step towards applications of high-resolution Brillouin analysis outside the research laboratory.

  20. Interfacial toughening and consequent improvement in fracture toughness of carbon fiber reinforced epoxy resin composites: induced by diblock copolymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. D. Zhou

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Carbon fibers chemically grafted with hydroxyl-terminated diblock copolymer poly (n-butylacrylate-b-poly (glycidyl methacrylate (OH-PnBA-b-PGMA, were used as the reinforcement for epoxy composites. The multi-filament composite specimens were prepared and measured by dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA, to study the interfacial toughness of carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composites with the diblock copolymers. The loss modulus and loss factor peaks of β-relaxation indicated that composites with diblock copolymers could dissipate more energy at small strain and possess better interfacial toughness, whereas composites without the ductile block PnBA having the worse interfacial toughness. The glass transition temperature and the apparent activation energy calculated from the glass transition showed that the strong interfacial adhesion existed in the composites with diblock copolymers, corresponding with the value of interfacial shear strength. Therefore, a strengthening and toughening interfacial structure in carbon fiber/epoxy composites was achieved by introducing the diblock copolymer OH-PnBA-b-PGMA. The resulting impact toughness, characterized with an Izod impact tester, was better than that of composite without the ductile block PnBA.

  1. Edge Delamination and Residual Properties of Drilled Carbon Fiber Composites with and without Short-Aramid-Fiber Interleaf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhi; Hu, Xiaozhi; Shi, Shanshan; Guo, Xu; Zhang, Yupeng; Chen, Haoran

    2016-05-01

    Edge delamination is frequently observed in carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) laminates after machining, due to the low fracture toughness of the resin interfaces between carbon fiber plies. In this study, the effects of incorporating tough aramid fibers into the brittle CFRP system are quantified by measuring the residual properties of bolted CFRP. By adding short-aramid-fiber interleaves in CFRP laminates, the residual tensile strength have been substantially increased by 14 % for twill-weave laminates and 45 % for unidirectional laminates respectively. Moreover, tensile failure was observed as the major mode of toughened laminates, in contrast to shear failure of plain laminates. The qualitative FEM results agreed well with the experimental results that edge delamination would cause relatively higher shear stress and therefore alter the failure mode from tensile failure to shear failure.

  2. Durability of carbon fiber reinforced shape memory polymer composites in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Joon Hyeok; Hong, Seok Bin; Ahn, Yong San; Kim, Jin-Gyun; Nam, Yong-Youn; Lee, Geun Ho; Yu, Woong-Ryeol

    2016-04-01

    Shape memory polymer (SMP) is one of smart polymers which exhibit shape memory effect upon external stimuli. Recently, shape memory polymer composites (SMPCs) have been considered for space structure instead of shape memory alloys due to their deformability, lightweight and large recovery ratio, requiring characterization of their mechanical properties against harsh space environment and further prediction of the durability of SMPCs in space. As such, the durability of carbon fiber reinforced shape memory polymer composites (CF-SMPCs) was investigated using accelerated testing method based on short-term testing of CF-SMPCs in harsh condition. CF-SMPCs were prepared using woven carbon fabrics and a thermoset SMP via vacuum assisted resin transfer molding process. Bending tests with constant strain rate of CF-SMPCs were conducted using universal tensile machine (UTM) and Storage modulus test were conducted using dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA). Using the results, a master curve based on time-temperature superposition principle was then constructed, through which the mechanical properties of CF-SMPCs at harsh temperature were predicted. CF-SMPCs would be exposed to simulated space environments under ultra-violet radiations at various temperatures. The mechanical properties including flexural and tensile strength and shape memory properties of SMPCs would be measured using UTM before and after such exposures for comparison. Finally, the durability of SMPCs in space would be assessed by developing a degradation model of SMPC.

  3. Light-weight sandwich panel honeycomb core with hybrid carbon-glass fiber composite skin for electric vehicle application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahyono, Sukmaji Indro; Widodo, Angit; Anwar, Miftahul; Diharjo, Kuncoro; Triyono, Teguh; Hapid, A.; Kaleg, S.

    2016-03-01

    The carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) composite is relative high cost material in current manufacturing process of electric vehicle body structure. Sandwich panels consisting polypropylene (PP) honeycomb core with hybrid carbon-glass fiber composite skin were investigated. The aim of present paper was evaluate the flexural properties and bending rigidity of various volume fraction carbon-glass fiber composite skins with the honeycomb core. The flexural properties and cost of panels were compared to the reported values of solid hybrid Carbon/Glass FRP used for the frame body structure of electric vehicle. The finite element model of represented sandwich panel was established to characterize the flexural properties of material using homogenization technique. Finally, simplified model was employed to crashworthiness analysis for engine hood of the body electric vehicle structure. The good cost-electiveness of honeycomb core with hybrid carbon-glass fiber skin has the potential to be used as a light-weight alternative material in body electric vehicle fabricated.

  4. Thermal management of a Li-ion battery using carbon fiber-PCM composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A combination of latent and sensible heat capabilities has made phase change materials (PCMs) very useful in a variety of heat transfer applications. The main purpose of using the phase change material in lithium-ion (Li-ion) battery thermal management systems (BTMs) is to mitigate the excessive temperature rise in the cells and to create uniform temperature distribution within the battery pack. In this work, carbon fibers were added to a PCM to enhance its heat transfer potentials. Various strategies were adopted to manage temperature distribution around a single AA-battery-like simulator. The effects of carbon fiber size and weight percent within the PCM on thermal performance were studied. Experimental results have indicated that a mixture of PCM with 2-mm-long carbon fibers and mass percentage of 0.46% showed the best thermal performance for which the maximum temperature rise in the battery simulator can be reduced by up to 45%. - Graphical abstract: The schematic of the experimental setup and data acquisition system (1-power source 2-container 3-battery module 4-thermocouples 5-temperature indicator 6-data acquisition system). - Highlights: • Thermal performance of a Li-ion battery simulator is studied in the presence of PCM. • The effect of carbon fiber on heat transfer enhancement is examined. • Better thermal management can be achieved by the presence of carbon fiber in PCM. • Both carbon fiber mass fraction and length play crucial role in thermal management

  5. Friction behaviour of aluminium composites mixed with carbon fibers with different orientations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caliman, R.

    2016-08-01

    The primary goal of this study work it was to distinguish a mixture of materials with enhanced friction and wearing behaviour. The composite materials may be differentiated from alloys; which can contain two more components but are formed naturally through different processes such as casting. The load applied on the specimen during the tests, is playing a very important role regarding friction coefficient and also the wearing speed. Sintered composites are gaining importance because the reinforcement serves to reduce the coefficient of thermal expansion and increase the strength and modulus. The friction tests are carried out, at the room temperature in dry condition, on a pin-on-disc machine. The exponentially decreasing areas form graphs, represented to the curves coefficient of friction, are attributed to the formation of lubricant transfer film and initial polishing surface samples. The influence of the orientation of the carbon fibers on the friction properties in the sintered polymer composites may be studied by the use of both mechanical wear tests by microscopy and through the use of phenomenological models.

  6. Novel carbon fiber composite for hip replacement with improved in vitro and in vivo osseointegration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrievska, S; Whitfield, J; Hacking, S A; Bureau, M N

    2009-10-01

    A novel composite femoral stem has been developed to match cortical stiffness and achieve fixation by osseointegration with the primary goal to reduce cortical bone loss associated with stress shielding. The femoral stem consists of three distinct material layers: the first is a long carbon fiber (CF) in a polyamide 12 (PA12) polymer matrix (PA12/CF); the second is a PA12/HA (hydroxyapatite) interface; and the third is a plasma-sprayed coating of HA. In vitro studies with MG63 cells indicated that the HA surface supported improved proliferation and differentiation of osteoblast-like cells as determined by alkaline phosphatase activity and osteocalcin production when compared with Ti-6Al-4V (Ti64). In vivo studies comparing the composite and Ti64 rods in the rabbit femur demonstrated significantly higher bone apposition to the composite than Ti64 rods. The results of this study indicate that the invasion of surrounding bone cells and thus osteointegration together with its bone-matching mechanical properties make the PA12/CF/HA stem a promising hip replacement candidate.

  7. Mechanical properties of several neat polymer matrix materials and unidirectional carbon fiber-reinforced composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coguill, Scott L.; Adams, Donald F.

    1989-01-01

    The mechanical and physical properties of three neat matrix materials, i.e., PEEK (polyetheretherketone) thermoplastic, Hexcel F155 rubber-toughened epoxy and Hercules 8551-7 rubber-toughened epoxy, were experimentally determined. Twelve unidirectional carbon fiber composites, incorporating matrix materials characterized in this or earlier studies (with one exception; the PISO(sub 2)-TPI matrix itself was not characterized), were also tested. These composite systems included AS4/2220-1, AS4/2220-3, T500/R914, IM6/HX1504, T300/4901A (MDA), T700/4901A (MDA), T300/4901B (MPDA), T700/4901B (MPDA), APC2 (AS4/PEEK, ICI), APC2 (AS4/PEEK, Langley Research Center), AS4/8551-7, and AS4/PISO(sub 2)-TPI. For the neat matrix materials, the tensile, shear, fracture toughness, coefficient of thermal expansion, and coefficient of moisture expansion properties were measured as a function of both temperature and moisture content. For the unidirectional composites, axial and transverse tensile, longitudinal shear, coefficient of thermal expansion, and coefficient of moisture expansion properties were determined, at room temperature and 100 C.

  8. Modeling elastic and thermal properties of 2.5D carbon fiber and carbon/SiC hybrid matrix composites by homogenization method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Claudio Pardini

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Advanced carbon fiber hybrid carbon-ceramic matrix composites are realizing their potential in many thermostructural components for aerospace vehicles. This work presents ab-initio predictions of elastic constants and thermal properties for 2.5D carbon fiber reinforced carbon-silicon carbide hybrid matrix composites, by using the homogenization technique. The homogenization technique takes properties of individual components of the composites (fiber and matrix and characteristics of the geometrical architecture of the preform to perform calculations. Ab-initio modeling of mechanical and thermal properties is very attractive, especially during the material development stage, when larger samples may be prohibitively expensive or impossible to fabricate. Modeling is also useful when bigger samples would be prohibitively expensive or impractical. Thermostructural composites made of 2.5D preforms are easy to manufacture in relation to 3D preforms. Besides, 2.5D preforms are also resistant to thermo cycling and have high resistance to crack propagation in relation to ply stacked composites such as unidirectional (1D and bidirectional (2D structures. The calculations were performed by setting an overall carbon fiber volume fraction at 40, 45 and 50 for a 2D stacked composite, and volume fraction in Z-direction of 2, 4 and 6.

  9. Curing kinetics and thermomechanical properties of latent epoxy/carbon fiber composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalle Vacche, S.; Michaud, V.; Demierre, M.; Bourban, P.-E.; Månson, J.-A. E.

    2016-07-01

    In this work, resins based on diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) epoxy and a latent hardener, dicyandiamide (DICY), as well as carbon fiber (CF) composites based on them, were prepared with three commercial accelerators: a methylene bis (phenyl dimethyl urea), a cycloaliphatic substituted urea, and a modified polyamine. The curing kinetics of the three DGEBA/DICY/accelerator systems were investigated by chemorheology and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), in isothermal and over temperature change conditions. Differences in the reaction onset temperature, and in the glass transition temperature (Tg) were highlighted. For curing of thick resin samples, a slow curing cycle at the lowest possible temperature was used, followed by high temperature (160 - 180 °C) post-curing. Indeed, fast curing at higher temperatures caused the formation of hot spots and led to local burning of the samples. The obtained thermomechanical properties, assessed by ultimate tensile testing and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) in single cantilever configuration, were all in the expected range for epoxy resins, with tensile moduli close to 3 GPa and Tg > 140 °C. The longterm stability of these resins at room temperature was verified by DSC. Composite samples were prepared by hand lay-up by manually impregnating four layers of 5-harness satin CF textile, and curing in vacuum bag. Impregnation quality and void content were assessed by optical microscopy. The flexural properties of the post-cured composites were assessed by three-point bending test at room temperature and showed no relevant differences, all composites having bending moduli of 45 - 50 GPa. Finally, composites cured with a faster high temperature curing cycle (20 min at 140 °C) were prepared with the DGEBA/DICY/ methylene bis (phenyl dimethyl urea) system, obtaining similar properties as with the slower curing cycle, showing that the prepreg system allowed more flexibility in terms of curing cycle than the bulk resin

  10. 碳纤维及其复合材料的应用%APPLICATION OF CARBON FIBER AND ITS COMPOSITES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜姗姗

    2013-01-01

    This paper introduces the characteristics of carbon fiber, the production technology and equipment, production status and application of composite materials in various fields. It also points out the problems existing in the development of carbon fiber in China, the market demand and development trend of carbon fiber in our country in the future.%介绍了碳纤维的特性、生产技术与装备、生产现状及其复合材料的多领域应用。指出了我国碳纤维发展中存在的问题,及未来我国碳纤维的市场需求和发展方向。

  11. Acoustic characterization of void distributions across carbon-fiber composite layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayong, Rostand B.; Smith, Robert A.; Pinfield, Valerie J.

    2016-02-01

    Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) composites are often used as aircraft structural components, mostly due to their superior mechanical properties. In order to improve the efficiency of these structures, it is important to detect and characterize any defects occurring during the manufacturing process, removing the need to mitigate the risk of defects through increased thicknesses of structure. Such defects include porosity, which is well-known to reduce the mechanical performance of composite structures, particularly the inter-laminar shear strength. Previous work by the authors has considered the determination of porosity distributions in a fiber-metal laminate structure [1]. This paper investigates the use of wave-propagation modeling to invert the ultrasonic response and characterize the void distribution within the plies of a CFRP structure. Finite Element (FE) simulations are used to simulate the ultrasonic response of a porous composite laminate to a typical transducer signal. This simulated response is then applied as input data to an inversion method to calculate the distribution of porosity across the layers. The inversion method is a multi-dimensional optimization utilizing an analytical model based on a normal-incidence plane-wave recursive method and appropriate mixture rules to estimate the acoustical properties of the structure, including the effects of plies and porosity. The effect of porosity is defined through an effective wave-number obtained from a scattering model description. Although a single-scattering approach is applied in this initial study, the limitations of the method in terms of the considered porous layer, percentage porosity and void radius are discussed in relation to single- and multiple-scattering methods. A comparison between the properties of the modeled structure and the void distribution obtained from the inversion is discussed. This work supports the general study of the use of ultrasound methods with inversion to

  12. Dynamic tensile behavior of two-dimensional carbon fiber reinforced silicon carbide matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: The dynamic tensile behavior of 2D C/SiC composites was experimentally investigated by means of SHTB. Both the fracture surface and bundle fracture surfaces of composites were observed. The strain rate sensitivity of in-bundle interface was concluded as the dominant contributor to the strain rate sensitivity of the tensile strength. Highlights: → The tensile strength increases with strain rate. → The tensile failure strain remains independent of strain rate. → Macro-structural morphology reveals rough fracture surface under dynamic loading. → SEM morphology reveals integrated bundle pull-out under dynamic loading. → Strain rate sensitivity of in-bundle interface leads to that of the tensile strength. - Abstract: An investigation has been undertaken to determine the dynamic and quasi-static tensile behavior of two-dimensional carbon fiber reinforced silicon carbide matrix (2D-C/SiC) composites by means of the split Hopkinson tension bar and an electronic universal test machine respectively. The results indicate that the tensile strength of 2D C/SiC composites is increased at high strain rate. Furthermore, coated specimens show not only a 15% improvement in tensile strength but heightened strain rate sensitivity compared with uncoated ones. It is also shown that the tensile failure strain is strain rate insensitive and remains around 0.4%. Optical macrograph of failed specimens under dynamic loading revealed jagged fracture surfaces characterized by delamination and crack deviation, together with obvious fiber pull-out/splitting, in contrast with the smooth fracture surfaces under quasi-static loading. Scanning electron microscopy micrograph of fracture surface under dynamic loading clearly displayed integrated bundle pull-out which implies suppressed in-bundle debonding and enhanced in-bundle interfacial strengthening, in contrast with extensive in-bundle debonding under quasi-static loading. Thus we conclude that, with 2D C

  13. Experimental Results in Support of Simulating Progressive Crush in Carbon-Fiber Textile Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeTeresa, S J; Allison, L M; Cunningham, B J; Freeman, DC; Saculla, M D; Sanchez, R J; Winchester, S W

    2001-04-02

    This report summarizes the findings of an experimental program conducted to support the modeling of the crush behavior of triaxial braid carbon fiber composites. The matrix material as well as braided panels and tubes were characterized in order to determine material properties, to assess failure modes, and to provide a test bed for new analytical and numerical tools developed specifically for braided composites. The matrix material selected by the ACC was an epoxy vinyl ester (Ashland Hetron 922). Tensile tests were used to compare two formulations-one used by the ACC and one recommended by the resin supplier. The latter was a faster reacting system and gelled in one-third the time of the ACC formulation. Both formulations had an average elongation at failure that was only half of the resin supplier's reported value. Only one specimen of each type came close to the reported elongation value and it was shown that failure invariably initiated at both surface and internal defects. Overall, the tensile properties of the two formulations were nearly identical, but those of the ACC system were more consistent. The properties of the ACC matrix formulation were measured in tension, shear, and compression and the average properties obtained in these tests are summarized.

  14. Extinction characterization of soot produced by laser ablating carbon fiber composite materials in air flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weiping; Ma, Zhiliang; Zhang, Zhenrong; Zhou, Menglian; Wei, Chenghua

    2015-05-01

    In order to research the dynamic process of energy coupling between an incident laser and a carbon fiber/epoxy resin composite material, an extinction characterization analysis of soot, which is produced by laser ablating and located in an air flow that is tangential to the surface of the composite material, is carried out. By the theory analyses, a relationship of mass extinction coefficient and extinction cross section of the soot is derived. It is obtained that the mass extinction coefficients of soot aggregates are the same as those of the primary particles when they contain only a few primary particles. This conclusion is significant when the soot is located in an air flow field, where the generations of the big soot aggregates are suppressed. A verification experiment is designed. The experiment employs Laser Induced Incandescence technology and laser extinction method for the soot synchronization diagnosis. It can derive a temporal curve of the mass extinction coefficient from the soot concentration and laser transmittance. The experiment results show that the mass extinction coefficient becomes smaller when the air flow velocity is higher. The reason is due to the decrease of the scatter effects of the soot particles. The experiment results agree with the theory analysis conclusion.

  15. Processing and Damage Tolerance of Continuous Carbon Fiber Composites Containing Puncture Self-Healing Thermoplastic Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimsley, Brian W.; Gordon, Keith L.; Czabaj, Michael W.; Cano, Roberto J.; Siochi, Emilie J.

    2012-01-01

    Research at NASA Langley Research Center (NASA LaRC) has identified several commercially available thermoplastic polymers that self-heal after ballistic impact and through-penetration. One of these resins, polybutadiene graft copolymer (PB(sub g)), was processed with unsized IM7 carbon fibers to fabricate reinforced composite material for further evaluation. Temperature dependent characteristics, such as the degradation point, glass transition (T(sub g)), and viscosity of the PBg polymer were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and dynamic parallel plate rheology. The PBg resin was processed into approximately equal to 22.0 cm wide unidirectional prepreg tape in the NASA LaRC Advanced Composites Processing Research Laboratory. Data from polymer thermal characterization guided the determination of a processing cycle used to fabricate quasi-isotropic 32-ply laminate panels in various dimensions up to 30.5cm x 30.5cm in a vacuum press. The consolidation quality of these panels was analyzed by optical microscopy and acid digestion. The process cycle was further optimized based on these results and quasi-isotropic, [45/0/-45/90]4S, 15.24cm x 15.24cm laminate panels were fabricated for mechanical property characterization. The compression strength after impact (CAI) of the IM7/pBG composites was measured both before and after an elevated temperature and pressure healing cycle. The results of the processing development effort of this composite material as well as the results of the mechanical property characterization are presented in this paper.

  16. Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2002-09-01

    Fiber-reinforced ceramic composites demonstrate the high-temperature stability of ceramics--with an increased fracture toughness resulting from the fiber reinforcement of the composite. The material optimization performed under the continuous fiber ceramic composites (CFCC) included a series of systematic optimizations. The overall goals were to define the processing window, to increase the robustinous of the process, to increase process yield while reducing costs, and to define the complexity of parts that could be fabricated.

  17. A novel carbon fiber based porous carbon monolith

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burchell, T.D.; Klett, J.W.; Weaver, C.E.

    1995-06-01

    A novel porous carbon material based on carbon fibers has been developed. The material, when activated, develops a significant micro- or mesopore volume dependent upon the carbon fiber type utilized (isotropic pitch or polyacrylonitrile). The materials will find applications in the field of fluid separations or as a catalyst support. Here, the manufacture and characterization of our porous carbon monoliths are described. A novel adsorbent carbon composite material has been developed comprising carbon fibers and a binder. The material, called carbon fiber composite molecular sieve (CFCMS), was developed through a joint research program between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the University of Kentucky, Center for Applied Energy Research (UKCAER).

  18. An electrical-heating and self-sensing shape memory polymer composite incorporated with carbon fiber felt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Xiaobo; Liu, Liwu; Liu, Yanju; Leng, Jinsong

    2016-03-01

    Shape memory polymers (SMPs) have the ability to adjust their stiffness, lock a temporary shape, and recover the permanent shape upon imposing an appropriate stimulus. They have found their way into the field of morphing structures. The electrically Joule resistive heating of the conductive composite can be a desirable stimulus to activate the shape memory effect of SMPs without external heating equipment. Electro-induced SMP composites incorporated with carbon fiber felt (CFF) were explored in this work. The CFF is an excellent conductive filler which can easily spread throughout the composite. It has a huge advantage in terms of low cost, simple manufacturing process, and uniform and tunable temperature distribution while heating. A continuous and compact conductive network made of carbon fibers and the overlap joints among them was observed from the microscopy images, and this network contributes to the high conductive properties of the CFF/SMP composites. The CFF/SMP composites can be electrical-heated rapidly and uniformly, and its’ shape recovery effect can be actuated by the electrical resistance Joule heating of the CFF without an external heater. The CFF/SMP composite get higher modulus and higher strength than the pure SMP without losing any strain recovery property. The high dependence of temperature and strain on the electrical resistance also make the composite a good self-sensing material. In general, the CFF/SMP composite shows great prospects as a potential material for the future morphing structures.

  19. Deformation behavior of FRP-metal composites locally reinforced with carbon fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholze, M.; Kolonko, A.; Lindner, T.; Lampke, T.; Helbig, F.

    2016-03-01

    This study investigates variations of hybrid laminates, consisting of one aluminum sheet and a unidirectional glass fiber (GF) reinforced polyamide 6 (PA6) basic structure with partial carbon fiber (CF) reinforcement. To create these heterogeneous FRP laminates, it is necessary to design and produce semi-finished textile-based products. Moreover, a warp knitting machine in conjunction with a warp thread offset unit was used to generate bionic inspired compounds. By the variation of stacking prior to the consolidation process of the hybrid laminate, an oriented CF reinforcement at the top and middle layer of the FRP is realized. In both cases the GFRP layer prevents contact between the aluminum and carbon fibers. In so doing, the high strength of carbon fibers can be transferred to the hybrid laminate in load directions with an active prevention of contact corrosion. The interface strength between thermoplastic and metal component was improved by a thermal spray coating on the aluminum sheet. Because of the high surface roughness and porosity, mechanical interlock was used to provide high interface strength without bonding agents between both components. The resulting mechanical properties of the hybrid laminates are evaluated by three point bending tests in different load directions. The effect of local fiber orientation and layer positioning on failure and deformation mechanism is additionally investigated by digital image correlation (DIC).

  20. Investigation of the properties of unidirectional fiber assemblies of single walled carbon nanotube-polyvinyl alcohol composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razal, Joselito M.

    Carbon nanotubes are difficult to process and this lack of convenient processibility has restricted their use for composite applications. High intensity sonication in surfactant solution has been the most common process used for nanotube exfoliation. Here we utilize our previously reported method to produce continuous SWNT composite fibers having mechanical properties that compare very favorably to recognized man-made or natural so-called "super" fibers such as Kevlar and spider silk. The process involved spinning an exfoliated dispersion of nanotubes into a bath of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). We further improved our spinning method by using a spinning solution enriched with individual tubes we obtained by ultracentrifugation. The exfoliated state of SWNTs initially present in the spinning solution is preserved in our composite fiber assemblies as monitored using various spectroscopic and microscopic techniques. More importantly, these modifications allowed us to control the final composition and morphology of the assemblies so that the effects of relative concentration and degree of crystallinity on mechanical strength could be investigated. While the interaction between the SWNTs is strictly non-covalent, we find that increasing the accessible surface area of the nanotubes by de-bundling maximizes stress transfer to the polymer matrix, and thus dramatically enhances composite reinforcement. We also correlated the total nanotube surface area with the degree of crystalline domains together with the effects of post-treatment processing. Without employing any fiber treatment, we demonstrated that crystallinity linearly increased with effective nanotube surface area and showed slight improvements in mechanical properties. Moreover, after post-spinning treatments, crystallinity and tensile strength are further increased by factors of 21--40% and 232--437%,respectively. Mechanical drawing was the dominant factor in enhancement of mechanical properties, and is believed to

  1. Carbon fiber-reinforced cyanate ester/nano-ZrW2O8 composites with tailored thermal expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badrinarayanan, Prashanth; Rogalski, Mark K; Kessler, Michael R

    2012-02-01

    Fiber-reinforced composites are widely used in the design and fabrication of a variety of high performance aerospace components. The mismatch in coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) between the high CTE polymer matrix and low CTE fiber reinforcements in such composite systems can lead to dimensional instability and deterioration of material lifetimes due to development of residual thermal stresses. The magnitude of thermally induced residual stresses in fiber-reinforced composite systems can be minimized by replacement of conventional polymer matrices with a low CTE, polymer nanocomposite matrix. Zirconium tungstate (ZrW(2)O(8)) is a unique ceramic material that exhibits isotropic negative thermal expansion and has excellent potential as a filler for development of low CTE polymer nanocomposites. In this paper, we report the fabrication and thermal characterization of novel, multiscale, macro-nano hybrid composite laminates comprising bisphenol E cyanate ester (BECy)/ZrW(2)O(8) nanocomposite matrices reinforced with unidirectional carbon fibers. The results reveal that incorporation of nanoparticles facilitates a reduction in CTE of the composite systems, which in turn results in a reduction in panel warpage and curvature after the cure because of mitigation of thermally induced residual stresses.

  2. Characterization of unidirectional carbon fiber reinforced polyamide-6 thermoplastic composite under longitudinal compression loading at high strain rate

    OpenAIRE

    Ploeckl Marina; Kuhn Peter; Koerber Hannes

    2015-01-01

    In the presented work, an experimental investigation has been performed to characterize the strain rate dependency of unidirectional carbon fiber reinforced polyamide-6 composite for longitudinal compression loading. An end-loaded compression specimen geometry, suitable for contactless optical strain measurement via digital image correlation and dynamic loading in a split-Hopkinson pressure bar, was developed. For the dynamic experiments at a constant strain rate of 100 s−1 a modified version...

  3. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY ON PEK-C MODIFIEDEPOXIES AND THE CARBON FIBER COMPOSITES FOR AEROSPACE APPLICATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Epoxy (EP) resins have been widely used as traditional materials in aerospace applications due to their relatively high stiffness and strength, good thermal stability, excellent adhesion, and good processabilities, particularly because that they have been toughened by incorporating rubber particles and thermoplastic (TP) component into the resins to form multi-component systems[1~5]. Compared with rubber modifiers, thermoplastics can improve the epoxy toughness without sacrificing the thermal stabilities of epoxy resins[6,7]. Thermoplastics modifiers used for this purpose have usually a high glass transition temperature, good thermal stability, and a low propensity to moisture. The toughening structure and thus the mechanical properties of these thermoset/thermoplastic binary systems are generally governed by a complicated spinodal decomposition process induced by crosslinking reaction during curing process of epoxies, and the following growth mechanism of the dispersed particles[8]. Most investigations reported were conducted on model systems with thermoplastics such as PEI[9,10], PES[11], and PSF[12~14]  as modifier. In most cases, factors affecting the processabilities like tackiness and drapabilities of these binary resins impregnated prepregs have rarely been considered into account.  The present paper reports a new thermoplastic modifier polyetherketone-C (PEK-C) of Chinese development[15]. Different epoxies were modified with the thermoplastic to study the structure development under the aerospace practice relevant processing conditions. The PEK-C modified binary system was then used as matrix resin for carbon fiber composites. The structures and properties were studied by using microscopic, thermo-analytic, FTIR-spectral, and mechanical methods. Based on these results, a composite model was finally suggested to explain the toughening mechanism.

  4. Recent trend of carbon fiber technology from mesophase pitch. Part 3. Development of applications of new high performance fiber to advanced composite materials; Mesofesu picchi kei tanso sen`i. 3. Senshin fukugo zairyo eno atarashii yoto tenkai

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, K. [Nippon Steel Technoresearch Corp., Kanagawa (Japan); Kubomura, K. [Nippon Steel Corp., Tokyo (Japan). Advanced Materials and Technology Research Lab.; Sato, F. [Nippon Steel Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1995-03-08

    Carbon fiber has the various kinds including pitch-based fiber, PAN fiber, nylon fiber, whisker fiber and so on. Further even in the pitch based fiber, optically anisotropic pitch being the general purpose carbon fiber and the mesophase pitch as the high performance carbon fiber are different from each other in the basic fiber properties, so the proper use of utilizing the respective fibers profitably is important in the development of the application thereof. In this paper, the focus is put on the new high performance pitch-based carbon fiber. The present status as well as the characteristics of the composite product revolving around the resin of this fiber, and the possibility of trying the development of the application thereof as the advanced composite materials in the future are described. The conventional application of high performance pitch-based carbon fiber is mainly in the brake lining of aircraft and warplane, but recently the application thereof is developed to be used widely as the industrial materials including the transport materials in railway, automobile, aerospace, ship, etc.; the construction materials as CFRC, the industrial long light roll, golf shaft, light frame of automobile and so on. 50 refs., 7 figs., 10 tabs.

  5. Coating Carbon Fibers With Platinum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effinger, Michael R.; Duncan, Peter; Coupland, Duncan; Rigali, Mark J.

