WorldWideScience

Sample records for carbon dioxide emissions

  1. Forecasting carbon dioxide emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaobing; Du, Ding

    2015-09-01

    This study extends the literature on forecasting carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions by applying the reduced-form econometrics approach of Schmalensee et al. (1998) to a more recent sample period, the post-1997 period. Using the post-1997 period is motivated by the observation that the strengthening pace of global climate policy may have been accelerated since 1997. Based on our parameter estimates, we project 25% reduction in CO2 emissions by 2050 according to an economic and population growth scenario that is more consistent with recent global trends. Our forecasts are conservative due to that we do not have sufficient data to fully take into account recent developments in the global economy.

  2. Carbon dioxide and methane emissions from estuaries

    OpenAIRE

    Abril, G.; Borges, Alberto

    2005-01-01

    Carbon dioxide and methane emissions from estuaries are reviewed in relationwith biogeochemical processes and carbon cycling. In estuaries, carbondioxide and methane emissions show a large spatial and temporalvariability, which results from a complex interaction of river carbon inputs,sedimentation and resuspension processes, microbial processes in watersand sediments, tidal exchanges with marshes and flats and gas exchangewith the atmosphere. The net mineralization of land-derived organic ca...

  3. Tourism Transport, Technology, and Carbon Dioxide Emissions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peeters, P.M.

    2010-01-01

    Technological development from horse-drawn carriages to the new Airbus A380 has led to a remarkable increase in both the capacity and speed of tourist travel. This development has an endogenous systemic cause and will continue to increase carbon dioxide emissions/energy consumption if left unchecked

  4. Will peak oil accelerate carbon dioxide emissions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldeira, K.; Davis, S. J.; Cao, L.

    2008-12-01

    The relative scarcity of oil suggests that oil production is peaking and will decline thereafter. Some have suggested that this represents an opportunity to reduce carbon dioxide emissions. However, in the absence of constraints on carbon dioxide emission, "peak oil" may drive a shift towards increased reliance on coal as a primary energy source. Because coal per unit energy, in the absence of carbon capture and disposal, releases more carbon dioxide to the atmosphere than oil, "peak oil" may lead to an acceleration of carbon dioxide emissions. We will never run out of oil. As oil becomes increasingly scarce, prices will rise and therefore consumption will diminish. As prices rise, other primary energy sources will become increasingly competitive with oil. The developed world uses oil primarily as a source of transportation fuels. The developing world uses oil primarily for heat and power, but the trend is towards increasing reliance on oil for transportation. Liquid fuels, including petroleum derivatives such as gasoline and diesel fuel, are attractive as transportation fuels because of their relative abundance of energy per unit mass and volume. Such considerations are especially important for the air transport industry. Today, there is little that can compete with petroleum-derived transportation fuels. Future CO2 emissions from the transportation sector largely depend on what replaces oil as a source of fuel. Some have suggested that biomass-derived ethanol, hydrogen, or electricity could play this role. Each of these potential substitutes has its own drawbacks (e.g., low power density per unit area in the case of biomass, low power density per unit volume in the case of hydrogen, and low power density per unit mass in the case of battery storage). Thus, it is entirely likely that liquefaction of coal could become the primary means by which transportation fuels are produced. Since the burning of coal produces more CO2 per unit energy than does the burning of

  5. Carbon dioxide emission from bamboo culms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachariah, E J; Sabulal, B; Nair, D N K; Johnson, A J; Kumar, C S P

    2016-05-01

    Bamboos are one of the fastest growing plants on Earth, and are widely considered to have high ability to capture and sequester atmospheric carbon, and consequently to mitigate climate change. We tested this hypothesis by measuring carbon dioxide (CO2 ) emissions from bamboo culms and comparing them with their biomass sequestration potential. We analysed diurnal effluxes from Bambusa vulgaris culm surface and gas mixtures inside hollow sections of various bamboos using gas chromatography. Corresponding variations in gas pressure inside the bamboo section and culm surface temperature were measured. SEM micrographs of rhizome and bud portions of bamboo culms were also recorded. We found very high CO2 effluxes from culm surface, nodes and buds of bamboos. Positive gas pressure and very high concentrations of CO2 were observed inside hollow sections of bamboos. The CO2 effluxes observed from bamboos were very high compared to their carbon sequestration potential. Our measurements suggest that bamboos are net emitters of CO2 during their lifespan.

  6. Adverse effects of the automotive industry on carbon dioxide emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mpho Bosupeng

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to determine the effects of the automotive industry on carbon dioxide emissions for the period from 1997 to 2010 for diverse economies, as well as the relationships between carbon dioxide discharges and output. The study applies cointegration and causality tests to validate these associations. The results of the Johansen cointegration test depict long-run associations between the quantity of passenger cars and carbon dioxide emissions in France, Sweden, Spain, Hungary and Japan. In addition, significant relations were observed between output and carbon dioxide discharges in Spain, Canada, India and Japan. Changes in output had substantial impact on emissions in Germany, Canada and India. The results also show that the number of passenger cars influences the magnitude of emissions in multiple economies. In conclusion, the automotive industry has to be considered in policies that aim to reduce carbon dioxide emissions.

  7. Carbon dioxide emission from bamboo culms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachariah, E J; Sabulal, B; Nair, D N K; Johnson, A J; Kumar, C S P

    2016-05-01

    Bamboos are one of the fastest growing plants on Earth, and are widely considered to have high ability to capture and sequester atmospheric carbon, and consequently to mitigate climate change. We tested this hypothesis by measuring carbon dioxide (CO2 ) emissions from bamboo culms and comparing them with their biomass sequestration potential. We analysed diurnal effluxes from Bambusa vulgaris culm surface and gas mixtures inside hollow sections of various bamboos using gas chromatography. Corresponding variations in gas pressure inside the bamboo section and culm surface temperature were measured. SEM micrographs of rhizome and bud portions of bamboo culms were also recorded. We found very high CO2 effluxes from culm surface, nodes and buds of bamboos. Positive gas pressure and very high concentrations of CO2 were observed inside hollow sections of bamboos. The CO2 effluxes observed from bamboos were very high compared to their carbon sequestration potential. Our measurements suggest that bamboos are net emitters of CO2 during their lifespan. PMID:26802362

  8. Balance and forecasts of french carbon dioxide emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper strikes the balance of carbon dioxide emissions in France between 1986 and 1991 and gives forecasts till 2010. Since 1986, France has reduced its efforts for energy conservation and air pollution by carbon dioxide begins to growth again in connection with consumption growth in transport area, development of computer and simulation needs

  9. Estimated Carbon Dioxide Emissions in 2008: United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, C A; Simon, A J; Belles, R D

    2011-04-01

    Flow charts depicting carbon dioxide emissions in the United States have been constructed from publicly available data and estimates of state-level energy use patterns. Approximately 5,800 million metric tons of carbon dioxide were emitted throughout the United States for use in power production, residential, commercial, industrial, and transportation applications in 2008. Carbon dioxide is emitted from the use of three major energy resources: natural gas, coal, and petroleum. The flow patterns are represented in a compact 'visual atlas' of 52 state-level (all 50 states, the District of Columbia, and one national) carbon dioxide flow charts representing a comprehensive systems view of national CO{sub 2} emissions. Lawrence Livermore National Lab (LLNL) has published flow charts (also referred to as 'Sankey Diagrams') of important national commodities since the early 1970s. The most widely recognized of these charts is the U.S. energy flow chart (http://flowcharts.llnl.gov). LLNL has also published charts depicting carbon (or carbon dioxide potential) flow and water flow at the national level as well as energy, carbon, and water flows at the international, state, municipal, and organizational (i.e. United States Air Force) level. Flow charts are valuable as single-page references that contain quantitative data about resource, commodity, and byproduct flows in a graphical form that also convey structural information about the system that manages those flows. Data on carbon dioxide emissions from the energy sector are reported on a national level. Because carbon dioxide emissions are not reported for individual states, the carbon dioxide emissions are estimated using published energy use information. Data on energy use is compiled by the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration (U.S. EIA) in the State Energy Data System (SEDS). SEDS is updated annually and reports data from 2 years prior to the year of the update. SEDS

  10. Direct carbon dioxide emissions from civil aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grote, Matt; Williams, Ian; Preston, John

    2014-10-01

    Global airlines consume over 5 million barrels of oil per day, and the resulting carbon dioxide (CO2) emitted by aircraft engines is of concern. This article provides a contemporary review of the literature associated with the measures available to the civil aviation industry for mitigating CO2 emissions from aircraft. The measures are addressed under two categories - policy and legal-related measures, and technological and operational measures. Results of the review are used to develop several insights into the challenges faced. The analysis shows that forecasts for strong growth in air-traffic will result in civil aviation becoming an increasingly significant contributor to anthropogenic CO2 emissions. Some mitigation-measures can be left to market-forces as the key-driver for implementation because they directly reduce airlines' fuel consumption, and their impact on reducing fuel-costs will be welcomed by the industry. Other mitigation-measures cannot be left to market-forces. Speed of implementation and stringency of these measures will not be satisfactorily resolved unattended, and the current global regulatory-framework does not provide the necessary strength of stewardship. A global regulator with ‘teeth' needs to be established, but investing such a body with the appropriate level of authority requires securing an international agreement which history would suggest is going to be very difficult. If all mitigation-measures are successfully implemented, it is still likely that traffic growth-rates will continue to out-pace emissions reduction-rates. Therefore, to achieve an overall reduction in CO2 emissions, behaviour change will be necessary to reduce demand for air-travel. However, reducing demand will be strongly resisted by all stakeholders in the industry; and the ticket price-increases necessary to induce the required reduction in traffic growth-rates place a monetary-value on CO2 emissions of approximately 7-100 times greater than other common

  11. Economic Growth, Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Renewable Energy and Globalization

    OpenAIRE

    Nuno Carlos LEITÃO

    2014-01-01

    This article investigates the correlation between economic growth, carbon dioxide emissions, renewable energy and globalization for the period 1970-2010, using time series (OLS,GMM, unit root test, VEC model, and Granger causality) to Portuguese economy. OLS estimator and GMM model demonstrate that carbon dioxide emissions and renewable energy are positively correlated with economic growth. The econometric models also show that the overall index of globalization has a positive effect...

  12. Carbon dioxide emissions from biochar in soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Sander; Clauson-Kaas, Anne Sofie Kjærulff; Bobuľská, L.;

    2014-01-01

    The stability of biochar in soil is of importance if it is to be used for carbon sequestration and long-term improvement of soil properties. It is well known that a significant fraction of biochar is highly stable in soil, but carbon dioxide (CO2) is also released immediately after application......-sterilized soils. It emerged that carbonate may be concentrated or form during or after biochar production, resulting in significant carbonate contents. If CO2 released from carbonates in short-term experiments is misinterpreted as mineralization of biochar, the impact of this process may be significantly over......-estimated. In addition to the CO2 released from carbonates, there appears to be a labile fraction of biochar that is oxidized quickly during the first days of incubation, probably by both abiotic and biotic processes. Later in the incubation, biotic mineralization appears to be the primary cause of CO2 evolution...

  13. Assessing Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Energy Use at a University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riddell, William; Bhatia, Krishan Kumar; Parisi, Matthew; Foote, Jessica; Imperatore, John, III

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to assess the carbon dioxide emissions associated with electric, HVAC, and hot water use from a US university. Design/methodology/approach: First, the total on-campus electrical, natural gas and oil consumption for an entire year was assessed. For each category of energy use, the carbon associated with…

  14. Global carbon dioxide emissions from inland waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, Peter A.; Hartmann, Jens; Lauerwald, Ronny; Sobek, Sebastian; McDonald, Cory P.; Hoover, Mark; Butman, David; Striegl, Rob; Mayorga, Emilio; Humborg, Christoph; Kortelainen, Pirkko; Durr, Hans H.; Meybeck, Michel; Ciais, Philippe; Guth, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) transfer from inland waters to the atmosphere, known as CO2 evasion, is a component of the global carbon cycle. Global estimates of CO2 evasion have been hampered, however, by the lack of a framework for estimating the inland water surface area and gas transfer velocity and by the absence of a global CO2 database. Here we report regional variations in global inland water surface area, dissolved CO2 and gas transfer velocity. We obtain global CO2 evasion rates of 1.8   petagrams of carbon (Pg C) per year from streams and rivers and 0.32  Pg C yr−1 from lakes and reservoirs, where the upper and lower limits are respectively the 5th and 95th confidence interval percentiles. The resulting global evasion rate of 2.1 Pg C yr−1 is higher than previous estimates owing to a larger stream and river evasion rate. Our analysis predicts global hotspots in stream and river evasion, with about 70 per cent of the flux occurring over just 20 per cent of the land surface. The source of inland water CO2 is still not known with certainty and new studies are needed to research the mechanisms controlling CO2 evasion globally.

  15. Carbon dioxide emission from brickfields around Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Imran

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The study was undertaken at six divisions of Bangladesh to investigate the CO2 emission from brickfields. to explore the rate of carbon emission over the last 10 years, based on existing technology for brick production. The finding reveals that there were more than 45,000 Brick kilns in Bangladesh which together account for about 95% of operating kilns including Bull's Trench Kiln, Fixed Chimney Kiln, Zigzag Kiln and Hoffman Kiln. These kilns were the most carbon emitting source but it varies on fuel type, kiln type and also for location. It has been found that, maximum carbon emission area was Chittagong, which was 93.150 with percentage of last 10 years and 9.310 per cent per year. Whereas Sylhet was lower carbon emission area indicating percentage 17.172 of last 10 years and 4.218 percent per year. It has been found that total annual amount of CO2 emission for 4 types brick kilns from Dhaka, Chittagong, Rajshahi, Khulana, Sylhet and Barisal were 8.862 Mt yr-1, 10.048 Mt yr-1, 12.783 Mt yr-1, 15.250 Mt yr-1, in the year of 2002, 2005, 2007 and 2010 respectively. In Mymensingh district, the maximum CO2 emission and coal consumption was obtained in Chamak brick field, which was 1882 tons and 950 tons, respectively and minimum was obtained in Zhalak brick field, which was 1039.5 tons and 525.0 tons, respectively during the year of 2013. The percentage in last 10 years of CO2 emission was 72.784 and per cent per year 7.970, which is very alarming for us. The estimates obtained from surveys and on-site investigations indicate that these kilns consume an average of 240 tons of coal to produce 1 million bricks. This type of coal has a measured calorific value of 6,400 KJ, heating value of coal is 20.93 GJ t-1 and it produces 94.61 TJ t-1 and 56.1 TJ t-1 CO2 from coal and natural gas, respectively.

  16. Methane and Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Different Composting Periods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Hsiung Chang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate green house gas emissions from compost preparations, methane and carbon dioxide concentrations and emission rates at different accumulative times and composting periods were determined. While the accumulative time was less than 10 min with a closed acrylic chamber, meth ane and carbon dioxide emissions in creased slightly but with high fluntuation in the sampling e ror, and these values decreased significantly when the accumulative time was more than 20 min. During the 8 weeks of composting, the methane emission rate reaches its peak near the end of the second week and the carbon dioxide emission rate does the same near the end of third week. Meth ane and carbon dioxide emissions had high val ues at the first stage of com post ing and then de creased grad u ally for the ma tu rity of com post. Carbon dioxide emission (y was significantly related to temperature (x1, moisture content (x2, and total or ganiccarbon (x3; and there gression equation is: y = 3.11907x1 + 6.19236x2 - 6.63081x3 - 50.62498. The re gres sion equa tion be tween meth ane emis sion (y? and mois ture con tent (x2, pH (x4, C/N ra tio (x5, and ash con tent (x6 is: y?= 0.13225x2 - 0.97046x4 - 1.10599x5 - 0.55220x6 + 50.77057 in the ini tial com post ing stage (weeks 1 to 3; while, the equa tion is: y?= 0.02824x2 - 0.0037x4 - 0.1499x5 - 0.07013x6 + 4.13589 in the later compost ing stage (weeks 4 to 8. Dif ferent stage composts have significant variation of properties and greenhouse gas emissions. Moreover, the emissions may be reduced by manipulating the proper factors.

  17. Hydrological restoration of Indonesian peatlands to mitigate carbon dioxide emissions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wösten, H.; Jaenicke, J.; Budiman, A.; Siegert, F.

    2010-01-01

    Delta Session DS 9: The lowland deltas of Indonesia. Hydrological restoration of Indonesian peatlands to mitigate carbon dioxide emissions, Henk Wösten (2010). Presented at the international conference Deltas in Times of Climate Change, 29 September - 1 October, Rotterdam, the Netherlands.

  18. Trade, production fragmentation, and China's carbon dioxide emissions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dietzenbacher, Erik; Pei, Jiansuo; Yang, Cuihong

    2012-01-01

    An input-output framework is adopted to estimate China's carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions as generated by its exports in 2002. More than one half of China's exports are related to international production fragmentation. These processing exports generate relatively little value added but also relativel

  19. Low Energy, Low Emissions: Sulfur Dioxide; Nitrogen Oxides, and Carbon Dioxide in Western Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcamo, Joseph; De Vries, Bert

    1992-01-01

    Links proposed low-energy scenarios for different Western European countries with the amount of pollutants that may result from these scenarios. Sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxide, and carbon dioxide emissions are calculated for the 10 countries for which low-energy scenarios are available, resulting in reductions of 54%, 37%, and 40%, respectively.…

  20. Monthly, global emissions of carbon dioxide from fossil fuel consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andres, R.J.; Gregg, Jay Sterling; Losey, L.;

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines available data, develops a strategy and presents a monthly, global time series of fossil-fuel carbon dioxide emissions for the years 1950–2006. This monthly time series was constructed from detailed study of monthly data from the 21 countries that account for approximately 80...... reproduces monthly patterns in the data and the global monthly pattern of emissions is relatively insensitive to the exact proxy assignments used. The data and results presented here should lead to a better understanding of global and regional carbon cycles, especially when the mass data are combined...... with the stable carbon isotope data in atmospheric transport models....

  1. The travel-related carbon dioxide emissions of atmospheric researchers

    OpenAIRE

    A. Stohl

    2008-01-01

    Most atmospheric scientists agree that greenhouse gas emissions have already caused significant changes to the global climate system and that these changes will accelerate in the near future. At the same time, atmospheric scientists who – like other scientists – rely on international collaboration and information exchange travel a lot and, thereby, cause substantial emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2). In this paper, the CO2 emis...

  2. Carbon dioxide emissions from international air freight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howitt, Oliver J. A.; Carruthers, Michael A.; Smith, Inga J.; Rodger, Craig J.

    2011-12-01

    Greenhouse gas emissions from international air transport were excluded from reduction targets under the Kyoto Protocol, partly because of difficulties with quantifying and apportioning such emissions. Although there has been a great deal of recent research into calculating emissions from aeroplane operations globally, publicly available emissions factors for air freight emissions are scarce. This paper presents a methodology to calculate the amount of fuel burnt and the resulting CO 2 emissions from New Zealand's internationally air freighted imports and exports in 2007. This methodology could be applied to other nations and/or regions. Using data on fuel uplift, air freight and air craft movements, and assumptions on mean passenger loadings and the mass of passengers and air freight, CO 2 emissions factors of 0.82 kg CO 2 per t-km and 0.69 kg CO 2 per t-km for short-haul and long-haul journeys, respectively, were calculated. The total amount of fuel consumed for the international air transport of New Zealand's imports and exports was calculated to be 0.21 Mt and 0.17 Mt respectively, with corresponding CO 2 emissions of 0.67 Mt and 0.53 Mt.

  3. EU Emission Trading: Starting with Carbon Dioxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vesterdal, Morten; Svendsen, Gert Tinggaard

    2003-01-01

    The Commission of the European Union wants to start a limited emission trading scheme by 2005 within the Community to enable "learning-by-doing" prior to the Kyoto Protocol. This to accomplish the desired 8% target level for six different greenhouse gases. However, in the EU it is not clear whether...

  4. Carbon dioxide emissions from Indian monsoonal estuaries

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sarma, V.V.S.S.; Viswanadham, R.; Rao, G.D.; Prasad, V.R.; Kumar, B.S.K.; Naidu, S.A.; Kumar, N.A.; Rao, D.B.; Sridevi, T.; Krishna, M.S.; Reddy, N.P.C.; Sadhuram, Y.; Murty, T.V.R.

    estuaries. The mean pCO sub(2) and particulate organic carbon (POC) showed positive relation with rate of discharge suggesting availability of high quantities of organic matter that led to enhanced microbial decomposition. The annual CO sub(2) fluxes from...

  5. Carbon Dioxide Emissions: 17 Years and Still Talking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper, written in French and in English, examines how the figures have changed from Kyoto base year 1990 up to 2007, before looking at certain countries' proposals for the future of their carbon dioxide emissions. Statistics are given concerning the emissions changes in various countries (or groups of countries) but also their developments in regards to the economy and energy use. Changes in CO2 emissions, changes in the gross domestic product of a country, its CO2 emissions per capita, its energy intensity (the ratio of energy use to the monetary value of GDP) and its carbon intensity of energy use as well as population change, are presented. The main countries considered are: United States, European Union, China, Japan, India, Brazil, South Africa and Russia

  6. Minimizing emission of carbon dioxide in the coconut processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    About 90% of the world's coconut production is made into copra. There are 2-3 million smoke kilns which are used by the coconut farmers for making copra. It is estimated that these kilns emit carbon dioxide from 247 to 366 gram of carbon per kg of copra produced. From the world copra production of 10 M tons, the total carbon released in copra making range is 2-3 Tg(telegram=1012grams) or 2-3M tons of carbon per year. To minimize carbon dioxide emission in copra making, kilns with better combustion characteristics and heat utilization efficiencies must be used. One of the most promising alternative dryers is a direct-fired, natural draft dryer known as the Los Banos (Lozada) Dryer. Developed at the University of the Philippines Los Banos, the dryer consist of a simple burner, a heat distributor and a drying bin. The burner combust coconut shell, corn cob, and wood pieces with extremely high efficiency thus minimizing fuel consumption and dramatically reducing the release of airborne pollutants. The resulting copra is practically smoke free. Tests have shown that carbon dioxide emissions from the Los Banos (Lozada) Dryer are about half of that released by the traditional smoke kilns. Furthermore, the dryer emits lower concentrations of CO (50 ppm vs 2000-3000 ppm), of NOx(5 ppm vs 400 ppm), and SOx(5 ppm vs 400 ppm). When used widely, significant reductions in the emissions of greenhouse and acid rain gases from biomass combustion will be attained. (About 500 units of the Los Banos (Lozada) Dryer are now in use in the Philippines and Papua New Guinea). (Author)

  7. Options for lowering U.S. carbon dioxide emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bierbaum, Rosina M.; Friedman, Robert M.; Levenson, Howard; Rapoport, Richard D.; Sundt, Nick

    1992-03-01

    The United States can decrease its emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) to as much as 35 percent below 1987 levels within the next 25 years by adopting an aggressive package of policies crossing all sectors of the economy. Such emissions reductions will be difficult to achieve and may be costly, but no major technological breakthroughs are needed. In this paper, we identify a ``Tough'' package of energy conservation, energy supply, and forest managment practices to accomplish this level of emissions reductions. We also present a package of cost-effective, ``Moderate'' technical options, which if adopted, would hold CO2 emissions to about 15-percent increase over 1987 levels by 2015. In constrast, if the United State takes not new actions to curb energy use, CO2 emissions will likely rise 50 percent during that time. A variety of Federal policy initiatives will be required to achieve large reductions in U.S. CO2 emissions. Such policy actions will have to include both regulatory ``push'' and market ``pull'' mechanisms--including performance standards, tax incentive programs, carbon-emission or energy taxes, labeling and efficiency ratings, and research, development, and demostration activities.

  8. Life cycle study. Carbon dioxide emissions lower in electric heating than in oil heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heikkinen, A.; Jaervinen, P.; Nikula, A.

    1996-11-01

    A primary objective of energy conservation is to cut carbon dioxide emissions. A comparative study on the various heating forms, based on the life cycle approach, showed that the carbon dioxide emissions resulting form heating are appreciably lower now that electric heating has become more common. The level of carbon dioxide emissions in Finland would have been millions of tonnes higher had oil heating been chosen instead of electric heating. (orig.)

  9. Research on urban road congestion pricing strategy considering carbon dioxide emissions

    OpenAIRE

    Yitian Wang; Zixuan Peng; Keming Wang; Xiaolin Song; Baozhen Yao; Tao Feng

    2015-01-01

    Congestion pricing strategy has been recognized as an effective countermeasure in the practical field of urban traffic congestion mitigation. In this paper, a bi-level programming model considering carbon dioxide emission is proposed to mitigate traffic congestion and reduce carbon dioxide emissions. The objective function of the upper level model is to minimize the sum of travel costs and the carbon dioxide emissions costs. The lower level is a multi-modal transportation network equilibrium ...

  10. Determinants of carbon dioxide emissions: Empirical evidence from 69 countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Susan Sunila [School of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Deakin University, 70 Elgar Road, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia)

    2011-01-15

    This study investigates the determinants of carbon dioxide emissions (CO{sub 2}) for a global panel consisting of 69 countries using a dynamic panel data model. To make the panel data analysis more homogenous, we also investigate the determinants of CO{sub 2} emissions for a number of sub-panels. These sub-panels are constructed based on the income level of countries. In this way, we end up with three income panels; namely, high income, middle income, and low income panels. The time component of our dataset is 1985-2005 inclusive. Our main findings are that trade openness, per capita GDP, and energy consumption, proxied by per capita electric power consumption and per capita total primary energy consumption, have positive effects on CO{sub 2} emissions. Urbanisation is found to have a negative impact on CO{sub 2} emissions in high income, middle income, and low income panels. For the global panel, only GDP per capita and per capita total primary energy consumption are found to be statistically significant determinants of CO{sub 2} emission, while urbanisation, trade openness, and per capita electric power consumption have negative effects on the CO{sub 2} emissions. (author)

  11. Carbon dioxide and methane emissions from the Yukon River system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striegl, Rob; Dornblaser, Mark M.; McDonald, Cory P.; Rover, Jennifer R.; Stets, Edward G.

    2012-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) emissions are important, but poorly quantified, components of riverine carbon (C) budgets. This is largely because the data needed for gas flux calculations are sparse and are spatially and temporally variable. Additionally, the importance of C gas emissions relative to lateral C exports is not well known because gaseous and aqueous fluxes are not commonly measured on the same rivers. We couple measurements of aqueous CO2 and CH4 partial pressures (pCO2, pCH4) and flux across the water-air interface with gas transfer models to calculate subbasin distributions of gas flux density. We then combine those flux densities with remote and direct observations of stream and river water surface area and ice duration, to calculate C gas emissions from flowing waters throughout the Yukon River basin. CO2emissions were 7.68 Tg C yr−1 (95% CI: 5.84 −10.46), averaging 750 g C m−2 yr−1 normalized to water surface area, and 9.0 g C m−2 yr−1 normalized to river basin area. River CH4 emissions totaled 55 Gg C yr−1 or 0.7% of the total mass of C emitted as CO2 plus CH4 and ∼6.4% of their combined radiative forcing. When combined with lateral inorganic plus organic C exports to below head of tide, C gas emissions comprised 50% of total C exported by the Yukon River and its tributaries. River CO2 and CH4 derive from multiple sources, including groundwater, surface water runoff, carbonate equilibrium reactions, and benthic and water column microbial processing of organic C. The exact role of each of these processes is not yet quantified in the overall river C budget.

  12. A synthesis of carbon dioxide emissions from fossil-fuel combustion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andres, R.J.; Boden, T.A.; Bréon, F.-M.;

    2012-01-01

    This synthesis discusses the emissions of carbon dioxide from fossil-fuel combustion and cement production. While much is known about these emissions, there is still much that is unknown about the details surrounding these emissions. This synthesis explores our knowledge of these emissions in terms......, or which have had emissions reduction as a byproduct of other events, global total emissions continue their general increase with time. Global total fossilfuel carbon dioxide emissions are known to within 10% uncertainty (95% confidence interval). Uncertainty on individual national total fossil-fuel carbon...... dioxide emissions range from a few percent to more than 50 %. This manuscript concludes that carbon dioxide emissions from fossil-fuel combustion continue to increase with time and that while much is known about the overall characteristics of these emissions, much is still to be learned about the detailed...

  13. The travel-related carbon dioxide emissions of atmospheric researchers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Stohl

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Most atmospheric scientists agree that greenhouse gas emissions have already caused significant changes to the global climate system and that these changes will accelerate in the near future. At the same time, atmospheric scientists who – like other scientists – rely on international collaboration and information exchange travel a lot and, thereby, cause substantial emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2. In this paper, the CO2 emissions of the employees working at an atmospheric research institute (the Norwegian Institute for Air Research, NILU caused by all types of business travel (conference visits, workshops, field campaigns, instrument maintainance, etc. were calculated for the years 2005–2007. It is estimated that more than 90% of the emissions were caused by air travel, 3% by ground travel and 5% by hotel usage. The travel-related annual emissions were between 1.9 and 2.4 t CO2 per employee or between 3.9 and 5.5 t CO2 per scientist. For comparison, the total annual per capita CO2 emissions are 4.5 t worldwide, 1.2 t for India, 3.8 t for China, 5.9 t for Sweden and 19.1 t for Norway. The travel-related CO2 emissions of a NILU scientist, occurring in 24 days of a year on average, exceed the global average annual per capita emission. Norway's per-capita CO2 emissions are among the highest in the world, mostly because of the emissions from the oil industry. If the emissions per NILU scientist derived in this paper are taken as representative for the average Norwegian researcher, travel by Norwegian scientists would nevertheless account for a substantial 0.2% of Norway's total CO2 emissions. Since most of the travel-related emissions are due to air travel, water vapor emissions, ozone production and contrail formation further increase the relative importance of NILU's travel in terms of radiative forcing.

  14. Separation of carbon dioxide from flue emissions using Endex principles

    CERN Document Server

    Ball, R

    2009-01-01

    In an Endex reactor endothermic and exothermic reactions are directly thermally coupled and kinetically matched to achieve intrinsic thermal stability, efficient conversion, autothermal operation, and minimal heat losses. Applied to the problem of in-line carbon dioxide separation from flue gas, Endex principles hold out the promise of effecting a carbon dioxide capture technology of unprecedented economic viability. In this work we describe an Endex Calcium Looping reactor, in which heat released by chemisorption of carbon dioxide onto calcium oxide is used directly to drive the reverse reaction, yielding a pure stream of carbon dioxide for compression and geosequestration. In this initial study we model the proposed reactor as a continuous-flow dynamical system in the well-stirred limit, compute the steady states and analyse their stability properties over the operating parameter space, flag potential design and operational challenges, and suggest an optimum regime for effective operation.

  15. Global Biogenic Emission of Carbon Dioxide from Landfills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, R.; Nolasco, D.; Meneses, W.; Salazar, J.; Hernández, P.; Pérez, N.

    2002-12-01

    Human-induced increases in the atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gas components have been underway over the past century and are expected to drive climate change in the coming decades. Carbon dioxide was responsible for an estimated 55 % of the antropogenically driven radiactive forcing of the atmosphere in the 1980s and is predicted to have even greater importance over the next century (Houghton et al., 1990). A highly resolved understanding of the sources and sinks of atmospheric CO2, and how they are affected by climate and land use, is essential in the analysis of the global carbon cycle and how it may be impacted by human activities. Landfills are biochemical reactors that produce CH4 and CO2 emissions due to anaerobic digestion of solid urban wastes. Estimated global CH4 emission from landfills is about 44 millions tons per year and account for a 7.4 % of all CH4 sources (Whiticar, 1989). Observed CO2/CH4 molar ratios from landfill gases lie within the range of 0.7-1.0; therefore, an estimated global biogenic emission of CO2 from landfills could reach levels of 11.2-16 millions tons per year. Since biogas extraction systems are installed for extracting, purifying and burning the landfill gases, most of the biogenic gas emission to the atmosphere from landfills occurs through the surface environment in a diffuse and disperse form, also known as non-controlled biogenic emission. Several studies of non-controlled biogenic gas emission from landfills showed that CO2/CH4 weight ratios of surface landfill gases, which are directly injected into the atmosphere, are about 200-300 times higher than those observed in the landfill wells, which are usually collected and burned by gas extraction systems. This difference between surface and well landfill gases is mainly due to bacterial oxidation of the CH4 to CO2 inducing higher CO2/CH4 ratios for surface landfill gases than those well landfill gases. Taking into consideration this observation, the global biogenic

  16. Carbon dioxide emissions and nutrition on a drained pine mire - a case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartman, M.; Karsisto, M.; Kaunisto, S. [Finnish Forest Research Inst., Vantaa (Finland). Vantaa Research Centre

    1996-12-31

    Drainage of boreal peatlands intensify aerobic decomposition and carbon dioxide emission from the peat substrate and increase tree growth. CO{sub 2} emission rates depend on the ground water level and the soil temperature. Predicted rises in mean air temperatures due to anthropogenically induced climate change are expected to further increase carbon dioxide emission from drained boreal peatlands. The role of added nutrients is somewhat vague. The purpose of this presentation is to give some preliminary results on microbial biomass carbon and on carbon dioxide output/input relationship on a pine mire. (6 refs.)

  17. Coping with carbon: a near-term strategy to limit carbon dioxide emissions from power stations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breeze, Paul

    2008-11-13

    Burning coal to generate electricity is one of the key sources of atmospheric carbon dioxide emissions; so, targeting coal-fired power plants offers one of the easiest ways of reducing global carbon emissions. Given that the world's largest economies all rely heavily on coal for electricity production, eliminating coal combustion is not an option. Indeed, coal consumption is likely to increase over the next 20-30 years. However, the introduction of more efficient steam cycles will improve the emission performance of these plants over the short term. To achieve a reduction in carbon emissions from coal-fired plant, however, it will be necessary to develop and introduce carbon capture and sequestration technologies. Given adequate investment, these technologies should be capable of commercial development by ca 2020. PMID:18757277

  18. Carbon dioxide and methane emission dynamics in central London (UK)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfter, Carole; Nemitz, Eiko; Barlow, Janet F.; Wood, Curtis R.

    2013-04-01

    London, with a population of 8.2 million, is the largest city in Europe. It is heavily built-up (typically 8% vegetation cover within the central boroughs) and boasts some of the busiest arteries in Europe despite efforts to reduce traffic in the city centre with the introduction of a congestion charging scheme in 2007. We report on two substantial pollution monitoring efforts in the heart of London between October 2006 and present. Fluxes of carbon dioxide (CO2) and water (H2O) were measured continuously by eddy-covariance in central London from October 2006 until May 2008 from a 190 m telecommunication tower (BT tower; 51° 31' 17.4'' N 0° 8' 20.04'' W). The eddy-covariance system consisted of a Gill R3-50 ultrasonic anemometer operated at 20 Hz and a LI-COR 6262 infrared gas analyser. Air was sampled 0.3 m below the sensor head of the ultrasonic anemometer - which was itself mounted on a 3 m mast to the top of a 15 m lattice tower situated on the roof of the tower (instrument head at 190 m above street level) - and pulled down 45 m of 12.7 mm OD Teflon tubing. In addition, meteorological variables (temperature, relative humidity, pressure, precipitation, wind speed and direction) were also measured with a multi-sensor (Weather Transmitter WXT510, Vaisala). Eddy-covariance measurements at the BT tower location were reinstated in July 2011 and include methane (CH4), CO2 and H2O concentrations measured by a Picarro fast methane analyser (G2301-f). CO2 emissions were found to be mainly controlled by fossil fuel combustion (e.g. traffic, commercial and domestic heating). Diurnal averages of CO2 fluxes were found to be highly correlated to traffic. However changes in heating-related natural gas consumption and, to a lesser extent, photosynthetic activity in two large city centre green spaces (Hyde Park and Regent's Park) explained the seasonal variability. Annual estimates of net exchange of CO2 obtained by eddy-covariance agreed well with up-scaled data from the UK

  19. On the Potential Economic Costs of Cutting Carbon Dioxide Emissions in Portugal

    OpenAIRE

    Alfredo M. Pereira; Rui Manuel Marvão Pereira

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to estimate the impact of reducing carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuel combustion activities on economic activity in Portugal. We find that energy consumption has a significant impact on macroeconomic activity. In fact, a one ton of oil equivalent permanent reduction in aggregate energy consumption reduces output in the long term by €6,340. More importantly, and since carbon dioxide emissions are linearly related to the amounts of fuel consumed, our result...

  20. Magmatic carbon dioxide emissions at Mammoth Mountain, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrar, Christopher D.; Neil, John M.; Howle, James F.

    1999-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) of magmatic origin is seeping out of the ground in unusual quantities at several locations around the flanks of Mammoth Mountain, a dormant volcano in Eastern California. The most recent volcanic activity on Mammoth Mountain was steam eruptions about 600 years ago, but seismic swarms and long-period earthquakes over the past decade are evidence of an active magmatic system at depth. The CO2 emission probably began in 1990 but was not recognized until 1994. Seismic swarms and minor ground deformation during 1989, believed to be results of a shallow intrusion of magma beneath Mammoth Mountain, probably triggered the release of CO2, which persists in 1998. The CO2 gas is at ambient temperatures and emanates diffusely from the soil surface rather than flowing from distinct vents. The CO2 has collected in the soil by displacing air in the pore spaces and reaches concentrations of greater than 95 percent by volume in places. The total area affected by high CO2 concentrations and high CO2 flux from the soil surface was estimated at 60 hectares in 1997. Coniferous forest covering about 40 hectares has been killed by high CO2 concentrations in the root zone. In more than 300 soil-gas samples collected from depths of 0.5 to 2 m in 1995, CO2 concentrations ranged from background levels (less than 1 percent) to greater than 95 percent by volume. At 250 locations, CO2 flux was measured using a closed chamber in 1996; values, in grams per square meter per day, ranged from background (less than 25) to more than 30,000. On the basis of these data, the total emission of magmatic CO2 in 1996 is estimated to be about 530 megagrams per day. Concentrations of CO2 exceeding Occupational Safety and Health Administration standards have been measured in pits dug in soil and snow, in poorly ventilated buildings, and in below-ground valve-boxes around Mammoth Mountain. CO2 concentrations greater than 10 percent in poorly ventilated spaces are not uncommon on some parts

  1. SIMULATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE EMISSIONS FROM DAIRY FARMS TO ASSESS GREENHOUSE GAS REDUCTION STRATEGIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farming practices can have a large impact on the soil carbon cycle and the resulting net emission of greenhouse gases including carbon dioxide (CO**2), methane and nitrous oxide. Primary sources of CO**2 emission on dairy farms are soil, plant, and animal respiration with smaller contributions from ...

  2. Research on Urban Road Congestion Pricing Strategy Considering Carbon Dioxide Emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yitian Wang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Congestion pricing strategy has been recognized as an effective countermeasure in the practical field of urban traffic congestion mitigation. In this paper, a bi-level programming model considering carbon dioxide emission is proposed to mitigate traffic congestion and reduce carbon dioxide emissions. The objective function of the upper level model is to minimize the sum of travel costs and the carbon dioxide emissions costs. The lower level is a multi-modal transportation network equilibrium model. To solve the model, the method of successive averages (MSA and the shuffled frog leaping algorithm (SFLA are introduced. The proposed method and algorithm are tested through the numerical example. The results show that the proposed congestion pricing strategy can mitigate traffic congestion and reduce carbon emissions effectively.

  3. A strategic decision-making model considering the social costs of carbon dioxide emissions for sustainable supply chain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Shih-Chang; Hung, Shiu-Wan

    2014-01-15

    Incorporating sustainability into supply chain management has become a critical issue driven by pressures from governments, customers, and various stakeholder groups over the past decade. This study proposes a strategic decision-making model considering both the operational costs and social costs caused by the carbon dioxide emissions from operating such a supply chain network for sustainable supply chain management. This model was used to evaluate carbon dioxide emissions and operational costs under different scenarios in an apparel manufacturing supply chain network. The results showed that the higher the social cost rate of carbon dioxide emissions, the lower the amount of the emission of carbon dioxide. The results also suggested that a legislation that forces the enterprises to bear the social costs of carbon dioxide emissions resulting from their economic activities is an effective approach to reducing carbon dioxide emissions. PMID:24412595

  4. A strategic decision-making model considering the social costs of carbon dioxide emissions for sustainable supply chain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Shih-Chang; Hung, Shiu-Wan

    2014-01-15

    Incorporating sustainability into supply chain management has become a critical issue driven by pressures from governments, customers, and various stakeholder groups over the past decade. This study proposes a strategic decision-making model considering both the operational costs and social costs caused by the carbon dioxide emissions from operating such a supply chain network for sustainable supply chain management. This model was used to evaluate carbon dioxide emissions and operational costs under different scenarios in an apparel manufacturing supply chain network. The results showed that the higher the social cost rate of carbon dioxide emissions, the lower the amount of the emission of carbon dioxide. The results also suggested that a legislation that forces the enterprises to bear the social costs of carbon dioxide emissions resulting from their economic activities is an effective approach to reducing carbon dioxide emissions.

  5. Implementation of Emission Trading in Carbon Dioxide Sequestration Optimization Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X.; Duncan, I.

    2013-12-01

    As an effective mid- and long- term solution for large-scale mitigation of industrial CO2 emissions, CO2 capture and sequestration (CCS) has been paid more and more attention in the past decades. A general CCS management system has complex characteristics of multiple emission sources, multiple mitigation technologies, multiple sequestration sites, and multiple project periods. Trade-off exists among numerous environmental, economic, political, and technical factors, leading to varied system features. Sound decision alternatives are thus desired for provide decision supports for decision makers or managers for managing such a CCS system from capture to the final geologic storage phases. Carbon emission trading has been developed as a cost-effective tool for reducing the global greenhouse gas emissions. In this study, a carbon capture and sequestration optimization management model is proposed to address the above issues. The carbon emission trading is integrated into the model, and its impacts on the resulting management decisions are analyzed. A multi-source multi-period case study is provided to justify the applicability of the modeling approach, where uncertainties in modeling parameters are also dealt with.

  6. Energy use and carbon dioxide emissions in the steel sector in key developing countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, L.K.; Phylipsen, G.J.M.; Worrell, E.

    2001-04-01

    Iron and steel production consumes enormous quantities of energy, especially in developing countries where outdated, inefficient technologies are still used to produce iron and steel. Carbon dioxide emissions from steel production, which range between 5 and 15% of total country emissions in key developing countries (Brazil, China, India, Mexico, and South Africa), will continue to grow as these countries develop and as demand for steel products such as materials, automobiles, and appliances increases. In this report, we describe the key steel processes, discuss typical energy-intensity values for these processes, review historical trends in iron and steel production by process in five key developing countries, describe the steel industry in each of the five key developing countries, present international comparisons of energy use and carbon dioxide emissions among these countries, and provide our assessment of the technical potential to reduce these emissions based on best-practice benchmarking. Using a best practice benchmark, we find that significant savings, in the range of 33% to 49% of total primary energy used to produce steel, are technically possible in these countries. Similarly, we find that the technical potential for reducing intensities of carbon dioxide emissions ranges between 26% and 49% of total carbon dioxide emissions from steel production in these countries.

  7. Carbon dioxide emissions embodied in international trade in Central Europe between 1995 and 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlčková Jana

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Climate change and environmental policies are widely discussed, but much less is known about emissions embodied in goods traded internationally, and the distinction between emission producers and consumers. The carbon dioxide emissions embodied in international trade in Central European countries are subject to examination in this paper. As a result of industrial restructuring and environmental legislation, air pollution has improved significantly in Central European countries since the 1989 transition. On the other hand, economic growth has been accompanied by a rise in consumerism. Despite the increasing role of exports, the Visegrad group countries have become net importers of carbon dioxide emissions between 1995 and 2008. This seems to be the ‘standard trajectory’ of a country’s transition toward a more developed and consumption-oriented economy. The global patterns of carbon dioxide emissions embodied in manufacturing exports are also mapped, using network analysis and constructing ‘product space’. The analysis confirms that industrial re-structuring played an important role in lowering the production of carbon dioxide emissions in the Visegrad countries.

  8. Influence of carbon dioxide content in the biogas to nitrogen oxides emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Živković Marija A.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Fuels derived from biomass are an alternative solution for the fossil fuel shortage. Usually this kind of fuels is called low calorific value fuels, due to the large proportion of inert components in their composition. The most common is carbon dioxide, and its proportion in biogas can be different, from 10 up to 40%, or even more. The presence of inert component in the composition of biogas causes the problems that are related with flame blow off limits. One of the possibilities for efficient combustion of biogas is the combustion in swirling flow including a pilot burner, aimed to expand the borders of stable combustion. This paper presents an analysis of the influence of the carbon dioxide content to the nitrogen oxides emissions. Laboratory biogas was used with different content of CO2 (10, 20, 30 and 40%. Investigation was carried out for different nominal powers, coefficients of excess air and carbon dioxide content. With increasing content of carbon dioxide, emission of nitrogen oxides was reduced, and this trend was the same throughout the whole range of excess air, carried out through measurements. Still, the influence of carbon dioxide content is significantly less than the influence of excess air. The coefficient of excess air greatly affects the production of radicals which are essential for the formation of nitrogen oxides, O, OH and CH. Also, the results show that the nominal power has no impact on the emission of nitrogen oxides.

  9. Understanding Long-Term Energy Use and Carbon Dioxide Emissions in the Usa

    OpenAIRE

    Tol, Richard S. J.; Pacala, Stephen W.; Socolow, Robert

    2006-01-01

    We compile a database of energy uses, energy sources, and carbon dioxide emissions for the USA for the period 1850-2002. We use a model to extrapolate the missing observations on energy use by sector. Overall emission intensity rose between 1850 and 1917, and fell between 1917 and 2002. The leading cause for the rise in emission intensity was the switch from wood to coal, but population growth, economic growth, and electrification contributed as well. After 1917, population growth, economic g...

  10. Carbon dioxide emission prediction using support vector machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Chairul; Rachman Dzakiyullah, Nur; Bayu Nugroho, Jonathan

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, the SVM model was proposed for predict expenditure of carbon (CO2) emission. The energy consumption such as electrical energy and burning coal is input variable that affect directly increasing of CO2 emissions were conducted to built the model. Our objective is to monitor the CO2 emission based on the electrical energy and burning coal used from the production process. The data electrical energy and burning coal used were obtained from Alcohol Industry in order to training and testing the models. It divided by cross-validation technique into 90% of training data and 10% of testing data. To find the optimal parameters of SVM model was used the trial and error approach on the experiment by adjusting C parameters and Epsilon. The result shows that the SVM model has an optimal parameter on C parameters 0.1 and 0 Epsilon. To measure the error of the model by using Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) with error value as 0.004. The smallest error of the model represents more accurately prediction. As a practice, this paper was contributing for an executive manager in making the effective decision for the business operation were monitoring expenditure of CO2 emission.

  11. The Probability of Tax Charges for Industrial Emission of Carbon Dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Generally, although all industrial by product can be toxic and non-toxic pollutant that have potential hazard for human being and environmental. One of these pollutants is carbon dioxide that has potential contribution for greenhouse effect. Although carbon dioxide can be absorbed by plants at the forest but quantity of this emission more higher than quantity of forest area. For this reason rehabilitation of the forest and diversifications and energy saving can be used for decreasing of greenhouse effect. The synergy action such as economical instrumentation (specially microeconomics) can be implemented base on regulators, taxing and incentive and effluent charge by deeper assessment on environmental economics. By identification of quality and quantity fossil fuels that was burned in the industrial process so with stoichiometry calculation will be found quantity of carbon dioxide emission and the taxes can be estimated. (author)

  12. Carbon dioxide emissions, GDP, energy use, and population growth: a multivariate and causality analysis for Ghana, 1971-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asumadu-Sarkodie, Samuel; Owusu, Phebe Asantewaa

    2016-07-01

    In this study, the relationship between carbon dioxide emissions, GDP, energy use, and population growth in Ghana was investigated from 1971 to 2013 by comparing the vector error correction model (VECM) and the autoregressive distributed lag (ARDL). Prior to testing for Granger causality based on VECM, the study tested for unit roots, Johansen's multivariate co-integration and performed a variance decomposition analysis using Cholesky's technique. Evidence from the variance decomposition shows that 21 % of future shocks in carbon dioxide emissions are due to fluctuations in energy use, 8 % of future shocks are due to fluctuations in GDP, and 6 % of future shocks are due to fluctuations in population. There was evidence of bidirectional causality running from energy use to GDP and a unidirectional causality running from carbon dioxide emissions to energy use, carbon dioxide emissions to GDP, carbon dioxide emissions to population, and population to energy use. Evidence from the long-run elasticities shows that a 1 % increase in population in Ghana will increase carbon dioxide emissions by 1.72 %. There was evidence of short-run equilibrium relationship running from energy use to carbon dioxide emissions and GDP to carbon dioxide emissions. As a policy implication, the addition of renewable energy and clean energy technologies into Ghana's energy mix can help mitigate climate change and its impact in the future. PMID:27030236

  13. Carbon dioxide emissions, GDP, energy use, and population growth: a multivariate and causality analysis for Ghana, 1971-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asumadu-Sarkodie, Samuel; Owusu, Phebe Asantewaa

    2016-07-01

    In this study, the relationship between carbon dioxide emissions, GDP, energy use, and population growth in Ghana was investigated from 1971 to 2013 by comparing the vector error correction model (VECM) and the autoregressive distributed lag (ARDL). Prior to testing for Granger causality based on VECM, the study tested for unit roots, Johansen's multivariate co-integration and performed a variance decomposition analysis using Cholesky's technique. Evidence from the variance decomposition shows that 21 % of future shocks in carbon dioxide emissions are due to fluctuations in energy use, 8 % of future shocks are due to fluctuations in GDP, and 6 % of future shocks are due to fluctuations in population. There was evidence of bidirectional causality running from energy use to GDP and a unidirectional causality running from carbon dioxide emissions to energy use, carbon dioxide emissions to GDP, carbon dioxide emissions to population, and population to energy use. Evidence from the long-run elasticities shows that a 1 % increase in population in Ghana will increase carbon dioxide emissions by 1.72 %. There was evidence of short-run equilibrium relationship running from energy use to carbon dioxide emissions and GDP to carbon dioxide emissions. As a policy implication, the addition of renewable energy and clean energy technologies into Ghana's energy mix can help mitigate climate change and its impact in the future.

  14. Automobiles and global warming: Alternative fuels and other options for carbon dioxide emissions reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Automobiles are a source of considerable pollution at the global level, including a significant fraction of the total greenhouse gas emissions. Alternative fuels have received some attention as potential options to curtail the carbon dioxide emissions from motor vehicles. This article discusses the feasibility and desirability (from a technical as well as a broader environmental perspective) of the large-scale production and use of alternative fuels as a strategy to mitigate automotive carbon dioxide emissions. Other options such as improving vehicle efficiency and switching to more efficient modes of passenger transportation are also discussed. These latter options offer an effective and immediate way to tackle the greenhouse and other pollutant emission from automobiles, especially as the limitations of currently available alternative fuels and the technological and other constraints for potential future alternatives are revealed

  15. Atmospheric CO2 capture by algae: Negative carbon dioxide emission path.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Diana; Pires, José C M

    2016-09-01

    Carbon dioxide is one of the most important greenhouse gas, which concentration increase in the atmosphere is associated to climate change and global warming. Besides CO2 capture in large emission point sources, the capture of this pollutant from atmosphere may be required due to significant contribution of diffuse sources. The technologies that remove CO2 from atmosphere (creating a negative balance of CO2) are called negative emission technologies. Bioenergy with Carbon Capture and Storage may play an important role for CO2 mitigation. It represents the combination of bioenergy production and carbon capture and storage, keeping carbon dioxide in geological reservoirs. Algae have a high potential as the source of biomass, as they present high photosynthetic efficiencies and high biomass yields. Their biomass has a wide range of applications, which can improve the economic viability of the process. Thus, this paper aims to assess the atmospheric CO2 capture by algal cultures. PMID:27005790

  16. Atmospheric CO2 capture by algae: Negative carbon dioxide emission path.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Diana; Pires, José C M

    2016-09-01

    Carbon dioxide is one of the most important greenhouse gas, which concentration increase in the atmosphere is associated to climate change and global warming. Besides CO2 capture in large emission point sources, the capture of this pollutant from atmosphere may be required due to significant contribution of diffuse sources. The technologies that remove CO2 from atmosphere (creating a negative balance of CO2) are called negative emission technologies. Bioenergy with Carbon Capture and Storage may play an important role for CO2 mitigation. It represents the combination of bioenergy production and carbon capture and storage, keeping carbon dioxide in geological reservoirs. Algae have a high potential as the source of biomass, as they present high photosynthetic efficiencies and high biomass yields. Their biomass has a wide range of applications, which can improve the economic viability of the process. Thus, this paper aims to assess the atmospheric CO2 capture by algal cultures.

  17. Carbon dioxide emission implications if hydrofluorocarbons are regulated: a refrigeration case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blowers, Paul; Lownsbury, James M

    2010-03-01

    The U.S. is strongly considering regulating hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) due to their global climate change forcing effects. A drop-in replacement hydrofluoroether has been evaluated using a gate-to-grave life cycle assessment of greenhouse gas emissions for the trade-offs between direct and indirect carbon dioxide equivalent emissions compared to a current HFC and a historically used refrigerant. The results indicate current regulations being considered may increase global climate change. PMID:20050659

  18. Inventory of Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Judd, Kathleen S.; Kora, Angela R.; Shankle, Steve A.; Fowler, Kimberly M.

    2009-06-29

    The Carbon Management Strategic Initiative (CMSI) is a lab-wide initiative to position the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) as a leader in science, technology and policy analysis required to understand, mitigate and adapt to global climate change as a nation. As part of an effort to walk the talk in the field of carbon management, PNNL conducted its first carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions inventory for the 2007 calendar year. The goal of this preliminary inventory is to provide PNNL staff and management with a sense for the relative impact different activities at PNNL have on the lab’s total carbon footprint.

  19. The travel-related carbon dioxide emissions of atmospheric researchers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Stohl

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Most atmospheric scientists agree that greenhouse gas emissions have already caused significant changes to the global climate system and that these changes will accelerate in the near future. At the same time, atmospheric scientists who – like other scientists – rely on international collaboration and information exchange travel a lot and, thereby, cause substantial emissions of CO2. In this paper, the CO2 emissions of the employees working at an atmospheric research institute (the Norwegian Institute for Air Research, NILU caused by all types of business travel (conference visits, workshops, field campaigns, instrument maintainance, etc. were calculated for the years 2005–2007. It is estimated that more than 90% of the emissions were caused by air travel, 3% by ground travel and 5% by hotel usage. The travel-related annual emissions were between 1.9 and 2.4 t CO2 per employee or between 3.9 and 5.5 t CO2 per scientist. For comparison, the total annual per capita CO2 emissions are 4.5 t worldwide, 1.2 t for India, 3.8 t for China, 5.9 t for Sweden and 19.1 t for Norway. The travel-related CO2 emissions of a NILU scientist, occurring in 24 days of a year on average, exceed the global average annual per capita emission. Norway's per-capita CO2 emissions are among the highest in the world, mostly because of the emissions from the oil industry. If the emissions per NILU scientist derived in this paper are taken as representative for the average Norwegian researcher, travel by Norwegian scientists would nevertheless account for a substantial 0.2% of Norway's total CO2 emissions. Since most of the travel-related emissions are due to air travel, water vapor emissions, ozone production and contrail formation further increase the relative importance of NILU's travel in terms of radiative forcing.

  20. Carbon dioxide emissions and economic growth. Panel data evidence from developing countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narayan, Paresh Kumar; Narayan, Seema [School of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Faculty of Business and Law, Deakin University, 221 Burwood Highway, Burwood, Victoria 3125 (Australia); School of Economics, Finance, and Marketing, Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology, Melbourne (Australia)

    2010-01-15

    In this paper we test the Environment Kuznet's Curve (EKC) hypothesis for 43 developing countries. We suggest examining the EKC hypothesis based on the short- and long-run income elasticities; that is, if the long-run income elasticity is smaller than the short-run income elasticity then it is evident that a country has reduced carbon dioxide emissions as its income has increased. Our empirical analysis based on individual countries suggests that Jordan, Iraq, Kuwait, Yemen, Qatar, the UAE, Argentina, Mexico, Venezuela, Algeria, Kenya, Nigeria, Congo, Ghana, and South Africa - approximately 35 per cent of the sample - carbon dioxide emissions have fallen over the long run; that is, as these economies have grown emissions have fallen since the long-run income elasticity is smaller than the short-run elasticity. We also examine the EKC hypothesis for panels of countries constructed on the basis of regional location using the panel cointegration and the panel long-run estimation techniques. We find that only for the Middle Eastern and South Asian panels, the income elasticity in the long run is smaller than the short run, implying that carbon dioxide emission has fallen with a rise in income. (author)

  1. Analysis of carbon dioxide emission of gas fuelled cogeneration plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordin, Adzuieen; Amin, M.; Majid, A.

    2013-12-01

    Gas turbines are widely used for power generation. In cogeneration system, the gas turbine generates electricity and the exhaust heat from the gas turbine is used to generate steam or chilled water. Besides enhancing the efficiency of the system, the process assists in reducing the emission of CO2 to the environment. This study analyzes the amount of CO2 emission by Universiti Teknologi Petronas gas fuelled cogeneration system using energy balance equations. The results indicate that the cogeneration system reduces the CO2 emission to the environment by 60%. This finding could encourage the power plant owners to install heat recovery systems to their respective plants.

  2. Carbon dioxide emission savings potential of household water use reduction in the UK.

    OpenAIRE

    GRAY, NICHOLAS FREDERICK

    2009-01-01

    PUBLISHED The relationship between household water use and energy consumption was examined to establish whether the conservation of water within a domestic environment offers significant potential for saving energy, thereby reducing household carbon dioxide emissions. Average UK water usage is 55,121 L ca-1yr-1. The supply of this volume of water and its subsequent treatment by the water companies is equivalent to just 38.6 kg CO2 ca-1 yr-1, although this is not currently inclu...

  3. Electric cars : The climate impact of electric cars, focusing on carbon dioxide equivalent emissions

    OpenAIRE

    Ly, Sandra; Sundin, Helena; Thell, Linda

    2012-01-01

    This bachelor thesis examines and models the emissions of carbon dioxide equivalents of the composition of automobiles in Sweden 2012. The report will be based on three scenarios of electricity valuation principles, which are a snapshot perspective, a retrospective perspective and a future perspective. The snapshot perspective includes high and low values for electricity on the margin, the retrospective perspective includes Nordic and European electricity mix and the future perspective includ...

  4. Technical efficiency of automobiles: A nonparametric approach incorporating carbon dioxide emissions

    OpenAIRE

    Hampf, Benjamin; Krüger, Jens

    2010-01-01

    We conduct an empirical analysis of the technical efficiency of cars sold in Germany in 2010. The analysis is performed using traditional data envelopment analysis (DEA) as well as directional distance functions (DDF). The approach of DDF allows incorporating the reduction of carbon dioxide emissions as an environmental goal in the efficiency analysis. A frontier separation approach is used to gain deeper insight for different car classes and regions of origin. Natural gas driven cars and spo...

  5. Energy efficiency and carbon dioxide emissions reduction opportunities in the U.S. cement industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Nathan; Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn

    1999-08-01

    This paper reports on an in-depth analysis of the U.S. cement industry, identifying cost-effective energy efficiency measures and potentials. The authors assess this industry at the aggregate level (Standard Industrial Classification 324), which includes establishments engaged in manufacturing hydraulic cements, including Portland, natural, masonry, and pozzolana when reviewing industry trends and when making international comparisons. Coal and coke are currently the primary fuels for the sector, supplanting the dominance of natural gas in the 1970s. Between 1970 and 1997, primary physical energy intensity for cement production (SIC 324) dropped 30%,from 7.9 GJ/t to 5.6 GJ/t, while carbon dioxide intensity due to fuel consumption (carbon dioxide emissions expressed in tons of carbon per ton cement) dropped 25%, from 0.16 tC/ton to 0.12 tC/ton. Carbon dioxide intensity due to fuel consumption and clinker calcination dropped 17%, from 0.29 tC/ton to 0.24 tC/ton. They examined 30 energy efficient technologies and measures and estimated energy savings, carbon dioxide savings, investment costs, and operation and maintenance costs for each of the measures. They constructed an energy conservation supply curve for U.S. cement industry which found a total cost-effective reduction of 0.6 GJ/ton of cement consisting of measures having a simple payback period of 3 years or less. This is equivalent to potential energy savings of 11% of 1994 energy use for cement making and a savings of 5% of total 1994 carbon dioxide emissions by the U.S. cement industry. Assuming the increased production of blended cement in the U.S., as is common in many parts of the world, the technical potential for energy efficiency improvement would not change considerably. However, the cost-effective potential, would increase to 1.1 GJ/ton cement or 18% of total energy use, and carbon dioxide emissions would be reduced by 16%.

  6. Causal nexus between energy consumption and carbon dioxide emission for Malaysia using maximum entropy bootstrap approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gul, Sehrish; Zou, Xiang; Hassan, Che Hashim; Azam, Muhammad; Zaman, Khalid

    2015-12-01

    This study investigates the relationship between energy consumption and carbon dioxide emission in the causal framework, as the direction of causality remains has a significant policy implication for developed and developing countries. The study employed maximum entropy bootstrap (Meboot) approach to examine the causal nexus between energy consumption and carbon dioxide emission using bivariate as well as multivariate framework for Malaysia, over a period of 1975-2013. This is a unified approach without requiring the use of conventional techniques based on asymptotical theory such as testing for possible unit root and cointegration. In addition, it can be applied in the presence of non-stationary of any type including structural breaks without any type of data transformation to achieve stationary. Thus, it provides more reliable and robust inferences which are insensitive to time span as well as lag length used. The empirical results show that there is a unidirectional causality running from energy consumption to carbon emission both in the bivariate model and multivariate framework, while controlling for broad money supply and population density. The results indicate that Malaysia is an energy-dependent country and hence energy is stimulus to carbon emissions.