    2007-01-01

    A process for coating carbon fibers with platinum has been developed. The process may also be adaptable to coating carbon fibers with other noble and refractory metals, including rhenium and iridium. The coated carbon fibers would be used as ingredients of matrix/fiber composite materials that would resist oxidation at high temperatures. The metal coats would contribute to oxidation resistance by keeping atmospheric oxygen away from fibers when cracks form in the matrices. Other processes that have been used to coat carbon fibers with metals have significant disadvantages: Metal-vapor deposition processes yield coats that are nonuniform along both the lengths and the circumferences of the fibers. The electrical resistivities of carbon fibers are too high to be compatible with electrolytic processes. Metal/organic vapor deposition entails the use of expensive starting materials, it may be necessary to use a furnace, and the starting materials and/or materials generated in the process may be hazardous. The present process does not have these disadvantages. It yields uniform, nonporous coats and is relatively inexpensive. The process can be summarized as one of pretreatment followed by electroless deposition. The process consists of the following steps: The surfaces of the fiber are activated by deposition of palladium crystallites from a solution. The surface-activated fibers are immersed in a solution that contains platinum. A reducing agent is used to supply electrons to effect a chemical reduction in situ. The chemical reduction displaces the platinum from the solution. The displaced platinum becomes deposited on the fibers. Each platinum atom that has been deposited acts as a catalytic site for the deposition of another platinum atom. Hence, the deposition process can also be characterized as autocatalytic. The thickness of the deposited metal can be tailored via the duration of immersion and the chemical activity of the solution.

  6. Study on the laser irradiation effects on carbon fiber reinforced resin composite subjected to tangential gas flow loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Minsun; Jiang, Houman; Jiao, Luguang; Li, Junshen; Liu, Zejin

    2013-05-01

    The irradiation effects of 976nm continuous-wave laser on carbon fiber reinforced E-51 resin composite is studied experimentally, with a 0.4Ma tangential airflow or 0.4Ma tangential nitrogen gas flow on the target surface. In order to simulate the thermal response of fiber reinforced resin composite materials subjected to combined laser and tangential gas flow loading, a three-dimensional thermal response model of resin composite materials is developed. In the model, the thermal decomposition of resin is described by a multi-step model. The motion of the decomposition gas is assumed to be one-dimensional, for the case that the laser spot is significantly larger than the thickness of the sample. According the above assumption, the flow of the decomposition gas is considered in the three-dimensional model without introducing any mechanical quantities. The influences of the tangential gas flow, the outflow of the thermal decomposition gas and the ablation-including phase change ablation or oxidative ablation-of the surface material on the laser irradiation effects are included in the surface boundary conditions. The three-dimensional thermal response model is calculated numerically by use of the modified smooth particle hydrodynamics (MSPH) method which is coded with FORTRAN. The model is tested by experimentally measuring the temperature profiles during carbon fiber reinforced E-51 resin composite subjected to combined laser and tangential gas flow. The predicted temperature profiles are in good agreement with experimental temperatures obtained using thermocouples.

  7. Gel spinning of PVA composite fibers with high content of multi-walled carbon nanotubes and graphene oxide hybrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yizhe; Lai, Dengpan; Zou, Liming; Ling, Xinlong; Lu, Hongwei; Xu, Yongjing

    2015-07-01

    In this report, poly (vinyl alcohol) (PVA) composite fibers with high content of multi-walled carbon nanotubes and graphene oxide (MWCNTs-GO) hybrids were prepared by gel spinning, and were characterized by TGA, DSC, SEM, XL-2 yarn strength tester and electrical conductivity measurement. The total content of MWCNTs-GO hybrids in the PVA composite fibers, which is up to 25 wt%, was confirmed by TGA analysis. The DSC measurement shows that the melting and crystallization peaks decreased after the addition of nano-fillers. This is due to the reason that the motion of PVA chains is completely confined by strong hydrogen bonding interaction between PVA and nano-fillers. After the addtion of GO, the dispersibility of MWCNTs in composite fibers improved slightly. And the tensile strength and Young's modulus increased by 38% and 67%, respectively. This is caused by the increased hydrogen bonding interaction and synergistic effect through hybridization of MWCNTs and GO. More significantly, the electrical conductivity of PVA/MWCNTs/GO composite fibers enhanced by three orders of magnitude with the addition of GO.

  8. 美国HEXEL公司的碳纤维及其复合材料%CARBON FIBERS AND COMPOSITE MATERIALS IN HEXEL CORPORATION,USA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵稼祥

    2001-01-01

    简要介绍美国第45届材料与加工工程促进学会年会与展览会概况及美国HEXEL公司碳纤维及其复合材料的现况与发展。%At the 45th SAMPE Conference and Exhibition there Were 8 famous carbon fibers corporations and incorporation’s in the world exhibited their carbon fibers & composites products. In this paper,present status & development of carbon fibers & composite materials in HEXEL Corporation,USA were briefly presented.

  9. Low-temperature SCR of NOx with NH3 over activated carbon fiber composite-supported metal oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In previous works, the authors were involved in the preparation and optimization of Nomex-based activated carbon fibers (ACFs) monoliths and their use as catalytic supports of manganese oxides for the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NOx with NH3 at low temperature. Thus, a low density monolith made of carbonized Nomex rejects was fabricated and submitted to different surface conditioning treatments in order to maximize the dispersion and loading of manganese oxides which were highly active in the SCR process. In order to complete the study, in this work different carbon fibers were used to fabricate the monolithic support, and the catalytic activity of the derived manganese oxide-based catalysts was analyzed and compared to that of the standard Nomex-supported catalyst. These fibers were coal Pitch-, Rayon-, PAN-, and phenolic Resin-based carbon fibers. Additionally, catalysts based on other metal oxides (nickel, chromium, vanadium and iron) were prepared via equilibrium adsorption (EA) and pore volume impregnation (PVI) of the strategically modified supports, in an attempt to surpass the catalytic performance of the already highly active manganese oxide-based catalysts and to tackle one of the main drawbacks for the utilization of these catalysts under practical conditions; the SO2 deactivation. For all the prepared catalysts the following parameters were evaluated at a standard reaction temperature of 150C: catalytic activity, selectivity, extent of support gasification, H2O inhibition and SO2 deactivation. Additionally temperature programmed desorption (TPD) of NO was conducted on specific samples in order to analyze the different adsorption modes of NO on the catalyst surface. All this research procedure has eventually derived in the selection of a catalyst (Nomex rejects-based activated carbon fiber composite (ACFC) supported iron oxides) which constitutes a compromise between high catalytic performance and moderate SO2 deactivation

  10. Determination of thermal diffusivity of carbon/epoxy composites with different fiber content using transient thermography

    OpenAIRE

    G. Wróbel; Z. Rdzawski; G. Muzia; S. Pawlak

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of present study was to determine the thermal diffusivity of carbon fibre/epoxy composites with different fibre content using flash method.Design/methodology/approach: The experiments have been performed using transient thermography to obtain the thermograms for carbon/epoxy specimens with different carbon fibre content. From recorded thermograms the thermal diffusivity values were determined for two different heating conditions to verify the effect of heating conditions ...

  11. Formation of carbon coating on SiC fiber for two-dimensional SiCf/SiC composites by electrophoretic deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon coating was formed on SiC fibers in the cloth by electrophoretic deposition method using commercial colloidal graphite suspension, and mechanical properties of SiCf/SiC composites fabricated by sheet stacking method and hot-pressing were investigated. Furthermore, the effectiveness of carbon coating on SiC fiber for SiCf/SiC composite was investigated. Graphite particles partially existed on the SiC fibers after dip-coating or vacuum infiltration, and carbon coating was non-uniform on SiC fibers. In the case of electrophoretic deposition, the surface of SiC fibers was wholly coated with flaky graphite particles, and graphite particles were infiltrated into fiber bundle by electrical force, and relatively homogeneous carbon coating was also formed on not only SiC fibers at the surface of the bundle but also fibers at the center of the bundle. This homogeneous carbon coating provided the optimum interface between fiber and the matrix, and promoted large amount of fiber pullout during fracture.

  12. Digitally focused array ultrasonic testing technique for carbon fiber composite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salchak, Y.; Zhvyrblya, V.; Sednev, D.; Lider, A.

    2016-06-01

    Composite fiber reinforced polymers are highly promising structures. At present, they are widely used in different areas such as aeronautics and nuclear industries. There is a great number of advantages of composite structures such as design flexibility, low cost per cubic inch, resistance to corrosion, lower material costs, lighter weight and improved productivity. However, composites degradation may be caused by different mechanisms such as overload, impact, overheating, creep and fatigue. Comparing to inspection of other materials some unique consideration is required for testing and analysis. Ultrasound testing is the most common method for inspection of composite structures. Digitally Focused Array Technology is considered as novel approach which enables fast and effective quantitative automatic testing. In this study new methodology of quality assurance of composite structure components based on DFA is performed.

  13. Fatigue Hysteresis of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Ceramic-Matrix Composites at Room and Elevated Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Longbiao

    2016-02-01

    When the fiber-reinforced ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs) are first loading to fatigue peak stress, matrix multicracking and fiber/matrix interface debonding occur. Under fatigue loading, the stress-strain hysteresis loops appear as fiber slipping relative to matrix in the interface debonded region upon unloading/reloading. Due to interface wear at room temperature or interface oxidation at elevated temperature, the interface shear stress degredes with increase of the number of applied cycles, leading to the evolution of the shape, location and area of stress-strain hysteresis loops. The evolution characteristics of fatigue hysteresis loss energy in different types of fiber-reinforced CMCs, i.e., unidirectional, cross-ply, 2D and 2.5D woven, have been investigated. The relationships between the fatigue hysteresis loss energy, stress-strain hysteresis loops, interface frictional slip, interface shear stress and interface radial thermal residual stress, matrix stochastic cracking and fatigue peak stress of fiber-reinforced CMCs have been established.

  14. Finite Element Analysis of Progressive Failure and Strain Localization of Carbon Fiber/Epoxy Composite Laminates by ABAQUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, P. F.; Yang, Y. H.; Gu, Z. P.; Zheng, J. Y.

    2015-12-01

    Interaction mechanism between the intralaminar damage and interlaminar delamination of composite laminates is always a challenging issue. It is important to consider the progressive failure and strain softening behaviors simultaneously during the damage modeling and numerical simulation of composites using FEA. This paper performs three-dimensional finite element analysis of the progressive failure and strain localization of composites using FEA. An intralaminar progressive failure model based on the strain components is proposed and the nonlinear cohesive model is used to predict the delamination growth. In particular, the nonlocal integral theory which introduces a length scale into the governing equations is used to regularize the strain localization problems of composite structures. Special finite element codes are developed using ABAQUS to predict the intralaminar and interlaminar damage evolution of composites simultaneously. The carbon fiber/epoxy composite laminates with a central hole demonstrates the developed theoretical models and numerical algorithm by discussing the effects of the mesh sizes and layups patterns. It is shown the strain localization problem can be well solved in the progressive failure analysis of composites when the energy dissipation due to the damage of the fiber, matrix and interface occurs at a relatively wide area.

  15. Microstructure of carbon fiber preform and distribution of pyrolytic carbon by chemical vapor infiltration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈建勋; 黄伯云

    2004-01-01

    The carbon/carbon composites were made by chemical vapor infiltration(CVI) with needled felt preform. The distribution of the pyrolytic carbon in the carbon fiber preform was studied by polarized light microscope(PLM) and scanning electronic microscope(SEM). The experimental results indicate that the amount of pyrolytic carbon deposited on the surface of chopped carbon fiber is more than that on the surface of long carbon fiber. The reason is the different porosity between the layer of chopped carbon fiber and long carbon fiber. The carbon precursor gas which passes through the part of chopped carbon fibers decomposes and deposits on the surface of chopped carbon fiber. The pyrolytic carbon on the surface of long carbon fibers is produced by the carbon precursor gas diffusing from the chopped fiber and the Z-d fiber. Uniform pore distribution and porosity in preform are necessary for producing C/C composites with high properties.

  16. Scalable Fabrication of Natural-Fiber Reinforced Composites with Electromagnetic Interference Shielding Properties by Incorporating Powdered Activated Carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changlei Xia

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Kenaf fiber—polyester composites incorporated with powdered activated carbon (PAC were prepared using the vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM process. The product demonstrates the electromagnetic interference (EMI shielding function. The kenaf fibers were retted in a pressured reactor to remove the lignin and extractives in the fiber. The PAC was loaded into the freshly retted fibers in water. The PAC loading effectiveness was determined using the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET specific surface area analysis. A higher BET value was obtained with a higher PAC loading. The transmission energies of the composites were measured by exposing the samples to the irradiation of electromagnetic waves with a variable frequency from 8 GHz to 12 GHz. As the PAC content increased from 0% to 10.0%, 20.5% and 28.9%, the EMI shielding effectiveness increased from 41.4% to 76.0%, 87.9% and 93.0%, respectively. Additionally, the EMI absorption increased from 21.2% to 31.7%, 44.7% and 64.0%, respectively. The ratio of EMI absorption/shielding of the composite at 28.9% of PAC loading was increased significantly by 37.1% as compared with the control sample. It was indicated that the incorporation of PAC into the composites was very effective for absorbing electromagnetic waves, which resulted in a decrease in secondary electromagnetic pollution.

  17. Characterization of Potential Exposures to Nanoparticles and Fibers during Manufacturing and Recycling of Carbon Nanotube Reinforced Polypropylene Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonruksa, Pongsit; Bello, Dhimiter; Zhang, Jinde; Isaacs, Jacqueline A; Mead, Joey L; Woskie, Susan R

    2016-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) polymer composites are widely used as raw materials in multiple industries because of their excellent properties. This expansion, however, is accompanied by realistic concerns over potential release of CNTs and associated nanoparticles during the manufacturing, recycling, use, and disposal of CNT composite products. Such data continue to be limited, especially with regards to post-processing of CNT-enabled products, recycling and handling of nanowaste, and end-of-life disposal. This study investigated for the first time airborne nanoparticle and fibers exposures during injection molding and recycling of CNT polypropylene composites (CNT-PP) relative to that of PP. Exposure characterization focused on source emissions during loading, melting, molding, grinding, and recycling of scrap material over 20 cycles and included real-time characterization of total particle number concentration and size distribution, nanoparticle and fiber morphology, and fiber concentrations near the operator. Total airborne nanoparticle concentration emitted during loading, melting, molding, and grinding of CNT-PP had geometric mean ranging from 1.2 × 10(3) to 4.3 × 10(5) particles cm(-3), with the highest exposures being up to 2.9 and 300.7 times above the background for injection molding and grinding, respectively. Most of these emissions were similar to PP synthesis. Melting and molding of CNT-PP and PP produced exclusively nanoparticles. Grinding of CNT-PP but not PP generated larger particles with encapsulated CNTs, particles with CNT extrusions, and respirable fiber (up to 0.2 fibers cm(-3)). No free CNTs were found in any of the processes. The number of recycling runs had no significant impact on exposures. Further research into the chemical composition of the emitted nanoparticles is warranted. In the meanwhile, exposure controls should be instituted during processing and recycling of CNT-PP.

  18. Characterization of Potential Exposures to Nanoparticles and Fibers during Manufacturing and Recycling of Carbon Nanotube Reinforced Polypropylene Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonruksa, Pongsit; Bello, Dhimiter; Zhang, Jinde; Isaacs, Jacqueline A; Mead, Joey L; Woskie, Susan R

    2016-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) polymer composites are widely used as raw materials in multiple industries because of their excellent properties. This expansion, however, is accompanied by realistic concerns over potential release of CNTs and associated nanoparticles during the manufacturing, recycling, use, and disposal of CNT composite products. Such data continue to be limited, especially with regards to post-processing of CNT-enabled products, recycling and handling of nanowaste, and end-of-life disposal. This study investigated for the first time airborne nanoparticle and fibers exposures during injection molding and recycling of CNT polypropylene composites (CNT-PP) relative to that of PP. Exposure characterization focused on source emissions during loading, melting, molding, grinding, and recycling of scrap material over 20 cycles and included real-time characterization of total particle number concentration and size distribution, nanoparticle and fiber morphology, and fiber concentrations near the operator. Total airborne nanoparticle concentration emitted during loading, melting, molding, and grinding of CNT-PP had geometric mean ranging from 1.2 × 10(3) to 4.3 × 10(5) particles cm(-3), with the highest exposures being up to 2.9 and 300.7 times above the background for injection molding and grinding, respectively. Most of these emissions were similar to PP synthesis. Melting and molding of CNT-PP and PP produced exclusively nanoparticles. Grinding of CNT-PP but not PP generated larger particles with encapsulated CNTs, particles with CNT extrusions, and respirable fiber (up to 0.2 fibers cm(-3)). No free CNTs were found in any of the processes. The number of recycling runs had no significant impact on exposures. Further research into the chemical composition of the emitted nanoparticles is warranted. In the meanwhile, exposure controls should be instituted during processing and recycling of CNT-PP. PMID:26447230

  19. Micromechanics model for predicting anisotropic electrical conductivity of carbon fiber composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider, Mohammad Faisal; Haider, Md. Mushfique; Yasmeen, Farzana

    2016-07-01

    Heterogeneous materials, such as composites consist of clearly distinguishable constituents (or phases) that show different electrical properties. Multifunctional composites have anisotropic electrical properties that can be tailored for a particular application. The effective anisotropic electrical conductivity of composites is strongly affected by many parameters including volume fractions, distributions, and orientations of constituents. Given the electrical properties of the constituents, one important goal of micromechanics of materials consists of predicting electrical response of the heterogeneous material on the basis of the geometries and properties of the individual phases, a task known as homogenization. The benefit of homogenization is that the behavior of a heterogeneous material can be determined without resorting or testing it. Furthermore, continuum micromechanics can predict the full multi-axial properties and responses of inhomogeneous materials, which are anisotropic in nature. Effective electrical conductivity estimation is performed by using classical micromechanics techniques (composite cylinder assemblage method) that investigates the effect of the fiber/matrix electrical properties and their volume fractions on the micro scale composite response. The composite cylinder assemblage method (CCM) is an analytical theory that is based on the assumption that composites are in a state of periodic structure. The CCM was developed to extend capabilities variable fiber shape/array availability with same volume fraction, interphase analysis, etc. The CCM is a continuum-based micromechanics model that provides closed form expressions for upper level length scales such as macro-scale composite responses in terms of the properties, shapes, orientations and constituent distributions at lower length levels such as the micro-scale.

  20. UV-Assisted 3D Printing of Glass and Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Dual-Cure Polymer Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Invernizzi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Glass (GFR and carbon fiber-reinforced (CFR dual-cure polymer composites fabricated by UV-assisted three-dimensional (UV-3D printing are presented. The resin material combines an acrylic-based photocurable resin with a low temperature (140 °C thermally-curable resin system based on bisphenol A diglycidyl ether as base component, an aliphatic anhydride (hexahydro-4-methylphthalic anhydride as hardener and (2,4,6,-tris(dimethylaminomethylphenol as catalyst. A thorough rheological characterization of these formulations allowed us to define their 3D printability window. UV-3D printed macrostructures were successfully demonstrated, giving a clear indication of their potential use in real-life structural applications. Differential scanning calorimetry and dynamic mechanical analysis highlighted the good thermal stability and mechanical properties of the printed parts. In addition, uniaxial tensile tests were used to assess the fiber reinforcing effect on the UV-3D printed objects. Finally, an initial study was conducted on the use of a sizing treatment on carbon fibers to improve the fiber/matrix interfacial adhesion, giving preliminary indications on the potential of this approach to improve the mechanical properties of the 3D printed CFR components.

  1. Thermoplastic coating of carbon fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edie, D. D.; Lickfield, G. C.; Allen, L. E.; Mccollum, J. R.

    1989-01-01

    A continuous powder coating system was developed for coating carbon fiber with LaRC-TPI (Langley Research Center-Thermoplastic Polyimide), a high-temperature thermoplastic polymide invented by NASA-Langley. The coating line developed used a pneumatic fiber spreader to separate the individual fibers. The polymer was applied within a recirculating powder coating chamber then melted using a combination of direct electrical resistance and convective heating to make it adhere to the fiber tow. The tension and speed of the line were controlled with a dancer arm and an electrically driven fiber wind-up and wind-off. The effects of heating during the coating process on the flexibility of the prepreg produced were investigated. The uniformity with which the fiber tow could be coated with polymer also was examined. Composite specimens were fabricated from the prepreg and tested to determine optimum process conditions. The study showed that a very uniform and flexible prepeg with up to 50 percent by volume polymer could be produced with this powder coating system. The coating line minimized powder loss and produced prepeg in lengths of up to 300 m. The fiber spreading was found to have a major effect on the coating uniformity and flexibility. Though test results showed low composite tensile strengths, analysis of fracture surfaces under scanning electron microscope indicated that fiber/matrix adhesion was adequate.

  2. Pyrolysis as a way to close a CFRC life cycle: Carbon fibers recovery and their use as feedstock for a new composite production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorgini, Loris; Benelli, Tiziana; Mazzocchetti, Laura; Leonardi, Chiara; Zattini, Giorgio; Minak, Giangiacomo; Dolcini, Enrico; Tosi, Cristian; Montanari, Ivan

    2014-05-01

    Pyrolysis is shown to be an efficient method for recycling carbon fiber composites in the form of both uncured prepregs scraps or as cured end-of-life objects. The pyrolytic process leads to different products in three physical states of matter. The gaseous fraction, called syngas, can be used as energy feedstock in the process itself. The oil fraction can be used as fuel or chemical feedstock. The solid residue contains substantially unharmed carbon fibers that can be isolated and recovered for the production of new composite materials, thus closing the life cycle of the composite in a "cradle to cradle" approach. All the pyrolysis outputs were thoroughly analyzed and characterized in terms of composition for oil and gas fraction and surface characteristics of the fibers. In particular, it is of paramount importance to correlate the aspect and properties of the fibers obtained with different composite feedstock and operational conditions, that can be significantly different, with the reinforcing performance in the newly produced Recycled Carbon Fibers Reinforced Polymers. Present results have been obtained on a pyrolysis pilot plant that offers the possibility of treating up to 70kg of materials, thus leading to a significant amount of products to be tested in the further composites production, focused mainly on chopped carbon fiber reinforcement.

  3. Coating of Carbon Fiber with Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxane (POSS to Enhance Mechanical Properties and Durability of Carbon/Vinyl Ester Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mujib Khan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Our continuing quest to improve the performance of polymer composites under moist and saltwater environments has gained momentum in recent years with the reinforcement of inorganic nanoparticles into the polymer. The key to mitigate degradation of composites under such environments is to maintain the integrity of the fiber/matrix (F/M interface. In this study, the F/M interface of carbon/vinyl ester composites has been modified by coating the carbon fiber with polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS. POSS is a nanostructured inorganic-organic hybrid particle with a cubic structure having silicon atoms at the core and linked to oxygen atoms. The advantage of using POSS is that the silicon atoms can be linked to a substituent that can be almost any chemical group known in organic chemistry. Cubic silica cores are ‘hard particles’ and are about 0.53 nm in diameter. The peripheral organic unit is a sphere of about 1–3 nm in diameter. Further, cubic structure of POSS remains intact during the polymerization process and therefore with appropriate functional groups, if installed on the fiber surface, would provide a stable and strong F/M interface. Two POSS systems with two different functional groups; namely, octaisobutyl and trisilanolphenyl have been investigated. A set of chemical and mechanical procedures has been developed to coat carbon fibers with POSS, and to fabricate layered composites with vinyl ester resin. Interlaminar shear and low velocity impact tests have indicated around 17–38% improvement in mechanical properties with respect to control samples made without the POSS coating. Saltwater and hygrothermal tests at various environmental conditions have revealed that coating with POSS reduces water absorption by 20–30% and retains the composite properties.

  4. Fabrication and Properties of Carbon Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaosong Huang

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the research and development activities conducted over the past few decades on carbon fibers. The two most important precursors in the carbon fiber industry are polyacrylonitrile (PAN and mesophase pitch (MP. The structure and composition of the precursor affect the properties of the resultant carbon fibers significantly. Although the essential processes for carbon fiber production are similar, different precursors require different processing conditions in order to achieve improved performance. The research efforts on process optimization are discussed in this review. The review also attempts to cover the research on other precursor materials developed mainly for the purpose of cost reduction.

  5. Computational modeling of the electromagnetic characteristics of carbon fiber-reinforced polymer composites with different weave structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, A. M.; Douglas, J. F.; Garboczi, E. J.

    2014-02-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites (CFRPC) are of great interest in the aerospace and automotive industries due to their exceptional mechanical properties. Carbon fibers are typically woven and inter-laced perpendicularly in warps and wefts to form a carbon fabric that can be embedded in a binding matrix. The warps and wefts can be interlaced in different patterns called weaving structures. The primary weaving structures are the plain, twill, and satin weaves, which give different mechanical composite properties. The goal of this work is to computationally investigate the dependence of CFRPC microwave and terahertz electromagnetic characteristics on weave structure. These bands are good candidates for the Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) of CFRPC since their wavelengths are comparable to the main weave features. 3D full wave electromagnetic simulations of several different weave models have been performed using a finite element (FEM) simulator, which is able to accurately model the complex weave structure. The computational experiments demonstrate that the reflection of electromagnetic waves from CFRPC depend sensitively on weave structure. The reflection spectra calculated in this work can be used to identify the optimal frequencies for the NDE of each weave structure.

  6. Fabrication and characterization of Polymer laminate composites reinforced with bi-woven carbon fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.V.Sanjeev Kumar

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The present paper evaluate slaminatedcarbonbi-wove fibers Reinforced with vinyl ester composites. Vinyl ester was used as a matrix to prepare composites by in situ polymerization technique. Four planar layers were made simultaneously by keeping one over the other and each layer made sure to be weighed off by 15% which was maintained in all layers with different orientations. Pre-assumed Layer-1 is (50/5050%,0º; Layer-2 is (35/35/30 35% 0º, 35% +45º,30%,0;Layer-3is (25/50/25 25% 0º, 50%+45º,25-45º; and Layer-4is (25/25/25/25 (25% 0º, 25% +45º,25% -45º,25% 90º.The composite was prepared with the help of hand layup technique. Test ready specimens were tested with the help of shearing machine in accordance with ASTM Standards .It was observed that vinyl ester made good interface with parent fiber material. Flexural strength and Tensile strength have improved up to 3rd layer and decreased afterwards whereas Flexural modulus and Tensile modulus have linearly increased up to 4th layer. Thermal stability and Glass transition temperature have also been found to be satisfactory for all the laminated layers. Chemical resistance was good for the entire chemicals except sodium hydroxide.

  7. Cryogenic optical measurements of 12-segment-bonded carbon-fiber-reinforced silicon carbide composite mirror with support mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneda, Hidehiro; Nakagawa, Takao; Onaka, Takashi; Enya, Keigo; Makiuti, Sin'itirou; Takaki, Junji; Haruna, Masaki; Kume, Masami; Ozaki, Tsuyoshi

    2008-03-01

    A 720 mm diameter 12-segment-bonded carbon-fiber-reinforced silicon carbide (C/SiC) composite mirror has been fabricated and tested at cryogenic temperatures. Interferometric measurements show significant cryogenic deformation of the C/SiC composite mirror, which is well reproduced by a model analysis with measured properties of the bonded segments. It is concluded that the deformation is due mostly to variation in coefficients of thermal expansion among segments. In parallel, a 4-degree-of-freedom ball-bearing support mechanism has been developed for cryogenic applications. The C/SiC composite mirror was mounted on an aluminum base plate with the support mechanism and tested again. Cryogenic deformation of the mirror attributed to thermal contraction of the aluminum base plate via the support mechanism is highly reduced by the support, confirming that the newly developed support mechanism is promising for its future application to large-aperture cooled space telescopes.

  8. Effect of temperature on the compressive behavior of carbon fiber composite pyramidal truss cores sandwich panels with reinforced frames

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaodong Li; Linzhi Wu∗; Li Ma; Xiangqiao Yan

    2016-01-01

    This paper focuses on the effect of temperature on the out-of-plane compressive properties and failure mechanism of carbon fiber/epoxy composite pyramidal truss cores sandwich panels (CF/CPTSP). CF/CPTSP with novel reinforced frames are manufactured by the water jet cutting and interlocking assembly method in this paper. The theoretical analysis is presented to predict the out-of-plane compressive stiffness and strength of CF/CPTSP at different ambient temperatures. The tests of composite sandwich panels are per-formed throughout the temperature range from−90◦C to 180◦C. Good agreement is found between theo-retical predictions and experimental measurements. Experimental results indicate that the low tempera-ture increases the compressive stiffness and strength of CF/CPTSP. However, the high temperature causes the degradation of the compressive stiffness and strength. Meanwhile, the effects of temperature on the failure mode of composite sandwich panels are also observed.

  9. Transitions in Wear and Friction of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Copper Matrix Composite Sliding Against AISI-1045 Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The friction and wear properties of carbon fiber reinforced copper matrix composite in dry sliding against AISI-1045 steel was evaluated by a block-on-ring test machine. It was shown that the low frictional factor and wear rate of the composite block could be maintained when pressure or velocity was below a certain value. But when the pressure or velocity exceeded the critical value, the friction factor and wear rate tended to increase rapidly with pressure and sliding velocity. The morphologies, elemental compositions, and surface profile of worn composite surfaces at different wear stages were analyzed by means of scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectrometry, and profile-meter. It was found that low values of friction and wear were due to a thin solid film forming on the surface of the composite block which includes carbon and copper at a mild wear stage. The film could impede adhesion and provide some degree of self-lubrication. When the film included more metal elements and were damaged, severe wear happened, and the wear rate increased sharply. As a result, a transition diagram in friction and wear was constructed, which provided pressure and velocity conditions of change from mild wear and low friction to severe wear and high friction for the wear-resisting design.

  10. Mechanical analysis of carbon fiber reinforced shape memory polymer composite for self-deployable structure in space environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Seok Bin; Ahn, Yong San; Jang, Joon Hyeok; Kim, Jin-Gyun; Goo, Nam Seo; Yu, Woong-Ryeol

    2016-04-01

    Shape memory polymer (SMP) is one of smart polymers which exhibit shape memory effect upon external stimuli. Reinforcements as carbon fiber had been used for making shape memory polymer composite (CF-SMPC). This study investigated a possibility of designing self-deployable structures in harsh space condition using CF-SMPCs and analyzed their shape memory behaviors with constitutive equation model.CF-SMPCs were prepared using woven carbon fabrics and a thermoset epoxy based SMP to obtain their basic mechanical properties including actuation in harsh environment. The mechanical and shape memory properties of SMP and CF-SMPCs were characterized using dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) and universal tensile machine (UTM) with an environmental chamber. The mechanical properties such as flexural strength and tensile strength of SMP and CF-SMPC were measured with simple tensile/bending test and time dependent shape memory behavior was characterized with designed shape memory bending test. For mechanical analysis of CF-SMPCs, a 3D constitutive equation of SMP, which had been developed using multiplicative decomposition of the deformation gradient and shape memory strains, was used with material parameters determined from CF-SMPCs. Carbon fibers in composites reinforced tensile and flexural strength of SMP and acted as strong elastic springs in rheology based equation models. The actuation behavior of SMP matrix and CF-SMPCs was then simulated as 3D shape memory bending cases. Fiber bundle property was imbued with shell model for more precise analysis and it would be used for prediction of deploying behavior in self-deployable hinge structure.

  11. Development of high-speed reactive processing system for carbon fiber-reinforced polyamide-6 composite: In-situ anionic ring-opening polymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang-Woo; Seong, Dong Gi; Yi, Jin-Woo; Um, Moon-Kwang

    2016-05-01

    In order to manufacture carbon fiber-reinforced polyamide-6 (PA-6) composite, we optimized the reactive processing system. The in-situ anionic ring-opening polymerization of ɛ-caprolactam was utilized with proper catalyst and initiator for PA-6 matrix. The mechanical properties such as tensile strength, inter-laminar shear strength and compressive strength of the produced carbon fiber-reinforced PA-6 composite were measured, which were compared with the corresponding scanning electron microscope (SEM) images to investigate the polymer properties as well as the interfacial interaction between fiber and polymer matrix. Furthermore, kinetics of in-situ anionic ring-opening polymerization of ɛ-caprolactam will be discussed in the viewpoint of increasing manufacturing speed and interfacial bonding between PA-6 matrix and carbon fiber during polymerization.

  12. Carbon Fiber Composite Materials in Modern Day Automotive Production Lines – A Case Study

    OpenAIRE

    Petersson, Håkan; Motte, Damien; Bjärnemo, Robert

    2014-01-01

    New and innovative production equipment can be developed by introducing lightweight materials in modern day automotive industry production lines. The properties of these new materials are expected to result in improved ergonomics, energy savings, increased flexibility and more robust equipment, which in the end will result in enhanced productivity. Carbon composite materials are one such alternative that has excellent material properties. These properties are well documented, and the market f...

  13. Wear resistant composite structure of vitreous carbon containing convoluted fibers. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burton, R.G.; Burton, R.A.

    1996-05-28

    Energy Related Inventions Program Number 613 was a two year program to commercialize a unique new wear material, Metal Reinforced Carbon Composite, MRCC. The program was designed to manufacture sample components of MRCC for evaluation by potential users and manufacturers. As a result of the program Burton Technologies Inc. and Rotary Power International are forming a joint company to manufacture, market and license MRCC materials to a wide range of industries.

  14. Characterization of unidirectional carbon fiber reinforced polyamide-6 thermoplastic composite under longitudinal compression loading at high strain rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploeckl, Marina; Kuhn, Peter; Koerber, Hannes

    2015-09-01

    In the presented work, an experimental investigation has been performed to characterize the strain rate dependency of unidirectional carbon fiber reinforced polyamide-6 composite for longitudinal compression loading. An end-loaded compression specimen geometry, suitable for contactless optical strain measurement via digital image correlation and dynamic loading in a split-Hopkinson pressure bar, was developed. For the dynamic experiments at a constant strain rate of 100 s-1 a modified version of the Dynamic Compression Fixture, developed by Koerber and Camanho [Koerber and Camanho, Composites Part A, 42, 462-470, 2011] was used. The results were compared with quasi-static test results at a strain rate of 3 · 10-4 s-1 using the same specimen geometry. It was found that the longitudinal compressive strength increased by 61% compared to the strength value obtained from the quasi-static tests.

  15. Characterization of unidirectional carbon fiber reinforced polyamide-6 thermoplastic composite under longitudinal compression loading at high strain rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ploeckl Marina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the presented work, an experimental investigation has been performed to characterize the strain rate dependency of unidirectional carbon fiber reinforced polyamide-6 composite for longitudinal compression loading. An end-loaded compression specimen geometry, suitable for contactless optical strain measurement via digital image correlation and dynamic loading in a split-Hopkinson pressure bar, was developed. For the dynamic experiments at a constant strain rate of 100 s−1 a modified version of the Dynamic Compression Fixture, developed by Koerber and Camanho [Koerber and Camanho, Composites Part A, 42, 462–470, 2011] was used. The results were compared with quasi-static test results at a strain rate of 3 · 10−4 s−1 using the same specimen geometry. It was found that the longitudinal compressive strength increased by 61% compared to the strength value obtained from the quasi-static tests.

  16. Process for preparing composite articles from composite fiber blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Paul E. (Inventor); Chung, Tai-Shung (Inventor); Ying, Lincoln (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A composite article is prepared by forming a continuous tow of continuous carbon fibers, forming a continuous tow of thermoplastic polymer fibers, uniformly and continuously spreading the thermoplastic polymer fibers to a selected width, uniformly and continuously spreading the carbon fiber tow to a width that is essentially the same as the selected width for the thermoplastic polymer fiber tow, intermixing the tows intimately, uniformly and continuously, in a relatively tension-free state, continuously withdrawing the intermixed tow and applying the tow to a mold and heating the tow.

  17. Damage tolerance and assessment of unidirectional carbon fiber composites: An experimental and numerical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Mark David

    Composites are beginning to be used in a variety of different applications throughout industry. However, certification and damage tolerance is a growing concern in many aerospace and marine applications. Although compression-after-impact have been studied thoroughly, determining a damage tolerance methodology that accurately characterizes the failure of composites has not been established. An experimental investigation was performed to study the effect of stacking sequence, low-velocity impact response, and residual strength due to compression and fatigue. Digital Image Correlation (DIC) captured the strains and deformation of the plate due to compression. Computational investigations integrated non-destructive techniques (C-Scan, X-Ray) to determine the extent of the damage created by the manufacturing process and impact to accurately create a representative of the pre-existing damage. Fiber/matrix cracking, delamination growth, buckling, as well as other failures mechanisms occur in compression-after-impact laminated specimens examined experimentally. The results from this study provide knowledge of the compression after impact strength of plates, and a basis for validation of detailed modeling of progressive failure from impact damaged composites.

  18. Plasma treatment of carbon fibers: Non-equilibrium dynamic adsorption and its effect on the mechanical properties of RTM fabricated composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Keming; Wang, Baichen; Chen, Ping; Zhou, Xia

    2011-02-01

    The effect of oxygen plasma treatment on the non-equilibrium dynamic adsorption of the carbon fabric reinforcements in RTM process was studied. 5-Dimethylamino-1-naphthalene-sulfonylchloride (DNS-Cl) was attached to the curing agent to study the change of curing agent content in the epoxy resin matrix. Steady state fluorescence spectroscopy (FS) analysis was used to study this changes in the epoxy resin at the inlet and outlet of the RTM mould, and XPS was used to study the chemical changes on the carbon fiber surfaces introduced by plasma treatment. The interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) and flexural strength were also measured to study the effects of this non-equilibrium dynamic adsorption progress on the mechanical properties of the end products. FS analysis shows that the curing agent adsorbed onto the fiber surface preferentially for untreated carbon fiber, the curing agent content in the resin matrix maintain unchanged after plasma treatment for 3 min and 5 min, but after oxygen plasma treatment for 7 min, the epoxy resin adsorbed onto the fiber surface preferentially. XPS analysis indicated that the oxygen plasma treatment successfully increased some polar functional groups concentration on the carbon fiber surfaces, this changes on the carbon fiber surfaces can change the adsorption ability of carbon fiber to the resin and curing agent. The mechanical properties of the composites were correlated to this results.

  19. Heat Treated Carbon Fiber Material Selection Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effinger, M.; Patel, B.; Koenig, J.

    2008-01-01

    Carbon fibers are used in a variety high temperature applications and materials. However, one limiting factor in their transition into additional applications is an understanding of their functional properties during component processing and function. The requirements on the fibers are governed by the nature of the materials and the environments in which they will be used. The current carbon fiber vendor literature is geared toward the polymeric composite industry and not the ceramic composite industry. Thus, selection of carbon fibers is difficult, since their properties change as a function of heat treatment, processing or component operational temperature, which ever is greatest. To enable proper decisions to be made, a program was established wherein multiple fibers were selected and heat treated at different temperatures. The fibers were then examined for their physical and mechanical properties which are reported herein.

  20. Boron nitride converted carbon fiber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rousseas, Michael; Mickelson, William; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2016-04-05

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to boron nitride converted carbon fiber. In one aspect, a method may include the operations of providing boron oxide and carbon fiber, heating the boron oxide to melt the boron oxide and heating the carbon fiber, mixing a nitrogen-containing gas with boron oxide vapor from molten boron oxide, and converting at least a portion of the carbon fiber to boron nitride.

  1. Improvement of carbon fiber surface properties using electron beam irradiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Carbon fiber-reinforced advance composites have been used for struetural applications, mainly on account of their mechanical properties. The main factor for a good mechanical performance of carbon fiber-reinforced composite is the interfacial interaction between its components, which are carbon fiber and polymeric matrix. The aim of this study is to improve the surface properties of the carbon fiber using ionizing radiation from an electron beam to obtain better adhesion properties in the resultant composite. EB radiation was applied on the carbon fiber itself before preparing test specimens for the mechanical tests. Experimental results showed that EB irradiation improved the tensile strength of carbon fiber samples. The maximum value in tensile strength was reached using doses of about 250kGy. After breakage, the morphology aspect of the tensile specimens prepared with irradiated and non-irradiated carbon fibers were evaluated. SEM micrographs showed modifications on the carbon fiber surface.

  2. Carbon Carbon Composites: An Overview .

    OpenAIRE

    G. Rohini Devi; K. Rama Rao

    1993-01-01

    Carbon carbon composites are a new class of engineering materials that are ceramic in nature but exhibit brittle to pseudoplastic behaviour. Carbon-carbon is a unique all-carbon composite with carbon fibre embeded in carbon matrix and is known as an inverse composite. Due to their excellent thermo-structural properties, carbon-carbon composites are used in specialised application like re-entry nose-tips, leading edges, rocket nozzles, and aircraft brake discs apart from several indust...

  3. Research on 3D Braided Nickel Plated Carbon Fiber/epoxy Resin Composites and Their Electromagnetic Protection Properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QU Zhaoming; WANG Qingguo; LEI Yisan; ZHANG Ruigang

    2013-01-01

    To develop electromagnetic protection composites with integrated structure-function properties,the three-dimension (3D) braided nickel plated carbon fiber/epoxy resin (Ni-CF3D/EP) composites were prepared based on 3D five-directional braiding,unitary nickel plating and mold compression shaping.The electromagnetic protection properties of Ni-CF3D/EP composites including shielding effectiveness (SE) and reflection loss against plane electromagnetic wave,shielding properties against electromagnetic pulse (EMP) were investigated.The test results show that the novel composites have good electromagnetic protection properties in a wide frequency range of 14 kHz~ 18 GHz with SE of 42 dB~95 dB,the absorption bandwidth of-5 dB in 2 GHz~ 18 GHz can reach 10 GHz and the pulse peak SE against EMP is 43.7 dB which can reduce the electromagnetic energy greatly.Meanwhile,the mechanic properties were also investigated and the results indicate that the Ni-CF3D/EP composites can replace metal materials for loading-bearing structural applications because of their excellent mechanic properties.

  4. Synthesis and Electrochemical Properties of Carbon Nanofibers and SiO2/Carbon Nanofiber Composite on Ni-Cu/C-Fiber Textiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Ki-Mok; Park, Heai-Ku; Lee, Chang-Seop

    2015-11-01

    In this study, carbon nanofibers (CNFs) were grown by chemical vapor deposition on C-fiber textiles that had Ni and Cu catalyst deposited via electrophoretic deposition. Before the CNFs were coated with silica layer via hydrolysis of TEOS (Tetraethyl orthosilicate), the carbon nanofibers were oxidized by nitric acid. Due to oxidation, the hydroxyl group was created on the carbon nanofibers and this was used as an activation site for the SiO2. The physicochemical properties of the grown carbon nanofibers were investigated with Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The structures of SiO2-coated carbon nanofibers were characterized by XPS and TEM. The electrochemical properties and the capacitance of the materials were investigated by galvanostatic charge-discharge and cyclic voltammetry. Different types of carbon nanofibers were grown upon the deposition utilizing catalysts, with the SiO2 uniformly coated on the surface of carbon nanofibers. When used as an anode material for the Li secondary battery, the SiO2/CNFs composite had a lower capacity maintenance and a greater discharge capacity as compared to the carbon nanofibers.

  5. Use of Modal Acoustic Emission to Monitor Damage Progression in Carbon Fiber/Epoxy and Implications for Composite Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, J. M.; Nichols, C. T.; Wentzel, D. J.; Saulsberry R. L.

    2010-01-01

    Broad-band modal acoustic emission (AE) data was used to characterize micromechanical damage progression in uniaxial IM7 and T1000 carbon fiber-epoxy tows and an IM7 composite overwrapped pressure vessel (COPV) subjected to an intermittent load hold tensile stress profile known to activate the Felicity ratio (FR). Damage progression was followed by inspecting the Fast Fourier Transforms (FFTs) associated with acoustic emission events. FFT analysis revealed the occurrence of cooperative micromechanical damage events in a frequency range between 100 kHz and 1 MHz. Evidence was found for the existence of a universal damage parameter, referred to here as the critical Felicity ratio, or Felicity ratio at rupture (FR*), which had a value close to 0.96 for the tows and the COPV tested. The implications of using FR* to predict failure in carbon/epoxy composite materials and related composite components such as COPVs are discussed. Trends in the FFT data are also discussed; namely, the difference between the low and high energy events, the difference between early and late-life events, comparison of IM7 and T1000 damage progression, and lastly, the similarity of events occurring at the onset of significant acoustic emission used to calculate the FR.

  6. A 1-3 Piezoelectric Fiber Reinforced Carbon Nanotube Composite Sensor for Crack Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makireddi, Sai; Balasubramaniam, Krishnan

    2016-07-01

    A method for the detection of location and size of a crack in simple structures using a nanocomposite sensor is discussed. In the present study, a piezoelectric/single walled carbon nanotube composite sensor is modeled on piezoelectric principle. The effective piezoelectric and dielectric properties of the composite at 0.2 volume fraction loading of single walled carbon nanotubes is determined by micromechanical analysis. By means of these effective properties a piezoelectric sensor has been modeled. The transfer function and bode response of this sensor is investigated. The sensor is fixed at a location on a cantilever beam and the response of the sensor with respect to the size and location of the crack is modeled. The analytical values are compared with ANSYS. It is assumed that there is no slippage between the sensor and the beam surface. The sensor behavior with respect to dynamic loading conditions is also studied. It is ascertained that the relative position of the sensor with respect to crack is crucial and determines the sensitivity of the sensor to detect a crack. Results are presented in the form of voltage output from the sensor at different crack locations and at varying lengths of the crack.

  7. Realizing the full nanofiller enhancement in melt-spun fibers of poly(vinylidene fluoride)/carbon nanotube composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strong interfacial interaction is extremely important for achieving efficient mechanical reinforcement in polymer/inorganic nanoparticle composites. In this study, it was demonstrated for the first time that largely improved interfacial interaction could be obtained in continuously melt-spun fibers of poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF)/multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNTs) composites, just by an increasing of the deformation extent (draw ratio). The superior interaction is attributed to high deformation inducing a formation of charge-transfer-type F-C bonding between all-trans conformation PVDF chains and extended MWCNTs. As a result, a large mechanical enhancement has been achieved. For the fibers prepared at the highest draw ratio of 200, the tensile strength and modulus are improved for 235% and 109%, respectively, after adding only 0.5 wt% MWCNTs to PVDF. More importantly, a mechanical model fitting, based on the rule of mixtures, indicates that in the case of the highest draw ratio the theoretical strength of MWCNTs is comparable to its real failure strength measured directly between two opposing AFM cantilever tips (Yu et al 2000 Science 287 637). Our present study suggests a great deal of promise for achieving highly efficient CNT enhancement via the non-covalent interaction arising from simple physical fabrication like melt-spinning.

  8. Stress wave propagation in thin long-fiber carbon/epoxy composite panel. Numerical and experimental solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kroupa T.

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with experimental and numerical analysis of stress wave propagation in a thin long fiber carbon/epoxy composite material. Experiments were performed on in-plane loaded square composite panels with dimensions 501mm x 501mm x 2:2 mm. The panels have several fiber orientations (0°, 30°, 60° and 90° measured from the loaded edge. They were loaded by in-plane impact of steel sphere. The impact area was on the edge, exactly 150mm from top left corners corner of the panels. The loading force was approximated by atime dependent function. Its shape was obtained from three dimensional contact analysis, which was performed on smaller area of panel. The function was used in further plane stress analysis of the whole panels. The comparison of the numerical and experimental results was executed. An attempt at determination of velocity of propagation of Rayleigh waves on the loaded edge was performed and the results are discussed in the paper. Further directions of the research are proposed.

  9. 碳纤维复合材料刹车片的发展及应用前景%Development and Application of Carbon Fiber Composite Braking Block

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李建利; 张元; 张新元

    2012-01-01

    本文介绍了刹车片材料发展的历程,基于密度低、制动性好等优越性的碳纤维复合材料刹车片的开发,以及碳纤维复合材料刹车片在汽车、列车、飞机产业的应用现状和应用前景.%Carbon fiber composite braking block is a type of friction materials made of carbon fiber as reinforcing material. The paper introduces the merits of carbon fiber composite braking block such as low density, good braking performance and so on, and application in automobile, train and aeroplane.

  10. Using maleic anhydride functionalized graphene oxide for improving the interfacial properties of carbon fiber/BMI composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Li

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Maleic anhydride functionalized graphene oxide (MAH-GO was synthesized and then introduced into carbon fiber (CF reinforced bismaleimide (BMI composites, with the aim of improving the interfacial adhesion strength between CF and BMI resin. Various characterization techniques including Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR, X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA demonstrated that the maleic anhydride has been successfully grafted onto the GO surfaces. The study showed that the interlaminar shear strength (ILSS and flexural properties of CF/BMI composites were all improved by the incorporation of GO and MAH-GO, and the MAH-GO showed the substantially improved effect due to the strong interaction between the MAH-GO and the resin matrix. The maximum increment of the ILSS, flexural strength and flexural modulus of composites were 24.4, 28.7 and 49.7%, respectively. Scanning electron microscope (SEM photographs of the fracture surfaces revealed that the interfacial bonding between CF and resin matrix was significantly strengthened by the addition of MAH-GO. The results suggest that this feasible method may be an ideal substitute for the traditional method in the interfacial modification of composites.

  11. Mechanical analysis and reasonable design for Ti-Al alloy liner wound with carbon fiber resin composite high pressure vessel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chuan-xiang ZHENG; Fan YANG; Ai-shi ZHU

    2009-01-01

    To consider the internal pressure loaded by both the cylindrical Ti-AI alloy liner and the carbon fiber resin composite (CFRC) wound layers, two models are built. The first one is a cylinder loaded with the internal pressure in the hoop direction only. In this model, the total hoop direction load is distributed over all layers under the internal pressure. The second one is a cylinder loaded with the internal pressure in the axial direction only. In this model, the total axial load is distributed over all cylinders under the internal pressure. Taking the boundary conditions of the continuous displacement between layers into account, a group of equations are built. From these equations, we get the solutions of stresses in both hoop direction and axial direction loaded by every layer under internal pressures. After the stresses are obtained, a reasonable design can be done. An example is given in the final section of this study.

  12. Surface analysis of plasma grafted carbon fiber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The surface characteristics of carbon fibers were studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and wetting measurements. The surface of carbon fiber was modified by means of plasma graft silsesquioxane. The oxygen/carbon and silicon/carbon ratio increased rapidly after treatments. Fitting the C 1s, O 1s, and Si 2p spectra demonstrated that new photopeaks were emerged, which were indicated C-Si, Si-O groups, respectively. The degree of surface roughness and the wettability of carbon fiber surface were both increased by plasma graft silsesquioxane. The results may shed some light on the design of the appropriate surface structure, which could react with resin, and the manufacture of the carbon fiber reinforced composites

  13. Method for the preparation of carbon fiber from polyolefin fiber precursor, and carbon fibers made thereby

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naskar, Amit Kumar; Hunt, Marcus Andrew; Saito, Tomonori

    2015-08-04

    Methods for the preparation of carbon fiber from polyolefin fiber precursor, wherein the polyolefin fiber precursor is partially sulfonated and then carbonized to produce carbon fiber. Methods for producing hollow carbon fibers, wherein the hollow core is circular- or complex-shaped, are also described. Methods for producing carbon fibers possessing a circular- or complex-shaped outer surface, which may be solid or hollow, are also described.

  14. Dynamic mechanical analysis and high strain-rate energy absorption characteristics of vertically aligned carbon nanotube reinforced woven fiber-glass composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    The dynamic mechanical behavior and energy absorption characteristics of nano-enhanced functionally graded composites, consisting of 3 layers of vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VACNT) forests grown on woven fiber-glass (FG) layer and embedded within 10 layers of woven FG, with polyester (PE) and...

  15. Multimetallic Electrodeposition on Carbon Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böttger-Hiller, F.; Kleiber, J.; Böttger, T.; Lampke, T.

    2016-03-01

    Efficient lightweight design requires intelligent materials that meet versatile functions. One approach is to extend the range of properties of carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) by plating the fiber component. Electroplating leads to metalized layers on carbon fibers. Herein only cyanide-free electrolytes where used. Until now dendrite-free layers were only obtained using current densities below 1.0 A dm-2. In this work, dendrite-free tin and copper coatings were achieved by pre-metalizing the carbon fiber substrates. Furthermore, applying a combination of two metals with different sized thermal expansion coefficient lead to a bimetallic coating on carbon fiber rovings, which show an actuatory effect.

  16. Design and performance of new type carbon fiber reinforced polyimide-based composites for X/γ photon shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: With the rapid development of radiation technology, demands of functional and structural integration have been put forward for the photon shielding material. Purpose: To meet this need, a new type of carbon fiber reinforced polyimide composite has been designed and tested. Methods: Shielding properties of composite materials of different PbO contents are modeled based on MCNP. According to the simulation results, shielding material is designed and prepared. And its shielding properties, mechanical properties as well as radiation-resistant properties are tested. Results: Through photon shield experiment and mechanical performance experiment, the composite material has good shielding performance for photons. Its photon transmission rate at thickness of 4.80-mm is 54.13% for 137Cs (662 keV) gamma-ray, bend strength and stretch strength at l.2-mm thickness can reach 263 MPa and 369 MPa, respectively. After 90-kGy irradiation, the stretch strength can retain 83.47% of its performance. Conclusion: Therefore, the material possesses great application potential in medicine and industry such as gamma ray flaw detection. (authors)

  17. The influence of sterilization processes on the micromechanical properties of carbon fiber-reinforced PEEK composites for bone implant applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godara, A; Raabe, D; Green, S

    2007-03-01

    The effect of sterilization on the structural integrity of the thermoplastic matrix composite polyetheretherketone (PEEK) reinforced with carbon fibers (CF) is investigated by nanoindentation and nanoscratch tests. The use of the material as a medical implant grade requires a detailed understanding of the micromechanical properties which primarily define its in vivo behavior. Sterilization is a mandatory process for such materials used in medical applications like bone implants. The steam and gamma radiation sterilization processes employed in this study are at sufficient levels to affect the micromechanical properties of some polymer materials, particularly in the interphase region between the polymer matrix and the reinforcing fibers. Nanoindentation and nanoscratch tests are used in this work to reveal local gradients in the hardness and the elastic properties of the interphase regions. Both methods help to explore microscopic changes in the hardness, reduced stiffness and scratch resistance in the interphase region and in the bulk polymer matrix due to the different sterilization processes employed. The results reveal that neither steam nor gamma radiation sterilization entails significant changes of the reduced elastic modulus, hardness or coefficient of friction in the bulk polymer matrix. However, minor material changes of the PEEK matrix were observed in the interphase region. Of the two sterilization methods used, the steam treatment has a more significant influence on these small changes in this region and appears to increase slightly the thickness of the interphase zone.

  18. Surface characterization in composite and titanium bonding: Carbon fiber surface treatments for improved adhesion to thermoplastic polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devilbiss, T. A.; Wightman, J. P.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of anodization in NaOH, H2SO4, and amine salts on the surface chemistry of carbon fibers was examined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The surfaces of carbon fibers after anodization in NaOH and H2SO4 were examined by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), angular dependent XPS, UV absorption spectroscopy of the anodization bath, secondary ion mass spectrometry, and polar/dispersive surface energy analysis. Hercules AS-4, Dexter Hysol XAS, and Union Carbide T-300 fibers were examined by STEM, angular dependent XPS, and breaking strength measurement before and after commercial surface treatment. Oxygen and nitrogen were added to the fiber surfaces by anodization in amine salts. Analysis of the plasmon peak in the carbon 1s signal indicated that H2SO4 anodization affected the morphological structure of the carbon fiber surface. The work of adhesion of carbon fibers to thermoplastic resins was calculated using the geometric mean relationship. A correlation was observed between the dispersive component of the work of adhesion and the interfacial adhesion.

  19. In Situ Tomography of Microcracking in Cross Ply Carbon Fiber Composites with Pre-existing Debonding Damage

    KAUST Repository

    Traudes, Daniel

    2012-07-01

    Carbon fiber based composites are an essential material in weight-critical applications such as in the aerospace industry. However, these materials are susceptible to damage such as matrix microcracking and fiber/matrix debonding (diffuse damage), which occurs at stresses much lower than the failure stress. A T700/M21 [0/90]s laminate was tensile loaded to introduce diffuse damage and prepared for a study on the initiation of transverse microcracks. The material was tensile loaded in a [+45/-45]s orientation to induce diffuse damage. A diffuse damage indicator was developed by measuring the decrease in shear stiffness. Samples with diffuse damage levels of 0, 0.05, 0.10, 0.15, 0.20, and 0.25 were prepared to be tensile tested in a [0/90]s orientation to induce microcracks. A successful development of the microcracking test procedure was performed. The edge of the material was studied with optical microscopy and x-ray to establish the structure of the fiber bundle geometry when undamaged. A sample containing microcracks was treated with diiodomethane dye penetrant, which successfully highlighted microcracks during x-ray imaging. The application time was not sufficient to produce consistent x-ray images over time, so a 45 minute soak time was recommended instead. The same damaged sample was subjected to a tomographic scan without a dye penetrant and while unloaded. Transverse microcracks were successfully identified from the data, although the results were not clean enough and likely omitted some smaller microcracks. Results are expected to be cleaner if performed during tensile testing. Future tensile testing will quantify the induced crack density of samples containing various degrees of initial diffuse damage, either using x-rays with a dye penetrant or using x-ray microtomography.

  20. Carbon Carbon Composites: An Overview .

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Rohini Devi

    1993-10-01

    Full Text Available Carbon carbon composites are a new class of engineering materials that are ceramic in nature but exhibit brittle to pseudoplastic behaviour. Carbon-carbon is a unique all-carbon composite with carbon fibre embeded in carbon matrix and is known as an inverse composite. Due to their excellent thermo-structural properties, carbon-carbon composites are used in specialised application like re-entry nose-tips, leading edges, rocket nozzles, and aircraft brake discs apart from several industrial and biomedical applications. The multidirectional carbon-carbon product technology is versatile and offers design flexibility. This paper describes the multidirectional preform and carbon-carbon process technology and research and development activities within the country. Carbon-carbon product experience at DRDL has also been discussed. Development of carbon-carbon brake discs process technology using the liquid impregnation process is described. Further the test results on material characterisation, thermal, mechanical and tribological properties are presented.

  1. Enhancement of high-speed flywheel energy storage via carbon-fiber composite reinforcement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conteh, Michael Abu

    This study on the enhancement of high-speed flywheel energy storage is to investigate composite materials that are suitable for high-speed, high-energy density for energy storage and/or energy recovery. The main motivation of the study is to explore the application of the flywheel in the aviation industry for recovering some of the energy that is currently being lost at the wheel brakes of an aircraft due to the high temperature developed in the brake stack as a result of landing, frequent brake applications during taxiing in or out of heavy traffic airports and rejected take-off. Lamina and laminate mechanical properties of materials suitable for flywheel high-speed energy storage were investigated. Design and optimum stress analysis were used to determine the shape factor, maximum stress and energy density for a flywheel with a constant stress disk and a constant thickness rim. Analytical studies along with the use of the CADEC-online software were used to evaluate the lamina and laminate properties. This study found that the use of hybrid composite material with higher strength (based on first ply failure strength) and lower density and lower elastic moduli for the disk than the rim material will yield high-speed and high-energy density. The materials designed based on the results from this study show outperformance compared to previous published results of standard flywheel material combinations. The safe rotational velocity and energy density were found to be 166,000 RPM and 2.73 MJ/kg respectively. Therefore, results from this study will contribute to aiding further development of the flywheel that has recently re-emerged as a promising application for energy storage due to significant improvements in composite materials and technology. Further study on flywheel energy recovery from aircraft brakes revealed that more than half of the energy dissipated at the wheel brake as heat could be recovered and converted to some useful form. In this way, the operating

  2. Fiber Breakage Model for Carbon Composite Stress Rupture Phenomenon: Theoretical Development and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Phoenix, S. Leigh; Grimes-Ledesma, Lorie

    2010-01-01

    Stress rupture failure of Carbon Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPVs) is of serious concern to Science Mission and Constellation programs since there are a number of COPVs on board space vehicles with stored gases under high pressure for long durations of time. It has become customary to establish the reliability of these vessels using the so called classic models. The classical models are based on Weibull statistics fitted to observed stress rupture data. These stochastic models cannot account for any additional damage due to the complex pressure-time histories characteristic of COPVs being supplied for NASA missions. In particular, it is suspected that the effects of proof test could significantly reduce the stress rupture lifetime of COPVs. The focus of this paper is to present an analytical appraisal of a model that incorporates damage due to proof test. The model examined in the current paper is based on physical mechanisms such as micromechanics based load sharing concepts coupled with creep rupture and Weibull statistics. For example, the classic model cannot accommodate for damage due to proof testing which every flight vessel undergoes. The paper compares current model to the classic model with a number of examples. In addition, several applications of the model to current ISS and Constellation program issues are also examined.