  7. Causal nexus between energy consumption and carbon dioxide emission for Malaysia using maximum entropy bootstrap approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gul, Sehrish; Zou, Xiang; Hassan, Che Hashim; Azam, Muhammad; Zaman, Khalid

    2015-12-01

    This study investigates the relationship between energy consumption and carbon dioxide emission in the causal framework, as the direction of causality remains has a significant policy implication for developed and developing countries. The study employed maximum entropy bootstrap (Meboot) approach to examine the causal nexus between energy consumption and carbon dioxide emission using bivariate as well as multivariate framework for Malaysia, over a period of 1975-2013. This is a unified approach without requiring the use of conventional techniques based on asymptotical theory such as testing for possible unit root and cointegration. In addition, it can be applied in the presence of non-stationary of any type including structural breaks without any type of data transformation to achieve stationary. Thus, it provides more reliable and robust inferences which are insensitive to time span as well as lag length used. The empirical results show that there is a unidirectional causality running from energy consumption to carbon emission both in the bivariate model and multivariate framework, while controlling for broad money supply and population density. The results indicate that Malaysia is an energy-dependent country and hence energy is stimulus to carbon emissions. PMID:26282441

  8. Carbon dioxide and methane emissions from calcareous-marly rock under stress: experimental tests results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Plescia

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The identified emissions of abiogenic carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide and methane are generally attributed to volcanic activity or to geochemical processes associated with thermometamorphic effects. In this paper we show another possible abiogenic source of emission, induced by mechanical, and not thermal, stresses. We investigated the mechanochemical production of carbon dioxide and methane when friction is applied to marly-type rock and studied the mechanisms determining the strong CO2 and CH4 emissions observed. A ring mill was used to apply friction and oriented pressure upon a synthetic calcite-clay mixture of varying proportions. We found that the CO2 and CH4 release versus the grinding action has a non-linear trend reflecting the behaviour of decreasing crystallinity, which indicates a close link between crystallinity and gas production. For the CO2 emission, we propose a release mechanism connected with the friction-induced fractures and the increase in structural disorders induced by creep in the lattice. The CH4 emission could be explained by a Sabatier reaction in which CO2 and hydrogen are involved to form CH4 and water.

  9. Policy Considerations for Using Forests to Mitigate Carbon Dioxide Emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Brown

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available A recent article in Nature, “Soil Fertility Limits Carbon Sequestration by Forest Ecosystems in a CO2-Enriched Atmosphere” by Oren and colleagues[1], has been widely reported on, and often misinterpreted, by the press. The article dampens enthusiasm for accelerated forest growth due to CO2 fertilization and puts in question the fringe theory that the world’s forests can provide an automatic mitigation feedback. We agree that these results increase our understanding of the global carbon cycle. At the same time, their relevance in the context of the international climate change negotiations is much more complicated than portrayed by newspapers such as the New York Times (“Role of Trees in Curbing Greenhouse Gases is Challenged”, May 24, 2001 and the Christian Science Monitor (“Trees No Savior for Global Warming”, May 25, 2001.

  10. Performance assessment of carbonation process integrated with coal fired power plant to reduce CO2 (carbon dioxide) emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a novel approach to recover energy from mineral carbonation process, one of the CCS (carbon capture and storage) technologies, to reduce its additional energy demand and reports the feasibility of integrating a carbonation process with an existing power plant for reducing CO2 (carbon dioxide) emission. A thermodynamic mass and energy flow model of the carbonation process is developed using Matlab/Simulink software for a range of carbonation temperatures using two naturally available feedstocks, namely serpentine and olivine. The CO2 emissions are reduced if a carbonation system is implemented in the power plant, though the power generation efficiency and net power output are reduced too due to the large amount of extra energy required for the grinding of feedstock and the compression of CO2. The existing power plant efficiency was found to be 36.1%. If a carbonation system is incorporated, the plant efficiency reduces to 22% and 24% using serpentine and olivine feedstocks respectively. However, a significant amount of heat energy can be recovered from exothermic reaction of carbonation and carbonated products. The power plant efficiency can be increased to 35% and 34% again, respectively, when energy from carbonation reaction and carbonated products can be recovered appropriately. - Highlights: • Mineral carbonation technology is one of the carbon capture and storage technologies. • Exothermic heat energy can be recovered from mineral carbonation process. • Mineral carbonation process is energy self-sufficient. • Thermodynamic mass and energy balance model is developed for mineral carbonation

  11. Carbon dioxide emissions reduction in China's transport sector: A dynamic VAR (vector autoregression) approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Energy saving and carbon dioxide emission reduction in China is attracting increasing attention worldwide. At present, China is in the phase of rapid urbanization and industrialization, which is characterized by rapid growth of energy consumption. China's transport sector is highly energy-consuming and pollution-intensive. Between 1980 and 2012, the carbon dioxide emissions in China's transport sector increased approximately 9.7 times, with an average annual growth rate of 7.4%. Identifying the driving forces of the increase in carbon dioxide emissions in the transport sector is vital to developing effective environmental policies. This study uses Vector Autoregressive model to analyze the influencing factors of the changes in carbon dioxide emissions in the sector. The results show that energy efficiency plays a dominant role in reducing carbon dioxide emissions. Private vehicles have more impact on emission reduction than cargo turnover due to the surge in private car population and its low energy efficiency. Urbanization also has significant effect on carbon dioxide emissions because of large-scale population movements and the transformation of the industrial structure. These findings are important for the relevant authorities in China in developing appropriate energy policy and planning for the transport sector. - Highlights: • The driving forces of CO2 emissions in China's transport sector were investigated. • Energy efficiency plays a dominant role in reducing carbon dioxide emissions. • Urbanization has significant effect on CO2 emissions due to large-scale migration. • The role of private cars in reducing emissions is more important than cargo turnover

  12. Prediction on carbon dioxide emissions based on fuzzy rules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauzi, Herrini; Abdullah, Lazim

    2014-06-01

    There are several ways to predict air quality, varying from simple regression to models based on artificial intelligence. Most of the conventional methods are not sufficiently able to provide good forecasting performances due to the problems with non-linearity uncertainty and complexity of the data. Artificial intelligence techniques are successfully used in modeling air quality in order to cope with the problems. This paper describes fuzzy inference system (FIS) to predict CO2 emissions in Malaysia. Furthermore, adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) is used to compare the prediction performance. Data of five variables: energy use, gross domestic product per capita, population density, combustible renewable and waste and CO2 intensity are employed in this comparative study. The results from the two model proposed are compared and it is clearly shown that the ANFIS outperforms FIS in CO2 prediction.

  13. A modelling on estimation of the carbon dioxide emission from vehicles using logistic equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, E. W.; Andry, A.; Afra, F.; Sumarti, N.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, the logistic differential equation is used in developing a model on carbon dioxide traces which potentially releases from a particular area. The improvement to a higher scale or scope is straightforward by considering the larger observed data or larger number of the potential CO2 sources. Let G(t) the total amount of the carbon dioxide emission from motorcycles and cars used by the resident of the area. G (t )=P (t )(r1(t )η (t )+r2(t )ξ (t )) where P(t) is the number of the resident of the observed area (population of Bandung Institute of Technology) at year t, r1(t) and r2(t) are the portion of the population who use motorcycles and cars respectively, η(t) and ξ(t) are the approximated total emission of the carbon dioxide from the related vehicles respectively. The number of resident is modeled by the logistic equation so the future number can be estimated. The model is implemented in a campus of Institut Teknologi Bandung (ITB) at Ganesha street, Indonesia. The results show that the amount of CO2 produced from the transport in Ganesha campus will reach the carrying capacity of the campus in the next 3 years, which will be at around 2.1 billion kilotons of CO2. Therefore, the need of reducing the usage of motorcycles and cars is inevitable in the near future.

  14. Carbon dioxide emission standards for U.S. power plants. An efficiency analysis perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hampf, Benjamin [Technische Univ. Darmstadt (Germany). Fachbereich Rechts- und Wirtschaftswissenschaften; Roedseth, Kenneth Loevold [Institute of Transport Economics, Oslo (Norway). Dept. of Economics and Logistics

    2013-07-01

    On June 25, 2013, President Obama announced his plan to introduce carbon dioxide emission standards for electricity generation. This paper proposes an efficiency analysis approach that addresses which mission rates (and standards) would be feasible if the existing generating units adopt best practices. A new efficiency measure is introduced and further decomposed to identify different sources' contributions to emission rate improvements. Estimating two Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) models - the well-known joint production model and the new materials balance model - on a dataset consisting of 160 bituminous-fired generating units, we find that the average generating unit's electricity-to-carbon dioxide ratio is 15.3 percent below the corresponding best-practice ratio. Further examinations reveal that this discrepancy can largely be attributed to non-discretionary factors and not to managerial inefficiency. Moreover, even if the best practice ratios could be implemented, the generating units would not be able to comply with the EPA's recently proposed carbon dioxide standard.

  15. Partitioning Carbon Dioxide Emission and Assessing Dissolved Organic Carbon Leaching of a Drained Peatland Cultivated with Pineapple at Saratok, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liza Nuriati Lim Kim Choo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pineapples (Ananas comosus (L. Merr. cultivation on drained peats could affect the release of carbon dioxide (CO2 into the atmosphere and also the leaching of dissolved organic carbon (DOC. Carbon dioxide emission needs to be partitioned before deciding on whether cultivated peat is net sink or net source of carbon. Partitioning of CO2 emission into root respiration, microbial respiration, and oxidative peat decomposition was achieved using a lysimeter experiment with three treatments: peat soil cultivated with pineapple, bare peat soil, and bare peat soil fumigated with chloroform. Drainage water leached from cultivated peat and bare peat soil was also analyzed for DOC. On a yearly basis, CO2 emissions were higher under bare peat (218.8 t CO2 ha/yr than under bare peat treated with chloroform (205 t CO2 ha/yr, and they were the lowest (179.6 t CO2 ha/yr under cultivated peat. Decreasing CO2 emissions under pineapple were attributed to the positive effects of photosynthesis and soil autotrophic activities. An average 235.7 mg/L loss of DOC under bare peat suggests rapid decline of peat organic carbon through heterotrophic respiration and peat decomposition. Soil CO2 emission depended on moderate temperature fluctuations, but it was not affected by soil moisture.

  16. Partitioning carbon dioxide emission and assessing dissolved organic carbon leaching of a drained peatland cultivated with pineapple at Saratok, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim Kim Choo, Liza Nuriati; Ahmed, Osumanu Haruna

    2014-01-01

    Pineapples (Ananas comosus (L.) Merr.) cultivation on drained peats could affect the release of carbon dioxide (CO2) into the atmosphere and also the leaching of dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Carbon dioxide emission needs to be partitioned before deciding on whether cultivated peat is net sink or net source of carbon. Partitioning of CO2 emission into root respiration, microbial respiration, and oxidative peat decomposition was achieved using a lysimeter experiment with three treatments: peat soil cultivated with pineapple, bare peat soil, and bare peat soil fumigated with chloroform. Drainage water leached from cultivated peat and bare peat soil was also analyzed for DOC. On a yearly basis, CO2 emissions were higher under bare peat (218.8 t CO2 ha/yr) than under bare peat treated with chloroform (205 t CO2 ha/yr), and they were the lowest (179.6 t CO2 ha/yr) under cultivated peat. Decreasing CO2 emissions under pineapple were attributed to the positive effects of photosynthesis and soil autotrophic activities. An average 235.7 mg/L loss of DOC under bare peat suggests rapid decline of peat organic carbon through heterotrophic respiration and peat decomposition. Soil CO2 emission depended on moderate temperature fluctuations, but it was not affected by soil moisture. PMID:25215335

  17. Trend of carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuels and cement production in Kenya

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nganga, J.K. [University of Nairobi, Nairobi (Kenya). Dept. Meteorology

    2000-07-01

    The data on annual consumption of fossil fuels and cement production in Kenya was used to carry out an inventory of carbon dioxide emissions from 1966 to 1993 using emission guidelines proposed by the Organisation of Economic Co-operation and Development. The results show an increasing trend of emissions from the two sources in association with increasing fossil fuel consumption and cement production in the country. Transport sector takes the largest share of fossil fuel consumption making the increasing vehicle population in the country a significant influencing factor in the observed trend. The demand for motor fuel in turn seems to be influenced by the economic performance and is indicated by periods of decline in the consumption of fossil fuels and resultant emissions. If the trend continues there will be an increase of about 46% by the next 20 years. However, Kenya's contribution of carbon dioxide emissions into the global atmosphere through these two sources is small and is consistent with treads observed in other developing parts of the world.

  18. Incorporation of catalytic dehydrogenation into fischer-tropsch synthesis to significantly reduce carbon dioxide emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huffman, Gerald P.

    2012-11-13

    A new method of producing liquid transportation fuels from coal and other hydrocarbons that significantly reduces carbon dioxide emissions by combining Fischer-Tropsch synthesis with catalytic dehydrogenation is claimed. Catalytic dehydrogenation (CDH) of the gaseous products (C1-C4) of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) can produce large quantities of hydrogen while converting the carbon to multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT). Incorporation of CDH into a FTS-CDH plant converting coal to liquid fuels can eliminate all or most of the CO.sub.2 emissions from the water-gas shift (WGS) reaction that is currently used to elevate the H.sub.2 level of coal-derived syngas for FTS. Additionally, the FTS-CDH process saves large amounts of water used by the WGS reaction and produces a valuable by-product, MWCNT.

  19. Incorporation of catalytic dehydrogenation into Fischer-Tropsch synthesis to lower carbon dioxide emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huffman, Gerald P

    2012-09-18

    A method for producing liquid fuels includes the steps of gasifying a starting material selected from a group consisting of coal, biomass, carbon nanotubes and mixtures thereof to produce a syngas, subjecting that syngas to Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) to produce a hyrdrocarbon product stream, separating that hydrocarbon product stream into C1-C4 hydrocarbons and C5+ hydrocarbons to be used as liquid fuels and subjecting the C1-C4 hydrocarbons to catalytic dehydrogenation (CDH) to produce hydrogen and carbon nanotubes. The hydrogen produced by CDH is recycled to be mixed with the syngas incident to the FTS reactor in order to raise the hydrogen to carbon monoxide ratio of the syngas to values of 2 or higher, which is required to produce liquid hydrocarbon fuels. This is accomplished with little or no production of carbon dioxide, a greenhouse gas. The carbon is captured in the form of a potentially valuable by-product, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT), while huge emissions of carbon dioxide are avoided and very large quantities of water employed for the water-gas shift in traditional FTS systems are saved.

  20. Outstanding field emission properties of wet-processed titanium dioxide coated carbon nanotube based field emission devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Jinzhuo; Ou-Yang, Wei, E-mail: ouyangwei@phy.ecnu.edu.cn; Chen, Xiaohong; Guo, Pingsheng; Piao, Xianqing; Sun, Zhuo [Engineering Research Center for Nanophotonics and Advanced Instrument, Ministry of Education, Department of Physics, East China Normal University, 3663 North Zhongshan Road, Shanghai 200062 (China); Xu, Peng; Wang, Miao [Department of Physics, Zhejiang University, 38 ZheDa Road, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Li, Jun [Department of Electronic Science and Technology, Tongji University, 4800 Caoan Road, Shanghai 201804 (China)

    2015-02-16

    Field emission devices using a wet-processed composite cathode of carbon nanotube films coated with titanium dioxide exhibit outstanding field emission characteristics, including ultralow turn on field of 0.383 V μm{sup −1} and threshold field of 0.657 V μm{sup −1} corresponding with a very high field enhancement factor of 20 000, exceptional current stability, and excellent emission uniformity. The improved field emission properties are attributed to the enhanced edge effect simultaneously with the reduced screening effect, and the lowered work function of the composite cathode. In addition, the highly stable electron emission is found due to the presence of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on the carbon nanotubes, which prohibits the cathode from the influence of ions and free radical created in the emission process as well as residual oxygen gas in the device. The high-performance solution-processed composite cathode demonstrates great potential application in vacuum electronic devices.

  1. Decomposing the Influencing Factors of Industrial Sector Carbon Dioxide Emissions in Inner Mongolia Based on the LMDI Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rina Wu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Understanding of the influencing factors of industrial sector carbon dioxide emissions is essential to reduce natural and anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. In this paper, we applied the Logarithmic Mean Divisia Index (LMDI decomposition method based on the extended Kaya identity to analyze the changes in industrial carbon dioxide emissions resulting from 39 industrial sectors in Inner Mongolia northeast of China over the period 2003–2012. The factors were divided into five types of effects i.e., industrial growth effect, industrial structure effect, energy effect, energy intensity effect, population effect and comparative analysis of differential influences of various factors on industrial sector. Our results clearly show that (1 Industrial sector carbon dioxide emissions have increased from 134.00 million ton in 2003 to 513.46 million ton in 2012, with an annual average growth rate of 16.097%. The industrial carbon dioxide emissions intensity has decreased from 0.99 million ton/billion yuan to 0.28 million ton/billion yuan. Also, the energy structure has been dominated by coal; (2 Production and supply of electric power, steam and hot water, coal mining and dressing, smelting and pressing of ferrous metals, petroleum processing, coking and nuclear fuel processing, and raw chemical materials and chemical products account for 89.74% of total increased industrial carbon dioxide emissions; (3 The industrial growth effect and population effect are found to be a critical driving force for increasing industrial sector carbon dioxide emissions over the research period. The energy intensity effect is the crucial drivers of the decrease of carbon dioxide emissions. However, the energy structure effect and industrial structure effect have considerably varied over the study years without displaying any clear trend.

  2. Short and Long Term Impacts of Forest Bioenergy Production on Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudiburg, T.; Law, B. E.; Luyssaert, S.; Thornton, P. E.

    2011-12-01

    Temperate forest annual net uptake of CO2 from the atmosphere is equivalent to ~16% of the annual fossil fuel emissions in the United States. Mitigation strategies to reduce emissions of carbon dioxide have lead to investigation of alternative sources of energy including forest biomass. The prospect of forest derived bioenergy has led to implementation of new forest management strategies based on the assumption that they will reduce total CO2 emissions to the atmosphere by simultaneously reducing the risk of wildfire and substituting for fossil fuels. The benefit of managing forests for bioenergy substitution of fossil fuels versus potential carbon sequestration by reducing harvest needs to be evaluated. This study uses a combination of Federal Forest Inventory data (FIA), remote sensing, and a coupled carbon-nitrogen ecosystem process model (CLM4-CN) to predict net atmospheric CO2 emissions from forest thinning for bioenergy production in Oregon under varying future management and climate scenarios. We use life-cycle assessment (LCA) incorporating both the forest and forest product sinks and sources of carbon dioxide. Future modeled results are compared with a reduced harvest scenario to determine the potential for increased carbon sequestration in forest biomass. We find that Oregon forests are a current strong sink of 7.5 ± 1.7 Tg C yr-1 or 61 g C m-2 yr-1. (NBP; NEP minus removals from fire and harvest). In the short term, we find that carbon dynamics following harvests for fire prevention and large-scale bioenergy production lead to 2-15% higher emissions over the next 20 years compared to current management, assuming 100% effectiveness of fire prevention. Given the current sink strength, analysis of the forest sector in Oregon demonstrates that increasing harvest levels by all practices above current business-as-usual levels increases CO2 emissions to the atmosphere as long as the region's sink persists. In the long-term, we find that projected changes in

  3. Carbon dioxide sequestration by mineral carbonation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijgen, W.J.J.

    2007-01-01

    The increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration, mainly caused by fossil fuel combustion, has lead to concerns about global warming. A possible technology that can contribute to the reduction of carbon dioxide emissions is CO2 sequestration by mineral carbonation. The basic concept beh

  4. Ammonia, hydrogen sulfide, carbon dioxide and particulate matter emissions from California high-rise layer houses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, X.-J.; Cortus, E. L.; Zhang, R.; Jiang, S.; Heber, A. J.

    2012-01-01

    Ammonia and hydrogen sulfide are hazardous substances that are regulated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency through community right-to-know legislation (EPCRA, EPA, 2011). The emissions of ammonia and hydrogen sulfide from large commercial layer facilities are of concern to legislators and nearby neighbors. Particulate matter (PM 10 and PM 2.5) released from layer houses are two of seven criteria pollutants for which EPA has set National Ambient Air Quality Standards as required by the Clean Air Act. Therefore, it is important to quantify the baseline emissions of these pollutants. The emissions of ammonia, hydrogen sulfide, carbon dioxide and PM from two California high-rise layer houses were monitored for two years from October 2007 to October 2009. Each house had 32,500 caged laying hens. The monitoring site was setup in compliance with a U.S. EPA-approved quality assurance project plan. The results showed the average daily mean emission rates of ammonia, hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide were 0.95 ± 0.67 (standard deviation) g d -1 bird -1, 1.27 ± 0.78 mg d -1 bird -1 and 91.4 ± 16.5 g d -1 bird -1, respectively. The average daily mean emission rates of PM 2.5, PM 10 and total suspended particulate (TSP) were 5.9 ± 12.6, 33.4 ± 27.4, and 78.0 ± 42.7 mg d -1 bird -1, respectively. It was observed that ammonia emission rates in summer were lower than in winter because the high airflow stabilized the manure by drying it. The reductions due to lower moisture content were greater than the increases due to higher temperature. However, PM 10 emission rates in summer were higher than in winter because the drier conditions coupled with higher internal air velocities increased PM 10 release from feathers, feed and manure.

  5. Analysis and Optimization of Carbon Dioxide Emission Mitigation Options in the Cement Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed B. Shammakh

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The cement industry is responsible for approximately 5% of global anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions emitting nearly 900 kg of CO2 for every 1000 kg of cement produced. Effective control strategies to mitigate these emissions are discussed and a mathematical programming model able to suggest the best cost effective strategy is outlined. Control costs consisting of operating and investment costs along with the efficiency of control options are taken into account in the model. A representative case study from the cement industry was considered in order to illustrate the use of the model in giving optimal control strategies. Efficiency improvement measures were found to be effective options for reduction targets up to 10 %. The model suggested that fuel switching and carbon capture must be considered at reduction targets higher than 10%. The cost of cement production was shown to increase dramatically with an increase in reduction target.

  6. World relation per capita between income and emission of carbon dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Artico Bigarani1

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to verify the existence of relation per capita between emission of carbon dioxide and the growth of the income. The used methodology is the exploratory analysis of space data for the years of 1994 and 2009. By means of maps and of the Index of Moran one searched to observe the existence of space autocorrelation enters carbonic gas emission the per capita and per capita Gross domestic product of the countries of the Europe and Africa and to verify the space existence of clusters. The analysis of the results presented significant space autocorrelation between the studied variable and allowed the space identification of clusters in the Europe and Africa. The conclusion confirms the theory of the Curve of Ambient Kuznets and also it was identified that the protocol of Kyoto was capable to promote alterations in univariate clusters analyzed in the period.

  7. Sharing responsibility for carbon dioxide emissions: A perspective on border tax adjustments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Concerns about the equity and efficiency of current allocation principles related to responsibility for carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions have been presented in the recent literature. The objective of this paper is to design a calculation framework for shared responsibility from the perspective of border tax adjustments. The advantage of this framework is that it makes the shared responsibility principle and border carbon taxation complementary to each other; these are important policies for reducing global CO2 emissions, but they are individually supported by developing and developed countries. As an illustration, the proposed framework is applied to data from China in 2007. The empirical results show that for the Chinese economy as a whole, changing from the production-based criterion to the shared responsibility approach would lead to an 11% decrease in its responsibility for CO2 emissions. Moreover, the differences observed between the production-based criterion and the shared responsibility approach are considerable in several sectors; for example, changing from the production-based criterion to the shared principle would lead to a 60% decrease in the responsibility of the textile sector. - Highlights: • This paper designs a shared responsibility calculation framework for CO2 emissions. • This paper suggests that the carbon tariff rate serve as a basis for calculating shared responsibility. • The proposed framework is applied to data from China in 2007. • Shared responsibility principle will significantly decrease China's responsibility for CO2 emissions

  8. The competitiveness of nuclear power and its impact on reduction of carbon dioxide emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study focuses on the competitiveness of nuclear power and its impact on reduction of carbon dioxide emissions in Finland. The approaching base-load power decision gave the basis to the work. Nuclear power has been for many years the biggest form of electricity generation in Finland. Over the last decade, Finland's four existing nuclear power units have recorded an average annual capacity factor of 91.2 %, the highest of any country in the world. Nuclear power has considerable significance for the whole nation as an economical form of electricity production and as a reducer of carbon dioxide emissions. In Finland the possible alternatives for the new base-load power generation are nuclear power plant, coal-fired condensing power plant, combined cycle gas turbine plant, peatfired condensing power plant. Of the four alternatives under consideration, the nuclear option is the only one, which does not generate any carbon dioxide emissions to the atmosphere. A new 1250 MW nuclear unit with 10 TWh annual production would save 8,3 million metric tons carbon dioxide emissions annually, if the reference is the coalfired condensing power plant. A financial analysis of the potential electricity production alternatives has been carried out. The calculations have been made using the annuity method with a real interest of 4,5 % per annum and fixed price levels as of February 2000. With the annual full load utilisation time of 8000 hours the nuclear electricity would cost 128 mk/MWh, the coal based electricity 143 mk/MWh and the gas based electricity 155 mk/MWh. In order to study the impact of changes in the input data, a sensitivity analysis has been made as well. It reveals that the advantage of the nuclear alternative is quite clear. E.g. the nuclear electricity cost is rather insensitive to the changes of the uranium price. For natural gas alternative the rising trend of gas price causes the greatest risk. Furthermore, the availability of natural gas in Finland for a new

  9. Definition of a Thermodynamic Parameter to Calculate Carbon Dioxide Emissions in a Catalytic Reforming Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Noëlle Pons

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available In the context of global warming, reduction of carbon dioxide emissions in oil and gas processes is an environmental and financial issue for process design and comparison. Environmental impact of a system can be determined by life cycle assessment (LCA. However this method presents limitations. Exergy is a thermodynamic function often chosen to complete LCA as it enables quantifying energetic efficiency of a process and takes into account the relation between the considered process and its environment. The aim of this work is to build a correlation between CO2 emissions and a thermodynamic quantity which depends on exergy. For the process under consideration, this correlation has the following asset: it enables CO2 emissions calculation without performing an LCA, when operating conditions are modified. The process studied here is naphtha catalytic reforming.

  10. Human development and carbon dioxide emissions: The current picture and the long-term prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The scale of human activity has grown to the point that gaseous emissions produced by four areas of human endeavor (energy, agriculture, land use, and chemical manufacture) are changing the stock of gases in the atmosphere. That change, in turn, affects the global temperature and climate. Such gases are called greenhouse, or radiatively important, gases (RIGs). The nature and timing of future climate change depend on three things: the rate of emission of RIGs into the atmosphere, the capacity of removal mechanisms, and the interaction between atmospheric composition and the climate. Herein, the first of these is examined: the rate of emission of RIGs and its determinants. The broad diversity of RIGs is briefly reviewed, but particular emphasis is on the relationship between energy use and the release of carbon dioxide from fossil fuels

  11. Effects of decoupling of carbon dioxide emission by Chinese nonferrous metals industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We adopted the refined Laspeyres index approach to explore the impacts of industry scale, energy mix, energy intensity and utility mix on the total carbon dioxide emissions from the Chinese nonferrous metals industry for the period 1996–2008. In addition, we calculated the trend of decoupling effects in nonferrous metals industry in China by presenting a theoretical framework for decoupling. As the results suggest, Chinese nonferrous metals industry has gone through four decoupling stages: strong negative decoupling stage (1996–1998), weak decoupling stage (1999–2000), expensive negative decoupling stage (2001–2003) and weak decoupling stage (2004–2008). We have analyzed the reasons for each phase. Generally speaking, the rapid growth of the industry is the most important factor responsible for the increase of CO2 emissions, and the change in energy mix was mainly due to the increased proportion of electric energy consumption that has contributed to the increase of CO2 emissions. Reduction of energy intensity has contributed significantly to emissions decrease, and the utility mix effect has also contributed to the emission decrease to some extent. - Highlights: ► We calculate the decoupling effects of CO2 from Chinese nonferrous metals industry. ► Results demonstrate that the industry has gone through four decoupling stages. ► The output effect is most important for the increase of CO2 emissions. ► Reduction of energy intensity has contributed significantly to emissions decrease.

  12. Carbon dioxide emissions from agricultural soils amended with livestock-derived organic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezzolla, D.; Said-Pullicino, D.; Gigliotti, G.

    2009-04-01

    Carbon dioxide gas xchange between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere, as well as the carbon sink strength of various arable land ecosystems, is of primary interest for global change research. Measures for increasing soil C inputs include the preferential use of livestock-derived organic materials (e.g. animal manure and slurries, digestate from biogas production plants and compost). The application of such materials to agricultural soils returns essential nutrients for plant growth and organic matter to maintain long-term fertility. Whether or not such practices ultimately result in sustained C sequestration at the ecosystem level will depend on their mineralization rates. This work presents preliminary results from a laboratory incubation trial to evaluate carbon dioxide fluxes from two agricultural soils (a calcareous silt loam and a silty clay loam) amended with agricultural doses of (i) pig slurry (PSL), (ii) the digestate from the anaerobic fermentation of pig slurries (AAS) and (ii) a compost from the aerobic stabilisation of the digestate (LDC). These subsequent steps of slurry stabilisation resulted in a decrease in the content of labile organic matter which was reflected in a reduction in maximum carbon dioxide emission rates from amended soils. Measurements have shown that peak emissions from soils occur immediately after application of these organic materials (within 5 days) and decrease in the order PSL > AAS > LDC. Moreover, mean cumulative emissions over the first 40 days showed that a higher percentage (about 44%) of the C added with PSL was mineralised respect to C added with AAS (39%) and LDC (25%). Although it was hypothesised that apart from the quantity and stability of the added organic materials, even soil characteristics could influence C mineralisation rates, no significant differences were observed between emission fluxes for similarly treated soils. Mean cumulative emission fluxes after 40 days from treatment were of 114, 103 and

  13. Driving factors of carbon dioxide emissions in China: an empirical study using 2006-2010 provincial data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu; Chen, Zhan-Ming; Xiao, Hongwei; Yang, Wei; Liu, Danhe; Chen, Bin

    2016-04-01

    The rapid urbanization of China has increased pressure on its environmental and ecological well being. In this study, the temporal and spatial profiles of China's carbon dioxide emissions are analyzed by taking heterogeneities into account based on an integration of the extended stochastic impacts using a geographically and temporally weighted regression model on population, affluence, and technology. Population size, urbanization rate, GDP per capita, energy intensity, industrial structure, energy consumption pattern, energy prices, and economy openness are identified as the key driving factors of regional carbon dioxide emissions and examined through the empirical data for 30 provinces during 2006-2010. The results show the driving factors and their spillover effects have distinct spatial and temporal heterogeneities. Most of the estimated time and space coefficients are consistent with expectation. According to the results of this study, the heterogeneous spatial and temporal effects should be taken into account when designing policies to achieve the goals of carbon dioxide emissions reduction in different regions.

  14. Capture and mineralization of carbon dioxide from coal combustion flue gas emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attili, Viswatej

    (Proprietary information: PCT/US/2006/49411 and WO/2007/ 081561A) Enormous amounts of carbon dioxide (CO2) released by human activity (anthropogenic), may lead to climate changes that could spread diseases, ruin crops, cause intense droughts and floods, and dramatically raise the sea levels, thereby submerging the low lying coastal regions. The objective of this study was to test whether CO2 and sulfur dioxide (SO2) from flue gases can be directly captured and converted into carbonate and sulfate minerals respectively through the mineralization process of alkaline solid wastes. A flow-through carbonation process was designed to react flue gases directly with alkaline fly ash, under coal combustion power plant conditions. For the first time, CO2 levels in the flue gas were reduced from 13.6% to 9.7% after the reaction with alkaline fly ash in a reaction time of less than 1 minute. Using a combination of Orion RTM plus multi-gas detector, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques, flue gas CO2 mineralization on fly ash particles was detected. This method can simultaneously help in separate, capture, and mineralize anthropogenic CO2 and SO2. Moreover, this process may be environmentally safe and a stable storage for anthropogenic CO2. Capturing anthropogenic CO2 using this mineralization process is an initial step towards developing more efficient methods of reducing industrial point source CO2 emissions into the atmosphere.

  15. Carbon dioxide sequestration by mineral carbonation

    OpenAIRE

    Huijgen, W.J.J.

    2007-01-01

    The increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration, mainly caused by fossil fuel combustion, has lead to concerns about global warming. A possible technology that can contribute to the reduction of carbon dioxide emissions is CO2 sequestration by mineral carbonation. The basic concept behind mineral CO2 sequestration is the mimicking of natural weathering processes in which calcium or magnesium containing minerals react with gaseous CO2 and form solid calcium or magnesium carbonate...

  16. Rapid carbon mineralization for permanent disposal of anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matter, Juerg M.; Stute, Martin; Snæbjörnsdottir, Sandra Ó.; Oelkers, Eric H.; Gislason, Sigurdur R.; Aradottir, Edda S.; Sigfusson, Bergur; Gunnarsson, Ingvi; Sigurdardottir, Holmfridur; Gunnlaugsson, Einar; Axelsson, Gudni; Alfredsson, Helgi A.; Wolff-Boenisch, Domenik; Mesfin, Kiflom; Taya, Diana Fernandez de la Reguera; Hall, Jennifer; Dideriksen, Knud; Broecker, Wallace S.

    2016-06-01

    Carbon capture and storage (CCS) provides a solution toward decarbonization of the global economy. The success of this solution depends on the ability to safely and permanently store CO2. This study demonstrates for the first time the permanent disposal of CO2 as environmentally benign carbonate minerals in basaltic rocks. We find that over 95% of the CO2 injected into the CarbFix site in Iceland was mineralized to carbonate minerals in less than 2 years. This result contrasts with the common view that the immobilization of CO2 as carbonate minerals within geologic reservoirs takes several hundreds to thousands of years. Our results, therefore, demonstrate that the safe long-term storage of anthropogenic CO2 emissions through mineralization can be far faster than previously postulated.

  17. Contributions of Vehicular Traffic to Carbon Dioxide Emissions in Kaduna and Abuja, Northern Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Ndoke NDOKE

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The quantity of carbon dioxide (CO2 contributed by automobile emissions to the environment was determined at some areas in Kaduna and Abuja in Northern Nigeria. Five census stations were selected in each of the two towns. In Kaduna, Jabi road in Ungwan Rimi, Kawo Motor park, Stadium round-about, Sabo and Kasuwa (Kaduna Main Market, were selected, while Asokoro (behind ECOWAS, Area One junction, A.Y.A. junction, Wuse market bus-stop, and Mabushi round-about were selected for Abuja. A gas sampling pump and tubes that could detect carbon dioxide were used to detect the quantity of CO2 in the environment at a certain time. The results obtained show a variation in the amount of CO2 in the environment. Areas with relatively heavy congestion show a high concentration of CO2, while areas with minimal traffic show a lower concentration of CO2. Sabo in Kaduna has an average concentration of 1840 ppm being the highest, while Asokoro (behind ECOWAS, Abuja has the least average concentration of 1160 ppm. Review of literature showed that increasing CO2 levels have adverse effects such as the Greenhouse Effect, which may lead to Global Warming, as well as a number of other climatic events. These concentrations are still not high enough to cause any serious health effects but they provide a baseline study for Policy makers and Town planners.

  18. Methane emissions of rice increased by elevated carbon dioxide and temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Leon H; Albrecht, Stephan L; Colón-Guasp, Wilfredo; Covell, Stephen A; Baker, Jeffrey T; Pan, Deyun; Boote, Kenneth J

    2003-01-01

    Methane (CH4) effluxes by paddy-culture rice (Oryza sativa L.) contribute about 16% of the total anthropogenic emissions. Since radiative forcing of CH4 at current atmospheric concentrations is 21 times greater on a per mole basis than that of carbon dioxide (CO2), it is imperative that the impact of global change on rice CH4 emissions be evaluated. Rice (cv. IR72) was planted in sunlit, closed-circulation, controlled-environment chambers in which CH4 efflux densities were measured daily. The CO2 concentration was maintained at either 330 or 660 micromol mol(-1). Air temperatures were controlled to daily maxima and minima of 32/23, 35/26, and 38/29 degrees C at each CO2 treatment. Emissions of CH4 each day were determined during a 4-h period after venting and resealing the chambers at 0800 h. Diurnal CH4 effluxes on 77, 98, and 119 d after planting (DAP) were obtained similarly at 4-h intervals. Emissions over four-plant hills and over flooded bare soil were measured at 53, 63, and 100 DAP. Emissions were negligible before 40 DAP. Thereafter, emissions were observed first in high-CO2, high-temperature treatments and reached a sustained maximum efflux density of about 7 mg m(-2) h(-1) (0.17 g m(-2) d(-1)) near the end of the growing season. Total seasonal CH4 emission was fourfold greater for high-CO2, high-temperature treatments than for the low-CO2, low-temperature treatment, probably due to more root sloughing or exudates, since about sixfold more acetate was found in the soil at 71 DAP. Both rising CO2 and increasing temperatures could lead to a positive feedback on global warming by increasing the emissions of CH4 from rice. PMID:14674519

  19. In-situ monitoring of carbon dioxide emissions from a diesel engine using a mid-infrared optical fibre sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Elfed; Clifford, John; Fitzpatrick, Colin; Dooly, Gerard; Zhao, Weizhong; Sun, Tong; Grattan, Ken; Lucas, James; Degner, Martin; Ewald, Hartmut; Lochmann, Steffan; Bramann, Gero; Merlone-Borla, Edoardo; Gili, Flavio

    2011-05-01

    A robust optical fibre based CO2 exhaust gas sensor operating in the mid infrared spectral range is described. It is capable of detecting on board carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from both diesel and petrol engines. The optical fibre sensor is not cross sensitive to other gaseous species in the exhaust such as water vapour (H2O), carbon monoxide (CO), oxides of nitrogen (NOx) or oxides of sulphur (SOx).The response of the sensor to carbon dioxide present in the exhaust of Fiat Croma diesel engine are presented.

  20. Future of energy efficiency and carbon dioxide emissions of Finnish road freight transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liimatainen, H.

    2013-05-15

    The targets to reduce the carbon dioxide emissions to mitigate climate change are as much applicable to the road freight transport sector as they are to all other sectors of society. The aim of this research is to support the initiatives of the Finnish government for improving the energy efficiency and reducing the CO{sub 2} emissions of road freight transport. This is done by forecasting the future development and giving the policy makers guidance on effective measures for promoting road freight energy efficiency and CO{sub 2} reduction. In the study a new method was introduced for connecting the fuel consumption data and goods transport data gathered from the official Finnish road statistics. This method enabled a detailed analysis of the interrelations between the economy, road freight transport, energy consumption and emissions. This analysis was conducted for the years 1995-2010 and the results were used as background information in the Delphi panel of experts. The experts estimated the development of the Finnish road freight sector to the year 2030. Furthermore, a web-based survey was conducted among Finnish road freight hauliers and shippers in order to explore the attitudes and measures related to the energy efficiency. Expert panel workshops were also organised to identify obstacles for the development of the energy efficiency of road freight transport as well as a wide selection of measures to overcome them. The results indicate that the economic development of different branches has a great effect on the energy efficiency and carbon dioxide emissions of road freight transport. Reaching the carbon emission target for the year 2030 is possible in the light of the scenarios which were formed based on expert forecasts. However, the target can be achieved with very different development paths, e.g. the structure of the national economy and the volume of transport seem to vary widely in the different scenarios. In the proposed recommendations on the measures

  1. Economic innovation and efficiency gains as the driving force for accelerating carbon dioxide emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, T. J.

    2012-12-01

    It is normally assumed that gains in energy efficiency are one of the best routes that society has available to it for stabilizing future carbon dioxide emissions. For a given degree of economic productivity less energy is consumed and a smaller quantity of fossil fuels is required. While certainly this observation is true in the instant, it ignores feedbacks in the economic system such that efficiency gains ultimately lead to greater energy consumption: taken as a global whole, they permit civilization to accelerate its expansion into the energy reserves that sustain it. Here this argument is formalized from a general thermodynamic perspective. The core result is that there exists a fixed, time-independent link between a very general representation of global inflation-adjusted economic wealth (units currency) and civilization's total capacity to consume power (units energy per time). Based on 40 years of available statistics covering more than a tripling of global GDP and a doubling of wealth, this constant has a value of 7.1 +/- 0.01 Watts per one thousand 2005 US dollars. Essentially, wealth is power. Civilization grows by dissipating power in order to sustain all its current activities and to incorporate more raw material into its existing structure. Growth of its structure is related to economic production, so more energy efficient economic production facilitates growth. Growth is into the reserves that sustain civilization, in which case there is a positive feedback in the economic system whereby energy efficiency gains ultimately "backfire" if their intended purpose is to reduce energy consumption and carbon dioxide emissions. The analogy that can be made is to a growing child: a healthy child who efficiently incorporates food into her structure grows quickly and is able to consume more in following years. Economically, an argument is made that, for a range of reasons, there are good reasons to refer to efficiency gains as economic "innovation", both for

  2. Quantifying Fossil Fuel Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Space: Fossil Fuel Data Assimilation System and Global Urban Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurney, K. R.; Song, Y.; Asefi-Najafabady, S.; Rayner, P. J.

    2015-12-01

    The Fossil Fuel Data Assimilation System (FFDAS) quantifies fossil fuel carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions for the planet at a scale of 10 km hourly for the time period 1997-2012. FFDAS is based on the Kaya identity constrained by multiple ground and space-based observations. Among these are the DMSP nightlights, Landscan population, and the Ventus power plant database. We have recently downscaled the FFDAS version 2.0 to 1 km x 1 km resolution using nighlights. The finer spatial resolution allows for the examination of urban emissions across the planet. We take two approaches to examination of urban FFCO2 emissions. The first, utilizes named administrative boundaries combined with manual GIS identification (supported by LandSat and ISA) to identify the top emitting urban areas of the planet. We also utilize an urban land mask, without governmental boundary identification, to analyze all urban area by country across the planet. We perform multiple regression to identify key drivers and patterns. The results demonstrate the change in urban emissions during the last decade and assess the question of whether urban areas exhibit scaling properties vis a vis FFCO2 emissions.

  3. Strategies for reducing the emission of carbon dioxide. A study of some Annex 1 countries; Strategier foer att minska koldioxidutslaeppen. En studie av naagra Annex 1 laender

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stenkvist, M.; Olofsdotter, A.

    2000-07-01

    This report gives an overview of the development of carbon dioxide emissions and the energy systems in a number of countries. The analysis also includes the strategies chosen by the countries to reduce the emissions.

  4. Potential carbon emissions dominated by carbon dioxide from thawed permafrost soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schädel, Christina; Bader, Martin K.-F.; Schuur, Edward A. G.; Biasi, Christina; Bracho, Rosvel; Čapek, Petr; de Baets, Sarah; Diáková, Kateřina; Ernakovich, Jessica; Estop-Aragones, Cristian; Graham, David E.; Hartley, Iain P.; Iversen, Colleen M.; Kane, Evan; Knoblauch, Christian; Lupascu, Massimo; Martikainen, Pertti J.; Natali, Susan M.; Norby, Richard J.; O'Donnell, Jonathan A.; Chowdhury, Taniya Roy; Šantrůčková, Hana; Shaver, Gaius; Sloan, Victoria L.; Treat, Claire C.; Turetsky, Merritt R.; Waldrop, Mark P.; Wickland, Kimberly P.

    2016-10-01

    Increasing temperatures in northern high latitudes are causing permafrost to thaw, making large amounts of previously frozen organic matter vulnerable to microbial decomposition. Permafrost thaw also creates a fragmented landscape of drier and wetter soil conditions that determine the amount and form (carbon dioxide (CO2), or methane (CH4)) of carbon (C) released to the atmosphere. The rate and form of C release control the magnitude of the permafrost C feedback, so their relative contribution with a warming climate remains unclear. We quantified the effect of increasing temperature and changes from aerobic to anaerobic soil conditions using 25 soil incubation studies from the permafrost zone. Here we show, using two separate meta-analyses, that a 10 °C increase in incubation temperature increased C release by a factor of 2.0 (95% confidence interval (CI), 1.8 to 2.2). Under aerobic incubation conditions, soils released 3.4 (95% CI, 2.2 to 5.2) times more C than under anaerobic conditions. Even when accounting for the higher heat trapping capacity of CH4, soils released 2.3 (95% CI, 1.5 to 3.4) times more C under aerobic conditions. These results imply that permafrost ecosystems thawing under aerobic conditions and releasing CO2 will strengthen the permafrost C feedback more than waterlogged systems releasing CO2 and CH4 for a given amount of C.

  5. The relationship between carbon dioxide emission and economic growth: Hierarchical structure methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deviren, Seyma Akkaya; Deviren, Bayram

    2016-06-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) emission has an essential role in the current debate on sustainable development and environmental protection. CO2 emission is also directly linked with use of energy which plays a focal role both for production and consumption in the world economy. Therefore the relationship between the CO2 emission and economic growth has a significant implication for the environmental and economical policies. In this study, within the scope of sociophysics, the topology, taxonomy and relationships among the 33 countries, which have almost the high CO2 emission and economic growth values, are investigated by using the hierarchical structure methods, such as the minimal spanning tree (MST) and hierarchical tree (HT), over the period of 1970-2010. The average linkage cluster analysis (ALCA) is also used to examine the cluster structure more clearly in HTs. According to their proximity, economic ties and economic growth, different clusters of countries are identified from the structural topologies of these trees. We have found that the high income & OECD countries are closely connected to each other and are isolated from the upper middle and lower middle income countries from the MSTs, which are obtained both for the CO2 emission and economic growth. Moreover, the high income & OECD clusters are homogeneous with respect to the economic activities and economic ties of the countries. It is also mentioned that the Group of Seven (G7) countries (CAN, ENG, FRA, GER, ITA, JPN, USA) are connected to each other and these countries are located at the center of the MST for the results of CO2 emission. The same analysis may also successfully apply to the other environmental sources and different countries.

  6. Energy analysis and carbon dioxide emission of Tokamak fusion power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Energy gain and carbon dioxide (CO2) emission of tokamak fusion power reactors are evaluated in this study compared with other reactor types, structural materials, and other Japanese energy sources currently in use. The reactors treated in this study are (1) a conventional physics performance international thermonuclear experimental reactor (ITER), like a reactor based upon the ITER engineering design activity (ITER-EDA), (2) a RS (reversed shear) reactor using the reversed shear safety-factor/plasma current profile, and (3) a ST (spherical torus) reactor based upon the final version of the advanced reactor innovative engineering study ST (ARIES-ST). The input energy and CO2 emission from these reactors are calculated by multiplying the weight or cost of the fusion reactor components by the energy intensity and/or with the CO2 intensity data, which are updated as often as possible. The ITER cost estimation is estimated based on the component unit costs. The following results were obtained: (1) The RS and the ST reactor can double the energy gain and reduce CO2 emission by one-half compared with the ITER-like reactor. (2) Silicon carbide (SiC) used as the structural material of inner vessel components is best for energy gain and CO2 emission reduction. (3) The ITER-like reactor is slightly superior to a photovoltaic (PV) with regard to CO2 emission. (4) The energy gain and CO2 emission intensity of the RS reactor and the ST reactor are as excellent as those of a fission reactor and a hydro-powered generator. These results indicate that a tokamak fusion power reactor can be one of the most effective power-generating technologies both in high-energy payback gains and reduction of CO2

  7. Conceptual design of syngas production systems with almost net-zero carbon dioxide emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work describes three different configurations of syngas production processes using a combination of SMR (steam methane reforming) and DRM (dry reforming of methane). The ideal SMR + DRM process ensures the maximum product yield, the heat-integrated SMR + DRM process fulfills the maximum heat recovery, and the stand-alone SMR + DRM process effectively suppress net CO2 (carbon dioxide) emissions. Through specific optimization algorithms, the syngas production systems subject to almost net-zero CO2 emissions are successfully verified by simulations in Aspen Plus environment. - Highlights: • A new syngas production process is composed of SMR (steam methane reforming) and DMR (dry reforming of methane). • The ideal SMR + DRM process can reduce greenhouse gas emissions and increase syngas yield. • The heat-integrated SMR + DRM process can effectively reduce energy consumption. • The stand-alone SMR + DRM process can completely remove external energy supply. • Through design, optimization, and simulation, the proposed system configurations are successfully verified

  8. Carbon dioxide emissions from Deccan volcanism and a K/T boundary greenhouse effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldeira, Ken; Rampino, Michael R.

    1990-01-01

    A greenhouse warming caused by increased emissions of carbon dioxide from the Deccan Traps volcanism has been suggested as the cause of the terminal Cretaceous extinctions on land and in the sea. Total eruptive and noneruptive CO2 output by the Deccan eruptions (from 6 to 20 x 10 to the 16th moles) over a period of several hundred thousand years is estimated based on best estimates of the CO2 weight fraction of the original basalts and basaltic melts, the fraction of CO2 degassed, and the volume of the Deccan Traps eruptions. Results of a model designed to estimate the effects of increased CO2 on climate and ocean chemistry suggest that increases in atmospheric pCO2 due to Deccan Traps CO2 emissions would have been less than 75 ppm, leading to a predicted global warming of less than 1 C over several hundred thousand years. It is concluded that the direct climate effects of CO2 emissions from the Deccan eruptions would have been too weak to be an important factor in the end-Cretaceous mass extinctions.

  9. Holocene Age Methane and Carbon Dioxide Dominate Northern Alaska Thaw Lake Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elder, C.; Townsend-Small, A.; Hinkel, K. M.; Xu, X.; Czimczik, C. I.

    2015-12-01

    Lakes expanding into ice-rich permafrost can rapidly re-introduce large quantities of ancient organic carbon (C) to the atmosphere as carbon dioxide (CO2) or the more powerful greenhouse gas methane (CH4). Quantifying the sources of greenhouse gas emissions from arctic lakes will reduce large uncertainties in the magnitude and timing of the C-climate feedback from the Arctic, and thus trajectories of climate change. This work provides the first regional assessment of integrated whole-lake radiocarbon (14C) ages of dissolved CH4 and CO2 as a proxy for C emission sources in northern Alaska. We collected water samples from below ice along two 170 km north-south transects on the Arctic Coastal Plain (ACP) of Alaska in April 2012 and 2013. These lakes represent a network monitored by the US-NSF funded project, Circum-Arctic Lakes Observation Network (CALON), http://www.arcticlakes.org/. Dissolved CH4 and CO2 were extracted and analyzed for their 14C content. The presence of winter ice on the surface of lakes obstructs the emission of CH4 and CO2 originating from the perennially thawed sub-lake sediments. The trapped gases are forced to mix, thus measured 14C ages are integrated signatures representing the whole-lake emissions. Dissolved CH4 and CO2 ages do not correlate with latitude, yet seem to be driven by surficial geology. Of nearly 150 14C measurements, below-ice dissolved CH4 is the oldest (around 2145 ± 15 14C YBP) in a lake residing on "peaty, sandy lowland" on the northern ACP near the town of Barrow. Modern CH4 and CO2 dominate emissions from "eolian sandy lowlands" in the interior of the ACP. Across all lakes, dissolved CH4 (avg. 836 14C YBP) is older than dissolved CO2 (avg. 480 14C YBP) by a regional average of ca. 360 14C YBP. Results from this study indicate that decomposing Holocene-age organic material is the primary source of CH4 and CO2 emissions from the Alaskan ACP. This baseline dataset provides the foundation for future regional lake monitoring

  10. Volcanic carbon dioxide emissions: observation strategies using GOSAT FTS SWIR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwandner, F. M.; Carn, S. A.; Head, E. M.; Newhall, C. G.

    2010-12-01

    About one tenth of the Earth’s human population lives under direct threat of volcanic hazards. Being able to provide sufficiently early and scientifically sound warning is a key to volcanic hazard mitigation. Forecasting volcanic eruptions is based on epidemiological and probabilistic analyses of monitoring data. In times of crisis, the extremely short time for decisions, validation and response leads to a quest for the earliest possible indicators of unrest. Among the first potential signals of ascending magma is the exsolution of volatiles contained in magma induced by dynamic depressurization, crystallization, and temperature variations. The three most abundant gas species in these emissions are usually water (H2O), Carbon Dioxide (CO2), and Sulfur Dioxide (SO2). SO2 monitoring methods are widespread, using COSPEC, mini-DOAS, SO2 cameras, and space-borne SO2 data. However, since H2O and SO2 are frequently scrubbed out by near-surface processes, they may be obscured unless the magma is already near the surface. SO2 is most useful for volcanoes that erupt frequently and have a dry chimney for easy gas escape. CO2 is more difficult to measure remotely than SO2} because the atmospheric background concentration of CO2 is so much higher than for SO2. Nevertheless, CO2 is important because it is the first gas to exsolve from magma (together with helium), and it is minimally affected by scrubbing and other near-surface processes. CO2 monitoring has been attempted by ground-based CO2 flux monitoring and by crater plume CO2 measurements using ground-based open-path FTIR and airborne closed-path IR measurements. In this study, we assess data acquired by JAXA’s GOSAT satellite for detection and eventually quantification of volcanic CO2 emissions. Two strategies are being investigated: (1) standard scheduled observation points, (2) repeat targeted observation requests of known centers of strong volcanic emissions. With a field of view of 10 km, GOSAT has the potential to

  11. The future of energy efficiency and carbon dioxide emissions of road freight transport; Tiekuljetusalan energiatehokkuuden ja hiilidioksidipaeaestoejen tulevaisuus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liimatainen, H.; Poellaenen, M.; Kallionpaeae, E.; Nykaenen, L. [Tampere University of Technology (Finland); Stenholm, P.; Tapio, P. [Univ. of Turku (Finland); McKinnon, A. [Heriot-Watt Univ, Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

    2012-01-15

    The targets to reduce the carbon dioxide emissions to mitigate the climate change are directed to the road freight transport sector similarly to all other sectors of the society. The objectives of the Future of energy efficiency and carbon dioxide emissions of road freight transport -project were (1) to estimate whether the energy efficiency and carbon dioxide emission targets set for the sector can be reached and (2) to give recommendations on the measures which can be used to promote reaching of the targets. In the study a new method was introduced for connecting the data comprising fuel consumption and Goods transport data gathered by the official road statistics. This method enabled a detailed analysis of the interrelations between the economy, road freight transport, energy consumption and emissions. This analysis was conducted for the years 1995-2010 and the results were used as background information in the experts' panel. The experts estimated the development of the Finnish road freight sector to the year 2030. Furthermore, a web-based survey was conducted among Finnish road freight companies in order to explore the attitudes and measures related to the energy efficiency. The results indicate that the economic development of different branches has a great effect on the energy efficiency and carbon dioxide emissions of road freight transport. Reaching the carbon emission target for the year 2030 is possible in the light of the scenarios which were given by the experts. However, the target can be achieved with very different development paths, e.g. the structure of the national economy and the volume of transport seem to vary widely in the different scenarios. In the workshops organised in the study the participant identified various obstacles for the development of the energy efficiency of road freight transport as well as a wide selection of measures to overcome them. In the proposed implications the cooperation and division of responsibilities between

  12. Analyzing carbon dioxide and methane emissions in California using airborne measurements and model simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, M. S.; Yates, E. L.; Iraci, L. T.; Jeong, S.; Fischer, M. L.

    2013-12-01

    Greenhouse gas (GHG) concentrations have increased over the past decades and are linked to global temperature increases and climate change. These changes in climate have been suggested to have varying effects, and uncertain consequences, on agriculture, water supply, weather, sea-level rise, the economy, and energy. To counteract the trend of increasing atmospheric concentrations of GHGs, the state of California has passed the California Global Warming Act of 2006 (AB-32). This requires that by the year 2020, GHG (e.g., carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4)) emissions will be reduced to 1990 levels. To quantify GHG fluxes, emission inventories are routinely compiled for the State of California (e.g., CH4 emissions from the California Greenhouse Gas Emissions Measurement (CALGEM) Project). The major sources of CO2 and CH4 in the state of California are: transportation, electricity production, oil and gas extraction, cement plants, agriculture, landfills/waste, livestock, and wetlands. However, uncertainties remain in these emission inventories because many factors contributing to these processes are poorly quantified. To alleviate these uncertainties, a synergistic approach of applying air-borne measurements and chemical transport modeling (CTM) efforts to provide a method of quantifying local and regional GHG emissions will be performed during this study. Additionally, in order to further understand the temporal and spatial distributions of GHG fluxes in California and the impact these species have on regional climate, CTM simulations of daily variations and seasonality of total column CO2 and CH4 will be analyzed. To assess the magnitude and spatial variation of GHG emissions and to identify local 'hot spots', airborne measurements of CH4 and CO2 were made by the Alpha Jet Atmospheric eXperiment (AJAX) over the San Francisco Bay Area (SFBA) and San Joaquin Valley (SJV) in January and February 2013 during the Discover-AQ-CA study. High mixing ratios of GHGs were

  13. Foreign Direct Investment, Environmental INGO Presence and Carbon Dioxide Emissions in Less-Developed Countries, 1980-2000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Jorgenson

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The authors engage foreign investment dependence and world society theories to examine environmental harms in less-developed countries. Results of cross-national random effects panel regression models indicate that foreign investment in manufacturing contributes to total carbon dioxide emissions and emissions per unit of production. World society integration in the context of environmental international non-governmental organization presence does not directly suppress emissions. However, a stronger presence of such organizations in some less-developed nations appears to mitigate the impacts of foreign investment on anthropogenic emissions. These results hold, net of population, level of development, and other structural factors.

  14. Reducing Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Electricity Sector Using Smart Electric Grid Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lamiaa Abdallah

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 40% of global CO2 emissions are emitted from electricity generation through the combustion of fossil fuels to generate heat needed to power steam turbines. Burning these fuels results in the production of carbon dioxide (CO2—the primary heat-trapping, “greenhouse gas” responsible for global warming. Applying smart electric grid technologies can potentially reduce CO2 emissions. Electric grid comprises three major sectors: generation, transmission and distribution grid, and consumption. Smart generation includes the use of renewable energy sources (wind, solar, or hydropower. Smart transmission and distribution relies on optimizing the existing assets of overhead transmission lines, underground cables, transformers, and substations such that minimum generating capacities are required in the future. Smart consumption will depend on the use of more efficient equipment like energy-saving lighting lamps, enabling smart homes and hybrid plug-in electric vehicles technologies. A special interest is given to the Egyptian case study. Main opportunities for Egypt include generating electricity from wind and solar energy sources and its geographical location that makes it a perfect center for interconnecting electrical systems from the Nile basin, North Africa, Gulf, and Europe. Challenges include shortage of investments, absence of political will, aging of transmission and distribution infrastructure, and lack of consumer awareness for power utilization.

  15. Ozone effects on Sphagnum mosses, carbon dioxide exchange and methane emission in boreal peatland microcosms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microcosms of a boreal peatland originating from an oligotrophic fen in Eastern Finland were fumigated under four ozone concentrations (0, 50, 100 and 150 ppb O3) in laboratory growth chambers during two separate experiments (autumn and summer) for 4 and 6 weeks, respectively. Ozone effects on Sphagnum mosses and the fluxes of carbon dioxide and methane were evaluated. In both experiments, the three Sphagnum species studied showed only a few significant responses to ozone. In the autumn experiment, membrane permeability of S. angustifolium, measured as conductivity and magnesium leakage, was significantly higher under ozone fumigation (P=0.005 and 2 exchange during the 6-week-long summer experiment, but dark ecosystem respiration was transiently increased by ozone concentration of 100 ppb after 14 days of exposure (P<0.05). Fumigation with 100 ppb of ozone, however, more than doubled (P<0.05) methane emission from the peatland monoliths. Our results suggest that increasing tropospheric ozone concentration may cause substantial changes in the carbon gas cycling of boreal peatlands, even though these changes are not closely associated with the changes in Sphagnum vegetation

  16. Potential of Demand Side Management to Reduce Carbon Dioxide Emissions Associated with the Operation of Heat Pumps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel J. G. Cooper

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This work considers the potential reduction in the carbon dioxide emissions associated with the operation of Air Source Heat Pump which could be achieved by using demand side management. In order to achieve significant reductions in carbon dioxide emissions, it is widely envisioned that electrification of the heating sector will need to be combined with decarbonisation of the electrical supply. By influencing the times at when electric heat pumps operate such that they coincide more with electricity generation which has a low marginal carbon emissions factor, it has been suggested that these emissions could be reduced further. In order to investigate this possibility, models of the UK electrical grid based on scenarios for 2020 to 2050 have been combined with a dynamic model of an air source heat pump unit and thermal models of a population of dwellings. The performance and carbon dioxide emissions associated with the heat pumps are compared both with and without demand side management interventions intended to give preference to operation when the marginal emissions factor of the electricity being generated is low. It is found that these interventions are unlikely to be effective at achieving further reductions in emissions. A reduction of around 3% was observed in scenarios based around 2035 but in other scenarios the reduction was insignificant. In the scenarios with high wind generation (2050, the DSM scheme considered here tends to improve thermal comfort (with minimal increases in emissions rather than achieving a decrease in emissions. The reasons for this are discussed and further recommendations are made.

  17. Spatial and temporal disaggregation of transport-related carbon dioxide emissions in Bogota - Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Gonzalez, L. A.; Jimenez Pizarro, R.; Néstor Y. Rojas, N. Y.

    2011-12-01

    As a result of rapid urbanization during the last 60 years, 75% of the Colombian population now lives in cities. Urban areas are net sources of greenhouse gases (GHG) and contribute significantly to national GHG emission inventories. The development of scientifically-sound GHG mitigation strategies require accurate GHG source and sink estimations. Disaggregated inventories are effective mitigation decision-making tools. The disaggregation process renders detailed information on the distribution of emissions by transport mode, and the resulting a priori emissions map allows for optimal definition of sites for GHG flux monitoring, either by eddy covariance or inverse modeling techniques. Fossil fuel use in transportation is a major source of carbon dioxide (CO2) in Bogota. We present estimates of CO2 emissions from road traffic in Bogota using the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) reference method, and a spatial and temporal disaggregation method. Aggregated CO2 emissions from mobile sources were estimated from monthly and annual fossil fuel (gasoline, diesel and compressed natural gas - CNG) consumption statistics, and estimations of bio-ethanol and bio-diesel use. Although bio-fuel CO2 emissions are considered balanced over annual (or multi-annual) agricultural cycles, we included them since CO2 generated by their combustion would be measurable by a net flux monitoring system. For the disaggregation methodology, we used information on Bogota's road network classification, mean travel speed and trip length for each vehicle category and road type. The CO2 emission factors were taken from recent in-road measurements for gasoline- and CNG-powered vehicles and also estimated from COPERT IV. We estimated emission factors for diesel from surveys on average trip length and fuel consumption. Using IPCC's reference method, we estimate Bogota's total transport-related CO2 emissions for 2008 (reference year) at 4.8 Tg CO2. The disaggregation method estimation is

  18. Incorporation of catalytic dehydrogenation into Fischer-Tropsch synthesis of liquid fuels from coal to minimize carbon dioxide emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerald P. Huffman [University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Consortium for Fossil Fuel Science and Department of Chemical & Materials Engineering

    2011-08-15

    Synthesis gas (syngas) produced from coal typically has hydrogen to carbon monoxide ratios in the range of approximately 0.7-1.1, depending on the gasification method. In order to produce liquid fuels from this syngas by Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS), these ratios must be raised to 2.0 or higher. If this is accomplished by the water-gas shift reaction, the traditional method, large emissions of carbon dioxide are produced. In this paper, it is shown that catalytic dehydrogenation (CDH) of the gaseous C1-C4 products of FT synthesis and recycling of the resulting hydrogen to the syngas feed-stream can increase the H{sub 2}/CO ratio to the desired values with little or no production of carbon dioxide. All carbon from the CDH reaction is in the form of a potentially valuable by-product, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT). The amounts of hydrogen and MWCNT produced, carbon dioxide emissions avoided, and water saved are calculated for a 50,000 bbl/day FTS-CDH plant and it is demonstrated that the energy balance for the process is favorable. Methods of utilizing the large quantity of MWCNT produced are discussed. 50 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Emission rates of sulfur dioxide and carbon dioxide from Redoubt Volcano, Alaska during the 1989-1990 eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casadevall, T.J.; Doukas, M.P.; Neal, C.A.; McGimsey, R.G.; Gardner, C.A.