  3. ELECTRODEPOSITION OF POLYMERS ON CARBON FIBERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Jiasong; WU Renjie

    1983-01-01

    Styrene-co-maleic anhydride, vinyl acetate-co-maleic anhydride, methyl methacrylate-co-maleic anhydride copolymers were deposited on the surface of carbon fibers by an electrodeposition technique.The anion-free radical mechanism of this process and the physical adhesion to the surface were preliminarily confirmed. The adhesion at fiber-resin matrix interface in carbon fiber reinforced plastics was improved by the electrodeposited polymer interlayer and the shear failure occurred mainly in the matrix.Interlaminar shear strength of the unidirectional carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composite is increased from about 600 kg/cm2 to 1000 kg/cm2 by electrodeposition of polymers and the strength loss of the composite which has been immersed in boiling water for 100 hrs is decreased.

  4. Effect of arc spraying power on the microstructure and mechanical properties of Zn-Al coating deposited onto carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper investigates the effect of arc spraying power on the microstructure and mechanical properties of Zn-Al coatings deposited on carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composites (CFRE composites). The bond strength between the Zn-Al coatings and the substrates was tested on a RGD-5 tensile testing machine. The microstructures and phase composition of the as-sprayed coatings were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), respectively. The results showed that both the melting extent of Zn-Al particles and the bond strength of the coatings were evidently improved by increasing the spraying power. Moreover, the content of crystalline Zn-Al coatings was slightly changed. Observation of fracture surfaces showed that the Zn-Al coatings could bond well with the carbon fiber bundles using 40 kW spraying power.

  5. Effect of Carbon Fiber Content on Mechanical Properties of Short Carbon Fiber Reinforced PE Composites%碳纤维含量对碳纤维增强PE复合材料力学性能的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李力; 曹昌林

    2012-01-01

    以短切碳纤维为增强体,以聚乙烯树脂为基体,运用螺杆注射成型的方法制备碳纤维增强热塑性复合材料.研究了碳纤维含量对复合材料硬度、拉伸、疲劳等性能的影响.结果表明,随着碳纤维含量的增加,复合材料的维氏硬度呈S形增加,拉伸强度、弹性模量、条件疲劳极限值都有提高;当碳纤维含量为4.021%时,相对纯聚乙烯,硬度、拉伸强度、弹性模量、条件疲劳极限值分别增加了35.489%、18.421%、208.024%、213.240%%Taking chopped carbon fiber as reinforce element and the polyethylene resin as matrix, the carbon fiber reinforced thermoplastic composites were prepared by the way of screw injection molding method. The effects of carbon fiber content on mechanical properties were investigated by measuring the hardness, tensile and fatigue. The results show that: with the increase of carbon fiber content, the hardness increase tendency in S-shape. The tensile strength and elastic modulus and the fatigue cycle and the fatigue limit were increased by 35.489%, 18.421%, 208.024%, 213.240%, respectively.

  6. Role of surface chemistry in adhesion between ZnO nanowires and carbon fibers in hybrid composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlert, Gregory J; Galan, Ulises; Sodano, Henry A

    2013-02-01

    Low interface strength is a persistent problem in composite materials and cascades to limit a variety of bulk material properties such as lamina shear strength. Whiskerization has long been pursued as a method to reinforce the interphase and improve both the single fiber interface strength as well as the bulk properties. Recent developments have shown that ZnO nanowire whiskerization can effectively improve the properties of a bulk composite without requiring the high temperatures that previous deposition processes needed. Although the efficacy of a ZnO nanowire interphase has been established, the mechanism for adhesion of the interphase to the fiber has not been identified. Specifically, the addition of the ZnO nanowires to the surface of the fibers requires that the ZnO nanowires have strong chemical adhesion to the fiber surface. This work will create a variety of chemical environments on the surface of the fibers through new and common chemical functionalization procedures and quantify the surface chemistry through X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The effect of fiber surface chemistry on the adhesion of the ZnO is assessed through single fiber fragmentation testing. The interface strength is found to strongly correlate with the concentration of ketone groups on the surface of the fibers. Following the experimental observations, liftoff of a ZnO crystal from a graphene surface was simulated with a variety of surface functionalizations. The computational models confirm the preference for ketone groups in promoting adhesion between ZnO and graphite.

  7. Fundamental study of a refractory-based carbon fiber reinforced composite made by reactive melt infiltration for hypersonic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wali, Natalie Alice

    Ceramic matrix composites are excellent candidates for ultrahigh temperature applications due their good physical properties, which are a combination of a chemically stable matrix and tough fiber reinforcement. This work is a fundamental study of a carbon fiber reinforced zirconium carbide composite (Cf/ZrC). The background chapter reviews reactive melt infiltration, which is the processing method used to make the Cf/ZrC composite. The first chapter discusses the microstructural characterization and development of Cf/ZrC. A formation mechanism of the unique matrix microstructure is proposed based on the characterization results. In the second chapter the mechanical properties of Cf/ZrC were determined. The fracture toughness at room temperature is obtained with a standard four point bend test, while flexural strength of Cf/ZrC is obtained to the ultra high temperature regime. For high temperatures a testing rig was modified to operate in inert atmosphere and tests were conducted at 1100 °C, 1350 °C and 1650 °C. Correlation is made between the flexural strength and fiber coatings of two different composite types. In situ compression tests were performed a modified SEM. Digital image correlation was used to monitor strains during compression. The stress-strain information is correlated to surface deformation. The environmental durability and oxidation behavior of Cf/ZrC and ZrC is detailed in the third and fourth chapters. The oxidation and shock behavior of Cf/ZrC were observed under both slow and rapid heating rates to ultra high temperatures. For rapid heating rates a panel was subjected to heating at steady-state and non-steady state heat flux. For slow heating rates specimen coupons were heated at 2000 °C in a bottom-loading furnace. Specimens were characterized post-test by x-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, electron probe microanalysis, and optical microscopy. The oxidation kinetics of Cf/ZrC composites and ZrC powders (45 micron and 60 nanometer

  8. Quantitative analysis of mechanical and electrostatic properties of poly(lactic) acid fibers and poly(lactic) acid—carbon nanotube composites using atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Qais; Bernstein, Peter; Zhu, Yazhe; Rahamim, Joseph; Cebe, Peggy; Staii, Cristian

    2015-03-01

    We use atomic force microscopy (AFM) to perform a systematic quantitative characterization of the elastic modulus and dielectric constant of poly(L-lactic acid) electrospun nanofibers (PLLA), as well as composites of PLLA fibers with 1.0 wt% embedded multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs-PLLA). The elastic moduli are measured in the fiber skin region via AFM nanoindentation, and the dielectric constants are determined by measuring the phase shifts obtained via electrostatic force microscopy (EFM). We find that the average value for the elastic modulus for PLLA fibers is (9.8 ± 0.9) GPa, which is a factor of 2 larger than the measured average elastic modulus for MWCNT-PLLA composites (4.1 ± 0.7) GPa. We also use EFM to measure dielectric constants for both types of fibers. These measurements show that the dielectric constants of the MWCNT-PLLA fibers are significantly larger than the corresponding values obtained for PLLA fiber. This result is consistent with the higher polarizability of the MWCNT-PLLA composites. The measurement methods presented are general, and can be applied to determine the mechanical and electrical properties of other polymers and polymer nanocomposites.

  9. Quantitative analysis of mechanical and electrostatic properties of poly(lactic) acid fibers and poly(lactic) acid—carbon nanotube composites using atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We use atomic force microscopy (AFM) to perform a systematic quantitative characterization of the elastic modulus and dielectric constant of poly(L-lactic acid) electrospun nanofibers (PLLA), as well as composites of PLLA fibers with 1.0 wt% embedded multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs–PLLA). The elastic moduli are measured in the fiber skin region via AFM nanoindentation, and the dielectric constants are determined by measuring the phase shifts obtained via electrostatic force microscopy (EFM). We find that the average value for the elastic modulus for PLLA fibers is (9.8 ± 0.9) GPa, which is a factor of 2 larger than the measured average elastic modulus for MWCNT–PLLA composites (4.1 ± 0.7) GPa. We also use EFM to measure dielectric constants for both types of fibers. These measurements show that the dielectric constants of the MWCNT–PLLA fibers are significantly larger than the corresponding values obtained for PLLA fiber. This result is consistent with the higher polarizability of the MWCNT–PLLA composites. The measurement methods presented are general, and can be applied to determine the mechanical and electrical properties of other polymers and polymer nanocomposites. (paper)

  10. A LASER INTERFERENCE-BASED SURFACE TREATMENT OF AL AND CARBON FIBER POLYMER COMPOSITES FOR ENHANCED BONDING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabau, Adrian S [ORNL; Warren, Charles David [ORNL; ERDMAN III, DONALD L [ORNL; Daniel, Claus [ORNL; Skszek, Timothy [Vehma International of American, Inc.; Caruso-Dailey, Mary M. [3M Company

    2016-01-01

    Due to its increased use in the automotive and aerospace industries, joining of Carbon Fiber-reinforced Polymer matrix Composites (CFPC) to metals demands enhanced surface preparation and control of surface morphology prior to joining. In this study, surfaces of both composite and aluminum were prepared for joining using a new laser based technique, in which the laser interference power profile was created by splitting the beam and guiding those beams to the sample surface by overlapping each other with defined angles to each other. Results were presented for the overlap shear testing of single-lap joints made with Al 5182 and CFPC specimens whose surfaces prepared by (a) surface abrasion and solvent cleaning; and (b) laser-interference structured surfaces by rastering with a 4 mm laser beam at approximately 3.5 W power. CFPC specimens of T700S carbon fiber, Prepreg T70 epoxy, 4 or 5 ply thick, 0/90o plaques were used. Adhesive DP810 was used to bond Al and CFPC. The bondline was 0.25mm and the bond length was consistent among all joints produced. First, the effect of the laser speed on the joint performance was evaluated by laser-interference structure Al and CFPC surfaces with a beam angle of 3o and laser beam speeds of 3, 5, and 10 mm/s. For this sensitivity study, 3 joint specimens were used per each joint type. Based on the results for minimum, maximum, and mean values for the shear lap strength and maximum load for all the 9 joint types, two joint types were selected for further evaluations. Six additional joint specimens were prepared for these two joint types in order to obtain better statistics and the shear test data was presented for the range, mean, and standard deviation. The results for the single-lap shear tests obtained for six joint specimens, indicate that the shear lap strength, maximum load, and displacement at maximum load for those joints made with laser-interference structured surfaces were increased by approximately 14.8%, 16%, and 100

  11. Microwave axial dielectric properties of carbon fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Wen; Xiao, Peng; Luo, Heng; Li, Zhuan

    2015-10-01

    Randomly distributed carbon fibers (CFs) reinforced epoxy resin composites are prepared by the pouring method, the dielectric properties of CF composites with different fiber content and length have been performed in the frequency range from 8.2 to 12.4 GHz. The complex permittivity of the composite increases with the fiber length, which is attributed to the decrease of depolarization field, and increases with the volume fraction, which is attributed to the increase of polarization. A formula, based on the theory of Reynolds-Hugh, is proposed to calculate the effective permittivity of CF composites, and validated by the experiments. The proposed formula is further applied to derive the axial permittivity of CF and analyze the effect of fiber length on the axial permittivity.

  12. Quantitative assessment on the orientation and distribution of carbon fibers in a conductive polymer composite using high-frequency ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi-Hsun; Huang, Chih-Chung; Wang, Shyh-Hau

    2012-05-01

    Conductive polymer composites, typically fabricated from a mix of conductive fillers and a polymer substrate, are commonly applied as bipolar plates in a fuel cell stack. Electrical conductivity is a crucial property that greatly depends on the distribution and orientation of the fillers. In this study, a 50-MHz ultrasound imaging system and analysis techniques capable of nondestructively assessing the properties of carbon fibers (CFs) in conductive polymer composites were developed. Composite materials containing a mix of polycarbonate substrates and 0 to 0.3 wt% of CFs were prepared using an injection molding technique. Ultrasonic A-line signals and C-scan images were acquired from each composite sample in regions at a depth of 0.15 mm beneath the sample surface (region A) and those at a depth of 0.3 mm (region B). The integrated backscatter (IB) and the Nakagami statistical parameter were calculated to quantitatively assess the samples. The area ratio, defined as the percentage of areas composed of CF images normalized by that of the whole C-scan image, was applied to further quantify the orientation of CFs perpendicular to the sample surface. Corresponding to the increase in CF concentrations from 0.1 to 0.3 wt%, the average IB and Nakagami parameter (m) of the composite samples increased from -78.10 ± 2.20 (mean ± standard deviation) to -72.66 ± 1.40 dB and from 0.024 ± 0.012 to 0.048 ± 0.011, respectively. The corresponding area ratios were respectively estimated to be 0.78 ± 0.35%, 2.33 ± 0.66%, and 2.20 ± 0.60% in region A of the samples; those of CFs with a perpendicular orientation were 0.04 ± 0.03%, 0.08 ± 0.02%, and 0.12 ± 0.05%. The area ratios in region B of the samples were calculated to be 1.19 ± 0.54%, 2.81 ± 0.42%, and 2.64 ± 0.76%, and those of CFs with a perpendicular orientation were 0.07 ± 0.04%, 0.12 ± 0.04%, and 0.14 ± 0.03%. According to the results of the orientations and ultrasonic images, CFs tended to distribute more

  13. Imaging the interphase of carbon fiber composites using transmission electron microscopy:Preparations by focused ion beam, ion beam etching, and ultramicrotomy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Qing; Li Min; Gu Yizhuo; Wang Shaokai; Zhang Zuoguang

    2015-01-01

    Three sample preparation techniques, focused ion beam (FIB), ion beam (IB) etching, and ultramicrotomy (UM) were used in comparison to analyze the interphase of carbon fiber/epoxy composites using transmission electron microscopy. An intact interphase with a relatively uniform thickness was obtained by FIB, and detailed chemical analysis of the interphase was investigated by electron energy loss spectroscopy. It shows that the interphase region is 200 nm wide with an increasing oxygen-to-carbon ratio from 10% to 19% and an almost constant nitrogen-to-carbon ratio of about 3%. However, gallium implantation of FIB tends to hinder fine structure analysis of the interphase. For IB etching, the interphase region is observed with transition morphology from amorphous resin to nano-crystalline carbon fiber, but the uneven sample thickness brings difficulty for quantitative chemical analysis. Moreover, UM tends to cause damage and/or deformation on the interphase. These results are meaningful for in-depth understanding on the interphase characteristic of carbon fiber composites.

  14. Reusing recycled fibers in high-value fiber-reinforced polymer composites: Improving bending strength by surface cleaning

    OpenAIRE

    SHI, JIAN; Bao, Limin; Kobayashi, Ryouhei; Kato, Jun; Kemmochi, Kiyoshi

    2012-01-01

    Glass fiber-reinforced polymer (GFRP) composites and carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites were recycled using superheated steam. Recycled glass fibers (R-GFs) and recycled carbon fibers (R-CFs) were surface treated for reuse as fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) composites. Treated R-GFs (TR-GFs) and treated R-CFs (TR-CFs) were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and remanufactured by vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM). Most residual resin impurities were ...

  15. Novel method for carbon nanofilament growth on carbon fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, Johathan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Luhrs, Claudia [UNM MECH.ENG.; Terani, Mehran [UNM MECH.ENG.; Al - Haik, Marwan [UNM MECH.ENG.; Garcia, Daniel [UNM MECH.ENG.; Taha, Mahmoud R [UNM MECH.ENG.

    2009-01-01

    Fiber reinforced structural composites such as fiber reinforced polymers (FRPs) have proven to be key materials for blast mitigation due to their enhanced mechanical performance. However, there is a need to further increase total energy absorption of the composites in order to retain structural integrity in high energy environments, for example, blast events. Research has shown that composite failure in high energy environments can be traced to their relatively low shear strength attributed to the limited bond strength between the matrix and the fibers. One area of focus for improving the strength of composite materials has been to create 'multi-scale' composites. The most common approach to date is to introduce carbon nanotubes into a more traditional composite consisting of epoxy with embedded micron scale fibers. The inclusion of carbon nanotubes (CNT) clearly toughens different matrices. Depositing CNT in brittle matrix increases stiffness by orders of magnitude. Currently, this approach to create multiscale composites is limited due to the difficulty of dispersing significant amounts of nanotubes. It has repeatedly been reported that phase separation occurs above relatively low weight percent loading (ca. 3%) due to the strong van der Waals forces between CNTs compared with that between CNT and polymer. Hence, the nanotubes tend to segregate and form inclusions. One means to prevent nanotube or nanofilament agglomeration is to anchor one end of the nanostructure, thereby creating a stable multi-phase structure. This is most easily done by literally growing the CNTs directly on micron scale fibers. Recently, CNT were grown on carbon fibers, both polyacrylonitrile- (PAN-) and pitch-based, by hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) using H2 and CH4 as precursors. Nickel clusters were electrodeposited on the fiber surfaces to catalyze the growth and uniform CNT coatings were obtained on both the PAN- and pitch-based carbon fibers. Multiwalled CNTs

  16. Process for preparing tows from composite fiber blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Paul (Inventor); Chung, Tai-Shung (Inventor); Ying, Lincoln (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A continuous, substantially uniform tow useful in forming composite molded articles is prepared by forming a continuous tow of continuous carbon fibers, forming a continuous tow of thermoplastic polymer fibers to a selected width, uniformly and continuously spreading the carbon fiber two to a width that is essentially the same as the selected width for the thermoplastic polymer fiber tow, intermixing the tows intimately, uniformly and continuously, in a relatively tension-free state, and continuosuly withdrawing the intermixed tow.

  17. Discussion on the Initial Elongation of Carbon Fiber Composite Core Conductor%碳纤维复合芯导线初始伸长的探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟宪彬; 戴云飞

    2011-01-01

    碳纤维复合芯导线是一种全新结构的节能型增容导线,与常规导线相比具有众多优点,代表了未来架空导线的技术发展趋势,有助于构造安全、环保、高效节约型输电网络。在施工架线过程中其与普通的架空导线(钢芯铝绞线)一样,需要考虑导线的初始伸长。通过两个碳纤维复合芯导线的架线施工的实例,对其初始伸长的特点进行了探讨。根据碳纤维复合芯棒初始伸长的迅速释放特性,可对碳纤维复合芯导线架线弧垂采用降温补偿法。%Carbon fiber composite core conductor is a new design of energy saving and capacity improved conductor, compared with other conventional conductors it has various advantages, and reflects the technical development trend of future overhead lines, more over, it is favorable to construct the power transmission lines with safe, eco, high efficient, and saving features. Like other common overhead lines (ACSR) it requires to consider the initial elongation of the conductor during construction and installation. Based on two construction and installation examples of carbon fiber composite core conductor, the characteristics of its initial elongation are discussed. According to the rapid release characteristics of the initial elongation of carbon fiber composite core bar, a lower temperature compensation mode can be used for the overhead line sag of carbon fiber composite core conductor.

  18. Mechanical Properties of Heat-treated Carbon Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effinger, Michael R.; Patel, Bhavesh; Koenig, John; Cuneo, Jaques; Neveux, Michael G.; Demos, Chrystoph G.

    2004-01-01

    Carbon fibers are selected for ceramic matrix composites (CMC) are based on their as-fabricated properties or on "that is what we have always done" technical culture while citing cost and availability when there are others with similar cost and availability. However, the information is not available for proper selection of carbon fibers since heat-treated properties are not known for the fibers on the market currently. Heat-treating changes the fiber's properties. Therefore, an effort was undertaken to establish fiber properties on 19 different types of fibers from six different manufactures for both PAN and pitch fibers. Heat-treating has been done at three different temperatures.

  19. Drawing dependent structures, mechanical properties and cyclization behaviors of polyacrylonitrile and polyacrylonitrile/carbon nanotube composite fibers prepared by plasticized spinning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang; Qin, Aiwen; Zhao, Xinzhen; Liu, Dapeng; Wang, Haiye; He, Chunju

    2015-09-14

    Drawing to change the structural properties and cyclization behaviors of the polyacrylonitrile (PAN) chains in crystalline and amorphous regions is carried out on PAN and PAN/carbon nanotube (CNT) composite fibers. Various characterization methods including Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction and thermal gravimetric analysis are used to monitor the structural evolution and cyclization behaviors of the fibers. With an increase of the draw ratio during the plasticized spinning process, the structural parameters of the fibers, i.e. crystallinity and planar zigzag conformation, are decreased at first, and then increased, which are associated with the heat exchange rate and the oriented-crystallization rate. A possible mechanism for plasticized spinning is proposed to explain the changing trends of crystallinity and planar zigzag conformation. PAN and PAN/CNT fibers exhibit various cyclization behaviors induced by drawing, e.g., the initiation temperature for the cyclization (Ti) of PAN fibers is increased with increasing draw ratio, while Ti of PAN/CNT fibers is decreased. Drawing also facilitates cyclization and lowers the percentage of β-amino nitrile for PAN/CNT fibers during the stabilization. PMID:26235219

  20. Carbon nanotube core graphitic shell hybrid fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahm, Myung Gwan; Lee, Jae-Hwang; Hart, Amelia H C; Song, Sung Moo; Nam, Jaewook; Jung, Hyun Young; Hashim, Daniel Paul; Li, Bo; Narayanan, Tharangattu N; Park, Chi-Dong; Zhao, Yao; Vajtai, Robert; Kim, Yoong Ahm; Hayashi, Takuya; Ku, Bon-Cheol; Endo, Morinobu; Barrera, Enrique; Jung, Yung Joon; Thomas, Edwin L; Ajayan, Pulickel M

    2013-12-23

    A carbon nanotube yarn core graphitic shell hybrid fiber was fabricated via facile heat treatment of epoxy-based negative photoresist (SU-8) on carbon nanotube yarn. The effective encapsulation of carbon nanotube yarn in carbon fiber and a glassy carbon outer shell determines their physical properties. The higher electrical conductivity (than carbon fiber) of the carbon nanotube yarn overcomes the drawbacks of carbon fiber/glassy carbon, and the better properties (than carbon nanotubes) of the carbon fiber/glassy carbon make up for the lower thermal and mechanical properties of the carbon nanotube yarn via synergistic hybridization without any chemical doping and additional processes. PMID:24224730

  1. Lightning Strike Ablation Damage Characteristic Analysis for Carbon Fiber/Epoxy Composite Laminate with Fastener

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, J. J.; Li, S. L.; Yao, X. L.; Chang, F.; Li, L. K.; Zhang, X. H.

    2016-08-01

    In order to analyze the lightning strike ablation damage characteristic of composite laminate with fastener, based on the energy-balance relationship in lightning strike, mathematical analysis model of ablation damage of composite laminate with fastener was constructed. According to the model, an effective three dimensional thermal-electrical coupling analysis finite element model of composite laminate with fastener suffered from lightning current was established based on ABAQUS, and lightning strike ablation damage characteristic was analyzed. Analytical results reveal that lightning current could conduct through the thickness direction of the laminate due to the existence of metallic fastener, and then distribute to all layers, finally conducted in-the-plane of each layer, conductive ability of different layup orientations depend on potential distribution and in-the-plane electrical conductivity along potential gradient declining direction; different potential boundaries correspond to different potential distribution in each layer, and result in conductive ability of different layup orientations was changed, then caused different lightning strike ablation damage distribution. According to the investigation in this paper, we can recognize the lightning strike ablation damage characteristic of composite laminate with fastener qualitatively.

  2. Effect of the surface treatment of plain carbon fiber posts on the retention of the composite core: an in vitro evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintas, A F; Bottino, M A; Neisser, M P; de Araújo, M A

    2001-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the role of surface treatments performed on plain carbon fiber posts, in relation to serrated carbon fiber posts, in the retention of the composite core. Fifty carbon fiber posts received surface treatments in order to verify their influence on the retention of the core material. An acrylic resin mold was developed in order to precisely fit the post, leaving a machined space to accommodate a self-curing composite resin. After the surface treatment, a primer was applied on the coronal portion of all posts, which were then dried. They were fitted to the mold and received a 3 mm composite core. All specimens were thermocycled and then stored in distilled water for a week. Tension test was performed at a speed of 0.5 mm/min until there was lack of adhesion or fracture of the core. The conclusions were: a) the values of retention related to aluminum oxide spray (group A), depth cutter diamond burs (group C) and posts with machined coronal portion (group D) were comparable to those of serrated posts (group E), although no statistically significant difference between these groups was found; b) the mean values of core retention in group B (medium grit diamond burs) were statistically lower than those of other groups.

  3. Property and Shape Modulation of Carbon Fibers Using Lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaker, Jonny J; Anthony, David B; Tang, Guang; Shamsuddin, Siti-Ros; Kalinka, Gerhard; Weinrich, Malte; Abdolvand, Amin; Shaffer, Milo S P; Bismarck, Alexander

    2016-06-29

    An exciting challenge is to create unduloid-reinforcing fibers with tailored dimensions to produce synthetic composites with improved toughness and increased ductility. Continuous carbon fibers, the state-of-the-art reinforcement for structural composites, were modified via controlled laser irradiation to result in expanded outwardly tapered regions, as well as fibers with Q-tip (cotton-bud) end shapes. A pulsed laser treatment was used to introduce damage at the single carbon fiber level, creating expanded regions at predetermined points along the lengths of continuous carbon fibers, while maintaining much of their stiffness. The range of produced shapes was quantified and correlated to single fiber tensile properties. Mapped Raman spectroscopy was used to elucidate the local compositional and structural changes. Irradiation conditions were adjusted to create a swollen weakened region, such that fiber failure occurred in the laser treated region producing two fiber ends with outwardly tapered ends. Loading the tapered fibers allows for viscoelastic energy dissipation during fiber pull-out by enhanced friction as the fibers plough through a matrix. In these tapered fibers, diameters were locally increased up to 53%, forming outward taper angles of up to 1.8°. The tensile strength and strain to failure of the modified fibers were significantly reduced, by 75% and 55%, respectively, ensuring localization of the break in the expanded region; however, the fiber stiffness was only reduced by 17%. Using harsher irradiation conditions, carbon fibers were completely cut, resulting in cotton-bud fiber end shapes. Single fiber pull-out tests performed using these fibers revealed a 6.75-fold increase in work of pull-out compared to pristine carbon fibers. Controlled laser irradiation is a route to modify the shape of continuous carbon fibers along their lengths, as well as to cut them into controlled lengths leaving tapered or cotton-bud shapes. PMID:27227575

  4. Material optimization of fiber reinforced composites applying a damage formulation

    OpenAIRE

    Kato, Junji

    2010-01-01

    The present thesis proposes material optimization schemes for fiber reinforced composites, specifically for a new composite material, denoted as Fiber Reinforced Concrete (FRC) or Textile Reinforced Concrete (TRC); here a reinforcement mesh of long carbon or glass fibers is embedded in a fine grained concrete (mortar) matrix. Unlike conventional steel reinforcement, these textile fibers are corrosion free; this holds also for AR-glass due to its high alkali-proof. This favorable property allo...

  5. Self-Sensing Properties of Alkali Activated Blast Furnace Slag (BFS) Composites Reinforced with Carbon Fibers

    OpenAIRE

    Pedro Garcés; Emilio Zornoza; Oscar Galao; Josep Lluís Vilaplana; Francisco Javier Baeza

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, several researchers have shown the good performance of alkali activated slag cement and concretes. Besides their good mechanical properties and durability, this type of cement is a good alternative to Portland cements if sustainability is considered. Moreover, multifunctional cement composites have been developed in the last decades for their functional applications (self-sensing, EMI shielding, self-heating, etc.). In this study, the strain and damage sensing possible applic...

  6. Studies on Carbon-Fly Ash Composites with Chopped PANOX Fibers

    OpenAIRE

    Patel,Rakesh V; Manocha, S.

    2013-01-01

    Chemical analysis and morphological studies of fly ash reveals the complex chemical constituents present as spherical particles with diameter of less than 25 μm. The constituents of fly ash are silica, alumina, iron oxide, titanium dioxide, calcium and magnesium oxide, and other trace elements. The use of thermosetting as well thermoplastic polymer matrix has been made by several workers to develop polymer matrix fly ash particulate composites by using the hard and abrasive properties of fly ...

  7. Modeling for Fatigue Hysteresis Loops of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Ceramic-Matrix Composites under Multiple Loading Stress Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longbiao, Li

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, the fatigue hysteresis loops of fiber-reinforced ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs) under multiple loading stress levels considering interface wear has been investigated using micromechanical approach. Under fatigue loading, the fiber/matrix interface shear stress decreases with the increase of cycle number due to interface wear. Upon increasing of fatigue peak stress, the interface debonded length would propagate along the fiber/matrix interface. The difference of interface shear stress existed in the new and original debonded region would affect the interface debonding and interface frictional slipping between the fiber and the matrix. Based on the fatigue damage mechanism of fiber slipping relative to matrix in the interface debonded region upon unloading and subsequent reloading, the interface slip lengths, i.e., the interface debonded length, interface counter-slip length and interface new-slip length, are determined by fracture mechanics approach. The fatigue hysteresis loops models under multiple loading stress levels have been developed. The effects of single/multiple loading stress levels and different loading sequences on fatigue hysteresis loops have been investigated. The fatigue hysteresis loops of unidirectional C/SiC composite under multiple loading stress levels have been predicted.

  8. Predictive Engineering Tools for Injection-Molded Long-Carbon-Fiber Thermoplastic Composites - Second FY 2015 Quarterly Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Fifield, Leonard S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kijewski, Seth A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Sangid, Michael D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wang, Jin [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Costa, Franco [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Tucker, III, Charles L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Mathur, Raj N. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Gandhi, Umesh N. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Mori, Steven [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-05-19

    During the second quarter of FY 2015, the following technical progress has been made toward project milestones: 1) Autodesk reviewed 3D fiber orientation distribution (FOD) comparisons and provided support on improving accuracy. 2) Autodesk reviewed fiber length distribution (FLD) data comparisons and provided suggestions, assisted PNNL in FOD and FLD parameter settings optimization, and advised PNNL on appropriate through thickness thermal conductivity for improved frozen layer effect on FOD predictions. Autodesk also participated in project review meetings including preparations and discussions towards passing the go/no-go decision point. 3) Autodesk implemented an improved FOD inlet profile specification method through the part thickness for 3D meshes and provided an updated ASMI research version to PNNL. 4) The University of Illinois (Prof. C.L. Tucker) provided Autodesk with ideas to improve fiber orientation modeling 5) Purdue University re-measured fiber orientation for the fast-fill 50wt% LCF/PA66 edge-gated plaque, and delivered the fiber orientation data for this plaque at the selected locations (named A, B, and C, Figure 1) to PNNL. Purdue also re-measured fiber orientation for locations A on the fast-fill 30wt% LCF/PP and 50wt% LCF/PA66 center-gated plaques, which exhibited anomalous fiber orientation behavior. 6) Purdue University conducted fiber length measurements and delivered the length data to PNNL for the purge materials (slow-fill 30wt% LCF/PP and 30wt% LCF/PA66 purge materials) and PlastiComp plaques selected on the go/no-go list for fiber length model validation (i.e., slow-fill edge-gated 30wt% LCF/PP and 30wt% LCF/PA66 plaques, Locations A, B, and C). 7) PNNL developed a method to recover intact carbon fibers from LCF/PA66 materials. Isolated fibers were shipped to Purdue for length distribution analysis. 8) PNNL completed ASMI mid-plane analyses for all the PlastiComp plaques defined on the go/no-go list for fiber orientation (FO) model

  9. 机床用碳纤维传动轴设计与分析%Design and analysis of carbon fiber composite propeller shaft for machine tool

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋春生; 徐仕伟; 张锦光; 龚静雯

    2012-01-01

    根据机床传动轴的设计参数,设计了碳纤维传动轴,确定了铺层层数及厚度.在此基础上,根据碳纤维布的铺层原则,制定了6种铺层方案,通过比较几种方案的变形和应力分布,从中选取最优铺层方案.运用ANSYS有限元仿真软件,对设计的碳纤维复合材料传动轴,进行静态扭转分析和模态分析,得到其扭转性能参数和固有频率,根据仿真结果可知设计的碳纤维传动轴能够满足机床传动轴的使用要求.%A carbon fiber composite material propeller shaft was developed, its stacking layers and thickness were determined according to the design parameters of the machine tool propeller shaft. On this basis, six different stacking sequences were developed with the stacking principles of carbon fiber cloth; the optimal stacking sequence was chosen by comparing the strain and stress distribution of those different stacking sequences. The finite element analysis software ANSYS has been used to analysis the static torsion and modal of the designed carbon fiber composite material propeller shaft, acquired its torsional performance parameters and natural frequency. The simulation results showed that the developed carbon fiber composite material propeller shaft could meet the usage requirements of propeller shaft for heavy machine tool.

  10. Carbon Fiber from Biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milbrandt, Anelia [Clean Energy Manufacturing Analysis Center, Godlen, CO (United States); Booth, Samuel [Clean Energy Manufacturing Analysis Center, Godlen, CO (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Carbon fiber (CF), known also as graphite fiber, is a lightweight, strong, and flexible material used in both structural (load-bearing) and non-structural applications (e.g., thermal insulation). The high cost of precursors (the starting material used to make CF, which comes predominately from fossil sources) and manufacturing have kept CF a niche market with applications limited mostly to high-performance structural materials (e.g., aerospace). Alternative precursors to reduce CF cost and dependence on fossil sources have been investigated over the years, including biomass-derived precursors such as rayon, lignin, glycerol, and lignocellulosic sugars. The purpose of this study is to provide a comprehensive overview of CF precursors from biomass and their market potential. We examine the potential CF production from these precursors, the state of technology and applications, and the production cost (when data are available). We discuss their advantages and limitations. We also discuss the physical properties of biomass-based CF, and we compare them to those of polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based CF. We also discuss manufacturing and end-product considerations for bio-based CF, as well as considerations for plant siting and biomass feedstock logistics, feedstock competition, and risk mitigation strategies. The main contribution of this study is that it provides detailed technical and market information about each bio-based CF precursor in one document while other studies focus on one precursor at a time or a particular topic (e.g., processing). Thus, this publication allows for a comprehensive view of the CF potential from all biomass sources and serves as a reference for both novice and experienced professionals interested in CF production from alternative sources.

  11. Friction and wear behavior of carbon fiber reinforced brake materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Du-qing CHENG; Xue-tao WANG; Jian ZHU; Dong-bua QIU; Xiu-wei CHENG; Qing-feng GUAN

    2009-01-01

    A new composite brake material was fabri-cated with metallic powders, barium sulphate and modified phenolic resin as the matrix and carbon fiber as the reinforced material. The friction, wear and fade character-istics of this composite were determined using a D-MS friction material testing machine. The surface structure of carbon fiber reinforced friction materials was analyzed by scanning electronic microscopy (SEM). Glass fiber-reinforced and asbestos fiber-reinforced composites with the same matrix were also fabricated for comparison. The carbon fiber-reinforced friction materials (CFRFM) shows lower wear rate than those of glass fiber- and asbestos fiber-reinforced composites in the temperature range of 100℃-300℃. It is interesting that the frictional coefficient of the carbon fiber-reinforced friction materials increases as frictional temperature increases from 100℃ to 300℃, while the frictional coefficients of the other two composites decrease during the increasing temperatures. Based on the SEM observation, the wear mechanism of CFRFM at low temperatures included fiber thinning and pull-out. At high temperature, the phenolic matrix was degraded and more pull-out enhanced fiber was demonstrated. The properties of carbon fiber may be the main reason that the CFRFM possess excellent tribological performances.

  12. Coating for gasifiable carbon-graphite fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper-Tervet, Jan (Inventor); Dowler, Warren L. (Inventor); Yen, Shiao-Ping S. (Inventor); Mueller, William A. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A thin, uniform, firmly adherent coating of metal gasification catalyst is applied to a carbon-graphite fiber by first coating the fiber with a film-forming polymer containing functional moieties capable of reaction with the catalytic metal ions. Multivalent metal cations such as calcium cross-link the polymer such as a polyacrylic acid to insolubilize the film by forming catalytic metal macro-salt links between adjacent polymer chains. The coated fibers are used as reinforcement for resin composites and will gasify upon combustion without evolving conductive airborne fragments.

  13. Hygrothermal effects on fiber reinforced polyphenylene sulphide composites : humidity uptake and temperature influence on mechanical properties of glass and carbon fiber reinforced polyphenylene sulphide composites

    OpenAIRE

    Suárez Cabrera, Emmanuel

    2011-01-01

    In the ever-continuing quest for greener and cheaper aerospace materials, the Durability Group, part of the Design and Production of Composite Structures Department at the faculty of Aerospace Engineering of the Delft University of Technology is focusing on the use of new thermoplastic composites for aerospace structures. Currently the introduction of Nylon composites in the aerospace industry is being investigated. Nylon as a thermoplastic matrix for fibre reinforced composites can be bought...

  14. Fiber composite flywheel rim

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Donald E.; Ingham, Kenneth T.

    1987-01-01

    A flywheel 2 comprising a hub 4 having at least one radially projecting disc 6, an annular rim 14 secured to said disc and providing a surface circumferential to said hub, a first plurality of resin-impregnated fibers 22 wound about said rim congruent to said surface, and a shell 26 enclosing said first plurality of fibers and formed by a second plurality of resin-impregnated fibers wound about said rim tangentially to said surface.

  15. Enhancement in Mode II Interlaminar Fracture Toughness at Cryogenic Temperature of Glass Fiber/Epoxy Composites through Matrix Modification by Carbon Nanotubes and n-Butyl Glycidyl Ether

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A typical diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-F (DGEBF/diethyl toluene diamine (DETD epoxy system modified by multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs and a reactive aliphatic diluent named n-butyl glycidyl ether (BGE was used as the matrix for glass fiber composites. The glass fiber (GF reinforced composites based on the unmodified and modified epoxy matrices were prepared by the hand lay-up hot-press process. Mode II interlaminar fracture toughness at both room temperature (RT and cryogenic temperature (77 K of the GF reinforced epoxy composites was investigated to examine the effect of the matrix modification. The result showed that the introduction of MWCNTs and BGE at their previously reported optimal contents led to the remarkable enhancement in mode II interlaminar fracture toughness of the composites. Namely, the 22.9% enhancement at RT and the 31.4% enhancement at 77 K were observed for mode II interlaminar fracture toughness of the fiber composite based on the optimally modified epoxy matrix by MWCNTs and BGE compared to the unmodified case.

  16. Recent developments in carbon fibre composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsui, J.; Norita, T.; Hirata, M.

    1985-12-01

    To fulfill requirements of carbon fiber composite for aircraft structures, intermediate modulus (295 GPa) and higher strength (5600 MPa) carbon fiber TORAYCA T800 was developed. T800 composite shows greatly improved composite properties dominated by fiber such as tensile modulus, compressive modulus, tensile strength without hole and with hole, and through-penetration impact load. There is no effect on transverse tensile strength, compressive strengths, and shear strength with increase of fiber properties. Status of matrix resin developments is also discussed in terms of improvements in transverse cracking and compressive strength after impact. 9 references.

  17. Method for fabricating composite carbon foam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, Steven T. (San Leandro, CA); Pekala, Richard W. (Pleasant Hill, CA); Kaschmitter, James L. (Pleasanton, CA)

    2001-01-01

    Carbon aerogels used as a binder for granularized materials, including other forms of carbon and metal additives, are cast onto carbon or metal fiber substrates to form composite carbon thin film sheets. The thin film sheets are utilized in electrochemical energy storage applications, such as electrochemical double layer capacitors (aerocapacitors), lithium based battery insertion electrodes, fuel cell electrodes, and electrocapacitive deionization electrodes. The composite carbon foam may be formed by prior known processes, but with the solid particles being added during the liquid phase of the process, i.e. prior to gelation. The other forms of carbon may include carbon microspheres, carbon powder, carbon aerogel powder or particles, graphite carbons. Metal and/or carbon fibers may be added for increased conductivity. The choice of materials and fibers will depend on the electrolyte used and the relative trade off of system resistivity and power to system energy.

  18. Capacitor with a composite carbon foam electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, S.T.; Pekala, R.W.; Kaschmitter, J.L.

    1999-04-27

    Carbon aerogels used as a binder for granularized materials, including other forms of carbon and metal additives, are cast onto carbon or metal fiber substrates to form composite carbon thin film sheets. The thin film sheets are utilized in electrochemical energy storage applications, such as electrochemical double layer capacitors (aerocapacitors), lithium based battery insertion electrodes, fuel cell electrodes, and electrocapacitive deionization electrodes. The composite carbon foam may be formed by prior known processes, but with the solid particles being added during the liquid phase of the process, i.e. prior to gelation. The other forms of carbon may include carbon microspheres, carbon powder, carbon aerogel powder or particles, graphite carbons. Metal and/or carbon fibers may be added for increased conductivity. The choice of materials and fibers will depend on the electrolyte used and the relative trade off of system resistivity and power to system energy. 1 fig.

  19. Capacitor with a composite carbon foam electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, Steven T. (San Leandro, CA); Pekala, Richard W. (Pleasant Hill, CA); Kaschmitter, James L. (Pleasanton, CA)

    1999-01-01

    Carbon aerogels used as a binder for granularized materials, including other forms of carbon and metal additives, are cast onto carbon or metal fiber substrates to form composite carbon thin film sheets. The thin film sheets are utilized in electrochemical energy storage applications, such as electrochemical double layer capacitors (aerocapacitors), lithium based battery insertion electrodes, fuel cell electrodes, and electrocapacitive deionization electrodes. The composite carbon foam may be formed by prior known processes, but with the solid partides being added during the liquid phase of the process, i.e. prior to gelation. The other forms of carbon may include carbon microspheres, carbon powder, carbon aerogel powder or particles, graphite carbons. Metal and/or carbon fibers may be added for increased conductivity. The choice of materials and fibers will depend on the electrolyte used and the relative trade off of system resistivity and power to system energy.

  20. Thermoplastic coated carbon fibers for textile preforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, L. E.; Edie, D. D.; Lickfield, G. C.; Mccollum, J. R.

    1988-01-01

    A continuous process for producing prepreg from carbon fiber and thermoplastic matrix is described. After the tow has been spread using a pneumatic device, the process utilizes a fluidized bed to apply thermoplastic powder to the bundle. Finally, direct electrical heating of the coated fiber tow melts the polymer on the individual fibers, creating a uniform and extremely flexible prepreg. The efficiency of the process was evaluated during initial trials in which a thermoplastic polyimide, LaRC-TPI, was applied to T-300, 3K (3000 filament) carbon fiber tow. The physical properties of unidirectional composite specimens fabricated from this prepreg were measured, and the matrix uniformity and void content of the samples was determined. The results of these evaluations are detailed and discussed.

  1. The surface properties of carbon fibers and their adhesion to organic polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bascom, W. D.; Drzal, L. T.

    1987-01-01

    The state of knowledge of the surface properties of carbon fibers is reviewed, with emphasis on fiber/matrix adhesion in carbon fiber reinforced plastics. Subjects treated include carbon fiber structure and chemistry, techniques for the study of the fiber surface, polymer/fiber bond strength and its measurement, variations in polymer properties in the interphase, and the influence of fiber matrix adhesion on composite mechanical properties. Critical issues are summarized and search recommendations are made.

  2. Carbon Fiber Technology Facility (CFTF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Functionally within the MDF, ORNL operates DOE’s unique Carbon Fiber Technology Facility (CFTF)—a 42,000 ft2 innovative technology facility and works with leading...

  3. The Preparation of Carbon Nanotube/MnO2 Composite Fiber and Its Application to Flexible Micro-Supercapacitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, flexible electronic devices pursued for potential applications. The design and the fabrication of a novel flexible nanoarchitecture by coating electrical conductive MWCNT fiber with ultrathin films of MnO2 to achieve high specific capacitance, for micro-supercapacitors electrode applications, are demonstrated here. The MWCNT/MnO2 composite fiber electrode was prepared by the electrochemical deposition which was carried out through using two different methods: cyclic voltammetry and potentiostatic methods. The cyclic voltammetry method can get “crumpled paper ball” morphology MnO2 which has bigger specific capacitances than that achieved by potentiostatic method. The flexible micro-supercapacitor was fabricated by twisting two aligned MWCNT fibers and showed an area specific capacitance of 2.43 mF/cm2. The flexible micro-supercapacitors also enable promising applications in various fields.

  4. The Preparation of Carbon Nanotube/MnO2 Composite Fiber and Its Application to Flexible Micro-Supercapacitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years, flexible electronic devices pursued for potential applications. The design and the fabrication of a novel flexible nano architecture by coating electrical conductive MWCNT fiber with ultrathin films of MnO2 to achieve high specific capacitance, for micro-super capacitors electrode applications, are demonstrated here. The MWCNT/MnO2 composite fiber electrode was prepared by the electrochemical deposition which was carried out through using two different methods: cyclic voltammetry and potentiostatic methods. The cyclic voltammetry method can get “crumpled paper ball” morphology MnO2 which has bigger specific capacitances than that achieved by potentiostatic method. The flexible micro-super capacitor was fabricated by twisting two aligned MWCNT fibers and showed an area specific capacitance of 2.43 mF/cm2. The flexible micro-super capacitors also enable promising applications in various fields

  5. Experimental investigation of fatigue behavior of carbon fiber composites using fully-reversed four-point bending test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiri, Ali

    Carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRP) have become an increasingly notable material for use in structural engineering applications. Some of their advantages include high strength-to-weight ratio, high stiffness-to-weight ratio, and good moldability. Prediction of the fatigue life of composite laminates has been the subject of various studies due to the cyclic loading experienced in many applications. Both theoretical studies and experimental tests have been performed to estimate the endurance limit and fatigue life of composite plates. One of the main methods to predict fatigue life is the four-point bending test. In most previous works, the tests have been done in one direction (load ratio, R, > 0). In the current work, we have designed and manufactured a special fixture to perform a fully reversed bending test (R = -1). Static four-point bending tests were carried out on three (0°/90°)15 and (± 45°)15 samples to measure the mechanical properties of CFRP. Testing was displacement-controlled at the rate of 10 mm/min until failure. In (0°/90°)15 samples, all failed by cracking/buckling on the compressive side of the sample. While in (± 45°)15 all three tests, no visual fracture or failure of the samples was observed. 3.4 times higher stresses were reached during four-point static bending test of (0° /90°)15 samples compared to (± 45°)15. Same trend was seen in literature for similar tests. Four-point bending fatigue tests were carried out on (0° /90°)15 sample with stress ratio, R = -1 and frequency of 5 Hz. Applied maximum stresses were approximately 45%, 56%, 67%, 72% and 76% of the measured yield stress for (0° /90°)15 samples. There was visible cracking through the thickness of the samples. The expected downward trend in fatigue life with increasing maximum applied stress was observed in S-N curves of samples. There appears to be a threshold for ‘infinite’ life, defined as 1.7 million cycles in the current work, at a maximum stress of about

  6. Role of interfacial carbon layer in the thermal diffusivity/conductivity of silicon carbide fiber-reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Hemanshu; Donaldson, Kimberly Y.; Hasselman, D. P. H.; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.

    1992-01-01

    Experiments were carried out on samples of reaction-bonded silicon nitride uniaxially reinforced by SiC monofilaments with and without a 3-micron-thick carbon-rich coating. It is found that a combination of a carbon coatings on the fibers and an interfacial gap due to the thermal expansion mismatch in the composite can significantly (by a factor of 2) lower the effective thermal diffusivity in the direction transverse to the fiber. At atmospheric pressure, gaseous conduction across the interfacial gap makes a significant contribution to the heat transfer across the interface, indicated by significantly lower values of the effective thermal diffusivity under vacuum than in nitrogen or helium at atmospheric pressure.

  7. 碳纤维针织复合材料的开发应用%A Research on the Development of Carbon Fiber Knitted Composite Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白榕

    2015-01-01

    Based on the high-strength and high modulus characteristics of carbon fiber, the paper analyzes in detail the situations of development and application of carbon fiber knitted composite materials, including aerospace, security and military, electronic information, sports and medical fields. In addition, it analyzes the structure design, material’s selection, production technology of the multi-axial non-crimp fabric, which is the more often-used rein-forced composite materials. The results show that the multi-axial non-crimp fabric bears excellent design flexibility, and lends the reinforced fabrics good mechanical properties to produce high-performance components materials. The paper finally points out that carbon fiber knitted composite materials should be carried out actively to form a whole industrial chain from PAN-based carbon fiber precursor to carbon fiber composite materials.%基于碳纤维具有高强高模的性能特点,详细分析碳纤维针织复合材料的研制和应用情况,包括在航空航天、国防军事、电子信息等高科技产业领域的应用和其他领域如体育界、医疗界等的应用。并对较常用的复合材料增强结构———多轴向无屈曲织物的结构设计、材料选择、生产技术等进行研究,表明多轴向无屈曲织物设计灵活,使增强织物具有良好的力学性能,能够制成具有理想机械性能和运行性能的构件。最后提出可以开发碳纤维针织复合材料,形成从聚丙烯腈基碳纤维原丝到碳纤维复合材料的产业链。

  8. Prospects for using carbon-carbon composites for EMI shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaier, James R.

    1990-01-01

    Since pyrolyzed carbon has a higher electrical conductivity than most polymers, carbon-carbon composites would be expected to have higher electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding ability than polymeric resin composites. A rule of mixtures model of composite conductivity was used to calculate the effect on EMI shielding of substituting a pyrolyzed carbon matrix for a polymeric matrix. It was found that the improvements were small, no more than about 2 percent for the lowest conductivity fibers (ex-rayon) and less than 0.2 percent for the highest conductivity fibers (vapor grown carbon fibers). The structure of the rule of mixtures is such that the matrix conductivity would only be important in those cases where it is much higher than the fiber conductivity, as in metal matrix composites.

  9. Jilin Chemical Fiber Group Launches Its Largest Carbon Fiber Preject

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Flora

    2011-01-01

    China's carbon fiber precursor production line with 5,000 tons of annual output was put into operation in Jilin Chemical Fiber Group on November 18th this year, creating the maximum production capacity currently in China, for which Jilin Chemical Fiber Group become China's largest carbon fiber precursor production base, The smooth operation of the project has laid a solid foundation for promoting China's carbon fiber industry steady, rapid, and healthy development,

  10. 碳纤维复合材料螺旋桨铺层角度研究%Ply Angle of Carbon Fiber Composite Propeller

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张建国; 岳金; 宋春生; 张锦光

    2014-01-01

    与传统的金属螺旋桨相比,碳纤维复合材料螺旋桨具有低振动、低噪音、轻质高效、耐海水腐蚀和易维修等特点。然而由于复合材料各向异性,碳纤维复合材料螺旋桨铺层角度对其性能有较大影响,因此,首先在Fluent中对螺旋桨进行桨叶压力分析,得到在设计工况下螺旋桨桨叶表面压力;其次对碳纤维复合材料螺旋桨进行铺层设计,得到了几种铺层方案,求解分析得到了铺层角度与碳纤维复合材料螺旋桨桨叶最大位移的关系;最后考虑到螺旋桨几何特征,对设计铺层方案的主铺层角进行了修正,修正作用使桨叶变形范围更大,为复合材料螺旋桨铺层角度设计提供了参考。%Compared with traditional metal propellers , carbon fiber composite propellers are of low vibration , low noise, light and efficient , resistant to seawater corrosion , and easy to maintain .Because of anisotropy characteristics of composite materials , ply angles of carbon fiber composite propellers have a greater impact on its performance .Firstly, blade stress analysis was taken in Fluent and propeller surface stress was gained in the design conditions .And then, ply angle design of carbon fiber composite propellers was conducted; the relations between ply angle and carbon fiber composite propeller blades maximum displacement were obtained;and finally taking the geometric characteristics of the propeller into account , the ply angle was modified .It can provide a reference for the ply angle design of composite propeller .

  11. Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites (CFCC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. A. Wagner

    2002-12-18

    This report summarizes work to develop CFCC's for various applications in the Industries of the Future (IOF) and power generation areas. Performance requirements range from relatively modest for hot gas filters to severe for turbine combustor liners and infrared burners. The McDermott Technology Inc. (MTI) CFCC program focused on oxide/oxide composite systems because they are known to be stable in the application environments of interest. The work is broadly focused on dense and porous composite systems depending on the specific application. Dense composites were targeted at corrosion resistant components, molten aluminum handling components and gas turbine combustor liners. The development work on dense composites led to significant advances in fiber coatings for oxide fibers and matrix densification. Additionally, a one-step fabrication process was developed to produce low cost composite components. The program also supported key developments in advanced oxide fibers that resulted in an improved version of Nextel 610 fiber (commercially available as Nextel 650) and significant progress in the development of a YAG/alumina fiber. Porous composite development focused on the vacuum winding process used to produce hot gas filters and infrared burner components.

  12. Continuous Natural Fiber Reinforced Thermoplastic Composites by Fiber Surface Modification

    OpenAIRE

    Patcharat Wongsriraksa; Kohsuke Togashi; Asami Nakai; Hiroyuki Hamada

    2013-01-01

    Continuous natural fiber reinforced thermoplastic materials are expected to replace inorganic fiber reinforced thermosetting materials. However, in the process of fabricating the composite, it is difficult to impregnate the thermoplastic resin into reinforcement fiber because of the high melt viscosity. Therefore, intermediate material, which allows high impregnation during molding, has been investigated for fabricating continuous fiber reinforced thermoplastic composite by aligning resin fib...

  13. Hybrid carbon-glass fiber/toughened epoxy thick composites subject to drop-weight and ballistic impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevkat, Ercan

    The goals of this study are to investigate the low velocity and ballistic impact response of thick-section hybrid fiber composites at room temperature. Plain-woven S2-Glass and IM7 Graphite fabrics are chosen as fiber materials reinforcing the SC-79 epoxy. Four different types of composites consisting of alternating layers of glass and graphite woven fabric sheets are considered. Tensile tests are conducted using 98 KN (22 kip) MTS testing machine equipped with environmental chamber. Low-velocity impact tests are conducted using an Instron-Dynatup 8250 impact test machine equipped with an environmental chamber. Ballistic impact tests are performed using helium pressured high-speed gas-gun. Tensile tests results were used to define the material behavior of the hybrid and non-hybrid composites in Finite Element modeling. The low velocity and ballistic impact tests showed that hybrid composites performance was somewhere between non-hybrid woven composites. Using woven glass fabrics as outer skin improved the impact performance of woven graphite composite. However hybrid composites are prone to delamination especially between dissimilar layers. The ballistic limit velocity V50 hybrid composites were higher that of woven graphite composite and lower than that of woven glass composite. Both destructive cross-sectional micrographs and nondestructive ultrasonic techniques are used to evaluate the damage created by impact. The Finite Element code LS-DYNA is chosen to perform numerical simulations of low velocity and ballistic impact on thick-section hybrid composites. The damage progression in these composites shows anisotropic nonlinearity. The material model to describe this behavior is not available in LS-DYNA material library. Initially, linear orthotropic material with damage (Chan-Chan Model) is employed to simulate some of the experimental results. Then, user-defined material subroutine is incorporated into LS-DYNA to simulate the nonlinear behavior. The

  14. Numerical simulating and experimental study on the woven carbon fiber-reinforced composite laminates under low-velocity impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hanyang; Tang, Zhanwen; Pan, Lingying; Zhao, Weidong; Sun, Baogang; Jiang, Wenge

    2016-05-01

    Impact damage has been identified as a critical form of the defects that constantly threatened the reliability of composite structures, such as those used in the aerospace structures and systems. Low energy impacts can introduce barely visible damage and cause the degradation of structural stiffness, furthermore, the flaws caused by low-velocity impact are so dangerous that they can give rise to the further extended delaminations. In order to improve the reliability and load carrying capacity of composite laminates under low-velocity impact, in this paper, the numerical simulatings and experimental studies on the woven fiber-reinforced composite laminates under low-velocity impact with impact energy 16.7J were discussed. The low velocity impact experiment was carried out through drop-weight system as the reason of inertia effect. A numerical progressive damage model was provided, in which the damages of fiber, matrix and interlamina were considered by VUMT subroutine in ABAQUS, to determine the damage modes. The Hashin failure criteria were improved to cover the failure modes of fiber failure in the directions of warp/weft and delaminations. The results of Finite Element Analysis (FEA) were compared with the experimental results of nondestructive examination including the results of ultrasonic C-scan, cross-section stereomicroscope and contact force - time history curves. It is found that the response of laminates under low-velocity impact could be divided into stages with different damage. Before the max-deformation of the laminates occurring, the matrix cracking, fiber breakage and delaminations were simulated during the impactor dropping. During the releasing and rebounding period, matrix cracking and delaminations areas kept increasing in the laminates because of the stress releasing of laminates. Finally, the simulating results showed the good agreements with the results of experiment.

  15. Wood versus Plant Fibers: Similarities and Differences in Composite Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Madsen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The work on cellulose fiber composites is typically strictly divided into two separated research fields depending on the fiber origin, that is, from wood and from annual plants, representing the two different industries of forest and agriculture, respectively. The present paper evaluates in parallel wood fibers and plant fibers to highlight their similarities and differences regarding their use as reinforcement in composites and to enable mutual transfer of knowledge and technology between the two research fields. The paper gives an introduction to the morphology, chemistry, and ultrastructure of the fibers, the modeling of the mechanical properties of the fibers, the fiber preforms available for manufacturing of composites, the typical mechanical properties of the composites, the modeling of the mechanical properties with focus on composites having a random fiber orientation and a non-negligible porosity content, and finally, the moisture sensitivity of the composites. The performance of wood and plant fiber composites is compared to the synthetic glass and carbon fibers conventionally used for composites, and advantages and disadvantages of the different fibers are discussed.

  16. Energy dissipation and high-strain rate dynamic response of E-glass fiber composites with anchored carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study explores the mechanical properties of an E-glass fabric composite reinforced with anchored multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The CNTs were grown on the E-glass fabric using a floating catalyst chemical vapor deposition procedure. The E-glass fabric with attached CNTs was then incorpor...

  17. 碳纤维复合材料的应用现状及我国碳纤维工业的发展方向%Application Status of Carbon Fiber Composites and the Development Trend of Carbon Fiber Industry in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李奇辉; 刘向阳; 房晓斌

    2016-01-01

    综述了碳纤维复合材料的性能及特点,从卫星天线、飞机制造、运载火箭、风电叶片及体育器材等多方面,介绍了国内外碳纤维复合材料的应用现状及发展前景,分析了我国碳纤维复合材料的发展方向。%This paper reviews the properties and characteristics of carbon fiber composites, introduces the application status and development prospect of carbon fiber composites in China and abroad from many aspects, such as satellite antenna, aircraft manufacturing, launch vehicle, wind turbine blade and sports equipment, and analyzes the development trend of carbon fiber composites in China.

  18. Effect of anodic surface treatment on PAN-based carbon fiber and its relationship to the fracture toughness of the carbon fiber-reinforced polymer composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarraf, Hamid; Skarpova, Ludmila

    2008-01-01

    . Results from contact angle measurements revealed that the angle of electrolyte solution largely decreases with increasing current densities of treatments up to 0.4-0.5 A m(-2). The results obtained from the evolution of K-IC with flexure of the composites as a function of electric current density shown...... that the K-IC of the composite continually increases with increased current densities of the treatments up to 0.5 A m(-2), and a maximum strength value is found about 294 MPa cm(1/2) at the anodic treatment of 0.5 A m(-2). It can be concluded that the anodic surface treatment is largely influenced...

  19. Carbon nanotube reinforced polyacrylonitrile and poly(etherketone) fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Rahul

    The graphitic nature, continuous structure, and high mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) make them good candidate for reinforcing polymer fiber. The different types of CNTs including single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), few-wall carbon nanotubes (FWNTs), and multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs), and carbon nanofibers (CNFs) differ in terms of their diameter and number of graphitic walls. The desire has been to increase the concentration of CNTs as much as possible to make next generation multi-functional materials. The work in this thesis is mainly focused on MWNT and CNF reinforced polyacrylonitrile (PAN) composite fibers, and SWNT, FWNT, and MWNT reinforced poly(etherketone) (PEK) composite fibers. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to report the spinning of 20% MWNT or 30% CNF reinforced polymer fiber spun using conventional fiber spinning. Also, this is the first study to report the PEK/CNT composite fibers. The fibers were characterized for their thermal, tensile, mechanical, and dynamic mechanical properties. The fiber structure and morphology was studied using WAXD and SEM. The effect of two-stage heat drawing, sonication time for CNF dispersion, fiber drying temperature, and molecular weight of PAN was also studied. Other challenges associated with processing high concentrations of solutions for making composite fibers have been identified and reported. The effect of CNT diameter and concentration on fiber spinnability and electrical conductivity of composite fiber have also been studied. This work suggests that CNT diameter controls the maximum possible concentration of CNTs in a composite fiber. The results show that by properly choosing the type of CNT, length of CNTs, dispersion of CNTs, fiber spinning method, fiber draw ratio, and type of polymer, one can get electrically conducting fibers with wide range of conductivities for different applications. The PEK based control and composite fibers possess high thermal

  20. Studies on copper coating on carbon fibers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO; Zhuo-kun; LIU; Yi-han; YAO; Guang-chun

    2005-01-01

    The weak interface bonding of metal matrix reinforced by carbon fibers is the central problem of fabricating such composites. Depositing copper coating on carbon fibers is regarded as a feasible method to solve the problem. In this paper, copper coating has been deposited on the fibers through both electroless deposition and electroplating methods. Two kinds of complexing agents and two stabilizing agents are taken during the electroless plating process. The solution is stable, and little extraneous component is absorbed on the surface. After adding additive agents and increasing the concentration of H2SO4 to the acid cupric sulfate electrolyte, the "black core" during usual electroplating process is avoided. The quality of copper coating is analyzed using SEM and XRD, etc.