    1994-01-01

    Airborne measurements of sulfur dioxide emission rates in the gas plume emitted from fumaroles in the summit crater of Redoubt Volcano were started on March 20, 1990 using the COSPEC method. During the latter half of the period of intermittent dome growth and destruction, between March 20 and mid-June 1990, sulfur dioxide emission rates ranged from approximately 1250 to 5850 t/d, rates notably higher than for other convergent-plate boundary volcanoes during periods of active dome growth. Emission rates following the end of dome growth from late June 1990 through May 1991 decreased steadily to less than 75 t/d. The largest mass of sulfur dioxide was released during the period of explosive vent clearing when explosive degassing on December 14-15 injected at least 175,000 ?? 50,000 tonnes of SO2 into the atmosphere. Following the explosive eruptions of December 1989, Redoubt Volcano entered a period of intermittent dome growth from late December 1989 to mid-June 1990 during which Redoubt emitted a total mass of SO2 ranging from 572,000 ?? 90,000 tonnes to 680,000 ?? 90,000 tonnes. From mid-June 1990 through May 1991, the volcano was in a state of posteruption degassing into the troposphere, producing approximately 183,000 ?? 50,000 tonnes of SO2. We estimate that Redoubt Volcano released a minimum mass of sulfur dioxide of approximately 930,000 tonnes. While COSPEC data were not obtained frequently enough to enable their use in eruption prediction, SO2 emission rates clearly indicated a consistent decline in emission rates between March through October 1990 and a continued low level of emission rates through the first half of 1991. Values from consecutive daily measurements of sulfur dioxide emission rates spanning the March 23, 1990 eruption decreased in the three days prior to eruption. That decrease was coincident with a several-fold increase in the frequency of shallow seismic events, suggesting partial sealing of the magma conduit to gas loss that resulted in

  20. Reduction of carbon dioxide emissions by solar water heating systems and passive technologies in social housing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Growing global concern regarding climate change motivates technological studies to minimize environmental impacts. In this context, solar water heating (SWH) systems are notably prominent in Brazil, primarily because of the abundance of solar energy in the country. However, SWH designs have not always been perfectly developed. In most projects, the installation option of the solar system only considers the electric power economy aspects and not the particular characteristics of each climatic zone. Thus, the primary objective of this paper is to assess the potential of carbon dioxide reduction with the use of SWH in comparison with electric showers in social housing in several Brazilian climatic zones. The Brazilian government authorities have created public policies to encourage the use of these technologies primarily among the low-income population. The results of this paper indicate that hot climactic regions demonstrate a low reduction of CO2 emissions with SWH installations. Thus, solar radiation is not useful for water heating in those regions, but it does lead to a large fraction of household cooling loads, implying a demand for electrical energy for air conditioning or requiring the adoption of passive techniques to maintain indoor temperatures below threshold values. -- Graphical abstract: Display Omitted -- Highlights: •Brazil has created public policies to increase the use of solar water heating in social housing. •We have evaluated the potential for reduction of CO2 emissions installing solar water heating. •We have found that the coldest regions have the greatest potential for reducing emissions. •Passive technologies for thermal comfort in hot climate households are more useful than solar water heating systems

  1. UV-visible emission as a probe of core excitations applied to the furan and carbon dioxide molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kivimaeki, A; Coreno, M; Simone, M de [CNR-INFM, Laboratorio Nazionale TASC, 34149 Trieste (Italy); Ruiz, J Alvarez [Departamento de Quimica Laser, Instituto de Quimica-Fisica Rocasolano Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Serrano 119, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Dampc, M; Zubek, M, E-mail: kivimaki@tasc.infm.i [Department of Physics of Electronic Phenomena, Gdansk University of Technology, Narutowicza 11/12, 80233 Gdansk (Poland)

    2009-11-15

    The core excitations of the furan and carbon dioxide molecules have been studied using dispersed UV-visible fluorescence spectroscopy. Balmer-{alpha} (Balmer-{beta}) emission was measured at the O 1s and C 1s (O 1s) excitations of furan, while emission due to an excited state of the neutral oxygen atom was measured at the O 1s excitations of CO{sub 2}. The excitation functions of the emission lines display both valence and Rydberg resonances, but the latter are more enhanced.

  2. Impact of future nitrous oxide and carbon dioxide emissions on the stratospheric ozone layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The atmospheric levels of human-produced chlorocarbons and bromocarbons are projected to make only small contributions to ozone depletion by 2100. Increases in carbon dioxide (CO2) and nitrous oxide (N2O) will become increasingly important in determining the future of the ozone layer. N2O increases lead to increased production of nitrogen oxides (NOx), contributing to ozone depletion. CO2 increases cool the stratosphere and affect ozone levels in several ways. Cooling decreases the rate of many photochemical reactions, thus slowing ozone loss rates. Cooling also increases the chemical destruction of nitrogen oxides, thereby moderating the effect of increased N2O on ozone depletion. The stratospheric ozone level projected for the end of this century therefore depends on future emissions of both CO2 and N2O. We use a two-dimensional chemical transport model to explore a wide range of values for the boundary conditions for CO2 and N2O, and find that all of the current scenarios for growth of greenhouse gases project the global average ozone to be larger in 2100 than in 1960. (letter)

  3. Role of C3 plant species on carbon dioxide and methane emissions in Mediterranean constructed wetland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmelo Maucieri

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available C3 plant species are widely used to vegetate constructed wetlands (CW, but so far no information is available on their effect on CW CO2(eq balance in the Mediterranean climate. The aim of this research was to study carbon dioxide (CO2 and methane (CH4 emissions and CO2(eq budgets of CW horizontal sub-surface flow pilot-plant beds vegetated with Arundo donax L. and Phragmites australis (Cav. Trin. ex Steud. compared with an unvegetated bed in Sicily. The highest total plant biomass production was measured in the bed vegetated with A. donax (17.0 kg m–2, whereas P. australis produced 7.6 kg m–2. CO2 and CH4 emissions and showed significant correlation with average air temperature and solar radiation for each bed. The CO2 emission values ranged from 0.8±0.1 g m–2 d–1, for the unvegetated bed in April, to 24.9±0.6 g m–2 d–1 for the bed with P. australis in August. The average CO2 emissions of the whole monitored period were 15.5±7.2, 15.1±7.1 and 3.6±2.4 g m–2 d–1 for A. donax, P. australis and unvegetated beds respectively. The CH4 fluxes differed significantly over the monitored seasons, with the highest median value being measured during spring (0.963 g m–2 d–1. No statistical differences were found for CH4 flux among the studied beds. Cumulative estimated CH4 emissions during the study period (from April to December were 159.5, 134.1 and 114.7 g m–2 for A. donax, P. australis and unvegetated beds respectively. CO2(eq balance showed that the two vegetated beds act as CO2(eq sinks, while the unvegetated bed, as expected, acts as a CO2(eq source. Considering only the above-ground plant biomass in the CO2(eq budgets, P. australis and A. donax determined uptakes of 1.30 and 8.35 kg CO2(eq m–2 respectively.

  4. Modeling carbon dioxide emissions reductions for three commercial reference buildings in Salt Lake City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucich, Stephen M.

    In the United States, the buildings sector is responsible for approximately 40% of the national carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. CO2 is created during the generation of heat and electricity, and has been linked to climate change, acid rain, a variety of health threats, surface water depletion, and the destruction of natural habitats. Building energy modeling is a powerful educational tool that building owners, architects, engineers, city planners, and policy makers can use to make informed decisions. The aim of this thesis is to simulate the reduction in CO2 emissions that may be achieved for three commercial buildings located in Salt Lake City, UT. The following two questions were used to guide this process: 1. How much can a building's annual CO2 emissions be reduced through a specific energy efficiency upgrade or policy? 2. How much can a building's annual CO2 emissions be reduced through the addition of a photovoltaic (PV) array? How large should the array be? Building energy simulations were performed with the Department of Energy's EnergyPlus software, commercial reference building models, and TMY3 weather data. The chosen models were a medium office building, a primary school, and a supermarket. Baseline energy consumption data were simulated for each model in order to identify changes that would have a meaningful impact. Modifications to the buildings construction and operation were considered before a PV array was incorporated. These modifications include (1) an improved building envelope, (2) reduced lighting intensity, and (3) modified HVAC temperature set points. The PV array sizing was optimized using a demand matching approach based on the method of least squares. The arrays tilt angle was optimized using the golden section search algorithm. Combined, energy efficiency upgrades and the PV array reduced building CO2 emissions by 58.6, 54.0, and 52.2% for the medium office, primary school, and supermarket, respectively. However, for these models, it was

  5. Carbon Dioxide Fountain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Seong-Joo; Ryu, Eun-Hee

    2007-01-01

    This article presents the development of a carbon dioxide fountain. The advantages of the carbon dioxide fountain are that it is odorless and uses consumer chemicals. This experiment also is a nice visual experiment that allows students to see evidence of a gaseous reagent being consumed when a pressure sensor is available. (Contains 3 figures.)…

  6. Regional Groundwater Discharge Drives High Carbon Dioxide Emissions from a Lowland Tropical Rainforest Stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oviedo-Vargas, D.; Dierick, D.; Genereux, D. P.; Oberbauer, S. F.; Osburn, C. L.

    2015-12-01

    Field measurements of carbon (C) fluxes are fundamental for understanding global C cycling, and the C source/sink status of ecosystems. In the tropical rainforest at La Selva Biological Station in Costa Rica, old regional bedrock groundwater (gw) high in dissolved inorganic C discharges into some streams and wetlands with possible impacts on ecosystem C pools and fluxes. We investigated carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) degassing from two streams at La Selva: the Arboleda, where ~1/3 of the streamflow is from regional gw, and the Taconazo, fed exclusively by much younger local gw recharged within the catchment. In two reaches (upper and lower) of the Arboleda and Taconazo streams, emissions were determined from tracer injections. In the lower Arboleda (the only reach receiving regional gw) CO2 fluxes (fCO2) averaged 5.5 mol C per m2 of stream surface per day, ~7.5x higher than the average (0.7 mol C m-2 d-1) from the stream reaches with no regional gw inflow (the Taconazo and upper Arboleda). The regional gw inflow had no measurable effect on CH4 emissions. To further understand the dynamics of enhanced CO2 degassing from the lower Arboleda, we examined spatiotemporal patterns in fCO2 using floating chambers. Both static and drifting chambers revealed high spatial heterogeneity in fCO2 at the scale of 5 to 30 m reaches. Temporal trends were highly localized; in two of three subreaches surveyed repeatedly, fCO2 increased with stream discharge and did not differ between wet and dry seasons, but the third subreach showed the opposite behavior. Results from static and drifting chambers deviated 31% and -36%, respectively, from tracer injection results. CO2 degassing from the Arboleda is a large C flux; when averaged over the watershed area it is similar in magnitude to the net ecosystem exchange measured by eddy covariance. Elevated CO2 emissions from the Arboleda stream are consistent with measurements of higher CO2 concentration in the air above the Arboleda

  7. Contribution of Ebullition to Methane and Carbon Dioxide Emission from Water between Plant Rows in a Tropical Rice Paddy Field

    OpenAIRE

    Komiya, Shujiro; Noborio, Kosuke; Katano, Kentaro; Pakoktom, Tiwa; Siangliw, Meechai; Toojinda, Theerayut

    2015-01-01

    Although bubble ebullition through water in rice paddy fields dominates direct methane (CH4) emissions from paddy soil to the atmosphere in tropical regions, the temporal changes and regulating factors of this ebullition are poorly understood. Bubbles in a submerged paddy soil also contain high concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2), implying that CO2 ebullition may occur in addition to CH4 ebullition. We investigated the dynamics of CH4 and CO2 ebullition in tropical rice paddy fields using ...

  8. The POETICs of industrial carbon dioxide emissions in Japan: an urban and institutional extension of the IPAT identity

    OpenAIRE

    Scholz Stephan

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background This study applies the POETICs framework (population, organization, environment, technology, institutions and culture) to an analysis of industrial carbon dioxide emissions in Japanese cities. The inclusion of institutional variables in the form of International Council for Local Environmental Initiatives membership, ISO 14001 implementation, and non-profit sector activity addresses the ecological limitations of the often used IPAT (impact = population × affluence × techno...

  9. Is Fuel-Switching a No-Regrets Environmental Policy? VAR Evidence on Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Energy Consumption and Economic Performance in Portugal

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira, Alfredo Marvão; Pereira, Rui Manuel Marvão

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to estimate the impact of carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuel combustion activities on economic activity in Portugal in order to evaluate the economic costs of policies designed to reduce carbon dioxide emissions. We find that energy consumption has a significant impact on macroeconomic activity. In fact, a one ton of oil equivalent permanent reduction in aggregate energy consumption reduces output by €6,340 over the long term, an aggregate impact which hi...

  10. Nongovernmental valorization of carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) is considered the largest contributor to the greenhouse gas effect. Most attempts to manage the flow of CO2 or carbon into our environment involve reducing net emissions or sequestering the gas into long-lived sinks. Using CO2 as a chemical feedstock has a long history, but using it on scales that might impact the net emissions of CO2 into the atmosphere has not generally been considered seriously. There is also a growing interest in employing our natural biomes of carbon such as trees, vegetation, and soils as storage media. Some amelioration of the net carbon emissions into the atmosphere could be achieved by concomitant large withdrawals of carbon. This report surveys the potential and limitations in employing carbon as a resource for organic chemicals, fuels, inorganic materials, and in using the biome to manage carbon. The outlook for each of these opportunities is also described

  11. Global Warming: Predicting OPEC Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Petroleum Consumption Using Neural Network and Hybrid Cuckoo Search Algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    Haruna Chiroma; Sameem Abdul-kareem; Abdullah Khan; Nazri Mohd. Nawi; Abdulsalam Ya'u Gital; Liyana Shuib; Abubakar, Adamu I.; Muhammad Zubair Rahman; Tutut Herawan

    2015-01-01

    Background Global warming is attracting attention from policy makers due to its impacts such as floods, extreme weather, increases in temperature by 0.7°C, heat waves, storms, etc. These disasters result in loss of human life and billions of dollars in property. Global warming is believed to be caused by the emissions of greenhouse gases due to human activities including the emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) from petroleum consumption. Limitations of the previous methods of predicting CO2 emi...

  12. The POETICs of industrial carbon dioxide emissions in Japan: an urban and institutional extension of the IPAT identity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scholz Stephan

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study applies the POETICs framework (population, organization, environment, technology, institutions and culture to an analysis of industrial carbon dioxide emissions in Japanese cities. The inclusion of institutional variables in the form of International Council for Local Environmental Initiatives membership, ISO 14001 implementation, and non-profit sector activity addresses the ecological limitations of the often used IPAT (impact = population × affluence × technology approach. Results Results suggest the weak existence of an environmental Kuznets curve, in which the wealthiest cities are reducing their emissions through increased efficiency. Significant institutional impacts are also found to hold in the predicted directions. Specifically, panel and cross-sectional regressions indicate that membership in the International Council for Local Environmental Initiatives and non-profit organizational presence have negative effects on industrial carbon dioxide emissions. Conclusion The presence of institutional drivers at the city level provides empirical support for the POETICs rubric, which recasts the ecological framing of the IPAT identity in a more sociological mold. The results also indicate that Japanese civil society has a role to play in carbon mitigation. More refined studies need to take into consideration an expanded set of methods, drivers, and carbon budgets, as applied to a broader range of cases outside of Japan, to more accurately assess how civil society can bridge the issue of scale that separates local level policy concerns from global level climate dynamics.

  13. Long-term ocean oxygen depletion in response to carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaffer, G.; Olsen, S.M.; Pedersen, Jens Olaf Pepke

    2009-01-01

    Ongoing global warming could persist far into the future, because natural processes require decades to hundreds of thousands of years to remove carbon dioxide from fossil-fuel burning from the atmosphere(1-3). Future warming may have large global impacts including ocean oxygen depletion and assoc......Ongoing global warming could persist far into the future, because natural processes require decades to hundreds of thousands of years to remove carbon dioxide from fossil-fuel burning from the atmosphere(1-3). Future warming may have large global impacts including ocean oxygen depletion...... solubility from surface-layer warming accounts for most of the enhanced oxygen depletion in the upper 500 m of the ocean. Possible weakening of ocean overturning and convection lead to further oxygen depletion, also in the deep ocean. We conclude that substantial reductions in fossil-fuel use over the next...

  14. Experimental studies and physically substantiated model of carbon dioxide emission from the exposed cultural layer of Velikii Novgorod

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smagin, A. V.; Dolgikh, A. V.; Karelin, D. V.

    2016-04-01

    The results of quantitative assessment and modeling of carbon dioxide emission from urban pedolithosediments (cultural layer) in the central part of Velikii Novgorod are discussed. At the first stages after the exposure of the cultural layer to the surface in archaeological excavations, very high CO2 emission values reaching 10-15 g C/(m2 h) have been determined. These values exceed the normal equilibrium emission from the soil surface by two orders of magnitude. However, they should not be interpreted as indications of the high biological activity of the buried urban sediments. A model based on physical processes shows that the measured emission values can be reliably explained by degassing of the soil water and desorption of gases from the urban sediments. This model suggests the diffusion mechanism of the transfer of carbon dioxide from the cultural layer into the atmosphere; in addition, it includes the equations to describe nonequilibrium interphase interactions (sorption-desorption and dissolution-degassing of CO2) with the first-order kinetics. With the use of statistically reliable data on physical parameters—the effective diffusion coefficient as dependent on the aeration porosity, the effective solubility, the Henry constant for the CO2 sorption, and the kinetic constants of the CO2 desorption and degassing of the soil solution—this model reproduces the experimental data on the dynamics of CO2 emission from the surface of the exposed cultural layer obtained by the static chamber method.

  15. Are there biomedical criteria to assess an acute carbon dioxide intoxication by a volcanic emission?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stupfel, Maurice; Le Guern, François

    1989-11-01

    On August 21, 1987, more than 1800 people, thousands of head of cattle and countless wild animals, including birds, were killed by a gas release which occurred during about 4 hours at the lake in the crater Iwi at Nyos in Cameroon; plant life was mostly unaffected. An international inquiry was performed by British, French, Italian, Japanese and U.S. volcanologists and physicians to determine what had been the cause of this disaster. An international conference organised by United Nations Educational Scientific, and Cultural Organisation (U.N.E.S.C.O.), the Cameroon Government and the U.N. Economic Commission for Africa held in Yaoundé March, 1987 concluded: 'that the cause of sudden death was suffocation (asphyxia) in a carbon dioxide atmosphere' The medical findings have been explained by asphyxia caused by carbon dioxide. The presence of other volcanic gases, e.g. hydrogen sulfide, cannot be ruled out' (Sigvaldason, 1989, this issue). This paper reviews what is mainly known about an acute carbon dioxide intoxication in order to disprove or confirm the diagnosis and helps to interpret the field observations and testimonies to provide a basis to discuss the prevention of such an intoxication.

  16. Decomposition analysis of energy-related carbon dioxide emissions in the iron and steel industry in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenqiang SUN; Jiuju CAI, Hai YU, Lei DAI

    2012-01-01

    This work aims to identify the main factors influencing the energy-related carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from the iron and steel industry in China during the period of 1995-2007. The logarithmic mean divisia index (LMDI) technique was applied with period-wise analysis and time-series analysis. Changes in energy- related CO2 emissions were decomposed into four factors: emission factor effect, energy structure effect, energy consumption effect, and the steel production effect. The results show that steel production is the major factor responsible for the rise in CO2 emissions during the sampling period; on the other hand the energy consump- tion is the largest contributor to the decrease in C02 emissions. To a lesser extent, the emission factor and energy structure effects have both negative and positive contributions to C02 emissions, respectively. Policy implications are provided regarding the reduction of C02 emissions from the iron and steel industry in China, such as controlling the overgrowth of steel production, improving energy-saving technologies, and introducing low-carbon energy sources into the iron and steel industry.

  17. Carbon dioxide sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutta, Prabir K. (Worthington, OH); Lee, Inhee (Columbus, OH); Akbar, Sheikh A. (Hilliard, OH)

    2011-11-15

    The present invention generally relates to carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensors. In one embodiment, the present invention relates to a carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensor that incorporates lithium phosphate (Li.sub.3PO.sub.4) as an electrolyte and sensing electrode comprising a combination of lithium carbonate (Li.sub.2CO.sub.3) and barium carbonate (BaCO.sub.3). In another embodiment, the present invention relates to a carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensor has a reduced sensitivity to humidity due to a sensing electrode with a layered structure of lithium carbonate and barium carbonate. In still another embodiment, the present invention relates to a method of producing carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensors having lithium phosphate (Li.sub.3PO.sub.4) as an electrolyte and sensing electrode comprising a combination of lithium carbonate (Li.sub.2CO.sub.3) and barium carbonate (BaCO.sub.3).

  18. The effectiveness of net negative carbon dioxide emissions in reversing anthropogenic climate change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artificial removal of CO2 from the atmosphere (also referred to as negative emissions) has been proposed as a means to restore the climate system to a desirable state, should the impacts of climate change become ‘dangerous’. Here we explore whether negative emissions are indeed effective in reversing climate change on human timescales, given the potentially counteracting effect of natural carbon sinks and the inertia of the climate system. We designed a range of CO2 emission scenarios, which follow a gradual transition to a zero-carbon energy system and entail implementation of various amounts of net-negative emissions at technologically plausible rates. These scenarios are used to force an Earth System Model of intermediate complexity. Results suggest that while it is possible to revert to a desired level of warming (e.g. 2 °C above pre-industrial) after different levels of overshoot, thermosteric sea level rise is not reversible for at least several centuries, even under assumption of large amounts of negative CO2 emissions. During the net-negative emission phase, artificial CO2 removal is opposed by CO2 outgassing from natural carbon sinks, with the efficiency of CO2 removal—here defined as the drop in atmospheric CO2 per unit negative emission—decreasing with the total amount of negative emissions. (letter)

  19. 我国人口-经济-二氧化碳排放的关联研究%Causal Relationships among Population and Carbon Dioxide Emissions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖周燕

    2012-01-01

    通过全国1995~2008年各省区二氧化碳排放和人口发展状况对比发现,人口与二氧化碳排放之间并不呈现简单的正相关关系。本文引入经济系统对人口与二氧化碳排放之间的关系进行关联分析。研究发现,在短时期内,人口增长对二氧化碳排放的影响不可忽视,但从长远来看,经济增长对二氧化碳排放影响更为重要。值得注意的是,虽然人口和经济增长是二氧化碳排放变化的原因,但当滞后期延长,人口和经济系统之间将互为因果,使得人口和二氧化碳排放的关系将更为复杂。%The carbon dioxide emissions of the provinces would be calculated from 1995 to 2008.And we compare the provinces' carbon dioxide emissions and population development.We found that the relationship between population and carbon dioxide emissions are not a simple correlation.In order to probe the relation,we introduce the economic variable into the research,take advantage the co-integration analysis and Granger causality test.The paper found that the population and economic growth is the main reason of carbon dioxide emission change.In short run the population growth would impact the carbon dioxide emissions,and increase in carbon dioxide emissions cannot be simply attributed to overpopulation,economic growth impact on carbon dioxide emissions more strongly.

  20. Network Level Carbon Dioxide Emissions From On-road Sources in the Portland OR, (USA) Metropolitan Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, J.; Butenhoff, C. L.; Rice, A. L.

    2014-12-01

    To mitigate climate change, governments at multiple levels are developing policies to decrease anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. The City of Portland (Oregon) and Multnomah County have adopted a Climate Action Plan with a stated goal of reducing emissions to 80% below 1990 levels by 2050. The transportation sector alone accounts for about 40% of total emissions in the Portland metropolitan area. Here we show a new street-level model of on-road mobile CO2 emissions for the Portland, OR metropolitan region. The model uses hourly traffic counter recordings made by the Portland Bureau of Transportation at 9,352 sites over 21 years (1986-2006), augmented with freeway loop detector data from the Portland Regional Transportation Archive Listing (PORTAL) transportation data archive. We constructed a land use regression model to fill in traffic network gaps with traffic counts as the dependent variable using GIS data such as road class (32 categories) and population density. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) MOtor Vehicle Emission Simulator (MOVES) model was used to estimate transportation CO2 emissions. The street-level emissions can be aggregated and gridded and used as input to atmospheric transport models for comparison with atmospheric measurements. This model also provides an independent assessment of top-down inventories that determine emissions from fuel sales, while being an important component of our ongoing effort to assess the effectiveness of emission mitigation strategies at the urban scale.

  1. Global Warming: Predicting OPEC Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Petroleum Consumption Using Neural Network and Hybrid Cuckoo Search Algorithm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haruna Chiroma

    Full Text Available Global warming is attracting attention from policy makers due to its impacts such as floods, extreme weather, increases in temperature by 0.7°C, heat waves, storms, etc. These disasters result in loss of human life and billions of dollars in property. Global warming is believed to be caused by the emissions of greenhouse gases due to human activities including the emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2 from petroleum consumption. Limitations of the previous methods of predicting CO2 emissions and lack of work on the prediction of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC CO2 emissions from petroleum consumption have motivated this research.The OPEC CO2 emissions data were collected from the Energy Information Administration. Artificial Neural Network (ANN adaptability and performance motivated its choice for this study. To improve effectiveness of the ANN, the cuckoo search algorithm was hybridised with accelerated particle swarm optimisation for training the ANN to build a model for the prediction of OPEC CO2 emissions. The proposed model predicts OPEC CO2 emissions for 3, 6, 9, 12 and 16 years with an improved accuracy and speed over the state-of-the-art methods.An accurate prediction of OPEC CO2 emissions can serve as a reference point for propagating the reorganisation of economic development in OPEC member countries with the view of reducing CO2 emissions to Kyoto benchmarks--hence, reducing global warming. The policy implications are discussed in the paper.

  2. Carbon dioxide and helium emissions from a reservoir of magmatic gas beneath Mammoth Mountain, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorey, M.L.; Evans, William C.; Kennedy, B.M.; Farrar, C.D.; Hainsworth, L.J.; Hausback, B.

    1998-01-01

    Carbon dioxide and helium with isotopic compositions indicative of a magmatic source (??13C = -4.5 to -5???, 3He/4He = 4.5 to 6.7 RA) are discharging at anomalous rates from Mammoth Mountain, on the southwestern rim of the Long Valley caldera in eastern California. The gas is released mainly as diffuse emissions from normal-temperature soils, but some gas issues from steam vents or leaves the mountain dissolved in cold groundwater. The rate of gas discharge increased significantly in 1989 following a 6-month period of persistent earthquake swarms and associated strain and ground deformation that has been attributed to dike emplacement beneath the mountain. An increase in the magmatic component of helium discharging in a steam vent on the north side of Mammoth Mountain, which also began in 1989, has persisted until the present time. Anomalous CO2 discharge from soils first occurred during the winter of 1990 and was followed by observations of several areas of tree kill and/or heavier than normal needlecast the following summer. Subsequent measurements have confirmed that the tree kills are associated with CO2 concentrations of 30-90% in soil gas and gas flow rates of up to 31,000 g m-2 d-1 at the soil surface. Each of the tree-kill areas and one area of CO2 discharge above tree line occurs in close proximity to one or more normal faults, which may provide conduits for gas flow from depth. We estimate that the total diffuse CO2 flux from the mountain is approximately 520 t/d, and that 30-50 t/d of CO2 are dissolved in cold groundwater flowing off the flanks of the mountain. Isotopic and chemical analyses of soil and fumarolic gas demonstrate a remarkable homogeneity in composition, suggesting that the CO2 and associated helium and excess nitrogen may be derived from a common gas reservoir whose source is associated with some combination of magmatic degassing and thermal metamorphism of metasedimentary rocks. Furthermore, N2/Ar ratios and nitrogen isotopic values

  3. Influence of carbon dioxide content in the biogas to nitrogen oxides emissions

    OpenAIRE

    Živković Marija A.; Adžić Miroljub M.; Fotev Vasko G.; Milivojević Aleksandar M.; Adžić Vuk M.; Ivezić Dejan D.; Ćosić Boško D.

    2010-01-01

    Fuels derived from biomass are an alternative solution for the fossil fuel shortage. Usually this kind of fuels is called low calorific value fuels, due to the large proportion of inert components in their composition. The most common is carbon dioxide, and its proportion in biogas can be different, from 10 up to 40%, or even more. The presence of inert component in the composition of biogas causes the problems that are related with flame blow off limits. One of the possibilities for efficien...

  4. Alignment-dependent fluorescence emission induced by tunnel ionization of carbon dioxide from lower-lying orbitals

    CERN Document Server

    Yao, Jinping; Jia, Xinyan; Hao, Xiaolei; Zeng, Bin; Jing, Chenrui; Chu, Wei; Ni, Jielei; Zhang, Haisu; Xie, Hongqiang; Zhang, Chaojin; Zhao, Zengxiu; Chen, Jing; Liu, Xiaojun; Cheng, Ya; Xu, Zhizhan

    2013-01-01

    We show that fluorescence emission induced by strong field tunnel ionization of carbon dioxide from its lower-lying orbitals exhibits a peculiar molecular alignment dependence. The experimentally measured alignment-dependence of the fluorescence agrees with the alignment-dependence of the ionization probability calculated in the framework of the strong field approximation. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of an all-optical approach for shedding more light on the ionization mechanisms of molecules from their lower-lying orbitals in tunnel ionization regime.

  5. Carbon dioxide recycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    The recycling of carbon dioxide to methanol and dimethyl ether is seen to offer a substantial route to renewable and environmentally carbon neutral fuels. One of the authors has championed the “Methanol Economy" in articles and a book. By recycling ambient CO2, the authors argue ...

  6. Economic modelling approaches to cost estimates for the control of carbon dioxide emissions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Z.X.; Folmer, H.

    1998-01-01

    This article gives an assessment of the relative strengths and weaknesses of a variety of economic modelling approaches commonly used for cost estimates for limiting carbon emissions, including the ad hoc approach, dynamic optimization approach, input-output approach, macroeconomic approach, computa

  7. Evaluation of carbon dioxide emission control strategies in New York State

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A MARKAL model was developed for the State of New York. It represents the state's energy system as a set of typical technologies for generating, converting, and using energy as it evolves over a 45-year period. NYMARKAL was applied here in demonstration analyses to explore strategies to reduce CO2 emissions. NYMARKAL was installed at the State Energy Office and in the Offices of the New York Power Pool. Staff members from both organizations and other state agencies were trained in its use. Example scenarios showed that it is more difficult and more expensive to reduce carbon emissions in New York State than in the United States as a whole. Were a common carbon tax instituted, it would have less effect in New York and most carbon emissions reduction would take place elsewhere in the country where it is more cost-effective. Alternatively, were all states required to reduce CO2 emission an equal percentage (say by 20%), the cost per unit emissions reduction to New York would be much greater than in the rest of the country

  8. World-Economy Centrality and Carbon Dioxide Emissions: A New Look at the Position in the Capitalist World-System and Environmental Pollution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Prew

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available With the ever-growing concern of climate change, much attention has been paid to the factors driving carbon dioxide emissions. Previous research in the World-Systems perspective has identified a relationship between carbon dioxide emissions and position in the world-economy. This study intends to build on the previous research by developing a new, more parsimonious indicator of World-System position based on Immanuel Wallerstein’s theoretical concepts of incorporation and core-periphery processes. The new World-System indicator is derived from the centrality measure in network analysis based on import data from the International Monetary Fund’s Direction of Trade Statistics. Based on the theoretical concepts of core-periphery processes, carbon dioxide emissions are predicted to rise based on the predominance of energy-intensive, high-technology, core processes within the nation. The results tend to demonstrate a strong relationship between carbon dioxide emissions and position in the world-economy, and the new World-System position indicator is more strongly related with carbon dioxide emissions than Gross Domestic Product per capita.

  9. Carbon dioxide and climate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Global climate change is a serious environmental concern, and the US has developed ''An Action Agenda'' to deal with it. At the heart of the US effort is the US Global Change Research Program (USGCRP), which has been developed by the Committee on Earth and Environmental Sciences (CEES) of the Federal Coordinating Council for Sciences, Engineering, and Technology (FCCSET). The USGCRP will provide the scientific basis for sound policy making on the climate-change issue. The DOE contribution to the USGCRP is the Carbon Dioxide Research Program, which now places particular emphasis on the rapid improvement of the capability to predict global and regional climate change. DOE's Carbon Dioxide Research Program has been addressing the carbon dioxide-climate change connection for more than twelve years and has provided a solid scientific foundation for the USGCRP. The expansion of the DOE effort reflects the increased attention that the Department has placed on the issue and is reflected in the National Energy Strategy (NES) that was released in 1991. This Program Summary describes projects funded by the Carbon Dioxide Research Program during FY 1991 and gives a brief overview of objectives, organization, and accomplishments. The Environmental Sciences Division of the Office of Health and Environmental Research, Office of Energy Research supports a Carbon Dioxide Research Program to determine the scientific linkage between the rise of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, especially carbon dioxide, and climate and vegetation change. One facet is the Core CO2 Program, a pioneering program that DOE established more than 10 years ago to understand and predict the ways that fossil-fuel burning could affect atmospheric CO2 concentration, global climate, and the Earth's biosphere. Major research areas are: global carbon cycle; climate detection and models of climate change; vegetation research; resource analysis; and, information and integration

  10. Carbon dioxide reducing processes; Koldioxidreducerande processer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svensson, Fredrik

    1999-12-01

    This thesis discusses different technologies to reduce or eliminate the carbon dioxide emissions, when a fossil fuel is used for energy production. Emission reduction can be accomplished by separating the carbon dioxide for storage or reuse. There are three different ways of doing the separation. The carbon dioxide can be separated before the combustion, the process can be designed so that the carbon dioxide can be separated without any energy consumption and costly systems or the carbon dioxide can be separated from the flue gas stream. Two different concepts of separating the carbon dioxide from a combined cycle are compared, from the performance and the economical point of view, with a standard natural gas fired combined cycle where no attempts are made to reduce the carbon dioxide emissions. One concept is to use absorption technologies to separate the carbon dioxide from the flue gas stream. The other concept is based on a semi-closed gas turbine cycle using carbon dioxide as working fluid and combustion with pure oxygen, generated in an air-separating unit. The calculations show that the efficiency (power) drop is smaller for the first concept than for the second, 8.7 % points compared to 13.7 % points, when power is produced. When both heat and power are produced, the relation concerning the efficiency (power) remains. Regarding the overall efficiency (heat and power) the opposite relation is present. A possible carbon dioxide tax must exceed 0.21 SEK/kg CO{sub 2} for it to be profitable to separate carbon dioxide with any of these technologies.

  11. Determination of Each Province's Carbon Dioxide Reduction Target Based on Embodied Carbon Dioxide Emissions%基于隐含碳排放的碳减排目标研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张增凯; 郭菊娥; 安尼瓦尔·阿木提

    2011-01-01

    中国政府以2005年为基年提出了碳减排指标,确定各省碳减排基数对于明确各省碳减排责任具有重要意义.本文结合“十一五”期间节能指标分解过程中存在的问题,分析了省际贸易中隐含的碳排放对于确定各省碳减排基数的影响,并分别基于生产者负责原则和消费者负责原则计算了“十二五”期间各省碳减排基数.计算结果表明:①将工业部门拆分为23个部门能够更加充分反映省际贸易结构差异对于隐含碳排放计算的影响;②省际贸易中隐含碳排放不仅在各省间有较大差异而且呈现出从中西部地区调往东部地区的整体转移方向;③不同原则下各省碳减排基数计算结果存在较大差异,消费者负责原则更加真实地反映了各地区实际减排责任,避免了部分省份通过省际调进代替本省生产的方式实现碳减排目标.%Measuring each province's carbon dioxide emissions is of great significance for the carbon reduction target, announced by Chinese Central Government, with 2005 as the base year. This paper firstly analyzes the existing problems of the energy conservation during the Eleventh Five Year Plan period and then studies the influence of embodied carbon dioxide emissions on the calculation of each province' s carbon emissions basis. Finally, each province' s carbon dioxide emissions of the base year are calculated based on two principles: the producer responsibility principle and the consumer responsibility principle. Several crucial conclusions are drawn as follows. First, dividing the industrial sector into 23 sectors adequately reflects the influence of the structural difference in inter-provincial trade on the calculation of the embodied carbon dioxide emissions. Second, the provincial differences of embodied carbon dioxide emissions are obvious. The transfer direction of embodied carbon dioxide emissions is from the central and western regions to the eastern

  12. Application of the Denitrification-Decomposition Model to Predict Carbon Dioxide Emissions under Alternative Straw Retention Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Can Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Straw retention has been shown to reduce carbon dioxide (CO2 emission from agricultural soils. But it remains a big challenge for models to effectively predict CO2 emission fluxes under different straw retention methods. We used maize season data in the Griffith region, Australia, to test whether the denitrification-decomposition (DNDC model could simulate annual CO2 emission. We also identified driving factors of CO2 emission by correlation analysis and path analysis. We show that the DNDC model was able to simulate CO2 emission under alternative straw retention scenarios. The correlation coefficients between simulated and observed daily values for treatments of straw burn and straw incorporation were 0.74 and 0.82, respectively, in the straw retention period and 0.72 and 0.83, respectively, in the crop growth period. The results also show that simulated values of annual CO2 emission for straw burn and straw incorporation were 3.45 t C ha−1 y−1 and 2.13 t C ha−1 y−1, respectively. In addition the DNDC model was found to be more suitable in simulating CO2 mission fluxes under straw incorporation. Finally the standard multiple regression describing the relationship between CO2 emissions and factors found that soil mean temperature (SMT, daily mean temperature (Tmean, and water-filled pore space (WFPS were significant.

  13. A projection of energy consumption and carbon dioxide emissions in the electricity sector for Saudi Arabia: The case for carbon capture and storage and solar photovoltaics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper examined the case study of the Saudi electricity sector and provided projections for energy use and respective carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions for the period 2010–2025 with and without cleaner energy technologies. Based on two sets of 20 life cycle assessment studies for carbon capture and storage and solar photovoltaic technologies, CO2 emission reduction rates were used for projecting future CO2 emissions. Results showed enormous savings in CO2 emissions, for the most likely case, year 2025 reported savings that range from 136 up to 235 MtCO2. Including low growth and high growth cases, these savings could range from 115 up to 468 MtCO2 presenting such an unrivalled opportunity for Saudi Arabia. These projections were developed as a way of translating the inherent advantages that cleaner energy technologies could provide for CO2 emissions savings. It is hoped that the results of this paper would inform energy policymaking in Saudi Arabia. - Highlights: • Electricity use in Saudi Arabia is predicted in the period 2010–2025. • Use of photovoltaic plants and carbon capture and storage are considered. • Life cycle assessment of the options is conducted. • Carbon emissions with and without the renewable energy are estimated. • The projections showcase the CO2 emissions savings

  14. A two-stage inexact-stochastic programming model for planning carbon dioxide emission trading under uncertainty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, W.T.; Li, Y.F. [Energy and Environmental Research Center, North China Electric Power University, Beijing 102206 (China); Li, Y.P. [Laboratory for Earth Surface Processes, College of Urban and Environmental Sciences, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Huang, G.H. [Environmental Systems Engineering Program, Faculty of Engineering, University of Regina, Regina, Saskatchewan (Canada); Chen, X. [Key Laboratory of Oasis Ecology and Desert Environment, Xinjiang Institute of Ecology and Geography, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Urumqi, Xinjiang 830011 (China)

    2010-03-15

    In this study, a two-stage inexact-stochastic programming (TISP) method is developed for planning carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emission trading under uncertainty. The developed TISP incorporates techniques of interval-parameter programming (IPP) and two-stage stochastic programming (TSP) within a general optimization framework. The TISP can not only tackle uncertainties expressed as probabilistic distributions and discrete intervals, but also provide an effective linkage between the pre-regulated greenhouse gas (GHG) management policies and the associated economic implications. The developed method is applied to a case study of energy systems and CO{sub 2} emission trading planning under uncertainty. The results indicate that reasonable solutions have been generated. They can be used for generating decision alternatives and thus help decision makers identify desired GHG abatement policies under various economic and system-reliability constraints. (author)

  15. Thermodynamic analysis of gas – steam combined cycle with carbon dioxide (CO2 emissions saving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alka Gupta, Om Prakash, S.K. Shukla

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, cogeneration or combined heat and power (CHP cycle has been analyzed in order to improve the efficiency of the gas – steam combined cycle and utilization of waste heat. The efficiency of the combined cycle is improved by decreasing the compressor inlet temperature (CIT and increasing the turbine inlet temperature (TIT. It is observed that the cycle offers the advantage of making efficient use of the energy available in the fuel and in turn, eliminate some portion of pollution associated with the power generation. The study also reveals that if this cycle is being employed for cogeneration, there is a significant saving (11.60% in the amount of Carbon dioxide (CO2 emitted by the coal-fired thermal power plants.

  16. CARBON DIOXIDE EMISSION ASSOCIATED WITH THE PRODUCTION OF PLASTICS - A COMPARISON OF PRODUCTION FROM CRUDE OIL AND RECYCLING FOR THE DUTCH CASE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rem, Peter C.; Olsen, Stig Irving; Welink, Jan-Henk;

    2009-01-01

    Literature data show that in general, plastics produced through the mechanical recycling route involve less carbon dioxide emission than when produced from crude oil. A review of readily available data shows that road transport of untreated waste plastics account for a significant portion...... of the carbon dioxide emission generated during recycling. Therefore, much carbon dioxide emission can be saved by optimizing the logistics in the recycling of plastics. On the example of polyolefins originating from household packaging waste, this paper attempts to compare two different scenarios of mechanical...... recycling to the production of plastics from crude oil as a reference. The first scenario deals with packaging waste from selective collection, in which data from the current practice of the German DSD system were translated for the Dutch situation. In the second scenario, plastic packaging recovered from...

  17. Are there basic physical constraints on future anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide?

    CERN Document Server

    Garrett, Timothy J

    2008-01-01

    Global Climate Models (GCMs) provide forecasts of future climate warming using a wide variety of highly sophisticated anthropogenic CO2 emissions models as input, each based on the evolution of four emissions "drivers": population p, standard of living g, energy productivity (or efficiency) f and energy carbonization c. The range of scenarios considered is extremely broad, however, and this is a primary source of forecast uncertainty. Here, it is shown both theoretically and observationally how the evolution of the human system can be considered from a surprisingly simple thermodynamic perspective in which it is unnecessary to explicitly model two of the emissions drivers: population and standard of living. Specifically, the human system grows through a self-perpetuating feedback loop in which the consumption rate of primary energy resources stays tied to the historical accumulation of global economic production - or p times g - through a time-independent factor of 9.7 +/- 0.3 milliwatts per inflation-adjuste...

  18. The effect of regional groundwater on carbon dioxide and methane emissions from a lowland rainforest stream in Costa Rica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oviedo-Vargas, Diana; Genereux, David P.; Dierick, Diego; Oberbauer, Steven F.

    2015-12-01

    In the tropical rainforest at La Selva Biological Station in Costa Rica, regional bedrock groundwater high in dissolved carbon discharges into some streams and wetlands, with the potential for multiple cascading effects on ecosystem carbon pools and fluxes. We investigated carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) degassing from two streams at La Selva: the Arboleda, where approximately one third of the streamflow is from regional groundwater, and the Taconazo, fed exclusively by local groundwater recharged within the catchment. The regional groundwater inflow to the Arboleda had no measurable effect on stream gas exchange velocity, dissolved CH4 concentration, or CH4 emissions but significantly increased stream CO2 concentration and degassing. CO2 evasion from the reach of the Arboleda receiving regional groundwater (lower Arboleda) averaged 5.5 mol C m-2 d-1, ~7.5 times higher than the average (0.7 mol C m-2 d-1) from the stream reaches with no regional groundwater inflow (the Taconazo and upper Arboleda). Carbon emissions from both streams were dominated by CO2; CH4 accounted for only 0.06-1.70% of the total (average of both streams: 5 × 10-3 mol C m-2 d-1). Annual stream degassing fluxes normalized by watershed area were 48 and 299 g C m-2 for the Taconazo and Arboleda, respectively. CO2 degassing from the Arboleda is a significant carbon flux, similar in magnitude to the average net ecosystem exchange estimated by eddy covariance. Examining the effects of catchment connections to underlying hydrogeological systems can help avoid overestimation of ecosystem respiration and advance our understanding of carbon source/sink status and overall terrestrial ecosystem carbon budgets.

  19. An Analysis of the Environmental Kuznets Curve for Carbon Dioxide Emissions: Evidence for OECD and Non-OECD Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kris Aaron Beck

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Over the past two decades, researchers have sought to establish empirical evidence for an Environmental Kuznets Curve (EKC for carbon dioxide (CO2, with varied results. This study builds on that research to re-evaluate whether the EKC exists for CO2 emissions, using an improved dataset and the enhanced econometric technique Arellano-Bover/Blundell-Bond Generalized Methods of Moments (GMM estimator. We directly compare OECD countries with countries of the non-OECD regions of Latin America, Asia, and Africa to determine how various factors like economic growth, population, trade, urbanization, and energy use influence CO2 emissions. We find that the OECD countries have an N-shaped curve with income growth whereas the regions of Asia and Africa experience an income-based EKC pattern. The results further reveal that population growth has a mixed impact on CO2emissions,increased trade and urbanization contribute to CO2 emissions for most areas, and increased energy use actually helps to decrease CO2 emissions. Keywords: CO2 • Environmental Kuznets Curve • GMM

  20. Large-scale carbon capture and storage for coal-fired power: Effect on global carbon dioxide emissions

    OpenAIRE

    Torvanger, Asbjørn

    2007-01-01

    The scenarios in this report show that large-scale deployment of carbon capture and storage technologies for new coal-fired power plants from year 2015 may reduce global CO2 emissions by 8-18% by 2030 and 22-25% by 2100. These estimates are sensitive to the Business-as-Usual scenarios chosen, both for total CO2 emissions and for power production based on coal.

  1. Carbon dioxide production in animal houses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Søren; Blanes-Vidal, Victoria; Joergensen, H.;

    2008-01-01

    This article deals with carbon dioxide production from farm animals; more specifically, it addresses the possibilities of using the measured carbon dioxide concentration in animal houses as basis for estimation of ventilation flow (as the ventilation flow is a key parameter of aerial emissions from...... animal houses). The investigations include measurements in respiration chambers and in animal houses, mainly for growing pigs and broilers. Over the last decade a fixed carbon dioxide production of 185 litres per hour per heat production unit, hpu (i.e. 1000 W of the total animal heat production at 20o......C) has often been used. The article shows that the carbon dioxide production per hpu increases with increasing respiration quotient. As the respiration quotient increases with body mass for growing animals, the carbon dioxide production per heat production unit also increases with increased body mass...

  2. Air plasma gasification of RDF as a prospective method for reduction of carbon dioxide emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratsev, A. N.; Kumkova, I. I.; Kuznetsov, V. A.; Popov, V. E.; Shtengel', S. V.; Ufimtsev, A. A.

    2011-03-01

    Waste disposal dumps are one of sources of carbonic gas penetration in the atmosphere. The waste is treated into RDF (refuse-derived fuel) and used in boilers for electric power or heat generation for decrease in carbonic gas emissions in the atmosphere. In industry power stations on the basis of the combined cycle have the highest efficiency of burning. The paper deals with the application of an air-plasma gasifier using the down draft scheme of RDF transformation into synthesis gas, which afterwards can be used in the combined cycle. Results of calculations of the process characteristics for various RDF compositions are presented. The advantage of the plasma method in comparison with autothermal one is shown. Experimental data are shown.

  3. Air plasma gasification of RDF as a prospective method for reduction of carbon dioxide emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waste disposal dumps are one of sources of carbonic gas penetration in the atmosphere. The waste is treated into RDF (refuse-derived fuel) and used in boilers for electric power or heat generation for decrease in carbonic gas emissions in the atmosphere. In industry power stations on the basis of the combined cycle have the highest efficiency of burning. The paper deals with the application of an air-plasma gasifier using the down draft scheme of RDF transformation into synthesis gas, which afterwards can be used in the combined cycle. Results of calculations of the process characteristics for various RDF compositions are presented. The advantage of the plasma method in comparison with autothermal one is shown. Experimental data are shown.

  4. Carbon Dioxide Separation from Flue Gases: A Technological Review Emphasizing Reduction in Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Songolzadeh; Mansooreh Soleimani; Maryam Takht Ravanchi; Reza Songolzadeh

    2014-01-01

    Increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases (GHGs) such as CO2 in the atmosphere is a global warming. Human activities are a major cause of increased CO2 concentration in atmosphere, as in recent decade, two-third of greenhouse effect was caused by human activities. Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is a major strategy that can be used to reduce GHGs emission. There are three methods for CCS: pre-combustion capture, oxy-fuel process, and post-combustion capture. Among them, post-combustion c...

  5. Carbon dioxide dangers demonstration model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venezky, Dina; Wessells, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Carbon dioxide is a dangerous volcanic gas. When carbon dioxide seeps from the ground, it normally mixes with the air and dissipates rapidly. However, because carbon dioxide gas is heavier than air, it can collect in snowbanks, depressions, and poorly ventilated enclosures posing a potential danger to people and other living things. In this experiment we show how carbon dioxide gas displaces oxygen as it collects in low-lying areas. When carbon dioxide, created by mixing vinegar and baking soda, is added to a bowl with candles of different heights, the flames are extinguished as if by magic.

  6. Emission rate, isotopic composition and origin(s) of magmatic carbon dioxide at Merapi volcano, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allard, P.

    2012-12-01

    Merapi volcano, located on a ~25 thick continental-type arc crust in central Java, is one of the most active arc volcanoes worldwide, where high temperature summit degassing and extrusion of basic andesite lava domes have persisted for several centuries at least. Carbon dioxide is the main anhydrous component of emitted magmatic gases [1,2] and is released at a time-averaged rate of ~500 tons/day from both high-temperature (900-600°C) gas venting [3] and soil degassing in the summit area [4]. Its δ13C averages -4.0±0.2 ‰ at the extruding lava dome and at all other degassing sites [1-4], thus evidencing its overall magmatic derivation. However, its ultimate origin is still debated. Merapi lavas indeed contain abundant calc-silicate (skarn-type) xenoliths and Ca-rich xenocrysts [5-7] which demonstrates shallow magma interactions with carbonate sediments present in the basement and renders plausible a crustal contribution to the magmatic CO2 output [1,6,7]. Here I outline a number of geochemical constraints which suggest that such a shallow crustal contribution may be of second order with respect to a deep slab carbon contribution: (i) The CO2/3He ratio of Merapi magmatic gases (5 times higher than the average MORB ratio), combined with the δ13C for MORB-type upper mantle carbon (-7 to -4‰), implies that the volcanic CO2 contains 80% of non-mantle carbon with maximum δ13C of -3.25‰. This is much lower than the potential δ13C of metamorphic CO2 generated from local carbonate sediments (-2.2 to +1.4‰; [1,8]); (ii) The δ13C of Merapi volcanic CO2 has remained remarkably constant over 30 years of standard eruptive activity, implying steady conditions of genesis and transfer from depth to the surface. This discards a permanent influence of likely variable magma-carbonate interactions. Instead, such interactions could well be responsible of one single 'anomalous' transient δ13C value (-2.4‰) measured just after a nearby tectonic earthquake in 2006 [8]; and

  7. Diurnal odor, ammonia, hydrogen sulfide, and carbon dioxide emission profiles of confined swine grower/finisher rooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Gang; Guo, Huiqing; Peterson, Jonathan; Predicala, Bernardo; Laguë, Claude

    2008-11-01

    The objective of this study was to obtain diurnal variation profiles of odor and gas (ammonia [NH3], hydrogen sulfide [H2S], carbon dioxide [CO2]) concentrations and emission rate (OGCER) from confined swine grower/ finisher rooms under three typical weather conditions (warm, mild, and cold weather) in a year. Two grower/ finisher rooms, one with a fully slatted floor and the other with partially slatted floors, were measured for 2 consecutive days under each weather condition. The results revealed that the diurnal OGCER in the room with a fully slatted floor was 9.2-39.4% higher than that with a partially slatted floor; however, no significant differences in the diurnal OGCER were found between these two rooms, except for the NH3 concentrations in August, the NH3 and H2S concentrations and emissions in October, and odor concentrations and emissions in February (p > 0.05). The OGCER variations presented different diurnal patterns as affected by time of day, season, type of floor, ventilation rate, animal growth cycles, in-house manure storage, and weather conditions. Significant diurnal fluctuations in the OGCER (except for the odor concentrations and H2S emissions) were observed in August (p dispersion modeling to decrease the great incertitude of setback determination using randomly measured data.

  8. Seasonal odor, ammonia, hydrogen sulfide, and carbon dioxide concentrations and emissions from swine grower-finisher rooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Gang; Guo, Huiqing; Peterson, Jonathan

    2010-04-01

    Seasonal odor and gas (ammonia [NH3], hydrogen sulfide [H2S], and carbon dioxide [CO2]) concentrations and emission rates (OGCERs) from swine facilities are vital for providing accurate source emissions and reducing the uncertainty of setback distances on the basis of emission data. In this study, a repeated measurement experimental method and a split-block statistical model were used to obtain seasonal OGCER profiles from two types of swine grower-finisher rooms in Saskatchewan, Canada, over a 12-month period. The results indicate that the OGCERs were significantly affected by the sampling month and ambient temperature (P dispersion models to reduce uncertainties in setback calculations. It was also found that the seasonal OGCERs from the rooms with fully slatted floors were 6.3-40.6% higher than those with partially slatted floors. The seasonal OGCERs (except for the NH3 concentrations in October, November, and January; the CO2 concentrations in August; and the CO2 emission rates in December) between these two rooms for each measuring month did not differ significantly (P > 0.05). The measured gas concentrations were generally below the permissible exposure limits (PELs) established by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) throughout the year except for the NH3 concentrations in cold weather (December, January, and February).

  9. Developed and developing world contributions to climate system change based on carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Ting; Dong, Wenjie; Yan, Qing; Chou, Jieming; Yang, Zhiyong; Tian, Di

    2016-05-01

    One of the key issues in international climate negotiations is the formulation of targets for emissions reduction for all countries based on the principle of "common but differentiated responsibilities". This formulation depends primarily on the quantitative attribution of the responsibilities of developed and developing countries for historical climate change. Using the Commuity Earth System Model (CESM), we estimate the responsibilities of developed countries and developing countries for climatic change from 1850 to 2005 using their carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide emissions. The results indicate that developed countries contribute approximately 53%-61%, and developing countries approximately 39%-47%, to the increase in global air temperature, upper oceanic warming, sea-ice reduction in the NH, and permafrost degradation. In addition, the spatial heterogeneity of these changes from 1850 to 2005 is primarily attributed to the emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs) in developed countries. Although uncertainties remain in the climate model and the external forcings used, GHG emissions in developed countries are the major contributor to the observed climate system changes in the 20th century.

  10. Vegetation sensitivity to global anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions in a topographically complex region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diffenbaugh, N.S.; Sloan, L.C.; Snyder, M.A.; Bell, J.L.; Kaplan, J.; Shafer, S.L.; Bartlein, P.J.

    2003-01-01

    Anthropogenic increases in atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations may affect vegetation distribution both directly through changes in photosynthesis and water-use efficiency, and indirectly through CO2-induced climate change. Using an equilibrium vegetation model (BIOME4) driven by a regional climate model (RegCM2.5), we tested the sensitivity of vegetation in the western United States, a topographically complex region, to the direct, indirect, and combined effects of doubled preindustrial atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Those sensitivities were quantified using the kappa statistic. Simulated vegetation in the western United States was sensitive to changes in atmospheric CO2 concentrations, with woody biome types replacing less woody types throughout the domain. The simulated vegetation was also sensitive to climatic effects, particularly at high elevations, due to both warming throughout the domain and decreased precipitation in key mountain regions such as the Sierra Nevada of California and the Cascade and Blue Mountains of Oregon. Significantly, when the direct effects of CO2 on vegetation were tested in combination with the indirect effects of CO2-induced climate change, new vegetation patterns were created that were not seen in either of the individual cases. This result indicates that climatic and nonclimatic effects must be considered in tandem when assessing the potential impacts of elevated CO2 levels.

  11. Evaluation of carbon dioxide emission factor from urea during rice cropping season: A case study in Korean paddy soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Gil Won; Jeong, Seung Tak; Kim, Gun Yeob; Kim, Pil Joo; Kim, Sang Yoon

    2016-08-01

    Fertilization with urea can lead to a loss of carbon dioxide (CO2) that was fixed during the industrial production process. The extent of atmospheric CO2 removal from urea manufacturing was estimated by the Industrial Processes and Product Use sector (IPPU sector). On its basis, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has proposed a value of 0.2 Mg C per Mg urea (available in 2006 revised IPCC guidelines for greenhouse gas inventories), which is the mass fractions of C in urea, as the CO2 emission coefficient from urea for the agricultural sector. Notably, due to the possibility of bicarbonate leaching to waters, all C in urea might not get released as CO2 to the atmosphere. Hence, in order to provide an accurate value of the CO2 emission coefficient from applied urea in the rice ecosystem, the CO2 emission factors were characterized under different levels of 13C-urea applied paddy field in the current study. The total CO2 fluxes and rice grain yields increased significantly with increasing urea application (110-130 kg N ha-1) and thereafter, decreased. However, with increasing 13C-urea application, a significant and proportional increase of the 13CO2sbnd C emissions from 13C-urea was also observed. From the relationships between urea application levels and 13CO2sbnd C fluxes from 13C-urea, the CO2sbnd C emission factor from urea was estimated to range between 0.0143 and 0.0156 Mg C per Mg urea. Thus, the CO2sbnd C emission factor of this study is less than that of the value proposed by IPCC. Therefore, for the first time, we propose to revise the current IPCC guideline value of CO2sbnd C emission factor from urea as 0.0143-0.0156 Mg C per Mg urea for Korean paddy soils.

  12. Energy Consumption and Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Petroleum Refining Sector in Mexico from 2015 to 2030

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Granados-Hernández Elías

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The increase in the volume of production of petroleum products of high demand, such as gasoline, rises the use of energy and therefore emissions of CO2 in oil refineries. In Mexico, for example, gasoline demand scenario for the next 20 years growth will increase the fuel consumption by almost 55%, considering a historical trend in traffic. The purpose of this study as to determine the impact of energy consumption per unit of processing oil and CO2 emissions using the methodology of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC as well as employing the stoichiometric calculation based on the carbon content. Different projections were made using four technological options of oil refining, processing three types of pure raw (Olmeca, Istmo, Maya and four blends (M1, M2, M3, M4. When performing an energy balance results show that projecting very complex refineries to meet a specific demand for gasoline will consume less energy and therefore CO2 emissions will be lower. This study is important as a tool for energy planning and environmental pollution in Mexico, as well as an object of analysis of the energy sector worldwide.

  13. Reduction of Carbon Dioxide Emissions from a SCGT/CC by Ammonia Solution Absorption – Preliminary Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidia Lombardi

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The reduction of carbon dioxide from the flue gases of a semi-closed gas turbine combined cycle (SCGT/CC by means of absorption in ammonia aqueous solutions has been studied. The absorption system has been simulated by means of Aspen PlusTM. The main variables of the removal system have been varied in order to understand their influence on system performance. With reference to the SCGT/CC case study, the removal of CO2, considering a removal efficiency of 89%, dramatically decreases the overall cycle efficiency from 53 to 41%, with the main contribution to this decrease being due to the power consumption for flue gas compression up to the absorption unit pressure. CO2 specific emissions pass from 390 to 57 kg/MWh.

  14. CARBON DIOXIDE FIXATION.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FUJITA,E.

    2000-01-12

    Solar carbon dioxide fixation offers the possibility of a renewable source of chemicals and fuels in the future. Its realization rests on future advances in the efficiency of solar energy collection and development of suitable catalysts for CO{sub 2} conversion. Recent achievements in the efficiency of solar energy conversion and in catalysis suggest that this approach holds a great deal of promise for contributing to future needs for fuels and chemicals.

  15. Nitrous oxide, carbon dioxide and methane emissions from irrigated cropping systems as influenced by legumes, manure and fertilizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellert, B.H.; Janzen, H.H. [Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Lethbridge, AB (Canada)

    2008-04-15

    Irrigated crops in Alberta require higher inputs of nitrogen (N) than rainfed crops. The aim of the study was to determine emissions of nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) from the soils of irrigated cropping systems that used inorganic fertilizer N at a site in Alberta. The study measured carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and methane (CH{sub 4}) levels in order to determine net greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The exchange of gases between the atmosphere and soil in selected treatments was measured in order to compare the effects of contrasting N inputs. Fluxes were measured bi-weekly from spring 2001 to spring 2004. The time period included annual and perennial legume crops; the termination of a perennial forage crop; manure application; and 2 growing seasons of test crops. Soil surface fluxes were measured using PVC chambers equipped with thermocouples. Gas samples were measured using gas chromatography. A linear least squares method was used to calculate gas concentrations. Results showed that soil CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O production rates were intertwined after legume production or manure application, but decoupled during early spring bursts of N{sub 2}O production. Higher soil CO{sub 2} emissions with alfalfa and manure-amended soils suggested that soil oxygen consumption during high CO{sub 2} emission periods may promote N{sub 2}O emissions. Appreciable proportions of N{sub 2}O were emitted outside the growing season. Results suggested that N{sub 2}O leakage is an inevitable hazard of crop production. The study highlighted the importance of understanding and quantifying N{sub 2}O emissions from intensive cropping systems. 22 refs., 4 tabs., 6 figs.