  1. Application of Carbon Fiber Composite Material in the Field of Automotive and Sports Goods%碳纤维复合材料在汽车、体育用品领域的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗栋

    2016-01-01

    碳纤维复合材料不仅在航天航空及其他工业领域得到广泛应用,而且也是汽车、体育用品开发最好的材料之一。该文介绍了碳纤维主要产品种类、用途及应用形态、几种碳纤维复合材料性能比较以及碳纤维复合材料在汽车工业、体育休闲用品领域的应用。随着科技发展,在我国占碳纤维总消费量的80%~90%是汽车体育用品。%Carbon fiber composite material is not only widely used in aerospace,automotive and other industrial fields,but also one of the best material for the development of automotive sports products. The main products of car-bon fiber,application of carbon fiber,and the properties comparasion of carbon fiber composite materials were intro-duced. Application of carbon fiber composite material in the field of automobile industry and sports leisure products were also introduced. With the development of science and technology,China’s carbon fiber consumption structure of sports is in the first place,about the total consumption of 80% ~90%.

  2. Thermal Properties of Hybrid Carbon Nanotube/Carbon Fiber Polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jin Ho; Cano, Roberto J.; Luong, Hoa; Ratcliffe, James G.; Grimsley, Brian W.; Siochi, Emilie J.

    2016-01-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites possess many advantages for aircraft structures over conventional aluminum alloys: light weight, higher strength- and stiffness-to-weight ratio, and low life-cycle maintenance costs. However, the relatively low thermal and electrical conductivities of CFRP composites are deficient in providing structural safety under certain operational conditions such as lightning strikes. One possible solution to these issues is to interleave carbon nanotube (CNT) sheets between conventional carbon fiber (CF) composite layers. However, the thermal and electrical properties of the orthotropic hybrid CNT/CF composites have not been fully understood. In this study, hybrid CNT/CF polymer composites were fabricated by interleaving layers of CNT sheets with Hexcel (Registered Trademark) IM7/8852 prepreg. The CNT sheets were infused with a 5% solution of a compatible epoxy resin prior to composite fabrication. Orthotropic thermal and electrical conductivities of the hybrid polymer composites were evaluated. The interleaved CNT sheets improved the in-plane thermal conductivity of the hybrid composite laminates by about 400% and the electrical conductivity by about 3 orders of magnitude.

  3. PROGRESS ON ACTIVATED CARBON FIBERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Activated carbon fiber is one kind of important adsorption materials. These novel fibrousadsorbents have high specific surface areas or abundant functional groups, which make them havegreater adsorption/desorption rates and larger adsorption capacities than other adsorbents. They canbe prepared as bundle, paper, cloth and felt to meet various technical requirement. They also showreduction property. In this paper the latest progress on the studies of the preparation and adsorptionproperties of activated carbon fibers is reviewed. The application of these materials in drinking waterpurification, environmental control, resource recovery, chemical industry, and in medicine and healthcare is also presented.

  4. The Oxidation Kinetics of Continuous Carbon Fibers in a Cracked Ceramic Matrix Composite. Degree awarded by Case Western Reserve Univ., May 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbig, Michael C.

    2001-01-01

    Experimental observations and results suggest two primary regimes as a function of temperature, i.e., diffusion and reaction controlled kinetics. Thermogravimetric analysis of carbon fiber in flowing oxygen gave an activation energy of 64.1 kJ/mol in the temperature range of 500 to 600 C and an apparent activation energy of 7.6 kJ/mol for temperatures from 600 to 1400 C. When C/SiC composite material was unstressed, matrix effects at temperatures from 900 to 1400 C protected the internal fibers. When under stress, self-protection was not observed. Increasing the stress from 10 to 25 ksi caused a 67 to 82 percent reduction in times to failure at temperatures from 750 to 1500 C. Based on experimental results, observation, and theory, a finite difference model was developed, which simulates the diffusion of oxygen into a matrix crack that is bridged by carbon fibers. The model allows the influence of important variables on oxidation kinetics to be studied systematically, i.e., temperature, reaction rate constant, diffusion coefficient, environment, and sample geometry.

  5. DSC Study on the Polyacrylonitrile Precursors for Carbon Fibers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wangxi ZHANG; Musen LI

    2005-01-01

    Different polyacrylonitrile (PAN) precursor fibers that displayed various thermal properties were studied by using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Results showed that some commercial PAN precursor fibers displayed double separated peaks and these fibers were of high quality because of their process stability during their conversion to carbon fibers of high performance. Some fabrication processes, such as spinning, drawing, could not apparently change the DSC features of a PAN precursor fiber. It was concluded that the thermal properties of a PAN precursor fiber was mainly determined from its comonomer content type and compositions.

  6. Characteristics of Resistivity-temperature for Carbon Fiber Reinforced Concrete

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The resistance response to temperature change of carbon fiber reinforced cement-based composites (CFRC) is reported, which shows some outstanding phenomena of positive temperature coefficient (PTC) of resistance and negative temperature coefficient (NTC) of resistance during the temperature rising.The influences of carbon fiber, cement-based matrix and thermal cycles on the characteristics of temperature-resistivity for the system were also discussed.Because of the special characteristics for temperature resistivity, carbon fiber cement based composites can be useful in structure with the function of alarm for fire.

  7. Nano-engineered composites: interlayer carbon nanotubes effect

    OpenAIRE

    Glaucio Carley; Viviany Geraldo; Sergio Oliveira; Antonio Ferreira Avila

    2013-01-01

    The concept of carbon nanotube interlayer was successfully introduced to carbon fiber/epoxy composites. This new hybrid laminated composites was characterized by Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and tensile tests. An increase on peak stress close to 85% was witnessed when CNTs interlayer with 206.30 mg was placed to carbon fiber/epoxy laminates. The failure mechanisms are associated to CNTs distribution between and around carbon fibers. These CNTs are also r...

  8. Hybrid fiber and nanopowder reinforced composites for wind turbine blades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikoloz M. Chikhradze

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of an investigation into the production of wind turbine blades manufactured using polymer composites reinforced by hybrid (carbon, basalt, glass fibers and strengthened by various nanopowders (oxides, carbides, borides are presented. The hybrid fiber-reinforced composites (HFRC were manufactured with prepreg technology by molding pre-saturated epoxy-strengthened matrix-reinforced fabric. Performance of the manufactured composites was estimated with values of the coefficient of operating condition (COC at a moderate and elevated temperature.

  9. A technique for real-time detection, location and quantification of damage in large polymer composite structures made of electrically non-conductive fibers and carbon nanotube networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naghashpour, Ali; Van Hoa, Suong

    2013-11-15

    In this work, we have developed a novel, practical and real-time structural health monitoring (SHM) technique to detect, locate and quantify damage that occurs at one or more locations in large polymer composite structures (LPCSs) made of electrically non-conductive fibers and carbon nanotube networks. Our technique exploits the piezoresistive effect of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in epoxy resin. The electrically conductive epoxy resin was used to prepare glass fiber reinforced composite plates. The plates were marked with grid points where electrically conductive silver-epoxy pastes were deposited. The electrical resistances between the grid points were measured and used as a reference set. Two new concepts are introduced. One is uniformity of MWCNT distribution which gives rise to uniformity in electrical conductivity. The second is maximum sensitivity to change in electrical resistance due to the occurrence of damage. These issues are demonstrated as criteria to determine the optimal quantity of MWCNTs. This optimal quantity is used to assure damage detectability at any region in the large plates. Drilled holes and impact testing were conducted to simulate damage. The damage causes the electrical resistance between the contact points surrounding the damage to increase. This increase is used to detect, locate and quantify damage. PMID:24141251

  10. Application of carbon fiber composites in the automotive industry%碳纤维复合材料在汽车工业中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵艳荣; 胡平; 梁继才; 张文杰

    2015-01-01

    节能减排是当前汽车工业可持续发展迫切需要解决的问题,采用碳纤维复合材料等轻质材料使汽车轻量化是一个有效的解决办法.介绍了碳纤维复合材料的性能特点和在汽车上的应用现状,从材料、设计和成型工艺3个方面分析了其在国内汽车工业应用中的问题,提出了促进碳纤维复合材料广泛应用的发展建议,并展望了其在汽车工业中的应用前景.%Energy conservation and emission reduction are two urgent problems to be solved in the sustainable development of automotive industry, an effective solution is to use carbon fiber composites and other light materials to make automobile lightweight. Performance characteristics and application status in the automotive industry of carbon fiber composites are introduced, application problems in the domestic automotive industry are analyzed from three aspects of material, design and forming process, some development suggestions are put forward and application prospect in the automotive industry is forecasted.

  11. Piezoresistivity of carbon fiber mat/epoxy resin composites%碳纤维毡/环氧树脂复合材料的力阻效应∗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑华升; 朱四荣; 李卓球

    2015-01-01

    The piezoresistive responses of the composites fabricated by short-cut carbon fiber mat and epoxy res-in were studied by uniaxial tension tests.Positive piezoresistive effect of this composite was found in the test. The gauge factor for single-lamina carbon fiber mat/epoxy resin composite is as high as 13.9,but the resistance for this composite is observed to be decreased gradually.More stable piezoresistivity was attained in laminated composite and the gauge factors were observed to decrease with the increase of the number of the laminas.The gauge factor for 5-lamina carbon fiber mat/epoxy resin composite is 5.7.The improvement in stability and the decrease in gauge factor for the laminated composite are due to the solid conductive network of this composite. The laminated carbon fiber mat/epoxy resin composites were used as smart layers on the beam surfaces,and based on their piezoresistivities,the structural deformation monitoring upon cyclic load and the damage detec-ting upon monotonous load were conducted.%以短切碳纤维毡和环氧树脂为原材料制成复合材料,考察了该材料在单向拉伸载荷下的力阻响应.实验结果表明,该材料具有正力阻效应(拉应变引起材料的电阻增大).其中,单层碳纤维毡/环氧树脂复合材料的力阻灵敏度可达13.9,但在加载过程中其电阻表现出逐渐衰减趋势;多层碳纤维毡/环氧树脂复合材料的力阻性能更为稳定,但随着层数的增加灵敏度逐渐降低,5层复合材料的力阻灵敏度下降到5.7.多层复合材料的立体导电网络是其稳定性提升和灵敏度下降的主要原因.将碳纤维毡/环氧树脂多层复合材料敷设在梁结构表面形成智能表层,利用其力阻性能实现了梁结构在循环载荷下的变形监测以及在单调载荷作用下损伤监测.

  12. Predictive Engineering Tools for Injection-Molded Long-Carbon-Fiber Thermoplastic Composites - FY 2014 First Quarterly Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Sanborn, Scott E.; Simmons, Kevin L.; Mathur, Raj N.; Sangid, Michael D.; Jin, Xiaoshi; Costa, Franco; Gandhi, Umesh N.; Mori, Steven; Tucker III, Charles L.

    2014-02-19

    The CRADA between PNNL, Autodesk, Toyota and Magna has been effective since October 28th, 2013. The whole team including CRADA and subcontract partners kicked off the project technically on November 1st, 2013. This report describes work performed during the first quarter of FY 2014. The following technical progresses have been made toward project milestones: 1) The project kickoff meeting was organized at PlastiComp, Inc. in Winona on November 13th, 2013 involving all the project partners. During this meeting the research plan and Gantt chart were discussed and refined. The coordination of the research activities among the partners was also discussed to ensure that the deliverables and timeline will be met. 2) Autodesk delivered a research version of ASMI to PNNL for process modeling using this tool under the project. PNNL installed this research version on a PNNL computer and tested it. Currently, PNNL is using ASMI to prepare the models for PlastiComp plaques. 3) PlastiComp has compounded long carbon-fiber reinforced polypropylene and polyamide 6,6 compounds for rheological and thermal characterization tests by the Autodesk laboratories in Melbourne, Australia. 4) Initial mold flow analysis was carried out by PlastiComp to confirm that the 3D complex part selected by Toyota as a representative automotive part is moldable. 5) Toyota, Magna, PlastiComp and PNNL finalized the planning for molding the Toyota 3D complex part. 6) Purdue University worked with PNNL to update and specify the test matrix for characterization of fiber length/orientation. 7) Purdue University developed tools to automate the data collection and analysis of fiber length and orientation measurements. 8) Purdue University designed and specified equipment to replace the need for equipment using the technology established by the University of Leeds at General Motors.

  13. Current Situation of the Carbon Fiber and Related Composites Industry%碳纤维及复合材料产业链现状分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张传雄

    2015-01-01

    By discussing the spinning, pre-oxidation, carbonization, compounding and recycling technologies for making carbon ifber and related composites, the paper discussed the present situation of technological development in the field of carbon fiber and related composites; analyzed the market situation of such products and their application prospects in aerospace, national defense, wind turbine, sport and leisure, transportation vehicles, civil-engineering, etc. It also pointed out some problems existing in China’s carbon ifber industry and gave related solutions.%从碳纤维纺丝、预氧化、碳化、复合成型和回收利用等方面概述碳纤维及复合材料产业链技术现状,分析碳纤维及复合材料市场现状以及在国防航空、交通工具、风力发电、运动休闲、土木建筑等领域的应用前景,指出中国碳纤维产业发展存在的问题及建议。

  14. Carbon Nanomaterials as Reinforcements for Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shen; Su, Ching-Hua; Lehoczky, S. L.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Carbon nanomaterials including fellerenes, nanotubes (CNT) and nanofibers have been proposed for many applications. One of applications is to use the carbon nanomaterials as reinforcements for composites, especially for polymer matrices. Carbon nanotubes is a good reinforcement for lightweight composite applications due to its low mass density and high Young's modulus. Two obscures need to overcome for carbon nanotubes as reinforcements in composites, which are large quantity production and functioning the nanotubes. This presentation will discuss the carbon nanotube growth by chemical vapor deposition. In order to reduce the cost of producing carbon nanotubes as well as preventing the sliding problems, carbon nanotubes were also synthesized on carbon fibers. The synthesis process and characterization results of nanotubes and nanotubes/fibers will be discussed in the presentation.

  15. Oxidation-resistant interfacial coatings for continuous fiber ceramic composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stinton, D.P.; Besmann, T.M.; Bleier, A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Shanmugham, S.; Liaw, P.K. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1995-08-01

    Continuous fiber ceramic composites mechanical behavior are influenced by the bonding characteristics between the fiber and the matrix. Finite modeling studies suggest that a low-modulus interfacial coating material will be effective in reducing the residual thermal stresses that are generated upon cooling from processing temperatures. Nicalon{trademark}/SiC composites with carbon, alumina and mullite interfacial coatings were fabricated with the SiC matrix deposited using a forced-flow, thermal gradient chemical vapor infiltration process. Composites with mullite interfacial coatings exhibited considerable fiber pull-out even after oxidation and have potential as a composite system.

  16. Research progress on Domestic Carbon Fiber Reinforced Thermoplastic Composite%国内碳纤维增强热塑性复合材料研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐秋红; 谭臻; 闫烨; 刘丽慧; 耿志; 李云英

    2014-01-01

    综述了近几年国内碳纤维(CF)增强热塑性复合材料的研究进展,主要概述了CF不同预处理方式、CF含量、制备工艺、试验条件等对CF增强热塑性复合材料力学、摩擦磨损等性能的影响。%The research progresses on domestic carbon fiber (CF) reinforced thermoplastic composites in recent years were summarized. The influences of different pretreatment methods about CF,CF content,preparation technology and test conditions on mechanical,friction and wear properties of the composites were reviewed mainly.

  17. Automatic Fiber Orientation Detection for Sewed Carbon Fibers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Automatic production and precise positioning of carbon fiber reinforced plastics (FRP) require precise detection of the fiber orientations. This paper presents an automatic method for detecting fiber orientations of sewed carbon fibers in the production of FRP. Detection was achieved by appropriate use of regional filling, edge detection operators, autocorrelation methods, and the Hough transformation. Regional filling was used to reduce the influence of the sewed regions, autocorrelation was used to clarify the fiber directions, edge detection operators were used to extract the edge features for the fiber orientations, and the Hough transformation was used to calculate the angles. Results for two kinds of carbon fiber materials show that the method is relatively quick and precise for detecting carbon fiber orientations.

  18. Continuous, linearly intermixed fiber tows and composite molded article thereform

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Paul E. (Inventor); Chung, Tai-Shung (Inventor); Ying, Lincoln (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    The instant invention involves a process used in preparing fibrous tows which may be formed into polymeric plastic composites. The process involves the steps of (a) forming a carbon fiber tow; (b) forming a thermoplastic polymeric fiber tow; (c) intermixing the two tows; and (d) withdrawing the intermixed tow for further use.

  19. ASSESMENT OF SELF HEALING PROPERTY IN HYBRID FIBER POLYMERIC COMPOSITE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.ABILASH

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, Natural fiber reinforced composites is an emerging area in polymer technology. Fibers resulting from plants are considered a budding substitute for non-renewable synthetic fibers like glass and carbon fibers. The objective of this study is to merge the benefits of natural and synthetic fibers by developing ahybrid composite of jute and glass fibers along with self healing property to eliminate delamination without compromising the benefits of hybridization. This concept offers the designer an ability to incorporate secondary functional ability of counteracting service degradation in addition to achieving the primary, usually structuralintegrity, requirement. The self-healing approach utilizes a releasable healing agent contained in a hollow fiber that is embedded in a resin system. Specimens are produced using a hollow glass fiber and epoxy resin. In addition, in the case of multiple fibers test, e-glass fibers are incorporated in the composite. When a crack isinitiated and propagates through the composite breaking the hollow fiber, a liquid healing agent comes out and fills the crack gap. Polymerization of the monomer healing agent is facilitated when it contacts a catalyst that is pre-coated on the outside surface of the hollow glass fiber. Self-healing materials also have the benefit ofoffering lighter and optimized structures as well as reduced maintenance cost.

  20. Research Progress of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Polylactic Acid Composites%碳纤维增强聚乳酸复合材料的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李健; 杨柳; 杨建忠

    2012-01-01

    The carbon fiber-reinforced polylactide(C/PLA) composites made of the carbon fiber as reinfoced fiber and polylactide as matrix are introduced. Compared with polylactied material, mechanical properties and shock resistance performance of the composites are improved, and they have some degradability. They also have favorable biocompatibility, and are suitable for development of internal fixation for bone fracture, bone repair material, etc. The main problems existing in the industrial production and application are summarized and the future application research are prospected.%介绍了以碳纤维为增强纤维、聚乳酸为基体,采取相应的加工工艺制备出碳纤维增强聚乳酸复合材料的种类与制备工艺,研究了该复合材料的相关性能,发现该材料与聚乳酸材料相比力学性能、抗冲击性能得到了明显改善,有一定的降解性,并且生物相容性良好,适合于开发骨折内固定材料、骨修复材料等.概述了碳纤维增强聚乳酸复合材料在工业化生产及应用中存在的主要问题,并对今后的应用研究进行了展望.

  1. [Carbon fiber-reinforced plastics as implant materials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bader, R; Steinhauser, E; Rechl, H; Siebels, W; Mittelmeier, W; Gradinger, R

    2003-01-01

    Carbon fiber-reinforced plastics have been used clinically as an implant material for different applications for over 20 years.A review of technical basics of the composite materials (carbon fibers and matrix systems), fields of application,advantages (e.g., postoperative visualization without distortion in computed and magnetic resonance tomography), and disadvantages with use as an implant material is given. The question of the biocompatibility of carbon fiber-reinforced plastics is discussed on the basis of experimental and clinical studies. Selected implant systems made of carbon composite materials for treatments in orthopedic surgery such as joint replacement, tumor surgery, and spinal operations are presented and assessed. Present applications for carbon fiber reinforced plastics are seen in the field of spinal surgery, both as cages for interbody fusion and vertebral body replacement.

  2. COAL DERIVED MATRIX PITCHES FOR CARBON-CARBON COMPOSITE MANUFACTURE/PRODUCTION OF FIBERS AND COMPOSITES FROM COAL-BASED PRECURSORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter G. Stansberry; John W. Zondlo

    2001-07-01

    The Consortium for premium Carbon Products from Coal, with funding from the US Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory continue with the development of innovative technologies that will allow coal or coal-derived feedstocks to be used in the production of value-added carbon materials. In addition to supporting eleven independent projects during budget period 3, three meetings were held at two separate locations for the membership. The first was held at Nemacolin Woodlands Resort on May 15-16, 2000. This was followed by two meetings at Penn State, a tutorial on August 11, 2000 and a technical progress meeting on October 26-27.

  3. Chemical Analysis of Emu Feather Fiber Reinforced Epoxy Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.Chandra sekhar

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A composite is usually made up of at least two materials out of which one is binding material called as matrix and other is a reinforcement material known as fiber. For the past ten years research is going on to explore possible composites with natural fiber like plant fibers and animal fibers. The important characteristics of composites are their strength, hardness light in weight. It is also necessary to study about the resistance of the composites for deferent chemicals. In the present work, composites prepared with epoxy (Araldite LY-556 as resin and „emu‟ bird feathers as fiber have been tested for chemical resistance. The composites were prepared by varying fiber loading (P of „emu‟ feathers ranging from 1 to 5 and length (L of feather fibers from 1 to 5 cm. The composites thus prepared were subjected to various chemicals (Acids, Alkalis, solvents etc.. Observations were plotted and studied. The results reveal that there will be weight gain for the composite samples after three days, when treated with Hydrochloric acid, Sodium carbonate, Acetic acid, Sodium hydroxide, Nitric acid and Ammonium hydroxide. Weight loss was observed for all the samples including pure epoxy when treated with Benzene, Carbon tetra chloride and Toluene.

  4. Carbon fiber-reinforced carbon as a potential implant material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, D; Williams, D F; Hill, J

    1978-01-01

    A carbon fiber-reinforced carbon is being evaluated as a promising implant material. In a unidirectional composite, high strengths (1200 MN/m2 longitudinal flexural strength) and high modulus (140 GN/m2 flexural modulus) may be obtained with an interlaminar shear strength of 18 MN/m2. Alternatively, layers of fibers may be laid in two directions to give more isotopic properties. The compatibility of the material with bone has been studied by implanting specimens in holes drilled in rat femora. For a period of up to 8 weeks, a thin layer of fibrous tissue bridged the gap between bone and implant; but this tissue mineralizes and by 10 weeks, bone can be observed adjacent to the implant, giving firm fixation. Potential applications include endosseous dental implants where a greater strength in the neck than that provided by unreinforced carbon would be advantageous.

  5. The Tensile Behavior of High-Strength Carbon Fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langston, Tye

    2016-08-01

    Carbon fibers exhibit exceptional properties such as high stiffness and specific strength, making them excellent reinforcements for composite materials. However, it is difficult to directly measure their tensile properties and estimates are often obtained by tensioning fiber bundles or composites. While these macro scale tests are informative for composite design, their results differ from that of direct testing of individual fibers. Furthermore, carbon filament strength also depends on other variables, including the test length, actual fiber diameter, and material flaw distribution. Single fiber tensile testing was performed on high-strength carbon fibers to determine the load and strain at failure. Scanning electron microscopy was also conducted to evaluate the fiber surface morphology and precisely measure each fiber's diameter. Fiber strength was found to depend on the test gage length and in an effort to better understand the overall expected performance of these fibers at various lengths, statistical weak link scaling was performed. In addition, the true Young's modulus was also determined by taking the system compliance into account. It was found that all properties (tensile strength, strain to failure, and Young's modulus) matched very well with the manufacturers' reported values at 20 mm gage lengths, but deviated significantly at other lengths.

  6. The Tensile Behavior of High-Strength Carbon Fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langston, Tye

    2016-08-01

    Carbon fibers exhibit exceptional properties such as high stiffness and specific strength, making them excellent reinforcements for composite materials. However, it is difficult to directly measure their tensile properties and estimates are often obtained by tensioning fiber bundles or composites. While these macro scale tests are informative for composite design, their results differ from that of direct testing of individual fibers. Furthermore, carbon filament strength also depends on other variables, including the test length, actual fiber diameter, and material flaw distribution. Single fiber tensile testing was performed on high-strength carbon fibers to determine the load and strain at failure. Scanning electron microscopy was also conducted to evaluate the fiber surface morphology and precisely measure each fiber's diameter. Fiber strength was found to depend on the test gage length and in an effort to better understand the overall expected performance of these fibers at various lengths, statistical weak link scaling was performed. In addition, the true Young's modulus was also determined by taking the system compliance into account. It was found that all properties (tensile strength, strain to failure, and Young's modulus) matched very well with the manufacturers' reported values at 20 mm gage lengths, but deviated significantly at other lengths. PMID:27278219

  7. Considerable different frequency dependence of dynamic tensile modulus between self-heating (Joule heat) and external heating for polymer--nickel-coated carbon fiber composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rong; Bin, Yuezhen; Dong, Enyuan; Matsuo, Masaru

    2014-06-26

    Dynamic tensile moduli of polyethylene--nickel-coated carbon fiber (NiCF) composites with 10 and 4 vol % NiCF contents under electrical field were measured by a homemade instrument in the frequency range of 100--0.01 Hz. The drastic descent of the storage modulus of the composite with 10 vol % was verified in lower frequency range with elevating surface temperature (T(s)) by self-heating (Joule heat). The composite was cut when T(s) was beyond 108 °C. On the other hand, the measurement of the composite with 4 vol % beyond 88 °C was impossible, since T(s) did not elevate because of the disruption of current networks. Incidentally, the dynamic tensile moduli by external heating could be measured up to 130 and 115 °C for 10 and 4 vol %, respectively, but the two composites could be elongated beyond the above temperatures. Such different properties were analyzed in terms of crystal dispersions, electrical treeing, and thermal fluctuation-induced tunneling effect. PMID:24893179

  8. Quantitative Damage Detection and Sparse Sensor Array Optimization of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Resin Composite Laminates for Wind Turbine Blade Structural Health Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Li

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The active structural health monitoring (SHM approach for the complex composite laminate structures of wind turbine blades (WTBs, addresses the important and complicated problem of signal noise. After illustrating the wind energy industry’s development perspectives and its crucial requirement for SHM, an improved redundant second generation wavelet transform (IRSGWT pre-processing algorithm based on neighboring coefficients is introduced for feeble signal denoising. The method can avoid the drawbacks of conventional wavelet methods that lose information in transforms and the shortcomings of redundant second generation wavelet (RSGWT denoising that can lead to error propagation. For large scale WTB composites, how to minimize the number of sensors while ensuring accuracy is also a key issue. A sparse sensor array optimization of composites for WTB applications is proposed that can reduce the number of transducers that must be used. Compared to a full sixteen transducer array, the optimized eight transducer configuration displays better accuracy in identifying the correct position of simulated damage (mass of load on composite laminates with anisotropic characteristics than a non-optimized array. It can help to guarantee more flexible and qualified monitoring of the areas that more frequently suffer damage. The proposed methods are verified experimentally on specimens of carbon fiber reinforced resin composite laminates.

  9. Quantitative Damage Detection and Sparse Sensor Array Optimization of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Resin Composite Laminates for Wind Turbine Blade Structural Health Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang; Yang, Zhibo; Chen, Xuefeng

    2014-01-01

    The active structural health monitoring (SHM) approach for the complex composite laminate structures of wind turbine blades (WTBs), addresses the important and complicated problem of signal noise. After illustrating the wind energy industry's development perspectives and its crucial requirement for SHM, an improved redundant second generation wavelet transform (IRSGWT) pre-processing algorithm based on neighboring coefficients is introduced for feeble signal denoising. The method can avoid the drawbacks of conventional wavelet methods that lose information in transforms and the shortcomings of redundant second generation wavelet (RSGWT) denoising that can lead to error propagation. For large scale WTB composites, how to minimize the number of sensors while ensuring accuracy is also a key issue. A sparse sensor array optimization of composites for WTB applications is proposed that can reduce the number of transducers that must be used. Compared to a full sixteen transducer array, the optimized eight transducer configuration displays better accuracy in identifying the correct position of simulated damage (mass of load) on composite laminates with anisotropic characteristics than a non-optimized array. It can help to guarantee more flexible and qualified monitoring of the areas that more frequently suffer damage. The proposed methods are verified experimentally on specimens of carbon fiber reinforced resin composite laminates. PMID:24763210

  10. 碳纤维/氰酸酯复合材料尺寸稳定性能%Stability of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Cyanate Ester Composite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    诸静; 郝旭峰; 叶周军

    2013-01-01

    对碳纤维/氰酸酯复合材料的吸湿、空间放气、吸湿变形性能进行了研究,并与传统碳纤维/环氧复合材料的性能进行对比.研究表明:氰酸酯基复合材料的吸湿性能优于碳纤维/环氧树脂复合材料,且其各项空间环境性能均与环氧树脂基复合材料相当.%In this paper,moisture absorption,outgas capacity in vacuum and deformation after moisture absorption of carbon fiber reinforced cyanate ester composite were studied,and were compared with corresponding capacity of epoxy resin composites.Result show that the moisture absorption of cyanate ester composite is lower than epoxy resin composites,and capacity in simulated space environment is compatible with epoxy resin composites.

  11. Raman Spectroscopy for the Nondestructive Testing of Carbon Fiber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenn Washer

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this research is to evaluate the potential of Raman spectroscopy as a method of condition assessment for carbon fiber composite materials used in high performance situations such as composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs. There are currently limited nondestructive evaluation (NDE technologies to evaluate these composite materials in situ. Variations in elastic strain in the composite material can manifest from degradation or damage, and as such could provide a tool for condition assessment. The characterization of active Raman bands and the strain sensitivity of these bands for commercially available carbon fibers are reported.

  12. Surface State of Carbon Fibers Modified by Electrochemical Oxidation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yunxia GUO; Jie LIU; Jieying LIANG

    2005-01-01

    Surface of polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based carbon fibers was modified by electrochemical oxidation. The modification effect on carbon fibers surface was explored using atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Results showed that on the modified surface of carbon fibers, the carbon contents decreased by 9.7% and the oxygen and nitrogen contents increased by 53.8% and 7.5 times, respectively. The surface roughness and the hydroxyl and carbonyl contents also increased. The surface orientation index was reduced by 1.5%which decreased tensile strength of carbon fibers by 8.1%, and the microcrystalline dimension also decreased which increased the active sites of carbon fiber surface by 78%. The physical and chemical properties of carbon fibers surface were modified through the electrochemical oxidative method, which improved the cohesiveness between the fibers and resin matrix and increased the interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) of carbon fibers reinforced epoxy composite (CFRP) over 20%.

  13. Vibration damping with active carbon fiber structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neugebauer, Reimund; Kunze, Holger; Riedel, Mathias; Roscher, Hans-Jürgen

    2007-04-01

    This paper presents a mechatronic strategy for active reduction of vibrations on machine tool struts or car shafts. The active structure is built from a carbon fiber composite with embedded piezofiber actuators that are composed of piezopatches based on the Macro Fiber Composite (MFC) technology, licensed by NASA and produced by Smart Material GmbH in Dresden, Germany. The structure of these actuators allows separate or selectively combined bending and torsion, meaning that both bending and torsion vibrations can be actively absorbed. Initial simulation work was done with a finite element model (ANSYS). This paper describes how state space models are generated out of a structure based on the finite element model and how controller codes are integrated into finite element models for transient analysis and the model-based control design. Finally, it showcases initial experimental findings and provides an outlook for damping multi-mode resonances with a parallel combination of resonant controllers.

  14. Carbon nanotube fiber spun from wetted ribbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yuntian T; Arendt, Paul; Zhang, Xiefei; Li, Qingwen; Fu, Lei; Zheng, Lianxi

    2014-04-29

    A fiber of carbon nanotubes was prepared by a wet-spinning method involving drawing carbon nanotubes away from a substantially aligned, supported array of carbon nanotubes to form a ribbon, wetting the ribbon with a liquid, and spinning a fiber from the wetted ribbon. The liquid can be a polymer solution and after forming the fiber, the polymer can be cured. The resulting fiber has a higher tensile strength and higher conductivity compared to dry-spun fibers and to wet-spun fibers prepared by other methods.

  15. Intermediate Temperature Carbon - Carbon Composite Structures. CRADA Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lara-Curzio, Edgar [ORNL

    2007-06-01

    The objective of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between UT-Battelle, LLC (the "Contractor") and Synterials, Inc. (the "Participant") was to demonstrate promising processing methods, which can lead to producing Carbon-Carbon Composites (CCC), with tensile and interlaminar properties comparable to those of organic matrix composites and environmental stability at 1200 F for long periods of time. The participant synthesized carbon-carbon composites with two different fiber coatings and three different matrices. Both parties evaluated the tensile and interlaminar properties of these materials and characterized the microstructure of the matrices and interfaces. It was found that fiber coatings of carbon and boron carbide provided the best environmental protection and resulted in composites with high tensile strength.

  16. Oxidation of carbon fiber surfaces for use as reinforcement in high-temperature cementitious material systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugama, Toshifumi

    1990-01-01

    The interfacial bond characteristics between carbon fiber and a cement matrix, in high temperature fiber-reinforced cementitious composite systems, can be improved by the oxidative treatment of the fiber surfaces. Compositions and the process for producing the compositions are disclosed.

  17. Predictive engineering tools for injection-molded long-carbon-fiber thermoplastic composites - FY 2015 third quarterly report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Fifield, Leonard S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Mori, Steven [MAGNA Exteriors and Interiors Corp. Aurora, ON (Canada); Gandhi, Umesh N. [Toyota Research Institute North America, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Wang, Jin [Autodesk, Inc., Ithaca, NY (United States); Costa, Franco [Autodesk, Inc., Ithaca, NY (United States); Wollan, Eric J. [PlastiComp, Inc., Winona, MN (United States); Tucker, III, Charles L. [Univ. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL (United States)

    2015-07-01

    During the third quarter of FY 2015, the following technical progress has been made toward project milestones: 1) Magna oversaw the tool build and prepared the molding plan for the complex part of Phase II. 2) PlastiComp hosted a visit by Magna and Toyota on April 23rd to finalize the molding scope and schedule. The plan for molding trials including selection of molding parameters for both LFT and D-LFT for the U-shape complex part was established. 3) Toyota shipped the U-shape complex part tool to Magna on May 28th, 2015. 4) Plasticomp provided 30wt% LCF/PP and 30wt% LCF/PA66 compounded pellets to Magna for molding the complex part. 5) Magna performed preliminary molding trials on June 2nd, 2015 to validate wall thickness, fill profile, tool temperature and shot size requirements for the complex part. 6) Magna performed the first complex part run on June 16th and 17th, 2015 at Magna’s Composite Centre of Excellence in Concord, ON, Canada. Dale Roland of Plasticomp, and Umesh Gandhi of Toyota also attended the molding. 7) Magna discussed and finalized the plan with PNNL and the team for cutting samples from molded parts at selected locations for fiber orientation and length measurements. 8) Magna provided the computer-aided design (CAD) files of the complex parts with and without ribs to PNNL and Autodesk to build the corresponding ASMI models for injection molding simulations. Magna also provided the actual parameters used. 9) Plasticomp’s provided knowledge and experience of molding LCF materials essential to the successful molding of the parts including optimization of fill speed, tool temperatures, and plasticizing conditions for the 30wt% LCF/PP and 30wt% LCF/PA66 materials in both rib and non-rib versions. 10) Magna molded additional parts for evaluation of mechanical property testing including torsional stiffness on June 29th and 30th, 2015 at Magna’s Composite Center of Excellence. 11) Toyota began preparation for the torsion test of the specimens

  18. Design and construction of the structure of the DEMONSTRATOR of the CALIFA detector for R3B-FAIR using carbon-fiber composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casarejos E.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we describe the DEMONSTRATOR structures and active units (PETALs developed for the detector CALIFA of the experiment R3B - FAIR. The design is based in the CALIFA BARREL mechanical solutions, but adapted to the characteristics of the PETALs, namely in what concerns the load distribution during setup and service. The R&D program defined the materials and procedures for both producing the pieces of carbon fiber (CF composites as well as the mounting of the bundles to make an alveolar structure. The procedures also include a quality control program to ensure the dimensional properties of the CF assemblies. We are also developing the use of tomographic imaging analysis for this quality program, that will be of mayor interest in the construction of the future CALIFA CF-structure.

  19. Fabrication and characterization of TiO2-NTs based hollow carbon fibers/carbon film composite electrode with NiOx decorated for capacitive application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Kajia; Wang, Yi; Han, Weiqing; Li, Jiansheng; Sun, Xiuyun; Shen, Jinyou; Wang, Lianjun

    2016-06-01

    This work designs a novel structure of TiO2 nanotubes (TiO2-NTs) based hollow carbon nanofibers (HCFs)/carbon film (CF) composite electrode with NiOx decorated for capacitive deionization application. The TiO2-NTs array is obtained through anode oxidation method on the titanium substrate, while the HCFs/CF is synthesized by thermal decomposition of a mixture of C6H12O6 and Ni(CH3COO)2·4H2O inside the nanochannels and over the caps of TiO2-NTs array, then followed by carbonization and HNO3 activation. The nickel possesses multi-functional effects during the synthesis process as carbon catalyst (Ni(II)), molecule binder (NiTi) and pseudo-capacitance supplier (NiOx). FE-SEM, XRD, Raman spectroscopy and water contact angle measurement reveal a uniform carbon distribution, favorable nickel dispersion, high stability and ideal hydrophilicity for this structure. With the addition of C6H12O6 and Ni(Ac)2·4H2O controlled at 10% (wt) and 2% (wt), respectively, a composite electrode with specific capacitance of 244.9 F·g-1, high oxygen evolution potential of 2.15 V and low water contact angle of 41.77° is obtained as well as minimum polarization impedance and efficient capacitive ability, which exhibits promising applications for practical employment.

  20. Polypropylene/Expanded Graphite/Carbon Fiber Thermal Conductive Composite%聚丙烯/膨胀石墨/碳纤维导热复合材料

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐睿杰; 雷彩红; 杨志广; 廖敦锃; 刘舜莉

    2012-01-01

    The thermal conductivity, mechanical properties and processing property of polypropylene ( PP)/expanded graphite (EG)/carbon fiber(CF) composite were studied. The results showed that the thermal conductivity of the composite with 20 % content of EC was 2 times that of pure PP,but its melt flow rate was decreased. The PE wax at the weight fraction of 1 % could improve the melt flow rate. When the content of carbon fiber was 5 % , the thermal conductivity reached 0.91 W ? M-1K-1 and was five times of pure PP. The melt flow rate was 1.72 g/10 min and the mechanical properties were good.%研究了聚丙烯(PP)/膨胀石墨(EG)/碳纤维(CF)复合材料的导热、力学以及加工性能.研究发现:当膨胀石墨的质量含量达到20%时,热导率是纯聚丙烯的2倍,但熔体流动性能有所下降;添加1%的聚乙烯蜡可以明显改善体系的熔体流动性能;将膨胀石墨与5%的碳纤维杂化使用,热导率达0.91 W·m-1K-1,是纯聚丙烯的5倍,熔体指数达到1.72 g/10 min,同时该复合材料具有较好的力学性能.

  1. Modeling oxidation damage of continuous fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng-Peng Yang; Gui-Qiong Jiao; Bo Wang

    2011-01-01

    For fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composites (CMCs), oxidation of the constituents is a very important damage type for high temperature applications. During the oxidizing process, the pyrolytic carbon interphase gradually recesses from the crack site in the axial direction of the fiber into the interior of the material. Carbon fiber usually presents notch-like or local neck-shrink oxidation phenomenon, causing strength degradation. But, the reason for SiC fiber degradation is the flaw growth mechanism on its surface. A micromechanical model based on the above mechanisms was established to simulate the mechanical properties of CMCs after high temperature oxidation. The statistic and shearlag theory were applied and the calculation expressions for retained tensile modulus and strength were deduced, respectively. Meanwhile, the interphase recession and fiber strength degradation were considered. And then, the model was validated by application to a C/SiC composite.

  2. Paper-based energy-storage devices comprising carbon fiber-reinforced polypyrrole-cladophora nanocellulose composite electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Razaq, Aamir; Sjoedin, Martin; Stroemme, Maria; Mihranyan, Albert [Nanotechnology and Functional Materials, Department of Engineering Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden); Department of Chemistry, Angstroem Laboratory, Uppsala (Sweden); Nyholm, Leif [Department of Chemistry, Angstroem Laboratory, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2012-04-15

    Composites of polypyrrole (PPy) and Cladophora nanocellulose, reinforced with 8 {mu}m-thick chopped carbon filaments, can be used as electrode materials to obtain paper-based energy-storage devices with unprecedented performance at high charge and discharge rates. Charge capacities of more than 200 C g{sup -1} (PPy) are obtained for paper-based electrodes at potential scan rates as high as 500 mV s{sup -1}, whereas cell capacitances of {proportional_to}60-70 F g{sup -1} (PPy) are reached for symmetric supercapacitor cells with capacitances up to 3.0 F (i.e.,0.48 F cm{sup -2}) when charged to 0.6 V using current densities as high as 31 A g{sup -1} based on the PPy weight (i.e., 99 mA cm{sup -2}). Energy and power densities of 1.75 Wh kg{sup -1} and 2.7 kW kg{sup -1}, respectively, are obtained when normalized with respect to twice the PPy weight of the smaller electrode. No loss in cell capacitance is seen during charging/discharging at 7.7 A g{sup -1} (PPy) over 1500 cycles. It is proposed that the nonelectroactive carbon filaments decrease the contact resistances and the resistance of the reduced PPy composite. The present straightforward approach represents significant progress in the development of low-cost and environmentally friendly paper-based energy-storage devices for high-power applications. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  3. Carbon Nanotube (CNT) and Carbon Fiber Reinforced SiC Optical Components Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — M Cubed has developed and patented technology to make carbon fiber reinforced SiC composites and components. In addition, the feasibility of doubling the toughness...

  4. Fiber-reinforced composites materials, manufacturing, and design

    CERN Document Server

    Mallick, P K

    2007-01-01

    The newly expanded and revised edition of Fiber-Reinforced Composites: Materials, Manufacturing, and Design presents the most up-to-date resource available on state-of-the-art composite materials. This book is unique in that it not only offers a current analysis of mechanics and properties, but also examines the latest advances in test methods, applications, manufacturing processes, and design aspects involving composites. This third edition presents thorough coverage of newly developed materials including nanocomposites. It also adds more emphasis on underlying theories, practical methods, and problem-solving skills employed in real-world applications of composite materials. Each chapter contains new examples drawn from diverse applications and additional problems to reinforce the practical relevance of key concepts. New in The Third Edition: Contains new sections on material substitution, cost analysis, nano- and natural fibers, fiber architecture, and carbon-carbon composites Provides a new chapter on poly...

  5. Polypropylene matrix composites reinforced with coconut fibers

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Virginia Gelfuso; Pedro Vieira Gurgel da Silva; Daniel Thomazini

    2011-01-01

    Polypropylene matrix composites reinforced with treated coconut fibers were produced. Fibers chemically treated (alkalization-CCUV samples) or mechanically treated (ultrasonic shockwave-CMUV samples) were dried using UV radiation. The goal was to combine low cost and eco-friendly treatments to improve fiber-matrix adhesion. Composite samples containing up to 20 vol. (%) of untreated and treated coconut fibers were taken from boxes fabricated by injection molding. Water absorption and mechanic...

  6. 长纤维增强反应注射成型PUR/CF复合材料力学性能研究%Study on Mechanical Properties of Long Fiber Reinforced Reaction Injection Molded Polyurethane/Carbon Fiber Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈丰; 张华; 夏显明; 张海涛; 陈洪军

    2013-01-01

    采用浓硫酸和硅烷偶联剂对碳纤维(CF)进行表面处理,利用可变纤维注入技术和反应注射成型技术相结合制备了聚氨酯(PUR)/CF泡沫复合材料,研究了CF表面处理及含量对复合材料力学性能的影响,并对破坏断口进行了扫描电镜观测。结果表明,CF表面处理可以有效提高PUR/CF泡沫复合材料的界面结合力,随着CF含量的增加,复合材料的拉伸强度、弯曲强度和冲击强度均呈先增加后下降的趋势,表面处理的CF质量分数为15%时,复合材料的拉伸强度、弯曲强度和冲击强度分别比纯PUR增加了1.52倍、2.73倍和2.25倍。%Polyurethane(PUR)/carbon fiber(CF) composites were prepared by varible fiber injection technology and reaction injection molding technology.The surface of CF was oxidized by concentrated sulfuric acid and was treated by silane coupling agent. The effects of carbon fiber content and surface treatment on mechanical properties of PUR/CF composites were studied,and the fracture microstructure of impact fracture specimens was observed with scanning electron microscope.The results show that surface treatment can improve the bonding and mechanical properties of PUR/CF composites efficiently.With the increase of CF content, the tensile strength,bending strength and impact strength of composites increase firstly and then decrease.When the content of CF is about 15%,and the tensile strength,bending strength and impact strength of composites increase 2.52 times,3.73 times and 3.25 times respectively,compared with those of pure PUR.

  7. Mechanical properties and tribological behaviour of silicon carbide/carbon nano fibers nano composites; Propiedades mecanicas y tribologicas de materiales nanoestructurados de carburo de silicio/nanofibras de carbono

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borrell, A.; Torrecillas, R.; Rocha, V. G.; Fernandez, A.; Bonache, V.; Salvador, M. D.

    2011-07-01

    The development of new ceramic/carbon nano structured materials is a very interesting option from the point of view of the automotive and aerospace industries. Its low density, high mechanical strength, high oxidation resistance and excellent friction behavior allows the use of these composites as functional materials. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of carbon nano fibers (CNFs) on the mechanical and tribological behavior of silicon carbide/CNFs nano composite obtained by spark plasma sintering technique. The tribological study was carried out in a ball-on-disk apparatus under dry sliding conditions (dry friction) and a fixed load of 15 N. The friction coefficient and wear rate were measured for each composite. Scanning electron microscope was used to analyze wear surface formed. The results show simultaneous improvement of wear behavior and mechanical properties of ceramic materials by incorporating of carbon nano fibers. (Author) 23 refs.

  8. Tribology of natural fiber polymer composites

    CERN Document Server

    Chand, N

    2008-01-01

    Environmental concerns are driving demand for bio-degradable materials such as plant-based natural fiber reinforced polymer composites. These composites are fast replacing conventional materials in many applications, especially in automobiles, where tribology (friction, lubrication and wear) is important. This book covers the availability and processing of natural fiber polymer composites and their structural, thermal, mechanical and, in particular, tribological properties.Chapter 1 discusses sources of natural fibers, their extraction and surface modification. It also reviews the ther

  9. Pitch carbon microsphere composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, H. L.; Nelson, J. B.

    1977-01-01

    Petroleum pitch carbon microspheres were prepared by flash heating emulsified pitch and carbonizing the resulting microspheres in an inert atmosphere. Microsphere composites were obtained from a mixture of microspheres and tetraester precursor pyrrone powder. Scanning electron micrographs of the composite showed that it was an aggregate of microspheres bonded together by the pyrrone at the sphere contact points, with voids in and among the microspheres. Physical, thermal, and sorption properties of the composite are described. Composite applications could include use as a honeycomb filler in elevated-temperature load-bearing sandwich boards or in patient-treatment tables for radiation treatment of tumors.

  10. Influence of Synthetic Fibers Angle Orientation on Bending Properties of Composite Plywood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mladen Brezović

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of research on carbon fiber angle orientation and quantity of carbon fi bers in yarn on bending properties of plywood. For that purpose the specimens have been defined as multilayer composites made from carbon fibers and veneer. Carbon fibers were inserted in the second and third glue line of the composite with angle variation of 15°. Stresses and strain were analyzed in significant layers together with displacement of the whole composite plate. The influence of carbon fiber angle orientation on properties of the composite (amount of stresses and related strains was significant. The best results have been achieved with carbon fiber angle of 0°, and bidirectional carbon fiber type (BCF with the orientation angle of 90°. The lowest values have been achieved with carbon fiber angle of 65° (unidirectional carbon fibers-UCF, and bidirectional carbon fiber type (BCF with the orientation angle of 45°. Greater quantity of carbon fibers per one yarn has positive influence on decrease of stresses and strains in veneer layers and provides better stiffness of plywood.

  11. Raman Spectroscopy for the Nondestructive Testing of Carbon Fiber

    OpenAIRE

    Glenn Washer; Frank Blum

    2008-01-01

    The goal of this research is to evaluate the potential of Raman spectroscopy as a method of condition assessment for carbon fiber composite materials used in high performance situations such as composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs). There are currently limited nondestructive evaluation (NDE) technologies to evaluate these composite materials in situ. Variations in elastic strain in the composite material can manifest from degradation or damage, and as such could provide a tool for co...

  12. Predictive Engineering Tools for Injection-Molded Long-Carbon-Fiber Thermoplastic Composites - FY 2016 First Quarterly Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Fifield, Leonard S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lambert, Gregory [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Baird, Donald G. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Wang, Jin [Autodesk, Inc, Ithaca, NY (United States); Costa, Franco [Autodesk, Inc, Ithaca, NY (United States); Tucker, III, Charles L. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Gandhi, Umesh N. [Toyota Research Inst. North America, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Mori, Steven [MAGNA Exteriors and Interiors Corp., Aurora, ON (Canada); Wollan, Eric J. [PlastiComp, Inc., Winona, MN (United States); Roland, Dale [PlastiComp, Inc., Winona, MN (United States)

    2016-01-31

    During the first quarter of FY 2016, the following technical progress has been made toward project milestones: 1) Virginia Tech completed fiber orientation (FO) measurements for the samples taken at Locations A, B, C and D (Figure 1) from the 30wt% LCF/PP and 30wt% LCF/PA66 ribbed and non-ribbed complex parts using Virginia Tech’s established procedure. Virginia Tech delivered to PNNL all the measured fiber orientation data for validating ASMI fiber orientation predictions. 2)Virginia Tech performed fiber length distribution (FLD) measurements for the samples taken at Locations A, B, C and D from these complex parts using Virginia Tech’s established procedure. Virginia also re-assessed previous data and measured fiber length distributions in the corresponding nozzle purging materials and delivered to PNNL all the measured length data for validating ASMI fiber length predictions. 3)Based on measured fiber orientation data, Autodesk identified the parameters of the anisotropic rotary diffusion reduced strain closure (ARD-RSC) model [1] and provided PNNL with the values of these parameters that were used in ASMI analyses of the complex parts. 4) Magna provided Virginia Tech with additional samples cut out from the 30wt% LCF/PP and 30wt% LCF/PA66 ribbed parts (Figure 1) for fiber length and orientation measurements. 5) In discussion with Autodesk, PNNL performed 3D ASMI analyses of the 30wt% LCF/PP and 30wt% LCF/PA66 ribbed and non-ribbed complex parts to predict fiber orientations and length distributions in these parts. The issues observed through the analyses regarding fiber orientation distributions profiles and abnormal length distributions were reported to Autodesk. Autodesk is working to resolve these issues. 6) PNNL completed 3D ASMI analyses of the complex parts and compared predicted fiber orientation results at Locations A, B, and C on the non-ribbed parts, and at Locations A, B, C and D on the ribbed parts with the corresponding measured data. PNNL also

  13. A QuaternaryPoly(ethylene carbonate)-Lithium Bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide-Ionic Liquid-Silica Fiber Composite Polymer Electrolyte for Lithium Batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A quaternary PEC-LiTFSI-Pyr14TFSI-Silica fiber electrolyte was prepared by a solvent casting method. • Both electrochemical and mechanical properties were improved by the presence of the Silica fiber. • The electrolyte showed a tLi+ value of 0.36 with an anodic stability extended up to 4.5 V vs. Li/Li+. • A prototype Li/LiFePO4 polymer cell delivered a discharge capacity of about 100 mAh g−1 (75 °C, C/15). - Abstract: Poly(ethylene carbonate) (PEC) is known as an alternating copolymer derived from carbon dioxide (CO2) and an epoxide as monomers. Here, we describe a new quaternary PEC-based composite electrolyte containing lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl) imide (LiTFSI) salt, N-n-butyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl) imide (Pyr14TFSI) ionic liquid, and an electrospun silica (SiO2) fiber (SiF) with a submicron diameter in view of its possible applications in solid-state Li polymer batteries. A free-standing electrolyte membrane is prepared by a solvent casting method. The Pyr14TFSI ionic liquid enhances the ionic conductivity of the electrolyte as a result of its plasticizing effect. The electrochemical properties, such as ionic conductivity and Li transference number (tLi+), as well as mechanical strength of the electrolyte, are further improved by the SiF. We show that the quaternary electrolyte has a conductivity of the order of 10−7 S cm−1 at ambient temperature and a high tLi+ value of 0.36 with an excellent flexibility. A prototype Li polymer cell using LiFePO4 as a cathode material is assembled and tested. We demonstrate that this battery delivers a reversible charge-discharge capacity close to 100 mAh g−1 at 75 °C and C/15 rate. We believe that this work may pave the road to utilize CO2 as a carbon source for highly-demanded, functional battery materials in future

  14. Homogenization of long fiber reinforced composites including fiber bending effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulios, Konstantinos; Niordson, Christian Frithiof

    2016-01-01

    to maintain the kinematics of the two material phases independent from the assumed constitutive models, so that stress-deformation relationships, can be expressed in the framework of hyper-elasticity and hyper-elastoplasticity for the fiber and the matrix materials respectively. The bending stiffness......This paper presents a homogenization method, which accounts for intrinsic size effects related to the fiber diameter in long fiber reinforced composite materials with two independent constitutive models for the matrix and fiber materials. A new choice of internal kinematic variables allows...... of the matrix and the fibers....

  15. Predictive Engineering Tools for Injection-Molded Long-Carbon-Fiber Thermoplastic Composites - FY 2015 First Quarterly Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Fifield, Leonard S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kijewski, Seth A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Sangid, Michael D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wang, Jin [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Jin, Xiaoshi [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Costa, Franco [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Tucker, III, Charles L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Mathur, Raj N. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Gandhi, Umesh N. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Mori, Steven [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-01-29

    During the first quarter of FY 2015, the following technical progress has been made toward project milestones: 1) Autodesk delivered a new research version of ASMI to PNNL. This version includes the improved 3D fiber orientation solver, and the reduced order model (ROM) for fiber length distribution using the proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) implemented in the mid-plane, dual-domain and 3D solvers. 2) Autodesk coordinated a conference paper with PNNL reporting ASMI mid-plane fiber orientation predictions compared with the measured data for two PlastiComp plaques. This paper was accepted for presentation at the 2015 Society for Plastics Engineers (SPE) ANTEC conference. 3) The University of Illinois (Prof. Tucker) assisted team members from Purdue with fiber orientation measurement techniques, including interpretation of off-axis cross sections. 4) The University of Illinois assisted Autodesk team members with software implementation of the POD approach for fiber length modeling, and with fiber orientation modeling. 5) The University of Illinois co-authored in the SPE ANTEC paper, participated with the team in discussions of plaque data and model results, and participated in the definition of go/no-go experiments and data. 6) Purdue University (Purdue) conducted fiber orientation measurements for 3 PlastiComp plaques: fast-fill 30wt% LCF/PP center-gated, fast-fill 50wt% LCF/PA66 edge-gated and fast-fill 50wt% LCF/PA66 center-gated plaques, and delivered the fiber orientation data for these plaques at the selected locations (named A, B, and C) to PNNL. However, the data for the fast-fill 50wt% LCF/PA66 edge-gated plaque exhibited unusual variations and could not be used for the model validation. Purdue will re-measure fiber orientation for this plaque. 7) Based on discussions with the University of Illinois Purdue explained the ambiguity in the measurements of the fiber orientation components. 8) PNNL discussed with team members to establish a go/no-go decision

  16. Effect of weight fraction of carbon black and number of plies of E-glass fiber to reflection loss of E-glass/ripoxy composite for radar absorbing structure (RAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widyastuti, Ramadhan, Rizal; Ardhyananta, Hosta; Zainuri, Mochamad

    2013-09-01

    Nowadays, studies on investigating radar absorbing structure (RAS) using fiber reinforced polymeric (FRP) composite materials are becoming popular research field because the electromagnetic properties of FRP composites can be tailored effectively by just adding some electromagnetic powders, such as carbon black, ferrite, carbonyl iron, and etc., to the matrix of composites. The RAS works not only as a load bearing structure to hold the antenna system, but also has the important function of absorbing the in-band electromagnetic wave coming from the electromagnetic energy of tracking systems. In this study, E-glass fiber reinforced ripoxy resin composite was fabricated by blending the conductive carbon black (Ketjenblack EC300J) with the binder matrix of the composite material and maximizing the coefficient of absorption more than 90% (more than -10 dB) within the X-band frequency (8 - 12 GHz). It was measured by electrical conductivity (LCR meter) and vector network analyzer (VNA). Finally, the composite RAS with 0.02 weight fraction of carbon black and 4 plies of E-glass fiber showed thickness of 2.1 mm, electrical conductivity of 8.33 × 10-6 S/m, and maximum reflection loss of -27.123 dB, which can absorb more than 90% of incident EM wave throughout the entire X-band frequency range, has been developed.

  17. Response to high heat fluxes and metallurgical examination of a brazed carbon-fiber-composite/refractory-metal divertor mock-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a feasibility-study an actively cooled divertor mock-up has been subjected to high heat flux loading in electron beam simulation. The divertor design concept is based on a carbon-fiber-composite material (Aerolor 05) brazed onto a TZM/Mo41Re heat sink. The plasma facing carbon armor is divided in seven tiles to allow variable loading parameters - and repeated destructive tests. The mock-up has survived high heat flux loading up to about 12 MW/m2 surface heat flux in steady-state conditions. One armor tile showed no change in the thermal response even after 500 s at ∝14 MW/m2. To estimate the general thermal response of the mock-up design, numerical methods were applied. The predicted behavior was confirmed by the experimental results. The loading experiments were followed by a detailed metallurgical investigation of the loaded sample regions and the braze joints. The typical damages after high heat flux testing and cycling were failure (i.e. detachment) in the Zr brazed carbon/TZM joint, and failure in the CuPd bonded TZM/TZM joint due to an excess of the melting temperature of the brazes. The microstructural changes in the braze regions and the recrystallization behavior of the refractory alloys are discussed. Only in one case the loaded surface of the carbon armor shows considerable erosion, caused by a partial detachment along a braze joint and thus loss of the good thermal contact during the last applied loading shots. The thermal analyses and high heat flux performance of the Aerolor-05 armored mock-up are compared to the thermal response of a previously tested mock-up of corresponding geometry with armor tiles of isotropic graphite. (orig.)

  18. Interactions between the glass fiber coating and oxidized carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ku-Herrera, J.J., E-mail: jesuskuh@live.com.mx [Centro de Investigación Científica de Yucatán A.C., Unidad de Materiales, Calle 43 No.130, Col. Chuburná de Hidalgo. C.P., 97200 Mérida, Yucatán (Mexico); Avilés, F., E-mail: faviles@cicy.mx [Centro de Investigación Científica de Yucatán A.C., Unidad de Materiales, Calle 43 No.130, Col. Chuburná de Hidalgo. C.P., 97200 Mérida, Yucatán (Mexico); Nistal, A. [Instituto de Cerámica y Vidrio (ICV-CSIC), Kelsen 5, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Cauich-Rodríguez, J.V. [Centro de Investigación Científica de Yucatán A.C., Unidad de Materiales, Calle 43 No.130, Col. Chuburná de Hidalgo. C.P., 97200 Mérida, Yucatán (Mexico); Rubio, F.; Rubio, J. [Instituto de Cerámica y Vidrio (ICV-CSIC), Kelsen 5, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Bartolo-Pérez, P. [Departamento de Física Aplicada, Cinvestav, Unidad Mérida, C.P., 97310 Mérida, Yucatán (Mexico)

    2015-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Oxidized multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were deposited onto E-glass fibers. • The role of the fiber coating on the deposition of MWCNTs on the fibers is studied. • A rather homogeneous deposition of MWCNTs is achieved if the coating is maintained. • Multiple oxygen-containing groups were found in the analysis of the fiber coating. • Evidence of chemical interaction between MWCNTs and the fiber coating was found. - Abstract: Chemically oxidized multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were deposited onto commercial E-glass fibers using a dipping procedure assisted by ultrasonic dispersion. In order to investigate the role of the fiber coating (known as “sizing”), MWCNTs were deposited on the surface of as-received E-glass fibers preserving the proprietary coating as well as onto glass fibers which had the coating deliberately removed. Scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy were used to assess the distribution of MWCNTs onto the fibers. A rather homogeneous coverage with high density of MWCNTs onto the glass fibers is achieved when the fiber coating is maintained. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analyses of the chemical composition of the glass fiber coating suggest that such coating is a complex mixture with multiple oxygen-containing functional groups such as hydroxyl, carbonyl and epoxy. FTIR and XPS of MWCNTs over the glass fibers and of a mixture of MWCNTs and fiber coating provided evidence that the hydroxyl and carboxyl groups of the oxidized MWCNTs react with the oxygen-containing functional groups of the glass fiber coating, forming hydrogen bonding and through epoxy ring opening. Hydrogen bonding and ester formation between the functional groups of the MWCNTs and the silane contained in the coating are also possible.