  16. Glucosinolate breakdown products as insect fumigants and their effect on carbon dioxide emission of insects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coats Joel R

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glucosinolate breakdown products are volatile, therefore good candidates for insect fumigants. However, although they are insecticidal, the mode of action of such natural products is not clear. We studied the insecticidal effect of these compounds as fumigants, and monitored the production of carbon dioxide by the insects as a probe to the understanding of their mode of action. Results The fumigation 24-h LC50 against the house fly (Musca domestica L. of allyl thiocyanate, allyl isothiocyanate, allyl cyanide, and l-cyano-2-hydroxy-3-butene was 0.1, 0.13, 3.66, and 6.2 μg cm-3, respectively; they were 0.55, 1.57, 2.8, and > 19.60 μg cm-3, respectively, against the lesser grain borer (Rhyzopertha dominica Fabricius. The fumigation toxicity of some of the glucosinolate products was very close to or better than that of the commercial insect fumigants such as chloropicrin (LC50: 0.08 and 1.3 μg cm-3 against M. domestica and R. dominica, respectively and dichlorovos (LC50: -3 against M. domestica and R. dominica, respectively in our laboratory tests. Significantly increased CO2 expiration was found in insects exposed to the vapor of allyl isothiocyanate, allyl thiocyanate and allyl isocyanate. Allyl isothiocyanate was also found to increase the CO2 expiration of the American cockroach (Periplaneta americana L.. Conclusions Glucosinolate breakdown products have potential as biodegradable and safe insect fumigants. They may act on the insect respiratory system in their mode of action.

  17. Investigation of carbon dioxide emission in China by primary component analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Wang, Cheng-Ming; Liu, Lian; Guo, Hang; Liu, Guo-Dong; Li, Yuan-Wei; Deng, Shi-Huai

    2014-02-15

    Principal component analysis (PCA) is employed to investigate the relationship between CO2 emissions (COEs) stemming from fossil fuel burning and cement manufacturing and their affecting factors. Eight affecting factors, namely, Population (P), Urban Population (UP); the Output Values of Primary Industry (PIOV), Secondary Industry (SIOV), and Tertiary Industry (TIOV); and the Proportions of Primary Industry's Output Value (PPIOV), Secondary Industry's Output Value (PSIOV), and Tertiary Industry's Output Value (PTIOV), are chosen. PCA is employed to eliminate the multicollinearity of the affecting factors. Two principal components, which can explain 92.86% of the variance of the eight affecting factors, are chosen as variables in the regression analysis. Ordinary least square regression is used to estimate multiple linear regression models, in which COEs and the principal components serve as dependent and independent variables, respectively. The results are given in the following. (1) Theoretically, the carbon intensities of PIOV, SIOV, and TIOV are 2573.4693, 552.7036, and 606.0791 kt per one billion $, respectively. The incomplete statistical data, the different statistical standards, and the ideology of self sufficiency and peasantry appear to show that the carbon intensity of PIOV is higher than those of SIOV and TIOV in China. (2) PPIOV, PSIOV, and PTIOV influence the fluctuations of COE. The parameters of PPIOV, PSIOV, and PTIOV are -2706946.7564, 2557300.5450, and 3924767.9807 kt, respectively. As the economic structure of China is strongly tied to technology level, the period when PIOV plays the leading position is characterized by lagging technology and economic developing. Thus, the influence of PPIOV has a negative value. As the increase of PSIOV and PTIOV is always followed by technological innovation and economic development, PSIOV and PTIOV have the opposite influence. (3) The carbon intensities of P and UP are 1.1029 and 1.7862 kt per thousand people

  18. A multi-scale approach to monitor urban carbon-dioxide emissions in the atmosphere over Vancouver, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christen, A.; Crawford, B.; Ketler, R.; Lee, J. K.; McKendry, I. G.; Nesic, Z.; Caitlin, S.

    2015-12-01

    Measurements of long-lived greenhouse gases in the urban atmosphere are potentially useful to constrain and validate urban emission inventories, or space-borne remote-sensing products. We summarize and compare three different approaches, operating at different scales, that directly or indirectly identify, attribute and quantify emissions (and uptake) of carbon dioxide (CO2) in urban environments. All three approaches are illustrated using in-situ measurements in the atmosphere in and over Vancouver, Canada. Mobile sensing may be a promising way to quantify and map CO2 mixing ratios at fine scales across heterogenous and complex urban environments. We developed a system for monitoring CO2 mixing ratios at street level using a network of mobile CO2 sensors deployable on vehicles and bikes. A total of 5 prototype sensors were built and simultaneously used in a measurement campaign across a range of urban land use types and densities within a short time frame (3 hours). The dataset is used to aid in fine scale emission mapping in combination with simultaneous tower-based flux measurements. Overall, calculated CO2 emissions are realistic when compared against a spatially disaggregated scale emission inventory. The second approach is based on mass flux measurements of CO2 using a tower-based eddy covariance (EC) system. We present a continuous 7-year long dataset of CO2 fluxes measured by EC at the 28m tall flux tower 'Vancouver-Sunset'. We show how this dataset can be combined with turbulent source area models to quantify and partition different emission processes at the neighborhood-scale. The long-term EC measurements are within 10% of a spatially disaggregated scale emission inventory. Thirdly, at the urban scale, we present a dataset of CO2 mixing ratios measured using a tethered balloon system in the urban boundary layer above Vancouver. Using a simple box model, net city-scale CO2 emissions can be determined using measured rate of change of CO2 mixing ratios

  19. Clinical usefulness of positron emission tomography in the evaluation of regional cerebral blood flow and cerebral oxygen metabolism under glycerol and carbon dioxide loadings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanada, Shuji; Yonekura, Yoshiharu; Senda, Michio

    1987-02-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) and oxygen metabolism (CMRO/sub 2/) were studied in normal cerebral cortices by positron emission tomography using continuous inhalation method of oxygen-15 labeled carbon dioxide and oxygen, and single inhalation method of oxygen-15 labeled carbon monoxide. The values of CBF, CMRO/sub 2/, and oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) in cerebral cortices of 18 healthy normal volunteers represented 40 +- 7 ml/100 ml/min, 3.2 +- 0.5 ml O/sub 2//100 ml/min, and 0.43 +- 0.07, respectively. In cases with glycerol loading, CBF increased in 10/14 cases. Studies of 6 cases with intracranial pressure indicated the presence of mechanism by which depressed CMRO/sub 2/ improved and was kept in normal values. The loading of 5% carbon dioxide showed an increase in CBF in cases with cerebral infarction, which implied the good cerebral vascular response to the elevated arterial carbon dioxide, but no particular changes were observed in CMRO/sub 2/ which seemed to be less responsive to the elevated arterial carbon dioxide level. In cases with moyamoya disease, 5% carbon dioxide loading showed no changes in CBF and CMRO/sub 2/. This suggested the poor cerebral vascular response to the elevation of arterial carbon dioxide, while X-ray CT failed to demonstrate any abnormalities in corresponding areas. Positron emission tomography proved to have a great potentiality regarding the evaluation of the changes in cerebral blood flow and cerebral oxygen metabolism under various loadings.

  20. Associations of health, physical activity and weight status with motorised travel and transport carbon dioxide emissions: a cross-sectional, observational study

    OpenAIRE

    Goodman Anna; Brand Christian; Ogilvie David

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Motorised travel and associated carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions generate substantial health costs; in the case of motorised travel, this may include contributing to rising obesity levels. Obesity has in turn been hypothesised to increase motorised travel and/or CO2 emissions, both because heavier people may use motorised travel more and because heavier people may choose larger and less fuel-efficient cars. These hypothesised associations have not been examined empirically, ...

  1. Associations of health, physical activity and weight status with motorised travel and transport carbon dioxide emissions : a cross-sectional, observational study

    OpenAIRE

    Goodman, A.; Brand, C; Ogilvie, D

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Motorised travel and associated carbon dioxide (CO₂) emissions generate substantial health costs; in the case of motorised travel, this may include contributing to rising obesity levels. Obesity has in turn been hypothesised to increase motorised travel and/or CO₂ emissions, both because heavier people may use motorised travel more and because heavier people may choose larger and less fuel-efficient cars. These hypothesised associations have not been examined empirically, however,...

  2. Estimating the opportunity costs of reducing carbon dioxide emissions via avoided deforestation, using integrated assessment modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overmars, K.P.; Stehfest, E.; Tabeau, A.A.; Meijl, van J.C.M.; Beltran, A.M.; Kram, T.

    2014-01-01

    Estimates show that, in recent years, deforestation and forest degradation accounted for about 17% of global greenhouse gas emissions. The implementation of REDD (Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation in Developing Countries) is suggested to provide substantial emission reduct

  3. Soil carbon dioxide emission from intensively cultivated black soil in Northeast China. Nitrogen fertilization effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ni, Kang [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing (China). State Key Lab. of Soil and Sustainable Agriculture; Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Ding, Weixin; Cai, Zucong [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing (China). State Key Lab. of Soil and Sustainable Agriculture; Wang, Yufeng; Zhang, Xilin; Zhou, Baoku [Heilongjiang Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Harbin (China). Inst. of Soil and Fertilizer

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to understand the effect of nitrogen fertilization on soil respiration and native soil organic carbon (SOC) decomposition and to identify the key factor affecting soil respiration in a cultivated black soil. Materials and methods: A field experiment was conducted at the Harbin State Key Agroecological Experimental Station, China. The study consisted of four treatments: unplanted and N-unfertilized soil (U0), unplanted soil treated with 225 kg N ha{sup -1} (UN), maize planted and N-unfertilized soil (P0), and planted soil fertilized with 225 kg N ha{sup -1} (PN). Soil CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O fluxes were measured using the static closed chamber method. Results and discussion: Cumulative CO{sub 2} emissions during the maize growing season with the U0, UN, P0, and PN treatments were 1.29, 1.04, 2.30 and 2.27 Mg C ha{sup -1}, respectively, indicating that N fertilization significantly reduced the decomposition of native SOC. However, no marked effect on soil respiration in planted soil was observed because the increase of rhizosphere respiration caused by N addition was counteracted by the reduction of native SOC decomposition. Soil CO{sub 2} fluxes were significantly affected by soil temperature but not by soil moisture. The temperature sensitivity (Q{sub 10}) of soil respiration was 2.16-2.47 for unplanted soil but increased to 3.16-3.44 in planted soil. N addition reduced the Q{sub 10} of native SOC decomposition possibly due to low labile organic C but increased the Q{sub 10} of soil respiration due to the stimulation of maize growth. The estimated annual CO{sub 2} emission in N-fertilized soil was 1.28 Mg C ha{sup -1} and was replenished by the residual stubble, roots, and exudates. In contrast, the lost C (1.53 Mg C ha{sup -1}) in N-unfertilized soil was not completely supplemented by maize residues, resulting in a reduction of SOC. Although N fertilization significantly increased N{sub 2}O emissions, the global warming potential

  4. Aspects of carbon dioxide utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omae, Iwao [Omae Research Laboratories, 335-23 Mizuno, Sayama, Saitama 350-1317 (Japan)

    2006-06-30

    Carbon dioxide reacts with hydrogen, alcohols, acetals, epoxides, amines, carbon-carbon unsaturated compounds, etc. in supercritical carbon dioxide or in other solvents in the presence of metal compounds as catalysts. The products of these reactions are formic acid, formic acid esters, formamides, methanol, dimethyl carbonate, alkylene carbonates, carbamic acid esters, lactones, carboxylic acids, polycarbonate (bisphenol-based engineering polymer), aliphatic polycarbonates, etc. Especially, the productions of formic acid, formic acid methyl ester and dimethylformamide with a ruthenium catalyst; dimethyl carbonate and urethanes with a dialkyltin catalyst; 2-pyrone with a nickel-phosphine catalyst; diphenyl carbonate with a lead phenoxide catalyst; the alternating copolymerization of carbon dioxide and epoxides with a zinc catalyst has attracted attentions as the industrial utilizations of carbon dioxide. The further development of these production processes is expected. (author)

  5. Guidance to regulations on trade with emission permits for carbon dioxide; Vaegledning till lagstiftning om handel med utslaeppsraetter foer koldioxid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2008-07-15

    (NFS 2007:5) and general recommendations on carbon dioxide emission allowances and the Swedish Energy Agency regulations (STEMFS 2004:8) on an emission allowance registry. All these documents can be found at www.utslappshandel.se

  6. Household carbon dioxide emissions from peasants and herdsmen in northwestern arid-alpine regions, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study assessed household CO2 emissions (related to the consumption of necessary and luxury goods and services) of peasants and herdsmen households in arid-alpine regions in Gansu, Qinghai and Ningxia provinces, China. We also explored whether agriculture types, family income and family size have played any role in household CO2 emissions. In order to address these issues, we: (i) developed assessment indicators for household emissions; (ii) conducted semi-structured questionnaire household surveys; and (iii) employed input-output analysis (IOA). The results showed that, the average household CO2 emission per capita is 1.43 tons (t) CO2; the proportion of subsistence emissions (related to the consumption of necessary goods and services) accounts for 93.24%, whereas luxury emissions (generated due to consumption of specific goods and services that are consumed only when household income improves) only account for 6.76%t. Moreover, household CO2 emissions increase with family income and family size, but per capita emissions are inversely related to family size. The highest average household emissions were found in the alpine agricultural and pastoral region (6.18 t CO2), followed by the irrigated agricultural region (6.07 t CO2) and the rain-fed agricultural region (5.34 t CO2). In consideration of insignificant amount of household emissions from these poor and vulnerable groups of the society, this study suggests to follow the principle of fairness while making energy conservation, emission reduction and adaptation policies. - Highlights: ► Per capita emissions decrease as the household size increases. ► The subsistence emissions accounts for 93.24% of the total emissions. ► If heating related emissions are excluded, household emissions are negligible. ► The reduction of emissions below current levels is almost impossible. ► Poor and vulnerable groups should be given special consideration

  7. Carbon dioxide emission reduction by increased utilization of waste-derived fuels in the cement industry

    OpenAIRE

    Tokheim, Lars-André; Brevik, Per

    2007-01-01

    Considerable reductions in Norway's emissions of greenhouse gases like CO2 are required to meet the commitments of the Kyoto Protocol. CO2 emissions from cement clinker production originate from decarbonation of limestone as well as fuel combustion, and the cement plants in Norway have to comply with requirements given by the pollution control authorities via the national emissions trading system. There are several ways of reducing CO2 emissions from the cement industry. Utiliz...

  8. Carbon dioxide and climate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-10-01

    Scientific and public interest in greenhouse gases, climate warming, and global change virtually exploded in 1988. The Department's focused research on atmospheric CO{sub 2} contributed sound and timely scientific information to the many questions produced by the groundswell of interest and concern. Research projects summarized in this document provided the data base that made timely responses possible, and the contributions from participating scientists are genuinely appreciated. In the past year, the core CO{sub 2} research has continued to improve the scientific knowledge needed to project future atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations, to estimate climate sensitivity, and to assess the responses of vegetation to rising concentrations of CO{sub 2} and to climate change. The Carbon Dioxide Research Program's goal is to develop sound scientific information for policy formulation and governmental action in response to changes of atmospheric CO{sub 2}. The Program Summary describes projects funded by the Carbon Dioxide Research Program during FY 1990 and gives a brief overview of objectives, organization, and accomplishments.

  9. The Use of an Automated System (GreenFeed) to Monitor Enteric Methane and Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Ruminant Animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hristov, Alexander N.; Oh, Joonpyo; Giallongo, Fabio; Frederick, Tyler; Weeks, Holley; Zimmerman, Patrick R.; Harper, Michael T.; Hristova, Rada A.; Zimmerman, R. Scott; Branco, Antonio F.

    2015-01-01

    Ruminant animals (domesticated or wild) emit methane (CH4) through enteric fermentation in their digestive tract and from decomposition of manure during storage. These processes are the major sources of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from animal production systems. Techniques for measuring enteric CH4 vary from direct measurements (respiration chambers, which are highly accurate, but with limited applicability) to various indirect methods (sniffers, laser technology, which are practical, but with variable accuracy). The sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) tracer gas method is commonly used to measure enteric CH4 production by animal scientists and more recently, application of an Automated Head-Chamber System (AHCS) (GreenFeed, C-Lock, Inc., Rapid City, SD), which is the focus of this experiment, has been growing. AHCS is an automated system to monitor CH4 and carbon dioxide (CO2) mass fluxes from the breath of ruminant animals. In a typical AHCS operation, small quantities of baiting feed are dispensed to individual animals to lure them to AHCS multiple times daily. As the animal visits AHCS, a fan system pulls air past the animal’s muzzle into an intake manifold, and through an air collection pipe where continuous airflow rates are measured. A sub-sample of air is pumped out of the pipe into non-dispersive infra-red sensors for continuous measurement of CH4 and CO2 concentrations. Field comparisons of AHCS to respiration chambers or SF6 have demonstrated that AHCS produces repeatable and accurate CH4 emission results, provided that animal visits to AHCS are sufficient so emission estimates are representative of the diurnal rhythm of rumen gas production. Here, we demonstrate the use of AHCS to measure CO2 and CH4 fluxes from dairy cows given a control diet or a diet supplemented with technical-grade cashew nut shell liquid. PMID:26383886

  10. The Use of an Automated System (GreenFeed) to Monitor Enteric Methane and Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Ruminant Animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hristov, Alexander N; Oh, Joonpyo; Giallongo, Fabio; Frederick, Tyler; Weeks, Holley; Zimmerman, Patrick R; Harper, Michael T; Hristova, Rada A; Zimmerman, R Scott; Branco, Antonio F

    2015-01-01

    Ruminant animals (domesticated or wild) emit methane (CH4) through enteric fermentation in their digestive tract and from decomposition of manure during storage. These processes are the major sources of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from animal production systems. Techniques for measuring enteric CH4 vary from direct measurements (respiration chambers, which are highly accurate, but with limited applicability) to various indirect methods (sniffers, laser technology, which are practical, but with variable accuracy). The sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) tracer gas method is commonly used to measure enteric CH4 production by animal scientists and more recently, application of an Automated Head-Chamber System (AHCS) (GreenFeed, C-Lock, Inc., Rapid City, SD), which is the focus of this experiment, has been growing. AHCS is an automated system to monitor CH4 and carbon dioxide (CO2) mass fluxes from the breath of ruminant animals. In a typical AHCS operation, small quantities of baiting feed are dispensed to individual animals to lure them to AHCS multiple times daily. As the animal visits AHCS, a fan system pulls air past the animal's muzzle into an intake manifold, and through an air collection pipe where continuous airflow rates are measured. A sub-sample of air is pumped out of the pipe into non-dispersive infra-red sensors for continuous measurement of CH4 and CO2 concentrations. Field comparisons of AHCS to respiration chambers or SF6 have demonstrated that AHCS produces repeatable and accurate CH4 emission results, provided that animal visits to AHCS are sufficient so emission estimates are representative of the diurnal rhythm of rumen gas production. Here, we demonstrate the use of AHCS to measure CO2 and CH4 fluxes from dairy cows given a control diet or a diet supplemented with technical-grade cashew nut shell liquid. PMID:26383886

  11. Carbon dioxide emission factors for U.S. coal by origin and destination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quick, J.C.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a method that uses published data to calculate locally robust CO2 emission factors for U.S. coal. The method is demonstrated by calculating CO2 emission factors by coal origin (223 counties, in 1999) and destination (479 power plants, in 2005). Locally robust CO2 emission factors should improve the accuracy and verification of greenhouse gas emission measurements from individual coal-fired power plants. Based largely on the county origin, average emission factors for U.S. lignite, subbituminous, bituminous, and anthracite coal produced during 1999 were 92.97,91.97,88.20, and 98.91 kg CO2/GJgross, respectively. However, greater variation is observed within these rank classes than between them, which limits the reliability of CO2 emission factors specified by coal rank. Emission factors calculated by destination (power plant) showed greater variation than those listed in the Emissions & Generation Resource Integrated Database (eGRID), which exhibit an unlikely uniformity that is inconsistent with the natural variation of CO2 emission factors for U.S. coal. ?? 2010 American Chemical Society.

  12. Improving the Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates from the Combustion of Fossil Fuels in California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Wenzel, Tom; Price, Lynn

    2008-08-13

    Central to any study of climate change is the development of an emission inventory that identifies and quantifies the State's primary anthropogenic sources and sinks of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. CO2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion accounted for 80 percent of California GHG emissions (CARB, 2007a). Even though these CO2 emissions are well characterized in the existing state inventory, there still exist significant sources of uncertainties regarding their accuracy. This report evaluates the CO2 emissions accounting based on the California Energy Balance database (CALEB) developed by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), in terms of what improvements are needed and where uncertainties lie. The estimated uncertainty for total CO2 emissions ranges between -21 and +37 million metric tons (Mt), or -6percent and +11percent of total CO2 emissions. The report also identifies where improvements are needed for the upcoming updates of CALEB. However, it is worth noting that the California Air Resources Board (CARB) GHG inventory did not use CALEB data for all combustion estimates. Therefore the range in uncertainty estimated in this report does not apply to the CARB's GHG inventory. As much as possible, additional data sources used by CARB in the development of its GHG inventory are summarized in this report for consideration in future updates to CALEB.

  13. Carbon dioxide emission drivers for a typical metropolis using input–output structural decomposition analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As the capital of China, Beijing is regarded as a major metropolis in the world. Study of the variation in temporal CO2 emissions generated by the driving forces in Beijing can provide guidance for policy decisions on CO2 emissions mitigation in global metropolises. Based on input–output structural decomposition analysis (IO-SDA), we analysed the driving forces for the increment in CO2 emissions in Beijing from both production and final demand perspectives during 1997–2010. According to our results, the CO2 emission growth in Beijing is driven mainly by production structure change and population growth, partly offset by CO2 emission intensity reduction as well as the decline in per capita final demand volume during the study period. Final demand structure change has a limited effect on the change in the CO2 emissions in Beijing. From the final demand perspective, urban trades, urban residential consumption, government consumption and fixed capital formation are mainly responsible for the booming emissions. This study showed how the “top-down” IO-SDA methodology was implemented on a city scale. Policy implications from this study would be helpful for addressing CO2 emissions mitigation in global capital cities and metropolises. - Highlights: • Changes in production structure and population are drivers of CO2 increment. • Changes in CO2 intensity and per capita GDP are forces to offset CO2 increment. • Final demand structure change has limited effect on Beijing's CO2 emission change. • Beijing's key final demand categories and economic sectors are identified. • Policy implications of Beijing's results are analyzed

  14. Driving Factors of Carbon Dioxide Emissions and the Impact from Kyoto Protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Grunewald, Nicole; Martínez-Zarzoso, Inmaculada

    2009-01-01

    In the last two decades increasing attention has been paid to the relationship between environmental quality and economic development. According to the Environmental Kuznets Curve (EKC) hypothesis this relationship may be described by an inverted-U curve. However, recent evidence rejects the EKC hypothesis for GHG emissions in a broad sense. In this paper we aim to investigate whether the EKC behavior for CO2 emissions could be proved on the behalf of institutional regulations. We analyze the...

  15. Carbon dioxide emissions in fallow periods of a corn-soybean rotation: eddy-covariance versus chamber methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) fluxes at terrestrial surface are typically quantified using eddy-covariance (EC) or chamber (Ch) techniques; however, long-term comparisons of the two techniques are not available. This study was conducted to assess the agreement between EC and Ch techniques when measuring CO2 ...

  16. Driving factors of carbon dioxide emissions and the impact from Kyoto Protocol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grunewald, Nicole [Goettingen Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Economics; Martinez-Zarzoso, Inmaculada [Jaume I Univ. (Spain). International Economics Institute

    2009-08-15

    In the last two decades increasing attention has been paid to the relationship between environmental degradation and economic development. According to the Environmental Kuznets Curve (EKC) hypothesis this relationship may be described by an inverted-U curve. However, recent evidence rejects the EKC hypothesis for GHG emissions in a broad sense. In this paper we aim to investigate whether the EKC behavior for CO2 emissions could be proved on the behalf of institutional regulations. We analyze the driving factors of CO2 for developed and developing countries to test the theory of the EKC in the context of environmental regulations using a static and dynamic panel data model. We consider the Kyoto Protocol and the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM). The results from this study indicate that the Kyoto obligations have a reducing effect on CO2 emissions in developed and developing countries. (orig.)

  17. Drying and wetting of Mediterranean soils stimulates decomposition and carbon dioxide emission: the "Birch effect".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, Paul; Rey, Ana; Petsikos, Charalampos; Wingate, Lisa; Rayment, Mark; Pereira, João; Banza, João; David, Jorge; Miglietta, Franco; Borghetti, Marco; Manca, Giovanni; Valentini, Riccardo

    2007-07-01

    Observations on the net carbon exchange of forests in the European Mediterranean region, measured recently by the eddy covariance method, have revived interest in a phenomenon first characterized on agricultural and forest soils in East Africa in the 1950s and 1960s by H. F. Birch and now often referred to as the "Birch effect." When soils become dry during summer because of lack of rain, as is common in regions with Mediterranean climate, or are dried in the laboratory in controlled conditions, and are then rewetted by precipitation or irrigation, there is a burst of decomposition, mineralization and release of inorganic nitrogen and CO(2). In forests in Mediterranean climates in southern Europe, this effect has been observed with eddy covariance techniques and soil respiration chambers at the stand and small plot scales, respectively. Following the early work of Birch, laboratory incubations of soils at controlled temperatures and water contents have been used to characterize CO(2) release following the rewetting of dry soils. A simple empirical model based on laboratory incubations demonstrates that the amount of carbon mineralized over one year can be predicted from soil temperature and precipitation regime, provided that carbon lost as CO(2) is taken into account. We show that the amount of carbon returned to the atmosphere following soil rewetting can reduce significantly the annual net carbon gain by Mediterranean forests. PMID:17403645

  18. The effectiveness of differentiation of the Finnish car purchase tax according to carbon dioxide emission performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perrels, A.; Tuovinen, T.

    2012-01-15

    The study concerns an assessment of the effectiveness of car purchase tax differentiation according to the CO{sub 2}-emission performance of newly sold cars as implemented in Finland. This policy instrument came into force as of 1 January 2008. The effectiveness of the instrument is assessed by means of decomposition of car sales by key features of cars and by estimation of impact relations between changes in the emission performance of newly sold cars and various explanatory variables, including the imputed tax differentiation based price differences. (orig.)

  19. Soil carbon dioxide emissions in response to precipitation frequency in the Loess Plateau, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Precipitation events can induce episodic CO2 emissions, so called the “Birch Effect”, but how precipitation frequency influences the mechanisms responsible for this effect in dryland cropping systems is not well known. We evaluated the effect of three precipitation frequencies (5-, 10-, and 20-d int...

  20. On the accuracy of HITEMP-2010 calculated emissivities of Water Vapor and Carbon Dioxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alberti, M.; Weber, R.; Mancini, M.;

    Nowadays, spectral Line-by-Line calculations using either HITRAN or HITEMP data bases are frequently used for calculating gas radiation properties like absorption coefficients or emissivities. Such calculations are computationally very expensive because of the vast number of spectral lines and, t...

  1. On the accuracy of HITEMP-2010 calculated emissivities of Water Vapor and Carbon Dioxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alberti, Michael; Weber, Roman; Mancini, Marco;

    2015-01-01

    Line-by-line (LbL) calculations using either HITRAN or HITEMP spectral data bases are often used for predicting gas radiation properties like absorption coefficients or emissivities. Due to the large size of these data bases, calculations are computationally too expensive to be used in regular CF...

  2. Effects of air pollutants on the carbon dioxide (CO2) emission rate of human subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bako-Biro, Zsolt; Wargocki, Pawel; Wyon, David;

    2004-01-01

    Several laboratory studies have shown the negative effects of emissions from typical indoor pollution sources on perceived air quality, SBS symptoms and the performance of office work. The subjects performed typical office tasks at their own pace while they were exposed for several hours to diffe...

  3. Atmospheric emissions of nitrous oxide, methane, and carbon dioxide from different nitrogen fertilizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sistani, K R; Jn-Baptiste, M; Lovanh, N; Cook, K L

    2011-01-01

    Alternative N fertilizers that produce low greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from soil are needed to reduce the impacts of agricultural practices on global warming potential (GWP). We quantified and compared growing season fluxes of NO, CH, and CO resulting from applications of different N fertilizer sources, urea (U), urea-ammonium nitrate (UAN), ammonium nitrate (NHNO), poultry litter, and commercially available, enhanced-efficiency N fertilizers as follows: polymer-coated urea (ESN), SuperU, UAN + AgrotainPlus, and poultry litter + AgrotainPlus in a no-till corn ( L.) production system. Greenhouse gas fluxes were measured during two growing seasons using static, vented chambers. The ESN delayed the NO flux peak by 3 to 4 wk compared with other N sources. No significant differences were observed in NO emissions among the enhanced-efficiency and traditional inorganic N sources, except for ESN in 2009. Cumulative growing season NO emission from poultry litter was significantly greater than from inorganic N sources. The NO loss (2-yr average) as a percentage of N applied ranged from 0.69% for SuperU to 4.5% for poultry litter. The CH-C and CO-C emissions were impacted by environmental factors, such as temperature and moisture, more than the N source. There was no significant difference in corn yield among all N sources in both years. Site specifics and climate conditions may be responsible for the differences among the results of this study and some of the previously published studies. Our results demonstrate that N fertilizer source and climate conditions need consideration when selecting N sources to reduce GHG emissions.

  4. Planning hydrological restoration of peatlands in Indonesia to mitigate carbon dioxide emissions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaenicke, J.; Wösten, H.; Budiman, A.; Siegert, F.

    2010-01-01

    Extensive degradation of Indonesian peatlands by deforestation, drainage and recurrent fires causes release of huge amounts of peat soil carbon to the atmosphere. Construction of drainage canals is associated with conversion to other land uses, especially plantations of oil palm and pulpwood trees,

  5. Avoiding emissions of carbon dioxide through the use of fuels derived from sugar cane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper shows that the use of ethyl alcohol and sugar cane bagasse as fuel substitutions for gasoline, and natural gas, fuel oil or coal, can have an important role to avoid GHG emissions. The Brazilian Alcohol program and the use of sugar cane bagasse for generating electricity may prove to be an important alternative for the reduction of GHG emissions. Large-scale production and the use of renewable energy from biomass may qualify Brazil for recognition at an international level. It is shown that the cost of alcohol is higher than that of gasoline with the present low price of oil on the international market, but the costs could be reduced by feasible technological improvements 10 refs, 4 figs, 2 tabs

  6. The Effects of the Tractor and Semitrailer Routing Problem on Mitigation of Carbon Dioxide Emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongqi Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The incorporation of CO2 emissions minimization in the vehicle routing problem (VRP is of critical importance to enterprise practice. Focusing on the tractor and semitrailer routing problem with full truckloads between any two terminals of the network, this paper proposes a mathematical programming model with the objective of minimizing CO2 emissions per ton-kilometer. A simulated annealing (SA algorithm is given to solve practical-scale problems. To evaluate the performance of the proposed algorithm, a lower bound is developed. Computational experiments on various problems generated randomly and a realistic instance are conducted. The results show that the proposed methods are effective and the algorithm can provide reasonable solutions within an acceptable computational time.

  7. Low Emission Conversion of Fossil Fuels with Simultaneous or Consecutive Storage of Carbon Dioxide

    OpenAIRE

    Eftekhari, A.A.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis evaluates the possibility of using underground coal gasification with a low CO2 footprint. The thesis consists of two parts. In the first part, by using the concept of exergy, a framework was constructed through which the practicality (feasibility) of an energy conversion/extraction method can be systematically evaluated. This framework, based on exergy analysis and cumulative degree of perfection, is described by analyzing a low emission underground coal gasification (UCG) proces...

  8. Carbon dioxide and methane annual emissions from two boreal reservoirs and nearby lakes in Quebec, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Demarty

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The results of dissolved GHG (CO2 and CH4 measurement campaigns carried out in Quebec (Canada during the open-water periods and under-ice in a newly created reservoir (Eastmain 1, a 25 year old reservoir (Robert-Bourassa and in three reference lakes are presented. While CO2 partial pressures varied with season with a net increase under the ice cover, CH4 partial pressures did not. We were able to extrapolate the highest CO2 partial pressures reached in the different studied systems just before ice break-up with high spring emission period. We then estimated the springtime CO2 fluxes and compared them to annual CO2 fluxes and GHG fluxes. Thus we clearly demonstrated that in our systems CH4 fluxes was of minor importance in the GHG emissions, CO2 fluxes representing around 90% of the annual fluxes. We also pointed out the importance of springtime emissions in the annual budget.

  9. An Integrated, Low Temperature Process to Capture and Sequester Carbon Dioxide from Industrial Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendlandt, R. F.; Foremski, J. J.

    2013-12-01

    Laboratory experiments show that it is possible to integrate (1) the chemistry of serpentine dissolution, (2) capture of CO2 gas from the combustion of natural gas and coal-fired power plants using aqueous amine-based solvents, (3) long-term CO2 sequestration via solid phase carbonate precipitation, and (4) capture solvent regeneration with acid recycling in a single, continuous process. In our process, magnesium is released from serpentine at 300°C via heat treatment with ammonium sulfate salts or at temperatures as low as 50°C via reaction with sulfuric acid. We have also demonstrated that various solid carbonate phases can be precipitated directly from aqueous amine-based (NH3, MEA, DMEA) CO2 capture solvent solutions at room temperature. Direct precipitation from the capture solvent enables regenerating CO2 capture solvent without the need for heat and without the need to compress the CO2 off gas. We propose that known low-temperature electrochemical methods can be integrated with this process to regenerate the aqueous amine capture solvent and recycle acid for dissolution of magnesium-bearing mineral feedstocks and magnesium release. Although the direct precipitation of magnesite at ambient conditions remains elusive, experimental results demonstrate that at temperatures ranging from 20°C to 60°C, either nesquehonite Mg(HCO3)(OH)●2H2O or a double salt with the formula [NH4]2Mg(CO3)2●4H2O or an amorphous magnesium carbonate precipitate directly from the capture solvent. These phases are less desirable for CO2 sequestration than magnesite because they potentially remove constituents (water, ammonia) from the reaction system, reducing the overall efficiency of the sequestration process. Accordingly, the integrated process can be accomplished with minimal energy consumption and loss of CO2 capture and acid solvents, and a net generation of 1 to 4 moles of H2O/6 moles of CO2 sequestered (depending on the solid carbonate precipitate and amount of produced H2

  10. Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Kill Zones Around the Resurgent Dome, Long Valley Caldera, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergfeld, D.; Evans, W. C.; Farrar, C. D.; Howle, J. F.

    2004-12-01

    An episode of seismic unrest beneath the resurgent dome at Long Valley caldera (LVC) in eastern California began in 1980 and is associated with approximately 80 cm of cumulative uplift on parts of the dome since that time. Studies of hydrologic and geochemical parameters can be useful in determining the source of uplift; and of particular relevance here, studies of diffuse soil degassing and temperature have been used to examine relations between gas emissions, uplift, and energy release. We present results from an eighteen-month investigation of soil temperature, soil-gas chemistry and CO2 efflux from fourteen discrete areas of vegetation kill that have appeared inside the caldera over the past two decades. Compared with the tree-kill around Mammoth Mountain on the southwest rim of the caldera, dead zones we studied around the resurgent dome are small. Individually the areas cover between 800 and 36,000 m2. All of the areas have some sites with elevated CO2 flux and elevated soil temperature. \\delta 13C values of CO2 from sites in eight of the studied areas are between -5.7 and -3.9\\permil, and are within the range of magmatic CO2. Results from the flux measurements indicate that on average total CO2 emissions from four of the areas sum about 10 tonnes per day. The other vegetation kill areas currently have only a few sites that exhibit anomalous soil temperatures and CO2 flux, and CO2 emissions from these areas are typically less than 0.3 of a tonne per day. The chemical composition of gas emissions from thermal ground in kill zones located 1.5 to 2 km northwest of the Casa Diablo geothermal power plant demonstrate a connection between some of the dead areas and perturbations related to geothermal fluid production. These results and estimates of thermal output from two of the high flux grids are used to evaluate the premise that the gaseous and thermal anomalies are related to magmatic intrusion beneath the resurgent dome.

  11. Carbon-dioxide emissions trading and hierarchical structure in worldwide finance and commodities markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zeyu; Yamasaki, Kazuko; Tenenbaum, Joel N.; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2013-01-01

    In a highly interdependent economic world, the nature of relationships between financial entities is becoming an increasingly important area of study. Recently, many studies have shown the usefulness of minimal spanning trees (MST) in extracting interactions between financial entities. Here, we propose a modified MST network whose metric distance is defined in terms of cross-correlation coefficient absolute values, enabling the connections between anticorrelated entities to manifest properly. We investigate 69 daily time series, comprising three types of financial assets: 28 stock market indicators, 21 currency futures, and 20 commodity futures. We show that though the resulting MST network evolves over time, the financial assets of similar type tend to have connections which are stable over time. In addition, we find a characteristic time lag between the volatility time series of the stock market indicators and those of the EU CO2 emission allowance (EUA) and crude oil futures (WTI). This time lag is given by the peak of the cross-correlation function of the volatility time series EUA (or WTI) with that of the stock market indicators, and is markedly different (>20 days) from 0, showing that the volatility of stock market indicators today can predict the volatility of EU emissions allowances and of crude oil in the near future.

  12. Implication of Land-Use and Land-Cover Change into Carbon Dioxide Emissions in Karang Gading and Langkat Timur Wildlife Reserve, North Sumatra, Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Basyuni; Lollie Agustina Pancawaraswati Putri; Muammar Bakar Murni

    2015-01-01

    Mangrove forest in the context of climate change is important sector to be included in the inventory of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The present study describes land-use and land-cover change during 2006–2012 of a mangrove forest conservation area, Karang Gading and Langkat Timur Laut Wildlife Reserve (KGLTLWR) in North Sumatra, Indonesia and their implications to carbon dioxide emissions. A land-use change matrix showed that the decrease of mangrove forest due to increases of other land-u...

  13. Spatial and Temporal Variations of Diffuse Carbon Dioxide Emission From Cerro Negro Volcano, Nicaragua, Central America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galindo, I.; Melián, G.; Salazar, J.; Hernández, P.; Pérez, N.; Strauch, W.

    2002-12-01

    Cerro Negro is a basaltic cinder cone that has erupted 22 times since its birth in 1850. It is part of a group of four young cinder cones NW of Las Pilas volcano. Cerro Negro's most recent activity was on 5 August 1999 when erupted ash clouds at heights of about 7 km. In December 1999, three months after the eruption, a surface flux survey was carried out at Cerro Negro. Soil CO2 efflux values ranged from 0.5 to 35,000 gm-2d-1 and the total diffuse CO2 output was estimated about 2,800 td-1. Soil temperature reached values above 300°C on the NE flank of the volcano (Salazar et al., 2001). The goal of this study is to evaluate how diffuse CO2 degassing rate at Cerro Negro changes through its eruptive cycle and improve its volcano monitoring program. From Febraury 26 to March 11, 2002, a new diffuse CO2 degassing survey was carried out at Cerro Negro. Sampling distribution was similar to the 1999 survey covering an area of (0.6 Km2). Diffuse CO2 emission rates for the 2002 survey showed a wide range of values from 0.3 to 26,500 gm-2d-1. Most of the study area showed soil CO2 efflux values above 110 gm-2d-1, and the highest CO2 efflux rate was observed in the Northeastern sector of the crater. Soil temperature was also recorded during the survey, and the highest value was observed in the NE flank reaching temperatures up to 450°C. The total diffuse CO2 output for the 2002 survey was estimated about 280 td-1, which is one order of magnitude lower than the estimated for the 1999 survey. This significant temporal variation on diffuse CO2 emission rate seems to be clearly related to the eruptive cycle of Cerro Negro. If we consider that the statistically eruptive cycle for Cerro Negro is less than a decade, it is obvious that the December 1999 survey was performed within its post-eruptive period, while the recent 2002 survey was carried out two years and a half after the most recent eruption of Cerro Negro, within its inter-eruptive period. These results suggest that

  14. Emission characteristics of carbon dioxide in the semiarid Stipa grandis steppe in Inner Mongolia, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Yun-she; QI Yu-chun; LIU Ji-yuan; Manfred Domroes; LIU Li-xin; GENG Yuan-bo; LIU Xing-ren; YANG Xiao-hong; LI Ming-feng

    2006-01-01

    Using the static opaque chamber method, the soil respiration rates (SR) were measured through the continuous experiments in situ in semiarid Stipa grandis steppe in Xilin River Basin of Inner Mongolia, China from June 2001 to June 2003, in parallel, the difference between the SR and the ecosystem respiration rates (TER) were compared. The results indicated that the seasonal variations of the SR and TER were obvious with higher emissions in growing season and a relatively low efflux level in non-growing season, furthermore, the negative effluxes were found in the (ANOVA) indicated that the difference between the annual average TER and SR did not reach the significance level of 0.05. The TER was under similar environmental controls as SR, in growing seasons of drought years, the variations of soil moisture at 0-10 cm and 10-20 cm depth could account for 79.1%-95.6% of the changes of the SR and TER, but in non-growing season, more than 75% of the variations of the SR and TER could be explained by the changes of the ground temperature of soil surface layers.

  15. Recuperative supercritical carbon dioxide cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonwane, Chandrashekhar; Sprouse, Kenneth M; Subbaraman, Ganesan; O' Connor, George M; Johnson, Gregory A

    2014-11-18

    A power plant includes a closed loop, supercritical carbon dioxide system (CLS-CO.sub.2 system). The CLS-CO.sub.2 system includes a turbine-generator and a high temperature recuperator (HTR) that is arranged to receive expanded carbon dioxide from the turbine-generator. The HTR includes a plurality of heat exchangers that define respective heat exchange areas. At least two of the heat exchangers have different heat exchange areas.

  16. Impact of Urbanization on Carbon Dioxide Emissions in China%我国城镇化对碳排放的影响研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢祖丹

    2011-01-01

    Accelerated urbanization and development of low-carbon economy are two important missions of the Chinese government at the moment. The paper explores the influence of urbanization on carbon dioxide emissions by utilizing the Three-Stage Least Square method. The results show that urbanization is generally beneficial to reducing carbon dioxide emissions, especially in the mid-western regions. However, in the eastern regions, urbanization dose not show any significant impact on carbon dioxide emissions in the sample period. Instead, a tendency of increased emissions is observed in the recent years. The above difference is attributed to different consumption patterns, economic structures, infrastructures and policies of the regions under study.%加快城镇化和发展低碳经济是摆在我国政府面前的两大重要任务.本文利用三阶段最小二乘法探讨了我国城镇化对碳排放的影响及其地区差异.研究显示:总体而言,城镇化发展将有利于我国实现碳减排,这在中西部地区尤为明显.此外,东部地区城镇化在样本期内对碳排放影响不明显,但近年来该地区城镇化加剧,碳排放的趋势却日渐清晰.这种差异与地区间不同的消费模式、经济结构、基础设施和区域发展政策有重要关联.

  17. Effects of carbon dioxide emission, kinetically-limited reactions, and diffusive transport on ammonia emission from manure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volatilization of ammonia (NH3) from animal manure causes significant loss of fixed N from livestock operations. Ammonia emission from manure is the culmination of biological, chemical, and physical processes, all of which are well-understood. In this work, we present a speciation and transport mode...

  18. Novel Dual-Functional Membrane for Controlling Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Fossil Fuel Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. Brinker; George Xomeritakis; C.-Y. Tsai; Ying-Bing Jiang

    2009-04-30

    CO{sub 2} captured from coal-fired power plants represents three-quarters of the total cost of an entire carbon sequestration process. Conventional amine absorption or cryogenic separation requires high capital investment and is very energy intensive. Our novel membrane process is energy efficient with great potential for economical CO{sub 2} capture. Three classes of microporous sol-gel derived silica-based membranes were developed for selective CO{sub 2} removal under simulated flue gas conditions (SFG), e.g. feed of 10% vol. CO{sub 22} in N{sub 2}, 1 atm total pressure, T = 50-60 C, RH>50%, SO2>10 ppm. A novel class of amine-functional microporous silica membranes was prepared using an amine-derivatized alkoxysilane precursor, exhibiting enhanced (>70) CO{sub 2}:N{sub 2} selectivity in the presence of H{sub 2}O vapor, but its CO{sub 2} permeance was lagging (<1 MPU). Pure siliceous membranes showed higher CO{sub 2} permeance (1.5-2 MPU) but subsequent densification occurred under prolonged SFG conditions. We incorporated NiO in the microporous network up to a loading of Ni:Si = 0.2 to retard densification and achieved CO2 permeance of 0.5 MPU and CO{sub 2}:N{sub 2} selectivity of 50 after 163 h exposure to SFG conditions. However, CO{sub 2} permeance should reach greater than 2.0 MPU in order to achieve the cost of electricity (COE) goal set by DOE. We introduced the atomic layer deposition (ALD), a molecular deposition technique that substantially reduces membrane thickness with intent to improve permeance and selectivity. The deposition technique also allows the incorporation of Ni or Ag cations by proper selection of metallorganic precursors. In addition, preliminary economic analysis provides a sensitivity study on the performance and cost of the proposed membranes for CO{sub 2} capture. Significant progress has been made toward the practical applications for CO{sub 2} capture. (1 MPU = 1.0 cm{sup 3}(STP){center_dot}cm-2{center_dot}min-1{center_dot}atm-1)

  19. The impact of an emerging port on the carbon dioxide emissions of inland container transport: An empirical study of Taipei port

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, C.-H., E-mail: chliao@mail.ncku.edu.t [Department of Transportation and Communication Management Science, National Cheng Kung University, No. 1 University Road, Tainan City 701, Taiwan (China); Tseng, P.-H., E-mail: tzeng_ypo@yahoo.com.t [Department of Transportation and Communication Management Science, National Cheng Kung University, No. 1 University Road, Tainan City 701, Taiwan (China); Cullinane, Kevin, E-mail: k.cullinane@napier.ac.u [Transport Research Institute (TRI), Edinburgh Napier University, Merchiston Campus, Edinburgh EH10 5DT (United Kingdom); School of Business, Economics and Law, University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Lu, C.-S., E-mail: lucs@mail.ncku.edu.t [Department of Transportation and Communication Management Science, National Cheng Kung University, No. 1 University Road, Tainan City 701, Taiwan (China)

    2010-09-15

    This study analyzes the changes in carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions resulting from the movement of containers from established ports through the emerging port of Taipei in Northern Taiwan. An activity-based emissions model is used to estimate the CO{sub 2} emissions of container transport under four scenarios where there are switches of market share from existing ports to the emerging port. The results show that there are greater reductions in CO{sub 2} when transhipment routes are changed from the ports of Kaohsiung, Taichung and Keelung to the emerging port of Taipei. The paper concludes that the analytical approach adopted in the paper can help decision-makers understand potential CO{sub 2} emissions reduction strategies in the route selection of inland container transportation and such consideration should provide a broader and more meaningful basis for the socio-economic evaluation of port investment projects.

  20. Carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuel consumption and cement manufacture, 1751-1991; and an estimate of their isotopic composition and latitudinal distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andres, R.J.; Marland, G.; Boden, T.; Bischof, S.

    1994-10-01

    This work briefly discusses four of the current research emphases at Oak Ridge National Laboratory regarding the emission of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from fossil fuel consumption, natural gas flaring and cement manufacture. These emphases include: (1) updating the 1950 to present time series of CO{sub 2} emissions from fossil fuel consumption and cement manufacture, (2) extending this time series back to 1751, (3) gridding the data at 1{sup 0} by 1{sup 0} resolution, and (4) estimating the isotopic signature of these emissions. In 1991, global emissions of CO{sub 2} from fossil fuel and cement increased 1.5% over 1990 levels to 6188 {times} 10{sup 6} metric tonnes C. The Kuwaiti oil fires can account for all of the increase. Recently published energy data (Etemad et al., 1991) allow extension of the CO emissions time series back to 1751. Preliminary examination shows good agreement with two other, but shorter, energy time series. A latitudinal distribution of carbon emissions is being completed. A southward shift in the major mass of CO{sub 2} emissions is occurring from European-North American latitudes towards central-southeast Asian latitudes, reflecting the growth of population and industrialization at these lower latitudes. The carbon isotopic signature of these emissions has been re-examined. The emissions of the last two decades are approximately 1{per_thousand} lighter than previously reported (Tans, 1981). This lightening of the emissions signature is due to fossil fuel gases and liquids, including a revision of their {delta}{sup 13}C isotopic signature and an increased production rate.

  1. Road Transport, Economic Growth and Carbon Dioxide Emissions in the BRIICS: Conditions For a Low Carbon Economic Development

    OpenAIRE

    Atte-Oudeyi, Barakatou; Kestemont, Bruno; De Meulemeester, Jean Luc

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we investigate the relationship between economic growth and CO2 emissions per capita due to road transport in order to test the validity of the Environmental Kuznets Curve (EKC) hypothesis. We test an EKC model on a sample of six emerging countries (Brazil, Russia, India, Indonesia, China and South Africa so-called BRIICS) using yearly data from 2000 to 2010. Empirical results reveal an inverted U-shaped EKC curve relating CO2 emissions per capita due to road transport to the...

  2. Implication of Land-Use and Land-Cover Change into Carbon Dioxide Emissions in Karang Gading and Langkat Timur Wildlife Reserve, North Sumatra, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Basyuni

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Mangrove forest in the context of climate change is important sector to be included in the inventory of greenhouse gas (GHG emissions. The present study describes land-use and land-cover change during 2006–2012 of a mangrove forest conservation area, Karang Gading and Langkat Timur Laut Wildlife Reserve (KGLTLWR in North Sumatra, Indonesia and their implications to carbon dioxide emissions. A land-use change matrix showed that the decrease of mangrove forest due to increases of other land-use such as aquaculture (50.00% and oil palm plantation (28.83%. Furthermore, the net cumulative of carbon emissions in KGLTLWR for 2006 was 3804.70 t CO2-eq year-1, whereas predicting future emissions in 2030 was 11,318.74 t CO2-eq year-1 or an increase of 33.61% for 12 years. Source of historical emissions mainly from changes of secondary mangrove forests into aquaculture and oil palm plantation were 3223.9 t CO2-eq year-1 (84.73% and 959.00 t CO2-eq year-1 (25.21%, respectively, indicating that the KGLTLWR is still a GHG emitter. Mitigation scenario with no conversion in secondary mangrove forest reduced 16.21% and 25.8% carbon emissions in 2024 and 2030, respectively. This study suggested that aquaculture and oil palm plantation are drivers of deforestation as well as the largest of GHG emission source in this area. Keywords: carbon emission, climate change, deforestation, forest degradation, mangrove conservation

  3. Understanding the Causality between Carbon Dioxide Emission, Fossil Energy Consumption and Economic Growth in Developed Countries: An Empirical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Xue

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Issues on climate change have been recognized as serious challenges for regional sustainable development both at a global and local level. Given the background that most of the artificial carbon emissions are resulted from the energy consumption sector and the energy is also the key element resource for economic development, this paper investigated the relationship between CO2 emission, fossil energy consumption, and economic growth in the period 1970–2008 of nine European countries, based on the approach of Granger Causality Test, followed by the risk analysis on impacts of CO2 reduction to local economic growth classified by the indicator of causality degree. The results show that there are various feedback causal relationships between carbon emission, energy consumption and economic growth, with both unidirectional and dual-directional Granger causality. The impact of reducing CO2 emission to economic growth varies between countries as well.

  4. 中国经济增长与二氧化碳排放关系实证研究%Economic Growth and Carbon Dioxide Emission in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吉丹俊

    2015-01-01

    Currently,many efforts have been put in the research on the relationship between economic growth and carbon dioxide emission.Based on the hypothesis formulated by Kuznets,many scholars put forward the Environmental Kuznets Curve (EKC)hypothesis.In this paper,we do fixed-effect and random-effect regressions on a panel data set of China’s 28 provinces from 1996 to 2010.We find that the relationship between carbon dioxide emission and GDP per capita is an inverted U-shaped curve,and that both energy consumption and FDI have a positive effect on carbon dioxide emission. Based on the above findings,we present policy advice on maintaining sustainable economic development.%当前环境经济学研究领域一个热点问题就是经济增长和环境污染之间的关系,借助于研究经济增长和收入不均衡关系的库伦兹曲线,学者们提出了环境库伦兹曲线假说。本文运用1996—2010年期间中国28个省份的数据进行固定效应和随机效应面板回归,结果发现二氧化碳排放和人均 GDP 之间呈倒“U”型曲线关系,能源消耗强度和外商直接投资与二氧化碳排放正相关,据此提出在确保我国经济稳定增长前提下的节能减排措施。

  5. 我国火电行业燃用不同煤质时CO 2排放量计算∗%The calculation of carbon dioxide emissions from different kinds of coal in thermal power industry of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    武世福; 苏铁熊; 张培华; 马理强

    2014-01-01

    通过对火电行业CO2排放源的梳理及煤质变化对 CO2的影响,由火电行业不同煤种推算出标准煤在不同煤种下得到的CO2排放值,阐述了燃煤电厂中 CO2排放量实际计算方法,提高了火电行业计算碳排放量的可靠性和准确度,有效解决了当前火电行业CO2排放量统计、计算的困难。%Based on carbon dioxide emission source of thermal power industry and the influ-ence of coal quality changing carbon dioxide,the carbon dioxide emissions have been calculated in different types coal in thermal power industry.The actual calculation of carbon dioxide emissions from coal fired power plants have been stated.The reliability and accuracy of carbon emissions calculation has been improved in thermal power industry,which solved the problems of statistics and calculation of carbon dioxide emissions.

  6. Winter emissions of carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide from a minerotrophic fen under nature conservation management in north-east Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Huth

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Drained peatlands are known to be important sources of carbon dioxide (CO2 and nitrous oxide (N2O. While CO2 emissions occur mainly during the growing season, large N2O emissions may occur during the non-growing season as well. Peatland re-wetting may be an effective measure to prevent those emissions. However, recent research shows that re-wetted peatlands may release large amounts of methane (CH4 during the years immediately after re-wetting whereas abandonment of intensive grassland on drained peat soils possibly leads to low nutrient supply and thus to small greenhouse gas (GHG emissions. Here we examine the role of extensification practices (such as abandonment of mineral fertilisation, reduced cutting frequency and a cattle-free winter period on GHG emissions from a temperate peatland during winter. From November 2009 to March 2010 GHG measurements were made on a minerotrophic fen five years after intensive grassland use was abandoned. During the measurement period CO2 and N2O emissions amounted to 4.4 t ha-1 and 2.6 t ha-1 CO2-equivalent, whilst CH4 emissions were negligible. Altogether the site emitted 7 t ha-1 CO2-equivalent, of which 37 % was N2O, even though the winter 2009/2010 was extraordinarily cold. Thus, extensification of grassland use alone may not be sufficient to reduce GHG emissions from temperate peatlands.

  7. Carbon Dioxide - Our Common "Enemy"

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, John T.; Macatangay, Ariel

    2009-01-01

    Health effects of brief and prolonged exposure to carbon dioxide continue to be a concern for those of us who manage this pollutant in closed volumes, such as in spacecraft and submarines. In both examples, considerable resources are required to scrub the atmosphere to levels that are considered totally safe for maintenance of crew health and performance. Defining safe levels is not a simple task because of many confounding factors, including: lack of a robust database on human exposures, suspected significant variations in individual susceptibility, variations in the endpoints used to assess potentially adverse effects, the added effects of stress, and the fluid shifts associated with micro-gravity (astronauts only). In 2007 the National Research Council proposed revised Continuous Exposure Guidelines (CEGLs) and Emergency Exposure Guidelines (EEGLs) to the U.S. Navy. Similarly, in 2008 the NASA Toxicology Group, in cooperation with another subcommittee of the National Research Council, revised Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations (SMACs). In addition, a 1000-day exposure limit was set for long-duration spaceflights to celestial bodies. Herein we examine the rationale for the levels proposed to the U.S. Navy and compare this rationale with the one used by NASA to set its limits. We include a critical review of previous studies on the effects of exposure to carbon dioxide and attempt to dissect out the challenges associated with setting fully-defensible limits. We also describe recent experiences with management of carbon dioxide aboard the International Space Station with 13 persons aboard. This includes the tandem operations of the Russian Vozduk and the U.S. Carbon Dioxide Removal System. A third removal system is present while the station is docked to the Shuttle spacecraft, so our experience includes the lithium hydroxide system aboard Shuttle for the removal of carbon dioxide. We discuss strategies for highly-efficient, regenerable removal of carbon

  8. Carbon Dioxide Absorption Heat Pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A carbon dioxide absorption heat pump cycle is disclosed using a high pressure stage and a super-critical cooling stage to provide a non-toxic system. Using carbon dioxide gas as the working fluid in the system, the present invention desorbs the CO2 from an absorbent and cools the gas in the super-critical state to deliver heat thereby. The cooled CO2 gas is then expanded thereby providing cooling and is returned to an absorber for further cycling. Strategic use of heat exchangers can increase the efficiency and performance of the system.

  9. Space–time dynamics of carbon and environmental parameters related to carbon dioxide emissions in the Buor-Khaya Bay and adjacent part of the Laptev Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. P. Semiletov

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to improve understanding of carbon cycling in the Buor-Khaya Bay (BKB and adjacent part of the Laptev Sea by studying the inter-annual, seasonal, and meso-scale variability of carbon and related hydrological and biogeochemical parameters in the water, as well as factors controlling carbon dioxide (CO2 emission. Here we present data sets obtained on summer cruises and winter expeditions during 12 yr of investigation. Based on data analysis, we suggest that in the heterotrophic BKB area, input of terrestrially borne organic carbon (OC varies seasonally and inter-annually and is largely determined by rates of coastal erosion and river discharge. Two different BKB sedimentation regimes were revealed: Type 1 (erosion accumulation and Type 2 (accumulation. A Type 1 sedimentation regime occurs more often and is believed to be the quantitatively most important mechanism for suspended particular matter (SPM and particulate organic carbon (POC delivery to the BKB. The mean SPM concentration observed in the BKB under a Type 1 regime was one order of magnitude greater than the mean concentration of SPM (~ 20 mg L−1 observed along the Lena River stream in summer 2003. Loadings of the BKB water column with particulate material vary by more than a factor of two between the two regimes. Higher partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2, higher concentrations of nutrients, and lower levels of oxygen saturation were observed in the bottom water near the eroded coasts, implying that coastal erosion and subsequent oxidation of eroded organic matter (OM rather than the Lena River serves as the predominant source of nutrients to the BKB. Atmospheric CO2 fluxes from the sea surface in the BKB vary from 1 to 95 mmol m−2 day−1 and are determined by specific features of hydrology and wind conditions, which change spatially, seasonally, and inter-annually. Mean values of CO2 emission from the shallow Laptev Sea were similar in September 1999 and 2005 (7.2 and 7

  10. Carbon dioxide emissions and the overshoot ratio change resulting from the implementation of 2nd Energy Master Plan in South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, M. J.; Kim, Y. P.

    2015-12-01

    The direction of the energy policies of the country is important in the projection of environmental impacts of the country. The greenhouse gases (GHGs) emission of the energy sector in South Korea is very huge, about 600 MtCO2e in 2011. Also the carbon footprint due to the energy consumption contributes to the ecological footprint is also large, more than 60%. Based on the official plans (the national greenhouse gases emission reduction target for 2030 (GHG target for 2030) and the 2nd Energy Master Plan (2nd EMP)), several scenarios were proposed and the sensitivity of the GHG emission amount and 'overshoot ratio' which is the ratio of ecological footprint to biocapacity were estimated. It was found that to meet the GHG target for 2030 the ratio of non-emission energy for power generation should be over 71% which would be very difficult. We also found that the overshoot ratio would increase from 5.9 in 2009 to 7.6 in 2035. Thus, additional efforts are required to reduce the environmental burdens in addition to optimize the power mix configuration. One example is the conversion efficiency in power generation. If the conversion efficiency in power generation rises up 50% from the current level, 40%, the energy demand and resultant carbon dioxide emissions would decrease about 10%. Also the influence on the environment through changes in consumption behavior, for example, the diet choice is expected to be meaningful.

  11. 全球气候变化与CO_2减排方案的探讨%On exploration for global climate changes and carbon dioxide emission-reducing scheme

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵洁

    2012-01-01

    The study points out the greenhouse gas mainly with carbon dioxide is the major driving factor for the global climate changes,explores the emission-reducing scheme of the carbon dioxide from the population,the Per Capita GDP,unit energy consumption and the energy carbon content,which play the role in the emission of the carbon dioxide,and considers the geological sequestration including the oil deposits,the gas layer and the deep aquifer can increase the carbon content,and indicates the reduction of the man-made carbon dioxide is the most potential way to reduce the emission of carbon dioxide.%指出以CO2为主的温室气体是全球气候变化的最主要的驱动因素,就影响CO2排放量的入口、人均GDP、单位耗能量和能源含碳量以及碳汇量等进行CO2减排方案的探讨,并认为油田、煤气层和深部含水层等地质处置方法能够有效增加CO2的碳汇量,降低CO2的人为排放量,是当前最有潜力的CO2减排途径。

  12. High capacity carbon dioxide sorbent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietz, Steven Dean; Alptekin, Gokhan; Jayaraman, Ambalavanan

    2015-09-01

    The present invention provides a sorbent for the removal of carbon dioxide from gas streams, comprising: a CO.sub.2 capacity of at least 9 weight percent when measured at 22.degree. C. and 1 atmosphere; an H.sub.2O capacity of at most 15 weight percent when measured at 25.degree. C. and 1 atmosphere; and an isosteric heat of adsorption of from 5 to 8.5 kilocalories per mole of CO.sub.2. The invention also provides a carbon sorbent in a powder, a granular or a pellet form for the removal of carbon dioxide from gas streams, comprising: a carbon content of at least 90 weight percent; a nitrogen content of at least 1 weight percent; an oxygen content of at most 3 weight percent; a BET surface area from 50 to 2600 m.sup.2/g; and a DFT micropore volume from 0.04 to 0.8 cc/g.

  13. Summary of the presentations at the international workshop on reducing carbon dioxide emissions from the developing world: Assessment of benefits, costs and barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ''International Workshop on Reducing Carbon Dioxide Emissions from the Developing World: Assessment of Benefits, Costs and Barriers'' was the second workshop held as part of a project being conducted by the International Energy Studies Group of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, in collaboration with experts from leading institutions across the developing world. The goal of the project is to analyze long-range energy consumption in developing countries and its potential contribution to global climate change. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is supporting this work, the results of which already have made a key contribution to the technical analysis being used as the basis for discussion by the Energy and Industry Sub-group of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). The main purpose of this workshop was two-fold: (1) to discuss the feasibility of implementing the efficiency improvements and fuel switching measures incorporated into the long-term energy scenarios created for 17 developing countries and (2) to examine the costs and benefits of reducing energy-related carbon dioxide emissions generated by developing countries

  14. Summary of the presentations at the international workshop on reducing carbon dioxide emissions from the developing world: Assessment of benefits, costs and barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sathaye, J.; Goldman, N. [eds.

    1991-06-01

    The ``International Workshop on Reducing Carbon Dioxide Emissions from the Developing World: Assessment of Benefits, Costs and Barriers`` was the second workshop held as part of a project being conducted by the International Energy Studies Group of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, in collaboration with experts from leading institutions across the developing world. The goal of the project is to analyze long-range energy consumption in developing countries and its potential contribution to global climate change. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is supporting this work, the results of which already have made a key contribution to the technical analysis being used as the basis for discussion by the Energy and Industry Sub-group of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). The main purpose of this workshop was two-fold: (1) to discuss the feasibility of implementing the efficiency improvements and fuel switching measures incorporated into the long-term energy scenarios created for 17 developing countries and (2) to examine the costs and benefits of reducing energy-related carbon dioxide emissions generated by developing countries.