  19. Predictive Engineering Tools for Injection-molded Long-Carbon-Fiber Thermoplastic Composites - FY 2014 Third Quarterly Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Sanborn, Scott E.; Mathur, Raj N.; Sharma, Bhisham; Sangid, Michael D.; Wang, Jin; Jin, Xiaoshi; Costa, Franco; Gandhi, Umesh N.; Mori, Steven; Tucker III, Charles L.

    2014-08-15

    This report describes the technical progresses made during the third quarter of FY 2014: 1) Autodesk introduced the options for fiber inlet condition to the 3D solver. These options are already available in the mid-plane/dual domain solver. 2) Autodesk improved the accuracy of 3D fiber orientation calculation around the gate. 3) Autodesk received consultant services from Prof. C.L. Tucker at the University of Illinois on the implementation of the reduced order model for fiber length, and discussed with Prof. Tucker the methods to reduce memory usage. 4) PlastiComp delivered to PNNL center-gated and edge-fan-gated 20-wt% to 30-wt% LCF/PP and LCF/PA66 (7”x7”x1/8”) plaques molded by the in-line direct injection molding (D-LFT) process. 5) PlastiComp molded ASTM tensile, flexural and impact bars under the same D-LFT processing conditions used for plaques for Certification of Assessment and ascertaining the resultant mechanical properties. 6) Purdue developed a new polishing routine, utilizing the automated polishing machine, to reduce fiber damage during surface preparation. 7) Purdue used a marker-based watershed segmentation routine, in conjunction with a hysteresis thresholding technique, for fiber segmentation during fiber orientation measurement. 8) Purdue validated Purdue’s fiber orientation measurement method using the previous fiber orientation data obtained from the Leeds machine and manually measured data by the University of Illinois. 9) PNNL conducted ASMI mid-plane analyses for a 30wt% LCF/PP plaque and compared the predicted fiber orientations with the measured data provided by Purdue University at the selected locations on this plaque. 10) PNNL put together the DOE 2014 Annual Merit Review (AMR) presentation with the team and presented it at the AMR meetings on June 17, 2014. 11) PNNL built ASMI dual domain models for the Toyota complex part and commenced mold filling analyses of the complex part with different wall thicknesses in order to

  20. Piezoelectric ceramic fibers for active fiber composites: a comparative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornmann, Xavier; Huber, Christian; Elsener, Hans-Rudolf

    2003-08-01

    The morphology and the free strain performances of three different piezoelectric ceramic fibers used for the manufacture of active fiber composites (AFCs) have been investigated. The morphology of the fibers has a direct influence on the manufacture of the AFCs. Fibers with non-uniform diameters are more difficult to contact with the interdigitated electrodes and can be the cause of irreparable damages in AFCs. An indirect method requiring the use of a simple analytical model is proposed to evaluate the free strain of active fiber composites. This indirect method presents a relatively good agreement with direct free strain measurements performed with strain gages glued on both sides of an AFC. The results show a systematic difference of ca. 20 % between the indirect and the direct methods. However, the indirect method did not permit to see differences of piezoelectric performance between the types of fibers.

  1. Homogenization of long fiber reinforced composites including fiber bending effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulios, Konstantinos; Niordson, Christian F.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a homogenization method, which accounts for intrinsic size effects related to the fiber diameter in long fiber reinforced composite materials with two independent constitutive models for the matrix and fiber materials. A new choice of internal kinematic variables allows to maintain the kinematics of the two material phases independent from the assumed constitutive models, so that stress-deformation relationships, can be expressed in the framework of hyper-elasticity and hyper-elastoplasticity for the fiber and the matrix materials respectively. The bending stiffness of the reinforcing fibers is captured by higher order strain terms, resulting in an accurate representation of the micro-mechanical behavior of the composite. Numerical examples show that the accuracy of the proposed model is very close to a non-homogenized finite-element model with an explicit discretization of the matrix and the fibers.

  2. Effect of surface roughness on osteogenesis in vitro and osseointegration in vivo of carbon fiber-reinforced polyetheretherketone-nanohydroxyapatite composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yi; Liu, Xiaochen; Xu, Anxiu; Wang, Lixin; Luo, Zuyuan; Zheng, Yunfei; Deng, Feng; Wei, Jie; Tang, Zhihui; Wei, Shicheng

    2015-01-01

    As United States Food and Drug Administration-approved implantable material, carbon fiber-reinforced polyetheretherketone (CFRPEEK) possesses an adjustable elastic modulus similar to cortical bone and is a prime candidate to replace surgical metallic implants. The bioinertness and inferior osteogenic properties of CFRPEEK, however, limit its clinical application as orthopedic/dental implants. In this study, CFRPEEK-nanohydroxyapatite ternary composites (PEEK/n-HA/CF) with variable surface roughness have been successfully fabricated. The effect of surface roughness on their in vitro cellular responses of osteoblast-like MG-63 cells (attachment, proliferation, apoptosis, and differentiation) and in vivo osseointegration is evaluated. The results show that the hydrophilicity and the amount of Ca ions on the surface are significantly improved as the surface roughness of composite increases. In cell culture tests, the results reveal that the cell proliferation rate and the extent of osteogenic differentiation of cells are a function of the size of surface roughness. The composite with moderate surface roughness significantly increases cell attachment/proliferation and promotes the production of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and calcium nodule formation compared with the other groups. More importantly, the PEEK/n-HA/CF implant with appropriate surface roughness exhibits remarkably enhanced bioactivity and osseointegration in vivo in the animal experiment. These findings will provide critical guidance for the design of CFRPEEK-based implants with optimal roughness to regulate cellular behaviors, and to enhance biocompability and osseointegration. Meanwhile, the PEEK/n-HA/CF ternary composite with optimal surface roughness might hold great potential as bioactive biomaterial for bone grafting and tissue engineering applications.

  3. Photoconductivity of Activated Carbon Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuriyama, K.; Dresselhaus, M. S.

    1990-08-01

    The photoconductivity is measured on a high-surface-area disordered carbon material, namely activated carbon fibers, to investigate their electronic properties. Measurements of decay time, recombination kinetics and temperature dependence of the photoconductivity generally reflect the electronic properties of a material. The material studied in this paper is a highly disordered carbon derived from a phenolic precursor, having a huge specific surface area of 1000--2000m{sup 2}/g. Our preliminary thermopower measurements suggest that this carbon material is a p-type semiconductor with an amorphous-like microstructure. The intrinsic electrical conductivity, on the order of 20S/cm at room temperature, increases with increasing temperature in the range 30--290K. In contrast with the intrinsic conductivity, the photoconductivity in vacuum decreases with increasing temperature. The recombination kinetics changes from a monomolecular process at room temperature to a biomolecular process at low temperatures. The observed decay time of the photoconductivity is {approx equal}0.3sec. The magnitude of the photoconductive signal was reduced by a factor of ten when the sample was exposed to air. The intrinsic carrier density and the activation energy for conduction are estimated to be {approx equal}10{sup 21}/cm{sup 3} and {approx equal}20meV, respectively. The majority of the induced photocarriers and of the intrinsic carriers are trapped, resulting in the long decay time of the photoconductivity and the positive temperature dependence of the conductivity.

  4. Optical Fiber Embedded in Epoxy Glass Unidirectional Fiber Composite System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Severin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to embed silica optical fibers in composites (epoxy vinyl ester matrix reinforced with E-glass unidirectional fibers in mass fraction of 60% in order to further monitor the robustness of civil engineering structures (such as bridges. A simple system was implemented using two different silica optical fibers (F1—double coating of 172 µm diameter and F2—single coating of 101.8 µm diameter respectively. The optical fibers were dynamically tensile tested and Weibull plots were traced. Interfacial adhesion stress was determined using pull-out test and stress values were correlated to fracture mechanisms based on SEM observations. In the case of the optical fiber (OF (F1/resin system and OF (F1/composite system, poor adhesion was reported that may be correlated to interface fracture at silica core level. Relevant applicable results were determined for OF (F2/composite system.

  5. Electron microscopy investigation of interface between carbon fiber and ultra high molecular weight polyethylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stepashkin, A.A.; Chukov, D.I., E-mail: dil_chukov@yahoo.com; Gorshenkov, M.V.; Tcherdyntsev, V.V.; Kaloshkin, S.D.

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • Effect of the carbon fibers surface treatments on the adhesive interactions in UHMWPE composites was studied. • Air oxidation of carbon filler ensures most significant increase in adhesion interaction in UHMWPE based composites. • Nanosized UHMWPE fibers with 20–40 nm in diameter and with 6–10 μm in length, was observed on the surface of carbon fibers. -- Abstract: Scanning electron microscopy was used to investigate the surface of initial and modified high-strength and high-modulus carbon fibers as well as interfaces in the ultra high molecular weight polyethylene, filled with above-mentioned fibers. Effect of the fibers surface modifying method on the adhesive interactions in composites was studied. It was observed that interaction of matrix with a modified surface of fibers results in a formation of bonds with strength higher than the yield strength of the polymer. It results in a formation of long nanosized polymer wires at tensile fracture of composites.

  6. Φ10mm 碳纤维复合材料管成型工艺及性能研究%Forming Process and Properties of Φ10 mm Carbon Fiber Reinforced Composite Pipe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵锐霞; 尹亮; 潘玲英; 董波

    2012-01-01

    The forming process and properties of carbon fiber reinforced composite pipe with the diameter of 10mm were investigated. The results show that the carbon fiber reinforced composite pipe fabricated by the thermal shrinkage process has the advantages of simple forming process and better quality reliability. Compared to the stainless steel pipe with the diamemer of 10 mm, the carbon fiber reinforced composite pipe with the same diameter has the e-quivalent flexural stiffness. While the flexural strength of composite pipe is more than three times of the stainless steel with the same diameter, and its weight is only half of the stainless steel pipe. In addition, the composite has good dimension precision which can meet the design requirements.%对外径为Φ10 mm 碳纤维复合材料管成型工艺及性能进行了研究.结果表明,采用热缩工艺成型的碳纤维复合材料管工艺简单、质量可靠,Φ10 mm 碳纤维复合材料管件弯曲刚度与不锈钢管相当,弯曲强度为不锈钢的3倍以上,质量仅为不锈钢的50%,尺寸精度满足设计要求.

  7. Fiber-Matrix Interface Studies on Electron Beam Cured Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drazel, L.T.; Janke, C.J.; Yarborough, K.D.

    1999-05-23

    The recently completed Department of Energy (DOE) and industry sponsored Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) entitled, ''Electron Beam Curing of Polymer Matrix Composites,'' determined that the interlaminar shear strength properties of the best electron beam cured IM7/epoxy composites were 19-28% lower than autoclave cured IM7/epoxy composites (i.e. IM7/977-2 and IM7/977-3). Low interlaminar shear strength is widely acknowledged as the key barrier to the successful acceptance and implementation of electron beam cured composites in the aircraft/aerospace industry. The objective of this work was to improve the interlaminar shear strength properties of electron beam cured composites by formulating and evaluating several different fiber sizings or coating materials. The researchers have recently achieved some promising results by having discovered that the application of epoxy-based, electron beam compatible sizings or coatings onto surface-treated, unsized IM7 carbon fibers improved the composite interlaminar shear strength properties by as much as 55% versus composites fabricated from surface-treated, unsized IM7 fibers. In addition, by applying these same epoxy-based sizings or coatings onto surface-treated, unsized IM7 fibers it was possible to achieve an 11% increase in the composite interlaminar shear strength compared to composites made from surface-treated, GP-sized IM7 fibers. Work is continuing in this area of research to further improve these properties.

  8. 不同T300级碳纤维轴棒法C/C复合材料的导热性能%Thermal Conductance of Axial Carbon Rods C/C Composites Woven With Different T300 Carbon Fiber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯阳阳; 崔红; 李瑞珍; 吴书峰

    2011-01-01

    By taking axial carbon rods 4D preform woven with two kinds of T300 grade PAN based carbon fiber made in China as reinforcement and high temperature coal-tar pitch as matrix precursor, the C/C composites with a density up to 1. 95 g/cm3 were prepared by using combined impregnation-carbonization and graphitization techniques.Thermal conductivity of the C/C composites from RT to 800℃ and the influencing factors were discussed. The results show that thermal conductance of the C/C composites is decreased with increasing of the temperature under the experimental condition. Because of the own features of raw materials and the directivity of preform , the thermal conductivity of the C/C composites along radial direction is higher than that of axial direction. C/C composites with higher density , lower porosity and higher graphitization degree have higher thermal conductivity due to their excellent connectivity between crystal particles and gradually perfected crystal microstructure. The thermal conductivity of the C/C composites with low pressure heat treatment as its final process is higher than that after high pressure carbonization. The thermal conductivity of C/C composites prepared by T300 carbon fibers made in China is similar to that of the C/C composites prepared by Toray T1300 carbon fibers.%选取两种国产T300级PAN基碳纤维,轴棒法制备4D预制体,以高温煤沥青为前驱体,采用液相浸渍-炭化以及石墨化相结合的技术制备C/C复合材料(密度≥1.95 g/cm),研究了C/C复合材料从室温(RT)到800℃的热导率及其影响因素.研究表明,在实验温度范围内C/C复合材料的热导率随温度升高而降低,由于原材料自身特性和预制体编织结构具有方向性,使C/C复合材料的导热性能表现出各向异性,径向热导率明显高于轴向;密度高、开孔率小、石墨化程度高的C/C复合材料由于晶粒间连通状态好,微晶结构趋于完整,材料的热导率增大;以低压

  9. Predictive Engineering Tools for Injection-Molded Long-Carbon-Fiber Thermoplastic Composites - Fourth FY 2015 Quarterly Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Fifield, Leonard S.; Wollan, Eric J.; Roland, Dale; Gandhi, Umesh N.; Mori, Steven; Lambert, Gregory; Baird, Donald G.; Wang, Jin; Costa, Franco; Tucker III, Charles L.

    2015-11-13

    During the last quarter of FY 2015, the following technical progress has been made toward project milestones: 1) PlastiComp used the PlastiComp direct in-line (D-LFT) Pushtrusion system to injection mold 40 30wt% LCF/PP parts with ribs, 40 30wt% LCF/PP parts without ribs, 10 30wt% LCF/PA66 parts with ribs, and 35 30wt% LCF/PA66 parts without ribs. In addition, purge materials from the injection molding nozzle were obtained for fiber length analysis, and molding parameters were sent to PNNL for process modeling. 2) Magna cut samples at four selected locations (named A, B, C and D) from the non-ribbed Magna-molded parts based on a plan discussed with PNNL and the team and shipped these samples to Virginia Tech for fiber orientation and length measurements. 3) Virginia Tech started fiber orientation and length measurements for the samples taken from the complex parts using Virginia Tech’s established procedure. 4) PNNL and Autodesk built ASMI models for the complex parts with and without ribs, reviewed process datasheets and performed preliminary analyses of these complex parts using the actual molding parameters received from Magna and PlastiComp to compare predicted to experimental mold filling patterns. 5) Autodesk assisted PNNL in developing the workflow to use Moldflow fiber orientation and length results in ABAQUS® simulations. 6) Autodesk advised the team on the practicality and difficulty of material viscosity characterization from the D-LFT process. 7) PNNL developed a procedure to import fiber orientation and length results from a 3D ASMI analysis to a 3D ABAQUS® model for structural analyses of the complex part for later weight reduction study. 8) In discussion with PNNL and Magna, Toyota developed mechanical test setups and built fixtures for three-point bending and torsion tests of the complex parts. 9) Toyota built a finite element model for the complex parts subjected to torsion loading. 10) PNNL built the 3D ABAQUS® model of the complex ribbed

  10. Predictive Engineering Tools for Injection-Molded Long-Carbon-Fiber Thermoplastic Composites - FY 2014 Fourth Quarterly Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Fifield, Leonard S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Mathur, Raj N. [PlastiComp, Inc., Winona, MN (United States); Kijewski, Seth A. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); Sangid, Michael D. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); Wang, Jin [Autodesk, Inc., Ithaca, NY (United States); Jin, Xiaoshi [Autodesk, Inc., Ithaca, NY (United States); Costa, Franco [Autodesk, Inc., Ithaca, NY (United States); Gandhi, Umesh N. [MAGNA Exteriors and Interiors Corp, Aurora, ON (Canada); Mori, Steven [Univ. of Illinois, Champaign, IL (United States); Tucker, III, Charles L.

    2014-09-30

    During the last quarter of FY 2014, the following technical progress has been made toward project milestones: 1) Autodesk, Inc. (Autodesk) has implemented a new fiber length distribution (FLD) model based on an unbreakable length assumption with Reduced Order Modeling (ROM) by the Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) approach in the mid-plane, dual-domain and 3D solvers. 2) Autodesk improved the ASMI 3D solver for fiber orientation prediction using the anisotropic rotary diffusion (ARD) – reduced strain closure (RSC) model. 3) Autodesk received consultant services from Prof. C.L. Tucker at the University of Illinois on numerical simulation of fiber orientation and fiber length. 4) PlastiComp, Inc. (PlastiComp) suggested to Purdue University a procedure for fiber separation using an inert-gas atmosphere in the burn-off furnace. 5) Purdue University (Purdue) hosted a face-to-face project review meeting at Purdue University on August 6-7, 2014. 6) Purdue conducted fiber orientation measurements for 3 PlastiComp plaques: fast-fill 30wt% LCF/PP edged-gated, slow-fill 50wt% LCF/PP edge-gated, and slow-fill 50wt% LCF/PP center-gated plaques, and delivered the orientation data for these plaques at the selected locations (named A, B, and C) to PNNL. 7) PNNL conducted ASMI mid-plane analyses for the above PlastiComp plaques and compared the predicted fiber orientations with the measured data provided by Purdue at Locations A, B, and C on these plaques. 8) PNNL planned the project review meeting (August 6-7, 2014) with Purdue. 9) PNNL performed ASMI analyses for the Toyota complex parts with and without ribs, having different wall thicknesses, and using the PlastiComp 50wt% LCF/PP, 50wt% LCF/PA66, 30wt% LCF/PP, and 30wt% LCF/PA66 materials to provide guidance for tool design and modifications needed for molding these parts. 10) Magna Exteriors and Interiors Corp. (Magna) molded plaques from the 50% LCF/PP and 50% LCF/PA66 materials received from Plasticomp in order to

  11. Self-healing in single and multiple fiber(s reinforced polymer composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woldesenbet E.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available You Polymer composites have been attractive medium to introduce the autonomic healing concept into modern day engineering materials. To date, there has been significant research in self-healing polymeric materials including several studies specifically in fiber reinforced polymers. Even though several methods have been suggested in autonomic healing materials, the concept of repair by bleeding of enclosed functional agents has garnered wide attention by the scientific community. A self-healing fiber reinforced polymer composite has been developed. Tensile tests are carried out on specimens that are fabricated by using the following components: hollow and solid glass fibers, healing agent, catalysts, multi-walled carbon nanotubes, and a polymer resin matrix. The test results have demonstrated that single fiber polymer composites and multiple fiber reinforced polymer matrix composites with healing agents and catalysts have provided 90.7% and 76.55% restoration of the original tensile strength, respectively. Incorporation of functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes in the healing medium of the single fiber polymer composite has provided additional efficiency. Healing is found to be localized, allowing multiple healing in the presence of several cracks.

  12. Effect of electron beam irradiation on the properties of carbon fiber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon fibers are used as a reinforcement material in an epoxy matrix in advanced composites due to their high mechanical strength, rigidity and low specific density. An important aspect of the mechanical properties of composites is associated to the adhesion between the surface of the carbon fiber and the epoxy matrix. This paper aimed to evaluate the effects of electron beam irradiation on the physicochemical properties of carbon fibers to obtain better adhesion properties in resultant composite. Chemical structure and surface of carbon fiber were determined by FT-IR, elemental analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, which indicated that the oxygen content increased significantly with increasing the radiation dose. Thermal stability of the carbon fibers was studied via the thermal gravimetric analysis. Surface morphology of carbon fiber was analyzed by scanning electron microscope. It was found that the degree of surface roughness was increased by electron beam irradiation

  13. Optical Fiber Embedded in Epoxy Glass Unidirectional Fiber Composite System

    OpenAIRE

    Irina Severin; Rochdi El Abdi; Guillaume Corvec; Mihai Caramihai

    2013-01-01

    We aimed to embed silica optical fibers in composites (epoxy vinyl ester matrix reinforced with E-glass unidirectional fibers in mass fraction of 60%) in order to further monitor the robustness of civil engineering structures (such as bridges). A simple system was implemented using two different silica optical fibers (F1—double coating of 172 µm diameter and F2—single coating of 101.8 µm diameter respectively). The optical fibers were dynamically tensile tested and Weibull plots were traced. ...

  14. Properties of fiber composites for advanced flywheel energy storage devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeTeresa, S J; Groves, S E

    2001-01-12

    The performance of commercial high-performance fibers is examined for application to flywheel power supplies. It is shown that actual delivered performance depends on multiple factors such as inherent fiber strength, strength translation and stress-rupture lifetime. Experimental results for recent stress-rupture studies of carbon fibers will be presented and compared with other candidate reinforcement materials. Based on an evaluation of all of the performance factors, it is concluded that carbon fibers are preferred for highest performance and E-glass fibers for lowest cost. The inferior performance of the low-cost E-glass fibers can be improved to some extent by retarding the stress-corrosion of the material due to moisture and practical approaches to mitigating this corrosion are discussed. Many flywheel designs are limited not by fiber failure, but by matrix-dominated failure modes. Unfortunately, very few experimental results for stress-rupture under transverse tensile loading are available. As a consequence, significant efforts are made in flywheel design to avoid generating any transverse tensile stresses. Recent results for stress-rupture of a carbon fiber/epoxy composite under transverse tensile load reveal that these materials are surprisingly durable under the transverse loading condition and that some radial tensile stress could be tolerated in flywheel applications.

  15. Shielding performance of metal fiber composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Gang; WU Bin; CHEN Ze-fei

    2004-01-01

    Metal fibers have been applied to construct composites with desirable electromagnetic interference shiel ding effectiveness and mechanical properties. Copper and stainless steel fibers were prepared with micro-saw fiberpulling combined cutting method. The cross section of the fibers is hook-like, which is beneficial to the improvement of bonding strength. Cement-based composites with copper and stainless steel fibers were fabricated and their electromagnetic shielding effectiveness was measured in the frequency range of 1 - 5 GHz. The results show that the electromagnetic interference shielding effectiveness of those composites is enhanced by the addition of metal fibers,which functions mainly due to the absorption. At some frequencies, 20 dB or more difference is obtained between the materials with and without metal fibers.

  16. Piezoresistivity of carbon fiber reinforced cement-matrix composites%碳纤维增强水泥基复合材料的压阻效应

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵晓华; 李国宝; 王玉林; 李庚英

    2011-01-01

    The piezoresistivity of short carbon fiber reinforced cement-matrix composites(CFRC) was experimentally studied.The whole process of transition from positive to negative piezoresistivity was observed.The results show that under continuously drying and uniaxially cyclic loading,both positive and negative piezoresistivity occur in CFRC due to the variation of moisture content in the composites.For most cases the electrical resistivity of the composites decreases monotonically upon longitudinal compression,and piezoresistivity tends to be positive.However,its magnitude varies.Lower moisture content leads to stronger piezoresistivity.When moisture content reduces to about 3.19%~4.04%,the electrical resistivity of the composites increases monotonically upon compressive strain,and piezoresistivity tends to be negative.This effect is much stronger than that of positive piezoresistivity.It is proposed that the occurrence of these phenomena is attributable to both the tunneling effect between fibers and decreasing in pore network connectivity during compression.%试验研究了短切碳纤维增强水泥基复合材料(CFRC)的压阻效应,获得了正、负两种压阻效应相互转换的全过程。从隧道效应和孔隙的连通性角度对该现象的产生机理进行了探讨。结果表明,在连续烘干和单向循环加载条件下,CFRC的压阻效应会随含水量变化而发生改变。多数情况下,CFRC的体积电阻率随压应变单调减少,压阻效应为正。含水量越少,正压阻效应越明显。当含水量减少到约3.19%~4.04%的范围时,CFRC的体积电阻率随压应变单调增加,压阻效应为负。与正压阻效应相比,负压阻效应表现更强。CFRC的正、负压阻效应及其相互转换是隧道效应和孔隙连通性两方面相互影响的必然结果。

  17. Research and Application Development of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Structural Microwave- absorbing Composite Materials%结构型碳纤维吸波复合材料的研究及应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李晶晶; 田启祥; 邹南智; 殷德飞

    2012-01-01

    The carbon fiber reinforced structural microwave - absorbing composite materials are multi - functional ma- terials which have the characteristic of radar - absorbing as well as high strength and light weight. This kind of materials has become an important development direction of radar stealthy materials. Several kind of microwave - absorbing carbon fiber such as irregular cross - section carbon fiber, chiral carbon fiber and carbon nanotubes as well as new type structures were introduced in this paper. Fina|ly,the development tendency was predicted.%结构型碳纤维吸波复合材料结合了复合材料轻质高强的结构优势和吸波特性,是雷达隐身材料的重要发展方向。本文主要从异型截面碳纤维、手性碳纤维和碳纳米管等新型吸波碳纤维增强体以及夹芯结构、点阵结构形式等方面总结了结构型碳纤维吸波复合材料国内外的最新研究和应用进展,并指出了未来发展方向。

  18. Numerical Simulation of Thermal Conductivity of Carbon-fiber/Resin Composites%炭纤维/树脂复合材料导热性能的数值模拟

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡妞; 李布楠; 高本征

    2014-01-01

    采用有限元方法对炭纤维/树脂复合材料的导热性能进行了数值模拟,分别建立一维结构和二维结构炭纤维/树脂复合材料计算分析模型,研究炭纤维含量、界面接触热阻、以及炭纤维直径对复合材料有效热导率的影响。研究结果表明炭纤维作为复合材料增强相,其含量越高复合材料的热导率越高;界面的接触热阻在10-3~10-5(m2 K)/W范围内对复合材料有效热导率有较大的影响,超出范围之后改变接触热阻对材料热导率的影响可以忽略;接触热阻比较大时,炭纤维的直径对复合材料的热导率有较大的的影响,当接触热阻比较小时,炭纤维的直径对于复合材料热导率的影响非常小。%Thermal conductivity of carbon-fiber/resin composites was simulated by finite element method. Simulation models of one-dimensional structure and two-dimensional structure were respectively built. Effects of carbon fiber content, interface contact resistance and diameter of carbon fiber on effective thermal conductivity of carbon-fiber/resin composite were studied. The results show that thermal conductivity of carbon-fiber /resin composites increases with increasing of carbon fiber volume fraction;the interface contact resistance in the range of 10-3~10-5 m2 K/W has obvious influence on the effective thermal conductivity, while out of range, the influence can be ignored; the diameter of carbon fiber has a remarkable influence on the thermal conductivity when the interface contact resistance is larger, but the influence is very small when the interface contact resistance is lesser.

  19. Study on Preparation and Fatigue Property of Short Carbon Fiber Reinforced Thermoplastics Composites%短碳纤维增强热塑性树脂复合材料的制备及其疲劳性能研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    盛永华; 李力

    2012-01-01

    Thermoplastic composites of polyethylene and chopped carbon fiber were prepared via injection molding. The influence of carbon fiber content on the fatigue property of the composites was studied, and the fracture mechanism of the composites was analyzed. The lifespan of the composites was prolonged with increasing content of carbon fiber.%采用注射成型的方法,以短切碳纤维为增强体,聚乙烯为基体制备了碳纤维增强热塑性树脂复合材料,并研究了碳纤维含量对该复合材料疲劳:I生能的影响,分析了短碳纤维增强热塑性树脂复合材料的断裂机理。结果表明,短碳纤维增强热塑性树脂复合材料的疲劳寿命随着碳纤维含量的增加而延长。

  20. Three-dimensional printing of continuous-fiber composites by in-nozzle impregnation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuzaki, Ryosuke; Ueda, Masahito; Namiki, Masaki; Jeong, Tae-Kun; Asahara, Hirosuke; Horiguchi, Keisuke; Nakamura, Taishi; Todoroki, Akira; Hirano, Yoshiyasu

    2016-03-11

    We have developed a method for the three-dimensional (3D) printing of continuous fiber-reinforced thermoplastics based on fused-deposition modeling. The technique enables direct 3D fabrication without the use of molds and may become the standard next-generation composite fabrication methodology. A thermoplastic filament and continuous fibers were separately supplied to the 3D printer and the fibers were impregnated with the filament within the heated nozzle of the printer immediately before printing. Polylactic acid was used as the matrix while carbon fibers, or twisted yarns of natural jute fibers, were used as the reinforcements. The thermoplastics reinforced with unidirectional jute fibers were examples of plant-sourced composites; those reinforced with unidirectional carbon fiber showed mechanical properties superior to those of both the jute-reinforced and unreinforced thermoplastics. Continuous fiber reinforcement improved the tensile strength of the printed composites relative to the values shown by conventional 3D-printed polymer-based composites.

  1. Three-dimensional printing of continuous-fiber composites by in-nozzle impregnation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuzaki, Ryosuke; Ueda, Masahito; Namiki, Masaki; Jeong, Tae-Kun; Asahara, Hirosuke; Horiguchi, Keisuke; Nakamura, Taishi; Todoroki, Akira; Hirano, Yoshiyasu

    2016-03-01

    We have developed a method for the three-dimensional (3D) printing of continuous fiber-reinforced thermoplastics based on fused-deposition modeling. The technique enables direct 3D fabrication without the use of molds and may become the standard next-generation composite fabrication methodology. A thermoplastic filament and continuous fibers were