  15. Summary of the presentations at the international workshop on reducing carbon dioxide emissions from the developing world: Assessment of benefits, costs and barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sathaye, J.; Goldman, N. (eds.)

    1991-06-01

    The International Workshop on Reducing Carbon Dioxide Emissions from the Developing World: Assessment of Benefits, Costs and Barriers'' was the second workshop held as part of a project being conducted by the International Energy Studies Group of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, in collaboration with experts from leading institutions across the developing world. The goal of the project is to analyze long-range energy consumption in developing countries and its potential contribution to global climate change. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is supporting this work, the results of which already have made a key contribution to the technical analysis being used as the basis for discussion by the Energy and Industry Sub-group of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). The main purpose of this workshop was two-fold: (1) to discuss the feasibility of implementing the efficiency improvements and fuel switching measures incorporated into the long-term energy scenarios created for 17 developing countries and (2) to examine the costs and benefits of reducing energy-related carbon dioxide emissions generated by developing countries.

  16. Modelling Sublimation of Carbon Dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkel, Brian

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author reports results in their efforts to model sublimation of carbon dioxide and the associated kinetics order and parameter estimation issues in their model. They have offered the reader two sets of data and several approaches to determine the rate of sublimation of a piece of solid dry ice. They presented several models…

  17. 21 CFR 582.1240 - Carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Carbon dioxide. 582.1240 Section 582.1240 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1240 Carbon dioxide. (a) Product. Carbon dioxide. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  18. Nuclear power and carbon dioxide free automobiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear energy has been developed as a major source of electric power in Canada. Electricity from nuclear energy already avoids the emission of about 100 million tonnes of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere in Canada. This is a significant fraction of the 619 million tonnes of Canadian greenhouse gas emissions in 1995. However, the current scope of application of electricity to end use energy needs in Canada limits the contribution nuclear energy can make to carbon dioxide emission reduction. Nuclear energy can also contribute to carbon dioxide emissions reduction through expansion of the use of electricity to less traditional applications. Transportation, in particular contributed 165 million tonnes of carbon dioxide to the Canadian atmosphere in 1995. Canada's fleet of personal vehicles consisted of 16.9 million cars and light trucks. These vehicles were driven on average 21,000 km/year and generated 91 million tonnes of greenhouse gases expressed as a C02 equivalent. Technology to improve the efficiency of cars is under development which is expected to increase the energy efficiency from the 1995 level of about 10 litres/100 km of gasoline to under 3 litres/100km expressed as an equivalent referenced to the energy content of gasoline. The development of this technology, which may ultimately lead to the practical implementation of hydrogen as a portable source of energy for transportation is reviewed. Fuel supply life cycle greenhouse gas releases for several personal vehicle energy supply systems are then estimated. Very substantial reductions of greenhouse gas emissions are possible due to efficiency improvements and changing to less carbon intensive fuels such as natural gas. C02 emissions from on board natural gas fueled versions of hybrid electric cars would be decreased to approximately 25 million t/year from the current 91 million tonnes/year. The ultimate reduction identified is through the use of hydrogen fuel produced via electricity from CANDU power

  19. Real-World Carbon Dioxide Impacts of Traffic Congestion

    OpenAIRE

    Barth, Matthew; Boriboonsomsin, Kanok

    2010-01-01

    Transportation plays a significant role in carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, accounting for approximately a third of the U.S. inventory. To reduce CO2 emissions in the future, transportation policy makers are planning on making vehicles more efficient and increasing the use of carbon-neutral alternative fuels. In addition, CO2 emissions can be lowered by improving traffic operations, specifically through the reduction of traffic congestion. Traffic congestion and its impact on CO2 emissions wer...

  20. Historical changes in carbon dioxide (CO2) and dimethyl sulphide (DMS) emissions in the eutrophied Southern North Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gypens, N.; Borges, A. V.; Lancelot, C.

    2012-04-01

    Anthropogenic activities after the Second World War have severely increased river nutrient [nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P)] loads to European coastal areas. The resulting N: P: Si imbalance (compared to phytoplankton requirements) stimulated in the Southern North Sea the growth of Phaeocystis colonies modifying the functioning of the ecosystem and, therefore, the carbon but also the biogenic sulphur cycles. Phaeocystis is a significant producer of DMSP (dimethylsulphide propionate), the precursor of DMS. When emitted to the atmosphere the DMS has a cooling effect on the climate contrarily to the CO2 greenhouse gas. Since the late 1990's specific nutrient reduction policies have however considerably reduced P loads while N is maintained. In this application we explore, with a mathematical tool, the effects of changing N and P loads on air-sea CO2 exchanges and DMS marine emissions. The chosen model is the MIRO-CO2-DMS, a complex biogeochemical model describing carbon, biogenic sulphur and nutrient cycles in the marine domain. Model simulations are performed for the contemporary period since 1950, using real forcing fields for sea surface temperature, wind speed and atmospheric CO2 and RIVERSTRAHLER model simulations for river carbon and nutrient loads. Results are discussing the importance of human activities and river inputs of carbon and nutrients on the eutrophication of coastal areas, their ability to absorb atmospheric CO2 and the importance of DMS emissions associated with phytoplankton blooms, especially Phaeocystis.

  1. CARBON DIOXIDE AS A FEEDSTOCK.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CREUTZ,C.; FUJITA,E.

    2000-12-09

    This report is an overview on the subject of carbon dioxide as a starting material for organic syntheses of potential commercial interest and the utilization of carbon dioxide as a substrate for fuel production. It draws extensively on literature sources, particularly on the report of a 1999 Workshop on the subject of catalysis in carbon dioxide utilization, but with emphasis on systems of most interest to us. Atmospheric carbon dioxide is an abundant (750 billion tons in atmosphere), but dilute source of carbon (only 0.036 % by volume), so technologies for utilization at the production source are crucial for both sequestration and utilization. Sequestration--such as pumping CO{sub 2} into sea or the earth--is beyond the scope of this report, except where it overlaps utilization, for example in converting CO{sub 2} to polymers. But sequestration dominates current thinking on short term solutions to global warming, as should be clear from reports from this and other workshops. The 3500 million tons estimated to be added to the atmosphere annually at present can be compared to the 110 million tons used to produce chemicals, chiefly urea (75 million tons), salicylic acid, cyclic carbonates and polycarbonates. Increased utilization of CO{sub 2} as a starting material is, however, highly desirable, because it is an inexpensive, non-toxic starting material. There are ongoing efforts to replace phosgene as a starting material. Creation of new materials and markets for them will increase this utilization, producing an increasingly positive, albeit small impact on global CO{sub 2} levels. The other uses of interest are utilization as a solvent and for fuel production and these will be discussed in turn.

  2. Temperature sensitivity of soil carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide emissions in mountain forest and meadow ecosystems in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junjun; Peng, Changhui; Zhu, Qiuan; Xue, Wei; Shen, Yan; Yang, Yanzheng; Shi, Guohua; Shi, Shengwei; Wang, Meng

    2016-10-01

    An incubation experiment was conducted at three temperature levels (8, 18 and 28 °C) to quantify the response of soil CO2 and N2O emissions to temperature in three ecosystems (pine forest, oak forest, and meadow) located in the Qinling Mountains of China, which are considered to be susceptible to disturbance and climate changes, especially global warming. The soil CO2 emission rates increased with temperature and decreased with soil depth; they were the highest in the oak forest (broadleaf forest) and were lower in the pine forest (coniferous forest) and the meadow ecosystem. However, there was no significant difference in the soil N2O emission rates among the three ecosystems. The temperature sensitivity of CO2 and N2O was higher in the forest than in the meadow ecosystem. The Q10 values (temperature sensitivity coefficient) for CO2 and N2O were 1.07-2.25 and 0.82-1.22, respectively, for the three ecosystems. There was also evidence that the CO2 and N2O emission rates were positively correlated. The soil characteristics exhibited different effects on CO2 and N2O emissions among different ecosystems at the three temperature levels. Moreover, the soil dissolved organic carbon (DOC), specific ultraviolet absorbance (SUVA) and nitrate (NO3-) were important factors for CO2 emissions, whereas the soil ammonium (NH4+) and pH were the major controllers of N2O emissions. Unexpectedly, our results indicated that CO2 emissions are more sensitive to increasing temperature than N2O, noting the different feedback of CO2 and N2O emissions to global warming in this region. The different responses of greenhouse gas emissions in different forest types and a meadow ecosystem suggest that it is critical to conduct a comprehensive investigation of the complex mountain forest and meadow ecosystem in the transitional climate zone under global warming. Our research results provide new insight and advanced understanding of the variations in major greenhouse gas emissions (CO2 and N2O

  3. Turning carbon dioxide into fuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Z; Xiao, T; Kuznetsov, V L; Edwards, P P

    2010-07-28

    Our present dependence on fossil fuels means that, as our demand for energy inevitably increases, so do emissions of greenhouse gases, most notably carbon dioxide (CO2). To avoid the obvious consequences on climate change, the concentration of such greenhouse gases in the atmosphere must be stabilized. But, as populations grow and economies develop, future demands now ensure that energy will be one of the defining issues of this century. This unique set of (coupled) challenges also means that science and engineering have a unique opportunity-and a burgeoning challenge-to apply their understanding to provide sustainable energy solutions. Integrated carbon capture and subsequent sequestration is generally advanced as the most promising option to tackle greenhouse gases in the short to medium term. Here, we provide a brief overview of an alternative mid- to long-term option, namely, the capture and conversion of CO2, to produce sustainable, synthetic hydrocarbon or carbonaceous fuels, most notably for transportation purposes. Basically, the approach centres on the concept of the large-scale re-use of CO2 released by human activity to produce synthetic fuels, and how this challenging approach could assume an important role in tackling the issue of global CO2 emissions. We highlight three possible strategies involving CO2 conversion by physico-chemical approaches: sustainable (or renewable) synthetic methanol, syngas production derived from flue gases from coal-, gas- or oil-fired electric power stations, and photochemical production of synthetic fuels. The use of CO2 to synthesize commodity chemicals is covered elsewhere (Arakawa et al. 2001 Chem. Rev. 101, 953-996); this review is focused on the possibilities for the conversion of CO2 to fuels. Although these three prototypical areas differ in their ultimate applications, the underpinning thermodynamic considerations centre on the conversion-and hence the utilization-of CO2. Here, we hope to illustrate that advances

  4. Changes in carbon dioxide emissions and LMDI-based impact factor decomposition:the Xinjiang Uygur autonomous region as a case

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li ZHANG; Jun LEI; Xuan ZHOU; XiaoLei ZHANG; Wen DONG; Yu YANG

    2014-01-01

    Studies on carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions at provincial level can provide a scientific basis for the op-timal use of energy and the formulation of CO2 reduction policies. We studied the variation of CO2 emissions of primary energy consumption and its influencing factors based on data in Xinjiang Uygur autonomous region from 1952 to 2008, which were calculated according to the 2006 IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inven-tories. Xinjiang’s CO2 emission process from 1952 to 2008 could be divided into five stages according to the growth rates of total amount of CO2 emissions and CO2 emission intensity. The impact factors were quantitatively analyzed using Logarithmic Mean Divisia Index (LMDI) method in each stage. Various factors, including government policies and technological progress related to the role of CO2 emissions, were comprehensively analyzed, and the internal relationships among various factors were clarified. The results show that the contribution rates of various impact factors are different in each stage. Overall, economic growth and energy consumption intensity were the main driving factors for CO2 emissions. Since the implementation of the birth control policy, the driving force of population growth on the increase in CO2 emissions has slowly weakened. The energy consumption intensity was further af-fected by the industrial structure and energy consumption intensity of primary, secondary and tertiary industries, with the energy consumption intensity of the secondary industries and the proportion of secondary industries being the most important factors affecting the energy consumption intensity. Governmental policies and technological progress were also important factors that affected CO2 emissions.

  5. A Global Outlook to the Carbon Dioxide Emissions in the World and Emission Factors of the Thermal Power Plants in Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    World primary energy demand increases with increases in population and economic development. Within the last 25 yr, the total energy consumption has almost doubled. For the purpose of meeting this demand, fossil energy sources are used and various pollutants are generated. CO2 is also one of these gases, which cannot be removed like other pollutants, and it causes greenhouse effect and climate change. Reducing the CO2 emission is very important because of the environmental concerns and regulations, especially the Kyoto Protocol. This paper reviews the estimated world carbon emissions, Turkey's situation in electrical energy production, emission amounts estimated until the year 2020 and emission factors for dust, SO2, NOx and CO2. The estimated results show that CO2 emissions from thermal power plants in Turkey will make about 0.66 % of the global CO2 emissions in 2020

  6. Transient Earth system responses to cumulative carbon dioxide emissions: linearities, uncertainties, and probabilities in an observation-constrained model ensemble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinacher, M.; Joos, F.

    2016-02-01

    Information on the relationship between cumulative fossil CO2 emissions and multiple climate targets is essential to design emission mitigation and climate adaptation strategies. In this study, the transient response of a climate or environmental variable per trillion tonnes of CO2 emissions, termed TRE, is quantified for a set of impact-relevant climate variables and from a large set of multi-forcing scenarios extended to year 2300 towards stabilization. An ˜ 1000-member ensemble of the Bern3D-LPJ carbon-climate model is applied and model outcomes are constrained by 26 physical and biogeochemical observational data sets in a Bayesian, Monte Carlo-type framework. Uncertainties in TRE estimates include both scenario uncertainty and model response uncertainty. Cumulative fossil emissions of 1000 Gt C result in a global mean surface air temperature change of 1.9 °C (68 % confidence interval (c.i.): 1.3 to 2.7 °C), a decrease in surface ocean pH of 0.19 (0.18 to 0.22), and a steric sea level rise of 20 cm (13 to 27 cm until 2300). Linearity between cumulative emissions and transient response is high for pH and reasonably high for surface air and sea surface temperatures, but less pronounced for changes in Atlantic meridional overturning, Southern Ocean and tropical surface water saturation with respect to biogenic structures of calcium carbonate, and carbon stocks in soils. The constrained model ensemble is also applied to determine the response to a pulse-like emission and in idealized CO2-only simulations. The transient climate response is constrained, primarily by long-term ocean heat observations, to 1.7 °C (68 % c.i.: 1.3 to 2.2 °C) and the equilibrium climate sensitivity to 2.9 °C (2.0 to 4.2 °C). This is consistent with results by CMIP5 models but inconsistent with recent studies that relied on short-term air temperature data affected by natural climate variability.

  7. Associations of health, physical activity and weight status with motorised travel and transport carbon dioxide emissions: a cross-sectional, observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goodman Anna

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Motorised travel and associated carbon dioxide (CO2 emissions generate substantial health costs; in the case of motorised travel, this may include contributing to rising obesity levels. Obesity has in turn been hypothesised to increase motorised travel and/or CO2 emissions, both because heavier people may use motorised travel more and because heavier people may choose larger and less fuel-efficient cars. These hypothesised associations have not been examined empirically, however, nor has previous research examined associations with other health characteristics. Our aim was therefore to examine how and why weight status, health, and physical activity are associated with transport CO2 emissions. Methods 3463 adults completed questionnaires in the baseline iConnect survey at three study sites in the UK, reporting their health, weight, height and past-week physical activity. Seven-day recall instruments were used to assess travel behaviour and, together with data on car characteristics, were used to estimate CO2 emissions. We used path analysis to examine the extent to which active travel, motorised travel and car engine size explained associations between health characteristics and CO2 emissions. Results CO2 emissions were higher in overweight or obese participants (multivariable standardized probit coefficients 0.16, 95% CI 0.08 to 0.25 for overweight vs. normal weight; 0.16, 95% CI 0.04 to 0.28 for obese vs. normal weight. Lower active travel and, particularly for obesity, larger car engine size explained 19-31% of this effect, but most of the effect was directly explained by greater distance travelled by motor vehicles. Walking for recreation and leisure-time physical activity were associated with higher motorised travel distance and therefore higher CO2 emissions, while active travel was associated with lower CO2 emissions. Poor health and illness were not independently associated with CO2 emissions. Conclusions Establishing

  8. Microporous metal-organic framework with potential for carbon dioxide capture at ambient conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.C. Xiang; Y. He; Z. Zhang; H. Wu; W. Zhou; R. Krishna; B. Chen

    2012-01-01

    Carbon dioxide capture and separation are important industrial processes that allow the use of carbon dioxide for the production of a range of chemical products and materials, and to minimize the effects of carbon dioxide emission. Porous metal-organic frameworks are promising materials to achieve s

  9. Method for carbon dioxide sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yifeng; Bryan, Charles R.; Dewers, Thomas; Heath, Jason E.

    2015-09-22

    A method for geo-sequestration of a carbon dioxide includes selection of a target water-laden geological formation with low-permeability interbeds, providing an injection well into the formation and injecting supercritical carbon dioxide (SC--CO.sub.2) into the injection well under conditions of temperature, pressure and density selected to cause the fluid to enter the formation and splinter and/or form immobilized ganglia within the formation. This process allows for the immobilization of the injected SC--CO.sub.2 for very long times. The dispersal of scCO2 into small ganglia is accomplished by alternating injection of SC--CO.sub.2 and water. The injection rate is required to be high enough to ensure the SC--CO.sub.2 at the advancing front to be broken into pieces and small enough for immobilization through viscous instability.

  10. Oxygen and carbon dioxide sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Fan (Inventor); Pearton, Stephen John (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) capable of performing as a CO.sub.2 or O.sub.2 sensor is disclosed, hi one implementation, a polymer solar cell can be connected to the HEMT for use in an infrared detection system. In a second implementation, a selective recognition layer can be provided on a gate region of the HEMT. For carbon dioxide sensing, the selective recognition layer can be, in one example, PEI/starch. For oxygen sensing, the selective recognition layer can be, in one example, indium zinc oxide (IZO). In one application, the HEMTs can be used for the detection of carbon dioxide and oxygen in exhaled breath or blood.

  11. Summer Ice and Carbon Dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukla, G.; Gavin, J.

    1981-10-01

    The extent of Antarctic pack ice in the summer, as charted from satellite imagery, decreased by 2.5 million square kilometers between 1973 and 1980. The U.S. Navy and Russian atlases and whaling and research ship reports from the 1930's indicate that summer ice conditions earlier in this century were heavier than the current average. Surface air temperatures along the seasonally shifting belt of melting snow between 55 degrees and 80 degrees N during spring and summer were higher in 1974 to 1978 than in 1934 to 1938. The observed departures in the two hemispheres qualitatively agree with the predicted impact of an increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide. However, since it is not known to what extent the changes in snow and ice cover and in temperature can be explained by the natural variability of the climate system or by other processes unrelated to carbon dioxide, a cause-and-effect relation cannot yet be established.

  12. Legislators Urge Carbon Emissions Cuts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Mohi

    2007-02-01

    Legislators from the world's largest carbon dioxide (CO2) emitting countries met on 14-15 February in Washington, D.C., to discuss the future of the global climate and strategies to mitigate temperature increases resulting from global warming. The world faces a ``double challenge-how to reduce damaging carbon emissions while still meeting the energy demand that the world's poor need to escape poverty,'' said World Bank President Paul Wolfowitz during a keynote talk.

  13. Emissions of ammonia, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen sulfide from swine wastewater during and after acidification treatment: effect of pH, mixing and aeration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dai, Xiao-Rong; Blanes-Vidal, Victoria

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed at evaluating the effect of swine slurry acidification and acidification-aeration treatments on ammonia (NH(3)), carbon dioxide (CO(2)) and hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) emissions during slurry treatment and subsequent undisturbed storage. The study was conducted in an experimental...... setup consisting of nine dynamic flux chambers. Three pH levels (pH = 6.0, pH = 5.8 and pH = 5.5), combined with short-term aeration and venting (with an inert gas) treatments were studied. Acidification reduced average NH(3) emissions from swine slurry stored after acidification treatment compared...... to emissions during storage of non-acidified slurry. The reduction were 50%, 62% and 77% when pH was reduce to 6.0, 5.8 and 5.5, respectively. However, it had no significant effect on average CO(2) and H(2)S emissions during storage of slurry after acidification. Aeration of the slurry for 30 min had no effect...

  14. 水泥工业CO2减排及利用技术进展%Technical Progress of Emission-reduction and Utilization of Carbon Dioxide in Cement Industry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马忠诚; 汪澜

    2011-01-01

    Emission-reduction exists potentially in cement industry, which is the key industry for carbon dioxide emission. Carbonate decomposition, fuel combustion and electric power consumption, etc. Which discharge carbon dioxide in cement industry, are introduced. A series of methods for decreasing carbon dioxide emission in cement industry, such as improving energy utilization, using alternative raw materials and fuels, developing new low carbone-mission binding materials, etc. Are expounded. Finally, several technologies for recycling of carbon dioxide, such as separation, capture, storage, fixation, etc. Are suggested.%水泥工业是CO2排放的重点行业,减排潜力巨大.全面介绍了水泥生产中碳酸盐分解、燃料燃烧和电力消耗等方面CO2的排放情况;详细阐述了水泥生产中通过提高能源利用率、使用替代原燃料、开发新型低碳排放的胶凝材料等措施实现CO2减排的方法,提出了对水泥工业CO2排放实施的分离、捕集、封存、固定等回收利用技术.

  15. Changes in the carbon dioxide emission from soils in the course of postagrogenic succession in the Chernozems forest-steppe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karelin, D. V.; Lyuri, D. I.; Goryachkin, S. V.; Lunin, V. N.; Kudikov, A. V.

    2015-11-01

    The CO2 emission from soils in the course of the long-term postagrogenic succession on Calcic Chernozems under meadow-steppe vegetation was studied. Seasonal dynamics of the emission at different stages of the restoration of natural vegetation and long-term changes in the main pools of carbon in the soils and phytomass were examined. These data were used to create a regression model of the CO2 emission on the basis of data on the soil water content and temperature with a temporal resolution of 3 h. The results were compared with an analogous study of the postagrogenic succession on sandy Agropodzols of southern taiga. It was found that the long-term pattern of the CO2 emission has a bimodal character. The first maximum corresponds to the early stages of the succession (2-8 years) and is ensured by a sharp intensification of respiration in the organomineral soil horizons under the impact of plant species typical of these stages, active growth of their underground parts, and, probably, activation of microbiota in the rhizosphere. The second maximum of the emission is observed at the final stages of the succession and is mainly ensured by the increasing pool of steppe litter. A decrease in the soil temperature because of the thermal insulation of the soil surface by the accumulating litter and organic substances in the topsoil horizons leads to a temporary decrease in the emission intensity at the middle stages of the succession, when the litter pool is still not vary large. The restoration of the initial level of the CO2 emission typical of the natural cenoses is achieved in about 80-100 years after the abandoning of the cultivated fields, i.e., considerably faster than that in the southern taiga zone (150-170 years). The results of modeling suggest that this is caused by the considerable accumulation of steppe litter, organic substances, and phytomass in the topsoil horizons rather than by the somewhat increased heat supply owing to longer duration of vegetation

  16. Potential for reducing paper mill energy use and carbon dioxide emissions through plant-wide energy audits: A case study in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► We audited a paper mill in China to reduce its energy use and CO2 emissions. ► The energy use and CO2 emissions of the mill and each paper machine are presented. ► The energy saving potential for the paper machine is estimated at 8–37%. ► The energy saving potential is 967.8 TJ, equal to 14.4% of the mill’s energy use. ► The CO2 reduction potential is 93,453 tonnes CO2 for the studied paper mill. -- Abstract: The pulp and paper industry is one of the most energy-intensive industries worldwide. In 2007, it accounted for 5% of total global industrial energy consumption and 2% of direct industrial carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. An energy audit is a primary step toward improving energy efficiency at the facility level. This paper describes a plant-wide energy audit aimed at identifying energy conservation and CO2 mitigation opportunities at a paper mill in Guangdong province, China. We describe the energy audit methods, relevant Chinese standards, methods of calculating energy and carbon indicators, baseline energy consumption and CO2 emissions of the audited paper mill, and nine energy-efficiency improvement opportunities identified by the audit. For each of the nine options, we evaluate the energy conservation and associated CO2 mitigation potential. The total technical energy conservation potential for these nine opportunities is 967.8 terajoules (TJ), and the total CO2 mitigation potential is equal to 93,453 tonnes CO2 annually, representing 14.4% and 14.7%, respectively, of the mill’s total energy consumption and CO2 emissions during the audit period.

  17. Effects of ozone exposure on `Golden' papaya fruit by photoacoustic phase-resolved method: Physiological changes associated with carbon dioxide and ethylene emission rates during ripening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrêa, Savio Figueira; Mota, Leonardo; Paiva, Luisa Brito; Couto, Flávio Mota do; Silva, Marcelo Gomes da; Oliveira, Jurandi Gonçalves de; Sthel, Marcelo Silva; Vargas, Helion; Miklós, András

    2011-06-01

    This work addresses the effects of ozone activity on the physiology of `Golden' papaya fruit. Depth profile analysis of double-layer biological samples was accomplished using the phase-resolved photoacoustic spectroscopy. The feasibility of the method was demonstrated by singling out the spectra of the cuticle and the pigment layers of papaya fruit. The same approach was used to monitor changes occurring on the fruit during ripening when exposed to ozone. In addition, one has performed real time studies of fluorescence parameters and the emission rates of carbon dioxide and ethylene. Finally, the amount of pigments and the changes in waxy cuticle have been monitored. Results indicate that a fruit deliberately subjected to ozone at a level of 6 ppmv underwent ripening sooner (at least 24-48 h) than a fruit stored at ambient conditions. Moreover, ozone caused a reduction in the maximum quantum yield of photosynthetic apparatus located within the skin of papaya fruit.

  18. Effects of ozone exposure on 'Golden' papaya fruit by photoacoustic phase-resolved method: Physiological changes associated with carbon dioxide and ethylene emission rates during ripening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work addresses the effects of ozone activity on the physiology of 'Golden' papaya fruit. Depth profile analysis of double-layer biological samples was accomplished using the phase-resolved photoacoustic spectroscopy. The feasibility of the method was demonstrated by singling out the spectra of the cuticle and the pigment layers of papaya fruit. The same approach was used to monitor changes occurring on the fruit during ripening when exposed to ozone. In addition, one has performed real time studies of fluorescence parameters and the emission rates of carbon dioxide and ethylene. Finally, the amount of pigments and the changes in waxy cuticle have been monitored. Results indicate that a fruit deliberately subjected to ozone at a level of 6 ppmv underwent ripening sooner (at least 24-48 h) than a fruit stored at ambient conditions. Moreover, ozone caused a reduction in the maximum quantum yield of photosynthetic apparatus located within the skin of papaya fruit.

  19. Carbon Dioxide Removal via Passive Thermal Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Michael; Hanford, Anthony; Conger, Bruce; Anderson, Molly

    2011-01-01

    A paper describes a regenerable approach to separate carbon dioxide from other cabin gases by means of cooling until the carbon dioxide forms carbon dioxide ice on the walls of the physical device. Currently, NASA space vehicles remove carbon dioxide by reaction with lithium hydroxide (LiOH) or by adsorption to an amine, a zeolite, or other sorbent. Use of lithium hydroxide, though reliable and well-understood, requires significant mass for all but the shortest missions in the form of lithium hydroxide pellets, because the reaction of carbon dioxide with lithium hydroxide is essentially irreversible. This approach is regenerable, uses less power than other historical approaches, and it is almost entirely passive, so it is more economical to operate and potentially maintenance- free for long-duration missions. In carbon dioxide removal mode, this approach passes a bone-dry stream of crew cabin atmospheric gas through a metal channel in thermal contact with a radiator. The radiator is pointed to reject thermal loads only to space. Within the channel, the working stream is cooled to the sublimation temperature of carbon dioxide at the prevailing cabin pressure, leading to formation of carbon dioxide ice on the channel walls. After a prescribed time or accumulation of carbon dioxide ice, for regeneration of the device, the channel is closed off from the crew cabin and the carbon dioxide ice is sublimed and either vented to the environment or accumulated for recovery of oxygen in a fully regenerative life support system.

  20. Estimation of the efficiency of hydrocarbon mineralization in soil by measuring CO2-emission and variations in the isotope composition of carbon dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubrovskaya, Ekaterina; Turkovskaya, Olga

    2010-05-01

    Estimation of the efficiency of hydrocarbon mineralization in soil by measuring CO2-emission and variations in the isotope composition of carbon dioxide E. Dubrovskaya1, O. Turkovskaya1, A. Tiunov2, N. Pozdnyakova1, A. Muratova1 1 - Institute of Biochemistry and Physiology of Plants and Microorganisms, RAS, Saratov, 2 - A.N. Severtsov Institute of Ecology and Evolution, RAS, Moscow, Russian Federation Hydrocarbon mineralization in soil undergoing phytoremediation was investigated in a laboratory experiment by estimating the variation in the 13С/12С ratio in the respired СО2. Hexadecane (HD) was used as a model hydrocarbon pollutant. The polluted soil was planted with winter rye (Secale cereale) inoculated with Azospirillum brasilense strain SR80, which combines the abilities to promote plant growth and to degrade oil hydrocarbon. Each vegetated treatment was accompanied with a corresponding nonvegetated one, and uncontaminated treatments were used as controls. Emission of carbon dioxide, its isotopic composition, and the residual concentration of HD in the soil were examined after two and four weeks. At the beginning of the experiment, the CO2-emission level was higher in the uncontaminated than in the contaminated soil. After two weeks, the quantity of emitted carbon dioxide decreased by about three times and did not change significantly in all uncontaminated treatments. The presence of HD in the soil initially increased CO2 emission, but later the respiration was reduced. During the first two weeks, nonvegetated soil had the highest CO2-emission level. Subsequently, the maximum increase in respiration was recorded in the vegetated contaminated treatments. The isotope composition of plant material determines the isotope composition of soil. The soil used in our experiment had an isotopic signature typical of soils formed by C3 plants (δ13C,-22.4‰). Generally, there was no significant fractionation of the carbon isotopes of the substrates metabolized by the

  1. The carbon dioxide capture and geological storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This road-map proposes by the Group Total aims to inform the public on the carbon dioxide capture and geological storage. One possible means of climate change mitigation consists of storing the CO2 generated by the greenhouse gases emission in order to stabilize atmospheric concentrations. This sheet presents the CO2 capture from lage fossil-fueled combustion installations, the three capture techniques and the CO2 transport options, the geological storage of the CO2 and Total commitments in the domain. (A.L.B.)

  2. VEGETATION SYNTAXONOMY AND LAND MANAGEMENT EFFECT ON METHANE AND CARBON DIOXIDE EMISSIONS FROM WETLANDS: A CASE STUDY FROM TIDAL SALT AND BRACKISH MARSH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annisa Satyanti

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Carbon dioxide (CO2 and methane (CH4 emission from wetlands significantly contribute to climate change and global warming. The interaction between among vegetation type, various environmental factors, and management regimes such as grazing and mowing is considered important in the calculation of CO2 and CH4 gas flux for an ecosystem. In this study, vegetation composition, CH4 and CO2 flux, soil characteristics, air temperature and humidity from the brackish marsh and salt marsh wetland ecosystems on Terschelling Island in Northern Holland were measured. We aimed to investigate the relationship between vegetation composition, grazing, and mowing on CH4 and CO2 emission. The abundance and number of plant species were higher in brackish than in salt marsh. Grazing was found to influence species richness, 39 species being found in a grazed site of brackish marsh compared to 31 species in a similar ungrazed site. CO2 fluxes in salt and brackish marsh were found to be similar while CH4 flux in the salt marsh was found to be lower than in the brackish marsh. Within the brackish marsh, a higher methane emission was recorded in the grazed zone. However the overall effect of grazing and mowing was found to be negligible for CH4 flux but is suggested to clearly reduce CO2 flux in both the salt and brackish marsh.

  3. Evaluation of CCHP systems performance based on operational cost, primary energy consumption, and carbon dioxide emission by utilizing an optimal operation scheme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Heejin; Mago, Pedro J.; Luck, Rogelio; Chamra, Louay M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Mississippi State University, 210 Carpenter Engineering Building, P.O. Box ME, Mississippi State, MS 39762-5925 (United States)

    2009-12-15

    Optimization of combined cooling, heating, and power (CCHP) systems operation commonly focuses only on energy cost. Different algorithms have been developed to attain optimal utilization of CCHP units by minimizing the energy cost in CCHP systems operation. However, other outcomes resulting from CCHP operation such as primary energy consumption and emission of pollutants should also be considered during CCHP systems evaluation as one would expect these outcomes can be subject to regulation. This paper presents an optimization of the operation of CCHP systems for different climate conditions based on operational cost, primary energy consumption (PEC), and carbon dioxide emissions (CDE) using an optimal energy dispatch algorithm. The results for the selected cities demonstrate that in general there is not a common trend among the three optimization modes presented in this paper since optimizing one parameter may reduce or increase the other two parameters. The only cities that show reduction of PEC while also reducing the CDE are Columbus, MS; Minneapolis, MN; and Miami, FL. For these cities the operational cost always increases when compared to the reference case consisting of using a vapor/compression cycle for cooling and natural gas for heating. On the other hand, for San Francisco and Boston, CCHP systems increase the CDE. In general, if CCHP systems increase the cost of operation, as long as energy savings and reduction of emissions are guaranteed, the implementation of these systems should be considered. (author)

  4. Solubility of Carbon Dioxide in Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Pat; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Describes an activity measuring the amount of dissolved carbon dioxide in carbonated water at different temperatures. The amount of carbon dioxide is measured by the amount of dilute ammonia solution needed to produce a pH indicator color change. (PR)

  5. Transformation and utilization of carbon dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhanage, Bhalchandra M. [Institute of Chemical Technology, Mumbai (India). Dept. of Chemistry; Arai, Masahiko (ed.) [Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan). Division of Chemical Process Engineering

    2014-04-01

    This book shows the various organic, polymeric and inorganic compounds which result from the transformation of carbon dioxide through chemical, photocatalytic, electrochemical, inorganic and biological processes. The book consists of twelve chapters demonstrating interesting examples of these reactions, depending on the types of reaction and catalyst. It also includes two chapters dealing with the utilization of carbon dioxide as a reaction promoter and presents a wide range of examples of chemistry and chemical engineering with carbon dioxide.

  6. Effect of irrigation, nitrogen application, and a nitrification inhibitor on nitrous oxide, carbon dioxide and methane emissions from an olive (Olea europaea L.) orchard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maris, S C; Teira-Esmatges, M R; Arbonés, A; Rufat, J

    2015-12-15

    Drip irrigation combined with nitrogen (N) fertigation is applied in order to save water and improve nutrient efficiency. Nitrification inhibitors reduce greenhouse gas emissions. A field study was conducted to compare the emissions of nitrous oxide (N2O), carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) associated with the application of N fertiliser through fertigation (0 and 50kgNha(-1)), and 50kgNha(-1)+nitrification inhibitor in a high tree density Arbequina olive orchard. Spanish Arbequina is the most suited variety for super intensive olive groves. This system allows reducing production costs and increases crop yield. Moreover its oil has excellent sensorial features. Subsurface drip irrigation markedly reduced N2O and N2O+N2 emissions compared with surface drip irrigation. Fertiliser application significantly increased N2O+N2, but not N2O emissions. Denitrification was the main source of N2O. The N2O losses (calculated as emission factor) ranging from -0.03 to 0.14% of the N applied, were lower than the IPCC (2007) values. The N2O+N2 losses were the largest, equivalent to 1.80% of the N applied, from the 50kgNha(-1)+drip irrigation treatment which resulted in water filled pore space >60% most of the time (high moisture). Nitrogen fertilisation significantly reduced CO2 emissions in 2011, but only for the subsurface drip irrigation strategies in 2012. The olive orchard acted as a net CH4 sink for all the treatments. Applying a nitrification inhibitor (DMPP), the cumulative N2O and N2O+N2 emissions were significantly reduced with respect to the control. The DMPP also inhibited CO2 emissions and significantly increased CH4 oxidation. Considering global warming potential, greenhouse gas intensity, cumulative N2O emissions and oil production, it can be concluded that applying DMPP with 50kgNha(-1)+drip irrigation treatment was the best option combining productivity with keeping greenhouse gas emissions under control.

  7. Effect of irrigation, nitrogen application, and a nitrification inhibitor on nitrous oxide, carbon dioxide and methane emissions from an olive (Olea europaea L.) orchard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maris, S C; Teira-Esmatges, M R; Arbonés, A; Rufat, J

    2015-12-15

    Drip irrigation combined with nitrogen (N) fertigation is applied in order to save water and improve nutrient efficiency. Nitrification inhibitors reduce greenhouse gas emissions. A field study was conducted to compare the emissions of nitrous oxide (N2O), carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) associated with the application of N fertiliser through fertigation (0 and 50kgNha(-1)), and 50kgNha(-1)+nitrification inhibitor in a high tree density Arbequina olive orchard. Spanish Arbequina is the most suited variety for super intensive olive groves. This system allows reducing production costs and increases crop yield. Moreover its oil has excellent sensorial features. Subsurface drip irrigation markedly reduced N2O and N2O+N2 emissions compared with surface drip irrigation. Fertiliser application significantly increased N2O+N2, but not N2O emissions. Denitrification was the main source of N2O. The N2O losses (calculated as emission factor) ranging from -0.03 to 0.14% of the N applied, were lower than the IPCC (2007) values. The N2O+N2 losses were the largest, equivalent to 1.80% of the N applied, from the 50kgNha(-1)+drip irrigation treatment which resulted in water filled pore space >60% most of the time (high moisture). Nitrogen fertilisation significantly reduced CO2 emissions in 2011, but only for the subsurface drip irrigation strategies in 2012. The olive orchard acted as a net CH4 sink for all the treatments. Applying a nitrification inhibitor (DMPP), the cumulative N2O and N2O+N2 emissions were significantly reduced with respect to the control. The DMPP also inhibited CO2 emissions and significantly increased CH4 oxidation. Considering global warming potential, greenhouse gas intensity, cumulative N2O emissions and oil production, it can be concluded that applying DMPP with 50kgNha(-1)+drip irrigation treatment was the best option combining productivity with keeping greenhouse gas emissions under control. PMID:26367066

  8. Volcanic versus anthropogenic carbon dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlach, T.

    2011-01-01

    Which emits more carbon dioxide (CO2): Earth's volcanoes or human activities? Research findings indicate unequivocally that the answer to this frequently asked question is human activities. However, most people, including some Earth scientists working in fields outside volcanology, are surprised by this answer. The climate change debate has revived and reinforced the belief, widespread among climate skeptics, that volcanoes emit more CO2 than human activities [Gerlach, 2010; Plimer, 2009]. In fact, present-day volcanoes emit relatively modest amounts of CO2, about as much annually as states like Florida, Michigan, and Ohio.

  9. Fluxes of methane, carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide in boreal lakes and potential anthropogenic effects on the aquatic greenhouse gas emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have examined how some major catchment disturbances may affect the aquatic greenhouse gas fluxes in the boreal zone, using gas flux data from studies made in 1994-1999 in the pelagic regions of seven lakes and two reservoirs in Finland. The highest pelagic seasonal average methane (CH4) emissions were up to 12 mmol m-2 d-1 from eutrophied lakes with agricultural catchments. Nutrient loading increases autochthonous primary production in lakes, promoting oxygen consumption and anaerobic decomposition in the sediments and this can lead to increased CH4 release from lakes to the atmosphere. The carbon dioxide (CO2) fluxes were higher from reservoirs and lakes whose catchment areas were rich in peatlands or managed forests, and from eutrophied lakes in comparison to oligotrophic and mesotrophic sites. However, all these sites were net sources of CO2 to the atmosphere. The pelagic CH4 emissions were generally lower than those from the littoral zone. The fluxes of nitrous oxide (N2O) were negligible in the pelagic regions, apparently due to low nitrate inputs and/or low nitrification activity. However, the littoral zone, acting as a buffer for leached nitrogen, did release N2O. Anthropogenic disturbances of boreal lakes, such as increasing eutrophication, can change the aquatic greenhouse gas balance, but also the gas exchange in the littoral zone should be included in any assessment of the overall effect. It seems that autochthonous and allochthonous carbon sources, which contribute to the CH4 and CO2 production in lakes, also have importance in the greenhouse gas emissions from reservoirs. (Author)

  10. Ocean uptake of carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Factors controlling the capacity of the ocean for taking up anthropogenic C02 include carbon chemistry, distribution of alkalinity, pCO2 and total concentration of dissolved C02, sea-air pCO2 difference, gas exchange rate across the sea-air interface, biological carbon pump, ocean water circulation and mixing, and dissolution of carbonate in deep sea sediments. A general review of these processes is given and models of ocean-atmosphere system based on our understanding of these regulating processes axe used to estimate the magnitude of C02 uptake by the ocean. We conclude that the ocean can absorb up to 35% of the fossil fuel emission. Direct measurements show that 55% Of C02 from fossil fuel burning remains in the atmosphere. The remaining 10% is not accounted for by atmospheric increases and ocean uptake. In addition, it is estimated that an amount equivalent to 30% of recent annual fossil fuel emissions is released into the atmosphere as a result of deforestation and farming. To balance global carbon budget, a sizable carbon sink besides the ocean is needed. Storage of carbon in terrestrial biosphere as a result of C02 fertilization is a potential candidate for such missing carbon sinks

  11. Carbon dioxide direct cycle modular reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, as the micro gas-turbine power generation is clean for environment and has high convenience, it is focused as a small size dispersion electric source for super markets, hospitals, factories, and so on. And, a modular high temperature gas reactor (PBMR) adopting the gas turbine is also focused recently, and is progressed on its construction in South Africa and reported on construction plan of the Exelon Inc. in U.S.A. PBMR has specific safety for a small size and pebble-bed reactor and also has some characters on low construction cost similar to that of LWR due to simplification and small size module adoption of its plant. The PBMR uses helium for its coolants, of which exit temperature is set for at 900degC to get higher thermal efficiency. This is because of its adoption of Brayton cycle to fast reduce the efficiency with falling temperature. However, as helium is a costly and easy-emission vapor, it is desired to alternate to cheaper and more difficult-emission vapor. Here were introduced on carbon dioxide (CO2) direct cycle using carbon dioxide with extremely higher thermal efficiency than helium and its applicability to nuclear reactors. (G.K.)

  12. Sulfur Dioxide Emission Control, Blockade and Drainage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents the present status of sulfur dioxide emission from thermal plants in China, tells the main problems existing in its emission control and finally gives out suggestions to the problems, that is, to constitute complete standards and regulations and enhancesupervision accordingly.

  13. The coupling of glycolysis and the Rubisco-based pathway through the non-oxidative pentose phosphate pathway to achieve low carbon dioxide emission fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ya-Han; Ou-Yang, Fan-Yu; Yang, Cheng-Han; Li, Si-Yu

    2015-01-01

    In this study, Rubisco-based engineered Escherichia coli, containing two heterologous enzymes of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) and phosphoribulokinase (PrkA), has been shown to be capable of the in situ recycling of carbon dioxide (CO2) during glycolysis. Two alternative approaches have been proposed to further enhance the carbon flow from glycolysis to a Rubisco-based pathway through the non-oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (NOPPP). The first is achieved by elevating the expression of transketolase I (TktA) and the second by blocking the native oxidation-decarboxylation reaction of E. coli by deleting the zwf gene from the chromosome (designated as JB/pTA and MZB, respectively). Decreases in the CO2 yield and the CO2 evolution per unit mole of ethanol production by at least 81% and 40% are observed. It is demonstrated in this study that the production of one mole of ethanol using E. coli strain MZB, the upper limit of CO2 emission is 0.052mol.

  14. Robust optical carbon dioxide isotope analyzer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Isotopic analysis of carbon dioxide is an important tool for characterization of the exchange and transformation of carbon between the biosphere and the atmosphere....

  15. It is time to put carbon dioxide to work

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipinsky, E.S. [Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States)

    1993-12-31

    The need to control emissions of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere is the subject of vigorous debate at this time. There is growing evidence that rising levels of carbon dioxide increase global warming, with perhaps highly adverse impacts for the human economy. There are calls for carbon taxes and other harsh measures. Japan has established a national goal of holding carbon dioxide emissions in the year 2000 to 1990 levels. I hope that this conference will be a turning point in the United States position on this issue. The current major end uses for CO{sub 2} include refrigeration, beverage carbonation, soda ash production, fire fighting, and urea fertilizer production. They are all based on chemistry that would not surprise a good chemist of the 19th century. Consumption of carbon dioxide in synthesis of industrial chemicals is limited. Usually one explains low production of chemicals from a candidate feedstock in terms of poor availability, price, purity, or reactivity. We can eliminate the first three as the causes of the underutilization of carbon dioxide.

  16. The role of renewable bioenergy in carbon dioxide sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinoshita, C.M. [Hawaii Natural Energy Inst., Honolulu, HI (United States)

    1993-12-31

    The use of renewable resources represents a sound approach to producing clean energy and reducing the dependence on diminishing reserves of fossil fuels. Unfortunately, the widespread interest in renewable energy in the 1970s, spurred by escalating fossil fuel prices, subsided with the collapse of energy prices in the mid 1980s. Today, it is largely to reverse alarming environmental trends, particularly the buildup of atmospheric carbon dioxide, rather than to reduce the cost of energy, that renewable energy resources are being pursued. This discussion focuses on a specific class of renewable energy resources - biomass. Unlike most other classes of renewable energy touted for controlling atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations, e.g., hydro, direct solar, wind, geothermal, and ocean thermal, which produce usable forms of energy while generating little or no carbon dioxide emissions, bioenergy almost always involves combustion and therefore generates carbon dioxide; however, if used on a sustained basis, bio-energy would not contribute to the build-up of atmospheric carbon dioxide because the amount released in combustion would be balanced by that taken up via photosynthesis. It is in that context, i.e., sustained production of biomass as a modern energy carrier, rather than reforestation for carbon sequestration, that biomass is being discussed here, since biomass can play a much greater role in controlling global warming by displacing fossil fuels than by being used strictly for carbon sequestration (partly because energy crop production can reduce fossil carbon dioxide emissions indefinitely, whereas under the reforestation strategy, carbon dioxide abatement ceases at forest maturity).

  17. Anthropogenic sulfur dioxide emissions: 1850–2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. J. Smith

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Sulfur aerosols impact human health, ecosystems, agriculture, and global and regional climate. A new annual estimate of anthropogenic global and regional sulfur dioxide emissions has been constructed spanning the period 1850–2005 using a bottom-up mass balance method, calibrated to country-level inventory data. Global emissions peaked in the early 1970s and decreased until 2000, with an increase in recent years due to increased emissions in China, international shipping, and developing countries in general. An uncertainty analysis was conducted including both random and systemic uncertainties. The overall global uncertainty in sulfur dioxide emissions is relatively small, but regional uncertainties ranged up to 30%. The largest contributors to uncertainty at present are emissions from China and international shipping. Emissions were distributed on a 0.5° grid by sector for use in coordinated climate model experiments.

  18. Calculation of Carbon Dioxide Emissions Considering Secondary Energy Deployment Among Provinces in China%基于二次能源省际调配的中国分省CO2排放量计算

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周曙东; 赵明正; 王传星; 李斌

    2012-01-01

    Scientific and rational calculation of carbon dioxide emissions provides the base is for setting energy saving and emission reduction targets. The existing IPCC's method to calculate carbon dioxide emissions only considered primary energy fuels, but did not consider the secondary energy deployment, which did not reflect the true situation of carbon dioxide emissions and Chinese situation. This study provided a new method to calculate carbon dioxide emissions considering secondary energy deployment, and according to this method, carbon dioxide emissions of every province were estimated based on the statistic data in 2009. The results showed that carbon dioxide emissions in traditional energy production provinces, such as Inner Mongolia and Shanxi, decreased, and those in eastern coastal provinces increased after considering the secondary energy deployment. But the CO; emission intensity in the central and western provinces were significantly higher than those in the eastern coastal provinces. Low energy efficiency, backward energy processing technology and equipment existed in the central and western provinces, which resulted in high intensity of carbon dioxide emissions. Recommendation was made to the central government to enhance investment in energy processing industry in the western provinces to improve energy processing technology, processing equipment to increase energy efficiency and to reduce carbon dioxide emissions. The secondary energy-transferred-inprovinces should provide compensation funds to secondary energy-transferred-out-provinces , and this part of the compensation funds should be used to upgrade energy industry for traditional energy production provinces in order to achieve emissions-reduction targets successfully.%节能减排目标任务的制定需要依据科学合理的CO2排放量测算.现有的IPCC提供的CO2排放量计算方法仅考虑一次能源燃料所产生的CO2,来考虑到二次能源省际调配的情况

  19. Encapsulated liquid sorbents for carbon dioxide capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vericella, John J; Baker, Sarah E; Stolaroff, Joshuah K; Duoss, Eric B; Hardin, James O; Lewicki, James; Glogowski, Elizabeth; Floyd, William C; Valdez, Carlos A; Smith, William L; Satcher, Joe H; Bourcier, William L; Spadaccini, Christopher M; Lewis, Jennifer A; Aines, Roger D

    2015-02-05

    Drawbacks of current carbon dioxide capture methods include corrosivity, evaporative losses and fouling. Separating the capture solvent from infrastructure and effluent gases via microencapsulation provides possible solutions to these issues. Here we report carbon capture materials that may enable low-cost and energy-efficient capture of carbon dioxide from flue gas. Polymer microcapsules composed of liquid carbonate cores and highly permeable silicone shells are produced by microfluidic assembly. This motif couples the capacity and selectivity of liquid sorbents with high surface area to facilitate rapid and controlled carbon dioxide uptake and release over repeated cycles. While mass transport across the capsule shell is slightly lower relative to neat liquid sorbents, the surface area enhancement gained via encapsulation provides an order-of-magnitude increase in carbon dioxide absorption rates for a given sorbent mass. The microcapsules are stable under typical industrial operating conditions and may be used in supported packing and fluidized beds for large-scale carbon capture.

  20. 大型钢铁企业典型工序碳排放系数的确定方法探讨%Determination of carbon dioxide emission factors in typical processes for large iron-steel companies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张肖; 吴高明; 吴声浩; 向晓东

    2012-01-01

    In order to accurately establish the carbon dioxide emission factors in iron and steel company, the carbon dioxide emissions of the processes are calculated according to the carbon balance method and then the carbon dioxide emission factors are backcalculated based on the definition of the carbon emission factors. Here, three typical processes, i. e. , coking, sintering, and iron-smelting, in a large steel company are taken as an example. The results show that, in 2009, the carbon dioxide emission factors of the coking, sintering, and iron-smelting in this large steel company are 0. 518, 0. 210, and 1. 375, respectively. These emission factors have a good agreement with the default values, 0.56, 0.20, and 1.35, recommended by IPCC. It is indicated that this calculation method can be used to determine carbon dioxide emission factors in iron and steel company reasonably.%为准确合理地确定适合于钢铁行业实际的碳排放系数,通过碳平衡算法求出了各工序的碳排放量,然后按碳排放系数的定义反算出了各工序的碳排放系数.同时,通过对某大型钢铁企业焦化、烧结、炼铁3个典型工序的原料产能的实测数据调查,首先基于碳平衡方程计算出典型工序的碳排放量,然后由碳排放量计算其碳排放系数.最后以该大型钢铁企业2009年的调查数据为例,按本方法计算出的焦化、烧结、炼铁工序的碳排放系数分别为0.518、0.210、1.375,与IPCC提供的默认值(0.56、0.20、1.35)极为吻合.这一结果表明,该方法用于我国钢铁行业碳排放系数体系的建立是可行的.

  1. Evolution and world-wide projections of the carbon dioxide emissions; Evolucion y proyecciones mundiales de las emisiones de bioxido de carbono

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saravia, Marisela; Gay, Carlos [Instituto de Ingenieria, UNAM (Mexico)

    1999-07-01

    In the frame of the present preoccupation on the global climatic change and its influence in the human activities, the possible mitigation scenarios of green house effect gases are analyzed (GEG) in the world-wide scope, the contribution of carbon dioxide future emissions as main green house effect gas originating from the burning of fossil fuels; taking into account two large classifications: Developed and developing countries. In accordance with the world-wide evolution in the 1972-1995 period and to diverse adjustments of future emissions a study of the necessary levels of these emissions is made to obtain the stabilization of the greenhouse effect gases in the atmosphere in a level in the vicinity of 550 ppmv. The considered projections are: emissions in accordance with the present tendency, basic scenario of the Intergovernmental Panel of Climatic Change (Panel Intergubernamental de Cambio Climatico) (IPCC-IS92a), mitigation proposals of the Netherlands (NL-1%, NL-2%) and profiles that entail the atmospheric CO{sub 2} stabilization. In addition the reduction in the contribution of future emissions that the developing countries would have to face to obtain the stabilization are compared, emissions that will depend on changes in factors such as population growth, economic, emissions per capita and carbon content of the power fuels, changes that would have to take place in all the countries, or certain key countries, in order to arrive to the necessary atmospheric stabilization of the emissions in accordance with those profiles. [Spanish] En el marco de la preocupacion actual sobre el cambio climatico global y su influencia en las actividades humanas, se analizan los posibles escenarios de mitigacion de gases efecto invernadero (GEI) en el ambito mundial, las cuotas de emisiones futuras de dioxido de carbono como principal gas invernadero proveniente de la quema de combustibles fosiles; tomando en cuenta dos grandes clasificaciones: Paises desarrollados y paises

  2. Electrocatalysts for carbon dioxide conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masel, Richard I; Salehi-Khojin, Amin

    2015-04-21

    Electrocatalysts for carbon dioxide conversion include at least one catalytically active element with a particle size above 0.6 nm. The electrocatalysts can also include a Helper Catalyst. The catalysts can be used to increase the rate, modify the selectivity or lower the overpotential of electrochemical conversion of CO.sub.2. Chemical processes and devices using the catalysts also include processes to produce CO, HCO.sup.-, H.sub.2CO, (HCO.sub.2).sup.-, H.sub.2CO.sub.2, CH.sub.3OH, CH.sub.4, C.sub.2H.sub.4, CH.sub.3CH.sub.2OH, CH.sub.3COO.sup.-, CH.sub.3COOH, C.sub.2H.sub.6, (COOH).sub.2, or (COO.sup.-).sub.2, and a specific device, namely, a CO.sub.2 sensor.

  3. DETERMINATION OF SULFUR DIOXIDE, NITROGEN OXIDES, AND CARBON DIOXIDE IN EMISSIONS FROM ELECTRIC UTILITY PLANTS BY ALKALINE PERMANGANATE SAMPLING AND ION CHROMATOGRAPHY

    Science.gov (United States)

    A manual 24-h integrated method for determining SO2, NOx, and CO2 in emissions from electric utility plants was developed and field tested downstream from an SO2 control system. Samples were collected in alkaline potassium permanganate solution contained in restricted-orifice imp...

  4. Carbon dioxide cleaning pilot project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1989, radioactive-contaminated metal at the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) was cleaned using a solvent paint stripper (Methylene chloride). One-third of the radioactive material was able to be recycled; two-thirds went to the scrap pile as low-level mixed waste. In addition, waste solvent solutions also required disposal. Not only was this an inefficient process, it was later prohibited by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), 40 CFR 268. A better way of doing business was needed. In the search for a solution to this situation, it was decided to study the advantages of using a new technology - pelletized carbon dioxide cleaning. A proof of principle demonstration occurred in December 1990 to test whether such a system could clean radioactive-contaminated metal. The proof of principle demonstration was expanded in June 1992 with a pilot project. The purpose of the pilot project was three fold: (1) to clean metal so that it can satisfy free release criteria for residual radioactive contamination at the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP); (2) to compare two different carbon dioxide cleaning systems; and (3) to determine the cost-effectiveness of decontamination process in a production situation and compare the cost of shipping the metal off site for waste disposal. The pilot project was completed in August 1993. The results of the pilot project were: (1) 90% of those items which were decontaminated, successfully met the free release criteria , (2) the Alpheus Model 250 was selected to be used on plantsite and (3) the break even cost of decontaminating the metal vs shipping the contaminated material offsite for disposal was a cleaning rate of 90 pounds per hour, which was easily achieved

  5. 考虑碳减排成本的内生经济增长路径研究%The Optimal Endogenous Economic Growth Considering the Abatement Cost of Carbon Dioxide Emissions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    公维凤; 王传会; 周德群

    2013-01-01

    In order to analyze carbon dioxide abatement impact on the endogenous economic growth,the rate of carbon dioxide abatement was put into the production function.Alert awareness towards climate change was put into utility function.An endogenous economic growth model of considering the abatement cost of carbon dioxide emissions was established.The influence of various parameters on path of the optimal economic growth was analyzed.In the long term,carbon dioxide emissions intensity and rate of carbon dioxide abatement have mutual negative linear relationship with economic growth.Widely using low carbon technology,improving the contribution of technology accumulation from research and development,reducing preference to the current consumption,and strengthening awareness towards climate change would be beneficial to promote economic sustainable development.%为了分析碳减排对内生经济增长的影响,将碳减排比例引入生产函数,将对气候变化的警惕意识引入效用函数,建立了考虑碳减排成本的内生经济增长模型,比较分析了各参数对经济增长路径的影响.长期来看,碳强度、碳减排比例与经济增长之间呈负向关系.低碳技术应用越广泛,研发成果对技术积累贡献率越大,消费者对当前消费的偏好程度越小,人们对气候变化的警惕意识越强,越有利于经济可持续发展.

  6. The carbon dioxide problem - a challenge to environmental protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the last century, man's activities on earth have sent off trace gases into the planet's atmosphere that have been concentrating to a level posing a threat to the global climate. Since scientists particularly spotted carbon dioxide as the main contributor to what we now call the greenhouse effect, there is urgent need for measures reducing carbon dioxide emission worldwide, may be on the basis of a global convention to be signed by both the industrialised and the developing countries. The industrialised countries, which certainly are the main pollutors, also will have the technological and financial resources to respond to the challenge of global warning more directly and faster than the developing countries. The power industry's management in the FRG is taking the problem seriously and has already come out with strategies for curbing carbon dioxide emissions from fossil-fuel power plant. (orig.)

  7. Regional carbon dioxide implications of forest bioenergy production

    OpenAIRE

    Hudiburg, Tara W.; Law, Beverly E.; Wirth, Christian; Luyssaert, Sebastiaan

    2011-01-01

    International audience Strategies for reducing carbon dioxide emissions include substitution of fossil fuel with bioenergy from forests1, where carbon emitted is expected to be recaptured in the growth of new biomass to achieve zero net emissions2, and forest thinning to reduce wildfire emissions3. Here, we use forest inventory data to show that fire prevention measures and large-scale bioenergy harvest in US West Coast forests lead to 2-14% (46-405 Tg C) higher emissions compared with cur...

  8. Sustainable catalyst supports for carbon dioxide gas adsorbent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazlee, M. N.

    2016-07-01

    The adsorption of carbon dioxide (CO2) become the prime attention nowadays due to the fact that increasing CO2 emissions has been identified as a contributor to global climate change. Major sources of CO2 emissions are thermoelectric power plants and industrial plants which account for approximately 45% of global CO2 emissions. Therefore, it is an urgent need to develop an efficient CO2 reduction technology such as carbon capture and storage (CCS) that can reduce CO2 emissions particularly from the energy sector. A lot of sustainable catalyst supports have been developed particularly for CO2 gas adsorbent applications.

  9. Beneficial Use of Carbon Dioxide in Precast Concrete Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shao, Yixin

    2014-03-31

    The feasibility of using carbon dioxide as feedstock in precast concrete production is studied. Carbon dioxide reacts with calcium compounds in concrete, producing solid calcium carbonates in binding matrix. Two typical precast products are examined for their capacity to store carbon dioxide during the production. They are concrete blocks and fiber‐cement panels. The two products are currently mass produced and cured by steam. Carbon dioxide can be used to replace steam in curing process to accelerate early strength, improve the long‐term durability and reduce energy and emission. For a reaction within a 24‐hour process window, the theoretical maximum possible carbon uptake in concrete is found to be 29% based on cement mass in the product. To reach the maximum uptake, a special process is developed to promote the reaction efficiency to 60‐80% in 4‐hour carbon dioxide curing and improve the resistance to freeze‐thaw cycling and sulfate ion attack. The process is also optimized to meet the project target of $10/tCO{sub 2} in carbon utilization. By the use of self‐concentrating absorption technology, high purity CO{sub 2} can be produced at a price below $40/t. With low cost CO{sub 2} capture and utilization technologies, it is feasible to establish a network for carbon capture and utilization at the vicinity of carbon sources. If all block produces and panel producers in United States could adopt carbon dioxide process in their production in place of steam, carbon utilization in these two markets alone could consume more than 2 Mt CO{sub 2}/year. This capture and utilization process can be extended to more precast products and will continue for years to come.

  10. Beneficial Use of Carbon Dioxide in Precast Concrete Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shao, Yixin [McGill Univ., Montreal, QC (Canada)

    2014-06-26

    The feasibility of using carbon dioxide as feedstock in precast concrete production is studied. Carbon dioxide reacts with calcium compounds in concrete, producing solid calcium carbonates in binding matrix. Two typical precast products are examined for their capacity to store carbon dioxide during the production. They are concrete blocks and fiber-cement panels. The two products are currently mass produced and cured by steam. Carbon dioxide can be used to replace steam in curing process to accelerate early strength, improve the long-term durability and reduce energy and emission. For a reaction within a 24-hour process window, the theoretical maximum possible carbon uptake in concrete is found to be 29% based on cement mass in the product. To reach the maximum uptake, a special process is developed to promote the reaction efficiency to 60-80% in 4-hour carbon dioxide curing and improve the resistance to freeze-thaw cycling and sulfate ion attack. The process is also optimized to meet the project target of $10/tCO2 in carbon utilization. By the use of self-concentrating absorption technology, high purity CO2 can be produced at a price below $40/t. With low cost CO2 capture and utilization technologies, it is feasible to establish a network for carbon capture and utilization at the vicinity of carbon sources. If all block produces and panel producers in United States could adopt carbon dioxide process in their production in place of steam, carbon utilization in these two markets alone could consume more than 2 Mt CO2/year. This capture and utilization process can be extended to more precast products and will continue for years to come.

  11. The fluorescent bioprobe with aggregation-induced emission features for monitoring to carbon dioxide generation rate in single living cell and early identification of cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Didi; Wang, Huan; Dong, Lichao; Liu, Pai; Zhang, Yahui; Shi, Jianbing; Feng, Xiao; Zhi, Junge; Tong, Bin; Dong, Yuping

    2016-10-01

    A novel fluorescent probe, tris (2-(dimethylamino) ethyl)-4,4',4″-(1H-pyrrole-1,2,5-triyl) tribenzoate (TPP-TMAE), with aggregation-enhanced emission (AEE) feature showed a simple, highly selective, specific, and instant response to trace amount carbon dioxide (CO2). Because of this special characteristic, TPP-TMAE is ideal to be a biomarker for in-situ monitoring of the CO2 generation rate during the metabolism of single living cell. The rates in single living HeLa cell, MCF-7 cell, and MEF cell were 6.40 × 10(-6)±6.0 × 10(-8) μg/h, 5.78 × 10(-6)±6.0 × 10(-8) μg/h, and 4.27 × 10(-7)±4.0 × 10(-9) μg/h, respectively. The distinct responses of TPP-TMAE to CO2 generated from cancer cells and normal cells suggested TPP-TMAE as a useful tool for deeper understanding metabolism process and distinguishing cancer cells from normal cells during the early diagnosis of cancers. PMID:27372422

  12. Carbon dioxide observations at Cape Rama, India for the period 1993–2002: implications for constraining Indian emissions

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Tiwari, Y.K.; Patra, P.K.; Chevallier, F.; Francey, R.J.; Krummel, P.B.; Allison, C.E.; Revadekar, J.V.; Chakraborty, S.; Langenfelds, R.L.; Bhattacharya, S.K.; Borole, D.V.; RaviKumar, K.; Steele, L.P.

    India has the second largest population, one of fastest growing economies and is ranked third in greenhouse gas emissions by fossil-fuel burning in the world. However, there has been little monitoring of atmospheric CO sub(2) concentration over...

  13. Influence of freeze-thaw events on carbon dioxide emission from soils at different moisture and land use

    OpenAIRE

    Loftfield Norman; Teepe Robert; Kurganova Irina

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background The repeated freeze-thaw events during cold season, freezing of soils in autumn and thawing in spring are typical for the tundra, boreal, and temperate soils. The thawing of soils during winter-summer transitions induces the release of decomposable organic carbon and acceleration of soil respiration. The winter-spring fluxes of CO2 from permanently and seasonally frozen soils are essential part of annual carbon budget varying from 5 to 50%. The mechanisms of the freeze-tha...

  14. A multiresolution spatial parametrization for the estimation of fossil-fuel carbon dioxide emissions via atmospheric inversions.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ray, Jaideep; Lee, Jina; Lefantzi, Sophia; Yadav, Vineet [Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford, CA; Michalak, Anna M. [Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford, CA; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart Gustaaf [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM; McKenna, Sean Andrew [IBM Research, Mulhuddart, Dublin 15, Ireland

    2013-04-01

    The estimation of fossil-fuel CO2 emissions (ffCO2) from limited ground-based and satellite measurements of CO2 concentrations will form a key component of the monitoring of treaties aimed at the abatement of greenhouse gas emissions. To that end, we construct a multiresolution spatial parametrization for fossil-fuel CO2 emissions (ffCO2), to be used in atmospheric inversions. Such a parametrization does not currently exist. The parametrization uses wavelets to accurately capture the multiscale, nonstationary nature of ffCO2 emissions and employs proxies of human habitation, e.g., images of lights at night and maps of built-up areas to reduce the dimensionality of the multiresolution parametrization. The parametrization is used in a synthetic data inversion to test its suitability for use in atmospheric inverse problem. This linear inverse problem is predicated on observations of ffCO2 concentrations collected at measurement towers. We adapt a convex optimization technique, commonly used in the reconstruction of compressively sensed images, to perform sparse reconstruction of the time-variant ffCO2 emission field. We also borrow concepts from compressive sensing to impose boundary conditions i.e., to limit ffCO2 emissions within an irregularly shaped region (the United States, in our case). We find that the optimization algorithm performs a data-driven sparsification of the spatial parametrization and retains only of those wavelets whose weights could be estimated from the observations. Further, our method for the imposition of boundary conditions leads to a 10computational saving over conventional means of doing so. We conclude with a discussion of the accuracy of the estimated emissions and the suitability of the spatial parametrization for use in inverse problems with a significant degree of regularization.

  15. Estimates of carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuels combustion in the main sectors of selected countries 1971-1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calculations of sectoral CO2 emissions from fossil fuel burning in the period 1971-1990 were done for the 15 countries at the top of the list of nations ordered by decreasing contribution to global emissions, namely: United States of America, Soviet Union, People's Republic of China, Japan, Federal Republic of Germany, United Kingdom, India, Poland, Canada, France, Italy, German Democratic Republic, South Africa, Mexico and Czechoslovakia. In addition, the CO2 emission of two groups of industrialized countries, namely the OECD and the European Economic Community (EEC) were calculated. The main recommendations of the IPCC/OECD current methodology have been adopted for the calculations, with the principal exception that CO2 emissions from the use of bunker fuels have not been included in the national estimates. The sectors are: 1. Transformations. Total emissions and the part stemming from power plants 2. Industry (excluding Feedstocks) 3. Transportation 4. Agriculture 5. Residential 6. Commerce and Public Services 7. Non-specified Other 8. Non-Energy Use 9. Feedstocks (in Industry). Data are presented in tables and diagrams. (orig./KW)

  16. Green dyeing of cotton fabrics by supercritical carbon dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Juan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Green dyeing process with zero waste water emission is a hot topic recently. This paper reveals that supercritical carbon dioxide is the best candidate for this purpose. Effects of thermodynamic parameters, such as enthalpy and entropy of activation, on dyeing process are studied experimentally.

  17. The impacts of future climate and carbon dioxide changes on the average and variability of US maize yields under two emission scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The United States is the largest producer of maize in the world, a crop for which demand continues to rise rapidly. Past studies have projected that climate change will negatively impact mean maize yields in this region, while at the same time increasing yield variability. However, some have questioned the accuracy of these projections because they are often based on indirect measures of soil moisture, have failed to explicitly capture the potential interactions between temperature and soil moisture availability, and often omit the beneficial effects of elevated carbon dioxide (CO2) on transpiration efficiency. Here we use a new detailed dataset on field-level yields in Iowa, Indiana, and Illinois, along with fine-resolution daily weather data and moisture reconstructions, to evaluate the combined effects of moisture and heat on maize yields in the region. Projected climate change scenarios over this region from a suite of CMIP5 models are then used to assess future impacts and the differences between two contrasting emissions scenarios (RCP 4.5 and RCP 8.5). We show that (i) statistical models which explicitly account for interactions between heat and moisture, which have not been represented in previous empirical models, lead to significant model improvement and significantly higher projected yield variability under warming and drying trends than when accounting for each factor independently; (ii) inclusion of the benefits of elevated CO2 significantly reduces impacts, particularly for yield variability; and (iii) net damages from climate change and CO2 become larger for the higher emission scenario in the latter half of the 21st century, and significantly so by the end of century. (paper)

  18. The impacts of future climate and carbon dioxide changes on the average and variability of US maize yields under two emission scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Daniel W.; Sheffield, Justin; Lobell, David B.

    2015-04-01

    The United States is the largest producer of maize in the world, a crop for which demand continues to rise rapidly. Past studies have projected that climate change will negatively impact mean maize yields in this region, while at the same time increasing yield variability. However, some have questioned the accuracy of these projections because they are often based on indirect measures of soil moisture, have failed to explicitly capture the potential interactions between temperature and soil moisture availability, and often omit the beneficial effects of elevated carbon dioxide (CO2) on transpiration efficiency. Here we use a new detailed dataset on field-level yields in Iowa, Indiana, and Illinois, along with fine-resolution daily weather data and moisture reconstructions, to evaluate the combined effects of moisture and heat on maize yields in the region. Projected climate change scenarios over this region from a suite of CMIP5 models are then used to assess future impacts and the differences between two contrasting emissions scenarios (RCP 4.5 and RCP 8.5). We show that (i) statistical models which explicitly account for interactions between heat and moisture, which have not been represented in previous empirical models, lead to significant model improvement and significantly higher projected yield variability under warming and drying trends than when accounting for each factor independently; (ii) inclusion of the benefits of elevated CO2 significantly reduces impacts, particularly for yield variability; and (iii) net damages from climate change and CO2 become larger for the higher emission scenario in the latter half of the 21st century, and significantly so by the end of century.

  19. Strategies for carbon dioxide emissions reductions: Residential natural gas efficiency, economic, and ancillary health impacts in Maryland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of its commitments to the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI), the State of Maryland, USA, auctions emission permits to electric utilities, creating revenue that can be used to benefit consumers and the environment. This paper explores the CO2 emissions reductions that may be possible by allocating some of that revenue to foster efficiency improvements in the residential sector's use of natural gas. Since these improvements will require changes to the capital stock of houses and end use equipment, efficiency improvements may be accompanied by economic and ancillary health impacts, both of which are quantified in this paper.

  20. Strategic analysis and prospect on carbon dioxide emission reduction of power industry%电力行业二氧化碳减排策略分析与展望

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵毅; 赵丽媛; 钱新凤

    2015-01-01

    全球CO2过量排放导致的温室效应日益严重,燃煤电厂作为碳排放大户,CO2控制与减排已成为电力行业亟待解决的重要任务之一。碳减排领域的研究主要集中在物理捕集、生物固定、化学转化与利用、地质封存等方面;结合其中几种策略取长补短,对CO2进行综合固定在电厂烟气处理中更具应用前景;对碳减排技术的潜在价值和面临的挑战进行了展望。%The greenhouse effect caused by excessive emissions of carbon dioxide has become a worldwide problem, coal-fired power plants as carbon emitters, limiting excessive carbon dioxide emissions has been an important task to be solved to electricity industry.The field of carbon emission reduction is mainly concentrated in physical capture, biological fixation, chemical conversion and utilization, geological storage, et al.Combined with several strategies, the way of comprehensively fixed carbon dioxide has more application prospects in the treatment of power plant flue gas.Prospecting The potential value and chal enges for carbon emission reduction technologies are propectd.

  1. 生物质炭施用量及水热条件对淹水土壤 CO2释放的影响%Effects of carbon dioxide emissions from waterlogged soils by biochar amendments and hydrothermal condition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    花莉; 唐志刚; 洛晶晶; 贾卫华

    2013-01-01

    通过模拟土柱实验,向水稻土中添加质量分数分别为0%(C0)、2%(C2)、5%(C5)、8%(C8)的生物质炭,并在不同淹水深度和温度下培养,旨在了解生物质炭的施用量及其水热条件对土壤CO2释放的影响,以期通过控制生物质炭的施炭量和改进农田管理措施,从而为农业温室气体碳减排提供依据.研究结果发现:施加生物质炭对土壤CO2释放的抑制作用明显,与对照相比,2%、5%、8%施炭量处理的土壤CO2累计释放量分别降低了5.1%、2.4%和26.5%.低施炭量对土壤CO2的释放降幅较少,而较高施炭量可能对抑制土壤CO2释放的效果更好;温度越高,土壤的呼吸作用越强,CO2释放速率也越快;在昼夜变化上,土壤夜间CO2的释放速率要高于白天;就淹水深度而言,土壤灌水深度愈深,CO2的释放速率愈低.此外,还从施炭量和水热条件对土壤CO2和CH4释放的综合排放效应进行了展望.%A waterlogged soil environment was simulated and added with mass fraction of 0%(C0) ,2% (C2) ,5% (C5) ,and 8% (C8) of biochar to paddy soils to realize the effects of carbon dioxide emissions by biochar amendments and hydrothermal condition under different irrigated water depths and culture temperature .It is aimed at decreasing agricultural green-house gases emissions by means of controlling biochar amendments and improving field man-agement measures .The results showed that there is a significant inhibition of carbon dioxide emission from soils due to biochar amendment .Compared with the control ,cumulative car-bon dioxide emissions from soils by biochar addition of 2% ,5% ,and 8% were reduced by 5 .1% ,2 .4% and 26 .5% respectively .In terms of inhibition of carbon dioxide emission from soils by biochar amendment ,higher biochar amendments might be better than lower amend-ments;with the higher temperature ,the stronger soil respiration became

  2. The Kyoto Protocol: a reality check. Carbon dioxide emission forecasts and scenarios for 25 Annex 1 countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-11-01

    This study aims to evaluate the climate change issues arising from Kyoto to give an independent, qualitative analysis of future emissions (to 2020) under three scenarios; business-as-usual scenario; a Kyoto scenario, which evaluates what measures might be necessary to meet Kyoto undertakings; and a realistic scenario of achievable results. The forecast methodology of covering the power sector, road transport and fuels sectors, and the steel and concrete sectors, is clearly set out. Each sector is analysed under the three scenarios for all 25 countries, with data covering 1990-2020. It analyses as well various key issues in the climate debate - whether nuclear power is an acceptable alternative to fossil fuels; the lack of concrete scientific answers regarding climate change; the issue of fairness in the sharing of the burden of emissions control, given the energy needs of the developing countries; where US sulfur trading can be used as a model for CO emissions trading and the problems of emissions where electricity is traded across borders. A brief history of climate change policy since the establishment of the IPCC in 1988 through COP-1 to COP-4 in Buenos Aires, and a glossary of terms are included.

  3. Nitrous oxide and carbon dioxide emissions during initial decomposition of animal by-products applied as fertilisers to soils.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cayuela, M.L.; Velthof, G.L.; Mondini, C.; Sinicco, T.; Groenigen, van J.W.

    2010-01-01

    The recycling of organic wastes as soil amendments is notably promoted in sustainable agricultural systems. However, for many animal by-products approved by organic farming regulations little is known about their effects on the greenhouse gas balance of the soil, in particular on N2O emissions. In t

  4. Assessing the potential impact of the CO2 performance ladder on the reduction of carbon dioxide emissions in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rietbergen, M.G.; Blok, K.

    2013-01-01

    Green public procurement is often promoted as a tool to reduce energy use and CO2 emissions in the supply chains of public entities. However, only a limited number of studies has quantitatively assessed the environmental impacts of green public procurement schemes. The aim of this paper was to asses

  5. Carbon dioxide neutral, integrated biofuel facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powell, E.E.; Hill, G.A. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, 57 Campus Drive, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, S7N 5A9 (Canada)

    2010-12-15

    Algae are efficient biocatalysts for both capture and conversion of carbon dioxide in the environment. In earlier work, we have optimized the ability of Chlorella vulgaris to rapidly capture CO{sub 2} from man-made emission sources by varying environmental growth conditions and bioreactor design. Here we demonstrate that a coupled biodiesel-bioethanol facility, using yeast to produce ethanol and photosynthetic algae to produce biodiesel, can result in an integrated, economical, large-scale process for biofuel production. Each bioreactor acts as an electrode for a coupled complete microbial fuel cell system; the integrated cultures produce electricity that is consumed as an energy source within the process. Finally, both the produced yeast and spent algae biomass can be used as added value byproducts in the feed or food industries. Using cost and revenue estimations, an IRR of up to 25% is calculated using a 5 year project lifespan. (author)

  6. Quantification of carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and chloroform emissions over Ireland from atmospheric observations at Mace Head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flux estimates of CO2, CH4, N2O and CHCl3 over Ireland are inferred from continuous atmospheric records of these species. We use radon-222 (222Rn) as a reference compound to estimate unknown sources of other species. The correlation between each species and 222Rn is calculated for a suite of diurnal events that have been selected in the Mace Head record over the period 1995-1997 to represent air masses exposed to sources over Ireland. We established data selection criteria based on 222Rn and 212Pb concentrations. We estimated flux densities of 12x103 kg CH4/km2/yr, 680 kg N2O/km2/yr and 20 kg CHCl3/km2/yr for CH4, N2O and CHCl3, respectively. We also inferred flux densities of 250x103 kg C/km2/yr for CO2 during wintertime, and of 760x103 kg C/km2/yr for CO2 during summer night-time. Our CH4 inferred flux compare well with the CORINAIR90 and CORNAIR94 inventories for Ireland. The N2O emission flux we inferred is close to the inventory value by CORINAIR90, but twice the inventory value by CORINAIR94 and EDGAR 2.0. This discrepancy may have been caused by the use of the revised 1996 IPCC guidelines for national greenhouse gas inventories in 1994, which include a new methodology for N2O emissions from agriculture. We carried out the first estimation of CHCl3 emission fluxes over Ireland. This estimation is 4 times larger than the CHCl3 emission fluxes measured close to the Mace Head station over peatlands. Our CHCl3 emission fluxes estimate is consistent with the interpretation of the same data by Ryall (personal communication, 2000), who obtained, using a Lagrangian atmospheric transport model, CHCl3 fluxes of 24±7 kg CHCl3/km2/yr. Our estimates of CO2 emission fluxes during summer night-time and wintertime are close to those estimated from inventories and to one biogeochemical model of heterotrophic respiration

  7. Higher capacity, lower carbon dioxide emissions. Idle power compensation in HV lines; Mehr Kapazitaet, weniger Kohlendioxid. Blindleistungskompensation bei Hochspannungsleitungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auer, Jan-Hendrik von [Alstom Grid GmbH, Berlin (Germany). Team Leistungselektronik und Kompensationsanlagen

    2012-07-01

    Even today, many HP lines have reached their limits. It is therefore highly urgent to find measures for optimum utilization of the available overhead transmssion capacities, e.g. by idle power compensation. Together with a filter for harmonics reduction, this will ensure higher grid stability and enhance transport capacities while reducing transport losses, thus saving money and reducing CO{sub 2} emissions. (orig./AKB)

  8. The Use of an Automated System (GreenFeed) to Monitor Enteric Methane and Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Ruminant Animals

    OpenAIRE

    Hristov, Alexander N.; Oh, Joonpyo; Giallongo, Fabio; Frederick, Tyler; Weeks, Holley; ZIMMERMAN, PATRICK R.; Harper, Michael T.; Hristova, Rada A.; Zimmerman, R. Scott; Branco, Antonio F.

    2015-01-01

    Ruminant animals (domesticated or wild) emit methane (CH4) through enteric fermentation in their digestive tract and from decomposition of manure during storage. These processes are the major sources of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from animal production systems. Techniques for measuring enteric CH4 vary from direct measurements (respiration chambers, which are highly accurate, but with limited applicability) to various indirect methods (sniffers, laser technology, which are practical, but ...

  9. An EKC-pattern in historical perspective. Carbon dioxide emissions, technology, fuel prices and growth in Sweden 1870-1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindmark, Magnus [Department of Economic History, Umea University, SE-901 87 Umea (Sweden)

    2002-08-01

    The environmental Kuznets curve (EKC) has been subject to research and debate since the early 1990s. This article examines the inverted-U trajectory of Swedish CO{sub 2} emissions during an extended time period beginning in 1870. The basis for the investigation is a structural time series approach that utilizes a stochastic trend as an indicator of technological and structural change, and GDP growth and changes in the price of fuel and cement price as independent variables. Finally, the development of technological and structural change with respect to CO{sub 2} emissions is interpreted within the context of growth regimes. The result suggests that the period 1920-1960, with high, sustained growth rates was associated with less technological and structural changes relating to CO{sub 2} emissions than periods with lower growth rates, such as the late 1800s and the post-1970 period. Furthermore, it is suggested that time-specific technological clusters may affect EKC patterns.

  10. Carbon dioxide conversion over carbon-based nanocatalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khavarian, Mehrnoush; Chai, Siang-Piao; Mohamed, Abdul Rahman

    2013-07-01

    The utilization of carbon dioxide for the production of valuable chemicals via catalysts is one of the efficient ways to mitigate the greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. It is known that the carbon dioxide conversion and product yields are still low even if the reaction is operated at high pressure and temperature. The carbon dioxide utilization and conversion provides many challenges in exploring new concepts and opportunities for development of unique catalysts for the purpose of activating the carbon dioxide molecules. In this paper, the role of carbon-based nanocatalysts in the hydrogenation of carbon dioxide and direct synthesis of dimethyl carbonate from carbon dioxide and methanol are reviewed. The current catalytic results obtained with different carbon-based nanocatalysts systems are presented and how these materials contribute to the carbon dioxide conversion is explained. In addition, different strategies and preparation methods of nanometallic catalysts on various carbon supports are described to optimize the dispersion of metal nanoparticles and catalytic activity. PMID:23901504

  11. 46 CFR 108.627 - Carbon dioxide alarm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Carbon dioxide alarm. 108.627 Section 108.627 Shipping... EQUIPMENT Equipment Markings and Instructions § 108.627 Carbon dioxide alarm. Each carbon dioxide alarm must be identified by marking: “WHEN ALARM SOUNDS VACATE AT ONCE. CARBON DIOXIDE BEING RELEASED” next...

  12. 46 CFR 78.47-9 - Carbon dioxide alarm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Carbon dioxide alarm. 78.47-9 Section 78.47-9 Shipping... and Emergency Equipment, Etc. § 78.47-9 Carbon dioxide alarm. (a) All carbon dioxide alarms shall be conspicuously identified: “WHEN ALARM SOUNDS—VACATE AT ONCE. CARBON DIOXIDE BEING RELEASED.” (b)...

  13. 46 CFR 169.732 - Carbon dioxide alarm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Carbon dioxide alarm. 169.732 Section 169.732 Shipping... Control, Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment Markings § 169.732 Carbon dioxide alarm. Each carbon dioxide alarm must be conspicuously identified: “WHEN ALARM SOUNDS—VACATE AT ONCE. CARBON DIOXIDE BEING RELEASED.”...

  14. 46 CFR 193.15-20 - Carbon dioxide storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Carbon dioxide storage. 193.15-20 Section 193.15-20... PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Carbon Dioxide Extinguishing Systems, Details § 193.15-20 Carbon dioxide storage. (a...), consisting of not more than 300 pounds of carbon dioxide, may have cylinders located within the...

  15. 46 CFR 95.15-20 - Carbon dioxide storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Carbon dioxide storage. 95.15-20 Section 95.15-20... PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Carbon Dioxide Extinguishing Systems, Details § 95.15-20 Carbon dioxide storage. (a... of not more than 300 pounds of carbon dioxide, may have the cylinders located within the...

  16. 46 CFR 97.37-9 - Carbon dioxide alarm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Carbon dioxide alarm. 97.37-9 Section 97.37-9 Shipping... Markings for Fire and Emergency Equipment, Etc. § 97.37-9 Carbon dioxide alarm. (a) All carbon dioxide alarms shall be conspicuously identified: “WHEN ALARM SOUNDS—VACATE AT ONCE. CARBON DIOXIDE...

  17. 46 CFR 76.15-20 - Carbon dioxide storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Carbon dioxide storage. 76.15-20 Section 76.15-20... EQUIPMENT Carbon Dioxide Extinguishing Systems, Details § 76.15-20 Carbon dioxide storage. (a) Except as... than 300 pounds of carbon dioxide, may have the cylinders located within the space protected. If...

  18. 46 CFR 196.37-9 - Carbon dioxide alarm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Carbon dioxide alarm. 196.37-9 Section 196.37-9 Shipping... Markings for Fire and Emergency Equipment, etc. § 196.37-9 Carbon dioxide alarm. (a) All carbon dioxide alarms shall be conspicuously identified: “WHEN ALARM SOUNDS—VACATE AT ONCE. CARBON DIOXIDE...

  19. Silver oxide sorbent for carbon dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, G. V.

    1974-01-01

    Material can be regenerated at least 20 times by heating at 250 C. Sorbent is compatible with environment of high humidity; up to 20% by weight of carbon dioxide can be absorbed. Material is prepared from silver carbonate, potassium hydroxide or carbonate, and sodium silicate.

  20. Carbon Dioxide Collection and Pressurization Technology Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Reactive Innovations, LLC, proposes a Phase I SBIR program to develop a compact and lightweight electrochemical reactor to separate and pressurize carbon dioxide...

  1. Reactive Capture of Carbon Dioxide Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this Phase I SBIR, Reactive Innovations, LLC (RIL) proposes to develop a compact and lightweight electrochemical to capture carbon dioxide in the martian...

  2. Supercritical carbon dioxide hop extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pfaf-Šovljanski Ivana I.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The hop of Magnum cultivar was extracted using supercritical carbon dioxide (SFE-as extractant. Extraction was carried out in the two steps: the first one being carried out at 150 bar and 40°C for 2.5 h (Extract A, and the second was the extraction of the same hop sample at 300 bar and 40°C for 2.5 h (Extract B. Extraction kinetics of the system hop-SFE-CO2 was investigated. Two of four most common compounds of hop aroma (α-humulene and β-caryophyllene were detected in Extract A. Isomerised α-acids and β-acids were detected too. a-Acid content in Extract B was high (that means it is a bitter variety of hop. Mathematical modeling using empirical model characteristic time model and simple single sphere model has been performed on Magnum cultivar extraction experimental results. Characteristic time model equations, best fitted experimental results. Empirical model equation, fitted results well, while simple single sphere model equation poorly approximated the results.

  3. Arterialisation of transcutaneous oxygen and carbon dioxide.

    OpenAIRE

    Broadhurst, E; Helms, P; Vyas, H; Cheriyan, G

    1988-01-01

    We compared previously calculated global correction factors for oxygen and carbon dioxide arterial/transcutaneous ratios with individual in vivo calibrations from the first arterial sample. In infants beyond the neonatal period and older children in vivo calibration confers little benefit over the use of a global calibration correction factor for transcutaneous carbon dioxide, and may reduce the precision with which arterial oxygen can be estimated from transcutaneous oxygen.

  4. Carbon dioxide emissions from semi-arid soils amended with biochar alone or combined with mineral and organic fertilizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, José M; Nieto, M Aurora; López-de-Sá, Esther G; Gascó, Gabriel; Méndez, Ana; Plaza, César

    2014-06-01

    Semi-arid soils cover a significant area of Earth's land surface and typically contain large amounts of inorganic C. Determining the effects of biochar additions on CO2 emissions from semi-arid soils is therefore essential for evaluating the potential of biochar as a climate change mitigation strategy. Here, we measured the CO2 that evolved from semi-arid calcareous soils amended with biochar at rates of 0 and 20tha(-1) in a full factorial combination with three different fertilizers (mineral fertilizer, municipal solid waste compost, and sewage sludge) applied at four rates (equivalent to 0, 75, 150, and 225kg potentially available Nha(-1)) during 182 days of aerobic incubation. A double exponential model, which describes cumulative CO2 emissions from two active soil C compartments with different turnover rates (one relatively stable and the other more labile), was found to fit very well all the experimental datasets. In general, the organic fertilizers increased the size and decomposition rate of the stable and labile soil C pools. In contrast, biochar addition had no effects on any of the double exponential model parameters and did not interact with the effects ascribed to the type and rate of fertilizer. After 182 days of incubation, soil organic and microbial biomass C contents tended to increase with increasing the application rates of organic fertilizer, especially of compost, whereas increasing the rate of mineral fertilizer tended to suppress microbial biomass. Biochar was found to increase both organic and inorganic C contents in soil and not to interact with the effects of type and rate of fertilizer on C fractions. As a whole, our results suggest that the use of biochar as enhancer of semi-arid soils, either alone or combined with mineral and organic fertilizers, is unlikely to increase abiotic and biotic soil CO2 emissions.

  5. Carbon dioxide emission from surface water in cascade reservoirs-river system on the Maotiao River, southwest of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fushun; Wang, Baoli; Liu, Cong-Qiang; Wang, Yuchun; Guan, Jin; Liu, Xiaolong; Yu, Yuanxiu

    2011-07-01

    Recently, controversies about whether hydropower is still a clean energy have been arisen up with the studies about high CO 2 emission flux from hydroelectric reservoirs in boreal and tropical regions. In this study, four subtropical reservoirs and their related reaches, draining on karstic area in southwest of China, were investigated to understand their CO 2 emission, with monthly sampling strategy from July 2007 to June 2008. pCO 2 values in the surface water of these reservoirs ranged from 38 to 3300 μ atm, indicating that reservoir surface could be not only source but also sink to atmosphere CO 2 in different seasons. In Hongfeng reservoir, the flux of CO 2 from surface water varied from -9 to 70 mmol m -2 d -2 with an average of 15 mmol m -2 d -2, and in Baihua reservoir, it had a range from -8 to 77 mmol m -2 d -2 with an average of 24 mmol m -2 d -2. Hongyan reservoir had similar average flux of CO 2 to Baihua reservoir. Xiuwen had the highest average flux of CO 2 with a value of 47 mmol m -2 d -2 among the studied reservoirs. Downstream the dams discharged by hydropower generation from these reservoirs generally had quite high flux of CO 2, with an average of 489 ± 297 mmol m -2 d -2, which is close to those from tropical rivers. This means that water releasing from these reservoirs would be an important way for CO 2 emission into atmosphere. The results showed that dam construction has significant impacts on the river water chemistry, with abrupt changes in pCO 2, DO, T, pH and SIc in surface water and their outlets. In addition, with the development of thermal gradient in warm seasons, water chemistry along the water column of reservoirs also showed seasonal variations, except in Xiuwen reservoir which only has daily storage capacity.

  6. Grubbing by wild boars (Sus scrofa L.) and its impact on hardwood forest soil carbon dioxide emissions in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risch, Anita C; Wirthner, Sven; Busse, Matt D; Page-Dumroese, Deborah S; Schütz, Martin

    2010-11-01

    Interest in soil C storage and release has increased in recent years. In addition to factors such as climate/land-use change, vertebrate animals can have a considerable impact on soil CO(2) emissions. To date, most research has considered herbivores, while the impact of omnivorous animals has rarely been investigated. Our goal was to determine how European wild boars (Sus scrofa L.), large omnivores that consume soil-inhabiting animals and belowground plant parts by grubbing in the soil, affect soil C dynamics. We measured soil respiration (CO(2)), temperature, and moisture on paired grubbed and non-grubbed plots in six hardwood forest stands for a 3-year period and sampled fine root and microbial biomass at the beginning and after 2 years of the study. We also measured the percentage of freshly disturbed forest soil within the larger surroundings of each stand and used this information together with hunting statistics and forest cover data to model the total amount of CO(2) released from Swiss forest soils due to grubbing during 1 year. Soil CO(2) emissions were significantly higher on grubbed compared to non-grubbed plots during the study. On average 23.1% more CO(2) was released from these plots, which we associated with potential alterations in CO(2) diffusion rates, incorporation of litter into the mineral soil and higher fine root/microbial biomass. Thus, wild boars considerably increased the small-scale heterogeneity of soil properties. Roughly 1% of Switzerland's surface area is similar to our sites (boar density/forest cover). Given the range of forest soil disturbance of 27-54% at our sites, the geographic information system model predicted that boar grubbing would lead to the release of an additional 49,731.10-98,454.74 t CO(2) year(-1). These values are relatively small compared to total soil emissions estimated for Swiss hardwood forests and suggest that boars will have little effect on large-scale emissions unless their numbers increase and their

  7. Urban Traffic Congestion Pricing Model with the Consideration of Carbon Emissions Cost

    OpenAIRE

    Jian Wang; Libing Chi; Xiaowei Hu; Hongfei Zhou

    2014-01-01

    As one of the most effective traffic demand management opinions, congestion pricing can reduce private car travel demand and the associated carbon dioxide emissions. First, we summarized the status quo of transport carbon dioxide emission charges and congestion pricing, and then, we analyzed the characteristics of urban transport carbon dioxide emissions. Then, we proposed a (pricing) framework in which carbon emission costs would be considered as part of the generalized cost of travel. Based...

  8. Comparison of life cycle carbon dioxide emissions and embodied energy in four renewable electricity generation technologies in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rule, Bridget M; Worth, Zeb J; Boyle, Carol A

    2009-08-15

    In order to make the best choice between renewable energy technologies, it is important to be able to compare these technologies on the basis of their sustainability, which may include a variety of social, environmental, and economic indicators. This study examined the comparative sustainability of four renewable electricity technologies in terms of their life cycle CO2 emissions and embodied energy, from construction to decommissioning and including maintenance (periodic component replacement plus machinery use), using life cycle analysis. The models developed were based on case studies of power plants in New Zealand, comprising geothermal, large-scale hydroelectric, tidal (a proposed scheme), and wind-farm electricity generation. The comparative results showed that tidal power generation was associated with 1.8 g of CO2/kWh, wind with 3.0 g of CO2/kWh, hydroelectric with 4.6 g of CO2/kWh, and geothermal with 5.6 g of CO2/kWh (not including fugitive emissions), and that tidal power generation was associated with 42.3 kJ/kWh, wind with 70.2 kJ/kWh, hydroelectric with 55.0 kJ/kWh, and geothermal with 94.6 kJ/kWh. Other environmental indicators, as well as social and economic indicators, should be applied to gain a complete picture of the technologies studied.

  9. Evaluation of avoided carbon dioxide emissions in cogeneration projects; Evaluacion de las emisiones evitadas de bioxido de carbono en proyectos de cogeneracion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flores Zamudio, Jesus Antonio; Fernandez Montiel, Manuel Francisco; Alcaraz Calderon, Agustin Moises [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)]. E-mail: jesus.flores@iie.org.mx; mffm@iie.org.mx; malcaraz@iie.org.mx

    2010-11-15

    In this paper, presents a methodology of how to calculate the emissions of CO{sub 2} (Carbon Dioxide) in cogeneration of plants for evaluate future cases with the type of fuel and fuel flow used in the plant. The methodology was in spreadsheets developed a series of stoichiometric balances. The methodology was done for three types of fossil fuels: solid, liquid and gas. The analysis is made only to the percentages of the items contained in the fuel flow automatically used and results in the combustion products in tons per hour. This method was compared with the results obtained in the software Thermoflow Inc. (Used in Gerencia de Procesos Termicos of Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas for evaluate various process systems that produce energy power) using different cogeneration systems, that is to say about the technology used emissions compared according to the amount of excess air for each type of technology and at one point before the gas cleaning systems. The results can be evaluated for emissions avoided through the fuel type used and developing a cogeneration plant compared to a conventional plant. [Spanish] En este articulo, se presenta una metodologia de como calcular las emisiones de CO{sub 2} (Bioxido de carbono) en plantas de cogeneracion, para evaluar casos a futuro por medio del tipo de combustible y flujo de combustible a utilizar en la planta. La metodologia se realizo en hojas de calculo, donde se desarrollaron una serie de balances estequiometricos. La metodologia se hizo para tres tipos de combustibles fosiles: solido, liquido y gas. El analisis se realiza con solo dar los porcentajes de los elementos que contiene el combustible y el flujo a utilizarse y automaticamente da como resultado los productos de la combustion en toneladas por hora. Esta metodologia se comparo con los resultados obtenidos en el software Thermoflow Inc. (Empleado en la Gerencia de Procesos Termicos del Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas para evaluar diversos

  10. MAMAP – a new spectrometer system for column-averaged methane and carbon dioxide observations from aircraft: retrieval algorithm and first inversions for point source emission rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Bovensmann

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available MAMAP is an airborne passive remote sensing instrument designed to measure the dry columns of methane (CH4 and carbon dioxide (CO2. The MAMAP instrument comprises two optical grating spectrometers: the first observing in the short wave infrared band (SWIR at 1590–1690 nm to measure CO2 and CH4 absorptions, and the second in the near infrared (NIR at 757–768 nm to measure O2 absorptions for reference/normalisation purposes. MAMAP can be operated in both nadir and zenith geometry during the flight. Mounted on an aeroplane, MAMAP surveys areas on regional to local scales with a ground pixel resolution of approximately 29 m × 33 m for a typical aircraft altitude of 1250 m and a velocity of 200 km h−1. The retrieval precision of the measured column relative to background is typically ≲1% (1σ. MAMAP measurements are valuable to close the gap between satellite data, having global coverage but with a rather coarse resolution, on the one hand, and highly accurate in situ measurements with sparse coverage on the other hand. In July 2007, test flights were performed over two coal-fired power plants operated by Vattenfall Europe Generation AG: Jänschwalde (27.4 Mt CO2 yr−1 and Schwarze Pumpe (11.9 Mt CO2 yr−1, about 100 km southeast of Berlin, Germany. By using two different inversion approaches, one based on an optimal estimation scheme to fit Gaussian plume models from multiple sources to the data, and another using a simple Gaussian integral method, the emission rates can be determined and compared with emissions reported by Vattenfall Europe. An extensive error analysis for the retrieval's dry column results (XCO2 and XCH4 and for the two inversion methods has been performed. Both methods – the Gaussian plume model fit and the Gaussian integral method – are capable of deriving

  11. Properties of equilibrium carbon dioxide hydrate in porous medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronov, V. P.; Gorodetskii, E. E.; Podnek, V. E.; Grigoriev, B. A.

    2016-09-01

    Specific heat capacity, dissociation heat and hydration number of carbon dioxide hydrate in porous medium are determined by adiabatic calorimetry method. The measurements were carried out in the temperature range 250-290 K and in pressure range 1-5 MPa. The measured specific heat of the hydrate is approximately 2.7 J/(g K), which is significantly larger than the specific heat of methane hydrate. In particular, at heating, larger value of the specific heat of carbon dioxide hydrate is a result of gas emission from the hydrate. The hydration number at the hydrate-gas coexistence changes from 6.2 to 6.9. The dissociation heat of carbon dioxide hydrate varies from the 55 kJ/mol near the upper quadruple point to the 57 kJ/mol near the lower quadruple point.

  12. Changing Arctic Ecosystems: Updated forecast: Reducing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions required to improve polar bear outlook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakley, Karen L.; Atwood, Todd C.; Mugel, Douglas N.; Rode, Karyn D.; Whalen, Mary E.

    2015-01-01

    The Arctic is warming faster than other regions of the world due to the loss of snow and ice, which increases the amount of solar energy absorbed by the region. The most visible consequence has been the rapid decline in sea ice over the last 3 decades-a decline projected to bring long ice-free summers if greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions are not significantly reduced. The polar bear (Ursus maritimus) depends on sea ice over the biologically productive continental shelves of the Arctic Ocean as a platform for hunting seals. In 2008, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service listed the polar bear as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) due to the threat posed by sea ice loss. The polar bear was the first species to be listed due to forecasted population declines from climate change.

  13. Estimation and the monitoring research on carbon dioxide emission from the cement%水泥二氧化碳排放量预测及监测研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张继义; 姬文强; 于涛; 马宁

    2013-01-01

    This paper is about the estimation of the carbon dioxide emission from the cement and the monitoring research on the emission reduction by using the method recommended by the Provincial Greenhouse Gas-emission Inventory and IPCC Guideline of the carbon dioxide emissions in the cement industry in Gansu Province.In this paper,we have adopted the GM (1,1) model,which was based on the gray-grade theory method in our work with the aid of MATLAB software.As the result,we have arrived the following conclusions in accordance with the model:(1) The carbon dioxide emissions have been worked out in recent years with the accuracy of the model verified.The relative error of the calculation done with the model proves less than 9.0% and the level ratio deviation being less than 0.1.This shows that the estimation of the emission amount comes in conformity with the demands as is required; (2) The amount of the emission in the cement production in the Province done by the model has been increased year by year,and the total emission is expected to beyond 15 million tons by the year of 2015.In addition,we have also introduced the current situation of carbon dioxide monitoring situation both at home and abroad.The carbon dioxide monitoring methods we have adopted can be divided into two categories:the in-situ measurement via instruments and via the sample analysis by using the monitoring methods employed in American Iron and Steel Enterprises.At the same time,we have also improved the monitoring methods and measures to reduce the emissions of the carbon dioxide of the cement industry.Therefore,our experience in using the model and the method can be taken as a reference to the reduction of the greenhouse gas emission in the Province in the future.%以甘肃省近几年水泥工业生产过程中的熟料产量为数据来源,依据《省级温室气体清单编制指南》和《IPCC指南》中推荐的方法,计算二氧化碳近几年的排放量.采用灰色

  14. 长三角地区旅游业能源消耗的CO_2排放测度研究%Measuring carbon dioxide emissions from energy consumption by tourism in Yangtze River Delta

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢园方; 赵媛

    2012-01-01

    旅游业与气候环境变化息息相关,低碳旅游是旅游业对气候变化的积极响应,也是低碳经济的延伸,将会给全球旅游业带来深远影响。但目前国内大部分有关低碳旅游的研究仍停留在定性阶段,尤其是旅游业碳排放的测度研究仍比较薄弱。本文在深入分析和总结国内外已有研究的基础上,以能源消耗平衡表为依据,借鉴"旅游消费剥离系数"概念,构建出符合我国目前统计口径的旅游业碳排放测度方法。并以长江三角洲地区为研究范围,对江苏、浙江和上海三地旅游业碳排放进行测度和对比分析。研究表明:目前在长三角地区,旅游业碳排放总量持续攀升,并与旅游业总收入成正相关。其中旅游交通仓储和邮电业碳排放在旅游业碳排放总量中占主导地位,而旅游餐饮、住宿和购物过程中的碳排放也不容忽视。旅游收入增长与旅游低碳化发展的矛盾仍然十分突出,迫切需要转变旅游业发展方式。%Climate change is projected to have great impact on tourism in various ways;however,tourism also contributes to climate change through the carbon dioxide emissions from transport,accommodation and other tourist activities.Now low-carbon tourism is becoming a popular choice to protect the environment for tourists.A lot of people have already accepted the low-carbon conception,and more and more people like it.But there are still numerous hurdles on the road to really achieve the low-carbon goal in our travels,because there is a large amount of direct energy consumption in the form of fossil fuels or indirect energy consumption in the form of electricity during the whole journey.And this consumption directly leads to more emissions of carbon dioxide.According to international experience,measuring carbon dioxide emissions from tourism is a key step to developing low-carbon tourism.However,the study of low-carbon tourism in China is still in its

  15. Carbon dioxide diffuse emission and thermal energy release from hydrothermal systems at Copahue-Caviahue Volcanic Complex (Argentina)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiodini, Giovanni; Cardellini, Carlo; Lamberti, María Clara; Agusto, Mariano; Caselli, Alberto; Liccioli, Caterina; Tamburello, Giancarlo; Tassi, Franco; Vaselli, Orlando; Caliro, Stefano

    2015-10-01

    The north-western sector of Caviahue caldera (Argentina), close to the active volcanic system of Copahue, is characterized by the presence of several hydrothermal sites that host numerous fumarolic emissions, anomalous soil diffuse degassing of CO2 and hot soils. In March 2014, measurements of soil CO2 fluxes in 5 of these sites (namely, Las Máquinas, Las Maquinitas I, Las Maquinitas II, Anfiteatro, and Termas de Copahue) allowed an estimation that ~ 165 t of deeply derived CO2 is daily released. The gas source is likely related to a relatively shallow geothermal reservoir containing a single vapor phase as also suggested by both the geochemical data from the 3 deep wells drilled in the 1980s and gas geoindicators applied to the fumarolic discharges. Gas equilibria within the H-C-O gas system indicate the presence of a large, probably unique, single phase vapor zone at 200-210 °C feeding the hydrothermal manifestations of Las Máquinas, Las Maquinitas I and II and Termas de Copahue. A natural thermal release of 107 MW was computed by using CO2 as a tracer of the original vapor phase. The magmatic signature of the incondensable fumarolic gases, the wide expanse of the hydrothermal areas and the remarkable high amount of gas and heat released by fluid expulsion seem to be compatible with an active magmatic intrusion beneath this portion of the Caviahue caldera.

  16. Understanding how individuals perceive carbon dioxide. Implications for acceptance of carbon dioxide capture and storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itaoka, K.; Saito, A. [Mizuho Information and Research Institute, Tokyo (Japan); Paukovic, M.; De Best-Waldhober, M. [ECN Policy Studies, Petten (Netherlands); Dowd, A.M.; Jeanneret, T.; Ashworth, P.; James, M. [The Global CCS Institute, Canberra (Australia)

    2012-06-15

    Carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) presents one potential technological solution for mitigating the atmospheric emission of carbon dioxide sources. However, CCS is a relatively new technology with associated uncertainties and perceived risks. For this reason, a growing body of research now focuses on public perceptions and potential for societal acceptance of CCS technology. Almost all explanations of CCS technology make reference to carbon dioxide, with an assumption that the general public understands CO2. It has become apparent that the general public’s knowledge and understanding of CO2’s properties influences how they engage with CO2 emitting industries and CCS technologies. However, surprisingly little research has investigated public perceptions, knowledge, and understanding of CO2. This investigation attempts to fill that gap. This report describes an investigation of how citizens of three countries (Japan, Australia, and the Netherlands) perceive CO2. Furthermore, it attempts to relate individual perceptions of CO2 to perceptions of CCS, and to determine how information provision about the underlying properties and characteristics of CO2 influences individual attitudes towards low carbon energy options, particularly CCS. In brief, the research had four ultimate aims. It aimed to: Explore the public’s knowledge and understanding of the properties of CO2; Examine the influence of that knowledge on their perceptions of CO2 and CCS; Investigate how information provision about the underlying properties and characteristics of CO2 influences individual attitudes towards CCS; and Identify if any differences between countries exist in relation to values and beliefs, knowledge of CO2’s properties, and CCS perceptions.

  17. Population Aging and Future Carbon Emissions in the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Dalton, M.G.; O'Neill, B. C.; Fuernkranz-Prskawetz, A.; Jiang, L.; Pitkin, J

    2005-01-01

    Changes in the age composition of U.S. households over the next several decades could affect energy use and carbon dioxide emissions. this article incorporates population age structure into and energy-economic growth model with multiple dynasties of heterogenous households. The model is used to estimate and compare effects of population aging and technical change on baseline paths of U.S. energy use and emissions. Results show that population aging reduces long-term carbon dioxide emissions, ...

  18. Carbon dioxide emission trends in cars and light trucks: A comparative analysis of emissions and methodologies for Florida's counties (2000 and 2008)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper investigates methodologies to quantify CO2 emissions from cars and light trucks in Florida. The most widely used methodology to calculate greenhouse gas emissions in the transportation sector at the local level uses a harmonic average (HA) methodology based on nationally averaged fuel economies that assume 55% city and 45% highway VMTs. This paper presents a local condition (LC) methodology that accounts for county-level variations in city and highway VMTs, as opposed to assumed uniform driving conditions. Both HA and LC methodologies were used to estimate and compare absolute and per capita CO2 emissions both statewide and counties for 2000 and 2008. From 2000 to 2008, statewide absolute and per capita CO2 emissions increased similarly using HA and LC methodologies; however, the percent change varied considerably among counties. Statewide CO2 emissions calculated from HA and LC methodologies differed by only -0.2% (2000) and 1.7% (2008); however, the differences in the county-level emissions ranged from -8.0% to 14.9% (2000) and from -5.6% to 17.0% (2008). While either the HA or the LC methodology yields a similar result statewide, significant variation exists at the county level, warranting the need to consider local driving conditions when estimating county-level emissions. - Highlights: → The paper evaluates GHG emission methods for on-road passenger vehicles in Florida. → The paper compares methods that assume the harmonic average with actual VMTs driven. → The paper analyzes statewide GHG emissions aggregated by county for 2000 and 2008. → The paper improves on methods that balance bottom-up with top-down GHG emissions.

  19. Method for Extracting and Sequestering Carbon Dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rau, Gregory H.; Caldeira, Kenneth G.

    2005-05-10

    A method and apparatus to extract and sequester carbon dioxide (CO2) from a stream or volume of gas wherein said method and apparatus hydrates CO2, and reacts the resulting carbonic acid with carbonate. Suitable carbonates include, but are not limited to, carbonates of alkali metals and alkaline earth metals, preferably carbonates of calcium and magnesium. Waste products are metal cations and bicarbonate in solution or dehydrated metal salts, which when disposed of in a large body of water provide an effective way of sequestering CO2 from a gaseous environment.

  20. Analyzing Sulfur Dioxide Emissions of Nyamuragira Volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guth, A. L.; Bluth, G. J.; Carn, S. A.

    2002-05-01

    Nyamuragira volcano, located in the Democratic Republic of Congo, is Africa's most active volcano, having erupted 13 times (every 1-3 years) since 1980. The eruption frequency, and the large amounts of sulfur dioxide emitted by this rift volcano, may produce a significant impact on the global sulfur budget. In this project we are attempting to quantify the sulfur dioxide emissions from this volcano over the past 20+ years using satellite data. Since 1978, satellites carrying NASA's Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) instruments have been orbiting the earth collecting atmospheric data. These instruments use six wavelength bands located within the ultraviolet spectrum to measure solar irradiance and the energy reflected and backscattered by the Earth's surface and atmosphere. Sunlit planetary coverage is provided once per day by TOMS data. The spatial resolution of these satellites varies from 24 km (Earth Probe, 1996-1997, but raised to 39 km from 1997 to present) to 62 km (Meteor-3, 1991-1994). Nimbus-7, the satellite operating for the longest span of time (1978-1993), had a nadir footprint of 50 km. The (instantaneous) mass retrievals of sulfur dioxide cloud masses are derived using several different image processing schemes and net tonnages are calculated using a background correction. Volcanic activity associated with this volcano typically consists of long term (weeks to months), and often continuous, effusive emissions. Work to date has discovered over 120 days in which sulfur dioxide plumes were observed from the 13 eruptions (ranging from a minimum of one day to a maximum of 32 days). Most (82%) of the sulfur dioxide clouds measured are relatively low-level, below 100 kilotonnes (kt); 16% of the emissions are between 100 and 1000 kt, and 1.5% were measured to have more than 1000 kt. Current work is focusing on deriving net emission fluxes, integrating the TOMS instantaneous measurements of relatively continuous emission activity. The eruptive activity

  1. SEQUESTERING CARBON DIOXIDE IN COALBEDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K.A.M. Gasem; R.L. Robinson, Jr.; L.R. Radovic

    2003-03-10

    The authors' long-term goal is to develop accurate prediction methods for describing the adsorption behavior of gas mixtures on solid adsorbents over complete ranges of temperature, pressure and adsorbent types. The originally-stated, major objectives of the current project are to (1) measure the adsorption behavior of pure CO{sub 2}, methane, nitrogen, and their binary and ternary mixtures on several selected coals having different properties at temperatures and pressures applicable to the particular coals being studied, (2) generalize the adsorption results in terms of appropriate properties of the coals to facilitate estimation of adsorption behavior for coals other than those studied experimentally, (3) delineate the sensitivity of the competitive adsorption of CO{sub 2}, methane and nitrogen to the specific characteristics of the coal on which they are adsorbed; establish the major differences (if any) in the nature of this competitive adsorption on different coals, and (4) test and/or develop theoretically-based mathematical models to represent accurately the adsorption behavior of mixtures of the type for which measurements are made. As this project has developed, an important additional objective has been added to the above original list. Namely, we have been encouraged to interact with industry and/or governmental agencies to utilize our expertise to advance the state of the art in coalbed adsorption science and technology. As a result of this additional objective, we have participated with the Department of Energy and industry in the measurement and analysis of adsorption behavior as part of two distinct investigations. These include (a) Advanced Resources International (ARI) DOE Project DE-FC26-00NT40924, ''Adsorption of Pure Methane, Nitrogen, and Carbon Dioxide and Their Mixtures on Wet Tiffany Coal'', and (b) the DOE-NETL Project, ''Round Robin: CO{sub 2} Adsorption on Selected Coals''. These activities

  2. SEQUESTERING CARBON DIOXIDE IN COALBEDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K.A.M. Gasem; R.L. Robinson, Jr.; J.E. Fitzgerald; Z. Pan; M. Sudibandriyo

    2003-04-30

    The authors' long-term goal is to develop accurate prediction methods for describing the adsorption behavior of gas mixtures on solid adsorbents over complete ranges of temperature, pressure, and adsorbent types. The originally-stated, major objectives of the current project are to: (1) measure the adsorption behavior of pure CO{sub 2}, methane, nitrogen, and their binary and ternary mixtures on several selected coals having different properties at temperatures and pressures applicable to the particular coals being studied, (2) generalize the adsorption results in terms of appropriate properties of the coals to facilitate estimation of adsorption behavior for coals other than those studied experimentally, (3) delineate the sensitivity of the competitive adsorption of CO{sub 2}, methane, and nitrogen to the specific characteristics of the coal on which they are adsorbed; establish the major differences (if any) in the nature of this competitive adsorption on different coals, and (4) test and/or develop theoretically-based mathematical models to represent accurately the adsorption behavior of mixtures of the type for which measurements are made. As this project developed, an important additional objective was added to the above original list. Namely, we were encouraged to interact with industry and/or governmental agencies to utilize our expertise to advance the state of the art in coalbed adsorption science and technology. As a result of this additional objective, we participated with the Department of Energy and industry in the measurement and analysis of adsorption behavior as part of two distinct investigations. These include (a) Advanced Resources International (ARI) DOE Project DE-FC26-00NT40924, ''Adsorption of Pure Methane, Nitrogen, and Carbon Dioxide and Their Mixtures on Wet Tiffany Coal'', and (b) the DOE-NETL Project, ''Round Robin: CO{sub 2} Adsorption on Selected Coals''. These activities, contributing

  3. The Carbon Emission Game

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    When Chinese President Hu Jintao attended the UN climate summit on September22,he made a solemn commitment that China will cut its per GDP unit carbon emission to a significant amount in 2020 compared with that of 2005.

  4. Regional carbon dioxide implications of forest bioenergy production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudiburg, Tara W.; Law, Beverly E.; Wirth, Christian; Luyssaert, Sebastiaan

    2011-11-01

    Strategies for reducing carbon dioxide emissions include substitution of fossil fuel with bioenergy from forests, where carbon emitted is expected to be recaptured in the growth of new biomass to achieve zero net emissions, and forest thinning to reduce wildfire emissions. Here, we use forest inventory data to show that fire prevention measures and large-scale bioenergy harvest in US West Coast forests lead to 2-14% (46-405TgC) higher emissions compared with current management practices over the next 20 years. We studied 80 forest types in 19 ecoregions, and found that the current carbon sink in 16 of these ecoregions is sufficiently strong that it cannot be matched or exceeded through substitution of fossil fuels by forest bioenergy. If the sink in these ecoregions weakens below its current level by 30-60gCm-2yr-1 owing to insect infestations, increased fire emissions or reduced primary production, management schemes including bioenergy production may succeed in jointly reducing fire risk and carbon emissions. In the remaining three ecoregions, immediate implementation of fire prevention and biofuel policies may yield net emission savings. Hence, forest policy should consider current forest carbon balance, local forest conditions and ecosystem sustainability in establishing how to decrease emissions.

  5. Designed amyloid fibers as materials for selective carbon dioxide capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dan; Furukawa, Hiroyasu; Deng, Hexiang; Liu, Cong; Yaghi, Omar M; Eisenberg, David S

    2014-01-01

    New materials capable of binding carbon dioxide are essential for addressing climate change. Here, we demonstrate that amyloids, self-assembling protein fibers, are effective for selective carbon dioxide capture. Solid-state NMR proves that amyloid fibers containing alkylamine groups reversibly bind carbon dioxide via carbamate formation. Thermodynamic and kinetic capture-and-release tests show the carbamate formation rate is fast enough to capture carbon dioxide by dynamic separation, undiminished by the presence of water, in both a natural amyloid and designed amyloids having increased carbon dioxide capacity. Heating to 100 °C regenerates the material. These results demonstrate the potential of amyloid fibers for environmental carbon dioxide capture.

  6. Geographic patterns of carbon dioxide emissions from fossil-fuel burning, hydraulic cement production, and gas flaring on a one degree by one degree grid cell basis: 1950 to 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brenkert, A.L. [ed.] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center; Andres, R.J. [Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK (United States). Inst. of Northern Engineering; Marland, G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.; Fung, I. [Univ. of Victoria, British Columbia (Canada)]|[National Aeronautics and Space Administration, New York, NY (United States). Goddard Inst. for Space Studies; Matthews, E. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)]|[National Aeronautics and Space Administration, New York, NY (United States). Goddard Inst. for Space Studies

    1997-03-01

    Data sets of one degree latitude by one degree longitude carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions in units of thousand metric tons of carbon (C) per year from anthropogenic sources have been produced for 1950, 1960, 1970, 1980 and 1990. Detailed geographic information on CO{sub 2} emissions can be critical in understanding the pattern of the atmospheric and biospheric response to these emissions. Global, regional and national annual estimates for 1950 through 1992 were published previously. Those national, annual CO{sub 2} emission estimates were based on statistics on fossil-fuel burning, cement manufacturing and gas flaring in oil fields as well as energy production, consumption and trade data, using the methods of Marland and Rotty. The national annual estimates were combined with gridded one-degree data on political units and 1984 human populations to create the new gridded CO{sub 2} emission data sets. The same population distribution was used for each of the years as proxy for the emission distribution within each country. The implied assumption for that procedure was that per capita energy use and fuel mix is uniform over a political unit. The consequence of this first-order procedure is that the spatial changes observed over time are solely due to changes in national energy consumption and nation-based fuel mix. Increases in emissions over time are apparent for most areas.

  7. Characteristics of Carbon Dioxide Emission from China's Cement Industry and Its Dynamic Development%我国水泥工业碳排放特征及动态变化分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李新; 吕淑珍; 王海滨; 石建屏

    2013-01-01

    水泥工业是温室气体二氧化碳(CO2)的主要排放源,利用碳排放数学模型计算2001-2010年我国水泥工业碳的排放量,分析碳排放量的变化特点和发展趋势.结果表明:水泥工业碳排放总量逐年增长,与水泥产量和排放强度呈线性关系.“十一五”期间单位产品碳排放强度由0.69t/t下降到0.65t/t.万元GDP碳排放量2008年达到最低值为0.295 1 t,平均每年万元GDP碳排放量下降2.85%.水泥工业十年间实施节能降耗、资源循环利用、提高经济效益等措施,对于减少碳排放具有明显效果.%Cement industry is a major source of greenhouse gas- carbon dioxide (CO2) emission. Mathematical model was used to calculate carbon emission quantities for China's cement industry during 2001 to 2010, and change characteristics and trend for carbon emission with cement outputs and emission factors were analyzed. Results indicated that carbon emissions quantities increased rapidly every year, and there is a linear relationship between carbon emission quantities and cement output, emission factors. Carbon emission factors decreased from 0.69 t/t to 0.65 t/t during the 11 th Five- Year- Plan period. Carbon emission quantities of ten thousand Yuan GDP decreased to minimum 0.295 1 t in 2008, decreased by 2.85%. Results showed that the energy saving and resource recycling and increase of economic efficiency are appearing in the reduction of carbon emissions.

  8. Synthesis of fluoropolymers in supercritical carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluoropolymers are used in many technologically demanding applications because of their balance of high-performance properties. A significant impediment to the synthesis of variants of commercially available amorphous fluoropolymers is their general insolubility in most solvents except chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). The environmental concerns about CFCs can be circumvented by preparing these technologically important materials in supercritical fluids. The homogeneous solution polymerization of highly fluorinated acrylic monomers can be achieved in supercritical carbon dioxide by using free radical methods. In addition, detailed decomposition rates and efficiency factors were measured for azobisisobutyronitrile in supercritical carbon dioxide and were compared to those obtained with conventional liquid solvents

  9. Global deforestation: contribution to atmospheric carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodwell, G M; Hobbie, J E; Houghton, R A; Melillo, J M; Moore, B; Peterson, B J; Shaver, G R

    1983-12-01

    A study of effects of terrestrial biota on the amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere suggests that the global net release of carbon due to forest clearing between 1860 and 1980 was between 135 x 10(15) and 228 x 10(15) grams. Between 1.8 x 10(15) and 4.7 x 10(15) grams of carbon were released in 1980, of which nearly 80 percent was due to deforestation, principally in the tropics. The annual release of carbon from the biota and soils exceeded the release from fossil fuels until about 1960. Because the biotic release has been and remains much larger than is commonly assumed, the airborne fraction, usually considered to be about 50 percent of the release from fossil fuels, was probably between 22 and 43 percent of the total carbon released in 1980. The increase in carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is thought by some to be increasing the storage of carbon in the earth's remaining forests sufficiently to offset the release from deforestation. The interpretation of the evidence presented here suggests no such effect; deforestation appears to be the dominant biotic effect on atmospheric carbon dioxide. If deforestation increases in proportion to population, the biotic release of carbon will reach 9 x 10(15) grams per year before forests are exhausted early in the next century. The possibilities for limiting the accumulation of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere through reduction in use of fossil fuels and through management of forests may be greater than is commonly assumed. PMID:17747369

  10. Enhancement of enterotoxin production by carbon dioxide in Vibrio cholerae.

    OpenAIRE

    Shimamura, T; Watanabe, S; Sasaki, S.

    1985-01-01

    We found that Vibrio cholerae 569B produced much more cholera enterotoxin in the presence of added carbon dioxide than in its absence. An atmosphere of 10% carbon dioxide was optimal for maximal enterotoxin production.

  11. Measuring global sulfur dioxide emissions with satellite sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Colin

    2013-11-01

    Atmospheric sulfur dioxide affects the weather by enhancing cloud formation, and long-term shifts in emissions can change the climate by increasing the amount of solar radiation scattered back into space. Sulfur dioxide emissions are the basis for acid rain, and the gas itself can cause respiratory problems. Despite the compound's importance to climate, the difficulties associated with accurately measuring sulfur dioxide mean that rates of emissions are generally not well understood.

  12. Electricity from fossil fuels without CO{sub 2} emissions: assessing the costs of carbon dioxide capture and sequestration in US electricity markets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, T.L.; Keith, D.W. [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA (US). Dept. of Engineering and Public Policy

    2001-10-01

    The decoupling of fossil-fuelled electricity production from atmospheric CO{sub 2} emissions via CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration (CCS) is increasingly regarded as an important means of mitigating climate change at a reasonable cost. Engineering analyses of CO{sub 2} mitigation typically compare the cost of electricity for a base generation technology to that for a similar plant with CO{sub 2} capture and then compute the carbon emissions mitigated per unit of cost. It can be hard to interpret mitigation cost estimates from this plant-level approach when a consistent base technology cannot be identified. In addition, neither engineering analyses nor general equilibrium models can capture the economics of plant dispatch. A realistic assessment of the costs of carbon sequestration as an emissions abatement strategy in the electricity sector therefore requires a systems-level analysis. The authors discuss various frameworks for computing mitigation costs and introduce a simplified model of electricity sector planning. Results from a 'bottom-up' engineering-economic analysis for a representative US North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) region illustrate how the penetration of CCS technologies and the dispatch of generating units vary with the price of carbon emissions and thereby determine the relationship between mitigation cost and emissions reduction. 13 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Magnesian calcite sorbent for carbon dioxide capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mabry, J.C.; Mondal, K. [Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, IL (United States)

    2011-07-01

    Magnesian calcite with controlled properties was synthesized for the removal of carbon dioxide. The results from characterization, reactivity and CO{sub 2} capture capacity for different synthesis conditions are reported. The magnesian calcite samples (CaCO{sub 3}:MgCO{sub 3}) were synthesized by the coprecipitation of specific amounts of commercially available CaO and MgO by carbon dioxide. Characterization was done with BET, SEM/EDS, particle size analysis and XRD. The capacity was measured using TGA cycles at 800 {sup o}C and compared for different preparation conditions. The effects of CaO, MgO and surfactant loading on the physical properties and carbonation activity were studied to determine the optimal synthesis condition. A long-term carbonation-calcination cycling test was conducted on the optimal sample. It was observed that the sample maintained its capacity to 86% of its original uptake even after 50 cycles.

  14. Immobilized Ruthenium Catalyst for Carbon Dioxide Hydrogenation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying Min YU; Jin Hua FEI; Yi Ping ZHANG; Xiao Ming ZHENG

    2006-01-01

    Three kinds of cross linked polystyrene resin (PS) supported ruthenium complexes were developed as catalysts for the synthesis of formic acid from carbon dioxide hydrogenation. Many factors, such as the functionalized supports, solvents and ligands, could influence their activities and reuse performances greatly. These immobilized catalysts also offer the industrial advantages such as easy separation.

  15. Conductive polymers for carbon dioxide sensing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doan, T.C.D.

    2012-01-01

    Augmented levels of carbon dioxide (CO2) in greenhouses stimulate plant growth through photosynthesis. Wireless sensor networks monitoring CO2 levels in greenhouses covering large areas require preferably low power sensors to minimize energy consumption. Therefore, the main obj

  16. Carbon dioxide foaming of glassy polymers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wessling, M.; Borneman, Z.; Boomgaard, van den Th.; Smolders, C.A.

    1994-01-01

    The mechanism of foaming a glassy polymer using sorbed carbon dioxide is studied in detail. A glassy polymer supersaturated with nitrogen forms a microcellular foam, if the polymer is quickly heated above its glass transition temperature. A glassy polymer supersaturated with CO2 forms this foam-like

  17. Carbon dioxide sensing with sulfonated polyaniline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doan, D.C.T.; Ramaneti, R.; Baggerman, J.; Bent, van der J.; Marcelis, A.T.M.; Tong, H.D.; Rijn, van C.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    The use of polyaniline and especially sulfonated polyaniline (SPAN) is explored for sensing carbon dioxide (CO2) at room temperature. Frequency-dependent AC measurements were carried out to detect changes in impedance of the polymer, drop casted on interdigitated electrodes, when exposed to CO2 gas.

  18. Diiodination of Alkynes in supercritical Carbon dioxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李金恒; 谢叶香; 尹笃林; 江焕峰

    2003-01-01

    A general,green and efficient method for the synthesis of transdiiodoalkenes in CO2(sc) has been developed.Trans-diiodoalkenes were obtained stereospecifically in quantitative yields via diiodination of both electron-rich and electron-deficient alkynes in the presence of KI,Ce(SO4)2 and water in supercritical carbon dioxide [CO2(sc)]at 40℃.

  19. 21 CFR 184.1240 - Carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    .... The solid form, dry ice, sublimes under atmospheric pressure at a temperature of −78.5 °C. Carbon dioxide is prepared as a byproduct of the manufacture of lime during the “burning” of limestone, from the... processing aid as defined in § 170.3(o)(24) of this chapter; and a propellant, aerating agent, and gas...

  20. Carbon dioxide in European coastal waters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borges, A.V.; Schiettecatte, L.-S.; Abril, G.; Delille, B.; Gazeau, F.P.H.

    2006-01-01

    We compiled from literature annually integrated air–water fluxes of carbon dioxide (CO2) computed from field measurements, in 20 coastal European environments that were gathered into 3 main ecosystems: inner estuaries, upwelling continental shelves and non-upwelling continental shelves. The comparis

  1. Heat transfer coefficient for boiling carbon dioxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Hans Jørgen Høgaard; Jensen, Per Henrik

    1998-01-01

    Heat transfer coefficient and pressure drop for boiling carbon dioxide (R744) flowing in a horizontal pipe has been measured. The calculated heat transfer coeeficient has been compared with the Chart correlation of Shah. The Chart Correlation predits too low heat transfer coefficient but the ratio...

  2. Heat transfer coeffcient for boiling carbon dioxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Hans Jørgen Høgaard; Jensen, Per Henrik

    1997-01-01

    Heat transfer coefficient and pressure drop for boiling carbon dioxide (R744) flowing in a horizontal pipe has been measured. The pipe is heated by condensing R22 outside the pipe. The heat input is supplied by an electrical heater wich evaporates the R22. With the heat flux assumed constant over...

  3. 27 CFR 26.222 - Still wines containing carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... carbon dioxide. 26.222 Section 26.222 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND... ISLANDS Formulas for Products From the Virgin Islands § 26.222 Still wines containing carbon dioxide. (a) General. Still wines may contain not more than 0.392 gram of carbon dioxide per 100 milliliters of...

  4. 27 CFR 26.52 - Still wines containing carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... carbon dioxide. 26.52 Section 26.52 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND... ISLANDS Formulas for Products From Puerto Rico § 26.52 Still wines containing carbon dioxide. (a) General. Still wines may contain not more than 0.392 gram of carbon dioxide per 100 milliliters of wine;...

  5. 46 CFR 169.565 - Fixed carbon dioxide system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fixed carbon dioxide system. 169.565 Section 169.565... Lifesaving and Firefighting Equipment Firefighting Equipment § 169.565 Fixed carbon dioxide system. (a) The number of pounds of carbon dioxide required for each space protected must be equal to the gross volume...

  6. 21 CFR 868.5310 - Carbon dioxide absorber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Carbon dioxide absorber. 868.5310 Section 868.5310...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5310 Carbon dioxide absorber. (a) Identification. A carbon dioxide absorber is a device that is intended for medical purposes and that is used in...

  7. 9 CFR 313.5 - Chemical; carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Chemical; carbon dioxide. 313.5... INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION HUMANE SLAUGHTER OF LIVESTOCK § 313.5 Chemical; carbon dioxide. The slaughtering of sheep, calves and swine with the use of carbon dioxide gas and the handling in...

  8. Somewhere beyond the sea? The oceanic - carbon dioxide - reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisinger, Philipp; Wittlich, Christian

    2014-05-01

    In correlation to climate change and CO2 emission different campaigns highlight the importance of forests and trees to regulate the concentration of carbon dioxide in the earths' atmosphere. Seeing millions of square miles of rainforest cut down every day, this is truly a valid point. Nevertheless, we often tend to forget what scientists like Spokes try to raise awareness for: The oceans - and foremost deep sea sections - resemble the second biggest deposit of carbon dioxide. Here carbon is mainly found in form of carbonate and hydrogen carbonate. The carbonates are needed by corals and other sea organisms to maintain their skeletal structure and thereby to remain vital. To raise awareness for the protection of this fragile ecosystem in schools is part of our approach. Awareness is achieved best through understanding. Therefore, our approach is a hands-on activity that aims at showing students how the carbon dioxide absorption changes in relation to the water temperature - in times of global warming a truly sensitive topic. The students use standard syringes filled with water (25 ml) at different temperatures (i.e. 10°C, 20°C, 40°C). Through a connector students inject carbon dioxide (25ml) into the different samples. After a fixed period of time, students can read of the remaining amount of carbon dioxide in relation to the given water temperature. Just as with every scientific project, students need to closely monitor their experiments and alter their setups (e.g. water temperature or acidity) according to their initial planning. A digital template (Excel-based) supports the analysis of students' experiments. Overview: What: hands-on, minds -on activity using standard syringes to exemplify carbon dioxide absorption in relation to the water temperature (Le Chatelier's principle) For whom: adjustable from German form 11-13 (age: 16-19 years) Time: depending on the prior knowledge 45-60 min. Sources (extract): Spokes, L.: Wie Ozeane CO2 aufnehmen. Environmental

  9. 40 CFR 86.316-79 - Carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide analyzer specifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide... Test Procedures § 86.316-79 Carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide analyzer specifications. (a) Carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide measurements are to be made with nondispersive infrared (NDIR) an analyzers....

  10. Temporal biomass dynamics of an Arctic plankton bloom in response toincreasing levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schulz, K.G.; Bellerby, R.G.J.; Brussaard, C.P.D.; Büdenbender, J.; Czerny, J.; Engel, A.; Fischer, M.; Koch-Klavsen, S.; Krug, S.A.; Lischka, S.; Ludwig, A.; Meyerhöfer, M.; Nondal, G.; Silyakova, A.; Stuhr, A.; Riebesell, U.

    2013-01-01

    Ocean acidification and carbonation, driven by anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2), have been shown to affect a variety of marine organisms and are likely to change ecosystem functioning. High latitudes, especially the Arctic, will be the first to encounter profound changes in carbonate

  11. Adsorption of Carbon Dioxide on Activated Carbon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Guo; Liping Chang; Kechang Xie

    2006-01-01

    The adsorption of CO2 on a raw activated carbon A and three modified activated carbon samples B, C, and D at temperatures ranging from 303 to 333 K and the thermodynamics of adsorption have been investigated using a vacuum adsorption apparatus in order to obtain more information about the effect of CO2 on removal of organic sulfur-containing compounds in industrial gases. The active ingredients impregnated in the carbon samples show significant influence on the adsorption for CO2 and its volumes adsorbed on modified carbon samples B, C, and D are all larger than that on the raw carbon sample A. On the other hand, the physical parameters such as surface area, pore volume, and micropore volume of carbon samples show no influence on the adsorbed amount of CO2. The Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) equation was the best model for fitting the adsorption data on carbon samples A and B, while the Freundlich equation was the best fit for the adsorption on carbon samples C and D. The isosteric heats of adsorption on carbon samples A, B, C, and D derived from the adsorption isotherms using the Clapeyron equation decreased slightly increasing surface loading. The heat of adsorption lay between 10.5 and 28.4 kJ/mol, with the carbon sample D having the highest value at all surface coverages that were studied. The observed entropy change associated with the adsorption for the carbon samples A, B, and C (above the surface coverage of 7 ml/g) was lower than the theoretical value for mobile adsorption. However, it was higher than the theoretical value for mobile adsorption but lower than the theoretical value for localized adsorption for carbon sample D.

  12. Monitoring carbon dioxide in mechanically ventilated patients during hyperbaric treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregård, Asger; Jansen, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Measurement of the arterial carbon dioxide (P(a)CO(2)) is an established part of the monitoring of mechanically ventilated patients. Other ways to get information about carbon dioxide in the patient are measurement of end-tidal carbon dioxide (P(ET)CO(2)) and transcutaneous carbon dioxide (PTCCO2......). Carbon dioxide in the blood and cerebral tissue has great influence on vasoactivity and thereby blood volume of the brain. We have found no studies on the correlation between P(ET)CO(2) or P(TC)CO(2), and P(a)CO(2) during hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT)....

  13. Materials for carbon dioxide separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Qingqing

    2014-10-01

    The CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities at room temperature have been investigated by comparing carbon nanotubes, fullerene, graphenes, graphite and granular activated carbons. It turned out that the amount of the micropore surface area was dominating the CO{sub 2} adsorption ability. Another promising class of materials for CO{sub 2} capture and separation are CaO derived from the eggshells. Two aspects were studied in present work: a new hybrid materials synthesized by doping the CaTiO{sub 3} and the relationship between physisorption and chemisorption properties of CaO-based materials.

  14. Carbon dioxide research conference: carbon dioxide, science and consensus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The DOE program focuses on three areas each of which requires more research before the many CO2-related questions can be answered. These areas include the global carbon cycle, climate effects, and vegetation effects. Additional information is needed to understand the sources and sinks of CO2. Research efforts include an attempt to estimate regional and global changes in temperature and precipitation. Increased atmospheric CO2 may be a potential benefit to vegetation and crops because it is an essential element required for plant growth. Eight separate papers are included

  15. The underground storages of carbon dioxide. Juridical aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the framework of the reduction of the carbon dioxide emissions in the air, the underground storage of the CO2 is studied. Some experimentation are already realized in the world and envisaged in France. This document aims to study the juridical aspects of these first works in France. After a presentation of the realization conditions and some recalls on the carbon dioxide its capture and storage, the natural CO2 underground storages and the first artificial storages are discussed. The CO2 waste qualification, in the framework of the environmental legislation is then detailed with a special task on the Lacq region. The problem of the sea underground storages is also presented. (A.L.B.)

  16. Crop soil air carbon dioxide concentration and sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guiresse, M.; Gers, C.; Dourel, L.; Kaemmerer, M.; Revel, J.C. [Institut National Polytechnique de Toulouse, Toulouse (France). Ecole Nationale Superieure Agronomique de Toulouse

    1995-12-31

    The introduction of organic compounds into the soil may increase carbon dioxide emission and thus change the composition of the soil air and microfauna. These factors were studied in a field experiment in luvi-redoxisoils in the South West of France. The untreated liquid sludge from the wastewater treatment plant of Toulouse was tested. The first field plot was an unploughed plot, without any fertilizer and any sludge; the second was a control plot sown with Zea mays and a standard mineral fertilizer without any sludge; the third plot was sown with Zea mays and a normal amount of sludge; and the last plot was sown with Zea mays and a large amount of sludge. In these plots soil air dioxide carbon concentration during all the maize cultivation was measured using the Draeger field method twice a week. The results showed that burying degradable organic compounds increases soil air CO{sub 2}. 8 refs., 6 figs.

  17. 40 CFR 60.1745 - What must I do if I choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? 60.1745 Section 60.1745 Protection of Environment... choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? You must establish the relationship between oxygen and carbon dioxide during the initial evaluation of your continuous emission...

  18. Trading permanent and temporary carbon emissions credits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marland, Gregg [ORNL; Marland, Eric [Appalachian State University

    2009-08-01

    In this issue of Climatic Change, Van Kooten (2009) addresses an issue that has bedeviled negotiators since the drafting stage of the Kyoto Protocol. If we accept that increasing withdrawals of carbon dioxide from the atmpshere has the same net impact on the climate system as reducing emissions of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere, how do we design a system that allows trading of one for the other? As van Kooten expresses the challenge: 'The problem is that emissions reduction and carbon sequestration, while opposite sides of the same coin in some sense, are not directly comparable, thereby inhibiting their trade in carbon markets.' He explains: 'The difficulty centers on the length of time that mitigation strategies without CO{sub 2} from entering the atmosphere - the duration problem.' While reducing emissions of CO{sub 2} represents an essentially permanent benefit for the atmosphere, capturing CO{sub 2} that has been produced (whether capture is from the atmosphere or directly from, for example, the exhaust from power plants) there is the challenge of storing the carbon adn the risk that it will yet escape to the atmosphere. Permanent benefit to the atmosphere is often not assured for carbon sequestration activities. This is especially true if the carbon is taken up and stored in the biosphere - e.g. in forest trees or agricultural soils.

  19. Carbon dioxide capture and use: organic synthesis using carbon dioxide from exhaust gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seung Hyo; Kim, Kwang Hee; Hong, Soon Hyeok

    2014-01-13

    A carbon capture and use (CCU) strategy was applied to organic synthesis. Carbon dioxide (CO2) captured directly from exhaust gas was used for organic transformations as efficiently as hyper-pure CO2 gas from a commercial source, even for highly air- and moisture-sensitive reactions. The CO2 capturing aqueous ethanolamine solution could be recycled continuously without any diminished reaction efficiency.

  20. Sequestering ADM ethanol plant carbon dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finley, R.J.; Riddle, D.

    2008-01-01

    Archer Daniels Midland Co. (ADM) and the Illinois State Geological Survey (ISGS) are collaborating on a project in confirming that a rock formation can store carbon dioxide from the plant in its pores. The project aimed to sequester the gas underground permanently to minimize release of the greenhouse gas into the atmosphere. It is also designed to store one million tons of carbon dioxide over a three-year period. The project is worth $84.3M, funded by $66.7M from the US Department Energy, supplemented by co-funding from ADM and other corporate and state resources. The project will start drilling of wells to an expected depth over 6500 feet into the Mount Simon Sandstone formation.

  1. Carbon dioxide in vascular imaging and intervention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Xiaoming [Dept. of Clinical Radiology, Univ. Hospital, Kuopio (Finland); Manninen, H. [Dept. of Clinical Radiology, Univ. Hospital, Kuopio (Finland); Soimakallio, S. [Dept. of Clinical Radiology, Univ. Hospital, Kuopio (Finland)

    1995-07-01

    Angiography with iodinated contrast agents is bound up with the risks of contrast-induced nephrotoxicity and hypersensitivity, which led to the idea of using carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) gas as a negative contrast medium to eliminate these drawbacks. During the last decade, refinements and experiences have proved carbon dioxide digital subtraction angiography (CO{sub 2}-DSA) to be an accurate, safe, and clinically promising vascular imaging modality, with the advantages of no hypersensitivity and no nephrotoxicity as well as minimal patient discomfort. In this article, we have reviewed the history, physical and chemical aspects, techniques, and pathophysiologic changes with the use of CO{sub 2}-DSA as well as some clinical trials. Applications of CO{sub 2} gas in vascular interventions and other imagings, and the advantages and limitations of using CO{sub 2} gas in DSA are also discussed. (orig.).

  2. Carbon dioxide in vascular imaging and intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, X; Manninen, H; Soimakallio, S

    1995-07-01

    Angiography with iodinated contrast agents is bound up with the risks of contrast-induced nephrotoxicity and hypersensitivity, which led to the idea of using carbon dioxide (CO2) gas as a negative contrast medium to eliminate these drawbacks. During the last decade, refinements and experiences have proved carbon dioxide digital subtraction angiography (CO2-DSA) to be an accurate, safe, and clinically promising vascular imaging modality, with the advantages of no hypersensitivity and no nephrotoxicity as well as minimal patient discomfort. In this article, we have reviewed the history, physical and chemical aspects, techniques, and pathophysiologic changes with the use of CO2-DSA as well as some clinical trials. Applications of CO2 gas in vascular interventions and other imagings, and the advantages and limitations of using CO2 gas in DSA are also discussed. PMID:7619608

  3. Supercritical carbon dioxide decontamination of PAH contaminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Before the 1940's, more than 2,000 manufactured gas plant sites existed across North America for the production of a low Btu gas for heating and lighting. These sites, now abandoned, are contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), a coal gasification byproduct that was dumped on-site into unlined pits. The potential for ground water contamination of PAHs has made these sites an environmental concern. The remediation of PAH contaminated sites is difficult to achieve by conventional cleaning methods. In this work, supercritical carbon dioxide extraction has been investigated on a town gas soil containing 3.37 wt% contamination. The soil has been remediated in a 300 cm3 semi-continuous extraction vessel and the effects of solvent temperature, pressure, and density will be discussed. Supercritical carbon dioxide extraction is an emerging technology that can extract compounds that are difficult or impossible by conventional processes

  4. Carbon dioxide in vascular imaging and intervention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angiography with iodinated contrast agents is bound up with the risks of contrast-induced nephrotoxicity and hypersensitivity, which led to the idea of using carbon dioxide (CO2) gas as a negative contrast medium to eliminate these drawbacks. During the last decade, refinements and experiences have proved carbon dioxide digital subtraction angiography (CO2-DSA) to be an accurate, safe, and clinically promising vascular imaging modality, with the advantages of no hypersensitivity and no nephrotoxicity as well as minimal patient discomfort. In this article, we have reviewed the history, physical and chemical aspects, techniques, and pathophysiologic changes with the use of CO2-DSA as well as some clinical trials. Applications of CO2 gas in vascular interventions and other imagings, and the advantages and limitations of using CO2 gas in DSA are also discussed. (orig.)

  5. Recycling technology of emitted carbon dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arakawa, Hironori [National Inst. of Materials and Chemical Research (NIMC), Ibaraki (Japan)

    1993-12-31

    Ways to halt global warming are being discussed worldwide. Global warming is an energy problem which is mainly attributed to the large volumes of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) released into the atmosphere from the rapid increase in energy consumption since the Industrial Revolution. The basic solution to the problem, therefore, is to cut consumption of fossil fuels. To this end, it is important to promote energy conservation by improving the fuel efficiency of machines, as well as shift to energy sources that do not emit carbon dioxide and develop related technologies. If current trends in economic growth continue in the devloping world as well as the developed countries, there can be no doubt that energy consumption will increase. Therefore, alongside energy conservation and the development of alternative energies, the importance of technologies to recover and fix CO{sub 2} will increase in the fight against global warming.

  6. Revising China's energy consumption and carbon emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z.

    2015-12-01

    China is the world's largest carbon emitter and takes the lion's share of new increased emission since 2000, China's carbon emissions and mitigation efforts have received global attentions (Liu et al., Nature 500, 143-145)1. Yet China's emission estimates have been approved to be greatly uncertain (Guan et al., Nature Climate Change 2, 672-675)2. Accurate estimation becomes even crucial as China has recently pledged to reach a carbon emission peak by 2030, but no quantitative target has been given, nor is it even possible to assess without a reasonable baseline. Here we produced new estimates of Chinese carbon emissions for 1950-2012 based on a new investigation in energy consumption activities and emission factors using extensively surveyed and experimental data from 4243 mines and 602 coal samples. We reported that the total energy consumption is 10% higher than the nationally published value. The investigated emission factors used in China are significantly (40%) different from the IPCC default values which were used in drawing up several previous emission inventories. The final calculated total carbon emissions from China are 10% different than the amount reported by international data sets. The new estimate provides a revision of 4% of global emissions, which could have important implications for global carbon budgets and burden-sharing of climate change mitigation. 1 Liu, Z. et al. A low-carbon road map for China. Nature 500, 143-145 (2013). 2 Guan, D., Liu, Z., Geng, Y., Lindner, S. & Hubacek, K. The gigatonne gap in China's carbon dioxide inventories. Nature Climate Change, 672-675 (2012).

  7. Water in supercritical carbon dioxide dyeing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Lai-Jiu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the effect of water serving as entrainer on the dyeing of wool fabrics in supercritical carbon dioxide. Compared with previous supercritical dyeing methods, addition of water makes the dyeing process more effective under low temperature and low pressure. During dyeing process, dyestuff can be uniformly distributed on fabrics’s surface due to water interaction, as a result coloration is enhanced while color difference is decreased.

  8. Dye solubility in supercritical carbon dioxide fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Jun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Supercritical carbon dioxide fluid is an alternative solvent for the water of the traditional dyeing. The solubility of dyestuff affects greatly the dyeing process. A theoretical model for predicting the dye solubility is proposed and verified experimentally. The paper concludes that the pressure has a greater impact on the dyestuff solubility than temperature, and an optimal dyeing condition is suggested for the highest distribution coefficient of dyestuff.

  9. Plasma beam discharge in carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper deals with the dissociation of carbon dioxide in nonequilibrium plasma of a stationary plasma-beam discharge. Experimental results of spectroscopic and probe measurements of plasma parameters are given. Moreover, a mass-spectrometric analysis of gaseous products of the chemical reactions is presented. In addition the measurement of the deposition rate of solid products by means of a quartz oscillator is described. The results show that plasma beam discharge is an effective tool for inducing plasma-chemical reactions. (author)

  10. Pulsed discharge plasmas in supercritical carbon dioxide

    OpenAIRE

    Kiyan, Tsuyoshi; Uemura, A.; Tanaka, K.; Zhang, C. H.; Namihira, Takao; Sakugawa, Takashi; Katsuki, Sunao; Akiyama, Hidenori; Roy, B.C; Sasaki, M.; Goto, M; キヤン, ツヨシ; ナミヒラ, タカオ; サクガワ, タカシ; カツキ, スナオ

    2005-01-01

    In recent years, several studies about electrical discharge plasma in supercritical carbon dioxide (CO2) have been carried out. One of the unique characteristics of supercritical fluid is a large density fluctuation near the critical point that can result in marked dramatic changes of thermal conductivity. Therefore, the electrical discharge plasma produced in supercritical fluid has unique features and reactions unlike those of normal plasma produced in gas phase. In our experiments, two typ...

  11. Carbon dioxide in Arctic and subarctic regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gosink, T. A.; Kelley, J. J.

    1981-03-01

    A three year research project was presented that would define the role of the Arctic ocean, sea ice, tundra, taiga, high latitude ponds and lakes and polar anthropogenic activity on the carbon dioxide content of the atmosphere. Due to the large physical and geographical differences between the two polar regions, a comparison of CO/sub 2/ source and sink strengths of the two areas was proposed. Research opportunities during the first year, particularly those aboard the Swedish icebreaker, YMER, provided additional confirmatory data about the natural source and sink strengths for carbon dioxide in the Arctic regions. As a result, the hypothesis that these natural sources and sinks are strong enough to significantly affect global atmospheric carbon dioxide levels is considerably strengthened. Based on the available data we calculate that the whole Arctic region is a net annual sink for about 1.1 x 10/sup 15/ g of CO/sub 2/, or the equivalent of about 5% of the annual anthropogenic input into the atmosphere. For the second year of this research effort, research on the seasonal sources and sinks of CO/sub 2/ in the Arctic will be continued. Particular attention will be paid to the seasonal sea ice zones during the freeze and thaw periods, and the tundra-taiga regions, also during the freeze and thaw periods.

  12. Conversion of carbon dioxide to valuable petrochemicals:An approach to clean development mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Farnaz Tahriri Zangeneh; Saeed Sahebdelfar; Maryam Takht Ravanchi

    2011-01-01

    The increase of atmospheric carbon dioxide and the global warming due to its greenhouse effect resulted in worldwide concerns. On the other hand, carbon dioxide might be considered as a valuable and renewable carbon source. One approach to reduce carbon dioxide emissions could be its capture and recycle via transformation into chemicals using the technologies in C1 chemistry. Despite its great interest, there are difficulties in CO2 separation on the one hand, and thermodynamic stability of carbon dioxide molecule rendering its chemical activity low on the other hand. Carbon dioxide has been already used in petrochemical industries for production of limited chemicals such as urea.The utilization of carbon dioxide does not necessarily involve development of new processes, and in certain processes such as methanol synthesis and methane steam reforming, addition of CO2 into the feed results in its utilization and increases carbon efficiency. In other cases,modifications in catalyst and/or processes, or even new catalysts and processes, are necessary. In either case, catalysis plays a crucial role in carbon dioxide conversion and effective catalysts are required for commercial realization of the related processes. Technologies for CO2 utilization are emerging after many years of research and development efforts.

  13. Production of lightweight aggregate from industrial waste and carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunning, Peter J; Hills, Colin D; Carey, Paula J

    2009-10-01

    The concomitant recycling of waste and carbon dioxide emissions is the subject of developing technology designed to close the industrial process loop and facilitate the bulk-re-use of waste in, for example, construction. The present work discusses a treatment step that employs accelerated carbonation to convert gaseous carbon dioxide into solid calcium carbonate through a reaction with industrial thermal residues. Treatment by accelerated carbonation enabled a synthetic aggregate to be made from thermal residues and waste quarry fines. The aggregates produced had a bulk density below 1000 kg/m(3) and a high water absorption capacity. Aggregate crushing strengths were between 30% and 90% stronger than the proprietary lightweight expanded clay aggregate available in the UK. Cast concrete blocks containing the carbonated aggregate achieve compressive strengths of 24 MPa, making them suitable for use with concrete exposed to non-aggressive service environments. The energy intensive firing and sintering processes traditionally required to produce lightweight aggregates can now be augmented by a cold-bonding, low energy method that contributes to the reduction of green house gases to the atmosphere. PMID:19577916

  14. Assessment of fossil fuel carbon dioxide and other anthropogenic trace gas emissions from airborne measurements over Sacramento, California in spring 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. Turnbull

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Direct quantification of fossil fuel CO2 (CO2ff in atmospheric samples can be used to examine several carbon cycle and air quality questions. We collected in situ CO2, CO, and CH4 measurements and flask samples in the boundary layer and free troposphere over Sacramento, California, USA, during two aircraft flights over and downwind of this urban area during spring of 2009. The flask samples were analyzed for Δ14CO2 and CO2 to determine the recently added CO2ff mole fraction. A suite of greenhouse and other trace gases, including hydrocarbons and halocarbons, were measured in the same samples. Strong correlations were observed between CO2ff and numerous trace gases associated with urban emissions. From these correlations we estimate emission ratios between CO2ff and these species, and compare these with bottom-up inventory-derived estimates. Recent county level inventory estimates for carbon monoxide (CO and benzene from the California Air Resources Board CEPAM database are in good agreement with our measured emission ratios, whereas older emissions inventories appear to overestimate emissions of these gases by a factor of two. For most other trace species, there are substantial differences (200–500% between our measured emission ratios and those derived from available emission inventories. For the first flight, we combine in situ CO measurements with the measured CO:CO2ff emission ratio of 14 ± 2 ppbCO/ppmCO2 to derive an estimate of CO2ff mole fraction throughout this flight, and also estimate the biospheric CO2 mixing ratio (CO2bio from the difference of total and fossil CO2. The resulting CO2bio varies dramatically from up to 8 ± 2 ppm in the urban plume to −6 ± 1 ppm in the surrounding boundary layer air. Finally, we use the in situ estimates of CO

  15. Tendencies in the energy consumption and in the carbon dioxide emissions in the Mexican cement industry; Tendencias del consumo de energia y emisiones de bioxido de carbono de la industria cementera mexicana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozawa M, Leticia; Sheinbaum P, Claudia [Instituto de Ingenieria UNAM, Mexico, D. F. (Mexico)

    1996-12-31

    This paper analyzes the changes occurred in the energy consumption and carbon dioxide in the Mexican cement industry. For this purpose, the energy consumption and the emissions are broken up into three types of changes that affect the energy demand of an industry: activity, structure and energy intensity. According to this analysis it is found that the Mexican cement industry has suffered an important reduction in the energy intensity as a result of the disappearance, almost complete, of the wet production process, of the increment in the production of pozzolanic cement and in the opening of new high technology industries. With respect to the intensity of carbon dioxide emissions it does not decrease at the same rate than the energy intensity due to the increased consumption of the fuel oil over the natural gas. At the end of this paper an international comparison is presented of the energy specific consumption and of its emissions. [Espanol] En este articulo se analizan los cambios ocurridos en el consumo de energia y emisiones de bioxido de carbono de la industria cementera mexicana. Para ello, se desagrega el consumo de energia y las emisiones en tres tipos de cambios que influyen en la demanda energetica de una industria: actividad, estructura, e intensidad energetica. De acuerdo con este analisis se encuentra que la industria cementera mexicana ha sufrido un importante decremento en la intensidad energetica producto de la desaparicion, casi por completo, del proceso de produccion por via humeda, del incremento en la produccion del cemento puzolanico y de la apertura de nuevas industrias con alta tecnologia. Por su parte, la intensidad en las emisiones de bioxido de carbono no disminuye a la misma tasa que la intensidad energetica debido al incremento en el uso del combustoleo sobre el gas natural. Al final del articulo se presenta una comparacion internacional del consumo especifico de energia y de las emisiones.

  16. Carbon emissions control strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was undertaken to address a fundamental issue: the cost of slowing climate change. Experts in eight nations were asked to evaluate, using the best economic models available, the prospects for reducing fossil fuel-based carbon emissions in their respective nations. The nations selected as case studies include: the Soviet Union, Poland, the United States, Japan, Hungary, France, the United Kingdom, and Canada. As important contributors to the greenhouse effect, these industrialized nations must find ways to substantially reduce their emissions. This is especially critical given that developing nations' emissions are expected to rise in the coming decades in the search for economic development. Ten papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases

  17. `People on the move and goods on the go` behavioral factors driving carbon-dioxide emissions for travel and freight in OECD countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schipper, L. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (United States)

    1996-12-01

    Concern has been expressed in many government and private studies over the cost of externalitites from transportation, which include safety, air pollution, noise, competition for urban space, balance of payments associated with oil imports, and risks from importing oil. If the individual (s) benefiting at the time faced those costs, the travel (or shipment) behind the externality might not take place, or technology would be applied to reduce the extent of the problem. For large trucks and busses, the costs (per vehicle-km) are considerably higher. Expressed as per unit of travel (passenger kilometers) or per unit of freight, i.e., taking into account the utilization of the vehicle, the specific cost change because of economics of scale. Transportation is a valuable part of our economy, but it is no free lunch. Emissions of CO{sub 2} or carbon from road transport are also on government agendas is industrialized countries. Not surprisingly, CO{sub 2} emissions from travel and freight have increased in most industrialized countries faster than population, albeit less rapidly than GDP. This paper reviews some of the factors driving that increase. Whatever the `real` external costs of each mode, all studies suggest two important findings: First, these costs are sometimes comparable to, or higher than, direct fuel costs per kilometer at the margin; Second, the value attached to the externality for carbon emissions tends to be low compared to those associated with other problems. Hence this suggests that CO{sub 2} by itself may not `felt` as a strong stimulus for change, but that changes to deal with the other problems may affect traffic, and therefore CO{sub 2} emissions, profoundly. (EG) 51 refs.

  18. Development of NaY zeolite derived from biomass and environmental assessment of carbon dioxide reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Worathanakul Patcharin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon dioxide is one of greenhouse gases. The carbon dioxide caused by the industry activities and impact to the global warming. The objectives of this research were to synthesize NaY zeolite from bagasse ash as silica source and loaded with different weight percentage of Cu(II for carbon dioxide reduction. The carbon footprint of Cu/Y zeolite for carbon dioxide reduction was calculated. The synthesized NaY zeolite from bagasse ash can be easily formed at Si/Al ratio of 0.75 with the additional heat after crystallization 70 °C for 1 hour. The crystal size of NaY zeolite was approximately 0.22−0.37 μm diameter. The results of carbon dioxide adsorption were increased when the flow rate of carbon dioxide decreased. Finally, the carbon footprint value was shown that synthesis step was shown the highest of greenhouse gas emission. This research can increase the value of wastes and reduce pollution emission.

  19. Automated carbon dioxide cleaning system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppe, David T.

    1991-01-01

    Solidified CO2 pellets are an effective blast media for the cleaning of a variety of materials. CO2 is obtained from the waste gas streams generated from other manufacturing processes and therefore does not contribute to the greenhouse effect, depletion of the ozone layer, or the environmental burden of hazardous waste disposal. The system is capable of removing as much as 90 percent of the contamination from a surface in one pass or to a high cleanliness level after multiple passes. Although the system is packaged and designed for manual hand held cleaning processes, the nozzle can easily be attached to the end effector of a robot for automated cleaning of predefined and known geometries. Specific tailoring of cleaning parameters are required to optimize the process for each individual geometry. Using optimum cleaning parameters the CO2 systems were shown to be capable of cleaning to molecular levels below 0.7 mg/sq ft. The systems were effective for removing a variety of contaminants such as lubricating oils, cutting oils, grease, alcohol residue, biological films, and silicone. The system was effective on steel, aluminum, and carbon phenolic substrates.

  20. Enzymatic conversion of carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jiafu; Jiang, Yanjun; Jiang, Zhongyi; Wang, Xueyan; Wang, Xiaoli; Zhang, Shaohua; Han, Pingping; Yang, Chen

    2015-10-01

    With the continuous increase in fossil fuels consumption and the rapid growth of atmospheric CO2 concentration, the harmonious state between human and nature faces severe challenges. Exploring green and sustainable energy resources and devising efficient methods for CO2 capture, sequestration and utilization are urgently required. Converting CO2 into fuels/chemicals/materials as an indispensable element for CO2 capture, sequestration and utilization may offer a win-win strategy to both decrease the CO2 concentration and achieve the efficient exploitation of carbon resources. Among the current major methods (including chemical, photochemical, electrochemical and enzymatic methods), the enzymatic method, which is inspired by the CO2 metabolic process in cells, offers a green and potent alternative for efficient CO2 conversion due to its superior stereo-specificity and region/chemo-selectivity. Thus, in this tutorial review, we firstly provide a brief background about enzymatic conversion for CO2 capture, sequestration and utilization. Next, we depict six major routes of the CO2 metabolic process in cells, which are taken as the inspiration source for the construction of enzymatic systems in vitro. Next, we focus on the state-of-the-art routes for the catalytic conversion of CO2 by a single enzyme system and by a multienzyme system. Some emerging approaches and materials utilized for constructing single-enzyme/multienzyme systems to enhance the catalytic activity/stability will be highlighted. Finally, a summary about the current advances and the future perspectives of the enzymatic conversion of CO2 will be presented. PMID:26055659

  1. Policy applications of a highly resolved spatial and temporal onroad carbon dioxide emissions data product for the U.S.: Analyses and their implications for mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza Lebrun, Daniel

    of CO2 emissions at a highly resolved level. Such a study would improve fossil fuel flux products by enhancing measurement accuracy and prompt location-specific mitigation policy. The carbon cycle science and policymaking communities are both poised to benefit greatly from the development of a highly resolved spatiotemporal emissions product.

  2. CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Raghubir P. Gupta; Alejandro Lopez-Ortiz; Douglas P. Harrison; Ya Liang

    2001-07-01

    Sodium based sorbents including sodium carbonate may be used to capture carbon dioxide from flue gas. A relatively concentrated carbon dioxide stream may be recoverable for sequestration when the sorbent is regenerated. Electrobalance tests indicated that sodium carbonate monohydrate was formed in a mixture of helium and water vapor at temperatures below 65 C. Additional compounds may also form, but this could not be confirmed. In the presence of carbon dioxide and water vapor, both the initial reaction rate of sodium carbonate with carbon dioxide and water and the sorbent capacity decreased with increasing temperature, consistent with the results from the previous quarter. Increasing the carbon dioxide concentration at constant temperature and water vapor concentration produced a measurable increase in rate, as did increasing the water vapor concentration at constant carbon dioxide concentration and temperature. Runs conducted with a flatter TGA pan resulted in a higher initial reaction rate, presumably due to improved gas-solid contact, but after a short time, there was no significant difference in the rates measured with the different pans. Analyses of kinetic data suggest that the surface of the sodium carbonate particles may be much hotter than the bulk gas due to the highly exothermic reaction with carbon dioxide and water, and that the rate of heat removal from the particle may control the reaction rate. A material and energy balance was developed for a cyclic carbonation/calcination process which captures about 26 percent of the carbon dioxide present in flue gas available at 250 C.

  3. The Megacities Carbon Project: measuring urban carbon emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duren, R. M.; Kort, E. A.; Miller, C. E.

    2012-12-01

    Carbon emissions from cities represent the single largest human contribution to climate change. Robust verification of emission changes due to growth or stabilization policies requires that we establish measurement baselines today and begin monitoring representative megacities immediately. An observing system designed to monitor the localized enhancements ("urban domes") of carbon dioxide and methane associated with cities must include a tiered set of surface, airborne, and satellite sensors and a framework for integrating top-down (atmospheric) and bottom-up (activity) data. We present a vision, strategy, requirements, and roadmap for an international effort to assess directly the carbon emission trends of the world's megacities. We describe a new coordinated pilot project for the megacities of Los Angeles and Paris that leverages and extends established measurement infrastructure in those cities and techniques being developed in methodological studies of smaller cities.

  4. Enhanced photocatalytic activity of titanium dioxide by nut shell carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi Xiaoliang, E-mail: sxl@whut.edu.cn [School of Mechanical and Electronic Engineering, Wuhan University of Technology, 122 Luoshi Road, Wuhan 430070 (China); State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Materials Synthesis and Processing, Wuhan University of Technology, 122 Luoshi Road, Wuhan 430070 (China); Wang Sheng; Dong Xuebin [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Materials Synthesis and Processing, Wuhan University of Technology, 122 Luoshi Road, Wuhan 430070 (China); Zhang Qiaoxin [School of Mechanical and Electronic Engineering, Wuhan University of Technology, 122 Luoshi Road, Wuhan 430070 (China); State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Materials Synthesis and Processing, Wuhan University of Technology, 122 Luoshi Road, Wuhan 430070 (China)

    2009-08-15

    Nut shell carbon (NSC)-nanotitanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) composites were prepared by sol-gel method. Photocatalytic activity on degradation of dye Rhodamine B was studied. X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area, pore size distribution, ultraviolet-vis light absorption spectrum, and photoluminescence spectrum were carried out to characterize the composite catalyst. The results indicated that the photocatalytic activity of NSC-nano-TiO{sub 2} composites was much higher than P25 (Degussa). NSC could greatly absorb the organic substance and oxygen of solution because of its large surface area.

  5. Effects of carbon dioxide on Penicillium chrysogenum: an autoradiographic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous research has shown that dissolved carbon dioxide causes significant changes in submerged penicillin fermentations, such as stunted, swollen hyphae, increased branching, lower growth rates, and lower penicillin productivity. Influent carbon dioxide levels of 5 and 10% were shown through the use of autoradiography to cause an increase in chitin synthesis in submerged cultures of Penicillium chrysogenum. At an influent 5% carbon dioxide level, chitin synthesis is ca. 100% greater in the subapical region of P. chrysogenum hyphae than that of the control, in which there was no influent carbon dioxide. Influent carbon dioxide of 10% caused an increase of 200% in chitin synthesis. It is believed that the cell wall must be plasticized before branching can occur and that high amounts of dissolved carbon dioxide cause the cell to lose control of the plasticizing effect, thus the severe morphological changes occur

  6. High resolution carbon and oxygen K-LL Auger spectra of carbon dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiltunen, A.; Aksela, S.; Vikor, Gy.; Ricz, S. E-mail: ricz@atomki.hu; Koever, A.; Sulik, B

    1999-06-03

    The proton excited carbon and oxygen K-LL Auger spectra of carbon dioxide were measured using the high-resolution, angular resolving ESA-21 electron spectrometer. The proton impact energy was 1.0 MeV. The transition energies of both K-LL Auger-spectra (oxygen and carbon) are determined and compared with the existing theoretical and earlier experimental data. The experimental line widths full width at half maximum (FWHM) and relative intensities of the Auger lines are determined. The Auger emission was found to be isotropic within the experimental accuracy.

  7. 49 CFR 179.102-1 - Carbon dioxide, refrigerated liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ....102-1, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Carbon dioxide, refrigerated liquid. 179.102-1...) § 179.102-1 Carbon dioxide, refrigerated liquid. (a) Tank cars used to transport carbon...

  8. Elevated pressure of carbon dioxide affects growth of thermophilic Petrotoga sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakoczy, Jana; Gniese, Claudia; Schippers, Axel; Schlömann, Michael; Krüger, Martin

    2014-05-01

    Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is considered a promising new technology which reduces carbon dioxide emissions into the atmosphere and thereby decelerates global warming. During CCS, carbon dioxide is captured from emission sources (e.g. fossil fuel power plants or other industries), pressurised, and finally stored in deep geological formations, such as former gas or oil reservoirs as well as saline aquifers. However, with CCS being a very young technology, there are a number of unknown factors that need to be investigated before declaring CCS as being safe. Our research investigates the effect of high carbon dioxide concentrations and pressures on an indigenous microorganism that colonises a potential storage site. Growth experiments were conducted using the thermophilic thiosulphate-reducing bacterium Petrotoga sp., isolated from formation water of the gas reservoir Schneeren (Lower Saxony, Germany), situated in the Northern German Plain. Growth (OD600) was monitored over one growth cycle (10 days) at different carbon dioxide concentrations (50%, 100%, and 150% in the gas phase), and was compared to control cultures grown with 20% carbon dioxide. An additional growth experiment was performed over a period of 145 days with repeated subcultivation steps in order to detect long-term effects of carbon dioxide. Cultivation over 10 days at 50% and 100% carbon dioxide slightly reduced cell growth. In contrast, long-term cultivation at 150% carbon dioxide reduced cell growth and finally led to cell death. This suggested a more pronounced effect of carbon dioxide at prolonged cultivation and stresses the need for a closer consideration of long-term effects. Experiments with supercritical carbon dioxide at 100 bar completely inhibited growth of freshly inoculated cultures and also caused a rapid decrease of growth of a pre-grown culture. This demonstrated that supercritical carbon dioxide had a sterilising effect on cells. This effect was not observed in control cultures

  9. Carbon dioxide kinetics and capnography during critical care

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Cynthia T; Breen, Peter H

    2000-01-01

    Greater understanding of the pathophysiology of carbon dioxide kinetics during steady and nonsteady state should improve, we believe, clinical care during intensive care treatment. Capnography and the measurement of end-tidal partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PETCO2) will gradually be augmented by relatively new measurement methodology, including the volume of carbon dioxide exhaled per breath (VCO2,br) and average alveolar expired PCO2 (PA̅E̅CO2). Future directions include the study of oxy...

  10. Designed amyloid fibers as materials for selective carbon dioxide capture

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Dan; Furukawa, Hiroyasu; Deng, Hexiang; Liu, Cong; Yaghi, Omar M.; Eisenberg, David S.

    2013-01-01

    New and improved materials capable of binding carbon dioxide are essential to addressing the global threat of accelerating climate change. The presently used industrial methods for carbon dioxide capture have severe drawbacks, including toxicity and energy inefficiency. Newer porous materials are so far less effective in water, invariably a component of combustion gases. Here, we present a material for carbon dioxide capture. This material, amyloid fibers in powdered form, selectively capture...

  11. Supercritical carbon dioxide: a solvent like no other

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jocelyn Peach

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2 could be one aspect of a significant and necessary movement towards green chemistry, being a potential replacement for volatile organic compounds (VOCs. Unfortunately, carbon dioxide has a notoriously poor solubilising power and is famously difficult to handle. This review examines attempts and breakthroughs in enhancing the physicochemical properties of carbon dioxide, focusing primarily on factors that impact solubility of polar and ionic species and attempts to enhance scCO2 viscosity.

  12. Changes in plasma potassium concentration during carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perner, A; Bugge, K; Lyng, K M;

    1999-01-01

    Hyperkalaemia with ECG changes had been noted during prolonged carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum in pigs. We have compared plasma potassium concentrations during surgery in 11 patients allocated randomly to undergo either laparoscopic or open appendectomy and in another 17 patients allocated randomly...... to either carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum or abdominal wall lifting for laparoscopic colectomy. Despite an increasing metabolic acidosis, prolonged carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum resulted in only a slight increase in plasma potassium concentrations, which was both statistically and clinically insignificant...

  13. PREPARATION OF MESOPOROUS CARBON BY CARBON DIOXIDE ACTIVATION WITH CATALYST

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    W.Z.Shen; A.H.Lu; J.T.Zheng

    2002-01-01

    A mesoporous activated carbon (AC) can be successfully prepared by catalytic activa-tion with carbon dioxide. For iron oxide as catalyst, there were two regions of mesoporesize distribution, i.e. 2-5nm and 30-70nm. When copper oxide or magnesium oxidecoexisted with iron oxide as composite catalyst, the content of pores with sizes of 2-5nm was decreased, while the pores with 30 70nm were increased significantly. Forcomparison, AC reactivated by carbon dioxide directly was also investigated. It wasshown that the size of mesopores of the resulting AC concentrated in 2-5nm with lessvolume. The adsorption of Congo red was tested to evaluate the property of the result-ing AC. Furthermore, the factors affecting pore size distribution and the possibility ofmesopore formation were discussed.

  14. Application of a novel calcium looping process for production of heat and carbon dioxide enrichment of greenhouses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The greenhouse calcium looping process was developed by ASPEN Plus simulator. • In this process, the carbonation reaction provides required heat during night time. • The calcination reaction provides required carbon dioxide during day time. • This novel process saves up to 72% energy compared to the fossil fuel burners. • The process thermodynamically attributes to zero emission of carbon dioxide. - Abstract: Greenhouses typically employ conventional burner systems to suffice heat and carbon dioxide required for plant growth. The energy requirement and carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuel burner are generally high. As an alternative, this paper describes a novel greenhouse calcium looping process which is expected to decrease the energy requirements and associated carbon dioxide emissions. The conceptual design of greenhouse calcium looping process is carried out in the ASPEN Plus v 7.3 simulator. In a greenhouse calcium looping process, the calcination reaction is considered to take place during day time in order to provide the required optimum carbon dioxide between 1000 and 2000 ppm, while the carbonation reaction is occurred during night time to provide required heat. The process simulations carried out in ASPEN indicates that greenhouse calcium looping process theoretically attributes to zero emission of carbon dioxide. Moreover, in a scenario modelling study compared to the conventional natural gas burner system, the heat duty requirements in the greenhouse calcium looping process were found to reduce by as high as 72%

  15. Six-fold Coordinated Carbon Dioxide VI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iota, V; Yoo, C; Klepeis, J; Jenei, Z

    2006-03-01

    Under standard conditions, carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) is a simple molecular gas and an important atmospheric constituent while silicon dioxide (SiO{sub 2}) is a covalent solid, and represents one of the fundamental minerals of the planet. The remarkable dissimilarity between these two group IV oxides is diminished at higher pressures and temperatures as CO{sub 2} transforms to a series of solid phases, from simple molecular to a fully covalent extended-solid V, structurally analogous to SiO{sub 2} tridymite. Here, we present the discovery of a new extended-solid phase of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}): a six-fold coordinated stishovite-like phase VI, obtained by isothermal compression of associated CO{sub 2}-II above 50GPa at 530-650K. Together with the previously reported CO{sub 2}-V and a-carbonia, this new extended phase indicates a fundamental similarity between CO{sub 2}--a prototypical molecular solid, and SiO{sub 2}--one of Earth's fundamental building blocks. The phase diagram suggests a limited stability domain for molecular CO{sub 2}-I, and proposes that the conversion to extended-network solids above 40-50 GPa occurs via intermediate phases II, III, and IV. The crystal structure of phase VI suggests strong disorder along the caxis in stishovite-like P4{sub 2}/mnm, with carbon atoms manifesting an average six-fold coordination within the framework of sp{sup 3} hybridization.

  16. Preparation of perlite-based carbon dioxide absorbent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, H; Wu, L; Zhu, J; Yu, B

    1994-02-01

    A new highly efficient carbon dioxide absorbent consisting of sodium hydroxide, expanded perlite and acid-base indicator was prepared. The absorption efficiency, absorption capacity, flow resistance and color indication for the absorbent were tested and compared with some commercial products. The absorbent can reduce the carbon dioxide content in gases to 3.3 ppb (v/v) and absorbs not less than 35% of its weight of carbon dioxide. Besides its large capacity and sharp color indication, the absorbent has an outstanding advantage of small flow resistance in comparison with other commercial carbon dioxide absorbents. Applications in gas analysis and purification were also investigated.

  17. Changes in plasma potassium concentration during carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perner, A; Bugge, K; Lyng, K M;

    1999-01-01

    Hyperkalaemia with ECG changes had been noted during prolonged carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum in pigs. We have compared plasma potassium concentrations during surgery in 11 patients allocated randomly to undergo either laparoscopic or open appendectomy and in another 17 patients allocated randomly...... to either carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum or abdominal wall lifting for laparoscopic colectomy. Despite an increasing metabolic acidosis, prolonged carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum resulted in only a slight increase in plasma potassium concentrations, which was both statistically and clinically insignificant....... Thus hyperkalaemia is unlikely to develop in patients with normal renal function undergoing carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum for laparoscopic surgery....

  18. Chemical recycling of carbon dioxide emissions from a cement plant into dimethyl ether, a case study of an integrated process in France using a Reverse Water Gas Shift (RWGS) step

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recycling of carbon dioxide (CO2) and hydrogen (H2) into liquid fuel technology has recently gained wide public interest since it is a potential pathway to increase the liquid fuel supply and to mitigate CO2 emissions simultaneously. In France, the majority of the electricity production is derived from nuclear and renewable energy which have a low CO2 footprint. This electricity power enables a potential for massive hydrogen production with low carbon emissions. We studied the possibility to develop this technology at an industrial scale in the French context on a typical industrial example of a cement manufacture in the south of France. An integrated process is proposed, which enables the use of the heat released by the CO2 to fuel process to help to capture the CO2 released by the cement manufacture. Some technological issues are discussed, and a potential solution is proposed for the catalyst used in the critical step of the Reverse Water Gas-Shift reaction (RWGS) of the process. (authors)

  19. Carbon Dioxide in Arable Soil Profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chirinda, Ngoni; Plauborg, Finn; Heckrath, Goswin Johann;

    2014-01-01

    ). In a winter wheat field in Denmark, soil CO2 concentrations were measured from 29 November 2011 to 14 June 2012 at upslope and footslope positions of a short catena (25 m). Carbon dioxide was measured at 20 and 40 cm soil depths (i.e., within and below the nominal plough layer) using the two measurement......; however, differences may occur in response to soil spatial variability. A better coverage of spatial variability is more easily addressed using manually operated systems whereas temporal variability can be covered using the automated system. Depending on the aim of the study, the two systems may be used...

  20. Carbon dioxide detection in adult Odonata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piersanti, Silvana; Frati, Francesca; Rebora, Manuela; Salerno, Gianandrea

    2016-04-01

    The present paper shows, by means of single-cell recordings, responses of antennal sensory neurons of the damselfly Ischnura elegans when stimulated by air streams at different CO2 concentrations. Unlike most insects, but similarly to termites, centipedes and ticks, Odonata possess sensory neurons strongly inhibited by CO2, with the magnitude of the off-response depending upon the CO2 concentration. The Odonata antennal sensory neurons responding to CO2 are also sensitive to airborne odors; in particular, the impulse frequency is increased by isoamylamine and decreased by heptanoic and pentanoic acid. Further behavioral investigations are necessary to assign a biological role to carbon dioxide detection in Odonata. PMID:26831359

  1. Carbon dioxide capture and geological storage

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Sustainable Carbon dioxide Capture and Storage, or CCS, can be achieved using geological means, an approach that differs in many ways from CO2 capture and storage in vegetation. Firstly, it differs because this latter approach enables CO2 to be stored only temporarily – for less than one year in annual plants or for several centuries in tree phytomass. Secondly, CO2 capture is associated with bioconversion of the sun’s energy which is then stored in biochemical form in the phytomass. As the t...

  2. Killing wild geese with carbon dioxide or a mixture of carbon dioxide and argon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritzen, M.A.; Reimert, H.G.M.; Lourens, A.; Bracke, M.B.M.; Verhoeven, M.T.W.

    2013-01-01

    The killing of animals is the subject of societal and political debate. Wild geese are caught and killed on a regular basis for fauna conservation and damage control. Killing geese with carbon dioxide (CO2) is commonly practiced, but not listed in legislation on the protection of flora and fauna, an

  3. Final Technical Report HFC Concrete: A Low­Energy, Carbon-Dioxide­Negative Solution for reducing Industrial Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Larry McCandlish, Principal Investigator; Dr. Richard Riman, Co-Principal Investigator

    2012-05-14

    Solidia/CCSM received funding for further research and development of its Low Temperature Solidification Process (LTS), which is used to create hydrate-free concrete (HFC). LTS/HFC is a technology/materials platform that offers wide applicability in the built infrastructure. Most importantly, it provides a means of making concrete without Portland cement. Cement and concrete production is a major consumer of energy and source of industrial greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The primary goal of this project was to develop and commercialize a novel material, HFC, which by replacing traditional concrete and cement, reduces both energy use and GHG emissions in the built infrastructure. Traditional concrete uses Portland Cement (PC) as a binder. PC production involves calcination of limestone at {approx}1450 C, which releases significant amounts of CO{sub 2} gas to the atmosphere and consumes a large amount of energy due to the high temperature required. In contrast, HFC is a carbonate-based hydrate-free concrete (HFC) that consumes CO{sub 2} gas in its production. HFC is made by reaction of silicate minerals with CO{sub 2} at temperatures below 100 C, more than an order-of-magnitude below the temperature required to make PC. Because of this significant difference in temperature, it is estimated that we will be able to reduce energy use in the cement and concrete industry by up to 30 trillion Btu by 2020. Because of the insulating properties of HFC, we believe we will also be able to significantly reduce energy use in the Building sector, though the extent of this saving is not yet quantified. It is estimated that production of a tonne of PC-based concrete requires about 6.2 million Btu of energy and produces over 1 tonne of CO{sub 2} emissions (Choate, 2003). These can be reduced to 1.9 million Btu and 0.025 tonnes of CO{sub 2} emissions per tonne of HFC (with overall CO{sub 2}-negativity possible by increasing carbonation yield). In this way, by replacing PC

  4. Removal of Carbon Dioxide Gas From the Exhaust Gases Generated at the Takoradi Thermal Power Station

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Charles

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Takoradi Thermal Power Station (TTPS generates electricity by burning fossil-fuel and hence it also generates greenhouse gases especially carbon dioxide, which is vented into the atmosphere. These greenhouse gases are pollutants known to cause global warming. A method for the removal of carbon dioxide gas from the exhaust gases generated at TTPS is proposed in this research. It aims at reducing the plant’s carbon dioxide emission into the atmosphere and hence reducing the plant’s rate of pollution into the atmosphere. The method employed is a modification of a method known as the Fluor Daniel ECONAMINE FG process. This method removes carbon dioxide from exhaust gas by using an amine solution which comes into “contact” with the exhaust gas in a counter-current manner. This method has been applied by 23 companies which produce CO2 on a large scale. However, before TTPS apply this method a cost feasibility study is recommended.

  5. Membrane loop process for separating carbon dioxide for use in gaseous form from flue gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wijmans, Johannes G; Baker, Richard W; Merkel, Timothy C

    2016-09-06

    The invention is a process involving membrane-based gas separation for separating and recovering carbon dioxide emissions from combustion processes in partially concentrated form, and then transporting the carbon dioxide and using or storing it in a confined manner without concentrating it to high purity. The process of the invention involves building up the concentration of carbon dioxide in a gas flow loop between the combustion step and a membrane separation step. A portion of the carbon dioxide-enriched gas can then be withdrawn from this loop and transported, without the need to liquefy the gas or otherwise create a high-purity stream, to a destination where it is used or confined, preferably in an environmentally benign manner.

  6. The polity and politics of carbon-dioxide taxation in small European states

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mikael Skou

    The most recent smaller country to adopt a carbon dioxide tax is Portugal (2014), but also Iceland (2013), Ireland (2010), Switzerland (2008), Croatia (2007), Estonia (2000) and Slovenia (1997) have managed to find ways to put into place taxes on carbon dioxide. France (2014) remains the exception...... are more susceptible to introduce carbon dioxide taxes ? It is hypothesized that features of the institutionalized patterns of policy-making, the polity of small states, can provide explanations for their climate politics, and ultimately the outcome policy in question....... to the adoption of carbon dioxide taxation in only smaller countries in Europe. The research questions addressed by the present paper are how and why is it that small countries that in terms of emissions are virtually irrelevant to climate change and which are more open to forces of international competition...

  7. Empirical Study on the Relationship between the Investment on Fixed Assets and Carbon Dioxide Emissions-Based on the Panel Date of Provinces%固定资产投资对二氧化碳排放影响的实证研究--基于省际面板数据模型

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李秋妍; 曹翠

    2014-01-01

    Mechanism relation between fixed assets investment (FAI)and carbon emission in our country was analyzed and an empirical research of the FAI and carbon dioxide emissions was made by the panel date mode in the whole country and 3 regions (east,middle,west) to analyze the relationship between FAI and carbon emission.The result indicates the positive relation can be found between FAI and carbon dioxide emission in the aspect of the whole country;there exits the difference in these 3 regions;the east and the middle’s FAI has a significant effect on carbon dioxide emission,while the west’s FAI has on effect on carbon dioxide emission.%对我国固定资产投资影响二氧化碳排放的机理进行分析,利用29个省市区的面板数据建立模型,研究固定资产投资与二氧化碳排放的关系。实证结果表明,从全国层面上看,固定资产投资对二氧化碳排放的影响显著为正;从区域层面上看,东、中、西部的固定资产投资对二氧化碳排放的影响存在差异,东、中部地区固定资产投资对二氧化碳排放具有拉动作用,而西部固定资产投资对二氧化碳排放的影响不显著。

  8. The kinetics of binding carbon dioxide in magnesium carbonate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butt, D.P.; Lackner, K.S.; Wendt, C.H.; Vaidya, R.; Pile, D.L.; Park, Y.; Holesinger, T.; Harradine, D.M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Nomura, Koji [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Materials Science and Technology Div.]|[Chichibu Onada Cement Co., Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-08-01

    Humans currently consume about 6 Gigatons of carbon annually as fossil fuel. In some sense, the coal industry has a unique advantage over many other anthropogenic and natural emitters of CO{sub 2} in that it owns large point sources of CO{sub 2} from which this gas could be isolated and disposed of. If the increased energy demands of a growing world population are to be satisfied from coal, the implementation of sequestration technologies will likely be unavoidable. The authors` method of sequestration involves binding carbon dioxide as magnesium carbonate, a thermodynamically stable solid, for safe and permanent disposal, with minimal environmental impact. The technology is based on extracting magnesium hydroxide from common ultramafic rock for thermal carbonation and subsequent disposition. The economics of the method appear to be promising, however, many details of the proposed process have yet to be optimized. Realization of a cost effective method requires development of optimal technologies for efficient extraction and thermal carbonation.

  9. Use of supercritical carbon dioxide extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taniguchi, Masayuki (Niigata Univ., Faculty of Engineering, Niigata, (Japan))

    1989-09-25

    Supercritical fluid extraction is a novel diffusion and separation technique which exploits simultaneously the increase of vapor pressure and the difference of chemical affinities of fluids near the critical point. A solvent which is used as the supercritical fluid has the following features: the critical point exists in the position of relatively ease of handling, the solvent is applicable to the extraction of a physiological active substance of thermal instability. Carbon dioxide as the solvent is non-flammable, non-corrosive, non-toxic, cheap, and readily available of high purity. The results of studies on the use of supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO{sub 2}) as a solvent for natural products in the fermentation and food industries, were collected. SC-CO{sub 2} extraction are used in many fields, examples for the application are as follows: removal of organic solvents from antibiotics; extraction of vegetable oils contained in wheat germ oil, high quality mustard seeds, rice bran and so on; brewing of sake using rice and rice-koji; use as a non-aqueous medium for the synthesis of precursors of the Aspartame; and use in sterilization. 66 refs., 17 figs., 21 tabs.

  10. Pharmaceutical applications of supercritical carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, C S; Römpp, H; Schmidt, P C

    2001-12-01

    The appearance of a supercritical state was already observed at the beginning of the 19th century. Nevertheless, the industrial extraction of plant and other natural materials started about twenty years ago with the decaffeination of coffee. Today carbon dioxide is the most common gas for supercritical fluid extraction in food and pharmaceutical industry. Since pure supercritical carbon dioxide is a lipophilic solvent, mixtures with organic solvents, especially alcohols, are used to increase the polarity of the extraction fluid; more polar compounds can be extracted in this way. The main fields of interest are the extraction of vegetable oils from plant material in analytical and preparative scale, the preparation of essential oils for food and cosmetic industry and the isolation of substances of pharmaceutical relevance. Progress in research was made by the precise measurement of phase equilibria data by means of different methods. Apart from extraction, supercritical fluid chromatography was introduced in the field of analytics, as well as micro- and nanoparticle formation using supercritical fluids as solvent or antisolvent. This review presents pharmaceutical relevant literature of the last twenty years with special emphasis on extraction of natural materials.

  11. Activation of Carbon Dioxide and Synthesis of Propylene Carbonate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Cycloaddition of carbon dioxide and propylene oxide to propylene carbonate catalyzed by tetra-tert-butyl metal phthalocyanine in the presence of tributylamine (TBA) shows higher yield than catalyzed by unsubstituted metal phthalocyanine. Comparing different catalysts of diverse metals, (t-Bu)4PcMg is more active than (t-Bu)4PcFe. But (t-Bu)4PcCo and (t-Bu)4PcNi only have low catalytic activities towards the reaction. Moreover, the yield will increase as the temperature increases.

  12. Low energy decomposition of carbon dioxide and other molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamfiloff, Eugene

    2013-05-01

    Since the observation of elevating quantities of atmospheric greenhouse gases, finding a practical method other than the capture-and-sequestration scheme for the reduction and disposal of carbon dioxide (CO2) has been an important objective. Recently, an efficient low-energy process has been developed allowing the selective molecular decomposition of CO2, CO, and other molecules. Thus, CO2 can be broken down into C + O + O. This permits the O2 molecules to be stored or released while the clean carbon atoms can be bagged and utilized in various industries. For the control of carbon dioxide or other gas emissions at their source, it can be scaled up for power plants or down for smaller facilities. The process also allows the production of a beam of exclusively positive ions or exclusively negative ions and contrary to other devices, excludes the probability of beam contamination by plasma or neutral particles, making it ideal for electronic thin-films manufacturing and spectroscopy systems. Because the system allows the simultaneous production of ion beams containing selectable ratios of positive to negative ions, it simplifies construction of favored or complex molecules through varied ionic bonds. Also discussed are several methods to apply the new technology as an upgrade to spectrometers and other devices. For further information contact the author: epamfiloff@mattertech.com.

  13. Carbon dioxide and nisin act synergistically on Listeria monocytogenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Lilian; Chen, Y.H.; Chikindas, M.L.;

    2000-01-01

    This paper examines the synergistic action of carbon dioxide and nisin on Listeria monocytogenes Scott A wild-type and nisin-resistant (Nis(r)) cells grown in broth at 4 degrees C. Carbon dioxide extended the lag phase and decreased the specific growth rate of both strains, but to a greater degree...

  14. 27 CFR 24.319 - Carbon dioxide record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Carbon dioxide record. 24.319 Section 24.319 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS WINE Records and Reports § 24.319 Carbon dioxide record. A proprietor...

  15. Investigating Diffusion and Entropy with Carbon Dioxide-Filled Balloons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadrich, James; Bruxvoort, Crystal

    2010-01-01

    Fill an ordinary latex balloon with helium gas and you know what to expect. Over the next day or two the volume will decrease noticeably as helium escapes from the balloon. So what happens when a latex balloon is filled with carbon dioxide gas? Surprisingly, carbon dioxide balloons deflate at rates as much as an order of magnitude faster than…

  16. Combined reactions and separations using ionic liquids and carbon dioxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroon, M.C.

    2006-01-01

    A new and general type of process for the chemical industry is presented using ionic liquids and supercritical carbon dioxide as combined reaction and separation media. In this process, the carbon dioxide pressure controls the miscibility of reactants, products, catalyst and ionic liquid, enabling f

  17. Carbon Dioxide and Global Warming: A Failed Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Carla

    2014-01-01

    Global warming is a current environmental issue that has been linked to an increase in anthropogenic carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. To raise awareness of the problem, various simple experiments have been proposed to demonstrate the effect of carbon dioxide on the planet's temperature. This article describes a similar experiment, which…

  18. Carbon dioxide fluxes from an urban area in Beijing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Tao; Wang, Yuesi

    2012-03-01

    A better understanding of urban carbon dioxide (CO 2) emissions is important for quantifying urban contributions to the global carbon budget. From January to December 2008, CO 2 fluxes were measured, by eddy covariance at 47 m above ground on a meteorological tower in a high-density residential area in Beijing. The results showed that the urban surface was a net source of CO 2 in the atmosphere. Diurnal flux patterns were similar to those previously observed in other cities and were largely influenced by traffic volume. Carbon uptake by both urban vegetation during the growing season and the reduction of fuel consumption for domestic heating resulted in less-positive daily fluxes in the summer. The average daily flux measured in the summer was 0.48 mg m - 2 s - 1 , which was 82%, 35% and 36% lower than those in the winter, spring and autumn, respectively. The reduction of vehicles on the road during the 29th Olympic and Paralympic Games had a significant impact on CO 2 flux. The flux of 0.40 mg m - 2 s - 1 for September 2008 was approximately 0.17 mg m - 2 s - 1 lower than the flux for September 2007. Annual CO 2 emissions from the study site were estimated at 20.6 kg CO 2 m - 2 y - 1 , considerably higher than yearly emissions obtained from other urban and suburban landscapes.

  19. Methane, Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Caged Broilers Production Systems in Four Seasons%笼养肉鸡不同季节CH4和CO2排放研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周忠凯; 董红敏; 朱志平; 陈永杏

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this research is to estimate broiler emission rates of methane and carbon dioxide,to support compilation of livestock greenhouse gas inventories and potential mitigation options. Methane, carbon dioxide emissions from a commercial high-rise broiler house with mechanically-ventilation system were monitored during four seasons of one year. Cases concentrations of incoming and exhaust air streams were measured for five consecutive days in each season from broilers age about 36 d to 42 d by using INNOVA 1312 multi-gas monitor with multi-channel samplers. Building ventilation rates were determined by calibrated on site FANS measurement systems. The experiment results showed that average emission rates were(0.276±0.193) g·d-1bird-1(58.85±37.2 g·d-1·AU-1) of methane, (154.4±45.7) g· d-1·bird-1(33.5±7.98 kg·d-1·AU-1) of carbon dioxide. Methane emission rates varied significantly in different seasons, methane emission rates in different seasons were 0.552 g · d-1 · Bird-1 in summer, 0.111 g · d-1 · bird-1 in winter, 0.187 g· d-1 · bird-1 in spring, and 0.254 g · d-1 · bird-1 in autumn, respectively. The estimated emission rates of carbon dioxide were slightly changed between 186.8 g·d-1·bird-1 and 179.8 g·d-1biid-1 in summer and fall, but significantly higher than 163.4 g·d-1·bird-1 in spring and 87.4 g·d-1·bird-1 in winter. There was a significant linear correlation between emission rates and ventilation rate for broilers. The percentage of feed C input recovered was as follows: (56.1 ±12.5)% in CO2-C emissions, only(0.27±0.14)% feed C emitted in CH4-C emissions.%为研究规模化肉鸡场温室气体排放系数,给我国畜牧业温室气体清单编制和选择减排技术提供依据,选择山东某商业化肉鸡养殖场,对肉鸡生产过程中CO2和CH4的排放情况进行了研究.利用多功能气体分析仪对肉鸡舍CH4和CO2的浓度进行测定,肉鸡舍通风量测定则采用风机风量现场测定

  20. Systemic effects of geoengineering by terrestrial carbon dioxide removal on carbon related planetary boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heck, Vera; Donges, Jonathan; Lucht, Wolfgang

    2015-04-01

    The planetary boundaries framework as proposed by Rockström et al. (2009) provides guidelines for ecological boundaries, the transgression of which is likely to result in a shift of Earth system functioning away from the relatively stable Holocene state. As the climate change boundary is already close to be transgressed, several geoengineering (GE) methods are discussed, aiming at a reduction of atmospheric carbon concentrations to control the Earth's energy balance. One of the proposed GE methods is carbon extraction from the atmosphere via biological carbon sequestration. In case mitigation efforts fail to substantially reduce greenhouse gas emissions, this form of GE could act as potential measure to reduce atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations. We here study the possible influences of human interactions in the Earth system on carbon related planetary boundaries in the form of geoengineering (terrestrial carbon dioxide removal). We use a conceptual model specifically designed to investigate fundamental carbon feedbacks between land, ocean and atmosphere (Anderies et al., 2013) and modify it to include an additional geoengineering component. With that we analyze the existence and stability of a safe operating space for humanity, which is here conceptualized in three of the 9 proposed dimensions, namely climate change, ocean acidification and land-use. References: J. M. Anderies et al., The topology of non-linear global carbon dynamics: from tipping points to planetary boundaries. Environ. Res. Lett., 8(4):044048 (2013) J. Rockström et al., A safe operating space for humanity. Nature 461 (7263), 472-475 (2009)

  1. 75 FR 29534 - Inorganic Nitrates-Nitrite, Carbon and Carbon Dioxide, and Sulfur Registration Review; Draft...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-26

    ... AGENCY Inorganic Nitrates-Nitrite, Carbon and Carbon Dioxide, and Sulfur Registration Review; Draft... draft ecological risk assessment for the registration review of inorganic nitrates - nitrites, carbon... occur for all inorganic nitrates- nitrites, carbon and carbon dioxide uses, as well as gas...

  2. Carbon dioxide stripping in aquaculture. part 1: terminology and reporting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colt, John; Watten, Barnaby; Pfeiffer, Tim

    2012-01-01

    The removal of carbon dioxide gas in aquacultural systems is much more complex than for oxygen or nitrogen gas because of liquid reactions of carbon dioxide and their kinetics. Almost all published carbon dioxide removal information for aquaculture is based on the apparent removal value after the CO2(aq) + HOH ⇔ H2CO3 reaction has reached equilibrium. The true carbon dioxide removal is larger than the apparent value, especially for high alkalinities and seawater. For low alkalinity freshwaters (<2000 μeq/kg), the difference between the true and apparent removal is small and can be ignored for many applications. Analytical and reporting standards are recommended to improve our understanding of carbon dioxide removal.

  3. Carbon Dioxide Detection and Indoor Air Quality Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonino, Steve

    2016-04-01

    When building ventilation is reduced, energy is saved because it is not necessary to heat or cool as much outside air. Reduced ventilation can result in higher levels of carbon dioxide, which may cause building occupants to experience symptoms. Heating or cooling for ventilation air can be enhanced by a DCV system, which can save energy while providing a comfortable environment. Carbon dioxide concentrations within a building are often used to indicate whether adequate fresh air is being supplied to the building. These DCV systems use carbon dioxide sensors in each space or in the return air and adjust the ventilation based on carbon dioxide concentration; the higher the concentration, the more people occupy the space relative to the ventilation rate. With a carbon dioxide sensor DCV system, the fresh air ventilation rate varies based on the number ofpeople in the space, saving energy while maintaining a safe and comfortable environment.

  4. Photobiological hydrogen production and carbon dioxide sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berberoglu, Halil

    Photobiological hydrogen production is an alternative to thermochemical and electrolytic technologies with the advantage of carbon dioxide sequestration. However, it suffers from low solar to hydrogen energy conversion efficiency due to limited light transfer, mass transfer, and nutrient medium composition. The present study aims at addressing these limitations and can be divided in three parts: (1) experimental measurements of the radiation characteristics of hydrogen producing and carbon dioxide consuming microorganisms, (2) solar radiation transfer modeling and simulation in photobioreactors, and (3) parametric experiments of photobiological hydrogen production and carbon dioxide sequestration. First, solar radiation transfer in photobioreactors containing microorganisms and bubbles was modeled using the radiative transport equation (RTE) and solved using the modified method of characteristics. The study concluded that Beer-Lambert's law gives inaccurate results and anisotropic scattering must be accounted for to predict the local irradiance inside a photobioreactor. The need for accurate measurement of the complete set of radiation characteristics of microorganisms was established. Then, experimental setup and analysis methods for measuring the complete set of radiation characteristics of microorganisms have been developed and successfully validated experimentally. A database of the radiation characteristics of representative microorganisms have been created including the cyanobacteria Anabaena variabilis, the purple non-sulfur bacteria Rhodobacter sphaeroides and the green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii along with its three genetically engineered strains. This enabled, for the first time, quantitative assessment of the effect of genetic engineering on the radiation characteristics of microorganisms. In addition, a parametric experimental study has been performed to model the growth, CO2 consumption, and H 2 production of Anabaena variabilis as functions of

  5. Carbon dioxide problems. Countermeasures to the carbon dioxide problem in hydrocarbon-fired plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Among the environmental problems discussed in this paper, global warming and the restriction of CFC are primarily thermal engineering issues. In particular, global warming, likely to be caused by an increase in the atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration, is one of the most essential and urgent environmental problems. In recent international conferences, held for example by UNEP, a proposal was made that carbon dioxide concentration be controlled under its 1898 level. However, this proposal may not be so forceful, since it is not clear whether the control is to be imposed on each country separately or on the developed countries as a whole. The vague content of the proposal may be attributed to the existing international situation, whereby the energy resources available to each country differ substantially

  6. Carbon dioxide: Global warning for nephrologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marano, Marco; D'Amato, Anna; Cantone, Alessandra

    2016-09-01

    The large prevalence of respiratory acid-base disorders overlapping metabolic acidosis in hemodialysis population should prompt nephrologists to deal with the partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2) complying with the reduced bicarbonate concentration. What the most suitable formula to compute pCO2 is reviewed. Then, the neglected issue of CO2 content in the dialysis fluid is under the spotlight. In fact, a considerable amount of CO2 comes to patients' bloodstream every hemodialysis treatment and "acidosis by dialysate" may occur if lungs do not properly clear away this burden of CO2. Moreover, vascular access recirculation may be easy diagnosed by detecting CO2 in the arterial line of extracorporeal circuit if CO2-enriched blood from the filter reenters arterial needle. PMID:27648406

  7. Carbon dioxide removal with inorganic membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Judkins, R.R.; Fain, D.E. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States)

    1993-12-31

    The increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases, particularly carbon dioxide, in the atmosphere has sparked a great deal of interest in the removal of CO{sub 2} from flue gases of fossil fueled plants. Presently, several techniques for the removal of CO{sub 2} are considered to have potential, but are lacking in practicality. For example, amine scrubbing of flue gas streams is potential, but are lacking in practically. For example, amine scrubbing of flue gas streams is effective in removing CO{sub 2}, but costs are high; efficiency suffers; and other acid gases must be removed prior to amine stripping. Membrane systems for CO{sub 2} removal are held in high regard, and inorganic, particularly ceramic, membranes offer the potential for high temperature, thus energy saving, removal.

  8. Biochemical Capture and Removal of Carbon Dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trachtenberg, Michael C.

    1998-01-01

    We devised an enzyme-based facilitated transport membrane bioreactor system to selectively remove carbon dioxide (CO2) from the space station environment. We developed and expressed site-directed enzyme mutants for CO2 capture. Enzyme kinetics showed the mutants to be almost identical to the wild type save at higher pH. Both native enzyme and mutant enzymes were immobilized to different supports including nylons, glasses, sepharose, methacrylate, titanium and nickel. Mutant enzyme could be attached and removed from metal ligand supports and the supports reused at least five times. Membrane systems were constructed to test CO2 selectivity. These included proteic membranes, thin liquid films and enzyme-immobilized teflon membranes. Selectivity ratios of more than 200:1 were obtained for CO2 versus oxygen with CO2 at 0.1%. The data indicate that a membrane based bioreactor can be constructed which could bring CO2 levels close to Earth.

  9. Thermodynamical effects during carbon dioxide release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, A. K.; Böttcher, N.; Görke, U.-J.; Kolditz, O.

    2012-04-01

    Pruess [1] investigated the risk of carbon dioxide leakage from shallow storage sites by modeling scenarios. Such a fluid release is associated with mechanical work performed by formation fluid against expansion without taking heat from ambient environment. Understanding of heat related to mechanical work is essential to predict the temperature at the leak. According to the first law of thermodynamics, internal energy of working fluid decreases with an amount which is equivalent to this work hence, working fluid lost its own heat. Such kind of heat loss depends strongly on whether the expansion process is adiabatic or isothermal. Isothermal expansion allows the working fluid to interact thermally with the solid matrix. Adiabatic expansion is an isenthalpic process that takes heat from the working fluid and the ambient environment remains unchanged. This work is part of the CLEAN research project [6]. In this study, thermodynamic effects of mechanical work during eventual carbon dioxide leakage are investigated numerically. In particular, we are interested to detect the temperature at leakage scenarios and its deviation with different thermodynamic processes. Finite element simulation is conducted with a two-dimensional rectangular geometry representing a shallow storage site which bottom was located at -300m below the land surface. A fully saturated porous medium is assumed where the pore space is filled completely with carbon dioxide. Carbon dioxide accumulated in the secondary trap at 30 Bar and 24 °C is allowed to leak from top right point of rectangle with atmospheric pressure. With (i) adiabatic and (ii) isothermal compressibility factors, temperature around leakage area has been calculated which show a significant difference. With some simplification, this study detects leak temperature which is very close with [1]. Temporal evaluation at the leaky area shows that the working fluid temperature can be reduced to -20 °C when the leakage scenario is performed

  10. Calcium Oxide Matrices and Carbon Dioxide Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Nicolini

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Homogeneous matrices of calcium oxide (CaO were prepared by mixing this material with polyethylene glycol (PEG acting as malleable inert support in order to obtain processable composites. Preliminary tests were carried out to assess the best concentration of CaO in the composite, individuated in the CaO/PEG weight ratio of 1/4. Experimental data highlighted that the composite was able to selectively detect carbon dioxide (CO2 via a nanogravimetric method by performing the experiments inside an atmosphere-controlled chamber filled with CO2. Furthermore, the composite material showed a linear absorption of CO2 as a function of the gas concentration inside the atmosphere-controlled chamber, thus paving the way for the possible use of these matrices for applications in the field of sensor devices for long-term evaluation of accumulated environmental CO2.

  11. Permanent storage of carbon dioxide in geological reservoirs by mineral carbonation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matter, Jürg M.; Kelemen, Peter B.

    2009-12-01

    Anthropogenic greenhouse-gas emissions continue to increase rapidly despite efforts aimed at curbing the release of such gases. One potentially long-term solution for offsetting these emissions is the capture and storage of carbon dioxide. In principle, fluid or gaseous carbon dioxide can be injected into the Earth's crust and locked up as carbonate minerals through chemical reactions with calcium and magnesium ions supplied by silicate minerals. This process can lead to near-permanent and secure sequestration, but its feasibility depends on the ease and vigour of the reactions. Laboratory studies as well as natural analogues indicate that the rate of carbonate mineral formation is much higher in host rocks that are rich in magnesium- and calcium-bearing minerals. Such rocks include, for example, basalts and magnesium-rich mantle rocks that have been emplaced on the continents. Carbonate mineral precipitation could quickly clog up existing voids, presenting a challenge to this approach. However, field and laboratory observations suggest that the stress induced by rapid precipitation may lead to fracturing and subsequent increase in pore space. Future work should rigorously test the feasibility of this approach by addressing reaction kinetics, the evolution of permeability and field-scale injection methods.

  12. Stationary plume induced by carbon dioxide dissolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, laminar convection flows induced by carbon dioxide absorption are addressed from experimental, numerical and theoretical points of view. A vertical glass tube (of centimetre scale) filled with distilled water is subjected to a sudden increase in the partial pressure of carbon dioxide. As a result of the diffusion of the gas into the unsaturated solution, a thin layer of fluid located underneath the surface becomes heavier. This initial density gradient first destabilizes to form a plume, which goes downwards through the entire cell. After a first transient pulsating regime (periodic succession of such Rayleigh-Benard plumes), a stationary flow settles in the tube, which is maintained by the constant supply of gas at the surface. At late stages, this stationary regime is followed by an aperiodic regime, which lasts until the complete saturation of the solution (thermodynamic equilibrium). The present study only focuses on the stationary regime, whose characteristics appear to be almost independent of the Bond number and the aspect ratio but strongly dependent on the chemical Rayleigh number. Three decades of Rayleigh numbers are explored using particle image velocimetry measurements, which allows for a precise determination of the scaling exponents for the vertical velocity amplitude and the plume width. The assumption that gravity and a constant pressure gradient balance the viscous effects enables us to derive an analytic expression for the stationary vertical velocity on the axis, which scales as Ra2/3 (ln Ra)1/3. As a consequence, the width of the plume scales as Ra-1/6 (ln Ra)-1/3 and the mass Nusselt number as (Ra= ln Ra)1/3. These scalings are in excellent agreement with the experimental and numerical results. The multiplicative constants of these scalings can also be calculated and show a fairly good agreement if a rigid boundary condition (no-slip) is assumed at the free surface. (authors)

  13. Six-fold coordinated carbon dioxide VI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iota, Valentin; Yoo, Choong-Shik; Klepeis, Jae-Hyun; Jenei, Zsolt; Evans, William; Cynn, Hyunchae (LLNL)

    2008-06-16

    Under standard conditions, carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) is a simple molecular gas and an important atmospheric constituent, whereas silicon dioxide (SiO{sub 2}) is a covalent solid, and one of the fundamental minerals of the planet. The remarkable dissimilarity between these two group IV oxides is diminished at higher pressures and temperatures as CO{sub 2} transforms to a series of solid phases, from simple molecular to a fully covalent extended-solid V, structurally analogous to SiO{sub 2} tridymite. Here, we present the discovery of an extended-solid phase of CO{sub 2}: a six-fold coordinated stishovite-like phase VI, obtained by isothermal compression of associated CO{sub 2}-II above 50 GPa at 530-650 K. Together with the previously reported CO{sub 2}-V and a-carbonia, this extended phase indicates a fundamental similarity between CO{sub 2} (a prototypical molecular solid) and SiO{sub 2} (one of Earth's fundamental building blocks). We present a phase diagram with a limited stability domain for molecular CO{sub 2}-I, and suggest that the conversion to extended-network solids above 40-50 GPa occurs via intermediate phases II, III and IV. The crystal structure of phase VI suggests strong disorder along the c axis in stishovite-like P4{sub 2}/mnm, with carbon atoms manifesting an average six-fold coordination within the framework of sp{sup 3} hybridization.

  14. Six-fold coordinated carbon dioxide VI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iota, Valentin; Yoo, Choong-Shik; Klepeis, Jae-Hyun; Jenei, Zsolt; Evans, William; Cynn, Hyunchae

    2007-01-01

    Under standard conditions, carbon dioxide (CO2) is a simple molecular gas and an important atmospheric constituent, whereas silicon dioxide (SiO2) is a covalent solid, and one of the fundamental minerals of the planet. The remarkable dissimilarity between these two group IV oxides is diminished at higher pressures and temperatures as CO2 transforms to a series of solid phases, from simple molecular to a fully covalent extended-solid V, structurally analogous to SiO2 tridymite. Here, we present the discovery of an extended-solid phase of CO2: a six-fold coordinated stishovite-like phase VI, obtained by isothermal compression of associated CO2-II (refs 1,2) above 50 GPa at 530-650 K. Together with the previously reported CO2-V (refs 3-5) and a-carbonia, this extended phase indicates a fundamental similarity between CO2 (a prototypical molecular solid) and SiO2 (one of Earth's fundamental building blocks). We present a phase diagram with a limited stability domain for molecular CO2-I, and suggest that the conversion to extended-network solids above 40-50 GPa occurs via intermediate phases II (refs 1,2), III (refs 7,8) and IV (refs 9,10). The crystal structure of phase VI suggests strong disorder along the c axis in stishovite-like P42/mnm, with carbon atoms manifesting an average six-fold coordination within the framework of sp3 hybridization. PMID:17160005

  15. Historical Sulfur Dioxide Emissions 1850-2000: Methods and Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Steven J.; Andres, Robert; Conception , Elvira; Lurz, Joshua

    2004-01-25

    A global, self-consistent estimate of sulfur dioxide emissions over the last one and a half century were estimated by using a combination of bottom-up and best available inventory methods including all anthropogenic sources. We find that global sulfur dioxide emissions peaked about 1980 and have generally declined since this time. Emissions were extrapolated to a 1{sup o} x 1{sup o} grid for the time period 1850-2000 at annual resolution with two emission height levels and by season. Emissions are somewhat higher in the recent past in this new work as compared with some comprehensive estimates. This difference is largely due to our use of emissions factors that vary with time to account for sulfur removals from fossil fuels and industrial smelting processes.

  16. CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Jeffrey W. Portzer; Thomas Nelson; Raghubir P. Gupta

    2005-01-01

    This report describes research conducted between October 1, 2004 and December 31, 2004 on the use of dry regenerable sorbents for removal of carbon dioxide from flue gas. Two supported sorbents were tested in a bench scale fluidized bed reactor system. The sorbents were prepared by impregnation of sodium carbonate on to an inert support at a commercial catalyst manufacturing facility. One sorbent, tested through five cycles of carbon dioxide sorption in an atmosphere of 3% water vapor and 0.8 to 3% carbon dioxide showed consistent reactivity with sodium carbonate utilization of 7 to 14%. A second, similarly prepared material, showed comparable reactivity in one cycle of testing. Batches of 5 other materials were prepared in laboratory scale quantities (primarily by spray drying). These materials generally have significantly greater surface areas than calcined sodium bicarbonate. Small scale testing showed no significant adsorption of mercury on representative carbon dioxide sorbent materials under expected flue gas conditions.

  17. Does carbon dioxide pool or stream in the subsurface?

    CERN Document Server

    Cardoso, Silvana S S

    2014-01-01

    Pools of carbon dioxide are found in natural geological accumulations and in engineered storage in saline aquifers. It has been thought that once this CO2 dissolves in the formation water, making it denser, convection streams would transport it efficiently to depth, but this may not be so. Here, we assess the impact of natural chemical reactions between the dissolved CO2 and the rock formation on the convection streams in the subsurface. We show that, while in carbonate rocks the streaming of dissolved carbon dioxide persists, the chemical interactions in silicate-rich rocks may curb this transport drastically and even inhibit it altogether. New laboratory experiments confirm the curtailing of convection by reaction. Wide and narrow streams of dense carbon-rich water are shut-off gradually as reaction strength increases until all transport of the pooled carbon dioxide occurs by slow molecular diffusion. These results show that the complex fluid dynamic and kinetic interactions between pooled carbon dioxide an...

  18. Design of stable catalysts for methane-carbon dioxide reforming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lercher, J.A.; Bitter, J.H.; Hally, W.; Niessen, W.; Seshan, K.

    2001-01-01

    The activity and stability of catalysts for methane-carbon dioxide reforming depend subtly upon the support and the active metal. Methane decomposes to carbon and hydrogen, forming carbon on the oxide support and the metal. Carbon on the metal is reactive and can be oxidized to CO by oxygen from dis

  19. Measurement of carbon dioxide diffusion coefficient of concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Villain, G.; PAVOINE, A; Thiery, M.

    2006-01-01

    The carbonation of concrete is a chemical reaction, which can be at the origin of the premature degradation of reinforced concrete structures. In order to predict service life of reinforced concrete structures, many models based on gas diffusion were developed. The carbon dioxide diffusion coefficient of concrete is thus a significant input datum for these models. The objective of this article is to present a simple reliable testing method to quantify the carbon dioxide diffusion coefficient ...

  20. An Empirical Research on Measuring Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Urban Tourism:A Case Study of Shenzhen%城市旅游业CO2排放量估算研究——以深圳市为例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪清蓉

    2012-01-01

    基于碳排放理论及旅游者的消费结构特征,提出城市旅游业能源消耗及CO2排放测算模型,计算并分析了2008年深圳市旅游业能源消耗及CO2排放.结果表明:各组分排放量从大到小依次是行、食、游、住、购、娱,旅游业产生的温室气体不容忽视;旅游规模、旅游交通工具的选择是影响旅游业CO2排放量的重要因素;在旅游产业日益发展的情况下旅游业面临能源消耗、排放量增加和节能减排的双重压力.最后就能源消耗计算模型的完善、能源参数的研究以及下一步研究方向进行了讨论,并提出了相应的建议.%Measuring carbon dioxide emissions from tourism is the starting point for the realization of industrial energy saving goals and the basis for the formulation of governmental reduction policies. However, it has also become a big problem due to the current situation of tourism in the country and the lack of energy consumption data Case studies on CQz emissions from urban tourism are rare, though city remains the most important space vector for tourism development Based on the theory of carbon dioxide emissions and the consumption structure of tourists, the paper proposes the calculation model of energy consumption and carbon dioxide emissions. Taking Shenzhen City for example, this paper calculates and analyses energy consumption and carbon dioxide emissions from Shenzhen s urban tourism in 2008. The result shows that; l)the descending order of carbon dioxide emissions of tourism s component is transportation,food, tour,housing,shopping, entertainment, which indicates that GHG emission from urban tourism cannot be ignored; 2) travel size and travel transport choices are two key factors affecting energy consumption and CO2 emissions from urban, tourism; 3)though growing fast,urban tourism is facing dual pressure from energy consumption, increase in emissions and mitigation. The paper also makes suggestions on the improvement of

  1. Carbon Dioxide Sequestration and ECBM in the Powder River Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colmenares, L. B.; Zoback, M. D.

    2003-12-01

    Coal seams are both a source of coal bed methane (CBM) and a potential carbon dioxide sink. For sub-bituminous coals like those in the Powder River Basin (PRB), the CO2/CH4 adsorption ratio is approximately 10:1, which indicates the significant potential for sequestering carbon dioxide. In addition, injected carbon dioxide would also enhance the production of methane from the coal seam because of its higher adsorption capacity. This means that the injection of carbon dioxide in coal beds may have the dual benefit of sequestering carbon dioxide and enhancing CBM production. Moreover, if carbon dioxide injection efficiently displaces the adsorbed methane, it may reduce the amount of water produced from CBM wells as part of the depressurization process. Our work in the Powder River Basin indicates that drilling and completion operations result in hydraulic fracturing of the coal and possibly the adjacent strata. This would result in both excess CBM water production and inefficient depressurization of coals. We have been able to collect water-enhancement tests data in coals to obtain the magnitude of the least principal stress in the coal seam. The preliminary data we have analyzed indicates that the hydrofracs are horizontal in some areas because the least principal stress corresponds to the overburden. It is interesting to speculate that one could use horizontal hydrofracs near the bottom of the coal seam for carbon dioxide injection and a horizontal hydrofrac near the upper part of the coal seam for methane production.

  2. Comparative study of solvent properties for carbon dioxide absorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aschenbrenner, O.; Styring, P. [University of Sheffield, Sheffield (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-01

    Several inexpensive and non-toxic solvents with low vapour pressures were investigated for their suitability as alternative solvents for the absorption of carbon dioxide from flue gas. The solvents include poly(ethylene glycol)s, poly(ethylene glycol) ethers, poly(ethylenimine) and glycerol-based substances. Solvent properties such as thermal stability, solubility of carbon dioxide and selectivity over nitrogen were investigated in a systematic study using a thermogravimetric analyser. Absorption results are reported for pure carbon dioxide and nitrogen as well as a mixture of both gases. Desorption and long-term sorption behaviour are also discussed. Glycerol and poly(ethylene glycol)s show a high solubility of carbon dioxide. Due to the high viscosity of the solvent, carbon dioxide absorption in poly(ethylenimine) is very slow in spite of the presence of favourable amine groups. PEG 300 was found to be the best solvent in this study and shows a high carbon dioxide solubility as well as good selectivity over nitrogen. The advantages of high stability, low solvent loss and low desorption energy of PEG 300 may outweigh its lower absorption capacity compared to the state-of-the-art solvent monoethanolamine, making it a potentially advantageous solvent for industrial carbon dioxide absorption processes.

  3. Modeling and calculation of open carbon dioxide refrigeration system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A model of open refrigeration system is developed. • The state of CO2 has great effect on Refrigeration capacity loss by heat transfer. • Refrigeration capacity loss by remaining CO2 has little relation to the state of CO2. • Calculation results are in agreement with the test results. - Abstract: Based on the analysis of the properties of carbon dioxide, an open carbon dioxide refrigeration system is proposed, which is responsible for the situation without external electricity unit. A model of open refrigeration system is developed, and the relationship between the storage environment of carbon dioxide and refrigeration capacity is conducted. Meanwhile, a test platform is developed to simulation the performance of the open carbon dioxide refrigeration system. By comparing the theoretical calculations and the experimental results, several conclusions are obtained as follows: refrigeration capacity loss by heat transfer in supercritical state is much more than that in two-phase region and the refrigeration capacity loss by remaining carbon dioxide has little relation to the state of carbon dioxide. The results will be helpful to the use of open carbon dioxide refrigeration

  4. The Formation of Ethane from Carbon Dioxide under Cold Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Pulsed-corona plasma has been used as a new method for ethane dehydrogenation at low temperature and normal pressure using carbon dioxide as an oxidant in this paper. The effect of carbon dioxide content in the feed, power input, and flow rate of the reactants on the ethane dehydrogenation has been investigated. The experimental results show that the conversion of ethane increases with the increase in the amount of carbon dioxide in the feed. The yield of ethylene and acetylene decreases with the increase in the yield of carbon monoxide, indicating that the increased carbon dioxide leads to the part of ethylene and acetylene being oxidized to carbon monoxide. Power input is primarily an electrical parameter in pulsed-corona plasma, which plays an important role in reactant conversion and product formation. When the power input reaches 16 W, ethane conversion is 41.0% and carbon dioxide conversion is 26.3%. The total yield of ethylene and acetylene is 15.6%. The reduced flow rate of feed improves the conversion of ethane,carbon dioxide and the yield of acetylene, and induces carbon deposit as well.

  5. Forest management techniques for carbon dioxide storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujimori, Takao [Forestry and Forest Products Research Inst., Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1993-12-31

    In the global ecosystem concerning carbon dioxide content in the atmosphere, the forest ecosystem plays an important role. In effect, the ratio of forest biomass to total terrestrial biomass is about 90%, and the ratio of carbon stored in the forest biomass to that in the atmosphere is two thirds. When soils and detritus of forests are added, there is more C stored in forests than in the atmosphere, about 1.3 times or more. Thus, forests can be regarded as the great holder of C on earth. If the area of forest land on the earth is constantly maintained and forests are in the climax stage, the uptake of C and the release of C by and from the forests will balance. In this case, forests are neither sinks nor sources of CO{sub 2} although they store a large amount of C. However, when forests are deforested, they become a source of C; through human activities, forests have become a source of C. According to a report by the IPCC, 1.6{+-}1.2 PgC is annually added to the atmosphere by deforestation. According to the FAO (1992), the area of land deforested annually in the tropics from 1981 to 1990 was 16.9 x 10{sup 6} ha. This value is nearly half the area of Japanese land. The most important thing for the CO{sub 2} environment concerning forests is therefore how to reduce deforestation and to successfully implement a forestation or reforestation.

  6. Carbon dioxide warming of the early Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrhenius, G.

    1997-01-01

    Svante Arrhenius' research in atmospheric physics extended beyond the recent past and the near future states of the Earth, which today are at the center of sociopolitical attention. His plan encompassed all of the physical phenomena known at the time to relate to the formation and evolution of stars and planets. His two-volume textbook on cosmic physics is a comprehensive synopsis of the field. The inquiry into the possible cause of the ice ages and the theory of selective wavelength filter control led Arrhenius to consider the surface states of the other terrestrial planets, and of the ancient Earth before it had been modified by the emergence of life. The rapid escape of hydrogen and the equilibration with igneous rocks required that carbon in the early atmosphere prevailed mainly in oxidized form as carbon dioxide, together with other photoactive gases exerting a greenhouse effect orders of magnitude larger than in our present atmosphere. This effect, together with the ensuing chemical processes, would have set the conditions for life to evolve on our planet, seeded from spores spreading through an infinite Universe, and propelled, as Arrhenius thought, by stellar radiation pressure.

  7. CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David A. Green; Thomas Nelson; Brian S. Turk; Paul Box; Weijiong Li; Raghubir P. Gupta

    2005-07-01

    This report describes research conducted between April 1, 2005 and June 30, 2005 on the use of dry regenerable sorbents for removal of carbon dioxide from flue gas from coal combustion and synthesis gas from coal gasification. Supported sodium carbonate sorbents removed up to 76% of the carbon dioxide from simulated flue gas in a downflow cocurrent flow reactor system, with an approximate 15 second gas-solid contact time. This reaction proceeds at temperatures as low as 25 C. Lithium silicate sorbents remove carbon dioxide from high temperature simulated flue gas and simulated synthesis gas. Both sorbent types can be thermally regenerated and reused. The lithium silicate sorbent was tested in a thermogravimetric analyzer and in a 1-in quartz reactor at atmospheric pressure; tests were also conducted at elevated pressure in a 2-in diameter high temperature high pressure reactor system. The lithium sorbent reacts rapidly with carbon dioxide in flue gas at 350-500 C to absorb about 10% of the sorbent weight, then continues to react at a lower rate. The sorbent can be essentially completely regenerated at temperatures above 600 C and reused. In atmospheric pressure tests with synthesis gas of 10% initial carbon dioxide content, the sorbent removed over 90% of the carbon dioxide. An economic analysis of a downflow absorption process for removal of carbon dioxide from flue gas with a supported sodium carbonate sorbent suggests that a 90% efficient carbon dioxide capture system installed at a 500 MW{sub e} generating plant would have an incremental capital cost of $35 million ($91/kWe, assuming 20 percent for contingencies) and an operating cost of $0.0046/kWh. Assuming capital costs of $1,000/kW for a 500 MWe plant the capital cost of the down flow absorption process represents a less than 10% increase, thus meeting DOE goals as set forth in its Carbon Sequestration Technology Roadmap and Program Plan.

  8. Temporal biomass dynamics of an Arctic plankton bloom in response to increasing levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.G. Schulz; R.G.J. Bellerby; C.P.D. Brussaard; J. Büdenbender; J. Czerny; A. Engel; M. Fischer; S. Koch-Klavsen; S.A. Krug; S. Lischka; A. Ludwig; M. Meyerhöfer; G. Nondal; A. Silyakova; A. Stuhr; U. Riebesell

    2013-01-01

    Ocean acidification and carbonation, driven by anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2), have been shown to affect a variety of marine organisms and are likely to change ecosystem functioning. High latitudes, especially the Arctic, will be the first to encounter profound changes in carbonate

  9. Alkali metal carbon dioxide electrochemical system for energy storage and/or conversion of carbon dioxide to oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagedorn, Norman H. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    An alkali metal, such as lithium, is the anodic reactant; carbon dioxide or a mixture of carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide is the cathodic reactant; and carbonate of the alkali metal is the electrolyte in an electrochemical cell for the storage and delivery of electrical energy. Additionally, alkali metal-carbon dioxide battery systems include a plurality of such electrochemical cells. Gold is a preferred catalyst for reducing the carbon dioxide at the cathode. The fuel cell of the invention produces electrochemical energy through the use of an anodic reactant which is extremely energetic and light, and a cathodic reactant which can be extracted from its environment and therefore exacts no transportation penalty. The invention is, therefore, especially useful in extraterrestrial environments.

  10. Economic Evaluations for the Carbon Dioxide-involved Production of High-value Chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Economic evaluation of the manufacturing technology of high-value chemicals through the carbonation reaction of carbon dioxide contained in the flue gas was performed, and analysis of the IRR (Internal Rate of Return) and whole profit along the production plan of the final product was conducted. Through a carbonation reaction with sodium hydroxide that is generated from electrolysis and by using carbon dioxide in the combustion gas that is generated in the power plant, it is possible to get a high value products such as sodium bicarbonate compound and also to reduce the carbon dioxide emission simultaneously. The IRR (Internal Rate of Return) and NPV (Net Present Value) methods were used for the economic evaluation of the process which could handle carbon dioxide of 100 tons per day in the period of the 20 years of plant operation. The results of economic evaluation showed that the IRR of baseline case of technology was 67.2% and the profit that obtained during the whole operation period (20 years) was 346,922 million won based on NPV value. When considering ETS due to the emissions trading enforcement that will be activated in 2015, the NPV was improved to a 6,000 million won. Based on this results, it could be concluded that this CO2 carbonation technology is an cost-effective technology option for the reduction of greenhouse gas

  11. Economic Evaluations for the Carbon Dioxide-involved Production of High-value Chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ji Hyun; Lee, Dong Woog; Jang, Se Gyu; Kwak, No-Sang; Lee, In Young; Jang, Kyung Ryoung; Shim, Jae-Goo [KEPCO Research Institute, Daejon (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Jong Shin [Korea East-West Power Co. LTD, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    Economic evaluation of the manufacturing technology of high-value chemicals through the carbonation reaction of carbon dioxide contained in the flue gas was performed, and analysis of the IRR (Internal Rate of Return) and whole profit along the production plan of the final product was conducted. Through a carbonation reaction with sodium hydroxide that is generated from electrolysis and by using carbon dioxide in the combustion gas that is generated in the power plant, it is possible to get a high value products such as sodium bicarbonate compound and also to reduce the carbon dioxide emission simultaneously. The IRR (Internal Rate of Return) and NPV (Net Present Value) methods were used for the economic evaluation of the process which could handle carbon dioxide of 100 tons per day in the period of the 20 years of plant operation. The results of economic evaluation showed that the IRR of baseline case of technology was 67.2% and the profit that obtained during the whole operation period (20 years) was 346,922 million won based on NPV value. When considering ETS due to the emissions trading enforcement that will be activated in 2015, the NPV was improved to a 6,000 million won. Based on this results, it could be concluded that this CO2 carbonation technology is an cost-effective technology option for the reduction of greenhouse gas.

  12. Carbon Dioxide, Methane, and Nitrous Oxide Emissions from a Rice-Wheat Rotation as Affected by Crop Residue Incorporation and Temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邹建文; 黄耀; 宗良纲; 郑循华; 王跃思

    2004-01-01

    Field measurements were made from June 2001 to May 2002 to evaluate the effect of crop residue application and temperature on CO2, CH4, and N2O emissions within an entire rice-wheat rotation season.Rapeseed cake and wheat straw were incorporated into the soil at a rate of 2.25 t hm-2 when the rice crop was transplanted in June 2001. Compared with the control, the incorporation of rapeseed cake enhanced the emissions of CO2, CH4, and N2O in the rice-growing season by 12.3%, 252.3%, and 17.5%,respectively, while no further effect was held on the emissions of CO2 and N2O in the following wheatgrowing season. The incorporation of wheat straw enhanced the emissions of CO2 and CH4 by 7.1%and 249.6%, respectively, but reduced the N2O emission by 18.8% in the rice-growing season. Significant reductions of 17.8% for the CO2 and of 12.9% for the N2O emission were observed in the following wheatgrowing season. A positive correlation existed between the emissions of N2O and CO2 (R2 = 0.445, n =73, p < 0.001) from the rice-growing season when N2O was emitted. A trade-off relationship between the emissions of CH4 and N2O was found in the rice-growing season. The CH4 emission was significantly correlated with the CO2 emission for the period from rice transplantation to field drainage, but not for the entire rice-growing season. In addition, air temperature was found to regulate the CO2 emissions from the non-waterlogged period over the entire rice-wheat rotation season and the N2O emissions from the nonwaterlogged period of the rice-growing season, which can be quantitatively described by an exponential function. The temperature coefficient (Q10) was then evaluated to be 2.3±0.2 for the CO2 emission and 3.9±0.4 for the N2O emission, respectively.

  13. Carbon Dioxide Capture from Flue Gas: Development and Evaluation of Existing and Novel Process Concepts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abu Zahra, M.R.M.

    2009-01-01

    One of the main global challenges in the years to come is to reduce the CO2 emissions in view of the apparent contribution to global warming. Carbon dioxide capture, transport, and storage (CCS) from fossil fuel fired power plants is drawing increased interest as an intermediate solution towards sus

  14. Carbon dioxide reduction in housing: experiences in urban renewal projects in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waals, F.M. van der; Vermeulen, W.J.V.; Glasbergen, P.

    2003-01-01

    It is increasingly being recognised that the housing sector can contribute to reductions in the levels of carbon dioxide (CO2 ). The renewal of existing residential areas offers opportunities to reduce CO2 emissions. However, technical options for CO2-reduction, such as insulation, solar energy, and

  15. Histidine-catalyzed synthesis of cyclic carbonates in supercritical carbon dioxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The coupling reaction of carbon dioxide with epoxides was investigated using naturally occurring α-amino acids as the catalyst in supercritical carbon dioxide and it was found that L-histidine is the most active catalyst.In the presence of 0.8 mol% of L-histidine at 130°C under 8 MPa of CO2,the reaction of carbon dioxide with epoxides proceeded smoothly,affording corresponding cyclic carbonates in good to excellent yields.

  16. CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David A. Green; Thomas Nelson; Brian S. Turk; Jeffrey W. Portzer; Raghubir P. Gupta

    2005-04-01

    This report describes research conducted between January 1, 2005 and March 31, 2005 on the use of dry regenerable sorbents for removal of carbon dioxide from flue gas. Engineered sorbents composed of sodium carbonate on a ceramic support were tested in a laboratory fluidized bed reactor system and found to be capable of essentially complete removal of carbon dioxide at 60 C in a short residence time. Upon breakthrough the sorbents can be thermally regenerated to recover essentially all of the absorbed carbon dioxide. An optimized supported sorbent tested in a pilot-scale entrained bed absorber retained its reactivity in multicycle tests and experienced no attrition. Removal of >90% of carbon dioxide in simulated flue gas was achieved in an entrained bed reactor.

  17. Disintegration of Carbon Dioxide Molecules in a Microwave Plasma Torch

    OpenAIRE

    Kwak, Hyoung S.; Uhm, Han S.; Yong C. Hong; Eun H. Choi

    2015-01-01

    A pure carbon dioxide torch is generated by making use of 2.45 GHz microwave. Carbon dioxide gas becomes the working gas and produces a stable carbon dioxide torch. The torch volume is almost linearly proportional to the microwave power. Temperature of the torch flame is measured by making use of optical spectroscopy and thermocouple. Two distinctive regions are exhibited, a bright, whitish region of high-temperature zone and a bluish, dimmer region of relatively low-temperature zone. Study o...

  18. Carbon dioxide fluid-flow modeling and injectivity calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Lauri

    2011-01-01

    At present, the literature lacks a geologic-based assessment methodology for numerically estimating injectivity, lateral migration, and subsequent long-term containment of supercritical carbon dioxide that has undergone geologic sequestration into subsurface formations. This study provides a method for and quantification of first-order approximations for the time scale of supercritical carbon dioxide lateral migration over a one-kilometer distance through a representative volume of rock. These calculations provide a quantified foundation for estimating injectivity and geologic storage of carbon dioxide.

  19. Carbon Dioxide-Water Emulsions for Enhanced Oil Recovery and Permanent Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, David; Golomb, Dan; Shi, Guang; Shih, Cherry; Lewczuk, Rob; Miksch, Joshua; Manmode, Rahul; Mulagapati, Srihariraju; Malepati, Chetankurmar

    2011-09-30

    This project involves the use of an innovative new invention Particle Stabilized Emulsions (PSEs) of Carbon Dioxide-in-Water and Water-in-Carbon Dioxide for Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) and Permanent Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide. The EOR emulsion would be injected into a semi-depleted oil reservoir such as Dover 33 in Otsego County, Michigan. It is expected that the emulsion would dislocate the stranded heavy crude oil from the rock granule surfaces, reduce its viscosity, and increase its mobility. The advancing emulsion front should provide viscosity control which drives the reduced-viscosity oil toward the production wells. The make-up of the emulsion would be subsequently changed so it interacts with the surrounding rock minerals in order to enhance mineralization, thereby providing permanent sequestration of the injected CO{sub 2}. In Phase 1 of the project, the following tasks were accomplished: 1. Perform laboratory scale (mL/min) refinements on existing procedures for producing liquid carbon dioxide-in-water (C/W) and water-in-liquid carbon dioxide (W/C) emulsion stabilized by hydrophilic and hydrophobic fine particles, respectively, using a Kenics-type static mixer. 2. Design and cost evaluate scaled up (gal/min) C/W and W/C emulsification systems to be deployed in Phase 2 at the Otsego County semi-depleted oil field. 3. Design the modifications necessary to the present CO{sub 2} flooding system at Otsego County for emulsion injection. 4. Design monitoring and verification systems to be deployed in Phase 2 for measuring potential leakage of CO{sub 2} after emulsion injection. 5. Design production protocol to assess enhanced oil recovery with emulsion injection compared to present recovery with neat CO{sub 2} flooding. 6. Obtain Federal and State permits for emulsion injection. Initial research focused on creating particle stabilized emulsions with the smallest possible globule size so that the emulsion can penetrate even low-permeability crude

  20. The correlation between the emissions of "three wastes" and carbon dioxide in Chinese food industry:based on the study of 1996~2008%中国食品工业“三废”与二氧化碳排放的相关性研究:基于1996~2008年间考察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晓莉; 吴林海

    2012-01-01

    Based on the development of low-carbon in the world,to analyze the discharging and reduction achievements of "three wastes" and the carbon dioxide emissions of Chinese food industry in 1996~2008.The regression model was also made to analyze the correlation between the emissions of "three wastes" and carbon dioxide.Results showed that Chinese food industry's "three waste" reduction were significantly associated with reduction in carbon emissions.And improving the comprehensive utilization of solid wastes was stronger than the improvements of both waste water and waste liquid in reducing carbon emissions of food industry.%基于全球低碳发展趋势,考察分析1996~2008年间中国食品工业"三废"排放与减排成效,并计算食品工业及分行业的二氧化碳排放,以此利用回归模型验证"三废"减排与碳减排的相关性。结果表明,我国食品工业的"三废"减排与碳减排显著相关,且提高固体废弃物的综合利用率较废水和废气的治理改善更可以显著降低食品工业碳排放。

  1. Synthesis pf dimethyl carbonate in supercritical carbon dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballivet-Tkatchenko, D.; Plasseraud, L. [Universite de Bourgogne-UFR Sciences et Techniques, Dijon (France). Lab. de Synthese et Electrosynthese Organometalliques]. E-mail: ballivet@u-bourgogne.fr; Ligabue, R.A. [Pontificia Univ. Catolica do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica Pura

    2006-01-15

    The reactivity of carbon dioxide with methanol to form dimethyl carbonate was studied in the presence of the n-butylmethoxytin compounds n-Bu{sub 3}SnOCH{sub 3}, n-Bu{sub 2}Sn(OCH{sub 3}){sub 2}, and [n-Bu{sub 2}(CH{sub 3}O)Sn]{sub 2}O. The reaction occurred under solventless conditions at 423 K and was produced by an increase in CO{sub 2} pressure. This beneficial effect is primarily attributed to phase behavior. The mass transfer under liquid-vapor biphasic conditions was not limiting when the system reached the supercritical state for a CO{sub 2} pressure higher than 16 MPa. Under these conditions, CO{sub 2} acted as a reactant and a solvent. (author)

  2. Synthesis of dimethyl carbonate in supercritical carbon dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Ballivet-Tkatchenko

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The reactivity of carbon dioxide with methanol to form dimethyl carbonate was studied in the presence of the n-butylmethoxytin compounds n-Bu3SnOCH3, n-Bu2Sn(OCH32 , and [n-Bu2(CH3OSn]2 O. The reaction occurred under solventless conditions at 423 K and was produced by an increase in CO2 pressure. This beneficial effect is primarily attributed to phase behavior. The mass transfer under liquid-vapor biphasic conditions was not limiting when the system reached the supercritical state for a CO2 pressure higher than 16 MPa. Under these conditions, CO2 acted as a reactant and a solvent.

  3. Atmospheric carbon dioxide: its role in maintaining phytoplankton standing crops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schindler, D.W.; Brunskill, G.J.; Emerson, S.; Broecker, W.S.; Peng, T.H.

    1972-01-01

    The rate of invasion of carbon dioxide into an artificially eutrophic Canadian Shield Lake with insuffient internal sources of carbon was determined by two methods: Measuring the carbon:nitrogen:phosphorus ratios of seston after weekly additions of nitrogen and phosphorus, and measuring the loss of radon-/sup 222/ tracer from the epilimnion. Both methods gave an invasion rate of about 0.2 gram of carbon per square meter per day. The results demonstrate that invasion of atmospheric carbon dioxide may be sufficient to permit eutrophication of any body of water receiving an adequate supply of phosphorus and nitrogen.

  4. Carbon Dioxide in Exoplanetary Atmospheres: Rarely Dominant Compared to Carbon Monoxide and Water

    CERN Document Server

    Heng, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the abundance of carbon dioxide in exoplanetary atmospheres. We construct analytical models of systems in chemical equilibrium that include carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, water, methane and acetylene and relate the equilibrium constants of the chemical reactions to temperature and pressure via the tabulated Gibbs free energies. We prove that such chemical systems may be described by a quintic equation for the mixing ratio of methane. By examining the abundances of these molecules across a broad range of temperatures (spanning equilibrium temperatures from 600 to 2500 K), pressures (via temperature-pressure profiles that explore albedo and opacity variations) and carbon-to-oxygen ratios (from 0.1 to 100), we conclude that carbon dioxide is subdominant compared to carbon monoxide and water. Atmospheric mixing does not alter this conclusion if carbon dioxide is subdominant everywhere in the atmosphere. Carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide may attain comparable abundances if th...

  5. Carbon ion pump for removal of carbon dioxide from combustion gas and other gas mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aines, Roger D.; Bourcier, William L.

    2010-11-09

    A novel method and system of separating carbon dioxide from flue gas is introduced. Instead of relying on large temperature or pressure changes to remove carbon dioxide from a solvent used to absorb it from flue gas, the ion pump method, as disclosed herein, dramatically increases the concentration of dissolved carbonate ion in solution. This increases the overlying vapor pressure of carbon dioxide gas, permitting carbon dioxide to be removed from the downstream side of the ion pump as a pure gas. The ion pumping may be obtained from reverse osmosis, electrodialysis, thermal desalination methods, or an ion pump system having an oscillating flow in synchronization with an induced electric field.

  6. Carbon ion pump for removal of carbon dioxide from combustion gas and other gas mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aines, Roger D.; Bourcier, William L.

    2014-08-19

    A novel method and system of separating carbon dioxide from flue gas is introduced. Instead of relying on large temperature or pressure changes to remove carbon dioxide from a solvent used to absorb it from flue gas, the ion pump method, as disclosed herein, dramatically increases the concentration of dissolved carbonate ion in solution. This increases the overlying vapor pressure of carbon dioxide gas, permitting carbon dioxide to be removed from the downstream side of the ion pump as a pure gas. The ion pumping may be obtained from reverse osmosis, electrodialysis, thermal desalination methods, or an ion pump system having an oscillating flow in synchronization with an induced electric field.

  7. The source of carbon dioxide for gastric acid production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steer, Howard

    2009-01-01

    The source of carbon dioxide for the chemical reaction leading to the production of gastric acid is unknown. The decarboxylation of an amino acid releases carbon dioxide. Pepsinogens provide a rich source of the amino acid arginine. Both the source of carbon dioxide, arginine, and the consequence of arginine decarboxylation, agmatine, have been studied. The site of carbon dioxide production has been related to the survival of the parietal cell. An immunohistochemical study has been carried out on glycol methacrylate embedded gastric biopsies from the normal stomach of 38 adult patients. The sections have been stained using polyclonal antibody to pepsinogen II, polyclonal antibody to agmatine, and polyclonal antibody to Helicobacter pylori. Pepsinogen II and agmatine are found in the parietal cell canaliculi. This is consistent with the production of carbon dioxide from arginine in the parietal cell canaliculi. Evidence is presented for the decarboxylation of arginine derived from the activation segment of pepsinogen as the source of carbon dioxide for the production of gastric acid. The production of carbon dioxide by the decarboxylation of arginine in the parietal cell canaliculus enables the extracellular hydration of carbon dioxide at the known site of carbonic anhydrase activity. The extracellular production of acid in the canaliculus together with the presence of agmatine helps to explain why the parietal cells are not destroyed during the formation of gastric acid. Agmatine is found in the mucus secreting cells of the stomach and its role in acid protection of the stomach is discussed. Anat Rec, 2009. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:18951509

  8. Past explosive outbursts of entrapped carbon dioxide in salt mines provide a new perspective on the hazards of carbon dioxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedlund, Frank Huess

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on a source of past carbon dioxide accidents which so far has only been sporadically mentioned in the literature. Violent and highly destructive outbursts of hundreds of tons of CO2 occurred regularly, if not routinely, in the now closed salt mines of the former DDR....... The Menzengraben mine experienced an extreme outburst in 1953, possibly involving a several thousand tons of carbon dioxide. This source of accidents fills an important gap in the available carbon dioxide accident history and may provide a unique empirical perspective on the hazards of handling very large amounts...

  9. 49 CFR 195.4 - Compatibility necessary for transportation of hazardous liquids or carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... hazardous liquids or carbon dioxide. 195.4 Section 195.4 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... necessary for transportation of hazardous liquids or carbon dioxide. No person may transport any hazardous liquid or carbon dioxide unless the hazardous liquid or carbon dioxide is chemically compatible with...

  10. Amazon river carbon dioxide outgassing fuelled by wetlands

    OpenAIRE

    Abril, G.; Martinez, J M; Artigas, L.F.; Moreira-Turcq, P.; Benedetti, M. F.; Vidal, L.; Meziane, T.; Kim, J. -H.; Bernardes, M. C.; Savoye, N.; Deborde, J; Souza, E.L.; Alberic, P; de Souza, M.F.L.; Roland, F.

    2014-01-01

    River systems connect the terrestrial biosphere, the atmosphere and the ocean in the global carbon cycle(1). A recent estimate suggests that up to 3 petagrams of carbon per year could be emitted as carbon dioxide (CO2) from global inland waters, offsetting the carbon uptake by terrestrial ecosystems(2). It is generally assumed that inland waters emit carbon that has been previously fixed upstream by land plant photosynthesis, then transferred to soils, and subsequently transported downstream ...

  11. The oxygen and carbon dioxide balance in the earth's atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, F. S.

    1975-01-01

    The oxygen-carbon dioxide cycle is described in detail, and steps which are sensitive to perturbation or instability are identified. About half of the carbon dioxide consumption each year in photosynthesis occurs in the oceans. Phytoplankton, which are the primary producers, have been shown to assimilate insecticides and herbicides. The impact of such materials on phytoplankton photosynthesis, both direct and as the indirect result of detrimental effects higher up in the food chain, cannot be assessed. Net oxygen production is very small in comparison with the total production and occurs almost exclusively in a few ocean areas with anoxic bottom conditions and in peat-forming marshes which are sensitive to anthropogenic disturbances. The carbon dioxide content of the atmosphere is increasing at a relatively rapid rate as the result of fossil fuel combustion. Increases in photosynthesis as the result of the hothouse effect may in turn reduce the carbon dioxide content of the atmosphere, leading to global cooling.

  12. Miniature Carbon Dioxide Sensor for Small Unmanned Aircraft Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — There is a growing need to develop improved technologies for precise airborne measurements of carbon dioxide, CO2. CO2 measurements are of great importance to many...

  13. Miniature Carbon Dioxide Sensor for Small Unmanned Aircraft Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Phase 1 has seen the development of a revolutionary new type of sensor for making carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements from small Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) and...

  14. Precision remote sensor for oxygen and carbon dioxide Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Mesa Photonics proposes development of a passive optical sensor for simultaneous high-precision measurement of oxygen and carbon dioxide profiles within the full...

  15. Electrochemical Reactor for Producing Oxygen From Carbon Dioxide Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An electrochemical reactor is proposed by MicroCell Technologies, LLC to electrochemically reduce carbon dioxide to oxygen. In support of NASA's advanced life...

  16. Monthly Carbon Dioxide in Troposphere (AIRS on AQUA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Carbon dioxide (CO2) is an important greenhouse gas released through natural processes such as respiration and volcano eruptions and through huma activities such as...

  17. Use of the electrosurgical unit in a carbon dioxide atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culp, William C; Kimbrough, Bradly A; Luna, Sarah; Maguddayao, Aris J; Eidson, Jack L; Paolino, David V

    2016-01-01

    The electrosurgical unit (ESU) utilizes an electrical discharge to cut and coagulate tissue and is often held above the surgical site, causing a spark to form. The voltage at which the spark is created, termed the breakdown voltage, is governed by the surrounding gaseous environment. Surgeons are now utilizing the ESU laparoscopically with carbon dioxide insufflation, potentially altering ESU operating characteristics. This study examines the clinical implications of altering gas composition by measuring the spark gap distance as a marker of breakdown voltage and use of the ESU on a biologic model, both in room air and carbon dioxide. Paschen's Law predicted a 35% decrease in gap distance in carbon dioxide, while testing revealed an average drop of 37-47% as compared to air. However, surgical model testing revealed no perceivable clinical difference. Electrosurgery can be performed in carbon dioxide environments, although surgeons should be aware of potentially altered ESU performance. PMID:26745650

  18. Urban Traffic Congestion Pricing Model with the Consideration of Carbon Emissions Cost

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Wang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available As one of the most effective traffic demand management opinions, congestion pricing can reduce private car travel demand and the associated carbon dioxide emissions. First, we summarized the status quo of transport carbon dioxide emission charges and congestion pricing, and then, we analyzed the characteristics of urban transport carbon dioxide emissions. Then, we proposed a (pricing framework in which carbon emission costs would be considered as part of the generalized cost of travel. Based on this framework, this paper developed a bi-level mathematical model to optimize consumer surplus, using congestion and carbon emission charges as the control variables. A dissect search algorithm was used to solve the bi-level program model, and a numerical example was given to illustrate the methodology. This paper incorporates the emission pricing into the congestion pricing model, while considering two modes, and puts forward suitable proposals for the implementation of an urban traffic congestion pricing policy in China.

  19. Some Organic Reactions in Supercritical Carbon Dioxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Huan-feng; YANG Xiao-yue; LI Guo-ping; ZOU Gang

    2004-01-01

    Organic reactions in supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) have facilitated great progress in recent years 1. ScCO2, as an environmentally friendly reaction medium, may be a substitute for volatile and toxic organic solvents and show some special advantages. Firstly, CO2 is inexpensive,nonflammable, nontoxic and chemical inert under many conditions. Secondly, scCO2 possesses hybrid properties of both liquid and gas, to the advantage of some reactions involving gaseous reagents. Control of the solvent density by variation of the temperature and pressure enables the solvent properties to be "tuned" to reactants. Finally, separating of CO2 from the reaction mixture is energy-efficient and simple. Here we disclose our new work on some organic reactions involving small molecules in scCO2.The results showed that the upper reactions in scCO2 could be carried out smoothly and thepressure of CO2 had a remarkable effect on the conversion and selectivity.

  20. Carbon dioxide removal in gas treating processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main contribution of this work is the development of a simple and reliable modelling technique on carbon dioxide removal describing the vapor-liquid equilibria of CO2 in aqueous alkanolamine solutions. By making use of measured pH data, the author has circumvented the problem of estimating interaction parameters, activity coefficients, and equilibrium constants in the prediction of vapor-liquid equilibria. The applicability of the model is best demonstrated on the tertiary amine system using MDEA. For this system, the VLE is accurately represented for temperatures in the range 25 to 140oC, for CO2 loadings from 0.001 to 1 mol/mol, and for amine molarities usually encountered in acid gas treating processes. The absorption of CO2 into solutions containing the sterically hindered amine AMP, is also well described by the model. The equilibrium of CO2 in mixed solvents containing a glycol (TEG,DEG) and an alkonolamine (MEA,DEA) has been measured at temperatures encountered in the absorption units. An equilibrium model has been developed for the CO2/TEG/MEA system for estimation of CO2 partial pressures, covering loadings and temperatures for both absorption and desorption conditions. An important spin-off of the work described is that two new experimental set-ups have been designed and built. 154 refs., 38 figs., 22 tabs